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Sample records for reactor gamma radiation

  1. Measurement and Calculation of Gamma Radiation from HWZPR Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jalali, Majid

    2006-07-01

    HWZPR is a research reactor with natural uranium fuel, D{sub 2}O moderator and graphite reflector with maximum power of 100 W. It is a suitable means for theoretical research and heavy water reactor experiments. Neutrons from the core participate in different nuclear reactions by interactions with fuel, moderator, graphite and the concrete around the reactor. The results of these interactions are the production of prompt gammas in the environment. Useful information is gained by the reactor gamma spectrum measurement from point of view of relative quantity and energy distribution of direct and scattered radiations. Reactor gamma ray spectrum has been gathered in different places around the reactor by HPGe detector. In analysis of these spectra, {sup 1}H(n,{gamma}){sup 2}H, {sup 16}O(n,n'{gamma}){sup 16}O, {sup 2}H(n,{gamma}){sup 3}H and {sup 238}U(n,{gamma}){sup 239}U reactions occurring in reactor moderator and fuel, are important. The measured spectrum has been primarily estimated by the MCNP code. There is agreement between the code and the experiments in some points. The scattered gamma rays from {sup 27}Al (n,{gamma}){sup 28}Al reaction in the reactor tank, are the most among the gammas scattered in the reactor environment. Also the dose calculations by MCNP code show that 72% of gamma dose belongs to the energy range 3-11 MeV from reactor gamma spectrum and the danger of exposure from the reactor high-energy photons is serious. (author)

  2. Prompt gamma radiation as a new tool to measure reactor power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    jalali, Majid; Abdi, Mohammad Reza; davati, Mojtaba Mostajabod

    2013-10-01

    A new method, based on reactor prompt gamma radiation detection, for reactor power measurement is introduced and validated. To verify, the ex-core gamma radiation spectrum from the Iranian Heavy Water Zero Power Reactor (HWZPR) were measured by HPGe and NaI detectors each suitably positioned. The collective prompt gamma count rates for all or for a portion of each of 2″×2″ NaI detector spectra were obtained for seven power level readings from calibrated reactor power monitors. A good linear behavior was found between gamma count rate and reactor power. The method of calibrated prompt gamma reactor power determination is a stable and reliable tool, on-line, sensitive to sudden variation of power, working in pulse mode, increasing redundancy and diversity and so improving the reactor safety. The prompt gamma counting system can be adopted and installed in other nuclear reactors to measure power.

  3. Radiation does from medical in-vivo prompt gamma-ray activation using a mobile nuclear reactor.

    PubMed

    Chung, C; Chen, C P; Chang, P S

    1988-10-01

    A method of medical diagnosis of toxic elements, using a neutron beam from a mobile nuclear reactor to perform partial-body in-vivo prompt gamma-ray activation technique, has been developed. Both neutron and gamma-ray dose equivalents in an irradiated phantom and around medical researchers were measured and evaluated. Neutron flux at various kinetic energies was measured using an activation foil technique, and the neutron dose equivalents at tissues of risk inside the irradiated phantom were calculated by neutron transport code. Gamma-ray dose equivalents inside the irradiated phantom and around the nuclear reactor were measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters. The risk associated with the neutron and gamma radiation dose equivalents received by both the irradiated phantom and medical researchers were evaluated in detail. The radiation safety of the in-vivo medical diagnosis using the mobile nuclear reactor, under the context of radiation protection guidelines, is discussed. PMID:3170218

  4. Final report of the gamma-ray leakage from the Aberdeen Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) reactor. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Heimbach, C.R.

    1995-04-01

    The gamma-ray leakage from the Aberdeen Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) fast-burst reactor has been measured. A BGO spectrometer was used to measure spectrum, and a Geiger counter was used to measure dose. The two detectors were consistent, but measured about 60 percent more dose than indicated by calculation.

  5. Non Invasive Water Level Monitoring on Boiling Water Reactors Using Internal Gamma Radiation: Application of Soft Computing Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, Sebastian; Hampel, Rainer

    2006-07-01

    To provide best knowledge about safety-related water level values in boiling water reactors (BWR) is essentially for operational regime. For the water level determination hydrostatic level measurement systems are almost exclusively applied, because they stand the test over many decades in conventional and nuclear power plants (NPP). Due to the steam generation especially in BWR a specific phenomenon occurs which leads to a water-steam mixture level in the reactor annular space and reactor plenum. The mixture level is a high transient non-measurable value concerning the hydrostatic water level measuring system and it significantly differs from the measured collapsed water level. In particular, during operational and accidental transient processes like fast negative pressure transients, the monitoring of these water levels is very important. In addition to the hydrostatic water level measurement system a diverse water level measurement system for BWR should be used. A real physical diversity is given by gamma radiation distribution inside and outside the reactor pressure vessel correlating with the water level. The vertical gamma radiation distribution depends on the water level, but it is also a function of the neutron flux and the coolant recirculation pump speed. For the water level monitoring, special algorithms are required. An analytical determination of the gamma radiation distribution outside the reactor pressure vessel is impossible due to the multitude of radiation of physical processes, complicated non-stationary radiation source distribution and complex geometry of fixtures. For creating suited algorithms Soft Computing methods (Fuzzy Sets Theory, Artificial Neural Networks, etc.) will be used. Therefore, a database containing input values (gamma radiation distribution) and output values (water levels) had to be built. Here, the database was established by experiments (data from BWR and from a test setup) and simulation with the authorised thermo

  6. Empirical correlation of residual gamma radiation resulting from operation of the Health Physics Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.L.; Ragan, G.E.; Sims, C.S.

    1985-04-01

    An empirical equation has been developed which gives gamma dose equivalent rate as a function of time, distance, and fission yield after a pulsed operation of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) unshielded Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR). A related expression which is applicable to steady-state reactor operation has been mathematically derived from the aforementioned empirical equation. The two relations can be used to predict the gamma dose equivalent rate to within 25% for times between 1 minute and 90 minutes after reactor shutdown. Similar agreement is expected for up to several days. In most cases the relations are expected to overestimate the gamma dose equivalent rate. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Diffuse gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Simpson, G. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    An examination of the intensity, energy spectrum, and spatial distribution of the diffuse gamma-radiation observed by SAS-2 satellite away from the galactic plane in the energy range above 35 MeV has shown that it consists of two components. One component is generally correlated with galactic latitudes, the atomic hydrogen column density was deduced from 21 cm measurements, and the continuum radio emission, believed to be synchrotron emission. It has an energy spectrum similar to that in the plane and joins smoothly to the intense radiation from the plane. It is therefore presumed to be of galactic origin. The other component is apparently isotropic, at least on a coarse scale, and has a steep energy spectrum. No evidence is found for a cosmic ray halo surrounding the galaxy in the shape of a sphere or oblate spheroid with galactic dimensions. Constraints for a halo model with significantly larger dimensions are set on the basis of an upper limit to the gamma-ray anisotropy.

  8. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, L.H.

    1994-08-16

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  9. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1995-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  10. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1994-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  11. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, L.H.

    1995-10-17

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  12. RADIATION FACILITY FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

    1961-12-12

    A radiation facility is designed for irradiating samples in close proximity to the core of a nuclear reactor. The facility comprises essentially a tubular member extending through the biological shield of the reactor and containing a manipulatable rod having the sample carrier at its inner end, the carrier being longitudinally movable from a position in close proximity to the reactor core to a position between the inner and outer faces of the shield. Shield plugs are provided within the tubular member to prevent direct radiation from the core emanating therethrough. In this device, samples may be inserted or removed during normal operation of the reactor without exposing personnel to direct radiation from the reactor core. A storage chamber is also provided within the radiation facility to contain an irradiated sample during the period of time required to reduce the radioactivity enough to permit removal of the sample for external handling. (AEC)

  13. Gamma radiation characteristics of plutonium dioxide fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gingo, P. J.

    1969-01-01

    Investigation of plutonium dioxide as an isotopic fuel for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators yielded the isotopic composition of production-grade plutonium dioxide fuel, sources of gamma radiation produced by plutonium isotopes, and the gamma flux at the surface.

  14. Optical Sensors for Monitoring Gamma and Neutron Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Clark D.

    2011-01-01

    For safety and efficiency, nuclear reactors must be carefully monitored to provide feedback that enables the fission rate to be held at a constant target level via adjustments in the position of neutron-absorbing rods and moderating coolant flow rates. For automated reactor control, the monitoring system should provide calibrated analog or digital output. The sensors must survive and produce reliable output with minimal drift for at least one to two years, for replacement only during refueling. Small sensor size is preferred to enable more sensors to be placed in the core for more detailed characterization of the local fission rate and fuel consumption, since local deviations from the norm tend to amplify themselves. Currently, reactors are monitored by local power range meters (LPRMs) based on the neutron flux or gamma thermometers based on the gamma flux. LPRMs tend to be bulky, while gamma thermometers are subject to unwanted drift. Both electronic reactor sensors are plagued by electrical noise induced by ionizing radiation near the reactor core. A fiber optic sensor system was developed that is capable of tracking thermal neutron fluence and gamma flux in order to monitor nuclear reactor fission rates. The system provides near-real-time feedback from small- profile probes that are not sensitive to electromagnetic noise. The key novel feature is the practical design of fiber optic radiation sensors. The use of an actinoid element to monitor neutron flux in fiber optic EFPI (extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric) sensors is a new use of material. The materials and structure used in the sensor construction can be adjusted to result in a sensor that is sensitive to just thermal, gamma, or neutron stimulus, or any combination of the three. The tested design showed low sensitivity to thermal and gamma stimuli and high sensitivity to neutrons, with a fast response time.

  15. Radiation Damage In Reactor Cavity Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G; Le Pape, Yann; Naus, Dan J; Remec, Igor; Busby, Jeremy T; Rosseel, Thomas M; Wall, Dr. James Joseph

    2015-01-01

    License renewal up to 60 years and the possibility of subsequent license renewal to 80 years has established a renewed focus on long-term aging of nuclear generating stations materials, and recently, on concrete. Large irreplaceable sections of most nuclear generating stations include concrete. The Expanded Materials Degradation Analysis (EMDA), jointly performed by the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Industry, identified the urgent need to develop a consistent knowledge base on irradiation effects in concrete. Much of the historical mechanical performance data of irradiated concrete does not accurately reflect typical radiation conditions in NPPs or conditions out to 60 or 80 years of radiation exposure. To address these potential gaps in the knowledge base, The Electric Power Research Institute and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working to disposition radiation damage as a degradation mechanism. This paper outlines the research program within this pathway including: (i) defining the upper bound of the neutron and gamma dose levels expected in the biological shield concrete for extended operation (80 years of operation and beyond), (ii) determining the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation as well as extended time at temperature on concrete, (iii) evaluating opportunities to irradiate prototypical concrete under accelerated neutron and gamma dose levels to establish a conservative bound and share data obtained from different flux, temperature, and fluence levels, (iv) evaluating opportunities to harvest and test irradiated concrete from international NPPs, (v) developing cooperative test programs to improve confidence in the results from the various concretes and research reactors, (vi) furthering the understanding of the effects of radiation on concrete (see companion paper) and (vii) establishing an international collaborative research and information exchange effort to leverage capabilities and knowledge.

  16. Determination of the optimal positions for installing gamma ray detection systems at Tehran Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayyah, A.; Rahmani, F.; Khalafi, H.

    2015-09-01

    Dosimetric instruments must constantly monitor radiation dose levels in different areas of nuclear reactor. Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) has seven beam tubes for different research purposes. All the beam tubes extend from the reactor core to Beam Port Floor (BPF) of the reactor facility. During the reactor operation, the gamma rays exiting from each beam tube outlet produce a specific gamma dose rate field in the space of the BPF. To effectively monitor the gamma dose rates on the BPF, gamma ray detection systems must be installed in optimal positions. The selection of optimal positions is a compromise between two requirements. First, the installation positions must possess largest gamma dose rates and second, gamma ray detectors must not be saturated in these positions. In this study, calculations and experimental measurements have been carried out to identify the optimal positions of the gamma ray detection systems. Eight three dimensional models of the reactor core and related facilities corresponding to eight scenarios have been simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code to calculate the gamma dose equivalent rate field in the space of the BPF. These facilities are beam tubes, thermal column, pool, BPF space filled with air, facilities such as neutron radiography facility, neutron powder diffraction facility embedded in the beam tubes as well as biological shields inserted into the unused beam tubes. According to the analysis results of the combined gamma dose rate field, three positions on the north side and two positions on the south side of the BPF have been recognized as optimal positions for installing the gamma ray detection systems. To ensure the consistency of the simulation data, experimental measurements were conducted using TLDs (600 and 700) pairs during the reactor operation at 4.5 MW.

  17. Apparatus and method for detecting gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Sigg, Raymond A.

    1994-01-01

    A high efficiency radiation detector for measuring X-ray and gamma radiation from small-volume, low-activity liquid samples with an overall uncertainty better than 0.7% (one sigma SD). The radiation detector includes a hyperpure germanium well detector, a collimator, and a reference source. The well detector monitors gamma radiation emitted by the reference source and a radioactive isotope or isotopes in a sample source. The radiation from the reference source is collimated to avoid attenuation of reference source gamma radiation by the sample. Signals from the well detector are processed and stored, and the stored data is analyzed to determine the radioactive isotope(s) content of the sample. Minor self-attenuation corrections are calculated from chemical composition data.

  18. Apparatus and method for detecting gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Sigg, R.A.

    1994-12-13

    A high efficiency radiation detector is disclosed for measuring X-ray and gamma radiation from small-volume, low-activity liquid samples with an overall uncertainty better than 0.7% (one sigma SD). The radiation detector includes a hyperpure germanium well detector, a collimator, and a reference source. The well detector monitors gamma radiation emitted by the reference source and a radioactive isotope or isotopes in a sample source. The radiation from the reference source is collimated to avoid attenuation of reference source gamma radiation by the sample. Signals from the well detector are processed and stored, and the stored data is analyzed to determine the radioactive isotope(s) content of the sample. Minor self-attenuation corrections are calculated from chemical composition data. 4 figures.

  19. RADIATION DOSIMETRY AT THE BNL HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR AND MEDICAL RESEARCH REACTOR.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    1999-09-10

    RADIATION DOSIMETRY MEASUREMENTS HAVE BEEN PERFORMED OVER A PERIOD OF MANY YEARS AT THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR (HFBR) AND THE MEDICAL RESEARCH REACTOR (BMRR) AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY TO PROVIDE INFORMATION ON THE ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF THE NEUTRON FLUX, NEUTRON DOSE RATES, GAMMA-RAY FLUXES AND GAMMA-RAY DOSE RATES. THE MCNP PARTICLE TRANSPORT CODE PROVIDED MONTE CARLO RESULTS TO COMPARE WITH VARIOUS DOSIMETRY MEASUREMENTS PERFORMED AT THE EXPERIMENTAL PORTS, AT THE TREATMENT ROOMS AND IN THE THIMBLES AT BOTH HFBR AND BMRR.

  20. Recent reactor testing and experience with gamma thermometers

    SciTech Connect

    Waring, J.P.; Smith, R.D.

    1983-02-01

    Recent experience with gamma thermometers for light water reactors has primarily been in the Framatome reactors operated by Electricite de France. Other recent testing has taken place at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Otto Hahn ship reactor. Earlier experience with gamma thermometers was in heavy water reactors at Savannah River and Halden. This paper presents recent data from the light water reactor (LWR) programs. The principles of design and operation of the Radcal gamma thermometer were presented in ''Gamma Thermometer Developments for Light Water Reactors'', Leyse and Smith/sup 1/. Observations from LWRs confirm the earlier experience from heavy water reactors that the gamma thermometer units give signals which are proportional to the power of surrounding fuel rods and virtually independent of exposure, surrounding poison and other conditions which affect signals of neutron sensitive devices. After 200 sensor-years in EdF reactors, there has been no change in the sensitivity of the devices. Nonetheless, the Radcal units can be recalibrated in-reactor by the introduction of electrical heating via a heater cable imbedded in the device. Algorithms and signal processing software have been developed to interpret and display the gamma thermometer signals. The results of this processing are illustrated here.

  1. KGK-2-type detector of gamma-radiation power for diagnosis of nuclear reactor radiation fields within the range from 1 µGy/s to 100 Gy/s

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, A. S. Dovbysh, L. Ye.; Khoruzhy, V. Kh.; Chuklyaev, S. V.

    2015-12-15

    The construction of the KGK-2-type detector of γ-radiation power is briefly described. The diagnostic possibilities of the detector are shown by the example of results of the dose rate measurement in the energy start-ups of the BR-K1 and BR-1M reactors implemented in the mode of generating fission pulses on delayed neutrons. The possibilities of using the KGK-2 detector for postpulse γ diagnostics are demonstrated by the example of results of measurements in the fission pulse on prompt neutrons of the BR-1M reactor.

  2. KGK-2-type detector of gamma-radiation power for diagnosis of nuclear reactor radiation fields within the range from 1 µGy/s to 100 Gy/s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshelev, A. S.; Dovbysh, L. Ye.; Khoruzhy, V. Kh.; Chuklyaev, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    The construction of the KGK-2-type detector of γ-radiation power is briefly described. The diagnostic possibilities of the detector are shown by the example of results of the dose rate measurement in the energy start-ups of the BR-K1 and BR-1M reactors implemented in the mode of generating fission pulses on delayed neutrons. The possibilities of using the KGK-2 detector for postpulse γ diagnostics are demonstrated by the example of results of measurements in the fission pulse on prompt neutrons of the BR-1M reactor.

  3. 30 CFR 57.5047 - Gamma radiation surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gamma radiation surveys. 57.5047 Section 57..., Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Radiation-Underground Only § 57.5047 Gamma radiation surveys. (a) Gamma radiation surveys shall be conducted annually in all underground mines...

  4. 30 CFR 57.5047 - Gamma radiation surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gamma radiation surveys. 57.5047 Section 57..., Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Radiation-Underground Only § 57.5047 Gamma radiation surveys. (a) Gamma radiation surveys shall be conducted annually in all underground mines...

  5. 30 CFR 57.5047 - Gamma radiation surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gamma radiation surveys. 57.5047 Section 57..., Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Radiation-Underground Only § 57.5047 Gamma radiation surveys. (a) Gamma radiation surveys shall be conducted annually in all underground mines...

  6. 30 CFR 57.5047 - Gamma radiation surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gamma radiation surveys. 57.5047 Section 57..., Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Radiation-Underground Only § 57.5047 Gamma radiation surveys. (a) Gamma radiation surveys shall be conducted annually in all underground mines...

  7. 30 CFR 57.5047 - Gamma radiation surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gamma radiation surveys. 57.5047 Section 57..., Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Radiation-Underground Only § 57.5047 Gamma radiation surveys. (a) Gamma radiation surveys shall be conducted annually in all underground mines...

  8. Gamma Radiation Damage in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chensen

    A theory for interpreting carrier removal in terms of trap production has been derived from the carrier distribution function, which provides a relationship between the carrier removal rate and trap production rates due to the radiation damage. The carrier removal rate is a function of trap production as well as Fermi level position. Also, the carrier removal rate depends on many parameters, which are the density of states of the valance band as well as the conduction band, density of doping impurities, temperature, location of donor and acceptor energy levels and location of trap energy levels. P-type and n-type silicon Schottky diodes are irradiated by cobalt 60 gamma rays. The experimental results show that the carrier removal rate is dependent on the initial carrier concentration. Carrier concentrations are determined by room temperature C-V measurements while the trap production rates are determined by DLTS from measurements from 50 K to room temperature. A model presented by Williams, et al. for the carrier concentration vs. fluence, has been rederived from simple semiconductor carrier statistical mechanics. This model has then been extended to yield an expression for the initial carrier removal rate which depends on the production rate of each defect trap level in the band gap. We have tested these models thoroughly for the first time by measuring the trap production rates by DLTS, and then, using this information to calculate carrier removal rate and carrier concentration vs. fluence, we have verified that the results of the model can explain these same relationships obtained experimentally by C-V measurements. We believe that this is the first time that DLTS results have been linked directly to such simple and useful measurements as carrier removal rate and carrier concentration vs. fluence in a convincing manner. The success of this procedure also suggests that there are no "hidden" levels or traps which contribute to carrier removal rate but which do not

  9. Gamma response study of radiation sensitive MOSFETs for their use as gamma radiation sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Saurabh; Aggarwal, Bharti; Singh, Arvind; Kumar, A. Vinod; Topkar, Anita

    2016-05-01

    Continuous monitoring of gamma dose is important in various fields like radiation therapy, space-related research, nuclear energy programs and high energy physics experiment facilities. The present work is focused on utilization of radiation-sensitive Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs) to monitor gamma radiation doses. Static characterization of these detectors was performed to check their expected current-voltage relationship. Threshold voltage and transconductance per unit gate to source voltage (K factor) were calculated from the experimental data. The detector was exposed to gamma radiation in both, with and without gate bias voltage conditions, and change in threshold voltage was monitored at different gamma doses. The experimental data was fitted to obtain equation for dependence of threshold voltage on gamma dose. More than ten times increase in sensitivity was observed in biased condition (+3 V) compared to the unbiased case.

  10. Gamma Radiation Doses In Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almgren, Sara; Barregârd, Lars; Isaksson, Mats

    2008-08-01

    Gamma dose rate measurements were performed in one urban and one rural area using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) worn by 46 participants and placed in their dwellings. The personal effective dose rates were 0.096±0.019(1 SD) and 0.092±0.016(1 SD)μSv/h in the urban and rural area, respectively. The corresponding dose rates in the dwellings were 0.11±0.042(1 SD) and 0.091±0.026(1 SD)μSv/h. However, the differences between the areas were not significant. The values were higher in buildings made of concrete than of wood and higher in apartments than in detached houses. Also, 222Rn measurements were performed in each dwelling, which showed no correlation with the gamma dose rates in the dwellings.

  11. Gamma Radiation Doses In Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Almgren, Sara; Isaksson, Mats; Barregaard, Lars

    2008-08-07

    Gamma dose rate measurements were performed in one urban and one rural area using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) worn by 46 participants and placed in their dwellings. The personal effective dose rates were 0.096{+-}0.019(1 SD) and 0.092{+-}0.016(1 SD){mu}Sv/h in the urban and rural area, respectively. The corresponding dose rates in the dwellings were 0.11{+-}0.042(1 SD) and 0.091{+-}0.026(1 SD){mu}Sv/h. However, the differences between the areas were not significant. The values were higher in buildings made of concrete than of wood and higher in apartments than in detached houses. Also, {sup 222}Rn measurements were performed in each dwelling, which showed no correlation with the gamma dose rates in the dwellings.

  12. Gamma Radiation Effects on Peanut Skin Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    de Camargo, Adriano Costa; de Souza Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira; Regitano-D’Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin

    2012-01-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached-deodorized (RBD) soybean oil. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Oil Stability Index method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. All extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Oil Stability Index method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts’ antioxidative properties when added to soybean oil. PMID:22489142

  13. Gamma radiation effects on peanut skin antioxidants.

    PubMed

    de Camargo, Adriano Costa; de Souza Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira; Regitano-D'Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin

    2012-01-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached-deodorized (RBD) soybean oil. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Oil Stability Index method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. All extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Oil Stability Index method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts' antioxidative properties when added to soybean oil. PMID:22489142

  14. Lightning: Ground observations of gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayanthi, U. B.; Gusev, A. A.; Neri, J. A. C.; Pugacheva, G. I.; Talavera, K. C.

    Recent satellite and ground observations of emissions in x and gamma-rays ascribing association with lightning phenomena have triggered interest in this natural phenomena The incentive for this Ground Gamma Radiation GGR experiment in the Brazilian Geomagnetic Anomaly BGA region is due to the absence of satellite data As a first step we want to test and calibrate the system with rocket triggered lightning flashes in the International Lightning facility in our Campus The lightning associated gamma rays can be inferred as due to bremsstrahlung associated with electrons released moments after the return stroke and the likely radiation associated with radioactive decay products in the interactions of protons generated in the lightning with the atmospheric constituents Initially in 2005 to observe the later phenomena a very large area NaI Tl detector of 40 cm diameter with a PHA system monitoring every 10 s was set up near the two rocket launchers for the induced lightning In few months of operation in 2005 increases in gamma-rays above the ground radiation flux are observed due to many rain precipitation events and in one lightning event coincident with the rocket launch To identify the association of emission due to the lightning we investigated both the decay period and the spectral information of these gamma rays The radon progeny in rain has an associated decay period of sim 30 min but however the decay time associated with the lightning is different Although the spectral information indicates a power law index for both

  15. Inspection of cargo containers using gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Esam M. A.; Gokhale, Prasad; Arendtsz, Nina V.; Lawrence, Andre H.

    1997-02-01

    This paper investigate, with the aid of Monte Carlo simulations and laboratory experiments, a technique for the detection of narcotics in large cargo containers using gamma-radiation. The transmission and back-scattering of photons, at different energies, is used to provide information useful for identifying the presence of bulk quantities of commonly encountered narcotics.

  16. Non-equilibrium radiation nuclear reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, K.; Schneider, R. T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An externally moderated thermal nuclear reactor is disclosed which is designed to provide output power in the form of electromagnetic radiation. The reactor is a gaseous fueled nuclear cavity reactor device which can operate over wide ranges of temperature and pressure, and which includes the capability of processing and recycling waste products such as long-lived transuranium actinides. The primary output of the device may be in the form of coherent radiation, so that the reactor may be utilized as a self-critical nuclear pumped laser.

  17. Ceramic Matrix Composites Performances Under High Gamma Radiation Doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cemmi, A.; Baccaro, S.; Fiore, S.; Gislon, P.; Serra, E.; Fassina, S.; Ferrari, E.; Ghisolfi, E.

    2014-06-01

    Ceramic matrix composites reinforced by continuous ceramic fibers (CMCs) represent a class of advanced materials developed for applications in automotive, aerospace, nuclear fusion reactors and in other specific systems for harsh environments. In the present work, the silicon carbide/silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites, manufactured by Chemical Vapour Infiltration process at FN S.p.A. plant, have been evaluated in term of gamma radiation hardness at three different absorbed doses (up to around 3MGy). Samples behavior has been investigated before and after irradiation by means of mechanical tests (flexural strength) and by surface and structural analyses (X-ray diffraction, SEM, FTIR-ATR, EPR).

  18. Titanium-Water Thermosyphon Gamma Radiation Effects and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanzi, James L.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Goodenow, Debra A.

    2012-01-01

    Titanium-water thermosyphons are being considered for use in heat rejection systems for fission power systems. Their proximity to the nuclear reactor will result in some exposure to gamma irradiation. Non-condensable gas formation from radiation may breakdown water over time and render a portion of the thermosyphon condenser inoperable. A series of developmental thermosyphons were operated at nominal operating temperature with accelerated gamma irradiation exposures on the same order of magnitude that is expected in eight years of heat rejection system operation. Temperature data were obtained during exposure at three locations on each thermosyphon; evaporator, condenser, and condenser end cap. Some non-condensable gas was evident, however thermosyphon performance was not affected because the non-condensable gas was compressed into the fill tube region at the top of the thermosyphon, away from the heat rejecting fin. The trend appeared to be an increasing amount of non-condensable gas formation with increasing gamma irradiation dose. Hydrogen is thought to be the most likely candidate for the non-condensable gas and hydrogen is known to diffuse through grain boundaries. Post-exposure evaluation of selected thermosyphons at temperature and in a vacuum chamber revealed that the non-condensable gas likely diffused out of the thermosyphons over a relatively short period of time. Further research shows a number of experimental and theoretical examples of radiolysis occurring through gamma radiation alone in pure water.

  19. Titanium-Water Thermosyphon Gamma Radiation Exposure and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanzi, James, L.A; Jaworske, Donald, A.; Goodenow, Debra, A.

    2012-01-01

    Titanium-water thermosyphons are being considered for use in heat rejection systems for fission power systems. Their proximity to the nuclear reactor will result in some gamma irradiation. Noncondensable gas formation from radiation-induced breakdown of water over time may render portions of the thermosyphon condenser inoperable. A series of developmental thermosyphons were operated at nominal operating temperature under accelerated gamma irradiation, with exposures on the same order of magnitude as that expected in 8 years of heat rejection system operation. Temperature data were obtained during exposure at three locations on each thermosyphon: evaporator, condenser, and condenser end cap. Some noncondensable gas was evident; however, thermosyphon performance was not affected because the noncondensable gas was compressed into the fill tube region at the top of the thermosyphon, away from the heat rejecting fin. The trend appeared to be an increasing amount of noncondensable gas formation with increasing gamma irradiation dose. Hydrogen is thought to be the most likely candidate for the noncondensable gas and hydrogen is known to diffuse through grain boundaries. Post-exposure evaluation of one thermosyphon in a vacuum chamber and at temperature revealed that the noncondensable gas diffused out of the thermosyphon over a relatively short period of time. Further research shows a number of experimental and theoretical examples of radiolysis occurring through gamma radiation alone in pure water.

  20. Mass optimization studies of gamma shield materials for space nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Banjac, V.; Heger, A.S. . Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering)

    1994-10-01

    A mass optimization study of the total shield mass requirements for gamma attenuation for a space nuclear power system is carried out. The reference system is a nuclear electric power-generating reactor with a 10[sup 16] [gamma]/s source term and reference dimensions based on the Russian TOPAZ-II. Seven potential shield materials are analyzed, and the total gamma shield masses are presented for a desired dose equivalent of 5.0 mrem/h at the end of the shield. A three-dimensional shielding code, QAD-CGGP, is used to model the reactor and the truncated cone shield. Gamma energies of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 MeV are analyzed, and the required shield masses are normalized to the lowest value, giving a mass index.'' Comparison of the required masses and mass indices for both direct radiation and buildup dose is presented. For all three gamma energies, depleted uranium has a mass index of 1.0 and provides the required shielding with the lowest mass requirement. Mass indices between 1.2 and 1.7 are characteristic of tungsten and lead, making them potential substitutes for depleted uranium in the case of smaller reactor power levels.

  1. Gamma thermometer based reactor core liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Burns, Thomas J.

    1983-01-01

    A system is provided which employs a modified gamma thermometer for determining the liquid coolant level within a nuclear reactor core. The gamma thermometer which normally is employed to monitor local core heat generation rate (reactor power), is modified by thermocouple junctions and leads to obtain an unambiguous indication of the presence or absence of coolant liquid at the gamma thermometer location. A signal processor generates a signal based on the thermometer surface heat transfer coefficient by comparing the signals from the thermocouples at the thermometer location. The generated signal is a direct indication of loss of coolant due to the change in surface heat transfer when coolant liquid drops below the thermometer location. The loss of coolant indication is independent of reactor power at the thermometer location. Further, the same thermometer may still be used for the normal power monitoring function.

  2. Gamma thermometer based reactor core liquid level detector

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, T.J.

    1983-09-20

    A system is provided which employs a modified gamma thermometer for determining the liquid coolant level within a nuclear reactor core. The gamma thermometer which normally is employed to monitor local core heat generation rate (reactor power), is midified by thermocouple junctions and leads to obtain an unambiguous indication of the presence or absence of coolant liquid at the gamma thermometer location. A signal processor generates a signal based on the thermometer surface heat transfer coefficient by comparing the signals from the thermocouples at the thermometer location. The generated signal is a direct indication of loss of coolant due to the change in surface heat transfer when coolant liquid drops below the thermometer location. The loss of coolant indication is independent of reactor power at the thermometer location. Further, the same thermometer may still be used for the normal power monitoring function.

  3. Neutron and gamma characterization within the FFTF reactor cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Bunch, W.L.; Carter, L.L.; Moore, F.S.; Werner, E.J.; Wilcox, A.D.; Wood, M.R.

    1980-08-01

    Neutron and gamma ray measurements were made within the reactor cavity of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to establish the operating characteristics of the Ex-Vessel Flux Monitoring (EVFM) system as a function of reactor power level. A significant effort was made to obtain absolute flux values in order that the measurements could be compared directly with shield design calculations. Good agreement was achieved for neutrons and for both the prompt and delayed components of the gamma ray field. 8 figures, 3 tables.

  4. Radiative Transfer In Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloborodov, Andrei

    We propose to develop state-of-the-art numerical tools for radiative transfer calculations in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We will investigate two problems: (1) Production and heating of photons at the early (opaque) stage of the explosion, which controls the brightness and spectral shape of the jet photospheric emission. (2) Transfer of GRB radiation through the external blast wave. Our recent results suggest that this transfer generates the GeV flash observed in GRBs, providing key information on the explosion and its progenitor. We will test our models against observations.

  5. Composition and apparatus for detecting gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Hofstetter, K.J.

    1994-08-09

    A gamma radiation detector and a radioluminescent composition for use therein. The detector includes a radioluminescent composition that emits light in a characteristic wavelength region when exposed to gamma radiation, and means for detecting said radiation. The composition contains a scintillant such as anglesite (PbSO[sub 4]) or cerussite (PbCO[sub 3]) incorporated into an inert, porous glass matrix via a sol-gel process. Particles of radiation-sensitive scintillant are added to, a sol solution. The mixture is polymerized to form a gel, then dried under conditions that preserve the structural integrity and radiation sensitivity of the scintillant. The final product is a composition containing the uniformly-dispersed scintillant in an inert, optically transparent and highly porous matrix. The composition is chemically inert and substantially impervious to environmental conditions including changes in temperature, air pressure, and so forth. It can be fabricated in cylinders, blocks with holes therethrough for flow of fluid, sheets, surface coatings, pellets or other convenient shapes. 3 figs.

  6. Composition and apparatus for detecting gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Hofstetter, Kenneth J.

    1994-01-01

    A gamma radiation detector and a radioluminiscent composition for use therein. The detector includes a radioluminscent composition that emits light in a characteristic wavelength region when exposed to gamma radiation, and means for detecting said radiation. The composition contains a scintillant such as anglesite (PbSO.sub.4) or cerussite (PbCO.sub.3) incorporated into an inert, porous glass matrix via a sol-gel process. Particles of radiation-sensitive scintillant are added to, a sol solution. The mixture is polymerized to form a gel, then dried under conditions that preserve the structural integrity and radiation sensitivity of the scintillant. The final product is a composition containing the uniformly-dispersed scintillant in an inert, optically transparent and highly porous matrix. The composition is chemically inert and substantially impervious to environmental conditions including changes in temperature, air pressure, and so forth. It can be fabricated in cylinders, blocks with holes therethrough for flow of fluid, sheets, surface coatings, pellets or other convenient shapes.

  7. Evaluation of the sensitivity of the gas-discharge gamma-counters to the concomitant neutron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikalov, G. L.; Kiseev, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    In the fields of gamma-neutron radiation the accuracy measurement of gamma- ray doses depends on their sensitivity to concomitant neutron radiation. In this connection, verification results of gamma-dosimetry on the installation with isotope cobalt or cesium sources are not always adequate to measurement results in real gamma-neutron fields. The data prove, that the sensitivity coefficients of gas-discharge gamma-dosimeters at PRIZ-M reactor is 1.23 larger as compared to Co60 source, due to the effect of the concomitant neutrons on their indications. The error due to the neutrons effect can be significantly reduced or eliminated completely, if gamma-dosimeters calibrated in the field of gamma-neutron radiation, adequate spectral and dose characteristics to radiation fields in which they are used.

  8. High-intensity power-resolved radiation imaging of an operational nuclear reactor.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Jonathan S; Mellor, Matthew P; Villa, Mario; Joyce, Malcolm J

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the neutron distribution in a nuclear reactor is necessary to ensure the safe and efficient burnup of reactor fuel. Currently these measurements are performed by in-core systems in what are extremely hostile environments and in most reactor accident scenarios it is likely that these systems would be damaged. Here we present a compact and portable radiation imaging system with the ability to image high-intensity fast-neutron and gamma-ray fields simultaneously. This system has been deployed to image radiation fields emitted during the operation of a TRIGA test reactor allowing a spatial visualization of the internal reactor conditions to be obtained. The imaged flux in each case is found to scale linearly with reactor power indicating that this method may be used for power-resolved reactor monitoring and for the assay of ongoing nuclear criticalities in damaged nuclear reactors. PMID:26450669

  9. High-intensity power-resolved radiation imaging of an operational nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, Jonathan S.; Mellor, Matthew P.; Villa, Mario; Joyce, Malcolm J.

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge of the neutron distribution in a nuclear reactor is necessary to ensure the safe and efficient burnup of reactor fuel. Currently these measurements are performed by in-core systems in what are extremely hostile environments and in most reactor accident scenarios it is likely that these systems would be damaged. Here we present a compact and portable radiation imaging system with the ability to image high-intensity fast-neutron and gamma-ray fields simultaneously. This system has been deployed to image radiation fields emitted during the operation of a TRIGA test reactor allowing a spatial visualization of the internal reactor conditions to be obtained. The imaged flux in each case is found to scale linearly with reactor power indicating that this method may be used for power-resolved reactor monitoring and for the assay of ongoing nuclear criticalities in damaged nuclear reactors.

  10. High-intensity power-resolved radiation imaging of an operational nuclear reactor

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Jonathan S.; Mellor, Matthew P.; Villa, Mario; Joyce, Malcolm J.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the neutron distribution in a nuclear reactor is necessary to ensure the safe and efficient burnup of reactor fuel. Currently these measurements are performed by in-core systems in what are extremely hostile environments and in most reactor accident scenarios it is likely that these systems would be damaged. Here we present a compact and portable radiation imaging system with the ability to image high-intensity fast-neutron and gamma-ray fields simultaneously. This system has been deployed to image radiation fields emitted during the operation of a TRIGA test reactor allowing a spatial visualization of the internal reactor conditions to be obtained. The imaged flux in each case is found to scale linearly with reactor power indicating that this method may be used for power-resolved reactor monitoring and for the assay of ongoing nuclear criticalities in damaged nuclear reactors. PMID:26450669

  11. Afterglow Radiation from Gamma Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Desmond, Hugh; /Leuven U. /SLAC

    2006-08-28

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are huge fluxes of gamma rays that appear randomly in the sky about once a day. It is now commonly accepted that GRBs are caused by a stellar object shooting off a powerful plasma jet along its rotation axis. After the initial outburst of gamma rays, a lower intensity radiation remains, called the afterglow. Using the data from a hydrodynamical numerical simulation that models the dynamics of the jet, we calculated the expected light curve of the afterglow radiation that would be observed on earth. We calculated the light curve and spectrum and compared them to the light curves and spectra predicted by two analytical models of the expansion of the jet (which are based on the Blandford and McKee solution of a relativistic isotropic expansion; see Sari's model [1] and Granot's model [2]). We found that the light curve did not decay as fast as predicted by Sari; the predictions by Granot were largely corroborated. Some results, however, did not match Granot's predictions, and more research is needed to explain these discrepancies.

  12. Radiation Sterilization and Food Irradiation Using Gamma Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, Kevin

    2003-03-01

    Since the introduction of MDS Nordion's first irradiator in the early 1960's, a variety of gamma-processing systems has been developed. Each design is suited to a particular set of requirements - from high-throughput operations of diverse product lots to full automation or batch processing, all using gamma radiation. Gamma irradiator designs include the Centurion irradiator for temperature-sensitive food products like hamburgers and poultry; the Brevion, a compact batch irradiator providing flexibility, timeliness and simplicity on a whole new scale; a JS-10000 irradiator that operates in either automatic or batch mode to enable multipurpose product scheduling and optimum throughput; and, an irradiator that processes full pallets and is ideal for processing high-density products requiring excellent dose uniformity. These innovative irradiator designs help facilities to be more efficient, maximize operating time, improve product turnaround and minimize inventory levels. MDS Nordion's development of improved Point Kernel and Monte Carlo techniques is discussed, including their application in radiation source optimization, production irradiator design and process control. Absorbed-dose calculations also provide insight into the critical areas for dose mapping and routine monitoring, allowing for the optimum placement of dosimeters. Calculations may also be used to determine the absorbed-dose distribution within product, especially in areas of complex geometry such as material interfaces. The use of easily accessible, accurate and validated dose-calculation programs can be used to optimize the irradiation process. Key Words: dosimetry, irradiator design, dose calculation, modelling, modeling, process control, radiation source optimization.

  13. 77 FR 62267 - Proposed Extension of Existing Information Collection; Gamma Radiation Surveys

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... Safety and Health Administration Proposed Extension of Existing Information Collection; Gamma Radiation...: I. Background Gamma radiation occurs where radioactive materials are present. It has been associated..., and ground water. Gamma radiation hazards may be found near radiation sources at surface...

  14. Dosimetry of mixed neutron and gamma radiation with paired Fricke solutions in light and heavy water.

    PubMed

    Himit, M; Itoh, T; Endo, S; Fujikawa, K; Hoshi, M

    1996-06-01

    Paired Fricke solutions, made up from light water or heavy water and 0.8N in H2SO4 and 1 mM in Fe(NH4)2(SO4)2 and NaCl, were calibrated with 60Co gamma rays and with mixed neutron and gamma radiation from a 252Cf source. Absorbance increases, AL and AH, in light- and heavy-water Fricke dosimeters, respectively, increased with fast-neutron and gamma-ray tissue doses, Dn (GY) and D gamma (GY), of the mixed radiation as follows: AL = 0.00178Dn + 0.00371D gamma; AH = 0.00121Dn + 0.00442 D gamma. G-values of 7.2 and 5.5 were obtained for 252Cf neutrons in light- and heavy-water Fricke dosimeters, respectively. When we applied the pair of equations to AL and AH values observed after exposure to mixed radiation in a nuclear reactor, resulting Dn and D gamma values agreed within 10% to doses measured with paired ionization chambers. Doses required for Fricke dosimeters were 5 Gy or more. In contrast, we found that micronuclear yields in onion roots can measure the neutron component of mixed radiation fields at the order of 10 cGy with reasonable accuracy even if the neutron to gamma-ray dose ratio is unknown. PMID:8840720

  15. Radiation hardening of diagnostics for fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Baur, J.F.; Engholm, B.A.; Hacker, M.P.; Maya, I.; Miller, P.H.; Toffolo, W.E.; Wojtowicz, S.S.

    1981-12-01

    A list of the diagnostic systems presently used in magnetic confinement fusion experiments is compiled herein. The radiation-sensitive components are identified, and their locations in zones around the machine are indicated. A table of radiation sensitivities of components is included to indicate the data available from previous work in fission reactor, space probe, and defense-related programs. Extrapolation and application to hardening of fusion diagnostic systems requires additional data that are more specific to the fusion radiation environment and fusion components. A list is also given of present radiation-producing facilities where near-term screening tests of materials and components can be performed.

  16. Near ground gamma radiation associated with lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, K.; Greenfield, M. B.; Ikeda, Y.; Kubo, K.

    2004-03-01

    Increases in the atmospheric gamma radiation of 22 to 82above normal background have been observed after the onset of lightning fifteen times since March 2001[1]. Gamma rays have been observed with up to four 12.9 cm3 NaI detectors and recently with a high resolution Ge detector positioned 6-21 m and 15 m above ground, respectively. The tail of the observed background subtracted gamma ray rates GRR were fitted with exponential decay curves yielding typical correlation coefficients of 0.95 to 0.99 and half-lives of 52.7 +/-4.81 min and 52.8+/-10.95 min, without and with precipitation, respectively. The GRR above 300 KeV from radon progeny due to precipitation were subtracted [2]. The 3x3 Ge detector with 2 KeV resolution positioned about 2 m from one of the NaI detectors observed increases in GRR minutes after the onset of lightning with a delayed 50 min exponential decay which was concurrently observed in the NaI detector. [1] M. B. Greenfield et al., Journal of Applied Physics 93 no. 3 (2003) pp 1839-1844. [2] M. B. Greenfield et al., Journal of Applied Physics 93 no. 9 (2003) pp 5733-5741.

  17. Carbon Nanotubes Synthesis Through Gamma Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirado, Pablo; Garcia, Rafael; Montes, Jorge; Melendrez, Rodrigo; Barboza, Marcelino; Contreras, Oscar

    2015-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes show a great potential of applications since there discovery by Iijima in 1991[1] due to their numerous physical-chemical properties such as their high weight to strength relationship, which make them ideal to use in high resistance compound materials, and in many other applications[2] In this work, a novel method for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes is presented, starting from an ultra-thin sheet of graphite synthesized by the chemical vapor decomposition technique (CVD), using ultra high purity methane and hydrogen at 1200°C in a horizontal quartz reactor. For the synthesis of carbon nanotubes, the graphite sheets were exposed to different doses of radiation, with the objective of breaking the graphite bonds and form carbon nanotubes; a Gammacell equipment model 220 Excel was used for the purpose, which counts with a radiation source of cobalt 60, and a current radiation rate of 0.9 Gy/seconds. The time of exposure to radiation was varied in each sample, according to the desired dose of radiation in each case, afterwards the samples were characterized using the Raman spectroscopy and TEM microscopy techniques with the objective of observing the kind of nanotubes formed, their morphology and their number of defects. Results will be shown during the poster session.

  18. Effect of gamma radiation on retroviral recombination.

    PubMed

    Hu, W S; Temin, H M

    1992-07-01

    To elucidate the mechanism(s) of retroviral recombination, we exposed virions to gamma radiation prior to infecting target cells. By using previously described spleen necrosis virus-based vectors containing multiple markers, recombinant proviruses were studied after a single round of retrovirus replication. The current models of retroviral recombination predict that breaking virion RNA should promote minus-strand recombination (forced copy-choice model), decrease or not affect plus-strand recombination (strand displacement/assimilation model), and shift plus-strand recombination towards the 3' end of the genome. However, we found that while gamma irradiation of virions reduced the amount of recoverable viral RNA, it did not primarily cause breaks. Thus, the frequency of selected recombinants was not significantly altered with greater doses of radiation. In spite of this, the irradiation did decrease the number of recombinants with only one internal template switch. As a result, the average number of additional internal template switches in the recombinant proviruses increased from 0.7 to 1.4 as infectivity decreased to 6%. The unselected internal template switches tended to be 5' of the selected crossover even in the recombinants from irradiated viruses, inconsistent with a plus-strand recombination mechanism. PMID:1602553

  19. Electrode-immobilized compounds through. gamma. radiation

    SciTech Connect

    De Castro, E.S.

    1983-01-01

    Chemically Modified Electrodes (CMEs) are used as substrates in heterogeneous catalysis and as sensors. This work demonstrates a new strategy for immobilizing polyelectrolytes and electroactive agents on electrode surfaces. The success of this method lies in cross-linking water soluble polymer chains through the ionizing radiation of ..gamma.. emissions from a /sup 60/Co source. Cross-linking can create a continuous network out of the polymer macromolecules which then makes the network insoluble on the electrode surface. Bonds between the network and the substrate are also possible. Redox species mixed with the polymer network and irradiated become part of the insoluble network, and are permanently attached. The use of ..gamma.. radiation to make electrochemical sensors is demonstrated. The immobilized network poly(diallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride) (DDAC) is placed in a solution of potassium ferricyanide and ionicly exchanges the anion into the network. An electroactive network is created from irradiating a mixture of DDAC and 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCIP). Using the amount of electroactive DCIP remaining in the film as the optimization parameter, variables such as polymer:DCIP ratio, film thickness, and dosage employed are shown to be relevant.

  20. Radiation effect on silicon transistors in mixed neutrons-gamma environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assaf, J.; Shweikani, R.; Ghazi, N.

    2014-10-01

    The effects of gamma and neutron irradiations on two different types of transistors, Junction Field Effect Transistor (JFET) and Bipolar Junction Transistor (BJT), were investigated. Irradiation was performed using a Syrian research reactor (RR) (Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR)) and a gamma source (Co-60 cell). For RR irradiation, MCNP code was used to calculate the absorbed dose received by the transistors. The experimental results showed an overall decrease in the gain factors of the transistors after irradiation, and the JFETs were more resistant to the effects of radiation than BJTs. The effect of RR irradiation was also greater than that of gamma source for the same dose, which could be because neutrons could cause more damage than gamma irradiation.

  1. Radiation dosimetry at the BNL Medical Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.; Reciniello, R.N.; Greenberg, D.D.; Hu, J.P.

    1998-11-01

    The Medical Research Reactor, BMRR, at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, BNL, is a three megawatt, 3 MW, heterogeneous, tank-type, light water cooled and moderated, graphite reflected reactor, which was designed for biomedical studies, and became operational in 1959. It provides thermal and epithermal neutron beams suitable for research studies such as radiation therapy of various types of tumors. At the present time, the major program at BMRR is Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, BNCT. Modifications have been made to the BMRR to significantly increase the available epithermal neutron flux density to a patient in clinical trials of BNCT. The data indicate that the flux density and dose rate are concentrated in the center of the beam, the patient absorbs neutrons rather than gamma radiation and as noted previously even with the increasing flux values, gamma-ray dose received by the attending personnel has remained minimal. Flux densities in the center of the thermal port and epithermal port beams have been characterized with an agreement between the measurements and the calculations.

  2. Satellite observation of atmospheric nuclear gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Letaw, J R; Share, G H; Kinzer, R L; Silberberg, R; Chupp, E L; Forrest, D J; Rieger, E

    1989-02-01

    We present a satellite observation of the spectrum of gamma radiation from the Earth's atmosphere in the energy interval from 300 keV to 8.5 MeV. The data were accumulated by the gamma ray spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission over 3 1/2 years, from 1980 to 1983. The excellent statistical accuracy of the data allows 20 atmospheric line features to be identified. The features are superimposed on a continuum background which is modeled using a power law with index -1.16. Many of these features contain a blend of more than one nuclear line. All of these lines (with the exception of the 511-keV annihilation line) are Doppler broadened. Line energies and intensities are consistent with production by secondary neutrons interacting with atmospheric 14N and 16O. Although we find no evidence for other production mechanisms, we cannot rule out significant contributions from direct excitation or spallation by primary cosmic ray protons. The relative intensities of the observed line features are in fair agreement with theoretical models; however, existing models are limited by the availability of neutron cross sections, especially at high energies. The intensity and spectrum of photons at energies below the 511-keV line, in excess of a power law continuum, can be explained by Compton scattering of the annihilation line photons in traversing an average of approximately 21 g cm-2 of atmosphere. PMID:11537397

  3. Gamma radiation effects on silicon photonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Grillanda, Stefano; Singh, Vivek; Raghunathan, Vivek; Morichetti, Francesco; Melloni, Andrea; Kimerling, Lionel; Agarwal, Anuradha M

    2016-07-01

    To support the use of integrated photonics in harsh environments, such as outer space, the hardness threshold to high-energy radiation must be established. Here, we investigate the effects of gamma (γ) rays, with energy in the MeV-range, on silicon photonic waveguides. By irradiation of high-quality factor amorphous silicon core resonators, we measure the impact of γ rays on the materials incorporated in our waveguide system, namely amorphous silicon, silicon dioxide, and polymer. While we show the robustness of amorphous silicon and silicon dioxide up to an absorbed dose of 15 Mrad, more than 100× higher than previous reports on crystalline silicon, polymer materials exhibit changes with doses as low as 1 Mrad. PMID:27367099

  4. Orchid flowers tolerance to gamma-radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Olivia Kimiko

    2000-03-01

    Cut flowers are fresh goods that may be treated with fumigants such as methyl bromide to meet the needs of the quarantine requirements of importing countries. Irradiation is a non-chemical alternative to substitute the methyl bromide treatment of fresh products. In this research, different cut orchids were irradiated to examine their tolerance to gamma-rays. A 200 Gy dose did inhibit the Dendrobium palenopsis buds from opening, but did not cause visible damage to opened flowers. Doses of 800 and 1000 Gy were damaging because they provoked the flowers to drop from the stem. Cattleya irradiated with 750 Gy did not show any damage, and were therefore eligible for the radiation treatment. Cymbidium tolerated up to 300 Gy and above this dose dropped prematurely. On the other hand, Oncydium did not tolerate doses above 150 Gy.

  5. Characterisation of radiation field for irradiation of biological samples at nuclear reactor-comparison of twin detector and recombination methods.

    PubMed

    Golnik, N; Gryziński, M A; Kowalska, M; Meronka, K; Tulik, P

    2014-10-01

    Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection is involved in achieving scientific project on biological dosimetry. The project includes irradiation of blood samples in radiation fields of nuclear reactor. A simple facility for irradiation of biological samples has been prepared at horizontal channel of the nuclear reactor MARIA in NCBJ in Poland. The radiation field, composed mainly of gamma radiation and thermal neutrons, has been characterised in terms of tissue kerma using twin-detector technique and recombination chambers. PMID:24366246

  6. Recoilless Nuclear Resonance Absorption of Gamma Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mössbauer, Rudolf L.

    It is a high distinction to be permitted to address you on the subject of recoilless nuclear resonance absorption of gamma radiation. The methods used in this special branch of experimental physics have recently found acceptance in many areas of science. I take the liberty to confine myself essentially to the work which I was able to carry out in the years 1955-1958 at the Max Planck Institute in Heidelberg, and which finally led to establishment of the field of recoilless nuclear resonance absorption. Many investigators shared in the preparations of the basis for the research we are concerned with in this lecture. As early as the middle of the last century Stokes observed, in the case of fluorite, the phenomenon now known as fluorescence - namely, that solids, liquids, and gases under certain conditions partially absorb incident electromagnetic radiation which immediately is reradiated. A special case is the so-called resonance fluorescence, a phenomenon in which the re-emitted and the incident radiation both are of the same wavelength. The resonance fluorescence of the yellow D lines of sodium in sodium vapour is a particularly notable and exhaustively studied example. In this optical type of resonance fluorescence, light sources are used in which the atoms undergo transitions from excited states to their ground states (Fig. 1.1). The light quanta emitted in these transitions (A → B) are used to initiate the inverse process of resonance absorption in the atoms of an absorber which are identical with the radiating atoms. The atoms of the absorber undergo a transition here from the ground state (B) to the excited state (A), from which they again return to the ground state, after a certain time delay, by emission of fluorescent light.

  7. Measurement of gamma and neutron radiations inside spent fuel assemblies with passive detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viererbl, L.; Lahodová, Z.; Voljanskij, A.; Klupák, V.; Koleška, M.; Cabalka, M.; Turek, K.

    2011-10-01

    During operation of a fission nuclear reactor, many radionuclides are generated in fuel by fission and activation of 235U, 238U and other nuclides present in the assembly. After removal of a fuel assembly from the core, these radionuclides are sources of different types of radiation. Gamma and neutron radiation emitted from an assembly can be non-destructively detected with different types of detectors. In this paper, a new method of measurement of radiation from a spent fuel assembly is presented. It is based on usage of passive detectors, such as alanine dosimeters for gamma radiation and track detectors for neutron radiation. Measurements are made on the IRT-2M spent fuel assemblies used in the LVR-15 research reactor. During irradiation of detectors, the fuel assembly is located in a water storage pool at a depth of 6 m. Detectors are inserted into central hole of the assembly, irradiated for a defined time interval, and after the detectors removed from the assembly, gamma dose or neutron fluence are evaluated. Measured profiles of gamma dose rate and neutron fluence rate inside of the spent fuel assembly are presented. This measurement can be used to evaluate relative fuel burn-up.

  8. Irradiation facility at the IBR-2 reactor for investigation of material radiation hardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulavin, M.; Cheplakov, A.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulagin, E.; Kulikov, S.; Shabalin, E.; Verkhoglyadov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Description of the irradiation facility and available parameters of the neutron and gamma exposures including the maximal integrated doses are presented in the paper. The research capabilities for radiation hardness tests of materials in high intensity beam of fast neutrons at the IBR-2 reactor of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna (Russia) are outlined.

  9. Irradiation facility at the IBR-2 reactor for investigating material radiation hardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulavin, M. V.; Verkhoglyadov, A. E.; Kulikov, S. A.; Kulagin, E. N.; Kukhtin, V. V.; Cheplakov, A. P.; Shabalin, E. P.

    2015-03-01

    A description of the irradiation facility and available parameters of neutron and gamma exposures, including the maximum integrated doses, are presented in the paper. The research capabilities for radiation hardness tests of materials in a high-intensity beam of fast neutrons at the IBR-2 reactor of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna (Russia) are outlined.

  10. Gamma dose from activation of internal shields in IRIS reactor.

    PubMed

    Agosteo, Stefano; Cammi, Antonio; Garlati, Luisella; Lombardi, Carlo; Padovani, Enrico

    2005-01-01

    The International Reactor Innovative and Secure is a modular pressurised water reactor with an integral design. This means that all the primary system components, such as the steam generators, pumps, pressuriser and control rod drive mechanisms, are located inside the reactor vessel, which requires a large diameter. For the sake of better reliability and safety, it is desirable to achieve the reduction of vessel embrittlement as well as the lowering of the dose beyond the vessel. The former can be easily accomplished by the presence of a wide downcomer, filled with water, which surrounds the core region, while the latter needs the presence of additional internal shields. An optimal shielding configuration is under investigation, for reducing the ex-vessel dose due to activated internals and for limiting the amount of the biological shielding. MCNP 4C calculations were performed to evaluate the neutron and the gamma dose during operation and the 60Co activation of various shields configurations. The gamma dose beyond the vessel from activation of its structural components was estimated in a shutdown condition, with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA 2002 and the MicroShield software. The results of the two codes are in agreement and show that the dose is sufficiently low, even without an additional shield. PMID:16381688

  11. Simple dynamic electromagnetic radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Been, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    Detector monitors gamma dose rate at particular position in a radiation facility where a mixed neutron-gamma environment exists, thus determining reactor power level changes. Device also maps gamma intensity profile across a neutron-gamma beam.

  12. A Device for Search of Gamma-Radiation Intensive Sources at the Radiation Accident Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Batiy, Valeriy; Klyuchnykov, A; Kochnev, N; Rudko, Vladimir; shcherbin, vladimir; Yegorov, V; Schmieman, Eric A.

    2005-08-08

    The procedure designed for measuring angular distributions of gamma radiation and for search of gamma radiation intensive sources is described. It is based on application of the original multidetector device ShD-1, for measuring an angular distribution in a complete solid angle (4 pi). The calibration results and data on the angular distributions of intensity of gamma radiation at the roof of Chornobyl NPP ''Shelter'' are presented.

  13. Calculation of neutron and gamma ray energy spectra for fusion reactor shield design: comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Chapman, G.T.

    1980-08-01

    Integral experiments that measure the transport of approx. 14 MeV D-T neutrons through laminated slabs of proposed fusion reactor shield materials have been carried out. Measured and calculated neutron and gamma ray energy spectra are compared as a function of the thickness and composition of stainless steel type 304, borated polyethylene, and Hevimet (a tungsten alloy), and as a function of detector position behind these materials. The measured data were obtained using a NE-213 liquid scintillator using pulse-shape discrimination methods to resolve neutron and gamma ray pulse height data and spectral unfolding methods to convert these data to energy spectra. The calculated data were obtained using two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport methods in a complex calculational network that takes into account the energy-angle dependence of the D-T neutrons and the nonphysical anomalies of the S/sub n/ method.

  14. On gamma and neutrino radiation from Cyg X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berezinsky, V. S.

    1985-01-01

    The production of high energy gamma and neutrino radiation is studied for Cyg X-3. A heating model is proposed to explain the presence of only one gamma-pulse during 4.8 h period of the source. The acceleration mechanisms are discussed. High energy neutrino flux from Cyg X-3 is calculated.

  15. Inactivation of rabies diagnostic reagents by gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, W.C.; Chappell, W.A.; George, E.H.

    1980-11-01

    Treatment of CVS-11 rabies adsorbing suspensions and street rabies infected mouse brains with gamma radiation resulted in inactivated reagents that are safer to distribute and use. These irradiated reagents were as sensitive and reactive as the nonirradiated control reagents.

  16. Differential sensitivity of Chironomus and human hemoglobin to gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Pallavi S; Panicker, Lata; Mohole, Madhura; Sawant, Sangeeta; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita; Nath, Bimalendu B

    2016-08-01

    Chironomus ramosus is known to tolerate high doses of gamma radiation exposure. Larvae of this insect possess more than 95% of hemoglobin (Hb) in its circulatory hemolymph. This is a comparative study to see effect of gamma radiation on Hb of Chironomus and humans, two evolutionarily diverse organisms one having extracellular and the other intracellular Hb respectively. Stability and integrity of Chironomus and human Hb to gamma radiation was compared using biophysical techniques like Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), UV-visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectrometry and CD spectroscopy after exposure of whole larvae, larval hemolymph, human peripheral blood, purified Chironomus and human Hb. Sequence- and structure-based bioinformatics methods were used to analyze the sequence and structural similarities or differences in the heme pockets of respective Hbs. Resistivity of Chironomus Hb to gamma radiation is remarkably higher than human Hb. Human Hb exhibited loss of heme iron at a relatively low dose of gamma radiation exposure as compared to Chironomus Hb. Unlike human Hb, the heme pocket of Chironomus Hb is rich in aromatic amino acids. Higher hydophobicity around heme pocket confers stability of Chironomus Hb compared to human Hb. Previously reported gamma radiation tolerance of Chironomus can be largely attributed to its evolutionarily ancient form of extracellular Hb as evident from the present study. PMID:27237970

  17. Measurement of background gamma radiation in the northern Marshall Islands

    PubMed Central

    Bordner, Autumn S.; Crosswell, Danielle A.; Katz, Ainsley O.; Shah, Jill T.; Zhang, Catherine R.; Nikolic-Hughes, Ivana; Hughes, Emlyn W.; Ruderman, Malvin A.

    2016-01-01

    We report measurements of background gamma radiation levels on six islands in the northern Marshall Islands (Enewetak, Medren, and Runit onEnewetak Atoll; Bikini and Nam on Bikini Atoll; and Rongelap on Rongelap Atoll). Measurable excess radiation could be expected from the decay of 137Cs produced by the US nuclear testing program there from 1946 to 1958. These recordings are of relevance to safety of human habitation and resettlement. We find low levels of gamma radiation for the settled island of Enewetak [mean = 7.6 millirem/year (mrem/y) = 0.076 millisievert/year (mSv/y)], larger levels of gamma radiation for the island of Rongelap (mean = 19.8 mrem/y = 0.198 mSv/y), and relatively high gamma radiation on the island of Bikini (mean = 184 mrem/y = 1.84 mSv/y). Distributions of gamma radiation levels are provided, and hot spots are discussed. We provide interpolated maps for four islands (Enewetak, Medren, Bikini, and Rongelap), and make comparisons to control measurements performed on the island of Majuro in the southern Marshall Islands, measurements made in Central Park in New York City, and the standard agreed upon by the United States and the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) governments (100 mrem/y = 1 mSv/y). External gamma radiation levels on Bikini Island significantly exceed this standard (P = <<0.01), and external gamma radiation levels on the other islands are below the standard. To determine conclusively whether these islands are safe for habitation, radiation exposure through additional pathways such as food ingestion must be considered. PMID:27274073

  18. Measurement of background gamma radiation in the northern Marshall Islands.

    PubMed

    Bordner, Autumn S; Crosswell, Danielle A; Katz, Ainsley O; Shah, Jill T; Zhang, Catherine R; Nikolic-Hughes, Ivana; Hughes, Emlyn W; Ruderman, Malvin A

    2016-06-21

    We report measurements of background gamma radiation levels on six islands in the northern Marshall Islands (Enewetak, Medren, and Runit onEnewetak Atoll; Bikini and Nam on Bikini Atoll; and Rongelap on Rongelap Atoll). Measurable excess radiation could be expected from the decay of (137)Cs produced by the US nuclear testing program there from 1946 to 1958. These recordings are of relevance to safety of human habitation and resettlement. We find low levels of gamma radiation for the settled island of Enewetak [mean = 7.6 millirem/year (mrem/y) = 0.076 millisievert/year (mSv/y)], larger levels of gamma radiation for the island of Rongelap (mean = 19.8 mrem/y = 0.198 mSv/y), and relatively high gamma radiation on the island of Bikini (mean = 184 mrem/y = 1.84 mSv/y). Distributions of gamma radiation levels are provided, and hot spots are discussed. We provide interpolated maps for four islands (Enewetak, Medren, Bikini, and Rongelap), and make comparisons to control measurements performed on the island of Majuro in the southern Marshall Islands, measurements made in Central Park in New York City, and the standard agreed upon by the United States and the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) governments (100 mrem/y = 1 mSv/y). External gamma radiation levels on Bikini Island significantly exceed this standard (P = <0.01), and external gamma radiation levels on the other islands are below the standard. To determine conclusively whether these islands are safe for habitation, radiation exposure through additional pathways such as food ingestion must be considered. PMID:27274073

  19. {lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma} Radiative-Decay Width

    SciTech Connect

    Vavilov, D.V.; Antipov, Yu.M.; Artamonov, A.V.; Batarin, V.A.; Victorov, V.A.; Golovkin, S.V.; Gorin, Yu.P.; Eroshin, O.V.; Kozhevnikov, A.P.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kubarovsky, V.P.; Kurshetsov, V.F.; Landsberg, L.G.; Leontiev, V.M.; Molchanov, V.V.; Mukhin, V.A.; Patalakha, D.I.; Petrenko, S.V.; Petrukhin, A.I.; Kolganov, V.Z.

    2005-03-01

    The radiative decay {lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma} was recorded in the exclusive reaction p + N {yields} {lambda}(1520)K{sup +} + N at the SPHINX facility. The branching ratio for this decay and the corresponding partial width were found to be, respectively, Br[{lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma}] = (1.02 {+-} 0.21) x 10{sup -2} and {gamma}[{lambda}(1520) {yields} {lambda}{gamma}] = 159 {+-} 35 keV (the quoted errors are purely statistical, the systematic errors being within 15%)

  20. Dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate, USP material compatibility with gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt Quiles, Maritza

    Gamma radiation is a commonly used method to reduce the microbial bioburden in compatible materials when it is applied at appropriate dose levels. Gamma irradiation kills bacteria and mold by breaking down the organism’s DNA and inhibiting cell division. The purpose of this study is to determine the radiation dosage to be used to treat Dibasic Calcium Phosphate Dihydrate, USP (DCPD) and to evaluate its physicochemical effects if any, on this material. This material will be submitted to various doses of gamma radiation that were selected based on literature review and existing regulations that demonstrate that this method is effective to reduce or eliminate microbial bioburden in natural source and synthetic materials. Analytical testing was conducted to the DCPD exposed material in order to demonstrate that gamma radiation does not alter the physicochemical properties and material still acceptable for use in the manufacture of pharmaceutical products. The results obtained through this study were satisfactory and demonstrated that the gamma irradiation dosages from 5 to 30 kGy can be applied to DCPD without altering its physicochemical properties. These are supported by the Assay test data evaluation of lots tested before and after gamma irradiation implementation that show no significant statistical difference between irradiated and non irradiated assay results. The results of this study represent an achievement for the industry since they provide as an alternative the use of Gamma irradiation technology to control the microbial growth in DCPD.

  1. Development of a novel gamma probe for detecting radiation direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Cinti, M. N.; Longo, M.; Donnarumma, R.; D'Alessio, A.; Borrazzo, C.; Pergola, A.; Ridolfi, S.; De Vincentis, G.

    2016-01-01

    Spatial localization of radioactive sources is currently a main issue interesting different fields, including nuclear industry, homeland security as well as medical imaging. It is currently achieved using different systems, but the development of technologies for detecting and characterizing radiation is becoming important especially in medical imaging. In this latter field, radiation detection probes have long been used to guide surgery, thanks to their ability to localize and quantify radiopharmaceutical uptake even deep in tissue. Radiolabelled colloid is injected into, or near to, the tumor and the surgeon uses a hand-held radiation detector, the gamma probe, to identify lymph nodes with radiopharmaceutical uptkake. The present work refers to a novel scintigraphic goniometric probe to identify gamma radiation and its direction. The probe incorporates several scintillation crystals joined together in a particular configuration to provide data related to the position of a gamma source. The main technical characteristics of the gamma locator prototype, i.e. sensitivity, spatial resolution and detection efficiency, are investigated. Moreover, the development of a specific procedure applied to the images permits to retrieve the source position with high precision with respect to the currently used gamma probes. The presented device shows a high sensitivity and efficiency to identify gamma radiation taking a short time (from 30 to 60 s). Even though it was designed for applications in radio-guided surgery, it could be used for other purposes, as for example homeland security.

  2. Observation of nuclear reactors on satellites with a balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Terrence J.; Kerrick, Alan D.; Ait-Ouamer, Farid; Tumer, O. Tumay; Zych, Allen D.

    1989-01-01

    Four Soviet nuclear-powered satellites flying over a double Compton gamma-ray telescope resulted in the detection of gamma rays with 0.3-8.0 MeV energies on April 15, 1988, as the balloonborne telescope searched, from a 35-km altitude, for celestial gamma-ray sources. The satellites included Cosmos 1900 and 1932. The USSR is the only nation currently employing moderated nuclear reactors for satellite power; reactors in space may cause significant problems for gamma-ray astronomy by increasing backgrounds, especially in the case of gamma-ray bursts.

  3. Some Radiation Techniques Used in the GU-3 Gamma Irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Dodbiba, Andon; Ylli, Ariana; Stamo, Iliriana; Kongjika, Efigjeni

    2007-04-23

    Different radiation techniques, measurement of dose and its distibution throughout the irradiated materials are the main problems treated in this paper. The oscillometry method combined with the ionization chamber, as an absolute dosimeter, is used for calibration of routine ECB dosimeters. The dose uniformity, for the used radiation techniques in our GU-3 Gamma Irradiator with Cs-137, is from 93% up to 99%.

  4. Designing Equipment for Use in Gamma Radiation Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Vandergriff, K.U.

    1990-01-01

    High levels of gamma radiation are known to cause degradation in a variety of materials and components. When designing systems to operate in a high radiation environment, special precautions and procedures should be followed. This report (1) outlines steps that should be followed in designing equipment and (2) explains the general effects of radiation on various engineering materials and components. Much information exists in the literature on radiation effects upon materials. However, very little information is available to give the designer a step-by-step process for designing systems that will be subject to high levels of gamma radiation, such as those found in a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. In this report, many radiation effect references are relied upon to aid in the design of components and systems.

  5. Coupled radiation transport/thermal analysis of the radiation shield for a space nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barattino, W. J.

    1985-07-01

    A coupled radiation transport-heat transfer-stress analysis of the radiation shield for an SP-100 reactor was performed using a numerical code developed at the University of New Mexico and Sandia National Laboratory. For a fast reactor operating at 1.66 MW sub th, the energy deposited and resulting temperature distribution was determined for a shield consisting of tungsten and lithium hydride pressed into a stainless steel honeycomb matrix. While temperature feedback was shown to have a minor effect on energy deposition, the shielding configuration was found to have a major influence in meeting thermal requirements of the lithium hydride. It was shown that a shield optimized for radiation protection will fail because of melting. However, with minor modifications in the shield layering and material selection, the thermal integrity of the shield can be preserved. A shield design of graphite, depleted lithium hydride, tungsten, and natural lithium hydride was shown to satisfy neutron and gamma fluence requirements, maximum temperature limits, and minimize cracking in the LiH portion of the shield.

  6. Radiation-induced electrical breakdown of helium in fusion reactor superconducting magnet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L.J.

    1983-12-02

    A comprehensive theoretical study has been performed on the reduction of the electrical breakdown potential of liquid and gaseous helium under neutron and gamma radiation. Extension of the conventional Townsend breakdown theory indicates that radiation fields at the superconducting magnets of a typical fusion reactor are potentially capable of significantly reducing currently established (i.e., unirradiated) helium breakdown voltages. Emphasis is given to the implications of these results including future deployment choices of magnet cryogenic methods (e.g., pool-boiling versus forced-flow), the possible impact on magnet shielding requirements and the analogous situation for radiation-induced electrical breakdown in fusion RF transmission systems.

  7. A study of the diffuse galactic gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Assuming cosmic rays pervade the Galaxy, they necessarily produced high energy gamma-rays as they interact with the instellar matter and photons. The cosmic ray nucleon interactions five rise to gamma rays primarily through the decay of pi mesons, giving a unique spectrum with a maximum at approximately 68 MeV. Cosmic ray electrons produce gamma rays through bremsstrahlung, but with a markedly different energy spectral shape, one which decreases monotonically with energy. Cosmic ray electrons also interact with the interstellar starlight, optical and infrared photons, and the blackbody radiation through the Compton process. A model of galactic gamma ray production is discussed, and the predicted spatial distribution and energy spectra are presented. Considering the uncertainty in the point source contributions, the agreement between the theoretical predictions and the gamma ray data seems quite reasonable.

  8. Analysis of Nuclear Reactor Background Radiation for Neutrino Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Ricky; Blackmon, J. C.; Rasco, B. C.; Mumm, H. P.; mTC; NuLat Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Prior measurements of reactor antineutrinos have found a lower flux than expected. Precision measurements of antineutrino energy spectra are important for understanding the anomaly, reactor safeguards, and nuclear nonproliferation. Antineutrino detector designs rely on good characterization of gamma-ray and neutron backgrounds near the reactor core. To study the gamma-ray background at the NIST research reactor, spectra were collected using a 6.25 cm diameter × 5.5 cm germanium detector. We analyzed the measured spectra using simulations of the detector response using the GEANT4 toolkit to determine background fluxes and build a background model that will be used to understand shielding requirements and the impact of backgrounds on potential short-baseline reactor antineutrino studies at NIST. This work supported by the National Science Foundation and LSU.

  9. Effect of gamma radiation on honey quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, A.; Almeida-Muradian, L. B.; Sabato, S. F.

    2009-07-01

    Honey is one of the most complex substances produced by bees, mainly from the nectar of flowers. Gamma radiation is a technique that can be used to decrease the number of microbiological problems associated with food and increase the shelf life of certain products. The objective of this study was to verify the effect of gamma radiation with source of cobalto-60 (10 kGy) on some parameters used in honey quality control. Seven samples of pure honey were obtained from local markets in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2007. The methods used are in accordance with Brazilian Regulations. The physicochemical parameters analyzed were: moisture, HMF, free acidity, pH, sugars and ash. The results showed that gamma radiation, in the dose mentioned above, did not cause significant physicochemical alterations.

  10. Gamma line radiation from supernovae. [nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, W. D.

    1978-01-01

    Recent calculations of core collapse or massive stars result in explosive ejection of the mantle by a reflected shock. These hydrodynamic results are important for predictions of explosive nucleosynthesis and gamma-ray line emission from supernovae. Previous estimates, based on simple parameterized models or the nucleosynthesis in an average supernova, are compared with these latest results.

  11. Passive gamma analysis of the boiling-water-reactor assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, D.; Favalli, A.; Grogan, B.; Jansson, P.; Liljenfeldt, H.; Mozin, V.; Schwalbach, P.; Sjöland, A.; Tobin, S.; Trellue, H.; Vaccaro, S.

    2016-09-01

    This research focused on the analysis of a set of stationary passive gamma measurements taken on the spent nuclear fuel assemblies from a boiling water reactor (BWR) using pulse height analysis data acquisition. The measurements were performed on 25 different BWR assemblies in 2014 at Sweden's Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab). This study was performed as part of the Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative-Spent Fuel project to research the application of nondestructive assay (NDA) to spent fuel assemblies. The NGSI-SF team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins, (3) estimate the plutonium mass, (4) estimate the decay heat, and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. The final objective of this project is to quantify the capability of several integrated NDA instruments to meet the aforementioned goals using the combined signatures of neutrons, gamma rays, and heat. This report presents a selection of the measured data and summarizes an analysis of the results. Specifically, trends in the count rates measured for spectral lines from the following isotopes were analyzed as a function of the declared burnup and cooling time: 137Cs, 154Eu, 134Cs, and to a lesser extent, 106Ru and 144Ce. From these measured count rates, predictive algorithms were developed to enable the estimation of the burnup and cooling time. Furthermore, these algorithms were benchmarked on a set of assemblies not included in the standard assemblies set used by this research team.

  12. Passive gamma analysis of the boiling-water-reactor assemblies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vo, D.; Favalli, A.; Grogan, B.; Jansson, P.; Liljenfeldt, H.; Mozin, V.; Schwalbach, P.; Sjöland, A.; Tobin, S.; Trellue, H.; et al

    2016-06-04

    This research focused on the analysis of a set of stationary passive gamma measurements taken on the spent nuclear fuel assemblies from a boiling water reactor (BWR) using pulse height analysis data acquisition. The measurements were performed on 25 different BWR assemblies in 2014 at Sweden’s Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab). This study was performed as part of the Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative–Spent Fuel project to research the application of nondestructive assay (NDA) to spent fuel assemblies. The NGSI–SF team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in themore » past using nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins, (3) estimate the plutonium mass, (4) estimate the decay heat, and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. The final objective of this project is to quantify the capability of several integrated NDA instruments to meet the aforementioned goals using the combined signatures of neutrons, gamma rays, and heat. This report presents a selection of the measured data and summarizes an analysis of the results. Specifically, trends in the count rates measured for spectral lines from the following isotopes were analyzed as a function of the declared burnup and cooling time: 137Cs, 154Eu, 134Cs, and to a lesser extent, 106Ru and 144Ce. From these measured count rates, predictive algorithms were developed to enable the estimation of the burnup and cooling time. Furthermore, these algorithms were benchmarked on a set of assemblies not included in the standard assemblies set used by this research team.« less

  13. Effects of Gamma Radiation on Individual and Mixed Ion Exchange Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, E.W.

    2003-01-06

    The ion exchange resins that are used to deionize moderator in the reactor purification systems may accumulate sufficient radiation dose to damage the resins. This radiation damage would be manifested by: (1) loss of useful exchange capacity of the bed, which is costly since resins from the reactor deionizers are not reused; (2) shrinking or swelling of the resins, which may have some effect on the hydraulic behavior of the beds; (3) release of resin degradation products into the process stream, which pollutes moderator with impurities and precursors of the neutron-induced radioisotopes. This document details results of a laboratory study to determine the magnitude of these three effects by gamma irradiation of individual resins and their mixtures.

  14. Gamma radiation stability studies of mercury fulminate

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F.F.

    2000-02-17

    Mercury fulminate completely decomposed in a gamma source (0.86 Mrad/h) after a dose of 208 Mrad. This exposure equates to approximately 2.4 years in Tank 15H and 4 years in Tank 12H, one of the vessels of concern. Since the tanks lost the supernatant cover layer more than a decade ago, this study suggests that any mercury fulminate or closely related energetic species decomposed long ago if ever formed.

  15. Characterization of Neutron and Gamma Dose in the Irradiation Cell of Texas A and M University Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, Latha; Reece, Warren D.; Chirayath, Sunil S.; Aghara, Sukesh

    2011-07-01

    The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code was used to develop a three dimensional computational model of the Texas A and M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR) operating against the irradiation (dry cell) at steady state thermal power of 1 MW. The geometry of the NSCR core and the dry cell were modeled in detail. NSCR is used for a wide variety of experiments that utilizes the dry cell for neutron as well as gamma irradiation of samples. Information on the neutron and gamma radiation environment inside the dry cell is required to facilitate irradiation of samples. This paper presents the computed neutron flux, neutron and gamma dose rate, and foil reaction rates in the dry cell, obtained through MCNP5 simulations of the NSCR core. The neutron flux was measured using foil activation method and the reaction rates obtained from {sup 197}Au(n,{gamma}){sup 198}Au and {sup 54}Fe(n,p){sup 54}Mn were compared with the model and they showed agreement within {approx} 20%. The gamma dose rate at selected locations inside the dry cell was measured using radiochromic films and the results indicate slightly higher dose rates than predicted from the model. This is because the model calculated only prompt gamma dose rates during reactor operation while the radiochromic films measured gammas from activation products and fission product decayed gammas. The model was also used to calculate the neutron energy spectra for the energy range from 0.001 eV- 20 MeV. (authors)

  16. Radiation burst from a single {gamma}-photon field

    SciTech Connect

    Shakhmuratov, R. N.; Vagizov, F.; Kocharovskaya, O.

    2011-10-15

    The radiation burst from a single {gamma}-photon field interacting with a dense resonant absorber is studied theoretically and experimentally. This effect was discovered for the fist time by P. Helisto et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 66, 2037 (1991)] and it was named the ''gamma echo''. The echo is generated by a 180 Degree-Sign phase shift of the incident radiation field, attained by an abrupt change of the position of the absorber with respect to the radiation source during the coherence time of the photon wave packet. Three distinguishing cases of the gamma echo are considered; i.e., the photon is in exact resonance with the absorber, close to resonance (on the slope of the absorption line), and far from resonance (on the far wings of the resonance line). In resonance the amplitude of the radiation burst is two times larger than the amplitude of the input radiation field just before its phase shift. This burst was explained by Helisto et al. as a result of constructive interference of the coherently scattered field with the phase-shifted input field, both having almost the same amplitude. We found that out of resonance the scattered radiation field acquires an additional component with almost the same amplitude as the amplitude of the incident radiation field. The phase of the additional field depends on the optical thickness of the absorber and resonant detuning. Far from resonance this field interferes destructively with the phase-shifted incident radiation field and radiation quenching is observed. Close to resonance the three fields interfere constructively and the amplitude of the radiation burst is three times larger than the amplitude of the input radiation field.

  17. Gamma scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    We give a progress report for the work which has been carried out in the last three years with DOE support. A facility for high-intensity Moessbauer scattering is now fully operational at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) as well as a facility at Purdue, using special isotopes produced at MURR. High precision, fundamental Moessbauer effect studies have been carried out using scattering to filter the unwanted radiation. These have led to a new Fourier transform method for describing Moessbauer effect (ME) lineshape and a direct method of fitting ME data to the convolution integral. These methods allow complete correction for source resonance self absorption (SRSA) and the accurate representation of interference effects that add an asymmetric component to the ME lines. We have begun applying these techniques to attenuated ME sources whose central peak has been attenuated by stationary resonant absorbers, to more precisely determine interference parameters and line-shape behavior in the resonance asymptotic region. This analysis is important to both the fundamental ME studies and to scattering studies for which a deconvolution is essential for extracting the correct recoilless fractions and interference parameters. A number of scattering studies have been successfully carried out including a study of the thermal diffuse scattering in Si, which led to an analysis of the resolution function for gamma-ray scattering. Also studied was the anharmonic motion in Na and the satellite reflection Debye-Waller factor in TaS{sub 2}, which indicate phason rather than phonon behavior. We have begun quasielastic diffusion studies in viscous liquids and current results are summarized. These advances, coupled to our improvements in MIcrofoil Conversion Electron spectroscopy lay the foundation for the proposed research outlined in this request for a three-year renewal of DOE support.

  18. Gamma Radiation from PSR B1055-52

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Bailes, M.; Bertsch, D. L.; Cordes, J.; DAmico, N. D.; Esposito, J. A.; Finley, J.; Hartman, R. C.; Hermsen, W.; Kanbach, G.; Kaspi, V. M.; Kniffen, D. A.; Kuiper, L.; Lin, Y. C.; Lyne, A.; Manchester, R.; Matz, S. M.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.; Michelson, P. F.; Nolan, P. L.

    1998-01-01

    The telescopes on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CCRO) have observed PSR B1055-52 a number of times between 1991 and 1998. From these data, a more detailed picture of the gamma radiation from this source has been developed, showing several characteristics which distinguish this pulsar: the light curve is complex; there is no detectable unpulsed emission; the energy spectrum is flat, with no evidence of a sharp high-energy cutoff up to greater than 4 GeV. Comparisons of the gamma-ray data with observations at longer wavelengths show that no two of the known gamma-ray pulsars have quite the same characteristics; this diversity makes interpretation in terms of theoretical models difficult.

  19. Gamma Radiation from PSR B1055-52

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Bailes, M.; Bertsch, D. L.; Cordes, J.; DAmico, N.; Esposito, J. A.; Finley, J.; Hartman, R. C.; Hermsen, W.; Kanbach, G.; Kaspi, V. M.; Kniffen, D. A.; Kuiper, L.; Lin, Y. C.; Lyne, A.; Manchester, R.; Matz, S. M.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.; Michelson, P. F.; Nolan, P. L.

    1999-01-01

    The telescopes on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) have observed PSR B1055-52 a number of times between 1991 and 1998. From these data, a more detailed picture of the gamma radiation from this source has been developed, showing several characteristics which distinguish this pulsar: the light curve is complex; there is no detectable unpulsed emission; the energy spectrum is flat, with no evidence of a sharp high-energy cutoff up to greater than 4 GeV. Comparisons of the gamma-ray data with observations at longer wavelengths show that no two of the known gamma-ray pulsars have quite the same characteristics; this diversity makes interpretation in terms of theoretical models difficult.

  20. Scan MDCs for GPS-Based Gamma Radiation Surveys.

    PubMed

    Alecksen, Tyler; Whicker, Randy

    2016-08-01

    A method for estimating the minimum detectable concentration of a contaminant radionuclide in soil when scanning with gamma radiation detectors (known as the "scan MDC") is described in the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). This paper presents an alternate method for estimating scan MDCs for GPS-based gamma surveys based on detector efficiencies modeled with the probabilistic Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended (MCNPX) Transport simulation code. Results are compared to those provided in MARSSIM. An extensive database of MCNPX-based detection efficiencies has been developed to represent a variety of gamma survey applications and potential scanning configurations (detector size, scan height, size of contaminated soil volume, etc.), and an associated web-based user interface has been developed to provide survey designers and regulators with access to a reasonably wide range of calculated scan MDC values for survey planning purposes. PMID:27356162

  1. Environmental gamma radiation in the KATRIN Spectrometer Hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kippenbrock, Luke; Katrin Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The KATRIN (KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino) experiment, presently undergoing final assembly in Germany, will use tritium β-decay to probe the electron antineutrino mass down to a sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c2 (90% confidence level). The experimental apparatus has been designed to limit the effect of known and predicted backgrounds near the beta endpoint energy. However, recent commissioning measurements with the main spectrometer have shown that an elusive background source still remains. In this talk, the interaction of environmental gamma radiation inside the KATRIN main spectrometer is studied as a potential background creation mechanism. Geant4 simulations of the gamma flux, derived from concrete radioassay measurements, are compared with detector background rates collected under multiple gamma radiation conditions. Funded by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics under Grant #DE-FG02-97ER41020.

  2. Gamma radiation transmission along the multibend mazes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangrok

    2016-08-01

    Installing a maze on the corridor reduces much shielding materials in shielding door at the end of the pathway. In this study, gamma transmission was measured along single-, double-, and triple-bend mazes, which were applied to nondestructive test workplace by Monte Carlo method. In the facility using (192)Ir 1.85TBq, the lengths of corridors to reduce the effective dose under the limitation without shielding door were 10 and 6m in double- and triple-bend mazes, respectively. PMID:27180220

  3. GAMMA RADIATION TREATMENT OF WATERS FROM LIGNITE MINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Discussed in this report are results of laboratory investigations carried out with the application of gamma radiation for the purification of waters drained from surface lignite mines. These waters are polluted to a considerable extent with suspended matter of various sizes, a la...

  4. Sewage sludge pasteurization by gamma radiation: Financial viability case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinwood, Jean F.; Kotler, Jiri

    This paper examines the financial viability of sewage sludge pasteurization by gamma radiation, by examining the following three North American scenarios: 1) Small volume sewage treatment plant experiencing high sludge disposal costs. 2) Large volume sewage treatment plant experiencing low sludge disposal costs. 3) Large volume sewage treatment plant experiencing high sludge disposal costs.

  5. Gamma Radiation Induced Calibration Shift for Four Cryogenic Thermometer Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courts, S. Scott; Yeager, C. J.

    2004-06-01

    Cryogenic temperature sensors utilized in space environments are exposed to ionizing radiation with the total dose dependent upon the length of the mission. Based upon their minimal size and robust packaging, four models of cryogenic Resistance Thermometer Devices (RTDs) manufactured by Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc. were tested to determine their reliability for space applications with regard to radiation. Samples of Cernox™ RTDs (CX-1050-SD), ruthenium oxide RTDs (models RX-102A-AA and RX-103A-AA), and silicon diode thermometers (model DT-670-SD) were irradiated at room temperature by a cesium-137 gamma source to total doses ranging from 5 Gy to 10 kGy. This paper presents the resulting temperature shifts induced by the gamma radiation as a function of total dose over the 1.4 K to 325 K temperature range. These data show that 1) Cernox™ RTDs exhibit high radiation hardness to 10 kGy from 1.4 K to 325 K, 2) ruthenium oxide RTDs show moderate radiation hardness to 10 kGy below 10 K, and 3) silicon diodes temperature sensors exhibit some radiation tolerance to low levels of radiation (especially below 70 K), but quickly shift calibration at radiation levels above 300 Gy, especially above 100 K.

  6. Bioburden assessment and gamma radiation inactivation patterns in parchment documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Inês; Mesquita, Nuno; Cabo Verde, Sandra; Carolino, Maria Manuela; Portugal, António; Botelho, Maria Luísa

    2013-07-01

    Parchment documents are part of our cultural heritage and, as historical artifacts that they are, should be preserved. The aim of this study was to validate an appropriate methodology to characterize the bioburden of parchment documents, and to assess the growth and gamma radiation inactivation patterns of the microbiota present in that material. Another goal was to estimate the minimum gamma radiation dose (Dmin) to be applied for the decontamination of parchment as an alternative treatment to the current toxic chemical and non-chemical decontamination methods. Two bioburden assessment methodologies were evaluated: the Swab Method (SM) and the Destructive Method (DM). The recovery efficiency of each method was estimated by artificial contamination, using a Cladosporium cladosporioides spore suspension. The parchment samples' microbiota was typified using morphological methods and the fungal isolates were identified by ITS-DNA sequencing. The inactivation pattern was assessed using the DM after exposure to different gamma radiation doses, and using C. cladosporioides as reference. Based on the applied methodology, parchment samples presented bioburden values lower than 5×103 CFU/cm2 for total microbiota, and lower than 10 CFU/cm2 for fungal propagules. The results suggest no evident inactivation trend for the natural parchment microbiota, especially regarding the fungal community. A minimum gamma radiation dose (Dmin) of 5 kGy is proposed for the decontamination treatment of parchment. Determining the minimal decontamination dose in parchment is essential for a correct application of gamma radiation as an alternative decontamination treatment for this type of documents avoiding the toxicity and the degradation promoted by the traditional chemical and non-chemical treatments.

  7. Field Deployable Gamma Radiation Detectors for DHS Use

    SciTech Connect

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay

    2007-08-31

    Recently, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has integrated all nuclear detection research, development, testing, evaluation, acquisition, and operational support into a single office: the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO). The DNDO has specific requirements set for all commercial and government off-the-shelf radiation detection equipment and data acquisition systems. This article would investigate several recent developments in field deployable gamma radiation detectors that are attempting to meet the DNDO specifications. Commercially available, transportable, handheld radio isotope identification devices (RIID) are inadequate for DHS’s requirements in terms of sensitivity, resolution, response time and reach back capability. The leading commercial vendor manufacturing handheld gamma spectrometer in the United States is Thermo Electron Corporation. Thermo Electron’s identiFINDER™, which primarily uses sodium iodide crystals (3.18-cm x 2.54-cm cylinders) as gamma detector, has a Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum energy resolution of 7 percent at 662 keV. Thermo Electron has just recently come up with a reach-back capability patented as RadReachBack™ that enables emergency personnel to obtain real-time technical analysis of radiation samples they find in the field. The current project has the goal to build a prototype handheld gamma spectrometer, equipped with a digital camera and an embedded cell phone to be used as an RIID with higher sensitivity (comparable to that of a 7.62-cm x 7.62-cm sodium iodide crystal at low gamma energy ranging from 30 keV to 3,000 keV), better resolution (< 3.0 percent at 662 keV), faster response time (able to detect the presence of gamma-emitting radio isotopes within 5 seconds of approach), which will make it useful as a field deployable tool. The handheld equipment continuously monitors the ambient gamma radiation and, if it comes across any radiation anomalies with higher than normal gamma gross counts, it sets

  8. Rheology of Indian Honey: Effect of Temperature and Gamma Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Panicker, Lata; Gautam, Satyendra

    2014-01-01

    Honey brands commonly available in Indian market were characterized for their rheological and thermal properties. Viscosity of all the honey samples belonging to different commercial brands was found to decrease with increase in temperature (5–40°C) and their sensitivity towards temperature varied significantly as explained by calculating activation energy based on Arrhenius model and ranged from 54.0 to 89.0 kJ/mol. However, shear rate was not found to alter the viscosity of honey indicating their Newtonian character and the shear stress varied linearly with shear rate for all honey samples. Honey is known to contain pathogenic microbial spores and in our earlier study gamma radiation was found to be effective in achieving microbial decontamination of honey. The effect of gamma radiation (5–15 kGy) on rheological properties of honey was assessed, and it was found to remain unchanged upon radiation treatment. The glass transition temperatures (Tg) of these honey analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry varied from −44.1 to −54.1°C and remained unchanged upon gamma radiation treatment. The results provide information about some key physical properties of commercial Indian honey. Radiation treatment which is useful for ensuring microbial safety of honey does not alter these properties. PMID:26904655

  9. Design and development of a portable gamma radiation monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munir, M.; Ahmad, N.; Sohail, S.; Naveed, R. A.; Rafiq, M. Q.; Khalid, M.

    2009-07-01

    A portable gamma radiation monitor has been designed and developed. The monitor can be used effectively in the dose range from 0.07 to 500 mGy/h due to gamma rays of energy greater than 65 keV. The monitor overestimated radiation doses and the uncertainty in the measured dose rate has been found to be ≤30%. The response of the monitor can be considered isotropic within an acceptable error of ±30%. Provision has also been added to use the monitor as an installed radiation monitor. In installed mode, it can be operated from a remote location up to 1 km and the timing history can be stored on a personal computer.

  10. Design and development of a portable gamma radiation monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Munir, M.; Khalid, M.; Ahmad, N.; Sohail, S.; Naveed, R. A.; Rafiq, M. Q.

    2009-07-15

    A portable gamma radiation monitor has been designed and developed. The monitor can be used effectively in the dose range from 0.07 to 500 mGy/h due to gamma rays of energy greater than 65 keV. The monitor overestimated radiation doses and the uncertainty in the measured dose rate has been found to be {<=}30%. The response of the monitor can be considered isotropic within an acceptable error of {+-}30%. Provision has also been added to use the monitor as an installed radiation monitor. In installed mode, it can be operated from a remote location up to 1 km and the timing history can be stored on a personal computer.

  11. A study of the diffuse galactic gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The observed diffuse galactic gamma radiation is compared to that predicted from galactic cosmic ray interactions with galactic matter and photons, assuming that on a broad scale the galactic cosmic rays in the plane are correlated with matter density. Recent considerations of the galactic diffuse matter distribution, particularly the molecular hydrogen, the galactic photon density, and a revised cosmic ray galactic scale height, are included. The predictions are compared to the observational gamma ray longitude distributions, the latitude distribution, and energy spectrum, including the COS-B satellite results, and the COS-B background estimate. Considering the uncertainties, the agreement between the theoretical predictions and the gamma ray data seems generally reasonable, suggesting that the general concepts are likely to be correct. Both the results determined here alone and in conjunction with other work calculating source functions assuming only cosmic ray matter contributions indicate no necessity for a significant point source contribution to the diffuse gamma radiation in the energy range being considered (E(gamma)10 MeV).

  12. Measurement of neutron and gamma radiation in a mixed field.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, S; Bechtel, E; Brucker, G J

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes a study of dosimeters with a range of 0 to 0.2 mGy that were developed by the authors and built by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). These instruments are a type of air-filled ion chamber that is self-reading by means of an internal carbon fiber electrometer. Two types of these dosimeters were constructed: one with an ion chamber wall made of a conductive hydrogenous material, and the other device made with a conductive wall lining of non-hydrogenous material. Both types of dosimeters have the same sensitivity for gamma radiation, but greatly different sensitivities for fast neutrons, thus making it possible to measure gamma radiation and neutron doses separately in a mixed radiation field. The results indicate that such pairs of dosimeters can be used for the first time to accurately monitor personnel for gamma ray and neutron doses in real time. Since the difference in neutron sensitivities is due to the properties of wall materials, periodic calibrations of the dosimeter system can be accomplished using only gamma rays after the material constants are measured. The absolute number of neutron induced transmutations in sulfur was required for this work. Methods and techniques which were applied to determine this quantity are described in the text. This approach was one of several dosimetric procedures utilized in this investigation. PMID:7558835

  13. Gamma radiation resistant Fabry-Perot fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanying; Miller, Don W.; Talnagi, Joseph

    2002-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1998 completed a study of emerging technologies that could be applicable to measurement systems in nuclear power plants [H. M. Hashemian [et al.], "Advanced Instrumentation and Maintenance Technologies for Nuclear Power Plants," NUREG/CR-5501 (1998)]. This study concluded that advanced fiber optic sensing technology is an emerging technology that should be investigated. It also indicated that there had been very little research related to performance evaluation of fiber optic sensors in nuclear plant harsh environments, although substantial research has been performed on nuclear radiation effects on optical fibers in the last two decades. A type of Fabry-Perot fiber optic temperature sensor, which is manufactured by Fiso Technologies in Canada, is qualified to be a candidate for potential applications in nuclear radiation environment due to its unique signal processing technique and its resistance to power loss. The gamma irradiation effects on this type of sensors are investigated in this article. Two sensors were irradiated in a gamma irradiation field and one of them was irradiated up to a total gamma dose of 133 Mrad. The sensor on-line performance was monitored during each gamma irradiation test. Furthermore, the sensor static and dynamic performance before and after each irradiation test were evaluated according to the Standard ISA-dS67.06.01 ("Performance Monitoring for Nuclear Safety-Related Instrument Channels in Nuclear Power Plants", Standard ISA-dS67.06.01, Draft 7, Instrument Society of America, 1999). Although several abnormal phenomena were observed, analysis shows that gamma irradiation is not accredited to the abnormal behavior, which implies that this type of sensor is suitable to a gamma irradiation environment with a high gamma dose.

  14. Field Deployable Gamma Radiation Detectors for DHS Use

    SciTech Connect

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay

    2007-08-01

    Recently, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has integrated all nuclear detection research, development, testing, evaluation, acquisition, and operational support into a single office: the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO). The DNDO has specific requirements set for all commercial off-the-shelf and government off-the-shelf radiation detection equipment and data acquisition systems. This article would investigate several recent developments in field deployable gamma radiation detectors that are attempting to meet the DNDO specifications. Commercially available, transportable, handheld radio isotope identification devices (RIID) are inadequate for DHS requirements in terms of sensitivity, resolution, response time, and reach-back capability. The leading commercial vendor manufacturing handheld gamma spectrometer in the United States is Thermo Electron Corporation. Thermo Electron's identiFINDER{trademark}, which primarily uses sodium iodide crystals (3.18 x 2.54cm cylinders) as gamma detectors, has a Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum energy resolution of 7 percent at 662 keV. Thermo Electron has just recently come up with a reach-back capability patented as RadReachBack{trademark} that enables emergency personnel to obtain real-time technical analysis of radiation samples they find in the field. The current project has the goal to build a prototype handheld gamma spectrometer, equipped with a digital camera and an embedded cell phone to be used as an RIID with higher sensitivity, better resolution, and faster response time (able to detect the presence of gamma-emitting radio isotopes within 5 seconds of approach), which will make it useful as a field deployable tool. The handheld equipment continuously monitors the ambient gamma radiation, and, if it comes across any radiation anomalies with higher than normal gamma gross counts, it sets an alarm condition. When a substantial alarm level is reached, the system automatically triggers the saving of relevant

  15. Radiolytic oxidation of propane. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, A.K.

    1983-01-01

    The Co-60 ..gamma.. radiolysis of gaseous propane was studied at 100 torr pressure and 25/sup 0/C, both pure and with 10% added oxygen. In the unscavenged system the major products and their G-values were hydrogen, 4.99; methane, 1.30; ethane, 1.95; iso-butane, 0.61; n-butane, 0.25; i-pentane, 0.42; n-pentane, 0.14; and hexanes, 0.89. Minor products were heptanes, 0.082; octanes, 0.067; nonanes, 0.088, and decanes, 0.033. Small yields of ethylene and propylene were also observed. Yields in the presence of 10% added oxygen were hydrogen, 1.87; methane, 0.83; and ethane, 1.22. Higher saturated hydrocarbons were eliminated. The reaction scheme for formation of major products was examined using computer modeling based on 24 reactions in the unscavenged system and 28 reactions in the propane-oxygen system. Yields could be brought into agreement with the data within experimental error in nearly all cases, but in the pure propane system it was necessary to assume that the molecular hydrogen yield was accompanied by the deposition of polymer on the vessel wall.

  16. Gamma radiation survey of the LDEF spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, G. W.; King, S. E.; August, R. A.; Ritter, J. C.; Cutchin, J. H.; Haskins, P. S.; Mckisson, J. E.; Ely, D. W.; Weisenberger, A. G.; Piercey, R. B.

    1992-01-01

    The retrieval of the Long Duration Exposure Facility spacecraft in January 1990 after nearly six years in orbit offered a unique opportunity to study the long term buildup of induced radioactivity in the variety of materials on board. We conducted the first complete gamma-ray survey of a large spacecraft on LDEF shortly after its return to earth. A surprising observation was the Be-7 activity which was seen primarily on the leading edge of the satellite, implying that it was picked up by LDEF in orbit. This is the first known evidence for accretion of a radioactive isotope onto an orbiting spacecraft. Other isotopes observed during the survey, the strongest being Na-22, are all attributed to activation of spacecraft components. Be-7 is a spallation product of cosmic rays on nitrogen and oxygen in the upper atmosphere. However, the observed density is much greater than expected due to cosmic-ray production in situ. This implies transport of Be-7 from much lower altitudes up to the LDEF orbit.

  17. Perfluorinated polymer optical fiber for gamma radiation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stajanca, P.; Mihai, L.; Sporea, D.; Negut, D.; Krebber, K.

    2016-05-01

    The sensitivity of low-loss perfluorinated polymer optical fiber (PF-POF) to gamma radiation is investigated for on-line radiation monitoring purposes. The radiation-induced attenuation (RIA) of a commercial PF-POF based on Cytop material is measured in the visible spectral region. The fiber RIA shows strong wavelength dependence with rapid increase towards the blue side of the spectrum. The wide range of radiation sensitivities is available via careful selection of appropriate monitoring wavelength. The accessible sensitivities span from 1.6 +/- 0.2 dBm-1/kGy measured at 750 nm to 18.3 +/- 0.7 dBm-1/kGy measured at 420 nm. The fairly high radiation sensitivity as well as its wide tunability makes the fiber a promising candidate for a broad range of applications.

  18. Quality assurance of environmental gamma radiation monitoring in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Stuhec, M; Zorko, B; Mitić, D; Miljanić, S; Ranogajec-Komor, M

    2006-01-01

    Environmental gamma radiation monitoring established in Slovenia consists of a network of multifunctional gamma monitors (MFMs) based on pairs of Geiger-Müller counters and a network of measuring sites with high-sensitive thermoluminiscence dosemeters. The measuring points are evenly spread across Slovenia, located at the meteorological stations and more densely on additional locations around the Krsko NPP. The MFM network has a 2-fold function with one sensor used for the purpose of early warning system in near surroundings of the NPP and the other, more sensitive, for natural radiation monitoring. The paper summarises activities to establish quality assurance of the environmental gamma radiation measurements in Slovenia, with a critical view of the results in comparison with the international standards and recommendations. While the results of linearity and energy dependence tests were satisfying, on-field intercomparison showed that the inherent signal of one of the monitors (MFM) has to be taken into account in the range of environmental background radiation. PMID:16410289

  19. Thermal stability of grafted fibers. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sundardi, F.; Kadariah; Marlianti, I.

    1983-10-01

    Presented the experimental results on the study of thermal stability of grafted fibers, i.e., polypropylene-, polyester-, and rayon-grafted fibers. These fibers were obtained by radiation grafting processes using hydrophylic monomers such as 1-vinyl 2-pyrolidone, acrylic acid, N-methylol acrylamide, and acrylonitrile. The thermal stability of the fibers was studied using a Shimadzu Thermal Analyzer DT-30. The thermal stability of the fibers, which can be indicated by the value of the activation energy for thermal degradation, was not improved by radiation grafting. The degree of improvement depends on the thermal stability of the monomers used for grafting. The thermal stability of a polypropylene fiber, either a grafted or an ungrafted one, was found to be inferior compared to the polyester of a rayon fiber, which may be due to the lack of C=O and C=C bonds in the polypropylene molecules. The thermal stability of a fiber grafted with acrylonitrile monomer was found to be better than that of an ungrafted one. However, no improvement was detected in the fibers grafted with 1-vinyl 2-pyrrolidone monomer, which may be due to the lower thermal stability of poly(1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone), compared to the polypropylene or polyester fibers. 17 figures, 3 tables.

  20. Anomalous primary radiation from the Leksell Gamma Knife Unit.

    PubMed

    Shearer, D R; Roventine, W A; Coy, S R

    1994-12-01

    The Leksell Gamma Knife Unit, Type U, utilizes 201 separate 60Co sources intersecting at a common focus for radiosurgical treatment of the brain. It has been generally understood that all primary unattenuated radiation beams are confined within the protective housing during all phases of Gamma Knife operation. We have found that when the unit's shielding door is lowered for treatment, twelve primary beams exit the unit's door opening. Furthermore, in the original Gamma Knife unit design, two of the twelve primary beams failed to be attenuated by either the unit base or the unit wings. This has implications for the design of structural shielding and the protection of personnel during emergency procedures. Engineering modifications to eliminate the problem are discussed. PMID:7960787

  1. Analytical modeling for gamma radiation damage on silicon photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, H.; Feghhi, S. A. H.

    2016-04-01

    Radiation-induced damage in PIN silicon photodiode induces degradation of the photodiode parameters. In this work, by presenting an analytical model, the effect of gamma dose on the dark current in a PIN photodiode array was investigated. Geant4 was used to obtain the damage constant as a result of primary incident particle fluence and NIEL distribution calculations. Experimental measurements as well as numerical simulation of the semiconductor with ATLAS were carried out to verify and parameterize the analytical model calculations. A reasonable agreement has been found between analytical results and experimental data for BPX65 silicon photodiodes irradiated by a Co-60 gamma source at total doses up to 500 krad under different reverse voltages. Moreover, the results showed that the dark current of each photodiode array pixel has considerably increased by gamma dose irradiation.

  2. Characterization of gamma radiation inducible thioredoxin h from Spirogyra varians.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Minchul; Yang, Ho-Yeon; Lee, Seung-Sik; Kim, Dong-Ho; Kim, Gwang-Hoon; Choi, Jong-il

    2013-08-15

    In this study, thioredoxin h (Trxh) was isolated and characterized from the fresh water green alga Spirogyra varians, which was one amongst the pool of proteins induced upon gamma radiation treatment. cDNA clones encoding S. varians thioredoxin h were isolated from a pre-constructed S. varians cDNA library. Trxh had a molecular mass of 13.5kDa and contained the canonical WCGPC active site. Recombinant Trxh showed the disulfide reduction activity, and exhibited insulin reduction activity. Also, Trxh had higher 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) reduction activity with Arabidopsis thioredoxin reductase (TR) than with Escherichia coli TR. Specific expression of the Trxh gene was further analyzed at mRNA and protein levels and was found to increase by gamma irradiation upto the absorbed dose of 3kGy, suggesting that Trxh may have potential functions in protection of biomolecules from gamma irradiation. PMID:23830452

  3. Effects of gamma radiation on snake venoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, N.; Spencer, P. J.; Andrade, H. F.; Guarnieri, M. C.; Rogero, J. R.

    1998-06-01

    Ionizing radiation is able to detoxify several venoms, including snake venoms, without affecting significantly their immunogenic properties. Inn order to elucidate this phenomena, we conceived a comparative pharmacological study between native and irradiated (2,000 Gy) crotoxin, the main toxin of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus. Crotoxin was isolated and purified by molecular exclusion chromatography, pI precipitation and, susbequentely submitted to irradiaiton. Gel filtration of the irradiated toxin resulted in some high molecular weight aggregates formation. Crotoxin toxicity decreased two folds after irradiation, as determined by LD 50 in mice. Native and irradiated crotoxin biodistribution ocured in the same general manner, with renal elimination. However, in contrast to irradiated crotoxin, the native form was initially retained in kidneys. A later concentration (2-3 hr) appeared in phagocytic mononuclear cells rich organs (liver and spleen) and neural junction rich organs (muscle and brain).

  4. Gamma radiation from the Crab and Vela pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanbach, Gottfried

    1990-01-01

    The young pulsars in Crab and Vela were observed as very efficient emitters of high energy gamma radiation. While their radiation in the radio, optical, and x ray range was always known to differ considerably, the gamma ray emission on a superficial level appears quite similar: lightcurves with two narrow peaks, separated by 141 deg (Crab) and 153 deg (Vela) and photon energies in excess of 1 GeV with spectra that can be described by a power-law for Crab and a broken power-law for Vela. The detailed observations of these sources with the COS-B instrument, extending over nearly seven years, have revealed significant differences in the characteristics of the pulsars in the gamma-ray domain. Secular changes in the temporal (Crab) and spectral (Vela) properties above 50 MeV were found. These tantalizing signatures of the pulsar emission processes must now be explored in more detail and over a larger spectral range with the GRO (Gamma Ray Observatory) instruments in order to gain a deeper understanding of the physics of young neutron stars.

  5. The Gamma-ray galactic diffuse radiation and Cerenkov telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Chardonnet, P. |; Salati, P. ||; Silk, J.; Grenier, I.; Smoot, G.

    1995-12-01

    By using the PYTHIA version of the Lund Monte Carlo program, we study the photon yield of proton-proton collisions in the energy range between 10 GeV and 1 TeV. The resulting photon spectrum turns out to scale roughly with incident energy. Then, by folding the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray protons with the distribution of HI and CO, the Galactic diffuse emission of {gamma}-rays above 100 GeV is mapped. Prospects for observing that diffuse radiation with atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes are discussed. Present instruments are able to detect the {gamma}-ray glow of the Galactic center. The latter will be mapped by the next generation of telescopes if their energy threshold is decreased. However, a detailed survey of the Galactic ridge will be a real challenge, even in the long term. The MILAGRO project seems more appropriate. Finally, we investigate the {gamma}-ray emission from weakly interacting massive particles clustering at the Galactic center. It has been speculated that those species are a major component of the halo dark matter. We show that their {gamma}-ray signal is swamped in the Galactic diffuse radiation and cannot be observed at TeV energies. {copyright} {ital 1995 The American Astronomical Society.}

  6. Airborne gamma radiation soil moisture measurements over short flight lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, Eugene L.; Carrol, Thomas R.; Lipinski, Daniel M.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on airborne gamma radiation measurements of soil moisture condition, carried out along short flight lines as part of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment (FIFE). Data were collected over an area in Kansas during the summers of 1987 and 1989. The airborne surveys, together with ground measurements, provide the most comprehensive set of airborne and ground truth data available in the U.S. for calibrating and evaluating airborne gamma flight lines. Analysis showed that, using standard National Weather Service weights for the K, Tl, and Gc radiation windows, the airborne soil moisture estimates for the FIFE lines had a root mean square error of no greater than 3.0 percent soil moisture. The soil moisture estimates for sections having acquisition time of at least 15 sec were found to be reliable.

  7. Characterization of muon and gamma radiations at the PTOLEMY site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, Susannah; Gentile, Charles; Tully, Chris; Zapata, Sandra; Chris Tully Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    PTOLEMY is an experimental project at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory designed to determine the present day number density of relic neutrinos through measurement of electrons produced from neutrino capture on tritium. The weak interaction cross section for relic neutrino interactions necessitates high sensitivity measurements that could be influenced by high energy particles, like muons and gamma ray photons, which induce nuclear transitions and secondary electrons. Muons produced from the collision of cosmic rays with atmospheric nuclei are a significant source of background radiation at and below Earth's surface. The muon flux is measured by the coincidence of minimum ionization radiation loss in two plastic scintillator paddles. The spectrum of gamma ray photons is measured using sodium iodide based scintillators. These measurements will provide a characterization of the background and rates at the PTOLEMY site.

  8. Manned mars rover powered by a nuclear reactor; Radiation shield analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Morley, N.J.; El-Genk, M. . Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    This paper discusses a key element in the conceptual design of a nuclear reactor power system for a manned Mars rover is the analysis, design, and integration of the radiation shield. A shield analysis is carried out to characterize the thickness and spacing of shield layers to provide the minimum mass configuration that meets a dose rate requirement of 300 mSv/yr. The analysis utilizes a two-dimensional transport code to model the reactor and to provide a source term that is subsequently used to calculate dose rates as a function of reactor power level and shield layer thickness. Results show that a multilayered tungsten and lithium hydride (LiH) shield would satisfy the dose rate limit of 300 mSv/yr (30 rem/yr) to the rover crew. The position of two tungsten and LiH layers is varied to minimize secondary gamma-ray production and to optimize shield mass.

  9. Effects of gamma radiation on perfluorinated polymer optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stajanca, Pavol; Mihai, Laura; Sporea, Dan; Neguţ, Daniel; Sturm, Heinz; Schukar, Marcus; Krebber, Katerina

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents the first complex study of gamma radiation effects on a low-loss perfluorinated polymer optical fiber (PF-POF) based on Cytop® polymer. Influence of gamma radiation on fiber's optical, mechanical and climatic performance is investigated. The radiation-induced attenuation (RIA) in the visible and near-infrared region (0.4 μm-1.7 μm) is measured and its origins are discussed. Besides attenuation increase, radiation is also shown to decrease the thermal degradation stability of the fiber and to increase its susceptibility to water. With regard to complex fiber transmission performance upon irradiation, the optimal operation wavelength region of PF-POF-based systems intended for use in radiation environments is determined to be around 1.1 μm. On the other hand, the investigated fiber holds potential for low-cost RIA-based optical fiber dosimetry applications with sensitivity as high as 260 dBm-1/kGy in the visible region.

  10. Influence of gamma radiation onto polymeric matrix with papain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulli, Gislaine; Lopes, Patrícia Santos; Velasco, Maria Valéria Robles; Alcântara, Mara Tânia Silva; Rogero, Sizue Ota; Lugao, Ademar Benévolo; Mathor, Monica Beatriz

    2010-03-01

    Papain is a proteolytic enzyme that has been widely used as debridement agent for scars and wound healing treatment. However, papain presents low stability, which limits its use to extemporaneous or short shelf-life formulations. The purpose of this study was to entrap papain into a polymeric matrix in order to obtain a drug delivery system that could be used as medical device. Since these systems must be sterile, gamma radiation is an interesting option and presents advantages in relation to conventional agents: no radioactive residues are formed; the product can be sterilized inside the final packaging and has an excellent reliability. The normative reference for the establishment of the sterilizing dose determines 25 kGy as the inactivation dose for viable microorganisms. A silicone dispersion was selected to prepare membranes containing 2% (w/w) papain. Irradiated and non-irradiated membranes were simultaneously assessed in order to verify whether gamma radiation interferes with the drug-releasing profile. Results showed that irradiation does not affect significantly papain release and its activity. Therefore papain shows radioresistance in the irradiation conditions applied. In conclusion, gamma radiation can be easily used as sterilizing agent without affecting the papain release profile and its activity onto the biocompatible device is studied.

  11. Thermionic reactor power system: Effects of radiation on integration with Manned Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gietzen, A. J.; Heath, C. A.; Perry, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    The application of a thermionic reactor power system to the modular space station is described. The nominal net power is 40 kWe, with the power system designed to be applicable over the power range from 25 to 60 kWe. The power system is designed to be launched by the space shuttle. Radiation protection is provided by LiH neutron shielding and W gamma shielding in a shaped 4 pion configuration, i.e., the reactor is shielded on all sides but not to equal extent. Isodose contours are presented for the region around the modular space station. Levels and spectral distribution of radiation are given for later evaluation of effects on space station experiments. Parametric data on the effects of separation distance on power system mass are presented.

  12. Purification of sulfide-alkali effluent with the aid of ionizing radiation. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Petryaev, E.P.; Gerasimovich, O.A.; Kovalevskaya, A.M.; Plyuto, I.Ch.; Shlyk, V.G.

    1984-03-01

    The treatment of sulfide-alkali effluent under the effect of ionizing radiation was investigated. The source was an LMB-..gamma..-1M ..gamma..-apparatus with /sup 137/Cs source. The dose rate was 52 rad/s. Irradiation was done in glass ampules and in vessels allowing bubbling with air and irradiation to be carried out at the same time. 7 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  13. Measurements of gamma radiation levels and spectra in the San Francisco Bay Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, B. T.; Brozek, K. P.; Angell, C. T.; Norman, E. B.

    2011-10-01

    Much of the radiation received by an average person is emitted by naturally-occurring radioactive isotopes from the thorium, actinium, and uranium decay series, or potassium. In this study, we have measured gamma radiation levels at various locations in the San Francisco Bay Area and the UC Berkeley campus from spectra taken using an ORTEC NOMAD portable data acquisition system and a large-volume coaxial HPGe detector. We have identified a large number of gamma rays originating from natural sources. The most noticeable isotopes are 214Bi, 40K, and 208Tl. We have observed variations in counting rates by factors of two to five between different locations due to differences in local conditions - such as building, concrete, grass, and soil compositions. In addition, in a number of outdoor locations, we have observed 604-, 662-, and 795-keV gamma rays from 134,137Cs, which we attribute to fallout from the recent Fukushima reactor accident. The implications of these results will be discussed. This work was supported in part by a grant from the U. S. Dept. of Homeland Security.

  14. Effects of gamma-Radiation on Select Lipids and Antioxidants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandolph, Jacob; Mauer, Lisa; Perchonok, Michele

    2006-01-01

    Radiation encountered on an extended duration space mission (estimates of 3 Sieverts for a mission to Mars) poses a threat not only to human health, but also to the quality, nutritional value, and palatability of the food system. Free radicals generated by radiation interaction with foods may initiate many unwanted reactions including: 1) autoxidation in lipids that alters flavor, odor, and concentrations of essential fatty acids, and 2) depletion of antioxidants food products and dietary supplements. Studies have shown that antioxidants may provide long term health protection from oxidative stress caused by radiation exposure; therefore, consumption of antioxidants will be important. Stability of essential fatty acids is also important for astronauts long-term health status. The objectives of this study were to characterize the effects of low dose gamma-radiation on lipids and antioxidants by monitoring oxidation and reducing power, respectively, in model systems. Select oils and antioxidants were exposed to levels of gamma-radiation ranging from 0 to 1000 Gy (1 Gy = 1 Sv) using a Gammacell 220 and stored at ambient or elevated temperatures (65 C) for up to 3 months prior to analysis. A Fricke dosimeter was used to verify differences between the radiation doses administered. Primary and secondary products of lipid oxidation in soybean and peanut oils were monitored using conjugated diene and 2-thiobarbituric acid (TBARs) assays. Changes in fatty acid composition and formation and vitamin E levels were also measured. The reducing power of antioxidant compounds, including vitamins C and E and beta-carotene, was determined using the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. Significant differences (alpha =0.05) were present between all radiation doses tested using the Fricke dosimeter. Increasing radiation doses above 3 Sv resulted in significantly (alpha =0.05) elevated levels of oxidation and free fatty acids in soybean and peanut oils. Decreases in

  15. Gamma-thermometer-based reactor-core liquid-level detector. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, T.J.

    1981-06-16

    A system is provided which employs a modified gamma thermometer for determining the liquid coolant level within a nuclear reactor core. The gamma thermometer which normally is employed to monitor local core heat generation rate (reactor power), is modified by thermocouple junctions and leads to obtain an unambiguous indication of the presence or absence of coolant liquid at the gamma thermometer location. A signal processor generates a signal based on the thermometer surface heat transfer coefficient by comparing the signals from the thermocouples at the thermometer location. The generated signal is a direct indication of loss of coolant due to the change in surface heat transfer when coolant liquid drops below the thermometer location. The loss of coolant indication is independent of reactor power at the thermometer location. Further, the same thermometer may still be used for the normal power monitoring function.

  16. Protracted low-dose radiation priming and response of liver to acute gamma and proton radiation.

    PubMed

    Gridley, D S; Mao, X W; Cao, J D; Bayeta, E J M; Pecaut, M J

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated liver from C57BL/6 mice irradiated with low-dose/low-dose-rate (LDR) γ-rays (0.01 Gy, 0.03 cGy/h), with and without subsequent exposure to acute 2 Gy gamma or proton radiation. Analyses were performed on day 56 post-exposure. Expression patterns of apoptosis-related genes were strikingly different among irradiated groups compared with 0 Gy (p < 0.05). Two genes were affected in the Gamma group, whereas 10 were modified in the LDR + Gamma group. In Proton and LDR + Proton groups, there were six and 12 affected genes, respectively. Expression of genes in the Gamma (Traf3) and Proton (Bak1, Birc2, Birc3, Mcl1) groups was no longer different from 0 Gy control group when mice were pre-exposed to LDR γ-rays. When each combined regimen was compared with the corresponding group that received acute radiation alone, two genes in the LDR + Gamma group and 17 genes in the LDR + Proton group were modified; greatest effect was on Birc2 and Nol3 (> 5-fold up-regulated by LDR + Protons). Oxygen radical production in livers from the LDR + Proton group was higher in LDR, Gamma, and LDR + Gamma groups (p < 0.05 vs. 0 Gy), but there were no differences in phagocytosis of E. coli. Sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) suggested more inflammation, with and without necrosis, in some irradiated groups. The data demonstrate that response to acute radiation is dependent on radiation quality and regimen and that some LDR γ-ray-induced modifications in liver response were still evident nearly 2 months after exposure. PMID:23869974

  17. Gamma-ray pulsars: Radiation processes in the outer magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romani, Roger W.

    1996-01-01

    We describe an emission model for gamma ray pulsars based on curvature radiation-reaction limited charges in the outer magnetosphere. We show how pair production on thermal surface flux can limit the acceleration zones. Estimates for the efficiency of GeV photon production eta gamma and the gamma-ray beaming fraction are derived, including their dependence on pulsar parameters. In general eta gamma increases with pulsar age, but is decreased for low magnetic fields and for small magnetic inclinations. We argue that this produces GeV pulse profiles, curvature spectra and detection statistics consistent with the observations. We also describe the optical through X-ray pulsar synchrotron spectrum and the spectral variations with pulsar phase. A test computation for Vela-like parameters reproduces phase-resolved GeV spectra consistent with those observed by EGRET. Finally we comment on very high energy pulsed emission and particle production and note extensions needed to allow a more complete pulsar model.

  18. Biological wound dressings sterilized with gamma radiation: Mexican clinical experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Pardo, M. E.; Ley-Chávez, E.; Reyes-Frías, M. L.; Rodríguez-Ferreyra, P.; Vázquez-Maya, L.; Salazar, M. A.

    2007-11-01

    Biological wound dressings sterilized with gamma radiation, such as amnion and pig skin, are a reality in Mexico. These tissues are currently processed in the tissue bank and sterilized in the Gamma Industrial Irradiation Plant; both facilities belong to the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) (National Institute of Nuclear Research). With the strong support of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the bank was established at the ININ and the Mexican Ministry of Health issued its sanitary license on July 7, 1999. The Quality Management System of the bank was certified by ISO 9001:2000 on August 1, 2003; the scope of the system is "Research, Development and Processing of Biological Tissues Sterilized with Gamma Radiation". At present, more than 150 patients from 16 hospitals have been successfully treated with these tissues. This paper presents a brief description of the tissue processing, as well as the present Mexican clinical experience with children and adult patients who underwent medical treatment with radiosterilized amnion and pig skin, used as biological wound dressings on burns and ocular surface disorders.

  19. Current trends in gamma radiation detection for radiological emergency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Guss, Paul; Maurer, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of inter-disciplinary research and development has taken place-techniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportation-the so-called second line of defense.

  20. Current Trends in Gamma Radiation Detection for Radiological Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, S., Guss, P., Maurer, R.

    2011-09-01

    Passive and active detection of gamma rays from shielded radioactive materials, including special nuclear materials, is an important task for any radiological emergency response organization. This article reports on the current trends and status of gamma radiation detection objectives and measurement techniques as applied to nonproliferation and radiological emergencies. In recent years, since the establishment of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office by the Department of Homeland Security, a tremendous amount of progress has been made in detection materials (scintillators, semiconductors), imaging techniques (Compton imaging, use of active masking and hybrid imaging), data acquisition systems with digital signal processing, field programmable gate arrays and embedded isotopic analysis software (viz. gamma detector response and analysis software [GADRAS]1), fast template matching, and data fusion (merging radiological data with geo-referenced maps, digital imagery to provide better situational awareness). In this stride to progress, a significant amount of interdisciplinary research and development has taken place–techniques and spin-offs from medical science (such as x-ray radiography and tomography), materials engineering (systematic planned studies on scintillators to optimize several qualities of a good scintillator, nanoparticle applications, quantum dots, and photonic crystals, just to name a few). No trend analysis of radiation detection systems would be complete without mentioning the unprecedented strategic position taken by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to deter, detect, and interdict illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials across international borders and through the global maritime transportation–the so-called second line of defense.

  1. The origin of the diffuse background gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Puget, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Recent observations provided evidence for diffuse background gamma radiation extending to energies beyond 100 MeV, and evidence of isotropy and implied cosmological origin. Significant features in the spectrum of this background radiation were observed which provide evidence for its origin in nuclear processes in the early stages of big-bang cosmology, and connect these processes with the galaxy formation theory. A test of the theory is in future observations of the background radiation in the 100 MeK to 100 GeV energy range which are made with large orbiting spark-chamber satellite detectors. The theoretical interpretations of present data, their connection with baryon-symmetric cosmology and galaxy formation theory, and the need for future observations are discussed.

  2. The origin of the diffuse background gamma-radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Puget, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Recent observations have now provided evidence for diffuse background gamma radiation extending to energies beyond 100 MeV. There is some evidence of isotropy and implied cosmological origin. Significant features in the spectrum of this background radiation have been observed which provide evidence for its origin in nuclear processes in the early stages of the big-band cosmology and tie in these processes with galaxy fromation theory. A crucial test of the theory may lie in future observations of the background radiation in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV energy range which may be made with large orbiting spark-chamber satellite detectors. A discussion of the theoretical interpretations of present data, their connection with baryon symmetric cosmology and galaxy formation theory, and the need for future observations are given.

  3. Super-Eddington radiation transfer in soft gamma repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, Andrew

    1994-12-01

    Bursts from soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) have been shown to be super-Eddington by a factor of 1000 and have been persuasively associated with compact objects. Super-Eddington radiation transfer on the surface of a strongly magnetic (greater than or equal to 1013 G) neutron star is studied and related to the observational constraints on SGRs. In strong magnetic fields, Thompson scattering is suppressed in one polarization state, so super-Eddington fluxes can be radiated while the plasma remains in hydrostatic equilibrium. We discuss a model which offers a somewhat natural explanation for the observation that the energy spectra of bursts with varying intensity are similar. The radiation produced is found to be linearly polarized to one part in 1000 in a direction determined by the local magnetic field, and intensity variations between bursts are understood as a change in the radiating area on the source. The net polarization is inversely correlated with burst intensity. Further, it is shown that for radiation transfer calculations in limit of superstrong magnetic fields, it is sufficient to solve the radiation transfer for the low opacity state rather than the coupled equations for both. With this approximation, standard stellar atmosphere techniques are utilized to calculate the model energy spectrum.

  4. Gamma Radiation Reduced Toxicity of Azoxystrobin Tested on Artemia franciscana.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, P; Zdarsky, M; Benova, K; Falis, M; Tomko, M

    2016-06-01

    Fungicide azoxystrobin toxicity was monitored by means of a 96-h biotest with Artemia franciscana nauplius stages after exposure to solutions with concentrations of 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 mg L(-1) irradiated with (60)Co gamma radiation with doses of 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 kGy. The effects of ionization radiation on azoxystrobin toxicity were mainly manifested by a statistically significant reduction of lethality after 72- and 96-h exposure. A maximum reduction of lethality of 72 % was achieved using doses of 1-5 kGy for an azoxystrobin initial concentration of 0.4 mg L(-1) and after 72 h of exposure. At a 96-h exposure, a difference of lethal effects reached up to 70 % for a dose of 10 kGy. The observed effect of gamma ionizing radiation on azoxystrobin toxicity suggest that this approach can be applied as an alternative for a reduction of azoxystrobin residua in food. PMID:27107585

  5. EFFECTS OF GAMMA RADIATION ON ELECTROCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF IONIC LIQUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, A; Nicholas Bridges, N; Thad Adams, T; John Mickalonis, J; Mark02 Williamson, M

    2009-04-21

    The electrochemical properties of ionic liquids (ILs) make them attractive for possible replacement of inorganic salts in high temperature molten salt electrochemical processing of nuclear fuel. To be a feasible replacement solvent, ILs need to be stable in moderate and high doses of radiation without adverse chemical and physical effects. Here, we exposed seven different ILs to a 1.2 MGy dose of gamma radiation to investigate their physical and chemical properties as they related to radiological stability. The azolium-based ILs experienced the greatest change in appearance, but these ILs were chemically more stable to gamma radiation than some of the other classes of ILs tested, due to the presence of aromatic electrons in the azolium ring. All the ILs exhibited a decrease in their conductivity and electrochemical window (at least 1.1 V), both of which could affect the utility of ILs in electrochemical processing. The concentration of the irradiation decomposition products was less than 3 mole %, with no impurities detectable using NMR techniques.

  6. LIDT test coupled with gamma radiation degraded optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    IOAN, M.-R.

    2016-06-01

    A laser can operate in regular but also in nuclear ionizing radiation environments. This paper presents the results of a real time measuring method used to detect the laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) in the optical surfaces/volumes of TEMPAX borosilicate glasses operating in high gamma rays fields. The laser damage quantification technique is applied by using of an automated station intended to measure the damage threshold of optical components, according to the International Standard ISO 21254. Single and multiple pulses laser damage thresholds were determined. For an optical material, life time when it is subjected to multiple pulses of high power laser radiation can be predicted. A few ns pulses shooting laser, operating in regular conditions, inflects damage to a target by its intense electrical component but also in a lower manner by local absorption of its transported thermal energy. When the beam is passing thru optical glass elements affected by ionizing radiation fields, the thermal component is starting to have a more important role, because of the increased thermal absorption in the material's volume caused by the radiation induced color centers. LIDT results on TEMPAX optical glass windows, with the contribution due to the gamma radiation effects (ionization mainly by Compton effect in this case), are presented. This contribution was highlighted and quantified. Energetic, temporal and spatial beam characterizations (according to ISO 11554 standards) and LIDT tests were performed using a high power Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm), before passing the beam through each irradiated glass sample (0 kGy, 1.3 kGy and 21.2 kGy).

  7. Neutron and gamma field investigations in the VVER-1000 mock-up concrete shielding on the reactor LR-0

    SciTech Connect

    Zaritsky, S.; Egorov, A.; Osmera, B.; Marik, M.; Rypar, V.; Cvachovec, F.; Kolros, A.

    2011-07-01

    Two sets of neutron and gamma field investigations were carried out in the dismountable model of radiation shielding of the VVER-1000 mock-up on the LR-0 reactor. First, measurements and calculations of the {sup 3}He(n,p)T reaction rate and fast neutrons and gamma flux spectra in the operational neutron monitor channel inside a concrete shielding for different shapes and locations of the channel (cylindrical channel in a concrete, channels with collimator in a concrete, cylindrical channel in a graphite). In all cases measurements and calculations of the {sup 3}He(n,p)T reaction rate were done with and without an additional moderator-polyethylene insert inside the channel. Second, measurements and calculations of the {sup 3}He(n,p)T reaction rate spatial distribution inside a concrete. The {sup 3}He(n,p)T reaction rate measurements and calculations were carried out exploring the relative thermal neutron density in the channels and its space distribution in the concrete. Fast neutrons and gamma measurements were carried out with a stilbene (45 x 45 mm) scintillation spectrometer in the energy regions 0.5-10 MeV (neutrons) and 0.2-10 MeV (gammas). (authors)

  8. SAS 2 observations of the earth albedo gamma radiation above 35 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Simpson, G. A.; Ozel, M. E.

    1981-01-01

    The earth albedo gamma radiation above 35 MeV in the equatorial region is investigated using observations from the second Small Astronomy Satellite. The zenith angle distribution of the gamma radiation has a peak toward the horizon which is about an order of magnitude more intense than the radiation coming from the nadir, and nearly two orders of magnitude more intense than the gamma radiation from most parts of the sky. The gamma radiation originating from the western horizon is a factor of four more intense than the radiation from the eastern horizon and a factor of three more intense than that from the northern and southern directions. This reflects the geomagnetic effects on the incident cosmic rays whose interactions produce the albedo gamma rays. The variation of the upcoming gamma ray intensity with vertical cutoff rigidity is consistent with the empirical relationship found by Gur'yan et al. (1979).

  9. Differentially Expressed Genes Associated with Low-Dose Gamma Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegyesi, Hargita; Sándor, Nikolett; Schilling, Boglárka; Kis, Enikő; Lumniczky, Katalin; Sáfrány, Géza

    We have studied low dose radiation induced gene expression alterations in a primary human fibroblast cell line using Agilent's whole human genome microarray. Cells were irradiated with 60Co γ-rays (0; 0.1; 0.5 Gy) and 2 hours later total cellular RNA was isolated. We observed differential regulation of approximately 300-500 genes represented on the microarray. Of these, 126 were differentially expressed at both doses, among them significant elevation of GDF-15 and KITLG was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Based on the transcriptional studies we selected GDF-15 to assess its role in radiation response, since GDF-15 is one of the p53 gene targets and is believed to participate in mediating p53 activities. First we confirmed gamma-radiation induced dose-dependent changes in GDF-15 expression by qRT-PCR. Next we determined the effect of GDF-15 silencing on radiosensitivity. Four GDF-15 targeting shRNA expressing lentiviral vectors were transfected into immortalized human fibroblast cells. We obtained efficient GDF-15 silencing in one of the four constructs. RNA interference inhibited GDF-15 gene expression and enhanced the radiosensitivity of the cells. Our studies proved that GDF-15 plays an essential role in radiation response and may serve as a promising target in radiation therapy.

  10. Petroleum and diesel sulfur degradation under gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Luana dos Santos; Calvo, Wilson Aparecido Parejo; Sato, Ivone Mulako; Duarte, Celina Lopes

    2015-10-01

    Hydrodesulfurization (HDS) is currently the most common method used by refineries to remove sulfur compounds from petroleum fractions. However, it is not highly effective for removing thiophene compounds such as benzothiophene. Additionally, this process generates high costs for the oil industry. In the present work, ionizing radiation was used in order to study the effect on the degradation of petroleum and diesel sulfur compounds. Crude oil and diesel fuel samples were studied, without any pretreatment, and irradiated using a cobalt-60 gamma cell in a batch system at absorbed doses of 30 kGy and 50 kGy. The sulfur compounds were extracted and then analyzed by gas chromatography associated with mass spectrometry (GCMS). A high efficiency of ionizing radiation was observed regarding the degradation of sulfur compounds such as benzothiophene and benzenethiol and the formation of fragments, for example 1.2-dimethylbenzene and toluene.

  11. EPR dosimetry in a mixed neutron and gamma radiation field.

    PubMed

    Trompier, F; Fattibene, P; Tikunov, D; Bartolotta, A; Carosi, A; Doca, M C

    2004-01-01

    Suitability of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for criticality dosimetry was evaluated for tooth enamel, mannose and alanine pellets during the 'international intercomparison of criticality dosimetry techniques' at the SILENE reactor held in Valduc in June 2002, France. These three materials were irradiated in neutron and gamma-ray fields of various relative intensities and spectral distributions in order to evaluate their neutron sensitivity. The neutron response was found to be around 10% for tooth enamel, 45% for mannose and between 40 and 90% for alanine pellets according their type. According to the IAEA recommendations on the early estimate of criticality accident absorbed dose, analyzed results show the EPR potentiality and complementarity with regular criticality techniques. PMID:15353687

  12. Gamma radiation effects on commercial Mexican bread making wheat flour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agúndez-Arvizu, Z.; Fernández-Ramírez, M. V.; Arce-Corrales, M. E.; Cruz-Zaragoza, E.; Meléndrez, R.; Chernov, V.; Barboza-Flores, M.

    2006-04-01

    Gamma irradiation is considered to be an alternative method for food preservation to prevent food spoilage, insect infestation and capable of reducing the microbial load. In the present investigation, commercial Mexican bread making wheat flour was irradiated at 1.0 kGy using a 60C Gammabeam 651 PT irradiator facility. No changes were detected in moisture, protein and ashes in gamma irradiated samples as compared to those of non-irradiated samples. Slight radiation effects were observed in the alveogram values and farinograph properties; the falling number decreased 11%, the absorption as well as the mixing tolerance were practically unchanged by irradiation. An increase of 15% in the stability value and a 29% in the dough development time were observed. Also the deformation energy decreased 7% with no change at all in the tenacity/extensibility factor. Total aerobic, yeast and mold counts were reduced 96%, 25% and 75%; respectively by the irradiation process. The obtained results confirm that gamma irradiation is effective in reducing the microbial load in bread making wheat flour without a significant change in the physicochemical and baking properties.

  13. An experimental search for gamma radiation associated with thunderstorm activity

    SciTech Connect

    Fryberger, D.

    1992-11-01

    This experiment is a repeat of an earlier experiment, but with more sensitive apparatus and in a location with a higher incidence of thunderstorm activity. The earlier experiment was undertaken by Ashby and Whitehead to investigate the theory that ball lightning might be associated with the annihilation of small amounts of antimatter, and it yielded some very interesting but inconclusive results. In the course of about 12 months of data taking, four high rate bursts of gamma radiation were detected. These events lasted a few seconds and had many thousands of counts (16500, 5000, 3700, and [gt] 7700. Unfortunately, the association of these gamma ray bursts with thunderstorms or ball lightning was not clearly established, although one of the bursts did occur during a local thunderstorm in rough coincidence with a lightning bolt striking a flagpole about 100 yards from the gamma ray detection crystals. A pulse height spectrum taken for this burst (no spectrum was taken for the other three) exhibited a significant peak, well above background, the energy of which appeared to be compatible with the 511 keV positron annihilation line. While the peak could not be unambiguously attributed to positron annihilation, this certainly appeared to be the most likely source.

  14. An experimental search for gamma radiation associated with thunderstorm activity

    SciTech Connect

    Fryberger, D.

    1992-11-01

    This experiment is a repeat of an earlier experiment, but with more sensitive apparatus and in a location with a higher incidence of thunderstorm activity. The earlier experiment was undertaken by Ashby and Whitehead to investigate the theory that ball lightning might be associated with the annihilation of small amounts of antimatter, and it yielded some very interesting but inconclusive results. In the course of about 12 months of data taking, four high rate bursts of gamma radiation were detected. These events lasted a few seconds and had many thousands of counts (16500, 5000, 3700, and {gt} 7700. Unfortunately, the association of these gamma ray bursts with thunderstorms or ball lightning was not clearly established, although one of the bursts did occur during a local thunderstorm in rough coincidence with a lightning bolt striking a flagpole about 100 yards from the gamma ray detection crystals. A pulse height spectrum taken for this burst (no spectrum was taken for the other three) exhibited a significant peak, well above background, the energy of which appeared to be compatible with the 511 keV positron annihilation line. While the peak could not be unambiguously attributed to positron annihilation, this certainly appeared to be the most likely source.

  15. Radiative Penguin Decays of B Mesons: Measurements of B to K* gamma, B to K2* gamma, and Search for B0 to phi gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, J.

    2005-01-03

    Electromagnetic radiative penguin decays of the B meson were studied with the BaBar detector at SLAC's PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory. Branching fractions and isospin asymmetry of the decay B {yields} K*{gamma}, branching fractions of B {yields} K*{sub 2}(1430){gamma}, and a search for B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{gamma} are presented. The decay rates may be enhanced by contributions from non-standard model processes.

  16. Background radiation measurements at high power research reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashenfelter, J.; Balantekin, B.; Baldenegro, C. X.; Band, H. R.; Barclay, G.; Bass, C. D.; Berish, D.; Bowden, N. S.; Bryan, C. D.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, R.; Classen, T.; Davee, D.; Dean, D.; Deichert, G.; Dolinski, M. J.; Dolph, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Fan, S.; Gaison, J. K.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilje, K.; Glenn, A.; Green, M.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Heeger, K. M.; Heffron, B.; Jaffe, D. E.; Kettell, S.; Langford, T. J.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Martinez, D.; McKeown, R. D.; Morrell, S.; Mueller, P. E.; Mumm, H. P.; Napolitano, J.; Norcini, D.; Pushin, D.; Romero, E.; Rosero, R.; Saldana, L.; Seilhan, B. S.; Sharma, R.; Stemen, N. T.; Surukuchi, P. T.; Thompson, S. J.; Varner, R. L.; Wang, W.; Watson, S. M.; White, B.; White, C.; Wilhelmi, J.; Williams, C.; Wise, T.; Yao, H.; Yeh, M.; Yen, Y.-R.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including γ-ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the background fields encountered. The general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.

  17. Background radiation measurements at high power research reactors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ashenfelter, J.; Yeh, M.; Balantekin, B.; Baldenegro, C. X.; Band, H. R.; Barclay, G.; Bass, C. D.; Berish, D.; Bowden, N. S.; Bryan, C. D.; et al

    2015-10-23

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including γ-ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the backgroundmore » fields encountered. Furthermore, the general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.« less

  18. Background radiation measurements at high power research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ashenfelter, J.; Yeh, M.; Balantekin, B.; Baldenegro, C. X.; Band, H. R.; Barclay, G.; Bass, C. D.; Berish, D.; Bowden, N. S.; Bryan, C. D.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, R.; Classen, T.; Davee, D.; Dean, D.; Deichert, G.; Dolinski, M. J.; Dolph, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Fan, S.; Gaison, J. K.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilje, K.; Glenn, A.; Green, M.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Heeger, K. M.; Heffron, B.; Jaffe, D. E.; Kettell, S.; Langford, T. J.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Martinez, D.; McKeown, R. D.; Morrell, S.; Mueller, P. E.; Mumm, H. P.; Napolitano, J.; Norcini, D.; Pushin, D.; Romero, E.; Rosero, R.; Saldana, L.; Seilhan, B. S.; Sharma, R.; Stemen, N. T.; Surukuchi, P. T.; Thompson, S. J.; Varner, R. L.; Wang, W.; Watson, S. M.; White, B.; White, C.; Wilhelmi, J.; Williams, C.; Wise, T.; Yao, H.; Yen, Y. -R.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, X.

    2015-10-23

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including γ-ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the background fields encountered. Furthermore, the general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.

  19. Removal of trihalomethane from chlorinated seawater using gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Rajamohan, R; Natesan, Usha; Venugopalan, V P; Rajesh, Puspalata; Rangarajan, S

    2015-12-01

    Chlorine addition as a biocide in seawater results in the formation of chlorination by-products such as trihalomethanes (THMs). Removal of THMs is of importance as they are potential mutagenic and carcinogenic agents. In this context, a study was conducted that used ionizing radiation to remove THMs from chlorinated (1, 3, and 5 mg/L) seawater by applying various dosages (0.4-5.0 kGy) of gamma radiation. Bromoform (BF) showed a faster rate of degradation as compared to other halocarbons such as bromodichloromethane (BDCM) and dibromochloromethane (DBCM). In chlorine-dosed seawater, total irradiation dose of 0.4 to 5 kGy caused percentage reduction in the range of 6.9 to 76.7%, 2.3 to 99.6%, and 45.7 to 98.3% for BDCM, DBCM, and BF, respectively. During the irradiation process, pH of the chlorinated seawater decreased with increase in the absorbed dose; however, no change in total organic carbon (TOC) was observed. The results show that gamma dose of 2.5 kGy was adequate for maximum degradation of THM; but for complete mineralization, higher dose would be required. PMID:26199004

  20. Effect of Gamma radiation on microbial population of natural casings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo, M. J.; Fraqueza, M. J.

    1998-06-01

    The high microbial load of fresh and dry natural casings increases the risk of meat product contamination with pathogenic microorganisms, agents of foodborn diseases. The aim of this work is to evaluate the killing effect of gamma radiation of the resident microbial population of pork and beef casings, to improve their hygiene and safety. Portions of fresh pork (small intestines and colon) and dry beef casings were irradiated in a Cobalt 60 source with with absorbed doses of 1,2,5 and 10 kGy. The D 10 values of total aerobic microorganisms in the pork casings were 1.65 kGy for colon and 1.54 kGy for small intestine. The D 10 value found in beef dry casings (small intestine) was 10.17 kGy. Radurization with 5 kGy was able to reduce, at least, 6 logs the coliform bacteria in pork casings. The killing effect over faecal Streptococci was 4 logs for pork fresh casings and 2 logs for beef dry casings. Gamma radiation with 5 kGy proved to be a convenient method to reduce substantially the microbial population of pork fresh casings. Otherwise, the microbial population of beef dry casings still resisted to 10 kGy.

  1. Delayed gamma radiation from lightning induced nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, M. B.; Sakuma, K.; Ikeda, Y.; Kubo, K.

    2004-03-01

    An increase in atmospheric gamma radiation observed with NaI and Ge detectors positioned about 15 m above ground was observed following natural lightning near Tokyo, Japan [1]. Background subtracted gamma ray rates GRR following numerous lightning strokes observed since 2001 persisted for a few hours and subsequently decayed with a half-life of about 50 minutes. Using a 3x3 Ge detector, with 2 KeV resolution, positioned about 2 m from one of the NaI detectors increases in GRR were observed minutes after the onset of lightning with a delayed 50 min exponential decay. Although most of the increase in activity occured at less than a few 100 KeV, on July 11, 2003 a 1267 +/-2 KeV line was observed. Although the statistics of this event were poor, the appearance of this line with an exponential decay of 50 min half-life suggests the possibility that it may be due to 39Cl (1267 MeV; half-life = 55.5 min) via the 40Ar(gamma,p)39Cl, 40Ar(p,2p)39Cl and/or 40Ar(n,d)39Cl reactions. Observations of > 10 MeV gamma rays observed in NaI detectors within 10s of meters from and coincident with rocket-triggered lightning at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing suggest that charged particles accelerated in intense electric fields associated with lightning give rise to photons with sufficient energy to initiate nuclear reactions [2]. Further work to explain the cause of this anomalous activity is underway using natural and triggered lightning. 1. M. B. Greenfield et al., Journal of Applied Physics 93 no. 3 (2003) pp 1839-184. 2. J. R. Dwyer et al., Science 299, (2003), pp 694-697 and recent communications

  2. Coupled radiation transport/thermal analysis of the radiation shield for a space nuclear reactor. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Barattino, W.J.

    1985-07-01

    A coupled radiation transport-heat transfer-stress analysis of the radiation shield for an SP-100 reactor was performed using a numerical code developed at the University of New Mexico and Sandia National Laboratory. For a fast reactor operating at 1.66 MW/sub th/, the energy deposited and resulting temperature distribution was determined for a shield consisting of tungsten and lithium hydride pressed into a stainless steel honeycomb matrix. While temperature feedback was shown to have a minor effect on energy deposition, the shielding configuration was found to have a major influence in meeting thermal requirements of the lithium hydride. It was shown that a shield optimized for radiation protection will fail because of melting. However, with minor modifications in the shield layering and material selection, the thermal integrity of the shield can be preserved. A shield design of graphite, depleted lithium hydride, tungsten, and natural lithium hydride was shown to satisfy neutron and gamma fluence requirements, maximum temperature limits, and minimize cracking in the LiH portion of the shield.

  3. A coupled radiation transport-thermal analysis of the radiation shield for an SP-100 type reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barattino, William J.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; McDaniel, Patrick J.

    A coupled radiation transport-thermal analysis of the radiation shield for an SP-100 reactor was performed using finite element codes developed at the University of New Mexico and Sandia National Laboratories. For a fast reactor operating at 1.66 MWt, the energy deposited and resulting temperature distribution were determined for a shield consisting of tungsten and lithium hydride pressed into a stainless steel honeycomb matrix. While temperature feedback was shown to have a minor effect on energy deposition, the shielding configuration was found to have a major influence in meeting thermal requirements of the lithium hydride. It was shown that a shield optimized only for radiation protection will fail because of LiH melting. However, with minor modifications in the shield layering and material selection, the thermal integrity of the shield can be preserved. A shield design of graphite, depleted lithium hydride, tungsten, and natural lithium hydride was shown to satisfy neutron and gamma fluence requirements, and maximum temperature limits, and to minimize cracking in the LiH portion of the shield.

  4. [Protection of cadaver tissues exposed to high gamma radiation].

    PubMed

    Matus-Jiménez, J; Flores-Fletes, J R; Carrillo, A

    2013-01-01

    Bone tissue is the most widely used tissue for the treatment of various conditions. As a result of this, allografts are used at an increasing frequency and processes for their harvest, preservation and sterilization have improved. The sterilization method that grants the greatest sterilization is high-dose gamma radiation, which destroys prions and any microorganism thus assuring that patients will not experience any infection. But given that radiation use has proven to deteriorate bone and tendon tissue, efforts have been made to protect the latter. One way to do this is a commercially available substance called Clearant. Studies conducted elsewhere have found that it does protect bone and tendon tissue. This study was therefore conducted with allograft samples exposed to high-dose radiation. Its purpose was to assess, with photon microscopy using various dyes and electron microscopy, the presence of color changes as well as the destruction of the anatomical structure. The same tissue was followed-up throughout the process until it was placed in the patient. The review found no structural changes in bone and tendon tissues exposed to high radiation doses (60 kilograys) when the Clearant process was used, and concluded that the former may be used safely in orthopedic or traumatologic diseases. PMID:24707605

  5. Gamma heating in reflector heat shield of gas core reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofthouse, J. H.; Kunze, J. F.; Young, T. E.; Young, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Heating rate measurements made in a mock-up of a BeO heat shield for a gas core nuclear rocket engine yields results nominally a factor of two greater than calculated by two different methods. The disparity is thought to be caused by errors in neutron capture cross sections and gamma spectra from the low cross-section elements, D, O, and Be.

  6. HIGH ENERGY DELAYED GAMMA SPECTROSCOPY FOR PLUTONIUM ASSAY OF SPENT REACTOR FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Luke W.; Smith, L. E.; Misner, Alex C.

    2011-07-18

    Nuclear safeguards requires accountancy of plutonium present in spent reactor fuels. Current non-destructive methods do not directly measure plutonium content but instead rely on indirect measurements that require operator declarations of the fuel history. Delayed gamma spectroscopy is one method being investigated which can overcome these limitations. Delayed gamma rays from fission depend on the isotopic fission yield of the fissile isotope, and thus can be used to fingerprint the isotopes undergoing fission. However, difficulties arise because of the intense background due to long lived fission radionuclides already present in the fuel. We report on progress on simulated measurements of the delayed gamma spectrum in the presence of this background, using neutrons from a D-T source thermalized in an interrogation chamber slipped over a fuel assembly. By focusing on delayed gammas in the 3 to 4 MeV range, the passive spectrum becomes negligible, while allowing the preferential attenuation of the passive background to acceptable levels.

  7. Exoemission instrument and technology to explore gamma radiation influence on bones.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Mohamad; Dekhtyar, Y; Bogucharska, T; Noskov, V

    This article aims at developing a new technology and instrument to explore the effect of gamma radiation on bone material. Exoelectron emission (EEE) phenomenon underlies a new electron spectroscopy to explore alteration of the electronic structurally dependence properties of bone material. The development of EEE technology for exploring the gamma radiation effects on bones is of high importance. Moreover, the influence of gamma radiation with different energies on the bone structure is discussed. It was found that the changes in EEE vary with radiation energy and radiation dose and that the response is non-linear. PMID:17643892

  8. Search for Charmonium States Decaying to J/\\psi\\gamma \\gamma $ Using Initial-State Radiation Events

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G.S.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2006-11-30

    We study the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} (J/{psi}{gamma}{gamma}){gamma} and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} (J/{psi}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}){gamma} where the hard photon radiated from an initial e{sup +}e{sup -} collision with center-of-mass (CM) energy near 10.58 GeV is detected. In the final state J/{psi}{gamma}{gamma} we consider J/{psi}{pi}{sup 0}, J/{psi}{eta}, {chi}{sub c1}{gamma}, and {chi}c{sub 2}{gamma} candidates. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective e{sup +}e{sup -} CM energy in each event, so these data can be compared with direct e{sup +}e{sup -} measurements. We report 90% CL upper limits for the integrated cross section times branching fractions of the J/{psi}{gamma}{gamma} channels in the Y (4260) mass region.

  9. Boron neutron capture therapy and radiation synovectomy research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Zamenhof, R.G.; Nwanguma, C.I.; Wazer, D.E.; Saris, S.; Madoc-Jones, H. ); Sledge, C.B.; Shortkroff, S. )

    1992-04-01

    In this paper, current research in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and radiation synovectomy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor is reviewed. In the last few years, major emphasis has been placed on the development of BNCT primarily for treatment of brain tumors. This has required a concerted effort in epithermal beam design and construction as well as the development of analytical capabilities for {sup 10}B analysis and patient treatment planning. Prompt gamma analysis and high-resolution track-etch autoradiography have been developed to meet the needs, respectively, for accurate bulk analysis and for quantitative imaging of {sup 10}B in tissue at subcellular resolutions. Monte Carlo-based treatment planning codes have been developed to ensure optimized and individualized patient treatments. In addition, the development of radiation synovectomy as an alternative therapy to surgical intervention is joints that are affected by rheumatoid arthritis is described.

  10. Networked gamma radiation detection system for tactical deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Smith, Ethan; Guss, Paul; Mitchell, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    A networked gamma radiation detection system with directional sensitivity and energy spectral data acquisition capability is being developed by the National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory to support the close and intense tactical engagement of law enforcement who carry out counterterrorism missions. In the proposed design, three clusters of 2″ × 4″ × 16″ sodium iodide crystals (4 each) with digiBASE-E (for list mode data collection) would be placed on the passenger side of a minivan. To enhance localization and facilitate rapid identification of isotopes, advanced smart real-time localization and radioisotope identification algorithms like WAVRAD (wavelet-assisted variance reduction for anomaly detection) and NSCRAD (nuisance-rejection spectral comparison ratio anomaly detection) will be incorporated. We will test a collection of algorithms and analysis that centers on the problem of radiation detection with a distributed sensor network. We will study the basic characteristics of a radiation sensor network and focus on the trade-offs between false positive alarm rates, true positive alarm rates, and time to detect multiple radiation sources in a large area. Empirical and simulation analyses of critical system parameters, such as number of sensors, sensor placement, and sensor response functions, will be examined. This networked system will provide an integrated radiation detection architecture and framework with (i) a large nationally recognized search database equivalent that would help generate a common operational picture in a major radiological crisis; (ii) a robust reach back connectivity for search data to be evaluated by home teams; and, finally, (iii) a possibility of integrating search data from multi-agency responders.

  11. The Impact of Gamma Radiation on Sediment Microbial Processes

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ashley R.; Boothman, Christopher; Pimblott, Simon M.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities have the potential to control the biogeochemical fate of some radionuclides in contaminated land scenarios or in the vicinity of a geological repository for radioactive waste. However, there have been few studies of ionizing radiation effects on microbial communities in sediment systems. Here, acetate and lactate amended sediment microcosms irradiated with gamma radiation at 0.5 or 30 Gy h−1 for 8 weeks all displayed NO3− and Fe(III) reduction, although the rate of Fe(III) reduction was decreased in 30-Gy h−1 treatments. These systems were dominated by fermentation processes. Pyrosequencing indicated that the 30-Gy h−1 treatment resulted in a community dominated by two Clostridial species. In systems containing no added electron donor, irradiation at either dose rate did not restrict NO3−, Fe(III), or SO42− reduction. Rather, Fe(III) reduction was stimulated in the 0.5-Gy h−1-treated systems. In irradiated systems, there was a relative increase in the proportion of bacteria capable of Fe(III) reduction, with Geothrix fermentans and Geobacter sp. identified in the 0.5-Gy h−1 and 30-Gy h−1 treatments, respectively. These results indicate that biogeochemical processes will likely not be restricted by dose rates in such environments, and electron accepting processes may even be stimulated by radiation. PMID:25841009

  12. The impact of gamma radiation on sediment microbial processes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ashley R; Boothman, Christopher; Pimblott, Simon M; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2015-06-15

    Microbial communities have the potential to control the biogeochemical fate of some radionuclides in contaminated land scenarios or in the vicinity of a geological repository for radioactive waste. However, there have been few studies of ionizing radiation effects on microbial communities in sediment systems. Here, acetate and lactate amended sediment microcosms irradiated with gamma radiation at 0.5 or 30 Gy h(-1) for 8 weeks all displayed NO3 (-) and Fe(III) reduction, although the rate of Fe(III) reduction was decreased in 30-Gy h(-1) treatments. These systems were dominated by fermentation processes. Pyrosequencing indicated that the 30-Gy h(-1) treatment resulted in a community dominated by two Clostridial species. In systems containing no added electron donor, irradiation at either dose rate did not restrict NO3 (-), Fe(III), or SO4 (2-) reduction. Rather, Fe(III) reduction was stimulated in the 0.5-Gy h(-1)-treated systems. In irradiated systems, there was a relative increase in the proportion of bacteria capable of Fe(III) reduction, with Geothrix fermentans and Geobacter sp. identified in the 0.5-Gy h(-1) and 30-Gy h(-1) treatments, respectively. These results indicate that biogeochemical processes will likely not be restricted by dose rates in such environments, and electron accepting processes may even be stimulated by radiation. PMID:25841009

  13. Gamma radiation influence on technological characteristics of wheat flour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Christian A. H. M.; Inamura, Patricia Y.; Uehara, Vanessa B.; Mastro, Nelida L. d.

    2012-08-01

    This study aimed at determining the influence of gamma radiation on technological characteristics of wheat (Triticum sativum) flour and physical properties of pan breads made with this flour. The bread formulation included wheat flour, water, milk, salt, sugar, yeast and butter. The α-amylase activity of wheat flour irradiated with 1, 3 and 9 kGy in a Gammacell 220 (AECL), one day, five days and one month after irradiation was evaluated. Deformation force, height and weight of breads prepared with the irradiated flour were also determined. The enzymatic activity increased—reduction of falling number time—as radiation dose increased, their values being 397 s (0 kGy), 388 s (1 kGy), 343 s (3 kGy) and 293 s (9 kGy) respectively, remaining almost constant over the period of one month. Pan breads prepared with irradiated wheat flour showed increased weight. Texture analysis showed that bread made of irradiated flour presented an increase in maximum deformation force. The results indicate that wheat flour ionizing radiation processing may confer increased enzymatic activity on bread making and depending on the irradiation dose, an increase in weight, height and deformation force parameters of pan breads made of it.

  14. Neutron and gamma radiation shielding material, structure, and process of making structure

    DOEpatents

    Hondorp, Hugh L.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a novel neutron and gamma radiation elding material consisting of 95 to 97 percent by weight SiO.sub.2 and 5 to 3 percent by weight sodium silicate. In addition, the method of using this composition to provide a continuous neutron and gamma radiation shielding structure is disclosed.

  15. Validation of the neutron and gamma fields in the JSI TRIGA reactor using in-core fission and ionization chambers.

    PubMed

    Žerovnik, Gašper; Kaiba, Tanja; Radulović, Vladimir; Jazbec, Anže; Rupnik, Sebastjan; Barbot, Loïc; Fourmentel, Damien; Snoj, Luka

    2015-02-01

    CEA developed fission chambers and ionization chambers were utilized at the JSI TRIGA reactor to measure neutron and gamma fields. The measured axial fission rate distributions in the reactor core are generally in good agreement with the calculated values using the Monte Carlo model of the reactor thus verifying both the computational model and the fission chambers. In future, multiple absolutely calibrated fission chambers could be used for more accurate online reactor thermal power monitoring. PMID:25479432

  16. Population doses from environmental gamma radiation in Iraq

    SciTech Connect

    Marouf, B.A.; Mohamad, A.S.; Taha, J.S.; al-Haddad, I.K. )

    1992-05-01

    The exposure rates due to external gamma radiation were measured in 11 Iraqi governerates. Measurements were performed with an Environmental Monitoring System (RSS-111) in open air 1 m above the ground. The average absorbed dose rate in each governerate was as follows (number x 10(-2) microGy h-1): Babylon (6.0), Kerbala (5.3), Al-Najaf (5.4), Al-Kadysia (6.5), Wasit (6.5), Diala (6.5), Al-Anbar (6.5), Al-Muthana (6.6), Maisan (6.8), Thee-Kar (6.6), and Al-Basrah (6.5). The collective doses to the population living in these governerates were 499, 187, 239, 269, 262, 458, 384, 153, 250, 450, and 419 person-Sv, respectively.

  17. Calorimetric calibration of pyroelectric gamma-radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Strakovskaya, R.Y.; Sras', A.G.

    1985-07-01

    A method has been devised for calibrating a pyroelectric dosimeter, which is based on comparing the readings obtained with it in a gamma-ray beam with the readings of an integral calorimeter under stationary conditions, with the latter previously calibrated from Joule heat. The calorimeter used was in the form of a closed shell, whose overall thermo-emf was independent of the spatial distribution of the heat sources in it, the value being proportional to the integral heat flux through the shell. Measurements were made not only with a quasiisotropic radiation field but also in directed fields. The overall error in calibrating the pyroelectric detectors by this method was less than or equal to plus or minus 10%.

  18. Effects of gamma radiation on viability of Encephalitozoon spores.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Trout, J M; Jenkins, M C; Palmer, R; Fayer, R

    2002-08-01

    Spores of Encephalitozoon cuniculi, E. hellem, and E. intestinalis harvested from cultured mammalian cells were suspended in deionized water, exposed to gamma irradiation at doses of 0-3.0 kGy, and then tested for infectivity by inoculating spores into monolayer cultures of Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells. The cultures were examined for developing microsporidia 4 days later. As the dosage level of radiation increased, corresponding decreases were observed in the number of developing microsporidia for all 3 species. For E. cuniculi and E. intestinalis, 100% inhibition of development was observed after exposure to 1.5 and 2.0 kGy, respectively. Although development of E. hellem was greatly inhibited (97.6% inhibition) after exposure to 3.0 kGy, complete inhibition was not obtained. These findings provide a baseline for investigating the dose levels required to render food products safe when kept under varying temperature, moisture, and other storage conditions. PMID:12197142

  19. Evaluation of gamma radiation shielding for nuclear waste shipping casks

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.Y.; Carlson, R.D.; Primeau, S.J.; Wangler, M.E.

    1998-05-01

    A method has been developed for evaluating gamma radiation shielding of shipping casks that are used to transport nuclear waste with ill-defined radionuclide contents. The method is based on calculations that establish individual limits for a comprehensive list of radionuclides in the waste, assuming that each radionuclide is uniformly distributed in a volumetric source in the cask. For multiple radionuclide mixtures, a linear fraction rule is used to restrict the total amount of radionuclides such that the sum of the fractions does not exceed 1. As long as the radionuclide limits and the linear fraction rule are followed, it can be shown that the regulatory dose rate requirements for a cask will be satisfied under normal conditions of transport and in a hypothetical accident during which the shielding thickness of the cask has been reduced by 40%.

  20. Improving degradation of paracetamol by integrating gamma radiation and Fenton processes.

    PubMed

    Cruz-González, Germán; Rivas-Ortiz, Iram B; González-Labrada, Katia; Rapado-Paneque, Manuel; Chávez-Ardanza, Armando; Nuevas-Paz, Lauro; Jáuregui-Haza, Ulises J

    2016-10-14

    Degradation of paracetamol (N-(4-hydroxiphenyl)acetamide) in aqueous solution by gamma radiation, gamma radiation/H2O2 and gamma radiation/Fenton processes was studied. Parameters affecting the radiolysis of paracetamol such as radiation dose, initial concentration of pollutant, pH and initial oxidant concentration were investigated. Gamma radiation was performed using a (60)Co source irradiator. Paracetamol degradation and mineralization increased with increasing absorbed radiation dose, but decreased with increasing initial concentration of the drug in aqueous solution. The addition of H2O2 resulted in an increased effect on irradiation-driven paracetamol degradation in comparison with the performance of the irradiation-driven process alone: paracetamol removal increased from 48.9% in the absence of H2O2 to 95.2% for H2O2 concentration of 41.7 mmol/L. However, the best results were obtained with gamma radiation/Fenton process with 100% of the drug removal at 5 kGy, for optimal H2O2 and Fe(2+) concentrations at 13.9 and 2.3 mmol/L, respectively, with a high mineralization of 63.7%. These results suggest gamma radiation/H2O2 and gamma radiation/Fenton processes as promising methods for paracetamol degradation in polluted wastewaters. PMID:27389621

  1. Comparison of measured and calculated air-transported radiation from a fast unshielded nuclear reactor. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Robitaille, H.A.; Hoffarth, B.E.

    1980-12-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray spectra have been measured at various distances up to 1100 metres from the fast-neutron reactor of the U.S. Army Pulse Radiation Division (Materiel Testing Directorate, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.) The spectra were obtained at a height of two metres above the air-ground interface and are compared to previous measurements performed by two other research laboratories, and also to the results of theoretical predictions based on two-dimensional discrete-ordinates transport theory. Integral quantities such as partial and total radiation kermas are generally in good agreement, however the theoretical calculations tend to predict somewhat softer neutron spectra than are observed experimentally.

  2. Calculated Neutron and Gamma-ray Spectra across the Prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor Core

    SciTech Connect

    James W. Sterbentz

    2008-05-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray flux spectra are calculated using the MCNP5 computer code and a one-sixth core model of a prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor based on the General Atomics Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor. Spectra are calculated in the five inner reflector graphite block rings, three annular active core fuel rings, three outer graphite reflector block rings, and the core barrel. The neutron spectra are block and fuel pin averages and are calculated as a function of temperature and burnup. Also provided are the total, fast, and thermal radial profile fluxes and core barrel dpa rates.

  3. BWR (boiling-water reactor) radiation control: In-plant demonstration at Vermont Yankee: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Palino, G.F.; Hobart, R.L.; Sawochka, S.G.

    1987-10-01

    Results of the RP1934 program, which was established by EPRI in 1981 to demonstrate the adequacy of BRAC program (RP819) principles for BWR radiation control at Vermont Yankee, are presented. Evaluations were performed of the effectiveness of optimization of purification system performance, control of feedwater dissolved oxygen concentrations, minimization of corrosion product and ionic transport, and improved startup, shutdown, and layup practices. The impact on shutdown radiation levels of these corrective actions was assessed based on extensive primary system radiation survey and component gamma scan data. Implementation of the BRAC recommendations was found to be insufficient to reduce the rate of activity buildup on out-of-core surfaces at Vermont Yankee, and additional corrective actions were found necessary. Specifically, replacement of cobalt-bearing materials in the control rod drive pins and rollers and feedwater regulating valves was pursued as was installation of electropolished 316 stainless steel during a recirculation piping replacement program. Aggressive programs to further reduce copper concentrations in the reactor water by improving condensate demineralizer efficiency and to minimize organic ingress to the power cycle by reducing organic concentrations in recycled radwaste also were undertaken. Evaluations of the impact on activity buildup of several pretreatment processes including prefilming in moist air, preexposure to high temperature water containing zinc, and electropolishing also were performed in a test loop installed in the reactor water cleanup system. A significant beneficial impact of electropolishing was shown to be present for periods up to 6000 hours.

  4. Mediate gamma radiation effects on some packaged food items

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamura, Patricia Y.; Uehara, Vanessa B.; Teixeira, Christian A. H. M.; del Mastro, Nelida L.

    2012-08-01

    For most of prepackaged foods a 10 kGy radiation dose is considered the maximum dose needed; however, the commercially available and practically accepted packaging materials must be suitable for such application. This work describes the application of ionizing radiation on several packaged food items, using 5 dehydrated food items, 5 ready-to-eat meals and 5 ready-to-eat food items irradiated in a 60Co gamma source with a 3 kGy dose. The quality evaluation of the irradiated samples was performed 2 and 8 months after irradiation. Microbiological analysis (bacteria, fungus and yeast load) was performed. The sensory characteristics were established for appearance, aroma, texture and flavor attributes were also established. From these data, the acceptability of all irradiated items was obtained. All ready-to-eat food items assayed like manioc flour, some pâtés and blocks of raw brown sugar and most of ready-to-eat meals like sausages and chicken with legumes were considered acceptable for microbial and sensory characteristics. On the other hand, the dehydrated food items chosen for this study, such as dehydrated bacon potatoes or pea soups were not accepted by the sensory analysis. A careful dose choice and special irradiation conditions must be used in order to achieve sensory acceptability needed for the commercialization of specific irradiated food items.

  5. JITTER RADIATION MODEL OF THE CRAB GAMMA-RAY FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Teraki, Yuto; Takahara, Fumio

    2013-02-15

    The gamma-ray flares of the Crab nebula detected by the Fermi and AGILE satellites challenge our understanding of the physics of pulsars and their nebulae. The central problem is that the peak energy of the flares exceeds the maximum energy E {sub c} determined by synchrotron radiation loss. However, when turbulent magnetic fields exist with scales {lambda}{sub B} smaller than 2{pi}mc {sup 2}/eB, jitter radiation can emit photons with energies higher than E {sub c}. The scale required for the Crab flares is about two orders of magnitude less than the wavelength of the striped wind. We discuss a model in which the flares are triggered by plunging the high-density blobs into the termination shock. The observed hard spectral shape may be explained by the jitter mechanism. We make three observational predictions: first, the polarization degree will become lower in flares; second, no counterpart will be seen in TeV-PeV range; and third, the flare spectrum will not be harder than {nu}F {sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup 1}.

  6. Degradation of monoterpenes in orange juice by gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Fan, X; Gates, R A

    2001-05-01

    Single-strength orange juice was irradiated with 0, 0.89, 2.24, 4.23, and 8.71 gGy of gamma radiation at 5 degrees C and then stored at 7 degrees C for 21 days. Volatile compounds, isolated by solid-phase microextraction, were separated and identified using a gas chromatograph equipped with a mass selective detector. The majority of the volatile compounds were terpenes, and the most abundant volatile compounds were ethanol and limonene. Most volatile compounds were stable during the 21-day storage period except geranial and neral which decreased over time. Irradiation reduced the concentration of acyclic monoterpenes, such as geranial, neral, myrcene, and linalool 1 and 7 days after irradiation, but did not affect other monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, or other volatile compounds. The reduction of acyclic monterpenes increased linearly with radiation dose, and correlated with an increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substrates (TBARS) content. Reduction in the concentration of monoterpenes induced by irradiation was not significant 21 days after irradiation. Our results indicate that acyclic monoterpenes are sensitive to irradiation whereas most other volatile compounds are resistant. PMID:11368614

  7. Response of radiation monitoring labels to gamma rays and electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahim, F. Abdel; Miller, A.; McLaughlin, W. L.

    Many kinds of coated or impregnated reflecting papers change color or become colored by large radiation doses. Such papers or "labels" do not generally supply dosimetry information, but may give useful inventory information, namely a visual indication of whether or not an industrial product or location has been irradiated to high doses. Among labels available worldwide, a few are suitable for indicating absorbed dose regions of slightly less than 10 4 Gy (< 1 Mrad), and some are intended for monitoring high dose ranges (i.e., sterilization dose levels of > 10 4 Gy or > 1 Mrad), and in some cases even up to very high dose regions (˜10 5 to 10 6 Gy or ˜10 to 100 Mrad). Only one labels which is expected to be commercially available, was studied for lower dose levels, 10 1-10 3 Gy (1-100 krad), namely one based on polymerization of diacetylene. Tests of stability, sensitivity of ambient light, and differences in dose rate and radiation type (gamma rays and electron beams) were made on 15 kinds of labels. The results show that, for many types of indicators, diverse effects may give misleading conclusions unless countermeasures are taken. For example, some of the most commonly used labels, which contain dyes that indicate changes of pH due to release of halogen from halogenated substrates, have limited shelf life and must be protected from extreme environmental conditions. Some also show a marked rate dependence of response. Readings of color reflection optical densities on labels or long paper strips permit somewhat more precise discrimination of dose levels, and may sometimes be useful for monitoring differences in local dose distributions or area monitoring of radiation damage probabilities around particle accelerators or large radionuclide sources.

  8. THERMAL RADIATION FROM GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, Akira; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Aoi, Junichi

    2011-05-01

    In this study, the light curves and spectrum of the photospheric thermal radiation from ultrarelativistic gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets are calculated using two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic simulations of jets from a collapsar. As the jet advances, the density around the head of the jet decreases, and its Lorentz factor reaches as high as 200 at the photosphere and 400 inside the photosphere. For an on-axis observer, the photosphere appears concave due to the low density and high beaming factor of the jet. The luminosity varies because of the abrupt change in the position of the photosphere due to the internal structure of the jet. Comparing our results with GRB 090902B, the flux level of the thermal-like component is similar to our model, although the peak energy appears slightly higher (but still within a factor of two). From the comparison, we estimate that the bulk Lorentz factor of GRB 090902B is {Gamma} {approx} 2.4 x 10{sup 2}(r/10{sup 12} cm), where r is the radius of the photosphere. The spectrum for an on-axis observer is harder than that for an off-axis observer. There is a time lag of a few seconds for high energy bands in the light curve. This may be the reason for the delayed onset of GeV emission seen in GRB 080916C. The spectrum below the peak energy is a power law and the index is 2.3-2.6, which is softer than that of a single temperature Planck distribution but still harder than that of the typical value of the observed spectrum.

  9. Effects of gamma radiation on fetal development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Tahere; Mozdarani, Hossein; Khoradmehr, Arezoo; Kalantar, Seyed Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many cancer patients receive radiotherapy which may lead to serious damages to the ovary storage and the matrix muscle state. Some of these patients may admit to infertility clinics for having pregnancy and on the other hand hormonal administration for superovulation induction is a routine procedure in assisted reproduction technology (ART) clinics. Objective: This study aimed to investigate fertility and fetuses of hormone treated super ovulated female mice who had received whole-body gamma irradiation before mating. Materials and Methods: Female mice were randomly categorized into a control group and 3 experimental groups including: Group I (Irradiation), Group II (Superovulation), and Group III (Superovulation and Irradiation). In hormone treated groups, mice were injected with different doses of pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG) followed with human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG). Irradiation was done using a Co-60 gamma ray generator with doses of 2 and 4 Gy. Number of fetuses counted and the fetus’s weight, head circumference, birth height, the number of live healthy fetuses, the number of fetuses with detected anomalies in the body, the sum of resorption and arrested fetuses were all recorded as outcome of treatments. Results: In the group I and group II, increased radiation and hormone dose led to a decrease in the number of survived fetuses (45 in 2 Gy vs. 29 in 4 Gy for irradiated group) as well as from 76 in 10 units into 48 in 15 units. In the group III, a higher dose of hormone in the presence of a 2 Gy irradiation boosted the slink rate; i.e. the number of aborted fetuses reached 21 cases while applying the dose of 15 Iu, whereas 6 cases of abortion were reported applying the hormone with a lower dose. Among different parameters studied, there was a significant difference in parameters of weight and height in the mouse fetuses (p=0.01). Conclusion: The data indicated that use of ovarian stimulating hormones in mice that received pre

  10. Recent Advances in Understanding Radiation Damage in Reactor Cavity Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Rosseel, Thomas M; Field, Kevin G; Le Pape, Yann; Remec, Igor; Giorla, Alain B; Wall, Dr. James Joseph

    2015-01-01

    License renewal up to 60 years and the possibility of subsequent license renewal to 80 years has resulted in a renewed focus on long-term aging of materials at nuclear power plants (NPPs) including concrete. Large irreplaceable sections of most nuclear generating stations include concrete. The Expanded Materials Degradation Analysis, jointly performed by the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Nuclear Industry, identified the urgent need to develop a consistent knowledge base on irradiation effects in concrete (Graves et al., (2014)). Much of the historical mechanical performance data of irradiated concrete (Hilsdorf et al., (1978)) does not accurately reflect typical radiation conditions in NPPs or conditions out to 60 or 80 years of radiation exposure (Kontani et al., (2011)). To address these potential gaps in the knowledge base, the Electric Power Research Institute and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, are working to better understand radiation damage as a degradation mechanism. This paper outlines recent progress toward: 1) assessing the radiation environment in concrete biological shields and defining the upper bound of the neutron and gamma dose levels expected in the biological shield for extended operation, and estimating adsorbed dose, 2) evaluating opportunities to harvest and test irradiated concrete from international NPPs, 3) evaluating opportunities to irradiate prototypical concrete and its components under accelerated neutron and gamma dose levels to establish conservative bounds and inform damage models, 4) developing improved models to enhance the understanding of the effects of radiation on concrete and 5) establishing an international collaborative research and information exchange effort to leverage capabilities and knowledge including developing cooperative test programs to improve confidence in data obtained from various concretes and from accelerated irradiation experiments.

  11. Influence on cell proliferation of background radiation or exposure to very low, chronic gamma radiation. [Paramecium tetraurelia; Synechococcus lividus

    SciTech Connect

    Planel, H.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Tixador, R.; Richoilley, G.; Conter, A.; Croute, F.; Caratero, C.; Gaubin, Y.

    1987-05-01

    Investigations carried out on the protozoan Paramecium tetraurelia and the cyanobacteria Synechococcus lividus, which were shielded against background radiation or exposed to very low doses of gamma radiation, demonstrated that radiation can stimulate the proliferation of these two single-cell organisms. Radiation hormesis depends on internal factors (age of starting cells) and external factors (lighting conditions). The stimulatory effect occurred only in a limited range of doses and disappeared for dose rates higher than 50 mGy/y.

  12. Gamma-ray radiation response at 1550 nm of fluorine-doped radiation hard single-mode optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngwoong; Ju, Seongmin; Jeong, Seongmook; Lee, Seung Ho; Han, Won-Taek

    2016-02-22

    We have investigated gamma-ray radiation response at 1550 nm of fluorine-doped radiation hard single-mode optical fiber. Radiation-induced attenuation (RIA) of the optical fiber was measured under intermittent gamma-ray irradiations with dose rate of ~10 kGy/h. No radiation hardening effect on the RIA by the gamma-ray pre-dose was found when the exposed fiber was bleached for long periods of time (27~47 days) at room-temperature. Photo-bleaching scheme upon 980 nm LD pumping has proven to be an effective deterrent to the RIA, particularly by suppressing the incipient RIA due to room-temperature unstable self-trapped hole defects (STHs). Large temperature dependence of the RIA of the optical fiber together with the photo-bleaching effect are worthy of note for reinforcing its radiation hard characteristics. PMID:26907044

  13. Evidence for a Solar Influence on Gamma Radiation from Radon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Steinitz, G.; Fischbach, E.; Javorsek, D.; Jenkins, J.

    2012-12-01

    We have analyzed 29,000 measurements of gamma radiation associated with the decay of radon confined to an airtight vessel at the Geological Survey of Israel (GSI) Laboratory in Jerusalem between January 28 2007 and May 10 2010. These measurements exhibit strong variations in time of year and time of day, which may be due in part to environmental influences. However, time-series analysis reveals a number of strong periodicities, including two at approximately 11.2 year-1 and 12.5 year-1. We consider it significant that these same oscillations have previously been detected in nuclear-decay data acquired at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and at the Physiklisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. We have suggested that these oscillations are due to some form of solar radiation (possibly neutrinos) that has its origin in the deep solar interior. A curious property of the GSI data is that the annual oscillation is much stronger in daytime data than in nighttime data, but the opposite is true for all other oscillations. Time-frequency analysis also yields quite different results from daytime and nighttime data. These procedures have also been applied to data collected from subsurface geological sites in Israel, Tenerife, and Italy, which have a variety of geological and geophysical scenarios, different elevations, and depths below the surface ranging from several meters to 1000 meters. In view of these results, and in view of the fact that there is at present no clear understanding of the behavior of radon in its natural environment, there would appear to be a need for multi-disciplinary research. Investigations that clarify the nature and mechanisms of solar influences may help clarify the nature and mechanisms of geological influences.

  14. Radiation Metabolomics: Identification of Minimally Invasive Urine Biomarkers for Gamma-Radiation Exposure in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tyburski, John B.; Patterson, Andrew D.; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Slavík, Josef; Fornace, Albert J.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Idle, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-radiation exposure has both short- and long-term adverse health effects. The threat of modern terrorism places human populations at risk for radiological exposures, yet current medical countermeasures to radiation exposure are limited. Here we describe metabolomics for γ-radiation biodosimetry in a mouse model. Mice were γ-irradiated at doses of 0, 3 and 8 Gy (2.57 Gy/min), and urine samples collected over the first 24 h after exposure were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography–time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC–TOFMS). Multivariate data were analyzed by orthogonal partial least squares (OPLS). Both 3- and 8-Gy exposures yielded distinct urine metabolomic phenotypes. The top 22 ions for 3 and 8 Gy were analyzed further, including tandem mass spectrometric comparison with authentic standards, revealing that N-hexanoylglycine and β-thymidine are urinary biomarkers of exposure to 3 and 8 Gy, 3-hydroxy-2-methylbenzoic acid 3-O-sulfate is elevated in urine of mice exposed to 3 but not 8 Gy, and taurine is elevated after 8 but not 3 Gy. Gene Expression Dynamics Inspector (GEDI) self-organizing maps showed clear dose–response relationships for subsets of the urine metabolome. This approach is useful for identifying mice exposed to γ radiation and for developing metabolomic strategies for noninvasive radiation biodosimetry in humans. PMID:18582157

  15. APPLICATION OF JITTER RADIATION: GAMMA-RAY BURST PROMPT POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Jirong; Wang, Jiancheng

    2013-10-10

    A high degree of polarization of gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission has been confirmed in recent years. In this paper, we apply jitter radiation to study the polarization feature of GRB prompt emission. In our framework, relativistic electrons are accelerated by turbulent acceleration. Random and small-scale magnetic fields are generated by turbulence. We further determine that the polarization property of GRB prompt emission is governed by the configuration of the random and small-scale magnetic fields. A two-dimensional compressed slab, which contains a stochastic magnetic field, is applied in our model. If the jitter condition is satisfied, the electron deflection angle in the magnetic field is very small and the electron trajectory can be treated as a straight line. A high degree of polarization can be achieved when the angle between the line of sight and the slab plane is small. Moreover, micro-emitters with mini-jet structures are considered to be within a bulk GRB jet. The jet 'off-axis' effect is intensely sensitive to the observed polarization degree. We discuss the depolarization effect on GRB prompt emission and afterglow. We also speculate that the rapid variability of GRB prompt polarization may be correlated with the stochastic variability of the turbulent dynamo or the magnetic reconnection of plasmas.

  16. Natural gamma-radiation in the Aeolian volcanic arc.

    PubMed

    Chiozzi, P; Pasquale, V; Verdoya, M; Minato, S

    2001-11-01

    Pulse-height distributions of gamma-rays, obtained with a field NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometer in numerous sites of the Lipari and Vulcano islands (Aeolian volcanic arc, Italy), were measured to determine the U, Th and K concentrations of the bedrock and the relative values of the air absorbed dose rate. U is spatially related to both Th and K and the Th/U ratio is on average 3.1-3.5. The magmatic evolution is reflected by the concentration of the three radioelements, as they are more abundant within the more felsic units of the volcanic series. The higher values of U (15.7-20.0 ppm) coincide with higher Th (48.3-65.9 ppm) and K (4.9-6.1%) concentrations associated with rhyolitic rocks of the third cycle (< 50 ky). The air absorbed dose rate varies from 20 to 470 nGy h(-1). The highest values (> 350 nGy h(-1)) are observed on outcrops of rhyolitic obsidian lava flows. The cosmic-ray contribution is also evaluated to estimate the total background radiation dose rate. PMID:11573810

  17. Hydrogel membranes of PVAl/ clay by gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, M. J. A.; Parra, D. F.; Amato, V. S.; Lugão, A. B.

    2013-03-01

    In the last decades several studies concerning the new methods for drug delivery system have been investigated. A new field known as "smart therapy" involves devices and drug delivery systems to detect, identify and treat the site affected by the disease, not interfering with the biological system. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis is an endemic disease that is characterized by the development of single or multiple localized lesions on exposed areas of skin and one coetaneous treatment could be a potential solution. The aim of this study was to obtain polymeric hydrogel matrices of poly(vinylalcohol)(PVAl) and chitosan with inorganic nanoparticles, which can release a drug according to the need of the treatment of injury caused by leishmania on the skin. The hydrogels matrices were obtained with PVAl/ chitosan and PVAl/ chitosan 0.5; 1.0 and 1.5% laponite RD clay, crosslinked by ionizing gamma radiation with dose of 25 kGy. The techniques used for characterization were swelling, gel fraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetry (TGA). After synthesis, the samples were immersed in distilled water and weighed in periods of time until 60 h for the swelling determination. The obtained results have indicated that the swelling of the membranes increases with clay concentration, in consequence of ionic groups present in the clay.

  18. Gamma radiation effect on gas production in anion exchange resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traboulsi, A.; Labed, V.; Dauvois, V.; Dupuy, N.; Rebufa, C.

    2013-10-01

    Radiation-induced decomposition of Amberlite IRA400 anion exchange resin in hydroxide form by gamma radiolysis has been studied at various doses in different atmospheres (anaerobic, anaerobic with liquid water, and aerobic). The effect of these parameters on the degradation of ion exchange resins is rarely investigated in the literature. We focused on the radiolysis gases produced by resin degradation. When the resin was irradiated under anaerobic conditions with liquid water, the liquid phase over the resin was also analyzed to identify any possible water-soluble products released by degradation of the resin. The main products released are trimethylamine (TMA), molecular hydrogen (H2g) and carbon dioxide (CO2g). TMA and H2g are produced in all the irradiation atmospheres. However, TMA was in gaseous form under anaerobic and aerobic conditions and in aqueous form in presence of liquid water. In the latter conditions, TMAaq was associated with aqueous dimethylamine (DMAaq), monomethylamine (MMAaq) and ammonia (NH). CO2g is formed in the presence of oxygen due to oxidation of organic compounds present in the system, in particular the degradation products such as TMAg.

  19. On-line interrogation of pebble bed reactor fuel using passive gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianwei

    The Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) is a helium-cooled, graphite-moderated high temperature nuclear power reactor. In addition to its inherently safe design, a unique feature of this reactor is its multipass fuel cycle in which graphite fuel pebbles (of varying enrichment) are randomly loaded and continuously circulated through the core until they reach their prescribed end-of-life burnup limit (˜80,000--100,000 MWD/MTU). Unlike the situation with conventional light water reactors (LWRs), depending solely on computational methods to perform in-core fuel management will be highly inaccurate. As a result, an on-line measurement approach becomes the only accurate method to assess whether a particular pebble has reached its end-of-life burnup limit. In this work, an investigation was performed to assess the feasibility of passive gamma-ray spectrometry assay as an approach for on-line interrogation of PBR fuel for the simultaneous determination of burnup and enrichment on a pebble-by-pebble basis. Due to the unavailability of irradiated or fresh pebbles, Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the gamma-ray spectra of the PBR fuel at various levels of burnup. A pebble depletion calculation was performed using the ORIGEN code, which yielded the gamma-ray source term that was introduced into the input of an MCNP simulation. The MCNP simulation assumed the use of a high-purity coaxial germanium detector. Due to the lack of one-group high temperature reactor cross sections for ORIGEN, a heterogeneous MCNP model was developed to describe a typical PBR core. Subsequently, the code MONTEBURNS was used to couple the MCNP model and ORIGEN. This approach allowed the development of the burnup-dependent, one-group spectral-averaged PBR cross sections to be used in the ORIGEN pebble depletion calculation. Based on the above studies, a relative approach for performing the measurements was established. The approach is based on using the relative activities of Np-239/I-132 in combination

  20. Some neutron and gamma radiation characteristics of plutonium cermet fuel for isotopic power sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, R. A.; Anderson, M. E.; Campbell, A. R.; Haas, F. X.

    1972-01-01

    Gamma and neutron measurements on various types of plutonium sources are presented in order to show the effects of O-17, O-18 F-19, Pu-236, age of the fuel, and size of the source on the gamma and neutron spectra. Analysis of the radiation measurements shows that fluorine is the main contributor to the neutron yields from present plutonium-molybdenum cermet fuel, while both fluorine and Pu-236 daughters contribute significantly to the gamma ray intensities.

  1. Development of an alpha/beta/gamma detector for radiation monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Hatazawa, Jun

    2011-11-15

    For radiation monitoring at the site of nuclear power plant accidents such as Fukushima Daiichi, radiation detectors not only for gamma photons but also for alpha and beta particles are needed because some nuclear fission products emit beta particles and gamma photons and some nuclear fuels contain plutonium that emits alpha particles. We developed a radiation detector that can simultaneously monitor alpha and beta particles and gamma photons for radiation monitoring. The detector consists of three-layered scintillators optically coupled to each other and coupled to a photomultiplier tube. The first layer, which is made of a thin plastic scintillator (decay time: 2.4 ns), detects alpha particles. The second layer, which is made of a thin Gd{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} (GSO) scintillator with 1.5 mol.% Ce (decay time: 35 ns), detects beta particles. The third layer made of a thin GSO scintillator with 0.4 mol.% Ce (decay time: 70 ns) detects gamma photons. By using pulse shape discrimination, the count rates of these layers can be separated. With individual irradiation of alpha and beta particles and gamma photons, the count rate of the first layer represented the alpha particles, the second layer represented the beta particles, and the third layer represented the gamma photons. Even with simultaneous irradiation of the alpha and beta particles and the gamma photons, these three types of radiation can be individually monitored using correction for the gamma detection efficiency of the second and third layers. Our developed alpha, beta, and gamma detector is simple and will be useful for radiation monitoring, especially at nuclear power plant accident sites or other applications where the simultaneous measurements of alpha and beta particles and gamma photons are required.

  2. Investigation of photoneutron and capture gamma-ray production in Pb and W under irradiation from 16N decay radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebwaro, Jeremiah Monari; Zhao, Yaolin; He, Chaohui

    2015-09-01

    Lead and tungsten are potential alternative materials for shielding reactor ex-core components with high 16N activity when available space limits application of concrete. Since the two materials are vulnerable to photonuclear reactions, the nature and intensity of the secondary radiation resulting from (γ,n) and (n,γ) reactions when 16N decay radiation interact with these materials need to be well known for effective shielding design. In this study the MCNP code was used to calculate the photoneutron and capture gamma-ray spectra in the two materials when irradiated by 16N decay radiation. It was observed that some of the photoneutrons generated in the two materials lie in the low-energy range which is considered optimum for (n,γ) reactions. Lead is more transparent to the photoneutrons when compared to tungsten. The calculations also revealed that the bremsstrahlung generated by the beta spectrum was not sufficient to trigger any additional photoneutrons. Both energetic and less energetic capture gamma-rays are observed when photoneutrons interact with nuclei of the two materials. Depending on the strength of the 16N source term, the secondary radiation could affect the effectiveness of the shield and need to be considered during design.

  3. Effect of Gamma Radiation on Zinc Tolerance Efficiency of Aspergillus terreus Thorn.

    PubMed

    Das, Dipanwita; Chakraborty, A; Santra, S C

    2016-03-01

    The present study emphasizes the potential of gamma radiation in enhancing zinc tolerance of Aspergillus terreus. Gamma-exposed A. terreus could tolerate 1.13 times more Zn, reflecting higher growth (in terms of CFU) under Zn stress and enhanced Zn removal efficacies than their unirradiated counterparts. Radiation-induced upregulation of antioxidative system (SOD, CAT, GSH and MT) of A. terreus is responsible for radiation-induced enhancement of Zn tolerance. FTIR spectra reveals the involvement of functional groups in Zn biosorption; SEM study divulges the structural changes due to metal and gamma exposure and SEM-EDX depicts the Zn uptake by A. terreus (both in gamma-exposed and unexposed conditions). This work sheds light toward utilizing low doses of ionizing radiation for making more metal-tolerant fungi and the possible mechanisms adopted by A. terreus for being more metallo-resistant. PMID:26612034

  4. Detection system for high-resolution gamma radiation spectroscopy with neutron time-of-flight filtering

    DOEpatents

    Dioszegi, Istvan; Salwen, Cynthia; Vanier, Peter

    2014-12-30

    A .gamma.-radiation detection system that includes at least one semiconductor detector such as HPGe-Detector, a position-sensitive .alpha.-Detector, a TOF Controller, and a Digitizer/Integrator. The Digitizer/Integrator starts to process the energy signals of a .gamma.-radiation sent from the HPGe-Detector instantly when the HPGe-Detector detects the .gamma.-radiation. Subsequently, it is determined whether a coincidence exists between the .alpha.-particles and .gamma.-radiation signal, based on a determination of the time-of-flight of neutrons obtained from the .alpha.-Detector and the HPGe-Detector. If it is determined that the time-of-flight falls within a predetermined coincidence window, the Digitizer/Integrator is allowed to continue and complete the energy signal processing. If, however, there is no coincidence, the Digitizer/Integrator is instructed to be clear and reset its operation instantly.

  5. A gamma-ray testing technique for spacecraft. [considering cosmic radiation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gribov, B. S.; Repin, N. N.; Sakovich, V. A.; Sakharov, V. M.

    1977-01-01

    The simulated cosmic radiation effect on a spacecraft structure is evaluated by gamma ray testing in relation to structural thickness. A drawing of the test set-up is provided and measurement errors are discussed.

  6. Treatment of opium alkaloid containing wastewater in sequencing batch reactor (SBR)—Effect of gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bural, Cavit B.; Demirer, Goksel N.; Kantoglu, Omer; Dilek, Filiz B.

    2010-04-01

    Aerobic biological treatment of opium alkaloid containing wastewater as well as the effect of gamma irradiation as pre-treatment was investigated. Biodegradability of raw wastewater was assessed in aerobic batch reactors and was found highly biodegradable (83-90% degradation). The effect of irradiation (40 and 140 kGy) on biodegradability was also evaluated in terms of BOD 5/COD values and results revealed that irradiation imparted no further enhancement in the biodegradability. Despite the highly biodegradable nature of wastewater, further experiments in sequencing batch reactors (SBR) revealed that the treatment operation was not possible due to sludge settleability problem observed beyond an influent COD value of 2000 mg dm -3. Possible reasons for this problem were investigated, and the high molecular weight, large size and aromatic structure of the organic pollutants present in wastewater was thought to contribute to poor settleability. Initial efforts to solve this problem by modifying the operational conditions, such as SRT reduction, failed. However, further operational modifications including addition of phosphate buffer cured the settleability problem and influent COD was increased up to 5000 mg dm -3. Significant COD removal efficiencies (>70%) were obtained in both SBRs fed with original and irradiated wastewaters (by 40 kGy). However, pre-irradiated wastewater provided complete thebain removal and a better settling sludge, which was thought due to degradation of complex structure by radiation application. Degradation of the structure was observed by GC/MS analyses and enhancement in filterability tests.

  7. Airborne time-series measurement of soil moisture using terrestrial gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Thomas R.; Lipinski, Daniel M.; Peck, Eugene L.

    1988-01-01

    Terrestrial gamma radiation data and independent ground-based core soil moisture data are analyzed. They reveal the possibility of using natural terrestrial gamma radiation collected from a low-flying aircraft to make reliable real-time soil moisture measurements for the upper 20 cm of soil. The airborne data were compared to the crude ground-based soil moisture data set collected at the core sites.

  8. Influence of gamma radiation on microbiological parameters of the ethanolic fermentation of sugar-cane must

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcarde, A. R.; Walder, J. M. M.; Horii, J.

    2003-04-01

    The influence of gamma radiation on reducing the population of some bacteria Bacillus and Lactobacillus that usually contaminate the sugar-cane must and its effects on acidity of the medium and viability of the yeast during fermentation were evaluated. The treatment with gamma radiation reduced the bacterial load of the sugar-cane must. Consequently, the volatile acidity produced during the fermentation of the must decreased and the viability of the yeast afterwards added increased.

  9. Neutron flux spectra and radiation damage parameters for the Russian Bor-60 and SM-2 reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Karasiov, A.V.; Greenwood, L.R.

    1995-04-01

    The objective is to compare neutron irradiation conditions in Russian reactors and similar US facilities. Neutron fluence and spectral information and calculated radiation damage parameters are presented for the BOR-60 (Fast Experimental Reactor - 60 MW) and SM-2 reactors in Russia. Their neutron exposure characteristics are comparable with those of the Experimental Breeder Reactor (ERB-II), the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in the United States.

  10. Characterisation of imperial college reactor centre legacy waste using gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuhaimi, Alif Imran Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Waste characterisation is a principal component in waste management strategy. The characterisation includes identification of chemical, physical and radiochemical parameters of radioactive waste. Failure to determine specific waste properties may result in sentencing waste packages which are not compliant with the regulation of long term storage or disposal. This project involved measurement of intensity and energy of gamma photons which may be emitted by radioactive waste generated during decommissioning of Imperial College Reactor Centre (ICRC). The measurement will use High Purity Germanium (HPGe) as Gamma-ray detector and ISOTOPIC-32 V4.1 as analyser. In order to ensure the measurements provide reliable results, two quality control (QC) measurements using difference matrices have been conducted. The results from QC measurements were used to determine the accuracy of the ISOTOPIC software.

  11. Detectors on base of scintillation structures for registration of volumetric activities of gaseous and liquid media gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadilin, V. V.; Yurov, V. N.; Ryabeva, E. V.; Samossadny, V. T.; Lupar, E. E.; Trofimov, Yu A.; Kolesnikov, S. V.; Chebishev, S. B.; Nebolsin, V. O.

    2016-02-01

    The main aim of this research is the development and prototyping of the ionizing radiation detectors for the diagnosis of the physical processes used for monitoring the radiation situation at the thermal or fast neutrons reactors. In this article we present the experimental verification of applicability of the scintillation detectors based on LaBr3(Ce) and YAlO3(Ce). The experimental studies of the gamma-ray detection with several designs of the crystal scintillation detectors in gas and liquid are considered. It was shown that the measurement range in the liquid medium at the duration of one measurement of 100 seconds for 137Cs equals from 3.79·102 Bq/l to 1.08·108 Bq/l for detector prototype based on YAlO3(Ce).

  12. Shelf life extension of fresh turmeric ( Curcuma longa L.) using gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanya, R.; Mishra, B. B.; Khaleel, K. M.; Cheruth, Abdul Jaleel

    2009-09-01

    Gamma radiation processing was found to extend shelf life of fresh turmeric. A 5 kGy radiation dose and 10 °C storage temperature was found to keep peeled turmeric samples microbe free and acceptable until 60 days of storage. The control sample without radiation treatment spoiled within a week of storage. The changes in color, texture and moisture content of fresh turmeric due to radiation treatment were found to be statistically insignificant.

  13. Effects of gamma radiation on raspberries: safety and quality issues.

    PubMed

    Verde, S Cabo; Trigo, M J; Sousa, M B; Ferreira, A; Ramos, A C; Nunes, I; Junqueira, C; Melo, R; Santos, P M P; Botelho, M L

    2013-01-01

    There is an ever-increasing global demand from consumers for high-quality foods with major emphasis placed on quality and safety attributes. One of the main demands that consumers display is for minimally processed, high-nutrition/low-energy natural foods with no or minimal chemical preservatives. The nutritional value of raspberry fruit is widely recognized. In particular, red raspberries are known to demonstrate a strong antioxidant capacity that might prove beneficial to human health by preventing free radical-induced oxidative stress. However, food products that are consumed raw, are increasingly being recognized as important vehicles for transmission of human pathogens. Food irradiation is one of the few technologies that address both food quality and safety by virtue of its ability to control spoilage and foodborne pathogenic microorganisms without significantly affecting sensory or other organoleptic attributes of the food. Food irradiation is well established as a physical, nonthermal treatment (cold pasteurization) that processes foods at or nearly at ambient temperature in the final packaging, reducing the possibility of cross contamination until the food is actually used by the consumer. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of gamma radiation on raspberries in order to assess consequences of irradiation. Freshly packed raspberries (Rubus idaeus L.) were irradiated in a (60)Co source at several doses (0.5, 1, or 1.5 kGy). Bioburden, total phenolic content, antioxidant activity, physicochemical properties such as texture, color, pH, soluble solids content, and acidity, and sensorial parameters were assessed before and after irradiation and during storage time up to 14 d at 4°C. Characterization of raspberries microbiota showed an average bioburden value of 10(4) colony-forming units (CFU)/g and a diverse microbial population predominantly composed of two morphological types (gram-negative, oxidase-negative rods, 35%, and filamentous fungi, 41

  14. Design of a personnel TLD badge for a power reactor beta/gamma spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, D.M.; Labenski, T. )

    1983-10-01

    This paper reports that three basic challenges are inherent in the design of a thermoluminescent dosimeter for a power reactor beta/gamma spectrum: the dosimeter must meet the current standard for performance in laboratory testing, the dosimeter must properly respond to a power reactor spectrum that is different from that specified in the standard, and the dosimeter must function under field conditions. These challenges were met at the Indian Point 3 Nuclear Power Station by modifying the case of a commercial multi-element TLD to include varying thicknesses of tissue equivalent plastic absorbers over the elements. An algorithm was developed to correct the TLD responses for laboratory testing: however, in field use, shallow and deep dose are read directly from the TLD without the use of an algorithm.

  15. Effect of high doses of gamma radiation on the functional characteristics of amniotic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rita; Purohit, Sumita; Chacharkar, M. P.

    2007-06-01

    The effect of different doses of gamma radiation viz. 25, 36 and 50 kGy on the chemical and functional characteristics of the amniotic membrane was studied. The change in the chemical structure of amniotic membranes at high doses of gamma irradiation was evaluated by means of Infrared (IR) Spectroscopy. The degradation of amnion on irradiation with gamma rays could produce a relative variation in IR absorption troughs. This kind of variation was absent in the samples irradiated to doses of 25, 36 and 50 kGy indicating no qualitative change in the material property of amnion. No significant differences in the water absorption capacity and water vapour transmission rate of amniotic membranes irradiated to different doses were observed. Impermeability of the amniotic membranes to different microorganisms was also not affected at high doses of gamma radiation. Gamma irradiation at doses of 25-50 kGy did not evoke undesirable changes in the functional properties of the amniotic membrane.

  16. 78 FR 79020 - Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  17. 78 FR 70597 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  18. Accuracy of soil water content estimates from gamma radiation monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jie; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Reemt Bogena, Heye; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial gamma radiation is known to be sensitive to soil water content, and could be promising for soil water content determination because of the availability of continental-scale gamma radiation monitoring networks. However, the accuracy of soil water content estimates that can be obtained from this type of data is currently unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the accuracy of soil water content estimates from measured time series of gamma radiation. For this, four gamma radiation monitoring stations were each equipped with four soil water content sensors at 5 and 15 cm depth to provide reference soil water content measurements. The contributions of terrestrial radiation and secondary cosmic radiation were separated from the total amount of measured gamma radiation by assuming that the long-term contribution of secondary cosmic radiation was constant, and that variations were related to changes in air pressure and incoming neutrons. In addition, precipitation effects related to atmospheric washout of radon progenies to the ground that cause an increase of gamma radiation were considered by excluding time periods with precipitation and time periods less than three hours after precipitation. The estimated terrestrial gamma radiation was related to soil water content using an exponential function with two fit parameters. For daily soil water content estimates, the goodness of fit ranged from R2= 0.21 to 0.48 and the RMSE ranged from 0.048 to 0.117 m3m‑3. The accuracy of the soil water content estimates improved considerably when a weekly resolution was used (RMSE ranged from 0.029 to 0.084 m3m‑3). Overall, these results indicate that gamma radiation monitoring data can be used to obtain useful soil water content information. The remaining differences between measured and estimated soil water content can at least partly be explained by the fact that the terrestrial gamma radiation is strongly determined by the upper few centimeters of the

  19. Isodose mapping of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate of Selangor state, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sanusi, M S M; Ramli, A T; Gabdo, H T; Garba, N N; Heryanshah, A; Wagiran, H; Said, M N

    2014-09-01

    A terrestrial gamma radiation survey for the state of Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya was conducted to obtain baseline data for environmental radiological health practices. Based on soil type, geological background and information from airborne survey maps, 95 survey points statistically representing the study area were determined. The measured doses varied according to geological background and soil types. They ranged from 17 nGy h(-1) to 500 nGy h(-1). The mean terrestrial gamma dose rate in air above the ground was 182 ± 81 nGy h(-1). This is two times higher than the average dose rate of terrestrial gamma radiation in Malaysia which is 92 nGy h(-1) (UNSCEAR 2000). An isodose map was produced to represent exposure rate from natural sources of terrestrial gamma radiation. PMID:24787672

  20. Attosecond Gamma-Ray Pulses via Nonlinear Compton Scattering in the Radiation-Dominated Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Xing; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z.; Galow, Benjamin J.; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2015-11-01

    The feasibility of the generation of bright ultrashort gamma-ray pulses is demonstrated in the interaction of a relativistic electron bunch with a counterpropagating tightly focused superstrong laser beam in the radiation-dominated regime. The Compton scattering spectra of gamma radiation are investigated using a semiclassical description for the electron dynamics in the laser field and a quantum electrodynamical description for the photon emission. We demonstrate the feasibility of ultrashort gamma-ray bursts of hundreds of attoseconds and of dozens of megaelectronvolt photon energies in the near-backwards direction of the initial electron motion. The tightly focused laser field structure and the radiation reaction are shown to be responsible for such short gamma-ray bursts, which are independent of the durations of the electron bunch and of the laser pulse. The results are measurable with the laser technology available in the near future.

  1. Gamma radiation shielding and health physics characteristics of diaspore-flyash concretes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kanwaldeep; Singh, Sukhpal; Singh, S P; Mudahar, Gurmel S; Dhaliwal, A S

    2015-06-01

    Different gamma radiation interaction parameters has been measured experimentally for the prepared diaspore-flyash concretes at 59.54, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV using narrow-beam transmission geometry and results are found to be in good agreement with theoretical values computed with a computer programme, WinXCom. The radiation exposure rate and absorbed dose rate for the gamma radiation with and without shielding of diaspore-flyash concretes have been determined using linear attenuation results. The results show that on average, there is reduction of 95%, 53% and 40% in dose rate for gamma sources (241)Am, (137)Cs and (60)Co, respectively with diaspore-flyash concretes as shielding material. Other health physics parameters namely equivalent dose, effective dose, gamma flux and energy fluence rate have also been determined. PMID:25946622

  2. [Cytotoxicity of PVC tubes sterilized in ethylene oxide after gamma radiation exposure].

    PubMed

    de Souza, Rafael Queiroz; Graziano, Kazuko Uchikawa; Ikeda, Tamiko Ichikawa; Gonçalves, Cláudia Regina; Cruz, Aurea Silveira

    2013-04-01

    Do materials sterilized using gamma rays become toxic when re-sterilized in ethylene oxide? This question guided the objective of this study, which was to investigate the potential cytotoxic effect of PVC sterilized by gamma radiation and re-sterilized with EO by the agar diffusion method in cell cultures. Nine PVC tubes were subjected to gamma radiation sterilization and were re-sterilized in EO. The tubes were divided into a total of 81 units of analysis that were tested so as to represent the internal and external surfaces and mass of each tube. It was concluded that the PVC materials sterilized in gamma radiation and re-sterilized in EO are not cytotoxic. PMID:23743920

  3. An integrated view of gamma radiation effects on marine fauna: from molecules to ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Won, Eun-Ji; Dahms, Hans-U; Kumar, K Suresh; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-11-01

    Accidental release of nuclides into the ocean is causing health risks to marine organisms and humans. All life forms are susceptible to gamma radiation with a high variation, depending on various physical factors such as dose, mode, and time of exposure and various biological factors such as species, vitality, age, and gender. Differences in sensitivity of gamma radiation are also associated with different efficiencies of mechanisms related to protection and repair systems. Gamma radiation may also affect various other integration levels: from gene, protein, cells and organs, population, and communities, disturbing the energy flow of food webs that will ultimately affect the structure and functioning of ecosystems. Depending on exposure levels, gamma radiation induces damages on growth and reproduction in various organisms such as zooplankton, benthos, and fish in aquatic ecosystems. In this paper, harmful effects of gamma-irradiated aquatic organisms are described and the potential of marine copepods in assessing the risk of gamma radiation is discussed with respect to physiological adverse effects that even affect the ecosystem level. PMID:25382502

  4. Gamma-ray spectral imaging using a single-shutter radiation camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVol, T. A.; Wehe, D. K.; Knoll, G. F.

    1990-12-01

    As part of a program to develop mobile robots for reactor environments, we are developing a radiation-imaging camera capable of operating in medium-intensity (<2 R/h), medium-energy (<8 MeV) gamma-ray fields. A systematic study of available detectors indicated the advisability of a high- Z scintillator. The raster-scanning camera uses a lead-shielded bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillator (1.25 cm×1.25 cm right-circular cylinder) coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) operated in pulse mode. Measurements yielded an angular resolution of 2.5° and energy resolution of 12.9% at 662 keV. The camera motion is totally automated and controlled by stepping motors connected to a remote computer. Several 2D images of radioactive sources have been acquired in fields of up to 400 mR/h and energies up to 2.75 MeV. Some of the images demonstrate the ability of the camera to image a polychromatic field.

  5. Comments on radiation sterilization in the UK and on the efficient operation of a gamma plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohnsdorff, R. S. M.

    Some general comments are made on the use of gamma radiation for the sterilisation of medical products in the UK. The radiation process is deceptively simple but successful operation requires careful study of detail. A computer has been programmed to study the arrangement of radio-active source rods. Optimisation of the source can improve dose uniformity and process efficiency.

  6. RecBC enzyme overproduction affects UV and gamma radiation survival of Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Nivedita P; Kamble, Vidya A; Misra, Hari S

    2008-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans recovering from the effect of acute dose of gamma (gamma) radiation shows a biphasic mechanism of DNA double strands breaks repair that involves an efficient homologous recombination. However, it shows higher sensitivity to near-UV (NUV) than Escherichia coli and lacks RecBC, a DNA strand break (DSB) repair enzyme in some bacteria. Recombinant Deinococcus expressing the recBC genes of E. coli showed nearly three-fold improvements in near-UV tolerance and nearly 2 log cycle reductions in wild type gamma radiation resistance. RecBC over expression effect on radiation response of D. radiodurans was independent of indigenous RecD. Loss of gamma radiation tolerance was attributed to the enhanced rate of in vivo degradation of radiation damaged DNA and delayed kinetics of DSB repair during post-irradiation recovery. RecBC expressing cells of Deinococcus showed wild type response to Far-UV. These results suggest that the overproduction of RecBC competes with the indigenous mechanism of gamma radiation damaged DNA repair while it supports near-UV tolerance in D. radiodurans. PMID:17720630

  7. Mold and aflatoxin reduction by gamma radiation of packed hot peppers and their evolution during storage.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Qumer; Amjad, Muhammad; Asi, Muhammad Rafique; Ariño, Agustin

    2012-08-01

    The effect of gamma radiation on moisture content, total mold counts, Aspergillus counts, and aflatoxins of three hot pepper hybrids (Sky Red, Maha, and Wonder King) was investigated. Whole dried peppers packed in polyethylene bags were gamma irradiated at 0 (control), 2, 4, and 6 kGy and stored at 25°C for 90 days. Gamma radiation proved to be effective in reducing total mold and Aspergillus counts in a dose-dependent relationship. Total mold counts in irradiated peppers immediately after treatments were significantly lowered compared with those in nonirradiated samples, achieving 90 and 99% reduction at 2- and 4-kGy doses, respectively. Aspergillus counts were significantly reduced, by 93 and 97%, immediately after irradiation at doses of 2 and 4 kGy, respectively. A radiation dose of 6 kGy completely eliminated the population of total molds and Aspergillus fungi. The evolution of total molds in control and irradiated samples indicated no further fungal proliferation during 3 months of storage at 25°C. Aflatoxin levels were slightly affected by radiation doses of 2 and 4 kGy and showed a nonsignificant reduction of 6% at the highest radiation dose of 6 kGy. The distinct effectiveness of gamma radiation in molds and aflatoxins can be explained by the target theory of food irradiation, which states that the likelihood of a microorganism or a molecule being inactivated by gamma rays increases as its size increases. PMID:22856582

  8. Distribution of terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in the eastern coastal area of Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Gusain, G S; Rautela, B S; Sahoo, S K; Ishikawa, T; Prasad, G; Omori, Y; Sorimachi, A; Tokonami, S; Ramola, R C

    2012-11-01

    Terrestrial gamma radiation is one of the important radiation exposures on the earth's surface that results from the three primordial radionuclides (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K. The elemental concentration of these elements in the earth's crust could result in the anomalous variation of the terrestrial gamma radiation in the environment. The geology of the local area plays an important role in distribution of these radioactive elements. Environmental terrestrial gamma radiation dose rates were measured around the eastern coastal area of Odisha with the objective of establishing baseline data on the background radiation level. The values of the terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate vary significantly at different locations in the study area. The values of the terrestrial gamma dose rate ranged from 77 to 1651 nGy h(-1), with an average of 230 nGy h(-1). During the measurement of the terrestrial gamma dose rate, sand and soil samples were also collected for the assessment of natural radionuclides. The activities of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K from these samples were measured using a gamma-ray spectrometry with a NaI(Tl) detector. Activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K ranged from 15.6 to 69 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 46.7 Bq kg(-1), from 28.9 to 973 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 250 Bq kg(-1) and from 139 to 952 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 429, respectively. The detailed significance of these studies has been discussed from the radiation protection point of view. PMID:22874894

  9. Repair effects of exogenous SOD on Bacillus subtilis against gamma radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoming; Zhang, E; Fang, Liu; Zhang, Jianguo; Zhu, Jie; He, Wei; Luo, Xuegang

    2013-12-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an enzyme that removes free radicals from cells in many organisms. In order to further characterize these repair effects and their mechanism when subjected to radiation, Bacillus subtilis cells were exposed to gamma radiation and the cell survival rate, intracellular SOD activity, and DNA double-strand breakage were investigated. Vegetative cells of B. subtilis were irradiated by (60)Co gamma radiation at varying doses and subsequently exposed to varying levels of exogenous SOD. Standard plate-count, xanthine oxidase, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) methods were employed to investigate the repair effects. The results showed that the exogenous SOD could significantly improve cell survival rate and intracellular SOD activity after gamma radiation. The cell survival rate was elevated 30-87 times above levels observed in control samples. Adding exogenous SOD into gamma irradiated cells may dramatically increase intracellular SOD activity (p < 0.01), while percentage of DNA release (PR) values may decrease significantly when cells are treated with SOD. The repair effects were observed to vary with the gamma radiation dose and SOD concentration. These findings suggest that exogenous SOD may have the ability to repair vegetative B. subtilis cell damage after irradiated by gamma radiation. DNA strand scission may also be prevented by addition of SOD. This research contributes to better understanding of protection from the effects of free radicals and their mechanisms, an ongoing process in many organisms that involves the cellular response to gamma radiation, which occurs naturally in soil and water, as well as in unusual cases of high-dosage exposure. PMID:24096311

  10. Gamma radiation monitoring at the Eastern North Atlantic (ENA), Graciosa Island ARM facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Susana; Miranda, Pedro; Azevedo, Eduardo B.; Nitschke, Kim

    2016-04-01

    Continuous monitoring of gamma radiation is often performed in nuclear facilities and industrial environments as a way to control the ambient radioactivity and give warning of potential accidents. However, gamma radiation is also ubiquitous in the natural environment. The main sources are i) cosmic radiation from space, including secondary radiation from the interaction with atoms in the atmosphere, ii) terrestrial sources from mineral grains in soils and rocks, particularly Potassium (K-40), Uranium (U-238) and Thorium (Th-232) and their decay products (e.g. Radium, Ra-226) , and iii) airborne Radon gas (Rn-222), which is the dominant source of natural environmental radioactivity. The temporal variability of this natural radiation background needs to be well understood and quantified in order to discriminate non-natural sources of radiation in the environment and artificial radionuclides contamination. To this end, continuous gamma radiation monitoring is being performed at the Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) facility located in the Graciosa island (Azores, 39N; 28W), a fixed site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement programme (ARM), established and supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) of the United States of America with the collaboration of the local government and University of the Azores. The site is unique for the study of the natural radioactivity background on one hand due to the remote oceanic geographical location, in the middle of the North Atlantic Ocean and clear of direct continental influence, and on the other hand because of the comprehensive dataset of atmospheric parameters that is available for enhancing the interpretation of the radiation measurements, as a result of the vast array of very detailed and high-quality atmospheric measurements performed at the ARM-ENA facility. Gamma radiation in the range 475 KeV to 3000 KeV is measured continuously with a 3" x 3" NaI(Tl) scintillator. The campaign started started in May 2015, with gamma

  11. Reflectivity of linear and nonlinear gamma radiated apodized chirped Bragg grating under ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdalla, Taymour A.

    2012-09-06

    In this paper, the effect Co{sup 60} gamma radiation is investigated on the effective refractive index of apodized chirped Bragg grating. Nine apodization profiles are considered. Comparison between the reflectivity of the gamma radiated and non radiated fiber Bragg grating has been carried out. The electric field of signals propagating through the apodized chirped fiber Bragg grating (ACFBG) is first calculated from which, new values for the refractive index are determined. The nonlinear effects appear on the ACFBG reflectivity. The effect of nonlinearity and undersea temperature and pressure on the grating is also studied.

  12. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING AND ANALYZING POLARIZED GAMMA RADIATION

    DOEpatents

    Hamermesh, M.; Hanna, S.S.; Perlow, G.J.

    1964-04-21

    A method of polarizing and resolving the plane of polarization of gamma rays is described. Polarization is produced by positioning a thin disc of ferromagnetic metal, cortaining /sup 57/Co, in a magnetic field. Resolution is accomplished by rotating a thin disc of iron enriched in /sup 57/Fe relative to a second magnetic field and noting the change of gamma absorption at each rotational position. (AEC)

  13. Comparison of the effects of gamma radiation on hydrated and air dried rye grass seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Worthington, M.

    1988-01-01

    This is a comparative study of the effects of gamma radiation on the growth of hydrated and air dried seeds during the first weeks of primary growth. Four groups of seeds were used in the study: 1) hydrated sweet corn, 2) air dried sweet corn, 3) hydrated rye grass, and 4) air dried rye grass. Each group was then further subdivided and exposed to various levels of gamma radiation using a Cobalt-60 irradiator, except for the control samples of the four groups which received no radiation above background level. All seeds samples were then planted, allowed to grow for approximately 12 days, and harvested. Growth of both shoot and root of each seed was recorded for data analysis according to specific groups. Analyses of data from this study shows that the mean growth of air dried seeds when exposed to gamma radiation prior to planting.

  14. Application of Gamma code coupled with turbomachinery models for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Oh

    2008-02-01

    The very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is envisioned as a single- or dual-purpose reactor for electricity and hydrogen generation. The concept has average coolant temperatures above 9000C and operational fuel temperatures above 12500C. The concept provides the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperature to support process heat applications, such as coal gasification, desalination or cogenerative processes, the VHTR’s higher temperatures allow broader applications, including thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the very high temperatures of this reactor concept can be detrimental to safety if a loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) occurs. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air will enter the core through the break by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heatup of the reactor core and the release of a toxic gas, CO, and fission products. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. Prior to the start of this Korean/United States collaboration, no computer codes were available that had been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably simulate a LOCA in the VHTR. Therefore, we have worked for the past three years on developing and validating advanced computational methods for simulating LOCAs in a VHTR. GAMMA code is being developed to implement turbomachinery models in the power conversion unit (PCU) and ultimately models associated with the hydrogen plant. Some preliminary results will be described in this paper.

  15. Development of GAMMA Code and Evaluation for a Very High Temperature gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Chang H; Lim, H.S.; Kim, E.S.; NO, H.C.

    2007-06-01

    The very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is envisioned as a single- or dual-purpose reactor for electricity and hydrogen generation. The concept has average coolant temperatures above 9000C and operational fuel temperatures above 12500C. The concept provides the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperature to support process heat applications, such as coal gasification, desalination or cogenerative processes, the VHTR’s higher temperatures allow broader applications, including thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the very high temperatures of this reactor concept can be detrimental to safety if a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) occurs. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air will enter the core through the break by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heatup of the reactor core and the release of toxic gasses (CO and CO2) and fission products. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. Prior to the start of this Korean/United States collaboration, no computer codes were available that had been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably simulate a LOCA in the VHTR. Therefore, we have worked for the past three years on developing and validating advanced computational methods for simulating LOCAs in a VHTR. This paper will also include what improvements will be made in the Gamma code for the VHTR.

  16. Gamma-ray spectrometry analysis of pebble bed reactor fuel using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianwei; Hawari, Ayman I.; Zhao, Zhongxiang; Su, Bingjing

    2003-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the gamma-ray spectra of pebble bed reactor fuel at various levels of burnup. A fuel depletion calculation was performed using the ORIGEN2.1 code, which yielded the gamma-ray source term that was introduced into the input of an MCNP4C simulation. The simulation assumed the use of a 100% efficient high-purity coaxial germanium (HPGe) detector, a pebble placed at a distance of 100 cm from the detector, and accounted for Gaussian broadening of the gamma-ray peaks. Previously, it was shown that 137Cs, 60Co (introduced as a dopant), and 134Cs are the relevant burnup indicators. The results show that the 662 keV line of 137Cs lies in close proximity to the intense 658 keV of 197Nb, which results in spectral interference between the lines. However, the 1333 keV line of 60Co, and selected 134Cs lines (e.g., at 605 keV) are free from spectral interference, which enhances the possibility of their utilization as relative burnup indicators.

  17. Threshold self-powered gamma detector for use as a monitor of power in a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    LeVert, Francis E.; Cox, Samson A.

    1978-01-01

    A self-powered gamma monitor for placement near the core of a nuclear reactor comprises a lead prism surrounded by a coaxial thin nickel sheet, the combination forming a collector. A coaxial polyethylene electron barrier encloses the collector and is separated from the nickel sheet by a vacuum region. The electron barrier is enclosed by a coaxial stainless steel emitter which, in turn, is enclosed within a lead casing. When the detector is placed in a flux of gamma rays, a measure of the current flow in an external circuit between emitter and collector provides a measure of the power level of the reactor.

  18. Radiation Hydrodynamic Simulations of an Inertial Fusion Energy Reactor Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacks, Ryan Foster

    Inertial fusion energy reactors present great promise for the future as they are capable of providing baseline power with no carbon footprint. Simulation work regarding the chamber response and first wall insult is carried out using the 1-D BUCKY radiation hydrodynamics code for a variety of differing chamber fills, radii, chamber obstructions and first wall materials. Discussion of the first wall temperature rise, x-ray spectrum incident on the wall, shock timing and maximum overpressure are presented. An additional discussion of the impact of different gas opacities and their effect on overall chamber dynamics, including the formation of two shock fronts, is also presented. This work is performed under collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Fusion Technology Institute.

  19. Radiation chemistry of salt-mine brines and hydrates. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jenks, G.H.; Walton, J.R.; Bronstein, H.R.; Baes, C.F. Jr.

    1981-07-01

    Certain aspects of the radiation chemistry of NaCl-saturated MgCl/sub 2/ solutions and MgCl/sub 2/ hydrates at temperatures in the range of 30 to 180/sup 0/C were investigated through experiments. A principal objective was to establish the values for the yields of H/sub 2/ (G(H/sub 2/)) and accompanying oxidants in the gamma-ray radiolysis of concentrated brines that might occur in waste repositories in salt. We concluded that G(H/sub 2/) from gamma-irradiated brine solution into a simultaneously irradiated, deaerated atmosphere above the solution is between 0.48 and 0.49 over most of the range 30 to 143/sup 0/C. The yield is probably somewhat lower at the lower end of this range, averaging 0.44 at 30 to 45/sup 0/C. Changes in the relative amounts of MgCl/sub 2/ and NaCl in the NaCl-saturated solutions have negligible effects on the yield. The yield of O/sub 2/ into the same atmosphere averages 0.13, independent of the temperature and brine composition, showing that only about 50% of the radiolytic oxidant that was formed along with the H/sub 2/ was present as O/sub 2/. We did not identify the species that compose the remainder of the oxidant. We concluded that the yield of H/sub 2/ from a gamma-irradiated brine solution into a simultaneously irradiated atmosphere containing 5 to 8% air in He may be greater than the yield in deaerated systems by amounts ranging from 0% for temperatures of 73 to 85/sup 0/C, to about 30 and 40% for temperatures in the ranges 100 to 143/sup 0/C and 30 to 45/sup 0/C, respectively. We did not establish the mechanism whereby the air affected the yields of H/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/. The values found in this work for G(H/sub 2/) in deaerated systems are in approximate agreement with the value of 0.44 for the gamma-irradiation yield of H/sub 2/ in pure H/sub 2/O at room temperature. They are also in agreement with the values predicted by extrapolation from the findings of previous researchers for the value for G(H/sub 2/) in 2 M NaCl solutions

  20. Galactic plane gamma radiation. [SAS-2 and COS-b observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Ogelman, H. B.; Tuner, T.; Ozel, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    Analysis of the complete data from SAS-2 accentuates the fact that the distribution of galactic gamma radiation has several similarities to that of other large-scale tracers of galactic structure. The gamma radiation shows no statistically significant variation with direction, and the spectrum seen along the plane is the same as that derived for the galactic component of the gamma radiation at high latitude. This uniformity of the energy spectrum, the smooth decrease in intensity as a function of galactic latitude, and the absence of any galactic gamma ray sources at high latitudes argue in favor of a diffuse origin for most of the galactic gamma radiation, rather than a collection of localized sources. All the localized sources identified in the SAS 2 data are associated with known compact objects on the basis of observed periodicities, except gamma195+5 Excluding those SAS 2 sources observed by COS-B and two other excesses (CG 312-1 and CG333+0) visible in the SAS 2 data associated with tangential directions of spiral arms, thera are eight remaining new sources in the COS-B catalog.

  1. Power monitoring in space nuclear reactors using silicon carbide radiation detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruddy, Frank H.; Patel, Jagdish U.; Williams, John G.

    2005-01-01

    Space reactor power monitors based on silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor neutron detectors are proposed. Detection of fast leakage neutrons using SiC detectors in ex-core locations could be used to determine reactor power: Neutron fluxes, gamma-ray dose rates and ambient temperatures have been calculated as a function of distance from the reactor core, and the feasibility of power monitoring with SiC detectors has been evaluated at several ex-core locations. Arrays of SiC diodes can be configured to provide the required count rates to monitor reactor power from startup to full power Due to their resistance to temperature and the effects of neutron and gamma-ray exposure, SiC detectors can be expected to provide power monitoring information for the fill mission of a space reactor.

  2. What is the radiative process of the prompt phase of Gamma Ray Bursts?

    SciTech Connect

    Ghisellini, G.

    2010-07-15

    Despite the dramatic improvement of our knowledge of the phenomenology of Gamma Ray Bursts, we still do not know several fundamental aspects of their physics. One of the puzzles concerns the nature of the radiative process originating the prompt phase radiation. Although the synchrotron process qualifies itself as a natural candidate, it faces severe problems, and many efforts have been done looking for alternatives. These, however, suffer from other problems, and there is no general consensus yet on a specific radiation mechanism.

  3. The radiation tolerance of MTP and LC optical fibre connectors to 500 kGy(Si) of gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, D. C.; Hamilton, P.; Huffman, B. T.; Teng, P. K.; Weidberg, A. R.

    2012-04-01

    The LHC luminosity upgrade, known as the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will require high-speed optical links to read out data from the detectors. The optical fibre connectors contained within such a link must have a small form factor and be capable of operating in the harsh radiation environment at the HL-LHC. MTP ribbon fibre connectors and LC single fibre connectors were exposed to 500 kGy(Si) of gamma radiation and their radiation hardness was investigated. Neither type of connector exhibited evidence for any significant radiation damage and both connectors could be qualified for use at HL-LHC detectors.

  4. Features of the flux of gamma-radiation in the lower atmosphere during precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germanenko, A. V.; Balabin, Yu V.; Gvozdevsky, B. B.; Vashenyuk, E. V.

    2013-02-01

    We are carrying out observations and studies of increases of gamma radiation intensity in a ground atmosphere layer during precipitations. Measurements have been carried out in two high-altitude points: Apatity (Murmansk) and Barentsburg (Spitsbergen). Scintillation detectors on the basis of NaI(Tl) crystals are used. Continuous radiation detection is made as the count rate in integral channels with threshold values >20 keV, >100 keV. There are more than 500 events of increase in gamma-ray background during precipitation. Average profiles of X-ray radiation increases in a ground level and the related with them increases of intensity of precipitations for stations in Apatity and Barentsburg have been built up. In Apatity the average increase profile in the gamma-ray flux and accompanying with profile of precipitations rate have been obtained. A time gap between peaks of precipitation and increase one is 30-40 minutes. A barometric coefficient of each component of radiation has been calculated. The barometric coefficient has a zero value on gamma-ray. The charged component of the secondary cosmic rays has a typical value ~0.18 %/mB. The lack of the barometric effect on gamma-ray indicates on the local origin of this radiation.

  5. On the mechanism of the interactions of neutrons and gamma radiation with nuclear graphite—Implications to HTGRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, C.; Barkatt, A.; Al-Sheikhly, M.

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear-grade varieties of graphite being considered for use in high-temperature gas reactors were exposed to gamma radiation (up to 87 MGy) and to fast neutrons (up to 5.4×1017 n/cm2 in air, 8.8×1011 n/cm2 in water-saturated helium). Results of XPS measurements indicated that gamma or mixed-field irradiation initially enhances the oxygen content in the surface region of the graphite, but this content decreases at higher doses, probably due to decomposition of surface CO complexes. Results of EPR measurements showed that gamma irradiation at low doses causes a decrease in the concentration of unpaired spins, but higher doses cause this concentration to rise. SQUID measurements of magnetic susceptibility support the EPR findings. At the dose range explored in this study, no structural changes were observed using XRD and Raman spectroscopy. In general, no significant differences were observed among the five varieties of graphite with respect to the effects of irradiation. Impurity analysis by means of GDMS and ICP-AES showed that impurity concentrations that concentrations of impurities, particularly those of neutron-absorbing impurities, were within the range specified for high-purity nuclear graphite. Activation relevant impurity concentrations, too, were very low.

  6. High-energy gamma radiation from Geminga observed by EGRET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.; Bertsch, D. L.; Brazier, K. T. S.; Chiang, J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Fierro, J. M.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kwok, P. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) has carried out extensive studies of the gamma-ray source Geminga. Following the detection of pulsed X-rays (Halpern and Holt 1992) from Geminga, Bertsch et al. (1992) reported the same 237 ms periodicity to be visible in the EGRET data. A full analysis of the Geminga source shows that the energy spectrum is compatible with a power law with a spectral index of -1.50 +/- 0.08 between 30 MeV and 2 GeV. A falloff relative to the power law is observed for energies above 2 GeV. Phase-resolved spectra also show power laws with high-energy cutoffs, but with significant variation of the spectral index with phase. No unpulsed emission is observed. No evidence for time variation was found within the EGRET observations.

  7. Operation of a tokamak reactor in the radiative improved mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, D. Kh.; Mavrin, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The operation of a nuclear fusion reactor has been simulated within a model based on experimental results obtained at the TEXTOR-94 tokamak and other facilities in which quasistationary regimes were achieved with long confinement times, high densities, and absence of the edge-localized mode. The radiative improved mode of confinement studied in detail at the TEXTOR-94 tokamak is the most interesting such regime. One of the most important problems of modern tokamaks is the problem of a very high thermal load on a divertor (or a limiter). This problem is quite easily solved in the radiative improved mode. Since a significant fraction of the thermal energy is reemitted by an impurity, the thermal loading is significantly reduced. As the energy confinement time τ E at high densities in the indicated mode is significantly larger than the time predicted by the scaling of ITERH-98P(y, 2), ignition can be achieved in a facility much smaller than the ITER facility at plasma temperatures below 20 keV. The revealed decrease in the degradation of the confinement time τ E with an increase in the introduced power has been analyzed.

  8. Gamma radiation induced degradation in PE-PP block copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, H. R.; Sreepad, H. R.; Ahmed, Khaleel; Govindaiah, T. N.

    2012-06-01

    In the present investigation, effect of gamma irradiation on the PP-PE block copolymer has been studied. The polymer has been subjected to gamma irradiation from 100 to 500 Mrad dosages. Characterization of the polymer using XRD and FTIR was done both before irradiation and after irradiation in each step. Effect of irradiation on the electrical properties of the material has also been studied. FTIR study shows that the sample loses C - C stretching mode of vibration but gains C=C stretching mode of vibration after irradiation. Present investigation clearly indicates that though the electrical conductivity increases in the material, it undergoes degradation and shows brittleness due to irradiation.

  9. Gamma radiation induced degradation in PE-PP block copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Ravi, H. R.; Sreepad, H. R.; Ahmed, Khaleel; Govindaiah, T. N.

    2012-06-05

    In the present investigation, effect of gamma irradiation on the PP-PE block copolymer has been studied. The polymer has been subjected to gamma irradiation from 100 to 500 Mrad dosages. Characterization of the polymer using XRD and FTIR was done both before irradiation and after irradiation in each step. Effect of irradiation on the electrical properties of the material has also been studied. FTIR study shows that the sample loses C - C stretching mode of vibration but gains C=C stretching mode of vibration after irradiation. Present investigation clearly indicates that though the electrical conductivity increases in the material, it undergoes degradation and shows brittleness due to irradiation.

  10. Dipole analysis on EGRET data of extragalactic gamma ray background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ying-Chi

    1990-01-01

    A dipole analysis on the EGRET (Energetic Gamma-Ray Experimental Telescope) data seems to be one of the numerous subjects that can be investigated for the extragalactic gamma ray background radiation. By the end of the first one and half years after launch, the all-sky survey program of GRO (Gamma Ray Observatory) will be completed. The EGRET detector will cover the full sky area fairly well by that time. A set of gamma ray data suitable for dipole moment calculations will be available. Furthermore, there now exist in the literature several dipole anisotropy results calculated for optical and infrared observations on the distribution of galaxies in the full sky. The results of dipole moment analysis from gamma ray observation can be compared with those at other wavebands, and hopefully some deeper understanding can be gained on the large scale structure of the Universe.

  11. Lower Bound on the Cosmic TeV Gamma-Ray Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.

    2016-02-01

    The Fermi gamma-ray space telescope has revolutionized our understanding of the cosmic gamma-ray background radiation in the GeV band. However, investigation on the cosmic TeV gamma-ray background radiation still remains sparse. Here, we report the lower bound on the cosmic TeV gamma-ray background spectrum placed by the cumulative flux of individual detected extragalactic TeV sources including blazars, radio galaxies, and starburst galaxies. The current limit on the cosmic TeV gamma-ray background above 0.1 TeV is obtained as 2.8 × 10-8(E/100 GeV)-0.55 exp(-E/2100GeV)[GeV cm-2 s-1 sr-1] < E2dN/dE < 1.1 × 10-7(E/100 GeV)-0.49 [GeV cm-2 s-1 sr-1], where the upper bound is set by requirement that the cascade flux from the cosmic TeV gamma-ray background radiation can not exceed the measured cosmic GeV gamma-ray background spectrum. Two nearby blazars, Mrk 421 and Mrk 501, explain ˜70% of the cumulative background flux at 0.8-4 TeV, while extreme blazars start to dominate at higher energies. We also provide the cumulative background flux from each population, i.e., blazars, radio galaxies, and starburst galaxies which will be the minimum requirement for their contribution to the cosmic TeV gamma-ray background radiation.

  12. Radiation effects on amberlite IRA-938 and bio-rad AG MP-50 ion exchange resins. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kazanjian, A.R.; Killion, M.E.

    1982-01-15

    The radiation stability of Amberlite IRA-938, an anion exchange resin, and Bio-Rad AG MP-50, a cation exchange resin, was investigated. The resins were gamma irradiated and analyzed for exchange capacity, gas generation, thermal stability, and plutonium capacity. The radiation stabilities were comparable to those of Dowex 11 and Dowex 50W-X8, the resins presently used in Rocky Flats recovery operations.

  13. Gamma radiation exposure of accompanying persons due to Lu-177 patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovan, Bilal; Demir, Bayram; Tuncman, Duygu; Capali, Veli; Turkmen, Cuneyt

    2015-07-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NET) are cancers usually observed and arisen in the stomach, intestine, pancreas and breathing system. Recently, radionuclide therapy applications with Lu-177 peptide compound are rapidly growing; especially effective clinical results are obtained in the treatment of well-differentiated and metastatic NET. In this treatment, Lu-177-DOTA, a beta emitter radioisotope in the radiopharmaceutical form, is given to the patient by intravenous way. Lu-177 has also gamma rays apart from beta rays. Gamma rays have 175 keV average energy and these gamma rays should be under the control in terms of radiation protection. In this study, we measured the exposure dose from the Lu-177 patient.

  14. THE DEVELOPMENT OF RADIATION EMBRITTLEMENT MODELS FOR U.S. POWER REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Rao, Nageswara S

    2006-01-01

    The information fusion technique is used to develop radiation embrittlement prediction models for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels from U.S. power reactors, including boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors. The Charpy transition temperature-shift data is used as the primary index of RPV radiation embrittlement in this study. Six parameters {Cu, Ni, P, neutron fluence, irradiation time, and irradiation temperature {are used in the embrittlement prediction models. The results indicate that this new embrittlement predictor achieved reductions of about 49.5% and 52% in the uncertainties for plate and weld data, respectively, for pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor data, compared with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2. The implications of dose-rate effect and irradiation temperature effects for the development of radiation embrittlement models are also discussed.

  15. Gamma-radiation induced changes in the physical and chemical properties of lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ferdous; Ahmad, S R; Kronfli, E

    2006-08-01

    gamma-radiation induced effects on the physical and chemical properties of natural lignocellulose (jute) polymer were investigated. Samples were irradiated to required total doses at a particular dose rate. The changes in the parameters such as the tensile strength, elongation at break, and work done at rupture for the lignocellulose samples on irradiation with the gamma-rays from a cobalt-60 source were measured. The mechanical properties were found to have nonlinear relations with the radiation doses. The chemical stability of irradiated fibers was found to degrade progressively with the increase of radiation dose. Additionally, other chemical changes of the samples due to exposure to high-energy radiation were also investigated using fluorescence and infrared spectroscopic analysis. Differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric studies showed a significant reduction in thermal stability. The wide-angle X-ray diffraction study showed that structural changes of cellulose appeared due to the radiation-induced chemical reaction of lignocellulose. PMID:16903675

  16. SAS-2 observations of the high energy gamma radiation from the Vela region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Data from a scan of the galactic plane by the SAS-B high energy gamma ray experiment in the region 250 deg smaller than 12 smaller than 290 deg show a statistically significant excess over the general radiation from the galactic plane for gamma radiation of energy larger than 100 MeV. If the enhanced gamma radiation results from interactions of cosmic rays with galactic matter, as the energy spectrum suggests, it seems reasonable to associate the enhancement with large scale galactic features, such as spiral arm segments in that direction, or with the region surrounding the Vela supernova remnant with which PSR 0833-45 is associated. If the excess is attributed to cosmic rays released from the supernova interacting with the interstellar matter in that region, than on the order of 3 x 10 to the 50th power ergs would have been released by that supernova in the form of cosmic rays.

  17. Secondary production of neutral pi-mesons and the diffuse galactic gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermer, C. D.

    1986-01-01

    Isobaric and scaling model predictions of the secondary spectra of neutral pi-mesons produced in proton-proton collisions, at energies between threshold and a few GeV, are compared on the basis of accelerator data and found to show the isobaric model to be superior. This model is accordingly used, in conjuction with a scaling model representation at high energies, in a recalculation of the pi exp (0) gamma-radiation's contribution to the diffuse galactic gamma background; the cosmic ray-induced production of photons (whose energy exceeds 100 MeV) by such radiation occurs at a rate of 1.53 x 10 to the -25 photons/(s-H atom). These results are compared with previous calculations of this process as well as with COS-B observations of the diffuse galactic gamma-radiation.

  18. Extended use of alanine irradiated in experimental reactor for combined gamma- and neutron-dose assessment by ESR spectroscopy and thermal neutron fluence assessment by measurement of (14)C by LSC.

    PubMed

    Bartoníček, B; Kučera, J; Světlík, I; Viererbl, L; Lahodová, Z; Tomášková, L; Cabalka, M

    2014-11-01

    Gamma- and neutron doses in an experimental reactor were measured using alanine/electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry. The absorbed dose in alanine was decomposed into contributions caused by gamma and neutron radiation using neutron kerma factors. To overcome a low sensitivity of the alanine/ESR response to thermal neutrons, a novel method has been proposed for the assessment of a thermal neutron flux using the (14)N(n,p) (14)C reaction on nitrogen present in alanine and subsequent measurement of (14)C by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). PMID:24581599

  19. (Gamma scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses: quasielastic scattering studies on glycerol; gamma-ray scattering from alkali halides; lattice dynamics in metals; Moessbauer neutron scattering, x-ray diffraction, and macroscopic studies of high {Tc} superconductors containing tungsten; NiAl scattering studies; and atomic interference factors and nuclear Casimir effect.

  20. Inhaled /sup 147/Pm and/or total-body gamma radiation: Early mortality and morbidity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Filipy, R.E.; Lauhala, K.E.; McGee, D.R.; Cannon, W.C.; Buschbom, R.L.; Decker, J.R.; Kuffel, E.G.; Park, J.F.; Ragan, H.A.; Yaniv, S.S.; Scott, B.R.

    1989-05-01

    Rats were given doses of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation and/or lung burdens of /sup 147/Pm (in fused aluminosilicate particles) within lethal ranges in an experiment to determine and compare morbidity and mortality responses for the radiation insults within 1 year after exposure. Radiation-induced morbidity was assessed by measuring changes in body weights, hematologic parameters, and pulmonary-function parameters. Acute mortality and morbidity from inhaled promethium were caused primarily by radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis that occurred more than 53 days after exposure. Acute mortality and morbidity from total-body gamma irradiation occurred within 30 days of exposure and resulted from the bone-marrow radiation syndrome. Gamma radiation caused transient morbidity, reflected by immediately depressed blood cell levels and by reduced body weight gain in animals that survived the acute gamma radiation syndrome. Inhaled promethium caused a loss of body weight and diminished pulmonary function, but its only effect on blood cell levels was lymphocytopenia. Combined gamma irradiation and promethium lung burdens were synergistic, in that animals receiving both radiation insults had higher morbidity and mortality rates than would be predicted based on the effect of either kind of radiation alone. Promethium lung burdens enhanced the effect of gamma radiation in rats within the first 30 days of exposure, and gamma radiation enhanced the later effect of promethium lung burdens. 70 refs., 68 figs., 21 tabs.

  1. Inter-laboratory comparisons of short-lived gamma-emitting radionuclides in nuclear reactor water.

    PubMed

    Klemola, S K

    2008-01-01

    Inter-laboratory comparisons of gamma-emitting nuclides in nuclear power plant coolant water have been carried out in Finland since 1994. The reactor water samples are taken and prepared by one of the two nuclear power plants and delivered to the participants. Since all the participants get their sample within just a few hours it has been possible to analyse and compare results of nuclides with half-lives shorter than 1h. The total number of short-lived nuclides is 26. All the main nuclides are regularly identified and the activities have been obtained with reasonable accuracy throughout the years. The overall deviation of the results has decreased in 13 years. The effects of true coincidence summing and discrepancies in nuclear data have been identified as potential sources of remaining discrepancies. All the participants have found this type of comparison very useful. PMID:18378157

  2. Effective gamma-ray doses due to natural radiation from soils of southeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, M. A. G.; Medina, N. H.; Moreira, R. H.; Bellini, B. S.; Aguiar, V. A. P.

    2010-08-01

    We have used gamma-ray spectrometry to study the distribution of natural radiation from soils of southeastern Brazil: Billings reservoir, Sa~o Bernardo do Campo Parks, Diadema Parks, Interlagos region, Sa~o Paulo, and soil from Sa~o Paulo and Rio de Janeiro beaches. In most of the regions studied we have found that the dose due the external exposure to gamma-rays, proceeding from natural terrestrial elements, are between the values 0.3 and 0.6 mSv/year, established by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation.

  3. Inactivation of aflatoxin B1 by using the synergistic effect of hydrogen peroxide and gamma radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, U D; Govindarajan, P; Dave, P J

    1989-01-01

    Inactivation of aflatoxin B1 was studied by using gamma radiation and hydrogen peroxide. A 100-krad dose of gamma radiation was sufficient to inactivate 50 micrograms of aflatoxin B1 in the presence of 5% hydrogen peroxide, and 400 krad was required for total degradation of 100 micrograms of aflatoxin in the same system. Degradation of aflatoxin B1 was confirmed by high-pressure liquid chromatographic and thin-layer chromatographic analysis. Ames microsomal mutagenicity test showed loss of aflatoxin activity. This method of detoxification also reduces the toxin levels effectively in artificially contaminated groundnuts. Images PMID:2497710

  4. Effective gamma-ray doses due to natural radiation from soils of southeastern Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Silveira, M. A. G.; Moreira, R. H.; Bellini, B. S.; Medina, N. H.; Aguiar, V. A. P.

    2010-08-04

    We have used gamma-ray spectrometry to study the distribution of natural radiation from soils of southeastern Brazil: Billings reservoir, Sao Bernardo do Campo Parks, Diadema Parks, Interlagos region, Sao Paulo, and soil from Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro beaches. In most of the regions studied we have found that the dose due the external exposure to gamma-rays, proceeding from natural terrestrial elements, are between the values 0.3 and 0.6 mSv/year, established by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation.

  5. Gadolinium-doped water cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma-ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Dazeley, Steven A; Svoboda, Robert C; Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel

    2013-02-12

    A water Cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system using water doped with a Gadolinium (Gd)-based compound as the Cerenkov radiator. An optically opaque enclosure is provided surrounding a detection chamber filled with the Cerenkov radiator, and photomultipliers are optically connected to the detect Cerenkov radiation generated by the Cerenkov radiator from incident high energy gamma rays or gamma rays induced by neutron capture on the Gd of incident neutrons from a fission source. The PMT signals are then used to determine time correlations indicative of neutron multiplicity events characteristic of a fission source.

  6. Gamma evaluation combined with isocenter optimal matching in intensity modulated radiation therapy quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Jino; Choi, Jin Hwa; Park, Suk Won; Park, Kwangwoo; Park, Sungho

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) dose comparisons are widely performed by using a gamma evaluation with patient-specific intensity modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA) or dose delivery quality assurance (DQA). In this way, a pass/fail determination is made for a particular treatment plan. When gamma evaluation results are close to the failure criterion, the pass/fail decision may change applying a small shift to the center of the 2D dose distribution. In this study, we quantitatively evaluated the meaning of such a small relative shift in a 2D dose distribution comparison. In addition, we propose the use of a small shift for a pass/fail criterion in gamma analysis, where the concept of isocenter optimal matching (IOM) is applied to IMRT QA of 20 patients. Gamma evaluations were performed to compare two dose distributions, one with and the other without IOM. In-house software was developed in C++ in order to find IOM values including both translational and rotational shifts. Upon gamma evaluation failure, further investigation was initiated using IOM. In this way, three groups were categorized: group 1 for `pass' on gamma evaluation, group 21 for `fail' on the gamma evaluation and `pass' on the gamma the evaluation with IOM, and group 22 for `fail' on the both gamma evaluations and the IOM calculation. IOM results revealed that some failures could be considered as a `pass'. In group 21, 88.98% (fail) of the averaged gamma pass rate changed to 90.45% (pass) when IOM was applied. On average, a ratio of γ ≥ 1 was reduced by 11.06% in 20 patients. We propose that gamma evaluations that do not pass with a rate of 85% to 90% may be augmented with IOM to reveal a potential pass result.

  7. Microwave and gamma radiation observations of soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Njoku, E. G.; Peck, E.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1979-01-01

    The unique dielectric properties of water at microwave wavelengths afford the possibility for remotely sensing the moisture content in the surface layer of the soil. The surface emissivity and reflectivity for the soils at these wavelengths are strong functions of its moisture content. The changes in emissivity can be observed by passive microwave techniques (radiometry) and the change in reflectivity can be observed by active microwave techniques (radar). The difference in the natural terrestrial gamma ray flux measured for wet and dry soil may be used to determine soil moisture. The presence of water moisture in the soil causes an effective increase in soil density, resulting in an increased attenuation of the gamma flux for wet soil and a corresponding lower flux above the ground surface.

  8. Radiation detection system for portable gamma-ray spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Howard, Douglas E.; Wong, James L.; Jessup, James L.; Bianchini, Greg M.; Miller, Wayne O.

    2006-06-20

    A portable gamma ray detection apparatus having a gamma ray detector encapsulated by a compact isolation structure having at least two volumetrically-nested enclosures where at least one is a thermal shield. The enclosures are suspension-mounted to each other to successively encapsulate the detector without structural penetrations through the thermal shields. A low power cooler is also provided capable of cooling the detector to cryogenic temperatures without consuming cryogens, due to the heat load reduction by the isolation structure and the reduction in the power requirements of the cooler. The apparatus also includes a lightweight portable power source for supplying power to the apparatus, including to the cooler and the processing means, and reducing the weight of the apparatus to enable handheld operation or toting on a user's person.

  9. Gamma radiation and photospheric white-light flare continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Dwivedi, B. N.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that recent gamma-ray observations of solar flares have provided a better means for estimating the heating of the solar atmosphere by energetic protons. This type of heating has been suggested as the explanation of the continuum emission of the white-light flare. The effects on the photosphere of high-energy particles capable of producing the intense gamma-ray emission observed in the flare of July 11, 1978, are analyzed. A simple energy-balance argument is used, and hydrogen ionization is taken into account. It is found that energy deposition increases with height for the inferred proton spectra and is not strongly dependent upon the assumed angle of incidence. At the top of the photosphere, the computed energy inputs fall in the range 10-100 ergs/cu cm-s.

  10. Measurement of gamma radiation levels in soil samples from Thanjavur using gamma-ray spectrometry and estimation of population exposure.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, B; Dhavamani, V; Ramkumar, S; Philominathan, P

    2010-01-01

    This study assesses the level of terrestrial gamma radiation and associated dose rates from the naturally occurring radionuclides (232)Th, (238)U and (40)K in 10 soil samples collected from Thanjavur (Tamil Nadu, India) using gamma-ray spectrometry. The activity profile of radionuclides has clearly showed the existence of low level activity in Thanjavur. The geometric mean activity concentrations of (232)Th, (238)U and (40)K is 42.9+/-9.4 Bq.kg(-1), 14.7+/-1.7 Bq.kg(-1) and 149.5+/-3.1 Bq.kg(-1) respectively are derived from all the soil samples studied. The activity concentration of (232)Th, (238)U and (40)K in soil is due to the presence of metamorphic rocks like shale, hornblende-biotite gneiss and quartzofeldspathic gneiss in these areas. Gamma absorbed dose rates in air outdoors were calculated to be in the range between 32 nGy.h(-1) and 59.1 nGy.h(-1) with an arithmetic mean of 43.3 +/-9 nGy.h(-1). This value is lesser than the population weighted world-averaged of 60 nGy.h(-1). Inhabitants of Thanjavur are subjected to external gamma radiation exposure (effective dose) ranging between 39.2 and 72.6 muSv.y(-1) with an arithmetic mean of 53.1+/-11 muSv.y(-1). The values of the external hazard index determined from the soil radioactivity of the study area are less than the recommended safe levels. PMID:20177570

  11. A biotechnological project with a gamma radiation source of 100,000 Ci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, J. H.; Smolko, E. E.

    A project for the production of radiovaccines and other bio-medical products is presented which includes a radiation facility provided with a gamma ray source equivalent to 100,000 Ci of Co-60. The whole process incorporates novel basic features in virus production and inactivation steps. The former is carried out in animals previously subjected to immunodepression through electromagnetic radiation. The later is obtained at low temperatures by using either electromagnetic or particle radiations. A vaccine manufacture process is shown to illustrate the utilization of ionizing radiations to obtain a foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccine with good antigenic quality and low cost.

  12. Aberrant megakaryocytopoiesis preceding radiation-induced leukemia in the dog. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolle, D.V.; Seed, T.M.; Cullen, S.M.; Poole, C.M.; Fritz, T.E.

    1982-01-01

    Six of nine decedent beagles exposed continuously to 2.5 R*/22 hour day of whole-body 60Co gamma-radiation died with myeloproliferative diseases: three cases of myelogenous leukemia and one each of monocytic leukemia, erythroleukemia, and erythremic myelosis. The three dogs that died with myelogenous leukemia had micromegakaryocytes and megakaryoblasts in the peripheral blood during the preleukemic phase when myeloblasts were not observed in the peripheral blood or in increased numbers in the bone marrow. In this study we have examined the megakaryocytes during the preleukemic period by a combination of light, transmission, and scanning electron microscopy. Morphologic abnormalities seen by light microscopy included mononucleated and binucleated forms, many with cytoplasmic blebs. The small mononuclear forms in the bone marrow tended to form clusters. Ultrastructural features included a paucity of both specific alpha granules and dense granules. The micromegakaryocytes showed dysgenesis of the demarcation membrane system. This membrane system appeared disorganized with a few dilated round, oval, or rarely, elongated vesicles and showed no evidence of platelet formation. The cells also had a paucity of endoplasmic reticulum, few mitochrondria, and sparse glycogen accumulations. The scarcity of cytoplasmic organelles gave a pale immature appearance to the cytoplasm. By scanning electron microscopy, the sponge-like surface of large mature megakaryocytes from unirradiated marrow contrasted with the characteristically smooth, topographically featureless surfaces of the micromegakaryocytes from preleukemic dogs.

  13. Aberrant megakaryocytopoiesis preceding radiation-induced leukemia in the dog. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolle, D.V.; Seed, T.M.; Cullen, S.M.; Poole, C.M.; Fritz, T.E.

    1982-01-01

    Six of nine decedent beagles exposed continuously to 2.5 R/22 hour day of whole-body /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-radiation died with myeloproliferative diseases: three cases of myelogenous leukemia and one each of monocytic leukemia, erythroleukemia, and erythremic myelosis. The three dogs that died with myelogenous leukemia had micromegakaryocytes and megakaryoblasts in the peripheral blood during the preleukemic phase when myeloblasts were not observed in the peripheral blood or in increased numbers in the bone marrow. In this study we have examined the megakaryocytes during the preleukemic period by a combination of light, transmission, and scanning electron microscopy. Morphologic abnormalities seen by light microscopy included mononucleated and binucleated forms, many with cytoplasmic blebs. The small mononuclear forms in the bone marrow tended to form clusters. Ultrastructural features included a paucity of both specific ..cap alpha.. granules and dense granules. The micromegakaryocytes showed dysgenesis of the demarcation membrane system. This membrane system appeared disorganized with a few dilated round, oval, or rarely, elongated vesicles and showed no evidence of platelet formation. The cells also had a paucity of endoplasmic reticulum, few mitochrondria, and sparse glycogen accumulations. The scarcity of cytoplasmic organelles gave a pale immature appearance to the cytoplasm. By scanning electron microscopy, the sponge-like surface of large mature megakaryocytes from unirradiated marrow contrasted with the characteristically smooth, topographically featureless surfaces of the micromegakaryocytes from preleukemic dogs.

  14. Immunotherapy of acute radiation syndromes with antiradiation gamma G globulin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Vecheslav; Casey, Rachael; Jones, Jeffrey; Kedar, Prasad

    Introduction: If an immunotherapy treatment approach to treatment of acute radiation syndromes (ARS) were to be developed; consideration could be given to neutralization of radiation toxins (Specific Radiation Determinants- SRD) by specific antiradiation antibodies. To accomplish this objective, irradiated animals were injected with a preparation of antiradiation immunoglobulin G (IgG) obtained from hyperimmune donors. Radiation-indeced toxins that we call Specific Radiation Determinants (SRD) possess toxic (neurotoxic, haemotoxic and enterotoxic) characteristics as well as specific antigenic properties that combined with the direct physiochemical direct radiation damage, induce the development of many of the pathological processes associated with ARS. We tested several specific hyperimmune IgG preparations against these radiation toxins and observed that their toxic properties were neutralized by specific antiradiation IgGs. Material and Methods: Rabbits were inoculated with SRD radiation toxins to induce hyperimmune serum. The hyperimmune serum was pooled from several animals, purified, and concentrated. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays of the hyperimmune serum revealed high titers of IgG with specific binding to radiation toxins. The antiradiation IgG preparation was injected into laboratory animals one hour before and three hours after irradiation, and was evaluated for its ability to protect inoculated animals against the development of acute radiation syndromes. Results: Animals that were inoculated with specific antiradiation antibodies before receiving lethal irradiation at LD 100/30 exhibited 60-75% survival rate at 30 days, whereas all control animals expired by 30 days following exposure. These inoculated animals also exhibited markedly reduced clinical symptoms of ARS, even those that did not survive irradiation. Discussion: The results of our experiments demonstrate that rabbit hyperimmune serum directed against SRD toxins afford significant, albeit

  15. Attenuation of VHE Gamma Rays by the Milky Way Interstellar Radiation Field

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Porter, Troy A.; Strong, Andrew W.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

    2006-04-19

    The attenuation of very high energy gamma rays by pair production on the Galactic interstellar radiation field has long been thought of as negligible. However, a new calculation of the interstellar radiation field consistent with multi-wavelength observations by DIRBE and FIRAS indicates that the energy density of the Galactic interstellar radiation field is higher, particularly in the Galactic center, than previously thought. We have made a calculation of the attenuation of very high energy gamma rays in the Galaxy using this new interstellar radiation field which takes into account its nonuniform spatial and angular distributions. We find that the maximum attenuation occurs around 100 TeV at the level of about 25% for sources located at the Galactic center, and is important for both Galactic and extragalactic sources.

  16. Stability of a salicylate-based poly(anhydride-ester) to electron beam and gamma radiation

    PubMed Central

    Rosario-Meléndez, Roselin; Lavelle, Linda; Bodnar, Stanko; Halperin, Frederick; Harper, Ike; Griffin, Jeremy; Uhrich, Kathryn E.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of electron beam and gamma radiation on the physicochemical properties of a salicylate-based poly(anhydride-ester) was studied by exposing polymers to 0 (control), 25 and 50 kGy. After radiation exposure, salicylic acid release in vitro was monitored to assess any changes in drug release profiles. Molecular weight, glass transition temperature and decomposition temperature were evaluated for polymer chain scission and/or crosslinking as well as changes in thermal properties. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopies were also used to determine polymer degradation and/or chain scission. In vitro cell studies were performed to identify cytocompatibility following radiation exposure. These studies demonstrate that the physicochemical properties of the polymer are not substantially affected by exposure to electron beam and gamma radiation. PMID:21909173

  17. Papain incorporated chitin dressings for wound debridement sterilized by gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Durgeshwer; Singh, Rita

    2012-11-01

    Wound debridement is essential for the removal of necrotic or nonviable tissue from the wound surface to create an environment conducive to healing. Nonsurgical enzymatic debridement is an attractive method due to its effectiveness and ease of use. Papain is a proteolytic enzyme derived from the fruit of Carica papaya and is capable of breaking down a variety of necrotic tissue substrates. The present study was focused on the use of gamma radiation for sterilization of papain dressing with wound debriding activity. Membranes with papain were prepared using 0.5% chitin in lithium chloride/dimethylacetamide solvent and sterilized by gamma radiation. Fluid absorption capacity of chitin-papain membranes without glycerol was 14.30±6.57% in 6 h. Incorporation of glycerol resulted in significant (p<0.001) increase in the absorption capacity. Moisture vapour transmission rate of the membranes was 4285.77±455.61 g/m2/24 h at 24 h. Gamma irradiation at 25 kGy was found suitable for sterilization of the dressings. Infrared (IR) spectral scanning has shown that papain was stable on gamma irradiation at 25-35 kGy. The irradiated chitin-papain membranes were impermeable to different bacterial strains and also exhibited strong bactericidal action against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The fluid handling characteristics and the antimicrobial properties of chitin-papain membranes sterilized by gamma radiation were found suitable for use as wound dressing with debriding activity.

  18. Influence of gamma-radiation on the nutritional and functional qualities of lotus seed flour.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Rajeev; Sridhar, Kandikere Ramaiah; Karim, Alias A; Young, Chiu C; Arun, Ananthapadmanabha B

    2009-10-28

    In the present study, we investigated the physicochemical and functional properties of lotus seed flour exposed to low and high doses of gamma-radiation (0-30 kGy; the dose recommended for quarantine and hygienic purposes). The results indicated raw seed flour to be rich in nutrients with minimal quantities of antinutritional factors. Irradiation resulted in a dose-dependent increase in some of the proximal constituents. The raw and gamma-irradiated seeds meet the Food and Agricultural Organization-World Health Organization recommended pattern of essential amino acids. Some of the antinutritional factors (phytic acid, total phenolics, and tannins) were lowered with gamma-irradiation, while the seed flours were devoid of lectins, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, and polonium-210. The functional properties of the seed flour were significantly improved with gamma-radiation. gamma-radiation selectively preserved or improved the desired nutritional and functional traits of lotus seeds, thus ensuring a safe production of appropriate nutraceutically valued products. PMID:19778060

  19. Radiation studies of optical interferometric modulators with fast neutrons and high energy gamma-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, T.; Radeka, V. ); Bulmer, C.H.; Burns, W.K. )

    1991-11-01

    The possibility of using Ti : LiNbO{sub 3} and single mode fibers for nuclear particle detection and transmission in large-scale machines, such as Superconducting Super Collider, calls for a detailed radiation damage study. In this report, we present radiation studies on Ti : LiNbO{sub 3} Mach-Zehnder interferometric optical modulators with fast neutrons and high energy Gamma-rays.

  20. Solid state sensor for locating and imaging sources of gamma and x-radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, S.; Brucker, G.J.; Bechtel, E.

    1998-06-01

    This paper describes the design and characterization of a directional Solid State Detector (SSD) that generates images of radiation point sources and scatter patterns from irradiated targets, thus accurately identifying their locations. Previous papers demonstrated that other types of directional radiation sensors, such as Ionization Chambers, Geiger-Mueller and Scintillation Counters, can be designed to detect and locate arrays of gamma ray and x-ray point sources and broad scatter patterns.

  1. Reevaluation of an individual's radiation exposure at NTS in 1963-64. [FRAN reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.S.

    1983-02-25

    The FRAN prompt burst reactor began operation at NTS on November 1, 1962 and continued in use until April 1965. From January 2, 1963 to August 12, 1964, an individual periodically performed maintenance and troubleshooting functions on various components of the FRAN reactor system. In June, 1980, the individual requested a review of the radiation dose that he received from his involvement with the FRAN reactor. An evaluation of the individual's radiation dose associated with the FRAN reactor operation was performed. This report details the reevaluation of the individual's estimated radiation dose from the FRAN reactor assembly, as derived from computer calculations, GODIVA-IV measurements, personnel dosimetry results, and a reconstruction of work scenarios.

  2. Orbital Observatory GLAST - New Step in the Study of Cosmic Gamma Radiation: Mission Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moiseev, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation is a overview of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), now named Fermi Space Telescope. The new telescope is scheduled for launch in the middle of 2008. It contains the high energy gamma-ray telescope LAT (Large Area Telescope) and the GMB (GLAST Burst Monitor). The science objectives of GLAST cover almost every area of high energy astrophysics, including Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), including Extragalactic background light (EBL), Gamma-ray bursts (GRB), Pulsars, Diffuse gamma-radiation, EGRET unidentified sources, Solar physics, Origin of Cosmic Rays and, Dark Matter and New Physics. Also included in this overview is a discussion of the preparation to the analysis of the science data.

  3. Thermal analysis evaluation of mechanical properties changes promoted by gamma radiation on surgical polymeric textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. M.; Casimiro, M. H.; Oliveira, C.; Cabeço Silva, M. E.; Marques Abreu, M. J.; Coelho, A.

    2002-05-01

    The large number of surgical operations with post-operative infection problems and the appearing of new infectious diseases, contribute to the development of new materials in order to answer the needs of health care services. This development must take into account the modifications promoted by sterilisation methods in materials, namely by gamma radiation. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TGA) techniques show that a nonwoven and a laminate textiles maintain a good molecular cohesion, do not showing high levels of degradation, for gamma radiation dose values lower than 100 kGy in nonwoven and 200 kGy in laminate materials. The tensile strength and the elongation decrease slowly for the nonwoven textile and decrease faster for the laminate textile for 25 and 80 kGy absorbed dose. This paper shows that the DSC and TGA techniques can be helpful for the prevision of mechanical changes occurred in the materials as a consequence of the gamma irradiation.

  4. Pulse-shape analysis for gamma background rejection in thermal neutron radiation using CVD diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavrigin, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Griesmayer, E.; Jericha, E.; Pappalardo, A.; Weiss, C.

    2015-09-01

    A novel technique for the rejection of gamma background from charged-particle spectra was demonstrated using a CVD diamond detector with a 6Li neutron converter installed at a thermal neutron beamline of the TRIGA research reactor at the Atominstitut (Vienna University of Technology). Spectra of the alpha particles and tritons of 6Li(n,T)4He thermal neutron capture reaction were separated from the gamma background by a new algorithm based on pulse-shape analysis. The thermal neutron capture in 6Li is already used for neutron flux monitoring, but the ability to remove gamma background allows using a CVD diamond detector for thermal neutron counting. The pulse-shape analysis can equally be applied to all cases where the charged products of an interaction are absorbed in the diamond and to other background particles that fully traverse the detector.

  5. New Spherical Gamma-Ray and Neutron Emitting Sources for Testing of Radiation Detection Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, L.; Pibida, L.

    2009-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed new gamma-ray and neutron emitting sources for testing radiation detection systems. These radioactive sources were developed for testing of detection systems in maritime applications. This required special source characteristics.

  6. Comparison of antibodies raised against heat-and gamma radiation-killed bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For antibody generation, pathogenic bacteria are often heat-treated prior to inoculation into host animals in order to prevent infection and subsequently, premature death of the host. Inoculation of host rabbits with gamma radiation-killed pathogenic bacteria was employed with the hopes of generati...

  7. Use of gamma radiation as a form of preservation of sweet potatoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The effects of (GAMMA) radiation on the sweet potato weevil, organoleptic properties of sweet potatoes, protein content of same, and sweet potato quality (vitamins, color, texture, and carbohydrates) are discussed. Evaluation of preliminary results indicate that changes should be made in irradiation procedures/conditions and analyses.

  8. Use of gamma radiation as a form of preservation of sweet potatoes. Quarterly progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This progress report covers: harvest and conditioning following harvest; effects of ..gamma.. radiation on the sweet potato weevil, organoleptic properties of sweet potatoes, protein content of same, and sweet potato quality (vitamins, color, texture, and carbohydrates). Evaluation of preliminary results indicate that changes should be made in irradiation procedures/conditions and analyses. (DLC)

  9. Measuring the activity of a 51Cr neutrino source based on the gamma-radiation spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, V. V.; Gavrin, V. N.; Ibragimova, T. V.; Kalikhov, A. V.; Malyshkin, Yu. M.; Shikhin, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    A technique for the measurement of activities of intense β sources by measuring the continuous gamma-radiation (internal bremsstrahlung) spectra is developed. A method for reconstructing the spectrum recorded by a germanium semiconductor detector is described. A method for the absolute measurement of the internal bremsstrahlung spectrum of 51Cr is presented.

  10. MICRONUCLEI IN BINUCLEATED LYMPHOCYTES OF MICE FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO GAMMA RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were designed to investigate the induction of micronuclei (MN) in mouse peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) after in vitro or in vivo exposure to 60Co gamma radiation. or the in vitro experiments, 4 ml of blood from male C57BL/6J mice were either irradiated in 6 ml Fa...

  11. Gamma radiation inactivation of non-0157:H7 shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli in foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-O157:H7 serovars of shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli are emerging foodborne pathogens that have been associated with illness outbreaks and food product recalls on a global basis. Ionizing (gamma) radiation is a nonthermal food safety intervention technology that has been approved for use i...

  12. Short-lived variations in the background gamma-radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Burnett, J L; Croudace, I W; Warwick, P E

    2010-09-01

    Sudden increases in the background gamma-radiation dose may occur due to the removal of (222)Rn and (220)Rn progeny from the atmosphere by wet deposition mechanisms. This contribution has been measured using a Geiger-Muller detector at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (Aldermaston, UK) during July 2005-April 2006. The results are approximated by a log-normal distribution and there were nine separate occurrences of the gamma-radiation dose exceeding 125% of the geometric mean value. The increases were associated with periods of heavy rainfall, although no correlation was evident between the dose rate and the amount of rainfall, as increased rainfall dilutes the activity further rather than increasing its atmospheric removal. The events were preceded by periods of fine weather and atmospheric stability that allow for the build-up of (222)Rn and (220)Rn progeny. Similar increases in gamma-radiation dose have been measured at a nearby monitoring station situated approximately 11 miles from Aldermaston. Increases in gamma-radiation dose during heavy rainfall have also been observed throughout the UK, that followed the trajectory of an air mass. All events decreased to typical values within 1-2 h as the water permeated into the ground below and the radioactivity decayed away. PMID:20826890

  13. Inactivation of foodborne pathogens on crawfish tail meat using cryogenic freezing and gamma radiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne illness outbreaks occasionally occur as a result of microbiologically contaminated crustaceans, including crawfish. Cryogenic freezing and gamma radiation are two technologies which can be used to improve the microbiological safety and shelf-life of foods. In the U.S. the majority of non-c...

  14. Radiation measurement above the lunar surface by Kaguya gamma-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasebe, Nobuyuki; Nagaoka, Hiroshi; Kusano, Hiroki; Hareyama, Matoko; Ideguchi, Yusuke; Shimizu, Sota; Shibamura, Eido

    The lunar surface is filled with various ionizing radiations such as high energy galactic particles, albedo particles and secondary radiations of neutrons, gamma rays and other elementary particles. A high-resolution Kaguya Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (KGRS) was carried on the Japan’s lunar explorer SELENE (Kaguya), the largest lunar orbiter since the Apollo missions. The KGRS instrument employed, for the first time in lunar exploration, a high-purity Ge crystal to increase the identification capability of elemental gamma-ray lines. The Ge detector is surrounded by BGO and plastic counters as for anticoincidence shields. The KGRS measured gamma rays in the energy range from 200 keV to 13 MeV with high precision to determine the chemical composition of the lunar surface. It provided data on the abundance of major elements over the entire lunar surface. In addition to the gamma-ray observation by the KGRS, it successfully measured the global distribution of fast neutrons. In the energy spectra of gamma-rays observed by the KGRS, several saw-tooth- peaks of Ge are included, which are formed by the collision interaction of lunar fast neutrons with Ge atoms in the Ge crystal. With these saw-tooth-peaks analysis, global distribution of neutrons emitted from the lunara surface was successfully created, which was compared with the previous results obtained by Lunar Prospector neutron maps. Another anticoincidence counter, the plastic counter with 5 mm thickness, was used to veto radiation events mostly generated by charged particles. A single photomultiplier serves to count scintillation light from the plastic scintillation counter. The global map of counting rates observed by the plastic counter was also created, implying that the radiation counting rate implies the geological distribution, in spite that the plastic counter mostly measures high energy charged particles and energetic neutrons. These results are presented and discussed.

  15. Naturally induced secondary radiation in interplanetary space: Preliminary analyses for gamma radiation and radioisotope production from thermal neutron activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza-Rosado, Heriberto

    1991-09-01

    Thermal neutron activation analyses were carried out for various space systems components to determine gamma radiation dose rates and food radiation contamination levels. The space systems components selected were those for which previous radiation studies existed. These include manned space vehicle radiation shielding, liquid hydrogen propellant tanks for a Mars mission, and a food supply used as space vehicle radiation shielding. The computational method used is based on the fast neutron distribution generated by the BRYNTRN and HZETRN transport codes for Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) at solar minimum conditions and intense solar flares in space systems components. The gamma dose rates for soft tissue are calculated for water and aluminum space vehicle slab shields considering volumetric source self-attenuation and exponential buildup factors. In the case of the lunar habitat with regolith shielding, a completely exposed spherical habitat was assumed for mathematical convenience and conservative calculations. Activation analysis of the food supply used as radiation shielding is presented for four selected nutrients: potassium, calcium, sodium, and phosphorus. Radioactive isotopes that could represent a health hazard if ingested are identified and their concentrations are identified. For nutrients soluble in water, it was found that all induced radioactivity was below the accepted maximum permissible concentrations.

  16. Naturally induced secondary radiation in interplanetary space: Preliminary analyses for gamma radiation and radioisotope production from thermal neutron activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaza-Rosado, Heriberto

    1991-01-01

    Thermal neutron activation analyses were carried out for various space systems components to determine gamma radiation dose rates and food radiation contamination levels. The space systems components selected were those for which previous radiation studies existed. These include manned space vehicle radiation shielding, liquid hydrogen propellant tanks for a Mars mission, and a food supply used as space vehicle radiation shielding. The computational method used is based on the fast neutron distribution generated by the BRYNTRN and HZETRN transport codes for Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) at solar minimum conditions and intense solar flares in space systems components. The gamma dose rates for soft tissue are calculated for water and aluminum space vehicle slab shields considering volumetric source self-attenuation and exponential buildup factors. In the case of the lunar habitat with regolith shielding, a completely exposed spherical habitat was assumed for mathematical convenience and conservative calculations. Activation analysis of the food supply used as radiation shielding is presented for four selected nutrients: potassium, calcium, sodium, and phosphorus. Radioactive isotopes that could represent a health hazard if ingested are identified and their concentrations are identified. For nutrients soluble in water, it was found that all induced radioactivity was below the accepted maximum permissible concentrations.

  17. Radon flux maps for the Netherlands and Europe using terrestrial gamma radiation derived from soil radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manohar, S. N.; Meijer, H. A. J.; Herber, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive noble gas, radon (222Rn) is a valuable tracer to study atmospheric processes and to validate global chemical transport models. However, the use of radon as a proxy in atmospheric and climate research is limited by the uncertainties in the magnitude and distribution of the radon flux density over the Earth's surface. Terrestrial gamma radiation is a useful proxy for generating radon flux maps. A previously reported radon flux map of Europe used terrestrial gamma radiation extracted from automated radiation monitoring networks. This approach failed to account for the influence of local artificial radiation sources around the detector, leading to under/over estimation of the reported radon flux values at different locations. We present an alternative approach based on soil radionuclides which enables us to generate accurate radon flux maps with good confidence. Firstly, we present a detailed comparison between the terrestrial gamma radiation obtained from the National Radiation Monitoring network of the Netherlands and the terrestrial gamma radiation calculated from soil radionuclides. Extending further, we generated radon flux maps of the Netherlands and Europe using our proposed approach. The modelled flux values for the Netherlands agree reasonably well with the two observed direct radon flux measurements (within 2σ level). On the European scale, we find that the observed radon flux values are higher than our modelled values and we introduce a correction factor to account for this difference. Our approach discussed in this paper enables us to develop reliable and accurate radon flux maps in countries with little or no information on radon flux values.

  18. Effect of gamma radiation on micromechanical hardness of lead-free solder joint

    SciTech Connect

    Paulus, Wilfred; Rahman, Irman Abdul; Jalar, Azman; Kamil, Insan; Bakar, Maria Abu; Yusoff, Wan Yusmawati Wan

    2015-09-25

    Lead-free solders are important material in nano and microelectronic surface mounting technology for various applications in bio medicine, environmental monitoring, spacecraft and satellite instrumentation. Nevertheless solder joint in radiation environment needs higher reliability and resistance to any damage caused by ionizing radiations. In this study a lead-free 99.0Sn0.3Ag0.7Cu wt.% (SAC) solder joint was developed and subjected to various doses of gamma radiation to investigate the effects of the ionizing radiation to micromechanical hardness of the solder. Averaged hardness of the SAC joint was obtained from nanoindentation test. The results show a relationship between hardness values of indentations and the increment of radiation dose. Highest mean hardness, 0.2290 ± 0.0270 GPa was calculated on solder joint which was exposed to 5 Gray dose of gamma radiation. This value indicates possible radiation hardening effect on irradiated solder. The hardness gradually decreased to 0.1933 ± 0.0210 GPa and 0.1631 ± 0.0173 GPa when exposed to doses 50 and 500 gray respectively. These values are also lower than the hardness of non irradiated sample which was calculated as 0.2084 ± 0.0.3633 GPa indicating possible radiation damage and needs further related atomic dislocation study.

  19. RADIATION DOSIMETRY OF THE PRESSURE VESSEL INTERNALS OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.; RECINIELLO,R.N.; HU,J.P.; RORER,D.C.

    2002-08-18

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, both measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose rate have been performed for the reactor pressure vessel and vessel internal structures which included the upper and lower thermal shields, the transition plate, and the control rod blades. The measurements were made using Red Perspex{trademark} polymethyl methacrylate high-level film dosimeters, a Radcal ''peanut'' ion chamber, and Eberline's high-range ion chamber. To compare with measured gamma-ray dose rate, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and geometric progressive Microshield code were used to model the gamma transport and dose buildup.

  20. Radiation Dosimetry of the Pressure Vessel Internals of the High Flux Beam Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Norman E.; Reciniello, Richard N.; Hu, Jih-Perng; Rorer, David C.

    2003-06-01

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, both measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose rate have been performed for the reactor pressure vessel and vessel internal structures which included the upper and lower thermal shields, the Transition Plate, and the Control Rod blades. The measurements were made using Red Perspex™ polymethyl methacrylate high-level film dosimeters, a Radcal "peanut" ion chamber, and Eberline's high-range ion chamber. To compare with measured gamma-ray dose rates, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and geometric progressive MicroShield code were used to model the gamma-ray transport and dose buildup.

  1. An automated system for gamma radiation field mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Robert; Tarpinian, James E.; Kenney, Edward S.

    1990-12-01

    Remote radiation survey equipment was sorely needed at Chernobyl but adequate systems did not exist. The current state of the art still consists of a survey meter mounted on a robotic carriage, which scans an area at many points on a grid. This process is both time consuming and somewhat inaccurate. The system we have developed will overcome these limitations, and would provide significant savings in man-hours and man-rem over manual survey techniques. The system we have developed consists of a collimated ionization chamber mounted in a scanning head. The measurement process is similar to that used in medical computed tomography (CT) imaging and consists of a series of collimator rotations and translations. The key to this work is the use of a collimator to provide position information with a position insensitive detector. In addition, an inverse filter image reconstruction technique has been used to reduce the distortion effects due to the scanner and scanning process in the resulting maps. This technique models the distortion as a linear, space invariant degrading function which is removed in a deconvolution process. We have constructed first- and second-generation prototype scanners, and developed software to produce three-dimensional radiation field "iso-dose" maps. The iso-dose maps will be superimposed on three-dimensional computer-aided design and drafting (CADD) drawings of the radiation area, aiding in the characterization of the source of radiation.

  2. Gamma radiation sensitivity of foodborne pathogens on meat and poultry

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, D.W.; Boyd, G.

    1994-12-31

    Several factors have been identified that may affect the responses of foodborne pathogens to ionizing radiation. Among these are the temperature and atmosphere during the process of irradiation; the medium in which the pathogen is suspended; and the genus, species, serovar, and physiological state of the organism. In addition to these factors, variations in {open_quotes}apparent{close_quotes} radiation sensitivity of bacteria may occur because of the incubation conditions and media used to estimate the number of surviving colony-forming units. Both incubation temperature and culture media frequently affect the ability of injured bacteria to recover. Because there are so many possible variables, it is often difficult to compare data on the radiation sensitivity of foodborne pathogens from different studies. The objectives of the studies reported here were to compare the radiation sensitivities of Bacillus cereus on beef, beef gravy, chicken, pork, and turkey; and of Escherichia coli 0157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, and Staphylococcus aureus on beef, pork, lamb, turkey breast, and turkey leg meats. Examples of the effects of serovar, irradiation temperature, growth phase, and atmosphere during irradiation were also examined.

  3. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousada, Cláudio M.; Soroka, Inna L.; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-04-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories.

  4. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water.

    PubMed

    Lousada, Cláudio M; Soroka, Inna L; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories. PMID:27086752

  5. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water

    PubMed Central

    Lousada, Cláudio M.; Soroka, Inna L.; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories. PMID:27086752

  6. PVNO-DVB hydrogels: synthesis and characterization. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hasirci, V.N.

    1982-01-01

    Hydrogels with various degrees of crosslinking were synthesized from 2-vinylpyridine and divinylbenzene/ethylbenzene monomers using gamma irradiation. The influence of the solvent solubility parameter, ionic strength, and temperature on swelling and gel density were studied. Adsorption of water vapor on these gels was determined, and the data were used in the calculation of free energy changes involved in the process. Finally the drug release behavior-crosslink content relation was investigated. It was found that increase in crosslinking agent content adversely influenced swelling, gel density, and water vapor adsorption. The solvent solubility parameter was found to influence swelling more than ionic strength. Contrary to what was expected, it was not possible to classify the drug release behavior as first order.

  7. Response of oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), eggs to gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, W. D.; Arthur, V.; Mastrangelo, T.

    2010-10-01

    As insects increase in radiotolerance as they develop and usually several developmental stages of the pest may be present in the fresh shipped commodity, it is important to know the radiation susceptibility of the stages of the target insect before the establishment of ionizing radiation quarantine treatments. This study was performed to determine the radiotolerance of eggs of the oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), to gamma radiation. This species is considered as one of the most serious worldwide pests for temperate fruits, especially peaches. Eggs (12 h old) were exposed to 0 (control), 25, 35, 50, 75, 100, 125 and 150 Gy of gamma radiation. Surviving larvae were allowed to feed on an artificial diet. Three days after irradiation, it was verified that larvae's cephalic capsules were significantly affected by gamma radiation, and the estimated mean LD 90 and LD 99 were 66.3 Gy and 125.8 Gy, respectively. Oriental fruit moth eggs revealed to be quite radiosensitive and very low doses as 50 Gy were sufficient to disrupt G. molesta embryogenesis. At 25 Gy, only male adults originated from the surviving larvae and, after mating with untreated fertile females, shown to be sterile.

  8. Effect of 60Co-gamma radiation on the binding properties in furs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raina, R. K.

    New Zealand white rabbit pelts were pickled by the usual procedure and were tanned with basic aluminium sulphate, basic chromium sulphate and their combinations. Tanned furs were irradiated with 60Co-gamma radiations in the dose range of 5.0-114.0 kGy. The effect of radiation on the binding properties of various added substances like mineral tannins, fats, moisture and shrinkage temperature has been assessed by their comparison with the control samples. The results of these investigations show that radiation on furs causes detannage, increases the moisture and bound fat content and decreases the shrinkage temperature of the furs.

  9. Combined Effects of Gamma Radiation and High Dietary Iron on Peripheral Leukocyte Distribution and Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Quiriarte, Heather A.; Sams, Clarence F.; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2012-01-01

    Both radiation and increased iron stores can independently increase oxidative damage, resulting in protein, lipid and DNA oxidation. Oxidative stress increases the risk of many health problems including cancer, cataracts, and heart disease. This study, a subset of a larger interdisciplinary investigation of the combined effect of iron overload on sensitivity to radiation injury, monitored immune parameters in the peripheral blood of rats subjected to gamma radiation, high dietary iron or both. Specific immune measures consisted of: (1) peripheral leukocyte distribution, (2) plasma cytokine levels and (3) cytokine production profiles following whole blood mitogenic stimulation

  10. CARBON FIBRE COMPOSITE MATERIALS PRODUCED BY GAMMA RADIATION INDUCED CURING OF EPOXY RESINS

    SciTech Connect

    Dispenza, C.; Spadaro, G.; Alessi, S.

    2008-08-28

    It is well known that ionizing radiation can initiate polymerization of suitable monomers for many applications. In this work an epoxy difunctional monomer has been used as matrix of a carbon fibre composite in order to produce materials through gamma radiation, for aerospace and advanced automotive applications. Radiation curing has been performed at different absorbed doses and, as comparison, also thermal curing of the same monomer formulations has been done. Furthermore some irradiated samples have been also subjected to a post irradiation thermal curing in order to complete the polymerization reactions. The properties of the cured materials have been studied by moisture absorption isotherms, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis and mechanical flexural tests.

  11. Gamma-irradiated onions as a biological indicator of radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Vaijapurkar, S G; Agarwal, D; Chaudhuri, S K; Senwar, K R; Bhatnagar, P K

    2001-10-01

    Post-irradiation identification and dose estimation are required to assess the radiation-induced effects on living things in any nuclear emergency. In this study, radiation-induced morphological/cytological changes i.e., number of root formation and its length, shooting length, reduction in mitotic index, micronuclei formation and chromosomal aberrations in the root tip cells of gamma-irradiated onions at lower doses (50-2000 cGy) are reported. The capabilities of this biological species to store the radiation-induced information are also studied. PMID:11762393

  12. Neutron and gamma radiation measurements and calculations up to 1. 1 kilometers from a fission source. Research report Aug-Dec 80

    SciTech Connect

    Kazi, A.H.; Heimbach, C.R.; Harrison, R.C.

    1981-01-26

    The primary objective of this study was to attempt to verify by experimental data whether state-of-the-art radiation transport codes and models, such as DOT III used by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Defence Research Establishment Ottawa (DREO) are suitable for predicting radioactive dose and spectra versus distance for fission nuclear weapons. To accomplish this, neutron and gamma spectra, tissue kerma, and dose were measured and calculated at ranges of 100 to 1100 meters from the Army Pulse Radiation Division's (APRD) reactor at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. This fast, unshielded reactor simulates a tactical nuclear burst, and was operated outdoors at 14 meters above ground. It was found that APRD measurements were quite close to those predicted by calculations for total (gamma plus neutrons) kerma. In terms of fluence and spectra, however, there were significant differences between calculations and measurements. This effort was accomplished in collaboration with scientists from the DREO, Canada. Agreement between the US and Canadian measurements was excellent. APRD uses primarily integral radiation detectors such as ion chambers while DREO used differential spectrometers. These techniques and the calibrations involved are quite different. Agreement in the results is therefore noteworthy. The present data are also compared to earlier measurements made to a range of 300 meters by scientists from the Wehrwissenschaftliche Dienststelle, Munster, Germany. Agreement with these data is also very good.

  13. Modification of silicone sealant to improve gamma radiation resistance, by addition of protective agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Pérez, Giovanni; Burillo, Guillermina

    2013-09-01

    Poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) sealant (SS) was modified with the addition of different protective compounds to conserve its physical-chemical properties during gamma irradiation. 2-Vinyl naphthalene (2-VN), bisphenol-A (BPA) and poly (vinyl carbazole) (PVK) were used to evaluate radiation protection through the crosslinking effect of radiation. The samples were irradiated with doses from 100 kGy to 500 kGy at room temperature in air, with a 60Co gamma source, and the changes in molecular weight, thermal behavior, elastic properties and infrared spectra (FTIR-ATR) absorbance analysis were determined. The molecular weight of unmodified silicone sealant increases with the absorbed dose because of crosslinking as predominant effect. However, the crosslinking effect was inhibited with the addition of protective agent due to the aromatic compounds present. Modified silicone sealant films present better radiation resistance than unmodified system.

  14. Gamma–Gamma Absorption in the Broad Line Region Radiation Fields of Gamma-Ray Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, Markus; Els, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The expected level of γγ absorption in the Broad Line Region (BLR) radiation field of γ-ray loud Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQs) is evaluated as a function of the location of the γ-ray emission region. This is done self-consistently with parameters inferred from the shape of the spectral energy distribution (SED) in a single-zone leptonic EC-BLR model scenario. We take into account all geometrical effects both in the calculation of the γγ opacity and the normalization of the BLR radiation energy density. As specific examples, we study the FSRQs 3C279 and PKS 1510-089, keeping the BLR radiation energy density at the location of the emission region fixed at the values inferred from the SED. We confirm previous findings that the optical depth due to γγ absorption in the BLR radiation field exceeds unity for both 3C279 and PKS 1510-089 for locations of the γ-ray emission region inside the inner boundary of the BLR. It decreases monotonically, with distance from the central engine and drops below unity for locations within the BLR. For locations outside the BLR, the BLR radiation energy density required for the production of GeV γ-rays rapidly increases beyond observational constraints, thus making the EC-BLR mechanism implausible. Therefore, in order to avoid significant γγ absorption by the BLR radiation field, the γ-ray emission region must therefore be located near the outer boundary of the BLR.

  15. Assessing Antibody Microarray for Space Missions: Effect of Long-term Storage, Gamma radiation and High Energy proton radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Diego-Castilla, G.; Parro, V.

    2012-09-01

    Fluorescent antibody microarray has been proposed for Molecular biomarker detector in planetary exploration [1]. A number of different environmental stresses may affect the antibody performance, such as temperatures variations, highly penetrating radiation and high energy particles. Here we have tested the effect of gamma radiation, proton radiation and longterm storage on the microarray immunoassay and fluorocromes. Although different antibodies might have different susceptibilities we conclude that there was not significant reduction in the functionality of antibodies printed on the microarray and the fluorescent tracers antibodies, even in a extreme case of receiving a radiation dose 3000-fold than a biochip would receive in a trip mission to Mars. In summary, antibodies are suitable for use in planetary exploration purposes.

  16. Evaluation of fungal burden and aflatoxin presence in packed medicinal plants treated by gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Simone; Gonçalez, Edlayne; Rossi, Maria Helena; Nogueira, Juliana Hellmeister de Campos; Reis, Tatiana Alves Dos; Corrêa, Benedito

    2010-05-01

    This study was developed to evaluate the fungal burden, toxigenic molds, and mycotoxin contamination and to verify the effects of gamma radiation in four kinds of medicinal plants stored before and after 30 days of irradiation treatment. Eighty samples of medicinal plants (Peumus boldus, Camellia sinensis, Maytenus ilicifolia, and Cassia angustifolia) purchased from drugstores, wholesale, and open-air markets in São Paulo city, Brazil, were analyzed. The samples were treated using a (60)Co gamma ray source (Gammacell) with doses of 5 and 10 kGy. Nonirradiated samples were used as controls of fungal isolates. For enumeration of fungi on medicinal plants, serial dilutions of the samples were plated in duplicate onto dichloran 18% glycerol agar. The control samples revealed a high burden of molds, including toxigenic fungi. The process of gamma radiation was effective in reducing the number of CFU per gram in all irradiated samples of medicinal plants after 30 days of storage, using a dose of 10 kGy and maintaining samples in a protective package. No aflatoxins were detected. Gamma radiation treatment can be used as an effective method for preventing fungal deterioration of medicinal plants subject to long-term storage. PMID:20501045

  17. Inactivation of Thirty Viruses by Gamma Radiation 1

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Robert; Fassolitis, Alexander C.; Larkin, Edward P.; Read, Ralston B.; Peeler, James T.

    1971-01-01

    Decimal reduction values (D value) for 30 viruses were determined. The weighted D values of the viruses suspended in Eagle's minimum essential medium ranged from 0.39 to 0.53 Mrads. It was necessary to increase the radiation dose by a factor of >3 to inactivate virus suspended in Eagle's minimum essential medium as compared to the same virus suspended in distilled water. The destruction rate curves were of a first-order reaction. PMID:4999976

  18. Effects of low-dose radiation on gene expression in Syrian hamster embryo cells: Comparison of JANUS neutrons and gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, C.M.

    1992-07-01

    Past work by or group and others has shown the modulation of specific genes following exposure of cells to ionizing radiation. Many classes of genes have been found to be modulated in response to ionizing radiation, including those encoding cytoskeletal elements, cell growth arresting proteins, cytokines, and cellular oncogenes. The functions of this specific modulation of gene expression are currently being investigated by several groups: it has been suggested that gene modulation in response to radiation plays a role in the cellular repair of DNA damage, cell survival, or cellular transformation. Several groups have examined induction of nuclear proto-oncogenes following exposure to DNA-damaging agents. In all experiments, we examined modulation of gene expression by ionizing radiations in Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) fibroblasts, which are normal diploid cells that can be neoplastically transformed by low doses of ionizing radiations. Cells plated in 100-mm Petri plates containing 10 ml of medium were irradiated with {sup 60}C {gamma}-rays or fission-spectrum neutrons (0.85 MeV) from the JANUS reactor. All irradiations were performed at 37{degrees}C on cycling cells; equitoxic doses of neutrons and {gamma}-rays were selected on the basis of survival data.

  19. Effects of low-dose radiation on gene expression in Syrian hamster embryo cells: Comparison of JANUS neutrons and gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    Past work by or group and others has shown the modulation of specific genes following exposure of cells to ionizing radiation. Many classes of genes have been found to be modulated in response to ionizing radiation, including those encoding cytoskeletal elements, cell growth arresting proteins, cytokines, and cellular oncogenes. The functions of this specific modulation of gene expression are currently being investigated by several groups: it has been suggested that gene modulation in response to radiation plays a role in the cellular repair of DNA damage, cell survival, or cellular transformation. Several groups have examined induction of nuclear proto-oncogenes following exposure to DNA-damaging agents. In all experiments, we examined modulation of gene expression by ionizing radiations in Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) fibroblasts, which are normal diploid cells that can be neoplastically transformed by low doses of ionizing radiations. Cells plated in 100-mm Petri plates containing 10 ml of medium were irradiated with {sup 60}C {gamma}-rays or fission-spectrum neutrons (0.85 MeV) from the JANUS reactor. All irradiations were performed at 37{degrees}C on cycling cells; equitoxic doses of neutrons and {gamma}-rays were selected on the basis of survival data.

  20. Radiation anomaly detection algorithms for field-acquired gamma energy spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ron; Guss, Paul; Mitchell, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    The Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing a tactical, networked radiation detection system that will be agile, reconfigurable, and capable of rapid threat assessment with high degree of fidelity and certainty. Our design is driven by the needs of users such as law enforcement personnel who must make decisions by evaluating threat signatures in urban settings. The most efficient tool available to identify the nature of the threat object is real-time gamma spectroscopic analysis, as it is fast and has a very low probability of producing false positive alarm conditions. Urban radiological searches are inherently challenged by the rapid and large spatial variation of background gamma radiation, the presence of benign radioactive materials in terms of the normally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), and shielded and/or masked threat sources. Multiple spectral anomaly detection algorithms have been developed by national laboratories and commercial vendors. For example, the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) a one-dimensional deterministic radiation transport software capable of calculating gamma ray spectra using physics-based detector response functions was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The nuisance-rejection spectral comparison ratio anomaly detection algorithm (or NSCRAD), developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, uses spectral comparison ratios to detect deviation from benign medical and NORM radiation source and can work in spite of strong presence of NORM and or medical sources. RSL has developed its own wavelet-based gamma energy spectral anomaly detection algorithm called WAVRAD. Test results and relative merits of these different algorithms will be discussed and demonstrated.

  1. Radiation Resistance of XLPE Nano-dielectrics for Advanced Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, Robert C; Polyzos, Georgios; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Aytug, Tolga; Leonard, Keith J; Sauers, Isidor

    2014-01-01

    Recently there has been renewed interest in nuclear reactor safety, particularly as commercial reactors are approaching 40 years service and lifetime extensions are considered, as well as for new reactor building projects around the world. The materials that are currently used in cabling for instrumentation, reactor control, and communications include cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), ethylene propylene rubber (EPR), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), neoprene, and chlorosulfonated polyethylene. While these materials show suitable radiation tolerance in laboratory tests, failures before their useful lifetime occur due to the combined environmental effects of radiation, temperature and moisture, or operation under abnormal conditions. In addition, the extended use of commercial reactors beyond their original service life places a greater demand on insulating materials to perform beyond their current ratings in these nuclear environments. Nanocomposite materials that are based on XLPE and other epoxy resins incorporating TiO2, MgO, SiO2, and Al2O3 nanoparticles are being fabricated using a novel in-situ method established at ORNL to demonstrate materials with increased resistance to radiation. As novel nanocomposite dielectric materials are developed, characterization of the non-irradiated and irradiated nanodielectrics will lead to a knowledge base that allow for dielectric materials to be engineered with specific nanoparticle additions for maximum benefit to wide-variety of radiation environments found in nuclear reactors. This paper presents the initial findings on the development of XLPE-based SiO2 nano-composite dielectrics in the context of electrical performance and radiation degradation.

  2. Analysis of Induced Gamma Activation by D-T Neutrons in Selected Fusion Reactor Relevant Materials with EAF-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klix, Axel; Fischer, Ulrich; Gehre, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Samples of lanthanum, erbium and titanium which are constituents of structural materials, insulating coatings and tritium breeder for blankets of fusion reactor designs have been irradiated in a fusion peak neutron field. The induced gamma activities were measured and the results were used to check calculations with the European activation system EASY-2010. Good agreement for the prediction of major contributors to the contact dose rate of the materials was found, but for minor contributors the calculation deviated up to 50%.

  3. Accumulation of Mn(II) in Deinococcus radiodurans Facilitates Gamma-Radiation Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Michael J.; Gaidamakova, E; Matrosova, V; Vasilenko, A; Zhai, M; Venkateswaran, Amudhan; Hess, M; Omelchenko, M V.; Kostandarithes, Heather M.; Makarova, S; Wackett, L. P.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Ghosal, D

    2004-11-05

    Deinococcus radiodurans is extremely resistant to ionizing radiation. How this bacterium can grow under chronic gamma-radiation (50 Gy/hour) or recover from acute doses greater than 10 kGy is unknown. We show that D. radiodurans accumulates very high intracellular manganese and low iron levels compared to radiation sensitive bacteria, and resistance exhibits a concentration-dependent response to Mn(II). Among the most radiation-resistant bacterial groups reported, Deinococcus, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus and cyanobacteria spp. accumulate Mn(II). In contrast, Shewanella oneidensis and Pseudomonas putida have high Fe but low intracellular Mn concentrations and are very sensitive. We propose that Mn(II) accumulation facilitates recovery from radiation injury.

  4. Bactericidal Effect of Various Combinations of Gamma Radiation and Chloramine on Aqueous Suspensions of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Venosa, Albert D.; Chambers, Cecil W.

    1973-01-01

    Methods of combining gamma radiation with chloramine to disinfect aqueous suspensions of Escherichia coli were investigated. Logarithmically grown cells were exposed to the bactericidal agents sequentially (i.e., radiation followed by chloramine, and chloramine followed by radiation) and simultaneously. Regardless of which combination was used, the bactericidal effect was always less than additive. During the phase of work involving the simultaneous addition of both agents, it was observed that chloramine was destroyed more rapidly by radiation than were the organisms. Since an increase in the bactericidal effectiveness of either disinfectant by prior or simultaneous treatment of the cells with the other disinfectant was not achieved in buffered distilled water, it was concluded that disinfection of wastewater effluents by combining ionizing radiation with chloramine would not be economically feasible. Images PMID:4577176

  5. THE RADIATION SAFETY INFORMATION COMPUTATIONAL CENTER: A RESOURCE FOR REACTOR DOSIMETRY SOFTWARE AND NUCLEAR DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, Bernadette Lugue

    2009-01-01

    The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) was established in 1963 to collect and disseminate computational nuclear technology in the form of radiation transport, shielding and safety software and corresponding nuclear cross sections. Approximately 1700 nuclear software and data packages are in the RSICC collection, and the majority are applicable to reactor dosimetry.

  6. The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center:. a Resource for Reactor Dosimetry Software and Nuclear Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, B. L.

    2009-08-01

    The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) was established in 1963 to collect and disseminate computational nuclear technology in the form of radiation transport, shielding and safety software and corresponding nuclear cross sections. Approximately 1700 nuclear software and data packages are in the RSICC collection, and the majority are applicable to reactor dosimetry.

  7. 75 FR 82092 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... October 21, 2010, (75 FR 65038-65039). Detailed meeting agendas and meeting transcripts are available on... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  8. 77 FR 56240 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ..., (76 FR 64126-64127). Detailed meeting agendas and meeting transcripts are available on the NRC Web... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  9. 77 FR 31044 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ..., (76 FR 64127-64128). Detailed meeting agendas and meeting transcripts are available on the NRC Web... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  10. 76 FR 34779 - Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials will hold a meeting on June...

  11. 76 FR 55717 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials will hold a meeting on...

  12. 78 FR 17944 - Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-25

    ... ACRS meetings were published in the Federal Register on October 18, 2012, (77 FR 64146-64147). Detailed... COMMISSION Advisory Committee On Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  13. 77 FR 68161 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials will hold a meeting on December...

  14. 75 FR 27841 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... ACRS meetings were published in the Federal Register on October 14, 2009 (74 FR 58268-58269). Detailed... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials...

  15. 75 FR 16874 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... Register on October 14, 2009, (74 FR 52829-52830). Detailed meeting agendas and meeting transcripts are... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  16. 75 FR 82093 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... were published in the Federal Register on October 21, 2010 (75 FR 65038-65039). Detailed meeting... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  17. 76 FR 44964 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ... October 21, 2010, (75 FR 65038-65039). Detailed meeting agendas and meeting transcripts are available on... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  18. 76 FR 36160 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... ACRS meetings were published in the Federal Register on October 21, 2010, (75 FR 65038-65039). Detailed... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  19. 77 FR 38099 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... October 17, 2011, (76 FR 64126-64127). Detailed meeting agendas and meeting transcripts are available on... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  20. 75 FR 58447 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... were published in the Federal Register on October 14, 2009, (74 FR 58268-58269). Detailed meeting... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials...

  1. 78 FR 66967 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommitte on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ..., 2012, (77 FR 64146- 64147). Detailed meeting agendas and meeting transcripts are available on the NRC... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommitte on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  2. 75 FR 4881 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... Register on October 14, 2009, (74 FR 52829-52830). Detailed meeting agendas and meeting transcripts are... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  3. 76 FR 27101 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... ACRS meetings were published in the Federal Register on October 21, 2010, (75 FR 65038-65039). Detailed... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  4. 75 FR 27840 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... participation in ACRS meetings were published in the Federal Register on October 14, 2009 (74 FR 58268-58269... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials...

  5. 76 FR 55716 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials will hold a meeting on...

  6. 76 FR 61119 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... October 21, 2010, (75 FR 65038-65039). Detailed meeting agendas and meeting transcripts are available on... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Materials; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Radiation Protection and...

  7. Modern Methods of Real-Time Gamma Radiation Monitoring for General Personal Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostynska, O.; Arshak, K.; Arshak, A.; Vaseashta, Ashok

    Real-time radiation detectors become an essential part of emergency personnel who may have to respond to unknown accidents, incidents or terrorist attacks, which could involve radioactive material. More and more ordinary citizens are interested in personal radiation protection as well. Reasons include lost sources, nuclear industrial accidents, nuclear or radiological terrorism and the possibility of nuclear weapons being used in a war. People want to have the ability to measure it for themselves and they want to be notified when the radiation levels are increased. To meet this demand, considerable research into new sensors is underway, including efforts to enhance the sensor performance through both the material properties and manufacturing technologies. Deep understanding of physical properties of the materials under the influence of radiation exposure is vital for the effective design of dosimeter devices. Detection of radiation is based on the fact that both the electrical and the optical properties of the materials undergo changes upon the exposure to ionizing radiation. It is believed that radiation causes structural defects. The influence of radiation depends on both the dose and the parameters of the films including their thickness: the degradation is more severe for the higher dose and the thinner films. This paper presents overview of modern methods of real-time gamma radiation monitoring for personal protection of radiation workers and general public and suggests further developments in this area.

  8. Gene expression in Catla catla (Hamilton) subjected to acute and protracted doses of gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Anbumani, S; Mohankumar, Mary N

    2016-09-01

    Studies on transcriptional modulation after gamma radiation exposure in fish are limited. Cell cycle perturbations and expression of apoptotic genes were investigated in the fish, Catla catla after acute and protracted exposures to gamma radiation over a 90day period. Significant changes in gene expression were observed between day 1 and 90 post-exposure. Gamma radiation induced a significant down-regulation of target genes gadd45α, cdk1 and bcl-2 from day 1 to day 3 after protracted exposure, whereas it persists till day 6 upon acute exposure. From day 12 onwards, Gadd45α, cdk1 and bcl-2 genes were up-regulated following protracted exposure, indicating DNA repair, cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. There exists a linear correlation between these genes (gadd45α - r=0.85, p=0.0073; cdk1 - r=0.86, p=0.0053; bcl-2 - r=0.89, p=0.0026) at protracted exposures. This is the first report on the dual role of bcl-2 gene in fish exposed to acute and protracted radiation and correlation among the aforementioned genes that work in concert to promote 'repair' and 'death' circuitries in fish blood cells. PMID:27497304

  9. Analysis of proposed gamma-ray detection system for the monitoring of core water inventory in a pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Markoff, D.M.

    1987-12-01

    An initial study has been performed of the feasibility of employing an axial array of gamma detectors located outside the pressure vessel to monitor the coolant in a PWR. A one-dimensional transport analysis model is developed for the LOFT research reactor and for a mock-PWR geometry. The gamma detector response to coolant voiding in the core and downcomer has been determined for both geometries. The effects of various conditions (for example, time after shutdown, materials in the transport path, and the relative void fraction in different water regions) on the detector response are studied. The calculational results have been validated by a favorable comparison with LOFT experimental data. Within the limitations and approximations considered in the analysis, the results indicate that the gamma-ray detection scheme is able to unambiguously respond to changes in the coolant inventory within any vessel water region.

  10. Foods for a Mission to Mars: Investigations of Low-Dose Gamma Radiation Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandolph, J.; Shand, A.; Stoklosa, A.; Ma, A.; Weiss, I.; Alexander, D.; Perchonok, M.; Mauer, L. J.

    2007-01-01

    Food must be safe, nutritious, and acceptable throughout a long duration mission to maintain the health, well-being, and productivity of the astronauts. In addition to a developing a stable pre-packaged food supply, research is required to better understand the ability to convert edible biomass into safe, nutritious, and acceptable food products in a closed system with many restrictions (mass, volume, power, crew time, etc.). An understanding of how storage conditions encountered in a long-term space mission, such as elevated radiation, will impact food quality is also needed. The focus of this project was to contribute to the development of the highest quality food system possible for the duration of a mission, considering shelf-stable extended shelf-life foods, bulk ingredients, and crops to be grown in space. The impacts of space-relevant radiation doses on food, bulk ingredient, and select candidate crop quality and antioxidant capacity were determined. Interestingly, increasing gamma-radiation doses (0 to 1000 Gy) did not always increase dose-related effects in foods. Intermediate radiation doses (10 to 800Gy) often had significantly larger impact on the stability of bulk ingredient oils than higher (1000Gy) radiation doses. Overall, most food, ingredient, and crop systems investigated showed no significant differences between control samples and those treated with 3 Gy of gamma radiation (the upper limit estimated for a mission to Mars). However, this does not mean that all foods will be stable for 3-5 years, nor does it mean that foods are stable to space radiation comprising more than gamma rays.

  11. Reactor Dosimetry Applications Using RAPTOR-M3G:. a New Parallel 3-D Radiation Transport Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longoni, Gianluca; Anderson, Stanwood L.

    2009-08-01

    The numerical solution of the Linearized Boltzmann Equation (LBE) via the Discrete Ordinates method (SN) requires extensive computational resources for large 3-D neutron and gamma transport applications due to the concurrent discretization of the angular, spatial, and energy domains. This paper will discuss the development RAPTOR-M3G (RApid Parallel Transport Of Radiation - Multiple 3D Geometries), a new 3-D parallel radiation transport code, and its application to the calculation of ex-vessel neutron dosimetry responses in the cavity of a commercial 2-loop Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). RAPTOR-M3G is based domain decomposition algorithms, where the spatial and angular domains are allocated and processed on multi-processor computer architectures. As compared to traditional single-processor applications, this approach reduces the computational load as well as the memory requirement per processor, yielding an efficient solution methodology for large 3-D problems. Measured neutron dosimetry responses in the reactor cavity air gap will be compared to the RAPTOR-M3G predictions. This paper is organized as follows: Section 1 discusses the RAPTOR-M3G methodology; Section 2 describes the 2-loop PWR model and the numerical results obtained. Section 3 addresses the parallel performance of the code, and Section 4 concludes this paper with final remarks and future work.

  12. Sensitometry of the response of a new radiochromic film dosimeter to gamma radiation and electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, W. L.; Yun-Dong, Chen; Soares, C. G.; Miller, A.; Van Dyk, G.; Lewis, D. F.

    1991-04-01

    A new radiation-sensitive imaging material, called GafChromic™ Dosimetry Media, offers advances in high-dose radiation dosimetry and high-resolution radiography for gamma radiation and electrons. The potential uses in radiation processing, radiation sterilization of medical devices, population control of insects by irradiation, food irradiation, blood irradiation for organ-transplant immuno-suppression, clinical radiography, and industrial radiography have led to the present sensitometric study over the breadth of the wide dynamic range of this new routine detector and imaging material, namely, absorbed doses from 10 Gy to 5 × 10 4 Gy. The thin-coated film is colorless before irradiation, and registers a deep-blue image upon irradiation, with two absorption bands at about 650 nm (major band) and 600 nm (minor band). The response to electrons, in terms of increase in absorbance per unit absorbed dose, is the same as that to gamma radiation within the estimated uncertainty of the measurements (± 5%, 95% confidence level). The spatial resolving power is > 1200 lines/mm. After the first 24 hours, the image is stable over many months (within ± 5% in absorbance), however, the system should be irradiated and analyzed at approximately the temperatures used during calibration, because of temperature dependence during irradiation and readout, and temperatures greater than 55°C should be avoided.

  13. High-efficiency scintillation detector for combined of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Chiles, Marion M.; Mihalczo, John T.; Blakeman, Edward D.

    1989-02-07

    A scintillation based radiation detector for the combined detection of thermal neutrons, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in a single detecting unit. The detector consists of a pair of scintillators sandwiched together and optically coupled to the light sensitive face of a photomultiplier tube. A light tight radiation pervious housing is disposed about the scintillators and a portion of the photomultiplier tube to hold the arrangement in assembly and provides a radiation window adjacent the outer scintillator through which the radiation to be detected enters the detector. The outer scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by thermal-neutrons and the inner scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by high-energy neutrons and gamma rays. The light pulses produced by events detected in both scintillators are coupled to the photomultiplier tube which produces a current pulse in response to each detected event. These current pulses may be processed in a conventional manner to produce a count rate output indicative of the total detected radiation even count rate. Pulse discrimination techniques may be used to distinguish the different radiations and their energy distribution.

  14. High-efficiency scintillation detector for combined of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Chiles, Marion M.; Mihalczo, John T.; Blakeman, Edward D.

    1989-01-01

    A scintillation based radiation detector for the combined detection of thermal neutrons, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in a single detecting unit. The detector consists of a pair of scintillators sandwiched together and optically coupled to the light sensitive face of a photomultiplier tube. A light tight radiation pervious housing is disposed about the scintillators and a portion of the photomultiplier tube to hold the arrangement in assembly and provides a radiation window adjacent the outer scintillator through which the radiation to be detected enters the detector. The outer scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by thermal-neutrons and the inner scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by high-energy neutrons and gamma rays. The light pulses produced by events detected in both scintillators are coupled to the photomultiplier tube which produces a current pulse in response to each detected event. These current pulses may be processed in a conventional manner to produce a count rate output indicative of the total detected radiation even count rate. Pulse discrimination techniques may be used to distinguish the different radiations and their energy distribution.

  15. High-efficiency scintillation detector for combined detection of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Chiles, M.M.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Blakeman, E.D.

    1987-02-27

    A scintillation based radiation detector for the combined detection of thermal neutrons, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in a single detecting unit. The detector consists of a pair of scintillators sandwiched together and optically coupled to the light sensitive face of a photomultiplier tube. A light tight radiation pervious housing is disposed about the scintillators and a portion of the photomultiplier tube to hold the arrangement in assembly and provides a radiation window adjacent the outer scintillator through which the radiation to be detected enters the detector. The outer scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by thermal-neutrons and the inner scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by high-energy neutrons and gamma rays. The light pulses produced by events detected in both scintillators are coupled to the photomultiplier tube which produces a current pulse in response to each detected event. These current pulses may be processed in a conventional manner to produce a count rate output indicative of the total detected radiation event count rate. Pulse discrimination techniques may be used to distinguish the different radiations and their energy distribution.

  16. Measurements of longitudinal gamma ray distribution using a multichannel fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, S. H.; Jeon, D.; Kim, J. S.; Jang, J. S.; Jang, K. W.; Yoo, W. J.; Moon, J. H.; Park, B. G.; Kim, S.; Lee, B.

    2014-11-01

    Cerenkov radiation occurs when charged particles are moving faster than the speed of light in a transparent dielectric medium. In optical fibers, Cerenkov radiation can also be generated due to the fiber’s dielectric components. Accordingly, the radiation-induced light signals can be obtained using the optical fibers without any scintillating material. In this study, we fabricated a multichannel, fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor (FOCRS) system using silica optical fibers (SOFs), plastic optical fibers (POFs), an optical spectrometer, multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (MA-PMTs) and a scanning system to measure the light intensities of Cerenkov radiation induced by gamma rays. To evaluate the fading effects in optical fibers, the spectra of Cerenkov radiation generated in the SOFs and POFs were measured based on the irradiation time by using an optical spectrometer. In addition, we measured the longitudinal distribution of gamma rays emitted from the cylindrical type Co-60 source by using MA-PMTs. The result was also compared with the distribution of the electron flux calculated by using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNPX).

  17. Factors affecting the gamma response of TLD-700 chips in mixed-radiation fields

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E. ); Scofield, P.A. )

    1986-10-01

    To determine the causes of gamma dose equivalent overestimates observed during mixed-radiation field personnel dosimetry intercomparisons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a study was performed to evaluate the effects of phosphor neutron sensitivity, badge materials, and phantoms on the response of TLD-700 chips. The results of the study presented in this paper indicate that even if a phosphor with relatively low neutron sensitivity is used, significant gamma overestimates can occur in mixed fields due to the interaction of the phosphor and badge materials with neutrons. Low energy photons can also contribute to gamma dose equivalent overestimates due to the increased sensitivity of the TLD-700 phosphor to photons with energies below about 100 keV.

  18. Gamma radiation effects on phenolics, antioxidants activity and in vitro digestion of pistachio ( Pistachia vera) hull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behgar, M.; Ghasemi, S.; Naserian, A.; Borzoie, A.; Fatollahi, H.

    2011-09-01

    The effect of gamma radiation (10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 kGy) on tannin, total phenolics, antioxidants activity and in vitro digestion of pistachio hulls has been investigated in this study. The possibility of using the radial diffusion method based on software measurement of the rings area has also been investigated in this study. The software based method in radial diffusion method showed a higher r2 (0.995) value when compared to the traditional method. Irradiation reduced the tannin content ( P<0.01) and activity of antioxidants ( P<0.05) of pistachio hull extracts but increased the total phenolic content ( P<0.05). There was no effect of gamma irradiation on the in vitro digestion of the pistachio hull. Irradiation decreased the digestion rate of the pistachio hull at the dose of 40 kGy when compared to the control. This study showed that gamma irradiation decreased tannin and antioxidants activity of pistachio hull.

  19. Indoor gamma radiation and radon concentrations in a Norwegian carbonatite area.

    PubMed

    Sundal, A V; Strand, T

    2004-01-01

    Results of indoor gamma radiation and radon measurements in 95 wooden dwellings located in a Norwegian thorium-rich carbonatite area using thermoluminescent dosemeters and CR-39 alpha track detectors, respectively, are reported together with a thorough analysis of the indoor data with regard to geological factors. Slightly enhanced radium levels and thorium concentrations of several thousands Bq kg(-1) in the carbonatites were found to cause elevated indoor radon-222 levels and the highest indoor gamma dose rates ever reported from wooden houses in Norway. An arithmetic mean indoor gamma dose rate of 200 nGy h(-1) and a maximum of 620 nGy h(-1) were obtained for the group of dwellings located directly on the most thorium-rich bedrock. PMID:15312702

  20. A new, passive dosemeter for gamma, beta and neutron radiations.

    PubMed

    Jones, L A; Stokes, R P

    2011-03-01

    The Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) provides personal radiation dosimetry to the UK Ministry of Defence. Dstl has recently developed a dosemeter that is based on a combination of thermoluminescent and etched-track detectors. The Dstl Combined Dosemeter is capable of assessing doses due to photons, beta particles and neutrons. This paper presents the laboratory type testing results for the Combined Dosemeter, and also describes the procedure for calibrating the dosemeter for use in workplace neutron fields. The Combined Dosemeter meets the type test requirements that are relevant to its intended applications, and gives neutron doses that are within 50% of the true dose in the workplaces in which it is used, even when the wearer has the potential to be exposed to a variety of neutron spectra (e.g. on board nuclear-powered submarines). PMID:21346288

  1. Correlation between indoor radon concentration and dose rate in air from terrestrial gamma radiation in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, K

    1998-09-01

    A correlation between the indoor radon concentration and dose rate in air from terrestrial gamma radiation is studied using the results of nationwide indoor radon and external exposure surveys, although the surveys were not conducted at the same time nor at the same location. The radon concentration shows a log-normal-like distribution, whereas the terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in air shows a normal-like distribution. A log-linear scatterplot for each pair of the indoor radon concentration and gamma-ray dose rate in air in each city reveals a clear relationship. The average, maximum, and minimum as well as regression line of radon concentration were found to increase with the gamma-ray dose rate in air. The group in higher quantile of radon concentration shows larger dependence on the gamma-ray dose rate. The rate of increase of radon concentration with the gamma-ray dose rate in air depends on the house structure. The wooden house has a larger rate of increase than the concrete house, and the regression lines cross at high air dose rate. Based on the finding in the present study a certain criterion level of air dose rate could be established and used for an effective survey to find out which houses might require a remedial action in conjunction with other screening tools. The criterion level of air dose rate might be more effective if the level is set for each house structure since the rate of increase of radon concentration depends on house structure. PMID:9721838

  2. Numerical modelling of gamma radiation from galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniati, Francesco

    2003-07-01

    We investigate the spatial and spectral properties of non-thermal emission from clusters of galaxies at γ-ray energies. We estimate the radiation flux between 10 keV and 10 TeV due to inverse-Compton (IC) emission, π0-decay and non-thermal bremsstrahlung (NTB) from cosmic ray (CR) ions and electrons accelerated at cosmic shocks as well as secondary e+/- generated in inelastic p-p collisions. We identify two main region of production of non-thermal radiation, namely the core (also bright in the thermal X-ray range) and the outskirts region where accretion shocks occur. We find that IC emission from shock-accelerated CR electrons dominate the emission at the outer regions of galaxy clusters, provided that at least a fraction of a per cent of the shock ram pressure is converted into CR electrons. A clear detection of this component and of its spatial distribution will allow us to probe the cosmic accretion shocks directly. In the cluster core, γ-ray emission above 100 MeV is dominated by the π0-decay mechanism. At lower energies, IC emission from secondary e+/- takes over. However, IC emission from shock-accelerated electrons projected on to the cluster core will not be negligible. We emphasize the importance of separating the aforementioned emission components for a correct interpretation of the experimental data and outline a strategy for that purpose. Failure to addresses this issue will produce unsound estimates of the intracluster magnetic field strength and CR ion content. According to our estimate future spaceborne and ground-based γ-ray facilities should be able to measure the whole non-thermal spectrum both in the cluster core and at its outskirts. The importance of such measurements in advancing our understanding of non-thermal processes in the intracluster medium is discussed.

  3. Characterization of commercial proton exchange membrane materials after exposure to beta and gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, S.N.; Carson, R.; Muirhead, C.; Li, H.; Castillo, I.; Boniface, H.; Suppiah, S.; Ratnayake, A.; Robinson, J.

    2015-03-15

    Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) type electrolysis cells have a potential use for tritium removal and heavy water upgrading. AECL is currently exposing various commercial PEM materials to both gamma (Cobalt-60 source) and beta (tritiated water) radiation to study the effects of radiation on these materials. This paper summarizes the testing methods and results that have been collected to date. The PEM materials that are or have been exposed to radiation are: Nafion 112, 212, 117 and 1110. Membrane characterization pre- and post- exposure consists of non-destructive inspection (FTIR, SEM/XPS), mechanical (tensile strength, percentage elongation, and modulus), electrical (resistance), or chemical (ion-exchange capacity - IEC). It has appeared that the best characterization techniques to compare exposed versus unexposed membranes were IEC, ultimate tensile strength and percent elongation. These testing techniques are easy and cheap to perform. The non-destructive tests, such as SEM and FTIR did not provide particularly useful information on radiation-induced degradation. Where changes in material properties were measured after radiation exposure, they would be expected to result in poorer cell performance. However, for modest γ-radiation exposure, all membranes showed a slight decrease in cell voltage (better performance). In contrast, the one β-radiation exposed membrane did show the expected increase in cell voltage. The counterintuitive trend for γ-radiation exposed membranes is not yet understood. Based on these preliminary results, it appears that γ- and β-radiation exposures have different effects.

  4. Public exposure due to external gamma background radiation in boundary areas of Iran.

    PubMed

    Pooya, S M Hosseini; Dashtipour, M R; Enferadi, A; Orouji, T

    2015-09-01

    A monitoring program in boundary areas of a country is an appropriate way to indicate the level of public exposure. In this research, gamma background radiation was measured using TL dosimeters at 12 boundary areas as well as in the capital city of Iran during the period 2010 to 2011. The measurements were carried out in semi-annual time intervals from January to June and July to December in each year. The maximum average dose equivalent value measured was approximately 70 μSv/month for Tehran city. Also, the average dose values obtained were less than 40 μSv/month for all the cities located at the sea level except that of high level natural radiation area of Ramsar, and more than 55 μSv/month for the higher elevation cities. The public exposure due to ambient gamma dose equivalent in Iran is within the levels reported by UNSCEAR. PMID:26057985

  5. Lignocellulolytic mutants of Pleurotus ostreatus induced by gamma-ray radiation and their genetic similarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.-K.; Chang, H.-H.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, K.-S.

    2000-02-01

    To induce the lignocellulolytic mutants of Pleurotus ostreatus, the mycelia were irradiated by gamma-ray radiation to doses of 1-2 kGy. Five strains were isolated by the criteria of clamp connection, fruiting body formation, growth rate and activities of extracellular enzymes. All isolated strains were able to form the fruiting bodies and grew similarly to the control. The extracellular enzymes activities in liquid media of isolated strains were up to 10 times higher than the control. Genetic similarities of the isolated strains ranged from 64.4% to 93.3% of the control. From these results, it seems that the genetic diversity of P. ostreatus could be changed and useful strains be induced by gamma-ray radiation to recycle or reuse biowastes.

  6. Three-dimensional radiation dosimetry for gamma knife using a gel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Kazi Muazzam

    The use of three-dimensional radiation dosimetry has been limited. With the use of water phantoms and ionization chambers, it has been possible to determine three dimensional dose distributions on a gross scale for cobalt 60 and linear accelerator sources. This method has been somewhat useful for traditional radiotherapy. There is, however, a need for more precise dosimetry, particularly with stereotactic radiosurgery. Most gamma knife facilities use either thermoluminescant dosimetry or film, neither of which provides three dimensional dose distributions. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a gel dosimetry system that relies on the production of a ferric ion-xylenol orange colored complex. This work demonstrates the use of laser light and a detector to quantify radiation-induced colorimetric changes in absorbance for the gel dosimeter. The absorbance has been reconstructed by the back projection technique to demonstrate the applicability of the gel dosimeter to gamma knife 3D-dose distributions.

  7. In situ gamma-ray spectrometry: A tutorial for environmental radiation scientists

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.M.; Shebell, P.

    1993-10-01

    This tutorial is intended for those in the environmental field who perform assessments in areas where there is radioactive contamination in the surface soil. Techniques will be introduced for performing on-site quantitative measurements of gamma radiation in the environment using high resolution germanium detectors. A basic understanding of ionizing radiation principles is assumed; however, a detailed knowledge of gamma spectrometry systems is not required. Emphasized is the practical end of operations in the field and the conversion of measured full absorption peak count rates in a collected spectrum to meaningful radiological quantities, such as the concentration of a radionuclide in the soil, activity per unit area, and dose rate in the air. The theory of operation and calibration procedures will be covered in detail to provide the necessary knowledge to adapt the technique to site-specific problems. Example calculations for detector calibration are also provided.

  8. New decay branches of the radiative capture reaction {sup 12}C({sup 16}O,{gamma}){sup 28}Si

    SciTech Connect

    Lebhertz, D.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Salsac, M.-D.; Beck, C.; Michalon, A.; Rousseau, M.; Marley, P. L.; Glover, R. G.; Kent, P. E.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Davis, C.; Pearson, J. E.

    2009-01-28

    Resonances in the {sup 12}C({sup 16}O,{gamma}){sup 28}Si radiative capture process at energies around the Coulomb barrier have been probed using the very selective 0 deg. Dragon spectrometer at Triumf and its associated BGO {gamma}-array. For the first time the full level scheme involved in this process has been measured and shows previously unobserved {gamma}-decay to doorway states around 11 MeV in {sup 28}Si.

  9. Reactor Start-up and Control Methodologies: Consideration of the Space Radiation Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Holloway, James Paul

    2004-02-04

    The use of fission energy in space power and propulsion systems offers considerable advantages over chemical propulsion. Fission provides over six orders of magnitude higher energy density, which translates to higher vehicle specific impulse and lower specific mass. These characteristics enable the accomplishment of ambitious space exploration missions. The natural radiation environment in space provides an external source of protons and high energy, high Z particles that can result in the production of secondary neutrons through interactions in reactor structures. Initial investigation using MCNPX 2.5.b for proton transport through the SAFE-400 reactor indicates a secondary neutron net current of 1.4x107 n/s at the core-reflector interface, with an incoming current of 3.4x106 n/s due to neutrons produced in the Be reflector alone. This neutron population could provide a reliable startup source for a space reactor. Additionally, this source must be considered in developing a reliable control strategy during reactor startup, steady-state operation, and power transients. An autonomous control system is developed and analyzed for application during reactor startup, accounting for fluctuations in the radiation environment that result from changes in vehicle location (altitude, latitude, position in solar system) or due to temporal variations in the radiation field, as may occur in the case of solar flares. One proposed application of a nuclear electric propulsion vehicle is in a tour of the Jovian system, where the time required for communication to Earth is significant. Hence, it is important that a reactor control system be designed with feedback mechanisms to automatically adjust to changes in reactor temperatures, power levels, etc., maintaining nominal operation without user intervention. This paper will evaluate the potential use of secondary neutrons produced by proton interactions in the reactor vessel as a startup source for a space reactor and will present a

  10. The high-energy diffuse cosmic gamma-ray background radiation from blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Salamon, M. H.; Malkan, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    We predict the spectrum and flux of the high-energy diffuse cosmic gamma-ray background radiation produced by blazars. Our calculations are based on the Compton Observatory EGRET observations of high-energy gamma-rays from these objects, the Whipple observation of TeV gamma-rays from Mrk 421, and radio population studies of flat-spectrum radio sources. Our statistical analysis gives a result consistent with a linear correlation. We then use the radio luminosity function and redshift evolution to calculate the gamma-ray background. We find that blazars cannot account for the flux level or steep spectrum of the background observed by SAS 2 in the sub-GeV range, but could likely provide the dominant background component in the multi-GeV energy range and above. We predict a differential photon spectral index for this component of about 2 up to about 10 GeV. Above that energy, the spectrum should gradually steepen owing to pair production by interactions of the gamma-rays with intergalactic infrared photons. Using the calculations of this effect by Stecker et al. (1992), we estimate a spectral index of about 3.5 for energies above a TeV.

  11. Celestial diffuse gamma radiation above 30 MeV observed by SAS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Hartman, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    The Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS)-2, launched on November 15, 1972, carried into orbit a 32-deck magnetic-core digitized spark chamber gamma ray telescope to study celestial gamma radiation in the energy range above 30 MeV. In the study of several regions with b sub 2 15 deg, a finite, diffuse flux of gamma rays with a steep energy spectrum in the energy region from 35 to 200 MeV is observed. Representing the energy spectrum by a power law of the form dJ/dE = AE to - alpha power over this energy range, alpha is found along with the integral flux above 100 MeV. Combining this result with existing low energy gamma ray data yields an energy spectrum which is not a simple power law in energy, as in the X-ray region, but which demonstrates first an increase and then a decrease in slope, consistent within uncertainties with that predicted by cosmological theories, including the continuous production of high energy gamma rays primarily from neutral pi mesons throughout the history of the universe.

  12. Radiation reaction in the interaction of ultraintense laser with matter and gamma ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, J. F.; Teo, W. R.; Moritaka, Toseo; Takabe, H.

    2016-05-01

    Radiation reaction (RR) force plays an important role in gamma ray production in the interaction of ultraintense laser with relativistic counterpropagating electron at intensity 1022 W/cm2 and beyond. The relationship between emission spectrum and initial kinetic energy of electron at such intensities is yet to be clear experimentally. On the other hand, the energy from both the relativistic electron beam and laser pulse may be converted into the gamma rays. Therefore, the conversion efficiency of energy purely from laser pulse into gamma rays is of great interest. We present simulation results of an electron dynamics in strong laser field by taking into account the RR effects. We investigated how the RR effects influence the emission spectrum and photon number distribution for different laser condition. We showed that the peaks of emission spectra are suppressed if higher initial kinetic energy of electron interacts with long laser pulse duration. We then list the conversion efficiencies of laser pulse energy into gamma ray. We note that an electron with energy of 40 MeV would convert up to 80% of the total of electromagnetic work and initial kinetic energy of electron when interacting with 10 fs laser pulse at intensity 2 ×1023 W/cm2. For a bunch of electron with charge 1 nC would emit around 0.1 J of energy into gamma ray emission.

  13. Branching Fractions and CP-Violating Asymmetries in Radiative B Decays to eta K gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2008-05-14

    The authors present measurements of the CP-violation parameters S and C for the radiative decay B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sub S}{sup 0}{gamma}; for B {yields} {eta}K{gamma} they also measure the branching fractions and for B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma} the time-integrated charge asymmetry {Alpha}{sub ch}. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represent 465 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. The results are S = -0.18{sub -0.46}{sup +0.49} {+-} 0.12, C = -0.32{sub -0.39}{sup +0.40} {+-} 0.07, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}{gamma}) = (7.1{sub -2.0}{sup +2.1} {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma}) = (7.7 {+-} 1.0 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, and {Alpha}{sub ch} = (-9.0{sub -9.8}{sup +10.4} {+-} 1.4) x 10{sup -2}. The first error quoted is statistical and the second systematic.

  14. Sewage sludge pasteurization by gamma radiation: A Canadian demonstration project — 1988-91

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinwood, Jean F.; Wilson, Bruce K.

    Nordion International Inc. and a Canadian city, in cooperation with the Federal & Provincial Ministries of the Environment, began a project in 1988 to construct and operate a commercial-scale sewage sludge pasteurization facility using gamma radiation technology. The facility is scheduled to begin operations in 1991. This paper discusses the objectives and scope of the project, the design of the irradiation system, and the plans to market the pasteurized sludge as a high-value, organic soil conditioner and fertilizer.

  15. Degradation of Biochemical Activity in Soil Sterilized by Dry Heat and Gamma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, K. L.; Souza, K. A.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of soil sterilization by dry heat (0.08% relative humidity), gamma radiation, or both on soil phosphatase, urease, and decarboxylase activity was studied. Soil sterilized by a long exposure to dry heat at relatively low temperatures (eight weeks at 100.5 C) retained higher activities than did soil exposed to a higher temperature (two weeks at 124.5 C), while all activity was destroyed by four days at 148.5 C. Sterilization with 7.5 Mrads destroyed less activity than did heat sterilization. The effect of several individually nonsterizing doses of heat radiation is described.

  16. Gamma radiation-induced blue shift of resonance peaks of Bragg gratings in pure silica fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faustov, A. V.; Gusarov, A. I.; Mégret, P.; Wuilpart, M.; Kinet, D.; Zhukov, A. V.; Novikov, S. G.; Svetukhin, V. V.; Fotiadi, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    We report the first observation of a significant gamma radiation-induced blue shift of the reflection/transmission peak of fibre Bragg gratings inscribed into pure-silica core fibres via multiphoton absorption of femtosecond pulses. At a total dose of ~100 kGy, the shift is ~20 pm. The observed effect is attributable to the ionising radiation-induced decrease in the density of the silica glass when the rate of colour centre formation is slow. We present results of experimental measurements that provide the key parameters of the dynamics of the gratings for remote dosimetry and temperature sensing.

  17. Method for detecting water equivalent of snow using secondary cosmic gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, K.J.

    1997-01-14

    Water equivalent of accumulated snow determination by measurement of secondary background cosmic radiation attenuation by the snowpack. By measuring the attenuation of 3-10 MeV secondary gamma radiation it is possible to determine the water equivalent of snowpack. The apparatus is designed to operate remotely to determine the water equivalent of snow in areas which are difficult or hazardous to access during winter, accumulate the data as a function of time and transmit, by means of an associated telemetry system, the accumulated data back to a central data collection point for analysis. The electronic circuitry is designed so that a battery pack can be used to supply power. 4 figs.

  18. Method for detecting water equivalent of snow using secondary cosmic gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, Kenneth J.

    1997-01-01

    Water equivalent of accumulated snow determination by measurement of secondary background cosmic radiation attenuation by the snowpack. By measuring the attentuation of 3-10 MeV secondary gamma radiation it is possible to determine the water equivalent of snowpack. The apparatus is designed to operate remotely to determine the water equivalent of snow in areas which are difficult or hazardous to access during winter, accumulate the data as a function of time and transmit, by means of an associated telemetry system, the accumulated data back to a central data collection point for analysis. The electronic circuitry is designed so that a battery pack can be used to supply power.

  19. Gamma radiation grafted polymers for immobilization of Brucella antigen in diagnostic test studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docters, E. H.; Smolko, E. E.; Suarez, C. E.

    The radiation grafting process has a wide field of industrial applications, and in the recent years the immobilization of biocomponents in grafted polymeric materials obtained by means of ionizing radiations is a new and important contribution to biotechnology. In the present work, gamma preirradiation grafting method was employed to produce acrylics hydrogels onto polyethylene (PE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polystyrene (PS). Two monomers were used to graft the previously mentioned polymers: methacrylic acid (MAAc) and acrylamide (AAm), and several working conditions were considered as influencing the degree of grafting. All this grafted polymers were used to study the possibility of a subsequent immobilization of Brucella antigen (BAg) in diagnostic test studies (ELISA).

  20. PHOTOSPHERIC EMISSION AS THE DOMINANT RADIATION MECHANISM IN LONG-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzati, Davide; Morsony, Brian J.; Margutti, Raffaella; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2013-03-10

    We present the results of a set of numerical simulations of long-duration gamma-ray burst jets associated with massive, compact stellar progenitors. The simulations extend to large radii and allow us to locate the region in which the peak frequency of the advected radiation is set before the radiation is released at the photosphere. Light curves and spectra are calculated for different viewing angles as well as different progenitor structures and jet properties. We find that the radiation released at the photosphere of matter-dominated jets is able to reproduce the observed Amati and energy-Lorentz factor correlations. Our simulations also predict a correlation between the burst energy and the radiative efficiency of the prompt phase, consistent with observations.

  1. Radiation resistivity of BGO crystals due to low-energy gamma-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozma, Peter; Kozma, Petr

    2003-04-01

    Radiation resistivity of 4×4×30 mm 3 BGO crystals from three suppliers has been studied for doses 10 4 Gy (10 6 rad) and 10 5 Gy (10 7 rad). Radiation hardness was examined by the measurement of optical transmission through BGO crystals before and after 60Co gamma-ray irradiations. The absolute degradation of transmission for 10 4 and 10 5 Gy doses at 480 nm wavelength of the peak emission of BGO, was found to be lower than 3.4% and 7.5%, respectively. The results have been also compared with radiation hardness measurements for a large volume ∅30×30 mm 3 BGO crystal as well as another heavy scintillation crystals: fluorides and tungstates. Complete recovery of BGO radiation damage was observed only after few days.

  2. Radiation damage of PbWO 4 crystals due to irradiation by 60Co gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozma, Peter; Bajgar, Robert; Kozma, Petr

    2002-09-01

    Radiation resistivity of large tungstate crystals PbWO 4 from three suppliers has been studied for doses 10 4 Gy (10 6 rad) and 10 5 Gy (10 7 rad). Radiation resistivity was examined by the measurement of optical transmission through tungstate crystals before and after 60Co gamma-ray irradiations. The absolute degradation of transmission for 10 4 and 10 5 Gy doses at 480 nm wavelength of the peak emission of PbWO 4 doped with La 2+, was found to be lower than 12.3% and 14.2%, respectively. The results have been also compared with radiation hardness measurements for a large volume CeF 3 scintillation crystal. Complete recovery of radiation damage was observed between 10 and 15 days after irradiations.

  3. Inactivation of human immunodeficiency virus by gamma radiation and its effect on plasma and coagulation factors

    SciTech Connect

    Hiemstra, H.; Tersmette, M.; Vos, A.H.; Over, J.; van Berkel, M.P.; de Bree, H. )

    1991-01-01

    The inactivation of HIV by gamma-radiation was studied in frozen and liquid plasma; a reduction of the virus titer of 5 to 6 logs was achieved at doses of 5 to 10 Mrad at -80 degrees C and 2.5 Mrad at 15 degrees C. The effect of irradiation on the biologic activity of a number of coagulation factors in plasma and in lyophilized concentrates of factor VIII (FVIII) and prothrombin complex was examined. A recovery of 85 percent of the biologic activity of therapeutic components present in frozen plasma and in lyophilized coagulation factor concentrates was reached at radiation doses as low as 1.5 and 0.5 Mrad, respectively. As derived from the first-order radiation inactivation curves, the radiosensitive target size of HIV was estimated to be 1 to 3 MDa; the target size of FVIII was estimated to be 130 to 160 kDa. Gamma radiation must be disregarded as a method for the sterilization of plasma and plasma-derived products, because of the low reduction of virus infectivity at radiation doses that still give acceptable recovery of biologic activity of plasma components.

  4. Radiation hardness of plastic scintillating fiber against fast neutron and [gamma]-ray irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Akira; Yoshinaka, Hideki; Goto, Minehiko . Dept. of Physics)

    1993-08-01

    In future collider experiments, where a background radiation level is estimated to be very high, e.g. around 10[sup 2] [approximately] 10[sup 5] Gy/yr and 10[sup 11] [approximately] 10[sup 14] n/cm[sup 2]/yr at SSC, the detectors operating around the collision point in the experiments will encounter a considerable amount of radiation. Therefore, the detectors, especially the calorimeter, are required to be resistive against high radiation levels. From this point of view, it is of great importance to study the effects of radiation damage on the performance of the detectors. The authors report preliminary results of measurements of radiation hardness of the plastic scintillating fiber Kuraray SCSF-81 against irradiation with fast neutrons and [sup 60]Co [gamma]-rays in the region of the neutron fluence from 1 [times] 10[sup 11] to 5 [times] 10[sup 13] n/cm[sup 2] and the integrated [gamma]-ray dose from 890 to 10[sup 5] Gy, respectively. Deterioration of both intrinsic light yield and light transmittance of the SCSF-81 has been studied.

  5. [The effectiveness of fractionated exposure of sarcoma M-1 to gamma-radiation and fast neutrons].

    PubMed

    Iuzhakov, V V; Sevan'kaeva, L E; Ul'ianenko, S E; Iakovleva, N D; Kuznetsova, M N; Tsyganova, M G; Fomina, N K; Ingel', I E; Lychagin, A A

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of fractionated exposure to gamma- and neutron radiation in their separate and combined use on the growth and functional morphology of mutant p53 sarcoma M-1 in rats was studied. Investigation techniques included immunostaining of PCNA and mutant p53 expressing cells, determination of mitotic activity and apoptotic death of tumor cells, as well as computer analysis of microscopic images. The antitumor efficacy of different types of radiation is shown to be determined by different levels of apoptosis induction, reduced proliferation and cellularity. Neutron radiation of the impulse generator has a marked damaging effect on the vasculature and the development of tumor necrosis. Fractionated irradiation at equal daily doses led to the decrease in the relative effectiveness of radio-inactivation of tumor cells. After 9 fractions of irradiation, the calculated value of the RBE of fast neutrons normalized to the input dose of 1 Gy by the coefficient of tumor growth inhibition, a reduced proliferative activity of PCNA and induced apoptosis of tumor cells was 3.4, 3.7 and 3.1, respectively. In the mode of daily superfractionation with splitting the dose in two fractions, the effectiveness of the combined exposure corresponded to the additive effect of gamma- and neutron radiation with a tendency toward synergism. There are reasons to believe that high resistance of sarcoma M-1 to the ionizing radiation impact is due not only to a fraction of hypoxic cells, but also the mutant status of p53 gene. PMID:24450208

  6. Secondary metabolite perturbations in Phaseolus vulgaris leaves due to gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Ramabulana, T; Mavunda, R D; Steenkamp, P A; Piater, L A; Dubery, I A; Madala, N E

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress is a condition in which the balance between the production and elimination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is disturbed. However, plants have developed a very sophisticated mechanism to mitigate the effect of ROS by constantly adjusting the concentration thereof to acceptable levels. Electromagnetic radiation is one of the factors which results in oxidative stress. In the current study, ionizing gamma radiation generated from a Cobalt-60 source was used to induce oxidative stress in Phaseolus vulgaris seedlings. Plants were irradiated with several radiation doses, with 2 kGy found to be the optimal, non-lethal dose. Metabolite distribution patterns from irradiated and non-irradiated plants were analyzed using UHPLC-qTOF-MS and multivariate data models such as principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminate analysis (OPLS-DA). Metabolites such as hydroxycinnamic phenolic acids, flavonoids, terpenes, and a novel chalcone were found to be perturbed in P. vulgaris seedlings treated with the aforementioned conditions. The results suggest that there is a compensatory link between constitutive protectants and inducible responses to injury as well as defense against oxidative stress induced by ionizing radiation. The current study is also the first to illustrate the power of a metabolomics approach to decipher the effect of gamma radiation on crop plants. PMID:26512968

  7. Durability and shielding performance of borated Ceramicrete coatings in beta and gamma radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagh, Arun S.; Sayenko, S. Yu.; Dovbnya, A. N.; Shkuropatenko, V. A.; Tarasov, R. V.; Rybka, A. V.; Zakharchenko, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    Ceramicrete™, a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic, was developed for nuclear waste immobilization and nuclear radiation shielding. Ceramicrete products are fabricated by an acid-base reaction between magnesium oxide and mono potassium phosphate. Fillers are used to impart desired properties to the product. Ceramicrete's tailored compositions have resulted in several commercial structural products, including corrosion- and fire-protection coatings. Their borated version, called Borobond™, has been studied for its neutron shielding capabilities and is being used in structures built for storage of nuclear materials. This investigation assesses the durability and shielding performance of borated Ceramicrete coatings when exposed to gamma and beta radiations to predict the composition needed for optimal shielding performance in a realistic nuclear radiation field. Investigations were conducted using experimental data coupled with predictive Monte Carlo computer model. The results show that it is possible to produce products for simultaneous shielding of all three types of nuclear radiations, viz., neutrons, gamma-, and beta-rays. Additionally, because sprayable Ceramicrete coatings exhibit excellent corrosion- and fire-protection characteristics on steel, this research also establishes an opportunity to produce thick coatings to enhance the shielding performance of corrosion and fire protection coatings for use in high radiation environment in nuclear industry.

  8. Diffuse gamma radiation. [intensity, energy spectrum and spatial distribution from SAS 2 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Simpson, G. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Results are reported for an investigation of the intensity, energy spectrum, and spatial distribution of the diffuse gamma radiation detected by SAS 2 away from the galactic plane in the energy range above 35 MeV. The gamma-ray data are compared with relevant data obtained at other wavelengths, including 21-cm emission, radio continuum radiation, and the limited UV and radio information on local molecular hydrogen. It is found that there are two quite distinct components to the diffuse radiation, one of which shows a good correlation with the galactic matter distribution and continuum radiation, while the other has a much steeper energy spectrum and appears to be isotropic at least on a coarse scale. The galactic component is interpreted in terms of its implications for both local and more distant regions of the Galaxy. The apparently isotropic radiation is discussed partly with regard to the constraints placed on possible models by the steep energy spectrum, the observed intensity, and an upper limit on the anisotropy.

  9. Enhancement of natural background gamma-radiation dose around uranium microparticles in the human body

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, John E.; Hugtenburg, Richard P.; Green, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Ongoing controversy surrounds the adverse health effects of the use of depleted uranium (DU) munitions. The biological effects of gamma-radiation arise from the direct or indirect interaction between secondary electrons and the DNA of living cells. The probability of the absorption of X-rays and gamma-rays with energies below about 200 keV by particles of high atomic number is proportional to the third to fourth power of the atomic number. In such a case, the more heavily ionizing low-energy recoil electrons are preferentially produced; these cause dose enhancement in the immediate vicinity of the particles. It has been claimed that upon exposure to naturally occurring background gamma-radiation, particles of DU in the human body would produce dose enhancement by a factor of 500–1000, thereby contributing a significant radiation dose in addition to the dose received from the inherent radioactivity of the DU. In this study, we used the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc to accurately estimate the likely maximum dose enhancement arising from the presence of micrometre-sized uranium particles in the body. We found that although the dose enhancement is significant, of the order of 1–10, it is considerably smaller than that suggested previously. PMID:19776147

  10. Impact of gamma radiation on the eruption rate of rat incisors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Faramawy, Nabil; El-Haddad, Khaled; Ali, Mohamed; Talaat, Mona

    2015-09-01

    The present work aims to test the effect of gamma radiation on the rate of eruption of rat incisors. One hundred and five adult male albino rats were used and irradiated at different gamma doses. The effects of irradiation were investigated by numerical measurements of eruption rate, histological investigation using light microscope and spectral analysis using Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR). No detectable changes were observed in the groups with smaller radiation doses. There was a significant decrease in the eruption rate starting from the 4 Gy radiation dose. The observation of histological sections revealed disturbance in cellular elements responsible for eruption as well as periodontal disturbance in the samples irradiated with 4 and 6 Gy. FTIR Spectroscopy of control group and the group irradiated by 0.5 Gy showed similar absorption bands with minor differences. However, samples irradiated by 1 Gy showed significant changes in both molecular structure and conformation related to carbonates and hydroxyl groups. From the previous results, it could be concluded that gamma irradiation negatively affects the eruption rate of the rat incisors especially with higher doses.

  11. SAS-2 observations of the galactic gamma radiation from the Vela region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Data from a scan of the galactic plane by the SAS-2 high energy gamma ray experiment in the region 250 deg l2 290 deg show a statistically-significant excess over the general radiation from the galactic plane for gamma radiation of energy 100 MeV in the region 260 deg l2 270 deg and -7.5 deg b2 0 deg. If the enhanced gamma radiation results from interactions of cosmic rays with galactic matter, as the energy spectrum suggests, it seems reasonable to associate the enhancement with large scale galactic features, such as spiral arm segments in that direction, or with the region surrounding the Vela supernova remnant, with which PSR 0833-45 is associated. If the excess is attributed to cosmic rays released from this supernova interacting with the interstellar matter in that region, then on the order of 3.10 to the 50th power ergs would be released by that supernova in the form of cosmic rays.

  12. Ferulic acid attenuates adhesion molecule expression in gamma-radiated human umbilical vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zeng-Chun; Hong, Qian; Wang, Yu-Guang; Tan, Hong-Ling; Xiao, Cheng-Rong; Liang, Qian-De; Cai, Shao-Hua; Gao, Yue

    2010-01-01

    Radiation induces an important inflammatory response in the irradiated organs, characterized by leukocyte infiltration and vascular changes. Since adhesion molecules play an important role in facilitating the immune response at the inflammation sites, interfering with the expression of these molecules may be an important therapeutic target of radiation induced inflammation. Many adhesion molecules such as intercellular cell adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) have been identified in radiation. Ferulic acid (FA), an effective radioprotector during radiotherapy, is widely used in endothelium protection. The present study examined the effect of FA on the induction of adhesion molecules by gamma-radiation and the mechanisms of its effect in gamma-irradiated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs were pretreated for 18 h with FA and then exposed to 10 Gy radiation. The result of cell adhesion assay showed FA inhibited radiation-induced U937 adhesion to HUVECs. FA prevented induction of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in a concentration-dependent manner after stimulation with radiation at the level of mRNA and protein. Inhibitors of the extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways were used to determine which pathway was involved in FA action; the result showed that the inhibitory effect of FA on adhesion molecule expression was mediated by the blockade of JNK. FA appears to be a potential therapeutic agent for treating various inflammatory disorders including radiation induced inflammation. PMID:20460750

  13. The Development of Radiation Embrittlement Models for U. S. Power Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Rao, Nageswara S; Konduri, Savanthi

    2007-01-01

    A new approach of utilizing information fusion technique is developed to predict the radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels. The Charpy transition temperature shift data contained in the Power Reactor Embrittlement Database is used in this study. Six parameters {Cu, Ni, P, neutron fluence, irradiation time, and irradiation temperature {are used in the embrittlement prediction models. The results indicate that this new embrittlement predictor achieved reductions of about 49.5% and 52% in the uncertainties for plate and weld data, respectively, for pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor data, compared with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2. The implications of dose-rate effect and irradiation temperature effects for the development of radiation embrittlement models are also discussed.

  14. Evaluation of genotoxicity of the acute gamma radiation on earthworm Eisenia fetida using single cell gel electrophoresis technique (Comet assay).

    PubMed

    Sowmithra, K; Shetty, N J; Jha, S K; Chaubey, R C

    2015-12-01

    Earthworms (Eisenia fetida) most suitable biological indicators of radioactive pollution. Radiation-induced lesions in DNA can be considered to be molecular markers for early effects of ionizing radiation. Gamma radiation produces a wide spectrum of DNA. Some of these lesions, i.e., DNA strand breaks and alkali labile sites can be detected by the single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) or comet assay by measuring the migration of DNA from immobilized nuclear DNA. E. fetida were exposed to different doses of gamma radiation, i.e., 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50Gy, and comet assay was performed for all the doses along with control at 1, 3 and 5h post irradiation to evaluate the genotoxicity of gamma radiation in this organism. The DNA damage was measured as percentage of comet tail DNA. A significant increase in DNA damage was observed in samples exposed to 5Gy and above, and the increase in DNA damage was dose dependent i.e., DNA damage was increased with increased doses of radiation. The highest DNA damage was noticed at 1h post irradiation and gradually decreased with time, i.e., at 3 and 5h post irradiation. The present study reveals that gamma radiation induces DNA damage in E. fetida and the comet assay is a sensitive and rapid method for its detection to detect genotoxicity of gamma radiation. PMID:26653984

  15. Ab initio simulation of radiation damage in nuclear reactor pressure vessel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Daniel; Finkenstadt, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Using Kinetic Monte Carlo we developed a code to study point defect hopping in BCC metallic alloys using energetics and attempt frequencies calculated using VASP, an electronic structure software package. Our code provides a way of simulating the effects of neutron radiation on potential reactor materials. Specifically we will compare the Molybdenum-Chromium alloy system to steel alloys for use in nuclear reactor pressure vessels.

  16. Cable aging and condition monitoring of radiation resistant nano-dielectrics in advanced reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, Robert C; Aytug, Tolga; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Kidder, Michelle; Polyzos, Georgios; Leonard, Keith J

    2015-01-01

    Cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) nanocomposites have been developed in an effort to improve cable insulation lifetime to serve in both instrument cables and auxiliary power systems in advanced reactor applications as well as to provide an alternative for new or retro-fit cable insulation installations. Nano-dielectrics composed of different weight percentages of MgO & SiO2 have been subjected to radiation at accumulated doses approaching 20 MRad and thermal aging temperatures exceeding 100 C. Depending on the composition, the performance of the nanodielectric insulation was influenced, both positively and negatively, when quantified with respect to its electrical and mechanical properties. For virgin unradiated or thermally aged samples, XLPE nanocomposites with 1wt.% SiO2 showed improvement in breakdown strength and reduction in its dissipation factor when compared to pure undoped XLPE, while XLPE 3wt.% SiO2 resulted in lower breakdown strength. When aged in air at 120 C, retention of electrical breakdown strength and dissipation factor was observed for XLPE 3wt.% MgO nanocomposites. Irrespective of the nanoparticle species, XLPE nanocomposites that were gamma irradiated up to the accumulated dose of 18 MRad showed a significant drop in breakdown strength especially for particle concentrations greater than 3 wt.%. Additional attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy measurements suggest changes in the structure of the XLPE SiO2 nanocomposites associated with the interaction of silicon and oxygen. Discussion on the relevance of property changes with respect to cable aging and condition monitoring is presented.

  17. Levels of naturally occurring gamma radiation measured in British homes and their prediction in particular residences.

    PubMed

    Kendall, G M; Wakeford, R; Athanson, M; Vincent, T J; Carter, E J; McColl, N P; Little, M P

    2016-03-01

    Gamma radiation from natural sources (including directly ionising cosmic rays) is an important component of background radiation. In the present paper, indoor measurements of naturally occurring gamma rays that were undertaken as part of the UK Childhood Cancer Study are summarised, and it is shown that these are broadly compatible with an earlier UK National Survey. The distribution of indoor gamma-ray dose rates in Great Britain is approximately normal with mean 96 nGy/h and standard deviation 23 nGy/h. Directly ionising cosmic rays contribute about one-third of the total. The expanded dataset allows a more detailed description than previously of indoor gamma-ray exposures and in particular their geographical variation. Various strategies for predicting indoor natural background gamma-ray dose rates were explored. In the first of these, a geostatistical model was fitted, which assumes an underlying geologically determined spatial variation, superimposed on which is a Gaussian stochastic process with Matérn correlation structure that models the observed tendency of dose rates in neighbouring houses to correlate. In the second approach, a number of dose-rate interpolation measures were first derived, based on averages over geologically or administratively defined areas or using distance-weighted averages of measurements at nearest-neighbour points. Linear regression was then used to derive an optimal linear combination of these interpolation measures. The predictive performances of the two models were compared via cross-validation, using a randomly selected 70 % of the data to fit the models and the remaining 30 % to test them. The mean square error (MSE) of the linear-regression model was lower than that of the Gaussian-Matérn model (MSE 378 and 411, respectively). The predictive performance of the two candidate models was also evaluated via simulation; the OLS model performs significantly better than the Gaussian-Matérn model. PMID:26880257

  18. Biological radiation dose from secondary particles in a Milky Way gamma-ray burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atri, Dimitra; Melott, Adrian L.; Karam, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are a class of highly energetic explosions emitting radiation in a very short timescale of a few seconds and with a very narrow opening angle. Although, all GRBs observed so far are extragalactic in origin, there is a high probability of a GRB of galactic origin beaming towards the Earth in the past ~0.5 Gyr. We define the level of catastrophic damage to the biosphere as approximation 100 kJ m-2, based on Thomas et al. (2005a, b). Using results in Melott & Thomas (2011), we estimate the probability of the Earth receiving this fluence from a GRB of any type, as 87% during the last 500 Myr. Such an intense burst of gamma rays would ionize the atmosphere and deplete the ozone (O3) layer. With depleted O3, there will be an increased flux of Solar UVB on the Earth's surface with potentially harmful biological effects. In addition to the atmospheric damage, secondary particles produced by gamma ray-induced showers will reach the surface. Among all secondary particles, muons dominate the ground-level secondary particle flux (99% of the total number of particles) and are potentially of biological significance. Using the Monte Carlo simulation code CORSIKA, we modelled the air showers produced by gamma-ray primaries up to 100 GeV. We found that the number of muons produced by the electromagnetic component of hypothetical galactic GRBs significantly increases the total muon flux. However, since the muon production efficiency is extremely low for photon energies below 100 GeV, and because GRBs radiate strongly for only a very short time, we find that the biological radiation dose from secondary muons is negligible. The main mechanism of biological damage from GRBs is through Solar UVB irradiation from the loss of O3 in the upper atmosphere.

  19. Comparative studies on PADC polymeric detector treated by gamma radiation and Ar ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Saftawy, A. A.; Abdel Reheem, A. M.; Kandil, S. A.; Abd El Aal, S. A.; Salama, S.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, a comparative analysis and evaluation of the induced defects in polyallyl diglycol carbonate (PADC) polymeric detector exposed to Ar+ and gamma radiation were made. To get insight into the structure defects due to irradiation, X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique was employed. The PADC surface structure changed after irradiation due to the reduction in the surface crystalline structure and the formation of disordered systems. Also, surface morphology changes were traced using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and showed minor surface irregularities after gamma irradiation and large changes upon Ar+ irradiation. Additionally, micro-hardness and friction coefficient of the irradiated samples were investigated and found to increase after irradiation. UV-vis spectroscopy was used to estimate the optical band gap energy which considered as the basis for calculating the number of conjugated carbon atoms responsible for the blackening effect and color changes took place over the PADC surface. It was found that as the applied dose increased, the band gap decreased and the number of carbon clusters get larger. The refractive index and the dispersion parameters for the studied polymer were calculated and discussed. Also, the induced defects on the polymer surface which serve as a non-radiative centers resulting in reduced photoluminescence (PL) intensity. For nearly all the measured parameters, gamma irradiated samples showed a significant changes compared to that induced by ions. But, low energy Ar+ prove efficiency in controlling surface properties of PADC polymer without affecting its sensitive bulk properties, besides that the obtained results are reasonable and comparable to that induced by gamma radiation.

  20. Terrestrial gamma radiation baseline mapping using ultra low density sampling methods.

    PubMed

    Kleinschmidt, R; Watson, D

    2016-01-01

    Baseline terrestrial gamma radiation maps are indispensable for providing basic reference information that may be used in assessing the impact of a radiation related incident, performing epidemiological studies, remediating land contaminated with radioactive materials, assessment of land use applications and resource prospectivity. For a large land mass, such as Queensland, Australia (over 1.7 million km(2)), it is prohibitively expensive and practically difficult to undertake detailed in-situ radiometric surveys of this scale. It is proposed that an existing, ultra-low density sampling program already undertaken for the purpose of a nationwide soil survey project be utilised to develop a baseline terrestrial gamma radiation map. Geoelement data derived from the National Geochemistry Survey of Australia (NGSA) was used to construct a baseline terrestrial gamma air kerma rate map, delineated by major drainage catchments, for Queensland. Three drainage catchments (sampled at the catchment outlet) spanning low, medium and high radioelement concentrations were selected for validation of the methodology using radiometric techniques including in-situ measurements and soil sampling for high resolution gamma spectrometry, and comparative non-radiometric analysis. A Queensland mean terrestrial air kerma rate, as calculated from the NGSA outlet sediment uranium, thorium and potassium concentrations, of 49 ± 69 nGy h(-1) (n = 311, 3σ 99% confidence level) is proposed as being suitable for use as a generic terrestrial air kerma rate background range. Validation results indicate that catchment outlet measurements are representative of the range of results obtained across the catchment and that the NGSA geoelement data is suitable for calculation and mapping of terrestrial air kerma rate. PMID:26063584

  1. Influence of Natural Convection and Thermal Radiation Multi-Component Transport in MOCVD Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, S.; Krishnan, A.; Clark, I.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of Grashof and Reynolds number in Metal Organic Chemical Vapor (MOCVD) reactors is being investigated under a combined empirical/numerical study. As part of that research, the deposition of Indium Phosphide in an MOCVD reactor is modeled using the computational code CFD-ACE. The model includes the effects of convection, conduction, and radiation as well as multi-component diffusion and multi-step surface/gas phase chemistry. The results of the prediction are compared with experimental data for a commercial reactor and analyzed with respect to the model accuracy.

  2. Characteristics of Neutron Fields for Radiation Protection and Other Applications at the Kinki University Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Tatsuya; Morishima, Hiroshige; Urabe, Itsumasa; Sagawa, Hiroyuki

    2003-06-01

    In order to get useful information about neutron energy spectrum and neutron dose, a versatile and accurate reactor model of the Kinki University Reactor (UTR-KINKI) was developed under the three-dimensional continuous-energy MCNP Monte Carlo code. The agreement between MCNP predictions and the experimentally determined values was very good. This paper describes characteristics of neutron fields at the Kinki University Reactor calculated with the present MCNP model of the UTR-KINKI. From the results obtained it was clear that these neutron fields are applicable to development and performance evaluation of personnel dosimeters and experimental studies on biological effects of low levels of radiation.

  3. 1989 neutron and gamma personnel dosimetry intercomparison study using RADCAL (Radiation Calibration Laboratory) sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, C.S.; Casson, W.H.; Patterson, G.R. ); Murakami, H. . Dept. of Health Physics); Liu, J.C. )

    1990-10-01

    The fourteenth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study (i.e., PDIS 14) was conducted during May 1-5, 1989. A total of 48 organizations (33 from the US and 15 from abroad) participated in PDIS 14. Participants submitted by mail a total of 1,302 neutron and gamma dosimeters for this mixed field study. The type of neutron dosimeter and the percentage of participants submitting that type are as follows: TLD-albedo (40%), direct interaction TLD (22%), track (20%), film (7%), combination (7%), and bubble detectors (4%). The type of gamma dosimeter and the percentage of participants submitting that type are as follows: TLD (84%) and film (16%). Radiation sources used in the six PDIS 14 exposures included {sup 252}Cf moderated by 15-cm D{sub 2}O, {sup 252}Cf moderated by 15-cm polyethylene (gamma-enhanced with {sup 137}Cs), and {sup 238}PuBe. Neutron dose equivalents ranged from 0.44--2.63 mSv and gamma doses ranged from 0. 01-1.85 mSv. One {sup 252}Cf(D{sub 2}O) exposure was performed at a 60{degree} angle of incidence (most performance tests are at perpendicular incidence). The average neutron dosimeter response for this exposure was 70% of that at normal incidence. The average gamma dosimeter response was 96% of that at normal incidence. A total of 70% of individual reported neutron dosimeter measurements were within {plus minus}50% of reference values. If the 0.01 mSv data are omitted, approximately 90% of the individual reported gamma measurements were within {plus minus}50% of reference values. 33 refs., 9 figs., 27 tabs.

  4. Size effects on gamma radiation response of magnetic properties of barium hexaferrite powders

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John; Kukkadapu, Ravi; Crum, Jarrod; Johnson, Brad; Droubay, Tim

    2011-12-01

    Little is currently known about the effects of gamma-ray irradiation on oxide magnet materials. In particular, the effect of particle size on radiation susceptibility was investigated. Two commercial powders of BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} were thoroughly characterized, then exposed to 1 MGy of gamma radiation from a {sup 60}Co source. AC susceptibility and DC magnetometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy were performed after irradiation and compared to pre-irradiated measurements. DC magnetization and AC susceptibility decreased for both samples with the relative change of DC magnetization being larger for the micrometer-sized particles and the relative change of the AC susceptibility being larger for the nanometer-sized particles. Moessbauer spectroscopy indicated a decrease in both the hyperfine fields and in their distribution for each Fe site, particularly in the larger particle sample. Decreases in susceptibility are believed to be due to radiation-induced amorphization at the particle surfaces as well as amorphization and nucleation of new crystallites at internal crystallite boundaries, resulting in overall reduction in the particle magnetic moment. This radiation damage mechanism is different than that seen in previous studies of neutron and heavy ion irradiation of BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}.

  5. Relative biological effectiveness of tritiated water to gamma radiation for germ line mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, B.J.; Lee, W.R.

    1989-03-01

    The relative biological effectiveness was determined using sex-linked recessive lethals induced in Drosophila spermatozoa as the biological effect. The sex-linked recessive lethal test, a measure of mutations induced in germ cells and transmitted through successive generations, yields a linear dose-response curve in the range used in these experiments. A dose-response curve was determined from three exposures to tritiated water and three exposures to /sup 60/Co gamma radiation. The ratio of the slopes of these two response curves is 2.7 +/- 0.3, yielding a relative biological effectiveness that suggests the tritium beta particle is 2.7 times more effective per unit of energy absorbed in inducing gene mutations transmitted to successive generations than /sup 60/Co gamma radiation. The increase in relative biological effectiveness with higher linear energy transfer for tritium beta radiation strongly suggests that single-strand breaks are repaired by a nearly error-free repair mechanism. Ion tracks with a high density of ions (high linear energy transfer) are more efficient than tracks with a low ion density (low linear energy transfer) in inducing transmissible mutations, suggesting interaction among products of ionization. Since most transmitted mutations induced by ionizing radiation result from strand breakage, interaction probably occurs at this level with double-strand breaks being repaired by an error-prone mechanism yielding transmissible mutations.

  6. Gamma radiation impact on performance of OOK, DPSK and homodyne BPSK based optical inter-satellite communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Zhao, Shanghong; Gong, Zizheng; Hou, Rui; Qiang, Ruoxin

    2015-09-01

    Performance of optical inter-satellite communication system is influenced by the harsh space radiation environment. Gamma radiation effects on main devices of communication system are analyzed and on the basis of existing experimental data, performance degradation of on off keying (OOK), differential phase shift keying (DPSK) and homodyne binary phase shift keying (BPSK) based system under 1 kGy gamma irradiation is simulated. Variation of Q factors and bit error ratio of these systems with different radiation position are achieved and discussed. The result shows that it is more urgent to improve the radiation hardness of transmitter, and the introduction of local laser is a considerable method to reduce gamma radiation impact on system performance.

  7. Dosimetric comparison of tools for intensity modulated radiation therapy with gamma analysis: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbas, Ugur; Okutan, Murat; Demir, Bayram; Koksal, Canan

    2015-07-01

    Dosimetry of the Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is very important because of the complex dose distributions. Diode arrays are the most common and practical measurement tools for clinical usage for IMRT. Phantom selection is critical for QA process. IMRT treatment plans are recalculated for the phantom irradiation in QA. Phantoms are made in different geometrical shapes to measure the doses of different types of irradiation techniques. Comparison of measured and calculated dose distributions for IMRT can be made by using gamma analysis. In this study, 10 head-and-neck IMRT QA plans were created with Varian Eclipse 8.9 treatment planning system. Water equivalent RW3-slab phantoms, Octavius-2 phantom and PTW Seven29 2D-array were used for QA measurements. Gantry, collimator and couch positions set to 00 and QA plans were delivered to RW3 and Octavius phantoms. Then the positions set to original angles and QA plans irradiated again. Measured and calculated fluence maps were evaluated with gamma analysis for different DD and DTA criteria. The effect of different set-up conditions for RW3 and Octavius phantoms in QA plan delivery evaluated by gamma analysis. Results of gamma analysis show that using RW3-slab phantoms with setting parameters to 00 is more appropriate for IMRT QA.

  8. Effects of sterilizing doses of gamma radiation on Mars analog rocks and minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Albert, Fred G.; Combie, Joan; Banin, Amos; Yablekovitch, Yehuda; Kan, Ido; Bodnar, Robert J.; Hamilton, Victoria E.; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Kuebler, Karla; Wang, Alian; Lindstrom, David J.; Morris, Penny A.; Morris, Richard V.; Murray, Richard W.; Nyquist, Laurence E.; Simpson, Paul D.; Steele, Andrew; Symes, Steven J.

    Rock and soil samples from the planet Mars are due to be returned to Earth within a decade. Martian samples initially will be tested for evidence of life and biological hazard under strict biological containment. Wider distribution of samples for organic and inorganic analysis may occur only if neither evidence of life nor hazard is detected, or if the samples are first sterilized. We subjected a range of Mars analog rocks and minerals to high doses of gamma radiation in order to determine the effects of gamma sterilization on the samples' isotopic, chemical, and physical properties. Gamma photons from 60Co (1.17 and 1.33 MeV) in doses as high as 3×107rads did not induce radioactivity in the samples and produced no measurable changes in their isotopic and chemical compositions. This level of irradiation also produced no measurable changes in the crystallographic structure of any sample, the surface areas of soil analogs, or the fluid inclusion homogenization temperature of quartz. The only detectable effects of irradiation were dose-dependent changes in the visible and near-infrared spectral region (e.g., discoloration and darkening of quartz and halite and an increase in albedo of carbonates) and increases in the thermoluminescence of quartz and plagioclase. If samples returned from Mars require biological sterilization, gamma irradiation provides a feasible option.

  9. Radiation-induced degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid in aqueous solutions by gamma ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Wenbao; He, Yanquan; Ling, Yongsheng; Hei, Daqian; Shan, Qing; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jiatong

    2015-04-01

    The radiation-induced degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid under gamma ray irradiation was investigated. Degradation experiments were performed with 100 mL sealed Pyrex glass vessels loaded with 80 mL of cyclohexanebutyric acid solutions at various initial concentrations of 10, 20, and 40 mg L-1. The absorbed doses were controlled at 0, 0.65, 1.95, 3.25, 6.5, 9.75, and 13 kGy. The results showed that gamma ray irradiation could effectively degrade cyclohexanebutyric acid in aqueous solutions. The removal rate of cyclohexanebutyric acid increased significantly with the increase of absorbed dose and the decrease of its initial concentration. At the same time, the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was as effective as that of cyclohexanebutyric acid. The kinetic studies showed that the degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid followed pseudo first-order reaction. Above all, the proposed mechanism obtained when NaNO2, NaNO3 and tert-butanol were added showed that the •OH radical played a major role in the gamma degradation process of cyclohexanebutyric acid, while •H and eaq- played a minor role in the gamma degradation process. The degradation products were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) during cyclohexanebutyric acid degradation.

  10. Studies on production of fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) by gamma radiation processing of microbial levan.

    PubMed

    Jalan, N; Varshney, Lalit; Misra, Nilanjal; Paul, Jhimli; Mitra, D; Rairakhwada, D D; Bhathena, Z; Kumar, Virendra

    2013-07-01

    Microbial levan, a natural polymer of fructose, was produced and purified by alcohol precipitation from culture supernatants of Bacillus megaterium type 1 grown in an optimized liquid sucrose medium. GPC analysis showed that the yield of the major fraction of levan having molecular weight ~5000 D increased with increase in sucrose concentration in the broth. Levan subjected to (60)Co-gamma radiation as well as acid hydrolysis was investigated by rheometry, UV-visible spectrophotometry and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) techniques. Unlike most of the polysaccharides, levan powder exhibited good radiation degradation stability up to 150 kGy. Gamma irradiation of 10% levan aqueous solution at 250 kGy yielded 63.0% fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS) with an average molecular weight of 1250 D. Acid hydrolysis of levan using 0.5 N HCl for 60 min treatment time gave rise to the desired FOS with lower yield (23.1%) as compared to that obtained in gamma radiolysis process. PMID:23688493

  11. Effect of gamma radiation on growth and survival of common seed-borne fungi in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, J. P.; Chakraborty, A.; Chanda, S.; Santra, S. C.

    2008-07-01

    The present work describes radiation-induced effects of major seeds like Oryza sativa Cv-2233, Oryza sativa Cv-Shankar, Cicer arietinum Cv-local and seed-borne fungi like Alternaria sp., Aspergillus sp., Trichoderma sp. and Curvularia sp. 60Co gamma source at 25 °C emitting gamma ray at 1173 and 1332 keV energy was used for irradiation. Dose of gamma irradiation up to 3 kGy (0.12 kGy/h) was applied for exposing the seed and fungal spores. Significant depletion of the fungal population was noted with irradiation at 1-2 kGy, whereas germinating potential of the treated grain did not alter significantly. However, significant differential radiation response in delayed seed germination, colony formation of the fungal spores and their depletion of growth were noticed in a dose-dependent manner. The depletion of the fungal viability (germination) was noted within the irradiation dose range of 1-2 kGy for Alternaria sp. and Aspergillus sp., while 0.5-1 kGy for Trichoderma sp. and Curvularia sp. However, complete inhibition of all the selected fungi was observed above 2.5 kGy.

  12. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis of salt-tolerant tobacco mutants generated by gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Çelik, Ö; Atak, Ç

    2015-01-01

    Salinity is one of the major problems limiting the yield of agricultural products. Radiation mutagenesis is used to improve salt-tolerant mutant plants. In this study, we aimed to improve salt-tolerant mutants of two oriental tobacco varieties. One thousand seeds of each variety (M₀) were irradiated with 100, 200, 300, and 400 Gy gamma rays by Cs-137 gamma. In the M₁ generation, 2999 single plants were harvested. The next season, these seeds were bulked and planted to obtain M₂ progeny. The seeds of 1900 M₂ plants were picked separately. Salinity tolerance was tested in the M₃ generation. Among M₃ plantlets, 10 salt-tolerant tobacco mutants were selected. According to the results of the selection studies, 100- and 200-Gy gamma radiation doses were the effective doses to obtain the desired mutants. Glutathione reductase enzyme activities of salt-tolerant tobacco mutants were determined biochemically as a stress-tolerance marker. The differences between control and salt-tolerant mutants belonging to the Akhisar 97 and İzmir Özbaş tobacco varieties were evaluated by random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis. The total polymorphism rate was 73.91%. PMID:25730072

  13. Attenuation of X and Gamma Rays in Personal Radiation Shielding Protective Clothing.

    PubMed

    Kozlovska, Michaela; Cerny, Radek; Otahal, Petr

    2015-11-01

    A collection of personal radiation shielding protective clothing, suitable for use in case of accidents in nuclear facilities or radiological emergency situations involving radioactive agents, was gathered and tested at the Nuclear Protection Department of the National Institute for Nuclear, Chemical and Biological Protection, Czech Republic. Attenuating qualities of shielding layers in individual protective clothing were tested via spectra measurement of x and gamma rays, penetrating them. The rays originated from different radionuclide point sources, the gamma ray energies of which cover a broad energy range. The spectra were measured by handheld spectrometers, both scintillation and High Purity Germanium. Different narrow beam geometries were adjusted using a special testing bench and a set of various collimators. The main experimentally determined quantity for individual samples of personal radiation shielding protective clothing was x and gamma rays attenuation for significant energies of the spectra. The attenuation was assessed comparing net peak areas (after background subtraction) in spectra, where a tested sample was placed between the source and the detector, and corresponding net peak areas in spectra, measured without the sample. Mass attenuation coefficients, which describe attenuating qualities of shielding layers materials in individual samples, together with corresponding lead equivalents, were determined as well. Experimentally assessed mass attenuation coefficients of the samples were compared to the referred ones for individual heavy metals. PMID:26425983

  14. Verification by the FISH translocation assay of historic doses to Mayak workers from external gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Sotnik, Natalia V; Azizova, Tamara V; Darroudi, Firouz; Ainsbury, Elizabeth A; Moquet, Jayne E; Fomina, Janna; Lloyd, David C; Hone, Pat A; Edwards, Alan A

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to apply the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) translocation assay in combination with chromosome painting of peripheral blood lymphocytes for retrospective biological dosimetry of Mayak nuclear power plant workers exposed chronically to external gamma radiation. These data were compared with physical dose estimates based on monitoring with badge dosimeters throughout each person's working life. Chromosome translocation yields for 94 workers of the Mayak production association were measured in three laboratories: Southern Urals Biophysics Institute, Leiden University Medical Center and the former Health Protection Agency of the UK (hereinafter Public Health England). The results of the study demonstrated that the FISH-based translocation assay in workers with prolonged (chronic) occupational gamma-ray exposure was a reliable biological dosimeter even many years after radiation exposure. Cytogenetic estimates of red bone marrow doses from external gamma rays were reasonably consistent with dose measurements based on film badge readings successfully validated in dosimetry system "Doses-2005" by FISH, within the bounds of the associated uncertainties. PMID:26319788

  15. Oxidative stress and gamma radiation-induced cancellous bone loss with musculoskeletal disuse

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Hisataka; Yumoto, Kenji; Alwood, Joshua S.; Mojarrab, Rose; Wang, Angela; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.; Searby, Nancy D.; Limoli, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure of astronauts in space to radiation during weightlessness may contribute to subsequent bone loss. Gamma irradiation of postpubertal mice rapidly increases the number of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and causes bone loss in cancellous tissue; similar changes occur in skeletal diseases associated with oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that increased oxidative stress mediates radiation-induced bone loss and that musculoskeletal disuse changes the sensitivity of cancellous tissue to radiation exposure. Musculoskeletal disuse by hindlimb unloading (1 or 2 wk) or total body gamma irradiation (1 or 2 Gy of 137Cs) of 4-mo-old, male C57BL/6 mice each decreased cancellous bone volume fraction in the proximal tibiae and lumbar vertebrae. The extent of radiation-induced acute cancellous bone loss in tibiae and lumbar vertebrae was similar in normally loaded and hindlimb-unloaded mice. Similarly, osteoclast surface in the tibiae increased 46% as a result of irradiation, 47% as a result of hindlimb unloading, and 64% as a result of irradiation + hindlimb unloading compared with normally loaded mice. Irradiation, but not hindlimb unloading, reduced viability and increased apoptosis of marrow cells and caused oxidative damage to lipids within mineralized tissue. Irradiation also stimulated generation of reactive oxygen species in marrow cells. Furthermore, injection of α-lipoic acid, an antioxidant, mitigated the acute bone loss caused by irradiation. Together, these results showed that disuse and gamma irradiation, alone or in combination, caused a similar degree of acute cancellous bone loss and shared a common cellular mechanism of increased bone resorption. Furthermore, irradiation, but not disuse, may increase the number of osteoclasts and the extent of acute bone loss via increased reactive oxygen species production and ensuing oxidative damage, implying different molecular mechanisms. The finding that α-lipoic acid protected cancellous tissue from the

  16. Effects of proton and gamma radiation on lymphocyte populations and acute response to antigen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kajioka, E. H.; Gheorghe, C.; Andres, M. L.; Abell, G. A.; Folz-Holbeck, J.; Slater, J. M.; Nelson, G. A.; Gridley, D. S.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical use of proton radiation in the management of cancer, as well as benign disorders, is rapidly increasing. The major goal of this study was to compare the effects of proton and gamma (60Co) radiation on cell-mediated and humoral immunological parameters. MATERIALS AND METHODS: C57BL/6 mice were exposed to a single dose of 3 Gray (Gy) protons or gamma-rays and intraperitoneally injected 1 day later with sheep red blood cells (sRBC). On 4, 10, 15, and 29 days after exposure, subsets from each group were euthanised; nonirradiated controls (with and without sRBC injection) were included. Body and relative spleen weights, leukocyte counts, spontaneous blastogenesis, lymphocyte populations, and anti-sRBC titers were evaluated. RESULTS: The data showed significant depression (p < 0.05) in nearly all assays on days 4 and 10 after irradiation. B lymphocytes (CD19+) were the most radiosensitive, although reconstitution back to normal levels was observed by day 15. T cell (CD3+) and T helper cell (CD4+) recovery was evident by day 29, whereas the T cytotoxic cell (CD8+) count remained significantly below normal. Natural killer cells (NK1.1+) were relatively radioresistant. Anti-sRBC antibody production was slow and low titers were obtained after irradiation. No significant differences were noted between the two types of radiation. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, the data show that whole-body irradiation with protons or gamma-rays, at the dose employed, results in marked, but transient, immunosuppression. However, at the time points of testing and with the assays used, little or no differences were found between the two forms of radiation.

  17. Effect of gamma radiation on membrane fluidity of MOLT-4 nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    McClain, D.E.; Trypus, C.A.; May, L.

    1990-01-01

    These experiments measured the effect of gamma radiation on the nuclear envelope using doxyl-fatty acid spin-label probes. Nuclei were isolated from cultured MOLT-4 cells, a radiation-sensitive human T-cell lymphocyte. Membrane fluidity was measured from the electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the probes. MOLT-4 cells were grown under standard conditions, and suspension were exposed to CO radiation at room temperature. The spectra of 5-doxylstearic acid in the nuclei were those of a strongly immobilized label. A difference in the membrane fluidity was detected in a series of experiments comparing labeled irradiated and nonirradiated nuclei. The change in fluidity was measured by comparing the changes in the order parameter, S, of the spin label in irradiated nuclei with those in control nuclei.

  18. Terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in Ryukyu Islands, subtropical region of Japan.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, M; Kina, S; Shiroma, M; Shiroma, Y; Masuda, N; Motomura, D; Hiraoka, H; Fujioka, S; Kawakami, T; Yasuda, Y; Arakawa, K; Fukahori, K; Jyunicho, M; Ishikawa, S; Ohomoto, T; Shingaki, R; Akata, N; Zhuo, W; Tokonami, S

    2015-11-01

    In order to explain the distribution of natural radiation level in the Asia, in situ measurements of dose rate in air due to terrestrial gamma radiation have been conducted in a total of 21 islands that belong to Ryukyu Islands (Ryukyu Archipelago), subtropical rejoin of southwest Japan. Car-borne surveys have also been carried out in Okinawa-jima, the biggest island of the archipelago. Based on the results for these measurements, arithmetic mean, the maximum and the minimum of the dose rates at 1 m in height from the unpaved soil ground in the archipelago were estimated to be 47, 165 and 8 nGy h(-1), respectively. A comparative study of car-borne data obtained prior to and subsequent to the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident, as for Okinawa-jima, indicated that the nuclear accident has no impact on the environmental radiation at the present time. PMID:26065703

  19. GAMMA-RAY BURST PROMPT EMISSION: JITTER RADIATION IN STOCHASTIC MAGNETIC FIELD REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Jirong; Wang Jiancheng

    2011-04-10

    We revisit the radiation mechanism of relativistic electrons in the stochastic magnetic field and apply it to the high-energy emissions of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We confirm that jitter radiation is a possible explanation for GRB prompt emission in the condition of a large electron deflection angle. In the turbulent scenario, the radiative spectral property of GRB prompt emission is decided by the kinetic energy spectrum of turbulence. The intensity of the random and small-scale magnetic field is determined by the viscous scale of the turbulent eddy. The microphysical parameters {epsilon}{sub e} and {epsilon}{sub B} can be obtained. The acceleration and cooling timescales are estimated as well. Due to particle acceleration in magnetized filamentary turbulence, the maximum energy released from the relativistic electrons can reach a value of about 10{sup 14} eV. The GeV GRBs are possible sources of high-energy cosmic-ray.

  20. Radiation dosimetry for NCT facilities at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.; Hu, J.P.; Greenberg, D.D.; Reciniello, R.N.

    1998-12-31

    Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) is a 3 mega-watt (MW) heterogeneous, tank-type, light water cooled and moderated, graphite reflected reactor, which was designed for medical and biological studies and became operational in 1959. Over time, the BMRR was modified to provide thermal and epithermal neutron beams suitable for research studies. NCT studies have been performed at both the epithermal neutron irradiation facility (ENIF) on the east side of the BMRR reactor core and the thermal neutron irradiation facility (TNIF) on the west side of the core. Neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry performed from 1994 to the present in both facilities are described and the results are presented and discussed.

  1. Complete suppression of reverse annealing of neutron radiation damage during active gamma irradiation in MCZ Si detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Verbitskaya, E.; Chen, W.; Eremin, V.; Gul, R.; Härkönen, J.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Kierstead, J.; Metcalfe, J.; Seidel, S.

    2013-01-01

    For the development of radiation-hard Si detectors for the SiD BeamCal (Si Detector Beam Calorimeter) program for International Linear Collider (ILC), n-type Magnetic Czochralski Si detectors have been irradiated first by fast neutrons to fluences of 1.5×1014 and 3×1014 neq/cm2, and then by gamma up to 500 Mrad. The motivation of this mixed radiation project is to test the radiation hardness of MCZ detectors that may utilize the gamma/electron radiation to compensate the negative effects caused by neutron irradiation, all of which exists in the ILC radiation environment. By using the positive space charge created by gamma radiation in MCZ Si detectors, one can cancel the negative space charge created by neutrons, thus reducing the overall net space charge density and therefore the full depletion voltage of the detector. It has been found that gamma radiation has suppressed the room temperature reverse annealing in neutron-irradiated detectors during the 5.5 month of time needed to reach a radiation dose of 500 Mrad. The room temperature annealing (RTA) was verified in control samples (irradiated to the same neutron fluences, but going through this 5.5 month RTA without gamma radiation). This suppression is in agreement with our previous predictions, since negative space charge generated during the reverse annealing was suppressed by positive space charge induced by gamma radiation. The effect is that regardless of the received neutron fluence the reverse annealing is totally suppressed by the same dose of gamma rays (500 Mrad). It has been found that the full depletion voltage for the two detectors irradiated to two different neutron fluences stays the same before and after gamma radiation. Meanwhile, for the control samples also irradiated to two different neutron fluences, full depletion voltages have gone up during this period. The increase in full depletion voltage in the control samples corresponds to the generation of negative space charge, and this

  2. High Resolution Gamma Ray Tomography and its Application to the Measurement of Phase Fractions in Chemical Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, Uwe; Bieberle, Andre; Schleicher, Eckhard; Hessel, Günther; Zippe, Cornelius; Friedrich, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-06-01

    We applied gamma ray tomography to the problem of phase fraction measurement in chemical reactors. Therefore, we used a new tomography device that is operated with a Cs-137 source and a high resolution gamma ray detector. One application example is the reconstruction of the fluid distribution and the measurement of radial gas fraction profiles in a laboratory scale stirred vessel. The tomograph was used to obtain radiographic projections of the averaged gamma ray attenuation for different stirrer speeds along the height of the vessel. With tomographic reconstruction techniques we calculated the angularly averaged radial distribution of the attenuation coefficient for as many as 150 single cross-sectional planes and synthesised from this data set the axial and radial fluid distribution pattern. Further, we exemplarily reconstructed the radial gas fraction distributions induced by the stirrer in the area of the stirrer blades. In a second application the gamma ray measurement system was used to visualise gas inclusions in a water cleaning column that is used to remove hazardous heavy metal species from water.

  3. Effect of gamma radiation on native endolithic microorganisms from a radioactive waste deposit site.

    PubMed

    Pitonzo, B J; Amy, P S; Rudin, M

    1999-07-01

    A time-course experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of gamma radiation on the indigenous microbiota present in rock obtained from Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site. Microcosms were constructed by placing pulverized Yucca Mountain rock in polystyrene cylinders. Continuous exposure (96 h) at a dose rate of 1.63 Gy/min was used to mimic the near-field environment surrounding waste canisters. The expected maximum surface dose rate from one unbreached canister designed to contain spent nuclear fuels is 0.06 Gy/min. Considering the current repository packing design, multiple canisters within one vault, the cumulative dose rate may well approach that used in this experiment. The microbial communities were characterized after receiving cumulative doses of 0, 0.098, 0. 58, 2.33, 4.67, 7.01 and 9.34 kGy. Radiation-resistant microorganisms in the pulverized rock became viable but nonculturable (VBNC) after a cumulative dose of 2.33 kGy. VBNC microorganisms lose the ability to grow on media on which they have routinely been cultured in response to the environmental stress imposed (i.e. radiation) but can be detected throughout the time course using direct fluorescence microscopy techniques. Two representative exopolysaccharide-producing isolates from Yucca Mountain were exposed to the same radiation regimen in sand microcosms. One isolate was much more radiation-resistant than the other, but both had greater resistance than the general microbial community based on culturable counts. However, when respiring cell counts (VBNC) were compared after irradiation, the results would indicate much more radiation resistance of the individual isolates and the microbial community in general. These results have significant implications for underground storage of nuclear waste as they indicate that indigenous microorganisms are capable of surviving gamma irradiation in a VBNC state. PMID:10381842

  4. On the conversion of infrared radiation from fission reactor-based photon engine into parallel beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulevich, Andrey V.; Levchenko, Vladislav E.; Loginov, Nicolay I.; Kukharchuk, Oleg F.; Evtodiev, Denis A.; Zrodnikov, Anatoly V.

    2002-01-01

    The efficiency of infrared radiation conversion from photon engine based on fission reactor into parallel photon beam is discussed. Two different ways of doing that are considered. One of them is to use the parabolic mirror to convert of infrared radiation into parallel photon beam. The another one is based on the use of special lattice consisting of numerous light conductors. The experimental facility and some results are described. .

  5. Radiative-neutron-capture gamma-ray analysis by a linear combination technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, A.B.; Bhargava, R.C.; Senftle, F.E.; Brinkerhoff, J.M.

    1972-01-01

    The linear combination technique, when applied to a gamma-ray spectrum, gives a single number indicative of the extent to which the spectral lines of a sought element are present in a complex spectrum. Spectra are taken of the sought element and of various other substances whose spectra interfere with that of the sought element. A weighting function is then computed for application to spectra of unknown materials. The technique was used to determine calcium by radiative-neutron-capture gamma-ray analysis in the presence of interfering elements, notably titanium, and the results were compared with those for two popular methods of peak area integration. Although linearity of response was similar for the methods, the linear combination technique was much better at rejecting interferences. For analyses involving mixtures of unknown composition the technique consequently offers improved sensitivity. ?? 1972.

  6. Gamma radiation dosimetry using a NaCl:Ba(T) thermoluminescent phosphor.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, O H; Joshi, T R; Nambi, K S; Joshi, R V

    1986-07-01

    A detailed examination is presented of the thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics of untreated and heat-treated pure and Ba-doped NaCl exposed to gamma radiation at room temperature. The NaCl:Ba (10(-2) molar fraction) phosphor quenched from 750 degrees C, designated as NaCl:Ba(T), is found to give a pronounced TL output with a well-defined glow peak around 220 degrees C (peak III) along with other peaks at lower temperatures. It is suggested that the TL centre associated with glow peak III is comprised of an impurity-vacancy dipole with a negative ion vacancy in its vicinity. The TL centres are presumed to be located in the dislocation region. The dosimetric properties of peak III after gamma irradiation have also been examined. It is observed that most of the basic requirements of an efficient TLD material are fulfilled by the phosphor. PMID:3455404

  7. Gamma radiation dosimetry using a NaCl:Ba(T) thermoluminescent phosphor

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, O.H.; Joshi, T.R.; Nambi, K.S.; Joshi, R.V.

    1986-07-01

    A detailed examination is presented of the thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics of untreated and heat-treated pure and Ba-doped NaCl exposed to gamma radiation at room temperature. The NaCl:Ba (10(-2) molar fraction) phosphor quenched from 750 degrees C, designated as NaCl:Ba(T), is found to give a pronounced TL output with a well-defined glow peak around 220 degrees C (peak III) along with other peaks at lower temperatures. It is suggested that the TL centre associated with glow peak III is comprised of an impurity-vacancy dipole with a negative ion vacancy in its vicinity. The TL centres are presumed to be located in the dislocation region. The dosimetric properties of peak III after gamma irradiation have also been examined. It is observed that most of the basic requirements of an efficient TLD material are fulfilled by the phosphor.

  8. Consequences of lethal-whole-body gamma radiation and possible ameliorative role of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Mihandoost, Ehsan; Shirazi, Alireza; Mahdavi, Seied Rabie; Aliasgharzadeh, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Gamma radiation induces the generation of free radicals, leading to serious cellular damages in biological systems. Radioprotectors act as prophylactic agents that are administered to shield normal cells and tissues from the deleterious effects of radiation. Melatonin synergistically acts as an immune-stimulator and antioxidant. We investigated the possible radioprotective role of melatonin (100 mg/kg i.p.) against lethal-whole-body radiation- (10 Gy) induced sickness, body weight loss, and mortality in rats. Results of the present study suggest that exposure to lethal-whole-body radiation incurred mortality, body weight loss, and apoptosis and it also depleted the immunity and the antioxidant status of the rats. Our results show that melatonin pretreatment provides protection against radiation induced mortality, oxidative stress, and immune-suppression. The melatonin pretreated irradiated rats showed less change in body weight as compared to radiation only group. On the other hand, melatonin appeared to have another radioprotective role, suggesting that melatonin may reduce apoptosis through a caspase-3-mediated pathway by blocking caspase-3 activity. PMID:25431791

  9. Consequences of Lethal-Whole-Body Gamma Radiation and Possible Ameliorative Role of Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Mihandoost, Ehsan; Shirazi, Alireza; Mahdavi, Seied Rabie; Aliasgharzadeh, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Gamma radiation induces the generation of free radicals, leading to serious cellular damages in biological systems. Radioprotectors act as prophylactic agents that are administered to shield normal cells and tissues from the deleterious effects of radiation. Melatonin synergistically acts as an immune-stimulator and antioxidant. We investigated the possible radioprotective role of melatonin (100 mg/kg i.p.) against lethal-whole-body radiation- (10 Gy) induced sickness, body weight loss, and mortality in rats. Results of the present study suggest that exposure to lethal-whole-body radiation incurred mortality, body weight loss, and apoptosis and it also depleted the immunity and the antioxidant status of the rats. Our results show that melatonin pretreatment provides protection against radiation induced mortality, oxidative stress, and immune-suppression. The melatonin pretreated irradiated rats showed less change in body weight as compared to radiation only group. On the other hand, melatonin appeared to have another radioprotective role, suggesting that melatonin may reduce apoptosis through a caspase-3-mediated pathway by blocking caspase-3 activity. PMID:25431791

  10. Reactor Decay Heat in {sup 239}Pu: Solving the {gamma} Discrepancy in the 4-3000-s Cooling Period

    SciTech Connect

    Algora, A.; Jordan, D.; Tain, J. L.; Rubio, B.; Agramunt, J.; Perez-Cerdan, A. B.; Molina, F.; Caballero, L.; Nacher, E.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Hunyadi, M. D.; Gulyas, J.; Vitez, A.; Csatlos, M.; Csige, L.; Aeysto, J.; Penttilae, H.; Moore, I. D.; Eronen, T.; Jokinen, A.

    2010-11-12

    The {beta} feeding probability of {sup 102,104,105,106,107}Tc, {sup 105}Mo, and {sup 101}Nb nuclei, which are important contributors to the decay heat in nuclear reactors, has been measured using the total absorption technique. We have coupled for the first time a total absorption spectrometer to a Penning trap in order to obtain sources of very high isobaric purity. Our results solve a significant part of a long-standing discrepancy in the {gamma} component of the decay heat for {sup 239}Pu in the 4-3000 s range.

  11. Gamma radiation and magnetic field mediated delay in effect of accelerated ageing of soybean.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mahesh; Singh, Bhupinder; Ahuja, Sumedha; Dahuja, Anil; Anand, Anjali

    2015-08-01

    Soybean seeds were exposed to gamma radiation (0.5, 1, 3 and 5 kGy), static magnetic field (50, 100 and 200 mT) and a combination of gamma radiation and magnetic energy (0.5 kGy + 200 mT and 5 kGy + 50 mT) and stored at room temperature for six months. These seeds were later subjected to accelerated ageing treatment at 42 °C temperature and 95-100 % relative humidity and were compared for various physical and biochemical characteristics between the untreated and the energized treatments. Energy treatment protected the quality of stored seeds in terms of its protein and oil content . Accelerated aging conditions, however, affected the oil and protein quantity and quality of seed negatively. Antioxidant enzymes exhibited a decline in their activity during aging while the LOX activity, which reflects the rate of lipid peroxidation, in general, increased during the aging. Gamma irradiated (3 and 5 kGy) and magnetic field treated seeds (100 and 200 mT) maintained a higher catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activity which may help in efficient scavenging of deleterious free radical produced during the aging. Aging caused peroxidative changes to lipids, which could be contributed to the loss of oil quality. Among the electromagnetic energy treatments, a dose of 1-5 kGy of gamma and 100 mT, 200 mT magnetic field effectively slowed the rate of biochemical degradation and loss of cellular integrity in seeds stored under conditions of accelerated aging and thus, protected the deterioration of seed quality. Energy combination treatments did not yield any additional protection advantage. PMID:26243899

  12. A preliminary assessment of a radiatively coupled in-core thermionic space reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Albert C.; King, Donald B.; Wilson, Volney C.; Houts, Michael G.

    1997-01-01

    A radiatively-coupled in-core thermionic space reactor is proposed that may offer a number of economic and performance benefits. This design combines the advantages of fuel loading after conducting non-nuclear system tests (characteristic of a single-cell design) with the performance benefits of a multi-cell design. Permitting full system tests without nuclear fuel can significantly reduce testing costs while improving reliability of the flight system. In addition, the approach permits the entire system to be transported to the launch site without nuclear fuel. Consequently, program planners can avoid the expensive development of a large shipping cask, or the potential costly completion of system assembly at the launch site. The concept uses a fast reactor as the power source; therefore, the development of a moderator capable of long operational times and high temperature is unnecessary. A fast reactor also permits the use of refractory materials without a significant critical mass penalty from resonance capture of neutrons. The high operating temperature permitted by refractory materials and multi-cell performance improvements will increase system efficiency and reduce radiator surface area requirements. The combination of higher efficiency and reduced radiator area can reduce system size and mass, resulting in launch cost savings. A conceptual design of the reactor power system has been completed. The RSMASS-D model was used to estimate a mass optimized system configuration. System mass predictions for the proposed concept compare favorably to mass predictions for alternative space reactor power system approaches.

  13. Interaction of ultraviolet and X-ray radiation with gamma rays produced by a jet in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zbyszewska, Magda

    1994-01-01

    Recent observations by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory give evidence for the existence of a type of blazar with strong gamma-ray emission. Data obtained by EGRET for the quasar 3C 279 show a spectrum between 100 MeV and 10 GeV. Photons of such energies should interact with the X-rays and produce positron/electron pairs. If the optical depth against pair production for the gamma rays is large (tau(gamma gamma) greater than 1), the gamma-ray spectrum should be affected. The importance of this process has been pointed out by, e.g., Maraschi, Ghisellini, & Celotti (1992). Several works (e.g., Dermer 1993; Zbyszewska 1993; Sikora, Begelman, & Rees 1993) concerning gamma-ray radiation from quasar 3C 279 have proposed a model in which the gamma rays are produced via interaction between a moving cloud of relativistic electrons and external soft photons. The presence of gamma rays in active galactic nuclei spectra gives constraints on the localization and the luminosity of the medium which produces ultraviolet/X-ray photons. We investigate what conditions should be fulfilled in the above model to avoid the absorption of the gamma rays due to pair production.

  14. Induction of transpositions of MGE Dm412 by {gamma}-radiation in an isogenic line of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Zabanov, S.A.; Vasil`eva, L.A.; Ratner, V.A. |

    1995-06-01

    In an isogenic line of Drosophila, transpositions of mobile genetic elements (MGE) Dm412 were induced by {gamma}-radiation at doses of 300, 800, and 1300 R. The rates of induced transpositions were (for each dose, respectively) 3.9 x 10{sup {minus}3}, 1.0 x 10{sup {minus}2}, and 1.87 x 10{sup {minus}2} events per occupied site per haploid genome of the isogenic line per generation. Thus, the transposition rate increased linearly with the radiation dose. The specific rate of {gamma}-radiation-induced transpositions was (1.3 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup {minus}5} per occupied site per haploid genome of the isogenic line per Roentgen per generation. {gamma}-Radiation-induced hot transposition sites and haplotypes, very similar to those induced by heat shock, were found. It was suggested that the mechanism of induction by {gamma}-radiation involves the heat shock system. Thus, it is more similar to the mechanism of temperature induction than to the direct mutational effect of {gamma}-radiation. Estimates of induced transposition rates per genome for each dose were calculated as 1.1, 3.0, and 5.6 events, respectively, per genome per generation. This level probably corresponds to the subthreshold level of genomes near the {open_quotes}catastrophic border of transpositional losses.{close_quotes} 21 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  15. Study of radiation limits in fusion reactor scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, G.

    1999-07-01

    Radiative mantle scenarios of the ignited ITER FDR (Final Design Report) with argon and neon seeding are explored by self-consistent simulations with a special version of the 1.5-D BALDUR predictive transport code. The calculations apply empirical transport coefficients and are carried out both in the bulk and in the SOL. Operation relevant upper limits to the radiative power losses from the main chamber, from closed flux surfaces and from the SOL are found. Both simulations and an analytic study of power balances show that these limits are set by the radiation profile and by the cross-field heat conduction in the SOL. For given heating power, the conductive heat flux across the separatrix and the energy flow to the divertor are also restricted. With high edge density, the required thermal energy confinement times at the radiation limits are found to be 4.4 s in the argon and 4.0 s in the neon scenario. The assumption of flat density profiles and no inward pinch in the whole plasma is supported by simulations using a new scaling relation for the anomalous inward drift. The dependence of the radiation limits on the separatrix density is investigated. Formulas for relevant power limits are presented.

  16. Amorphous and crystalline optical materials used as instruments for high gamma radiation doses estimations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioan, M.-R.

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear radiation induce some changes to the structure of exposed materials. The main effect of ionizing radiation when interacting with optical materials is the occurrence of color centers, which are quantitatively proportional to the up-taken doses. In this paper, a relation between browning effect magnitude and dose values was found. Using this relation, the estimation of a gamma radiation dose can be done. By using two types of laser wavelengths (532 nm and 633 nm), the optical powers transmitted thru glass samples irradiated to different doses between 0 and 59.1 kGy, were measured and the associated optical browning densities were determined. The use of laser light gives the opportunity of using its particularities: monochromaticity, directionality and coherence. Polarized light was also used for enhancing measurements quality. These preliminary results bring the opportunity of using glasses as detectors for the estimation of the dose in a certain point in space and for certain energy, especially in particles accelerators experiments, where the occurred nuclear reactions are involving the presence of high gamma rays fields.

  17. Gamma rays from muons from WIMPs: Implementation of radiative muon decays for dark matter analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaffidi, Andre; Freese, Katherine; Li, Jinmian; Savage, Christopher; White, Martin; Williams, Anthony G.

    2016-06-01

    Dark matter searches in gamma ray final states often make use of the fact that photons can be produced from final state muons. Modern Monte Carlo generators and dark matter codes include the effects of final state radiation from muons produced in the dark matter annihilation process itself, but neglect the O (1 %) radiative correction that arises from the subsequent muon decay. After implementing this correction we demonstrate the effect that it can have on dark matter phenomenology by considering the case of dark matter annihilation to four muons via scalar mediator production. We first show that the AMS-02 positron excess can no longer easily be made consistent with this final state once the Fermi-LAT dwarf limits are calculated with the inclusion of radiative muon decays, and we next show that the Fermi-LAT galactic center gamma excess can be improved with this final state after inclusion of the same effect. We provide code and tables for the implementation of this effect in the popular dark matter code micrOMEGAs, providing a solution for any model producing final state muons.

  18. Airborne gamma radiation measurements of soil moisture during FIFE: Activities and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, Eugene L.

    1992-01-01

    Soil moisture measurements were obtained during the summer of 1987 and 1989 near Manhattan, Kansas, using the National Weather Service (NWS) airborne gamma radiation system. A network of 24 flight lines were established over the research area. Airborne surveys were flown daily during two intensive field campaigns. The data collected was sufficient to modify the NWS standard operational method for estimating soil moisture for the Field Experiment (FIFE) flight lines. The average root mean square error of the soil moisture estimates for shorter FIFE flight lines was found to be 2.5 percent, compared with a reported value of 3.9 percent for NWS flight lines. Techniques were developed to compute soil moisture estimates for portions of the flight lines. Results of comparisons of the airborne gamma radiation soil moisture estimates with those obtained using the NASA Pushbroom Microwave Radiation (PBMR) system and hydrological model are presented. The airborne soil moisture measurements, and real averages computed using all remotely sensed and ground data, have been in support of the research of the many FIFE investigators whose overall goal was the upscale integration of models and the application of satellite remote sensing.

  19. Gamma radiation effects on mechanical properties and morphology of a polyurethane derivate from castor oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Elaine Cristina; Orivaldo Chierice, Gilberto; Claro Neto, Salvador; Scheidegger Soboll, Daniel; Mauro Nascimento, Eduardo; Lepienski, Carlos Mauricio

    2011-03-01

    In this study, an adhesive of a polyurethane derivate from castor oil was irradiated with gamma radiation from a 60Co source, at doses from 0.2 to 25 kGy. This adhesive polyurethane is considered for use in hospital furniture because it does not liberate dangerous solvents. Hardness and elastic modulus were measured by instrumented indentation with a pyramidal Berkovich indenter, using loads from 0.08-40 mN with a nanoindenter XP. The instrumented indentation hardness was 110 MPa for an untreated sample, increasing to 124 MPa after irradiation with 25 kGy, at penetration depths of about 5 μm. The increases in elastic modulus induced by radiation were less pronounced. This polyurethane is naturally cross-linked and the relative modifications in the hardness are attributed to an additional cross-linking process induced by radiation. X-ray diffraction indicates a slight increase in crystallinity. The roughness measured by atomic force microscopy increases after gamma irradiation.

  20. Effect of gamma radiation on chlorobutyl rubber vulcanized by three different crosslinking systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scagliusi, Sandra R.; Cardoso, Elisabeth L. C.; Lugao, Ademar B.

    2012-09-01

    The development of halogenated butyl rubber (chlorobutyl) in the 1950s and 1960s greatly extended the usefulness of butyl. Their properties allowed the development of more durable tubeless tires with the air retaining innerliner, chemically bonded to the body of the tire. Tire innerliners are by far the largest application for halobutyl. When polymers are subjected to high energy radiation, a number of chemical reactions may occur following the initial ionization and excitation events. These reactions lead to changes in the molecular weight of the polymer through scission (S) and crosslinking (X) of the molecules and affect the physical and mechanical properties. In the halobutyl rubbers the chain scission may predominate. This work aims to show effects of gamma radiation in properties of chlorobutyl rubbers vulcanized with sulfur, sulfur donor and phenolic resin. The butyl rubber has been already studied by us previously. The samples were characterized before and after irradiation. Gamma radiation doses used were: 25 kGy, 50 kGy, 100 kGy, 150 kGy and 200 kGy, in order to identify which cure system is the most stable under irradiation. In this study we observed that the properties of all samples were affected irrespective of the vulcanization system.

  1. Evaluation of phenolic compounds in maté ( Ilex paraguariensis) processed by gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furgeri, C.; Nunes, T. C. F.; Fanaro, G. B.; Souza, M. F. F.; Bastos, D. H. M.; Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.

    2009-07-01

    The radiation food processing has been demonstrating great effectiveness in the attack of pathogenic agents, while little compromising nutritional value and sensorial properties of foods. The maté ( Ilex paraguariensis), widely consumed product in South America, generally in the form of infusions with hot or cold water, calls of chimarrão or tererê, it is cited in literature as one of the best sources phenolic compounds. The antioxidants action of these constituent has been related to the protection of the organism against the free radicals, generated in alive, currently responsible for the sprouting of some degenerative illness as cancer, arteriosclerosis, rheumatic arthritis and cardiovascular clutters among others. The objective of that work was to evaluate the action of the processing for gamma radiation in phenolic compounds of tererê beverage in the doses of 0, 3, 5, 7 and 10 kGy. The observed results do not demonstrate significant alterations in phenolic compounds of tererê beverage processed by gamma radiation.

  2. Spirosoma radiotolerans sp. nov., a gamma-radiation-resistant bacterium isolated from gamma ray-irradiated soil.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Jin; Srinivasan, Sathiyaraj; Lim, Sangyong; Joe, Minho; Im, Seonghun; Bae, So Il; Park, Kyoung Ryun; Han, Ji-Hee; Park, Se-Hee; Joo, Bo-Min; Park, Sol-Ji; Kim, Myung Kyum

    2014-09-01

    A Gram-negative, short-rod-shaped bacterial strain with gliding motility, designated as DG5A(T), was isolated from a rice field soil in South Korea. Phylogenic analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequence of the new isolate showed that strain DG5A(T) belong to the genus Spirosoma in the family Spirosomaceae, and the highest sequence similarities were 95.5 % with Spirosoma linguale DSM 74(T), 93.4 % with Spirosoma rigui WPCB118(T), 92.8 % with Spirosoma luteum SPM-10(T), 92.7 % with Spirosoma spitsbergense SPM-9(T), and 91.9 % with Spirosoma panaciterrae Gsoil 1519(T). Strain DG5A(T) revealed resistance to gamma and UV radiation. Chemotaxonomic data showed that the most abundant fatty acids were summed feature C(16:1) ω7c/C(16:1) ω6c (36.90 %), C(16:1) ω5c (29.55 %), and iso-C(15:0) (14.78 %), and the major polar lipid was phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). The DNA G+C content of strain DG5A(T) was 49.1 mol%. Together, the phenotypic, phylogenetic, and chemotaxonomic data supported that strain DG5A(T) presents a novel species of the genus Spirosoma, for which the name Spirosoma radiotolerans sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is DG5A(T) (=KCTC 32455(T) = JCM19447(T)). PMID:24748440

  3. Gamma radiation process for destruction of toxic polychlorinated biphenyls (Pcbs) in transformer oils.

    PubMed

    Singh, R K; Nayak, Poonam; Niyogi, U K; Khandal, R K; Singh, Gurdeep

    2006-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are synthetic organic chemicals commercially used worldwide in many applications. PCBs were used in oils because of their excellent properties such as good thermal stability, flame resistance, dielectric constant, high break down voltage, high boiling point and low volatility. However, because of their adverse affects on environment and human health, the use of PCBs has been banned now. PCBs are today considered among the widespread pollutants in the global system. PCBs sources still exist in various industrial products and in waste streams such as capacitor oils, lubricating oils, transformer oils, hydraulic oils, paints, rubbers, cables, etc. Several such materials containing PCBs emanating from various sources need to be detoxified before their reuse or before going to landfill for final disposal. Various remedial technologies have been developed in the world to destroy toxic PCBs. The radiolysis has been investigated as an environment-friendly process for waste oil treatment contaminated with PCBs, which may be a better alternative to the globally most widely accepted incineration method. A study was undertaken to detoxify PCBs in transformer oil by gamma radiation using Cobalt 60 source. Analysis of PCBs in transformer oils before and after radiation was carried out by GC-MS instrument. The effect of radiation dose and destruction of PCBs in transformer oils are discussed in details in the present paper. The method used was found to be highly effective and destruction was as high as 79 %. Further, the transformer oil samples were also evaluated before and after radiation to check their quality. The properties of oils were not significantly altered by gamma radiation treatment as evident from the results given in the paper. PMID:17913201

  4. Comparison of radon fluxes with gamma-radiation exposure rates and soil /sup 226/Ra concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.A.; Thomas, V.W.

    1984-04-01

    Radon fluxes and contact gamma-radiation-exposure rates were measured at the grid points of rectangular grids on three properties in Edgemont, South Dakota that were known to have deposits of residual radioactivity relatively near to the surface. The coefficient of determination, r/sup 2/, between the radon fluxes and the contact gamma-radiation-exposure rates varied from 0.89 to 0.31 for the three properties. The property having the highest fluxes and residual radioactivity of relatively uniform depth showed the highest correlation between fluxes and exposure rates, and the property having residual radioactivity that varied considerably in depth showed the lowest. Correlations between fluxes and /sup 226/Ra concentrations measured in boreholes that varied in depth from 60 to 195 cm were lower than those between fluxes and exposure rates, indicating that exposure rates are better than /sup 226/Ra measurements for detecting elevated radon fluxes from near-surface deposits. Measurements made on one property at two different times indicated that if the average flux were determined from a large number (40) of measurements at one time, the average flux at a later time could be estimated from a few measurements using the assumption that the change in the flux at individual locations will be equal to the change in the average flux. Flux measurements around two buildings showing elevated indoor radon-daughter concentrations, but around which no residual radioactivity had been discovered by /sup 226/Ra and gamma-radiation measurements, provided no clear indication of the presence of such material, possibly because none was present.

  5. A broadband gamma-ray spectrometry using novel unfolding algorithms for characterization of laser wakefield-generated betatron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Jong Ho Nakajima, Kazuhisa Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Yoo, Byung Ju; Shin, Kang Woo; Kim, Hyung Taek; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seung Ku; Choi, Il Woo; Rhee, Yong Joo; Shin, Jung Hun; Jo, Sung Ha; Hojbota, Calin; Cho, Byeoung Ick; Nam, Chang Hee

    2015-12-15

    We present a high-flux, broadband gamma-ray spectrometry capable of characterizing the betatron radiation spectrum over the photon energy range from 10 keV to 20 MeV with respect to the peak photon energy, spectral bandwidth, and unique discrimination from background radiations, using a differential filtering spectrometer and the unfolding procedure based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. These properties are experimentally verified by measuring betatron radiation from a cm-scale laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) driven by a 1-PW laser, using a differential filtering spectrometer consisting of a 15-filter and image plate stack. The gamma-ray spectra were derived by unfolding the photostimulated luminescence (PSL) values recorded on the image plates, using the spectrometer response matrix modeled with the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The accuracy of unfolded betatron radiation spectra was assessed by unfolding the test PSL data simulated with GEANT4, showing an ambiguity of less than 20% and clear discrimination from the background radiation with less than 10%. The spectral analysis of betatron radiation from laser wakefield-accelerated electron beams with energies up to 3 GeV revealed radiation spectra characterized by synchrotron radiation with the critical photon energy up to 7 MeV. The gamma-ray spectrometer and unfolding method presented here facilitate an in-depth understanding of betatron radiation from LWFA process and a novel radiation source of high-quality photon beams in the MeV regime.

  6. Effective Atomic Numbers of Lanthanides with Gamma Radiation for Photon Energy Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shantappa, Anil; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption, ZPEA,eff have been calculated for photon from 1 keV to 20 MeV for selected oxides of lanthanides, such as Lanthanum oxide, Cerium oxide, Samarium oxide, Europium oxide, Dysprosium oxide, Thulium oxide, Ytterbium oxide. The ZPEA,eff values then compared with ZPI,eff for photon interaction. The ZPEA,eff values have been found to change with energy and composition of selected lanthanides. Oxides of lanthanides are considered as better shielding materials to the exposure of gamma radiation. The values of effective atomic number for photon energy absorption help in the calculation of absorbed dose.

  7. Experimental investigation of gamma ray radiation effects on 1550nm single mode fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingfeng; Ma, Jing; Tan, Liying; Zhou, Yanping; Che, Chi; Yang, Qingbo

    2015-03-01

    We compared the degradation of two kinds of 1550nm single-mode optical fibers following the irradiation by gamma ray (60Co). Over a total dose of 9.06×104 rad, the absorption coefficient increased while the rates were different between samples. The influence of ionizing radiation is theoretically analyzed. In room temperature annealing experiment, the absorption coefficient of Corning sample was recovered visibly, but Alcatel sample continues to deteriorate. It is suggested that different producing technology and doping are clearly influence the generation and recombination process of color center.

  8. Gamma radiation effects on the dynamic fatigue measurements of glass discs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ananaba, T. O. J.; Kinser, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    Circular specimens of low iron soda lime silicate glass were blasted with grit after having a circular notch etched into their centers. After separation into two groups, one group was exposed to gamma radiation. The fracture strengths of all samples were then tested by the biaxial technique, i.e., specimens were balanced on three balls and loaded in the center by a piston. The irradiated samples had received a 140,000 Gy dose from a Co-60 source. An enhanced interaction between the ambient moisture and the grit-blasted central notch was observed in the irradiated samples, which displayed accelerated corrosion.

  9. Use of gamma ray radiation to parallel the plates of a Fabry-Perot interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Wilbert R.; Hays, Paul B.; Anderson, Sally M.

    1987-01-01

    The use of gamma radiation to parallel the plates of a Fabry-Perot etalon is examined. The method for determining the etalon parallelism, and the procedure for irradiating the posts are described. Changes in effective gap for the etalon over the surface are utilized to measure the parallelism of the Fabry-Perot etalon. An example in which this technique is applied to an etalon of fused silica plates, which are 132 mm in diameter and coded with zinc sulfide and cryolite, with Zerodur spaces 2 cm in length. The effect of the irradiation of the posts on the thermal performance of the etalon is investigated.

  10. Radiation-Resistant Micrococcus luteus SC1204 and Its Proteomics Change Upon Gamma Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wuyuan; Yang, Yang; Gao, Peng; Chen, Hao; Wen, Wenting; Sun, Qun

    2016-06-01

    To explore the radiation-resistance mechanisms in bacteria, a radiation-resistant strain SC1204 was isolated from the surrounding area of a (60)Co-γ radiation facility. SC1204 could survive up to 8 kGy dose of gamma irradiation and was identified as Micrococcus luteus by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. Its proteomic changes under 2-kGy irradiation were examined by two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS analysis. The results showed that at least 24 proteins displayed significant changes (p < 0.05) at expression level under the radiation stress, among which 22 were successfully identified and classified into the major functional categories of metabolism, energy production and conservation, translation, ribosomal structure, and biogenesis. Among these proteins, leucyl aminopeptidase involved in synthesis of glutathione was the most abundant induced protein during postirradiation recovery, indicating that anti-oxidation protection was the most important line of defense in SC1204 against radiation. The next abundant protein was phosphoribosyl aminoimidazole carboxamide formyltransferase/IMP cyclohydrolase (AICAR Tfase/IMPCH), the key enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of purine that is anti-radiation compound. Other proteins changing significantly (p < 0.05) after radiation exposure included urocanate hydratase, dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase, succinyl-CoA synthetase subunit alpha, phosphoglycerate kinase, cell division protein FtsZ, elongation factor Ts and Tu, translation elongation factor Tu and G, 30S ribosomal protein S1, histidyl-tRNA synthetase, and arginyl-tRNA synthetase, which were considered to be the key proteins in urocanate metabolism, tricarboxylic acid cycle, glycolysis, cell division process, and synthesis process of proteins. Therefore, these proteins may also play important roles in radiation resistance in M. luteus. PMID:26920868

  11. Gamma radiation influence on silica optical fibers measured by optical backscatter reflectometry and Brillouin sensing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosniok, A.; Sporea, D.; Neguţ, D.; Krebber, K.

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the influence of gamma rays on physical properties of different commercially available silica optical fibers stepwise irradiated up to a total dose of 100 kGy. The detection of radiation-induced changes in silica glass offers the possibility of using selected optical fibers as distributed radiation sensors. The measurements performed by us were based on optical backscatter reflectometry and Brillouin distributed sensing. The measurement methods enable an analysis of radiation-induced modification of the group refractive index and density of the optical fibers. The most distinct physical effect observed by us concerns the increase of the optical attenuation with rising total radiation doses. Quantitative measurement results indicate a crucial impact of fiber dopants on radiation-induced physical and sensory characteristics of silica optical fibers affected by differences in fiber fabrication techniques. Based on the obtained results, the suitability of distributed Brillouin sensing for dosimetry applications seems to be improved by modifying the refractive index profile of the fiber core.

  12. Spectral analysis of paramagnetic centers induced in human tooth enamel by x-rays and gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, V. A.; Kuchuro, I. I.

    2010-03-01

    Based on study of spectral and relaxation characteristics, we have established that paramagnetic centers induced in tooth enamel by x-rays and gamma radiation are identical in nature. We show that for the same exposure dose, the intensity of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal induced by x-radiation with effective energy 34 keV is about an order of magnitude higher than the amplitude of the signal induced by gamma radiation. We have identified a three-fold attenuation of the EPR signal along the path of the x-radiation from the buccal to the lingual side of a tooth, which is evidence that the individual had undergone diagnostic x-ray examination of the dentition or skull. We have shown that the x-ray exposure doses reconstructed from the EPR spectra are an order of magnitude higher than the applied doses, while the dose loads due to gamma radiation are equal to the applied doses. The data obtained indicate that for adequate reconstruction of individual absorbed doses from EPR spectra of tooth enamel in the population subjected to the combined effect of x-radiation and accidental external gamma radiation as a result of the disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, we need to take into account the contribution to the dose load from diagnostic x-rays in examination of the teeth, jaw, or skull.

  13. Effects of Dietary Iron and Gamma Radiation on the Rat Retina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Jennifer; Marshall, Grace; Theriot, Corey A.; Chacon, Natalia; Zwart, Sara; Zanello, Susana B.

    2012-01-01

    A health risk of concern for NASA relates to radiation exposure and its synergistic effects with other space environmental factors, includi ng nutritional status of the crew. Astronauts consume almost three times the recommended daily allowance of iron due to the use of fortifie d foods aboard the International Space Station, with iron intake occa sionally exceeding six times the recommended values. Recently, NASA has become concerned with visual changes associated with spaceflight, a nd research is being conducted to elucidate the etiology of eye structure alterations in the spaceflight environment. Terrestrially, iron o verload is also associated with certain optic neuropathies. In additi on, due to its role in Fenton reactions, iron can potentiate oxidative stress, which is a recognized cause of cataract formation. As part o f a study investigating the combined effects of radiation exposure an d iron overload on multiple physiological systems, we focused on defining the effects of both treatments on eye biology. In this study, 12- week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of four experimental groups: normal iron/no radiation (Control/Sham), high iron/no radiat ion (Fe/Sham), normal iron/gamma radiation (3 Gy cumulative dose, fra ctionated at 0.375 Gy/d every other day for 16 d) (Control/Rad), and high iron/gamma radiation (Fe/Rad). Oxidative stress-induced DNA damag e, measured as concentration of the marker 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG) in eye retinal tissue by enzyme-immunoanalysis did not show significant changes among treatments. However, there was an overall i ncrease in 8OHdG immunostaining density in retina sections due to radiation exposure (P = 0.05). Increased dietary iron and radiation expos ure had an interactive effect (P = 0.02) on 8OHdG immunostaining of t he retinal ganglion cell layer with iron diet increasing the signal in the group not exposed to radiation (P = 0.05). qPCR gene expression profiling of relevant target genes

  14. Influence of gamma radiation on morphology structure, electrochemical corrosion behavior and hardness of Ni-Cr based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bediwi, Abu Bakr; Saad, Mohamed; El-Fallalb, Abeer A.

    This study evaluates the effects of gamma radiation on structure, electrochemical corrosion behavior and Vickers hardness of commercial dental Nikkeli-Kromi-Polttosekoitus [Ni65.2Cr22.5Mo9.5X2.8 (X=Nb, Si, Fe and Mn)] alloy. The corrosion rate of Ni65.2Cr22.5Mo9.5X2.8 (X=Nb, Si, Fe and Mn) alloy with 0.5 M HCl is increased with increasing the exposure rate of gamma radiation. The corrosion resistance of Ni65.2Cr22.5Mo9.5X2.8 (X=Nb, Si, Fe and Mn) is varied and reaches a minimum value at 30 KGy. The corrosion potential value also is varied and reaches its highest value at 30 KGy. The Vickers hardness value of Ni65.2Cr22.5Mo9.5X2.8 (X=Nb, Si, Fe and Mn) alloy is decreased by increasing the gamma radiation dose. Also it is obvious from our results that the effects of gamma radiation at the surface are much higher as compared with deeper parts and the structure of the alloy is changed due to its exposure to gamma radiation.

  15. Preliminary results on soil-emitted gamma radiation and its relation with the local atmospheric electric field at Amieira (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, F.; Silva, H. G.; Bárias, S.; Barbosa, S. M.

    2015-10-01

    The atmospheric electric field near the Earth's surface is dominated by atmospheric pollutants and natural radioactivity, with the latter directly linked to radon (222Rn) gas. For a better comprehension on the temporal variability of both the atmospheric electric field and the radon concentration and its relation with local atmospheric variables, simultaneous measurements of soil-emitted gamma radiation and potential gradient (defined from the vertical component of the atmospheric electric field) were taken every minute, along with local meteorological parameters (e.g., temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity and daily solar radiation). The study region is Amieira, part of the Alqueva lake in Alentejo Portugal, where an interdisciplinary meteorological campaign, ALEX2014, took place from June to August 2014. Soil gamma radiation is more sensitive to small concentrations of radon as compared with alpha particles measurements, for that reason it is more suited for sites with low radon levels, as expected in this case. Preliminary results are presented here: statistical and spectral analysis show that i) the potential gradient has a stronger daily cycle as compared with the gamma radiation, ii) most of the energy of the gamma signal is concentrated in the low frequencies (close to 0), contrary to the potential gradient that has most of the energy in frequency 1 (daily cycle) and iii) a short-term relation between gamma radiation and the potential gradient has not been found. Future work and plans are also discussed.

  16. Dynamic friction and wear of a solid film lubricant during radiation exposure in a nuclear reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of nuclear reactor radiation on the performance of a solid film lubricant was studied. The film consisted of molybdenum disulfide and graphite in a sodium silicate binder. Radiation levels of fast neutrons (E or = 1 MeV) were fluxed up to 3.5 times 10 to the 12th power n/sq cm-sec (intensity) and fluences up to 2 times 10 to the 18th power n/sq cm (total exposure). Coating wear lives were much shorter and friction coefficients higher in a high flux region of the reactor than in a low flux region. The amount of total exposure did not affect lubrication behavior as severely as the radiation intensity during sliding.

  17. [Radiation transformation mechanism in a photocatalytic reactor of three-phase internal circulating fluidized bed].

    PubMed

    You, Hong; Luo, Wei-nan; Yao, Jie; Chen, Ping; Cai, Wei-min

    2005-01-01

    A novel three-phase internal circulating fluidized bed photocatalytic reactor was established and the radiation transformation in which was investigated. The experimental results indicate that with the interaction of gas and solid (gas flux > 0.3m3/h), the radiation transformation in the reactor along radial direction conforms to a definite exponential function, which agrees to formula Rose about the rules of light intensity distribution through evenly suspended particles. The value of radiation energy is affected by the initial light intensity, the concentration of photocatalyst and the thickness of liquid layer. The aerated gas amount only influence the state of the fluidized bed and has little effect on the distribution of light intensity along radical direction. Photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B indicate that the efficiency of three-phase internal circulating fluidized bed is much higher than slurry bed. The optimal catalyst concentration of this system is 10 - 12g/L. PMID:15859420

  18. DETERMINING THE EFFECTS OF RADIATION ON AGING CONCRETE STRUCTURES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Serrato, M.

    2010-01-29

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) is responsible for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities throughout the DOE Complex. Some of these facilities will be completely dismantled, while others will be partially dismantled and the remaining structure will be stabilized with cementitious fill materials. The latter is a process known as In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD). The ISD decision process requires a detailed understanding of the existing facility conditions, and operational history. System information and material properties are need for aged nuclear facilities. This literature review investigated the properties of aged concrete structures affected by radiation. In particular, this review addresses the Savannah River Site (SRS) isotope production nuclear reactors. The concrete in the reactors at SRS was not seriously damaged by the levels of radiation exposure. Loss of composite compressive strength was the most common effect of radiation induced damage documented at nuclear power plants.

  19. SIMILAR RADIATION MECHANISM IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND BLAZARS: EVIDENCE FROM TWO LUMINOSITY CORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F. Y.; Yi, S. X.; Dai, Z. G.

    2014-05-01

    Active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are powerful astrophysical events with relativistic jets. In this Letter, the broadband spectral properties of GRBs and well-observed blazars are compared. The distribution of GRBs is consistent with the well-known blazar sequence including the νL {sub ν}(5 GHz) – α{sub RX} and νL {sub ν}(5 GHz) – ν{sub peak} correlations, where α{sub RX} is defined as the broadband spectral slope in radio-to-X-ray bands, and ν{sub peak} is defined as the spectral peak frequency. Moreover, GRBs occupy the low radio luminosity end of these sequences. These two correlations suggest that GRBs could have a radiation process, i.e., synchrotron radiation, similar to blazars both in the prompt emission and afterglow phases.

  20. Modeling of gamma-radiation impact on transmission characteristics of optical glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusarov, Andrei I.; Doyle, Dominic B.

    2002-01-01

    Optical systems operating in space must maintain their performance over long mission times. Glasses are well known to darken upon exposure to radiation, due to formation of color centers, resulting in performance degradation. Despite increasing demand, an approach which would allow accurate prediction of the end-of-life performance characteristics of space optical instruments, has not been elaborated yet. We propose here a phenomenological methodology that should help to solve the problem. In our model, functional dependencies describing defect generation and annealing are derived from mathematical models, taking into account dose levels and irradiation times relevant for space missions. Numerical values for the parameters come from experimental data. Our experimental methodology is also described. We apply this model to analyze the results obtained for BK7 glass subject to Co60 gamma-radiation.

  1. The effects of electron and gamma radiation on epoxy-based materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fornes, R. E.; Memory, J. D.; Gilbert, R. D.; Long, E. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Specimens of graphite/epoxy composites and epoxy resins were exposed to electron and gamma radiation, followed by mechanical property and fundamental measurements. Measurement techniques included: scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and electron spin resonance spectroscopic analysis. Results indicate little or no change in flexural properties of miniature specimens of a graphite/epoxy composite and no change in failure mode at the fiber-resin interface and in the crystallinity of the fiber and the resin. Some doubt in the observation of stable flexural properties is cast by electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of a relatively large number of radiation-generated radicals. These generally lead to a change in cross-linking and in chain-scissioning which should alter mechanical properties.

  2. Influence of gamma radiation on hindered phenols in LDPE, paraffin oil and paraffin wax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Shamshad; Yasin, Tariq; Ghaffar, Abdul

    2003-12-01

    Extraction and high performance liquid chromatography procedures have been developed for the determination of two hindered phenols—Irganox-1010 and Santonox ®, incorporated in low density polyethylene (LDPE), paraffin oil and paraffin wax at varied concentrations. These blends were gamma irradiated from 25 to 400 kGy and the radiation and thermal stability of the antioxidant under the experimental conditions has been determined. Upon increase in radiation dose from 25 to 400 kGy, a gradual diminution in the extractable level of each antioxidant was observed. The fate of both the antioxidants in various matrices has been compared. It has been shown that both the antioxidants can influence the polyethylene network formation and the radical yield in different ways resulting in retardation in the rate of crosslinking, as determined by gel-content analysis.

  3. Spectroscopic evaluation of painted layer structural changes induced by gamma radiation in experimental models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Mihaela M.; Moise, Ioan V.; Virgolici, Marian; Negut, Constantin D.; Barbu, Olimpia-Hinamatsuri; Cutrubinis, Mihalis; Fugaru, Viorel; Stanculescu, Ioana R.; Ponta, Corneliu C.

    2012-02-01

    The degradation of cultural heritage objects by insects and microorganisms is an important issue for conservators, art specialists and humankind in general. Gamma irradiation is an efficient method of polychrome wooden artifacts disinfestation. Color changes and other modifications in the physical chemical properties of materials induced by gamma irradiation are feared by cultural heritage responsible committees and they have to be evaluated objectively and precisely. In this paper FTIR and FT-Raman spectroscopy methods were used to investigate the structural changes in some experimental models of tempera paint layers on wood following 11 kGy gamma irradiation at two dose rates. Radiation chemistry depends on the particular pigment, matrix formed by protein, resin (in case of varnished samples) and water presence. For the majority of painted layer in experimental models very small spectral variations were observed. Small changes in the FTIR spectra were observed for the raw sienna experimental model: for the higher dose rate the egg yolk protein oxidation peaks and the CH stretching bands due to lipids degradation products increased.

  4. Aflatoxins and ochratoxin a reduction in black and white pepper by gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalili, M.; Jinap, S.; Noranizan, M. A.

    2012-11-01

    Irradiation is an important means of decontamination of food commodities, especially spices. The aim of the current study was to investigate the efficacy of gamma radiation (60Co) for decontaminating ochratoxin A (OTA) and aflatoxins B1 (AFB1), B2 (AFB2), G1 (AFG1) and G2 (AFG2) residues in artificially contaminated black and white pepper samples. The moisture content of the pepper samples was set at 12% or 18%, and the applied gamma dose ranged from 5 to 30 kGy. Mycotoxin levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) after immunoaffinity column (IAC) chromatography. Both the gamma irradiation dose and moisture content showed significant effects (P<0.05) on mycotoxin reduction. The maximum toxin reductions, found at 18% moisture content and 30 kGy, were 55.2%, 50.6%, 39.2%, 47.7% and 42.9% for OTA, AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2, respectively.

  5. Neutron and gamma-radiation sensitivity of plasmid DNA of varying superhelical density

    SciTech Connect

    Swenberg, C.E.; Speicher, J.M.

    1995-12-01

    Several families of negatively supercoiled topoisomers of plasmid pIBI30 were prepared by a modification of the procedure of Singleton and Wells. The average superhelical density ({sigma}) was determined by two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis and varied from -0.010 to -0.067, corresponding to a change in the number of supercoils from 3 to 19 and an effective volume change from 1.6 x 10{sup 8} to 4 x 10{sup 8} {angstrom}{sup 3}. Samples were exposed to either fission-neutron or {sup 60}Co {gamma} radiation and assayed for single-strand breaks by agarose gel electrophoresis. Form I DNA for all topoisomers decreased exponentially with increasing dose. The D{sub 37} values for both neutron and {gamma} radiation increased monotonically with increasing {vert_bar}{sigma}{vert_bar}. Using a branched plectonemic (interwound) form for DNA over the range of {sigma} studied and standard (single-hit) target theory, a quantitative linear fit to (D{sub 37}{sup -1}) as a function of the effective DNA radius, S({angstrom}), was obtained. The model predicts that both the slope (a) and the intercept (b) of (D{sub 37}){sup -1} as a function of S({angstrom}) are directly proportional to the length of DNA and the radiation fluence. Furthermore, the ratio b/a (= r{sub o}) at {sigma} = 0 depends only on the ionic strength of the medium and is independent of the radiation source parameters. Our results support the model and we calculate r{sub o} = 13.4 {+-} 1.4 nm, a value consistent with other investigations. Our results are consistent with studies using {sup 137}Cs but disagree with data obtained for X rays. 31 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Progenitors Mobilized by Gamma-Tocotrienol as an Effective Radiation Countermeasure

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vijay K.; Wise, Stephen Y.; Fatanmi, Oluseyi O.; Scott, Jessica; Romaine, Patricia L. P.; Newman, Victoria L.; Verma, Amit; Elliott, Thomas B.; Seed, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of gamma-tocotrienol (GT3)-mobilized progenitors in mitigating damage to mice exposed to a supralethal dose of cobalt-60 gamma-radiation. CD2F1 mice were transfused 24 h post-irradiation with whole blood or isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from donors that had received GT3 72 h prior to blood collection and recipient mice were monitored for 30 days. To understand the role of GT3-induced granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in mobilizing progenitors, donor mice were administered a neutralizing antibody specific to G-CSF or its isotype before blood collection. Bacterial translocation from gut to heart, spleen and liver of irradiated recipient mice was evaluated by bacterial culture on enriched and selective agar media. Endotoxin in serum samples also was measured. We also analyzed the colony-forming units in the spleens of irradiated mice. Our results demonstrate that whole blood or PBMC from GT3-administered mice mitigated radiation injury when administered 24 h post-irradiation. Furthermore, administration of a G-CSF antibody to GT3-injected mice abrogated the efficacy of blood or PBMC obtained from such donors. Additionally, GT3-mobilized PBMC inhibited the translocation of intestinal bacteria to the heart, spleen, and liver, and increased colony forming unit-spleen (CFU-S) numbers in irradiated mice. Our data suggests that GT3 induces G-CSF, which mobilizes progenitors and these progenitors mitigate radiation injury in recipient mice. This approach using mobilized progenitor cells from GT3-injected donors could be a potential treatment for humans exposed to high doses of radiation. PMID:25423021

  7. A meta-analysis of leukaemia risk from protracted exposure to low-dose gamma radiation

    PubMed Central

    Schubauer-Berigan, M K

    2010-01-01

    Context More than 400 000 workers annually receive a measurable radiation dose and may be at increased risk of radiation-induced leukaemia. It is unclear whether leukaemia risk is elevated with protracted, low-dose exposure. Objective We conducted a meta-analysis examining the relationship between protracted low-dose ionising radiation exposure and leukaemia. Data sources Reviews by the National Academies and United Nations provided a summary of informative studies published before 2005. PubMed and Embase databases were searched for additional occupational and environmental studies published between 2005 and 2009. Study selection We selected 23 studies that: (1) examined the association between protracted exposures to ionising radiation and leukaemia excluding chronic lymphocytic subtype; (2) were a cohort or nested case–control design without major bias; (3) reported quantitative estimates of exposure; and (4) conducted exposure–response analyses using relative or excess RR per unit exposure. Methods Studies were further screened to reduce information overlap. Random effects models were developed to summarise between-study variance and obtain an aggregate estimate of the excess RR at 100 mGy. Publication bias was assessed by trim and fill and Rosenthal's file drawer methods. Results We found an ERR at 100 mGy of 0.19 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.32) by modelling results from 10 studies and adjusting for publication bias. Between-study variance was not evident (p=0.99). Conclusions Protracted exposure to low-dose gamma radiation is significantly associated with leukaemia. Our estimate agreed well with the leukaemia risk observed among exposed adults in the Life Span Study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors, providing increased confidence in the current understanding of leukaemia risk from ionising radiation. However, unlike the estimates obtained from the LSS, our model provides a precise, quantitative summary of the direct estimates of excess risk from studies of

  8. Dose calculation in biological samples in a mixed neutron-gamma field at the TRIGA reactor of the University of Mainz.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Tobias; Blaickner, Matthias; Schütz, Christian; Wiehl, Norbert; Kratz, Jens V; Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Otto, Gerd; Hampel, Gabriele

    2010-10-01

    To establish Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for non-resectable liver metastases and for in vitro experiments at the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Mainz, Germany, it is necessary to have a reliable dose monitoring system. The in vitro experiments are used to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of liver and cancer cells in our mixed neutron and gamma field. We work with alanine detectors in combination with Monte Carlo simulations, where we can measure and characterize the dose. To verify our calculations we perform neutron flux measurements using gold foil activation and pin-diodes. Material and methods. When L-α-alanine is irradiated with ionizing radiation, it forms a stable radical which can be detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The value of the ESR signal correlates to the amount of absorbed dose. The dose for each pellet is calculated using FLUKA, a multipurpose Monte Carlo transport code. The pin-diode is augmented by a lithium fluoride foil. This foil converts the neutrons into alpha and tritium particles which are products of the (7)Li(n,α)(3)H-reaction. These particles are detected by the diode and their amount correlates to the neutron fluence directly. Results and discussion. Gold foil activation and the pin-diode are reliable fluence measurement systems for the TRIGA reactor, Mainz. Alanine dosimetry of the photon field and charged particle field from secondary reactions can in principle be carried out in combination with MC-calculations for mixed radiation fields and the Hansen & Olsen alanine detector response model. With the acquired data about the background dose and charged particle spectrum, and with the acquired information of the neutron flux, we are capable of calculating the dose to the tissue. Conclusion. Monte Carlo simulation of the mixed neutron and gamma field of the TRIGA Mainz is possible in order to characterize the neutron behavior in the thermal column. Currently we also

  9. Isolation and characterization of mold fungi and insects infecting sawmill wood, and their inhibition by gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalawate, Aparna; Mehetre, Sayaji

    2015-12-01

    This article describes the isolation, identification, and characterization of wood-rotting fungi and insects, and their inhibition was studied using gamma radiation. Products manufactured from plantation timber species are deteriorated by wood-rotting fungi such as Hypocrea lixii, Fusarium proliferatum, and Aspergillus flavus, and insects such as powderpost beetles. Proper preservation methods are necessary for ensuring a long service life of wood products. In this study, wood samples were treated with 2.5% copper ethanolamine boron (CEB) (10% w/v) and subsequently irradiated with gamma rays (10 kGy). It was observed that CEB-treated and gamma-irradiated samples controlled fungi and powderpost beetles significantly. As wood is a dead organic material, penetration of chemicals into it is very difficult. Gamma rays easily pass through wooden objects with hidden eggs and dormant spores of insects and fungi, respectively. Gamma irradiation was proved very effective in reducing damage caused by both fungi and insects.

  10. Evaluation of HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor) pressure-vessel integrity considering radiation embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Merkle, J.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1988-04-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel has been in service for 20 years, and during this time, radiation damage was monitored with a vessel-material surveillance program. In mid-November 1986, data from this program indicated that the radiation-induced reduction in fracture toughness was greater than expected. As a result, a reevaluation of vessel integrity was undertaken. Updated methods of fracture-mechanics analysis were applied, and an accelerated irradiations program was conducted using the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. Results of these efforts indicate that (1) the vessel life can be extended 10 years if the reactor power level is reduced 15% and if the vessel is subjected to a hydrostatic proof test each year; (2) during the 10-year life extension, significant radiation damage will be limited to a rather small area around the beam tubes; and (3) the greater-than-expected damage rate is the result of the very low neutron flux in the HFIR vessel relative to that in samples of material irradiated in materials-testing reactors (a factor of approx.10/sup 4/ less), that is, a rate effect.

  11. Decay strength distributions in {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,{gamma}) radiative capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, D. G.; Fulton, B. R.; Marley, P.; Fox, S. P.; Glover, R.; Wadsworth, R.; Watson, D. L.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Lebhertz, D.; Beck, C.; Papka, P.; Rousseau, M.; Sanchez i Zafra, A.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Davis, C.; Ottewell, D.; Pavan, M. M.; Pearson, J.; Ruiz, C.

    2007-10-15

    The heavy-ion radiative capture reaction, {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,{gamma}), has been investigated at energies both on- and off-resonance, with a particular focus on known resonances at E{sub c.m.}=6.0, 6.8, 7.5, and 8.0 MeV. Gamma rays detected in a BGO scintillator array were recorded in coincidence with {sup 24}Mg residues at the focal plane of the DRAGON recoil separator at TRIUMF. In this manner, the relative strength of all decay pathways through excited states up to the particle threshold could be examined for the first time. Isovector M1 transitions are found to be a important component of the radiative capture from the E{sub c.m.}=6.0 and 6.8 MeV resonances. Comparison with Monte Carlo simulations suggests that these resonances may have either J=0 or 2, with a preference for J=2. The higher energy resonances at E{sub c.m.}=7.5 and 8.0 MeV have a rather different decay pattern. The former is a clear candidate for a J=4 resonance, whereas the latter has a dominant J=4 character superposed on a J=2 resonant component underneath. The relationship between these resonances and the well-known quasimolecular resonances as well as resonances in breakup and electrofission of {sup 24}Mg into two {sup 12}C nuclei are discussed.

  12. Advances in commercial application of gamma radiation in tropical fruits at Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabato, S. F.; Silva, J. M.; Cruz, J. N.; Broisler, P. O.; Rela, P. R.; Salmieri, S.; Lacroix, M.

    2009-07-01

    All regions of Brazil are potential areas for growing tropical fruits. As this country is already a great producer and exporter of tropical fruits, ionizing radiation has been the subject of studies in many commodities. An important project has been carried out to increase the commercial use of gamma radiation in our country. Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN)-CNEN/SP together with field producers in northeast region and partners like International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), CIC, Empresa Brasileira Pesquisa na Agricultura (EMBRAPA) joined to demonstrate this technology, its application and commercial feasibility. The objective of this study is to show advances in feasibility demonstrate the quality of the irradiated fruits in an international consignment from Brazil to Canada. In this work, Tommy Atkins mangoes harvested in northeast region of Brazil were sent to Canada. The fruits were treated in a gamma irradiation facility at doses 0.4 and 1.0 kGy. The control group was submitted to hydrothermal treatment (46 °C for 110 min). The fruits were stored at 11 °C for 10 days until the international transportation and kept at an environmental condition (22 °C) for 12 days, where their physical-chemical and sensorial properties were evaluated. The financial part of the feasibility study covers the scope of the investment, including the net working capital and production costs.

  13. Deinococcus puniceus sp. nov., a bacterium isolated from soil-irradiated gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Jin; Srinivasan, Sathiyaraj; Lim, Sangyong; Joe, Minho; Im, Seonghun; Kim, Myung Kyum

    2015-04-01

    A Gram-positive, coccus-shaped, crimson-color-pigmented bacterium was isolated from soil irradiated with 5 kGy gamma radiation and was designated strain DY1(T). Cells showed growth at 10-30 °C and pH 7-11 and were oxidase-negative and catalase-positive. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene showed that the strain DY1(T) belonged to the genus Deinococcus with sequence similarities to Deinococcus aquatilis CCUG 53370(T) (96.2 %) and Deinococcus navajonensis KR-114(T) (94.1 %). Strain DY1(T) showed low level of DNA relatedness with D. aquatilis CCUG 53370(T) (41.3 ± 3.9 %). The DNA G + C content of DY1(T) was 58.7 mol%. Predominant fatty acids were summed feature 3 (C16:1 ω7c/ω6c), C16:0, and C17:0. The major amino acids were D-alanine, L-glutamic acid, glycine, and L-ornithine in the peptidoglycan. The major polar lipids were unknown phosphoglycolipids (PGL). Strain DY1(T) has resistance to gamma radiation and was found to be a novel species. Therefore, the strain was designated as DY1(T) (=KCTC 33027(T) = JCM 18576(T)), and the name Deinococcus puniceus sp. nov. is herein proposed. PMID:25477066

  14. Influence of gamma radiation on the gel rigidity index and binding capability of gelatin

    SciTech Connect

    Fassihi, A.R.; Parker, M.S.

    1988-10-01

    Changes in the rigidity indices of gelatin gel before and after gamma irradiation were characterized by dynamic mechanical testing, and the significance of these changes on the strength of granules was evaluated. Results illustrate the difficulty of obtaining reproducible values for gels containing less than 20% gelatin. However, rigidity indices for gels with a gelatin content of 20% and higher are consistent and may provide a useful controlling factor for preparation of gelatins of more precise specifications. The data indicate that rigidity degradation kinetics of several concentrations of gelatin gel at different radiation doses are complex, showing both increasing and decreasing rates. These findings strongly suggest that doses of less than 2.0 Mrad of gamma radiation should be used in order to obtain gelatins of acceptable quality for pharmaceutical applications. The crushing strength of granules of lactose powder granulated with irradiated gelatin reveals that the binding capability of such gelatin is significantly reduced. The results obtained for various size fractions and granule hardnesses containing different binder concentrations also suggest that particle size influences the granule strength to a lesser extent than does binder concentration and its consistency.

  15. Improvement of microbiological safety of sous-vide meals by gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, J.; Polyák-Fehér, K.; Andrássy, É.; Mészáros, L.

    2002-03-01

    Experimental batches of smoked-cured pork in stewed beans sauce were inoculated with spores of psychrotrophic Bacillus cereus, more heat and radiation resistant than spores of non-proteolytic C. botulinum. After vacuum packaging, the meals were treated with combinations of pasteurizing heat treatments and gamma irradiation of 5 kGy. Prior and after treatments, and periodically during storage at 10°C, total aerobic and total anerobic viable cell counts, and selectively, the viable cell counts of B. cereus and sulphite-reducing clostridia have been determined. The effects of the treatment order as well as addition of nisin to enhance the preservative efficiency of the physical treatments were also studied. Heat-sensitization of bacterial spores surviving irradiation occurred. The quality-friendly sous-vide cooking in combination with this medium dose gamma irradiation and/or nisin addition increased considerably the microbiological safety and the keeping quality of the meals studied. However, approx. 40% loss of thiamin content occurred as an effect of combination treatments, and adverse sensorial effects may also limit the feasible radiation doses or the usable concentrations of nisin.

  16. Gamma spectroscopic analysis and associated radiation hazards of building materials used in Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Taher, A

    2010-02-01

    Radiation exposure of the population can be increased appreciably by the use of building materials containing above-normal levels of naturally occurring radionuclides of terrestrial origin. Using gamma-ray spectrometry, the natural radioactivity levels of 55 samples of natural and manufactured Egyptian building materials have been investigated. The samples were collected from local market and construction sites. From the measured gamma-ray spectra, activity concentrations were determined. The activities were in the ranges 11.7-35.6, 12.4-55.2 and 60-350 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. The activities are compared with available reported data from other countries and with the world average value for soils. The radium equivalent activity Ra(eq), the external hazard index H(ex) and the absorbed dose rate in air D in each sample was evaluated to assess the radiation hazard for people living in dwellings made of the materials studied. All building materials have shown Ra(eq) (range from 37.76 to 116.87 Bq kg(-1)) lower than the limit of 370 Bq kg(-1) adopted by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The absorbed dose rate in indoor air is lower than the international recommended value of 55 nGy h(-1) for all test samples. All the materials examined are acceptable for use as building materials as defined by the OECD criterion. PMID:19841012

  17. Single-source gamma radiation procedures for improved calibration and measurements in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, M.; Hofstee, C.; Dane, H.; Lenhard, R.J.

    1998-08-01

    When dual-energy gamma radiation systems are employed for measurements in porous media, count rates from both sources are often used to compute parameter values. However, for several applications, the count rates of just one source are insufficient. These applications include the determination of volumetric liquid content values in two-liquid systems and salt concentration values in water-saturated porous media. Single-energy gamma radiation procedures for three applications are described in this paper. Through an error analysis, single-source procedures are shown to reduce the probable error in the determinations considerably. Example calculations and simple column experiments were conducted for each application to compare the performance of the new single-source and standard dual-source methods. In all cases, the single-source methods provided more reliable data than the traditional dual-source methods. In addition, a single-source calibration procedure is proposed to determine incident count rates indirectly. This procedure, which requires packing under saturated conditions, can be used in all single- and dual-source applications and yields accurate porosity and dry bulk density values.

  18. Gamma Radiation Effects on Physical, Optical, and Structural Properties of Binary As-S glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, S. K.; McCloy, John S.; Riley, Brian J.; Murphy, Mark K.; Qiao, Hong; Windisch, Charles F.; Walter, Eric D.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Golovchak, Roman; Shpotyuk, O.

    2012-03-01

    Gamma radiation induces changes in physical, optical, and structural properties in chalcogenide glasses., Previous research has focused on As{sub 2}S{sub 3} and families of glasses containing Ge. For the first time, we present composition and dose dependent data on the As-S binary glass series. Binary As{sub x}S{sub 100-x} (x = 30, 33, 36, 40, and 42) glasses were irradiated with gamma radiation using a {sup 60}Co source at 2.8 Gy/s to accumulated doses of 1, 2, 3, and 4 MGy. The irradiated samples were characterized at each dose level for density, refractive index, x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectrum. These results are compared to those of as-made and 1 year aged samples. We report an initial increase in density followed by a decrease as a function of dose that contradicts the expected compositional dependence of molar volume of these glasses. This unusual behavior is explained based on microvoid formation and nanoscale phase-separation induced by the irradiation in these glasses. XRD, Raman, and EPR data provide supporting evidence, underscoring the importance of optimally- or overly-constrained structures for stability under aging or irradiation.

  19. Radiation background in a LaBr3(Ce) gamma-ray scintillation detector.

    PubMed

    Rosson, Robert; Lahr, Jeffrey; Kahn, Bernd

    2011-12-01

    Gamma-ray spectral analyses with a 5-cm × 5-cm LaBr3(Ce) detector and a NaI(Tl) detector of the same size show that the LaBr3(Ce) has much better gamma-ray peak resolution and full-energy peak counting efficiency but worse detection sensitivity. The LaBr3(Ce) detector has relatively high intrinsic radiation background due to the naturally occurring La radioisotope in lanthanum. Although this La background is entirely below the energy of 1,500 keV, additional background is in the energy region between 1,500 keV and 2,750 keV. The manufacturer attributes this radiation to alpha particles emitted by the five short-lived progeny of an Ac impurity. Comparative values for peak resolution, full-energy peak counting efficiency, and detection sensitivity are reported for Am, Co, and Cs. Results of counting Cs sources at two activity levels demonstrate the impact of background on detection sensitivity. PMID:22048488

  20. Low doses of gamma radiation in the management of postharvest Lasiodiplodia theobromae in mangos

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Alice Maria Gonçalves; Lins, Severina Rodrigues Oliveira; da Silva, Josenilda Maria; de Oliveira, Sônia Maria Alves

    2015-01-01

    The postharvest life of mango is limited by the development of pathogens, especially fungi that cause rot, among which stands out the Lasiodiplodia theobromae. Several control methods have been employed to minimize the damages caused by this fungus, chemical control can leave residues to man and nature; physical control by the use of gamma radiation in combination with modified atmosphere and cold storage. The use of gamma radiation helps to reduce the severity of the pathogen assist in the ripening process of fruits, even at low doses (0.25, 0.35 and 0.45 kGy) chemical properties such as pH, soluble solids, acid ascorbic, titratable acidity and also the quality parameters of the pulp showed no damage that are ideal for trade and consumption of mangoes. This treatment can be extended for use in the management of diseases such as natural infections for penducular rot complex that has as one of L. theobroma pathogens involved. PMID:26413068

  1. Effect of gamma radiation on the inactivation of aflatoxin B1 in food and feed crops

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, I.; Orfi, M.; Shamma, M.

    2008-01-01

    Samples of food crops (peanut, peeled pistachio, unpeeled pistachio, rice, and corn) and feed (barley, bran, corn) were autoclave-sterilized, and inoculated with 106 of spore suspension of an isolate of Aspergillus flavus fungus known to produce aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) . Following a 10-day period of incubation at 27 C to allow for fungal growth, food and feed samples were irradiated with gamma radiation at the doses 4, 6, and 10 kGy. Results indicated that degradation of AFB1 was positively correlated with the increase in the applied dose of gamma ray for each tested sample. At a dose of 10 kGy percentages of AFB1 degradation reached highest values at 58.6, 68.8, 84.6, 81.1 and 87.8% for peanuts, peeled pistachios, unpeeled pistachios, corn and rice samples, respectively. In feed samples percentages of AFB1 degradation were 45, 66, and 90% in barley, 47, 75, and 86% in bran, and 31, 72, and 84% in corn for the doses of 4, 6, and 10 kGy, respectively. AFB1 degradation in food samples correlated negatively with oil content in irradiated samples. Thus, in peanuts, which contained the highest oil content, percentage of AFB1 degradation at 10 kGy was not more than 56.6%, whereas, the corresponding value in corn, which contained the lowest oil content, reached as high as 80%. The above results indicate the possibility of using gamma radiation as a means of degradation of AFB1 in food and feed crops to levels lower than the maximum allowed levels. PMID:24031308

  2. Optimization of a heat-pipe-cooled space radiator for use with a reactor-powered Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriarty, Michael P.; French, Edward P.

    1987-01-01

    The design optimization of a reactor-Stirling heat-pipe-cooled radiator is presented. The radiator is a self-deploying concept that uses individual finned heat pipe 'petals' to reject waste heat from a Stirling engine. Radiator optimization methodology is presented, and the results of a parametric analysis of the radiator design variables for a 100-kW(e) system are given. The additional steps of optiminzing the radiator resulted in a net system mass savings of 3 percent.

  3. Measurement of Branching Fractions in Radiative BDecays to eta K gamma and Search for B Decays to eta' K gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-03-31

    The authors present measurements of the B {yields} {eta}K{gamma} branching fractions and upper limits for the B {yields} {eta}'K{gamma} branching fractions. For B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma} they also measure the time-integrated charge asymmetry. The data sample, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represents 232 x 10{sup 6} produced B{bar B} pairs. The results for branching fractions and upper limits at 90% C.L. in units of 10{sup -6} are: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}{gamma}) = 11.3{sub -2.6}{sup +2.8} {+-} 0.6, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma}) = 10.0 {+-} 1.3 {+-} 0.5, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}'K{sup 0}{gamma}) < 6.6, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}'K{sup +}{gamma}) < 4.2. The charge asymmetry in the decay B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma} is {Alpha}{sub ch} = -0.09 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.01. The first errors are statistical and the second systematic.

  4. The search for gamma radiation from supernova 1987A in an experiment aboard the Salut-7/Cosmos-1686 complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachilova, R. N.; Bloch, G. M.; Pankov, V. M.; Prohin, V. L.; Rutkovsky, A. I.; Rumin, S. P.

    1988-07-01

    Gamma-quanta flux measurements were carried out during February-October 1987 in a search for radiation from SN 1987A. The time dependence of the mean monthly gamma-quanta flux measured with the Nega telescope at an altitude of 500 km in the equatorial region is analyzed. The upper limit of the gamma-quanta flux is determined to be 1.5 x 10 to the -6th/sq cm s keV on the 3-sigma level for the 1.5-4.4 MeV energy interval.

  5. A new analytical formula for neutron capture gamma dose calculations in double-bend mazes in radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghiasi, Hosein; Mesbahi, Asghar

    2012-01-01

    Background Photoneutrons are produced in radiation therapy with high energy photons. Also, capture gamma rays are the byproduct of neutrons interactions with wall material of radiotherapy rooms. Aim In the current study an analytical formula was proposed for capture gamma dose calculations in double bend mazes in radiation therapy rooms. Materials and methods A total of 40 different layouts with double-bend mazes and a 18 MeV photon beam of Varian 2100 Clinac were simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo (MC) code. Neutron capture gamma ray dose equivalent was calculated by the MC method along the maze and at the maze entrance door of all the simulated rooms. Then, all MC resulted data were fitted to an empirical formula for capture gamma dose calculations. Wu–McGinley analytical formula for capture gamma dose equivalent at the maze entrance door in single-bend mazes was also used for comparison purposes. Results For capture gamma dose equivalents at the maze entrance door, the difference of 2–11% was seen between MC and the derived equation, while the difference of 36–87% was found between MC and the Wu–McGinley methods. Conclusion Our results showed that the derived formula results were consistent with the MC results for all of 40 different geometries. However, as a new formula, further evaluations are required to validate its use in practical situations. Finally, its application is recommend for capture gamma dose calculations in double-bend mazes to improve shielding calculations. PMID:24377027

  6. SOLIDIFICATION TESTING FOR A HIGH ACTIVITY WASTESTREAM FROM THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE USING GROUT AND GAMMA RADIATION SHEILDING MATERIALS - 10017

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, H.

    2009-11-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tasked MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) with evaluating grouts that include gamma radiation shielding materials to solidify surrogates of liquid aqueous radioactive wastes from across the DOE Complex. The Savannah River Site (SRS) identified a High Activity Waste (HAW) that will be treated and solidified at the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for surrogate grout testing. The HAW, which is produced at the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF), is an acidic aqueous wastestream generated by the alkaline treatment process and the aqueous purification process. The HAW surrogate was solidified using Portland cement with and without the inclusion of different gamma radiation shielding materials to determine the shielding material that is the most effective to attenuate gamma radiation for this application.

  7. Search for radiative penguin decays B(+)-->rho(+)gamma, B(0)-->rho(0)gamma, and B(0)-->omegagamma.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q L; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Vetere, M Lo; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Diberder, F Le; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Lodovico, F Di; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Buono, L Del; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Groot, N De; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Nardo, G De; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Ricca, G Della; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Band, H R; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-01-14

    A search for the decays B-->rho(770)gamma and B0-->omega(782)gamma is performed on a sample of 211 x 10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB events collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e(+)e(-) storage ring. No evidence for the decays is seen. We set the following limits on the individual branching fractions: B(B+-->rho(+)gamma)<1.8 x 10(-6), B(B0-->rho(0)gamma)<0.4 x 10(-6), and B(B0-->omegagamma)<1.0 x 10(-6) at the 90% confidence level. We use the quark model to limit the combined branching fraction B [B-->(rho/omega)gamma]<1.2 x 10(-6), from which we determine a constraint on the ratio of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements |V(td)|/|V(ts)|. PMID:15698065

  8. Cytoskeletal and functional changes in bioreactor assembled thyroid tissue organoids exposed to gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lora M.; Patel, Zarana; Murray, Deborah K.; Rightnar, Steven; Burell, Cheryl G.; Gridley, Daila S.; Nelson, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    Fischer rat thyroid cells were grown under low-shear stress in a bioreactor to a stage of organization composed of integrated follicles resembling small thyroid glands prior to exposure to 3 Gray-gamma radiation. Bioreactor tissues and controls (both irradiated and non-irradiated) were harvested at 24, 48, 96 and 144 hours post-exposure. Tissue samples were fixed and fluorescently labeled for actin and microtubules. Tissues were assessed for changes in cytoskeletal components induced by radiation and quantified by laser scanning cytometry. ELISA's were used to quantify transforming growth factor-beta and thyroxin released from cells to the culture supernatant. Tissue architecture was disrupted by exposure to radiation with the structural organization of actin and loss of follicular content the most obviously affected. With time post-irradiation the actin appeared disordered and the levels of fluorescence associated with filamentous-actin and microtubules cycled in the tissue analogs, but not in the flask-grown cultures. Active transforming growth factor-beta was higher in supernatants from the irradiated bioreactor tissue. Thyroxin release paralleled cell survival in the bioreactors and control cultures. Thus, the engineered tissue responses to radiation differed from those of conventional tissue culture making it a potentially better mimic of the in vivo situation.

  9. Progenitor Cell Mobilization by Gamma-tocotrienol: A Promising Radiation Countermeasure

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vijay K.; Fatanmi, Oluseyi O.; Verma, Amit; Newman, Victoria L.; Wise, Stephen Y.; Romaine, Patricia L.P.; Berg, Allison N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This article reviews studies of progenitor mobilization with gamma-tocotrienol (GT3), a tocol under advanced development as a radiation countermeasure for acute radiation syndrome (ARS). GT3 protects mice against high doses of ionizing radiation and induces high levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). GT3‐induced G-CSF in conjunction with AMD3100 (a chemokine receptor antagonist clinically used to improve the yield of mobilized progenitors) mobilizes progenitors; these mobilized progenitors mitigate injury when infused to mice exposed to acute, high-dose ionizing radiation. The administration of a G-CSF antibody to GT3‐injected donor mice abrogated the radiomitigative efficacy of blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in irradiated recipient mice. The efficacy of GT3‐injected donor mice blood or PBMC was comparable to a recently published article involving blood or mononuclear cells obtained from mice injected with G-CSF. The injected progenitors were found to localize in various tissues of irradiated hosts. The authors demonstrate the efficacy of a bridging therapy in a preclinical animal model that allows the lymphohematopoietic system of severely immunocompromised mice to recover. This suggests that GT3 is a highly effective agent for radioprotection and mobilizing progenitors with significant therapeutic potential. Therefore, GT3 may be considered for further translational development and ultimately for use in humans. PMID:27356050

  10. The effect of gamma radiation on the ultrastructure of sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas)

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.

    1986-12-01

    Radiation is being used to increase the storage life of fresh foods. Various doses of gamma radiation were administered to Jewel cultivar sweet potatoes and the effects were monitored by direct observation and by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Potatoes were divided into two groups: those irradiated immediately after harvest (doses = 0 kGy - 0.4 KGy) and those irradiated one week after harvest (doses = 0 kGy - 0.4 kGy). Potatoes were examined and viewed each month for 7 months. Gross observations included weight, color and texture of the sweet potatoes. Those potatoes irradiated immediately after harvest spoiled faster than those irradiated one week after harvest. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated several cellular modifications accompanying spoilage. Cell collapse was greatest at the higher radiation doses during the periods of 1 to 5 months post-irradiation. The shape and size of starch granules varied with storage time and radiation levels. The mitochondria, cell walls and plasma membranes appeared normal as seen by transmission electron microscopy until 6 months post-irradiation for potatoes irradiated both immediately after harvest and one week after harvest. Thereafter, degradative changes were observed.

  11. Geraniin down regulates gamma radiation-induced apoptosis by suppressing DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bing, So Jin; Ha, Danbee; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Eunjin; Ahn, Ginnae; Kim, Dae Seung; Ko, Ryeo Kyeong; Park, Jae Woo; Lee, Nam Ho; Jee, Youngheun

    2013-07-01

    Gamma ray irradiation triggers DNA damage and apoptosis of proliferating stem cells and peripheral immune cells, resulting in the destruction of intestinal crypts and lymphoid system. Geraniin is a natural compound extracts from an aquatic plant Nymphaea tetragona and possesses good antioxidant property. In this study, we demonstrate that geraniin rescues radiosensitive splenocytes and jejunal crypt cells from radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Isolated splenocytes from C57BL/6 mice treated with geraniin were protected against radiation injury of 2 Gy irradiation through the enhancement of the proliferation and attenuation of DNA damage. Also, geraniin inhibited apoptosis in radiosensitive splenocytes by reducing the expression level and immunoreactivity of proapoptotic p53 and Bax and increasing those of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. In mice exposed to radiation, geraniin treatment protected splenocytes and intestinal crypt cells from radiation-induced cell death. Our results suggest that geraniin presents radioprotective effects by regulating DNA damage on splenocytes, exerting immunostimulatory capacities and inhibiting apoptosis of radiosensitive immune cells and jejunal crypt cells. Therefore, geraniin can be a radioprotective agent against γ-irradiation exposure. PMID:23541438

  12. The effect of perinatal sup 60 Co gamma radiation on brain weight in beagles

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, B.F.; Benjamin, S.A.; Angleton, G.M.; Lee, A.C. )

    1989-08-01

    Beagle dogs were given single, whole-body {sup 60}Co gamma-radiation exposures at one of three prenatal (8, 28, or 55 days postcoitus) or three postnatal (2, 70, or 365 days postpartum) ages to evaluate the relative radiosensitivity of various stages of brain development. A total of 387 dogs received mean doses ranging from 0.16 to 3.83 Gy, and 120 dogs were sham-irradiated. Groups of dogs were sacrificed at preselected times from 70 days to 11 years of age. Brain weight decreased significantly with increasing dose in dogs irradiated at 28 or 55 days postcoitus or at 2 days postpartum. Irradiations at 28 days postcoitus were dramatically more effective in causing a reduction in brain weight than those at 55 days postcoitus or 2 days postpartum. Among dogs given 1.0 Gy or more and followed for up to 4 years, there was a radiation effect evident at all three sensitive exposure ages. Among dogs given lower doses and followed for up to 11 years, there was a significant decrease in brain weight in dogs given 0.80-0.88 Gy at 28 days postcoitus. All decreases in brain weight were present after normalization for radiation-induced reductions in skeletal (body) size. No specific morphologic changes were noted in the brains which showed the radiation-related reductions in size.

  13. Synergistic effects in the short-term preservation of hides with antiseptics and gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Plessis, TA; Russell, AE; Stevens, RCB; Galloway, AC

    The normal time lapse between the skinning and tanning processes of green hides necessitates the need for a short-term preservation technique to be employed. The most common method of bringing about such preservation is the coarse salting of the flesh side of hides. More recently the antiseptic treatment of hides was introduced to overcome the serious environmental pollution brought about by the salting process. The antiseptic treatment, however, must also be carefully controlled to avoid upsetting the biological breakdown processes in effluent plants. The gamma sterilization of such hides presents a non-polluting alternative to these methods. As the nature of this product demands excessively high radiation doses to be effective, which negatively influences the economics of the process and the physical properties of the resultant leather, a combination process employing radiation and antiseptics was investigated. It was observed that the radiation dose could be lowered from 50 kGy to 8 kGy in combination with certain antiseptics, whilst the required antiseptic concentration could be substantially lowered in the presence of radiation. The resultant leather was of an excellent quality whilst minimizing the environmental pollution problem.

  14. Progenitor Cell Mobilization by Gamma-tocotrienol: A Promising Radiation Countermeasure.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay K; Fatanmi, Oluseyi O; Verma, Amit; Newman, Victoria L; Wise, Stephen Y; Romaine, Patricia L P; Berg, Allison N

    2016-08-01

    This article reviews studies of progenitor mobilization with gamma-tocotrienol (GT3), a tocol under advanced development as a radiation countermeasure for acute radiation syndrome (ARS). GT3 protects mice against high doses of ionizing radiation and induces high levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). GT3-induced G-CSF in conjunction with AMD3100 (a chemokine receptor antagonist clinically used to improve the yield of mobilized progenitors) mobilizes progenitors; these mobilized progenitors mitigate injury when infused to mice exposed to acute, high-dose ionizing radiation. The administration of a G-CSF antibody to GT3-injected donor mice abrogated the radiomitigative efficacy of blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in irradiated recipient mice. The efficacy of GT3-injected donor mice blood or PBMC was comparable to a recently published article involving blood or mononuclear cells obtained from mice injected with G-CSF. The injected progenitors were found to localize in various tissues of irradiated hosts. The authors demonstrate the efficacy of a bridging therapy in a preclinical animal model that allows the lymphohematopoietic system of severely immunocompromised mice to recover. This suggests that GT3 is a highly effective agent for radioprotection and mobilizing progenitors with significant therapeutic potential. Therefore, GT3 may be considered for further translational development and ultimately for use in humans. PMID:27356050

  15. Adaptive response to gamma radiation in mammalian cells proficient and deficient in components of nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Hafer, Kurt; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Iwamoto, Keisuke K; Scuric, Zorica; Schiestl, Robert H

    2007-08-01

    Cells preconditioned with low doses of low-linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation become more resistant to later challenges of radiation. The mechanism(s) by which cells adaptively respond to radiation remains unclear, although it has been suggested that DNA repair induced by low doses of radiation increases cellular radioresistance. Recent gene expression profiles have consistently indicated that proteins involved in the nucleotide excision repair pathway are up-regulated after exposure to ionizing radiation. Here we test the role of the nucleotide excision repair pathway for adaptive response to gamma radiation in vitro. Wild-type CHO cells exhibited both greater survival and fewer HPRT mutations when preconditioned with a low dose of gamma rays before exposure to a later challenging dose. Cells mutated for ERCC1, ERCC3, ERCC4 or ERCC5 did not express either adaptive response to radiation; cells mutated for ERCC2 expressed a survival adaptive response but no mutation adaptive response. These results suggest that some components of the nucleotide excision repair pathway are required for phenotypic low-dose induction of resistance to gamma radiation in mammalian cells. PMID:17638404

  16. Radiation-initiated emulsion copolymerization of styrene and carboxylic acid monomers. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Egusa, S.; Makuuchi, K.

    1982-03-01

    The emulsion copolymerization of styrene and carboxylic acid monomers such as acrylic, methacrylic, and itaconic acids (AAc, MAAc, IAc) was studied by using /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays as initiator and sodium dodecylsulfate as emulsifier. The polymerization behavior of these acid monomers was followed by simultaneous conductometric and potentiometric titrations for a latex sample taken in polymerization. The polymerization rate of these acid monomers increases in the following order of hydrophobicity: IAc < AAc < MAAc; this suggests that their polymerization sites are mainly the surface and/or subsurface regions of latex particles. The copolymerization rate of styrene and acid monomer increases with an increase in the acid monomer content for AAc and MAAc, whereas for IAc the rate decreases. The particle sizes determined by the stopped-flow method reveal that this variation of copolymerization rate cannot be explained by the number of growing particles and should be attributed to another factor; for instance, the transfer rate of styrene molecules from oil droplets to growing particles.

  17. Inactivation of murine norovirus-1 in the edible seaweeds Capsosiphon fulvescens and Hizikia fusiforme using gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin Young; Kang, Sujin; Ha, Sang-Do

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of gamma radiation (3-10 kGy) upon the inactivation of murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1), a human norovirus (NoV) surrogate. The edible green and brown algae, fulvescens (Capsosiphon fulvescens) and fusiforme (Hizikia fusiforme), respectively, were experimentally contaminated with 5-6 log10 plaque forming units (PFU)/ml MNV-1. The titer of MNV-1 significantly decreased (P < 0.05) as the dose of gamma radiation increased. MNV-1 titer decreased to 1.16-2.46 log10 PFU/ml in fulvescens and 0.37-2.21 log10 PFU/ml in fusiforme following irradiation. However, all Hunters ('L', 'a' and 'b') and sensory qualities (appearance, color, flavor, texture and overall acceptability) were not significantly (P > 0.05) different in both algae following gamma radiation. The Weibull model was used to generate non-linear survival curves and to calculate Gd values for 1, 2, and 3 log10 reductions of MNV-1 in fulvescens (R(2) = 0.992) and fusiforme (R(2) = 0.988). A Gd value of 1 (90% reduction) corresponded to 2.89 and 3.93 kGy in fulvescens and fusiforme, respectively. A Gd value of 2 (99% reduction) corresponded to 7.75 and 9.02 kGy in fulvescens and fusiforme, respectively, while a Gd value of 3 (99.9% reduction) in fulvescens and fusiforme corresponded with 13.83 and 14.93 kGy of gamma radiation, respectively. A combination of gamma radiation at medium doses and other treatments could be used to inactivate ≥ 3 log10 PFU/ml NoV in seaweed. The inactivation kinetics due to gamma radiation against NoV in these algae might provide basic information for use in seaweed processing and distribution. PMID:26919820

  18. Gamma-Tocotrienol Modulates Radiation-Induced MicroRNA Expression in Mouse Spleen.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sanchita P; Pathak, Rupak; Kumar, Parameet; Biswas, Shukla; Bhattacharyya, Sharmistha; Kumar, Vidya P; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Biswas, Roopa

    2016-05-01

    Ionizing radiation causes depletion of hematopoietic cells and enhances the risk of developing secondary hematopoietic malignancies. Vitamin E analog gamma-tocotrienol (GT3), which has anticancer properties, promotes postirradiation hematopoietic cell recovery by enhancing spleen colony-forming capacity, and provides protection against radiation-induced lethality in mice. However, the underlying molecular mechanism involved in GT3-mediated postirradiation survival is not clearly understood. Recent studies have shown that natural dietary products including vitamin E provide a benefit to biological systems by modulating microRNA (miR) expression. In this study, we show that GT3 differentially modulates the miR footprint in the spleen of irradiated mice compared to controls at early times (day 1), as well as later times (day 4 and 15) after total-body irradiation. We observed that miR expression was altered in a dose- and time-dependent manner in GT3-pretreated spleen tissues from total-body irradiated mice. GT3 appeared to affect the expression of a number of radiation-modulated miRs known to be involved in hematopoiesis and lymphogenesis. Moreover, GT3 pretreatment also suppressed the upregulation of radiation-induced p53, suggesting the function of GT3 in the prevention of radiation-induced damage to the spleen. In addition, we have shown that GT3 significantly reduced serum levels of Flt3L, a biomarker of radiation-induced bone marrow aplasia. Further in silico analyses of the effect of GT3 implied the association of p38 MAPK, ERK and insulin signaling pathways. Our study provides initial insight into the mechanism by which GT3 mediates protection of spleen after total-body irradiation. PMID:27128741

  19. Phase effects in the radiation chemistry of dl-camphor. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Klingen, T.J.; Sherman, L.R.; McCormick, D.G.

    1980-12-11

    The effect of mesomorphism on the radiation chemistry of the solid state is examined for the system dl-camphor, which has only a small entropy difference between the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. mesophases. The results of the radiolysis of these phases gave rise to the same products in both mesophases but with differences in the product G values in the two mesophases. These results are discussed in terms of the effect of phase on the overall mechanism for the formation of the observed products, which can be attributed to efficient abstraction reactions operative in the ..beta.. phase but not the ..cap alpha.. phase.

  20. Effect of high-power gamma-radiation on the /sup 90/Sr distribution in the ground

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, I.A.; Barinov, A.S.; Khomchik, L.M.; Ozhovan, M.I.; Timofeev, E.M.

    1986-02-01

    This paper examines the effect of gamma-radiation on the Sr-90 distribution in argillaceous soil. For the irradiated argillaceous ground specimens, the authors investigated the ion-exchange capacity and the Sr-90 distribution coefficient concentration in the solid phase to the Sr-90 concentration in the contacting equilibrium solution. The investigation of the irradiated ground samples has shown that the ion-exchange capacity remains virtually unchanged up to a total dose of 2.3 x 10/sup 8/ rd. The effect of gamma-radiation on the Sr-90 distribution coefficient was investigated in two series of experiments.