Science.gov

Sample records for reactive planning engineering

  1. Integrating planning and reactive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenschein, Stanley J.; Kaelbling, Leslie Pack

    1989-01-01

    Artificial intelligence research on planning is concerned with designing control systems that choose actions by manipulating explicit descriptions of the world state, the goal to be achieved, and the effects of elementary operations available to the system. Because planning shifts much of the burden of reasoning to the machine, it holds great appeal as a high-level programming method. Experience shows, however, that it cannot be used indiscriminately because even moderately rich languages for describing goals, states, and the elementary operators lead to computational inefficiencies that render the approach unsuitable for realistic applications. This inadequacy has spawned a recent wave of research on reactive control or situated activity in which control systems are modeled as reacting directly to the current situation rather than as reasoning about the future effects of alternative action sequences. While this research has confronted the issue of run-time tractability head on, in many cases it has done so by sacrificing the advantages of declarative planning techniques. Ways in which the two approaches can be unified are discussed. The authors begin by modeling reactive control systems as state machines that map a stream of sensory inputs to a stream of control outputs. These machines can be decomposed into two continuously active subsystems: the planner and the execution module. The planner computes a plan, which can be seen as a set of bits that control the behavior of the execution module. An important element of this work is the formulation of a precise semantic interpretation for the inputs and outputs of the planning system. They show that the distinction between planned and reactive behavior is largely in the eye of the beholder: systems that seem to compute explicit plans can be redescribed in situation-action terms and vice versa. They also discuss practical programming techniques that allow the advantages of declarative programming and guaranteed

  2. Integrating planning and reactive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, David E.; Myers, Karen L.

    1994-10-01

    Our research is developing persistent agents that can achieve complex tasks in dynamic and uncertain environments. We refer to such agents as taskable, reactive agents. An agent of this type requires a number of capabilities. The ability to execute complex tasks necessitates the use of strategic plans for accomplishing tasks; hence, the agent must be able to synthesize new plans at run time. The dynamic nature of the environment requires that the agent be able to deal with unpredictable changes in its world. As such, agents must be able to react to unanticipated events by taking appropriate actions in a timely manner, while continuing activities that support current goals. The unpredictability of the world could lead to failure of plans generated for individual tasks. Agents must have the ability to recover from failures by adapting their activities to the new situation, or replanning if the world changes sufficiently. Finally, the agent should be able to perform in the face of uncertainty. The Cypress system, described here, provides a framework for creating taskable, reactive agents. Several features distinguish our approach: (1) the generation and execution of complex plans with parallel actions; (2) the integration of goal-driven and event driven activities during execution; (3) the use of evidential reasoning for dealing with uncertainty; and (4) the use of replanning to handle run-time execution problems. Our model for a taskable, reactive agent has two main intelligent components, an executor and a planner. The two components share a library of possible actions that the system can take. The library encompasses a full range of action representations, including plans, planning operators, and executable procedures such as predefined standard operating procedures (SOP's). These three classes of actions span multiple levels of abstraction.

  3. Integrating planning and reactive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, David E.; Myers, Karen L.

    1994-01-01

    Our research is developing persistent agents that can achieve complex tasks in dynamic and uncertain environments. We refer to such agents as taskable, reactive agents. An agent of this type requires a number of capabilities. The ability to execute complex tasks necessitates the use of strategic plans for accomplishing tasks; hence, the agent must be able to synthesize new plans at run time. The dynamic nature of the environment requires that the agent be able to deal with unpredictable changes in its world. As such, agents must be able to react to unanticipated events by taking appropriate actions in a timely manner, while continuing activities that support current goals. The unpredictability of the world could lead to failure of plans generated for individual tasks. Agents must have the ability to recover from failures by adapting their activities to the new situation, or replanning if the world changes sufficiently. Finally, the agent should be able to perform in the face of uncertainty. The Cypress system, described here, provides a framework for creating taskable, reactive agents. Several features distinguish our approach: (1) the generation and execution of complex plans with parallel actions; (2) the integration of goal-driven and event driven activities during execution; (3) the use of evidential reasoning for dealing with uncertainty; and (4) the use of replanning to handle run-time execution problems. Our model for a taskable, reactive agent has two main intelligent components, an executor and a planner. The two components share a library of possible actions that the system can take. The library encompasses a full range of action representations, including plans, planning operators, and executable procedures such as predefined standard operating procedures (SOP's). These three classes of actions span multiple levels of abstraction.

  4. Systems engineering management plans.

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Tamara S.

    2009-10-01

    The Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) is a comprehensive and effective tool used to assist in the management of systems engineering efforts. It is intended to guide the work of all those involved in the project. The SEMP is comprised of three main sections: technical project planning and control, systems engineering process, and engineering specialty integration. The contents of each section must be tailored to the specific effort. A model outline and example SEMP are provided. The target audience is those who are familiar with the systems engineering approach and who have an interest in employing the SEMP as a tool for systems management. The goal of this document is to provide the reader with an appreciation for the use and importance of the SEMP, as well as provide a framework that can be used to create the management plan.

  5. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M.; Splitter, Derek A.; Kokjohn, Sage L.

    2015-07-14

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  6. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

    2013-12-31

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choose the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  7. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    DOEpatents

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M.; Splitter, Derek A.; Kokjohn, Sage L.

    2016-06-28

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  8. On the size of reactive plans

    SciTech Connect

    Jonsson, P.; Baeckstroem, C.

    1996-12-31

    One of the most widespread approaches to reactive planning is Schoppers universal plans. We propose a stricter definition of universal plans which guarantees a weak notion of soundness not present in the original definition. Furthermore, we isolate three different types of completeness which capture different behaviors exhibited by universal plans. We show that universal plans which run in polynomial time and are of polynomial size cannot satisfy even the weakest type of completeness unless the polynomial hierarchy collapses. However, by relaxing either the polynomial time or the polynomial space requirement, the construction of universal plans satisfying the strongest type of completeness becomes trivial.

  9. SNF Project Engineering Process Improvement Plan

    SciTech Connect

    DESAI, S.P.

    2000-02-09

    This plan documents the SNF Project activities and plans to support its engineering process. It describes five SNF Project Engineering initiatives: new engineering procedures, qualification cards process; configuration management, engineering self assessments, and integrated schedule for engineering activities.

  10. Nuclear engine flow reactivity shim control

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, J.M.

    1973-12-11

    A nuclear engine control system is provided which automatically compensates for reactor reactivity uncertainties at the start of life and reactivity losses due to core corrosion during the reactor life in gas-cooled reactors. The coolant gas flow is varied automatically by means of specially provided control apparatus so that the reactor control drums maintain a predetermined steady state position throughout the reactor life. This permits the reactor to be designed for a constant drum position and results in a desirable, relatively flat temperature profile across the core. (Official Gazette)

  11. A heuristic method for reactive power planning

    SciTech Connect

    Mantovani, J.R.S.

    1996-02-01

    An approach for solving reactive power planning problems is presented, which is based on binary search techniques and the use of a special heuristic to obtain a discrete solution. Two versions were developed, one to run on conventional (sequential) computers and the other to run on a distributed memory (hypercube) machine. This latter parallel processing version employs an asynchronous programming model. Once the set of candidate bases has been defined, the program gives the location and size of the reactive sources needed (if any) in keeping with operating and security constraints.

  12. Optimal reactive planning with security constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, W.R.; Cheng, D.T.Y.; Dixon, A.M.; Thorp, J.D.; Dunnett, R.M.; Schaff, G.

    1995-12-31

    The National Grid Company (NGC) of England and Wales has developed a computer program, SCORPION, to help system planners optimize the location and size of new reactive compensation plant on the transmission system. The reactive power requirements of the NGC system have risen as a result of increased power flows and the shorter timescale on which power stations are commissioned and withdrawn from service. In view of the high costs involved, it is important that reactive compensation be installed as economically as possible, without compromising security. Traditional methods based on iterative use of a load flow program are labor intensive and subjective. SCORPION determines a near-optimal pattern of new reactive sources which are required to satisfy voltage constraints for normal and contingent states of operation of the transmission system. The algorithm processes the system states sequentially, instead of optimizing all of them simultaneously. This allows a large number of system states to be considered with an acceptable run time and computer memory requirement. Installed reactive sources are treated as continuous, rather than discrete, variables. However, the program has a restart facility which enables the user to add realistically sized reactive sources explicitly and thereby work towards a realizable solution to the planning problem.

  13. Engineering Technical Review Planning Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Terrie

    2012-01-01

    The general topics covered in the engineering technical planning briefing are 1) overviews of NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and Engineering, 2) the NASA Systems Engineering(SE) Engine and its implementation , 3) the NASA Project Life Cycle, 4) MSFC Technical Management Branch Services in relation to the SE Engine and the Project Life Cycle , 5) Technical Reviews, 6) NASA Human Factor Design Guidance , and 7) the MSFC Human Factors Team. The engineering technical review portion of the presentation is the primary focus of the overall presentation and will address the definition of a design review, execution guidance, the essential stages of a technical review, and the overall review planning life cycle. Examples of a technical review plan content, review approaches, review schedules, and the review process will be provided and discussed. The human factors portion of the presentation will focus on the NASA guidance for human factors. Human factors definition, categories, design guidance, and human factor specialist roles will be addressed. In addition, the NASA Systems Engineering Engine description, definition, and application will be reviewed as background leading into the NASA Project Life Cycle Overview and technical review planning discussion.

  14. Software Engineering Improvement Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    In performance of this task order, bd Systems personnel provided support to the Flight Software Branch and the Software Working Group through multiple tasks related to software engineering improvement and to activities of the independent Technical Authority (iTA) Discipline Technical Warrant Holder (DTWH) for software engineering. To ensure that the products, comments, and recommendations complied with customer requirements and the statement of work, bd Systems personnel maintained close coordination with the customer. These personnel performed work in areas such as update of agency requirements and directives database, software effort estimation, software problem reports, a web-based process asset library, miscellaneous documentation review, software system requirements, issue tracking software survey, systems engineering NPR, and project-related reviews. This report contains a summary of the work performed and the accomplishments in each of these areas.

  15. Engineering a Grand Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Tracie

    2005-01-01

    Columbia has the Pulitzer Prize, Harvard has the Nieman and the University of Georgia has the Peabody award. Now North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University has the lofty goal of joining the ranks of the elite with a prestigious journalism institute and prize all its own. With a new home and plans to unveil an award for journalistic…

  16. NIF Title III engineering plan

    SciTech Connect

    Deis, G

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the work that must be accomplished by the NIF Project during Title III Engineering. This definition is intended to be sufficiently detailed to provide a framework for yearly planning, to clearly identify the specific deliverables so that the Project teams can focus on them, and to provide a common set of objectives and processes across the Project. This plan has been preceded by similar documents for Title I and Title II design and complements the Site Management Plan, the Project Control Manual, the Quality Assurance Program Plan, the RM Parsons NIF Title III Configuration Control Plan, the Integrated Project Schedule, the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report, the Configuration Management Plan, and the Transition Plan.

  17. Acellular assessments of engineered-manufactured nanoparticle biological surface reactivity

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is critical to assess the surface properties and reactivity of engineered-manufactured nanoparticles (NPs) as these will influence their interactions with biological systems, biokinetics and toxicity. We examined the physicochemical properties and surface reactivity of metal o...

  18. SNF project engineering process improvement plan

    SciTech Connect

    DESAI, S.P.

    1999-07-13

    This Engineering Process Improvement Plan documents the activities and plans to be taken by the SNF Project to support its engineering process and to produce a consolidated set of engineering procedures that are fully compliant with the requirements of HNF-PRO-1819. All new procedures will be issued and implemented by September 30, 1999.

  19. 40. PHOTOGRAPHY OF ORIGINAL PLAN (MINNEAPOLIS CITY ENGINEER) PLAN OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. PHOTOGRAPHY OF ORIGINAL PLAN (MINNEAPOLIS CITY ENGINEER) PLAN OF SOUTH HALF CENTRE PIER, STEEL ARCH BRIDGE (4 x 5 negative) - Steel Arch Bridge, Hennepin Avenue spanning west channel of Mississippi River, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  20. Tank waste remediation system engineering plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rifaey, S.H.

    1998-01-09

    This Engineering Plan describes the engineering process and controls that will be in place to support the Technical Baseline definition and manage its evolution and implementation to the field operations. This plan provides the vision for the engineering required to support the retrieval and disposal mission through Phase 1 and 2, which includes integrated data management of the Technical Baseline. Further, this plan describes the approach for moving from the ``as is`` condition of engineering practice, systems, and facilities to the desired ``to be`` configuration. To make this transition, Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Engineering will become a center of excellence for TWRS which,will perform engineering in the most effective manner to meet the mission. TWRS engineering will process deviations from sitewide systems if necessary to meet the mission most effectively.

  1. Software Engineering Improvement Activities/Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    bd Systems personnel accomplished the technical responsibilities for this reporting period, as planned. A close working relationship was maintained with personnel of the MSFC Avionics Department Software Group (ED14). Work accomplishments included development, evaluation, and enhancement of a software cost model, performing literature search and evaluation of software tools available for code analysis and requirements analysis, and participating in other relevant software engineering activities. Monthly reports were submitted. This support was provided to the Flight Software Group/ED 1 4 in accomplishing the software engineering improvement engineering activities of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Software Engineering Improvement Plan.

  2. SNF project engineering process improvement plan

    SciTech Connect

    KELMENSON, R.L.

    1999-05-24

    This Engineering Process Improvement Plan documents the activities and plans to be taken by the SNF Project (the Project) to support its engineering process and to produce a consolidated set of engineering procedures that are fully compliant with the requirements of HNF-PRO-1819 (1819). These requirements are imposed on all engineering activities performed for the Project and apply to all life-cycle stages of the Project's systems, structures and components (SSCs). This Plan describes the steps that will be taken by the Project during the transition period to ensure that new procedures are effectively integrated into the Project's work process as these procedures are issued. The consolidated procedures will be issued and implemented by September 30, 1999.

  3. Role of strategic planning in engineering management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar

    1993-01-01

    Today, more than ever before, engineers are faced with uncertain and sometimes chaotic environments in which to function. The traditional roles of an engineer to design, develop, and streamline a manufacturing process for a product are still valued and relevant. However, the need for an engineer to participate in the process of identifying the product to be developed, the schedule and resources required, and the goal of satisfying the customer, has become paramount to achieving the success of the enterprise. When we include these endeavors in the functions of an engineer, management of 'engineering' takes on a new dimension. In this paper, the ramifications of the changing and increased functions of an engineer and consequent impacts on engineering management are explored. The basic principles which should be invoked in order to embrace the new environment for engineering management are outlined. The ultimate finding of this study is that the enterprise strategic plan should be developed in such a way as to allow engineering management to encompass the full spectrum of the responsibilities of engineers. A consequence of this is that the fundamental elements of the strategic process can best be implemented through a project team or group approach. The paper thus concentrates on three areas: evolving environment, strategic plan, and ways to achieve enterprise success.

  4. IDEA: Planning at the Core of Autonomous Reactive Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscettola, Nicola; Dorais, Gregory A.; Fry, Chuck; Levinson, Richard; Plaunt, Christian; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several successful autonomous systems are separated into technologically diverse functional layers operating at different levels of abstraction. This diversity makes them difficult to implement and validate. In this paper, we present IDEA (Intelligent Distributed Execution Architecture), a unified planning and execution framework. In IDEA a layered system can be implemented as separate agents, one per layer, each representing its interactions with the world in a model. At all levels, the model representation primitives and their semantics is the same. Moreover, each agent relies on a single model, plan database, plan runner and on a variety of planners, both reactive and deliberative. The framework allows the specification of agents that operate, within a guaranteed reaction time and supports flexible specification of reactive vs. deliberative agent behavior. Within the IDEA framework we are working to fully duplicate the functionalities of the DS1 Remote Agent and extend it to domains of higher complexity than autonomous spacecraft control.

  5. UMTRA Project value engineering plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    The objective of value engineering (VE) on the Uranium MILL Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is to ensure that remedial action at the UMTRA Project sites is performed to meet the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for inactive uranium mill tailings sites at the lowest cost, while maintaining a high quality of work. Through review of designs and consideration of reasonable, less expensive alternatives, VE can be an effective cost reduction tool and a means to improve the design. The UMTRA Project products are the design and construction of stabilized tailings embankments.

  6. Safe motion planning for mobile agents: A model of reactive planning for multiple mobile agents

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimura, Kikuo.

    1990-01-01

    The problem of motion planning for multiple mobile agents is studied. Each planning agent independently plans its own action based on its map which contains a limited information about the environment. In an environment where more than one mobile agent interacts, the motions of the robots are uncertain and dynamic. A model for reactive agents is described and simulation results are presented to show their behavior patterns. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Business planning for scientists and engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Servo, J.C.; Hauler, P.D.

    1992-03-01

    Business Planning for Scientists and Engineers is a combination text/workbook intended for use by individuals and firms having received Phase II SBIR funding (Small Business Innovation Research). It is used to best advantage in combination with other aspects of the Commercialization Assistance Project developed by Dawnbreaker for the US Department of Energy. Although there are many books on the market which indicate the desired contents of a business plan, there are none which clearly indicate how to find the needed information. This book focuses on the how of business planning: how to find the needed information; how to keep yourself honest about the market potential; how to develop the plan; how to sell and use the plan.

  8. Engine combustion control at low loads via fuel reactivity stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

    2014-10-07

    A compression ignition (diesel) engine uses two or more fuel charges during a combustion cycle, with the fuel charges having two or more reactivities (e.g., different cetane numbers), in order to control the timing and duration of combustion. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot). At low load and no load (idling) conditions, the aforementioned results are attained by restricting airflow to the combustion chamber during the intake stroke (as by throttling the incoming air at or prior to the combustion chamber's intake port) so that the cylinder air pressure is below ambient pressure at the start of the compression stroke.

  9. Systems Engineering Simulator (SES) Simulator Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarlane, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The simulation process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the SES. The Simulator Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their engineering personnel in simulation planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the simulation process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, facility interfaces, and inputs necessary to define scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  10. Automated software engineering planning with SASEA

    SciTech Connect

    Lawlis, P.K.; Hoffman, C.L.

    1998-07-01

    Planning for effective software engineering is not easy, and software project managers would usually welcome assistance in this area. Very effective assistance could be provided by automated tools that are decision aids. However, a comprehensive suite of such tools does not yet exist. One area that has been addressed is the selection of a programming language. This paper discusses in detail a decision tool that has been developed for language selection. It also addresses the areas in which other such tools are required.

  11. Bayesian statistics in environmental engineering planning

    SciTech Connect

    Englehardt, J.D.; Simon, T.W.

    1999-07-01

    Today's engineer must be able to quantify both uncertainty due to information limitations, and the variability of natural processes, in order to determine risk. Nowhere is this emphasis on risk assessment more evident than in environmental engineering. The use of Bayesian inference for the rigorous assessment of risk based on available information is reviewed in this paper. Several example environmental engineering planning applications are presented: (1) assessment of losses involving the evaluation of proposed revisions to the South Florida Building Code after Hurricane Andrew; (2) development of a model to predict oil spill consequences due to proposed changes in the oil transportation network in the Gulf of Mexico; (3) studies of ambient concentrations of perchloroethylene surrounding dry cleaners and of tire particulates in residential areas near roadways in Miami, FL; (4) risk assessment from contaminated soils at a cleanup of an old transformer dump site.

  12. Center Planning and Development Student Engineer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Kenneth T.

    2013-01-01

    This fall I was the Student Trainee (Engineering) Pathways Intern (co-op) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in the Center Planning Development (CPD) Directorate. CPD works with commercial companies who are interested using KSCs unique capabilities in spaceflight, spacecraft processing, ground systems and Research Development (RD) projects that fall in line with NASAs mission and goals. CPD is divided into four (4) groups: (1) AD-A, which works on the Master Planning for center, (2) AD-B (where I am), which works on project management and integration, (3) AD-C, which works on partnership development, and (4) AD-T, which works on the RD aspects of partnerships. CPDs main goal is to one day make KSC the worlds largest spaceport and maintain the center as a leader in space exploration. CPD is a very diverse group with employees having a wide knowledge of not only the Space Shuttle, but also that of the Apollo era. Our director of CPD, Scott Colloredo, is on the advisory board for Commercial Space Operations (CSO) and has a degree at ERAU. I worked on a number of different tasks for AD-B, as well as CPD, that includes, but not limited to: reviewing and reissuing engineering drawings from the Apollo and Shuttle eras, to supporting NASA rocket launches (MAVEN), and working on actual agreementsproposals that will be used in the partnership process with multiple partners. Most of the work I have done is sensitive information and cannot be disclosed.

  13. Engineering task plan for purged light system

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-05-11

    A purged, closed circuit television system is currently used to video inside of waste tanks. The video is used to support inspection and assessment of the tank interiors, waste residues, and deployed hardware. The system is also used to facilitate deployment of new equipment. A new light source has been requested by Characterization Project Operations (CPO) for the video system. The current light used is mounted on the camera and provides 75 watts of light, which is insufficient for clear video. Other light sources currently in use on the Hanford site either can not be deployed in a 4-inch riser or do not meet the ignition source controls. The scope of this Engineering Task Plan is to address all activities associated with the specification and procurement of a light source for use with the existing CPO video equipment. The installation design change to tank farm facilities is not within the scope of this ETP.

  14. 12. Historic plot plan and drawings index for rocket engine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic plot plan and drawings index for rocket engine test facility, June 28, 1956. NASA GRC drawing number CE-101810. On file at NASA Glenn Research Center. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  15. Photographic copy of floor plan, undated, Civil Engineers Office, in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of floor plan, undated, Civil Engineers Office, in possession of Selfridge Base Civil Engineers Office, Mt. Clemens, Michigan - Selfridge Field, Building No. 833, West of Mulberry Street north of George Avenue, Mount Clemens, Macomb County, MI

  16. Integrating task-directed planning with reactive object recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Sven J.; Stevenson, Suzanne; Amdur, Eugene; Tsotsos, John K.; Olsson, Lars

    1993-08-01

    We describe a robot vision system that achieves complex object recognition with two layers of behaviors, performing the tasks of planning and object recognition, respectively. The recognition layer is a pipeline in which successive stages take in images from a stereo head, recover relevant features, build intermediate representations, and deposit 3-D objects into a world model. Each stage is an independent process that reacts automatically to output from the previous stage. This reactive system operates continuously and autonomously to construct the robot's 3-D model of the environment. Sitting above the recognition pipeline is the planner which is responsible for populating the world model with objects that satisfy the high-level goals of the system. For example, upon examination of the world model, the planner can decide to direct the head to another location, gating new images into the recognition pipeline, causing new objects to be deposited into the world model. Alternatively, the planner can alter the recognition behavior of the pipeline so that objects of a certain type or at a certain location appear in the world model.

  17. 15. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans and Services Division, Rock Island Arsenal. SECOND FLOOR PLAN, 1920. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 90, East Avenue between North Avenue & King Drive, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  18. 13. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans and Services Division, Rock Island Arsenal. BASEMENT PLAN, 1920. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 90, East Avenue between North Avenue & King Drive, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  19. 16. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans and Services Division, Rock Island Arsenal. ATTIC PLAN, 1920. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 90, East Avenue between North Avenue & King Drive, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  20. 5. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans and Services Division, Rock Island Arsenal. PLAN, UNDATED. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 105, South Avenue between Gillespie Avenue & Second Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  1. 6. photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans and Services Division, Rock Island Arsenal. ELEVATIONS AND PLANS FOR POWDER BARREL RACK, 1889. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 280, Sylvan Drive, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  2. 14. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans and Services Division, Rock Island Arsenal. FIRST FLOOR PLAN, 1920. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 90, East Avenue between North Avenue & King Drive, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  3. 5. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans and Services Division, Rock Island Arsenal. PLAN, ELEVATION, AND SECTION, 1874; TRACING, 1935. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 53, North Avenue North of Midpoint, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  4. Systems Engineering Management Plan. Volume 5 of the MRS Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Project Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) is to define and establish the MRS Project Systems Engineering process that implements the approved policy and requirements of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This plan is Volume 5 of the MRS Project Management Plan (PMP). This plan provides the framework for implementation of systems engineering on the MRS Project consistent with DOE Order 4700.1, the OCRWM Program Management System Manual (PMSM), and the OCRWM Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP).

  5. A Working Plan for Treating the Engineering Faculty Shortage Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoup, Terry E., Ed.

    In view of the consequences of the engineering faculty shortage problem on engineering capabilities in the future in the United States, a working plan which will serve as a national agenda for prompt action has been developed. This plan involves the three key groups (federal government, academic community, industry) who have the vision,…

  6. 7 CFR 1717.604 - Long-range engineering plans and construction work plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... construction work plans (CWPs) in form and substance as set forth in 7 CFR part 1710, subpart F. (b... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Long-range engineering plans and construction work... AND GUARANTEED ELECTRIC LOANS Operational Controls § 1717.604 Long-range engineering plans...

  7. 7 CFR 1717.604 - Long-range engineering plans and construction work plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... construction work plans (CWPs) in form and substance as set forth in 7 CFR part 1710, subpart F. (b... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Long-range engineering plans and construction work... AND GUARANTEED ELECTRIC LOANS Operational Controls § 1717.604 Long-range engineering plans...

  8. 7 CFR 1717.604 - Long-range engineering plans and construction work plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... construction work plans (CWPs) in form and substance as set forth in 7 CFR part 1710, subpart F. (b... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Long-range engineering plans and construction work... AND GUARANTEED ELECTRIC LOANS Operational Controls § 1717.604 Long-range engineering plans...

  9. 7 CFR 1717.604 - Long-range engineering plans and construction work plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... construction work plans (CWPs) in form and substance as set forth in 7 CFR part 1710, subpart F. (b... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Long-range engineering plans and construction work... AND GUARANTEED ELECTRIC LOANS Operational Controls § 1717.604 Long-range engineering plans...

  10. 7 CFR 1717.604 - Long-range engineering plans and construction work plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... construction work plans (CWPs) in form and substance as set forth in 7 CFR part 1710, subpart F. (b... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Long-range engineering plans and construction work... AND GUARANTEED ELECTRIC LOANS Operational Controls § 1717.604 Long-range engineering plans...

  11. Implementing Motivational Features in Reactive Blended Learning: Application to an Introductory Control Engineering Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendez, J. A.; Gonzalez, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a significant advance in a reactive blended learning methodology applied to an introductory control engineering course. This proposal was based on the inclusion of a reactive element (a fuzzy-logic-based controller) designed to regulate the workload for each student according to his/her activity and performance. The…

  12. Systems engineering implementation plan for the liquid effluents services program

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, S.S.

    1995-01-01

    A graded approach is being taken by the Liquid Effluents Services Program in implementing systems engineering because of the advanced state of the program. The approach is cost-effective and takes credit for related work already completed, yet retains the benefits of systems engineering. This plan describes how the Liquid Effluents Services Program will implement systems engineering so there is a common understanding. Systems engineering work to be performed and the products of that work are identified. The relation to the current planning process and integration with the sitewide systems engineering effort is described.

  13. This photographic copy of an engineering drawing shows floor plans, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    This photographic copy of an engineering drawing shows floor plans, sections and elevations of Building E-86, with details typical of the steel frame and "Transite" building construction at JPL Edwards Facility. California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Facilities Engineering and Construction Office: "Casting & Curing, Building E-86, Floor Plan, Elevations & Section," drawing no. E86/6, 25 February 1977. California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Plant Engineering: engineering drawings of structures at JPL Edwards Facility. Drawings on file at JPL Plant Engineering, Pasadena, California - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Casting & Curing Building, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. The Keller Plan: A Successful Experiment in Engineering Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koen, Billy; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the Keller Plan or personalized system of instruction (PSI), a mastery-oriented, self-paced, modular teaching strategy using student/peer proctors. Success for PSI in chemical engineering, operations research, electrical engineering, and nuclear engineering courses is explained. (DH)

  15. Floor Plans Engine Removal Platform, Hold Down Arm Platform, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Floor Plans - Engine Removal Platform, Hold Down Arm Platform, Hydraulic Equipment Platforms, Isometric Cutaway of Engine Removal Platform, Isometric Cutaway of Hold Down Arm Platform, Isometric Cutaway of Hydraulic Platforms and Engine Support System Access - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn V S-IC Static Test Facility, West Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  16. Test plan for engineering scale electrostatic enclosure demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, L.C.

    1993-02-01

    This test plan describes experimental details of an engineering-scale electrostatic enclosure demonstration to be performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in fiscal year (FY)-93. This demonstration will investigate, in the engineering scale, the feasibility of using electrostatic enclosures and devices to control the spread of contaminants during transuranic waste handling operations. Test objectives, detailed experimental procedures, and data quality objectives necessary to perform the FY-93 experiments are included in this plan.

  17. Engineering task plan for rotary mode core sample truck calibration procedure support engineering

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-06-04

    This Engineering Task Plan defines the tasks associated with providing an overview, with respect to the Authorization Basis and PHMC procedures, as applicable, of the calibration documentation for operational equipment for which Characterization Engineering has calibration responsibility.

  18. This photocopy of an engineering drawing shows the floor plan ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    This photocopy of an engineering drawing shows the floor plan of the Liner Lab, including room functions. Austin, Field & Fry, Architects Engineers, 22311 West Third Street, Los Angeles 57, California: Edwards Test Station Complex Phase II, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Edwards Air Force Base, Edwards, California: "Liner Laboratory, Floor Plan and Schedules," drawing no. E33/4-2, 26 June 1962. California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Plant Engineering: engineering drawings of structures at JPL Edwards Facility. Drawings on file at JPL Plant Engineering, Pasadena, California. California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Plant Engineering: engineering drawings of structures at JPL Edwards Facility. Drawings on file at JPL Plant Engineering, Pasadena, California - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Liner Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. A Reactive Blended Learning Proposal for an Introductory Control Engineering Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendez, Juan A.; Gonzalez, Evelio J.

    2010-01-01

    As it happens in other fields of engineering, blended learning is widely used to teach process control topics. In this paper, the inclusion of a reactive element--a Fuzzy Logic based controller--is proposed for a blended learning approach in an introductory control engineering course. This controller has been designed in order to regulate the…

  20. Engineering of Pyranose Dehydrogenase for Increased Oxygen Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Krondorfer, Iris; Lipp, Katharina; Brugger, Dagmar; Staudigl, Petra; Sygmund, Christoph; Haltrich, Dietmar; Peterbauer, Clemens K.

    2014-01-01

    Pyranose dehydrogenase (PDH), a member of the GMC family of flavoproteins, shows a very broad sugar substrate specificity but is limited to a narrow range of electron acceptors and reacts extremely slowly with dioxygen as acceptor. The use of substituted quinones or (organo)metals as electron acceptors is undesirable for many production processes, especially of food ingredients. To improve the oxygen reactivity, site-saturation mutagenesis libraries of twelve amino acids around the active site of Agaricus meleagris PDH were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We established high-throughput screening assays for oxygen reactivity and standard dehydrogenase activity using an indirect Amplex Red/horseradish peroxidase and a DCIP/D-glucose based approach. The low number of active clones confirmed the catalytic role of H512 and H556. Only one position was found to display increased oxygen reactivity. Histidine 103, carrying the covalently linked FAD cofactor in the wild-type, was substituted by tyrosine, phenylalanine, tryptophan and methionine. Variant H103Y was produced in Pichia pastoris and characterized and revealed a five-fold increase of the oxygen reactivity. PMID:24614932

  1. FIRST FLOOR PLAN AND SCHEDULES. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FIRST FLOOR PLAN AND SCHEDULES. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard, Ship Repair Facilities, Office Building. First floor plan, door transom schedule, interior finish schedule, sash schedule, exterior color schedule, and location plot plan. John Hudspeth, Architect, at foot of Main Street, Alameda, Calif. Sheet no. Al of 8 sheets, Plan no. 10,007. Scale 1/8 inch to the foot. March 18, 1942, last revised 9/25/43. U.S. Navy, Bureau of Yards & Docks, Contract no. bs 76. Approved for construction October 9, 1943. blueprint - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Office Building No. 137, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  2. PLANS & ELEVATIONS. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard. Also ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PLANS & ELEVATIONS. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard. Also includes door schedule and a small scale plot plan. No architect noted. Drawn by W.H.H. Plan no. 2-N-5 (U.E. Co. plan no. 10,523). Scale 1/8 inch to the foot. March 10, 1942, last revised 10/6/43. U.S. Navy, Bureau of Yards & Docks, Contract no. bs 76, item no. 22A. Approved for construction October 9, 1943. blueprint - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Warehouse, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  3. SECOND FLOOR AND ROOF PLANS. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SECOND FLOOR AND ROOF PLANS. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard, Ship Repair Facilities, Office Building. Second floor plan, and roof plan. John Hudspeth, Architect, at foot of Main Street, Alameda, Calif. Sheet no. A2 of 8 sheets, Plan no. 10,007. Scale 1/8 inch to the foot. March 18, 1942, last revised 9/22/43. U.S. Navy, Bureau of Yards & Docks, Contract no. bs 76. Approved for construction October 9, 1943. blueprint - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Office Building No. 137, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  4. Perspectives and Plans for Graduate Studies. 11, Engineering 1974-75; F. Civil Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Council on Graduate Studies, Toronto. Advisory Committee on Academic Planning.

    A series of studies carried out by the Advisory Committee on Academic Planning (ACAP) published by the Council of Ontario Universities (COU) dealt with a planning study of doctoral work in engineering that was conducted in several parts corresponding to the various disciplines within engineering. This document, which is one part of that study,…

  5. Exploring How Experience with Planning Impacts First Grade Students' Planning and Solutions to Engineering Design Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portsmore, Merredith D.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation presents research that investigated how first grade students' ability to construct solutions and to plan through drawing for engineering design problems is related to their participation in a LEGO-based engineering curriculum with two variations on the instruction for planning. The quasi-experimental design engaged two first…

  6. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans and Services Division, Rock Island Arsenal. MAP OF ROCK ISLAND ARSENAL, 1919, REVISED 1938 - Rock Island Arsenal, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  7. 123. SECTION, ELEVATION, AND PLAN OF ENGINE HOUSE, 1843 Frederic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    123. SECTION, ELEVATION, AND PLAN OF ENGINE HOUSE, 1843 Frederic Graff, Jr., Collection of Philadelphia Museum of Art - Fairmount Waterworks, East bank of Schuylkill River, Aquarium Drive, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. 18. Power plant engine piping floor plan, sheet 71 of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Power plant engine piping floor plan, sheet 71 of 130 - Naval Air Station Fallon, Power Plant, 800 Complex, off Carson Road near intersection of Pasture & Berney Roads, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  9. 19. Power plant engine pipinglower level plan, sheet 80 of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Power plant engine piping-lower level plan, sheet 80 of 130 - Naval Air Station Fallon, Power Plant, 800 Complex, off Carson Road near intersection of Pasture & Berney Roads, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  10. 10. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans and Services Division, Rock Island Arsenal. FRONT ELEVATION, 1873. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 225, Rodman Avenue between Flagler Street & Gillespie Avenue, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  11. 6. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans and Services Division, Rock Island Arsenal. ELEVATIONS, 1871. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 105, South Avenue between Gillespie Avenue & Second Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  12. 11. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans and Services Division, Rock Island Arsenal. ELEVATION AND DETAILS, UNDATED. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 138, Second Avenue between South Avenue & Ramsey Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  13. Variable Cycle Engine Technology Program Planning and Definition Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westmoreland, J. S.; Stern, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    The variable stream control engine, VSCE-502B, was selected as the base engine, with the inverted flow engine concept selected as a backup. Critical component technologies were identified, and technology programs were formulated. Several engine configurations were defined on a preliminary basis to serve as demonstration vehicles for the various technologies. The different configurations present compromises in cost, technical risk, and technology return. Plans for possible variably cycle engine technology programs were formulated by synthesizing the technology requirements with the different demonstrator configurations.

  14. 61. Photocopy of Engine Room Floor Plan, White Alder. The ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. Photocopy of Engine Room Floor Plan, White Alder. The Niagara Shipbuilding Corp. Engineering Department, Buffalo, New York. Coast Guard Headquarters Drawing No. 540-WAGL-1604-10, dated February 1943; revised January 1963. Original drawing property of the U.S. Coast Guard. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HEATH, USGS Integrated Support Command Boston, 427 Commercial Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  15. 31. GENERAL PLAN AS PROPOSED BY ENGINEERS. Tender's house with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. GENERAL PLAN AS PROPOSED BY ENGINEERS. Tender's house with hipped roof. Courtesy of John E. Carry, Division Engineer, Boston Department of Public Works, 1924 Taken by Robert Severy, December 1965: - Congress Street Bascule Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel at Congress Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  16. BENDING SHOP & OVEN. United Engineering Co., Alameda, California. Plan, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BENDING SHOP & OVEN. United Engineering Co., Alameda, California. Plan, two elevations, sections, and details. Alben Froberg, Architect, Oakland, California. Sheet no. 1 of 1. Various scales. December 15, 1941. pencil on tracing paper - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Bending Shop & Oven, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  17. Configuration management program plan for Hanford site systems engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Kellie, C.L.

    1996-03-28

    This plan establishes the integrated management program for the evolving technical baseline developed through the systems engineering process. This configuration management program aligns with the criteria identified in the DOE Standard, DOE-STD-1073-93. Included are specific requirements for control of the systems engineering RDD-100 database, and electronic data incorporated in the database that establishes the Hanford Site Technical Baseline.

  18. Personal Study Planning in Doctoral Education in Industrial Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahenius, K.; Martinsuo, M.

    2010-01-01

    The duration of doctoral studies has increased in Europe. Personal study planning has been considered as one possible solution to help students in achieving shorter study times. This study investigates how doctoral students experience and use personal study plans in one university department of industrial engineering. The research material…

  19. Business planning for scientists and engineers [3rd edition

    SciTech Connect

    Servo, Jenny C.

    1999-09-01

    This combination text/workbook is intended for use by scientists or engineers actively engaged in developing a product or technology to commercial production. The 'how' of planning is a central theme with special emphasis on development of operational plans and strategic thinking.

  20. 8. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans and Services Division, Rock Island Arsenal. PLAN AND SECTION, AUGUST 24, 1874. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 105, South Avenue between Gillespie Avenue & Second Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  1. 7. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans and Services Division, Rock Island Arsenal. ROOF PLAN, 1871. DELINEATOR: W. OTTO GRONEN. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 105, South Avenue between Gillespie Avenue & Second Street, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  2. Engineering Pyranose 2-Oxidase for Modified Oxygen Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Brugger, Dagmar; Krondorfer, Iris; Shelswell, Christopher; Huber-Dittes, Benjamin; Haltrich, Dietmar; Peterbauer, Clemens K.

    2014-01-01

    Pyranose 2-oxidase (POx), a member of the GMC family of flavoproteins, catalyzes the regioselective oxidation of aldopyranoses at position C2 to the corresponding 2-ketoaldoses. During the first half-reaction, FAD is reduced to FADH2 and reoxidized in the second half-reaction by reducing molecular oxygen to H2O2. Alternative electron acceptors including quinones, radicals or chelated metal ions show significant and in some cases even higher activity. While oxygen as cheap and abundantly available electron acceptor is favored for many processes, reduced oxygen reactivity is desirable for some applications such as in biosensors/biofuel cells because of reduced oxidative damages to the biocatalyst from concomitant H2O2 production as well as reduced electron “leakage” to oxygen. The reactivity of flavoproteins with oxygen is of considerable scientific interest, and the determinants of oxygen activation and reactivity are the subject of numerous studies. We applied site-saturation mutagenesis on a set of eleven amino acids around the active site based on the crystal structure of the enzyme. Using microtiter plate screening assays with peroxidase/2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) and 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol, variants of POx with decreased oxidase activity and maintained dehydrogenase activity were identified. Variants T166R, Q448H, L545C, L547R and N593C were characterized with respect to their apparent steady-state constants with oxygen and the alternative electron acceptors DCPIP, 1,4-benzoquinone and ferricenium ion, and the effect of the mutations was rationalized based on structural properties. PMID:25296188

  3. Laboratory Planning for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Harry F., Ed.

    This study is the result of a project of the Committee on Design, Construction and Equipment of Laboratories, Division of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, of the National Academy of Sciences. The problems and methods of planning, designing and constructing varying types of chemical laboratories for research and developmental buildings are…

  4. Learning to integrate reactivity and deliberation in uncertain planning and scheduling problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve A.; Gervasio, Melinda T.; Dejong, Gerald F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to planning and scheduling in uncertain domains. In this approach, a system divides a task on a goal by goal basis into reactive and deliberative components. Initially, a task is handled entirely reactively. When failures occur, the system changes the reactive/deliverative goal division by moving goals into the deliberative component. Because our approach attempts to minimize the number of deliberative goals, we call our approach Minimal Deliberation (MD). Because MD allows goals to be treated reactively, it gains some of the advantages of reactive systems: computational efficiency, the ability to deal with noise and non-deterministic effects, and the ability to take advantage of unforseen opportunities. However, because MD can fall back upon deliberation, it can also provide some of the guarantees of classical planning, such as the ability to deal with complex goal interactions. This paper describes the Minimal Deliberation approach to integrating reactivity and deliberation and describe an ongoing application of the approach to an uncertain planning and scheduling domain.

  5. Exploring how experience with planning impacts first grade students' planning and solutions to engineering design problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portsmore, Merredith D.

    This dissertation presents research that investigated how first grade students' ability to construct solutions and to plan through drawing for engineering design problems is related to their participation in a LEGO-based engineering curriculum with two variations on the instruction for planning. The quasi-experimental design engaged two first grade classrooms in an urban K-6 Science and Technology elementary school outside of Boston, MA in a set of activities that asked students to construct solutions to engineering design problems inspired by the story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears. The planning classroom was provided with instructions on how to plan and students were required to plan through drawing prior to constructing their solution to engineering design problems. Students in the spontaneous classroom were not given instruction in planning and were allowed immediate access to materials to construct their solution. Students' drawings and constructed artifacts for engineering design problems during pre and post assessments as well as during the classroom were collected. The analysis of the classroom data found that students were able to successfully construct solutions to engineering design problems with increasingly number of requirements. Pre and post comparisons of students' performance on problems with materials they had had extensive experience with (LEGO) and craft materials (non-LEGO) found that students only made gains in constructing solutions to engineering design problems with materials they had prior experience with. The planning intervention appeared to have no relationship with students' ability to construct solutions that addressed requirements that were clearly presented to the students. However, there may be a relationship with less obvious requirements regarding aesthetics (as measured by symmetry of the artifacts) and material selection. In general, the findings suggest that planning through drawing may help students preserve their ideas

  6. Engineering calculations for communications satellite systems planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reilly, Charles H.; Walton, Eric K.; Kohnhorst, Paul

    1987-01-01

    A procedure is described that was used to calculate minimum required satellite separations based on total link carrier to interference requirements. Also summarized are recent results with a switching algorithm for satellite synthesis problems. Analytic solution value bounds for two of the satellite synthesis models studied are described. Preliminary results from an empirical study of alternate mixed integer programming models for satellite synthesis are presented. Research plans for the near future are discussed.

  7. Interpolation Approximation of Voltage Stability Constrained OPF (VSCOPF) for Reactive Power Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, Leon M; Zhang, Wenjuan; Li, Fangxing

    2011-01-01

    Reactive power planning (RPP), or Var planning, is to identify the optimal size and location of reactive power sources. In this paper, first, the previous work using least square method to simplify the voltage stability constrained OPF (VSCOPF) model for RPP is presented. Then, this paper presents a new model simplification solution using interpolation. The interpolation approach can be easily applied to a piecewise formulation while preserving the continuity at boundary points, which cannot be easily achieved by previous works like the least square method. The proposed interpolation approach is numerically tested and compared with the least square approach. It is concluded that interpolation is an improved model simplification approach for RPP.

  8. The MSFC Systems Engineering Guide: An Overview and Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelby, Jerry; Thomas, L. Dale

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the guiding vision, progress to date and the plan forward for development of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Systems Engineering Guide (SEG), a virtual systems engineering handbook and archive that describes the system engineering processes used by MSFC in the development of ongoing complex space systems such as the Ares launch vehicle and forthcoming ones as well. It is the intent of this website to be a "One Stop Shop' for MSFC systems engineers that will provide tutorial information, an overview of processes and procedures and links to assist system engineering with guidance and references, and provide an archive of relevant systems engineering artifacts produced by the many NASA projects developed and managed by MSFC over the years.

  9. Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in Engineering Barrier Systems (EBS)

    SciTech Connect

    Steefel, Carl; Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Liu, Hui-Hai; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    Geological repositories for disposal of high-level nuclear wastes generally rely on a multi-barrier system to isolate radioactive wastes from the biosphere. The multi-barrier system typically consists of a natural barrier system, including repository host rock and its surrounding subsurface environment, and an engineering barrier system (EBS). EBS represents the man-made, engineered materials placed within a repository, including the waste form, waste canisters, buffer materials, backfill and seals (OECD, 2003). EBS plays a significant role in the containment and long-term retardation of radionuclide release. EBS is involved in complex thermal, hydrogeological, mechanical, chemical and biological processes, such as heat release due to radionuclide decay, multiphase flow (including gas release due to canister corrosion), swelling of buffer materials, radionuclide diffusive transport, waste dissolution and chemical reactions. All these processes are related to each other. An in-depth understanding of these coupled processes is critical for the performance assessment (PA) for EBS and the entire repository. Within the EBS group of Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign, LBNL is currently focused on (1) thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in buffer materials (bentonite) and (2) diffusive transport in EBS associated with clay host rock, with a long-term goal to develop a full understanding of (and needed modeling capabilities to simulate) impacts of coupled processes on radionuclide transport in different components of EBS, as well as the interaction between near-field host rock (e.g., clay) and EBS and how they effect radionuclide release. This final report documents the progress that LBNL has made in its focus areas. Specifically, Section 2 summarizes progress on literature review for THMC processes and reactive-diffusive radionuclide transport in bentonite. The literature review provides a picture of the state-of-the-art of the relevant research areas

  10. Engineering calculations for communications satellite systems planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reilly, C. H.; Levis, C. A.; Buyukdura, O. M.; Mount-Campbell, C. A.

    1986-01-01

    Observed solution times were analyzed for the extended gradient and cyclic coordinate search procedures. The times used in the analysis come from computer runs made during a previously-reported experiment conducted to assess the quality of the solutions to a BSS synthesis problem found by the two search methods. The results of a second experiment with a Fixed Satellite Service (FSS) test problem are also presented. Computational results are summarized for mixed integer programming approaches for solving FSS synthesis problems. A promising heuristic algorithm is described. A synthesis model is discussed for orbital arc allotment optimization. Research plans for the near future are also presented.

  11. [Biomedical engineering supports surgical planning and interventions].

    PubMed

    Dickhaus, H; Metzner, R

    2010-08-01

    Fundamental changes were achieved with the introduction of minimally invasive surgery. In this context, innovations in microtechnology played a significant role in the deployment of new tools. Developments for further integration are still ongoing. Furthermore, decisive progress was made by the timely provision of individual patient data prior to surgery. These comprise imaging data, electrophysiological or functional recordings, and synthetic data gained by modeling and simulation of anatomical or physiological conditions. Aside from the technical aspects of supporting surgery, effective quality management and optimized workflow are essential for therapeutic success. The vision of autonomously operating robots has been dropped in favor of permanently conducted and supervised interventions with the support of intelligent tools for the surgeon. Recent advances in reconstruction and transplantation surgery by tissue engineering and molecular biology are only the beginning of new promising concepts. PMID:20700778

  12. Repository Planning, Design, and Engineering: Part I--Infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Baird, Philip M; Gunter, Elaine W

    2016-04-01

    This is a two-part review describing the planning, engineering, and design considerations for building a new repository for biological and environmental samples. Part I addresses the physical infrastructure requirements for a repository; Part II will cover equipment and costing. Planning for construction of a new repository is a complex process requiring comprehensive preplanning and adherence to many regulatory and safety requirements. Guidance and a planning timeline are provided for many of the physical aspects and large capital acquisition costs for the expansion of an existing repository, or the creation of a new repository facility, using an available unoccupied building such as a former warehouse. This article provides a comprehensive set of information about every aspect of repository construction and operation to be considered in the planning process, and also addresses all aspects of designing and constructing a new repository in an existing structure. The engineering and design parameters for the repository are discussed in detail. PMID:26886580

  13. Tank waste remediation system systems engineering management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, L.G.

    1998-01-08

    This Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) describes the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) implementation of the US Department of Energy (DOE) systems engineering policy provided in 97-IMSD-193. The SEMP defines the products, process, organization, and procedures used by the TWRS Project to implement the policy. The SEMP will be used as the basis for tailoring the systems engineering applications to the development of the physical systems and processes necessary to achieve the desired end states of the program. It is a living document that will be revised as necessary to reflect changes in systems engineering guidance as the program evolves. The US Department of Energy-Headquarters has issued program management guidance, DOE Order 430. 1, Life Cycle Asset Management, and associated Good Practice Guides that include substantial systems engineering guidance.

  14. Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, Scott; Hanson, Reed M; Wagner, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    Reactivity controlled compression ignition is a low-temperature combustion technique that has been shown, both in computational fluid dynamics modeling and single-cylinder experiments, to obtain diesel-like efficiency or better with ultra-low nitrogen oxide and soot emissions, while operating primarily on gasoline-like fuels. This paper investigates reactivity controlled compression ignition operation on a four-cylinder light-duty diesel engine with production-viable hardware using conventional gasoline and diesel fuel. Experimental results are presented over a wide speed and load range using a systematic approach for achieving successful steady-state reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion. The results demonstrated diesel-like efficiency or better over the operating range explored with low engine-out nitrogen oxide and soot emissions. A peak brake thermal efficiency of 39.0% was demonstrated for 2600 r/min and 6.9 bar brake mean effective pressure with nitrogen oxide emissions reduced by an order of magnitude compared to conventional diesel combustion operation. Reactivity controlled compression ignition emissions and efficiency results are compared to conventional diesel combustion operation on the same engine.

  15. 8. PHOTOCOPY OF ENGINEERING DRAWING: "PLAN, PROFILE, AND TYPICAL SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. PHOTOCOPY OF ENGINEERING DRAWING: "PLAN, PROFILE, AND TYPICAL SECTION OF FINISHED SUBGRADE READY FOR TRAFFIC BOUND SURFACING OF SLAG, CONTRACT 274A, HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT, DELAWARE, BRIDGE AND ROADWAY, SAWMILL BRANCH, AUGUST 1934." Original on file at Delaware Department of Transportation, Dover. - State Bridge No. 456, Walker School Road (Road 45), spanning Sawmill Branch, Townsend, New Castle County, DE

  16. 9. PHOTOCOPY OF ENGINEERING DRAWING: "ELEVATION, HALF PLAN, HALF SECTIONABUTMENT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. PHOTOCOPY OF ENGINEERING DRAWING: "ELEVATION, HALF PLAN, HALF SECTION-ABUTMENT, HALF SECTION-PILE BENT, CONTRACT 274A, HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT, DELAWARE, BRIDGE AND ROADWAY, SAWMILL BRANCH, 1934." Original on file at Delaware Department of Transportation, Dover. - State Bridge No. 456, Walker School Road (Road 45), spanning Sawmill Branch, Townsend, New Castle County, DE

  17. 26. Site plan of Lake Whitney; detail of original engineering ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Site plan of Lake Whitney; detail of original engineering drawing, 1856 Photocopied from map drawn and surveyed by Nelson J. Welton, C.E., 'Contemplated Waterworks at Whitneyville, 1856,' unaccessioned New Haven Water Company Papers, collection of NHCHSL. Shows 'Whitney's Upper Armory,' 'Clock Shop,' 'E. Whitney's Lower Armory.' - Eli Whitney Armory, West of Whitney Avenue, Armory Street Vicinity, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  18. The entropy reduction engine: Integrating planning, scheduling, and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Mark; Bresina, John L.; Kedar, Smadar T.

    1991-01-01

    The Entropy Reduction Engine, an architecture for the integration of planning, scheduling, and control, is described. The architecture is motivated, presented, and analyzed in terms of its different components; namely, problem reduction, temporal projection, and situated control rule execution. Experience with this architecture has motivated the recent integration of learning. The learning methods are described along with their impact on architecture performance.

  19. 12. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photograph of line drawing in possession of Engineering Plans and Services Division, Rock Island Arsenal. FRONT (WEST) ELEVATION, 1877. DELINEATOR: W. OTTO GRONEN. - Rock Island Arsenal, Building No. 90, East Avenue between North Avenue & King Drive, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  20. 36. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco. Plot Plan, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco. Plot Plan, Letterman Army Hospital, San Francisco, Calif. 1958. SHOWING LOCATION OF BUILDINGS 1006 AND 1049 IN LETTERMAN HOSPITAL COMPLEX IN 1958. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  1. 34. PLAN, PROPOSED EXTENSION OF COAL HOUSE, EXTENSIONS OF ENGINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. PLAN, PROPOSED EXTENSION OF COAL HOUSE, EXTENSIONS OF ENGINE AND COAL HOUSES, DEER ISLAND PUMPING STATION, METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD, METROPOLITAN SEWARAGE WORKS, JANUARY 1909, SHEET NO. 11. Aperture card 6498-11. - Deer Island Pumping Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  2. The MSFC Systems Engineering Guide: An Overview and Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelby, Jerry A.; Thomas, L. Dale

    2007-01-01

    As systems and subsystems requirements become more complex in the pursuit of the exploration of space, advanced technology will demand and require an integrated approach to the design and development of safe and successful space vehicles and there products. System engineers play a vital and key role in transforming mission needs into vehicle requirements that can be verified and validated. This will result in a safe and cost effective design that will satisfy the mission schedule. A key to successful vehicle design within systems engineering is communication. Communication, through a systems engineering infrastructure, will not only ensure that customers and stakeholders are satisfied but will also assist in identifying vehicle requirements; i.e. identification, integration and management. This vehicle design will produce a system that is verifiable, traceable, and effectively satisfies cost, schedule, performance, and risk throughout the life-cycle of the product. A communication infrastructure will bring about the integration of different engineering disciplines within vehicle design. A system utilizing these aspects will enhance system engineering performance and improve upon required activities such as Development of Requirements, Requirements Management, Functional Analysis, Test, Synthesis, Trade Studies, Documentation, and Lessons Learned to produce a successful final product. This paper will describe the guiding vision, progress to date and the plan forward for development of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Systems Engineering Guide (SEG), a virtual systems engineering handbook and archive that will describe the system engineering processes that are used by MSFC in the development of complex systems such as the Ares launch vehicle. It is the intent of this website to be a "One Stop Shop" for our systems engineers that will provide tutorial information, an overview of processes and procedures and links to assist system engineering with guidance and

  3. Solid waste operations complex engineering verification program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeson, C.L.

    1994-09-28

    This plan supersedes, but does not replace, the previous Waste Receiving and Processing/Solid Waste Engineering Development Program Plan. In doing this, it does not repeat the basic definitions of the various types or classes of development activities nor provide the rigorous written description of each facility and assign the equipment to development classes. The methodology described in the previous document is still valid and was used to determine the types of verification efforts required. This Engineering Verification Program Plan will be updated on a yearly basis. This EVPP provides programmatic definition of all engineering verification activities for the following SWOC projects: (1) Project W-026 - Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1; (2) Project W-100 - Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A; (3) Project W-112 - Phase V Storage Facility; and (4) Project W-113 - Solid Waste Retrieval. No engineering verification activities are defined for Project W-112 as no verification work was identified. The Acceptance Test Procedures/Operational Test Procedures will be part of each project`s Title III operation test efforts. The ATPs/OTPs are not covered by this EVPP.

  4. Comparison of reactivity in a flow reactor and a single cylinder engine

    SciTech Connect

    Natelson, Robert H.; Johnson, Rodney O.; Kurman, Matthew S.; Cernansky, Nicholas P.; Miller, David L.

    2010-10-15

    The relative reactivity of 2:1:1 and 1:1:1 mixtures of n-decane:n-butylcyclohexane:n-butylbenzene and an average sample of JP-8 were evaluated in a single cylinder engine and compared to results obtained in a pressurized flow reactor. At compression ratios of 14:1, 15:1, and 16:1, inlet temperature of 500 K, inlet pressure of 0.1 MPa, equivalence ratio of 0.23, and engine speed of 800 RPM, the autoignition delay times were, from shortest to longest, the 2:1:1, followed by the 1:1:1, and then the JP-8. This order corresponded with recent results in a pressurized flow reactor, where the preignition oxidation chemistry was monitored at temperatures of 600-800 K, 0.8 MPa pressure, and an equivalence ratio of 0.30, and where the preignition reactivity from highest to lowest was the 2:1:1, followed by the 1:1:1, and the JP-8. This shows that the relative reactivity at low temperatures in the flow reactor tracks the autoignition tendencies in the engine for these particular fuels. (author) the computed experimental error. (author)

  5. Site-specific antibody-drug conjugation through an engineered glycotransferase and a chemically reactive sugar.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhongyu; Ramakrishnan, Boopathy; Li, Jinyu; Wang, Yanping; Feng, Yang; Prabakaran, Ponraj; Colantonio, Simona; Dyba, Marzena A; Qasba, Pradman K; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2014-01-01

    Conjugation of small molecule drugs to specific sites on the antibody molecule has been increasingly used for the generation of relatively homogenous preparations of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) with physicochemical properties similar or identical to those of the naked antibody. Previously a method for conjugation of small molecules to glycoproteins through existing glycans by using an engineered glycotransferase and a chemically reactive sugar as a handle was developed. Here, for the first time, we report the use of this method with some modifications to generate an ADC from a monoclonal antibody, m860, which we identified from a human naïve phage display Fab library by panning against the extracellular domain of human HER2. M860 bound to cell surface-associated HER2 with affinity comparable to that of Trastuzumab (Herceptin), but to a different epitope. The m860ADC was generated by enzymatically adding a reactive keto-galactose to m860 using an engineered glycotransferase and conjugating the reactive m860 to aminooxy auristatin F. It exhibited potent and specific cell-killing activity against HER2 positive cancer cells, including trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer cells. This unique ADC may have utility as a potential therapeutic for HER2 positive cancers alone or in combination with other drugs. Our results also validate the keto-galactose/engineered glycotransferase method for generation of functional ADCs, which could potentially also be used for preparation of ADCs targeting other disease markers. PMID:25517304

  6. Comparative Studies of Particle Swarm Optimization Techniques for Reactive Power Allocation Planning in Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Yoshikazu

    This paper compares particle swarm optimization (PSO) techniques for a reactive power allocation planning problem in power systems. The problem can be formulated as a mixed-integer nonlinear optimization problem (MINLP). The PSO based methods determines a reactive power allocation strategy with continuous and discrete state variables such as automatic voltage regulator (AVR) operating values of electric power generators, tap positions of on-load tap changer (OLTC) of transformers, and the number of reactive power compensation equipment. Namely, this paper investigates applicability of PSO techniques to one of the practical MINLPs in power systems. Four variations of PSO: PSO with inertia weight approach (IWA), PSO with constriction factor approach (CFA), hybrid particle swarm optimization (HPSO) with IWA, and HPSO with CFA are compared. The four methods are applied to the standard IEEE14 bus system and a practical 112 bus system.

  7. OCRWM Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP). Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Systems Engineering Management Plan (OCRWM SEMP) specifies the technical management approach for the development of the waste management system, and specifies the approach for the development of each of the system elements -- the waste acceptance system, the transportation system, the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility, and the mined geologic disposal system, which includes site characterization activity. The SEMP also delineates how systems engineering will be used by OCRWM to describe the system development process; it identifies responsibilities for its implementation, and specifies the minimum requirements for systems engineering. It also identifies the close interrelationship of system engineering and licensing processes. This SEMP, which is a combined OCRWM and M&O SEMP, is part of the top-level program documentation and is prepared in accordance with the direction provided in the Program Management System Manual (PMSM). The relationship of this document to other top level documents in the CRWMS document hierarchy is defined in the PMSM. A systems engineering management plan for each project, which specifies the actions to be taken in implementing systems engineering at the project level, shall be prepared by the respective project managers. [``Program`` refers to the CRWMS-wide activity and ``project`` refers to that level responsible for accomplishing the specific activities of that segment of the program.] The requirements for the project level SEMPs are addressed in Section 4.2.2.2. They represent the minimum set of requirements, and do not preclude the broadening of systems engineering activities to meet the specific needs of each project.

  8. 5. Photographic copy of engineering drawing showing plans, elevation and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photographic copy of engineering drawing showing plans, elevation and section of Deluge Water System, including reservior (4316), Pump House (4317), and water tower. Job No. Muroc A(5-ll), Military Construction, San Bernardino-Mojave Area, San Bernardino, California: Muroc Bombing Range, Muroc Lake, California.; Additional Facilities for Materiel Center Flight Test Base, Water Supply System, Plans and Sections, Sheet 5 of 10, May 1943. Records on file at AFFTC/CE-CECC-B (Design/Construction Flight/RPMC), Edwards AFB, California. - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Deluge Water Pumping Station, Near Second & D Streets, Boron, Kern County, CA

  9. Genetic algorithms for optimal reactive power compensation planning on the national grid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilgrim, J. D.

    This work investigates the use of Genetic Algorithms (GAs) for optimal Reactive power Compensation Planning (RCP) of practical power systems. In particular, RCP of the transmission system of England and Wales as owned and operated by National Grid is considered. The GA is used to simultaneously solve both the siting problem---optimisation of the installation of new devices---and the operational problem---optimisation of preventive transformer taps and the controller characteristics of dynamic compensation devices. A computer package called Genetic Compensation Placement (GCP) has been developed which uses an Integer coded GA (IGA) to solve the RCP problem. The RCP problem is implemented as a multi-objective optimisation: in the interests of security, the number of system and operational constraint violations and the deviation of the busbar voltages from the ideal are all minimised for the base (intact) case and the contingent cases. In the interests of cost reduction, the reactive power cost is minimised for the base case. The reactive power cost encompasses the costs incurred from the installation of reactive power sources and the utilisation of new and existing dynamic reactive power compensation devices. GCP is compared to SCORPION (a planning program currently being used by National Grid) which uses a combination of linear programming and heuristic back-tracking. Results are presented for a practical test system developed with the cooperation of National Grid, and it is found that GCP produces solutions that are cheaper than solutions found by SCORPION and perform extremely well: an improvement in voltage profiles, a decrease in complex power mismatches, and a reduction in MVolt Amps-reactive (VAr) utilisation were observed.

  10. Perspectives and Plans for Graduate Studies. 11. Engineering 1974. C. Metallurgical and Materials Engineering. Report No. 74-15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Council on Graduate Studies, Toronto. Advisory Committee on Academic Planning.

    On the instruction of the Council of Ontario Universities, the Advisory Committee on Academic Planning in coordination with the Committee of Ontario Deans of Engineering has conducted a planning assessment for doctoral work in metallurgical and materials engineering. A consultants' study of metallurgical and materials engineering is presented,…

  11. STOMP-ECKEChem: An Engineering Perspective on Reactive Transport in Geologic Media

    SciTech Connect

    White, Mark D.; Fang, Yilin

    2012-04-04

    ECKEChem (Equilibrium, Conservation, Kinetic Equation Chemistry) is a reactive transport module for the STOMP suite of multifluid subsurface flow and transport simulators that was developed from an engineering perspective. STOMP comprises a suite of operational modes that are distinguished by the solved coupled conservation equations with capabilities for a variety of subsurface applications (e.g., environmental remediation and stewardship, geologic sequestration of greenhouse gases, gas hydrate production, and oil shale production). The ECKEChem module was designed to provide integrated reactive transport capabilities across the suite of STOMP simulator operational modes. The initial application for the ECKEChem module was in the simulation of the mineralization reactions that occurred with the injection of supercritical carbon dioxide into deep Columbia River basalt formations, where it was implemented in the STOMP-CO2 simulator. The STOMP-ECKEChem solution approach to modeling reactive transport in multifluid geologic media is founded on an engineering perspective: (1) sequential non-iterative coupling between the flow and reactive transport is sufficient, (2) reactive transport can be modeled by operator splitting with local geochemistry and global transport, (3) geochemistry can be expressed as a system of coupled nonlinear equilibrium, conservation and kinetic equations, (4) a limited number of kinetic equation forms are used in geochemical practice. This chapter describes the conceptual approach to converting a geochemical reaction network into a series of equilibrium, conservation and kinetic equations, the implementation of ECKEChem in STOMP, the numerical solution approach, and a demonstration of the simulator on a complex application involving desorption of uranium from contaminated field-textured sediments.

  12. An Investigation of Engineering Students' Post-Graduation Plans inside or outside of Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ro, Hyun Kyoung

    2011-01-01

    The question of students' post-graduation plans is a critical one for the field of engineering as both industry and higher education institutions seek to understand how to increase the production of highly-skilled individuals for the STEM workforce. Despite the concern, there are but a few empirical studies that examine how students' academic…

  13. NASA Glenn's Engine Components Research Lab, Cell 2B, Reactivated to Support the U.S. Army Research Laboratory T700 Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beltran, Luis R.; Griffin, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Army Vehicle Technology Directorate at the NASA Glenn Research Center has been directed by their parent command, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL), to demonstrate active stall technology in a turboshaft engine as the next step in transitioning this technology to the Army and aerospace industry. Therefore, the Vehicle Technology Directorate requested the reactivation of Glenn's Engine Components Research Lab, Cell 2B, (ECRL 2B). They wanted to test a T700 engine that had been used previously for turboshaft engine research as a partnership between the Army and NASA on small turbine engine research. ECRL 2B had been placed in standby mode in 1997. Glenn's Testing Division initiated reactivation in May 2002 to support the new research effort, and they completed reactivation and improvements in September 2003.

  14. Predictive / Reactive Planning and Scheduling of a Surgical Suite with Emergency Patient Arrival.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Mehdi; Soudi, Asie

    2016-01-01

    This paper surveys the problem of predictive / reactive scheduling of an integrated operating theatre with two types of demand for surgery: 1) elective or known demand; 2) emergency or uncertain demand. The stochastic arrival of emergency patients with uncertain surgery time enforces the scheduler to react to disruption and modify scheduling plan of elective patients. We focus on this predictive / reactive scheduling problem which has not been investigated in such way before. As in hospitals, at the time of occurrence a disruption in a surgical suite, the scheduler has not enough time to make the best decision; we propose a new approach based on two-stage stochastic programming model with recourse which determines the best recourse strategy in advance of any disruption occurrence. Using the proposed approach, the primary schedule is generated in such a way that it can absorb disruption with minimum effect on planned elective surgeries. For the first time in operating theatre planning, two new significant sets of performance measures comprising "robustness" and "stability" measures are considered in generation of primary schedule which will be shown to be of great importance in efficiency of surgical suite planning. Computational experiments performed on sets of generated problem based on the data obtained from a non-profit hospital. In order to demonstrate efficiency of the proposed method, computational results of the proposed approach are compared with classic approach. PMID:26547850

  15. Reactive power planning under high penetration of wind energy using Benders decomposition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, Yan; Wei, Yanli; Fang, Xin; Li, Fangxing; Azim, Riyasat

    2015-11-05

    This study addresses the optimal allocation of reactive power volt-ampere reactive (VAR) sources under the paradigm of high penetration of wind energy. Reactive power planning (RPP) in this particular condition involves a high level of uncertainty because of wind power characteristic. To properly model wind generation uncertainty, a multi-scenario framework optimal power flow that considers the voltage stability constraint under the worst wind scenario and transmission N 1 contingency is developed. The objective of RPP in this study is to minimise the total cost including the VAR investment cost and the expected generation cost. Therefore RPP under this condition ismore » modelled as a two-stage stochastic programming problem to optimise the VAR location and size in one stage, then to minimise the fuel cost in the other stage, and eventually, to find the global optimal RPP results iteratively. Benders decomposition is used to solve this model with an upper level problem (master problem) for VAR allocation optimisation and a lower problem (sub-problem) for generation cost minimisation. Impact of the potential reactive power support from doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) is also analysed. Lastly, case studies on the IEEE 14-bus and 118-bus systems are provided to verify the proposed method.« less

  16. Reactive power planning under high penetration of wind energy using Benders decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yan; Wei, Yanli; Fang, Xin; Li, Fangxing; Azim, Riyasat

    2015-11-05

    This study addresses the optimal allocation of reactive power volt-ampere reactive (VAR) sources under the paradigm of high penetration of wind energy. Reactive power planning (RPP) in this particular condition involves a high level of uncertainty because of wind power characteristic. To properly model wind generation uncertainty, a multi-scenario framework optimal power flow that considers the voltage stability constraint under the worst wind scenario and transmission N 1 contingency is developed. The objective of RPP in this study is to minimise the total cost including the VAR investment cost and the expected generation cost. Therefore RPP under this condition is modelled as a two-stage stochastic programming problem to optimise the VAR location and size in one stage, then to minimise the fuel cost in the other stage, and eventually, to find the global optimal RPP results iteratively. Benders decomposition is used to solve this model with an upper level problem (master problem) for VAR allocation optimisation and a lower problem (sub-problem) for generation cost minimisation. Impact of the potential reactive power support from doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) is also analysed. Lastly, case studies on the IEEE 14-bus and 118-bus systems are provided to verify the proposed method.

  17. In situ sampling device development engineering task plan

    SciTech Connect

    DeFord, D.K.

    1994-10-07

    This engineering task plan (ETP) supports the development for facility use of an improved packaging method or device for the sorbent media used during in situ sampling of waste tanks. Improvement is being sought due to problems with internal and external radioactive contamination. In situ sampling refers to placing sample collection media (primarily sorbent tubes) directly into the tank headspace, then drawing tank gases through the collection media to obtain samples. Development for facility use, includes design, fabrication, and formal documentation of the device. As the most important change to be made is addition of a High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter, the device will be referred to in this ETP as the Filter Device or simply the Device. This ETP is intended to be the management plan governing the design, fabrication, and formal documentation of the Filter Device. This plan identifies the engineering services and other resources to accomplish that purpose. The design basis for the development of the Device is presented in this ETP.

  18. Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering Program - Strategic Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2004-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Engineering (NEM R&E) Program is dedicated to providing knowledge, technical expertise, and products to US agencies responsible for monitoring nuclear explosions in all environments and is successful in turning scientific breakthroughs into tools for use by operational monitoring agencies. To effectively address the rapidly evolving state of affairs, the NNSA NEM R&E program is structured around three program elements described within this strategic plan: Integration of New Monitoring Assets, Advanced Event Characterization, and Next-Generation Monitoring Systems. How the Program fits into the National effort and historical accomplishments are also addressed.

  19. Chemical Reactivity Testing for the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program. Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, H.C.

    1999-01-24

    This quality assurance project plan (QAPjP) summarizes requirements used by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Incorporated (LMES) Development Division at Y-12 for conducting chemical reactivity testing of Department of Energy (DOE) owned spent nuclear fuel, sponsored by the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP). The requirements are based on the NSNFP Statement of Work PRO-007 (Statement of Work for Laboratory Determination of Uranium Hydride Oxidation Reaction Kinetics.) This QAPjP will utilize the quality assurance program at Y-12, QA-101PD, revision 1, and existing implementing procedures for the most part in meeting the NSNFP Statement of Work PRO-007 requirements, exceptions will be noted.

  20. Reactivation of Latent HIV-1 Expression by Engineered TALE Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Perdigão, Pedro; Gaj, Thomas; Santa-Marta, Mariana; Goncalves, Joao

    2016-01-01

    The presence of replication-competent HIV-1 –which resides mainly in resting CD4+ T cells–is a major hurdle to its eradication. While pharmacological approaches have been useful for inducing the expression of this latent population of virus, they have been unable to purge HIV-1 from all its reservoirs. Additionally, many of these strategies have been associated with adverse effects, underscoring the need for alternative approaches capable of reactivating viral expression. Here we show that engineered transcriptional modulators based on customizable transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins can induce gene expression from the HIV-1 long terminal repeat promoter, and that combinations of TALE transcription factors can synergistically reactivate latent viral expression in cell line models of HIV-1 latency. We further show that complementing TALE transcription factors with Vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, enhances HIV-1 expression in latency models. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that TALE transcription factors are a potentially effective alternative to current pharmacological routes for reactivating latent virus and that combining synthetic transcriptional activators with histone deacetylase inhibitors could lead to the development of improved therapies for latent HIV-1 infection. PMID:26933881

  1. Perspectives and Plans for Graduate Studies. 11. Engineering 1974. D. Mechanical Engineering. Report No. 74-21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Council on Graduate Studies, Toronto. Advisory Committee on Academic Planning.

    On the instruction of the Council of Ontario Universities, the Advisory Committee on Academic Planning in cooperation with the Committee of Ontario Deans of Engineering has conducted a planning assessment for doctoral work in mechanical engineering. This report presents as overview of the recommendations for each of the assessments conducted in…

  2. System Engineering Management and Implementation Plan for Project W-211 Initial Tank Retrieval Systems (ITRS)

    SciTech Connect

    VAN BEEK, J.E.

    2000-05-05

    This systems Engineering Management and Implementation Plan (SEMIP) describes the Project W-211 implementation of the Tank Farm Contractor Systems Engineering Management Plan (TFC SEMP). The SEMIP defines the systems engineering products and processes used by the project to comply with the TFC SEMP, and provides the basis for tailoring systems engineering processes by applying a graded approach to identify appropriate systems engineering requirements for W-211.

  3. Graceful Failure, Engineering, and Planning for Extremes: The Engineering for Climate Extremes Partnership (ECEP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruyere, C. L.; Tye, M. R.; Holland, G. J.; Done, J.

    2015-12-01

    Graceful failure acknowledges that all systems will fail at some level and incorporates the potential for failure as a key component of engineering design, community planning, and the associated research and development. This is a fundamental component of the ECEP, an interdisciplinary partnership bringing together scientific, engineering, cultural, business and government expertise to develop robust, well-communicated predictions and advice on the impacts of weather and climate extremes in support of decision-making. A feature of the partnership is the manner in which basic and applied research and development is conducted in direct collaboration with the end user. A major ECEP focus is the Global Risk and Resilience Toolbox (GRRT) that is aimed at developing public-domain, risk-modeling and response data and planning system in support of engineering design, and community planning and adaptation activities. In this presentation I will outline the overall ECEP and GRIP activities, and expand on the 'graceful failure' concept. Specific examples for direct assessment and prediction of hurricane impacts and damage potential will be included.

  4. Investigation of reactivity between SiC and Nb-1Zr in planned irradiation creep experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lewinsohn, C.A.; Hamilton, M.L.; Jones, R.H.

    1997-08-01

    Thermodynamic calculations and diffusion couple experiments showed that SiC and Nb-1Zr were reactive at the upper range of temperatures anticipated in the planned irradiation creep experiment. Sputter-deposited aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was selected as a diffusion barrier coating. Experiments showed that although the coating coarsened at high temperature it was an effective barrier for diffusion of silicon from SiC into Nb-1Zr. Therefore, to avoid detrimental reactions between the SiC composite and the Nb-1Zr pressurized bladder during the planned irradiation creep experiment, a coating of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} will be required on the Nb-1Zr bladder.

  5. Center Planning and Development Student Engineer at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Kenneth T., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This summer I was the Student Trainee (Engineering) Pathways Intern (co-op) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in the Center Planning & Development (CPD) Directorate. CPD works with commercial companies who are interested in using KSC's unique capabilities for spaceflight, spacecraft processing, ground systems and Research & Development (R&D) projects that fall in line with NASA's Mission and Vision. CPD is divided into three (3) groups: (1) AD-A, which works on the Master Planning for the center, (2) AD-B (where I am), which works on project control, management and integration, and (3) AD-C, which works on partnership development. CPD's main goal is to make KSC the world's preeminent multi-user spaceport and maintain the center as a leader in space exploration. CPD is a very diverse group of employees having a wide knowledge of not only the Space Shuttle, but also Expendable Launch Vehicles (ELV). The director of CPD, Scott Colloredo, is on the advisory board for Commercial Space Operations (CSO) and has a degree from ERAU. I worked on a number of different tasks for AD-B, as well as CPD, that includes, but not limited to: reviewing and reissuing engineering documents, weekly notes for CPD and senior management, engineering familiarizations with facilities at KSC, leading a tour for the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Career Services office, and working on actual agreements/proposals that will be used in the partnership process with multiple partners, along with other projects. Most of the work I have done is sensitive information and cannot be disclosed.

  6. The Purdue Interest Questionnaire--An Interest Inventory to Assist Engineering Students in Their Career Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBold, William K.; And Others

    The Purdue Interest Questionnaire (PIQ), a 264-item Likert-type scale, was developed to assist engineering students in their career planning. The six engineering scales identify specialized fields: aeronautical, chemical, civil, electrical, industrial, or mechanical. For students planning to transfer out of engineering, four scales identify…

  7. Tableau method for reactive path planning in an obstacle avoidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeson, Bradley K.; Kurtz, John J.; Bonner, Kevin G.

    1999-07-01

    Autonomous off-road vehicles face the daunting challenge of successfully navigating through terrain in which unmapped obstacles present hazards to safe vehicle operation. These obstacles can be sparsely scattered or densely clustered. The obstacle avoidance (OA) system on-board the autonomous vehicle must be capable of detecting all non-negotiable obstacles and planning paths around them in a sufficient computing interval to permit effective operation of the platform. To date, the reactive path planning function performed by OA systems has been essentially an exhaustive search through a set of preprogrammed swaths (linear trajectories projected through the on-board local obstacle map) to determine the best path for the vehicle to travel toward achieving a goal state. Historically, this function is a large consumer of computational resources in an OA system. A novel reactive path planner is described that minimizes processing time through the use of pre-computed indices into an n over n + 1 tableau structure with the lowest level in the tableau representing the traditional 'histogram' result. The tableau method differs significantly from other reactive planners in three ways: (1) the entire tableau is computed off-line and loaded on system startup, minimizing computational load; (2) the real-time computational load is directly proportional to the number of grid points searched and proportional to the square of the number of paths; and (3) the tableau is independent of grid resolution. Analytical and experimental comparisons of the tableau and histogram methods are presented along with generalization into an autonomous mobility system incorporating multiple feature planes and path cost evaluation.

  8. Impacts of fuel formulation and engine operating parameters on the nanostructure and reactivity of diesel soot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yehliu, Kuen

    This study focuses on the impacts of fuel formulations on the reactivity and nanostructure of diesel soot. A 2.5L, 4-cylinder, turbocharged, common rail, direct injection light-duty diesel engine was used in generating soot samples. The impacts of engine operating modes and the start of combustion on soot reactivity were investigated first. Based on preliminary investigations, a test condition of 2400 rpm and 64 Nm, with single and split injection strategies, was chosen for studying the impacts of fuel formulation on the characteristics of diesel soot. Three test fuels were used: an ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (BP15), a pure soybean methyl-ester (B100), and a synthetic Fischer-Tropsch fuel (FT) produced in a gas-to-liquid process. The start of injection (SOI) and fuel rail pressures were adjusted such that the three test fuels have similar combustion phasing, thereby facilitating comparisons between soots from the different fuels. Soot reactivity was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). According to TGA, B100 soot exhibits the fastest oxidation on a mass basis followed by BP15 and FT derived soots in order of apparent rate constant. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicates no relation between the surface oxygen content and the soot reactivity. Crystalline information for the soot samples was obtained using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The basal plane diameter obtained from XRD was inversely related to the apparent rate constants for soot oxidation. For comparison, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) provided images of the graphene layers. Quantitative image analysis proceeded by a custom algorithm. B100 derived soot possessed the shortest mean fringe length and greatest mean fringe tortuosity. This suggests soot (nano)structural disorder correlates with a faster oxidation rate. Such results are in agreement with the X-ray analysis, as the observed fringe length is a measure of basal plane diameter. Moreover the relation

  9. Repository-Based Software Engineering Program: Working Program Management Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Repository-Based Software Engineering Program (RBSE) is a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sponsored program dedicated to introducing and supporting common, effective approaches to software engineering practices. The process of conceiving, designing, building, and maintaining software systems by using existing software assets that are stored in a specialized operational reuse library or repository, accessible to system designers, is the foundation of the program. In addition to operating a software repository, RBSE promotes (1) software engineering technology transfer, (2) academic and instructional support of reuse programs, (3) the use of common software engineering standards and practices, (4) software reuse technology research, and (5) interoperability between reuse libraries. This Program Management Plan (PMP) is intended to communicate program goals and objectives, describe major work areas, and define a management report and control process. This process will assist the Program Manager, University of Houston at Clear Lake (UHCL) in tracking work progress and describing major program activities to NASA management. The goal of this PMP is to make managing the RBSE program a relatively easy process that improves the work of all team members. The PMP describes work areas addressed and work efforts being accomplished by the program; however, it is not intended as a complete description of the program. Its focus is on providing management tools and management processes for monitoring, evaluating, and administering the program; and it includes schedules for charting milestones and deliveries of program products. The PMP was developed by soliciting and obtaining guidance from appropriate program participants, analyzing program management guidance, and reviewing related program management documents.

  10. Orbit Transfer Vehicle Engine Study. Phase A, extension 1: Study plan update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellish, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The updated study plan for the Space Transportation System orbit transfer vehicle (OTV) engine study is presented. The study program consists of engine system, programmatic, cost, and risk analyses of OTV engine concepts. Detailed task descriptions for the advanced expander cycle engine optimization, alternate low thrust capability, and safety, reliability, and cost comparisons are given.

  11. The Theory of Planned Behaviour Applied to Search Engines as a Learning Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liaw, Shu-Sheng

    2004-01-01

    Search engines have been developed for helping learners to seek online information. Based on theory of planned behaviour approach, this research intends to investigate the behaviour of using search engines as a learning tool. After factor analysis, the results suggest that perceived satisfaction of search engine, search engines as an information…

  12. Optimizing spacecraft design - optimization engine development : progress and plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornford, Steven L.; Feather, Martin S.; Dunphy, Julia R; Salcedo, Jose; Menzies, Tim

    2003-01-01

    At JPL and NASA, a process has been developed to perform life cycle risk management. This process requires users to identify: goals and objectives to be achieved (and their relative priorities), the various risks to achieving those goals and objectives, and options for risk mitigation (prevention, detection ahead of time, and alleviation). Risks are broadly defined to include the risk of failing to design a system with adequate performance, compatibility and robustness in addition to more traditional implementation and operational risks. The options for mitigating these different kinds of risks can include architectural and design choices, technology plans and technology back-up options, test-bed and simulation options, engineering models and hardware/software development techniques and other more traditional risk reduction techniques.

  13. NEP systems engineering efforts in FY-92: Plans and status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Gilland, James H.

    1992-01-01

    A system engineering effort has been initiated by NASA in FY-92 to define, address, and resolve issues associated with the use of Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) for megawatt (MW) space propulsion applications associated with the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). It is intended that key technical issues will be addressed by activities conducted in the early years of a project in NEP, with the objective of resolving such issues. Also, in response to more recent programmatic direction, a concept definition activity for 100 kilowatt NEP is being initiated. This paper will present key issues associated with megawatt NEP, and the plans and status for their resolution, and present the scope and rationale for the 100 kilowatt concept definition activity.

  14. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory analytical services performance evaluation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, J.M.; Sailer, S.J.; Anderson, D.A.

    1994-03-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL`s) Sample Management Office (SMO) conducts a Performance Evaluation Program that ensures that data of known quality are supplied by the analytical. chemistry service organizations with which the INEL contracts. The Analytical Services Performance Evaluation Plan documents the routine monitoring and assessment of suppliers conducted by the SMO, and it describes the procedures that are followed to ensure that suppliers meet all appropriate requirements. Because high-quality analytical support is vital to the success of DOE Environmental Management programs at the INEL, the performance of organizations providing these services must be routinely monitored and assessed. Analytical disciplines for which performance is monitored include metals, organics, radiochemical, and miscellaneous classical analysis methods.

  15. Updated plan for support of research related to geothermal reservoir engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, J.H.; Goldstein, N.E.; Graf, A.N.

    1980-09-01

    The original plan for support of research in geothermal reservoir engineering, GREMP, is reviewed and compared with accomplishments to date. A commentary on the comparison and an updated plan are presented. Also included are a justification of the updated plan and a revised management plan. (MHR)

  16. A Porous Tissue Engineering Scaffold Selectively Degraded by Cell-Generated Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Martin, John R.; Gupta, Mukesh K.; Page, Jonathan M.; Yu, Fang; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable tissue engineering scaffolds are commonly fabricated from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or similar polyesters that degrade by hydrolysis. PLGA hydrolysis generates acidic breakdown products that trigger an accelerated, autocatalytic degradation mechanism that can create mismatched rates of biomaterial breakdown and tissue formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key mediators of cell function in both health and disease, especially at sites of inflammation and tissue healing, and induction of inflammation and ROS are natural components of the in vivo response to biomaterial implantation. Thus, polymeric biomaterials that are selectively degraded by cell-generated ROS may have potential for creating tissue engineering scaffolds with better matched rates of tissue in-growth and cell-mediated scaffold biodegradation. To explore this approach, a series of poly(thioketal) (PTK) urethane (PTK-UR) biomaterial scaffolds were synthesized that degrade specifically by an ROS-dependent mechanism. PTK-UR scaffolds had significantly higher compressive moduli than analogous poly(ester urethane) (PEUR) scaffolds formed from hydrolytically-degradable ester-based diols (p < 0.05). Unlike PEUR scaffolds, the PTK-UR scaffolds were stable under aqueous conditions out to 25 weeks but were selectively degraded by ROS, indicating that their biodegradation would be exclusively cell-mediated. The in vitro oxidative degradation rates of the PTK-URs followed first-order degradation kinetics, were significantly dependent on PTK composition (p < 0.05), and correlated to ROS concentration. In subcutaneous rat wounds, PTK-UR scaffolds supported cellular infiltration and granulation tissue formation, followed first-order degradation kinetics over 7 weeks, and produced significantly greater stenting of subcutaneous wounds compared to PEUR scaffolds. These combined results indicate that ROS-degradable PTK-UR tissue engineering scaffolds have significant advantages over analogous

  17. Reactive Transport Modeling of Cap Rock Integrity During Natural and Engineered CO2 Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J W; Nitao, J J; Morris, J P

    2004-05-26

    Long-term cap rock integrity represents the single most important constraint on the long-term isolation performance of natural and engineered CO{sub 2} storage sites. CO{sub 2} influx that forms natural accumulations and CO{sub 2} injection for EOR/sequestration or saline-aquifer disposal both lead to concomitant geochemical alteration and geomechanical deformation of the cap rock, enhancing or degrading its seal integrity depending on the relative effectiveness of these interdependent processes. Using our reactive transport simulator (NUFT), supporting geochemical databases and software (GEMBOCHS, SUPCRT92), and distinct-element geomechanical model (LDEC), we have shown that influx-triggered mineral dissolution/precipitation reactions within typical shale cap rocks continuously reduce microfracture apertures, while pressure and effective-stress evolution first rapidly increase then slowly constrict them. For a given shale composition, the extent of geochemical enhancement is nearly independent of key reservoir properties (permeability and lateral continuity) that distinguish EOR/sequestration and saline-aquifer settings and CO{sub 2} influx parameters (rate, focality, and duration) that distinguish engineered disposal sites and natural accumulations, because these characteristics and parameters have negligible (indirect) impact on mineral dissolution/precipitation rates. In contrast, the extent of geomechanical degradation is highly dependent on these reservoir properties and influx parameters because they effectively dictate magnitude of the pressure perturbation; specifically, initial geomechanical degradation has been shown inversely proportional to reservoir permeability and lateral continuity and proportional to influx rate. Hence, while the extent of geochemical alteration is nearly independent of filling mode, that of geomechanical deformation is significantly more pronounced during engineered injection. This distinction limits the extent to which naturally

  18. Application of fuzzy sets to optimal reactive power planning with security constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Abdul-Rahman, K.H.; Shahidehpour, S.M. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1994-05-01

    This paper presents a mathematical formulation for the optimal reactive power planning taking into account the static security constraints and the non-probabilistic uncertainty in load values. The planning process is decomposed into investment and operation problems via the generalized Benders decomposition (GBD). Fixed and variable costs are considered in the investment problem. Linguistic declarations of load values in the operation problem are translated into possibility distribution functions. The operation problem is decomposed into 4 subproblems via Dantzig-Wolfe decomposition (DWD), and the modeling of multi-area power systems is considered by applying a second DWD to each subproblem, leading to a significant reduction in its dimensions for personal computer applications. Voltage constraints within each area are modeled as fuzzy sets for the static security analysis by biasing the final solution towards desired values of variables within their given ranges. The overall solution is a compromise between economics (lower investment and operation costs) and security (tighter feasible region). Numerical examples for the applicability of the proposed approach to multi-area power systems are discussed.

  19. Engineering Task Plan for Hose In Hose Transfer Lines for the Interim Stabilization Program

    SciTech Connect

    RUNG, M.P.

    2000-06-20

    This document is the Engineering Task Plan for the engineering, design services, planning, project integration and management support for the design, modification, installation and testing of an over ground transfer (OGT) system to support the interim stabilization of nine tanks in the 241-S/SX Tank Farms.

  20. Engineering Task Plan for Hose In Hose Transfer Lines for the Interim Stabilization Program

    SciTech Connect

    TORRES, T.D.

    2000-08-16

    The document is the Engineering Task Plan for the engineering, design services, planning, project integration and management support for the design, modification, installation and testing of an over ground transfer (OGT) system to support the interim stabilization of S/SX and U Tank Farms.

  1. Engineering task plan for the ultrasonic inspection of hanford double-shell tanks

    SciTech Connect

    LYSHER, R.W.

    1999-06-23

    This document facilitates the ultrasonic examination of Hanford Double-Shell Tanks. Included are a plan for engineering activities (individual responsibilities), plan for performance demonstration testing, and a plan for field activities (tank inspection). Also included are a Statement of Work (SOW) for contractor performance of the work and a protocol to be followed should tank flaws that exceed the acceptances criteria be discovered.

  2. Engineering Task Plan for the Ultrasonic Inspection of Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST) FY2000

    SciTech Connect

    JENSEN, C.E.

    2000-01-10

    This document facilitates the ultrasonic examination of Hanford double-shell tanks. Included are a plan for engineering activities (individual responsibilities), plan for performance demonstration testing, and a plan for field activities (tank inspection). Also included are a Statement of Work for contractor performance of the work and a protocol to be followed should tank flaws that exceed the acceptance criteria be discovered.

  3. Engineering Task Plan for the Ultrasonic Inspection of Hanford Double-Shell Tanks - FY 2001

    SciTech Connect

    JENSEN, C.E.

    2000-10-12

    This document facilitates the ultrasonic examination of Hanford double-shell tanks. Included are a plan for engineering activities, plan for performance demonstration testing, and a plan for field activities. Also included are a Statement of Work for contractor performance and a protocol to be followed should tank flaws that exceed the acceptance criteria are found.

  4. Engineering Task Plan for Fourth Generation Hanford Corrosion Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-06-20

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) describes the activities associated with the installation of cabinets containing corrosion monitoring equipment on tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107. The new cabinets (one per tank) will be installed adjacent to existing corrosion probes already installed in riser WST-RISER-016 on both tanks. The corrosion monitoring equipment to be installed utilizes the technique of electrochemical noise (EN) for monitoring waste tank corrosion. Typically, EN consists of low frequency (4 Hz) and small amplitude signals that are spontaneously generated by electrochemical reactions occurring at corroding or other surfaces. EN analysis is well suited for monitoring and identifying the onset of localized corrosion, and for measuring uniform corrosion rates. A typical EN based corrosion-monitoring system measures instantaneous fluctuations in corrosion current and potential between three nominally identical electrodes of the material of interest immersed in the environment of interest. Time-dependent fluctuations in corrosion current are described by electrochemical current noise, and time-dependent fluctuations of corrosion potential are described by electrochemical noise. The corrosion monitoring systems are designed to detect the onset of localized corrosion phenomena if tank conditions should change to allow these phenomena to occur. In addition to the EN technique, the systems also facilitate the use of the Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) technique to collect uniform corrosion rate information. LPR measures the linearity at the origin of the polarization curve for overvoltages up to a few millivolts away from the rest potential or natural corrosion potential. The slope of the current vs. voltage plot gives information on uniform corrosion rates.

  5. Configuration evaluation and criteria plan. Volume 1: System trades study and design methodology plan (preliminary). Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, E. K.

    1986-01-01

    The System Trades Study and Design Methodology Plan is used to conduct trade studies to define the combination of Space Shuttle Main Engine features that will optimize candidate engine configurations. This is accomplished by using vehicle sensitivities and engine parametric data to establish engine chamber pressure and area ratio design points for candidate engine configurations. Engineering analyses are to be conducted to refine and optimize the candidate configurations at their design points. The optimized engine data and characteristics are then evaluated and compared against other candidates being considered. The Evaluation Criteria Plan is then used to compare and rank the optimized engine configurations on the basis of cost.

  6. Operational Plan for SI (Metric) Transition in Engineering Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engineering Education, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents guidelines by which all engineering schools under the American Society for Engineering Education umbrella can work together with the American enterprise, through the American National Metric Council, to achieve transition to the International System of Units in a purposeful, cost-effective, and well-coordinated manner. (JN)

  7. Engineering Task Plan for Water Supply for Spray Washers on the Support Trucks

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    2000-02-03

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) defines the task and deliverables associated with the design, fabrication and testing of an improved spray wash system for the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) System Support Trucks.

  8. Engineering Task Plan Supporting Rupture of Compressed Air Lines in Contaminated Areas USQ

    SciTech Connect

    JANICEK, G.P.

    2001-11-30

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) defines the Tasks and organizational responsibilities for obtaining Tank Farm data relative to pit structures and soil contamination levels for purposes of resolving the rupture of compressed air/gas lines unreviewed safety question.

  9. Engineering Task Plan to Expand the Environmental Operational Envelope of Core Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-12-14

    This Engineering Task Plan authorizes the development of an Alternative Generation and Analysis (AGA). The AGA will determine how to expand the environmental operating envelope during core sampling operations.

  10. Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC), cartographer unknown, title unknown, March 28, 1892 1890 lifesaving station shown near fort and beach, no boathouse near engineer's wharf - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  11. Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC) from Talcott, T.M.R., plot of a survey of site, Fort at Sandy Hook, NJ, 1859-1860 Detail of engineer's wharf - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  12. STEM Teachers' Planned and Enacted Attempts at Implementing Engineering Design-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capobianco, Brenda M.; Rupp, Madeline

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates grades 5 and 6 science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) teachers' planned and actualized engineering design-based instruction, the instruments used to characterize their efforts, and the implications this work has for teachers' implementations of an integrated approach to STEM education.…

  13. Initial single shell tank retrieval system project system engineering management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, S.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-31

    This System Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) describes the Systems Engineering approach that will be used to manage the retrieval of waste from the first single shell tank farm using past practice sluicing techniques. This Project SEMP is used to supplement the requirements of the TWRS SEMP, WHC-SD-WM-SEMP-002.

  14. Engineering Task Plan for Hepa Filter Differential Pressure (DP) Fan Interlock Upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    SIMONS, S.R.

    2000-05-19

    This document provides a plan for installation of Differential Pressure (DP) fan interlocks on the primary ventilation systems in selected Tank Farm facilities. This plan contains the engineering tasks required for installation and is summarized by the Acceptance for Beneficial Use list. Individuals responsible for each task are identified and scheduled accordingly.

  15. Educational Planning for Engineering Schools: A Study of Iran Between 1962 and 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobhe, Khosrow

    1983-01-01

    The state of educational planning for engineering in Iran, a critical element in industralization, is investigated. It is concluded that no adequate survey of markets and industries was made, and implementation of any planning was incomplete. Recommendations are made for solving current problems. (MSE)

  16. SUCCEED (Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education) Strategic Plan, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohland, Matthew W., Ed.; Anderson, Tim J., Ed.

    This document outlines the strategic plan developed in 1998 by the Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education (SUCCEED). The organizational structure, overall goals and milestones, and core strategies of the SUCCEED Project are described. Focus Team strategic plans for faculty development, outcomes assessment, student…

  17. SUCCEED (Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education) Strategic Plan, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohland, Matthew W., Ed.; Anderson, Tim J., Ed.

    This document outlines the strategic plan developed in 1999 by the Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education (SUCCEED). The organizational structure, overall goals and milestones, and core strategies of the SUCCEED Project are described. This plan overviews faculty development, outcomes assessment, student…

  18. Engineering task plan for AX-104 residual waste volume and inventory data collection

    SciTech Connect

    Boechler, G.N., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-06

    The purpose of this Engineering Task Plan is to document the strategy, equipment and responsibilities of the tasks required to preform the volume and inventory data collection of tank AX-104. The project is a part of the Hanford Tanks Initiative Plan document number WHC-SD-WM-PMP-022 Revision D.

  19. General Mechanical Repair. Minor Automotive Maintenance, Small Engine [Repair, and] Welding: Curriculum Guide and Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamlin, Larry

    This document contains a curriculum guide and lesson plans for a general mechanical repair course with three sections: minor automotive maintenance, small engine repair, and welding. The curriculum guide begins with a matrix that relates the lesson plans to essential elements of math, science, language arts, and social studies and to Texas…

  20. Systems engineering management and implementation plan for Project W-464, immobilized high-level waste storage

    SciTech Connect

    Wecks, M.D.

    1998-04-15

    The Systems Engineering Management and Implementation Plan (SEMIP) for TWRS Project W-46 describes the project implementation of the Tank Waste Remediation System Systems Engineering Management Plan. (TWRS SEMP), Rev. 1. The SEMIP outlines systems engineering (SE) products and processes to be used by the project for technical baseline development. A formal graded approach is used to determine the products necessary for requirements, design, and operational baseline completion. SE management processes are defined, and roles and responsibilities for management processes and major technical baseline elements are documented.

  1. Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC), U.S. Engineer Office, New York District, Harbor Defenses of New York Mine Boathouse, location plan and elevations, Fort Hancock, New Jersey, July 1943 Detail of western docking structure - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  2. Stennis Holds Last Planned Space Shuttle Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    With 520 seconds of shake, rattle and roar on July 29, 2009 NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center marked the end of an era for testing the space shuttle main engines that have powered the nation's Space Shuttle Program for nearly three decades.

  3. Arizona TeleMedicine Network: Engineering Master Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlantic Research Corp., Alexandria, VA.

    As the planning document for establishing a statewide health communications system initially servicing the Papago, San Carlos and White Mountain Apache, Navajo, and Hopi reservations, this document prescribes the communications services to be provided by the Arizona TeleMedicine Network. Specifications include: (1) communications services for each…

  4. Engineering task plan HTI [Hanford Tank Initiative] cone penetrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, S.A.

    1998-03-19

    The Hanford Cone Penetrometer Platform (CPP) will be used to insert instrumented and soil sampling probes into the soil adjacent to Tank AX-104 to assist in characterizing the waste plume. The scope, deliverables, roles and responsibilities, safety, and environmental considerations are presented in the task plan.

  5. Analysis of Engineering Faculty Members' Reflections on Planning for Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warcholak, Nicholas D.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to begin development of a method to better describe the instructional planning processes of post-secondary teachers. Long term, it is hoped this work might have constructive implications for faculty development by providing a few case studies demonstrating how instructors with a strong interest in teaching think about…

  6. Impact of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on the oxidative reactivity of diesel engine soot

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Qurashi, Khalid; Boehman, Andre L.

    2008-12-15

    This paper expands the consideration of the factors affecting the nanostructure and oxidative reactivity of diesel soot to include the impact of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Past work showed that soot derived from oxygenated fuels such as biodiesel carries some surface oxygen functionality and thereby possesses higher reactivity than soot from conventional diesel fuel. In this work, results show that EGR exerts a strong influence on the physical properties of the soot which leads to enhanced oxidation rate. HRTEM images showed a dramatic difference between the burning modes of the soot generated under 0 and 20% EGR. The soot produced under 0% EGR strictly followed an external burning mode with no evidence of internal burning. In contrast, soot generated under 20% EGR exhibited dual burning modes: slow external burning and rapid internal burning. The results demonstrate clearly that highly reactive soot can be achieved by manipulating the physical properties of the soot via EGR. (author)

  7. A Planning Approach of Engineering Characteristics Based on QFD-TRIZ Integrated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shang; Shi, Dongyan; Zhang, Ying

    Traditional QFD planning method compromises contradictions between engineering characteristics to achieve higher customer satisfaction. However, this compromise trade-off can not eliminate the contradictions existing among the engineering characteristics which limited the overall customer satisfaction. QFD (Quality function deployment) integrated with TRIZ (the Russian acronym of the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving) becomes hot research recently for TRIZ can be used to solve contradictions between engineering characteristics which construct the roof of HOQ (House of quality). But, the traditional QFD planning approach is not suitable for QFD integrated with TRIZ for that TRIZ requires emphasizing the contradictions between engineering characteristics at problem definition stage instead of compromising trade-off. So, a new planning approach based on QFD / TRIZ integration is proposed in this paper, which based on the consideration of the correlation matrix of engineering characteristics and customer satisfaction on the basis of cost. The proposed approach suggests that TRIZ should be applied to solve contradictions at the first step, and the correlation matrix of engineering characteristics should be amended at the second step, and at next step IFR (ideal final result) must be validated, then planning execute. An example is used to illustrate the proposed approach. The application indicated that higher customer satisfaction can be met and the contradictions between the characteristic parameters are eliminated.

  8. Inspection planning development: An evolutionary approach using reliability engineering as a tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, David A.; Huang, Zhaofeng

    1994-01-01

    This paper proposes an evolutionary approach for inspection planning which introduces various reliability engineering tools into the process and assess system trade-offs among reliability, engineering requirement, manufacturing capability and inspection cost to establish an optimal inspection plan. The examples presented in the paper illustrate some advantages and benefits of the new approach. Through the analysis, reliability and engineering impacts due to manufacturing process capability and inspection uncertainty are clearly understood; the most cost effective and efficient inspection plan can be established and associated risks are well controlled; some inspection reductions and relaxations are well justified; and design feedbacks and changes may be initiated from the analysis conclusion to further enhance reliability and reduce cost. The approach is particularly promising as global competitions and customer quality improvement expectations are rapidly increasing.

  9. Definition study of a Variable Cycle Experimental Engine (VCEE) and associated test program and test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The Definition Study of a Variable Cycle Experimental Engine (VCEE) and Associated Test Program and Test Plan, was initiated to identify the most cost effective program for a follow-on to the AST Test Bed Program. The VCEE Study defined various subscale VCE's based on different available core engine components, and a full scale VCEE utilizing current technology. The cycles were selected, preliminary design accomplished and program plans and engineering costs developed for several program options. In addition to the VCEE program plans and options, a limited effort was applied to identifying programs that could logically be accomplished on the AST Test Bed Program VCE to extend the usefulness of this test hardware. Component programs were provided that could be accomplished prior to the start of a VCEE program.

  10. 1.8.2.1.2 Site system engineering implementation Fiscal Year 1998 multi-year work plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J. E.

    1997-10-03

    Manage the Site Systems Engineering process to provide a traceable, integrated, requirements-driven, and technically defensible baseline., Through the Site Integration Group, Systems Engineering ensures integration of technical activities across all site projects. Systems Engineering`s primary interfaces are with the Project Direction Office and with the projects, as well as with the Planning organization.

  11. Viewgraph description of Penn State's Propulsion Engineering Research Center: Activity highlights and future plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented that describe the progress and status of Penn State's Propulsion Engineering Research Center. The Center was established in Jul. 1988 by a grant from NASA's University Space Engineering Research Centers Program. After two and one-half years of operation, some 16 faculty are participating, and the Center is supporting 39 graduate students plus 18 undergraduates. In reviewing the Center's status, long-term plans and goals are reviewed and then the present status of the Center and the highlights and accomplishments of the past year are summarized. An overview of plans for the upcoming year are presented.

  12. Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC) Gillespie, G.L., map of a portion of Sandy Hook, NJ showing condition of beach in vicinity of dynamite gun emplacements, 1894 Engineer's wharf - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  13. Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of plan (in U.S. Army office of Army Engineers plans and drawings, Fort Hancock and Sandy hook proving ground, record group 7, drawer 44, Cartographic and Architectural branc, The National Archives, Washington, DC) , Ordnance Dept. U.S. Army, proposed addition to dock at Sandy Hook, 1918 Ordnance wharf and boathouse - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  14. Test/QA plan for the verification testing of diesel exhaust catalysts, particulate filters and engine modification control technologies for highway and nonroad use diesel engines

    EPA Science Inventory

    This ETV test/QA plan for heavy-duty diesel engine testing at the Southwest Research Institute’s Department of Emissions Research (DER) describes how the Federal Test Procedure (FTP), as listed in 40 CFR Part 86 for highway engines and 40 CFR Part 89 for nonroad engines, will be ...

  15. Free-piston Stirling engine-driven heat pump program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, B.A.; Hutchinson, R.A.; Chen, F.C.

    1988-07-01

    Stirling engine driven heat pumps are one of the most attractive potential products based on Stirling engines. Their many advantages in efficiency, fuel adaptability, quietness, compactness, controllability and potential for high reliability are well known. This paper briefly reviews these advantages, then turns to key technical concerns in Sterling engine driven heat pump development. These have been organized into an effective development program that will require about $4 million per year for 8 years to complete basic research, component development, and an estimated 3 generations of system hardware. The planning effort was directed by the Building Equipment Division of the DOE Office of Buildings and Communities Systems. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Knowingplant: decision support and planning for engineering design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeberle, Stephan; Fuerst, Karl

    2000-10-01

    In this paper a software tool for engineering design is presented, which supports the user in drafting automation tasks. The system was developed in cooperation with an industrial partner to assist sales representatives of components for automation (like linear drives, grippers, etc.). Today, sales representatives are supported with information on components in the form of paper catalogs or CD-ROMs, but although they do not sell complete systems, they need structured in formation on tasks and standards to meet their consulting obligation. Knowingplant provides a framework to structure and document automation knowledge in a hierarchical network of functions, where a function can be described as an automation task like temperature measuring. Each of these functions is either described by a set of sub function or can be refined by a decision between alternative functions. The decision making process is supported by decision tables and a search for similar decision problems on the base of parameter values. On the base of the hierarchical knowledge representation projects are drafted. Functions used in projects are automatically transferred together with their sub-functions until the system reaches a decision, which have to be made by the user. This leads to a fast structured draft of projects with all related subtasks and required parameters for further indoor processing. Knowingplant provides a flexible framework for system users as well as for knowledge authors who can easily update represented knowledge without programming, which enables a continuous growing knowledge base.

  17. Large Eddy Simulations of Two-phase Turbulent Reactive Flows in IC Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaeizadeh, Araz; Schock, Harold; Jaberi, Farhad

    2008-11-01

    The two-phase filtered mass density function (FMDF) subgrid-scale (SGS) model is used for large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent spray combustion in internal combustion (IC) engines. The LES/FMDF is implemented via an efficient, hybrid numerical method. In this method, the filtered compressible Navier-Stokes equations in curvilinear coordinate systems are solved with a generalized, high-order, multi-block, compact differencing scheme. The spray and the FMDF are implemented with Lagrangian methods. The reliability and the consistency of the numerical methods are established for different IC engines and the complex interactions among mean and turbulent velocity fields, fuel droplets and combustion are shown to be well captured with the LES/FMDF. In both spark-ignition/direct-injection and diesel engines, the droplet size and velocity distributions are found to be modified by the unsteady, vortical motions generated by the incoming air during the intake stroke. In turn, the droplets are found to change the in-cylinder flow structure. In the spark-ignition engine, flame propagation is similar to the experiment. In the diesel engine, the maximum evaporated fuel concentration is near the cylinder wall where the flame starts, which is again consistent with the experiment.

  18. Engineering test plan for field radionuclide migration experiments in climax granite

    SciTech Connect

    Isherwood, D.; Raber, E.; Stone, R.; Lord, D.; Rector, N.; Failor, R.

    1982-05-01

    This Engineering Test Plan (ETP) describes field studies of radionuclide migration in fractured rock designed for the Climax grainite at the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of the ETP is to provide a detailed written document of the method of accomplishing these studies. The ETP contains the experimental test plans, an instrumentation plan, system schematics, a description of the test facility, and a brief outline of the laboratory support studies needed to understand the chemistry of the rock/water/radionuclide interactions. Results of our initial hydrologic investigations are presented along with pretest predictions based on the hydrologic test results.

  19. The HAL 9000 Space Operating System Real-Time Planning Engine Design and Operations Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stetson, Howard; Watson, Michael D.; Shaughnessy, Ray

    2012-01-01

    In support of future deep space manned missions, an autonomous/automated vehicle, providing crew autonomy and an autonomous response planning system, will be required due to the light time delays in communication. Vehicle capabilities as a whole must provide for tactical response to vehicle system failures and space environmental effects induced failures, for risk mitigation of permanent loss of communication with Earth, and for assured crew return capabilities. The complexity of human rated space systems and the limited crew sizes and crew skills mix drive the need for a robust autonomous capability on-board the vehicle. The HAL 9000 Space Operating System[2] designed for such missions and space craft includes the first distributed real-time planning / re-planning system. This paper will detail the software architecture of the multiple planning engine system, and the interface design for plan changes, approval and implementation that is performed autonomously. Operations scenarios will be defined for analysis of the planning engines operations and its requirements for nominal / off nominal activities. An assessment of the distributed realtime re-planning system, in the defined operations environment, will be provided as well as findings as it pertains to the vehicle, crew, and mission control requirements needed for implementation.

  20. Strategic plan : providing high precision search to NASA employees using the NASA engineering network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutra, Jayne E.; Smith, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this plan is to briefly describe new technologies available to us in the arenas of information discovery and discuss the strategic value they have for the NASA enterprise with some considerations and suggestions for near term implementations using the NASA Engineering Network (NEN) as a delivery venue.

  1. SUCCEED (Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education) Strategic Plan Revision, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohland, Matthew W., Ed.; Anderson, Tim J., Ed.

    This document presents the Strategic Plan Revision of the Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education (SUCCEED). SUCCEED aims to institute a sustainable version of its curriculum model on each of the selected campuses. The areas of expertise in the program include faculty development, outcomes assessment,…

  2. SUCCEED (Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education) Strategic Plan Revision, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohland, Matthew W., Ed.; Anderson, Tim J., Ed.

    This document presents the Strategic Plan Revision of the Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education (SUCCEED). SUCCEED aims to institute a sustainable version of its curriculum model on each of the selected campuses. The areas of expertise in the program include faculty development, outcomes assessment,…

  3. 38. OFFICE OF THE AREA ENGINEER; CAMP McCOY, WISCONSIN; PLAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. OFFICE OF THE AREA ENGINEER; CAMP McCOY, WISCONSIN; PLAN NUMBER 6150-11-B. CAMP McCOY PROJECT; MOBILIZATION BUILDINGS; CHIMNEY DETAILS. MAY 16, 1942; REVISED TO JUNE 22, 1942. - Fort McCoy, Building T-1129, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

  4. Model-based Executive Control through Reactive Planning for Autonomous Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finzi, Alberto; Ingrand, Felix; Muscettola, Nicola

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports on the design and implementation of a real-time executive for a mobile rover that uses a model-based, declarative approach. The control system is based on the Intelligent Distributed Execution Architecture (IDEA), an approach to planning and execution that provides a unified representational and computational framework for an autonomous agent. The basic hypothesis of IDEA is that a large control system can be structured as a collection of interacting agents, each with the same fundamental structure. We show that planning and real-time response are compatible if the executive minimizes the size of the planning problem. We detail the implementation of this approach on an exploration rover (Gromit an RWI ATRV Junior at NASA Ames) presenting different IDEA controllers of the same domain and comparing them with more classical approaches. We demonstrate that the approach is scalable to complex coordination of functional modules needed for autonomous navigation and exploration.

  5. Bioenergy Research and Strategic Planning: The Need for both Proactive and Reactive research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Public policy typically refers to governmental actions such as laws, regulatory measures, and funding decisions for a specified issue. As scientists, we should strive to provide unbiased, research information on which strategic planning and long-term goals can be based. However, research can contrib...

  6. A Plan for Revolutionary Change in Gas Turbine Engine Control System Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culley, Dennis E.

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of Distributed Engine Control technology on the gas turbine engine has been a vexing challenge for the controls community. A successful implementation requires the resolution of multiple technical issues in areas such as network communications, power distribution, and system integration, but especially in the area of high temperature electronics. Impeding the achievement has been the lack of a clearly articulated message about the importance of the distributed control technology to future turbine engine system goals and objectives. To resolve these issues and bring the technology to fruition has, and will continue to require, a broad coalition of resources from government, industry, and academia. This presentation will describe the broad challenges facing the next generation of advanced control systems and the plan which is being put into action to successfully implement the technology on the next generation of gas turbine engine systems.

  7. Engineering-geological model of the landslide of Güevejar (S Spain) reactivated by historical earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, José; García-Tortosa, Francisco J.; Garrido, Jesús; Giner, José; Lenti, Luca; López-Casado, Carlos; Martino, Salvatore; Peláez, José A.; Sanz de Galdeano, Carlos; Soler, Juan L.

    2015-04-01

    Landslides are a common ground effect induced by earthquakes of moderate to large magnitude. Most of them correspond to first-time instabilities induced by the seismic event, being the reactivation of pre-existing landslides less frequent in practice. The landslide of Güevejar (Granada province, S Spain) represents a case study of landslide that was reactivated, at least, two times by far field earthquakes: the Mw 8.7, 1755, Lisbon earthquake (with estimated epicentral distance of 680 km), and the Mw 6.5, 1884, Andalucia event (estimated epicentral distance of 45 km), but not by near field events of moderate magnitude (Mw < 6.0 and epicentral distances lower than 25 km). To study the seismic response of this landslide, a study has been conducted to elaborate an engineering-geological model. For this purpose, field work done included the elaboration of a detailed geological map (1:1000) of the landslide and surrounding areas, drilling of deep boreholes (80 m deep), down-hole measurement of both P and S wave velocities in the boreholes drilled, piezometric control of water table, MASW and ReMi profiles for determining the underlying structure of the sites tested (soil profile stratigraphy and the corresponding S-wave velocity of each soil level) and undisturbed sampling of the materials affected by the landslide. These samples were then tested in laboratory according to standard procedures for determination of both static (among which soil density, soil classification and shear strength) and dynamic properties (degradation curves for shear modulus and damping ratio with shear strain) of the landslide-involved materials. The model proposed corresponds to a complex landslide that combines a rototranslational mechanism with an earth-flow at its toe, which is characterized by a deep (> 50 m) sliding surface. The engineering-geological model constitutes the first step in an ongoing research devoted to understand how it could be reactivated during far field events. The

  8. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 91 Protection of Environment...-IGNITION ENGINES Selective Enforcement Auditing Regulations Pt. 91, Subpt. G, App. A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 91—Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines Table...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart F of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Nonroad Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Enforcement Auditing of Nonroad Engines A Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 89 Protection of Environment... NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Selective Enforcement Auditing Pt. 89, Subpt. F, App. A Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 89—Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Nonroad Engines Table...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart F of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Nonroad Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Enforcement Auditing of Nonroad Engines A Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 89 Protection of Environment... NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Selective Enforcement Auditing Pt. 89, Subpt. F, App. A Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 89—Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Nonroad Engines Table...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 91 Protection of Environment...-IGNITION ENGINES Selective Enforcement Auditing Regulations Pt. 91, Subpt. G, App. A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 91—Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines Table...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 91 Protection of Environment...-IGNITION ENGINES Selective Enforcement Auditing Regulations Pt. 91, Subpt. G, App. A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 91—Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines Table...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart F of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Nonroad Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Enforcement Auditing of Nonroad Engines A Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 89 Protection of Environment... NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Selective Enforcement Auditing Pt. 89, Subpt. F, App. A Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 89—Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Nonroad Engines Table...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart F of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Nonroad Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Enforcement Auditing of Nonroad Engines A Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 89 Protection of Environment... NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Selective Enforcement Auditing Pt. 89, Subpt. F, App. A Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 89—Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Nonroad Engines Table...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 91 Protection of Environment...-IGNITION ENGINES Selective Enforcement Auditing Regulations Pt. 91, Subpt. G, App. A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 91—Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines Table...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 91 Protection of Environment...-IGNITION ENGINES Selective Enforcement Auditing Regulations Pt. 91, Subpt. G, App. A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 91—Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Marine Engines Table...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart F of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Nonroad Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Enforcement Auditing of Nonroad Engines A Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 89 Protection of Environment... NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Selective Enforcement Auditing Pt. 89, Subpt. F, App. A Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 89—Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Nonroad Engines Table...

  18. One-Step Conjugation Method for Site-Specific Antibody-Drug Conjugates through Reactive Cysteine-Engineered Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Shinmi, Daisuke; Taguchi, Eri; Iwano, Junko; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Masuda, Kazuhiro; Enokizono, Junichi; Shiraishi, Yasuhisa

    2016-05-18

    Engineered cysteine residues are particularly convenient for site-specific conjugation of antibody-drug conjugates (ADC), because no cell engineering and additives are required. Usually, unpaired cysteine residues form mixed disulfides during fermentation in Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO) cells; therefore, additional reduction and oxidization steps are required prior to conjugation. In this study, we prepared light chain (Lc)-Q124C variants in IgG and examined the conjugation efficiency. Intriguingly, Lc-Q124C exhibited high thiol reactivity and directly generated site-specific ADC without any pretreatment (named active thiol antibody: Actibody). Most of the cysteine-maleimide conjugates including Lc-Q124C showed retro-Michael reaction with cysteine 34 in albumin and were decomposed over time. In order to acquire resistance to a maleimide exchange reaction, the facile procedure for succinimide hydrolysis on anion exchange resin was employed. Hydrolyzed Lc-Q124C conjugate prepared with anion exchange procedure retained high stability in plasma. Recently, various stable linkage schemes for cysteine conjugation have been reported. The combination with direct conjugation by the use of Actibody and stable linker technology could enable the generation of stable site-specific ADC through a simple method. Actibody technology with Lc-Q124C at a less exposed position opens a new path for cysteine-based conjugation, and contributes to reducing entry barriers to the preparation and evaluation of ADC. PMID:27074832

  19. Use of general purpose mechanical computer assisted engineering software in orthopaedic surgical planning: advantages and limitations.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, C J; Bresina, S J; Gayou, D E

    1994-01-01

    Two surgical plans were developed for an appropriately complex reconstructive orthopaedic surgery case. One plan was developed with customary methods using two-dimensional (2D) radiographs. The second plan was developed with general purpose mechanical computer assisted engineering (MCAE) software using x-ray computed tomography (CT) data. The limitations of each method are identified. To create a surgical plan using three-dimensional (3D) medical datasets and MCAE software, five necessary steps were identified: (a) data reduction; (b) contour extraction; (c) 3D model creation; (d) extraction of mass properties; (e) model idealization. The principal limitation of general purpose MCAE software is the lack of pre-processing modules with which to address the unique requirements of medical image datasets. PMID:7850738

  20. Engineering Task Plan for the Integrity Assessment Examination of Double Contained Receiver Tanks (DCRT) Catch Tanks and Ancillary facilities

    SciTech Connect

    BECKER, D.L.

    2000-05-23

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) presents the integrity assessment examination of three DCRTs, seven catch tanks, and two ancillary facilities located in the 200 East and West Areas of the Hanford Site. The integrity assessment examinations, as described in this ETP, will provide the necessary information to enable the independently qualified registered professional engineer (IQRPE) to assess the condition and integrity of these facilities. The plan is consistent with the Double-Shell Tank Waste Transfer Facilities Integrity Assessment Plan.

  1. Engineering Human Urate Oxidase: Towards Reactivating It as an Important Therapeutic Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Dabbagh, Fatemeh; Ghoshoon, Mohammad B; Hemmati, Shiva; Zamani, Mozhdeh; Mohkam, Milad; Ghasemi, Younes

    2015-01-01

    Urate oxidase is considered as an important therapeutic enzyme used to control hyperuricemia. In spite of widespread distribution in numerous (micro)organisms, active urate oxidase is absent in higher primates (humans and apes) due to gene mutations. Considering the therapeutic significance of urate oxidase, further understanding on the inactivation process of the enzyme during primate evolution is critical. This study, therefore, aims to express genetically modified human urate oxidase in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. Accordingly, the genetically modified human urate oxidase was successfully expressed intracellularly and extracellularly under the control of an alcohol oxidase promoter and was subjected to the enzyme activity assay. The results demonstrated that reactivating the non-functional human urate oxidase gene fully or even moderately by simply replacing the premature stop codons is impossible. This finding confirms the idea that a number of successive loss-of-function missense mutations occurred during evolution, making higher primates functional uricase-deficit and vulnerable to hyperuricemic disorders. PMID:26343133

  2. Optimal reactive power planning for distribution systems considering intermittent wind power using Markov model and genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng

    Wind farms, photovoltaic arrays, fuel cells, and micro-turbines are all considered to be Distributed Generation (DG). DG is defined as the generation of power which is dispersed throughout a utility's service territory and either connected to the utility's distribution system or isolated in a small grid. This thesis addresses modeling and economic issues pertaining to the optimal reactive power planning for distribution system with wind power generation (WPG) units. Wind farms are inclined to cause reverse power flows and voltage variations due to the random-like outputs of wind turbines. To deal with this kind of problem caused by wide spread usage of wind power generation, this thesis investigates voltage and reactive power controls in such a distribution system. Consequently static capacitors (SC) and transformer taps are introduced into the system and treated as controllers. For the purpose of getting optimum voltage and realizing reactive power control, the research proposes a proper coordination among the controllers like on-load tap changer (OLTC), feeder-switched capacitors. What's more, in order to simulate its uncertainty, the wind power generation is modeled by the Markov model. In that way, calculating the probabilities for all the scenarios is possible. Some outputs with consecutive and discrete values have been used for transition between successive time states and within state wind speeds. The thesis will describe the method to generate the wind speed time series from the transition probability matrix. After that, utilizing genetic algorithm, the optimal locations of SCs, the sizes of SCs and transformer taps are determined so as to minimize the cost or minimize the power loss, and more importantly improve voltage profiles. The applicability of the proposed method is verified through simulation on a 9-bus system and a 30-bus system respectively. At last, the simulation results indicate that as long as the available capacitors are able to sufficiently

  3. Independent calculation-based verification of IMRT plans using a 3D dose-calculation engine

    SciTech Connect

    Arumugam, Sankar; Xing, Aitang; Goozee, Gary; Holloway, Lois

    2013-01-01

    Independent monitor unit verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans requires detailed 3-dimensional (3D) dose verification. The aim of this study was to investigate using a 3D dose engine in a second commercial treatment planning system (TPS) for this task, facilitated by in-house software. Our department has XiO and Pinnacle TPSs, both with IMRT planning capability and modeled for an Elekta-Synergy 6 MV photon beam. These systems allow the transfer of computed tomography (CT) data and RT structures between them but do not allow IMRT plans to be transferred. To provide this connectivity, an in-house computer programme was developed to convert radiation therapy prescription (RTP) files as generated by many planning systems into either XiO or Pinnacle IMRT file formats. Utilization of the technique and software was assessed by transferring 14 IMRT plans from XiO and Pinnacle onto the other system and performing 3D dose verification. The accuracy of the conversion process was checked by comparing the 3D dose matrices and dose volume histograms (DVHs) of structures for the recalculated plan on the same system. The developed software successfully transferred IMRT plans generated by 1 planning system into the other. Comparison of planning target volume (TV) DVHs for the original and recalculated plans showed good agreement; a maximum difference of 2% in mean dose, − 2.5% in D95, and 2.9% in V95 was observed. Similarly, a DVH comparison of organs at risk showed a maximum difference of +7.7% between the original and recalculated plans for structures in both high- and medium-dose regions. However, for structures in low-dose regions (less than 15% of prescription dose) a difference in mean dose up to +21.1% was observed between XiO and Pinnacle calculations. A dose matrix comparison of original and recalculated plans in XiO and Pinnacle TPSs was performed using gamma analysis with 3%/3 mm criteria. The mean and standard deviation of pixels passing

  4. Independent calculation-based verification of IMRT plans using a 3D dose-calculation engine.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Sankar; Xing, Aitang; Goozee, Gary; Holloway, Lois

    2013-01-01

    Independent monitor unit verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans requires detailed 3-dimensional (3D) dose verification. The aim of this study was to investigate using a 3D dose engine in a second commercial treatment planning system (TPS) for this task, facilitated by in-house software. Our department has XiO and Pinnacle TPSs, both with IMRT planning capability and modeled for an Elekta-Synergy 6MV photon beam. These systems allow the transfer of computed tomography (CT) data and RT structures between them but do not allow IMRT plans to be transferred. To provide this connectivity, an in-house computer programme was developed to convert radiation therapy prescription (RTP) files as generated by many planning systems into either XiO or Pinnacle IMRT file formats. Utilization of the technique and software was assessed by transferring 14 IMRT plans from XiO and Pinnacle onto the other system and performing 3D dose verification. The accuracy of the conversion process was checked by comparing the 3D dose matrices and dose volume histograms (DVHs) of structures for the recalculated plan on the same system. The developed software successfully transferred IMRT plans generated by 1 planning system into the other. Comparison of planning target volume (TV) DVHs for the original and recalculated plans showed good agreement; a maximum difference of 2% in mean dose, - 2.5% in D95, and 2.9% in V95 was observed. Similarly, a DVH comparison of organs at risk showed a maximum difference of +7.7% between the original and recalculated plans for structures in both high- and medium-dose regions. However, for structures in low-dose regions (less than 15% of prescription dose) a difference in mean dose up to +21.1% was observed between XiO and Pinnacle calculations. A dose matrix comparison of original and recalculated plans in XiO and Pinnacle TPSs was performed using gamma analysis with 3%/3mm criteria. The mean and standard deviation of pixels passing gamma

  5. Configuration management plan. System definition and project development. Repository Based Software Engineering (RBSE) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, Charles

    1991-01-01

    This is the configuration management Plan for the AdaNet Repository Based Software Engineering (RBSE) contract. This document establishes the requirements and activities needed to ensure that the products developed for the AdaNet RBSE contract are accurately identified, that proposed changes to the product are systematically evaluated and controlled, that the status of all change activity is known at all times, and that the product achieves its functional performance requirements and is accurately documented.

  6. Systems engineering plan for the construction phase of the E-ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, J. C.; Kurlandczyk, H.; Schneller, D.

    2014-08-01

    After having completed the phase B (front-end design) of the several subsystems, the E-ELT project is entering into the construction phase. The subsystems specifications, interface control documents and accompanying technical documentation resulting from the said design activities are being drafted along with the statements of work needed for the tendering processes. This paper presents an overview of the Systems Engineering Plan for the construction phase focusing on the specific systems engineering processes. The goal is to ensure that this phase is developed following an efficient systems engineering approach based on the lessons learned during phase B. The ultimate objective is that the E-ELT meets the science requirements defined by the users while the risk of overruns in cost or schedule, which might otherwise originate from the lack of a system perspective, is minimized.

  7. Transport and Reactivity of Engineered Nanoparticles in Partially Saturated Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dror, I.; Yecheskel, Y.; Berkowitz, B.

    2015-12-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are being produced in increasing amounts and have numerous applications in a variety of products and industrial processes. The same properties that make these substances so appealing may also cause them to act as persistent and toxic pollutants. The post-use release of ENPs to the environment is inevitable and soil appears to be one of the largest sinks of these potential contaminants. To date, despite the significant attention that ENP behavior in the environment has received, only a few studies have considered the fate and transport of ENPs in partially saturated systems. Here, we report measurements on the transport and fate of three commonly used ENPs - silver (Ag), gold (Au) and zinc oxide (ZnO) - in partially saturated porous media. The results show that ENP interactions with the solid matrix and solution components affect the fate of the ENPs and their transport. The negatively charged ENPs (AgNPs and AuNPs) are shown to be mobile in sand (which is also negatively charged) under various conditions, including water saturation levels and inlet concentration, with transport behavior resembling conservative tracer movement. Various aging scenarios were considered and the interaction of AgNPs with sulfides, chlorides, and calcium ions, all of which are known to interact and change AgNP properties, are shown to affect AgNP fate; however, in some cases, the changed particles remained suspended in solution and mobile. The positively charged ZnO showed very low mobility, but when humic acid was present in the inlet solution, interactions leading to enhanced mobility were observed. The presence of humic acid also changes ENP size and surface charge, transforming them to negatively charged larger aggregates that can be transported through the sand. Finally, remobilization of particles that were retained in the porous media was also demonstrated for ZnO ENPs, indicating possible release of entrapped ENPs upon changes in solution chemistry.

  8. Electrical Resistivity Modeling of a Permeable Reactive Barrier for Vista Engineering Technologies: Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A L; Daily, W D

    2003-11-21

    We have performed a numerical modeling study that evaluated the capacity of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to detect flaws in a passive reactive barrier (PRB). The model barrier is based on a real barrier described in the literature Slater and Binley (2003). It consists of highly conducting, granular iron emplaced within a trench. We assumed that the barrier was filled with a mixture of iron and sand, and that vertical electrode arrays were embedded within the barrier. We have considered (a) characterization and (b) monitoring scenarios. For (a), the objective is to use tomographs of absolute resistivity to detect construction flaws and inhomogeneities in iron distribution shortly after installation. For (b), the objective is to use resistivity change tomographs to detect iron oxidation and barrier plugging as a function of time. The study considered varying PRB hole sizes and locations. For any given model, a hole was located right next to and near the center of an electrode array (maximum sensitivity and resolution expected), at the center between two electrode arrays (moderate sensitivity and resolution), or near the bottom centered between the two arrays (minimum sensitivity and resolution). We also considered various hole sizes. The smallest hole considered had a height and a width of 0.33 m (0.11 m{sup 2}), or 1/2 of the electrode spacing within an array; the depth of the hole was always equal to the thickness of the barrier (0.66m). The largest hole had a height and a width of 1.22 m (1.74 m{sup 2}). We also modeled a medium sized hole with a height and a width of 0.66 m (0.44 m{sup 2}). The PRB material had an electrical resistivity of 0.3 ohm-m (sand/iron mix) while the hole's resistivity was 3.0 ohm-m. The study also considered various array aspect ratios because it is well known that aspect ratio controls sensitivity and resolution when line arrays of electrodes are used (Ramirez et al., 1993). Aspect ratio is defined as the distance between the

  9. Balancing Plan-Driven and Agile Methods in Software Engineering Project Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Barry; Port, Dan; Winsor Brown, A.

    2002-09-01

    For the past 6 years, we have been teaching a two-semester software engineering project course. The students organize into 5-person teams and develop largely web-based electronic services projects for real USC campus clients. We have been using and evolving a method called Model- Based (System) Architecting and Software Engineering (MBASE) for use in both the course and in industrial applications. The MBASE Guidelines include a lot of documents. We teach risk-driven documentation: if it is risky to document something, and not risky to leave it out (e.g., GUI screen placements), leave it out. Even so, students tend to associate more documentation with higher grades, although our grading eventually discourages this. We are always on the lookout for ways to have students learn best practices without having to produce excessive documentation. Thus, we were very interested in analyzing the various emerging agile methods. We found that agile methods and milestone plan-driven methods are part of a “how much planning is enough?” spectrum. Both agile and plan-driven methods have home grounds of project characteristics where they clearly work best, and where the other will have difficulties. Hybrid agile/plan-driven approaches are feasible, and necessary for projects having a mix of agile and plan-driven home ground characteristics. Information technology trends are going more toward the agile methods' home ground characteristics of emergent requirements and rapid change, although there is a concurrent increase in concern with dependability. As a result, we are currently experimenting with risk-driven combinations of MBASE and agile methods, such as integrating requirements, test plans, peer reviews, and pair programming into “agile quality management.”

  10. Ares First Stage "Systemology" - Combining Advanced Systems Engineering and Planning Tools to Assure Mission Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiler, James; Brasfield, Fred; Cannon, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Ares is an integral part of NASA s Constellation architecture that will provide crew and cargo access to the International Space Station as well as low earth orbit support for lunar missions. Ares replaces the Space Shuttle in the post 2010 time frame. Ares I is an in-line, two-stage rocket topped by the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. The Ares I first stage is a single, five-segment reusable solid rocket booster derived from the Space Shuttle Program's reusable solid rocket motor. The Ares second or upper stage is propelled by a J-2X main engine fueled with liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. This paper describes the advanced systems engineering and planning tools being utilized for the design, test, and qualification of the Ares I first stage element. Included are descriptions of the current first stage design, the milestone schedule requirements, and the marriage of systems engineering, detailed planning efforts, and roadmapping employed to achieve these goals.

  11. Bonneville Power Administration, Office of Engineering 10-Year Plan, 1992-2001 : Draft.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Office of Engineering.

    1992-05-01

    For over 50 years, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has evolved to supply electric power to more than 170 customer utilities and direct service industries across 14,800 miles of high voltage transmission lines. BPA's Office of Engineering provides the planning, development, and engineering for the required expansion, upgrade, and replacement of the transmission system. The purpose of this 10-Year Plan is to present strategies to maintain a reliable energy delivery system within changing public, business, technological, and environmental climates. The issues and trends discussed in this document and our strategies for addressing them provide the background for the Office of Engineering programs and projects. With a budget in the hundreds of millions annually and increasing public concern, we welcome the opportunity to communicate with our customers. In addition to the factors, trends and issues described in this document are two appendices containing project costs and program and staffing levels. These figures are preliminary with estimates current as of May 13, 1992.

  12. Bonneville Power Administration, Office of Engineering 10-Year Plan, 1992-2001 : Draft.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Office of Engineering.

    1992-05-01

    For over 50 years, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has evolved to supply electric power to more than 170 customer utilities and direct service industries across 14,800 miles of high voltage transmission lines. BPA`s Office of Engineering provides the planning, development, and engineering for the required expansion, upgrade, and replacement of the transmission system. The purpose of this 10-Year Plan is to present strategies to maintain a reliable energy delivery system within changing public, business, technological, and environmental climates. The issues and trends discussed in this document and our strategies for addressing them provide the background for the Office of Engineering programs and projects. With a budget in the hundreds of millions annually and increasing public concern, we welcome the opportunity to communicate with our customers. In addition to the factors, trends and issues described in this document are two appendices containing project costs and program and staffing levels. These figures are preliminary with estimates current as of May 13, 1992.

  13. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart F of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Small Nonroad Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Enforcement Auditing of Small Nonroad Engines A Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 90 Protection of Environment...-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Selective Enforcement Auditing Pt. 90, Subpt. F, App. A Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 90—Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Small Nonroad...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart F of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Small Nonroad Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Enforcement Auditing of Small Nonroad Engines A Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 90 Protection of Environment...-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Selective Enforcement Auditing Pt. 90, Subpt. F, App. A Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 90—Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Small Nonroad...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart F of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Small Nonroad Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Enforcement Auditing of Small Nonroad Engines A Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 90 Protection of Environment...-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Selective Enforcement Auditing Pt. 90, Subpt. F, App. A Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 90—Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Small Nonroad...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart F of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Small Nonroad Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Enforcement Auditing of Small Nonroad Engines A Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 90 Protection of Environment...-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Selective Enforcement Auditing Pt. 90, Subpt. F, App. A Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 90—Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Small Nonroad...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart F of... - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Small Nonroad Engines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Enforcement Auditing of Small Nonroad Engines A Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 90 Protection of Environment...-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Selective Enforcement Auditing Pt. 90, Subpt. F, App. A Appendix A to Subpart F of Part 90—Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Small Nonroad...

  18. Materials Development Program, Ceramic Technology Project addendum to program plan: Cost effective ceramics for heat engines

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This is a new thrust in the Ceramic Technology project. This effort represents an expansion of the program and an extension through FY 1997. Moderate temperature applications in conventional automobile and truck engines will be included along with high-temp. gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The reliability goals are expected to be met on schedule by end of FY 1993. Ceramic turbine rotors have been run (in DOE`s ATTAP program) for 1000 h at 1370C and full speed. However, the cost of ceramic components is a deterrrent to near-term commercialization. A systematic approach to reducing this cost includes the following elements: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, and testing and data base development. A draft funding plan is outlined. 6 figs, 1 tab.

  19. Materials Development Program, Ceramic Technology Project addendum to program plan: Cost effective ceramics for heat engines

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This is a new thrust in the Ceramic Technology project. This effort represents an expansion of the program and an extension through FY 1997. Moderate temperature applications in conventional automobile and truck engines will be included along with high-temp. gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The reliability goals are expected to be met on schedule by end of FY 1993. Ceramic turbine rotors have been run (in DOE's ATTAP program) for 1000 h at 1370C and full speed. However, the cost of ceramic components is a deterrrent to near-term commercialization. A systematic approach to reducing this cost includes the following elements: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, and testing and data base development. A draft funding plan is outlined. 6 figs, 1 tab.

  20. Customer satisfaction planning and industrial engineering move hospital towards in-house stockless program.

    PubMed

    Burton, R; Mauk, D

    1993-03-01

    By integrating customer satisfaction planning and industrial engineering techniques when examining internal costs and efficiencies, materiel managers are able to better realize what concepts will best meet their customers' needs. Defining your customer(s), applying industrial engineering techniques, completing work sampling studies, itemizing recommendations and benefits to each alternative, performing feasibility and cost-analysis matrixes and utilizing resources through productivity monitoring will get you on the right path toward selecting concepts to use. This article reviews the above procedures as they applied to one hospital's decision-making process to determine whether to incorporate a stockless inventory program. Through an analysis of customer demand, the hospital realized that stockless was the way to go, but not by outsourcing the function--the hospital incorporated an in-house stockless inventory program. PMID:10124470

  1. Engineering task plan for Tanks 241-AN-103, 104, 105 color video camera systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kohlman, E.H.

    1994-11-17

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) describes the design, fabrication, assembly, and installation of the video camera systems into the vapor space within tanks 241-AN-103, 104, and 105. The one camera remotely operated color video systems will be used to observe and record the activities within the vapor space. Activities may include but are not limited to core sampling, auger activities, crust layer examination, monitoring of equipment installation/removal, and any other activities. The objective of this task is to provide a single camera system in each of the tanks for the Flammable Gas Tank Safety Program.

  2. Trends in SAT Scores and Other Characteristics of Examinees Planning To Major in Mathematics, Science, or Engineering. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grandy, Jerilee

    This study analyzed data from the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) taken between 1977 and 1988 to study trends in the numbers, test scores, and other characteristics of high school seniors planning to major in math, science, or engineering, and to compare these data with comparable data from examinees planning to major in other fields. Results…

  3. Collaborative Large-scale Engineering Analysis Network for Environmental Research (CLEANER)Science Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnoor, J. L.; Minsker, B. S.; Haas, C. N.

    2005-12-01

    The Project Office of the Collaborative Large-scale Engineering Analysis Network for Environmental Research (CLEANER) was awarded a cooperative agreement from the National Science Foundation (NSF)and began operations on August 1, 2005. Since that time we have organized six standing committees and an executive committee with an advisory board. The first all-hands meeting of CLEANER took place at NSF and the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) Access facility in Arlington, Virginia, in September. Among the initial tasks of CLEANER is to join with the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrological Sciences Incorporated (CUAHSI) in developing a joint science plan for a national observatory for environmental research utilizing NSF Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction (MREFC) funds slated for 2011. This presentation describes our initial thinking on the science plan and our vision for the national environmental observatory and cyberinfrastructure.

  4. Expanding universes. From biomedical engineering to facility planning, CIOs are finding the domain of responsibility widening.

    PubMed

    Hagland, Mark

    2010-04-01

    More CIOs are seeing broad new areas being brought under their supervision, from biomedical engineering to HIM/medical records to facilities planning, among other areas. For CIOs, having a strong, consensus-created strategic vision and set of operating principles, is very important. Making sure everyone in the organization is on the same page about direction and priorities, at a broad level, is crucial to success. These shifts are changing how CIOs spend their time: inevitably, the focus becomes more strategic and less day-to-day-operational. The CIO's profile with regard to the C-suite, board of directors, and even community, is virtually always elevated over time. To a large extent, broad changes in the operational landscape of healthcare are helping to dictate these changes to CIOs' portfolios. CIOs need to plan carefully and execute beautifully in order to make a success of their broadened scope of responsibility. PMID:20426232

  5. Systems Engineering Management Plan NASA Traffic Aware Planner Integration Into P-180 Airborne Test-Bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maris, John

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Traffic Aware Planner (TAP) is a cockpit decision support tool that provides aircrew with vertical and lateral flight-path optimizations with the intent of achieving significant fuel and time savings, while automatically avoiding traffic, weather, and restricted airspace conflicts. A key step towards the maturation and deployment of TAP concerned its operational evaluation in a representative flight environment. This Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) addresses the test-vehicle design, systems integration, and flight-test planning for the first TAP operational flight evaluations, which were successfully completed in November 2013. The trial outcomes are documented in the Traffic Aware Planner (TAP) flight evaluation paper presented at the 14th AIAA Aviation Technology, Integration, and Operations Conference, Atlanta, GA. (AIAA-2014-2166, Maris, J. M., Haynes, M. A., Wing, D. J., Burke, K. A., Henderson, J., & Woods, S. E., 2014).

  6. Processing Plan for Potentially Reactive/Ignitable Remote Handled Transuranic Waste at the Idaho Cleanup Project - 12090

    SciTech Connect

    Troescher, Patrick D.; Hobbes, Tammy L.; Anderson, Scott A.

    2012-07-01

    Remote Handle Transuranic (RH-TRU) Waste generated at Argonne National Laboratory - East, from the examination of irradiated and un-irradiated fuel pins and other reactor materials requires a detailed processing plan to ensure reactive/ignitable material is absent to meet WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria prior to shipping and disposal. The Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) approach to repackaging Lot 2 waste and how we ensure prohibited materials are not present in waste intended for disposal at Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 'WIPP' uses an Argon Repackaging Station (ARS), which provides an inert gas blanket. Opening of the Lot 2 containers under an argon gas blanket is proposed to be completed in the ARS. The ARS is an interim transition repackaging station that provides a mitigation technique to reduce the chances of a reoccurrence of a thermal event prior to rendering the waste 'Safe'. The consequences, should another thermal event be encountered, (which is likely) is to package the waste, apply the reactive and or ignitable codes to the container, and store until the future treatment permit and process are available. This is the same disposition that the two earlier containers in the 'Thermal Events' were assigned. By performing the initial handling under an inert gas blanket, the waste can sorted and segregate the fines and add the Met-L-X to minimize risk before it is exposed to air. The 1-gal cans that are inside the ANL-E canister will be removed and each can is moved to the ARS for repackaging. In the ARS, the 1-gal can is opened in the inerted environment. The contained waste is sorted, weighed, and visually examined for non compliant items such as unvented aerosol cans and liquids. The contents of the paint cans are transferred into a sieve and manipulated to allow the fines, if any, to be separated into the tray below. The fines are weighed and then blended with a minimum 5:1 mix of Met-L-X. Other debris materials found are segregated from the cans into containers

  7. Effects of Preventative Ankle Taping on Planned Change-of-Direction and Reactive Agility Performance and Ankle Muscle Activity in Basketballers

    PubMed Central

    Jeffriess, Matthew D.; Schultz, Adrian B.; McGann, Tye S.; Callaghan, Samuel J.; Lockie, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of preventative ankle taping on planned change-of-direction and reactive agility performance and peak ankle muscle activity in basketballers. Twenty male basketballers (age = 22.30 ± 3.97 years; height = 1.84 ± 0.09 meters; body mass = 85.96 ± 11.88 kilograms) with no ankle pathologies attended two testing sessions. Within each session, subjects completed six planned and six reactive randomized trials (three to the left and three to the right for each condition) of the Y-shaped agility test, which was recorded by timing lights. In one session, subjects had both ankles un-taped. In the other, both ankles were taped using a modified subtalar sling. Peak tibialis anterior, peroneus longus (PL), peroneus brevis (PB), and soleus muscle activity was recorded for both the inside and outside legs across stance phase during the directional change, which was normalized against 10-meter sprint muscle activity (nEMG). Both the inside and outside cut legs during the change-of-direction step were investigated. Repeated measures ANOVA determined performance time and nEMG differences between un-taped and taped conditions. There were no differences in planned change-of-direction or reactive agility times between the conditions. Inside cut leg PL nEMG decreased when taped for the planned left, reactive left, and reactive right cuts (p = 0.01). Outside leg PB and soleus nEMG increased during the taped planned left cut (p = 0.02). There were no other nEMG changes during the cuts with taping. Taping did not affect change-of-direction or agility performance. Inside leg PL activity was decreased, possibly due to the tape following the line of muscle action. This may reduce the kinetic demand for the PL during cuts. In conclusion, ankle taping did not significantly affect planned change-of-direction or reactive agility performance, and did not demonstrate large changes in activity of the muscle complex in healthy basketballers. Key points Ankle

  8. Cortical Regions Recruited for Complex Active-Learning Strategies and Action Planning Exhibit Rapid Reactivation during Memory Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voss, Joel L.; Galvan, Ashley; Gonsalves, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    Memory retrieval can involve activity in the same sensory cortical regions involved in perception of the original event, and this neural "reactivation" has been suggested as an important mechanism of memory retrieval. However, it is still unclear if fragments of experience other than sensory information are retained and later reactivated during…

  9. Creating a strategic plan for configuration management using computer aided software engineering (CASE) tools

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.R.; Sarfaty, R.

    1993-05-01

    This paper provides guidance in the definition, documentation, measurement, enhancement of processes, and validation of a strategic plan for configuration management (CM). The approach and methodology used in establishing a strategic plan is the same for any enterprise, including the Department of Energy (DOE), commercial nuclear plants, the Department of Defense (DOD), or large industrial complexes. The principles and techniques presented are used world wide by some of the largest corporations. The authors used industry knowledge and the areas of their current employment to illustrate and provide examples. Developing a strategic configuration and information management plan for DOE Idaho Field Office (DOE-ID) facilities is discussed in this paper. A good knowledge of CM principles is the key to successful strategic planning. This paper will describe and define CM elements, and discuss how CM integrates the facility`s physical configuration, design basis, and documentation. The strategic plan does not need the support of a computer aided software engineering (CASE) tool. However, the use of the CASE tool provides a methodology for consistency in approach, graphics, and database capability combined to form an encyclopedia and a method of presentation that is easily understood and aids the process of reengineering. CASE tools have much more capability than those stated above. Some examples are supporting a joint application development group (JAD) to prepare a software functional specification document and, if necessary, provide the capability to automatically generate software application code. This paper briefly discusses characteristics and capabilities of two CASE tools that use different methodologies to generate similar deliverables.

  10. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory institutional plan -- FY 2000--2004

    SciTech Connect

    Enge, R.S.

    1999-12-01

    In this first institutional plan prepared by Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC, for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, the INEEL will focus its efforts on three strategic thrusts: (1) Environmental Management stewardship for DOE-EM, (2) Nuclear reactor technology for DOE-Nuclear Energy (NE), and (3) Energy R and D, demonstration, and deployment (initial focus on biofuels and chemicals from biomass). The first strategic thrust focuses on meeting DOE-EMs environmental cleanup and long-term stewardship needs in a manner that is safe, cost-effective, science-based, and approved by key stakeholders. The science base at the INEEL will be further used to address a grand challenge for the INEEL and the DOE complex--the development of a fundamental scientific understanding of the migration of subsurface contaminants. The second strategic thrust is directed at DOE-NEs needs for safe, economical, waste-minimized, and proliferation-resistant nuclear technologies. As NE lead laboratories, the INEEL and ANL will pursue specific priorities. The third strategic thrust focuses on DOE's needs for clean, efficient, and renewable energy technology. As an initial effort, the INEEL will enhance its capability in biofuels, bioprocessing, and biochemicals. The content of this institutional plan is designed to meet basic DOE requirements for content and structure and reflect the key INEEL strategic thrusts. Updates to this institutional plan will offer additional content and resource refinements.

  11. DRIVE CYCLE EFFICIENCY AND EMISSIONS ESTIMATES FOR REACTIVITY CONTROLLED COMPRESSION IGNITION IN A MULTI-CYLINDER LIGHT-DUTY DIESEL ENGINE

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, Scott; Briggs, Thomas E; Cho, Kukwon; Wagner, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel to achieve Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) has been shown to reduce NOx and PM emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency as compared to conventional diesel combustion (CDC). The RCCI concept has an advantage over many advanced combustion strategies in that by varying both the percent of premixed gasoline and EGR rate, stable combustion can be extended over more of the light-duty drive cycle load range. Changing the percent premixed gasoline changes the fuel reactivity stratification in the cylinder providing further control of combustion phasing and pressure rise rate than the use of EGR alone. This paper examines the combustion and emissions performance of light-duty diesel engine using direct injected diesel fuel and port injected gasoline to carry out RCCI for steady-state engine conditions which are consistent with a light-duty drive cycle. A GM 1.9L four-cylinder engine with the stock compression ratio of 17.5:1, common rail diesel injection system, high-pressure EGR system and variable geometry turbocharger was modified to allow for port fuel injection with gasoline. Engine-out emissions, engine performance and combustion behavior for RCCI operation is compared against both CDC and a premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) strategy which relies on high levels of EGR dilution. The effect of percent of premixed gasoline, EGR rate, boost level, intake mixture temperature, combustion phasing and pressure rise rate is investigated for RCCI combustion for the light-duty modal points. Engine-out emissions of NOx and PM were found to be considerably lower for RCCI operation as compared to CDC and PCCI, while HC and CO emissions were higher. Brake thermal efficiency was similar or higher for many of the modal conditions for RCCI operation. The emissions results are used to estimate hot-start FTP-75 emissions levels with RCCI and are compared against CDC and PCCI modes.

  12. Engineering task plan for flammable gas atmosphere mobile color video camera systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kohlman, E.H.

    1995-01-25

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) describes the design, fabrication, assembly, and testing of the mobile video camera systems. The color video camera systems will be used to observe and record the activities within the vapor space of a tank on a limited exposure basis. The units will be fully mobile and designed for operation in the single-shell flammable gas producing tanks. The objective of this tank is to provide two mobile camera systems for use in flammable gas producing single-shell tanks (SSTs) for the Flammable Gas Tank Safety Program. The camera systems will provide observation, video recording, and monitoring of the activities that occur in the vapor space of applied tanks. The camera systems will be designed to be totally mobile, capable of deployment up to 6.1 meters into a 4 inch (minimum) riser.

  13. The p16-specific reactivation and inhibition of cell migration through demethylation of CpG islands by engineered transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baozhen; Xiang, Shengyan; Zhong, Qiming; Yin, Yanru; Gu, Liankun; Deng, Dajun

    2012-10-01

    Methylation of CpG islands inactivates transcription of tumor suppressor genes including p16 (CDKN2A). Inhibitors of DNA methylation and histone deacylation are recognized as useful cancer therapeutic chemicals through reactivation of the expression of methylated genes. However, these inhibitors are not target gene-specific, so that they lead to serious side effects as regular cytotoxic chemotherapy agents. To explore the feasibility of methylated gene-specific reactivation by artificial transcription factors, we engineered a set of Sp1-like seven-finger zinc-finger proteins (7ZFPs) targeted to a 21-bp sequence of the p16 promoter and found that these 7ZFPs could bind specifically to the target p16 promoter probe. Then the p16-specific artificial transcription factors (p16ATFs) were made from these 7ZFPs and the transcription activator VP64. Results showed that transient transfection of some p16ATFs selectively up-regulated the endogenous p16 expression in the p16-active 293T cells. Moreover, the transient transfection of the representative p16ATF-6I specifically reactivated p16 expression in the p16-methylated H1299 and AGS cells pretreated with a nontoxic amount of 5'-aza-deoxycytidine (20 and 80 nM, respectively). In addition, stable transfection of the p16ATF induced demethylation of p16 CpG island and trimethylation of histone H3K4, and inhibited recruitment of DNA methyltransferase 1 and trimethylation of H3K9 and H3K27 in the p16 promoter in H1299 cells without 5'-aza-deoxycytidine pretreatment. Notably, inhibition of cell migration and invasion was observed in these p16-reactivated cells induced by transient and stable p16ATF transfection. These results demonstrate that p16ATF not only specifically reactivates p16 expression through demethylation of CpG islands, but also restores methylated p16 function. PMID:22738793

  14. Report on the Application of Workforce Planning Methodology in the Cuyahoga County Sanitary Engineers Operations and Maintenance Sections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kordic, Michael G.

    Progress to date is reported for a project initiated in 1979 to apply a workforce planning methodology to the operations and maintenance sections of the Cuyahoga County Sanitary Engineering Department in an effort to document the human resources utilized by the Department during 1979 and to determine its personnel needs for 1980 and 1981. After…

  15. Site systems engineering fiscal year 1999 multi-year work plan (MYWP) update for WBS 1.8.2.2

    SciTech Connect

    GRYGIEL, M.L.

    1998-10-08

    Manage the Site Systems Engineering process to provide a traceable integrated requirements-driven, and technically defensible baseline. Through the Site Integration Group(SIG), Systems Engineering ensures integration of technical activities across all site projects. Systems Engineering's primary interfaces are with the RL Project Managers, the Project Direction Office and with the Project Major Subcontractors, as well as with the Site Planning organization. Systems Implementation: (1) Develops, maintains, and controls the site integrated technical baseline, ensures the Systems Engineering interfaces between projects are documented, and maintain the Site Environmental Management Specification. (2) Develops and uses dynamic simulation models for verification of the baseline and analysis of alternatives. (3) Performs and documents fictional and requirements analyses. (4) Works with projects, technology management, and the SIG to identify and resolve technical issues. (5) Supports technical baseline information for the planning and budgeting of the Accelerated Cleanup Plan, Multi-Year Work Plans, Project Baseline Summaries as well as performance measure reporting. (6) Works with projects to ensure the quality of data in the technical baseline. (7) Develops, maintains and implements the site configuration management system.

  16. The contribution of lubricant to the formation of particulate matter with reactivity controlled compression ignition in light-duty diesel engines

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Storey, John Morse; Curran, Scott; Dempsey, Adam B.; Lewis, Sr., Samuel Arthur; Reitz, Rolf; Walker, N. Ryan; Wright, Chris

    2014-12-25

    Reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) has been shown in single- and multi-cylinder engine research to achieve high thermal efficiencies with ultra-low NOX and soot emissions. The nature of the particulate matter (PM) produced by RCCI operation has been shown in recent research to be different than that of conventional diesel combustion and even diesel low-temperature combustion. Previous research has shown that the PM from RCCI operation contains a large amount of organic material that is volatile and semi-volatile. However, it is unclear if the organic compounds are stemming from fuel or lubricant oil. The PM emissions from dual-fuel RCCI weremore » investigated in this study using two engine platforms, with an emphasis on the potential contribution of lubricant. Both engine platforms used the same base General Motors (GM) 1.9-L diesel engine geometry. The first study was conducted on a single-cylinder research engine with primary reference fuels (PRFs), n-heptane, and iso-octane. The second study was conducted on a four-cylinder GM 1.9-L ZDTH engine which was modified with a port fuel injection (PFI) system while maintaining the stock direct injection fuel system. Multi-cylinder RCCI experiments were run with PFI gasoline and direct injection of 2-ethylhexyl nitrate (EHN) mixed with gasoline at 5 % EHN by volume. In addition, comparison cases of conventional diesel combustion (CDC) were performed. Particulate size distributions were measured, and PM filter samples were collected for analysis of lube oil components. Triplicate PM filter samples (i.e., three individual filter samples) for both gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS; organic) analysis and X-ray fluorescence (XRF; metals) were obtained at each operating point and queued for analysis of both organic species and lubricant metals. Here, the results give a clear indication that lubricants do not contribute significantly to the formation of RCCI PM.« less

  17. The contribution of lubricant to the formation of particulate matter with reactivity controlled compression ignition in light-duty diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Storey, John Morse; Curran, Scott; Dempsey, Adam B.; Lewis, Sr., Samuel Arthur; Reitz, Rolf; Walker, N. Ryan; Wright, Chris

    2014-12-25

    Reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) has been shown in single- and multi-cylinder engine research to achieve high thermal efficiencies with ultra-low NOX and soot emissions. The nature of the particulate matter (PM) produced by RCCI operation has been shown in recent research to be different than that of conventional diesel combustion and even diesel low-temperature combustion. Previous research has shown that the PM from RCCI operation contains a large amount of organic material that is volatile and semi-volatile. However, it is unclear if the organic compounds are stemming from fuel or lubricant oil. The PM emissions from dual-fuel RCCI were investigated in this study using two engine platforms, with an emphasis on the potential contribution of lubricant. Both engine platforms used the same base General Motors (GM) 1.9-L diesel engine geometry. The first study was conducted on a single-cylinder research engine with primary reference fuels (PRFs), n-heptane, and iso-octane. The second study was conducted on a four-cylinder GM 1.9-L ZDTH engine which was modified with a port fuel injection (PFI) system while maintaining the stock direct injection fuel system. Multi-cylinder RCCI experiments were run with PFI gasoline and direct injection of 2-ethylhexyl nitrate (EHN) mixed with gasoline at 5 % EHN by volume. In addition, comparison cases of conventional diesel combustion (CDC) were performed. Particulate size distributions were measured, and PM filter samples were collected for analysis of lube oil components. Triplicate PM filter samples (i.e., three individual filter samples) for both gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS; organic) analysis and X-ray fluorescence (XRF; metals) were obtained at each operating point and queued for analysis of both organic species and lubricant metals. Here, the results give a clear indication that lubricants do not contribute significantly to the formation of RCCI PM.

  18. Configuration evaluation and criteria plan. Volume 2: Evaluation criteria plan (update). Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, E. K.

    1987-01-01

    Candidate main engine configurations which enhance vehicle performance, operation and cost are identified. These candidate configurations are evaluated and the configurations which provide significant advantages over existing systems are selected for consideration for the next generation of launch vehicles. The unbiased selection of the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) configuration requires that the candidate engines be evaluated against a predetermined set of criteria which must be properly weighted to emphasize critical requirements defined prior to the actual evaluation. During a prior study of the STME a Gas Generator Cycle engine was selected for conceptual design, with emphasis on reusability, reliability and low cost while achieving good performance. In this study emphasis is on expendable application of the STME while maintaining low cost and high reliability.

  19. Action Plan For The Establishment of a United Engineering Information Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tripartite Committee

    1970-01-01

    Recommends that new corporation be formed to operate a united engineering information service and that Tripartite Committee comprising president and vice president from United Engineering Trustees, Engineers Joint Council and Engineering Index be authorized to organize this new institution. Complete report available from Frank Y. Speight,…

  20. Configuration evaluation and criteria plan. Volume 2: Evaluation critera plan (preliminary). Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, E. K.

    1986-01-01

    The unbiased selection of the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) configuration requires that the candidate engines be evaluated against a predetermined set of criteria which must be properly weighted to emphasize critical requirements defined prior to the actual evaluation. The evaluation and selection process involves the following functions: (1) determining if a configuration can satisfy basic STME requirements (yes/no); (2) defining the evaluation criteria; (3) selecting the criteria relative importance or weighting; (4) determining the weighting sensitivities; and (5) establishing a baseline for engine evaluation. The criteria weighting and sensitivities are cost related and are based on mission models and vehicle requirements. The evaluation process is used as a coarse screen to determine the candidate engines for the parametric studies and as a fine screen to determine concept(s) for conceptual design. The criteria used for the coarse and fine screen evaluation process is shown. The coarse screen process involves verifying that the candidate engines can meet the yes/no screening requirements and a semi-subjective quantitative evaluation. The fine screen engines have to meet all of the yes/no screening gates and are then subjected to a detailed evaluation or assessment using the quantitative cost evaluation processes. The option exists for re-cycling a concept through the quantitative portion of the screening and allows for some degree of optimization. The basic vehicle is a two stage LOX/HC, LOX/LH2 parallel burn vehicle capable of placing 150,000 lbs in low Earth orbit (LEO).

  1. 40 CFR Appendix X to Part 86 - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Heavy-Duty Engines and Light-Duty Trucks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Heavy-Duty Engines and Light-Duty Trucks X Appendix X to Part 86 Protection of... AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Pt. 86, App. X Appendix X to Part 86—Sampling Plans...

  2. Project Management Plan for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Experimental Test Program

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, M.J.; Sayer, D.L.

    1993-11-01

    EG&G Idaho, Inc. and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) are participating in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL`s) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program (WETP). The purpose of the INEL WET is to provide chemical, physical, and radiochemical data on transuranic (TRU) waste to be stored at WIPP. The waste characterization data collected will be used to support the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA), development of the disposal No-Migration Variance Petition (NMVP), and to support the WIPP disposal decision. The PA is an analysis required by the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 191 (40 CFR 191), which identifies the processes and events that may affect the disposal system (WIPP) and examines the effects of those processes and events on the performance of WIPP. A NMVP is required for the WIPP by 40 CFR 268 in order to dispose of land disposal restriction (LDR) mixed TRU waste in WIPP. It is anticipated that the detailed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste characterization data of all INEL retrievably-stored TRU waste to be stored in WIPP will be required for the NMVP. Waste characterization requirements for PA and RCRA may not necessarily be identical. Waste characterization requirements for the PA will be defined by Sandia National Laboratories. The requirements for RCRA are defined in 40 CFR 268, WIPP RCRA Part B Application Waste Analysis Plan (WAP), and WIPP Waste Characterization Program Plan (WWCP). This Project Management Plan (PMP) addresses only the characterization of the contact handled (CH) TRU waste at the INEL. This document will address all work in which EG&G Idaho is responsible concerning the INEL WETP. Even though EG&G Idaho has no responsibility for the work that ANL-W is performing, EG&G Idaho will keep a current status and provide a project coordination effort with ANL-W to ensure that the INEL, as a whole, is effectively and efficiently completing the requirements for WETP.

  3. Incorporating science and engineering practices into preservice secondary science teachers' planning practices: Testing the efficacy of an intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wargo, Brian M.

    The New Standards Framework (NRC, 2012) explicitly calls for teachers to engage students in science and engineering practices (SEPs) as they develop knowledge of scientific phenomena and canonical disciplinary ideas. This study analyzed six pre-service secondary science teachers' (PSSSTs') incorporation of SEPs into their planning practices before, during, and after an instructional intervention. The intervention, which was nested into an instructional methods course, supported the PSSSTs by representing the practices they were to engage their own students with. The PSSSTs were then able to decompose and approximate those scientific practices in their lesson planning, thereby developing pedagogical design capacity (PDC). The PSSSTs were interviewed to determine what affordances and constraints they felt when planning for incorporating SEPs into their lesson planning. Analysis of the lesson plans showed that 50% of the PSSSTs incorporated SEPs into their lesson plans when only provided a written description of the SEPs and prompted to do so. During the instructional intervention, 83% of the PSSSTs incorporated SEPs into their lesson plans. After the instructional intervention, the PSSSTs were no longer required to incorporate SEPs into their lesson planning nor were they required to hand in lesson plans for a grade. Instead, they wrote lesson plans for their cooperating teachers and for their own use. Surprisingly, the PSSSTs not only continued to incorporate SEPs into their lessons, but did so more completely by incorporating a diversity of sub-SEPs and more of them in their lessons. This is significant because this may indicate that the instructional intervention has longevity. Interview data suggests that PSSSTs experience both internal and external affordances and constrains when attempting to incorporate SEPs into their lesson planning. Three categories of issues (epistemic, logistical, and curricular) emerged in the results and influence how teachers interact

  4. Engineering Task Plan for the 241-AN-105 Multi-Function Corrosion Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    EDGEMON, G.L.

    1999-08-25

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) describes the activities associated with the installation of the corrosion probe assembly into riser WST-RISER-016 (formerly 15B) of tank 241-AN-105. The corrosion monitoring system utilizes the technique of electrochemical noise (EN) for monitoring waste tank corrosion. Typically, EN consists of low frequency (4 Hz) and small amplitude signals that are spontaneously generated by electrochemical reactions occurring at corroding or other surfaces. EN analysis is well suited for monitoring and identifying the onset of localized corrosion, and for measuring uniform corrosion rates. A typical EN based corrosion-monitoring system measures instantaneous fluctuations in corrosion current and potential between three nominally identical electrodes of the material of interest immersed in the environment of interest. Time-dependent fluctuations in corrosion current are described by electrochemical current noise, and time-dependent fluctuations of corrosion potential are described by electrochemical noise. The corrosion monitoring system is designed to detect the onset of localized corrosion phenomena if tank conditions should change to allow these phenomena to occur. In addition to the EN technique, the system also facilitates the use of the Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) technique to collect uniform corrosion rate information. LPR measures the linearity at the origin of the polarization curve for overvoltages up to a few millivolts away from the rest potential or natural corrosion potential. The slope of the current vs. voltage plot gives information on uniform corrosion rates.

  5. Planning and Control for Microassembly of Structures Composed of Stress-Engineered MEMS Microrobots

    PubMed Central

    Donald, Bruce R.; Levey, Christopher G.; Paprotny, Igor; Rus, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    We present control strategies that implement planar microassembly using groups of stress-engineered MEMS microrobots (MicroStressBots) controlled through a single global control signal. The global control signal couples the motion of the devices, causing the system to be highly underactuated. In order for the robots to assemble into arbitrary planar shapes despite the high degree of underactuation, it is desirable that each robot be independently maneuverable (independently controllable). To achieve independent control, we fabricated robots that behave (move) differently from one another in response to the same global control signal. We harnessed this differentiation to develop assembly control strategies, where the assembly goal is a desired geometric shape that can be obtained by connecting the chassis of individual robots. We derived and experimentally tested assembly plans that command some of the robots to make progress toward the goal, while other robots are constrained to remain in small circular trajectories (closed-loop orbits) until it is their turn to move into the goal shape. Our control strategies were tested on systems of fabricated MicroStressBots. The robots are 240–280 μm × 60 μm × 7–20 μm in size and move simultaneously within a single operating environment. We demonstrated the feasibility of our control scheme by accurately assembling five different types of planar microstructures. PMID:23580796

  6. Integration of CAD-based mine planning and subsidence engineering systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jarosz, A.P.

    1995-11-01

    The present computerized mine planning systems use CAD-like and Data Base Management System (DBMS) environments for the handling of numerical, textural, and graphical data. These two environments are usually integrated, that is, the data provided by the DBMS are linked to any graphical element rendered by the CAD system. The subsidence monitoring, analysis and prediction process should be integrated with the mine design process. It should allow for the assessment of impacts of mining on surface, surface utilities, and structures. It should also provide for the measures to control mining, that will create only acceptable levels of negative impacts on the surface. The common data base, and graphical capabilities of the CAD interface, may be used with great advantage for both systems. The findings of the subsidence engineering modulus should be directly incorporated into the mine design system, and vice versa. In this paper the author suggests guidelines for the development of the comprehensive computer system, able not only to predict the vertical and horizontal components of the ground movement, but also assess the induced surface damages, and costs related to subsidence prevention and compensation.

  7. Evaluating temperature and fuel stratification for heat-release rate control in a reactivity-controlled compression-ignition engine using optical diagnostics and chemical kinetics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Musculus, Mark P. B.; Kokjohn, Sage L.; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2015-04-23

    We investigated the combustion process in a dual-fuel, reactivity-controlled compression-ignition (RCCI) engine using a combination of optical diagnostics and chemical kinetics modeling to explain the role of equivalence ratio, temperature, and fuel reactivity stratification for heat-release rate control. An optically accessible engine is operated in the RCCI combustion mode using gasoline primary reference fuels (PRF). A well-mixed charge of iso-octane (PRF = 100) is created by injecting fuel into the engine cylinder during the intake stroke using a gasoline-type direct injector. Later in the cycle, n-heptane (PRF = 0) is delivered through a centrally mounted diesel-type common-rail injector. This injection strategy generates stratification in equivalence ratio, fuel blend, and temperature. The first part of this study uses a high-speed camera to image the injection events and record high-temperature combustion chemiluminescence. Moreover, the chemiluminescence imaging showed that, at the operating condition studied in the present work, mixtures in the squish region ignite first, and the reaction zone proceeds inward toward the center of the combustion chamber. The second part of this study investigates the charge preparation of the RCCI strategy using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of a fuel tracer under non-reacting conditions to quantify fuel concentration distributions prior to ignition. The fuel-tracer PLIF data show that the combustion event proceeds down gradients in the n-heptane distribution. The third part of the study uses chemical kinetics modeling over a range of mixtures spanning the distributions observed from the fuel-tracer fluorescence imaging to isolate the roles of temperature, equivalence ratio, and PRF number stratification. The simulations predict that PRF number stratification is the dominant factor controlling the ignition location and growth rate of the reaction zone. Equivalence ratio has a smaller, but still significant

  8. Test/QA plan for the verification testing of selective catalytic reduction control technologies for highway, nonroad use heavy-duty diesel engines

    EPA Science Inventory

    This ETV test/QA plan for heavy-duty diesel engine testing at the Southwest Research Institute’s Department of Emissions Research (DER) describes how the Federal Test Procedure (FTP), as listed in 40 CFR Part 86 for highway engines and 40 CFR Part 89 for nonroad engines, will be ...

  9. Monte Carlo-based treatment planning system calculation engine for microbeam radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Rovira, I.; Sempau, J.; Prezado, Y.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a synchrotron radiotherapy technique that explores the limits of the dose-volume effect. Preclinical studies have shown that MRT irradiations (arrays of 25-75-{mu}m-wide microbeams spaced by 200-400 {mu}m) are able to eradicate highly aggressive animal tumor models while healthy tissue is preserved. These promising results have provided the basis for the forthcoming clinical trials at the ID17 Biomedical Beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). The first step includes irradiation of pets (cats and dogs) as a milestone before treatment of human patients. Within this context, accurate dose calculations are required. The distinct features of both beam generation and irradiation geometry in MRT with respect to conventional techniques require the development of a specific MRT treatment planning system (TPS). In particular, a Monte Carlo (MC)-based calculation engine for the MRT TPS has been developed in this work. Experimental verification in heterogeneous phantoms and optimization of the computation time have also been performed. Methods: The penelope/penEasy MC code was used to compute dose distributions from a realistic beam source model. Experimental verification was carried out by means of radiochromic films placed within heterogeneous slab-phantoms. Once validation was completed, dose computations in a virtual model of a patient, reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) images, were performed. To this end, decoupling of the CT image voxel grid (a few cubic millimeter volume) to the dose bin grid, which has micrometer dimensions in the transversal direction of the microbeams, was performed. Optimization of the simulation parameters, the use of variance-reduction (VR) techniques, and other methods, such as the parallelization of the simulations, were applied in order to speed up the dose computation. Results: Good agreement between MC simulations and experimental results was achieved, even at

  10. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan : ASC software quality engineering practices Version 3.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Turgeon, Jennifer L.; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Pilch, Martin M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in the US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) Quality Criteria, Revision 10 (QC-1) as 'conformance to customer requirements and expectations'. This quality plan defines the SNL ASC Program software quality engineering (SQE) practices and provides a mapping of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirement (CPR) 001.3.6; 'Corporate Software Engineering Excellence'. This plan also identifies ASC management's and the software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals. This SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitments to improving software products by applying cost-effective SQE practices. This plan enumerates the SQE practices that comprise the development of SNL ASC's software products and explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices.

  11. Engineering task plan for the development of a high pressure water drill system for BY-105 saltwell screen installation

    SciTech Connect

    RITTER, G.A.

    1999-02-24

    This engineering task plan identifies the activities required for developing an ultra high pressure water drill system for installation of a saltwell screen in Tank BY-105. A water drill system is needed to bore through the hard waste material in this tank because of the addition of Portland cement in the 1960s and/or 1970s. The activities identified in this plan include the design, procurement, and qualification testing of the water drill along with readiness preparations including developing operating procedures, training Operations personnel, and conducting an assessment of readiness.

  12. Technical Work Plan for: Near Field Environment: Engineered System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Schreiber

    2006-12-08

    This technical work plan (TWP) describes work activities to be performed by the Near-Field Environment Team. The objective of the work scope covered by this TWP is to generate Revision 03 of EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction, referred to herein as the radionuclide transport abstraction (RTA) report. The RTA report is being revised primarily to address condition reports (CRs), to address issues identified by the Independent Validation Review Team (IVRT), to address the potential impact of transport, aging, and disposal (TAD) canister design on transport models, and to ensure integration with other models that are closely associated with the RTA report and being developed or revised in other analysis/model reports in response to IVRT comments. The RTA report will be developed in accordance with the most current version of LP-SIII.10Q-BSC and will reflect current administrative procedures (LP-3.15Q-BSC, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''; LP-SIII.2Q-BSC, ''Qualification of Unqualified Data''; etc.), and will develop related Document Input Reference System (DIRS) reports and data qualifications as applicable in accordance with prevailing procedures. The RTA report consists of three models: the engineered barrier system (EBS) flow model, the EBS transport model, and the EBS-unsaturated zone (UZ) interface model. The flux-splitting submodel in the EBS flow model will change, so the EBS flow model will be validated again. The EBS transport model and validation of the model will be substantially revised in Revision 03 of the RTA report, which is the main subject of this TWP. The EBS-UZ interface model may be changed in Revision 03 of the RTA report due to changes in the conceptualization of the UZ transport abstraction model (a particle tracker transport model based on the discrete fracture transfer function will be used instead of the dual-continuum transport model previously used). Validation of the EBS-UZ interface model will be revised to be consistent with

  13. Cell uptake, intracellular distribution, fate and reactive oxygen species generation of polymer brush engineered CeO2-x NPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yuan; Rojas, Elena; Murray, Richard A.; Irigoyen, Joseba; Gregurec, Danijela; Castro-Hartmann, Pablo; Fledderman, Jana; Estrela-Lopis, Irina; Donath, Edwin; Moya, Sergio E.

    2015-04-01

    Cerium Oxide nanoparticles (CeO2-x NPs) are modified with polymer brushes of negatively charged poly (3-sulfopropylmethacrylate) (PSPM) and positively charged poly (2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl-trimethylammonium chloride) (PMETAC) by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerisation (ATRP). CeO2-x NPs are fluorescently labelled by covalently attaching Alexa Fluor® 488/Fluorescein isothiocyanate to the NP surface prior to polymerisation. Cell uptake, intracellular distribution and the impact on the generation of intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) with respect to CeO2-x NPs are studied by means of Raman Confocal Microscopy (CRM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). PSPM and PMETAC coated CeO2-x NPs show slower and less uptake compared to uncoated Brush modified NPs display a higher degree of co-localisation with cell endosomes and lysosomes after 24 h of incubation. They also show higher co-localisation with lipid bodies when compared to unmodified CeO2-x NPs. The brush coating does not prevent CeO2-x NPs from displaying antioxidant properties.Cerium Oxide nanoparticles (CeO2-x NPs) are modified with polymer brushes of negatively charged poly (3-sulfopropylmethacrylate) (PSPM) and positively charged poly (2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl-trimethylammonium chloride) (PMETAC) by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerisation (ATRP). CeO2-x NPs are fluorescently labelled by covalently attaching Alexa Fluor® 488/Fluorescein isothiocyanate to the NP surface prior to polymerisation. Cell uptake, intracellular distribution and the impact on the generation of intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) with respect to CeO2-x NPs are studied by means of Raman Confocal Microscopy (CRM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). PSPM and PMETAC coated CeO2-x NPs show slower and less uptake compared to uncoated Brush modified NPs display a higher degree of co-localisation with cell

  14. Evaluating temperature and fuel stratification for heat-release rate control in a reactivity-controlled compression-ignition engine using optical diagnostics and chemical kinetics modeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Musculus, Mark P. B.; Kokjohn, Sage L.; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2015-04-23

    We investigated the combustion process in a dual-fuel, reactivity-controlled compression-ignition (RCCI) engine using a combination of optical diagnostics and chemical kinetics modeling to explain the role of equivalence ratio, temperature, and fuel reactivity stratification for heat-release rate control. An optically accessible engine is operated in the RCCI combustion mode using gasoline primary reference fuels (PRF). A well-mixed charge of iso-octane (PRF = 100) is created by injecting fuel into the engine cylinder during the intake stroke using a gasoline-type direct injector. Later in the cycle, n-heptane (PRF = 0) is delivered through a centrally mounted diesel-type common-rail injector. This injectionmore » strategy generates stratification in equivalence ratio, fuel blend, and temperature. The first part of this study uses a high-speed camera to image the injection events and record high-temperature combustion chemiluminescence. Moreover, the chemiluminescence imaging showed that, at the operating condition studied in the present work, mixtures in the squish region ignite first, and the reaction zone proceeds inward toward the center of the combustion chamber. The second part of this study investigates the charge preparation of the RCCI strategy using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of a fuel tracer under non-reacting conditions to quantify fuel concentration distributions prior to ignition. The fuel-tracer PLIF data show that the combustion event proceeds down gradients in the n-heptane distribution. The third part of the study uses chemical kinetics modeling over a range of mixtures spanning the distributions observed from the fuel-tracer fluorescence imaging to isolate the roles of temperature, equivalence ratio, and PRF number stratification. The simulations predict that PRF number stratification is the dominant factor controlling the ignition location and growth rate of the reaction zone. Equivalence ratio has a smaller, but still

  15. Dual-syringe reactive electrospinning of cross-linked hyaluronic acid hydrogel nanofibers for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yuan; Ghosh, Kaustabh; Li, Bingquan; Sokolov, Jonathan C; Clark, Richard A F; Rafailovich, Miriam H

    2006-10-20

    A facile fabrication of a cross-linked hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel nanofibers by a reactive electrospinning method is described. A thiolated HA derivative, 3,3'-dithiobis(propanoic dihydrazide)-modified HA (HA-DTPH), and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) are selected as the cross-linking system. The cross-linking reaction occurs simultaneously during the electrospinning process using a dual-syringe mixing technique. Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) is added into the spinning solution as a viscosity modifier to facilitate the fiber formation and is selectively removed with water after the electrospinning process. The nanofibrous structure of the electrospun HA scaffold is well preserved after hydration with an average fiber diameter of 110 nm. A cell morphology study on fibronectin (FN)-adsorbed HA nanofibrous scaffolds shows that the NIH 3T3 fibroblasts migrate into the scaffold through the nanofibrous network, and demonstrate an elaborate three-dimensional dendritic morphology within the scaffold, which reflects the dimensions of the electrospun HA nanofibers. These results suggest the application of electrospun HA nanofibrous scaffolds as a potential material for wound healing and tissue regeneration. [image: see text] Laser scanning confocal microscopy demonstrates that the NIH3T3 fibroblast develops an extended 3D dendritic morphology within the fibronectin-adsorbed electrospun HA nanofibrous scaffold. PMID:17022092

  16. Cell uptake, intracellular distribution, fate and reactive oxygen species generation of polymer brush engineered CeO(2-x) NPs.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yuan; Rojas, Elena; Murray, Richard A; Irigoyen, Joseba; Gregurec, Danijela; Castro-Hartmann, Pablo; Fledderman, Jana; Estrela-Lopis, Irina; Donath, Edwin; Moya, Sergio E

    2015-04-21

    Cerium Oxide nanoparticles (CeO(2-x) NPs) are modified with polymer brushes of negatively charged poly (3-sulfopropylmethacrylate) (PSPM) and positively charged poly (2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl-trimethylammonium chloride) (PMETAC) by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerisation (ATRP). CeO(2-x) NPs are fluorescently labelled by covalently attaching Alexa Fluor® 488/Fluorescein isothiocyanate to the NP surface prior to polymerisation. Cell uptake, intracellular distribution and the impact on the generation of intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) with respect to CeO(2-x) NPs are studied by means of Raman Confocal Microscopy (CRM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). PSPM and PMETAC coated CeO(2-x) NPs show slower and less uptake compared to uncoated Brush modified NPs display a higher degree of co-localisation with cell endosomes and lysosomes after 24 h of incubation. They also show higher co-localisation with lipid bodies when compared to unmodified CeO(2-x) NPs. The brush coating does not prevent CeO(2-x) NPs from displaying antioxidant properties. PMID:25789459

  17. Advanced Materials Development Program: Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines program plan, 1983--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The purpose of the Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines (CTAHE) Project is the development of an industrial technology base capable of providing reliable and cost-effective high temperature ceramic components for application in advanced heat engines. There is a deliberate emphasis on industrial'' in the purpose statement. The project is intended to support the US ceramic and engine industries by providing the needed ceramic materials technology. The heat engine programs have goals of component development and proof-of-concept. The CTAHE Project is aimed at developing generic basic ceramic technology and does not involve specific engine designs and components. The materials research and development efforts in the CTAHE Project are focused on the needs and general requirements of the advanced gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The CTAHE Project supports the DOE Office of Transportation Systems' heat engine programs, Advanced Turbine Technology Applications (ATTAP) and Heavy Duty Transport (HDT) by providing the basic technology required for development of reliable and cost-effective ceramic components. The heat engine programs provide the iterative component design, fabrication, and test development logic. 103 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  18. A RESEARCH PLAN TO STUDY EMISSIONS FROM SMALL INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report examines some of the requirements for investigating the environmental status of small internal combustion (IC) engines. These engines range in size from 1.5 to 15 hp and power a variety of equipment operated by homeowners and industry. With EPA's general growing concer...

  19. Development of a Virtual Tool for Learning Basic Organisation and Planning in Rural Engineering Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redel-Macías, María Dolores; Castillo, Carlos; Aguilar Porro, Cristina; Polo, María; Taguas, Encarnación V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a virtual lab for the contents of an Engineering project, for designing an agro-industrial building, which is also useful for a range of different transversal courses in Engineering sciences. The aims of this tool are to analyse the most important contents of a project-document (calculation, regulations, drawings and budgets),…

  20. Characterization of Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Using Premixed Gasoline and Direct-Injected Gasoline with a Cetane Improver on a Multi-Cylinder Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Dempsey, Adam B.; Curran, Scott; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2015-04-14

    The focus of the present paper was to characterize Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) using a single-fuel approach of gasoline and gasoline mixed with a commercially available cetane improver on a multi-cylinder engine. RCCI was achieved by port-injecting a certification grade 96 research octane gasoline and direct-injecting the same gasoline mixed with various levels of a cetane improver, 2-ethylhexyl nitrate (EHN). The EHN volume percentages investigated in the direct-injected fuel were 10, 5, and 2.5%. The combustion phasing controllability and emissions of the different fueling combinations were characterized at 2300 rpm and 4.2 bar brake mean effective pressure over a variety of parametric investigations including direct injection timing, premixed gasoline percentage, and intake temperature. Comparisons were made to gasoline/diesel RCCI operation on the same engine platform at nominally the same operating condition. The experiments were conducted on a modern four cylinder light-duty diesel engine that was modified with a port-fuel injection system while maintaining the stock direct injection fuel system. The pistons were modified for highly premixed operation and feature an open shallow bowl design. The results indicate that the authority to control the combustion phasing through the fuel delivery strategy (e.g., direct injection timing or premixed gasoline percentage) is not a strong function of the EHN concentration in the direct-injected fuel. It was also observed that NOx emissions are a strong function of the global EHN concentration in-cylinder and the combustion phasing. Finally, in general, NOx emissions are significantly elevated for gasoline/gasoline+EHN operation compared with gasoline/diesel RCCI operation at a given operating condition.

  1. Characterization of Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Using Premixed Gasoline and Direct-Injected Gasoline with a Cetane Improver on a Multi-Cylinder Engine

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dempsey, Adam B.; Curran, Scott; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2015-04-14

    The focus of the present paper was to characterize Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) using a single-fuel approach of gasoline and gasoline mixed with a commercially available cetane improver on a multi-cylinder engine. RCCI was achieved by port-injecting a certification grade 96 research octane gasoline and direct-injecting the same gasoline mixed with various levels of a cetane improver, 2-ethylhexyl nitrate (EHN). The EHN volume percentages investigated in the direct-injected fuel were 10, 5, and 2.5%. The combustion phasing controllability and emissions of the different fueling combinations were characterized at 2300 rpm and 4.2 bar brake mean effective pressure over amore » variety of parametric investigations including direct injection timing, premixed gasoline percentage, and intake temperature. Comparisons were made to gasoline/diesel RCCI operation on the same engine platform at nominally the same operating condition. The experiments were conducted on a modern four cylinder light-duty diesel engine that was modified with a port-fuel injection system while maintaining the stock direct injection fuel system. The pistons were modified for highly premixed operation and feature an open shallow bowl design. The results indicate that the authority to control the combustion phasing through the fuel delivery strategy (e.g., direct injection timing or premixed gasoline percentage) is not a strong function of the EHN concentration in the direct-injected fuel. It was also observed that NOx emissions are a strong function of the global EHN concentration in-cylinder and the combustion phasing. Finally, in general, NOx emissions are significantly elevated for gasoline/gasoline+EHN operation compared with gasoline/diesel RCCI operation at a given operating condition.« less

  2. NASA Glenn Research Center, Propulsion Systems Laboratory: Plan to Measure Engine Core Flow Water Vapor Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This presentation will be made at the 92nd AIAA Turbine Engine Testing Working Group (TETWoG), a semi-annual technical meeting of turbine engine testing professionals. The objective is to describe an effort by NASA to measure the water vapor content on the core airflow in a full scale turbine engine ice crystal icing test and to open a discussion with colleagues how to accurately conduct the measurement based on any previous collective experience with the procedure, instruments and nature of engine icing testing within the group. The presentation lays out the schematics of the location in the flow path from which the sample will be drawn, the plumbing to get it from the engine flow path to the sensor and several different water vapor measurement technologies that will be used: Tunable diode laser and infrared spectroscopy.

  3. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Conceptual Site Treatment Plan. Tables 8.1 and 8.2, Appendices A, B, C

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, D.

    1993-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by Section 3021(b) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct), to prepare plans describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste. The FFCAct requires site treatment plans (STPs or plans) to be developed for each site at which DOE generates or stores mixed waste and submitted to the host state or the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for either approval, approval with modification, or disapproval. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) is the preliminary version of the plan required by the FFCAct and is being provided to the State of Idaho, the EPA, and others for review. A list of the other DOE sites preparing CSTPs is included in Appendix A of this document. In addition to aiding the INEL in formulating its Final Proposed STP, this CSTP will also provide information to other DOE sites for use in identifying common technology needs and potential options for treating their wastes. The INEL CSTP is also intended to be used in conjunction with CSTPs from other sites as a basis for nationwide discussions among state regulators, the EPA, and other interested parties on treatment strategies and options, and on technical and equity issues associated with DOE`s mixed waste.

  4. Planning for Plume Diagnostics for Ground Testing of J-2X Engines at the SSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SaintCyr, William W.; Tejwani, Gopal D.; McVay, Gregory P.; Langford, Lester A.; SaintCyr, William W.

    2010-01-01

    John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) is the premier test facility for liquid rocket engine development and certification for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Therefore, it is no surprise that the SSC will play the most prominent role in the engine development testing and certification for the J-2X engine. The Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne J-2X engine has been selected by the Constellation Program to power the Ares I Upper Stage Element and the Ares V Earth Departure Stage in NASA s strategy of risk mitigation for hardware development by building on the Apollo program and other lessons learned to deliver a human-rated engine that is on an aggressive development schedule, with first demonstration flight in 2010 and human test flights in 2012. Accordingly, J-2X engine design, development, test, and evaluation is to build upon heritage hardware and apply valuable experience gained from past development and testing efforts. In order to leverage SSC s successful and innovative expertise in the plume diagnostics for the space shuttle main engine (SSME) health monitoring,1-10 this paper will present a blueprint for plume diagnostics for various proposed ground testing activities for J-2X at SSC. Complete description of the SSC s test facilities, supporting infrastructure, and test facilities is available in Ref. 11. The A-1 Test Stand is currently being prepared for testing the J-2X engine at sea level conditions. The A-2 Test Stand is currently being used for testing the SSME and may also be used for testing the J-2X engine at sea level conditions in the future. Very recently, ground-breaking ceremony for the new A-3 rocket engine test stand took place at SSC on August 23, 2007. A-3 is the first large - scale test stand to be built at the SSC since the A and B stands were constructed in the 1960s. The A-3 Test Stand will be used for testing J-2X engines under vacuum conditions simulating high altitude operation at approximately 30,480 m (100,000 ft

  5. Design and development of Stirling engines for stationary power generation applications in the 500 to 3000 horsepower range. Volume 2: Program plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, M.; Gerstmann, J.; Hoagland, L.

    1980-09-01

    A plan for implementing the proposed state-of-the-art design was developed. The main objective of the project is to demonstrate a large coal-fired Stirling engine and thus shorten the lead time to commercialization. The program plan is based on the U-4 engine concept fired by a fluidized bed combustor with a two-stage gravity-assisted heat pipe.

  6. Structural Insights into 2,2′-Azino-Bis(3-Ethylbenzothiazoline-6-Sulfonic Acid) (ABTS)-Mediated Degradation of Reactive Blue 21 by Engineered Cyathus bulleri Laccase and Characterization of Degradation Products

    PubMed Central

    Kenzom, T.; Srivastava, P.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced oxidation processes are currently used for the treatment of different reactive dyes which involve use of toxic catalysts. Peroxidases are reported to be effective on such dyes and require hydrogen peroxide and/or metal ions. Cyathus bulleri laccase, expressed in Pichia pastoris, catalyzes efficient degradation (78 to 85%) of reactive azo dyes (reactive black 5, reactive orange 16, and reactive red 198) in the presence of synthetic mediator ABTS [2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)]. This laccase was engineered to degrade effectively reactive blue 21 (RB21), a phthalocyanine dye reported to be decolorized only by peroxidases. The 816-bp segment (toward the C terminus) of the lcc gene was subjected to random mutagenesis and enzyme variants (Lcc35, Lcc61, and Lcc62) were selected based on increased ABTS oxidizing ability. Around 78 to 95% decolorization of RB21 was observed with the ABTS-supplemented Lcc variants in 30 min. Analysis of the degradation products by mass spectrometry indicated the formation of several low-molecular-weight compounds. Mapping the mutations on the modeled structure implicated residues both near and far from the T1 Cu site that affected the catalytic efficiency of the mutant enzymes on ABTS and, in turn, the rate of oxidation of RB21. Several inactive clones were also mapped. The importance of geometry as well as electronic changes on the reactivity of laccases was indicated. PMID:25261507

  7. Specific photosynthetic rate enhancement by cyanobacteria coated onto paper enables engineering of highly reactive cellular biocomposite "leaves".

    PubMed

    Bernal, Oscar I; Mooney, Charles B; Flickinger, Michael C

    2014-10-01

    We describe a latex wet coalescence extrusive coating method that produces up to 10-fold specific photosynthetic rate enhancements by nitrate-limited non-growing cyanobacteria deposited onto paper, hydrated and placed in the gas-phase of small tube photobioreactors. These plant leaf-like biocomposites were used to study the tolerance of cyanobacteria strains to illumination and temperature using a solar simulator. We report sustained CO2 absorption and O2 production for 500 h by hydrated gas-phase paper coatings of non-growing Synechococcus PCC7002, Synechocystis PCC6803, Synechocystis PCC6308, and Anabaena PCC7120. Nitrate-starved cyanobacteria immobilized on the paper surface by the latex binder did not grow out of the coatings into the bulk liquid. The average CO2 consumption rate in Synechococcus coatings is 5.67 mmol m(-2)  h(-1) which is remarkably close to the rate reported in the literature for Arabidopsis thaliana leaves under similar experimental conditions (18 mmol m(-2)  h(-1) ). We observed average ratios of oxygen production to carbon dioxide consumption (photosynthetic quotient, PQ) between 1.3 and 1.4, which may indicate a strong dependence on nitrate assimilation during growth and was used to develop a non-growth media formulation for intrinsic kinetics studies. Photosynthetic intensification factors (PIF) (O2 production by nitrate-limited cyanobacteria in latex coatings/O2 produced by nitrate-limited cell suspensions) in cyanobacteria biocomposites prepared from wet cell pellets concentrated 100- to 300-fold show 7-10 times higher specific reactivity compared to cells in suspension under identical nitrate-limited non-growth conditions. This is the first report of changes of cyanobacteria tolerance to temperature and light intensities after deposition as a thin coating on a porous matrix, which has important implications for gas-phase photobioreactor design using porous composite materials. Cryo-fracture SEM and confocal microscopy

  8. 40 CFR Appendix X to Part 86 - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Heavy-Duty Engines and Light-Duty Trucks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Heavy-Duty Engines and Light-Duty Trucks X Appendix X to Part 86 Protection of... AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Pt. 86, App. X Appendix X to Part...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix X to Part 86 - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Heavy-Duty Engines and Light-Duty Trucks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Heavy-Duty Engines and Light-Duty Trucks X Appendix X to Part 86 Protection of... AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Pt. 86, App. X Appendix X to Part...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix X to Part 86 - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Heavy-Duty Engines and Light-Duty Trucks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Heavy-Duty Engines and Light-Duty Trucks X Appendix X to Part 86 Protection of... AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Pt. 86, App. X Appendix X to Part...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix X to Part 86 - Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Heavy-Duty Engines and Light-Duty Trucks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sampling Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing of Heavy-Duty Engines and Light-Duty Trucks X Appendix X to Part 86 Protection of... AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Pt. 86, App. X Appendix X to Part...

  12. CaseMIDAS - A reactive planning architecture for the man-machine integration design and analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, R.A.

    1995-09-01

    MIDAS is a set of tools which allow a designer to specify the physical and functional characteristics of a complex system such as an aircraft cockpit, and analyze the system with regard to human performance. MIDAS allows for a number of static analyses such as military standard reach and fit analysis, display legibility analysis, and vision polars. It also supports dynamic simulation of mission segments with 3d visualization. MIDAS development has incorporated several models of human planning behavior. The CaseMIDAS effort has been to provide a simplified and unified approach to modeling task selection behavior. Except for highly practiced, routine procedures, a human operator exhibits a cognitive effort while determining what step to take next in the accomplishment of mission tasks. Current versions of MIDAS do not model this effort in a consistent and inclusive manner. CaseMIDAS also attempts to address this issue. The CaseMIDAS project has yielded an easy to use software module for case creation and execution which is integrated with existing MIDAS simulation components.

  13. CaseMIDAS - A reactive planning architecture for the man-machine integration design and analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pease, R. Adam

    1995-01-01

    MIDAS is a set of tools which allow a designer to specify the physical and functional characteristics of a complex system such as an aircraft cockpit, and analyze the system with regard to human performance. MIDAS allows for a number of static analyses such as military standard reach and fit analysis, display legibility analysis, and vision polars. It also supports dynamic simulation of mission segments with 3d visualization. MIDAS development has incorporated several models of human planning behavior. The CaseMIDAS effort has been to provide a simplified and unified approach to modeling task selection behavior. Except for highly practiced, routine procedures, a human operator exhibits a cognitive effort while determining what step to take next in the accomplishment of mission tasks. Current versions of MIDAS do not model this effort in a consistent and inclusive manner. CaseMIDAS also attempts to address this issue. The CaseMIDAS project has yielded an easy to use software module for case creation and execution which is integrated with existing MIDAS simulation components.

  14. State-dependent chemical reactivity of an engineered cysteine reveals conformational changes in the outer vestibule of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Song, Binlin; McCarty, Nael A

    2005-12-23

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channels are gated by binding and hydrolysis of ATP at the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). We used covalent modification of CFTR channels bearing a cysteine engineered at position 334 to investigate changes in pore conformation that might accompany channel gating. In single R334C-CFTR channels studied in excised patches, modification by [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] methanethiosulfonate (MTSET+), which increases conductance, occurred only during channel closed states. This suggests that the rate of reaction of the cysteine was greater in closed channels than in open channels. R334C-CFTR channels in outside-out macropatches activated by ATP alone were modified with first order kinetics upon rapid exposure to MTSET+. Modification was much slower when channels were locked open by the addition of nonhydrolyzable nucleotide or when the R334C mutation was coupled to a second mutation, K1250A, which greatly decreases channel closing rate. In contrast, modification was faster in R334C/K464A-CFTR channels, which exhibit prolonged interburst closed states. These data indicate that the reactivity of the engineered cysteine in R334C-CFTR is state-dependent, providing evidence of changes in pore conformation coupled to ATP binding and hydrolysis at the NBDs. The data also show that maneuvers that lock open R334C-CFTR do so by locking channels into the prominent s2 subconductance state, suggesting that the most stable conducting state of the pore reflects the fully occupied, prehydrolytic state of the NBDs. PMID:16227620

  15. Clinical engineering department strategic graphical dashboard to enhance maintenance planning and asset management.

    PubMed

    Sloane, Elliot; Rosow, Eric; Adam, Joe; Shine, Dave

    2005-01-01

    The Clinical Engineering (a.k.a. Biomedical Engineering) Department has heretofore lagged in adoption of some of the leading-edge information system tools used in other industries. This present application is part of a DOD-funded SBIR grant to improve the overall management of medical technology, and describes the capabilities that Strategic Graphical Dashboards (SGDs) can afford. This SGD is built on top of an Oracle database, and uses custom-written graphic objects like gauges, fuel tanks, and Geographic Information System (GIS) maps to improve and accelerate decision making. PMID:17281913

  16. Design and development of Stirling engines for stationary power generation applications in the 500 to 3000 horsepower range. Volume 2. Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available,

    1980-09-15

    A plan for implementing the proposed state-of-the-art design described in Volume I has been developed. The main objective of the project is to demonstrate a large coal-fired Stirling engine and thus shorten the lead time to commercialization. The demonstration engine will be based on the concepts developed in the first phase of this program, as detailed in Volume I of this report. Thus the proposed program plan is based on the U-4 engine concept fired by a fluidized bed combustor with a two-stage gravity-assisted heat pipe. The plan is divided into five phases and an ongoing supporting technology program. Phase I, Conceptual Design, has been completed. The remaining phases are: Preliminary Design; Final Design; Fabrication; and Testing and Demonstration. The primary target is to begin testing the large coal-fired engine by the fifth year (1985) after the start of Preliminary Design.

  17. Integrated computer aided planning and manufacture of advanced technology jet engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhas, B. K.; George, Chacko; Arul Raj, A.

    1987-10-01

    This paper highlights an attempt at evolving a computer aided manufacturing system on a personal computer. A case study of an advanced technology jet engine component is included to illustrate various outputs from the system. The proposed system could be an alternate solution to sophisticated and expensive CAD/CAM workstations.

  18. Study and program plan for improved heavy duty gas turbine engine ceramic component development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel economy in a commercially viable gas turbine engine was demonstrated through use of ceramic materials. Study results show that increased turbine inlet and generator inlet temperatures, through the use of ceramic materials, contribute the greatest amount to achieving fuel economy goals. Improved component efficiencies show significant additional gains in fuel economy.

  19. Development of a virtual tool for learning basic organisation and planning in rural engineering projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redel-Macías, María Dolores; Castillo, Carlos; Aguilar Porro, Cristina; Polo, María; Taguas, Encarnación V.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a virtual lab for the contents of an Engineering project, for designing an agro-industrial building, which is also useful for a range of different transversal courses in Engineering sciences. The aims of this tool are to analyse the most important contents of a project-document (calculation, regulations, drawings and budgets), as well as their relationship with the activities which make up the work and the schedule. The design criteria we considered were: its online applications and their compatibility with Moodle; the inclusion of different learning approaches, such as exploratory learning and inquiry-based learning; its interactivity, and the use of multimedia elements for visualisation and direct analysis on material common to Engineering subjects. The students' perceptions of the improvements brought by the virtual lab were analysed statistically through a series of questions over two academic years. The results of the questionnaires suggested that most of those who had used the e-learning tool valued positively its overall suitability for reaching the objectives in their subject as well as the way it improved the working methodology. The practical knowledge acquired by the students was also highly valued. In addition, the lack of constraints commonly related to field trips (expenses, time and complexity) illustrates the utility of self-access learning tools in key transversal disciplines such as Engineering projects.

  20. Design study of RL10 derivatives. Volume 3, part 2: Operational and flight support plan. [analysis of transportation requirements for rocket engine in support of space tug program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shubert, W. C.

    1973-01-01

    Transportation requirements are considered during the engine design layout reviews and maintenance engineering analyses. Where designs cannot be influenced to avoid transportation problems, the transportation representative is advised of the problems permitting remedies early in the program. The transportation representative will monitor and be involved in the shipment of development engine and GSE hardware between FRDC and vehicle manufacturing plant and thereby will be provided an early evaluation of the transportation plans, methods and procedures to be used in the space tug support program. Unanticipated problems discovered in the shipment of development hardware will be known early enough to permit changes in packaging designs and transportation plans before the start of production hardware and engine shipments. All conventional transport media can be used for the movement of space tug engines. However, truck transport is recommended for ready availability, variety of routes, short transit time, and low cost.

  1. The 324 building radiochemical engineering scales and high-level vault closure plan

    SciTech Connect

    Prignano, A.L.

    1997-05-29

    This closure plan incorporates the requirements and decisions made during a Data Quality Objectives process held in 1996 by the State of Washington Department of Ecology, US Department of Energy Richland Operations Office, and contractors associated with closure of the 324 Building.

  2. Technical work plan for Surface Impoundments Operable Unit engineering support studies

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This document provides a comprehensive work plan which, when utilized as a data collection guide for field activities, will provide the necessary information required to complete a report on geotechnical properties of the sediments contained in the Surface Impoundments Operable Unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Detailed guidance is provided for the following activities: collection of samples from the impoundments; compressive strength testing of the raw sediments; compressive strength testing of the structurally modified (lime and cement additives) sediments; testing for sediment physical properties and settling rates; testing for sediment dewatering characteristics; testing for radiation activity during the field work; testing for polymer additions that may enhance settling. The work plan additionally provides guidance and examples for the preparation of documents necessary to establish readiness for safe and satisfactory performance of the field activities. An outline for the format requested for a report of these data is also provided.

  3. Engineering work plan for container venting system drill press assembly troubleshooting. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Prather, M.C.

    1994-11-01

    This work plan is for troubleshooting the current CVS drill press to ensure that the drill bit assembly doesn`t bind in the press plate. A drill press assembly has been fabricated for the Container Venting System (CVS). The drill bit assembly has bound in the press plate in previous revisions of this design. Initial troubleshooting of the drill press per Rev. 0 of this work plan was performed at the 200W Kaiser Machine Shop under Work Package 2H9401670F, Internal Work Order E20027. The drill press operated without jamming. Then, during the pre-operational test on 11/14/17 and the operational test on 11/17/94, two drum lids were drilled. Immediately after the test on 11/17/94, the drill was again operated, and it jammed. An inspection found shavings at the bottom of the drill bit assembly, between the drill bit sleeve and the press plate bore. This revised work plan provides direction for the machine shop to diagnose and correct this recent problem.

  4. Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, H.B.

    1984-02-28

    An internal combustion engine has a piston rack depending from each piston. This rack is connected to a power output shaft through a mechanical rectifier so that the power output shaft rotates in only one direction. A connecting rod is pivotally connected at one end to the rack and at the other end to the crank of a reduced function crankshaft so that the crankshaft rotates at the same angular velocity as the power output shaft and at the same frequency as the pistons. The crankshaft has a size, weight and shape sufficient to return the pistons back into the cylinders in position for the next power stroke.

  5. UMTRA Project value engineering plan. [Design and construction of stabilized tailings embankments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    The objective of value engineering (VE) on the Uranium MILL Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is to ensure that remedial action at the UMTRA Project sites is performed to meet the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for inactive uranium mill tailings sites at the lowest cost, while maintaining a high quality of work. Through review of designs and consideration of reasonable, less expensive alternatives, VE can be an effective cost reduction tool and a means to improve the design. The UMTRA Project products are the design and construction of stabilized tailings embankments.

  6. Engineering Task Plan for Preparing the Type 4 In Situ Vapor Samplers (ISVS) for Use

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    2000-01-06

    The DOE has identified a need to sample vapor space and exhaust ducts of several waste tanks The In-Situ Vapor Sampling (ISVS) Type IV vapor sampling cart has been identified as the appropriate monitoring tool. The ISVS carts have been out of service for a number of years. This ETP outlines the work to be performed to ready the type IV gas sampler for operation Characterization Engineering will evaluate the Type IV gas sampler carts to determine their state of readiness and will proceed to update procedures and equipment documentation to make the sampler operationally acceptable.

  7. TWRS hydrogen mitigation gas characterization system design and fabrication engineering task plan

    SciTech Connect

    Straalsund, E.K.

    1995-01-01

    The flammable gas watch-list (FGWL) tanks, which have demonstrated a gas release event (GRE) exceeding 0.625% hydrogen by volume will require additional characterization. The purpose of this additional characterization is to accurately measure the flammable and hazardous gas compositions and resulting lower flammability limit (LFL) of the tank vapor space during baseline and GRE emissions. Data from this characterization will help determine methods to resolve the unreviewed safety questions for the FGWL tanks. This document details organization responsibilities and engineering requirements for the design and fabrication of two gas characterization systems used to monitor flammable gas watch-list tanks.

  8. When biologists and engineers collide: Habitat conservation planning in the middle of urbanized development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, Larry D.; Murphy, Robert

    1996-11-01

    The City of Austin, Texas, is one of the fastest growing metropolitan areas in the United States. It is also in one of the most biologically diverse terrestrial ecosystems in the world: the Balcones Canyonlands. Five cave invertebrates and two species of birds that inhabit the area are listed as threatened or endangered, two species of plants are candidates for listing, several others are considered rare and of concern, and a species of the salamander has also been proposed for listing. A habitat conservation plan, of “national significance⋯” according to Secretary of Interior Bruce Babbit (Haurwitz 1996), has been under development for the last several years to conserve those endangered species through a 2400-ha system of preserves and to allow development to continue in more than 162,000 ha of surrounding area. The preserve system, comprising several units ranging in size from less than a hundred to several thousand hectares, would be bordered in many instances by developed areas. Development and maintenance of the infrastructure necessary for new and existing development, both commercial and residential, could have negated the biological value of the preserves (e.g., power-line corridors, water-treatment pipelines and facilities). The challenge of bringing this plan to fruition illustrates the complex biological, technical, and sociological context within which habitat conservation planning may occur. Resolving resource use conflicts of this nature have several commonalities that overarch these contexts. If recognized and addressed, one may move easily and foster positive results. These commonalities can be expressed as principles such as: relying on scientists to recognize, but not solve problems; acting before a scientific consensus is achieved; including human motivation and responses as part of the system to be studied and managed; and confronting uncertainty.

  9. Engineering Task Plan for Development and Fabrication and Deployment of Nested Fixed Depth Fluidic Sampling and At Tank Analysis Systems

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    2000-10-30

    This engineering task plan identifies the resources, responsibilities, and schedules for the development and deployment of a mobile, variable depth sampling system and an at-tank analysis system. The mobile, variable depth sampling system concept was developed after a cost assessment indicated a high cost for multiple deployments of the nested, fixed-depth sampling system. The sampling will provide double-shell tank (DST) staging tank waste samples for assuring the readiness of the waste for shipment to the LAW/HLW plant for treatment and immobilization. The at-tank analysis system will provide ''real-time'' assessments of the samples' chemical and physical properties. These systems support the Hanford Phase 1B vitrification project.

  10. Re-Engineering JPL's Mission Planning Ground System Architecture for Cost Efficient Operations in the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fordyce, Jess

    1996-01-01

    Work carried out to re-engineer the mission analysis segment of JPL's mission planning ground system architecture is reported on. The aim is to transform the existing software tools, originally developed for specific missions on different support environments, into an integrated, general purpose, multi-mission tool set. The issues considered are: the development of a partnership between software developers and users; the definition of key mission analysis functions; the development of a consensus based architecture; the move towards evolutionary change instead of revolutionary replacement; software reusability, and the minimization of future maintenance costs. The current status and aims of new developments are discussed and specific examples of cost savings and improved productivity are presented.

  11. National Ignition Facility start-up/operations engineering and special equipment construction health and safety plan

    SciTech Connect

    Huddleston, P C

    1998-05-08

    This document sets forth the responsibilities, interfaces, guidelines, rules, policy, and regulations for all workers involved in the S/O and SE construction, installation, and acceptance testing. This document is enforced from the first day that S/O and SE workers set foot on the NIF construction site until the end of the Project at Critical Decision 4. This document is applicable only to site activities, which are defined as those that occur within the perimeter of the fenced-off NIF construction zone and the Target Chamber Assembly Area (Helipad). The associated Special Equipment laydown and construction support areas listed in Appendix B are not under this plan; their safety provisions are discussed in the Appendix. Prototype and other support activities, such as the Amplifier Laboratory and Frame Assembly Unit assembly area, are not included in this plan. After completion of the Operational Readiness Review, the Facility Safety Procedure, Operational Safety Requirements, and Operational Safety Procedures are the governing safety documents for the operating facility. The S/O and SE project elements are required to implement measures that create a universal awareness of and promote safe job practices at the site. This includes all Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, University of Rochester, supplement labor organization, and subcontractor employees; visitors; and guests serving the S/O and SE effort.

  12. A Control Engineering Approach for Designing an Optimized Treatment Plan for Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Sunil; Nandola, Naresh N.; Rivera, Daniel E.; Younger, Jarred

    2011-01-01

    Control engineering offers a systematic and efficient means for optimizing the effectiveness of behavioral interventions. In this paper, we present an approach to develop dynamical models and subsequently, hybrid model predictive control schemes for assigning optimal dosages of naltrexone as treatment for a chronic pain condition known as fibromyalgia. We apply system identification techniques to develop models from daily diary reports completed by participants of a naltrexone intervention trial. The dynamic model serves as the basis for applying model predictive control as a decision algorithm for automated dosage selection of naltrexone in the face of the external disturbances. The categorical/discrete nature of the dosage assignment creates a need for hybrid model predictive control (HMPC) schemes. Simulation results that include conditions of significant plant-model mismatch demonstrate the performance and applicability of hybrid predictive control for optimized adaptive interventions for fibromyalgia treatment involving naltrexone. PMID:22034548

  13. Repository Planning, Design, and Engineering: Part II-Equipment and Costing.

    PubMed

    Baird, Phillip M; Gunter, Elaine W

    2016-08-01

    Part II of this article discusses and provides guidance on the equipment and systems necessary to operate a repository. The various types of storage equipment and monitoring and support systems are presented in detail. While the material focuses on the large repository, the requirements for a small-scale startup are also presented. Cost estimates and a cost model for establishing a repository are presented. The cost model presents an expected range of acquisition costs for the large capital items in developing a repository. A range of 5,000-7,000 ft(2) constructed has been assumed, with 50 frozen storage units, to reflect a successful operation with growth potential. No design or engineering costs, permit or regulatory costs, or smaller items such as the computers, software, furniture, phones, and barcode readers required for operations have been included. PMID:26886768

  14. ThermoData Engine (TDE): software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept. 5. Experiment planning and product design.

    PubMed

    Diky, Vladimir; Chirico, Robert D; Kazakov, Andrei F; Muzny, Chris D; Magee, Joseph W; Abdulagatov, Ilmutdin; Kang, Jeong Won; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Frenkel, Michael

    2011-01-24

    ThermoData Engine (TDE) is the first full-scale software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept, as reported recently in this journal. In the present paper, we describe development of an algorithmic approach to assist experiment planning through assessment of the existing body of knowledge, including availability of experimental thermophysical property data, variable ranges studied, associated uncertainties, state of prediction methods, and parameters for deployment of prediction methods and how these parameters can be obtained using targeted measurements, etc., and, indeed, how the intended measurement may address the underlying scientific or engineering problem under consideration. A second new feature described here is the application of the software capabilities for aid in the design of chemical products through identification of chemical systems possessing desired values of thermophysical properties within defined ranges of tolerance. The algorithms and their software implementation to achieve this are described. Finally, implementation of a new data validation and weighting system is described for vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data, and directions for future enhancements are outlined. PMID:21166466

  15. Engineering design and test plan for demonstrating DETOX treatment of mixed wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Goldblatt, S.; Dhooge, P.

    1995-03-01

    DETOX is a cocatalyzed wet oxidation process in which the catalysts are a relatively great concentration of iron ions (typically as iron(III) chloride) in the presence of small amounts of platinum and ruthenium ions. Organic compounds are oxidized completely to carbon dioxide, water, and (if chlorinated) hydrogen chloride. The process has shown promise as a non-thermal alternative to incineration for treatment and/or volume reduction of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes. Design and fabrication of a demonstration unit capable of destroying 25. Kg/hr of organic material is now in progress. This paper describes the Title 2 design of the demonstration unit, and the planned demonstration effort at Savannah River Site (SRS) and Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP).

  16. Test Plan to Assess Fire Effects on the Function of an Engineered Surface Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Anderson L.; Berlin, Gregory T.; Cammann, Jerry W.; Leary, Kevin D.; Link, Steven O.

    2008-09-29

    Wildfire is a frequent perturbation in shrub steppe ecosystems, altering the flora, fauna, atmosphere, and soil of these systems. Research on the fire effects has focused mostly on natural ecosystems with essentially no attention on engineered systems like surface barriers. The scope of the project is to use a simulated wildfire to induce changes in an engineered surface barrier and document the effects on barrier performance. The main objective is to quantify the effects of burning and the resulting post-fire conditions on alterations in soil physical properties; hydrologic response, particularly the water balance; geochemical properties; and biological properties. A secondary objective is to use the lessons learned to maximize fire protection in the design of long-term monitoring systems based on electronic sensors. A simulated wildfire will be initiated, controlled and monitored at the 200-BP-1 barrier in collaboration with the Hanford Fire Department during the fall of 2008. The north half of the barrier will be divided into nine 12 x 12 m plots, each of which will be randomly assigned a fuel load of 2 kg m-2 or 4 kg m-2. Each plot will be ignited around the perimeter and flames allowed to carry to the centre. Any remaining unburned vegetation will be manually burned off using a drip torch. Progress of the fire and its effects will be monitored using point measurements of thermal, hydrologic, and biotic variables. Three measures of fire intensity will be used to characterize fire behavior: (1) flame height, (2) the maximum temperature at three vertical profile levels, and (3) total duration of elevated temperature at these levels. Pre-burn plant information, including species diversity, plant height, and canopy diameter will be measured on shrubs from the plots to be burned and from control plots at the McGee ranch. General assessments of shrub survival, recovery, and recruitment will be made after the fire. Near-surface soil samples will be collected pre- and

  17. TWRS hydrogen mitigation portable standard hydrogen monitoring system platform design and fabrication engineering task plan

    SciTech Connect

    Philipp, B.L.

    1997-03-01

    The primary function of portable gas monitoring is to quickly determine tank vapor space gas composition and gas release rate, and to detect gas release events. Characterization of the gas composition is needed for safety analysis. The lower flammability limit, as well as the peak burn temperature and pressure, are dependent upon the gas composition. If there is little or no knowledge about the gas composition, safety analysis utilize compositions that yield the worst case in a deflagration or detonation. This conservative approach to unknowns necessitates a significant increase in administrative and engineering costs. Knowledge of the true composition could lead to reductions in the assumptions and therefore contribute to a reduction in controls and work restrictions. Also, knowledge of the actual composition will be required information for the analysis that is needed to remove tanks from the Watch List. Similarly, the rate of generation and release of gases is required information for performing safety analysis, developing controls, designing equipment, and closing safety issues. To determine release rate, both the gas concentrations and the dome space ventilation rates (exhauster flow rate or passive dome/atmosphere exchange rate) are needed. Therefore, to quickly verify waste tank categorization or to provide additional characterization for tanks with installed gas monitoring, a temporary, portable standard hydrogen monitoring system is needed that can be used to measure gas compositions at both high and low sensitivities.

  18. HWMA closure plan for the Waste Calcining Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) calcined and evaporated aqueous wastes generated from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The calciner operated from 1963 to 1981, primarily processing high level waste from the first cycle of spent fuel extraction. Following the calciner shutdown the evaporator system concentrated high activity aqueous waste from 1983 until 1987. In 1988, US Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) requested interim status for the evaporator system, in anticipation of future use of the evaporator system. The evaporator system has not been operated since it received interim status. At the present time, DOE-ID is completing construction on a new evaporator at the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) and the evaporator at the WCF is not needed. The decision to not use the WCF evaporator requires Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) and DOE-ID to close these units. After a detailed evaluation of closure options, LITCO and DOE-ID have determined the safest option is to fill the voids (grout the vessels, cells and waste pile) and close the WCF to meet the requirements applicable to landfills. The WCF will be covered with a concrete cap that will meet the closure standards. In addition, it was decided to apply these closure standards to the calcining system since it is contained within the WCF building. The paper describes the site, waste inventory, closure activities, and post-closure care plans.

  19. Engineering work plan for implementing the Process Condensate Recycle Project at the 242-A evaporator

    SciTech Connect

    Haring, D.S.

    1995-02-02

    The 242-A Evaporator facility is used to reduce the volume of waste stored in the Hanford double shell tanks. This facility uses filtered raw water for cooling, de-entrainment pad sprays, pump seal water, and chemical tank make-up. Some of these uses result in the introduction of filtered raw water into the process, thus increasing the volume of waste requiring evaporation and subsequent treatment by the 200 East Effluent Treatment Facility. The pump seal water and the de-entrainment pad spray systems were identified as candidates for a waste minimization upgrade. This work plan describes the activities associated with the design, installation, testing and initial operation of the process condensate recycle system. Implementation of the process condensate recycle system will permit the use of process condensate in place of raw water for the de-entrainment pad sprays and pump seals. This will reduce the amount of low-level liquid waste and generated during facility operation through source reduction and recycling.

  20. How to deal with climate change uncertainty in the planning of engineering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackova, Olga; Dittes, Beatrice; Straub, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The effect of extreme events such as floods on the infrastructure and built environment is associated with significant uncertainties: These include the uncertain effect of climate change, uncertainty on extreme event frequency estimation due to limited historic data and imperfect models, and, not least, uncertainty on future socio-economic developments, which determine the damage potential. One option for dealing with these uncertainties is the use of adaptable (flexible) infrastructure that can easily be adjusted in the future without excessive costs. The challenge is in quantifying the value of adaptability and in finding the optimal sequence of decision. Is it worth to build a (potentially more expensive) adaptable system that can be adjusted in the future depending on the future conditions? Or is it more cost-effective to make a conservative design without counting with the possible future changes to the system? What is the optimal timing of the decision to build/adjust the system? We develop a quantitative decision-support framework for evaluation of alternative infrastructure designs under uncertainties, which: • probabilistically models the uncertain future (trough a Bayesian approach) • includes the adaptability of the systems (the costs of future changes) • takes into account the fact that future decisions will be made under uncertainty as well (using pre-posterior decision analysis) • allows to identify the optimal capacity and optimal timing to build/adjust the infrastructure. Application of the decision framework will be demonstrated on an example of flood mitigation planning in Bavaria.

  1. A social-economic-engineering combined framework for decision making in water resources planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, E. S.; Lee, K. S.

    2008-10-01

    This study presents a new methodology not only to evaluate willingness to pays (WTPs) for the improvement of hydrological vulnerability using a choice experiment (CE) method but also to do a cost-benefit analysis (CBA) of some feasible alternatives combing the derived WTPs with an alternative evaluation index (AEI). The hydrological vulnerability consists of potential streamflow depletion (PSD), and potential water quality deterioration (PWQD) and can be quantified using a multi-criteria decision making technique and pressure-state-response (PSR) framework. PSD and PWQD not only provide survey respondents with sufficient site-specific information to avoid scope sensitivity in a choice experiment but also support the standard of dividing the study watershed into six sub-regions for site-fitted management. Therefore CE was applied to six regions one after the other, in order to determine WTPs for improvements on hydrological vulnerability considering the characteristics which are vulnerability, location, and preferences with regard to management objectives. The AEI was developed to prioritize the feasible alternatives using a continuous water quantity/quality simulation model as well as multi-criteria decision making techniques. All criteria for alternative performance were selected based on a driver-pressures-state-impact-response (DPSIR) framework, and their weights were estimated using an Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). In addition, the AEI that reflects on residents' preference with regard to management objectives was proposed in order to incite the stakeholder to participate in the decision making process. Finally, the economic values of each alternative are estimated by a newly developed method which combines the WTPs for improvements on hydrologic vulnerability with the AEI. This social-economic-engineering combined framework can provide the decision makers with more specific information as well as decrease the uncertainty of the CBA.

  2. A Guide to the Santa Monica Project Documentation: Engineered Classroom, Madison School Plan/Learning Center, and the Train and Trade Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosnowsky, William P.; LaPlante, Frances M.

    Presented is a guide to about 40 items of literature and materials concerned with the special education approach developed by Frank M. Hewett of the Santa Monica project. Major components of the approach are said to be the engineered classroom, the Madison school plan/learning center, and the train and trade program. Listings generally include…

  3. Ten-Year Trends in SAT Scores and Other Characteristics of High School Seniors Taking the SAT and Planning To Study Mathematics, Science, or Engineering. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grandy, Jerilee

    This study analyzed data from the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) taken by high school seniors between 1975 and 1986. Its purpose was to study trends in the numbers, test scores, and other characteristics of examinees planning to major in mathematics, science, and engineering, and to compare these data with comparable data from examinees planning…

  4. The Development of a Strategic Plan To Provide a Multisite Electronic Engineering Technology Program at the Community College of Allegheny County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Pearly

    A project was undertaken to develop a strategic plan to implement a multisite electronic engineering technology (EET) program at Pennsylvania's Community College of Allegheny County. Specifically, the project sought to determine how electronic communication technologies could provide a virtual learning community for the program; appropriate plans…

  5. Program plan for the DOE Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Technology Program. Volume I. Summary, objectives and management. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    This document defines a plan for conducting selected aspects of the engineering testing required for magnetic fusion reactor FWBS components and systems. The ultimate product of this program is an established data base that contributes to a functional, reliable, maintainable, economically attractive, and environmentally acceptable commercial fusion reactor first wall, blanket, and shield system. This program plan updates the initial plan issued in November of 1980 by the DOE/Office of Fusion Energy (unnumbered report). The plan consists of two parts. Part I is a summary of activities, responsibilities and program management including reporting and interfaces with other programs. Part II is a compilation of the Detailed Technical Plans for Phase I (1982 to 1984) developed by the participants during Phase 0 of the program (July to December 1981).

  6. 324 Building radiochemical engineering cells, high-level vault, low-level vault, and associated areas closure plan

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, J.M.

    1998-03-25

    The Hanford Site, located adjacent to and north of Richland, Washington, is operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL). The 324 Building is located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The 324 Building was constructed in the 1960s to support materials and chemical process research and development activities ranging from laboratory/bench-scale studies to full engineering-scale pilot plant demonstrations. In the mid-1990s, it was determined that dangerous waste and waste residues were being stored for greater than 90 days in the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cells (REC) and in the High-Level Vault/Low-Level Vault (HLV/LLV) tanks. [These areas are not Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) permitted portions of the 324 Building.] Through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-89, agreement was reached to close the nonpermitted RCRA unit in the 324 Building. This closure plan, managed under TPA Milestone M-20-55, addresses the identified building areas targeted by the Tri-Party Agreement and provides commitments to achieve the highest degree of compliance practicable, given the special technical difficulties of managing mixed waste that contains high-activity radioactive materials, and the physical limitations of working remotely in the areas within the subject closure unit. This closure plan is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1.0 provides the introduction, historical perspective, 324 Building history and current mission, and the regulatory basis and strategy for managing the closure unit. Chapters 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0 discuss the detailed facility description, process information, waste characteristics, and groundwater monitoring respectively. Chapter 6.0 deals with the closure strategy and performance standard, including the closure activities for the B-Cell, D-Cell, HLV, LLV; piping and miscellaneous associated building areas. Chapter 7.0 addresses the

  7. Reactive arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Reactive arthritis is a group of conditions that may involve the joints, eyes, and urinary and genital systems. ... The exact cause of reactive arthritis is unknown. It occurs most often in men younger than age 40. It may follow an infection in the urethra ...

  8. Engineering task plan for upgrades to the leveling jacks on core sample trucks number 3 and 4

    SciTech Connect

    KOSTELNIK, A.J.

    1999-02-24

    Characterizing the waste in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site is accomplished by obtaining a representative core sample for analysis. Core sampling is one of the numerous techniques that have been developed for use given the environmental and field conditions at the Hanford Site. Core sampling is currently accomplished using either Push Mode Core Sample Truck No.1 or; Rotary Mode Core Sample Trucks No.2, 3 or 4. Past analysis (WHC 1994) has indicated that the Core Sample Truck (CST) leveling jacks are structurally inadequate when lateral loads are applied. WHC 1994 identifies many areas where failure could occur. All these failures are based on exceeding the allowable stresses listed in the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) code. The mode of failure is for the outrigger attachments to the truck frame to fail resulting in dropping of the CST and possible overturning (Ref. Ziada and Hundal, 1996). Out of level deployment of the truck can exceed the code allowable stresses in the structure. Calculations have been performed to establish limits for maintaining the truck level when lifting. The calculations and the associated limits are included in appendix A. The need for future operations of the CSTS is limited. Sampling is expected to be complete in FY-2001. Since there is limited time at risk for continued use of the CSTS with the leveling controls without correcting the structural problems, there are several design changes that could give incremental improvements to the operational safety of the CSTS with limited impact on available operating time. The improvements focus on making the truck easier to control during lifting and leveling. Not all of the tasks identified in this ETP need to be performed. Each task alone can improve the safety. This engineering task plan is the management plan document for implementing the necessary additional structural analysis. Any additional changes to meet requirements of standing orders shall require a

  9. Applying value engineering and modern assessment tools in managing NEPA: Improving effectiveness of the NEPA scoping and planning process

    SciTech Connect

    ECCLESTON, C.H.

    1998-09-03

    While the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementing regulations focus on describing ''What'' must be done, they provide surprisingly little direction on ''how'' such requirements are to be implemented. Specific implementation of these requirements has largely been left to the discretion of individual agencies. More than a quarter of a century after NEPA's enactment, few rigorous tools, techniques, or methodologies have been developed or widely adopted for implementing the regulatory requirements. In preparing an Environmental Impact Statement, agencies are required to conduct a public scoping process to determine the range of actions, alternatives, and impacts that will be investigated. Determining the proper scope of analysis is an element essential in the successful planning and implementation of future agency actions. Lack of rigorous tools and methodologies can lead to project delays, cost escalation, and increased risk that the scoping process may not adequately capture the scope of decisions that eventually might need to be considered. Recently, selected Value Engineering (VE) techniques were successfully used in managing a prescoping effort. A new strategy is advanced for conducting a pre-scoping/scoping effort that combines NEPA with VE. Consisting of five distinct phases, this approach has potentially wide-spread implications in the way NEPA, and scoping in particular, is practiced.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1 : ASC software quality engineering practices version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Minana, Molly A.; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in DOE/AL Quality Criteria (QC-1) as conformance to customer requirements and expectations. This quality plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirements (CPR 1.3.2 and CPR 1.3.6) and the Department of Energy (DOE) document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines (GP&G). This quality plan identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities for cost-effective software engineering quality practices. The SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitment to improving software products by applying cost-effective software engineering quality practices. This document explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices; enumerates the practices that compose the development of SNL ASC's software products; and includes a sample assessment checklist that was developed based upon the practices in this document.

  11. Reactive Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with treatment and may cause joint damage. What Research Is Being Conducted on Reactive Arthritis? Researchers continue ... such as methotrexate and sulfasalazine. More information on research is available from the following websites: National Institutes ...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan part 2 mappings for the ASC software quality engineering practices, version 2.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Heaphy, Robert; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR001.3.2 and CPR001.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ''ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines''. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1: ASC software quality engineering practices, Version 2.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR 1.3.2 and 1.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan. Part 2, Mappings for the ASC software quality engineering practices. Version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Molly A.; Heaphy, Robert; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR 1.3.2 and 1.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, 'ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines'. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

  15. GENE ENGINEERING IN YEAST FOR BIODEGRADATION: IMMUNOLOGICAL CROSS-REACTIVITY AMONG CYTOCHROME P-450 SYSTEM PROTEINS OF SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE AND CANDIDA TROPICALIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Yeasts are eukaryotic microorganisms whose cytochrome P-450 monoxygenase systems may be amenable to genetic engineering for the hydroxylation and detoxication of polychlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. e are examining the molecular genetic properties of strains of bakers yeast, Sa...

  16. Evolution and current understanding of physicochemical characterization of particulate matter from reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion on a multicylinder light-duty engine

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Storey, John Morse; Curran, Scott J.; Lewis, Samuel A.; Barone, Teresa L.; Dempsey, Adam B.; Moses-DeBusk, Melanie; Hanson, Reed M.; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y.; Northrop, William F.

    2016-08-04

    Low-temperature compression ignition combustion can result in nearly smokeless combustion, as indicated by a smoke meter or other forms of soot measurement that rely on absorbance due to elemental carbon content. Highly premixed low-temperature combustion modes do not form particulate matter in the traditional pathways seen with conventional diesel combustion. Previous research into reactivity controlled compression ignition particulate matter has shown, despite a near zero smoke number, significant mass can be collected on filter media used for particulate matter certification measurement. In addition, particulate matter size distributions reveal that a fraction of the particles survive heated double-dilution conditions. This papermore » summarizes research completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to date on characterizing the nature, chemistry and aftertreatment considerations of reactivity controlled compression ignition particulate matter and presents new research highlighting the importance of injection strategy and fuel composition on reactivity controlled compression ignition particulate matter formation. Particle size measurements and the transmission electron microscopy results do show the presence of soot particles; however, the elemental carbon fraction was, in many cases, within the uncertainty of the thermal–optical measurement. Particulate matter emitted during reactivity controlled compression ignition operation was also collected with a novel sampling technique and analyzed by thermal desorption or pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectroscopy. Particulate matter speciation results indicated that the high boiling range of diesel hydrocarbons was likely responsible for the particulate matter mass captured on the filter media. Finally, to investigate potential fuel chemistry effects, either ethanol or biodiesel were incorporated to assess whether oxygenated fuels may enhance particle emission reduction.« less

  17. Static reactive power compensators for high-voltage power systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    A study conducted to summarize the role of static reactive power compensators for high voltage power system applications is described. This information should be useful to the utility system planning engineer in applying static var systems (SVS) to high voltage as (HVAC) systems. The static var system is defined as a form of reactive power compensator. The general need for reactive power compensation in HVAC systems is discussed, and the static var system is compared to other devices utilized to provide reactive power compensation. Examples are presented of applying SVS for specific functions, such as the prevention of voltage collapse. The operating principles of commercially available SVS's are discussed in detail. The perormance and active power loss characteristics of SVS types are compared.

  18. Marine Planning and Service Platform: specific ontology based semantic search engine serving data management and sustainable development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzella, Giuseppe M. R.; Bartolini, Andrea; Bustaffa, Franco; D'Angelo, Paolo; De Mattei, Maurizio; Frontini, Francesca; Maltese, Maurizio; Medone, Daniele; Monachini, Monica; Novellino, Antonio; Spada, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The MAPS (Marine Planning and Service Platform) project is aiming at building a computer platform supporting a Marine Information and Knowledge System. One of the main objective of the project is to develop a repository that should gather, classify and structure marine scientific literature and data thus guaranteeing their accessibility to researchers and institutions by means of standard protocols. In oceanography the cost related to data collection is very high and the new paradigm is based on the concept to collect once and re-use many times (for re-analysis, marine environment assessment, studies on trends, etc). This concept requires the access to quality controlled data and to information that is provided in reports (grey literature) and/or in relevant scientific literature. Hence, creation of new technology is needed by integrating several disciplines such as data management, information systems, knowledge management. In one of the most important EC projects on data management, namely SeaDataNet (www.seadatanet.org), an initial example of knowledge management is provided through the Common Data Index, that is providing links to data and (eventually) to papers. There are efforts to develop search engines to find author's contributions to scientific literature or publications. This implies the use of persistent identifiers (such as DOI), as is done in ORCID. However very few efforts are dedicated to link publications to the data cited or used or that can be of importance for the published studies. This is the objective of MAPS. Full-text technologies are often unsuccessful since they assume the presence of specific keywords in the text; in order to fix this problem, the MAPS project suggests to use different semantic technologies for retrieving the text and data and thus getting much more complying results. The main parts of our design of the search engine are: • Syntactic parser - This module is responsible for the extraction of "rich words" from the text

  19. Effects of Laser Printer–Emitted Engineered Nanoparticles on Cytotoxicity, Chemokine Expression, Reactive Oxygen Species, DNA Methylation, and DNA Damage: A Comprehensive in Vitro Analysis in Human Small Airway Epithelial Cells, Macrophages, and Lymphoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Pirela, Sandra V.; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Lu, Xiaoyan; Castranova, Vincent; Thomas, Treye; Qian, Yong; Bello, Dhimiter; Kobzik, Lester; Koturbash, Igor; Demokritou, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Background Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) incorporated into toner formulations of printing equipment become airborne during consumer use. Although information on the complex physicochemical and toxicological properties of both toner powders and printer-emitted particles (PEPs) continues to grow, most toxicological studies have not used the actual PEPs but rather have primarily used raw toner powders, which are not representative of current exposures experienced at the consumer level during printing. Objectives We assessed the biological responses of a panel of human cell lines to PEPs. Methods Three physiologically relevant cell lines—small airway epithelial cells (SAECs), macrophages (THP-1 cells), and lymphoblasts (TK6 cells)—were exposed to PEPs at a wide range of doses (0.5–100 μg/mL) corresponding to human inhalation exposure durations at the consumer level of 8 hr or more. Following treatment, toxicological parameters reflecting distinct mechanisms were evaluated. Results PEPs caused significant membrane integrity damage, an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine release in different cell lines at doses equivalent to exposure durations from 7.8 to 1,500 hr. Furthermore, there were differences in methylation patterns that, although not statistically significant, demonstrate the potential effects of PEPs on the overall epigenome following exposure. Conclusions The in vitro findings obtained in this study suggest that laser printer–emitted engineered nanoparticles may be deleterious to lung cells and provide preliminary evidence of epigenetic modifications that might translate to pulmonary disorders. Citation Pirela SV, Miousse IR, Lu X, Castranova V, Thomas T, Qian Y, Bello D, Kobzik L, Koturbash I, Demokritou P. 2016. Effects of laser printer–emitted engineered nanoparticles on cytotoxicity, chemokine expression, reactive oxygen species, DNA methylation, and DNA damage: a comprehensive in

  20. Reactive arthritis.

    PubMed

    Keat, A

    1999-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is one of the spondyloarthropathy family of clinical syndromes. The clinical features are those shared by other members of the spondyloarthritis family, though it is distinguished by a clear relationship with a precipitating infection. Susceptibility to reactive arthritis is closely linked with the class 1 HLA allele B27; it is likely that all sub-types pre-dispose to this condition. The link between HLA B27 and infection is mirrored by the development of arthritis in HLA B27-transgenic rats. In this model, arthritis does not develop in animals maintained in a germ-free environment. Infections of the gastrointestinal, genitourinary and respiratory tract appear to provoke reactive arthritis and a wide range of pathogens has now been implicated. Although mechanistic parallels may exist, reactive arthritis is distinguished from Lyme disease, rheumatic fever and Whipple's disease by virtue of the distinct clinical features and the link with HLA B27. As in these conditions both antigens and DNA of several micro-organisms have been detected in joint material from patients with reactive arthritis. The role of such disseminated microbial elements in the provocation or maintenance of arthritis remains unclear. HLA B27-restricted T-cell responses to microbial antigens have been demonstrated and these may be important in disease pathogenesis. The importance of dissemination of bacteria from sites of mucosal infection and their deposition in joints has yet to be fully understood. The role of antibiotic therapy in the treatment of reactive arthritis is being explored; in some circumstances, both the anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial effects of certain antibiotics appear to be valuable. The term reactive arthritis should be seen as a transitory one, reflecting a concept which may itself be on the verge of replacement, as our understanding of the condition develops. Nevertheless it appropriately describes arthritis that is associated with demonstrable

  1. Marine Planning and Service Platform: specific ontology based semantic search engine serving data management and sustainable development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzella, Giuseppe M. R.; Bartolini, Andrea; Bustaffa, Franco; D'Angelo, Paolo; De Mattei, Maurizio; Frontini, Francesca; Maltese, Maurizio; Medone, Daniele; Monachini, Monica; Novellino, Antonio; Spada, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The MAPS (Marine Planning and Service Platform) project is aiming at building a computer platform supporting a Marine Information and Knowledge System. One of the main objective of the project is to develop a repository that should gather, classify and structure marine scientific literature and data thus guaranteeing their accessibility to researchers and institutions by means of standard protocols. In oceanography the cost related to data collection is very high and the new paradigm is based on the concept to collect once and re-use many times (for re-analysis, marine environment assessment, studies on trends, etc). This concept requires the access to quality controlled data and to information that is provided in reports (grey literature) and/or in relevant scientific literature. Hence, creation of new technology is needed by integrating several disciplines such as data management, information systems, knowledge management. In one of the most important EC projects on data management, namely SeaDataNet (www.seadatanet.org), an initial example of knowledge management is provided through the Common Data Index, that is providing links to data and (eventually) to papers. There are efforts to develop search engines to find author's contributions to scientific literature or publications. This implies the use of persistent identifiers (such as DOI), as is done in ORCID. However very few efforts are dedicated to link publications to the data cited or used or that can be of importance for the published studies. This is the objective of MAPS. Full-text technologies are often unsuccessful since they assume the presence of specific keywords in the text; in order to fix this problem, the MAPS project suggests to use different semantic technologies for retrieving the text and data and thus getting much more complying results. The main parts of our design of the search engine are: • Syntactic parser - This module is responsible for the extraction of "rich words" from the text

  2. Understanding of Student Task Interpretation, Design Planning, and Cognitive Strategies during Engineering Design Activities in Grades 9-12. Final Report. Research in Engineering and Technology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawanto, Oenardi

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the task interpretation of students engaged in a design activity and determine the extent to which students translate their understanding of their design task to their planning and cognitive strategies. Twenty-nine students at one Colorado high school participated in this study. Students worked…

  3. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Conceptual Site Treatment Plan. Sections 1 through 8, Tables 2-1 through 6-1, Figures 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, D.

    1993-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required by Section 3021(b) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct), to prepare plans describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste. The FFCAct requires site treatment plans (STPs or plans) to be developed for each site at which DOE generates or stores mixed waste and submitted to the host state or the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for either approval, approval with modification, or disapproval. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) is the preliminary version of the plan required by the FFCAct and is being provided to the State of Idaho, the EPA, and others for review. A list of the other DOE sites preparing CSTPs is included in Appendix A of this document. In addition to aiding the INEL in formulating its Final Proposed STP, this CSTP will also provide information to other DOE sites for use in identifying common technology needs and potential options for treating their wastes. The INEL CSTP is also intended to be used in conjunction with CSTPs from other sites as a basis for nationwide discussions among state regulators, the EPA, and other interested parties on treatment strategies and options, and on technical and equity issues associated with DOE`s mixed waste.

  4. Gene engineering in yeast for biodegradation: Immunological cross-reactivity among cytochrome p-450 system proteins of saccharomyces cerevisiae and candida tropicalis

    SciTech Connect

    Loper, J.C.; Chen, C.; Dey, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    Yeasts are eukaryotic microorganisms whose cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase systems may be amenable to genetic engineering for the hydroxylation and detoxication of polychlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. The molecular genetic properties of strains of bakers yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and an n-alkane utilizing yeast, Candida tropicalis ATCC750 are examined. Standard methods were used to purify cytochrome P-450 and NADPH-cytochrome c (P-450) reductase proteins from cells cultured by semi-anaerobic glucose fermentation (S. cerevisiae, C. tropicalis) and by growth on tetradecane (C. tropicalis). Polyvalent antisera prepared in rabbits to some of these proteins were used in tests of immunological relatedness among the purified proteins using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and nitrocellulose filter immunoblots. The results provide evidence for gene relationships which should prove useful in gene isolation and subsequent engineering of P-450 enzyme systems in yeast.

  5. Contribution of Reactive and Proactive Control to Children's Working Memory Performance: Insight from Item Recall Durations in Response Sequence Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chevalier, Nicolas; James, Tiffany D.; Wiebe, Sandra A.; Nelson, Jennifer Mize; Espy, Kimberly Andrews

    2014-01-01

    The present study addressed whether developmental improvement in working memory span task performance relies upon a growing ability to proactively plan response sequences during childhood. Two hundred thirteen children completed a working memory span task in which they used a touchscreen to reproduce orally presented sequences of animal names.…

  6. Test/QA plan for the verification testing of alternative or reformulated liquid fuels, fuel additives, fuel emulsions, and lubricants for highway and nonroad use heavy-duty diesel engines

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Environmental Technology Verification Program test/QA plan for heavy-duty diesel engine testing at the Southwest Research Institute’s Department of Emissions Research describes how the Federal Test Procedure (FTP), as listed in 40 CFR Part 86 for highway engines and 40 CFR P...

  7. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  8. Intratumoral delivery of dendritic cells engineered to secrete both interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-18 effectively treats local and distant disease in association with broadly reactive Tc1-type immunity.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Tomohide; Huang, Jian; Gooding, William E; Gambotto, Andrea; Robbins, Paul D; Vujanovic, Nikola L; Alber, Sean M; Watkins, Simon C; Okada, Hideho; Storkus, Walter J

    2003-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) were adenovirally engineered to constitutively and durably secrete the potent Th1-biasing cytokines interleukin (IL)-12 (AdIL12DC) and/or IL-18 (AdIL18DC) and evaluated for their ability to promote therapeutic antitumor immunity in murine sarcoma models. Injection of either AdIL12DC or AdIL18DC into day 7 CMS4 or MethA tumors resulted in tumor rejection or slowed tumor growth when compared with control cohorts. Importantly, intratumoral injection with DCs engineered to secrete both IL-12 and IL-18 (AdIL12/IL18DC) resulted in complete and the most acute rejection of any treatment group analyzed. This strategy was also effective in promoting the regression of contralateral, untreated tumors. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were required for tumor rejection. CD8+ splenic T cells from mice treated with AdIL12/IL18DC produced the highest levels of IFN-gamma in response to tumor rechallenge in vitro and displayed the broadest repertoire of Tc1-type reactivity to acid-eluted, tumor-derived peptides among all treatment cohorts. This apparent enhancement in cross-presentation of tumor-associated epitopes in vivo may result from the increased capacity of engineered DCs to kill tumor cells, survive tumor-induced apoptosis, and present immunogenic MHC/tumor peptide complexes to T cells after intratumoral injection. In support of this hypothesis, cytokine gene-engineered DCs expressed higher levels of MHC and costimulatory molecules, as well as Fas ligand and membrane-bound tumor necrosis factor alpha, with the latter markers associated with elevated tumoricidal activity in vitro. Cytokine gene-engineered DCs appeared to have a survival advantage in situ when injected into tumor lesions, to be found in approximation with regions of tumor apoptosis, and to have the capacity to ingest apoptotic tumor bodies. These results support the ability of combined cytokine gene transfer to enhance multiple effector functions mediated by intralesionally injected DCs that may

  9. Engineering Work Plan for the Development of Phased Startup Initiative (PSI) Phases 3 and 4 Test Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    PITNER, A.L.

    2000-04-11

    A number of tools and equipment pieces are required to facilitate planned test operations during Phases 3 and 4 of the Phased Startup Initiative (PSI). These items will be used in assessing residual canister sludge quantities on cleaned fuel assemblies, sorting coarse and fine scrap fuel pieces, assessing the size distribution of scrap pieces, loading scrap into a canister, and measuring the depth of the accumulated scrap in a canister. This work plan supercedes those previously issued for development of several of these test items. These items will be considered prototype equipment until testing has confirmed their suitability for use in K West Basin. The process described in AP-EN-6-032 will be used to qualify the equipment for facility use. These items are considered non-OCRWM for PSI Phase 3 applications. The safety classification of this equipment is General Service, with Quality Level 0 (for PSI Phase 3). Quality Control inspections shall be performed to verify basic dimensions and overall configurations of fabricated components, and any special quality control verifications specified in this work plan (Section 3.1.5). These inspections shall serve to approve the test equipment for use in K West Basin (Acceptance Tag). This equipment is for information gathering only during PSI Phases 3 and 4 activities, and will be discarded at the completion of PSI. For equipment needed to support actual production throughput, development/fabrication/testing activities would be more rigorously controlled.

  10. Preliminary Waste Form Compliance Plan for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory High-Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    B. A. Staples; T. P. O'Holleran

    1999-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has specific technical and documentation requirements for high-level waste (HLW) that is to be placed in a federal repository. This document describes in general terms the strategy to be used at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to demonstrate that vitrified HLW, if produced at the INEEL, meets these requirements. Waste form, canister, quality assurance, and documentation specifications are discussed. Compliance strategy is given, followed by an overview of how this strategy would be implemented for each specification.

  11. The 'reactive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista Piccardo, Giovanni; Guarnieri, Luisa

    2010-05-01

    The Ligurian ophiolitic peridotites [South Lanzo, Erro-Tobbio, Internal Ligurides and Corsica] are characterized by the abundance of spinel(Sp) peridotites showing depleted compositions and ranging from Cpx-poor Sp lherzolites to Sp harzburgites. They were recognized in the last decades as refractory residua by MORB-forming partial melting of the asthenosphere, and were similar to abyssal peridotites. Recent structural and compositional studies promoted a better understanding of their structural and compositional features and their genetic processes. In the field these depleted peridotites replace with primary contacts pyroxenite-bearing fertile Sp lherzolites that have been recognized as sub-continental lithospheric mantle. Field relationships evidence that decametric-hectometric bodies of pristine pyroxenite-veined lithospheric Sp lherzolites are preserved as structural remnants within the km-scale masses of depleted peridotites. The depleted peridotites show coarse-grained recrystallized textures and reaction micro-structures indicating pyroxene dissolution and olivine precipitation that have been considered as records of melt/peridotite interaction during reactive diffuse porous flow of undersaturated melts. They show, moreover, contrasting bulk and mineral chemistries that cannot be produced by simple partial melting and melt extraction. In particular, their bulk compositions are depleted in SiO2 and enriched in FeO with respect to refractory residua after any kind of partial melting, as calculated by Niu (1997), indicating that they cannot be formed by simple partial melting and melt extraction processes. Moreover, TiO2 content in Sp is usually significantly higher (up to 0.8-1.0 wt%) than typical TiO2 contents of spinels (usually < 0.1-0.2 wt %) in fertile mantle peridotites and melting refractory residua, indicating that spinel attained element equilibration with a Ti-bearing basaltic melt. The depleted peridotites usually show strongly variable Cpx modal

  12. Comparative analysis of the designs and implementation of vehicles based on reactive propulsion proposed during the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth centuries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolskiy, V. N.

    1977-01-01

    Examination of the presently known historical scientific literature related to the problem of reactive flight indicates that considerable attention had already been given to the idea of reactive propulsion in the nineteenth century; about thirty designs for reaction flying vehicles were proposed during this period. However, the authors of a majority of the designs limited themselves only to a presentation of a diagram of the engine or an account of the principle of its operation, giving neither plans for its structural development nor precise calculations of the amount of energy required for accomplishing reaction flight. None of these authors considered the reaction flying vehicle as an object of variable mass, their choice of energy sources was extremely random, and the theory of the flight of reaction flying vehicles remained completely undeveloped. Early rocket designs of Nezhdanovsky, Ganswindt, Goddard, Tsiolkovsky, and others are examined and the evolution of liquid-propellant rocket engines, solid-propellant rocket engines, and jet aircraft engines is reviewed.

  13. Synchronous reactive programming in Ptolemy

    SciTech Connect

    Boulanger, F.; Vidal-Naquet, G.

    1996-12-31

    Synchronous reactive languages allow a high level deterministic description of reactive systems such as control-command systems. Their well defined mathematical semantics makes it possible to check formal properties on the control of a system. In previous work, we developed an object-oriented execution model for synchronous reactive modules. This model is implemented as a set of tools and a C++ class library, and allows us to use object-oriented methodologies and tools for the design of complex applications with both transformational and reactive parts. Among these design tools, the Ptolemy system stands as an object-oriented framework that supports various execution models, or {open_quotes}domains{close_quotes}. We are currently working on a translator from the output format of the Lustre and Esterel compilers to the Ptolemy language. Since no existing domain matches the reactive synchronous execution model, we also plan to develop a SEC (Synchronous Execution and Communication) domain. Such a domain will provide support for the execution of synchronous modules in Ptolemy. One of the most interesting features of Ptolemy is the communication between domains. Therefore we discuss the interface of the SEC domain to other domains to determine the meaning of communications between them. The main goal is to allow the use of synchronous reactive modules for the control of the behavior of data-flow or discrete event processes.

  14. IDC Integrated Master Plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, David J.; Harris, James M.

    2014-12-01

    This is the IDC Re-Engineering Phase 2 project Integrated Master Plan (IMP). The IMP presents the major accomplishments planned over time to re-engineer the IDC system. The IMP and the associate Integrated Master Schedule (IMS) are used for planning, scheduling, executing, and tracking the project technical work efforts. REVISIONS Version Date Author/Team Revision Description Authorized by V1.0 12/2014 IDC Re- engineering Project Team Initial delivery M. Harris

  15. Idaho HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tanks WM-182 and WM-183 - Rev. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Susan Kay; unknown

    2000-12-01

    This document presents the plan for the closure of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tank Farm Facility tanks WM-182 and WM-183 in accordance with Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act interim status closure requirements. Closure of these two tanks is the first in a series of closures leading to the final closure of the eleven 300,000-gal tanks in the Tank Farm Facility. As such, closure of tanks WM-182 and WM-183 will serve as a proof-of-process demonstration of the waste removal, decontamination, and sampling techniques for the closure of the remaining Tank Farm Facility tanks. Such an approach is required because of the complexity and uniqueness of the Tank Farm Facility closure. This plan describes the closure units, objectives, and compliance strategy as well as the operational history and current status of the tanks. Decontamination, closure activities, and sampling and analysis will be performed with the goal of achieving clean closure of the tanks. Coordination with other regulatory requirements, such as U.S. Department of Energy closure requirements, is also discussed.

  16. Engineering Strategies and Methods for Avoiding Air-Quality Externalities: Dispersion Modeling, Home Energy Conservation, and Scenario Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, Andrew James

    Energy conservation can improve air quality by reducing emissions from fuel combustion. The human health value retained through better air quality can then offset the cost of energy conservation. Through this thesis' innovative yet widely-accessible combination of air pollution dispersion modeling and atmospheric chemistry, it is estimated that the health value retained by avoiding emissions from Ontario's former coal-fired generating stations is 5.74/MWh (using an upper-bound value of 265,000 per year of life lost). This value is combined with energy modeling of homes in the first-ever assessment of the air-quality health benefits of low-energy buildings. It is shown that avoided health damages can equal 7% of additional construction costs of energy efficient buildings in Ontario. At 7%, health savings are a significant item in the cost analysis of efficient buildings. Looking to energy efficiency in the context of likely future low-resource natural gas scenarios, building efficient buildings today is shown to be more economically efficient than any building retrofit option. Considering future natural gas scarcity in the context of Ontario's Long-Term Energy Plan reveals that Ontario may be forced to return to coal-fired electricity. Projected coal use would result in externalities greater than $600 million/year; 80% more than air-quality externalities from Ontario's electricity in 1985. Radically aggressive investment in electricity conservation (75% reduction per capita by 2075) is one promising path forward that keeps air-quality externalities below 1985 levels. Non-health externalities are an additional concern, the quantification, and ultimately monetization, of which could be practical using emerging air pollution monitoring technologies. Energy, conservation, energy planning, and energy's externalities form a complex situation in which today's decisions are critical to a successful future. It is clear that reducing the demand for energy is essential and

  17. Reactive behavior, learning, and anticipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Steven D.; Ballard, Dana H.

    1989-01-01

    Reactive systems always act, thinking only long enough to 'look up' the action to execute. Traditional planning systems think a lot, and act only after generating fairly precise plans. Each represents an endpoint on a spectrum. It is argued that primitive forms of reasoning, like anticipation, play an important role in reducing the cost of learning and that the decision to act or think should be based on the uncertainty associated with the utility of executing an action in a particular situation. An architecture for an adaptable reactive system is presented and it is shown how it can be augmented with a simple anticipation mechanism that can substantially reduce the cost and time of learning.

  18. Floor Plans Foundation Plan at Bedrock and Subgrade Level ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Floor Plans - Foundation Plan at Bedrock and Subgrade Level Plan - Marshall Space Flight Center, F-1 Engine Static Test Stand, On Route 565 between Huntsville and Decatur, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  19. Intelligent Agent Architectures: Reactive Planning Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenschein, Stanley J.; Kahn, Philip

    1993-01-01

    An Integrated Agent Architecture (IAA) is a framework or paradigm for constructing intelligent agents. Intelligent agents are collections of sensors, computers, and effectors that interact with their environments in real time in goal-directed ways. Because of the complexity involved in designing intelligent agents, it has been found useful to approach the construction of agents with some organizing principle, theory, or paradigm that gives shape to the agent's components and structures their relationships. Given the wide variety of approaches being taken in the field, the question naturally arises: Is there a way to compare and evaluate these approaches? The purpose of the present work is to develop common benchmark tasks and evaluation metrics to which intelligent agents, including complex robotic agents, constructed using various architectural approaches can be subjected.

  20. System for reactivating catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2010-03-02

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst is provided. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  1. Fracture Reactivation in Chemically Reactive Rock Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, P.; Hooker, J. N.

    2013-12-01

    Reactivation of existing fractures is a fundamental process of brittle failure that controls the nucleation of earthquake ruptures, propagation and linkage of hydraulic fractures in oil and gas production, and the evolution of fault and fracture networks and thus of fluid and heat transport in the upper crust. At depths below 2-3 km, and frequently shallower, brittle processes of fracture growth, linkage, and reactivation compete with chemical processes of fracture sealing by mineral precipitation, with precipitation rates similar to fracture opening rates. We recently found rates of fracture opening in tectonically quiescent settings of 10-20 μm/m.y., rates similar to euhedral quartz precipitation under these conditions. The tendency of existing partially or completely cemented fractures to reactivate will vary depending on strain rate, mineral precipitation kinetics, strength contrast between host rock and fracture cement, stress conditions, degree of fracture infill, and fracture network geometry. Natural fractures in quartzite of the Cambrian Eriboll Formation, NW Scotland, exhibit a complex history of fracture formation and reactivation, with reactivation involving both repeated crack-seal opening-mode failure and shear failure of fractures that formed in opening mode. Fractures are partially to completely sealed with crack-seal or euhedral quartz cement or quartz cement fragmented by shear reactivation. Degree of cementation controls the tendency of fractures for later shear reactivation, to interact elastically with adjacent open fractures, and their intersection behavior. Using kinematic, dynamic, and diagenetic criteria, we determine the sequence of opening-mode fracture formation and later shear reactivation. We find that sheared fracture systems of similar orientation display spatially varying sense of slip We attribute these inconsistent directions of shear reactivation to 1) a heterogeneous stress field in this highly fractured rock unit and 2

  2. Manpower and project planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, David W.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose was to study how manpower and projects are planned at the Facilities Engineering Division (FENGD) within the Systems Engineering and Operations Directorate of the LaRC and to make recommendations for improving the effectiveness and productivity ot the tools that are used. The existing manpower and project planning processes (including the management plan for the FENGD, existing manpower planning reports, project reporting to LaRC and NASA Headquarters, employee time reporting, financial reporting, and coordination/tracking reports for procurement) were discussed with several people, and project planning software was evaluated.

  3. Thermophysical Reactivity Control of RBMK-1000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobiev, Aleksander V.; Antonova, Aleksandra M.; Vinogradov, Maksim P.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, viewed thermophysical characteristics of the moderator water graphite reactor RBMK. Indicated possibilities of controlling thermal state of graphite stack by regulation composition of the purge gas. Presents experimental results, but static thermal state characteristics of graphite moderator RBMK-1000. Developed a software code for integral characteristic engineering calculations, that determine value of margin reactivity reactor RBMK-1000, in the slow transients.

  4. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 252: Area 25 Engine Test Stand 1 Decontamination Pad, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    1999-08-20

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 252 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 252 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-07-02, Engine Test Stand-1 (ETS-1) Decontamination Pad. Located in Area 25 at the intersection of Road H and Road K at the Nevada Test Site, ETS-1 was designed for use as a mobile radiation checkpoint and for vehicle decontamination. The CAS consists of a concrete decontamination pad with a drain, a gravel-filled sump, two concrete trailer pads, and utility boxes. Constructed in 1966, the ETS-1 facility was part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS) complex and used to test nuclear rockets. The ETS-1 Decontamination Pad and mobile radiation check point was built in 1968. The NRDS complex ceased primary operations in 1973. Based on site history, the focus of the field investigation activities will be to determine if any primary contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) (including radionuclides, total volatile organic compounds, total semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls) are present at this site. Vertical extent of migration of suspected vehicle decontamination effluent COPCs is expected to be less than 12 feet below ground surface. Lateral extent of migration of COPCs is expected to be limited to the sump area or near the northeast corner of the decontamination pad. Using a biased sampling approach, near-surface and subsurface sampling will be conducted at the suspected worst-case areas including the sump and soil near the northeast corner of the decontamination pad. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible e valuation

  5. A Model-based Approach to Reactive Self-Configuring Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian C.; Nayak, P. Pandurang

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes Livingstone, an implemented kernel for a self-reconfiguring autonomous system, that is reactive and uses component-based declarative models. The paper presents a formal characterization of the representation formalism used in Livingstone, and reports on our experience with the implementation in a variety of domains. Livingstone's representation formalism achieves broad coverage of hybrid software/hardware systems by coupling the concurrent transition system models underlying concurrent reactive languages with the discrete qualitative representations developed in model-based reasoning. We achieve a reactive system that performs significant deductions in the sense/response loop by drawing on our past experience at building fast prepositional conflict-based algorithms for model-based diagnosis, and by framing a model-based configuration manager as a prepositional, conflict-based feedback controller that generates focused, optimal responses. Livingstone automates all these tasks using a single model and a single core deductive engine, thus making significant progress towards achieving a central goal of model-based reasoning. Livingstone, together with the HSTS planning and scheduling engine and the RAPS executive, has been selected as the core autonomy architecture for Deep Space One, the first spacecraft for NASA's New Millennium program.

  6. A Study of Engineering and Engineering Technology Education in Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terman, F. E.; Higdon, Archie

    This study reviews engineering education in Florida and investigates programs and plans for engineering technology. A questionnaire was prepared to obtain statistical data on the engineering activities at individual institutions. Deans of engineering schools responded to the questionnaires and site visits were made by consultants to each school.…

  7. Goal-driven Automation of a Deep Space Communications Station: A Case Study in Knowledge Engineering for Plan Generation and Execution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, R. W., Jr.; Chien, S. A.; Fayyad, K. V.; Chien, S.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the application of Artificial Intelligence techniques for plan generation, plan execution, and plan monitoring to automate a Deep Space Communication Station. This automation allows a Communication station to respond to a set of tracking goals by appropriately reconfiguring the communications hardware and software to provide the requested communications services.

  8. Automotive Stirling Engine Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nightingale, N.; Ernst, W.; Richey, A.; Simetkosky, M.; Smith, G.; Rohdenburg, C.; Antonelli, M. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Program status and plans are discussed for component and technology development; reference engine system design, the upgraded Mod 1 engine; industry test and evaluation; and product assurance. Four current Mod 1 engines reached a total of 2523 operational hours, while two upgraded engines accumulated 166 hours.

  9. Reactive navigational controller for autonomous mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Scott

    1993-12-01

    Autonomous mobile robots must respond to external challenges and threats in real time. One way to satisfy this requirement is to use a fast low level intelligence to react to local environment changes. A fast reactive controller has been implemented which performs the task of real time local navigation by integrating primitive elements of perception, planning, and control. Competing achievement and constraint behaviors are used to allow abstract qualitative specification of navigation goals. An interface is provided to allow a higher level deliberative intelligence with a more global perspective to set local goals for the reactive controller. The reactive controller's simplistic strategies may not always succeed, so a means to monitor and redirect the reactive controller is provided.

  10. Phenylethynyl reactive diluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A composition of matter having a specified general structure is employed to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent having a specified general structure is employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react with to provide a thermosetting material of enhanced density. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  11. Reactive Arthritis Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Of Spondylitis The Heart In Spondyloarthritis Inflammatory vs. Mechanical Back ... Arthritis Symptoms Because there is no specific laboratory test for reactive arthritis, doctors sometimes find it difficult ...

  12. Experimental research and design planning in the field of liquid-propellant rocket engines conducted between 1934 - 1944 by the followers of F. A. Tsander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dushkin, L. S.

    1977-01-01

    The development of the following Liquid-Propellant Rocket Engines (LPRE) is reviewed: (1) an alcohol-oxygen single-firing LPRE for use in wingless and winged rockets, (2) a similar multifiring LPRE for use in rocket gliders, (3) a combined solid-liquid propellant rocket engine, and (4) an aircraft LPRE operating on nitric acid and kerosene.

  13. Reactive Collision Avoidance Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel; Acikmese, Behcet; Ploen, Scott; Hadaegh, Fred

    2010-01-01

    The reactive collision avoidance (RCA) algorithm allows a spacecraft to find a fuel-optimal trajectory for avoiding an arbitrary number of colliding spacecraft in real time while accounting for acceleration limits. In addition to spacecraft, the technology can be used for vehicles that can accelerate in any direction, such as helicopters and submersibles. In contrast to existing, passive algorithms that simultaneously design trajectories for a cluster of vehicles working to achieve a common goal, RCA is implemented onboard spacecraft only when an imminent collision is detected, and then plans a collision avoidance maneuver for only that host vehicle, thus preventing a collision in an off-nominal situation for which passive algorithms cannot. An example scenario for such a situation might be when a spacecraft in the cluster is approaching another one, but enters safe mode and begins to drift. Functionally, the RCA detects colliding spacecraft, plans an evasion trajectory by solving the Evasion Trajectory Problem (ETP), and then recovers after the collision is avoided. A direct optimization approach was used to develop the algorithm so it can run in real time. In this innovation, a parameterized class of avoidance trajectories is specified, and then the optimal trajectory is found by searching over the parameters. The class of trajectories is selected as bang-off-bang as motivated by optimal control theory. That is, an avoiding spacecraft first applies full acceleration in a constant direction, then coasts, and finally applies full acceleration to stop. The parameter optimization problem can be solved offline and stored as a look-up table of values. Using a look-up table allows the algorithm to run in real time. Given a colliding spacecraft, the properties of the collision geometry serve as indices of the look-up table that gives the optimal trajectory. For multiple colliding spacecraft, the set of trajectories that avoid all spacecraft is rapidly searched on

  14. Planning Systems for Distributed Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, Theresa G.

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph representation presents an overview of the mission planning process involving distributed operations (such as the International Space Station (ISS)) and the computer hardware and software systems needed to support such an effort. Topics considered include: evolution of distributed planning systems, ISS distributed planning, the Payload Planning System (PPS), future developments in distributed planning systems, Request Oriented Scheduling Engine (ROSE) and Next Generation distributed planning systems.

  15. REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY, UNDER CONSTRUCTION OVER MTR CANAL IN BASEMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY, UNDER CONSTRUCTION OVER MTR CANAL IN BASEMENT OF MTR BUILDING, TRA-603. WOOD PLANKS REST ON CANAL WALL OBSERVABLE IN FOREGROUND. INL NEGATIVE NO. 11745. Unknown Photographer, 8/20/1954 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY. CAMERA LOOKS DOWN INTO MTR CANAL. REACTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY. CAMERA LOOKS DOWN INTO MTR CANAL. REACTOR IS FUELED AS AN ETR MOCK-UP. LIGHTS DANGLE BELOW WATER LEVEL. CONTROL RODS AND OTHER APPARATUS DESCEND FROM ABOVE WATER LEVEL. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-900. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 3/26/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. CeraMem NO{sub x} catalytic filter 5000 ACFM field demonstration test plan: Engineering development of a coal-fired low emissions boiler system: Subtask 9.2, Subsystem test plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-18

    As a deliverable of the project, ABB Environmental Systems has written this subsystem test plan to outline and detail activities to be undertaken in Tasks 10 and 11 of the Low Emissions Boiler System project. This subsystem test plan includes the budget and schedule for the construction, modification and operation of the subsystem test unit. This subsystem test plan also discusses securing of all applicable construction and operating permits, completing all necessary agreements with any host facilities, management procedures for monitoring and controlling all procurement and construction activities, implementation of Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) measures, data acquisition during operations, data analysis, and the startup and shutdown procedures of the test unit. The subsystem test plan is part of the updated Phase II RD&T Plan.

  18. Acquired reactive perforating collagenosis.

    PubMed

    Basak, P Y; Turkmen, C

    2001-01-01

    Acquired perforating disorder has been recognized as an uncommon distinct dermatosis in which altered collagen is eliminated through the epidermis. Several disorders accompanied by itching and scratching were reported to be associated with reactive perforating collagenosis. A 67-year-old white woman diagnosed as acquired reactive perforating collagenosis with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and congestive cardiac failure is presented. PMID:11525959

  19. Detailed technical plan for Test Program Element-III (TPE-III) of the first wall/blanket shield engineering test program

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L.R.; Praeg, W.F.

    1982-03-01

    The experimental requirements, test-bed design, and computational requirements are reviewed and updated. Next, in Sections 3, 4 and 5, the experimental plan, instrumentation, and computer plan, respectively, are described. Finally, Section 6 treats other considerations, such as personnel, outside participation, and distribution of results.

  20. Transmission Planning Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-06-23

    Developed to solve specific problem: Assist transmission planning for regional transfers in interconnected power systems. This work was originated in a study for the U.S. Department of State, to recommend transmission reinforcements for the Central American regional system that interconnects 6 countries. Transmission planning analysis is currently performed by engineers with domainspecific and systemspecific knowledge without a unique methodology. The software codes of this disclosure assists engineers by defining systematic analysis procedures to help identifymore » weak points and make decisions on transmission planning of regional interconnected power systems. Transmission Planning Analysis Tool groups PSS/E results of multiple AC contingency analysis and voltage stability analysis and QV analysis of many scenarios of study and arrange them in a systematic way to aid power system planning engineers or transmission operators in effective decision]making process or in the off]line study environment.« less

  1. Transmission Planning Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-23

    Developed to solve specific problem: Assist transmission planning for regional transfers in interconnected power systems. This work was originated in a study for the U.S. Department of State, to recommend transmission reinforcements for the Central American regional system that interconnects 6 countries. Transmission planning analysis is currently performed by engineers with domainspecific and systemspecific knowledge without a unique methodology. The software codes of this disclosure assists engineers by defining systematic analysis procedures to help identify weak points and make decisions on transmission planning of regional interconnected power systems. Transmission Planning Analysis Tool groups PSS/E results of multiple AC contingency analysis and voltage stability analysis and QV analysis of many scenarios of study and arrange them in a systematic way to aid power system planning engineers or transmission operators in effective decision]making process or in the off]line study environment.

  2. First-Grade Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bautista, Nazan Uludag; Peters, Kari Nichole

    2010-01-01

    Can students build a house that is cost effective and strong enough to survive strong winds, heavy rains, and earthquakes? First graders in Ms. Peter's classroom worked like engineers to answer this question. They participated in a design challenge that required them to plan like engineers and build strong and cost-effective houses that would fit…

  3. Remedial investigation/feasibility study Work Plan and addenda for Operable Unit 4-12: Central Facilities Area Landfills II and III at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, K.N.; Stormberg, G.J.; Porro, I.; Sondrup, A.J.; McCormick, S.H.

    1993-07-01

    This document is divided into two main sections -- the Work Plan and the addenda. The Work Plan describes the regulatory history and physical setting of Operable Unit 4-12, previous sampling activities, and data. It also identifies a preliminary conceptual model, preliminary remedial action alternatives, and preliminary applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. In addition, the Work Plan discusses data gaps and data quality objectives for proposed remedial investigation activities. Also included are tasks identified for the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) and a schedule of RI/FS activities. The addenda include details of the proposed field activities (Field Sampling Plan), anticipated quality assurance activities (Quality Assurance Project Plan), policies and procedures to protect RI/FS workers and the environment during field investigations (Health and Safety Plan), and policies, procedures, and activities that the Department of Energy will use to involve the public in the decision-making process concerning CFA Landfills II and III RI/FS activities (Community Relations Plan).

  4. Reactive metabolites and agranulocytosis.

    PubMed

    Uetrecht, J P

    1996-01-01

    Central to most hypotheses of the mechanism of idiosyncratic drug-induced blood dyscrasias is the involvement of reactive metabolites. In view of the reactive nature of the majority of such metabolites, it is likely that they are formed by, or in close proximity to the blood cells affected. The major oxidative system of neutrophils generates hypochlorous acid. We have demonstrated that the drugs associated with the highest incidence of agranulocytosis are oxidized to reactive metabolites by hypochlorous acid and/or activated neutrophils. There are many mechanisms by which such reactive metabolites could induce agranulocytosis. In the case of aminopyrine-induced agranulocytosis, most cases appear to involve drug-dependent anti-neutrophil antibodies, and these are likely to be induced by cell membrane antigens modified by the reactive metabolite of aminopyrine. The target of agranulocytosis associated with many other drugs is usually neutrophil precursors and may involve cytotoxicity or a cell-mediated immune reaction induced by a reactive metabolite. In the case of aplastic anaemia, there is evidence in some cases for involvement of cytotoxic T cells, which could either be induced by metabolites generated by neutrophils, or more likely, by reactive metabolites generated by stem cells. PMID:8987247

  5. Biocommodity Engineering.

    PubMed

    Lynd; Wyman; Gerngross

    1999-10-01

    The application of biotechnology to the production of commodity products (fuels, chemicals, and materials) offering benefits in terms of sustainable resource supply and environmental quality is an emergent area of intellectual endeavor and industrial practice with great promise. Such "biocommodity engineering" is distinct from biotechnology motivated by health care at multiple levels, including economic driving forces, the importance of feedstocks and cost-motivated process engineering, and the scale of application. Plant biomass represents both the dominant foreseeable source of feedstocks for biotechnological processes as well as the only foreseeable sustainable source of organic fuels, chemicals, and materials. A variety of forms of biomass, notably many cellulosic feedstocks, are potentially available at a large scale and are cost-competitive with low-cost petroleum whether considered on a mass or energy basis, and in terms of price defined on a purchase or net basis for both current and projected mature technology, and on a transfer basis for mature technology. Thus the central, and we believe surmountable, impediment to more widespread application of biocommodity engineering is the general absence of low-cost processing technology. Technological and research challenges associated with converting plant biomass into commodity products are considered relative to overcoming the recalcitrance of cellulosic biomass (converting cellulosic biomass into reactive intermediates) and product diversification (converting reactive intermediates into useful products). Advances are needed in pretreatment technology to make cellulosic materials accessible to enzymatic hydrolysis, with increased attention to the fundamental chemistry operative in pretreatment processes likely to accelerate progress. Important biotechnological challenges related to the utilization of cellulosic biomass include developing cellulase enzymes and microorganisms to produce them, fermentation of

  6. Reactive Leidenfrost droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raufaste, C.; Bouret, Y.; Celestini, F.

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally investigate the reactivity of Leidenfrost droplets with their supporting substrates. Several organic liquids are put into contact with a copper substrate heated above their Leidenfrost temperature. As the liquid evaporates, the gaseous flow cleans the superficial copper oxide formed at the substrate surface and the reaction maintains a native copper spot below the evaporating droplet. The copper spot can reach several times the droplet size for the most reactive organic compounds. This study shows an interesting coupling between the physics of the Leidenfrost effect and the mechanics of reactive flows. Different applications are proposed such as drop motion tracking and vapor flow monitoring.

  7. Improving Technology and Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Improving Technology and Engineering Education for All Students: A Plan of Action is the theme of this year's International Technology and Engineering Educators Association (ITEEA) annual conference, which meets March 7-9 in Columbus, OH. The theme is aligned with ITEEA's 2012-15 Strategic Plan: Investing in People as Educational Change Agents.…

  8. Engineering task plan for determining the interstitial liquid level in tank 241-SY-101 utilizing a neutron probe in the multifunction instrument tree

    SciTech Connect

    CANNON, N.S.

    1999-02-23

    This plan outlines the steps to be taken to modify existing neutron/gamma probe designs to allow insertion of these probes into the multifunction instrument trees (MITs) at tank 241-SY-101. The objective is to locate and track this tank's Interstitial Liquid Level (ILL). This plan provides scope, schedule, and cost estimates to achieve this objective, and assigns individual organizational responsibilities to carry out this task.

  9. When is arthritis reactive?

    PubMed

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-07-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra-articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA-B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised "trigger" infection. The identification and management of "sexually acquired" and "enteric" forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  10. When is arthritis reactive?

    PubMed Central

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra‐articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA‐B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised “trigger” infection. The identification and management of “sexually acquired” and “enteric” forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  11. Stress Reactivity in Insomnia.

    PubMed

    Gehrman, Philip R; Hall, Martica; Barilla, Holly; Buysse, Daniel; Perlis, Michael; Gooneratne, Nalaka; Ross, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether individuals with primary insomnia (PI) are more reactive to stress than good sleepers (GS). PI and GS (n = 20 per group), matched on gender and age, completed three nights of polysomnography. On the stress night, participants received a mild electric shock and were told they could receive additional shocks during the night. Saliva samples were obtained for analysis of cortisol and alpha amylase along with self-report and visual analog scales (VAS). There was very little evidence of increased stress on the stress night, compared to the baseline night. There was also no evidence of greater stress reactivity in the PI group for any sleep or for salivary measures. In the GS group, stress reactivity measured by VAS scales was positively associated with an increase in sleep latency in the experimental night on exploratory analyses. Individuals with PI did not show greater stress reactivity compared to GS. PMID:25126695

  12. Exo-Skeletal Engine: Novel Engine Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Cristos C.; Blankson, Isaiah M.

    2004-01-01

    The exo-skeletal engine concept represents a new radical engine technology with the potential to substantially revolutionize engine design. It is an all-composite drum-rotor engine in which conventionally heavy shafts and discs are eliminated and are replaced by rotating casings that support the blades in spanwise compression. Thus the rotating blades are in compression rather than tension. The resulting open channel at the engine centerline has immense potential for jet noise reduction and can also accommodate an inner combined-cycle thruster such as a ramjet. The exo-skeletal engine is described in some detail with respect to geometry, components, and potential benefits. Initial evaluations and results for drum rotors, bearings, and weights are summarized. Component configuration, assembly plan, and potential fabrication processes are also identified. A finite element model of the assembled engine and its major components is described. Preliminary results obtained thus far show at least a 30-percent reduction of engine weight and about a 10-dB noise reduction, compared with a baseline conventional high-bypass-ratio engine. Potential benefits in all aspects of this engine technology are identified and tabulated. Quantitative assessments of potential benefits are in progress.

  13. Control of Mixing and Reactive Flow Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karagozian, A. R.

    1999-01-01

    The interdisciplinary field of reactive flow control is one that holds a great deal of promise for the optimization of complex phenomena occurring in many practical systems, ranging from automobile and gas turbine engines to environmental thermal destruction systems. The fundamental underpinnings of combustion control, however, require a detailed level of understanding of complex reactive flow phenomena, and, in the case of closed-loop active control, require the ability to sense (monitor) and actuate (manipulate) flow processes in a spatially distributed manner in "near real time". Hence the ultimate growth and success of the field of reactive flow control is intimately linked: 1) to advances in the understanding, simulation, and model reduction for complex reactive flows, 2) to the development of experimental diagnostic techniques, in particular, to the development of physically robust sensors, and 3) to the development of a framework or frameworks for generation of closed loop control algorithms suitable for unsteady, nonlinear reactive flow systems. The present paper seeks to outline the potential benefits and technical challenges that exist for mixing and combustion control in fundamental as well as practical systems and to identify promising research directions that could help meet these challenges.

  14. Fluoropolymer and aluminum piezoelectric reactives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janesheski, Robert S.; Groven, Lori J.; Son, Steven

    2012-03-01

    The ability to sensitize a nanoaluminum/piezoelectric polymer composite has been studied using two fluoropolymer systems (THV220A and FC-2175). Reactive composite samples of the nanoaluminum/polymer were made into thin sheets and their ability to store energy and exhibit piezoelectric properties was measured. Also, initial drop weight impact tests were performed on the samples and results showed the piezoelectric energetic composites failed to ignite at a given impact energy unless sensitized. When a DC voltage was applied to the sample, the materials ignited at the same impact energy where previous ignition failed. Results indicate that the reactive composites may have been sensitized by storing the applied charge. The application of a DC voltage may also have an effect on the piezoelectric properties of the energetic composites similar to the way poling techniques work. Further work is planned to investigate what parameters are inducing the sensitization of the material. A better understanding could lead to applications where switching or tuning the sensitization of an energetic material is beneficial.

  15. Retraining the Modern Civil Engineer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priscoli, Jerome Delli

    1983-01-01

    Discusses why modern engineering requires social science and the nature of planning. After these conceptional discussions, 12 practical tools which social science brings to engineering are reviewed. A tested approach to training engineers in these tools is then described. Tools include institutional analysis, policy profiling, and other impact…

  16. An Engineer Does What Now?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Amy; Wade, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    For an introductory engineering class at an all-girls urban high school in the Southeast, the authors planned an experience that would align with the engineering aspects of the "Next Generation Science Standards" (NGSS Lead States 2013). The goal was to better relate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) to everyday…

  17. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education: Strategic Planning Needed to Better Manage Overlapping Programs across Multiple Agencies. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-12-108

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, George A.

    2012-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education programs help to enhance the nation's global competitiveness. Many federal agencies have been involved in administering these programs. Concerns have been raised about the overall effectiveness and efficiency of STEM education programs. GAO examined (1) the number of federal…

  18. Collaboration To Teach the Critical Thinking Skills Needed To Become a Successful Internet Searcher: The Planning of a WWW Search Engine Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Douglas

    2000-01-01

    Describes a collaborative workshop designed by the Associated College Libraries of Central Pennsylvania to identify and teach World Wide Web search skills to librarians. Highlights include how information get on the Web and is indexed; evaluation of Web resources; types of search sites; and which search engine is the best. (Author/LRW)

  19. A model-based approach to reactive self-configuring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, B.C.; Nayak, P.P.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes Livingstone, an implemented kernel for a model-based reactive self-configuring autonomous system. It presents a formal characterization of Livingstone`s representation formalism, and reports on our experience with the implementation in a variety of domains. Livingstone provides a reactive system that performs significant deduction in the sense/response loop by drawing on our past experience at building fast propositional conflict-based algorithms for model-based diagnosis, and by framing a model-based configuration manager as a propositional feedback controller that generates focused, optimal responses. Livingstone`s representation formalism achieves broad coverage of hybrid hardware/software systems by coupling the transition system models underlying concurrent reactive languages with the qualitative representations developed in model-based reasoning. Livingstone automates a wide variety of tasks using a single model and a single core algorithm, thus making significant progress towards achieving a central goal of model-based reasoning. Livingstone, together with the HSTS planning and scheduling engine and the RAPS executive, has been selected as part of the core autonomy architecture for NASA`s first New Millennium spacecraft.

  20. Reactive Power Compensator.

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Venkata, S.S.; Chen, M.; Andexler, G.; Huang, T.

    1992-07-28

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation. 26 figs.

  1. Reactive power compensator

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.; Chen, Mingliang; Andexler, George; Huang, Tony

    1992-01-01

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

  2. Flight Test Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlock, Kate Maureen

    2013-01-01

    Although the scope of flight test engineering efforts may vary among organizations, all point to a common theme: flight test engineering is an interdisciplinary effort to test an asset in its operational flight environment. Upfront planning where design, implementation, and test efforts are clearly aligned with the flight test objective are keys to success. This chapter provides a top level perspective of flight test engineering for the non-expert. Additional research and reading on the topic is encouraged to develop a deeper understanding of specific considerations involved in each phase of flight test engineering.

  3. Biodiesel Fuel Property Effects on Particulate Matter Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.; Black, S.; McCormick, R. L.

    2010-06-01

    Controlling diesel particulate emissions to meet the 2007 U.S. standard requires the use of a diesel particulate filter (DPF). The reactivity of soot, or the carbon fraction of particulate matter, in the DPF and the kinetics of soot oxidation are important in achieving better control of aftertreatment devices. Studies showed that biodiesel in the fuel can increase soot reactivity. This study therefore investigated which biodiesel fuel properties impact reactivity. Three fuel properties of interest included fuel oxygen content and functionality, fuel aromatic content, and the presence of alkali metals. To determine fuel effects on soot reactivity, the performance of a catalyzed DPF was measured with different test fuels through engine testing and thermo-gravimetric analysis. Results showed no dependence on the aromatic content or the presence of alkali metals in the fuel. The presence and form of fuel oxygen was the dominant contributor to faster DPF regeneration times and soot reactivity.

  4. Phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A composition of matter having the general structure: ##STR1## (wherein X is F, Cl, or NO.sub.2, and Y is CO, SO.sub.2 or C(CF.sub.3).sub.2) is employed to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent having the general structure: ##STR2## (wherein R is any aliphatic or aromatic moiety) is employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react therewith to provide a thermosetting material of enhanced density. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  5. Interactive chemical reactivity exploration.

    PubMed

    Haag, Moritz P; Vaucher, Alain C; Bosson, Maël; Redon, Stéphane; Reiher, Markus

    2014-10-20

    Elucidating chemical reactivity in complex molecular assemblies of a few hundred atoms is, despite the remarkable progress in quantum chemistry, still a major challenge. Black-box search methods to find intermediates and transition-state structures might fail in such situations because of the high-dimensionality of the potential energy surface. Here, we propose the concept of interactive chemical reactivity exploration to effectively introduce the chemist's intuition into the search process. We employ a haptic pointer device with force feedback to allow the operator the direct manipulation of structures in three dimensions along with simultaneous perception of the quantum mechanical response upon structure modification as forces. We elaborate on the details of how such an interactive exploration should proceed and which technical difficulties need to be overcome. All reactivity-exploration concepts developed for this purpose have been implemented in the samson programming environment. PMID:25205397

  6. 33 CFR 385.32 - Comprehensive Plan Modification Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Ecosystem Restoration Task Force in preparing the Comprehensive Plan Modification Report. (a) General... as: Plan formulation and evaluation, engineering and design, estimated benefits and costs,...

  7. A Unified Approach to Model-Based Planning and Execution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscettola, Nicola; Dorais, Gregory A.; Fry, Chuck; Levinson, Richard; Plaunt, Christian; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Writing autonomous software is complex, requiring the coordination of functionally and technologically diverse software modules. System and mission engineers must rely on specialists familiar with the different software modules to translate requirements into application software. Also, each module often encodes the same requirement in different forms. The results are high costs and reduced reliability due to the difficulty of tracking discrepancies in these encodings. In this paper we describe a unified approach to planning and execution that we believe provides a unified representational and computational framework for an autonomous agent. We identify the four main components whose interplay provides the basis for the agent's autonomous behavior: the domain model, the plan database, the plan running module, and the planner modules. This representational and problem solving approach can be applied at all levels of the architecture of a complex agent, such as Remote Agent. In the rest of the paper we briefly describe the Remote Agent architecture. The new agent architecture proposed here aims at achieving the full Remote Agent functionality. We then give the fundamental ideas behind the new agent architecture and point out some implication of the structure of the architecture, mainly in the area of reactivity and interaction between reactive and deliberative decision making. We conclude with related work and current status.

  8. Modeling Atmospheric Reactive Nitrogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen is an essential building block of all proteins and thus an essential nutrient for all life. Reactive nitrogen, which is naturally produced via enzymatic reactions, forest fires and lightning, is continually recycled and cascades through air, water, and soil media. Human ...

  9. Reactive power compensating system

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

    1987-01-01

    The reactive power of an induction machine is compensated by providing fixed capacitors on each phase line for the minimum compensation required, sensing the current on one line at the time its voltage crosses zero to determine the actual compensation required for each phase, and selecting switched capacitors on each line to provide the balance of the compensation required.

  10. Reactive Power Compensating System.

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

    1985-01-04

    The circuit was designed for the specific application of wind-driven induction generators. It has great potential for application in any situation where a varying reactive power load is present, such as with induction motors or generators, or for transmission network compensation.

  11. Working Memory and Reactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goo, Jaemyung

    2010-01-01

    The present study explores the relationship between working memory capacity (WMC) and think-alouds, focusing on the issue of reactivity. Two WM span tasks (listening span and operation span) were administered to 42 English-speaking learners of Spanish. Learner performance on reading comprehension and written production was measured under two…

  12. 14 CFR 151.113 - Advance planning proposals: Sponsor eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Engineering Proposals § 151.113 Advance planning proposals: Sponsor eligibility. The sponsor of an advance planning and engineering proposal must be a public agency, as defined in § 151.37(a), and must be...

  13. The Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-31

    The purpose of the project is to conduct research at an Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge Site in the Hanford Site 300 Area, CERCLA OU 300-FF-5 (Figure 1), to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The project will investigate a series of science questions posed for research related to the effect of spatial heterogeneities, the importance of scale, coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes, and measurements/approaches needed to characterize a mass-transfer dominated system. The research will be conducted by evaluating three (3) different hypotheses focused on multi-scale mass transfer processes in the vadose zone and groundwater, their influence on field-scale U(VI) biogeochemistry and transport, and their implications to natural systems and remediation. The project also includes goals to 1) provide relevant materials and field experimental opportunities for other ERSD researchers and 2) generate a lasting, accessible, and high-quality field experimental database that can be used by the scientific community for testing and validation of new conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reactive transport.

  14. Layered Systems Engineering Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, Julian C.; Overman, Marvin J.

    2009-01-01

    A notation is described for depicting the relationships between multiple, contemporaneous systems engineering efforts undertaken within a multi-layer system-of-systems hierarchy. We combined the concepts of remoteness of activity from the end customer, depiction of activity on a timeline, and data flow to create a new kind of diagram which we call a "Layered Vee Diagram." This notation is an advance over previous notations because it is able to be simultaneously precise about activity, level of granularity, product exchanges, and timing; these advances provide systems engineering managers a significantly improved ability to express and understand the relationships between many systems engineering efforts. Using the new notation, we obtain a key insight into the relationship between project duration and the strategy selected for chaining the systems engineering effort between layers, as well as insights into the costs, opportunities, and risks associated with alternate chaining strategies.

  15. Reactivity Network: Secondary Sources for Inorganic Reactivity Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, E. K.

    1989-01-01

    Provides an eclectic annotated bibliography of secondary sources for inorganic reactivity information of interest to reactivity network review authors and to anyone seeking information about simple inorganic reactions in order to develop experiments and demonstrations. Gives 119 sources. (MVL)

  16. Balance of plant for SOFC experiences with the planning, engineering, construction and testing of a 10 kW planar SOFC pilot plant

    SciTech Connect

    Klov, K.; Sundal, P.; Monsen, T.; Vik, A.

    1996-12-31

    The Statoil Solide Oxide Fuel Cell Research Program was started in January 1991. Some results from this Program were presented to the 1994 Fuel Cell Seminar in San Diego. The final technical milestone for the program was to design, engineer, construct and test a 10 kW pilot plant. From the very beginning, the importance of coordination and integration in the development of components, subsystems and systems, combined with basic research on cell and stack performance, were established as the guidelines for the program. In this way the progress towards the final goal was not a matter of making the best individual cell, the best stack or a superior balance of plant, but to build an efficient, reliable and operative pilot plant system, and thus make a further step towards a verification of commercial SOFC system technology.

  17. 14 CFR 151.111 - Advance planning proposals: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Engineering Proposals § 151.111 Advance planning proposals: General. (a) Each advance planning and engineering... application, under §§ 151.21(c) and 151.27, or both. (c) Each proposal must relate to planning and engineering... “Airport Activity Statistics of Certificated Route Air Carriers” (published jointly by FAA and the...

  18. 14 CFR 151.111 - Advance planning proposals: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Engineering Proposals § 151.111 Advance planning proposals: General. (a) Each advance planning and engineering... application, under §§ 151.21(c) and 151.27, or both. (c) Each proposal must relate to planning and engineering... “Airport Activity Statistics of Certificated Route Air Carriers” (published jointly by FAA and the...

  19. 14 CFR 151.111 - Advance planning proposals: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Engineering Proposals § 151.111 Advance planning proposals: General. (a) Each advance planning and engineering... application, under §§ 151.21(c) and 151.27, or both. (c) Each proposal must relate to planning and engineering... “Airport Activity Statistics of Certificated Route Air Carriers” (published jointly by FAA and the...

  20. 14 CFR 151.111 - Advance planning proposals: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Engineering Proposals § 151.111 Advance planning proposals: General. (a) Each advance planning and engineering... application, under §§ 151.21(c) and 151.27, or both. (c) Each proposal must relate to planning and engineering... “Airport Activity Statistics of Certificated Route Air Carriers” (published jointly by FAA and the...

  1. 14 CFR 151.111 - Advance planning proposals: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Engineering Proposals § 151.111 Advance planning proposals: General. (a) Each advance planning and engineering... application, under §§ 151.21(c) and 151.27, or both. (c) Each proposal must relate to planning and engineering... “Airport Activity Statistics of Certificated Route Air Carriers” (published jointly by FAA and the...

  2. PREDICTING CHEMICAL REACTIVITY BY COMPUTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mathematical models for predicting the fate of pollutants in the environment require reactivity parameter values--that it, the physical and chemical constants that govern reactivity. lthough empirical structure-activity relationships have been developed that allow estimation of s...

  3. 32 CFR 634.24 - Traffic planning and codes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... enforcement officer, engineer, safety officer, and other concerned staff agencies. Highway engineering representatives from adjacent civil communities must be consulted to ensure the installation plan is compatible... and minor routes, location of traffic control devices, and conditions requiring engineering...

  4. 32 CFR 634.24 - Traffic planning and codes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... engineering representatives from adjacent civil communities must be consulted to ensure the installation plan... and minor routes, location of traffic control devices, and conditions requiring engineering or... Engineering Agency (SDDCTEA) will help installation commanders solve complex highway traffic...

  5. Advances in reactive surfactants.

    PubMed

    Guyot, A

    2004-05-20

    The study of reactive surfactants and their applications in the synthesis of latexes for waterborne coatings has been recently boosted by two successive European programmes, involving all together eight academic and five industrial laboratories. The most significant results were obtained using surfactants derived from maleic and related anhydrides, or both nonionic and anionic reactive polymeric surfactants. Such surfactants are able to improve the stability of styrenic and acrylic latexes vs. various constraints, such as electrolyte addition, freeze-thawing tests or extraction with alcohol or acetone. The properties of films used in waterborne coatings are also improved in case of water exposure (less water uptake, dimensional stability), as well as improved weatherability, and blocking properties. Formulations for woodstain varnishes, metal coating of printing inks, based on the use of simple polymerizable surfactants, are now in the market. PMID:15072924

  6. Reactive Air Aluminization

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-10-28

    Ferritic stainless steels and other alloys are of great interest to SOFC developers for applications such as interconnects, cell frames, and balance of plant components. While these alloys offer significant advantages (e.g., low material and manufacturing cost, high thermal conductivity, and high temperature oxidation resistance), there are challenges which can hinder their utilization in SOFC systems; these challenges include Cr volatility and reactivity with glass seals. To overcome these challenges, protective coatings and surface treatments for the alloys are under development. In particular, aluminization of alloy surfaces offers the potential for mitigating both evaporation of Cr from the alloy surface and reaction of alloy constituents with glass seals. Commercial aluminization processes are available to SOFC developers, but they tend to be costly due to their use of exotic raw materials and/or processing conditions. As an alternative, PNNL has developed Reactive Air Aluminization (RAA), which offers a low-cost, simpler alternative to conventional aluminization methods.

  7. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  8. Multifunctional reactive nanocomposite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatis, Demitrios

    Many multifunctional nanocomposite materials have been developed for use in propellants, explosives, pyrotechnics, and reactive structures. These materials exhibit high reaction rates due to their developed reaction interfacial area. Two applications addressed in this work include nanocomposite powders prepared by arrested reactive milling (ARM) for burn rate modifiers and reactive structures. In burn rate modifiers, addition of reactive nanocomposite powders to aluminized propellants increases the burn rate of aluminum and thus the overall reaction rate of an energetic formulation. Replacing only a small fraction of aluminum by 8Al·MoO3 and 2B·Ti nanocomposite powders enhances the reaction rate with little change to the thermodynamic performance of the formulation; both the rate of pressure rise and maximum pressure measured in the constant volume explosion test increase. For reactive structures, nanocomposite powders with bulk compositions of 8Al·MoO3, 12Al·MoO3, and 8Al·3CuO were prepared by ARM and consolidated using a uniaxial die. Consolidated samples had densities greater than 90% of theoretical maximum density while maintaining their high reactivity. Pellets prepared using 8Al·MoO3 powders were ignited by a CO2 laser. Ignition delays increased at lower laser powers and greater pellet densities. A simplified numerical model describing heating and thermal initiation of the reactive pellets predicted adequately the observed effects of both laser power and pellet density on the measured ignition delays. To investigate the reaction mechanisms in nanocomposite thermites, two types of nanocomposite reactive materials with the same bulk compositions 8Al·MoO3 were prepared by different methods. One of the materials was manufactured by ARM and the other, so called metastable interstitial composite (MIC), by mixing of nano-scaled individual powders. Clear differences in the low-temperature redox reactions, welldetectable by differential scanning calorimetry

  9. Skylab reactivation mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    On July 11, 1979, Skylab impacted the Earth's surface. The debris dispersion area stretched from the South Eastern Indian Ocean across a sparsely populated section of Western Australia. The events leading to the reentry of Skylab are discussed and a final assessment of the Skylab debris impact footprint is presented. Also included are detailed evaluations of the various Skylab systems that were reactivated when control of Skylab was regained in mid-1978 after having been powered down since February 4, 1974.

  10. Risk Analysis for Resource Planning Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Kar-Ming

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a systems engineering approach to resource planning by integrating mathematical modeling and constrained optimization, empirical simulation, and theoretical analysis techniques to generate an optimal task plan in the presence of uncertainties.

  11. Model-Unified Planning and Execution for Distributed Autonomous System Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Pascal; Baskaran, Vijay; Bernardini, Sara; Fry, Chuck; Moreno, Maria; Muscettola, Nicola; Plaunt, Chris; Rijsman, David; Tompkins, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The Intelligent Distributed Execution Architecture (IDEA) is a real-time architecture that exploits artificial intelligence planning as the core reasoning engine for interacting autonomous agents. Rather than enforcing separate deliberation and execution layers, IDEA unifies them under a single planning technology. Deliberative and reactive planners reason about and act according to a single representation of the past, present and future domain state. The domain state behaves the rules dictated by a declarative model of the subsystem to be controlled, internal processes of the IDEA controller, and interactions with other agents. We present IDEA concepts - modeling, the IDEA core architecture, the unification of deliberation and reaction under planning - and illustrate its use in a simple example. Finally, we present several real-world applications of IDEA, and compare IDEA to other high-level control approaches.

  12. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chris; Lindberg, Gerrick E.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-12-01

    Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data directly from condensed phase ab initio simulations to develop reactive molecular dynamics models that do not require predefined empirical functions. Instead, the interactions used in the reactive model are expressed as linear combinations of interpolating functions that are optimized by using a linear least-squares algorithm. One notable benefit of the procedure outlined here is the capability to minimize the number of parameters requiring nonlinear optimization. The method presented can be generally applied to multiscale problems and is demonstrated by generating reactive models for the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide ion based directly on condensed phase ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting models faithfully reproduce the water-ion structural properties and diffusion constants from the ab initio simulations. Additionally, the free energy profiles for proton transfer, which is sensitive to the structural diffusion of both ions in water, are reproduced. The high fidelity of these models to ab initio simulations will permit accurate modeling of general chemical reactions in condensed phase systems with computational efficiency orders of magnitudes greater than currently possible with ab initio simulation methods, thus facilitating a proper statistical sampling of the coupling to slow, large-scale motions of the system.

  13. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Chris; Lindberg, Gerrick E.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data directly from condensed phase ab initio simulations to develop reactive molecular dynamics models that do not require predefined empirical functions. Instead, the interactions used in the reactive model are expressed as linear combinations of interpolating functions that are optimized by using a linear least-squares algorithm. One notable benefit of the procedure outlined here is the capability to minimize the number of parameters requiring nonlinear optimization. The method presented can be generally applied to multiscale problems and is demonstrated by generating reactive models for the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide ion based directly on condensed phase ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting models faithfully reproduce the water-ion structural properties and diffusion constants from the ab initio simulations. Additionally, the free energy profiles for proton transfer, which is sensitive to the structural diffusion of both ions in water, are reproduced. The high fidelity of these models to ab initio simulations will permit accurate modeling of general chemical reactions in condensed phase systems with computational efficiency orders of magnitudes greater than currently possible with ab initio simulation methods, thus facilitating a proper statistical sampling of the coupling to slow, large-scale motions of the system. PMID:23249062

  14. Becoming Reactive by Concretization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prieditis, Armand; Janakiraman, Bhaskar

    1992-01-01

    One way to build a reactive system is to construct an action table indexed by the current situation or stimulus. The action table describes what course of action to pursue for each situation or stimulus. This paper describes an incremental approach to constructing the action table through achieving goals with a hierarchical search system. These hierarchies are generated with transformations called concretizations, which add constraints to a problem and which can reduce the search space. The basic idea is that an action for a state is looked up in the action table and executed whenever the action table has an entry for that state; otherwise, a path is found to the nearest (cost-wise in a graph with costweighted arcs) state that has a mappring from a state in the next highest hierarchy. For each state along the solution path, the successor state in the path is cached in the action table entry for that state. Without caching, the hierarchical search system can logarithmically reduce search. When the table is complete the system no longer searches: it simply reacts by proceeding to the state listed in the table for each state. Since the cached information is specific only to the nearest state in the next highest hierarchy and not the goal, inter-goal transfer of reactivity is possible. To illustrate our approach, we show how an implemented hierarchical search system can completely reactive.

  15. Cassini science planning process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paczkowski, Brian G.; Ray, Trina L.

    2004-01-01

    The mission design for Cassini-Huygens calls for a four-year orbital survey of the Saturnian system and the descent into the Titan atmosphere and eventual soft-landing of the Huygens probe. The Cassini orbiter tour consists of 76 orbits around Saturn with 44 close Titan flybys and 8 targeted icy satellite flybys. The Cassini orbiter spacecraft carries twelve scientific instruments that will perform a wide range of observations on a multitude of designated targets. The science opportunities, frequency of encounters, the length of the Tour, and the use of distributed operations pose significant challenges for developing the science plan for the orbiter mission. The Cassini Science Planning Process is the process used to develop and integrate the science and engineering plan that incorporates an acceptable level of science required to meet the primary mission objectives far the orbiter. The bulk of the integrated science and engineering plan will be developed prior to Saturn Orbit Insertion (Sol). The Science Planning Process consists of three elements: 1) the creation of the Tour Atlas, which identifies the science opportunities in the tour, 2) the development of the Science Operations Plan (SOP), which is the conflict-free timeline of all science observations and engineering activities, a constraint-checked spacecraft pointing profile, and data volume allocations to the science instruments, and 3) an Aftermarket and SOP Update process, which is used to update the SOP while in tour with the latest information on spacecraft performance, science opportunities, and ephemerides. This paper will discuss the various elements of the Science Planning Process used on the Cassini Mission to integrate, implement, and adapt the science and engineering activity plans for Tour.

  16. Reactivity-controlled compression ignition drive cycle emissions and fuel economy estimations using vehicle system simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Curran, Scott J.; Gao, Zhiming; Wagner, Robert M.

    2014-12-22

    In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel to achieve reactivity-controlled compression ignition has been shown to reduce NOX and soot emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency as compared with conventional diesel combustion. The reactivity-controlled compression ignition concept has an advantage over many advanced combustion strategies in that the fuel reactivity can be tailored to the engine speed and load, allowing stable low-temperature combustion to be extended over more of the light-duty drive cycle load range. In this paper, a multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition strategy is employed where the engine switches from reactivity-controlled compression ignition to conventional diesel combustion whenmore » speed and load demand are outside of the experimentally determined reactivity-controlled compression ignition range. The potential for reactivity-controlled compression ignition to reduce drive cycle fuel economy and emissions is not clearly understood and is explored here by simulating the fuel economy and emissions for a multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition–enabled vehicle operating over a variety of US drive cycles using experimental engine maps for multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition, conventional diesel combustion, and a 2009 port-fuel injected gasoline engine. Drive cycle simulations are completed assuming a conventional mid-size passenger vehicle with an automatic transmission. Multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition fuel economy simulation results are compared with the same vehicle powered by a representative 2009 port-fuel injected gasoline engine over multiple drive cycles. Finally, engine-out drive cycle emissions are compared with conventional diesel combustion, and observations regarding relative gasoline and diesel tank sizes needed for the various drive cycles are also summarized.« less

  17. Reactivity-controlled compression ignition drive cycle emissions and fuel economy estimations using vehicle system simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, Scott J.; Gao, Zhiming; Wagner, Robert M.

    2014-12-22

    In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel to achieve reactivity-controlled compression ignition has been shown to reduce NOX and soot emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency as compared with conventional diesel combustion. The reactivity-controlled compression ignition concept has an advantage over many advanced combustion strategies in that the fuel reactivity can be tailored to the engine speed and load, allowing stable low-temperature combustion to be extended over more of the light-duty drive cycle load range. In this paper, a multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition strategy is employed where the engine switches from reactivity-controlled compression ignition to conventional diesel combustion when speed and load demand are outside of the experimentally determined reactivity-controlled compression ignition range. The potential for reactivity-controlled compression ignition to reduce drive cycle fuel economy and emissions is not clearly understood and is explored here by simulating the fuel economy and emissions for a multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition–enabled vehicle operating over a variety of US drive cycles using experimental engine maps for multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition, conventional diesel combustion, and a 2009 port-fuel injected gasoline engine. Drive cycle simulations are completed assuming a conventional mid-size passenger vehicle with an automatic transmission. Multi-mode reactivity-controlled compression ignition fuel economy simulation results are compared with the same vehicle powered by a representative 2009 port-fuel injected gasoline engine over multiple drive cycles. Finally, engine-out drive cycle emissions are compared with conventional diesel combustion, and observations regarding relative gasoline and diesel tank sizes needed for the various drive cycles are also summarized.

  18. Civil Engineering Technology Program Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This publication contains statewide standards for the civil engineering program in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories: foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation); admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment, evaluation and planning); program…

  19. Solar light-induced production of reactive oxygen species by single walled carbon nanotubes in water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photosensitizing processes of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) which include photo-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) convert light energy into oxidizing chemical energy that mediates transformations of nanomaterials. The oxidative stress associated with ROS may p...

  20. Information System Development: Phase I, Management Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Bill M.

    Objectives of this study of the operations of Engineering Index were to: (1) determine the need for a planning capability, (2) blueprint a mechanism to accomplish planning, and (3) recommend priorities requiring planning attention. Topics considered in the study are planning, the role of the board of directors and trustees, organizational…

  1. Space Transportation Booster Engine (STBE) configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The overall objective of this Space Transportation Booster Engine (STBE) study is to identify candidate engine configurations which enhance vehicle performance and provide operational flexibility at low cost. The specific objectives are as follows: (1) to identify and evaluate candidate LOX/HC engine configurations for the Advanced Space Transportation System for an early 1995 IOC and a late 2000 IOC; (2) to select one optimum engine for each time period; 3) to prepare a conceptual design for each configuration; (4) to develop a technology plan for the 2000 IOC engine; and, (5) to prepare preliminary programmatic planning and analysis for the 1995 IOC engine.

  2. Engineering and Software Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Michael

    The phrase ‘software engineering' has many meanings. One central meaning is the reliable development of dependable computer-based systems, especially those for critical applications. This is not a solved problem. Failures in software development have played a large part in many fatalities and in huge economic losses. While some of these failures may be attributable to programming errors in the narrowest sense—a program's failure to satisfy a given formal specification—there is good reason to think that most of them have other roots. These roots are located in the problem of software engineering rather than in the problem of program correctness. The famous 1968 conference was motivated by the belief that software development should be based on “the types of theoretical foundations and practical disciplines that are traditional in the established branches of engineering.” Yet after forty years of currency the phrase ‘software engineering' still denotes no more than a vague and largely unfulfilled aspiration. Two major causes of this disappointment are immediately clear. First, too many areas of software development are inadequately specialised, and consequently have not developed the repertoires of normal designs that are the indispensable basis of reliable engineering success. Second, the relationship between structural design and formal analytical techniques for software has rarely been one of fruitful synergy: too often it has defined a boundary between competing dogmas, at which mutual distrust and incomprehension deprive both sides of advantages that should be within their grasp. This paper discusses these causes and their effects. Whether the common practice of software development will eventually satisfy the broad aspiration of 1968 is hard to predict; but an understanding of past failure is surely a prerequisite of future success.

  3. Engineer Equipment Chief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by engineer equipment chiefs. Addressed in the five individual units of the course are the following topics: construction management (planning, scheduling, and supervision);…

  4. 77 FR 15250 - Value Engineering

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ... Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) in the Federal Register at 76 FR 36410 soliciting public comments on its... Federal Highway Administration 23 CFR Part 627 RIN 2125-AF40 Value Engineering AGENCY: Federal Highway... of value engineering (VE) analysis in the planning and development of highway improvement...

  5. Technical Project Plan for The Enhanced Thermal Conductivity of Oxide Fuels Through the Addition of High Thermal Conductivity Fibers and Microstructural Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbach, Daniel F; Ott, Larry J; Besmann, Theodore M; Armstrong, Beth L; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Lin, Hua-Tay; Ellis, Ronald James; Becher, Paul F; Jubin, Robert Thomas; Voit, Stewart L

    2010-09-01

    The commercial nuclear power industry is investing heavily in advanced fuels that can produce higher power levels with a higher safety margin and be produced at low cost. Although chemically stable and inexpensive to manufacture, the in-core performance of UO{sub 2} fuel is limited by its low thermal conductivity. There will be enormous financial benefits to any utility that can exploit a new type of fuel that is chemically stable, has a high thermal conductivity, and is inexpensive to manufacture. At reactor operating temperatures, UO{sub 2} has a very low thermal conductivity (<5 W/m {center_dot}K), which decreases with temperature and fuel burnup. This low thermal conductivity limits the rate at which energy can be removed from the fuel, thus limiting the total integrated reactor power. If the fuel thermal conductivity could be increased, nuclear reactors would be able to operate at higher powers and larger safety margins thus decreasing the overall cost of electricity by increasing the power output from existing reactors and decreasing the number of new electrical generating plants needed to meet base load demand. The objective of the work defined herein is to produce an advanced nuclear fuel based on the current UO{sub 2} fuel with superior thermal conductivity and structural integrity that is suitable for current and future nuclear reactors, using the existing fuel fabrication infrastructure with minimal modifications. There are two separate components to the research: (1) Enhanced Thermal Conductivity (ETC) - adding high conductivity fibers to the UO{sub 2} prior to sintering, which act as conduits for moving the heat energy generated within the pellet to the outer surface, (2) Microstructural Engineering (ME) - adding second phase particulates to UO{sub 2} bodies to retard grain growth and to increase thermal conductivity, as well as improve fracture and creep resistance. Different groups will perform the laboratory work for each of these research

  6. Construction Management: Planning Ahead.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arsht, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Explains that preconstruction planning is essential when undertaking the challenges of a school building renovation or expansion, focusing on developing a detailed estimate, creating an effective construction strategy, conducting reviews and value-engineering workshops, and realizing savings through effective risk analysis and contingency…

  7. Fixed costs of providing ancillary services from power plants: Reactive supply and voltage control, regulation and frequency response, operating reserve--spinning. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, R.; Kure-Jensen, J.

    1998-12-01

    This report describes methodologies to determine the fixed costs for a steam cycle generating unit to participate in Reactive Supply and Voltage Control (RS-VC), Regulation and Frequency Response (RFR), and Operating Reserve-Spinning (ORS) services. It is intended for use by a Generator of electricity who is planning to offer these ancillary services in a competitive market. The methodology is based on common steam power plant engineering and economic principles. Reactive supply and voltage control provides reactive supply through changes to generator reactive output to maintain acceptable transmission system voltages and facilitate electricity transfers and provides the ability to continually adjust transmission system voltage in response to system changes. Regulation and frequency response service include all rapid load changes whether their purpose is to meet the instantaneous load demand, to balance control area supply resources with load, or to maintain frequency. Spinning reserve is provided by generating units that are on-line and loaded at less than maximum output. They are available to serve load immediately in an unexpected contingency such as an unplanned outage of a generating unit.

  8. Preparing for Catastrophic Disasters: Application of Earth Science and Engineering Data, and Loss Scenarios for Emergency Management and Disaster Recovery Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisner, R.

    2006-12-01

    Catastrophic disasters, either man or nature caused, pose unique challenges to federal, state and local governments. The complex interactions of lifeline disruption, structural damage, and population displacement are difficult to comprehend or predict. As the preparation for and response to the landfall of Hurricane Katrina in 2005 illustrated, forecasting the occurrence of the event does not adequately define the complexity of the consequences. Preparing for the occurrence of a rapid onset disaster that occurs without warning creates additional challenges to the emergency management community. If the event is catastrophic, it will quickly overwhelm local, regional and state resources. The ability to comprehend the magnitude and complexity of such a disruption will also be overwhelmed. The State of California, in order to gain insights into the complexity and demands of a catastrophic earthquake event (historic events include Central California [1906, 1868], Southern California [1857], and possible future events), has partnered with the United States Geological Survey, Charles Kircher and Associates, PBS&J and FEMA to exercise and test the State's response to a catastrophic recurrence of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. As Kircher notes in his paper, USGS ground motions, enhanced structure inventories, and FEMA' loss estimation tool, HAZUS, are used to define the impact on the San Francisco Bay Region infrastructure, resources and economy. In November of 2006, this scenario will serve as the structure of a 10-county response exercise that will be played out over 36 continuous hours, replicating lifeline, communications and transportation disruption. The exercise, funded by the California Office of Homeland Security, is the first statewide catastrophic disaster response to be carried out in the State and should serve as both a model for integration of natural hazard information into homeland security planning and for developing training that addresses the complex

  9. The Role of Science in Managed Aquifer Recharge--the Equus Beds aquifer near Wichita, Kansas Andrew Ziegler, Director Brian Kelly, Office Chief Michael Jacobs, Manager of Water Planning and Production Debra Ary, Engineer, Water Systems Planning (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, A. C.; Jacobs, M.; Ary, D.; Kelly, B.

    2013-12-01

    Data collection and interpretation using statistical, geochemical, and numerical simulation tools are essential parts of a long-term cooperative study between the city of Wichita, U.S. Geological Survey, and others to describe water quantity and quality conditions in a 165 square-mile part of the Equus Beds aquifer and Arkansas and Little Arkansas Rivers. The Equus Beds aquifer, eastern part of the High Plains Aquifer in south-central Kansas, is a vital water resource for agriculture and city of Wichita. Withdrawals for public supply began in the 1940s and agricultural irrigation began in the 1950-60s. These withdrawals led to water-level declines of up to 40 feet (historic low in 1993), a storage loss of 250,000 acre feet compared to predevelopment, and may enhance movement of chloride contamination from a past oilfield disposal area near Burrton and from natural chloride along the Arkansas River. Monitoring data and modeling show chloride near Burrton moved about 3 miles in 45 years, is about 1 mile away from the nearest public supply wells, and will continue to move for decades to centuries making the water unusable for irrigation or water supply without treatment. These concerns led to development of Wichita's 1993 integrated local water-supply plan that increased use of Cheney Reservoir and implemented aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) within the aquifer using high flows from the Little Arkansas River. ASR benefits include replacing depleted storage and slowing chloride movement. Decreased withdrawals, increased precipitation, and artificial recharge increased water levels and added 100,000 acre feet of storage through 2010, but drought since 2011 has increased withdrawals. A calibrated model will be used to simulate transport of chloride under several withdrawal scenarios using MODFLOW coupled with SEAWAT. Since 1995, water-quality data collection for more than 400 organic and inorganic compounds in surface water, treated source water for artificial recharge

  10. Genomic Analysis of Reactive Astrogliosis

    PubMed Central

    Zamanian, JL; Xu, L; Foo, LC; Nouri, N; Zhou, L; Giffard, RG; Barres, BA

    2012-01-01

    Reactive astrogliosis is characterized by a profound change in astrocyte phenotype in response to all CNS injuries and diseases. To better understand the reactive astrocyte state, we used Affymetrix GeneChip arrays to profile gene expression in populations of reactive astrocytes isolated at various time points after induction using two mouse injury models, ischemic stroke and neuroinflammation. We find reactive gliosis consists of a rapid, but quickly attenuated induction of gene expression after insult and identify two induced genes, Lcn2 and Serpina3n, as strong markers of reactive astrocytes. Strikingly, reactive astrocyte phenotype strongly depended on the type of inducing injury. Although there is a core set of genes that is up-regulated in reactive astrocytes from both injury models, at least 50% of the altered gene expression is specific to a given injury type. Reactive astrocytes in ischemia exhibited a molecular phenotype that suggests that they may be beneficial or protective, whereas reactive astrocytes induced by LPS exhibited a phenotype that suggests that they may be detrimental. These findings demonstrate that, despite well established commonalities, astrocyte reactive gliosis is a highly heterogeneous state in which astrocyte activities are altered to respond to the specific injury. This raises the question of how many subtypes of reactive astrocytes exist. Our findings provide transcriptome databases for two subtypes of reactive astrocytes that will be highly useful in generating new and testable hypotheses of their function, as well as for providing new markers to detect different types of reactive astrocytes in human neurological diseases. PMID:22553043

  11. 37. ELECTRICAL PLAN AND DETAILS. SHOWS PLANNED LOCATION OF PORTABLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. ELECTRICAL PLAN AND DETAILS. SHOWS PLANNED LOCATION OF PORTABLE GENERATOR. FUNCTION OF FOUR-FOOT SQUARE PIT IS SHOWN AS 'D.C. POWER SUPPLY PIT.' F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-701-E-1. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0701 10 851 151973. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. 140. ARAIII Grading and drainage plan showing plot plan, including ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    140. ARA-III Grading and drainage plan showing plot plan, including berms around waste storage tank and fuel oil storage tank. Aerojet-general 880-area-GCRE-101-1. Date: February 1958. Ineel index code no. 063-0101-00-013-102507. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. 19. Photocopy of engineering drawing, May, 1941 (original drawing located ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Photocopy of engineering drawing, May, 1941 (original drawing located at Fairchild Air Force Base, Civil Engineering Building, Civil Engineering vault). ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING. FIRST FLOOR PLAN, RIGHT AND LEFT END PORTIONS, TEST CELLS 5-12. - Fairchild Air Force Base, Engine Test Cell Building, Near intersection of Arnold Street & George Avenue, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  14. 23. Photocopy of engineering drawing, May, 1941 (original drawing located ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Photocopy of engineering drawing, May, 1941 (original drawing located at Fairchild Air Force Base, Civil Engineering Building, Civil Engineering vault). ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING. THIRD FLOOR AND ROOF PLAN, RIGHT AND LEFT END PORTIONS, TEST CELLS 5-12. - Fairchild Air Force Base, Engine Test Cell Building, Near intersection of Arnold Street & George Avenue, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  15. 22. Photocopy of engineering drawing, May, 1941 (original drawing located ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photocopy of engineering drawing, May, 1941 (original drawing located at Fairchild Air Force Base, Civil Engineering Building, Civil Engineering vault). ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING. THIRD FLOOR AND ROOF PLAN, CENTRAL PORTION AND TEST CELLS 1-4. - Fairchild Air Force Base, Engine Test Cell Building, Near intersection of Arnold Street & George Avenue, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  16. 16. Photocopy of engineering drawing, May, 1941 (original drawing located ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of engineering drawing, May, 1941 (original drawing located at Fairchild Air Force Base, Civil Engineering Building, Civil Engineering vault). ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING. BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN, CENTRAL PORTION AND TEST CELLS 1-4. - Fairchild Air Force Base, Engine Test Cell Building, Near intersection of Arnold Street & George Avenue, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  17. 21. Photocopy of engineering drawing, May, 1941 (original drawing located ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Photocopy of engineering drawing, May, 1941 (original drawing located at Fairchild Air Force Base, Civil Engineering Building, Civil Engineering vault). ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING. SECOND FLOOR PLAN, RIGHT AND LEFT END PORTIONS, TEST CELLS 5-12. - Fairchild Air Force Base, Engine Test Cell Building, Near intersection of Arnold Street & George Avenue, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  18. 17. Photocopy of engineering drawing, May, 1941 (original drawing located ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photocopy of engineering drawing, May, 1941 (original drawing located at Fairchild Air Force Base, Civil Engineering Building, Civil Engineering vault). ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING. BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN, RIGHT AND LEFT END PORTIONS, TEST CELLS 5-12. - Fairchild Air Force Base, Engine Test Cell Building, Near intersection of Arnold Street & George Avenue, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  19. 20. Photocopy of engineering drawing, May, 1941 (original drawing located ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photocopy of engineering drawing, May, 1941 (original drawing located at Fairchild Air Force Base, Civil Engineering Building, Civil Engineering vault). ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING. SECOND FLOOR PLAN, CENTRAL PORTION AND TEST CELLS 1-4. - Fairchild Air Force Base, Engine Test Cell Building, Near intersection of Arnold Street & George Avenue, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  20. 18. Photocopy of engineering drawing, May, 1941 (original drawing located ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of engineering drawing, May, 1941 (original drawing located at Fairchild Air Force Base, Civil Engineering Building, Civil Engineering vault). ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING. FIRST FLOOR PLAN, CENTRAL PORTION AND TEST CELLS 1-4. - Fairchild Air Force Base, Engine Test Cell Building, Near intersection of Arnold Street & George Avenue, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  1. Geotechnical techniques for the construction of reactive barriers

    PubMed

    Day; O'Hannesin; Marsden

    1999-06-30

    One of the newest and most promising remediation techniques for the treatment of contaminated groundwater and soil is the reactive barrier wall (commonly known as PRB for permeable reactive barrier or reactive barrier). Although a variety of treatment media and strategies are available, the most common technique is to bury granular iron in a trench so that contaminated groundwater passes through the reactive materials, the contaminants are removed and the water becomes 'clean'. The principal advantages of the technique are the elimination of pumping, mass excavation, off-site disposal, and a very significant reduction in costs. The use of this technology is now becoming better known and implemented. Special construction considerations need to be made when planning the installation of reactive barriers or PRBs to ensure the design life of the installation and to be cost-effective. Geotechnical techniques such as slurry trenching, deep soil mixing, and grouting can be used to simplify and improve the installation of reactive materials relative to conventional trench and fill methods. These techniques make it possible to reduce the hazards to workers during installation, reduce waste and reduce costs for most installations. To date, most PRBs have been installed to shallow depths using construction methods such as open trenching and/or shored excavations. While these methods are usable, they are limited to shallow depths and more disruptive to the site's normal use. Geotechnical techniques are more quickly installed and less disruptive to site activities and thus more effective. Recently, laboratory studies and pilot projects have demonstrated that geotechnical techniques can be used successfully to install reactive barriers. This paper describes the factors that are important in designing a reactive barrier or PRB installation and discusses some of the potential problems and pitfalls that can be avoided with careful planning and the use of geotechnical techniques

  2. Strategic Planning in Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilfoil, Wendy R.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of strategic planning is to align the institution with the external environment. In fact, it is a complex solution to a complex problem. Environmental change is inevitable and it will always impact one's institution sooner or later. It is better to be proactive, thoughtful, and in charge of change, than to be always in a reactive mode…

  3. Planning School Library Media Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Pauline H.

    This manual examines the planning process for building or renovating new library media facilities. It is concerned with building programs, local building and fire codes, design, working with architects, reading blueprints, engineering and mechanical plans, budgets, bids, and change orders. It offers help with such sensitive issues as the politics…

  4. The House Plan at Cypress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Daniel G.

    A House system is planned for Cypress Junior College, California, for an expected enrollment of 12,000. This idea of a residence hall where students live and work together may be organized around a major field (science, engineering, arts) or for a deliberate interdisciplinary mix. Usually a House plan brings living and learning together to…

  5. Personal Approaches to Career Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMont, Billie; DeMont, Roger

    1983-01-01

    Identifies four approaches to career planning based on situational leadership theory: the network approach, self-help approach, engineering approach, and mentor approach. Guidelines for the selection of a planning method based on the nature of the work environment and personal preference are discussed. (JAC)

  6. Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect

    Reader, G.T.; Hooper

    1983-01-01

    The Stirling engine was invented by a Scottish clergyman in 1816, but fell into disuse with the coming of the diesel engine. Advances in materials science and the energy crisis have made a hot air engine economically attractive. Explanations are full and understandable. Includes coverage of the underlying thermodynamics and an interesting historical section. Topics include: Introduction to Stirling engine technology, Theoretical concepts--practical realities, Analysis, simulation and design, Practical aspects, Some alternative energy sources, Present research and development, Stirling engine literature.

  7. Neural Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin

    About the Series: Bioelectric Engineering presents state-of-the-art discussions on modern biomedical engineering with respect to applications of electrical engineering and information technology in biomedicine. This focus affirms Springer's commitment to publishing important reviews of the broadest interest to biomedical engineers, bioengineers, and their colleagues in affiliated disciplines. Recent volumes have covered modeling and imaging of bioelectric activity, neural engineering, biosignal processing, bionanotechnology, among other topics.

  8. Planning in subsumption architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chalfant, Eugene C.

    1994-01-01

    A subsumption planner using a parallel distributed computational paradigm based on the subsumption architecture for control of real-world capable robots is described. Virtual sensor state space is used as a planning tool to visualize the robot's anticipated effect on its environment. Decision sequences are generated based on the environmental situation expected at the time the robot must commit to a decision. Between decision points, the robot performs in a preprogrammed manner. A rudimentary, domain-specific partial world model contains enough information to extrapolate the end results of the rote behavior between decision points. A collective network of predictors operates in parallel with the reactive network forming a recurrrent network which generates plans as a hierarchy. Details of a plan segment are generated only when its execution is imminent. The use of the subsumption planner is demonstrated by a simple maze navigation problem.

  9. Controlling Material Reactivity Using Architecture.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kyle T; Zhu, Cheng; Duoss, Eric B; Gash, Alexander E; Kolesky, David B; Kuntz, Joshua D; Lewis, Jennifer A; Spadaccini, Christopher M

    2016-03-01

    3D-printing methods are used to generate reactive material architectures. Several geometric parameters are observed to influence the resultant flame propagation velocity, indicating that the architecture can be utilized to control reactivity. Two different architectures, channels and hurdles, are generated, and thin films of thermite are deposited onto the surface. The architecture offers an additional route to control, at will, the energy release rate in reactive composite materials. PMID:26669517

  10. Adaptive Reactive Rich Internet Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Kay-Uwe; Stühmer, Roland; Dörflinger, Jörg; Rahmani, Tirdad; Thomas, Susan; Stojanovic, Ljiljana

    Rich Internet Applications significantly raise the user experience compared with legacy page-based Web applications because of their highly responsive user interfaces. Although this is a tremendous advance, it does not solve the problem of the one-size-fits-all approach1 of current Web applications. So although Rich Internet Applications put the user in a position to interact seamlessly with the Web application, they do not adapt to the context in which the user is currently working. In this paper we address the on-the-fly personalization of Rich Internet Applications. We introduce the concept of ARRIAs: Adaptive Reactive Rich Internet Applications and elaborate on how they are able to adapt to the current working context the user is engaged in. An architecture for the ad hoc adaptation of Rich Internet Applications is presented as well as a holistic framework and tools for the realization of our on-the-fly personalization approach. We divided both the architecture and the framework into two levels: offline/design-time and online/run-time. For design-time we explain how to use ontologies in order to annotate Rich Internet Applications and how to use these annotations for conceptual Web usage mining. Furthermore, we describe how to create client-side executable rules from the semantic data mining results. We present our declarative lightweight rule language tailored to the needs of being executed directly on the client. Because of the event-driven nature of the user interfaces of Rich Internet Applications, we designed a lightweight rule language based on the event-condition-action paradigm.2 At run-time the interactions of a user are tracked directly on the client and in real-time a user model is built up. The user model then acts as input to and is evaluated by our client-side complex event processing and rule engine.

  11. Test Planning Approach and Lessons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Douglas A.; Brown, Kendall K.

    2004-01-01

    As NASA began technology risk reduction activities and planning for the next generation launch vehicle under the Space Launch Initiative (SLI), now the Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) Program, a review of past large liquid rocket engine development programs was performed. The intent of the review was to identify any significant lessons from the development testing programs that could be applied to current and future engine development programs. Because the primary prototype engine in design at the time of this study was the Boeing-Rocketdyne RS-84, the study was slightly biased towards LOX/RP-1 liquid propellant engines. However, the significant lessons identified are universal. It is anticipated that these lessons will serve as a reference for test planning in the Engine Systems Group at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Towards the end of F-1 and J-2 engine development testing, NASA/MSFC asked Rocketdyne to review those test programs. The result was a document titled, Study to Accelerate Development by Test of a Rocket Engine (R-8099). The "intent (of this study) is to apply this thinking and learning to more efficiently develop rocket engines to high reliability with improved cost effectivenes" Additionally, several other engine programs were reviewed - such as SSME, NSTS, STME, MC-1, and RS-83- to support or refute the R-8099. R-8099 revealed two primary lessons for test planning, which were supported by the other engine development programs. First, engine development programs can benefit from arranging the test program for engine system testing as early as feasible. The best test for determining environments is at the system level, the closest to the operational flight environment. Secondly, the component testing, which tends to be elaborate, should instead be geared towards reducing risk to enable system test. Technical risk can be reduced at the component level, but the design can only be truly verified and validated after engine system testing.

  12. [Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome].

    PubMed

    Costa, R; Orriols, R

    2005-01-01

    Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome, better known as RADS, was described as a clinical entity consisting in the appearance of bronchial asthma due to massive toxic inhalation. The term was coined and recognised for the first time in 1985. Since then different publications have verified new cases as well as different causal agents. It usually arises from an accident at the work place and in closed or poorly ventilated spaces, where high concentrations of irritant products are inhaled in the form of gas, smoke or vapour. In the following minutes or hours symptoms of bronchial obstruction appear in an acute form, with bronchial hyperresponsiveness persisting for months or years. The affected patients do not show a recurrence of symptoms following exposure to non-toxic doses of the same agent that started the symptoms. This is why diagnosis is based on clinical manifestations as it is not reproducible through a provocation test. PMID:15915173

  13. On 'reactivity' versus 'tolerance'.

    PubMed

    Zinkernagel, Rolf M

    2004-08-01

    In Burnet's review on 'The impact of ideas on immunology' he considers himself an observer of nature using biochemical and molecular analysis for more detailed understanding, a description that applies also to me. I use three examples--repertoire selection of T cells, rules of immune reactivity versus non-reactivity and immunological memory--to illustrate the difficulties we all have in probing nature's immunological secrets and in critically testing immunologists' ideas. At one end of the spectrum of biological research one may argue everything is possible and therefore all results are correct, if correctly measured. But perhaps it is more important to always ask again and again what is frequent and enhances survival versus what is rare and an exception. At the same time one must keep in mind that special situations and special tricks may well be applied for medical benefits, although they may have little impact on physiology and species survival. I will attempt to use disease in virus-infected mice to obtain some answers to what I consider to be important immunological questions with the hope of improving the ratio of answers that are right for the right experimental reasons versus those that are right for the wrong reasons. Some of these experiments falsify hypotheses, previous experiments and interpretations and therefore are particularly important in correcting misleading concepts. They should help to find out which half of immunological ideas and truths in immunological text books written today are likely to be wrong. Ideas are important in immunology, but are often rather demagogically handled and therefore may cost us very dearly indeed. Evaluating immunity to infections and tumours in vivo should help prevent us from getting lost in immunology. PMID:15283843

  14. Second floor plan. (Also includes a roof plan and finish ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Second floor plan. (Also includes a roof plan and finish schedule.) March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, Combat Operations Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 13, approved March, 1962; specifications no. OCI-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/13, Rev. "C"; file drawer 1290. Last revised 7 February 1984. Roof plan scale one-sixteenth inch to one foot; second floor plan scale one-eighth inch to one foot. 28.75x41 inches. pencil on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  15. Approximate photochemical dynamics of azobenzene with reactive force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Hartke, Bernd

    2013-12-14

    We have fitted reactive force fields of the ReaxFF type to the ground and first excited electronic states of azobenzene, using global parameter optimization by genetic algorithms. Upon coupling with a simple energy-gap transition probability model, this setup allows for completely force-field-based simulations of photochemical cis→trans- and trans→cis-isomerizations of azobenzene, with qualitatively acceptable quantum yields. This paves the way towards large-scale dynamics simulations of molecular machines, including bond breaking and formation (via the reactive force field) as well as photochemical engines (presented in this work)

  16. Game Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morring, Frank, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Industry proposals for the Crew Exploration Vehicle that NASA plans as a replacement for the space shuttle are due next week, but the agency's new chief says it might be necessary to slow the CEV procurement at first to speed it up later. After a quick trip to Kennedy Space Center for briefings on getting the space shuttle back in operation, Michael D. Griffin sat down with his growing staff last week to begin work on modifying the CEV procurement. "We are going to rethink our entire program in that area," he said during an inaugural press conference Apr. 18. The proposals due May 2 are being prepared in response to NASA's call for a "risk-reduction flight effort" in 2008 that would lead to delivery of a human-rated CEV in 2014. But Griffin was co-leader on an independent study in 2004 that recommended a way to get the CEV flying astronauts in 2010, the year President Bush has set as a deadline for retiring the space shuttle fleet. In that study, produced for The Planetary Society, Griffin and his team called for development of a 13-15-ton "Block 1" CEV limited to low Earth orbit (LEO) that would be launched atop a single space shuttle solid rocket motor (SRM), with a new cryogenic upper stage based on existing rocket engine technology, Under this approach, NASA would develop a "Block 2" CEV later for human exploration beyond LEO.

  17. Global Reactive Gases in the MACC project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, M. G.

    2012-04-01

    In preparation for the planned atmospheric service component of the European Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) initiative, the EU FP7 project Monitoring of Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) developed a preoperational data assimilation and modelling system for monitoring and forecasting of reactive gases, greenhouse gases and aerosols. The project is coordinated by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) and the system is built on ECMWF's Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) which has been coupled to the chemistry transport models MOZART-3 and TM5. In order to provide daily forecasts of up to 96 hours for global reactive gases, various satellite retrieval products for ozone (total column and profile data), CO, NO2, CH2O and SO2 are either actively assimilated or passively monitored. The MACC system is routinely evaluated with in-situ data from ground-based stations, ozone sondes and aircraft measurements, and with independent satellite retrievals. Global MACC reactive gases forecasts are used in the planning and analysis of large international field campaigns and to provide dynamical chemical boundary conditions to regional air quality models worldwide. Several case studies of outstanding air pollution events have been performed, and they demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of chemical data assimilation based on current satellite data products. Besides the regular analyses and forecasts of the tropospheric chemical composition, the MACC system is also used to monitor the evolution of stratospheric ozone. A comprehensive reanalysis simulation from 2003 to 2010 provides new insights into the interannual variability of the atmospheric chemical composition.

  18. Developing a Virtual Engineering Management Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Bill; Kidd, Moray; Smith, Robin; Wearne, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The paper reviews the lessons of planning and running an "Engineering Management" practitioner development programme in a partnership between BP and the University of Manchester. This distance-learning programme is for professional engineers in mid-career experienced in the engineering and support activities for delivering safe,…

  19. ADVANCED REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY, TRA660, INTERIOR. REACTOR INSIDE TANK. METAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ADVANCED REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY, TRA-660, INTERIOR. REACTOR INSIDE TANK. METAL WORK PLATFORM ABOVE. THE REACTOR WAS IN A SMALL WATER-FILLED POOL. INL NEGATIVE NO. 66-6373. Unknown Photographer, ca. 1966 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. Integrating deliberative planning in a robot architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsaesser, Chris; Slack, Marc G.

    1994-01-01

    The role of planning and reactive control in an architecture for autonomous agents is discussed. The postulated architecture seperates the general robot intelligence problem into three interacting pieces: (1) robot reactive skills, i.e., grasping, object tracking, etc.; (2) a sequencing capability to differentially ativate the reactive skills; and (3) a delibrative planning capability to reason in depth about goals, preconditions, resources, and timing constraints. Within the sequencing module, caching techniques are used for handling routine activities. The planning system then builds on these cached solutions to routine tasks to build larger grain sized primitives. This eliminates large numbers of essentially linear planning problems. The architecture will be used in the future to incorporate in robots cognitive capabilites normally associated with intelligent behavior.

  1. A Tariff for Reactive Power

    SciTech Connect

    Kueck, John D; Kirby, Brendan J; Li, Fangxing; Tufon, Christopher; Isemonger, Alan

    2008-07-01

    Two kinds of power are required to operate an electric power system: real power, measured in watts, and reactive power, measured in volt-amperes reactive or VARs. Reactive power supply is one of a class of power system reliability services collectively known as ancillary services, and is essential for the reliable operation of the bulk power system. Reactive power flows when current leads or lags behind voltage. Typically, the current in a distribution system lags behind voltage because of inductive loads such as motors. Reactive power flow wastes energy and capacity and causes voltage droop. To correct lagging power flow, leading reactive power (current leading voltage) is supplied to bring the current into phase with voltage. When the current is in phase with voltage, there is a reduction in system losses, an increase in system capacity, and a rise in voltage. Reactive power can be supplied from either static or dynamic VAR sources. Static sources are typically transmission and distribution equipment, such as capacitors at substations, and their cost has historically been included in the revenue requirement of the transmission operator (TO), and recovered through cost-of-service rates. By contrast, dynamic sources are typically generators capable of producing variable levels of reactive power by automatically controlling the generator to regulate voltage. Transmission system devices such as synchronous condensers can also provide dynamic reactive power. A class of solid state devices (called flexible AC transmission system devices or FACTs) can provide dynamic reactive power. One specific device has the unfortunate name of static VAR compensator (SVC), where 'static' refers to the solid state nature of the device (it does not include rotating equipment) and not to the production of static reactive power. Dynamic sources at the distribution level, while more costly would be very useful in helping to regulate local voltage. Local voltage regulation would reduce

  2. Spacecraft servicing demonstration plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergonz, F. H.; Bulboaca, M. A.; Derocher, W. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A preliminary spacecraft servicing demonstration plan is prepared which leads to a fully verified operational on-orbit servicing system based on the module exchange, refueling, and resupply technologies. The resulting system can be applied at the space station, in low Earth orbit with an orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV), or be carried with an OMV to geosynchronous orbit by an orbital transfer vehicle. The three phase plan includes ground demonstrations, cargo bay demonstrations, and free flight verifications. The plan emphasizes the exchange of multimission modular spacecraft (MMS) modules which involves space repairable satellites. Three servicer mechanism configurations are the engineering test unit, a protoflight quality unit, and two fully operational units that have been qualified and documented for use in free flight verification activity. The plan balances costs and risks by overlapping study phases, utilizing existing equipment for ground demonstrations, maximizing use of existing MMS equipment, and rental of a spacecraft bus.

  3. Engine costs for reusability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schindler, Carla M.; Lansaw, John

    1990-01-01

    The advanced Launch System (ALS) program goals demand an order-of-magnitude reduction in costs over existing launch vehicle propulsion systems. Studies suggest that reusable engines provide cost advantages over expendable propulsion systems. Early studies are quantifying operations costs, and cost sensitivities to engine production and operations variables. ALS production and operations philosophies enhance the potential of an affordable, operationally flexible launch vehicle propulsion system. The assumptions made and criteria set during the initial planning for the operations phase of the ALS highlight the changes for implementing such a system.

  4. Long-Term Monitoring of Permeable Reactive Barriers - Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, L.

    2001-04-12

    The purpose of this project is to conduct collaborative research to evaluate and maximize the effectiveness of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) with a broad-based working group including representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) and its project partner, Battelle, are leading the DoD effort with funding from DoD's Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) and Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is coordinating the DOE effort with support from Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area (SCFA), a research program under DOEs Office of Science and Technology. The National Risk Management Research Laboratory's Subsurface Protection and Remediation Division is leading EPA's effort. The combined effort of these three agencies allows the evaluation of a large number of sites. Documents generated by this joint project will be reviewed by the participating agencies' principal investigators, the Permeable Barriers Group of the Remediation Technologies Development Forum (RTDF), and the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Cooperation (ITRC). The technical objectives of this project are to collect and review existing field data at selected PRB sites, identify data gaps, conduct additional measurements, and provide recommendations to DOE users on suitable long-term monitoring strategies. The specific objectives are to (1) evaluate geochemical and hydraulic performance of PRBs, (2) develop guidelines for hydraulic and geochemical characterization/monitoring, and (3) devise and implement long-term monitoring strategies through the use of hydrological and geochemical models. Accomplishing these objectives will provide valuable information regarding the optimum configuration and lifetime of barriers at specific sites. It will also permit

  5. Hydrothermal reactivity of saponite.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, G.

    1983-01-01

    The nature and extent of the reactions of synthetic Fe-free saponite have been investigated under experimental hydrothermal conditions as a first step towards understanding saponite reactivity under relatively simple conditions. Saponite crystallizes from amorphous gel of ideal saponite composition within 7 days at 300o-550oC under P = 1 kbar. Reactions subsequent to this initial crystallization depend on reaction T and interlayer cations. Saponite is found to react hydrothermally, over a period of 200 days, at T down to 400oC, at least 150oC lower than previously reported, but showed no signs of reaction below 400oC. At 450oC, a mixture of talc/saponite and saponite/phlogopite clays forms from K-saponite via intracrystalline layer transformations, while above 450oC the initial K-saponite dissolves, with talc and phlogopite forming as discrete phases. After 200 days reactions at 400-450oC were not complete, so that given sufficient time to reach equilibrium, a lower hydrothermal stability limit for saponite is possible. Further study of the Fe-bearing saponite system will be required before experimental results can be applied to natural systems.-D.F.B.

  6. Thinking Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Stu; Sharp, Janet; Zachary, Loren

    2004-01-01

    Most people think that engineering and mathematics go hand in hand. To many, being an engineer means manipulating equations and calculating measurements to design and build structures of all kinds. And they are right. Engineering does involve a great deal of mathematics. But, building structures to withstand certain environmental conditions or…

  7. Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, G.

    1980-01-01

    Stirling engines exist in a bewildering array of mechanical arrangements. This book attempts to describe and classify the systems in a rational way, to explain the intricacies of the cycle, and to present a large amount of detailed information related to Stirling engines such as design, heat exchangers, working fluids, operation and performance, control equipment, recently developed engines, and current and proposed uses. (LCL)

  8. Genetic and environmental stability differs in reactive and proactive aggression.

    PubMed

    Tuvblad, Catherine; Raine, Adrian; Zheng, Mo; Baker, Laura A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine stability and change in genetic and environmental influences on reactive (impulsive and affective) and proactive (planned and instrumental) aggression from childhood to early adolescence. The sample was drawn from an ongoing longitudinal twin study of risk factors for antisocial behavior at the University of Southern California (USC). The twins were measured on two occasions: ages 9-10 years (N=1,241) and 11-14 years (N=874). Reactive and proactive aggressive behaviors were rated by parents. The stability in reactive aggression was due to genetic and nonshared environmental influences, whereas the continuity in proactive aggression was primarily genetically mediated. Change in both reactive and proactive aggression between the two occasions was mainly explained by nonshared environmental influences, although some evidence for new genetic variance at the second occasion was found for both forms of aggression. These results suggest that proactive and reactive aggression differ in their genetic and environmental stability, and provide further evidence for some distinction between reactive and proactive forms of aggression. PMID:19688841

  9. PST and PARR: Plan specification tools and a planning and resource reasoning shell for use in satellite mission planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclean, David; Yen, Wen

    1989-01-01

    Plan Specification Tools (PST) are tools that allow the user to specify satellite mission plans in terms of satellite activities, relevent orbital events, and targets for observation. The output of these tools is a set of knowledge bases and environmental events which can then be used by a Planning And Resource Reasoning (PARR) shell to build a schedule. PARR is a reactive planning shell which is capable of reasoning about actions in the satellite mission planning domain. Each of the PST tools and PARR are described as well as the use of PARR for scheduling computer usage in the multisatellite operations control center at Goddard Space Flight Center.

  10. ESSOPE: Towards S/C operations with reactive schedule planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheadon, J.

    1993-01-01

    The ESSOPE is a prototype front-end tool running on a Sun workstation and interfacing to ESOC's MSSS spacecraft control system for the exchange of telecommand requests (to MSSS) and telemetry reports (from MSSS). ESSOPE combines an operations Planner-Scheduler, with a Schedule Execution Control function. Using an internal 'model' of the spacecraft, the Planner generates a schedule based on utilization requests for a variety of payload services by a community of Olympus users, and incorporating certain housekeeping operations. Conflicts based on operational constraints are automatically resolved, by employing one of several available strategies. The schedule is passed to the execution function which drives MSSS to perform it. When the schedule can no longer be met, either because the operator interferes (by delays or changes of requirements), or because ESSOPE has recognized some spacecraft anomalies, the Planner produces a modified schedule maintaining the on-going procedures as far as consistent with the new constraints or requirements.

  11. Engineering calculations for communications satellite systems planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levis, C. A.; Martin, C. H.; Reilly, C. H.; Gonsalvez, D. J.; Yamaura, Y.

    1985-01-01

    An extended gradient search code for broadcasting satellite service (BSS) spectrum/orbit assignment synthesis is discussed. Progress is also reported on both single-entry and full synthesis computational aids for fixed satellite service (FSS) spectrum/orbit assignment purposes.

  12. Engineering calculations for communications systems planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levis, C. A.; Martin, C. H.; Wang, C. W.; Gonsalvez, D.

    1982-01-01

    The single entry interference problem is treated for frequency sharing between the broadcasting satellite and intersatellite services near 23 GHz. It is recommended that very long (more than 120 longitude difference) intersatellite hops be relegated to the unshared portion of the band. When this is done, it is found that suitable orbit assignments can be determined easily with the aid of a set of universal curves. An attempt to develop synthesis procedures for optimally assigning frequencies and orbital slots for the broadcasting satellite service in region 2 was initiated. Several discrete programming and continuous optimization techniques are discussed.

  13. Advanced systems engineering and network planning support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, David H.; Barrett, Larry K.; Boyd, Ronald; Bazaj, Suresh; Mitchell, Lionel; Brosi, Fred

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this task was to take a fresh look at the NASA Space Network Control (SNC) element for the Advanced Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (ATDRSS) such that it can be made more efficient and responsive to the user by introducing new concepts and technologies appropriate for the 1997 timeframe. In particular, it was desired to investigate the technologies and concepts employed in similar systems that may be applicable to the SNC. The recommendations resulting from this study include resource partitioning, on-line access to subsets of the SN schedule, fluid scheduling, increased use of demand access on the MA service, automating Inter-System Control functions using monitor by exception, increase automation for distributed data management and distributed work management, viewing SN operational control in terms of the OSI Management framework, and the introduction of automated interface management.

  14. Engineering calculations for communications satellite systems planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reilly, C. H.; Levis, C. A.; Mount-Campbell, C.; Gonsalvez, D. J.; Wang, C. W.; Yamamura, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Computer-based techniques for optimizing communications-satellite orbit and frequency assignments are discussed. A gradient-search code was tested against a BSS scenario derived from the RARC-83 data. Improvement was obtained, but each iteration requires about 50 minutes of IBM-3081 CPU time. Gradient-search experiments on a small FSS test problem, consisting of a single service area served by 8 satellites, showed quickest convergence when the satellites were all initially placed near the center of the available orbital arc with moderate spacing. A transformation technique is proposed for investigating the surface topography of the objective function used in the gradient-search method. A new synthesis approach is based on transforming single-entry interference constraints into corresponding constraints on satellite spacings. These constraints are used with linear objective functions to formulate the co-channel orbital assignment task as a linear-programming (LP) problem or mixed integer programming (MIP) problem. Globally optimal solutions are always found with the MIP problems, but not necessarily with the LP problems. The MIP solutions can be used to evaluate the quality of the LP solutions. The initial results are very encouraging.

  15. TWRS process engineering data management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.R.

    1997-05-12

    The Tank Characterization Data Management (TCDM) system provides customers and users with data and information of known and acceptable quality when they are needed, in the form they are needed, and at a reasonable cost. The TCDM mission will be accomplished by the following: (1) maintaining and managing tank characterization data and information based on business needs and objectives including transfer of ownership to future contractors; (2) capturing data where it originates and entering it only once to control data consistency, electronic data and information management shall be emphasized to the extent practicable; (3) establishing data quality standards, and managing and certifying databases and data sources against these standards to maintain the proper level of data and information quality consistent with the importance of the data and information, data obtained at high cost with significant implications to decision making regarding tank safety and/or disposal will be maintained and managed at the highest necessary levels of quality; (4) establishing and enforcing data management standards for the Tank Characterization Database (TCD) and supporting data sources including providing mechanisms for discovering and correcting data errors before they propagate; (5) emphasizing electronic data sharing with all authorized users, customers, contractors, and stakeholders to the extent practicable; (6) safeguarding data and information from unauthorized alteration or destruction; (7) providing standards for electronic information deliverables to subcontractors and vendors to achieve uniformity in electronic data management; and (8) investing in new technology (hardware and/or software) as prudent and necessary to accomplish the mission in an efficient and effective manner.

  16. Engineering calculations for communications satellite systems planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, E.; Aebker, E.; Mata, F.; Reilly, C.

    1991-01-01

    The final phase of a satellite synthesis project is described. Several methods for generating satellite positionings with improved aggregate carrier to interference characteristics were studied. Two general methods for modifying required separation values are presented. Also, two methods for improving aggregate carrier to interference (C/I) performance of given satellite synthesis solutions are presented. A perturbation of the World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC) synthesis is presented.

  17. 46 CFR 128.120 - Plan approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Plan approval. 128.120 Section 128.120 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS General § 128.120 Plan approval. The plans required by subchapter F of this chapter...

  18. 46 CFR 128.120 - Plan approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plan approval. 128.120 Section 128.120 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS General § 128.120 Plan approval. The plans required by subchapter F of this chapter...

  19. Method of vibration isolating an aircraft engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, Stanley I. (Inventor); Butler, Lawrence (Inventor); Dawes, Peter W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method for coupling an engine to a support frame for mounting to a fuselage of an aircraft using a three point vibration isolating mounting system in which the load reactive forces at each mounting point are statically and dynamically determined. A first vibration isolating mount pivotably couples a first end of an elongated support beam to a stator portion of an engine with the pivoting action of the vibration mount being oriented such that it is pivotable about a line parallel to a center line of the engine. An aft end of the supporting frame is coupled to the engine through an additional pair of vibration isolating mounts with the mounts being oriented such that they are pivotable about a circumference of the engine. The aft mounts are symmetrically spaced to each side of the supporting frame by 45 degrees. The relative orientation between the front mount and the pair of rear mounts is such that only the rear mounts provide load reactive forces parallel to the engine center line, in support of the engine to the aircraft against thrust forces. The forward mount is oriented so as to provide only radial forces to the engine and some lifting forces to maintain the engine in position adjacent a fuselage. Since each mount is connected to provide specific forces to support the engine, forces required of each mount are statically and dynamically determinable.

  20. A heuristic approach to incremental and reactive scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odubiyi, Jide B.; Zoch, David R.

    1989-01-01

    An heuristic approach to incremental and reactive scheduling is described. Incremental scheduling is the process of modifying an existing schedule if the initial schedule does not meet its stated initial goals. Reactive scheduling occurs in near real-time in response to changes in available resources or the occurrence of targets of opportunity. Only minor changes are made during both incremental and reactive scheduling because a goal of re-scheduling procedures is to minimally impact the schedule. The described heuristic search techniques, which are employed by the Request Oriented Scheduling Engine (ROSE), a prototype generic scheduler, efficiently approximate the cost of reaching a goal from a given state and effective mechanisms for controlling search.

  1. Engine Lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    PS 212, a plasma-sprayed coating developed by NASA, is used to coat valves in a new rotorcam engine. The coating eliminates the need for a liquid lubricant in the rotorcam, which has no crankshaft, flywheel, distributor or water pump. Developed by Murray United Development Corporation, it is a rotary engine only 10 inches long with four cylinders radiating outward from a central axle. Company officials say the engine will be lighter, more compact and cheaper to manufacture than current engines and will feature cleaner exhaust emissions. A licensing arrangement with a manufacturer is under negotiation. Primary applications are for automobiles, but the engine may also be used in light aircraft.

  2. Manufacturing Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waid, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Manufacturing process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the manufacturing facilities. The Manufacturing Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their project engineering personnel in manufacturing planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the manufacturing process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, products, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  3. JPL Contamination Control Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakkolb, Brian

    2013-01-01

    JPL has extensive expertise fielding contamination sensitive missions-in house and with our NASA/industry/academic partners.t Development and implementation of performance-driven cleanliness requirements for a wide range missions and payloads - UV-Vis-IR: GALEX, Dawn, Juno, WFPC-II, AIRS, TES, et al - Propulsion, thermal control, robotic sample acquisition systems. Contamination control engineering across the mission life cycle: - System and payload requirements derivation, analysis, and contamination control implementation plans - Hardware Design, Risk trades, Requirements V-V - Assembly, Integration & Test planning and implementation - Launch site operations and launch vehicle/payload integration - Flight ops center dot Personnel on staff have expertise with space materials development and flight experiments. JPL has capabilities and expertise to successfully address contamination issues presented by space and habitable environments. JPL has extensive experience fielding and managing contamination sensitive missions. Excellent working relationship with the aerospace contamination control engineering community/.

  4. Kinetics of reactive wetting

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, F.G.

    2000-04-14

    The importance of interfacial processes in materials joining has a long history. A significant amount of work has suggested that processes collateral to wetting can affect the extent of wetting and moderate or retard wetting rate. Even very small additions of a constituent, known to react with the substrate, cause pronounced improvement in wetting and are exploited in braze alloys, especially those used for joining to ceramics. In the following a model will be constructed for the wetting kinetics of a small droplet of metal containing a constituent that diffuses to the wetting line and chemically reacts with a flat, smooth substrate. The model is similar to that of Voitovitch et al. and Mortensen et al. but incorporates chemical reaction kinetics such that the result contains both diffusion and reaction kinetics. The model is constructed in the circular cylinder coordinate system, satisfies the diffusion equation under conditions of slow flow, and considers diffusion and reaction at the wetting line to be processes in series. This is done by solving the diffusion equation with proper initial and boundary conditions, computing the diffusive flux at the wetting line, and equating this to both the convective flux and reaction flux. This procedure is similar to equating the current flowing in components of a series circuit. The wetting rate will be computed versus time for a variety of diffusion and reaction conditions. A transition is observed from nonlinear (diffusive) to linear (reactive) behavior as the control parameters (such as the diffusion coefficient) are modified. This is in agreement with experimental observations. The adequacy of the slow flow condition, used in this type of analysis, is discussed and an amended procedure is suggested.

  5. Reactive power management and voltage control in deregulated power markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Robert G.

    The research that is the subject of this dissertation is about the management of reactive power and voltage support in the wholesale open access power markets in the United States (US). The purpose of this research is to place decisions about open access market structures, as they relate to reactive power and voltage control, on a logical and consistent economic basis, given the engineering needs of a commercial electric power system. An examination of the electricity markets operating in the US today reveals that current approaches to reactive power management and voltage support are extensions of those based on historical, regulated monopoly electric service. A case for change is built by first looking at the subject of reactive power from an engineering viewpoint and then from an economic perspective. Ultimately, a set of market rules for managing reactive power and voltage support is proposed. The proposal suggests that cost recovery for static and dynamic VARs is appropriately accomplished through the regulated transmission cost of service. Static VAR cost recovery should follow traditional rate recovery methodologies. In the case of dynamic VARs, this work provides a methodology based on the microeconomic theory of the firm for determining such cost. It further suggests that an operational strategy that reduces and limits the use of dynamic VARs, during normal operations, is appropriate. This latter point leads to an increase in the fixed cost of the transmission network but prevents price spikes and short supply situations from affecting, or being affected by, the reactive capability limitations associated with dynamic VARs supplied from synchronous generators. The rules are consistent with a market structure that includes competitive generation and their application will result in the communication of a clear understanding of the responsibilities, related to voltage control, of each type of market entity. In this sense, their application will contribute to

  6. Computer aided production engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the following contents: CIM in avionics; computer analysis of product designs for robot assembly; a simulation decision mould for manpower forecast and its application; development of flexible manufacturing system; advances in microcomputer applications in CAD/CAM; an automated interface between CAD and process planning; CAM and computer vision; low friction pneumatic actuators for accurate robot control; robot assembly of printed circuit boards; information systems design for computer integrated manufacture; and a CAD engineering language to aid manufacture.

  7. Engineering visualization utilizing advanced animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabionski, Gunter R.; Robinson, Thomas L., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Engineering visualization is the use of computer graphics to depict engineering analysis and simulation in visual form from project planning through documentation. Graphics displays let engineers see data represented dynamically which permits the quick evaluation of results. The current state of graphics hardware and software generally allows the creation of two types of 3D graphics. The use of animated video as an engineering visualization tool is presented. The engineering, animation, and videography aspects of animated video production are each discussed. Specific issues include the integration of staffing expertise, hardware, software, and the various production processes. A detailed explanation of the animation process reveals the capabilities of this unique engineering visualization method. Automation of animation and video production processes are covered and future directions are proposed.

  8. On Spurious Numerics in Solving Reactive Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotov, D. V; Yee, H. C.; Wang, W.; Shu, C.-W.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to gain a deeper understanding of the behavior of high order shock-capturing schemes for problems with stiff source terms and discontinuities and on corresponding numerical prediction strategies. The studies by Yee et al. (2012) and Wang et al. (2012) focus only on solving the reactive system by the fractional step method using the Strang splitting (Strang 1968). It is a common practice by developers in computational physics and engineering simulations to include a cut off safeguard if densities are outside the permissible range. Here we compare the spurious behavior of the same schemes by solving the fully coupled reactive system without the Strang splitting vs. using the Strang splitting. Comparison between the two procedures and the effects of a cut off safeguard is the focus the present study. The comparison of the performance of these schemes is largely based on the degree to which each method captures the correct location of the reaction front for coarse grids. Here "coarse grids" means standard mesh density requirement for accurate simulation of typical non-reacting flows of similar problem setup. It is remarked that, in order to resolve the sharp reaction front, local refinement beyond standard mesh density is still needed.

  9. Comparison: Direct thrust nuclear engine, nuclear electric engine, and a chemical engine for future space missions

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsthaler, J.H.; Sulmeisters, T.K.

    1988-01-01

    The need for an advanced direct thrust nuclear rocket propulsion engine has been identified in Project Forecast 2, Air Force Systems Command report which looks into future Air Force needs. The Air Force Astronautical Laboratory (AFAL) has been assigned responsibility for developing the nuclear engine, and they in turn have requested support from teams of contractors who have the full capability to assist in the development of the nuclear engine. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has formed a team of experts with Martin Marietta for mission analysis. Science Applications International (SAIC) for flight safety analysis, Westinghouse for the nuclear subsystem, and Rocketdyne for the engine system. INEL is the overall program manager and manager for test facility design, construction and operation. The INEL team has produced plans for both the engine system and the ground test facility. AFAL has funded the INEL team to perform mission analyses to evaluate the cost, performance and operational advantages for a nuclear rocket engine in performing Air Force Space Missions. For those studies, the Advanced Nuclear Rocket Engine (ANRE), a scaled down NERVA derivative, was used as the baseline nuclear engine to compare against chemical engines and nuclear electric engines for performance of orbital transfer and maneuvering missions. 3 tabs.

  10. Strutjet RBCC Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulman, Mel; Neill, Todd; Yam, Clement

    1999-01-01

    In the past two years Strutjet Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) engine has been tested extensively under the Advanced Reusable Technology (ART) contract from NASA MSFC. RBCC Engines combine the high thrust to weight of the rocket with the high efficiency of the ramjet engine. This propulsion system has the potential to reduce the cost of launching payloads to orbit by up to a factor of 100. In the ART program we have conducted over 100 hot fire tests. The propellants have been hydrogen and oxygen. The Modes tested have included the Air Augmented Rocket (AAR) from M = 0 to 2.4, the Ramjet at M = 2.4 & 6, Scramjet at M = 6 & 8, Scram/Rocket at Mach 8 and Ascent Rocket in Vacuum. This invited paper will present an overview of these test results and plans for future development of this propulsion cycle.

  11. Adolescents’ Emotional Reactivity across Relationship Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Emily C.; Buehler, Cheryl; Blair, Bethany L.

    2012-01-01

    Adolescents’ emotional reactivity in family, close friendships, and romantic relationships was examined in a community-based sample of 416 two-parent families. Six waves of annual data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Emotional reactivity to interparental conflict during early adolescence was associated prospectively with adolescents’ reactivity to conflict in friendships and romantic relationships during middle adolescence. Close friendship reactivity partially explained the prospective association between reactivity to interparental conflict and romantic relationship reactivity. The association between perceived emotional reactivity and relationship conflict was stronger for girls than boys. Results have important developmental implications regarding adolescents’ emotional reactivity across salient interpersonal contexts during adolescence. PMID:22545839

  12. Engineering Annual Summary 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Dimolitsas, S.

    1997-04-30

    Fiscal year 1996 has been a year of significant change for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in general and for Engineering in particular. Among these changes, the Laboratory`s national security mission was better defined, the stockpile stewardship program objectives became crisper, LLNL`s investment in high-performance computing was re-emphasized with the procurement of a $100 million supercomputer for the Laboratory`s Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) program, two major Laser programs (the National Ignition Facility and Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation) expanded significantly, and DOE`s human genome efforts moved to the next phase of development. In the area of business operations, LLNL`s Cost Cutting Initiative Program (CCIP) was completed and the Laboratory restructured its workforce using a Voluntary Separation Incentive Program (VSIP). Engineering similarly also saw many technical and programmatic successes, as well as changes, starting with completion of its strategic plan, significant consolidation of its facilities, restructuring of its workforce, reduction of its overhead costs, substantial transfers of staff between programs, and finally my personal arrival at Livermore. This report is the first opportunity to capture some of Engineering`s FY96 activities and accomplishments in a succinct fashion, and to relate these to our strategic plan.

  13. Understanding the Reactivity of Lunar Dust for Future Lunar Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, William; Taylor, L. A.; Jeevarajan, Antony

    2009-01-01

    During the Apollo missions, dust was found to cause numerous problems for various instruments and systems. Additionally, the dust may have caused momentary health issues for some of the astronauts. Therefore, the plan to resume robotic and manned missions to the Moon in the next decade has led to a renewed interest in the properties of lunar dust, ranging from geological to chemical to toxicological. An important property to understand is the reactivity of the dust particles. Due to the lack of an atmosphere on the Moon, there is nothing to protect the lunar soil from ultraviolet radiation, solar wind, and meteorite impacts. These processes could all serve to activate the soil, or produce reactive surface species. On the Moon, these species can be maintained for millennia without oxygen or water vapor present to satisfy the broken bonds. Unfortunately, the Apollo dust samples that were returned to Earth were inadvertently exposed to the atmosphere, causing them to lose their reactive characteristics. In order to aid in the preparation of mitigation techniques prior to returning to the Moon, we measured the ability of lunar dust, lunar dust simulant, and quartz samples to produce hydroxyl radicals in solution[1]. As a first approximation of meteorite impacts on the lunar surface, we ground samples using a mortar and pestle. Our initial studies showed that all three test materials (lunar dust (62241), lunar dust simulant (JSC-1Avf), and quartz) produced hydroxyl radicals after grinding and mixing with water. However, the radical production of the ground lunar dust was approximately 10-fold and 3-fold greater than quartz and JSC-1 Avf, respectively. These reactivity differences between the different samples did not correlate with differences in specific surface area. The increased reactivity produced for the quartz by grinding was attributed to the presence of silicon- or oxygen-based radicals on the surface, as had been seen previously[2]. These radicals may also

  14. Shockwave Engine: Wave Disk Engine

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-14

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: MSU is developing a new engine for use in hybrid automobiles that could significantly reduce fuel waste and improve engine efficiency. In a traditional internal combustion engine, air and fuel are ignited, creating high-temperature and high-pressure gases which expand rapidly. This expansion of gases forces the engine’s pistons to pump and powers the car. MSU’s engine has no pistons. It uses the combustion of air and fuel to build up pressure within the engine, generating a shockwave that blasts hot gas exhaust into the blades of the engine’s rotors causing them to turn, which generates electricity. MSU’s redesigned engine would be the size of a cooking pot and contain fewer moving parts—reducing the weight of the engine by 30%. It would also enable a vehicle that could use 60% of its fuel for propulsion.

  15. Kinetics of Reactive Wetting

    SciTech Connect

    YOST, FREDERICK G.

    1999-09-09

    for a variety of diffusion and reaction conditions. A transition is observed from nonlinear (diffusive) to linear (reactive) behavior as the control parameters (such as the diffusion coefficient) are modified. This is in agreement with experimental observations. The adequacy of the slow flow condition, used in this type of analysis, is discussed and an amended procedure is suggested.

  16. Participatory Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeJong, William S.

    1980-01-01

    A synopsis of a Planning Assistance Kit designed by the Council of Educational Facility Planners (CEFP) and Educational Facilities Laboratories (EFL) to assist local communities in participatory planning. (MLF)

  17. Planning Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabel, Medard

    1984-01-01

    To solve societal problems, both local and global, a global approach is needed. Serious diseases that are crippling present-day problem solving and planning are discussed, and the characteristics of a healthy, effective planning approach are described. (RM)

  18. Tropospheric budget of reactive chlorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graedel, T. E.; Keene, W. C.

    1995-03-01

    Reactive chlorine in the lower atmosphere (as distinguished from chlorofluorocarbon-derived chlorine in the stratosphere) is important to considerations of precipitation acidity, corrosion, foliar damage, and chemistry of the marine boundary layer. Many of the chlorine-containing gases are difficult to measure, and natural sources appear to dominate anthropogenic sources for some chemical species. As a consequence, no satisfactory budget for reactive chlorine in the lower atmosphere is available. We have reviewed information on sources; source strengths; measurements in gas, aqueous, and aerosol phases; and chemical processes and from those data derive global budgets for nine reactive chlorine species and for reactive chlorine as a whole. The typical background abundance of reactive chlorine in the lower tropospheric is about 1.5 ppbv. The nine species, CH3 Cl, CH3 CCl3, HCl, CHClF2, Cl2* (thought to be HOCl and/or Cl2), CCl2 = CCl2, CH2 Cl2 , COCl2 , and CHCl3, each contribute at least a few percent to that total. The tropospheric reactive chlorine burden of approximately 8.3 Tg Cl is dominated by CH3 Cl (≈45 %) and CH3 CCl3 (≈25 %) and appears to be increasing by several percent per year. By far the most vigorous chlorine cycling appears to occur among seasalt aerosol, HCl, and Cl2*. The principal sources of reactive chlorine are volatilization from seasalt (enhanced by anthropogenically generated reactants), marine algae, volcanoes, and coal combustion (natural sources being thus quite important to the budget). It is anticipated that the concentrations of tropospheric reactive chlorine will continue to increase in the next several decades, particularly near urban areas in the rapidly developing countries.

  19. Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    2001-07-31

    A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

  20. Detroit Diesel Engine Technology for Light Duty Truck Applications - DELTA Engine Update

    SciTech Connect

    Freese, Charlie

    2000-08-20

    The early generation of the DELTA engine has been thoroughly tested and characterized in the virtual lab, during engine dynamometer testing, and on light duty trucks for personal transportation. This paper provides an up-to-date account of program findings. Further, the next generation engine design and future program plans will be briefly presented.