Science.gov

Sample records for reactor irradiation experiments

  1. Neutron irradiation experiments for fusion reactor materials through JUPITER program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Kohyama, A.; Namba, C.; Wiffen, F. W.; Jones, R. H.

    1998-10-01

    A Japan-USA Program of irradiation experiments for fusion research, "JUPITER", has been established as a 6 year program from 1995 to 2000. The goal is to study "the dynamic behavior of fusion reactor materials and their response to variable and complex irradiation environment". This is phase-three of the collaborative program, which follows RTNS-II Program (Phase-1: 1982-1986) and FFTF/MOTA Program (Phase-2: 1987-1994). This program is to provide a scientific basis for application of materials performance data, generated by fission reactor experiments, to anticipated fusion environments. Following the systematic study on cumulative irradiation effects, done through FFTF/MOTA Program, JUPITER is emphasizing the importance of dynamic irradiation effects on materials performance in fusion systems. The irradiation experiments in this program include low activation structural materials, functional ceramics and other innovative materials. The experimental data are analyzed by theoretical modeling and computer simulation to integrate the above effects.

  2. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR)-5/6/7 Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    A. Joseph Palmer; David A. Petti; S. Blaine Grover

    2014-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which each consist of at least five separate capsules, are being irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gases also have on-line fission product monitoring the effluent from each capsule to track performance of the fuel during irradiation. The first two experiments (designated AGR-1 and AGR-2), have been completed. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. The design of the fuel qualification experiment, designated AGR-5/6/7, is well underway and incorporates lessons learned from the three previous experiments. Various design issues will be discussed with particular details related to selection of thermometry.

  3. Design of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2005-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight particle fuel tests in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the newly formed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to support development of the next generation Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature monitoring and control combined with on-line fission product monitoring of the sweep gas. The final design phase has just been completed on the first experiment (AGR-1) in this series and the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation. This paper discusses the development of the experimental hardware and support system designs and the status of the experiment.

  4. Safety Assurance for Irradiating Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    T. A. Tomberlin; S. B. Grover

    2004-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), was specifically designed to provide a high neutron flux test environment for conducting a variety of experiments. This paper addresses the safety assurance process for two general types of experiments conducted in the ATR facility and how the safety analyses for experiments are related to the ATR safety basis. One type of experiment is more routine and generally represents greater risks; therefore, this type of experiment is addressed in more detail in the ATR safety basis. This allows the individual safety analysis for this type of experiment to be more standardized. The second type of experiment is defined in more general terms in the ATR safety basis and is permitted under more general controls. Therefore, the individual safety analysis for the second type of experiment tends to be more unique and is tailored to each experiment.

  5. INITIAL IRRADIATION OF THE FIRST ADVANCED GAS REACTOR FUEL DEVELOPMENT AND QUALIFICATION EXPERIMENT IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2007-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation.

  6. Completing the Design of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2006-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the newly formed Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation.

  7. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite Creep Experiment Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Blaine Grover

    2010-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six gas reactor graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These graphite irradiations are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six stacks will have differing compressive loads applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be the capability of sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during initial start-up of

  8. Completion of the first NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiment, AGR-1, in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Blaine Grover; John Maki; David Petti

    2010-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and completed a very successful irradiation in early November 2009. The design of AGR-1 test train and support systems used to monitor and control the experiment during

  9. Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and support systems will be briefly discussed, followed by the progress and status of the experiment to date.

  10. Irradiation of the First Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2008-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The design of the first experiment (designated AGR-1) was completed in 2005, and the fabrication and assembly of the test train as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that monitor and control the experiment during irradiation were completed in September 2006. The experiment was inserted in the ATR in December 2006, and is serving as a shakedown test of the multi-capsule experiment design that will be used in the subsequent irradiations as well as a test of the early variants of the fuel produced under this program. The experiment test train as well as the monitoring, control, and data collection systems are discussed and the status of the experiment is provided.

  11. Status of the NGNP fuel experiment AGR-2 irradiated in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2014-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also undergo on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and sup

  12. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2009-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006, and the second experiment (AGR-2) is currently in the design phase. The design of test trains, as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed. In

  13. Advanced Test Reactor In-Canal Ultrasonic Scanner: Experiment Design and Initial Results on Irradiated Plates

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Wachs; J. M. Wight; D. T. Clark; J. M. Williams; S. C. Taylor; D. J. Utterbeck; G. L. Hawkes; G. S. Chang; R. G. Ambrosek; N. C. Craft

    2008-09-01

    An irradiation test device has been developed to support testing of prototypic scale plate type fuels in the Advanced Test Reactor. The experiment hardware and operating conditions were optimized to provide the irradiation conditions necessary to conduct performance and qualification tests on research reactor type fuels for the RERTR program. The device was designed to allow disassembly and reassembly in the ATR spent fuel canal so that interim inspections could be performed on the fuel plates. An ultrasonic scanner was developed to perform dimensional and transmission inspections during these interim investigations. Example results from the AFIP-2 experiment are presented.

  14. Design Studies for a Multiple Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation Experiments (MATRIX)

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, Michael A.; Gougar, Hans D.; Ryskamp, J. M.

    2015-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density test reactor specializing in fuel and materials irradiation. For more than 45 years, the ATR has provided irradiations of materials and fuels testing along with radioisotope production. Should unforeseen circumstances lead to the decommissioning of ATR, the U.S. Government would be left without a large-scale materials irradiation capability to meet the needs of its nuclear energy and naval reactor missions. In anticipation of this possibility, work was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate test reactor concepts that could satisfy the current missions of the ATR along with an expanded set of secondary missions. A survey was conducted in order to catalogue the anticipated needs of potential customers. Then, concepts were evaluated to fill the role for this reactor, dubbed the Multi-Application Thermal Reactor Irradiation eXperiments (MATRIX). The baseline MATRIX design is expected to be capable of longer cycle lengths than ATR given a particular batch scheme. The volume of test space in In-Pile-Tubes (IPTs) is larger in MATRIX than in ATR with comparable magnitude of neutron flux. Furthermore, MATRIX has more locations of greater volume having high fast neutron flux than ATR. From the analyses performed in this work, it appears that the lead MATRIX design can be designed to meet the anticipated needs of the ATR replacement reactor. However, this design is quite immature, and therefore any requirements currently met must be re-evaluated as the design is developed further.

  15. Status of the NGNP Graphite Creep Experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have different compressive loads applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment. The first experiment, AGC-1, started its irradiation in September 2009, and the irradiation was completed in January 2011. The second experiment, AGC-2, started its irradiation in April 2011 and completed its irradiation in May 2012. This paper will briefly discuss the design of the experiment and control systems, and then present the irradiation results for each experiment to date.

  16. Status of the NGNP graphite creep experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 irradiated in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2014-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) very high temperature gas reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have three different compressive loads applied to the top half of three diametrically opposite pairs of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment.

  17. Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite Creep Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2009-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six gas reactor graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These graphite irradiations are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain seven separate stacks of graphite specimens. Six of the specimen stacks will have half of their graphite specimens under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six stacks will be organized into pairs with a different compressive load being applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks. The seventh stack will not have a compressive load on the graphite specimens during irradiation. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be the capability of sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any

  18. Impact of transmutation issues on interpretation of data obtained from fast reactor irradiation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, L. R.; Garner, F. A.

    2004-08-01

    The subject of fission-fusion correlation is usually cast in terms of reactor-to-reactor differences, but recently the fusion community has become aware of the impact of differences within a given surrogate facility, especially in constant time experiments when different dose levels are attained in different positions of one reactor. For some materials, it is not safe to assume that in-reactor spectral variations are small and of no consequence. This point is illustrated using calculations for fusion-relevant materials that were irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility-Materials Open Test Assembly (FFTF-MOTA) over a wide range of in-core and out-of-core positions spanning more than two orders of magnitude in dpa rate. It is shown that although both the neutron spectrum and flux changes, the spectral effectiveness factor, dpa/10 22 n/cm 2 ( E>0.1 MeV), remains remarkably constant over this range. The transmutation rate per dpa varies strongly with reactor position, however.

  19. Impact of Transmutation Issues on Interpretation of Data Obtained From Fast Reactor Irradiation Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Garner, Francis A.

    2004-04-15

    The subject of fission-fusion correlation is usually cast in terms of reactor-to-reactor differences, but recently the fusion community has become aware of the impact of differences within a given surrogate facility, especially in constant time experiments when different dose levels are attained in different positions of one reactor. For some materials, it is not safe to assume that in-reactor spectral variations are small and of no consequence. This point is illustrated using calculations for fusion-relevant materials that were irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility – Materials Open Test Assembly (FFTF-MOTA) over a wide range of in-core and out of core positions spanning more than two orders of magnitude in dpa rate. It is shown that although both the neutron spectrum and flux changes, the spectral effectiveness factor, dpa/10(22) superscript n/cm(2) superscript (E > 0.1 MeV), remains remarkably constant over this range. The transmutation rate per dpa varies strongly with reactor position, however.

  20. Final Assembly and Initial Irradiation of the First Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. B. Grover

    2007-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing.1,2 The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The final design phase for the first experiment was completed in 2005, and the fabrication and assembly of the first experiment test train (designated AGR-1) as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment

  1. Design and Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-3/4 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in November 2013. Since the purpose of this experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is

  2. Evaluation of Concepts for Mulitiple Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation eXperiments (MATRIX)

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Pope; Hans D. Gougar; John M. Ryskamp

    2013-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density test reactor specializing in fuel and materials irradiation. For more than 45 years, the ATR has provided irradiations of materials and fuels testing along with radioisotope production. Originally operated primarily in support of the Offcie of Naval Reactors (NR), the mission has gradually expanded to cater to other customers, such as the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), private industry, and universities. Unforeseen circumstances may lead to the decommissioning of ATR, thus leaving the U.S. Government without a large-scale materials irradiation capability to meet the needs of its nuclear energy and naval reactor missions. In anticipation of this possibility, work was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate test reactor concepts that could satisfy the current missions of the ATR along with an expanded set of secondary missions. This work can be viewed as an update to a project from the 1990’s called the Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR). In FY 2012, a survey of anticipated customer needs was performed, followed by analysis of the original BATR concepts with fuel changed to low-enriched uranium. Departing from these original BATR designs, four concepts were identified for further analysis in FY2013. The project informally adopted the acronym MATRIX (Multiple-Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation eXperiments). This report discusses analysis of the four MATRIX concepts along with a number of variations on these main concepts. Designs were evaluated based on their satisfaction of anticipated customer requirements and the “Cylindrical” variant was selected for further analysis of options. This downselection should be considered preliminary and the backup alternatives should include the other three main designs. The baseline Cylindrical MATRIX design is expected to be capable of higher burnup than the ATR (or longer cycle length given a

  3. Design of spectrally tailored fusion reactor materials experiments in the HFIR RB∗ capsule irradiation facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longest, A. W.; Corum, J. E.; Heatherly, D. W.; Thoms, K. R.

    1988-07-01

    Design of four spectrally tailored capsules to irradiate magnetic fusion energy (MFE) materials specimens in the new High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) removable beryllium (RB∗) facility at temperatures of 60, 200, 330 and 400°C, is described. These designs incorporate provisions for removal, examination and reencapsulation of the specimens at intermediate exposure levels en route to a target exposure level of 30 displacements per atom (dpa). With the exception of the 60°C capsule, where the test specimens are in direct contact with the reactor cooling water, the specimen temperatures (monitored by 21 thermocouples) are controlled by varying the thermal conductance of a small gap region between the specimen holder and the containment tube. Hafnium shields are used to tailor the neutron spectrum to closely match the helium production-to-atom displacement ratio ( {14 appm}/{dpa}) expected in an austenitic stainless steel fusion reactor first wall. These MFE capsule irradiations will begin in early 1988.

  4. Summary of Thermocouple Performance During Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor and Out-of-Pile Thermocouple Testing in Support of Such Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    A. J. Palmer; DC Haggard; J. W. Herter; M. Scervini; W. D. Swank; D. L. Knudson; R. S. Cherry

    2011-07-01

    High temperature gas reactor experiments create unique challenges for thermocouple based temperature measurements. As a result of the interaction with neutrons, the thermoelements of the thermocouples undergo transmutation, which produces a time dependent change in composition and, as a consequence, a time dependent drift of the thermocouple signal. This drift is particularly severe for high temperature platinum-rhodium thermocouples (Types S, R, and B); and tungsten-rhenium thermocouples (Types C and W). For lower temperature applications, previous experiences with type K thermocouples in nuclear reactors have shown that they are affected by neutron irradiation only to a limited extent. Similarly type N thermocouples are expected to be only slightly affected by neutron fluxes. Currently the use of these Nickel based thermocouples is limited when the temperature exceeds 1000°C due to drift related to phenomena other than nuclear irradiation. High rates of open-circuit failure are also typical. Over the past ten years, three long-term Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experiments have been conducted with measured temperatures ranging from 700oC – 1200oC. A variety of standard Type N and specialty thermocouple designs have been used in these experiments with mixed results. A brief summary of thermocouple performance in these experiments is provided. Most recently, out of pile testing has been conducted on a variety of Type N thermocouple designs at the following (nominal) temperatures and durations: 1150oC and 1200oC for 2000 hours at each temperature, followed by 200 hours at 1250oC, and 200 hours at 1300oC. The standard Type N design utilizes high purity crushed MgO insulation and an Inconel 600 sheath. Several variations on the standard Type N design were tested, including Haynes 214 alloy sheath, spinel (MgAl2O4) insulation instead of MgO, a customized sheath developed at the University of Cambridge, and finally a loose assembly thermocouple with hard fired alumina

  5. Schedule and status of irradiation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1997-04-01

    To provide an updated summary of the status of irradiation experiments for the neutron-interactive materials program. The current status of reactor irradiation experiments is presented in tables summarizing the experimental objectives, conditions, and schedule. Currently, the program has two irradiation experiments in reactor; and 8 experiments in the planning or design stages. Postirradiation examination and testing is in progress on 18 experiments.

  6. Neutron irradiation of V-Cr-Ti alloys in the BOR-60 fast reactor: Description of the fusion-1 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Tsai, H.C.; Smith, D.L.

    1997-08-01

    The FUSION-1 irradiation capsule was inserted in Row 5 of the BOR-60 fast reactor in June 1995. The capsule contains a collaborative RF/U.S. experiment to investigate the irradiation performance of V-Cr-Ti alloys in the temperature range 310 to 350{degrees}C. This report describes the capsule layout, specimen fabrication history, and the detailed test matrix for the U.S. specimens. A description of the operating history and neutronics will be presented in the next semiannual report.

  7. FOOD IRRADIATION REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Leyse, C.F.; Putnam, G.E.

    1961-05-01

    An irradiation apparatus is described. It comprises a pressure vessel, a neutronic reactor active portion having a substantially greater height than diameter in the pressure vessel, an annular tank surrounding and spaced from the pressure vessel containing an aqueous indium/sup 1//sup 1//sup 5/ sulfate solution of approximately 600 grams per liter concentration, means for circulating separate coolants through the active portion and the space between the annular tank and the pressure vessel, radiator means adapted to receive the materials to be irradiated, and means for flowing the indium/sup 1//sup 1//sup 5/ sulfate solution through the radiator means.

  8. Schedule and status of irradiation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Robertson, J.P.

    1998-03-01

    The current status of reactor irradiation experiments is presented in tables summarizing the experimental objectives, conditions, and schedule. Currently, the program has four irradiation experiments in reactor, and five experiments in the design or construction stages. Postirradiation examination and testing is in progress on ten experiments.

  9. Schedule and status of irradiation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Robertson, J.P.

    1998-09-01

    The current status of reactor irradiation experiments is presented in tables summarizing the experimental objectives, conditions, and schedule. Currently, the program has one irradiation experiment in reactor and five experiments in the design or construction stages. Postirradiation examination and testing is in progress on ten experiments.

  10. Multiple Irradiation Capsule Experiment (MICE)-3B Irradiation Test of Space Fuel Specimens in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) - Close Out Documentation for Naval Reactors (NR) Information

    SciTech Connect

    M. Chen; CM Regan; D. Noe

    2006-01-09

    Few data exist for UO{sub 2} or UN within the notional design space for the Prometheus-1 reactor (low fission rate, high temperature, long duration). As such, basic testing is required to validate predictions (and in some cases determine) performance aspects of these fuels. Therefore, the MICE-3B test of UO{sub 2} pellets was designed to provide data on gas release, unrestrained swelling, and restrained swelling at the upper range of fission rates expected for a space reactor. These data would be compared with model predictions and used to determine adequacy of a space reactor design basis relative to fission gas release and swelling of UO{sub 2} fuel and to assess potential pellet-clad interactions. A primary goal of an irradiation test for UN fuel was to assess performance issues currently associated with this fuel type such as gas release, swelling and transient performance. Information learned from this effort may have enabled use of UN fuel for future applications.

  11. Test reactor irradiation coordination

    SciTech Connect

    Heartherly, D.W.; Siman Tov, I.I.; Sparks, D.W.

    1995-10-01

    This task was established to supply and coordinate irradiation services needed by NRC contractors other than ORNL. These services include the design and assembly of irradiation capsules as well as arranging for their exposure, disassembly, and return of specimens. During this period, the final design of the facility and specimen baskets was determined through an iterative process involving the designers and thermal analysts. The resulting design should permit the irradiation of all test specimens to within 5{degrees}C of their desired temperature. Detailing of all parts is ongoing and should be completed during the next reporting period. Procurement of the facility will also be initiated during the next review period.

  12. Experiment Safety Assurance Package for Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in an Average Power Position (I-24) in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    J. M . Ryskamp; R. C. Howard; R. C. Pedersen; S. T. Khericha

    1998-10-01

    The Fissile Material Disposition Program Light Water Reactor Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan details a series of test irradiations designed to investigate the use of weapons-grade plutonium in MOX fuel for light water reactors (LWR) (Cowell 1996a, Cowell 1997a, Thoms 1997a). Commercial MOX fuel has been successfully used in overseas reactors for many years; however, weapons-derived test fuel contains small amounts of gallium (about 2 parts per million). A concern exists that the gallium may migrate out of the fuel and into the clad, inducing embrittlement. For preliminary out-of-pile experiments, Wilson (1997) states that intermetallic compound formation is the principal interaction mechanism between zircaloy cladding and gallium. This interaction is very limited by the low mass of gallium, so problems are not expected with the zircaloy cladding, but an in-pile experiment is needed to confirm the out-of-pile experiments. Ryskamp (1998) provides an overview of this experiment and its documentation. The purpose of this Experiment Safety Assurance Package (ESAP) is to demonstrate the safe irradiation and handling of the mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) Fuel Average Power Test (APT) experiment as required by Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) 3.9.1 (LMITCO 1998). This ESAP addresses the specific operation of the MOX Fuel APT experiment with respect to the operating envelope for irradiation established by the Upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report (UFSAR) Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO 1997a). Experiment handling activities are discussed herein.

  13. Fabrication and Pre-irradiation Characterization of a Minor Actinide and Rare Earth Containing Fast Reactor Fuel Experiment for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy A. Hyde

    2012-06-01

    The United States Department of Energy, seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter lived fission products, thereby decreasing the volume of material requiring disposal and reducing the long-term radiotoxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. This transmutation of the long lived actinides plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium can be accomplished by first separating them from spent Light Water Reactor fuel using a pyro-metalurgical process, then reprocessing them into new fuel with fresh uranium additions, and then transmuted to short lived nuclides in a liquid metal cooled fast reactor. An important component of the technology is developing actinide-bearing fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium isotopes that meet the stringent requirements of reactor fuels and materials.

  14. Computational analysis of irradiation facilities at the JSI TRIGA reactor.

    PubMed

    Snoj, Luka; Zerovnik, Gašper; Trkov, Andrej

    2012-03-01

    Characterization and optimization of irradiation facilities in a research reactor is important for optimal performance. Nowadays this is commonly done with advanced Monte Carlo neutron transport computer codes such as MCNP. However, the computational model in such calculations should be verified and validated with experiments. In the paper we describe the irradiation facilities at the JSI TRIGA reactor and demonstrate their computational characterization to support experimental campaigns by providing information on the characteristics of the irradiation facilities. PMID:22154389

  15. New Dosimetric Interpretation of the DV50 Vessel-Steel Experiment Irradiated in the OSIRIS MTR Reactor Using the Monte-Carlo Code TRIPOLI-4®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malouch, Fadhel

    2016-02-01

    An irradiation program DV50 was carried out from 2002 to 2006 in the OSIRIS material testing reactor (CEA-Saclay center) to assess the pressure vessel steel toughness curve for a fast neutron fluence (E > 1 MeV) equivalent to a French 900-MWe PWR lifetime of 50 years. This program allowed the irradiation of 120 specimens out of vessel steel, subdivided in two successive irradiations DV50 n∘1 and DV50 n∘2. To measure the fast neutron fluence (E > 1 MeV) received by specimens after each irradiation, sample holders were equipped with activation foils that were withdrawn at the end of irradiation for activity counting and processing. The fast effective cross-sections used in the dosimeter processing were determined with a specific calculation scheme based on the Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-3 (and the nuclear data ENDF/B-VI and IRDF-90). In order to put vessel-steel experiments at the same standard, a new dosimetric interpretation of the DV50 experiment has been performed by using the Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-4 and more recent nuclear data (JEFF3.1.1 and IRDF-2002). This paper presents a comparison of previous and recent calculations performed for the DV50 vessel-steel experiment to assess the impact on the dosimetric interpretation.

  16. Future reactor experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Liangjian

    2015-07-01

    The non-zero neutrino mixing angle θ13 has been discovered and precisely measured by the current generation short-baseline reactor neutrino experiments. It opens the gate of measuring the leptonic CP-violating phase and enables the neutrino mass ordering. The JUNO and RENO-50 proposals aim at resolving the neutrino mass ordering using reactors. The experiment design, physics sensitivity, technical challenges as well as the progresses of those two proposed experiments are reviewed in this paper.

  17. Future reactor experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Liangjian

    2015-07-15

    The non-zero neutrino mixing angle θ{sub 13} has been discovered and precisely measured by the current generation short-baseline reactor neutrino experiments. It opens the gate of measuring the leptonic CP-violating phase and enables the neutrino mass ordering. The JUNO and RENO-50 proposals aim at resolving the neutrino mass ordering using reactors. The experiment design, physics sensitivity, technical challenges as well as the progresses of those two proposed experiments are reviewed in this paper.

  18. Status of ITER task T213 collaborative irradiation screening experiment on Cu/SS joints in the Russian Federation SM-2-reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.J.; Fabritsiev, S.A.; Pokrovsky, A.S.; Zinkle, S.J.

    1996-04-01

    Specimen fabrication is underway for an irradiation screening experiment planned to start in January 1996 in the SM-2 reactor in Dimitrovgrad, Russia. The purpose of the experiment is to evaluate the effects of neutron irradiation at ITER-relevant temperatures on the bond integrity performance of Cu/SS and Be/Cu joints, as well as to further investigate the base metal properties of irradiated copper alloys. Specimens from each of the four ITER parties (U.S., EU, japan, and RF) will be irradiated to a dose of {approx}0.2 dpa at two different temperatures, 150 and 300{degrees}C. The specimens will consist of Cu/SS and Be/Cu joints in several different geometries, as well as a large number of specimens from the base materials. Fracture toughness data on base metal and Cu/SS bonded specimens will be obtained from specimens supplied by the U.S. Due to lack of material, the Be/Cu specimens supplied by the U.S will only be irradiated as TEM disks.

  19. Packed Bed Reactor Experiment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The purpose of the Packed Bed Reactor Experiment in low gravity is to determine how a mixture of gas and liquid flows through a packed bed in reduced gravity. A packed bed consists of a metal pipe ...

  20. Emulation of reactor irradiation damage using ion beams

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Was, G. S.; Jiao, Z.; Getto, E.; Sun, K.; Monterrosa, A. M.; Maloy, S. A.; Anderoglu, O.; Sencer, B. H.; Hackett, M.

    2014-06-14

    The continued operation of existing light water nuclear reactors and the development of advanced nuclear reactor depend heavily on understanding how damage by radiation to levels degrades materials that serve as the structural components in reactor cores. The first high dose ion irradiation experiments on a ferritic-martensitic steel showing that ion irradiation closely emulates the full radiation damage microstructure created in-reactor are described. Ferritic-martensitic alloy HT9 (heat 84425) in the form of a hexagonal fuel bundle duct (ACO-3) accumulated 155 dpa at an average temperature of 443°C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Using invariance theory as a guide,more » irradiation of the same heat was conducted using self-ions (Fe++) at 5 MeV at a temperature of 460°C and to a dose of 188 displacements per atom. The void swelling was nearly identical between the two irradiation and the size and density of precipitates and loops following ion irradiation are within a factor of two of those for neutron irradiation. The level of agreement across all of the principal microstructure changes between ion and reactor irradiation establishes the capability of tailoring ion irradiation to emulate the reactor-irradiated microstructure.« less

  1. Emulation of reactor irradiation damage using ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Was, G. S.; Jiao, Z.; Getto, E.; Sun, K.; Monterrosa, A. M.; Maloy, S. A.; Anderoglu, O.; Sencer, B. H.; Hackett, M.

    2014-06-14

    The continued operation of existing light water nuclear reactors and the development of advanced nuclear reactor depend heavily on understanding how damage by radiation to levels degrades materials that serve as the structural components in reactor cores. The first high dose ion irradiation experiments on a ferritic-martensitic steel showing that ion irradiation closely emulates the full radiation damage microstructure created in-reactor are described. Ferritic-martensitic alloy HT9 (heat 84425) in the form of a hexagonal fuel bundle duct (ACO-3) accumulated 155 dpa at an average temperature of 443°C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Using invariance theory as a guide, irradiation of the same heat was conducted using self-ions (Fe++) at 5 MeV at a temperature of 460°C and to a dose of 188 displacements per atom. The void swelling was nearly identical between the two irradiation and the size and density of precipitates and loops following ion irradiation are within a factor of two of those for neutron irradiation. The level of agreement across all of the principal microstructure changes between ion and reactor irradiation establishes the capability of tailoring ion irradiation to emulate the reactor-irradiated microstructure.

  2. AGR-1 Irradiation Experiment Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    John T. Maki

    2009-10-01

    This document presents the current state of planning for the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment will be irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The test will contain six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule will contain a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. The irradiation is planned for about 700 effective full power days (approximately 2.4 calendar years) with a time-averaged, volume-average temperature of approximately 1050 °C. Average fuel burnup, for the entire test, will be greater than 17.7 % FIMA, and the fuel will experience fast neutron fluences between 2.4 and 4.5 x 1025 n/m2 (E>0.18 MeV).

  3. The Advanced Test Reactor Irradiation Facilities and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover; Raymond V. Furstenau

    2007-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. The ATR is a very versatile facility with a wide variety of experimental test capabilities for providing the environment needed in an irradiation experiment. These different capabilities include passive sealed capsule experiments, instrumented and/or temperature-controlled experiments, and pressurized water loop experiment facilities. The ATR has enhanced capabilities in experiment monitoring and control systems for instrumented and/or temperature controlled experiments. The control systems utilize feedback from thermocouples in the experiment to provide a custom blended flowing inert gas mixture to control the temperature in the experiments. Monitoring systems have also been utilized on the exhaust gas lines from the experiment to monitor different parameters, such as fission gases for fuel experiments, during irradiation. ATR’s unique control system provides axial flux profiles in the experiments, unperturbed by axially positioned control components, throughout each reactor operating cycle and over the duration of test programs requiring many years of irradiation. The ATR irradiation positions vary in diameter from 1.6 cm (0.625 inches) to 12.7 cm (5.0 inches) over an active core length of 122 cm (48.0 inches). Thermal and fast neutron fluxes can be adjusted radially across the core depending on the needs of individual test programs. This paper will discuss the different irradiation capabilities available and the cost/benefit issues related to each capability. Examples of different experiments will also be discussed to demonstrate the use of the capabilities and facilities at ATR for performing irradiation experiments.

  4. Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) Experiences and Considerations With Irradiation Test Performance in an International Environment

    SciTech Connect

    MH Lane

    2006-02-15

    This letter forwards a compilation of knowledge gained regarding international interactions and issues associated with Project Prometheus. The following topics are discussed herein: (1) Assessment of international fast reactor capability and availability; (2) Japanese fast reactor (JOYO) contracting strategy; (3) NRPCT/Program Office international contract follow; (4) Completion of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contract for manufacture of reactor test components; (5) US/Japanese Departmental interactions and required Treaties and Agreements; and (6) Non-technical details--interactions and considerations.

  5. Reactor antineutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haoqi

    2014-05-01

    Neutrinos are elementary particles in the standard model of particle physics. There are three flavors of neutrinos that oscillate among themselves. Their oscillation can be described by a 3×3 unitary matrix, containing three mixing angles θ12, θ23, θ13, and one CP phase. Both θ12 and θ23 are known from previous experiments. θ13 was unknown just two years ago. The Daya Bay experiment gave the first definitive non-zero value in 2012. An improved measurement of the oscillation amplitude sin 22(θ 13) = 0.090+0.008-0.009 and the first direct measurement of the \\bar ν e mass-squared difference ∣ Δ m2ee∣ = (2.59+0.19-0.20)× 10-3 eV2 were obtained recently. The large value of θ13 boosts the next generation of reactor antineutrino experiments designed to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, such as JUNO and RENO-50.

  6. Meso-scale modeling of irradiated concrete in test reactor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Giorla, Alain B.; Vaitová, M.; Le Pape, Yann; Štemberk, P.

    2015-10-18

    In this paper, we detail a numerical model accounting for the effects of neutron irradiation on concrete at the mesoscale. Irradiation experiments in test reactor (Elleuch et al.,1972), i.e., in accelerated conditions, are simulated. Concrete is considered as a two-phase material made of elastic inclusions (aggregate) subjected to thermal and irradiation-induced swelling and embedded in a cementitious matrix subjected to shrinkage and thermal expansion. The role of the hardened cement paste in the post-peak regime (brittle-ductile transition with decreasing loading rate), and creep effects are investigated. Radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE) of the aggregate cause the development and propagation of damagemore » around the aggregate which further develops in bridging cracks across the hardened cement paste between the individual aggregate particles. The development of damage is aggravated when shrinkage occurs simultaneously with RIVE during the irradiation experiment. The post-irradiation expansion derived from the simulation is well correlated with the experimental data and, the obtained damage levels are fully consistent with previous estimations based on a micromechanical interpretation of the experimental post-irradiation elastic properties (Le Pape et al.,2015). In conclusion, the proposed modeling opens new perspectives for the interpretation of test reactor experiments in regards to the actual operation of light water reactors.« less

  7. Meso-scale modeling of irradiated concrete in test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Giorla, Alain B.; Vaitová, M.; Le Pape, Yann; Štemberk, P.

    2015-10-18

    In this paper, we detail a numerical model accounting for the effects of neutron irradiation on concrete at the mesoscale. Irradiation experiments in test reactor (Elleuch et al.,1972), i.e., in accelerated conditions, are simulated. Concrete is considered as a two-phase material made of elastic inclusions (aggregate) subjected to thermal and irradiation-induced swelling and embedded in a cementitious matrix subjected to shrinkage and thermal expansion. The role of the hardened cement paste in the post-peak regime (brittle-ductile transition with decreasing loading rate), and creep effects are investigated. Radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE) of the aggregate cause the development and propagation of damage around the aggregate which further develops in bridging cracks across the hardened cement paste between the individual aggregate particles. The development of damage is aggravated when shrinkage occurs simultaneously with RIVE during the irradiation experiment. The post-irradiation expansion derived from the simulation is well correlated with the experimental data and, the obtained damage levels are fully consistent with previous estimations based on a micromechanical interpretation of the experimental post-irradiation elastic properties (Le Pape et al.,2015). In conclusion, the proposed modeling opens new perspectives for the interpretation of test reactor experiments in regards to the actual operation of light water reactors.

  8. Temperature controlled material irradiation in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Furstenau, R.V.; Ingrahm, F.W.

    1995-12-31

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA and is owned and regulated by the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE). The ATR is operated for the US DOE by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies. In recent years, prime irradiation space in the ATR has been made available for use by customers having irradiation service needs in addition to the reactor`s principal user, the U.S. Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program. To enhance the reactor`s capabilities, the US DOE has initiated the development of an Irradiation Test Vehicle (ITV) capable of providing neutron spectral tailoring and temperature control for up to 28 experiments. The ATR-ITV will have the flexibility to simultaneously support a variety of experiments requiring fast, thermal or mixed spectrum neutron environments. Temperature control is accomplished by varying the thermal conductivity across a gas gap established between the experiment specimen capsule wall and the experiment `in-pile tube (IPT)` inside diameter. Thermal conductivity is adjusted by alternating the control gas mixture ratio of two gases with different thermal conductivities.

  9. Irradiation Facilities at the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2005-12-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is the third generation and largest test reactor built in the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC – formerly known as the Test Reactor Area), located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), to study the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The RTC was established in the early 1950s with the development of the Materials Testing Reactor (MTR), which operated until 1970. The second major reactor was the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR), which operated from 1957 to 1981, and finally the ATR, which began operation in 1967 and will continue operation well into the future. These reactors have produced a significant portion of the world’s data on materials response to reactor environments. The wide range of experiment facilities in the ATR and the unique ability to vary the neutron flux in different areas of the core allow numerous experiment conditions to co-exist during the same reactor operating cycle. Simple experiments may involve a non-instrumented capsule containing test specimens with no real-time monitoring or control capabilities1. More sophisticated testing facilities include inert gas temperature control systems and pressurized water loops that have continuous chemistry, pressure, temperature, and flow control as well as numerous test specimen monitoring capabilities. There are also apparatus that allow for the simulation of reactor transients on test specimens.

  10. Reactor antineutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haoqi

    2014-09-01

    Neutrinos are elementary particles in the standard model of particle physics. There are three flavors of neutrinos that oscillate among themselves. Their oscillation can be described by a 3×3 unitary matrix, containing three mixing angles θ12, θ23, θ13, and one CP phase. Both θ12 and θ23 are known from previous experiments. θ13 was unknown just two years ago. The Daya Bay experiment gave the first definitive nonzero value in 2012. An improved measurement of the oscillation amplitude sin 22(θ 13) = 0.090+0.008-0.009 and the first direct measurement of the \\bar ν e mass-squared difference \\vertΔ m2ee\\vert\\big (2.59+0.19-0.20\\big )×10-3 eV2 were obtained recently. The large value of θ13 boosts the next generation of reactor antineutrino experiments designed to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, such as JUNO and RENO-50.

  11. Irradiation-Accelerated Corrosion of Reactor Core Materials. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Zhujie; Was, Gary; Bartels, David

    2015-04-02

    This project aims to understand how radiation accelerates corrosion of reactor core materials. The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, as well as the success of most all GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion places the most severe demands on materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is simply absent. Only a few experiments have been conducted to understand how corrosion occurs under irradiation, yet the limited data indicates that the effect is large; irradiation causes order of magnitude increases in corrosion rates. Without a firm understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation and corrosion interact in film formation, growth, breakdown and repair, the extension of the current LWR fleet beyond 60 years and the success of advanced nuclear energy systems are questionable. The proposed work will address the process of irradiation-accelerated corrosion that is important to all current and advanced reactor designs, but remains very poorly understood. An improved understanding of the role of irradiation in the corrosion process will provide the community with the tools to develop predictive models for in-reactor corrosion, and to address specific, important forms of corrosion such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  12. Selection of support structure materials for irradiation experiments in the HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor) at temperatures up to 500 degrees C

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, K.; Longest, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    The key factor in the design of capsules for irradiation of test specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at preselected temperatures up to 500{degree}C utilizing nuclear heating is a narrow gas-filled gap which surrounds the specimens and controls the transfer of heat from the specimens through the wall of a containment tube to the reactor cooling water. Maintenance of this gap to close tolerances is dependent on the characteristics of the materials used to support the specimens and isolate them from the water. These support structure materials must have low nuclear heating rates, high thermal conductivities, and good dimensional stabilities under irradiation. These conditions are satisfied by certain aluminum alloys. One of these alloys, a powder metallurgy product containing a fine dispersion of aluminum oxide, is no longer manufactured. A new alloys of this type, with the trade name DISPAL, is determined to be a suitable substitute. 23 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. DECONTAMINATION OF NEUTRON-IRRADIATED REACTOR FUEL

    DOEpatents

    Buyers, A.G.; Rosen, F.D.; Motta, E.E.

    1959-12-22

    A pyrometallurgical method of decontaminating neutronirradiated reactor fuel is presented. In accordance with the invention, neutron-irradiated reactor fuel may be decontaminated by countercurrently contacting the fuel with a bed of alkali and alkaine fluorides under an inert gas atmosphere and inductively melting the fuel and tracking the resulting descending molten fuel with induction heating as it passes through the bed. By this method, a large, continually fresh surface of salt is exposed to the descending molten fuel which enhances the efficiency of the scrubbing operation.

  14. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated {approximately}400 C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.; Eiholzer, C.R.

    1998-03-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400 C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400 C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  15. Production of long-lived hafnium isomers in reactor irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamian, S. A.; Carroll, J. J.; Adam, J.; Kulagin, E. N.; Shabalin, E. P.

    2006-06-01

    Experiments on production of long-lived Hf178m isomer in reactor irradiations are described. Properties of this nuclide are promising for its potential application as a relatively safe power source characterized by high density of accumulated energy. Metal natHf samples were activated in the Dubna IBR-2 reactor at positions corresponding to different neutron fluxes. Samples were bare or shielded by Cd and B 4C layers. The gamma activity of the samples was analyzed with Ge gamma spectrometers during a two-year period following their irradiation. In the presence of dominant activation products 175Hf and 181Hf, the high-spin isomers Hf178m and Hf179m were also detected despite relatively low levels. The isomer-to-ground state ratios and cross-sections were determined from the measured yields. For Hf178m, the cross-section for burnup (destruction) by neutron capture after its production was also estimated, clarifying the results from earlier experiments. In the context of suggestions for use of Hf178m for applications, the results confirm that large-scale production of this isomer by reactor irradiations is not feasible. In contrast, the efficiency of production of Hf179m is much higher and an amount of about 10 16 atoms may be produced in standard reactor irradiations. For Hf178m, more productive methods are known, in particular fast neutron irradiations at E n ≥ 14 MeV and spallation reactions at intermediate energies. Neutron cross-sections for isomers may also be significant in astrophysics.

  16. Review of Reactor Neutrino Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo-Bong

    New generation of reactor neutrino experiments, Daya Bay and RENO, have made definitive measurements of the smallest neutrino mixing angle θ13 in 2012, based on the disappearance of electron antineutrinos. More precise measurements of the mixing angle and reactor neutrino spectra have been made and presented. A rather large value of θ13 has opened a new window to find the CP violation phase and to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. Future reactor experiments, JUNO and RENO-50, are proposed to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to make highly precise measurements of θ12, Δm212, and Δm312.

  17. Design and Status of RERTR Irradiation Tests in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Wachs; Richard G. Ambrosek; Gray Chang; Mitchell K. Meyer

    2006-10-01

    Irradiation testing of U-Mo based fuels is the central component of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program fuel qualification plan. Several RERTR tests have recently been completed or are planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory in Idaho Falls, ID. Four mini-plate experiments in various stages of completion are described in detail, including the irradiation test design, objectives, and irradiation conditions. Observations made during and after the in-reactor RERTR-7A experiment breach are summarized. The irradiation experiment design and planned irradiation conditions for full-size plate test are described. Progress toward element testing will be reviewed.

  18. Experimental plan for irradiation experiment HRB-21

    SciTech Connect

    Goodin, D. T.; Kania, M. J.; Patton, B. W.

    1989-04-01

    Irradiation experiment HRB-21 is the first in a series of test capsules that are designed to provide a fuel-performance data base to be used for the validation of modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) coated-particle fuel performance models under MHTGR normal operating conditions and specific licensing basis events. Capsule HRB-21 will contain an advanced TRISO-P UCO/ThO{sub 2} - coated-particle fuel system with demonstrated low defective-particle fraction ({le}5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}) and a heavy metal-contamination fraction ({le}1 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}) that meets MHTGR quality specifications. The coated particles and fuel compacts were fabricated in laboratory-scale facilities using MHTGR reference procedures at General Atomics (GA). Nearly 150,000 fissile and fertile particles will be irradiated in capsule HRB-21 at a mean volumetric fuel temperature of 975{degree}C and will achieve a peak fissile burnup of 26% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA) while accumulating a fast neutron fluence of about 4.5 {times} 10{sup 25} neutrons/m{sup 2}. This experiment is a cooperative effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The participants are the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), GA, and the Tokai Research Establishment. Capsule HRB-21 will contain the US MHTGR fuel specimens, and a companion capsule, HRB-22, will contain the JAERI fuel. The irradiation will take place in the removable beryllium reflector facility of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL. The performance of the fuel during irradiation will be closely monitored through on-line fission gas release measurements. Detailed postirradiation examination and conduction cooldown simulation testing will be performed on the irradiated fuel compacts from both the HRB-21 and HRB-22 capsules. 5 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Temperature controlled material irradiation in the advanced test reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, F. W.; Palmer, A. J.; Stites, D. J.

    1998-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) has initiated the development of an Irradiation Test Vehicle (ITV) for fusion materials irradiation at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA. The ITV is capable of providing neutron spectral tailoring and individual temperature control for up to 15 experiment capsules simultaneously. The test vehicle consists of three In-Pile Tubes (IPTs) running the length of the reactor vessel. These IPTs are kept dry and test trains with integral instrumentation are inserted and removed through a transfer shield plate above the reactor vessel head. The test vehicle is designed to irradiate specimens as large as 2.2 cm in diameter, at temperatures of 250-800°C, achieving neutron damage rates as high as 10 displacements per atom per year. The high fast to thermal neutron flux ratio required for fusion materials testing is accomplished by using an aluminum filler to displace as much water as possible from the flux trap and surrounding the filler piece with a ring of replaceable neutron absorbing material. The gas blend temperature control system remains in place from test to test, thus hardware costs for new tests are limited to the experiment capsule train and integral instrumentation.

  20. The COBRA-1B irradiation experiment in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Hins, A.G.; Strain, R.V.; Smith, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of the forthcoming COBRA-1B experiment in EBR-II is to evaluate the effects of fast neutron irradiation on the physical and mechanical properties of candidate fusion structural materials. Of special interest in this experiment will be ITER-relevant temperature and exposure for the test specimens. Approximately 50% of the irradiation test volume will be devoted to vanadium-alloy specimens. Design of the COBRA-1B irradiation experiment began in this reporting period and is in progress. The target reactor insertion date for COBRA-1B is September 1994. Technical and programmatic feasibility approval for the experiment has been granted by EBR-II Operations.

  1. Instrumentation to Enhance Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; J. E. Daw; S. C. Taylor

    2009-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors has been completed. Based on this review, recommendations are made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR and a strategy has been developed for obtaining these sensors. Progress toward implementing this strategy is reported in this document. It is anticipated that this report will be updated on an annual basis.

  2. Neutrino Experiments at Reactors

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Reines, F.; Gurr, H. S.; Jenkins, T. L.; Munsee, J. H.

    1968-09-09

    A description is given of the electron-antineutrino program using a large fission reactor. A search has been made for a neutral weak interaction via the reaction (electron antineutrino + d .> p + n + electron antineutrino), the reaction (electron antineutrino + d .> n + n + e{sup +}) has now been detected, and an effort is underway to observe the elastic scattering reaction (electron antineutrino + e{sup -} .> electron antineutrino + e{sup -}) as well as to measure more precisely the reaction (electron antineutrino + p .> n + e{sup+}). The upper limit on the elastic scattering reaction which we have obtained with our large composite NaI, plastic, liquid scintillation detector is now about 50 times the predicted value.

  3. Tensile properties of vanadium-base alloys irradiated in the Fusion-1 low-temperature experiment in the BOR-60 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Gazda, J.; Nowicki, L.J.; Billone, M.C.; Smith, D.L.

    1998-09-01

    The irradiation has been completed and the test specimens have been retrieved from the lithium-bonded capsule at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Russia. During this reporting period, the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) tensile specimens were received from RIAR and initial testing and examination of these specimens at ANL has been completed. The results, corroborating previous findings showed a significant loss of work hardening capability in the materials. There appears to be no significant difference in behavior among the various heats of vanadium-base alloys in the V-(4-5)Cr-(4-5)Ti composition range. The variations in the preirradiation annealing conditions also produced no notable differences.

  4. A CANDU-Based Fast Irradiation Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Shatilla, Youssef

    2006-07-01

    A new steady-state fast neutron reactor is needed to satisfy the testing needs of Generation IV reactors, the Space Propulsion Program, and the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative. This paper presents a new concept for a CANDU-based fast irradiation reactor that is horizontal in orientation, with individual pressure tubes running the entire length of the scattering-medium tank (Calandria) filled with Lead-Bismuth-Eutectic (LBE). This approach for a test reactor will provide more flexibility in refueling, sample removal, and ability to completely re-configure the core to meet different users' requirements. Full core neutronic analysis of several fuel/coolant/geometry combinations showed a small hexagonal, LBE-cooled, U-Pu-10Zr fuel, with a core power of 100 MW{sub th} produced a fast flux (>0.1 MeV) of 1.5 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} sec averaged over the whole length of six irradiation channels with a total testing volume of more than 77 liters. In-core breeding allowed the Pu-239 enrichment to be 15.3% which should result in core continuous operation for 180 effective full power days. Other coolants investigated included high pressure water steam and helium. An innovative shutdown/control system which consisted of the six outermost fuel channels was proven to be effective in shutting the core down when flooded with boric acid as a neutron absorber. The new shutdown/control system has the advantage of causing the minimum perturbation of the axial flux shape when the control channels are partially flooded with boric acid. This is because the acid is injected homogeneously along the control channel in contrast to regular control rods that are injected partially causing an axial perturbation in the core flux which in turn reduces safety analysis margins. The new shutdown/control system is not required to penetrate the core in a direction vertical to the fuel channels which allowed the freedom of changing core pitch as deemed necessary. A preliminary thermal hydraulic analysis

  5. Thermal evaluation of alternative shipping cask for irradiated experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Guillen, Donna Post

    2015-06-01

    Results of a thermal evaluation are provided for a new shipping cask under consideration for transporting irradiated experiments between the test reactor and post-irradiation examination (PIE) facilities. Most of the experiments will be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), then later shipped to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) located at the Materials and Fuels Complex for PIE. To date, the General Electric (GE)-2000 cask has been used to transport experiment payloads between these facilities. However, the availability of the GE-2000 cask to support future experiment shipping is uncertain. In addition, the internal cavity of the GE-2000 cask is too short to accommodate shipping the larger payloads. Therefore, an alternate shipping capability is being pursued. The Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Research Reactor (BRR) cask has been determined to be the best alternative to the GE-2000 cask. An evaluation of the thermal performance of the BRR cask is necessary before proceeding with fabrication of the newly designed cask hardware and the development of handling, shipping and transport procedures. This paper presents the results of the thermal evaluation of the BRR cask loaded with a representative set of fueled and non-fueled payloads. When analyzed with identical payloads, experiment temperatures were found to be lower with the BRR cask than with the GE-2000 cask. Furthermore, from a thermal standpoint, the BRR cask was found to be a suitable alternate to the GE-2000 cask for shipping irradiated experiment payloads.

  6. Pulsed reactor experiments at Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes dynamic experiments for 3 pulsed reactors. 1st reactor was pulsed from some average power by rotating a partial Be reflector past an unreflected core face; the other 2 reactors were pulsed by rapid insertion of a fuel rod into the unmoderated and unreflected reactor at essentially zero neutron level with no significant neutron source present. The first reactor was a mockup of an EURATOM design (never constructed) of the proposed SORA Reactor, and the other two were the Health Physics Research Reactor and the Army Pulse Radiation Facility Reactor (APRFR). This paper describes the experiments performed in initial testing of these systems, including destructive tests of APRFR, to set operating limits for this type of reactor in pulsed operation. All the experiments described were performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility.

  7. Status of the Combined Third and Fourth NGNP Fuel Irradiations In the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti; Michael E. Davenport

    2013-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in September 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this combined experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is

  8. Delivery of completed irradiation vehicles and the quality assurance document to the High Flux Isotope Reactor for irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, Christian M.; McDuffee, Joel Lee; Katoh, Yutai; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2015-10-01

    This report details the initial fabrication and delivery of two Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) irradiation capsules (ATFSC01 and ATFSC02), with associated quality assurance documentation, to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The capsules and documentation were delivered by September 30, 2015, thus meeting the deadline for milestone M3FT-15OR0202268. These irradiation experiments are testing silicon carbide composite tubes in order to obtain experimental validation of thermo-mechanical models of stress states in SiC cladding irradiated under a prototypic high heat flux. This document contains a copy of the completed capsule fabrication request sheets, which detail all constituent components, pertinent drawings, etc., along with a detailed summary of the capsule assembly process performed by the Thermal Hydraulics and Irradiation Engineering Group (THIEG) in the Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division (RNSD). A complete fabrication package record is maintained by the THIEG and is available upon request.

  9. Progress report on the design of a varying temperature irradiation experiment for operation in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Qualls, A.L.; Muroga, T.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to determine effects of temperature variation during irradiation on microstructure and mechanical properties of potential fusion reactor structural materials. A varying temperature irradiation experiment is being performed under the framework of the Japan-USA Program of Irradiation Tests for fusion Research (JUPITER) to study the effects of temperature variation on the microstructure and mechanical properties of candidate fusion reactor structural materials. An irradiation capsule has been designed for operation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that will allow four sets of metallurgical test specimens to be irradiated to exposure levels ranging from 5 to 10 dpa. Two sets of specimens will be irradiated at constant temperature of 500{degrees}C and 350{degrees}C. Matching specimen sets will be irradiated to similar exposure levels, with 10% of the exposure to occur at reduced temperatures of 300{degrees}C and 200{degrees}C.

  10. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated at {approximately}400{degrees}C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.; Eiholzer, C.R.

    1997-04-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400{degrees}C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400{degrees}C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 x 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  11. Packaging and shipment of U. S. breeder reactor experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    Irradiation testing of fuels and materials in the Fast Test Reactor (FTR) required development of a shipping cask (designated T-3) and associated hardware for loading and shipping of these experiments to postirradiation examination facilities. The T-3 shipping-cask program included design, fabrication, and testing of internal cask packages to protect the experiments during loading, shipping, and unloading. The cask was designed for loading in both the vertical and horizontal attitudes.

  12. The Advanced Test Reactor Irradiation Capabilities Available as a National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2008-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. The ATR is a very versatile facility with a wide variety of experimental test capabilities for providing the environment needed in an irradiation experiment. These capabilities include simple capsule experiments, instrumented and/or temperature-controlled experiments, and pressurized water loop experiment facilities. Monitoring systems have also been utilized to monitor different parameters such as fission gases for fuel experiments, to measure specimen performance during irradiation. ATR’s control system provides a stable axial flux profile throughout each reactor operating cycle, and allows the thermal and fast neutron fluxes to be controlled separately in different sections of the core. The ATR irradiation positions vary in diameter from 16 mm to 127 mm over an active core height of 1.2 m. This paper discusses the different irradiation capabilities with examples of different experiments and the cost/benefit issues related to each capability. The recent designation of ATR as a national scientific user facility will make the ATR much more accessible at very low to no cost for research by universities and possibly commercial entities.

  13. Thermal Analysis of Irradiation Experiments in the ATR

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Murray

    2012-09-01

    Reactor material testing in the INL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) involves modeling and simulation of each experiment to accurately determine the irradiation temperature. This paper describes thermal analysis of capsule experiments using gas gap temperature control and provides data on recent material tests that validate the modeling results. Static capsule experiments and lead-out capsule experiments are discussed. The source of temperature variation in capsule experiments and ways to mitigate these variations are also explained. Two examples of instrumented lead-out capsule experiments, TMIST-1 and UCSB-2, are presented. A comparison of measured and calculated temperatures is used to validate the thermal models and to ascertain the accuracy of the calculated temperature.

  14. EVALUATION OF LVDTS FOR USE IN ATR IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe

    2009-04-01

    New materials are being considered for fuel, cladding, and structures in next generation and existing nuclear reactors. Such materials can experience significant dimensional changes during high temperature irradiation. Currently, these changes are determined by repeatedly irradiating a specimen for a defined period of time in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and then removing it from the reactor for evaluation. The time and labor to remove, examine, and return irradiated samples for each measurement makes this approach very expensive. In addition, such techniques provide limited data and may disturb the phenomena of interest. To address these issues, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) recently initiated efforts to evaluate candidate linear variable differential transducers (LVDTs) for use during high temperature irradiation experiments in typical ATR test locations. Two nuclear grade LVDTs are under consideration – a smaller diameter design qualified for temperatures up to 350 °C and a larger design with capabilities to 500 °C. Calibration and long duration performance evaluations are underway for temperatures up to 600 ºC. This paper presents results from these evaluations, which will ultimately lead to recommendations for an improved design for use in the ATR.

  15. Experimental studies of irradiated and hydrogen implantation damaged reactor steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slugeň, Vladimír; Pecko, Stanislav; Sojak, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    Radiation degradation of nuclear materials can be experimentally simulated via ion implantation. In our case, German reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels were studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). This unique non-destructive method can be effectively applied for the evaluation of microstructural changes and for the analysis of degradation of reactor steels due to neutron irradiation and proton implantation. Studied specimens of German reactor pressure vessel steels are originally from CARINA/CARISMA program. Eight specimens were measured in as-received state and two specimens were irradiated by neutrons in German experimental reactor VAK (Versuchsatomkraftwerk Kahl) in the 1980s. One of the specimens which was in as-received and neutron irradiated condition was also used for simulation of neutron damage by hydrogen nuclei implantation. Defects with the size of about 1-2 vacancies with relatively small contribution (with intensity on the level of 20-40 %) were observed in "as-received" steels. A significant increase in the size of the induced defects due to neutron damage was observed in the irradiated specimens resulting in 2-3 vacancies. The size and intensity of defects reached a similar level as in the specimens irradiated in the nuclear reactor due to the implantation of hydrogen ions with energies of 100 keV (up to the depth <500 nm).

  16. Displacement damage in silicon carbide irradiated in fission reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinisch, H. L.; Greenwood, L. R.; Weber, W. J.; Williford, R. E.

    2004-05-01

    Calculations are performed for displacement damage in SiC due to irradiation in the neutron environments of various types of nuclear reactors using the best available models and nuclear data. The displacement damage calculations use recently developed damage functions for SiC that are based on extensive molecular dynamics simulations of displacement events. Displacements per atom (DPA) cross sections for SiC have been calculated as a function of neutron energy, and they are presented here in tabular form to facilitate their use as the standard measure of displacement damage for irradiated SiC. DPA cross sections averaged over the neutron energy spectrum are calculated for neutron spectra in the cores of typical commercial reactors and in the test sample irradiation regions of several materials test reactors used in both past and present irradiation testing. Particular attention is focused on a next-generation high-temperature gas-cooled pebble bed reactor, for which the high-temperature properties of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites are well suited. Calculated transmutations and activation levels in a pebble bed reactor are compared to those in other reactors.

  17. Mechanical cutting of irradiated reactor internal components

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael G.

    2008-01-15

    Mechanical cutting methods to volume reduce and package reactor internal components are now a viable solution for stakeholders challenged with the retirement of first generation nuclear facilities. The recent completion of the removal of the Reactor Vessel Internals (RVI) from within the Sacramento Municipal Utility District's (SMUD) Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Plant demonstrates that unlike previous methods, inclusive of plasma arc and abrasive water-jet cutting, mechanical cutting minimizes exposure to workers, costly water cleanup, and excessive secondary waste generation. Reactor internal components were segmented, packaged, and removed from the reactor building for shipment or storage, allowing the reactor cavity to be drained and follow-on reactor segmentation activities to proceed in the dry state. Area exposure rates at the work positions during the segmentation process were generally 1 mR per hr. Radiological exposure documented for the underwater segmentation processes totaled 13 person rem. The reactor internals weighing 343,000 pounds were segmented into over 200 pieces for maximum shipping package efficiency and produced 5,600 lb of stainless steel chips and shavings which were packaged in void spaces of existing disposal containers, therefore creating no additional disposal volume. Because no secondary waste was driven into suspension in the reactor cavity water, the water was free released after one pass through a charcoal bed and ion exchange filter system. Mechanical cutting techniques are capable of underwater segmentation of highly radioactive components on a large scale. This method minimized radiological exposure and costly water cleanup while creating no secondary waste.

  18. Status of the irradiation test vehicle for testing fusion materials in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L.; Palmer, A.J.; Ingram, F.W.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1998-09-01

    The design of the irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been completed. The main application for the ITV is irradiation testing of candidate fusion structural materials, including vanadium-base alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low-activation steels. Construction of the vehicle is underway at the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO). Dummy test trains are being built for system checkout and fine-tuning. Reactor insertion of the ITV with the dummy test trains is scheduled for fall 1998. Barring unexpected difficulties, the ITV will be available for experiments in early 1999.

  19. A Retailer's Experience with Irradiated Foods

    SciTech Connect

    James P. Corrigan

    2000-11-12

    A food irradiation success story comes from Northbrook, Illinois, where Carrot Top, Inc., has been routinely carrying irradiated food for more than 7 yr. This paper presents the experiences of Carrot Top during those years, details the marketing approaches used, and summarizes the resulting sales figures.

  20. Thermal Analysis of a Uranium Silicide Miniplate Irradiation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen

    2009-09-01

    This paper outlines the thermal analysis for the irradiation of high density uranium-silicide (U3Si2 dispersed in an aluminum matrix and clad in aluminum) booster fuel for a Boosted Fast Flux Loop designed to provide fast neutron flux test capability in the ATR. The purpose of this experiment (designated as Gas Test Loop-1 [GTL-1]) is two-fold: (1) to assess the adequacy of the U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel and the aluminum alloy 6061 cladding, and (2) to verify stability of the fuel cladding boehmite pre-treatment at nominal power levels in the 430 to 615 W/cm2 (2.63 to 3.76 Btu/s•in2) range. The GTL-1 experiment relies on a difficult balance between achieving a high heat flux, yet keeping fuel centerline temperature below a specified maximum value throughout an entire operating cycle of the reactor. A detailed finite element model was constructed to calculate temperatures and heat flux levels and to reveal which experiment parameters place constraints on reactor operations. Analyses were performed to determine the bounding lobe power level at which the experiment could be safely irradiated, yet still provide meaningful data under nominal operating conditions. Then, simulations were conducted for nominal and bounding lobe power levels under steady-state and transient conditions with the experiment in the reactor. Reactivity changes due to a loss of commercial power with pump coast-down to emergency flow or a standard in-pile tube pump discharge break were evaluated. The time after shutdown for which the experiment can be adequately cooled by natural convection cooling was determined using a system thermal hydraulic model. An analysis was performed to establish the required in-reactor cooling time prior to removal of the experiment from the reactor. The inclusion of machining tolerances in the numerical model has a large effect on heat transfer.

  1. Thermal evaluation of alternative shipping cask for irradiated experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Guillen, Donna Post

    2015-06-01

    Results of a thermal evaluation are provided for a new shipping cask under consideration for transporting irradiated experiments between the test reactor and post-irradiation examination (PIE) facilities. Most of the experiments will be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), then later shipped to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) located at the Materials and Fuels Complex for PIE. To date, the General Electric (GE)-2000 cask has been used to transport experiment payloads between these facilities. However, the availability of the GE-2000 cask to support future experiment shipping is uncertain. In addition, the internal cavitymore » of the GE-2000 cask is too short to accommodate shipping the larger payloads. Therefore, an alternate shipping capability is being pursued. The Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Research Reactor (BRR) cask has been determined to be the best alternative to the GE-2000 cask. An evaluation of the thermal performance of the BRR cask is necessary before proceeding with fabrication of the newly designed cask hardware and the development of handling, shipping and transport procedures. This paper presents the results of the thermal evaluation of the BRR cask loaded with a representative set of fueled and non-fueled payloads. When analyzed with identical payloads, experiment temperatures were found to be lower with the BRR cask than with the GE-2000 cask. Furthermore, from a thermal standpoint, the BRR cask was found to be a suitable alternate to the GE-2000 cask for shipping irradiated experiment payloads.« less

  2. Advanced Test Reactor Testing Experience: Past, Present and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Frances M. Marshall

    2005-04-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world’s premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The physical configuration of the ATR, a 4-leaf clover shape, allows the reactor to be operated at different power levels in the corner “lobes” to allow for different testing conditions for multiple simultaneous experiments. The combination of high flux (maximum thermal neutron fluxes of 1E15 neutrons per square centimeter per second and maximum fast [E>1.0 MeV] neutron fluxes of 5E14 neutrons per square centimeter per second) and large test volumes (up to 48" long and 5.0" diameter) provide unique testing opportunities. The current experiments in the ATR are for a variety of test sponsors -- US government, foreign governments, private researchers, and commercial companies needing neutron irradiation services. There are three basic types of test configurations in the ATR. The simplest configuration is the sealed static capsule, wherein the target material is placed in a capsule, or plate form, and the capsule is in direct contact with the primary coolant. The next level of complexity of an experiment is an instrumented lead experiment, which allows for active monitoring and control of experiment conditions during the irradiation. The highest level of complexity of experiment is the pressurized water loop experiment, in which the test sample can be subjected to the exact environment of a pressurized water reactor. For future research, some ATR modifications and enhancements are currently planned. This paper provides more details on some of the ATR capabilities, key design features, experiments, and future plans.

  3. Preliminary Results of the Combined Third and Fourth Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, Michael E.; Palmer, A. Joseph; Petti, David A.

    2001-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Very High Temperature Reactor Technology Development Office (VHTR-TDO) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation high temperature gas-cooled reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and completed in October 2013. The third and fourth experiments were combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this combined experiment was to provide data on fission product migration and retention in a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), the design of

  4. High-irradiance reactors with unfolded aplanatic optics.

    PubMed

    Feuermann, Daniel; Gordon, Jeffrey M

    2008-11-01

    Reconstituting the intense irradiance of short-arc discharge lamps at a remote target, at high radiative efficiency, represents a central challenge in the design of high-temperature chemical reactors, heightened by the need for high numerical aperture at both the target and the source. Separating the optical system from both the source and the reactor allows pragmatic operation, monitoring, and control. We explore near-field unfolded aplanats as feasible solutions and report measurements for a prototype that constitutes a double-ellipsoid mirror. We also propose compound unfolded aplanats that collect lamp emission over all angles (in lieu of light recycling optics) and irradiate the reactor over nearly its full circumference. PMID:19122711

  5. AGC-1 Irradiation Experiment Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    R. L. Bratton

    2006-05-01

    The Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC) irradiation test program supports the acquisition of irradiated graphite performance data to assist in the selection of the technology to be used for the VHTR. Six irradiations are planned to investigate compressive creep in graphite subjected to a neutron field and obtain irradiated mechanical properties of vibrationally molded, extruded, and iso-molded graphites for comparison. The experiments will be conducted at three temperatures: 600, 900, and 1200°C. At each temperature, two different capsules will be irradiated to different fluence levels, the first from 0.5 to 4 dpa and the second from 4 to 7 dpa. AGC-1 is the first of the six capsules designed for ATR and will focus on the prismatic fluence range.

  6. A Simple Tubular Reactor Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudgins, Robert R.; Cayrol, Bertrand

    1981-01-01

    Using the hydrolysis of crystal violet dye by sodium hydroxide as an example, the theory, apparatus, and procedure for a laboratory demonstration of tubular reactor behavior are described. The reaction presented can occur at room temperature and features a color change to reinforce measured results. (WB)

  7. Comparison of the microstructure, deformation and crack initiation behavior of austenitic stainless steel irradiated in-reactor or with protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Kale J.; Was, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the microstructures, microchemistry, hardening, susceptibility to IASCC initiation, and deformation behavior resulting from proton or reactor irradiation. Two commercial purity and six high purity austenitic stainless steels with various solute element additions were compared. Samples of each alloy were irradiated in the BOR-60 fast reactor at 320 °C to doses between approximately 4 and 12 dpa or by a 3.2 MeV proton beam at 360 °C to a dose of 5.5 dpa. Irradiated microstructures consisted mainly of dislocation loops, which were similar in size but lower in density after proton irradiation. Both irradiation types resulted in the formation of Ni-Si rich precipitates in a high purity alloy with added Si, but several other high purity neutron irradiated alloys showed precipitation that was not observed after proton irradiation, likely due to their higher irradiation dose. Low densities of small voids were observed in several high purity proton irradiated alloys, and even lower densities in neutron irradiated alloys, implying void nucleation was in process. Elemental segregation at grain boundaries was very similar after each irradiation type. Constant extension rate tensile experiments on the alloys in simulated light water reactor environments showed excellent agreement in terms of the relative amounts of intergranular cracking, and an analysis of localized deformation after straining showed a similar response of cracking to surface step height after both irradiation types. Overall, excellent agreement was observed after proton and reactor irradiation, providing additional evidence that proton irradiation is a useful tool for accelerated testing of irradiation effects in austenitic stainless steel.

  8. Neutron irradiation facilities for fission and fusion reactor materials studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    The successful development of energy-conversion machines based upon nuclear fission or fusion reactors is critically dependent upon the behavior of the engineering materials used to construct the full containment and primary heat extraction systems. The development of radiation damage-resistant materials requires irradiation testing facilities which reproduce, as closely as possible, the thermal and neutronic environment expected in a power-producing reactor. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reference core design for the Center for Neutron Research (CNR) reactor provides for instrumented facilities in regions of both hard and mixed neutron spectra, with substantially higher fluxes than are currently available. The benefits of these new facilities to the development of radiation damage resistant materials are discussed in terms of the major US fission and fusion reactor programs.

  9. A comparative TEM study of in-reactor and post-irradiation tensile tested copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakarinen, J.; Tähtinen, S.; Singh, B. N.

    2013-11-01

    The deformation microstructures of oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) following in-reactor and post-irradiation slow strain rate tensile tests. The TEM results suggest that the main modes of deformation differ between all examined cases. Plastic deformation appeared predominantly localized in the defect-free cleared channels following post-irradiation testing and hardly any dislocations were seen outside the channels. The microstructures following in-reactor tests were characterized by a small amount of cleared channels and a distinct dislocation density within the matrix. However, the dislocations observed following in-reactor testing did not seem to interact with each other, whereas that was the main mode of deformation in the non-irradiated reference sample. The possible mechanisms of plastic deformation are discussed based on the experimental results. Dislocation-dislocation interactions played the major role if irradiation or irradiation damage is not present. As a result of the interactions, the microstructure of non-irradiated reference copper was characterized by a well-defined cellularized dislocation microstructure. Dynamic dislocation-displacement cascade interactions dominated the deformation process at the in-reactor tensile tests. As a result, the formation of defect-free cleared channels was delayed, dislocations were found from the matrix between the channels, and a clear strain hardening was observed after the yield point. No clear difference between accumulated irradiation damage at in-reactor and post-irradiation samples was found, which may be due to localized nature of SFT evolution in displacement cascades at copper. In the post-irradiation experiments, dislocations were confined to slip planes and annihilate irradiation defects, while moving on the planes and creating defect-free cleared channels. The plastic deformation is localized into these channels, causing a decrease in

  10. Design of sample carrier for neutron irradiation facility at TRIGA MARK II nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Y.; Hamid, N. A.; Mansor, M. A.; Ahmad, M. H. A. R. M.; Yusof, M. R.; Yazid, H.; Mohamed, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this work is to design a sample carrier for neutron irradiation experiment at beam ports of research nuclear reactor, the Reaktor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP). The sample carrier was designed so that irradiation experiment can be performed safely by researchers. This development will resolve the transferring of sample issues faced by the researchers at the facility when performing neutron irradiation studies. The function of sample carrier is to ensure the sample for the irradiation process can be transferred into and out from the beam port of the reactor safely and effectively. The design model used was House of Quality Method (HOQ) which is usually used for developing specifications for product and develop numerical target to work towards and determining how well we can meet up to the needs. The chosen sample carrier (product) consists of cylindrical casing shape with hydraulic cylinders transportation method. The sample placing can be done manually, locomotion was by wheel while shielding used was made of boron materials. The sample carrier design can shield thermal neutron during irradiation of sample so that only low fluencies fast neutron irradiates the sample.

  11. Characteristics of irradiation creep in the first wall of a fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Coghlan, W.A.; Mansur, L.K.

    1981-01-01

    A number of significant differences in the irradiation environment of a fusion reactor are expected with respect to the fission reactor irradiation environment. These differences are expected to affect the characteristics of irradiation creep in the fusion reactor. Special conditions of importance are identified as the (1) large number of defects produced per pka, (2) high helium production rate, (3) cyclic operation, (4) unique stress histories, and (5) low temperature operations. Existing experimental data from the fission reactor environment is analyzed to shed light on irradiation creep under fusion conditions. Theoretical considerations are used to deduce additional characteristics of irradiation creep in the fusion reactor environment for which no experimental data are available.

  12. Future Reactor Neutrino Experiments (RRNOLD)1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, David E.

    The prospects for future reactor neutrino experiments that would use tens of kilotons of liquid scintillator with a ∼ 50 km baseline are discussed. These experiments are generically dubbed "RRNOLD" for Radical Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Liquid scintillator Detector experiment. Such experiments are designed to resolve the neutrino mass hierarchy and make sub-percent measurements sin2θ12, Δm232 and Δm122 . RRNOLD would also be sensitive to neutrinos from other sources and have notable sensitivity to proton decay.

  13. Jules Horowitz Reactor, a new irradiation facility: Improving dosimetry for the future of nuclear experimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoire, G.; Beretz, D.; Destouches, C.

    2011-07-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of document follows: The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is an experimental reactor under construction at the French Nuclear Energy and Alternative Energies Commission (CEA) facility at Cadarache. It will achieve its first criticality by the end of 2014. Experiments that will be conducted at JHR will deal with fuel, cladding, and material behavior. The JHR will also produce medical radio-isotopes and doped silicon for the electronic industry. As a new irradiation facility, its instrumentation will benefit from recent improvements. Nuclear instrumentation will include reactor dosimetry, as it is a reference technique to determine neutron fluence in experimental devices or characterize irradiation locations. Reactor dosimetry has been improved with the progress of simulation tools and nuclear data, but at the same time the customer needs have increased: Experimental results must have reduced and assessed uncertainties. This is now a necessary condition to perform an experimental irradiation in a test reactor. Items improved, in the framework of a general upgrading of the dosimetry process based on uncertainty minimization, will include dosimeter, nuclear data, and modelling scheme. (authors)

  14. Advanced Test Reactor Capabilities and Future Irradiation Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Frances M. Marshall

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the most versatile operating research reactors in the Untied States. The ATR has a long history of supporting reactor fuel and material research for the US government and other test sponsors. The INL is owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and currently operated by Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The ATR is the third generation of test reactors built at the Test Reactor Area, now named the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC), whose mission is to study the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The current experiments in the ATR are for a variety of customers--US DOE, foreign governments and private researchers, and commercial companies that need neutrons. The ATR has several unique features that enable the reactor to perform diverse simultaneous tests for multiple test sponsors. The ATR has been operating since 1967, and is expected to continue operating for several more decades. The remainder of this paper discusses the ATR design features, testing options, previous experiment programs, future plans for the ATR capabilities and experiments, and some introduction to the INL and DOE's expectations for nuclear research in the future.

  15. ``Sleeping reactor`` irradiations: Shutdown reactor determination of short-lived activation products

    SciTech Connect

    Jerde, E.A.; Glasgow, D.C.

    1998-09-01

    At the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the principal irradiation system has a thermal neutron flux ({phi}) of {approximately} 4 {times} 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s, permitting the detection of elements via irradiation of 60 s or less. Irradiations of 6 or 7 s are acceptable for detection of elements with half-lives of as little as 30 min. However, important elements such as Al, Mg, Ti, and V have half-lives of only a few minutes. At HFIR, these can be determined with irradiation times of {approximately} 6 s, but the requirement of immediate counting leads to increased exposure to the high activity produced by irradiation in the high flux. In addition, pneumatic system timing uncertainties (about {+-} 0.5 s) make irradiations of < 6 s less reliable. Therefore, the determination of these ultra-short-lived species in mixed matrices has not generally been made at HFIR. The authors have found that very short lived activation products can be produced easily during the period after reactor shutdown (SCRAM), but prior to the removal of spent fuel elements. During this 24- to 36-h period (dubbed the ``sleeping reactor``), neutrons are produced in the beryllium reflector by the reaction {sup 9}Be({gamma},n){sup 8}Be, the gamma rays principally originating in the spent fuel. Upon reactor SCRAM, the flux drops to {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 10} n/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s within 1 h. By the time the fuel elements are removed, the flux has dropped to {approximately} 6 {times} 10{sup 8}. Such fluxes are ideal for the determination of short-lived elements such as Al, Ti, Mg, and V. An important feature of the sleeping reactor is a flux that is not constant.

  16. Shear punch testing of candidate reactor materials after irradiation in fast reactors and spallation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, S. A.; Romero, T. J.; Hosemann, P.; Toloczko, M. B.; Dai, Y.

    2011-10-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels and nickel-base superalloys are potential materials for use in spallation targets and fusion and fast reactors. To investigate the effects of irradiation on these materials, tests were performed after irradiation in the high energy proton beam at the Paul Scherrer Institute (SINQ Target Irradiation Program (STIP), 570 MeV), as well on specimens obtained from a driver duct irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Dose accumulations were up to 18 dpa for STIP irradiations (at 147-406 °C) and up to 155 dpa in FFTF (at 383-505 °C). The helium/dpa ratios ranged from 0.2 to 80 appm/dpa. Mechanical testing was performed at 25 °C. Increases in shear yield and shear maximum stress with increasing dose mirrored the results observed from companion tensile tests.

  17. Disassembly of the fusion-1 capsule after irradiation in the BOR-60 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Kazakov, V.A.; Chakin, V.P.

    1997-04-01

    A U.S./Russia (RF) collaborative irradiation experiment, Fusion-1, was completed in June 1996 after reaching a peak exposure of {approx}17 dpa in the BOR-60 fast reactor at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Russia. The specimens were vanadium alloys, mainly of recent heats from both countries. In this reporting period, the capsule was disassembled at the RIAR hot cells and all test specimens were successfully retrieved. For the disassembly, an innovative method of using a heated diffusion oil to melt and separate the lithium bond from the test specimens was adopted. This method proved highly successful.

  18. AGC-3 Experiment Irradiation Monitoring Data Qualification Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence Hull

    2014-10-01

    The Graphite Technology Development Program will run a series of six experiments to quantify the effects of irradiation on nuclear grade graphite. The third experiment, Advanced Graphite Creep 3 (AGC 3), began with Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycle 152B on November 27, 2012, and ended with ATR Cycle 155B on April 23, 2014. This report documents qualification of AGC 3 experiment irradiation monitoring data for use by the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Program for research and development activities required to design and license the first VHTR nuclear plant. Qualified data meet the requirements for data collection and use as described in the experiment planning and quality assurance documents. Failed data do not meet the requirements. Trend data may not meet the requirements, but may still provide some useable information. All thermocouples (TCs) functioned throughout the AGC 3 experiment. There was one interval between December 18, 2012, and December 20, 2012, where 10 NULL values were reported for various TCs. These NULL values were deleted from the Nuclear Data Management and Analysis System database. All temperature data are Qualified for use by the VHTR TDO Program. Argon, helium, and total gas flow data were within expected ranges and are Qualified for use by the VHTR TDO Program. Total gas flow was approximately 50 sccm through the AGC 3 experiment capsule. Helium gas flow was briefly increased to 100 sccm during ATR shutdowns. At the start of the AGC 3 experiment, moisture in the outflow gas line was stuck at a constant value of 335.6174 ppmv for the first cycle (Cycle 152B). When the AGC 3 experiment capsule was reinstalled in ATR for Cycle 154B, a new moisture filter was installed. Moisture data from Cycle 152B are Failed. All moisture data from the final three cycles (Cycles 154B, 155A, and 155B) are Qualified for use by the VHTR TDO Program.

  19. Reactor Materials Program: Mechanical properties of irradiated Types 304 and 304L stainless steel weldment components

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1991-12-01

    The vessels (reactor tanks) of the Savannah River Site nuclear production reactors constructed in the 1950's are comprised of Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel weld filler. Irradiation exposure to the reactor tank sidewalls through reactor operation has caused a change in the mechanical properties of these materials. A database of as-irradiated mechanical properties for site-specific materials and irradiation conditions has been produced for reactor tank structural analyses and to quantify the effects of radiation-induced materials degradation for evaluating reactor service life. The data has been collected from the SRL Reactor Materials Program (RMP) irradiations and testing of archival stainless steel weldment components and from previous SRL programs to measure properties of irradiated reactor Thermal Shield weldments and reactor tank (R-tank) sidewall material. Irradiation programs of the RMP are designed to quantify mechanical properties at tank operating temperatures following irradiation to present and future tank wall maximum exposure conditions. The exposure conditions are characterized in terms of fast neutron fluence (E{sub n} > 0.1 MeV) and displacements per atom (dpa){sup 3}. Tensile properties, Charpy-V notch toughness, and elastic-plastic fracture toughness were measured for base, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) weldment components from archival piping specimens following a Screening Irradiation in the University of Buffalo Reactor (UBR) and following a Full-Term Irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

  20. Reactor Materials Program: Mechanical properties of irradiated Types 304 and 304L stainless steel weldment components

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1991-12-01

    The vessels (reactor tanks) of the Savannah River Site nuclear production reactors constructed in the 1950`s are comprised of Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel weld filler. Irradiation exposure to the reactor tank sidewalls through reactor operation has caused a change in the mechanical properties of these materials. A database of as-irradiated mechanical properties for site-specific materials and irradiation conditions has been produced for reactor tank structural analyses and to quantify the effects of radiation-induced materials degradation for evaluating reactor service life. The data has been collected from the SRL Reactor Materials Program (RMP) irradiations and testing of archival stainless steel weldment components and from previous SRL programs to measure properties of irradiated reactor Thermal Shield weldments and reactor tank (R-tank) sidewall material. Irradiation programs of the RMP are designed to quantify mechanical properties at tank operating temperatures following irradiation to present and future tank wall maximum exposure conditions. The exposure conditions are characterized in terms of fast neutron fluence (E{sub n} > 0.1 MeV) and displacements per atom (dpa){sup 3}. Tensile properties, Charpy-V notch toughness, and elastic-plastic fracture toughness were measured for base, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) weldment components from archival piping specimens following a Screening Irradiation in the University of Buffalo Reactor (UBR) and following a Full-Term Irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

  1. Fast critical experiment data for space reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, P. J.; McFarlane, H. F.; Olsen, D. N.; Atkinson, C. A.; Ross, J. R.

    Data from a number of previous critical experiments exist that are relevant to the design concepts being considered for SP-100 and MMW space reactors. Although substantial improvements in experiment techniques have since made some of the measured quantities somewhat suspect, the basic criticality data are still useful in most cases. However, experiments require recalculation with modern computational methods and nuclear cross section data before they can be applied to today's designs. Recently, about 20 fast benchmark critical experiments were calculated with the latest ENDF/B data and modern transport codes. These calculations were undertaken as a part of the planning process for a new series of benchmark experiments aimed at supporting preliminary designs of SP-100 and MMW space reactors.

  2. Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) Recently Installed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR)

    SciTech Connect

    A. Joseph Palmer; Gerry L. McCormick; Shannon J. Corrigan

    2010-06-01

    2010 International Congress on Advances in Nuclear Power Plants (ICAPP’10) ANS Annual Meeting Imbedded Topical San Diego, CA June 13 – 17, 2010 Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) Recently Installed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Author: A. Joseph Palmer, Mechanical Engineer, Irradiation Test Programs, 208-526-8700, Joe.Palmer@INL.gov Affiliation: Idaho National Laboratory P.O. Box 1625, MS-3840 Idaho Falls, ID 83415 INL/CON-10-17680 ABSTRACT Most test reactors are equipped with shuttle facilities (sometimes called rabbit tubes) whereby small capsules can be inserted into the reactor and retrieved during power operations. With the installation of Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) this capability has been restored to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The general design and operating principles of this system were patterned after the hydraulic rabbit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), which has operated successfully for many years. Using primary coolant as the motive medium the HSIS system is designed to simultaneously transport fourteen shuttle capsules, each 16 mm OD x 57 mm long, to and from the B-7 position of the reactor. The B-7 position is one of the higher flux positions in the reactor with typical thermal and fast (>1 Mev) fluxes of 2.8E+14 n/cm2/sec and 1.9E+14 n/cm2/sec respectively. The available space inside each shuttle is approximately 14 mm diameter x 50 mm long. The shuttle containers are made from titanium which was selected for its low neutron activation properties and durability. Shuttles can be irradiated for time periods ranging from a few minutes to several months. The Send and Receive Station (SRS) for the HSIS is located 2.5 m deep in the ATR canal which allows irradiated shuttles to be easily moved from the SRS to a wet loaded cask, or transport pig. The HSIS system first irradiated (empty) shuttles in September 2009 and has since completed

  3. Toxicity of irradiated advanced heavy water reactor fuels.

    PubMed

    Priest, N D; Richardson, R B; Edwards, G W R

    2013-02-01

    The good neutron economy and online refueling capability of the CANDU® heavy water moderated reactor (HWR) enable it to use many different fuels such as low enriched uranium (LEU), plutonium, or thorium, in addition to its traditional natural uranium (NU) fuel. The toxicity and radiological protection methods for these proposed fuels, unlike those for NU, are not well established. This study uses software to compare the fuel composition and toxicity of irradiated NU fuel against those of two irradiated advanced HWR fuel bundles as a function of post-irradiation time. The first bundle investigated is a CANFLEX® low void reactor fuel (LVRF), of which only the dysprosium-poisoned central element, and not the outer 42 LEU elements, is specifically analyzed. The second bundle investigated is a heterogeneous high-burnup (LEU,Th)O(2) fuelled bundle, whose two components (LEU in the outer 35 elements and thorium in the central eight elements) are analyzed separately. The LVRF central element was estimated to have a much lower toxicity than that of NU at all times after shutdown. Both the high burnup LEU and the thorium fuel had similar toxicity to NU at shutdown, but due to the creation of such inhalation hazards as (238)Pu, (240)Pu, (242)Am, (242)Cm, and (244)Cm (in high burnup LEU), and (232)U and (228)Th (in irradiated thorium), the toxicity of these fuels was almost double that of irradiated NU after 2,700 d of cooling. New urine bioassay methods for higher actinoids and the analysis of thorium in fecal samples are recommended to assess the internal dose from these two fuels. PMID:23274823

  4. Neutron field for activation experiments in horizontal channel of training reactor VR-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanik, Milan; Katovsky, Karel; Vins, Miroslav; Soltes, Jaroslav; Zavorka, Lukas

    2014-11-01

    The experimental channels of nuclear reactors often serve for nuclear data measurement and validation. The dosimetry-foils activation technique was employed to measure neutron field parameters in the horizontal radial channel of the training reactor VR-1, and to test the possibility of using the reactor for scientific purposes. The reaction rates, energy spectral indexes, and neutron spectrum at several irradiation positions of the experimental channel were determined. The experimental results show the feasibility of the radial channel for irradiating experiments and open new possibilities for data validation by using this nuclear facility.

  5. Results of the Irradiation of R6R018 in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Adam B Robinson; Daniel Wachs; Pavel Medvedev; Curtis Clark; Gray Chang; Misti Lillo; Jan-Fong Jue; Glenn Moore; Jared Wight

    2010-04-01

    For over 30 years the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program has worked to provide the fuel technology and analytical support required to convert research and test reactors from nuclear fuels that utilize highly enriched uranium (HEU) to fuels based on low-enriched uranium (LEU) (defined as <20% U-235). This effort is driven by a desire to minimize international civilian commerce in weapons usable materials. The RERTR fuel development program has executed a wide array of fuel tests over the last decade that clearly established the viability of research reactor fuels based on uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloys. Fuel testing has included a large number of dispersion type fuels capable of providing uranium densities up to approximately 8.5 g U/cc (~1.7 g U-235/cc at 20% enrichment). The dispersion fuel designs tested are very similar to existing research test reactor fuels in that the U-Mo particles simply replace the current fuel phase within the matrix. In 2003 it became evident that the first generation U-Mo-based dispersion fuel within an aluminum matrix exhibited significant fuel performance problems at high power and burn-up. These issues have been successfully addressed with a modest modification to the matrix material composition. Testing has shown that small additions of silicon (2–5 wt%) to the aluminum (Al) matrix stabilizes the fuel performance. The fuel plate R6R018 which was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as part of the RERTR-9B experiment was part of an investigation into the role of the silicon content in the matrix. This plate consisted of a U-7Mo fuel phase dispersed in an Al-3.5Si matrix clad in Al-6061. This report outlines the fabrication history, the as fabricated analysis performed prior to irradiation, the irradiation conditions, the post irradiation examination results, and an analysis of the plates behavior.

  6. Modeling of microstructure evolution in austenitic stainless steels irradiated under light water reactor condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, J.; Was, G. S.; Stoller, R. E.

    2001-10-01

    A model for microstructure development in austenitic alloys under light water reactor irradiation conditions is described. The model is derived from the model developed by Stoller and Odette to describe microstructural evolution under fast neutron or fusion reactor irradiation conditions. The model is benchmarked against microstructure measurements in 304 and 316 SS irradiated in a boiling water reactor core using one material-dependent and three irradiation-based parameters. The model is also adapted for proton irradiation at higher dose rate and higher temperature and is calibrated against microstructure measurements for proton irradiation. The model calculations show that for both neutron and proton irradiations, in-cascade interstitial clustering is the driving mechanism for loop nucleation. The loss of interstitial clusters to sinks by interstitial cluster diffusion was found to be an important factor in determining the loop density. The model also explains how proton irradiation can produce an irradiated dislocation microstructure similar to that in neutron irradiation.

  7. US graphite reactor D&D experience

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, S.M.K.; Williams, N.C.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the results of the U.S. Graphite Reactor Experience Task for the Decommissioning Strategy Plan for the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Unit 1 Study. The work described in this report was performed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE).

  8. Reactor neutrino experiments: θ13 and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xin; Wang, Wei

    2014-05-01

    We review the current-generation short-baseline reactor neutrino experiments that have firmly established the third neutrino mixing angle θ13 to be nonzero. The relative large value of θ13 (around 9°) has opened many new and exciting opportunities for future neutrino experiments. Daya Bay experiment with the first measurement of Δ m2ee is aiming for a precision measurement of this atmospheric mass-squared splitting with a comparable precision as Δ m2μ μ from accelerator muon neutrino experiments. JUNO, a next-generation reactor neutrino experiment, is targeting to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy (MH) with medium baselines ( 50 km). Beside these opportunities enabled by the large θ13, the current-generation (Daya Bay, Double Chooz, and RENO) and the next-generation (JUNO, RENO-50, and PROSPECT) reactor experiments, with their unprecedented statistics, are also leading the precision era of the three-flavor neutrino oscillation physics as well as constraining new physics beyond the neutrino Standard Model.

  9. Experiment Safety Assurance Package for the 40- to 52-GWd/MT Burnup Phase of Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in Small I-hole Positions in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. T. Khericha; R. C. Pedersen

    2003-09-01

    This experiment safety assurance package (ESAP) is a revision of the last mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) ESAP issued in June 2002). The purpose of this revision is to provide a basis to continue irradiation up to 52 GWd/MT burnup [as predicted by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code The last ESAP provided basis for irradiation, at a linear heat generation rate (LHGR) no greater than 9 kW/ft, of the highest burnup capsule assembly to 50 GWd/MT. This ESAP extends the basis for irradiation, at a LHGR no greater than 5 kW/ft, of the highest burnup capsule assembly from 50 to 52 GWd/MT.

  10. The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe

    2010-02-01

    The 3x3 PMNS leptonic mixing matrix relates the mass and flavor eigenstates of the 3 known neutrinos. The θ13 mixing angle is the last unknown mixing angle in the PMNS matrix, the parameters of which must be determined experimentally. The Daya Bay experiment will search for the ``disappearance'' of reactor anti-neutrinos from the Daya Bay and Ling Ao Nuclear Power Plants located in Daya Bay, Guangdong, China using multiple identical detectors at different baselines. The disappearance probability of reactor anti-neutrinos at short baselines of 1-2km is directly proportional to 2̂(2 θ13). The goal of the Daya Bay experiment is to reach a sensitivity of 2̂(2 θ13) = 0.01 at the 90 % C.L. The status and prospects of the experiment will be presented. )

  11. Sodium Reactor Experiment decommissioning. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, J.W.; Conners, C.C.; Harris, J.M.; Marzec, J.M.; Ureda, B.F.

    1983-08-15

    The Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) located at the Rockwell International Field Laboratories northwest of Los Angeles was developed to demonstrate a sodium-cooled, graphite-moderated reactor for civilian use. The reactor reached full power in May 1958 and provided 37 GWh to the Southern California Edison Company grid before it was shut down in 1967. Decommissioning of the SRE began in 1974 with the objective of removing all significant radioactivity from the site and releasing the facility for unrestricted use. Planning documentation was prepared to describe in detail the equipment and techniques development and the decommissioning work scope. A plasma-arc manipulator was developed for remotely dissecting the highly radioactive reactor vessels. Other important developments included techniques for using explosives to cut reactor vessel internal piping, clamps, and brackets; decontaminating porous concrete surfaces; and disposing of massive equipment and structures. The documentation defined the decommissioning in an SRE dismantling plan, in activity requirements for elements of the decommissioning work scope, and in detailed procedures for each major task.

  12. Optimization of irradiation conditions for {sup 177}Lu production at the LVR-15 research reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lahodova, Z.; Viererbl, L.; Klupak, V.; Srank, J.

    2012-07-01

    The use of lutetium in medicine has been increasing over the last few years. The {sup 177}Lu radionuclide is commercially available for research and test purposes as a diagnostic and radiotherapy agent in the treatment of several malignant tumours. The yield of {sup 177}Lu from the {sup 176}Lu(n,{gamma}){sup 177}Lu nuclear reaction depends significantly on the thermal neutron fluence rate. The capture cross-sections of both reaction {sup 176}Lu(n,{gamma}){sup 177}Lu and reaction {sup 177}Lu(n,{gamma}){sup 178}Lu are very high. Therefore a burn-up of target and product nuclides should be taken into account when calculating {sup 177}Lu activity. The maximum irradiation time, when the activity of the {sup 177}Lu radionuclide begins to decline, was found for different fluence rates. Two vertical irradiation channels at the LVR-15 nuclear research reactor were compared in order to choose the channel with better irradiation conditions, such as a higher thermal neutron fluence rate in the irradiation volume. In this experiment, lutetium was irradiated in a titanium capsule. The influence of the Ti capsule on the neutron spectrum was monitored using activation detectors. The choice of detectors was based on requirements for irradiation time and accurate determination of thermal neutrons. The following activation detectors were selected for measurement of the neutron spectrum: Ti, Fe, Ni, Co, Ag and W. (authors)

  13. High-irradiance reactor design with practical unfolded optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuermann, Daniel; Gordon, Jeffrey M.

    2008-08-01

    In the design of high-temperature chemical reactors and furnaces, as well as high-radiance light projection applications, reconstituting the ultra-high radiance of short-arc discharge lamps at maximum radiative efficiency constitutes a significant challenge. The difficulty is exacerbated by the high numerical aperture necessary at both the source and the target. Separating the optic from both the light source and the target allows practical operation, control, monitoring, diagnostics and maintenance. We present near-field unfolded aplanatic optics as a feasible solution. The concept is illustrated with a design customized to a high-temperature chemical reactor for nano-material synthesis, driven by an ultra-bright xenon short-arc discharge lamp, with near-unity numerical aperture for both light input and light output. We report preliminary optical measurements for the first prototype, which constitutes a double-ellipsoid solution. We also propose compound unfolded aplanats that collect the full angular extent of lamp emission (in lieu of light recycling optics) and additionally permit nearly full-circumference irradiation of the reactor.

  14. Status of the RENO Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, K. K.; RENO Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    The Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation (RENO) is a reactor based neutrino oscillation experiment to measure the neutrino mixing angle θ13 using anti-neutrinos emitted from the Yonggwang nuclear power plant in Korea. Its thermal power output is 16.4 Gwth. The experimental setup consists of two identical 16-ton gadolinium-loaded liquid scintillator detectors. The near and far detectors are placed roughly 290 m and 1.4 km from the center of the reactor array, respectively. The near detector is constructed at underground of a 70 m high hill and the far detector at underground of a 260 m high mountain. The construction of experimental halls and access tunnels for both near and far detector sites was completed in early 2009. The experiment is planned to start data-taking from early 2011. An expected number of observed anti-neutrinos is roughly 1300 per day and 100 per day in the far and near detector, respectively. We expect that an estimated systematic uncertainty is less than 0.5%. With three years of data taken, RENO is sensitive to measure sin2(2θ13)>0.02. Sensitivity is ten times better than the current limit obtained by Chooz. In this review, current status of RENO is presented.

  15. Vanadium alloy irradiation experiment X530 in EBR-II{sup *}

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Hins, A.G.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of the X530 experiment in EBR-II was to obtain early irradiation performance data, particularly the fracture properties, on the new 500-kg production heat of V-4Cr-4Ti material before the scheduled reactor shutdown at the end of September 1994.

  16. Initial tensile test results from J316 stainless steel irradiated in the HFIR spectrally tailored experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, J.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel alloys. In this experiment, the spectrum has been tailored to reduce the thermal neutron flux and achieve a He/dpa level near that expected in a fusion reactor.

  17. 78 FR 58575 - Review of Experiments for Research Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... COMMISSION Review of Experiments for Research Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION... Guide (RG) 2.4, ``Review of Experiments for Research Reactors.'' The guide is being withdrawn because... Experiments for Research Reactors,'' (ADAMS Accession No. ML003740131) because its guidance no longer...

  18. 10 CFR 71.97 - Advance notification of shipment of irradiated reactor fuel and nuclear waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... shipment, as specified in the regulations of DOT in 49 CFR 172.202 and 172.203(d); (3) The point of origin... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advance notification of shipment of irradiated reactor... notification of shipment of irradiated reactor fuel and nuclear waste. (a)(1) As specified in paragraphs...

  19. 10 CFR 71.97 - Advance notification of shipment of irradiated reactor fuel and nuclear waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... regulations of DOT in 49 CFR 172.202 and 172.203(d); (3) The point of origin of the shipment and the 7-day... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advance notification of shipment of irradiated reactor... notification of shipment of irradiated reactor fuel and nuclear waste. (a) As specified in paragraphs (b),...

  20. 10 CFR 71.97 - Advance notification of shipment of irradiated reactor fuel and nuclear waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... shipment, as specified in the regulations of DOT in 49 CFR 172.202 and 172.203(d); (3) The point of origin... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advance notification of shipment of irradiated reactor... notification of shipment of irradiated reactor fuel and nuclear waste. (a)(1) As specified in paragraphs...

  1. 10 CFR 71.97 - Advance notification of shipment of irradiated reactor fuel and nuclear waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... nuclear waste contained in the shipment, as specified in the regulations of DOT in 49 CFR 172.202 and 172... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advance notification of shipment of irradiated reactor... notification of shipment of irradiated reactor fuel and nuclear waste. (a) As specified in paragraphs (b),...

  2. Predicting Activation of Experiments Inside the Annular Core Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Joseph Isaac

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this thesis is to create a program to quickly estimate the radioactivity and decay of experiments conducted inside of the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories and eliminate the need for users to write code. This is achieved by model the neutron fluxes in the reactor’s central cavity where experiments are conducted for 4 different neutron spectra using MCNP. The desired neutron spectrum, experiment material composition, and reactor power level are then input into CINDER2008 burnup code to obtain activation and decay information for every isotope generated. DREAD creates all of the files required for CINDER2008 through user selected inputs in a graphical user interface and executes the program for the user and displays the resulting estimation for dose rate at various distances. The DREAD program was validated by weighing and measuring various experiments in the different spectra and then collecting dose rate information after they were irradiated and comparing it to the dose rates that DREAD predicted. The program provides results with an average of 17% higher estimates than the actual values and takes seconds to execute.

  3. (Boiling water reactor (BWR) CORA experiments)

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L.J.

    1990-10-16

    To participate in the 1990 CORA Workshop at Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) GmbH, Karlsruhe, FRG, on October 1--4, and to participate in detailed discussions on October 5 with the KfK CORA Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) experiments. The traveler attended the 1990 CORA Workshop at KfK, FRG. Participation included the presentation of a paper on work performed by the Boiling Water Reactor Core Melt Progression Phenomena Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on posttest analyses of CORA BWR experiments. The Statement of Work (November 1989) for the BWR Core Melt Progression Phenomena Program provides for pretest and posttest analyses of the BWR CORA experiments performed at KfK. Additionally, it is intended that ORNL personnel participate in the planning process for future CORA BWR experiments. For these purposes, meetings were held with KfK staff to discuss such topics as (1) experimental test schedule, (2) BWR test conduct, (3) perceived BWR experimental needs, and (4) KfK operational staff needs with respect to ORNL support. 19 refs.

  4. Low Temperature Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John

    2015-08-01

    The embrittlement trend curve development project for HFIR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was carried out with three major tasks. Which are (1) data collection to match that used in HFIR steel embrittlement trend published in 1994 Journal Nuclear Material by Remec et. al, (2) new embrittlement data of A212B steel that are not included in earlier HFIR RPV trend curve, and (3) the adjustment of nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDTT) shift data with the consideration of the irradiation temperature effect. An updated HFIR RPV steel embrittlement trend curve was developed, as described below. NDTT( C) = 23.85 log(x) + 203.3 log (x) + 434.7, with 2- uncertainty of 34.6 C, where parameter x is referred to total dpa. The developed update HFIR RPV embrittlement trend curve has higher embrittlement rate compared to that of the trend curve developed in 1994.

  5. Solar Irradiance and Thermospheric Airglow Rocket Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Stanley C.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes work done in support of the Solar Irradiance and Thermospheric Air-glow Rocket Experiments at the University of Colorado for NASA grant NAG5-5021 under the direction of Dr. Stanley C. Solomon. (The overall rocket program is directed by Dr. Thomas N. Woods, formerly at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and now also at the University of Colorado, for NASA grant NAG5-5141.) Grant NAG5-5021 provided assistance to the overall program through analysis of airglow and solar data, support of two graduate students, laboratory technical services, and field support. The general goals of the rocket program were to measure the solar extreme ultraviolet spectral irradiance, measure the terrestrial far-ultraviolet airglow, and analyze their relationship at various levels of solar activity, including near solar minimum. These have been met, as shown below. In addition, we have used the attenuation of solar radiation as the rocket descends through the thermosphere to measure density changes. This work demonstrates the maturity of the observational and modeling methods connecting energetic solar photon fluxes and airglow emissions through the processes of photoionization and photoelectron production and loss. Without a simultaneous photoelectron measurement, some aspects of this relationship remain obscure, and there are still questions pertaining to cascade contributions to molecular and atomic airglow emissions. However, by removing the solar irradiance as an "adjustable parameter" in the analysis, significant progress has been made toward understanding the relationship of far-ultraviolet airglow emissions to the solar and atmospheric conditions that control them.

  6. The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishai, Mary

    2007-04-01

    The 3x3 PMNS leptonic mixing matrix relates the mass and flavor eigenstates of the 3 known neutrinos. The θ13 mixing angle is the last unknown mixing angle in the PMNS matrix, the parameters of which must be determined experimentally. The goal of the Daya Bay experiment is to measure θ13 with a sensitivity in 2circ(2θ13) of 0.01. The Daya Bay experiment will search for the `disappearance' of reactor electron anti-neutrinos from the Daya Bay and Ling Ao Nuclear Power Plants located in Daya Bay, Guangdong, China using multiple identical detectors at different baselines. The status and prospects of the experiment will be presented.

  7. Experiment Safety Assurance Package for the 40- to 50-GWd/MT Burnup Phase of Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in Small I-Hole Positions in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Khericha, S.T.

    2002-06-30

    This experiment safety assurance package (ESAP) is a revision of the last MOX ESAP issued in February 2001(Khericha 2001). The purpose of this revision is to identify the changes in the loading pattern and to provide a basis to continue irradiation up to {approx}42 GWd/MT burnup (+ 2.5%) as predicted by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code before the preliminary postirradiation examination (PIE) results for 40 GWd/MT burnup are available. Note that the safety analysis performed for the last ESAP is still applicable and no additional analysis is required (Khericha 2001). In July 2001, it was decided to reconfigure the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 3, at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, as the loading pattern for Phase IV, Parts 2 and 3. Three capsule assemblies will be irradiated until the highest burnup capsule assembly accumulates: {approx}50 GWd/MT burnup, based on the MCNP code predictions. The last ESAP suggests that at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, we remove the two highest burnup capsule assemblies ({at} {approx}40 GWd/MT burnup) and send them to ORNL for PIE. Then, irradiate the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 2, until the highest burnup capsule reaches {approx}40 GWd/MT burnup per MCNP-predicted values.

  8. Experiment Safety Assurance Package for the 40- to 50-GWd/MT Burnup Phase of Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in Small I-Hole Positions in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Khericha, Soli T

    2002-06-01

    This experiment safety assurance package (ESAP) is a revision of the last MOX ESAP issued in February 2001(Khericha 2001). The purpose of this revision is to identify the changes in the loading pattern and to provide a basis to continue irradiation up to ~42 GWd/MT burnup (+ 2.5% as predicted by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code before the preliminary postirradiation examination (PIE) results for 40 GWd/MT burnup are available. Note that the safety analysis performed for the last ESAP is still applicable and no additional analysis is required (Khericha 2001). In July 2001, it was decided to reconfigure the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 3, at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, as the loading pattern for Phase IV, Parts 2 and 3. Three capsule assemblies will be irradiated until the highest burnup capsule assembly accumulates: ~50 GWd/MT burnup, based on the MCNP code predictions. The last ESAP suggests that at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, we remove the two highest burnup capsule assemblies (@ ~40 GWd/MT burnup) and send them to ORNL for PIE. Then, irradiate the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 2, until the highest burnup capsule reaches ~40 GWd/MT burnup per MCNP-predicted values.

  9. ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tasi, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Hins, A.G.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    To study the mechanical properties of vanadium alloys under neutron irradiation at low temperatures, an experiment was designed and constructed for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The experiment contained Charpy, tensile, compact tension, TEM, and creep specimens of vanadium alloys. It also contained limited low-activation ferritic steel specimens as part of the collaborative agreement with Monbusho of Japan. The design irradiation temperatures for the vanadium alloy specimens in the experiment are {approx}200 and 300{degrees}C, achieved with passive gap-gap sizing and fill gas blending. To mitigate vanadium-to-chromium transmutation from the thermal neutron flux, the test specimens are contained inside gadolinium flux filters. All specimens are lithium-bonded. The irradiation started in Cycle 108A (December 3, 1995) and is expected to have a duration of three ATR cycles and a peak influence of 4.4 dpa.

  10. Preliminary Results From High Temperature Scoping Irradiation Experiments Of Selected Gen IV Structural Metallic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K; McClintock, David A; Hoelzer, David T

    2007-01-01

    The performance of Generation IV reactors as a class will be determined by the behavior of advanced engineering materials. In the case of materials utilized for reactor internals and pressure vessels, the effects of irradiation are major issues. The environmental conditions for most of the Gen IV reactors are generally beyond present day reactor technology, especially as regards the combinations of operating temperatures, reactor coolant characteristics, and neutron spectra. In some of the applications, the conditions lay well beyond advanced research programs in radiation effects on materials. Therefore, new experimental data as well as analytical predictions of expected behavior of candidate materials at conditions for which there are no experimental data will be required. In the Gen IV Materials Program cross-cutting task, plans are being developed and irradiations and testing are being carried out to address the issues described above. This paper provides preliminary results for the first series of scoping irradiation experiments with selected metallic alloys, some of which are considered candidate materials for current Gen IV reactor applications, while others are considered as potential future candidate materials. The material classes represented are (1) nickel-base alloys (alloy 800H and Inconel 617; (2) advanced oxide-dispersion strengthened steels (14WT and 14YWT); and (3) commercial ferritic-martensitic steels (9Cr-1MoV). The results presented are from tensile tests using small flat tensile specimens (SS-3) in both the unirradiated and irradiated conditions. Specimens were irradiated in so-called rabbit capsules in the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at temperatures from 550 to 750 C and to irradiation doses from about 1.28 to 1.61 dpa. For the preliminary results from the first phase of this study, the annealed 9Cr-1MoV shows small amounts of irradiation-induced hardening. For the Alloy 800H, however, the hardening resulting from the 580 C irradiation

  11. A Semi-Batch Reactor Experiment for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derevjanik, Mario; Badri, Solmaz; Barat, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This experiment and analysis offer an economic yet challenging semi-batch reactor experience. Household bleach is pumped at a controlled rate into a batch reactor containing pharmaceutical hydrogen peroxide solution. Batch temperature, product molecular oxygen, and the overall change in solution conductivity are metered. The reactor simulation…

  12. Principles and practices of irradiation creep experiment using pressurized mini-bellows

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Li, Meimei; Snead, Lance Lewis; Katoh, Yutai; Burchell, Timothy D; McDuffee, Joel Lee

    2013-01-01

    This article is to describe the key design principles and application practices of the newly developed in-reactor irradiation creep testing technology using pressurized mini-bellows. Miniature creep test frames were designed to fit into the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) rabbit capsule whose internal diameter is slightly less than 10 mm. The most important consideration for this in-reactor creep testing technology was the ability of the small pressurized metallic bellows to survive irradiation at elevated temperatures while maintaining applied load to the specimen. Conceptual designs have been developed for inducing tension and compression stresses in specimens. Both the theoretical model and the in-furnace test confirmed that a gas-pressurized bellows can produce high enough stress to induce irradiation creep in subsize specimens. Discussion focuses on the possible stress range in specimens induced by the miniature gas-pressurized bellows and the limitations imposed by the size and structure of thin-walled bellows. A brief introduction to the in-reactor creep experiment for graphite is provided to connect to the companion paper describing the application practices and irradiation creep data. An experimental and calculation procedure to obtain in-situ applied stress values from post irradiation in-furnace force measurements is also presented.

  13. In-situ radio-luminescence from sapphires under fission reactor irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shikama, T.; Narui, M.; Kayano, H.; Kakuta, T.; Sagawa, T.; Jensen, B.F.H.; Nakazawa, S.

    1999-10-01

    Radio-luminescence from the sapphire was detected in-situ under the reactor irradiation using the silica core optical fiber. The radio-luminescence peaks at 420, 690, and 860 nm, and broad band in 700--1200 nm were identified. However, these radio-luminescence peaks and band became obscure as the reactor power went up, due to the increase of the specimen temperatures and to the interference of the strong radio-luminescence from the silica core optical fiber itself. The effect of the applied electric field on the radio-luminescence was studied. Change was observed due to the electric field but it was very small. Further study and a better-controlled experiments will be needed to clarify the effect.

  14. Irradiation performance of AGR-1 high temperature reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A. Demkowicz; John D. Hunn; Robert N. Morris; Charles A. Baldwin; Philip L. Winston; Jason M. Harp; Scott A. Ploger; Tyler Gerczak; Isabella J. van Rooyen; Fred C. Montgomery; Chinthaka M. Silva

    2014-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment contained 72 low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts in six capsules irradiated to burnups of 11.2 to 19.5% FIMA, with zero TRISO coating failures detected during the irradiation. The irradiation performance of the fuel–including the extent of fission product release and the evolution of kernel and coating microstructures–was evaluated based on detailed examination of the irradiation capsules, the fuel compacts, and individual particles. Fractional release of 110mAg from the fuel compacts was often significant, with capsule-average values ranging from 0.01 to 0.38. Analysis of silver release from individual compacts indicated that it was primarily dependent on fuel temperature history. Europium and strontium were released in small amounts through intact coatings, but were found to be significantly retained in the outer pyrocrabon and compact matrix. The capsule-average fractional release from the compacts was 1×10 4 to 5×10 4 for 154Eu and 8×10 7 to 3×10 5 for 90Sr. The average 134Cs release from compacts was <3×10 6 when all particles maintained intact SiC. An estimated four particles out of 2.98×105 experienced partial cesium release due to SiC failure during the irradiation, driving 134Cs release in two capsules to approximately 10 5. Identification and characterization of these particles has provided unprecedented insight into the nature and causes of SiC coating failure in high-quality TRISO fuel. In general, changes in coating morphology were found to be dominated by the behavior of the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC), and infrequently observed SiC layer damage was usually related to cracks in the IPyC. Palladium attack of the SiC layer was relatively minor, except for the particles that released cesium during irradiation, where SiC corrosion was found adjacent to IPyC cracks. Palladium, silver, and uranium were found in the SiC layer of irradiated particles, and characterization

  15. A Review of Graphite Irradiation Creep Data from the "OC-Series" of Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Mark A.; Burchell, Timothy D.

    2012-09-01

    The OC-Series graphite irradiation creep experiments were conducted in the early 1970s in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) at ORNL. The OC Series consisted of 5 experiments, Capsules 1, 3 and 5 were irradiated at 900°C and Capsules 2 and 4 were irradiated at 600°C. Each capsule contained four columns of specimens, two loaded in compression and two un-loaded. The loaded columns had specimens of different diameter to generate two stress levels, 13.8 MPa and 20.7 MPa. Some of the data from these experiments were presented in extended abstracts at a Carbon Conference (Kennedy et al, 1977: Kennedy and Eatherly, 1979). The data presented some challenges to the accepted approach to irradiation induced creep in graphite adopted in the UK, specifically lateral creep strain behaviour and the effect of irradiation induced creep strain on material properties, e.g. CTE and Poisson’s Ratio. A recent review of irradiation induced creep (Davies & Bradford, 2004) included an anlaysis of the available OC-series data (Mobasheran, 1990) and led to a request to ORNL for an examination of the original OC-Series dataset. An initial search of the ORNL archive revealed additional data from the OC-Series experiment including previously unknown irradiation annealing experiments. This report presents a re-analysis of the available data from the OC-Series archive.

  16. IET. Typical detail during Snaptran reactor experiments. Shielding bricks protect ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET. Typical detail during Snaptran reactor experiments. Shielding bricks protect ion chamber beneath reactor on dolly. Photographer: Page Comiskey. Date: August 11, 1965. INEEL negative no. 65-4039 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Irradiation creep behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti alloys irradiated in a liquid sodium environment at the JOYO fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, Ken-ichi; Matsui, Hideki; Narui, Minoru; Yamazaki, Masanori

    2013-06-01

    Irradiation experiments on V-4Cr-4Ti alloys with sodium-enclosed irradiation capsules in the JOYO fast reactor were conducted using pressurized creep tubes (PCTs). The irradiation creep strain was significantly larger than the thermal creep strain below 686 °C, but there was no swelling of the neutron-irradiated V-4Cr-4Ti alloys. At temperatures below 500 °C, the irradiation creep was found to be proportional to the square root of the neutron dose and linear with the stress level. Above 500 °C, it was expected to be proportional to the stress level to a power greater than unity, because the irradiation creep mechanism could change from the stress-induced preferred absorption mechanism (SIPA) to the preferred absorption glide mechanism (PGA). By comparing annealed PCT specimens with cold-worked specimens, the cold-worked V-4Cr-4Ti alloys exhibited a larger irradiation creep strain compared with the annealed alloys. The irradiation creep compliance of the V-4Cr-4Ti alloys were ˜10 × 10-6 MPa-1 dpa-1 below 500 °C and 50-200 × 10-6 MPa-1 dpa-1 above 500 °C, a value greater than that of commercial V-4Cr-4Ti alloys, austenitic steels and ferritic steels.

  18. The medical-irradiation characteristics for neutron capture therapy at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Research Reactor.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru

    2002-10-01

    At the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of the Kyoto University Research Reactor, the mix irradiation of thermal and epi-thermal neutrons, and the solo irradiation of epi-thermal neutrons are available additionally to the thermal neutron irradiation, and then the neutron capture therapy (NCT) at this facility became more flexible, after the update in 1996. The estimation of the depth dose distributions in NCT clinical irradiation, were performed for the standard irradiation modes of thermal, mixed and epi-thermal neutrons, from the both sides of experiment and calculation. On the assumption that the 10B concentration in tumor part was 40 ppm and the ratio of tumor to normal tissue was 3.5, the advantage depth were estimated to 5.4, 6.0, and 8.0, for the respective standard irradiation modes. It was confirmed that the various irradiation conditions can be selected according to the target-volume conditions, such as size, depth, etc. Besides, in the viewpoint of the radiation shielding for patient, it was confirmed that the whole-body exposure is effectively reduced by the new clinical collimators, compared with the old one. PMID:12408307

  19. Neutron spectrum effect on pressure vessel embrittlement: Dosimetry and qualification of irradiation locations in OSIRIS and SILOE reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Alberman, A.; Bourdet, L.; Carcreff, H.; Beretz, D.

    1994-12-31

    Two irradiation experiments have been undertaken in OSIRIS (Saclay) and SILOE (Grenoble) reactors, in order to establish the correlation between the embrittlement of pressure vessel steels and neutron spectrum. Target fluence is 0.1 dpa for both experiments. This damage fluence corresponds to a fluence of 7.5 10{sup 19} n.cm{sup {minus}2} E > 1 MeV (7.5 10{sup 15} n.m{sup {minus}2}) in the case of a well moderated light water spectrum, but only 45 10{sup 19} n.cm{sup {minus}2} in the case of the specially designed SILOE irradiation location. One irradiation run is now completed, the second one is underway. This paper presents the experimental dosimetry data and irradiation parameters obtained in the preliminary qualification program, needed to assess this damage correlation.

  20. Status of ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low-activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Chung, H.; Smith, D.L.

    1997-04-01

    The ATR-A1 irradiation experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was a collaborative U.S./Japan effort to study at low temperatures the effects of neutron damage on vanadium alloys. The experiment also contained a limited quantity of low-activation ferritic steel specimens from Japan as part of the collaboration agreement. The irradiation was completed on May 5, 1996, as planned, after achieving an estimated neutron damage of 4.7 dpa in vanadium. The capsule has since been kept in the ATR water canal for the required radioactivity cool-down. Planning is underway for disassembly of the capsule and test specimen retrieval.

  1. AGR-2: The first irradiation of French HTR fuel in Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    T. Lambert; B. Grover; P. Guillermier; D. Moulinier; F. Imbault Huart

    2012-10-01

    performed by INL team, and preliminary thermal mechanical ATLAS calculations were carried out by CEA from this pre-design. Despite the mean burn-up achieved in approximately 600 EFPD being a little high (16.3% FIMA max. associated with a low fluence up to 2.85 × 1025 n/m2), this irradiation will nevertheless encompass the range of irradiation effects covered in our experimental objectives (maximum stress peak at start of irradiation then sign inversion of the stress in the SiC layer). In addition, the fluence and burn-up acceleration factors are very similar to those of the German reference experiments. This experimental irradiation began in July 2010 in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and first results have been acquired.

  2. Swelling under irradiation of MgO pellets containing americium oxide: The ECRIX-H irradiation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontagne, J.; Béjaoui, S.; Hanifi, K.; Valot, Ch.; Loubet, L.

    2011-06-01

    The ECRIX-H irradiation experiment studied the behaviour of pellets containing americium dispersed in MgO. The purpose of the irradiation was to demonstrate the capacity of magnesia to provide an efficient support matrix. After fabrication, the sintered pellets contained 16.65 wt.% of Am microdispersed in the inert matrix. The ECRIX-H pellets were irradiated under a locally moderated neutron flux in the Phénix sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) for 318 Effective Full Power Days (EFPD). Post-test calculations indicated that the fission and transmutation rates of americium at the maximum flux plane reached 33.9% and 92.6% respectively at the end of the irradiation phase. The results of the post-irradiation examinations - both non-destructive and destructive - are discussed in this paper. These results indicate a satisfactory behaviour of the MgO matrix. Particularly, a moderate swelling occurs in the pellets under irradiation even with significant quantities of helium generated and at high transmutation rate.

  3. Some scoping experiments for a space reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, C.A.; Ogden, J.S.

    1983-07-07

    Some scoping experiments were performed to evaluate fuel performance in a lithium heat pipe reactor operating at a nominal 1500K heat pipe temperature. Fuel-coolant and fuel-coolant-clad relationships showed that once a failed heat pipe occurs temperatures can rise high enough so that large concentrations of uranium can be transported by the vapor phase. Upon condensation this uranium would be capable of penetrating heat pipes adjacent to the failed pipe. The potential for propagation of failure exists with UO/sub 2/ and a lithium heat pipe. Changing the composition of the metal of the heat pipe would have only a second order effect on the kinetics of the failure mechanism. Uranium carbide and nitride were considered as potential fuels which are nonreactive in a lithium environment. At high temperatures the nitride would be favored because of its better compatibility with potential cladding materials. Compositions of UN with small additions of YN appear to offer very attractive properties for a compact high temperature high power density reactor.

  4. Janus Experiments: Data from Mouse Irradiation Experiments 1972 - 1989

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Janus Experiments, carried out at Argonne National Laboratory from 1972 to 1989 and supported by grants from the US Department of Energy, investigated the effects of neutron and gamma radiation on mouse tissues primarily from B6CF1 mice. 49,000 mice were irradiated: Death records were recorded for 42,000 mice; gross pathologies were recorded for 39,000 mice; and paraffin embedded tissues were preserved for most mice. Mouse record details type and source of radiation [gamma, neutrons]; dose and dose rate [including life span irradiation]; type and presence/absence of radioprotector treatment; tissue/animal morphology and pathology. Protracted low dose rate treatments, short term higher dose rate treatments, variable dose rates with a same total dose, etc. in some cases in conjunction with radioprotectors, were administered. Normal tissues, tumors, metastases were preserved. Standard tissues saved were : lung, liver, spleen, kidney, heart, any with gross lesions (including mammary glands, Harderian gland with eye, adrenal gland, gut, ovaries or testes, brain and pituitary, bone). Data are searchable and specimens can be obtained by request.

  5. Irradiated Xenon Isotopic Ratio Measurement for Failed Fuel Detection and Location in Fast Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Chikara; Iguchi, Tetsuo; Harano, Hideki

    2009-08-01

    The accuracy of xenon isotopic ratio burn-up calculations used for failed fuel identification was evaluated by an irradiation test of xenon tag gas samples in the Joyo test reactor. The experiment was carried out using pressurized steel capsules containing unique blend ratios of stable xenon tag gases in an on-line creep rupture experiment in Joyo. The tag gas samples were irradiated to total neutron fluences of 1.6 to 4.8 × 1026 n/m2. Laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry was used to analyze the cover gas containing released tag gas diluted to isotopic ratios of 100 to 102 ppb. The isotopic ratios of xenon tag gases after irradiation were calculated using the ORIGEN2 code. The neutron cross sections of xenon nuclides were based on the JENDL-3.3 library. These cross sections were collapsed into one group using the neutron spectra of Joyo. The comparison of measured and calculated xenon isotopic ratios provided C/E values that ranged from 0.92 to 1.10. The differences between calculation and measurement were considered to be mainly due to the measurement errors and the xenon nuclide cross section uncertainties.

  6. Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, Jeremy T; Gussev, Maxim N

    2011-04-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking is a key materials degradation issue in today s nuclear power reactor fleet and affects critical structural components within the reactor core. The effects of increased exposure to irradiation, stress, and/or coolant can substantially increase susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic steels in high-temperature water environments. . Despite 30 years of experience, the underlying mechanisms of IASCC are unknown. Extended service conditions will increase the exposure to irradiation, stress, and corrosive environment for all core internal components. The objective of this effort within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program is to evaluate the response and mechanisms of IASCC in austenitic stainless steels with single variable experiments. A series of high-value irradiated specimens has been acquired from the past international research programs, providing a valuable opportunity to examine the mechanisms of IASCC. This batch of irradiated specimens has been received and inventoried. In addition, visual examination and sample cleaning has been completed. Microhardness testing has been performed on these specimens. All samples show evidence of hardening, as expected, although the degree of hardening has saturated and no trend with dose is observed. Further, the change in hardening can be converted to changes in mechanical properties. The calculated yield stress is consistent with previous data from light water reactor conditions. In addition, some evidence of changes in deformation mode was identified via examination of the microhardness indents. This analysis may provide further insights into the deformation mode under larger scale tests. Finally, swelling analysis was performed using immersion density methods. Most alloys showed some evidence of swelling, consistent with the expected trends for this class of alloy. The Hf-doped alloy showed densification rather than swelling. This observation may be

  7. The materials irradiation experiment for testing plasma facing materials at fusion relevant conditions.

    PubMed

    Garrison, L M; Zenobia, S J; Egle, B J; Kulcinski, G L; Santarius, J F

    2016-08-01

    The Materials Irradiation Experiment (MITE-E) was constructed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Laboratory to test materials for potential use as plasma-facing materials (PFMs) in fusion reactors. PFMs in fusion reactors will be bombarded with x-rays, neutrons, and ions of hydrogen and helium. More needs to be understood about the interactions between the plasma and the materials to validate their use for fusion reactors. The MITE-E simulates some of the fusion reactor conditions by holding samples at temperatures up to 1000 °C while irradiating them with helium or deuterium ions with energies from 10 to 150 keV. The ion gun can irradiate the samples with ion currents of 20 μA-500 μA; the typical current used is 72 μA, which is an average flux of 9 × 10(14) ions/(cm(2) s). The ion gun uses electrostatic lenses to extract and shape the ion beam. A variable power (1-20 W), steady-state, Nd:YAG laser provides additional heating to maintain a constant sample temperature during irradiations. The ion beam current reaching the sample is directly measured and monitored in real-time during irradiations. The ion beam profile has been investigated using a copper sample sputtering experiment. The MITE-E has successfully been used to irradiate polycrystalline and single crystal tungsten samples with helium ions and will continue to be a source of important data for plasma interactions with materials. PMID:27587118

  8. The materials irradiation experiment for testing plasma facing materials at fusion relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, L. M.; Zenobia, S. J.; Egle, B. J.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F.

    2016-08-01

    The Materials Irradiation Experiment (MITE-E) was constructed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Laboratory to test materials for potential use as plasma-facing materials (PFMs) in fusion reactors. PFMs in fusion reactors will be bombarded with x-rays, neutrons, and ions of hydrogen and helium. More needs to be understood about the interactions between the plasma and the materials to validate their use for fusion reactors. The MITE-E simulates some of the fusion reactor conditions by holding samples at temperatures up to 1000 °C while irradiating them with helium or deuterium ions with energies from 10 to 150 keV. The ion gun can irradiate the samples with ion currents of 20 μA-500 μA; the typical current used is 72 μA, which is an average flux of 9 × 1014 ions/(cm2 s). The ion gun uses electrostatic lenses to extract and shape the ion beam. A variable power (1-20 W), steady-state, Nd:YAG laser provides additional heating to maintain a constant sample temperature during irradiations. The ion beam current reaching the sample is directly measured and monitored in real-time during irradiations. The ion beam profile has been investigated using a copper sample sputtering experiment. The MITE-E has successfully been used to irradiate polycrystalline and single crystal tungsten samples with helium ions and will continue to be a source of important data for plasma interactions with materials.

  9. Investigation of in-reactor creep and irradiation growth of zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium channel tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, V. V.; Platonov, P. A.; Ivanov, A. N.; Frolov, I. A.

    1980-05-01

    We summarize the diametral creep results obtained in the MR reactor of the Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy on zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium pressure tubes of the type used in RBMK-1000 power reactors. The experiments that lasted up to 30 000 h cover a temperature range of 270 to 350°C, neutron fluxes between 0.6 and 4.0 ×10 13n/ cm2 · s ( E > 1 MeV) and stresses of up to 16 kgf/mm 2. Diametral strains of up to 4.8% have been measured. In-reactor creep results have been analyzed in terms of thermal and irradiation creep components assuming them to be additive. The thermal creep rate is given by a relationship of the type ɛth = A1exp [( A2 + A3 σt) T] and the irradiation component by ɛrad = A4 σtø( T - A5), where T = temperature, σ t = hoop stress, ø = neutron flux and a1 to A5 are constants. Irradiation growth experiments carried out at 280° C on specimens machined from pressure tubes showed a non-linear dependence of growth strain on neutron fluence up to neutron fluences of 5 × 10 20 n/cm 2. The significance of these results to the elongation of RBMK reactor pressure tubes is discussed.

  10. 75 FR 67636 - Physical Protection of Shipments of Irradiated Reactor Fuel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... rule was published on October 13, 2010 (75 FR 62695), and the public comment period runs through... ``irradiated reactor fuel'' and ``spent nuclear fuel'' (SNF) are used interchangeably). The NRC has prepared...

  11. IRRADIATION TESTING OF THE RERTR FUEL MINIPLATES WITH BURNABLE ABSORBERS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    I. Glagolenko; D. Wachs; N. Woolstenhulme; G. Chang; B. Rabin; C. Clark; T. Wiencek

    2010-10-01

    Based on the results of the reactor physics assessment, conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) can be potentially accomplished in two ways, by either using U-10Mo monolithic or U-7Mo dispersion type plates in the ATR fuel element. Both designs, however, would require incorporation of the burnable absorber in several plates of the fuel element to compensate for the excess reactivity and to flatten the radial power profile. Several different types of burnable absorbers were considered initially, but only borated compounds, such as B4C, ZrB2 and Al-B alloys, were selected for testing primarily due to the length of the ATR fuel cycle and fuel manufacturing constraints. To assess and compare irradiation performance of the U-Mo fuels with different burnable absorbers we have designed and manufactured 28 RERTR miniplates (20 fueled and 8 non-fueled) containing fore-mentioned borated compounds. These miniplates will be tested in the ATR as part of the RERTR-13 experiment, which is described in this paper. Detailed plate design, compositions and irradiations conditions are discussed.

  12. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated at ˜400°C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloczko, M. B.; Garner, F. A.; Eiholzer, C. R.

    1998-10-01

    Irradiation creep of three ferritic alloys at ˜400 ∘C has been studied. Specimens were in the form of pressurized tubes. In a joint US/UK creep study, two identical sets of creep specimens constructed from one heat of HT9 were irradiated in fast reactors, one in the Prototypic Fast Reactor (PFR) and the other in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The specimens in PFR were irradiated to a dose of ˜50 dpa, whereas the specimens in FFTF were irradiated to a dose of 165 dpa. The observed swelling and creep behavior were very different in the two reactors. Creep specimens constructed from D57, a developmental alloy ferritic alloy, were also irradiated in PFR to a dose of ˜50 dpa. Creep behavior typical of previous studies on ferritic alloys was observed. Finally, creep specimens constructed from MA957, a Y 2O 3 dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy, were irradiated in FFTF to a dose of ˜110 dpa. This alloy exhibited a large amount of densification, and the creep behavior was different than observed in more conventional ferritic or ferritic-martensitic alloys.

  13. Irradiation creep in austenitic and ferritic steels irradiated in a tailored neutron spectrum to induce fusion reactor levels of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Gibson, L.T.; Jitsukawa, S.

    1996-04-01

    Six austenitic stainless steels and two ferritic alloys were irradiated sequentially in two research reactors where the neutron spectrum was tailored to produce a He production rate typical of a fusion device. Irradiation began in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor where an atomic displacement level of 7.4 dpa was achieved and was then transferred to the High Flux Isotope Reactor for the remainder of the irradiation to a total displacement level of 19 dpa. Temperatures of 60 and 330{degree}C are reported on. At 330{degree}C irradiation creep was found to be linear in stress and fluence with rates in the range of 1.7 - 5.5 x 10{sup -4}% MPa{sup -1} dpa{sup -1}. Annealed and cold-worked materials exhibited similar creep rates. There is some indication that austenitic alloys with TiC or TiO precipitates had a slightly higher irradiation creep rate than those without. The ferritic alloys HT-9 and Fe-16Cr had irradiatoin creep rates about 0.5 x 10{sup -4}% MPa{sup -1} dpa{sup -1}. No meaningful data could be obtained from the tubes irradiated at 60{degree}C because of damage to the tubes.

  14. LIGHT WATER REACTOR ACCIDENT TOLERANT FUELS IRRADIATION TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Carmack, William Jonathan; Barrett, Kristine Eloise; Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) experiments is to test novel fuel and cladding concepts designed to replace the current zirconium alloy uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel system. The objective of this Research and Development (R&D) is to develop novel ATF concepts that will be able to withstand loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period than the current fuel system while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, design basis, and beyond design basis events. It was necessary to design, analyze, and fabricate drop-in capsules to meet the requirements for testing under prototypic LWR temperatures in Idaho National Laboratory's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). Three industry led teams and one DOE team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory provided fuel rodlet samples for their new concepts for ATR insertion in 2015. As-built projected temperature calculations were performed on the ATF capsules using the BISON fuel performance code. BISON is an application of INL’s Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE), which is a massively parallel finite element based framework used to solve systems of fully coupled nonlinear partial differential equations. Both 2D and 3D models were set up to examine cladding and fuel performance.

  15. Characterization of the fast neutron irradiation facility of the Portuguese Research Reactor after core conversion.

    PubMed

    Marques, J G; Sousa, M; Santos, J P; Fernandes, A C

    2011-08-01

    The fast neutron irradiation facility of the Portuguese Research Reactor was characterized after the reduction in uranium enrichment and rearrangement of the core configuration. In this work we report on the determination of the hardness parameter and the 1MeV equivalent neutron flux along the facility, in the new irradiation conditions, following ASTM E722 standard. PMID:21071234

  16. Sample Heat, Activity, Reactivity, and Dose Analysis for Safety Analysis of Irradiations in a Research Reactor.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1987-12-01

    SHARDA is a program for assessing sample heating rates, activities produced and reactivity load caused while irradiating a small sample in a well thermalized research reactor like CIRUS. It estimates the sample cooling or lead shielding requirements to limit the gamma-ray dose rates due to the irradiated sample within permissible levels.

  17. 10 CFR Appendix D to Part 73 - Physical Protection of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit, Training Program Subject Schedule

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit, Training Program Subject Schedule Pursuant to the provision of § 73.37 of 10 CFR part 73, each licensee who transports or delivers to a carrier for transport irradiated... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Physical Protection of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in...

  18. Multiscale Simulation of Thermo-mechanical Processes in Irradiated Fission-reactor Materials

    SciTech Connect

    El-Azab, Anter

    2012-05-28

    This report contains a summary of progress made on the subtask area on phase field model development for microstructure evolution in irradiated materials, which was a part of the Computational Materials Science Network (CMSN) project entitled: Multiscale Simulation of Thermo-mechanical Processes in Irradiated Fission-reactor Materials. The model problem chosen has been that of void nucleation and growth under irradiation conditions in single component systems.

  19. Investigation of parameters of interaction of hydrogen isotopes with liquid lithium and lithium capillary-porous system under reactor irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazhibayeva, I. L.; Kulsartov, T. V.; Gordienko, Yu. N.; Zaurbekova, Zh. A.; Ponkratov, Yu. V.; Barsukov, N. I.; Tulubayev, Ye. Yu.; Baklanov, V. V.; Gnyrya, V. S.; Kenzhin, Ye. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the effect of reactor irradiation on the processes of interaction of hydrogen with liquid lithium and a lithium capillary-porous system (CPS) is considered. The experiments are carried out by the gas-absorption method with use of a specially designed ampoule device. The results of investigation of the interaction of hydrogen with liquid lithium and a lithium CPS under conditions of reactor irradiation are described; namely, these are the temperature dependences of the rate constant for the interaction of hydrogen with liquid lithium at different reactor powers, the activation energies of the processes, and the pre-exponential factor in the Arrhenius dependence. The effect of increasing absorption of hydrogen by the samples under investigation as a result of the reactor irradiation is fixed. The effect can be explained by increasing mobility of hydrogen in liquid lithium due to hot spots in lithium bulk and the interaction of helium and tritium ions (formed as a result of the nuclear reaction of 6Li with neutron) with a surface hydride film.

  20. Investigation of parameters of interaction of hydrogen isotopes with liquid lithium and lithium capillary-porous system under reactor irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tazhibayeva, I. L. Kulsartov, T. V.; Gordienko, Yu. N.; Zaurbekova, Zh. A.; Ponkratov, Yu. V.; Barsukov, N. I.; Tulubayev, Ye. Yu.; Baklanov, V. V.; Gnyrya, V. S.; Kenzhin, Ye. A.

    2015-12-15

    In this study, the effect of reactor irradiation on the processes of interaction of hydrogen with liquid lithium and a lithium capillary-porous system (CPS) is considered. The experiments are carried out by the gas-absorption method with use of a specially designed ampoule device. The results of investigation of the interaction of hydrogen with liquid lithium and a lithium CPS under conditions of reactor irradiation are described; namely, these are the temperature dependences of the rate constant for the interaction of hydrogen with liquid lithium at different reactor powers, the activation energies of the processes, and the pre-exponential factor in the Arrhenius dependence. The effect of increasing absorption of hydrogen by the samples under investigation as a result of the reactor irradiation is fixed. The effect can be explained by increasing mobility of hydrogen in liquid lithium due to hot spots in lithium bulk and the interaction of helium and tritium ions (formed as a result of the nuclear reaction of {sup 6}Li with neutron) with a surface hydride film.

  1. Present status of the medical irradiation facility at the Musashi reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Aizawa, O.; Nozaki, T.; Sato, T. )

    1989-07-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of malignant brain tumors has been efficiently performed since March 1977, and the first human case of malignant melanoma was also successfully treated on July 1987 in our reactor (Musashi reactor, TRIGA-II, 100 kW). To obtain both good irradiation field characteristics and a better irradiation facility, some tests and developments have been continued in accordance with the study of medical and biological irradiations. The results of these evaluations and a new approach are presented.6 references.

  2. Post-irradiation Examination of the AGR-1 Experiment: Plans and Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Demkowicz

    2001-10-01

    Abstract – The AGR-1 irradiation experiment contains seventy-two individual cylindrical fuel compacts (25 mm long x 12.5 mm diameter) each containing approximately 4100 TRISO-coated uranium oxycarbide fuel particles. The experiment accumulated 620 effective full power days in the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory with peak burnups exceeding 19% FIMA. An extensive post-irradiation examination campaign will be performed on the AGR-1 fuel in order to characterize the irradiated fuel properties, assess the in-pile fuel performance in terms of coating integrity and fission metals release, and determine the fission product retention behavior during high temperature accident testing. PIE experiments will include dimensional measurements of fuel and irradiated graphite, burnup measurements, assessment of fission metals release during irradiation, evaluation of coating integrity using the leach-burn-leach technique, microscopic examination of kernel and coating microstructures, and accident testing of the fuel in helium at temperatures up to 1800°C. Activities completed to date include opening of the irradiated capsules, measurement of fuel dimensions, and gamma spectrometry of selected fuel compacts.

  3. Fabrication, Inspection, and Test Plan for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) High-Power Mixed-Oxide (MOX) Fuel Irradiation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wachs, G. W.

    1998-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Disposition Program (FMDP) has announced that reactor irradiation of Mixed-Oxide (MOX) fuel is one of the preferred alternatives for disposal of surplus weapons-usable plutonium (Pu). MOX fuel has been utilized domestically in test reactors and on an experimental basis in a number of Commercial Light Water Reactors (CLWRs). Most of this experience has been with Pu derived from spent low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, known as reactor grade (RG) Pu. The High-Power MOX fuel test will be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to provide preliminary data to demonstrate that the unique properties of surplus weapons-derived or weapons-grade (WG) plutonium (Pu) do not compromise the applicability of this MOX experience base. The purpose of the high-power experiment, in conjunction with the currently ongoing average-power experiment at the ATR, is to contribute new information concerning the response of WG plutonium under more severe irradiation conditions typical of the peak power locations in commercial reactors. In addition, the high-power test will contribute experience with irradiation of gallium-containing fuel to the database required for resolution of generic CLWR fuel design issues. The distinction between "high-power" and "average-power" relates to the position within the nominal CLWR core. The high-power test project is subject to a number of requirements, as discussed in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light Water Reactor Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation High-Power Test Project Plan (ORNL/MD/LTR-125).

  4. Reactor Materials Program electrochemical potential measurements by ORNL with unirradiated and irradiated stainless steel specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, E.W.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1993-07-01

    Effect of irradiation of stainless steel on electrochemical potential (ECP) was investigated by measurements in dilute HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solutions, conditions simulating reactor moderator. The electrodes were made from unirradiated/irradiated, unsensitized/sensitized specimens from R-reactor piping. Results were inconclusive because of budgetary restrictions. The dose rate may have been too small to produce a significant radiolytic effect. Neither the earlier CERT corrosion susceptibility tests nor the present ECP measurements showed a pronounced effect of irradiation on susceptibility of the stainless steel to IGSCC; this is confirmed by the absence in the stainless steel of the SRS reactor tanks (except for the C Reactor tank knuckle area).

  5. Survey of Worldwide Light Water Reactor Experience with Mixed Uranium-Plutonium Oxide Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Cowell, B.S.; Fisher, S.E.

    1999-02-01

    The US and the Former Soviet Union (FSU) have recently declared quantities of weapons materials, including weapons-grade (WG) plutonium, excess to strategic requirements. One of the leading candidates for the disposition of excess WG plutonium is irradiation in light water reactors (LWRs) as mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel. A description of the MOX fuel fabrication techniques in worldwide use is presented. A comprehensive examination of the domestic MOX experience in US reactors obtained during the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s is also presented. This experience is described by manufacturer and is also categorized by the reactor facility that irradiated the MOX fuel. A limited summary of the international experience with MOX fuels is also presented. A review of MOX fuel and its performance is conducted in view of the special considerations associated with the disposition of WG plutonium. Based on the available information, it appears that adoption of foreign commercial MOX technology from one of the successful MOX fuel vendors will minimize the technical risks to the overall mission. The conclusion is made that the existing MOX fuel experience base suggests that disposition of excess weapons plutonium through irradiation in LWRs is a technically attractive option.

  6. Irradiation Experiment Conceptual Design Parameters for NBSR Fuel Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Brown N. R.; Brown,N.R.; Baek,J.S; Hanson, A.L.; Cuadra,A.; Cheng,L.Y.; Diamond, D.J.

    2013-03-31

    It has been proposed to convert the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor, known as the NBSR, from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The motivation to convert the NBSR to LEU fuel is to reduce the risk of proliferation of special nuclear material. This report is a compilation of relevant information from recent studies related to the proposed conversion using a metal alloy of LEU with 10 w/o molybdenum. The objective is to inform the design of the mini-plate and full-size plate irradiation experiments that are being planned. This report provides relevant dimensions of the fuel elements, and the following parameters at steady state: average and maximum fission rate density and fission density, fuel temperature distribution for the plate with maximum local temperature, and two-dimensional heat flux profiles of fuel plates with high power densities. . The latter profiles are given for plates in both the inner and outer core zones and for cores with both fresh and depleted shim arms (reactivity control devices). In addition, a summary of the methodology to obtain these results is presented.

  7. Irradiation Experiment Conceptual Design Parameters for NBSR Fuel Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N. R.; Brown, N. R.; Baek, J. S; Hanson, A. L.; Cuadra, A.; Cheng, L. Y.; Diamond, D. J.

    2014-04-30

    It has been proposed to convert the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor, known as the NBSR, from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-Enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The motivation to convert the NBSR to LEU fuel is to reduce the risk of proliferation of special nuclear material. This report is a compilation of relevant information from recent studies related to the proposed conversion using a metal alloy of LEU with 10 w/o molybdenum. The objective is to inform the design of the mini-plate and full-size-Plate irradiation experiments that are being planned. This report provides relevant dimensions of the fuel elements, and the following parameters at steady state: average and maximum fission rate density and fission density, fuel temperature distribution for the plate with maximum local temperature, and two-dimensional heat flux profiles of fuel plates with high power densities. The latter profiles are given for plates in both the inner and outer core zones and for cores with both fresh and depleted shim arms (reactivity control devices). A summary of the methodology to obtain these results is presented. Fuel element tolerance assumptions and hot channel factors used in the safety analysis are also given.

  8. Treatment of opium alkaloid containing wastewater in sequencing batch reactor (SBR)—Effect of gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bural, Cavit B.; Demirer, Goksel N.; Kantoglu, Omer; Dilek, Filiz B.

    2010-04-01

    Aerobic biological treatment of opium alkaloid containing wastewater as well as the effect of gamma irradiation as pre-treatment was investigated. Biodegradability of raw wastewater was assessed in aerobic batch reactors and was found highly biodegradable (83-90% degradation). The effect of irradiation (40 and 140 kGy) on biodegradability was also evaluated in terms of BOD 5/COD values and results revealed that irradiation imparted no further enhancement in the biodegradability. Despite the highly biodegradable nature of wastewater, further experiments in sequencing batch reactors (SBR) revealed that the treatment operation was not possible due to sludge settleability problem observed beyond an influent COD value of 2000 mg dm -3. Possible reasons for this problem were investigated, and the high molecular weight, large size and aromatic structure of the organic pollutants present in wastewater was thought to contribute to poor settleability. Initial efforts to solve this problem by modifying the operational conditions, such as SRT reduction, failed. However, further operational modifications including addition of phosphate buffer cured the settleability problem and influent COD was increased up to 5000 mg dm -3. Significant COD removal efficiencies (>70%) were obtained in both SBRs fed with original and irradiated wastewaters (by 40 kGy). However, pre-irradiated wastewater provided complete thebain removal and a better settling sludge, which was thought due to degradation of complex structure by radiation application. Degradation of the structure was observed by GC/MS analyses and enhancement in filterability tests.

  9. Uncertainty analysis of fission fraction for reactor antineutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X. B.; Lu, F.; Wang, L. Z.; Chen, Y. X.; Zhong, W. L.; An, F. P.

    2016-06-01

    Reactor simulation is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. Therefore, how to evaluate the antineutrino flux uncertainty results from reactor simulation is an important question. In this study, a method of the antineutrino flux uncertainty result from reactor simulation was proposed by considering the correlation coefficient. In order to use this method in the Daya Bay antineutrino experiment, the open source code DRAGON was improved and used for obtaining the fission fraction and correlation coefficient. The average fission fraction between DRAGON and SCIENCE code was compared and the difference was less than 5% for all the four isotopes. The uncertainty of fission fraction was evaluated by comparing simulation atomic density of four main isotopes with Takahama-3 experiment measurement. After that, the uncertainty of the antineutrino flux results from reactor simulation was evaluated as 0.6% per core for Daya Bay antineutrino experiment.

  10. In vitro irradiation system for radiobiological experiments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although two-dimensional (2-D) monolayer cell cultures provide important information on basic tumor biology and radiobiology, they are not representative of the complexity of three-dimensional (3-D) solid tumors. In particular, new models reproducing clinical conditions as closely as possible are needed for radiobiological studies to provide information that can be translated from bench to bedside. Methods We developed a novel system for the irradiation, under sterile conditions, of 3-D tumor spheroids, the in vitro model considered as a bridge between the complex architectural organization of in vivo tumors and the very simple one of in vitro monolayer cell cultures. The system exploits the same equipment as that used for patient treatments, without the need for dedicated and highly expensive instruments. To mimic the passage of radiation beams through human tissues before they reach the target tumor mass, 96-multiwell plates containing the multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are inserted into a custom-built phantom made of plexiglass, the material most similar to water, the main component of human tissue. Results The system was used to irradiate CAEP- and A549-derived MCTS, pre-treated or not with 20 μM cisplatin, with a dose of 20 Gy delivered in one session. We also tested the same treatment schemes on monolayer CAEP and A549 cells. Our preliminary results indicated a significant increment in radiotoxicity 20 days after the end of irradiation in the CAEP spheroids pre-treated with cisplatin compared to those treated with cisplatin or irradiation alone. Conversely, the effect of the radio- chemotherapy combination in A549-derived MCTS was similar to that induced by cisplatin or irradiation alone. Finally, the 20 Gy dose did not affect cell survival in monolayer CAEP and A549 cells, whereas cisplatin or cisplatin plus radiation caused 100% cell death, regardless of the type of cell line used. Conclusions We set up a system for the irradiation

  11. Analysis of the DHCE experiment in the position A10 of the ATR reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L.; Tsai, H.

    1997-08-01

    Calculations were performed to assess the possibility of performing DHCE experiments in mixed spectrum fission reactors. Calculated values of key parameters were compared with limit values for each quantity. The values calculated were: He-4 production from the {sup 6}Li(n,t){sup 4}He reaction, tritium leakage, required tritium concentration in lithium, initial tritium charge per capsule, and helium to dpa ratio after 10 dpa of irradiation.

  12. Study of in-reactor creep of vanadium alloy in the HFIR RB-12J experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, R.V.; Konicek, C.F.; Tsai, H.

    1996-10-01

    Biaxial creep specimens will be included in the HFIR RB-12J experiment to study in-reactor creep of the V-4Cr-4Ti alloy at {approx}500{degrees}C and 5 dpa. These specimens were fabricated with the 500-kg, heat (832665) material and pressurized to attain 0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 MPa mid-wall hoop stresses during the irradiation.

  13. Recent reactor testing and experience with gamma thermometers

    SciTech Connect

    Waring, J.P.; Smith, R.D.

    1983-02-01

    Recent experience with gamma thermometers for light water reactors has primarily been in the Framatome reactors operated by Electricite de France. Other recent testing has taken place at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Otto Hahn ship reactor. Earlier experience with gamma thermometers was in heavy water reactors at Savannah River and Halden. This paper presents recent data from the light water reactor (LWR) programs. The principles of design and operation of the Radcal gamma thermometer were presented in ''Gamma Thermometer Developments for Light Water Reactors'', Leyse and Smith/sup 1/. Observations from LWRs confirm the earlier experience from heavy water reactors that the gamma thermometer units give signals which are proportional to the power of surrounding fuel rods and virtually independent of exposure, surrounding poison and other conditions which affect signals of neutron sensitive devices. After 200 sensor-years in EdF reactors, there has been no change in the sensitivity of the devices. Nonetheless, the Radcal units can be recalibrated in-reactor by the introduction of electrical heating via a heater cable imbedded in the device. Algorithms and signal processing software have been developed to interpret and display the gamma thermometer signals. The results of this processing are illustrated here.

  14. Review on θ13 Measurements from Reactor Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo-Bong

    2015-03-01

    Definitive measurements of the smallest neutrino mixing angle θ13 were made by Daya Bay, Double Chooz and RENO experiments in 2012, based on the disappearance of electron antineutrinos emitted from reactors. The new generation reactor experiments have significantly improved a sensitivity for θ13 down to the sin2(2θ13) ~ 0.01 level. A rather large value of θ13 has opened a new window to find the CP violation phase and to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. The θ13 measurements by the three reactor experiments are presented with their future expected sensitivities.

  15. An Improved Design of a Simple Tubular Reactor Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asfour, Abdul-Fattah A.

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for an experiment which: (1) examines the effect of residence time on conversion in a tubular flow reactor; and (2) compares the experimental conversions with those obtained from plug-flow and laminar-flow reactor models. (JN)

  16. 139. ARAIII Index of drwaings of gascooled reactor experiment buildings. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    139. ARA-III Index of drwaings of gas-cooled reactor experiment buildings. Aerojet-general 880-area/GCRE-100. Date: February 1958. Ineel index code no. 063-9999-80-013-102505. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Simultaneously photocatalytic treatment of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) using rotating reactor under solar irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngji; Joo, Hyunku; Her, Namguk; Yoon, Yeomin; Sohn, Jinsik; Kim, Sungpyo; Yoon, Jaekyung

    2015-05-15

    In this study, simultaneous treatments, reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and oxidation of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), such as bisphenol A (BPA), 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) and 17β-estradiol (E2), were investigated with a rotating photocatalytic reactor including TiO₂ nanotubes formed on titanium mesh substrates under solar UV irradiation. In the laboratory tests with a rotating type I reactor, synergy effects of the simultaneous photocatalytic reduction and oxidation of inorganic (Cr(VI)) and organic (BPA) pollutants were achieved. Particularly, the concurrent photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidation of BPA was higher under acidic conditions. The enhanced reaction efficiency of both pollutants was attributed to a stronger charge interaction between TiO₂ nanotubes (positive charge) and the anionic form of Cr(VI) (negative charge), which are prevented recombination (electron-hole pair) by the hole scavenging effect of BPA. In the extended outdoor tests with a rotating type II reactor under solar irradiation, the experiment was extended to examine the simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) in the presence of additional EDCs, such as EE2 and E2 as well as BPA. The findings showed that synergic effect of both photocatalytic reduction and oxidation was confirmed with single-component (Cr(VI) only), two-components (Cr(VI)/BPA, Cr(VI)/EE2, and Cr(VI)/E2), and four-components (Cr(VI)/BPA/EE2/E2) under various solar irradiation conditions. PMID:25698573

  18. Development of a multi-physics calculation platform dedicated to irradiation devices in a material testing reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bonaccorsi, T.; Di Salvo, J.; Aggery, A.; D'Aletto, C.; Doederlein, C.; Sireta, P.; Willermoz, G.; Daniel, M.

    2006-07-01

    The physical phenomena involved in irradiation devices within material testing reactors are complex (neutron and photon interactions, nuclear heating, thermal hydraulics, ...). However, the simulation of these phenomena requires a high precision in order to control the condition of the experiment and the development of predictive models. Until now, physicists use different tools with several approximations at each interface. The aim of this work is to develop a calculation platform dedicated to numerical multi-physics simulations of irradiation devices in the future European Jules Horowitz Reactor [1], This platform is based on a multi-physics data model which describes geometries, materials and state parameters associated with a sequence of thematic (neutronics, thermal hydraulics...) computations of these devices. Once the computation is carried out, the results can be returned to the data model (DM). The DM is encapsulated in a dedicated module of the SALOME platform [2] and exchanges data with SALOME native modules. This method allows a parametric description of a study, independent of the code used to perform the simulation. The application proposed in this paper concerns neutronic calculation of a fuel irradiation device with the new method of characteristics implemented in the APOLLO2 code [3]. The device is located at the periphery of the OSIRIS core. This choice is motivated by the possibility to compare the calculation with experimental results, which cannot be done for the Jules Horowitz Reactor, currently in design study phase. (authors)

  19. Thermomechanical simulation of the DIAMINO irradiation experiment using the LICOS fuel design code

    SciTech Connect

    Bejaoui, S.; Helfer, T.; Brunon, E.; Lambert, T.; Bendotti, S.; Neyroud, C.

    2013-07-01

    Two separate-effect experiments in the HFR and OSIRIS Material Test Reactors (MTRs) are currently under Post- Irradiation Examinations (MARIOS) and under preparation (DIAMINO) respectively. The main goal of these experiments is to investigate gaseous release and swelling of Am-bearing UO2-x fuels as a function of temperature, fuel microstructure and gas production rate. First, a brief description of the MARIOS and DIAMINO irradiations is provided. Then, the innovative experimental in-pile device specifically developed for the DIAMINO experiment is described. Eventually, the thermo-mechanical computations performed using the LICOS code are presented. These simulations support the DIAMINO experimental design and highlight some of the capabilities of the code. (authors)

  20. System Requirements Document for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aigner, R.D.

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of the conversion process is to convert the {sup 233}U fluoride compounds that are being extracted from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) equipment to a stable oxide for long-term storage at Bldg. 3019.

  1. Displacement damage effects on CMOS APS image sensors induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zujun Huang, Shaoyan; Liu, Minbo; Xiao, Zhigang; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Sheng, Jiangkun

    2014-07-15

    The experiments of displacement damage effects on CMOS APS image sensors induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor are presented. The CMOS APS image sensors are manufactured in the standard 0.35 μm CMOS technology. The flux of neutron beams was about 1.33 × 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}s. The three samples were exposed by 1 MeV neutron equivalent-fluence of 1 × 10{sup 11}, 5 × 10{sup 11}, and 1 × 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The mean dark signal (K{sub D}), dark signal spike, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), noise (V{sub N}), saturation output signal voltage (V{sub S}), and dynamic range (DR) versus neutron fluence are investigated. The degradation mechanisms of CMOS APS image sensors are analyzed. The mean dark signal increase due to neutron displacement damage appears to be proportional to displacement damage dose. The dark images from CMOS APS image sensors irradiated by neutrons are presented to investigate the generation of dark signal spike.

  2. A target station for plasma exposure of neutron irradiated fusion material samples to reactor relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Juergen; Giuliano, Dominic; Ellis, Ronald; Howard, Richard; Lore, Jeremy; Lumsdaine, Arnold; Lessard, Timothy; McGinnis, William; Meitner, Steven; Owen, Larry; Varma, Venugopal

    2015-11-01

    The Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) is a device planned to address scientific and technological gaps for the development of viable plasma facing components for fusion reactor conditions (FNSF, DEMO). It will have to address the relevant plasma conditions in a reactor divertor (electron density, electron temperature, ion fluxes) and it needs to be able to expose a-priori neutron irradiated samples. A pre design of a target station able to handle activated materials will be presented. This includes detailed MCNP as well as SCALE and MAVRIC calculations for all potential plasma-facing materials to estimate dose rates. Details on the remote handling schemes for the material samples will be presented. 2 point modeling of the linear plasma transport has been used to scope out the parameter range of the anticipated power fluxes to the target. This has been used to design the cooling capability of the target. The operational conditions of surface temperatures, plasma conditions, and oblique angle of incidence of magnetic field to target surface will be discussed. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  3. Long-lived activation products in TRIGA Mark II research reactor concrete shield: calculation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žagar, Tomaž; Božič, Matjaž; Ravnik, Matjaž

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, a process of long-lived activity determination in research reactor concrete shielding is presented. The described process is a combination of experiment and calculations. Samples of original heavy reactor concrete containing mineral barite were irradiated inside the reactor shielding to measure its long-lived induced radioactivity. The most active long-lived (γ emitting) radioactive nuclides in the concrete were found to be 133Ba, 60Co and 152Eu. Neutron flux, activation rates and concrete activity were calculated for actual shield geometry for different irradiation and cooling times using TORT and ORIGEN codes. Experimental results of flux and activity measurements showed good agreement with the results of calculations. Volume of activated concrete waste after reactor decommissioning was estimated for particular case of Jožef Stefan Institute TRIGA reactor. It was observed that the clearance levels of some important long-lived isotopes typical for barite concrete (e.g. 133Ba, 41Ca) are not included in the IAEA and EU basic safety standards.

  4. Development of material irradiation rig with precision temperature control in experimental fast reactor JOYO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, H.; Yasu, T.; Takatsudo, H.; Miyakawa, S.

    1998-10-01

    In the experimental fast reactor JOYO, an on-line instrumented material irradiation rig has been developed to acquire various irradiation data. Material Testing Rig with Temperature Control (MARICO) is capable of collecting creep rupture strength data for fast reactor fuel cladding materials. The specimen temperature in the MARICO-1 rig is controlled with an accuracy of ±4°C by the use of a gas gap method similar to that of FFTF/MOTA. Presently, irradiation testing using MARICO-1 has been so successful that the development of MARICO-2 is under way for completion by the early part of the next century. MARICO-2 will contain an electrical heater for temperature control, a larger irradiation space and other data collecting improvements.

  5. Irradiation performance of (Th,Pu)O2 fuel under Pressurized Water Reactor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boer, B.; Lemehov, S.; Wéber, M.; Parthoens, Y.; Gysemans, M.; McGinley, J.; Somers, J.; Verwerft, M.

    2016-04-01

    This paper examines the in-pile safety performance of (Th,Pu)O2 fuel pins under simulated Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) conditions. Both sol-gel and SOLMAS produced (Th,Pu)O2 fuels at enrichments of 7.9% and 12.8% in Pu/HM have been irradiated at SCK·CEN. The irradiation has been performed under PWR conditions (155 bar, 300 °C) in a dedicated loop of the BR-2 reactor. The loop is instrumented with flow and temperature monitors at inlet and outlet, which allow for an accurate measurement of the deposited enthalpy.

  6. Systems and methods for processing irradiation targets through a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Dayal, Yogeshwar; Saito, Earl F.; Berger, John F.; Brittingham, Martin W.; Morales, Stephen K.; Hare, Jeffrey M.

    2016-05-03

    Apparatuses and methods produce radioisotopes in instrumentation tubes of operating commercial nuclear reactors. Irradiation targets may be inserted and removed from instrumentation tubes during operation and converted to radioisotopes otherwise unavailable during operation of commercial nuclear reactors. Example apparatuses may continuously insert, remove, and store irradiation targets to be converted to useable radioisotopes or other desired materials at several different origin and termination points accessible outside an access barrier such as a containment building, drywell wall, or other access restriction preventing access to instrumentation tubes during operation of the nuclear plant.

  7. The Irradiation Facility at the IBR-2M Reactor in Dubna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulavin, M.; Cheplakov, A.; Kulikov, S.; Kukhtin, V.; Shabalin, E.; Verhoglyadov, A.

    2014-06-01

    After renovation neutron pulsed reactor was successfully put into operation. In view of HL-LHC development, the irradiation facility at the IBR-2m, previously used for the ATLAS Liquid Argon calorimeters electronics and materials certification, has been upgraded to permit accumulation in the warm temperature conditions of the fast neutrons fluences up to k*1017 n/cm2 per one standard reactor operation cycle - 11 days. The first test of materials for ATLAS was conducted.

  8. Results on θ13 Neutrino Oscillations from Reactor Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo-Bong

    2014-03-01

    Definitive measurements of the smallest neutrino mixing angle θ13 were made by Daya Bay, Double Chooz and RENO in 2012, based on the disappearance of electron antineutrinos emitted from reactors. The new generation reactor experiments have significantly improved a sensitivity for θ13 down to the sin2(2θ13)~0.01 level using two identical detectors of 10 ~ 40 tons at near (300 ~ 400 m) and far (1 ~ 2 km) locations. The θ13 measurements by the three reactor experiments are presented with their future expected sensitivities.

  9. Tritium experience in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C.H.; Blanchard, W.; Hosea, J.; Mueller, D.; Nagy, A.; Brooks, J.N.; Hogan, J.

    1998-07-01

    Tritium management is a key enabling element in fusion technology. Tritium fuel was used in 3.5 years of successful deuterium-tritium (D-T) operations in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The D-T campaign enabled TFTR to explore the transport, alpha physics, and MHD stability of a reactor core. It also provided experience with tritium retention and removal that highlighted the importance of these issues in future D-T machines. In this paper, the authors summarize the tritium retention and removal experience in TFTR and its implications for future reactors.

  10. An overview of the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jun; Luk, Kam-Biu

    2016-07-01

    The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment discovered an unexpectedly large neutrino oscillation related to the mixing angle θ13 in 2012. This finding paved the way to the next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments. In this article, we review the history, featured design, and scientific results of Daya Bay. Prospects of the experiment are also described.

  11. Small Specimen Data from a High Temperature HFIR Irradiation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; McDuffee, Joel Lee; Thoms, Kenneth R

    2014-01-01

    The HTV capsule is a High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) target-rod capsule designed to operate at very high temperatures. The graphite containing section of the capsule (in core) is approximately 18 inches (457.2 mm) long and is separated into eight temperature zones. The specimen diameters within each zone are set to achieve the desired gas gap and hence design temperature (900 C, 1200 C or 1500 C). The capsule has five zones containing 0.400 inch (10.16 mm) diameter specimens, two zones containing 0.350 inch (8.89 mm) diameter specimens and one zone containing 0.300 inch (7.62 mm) diameter specimens. The zones have been distributed within the experiment to optimize the gamma heating from the HFIR core as well as minimize the axial heat flow in the capsule. Consequently, there are two 900 C zones, three 1200 C zones, and three 1500 C zones within the HTV capsule. Each zone contains nine specimens 0.210 0.002 inches (5.334 mm) in length. The capsule will be irradiated to a peak dose of 3.17 displacements per atom. The HTV specimens include samples of the following graphite grades: SGL Carbon s NBG-17 and NBG-18, GrafTech s PCEA, Toyo Tanso s IG-110, Mersen s 2114 and the reference grade H-451 (SGL Carbon). As part of the pre-irradiation program the specimens were characterized using ASTM Standards C559 for bulk density, and ASTM C769 for approximate Young s modulus from the sonic velocity. The probe frequency used for the determination of time of flight of the ultrasonic signal was 2.25 MHz. Marked volume (specimen diameter) effects were noted for both bulk density (increased with increasing specimen volume or diameter) and Dynamic Young s modulus (decreased with increasing specimen volume or diameter). These trends are extended by adding the property vs. diameter data for unirradiated AGC-1 creep specimens (nominally 12.5 mm-diameter x 25.4 mm-length). The relatively large reduction in Dynamic Young s Modulus was surprising given the trend for increasing density

  12. ECRIX-H experiment: Synthesis of post-irradiation examinations and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béjaoui, S.; Lamontagne, J.; Esbelin, E.; Bonnerot, J. M.; Brunon, E.; Bourdot, P.

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of the ECRIX-H experiment is to study the behaviour of a composite ceramic target made of AmO 1.62 microdispersed in an MgO matrix irradiated for 318 EFPD in the Phenix sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), in a specific carrier sub-assembly equipped with annular blocks of CaH x acting as a neutron moderator. Results indicate that magnesia-based inert matrix targets display satisfactory behaviour and moderate swelling under irradiation, even for significant quantities of helium produced and a high burn-up. On this basis, the design of transmutation fuel pins for recycling of minor actinides (MA) in accelerator-driven systems (ADS) or in fast neutron reactors (FR) could be optimised so as to increase their performance level (initial MA content, burn-up, etc.). The measured Am fission rate (25 at.%) was found to be lower than that predicted by neutronic simulations probably due to the inaccuracies linked to the complexity of neutron modelling and the uncertainties on nuclear data related to moderated neutron spectrum. In addition, as most of the initial Am transmuted into Pu under irradiation, a PuO x-type phase was created within the initial AmO 1.62 particles, leading to the incomplete dissolution of the irradiated targets under standard reprocessing conditions. This issue will have to be considered and investigated in greater detail for all transmutation fuels and targets devoted to the multi-recycling of MA.

  13. Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Facility 10CFR830 Safety Basis Related to Facility Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tomberlin, Terry Alan

    2002-06-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), a DOE Category A reactor, was designed to provide an irradiation test environment for conducting a variety of experiments. The ATR Safety Analysis Report, determined by DOE to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, provides versatility in types of experiments that may be conducted. This paper addresses two general types of experiments in the ATR facility and how safety analyses for experiments are related to the ATR safety basis. One type of experiment is more routine and generally represents greater risks; therefore this type of experiment is addressed with more detail in the safety basis. This allows individual safety analyses for these experiments to be more routine and repetitive. The second type of experiment is less defined and is permitted under more general controls. Therefore, individual safety analyses for the second type of experiment tend to be more unique from experiment to experiment. Experiments are also discussed relative to "major modifications" and DOE-STD-1027-92. Application of the USQ process to ATR experiments is also discussed.

  14. Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Facility 10CFR830 Safety Basis Related to Facility Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tomberlin, T.A.

    2002-06-19

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), a DOE Category A reactor, was designed to provide an irradiation test environment for conducting a variety of experiments. The ATR Safety Analysis Report, determined by DOE to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, provides versatility in types of experiments that may be conducted. This paper addresses two general types of experiments in the ATR facility and how safety analyses for experiments are related to the ATR safety basis. One type of experiment is more routine and generally represents greater risks; therefore this type of experiment is addressed with more detail in the safety basis. This allows individual safety analyses for these experiments to be more routine and repetitive. The second type of experiment is less defined and is permitted under more general controls. Therefore, individual safety analyses for the second type of experiment tend to be more unique from experiment to experiment. Experiments are also discussed relative to ''major modifications'' and DOE-STD-1027-92. Application of the USQ process to ATR experiments is also discussed.

  15. 10 CFR 73.35 - Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel (100 grams or less) in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... fuel (100 grams or less) in transit. 73.35 Section 73.35 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... Transit § 73.35 Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel (100 grams or less) in... quantity of irradiated reactor fuel weighing 100 grams (0.22 pounds) or less in net weight of...

  16. Plasma Reactor Modeling and Validation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, M.; Bose, D.; Hash, D.; Hwang, H.; Cruden, B.; Sharma, S. P.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Plasma processing is a key processing stop in integrated circuit manufacturing. Low pressure, high density plum reactors are widely used for etching and deposition. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source has become popular recently in many processing applications. In order to accelerate equipment and process design, an understanding of the physics and chemistry, particularly, plasma power coupling, plasma and processing uniformity and mechanism is important. This understanding is facilitated by comprehensive modeling and simulation as well as plasma diagnostics to provide the necessary data for model validation which are addressed in this presentation. We have developed a complete code for simulating an ICP reactor and the model consists of transport of electrons, ions, and neutrals, Poisson's equation, and Maxwell's equation along with gas flow and energy equations. Results will be presented for chlorine and fluorocarbon plasmas and compared with data from Langmuir probe, mass spectrometry and FTIR.

  17. Irradiation performance of HTGR fuel in HFIR experiment HRB-13

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.

    1982-03-01

    Irradiation capsule HRB-13 tested High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) fuel under accelerated conditions in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL. The ORNL part of the capsule was designed to provide definitive results on how variously misshapen kernels affect the irradiation performance of weak-acid-resin (WAR)-derived fissile fuel particles. Two batches of WAR fissile fuel particles were Triso-coated and shape-separated into four different fractions according to their deviation from spericity, which ranged from 9.6 to 29.7%. The fissile particles were irradiated for 7721 h. Heavy-metal burnups ranged from 80 to 82.5% FIMA (fraction of initial heavy-metal atoms). Fast neutron fluences (>0.18 MeV) ranged from 4.9 x 10/sup 25/ neutrons/m/sup 2/ to 8.5 x 10/sup 25/ neutrons/m/sup 2/. Postirradiation examination showed that the two batches of fissile particles contained chlorine, presumably introduced during deposition of the SiC coating.

  18. Irradiation effects in oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys for Gen. IV nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oono, Naoko; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kondo, Sosuke; Hashitomi, Okinobu; Kimura, Akihiko

    2015-10-01

    Oxide particle dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys are irradiated by using simulation technique (Fe/He dual-ion irradiation) to investigate the reliability to Gen. IV high-temperature reactors. The fine oxide particles with less than 10 nm in average size and approximately 8.0 × 1022 m-3 in number density remained after 101 dpa irradiation. The tiny helium bubbles were inside grains, not at grain-boundaries; it is advantageous effect of oxide particles which trap the helium atoms at the particle-matrix interface. Ni-base ODS alloys demonstrated their great ability to overcome He embrittlement.

  19. Collaborative investigations of in-service irradiated material from the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.; Broadhead, B.L.; Suzuki, M.; Kohsaka, A.

    1997-02-01

    There is a need to validate the results of irradiation effects research by the examination of material taken directly from the wall of a pressure vessel that has been irradiated during normal service. Just such an evaluation is currently being conducted on material from the wall of the pressure vessel from the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR). The research is being jointly performed at the Tokai Research Establishment of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-funded Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  20. Double Chooz and a history of reactor θ13 experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suekane, Fumihiko; Junqueira de Castro Bezerra, Thiago

    2016-07-01

    This is a contribution paper from the Double Chooz (DC) experiment to the special issue of Nuclear Physics B on the topics of neutrino oscillations, celebrating the recent Nobel prize to Profs. T. Kajita and A.B. McDonald. DC is a reactor neutrino experiment which measures the last neutrino mixing angle θ13. The DC group presented an indication of disappearance of the reactor neutrinos at a baseline of ∼1 km for the first time in 2011 and is improving the measurement of θ13. DC is a pioneering experiment of this research field. In accordance with the nature of this special issue, physics and history of the reactor-θ13 experiments, as well as the Double Chooz experiment and its neutrino oscillation analyses, are reviewed.

  1. Status of ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low-activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Smith, D.L.; Matsui, H.

    1996-10-01

    The ATR-A1 irradiation experiment was a collaborative U.S./Japan effort to study at low temperature the effects of neutron damage on vanadium alloys. The experiment also contained a limited quantity of low-activation ferritic steel specimens from Japan as part of the collaboration agreement. The irradiation started in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) on November 30, 1995, and ended as planned on May 5, 1996. Total exposure was 132.9 effective full power days (EFPDs) and estimated neutron damage in the vanadium was 4.7 dpa. The vehicle has been discharged from the ATR core and is scheduled to be disassembled in the next reporting period.

  2. New irradiation facility for biomedical applications at the RA-3 reactor thermal column.

    PubMed

    Miller, M; Quintana, J; Ojeda, J; Langan, S; Thorp, S; Pozzi, E; Sztejnberg, M; Estryk, G; Nosal, R; Saire, E; Agrazar, H; Graiño, F

    2009-07-01

    A new irradiation facility has been developed in the RA-3 reactor in order to perform trials for the treatment of liver metastases using boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). RA-3 is a production research reactor that works continuously five days a week. It had a thermal column with a small cross section access tunnel that was not accessible during operation. The objective of the work was to perform the necessary modifications to obtain a facility for irradiating a portion of the human liver. This irradiation facility must be operated without disrupting the normal reactor schedule and requires a highly thermalized neutron spectrum, a thermal flux of around 10(10) n cm(-2)s(-1) that is as isotropic and uniform as possible, as well as on-line instrumentation. The main modifications consist of enlarging the access tunnel inside the thermal column to the suitable dimensions, reducing the gamma dose rate at the irradiation position, and constructing properly shielded entrance gates enabled by logical control to safely irradiate and withdraw samples with the reactor at full power. Activation foils and a neutron shielded graphite ionization chamber were used for a preliminary in-air characterization of the irradiation site. The constructed facility is very practical and easy to use. Operational authorization was obtained from radioprotection personnel after confirming radiation levels did not significantly increase after the modification. A highly thermalized and homogenous irradiation field was obtained. Measurements in the empty cavity showed a thermal flux near 10(10) n cm(-2)s(-1), a cadmium ratio of 4100 for gold foils and a gamma dose rate of approximately 5 Gy h(-1). PMID:19406651

  3. Numerical and experimental determination of neutron characteristics in irradiation rigs operated in LVR-15 research reactor.

    PubMed

    Koleska, Michal; Viererbl, Ladislav; Lahodova, Zdena; Ernest, Jaroslav; Zmitkova, Jelena; Marek, Milan

    2014-10-01

    The LVR-15 reactor is a 10-MW research reactor mostly dedicated to material research and isotope production. Material testing can be performed in various irradiation loops and rigs. For specimen irradiation, several rig constructions can be used, including standard single-cell CHOUCA rigs or special dedicated multi-cell rigs. The temperature in the rigs is controlled by a temperature control system, which can be operated in a stable or pulsed mode, with regard to the rig design. Irradiation conditions in the rig are monitored by a set of various fluence detectors. From these detectors, neutron fluence and its energy distribution can be determined for the whole volume of irradiation samples. Besides measurement, irradiation conditions are calculated by the Monte Carlo code MCNPX, which provides a complete review of irradiation conditions including neutron fluence and its energy distribution in samples and detectors, radiation damage and radiation heating conditions for the rig. A set of experimental and theoretical characteristics for dedicated irradiation positions in the core reflector and in fuel will be provided. PMID:24972899

  4. STATUS OF HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR IRRADIATION OF SILICON CARBIDE/SILICON CARBIDE JOINTS

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Yutai; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Kiggans, Jim; Cetiner, Nesrin; McDuffee, Joel

    2014-09-01

    Development of silicon carbide (SiC) joints that retain adequate structural and functional properties in the anticipated service conditions is a critical milestone toward establishment of advanced SiC composite technology for the accident-tolerant light water reactor (LWR) fuels and core structures. Neutron irradiation is among the most critical factors that define the harsh service condition of LWR fuel during the normal operation. The overarching goal of the present joining and irradiation studies is to establish technologies for joining SiC-based materials for use as the LWR fuel cladding. The purpose of this work is to fabricate SiC joint specimens, characterize those joints in an unirradiated condition, and prepare rabbit capsules for neutron irradiation study on the fabricated specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Torsional shear test specimens of chemically vapor-deposited SiC were prepared by seven different joining methods either at Oak Ridge National Laboratory or by industrial partners. The joint test specimens were characterized for shear strength and microstructures in an unirradiated condition. Rabbit irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated for neutron irradiation of these joint specimens at an LWR-relevant temperature. These rabbit capsules, already started irradiation in HFIR, are scheduled to complete irradiation to an LWR-relevant dose level in early 2015.

  5. 10 CFR 71.97 - Advance notification of shipment of irradiated reactor fuel and nuclear waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... regulations of DOT in 49 CFR 172.202 and 172.203(d); (3) The point of origin of the shipment and the 7-day... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Advance notification of shipment of irradiated reactor fuel and nuclear waste. 71.97 Section 71.97 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED)...

  6. 78 FR 50313 - Physical Protection of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... safety. On May 20, 2013 (78 FR 29520), the NRC published the final rule for 10 CFR 73.37, ``Physical... 3150-AI64 Physical Protection of Irradiated Reactor Fuel in Transit AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Greater than 100 Grams,'' dated October 10, 2002, and subsequent...

  7. 78 FR 31821 - Physical Protection of Shipments of Irradiated Reactor Fuel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ... in the Federal Register on May 20, 2013 (78 FR 29519) (RIN 3150-AI64), that amended its security... public comment on November 3, 2010 (75 FR 67636). The NRC received comments from eight commenters during... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 73 RIN 3150-AI64 Physical Protection of Shipments of Irradiated Reactor Fuel...

  8. 10 CFR 73.37 - Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the Department of Transportation in 49 CFR § 172.202 and § 172.203(d). (iii) A listing of the routes... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel in transit. 73.37 Section 73.37 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED)...

  9. 10 CFR 73.37 - Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... achieve the following objectives: 1 For purposes of 10 CFR 73.37, the terms “irradiated reactor fuel” and... DOT regulations in Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (49 CFR), in particular those... of the shipment as specified by DOT in 49 CFR 172.202 and 172.203(d); and (C) A listing of the...

  10. 10 CFR 73.37 - Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the Department of Transportation in 49 CFR § 172.202 and § 172.203(d). (iii) A listing of the routes... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel in transit. 73.37 Section 73.37 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED)...

  11. 10 CFR 73.37 - Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the Department of Transportation in 49 CFR § 172.202 and § 172.203(d). (iii) A listing of the routes... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel in transit. 73.37 Section 73.37 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED)...

  12. 10 CFR 73.37 - Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel in transit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... in 49 CFR 172.202 and 172.203(d). (iii) A listing of the routes to be used within the State or Tribal... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requirements for physical protection of irradiated reactor fuel in transit. 73.37 Section 73.37 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED)...

  13. Irradiation facility at the IBR-2 reactor for investigation of material radiation hardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulavin, M.; Cheplakov, A.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulagin, E.; Kulikov, S.; Shabalin, E.; Verkhoglyadov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Description of the irradiation facility and available parameters of the neutron and gamma exposures including the maximal integrated doses are presented in the paper. The research capabilities for radiation hardness tests of materials in high intensity beam of fast neutrons at the IBR-2 reactor of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna (Russia) are outlined.

  14. Irradiation facility at the IBR-2 reactor for investigating material radiation hardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulavin, M. V.; Verkhoglyadov, A. E.; Kulikov, S. A.; Kulagin, E. N.; Kukhtin, V. V.; Cheplakov, A. P.; Shabalin, E. P.

    2015-03-01

    A description of the irradiation facility and available parameters of neutron and gamma exposures, including the maximum integrated doses, are presented in the paper. The research capabilities for radiation hardness tests of materials in a high-intensity beam of fast neutrons at the IBR-2 reactor of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna (Russia) are outlined.

  15. Whole-Pin Furnace system: An experimental facility for studying irradiated fuel pin behavior under potential reactor accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.Y.; Tsai, H.C.; Donahue, D.A.; Pushis, D.O.; Savoie, F.E.; Holland, J.W.; Wright, A.E.; August, C.; Bailey, J.L.; Patterson, D.R.

    1990-05-01

    The whole-pin furnace system is a new in-cell experimental facility constructed to investigate how irradiated fuel pins may fail under potential reactor accident conditions. Extensive checkouts have demonstrated excellent performance in remote operation, temperature control, pin breach detection, and fission gas handling. The system is currently being used in testing of EBIR-II-irradiated Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metal fuel pins; future testing will include EBR-II-irradiated mixed-oxide fuel pins. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Transmutation behaviour of Eurofer under irradiation in the IFMIF test facility and fusion power reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, U.; Simakov, S. P.; Wilson, P. P. H.

    2004-08-01

    The transmutation behaviour of the low activation steel Eurofer was analysed for irradiation simulations in the high flux test module (HFTM) of the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) neutron source and the first wall of a typical fusion power reactor (FPR) employing helium cooled lithium lead (HCLL) and pebble bed (HCPB) blankets. The transmutation calculations were conducted with the analytical and laplacian adaptive radioactivity analysis (ALARA) code and IEAF-2001 data for the IFMIF and the EASY-2003 system for the fusion power reactor (FPR) irradiations. The analyses showed that the transmutation of the main constituents of Eurofer, including iron and chromium, is not significant. Minor constituents such as Ti, V and Mn increase by 5-15% per irradiation year in the FPR and by 10-35% in the IFMIF HFTM. Other minor constituents such as B, Ta, and W show a different transmutation behaviour resulting in different elemental compositions of the Eurofer steel after high fluence irradiations in IFMIF and fusion power reactors.

  17. PROSPECT: A Precision Reactor Oscillation and Spectrum Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littlejohn, Bryce

    2014-03-01

    Antineutrino detectors operated close to a compact reactor core can provide excellent sensitivity to short-baseline oscillation effects by precisely measuring any relative distortion of the ν̲e spectrum as a function of both energy and baseline. Such a measurement can be performed in the United States at several highly-enriched uranium fueled research reactors using near-surface segmented scintillator detectors. This talk will describe the preliminary conceptual design and oscillation physics potential of the PROSPECT experiment, a U.S.-based, multi-phase, 2-detector experiment with reactor-detector baselines of 4-20 meters capable of excluding a majority of the suggested sterile neutrino oscillation parameter space at high confidence level. Additional goals, such as precise measurement of the ν̲e spectrum from a highly-enriched uranium core, as well as development of detection techniques and technology for reactor monitoring applications, will be discussed.

  18. PROSPECT: the Precision Reactor Oscillation and Spectrum Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Donald; Prospect Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    PROSPECT is a phased experiment consisting of segmented Li-loaded liquid scintillator antineutrino detectors designed to probe short-baseline neutrino oscillations and precisely measure the reactor antineutrino spectrum. The experiment will be located at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Lab. The first phase is a movable 3 tonne detector located 7-9 m from the compact, highly enriched uranium core. Over the past three years, PROSPECT has deployed multiple prototype detectors at HFIR to understand the local background environment and demonstrate active and passive background rejection. A two-segment prototype has been developed that demonstrates critical subsystems of the full detector. Measuring the neutrino spectrum from 235U will give insight to the recent spectral discrepancies and provide an important benchmark for future reactor experiments. As a high statistics experiment, PROSPECT will probe the sterile neutrino best-fit region within one year of operation at HFIR.

  19. Cosmic muon background and reactor neutrino detectors: the Angra experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casimiro, E.; Anjos, J. C.

    2008-06-01

    We discuss on the importance of appropriately taking into account the cosmic background in the design of reactor neutrino detectors. In particular, as a practical study case, we describe the Angra Project, a new reactor neutrino oscillation experiment proposed to be built in the coming years at the Brazilian nuclear power complex, located near the Angra dos Reis city. The main goal of the experiment is to measure with high precision θ13, the last unknown of the three neutrino mixing angles. The experiment will in addition explore the possibility of using neutrino detectors for purposes of safeguards and non-proliferation of nuclear weapons.

  20. Positron annihilation study of Fe-ion irradiated reactor pressure vessel model alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Li, Z. C.; Schut, H.; Sekimura, N.

    2016-01-01

    The degradation of reactor pressure vessel steels under irradiation, which results from the hardening and embrittlement caused by a high number density of nanometer scale damage, is of increasingly crucial concern for safe nuclear power plant operation and possible reactor lifetime prolongation. In this paper, the radiation damage in model alloys with increasing chemical complexity (Fe, Fe-Cu, Fe-Cu-Si, Fe-Cu-Ni and Fe-Cu-Ni-Mn) has been studied by Positron Annihilation Doppler Broadening spectroscopy after 1.5 MeV Fe-ion implantation at room temperature or high temperature (290 oC). It is found that the room temperature irradiation generally leads to the formation of vacancy-type defects in the Fe matrix. The high temperature irradiation exhibits an additional annealing effect for the radiation damage. Besides the Cu-rich clusters observed by the positron probe, the results show formation of vacancy-Mn complexes for implantation at low temperatures.

  1. Foreign research reactor irradiated nuclear fuel inventories containing HEU and LEU of United States origin

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, J.E.

    1994-12-01

    This report provides estimates of foreign research reactor inventories of aluminum-based and TRIGA irradiated nuclear fuel elements containing highly enriched and low enriched uranium of United States origin that are anticipated in January 1996, January 2001, and January 2006. These fuels from 104 research reactors in 41 countries are the same aluminum-based and TRIGA fuels that were eligible for receipt under the Department of Energy`s Offsite Fuels Policy that was in effect in 1988. All fuel inventory and reactor data that were available as of December 1, 1994, have been included in the estimates of approximately 14,300 irradiated fuel elements in January 1996, 18,800 in January 2001, and 22,700 in January 2006.

  2. Radiation-induced electrical degradation experiments in the Japan materials testing reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Farnum, E.; Scharborough, K.; Shikama, Tatsuo

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this experiment is to determine the extent of degradation during neutron irradiation of electrical and optical properties of candidate dielectric materials. The goals are to identify promising dielectrics for ITER and other fusion machines for diagnostic applications and establish the basis for optimization of candidate materials. An experiment to measure radiation-induced electrical degradation (REID) in sapphire and MgO-insulated cables was conducted at the JMTR light water reactor. The materials were irradiated at about 260 {degree}C to a fluence of 3{times}10{sup 24} n/m{sup 2} (E>1 MeV) with an applied DC electric field between 100 kV/m and 500 kV/m.

  3. Feasibility of conducting a dynamic helium charging experiment for vanadium alloys in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.; Strain, R.V.; Smith, D.L.; Matsui, H.

    1996-10-01

    The feasibility of conducting a dynamic helium charging experiment (DHCE) for vanadium alloys in the water-cooled Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is being investigated as part of the U.S./Monbusho collaboration. Preliminary findings suggest that such an experiment is feasible, with certain constraints. Creating a suitable irradiation position in the ATR, designing an effective thermal neutron filter, incorporating thermocouples for limited specimen temperature monitoring, and handling of tritium during various phases of the assembly and reactor operation all appear to be feasible. An issue that would require special attention, however, is tritium permeation loss through the capsule wall at the higher design temperatures (>{approx}600{degrees}C). If permeation is excessive, the reduced amount of tritium entering the test specimens would limit the helium generation rates in them. At the lower design temperatures (<{approx}425{degrees}C), sodium, instead of lithium, may have to be used as the bond material to overcome the tritium solubility limitation.

  4. Evaluation of performance of select fusion experiments and projected reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, G. H.

    1978-01-01

    The performance of NASA Lewis fusion experiments (SUMMA and Bumpy Torus) is compared with other experiments and that necessary for a power reactor. Key parameters cited are gain (fusion power/input power) and the time average fusion power, both of which may be more significant for real fusion reactors than the commonly used Lawson parameter. The NASA devices are over 10 orders of magnitude below the required powerplant values in both gain and time average power. The best experiments elsewhere are also as much as 4 to 5 orders of magnitude low. However, the NASA experiments compare favorably with other alternate approaches that have received less funding than the mainline experiments. The steady-state character and efficiency of plasma heating are strong advantages of the NASA approach. The problem, though, is to move ahead to experiments of sufficient size to advance in gain and average power parameters.

  5. Latest progress from the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Recently the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment has presented several new results about neutrino and reactor physics after acquiring a large data sample and after gaining a more sophisticated understanding of the experiment. In this talk I will introduce the latest progress made by the experiment including a three-flavor neutrino oscillation analysis using neutron capture on gadolinium, which gave sin2 2θ 13 = 0.084 ± 0.005 and |Δm2 ee| = (2.42 ±0.11) × 10-3 eV2, an independent θ 13 measurement using neutron capture on hydrogen, a search for a light sterile neutrino, and a measurement of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum.

  6. Fission Product Monitoring and Release Data for the Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John B. Walter; Jason M. Harp; Mark W. Drigert; Edward L. Reber

    2010-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment is a fueled multiple-capsule irradiation experiment that was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) from December 26, 2006 until November 6, 2009 in support of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Fuel Development and Qualification program. An important measure of the fuel performance is the quantification of the fission product releases over the duration of the experiment. To provide this data for the inert fission gasses(Kr and Xe), a fission product monitoring system (FPMS) was developed and implemented to monitor the individual capsule effluents for the radioactive species. The FPMS continuously measured the concentrations of various krypton and xenon isotopes in the sweep gas from each AGR-1 capsule to provide an indicator of fuel irradiation performance. Spectrometer systems quantified the concentrations of Kr-85m, Kr-87, Kr-88, Kr-89, Kr-90, Xe-131m, Xe-133, Xe 135, Xe 135m, Xe-137, Xe-138, and Xe-139 accumulated over repeated eight hour counting intervals.-. To determine initial fuel quality and fuel performance, release activity for each isotope of interest was derived from FPMS measurements and paired with a calculation of the corresponding isotopic production or birthrate. The release activities and birthrates were combined to determine Release-to-Birth ratios for the selected nuclides. R/B values provide indicators of initial fuel quality and fuel performance during irradiation. This paper presents a brief summary of the FPMS, the release to birth ratio data for the AGR-1 experiment and preliminary comparisons of AGR-1 experimental fuels data to fission gas release models.

  7. Fission Product Monitoring of TRISO Coated Fuel For The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John K Hartwell; John B. Walter

    2008-09-01

    The US Department of Energy has embarked on a series of tests of TRISO-coated particle reactor fuel intended for use in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program. The AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment, currently underway, is the first in a series of eight fuel tests planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The AGR-1 experiment reached a peak compact averaged burn up of 9% FIMA with no known TRISO fuel particle failures in March 2008. The burnup goal for the majority of the fuel compacts is to have a compact averaged burnup greater than 18% FIMA and a minimum compact averaged burnup of 14% FIMA. At the INL the TRISO fuel in the AGR-1 experiment is closely monitored while it is being irradiated in the ATR. The effluent monitoring system used for the AGR-1 fuel is the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS). The FPMS is a valuable tool that provides near real-time data indicative of the AGR-1 test fuel performance and incorporates both high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based gross radiation monitors. To quantify the fuel performance, release-to-birth ratios (R/B’s) of radioactive fission gases are computed. The gamma-ray spectra acquired by the AGR-1 FPMS are analyzed and used to determine the released activities of specific fission gases, while a dedicated detector provides near-real time count rate information. Isotopic build up and depletion calculations provide the associated isotopic birth rates. This paper highlights the features of the FPMS, encompassing the equipment, methods and measures that enable the calculation of the release-to-birth ratios. Some preliminary results from the AGR-1 experiment are also presented.

  8. Fission Product Monitoring of TRISO Coated Fuel For The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John K. Hartwell; John b. Walter

    2010-10-01

    The US Department of Energy has embarked on a series of tests of TRISO-coated particle reactor fuel intended for use in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program. The AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment, currently underway, is the first in a series of eight fuel tests planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The AGR-1 experiment reached a peak compact averaged burn up of 9% FIMA with no known TRISO fuel particle failures in March 2008. The burnup goal for the majority of the fuel compacts is to have a compact averaged burnup greater than 18% FIMA and a minimum compact averaged burnup of 14% FIMA. At the INL the TRISO fuel in the AGR-1 experiment is closely monitored while it is being irradiated in the ATR. The effluent monitoring system used for the AGR-1 fuel is the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS). The FPMS is a valuable tool that provides near real-time data indicative of the AGR-1 test fuel performance and incorporates both high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based gross radiation monitors. To quantify the fuel performance, release-to-birth ratios (R/B’s) of radioactive fission gases are computed. The gamma-ray spectra acquired by the AGR-1 FPMS are analyzed and used to determine the released activities of specific fission gases, while a dedicated detector provides near-real time count rate information. Isotopic build up and depletion calculations provide the associated isotopic birth rates. This paper highlights the features of the FPMS, encompassing the equipment, methods and measures that enable the calculation of the release-to-birth ratios. Some preliminary results from the AGR-1 experiment are also presented.

  9. Deformation behavior in reactor pressure vessel steels as a clue to understanding irradiation hardening.

    SciTech Connect

    DiMelfi, R. J.; Alexander, D. E.; Rehn, L. E.

    1999-10-25

    In this paper, we examine the post-yield true stress vs true strain behavior of irradiated pressure vessel steels and iron-based alloys to reveal differences in strain-hardening behavior associated with different irradiating particles (neutrons and electrons) and different alloy chernky. It is important to understand the effects on mechanical properties caused by displacement producing radiation of nuclear reactor pressure steels. Critical embrittling effects, e.g. increases in the ductile-to-brittle-transition-temperature, are associated with irradiation-induced increases in yield strength. In addition, fatigue-life and loading-rate effects on fracture can be related to the post-irradiation strain-hardening behavior of the steels. All of these properties affect the expected service life of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. We address the characteristics of two general strengthening effects that we believe are relevant to the differing defect cluster characters produced by neutrons and electrons in four different alloys: two pressure vessel steels, A212B and A350, and two binary alloys, Fe-0.28 wt%Cu and Fe-0.74 wt%Ni. Our results show that there are differences in the post-irradiation mechanical behavior for the two kinds of irradiation and that the differences are related both to differences in damage produced and alloy chemistry. We find that while electron and neutron irradiations (at T {le} 60 C) of pressure vessel steels and binary iron-based model alloys produce similar increases in yield strength for the same dose level, they do not result in the same post-yield hardening behavior. For neutron irradiation, the true stress flow curves of the irradiated material can be made to superimpose on that of the unirradiated material, when the former are shifted appropriately along the strain axis. This behavior suggests that neutron irradiation hardening has the same effect as strain hardening for all of the materials analyzed. For electron irradiated steels, the

  10. Small-Scale Mechanical Testing on Proton Beam-Irradiated 304 SS from Room Temperature to Reactor Operation Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, H.; Reichardt, A.; Howard, C.; Abad, M. D.; Kaoumi, D.; Chou, P.; Hosemann, P.

    2015-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are common structural components in light water reactors. Because reactor components are subjected to harsh conditions such as high operating temperatures and neutron radiation, they can undergo irradiation-induced embrittlement and related failure, which compromises reliable operation. Small-scale mechanical testing has seen widespread use as a testing method for both ion- and reactor-irradiated materials because it allows access to the mechanical properties of the ion beam-irradiated region, and for safe handling of a small amount of activated material. In this study, nanoindentation and microcompression testing were performed on unirradiated and 10 dpa proton-irradiated 304 SS, from 25°C to 300°C. Increases in yield stress (YS), critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) and hardness ( H) were seen in the irradiated region relative to the unirradiated region. Relationships between H, YS, and CRSS of irradiated and unirradiated materials are discussed over this temperature range.

  11. 55Fe effect on enhancing ferritic steel He/dpa ratio in fission reactor irradiations to simulate fusion conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haibo; Abdou, Mohamed A.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.

    2013-11-01

    How to increase the ferritic steel He(appm)/dpa ratio in a fission reactor neutron spectrum is an important question for fusion reactor material testing. An early experiment showed that the accelerated He(appm)/dpa ratio of about 2.3 was achieved for 96% enriched 54Fe in iron with 458.2 effective full power days (EFPD) irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), ORNL. Greenwood suggested that the transmutation produced 55Fe has a thermal neutron helium production cross section which may have an effect on this result. In the current work, the ferritic steel He(appm)/dpa ratio is studied in the neutron spectrum of HFIR with 55Fe thermal neutron helium production taken into account. The available ENDF-b format 55Fe incident neutron cross section file from TENDL, Netherlands, is first input into the calculation model. A benchmark calculation for the same sample as used in the aforementioned experiment was used to adjust and evaluate the TENDL 55Fe (n, a) cross section values. The analysis shows a decrease of a factor of 6700 for the TENDL 55Fe (n, a) cross section in the intermediate and low energy regions is required in order to fit the experimental results. The best fit to the cross section value at thermal neutron energy is about 27 mb. With the adjusted 55Fe (n, a) cross sections, calculation show that the 54Fe and 55Fe isotopes can be enriched by the isotopic tailoring technique in a ferritic steel sample irradiated in HFIR to significantly enhance the helium production rate. The results show that a 70% enriched 54Fe and 30% enriched 55Fe ferritic steel sample would produce a He(appm)/dpa ratio of about 13 initially in the HFIR peripheral target position (PTP). After one year irradiation, the ratio decreases to about 10. This new calculation can be used to guide future isotopic tailoring experiments designed to increase the He(appm)/dpa ratio in fission reactors. A benchmark experiment is suggested to be performed to evaluate the 55Fe (n, a) cross section

  12. Properties of vanadium-base alloys irradiated in the dynamic helium charging experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-02-01

    One property of vanadium-base alloys that is not well understood in terms of their potential use as fusion reactor structural materials is the effect of simultaneous generation of helium and neutron damage. In the present Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE), helium was produced uniformly in the specimen at linear rates of {approx} 0.4 to 4.2 appm helium/dpa by the decay of tritium during irradiation to 18--31 dpa at 425--600 C in Li-filled capsules in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. This paper presents results of postirradiation examination and tests of microstructure and mechanical properties of V-5Ti, V-3Ti-1Si, V-8Cr-6Ti, and V-4Cr-4Ti (the latter alloy has been identified as the most promising candidate vanadium alloy). Effects of helium on tensile strength and ductility were insignificant after irradiation and testing at > 420 C. However, postirradiation ductilities at < 250 C were higher than those of the non-DHCE specimens (< 0.1 appm helium), whereas strengths were lower, indicating that different types of hardening centers are produced during DHCE and non-DHCE irradiation. Ductile-brittle transition behavior of the DHCE specimens was also determined from bend tests and fracture appearance of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) disks and broken tensile specimens. No brittle behavior was observed at temperatures > {minus}150 C in DHCE specimens. Predominantly brittle-cleavage fracture morphologies were observed only at {minus}196 C in some specimens that were irradiated to 31 dpa at 425 C during the DHCE. For the helium generation rates in this experiment ({approx} 0.4--4.2 appm He/dpa), grain-boundary coalescence of helium microcavities was negligible and intergranular fracture was not observed.

  13. Properties of precipitation hardened steel irradiated at 323 K in the Japan materials testing reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niimi, M.; Matsui, Y.; Jitsukawa, S.; Hoshiya, T.; Tsukada, T.; Ohmi, M.; Mimura, H.; Ooka, N.; Hide, K.

    A precipitation hardening type 630 stainless steel was irradiated in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) in contact with the reactor primary coolant. The temperature of the irradiated specimens was about 330 K. The fast neutron ( E > 1 MeV) fluence for the specimens ranged from 10 24 to 10 26 m -2. Tension tests and fracture toughness tests were carried out at room temperature, while Charpy impact tests were done at temperatures of 273-453 K. Tensile strength data showed a peak of 1600 MPa at around 7 × 10 24 m -2, then gradually decreased to about 1500 MPa at 1.2 × 10 26 m -2. The elongation decreased with irradiation from 12% for unirradiated material to 6% at 1.2 × 10 26 m -2. The fractography after the tension test revealed that the fracture was ductile. Fracture toughness decreased to about a half of the value for unirradiated material with irradiation. The cleavage fracture was dominant on the fractured surface. Charpy impact tests showed an increase of ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) by 60 K with irradiation.

  14. Change in physical properties of high density isotropic graphites irradiated in the ?JOYO? fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, T.; Kaito, T.; Onose, S.; Shibahara, I.

    1995-08-01

    Thirteen kinds of isotropic graphites with different density and maximum grain size were irradiated in the experimental fast reactor "JOYO" to fluences from 2.11 to 2.86 × 10 26 n/m 2 ( E > 0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 549 to 597°C. Postirradiation examination was carried out on the dimensional changes, elastic modulus, and thermal conductivity of these materials. Dimensional change results indicate that the graphites irradiated at lower fluences showed shrinkage upon neutron irradiation followed by increase with increasing neutron fluences, irrespective of differences in material parameters. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increased by two to three times the unirradiated values. The large scatter found in Poisson's ratio of unirradiated materials became very small and a linear dependence on density was obtained after irradiation. The thermal conductivity decreased to one-fifth to one-tenth of unirradiated values, with a negligible change in specific heat. The results of postirradiation examination indicated that the changes in physical properties of high density, isotropic graphites were mainly dominated by the irradiation condition rather than their material parameters. Namely, the effects of irradiation induced defects on physical properties of heavily neutron-irradiated graphites are much larger than that of defects associated with as-fabricated specimens.

  15. Assessment of light water reactor accident management programs and experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hammersley, R.J.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this report is to provide an assessment of the current light water reactor experience regarding accident management programs and associated technology developments. This assessment for light water reactor (LWR) designs is provided as a resource and reference for the development of accident management capabilities for the production reactors at the Savannah River Site. The specific objectives of this assessment are as follows: 1. Perform a review of the NRC, utility, and industry (NUMARC, EPRI) accident management programs and implementation experience. 2. Provide an assessment of the problems and opportunities in developing an accident management program in conjunction or following the Individual Plant Examination process. 3. Review current NRC, utility, and industry technological developments in the areas of computational tools, severe accident predictive tools, diagnostic aids, and severe accident training and simulation.

  16. An Overview of the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, J. Blair; Gulliford, Jim

    2014-10-09

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties associated with advanced modeling and simulation accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. Two Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) activities, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), initiated in 1992, and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP), initiated in 2003, have been identifying existing integral experiment data, evaluating those data, and providing integral benchmark specifications for methods and data validation for nearly two decades. Data provided by those two projects will be of use to the international reactor physics, criticality safety, and nuclear data communities for future decades. An overview of the IRPhEP and a brief update of the ICSBEP are provided in this paper.

  17. Mesos-scale modeling of irradiation in pressurized water reactor concrete biological shields

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pape, Yann; Huang, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Neutron irradiation exposure causes aggregate expansion, namely radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE). The structural significance of RIVE on a portion of a prototypical pressurized water reactor (PWR) concrete biological shield (CBS) is investigated by using a meso- scale nonlinear concrete model with inputs from an irradiation transport code and a coupled moisture transport-heat transfer code. RIVE-induced severe cracking onset appears to be triggered by the ini- tial shrinkage-induced cracking and propagates to a depth of > 10 cm at extended operation of 80 years. Relaxation of the cement paste stresses results in delaying the crack propagation by about 10 years.

  18. Design considerations of the irradiation test vehicle for the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L.

    1997-08-01

    An irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is being jointly developed by the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMIT) and the U.S. Fusion Program. The vehicle is intended for neutron irradiation testing of candidate structural materials, including vanadium-based alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low activation steels. It could possibly be used for U.S./Japanese collaboration in the Jupiter Program. The first test train is scheduled to be completed by September 1998. In this report, we present the functional requirements for the vehicle and a preliminary design that satisfies these requirements.

  19. Determination of irradiated reactor uranium in soil samples in Belarus using 236U as irradiated uranium tracer.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Vladislav P; Matusevich, Janna L; Kudrjashov, Vladimir P; Boulyga, Sergei F; Becker, J Sabine

    2002-12-01

    This work presents experimental results on the distribution of irradiated reactor uranium from fallout after the accident at Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in comparison to natural uranium distribution in different soil types. Oxidation processes and vertical migration of irradiated uranium in soils typical of the 30 km relocation area around Chernobyl NPP were studied using 236U as the tracer for irradiated reactor uranium and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry as the analytical method for uranium isotope ratio measurements. Measurements of natural uranium yielded significant variations of its concentration in upper soil layers from 2 x 10(-7) g g(-1) to 3.4 x 10(-6) g g(-1). Concentrations of irradiated uranium in the upper 0-10 cm soil layers at the investigated sampling sites varied from 5 x 10(-12) g g(-1) to 2 x 10(-6) g g(-1) depending on the distance from Chernobyl NPP. In the majority of investigated soil profiles 78% to 97% of irradiated "Chernobyl" uranium is still contained in the upper 0-10 cm soil layers. The physical and chemical characteristics of the soil do not have any significant influence on processes of fuel particle destruction. Results obtained using carbonate leaching of 236U confirmed that more than 60% of irradiated "Chernobyl" uranium is still in a tetravalent form, ie. it is included in the fuel matrix (non-oxidized fuel UO2). The average value of the destruction rate of fuel particles determined for the Western radioactive trace (k = 0.030 +/- 0.005 yr(-1)) and for the Northern radioactive trace (k = 0.035 + 0.009 yr(-1)) coincide within experimental errors. Use of leaching of fission products in comparison to leaching of uranium for study of the destruction rate of fuel particles yielded poor coincidence due to the fact that use of fission products does not take into account differences in the chemical properties of fission products and fuel matrix (uranium). PMID:12509057

  20. Calculated analysis of experiments in fast neutron reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, V. K. Kalugina, K. M.; Gomin, E. A.

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, the results of computational simulation of experiments with the MK-I core of the JOYO fast neutron sodium-cooled reactor are presented. The MCU-KS code based on the Monte Carlo method was used for calculations. The research was aimed at additional verification of the MCU-KS code for systems with a fast neutron spectrum.

  1. Calculated analysis of experiments in fast neutron reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, V. K.; Kalugina, K. M.; Gomin, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, the results of computational simulation of experiments with the MK-I core of the JOYO fast neutron sodium-cooled reactor are presented. The MCU-KS code based on the Monte Carlo method was used for calculations. The research was aimed at additional verification of the MCU-KS code for systems with a fast neutron spectrum.

  2. Comparison of Calculated and Measured Neutron Fluence in Fuel/Cladding Irradiation Experiments in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Ronald James

    2011-01-01

    A recently-designed thermal neutron irradiation facility has been used for a first series of irradiations of PWR fuel pellets in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Since June 2010, irradiations of PWR fuel pellets made of UN or UO{sub 2}, clad in SiC, have been ongoing in the outer small VXF sites in the beryllium reflector region of the HFIR, as seen in Fig. 1. HFIR is a versatile, 85 MW isotope production and test reactor with the capability and facilities for performing a wide variety of irradiation experiments. HFIR is a beryllium-reflected, light-water-cooled and -moderated, flux-trap type reactor that uses highly enriched (in {sup 235}U) uranium (HEU) as the fuel. The reactor core consists of a series of concentric annular regions, each about 2 ft (0.61 m) high. A 5-in. (12.70-cm)-diam hole, referred to as the flux trap, forms the center of the core. The fuel region is composed of two concentric fuel elements made up of many involute-shaped fuel plates: an inner element that contains 171 fuel plates, and an outer element that contains 369 fuel plates. The fuel plates are curved in the shape of an involute, which provides constant coolant channel width between plates. The fuel (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al cermet) is nonuniformly distributed along the arc of the involute to minimize the radial peak-to-average power density ratio. A burnable poison (B{sub 4}C) is included in the inner fuel element primarily to reduce the negative reactivity requirements of the reactor control plates. A typical HEU core loading in HFIR is 9.4 kg of {sup 235}U and 2.8 g of {sup 10}B. The thermal neutron flux in the flux trap region can exceed 2.5 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s while the fast flux in this region exceeds 1 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s. The inner and outer fuel elements are in turn surrounded by a concentric ring of beryllium reflector approximately 1 ft (0.30 m) thick. The beryllium reflector consists of three regions

  3. Post-irradiation Examination Plan for ORNL and University of California Santa Barbara Assessment of UCSB ATR-2 Irradiation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R. K.; Yamamoto, T.; Sokolov, M. A.

    2014-01-25

    New and existing databases will be combined to support development of physically based models of transition temperature shifts (TTS) for high fluence-low flux (φ < 10{sup 11}n/cm{sup 2}-s) conditions, beyond the existing surveillance database, to neutron fluences of at least 1×10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV). All references to neutron flux and fluence in this report are for fast neutrons (>1 MeV). The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) task of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is working with various organizations to obtain archival surveillance materials from commercial nuclear power plants to allow for comparisons of the irradiation-induced microstructural features from reactor surveillance materials with those from similar materials irradiated under high flux conditions in test reactors

  4. Progress Report on Disassembly and Post-Irradiation Experiments for UCSB ATR-2 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K; Odette, G. R.; Robertson, Janet Pawel; Yamamoto, T

    2015-09-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water reactor (LWR) represents the first line of defense against a release of radiation in case of an accident. Thus, regulations that govern the operation of commercial nuclear power plants require conservative margins of fracture toughness, both during normal operation and under accident scenarios. In the unirradiated condition, the RPV has sufficient fracture toughness such that failure is implausible under any postulated condition, including pressurized thermal shock (PTS) in pressurized water reactors (PWR). In the irradiated condition, however, the fracture toughness of the RPV may be severely degraded, with the degree of toughness loss dependent on the radiation sensitivity of the materials. As stated in previous progress reports, the available embrittlement predictive models, e.g. [1], and our present understanding of radiation damage are not fully quantitative, and do not treat all potentially significant variables and issues, particularly considering extension of operation to 80y.

  5. Review of progress on fusion materials technology, Harwell, December 1980. Irradiation effects in fusion reactor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harries, D. R.

    1981-03-01

    The evolution of the radiation damage structure, void and gas bubble swelling, and surface blistering effects in both model and potential first wall materials for a D-T fusion reactor system of the TOKAMAK type was investigated along with radiation effects in inorganic insulator materials. In addition, investigations were carried out into the effects of irradiation on organic insulators and on the performance of rubber seals. The principal achievements are summarized and a list of 50 references is given.

  6. Nondestructive verification with minimal movement of irradiated light-water-reactor fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.R.; Bosler, G.E.; Halbig, J.K.; Klosterbuer, S.F.; Menlove, H.O.

    1982-10-01

    Nondestructive verification of irradiated light-water reactor fuel assemblies can be performed rapidly and precisely by measuring their gross gamma-ray and neutron signatures. A portable system measured fuel assemblies with exposures ranging from 18.4 to 40.6 GWd/tU and with cooling times ranging from 1575 to 2638 days. Differences in the measured results for side or corner measurements are discussed. 25 figures, 20 tables.

  7. The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP)

    SciTech Connect

    Blair Briggs, J.; Sartori, E.; Scott, L.

    2006-07-01

    Since the beginning of the Nuclear Power industry, numerous experiments concerned with nuclear energy and technology have been performed at different research laboratories, worldwide. These experiments required a large investment in terms of infrastructure, expertise, and cost; however, many were performed without a high degree of attention to archival of results for future use. The degree and quality of documentation varies greatly. There is an urgent need to preserve integral reactor physics experimental data, including measurement methods, techniques, and separate or special effects data for nuclear energy and technology applications and the knowledge and competence contained therein. If the data are compromised, it is unlikely that any of these experiments will be repeated again in the future. The International Reactor Physics Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated, as a pilot activity in 1999 by the by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). The project was endorsed as an official activity of the NSC in June of 2003. The purpose of the IRPhEP is to provide an extensively peer reviewed set of reactor physics related integral benchmark data that can be used by reactor designers and safety analysts to validate the analytical tools used to design next generation reactors and establish the safety basis for operation of these reactors. A short history of the IRPhEP is presented and its purposes are discussed in this paper. Accomplishments of the IRPhEP, including the first publication of the IRPhEP Handbook, are highlighted and the future of the project outlined. (authors)

  8. The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPHEP)

    SciTech Connect

    J. Blair Briggs; Enrico Sartori; Lori Scott

    2006-09-01

    Since the beginning of the Nuclear Power industry, numerous experiments concerned with nuclear energy and technology have been performed at different research laboratories, worldwide. These experiments required a large investment in terms of infrastructure, expertise, and cost; however, many were performed without a high degree of attention to archival of results for future use. The degree and quality of documentation varies greatly. There is an urgent need to preserve integral reactor physics experimental data, including measurement methods, techniques, and separate or special effects data for nuclear energy and technology applications and the knowledge and competence contained therein. If the data are compromised, it is unlikely that any of these experiments will be repeated again in the future. The International Reactor Physics Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated, as a pilot activity in 1999 by the by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). The project was endorsed as an official activity of the NSC in June of 2003. The purpose of the IRPhEP is to provide an extensively peer reviewed set of reactor physics related integral benchmark data that can be used by reactor designers and safety analysts to validate the analytical tools used to design next generation reactors and establish the safety basis for operation of these reactors. A short history of the IRPhEP is presented and its purposes are discussed in this paper. Accomplishments of the IRPhEP, including the first publication of the IRPhEP Handbook, are highlighted and the future of the project outlined.

  9. Irradiation performance of (Th,Pu)O2 fuel under Pressurized Water Reactor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boer, B.; Lemehov, S.; Wéber, M.; Parthoens, Y.; Gysemans, M.; McGinley, J.; Somers, J.; Verwerft, M.

    2016-04-01

    This paper examines the in-pile safety performance of (Th,Pu)O2 fuel pins under simulated Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) conditions. Both sol-gel and SOLMAS produced (Th,Pu)O2 fuels at enrichments of 7.9% and 12.8% in Pu/HM have been irradiated at SCK·CEN. The irradiation has been performed under PWR conditions (155 bar, 300 °C) in a dedicated loop of the BR-2 reactor. The loop is instrumented with flow and temperature monitors at inlet and outlet, which allow for an accurate measurement of the deposited enthalpy. Between 2004 and 2006, four fuel segments were irradiated, with on-line recording of centerline temperature and rod pressure of the two instrumented rods and intermittent non-destructive hot-cell investigations of the other two non-instrumented rods. At the end of 2006, the instrumented rods were unloaded for hot-cell investigations. The hot-cell investigations reduced uncertainties in the power history to build a reliable and consistent irradiation history which can be used to assess and validate fuel performance codes. The on-line recorded temperatures of the instrumented rods are presented in this paper and are compared to corresponding calculations on the basis of the power history. One of the non-instrumented rods was re-inserted in the reactor in 2012 and attained a peak burnup level of 37 GWd/tHM by the end of 2014. The combined data set of on-line measurements and post irradiation examinations enables further code validation. In this context, the results of the in-house MACROS code of SCK·CEN have been compared with the experimental results. The code contains dedicated (Th,Pu)O2 models for the calculation of the thermal conductivity as a function of the burnup and models that determine the radial power profile within the pellet.

  10. Meso-scale magnetic signatures for nuclear reactor steel irradiation embrittlement monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, J. D.; Ramuhalli, P.; McCloy, J. S.; Xu, K.; Hu, S.; Li, Y.; Jiang, W.; Edwards, D. J.; Schemer-Kohrn, A. L.; Johnson, B. R.

    2015-03-01

    Verifying the structural integrity of passive components in light water and advanced reactors will be necessary to ensure safe, long-term operations of the existing U.S. nuclear fleet. This objective can be achieved through nondestructive condition monitoring techniques, which can be integrated with plant operations to quantify the "state of health" of structural materials in real-time. While nondestructive methods for monitoring many classes of degradation (such as fatigue or stress corrosion cracking) are relatively advanced, this is not the case for degradation caused by irradiation. The development of nondestructive evaluation technologies for these types of degradation will require advanced materials characterization techniques and tools that enable comprehensive understanding of nuclear reactor material microstructural and behavioral changes under extreme operating environments. Irradiation-induced degradation of reactor steels causes changes in their microstructure that impacts their micro-magnetic properties. In this paper, we describe preliminary results of integrating advanced material characterization techniques with meso-scale computational models. In the future, this will help to provide an interpretive understanding of the state of degradation in structural materials. Microstructural data are presented from monocrystalline Fe and are correlated with variable-field magnetic force microscopy and micro-magnetic measurements. Ongoing research is focused on extending the measurements and models on thin films to gain insights into the structural state of irradiated materials and the resulting impact on magnetic properties. Preliminary conclusions from these correlations are presented, and next steps described.

  11. Meso-Scale Magnetic Signatures for Nuclear Reactor Steel Irradiation Embrittlement Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, Jonathan D.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; McCloy, John S.; Xu, Ke; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Jiang, Weilin; Edwards, Danny J.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Johnson, Bradley R.

    2015-03-31

    Verifying the structural integrity of passive components in light-water and advanced reactors will be necessary to ensure safe, long-term operations of the existing U.S. nuclear fleet. This objective can be achieved through nondestructive condition monitoring techniques, which can be integrated with plant operations to quantify the ‘state of health’ of structural materials in real-time. While nondestructive methods for monitoring many classes of degradation (such as fatigue or stress corrosion cracking) are relatively advanced, this is not the case for degradation caused by irradiation. The development of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technologies for these types of degradation will require advanced materials characterization techniques and tools that enable comprehensive understanding of nuclear reactor material microstructural and behavioral changes under extreme operating environments. Irradiation-induced degradation of reactor steels causes changes in their microstructure that impacts their micro-magnetic properties. In this paper, we describe preliminary results to integrate advanced material characterization techniques with meso-scale computational models to provide an interpretive understanding of the state of degradation in a material. Microstructural data are presented from monocrystalline Fe and are correlated with variable-field magnetic force microscopy and micro-magnetic measurements. In future efforts, microstructural measurements and meso-scale magnetic measurements on thin films will be used to gain insights into the structural state of these materials to study the impact of irradiation on magnetic properties. Preliminary conclusions from these correlations are presented, and next steps described.

  12. Meso-scale magnetic signatures for nuclear reactor steel irradiation embrittlement monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, J. D. Ramuhalli, P. Hu, S.; Li, Y.; Jiang, W.; Edwards, D. J.; Schemer-Kohrn, A. L.; Johnson, B. R.; McCloy, J. S. Xu, K.

    2015-03-31

    Verifying the structural integrity of passive components in light water and advanced reactors will be necessary to ensure safe, long-term operations of the existing U.S. nuclear fleet. This objective can be achieved through nondestructive condition monitoring techniques, which can be integrated with plant operations to quantify the “state of health” of structural materials in real-time. While nondestructive methods for monitoring many classes of degradation (such as fatigue or stress corrosion cracking) are relatively advanced, this is not the case for degradation caused by irradiation. The development of nondestructive evaluation technologies for these types of degradation will require advanced materials characterization techniques and tools that enable comprehensive understanding of nuclear reactor material microstructural and behavioral changes under extreme operating environments. Irradiation-induced degradation of reactor steels causes changes in their microstructure that impacts their micro-magnetic properties. In this paper, we describe preliminary results of integrating advanced material characterization techniques with meso-scale computational models. In the future, this will help to provide an interpretive understanding of the state of degradation in structural materials. Microstructural data are presented from monocrystalline Fe and are correlated with variable-field magnetic force microscopy and micro-magnetic measurements. Ongoing research is focused on extending the measurements and models on thin films to gain insights into the structural state of irradiated materials and the resulting impact on magnetic properties. Preliminary conclusions from these correlations are presented, and next steps described.

  13. Positron annihilation study of neutron irradiated model alloys and of a reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrecht, M.; Almazouzi, A.

    2009-03-01

    The hardening and embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels are of great concern in the actual nuclear power plant life assessment. This embrittlement is caused by irradiation-induced damage, and positron annihilation spectroscopy has been shown to be a suitable method for analysing most of these defects. In this paper, this technique (both positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and coincidence Doppler broadening) has been used to investigate neutron irradiated model alloys, with increasing chemical complexity and a reactor pressure vessel steel. It is found that the clustering of copper takes place at the very early stages of irradiation using coincidence Doppler broadening, when this element is present in the alloy. On the other hand, considerations based on positron annihilation spectroscopy analyses suggest that the main objects causing hardening are most probably self-interstitial clusters decorated with manganese in Cu-free alloys. In low-Cu reactor pressure vessel steels and in (Fe, Mn, Ni, Cu) alloys, the main effect is still due to Cu-rich precipitates at low doses, but the role of manganese-related features becomes pre-dominant at high doses.

  14. Characterisation of radiation field for irradiation of biological samples at nuclear reactor-comparison of twin detector and recombination methods.

    PubMed

    Golnik, N; Gryziński, M A; Kowalska, M; Meronka, K; Tulik, P

    2014-10-01

    Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection is involved in achieving scientific project on biological dosimetry. The project includes irradiation of blood samples in radiation fields of nuclear reactor. A simple facility for irradiation of biological samples has been prepared at horizontal channel of the nuclear reactor MARIA in NCBJ in Poland. The radiation field, composed mainly of gamma radiation and thermal neutrons, has been characterised in terms of tissue kerma using twin-detector technique and recombination chambers. PMID:24366246

  15. Feasibility of underwater welding of highly irradiated in-vessel components of boiling-water reactors: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, A.L.

    1997-11-01

    In February 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES), initiated a literature review to assess the state of underwater welding technology. In particular, the objective of this literature review was to evaluate the viability of underwater welding in-vessel components of boiling water reactor (BWR) in-vessel components, especially those components fabricated from stainless steels that are subjected to high neutron fluences. This assessment was requested because of the recent increased level of activity in the commercial nuclear industry to address generic issues concerning the reactor vessel and internals, especially those issues related to repair options. This literature review revealed a preponderance of general information about underwater welding technology, as a result of the active research in this field sponsored by the U.S. Navy and offshore oil and gas industry concerns. However, the literature search yielded only a limited amount of information about underwater welding of components in low-fluence areas of BWR in-vessel environments, and no information at all concerning underwater welding experiences in high-fluence environments. Research reported by the staff of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and researchers from the DOE fusion reactor program proved more fruitful. This research documented relevant experience concerning welding of stainless steel materials in air environments exposed to high neutron fluences. It also addressed problems with welding highly irradiated materials, and primarily attributed those problems to helium-induced cracking in the material. (Helium is produced from the neutron irradiation of boron, an impurity, and nickel.) The researchers found that the amount of helium-induced cracking could be controlled, or even eliminated, by reducing the heat input into the weld and applying a compressive stress perpendicular to the weld path.

  16. Performance of Magnet Insulation Systems at Low Temperature and After Reactor Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bittner-Rohrhofer, K.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R.K.; Weber, H.W.

    2004-06-28

    Advanced composite materials reinforced with boron-free glass fibers are candidate insulation materials for fusion magnets, in particular for ITER. Thus, these systems require an excellent performance and mechanical integrity after irradiation. The present innovative organic insulation system consists of R-glass fiber reinforced tapes impregnated with an advanced cyanate-ester/epoxy resin. This composite is suitable for vacuum-pressure impregnation. In order to assess the radiation resistance of the mechanical properties, the laminate was irradiated in the TRIGA reactor (Vienna) to the ITER design fluence level of 1x1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV). The blend was screened at 77 K using the static tensile and short-beam-shear test prior to and after irradiation. In addition, tension-tension fatigue measurements were done in order to investigate the material performance under pulsed operating conditions.

  17. Performance of Magnet Insulation Systems at Low Temperature and After Reactor Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner-Rohrhofer, K.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W.

    2004-06-01

    Advanced composite materials reinforced with boron-free glass fibers are candidate insulation materials for fusion magnets, in particular for ITER. Thus, these systems require an excellent performance and mechanical integrity after irradiation. The present innovative organic insulation system consists of R-glass fiber reinforced tapes impregnated with an advanced cyanate-ester/epoxy resin. This composite is suitable for vacuum-pressure impregnation. In order to assess the radiation resistance of the mechanical properties, the laminate was irradiated in the TRIGA reactor (Vienna) to the ITER design fluence level of 1×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV). The blend was screened at 77 K using the static tensile and short-beam-shear test prior to and after irradiation. In addition, tension-tension fatigue measurements were done in order to investigate the material performance under pulsed operating conditions.

  18. Void Swelling and Microstructure of Austenitic Stainless Steels Irradiated in the BOR - 60 Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Yang, Yong; Huang, Yina; Allen, T.; Alexandreanu, B.; Natesan, K.

    2012-11-01

    As nuclear power plants age and neutron fluence increases, detrimental effects resulting from radiation damage have become an increasingly important issue for the operational safety and structural integrity of core internal components. In this study, irradiated specimens of reactor core internal components were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The specimens had been irradiated to 5.5-45 dpa in the BOR-60 reactor at a dose rate close to 10-6 dpa/s and temperature of about 320°C. No voids were observed in the austenitic stainless steels and nickel alloys at all doses. Despite the possibility that fine voids below the TEM resolution limit may be present, it was clear that void swelling was insignificant in all examined alloys up to 45 dpa. Irradiated microstructures of the studied alloys were dominated by a high density of Frank loops. The mean size and density of the Frank loops varied from one material to another, but saturated with increasing dose above ~10 dpa. While no irradiation-induced precipitations were present below 24.5 dpa, fine precipitates were evident in several alloys at 45 dpa.

  19. Fatigue behavior of irradiated helium-containing ferritic steels for fusion reactor applications*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossbeck, M. L.; Vitek, J. M.; Liu, K. C.

    1986-11-01

    The martensitic alloys 12Cr-1MoVW and 9Cr-1MoVNb have been irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and subsequently tested in fatigue. In order to achieve helium levels characteristic of fusion reactors, the 12Cr-1MoVW was doped with 1 and 2% Ni, resulting in helium levels of 210 and 410 appm at damage levels of 25 dpa. The 9Cr-1MoVNb was irradiated to a damage level of 3 dpa and contained less than 5 appm He. Irradiations were carried out at 55°C and testing at 22°C. No significant changes were found in 9Cr-1MoVNb upon irradiation at this damage level, but effects that could possibly be attributed to helium were found in 12Cr-1MoVW. Levels of 210 and 410 appm He produced cyclic strengthening of 29 and 34% over unirradiated nickel-doped materials, respectively. This cyclic hardening, attributable largely to helium, resulted in degradation of the cyclic life. However, the fatigue life remained comparable to or better than unirradiated 20%-cold-worked 316 stainless steel.

  20. Systems and methods for managing shared-path instrumentation and irradiation targets in a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Heinold, Mark R.; Berger, John F.; Loper, Milton H.; Runkle, Gary A.

    2015-12-29

    Systems and methods permit discriminate access to nuclear reactors. Systems provide penetration pathways to irradiation target loading and offloading systems, instrumentation systems, and other external systems at desired times, while limiting such access during undesired times. Systems use selection mechanisms that can be strategically positioned for space sharing to connect only desired systems to a reactor. Selection mechanisms include distinct paths, forks, diverters, turntables, and other types of selectors. Management methods with such systems permits use of the nuclear reactor and penetration pathways between different systems and functions, simultaneously and at only distinct desired times. Existing TIP drives and other known instrumentation and plant systems are useable with access management systems and methods, which can be used in any nuclear plant with access restrictions.

  1. Observation of reactor electron antineutrinos disappearance in the RENO experiment.

    PubMed

    Ahn, J K; Chebotaryov, S; Choi, J H; Choi, S; Choi, W; Choi, Y; Jang, H I; Jang, J S; Jeon, E J; Jeong, I S; Joo, K K; Kim, B R; Kim, B C; Kim, H S; Kim, J Y; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, S Y; Kim, W; Kim, Y D; Lee, J; Lee, J K; Lim, I T; Ma, K J; Pac, M Y; Park, I G; Park, J S; Park, K S; Shin, J W; Siyeon, K; Yang, B S; Yeo, I S; Yi, S H; Yu, I

    2012-05-11

    The RENO experiment has observed the disappearance of reactor electron antineutrinos, consistent with neutrino oscillations, with a significance of 4.9 standard deviations. Antineutrinos from six 2.8  GW(th) reactors at the Yonggwang Nuclear Power Plant in Korea, are detected by two identical detectors located at 294 and 1383 m, respectively, from the reactor array center. In the 229 d data-taking period between 11 August 2011 and 26 March 2012, the far (near) detector observed 17102 (154088) electron antineutrino candidate events with a background fraction of 5.5% (2.7%). The ratio of observed to expected numbers of antineutrinos in the far detector is 0.920±0.009(stat)±0.014(syst). From this deficit, we determine sin(2)2θ(13)=0.113±0.013(stat)±0.019(syst) based on a rate-only analysis. PMID:23003027

  2. Radiation damage induced in Al2O3 single crystal sequentially irradiated with reactor neutrons and 90 MeV Xe ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirour, H.; Izerrouken, M.; Sari, A.

    2016-06-01

    The present investigation reports the effect of 90 MeV Xe ion irradiation on neutron irradiated Al2O3 single crystals. Three irradiation experiments were performed, with neutrons only, 90 MeV Xe ions only and with neutrons followed by 90 MeV Xe ions. Neutron and 90 MeV Xe ion irradiations were performed at NUR research reactor, Algiers, Algeria and at GANIL accelerator, Caen, France respectively. After irradiation, the radiation damage was investigated by Raman spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), optical absorption measurements, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Raman technique revealed that the concentration of the defects formed in Al2O3 samples subsequently irradiated with neutrons and 90 MeV Xe ions is lower than that formed in Al2O3 samples which were irradiated only with neutrons. This reveals the occurrence of ionization-induced recovery of the neutron damage. Furthermore, as revealed by XRD analysis, a new peak is appeared at about 2θ = 38.03° after irradiation at high fluence (>3 × 1013 Xe/cm2). It can be assigned to the formation of new lattice plane.

  3. Treatment of Irradiated Graphite from French Bugey Reactor - 13424

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas; Poncet, Bernard

    2013-07-01

    Beginning in 2009, in order to determine an alternative to direct disposal for decommissioned irradiated graphite from EDF's Bugey NPP, Studsvik and EDF began a test program to determine if graphite decontamination and destruction were practicable using Studsvik's thermal organic reduction (THOR) technology. The testing program focused primarily on the release of C-14, H-3, and Cl-36 and also monitored graphite mass loss. For said testing, a bench-scale steam reformer (BSSR) was constructed with the capability of flowing various compositions of gases at temperatures up to 1300 deg. C over uniformly sized particles of graphite for fixed amounts of time. The BSSR was followed by a condenser, thermal oxidizer, and NaOH bubbler system designed to capture H-3 and C-14. Also, in a separate series of testing, high concentration acid and peroxide solutions were used to soak the graphite and leach out and measure Cl-36. A series of gasification tests were performed to scope gas compositions and temperatures for graphite gasification using steam and oxygen. Results suggested higher temperature steam (1100 deg. C vs. 900 deg. C) yielded a practicable gasification rate but that lower temperature (900 deg. C) gasification was also a practicable treatment alternative if oxygen is fed into the process. A series of decontamination tests were performed to determine the release behavior of and extent to which C-14 and H-3 were released from graphite in a high temperature (900-1300 deg. C), low flow roasting gas environment. In general, testing determined that higher temperatures and longer roasting times were efficacious for releasing H-3 completely and the majority (80%) of C-14. Manipulating oxidizing and reducing gas environments was also found to limit graphite mass loss. A series of soaking tests was performed to measure the amount of Cl-36 in the samples of graphite before and after roasting in the BSSR. Similar to C-14 release, these soaking tests revealed that 70-80% Cl-36

  4. In vitro irradiation station for broad beam radiobiological experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wéra, A.-C.; Riquier, H.; Heuskin, A.-C.; Michiels, C.; Lucas, S.

    2011-12-01

    The study of the interaction of charged particles with living matter is of prime importance to the fields of radiotherapy, radioprotection and space radiobiology. Particle accelerators and their associated equipment are proven to be helpful tools in performing basic science in all these fields. Indeed, they can accelerate virtually any ions to a given energy and flux and let them interact with living matter either in vivo or in vitro. In this context, the University of Namur has developed a broad beam in vitro irradiation station for use in radiobiological experiments. Cells are handled in GLP conditions and can be irradiated at various fluxes with ions ranging from hydrogen to carbon. The station is mounted on a 2 MV tandem accelerator, and the energy range can be set up in the linear energy transfer (LET) ranges that are useful for radiobiological experiments. This paper describes the current status of the hardware that has been developed, and presents results related to its performance in term of dose-rate, energy range and beam uniformity for protons, alpha particles and carbon ions. The results of clonogenic assays of A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells irradiated with protons and alpha particles are also presented and compared with literature.

  5. Tritium permeation in EUROFER97 steel in EXOTIC-9/1 irradiation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. V.; Magielsen, A. J.; Stijkel, M. P.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the results of the tritium permeation study in EUROFER97 carried out within the EXOTIC (EXtraction Of Tritium In Ceramics) irradiation experiment. In the EXOTIC 9/1 experiment, a pebble bed assembly containing Lithium Titanate (Li2TiO3) pebbles is irradiated for 300 days in the High Flux Reactor (HFR), in the temperature range between 340 and 580 °C, reaching a lithium burn up of 3.5% and 1.2 dpa of damage in steel. The primary objective of this experiment was to measure the in-pile tritium release characteristics of Li2TiO3 pebbles. Additionally tritium permeation through the EUROFER97 pebble bed wall was measured on line. The permeation of tritium was studied at steady state conditions, during temperature transients, and at different hydrogen concentrations in the helium purge gas flow. The model used in the analysis of the experimental data which account for co-permeation of tritium and hydrogen is presented. It has been demonstrated that the permeation of tritium under experiment conditions proceeds in the diffusion limited regime. From the analysis of the experimental data the permeability and diffusivity of tritium in EUROFER97 is determined.

  6. Solar-Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment 1. II - Instrument calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.; Ucker, Gregory J.

    1993-01-01

    The science objective for the Solar-Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) is to accurately measure the full disk solar spectral irradiance in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region over a long time period. The SOLSTICE design was driven by the requirement for long-term, precise solar photometry conducted from space. The SOLSTICE 1 is on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), launched in September 1991 with the possibility for a 10-year operational mission. The in-flight calibration for SOLSTICE to meet its primary objective is the routine measurements of the UV radiation from a set of early-type stars, using the identical optical elements employed for the solar observations. The extensive preflight calibrations of the instrument have yielded a precise characterization of the three SOLSTICE channels. Details of the preflight and in-flight SOLSTICE calibrations are discussed in this paper.

  7. The radon monitoring system in Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. C.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Leung, J. K. C.; Leung, K. Y.; Lin, Y. C.; Luk, K. B.; Pun, C. S. J.

    2016-02-01

    We developed a highly sensitive, reliable and portable automatic system (H3) to monitor the radon concentration of the underground experimental halls of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. H3 is able to measure radon concentration with a statistical error less than 10% in a 1-h measurement of dehumidified air (R.H. 5% at 25 °C) with radon concentration as low as 50 Bq/m3. This is achieved by using a large radon progeny collection chamber, semiconductor α-particle detector with high energy resolution, improved electronics and software. The integrated radon monitoring system is highly customizable to operate in different run modes at scheduled times and can be controlled remotely to sample radon in ambient air or in water from the water pools where the antineutrino detectors are being housed. The radon monitoring system has been running in the three experimental halls of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment since November 2013.

  8. Slow control systems of the Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J. H.; Jang, H. I.; Choi, W. Q.; Choi, Y.; Jang, J. S.; Jeon, E. J.; Joo, K. K.; Kim, B. R.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. Y.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y. D.; Ko, Y. J.; Lee, J. K.; Lim, I. T.; Pac, M. Y.; Park, I. G.; Park, J. S.; Park, R. G.; Seo, H. K.; Seo, S. H.; Shin, C. D.; Siyeon, K.; Yeo, I. S.; Yu, I.

    2016-02-01

    The RENO experiment has been in operation since August 2011 to measure reactor antineutrino disappearance using identical near and far detectors. For accurate measurements of neutrino mixing parameters and efficient data taking, it is crucial to monitor and control the detector in real time. Environmental conditions also need to be monitored for stable operation of detectors as well as for safety reasons. In this paper, we report the design, hardware, operation, and performance of the slow control system.

  9. Characterization of Neutron and Gamma Dose in the Irradiation Cell of Texas A and M University Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, Latha; Reece, Warren D.; Chirayath, Sunil S.; Aghara, Sukesh

    2011-07-01

    The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code was used to develop a three dimensional computational model of the Texas A and M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR) operating against the irradiation (dry cell) at steady state thermal power of 1 MW. The geometry of the NSCR core and the dry cell were modeled in detail. NSCR is used for a wide variety of experiments that utilizes the dry cell for neutron as well as gamma irradiation of samples. Information on the neutron and gamma radiation environment inside the dry cell is required to facilitate irradiation of samples. This paper presents the computed neutron flux, neutron and gamma dose rate, and foil reaction rates in the dry cell, obtained through MCNP5 simulations of the NSCR core. The neutron flux was measured using foil activation method and the reaction rates obtained from {sup 197}Au(n,{gamma}){sup 198}Au and {sup 54}Fe(n,p){sup 54}Mn were compared with the model and they showed agreement within {approx} 20%. The gamma dose rate at selected locations inside the dry cell was measured using radiochromic films and the results indicate slightly higher dose rates than predicted from the model. This is because the model calculated only prompt gamma dose rates during reactor operation while the radiochromic films measured gammas from activation products and fission product decayed gammas. The model was also used to calculate the neutron energy spectra for the energy range from 0.001 eV- 20 MeV. (authors)

  10. Improving the AGR Fuel Testing Power Density Profile Versus Irradiation-Time in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gray S. Chang; David A. Petti; John T. Maki; Misti A. Lillo

    2009-05-01

    The Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR), which is currently being developed, achieves simplification of safety through reliance on ceramic-coated fuel particles. Each TRISO-coated fuel particle has its own containment which serves as the principal barrier against radionuclide release under normal operating and accident conditions. These fuel particles, in the form of graphite fuel compacts, are currently undergoing a series of irradiation tests in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to support the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (AGR) fuel qualification program. A representive coated fuel particle with an 235U enrichment of 19.8 wt% was used in this analysis. The fuel burnup analysis tool used to perform the neutronics study reported herein, couples the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP, with the radioactive decay and burnup code ORIGEN2. The fuel burnup methodology known as Monte-Carlo with ORIGEN2 (MCWO) was used to evaluate the AGR experiment assembly and demonstrate compliance with ATR safety requirements. For the AGR graphite fuel compacts, the MCWO-calculated fission power density (FPD) due to neutron fission in 235U is an important design parameter. One of the more important AGR fuel testing requirements is to maintain the peak fuel compact temperature close to 1250°C throughout the proposed irradiation campaign of 550 effective full power days (EFPDs). Based on the MCWO-calculated FPD, a fixed gas gap size was designed to allow regulation of the fuel compact temperatures throughout the entire fuel irradiation campaign by filling the gap with a mixture of helium and neon gases. The chosen fixed gas gap can only regulate the peak fuel compact temperature in the desired range during the irradiation test if the ratio of the peak power density to the time-dependent low power density (P/T) at 550 EFPDs is less than 2.5. However, given the near constant neutron flux within the ATR driver core and the depletion of 235U in

  11. AN INTEGRAL REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT TO INFER ACTINIDE CAPTURE CROSS-SECTIONS FROM THORIUM TO CALIFORNIUM WITH ACCELERATOR MASS SPECTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    G. Youinou; M. Salvatores; M. Paul; R. Pardo; G. Palmiotti; F. Kondev; G. Imel

    2010-04-01

    The principle of the proposed experiment is to irradiate very pure actinide samples in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INL and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The determination of the nuclide densities before and after neutron irradiation will allow inference of effective neutron capture cross-sections. This approach has been used in the past and the novelty of this experiment is that the atom densities of the different transmutation products will be determined using the Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) technique at the ATLAS facility located at ANL. It is currently planned to irradiate the following isotopes: 232Th, 235U, 236U, 238U, 237Np, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, 241Am, 243Am and 248Cm.

  12. Predictive Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Irradiation Embrittlement Models: Issues and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, George Robert; Nanstad, Randy K

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear plant life extension to 80 years will require accurate predictions of neutron irradiation-induced increases in the ductile-brittle transition temperature ( T) of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels at high fluence conditions that are far outside the existing database. Remarkable progress in mechanistic understanding of irradiation embrittlement has led to physically motivated T correlation models that provide excellent statistical fi ts to the existing surveillance database. However, an important challenge is developing advanced embrittlement models for low fl ux-high fl uence conditions pertinent to extended life. These new models must also provide better treatment of key variables and variable combinations and account for possible delayed formation of late blooming phases in low copper steels. Other issues include uncertainties in the compositions of actual vessel steels, methods to predict T attenuation away from the reactor core, verifi cation of the master curve method to directly measure the fracture toughness with small specimens and predicting T for vessel annealing remediation and re-irradiation cycles.

  13. Inhalation radiotoxicity of irradiated thorium as a heavy water reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, G.W.R.; Priest, N.D.; Richardson, R.B.

    2013-07-01

    The online refueling capability of Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs), and their good neutron economy, allows a relatively high amount of neutron absorption in breeding materials to occur during normal fuel irradiation. This characteristic makes HWRs uniquely suited to the extraction of energy from thorium. In Canada, the toxicity and radiological protection methods dealing with personnel exposure to natural uranium (NU) spent fuel (SF) are well-established, but the corresponding methods for irradiated thorium fuel are not well known. This study uses software to compare the activity and toxicity of irradiated thorium fuel ('thorium SF') against those of NU. Thorium elements, contained in the inner eight elements of a heterogeneous high-burnup bundle having LEU (Low-enriched uranium) in the outer 35 elements, achieve a similar burnup to NU SF during its residence in a reactor, and the radiotoxicity due to fission products was found to be similar. However, due to the creation of such inhalation hazards as U-232 and Th-228, the radiotoxicity of thorium SF was almost double that of NU SF after sufficient time has passed for the decay of shorter-lived fission products. Current radio-protection methods for NU SF exposure are likely inadequate to estimate the internal dose to personnel to thorium SF, and an analysis of thorium in fecal samples is recommended to assess the internal dose from exposure to this fuel. (authors)

  14. Dose rate estimates from irradiated light-water-reactor fuel assemblies in air

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, W.R.; Sheaffer, M.K.; Sutcliffe, W.G.

    1994-01-31

    It is generally considered that irradiated spent fuel is so radioactive (self-protecting) that it can only be moved and processed with specialized equipment and facilities. However, a small, possibly subnational, group acting in secret with no concern for the environment (other than the reduction of signatures) and willing to incur substantial but not lethal radiation doses, could obtain plutonium by stealing and processing irradiated spent fuel that has cooled for several years. In this paper, we estimate the dose rate at various distances and directions from typical pressurized-water reactor (PWR) and boiling-water reactor (BWR) spent-fuel assemblies as a function of cooling time. Our results show that the dose rate is reduced rapidly for the first ten years after exposure in the reactor, and that it is reduced by a factor of {approx}10 (from the one year dose rate) after 15 years. Even for fuel that has cooled for 15 years, a lethal dose (LD50) of 450 rem would be received at 1 m from the center of the fuel assembly after several minutes. However, moving from 1 to 5 m reduces the dose rate by over a factor of 10, and moving from 1 to 10 m reduces the dose rate by about a factor of 50. The dose rates 1 m from the top or bottom of the assembly are considerably less (about 10 and 22%, respectively) than 1 m from the center of the assembly, which is the direction of the maximum dose rate.

  15. Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.J.; et al.

    1998-12-14

    Alpha particle physics experiments were done on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium (DT) run from 1993-1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single-particle confinement model in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) quiescent discharges. Also, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE), and ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) waves were roughly consistent with theoretical modeling. This paper reviews what was learned and identifies what remains to be understood.

  16. Bounds on sterile neutrino parameters from reactor experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Kalpana

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we present a realistic analysis of the potential of the present-day reactor experiments Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO for probing the existence of sterile neutrinos. We present exclusion regions for sterile oscillation parameters and find that these experimental set-ups give significant bounds on the parameter Θee especially in the low sterile oscillation region 0.01 < Δm241 < 0.05 eV2. These bounds can add to our understanding of the sterile neutrino sector since there is still a tension in the allowed regions from different experiments for sterile parameters.

  17. Development of the Packed Bed Reactor ISS Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patton, Martin O.; Bruzas, Anthony E.; Rame, Enrique; Motil, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    Packed bed reactors are compact, require minimum power and maintenance to operate, and are highly reliable. These features make this technology a leading candidate as a potential unit operation in support of long duration human space exploration. On earth, this type of reactor accounts for approximately 80% of all the reactors used in the chemical process industry today. Development of this technology for space exploration is truly crosscutting with many other potential applications (e.g., in-situ chemical processing of planetary materials and transport of nutrients through soil). NASA is developing an ISS experiment to address this technology with particular focus on water reclamation and air revitalization. Earlier research and development efforts funded by NASA have resulted in two hydrodynamic models which require validation with appropriate instrumentation in an extended microgravity environment. The first model developed by Motil et al., (2003) is based on a modified Ergun equation. This model was demonstrated at moderate gas and liquid flow rates, but extension to the lower flow rates expected in many advanced life support systems must be validated. The other model, developed by Guo et al., (2004) is based on Darcy s (1856) law for two-phase flow. This model has been validated for a narrow range of flow parameters indirectly (without full instrumentation) and included test points where the flow was not fully developed. The flight experiment presented will be designed with removable test sections to test the hydrodynamic models. The experiment will provide flexibility to test additional beds with different types of packing in the future. One initial test bed is based on the VRA (Volatile Removal Assembly), a packed bed reactor currently on ISS whose behavior in micro-gravity is not fully understood. Improving the performance of this system through an accurate model will increase our ability to purify water in the space environment.

  18. SUMMARY OF ‘AFIP’ FULL SIZED PLATE IRRADIATIONS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Adam B; Wachs, Daniel M

    2010-03-01

    Recent testing at the Idaho National Laboratory has included four AFIP (ATR Full Size plate In center flux trap Position) experiments. These experiments included both dispersion plates and monolithic plates fabricated by both hot isostatic pressing and friction bonding utilizing both thermally sprayed inter-layers and zirconium barriers. These plates were tested between 100 and 350 w/cm2 at low temperatures and high burn-ups. The post irradiation exams performed have indicated good performance under the conditions tested and a summary of the findings and irradiation history are included herein.

  19. Neutron-Induced Microstructural Evolution of Fe-15Cr-16Ni Alloys at ~400 C During Neutron Irradiation in the FFTF Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, Taira; Sato, Toshihiko; Sekimura, Naoto; Garner, Francis A.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Wolfer, W. G.; Isobe, Yoshihiro

    2001-06-30

    An experiment conducted at ~400 degrees C on simple model austenitic alloys (Fe-15Cr-16Ni and Fe-15Cr-16Ni-0.25Ti, both with and without 500 appm boron) irradiated in the FFTF fast reactor at seven different dpa rates clearly shows that lowering of the atomic displacement rate leads to a pronounced reduction in the transient regime of void swelling. While the steady state swelling rate (~1%/dpa) of these alloys is unaffected by changes in the dpa rate, the transient regime of swelling can vary from <1 to ~60 dpa when the dpa rate varies over more than two orders of magnitude. This range of dpa rates covers the full span of fusion, PWR and fast reactor rates. The origin of the flux sensitivity of swelling arises first in the evolution of the Frank dislocation loop population, its unfaulting, and the subsequent evolution of the dislocation network. There also appears to be some flux sensitivity to the void nucleation process. Most interestingly, the addition of titanium suppresses the void nucleation process somewhat, but does not alter the duration of the transient regime of swelling or its sensitivity to dpa rate. Side-by-side irradiation of boron-modified model alloys in this same experiment shows that higher helium generation rates homogenize the swelling somewhat, but do not significantly change its magnitude or flux sensitivity. The results of this study support the prediction that austenitic alloys irradiated at PWR-relevant displacement rates will most likely swell more than when irradiated at higher rates characteristic of fast reactors. Thus, the use of swelling data accumulated in fast reactors may possibly lead to an under-prediction of swelling in lower-flux PWRs and fusion devices.

  20. The detector system of the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    An, F. P.

    2015-12-15

    The Daya Bay experiment was the first to report simultaneous measurements of reactor antineutrinos at multiple baselines leading to the discovery of ν¯e oscillations over km-baselines. Subsequent data has provided the world's most precise measurement of sin 22θ13 and the effective mass splitting Δm2ee. The experiment is located in Daya Bay, China where the cluster of six nuclear reactors is among the world's most prolific sources of electron antineutrinos. Multiple antineutrino detectors are deployed in three underground water pools at different distances from the reactor cores to search for deviations in the antineutrino rate and energy spectrum due to neutrinomore » mixing. Instrumented with photomultiplier tubes, the water pools serve as shielding against natural radioactivity from the surrounding rock and provide efficient muon tagging. Arrays of resistive plate chambers over the top of each pool provide additional muon detection. The antineutrino detectors were specifically designed for measurements of the antineutrino flux with minimal systematic uncertainty. Relative detector efficiencies between the near and far detectors are known to better than 0.2%. With the unblinding of the final two detectors’ baselines and target masses, a complete description and comparison of the eight antineutrino detectors can now be presented. This study describes the Daya Bay detector systems, consisting of eight antineutrino detectors in three instrumented water pools in three underground halls, and their operation through the first year of eight detector data-taking.« less

  1. The detector system of the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment

    SciTech Connect

    An, F. P.

    2015-12-15

    The Daya Bay experiment was the first to report simultaneous measurements of reactor antineutrinos at multiple baselines leading to the discovery of ν¯e oscillations over km-baselines. Subsequent data has provided the world's most precise measurement of sin 213 and the effective mass splitting Δm2ee. The experiment is located in Daya Bay, China where the cluster of six nuclear reactors is among the world's most prolific sources of electron antineutrinos. Multiple antineutrino detectors are deployed in three underground water pools at different distances from the reactor cores to search for deviations in the antineutrino rate and energy spectrum due to neutrino mixing. Instrumented with photomultiplier tubes, the water pools serve as shielding against natural radioactivity from the surrounding rock and provide efficient muon tagging. Arrays of resistive plate chambers over the top of each pool provide additional muon detection. The antineutrino detectors were specifically designed for measurements of the antineutrino flux with minimal systematic uncertainty. Relative detector efficiencies between the near and far detectors are known to better than 0.2%. With the unblinding of the final two detectors’ baselines and target masses, a complete description and comparison of the eight antineutrino detectors can now be presented. This study describes the Daya Bay detector systems, consisting of eight antineutrino detectors in three instrumented water pools in three underground halls, and their operation through the first year of eight detector data-taking.

  2. The detector system of the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, F. P.; Bai, J. Z.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Beavis, D.; Beriguete, W.; Bishai, M.; Blyth, S.; Brown, R. L.; Butorov, I.; Cao, D.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, J.; Carr, R.; Cen, W. R.; Chan, W. T.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, L. C.; Chang, Y.; Chasman, C.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M. J.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, X. C.; Chen, X. H.; Chen, X. S.; Chen, Y. X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cheng, Y. P.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chidzik, S.; Chow, K.; Chu, M. C.; Cummings, J. P.; de Arcos, J.; Deng, Z. Y.; Ding, X. F.; Ding, Y. Y.; Diwan, M. V.; Dong, L.; Dove, J.; Draeger, E.; Du, X. F.; Dwyer, D. A.; Edwards, W. R.; Ely, S. R.; Fang, S. D.; Fu, J. Y.; Fu, Z. W.; Ge, L. Q.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Gill, R.; Goett, J.; Gonchar, M.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Gornushkin, Y. A.; Grassi, M.; Greenler, L. S.; Gu, W. Q.; Guan, M. Y.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, X. H.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Hahn, R. L.; Han, R.; Hans, S.; He, M.; He, Q.; He, W. S.; Heeger, K. M.; Heng, Y. K.; Higuera, A.; Hinrichs, P.; Ho, T. H.; Hoff, M.; Hor, Y. K.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Hu, L. M.; Hu, L. J.; Hu, T.; Hu, W.; Huang, E. C.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, H. X.; Huang, P. W.; Huang, X.; Huang, X. T.; Huber, P.; Hussain, G.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jaffke, P.; Jen, K. L.; Jetter, S.; Ji, X. P.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, H. J.; Jiang, W. Q.; Jiao, J. B.; Johnson, R. A.; Joseph, J.; Kang, L.; Kettell, S. H.; Kohn, S.; Kramer, M.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Lai, C. Y.; Lai, W. C.; Lai, W. H.; Langford, T. J.; Lau, K.; Lebanowski, L.; Lee, J.; Lee, M. K. P.; Lei, R. T.; Leitner, R.; Leung, J. K. C.; Lewis, C. A.; Li, B.; Li, C.; Li, D. J.; Li, F.; Li, G. S.; Li, J.; Li, N. Y.; Li, Q. J.; Li, S. F.; Li, S. C.; Li, W. D.; Li, X. B.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y.; Li, Y. F.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, J.; Lin, C. J.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, P. Y.; Lin, S. X.; Lin, S. K.; Lin, Y. C.; Ling, J. J.; Link, J. M.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C.; Liu, D. W.; Liu, H.; Liu, J. L.; Liu, J. C.; Liu, S.; Liu, S. S.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Lu, C.; Lu, H. Q.; Lu, J. S.; Luk, A.; Luk, K. B.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Ma, L. H.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, X. B.; Ma, Y. Q.; Mayes, B.; McDonald, K. T.; McFarlane, M. C.; McKeown, R. D.; Meng, Y.; Mitchell, I.; Mohapatra, D.; Monari Kebwaro, J.; Morgan, J. E.; Nakajima, Y.; Napolitano, J.; Naumov, D.; Naumova, E.; Newsom, C.; Ngai, H. Y.; Ngai, W. K.; Nie, Y. B.; Ning, Z.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Olshevskiy, A.; Pagac, A.; Pan, H.-R.; Patton, S.; Pearson, C.; Pec, V.; Peng, J. C.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pinsky, L.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, F. Z.; Qi, M.; Qian, X.; Raper, N.; Ren, B.; Ren, J.; Rosero, R.; Roskovec, B.; Ruan, X. C.; Sands, W. R.; Seilhan, B.; Shao, B. B.; Shih, K.; Song, W. Y.; Steiner, H.; Stoler, P.; Stuart, M.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. L.; Tagg, N.; Tam, Y. H.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tang, W.; Tang, X.; Taychenachev, D.; Themann, H.; Torun, Y.; Trentalange, S.; Tsai, O.; Tsang, K. V.; Tsang, R. H. M.; Tull, C. E.; Tung, Y. C.; Viaux, N.; Viren, B.; Virostek, S.; Vorobel, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, L. Y.; Wang, L. Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, N. Y.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. W.; Wang, X. T.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Webber, D. M.; Wei, H. Y.; Wei, Y. D.; Wen, L. J.; Wenman, D. L.; Whisnant, K.; White, C. G.; Whitehead, L.; Whitten, C. A.; Wilhelmi, J.; Wise, T.; Wong, H. C.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, J.; Wong, S. C. F.; Worcester, E.; Wu, F. F.; Wu, Q.; Xia, D. M.; Xia, J. K.; Xiang, S. T.; Xiao, Q.; Xing, Z. Z.; Xu, G.; Xu, J. Y.; Xu, J. L.; Xu, J.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xue, T.; Yan, J.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, L.; Yang, M. S.; Yang, M. T.; Ye, M.; Yeh, M.; Yeh, Y. S.; Yip, K.; Young, B. L.; Yu, G. Y.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zeng, S.; Zhan, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, F. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, Q. X.; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. T.; Zhang, Y. C.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, Y. F.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zheng, L.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Z. Y.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zimmerman, S.; Zou, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    The Daya Bay experiment was the first to report simultaneous measurements of reactor antineutrinos at multiple baselines leading to the discovery of νbare oscillations over km-baselines. Subsequent data has provided the world's most precise measurement of sin2 2θ13 and the effective mass splitting Δ mee2. The experiment is located in Daya Bay, China where the cluster of six nuclear reactors is among the world's most prolific sources of electron antineutrinos. Multiple antineutrino detectors are deployed in three underground water pools at different distances from the reactor cores to search for deviations in the antineutrino rate and energy spectrum due to neutrino mixing. Instrumented with photomultiplier tubes, the water pools serve as shielding against natural radioactivity from the surrounding rock and provide efficient muon tagging. Arrays of resistive plate chambers over the top of each pool provide additional muon detection. The antineutrino detectors were specifically designed for measurements of the antineutrino flux with minimal systematic uncertainty. Relative detector efficiencies between the near and far detectors are known to better than 0.2%. With the unblinding of the final two detectors' baselines and target masses, a complete description and comparison of the eight antineutrino detectors can now be presented. This paper describes the Daya Bay detector systems, consisting of eight antineutrino detectors in three instrumented water pools in three underground halls, and their operation through the first year of eight detector data-taking.

  3. Status of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Daya Bay Collaboration; Lin, Cheng-Ju Stephen

    2010-12-15

    The last unknown neutrino mixing angle theta_13 is one of the fundamental parameters of nature; it is also a crucial parameter for determining the sensitivity of future long-baseline experiments aimed to study CP violation in the neutrino sector. Daya Bay is a reactor neutrino oscillation experiment designed to achieve a sensitivity on the value of sin^2(2*theta_13) to better than 0.01 at 90percent CL. The experiment consists of multiple identical detectors placed underground at different baselines to minimize systematic errors and suppress cosmogenic backgrounds. With the baseline design, the expected anti-neutrino signal at the far site is about 360 events per day and at each of the near sites is about 1500 events per day. An overview and current status of the experiment will be presented.

  4. Systematic Ion Irradiation Experiments to Olivine: Comparison with Space Weathered Rims of Itokawa Regolith Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, T.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Watanabe, N.; Yasuda, K.; Miyake, A.; Nakauchi, Y.; Okada, T.; Abe, M.; Yada, T.; Uesugi, M.; Karouji, Y.; Nakato, A.; Hashiguschi, M.; Kumagai, K.

    2015-11-01

    We performed H and He ion irradiation experiments using olivine fragments, in order to reveal formation time-scales of space weathered rims and formation processes of blisters by solar wind irradiation.

  5. Biomedical irradiation system for boron neutron capture therapy at the Kyoto University Reactor.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Kanda, K; Ujeno, Y; Ishida, M R

    1990-01-01

    Physics studies related to radiation source, spectroscopy, beam quality, dosimetry, and biomedical applications using the Kyoto University Reactor Heavy Water Facility are described. Also, described are a Nickel Mirror Neutron Guide Tube and a Super Mirror Neutron Guide Tube that are used both for the measurement of boron concentration in phantom and living tissue and for precise measurements of neutron flux in phantom in the presence of both light and heavy water. Discussed are: (1) spectrum measurements using the time of flight technique, (2) the elimination of gamma rays and fast neutrons from a thermal neutron irradiation field, (3) neutron collimation without producing secondary gamma rays, (4) precise neutron flux measurements, dose estimation, and the measurement of boron concentration in tumor and its periphery using guide tubes, (5) the dose estimation of boron-10 for the first melanoma patient, and (6) special-purpose biological irradiation equipment. Other related subjects are also described. PMID:2176458

  6. Design study of multi-imaging plate system for BNCT irradiation field at Kyoto university reactor.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Endo, Satoru

    2016-09-01

    The converter configuration for a multi-imaging plate system was investigated for the application of quality assurance in the irradiation field profile for boron neutron capture therapy. This was performed by the simulation calculation using the PHITS code in the fields at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Reactor. The converter constituents investigated were carbon for gamma rays, and polyethylene with and without LiF at varied (6)Li concentration for thermal, epithermal, and fast neutrons. Consequently, potential combinations of the converters were found for two components, gamma rays and thermal neutrons, for the standard thermal neutron mode and three components of gamma rays, epithermal neutrons, and thermal or fast neutrons, for the standard mixed or epithermal neutron modes, respectively. PMID:27423022

  7. Electrically heated ex-reactor pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) simulations utilizing irradiated Zircaloy cladding. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Barner, J.O.; Fitzsimmons, D.E.

    1985-02-01

    In a program sponsored by the Fuel Systems Research Branch of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, a series of six electrically heated fuel rod simulation tests were conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The primary objective of these tests was to determine the susceptibility of irradiated pressurized-water reactor (PWR) Zircaloy-4 cladding to failures caused by pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI). A secondary objective was to acquire kinetic data (e.g., ridge growth or relaxation rates) that might be helpful in the interpretation of in-reactor performance results and/or the modeling of PCMI. No cladding failures attributable to PCMI occurred during the six tests. This report describes the testing methods, testing apparatus, fuel rod diametral strain-measuring device, and test matrix. Test results are presented and discussed.

  8. IAEA international studies on irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Brumovsky, M.; Steele, L.E.

    1997-02-01

    In last 25 years, three phases a Co-operative Research Programme on Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels has been organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency. This programme started with eight countries in 1971 and finally 16 countries took part in phase III of the Programme in 1983. Several main efforts were put into preparation of the programme, but the principal task was concentrated on an international comparison of radiation damage characterization by different laboratories for steels of {open_quotes}old{close_quotes} (with high impurity contents) and {open_quotes}advanced{close_quotes} (with low impurity contents) types as well as on development of small scale fracture mechanics procedures applicable to reactor pressure vessel surveillance programmes. This year, a new programme has been opened, concentrated mostly on small scale fracture mechanics testing.

  9. Beryllium reflected cavity reactor for UF6 critical experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarvis, G. A.; Bernard, W.; Helmick, H. H.; White, R.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments and theoretical studies are being conducted for NASA on critical assemblies with one-meter diam by one-meter long low-density cores surrounded by a thick beryllium reflector. These assemblies make extensive use of existing nuclear propulsion reactor components, facilities, and instrumentation. Due to excessive porosity in the reflector, the initial critical mass was 19 kg U(93.2). Addition of a 17-cm-thick by 89-cm-diam beryllium flux trap in the cavity reduced the critical mass to 7 kg when all the uranium was in the zone just outside the flux trap. A mockup aluminum UF6 container was placed inside the flux trap and fueled with uranium-graphite elements. Fission distributions and reactivity worths of fuel and structural materials are available. These results will be used to guide the design of a prototype plasma core reactor which will test energy removal by optical radiation.

  10. Filtered fast neutron irradiation system using Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, S. Y.; Kim, C. H.; Reece, W. D.; Braby, L. A.

    2004-09-01

    A heavily filtered fast neutron irradiation system (FNIS) was developed for a variety of applications, including the study of long-term health effects of fast neutrons by evaluating the biological mechanisms of damage in cultured cells and living animals such as rats or mice. This irradiation system includes an exposure cave made with a lead-bismuth alloy, a cave positioning system, a gamma and neutron monitoring system, a sample transfer system, and interchangeable filters. This system was installed in the irradiation cell of the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR). For a realistic modeling of the NSCR, the irradiation cell, and the FNIS, this study used the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code and a set of high-temperature ENDF/B-VI continuous neutron cross-section data. Sensitivity analysis was performed to find the characteristics of the FNIS as a function of the thickness of the lead-bismuth alloy. A paired ion chamber system was constructed with a tissue-equivalent plastic (A-150) and propane gas for total dose monitoring and with graphite and argon for gamma dose monitoring. This study, in addition, tested the Monte Carlo modeling of the FNIS system, as well as the performance of the system by comparing the calculated results with experimental measurements using activation foils and paired ion chambers.

  11. Tensile and electrical properties of copper alloys irradiated in a fission reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fabritsiev, S.A.; Pokrovsky, A.S.; Zinkle, S.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1996-04-01

    Postirradiation electrical sensitivity and tensile measurements have been completed on pure copper and copper alloy sheet tensile specimens irradiated in the SM-2 reactor to doses of {approx}0.5 to 5 dpa and temperatures between {approx}80 and 400{degrees}C. Considerable radiation hardening and accompanying embrittlement was observed in all of the specimens at irradiation temperature below 200{degrees}C. The radiation-induced electrical conductivity degradation consisted of two main components: solid transmutation effects and radiation damage (defect cluster and particle dissolution) effects. The radiation damage component was nearly constant for the doses in this study, with a value of {approx}1.2n{Omega}m for pure copper and {approx}1.6n{Omega}m for dispersion strengthened copper irradiated at {approx}100{degrees}C. The solid transmutation component was proportional to the thermal neutron flux, and became larger than the radiation damage component for fluences larger than {approx}5 10{sup 24} n.m{sup 2}. The radiation hardening and electrical conductivity degradation decreased with increasing irradiation temperature, and became negligible for temperatures above {approx}300{degrees}C.

  12. NUHOWS - Storage and Transportation of Irradiated Reactor Components in Large Packages - 13439

    SciTech Connect

    Rae, Glen A.

    2013-07-01

    Most irradiated reactor components (hardware such as Control Rod Blades, Fuel Channels, Poison Curtains, etc.) generated at reactors previously required significant processing for size reduction due to the available transportation casks not being physically capable of containing unprocessed material. As of July 1, 2008, disposal for this typical waste class (B and C) became inaccessible (for the major part of the nation) due to the Barnwell, SC disposal facility being closed to all but its three compact states (CT, NJ and SC). Currently in the United States, most facilities are storing their irradiated hardware on-site in the spent fuel pools. Until recently with the opening of the Waste Control Specialists' Texas disposal facility, utilities faced the challenges of spent fuel pool space and capacity management. However, even with WCS's disposal availability, the site currently has annual Curie limitations for disposal, which will continue to promote interim on-site storage until such time as disposal is available. In response, Transnuclear Inc., (TN) an AREVA company, proceeded with designing a new large Radioactive Waste Container (RWC) that can be used to package irradiated hardware without the need for significant processing. The design features of the RWC allows for intermittent loadings of the hardware for better packaging efficiency, higher packaging density, space savings and reduced cost. This RWC is also compatible with TN's on-site modular vault storage system. Once completely loaded, the RWC can be transported to an on-site storage facility, an off-site storage facility and/or an available disposal facility. To accommodate the transportation, TN has designed a large transportation cask, the MP197HB. As the original design was for transporting fuel, it contains the necessary shielding to allow for the transport of unprocessed irradiated reactor components, while significantly reducing the amount of irradiated hardware shipments required with the use of

  13. Cracking behavior and microstructure of austenitic stainless steels and alloy 690 irradiated in BOR-60 reactor, phase I.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Soppet, W. K.; Shack, W. J.; Yang, Y.; Allen, T. R.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison

    2010-02-16

    Cracking behavior of stainless steels specimens irradiated in the BOR-60 at about 320 C is studied. The primary objective of this research is to improve the mechanistic understanding of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of core internal components under conditions relevant to pressurized water reactors. The current report covers several baseline tests in air, a comparison study in high-dissolved-oxygen environment, and TEM characterization of irradiation defect structure. Slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted in air and in high-dissolved-oxygen (DO) water with selected 5- and 10-dpa specimens. The results in high-DO water were compared with those from earlier tests with identical materials irradiated in the Halden reactor to a similar dose. The SSRT tests produced similar results among different materials irradiated in the Halden and BOR-60 reactors. However, the post-irradiation strength for the BOR-60 specimens was consistently lower than that of the corresponding Halden specimens. The elongation of the BOR-60 specimens was also greater than that of their Halden specimens. Intergranular cracking in high-DO water was consistent for most of the tested materials in the Halden and BOR-60 irradiations. Nonetheless, the BOR-60 irradiation was somewhat less effective in stimulating IG fracture among the tested materials. Microstructural characterization was also carried out using transmission electron microscopy on selected BOR-60 specimens irradiated to {approx}25 dpa. No voids were observed in irradiated austenitic stainless steels and cast stainless steels, while a few voids were found in base and grain-boundary-engineered Alloy 690. All the irradiated microstructures were dominated by a high density of Frank loops, which varied in mean size and density for different alloys.

  14. Irradiation performance of fast reactor MOX fuel pins with ferritic/martensitic cladding irradiated to high burnups

    SciTech Connect

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Ito, Masahiro; Mizuno, Tomoyasu; Katsuyama, Kozo; Makenas, Bruce J.; Wootan, David W.; Carmack, Jon

    2011-06-16

    The ACO-3 irradiation test, which attained extremely high burnups of about 232 GWd/t and resisted a high neutron fluence (E > 0.1 MeV) of about 39E26 n/m2 as one of the lead tests of the Core Demonstration Experiment in the Fast Flux Test Facility, demonstrated that the fuel pin cladding made of ferritic/martensitic HT-9 alloy had superior void swelling resistance. The measured diameter profiles of the irradiated ACO-3 fuel pins showed axially extensive incremental strain in the MOX fuel column region and localized incremental strain near the interfaces between the MOX fuel and upper blanket columns. These incremental strains were as low as 1.5% despite the extremely high level of the fast neutron fluence. Evaluation of the pin diametral strain indicated that the incremental strain in the MOX fuel column region was substantially due to cladding void swelling and irradiation creep caused by internal fission gas pressure, while the localized strain near the MOX fuel/upper blanket interface was likely the result of the pellet/cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) caused by cesium/fuel reactions. The evaluation also suggested that the PCMI was effectively mitigated by a large gap size between the cladding and blanket column.

  15. Irradiation performance of fast reactor MOX fuel pins with ferritic/martensitic cladding irradiated to high burnups

    SciTech Connect

    Tomoyuki Uwaba; Masahiro Ito; Kozo Katsuyama; Bruce J. Makenas; David W. Wootan; Jon Carmack

    2011-05-01

    The ACO-3 irradiation test, which attained extremely high burnups of about 232 GWd/t and resisted a high neutron fluence (E > 0.1 MeV) of about 39 × 1026 n/m2 as one of the lead tests of the Core Demonstration Experiment in the Fast Flux Test Facility, demonstrated that the fuel pin cladding made of ferritic/martensitic HT-9 alloy had superior void swelling resistance. The measured diameter profiles of the irradiated ACO-3 fuel pins showed axially extensive incremental strain in the MOX fuel column region and localized incremental strain near the interfaces between the MOX fuel and upper blanket columns. These incremental strains were as low as 1.5% despite the extremely high level of the fast neutron fluence. Evaluation of the pin diametral strain indicated that the incremental strain in the MOX fuel column region was substantially due to cladding void swelling and irradiation creep caused by internal fission gas pressure, while the localized strain near the MOX fuel/upper blanket interface was likely the result of the pellet/cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) caused by cesium/fuel reactions. The evaluation also suggested that the PCMI was effectively mitigated by a large gap size between the cladding and blanket column.

  16. Microstructural Characterization of a Mg Matrix U-Mo Dispersion Fuel Plate Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor to High Fission Density: SEM Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon D.; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam B.; Medvedev, Pavel G.; Madden, James W.; Moore, Glenn A.

    2016-04-01

    Low-enriched (U-235 <20 pct) U-Mo dispersion fuel is being developed for use in research and test reactors. In most cases, fuel plates with Al or Al-Si alloy matrices have been tested in the Advanced Test Reactor to support this development. In addition, fuel plates with Mg as the matrix have also been tested. The benefit of using Mg as the matrix is that it potentially will not chemically interact with the U-Mo fuel particles during fabrication or irradiation, whereas with Al and Al-Si alloys such interactions will occur. Fuel plate R9R010 is a Mg matrix fuel plate that was aggressively irradiated in ATR. This fuel plate was irradiated as part of the RERTR-8 experiment at high temperature, high fission rate, and high power, up to high fission density. This paper describes the results of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of an irradiated fuel plate using polished samples and those produced with a focused ion beam. A follow-up paper will discuss the results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Using SEM, it was observed that even at very aggressive irradiation conditions, negligible chemical interaction occurred between the irradiated U-7Mo fuel particles and Mg matrix; no interconnection of fission gas bubbles from fuel particle to fuel particle was observed; the interconnected fission gas bubbles that were observed in the irradiated U-7Mo particles resulted in some transport of solid fission products to the U-7Mo/Mg interface; the presence of microstructural pathways in some U-9.1 Mo particles that could allow for transport of fission gases did not result in the apparent presence of large porosity at the U-7Mo/Mg interface; and, the Mg-Al interaction layers that were present at the Mg matrix/Al 6061 cladding interface exhibited good radiation stability, i.e. no large pores.

  17. Microstructural Characterization of a Mg Matrix U-Mo Dispersion Fuel Plate Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor to High Fission Density: SEM Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon D.; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam B.; Medvedev, Pavel G.; Madden, James W.; Moore, Glenn A.

    2016-06-01

    Low-enriched (U-235 <20 pct) U-Mo dispersion fuel is being developed for use in research and test reactors. In most cases, fuel plates with Al or Al-Si alloy matrices have been tested in the Advanced Test Reactor to support this development. In addition, fuel plates with Mg as the matrix have also been tested. The benefit of using Mg as the matrix is that it potentially will not chemically interact with the U-Mo fuel particles during fabrication or irradiation, whereas with Al and Al-Si alloys such interactions will occur. Fuel plate R9R010 is a Mg matrix fuel plate that was aggressively irradiated in ATR. This fuel plate was irradiated as part of the RERTR-8 experiment at high temperature, high fission rate, and high power, up to high fission density. This paper describes the results of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of an irradiated fuel plate using polished samples and those produced with a focused ion beam. A follow-up paper will discuss the results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Using SEM, it was observed that even at very aggressive irradiation conditions, negligible chemical interaction occurred between the irradiated U-7Mo fuel particles and Mg matrix; no interconnection of fission gas bubbles from fuel particle to fuel particle was observed; the interconnected fission gas bubbles that were observed in the irradiated U-7Mo particles resulted in some transport of solid fission products to the U-7Mo/Mg interface; the presence of microstructural pathways in some U-9.1 Mo particles that could allow for transport of fission gases did not result in the apparent presence of large porosity at the U-7Mo/Mg interface; and, the Mg-Al interaction layers that were present at the Mg matrix/Al 6061 cladding interface exhibited good radiation stability, i.e. no large pores.

  18. The Muon System of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    An, F. P.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Brown, R. E.; Chasman, C.; Dale, E.; Diwan, M. V.; Gill, R.; Hans, S.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; et al

    2014-10-05

    The Daya Bay experiment consists of functionally identical antineutrino detectors immersed in pools of ultrapure water in three well-separated underground experimental halls near two nuclear reactor complexes. These pools serve both as shields against natural, low-energy radiation, and as water Cherenkov detectors that efficiently detect cosmic muons using arrays of photomultiplier tubes. Each pool is covered by a plane of resistive plate chambers as an additional means of detecting muons. Design, construction, operation, and performance of these muon detectors are described. (auth)

  19. MHTGR: New production reactor summary of experience base

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    Worldwide interest in the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) stems from the capability of the system to retain the advanced fuel and thermal performance while providing unparalleled levels of safety. The small power level of the MHTGR and its passive systems give it a margin of safety not attained by other concepts being developed for power generation. This report covers the experience base for the key nuclear system, components, and processes related to the MHTGR-NPR. 9 refs., 39 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. The muon system of the Daya Bay Reactor antineutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, F. P.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Beriguete, W.; Bishai, M.; Blyth, S.; Brown, R. E.; Butorov, I.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, J.; Carr, R.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, L.; Chang, Y.; Chasman, C.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, X. C.; Chen, X. H.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. X.; Cheng, Y. P.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, M. C.; Cummings, J. P.; Dale, E.; de Arcos, J.; Deng, Z. Y.; Ding, Y. Y.; Diwan, M. V.; Draeger, E.; Du, X. F.; Dwyer, D. A.; Edwards, W. R.; Ely, S. R.; Fu, J. Y.; Ge, L. Q.; Gill, R.; Goett, J.; Gonchar, M.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Gu, W. Q.; Guan, M. Y.; Guo, X. H.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Han, G. H.; Hans, S.; He, M.; He, Q.; Heeger, K. M.; Heng, Y. K.; Hinrichs, P.; Hor, Y. K.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Hu, L. J.; Hu, L. M.; Hu, T.; Hu, W.; Huang, E. C.; Huang, H. X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X. T.; Huber, P.; Hussain, G.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jaffke, P.; Jetter, S.; Ji, X. L.; Ji, X. P.; Jiang, H. J.; Jiao, J. B.; Johnson, R. A.; Kang, L.; Kebwaro, J. M.; Kettell, S. H.; Kramer, M.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Lai, W. C.; Lai, W. H.; Lau, K.; Lebanowski, L.; Lee, J.; Lei, R. T.; Leitner, R.; Leung, A.; Leung, J. K. C.; Lewis, C. A.; Li, D. J.; Li, F.; Li, G. S.; Li, Q. J.; Li, W. D.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y. Z. B.; Liang, H.; Lin, C. J.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, P. Y.; Lin, S. K.; Link, J. M.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Liu, D. W.; Liu, H.; Liu, J. C.; Liu, J. L.; Liu, S. S.; Liu, Y. B.; Lu, C.; Lu, H. Q.; Luk, K. B.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. B.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. Q.; McDonald, K. T.; McFarlane, M. C.; McKeown, R. D.; Meng, Y.; Mitchell, I.; Mohapatra, D.; Morgan, J. E.; Nakajima, Y.; Napolitano, J.; Naumov, D.; Naumova, E.; Nemchenok, I.; Newsom, C.; Ngai, H. Y.; Ngai, W. K.; Ning, Z.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Olshevski, A.; Patton, S.; Pec, V.; Pearson, C. E.; Peng, J. C.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pinsky, L.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, F. Z.; Qi, M.; Qian, X.; Raper, N.; Ren, B.; Ren, J.; Rosero, R.; Roskovec, B.; Ruan, X. C.; Shao, B. B.; Steiner, H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. L.; Tam, Y. H.; Tang, X.; Themann, H.; Tsang, K. V.; Tsang, R. H. M.; Tull, C. E.; Tung, Y. C.; Viren, B.; Virostek, S.; Vorobel, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, L. Y.; Wang, L. Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, N. Y.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. W.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Webber, D. M.; Wei, H. Y.; Wei, Y. D.; Wen, L. J.; Whisnant, K.; White, C. G.; Whitehead, L.; Wilhelmi, J.; Wise, T.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, S. C. F.; Worcester, E.; Wu, Q.; Xia, D. M.; Xia, J. K.; Xia, X.; Xing, Z. Z.; Xu, G. H.; Xu, J.; Xu, J. L.; Xu, J. Y.; Xu, Y.; Xue, T.; Yan, J.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, L.; Yang, M. S.; Yang, M. T.; Ye, M.; Yeh, M.; Yeh, Y. S.; Young, B. L.; Yu, G. Y.; Yu, J. Y.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zang, S. L.; Zhan, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, F. H.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zheng, L.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Z. Y.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zou, J. H.

    2015-02-01

    The Daya Bay experiment consists of functionally identical antineutrino detectors immersed in pools of ultrapure water in three well-separated underground experimental halls near two nuclear reactor complexes. These pools serve both as shields against natural, low-energy radiation, and as water Cherenkov detectors that efficiently detect cosmic muons using arrays of photomultiplier tubes. Each pool is covered by a plane of resistive plate chambers as an additional means of detecting muons. Design, construction, operation, and performance of these muon detectors are described.

  1. Simulated Irradiation of Samples in HFIR for use as Possible Test Materials in the MPEX (Material Plasma Exposure Experiment) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Ronald James; Rapp, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The importance of Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) facility will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. The project presented in this paper involved performing assessments of the induced radioactivity and resulting radiation fields of a variety of potential fusion reactor materials. The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of the samples in HFIR; generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. These state-of-the-art simulation methods were used in addressing the challenge of the MPEX project to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples for inclusion in the MPEX facility.

  2. Weapons-Grade MOX Fuel Burnup Characteristics in Advanced Test Reactor Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang

    2006-07-01

    Mixed oxide (MOX) test capsules prepared with weapons-derived plutonium have been irradiated to a burnup of 50 GWd/t. The MOX fuel was fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) by a master-mix process and has been irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Previous withdrawals of the same fuel have occurred at 9, 21, 30, 40, and 50 GWd/t. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) manages this test series for the Department of Energy’s Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP). A UNIX BASH (Bourne Again SHell) script CMO has been written and validated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to couple the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the depletion and buildup code ORIGEN-2 (CMO). The new Monte Carlo burnup analysis methodology in this paper consists of MCNP coupling through CMO with ORIGEN-2(MCWO). MCWO is a fully automated tool that links the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the radioactive decay and burnup code ORIGEN-2. The fuel burnup analyses presented in this study were performed using MCWO. MCWO analysis yields time-dependent and neutron-spectrum-dependent minor actinide and Pu concentrations for the ATR small I-irradiation test position. The purpose of this report is to validate both the Weapons-Grade Mixed Oxide (WG-MOX) test assembly model and the new fuel burnup analysis methodology by comparing the computed results against the neutron monitor measurements and the irradiated WG-MOX post irradiation examination (PIE) data.

  3. Subtask 12G3: Fracture properties of V-4Cr-4Ti irradiated in the dynamic helium charging experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Nowicki, L.J.; Busch, D.E.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the effect of simultaneous displacement damage and dynamically charged helium on the ductile-brittle transition behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti specimens irradiated to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degrees}C in the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE). One property of vanadium-base alloys that is not well understood in terms of their potential use as fusion reactor structural materials is the effect of simultaneous generation of helium and neutron damage under conditions relevant to fusion reactor operation. In the present DHCE, helium was produced uniformly in the specimen at linear rates ranging from {approx}0.4 to 4.2 appm helium/dpa by the decay of tritium during irradiation to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degrees}C in Li-filled DHCE capsules in the Fast Flux Test Facility. Ductile-brittle transition behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti, recently identified as the most promising vanadium-base alloy for fusion reactor use, was determined from multiple-bending tests (at -196{degrees}C to 50{degrees}C) and quantitative SEM fractography on TEM disks (0.3-mm thick) and broken tensile specimens (1.0-mm thick). No brittle behavior was observed at temperatures >-150{degrees}C, and predominantly brittle-cleavage fracture morphologies were observed only at -196{degrees}C in some specimens irradiated to 31 dpa at 425{degrees}C during DHCE. Ductile-brittle transition temperatures (DBTTs) were -200{degrees}C to -175{degrees}C for both types of specimens. In strong contrast to tritium-trick experiments in which dense coalescence of helium bubbles is produced on grain boundaries in the absence of displacement damage, no intergranular fracture was observed in the bend-tested specimens irradiated in the DHCE. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Startup of reactors for anoxic ammonium oxidation: experiences from the first full-scale anammox reactor in Rotterdam.

    PubMed

    van der Star, Wouter R L; Abma, Wiebe R; Blommers, Dennis; Mulder, Jan-Willem; Tokutomi, Takaaki; Strous, Marc; Picioreanu, Cristian; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2007-10-01

    The first full-scale anammox reactor in the world was started in Rotterdam (NL). The reactor was scaled-up directly from laboratory-scale to full-scale and treats up to 750 kg-N/d. In the initial phase of the startup, anammox conversions could not be identified by traditional methods, but quantitative PCR proved to be a reliable indicator for growth of the anammox population, indicating an anammox doubling time of 10-12 days. The experience gained during this first startup in combination with the availability of seed sludge from this reactor, will lead to a faster startup of anammox reactors in the future. The anammox reactor type employed in Rotterdam was compared to other reactor types for the anammox process. Reactors with a high specific surface area like the granular sludge reactor employed in Rotterdam provide the highest volumetric loading rates. Mass transfer of nitrite into the biofilm is limiting the conversion of those reactor types that have a lower specific surface area. Now the first full-scale commercial anammox reactor is in operation, a consistent and descriptive nomenclature is suggested for reactors in which the anammox process is employed. PMID:17583763

  5. Method to Assess the Radionuclide Inventory of Irradiated Graphite from Gas-Cooled Reactors - 13072

    SciTech Connect

    Poncet, Bernard

    2013-07-01

    About 17,000 t of irradiated graphite waste will be produced from the decommissioning of the six French gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Determining the radionuclide (RN) content of this waste is of relevant importance for safety reasons and in order to determine the best way to manage them. For many reasons the impurity content that gave rise to the RNs in irradiated graphite by neutron activation during operation is not always well known and sometimes actually unknown. So, assessing the RN content by the use of traditional calculation activation, starting from assumed impurity content, leads to a false assessment. Moreover, radiochemical measurements exhibit very wide discrepancies especially on RN corresponding to precursor at the trace level such as natural chlorine corresponding to chlorine 36. This wide discrepancy is unavoidable and is due to very simple reasons. The level of impurity is very low because the uranium fuel used at that very moment was not enriched, so it was a necessity to have very pure nuclear grade graphite and the very low size of radiochemical sample is a simple technical constraint because device size used to get mineralization product for measurement purpose is limited. The assessment of a radionuclide inventory only based on few number of radiochemical measurements lead in most cases, to a gross over or under-estimation that is detrimental for graphite waste management. A method using an identification calculation-measurement process is proposed in order to assess a radiological inventory for disposal sizing purpose as precise as possible while guaranteeing its upper character. This method present a closer approach to the reality of the main phenomenon at the origin of RNs in a reactor, while also incorporating the secondary effects that can alter this result such as RN (or its precursor) release during reactor operation. (authors)

  6. Mechanical behavior of the ITER TF model coil ground insulation system after reactor irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner-Rohrhofer, K.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W.

    2002-11-01

    The mechanical properties of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRPs) suggested for the turn and ground insulation of the ITER toroidal field (TF) coils are subject to extensive investigations with respect to their design requirements at present. The insulation system used for the ITER TF model coil, manufactured by European industry, consists of a boron-free R-glass fiber reinforced tape, vacuum-pressure impregnated in a DGEBA epoxy system and partly interleaved with polyimide-foils (e.g. Kapton-H-foils). In order to assess the material performance under the actual operating conditions of ITER-FEAT, the system was irradiated in the TRIGA reactor (Vienna, Austria) to neutron fluences of 5×10 21 and 1×10 22 m -2 ( E>0.1 MeV). The composite was screened at 77 K using static tensile, short-beam-shear (SBS) as well as double-lap-shear tests prior to and after irradiation. Furthermore, tension-tension fatigue measurements were done in order to simulate the pulsed ITER-FEAT operation. We observe that the mechanical strength and the fracture behavior of these GFRPs after irradiation are strongly influenced by the three factors: the winding direction of the tape, the quality of fabrication and the delamination process.

  7. Nanostructures formed in pure quartz glass under irradiation in the reactor core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibragimova, E. M.; Mussaeva, M. A.; Kalanov, M. U.

    2014-04-01

    Optical spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques were used for studying nanoscale particles grown in pure SiO2 glass under irradiation with fast neutron fluencies within 6×1016-5·1019 cm-2 and gamma-quanta ~1.8×1020 cm-2 in the reactor core in water. The neutron irradiation results in destroying of the initial α- and β-quartz mesoscopic order of 1.7 and 1.2 nm sizes and growing of cristobalite and tridymite nanocrystals of 16 and 8 nm sizes in the thermal peaks of displacements reapectively. The point defects (oxygen deficient E‧s, E'1, E'2 and non-bridging oxygen centers) induced by the γ-irradiation are accumulated in the nanocrystals shell of 0.65-0.85 nm thickness. Interaction of close point defects at the nanocrystal-glass interface causes the splitting of optical absorption bands into the intensive (D~2-4) resonances characteristic for local interband electron transitions, having the width of 10-15 nm close to the nanocrystals' sizes and the energy depending on their structure.

  8. Comparative study of survived displacement damage defects in iron irradiated in IFMIF and fusion power reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, S. P.; Konobeyev, A. Yu.; Fischer, U.; Heinzel, V.

    2009-04-01

    The assessment of the primary survived defects rates in iron such as vacancies-interstitials pairs and simplest clusters have been performed for the IFMIF, fusion power plant and research reactor. This was achieved by a modified version of the NJOY code, when processing evaluated nuclear cross section file. The modifications accounted for the reduction of the available damage energy predicted by the standard NRT model by the surviving defects fractions. These fractions were picked-up from the molecular dynamics and binary collisions simulation results available in the literature. The number of primary survived and clustered defects in the α-iron irradiated in the high flux test module of IFMIF was estimated as 10 and 6 dpa/fpy or several times less than standard NRT estimates at the level of 30 dpa/fpy. The comparison with damages in iron calculated for irradiation in the first wall of fusion power plant gave however the same reduction factors, that supports the qualification of IFMIF as a fusion material irradiation facility.

  9. Warm PreStress effect on highly irradiated reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hure, J.; Vaille, C.; Wident, P.; Moinereau, D.; Landron, C.; Chapuliot, S.; Benhamou, C.; Tanguy, B.

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the Warm Prestress (WPS) effect on 16MND5 (A508 Cl3) RPV steel, irradiated up to a fluence of 13 ·1023 n .m-2 (E > 1 MeV) at a temperature of 288 ° C, corresponding to more than 60 years of operations in a French Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Mechanical properties, including tensile tests with different strain rates and tension-compression tests on notched specimens, have been characterized at unirradiated and irradiated states and used to calibrate constitutive equations to describe the mechanical behavior as a function of temperature and fluence. Irradiation embrittlement has been determined based on Charpy V-notch impact tests and isothermal quasi-static toughness tests. Assessment of WPS effect has been done through various types of thermomechanical loadings performed on CT(0.5 T) specimens. All tests have confirmed the non-failure during the thermo-mechanical transients. Experimental data obtained in this study have been compared to both engineering-based models and to a local approach (Beremin) model for cleavage fracture. It is shown that both types of modeling give good predictions for the effective toughness after warm prestressing.

  10. Low-temperature irradiation creep of fusion reactor structural materials*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossbeck, M. L.; Mansur, L. K.

    1991-03-01

    Irradiation creep has been investigated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor in an assembly spectrally tailored to achieve a He : dpa ratio of 12-14:1 appm/dpa in austenitic stainless steels. Temperatures of 60-400°C were investigated to address the requirements of near term fusion devices. It was found that austenitic alloys, especially PCA, have higher creep rates at 60°C than at 330 and 400°C. Since this phenomenon could not be explained by existing theoretical models, a new mechanism was proposed and a corresponding theoretical model was developed. Since vacancy migration times can be a few orders of magnitude longer than the irradiation times in this temperature regime, the immobile vacancies do not cancel climb produced by mobile interstitials absorbed at dislocations. The result is a high climb rate independent of stress-induced preferred absorption (SIPA) mechanisms. Preliminary calculations indicate that this mechanism coupled with preferred-absorption-driven glide at higher temperatures predicts a high creep rate at low temperatures and a weak temperature dependence of irradiation creep over the entire temperature range investigated.

  11. Tritium trapping in silicon carbide in contact with solid breeder under high flux isotope reactor irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    H. Katsui; Y. Katoh; A. Hasegawa; M. Shimada; Y. Hatano; T. Hinoki; S. Nogami; T. Tanaka; S. Nagata; T. Shikama

    2013-11-01

    The trapping of tritium in silicon carbide (SiC) injected from ceramic breeding materials was examined via tritium measurements using imaging plate (IP) techniques. Monolithic SiC in contact with ternary lithium oxide (lithium titanate and lithium aluminate) as a ceramic breeder was irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. The distribution of photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) of tritium in SiC was successfully obtained, which separated the contribution of 14C ß-rays to the PSL. The tritium incident from ceramic breeders was retained in the vicinity of the SiC surface even after irradiation at 1073 K over the duration of ~3000 h, while trapping of tritium was not observed in the bulk region. The PSL intensity near the SiC surface in contact with lithium titanate was higher than that obtained with lithium aluminate. The amount of the incident tritium and/or the formation of a Li2SiO3 phase on SiC due to the reaction with lithium aluminate under irradiation likely were responsible for this observation.

  12. UNDERWATER ANALYSIS OF IRRADIATED REACTOR SLUGS FOR Co-60 AND OTHER RADIONUCLIDES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    CASELLA, VITO

    2004-05-10

    Co-60 was produced in the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors in the 1970s, and the irradiated cobalt reactor slugs were stored in a reactor basin at SRS. Since the activity rates of these slugs were not accurately known, assaying was required. A sodium iodide gamma detector was placed above a specially designed air collimator assembly, so that the slug was eight to nine feet from the detector and was shielded by the basin water. Also, 18 curium sampler slugs, used to produce Cm-244 from Pu-239, were to be disposed of with the cobalt slugs. The curium slugs were also analyzed with a High Purity Germanium (HPGE) detector in an attempt to identify any additional radionuclides produced from the irradiation. Co-60 concentrations were determined for reactor disassembly basin cobalt slugs and the 18 curium sampler slugs. The total Co-60 activity of all of the assayed slugs in this work summed to 31,783 curies on 9/15/03. From the Co-60 concentrations of the curium sampler slugs, the irradiation flux was determined for the known irradiation time. The amounts of Pu-238,-239,-240,-241,-242; Am-241,-243; and Cm-242,-244 produced were then obtained based on the original amount of Pu-239 irradiated.

  13. Linear variable differential transformer (LVDT)-based elongation measurements in Advanced Test Reactor high temperature irradiation testing

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe

    2012-02-01

    New materials are being considered for fuel, cladding, and structures in next generation and existing nuclear reactors. These materials can undergo significant dimensional and physical changes during high temperature irradiations. Currently, such changes are determined by repeatedly irradiating a specimen for a specified period of time in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and then removing it from the reactor for evaluation. The labor and time to remove, examine, and return irradiated samples for each measurement makes this approach very expensive. In addition, such techniques provide limited data and may disturb the phenomena of interest. To resolve these issues, an instrumented creep testing capability is being developed for specimens irradiated in pressurized water reactor (PWR) coolant conditions in the ATR at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This paper reports the status of INL efforts to develop this testing capability. In addition to providing an overview of in-pile creep test capabilities available at other test reactors, this paper focuses on efforts to design and evaluate a prototype test rig in an autoclave at INL's High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL).

  14. Linear variable differential transformer (LVDT)-based elongation measurements in Advanced Test Reactor high temperature irradiation testing

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe

    2012-02-01

    New materials are being considered for fuel, cladding and structures in next generation and existing nuclear reactors. These materials can undergo significant dimensional and physical changes during high temperature irradiations. Currently, such changes are determined by repeatedly irradiating a specimen for a specified period of time in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and then removing it from the reactor for evaluation. The labor and time to remove, examine and return irradiated samples for each measurement make this approach very expensive. In addition, such techniques provide limited data and may disturb the phenomena of interest. To resolve these issues, an instrumented creep testing capability is being developed for specimens irradiated under pressurized water reactor coolant conditions in the ATR at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This paper reports the status of INL efforts to develop this testing capability. In addition to providing an overview of in-pile creep test capabilities available at other test reactors, this paper focuses on efforts to design and evaluate a prototype test rig in an autoclave at INL’s High Temperature Test Laboratory.

  15. Accelerator-Based Irradiation Creep of Pyrolytic Carbon Used in TRISO Fuel Particles for the (VHTR) Very Hight Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lumin Wang; Gary Was

    2010-07-30

    Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) is one of the important structural materials in the TRISO fuel particles which will be used in the next generation of gas-cooled very-high-temperature reactors (VHTR). When the TRISO particles are under irradiation at high temperatures, creep of the PyC layers may cause radial cracking leading to catastrophic particle failure. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the creep behavior of PyC during irradiation is required to predict the overall fuel performance.

  16. Spectrum and density of neutron flux in the irradiation beam line no. 3 of the IBR-2 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabalin, E. P.; Verkhoglyadov, A. E.; Bulavin, M. V.; Rogov, A. D.; Kulagin, E. N.; Kulikov, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    Methodology and results of measuring the differential density of the neutron flux in irradiation beam line no. 3 of the IBR-2 reactor using neutron activation analysis (NAA) are presented in the paper. The results are compared to the calculation performed on the basis of the 3D MCNP model. The data that are obtained are required to determine the integrated radiation dose of the studied samples at various distances from the reactor.

  17. Microstructure and Property Evolution in Advanced Cladding and Duct Materials Under Long-Term Irradiation at Elevated Temperature: Critical Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Was, Gary; Jiao, Zhijie; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2013-12-20

    The in-service degradation of reactor core materials is related to underlying changes in the irradiated microstructure. During reactor operation, structural components and cladding experience displacement of atoms by collisions with neutrons at temperatures at which the radiation-induced defects are mobile, leading to microstructure evolution under irradiation that can degrade material properties. At the doses and temperatures relevant to fast reactor operation, the microstructure evolves by microchemistry changes due to radiation-induced segregation, dislocation loop formation and growth, radiation induced precipitation, destabilization of the existing precipitate structure, as well as the possibility for void formation and growth. These processes do not occur independently; rather, their evolution is highly interlinked. Radiation-induced segregation of Cr and existing chromium carbide coverage in irradiated alloy T91 track each other closely. The radiation-induced precipitation of Ni-Si precipitates and RIS of Ni and Si in alloys T91 and HCM12A are likely related. Neither the evolution of these processes nor their coupling is understood under the conditions required for materials performance in fast reactors (temperature range 300-600°C and doses to 200 dpa and beyond). Further, predictive modeling is not yet possible, as models for microstructure evolution must be developed along with experiments to characterize these key processes and provide tools for extrapolation. To extend the range of operation of nuclear fuel cladding and structural materials in advanced nuclear energy and transmutation systems to that required for the fast reactor, the irradiation-induced evolution of the microstructure, microchemistry, and the associated mechanical properties at relevant temperatures and doses must be understood. This project builds upon joint work at the proposing institutions, under a NERI-C program that is scheduled to end in September, to understand the effects of

  18. Status of the Norwegian thorium light water reactor (LWR) fuel development and irradiation test program

    SciTech Connect

    Drera, S.S.; Bjork, K.I.; Kelly, J.F.; Asphjell, O.

    2013-07-01

    Thorium based fuels offer several benefits compared to uranium based fuels and should thus be an attractive alternative to conventional fuel types. In order for thorium based fuel to be licensed for use in current LWRs, material properties must be well known for fresh as well as irradiated fuel, and accurate prediction of fuel behavior must be possible to make for both normal operation and transient scenarios. Important parameters are known for fresh material but the behaviour of the fuel under irradiation is unknown particularly for low Th content. The irradiation campaign aims to widen the experience base to irradiated (Th,Pu)O{sub 2} fuel and (Th,U)O{sub 2} with low Th content and to confirm existing data for fresh fuel. The assumptions with respect to improved in-core fuel performance are confirmed by our preliminary irradiation test results, and our fuel manufacture trials so far indicate that both (Th,U)O{sub 2} and (Th,Pu)O{sub 2} fuels can be fabricated with existing technologies, which are possible to upscale to commercial volumes.

  19. COUNTERCURRENT FLOW LIMITATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING FOR IMPROVED REACTOR SAFETY

    SciTech Connect

    Vierow, Karen

    2008-09-26

    This project is investigating countercurrent flow and “flooding” phenomena in light water reactor systems to improve reactor safety of current and future reactors. To better understand the occurrence of flooding in the surge line geometry of a PWR, two experimental programs were performed. In the first, a test facility with an acrylic test section provided visual data on flooding for air-water systems in large diameter tubes. This test section also allowed for development of techniques to form an annular liquid film along the inner surface of the “surge line” and other techniques which would be difficult to verify in an opaque test section. Based on experiences in the air-water testing and the improved understanding of flooding phenomena, two series of tests were conducted in a large-diameter, stainless steel test section. Air-water test results and steam-water test results were directly compared to note the effect of condensation. Results indicate that, as for smaller diameter tubes, the flooding phenomena is predominantly driven by the hydrodynamics. Tests with the test sections inclined were attempted but the annular film was easily disrupted. A theoretical model for steam venting from inclined tubes is proposed herein and validated against air-water data. Empirical correlations were proposed for air-water and steam-water data. Methods for developing analytical models of the air-water and steam-water systems are discussed, as is the applicability of the current data to the surge line conditions. This report documents the project results from July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2008.

  20. Resolving the reactor neutrino anomaly with the KATRIN neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formaggio, J. A.; Barrett, J.

    2011-11-01

    The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) combines an ultra-luminous molecular tritium source with an integrating high-resolution spectrometer to gain sensitivity to the absolute mass scale of neutrinos. The projected sensitivity of the experiment on the electron neutrino mass is 200 meV at 90% C.L. With such unprecedented resolution, the experiment is also sensitive to physics beyond the Standard Model, particularly to the existence of additional sterile neutrinos at the eV mass scale. A recent analysis of available reactor data appears to favor the existence of such a sterile neutrino with a mass splitting of | Δmsterile | 2 ⩾ 1.5eV2 and mixing strength of sin2 2θsterile = 0.17 ± 0.08 at 95% C.L. Upcoming tritium beta decay experiments should be able to rule out or confirm the presence of the new phenomenon for a substantial fraction of the allowed parameter space.

  1. Reactor operations Brookhaven medical research reactor, Brookhaven high flux beam reactor informal monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Hauptman, H.M.; Petro, J.N.; Jacobi, O.

    1995-04-01

    This document is the April 1995 summary report on reactor operations at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor and the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Ongoing experiments/irradiations in each are listed, and other significant operations functions are also noted. The HFBR surveillance testing schedule is also listed.

  2. Fabrication and Comparison of Fuels for Advanced Gas Reactor Irradiation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Phillips; Charles Barnes; John Hunn

    2010-10-01

    As part of the program to demonstrate TRISO-coated fuel for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a series of irradiation tests of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel are being performed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. In the first test, called “AGR-1,” graphite compacts containing approximately 300,000 coated particles were irradiated from December 2006 until November 2009. Development of AGR-1 fuel sought to replicate the properties of German TRISO-coated particles. No particle failures were seen in the nearly 3-year irradiation to a burn up of 19%. The AGR-1 particles were coated in a two-inch diameter coater. Following fabrication of AGR-1 fuel, process improvements and changes were made in each of the fabrication processes. Changes in the kernel fabrication process included replacing the carbon black powder feed with a surface-modified carbon slurry and shortening the sintering schedule. AGR-2 TRISO particles were produced in a six-inch diameter coater using a change size about twenty-one times that of the two-inch diameter coater used to coat AGR-1 particles. Changes were also made in the compacting process, including increasing the temperature and pressure of pressing and using a different type of press. Irradiation of AGR-2 fuel began in late spring 2010. Properties of AGR-2 fuel compare favorably with AGR-1 and historic German fuel. Kernels are more homogeneous in shape, chemistry and density. TRISO-particle sphericity, layer thickness standard deviations, and defect fractions are also comparable. In a sample of 317,000 particles from deconsolidated AGR-2 compacts, 3 exposed kernels were found in a leach test. No SiC defects were found in a sample of 250,000 deconsolidated particles, and no IPyC defects in a sample of 64,000 particles. The primary difference in properties between AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacts is that AGR-2 compacts have a higher matrix density, 1.6 g/cm3 compared to about 1.3 g/cm3 for AGR-1 compacts. Based on

  3. Further evaluations of the toxicity of irradiated advanced heavy water reactor fuels.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Geoffrey W R; Priest, Nicholas D

    2014-11-01

    The neutron economy and online refueling capability of heavy water moderated reactors enable them to use many different fuel types, such as low enriched uranium, plutonium mixed with uranium, or plutonium and/or U mixed with thorium, in addition to their traditional natural uranium fuel. However, the toxicity and radiological protection methods for fuels other than natural uranium are not well established. A previous paper by the current authors compared the composition and toxicity of irradiated natural uranium to that of three potential advanced heavy water fuels not containing plutonium, and this work uses the same method to compare irradiated natural uranium to three other fuels that do contain plutonium in their initial composition. All three of the new fuels are assumed to incorporate plutonium isotopes characteristic of those that would be recovered from light water reactor fuel via reprocessing. The first fuel investigated is a homogeneous thorium-plutonium fuel designed for a once-through fuel cycle without reprocessing. The second fuel is a heterogeneous thorium-plutonium-U bundle, with graded enrichments of U in different parts of a single fuel assembly. This fuel is assumed to be part of a recycling scenario in which U from previously irradiated fuel is recovered. The third fuel is one in which plutonium and Am are mixed with natural uranium. Each of these fuels, because of the presence of plutonium in the initial composition, is determined to be considerably more radiotoxic than is standard natural uranium. Canadian nuclear safety regulations require that techniques be available for the measurement of 1 mSv of committed effective dose after exposure to irradiated fuel. For natural uranium fuel, the isotope Pu is a significant contributor to the committed effective dose after exposure, and thermal ionization mass spectrometry is sensitive enough that the amount of Pu excreted in urine is sufficient to estimate internal doses, from all isotopes, as low

  4. Elemental analysis of Egyptian crude oils by INAA using rabbit irradiation system at ETRR-2 reactor.

    PubMed

    El-Khayatt, A M

    2010-12-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) using rabbit irradiation system at ETRR-2 reactor was utilized to analyze some elements namely Na, Mg, Al, Cl, V, Mn, In, and Br in four different crude petroleum samples from different oil fields in the Suez-Gulf region of Egypt. The INAA was performed by four different standardization methods. Namely absolute, single comparator based on effective cross section concept, single comparator based on k(0,Au) factors, and that based on k(0,ic) factors defined versus any suitable internal comparator method. A FORTRAN computer program was written to calculate the extracted concentrations by these methods. A reasonable agreement between the obtained results was noticed. PMID:20692177

  5. Systems and methods for retaining and removing irradiation targets in a nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Runkle, Gary A.; Matsumoto, Jack T.; Dayal, Yogeshwar; Heinold, Mark R.

    2015-12-08

    A retainer is placed on a conduit to control movement of objects within the conduit in access-restricted areas. Retainers can prevent or allow movement in the conduit in a discriminatory fashion. A fork with variable-spacing between prongs can be a retainer and be extended or collapsed with respect to the conduit to change the size of the conduit. Different objects of different sizes may thus react to the fork differently, some passing and some being blocked. Retainers can be installed in inaccessible areas and allow selective movement in remote portions of conduit where users cannot directly interface, including below nuclear reactors. Position detectors can monitor the movement of objects through the conduit remotely as well, permitting engagement of a desired level of restriction and object movement. Retainers are useable in a variety of nuclear power plants and with irradiation target delivery, harvesting, driving, and other remote handling or robotic systems.

  6. Public information circular for shipments of irradiated reactor fuel. Revision 10

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    This circular has been prepared to provide information on the shipment of irradiated reactor fuel (spent fuel) subject to regulation by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). It provides a brief description of spent fuel shipment safety and safeguards requirements of general interest, a summary of data for 1979--1994 highway and railway shipments, and a listing, by State, of recent highway and railway shipment routes. The enclosed route information reflects specific NRC approvals that have been granted in response to requests for shipments of spent fuel. This publication does not constitute authority for carriers or other persons to use the routes described to ship spent fuel, other categories of nuclear waste, or other materials.

  7. Public information circular for shipments of irradiated reactor fuel. Revision 12

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    This circular has been prepared to provide information on the shipment of irradiated reactor fuel (spent fuel) subject to regulation by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). It provides a brief description of spent fuel shipment safety and safeguards requirements of general interest, a summary of data for 1979--1996 highway and railway shipments, and a listing, by State, of recent highway and railway shipment routes. The enclosed route information reflects specific NRC approvals that have been granted in response to requests for shipments of spent fuel. This publication does not constitute authority for carriers or other persons to use the routes described to ship spent fuel, other categories of nuclear waste, or other materials.

  8. Power Distribution Analysis for the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor Critical Experiment 3

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, David; Primm, Trent; Maldonado, G Ivan

    2010-01-01

    The mission of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program is to minimize and, to the extent possible, eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in civilian nuclear applications by working to convert research and test reactors, as well as radioisotope production processes, to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel and targets. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is currently reviewing the design bases and key operating criteria including fuel operating parameters, enrichment-related safety analyses, fuel performance, and fuel fabrication in regard to converting the fuel of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from HEU to LEU. The purpose of this study is to validate Monte Carlo methods currently in use for conversion analyses. The methods have been validated for the prediction offlux values in the reactor target, reflector, and beam tubes, but this study focuses on the prediction of the power density profile in the core. Power distributions were calculated in the fuel elements of the HFIR, a research reactor at ORNL, via MCNP and were compared to experimentally obtained data. This study was performed to validate Monte Carlo methods for power density calculations and to observe biases. A current three-dimensional MCNP model was modified to replicate the 1965 HFIR Critical Experiment 3 (HFIRCE-3). In this experiment, the power profile was determined by counting the gamma activity at selected locations in the core. 'Foils' (chunks of fuel meat and clad) were punched out of the fuel elements in HFIRCE-3 following irradiation, and experimental relative power densities were obtained by measuring the activity of these foils and comparing each foil's activity to the activity of a normalizing foil. This analysis consisted of calculating corresponding activities by inserting volume tallies into the modified MCNP model to represent the punchings. The average fission density was calculated for each foil location and then normalized to the reference foil

  9. Evolution of Nickel-Manganese-Silicon Dominated Phases in Highly Irradiated Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Peter B Wells; Yuan Wu; Tim Milot; G. Robert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto; Brandon Miller; James Cole

    2014-11-01

    Formation of a high density of Ni-Mn-Si nm-scale precipitates in irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels, both with and without Cu, could lead to severe embrittlement. Models long ago predicted that these precipitates, which are not treated in current embrittlement regulations, would emerge only at high fluence. However, the mechanisms and variables that control Ni-Mn- Si precipitate formation, and their detailed characteristics, have not been well understood. High flux irradiations of six steels with systematic variations in Cu and Ni were carried out at ˜ 295±5°C to high and very high neutron fluences of ˜ 1.3x1020 and 1.1x1021 n/cm2. Atom probe tomography (APT) shows that significant mole fractions of these precipitates form in the Cu bearing steels at ˜ 1.3x1020 n/cm2, while they are only beginning to develop in Cu-free steels. However, large mole fractions, far in excess of those found in previous studies, are observed at 1.1x1021 n/cm2 at all Cu levels. The precipitates diffract, and in one case are compositionally and structurally consistent with the Mn6Ni16Si7 G-phase. At the highest fluence, the large precipitate mole fractions primarily depend on the steel Ni content, rather than Cu, and lead to enormous strength increases up to about 700 MPa. The implications of these results to light water reactor life extension are discussed briefly.

  10. Analysis of epithermal neutron beam experiments at the HIFAR reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, B.V.; Constantine, G.

    1995-01-01

    A calculated model of the entire core of the DIDO class reactor HIFAR has been used to analyze epithermal neutron beam experiments. In the experiments, an off-center fuel element was replaced by a dummy fuel element voided by a dry liner in which an aluminium spectrum shifter was suspended at core center to extract the beam. Various combinations of the filter materials aluminum, iron, sulfur, titanium, and cadmium were inserted near the top of the dry liner, and liquid argon was placed in a cryostat above the dummy element. Reaction rates were measured in a fission chamber, sandwiched between various thicknesses of polyethylene, in order to assess the accuracy of the calculational model for different regions of the neutron energy spectrum of the beam. The neutron source distribution of the HIFAR core was obtained from a three-dimensional diffusion calculation, with burnup-dependent fuel compositions and fission products included, using the AUS modular code scheme. Argon cross sections were generated from ENDL-84 data and resonance parameters taken from Neutron Cross Sections (1984). A whole-core MCNP source calculation was used to analyze the experiments giving good agreement between measured and calculated reaction rates. This whole-core model of HIFAR may be applied with confidence to predict the performance of filtered beams for boron neutron capture therapy and also to other HIFAR calculations.

  11. Seventeen years of LMFBR experience: Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II)

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, W.H.; Lentz, G.L.; Richardson, W.J.; Wolz, G.C.

    1982-05-01

    Operating experience at EBR-II over the past 17 years has shown that a sodium-cooled pool-type reactor can be safely and efficiently operated and maintained. The reactor has performed predictably and benignly during normal operation and during both unplanned and planned plant upsets. The duplex-tube evaporators and superheaters have never experienced a sodium/water leak, and the rest of the steam-generating system has operated without incident. There has been no noticeable degradation of the heat transfer efficiency of the evaporators and superheaters, except for the one superheater replaced in 1981. There has been no need to perform any chemical cleaning of steam-system components. Operation of EBR-II has produced a wealth of information. As an irradiation facility, EBR-II has generated specific information on the behavior of oxide, carbide, and metallic fuels. As an LMFBR power plant, EBR-II has produced general information related to plant-systems and equipment design, plant safety, plant availability, and plant maintenance.

  12. Evolution of magnetic properties of cladding austenitic steel under irradiation in a reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukalkin, Yu. G.; Kozlov, A. V.; Evseev, M. V.

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic properties of samples of austenitic steel ChS-68 cut from the cladding of a fuel element, which was irradiated in a BN-600 fast-neutron reactor to a maximal damage dose of ˜80 displacements per atom (dpa) at temperatures of 370-587°C, have been investigated. It has been established that irradiation with fast neutrons leads to the formation of ferromagnetic microregions, the effective sizes and concentration of which depend on the damage dose. It has been shown that, at damage doses higher than ˜55 dpa, small spontaneous magnetization and magnetization hysteresis, which are characteristic of the ferromagnetic state, appear in the samples. It is assumed that the ferromagnetic microregions are the nuclei of the α' phase and the radiation-induced segregation microregions, in which the spacing between the nearest iron atoms exceeds the critical distance that determines the change in the sign of exchange interaction. Arguments in favor of this assumption are presented.

  13. Low Temperature Fatigue Properties of Advanced Cyanate-Ester Blends after Reactor Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner-Rohrhofer, K.; Humer, K.; Weber, H. W.; Fabian, P. E.; Munshi, N. A.; Feucht, S. W.

    2004-06-01

    Fiber reinforced composites offer a broad spectrum of applications due to their excellent material performance under demanding conditions. Therefore, these materials will also be employed as insulation systems for the superconducting magnets in fusion devices. However, high doses of gamma and neutron irradiation lead to a drastic damage mostly of the organic matrices, such as pure epoxy resins. An improvement of these composites with regard to higher radiation resistance is of special importance to ensure stable coil operation over the plant lifetime. Recently, a series of advanced S2-glass fiber composites was developed, which consist of novel cyanate ester (CE) blends. All systems were irradiated in the TRIGA reactor (Vienna, Austria) to a neutron fluence of 1×1021 and 1×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV), in order to assess the radiation hardness of their ultimate tensile strength. Furthermore, the material performance under cyclic load was investigated by tension-tension fatigue measurements at 77 K in view of the pulsed ITER operating conditions.

  14. Mechanical Behaviour of Cyanate Ester/epoxy Blends after Reactor Irradiation to High Neutron Fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopec, R.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W.

    2008-03-01

    The mechanical strength of conventional epoxy resins drops dramatically after irradiation to a fast neutron fluence of 1×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV). Recent results demonstrated that cyanate ester/epoxy blends were not affected at this fluence level. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance potential of these blends at higher fluence levels without significant degradation of their mechanical properties. Short-beam shear as well as static tensile tests were carried out at 77 K prior to and after irradiation to fast neutron fluences of up to 4×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV) in the TRIGA reactor at ambient temperature (340 K). In addition, load controlled tension-tension fatigue measurements were performed, in order to simulate the pulsed operation conditions of a tokamak. Initial results show that only a small reduction of the mechanical strength under static and dynamic load is observed at a fast neutron fluence of 2×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV). After exposure to 4×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV) the interlaminar shear strength of materials with a cyanate ester content of 40% or more is only reduced by 20% to 30%.

  15. Disposal Of Irradiated Cadmium Control Rods From The Plumbrook Reactor Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Posivak, E.J.; Berger, S.R.; Freitag, A.A.

    2008-07-01

    Innovative mixed waste disposition from NASA's Plum Brook Reactor Facility was accomplished without costly repackaging. Irradiated characteristic hardware with contact dose rates as high as 8 Sv/hr was packaged in a HDPE overpack and stored in a Secure Environmental Container during earlier decommissioning efforts, awaiting identification of a suitable pathway. WMG obtained regulatory concurrence that the existing overpack would serve as the macro-encapsulant per 40CFR268.45 Table 1.C. The overpack vent was disabled and the overpack was placed in a stainless steel liner to satisfy overburden slumping requirements. The liner was sealed and placed in shielded shoring for transport to the disposal site in a US DOT Type A cask. Disposition via this innovative method avoided cost, risk, and dose associated with repackaging the high dose irradiated characteristic hardware. In conclusion: WMG accomplished what others said could not be done. Large D and D contractors advised NASA that the cadmium control rods could only be shipped to the proposed Yucca mountain repository. NASA management challenged MOTA to find a more realistic alternative. NASA and MOTA turned to WMG to develop a methodology to disposition the 'hot and nasty' waste that presumably had no path forward. Although WMG lead a team that accomplished the 'impossible', the project could not have been completed with out the patient, supportive management by DOE-EM, NASA, and MOTA. (authors)

  16. Slow positron beam and nanoindentation study of irradiation-related defects in reactor vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangbing; Wang, Rongshan; Jiang, Jing; Wu, Yichu; Zhang, Chonghong; Ren, Ai; Xu, Chaoliang; Qian, Wangjie

    2014-08-01

    In order to understand the nature of the hardening after radiation in reactor vessel steels, China A508-3 steels were implanted by proton with an energy of 240 keV up to 2.5 × 1016, 5.5 × 1016, 1.1 × 1017, and 2.5 × 1017 ions cm-2, respectively. Vacancy type defects were detected by energy-variable positron beam Doppler broadening technique and then nanoindentation measurements were performed to investigate proton-induced hardening effects. The results showed that S-parameter increased as a function of positron incident energy after irradiation, and the increasing rate of the S-parameter near the surface was larger than that in the bulk due to radiation damage. The size of vacancy type defects increased with dose. Irradiation induced hardening was shown that the average hardness increased with dose. Moreover a direct correlation between positron annihilation parameter and hardness was found based on Kasada method.

  17. Low Temperature Fatigue Properties of Advanced Cyanate-Ester Blends after Reactor Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bittner-Rohrhofer, K.; Humer, K.; Weber, H.W.; Fabian, P.E.; Munshi, N.A.; Feucht, S.W.

    2004-06-28

    Fiber reinforced composites offer a broad spectrum of applications due to their excellent material performance under demanding conditions. Therefore, these materials will also be employed as insulation systems for the superconducting magnets in fusion devices. However, high doses of gamma and neutron irradiation lead to a drastic damage mostly of the organic matrices, such as pure epoxy resins. An improvement of these composites with regard to higher radiation resistance is of special importance to ensure stable coil operation over the plant lifetime. Recently, a series of advanced S2-glass fiber composites was developed, which consist of novel cyanate ester (CE) blends. All systems were irradiated in the TRIGA reactor (Vienna, Austria) to a neutron fluence of 1x1021 and 1x1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV), in order to assess the radiation hardness of their ultimate tensile strength. Furthermore, the material performance under cyclic load was investigated by tension-tension fatigue measurements at 77 K in view of the pulsed ITER operating conditions.

  18. MECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF CYANATE ESTER/EPOXY BLENDS AFTER REACTOR IRRADIATION TO HIGH NEUTRON FLUENCES

    SciTech Connect

    Prokopec, R.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W.

    2008-03-03

    The mechanical strength of conventional epoxy resins drops dramatically after irradiation to a fast neutron fluence of 1x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV). Recent results demonstrated that cyanate ester/epoxy blends were not affected at this fluence level. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance potential of these blends at higher fluence levels without significant degradation of their mechanical properties. Short-beam shear as well as static tensile tests were carried out at 77 K prior to and after irradiation to fast neutron fluences of up to 4x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV) in the TRIGA reactor at ambient temperature (340 K). In addition, load controlled tension-tension fatigue measurements were performed, in order to simulate the pulsed operation conditions of a tokamak. Initial results show that only a small reduction of the mechanical strength under static and dynamic load is observed at a fast neutron fluence of 2x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV). After exposure to 4x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV) the interlaminar shear strength of materials with a cyanate ester content of 40% or more is only reduced by 20% to 30%.

  19. Status Report on Efforts to Enhance Instrumentation to Support Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; J. E. Daw

    2011-03-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR NSUF facilitates basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors was completed. Based on this review, recommendations were made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR; and a strategy was developed for obtaining these sensors. In 2009, a report was issued documenting this program’s strategy and initial progress toward accomplishing program objectives. In 2009, a report was issued documenting this instrumentation development strategy and initial progress toward accomplishing instrumentation development program objectives. This document reports progress toward implementing this strategy in 2010.

  20. Gas Evolution Measurements on Reactor Irradiated Advanced Fusion Magnet Insulation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humer, K.; Seidl, E.; Weber, H. W.; Fabian, P. E.; Feucht, S. W.; Munshi, N. A.

    2006-03-01

    Glass-fiber reinforced plastics (GFRPs) are used as insulation materials for the superconducting magnet coils of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The radiation environment present at the magnet location will lead to gas production, swelling and weight loss of the laminate, which may result in a pressure rise combined with undefined stresses on the magnet coil casing. Consequently, these effects are important parameters for the engineering and design criteria of superconducting magnet coil structures. In this study, newly developed epoxy and cyanate-ester (CE) based S2-glass fiber reinforced insulation systems were irradiated at ambient temperature in the TRIGA-Mark II reactor (Vienna) to a fast neutron fluence of 1 and 5×1021 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV) prior to measurements of gas evolution, swelling and weight loss. The CE based laminates show increased radiation resistance, i.e. less gas evolution. The highest radiation hardness up to the highest dose was observed in a pure CE system. In addition, the effects of swelling and weight loss are either negligible or less pronounced for all systems. The results prove that the newly developed CE based composites are serious candidate insulation systems for ITER.

  1. Status Report on Efforts to Enhance Instrumentation to Support Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    J. Rempe; D. Knudson; J. Daw; T. Unruh; B. Chase; R. Schley; J. Palmer; K. Condie

    2014-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support the growth of nuclear science and technology in the United States (US). By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR NSUF facilitates basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to design, develop, and deploy new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors was completed. Based on this initial review, recommendations were made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR, and a strategy was developed for obtaining these sensors. In 2009, a report was issued documenting this program’s strategy and initial progress toward accomplishing program objectives. Since 2009, annual reports have been issued to provide updates on the program strategy and the progress made on implementing the strategy. This report provides an update reflecting progress as of January 2014.

  2. Structural characterization of nanoscale intermetallic precipitates in highly neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouster, D. J.; Sinsheimer, J.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.; Wells, P.; Stan, T.; Almirall, N.; Odette, G. R.; Ecker, L. E.

    2015-10-21

    Here, massive, thick-walled pressure vessels are permanent nuclear reactor structures that are exposed to a damaging flux of neutrons from the adjacent core. The neutrons cause embrittlement of the vessel steel that increases with dose (fluence or service time), as manifested by an increasing temperature transition from ductile-to-brittle fracture. Moreover, extending reactor life requires demonstrating that large safety margins against brittle fracture are maintained at the higher neutron fluence associated with 60 to 80 years of service. Here synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering measurements are used to characterize a new class of highly embrittling nm-scale Mn-Ni-Si precipitates that develop in the irradiated steels at high fluence. Furthermore, these precipitates can lead to severe embrittlement that is not accounted for in current regulatory models. Application of the complementarity techniques has, for the very first time, successfully characterized the crystal structures of the nanoprecipitates, while also yielding self-consistent compositions, volume fractions and size distributions.

  3. Structural characterization of nanoscale intermetallic precipitates in highly neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sprouster, D. J.; Sinsheimer, J.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.; Wells, P.; Stan, T.; Almirall, N.; Odette, G. R.; Ecker, L. E.

    2015-10-21

    Here, massive, thick-walled pressure vessels are permanent nuclear reactor structures that are exposed to a damaging flux of neutrons from the adjacent core. The neutrons cause embrittlement of the vessel steel that increases with dose (fluence or service time), as manifested by an increasing temperature transition from ductile-to-brittle fracture. Moreover, extending reactor life requires demonstrating that large safety margins against brittle fracture are maintained at the higher neutron fluence associated with 60 to 80 years of service. Here synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering measurements are used to characterize a new class of highly embrittling nm-scale Mn-Ni-Si precipitatesmore » that develop in the irradiated steels at high fluence. Furthermore, these precipitates can lead to severe embrittlement that is not accounted for in current regulatory models. Application of the complementarity techniques has, for the very first time, successfully characterized the crystal structures of the nanoprecipitates, while also yielding self-consistent compositions, volume fractions and size distributions.« less

  4. Gas Evolution Measurements on Reactor Irradiated Advanced Fusion Magnet Insulation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Humer, K.; Seidl, E.; Weber, H. W.; Fabian, P. E.; Feucht, S. W.; Munshi, N. A.

    2006-03-31

    Glass-fiber reinforced plastics (GFRPs) are used as insulation materials for the superconducting magnet coils of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The radiation environment present at the magnet location will lead to gas production, swelling and weight loss of the laminate, which may result in a pressure rise combined with undefined stresses on the magnet coil casing. Consequently, these effects are important parameters for the engineering and design criteria of superconducting magnet coil structures. In this study, newly developed epoxy and cyanate-ester (CE) based S2-glass fiber reinforced insulation systems were irradiated at ambient temperature in the TRIGA-Mark II reactor (Vienna) to a fast neutron fluence of 1 and 5x1021 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV) prior to measurements of gas evolution, swelling and weight loss. The CE based laminates show increased radiation resistance, i.e. less gas evolution. The highest radiation hardness up to the highest dose was observed in a pure CE system. In addition, the effects of swelling and weight loss are either negligible or less pronounced for all systems. The results prove that the newly developed CE based composites are serious candidate insulation systems for ITER.

  5. Modeling of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of mixed oxide fuel for sodium fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karahan, Aydın; Buongiorno, Jacopo

    2010-01-01

    An engineering code to model the irradiation behavior of UO2-PuO2 mixed oxide fuel pins in sodium-cooled fast reactors was developed. The code was named fuel engineering and structural analysis tool (FEAST-OXIDE). FEAST-OXIDE has several modules working in coupled form with an explicit numerical algorithm. These modules describe: (1) fission gas release and swelling, (2) fuel chemistry and restructuring, (3) temperature distribution, (4) fuel-clad chemical interaction and (5) fuel-clad mechanical analysis. Given the fuel pin geometry, composition and irradiation history, FEAST-OXIDE can analyze fuel and cladding thermo-mechanical behavior at both steady-state and design-basis transient scenarios. The code was written in FORTRAN-90 program language. The mechanical analysis module implements the LIFE algorithm. Fission gas release and swelling behavior is described by the OGRES and NEFIG models. However, the original OGRES model has been extended to include the effects of joint oxide gain (JOG) formation on fission gas release and swelling. A detailed fuel chemistry model has been included to describe the cesium radial migration and JOG formation, oxygen and plutonium radial distribution and the axial migration of cesium. The fuel restructuring model includes the effects of as-fabricated porosity migration, irradiation-induced fuel densification, grain growth, hot pressing and fuel cracking and relocation. Finally, a kinetics model is included to predict the clad wastage formation. FEAST-OXIDE predictions have been compared to the available FFTF, EBR-II and JOYO databases, as well as the LIFE-4 code predictions. The agreement was found to be satisfactory for steady-state and slow-ramp over-power accidents.

  6. Benchmark Evaluation of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment Program Critical Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2013-02-01

    A series of small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were performed in 1962-1965 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) program. The MPRE was a stainless-steel clad, highly enriched uranium (HEU)-O2 fuelled, BeO reflected reactor design to provide electrical power to space vehicles. Cooling and heat transfer were to be achieved by boiling potassium in the reactor core and passing vapor directly through a turbine. Graphite- and beryllium-reflected assemblies were constructed at ORCEF to verify the critical mass, power distribution, and other reactor physics measurements needed to validate reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. The experimental series was broken into three parts, with the third portion of the experiments representing the beryllium-reflected measurements. The latter experiments are of interest for validating current reactor design efforts for a fission surface power reactor. The entire series has been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments and submitted for publication in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

  7. Changes in magnetic parameters of neutron irradiated SA 508 Cl. 3 reactor pressure vessel forging and weld surveillance specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Se-Hwan; Chang, Kee-Ok; Hong, Jun-Hwa; Kuk, Il-Hiun; Kim, Chong-Oh

    1999-04-01

    Irradiation-induced changes in the magnetic parameters and mechanical properties were measured and compared to explore possible correlations for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) forging and weld surveillance Charpy specimens which were irradiated to the neutron fluence of 2.3×1019n/cm2 (E>1.0 MeV) in a typical pressurized water reactor environment at 290 °C. For mechanical property parameters, Vickers microhardness, tensile and Charpy impact tests were performed and saturation magnetization (Ms), remanence (Mr), coercivity (Hc), and Barkhausen noise amplitude (BNA) were measured for magnetic parameters for both unirradiated and irradiated specimens, respectively. Results of mechanical property measurements showed an increase in yield and tensile strength, Vickers microhardness, 30 ft. lb indexed RTNDT and a decrease in Charpy upper-shelf energy irrespective of forging and weld metals. Hysteresis loops appeared to turn clockwise, resulting in an increase in Hc, and BNA appeared to decrease after irradiation. Both magnetic parameters showed viable correlations to the changes in mechanical parameters (Vickers microhardness, Charpy upper shelf energy) due to irradiation. Even limited, the present study seems to show additional possibilities for the application of this magnetic method in monitoring the mechanical parameter changes due to neutron irradiation.

  8. Comparison of MCNP calculation and measurement of neutron fluence in a channel for short-time irradiation in the LVR-15 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lahodova, Z.; Flibor, S.; Klupak, V.; Kucera, J.; Marek, M.; Viererbl, L.

    2006-07-01

    The main purpose of this work was to evaluate the neutron energy distribution in a channel of the LVR-15 reactor used mostly for short-time neutron activation analysis. Twenty types of activation monitors were irradiated in this channel equipped with a pneumatic facility with a transport time of 3.5 s. The activities measured and the corresponding reaction rates were used to determinate the neutron spectrum. The reaction rates were compared with MCNP calculations to confirm the results. The second purpose of this work was to verify our nuclear data library used for the reaction rate calculations. The experiment results were also incorporated into our database system of neutron energy distribution at the reactor core. (authors)

  9. Effects of neutron irradiation on microstructures and hardness of stainless steel weld-overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, T.; Kakubo, Y.; Matsukawa, Y.; Nozawa, Y.; Toyama, T.; Nagai, Y.; Nishiyama, Y.; Katsuyama, J.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Onizawa, K.

    2014-06-01

    The microstructures and the hardness of stainless steel weld overlay cladding of reactor pressure vessels subjected to neutron irradiation at a dose of 7.2 × 1019 n cm-2 (E > 1 MeV) and a flux of 1.1 × 1013 n cm-2 s-1 at 290 °C were investigated by atom probe tomography and by a nanoindentation technique. To isolate the effects of the neutron irradiation, we compared the results of the measurements of the neutron-irradiated samples with those from a sample aged at 300 °C for a duration equivalent to that of the irradiation. The Cr concentration fluctuation was enhanced in the δ-ferrite phase of the irradiated sample. In addition, enhancement of the concentration fluctuation of Si, which was not observed in the aged sample, was observed. The hardening in the δ-ferrite phase occurred due to both irradiation and aging; however, the hardening of the irradiated sample was more than that expected from the Cr concentration fluctuation, which suggested that the Si concentration fluctuation and irradiation-induced defects were possible origins of the additional hardening.

  10. IRRADIATION CREEP AND SWELLING OF RUSSIAN FERRITIC-MARTENSITIC STEELS IRRADIATED TO VERY HIGH EXPOSURES IN THE BN-350 FAST REACTOR AT 305-335 DEGREES C

    SciTech Connect

    Konobeev, Yu V.; Dvoraishin, A. M.; Porollo, S. I.; Shulepin, S. V.; Budylkin, N. I.; Mironova, E. G.; Garner, Francis A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2003-09-03

    Russian ferritic martensitic (F(slash)M) steels EP(dash)450, EP(dash)852 and EP(dash)823 were irradiated in the BN(dash)350 fast reactor in the form of gas-pressurized creep tubes. The first steel is used in Russia for hexagonal wrappers in fast reactors. The other steels were developed for compatibility with Pb(dash)Bi coolants and serve to enhance our understanding of the general behavior of this class of steels. In an earlier paper we published data on irradiation creep of EP(dash)450 and EP(dash) 823 at temperatures between 390 and 520 degrees C, with dpa levels ranging from 20 to 60 dpa. In the current paper new data on the irradiation creep and swelling of EP(dash)450 and EP(dash)852 at temperatures between 305 and 335 degrees C and doses ranging from 61 to 89 dpa are presented. Where comparisons are possible, it appears that these steels exhibit behavior that is very consistent with that of Western steels. Swelling is relatively low at high neutron exposure and confined to temperatures less then 420 degrees C, but may be camouflaged somewhat by precipitation related densification. These irradiation creep studies confirm that the creep compliance of F(slash)M steels is about one half that of austenitic steels.

  11. Irradiation effects in low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels (Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program Series 4 and 5)

    SciTech Connect

    Berggren, R.G.; McGowan, J.J.; Menke, B.H.; Nanstad, R.K.; Thoms, K.R.

    1984-01-01

    Multiple testing is done at two laboratories of typical nuclear pressure vessel materials (both irradiated and unirradiated) and statistical analyses of the test results. Multiple tests are conducted at each of several test temperatures for each material, standard deviations are determined, and results from the two laboratories are compared. The Fourth Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Irradiation Series, almost completed, was aimed at elastic-plastic and fully plastic fracture toughness of low-copper weldments (current practice welds). A typical nuclear pressure vessel plate steel was included for statistical purposes. The Fifth HSST Irradiation Series, now in progress, is aimed at determining the shape of the K/sub IR/ curve after significant radiation-induced shift of the transition temperatures. This series includes irradiated test specimens of thicknesses up to 100 mm and weldment compositions typical of early nuclear power reactor pressure vessel welds.

  12. NERVA irradiation program. GTR 23, volume 1: Combined effects of reactor radiation and cryogenic temperature on NERVA structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdaniel, R. H.; Bradford, E. W.; Lewis, J. H.; Wattier, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    Specimens fabricated from structural materials that were candidates for certain NERVA applications were irradiated in liquid nitrogen (LN2), liquid hydrogen (LH2), water, and air. The specimens irradiated in LN2 were stored in LN2 and finally tested in LN2, or at some higher temperature in a few instances. The specimens irradiated in LH2 underwent an unplanned warmup while in storage so this portion of the test was lost; some specimens were tested in LN2 but none were tested in LH2. The Ground Test Reactor was the radiation source. The test specimens consisted mainly of tensile and fracture toughness specimens of several different materials, but other types of specimens such as tear, flexure, springs, and lubricant were also irradiated. Materials tested include Hastelloy X, Al, Ni steel, steel, Be, ZrC, Ti-6Al-4V, CuB, and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn.

  13. Magnetic evaluation of irradiation hardening in A533B reactor pressure vessel steels: Magnetic hysteresis measurements and the model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Klingensmith, D.; Odette, G. R.; Kikuchi, H.; Kamada, Y.

    2012-03-01

    We report results of measurements of magnetic minor hysteresis loops for neutron-irradiated A533B nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels varying alloy composition and irradiation condition. A minor-loop coefficient, which is obtained from a scaling power law between minor-loop parameters exhibits a steep decrease just after irradiation, followed by a maximum in the intermediate fluence regime for most alloys. A model analysis assuming Avrami-type growth for Cu-rich precipitates and an empirical logarithmic law for relaxation of residual stress demonstrates that an increment of the coefficient due to Cu-rich precipitates increases with Cu and Ni contents and is in proportion to a yield stress change, which is related to irradiation hardening.

  14. Solar-driven coal gasification in a thermally irradiated packed-bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolas Piatkowski; Aldo Steinfeld

    2008-05-15

    Coal gasification for high-quality synthesis gas production is considered using concentrated solar energy as the source of high-temperature process heat. The solar reactor consists of two cavities separated by a radiant emitter plate, with the upper one serving as the solar absorber and the lower one containing the reacting packed bed that shrinks as the reaction progresses. A 5 kW prototype reactor with an 8 cm depth, 14.3 cm diameter cylindrical bed was fabricated and tested in a high-flux solar furnace, subjected to solar flux concentrations up to 2600 suns and packed-bed temperatures up to 1440 K. The reactor is modeled by formulating the 1D unsteady energy conservation equation that couples conductive-radiative heat transfer with the reaction kinetics and solving it by the finite volume technique for a transient shrinking domain. The overall reaction rate was determined experimentally by thermogravimetry, while the effective thermal conductivity was determined experimentally in a radial heat flow oven. Model validation was accomplished in terms of bed temperatures, gasified mass, and bed shrink rates measured in solar experiments conducted with beech charcoal. Heat transfer through the bed proved to be the rate-controlling mechanism, indicating an ablation regime. 31 refs., 18 figs.

  15. Irradiation creep in type 316 stainless steel and us PCA with fusion reactor He/dpa levels*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossbeck, M. L.; Horak, J. A.

    1988-07-01

    Irradiation creep was investigated in Type 316 stainless steel (316 SS) and US Fusion Program PCA using a tailored spectrum of the Oak Ridge Research Reactor in order to achieve a He/dpa value characteristic of a fusion reactor first wall. Pressurized tubes with stresses of 20 to 470 MPa were irradiated at temperatures of 330, 400, 500, and 600°C. It was found that irradiation creep was independent of temperature in this range and varied linearly with stress at low stresses, but the stress exponent increased to 1.3 and 1.8 for 316 SS and PCA, respectively, at higher stresses. Specimens of PCA irradiated in the ORR and having helium levels up to 200 appm experienced a 3 to 10 times higher creep rate than similar specimens irradiated in the FFTF and having helium levels below 20 appm. The higher creep rates are attributed to either a lower flux or the presence of helium. A mechanism involving interstitial helium-enhanced climb is proposed.

  16. Characterization of the homogeneous reactor experiment No. 2 (HRE) impoundment

    SciTech Connect

    Stansfield, R.G.; Francis, C.W.

    1986-07-01

    A characterization study was conducted on a radioactive waste impoundment for the Homogeneous Reactor Experiment No. 2 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, to provide information necessary for its proper disposition. The impoundment received low-level radioactive wastes from 1957 until 1963. In 1970, the pond was backfilled with clay soil and the impoundment capped with asphaltic concrete, but no wastes were removed. The mixed soil fill and sediment, approximately 4.8 m deep, was sampled using soil boring methods. The samples were analyzed to determine if the material would classify as a hazardous waste under regulatory definitions promulgated in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). If the soil and sediment mixture contained RCRA-defined hazardous waste, it would be subject to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). Chemical analyses indicate that the sampled material does not contain hazardous chemical constituents above the levels permitted by RCRA regulations. The sediment was found to contain an estimated radioactivity inventory of approximately 2700 GBq (70 Ci) of /sup 90/Sr and 600 GBq (16 Ci) of /sup 137/Cs.

  17. Decommissioning of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment: A technical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Notz, K.J.

    1988-01-01

    This report completes a technical evaluation of decommissioning planning for the former Molten Salt Reactor Experiment, which was shut down in December, 1969. The key issues revolve around the treatment and disposal of some five tons of solid fuel salt which contains over 30 kg of fissionable uranium-233 plus fission products and higher actinides. The chemistry of this material is complicated by the formation of elemental fluorine via a radiolysis reaction under certain conditions. Supporting studies carried out as part of this evaluation include (a) a broad scope analysis of possible options for storage/disposal of the salts, (b) calculation of nuclide decay in future years, (c) technical evaluation of the containment facility and hot cell penetrations, (d) review and update of surveillance and maintenance procedures, (e) measurements of facility groundwater radioactivity and sump pump operation, (f) laboratory studies of the radiolysis reaction, and (g) laboratory studies which resulted in finding a suitable getter for elemental fluorine. In addition, geologic and hydrologic factors of the surrounding area were considered, and also the implications of entombment of the fuel in-place with concrete. The results of this evaluation show that the fuel salt cannot be left in its present form and location permanently. On the other hand, extended storage in its present form is quite acceptable for 20 to 30 years, or even longer. For continued storage in-place, some facility modifications are recommended. 30 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. Fabrication of (U, Zr) C-fueled/tungsten-clad specimens for irradiation in the Plum Brook Reactor Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Fuel samples, 90UC - 10 ZrC, and chemically vapor deposited tungsten fuel cups were fabricated for the study of the long term dimensional stability and compatibility of the carbide-tungsten fuel-cladding systems under irradiation. These fuel samples and fuel cups were assembled into the fuel pins of two capsules, designated as V-2E and V-2F, for irradiation in NASA Plum Brook Reactor Facility at a fission power density of 172 watts/c.c. and a miximum cladding temperature of 1823 K. Fabrication methods and characteristics of the fuel samples and fuel cups prepared are described.

  19. Micromechanical tests of ion irradiated materials: Atomistic simulations and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, C.; Jin, H. H.; Kwon, J.

    2012-07-01

    We investigated irradiation effects on Fe-Cr binary alloys by using a nano-indentation combined with a continuous stiffness measurement (CSM) technique. We modeled the nano-indentation test by using a finite element method. We could extract the intrinsic hardness and the yield stress of an irradiation hardened region by using a so-called inverse method. SiC micro-pillars of various sizes were fabricated by mask and inductively coupled plasma etching technique and compressed by using flat punch nano-indentation. Compressive fracture strength showed a clear specimen size effect. Brittle-to-Ductile transition at room temperature was observed as the specimen size decreases. The effect of irradiation on the fracture strength of SiC micro-pillars was evaluated by performing ion irradiation with Si ions. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of nano-indentation and nano-pillar compression tests. Radiation effect was observed which is found to be due to the interaction of dislocations nucleated by spherical indenter with pre-existing radiation defects (voids). These atomistic simulations are expected to significantly contribute to the investigation of the fundamental deformation mechanism of small scale irradiated materials. (authors)

  20. Analysis of Nuclear Reactor Background Radiation for Neutrino Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Ricky; Blackmon, J. C.; Rasco, B. C.; Mumm, H. P.; mTC; NuLat Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Prior measurements of reactor antineutrinos have found a lower flux than expected. Precision measurements of antineutrino energy spectra are important for understanding the anomaly, reactor safeguards, and nuclear nonproliferation. Antineutrino detector designs rely on good characterization of gamma-ray and neutron backgrounds near the reactor core. To study the gamma-ray background at the NIST research reactor, spectra were collected using a 6.25 cm diameter × 5.5 cm germanium detector. We analyzed the measured spectra using simulations of the detector response using the GEANT4 toolkit to determine background fluxes and build a background model that will be used to understand shielding requirements and the impact of backgrounds on potential short-baseline reactor antineutrino studies at NIST. This work supported by the National Science Foundation and LSU.

  1. QUB Low Energy Ion-Ices Irradiation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muntean, A.; Field, T.; Hunniford, A.; McCullough, B.; Konanoff, J.; Millar, T.

    2011-05-01

    Ion processing plays an important role in the chemical and physical modification of ice surfaces in astrophysical environments. This experimental project supported by the LASSIE ITN, led by Dr Tom Field, will investigate irradiation of astrophysical ice analogues by singly and multiply charged ion analogues of cosmic rays. Singly or multiply charged ions of either gaseous or solid elements are produced by a compact permanent magnet Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source attached to a ''floating beamline'' accelerator. Charge (q) to mass analysed ion beams in the energy range from a few 100 eV to 5xq keV are directed into a dedicated experimental chamber containing a temperature controlled (6K - 300K) cryostatically cooled sample of an astrophysical ice analogue. Current diagnostics include a differentially pumped, high resolution, quadrupole mass spectrometer mounted in ''line of sight'' of the ion impact area of the ice sample In a preliminary collaborative experiment with the groups of Prof Nigel Mason (Open University, UK) and Prof Elisabetta Palumbo (INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania. Italy) and using a cryostat and FTIR spectrometer provided by Prof Nigel Mason we studied the interaction of 4 keV C+ and C2+ ions with H2O ices at 30K AND 90K. The most significant species formed in these interactions was 13CO2, the yield of which, with singly charged ions, could be explained by the competition between a formation and a destruction mechanism. In the case of doubly charged ions, explanation of the CO2 yield required additional formation and destruction mechanisms which were considered to be a result of the additional potential energy possessed by the projectile ions. These results also showed the influence of sample temperature and morphology. It is clear that for both singly and doubly charged projectile ions, the yield of 13CO2 was greater at 30K than at 90K. This effect has been observed elsewhere and has been assigned to the greater porosity of

  2. Advanced neutron irradiation system using Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Si Young

    A heavily filtered fast neutron irradiation system (FNIS) was developed for a variety of applications, including the study of long-term health effects of fast neutrons by evaluating the biological mechanisms of damage in cultured cells and living animals such as rats or mice. This irradiation system includes an exposure cave made with a lead-bismuth alloy, a cave positioning system, a gamma and neutron monitoring system, a sample transfer system, and interchangeable filters. This system was installed in the irradiation cell of the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR). By increasing the thickness of the lead-bismuth alloy, the neutron spectra were shifted into lower energies by the scattering interactions of fast neutrons with the alloy. It is possible, therefore, by changing the alloy thickness, to produce distinctly different dose weighted neutron spectra inside the exposure cave of the FNIS. The calculated neutron spectra showed close agreement with the results of activation foil measurements, unfolded by SAND-II close to the cell window. However, there was a considerable less agreement for locations far away from the cell window. Even though the magnitude of values such as neutron flux and tissue kerma rates in air differed, the weighted average neutron energies showed close agreement between the MCNP and SAND-II since the normalized neutron spectra were in a good agreement each other. A paired ion chamber system was constructed, one with a tissue equivalent plastic (A-150) and propane gas for total dose monitoring, and another with graphite and argon for photon dose monitoring. Using the pair of detectors, the neutron to gamma ratio can be inferred. With the 20 cm-thick FNIS, the absorbed dose rates of neutrons measured with the paired ion chamber method and calculated with the SAND-II results were 13.7 +/- 0.02 Gy/min and 15.5 Gy/min, respectively. The absorbed dose rate of photons and the gamma contribution to total dose were 6.7 x 10

  3. Improving Thermal Model Prediction Through Statistical Analysis of Irradiation and Post-Irradiation Data from AGR Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Binh T. Pham; Grant L. Hawkes; Jeffrey J. Einerson

    2012-10-01

    As part of the Research and Development program for Next Generation High Temperature Reactors (HTR), a series of irradiation tests, designated as Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR), have been defined to support development and qualification of fuel design, fabrication process, and fuel performance under normal operation and accident conditions. The AGR tests employ fuel compacts placed in a graphite cylinder shrouded by a steel capsule and instrumented with thermocouples (TC) embedded in graphite blocks enabling temperature control. The data representing the crucial test fuel conditions (e.g., temperature, neutron fast fluence, and burnup) while impossible to obtain from direct measurements are calculated by physics and thermal models. The irradiation and post-irradiation examination (PIE) experimental data are used in model calibration effort to reduce the inherent uncertainty of simulation results. This paper is focused on fuel temperature predicted by the ABAQUS code’s finite element-based thermal models. The work follows up on a previous study, in which several statistical analysis methods were adapted, implemented in the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS), and applied for improving qualification of AGR-1 thermocouple data. The present work exercises the idea that the abnormal trends of measured data observed from statistical analysis may be caused by either measuring instrument deterioration or physical mechanisms in capsules that may have shifted the system thermal response. As an example, the uneven reduction of the control gas gap in Capsule 5 revealed by the capsule metrology measurements in PIE helps justify the reduction in TC readings instead of TC drift. This in turn prompts modification of thermal model to better fit with experimental data, thus help increase confidence, and in other word reduce model uncertainties in thermal simulation results of the AGR-1 test.

  4. Improving Thermal Model Prediction Through Statistical Analysis of Irradiation and Post-Irradiation Data from AGR Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Binh T. Pham; Grant L. Hawkes; Jeffrey J. Einerson

    2014-05-01

    As part of the High Temperature Reactors (HTR) R&D program, a series of irradiation tests, designated as Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR), have been defined to support development and qualification of fuel design, fabrication process, and fuel performance under normal operation and accident conditions. The AGR tests employ fuel compacts placed in a graphite cylinder shrouded by a steel capsule and instrumented with thermocouples (TC) embedded in graphite blocks enabling temperature control. While not possible to obtain by direct measurements in the tests, crucial fuel conditions (e.g., temperature, neutron fast fluence, and burnup) are calculated using core physics and thermal modeling codes. This paper is focused on AGR test fuel temperature predicted by the ABAQUS code's finite element-based thermal models. The work follows up on a previous study, in which several statistical analysis methods were adapted, implemented in the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS), and applied for qualification of AGR-1 thermocouple data. Abnormal trends in measured data revealed by the statistical analysis are traced to either measuring instrument deterioration or physical mechanisms in capsules that may have shifted the system thermal response. The main thrust of this work is to exploit the variety of data obtained in irradiation and post-irradiation examination (PIE) for assessment of modeling assumptions. As an example, the uneven reduction of the control gas gap in Capsule 5 found in the capsule metrology measurements in PIE helps identify mechanisms other than TC drift causing the decrease in TC readings. This suggests a more physics-based modification of the thermal model that leads to a better fit with experimental data, thus reducing model uncertainty and increasing confidence in the calculated fuel temperatures of the AGR-1 test.

  5. Monte Carlo estimation of the dose and heating of cobalt adjuster rods irradiated in the CANDU 6 reactor core.

    PubMed

    Gugiu, Daniela; Dumitrache, Ion

    2005-01-01

    The present work is a part of a more complex project related to the replacement of the original stainless steel adjuster rods with cobalt assemblies in the CANDU 6 reactor core. The 60Co produced by 59Co irradiation could be used extensively in medicine and industry. The paper will mainly describe some of the reactor physics and safety requirements that must be carried into practice for the Co adjuster rods. The computations related to the neutronic equivalence of the stainless steel adjusters with the Co adjuster assemblies, as well as the estimations of the activity and heating of the irradiated cobalt rods, are performed using the Monte Carlo codes MCNP5 and MONTEBURNS 2.1. The activity values are used to evaluate the dose at the surface of the device designed to transport the cobalt adjusters. PMID:16604599

  6. MECHANICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ITER MOCK-UP INSULATION AFTER REACTOR IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Prokopec, R.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W.

    2010-04-08

    The ITER mock-up project was launched in order to demonstrate the feasibility of an industrial impregnation process using the new cyanate ester/epoxy blend. The mock-up simulates the TF winding pack cross section by a stainless steel structure with the same dimensions as the TF winding pack at a length of 1 m. It consists of 7 plates simulating the double pancakes, each of them is wrapped with glass fiber/Kapton sandwich tapes. After stacking the 7 plates, additional insulation layers are wrapped to simulate the ground insulation. This paper presents the results of the mechanical quality tests on the mock-up pancake insulation. Tensile and short beam shear specimens were cut from the plates extracted from the mock-up and tested at 77 K using a servo-hydraulic material testing device. All tests were repeated after reactor irradiation to a fast neutron fluence of 1x10{sup 22} m{sup -2}(E>0.1 MeV). In order to simulate the pulsed operation of ITER, tension-tension fatigue measurements were performed in the load controlled mode. Initial results show a high mechanical strength as expected from the high number of thin glass fiber layers, and an excellent homogeneity of the material.

  7. Mechanical Characterization of the Iter Mock-Up Insulation after Reactor Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopec, R.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W.

    2010-04-01

    The ITER mock-up project was launched in order to demonstrate the feasibility of an industrial impregnation process using the new cyanate ester/epoxy blend. The mock-up simulates the TF winding pack cross section by a stainless steel structure with the same dimensions as the TF winding pack at a length of 1 m. It consists of 7 plates simulating the double pancakes, each of them is wrapped with glass fiber/Kapton sandwich tapes. After stacking the 7 plates, additional insulation layers are wrapped to simulate the ground insulation. This paper presents the results of the mechanical quality tests on the mock-up pancake insulation. Tensile and short beam shear specimens were cut from the plates extracted from the mock-up and tested at 77 K using a servo-hydraulic material testing device. All tests were repeated after reactor irradiation to a fast neutron fluence of 1×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV). In order to simulate the pulsed operation of ITER, tension-tension fatigue measurements were performed in the load controlled mode. Initial results show a high mechanical strength as expected from the high number of thin glass fiber layers, and an excellent homogeneity of the material.

  8. Experimental parameters for a reactor antineutrino experiment at very short baselines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeger, K. M.; Tobin, M. N.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Mumm, H. P.

    2013-04-01

    Reactor antineutrinos are used to study neutrino oscillation, search for signatures of nonstandard neutrino interactions, and monitor reactor operation for safeguard applications. The flux and energy spectrum of reactor antineutrinos can be predicted from the decays of the nuclear fission products. A comparison of recent reactor calculations with past measurements at baselines of 10-100 m suggests a 7.2% deficit. Precision measurements of reactor antineutrinos at very short baselines O(1-10m) can be used to probe this anomaly and search for possible oscillations into sterile neutrino species. This paper studies the experimental requirements for a new reactor antineutrino measurement at very short baselines and calculates the sensitivity of various scenarios. We conclude that, given proper site optimization, detector design, and background reduction, an experiment at a typical research reactor can provide 5σ discovery potential for the favored oscillation parameter space with 3 years of detector live time.

  9. Measuring of fissile isotope partial antineutrino spectra in direct experiment at nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sinev, V. V.

    2009-11-15

    The direct measuring method is considered to get nuclear reactor antineutrino spectrum. We suppose to isolate partial spectra of the fissile isotopes by using the method of antineutrino spectrum extraction from the inverse beta-decay reaction positron spectrum applied at Rovno experiment. This admits to increase the accuracy of partial antineutrino spectra forming the total nuclear reactor spectrum. It is important for the analysis of the reactor core fuel composition and could be applied for non-proliferation purposes.

  10. Irradiation Effect on the Interface of the Composites Used as the Insulation Materials in the Nuclear Fusion Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, M.; Nakata, Y.; Mishima, F.; Akiyama, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    In ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), the insulation materials containing polymeric matrix are the most radiation-sensitive among the materials constituting the superconducting magnet in the nuclear fusion reactor. Insulation materials are fabricated by impregnating the polymeric material into the stacks of alternating layers of polyimide films and glass cloth. There are a lot of studies about irradiation property of each constituent material, whereas few studies are reported about the irradiation effect on the resin -glass cloth and the resin -polyimide film boundary. In this study, we focused on the degradation of the resin-glass cloth boundary. The influence of the surface treatment and the weaving density of the glass cloth on the boundary degradation was evaluated by the mechanical properties before and after irradiation. The composite material specimens were prepared using the glass cloth with different surface treatment, and with different weaving density. The inter laminar shear strength (ILSS) test was conducted to examine the influence of the boundary on the radiation effect. In addition, the fracture mechanism were evaluated by optical micro-scope. Based on the results, it was indicated that the weaving density of the glass cloth is small influence on the irradiation effect and the radiation resistance was improved by the surface treatment.

  11. Diametral strain of fast reactor MOX fuel pins with austenitic stainless steel cladding irradiated to high burnup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Ito, Masahiro; Maeda, Koji

    2011-09-01

    The C3M irradiation test, which was conducted in the experimental fast reactor, "Joyo", demonstrated that mixed oxide (MOX) fuel pins with austenitic steel cladding could attain a peak pellet burnup of about 130 GWd/t safely. The test fuel assembly consisted of 61 fuel pins, whose design specifications were similar to those of driver fuel pins of a prototype fast breeder reactor, "Monju". The irradiated fuel pins exhibited diametral strain due to cladding void swelling and irradiation creep. The cladding irradiation creep strain were due to the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) as well as the internal gas pressure. From the fuel pin ceramographs and 137Cs gamma scanning, it was found that the PCMI was associated with the pellet swelling which was enhanced by the rim structure formation or by cesium uranate formation. The PCMI due to cesium uranate, which occurred near the top of the MOX fuel column, significantly affected cladding hoop stress and thermal creep, and the latter effect tended to increase the cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of the cladding though the CDF indicated that the cladding still had some margin to failure due to the creep damage.

  12. MANTRA: An Integral Reactor Physics Experiment to Infer Actinide Capture Cross-sections from Thorium to Californium with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    G. Youinou; C. McGrath; G. Imel; M. Paul; R. Pardo; F. Kondev; M. Salvatores; G. Palmiotti

    2011-08-01

    The principle of the proposed experiment is to irradiate very pure actinide samples in the Advanced Test Reactor at INL and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The determination of the nuclide densities before and after neutron irradiation will allow inference of effective neutron capture cross-sections. This approach has been used in the past and the novelty of this experiment is that the atom densities of the different transmutation products will be determined using the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry technique at the ATLAS facility located at ANL. It is currently planned to irradiate the following isotopes: 232Th, 235U, 236U, 238U, 237Np, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, 241Am, 243Am, 244Cm and 248Cm.

  13. Preliminary report on the irradiation conditions of the HFIR JP-23 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ermi, A.M.; Gelles, D.S.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this effort was to irradiate a series of alloys over the temperature range 300 to 600{degrees}C to approximately 10 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The alloys covered a wide range of materials and treatments. The Japanese specimen matrix consisted of ferritic steels, vanadium alloys, copper alloys, molybdenum alloys, and titanium-aluminum compounds. The US specimen matrix consisted of vanadium alloys, 316 stainless steels, and isotopically tailored ferritic and austenitic alloys.

  14. Performance of AGR-1 High-Temperature Reactor Fuel During Post-Irradiation Heating Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Robert Noel; Baldwin, Charles A; Hunn, John D; Demkowicz, Paul; Reber, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The fission product retention of irradiated low-enriched uranium oxide/uranium carbide TRISO fuel compacts from the AGR-1 experiment has been evaluated at temperatures of 1600 1800 C during post-irradiation safety tests. Fourteen compacts (a total of ~58,000 particles) with a burnup ranging from 13.4 to 19.1% FIMA have been tested using dedicated furnace systems at Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The release of fission products 110mAg, 134Cs, 137Cs, 154Eu, 155Eu, 90Sr, and 85Kr was monitored while heating the fuel specimens in flowing helium. The behavior of silver, europium, and strontium appears to be dominated by inventory that was originally released through intact SiC coating layers during irradiation, but was retained in the compact at the end of irradiation and subsequently released during the safety tests. However, at a test temperature of 1800 C, the data suggest that release of these elements through intact coatings may become significant after ~100 h. Cesium was very well retained by intact SiC layers, with a fractional release <5 10-6 after 300 h at 1600 C or 100 h at 1800 C. However, it was rapidly released from individual particles if the SiC layer failed, and therefore the overall cesium release fraction was dominated by the SiC defect and failure fractions in the fuel compacts. No complete TRISO coating layer failures were observed after 300 h at 1600 or 1700 C, and 85Kr release was very low during the tests (particles with breached SiC, but intact outer pyrocarbon, retained most of their krypton). Krypton release from TRISO failures was only observed after ~210 h at 1800 C in one compact. Post-safety-test examination of fuel compacts and particles has focused on identifying specific particles from each compact with notable fission product release and detailed analysis of the coating layers to understand particle behavior.

  15. Investigation of the Feasibility of Utilizing Gamma Emission Computed Tomography in Evaluating Fission Product Migration in Irradiated TRISO Fuel Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jason M. Harp; Paul A. Demkowicz

    2014-10-01

    In the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) the TRISO particle fuel serves as the primary fission product containment. However the large number of TRISO particles present in proposed HTGRs dictates that there will be a small fraction (~10-4 to 10-5) of as manufactured and in-pile particle failures that will lead to some fission product release. The matrix material surrounding the TRISO particles in fuel compacts and the structural graphite holding the TRISO particles in place can also serve as sinks for containing any released fission products. However data on the migration of solid fission products through these materials is lacking. One of the primary goals of the AGR-3/4 experiment is to study fission product migration from failed TRISO particles in prototypic HTGR components such as structural graphite and compact matrix material. In this work, the potential for a Gamma Emission Computed Tomography (GECT) technique to non-destructively examine the fission product distribution in AGR-3/4 components and other irradiation experiments is explored. Specifically, the feasibility of using the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) Precision Gamma Scanner (PGS) system for this GECT application is considered. To test the feasibility, the response of the PGS system to idealized fission product distributions has been simulated using Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations. Previous work that applied similar techniques during the AGR-1 experiment will also be discussed as well as planned uses for the GECT technique during the post irradiation examination of the AGR-2 experiment. The GECT technique has also been applied to other irradiated nuclear fuel systems that were currently available in the HFEF hot cell including oxide fuel pins, metallic fuel pins, and monolithic plate fuel.

  16. AFIP-4 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Danielle M Perez; Misti A Lillo; Gray S. Chang; Glenn A Roth; Nicolas Woolstenhulme; Daniel M Wachs

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Full size plate In center flux trap Position (AFIP) experiment AFIP-4 was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuels at a scale prototypic of research reactor fuel plates. The AFIP-4 test further examine the fuel/clad interface and its behavior under extreme conditions. After irradiation, fission gas retention measurements will be performed during post irradiation (PIE)1,2. The following report summarizes the life of the AFIP-4 experiment through end of irradiation, including a brief description of the safety analysis, as-run neutronic analysis results, hydraulic testing results, and thermal analysis results.

  17. AFIP-4 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Danielle M Perez; Misti A Lillo; Gray S. Chang; Glenn A Roth; Nicolas Woolstenhulme; Daniel M Wachs

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Full size plate In center flux trap Position (AFIP) experiment AFIP-4 was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuels at a scale prototypic of research reactor fuel plates. The AFIP-4 test further examine the fuel/clad interface and its behavior under extreme conditions. After irradiation, fission gas retention measurements will be performed during post irradiation (PIE). The following report summarizes the life of the AFIP-4 experiment through end of irradiation, including a brief description of the safety analysis, as-run neutronic analysis results, hydraulic testing results, and thermal analysis results.

  18. The new hybrid thermal neutron facility at TAPIRO reactor for BNCT radiobiological experiments.

    PubMed

    Esposito, J; Rosi, G; Agosteo, S

    2007-01-01

    A new thermal neutron irradiation facility, devoted to carry out both dosimetric and radiobiological studies on boron carriers, which are being developed in the framework of INFN BNCT project, has been installed at the ENEA Casaccia TAPIRO research fast reactor. The thermal column, based on an original, hybrid, neutron spectrum shifter configuration, has been recently become operative. In spite of its low power (5 kW), the new facility is able to provide a high thermal neutron flux level, uniformly distributed inside the irradiation cavity, with a quite low gamma background. The main features and preliminary benchmark measurements of the Beam-shaping assembly are here presented and discussed. PMID:17504745

  19. Recent performance experience with US light water reactor self-actuating safety and relief valves

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, C.G.

    1996-12-01

    Over the past several years, there have been a number of operating reactor events involving performance of primary and secondary safety and relief valves in U.S. Light Water Reactors. There are several different types of safety and relief valves installed for overpressure protection of various safety systems throughout a typical nuclear power plant. The following discussion is limited to those valves in the reactor coolant systems (RCS) and main steam systems of pressurized water reactors (PWR) and in the RCS of boiling water reactors (BWR), all of which are self-actuating having a setpoint controlled by a spring-loaded disk acting against system fluid pressure. The following discussion relates some of the significant recent experience involving operating reactor events or various testing data. Some of the more unusual and interesting operating events or test data involving some of these designs are included, in addition to some involving a number of similar events and those which have generic applicability.

  20. Solar Irradiation of Bilirubin: An Experiment in Photochemical Oxidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay A. E.; Salih, F. M.

    2006-01-01

    An experiment in photochemical oxidation, which deals with bilirubin, a well-known light-sensitive biological compound that is pedagogically ideal for photochemical experiments at tertiary institutes, is presented. The experiment would benefit students in chemistry who eventually branch out into the health sciences or biochemistry.

  1. Effect of neutron irradiation on tensile properties of materials for pressure vessel internals of WWER type reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, A. A.; Margolin, B. Z.; Kursevich, I. P.; Minkin, A. J.; Neustroev, V. S.

    2014-01-01

    Tensile properties of austenitic stainless steels used for pressure vessel internals of WWER type reactors (18Cr-10Ni-Ti steel and its weld metal) in the initial and irradiated conditions were investigated. Based on the presented original investigations and generalization of the available experimental data the dependences of yield strength and ultimate strength on a neutron damage dose up to 108 dpa, irradiation temperature range 320-450 °C and test temperature range 20-450 °C were obtained. The method of determination of the stress-strain curve parameters was proposed which does not require uniform elongation of a specimen as an input parameter. The dependences was proposed allowing one to calculate the stress-strain curve parameters for 18Cr-10Ni-Ti steel and its weld metal for different test temperatures, different irradiation temperatures and doses. The dependences were obtained to describe the fracture strain decrease under irradiation at a temperature range 320-340 °C when irradiation swelling is absent.

  2. The Ongoing Impact of the U.S. Fast Reactor Integral Experiments Program

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Michael A. Pope; Harold F. McFarlane

    2012-11-01

    The creation of a large database of integral fast reactor physics experiments advanced nuclear science and technology in ways that were unachievable by less capital intensive and operationally challenging approaches. They enabled the compilation of integral physics benchmark data, validated (or not) analytical methods, and provided assurance of future rector designs The integral experiments performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) represent decades of research performed to support fast reactor design and our understanding of neutronics behavior and reactor physics measurements. Experiments began in 1955 with the Zero Power Reactor No. 3 (ZPR-3) and terminated with the Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR, originally the Zero Power Plutonium Reactor) in 1990 at the former ANL-West site in Idaho, which is now part of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Two additional critical assemblies, ZPR-6 and ZPR-9, operated at the ANL-East site in Illinois. A total of 128 fast reactor assemblies were constructed with these facilities [1]. The infrastructure and measurement capabilities are too expensive to be replicated in the modern era, making the integral database invaluable as the world pushes ahead with development of liquid metal cooled reactors.

  3. Finite Element Based Stress Analysis of Graphite Component in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Core Using Linear and Nonlinear Irradiation Creep Models

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Majumdar, Saurindranath

    2015-01-01

    Irradiation creep plays a major role in the structural integrity of the graphite components in high temperature gas cooled reactors. Finite element procedures combined with a suitable irradiation creep model can be used to simulate the time-integrated structural integrity of complex shapes, such as the reactor core graphite reflector and fuel bricks. In the present work a comparative study was undertaken to understand the effect of linear and nonlinear irradiation creep on results of finite element based stress analysis. Numerical results were generated through finite element simulations of a typical graphite reflector.

  4. Flooding Experiments and Modeling for Improved Reactor Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Solmos, M., Hogan, K.J., VIerow, K.

    2008-09-14

    Countercurrent two-phase flow and “flooding” phenomena in light water reactor systems are being investigated experimentally and analytically to improve reactor safety of current and future reactors. The aspects that will be better clarified are the effects of condensation and tube inclination on flooding in large diameter tubes. The current project aims to improve the level of understanding of flooding mechanisms and to develop an analysis model for more accurate evaluations of flooding in the pressurizer surge line of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Interest in flooding has recently increased because Countercurrent Flow Limitation (CCFL) in the AP600 pressurizer surge line can affect the vessel refill rate following a small break LOCA and because analysis of hypothetical severe accidents with the current flooding models in reactor safety codes shows that these models represent the largest uncertainty in analysis of steam generator tube creep rupture. During a hypothetical station blackout without auxiliary feedwater recovery, should the hot leg become voided, the pressurizer liquid will drain to the hot leg and flooding may occur in the surge line. The flooding model heavily influences the pressurizer emptying rate and the potential for surge line structural failure due to overheating and creep rupture. The air-water test results in vertical tubes are presented in this paper along with a semi-empirical correlation for the onset of flooding. The unique aspects of the study include careful experimentation on large-diameter tubes and an integrated program in which air-water testing provides benchmark knowledge and visualization data from which to conduct steam-water testing.

  5. Absorption and decomposition of ozone in a three-phase split-rectangular airlift reactor under ultrasonic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yin; Zhong, Xin; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Ozone absorption was investigated in a three-phase split-rectangular airlift reactor under ultrasonic irradiation using γ-Al2O3 as catalyst. The reactor consisted of a square column (50 × 50 mm) with the height of 120 mm, divided into a riser and a downcomer by a baffle, 50 mm in width, 4 mm in thickness and 50 mm in total height. An absorption kinetic model was proposed to determine the volumetric mass transfer coefficient of ozone kLaA. The results showed that kLaA increased from 0.409 to 0.712 min(-1) as power density rose from 27.2 to 100.3 W L(-1), comparing with 0.242 min(-1) in the absence of ultrasonic irradiation. The increase in gas flow rate and catalyst loading also favored the increase of kLaA. The degassing effect due to ultrasonic irradiation could be ignored in the ozone absorption process. PMID:27120632

  6. Fast Reactor Spent Fuel Processing: Experience and Criticality Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Chad Pope

    2007-05-01

    This paper discusses operational and criticality safety experience associated with the Idaho National Laboratory Fuel Conditioning Facility which uses a pyrometallurgical process to treat spent fast reactor metallic fuel. The process is conducted in an inert atmosphere hot cell. The process starts with chopping metallic fuel elements into a basket. The basket is lowered into molten salt (LiCl-KCl) along with a steel mandrel. Active metal fission products, transuranic metals and sodium metal in the spent fuel undergo chemical oxidation and form chlorides. Voltage is applied between the basket, which serves as an anode, and the mandrel, which serves as a cathode, causing metallic uranium in the spent fuel to undergo electro-chemical oxidation thereby forming uranium chloride. Simultaneously at the cathode, uranium chloride undergoes electro-chemical reduction and deposits uranium metal onto the mandrel. The uranium metal and accompanying entrained salt are placed in a distillation furnace where the uranium melts forming an ingot and the entrained salt boils and subsequently condenses in a separate crucible. The uranium ingots are placed in long term storage. During the ten year operating history, over one hundred criticality safety evaluations were prepared. All criticality safety related limits and controls for the entire process are contained in a single document which required over thirty revisions to accommodate the process changes. Operational implementation of the limits and controls includes use of a near real-time computerized tracking system. The tracking system uses an Oracle database coupled with numerous software applications. The computerized tracking system includes direct fuel handler interaction with every movement of material. Improvements to this system during the ten year history include introduction of web based operator interaction, tracking of moderator materials and the development of a plethora database queries to assist in day to day

  7. Deuterium migration in nuclear graphite: Consequences for the behavior of tritium in CO2-cooled reactors and for the decontamination of irradiated graphite waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Guillou, M.; Toulhoat, N.; Pipon, Y.; Moncoffre, N.; Khodja, H.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we aim at understanding tritium behavior in the graphite moderator of French CO2-cooled nuclear fission reactors (called UNGG for "Uranium Naturel-Graphite-Gaz") to get information on its distribution and inventory in the irradiated graphite waste after their dismantling. These findings should be useful both to improve waste treatment processes and to foresee tritium behavior during reactor decommissioning and waste disposal operations. The purpose of the present work is to elucidate the effects of temperature on the behavior of tritium during reactor operation. Furthermore, it aims at exploring options of thermal decontamination. For both purposes, annealing experiments were carried out in inert atmosphere as well as in thermal conditions as close as possible to those encountered in UNGG reactors and in view of a potential decontamination in humid gas. D+ ions were implanted into virgin nuclear graphite in order to simulate tritium displaced from its original structural site through recoil during reactor operation. The effect of thermal treatments on the mobility of the implanted deuterium was then investigated at temperatures ranging from 200 to 1200 °C, in inert atmosphere (vacuum or argon), in a gas simulating the UNGG coolant gas (mainly CO2) or in humid nitrogen. Deuterium was analyzed by Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) both at millimetric and micrometric scales. We have identified three main stages for the deuterium release. The first one corresponds to deuterium permeation through graphite open pores. The second and third ones are controlled by the progressive detrapping of deuterium located at different trapping sites and its successive migration through the crystallites and along crystallites and coke grains edges. Extrapolating the thermal behavior of deuterium to tritium, the results show that the release becomes significant above the maximum UNGG reactor temperature of 500 °C and should be lower than 30% of the total amount produced

  8. Flow excursion experiments with a production reactor assembly mockup

    SciTech Connect

    Rush, G.C.; Blake, J.E. ); Nash, C.A. )

    1990-01-01

    A series of power ramp and loss-of-coolant accidents were simulated with an electrically heated mockup of a Savannah River Site production reactor assembly. The one-to-one scale mockup had full multichannel annular geometry in its heated section in addition to prototypical inlet and outlet endfitting hardware. Power levels causing void generation and flow instability in the water coolant flowing through the mockup were found under different transient and quasi-steady state test conditions. A reasonably sharp boundary between initial operating powers leading to or not leading to flow instability were found: that being 0.2 MW or less on power levels of 4 to 6.3 MW. Void generation occurred before, but close to, the point of flow instability. The data were taken in support of the Savannah River reactor limits program and will be used in continuing code benchmarking efforts. 6 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Lead-bismuth eutectic as advanced reactor collant : operational experience

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshun, K. A.; Watts, V.; Li, N.

    2004-01-01

    Some proposed advanced reactor concepts would be cooled by lead or lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE). An LBE test loop was designed and built at Los Alamos to develop the engineering and materials technology necessary to successfully implement LBE as a coolant (Fig. 1). Operational since December 2001, this test loop has been used to develop and demonstrate safe operation, oxygen concentration and metal corrosion control, instrumentation, thermal-hydraulic performance of heat exchangers and recuperators, and free convection and forced pumping. This paper discusses the technology development and lessons learned from the operation of this facility. A LBE test loop has been operational since December 2001. Using procedures, training, and engineering controls, this loop has operated without an accident. Continuous improvements in operation procedures and instrumentation over these years have resulted in a facility of high reliability, providing the groundwork for the use of LBE as a reactor coolant for temperatures up to 550 C.

  10. Reactor physics studies for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Reactor-Accelerator Coupling Experiments (RACE) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankovskiy, Evgeny Yuryevich

    In the recently completed RACE Project of the AFCI, accelerator-driven subcritical systems (ADS) experiments were conducted to develop technology of coupling accelerators to nuclear reactors. In these experiments electron accelerators induced photon-neutron reactions in heavy-metal targets to initiate fission reactions in ADS. Although the Idaho State University (ISU) RACE ADS was constructed only to develop measurement techniques for advanced experiments, many reactor kinetics experiments were conducted there. In the research reported in this dissertation, a method was developed to calculate kinetics parameters for measurement and calculation of the reactivity of ADS, a safety parameter that is necessary for control and monitoring of power production. Reactivity is measured in units of fraction of delayed versus prompt neutron from fission, a quantity that cannot be directly measured in far-subcritical reactors such as the ISU RACE configuration. A new technique is reported herein to calculate it accurately and to predict kinetic behavior of a far-subcritical ADS. Experiments conducted at ISU are first described and experimental data are presented before development of the kinetic theory used in the new computational method. Because of the complexity of the ISU ADS, the Monte-Carlo method as applied in the MCNP code is most suitable for modeling reactor kinetics. However, the standard method of calculating the delayed neutron fraction produces inaccurate values. A new method was developed and used herein to evaluate actual experiments. An advantage of this method is that its efficiency is independent of the fission yield of delayed neutrons, which makes it suitable for fuel with a minor actinide component (e.g. transmutation fuels). The implementation of this method is based on a correlated sampling technique which allows the accurate evaluation of delayed and prompt neutrons. The validity of the obtained results is indicated by good agreement between experimental

  11. Stresses in reactor pressure vessel nozzles -- Calculations and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Brumovsky, M.; Polachova, H.

    1995-11-01

    Reactor pressure vessel nozzles are characterized by a high stress concentration which is critical in their low-cycle fatigue assessment. Program of experimental verification of stress/strain field distribution during elastic-plastic loading of a reactor pressure vessel WWER-1000 primary nozzle model in scale 1:3 is presented. While primary nozzle has an ID equal to 850 mm, the model nozzle has ID equal to 280 mm, and was made from 15Kh2NMFA type of steel. Calculation using analytical methods was performed. Comparison of results using different analytical methods -- Neuber`s, Hardrath-Ohman`s as well as equivalent energy ones, used in different reactor Codes -- is shown. Experimental verification was carried out on model nozzles loaded statically as well as by repeated loading, both in elastic-plastic region. Strain fields were measured using high-strain gauges, which were located in different distances from center of nozzle radius, thus different stress concentration values were reached. Comparison of calculated and experimental data are shown and compared.

  12. Mechanism of Irradiation Assisted Cracking of Core Components in Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Was, Gary S; Atzmon, Michael; Wang, Lumin

    2003-04-28

    The overall goal of the project is to determine the mechanism of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). IASCC has been linked to hardening, microstructural and microchemical changes during irradiation. Unfortunately, all of these changes occur simultaneously and at similar rates during irradiation, making attribution of IASCC to any one of these features nearly impossible to determine. The strategy set forth in this project is to develop means to separate microstructural from microchemical changes to evaluate each separately for their effect on IASCC. In the first part, post irradiation annealing (PIA) treatments are used to anneal the irradiated microstructure, leaving only radiation induced segregation (RIS) for evaluation for its contribution to IASCC. The second part of the strategy is to use low temperature irradiation to produce a radiation damage dislocation loop microstructure without radiation induced segregation in order to evaluate the effect of the dislocation microstructure alone.

  13. Nanostructure evolution under irradiation of Fe(C)MnNi model alloys for reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiapetto, M.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.; Malerba, L.

    2015-06-01

    Radiation-induced embrittlement of bainitic steels is one of the most important lifetime limiting factors of existing nuclear light water reactor pressure vessels. The primary mechanism of embrittlement is the obstruction of dislocation motion produced by nanometric defect structures that develop in the bulk of the material due to irradiation. The development of models that describe, based on physical mechanisms, the nanostructural changes in these types of materials due to neutron irradiation are expected to help to better understand which features are mainly responsible for embrittlement. The chemical elements that are thought to influence most the response under irradiation of low-Cu RPV steels, especially at high fluence, are Ni and Mn, hence there is an interest in modelling the nanostructure evolution in irradiated FeMnNi alloys. As a first step in this direction, we developed sets of parameters for object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations that allow this to be done, under simplifying assumptions, using a "grey alloy" approach that extends the already existing OKMC model for neutron irradiated Fe-C binary alloys [1]. Our model proved to be able to describe the trend in the buildup of irradiation defect populations at the operational temperature of LWR (∼300 °C), in terms of both density and size distribution of the defect cluster populations, in FeMnNi model alloys as compared to Fe-C. In particular, the reduction of the mobility of point-defect clusters as a consequence of the presence of solutes proves to be key to explain the experimentally observed disappearance of detectable point-defect clusters with increasing solute content.

  14. Microstructural evolution under dual ion irradiation and in-reactor creep of type 316 stainless steel welded joints*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohyama, A.; Kohno, Y.; Hishinuma, A.

    1994-09-01

    Electron beam (EB) welding was applied to 316SS and the titanium modified 316SS (JPCA). For the prospective improvement of swelling in welded joints, modified TIG or EB welding procedures utilizing titanium or nickel foil insertion were employed. For the case of EB welding of 15 mm thickness I-butt joint, the higher weld heat input showed better swelling resistance in the joints. The in-reactor creep results suggest that irradiation creep in welded joints may not be a big concern, as far as swelling resistance is maintained. So, Ni addition, stress relief treatment and high heat input for EB welding with optimization of welding condition are recommended for suppressing irradiation creep and swelling.

  15. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analysis of new irradiation channels inside the Moroccan TRIGA Mark II research reactor core.

    PubMed

    Chham, E; El Bardouni, T; Benaalilou, K; Boukhal, H; El Bakkari, B; Boulaich, Y; El Younoussi, C; Nacir, B

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to improve the capacity of radioisotope production in the Moroccan TRIGA Mark II research reactor, which is considered as one of the most important applications of research reactors. The aim of this study is to enhance the utilization of TRIGA core in the field of neutron activation and ensure an economic use of the fuel. The main idea was to create an additional irradiation channel (IC) inside the core. For this purpose, three new core configurations are proposed, which differ according to the IC position in the core. Thermal neutron flux distribution and other neutronic safety parameters such as power peaking factors, excess reactivity, and control rods worth reactivity were calculated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport (MCNP) code and neutron cross-section library based on ENDF/B-VII evaluation. The calculated thermal flux in the central thimble (CT) and in the added IC for the reconfigured core is compared with the thermal flux in the CT of the existing core, which is taken as a reference. The results show that all the obtained fluxes in CTs are very close to the reference value, while a remarkable difference is observed between the fluxes in the new ICs and reference. This difference depends on the position of IC in the reactor core. To demonstrate that the Moroccan TRIGA reactor could safely operate at 2MW, with new configurations based on new ICs, different safety-related thermal-hydraulic parameters were investigated. The PARET model was used in this study to verify whether the safety margins are met despite the new modifications of the core. The results show that it is possible to introduce new ICs safely in the reactor core, because the obtained values of the parameters are largely far from compromising the safety of the reactor. PMID:27552124

  16. In-Pile Experiment of a New Hafnium Aluminide Composite Material to Enable Fast Neutron Testing in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; Douglas L. Porter; James R. Parry; Heng Ban

    2010-06-01

    A new hafnium aluminide composite material is being developed as a key component in a Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) system designed to provide fast neutron flux test capability in the Advanced Test Reactor. An absorber block comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) particles (~23% by volume) dispersed in an aluminum matrix can absorb thermal neutrons and transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels. However, the thermophysical properties, such as thermal conductivity, of this material and the effect of irradiation are not known. This paper describes the design of an in-pile experiment to obtain such data to enable design and optimization of the BFFL neutron filter.

  17. Hydraulic characterization of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system by tracer experiment and analytical models.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, F; Viedma, A; Kaiser, A S

    2016-09-15

    Fluid dynamic behaviour plays an important role in wastewater treatment. An efficient treatment requires the inexistence of certain hydraulic problems such as dead zones or short-circuiting flows. Residence time distribution (RTD) analysis is an excellent technique for detecting these inefficiencies. However, many wastewater treatment installations include water or sludge recycling systems, which prevent us from carrying out a conventional tracer pulse experiment to obtain the RTD curve of the installation. This paper develops an RTD analysis of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system. A tracer experiment in the reactor is carried out. Three analytical models, derived from the conventional pulse model, are proposed to obtain the RTD curve of the reactor. An analysis of the results is made, studying which model is the most suitable for each situation. This paper is useful to analyse the hydraulic efficiency of reactors with recycling systems. PMID:27288672

  18. PROSPECT: A Short-baseline Reactor Precision Spectrum and Oscillation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, Thomas; Prospect Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    PROSPECT is a phased experiment consisting of segmented Li-loaded liquid scintillator antineutrino detectors designed to probe short-baseline neutrino oscillations and precisely measure the reactor antineutrino spectrum. The experiment will be located at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Lab. The first phase is a movable 2.5 tonne detector located 7-9 m from the compact, highly enriched uranium (HEU) core. Over the past two years, PROSPECT has deployed multiple prototype detectors at HFIR to understand the local background environment and demonstrate active and passive background rejection. Measuring the neutrino spectrum from 235U will give insight to the recent spectral discrepancies and provide an important benchmark for future reactor experiments. As a high statistics experiment, PROSPECT will probe the sterile neutrino best-fit region within one year of operation at HFIR.

  19. Natural circulation in a VVER reactor geometry: Experiments with the PACTEL facility and Cathare simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Raussi, P.; Kainulainen, S.; Kouhia, J.

    1995-09-01

    There are some 40 reactors based on the VVER design in use. Database available for computer code assessment for VVER reactors is rather limited. Experiments were conducted to study natural circulation behaviour in the PACTEL facility, a medium-scale integral test loop patterned after VVER pressurized water reactors. Flow behaviour over a range of coolant inventories was studied with a small-break experiment. In the small-break experiments, flow stagnation and system repressurization were observed when the water level in the upper plenum fell below the entrances to the hot legs. The cause was attributed to the hot leg loop seals, which are a unique feature of the VVER geometry. At low primary inventories, core cooling was achieved through the boiler-condenser mode. The experiment was simulated using French thermalhydraulic system code CATHARE.

  20. Swelling and structure of vanadium-base alloys irradiated in the dynamic helium charging experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1994-08-01

    Combined effects of dynamically charged helium and neutron damage on density change, void distribution, and microstructural evolution of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy have been determined after irradiation to 18--31 dpa at 425--600 C in the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE), and the results were compared with those from a non-DHCE in which helium generation and negligible. For specimens irradiated to {approx}18-31 dpa at 500--600 with a helium generation rate of 0.4--4.2 appm He/dpa, only a few helium bubbles were observed at the interface of grain matrices and some of the Ti(O,N,C) precipitates, and no microvoids or helium bubbles were observed either in grain matrices or near grain boundaries. Under these conditions, dynamically produced helium atoms seem to be trapped in the grain matrix without significant bubble nucleation or growth, and in accordance with this, density changes from DHCE and non-DHCE (negligible helium generation) were similar for comparable fluence and irradiation temperature. Only for specimens irradiated to {approx}31 dpa at 425 C, when helium was generated at a rage of 0.4--0.8 appm helium/dpa, were diffuse helium bubbles observed in limited regions of grain matrices and near {approx}15% of the grain boundaries in densities significantly lower than those in the extensive coalescences of helium bubbles typical of other alloys irradiated in tritium-trick experiments. Density changes of specimens irradiated at 425 C in the DHCE were significantly higher than those from non-DHCE irradiation. Microstructural evolution in V-4Cr-4Ti was similar for DHCE and non-DHCE except for helium bubble number density and distribution. As in non-DHCE, the irradiation-induced precipitation of ultrafine Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} was observed for DHCE at >500 C but not at 425 C.

  1. Experience with non-fuel-bearing components in LWR (light-water reactor) fuel systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.J.; Berting, F.M.

    1990-12-01

    Many non-fuel-bearing components are so closely associated with the spent fuel assemblies that their integrity and behavior must be taken into consideration with the fuel assemblies, when handling spent fuel of planning waste management activities. Presented herein is some of the experience that has been gained over the past two decades from non-fuel-bearing components in light-water reactors (LWRs), both pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) and boiling-water reactors (BWRs). Among the most important of these components are the control rod systems, the absorber and burnable poison rods, and the fuel assembly channels. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Analysis of the thorium axial blanket experiments in the PROTEUS reactor

    SciTech Connect

    White, J. R.; Ingersoll, D. T.; Schmocker, U.

    1980-01-01

    An extensive program of reactor physics experiments in GCFR fuel pin lattices has been completed recently at the PROTEUS critical facility located at EIR laboratory in Switzerland. The PROTEUS reactor consists of a central test zone surrounded by a uranium buffer and thermal driver region. The test lattices included a PuO/sub 2//UO/sub 2/ fuel region with internal and axial blankets of UO/sub 2/, ThO/sub 2/, and thorium metal. Detailed analysis of the thorium-bearing lattices has been performed at EIR and at ORNL in order to validate nuclear data and methods used for reactor physics analysis of advanced GCFR designs.

  3. Analysis of a boron-carbide-drum-controlled critical reactor experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, W. T.

    1972-01-01

    In order to validate methods and cross sections used in the neutronic design of compact fast-spectrum reactors for generating electric power in space, an analysis of a boron-carbide-drum-controlled critical reactor was made. For this reactor the transport analysis gave generally satisfactory results. The calculated multiplication factor for the most detailed calculation was only 0.7-percent Delta k too high. Calculated reactivity worth of the control drums was $11.61 compared to measurements of $11.58 by the inverse kinetics methods and $11.98 by the inverse counting method. Calculated radial and axial power distributions were in good agreement with experiment.

  4. Movable-molybdenum-reflector reactivity experiments for control studies of compact space power reactor concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, T. A.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental reflector reactivity study was made with a compact cylindrical reactor using a uranyl fluoride - water fuel solution. The reactor was axially unreflected and radially reflected with segments of molybdenum. The reflector segments were displaced incrementally in both the axial and radial dimensions, and the shutdown of each configuration was measured by using the pulsed-neutron source technique. The reactivity effects for axial and radial displacement of reflector segments are tabulated separately and compared. The experiments provide data for control-system studies of compact-space-power-reactor concepts.

  5. Summary of the Workshop on Molten Salt Reactor Technologies Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the Startup of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Betzler, Benjamin R; Mays, Gary T

    2016-01-01

    A workshop on Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) technologies commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on October 15 16, 2015. The MSRE represented a pioneering experiment that demonstrated an advanced reactor technology: the molten salt eutectic-fueled reactor. A multinational group of more than 130 individuals representing a diverse set of stakeholders gathered to discuss the historical, current, and future technical challenges and paths to deployment of MSR technology. This paper provides a summary of the key messages from this workshop.

  6. Experiments on the high-temperature behaviour of neutron-irradiated uranium dioxide and fission products, volume 8, number 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanke, R. H. J.

    The release rate of fission products from overheated UO2, the chemical form of these fission products, and the transport mechanism inside the nuclear fuel are determined. UO spheres of approximately 1 mm diameter, irradiated in a high-flux reactor were used for the experiments. The chemical forms of the particles released from the spheres during evaporation were determined by mass spectrometry and the release rate of the mission products was determined by gamma spectrometry. A gamma topographer was developed to determine the change with temperature in the three dimensional distribution of radioactive fission products in the spheres. No clear relationship between the stoichiometry of the spheres and uranium consumption were shown. A diffusion model was used to determine the activation energy for the diffusion of fission products. It is concluded that the microstructure of the nuclear fuel greatly affects the number of free oxygen atoms, the release rate and the chemical form of the fission products. The evaporation of the UO2 matrix is the main mechanism for the release of all fission products at temperatures above 2300 K. Barium can be as volatile as iodine. Niobium and lanthenum can be volatile. Molecular combinations of the fission products, iodine, cesium and tellurium, are highly unlikely to be present inside the fuel. Barium and nobium may form compounds with oxygen and are then released as simple oxides. Fission products are released from overheated UO2 or as oxides. A new model is proposed for describing the behavior of oxygen in irradiated nuclear fuel.

  7. Microstructure of austenitic stainless steels irradiated at 400°C in the ORR and the HFIR spectral tailoring experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, N.; Wakai, E.; Robertson, J. P.; Sawai, T.; Hishinuma, A.

    2000-07-01

    Microstructural evolution in solution-annealed Japanese-PCA (JPCA-SA) and four other austenitic stainless steels, irradiated at 400°C to 17.3 dpa in the ORR and the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) spectrally tailored experiment, were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The mean He/dpa ratio throughout the irradiation fell between 12 and 16 appm He/dpa , which is close to the He/dpa values expected for fusion. In all the specimens, a bi-modal size distribution of cavities was observed and the number densities were about 1.0×10 22 m -3. There was no significant difference between the number densities in the different alloys, although the root mean cubes of the cavity radius are quite different for each alloy. Precipitates of the MC type were also observed in the matrix and on grain boundaries in all alloys except a high-purity (HP) ternary alloy. The JPCA-SA (including 0.06% carbon and 0.027% phosphorus) and standard type 316 steel (including 0.06% carbon and 0.028% phosphorus) showed quite low-swelling values of about 0.016 and 0.015%, respectively, while a HP ternary austenitic alloy showed the highest swelling value of 2.9%. This suggests that the existence of impurities affects the cavity growth in austenitic stainless steels even at 400°C.

  8. Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise Collin

    2014-09-01

    This report documents comparisons between post-irradiation examination measurements and model predictions of silver (Ag), cesium (Cs), and strontium (Sr) release from selected tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation test of the Advanced Gas Reactor program that occurred from December 2006 to November 2009 in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The modeling was performed using the particle fuel model computer code PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) developed at INL. PARFUME is an advanced gas-cooled reactor fuel performance modeling and analysis code (Miller 2009). It has been developed as an integrated mechanistic code that evaluates the thermal, mechanical, and physico-chemical behavior of fuel particles during irradiation to determine the failure probability of a population of fuel particles given the particle-to-particle statistical variations in physical dimensions and material properties that arise from the fuel fabrication process, accounting for all viable mechanisms that can lead to particle failure. The code also determines the diffusion of fission products from the fuel through the particle coating layers, and through the fuel matrix to the coolant boundary. The subsequent release of fission products is calculated at the compact level (release of fission products from the compact) but it can be assessed at the particle level by adjusting the diffusivity in the fuel matrix to very high values. Furthermore, the diffusivity of each layer can be individually set to a high value (typically 10-6 m2/s) to simulate a failed layer with no capability of fission product retention. In this study, the comparison to PIE focused on fission product release and because of the lack of failure in the irradiation, the probability of particle failure was not calculated. During the AGR-1 irradiation campaign, the fuel kernel produced and released fission products, which migrated through the successive

  9. The nanostructure evolution in Fe-C systems under irradiation at 560 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansson, V.; Chiapetto, M.; Malerba, L.

    2013-11-01

    This work extends our Object Kinetic Monte Carlo model for neutron irradiation-induced nanostructure evolution in Fe-C alloys to consider higher irradiation temperatures. The previous study concentrated on irradiation temperatures <370 K. Here we study the evolution of vacancy and self-interstitial atom (SIA) cluster populations at the operational temperature of light water reactors, by simulating specific reference irradiation experiments.

  10. Mechanical properties and microstructure of three Russian ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in BN-350 reactor to 50 dpa at 490C

    SciTech Connect

    Dvoriashin, Alexander M.; Porollo, S. I.; Konobeev, Yu V.; Budylkin, N. I.; Mironova, E. G.; Ioltukhovsky, A. G.; Leonteva-Smirnova, M. V.; Garner, Francis A.

    2007-08-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels are being considered for application in fusion reactors, intense neutron sources, and accelerator-driven systems. While EP-450 is traditionally used with sodium coolants in Russia, EP-823 and EI-852 steels with higher silicon levels have been developed for reactor facilities using lead-bismuth coolant. To determine the influence of silicon additions on short-term mechanical properties and microstructure, ring specimens cut from cladding tubes of these three steels were irradiated in sodium at 490С in the BN-350 reactor to 50 dpa. Post-irradiation tensile testing and microstructural examination show that EI-852 steel (1.9 wt% Si) undergoes severe irradiation embrittlement. Microstructural investigation showed that the formation of near-continuous -phase precipitates on grain boundaries is the main cause of the embrittlement.

  11. As-Run Physics Analysis for the UCSB-1 Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Joseph Wayne

    2015-09-01

    The University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) -1 experiment was irradiated in the A-10 position of the ATR. The experiment was irradiated during cycles 145A, 145B, 146A, and 146B. Capsule 6A was removed from the test train following Cycle 145A and replaced with Capsule 6B. This report documents the as-run physics analysis in support of Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE) of the test. This report documents the as-run fluence and displacements per atom (DPA) for each capsule of the experiment based on as-run operating history of the ATR. Average as-run heating rates for each capsule are also presented in this report to support the thermal analysis.

  12. Investigation of reactivity between SiC and Nb-1Zr in planned irradiation creep experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lewinsohn, C.A.; Hamilton, M.L.; Jones, R.H.

    1997-08-01

    Thermodynamic calculations and diffusion couple experiments showed that SiC and Nb-1Zr were reactive at the upper range of temperatures anticipated in the planned irradiation creep experiment. Sputter-deposited aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was selected as a diffusion barrier coating. Experiments showed that although the coating coarsened at high temperature it was an effective barrier for diffusion of silicon from SiC into Nb-1Zr. Therefore, to avoid detrimental reactions between the SiC composite and the Nb-1Zr pressurized bladder during the planned irradiation creep experiment, a coating of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} will be required on the Nb-1Zr bladder.

  13. PROCESS INTENSIFICATION: OXIDATION OF BENZYL ALCOHOL USING A CONTINUOUS ISOTHERMAL REACTOR UNDER MICROWAVE IRRADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past two decades, several investigations have been carried out using microwave radiation for performing chemical transformations. These transformations have been largely performed in conventional batch reactors with limited mixing and heat transfer capabilities. The reacti...

  14. Modeling injected interstitial effects on void swelling in self-ion irradiation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, M. P.; Gaston, D. R.; Jin, M.; Shao, L.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-04-01

    Heavy ion irradiations at high dose rates are often used to simulate slow and expensive neutron irradiation experiments. However, many differences in the resultant modes of damage arise due to unique aspects of heavy ion irradiation. One such difference was recently shown in pure iron to manifest itself as a double peak in void swelling, with both peaks located away from the region of highest displacement damage. In other cases involving a variety of ferritic alloys there is often only a single peak in swelling vs. depth that is located very near the ion-incident surface. We show that these behaviors arise due to a combination of two separate effects: 1) suppression of void swelling due to injected interstitials, and 2) preferential sinking of interstitials to the ion-incident surface, which are very sensitive to the irradiation temperature and displacement rate. Care should therefore be used in collection and interpretation of data from the depth range outside the Bragg peak of ion irradiation experiments, as it is shown to be more complex than previously envisioned.

  15. Testing of Gas Reactor Materials and Fuel in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2004-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has long been involved in testing gas reactor materials, and has developed facilities well suited for providing the right conditions and environment for gas reactor tests. This paper discusses the different types of irradiation hardware that have been utilized in past ATR irradiation tests of gas reactor materials. The new Gas Test Loop facility currently being developed for the ATR is discussed and the different approaches being considered in the design of the facility. The different options for an irradiation experiment such as active versus passive temperature control, neutron spectrum tailoring, and different types of lead experiment sweep gas monitors are also discussed. The paper is then concluded with examples of different past and present gas reactor material and fuel irradiations.

  16. TESTING OF GAS REACTOR MATERIALS AND FUEL IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, S.B.

    2004-10-06

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has long been involved in testing gas reactor materials, and has developed facilities well suited for providing the right conditions and environment for gas reactor tests. This paper discusses the different types of irradiation hardware that have been utilized in past ATR irradiation tests of gas reactor materials. The new Gas Test Loop facility currently being developed for the ATR is discussed and the different approaches being considered in the design of the facility. The different options for an irradiation experiment such as active versus passive temperature control, neutron spectrum tailoring, and different types of lead experiment sweep gas monitors are also discussed. The paper is then concluded with examples of different past and present gas reactor material and fuel irradiations.

  17. Effect of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of weld overlay cladding for reactor pressure vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobita, Tohru; Udagawa, Makoto; Chimi, Yasuhiro; Nishiyama, Yutaka; Onizawa, Kunio

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the effects of high fluence neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of two types of cladding materials fabricated using the submerged-arc welding and electroslag welding methods. The tensile tests, Charpy impact tests, and fracture toughness tests were conducted before and after the neutron irradiation with a fluence of 1 × 1024 n/m2 at 290 °C. With neutron irradiation, we could observe an increase in the yield strength and ultimate strength, and a decrease in the total elongation. All cladding materials exhibited ductile-to-brittle transition behavior during the Charpy impact tests. A reduction in the Charpy upper-shelf energy and an increase in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature was observed with neutron irradiation. There was no obvious decrease in the elastic-plastic fracture toughness (JIc) of the cladding materials upon irradiation with high neutron fluence. The tearing modulus was found to decrease with neutron irradiation; the submerged-arc-welded cladding materials exhibited low JIc values at high temperatures.

  18. Effect of neutron irradiation on the microstructure of the stainless steel electroslag weld overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, T.; Kakubo, Y.; Matsukawa, Y.; Nozawa, Y.; Nagai, Y.; Nishiyama, Y.; Katsuyama, J.; Onizawa, K.; Suzuki, M.

    2013-11-01

    Microstructural changes in the stainless steel weld overlay cladding of reactor pressure vessels subjected to neutron irradiation with a fluence of 7.2 × 1023 n m-2 (E > 1 MeV) and a flux of 1.1 × 1017 n m-2 s-1 at 290 °C were investigated by atom probe tomography. The results showed a difference in the microstructural changes that result from neutron irradiation and thermal aging. Neutron irradiation resulted in the slight progression of Cr spinodal decomposition and an increase in the fluctuation of the Si, Ni, and Mn concentrations in the ferrite phases, with formation of γ‧-like clusters in the austenite phases. On the other hand, thermal aging resulted in the considerable progression of the Cr spinodal decomposition, formation of G-phases, and a decrease in the Si and an increase in the Ni and Mn concentration fluctuations at the matrix in the ferrite phases, without the microstructural changes in the austenite phases.

  19. Study of irradiation creep of vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Smith, D.L.

    1997-08-01

    Thin-wall tubing was produced from the 832665 (500 kg) heat of V-4 wt.% Cr-4 wt.% Ti to study its irradiation creep behavior. The specimens, in the form of pressurized capsules, were irradiated in Advanced Test Reactor and High Flux Isotope Reactor experiments (ATR-A1 and HFIR RB-12J, respectively). The ATR-A1 irradiation has been completed and specimens from it will soon be available for postirradiation examination. The RB-12J irradiation is not yet complete.

  20. Fabrication of ORNL Fuel Irradiated in the Peach Bottom Reactor and Postirradiation Examination of Recycle Test Elements 7 and 4

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Jr. E.L.

    2001-10-25

    Seven full-sized Peach Bottom Reactor. fuel elements were fabricated in a cooperative effort by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Gulf General Atomic (GGA) as part of the National HTGR Fuel Recycle Development Program. These elements contain bonded fuel rods and loose beds of particles made from several combinations of fertile and fissile particles of interest for present and future use in the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). The portion of the fuel prepared for these elements by ORNL is described in detail in this report, and it is in conjunction with the GGA report (GA-10109) a complete fabrication description of the test. In addition, this report describes the results obtained to date from postirradiation examination of the first two elements removed from the Peach Bottom Reactor, RTE-7 and -4. The fuel examined had relatively low exposure, up to about 1.5 x 10{sup 21} neutrons/cm* fast (>0.18 MeV) fluence, compared with the peak anticipated HTGR fluence of 8.0 x 10{sup 21}, but it has performed well at this exposure. Dimensional data indicate greater irradiation shrinkage than expected from accelerated test data to higher exposures. This suggests that either the method of extrapolation of the higher exposure data back to low exposure is faulty, or the behavior of the coated particles in the neutron spectrum characteristic of the accelerated tests does not adequately represent the behavior in an HTGR spectrum.

  1. Benchmark experiments for validation of reaction rates determination in reactor dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rataj, J.; Huml, O.; Heraltova, L.; Bily, T.

    2014-11-01

    The precision of Monte Carlo calculations of quantities of neutron dosimetry strongly depends on precision of reaction rates prediction. Research reactor represents a very useful tool for validation of the ability of a code to calculate such quantities as it can provide environments with various types of neutron energy spectra. Especially, a zero power research reactor with well-defined core geometry and neutronic properties enables precise comparison between experimental and calculated data. Thus, at the VR-1 zero power research reactor, a set of benchmark experiments were proposed and carried out to verify the MCNP Monte Carlo code ability to predict correctly the reaction rates. For that purpose two frequently used reactions were chosen: He-3(n,p)H-3 and Au-197(n,γ)Au-198. The benchmark consists of response measurement of small He-3 gas filled detector in various positions of reactor core and of activated gold wires placed inside the core or to its vicinity. The reaction rates were calculated in MCNP5 code utilizing a detailed model of VR-1 reactor which was validated for neutronic calculations at the reactor. The paper describes in detail the experimental set-up of the benchmark, the MCNP model of the VR-1 reactor and provides a comparison between experimental and calculated data.

  2. Shifts of neutrino oscillation parameters in reactor antineutrino experiments with non-standard interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Feng; Zhou, Ye-Ling

    2014-11-01

    We discuss reactor antineutrino oscillations with non-standard interactions (NSIs) at the neutrino production and detection processes. The neutrino oscillation probability is calculated with a parametrization of the NSI parameters by splitting them into the averages and differences of the production and detection processes respectively. The average parts induce constant shifts of the neutrino mixing angles from their true values, and the difference parts can generate the energy (and baseline) dependent corrections to the initial mass-squared differences. We stress that only the shifts of mass-squared differences are measurable in reactor antineutrino experiments. Taking Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) as an example, we analyze how NSIs influence the standard neutrino measurements and to what extent we can constrain the NSI parameters. Long baseline reactor antineutrino experiments, such as KamLAND [10,11]. The aim of these experiments is to observe the slow oscillation with Δ21 and measure the corresponding oscillation parameters Δm212 and θ12. Short baseline reactor antineutrino experiments, such as Daya Bay [1-3], Double CHOOZ [4], RENO [5]. They are designed to observe the fast oscillation with Δ31 and Δ32 (or equivalently, Δee[3]) and measure the corresponding oscillation parameters Δmee2, θ13. Medium baseline reactor antineutrino experiments. They stand for the next generation experiments of reactor antineutrinos, with typical representatives of Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) [12] and RENO-50 [13]. They can determine the neutrino mass ordering (m1reactor antineutrino experiments. High-dimensional operators originating from new physics can contribute to the neutrino oscillation in the form of non-standard interactions (NSIs) [14

  3. Solar EUV irradiance derived from a sounding rocket experiment on November 10, 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.

    1990-05-01

    Results are presented on the solar EUV irradiance measurements in the range 30-100 nm obtained in a sounding rocket experiment launched from the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, on November 10, 1988. The observed solar EUV irradiance was found to be about 20 percent less than the solar EUV flux from a proxy model based on the daily 10.7-cm solar flux and its 81-day mean and the AE-E solar EUV data taken in the 1970s. The November 10 measurement of the solar EUV flux provides a good calibration reference spectrum for the solar EUV instruments on the San Marco satellite.

  4. Solar EUV irradiance derived from a sounding rocket experiment on November 10, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on the solar EUV irradiance measurements in the range 30-100 nm obtained in a sounding rocket experiment launched from the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, on November 10, 1988. The observed solar EUV irradiance was found to be about 20 percent less than the solar EUV flux from a proxy model based on the daily 10.7-cm solar flux and its 81-day mean and the AE-E solar EUV data taken in the 1970s. The November 10 measurement of the solar EUV flux provides a good calibration reference spectrum for the solar EUV instruments on the San Marco satellite.

  5. Human Factors Engineering (HFE) insights for advanced reactors based upon operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, J.; Nasta, K.

    1997-01-01

    The NRC Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (HFE PRM, NUREG-0711) was developed to support a design process review for advanced reactor design certification under 10CFR52. The HFE PRM defines ten fundamental elements of a human factors engineering program. An Operating Experience Review (OER) is one of these elements. The main purpose of an OER is to identify potential safety issues from operating plant experience and ensure that they are addressed in a new design. Broad-based experience reviews have typically been performed in the past by reactor designers. For the HFE PRM the intent is to have a more focussed OER that concentrates on HFE issues or experience that would be relevant to the human-system interface (HSI) design process for new advanced reactors. This document provides a detailed list of HFE-relevant operating experience pertinent to the HSI design process for advanced nuclear power plants. This document is intended to be used by NRC reviewers as part of the HFE PRM review process in determining the completeness of an OER performed by an applicant for advanced reactor design certification. 49 refs.

  6. AFC-1 Transmutation Fuels Post-Irradiation Hot Cell Examination 4-8 at.% - Final Report (Irradiation Experiments AFC-1B, -1F and -1Æ)

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Hilton; Douglas Porter; Steven Hayes

    2006-09-01

    The AFC-1B, AFC-1F and AFC-1Æ irradiation tests are part of a series of test irradiations designed to evaluate the feasibility of the use of actinide bearing fuel forms in advanced fuel cycles for the transmutation of transuranic elements from nuclear waste. The tests were irradiated in the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to an intermediate burnup of 4 to 8 at% (2.7 - 6.8 x 1020 fiss/cm3). The tests contain metallic and nitride fuel forms with non-fertile (i.e., no uranium) and low-fertile (i.e., uranium bearing) compositions. Results of postirradiation hot cell examinations of AFC-1 irradiation tests are reported for eleven metallic alloy transmutation fuel rodlets and five nitride transmutation fuel rodlets. Non-destructive examinations included visual examination, dimensional inspection, gamma scan analysis, and neutron radiography. Detailed examinations, including fission gas puncture and analysis, metallography / ceramography and isotopics and burnup analyses, were performed on five metallic alloy and three nitride transmutation fuels. Fuel performance of both metallic alloy and nitride fuel forms was best correlated with fission density as a burnup metric rather than at.% depletion. The actinide bearing transmutation metallic alloy compositions exhibit irradiation performance very similar to U-xPu-10Zr fuel at equivalent fission densities. The irradiation performance of nitride transmutation fuels was comparable to limited data published on mixed nitride systems.

  7. Identification of Silver and Palladium in Irradiated TRISO Coated Particles of the AGR-1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    van Rooyen, Y. J.; Lillo, T. M.; Wu, Y. Q.

    2014-03-01

    Evidence of the release of certain metallic fission product through intact tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particles has been seen for decades around the world, as well as in the recent AGR-1 experiment at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). However, understanding the basic mechanism of transport is still lacking. This understanding is important because the TRISO coating is part of the high temperature gas reactor functional containment and critical for the safety strategy for licensing purposes. Our approach to identify fission products in irradiated AGR-1 TRISO fuel using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) and Energy Filtered TEM (EFTEM), has led to first-of-a-kind data at the nano-scale indicating the presence of silver at triple points and grain boundaries of the SiC layer in the TRISO particle. Cadmium was also found in the triple junctions. In this initial study, the silver was only identified in SiC grain boundaries and triple points on the edge of the SiC-IPyC interface up to a depth of approximately 0.5 um. Palladium was identified as the main constituent of micron-sized precipitates present at the SiC grain boundaries. Additionally spherical nano-sized palladium rich precipitates were found inside the SiC grains. These nano-sized Pd precipitates were distributed up to a depth of 5 um away from the SiC-IPyC interlayer. No silver was found in the center of the micron-sized fission product precipitates using these techniques, although silver was found on the outer edge of one of the Pd-U-Si containing precipitates which was facing the IPyC layer. Only Pd-U containing precipitates were identified in the IPyC layer and no silver was identified in the IPyC layer. The identification of silver alongside the grain boundaries and the findings of Pd alongside grain boundaries as well as inside the grains, provide significant knowledge for understanding silver and palladium transport in TIRSO fuel, which has been

  8. Part I. Fuel-motion diagnostics in support of fast-reactor safety experiments. Part II. Fission product detection system in support of fast reactor safety experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Devolpi, A.; Doerner, R.C.; Fink, C.L.; Regis, J.P.; Rhodes, E.A.; Stanford, G.S.; Braid, T.H.; Boyar, R.E.

    1986-05-01

    In all destructive fast-reactor safety experiments at TREAT, fuel motion and cladding failure have been monitored by the fast-neutron/gamma-ray hodoscope, providing experimental results that are directly applicable to design, modeling, and validation in fast-reactor safety. Hodoscope contributions to the safety program can be considered to fall into several groupings: pre-failure fuel motion, cladding failure, post-failure fuel motion, steel blockages, pretest and posttest radiography, axial-power-profile variations, and power-coupling monitoring. High-quality results in fuel motion have been achieved, and motion sequences have been reconstructed in qualitative and quantitative visual forms. A collimated detection system has been used to observe fission products in the upper regions of a test loop in the TREAT reactor. Particular regions of the loop are targeted through any of five channels in a rotatable assembly in a horizontal hole through the biological shield. A well-type neutron detector, optimized for delayed neutrons, and two GeLi gamma ray spectrometers have been used in several experiments. Data are presented showing a time history of the transport of Dn emitters, of gamma spectra identifying volatile fission products deposited as aerosols, and of fission gas isotopes released from the coolant.

  9. Lunar dust simulant charging and transport under UV irradiation in vacuum: Experiments and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champlain, A.; Matéo-Vélez, J.-C.; Roussel, J.-F.; Hess, S.; Sarrailh, P.; Murat, G.; Chardon, J.-P.; Gajan, A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent high-altitude observations, made by the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) experiment on board LADEE orbiting the Moon, indicate that high-altitude (>10 km) dust particle densities are well correlated with interplanetary dust impacts. They show no evidence of high dust density suggested by Apollo 15 and 17 observations and possibly explained by electrostatic forces imposed by the plasma environment and photon irradiation. This paper deals with near-surface conditions below the domain of observation of LDEX where electrostatic forces could clearly be at play. The upper and lower limits of the cohesive force between dusts are obtained by comparing experiments and numerical simulations of dust charging under ultraviolet irradiation in the presence of an electric field and mechanical vibrations. It is suggested that dust ejection by electrostatic forces is made possible by microscopic-scale amplifications due to soil irregularities. At low altitude, this process may be complementary to interplanetary dust impacts.

  10. Reactor service life extension program

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, G.R.; Sindelar, R.L.; Ondrejcin, R.S.; Baumann, E.W.

    1990-01-01

    A review of the Savannah River Site production reactor systems was initiated in 1980 and led to implementation of the Reactor Materials Program in 1984 to assess reactor safety and reactor service life. The program evaluated performance of the reactor tanks, primary coolant piping, and thermal shields, components of welded construction that were fabricated from Type 304 stainless steel. The structural integrity analysis of the primary coolant system has shown that the pressure boundary is not susceptible to gross rupture, including a double ended guillotine break or equivalent large area bank. Residual service life is potentially limited by two material degradation modes, irradiation damage and intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Analysis of the structural integrity of the tanks and piping has shown that continued safe operation of the reactors for several additional decades is not limited by the material performance of the primary coolant system. Although irradiation damage has not degraded material behavior to an unacceptable level, past experience has revealed serious difficulties with repair welding on irradiated stainless steel. Stress corrosion can be mitigated by newly identified limits on impurity concentrations in the coolant water and by stress mitigation of weld residual stresses. Work continues in several areas: the effects of helium on mechanical behavior of irradiated stainless steel; improved weld methods for piping and the reactor tanks; and a surveillance program to track irradiation effects on the tank walls.

  11. Reactor service life extension program

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, G.R.; Sindelar, R.L.; Ondrejcin, R.S.; Baumann, E.W.

    1990-12-31

    A review of the Savannah River Site production reactor systems was initiated in 1980 and led to implementation of the Reactor Materials Program in 1984 to assess reactor safety and reactor service life. The program evaluated performance of the reactor tanks, primary coolant piping, and thermal shields, components of welded construction that were fabricated from Type 304 stainless steel. The structural integrity analysis of the primary coolant system has shown that the pressure boundary is not susceptible to gross rupture, including a double ended guillotine break or equivalent large area bank. Residual service life is potentially limited by two material degradation modes, irradiation damage and intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Analysis of the structural integrity of the tanks and piping has shown that continued safe operation of the reactors for several additional decades is not limited by the material performance of the primary coolant system. Although irradiation damage has not degraded material behavior to an unacceptable level, past experience has revealed serious difficulties with repair welding on irradiated stainless steel. Stress corrosion can be mitigated by newly identified limits on impurity concentrations in the coolant water and by stress mitigation of weld residual stresses. Work continues in several areas: the effects of helium on mechanical behavior of irradiated stainless steel; improved weld methods for piping and the reactor tanks; and a surveillance program to track irradiation effects on the tank walls.

  12. Design and Nuclear-Safety Related Simulations of Bare-Pellet Test Irradiations for the Production of Pu-238 in the High Flux Isotope Reactor using COMSOL

    SciTech Connect

    Freels, James D; Jain, Prashant K; Hobbs, Randy W

    2012-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)is developing technology to produce plutonium-238 for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as a power source material for powering vehicles while in deep-space[1]. The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of ORNL has been utilized to perform test irradiations of incapsulated neptunium oxide (NpO2) and aluminum powder bare pellets for purposes of understanding the performance of the pellets during irradiation[2]. Post irradiation examinations (PIE) are currently underway to assess the effect of temperature, thermal expansion, swelling due to gas production, fission products, and other phenomena

  13. Review of ORNL-TSF shielding experiments for the gas-cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, L.S.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Muckenthaler, F.J.; Slater, C.O.

    1982-01-01

    During the period between 1975 and 1980 a series of experiments was performed at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility in support of the shield design for a 300-MW(e) Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Demonstration Plant. This report reviews the experiments and calculations, which included studies of: (1) neutron streaming in the helium coolant passageways in the GCFR core; (2) the effectiveness of the shield designed to protect the reactor grid plate from radiation damage; (3) the adequacy of the radial shield in protecting the PCRV (prestressed concrete reactor vessel) from radiation damage; (4) neutron streaming between abutting sections of the radial shield; and (5) the effectiveness of the exit shield in reducing the neutron fluxes in the upper plenum region of the reactor.

  14. Ion chromatographic determination of transition metals in irradiated nuclear reactor surveillance samples.

    PubMed

    Louw, I

    1996-02-01

    The determination of transition metal ions in radioactive (+/-25 microCi/g) low-alloy steels (nuclear reactor surveillance samples) by ion chromatography (IC) is described. The analysis has been done directly without prior separation of the iron matrix. The eluted metal ions have been detected with a UV-visible spectrophotometric detector after post-column complexation with 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol. The results are in a good agreement with the certified values for the standard reference material used. The method was applied to nuclear reactor surveillance samples for the determination of Cu, Mn, Co and Ni. PMID:15048428

  15. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Program (NERI) Quarterly Progress Report; New Design Equations for Swelling and Irradiation Creep in Generation IV Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfer, W G; Surh, M P; Garner, F A; Chrzan, D C; Schaldach, C; Sturgeon, J B

    2003-02-13

    The objectives of this research project are to significantly extend the theoretical foundation and the modeling of radiation-induced microstructural changes in structural materials used in Generation IV nuclear reactors, and to derive from these microstructure models the constitutive laws for void swelling, irradiation creep and stress-induced swelling, as well as changes in mechanical properties. The need for the proposed research is based on three major developments and advances over the past two decades. First, new experimental discoveries have been made on void swelling and irradiation creep which invalidate previous theoretical models and empirical constitutive laws for swelling and irradiation creep. Second, recent advances in computational methods and power make it now possible to model the complex processes of microstructure evolution over long-term neutron exposures. Third, it is now required that radiation-induced changes in structural materials over extended lifetimes be predicted and incorporated in the design of Generation IV reactors. Our approach to modeling and data analysis is a dual one in accord with both the objectives to simulate the evolution of the microstructure and to develop design equations for macroscopic properties. Validation of the models through data analysis is therefore carried out at both the microscopic and the macroscopic levels. For the microstructure models, we utilize the transmission electron microscopy results from steels irradiated in reactors and from model materials irradiated by neutrons as well as ion bombardments. The macroscopic constitutive laws will be tested and validated by analyzing density data, irradiation creep data, diameter changes of fuel elements, and post-irradiation tensile data. Validation of both microstructure models and macroscopic constitutive laws is a more stringent test of the internal consistency of the underlying science for radiation effects in structural materials for nuclear reactors.

  16. RERTR-12 Insertion 2 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Perez; G. S. Chang; D. M. Wachs; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme

    2012-09-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-12 was designed to provide comprehensive information on the performance of uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) based monolithic fuels for research reactor applications.1 RERTR-12 insertion 2 includes the capsules irradiated during the last three irradiation cycles. These capsules include Z, Y1, Y2 and Y3 type capsules. The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-12 insertion 2 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis results, thermal analysis results and hydraulic testing results.

  17. Zirconium carbide coating for corium experiments related to water-cooled and sodium-cooled reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plevacova, K.; Journeau, C.; Piluso, P.; Zhdanov, V.; Baklanov, V.; Poirier, J.

    2011-07-01

    Since the TMI and Chernobyl accidents the risk of nuclear severe accident is intensively studied for existing and future reactors. In case of a core melt-down accident in a nuclear reactor, a complex melt, called corium, forms. To be able to perform experiments with prototypic corium materials at high temperature, a coating which resists to different corium melts related to Generation I and II Water Reactors and Generation IV sodium fast reactor was researched in our experimental platforms both in IAE NNC in Kazakhstan and in CEA in France. Zirconium carbide was selected as protective coating for graphite crucibles used in our induction furnaces: VCG-135 and VITI. The method of coating application, called reactive wetting, was developed. Zirconium carbide revealed to resist well to the (U x, Zr y)O 2-z water reactor corium. It has also the advantage not to bring new elements to this chemical system. The coating was then tested with sodium fast reactor corium melts containing steel or absorbers. Undesirable interactions were observed between the coating and these materials, leading to the carburization of the corium ingots. Concerning the resistance of the coating to oxide melts without ZrO 2, the zirconium carbide coating keeps its role of protective barrier with UO 2-Al 2O 3 below 2000 °C but does not resist to a UO 2-Eu 2O 3 mixture.

  18. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Szilard, L.

    1963-09-10

    A breeder reactor is described, including a mass of fissionable material that is less than critical with respect to unmoderated neutrons and greater than critical with respect to neutrons of average energies substantially greater than thermal, a coolant selected from sodium or sodium--potassium alloys, a control liquid selected from lead or lead--bismuth alloys, and means for varying the quantity of control liquid in the reactor. (AEC)

  19. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1961-07-25

    A means is described for co-relating the essential physical requirements of a fission chain reaction in order that practical, compact, and easily controllable reactors can be built. These objects are obtained by employing a composition of fissionsble isotope and moderator in fluid form in which the amount of fissionsble isotcpe present governs the reaction. The size of the reactor is no longer a critical factor, the new criterion being the concentration of the fissionable isotope.

  20. MAPPING FLOW LOCALIZATION PROCESSES IN DEFORMATION OF IRRADIATED REACTOR STRUCTURAL ALLOYS - FINAL REPORT. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Program No. MSF99-0072. Period: August 1999 through September 2002. (ORNL/TM-2003/63)

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, K.

    2003-09-26

    Metals that can sustain plastic deformation homogeneously throughout their bulk tend to be tough and malleable. Often, however, if a metal has been hardened it will no longer deform uniformly. Instead, the deformation occurs in narrow bands on a microscopic scale wherein stresses and strains become concentrated in localized zones. This strain localization degrades the mechanical properties of the metal by causing premature plastic instability failure or by inducing the formation of cracks. Irradiation with neutrons hardens a metal and makes it more prone to deformation by strain localization. Although this has been known since the earliest days of radiation damage studies, a full measure of the connection between neutron irradiation hardening and strain localization is wanting, particularly in commercial alloys used in the construction of nuclear reactors. Therefore, the goal of this project is to systematically map the extent of involvement of strain localization processes in plastic deformation of three reactor alloys that have been neutron irradiated. The deformation processes are to be identified and related to changes in the tensile properties of the alloys as functions of neutron fluence (dose) and degree of plastic strain. The intent is to define the role of strain localization in radiation embrittlement phenomena. The three test materials are a tempered bainitic A533B steel, representing reactor pressure vessel steel, an annealed 316 stainless steel and annealed Zircaloy-4 representing reactor internal components. These three alloys cover the range of crystal structures usually encountered in structural alloys, i.e. body-centered cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc), and close-packed hexagonal (cph), respectively. The experiments were conducted in three Phases, corresponding to the three years duration of the project. Phases 1 and 2 addressed irradiations and tensile tests made at near-ambient temperatures, and covered a wide range of neutron fluences

  1. Design, fabrication, and operation of capsules for the irradiation testing of candidate advanced space reactor fuel pins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thoms, K. R.

    1975-01-01

    Fuel irradiation experiments were designed, built, and operated to test uranium mononitride (UN) fuel clad in tungsten-lined T-111 and uranium dioxide fuel clad in both tungsten-lined T-111 and tungsten-lined Nb-1% Zr. A total of nine fuel pins was irradiated at average cladding temperatures ranging from 931 to 1015 C. The UN experiments, capsules UN-4 and -5, operated for 10,480 and 10,037 hr, respectively, at an average linear heat generation rate of 10 kW/ft. The UO2 experiment, capsule UN-6, operated for 8333 hr at an average linear heat generation rate of approximately 5 kW/ft. Following irradiation, the nine fuel pins were removed from their capsules, externally examined, and sent to the NASA Plum Brook Facility for more detailed postirradiation examination. During visual examination, it was discovered that the cladding of the fuel pin containing dense UN in each of capsules UN-4 and -5 had failed, exposing the UN fuel to the NaK in which the pins were submerged and permitting the release of fission gas from the failed pins. A rough analysis of the fission gas seen in samples of the gas in the fuel pin region indicated fission gas release-to-birth rates from these fuel pins in the range of .00001.

  2. Startup experience at the University of Texas TRIGA Mark II Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Thomas L.; Wehring, Bernard W.

    1992-07-01

    After eight years of singular effort, the UT-TRIGA Mark II research reactor was licensed and is fully operational. This reactor is the focus of a new reactor laboratory facility which is located at the Balcones Research Center, a north Austin campus of The University of Texas at Austin. The UT-TRIGA reactor is licensed for 1.1 MW steady power operation and 3 dollar pulsing. A startup program was implemented upon receipt of the facility license on January 17, 1992. Several facility features are unique to this startup. Among these were the use of fuel with various burnup and a digital control system. The reactor laboratory staff with assistance from a General Atomics instrumentation engineer performed all phases of the startup program. Core loading began in February 1992 with final testing completed in May 1992. Several unusual problems were encountered during this time. Experiment authorizations have been written to resume Neutron Activation Analysis programs and isotope production. Several neutron beam tube experiments are in the design and test phase. (author)

  3. Dielectric strength, swelling and weight loss of the ITER Toroidal Field Model Coil insulation after low temperature reactor irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humer, K.; Weber, H. W.; Hastik, R.; Hauser, H.; Gerstenberg, H.

    2000-04-01

    The insulation system for the Toroidal Field Model Coil of ITER is a fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) laminate, which consists of a combined Kapton/R-glass-fiber reinforcement tape, vacuum-impregnated with an epoxy DGEBA system. Pure disk shaped laminates, FRP/stainless-steel sandwiches, and conductor insulation prototypes were irradiated at 5 K in a fission reactor up to a fast neutron fluence of 10 22 m -2 ( E>0.1 MeV) to investigate the radiation induced degradation of the dielectric strength of the insulation system. After warm-up to room temperature, swelling, weight loss, and the breakdown strength were measured at 77 K. The sandwich swells by 4% at a fluence of 5×10 21 m-2 and by 9% at 1×10 22 m-2. The weight loss of the FRP is 2% at 1×10 22 m-2. The dielectric strength remained unchanged over the whole dose range.

  4. Reconstitution and Upgrade of the Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility in the Basement Medical Room of the MIT Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Harling, Otto, K.; Riley, Kent, J.; Binns, Peter J.

    2004-12-31

    The M-011 thermal neutron beam has been reconstituted and upgraded to provide a high intensity and high quality facility for preclinical and certain clinical studies. Intensities of thermal neutrons in the beam range from 5.0-8.5 x 109 n cm-2 s-1. Beam contamination is at a low level where it has no practical influence on beam performance. New computer controlled dose and beam monitoring systems have been implemented which assure precise dose delivery and redundant safety interlocks. An additional beam shutter and massive shielding in the back of the medical room have been added which significantly reduce room background and now permit staff entry without the necessity for lowering the reactor power. This system is needed for BNCT research by the MIT group as well as other US groups. This need became acute with the closure of the BMRR which previously had the only high quality thermal neutron irradiation facility for BNCT in the USA.

  5. On the correlation between irradiation-induced microstructural features and the hardening of reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrecht, M.; Meslin, E.; Malerba, L.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Bergner, F.; Pareige, P.; Radiguet, B.; Almazouzi, A.

    2010-11-01

    A correlation is attempted between microstructural observations by various complementary techniques, which have been implemented within the PERFECT project and the hardening measured by tensile tests of reactor pressure vessel steel and model alloys after irradiation to a dose of ˜7 × 10 19 n cm -2. This is done, using the simple hardening model embodied by the Orowan equation and applying the most suitable superposition law, as suggested by a parametric study using the DUPAIR line tension code. It is found that loops are very strong obstacles to dislocation motion, but due to their low concentration, they only play a minor role in the hardening itself. For the precipitates, the contrary is found, although they are quite soft (due to their very small sizes and their coherent nature), they still play the dominant role in the hardening. Vacancy clusters are important for the formation of both loops and precipitates, but they will play almost no role in the hardening by themselves.

  6. Calculated k-effectives for light water reactor typical, U + Pu nitrate solution critical experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Primm, R.T. III; Mincey, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program has as a goal the design of nuclear fuel reprocessing equipment. In order to validate computer codes used for criticality analyses in the design of such equipment, k-effectives have been calculated for several U + Pu nitrate solution critical experiments. As of January 1981, descriptions of 45 unpoisoned, U + Pu solution experiments were available in the open literature. Twelve of these experiments were performed with solutions which have physical characteristics typical of dissolved, light water reactor fuel. This paper contains a discussion of these twelve experiments, a review of the calculational procedure used to determine k-effectives, and the results of the calculations.

  7. Atom probe tomography characterization of neutron irradiated surveillance samples from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, P. D.; Miller, M. K.; Powers, K. A.; Nanstad, R. K.

    2016-03-01

    Surveillance samples of a low copper (nominally 0.05 wt.% Cu) forging and a higher copper (0.23 wt.% Cu) submerged arc weld from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel have been characterized by atom probe tomography (APT) after exposure to three levels of neutron irradiation, i.e., fluences of 1.7, 3.6 and 5.8 × 1023 n.m-2 (E > 1 MeV), and inlet temperatures of ∼289 °C (∼552 °F). As no copper-enriched precipitates were observed in the low copper forging, and the measured copper content in the ferrite matrix was 0.04± <0.01 at.% Cu, after neutron irradiation to a fluence of 1.7 × 1023 n.m-3, this copper level was below the solubility limit. A number density of 2 × 1022 m-3 of Ni-, Mn- Si-enriched precipitates with an equivalent radius of gyration of 1.7 ± 0.4 nm were detected in the sample. However, Cu-, Ni-, Mn-enriched precipitates were observed in specimens cut from different surveillance specimens from the same forging material in which the overall measured copper level was 0.08± <0.01 at.% (fluence of 3.6 × 1023 n.m-3) and 0.09± <0.01 at.% Cu (fluence of 5.8 × 1023 n.m-3). Therefore, these slightly higher copper contents were above the solubility limit of Cu under these irradiation conditions. A best fit of all the composition data indicated that the size and number density of the Cu-enriched precipitates increased slightly in both size and number density by additional exposure to neutron irradiation. High number densities of Cu-enriched precipitates were observed in the higher Cu submerged arc weld for all irradiated conditions. The size and number density of the precipitates in the welds were higher than in the same fluence forgings. Some Cu-enriched precipitates were found to have Ni-, Mn- Si-, and P-enriched regions on their surfaces suggesting a preferential nucleation site. Atom maps revealed P, Ni, and Mn segregation to, and preferential precipitation of, Cu-enriched precipitates over the surface of a grain boundary in the low fluence

  8. Atom probe tomography characterization of neutron irradiated surveillance samples from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Edmondson, Philip D.; Miller, Michael K.; Powers, Kathy A.; Nanstad, Randy K.

    2015-12-29

    Surveillance samples of a low copper (nominally 0.05 wt.% Cu) forging and a higher copper (0.23 wt.% Cu) submerged arc weld from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel have been characterized by atom probe tomography (APT) after exposure to three levels of neutron irradiation, i.e., fluences of 1.7, 3.6 and 5.8 × 1023 n.m–2 (E > 1 MeV), and inlet temperatures of ~289 °C (~552 °F). As no copper-enriched precipitates were observed in the low copper forging, and the measured copper content in the ferrite matrix was 0.04± <0.01 at.% Cu, after neutron irradiation to a fluence of 1.7more » × 1023 n.m–3, this copper level was below the solubility limit. A number density of 2 × 1022 m–3 of Ni–, Mn– Si-enriched precipitates with an equivalent radius of gyration of 1.7 ± 0.4 nm were detected in the sample. However, Cu-, Ni-, Mn-enriched precipitates were observed in specimens cut from different surveillance specimens from the same forging material in which the overall measured copper level was 0.08± <0.01 at.% (fluence of 3.6 × 1023 n.m–3) and 0.09± <0.01 at.% Cu (fluence of 5.8 × 1023 n.m–3). Therefore, these slightly higher copper contents were above the solubility limit of Cu under these irradiation conditions. A best fit of all the composition data indicated that the size and number density of the Cu-enriched precipitates increased slightly in both size and number density by additional exposure to neutron irradiation. High number densities of Cu-enriched precipitates were observed in the higher Cu submerged arc weld for all irradiated conditions. The size and number density of the precipitates in the welds were higher than in the same fluence forgings. Some Cu-enriched precipitates were found to have Ni-, Mn- Si-, and P-enriched regions on their surfaces suggesting a preferential nucleation site. Furthermore, atom maps revealed P, Ni, and Mn segregation to, and preferential precipitation of, Cu-enriched precipitates over the surface of a grain

  9. Atom probe tomography characterization of neutron irradiated surveillance samples from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Philip D.; Miller, Michael K.; Powers, Kathy A.; Nanstad, Randy K.

    2015-12-29

    Surveillance samples of a low copper (nominally 0.05 wt.% Cu) forging and a higher copper (0.23 wt.% Cu) submerged arc weld from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel have been characterized by atom probe tomography (APT) after exposure to three levels of neutron irradiation, i.e., fluences of 1.7, 3.6 and 5.8 × 1023 n.m–2 (E > 1 MeV), and inlet temperatures of ~289 °C (~552 °F). As no copper-enriched precipitates were observed in the low copper forging, and the measured copper content in the ferrite matrix was 0.04± <0.01 at.% Cu, after neutron irradiation to a fluence of 1.7 × 1023 n.m–3, this copper level was below the solubility limit. A number density of 2 × 1022 m–3 of Ni–, Mn– Si-enriched precipitates with an equivalent radius of gyration of 1.7 ± 0.4 nm were detected in the sample. However, Cu-, Ni-, Mn-enriched precipitates were observed in specimens cut from different surveillance specimens from the same forging material in which the overall measured copper level was 0.08± <0.01 at.% (fluence of 3.6 × 1023 n.m–3) and 0.09± <0.01 at.% Cu (fluence of 5.8 × 1023 n.m–3). Therefore, these slightly higher copper contents were above the solubility limit of Cu under these irradiation conditions. A best fit of all the composition data indicated that the size and number density of the Cu-enriched precipitates increased slightly in both size and number density by additional exposure to neutron irradiation. High number densities of Cu-enriched precipitates were observed in the higher Cu submerged arc weld for all irradiated conditions. The size and number density of the precipitates in the welds were higher than in the same fluence forgings. Some Cu-enriched precipitates were found to have Ni-, Mn- Si-, and P-enriched regions on their surfaces suggesting a preferential nucleation site. Furthermore, atom maps revealed P, Ni, and Mn

  10. Circulation system for flowing uranium hexafluoride cavity reactor experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaminet, J. F.; Kendall, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    Research related to determining the feasibility of producing continuous power from fissile fuel in the gaseous state is presented. The development of three laboratory-scale flow systems for handling gaseous UF6 at temperatures up to 500 K, pressure up to approximately 40 atm, and continuous flow rates up to approximately 50g/s is presented. A UF6 handling system fabricated for static critical tests currently being conducted is described. The system was designed to supply UF6 to a double-walled aluminum core canister assembly at temperatures between 300 K and 400 K and pressure up to 4 atm. A second UF6 handling system designed to provide a circulating flow of up to 50g/s of gaseous UF6 in a closed-loop through a double-walled aluminum core canister with controlled temperature and pressure is described. Data from flow tests using UF6 and UF6/He mixtures with this system at flow rates up to approximately 12g/s and pressure up to 4 atm are presented. A third UF6 handling system fabricated to provide a continuous flow of UF6 at flow rates up to 5g/s and at pressures up to 40 atm for use in rf-heated, uranium plasma confinement experiments is described.

  11. Materials experience and selection for nuclear materials production reactor heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J.E.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The primary coolant systems for the heavy-water nuclear materials production reactors at the Savannah River Site are coupled to the secondary coolant systems through shell and tube heat exchangers. The head, shell, and tube sheets of these heat exchangers are fabricated from AISI Type 304 grades of austenitic stainless steel. The 8,957 tubes in each heat exchanger were originally fabricated from Type 304 stainless steel, but service experience has lead to the use of Sea Cure tubing in newer systems. The design includes double tube sheets, core rods, and 33,410 square feet of heat transfer surface. Tubes are rolled into the tube sheets and seal welded after rolling. The tubes contain Type 304 stainless steel rods which are positioned in the center of each tube axis to increase the fraction of the cooling water contacting the heat transfer surface. Each reactor utilizes twelve heat exchangers; thus the 120+ reactor-years of operating experience provide approximately 1,440 heat exchanger-years of service. Fatigue, stress corrosion cracking, crevice corrosion, and pitting have been observed during the service life. This paper describes the observed degradation processes and uses the operational experience to recommend materials for the Heavy Water -- New Production Reactor (HW-NPR).

  12. Multiscale Simulation of Thermo-mechancial Processes in Irradiated Fission-reactor Materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Simon R. Phillpot

    2012-06-08

    The work funded from this project has been published in six papers, with two more in draft form, with submission planned for the near future. The papers are: (1) Kinetically-Evolving Irradiation-Induced Point-Defect Clusters in UO{sub 2} by Molecular-Dynamics Simulation; (2) Kinetically driven point-defect clustering in irradiated MgO by molecular-dynamics simulation; (3) Grain-Boundary Source/Sink Behavior for Point Defect: An Atomistic Simulation Study; (4) Energetics of intrinsic point defects in uranium dioxide from electronic structure calculations; (5) Thermodynamics of fission products in UO{sub 2{+-}x}; and (6) Atomistic study of grain boundary sink strength under prolonged electron irradiation. The other two pieces of work that are currently being written-up for publication are: (1) Effect of Pores and He Bubbles on the Thermal Transport Properties of UO2 by Molecular Dynamics Simulation; and (2) Segregation of Ruthenium to Edge Dislocations in Uranium Dioxide.

  13. Advanced Reactor Licensing: Experience with Digital I&C Technology in Evolutionary Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, RT

    2004-09-27

    This report presents the findings from a study of experience with digital instrumentation and controls (I&C) technology in evolutionary nuclear power plants. In particular, this study evaluated regulatory approaches employed by the international nuclear power community for licensing advanced l&C systems and identified lessons learned. The report (1) gives an overview of the modern l&C technologies employed at numerous evolutionary nuclear power plants, (2) identifies performance experience derived from those applications, (3) discusses regulatory processes employed and issues that have arisen, (4) captures lessons learned from performance and regulatory experience, (5) suggests anticipated issues that may arise from international near-term deployment of reactor concepts, and (6) offers conclusions and recommendations for potential activities to support advanced reactor licensing in the United States.

  14. US/Japan collaborative program on fusion reactor materials: Summary of the tenth DOE/JAERI Annex I technical progress meeting on neutron irradiation effects in first wall and blanket structural materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1989-03-17

    This meeting was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on March 17, 1989, to review the technical progress on the collaborative DOE/JAERI program on fusion reactor materials. The purpose of the program is to determine the effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical behavior and dimensional stability of US and Japanese austenitic stainless steels. Phase I of the program focused on the effects of high concentrations of helium on the tensile, fatigue, and swelling properties of both US and Japanese alloys. In Phase II of the program, spectral and isotropic tailoring techniques are fully utilized to reproduce the helium:dpa ratio typical of the fusion environment. The Phase II program hinges on a restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor by mid-1989. Eight target position capsules and two RB* position capsules have been assembled. The target capsule experiments will address issues relating to the performance of austenitic steels at high damage levels including an assessment of the performance of a variety of weld materials. The RB* capsules will provide a unique and important set of data on the behavior of austenitic steels irradiated under conditions which reproduce the damage rate, dose, temperature, and helium generation rate expected in the first wall and blanket structure of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor.

  15. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Roman, W.G.

    1961-06-27

    A pressurized water reactor in which automatic control is achieved by varying the average density of the liquid moderator-cooiant is patented. Density is controlled by the temperature and power level of the reactor ftself. This control can be effected by the use of either plate, pellet, or tubular fuel elements. The fuel elements are disposed between upper and lower coolant plenum chambers and are designed to permit unrestricted coolant flow. The control chamber has an inlet opening communicating with the lower coolant plenum chamber and a restricted vapor vent communicating with the upper coolant plenum chamber. Thus, a variation in temperature of the fuel elements will cause a variation in the average moderator density in the chamber which directly affects the power level of the reactor.

  16. Sequential UASB and dual media packed-bed reactors for domestic wastewater treatment - experiment and simulation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gómez, Raúl; Renman, Gunno

    2016-01-01

    A wastewater treatment system composed of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor followed by a packed-bed reactor (PBR) filled with Sorbulite(®) and Polonite(®) filter material was tested in a laboratory bench-scale experiment. The system was operated for 50 weeks and achieved very efficient total phosphorus (P) removal (99%), 7-day biochemical oxygen demand removal (99%) and pathogenic bacteria reduction (99%). However, total nitrogen was only moderately reduced in the system (40%). A model focusing on simulation of organic material, solids and size of granules was then implemented and validated for the UASB reactor. Good agreement between the simulated and measured results demonstrated the capacity of the model to predict the behaviour of solids and chemical oxygen demand, which is critical for successful P removal and recovery in the PBR. PMID:27332842

  17. FLOWSHEET EVALUATION FOR THE DISSOLVING AND NEUTRALIZATION OF SODIUM REACTOR EXPERIMENT USED NUCLEAR FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, W. E.; Hansen, E. K.; Shehee, T. C.

    2012-10-30

    This report includes the literature review, hydrogen off-gas calculations, and hydrogen generation tests to determine that H-Canyon can safely dissolve the Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE; thorium fuel), Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR; aluminum alloy fuel), and Denmark Reactor (DR-3; silicide fuel, aluminum alloy fuel, and aluminum oxide fuel) assemblies in the L-Bundles with respect to the hydrogen levels in the projected peak off-gas rates. This is provided that the number of L-Bundles charged to the dissolver is controlled. Examination of SRE dissolution for potential issues has aided in predicting the optimal batching scenario. The calculations detailed in this report demonstrate that the FNR, SRE, and DR-3 used nuclear fuel (UNF) are bounded by MURR UNF and may be charged using the controls outlined for MURR dissolution in a prior report.

  18. Comparison of silver, cesium, and strontium release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Maki, John T.

    2015-08-22

    The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, and strontium from tristructural isotropic coated fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation experiment (AGR-1) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-1 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 620 days of irradiation to calculate the release of silver, cesium, and strontium from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-1 compacts. Post-irradiation examination measurements provided data on release of these fission products from fuel compacts and fuel particles, and retention of silver in the compacts outside of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer. PARFUME-predicted fractional release of silver, cesium, and strontium was determined and compared to the PIE measurements. For silver, comparisons show a trend of over-prediction at low burnup and under-prediction at high burnup. PARFUME has limitations in the modeling of the temporal and spatial distributions of the temperature and burnup across the compacts, which affects the accuracy of its predictions. Nevertheless, the comparisons on silver release lie in the same order of magnitude. Results show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of cesium by PARFUME. For particles with failed SiC layers, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 3, corresponding to a potential over-estimation of the diffusivity in uranium oxycarbide (UCO) by a factor of up to 250. For intact particles, whose release is much lower, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 100, which could be attributed to an over-estimated diffusivity in SiC by about 40% on average. The release of strontium from intact particles is also over-predicted by PARFUME, which also points towards an over-estimated diffusivity of strontium in either SiC or UCO, or possibly both. The measured strontium fractional release from

  19. Comparison of silver, cesium, and strontium release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Maki, John T.

    2015-11-01

    The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, and strontium from tristructural isotropic coated fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation experiment (AGR-1) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-1 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 620 days of irradiation to calculate the release of silver, cesium, and strontium from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-1 compacts. Post-irradiation examination (PIE) measurements provided data on release of these fission products from fuel compacts and fuel particles, and retention of silver in the compacts outside of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer. PARFUME-predicted fractional release of silver, cesium, and strontium was determined and compared to the PIE measurements. For silver, comparisons show a trend of over-prediction at low burnup and under-prediction at high burnup. PARFUME has limitations in the modeling of the temporal and spatial distributions of the temperature and burnup across the compacts, which affects the accuracy of its predictions. Nevertheless, the comparisons on silver release lie in the same order of magnitude. Results show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of cesium by PARFUME. For particles with failed SiC layers, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 3, corresponding to a potential over-estimation of the diffusivity in uranium oxycarbide (UCO) by a factor of up to 250. For intact particles, whose release is much lower, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 100, which could be attributed to an over-estimated diffusivity in SiC by about 40% on average. The release of strontium from intact particles is also over-predicted by PARFUME, which also points towards an over-estimated diffusivity of strontium in either SiC or UCO, or possibly both. The measured strontium fractional release

  20. HTR-2014 Paper Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise Collin

    2001-10-01

    The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict fission product release from tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation experiment (AGR-1) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-1 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 620 days of irradiation to calculate the release of fission products silver, cesium, and strontium from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-1 compacts. Post-irradiation examination (PIE) measurements provided data on release of fission products from fuel compacts and fuel particles, and retention of fission products in the compacts outside of the SiC layer. PARFUME-predicted fractional release of these fission products was determined and compared to the PIE measurements. Results show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of cesium by PARFUME. For particles with failed silicon carbide (SiC) layers, the over-prediction is by a factor of about two, corresponding to an over-estimation of the diffusivity in uranium oxycarbide (UCO) by a factor of about 100. For intact particles, whose release is much lower, the over-prediction is by an average of about an order of magnitude, which could additionally be attributed to an over-estimated diffusivity in SiC by about 30%. The release of strontium from intact particles is also over-estimated by PARFUME, which also points towards an over-estimated diffusivity of strontium in either SiC or UCO, or possibly both. The measured strontium fractional release from intact particles varied considerably from compact to compact, making it difficult to assess the effective over-estimation of the diffusivities. Furthermore, the release of strontium from particles with failed SiC is difficult to observe experimentally due to the release from intact particles, preventing any conclusions to be made on the accuracy or validity of the

  1. Comparison of silver, cesium, and strontium release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Maki, John T.

    2015-08-22

    The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, and strontium from tristructural isotropic coated fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation experiment (AGR-1) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-1 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 620 days of irradiation to calculate the release of silver, cesium, and strontium from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-1 compacts. Post-irradiation examination measurements provided data on release of these fission products from fuel compacts andmore » fuel particles, and retention of silver in the compacts outside of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer. PARFUME-predicted fractional release of silver, cesium, and strontium was determined and compared to the PIE measurements. For silver, comparisons show a trend of over-prediction at low burnup and under-prediction at high burnup. PARFUME has limitations in the modeling of the temporal and spatial distributions of the temperature and burnup across the compacts, which affects the accuracy of its predictions. Nevertheless, the comparisons on silver release lie in the same order of magnitude. Results show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of cesium by PARFUME. For particles with failed SiC layers, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 3, corresponding to a potential over-estimation of the diffusivity in uranium oxycarbide (UCO) by a factor of up to 250. For intact particles, whose release is much lower, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 100, which could be attributed to an over-estimated diffusivity in SiC by about 40% on average. The release of strontium from intact particles is also over-predicted by PARFUME, which also points towards an over-estimated diffusivity of strontium in either SiC or UCO, or possibly both. The measured strontium fractional release

  2. REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Spitzer, L. Jr.

    1961-10-01

    Thermonuclear reactors, methods, and apparatus are described for controlling and confining high temperature plasma. Main axial confining coils in combination with helical windings provide a rotational transform that avoids the necessity of a figure-eight shaped reactor tube. The helical windings provide a multipolar helical magnetic field transverse to the axis of the main axial confining coils so as to improve the effectiveness of the confining field by counteracting the tendency of the more central lines of force in the stellarator tube to exchange positions with the magnetic lines of force nearer the walls of the tube. (AEC)

  3. Summary report on the fuel performance modeling of the AFC-2A, 2B irradiation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel G. Medvedev

    2013-09-01

    The primary objective of this work at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to determine the fuel and cladding temperature history during irradiation of the AFC-2A, 2B transmutation metallic fuel alloy irradiation experiments containing transuranic and rare earth elements. Addition of the rare earth elements intends to simulate potential fission product carry-over from pyro-metallurgical reprocessing. Post irradiation examination of the AFC-2A, 2B rodlets revealed breaches in the rodlets and fuel melting which was attributed to the release of the fission gas into the helium gap between the rodlet cladding and the capsule which houses six individually encapsulated rodlets. This release is not anticipated during nominal operation of the AFC irradiation vehicle that features a double encapsulated design in which sodium bonded metallic fuel is separated from the ATR coolant by the cladding and the capsule walls. The modeling effort is focused on assessing effects of this unanticipated event on the fuel and cladding temperature with an objective to compare calculated results with the temperature limits of the fuel and the cladding.

  4. A new irradiation method with a neutron filter for silicon neutron transmutation doping at the Japan research reactor no. 3 (JRR-3).

    PubMed

    Komeda, Masao; Kawasaki, Kozo; Obara, Toru

    2013-04-01

    We studied a new silicon irradiation holder with a neutron filter designed to make the vertical neutron flux profile uniform. Since an irradiation holder has to be made of a low activation material, we applied aluminum blended with B4C as the holder material. Irradiation methods to achieve uniform flux with a filter are discussed using Monte-Carlo calculation code MVP. Validation of the use of the MVP code for the holder's analyses is also discussed via characteristic experiments. PMID:23395784

  5. Safety Assurance for ATR Irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is the world’s premiere test reactor for performing high fluence, large volume, irradiation test programs. The ATR has many capabilities and a wide variety of tests are performed in this truly one of a kind reactor, including isotope production, simple self-contained static capsule experiments, instrumented/controlled experiments, and loop testing under pressurized water conditions. Along with the five pressurized water loops, ATR may also have gas (temperature controlled) lead experiments, fuel boosted fast flux experiments, and static sealed capsules all in the core at the same time. In addition, any or all of these tests may contain fuel or moderating materials that can affect reactivity levels in the ATR core. Therefore the safety analyses required to ensure safe operation of each experiment as well as the reactor itself are complex. Each test has to be evaluated against stringent reactor control safety criteria, as well as the effects it could have on adjacent tests and the reactor as well as the consequences of those effects. The safety analyses of each experiment are summarized in a document entitled the Experiment Safety Assurance Package (ESAP). The ESAP references and employs the results of the reactor physics, thermal, hydraulic, stress, seismic, vibration, and all other analyses necessary to ensure the experiment can be irradiated safely in the ATR. The requirements for reactivity worth, chemistry compatibilities, pressure limitations, material issues, etc. are all specified in the Technical Safety Requirements and the Upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report (UFSAR) for the ATR. This paper discusses the ESAP process, types of analyses, types of safety requirements and the approvals necessary to ensure an experiment can be safely irradiated in the ATR.

  6. Theoretical analysis of the subcritical experiments performed in the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. M.; Dos Santos, A.

    2012-07-01

    The theoretical analysis of the subcritical experiments performed at the IPEN/MB-01 reactor employing the coupled NJOY/AMPX-II/TORT systems was successfully accomplished. All the analysis was performed employing ENDF/B-VII.0. The theoretical approach follows all the steps of the subcritical model of Gandini and Salvatores. The theory/experiment comparison reveals that the calculated subcritical reactivity is in a very good agreement to the experimental values. The subcritical index ({xi}) shows some discrepancies although in this particular case some work still have to be made to model in a better way the neutron source present in the experiments. (authors)

  7. Determination of the irradiation field at the research reactor TRIGA Mainz for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Nagels, S; Hampel, G; Kratz, J V; Aguilar, A L; Minouchehr, S; Otto, G; Schmidberger, H; Schütz, C; Vogtländer, L; Wortmann, B

    2009-07-01

    For the application of the BNCT for the excorporal treatment of organs at the TRIGA Mainz, the basic characteristics of the radiation field in the thermal column as beam geometry, neutron and gamma ray energies, angular distributions, neutron flux, as well as absorbed gamma and neutron doses must be determined in a reproducible way. To determine the mixed irradiation field thermoluminescence detectors (TLD) made of CaF(2):Tm with a newly developed energy-compensation filter system and LiF:Mg,Ti materials with different (6)Li concentrations and different thicknesses as well as thin gold foils were used. PMID:19380234

  8. Thermal analysis of the FSP-1 fuel pin irradiation test. [for SP-100 space power reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, William F., III

    1991-01-01

    Thermal analysis of a pin from the FSP-1 fuels irradiation test has been completed. The purpose of the analysis was to provide predictions of fuel pin temperatures, determine the flow regime within the lithium annulus of the test assembly, and provide a standardized model for a consistent basis of comparison between pins within the test assembly. The calculations have predicted that the pin is operating at slightly above the test design temperatures and that the flow regime within the lithium annulus is a laminar buoyancy driven flow.

  9. Production of microgram amounts of einsteinium 253 by irradiating californium in a reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kulyukhin, S.A.; Averman, L.N.; Mikheev, N.B.; Novichenko, V.L.; Rumer, I.A.

    1986-07-01

    /sup 253/Es has been made by irradiating 250 microg of /sup 252/Cf in a neutron flux of 5.10/sup 14/ n/cm/sup 2/.sec for 500 h. The product, about 1 microg of einsteinium, was separated chromatographically on Aminex resin of particle size 20-25 microm. The eluent was ammonium alpha-hydroxyisobutyrate (0.14 mole/liter) at pH 4.95. The purification coefficient for Es from Cf was about 1.10/sup 5/. More extensive purification can be provided by repeating the process on another column with the same parameters.

  10. U.S. Plans for the Next Fast Reactor Transmutation Fuels Irradiation Test

    SciTech Connect

    B. A. Hilton

    2007-09-01

    The U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products, thereby dramatically decreasing the volume of material requiring disposal and the long-term radio-toxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. One important component of the technology development is actinide-bearing transmutation fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium (and possibly curium) isotopes. Metallic alloy and oxide fuel forms are being developed as the near term options for fast reactor implementation.

  11. Chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by U-235 fission neutrons: I. Irradiation of human blood samples in the "dry cell" of the TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor.

    PubMed

    Fajgelj, A; Lakoski, A; Horvat, D; Remec, I; Skrk, J; Stegnar, P

    1991-11-01

    A set-up for irradiation of biological samples in the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Ljubljana is described. Threshold activation detectors were used for characterisation of the neutron flux, and the accompanying gamma dose was measured by TLDs. Human peripheral blood samples were irradiated "in vitro" and biological effects evaluated according to the unstable chromosomal aberrations induced. Biological effects of two types of cultivation of irradiated blood samples, the first immediately after irradiation and the second after 96 h storage, were studied. A significant difference in the incidence of chromosomal aberrations between these two types of samples was obtained, while our dose-response curve fitting coefficients alpha 1 = (7.71 +/- 0.09) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (immediate cultivation) and alpha 2 = (11.03 +/- 0.08) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (96 h delayed cultivation) are in both cases lower than could be found in the literature. PMID:1962281

  12. Tomographic imaging of a target directly irradiated in experiments on the Iskra-5 iodine laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, S V; Garanin, R V; Garanin, Sergey G; Zhidkov, N V; Oreshkov, O V; Potapov, S V; Suslov, N A; Frolova, N V

    2010-12-29

    We set forth the data of experiments involving direct microtarget irradiation by the 12 second-harmonic beams ({lambda} = 0.66 {mu}m) of iodine laser radiation carried out on the Iskra-5 facility. For microtargets we employed glass shells {approx}500 {mu}m in diameter with {approx}1-{mu}m thick walls, which were filled with a DT mixture at a pressure p{sub DT} {approx} 3-4 atm. In one of these experiments, a tomographic image of the microtarget was recorded from the images obtained using pinhole cameras, which were arranged along seven different directions. The pinhole images were acquired in the X-ray radiation with photon energies above 1.5 keV. The procedure used for reconstructing the volume luminosity of the microtarget is described. An analysis of the tomographic image suggests that the compressed microtarget domain possesses a complex asymmetric shape; 20-30 {mu}m sized structural elements being clearly visible. The resultant data set allowed us to estimate the initial nonuniformity of microtarget surface irradiation by the laser radiation. The rms nonuniformity of microtarget irradiance was estimated at {approx}60 %. (interaction of laser radiation with targets)

  13. Testing of Gas Reactor Fuel and Materials in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2006-10-01

    The recent growth in interest for high temperature gas reactors has resulted in an increased need for materials and fuel testing for this type of reactor. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the US Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, has long been involved in testing gas reactor fuel and materials, and has facilities and capabilities to provide the right environment for gas reactor irradiation experiments. These capabilities include both passive sealed capsule experiments, and instrumented/actively controlled experiments. The instrumented/actively controlled experiments typically contain thermocouples and control the irradiation temperature, but on-line measurements and controls for pressure and gas environment have also been performed in past irradiations. The ATR has an existing automated gas temperature control system that can maintain temperature in an irradiation experiment within very tight bounds, and has developed an on-line fission product monitoring system that is especially well suited for testing gas reactor particle fuel. The ATR’s control system, which consists primarily of vertical cylinders used to rotate neutron poisons/reflectors toward or away from the reactor core, provides a constant vertical flux profile over the duration of each operating cycle. This constant chopped cosine shaped axial flux profile, with a relatively flat peak at the vertical centre of the core, is more desirable for experiments than a constantly moving axial flux peak resulting from a control system of axially positioned control components which are vertically withdrawn from the core.

  14. [Comparison of different G-CSF treatment effectiveness in experiments on irradiated mice].

    PubMed

    Rozhdestvenskiĭ, L M; Shchegoleva, R A; Deshevoĭ, Iu B; Lisina, N I; Titov, B A

    2012-01-01

    In the experiments on F1 (CBA x C57BL) and BALB mice irradiated by 137Cs gamma-rays, preparations of unglycosilated G-SCF such as Neupogen and their domestic analogs Leucostim and Neupomax were investigated. The tests such as 9-day bone marrow cellularity (BMC) and endogenous CFUs, the neutrophile number restoration, the 30-day survival index have shown that all three preparations have an approximately equal effectiveness relating to acute radiation disease treatment and granulopoiesis stimulation after a 5-10 day consecutive administration following irradiation of mice at lethal and sublethal doses. We have come to the conclusion that Leucostim and Neupomax can be regarded as adequate substitutes for Neupogen. PMID:23227714

  15. Density decrease in vanadium-base alloys irradiated in the dynamic helium charging experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Galvin, T.M.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    Combined effects of dynamically charged helium and neutron damage on density decrease (swelling) of V-4Cr-4Ti, V-5Ti, V-3Ti-1Si, and V-8Cr-6Ti alloys have been determined after irradiation to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degrees}C in the Dynamic helium Charging Experiment (DHCE). To ensure better accuracy in density measurement, broken pieces of tensile specimens {approx} 10 times heavier than a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) disk were used. Density increases of the four alloys irradiated in the DHCE were <0.5%. This small change seems to be consistent with the negligible number density of microcavities characterized by TEM. Most of the dynamically produced helium atoms seem to have been trapped in the grain matrix without significant cavity nucleation or growth.

  16. Tensile and impact properties of vanadium-base alloys irradiated at low temperatures in the ATR-A1 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Nowicki, L.J.; Billone, M.C.; Chung, H.M.; Smith, D.L.

    1998-03-01

    Subsize tensile and Charpy specimens made from several V-(4-5)Cr-(4-5)Ti alloys were irradiated in the ATR-A1 experiment to study the effects of low-temperature irradiation on mechanical properties. These specimens were contained in lithium-bonded subcapsules and irradiated at temperatures between {approx}200 and 300 C. Peak neutron damage was {approx}4.7 dpa. Postirradiation testing of these specimens has begun. Preliminary results from a limited number of specimens indicate a significant loss of work-hardening capability and dynamic toughness due to the irradiation. These results are consistent with data from previous low-temperature neutron irradiation experiments on these alloys.

  17. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Spitzer, L. Jr.

    1962-01-01

    The system conteraplates ohmically heating a gas to high temperatures such as are useful in thermonuclear reactors of the stellarator class. To this end the gas is ionized and an electric current is applied to the ionized gas ohmically to heat the gas while the ionized gas is confined to a central portion of a reaction chamber. Additionally, means are provided for pumping impurities from the gas and for further heating the gas. (AEC)

  18. A new code for predicting the thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of metallic fuels in sodium fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karahan, Aydın; Buongiorno, Jacopo

    2010-01-01

    An engineering code to predict the irradiation behavior of U-Zr and U-Pu-Zr metallic alloy fuel pins and UO2-PuO2 mixed oxide fuel pins in sodium-cooled fast reactors was developed. The code was named Fuel Engineering and Structural analysis Tool (FEAST). FEAST has several modules working in coupled form with an explicit numerical algorithm. These modules describe fission gas release and fuel swelling, fuel chemistry and restructuring, temperature distribution, fuel-clad chemical interaction, and fuel and clad mechanical analysis including transient creep-fracture for the clad. Given the fuel pin geometry, composition and irradiation history, FEAST can analyze fuel and clad thermo-mechanical behavior at both steady-state and design-basis (non-disruptive) transient scenarios. FEAST was written in FORTRAN-90 and has a simple input file similar to that of the LWR fuel code FRAPCON. The metal-fuel version is called FEAST-METAL, and is described in this paper. The oxide-fuel version, FEAST-OXIDE is described in a companion paper. With respect to the old Argonne National Laboratory code LIFE-METAL and other same-generation codes, FEAST-METAL emphasizes more mechanistic, less empirical models, whenever available. Specifically, fission gas release and swelling are modeled with the GRSIS algorithm, which is based on detailed tracking of fission gas bubbles within the metal fuel. Migration of the fuel constituents is modeled by means of thermo-transport theory. Fuel-clad chemical interaction models based on precipitation kinetics were developed for steady-state operation and transients. Finally, a transient intergranular creep-fracture model for the clad, which tracks the nucleation and growth of the cavities at the grain boundaries, was developed for and implemented in the code. Reducing the empiricism in the constitutive models should make it more acceptable to extrapolate FEAST-METAL to new fuel compositions and higher burnup, as envisioned in advanced sodium reactors

  19. Dealing with Historical Discrepancies: The Recovery of National Research Experiment (NRX) Reactor Fuel Rods at Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) - 13324

    SciTech Connect

    Vickerd, Meggan

    2013-07-01

    Following the 1952 National Research Experiment (NRX) Reactor accident, fuel rods which had short irradiation histories were 'temporarily' buried in wooden boxes at the 'disposal grounds' during the cleanup effort. The Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP), funded by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), strategically retrieves legacy waste and restores lands affected by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) early operations. Thus under this program the recovery of still buried NRX reactor fuel rods and their relocation to modern fuel storage was identified as a priority. A suspect inventory of NRX fuels was compiled from historical records and various research activities. Site characterization in 2005 verified the physical location of the fuel rods and determined the wooden boxes they were buried in had degraded such that the fuel rods were in direct contact with the soil. The fuel rods were recovered and transferred to a modern fuel storage facility in 2007. Recovered identification tags and measured radiation fields were used to identify the inventory of these fuels. During the retrieval activity, a discrepancy was discovered between the anticipated number of fuel rods and the number found during the retrieval. A total of 32 fuel rods and cans of cut end pieces were recovered from the specified site, which was greater than the anticipated 19 fuel rods and cans. This discovery delayed the completion of the project, increased the associated costs, and required more than anticipated storage space in the modern fuel storage facility. A number of lessons learned were identified following completion of this project, the most significant of which was the potential for discrepancies within the historical records. Historical discrepancies are more likely to be resolved by comprehensive historical record searches and site characterizations. It was also recommended that a complete review of the wastes generated, and the total affected lands as a result of this historic

  20. An Investigation into the Transportation of Irradiated Uranium/Aluminum Targets from a Foreign Nuclear Reactor to the Chalk River Laboratories Site in Ontario, Canada - 12249

    SciTech Connect

    Clough, Malcolm; Jackson, Austin

    2012-07-01

    . A suitable transport cask was selected and a device for housing irradiated targets for loading, unloading and transportation has been designed, built and validated. The device was successful in meeting all design requirements for this feasibility study. Experiments were conducted with a custom test facility to confirm that the design met the maximum temperature requirements during shipping. Results from tests showed that the peak temperature in the apparatus was 300 deg. C. By compensating for experimental considerations, such as reduced thermal conductivity of the test cask versus that of the actual cask the expected maximum target temperature reduces to 231 deg. C. This is below the designated peak value of 250 deg. C. It can therefore be concluded, based on the content of this paper and from a heat-removal standpoint, the feasibility of transporting targets from a foreign nuclear reactor to Canada is possible, although further testing with irradiated targets and a full size cask would be a recommended next step. (authors)

  1. Indication of reactor ν(e) disappearance in the Double Chooz experiment.

    PubMed

    Abe, Y; Aberle, C; Akiri, T; dos Anjos, J C; Ardellier, F; Barbosa, A F; Baxter, A; Bergevin, M; Bernstein, A; Bezerra, T J C; Bezrukhov, L; Blucher, E; Bongrand, M; Bowden, N S; Buck, C; Busenitz, J; Cabrera, A; Caden, E; Camilleri, L; Carr, R; Cerrada, M; Chang, P-J; Chimenti, P; Classen, T; Collin, A P; Conover, E; Conrad, J M; Cormon, S; Crespo-Anadón, J I; Cribier, M; Crum, K; Cucoanes, A; D'Agostino, M V; Damon, E; Dawson, J V; Dazeley, S; Dierckxsens, M; Dietrich, D; Djurcic, Z; Dracos, M; Durand, V; Efremenko, Y; Elnimr, M; Endo, Y; Etenko, A; Falk, E; Fallot, M; Fechner, M; von Feilitzsch, F; Felde, J; Fernandes, S M; Franco, D; Franke, A J; Franke, M; Furuta, H; Gama, R; Gil-Botella, I; Giot, L; Göger-Neff, M; Gonzalez, L F G; Goodman, M C; Goon, J T M; Greiner, D; Guillon, B; Haag, N; Hagner, C; Hara, T; Hartmann, F X; Hartnell, J; Haruna, T; Haser, J; Hatzikoutelis, A; Hayakawa, T; Hofmann, M; Horton-Smith, G A; Ishitsuka, M; Jochum, J; Jollet, C; Jones, C L; Kaether, F; Kalousis, L; Kamyshkov, Y; Kaplan, D M; Kawasaki, T; Keefer, G; Kemp, E; de Kerret, H; Kibe, Y; Konno, T; Kryn, D; Kuze, M; Lachenmaier, T; Lane, C E; Langbrandtner, C; Lasserre, T; Letourneau, A; Lhuillier, D; Lima, H P; Lindner, M; Liu, Y; López-Castanõ, J M; LoSecco, J M; Lubsandorzhiev, B K; Lucht, S; McKee, D; Maeda, J; Maesano, C N; Mariani, C; Maricic, J; Martino, J; Matsubara, T; Mention, G; Meregaglia, A; Miletic, T; Milincic, R; Milzstajn, A; Miyata, H; Motta, D; Mueller, Th A; Nagasaka, Y; Nakajima, K; Novella, P; Obolensky, M; Oberauer, L; Onillon, A; Osborn, A; Ostrovskiy, I; Palomares, C; Peeters, S J M; Pepe, I M; Perasso, S; Perrin, P; Pfahler, P; Porta, A; Potzel, W; Queval, R; Reichenbacher, J; Reinhold, B; Remoto, A; Reyna, D; Röhling, M; Roth, S; Rubin, H A; Sakamoto, Y; Santorelli, R; Sato, F; Schönert, S; Schoppmann, S; Schwan, U; Schwetz, T; Shaevitz, M H; Shrestha, D; Sida, J-L; Sinev, V; Skorokhvatov, M; Smith, E; Spitz, J; Stahl, A; Stancu, I; Strait, M; Stüken, A; Suekane, F; Sukhotin, S; Sumiyoshi, T; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Svoboda, R; Tabata, H; Tamura, N; Terao, K; Tonazzo, A; Toups, M; Trinh Thi, H H; Veyssiere, C; Wagner, S; Watanabe, H; White, B; Wiebusch, C; Winslow, L; Worcester, M; Wurm, M; Yanovitch, E; Yermia, F; Zbiri, K; Zimmer, V

    2012-03-30

    The Double Chooz experiment presents an indication of reactor electron antineutrino disappearance consistent with neutrino oscillations. An observed-to-predicted ratio of events of 0.944±0.016(stat)±0.040(syst) was obtained in 101 days of running at the Chooz nuclear power plant in France, with two 4.25 GW(th) reactors. The results were obtained from a single 10 m(3) fiducial volume detector located 1050 m from the two reactor cores. The reactor antineutrino flux prediction used the Bugey4 flux measurement after correction for differences in core composition. The deficit can be interpreted as an indication of a nonzero value of the still unmeasured neutrino mixing parameter sin(2)2θ(13). Analyzing both the rate of the prompt positrons and their energy spectrum, we find sin(2)2θ(13)=0.086±0.041(stat)±0.030(syst), or, at 90% C.L., 0.017

  2. Waterproofed photomultiplier tube assemblies for the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Ken; Cummings, John; Edwards, Emily; Edwards, William; Ely, Ry; Hoff, Matthew; Lebanowski, Logan; Li, Bo; Li, Piyi; Lin, Shih-Kai; Liu, Dawei; Liu, Jinchang; Luk, Kam-Biu; Miao, Jiayuan; Napolitano, Jim; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Peng, Jen-Chieh; Qi, Ming; Steiner, Herbert; Stoler, Paul; Stuart, Mary; Wang, Lingyu; Yang, Changgen; Zhong, Weili

    2015-09-01

    In the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment 960 20-cm-diameter waterproof photomultiplier tubes are used to instrument three water pools as Cherenkov detectors for detecting cosmic-ray muons. Of these 960 photomultiplier tubes, 341 are recycled from the MACRO experiment. A systematic program was undertaken to refurbish them as waterproof assemblies. In the context of passing the water leakage check, a success rate better than 97% was achieved. Details of the design, fabrication, testing, operation, and performance of these waterproofed photomultiplier-tube assemblies are presented.

  3. SLSF in-reactor local fault safety experiment P4. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D. H.; Holland, J. W.; Braid, T. H.; Ragland, W. A.

    1985-09-01

    The Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF), a major facility in the US fast-reactor safety program, has been used to simulate a variety of sodium-cooled fast reactor accidents. SLSF experiment P4 was conducted to investigate the behavior of a "worse-than-case" local fault configuration. Objectives of this experiment were to eject molten fuel into a 37-pin bundle of full-length Fast-Test-Reactor-type fuel pins form heat-generating fuel canisters, to characterize the severity of any molten fuel-coolant interaction, and to demonstrate that any resulting blockage could either be tolerated during continued power operation or detected by global monitors to prevent fuel failure propagation. The design goal for molten fuel release was 10 to 30 g. Explusion of molten fuel from fuel canisters caused failure of adjacent pins and a partial flow channel blockage in the fuel bundle during full-power operation. Molten fuel and fuel debris also lodged against the inner surface of the test subassembly hex-can wall. The total fuel disruption of 310 g evaluated from posttest examination data was in excellent agreement with results from the SLSF delayed neutron detection system, but exceeded the target molten fuel release by an order of magnitude. This report contains a summary description of the SLSF in-reactor loop and support systems and the experiment operations. results of the detailed macro- and microexamination of disrupted fuel and metal and results from the analysis of the on-line experimental data are described, as are the interpretations and conclusions drawn from the posttest evaluations. 60 refs., 74 figs.

  4. GROWTH OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY AND REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    J. Blair Briggs; John D. Bess; Jim Gulliford

    2011-09-01

    Since the International Conference on Nuclear Criticality Safety (ICNC) 2007, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) have continued to expand their efforts and broaden their scope. Eighteen countries participated on the ICSBEP in 2007. Now, there are 20, with recent contributions from Sweden and Argentina. The IRPhEP has also expanded from eight contributing countries in 2007 to 16 in 2011. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments1' have increased from 442 evaluations (38000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 3955 critical or subcritical configurations to 516 evaluations (nearly 55000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 4405 critical or subcritical configurations in the 2010 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. The contents of the Handbook have also increased from 21 to 24 criticality-alarm-placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and from 20 to 200 configurations categorized as fundamental physics measurements relevant to criticality safety applications. Approximately 25 new evaluations and 150 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments2' have increased from 16 different experimental series that were performed at 12 different reactor facilities to 53 experimental series that were performed at 30 different reactor facilities in the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Considerable effort has also been made to improve the functionality of the searchable database, DICE (Database for the International Criticality Benchmark Evaluation Project) and verify the accuracy of the data contained therein. DICE will be discussed in separate papers at ICNC 2011. The status of the ICSBEP and the IRPh

  5. Consolidated fuel reprocessing program: Criticality experiments with fast test reactor fuel pins in an organic moderator

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, S.R.

    1986-12-01

    The results obtained in a series of criticality experiments performed as part of a joint program on criticality data development between the United States Department of Energy and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan are presented in this report along with a complete description of the experiments. The experiments involved lattices of Fast Test Reactor (FTR) fuel pins in an organic moderator mixture similar to that used in the solvent extraction stage of fuel reprocessing. The experiments are designed to provide data for direct comparison with previously performed experimental measurements with water moderated lattices of FTR fuel pins. The same lattice arrangements and FTR fuel pin types are used in these organic moderated experimental assemblies as were used in the water moderated experiments. The organic moderator is a mixture of 38 wt % tributylphosphate in a normal paraffin hydrocarbon mixture of C{sub 11}H{sub 24} to C{sub 15}H{sub 32} molecules. Critical sizes of 1054.8, 599.2, 301.8, 199.5 and 165.3 fuel pins were obtained respectively for organic moderated lattices having 0.761 cm, 0.968 cm, 1.242 cm, 1.537 cm and 1.935 cm square lattice pitches as compared to 1046.9, 571.9, 293.9, 199.7 and 165.1 fuel pins for the same lattices water moderated.

  6. Neutron dosimetry qualification experiments for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Lithium Blanket Module program

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, F.Y.; Harker, Y.D.; Anderi, R.A.; Nigg, D.W.; Jassby, D.L.

    1986-11-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Lithium Blanket module (LBM) program is a first-of-kind neutronics experiment involving a toroidal fusion neutron source. Qualification experiments have been conducted to develop primary measurement techniques and verify dosimetry materials that will be used to characterize the neutron environment inside and on the surfaces of the LBM. The deuterium-tritium simulation experiments utilizing a 14-MeV neutron generator and a fusion blanket mockup facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory are described. Results and discussions are presented that identify the quality and limitations of the measured integral reaction data, including the minimum fluence requirement for the TFTR experiment and the use of such data in neutron spectrum adjustment and in predicting integral performance parameters, e.g., tritium production.

  7. Active in-core irradiation of SiC JFETs at 300 C in a TRIGA nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    McGarrity, J.; Scozzie, C.; Blackburn, J.; DeLancey, M.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper the authors demonstrate that SiC transistors have the potential to operate in the severe high temperature and radiation environments of commercial and space nuclear power sources. 6H-SiC FETs were exposed to neutron fluxes and gamma dose rates as high as 1.6 {times} 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2}/sec and 3.8 {times} 10{sup 4} rad(Si)/sec while they were maintained under bias at both 300 C and room temperature within the core of a TRIGA reactor operated at 200 kW power level. The radiation exposure was continuous and the bias on the devices was interrupted only to record the current-voltage characteristics at various accumulated neutron fluences from 10{sup 13} to 5 {times} 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}. No significant degradation in the device characteristics was observed until the total neutron fluence exceeded 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} for irradiation at 25 C, and no significant changes were observed even at 5 {times} 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} at 300 C.

  8. The dependence of helium generation rate on nickel content of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys irradiated at high dpa levels in fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Oliver, B.M.; Greenwood, L.R.

    1997-04-01

    With a few exceptions in the literature, it is generally accepted that it is nickel in Fe-Cr-Ni alloys that produces most of the transmutant helium and that the helium generation rate should scale linearly with the nickel content. Surprisingly, this assumption is based only on irradiations of pure nickel and has never been tested in an alloy series. There have also been no extensive tests of the predictions for helium production in alloys in various fast reactors spectra.

  9. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Organic Moderated Reactor Experiment facility (OMRE)

    SciTech Connect

    Hine, R.E.

    1980-09-01

    This report describes the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Organic Moderated Reactor Experiment (OMRE) facility performed from October 1977 through September 1979. This D and D project included removal of all the facilities and as much contaminated soil and rock as practical. Removal of the reactor pressure vessel was an unusually difficult problem, and an extraordinary, unexpected amount of activated rock and soil was removed. After removal of all significantly contaminated material, the site consisted of a 20-ft deep excavation surrounded by backfill material. Before this excavation was backfilled, it and the backfill material were radiologically surveyed and detailed records made of these surveys. After the excavation was backfilled and graded, the site surface was surveyed again and found to be essentially uncontaminated.

  10. Reactor ν̄e disappearance in the Double Chooz experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abe, Y.; Aberle, C.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Barriere, J. C.; Bergevin, M.; Bernstein, A.; Bezerra, T. J. C.; Bezrukhov, L.; Blucher, E.; Bowden, N. S.; et al

    2012-09-18

    The Double Chooz experiment has observed 8249 candidate electron antineutrino events in 227.93 live days with 33.71 GW-ton-years (reactor power×detector mass×live time) exposure using a 10.3 m³ fiducial volume detector located at 1050 m from the reactor cores of the Chooz nuclear power plant in France. The expectation in case of θ₁₃=0 is 8937 events. The deficit is interpreted as evidence of electron antineutrino disappearance. From a rate plus spectral shape analysis we find sin²2θ₁₃=0.109±0.030(stat)±0.025(syst). The data exclude the no-oscillation hypothesis at 99.8% CL (2.9σ).

  11. Seventeen years of LMFBR experience: Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II)

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, W.H.; Lentz, G.L.; Richardson, W.J.; Wolz, G.C.

    1982-01-01

    Operating experience at EBR-II over the past 17 years has shown that a sodium-cooled pool-type reactor can be safely and efficiently operated and maintained. The reactor has performed predictably and benignly during normal operation and during both unplanned and planned plant upsets. The duplex-tube evaporators and superheaters have never experienced a sodium/water leak, and the rest of the steam-generating system has operated without incident. There has been no noticeable degradation of the heat transfer efficiency of the evaporators and superheaters, except for the one superheater replaced in 1981. There has been no need to perform any chemical cleaning of steam-system components.

  12. Reactor ν̄e disappearance in the Double Chooz experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Y.; Aberle, C.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Barriere, J. C.; Bergevin, M.; Bernstein, A.; Bezerra, T. J. C.; Bezrukhov, L.; Blucher, E.; Bowden, N. S.; Buck, C.; Busenitz, J.; Cabrera, A.; Caden, E.; Camilleri, L.; Carr, R.; Cerrada, M.; Chang, P.-J.; Chimenti, P.; Classen, T.; Collin, A. P.; Conover, E.; Conrad, J. M.; Crespo-Anadón, J. I.; Crum, K.; Cucoanes, A.; D’Agostino, M. V.; Damon, E.; Dawson, J. V.; Dazeley, S.; Dietrich, D.; Djurcic, Z.; Dracos, M.; Durand, V.; Ebert, J.; Efremenko, Y.; Elnimr, M.; Etenko, A.; Fallot, M.; Fechner, M.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Felde, J.; Franco, D.; Franke, A. J.; Franke, M.; Furuta, H.; Gama, R.; Gil-Botella, I.; Giot, L.; Göger-Neff, M.; Gonzalez, L. F. G.; Goodman, M. C.; Goon, J. TM.; Greiner, D.; Haag, N.; Hagner, C.; Hara, T.; Hartmann, F. X.; Haser, J.; Hatzikoutelis, A.; Hayakawa, T.; Hofmann, M.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Hourlier, A.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jochum, J.; Jollet, C.; Jones, C. L.; Kaether, F.; Kalousis, L. N.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Kaplan, D. M.; Kawasaki, T.; Keefer, G.; Kemp, E.; de Kerret, H.; Kibe, Y.; Konno, T.; Kryn, D.; Kuze, M.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lane, C. E.; Langbrandtner, C.; Lasserre, T.; Letourneau, A.; Lhuillier, D.; Lima, H. P.; Lindner, M.; López-Castanõ, J. M.; LoSecco, J. M.; Lubsandorzhiev, B. K.; Lucht, S.; McKee, D.; Maeda, J.; Maesano, C. N.; Mariani, C.; Maricic, J.; Martino, J.; Matsubara, T.; Mention, G.; Meregaglia, A.; Miletic, T.; Milincic, R.; Miyata, H.; Mueller, Th. A.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakajima, K.; Novella, P.; Obolensky, M.; Oberauer, L.; Onillon, A.; Osborn, A.; Ostrovskiy, I.; Palomares, C.; Pepe, I. M.; Perasso, S.; Perrin, P.; Pfahler, P.; Porta, A.; Potzel, W.; Reichenbacher, J.; Reinhold, B.; Remoto, A.; Röhling, M.; Roncin, R.; Roth, S.; Sakamoto, Y.; Santorelli, R.; Sato, F.; Schönert, S.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwetz, T.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shimojima, S.; Shrestha, D.; Sida, J-L.; Sinev, V.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smith, E.; Spitz, J.; Stahl, A.; Stancu, I.; Stokes, L. F. F.; Strait, M.; Stüken, A.; Suekane, F.; Sukhotin, S.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Sun, Y.; Svoboda, R.; Terao, K.; Tonazzo, A.; Toups, M.; Trinh Thi, H. H.; Valdiviesso, G.; Veyssiere, C.; Wagner, S.; Watanabe, H.; White, B.; Wiebusch, C.; Winslow, L.; Worcester, M.; Wurm, M.; Yermia, F.; Zimmer, V.

    2012-09-18

    The Double Chooz experiment has observed 8249 candidate electron antineutrino events in 227.93 live days with 33.71 GW-ton-years (reactor power×detector mass×live time) exposure using a 10.3 m³ fiducial volume detector located at 1050 m from the reactor cores of the Chooz nuclear power plant in France. The expectation in case of θ₁₃=0 is 8937 events. The deficit is interpreted as evidence of electron antineutrino disappearance. From a rate plus spectral shape analysis we find sin²2θ₁₃=0.109±0.030(stat)±0.025(syst). The data exclude the no-oscillation hypothesis at 99.8% CL (2.9σ).

  13. Effect of irradiation with reactor neutrons and the temperature of subsequent heat treatment on the structure of InP single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Boiko, V. M.; Bublik, V. T.; Voronova, M. I.; Kolin, N. G. Merkurisov, D. I.; Shcherbatchev, K. D.

    2006-06-15

    The results of studying the features of the effect of irradiation with fast and full-spectrum reactor neutrons and subsequent heat treatments on the structural characteristics of InP single crystals are reported. It is shown that, in contrast to other III-V semiconductor compounds, the lattice constant decreases in InP as a result of irradiation with neutrons. Fast neutrons make the major contribution to the variation in the lattice constant. The presence of the component of thermal neutrons that give rise to Sn atoms in the material does not bring about any appreciable variation in the lattice constant. Heat treatment of irradiated samples at temperatures as high as 600 deg. C leads to annealing of radiation defects and recovery of the lattice constant; in the samples irradiated with high neutron fluences, the lattice constant becomes even larger than that before irradiation. An analysis of the obtained experimental data made it possible to assume that the decrease in the InP lattice constant as a result of irradiation with neutrons is mainly caused by the introduction of the P{sub In} antisite defects that give rise to an effect similar to that of vacancy-related defects.

  14. Measuring the mass of a sterile neutrino with a very short baseline reactor experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latimer, D. C.; Escamilla, J.; Ernst, D. J.

    2007-04-01

    An analysis of the world's neutrino oscillation data, including sterile neutrinos, [M. Sorel, C. M. Conrad, and M. H. Shaevitz, Phys. Rev. D 70, 073004 (2004)] found a peak in the allowed region at a mass-squared difference Δm2≅0.9eV2. We trace its origin to harmonic oscillations in the electron survival probability Pee as a function of L/E, the ratio of baseline to neutrino energy, as measured in the near detector of the Bugey experiment. We find a second occurrence for Δm2≅1.9eV2. We point out that the phenomenon of harmonic oscillations of Pee as a function of L/E, as seen in the Bugey experiment, can be used to measure the mass-squared difference associated with a sterile neutrino in the range from a fraction of an eV2 to several eV2 (compatible with that indicated by the LSND experiment), as well as measure the amount of electron-sterile neutrino mixing. We observe that the experiment is independent, to lowest order, of the size of the reactor and suggest the possibility of a small reactor with a detector sitting at a very short baseline.

  15. Measuring the mass of a sterile neutrino with a very short baseline reactor experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Latimer, D. C.; Escamilla, J.; Ernst, D. J.

    2007-04-15

    An analysis of the world's neutrino oscillation data, including sterile neutrinos, [M. Sorel, C. M. Conrad, and M. H. Shaevitz, Phys. Rev. D 70, 073004 (2004)] found a peak in the allowed region at a mass-squared difference {delta}m{sup 2} congruent with 0.9 eV{sup 2}. We trace its origin to harmonic oscillations in the electron survival probability P{sub ee} as a function of L/E, the ratio of baseline to neutrino energy, as measured in the near detector of the Bugey experiment. We find a second occurrence for {delta}m{sup 2} congruent with 1.9 eV{sup 2}. We point out that the phenomenon of harmonic oscillations of P{sub ee} as a function of L/E, as seen in the Bugey experiment, can be used to measure the mass-squared difference associated with a sterile neutrino in the range from a fraction of an eV{sup 2} to several eV{sup 2} (compatible with that indicated by the LSND experiment), as well as measure the amount of electron-sterile neutrino mixing. We observe that the experiment is independent, to lowest order, of the size of the reactor and suggest the possibility of a small reactor with a detector sitting at a very short baseline.

  16. Heavy reflector experiments in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor: Stainless steel, carbon steel and nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Adimir dos; Andrade e Silva, Graciete Simoes de; Jerez, Rogerio; Liambos Mura, Luis Felipe; Fuga, Rinaldo

    2013-05-06

    New experiments devoted to the measurements of physical parameters of a light water core surrounded by a heavy reflector were performed in the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor facility. These experiments comprise three sets of heavy reflector (SS-304, Carbon Steel, and Nickel) in a form of laminates around 3 mm thick. Each set was introduced individually in the west face of the core of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor. The aim here is to provide high quality experimental data for the interpretation and validation of the SS-304 heavy reflector calculation methods. The experiments of Carbon Steel, which is composed mainly of iron, and Nickel were performed to provide a consistent and an interpretative check for the SS-304 reflector experiment. The experimental results comprise critical control bank positions, temperatures and reactivities as a function of the number of the plates. Particularly to the case of Nickel, the experimental data are unique of its kind. The theoretical analysis was performed by MCNP-5 with the nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.0. It was shown that this nuclear data library has a very good performance up to thirteen plates and overestimates the reactivity for higher number of plates independently of the type of the reflector.

  17. Recommended practices in elevated temperature design: A compendium of breeder reactor experiences (1970-1986): An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, B.C.; Cooper, W.L. Jr.; Dhalla, A.K.

    1987-09-01

    Significant experiences have been accumulated in the establishment of design methods and criteria applicable to the design of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) components. The Subcommittee of the Elevated Temperature Design under the Pressure Vessel Research Council (PVRC) has undertaken to collect, on an international basis, design experience gained, and the lessons learned, to provide guidelines for next generation advanced reactor designs. This paper shall present an overview and describe the highlights of the work.

  18. Ion Irradiation Experiments on the Murchison CM2 Carbonaceous Chondrite: Simulating Space Weathering of Primitive Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Christoffersen, R.; Dukes, C. A.; Baragiola, R. A.; Rahman, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Remote sensing observations show that space weathering processes affect all airless bodies in the Solar System to some degree. Sample analyses and lab experiments provide insights into the chemical, spectroscopic and mineralogic effects of space weathering and aid in the interpretation of remote- sensing data. For example, analyses of particles returned from the S-type asteroid Itokawa by the Hayabusa mission revealed that space-weathering on that body was dominated by interactions with the solar wind acting on LL ordinary chondrite-like materials [1, 2]. Understanding and predicting how the surface regoliths of primitive carbonaceous asteroids respond to space weathering processes is important for future sample return missions (Hayabusa 2 and OSIRIS-REx) that are targeting objects of this type. Here, we report the results of our preliminary ion irradiation experiments on a hydrated carbonaceous chondrite with emphasis on microstructural and infrared spectral changes.

  19. User`s guide for the irradiation of experiments in the FTR. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    1990-07-01

    This document provides Revision 3 updates the FTR Users Guide. Revision 3 updates Appendix 1 (FFTF Technical Specifications) to include the following: Documentation of the acceptability of handling metal fuel assemblies in the Closed Loop Ex-Vessel Handling Machine (CLEM) and storing them in the Interim Decay Storage (IDS) vessel. Reactivity limit version (utilizing existing FSAR analysis bounds) to allow for the larger beta-effective associated with the addition of enriched uranium metal and oxide experiments to the core. Operational temperature limits for Open Test Assemblies (OTAs) have been expanded to differentiate between 40-foot experiment test articles, 28-foot Post Irradiation Open Test Assemblies (PIOTAs) and the 28-foot Loose Parts Monitor Assemblies (LMPAs) operating under FFTF core Engineering cognizance.

  20. Controllability of depth dose distribution for neutron capture therapy at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Research Reactor.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru

    2002-10-01

    The updating construction of the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of the Kyoto University Research Reactor has been performed from November 1995 to March 1996 mainly for the improvement in neutron capture therapy. On the performance, the neutron irradiation modes with the variable energy spectra from almost pure thermal to epi-thermal neutrons became available by the control of the heavy-water thickness in the spectrum shifter and by the open-and-close of the cadmium and boral thermal neutron filters. The depth distributions of thermal, epi-thermal and fast neutron fluxes were measured by activation method using gold and indium, and the depth distributions of gamma-ray absorbed dose rate were measured using thermo-luminescent dosimeter of beryllium oxide for the several irradiation modes. From these measured data, the controllability of the depth dose distribution using the spectrum shifter and the thermal neutron filters was confirmed. PMID:12408308