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Sample records for readout electronics development

  1. Hyper Suprime-Cam: development of the CCD readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaya, Hidehiko; Uchida, Tomohisa; Miyatake, Hironao; Fujimori, Hiroki; Mineo, Sogo; Aihara, Hiroaki; Furusawa, Hisanori; Kamata, Yukiko; Karoji, Hiroshi; Kawanomoto, Satoshi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Obuchi, Yoshiyuki; Okura, Yuki; Tanaka, Manobu; Tanaka, Yoko; Uraguchi, Fumihiro; Utsumi, Yosuke

    2010-07-01

    Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) employs 116 of 2k×4k CCDs with 464 signal outputs in total. The image size exceeds 2 GBytes, and the data can be readout every 10 seconds which results in the data rate of 210 Mbytes / sec. The data is digitized to 16-bit. The readout noise of the electronics at the readout time of 20 seconds is ~0.9 ADU, and the one with CCD is ~1.5 ADU which corresponds to ~4.5 e. The linearity error fits within +/- 0.5 % up to 150,000 e. The CCD readout electronics for HSC was newly developed based on the electronics for Suprime-Cam. The frontend electronics (FEE) is placed in the vacuum dewar, and the backend electronics (BEE) is mounted on the outside of the dewar on the prime focus unit. The FEE boards were designed to minimize the outgas and to maximize the heat transfer efficiency to keep the vacuum of the dewar. The BEE boards were designed to be simple and small as long as to achieve the readout time within 10 seconds. The production of the system has been finished, and the full set of the boards are being tested with several CCDs installed in the HSC dewar. We will show the system design, performance, and the current status of the development.

  2. Development of TORCH readout electronics for customised MCPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, R.; Brook, N.; Castillo García, L.; Cussans, D.; Fohl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros García, A.; Van Dijk, M.

    2016-04-01

    The TORCH detector is being developed for low-momentum particle identification, combining time-of-flight and Cherenkov techniques to achieve charged particle pi/K/p separation up to 10 GeV/c over a flight distance of 10m. This requires a timing resolution of 70 ps for single photons. Based on an existing scalable design, production and testing of a TORCH readout system has been undertaken over the past year, and a novel customized Micro Channel Plate (MCP) photomultiplier device with 128-channels has been instrumented. This paper will report on the development of the readout system which is being used to measure time-of-flight in a test-beam, and its performance. We will also discuss the communication and data alignment between the TORCH system and the TimePix3 telescope in order to provide track reconstruction.

  3. Development of Readout Electronics for POLARBEAR-2 Cosmic Microwave Background Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, K.; Akiba, Y.; Arnold, K.; Barron, D.; Bender, A. N.; Cukierman, A.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M.; Elleflot, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Hazumi, M.; Holzapfel, W.; Hori, Y.; Keating, B.; Kusaka, A.; Lee, A.; Montgomery, J.; Rotermund, K.; Shirley, I.; Suzuki, A.; Whitehorn, N.

    2016-07-01

    The readout of transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers with a large multiplexing factor is key for the next generation cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiment, Polarbear-2 (Suzuki in J Low Temp Phys 176:719, 2014), having 7588 TES bolometers. To enable the large arrays, we have been developing a readout system with a multiplexing factor of 40 in the frequency domain. Extending that architecture to 40 bolometers requires an increase in the bandwidth of the SQUID electronics, above 4 MHz. This paper focuses on cryogenic readout and shows how it affects cross talk and the responsivity of the TES bolometers. A series resistance, such as equivalent series resistance of capacitors for LC filters, leads to non-linear response of the bolometers. A wiring inductance modulates a voltage across the bolometers and causes cross talk. They should be controlled well to reduce systematic errors in CMB observations. We have been developing a cryogenic readout with a low series impedance and have tuned bolometers in the middle of their transition at a high frequency (>3 MHz).

  4. Development of Readout Electronics for uc(POLARBEAR-2) Cosmic Microwave Background Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, K.; Akiba, Y.; Arnold, K.; Barron, D.; Bender, A. N.; Cukierman, A.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M.; Elleflot, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Hazumi, M.; Holzapfel, W.; Hori, Y.; Keating, B.; Kusaka, A.; Lee, A.; Montgomery, J.; Rotermund, K.; Shirley, I.; Suzuki, A.; Whitehorn, N.

    2016-01-01

    The readout of transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers with a large multiplexing factor is key for the next generation cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiment, uc(Polarbear)-2 (Suzuki in J Low Temp Phys 176:719, 2014), having 7588 TES bolometers. To enable the large arrays, we have been developing a readout system with a multiplexing factor of 40 in the frequency domain. Extending that architecture to 40 bolometers requires an increase in the bandwidth of the SQUID electronics, above 4 MHz. This paper focuses on cryogenic readout and shows how it affects cross talk and the responsivity of the TES bolometers. A series resistance, such as equivalent series resistance of capacitors for LC filters, leads to non-linear response of the bolometers. A wiring inductance modulates a voltage across the bolometers and causes cross talk. They should be controlled well to reduce systematic errors in CMB observations. We have been developing a cryogenic readout with a low series impedance and have tuned bolometers in the middle of their transition at a high frequency (> 3 MHz).

  5. SNO+ Readout Electronics Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonventre, Richard; Shokair, Timothy; Knapik, Robert

    2012-03-01

    The SNO+ experiment is designed to explore several topics in neutrino physics including neutrinoless double beta decay, reactor antineutrinos, and low energy solar neutrinos. SNO+ uses the existing Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) detector, with the heavy water target replaced with liquid scintillator. The new target requires an upgrade to the command and control electronics to handle the higher rates expected with scintillation light as compared to Cherenkov light. The readout electronics have been upgraded to autonomously push data to a central data acquisition computer over ethernet from each of the 19 front end crates. The autonomous readout is achieved with a field programmable gate array (FPGA) with an embedded processor. Inside the FPGA fabric a state machine is configured to pull data across the VME-like bus of each crate. A small C program, making use of the open source Light Weight IP (LWIP) libraries, is run directly on the hardware (with no operating system) to push the data via TCP/IP. The hybrid combination of `high-level' C code and a `low-level' VHDL state machine is a cost effective and flexible solution for reading out individual front end crates.

  6. High speed readout electronics development for frequency-multiplexed kinetic inductance detector design optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourrion, O.; Vescovi, C.; Catalano, A.; Calvo, M.; D'Addabbo, A.; Goupy, J.; Boudou, N.; Macias-Perez, J. F.; Monfardini, A.

    2013-12-01

    Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKID) are a promising solution for space-borne mm-wave astronomy. To optimize their design and make them insensitive to the ballistic phonons created by cosmic-ray interactions in the substrate, the phonon propagation in silicon must be studied. A dedicated fast readout electronics, using channelized Digital Down Conversion for monitoring up to 12 MKIDs over a 100 MHz bandwidth was developed. Thanks to the fast ADC sampling and steep digital filtering, In-phase and Quadrature samples, having a high dynamic range, are provided at ~ 2 Msps. This paper describes the technical solution chosen and the results obtained.

  7. Report of the sensor readout electronics panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Carson, J.; Kleinhans, W.; Kosonocky, W.; Kozlowski, L.; Pecsalski, A.; Silver, A.; Spieler, H.; Woolaway, J.

    1991-01-01

    The findings of the Sensor Readout Electronics Panel are summarized in regard to technology assessment and recommended development plans. In addition to two specific readout issues, cryogenic readouts and sub-electron noise, the panel considered three advanced technology areas that impact the ability to achieve large format sensor arrays. These are mega-pixel focal plane packaging issues, focal plane to data processing module interfaces, and event driven readout architectures. Development in each of these five areas was judged to have significant impact in enabling the sensor performance desired for the Astrotech 21 mission set. Other readout issues, such as focal plane signal processing or other high volume data acquisition applications important for Eos-type mapping, were determined not to be relevant for astrophysics science goals.

  8. Development of Cryogenic Readout Electronics for Sensitive Far-Infrared Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watabe, Toyoki; Shibai, Hiroshi; Hirao, Takanori; Nagata, Hirohisa; Hibi, Yasunori; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Nakagawa, Takao; Noda, Manabu

    We have successfully developed low-noise, low-power cryogenic readout electronics (CRE) for sensitive far-infrared detectors operated at low temperatures. The CRE must be mounted besides of the detector, and thus, it must be operated at cryogenic temperatures. The reasons of that are to avoid electrical interferences to the high-impedance portion between the detector itself and the CRE, and to minimize the stray capacitance that may decrease the read-out gain. The goals of the CRE performance are the operation temperature can be down to 2K, the noise level is 2µV/√Hz at 1Hz, the power consumption is 10µW/channel, and the open-loop gain of differential amplifier is over 1000. We have so far manufactured the CRE four times, and evaluated the performances at 4.2K. The present performance achieved is nearly acceptable for the far-infrared sensor of the next Japanese infrared astronomical satellite, ASTRO-F.

  9. Hyper Suprime-Cam: CCD readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaya, Hidehiko; Uchida, Tomohisa; Miyatake, Hironao; Aihara, Hiroaki; Doi, Yoshiyuki; Furusawa, Hisanori; Karoji, Hiroshi; Kamata, Yukiko; Kawanomoto, Satoshi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Tanaka, Manobu; Tanaka, Yoko

    2008-07-01

    Hyper Suprime-Cam is planned to employ about 120 2k×4k fully-depleted CCDs with 4 signal outputs for each. The data size of an image becomes larger than 2Gbytes. All of the CCDs are designed to be readout parallel within 20 seconds, and the readout noise is expected to be 5e. The frontend electronics will be mounted in a vacuumed cryostat, and connected to the backend electronics mounted on the outside of the cryostat. The frontend electronics includes entire analog circuits for CCD including CCD drivers, preamplifiers and ADC. The backend electronics consists of newly developed gigabit Ethernet modules combined with 2Gbytes memory modules, and several supporting boards. We will present the current status of the CCD readout electronics developments for HSC.

  10. Development of large area, pico-second resolution photo-detectors and associated readout electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Grabas, H.; Oberla, E.; Attenkoffer, K.; Bogdan, M.; Frisch, H. J.; Genat, J. F.; May, E. N.; Varner, G. S.; Wetstein, M.

    2011-07-01

    The Large Area Pico-second Photo-detectors described in this contribution incorporate a photo-cathode and a borosilicate glass capillary Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) pair functionalized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of separate resistive and electron secondary emitters materials. They may be used for biomedical imaging purposes, a remarkable opportunity to apply technologies developed in HEP having the potential to make major advances in the medical world, in particular for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). If daisy-chained and coupled to fast transmission lines read at both ends, they could be implemented in very large dimensions. Initial testing with matched pairs of small glass capillary test has demonstrated gains of the order of 105 to 106. Compared to other fast imaging devices, these photo-detectors are expected to provide timing resolutions in the 10-100 ps range, and two-dimension position in the sub-millimeter range. A 6-channel readout ASIC has been designed in 130 nm CMOS technology and tested. As a result, fast analog sampling up to 17 GS/s has been obtained, the intrinsic analog bandwidth being presently under evaluation. The digitization in parallel of several cells in two microseconds allows getting off-chip digital data read at a maximum rate of 40 MHz. Digital Signal Processing of the sampled waveforms is expected achieving the timing and space resolutions obtained with digital oscilloscopes. (authors)

  11. Cryogenic readout electronics for astronomical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierickx, B.; Vermeiren, J.; Cos, S.; Faymonville, R.; Lemke, D.

    1992-12-01

    The development of the cold readout electronics for the ISOPHOT focal plane experiment on the ISO (Infrared Space Observatory) is reported. For this low background application, custom designed highly sensitive integrating charge amplifiers are used for the readout of the extrinsic IR detectors. The use of CMOS circuits allows the multiplexing and readout of a large number of detectors at the detector temperature, with a very low power dissipation. The CMOS readout amplifier/multiplexer for deep cryogenic operation is discussed. The device is able to interface directly with extrinsic photoconductive detectors cooled down to the 1.8 to 10K range. In order to observe faint objects under low light level conditions the integration capacitor is 80 fF, featuring a saturation at 1 million charge carriers for an output voltage swing of 2 V and a noise level of 0.5 mV root mean square in nondestructive readout mode. With this circuit coupled to detectors with a responsivity of around 5 to 10 A/W, it is possible to reach noise equivalent power values of 10 to the minus 17th power W/square root of Hz. The multiplexer can be operated with only 10 wires for the supplies, and the clocking of the circuits.

  12. Characterization of Silicon Detector Readout Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.

    2015-07-22

    Configuration and calibration of the front-end electronics typical of many silicon detector configurations were investigated in a lab activity based on a pair of strip sensors interfaced with FSSR2 read-out chips and an FPGA. This simple hardware configuration, originally developed for a telescope at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility, was used to measure thresholds and noise on individual readout channels and to study the influence that different configurations of the front-end electronics had on the observed levels of noise in the system. An understanding of the calibration and operation of this small detector system provided an opportunity to explore the architecture of larger systems such as those currently in use at LHC experiments.

  13. Moire deflectometry with deferred electronic heterodyne readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stricker, J.

    1985-01-01

    The electronic heterodyne technique is applied to the task of deferred readout of phase objects' moire fringes. In combination with the heterodyne readout technique, moire deflectometry constitutes a powerful tool for the study of phase objects, exhibiting high sensitivity, ease of automation and recording, low cost, use of incoherent illumination, and independence from fringe contrast variations.

  14. Low-noise low-power readout electronics circuit development in standard CMOS technology for 4 K applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merken, Patrick; Souverijns, Tim; Putzeys, Jan; Creten, Ybe; Van Hoof, Chris

    2006-06-01

    In the framework of the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) project IMEC designed the Cold Readout Electronics (CRE) for the Ge:Ga far-infrared detector array. Key specifications for this circuit were high linearity, low power consumption and low noise at an operating temperature of 4.2K. We have implemented this circuit in a standard CMOS technology which guarantees high yield and uniformity, and design portability. A drawback of this approach is the anomalous behavior of CMOS transistors at temperatures below 30-40K. These cryogenic phenomena disturb the normal functionality of commonly used circuits. We were able to overcome these problems and developed a library of digital and analog building blocks based on the modeling of cryogenic behavior, and on adapted design and layout techniques. We will present the design of the 18 channel CRE circuit, its interface with the Ge:Ga sensor, and its electrical performance. We will show how the library that was developed for PACS served as a baseline for the designs used in the Darwin-far-infrared detector array, where a cryogenic 180 channel, 30μm pitch, Readout Integrated Circuit (ROIC) for flip-chip integration was developed. Other designs and topologies for low noise and low power applications will be equally presented.

  15. A reconfigurable image tube using an external electronic image readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapington, J. S.; Howorth, J. R.; Milnes, J. S.

    2005-08-01

    We have designed and built a sealed tube microchannel plate (MCP) intensifier for optical/NUV photon counting applications suitable for 18, 25 and 40 mm diameter formats. The intensifier uses an electronic image readout to provide direct conversion of event position into electronic signals, without the drawbacks associated with phosphor screens and subsequent optical detection. The Image Charge technique is used to remove the readout from the intensifier vacuum enclosure, obviating the requirement for additional electrical vacuum feedthroughs and for the readout pattern to be UHV compatible. The charge signal from an MCP intensifier is capacitively coupled via a thin dielectric vacuum window to the electronic image readout, which is external to the sealed intensifier tube. The readout pattern is a separate item held in proximity to the dielectric window and can be easily detached, making the system easily reconfigurable. Since the readout pattern detects induced charge and is external to the tube, it can be constructed as a multilayer, eliminating the requirement for narrow insulator gaps and allowing it to be constructed using standard PCB manufacturing tolerances. We describe two readout patterns, the tetra wedge anode (TWA), an optimized 4 electrode device similar to the wedge and strip anode (WSA) but with a factor 2 improvement in resolution, and an 8 channel high speed 50 ohm device, both manufactured as multilayer PCBs. We present results of the detector imaging performance, image resolution, linearity and stability, and discuss the development of an integrated readout and electronics device based on these designs.

  16. D-Zero muon readout electronics design

    SciTech Connect

    Baldin, B.; Hansen, S.; Los, S.; Matveev, M.; Vaniev, V.

    1996-11-01

    The readout electronics designed for the D{null} Muon Upgrade are described. These electronics serve three detector subsystems and one trigger system. The front-ends and readout hardware are synchronized by means of timing signals broadcast from the D{null} Trigger Framework. The front-end electronics have continuously running digitizers and two levels of buffering resulting in nearly deadtimeless operation. The raw data is corrected and formatted by 16- bit fixed point DSP processors. These processors also perform control of the data buffering. The data transfer from the front-end electronics located on the detector platform is performed by serial links running at 160 Mbit/s. The design and test results of the subsystem readout electronics and system interface are discussed.

  17. Development of a cryogenic DC-low noise amplifier for SQuID-based readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macculi, C.; Torrioli, G.; Di Giorgio, A.; Spinoglio, L.; Piro, Luigi

    2014-07-01

    We present the preliminary results of the design and test activities for a DC cryogenic low noise amplifier for the SAFARI imaging spectrometer, planned to be onboard the SPICA mission, necessary not only to drive, as usual, the voltage signal produced by the SQuID but also to boost such signals over about 7 meter of path towards the warm feedback electronics. This development has been done in the framework of the mission preparation studies, within the European Consortium for the development of the SAFARI instrument. The actual configuration of the SAFARI focal plane assembly (FPA), indeed, foresees a long distance to the warm back end electronics. It is therefore mandatory to boost the faint electric signal coming from the SQuID device by keeping under control both power dissipation and noise: this is the main role of the designed Cryogenic Low Noise Amplifier (LNA). Working at 136K, it has a differential input gain-stage, and a differential balanced voltage buffer output stage, running at few mW target overall power. At present the design is based on the use of Heterojunction Si:Ge transistors, the required bandwidth is DC-4MHz and the required noise lower than 1 nV/rtHz.

  18. Electronic readout systems for microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    The modes of operation of position-sensitive electronic readout systems which use high-gain microchannel plate (MCP) electron multipliers are described, and their performance characteristics, along with those of the MCP, are compared. Among the structures presented are the wedge-and-strip, Codacon, and multilayer coincidence-anode MAMA (Multimode Microchannel Array) arrays. Spatial resolution of 25 x 25 sq microns (coincidence anode arrays) is achieved with an array format of 256 x 1024 pixels. On the basis of the performance data it is concluded that the readout systems using only conducting electrodes offer the best performance characteristics.

  19. Readout electronics for the Dark Energy Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castilla, Javier; Ballester, Otger; Cardiel, Laia; Chappa, Steve; de Vicente, Juan; Holm, Scott; Huffman, David; Kozlovsky, Mark; Martinez, Gustavo; Olsen, Jamieson; Shaw, Theresa; Stuermer, Walter

    2010-07-01

    The goal of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) is to measure the dark energy equation of state parameter with four complementary techniques: galaxy cluster counts, weak lensing, angular power spectrum and type Ia supernovae. DES will survey a 5000 sq. degrees area of the sky in five filter bands using a new 3 deg2 mosaic camera (DECam) mounted at the prime focus of the Blanco 4-meter telescope at the Cerro-Tololo International Observatory (CTIO). DECam is a ~520 megapixel optical CCD camera that consists of 62 2k x 4k science sensors plus 4 2k x 2k sensors for guiding. The CCDs, developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and packaged and tested at Fermilab, have been selected to obtain images efficiently at long wavelengths. A front-end electronics system has been developed specifically to perform the CCD readout. The system is based in Monsoon, an open source image acquisition system designed by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). The electronics consists mainly of three types of modules: Control, Acquisition and Clock boards. The system provides a total of 132 video channels, 396 bias levels and around 1000 clock channels in order to readout the full mosaic at 250 kpixel/s speed with 10 e- noise performance. System configuration and data acquisition is done by means of six 0.8 Gbps optical links. The production of the whole system is currently underway. The contribution will focus on the testing, calibration and general performance of the full system in a realistic environment.

  20. Zero suppression logic of the ALICE muon forward tracker pixel chip prototype PIXAM and associated readout electronics development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flouzat, C.; Değerli, Y.; Guilloux, F.; Orsini, F.; Venault, P.

    2015-05-01

    In the framework of the ALICE experiment upgrade at HL-LHC, a new forward tracking detector, the Muon Forward Tracker (MFT), is foreseen to overcome the intrinsic limitations of the present Muon Spectrometer and will perform new measurements of general interest for the whole ALICE physics. To fulfill the new detector requirements, CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) provide an attractive trade-off between readout speed, spatial resolution, radiation hardness, granularity, power consumption and material budget. This technology has been chosen to equip the Muon Forward Tracker and also the vertex detector: the Inner Tracking System (ITS). Since few years, an intensive R&D program has been performed on the design of MAPS in the 0.18 μ m CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) process. In order to avoid pile up effects in the experiment, the classical rolling shutter readout system of MAPS has been improved to overcome the readout speed limitation. A zero suppression algorithm, based on a 3 by 3 cluster finding (position and data), has been chosen for the MFT. This algorithm allows adequate data compression for the sensor. This paper presents the large size prototype PIXAM, which represents 1/3 of the final chip, and will focus specially on the zero suppression block architecture. This chip is designed and under fabrication in the 0.18 μ m CIS process. Finally, the readout electronics principle to send out the compressed data flow is also presented taking into account the cluster occupancy per MFT plane for a single central Pb-Pb collision.

  1. A Review of Infrared Readout Electronics for Space Science Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    A review of infrared readout electornics for space science sensors is presented. General requirements for scientific IR FPA readout are discussed. Specific approaches to the unit cell electronics are described with respect to operation, complexity, noise and other operating parameters. Recent achievements in IR FPA readout electronics are reviewed. Implementation technologies for realization of IR FPA readout electronics are discussed. Future directions for addressing NASA and other scientific users' needs are suggested.

  2. Readout Electronics for Hyper Suprime-Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyatake, Hironao; Aihara, Hiroaki; Fujimori, Hiroki; Mineo, Sogo; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Nakaya, Hidehiko; Uchida, Tomohisa

    Hyper Suprime-Cam(HSC)isa1GigapixelCCD camerafora wide-fieldgalaxy surveyatthe Subaru8-mTelescope. It will be mounted on the prime focus of the SubaruTelescope and is scheduled to receive its first light in 2012. The primary science is to conduct a weak lensing survey over ∼ 2,000 square degrees. The HSC has a 1.5-degree-diameter fieldofview, 7timeslarger than thatofits predecessor Suprime-Cam.It consistsofalarge corrector lens systemand afocalplane equippedwith116piecesof2kx4kfully depletedCCDs. Combinedwiththesuperbimagequalityand large aperture of the Subaru telescope, the surveyusing HSC can cover a cosmological volume and reach the limiting magnitude of at least one magnitudefainter than the other surveys conducted using 4-m class telescopes. The readout electronics of the HSC consist of two parts: one is the analog front-end electronics (FEE) and the other is the digital back-end electronics (BEE). The FEE is placed in a vacuum dewar together with the CCDs, and processes the analog CCD signal into 16-bit digital data. The BEE is small and light enough to be integrated into the camera unit, and employs three linksofGigabit Ethernetto readouta 2.3-GByte singleexposure within10 secondsatfast readout operation. The readout noise from the electronics is smaller than that from CCDs.

  3. Readout Electronics for the Forward Vertex Detector at PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Michael

    2010-11-01

    The PHENIX experiment at RHIC at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been providing high quality physics data for over 10 years. The current PHENIX physics program will be significantly enhanced by addition of the Forward Silicon Vertex upgrade detector (FVTX) in the acceptance of existing muon arm detectors. The proposed tracker is planned to be put into operation in 2012. Each arm of the FVTX detector consist of 4 discs of silicon strip sensors combined with FPHX readout chips, designed at FNAL. The full detector consists of over 1 million active mini-strip channels with instantaneous bandwidth topping 3.4 Tb/s. The FPHX chip utilizes data push architecture with 2 serial output streams at 200 MHz. The readout electronics design consists of Read-Out Cards (ROC) located in the vicinity of the detector and Front End Modules (FEM) located in the Counting House. ROC boards combine the data from several chips, synchronizes data streams and send them to FEM over a Fiber Optics Link. The data are buffered in the FEM and then sent to a standard PHENIX DAQ interface upon Level-1 trigger request. We will present the current status of the readout electronics development and testing, including tests with data from production wedges.

  4. Read-out electronics for DC squid magnetic measurements

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-01-01

    Read-out electronics for DC SQUID sensor systems, the read-out electronics incorporating low Johnson noise radio-frequency flux-locked loop circuitry and digital signal processing algorithms in order to improve upon the prior art by a factor of at least ten, thereby alleviating problems caused by magnetic interference when operating DC SQUID sensor systems in magnetically unshielded environments.

  5. Pixel readout electronics for LHC and biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanquart, L.; Bonzom, V.; Comes, G.; Delpierre, P.; Fischer, P.; Hausmann, J.; Keil, M.; Lindner, M.; Meuser, S.; Wermes, N.

    2000-01-01

    The demanding requirements for pixel readout electronics for high-energy physics experiments and biomedical applications are reviewed. Some examples of the measured analog performance of prototype chips are given. The readout architectures of the PIxel Readout for the ATlas Experiment (PIRATE) chip suited for LHC experiments and of the Multi Picture Element Counter (MPEC) counting chip targeted for biomedical applications are presented. First results with complete chip-sensor assemblies are also shown.

  6. An integrated wire harp and readout electronics inside vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Mou; Nabhiraj, P. Y.

    2015-03-01

    A wire harp is a well known instrument used in ion beam profile measurement and beam diagnostics. Till date, for beam instrumentation, the harp is placed inside the vacuum chamber or beam line in direct exposure to the beam profile to be measured, whereas the related readout electronics is placed outside somewhere at a convenient place. Here, a harp has been developed along with the readout electronics as an integrated part of it and both were placed inside the beam line vacuum (order of 10-7 Torr) to make the system much simpler, easy to operate, and measure small beam current more accurately. The entire signal conversion and processing is done inside the vacuum unlike other systems; hence, the electronics is kept inside. This results in a lesser number (only 4 pin) of electrical connections (feedthrough) including power which otherwise would have required 32 feedthrough pins only for signal readout for a 13 × 13 (X × Y) channel harp. This paper describes a completely new approach to the design of a conventional beam harp widely used for beam instrumentation.

  7. An integrated wire harp and readout electronics inside vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Mou; Nabhiraj, P. Y.

    2015-03-15

    A wire harp is a well known instrument used in ion beam profile measurement and beam diagnostics. Till date, for beam instrumentation, the harp is placed inside the vacuum chamber or beam line in direct exposure to the beam profile to be measured, whereas the related readout electronics is placed outside somewhere at a convenient place. Here, a harp has been developed along with the readout electronics as an integrated part of it and both were placed inside the beam line vacuum (order of 10{sup −7} Torr) to make the system much simpler, easy to operate, and measure small beam current more accurately. The entire signal conversion and processing is done inside the vacuum unlike other systems; hence, the electronics is kept inside. This results in a lesser number (only 4 pin) of electrical connections (feedthrough) including power which otherwise would have required 32 feedthrough pins only for signal readout for a 13 × 13 (X × Y) channel harp. This paper describes a completely new approach to the design of a conventional beam harp widely used for beam instrumentation.

  8. A new electronic read-out for the YAPPET scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, C.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Malaguti, R.; Del Guerra, A.; Di Domenico, G.; Zavattini, G.

    2002-09-01

    A small animal PET-SPECT scanner (YAPPET) prototype was built at the Physics Department of the Ferrara University and is presently being used at the Nuclear Medicine Department for radiopharmaceutical studies on rats. The first YAPPET prototype shows very good performances, but needs some improvements before it can be fully used for intensive radiopharmaceutical research. The main problem of the actual prototype is its heavy electronics, based on NIM and CAMAC standard modules. For this reason a new, compact read-out electronics was developed and tested. The results of a first series of tests made on the first prototype will be presented in the paper.

  9. Development of Readout System for the CALET Scintillating Fiber Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, T.; Torii, S.; Yoshida, K.; Hibino, K.; Yamagami, T.; Murakami, H.; Kasahara, K.

    2001-08-01

    We have a plan to make observations of high energy electrons and gamma rays with the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS). We are carrying out a R&D for the detector, CALET (CALorimetric Electron Telescope). It consists of an imaging calorimeter (IC) and a total absorption calorimeter (TASC). We will utilize a few hundred-thousands scintillating fibers (SCIFI) for the IC part to visualize cascade showers. We have two options for readout of such amount of SCIFI. First, we have developed a new image intensifier coupled to CCD camera (II-CCD), which is based on the technology utilized and established in the balloon observations with BETS (Balloonborne Electron Telescope with Scintillating fibers). Although the data acquisition rate will be limited to a few 10 Hz, a lot of SCIFI can be read relatively easily with the readout system of the II-CCD. Second, we are developing a readout system with multi-anode photo multipliers (MA-PMT) and front-end chips (VA32 hdr32; one of the Viking family). The readout system with the MA-PMT will enable us to make data acquisition at high frequency of over one thousand Hz.

  10. Development of the readout controller for KASINICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seoung-hyun; Jin, Ho; Nam, Uk-Won; Lee, Sungho; Kong, Kyung-Nam; Yuk, In-Soo; Park, Youngsik; Pak, Soojong; Han, Wonyong; Kim, Sungsoo S.

    2006-06-01

    Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) is developing the KASI Near Infrared Camera System (KASINICS) which will be installed on the 61 cm telescope at the Sobaeksan Optical Astronomy Observatory (SOAO) in Korea. KASINICS is equipped with a ALADDIN III Quadrant (512×512 InSb array, manufactured by Raytheon). For this instrument, we make a new IR array control electronics system. The controller consists of DSP, Bias, Clock, and Video boards which are installed on a VME bus system. The DSP board includes TMS320C6713, FPGA, and 384MB SDRAM. Clock patterns are downloaded from a PC and stored on the FPGA. USB 2.0 is used for the communication with the PC and UART for the serial communication with peripherals. Each of two video boards has 4 video channels. The Bias board provides 16 voltage sources and the Clock board has 15 clock channels. Our goal of readout speed is 10 frames sec -1. We have successfully finished operational tests of the controller using a 256×256 ROIC (CRC744). We are now upgrading the system for the ALADDIN III array. We plan to operate KASINICS by the end of 2006.

  11. Readout electronics upgrade on ALICE/PHOS detector for Run 2 of LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Zhang, F.; Feng, W.; Huang, G.; Song, Z.; Yin, Z.; Zhou, D.

    2015-02-01

    The ALICE/PHOS detector is carrying out a major upgrade of its readout electronics for the RUN 2 of LHC (2015-2017). A new architecture based on the point to point link is developed. The event readout rate can achieve 30 kHz by replacing the old parallel GTL bus with DTC links. The communication stability of the interface between front-end electronic boards and readout concentrators is significantly improved. A new FPGA firmware is designed to be compatible with the upgraded ALICE trigger system and DATE software.

  12. Issues and directions in IR detector readout electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.

    1990-01-01

    An introduction to the major issues encountered in the readout of imaging detector arrays in the infrared are presented. These include circuit issues such as multiplexing, buffering, and noise, as well as materials issues. Future directions in infrared readout electronics will also be discussed. These include on-chip signal processing and advanced hybridization schemes. Finally, recent work at Columbia on 2DEG-charge coupled devices for IR detector multiplexing are described.

  13. Developments and tests of double-sided silicon strip detectors and read-out electronics for the Internal Tracking System of ALICE at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffin, J. P.; Alice Collaboration

    1999-12-01

    The internal-tracking-system (ITS) of the ALICE detector at LHC, consists of six concentrical barrels of silicon detectors. The outmost two layers are made of double-sided strip detectors (SSD). In the framework of a R&D, the characteristics and performances of these devices, manufactured by two different companies, associated with their designed read-out electronics, have been studied off- and in-beam at the SPS (CERN). The results are presented and discussed.

  14. PAUCam readout electronics assembly, integration and test (AIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Jorge; Illa, José M.; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; de Vicente, Juan; Castilla, Javier; Casas, Ricard

    2014-08-01

    The PAUCam is an optical camera with an array of 18 CCDs (Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.) and up to 45 narrow and broad band filters. The camera will be installed on the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) in the Canary Islands, Spain. In order to fulfill with the specifications for the camera readout system, it was necessary to test the different readout electronics subsystems individually before to integrate the final readout work package, which is composed of 4 MONSOON (NOAO) front-ends, 6 fan out boards (MIX), each one driving up to 5 CCDs signals and a pre-amplification stage (PREAMP) located inside the cryostat. To get the subsystems integration, it was built a small camera prototype using the same technology as used in the main camera: a carbon fiber cryostat refrigerated by a cryotiger cooling system but with capacity to allocate just 2 CCDs, which were readout and re-characterized to measure the electronics performance as conversion factor or gain, readout noise, stability, linearity, etc. while the cross-talk was measured by using a spot-light. The aim of this paper is to review the whole process of assembly, integration and test (AIT) of the readout electronics work package and present the main results to demonstrate the viability of the proposed systems to be use with the PAUCam camera.

  15. Development of a prototype PET scanner with depth-of-interaction measurement using solid-state photomultiplier arrays and parallel readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yiping; Sun, Xishan; Lan, Kejian A.; Bircher, Chad; Lou, Kai; Deng, Zhi

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we developed a prototype animal PET by applying several novel technologies to use solid-state photomultiplier (SSPM) arrays to measure the depth of interaction (DOI) and improve imaging performance. Each PET detector has an 8 × 8 array of about 1.9 × 1.9 × 30.0 mm3 lutetium-yttrium-oxyorthosilicate scintillators, with each end optically connected to an SSPM array (16 channels in a 4 × 4 matrix) through a light guide to enable continuous DOI measurement. Each SSPM has an active area of about 3 × 3 mm2, and its output is read by a custom-developed application-specific integrated circuit to directly convert analogue signals to digital timing pulses that encode the interaction information. These pulses are transferred to and are decoded by a field-programmable gate array-based time-to-digital convertor for coincident event selection and data acquisition. The independent readout of each SSPM and the parallel signal process can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and enable the use of flexible algorithms for different data processes. The prototype PET consists of two rotating detector panels on a portable gantry with four detectors in each panel to provide 16 mm axial and variable transaxial field-of-view (FOV) sizes. List-mode ordered subset expectation maximization image reconstruction was implemented. The measured mean energy, coincidence timing and DOI resolution for a crystal were about 17.6%, 2.8 ns and 5.6 mm, respectively. The measured transaxial resolutions at the center of the FOV were 2.0 mm and 2.3 mm for images reconstructed with and without DOI, respectively. In addition, the resolutions across the FOV with DOI were substantially better than those without DOI. The quality of PET images of both a hot-rod phantom and mouse acquired with DOI was much higher than that of images obtained without DOI. This study demonstrates that SSPM arrays and advanced readout/processing electronics can be used to develop a practical DOI

  16. Development of a prototype PET scanner with depth-of-interaction measurement using solid-state photomultiplier arrays and parallel readout electronics

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yiping; Sun, Xishan; Lan, Kejian A.; Bircher, Chad; Lou, Kai; Deng, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we developed a prototype animal PET by applying several novel technologies to use the solid-state photomultiplier (SSPM) arrays for measuring the depth-of-interaction (DOI) and improving imaging performance. Each PET detector has an 8×8 array of about 1.9×1.9×30.0 mm3 lutetium-yttrium-oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) scintillators, with each end optically connected to a SSPM array (16-channel in a 4×4 matrix) through a light guide to enable continuous DOI measurement. Each SSPM has an active area of about 3×3 mm2, and its output is read by a custom-developed application-specific-integrated-circuit (ASIC) to directly convert analog signals to digital timing pulses that encode the interaction information. These pulses are transferred to and be decoded by a field-programmable-gate-array (FPGA) based time-to-digital convertor for coincident event selection and data acquisition. The independent readout of each SSPM and the parallel signal process can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and enable using flexible algorithms for different data processes. The prototype PET consists of two rotating detector panels on a portable gantry with four detectors in each panel to provide 16 mm axial and variable transaxial field-of-view (FOV) sizes. List-mode ordered-subset-expectation-maximization image reconstruction was implemented. The measured mean energy, coincidence timing, and DOI resolution for a crystal were about 17.6%, 2.8 ns, and 5.6 mm, respectively. The measured transaxial resolutions at the center of the FOV were 2.0 mm and 2.3 mm for images reconstructed with and without DOI, respectively. In addition, the resolutions across the FOV with DOI were substantially better than those without DOI. The quality of PET images of both a hot-rod phantom and mouse acquired with DOI was much higher than that of images obtained without DOI. This study demonstrates that SSPM arrays and advanced readout/processing electronics can be used to develop a practical

  17. Development of a prototype PET scanner with depth-of-interaction measurement using solid-state photomultiplier arrays and parallel readout electronics.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yiping; Sun, Xishan; Lan, Kejian A; Bircher, Chad; Lou, Kai; Deng, Zhi

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we developed a prototype animal PET by applying several novel technologies to use solid-state photomultiplier (SSPM) arrays to measure the depth of interaction (DOI) and improve imaging performance. Each PET detector has an 8 × 8 array of about 1.9 × 1.9 × 30.0 mm(3) lutetium-yttrium-oxyorthosilicate scintillators, with each end optically connected to an SSPM array (16 channels in a 4 × 4 matrix) through a light guide to enable continuous DOI measurement. Each SSPM has an active area of about 3 × 3 mm(2), and its output is read by a custom-developed application-specific integrated circuit to directly convert analogue signals to digital timing pulses that encode the interaction information. These pulses are transferred to and are decoded by a field-programmable gate array-based time-to-digital convertor for coincident event selection and data acquisition. The independent readout of each SSPM and the parallel signal process can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and enable the use of flexible algorithms for different data processes. The prototype PET consists of two rotating detector panels on a portable gantry with four detectors in each panel to provide 16 mm axial and variable transaxial field-of-view (FOV) sizes. List-mode ordered subset expectation maximization image reconstruction was implemented. The measured mean energy, coincidence timing and DOI resolution for a crystal were about 17.6%, 2.8 ns and 5.6 mm, respectively. The measured transaxial resolutions at the center of the FOV were 2.0 mm and 2.3 mm for images reconstructed with and without DOI, respectively. In addition, the resolutions across the FOV with DOI were substantially better than those without DOI. The quality of PET images of both a hot-rod phantom and mouse acquired with DOI was much higher than that of images obtained without DOI. This study demonstrates that SSPM arrays and advanced readout/processing electronics can be used to develop a practical DOI

  18. The pad readout electronics of the SLD Warm Iron Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, P.N.; Busza, W.; Cartwright, S.L.; Friedman, J.I.; Fuess, S.; Gonzalez, S.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Kendall, H.W.; Lath, A.; Lyons, T.; Osborne, L.S.; Rosenson, L.; Schneekloth, U.; Taylor, F.E.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Williams, D.C.; Yamartino, J.M. ); Byers, B.L.; Escalera, J.; Gioumousis, A.; Gray, R.; Horelick, D.; Kharakh, D.; Messner, R.L.; Moss, J.; Zdark

    1990-08-01

    The design of the pad readout electronics of the Warm Iron Calorimeter for the SLD detector at SLAC, consisting of about 9000 analog channels, is described. Results of various tests performed during the construction, installation and commissioning of the electronics mounted on the detector are presented. 10 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Characterisation of low power readout electronics for a UV microchannel plate detector with cross-strip readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, M.; Barnstedt, J.; Diebold, S.; Hermanutz, S.; Kalkuhl, C.; Kappelmann, N.; Schanz, T.; Schütze, B.; Werner, K.

    2014-07-01

    Astronomical observations in the ultraviolet (UV) wavelength range between 91 and 300nm are fundamental for the progress in astrophysics. Scientific success of future UV observatories raises the need for technology development in the areas of detectors, optical components, and their coatings. We develop solar blind and photon counting microchannel plate (MCP) UV detectors as a contribution to the progress in UV observation technology. New combinations of materials for the photocathode (see paper No. 9144-111, this volume, for details) as well as a cross-strip (XS) anode, having 64 strips on each layer, are used. Pre-amplification of the charge deposited onto the anode is performed by the Beetle chip designed at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg for LHCb at CERN. It features 128 pre-amplifiers on one die and provides the analogue output in a four-fold serial stream. This stream is digitised by only four ADCs and is processed in an FPGA. This concept results in a reduced power consumption well below 10W as well as a reduced volume, weight and complexity of the readout electronics compared to existing cross-strip readouts. We developed an electronics prototype assembly and a setup in a vacuum chamber that is similar to the configuration in the final detector. The setup in the chamber is used for the burn-in of the MCPs as well as for tests of the readout electronics prototype assembly incorporating realistic signals. In this paper, information on the XS anodes as well as on the hybrid PCB carrying the Beetle pre-amplifier chip is shown. Details on the readout electronics design as well as details of the setup in the vacuum chamber are presented. An outlook to the next steps in the development process is given.

  20. Cross strip anode readouts for large format, photon counting microchannel plate detectors: developing flight qualified prototypes of the detector and electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerga, John; Raffanti, Rick; Cooney, Michael; Cumming, Harley; Varner, Gary; Seljak, Andrej

    2014-07-01

    Photon counting microchannel plate (MCP) imagers have been the detector of choice for most UV astronomical missions over the last two decades (e.g. EUVE, FUSE, COS on Hubble etc.). Over this duration, improvements in the MCP laboratory readout technology have resulted in better spatial resolution (x10), temporal resolution (x1000) and output event rate (x100), all the while operating at lower gain (x 10) resulting in lower high voltage requirements and longer MCP lifetimes. One such technology is the parallel cross strip (PXS) readout. Laboratory versions of PXS electronics have demonstrated < 20 μm FWHM spatial resolution, count rates on the order of 2 MHz, and temporal resolution of ~ 1ns. In 2012 our group at U.C. Berkeley, along with our partners at the U. Hawaii, received a Strategic Astrophysics Technology grant to raise the TRL of the PXS detector and electronics from 4 to 6 by replacing most of the high powered electronics with application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) which will lower the power, mass and volume requirements of the PXS detector. We were also tasked to design and fabricate a "standard" 50mm square active area MCP detector incorporating these electronics that can be environmentally qualified for flight (temperature, vacuum, vibration). The first ASICs designed for this program have been fabricated and are undergoing testing. We present the latest progress on these ASIC designs and performance and show imaging results from the new 50 x 50 mm XS detector.

  1. Superconducting THz Camera with GaAs-JFET Cryogenic Readout Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Hiroshi; Hibi, Yasunori; Suzuki, Toyoaki; Naruse, Masato; Noguchi, Takashi; Sekimoto, Yutaro; Uzawa, Yoshinori; Nagata, Hirohisa; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Ariyoshi, Seiichiro; Otani, Chiko; Nitta, Tom; Qi-jun, Yao, Fujiwara, Mikio

    2009-12-01

    We describe the development of large format array of superconducting tunnel junction detectors that is readout by SONY GaAs-JFET cryogenic integrated circuits. High quality SIS photon detectors have high dynamic impedance that can be readout by low gate leakage GaAs-JFET circuits. Our imaging array design, with niobium SIS photon detectors and GaAs-JFET cryogenics electronics, uses integrating amplifiers, multiplexers and shift-registers to readout large number of pixels that is similar to CMOS digital cameras. We have designed and fabricated GaAs-JFET cryogenic integrated circuits, such as AC-coupled capacitive trans-impedance amplifier, multiplexers with sample-and-holds and shift-registers, for 32-channel readout module. The Advanced Technology Center of National Astronomical Observatory of Japan have started extensive development program for large format array of SIS photon detectors.

  2. EDELWEISS Read-out Electronics and Future Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Censier, B.; Benoit, A.; Bres, G.; Charlieu, F.; Gascon, J.; Gironnet, J.; Grollier, M.; Guichardaz, R.; Juillard, A.; Lauro, L.; Minet, J.; Paul, B.; Vagneron, L.

    2012-06-01

    The read-out electronics of the EDELWEISS-II experiment is presented. Its implementation has been guided by two important design choices. The first one is putting cold electronics far from the detectors in order to attenuate possible background sources from electronic components. It implies strong constraints on noise optimization, line stray capacitance and thermal load. The second one is acquisition of fully digitized signals to minimize the E.M. noises and to take full advantage of digital processing possibilities for filtering and triggering. The resulting amplification scheme is presented for both ionization and heat channel, as well as performances of the full read-out scheme. Future prospects about the coming EDELWEISS-III experiment electronics are also discussed. This updated design takes advantage of the experience gained in previous steps of the experiment while aiming at fulfilling specific constraints of a future ton-scale experiment.

  3. High- Tc dc SQUID readout electronics with low noise and high bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, D. F.; Itozaki, H.

    2006-10-01

    Using AD797 low noise op amps and 2SA1048 low noise transistors, we have developed a composite preamplifier for use in dc SQUID readout electronics. This preamplifier has a small dc drift and super low noise at high frequencies. The equivalent input voltage noise of the preamplifier is about 0.35 nV/√Hz from 100 kHz to 10 MHz. Using this preamplifier, we developed dc SQUID readout electronics having low noise and high bandwidth. Used with a 3 mm2 high-Tc dc SQUID, the white flux noise was about 18 μΦ0/√Hz above 100 kHz and the FLL bandwidth was about 2 MHz. This readout electronics can be used for the applications of SQUID-based NDE and SQUID-based NQR.

  4. Development of low noise CCD readout front-end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JamroŻy, M.; Kasprowicz, G.; Romaniuk, R.; Poźniak, K.

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes development of low noise readout subsystem for digital camera dedicated for astronomical observations. Main aim of the study is noise reduction in regard of sensor's output signal and noise added by the analogue electronics. Basic concept and simulation results of analogue front-end are presented. Various Digital Signal Processing schemes are considered in order to increase Signal to Noise ratio. Another step of development are design of the prototype PCB board and implementation of selected processing techniques in to the structure of a FPGA device.

  5. Performance of moire deflectometry with deferred electronic heterodyne readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stricker, Josef

    1987-01-01

    The effects of diffraction and nonlinear photographic emulsion characteristics on the performance of deferred electronic heterodyne moire deflectometry are theoretically and experimentally investigated. The intensity transmission distribution of the transparency, the moire image, the heterodyne readout, and the spatial and angular resolution are analytically discussed. The deferred electronic heterodyne technique is evaluated by measuring small fringe shifts caused by a weak phase object. It is found that this technique can be applied for accurate and sensitive readout of moire fringes of unsteady phase objects. The theoretical study shows that the accuracy and sensitivity of the system are weakly affected by diffraction and nonlinear photographic emulsion characteristics. Nonlinear recording does not affect the spatial resolution of the system.

  6. High fidelity readout of a single electron spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keselman, Anna; Glickman, Yinnon; Akerman, Nitzan; Kotler, Shlomi; Dallal, Yehonatan; Ozeri, Roee

    2010-03-01

    We use the two spin states of the valence electron of a single trapped ^88Sr^+ ion as a physical qubit implementation. For qubit readout one of the qubit states is shelved to a metastable D level using a narrow linewidth 674nm diode laser followed by state-selective fluorescence detection. Careful analysis of the resulting photon detection statistics allows for a minimal detection error of 2 . 10-3, compatible with recent estimates of the fault-tolerance required error threshold.

  7. Fabrication of the GLAST Silicon Tracker Readout Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Baldini, Luca; Brez, Alessandro; Himel, Thomas; Johnson, R.P.; Latronico, Luca; Minuti, Massimo; Nelson, David; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Sgro, Carmelo; Spandre, Gloria; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Tajima, Hiro; Cohen Tanugi, Johann; Young, Charles; Ziegler, Marcus; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /SLAC /UC, Santa Cruz

    2006-03-03

    A unique electronics system has been built and tested for reading signals from the silicon-strip detectors of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope mission. The system amplifies and processes signals from 884,736 36-cm long silicon strips in a 4 x 4 array of tower modules. An aggressive mechanical design fits the readout electronics in narrow spaces between the tower modules, to minimize dead area. This design and the resulting departures from conventional electronics packaging led to several fabrication challenges and lessons learned. This paper describes the fabrication processes and how the problems peculiar to this design were overcome.

  8. Commodity readout electronics for an underwater neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anassontzis, E. G.; Athanasopoulos, T.; Belias, A.; Fotiou, A.; Maniatis, E.; Resvanis, L. K.; Stavropoulos, G.

    2009-04-01

    Typically the front end electronics required for a neutrino telescope, incorporates electronics to perform waveform capture of photomultiplier tube signals, possibly applying a local triggering algorithm and transmission of the data to the shore. We show how a commodity based system which employs Component Off The Shelf (COTS) devices, with Flash Analog to Digital Converters (FADCs) and Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), can be used for synchronous signal digitization of multiple photomultiplier tubes. The transmission link to the shore has been realized using the standard communication protocol of Gbit Ethernet through fiber. We describe the readout system and our designs to interface with existing electronics for control and operation of a neutrino telescope.

  9. High-performance DC SQUID read-out electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drung, Dietmar

    2002-03-01

    The dynamic behavior of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) operated in a flux-locked loop (FLL) is discussed using a simple mathematical description. It is shown that the slew rate of any FLL is limited by the linear flux range of the SQUID Φlin and the effective loop delay td to approximately Φ˙f, max=Φ lin/(4t d) if a one-pole integrator is used. This allows one to estimate the dynamic limits of both analog SQUIDs with flux modulation or direct read-out and digital SQUIDs with on-chip read-out. In addition to theoretical limits, practically achievable performance is presented using our latest direct-coupled FLL electronics as an example of state-of-the-art SQUID read-out. This electronics is designed for both low-critical temperature (low- Tc) and high- Tc SQUIDs. It combines low noise with high bandwidth and slew rate. All functions are computer controlled using a LabVIEW ® program. An automatic bias voltage tuning circuit increases the system stability in case of large cryogenic temperature fluctuations. Furthermore, an ultra-low-noise current source is integrated into the FLL board which can be used to supply a coil system compensating the Earth's magnetic field of about 60 μT while producing only 17 fT/ Hz extra noise at 1 kHz and 41 fT/ Hz at 1 Hz, respectively.

  10. A SPICE model for Si microstrip detectors and read-out electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Bacchetta, N.; Candelori, A.; Bisello, D. |; Calgarotto, C.; Paccagnella, A. |

    1996-06-01

    The authors have developed a SPICE model of silicon microstrip detector and its read-out electronics. The SPICE model of an AC-coupled single-sided polysilicon-biased silicon microstrip detector has been implemented by using a RC network containing up to 19 strips. The main parameters of this model have been determined by direct comparison with DC and AC measurements. The simulated interstrip and coupling impedance and phase angle are in good agreement with experimental results, up to a frequency of 1 MHz. The authors have used the PreShape 32 as the read-out chip for both the simulation and the measurements. It consists of a charge sensitive preamplifier followed by a shaper and a buffer. The SPICE parameters have been adjusted to fit the experimental results obtained for the configuration where every strip is connected to the read-out electronics and kept the same for the different read-out configurations they have considered. By adding 2 further capacitances simulating the parasitic contributions between the read-out channels of the PS32 chip, a satisfactory matching between the experimental data and the simulated curves has been reached on both rising and trailing edges of the signal. Such agreement deteriorates only for strips far from the strip where the signal has been applied.

  11. ATLAS LAr calorimeters readout electronics upgrade R&D for sLHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hucheng; ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Group

    2011-04-01

    The ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters consist of an electromagnetic barrel calorimeter and two end-caps with electromagnetic, hadronic and forward calorimeters. A total of 182,468 signals are digitized and processed real-time on detector, to provide energy and time deposited in each detector element at every occurrence of the Level-1 trigger. A luminosity upgrade of the LHC will occur in the years ~2020. The current readout electronics will need to be upgraded to sustain the higher radiation levels. A completely innovative readout scheme is being developed. The front-end readout will send out data continuously at each bunch crossing through high speed radiation resistant optical links, the data will be processed real-time with the possibility of implementing trigger algorithms. This article is an overview of the R&D activities and architectural studies the ATLAS LAr Calorimeter Group is developing.

  12. The readout electronics for Plastic Scintillator Detector of DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jie; Yang, Haibo; Zhao, Hongyun; Su, Hong; Sun, Zhiyu; Yu, Yuhong; JingZhe, Zhang; Wang, XiaoHui; Liu, Jie; Xiao, Guoqing; Ma, Xinwen

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) satellite, which launched in December 2015, is designed to find the evidence of the existence of dark matter particles in the universe via the detection of the high-energy electrons and gamma-ray particles produced possibly by the annihilation of dark matter particles. Plastic Scintillator Detector (PSD) is one of major part of the satellite payload, which is comprised of a crossed pair of layers with 41 plastic scintillator-strips, each read out from both ends by the same Hamamatsu R4443MOD2 photo-multiplier tubes (PMTs). In order to extend linear dynamic range of detector, PMTs read out each plastic scintillator-strip separately with two dynode pickoffs. Therefore, the readout electronics system comprises of four Front-end boards to receive the pulses from 328 PMTs and implement charge measurement, which is based on the Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) chip VA160, 16 bits ADC and FPGA. The electronics of the detector has been designed following stringent requirements on mechanical and thermal stability, power consumption, radiation hardness and double redundancy. Various experiments are designed and implemented to check the performance of the electronics, some excellent results has been achieved.According to experimental results analysis, it is proved that the readout electronics works well.

  13. Low power readout electronics for a UV MCP detector with cross strip anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, M.; Diebold, S.; Barnstedt, J.; Hermanutz, S.; Kalkuhl, C.; Kappelmann, N.; Schanz, T.; Werner, K.

    2014-03-01

    After the shutdown of the Hubble Space Telescope in a few years, new astronomical missions for the ultraviolet (UV) wavelength range between 91 and 300 nm with improved optics and detectors will be necessary. This fact drives our development of solar blind photon counting microchannel plate (MCP) UV detectors with high quantum efficiency, high spatial resolution, and low power readout electronics. We plan to use a cross-strip anode (XSA), which has a high spatial resolution and additionally allows a low gain operation of the MCPs which leads to an increased lifetime of the MCPs compared to detectors with other anode types. The main difficulty in implementing an XSA in a detector for space applications is the need for a (pre-) amplifier, a shaper, and an ADC for each of the strips, which means large power consumption and spatial requirements. The solution we are studying is the application of the so-called Beetle chip. This allows for an implementation of a readout electronics for an XSA with a power consumption of less then 10 W. For the tests of our readout electronics prototype, and for the burn-in of the MCPs, we recently finished a setup in a vacuum chamber that is similar to the configuration in the final detector. We present a brief overview of our detector design and details of the readout electronics setup as well as details of the setup in our vacuum chamber.

  14. CCD readout electronics for the Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hope, Stephen C.; Gunn, James E.; Loomis, Craig P.; Fitzgerald, Roger E.; Peacock, Grant O.

    2014-07-01

    The following paper details the design for the CCD readout electronics for the Subaru Telescope Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS). PFS is designed to gather spectra from 2394 objects simultaneously, covering wavelengths that extend from 380 nm to 1260 nm. The spectrograph is comprised of four identical spectrograph modules, each collecting roughly 600 spectra. The spectrograph modules provide simultaneous wavelength coverage over the entire band through the use of three separate optical channels: blue, red, and near infrared (NIR). A camera in each channel images the multi-object spectra onto a 4k × 4k, 15 μm pixel, detector format. The two visible cameras use a pair of Hamamatsu 2k × 4k CCDs with readout provided by custom electronics, while the NIR camera uses a single Teledyne HgCdTe 4k × 4k detector and Teledyne's ASIC Sidecar to read the device. The CCD readout system is a custom design comprised of three electrical subsystems - the Back End Electronics (BEE), the Front End Electronics (FEE), and a Pre-amplifier. The BEE is an off-the-shelf PC104 computer, with an auxiliary Xilinx FPGA module. The computer serves as the main interface to the Subaru messaging hub and controls other peripheral devices associated with the camera, while the FPGA is used to generate the necessary clocks and transfer image data from the CCDs. The FEE board sets clock biases, substrate bias, and CDS offsets. It also monitors bias voltages, offset voltages, power rail voltage, substrate voltage and CCD temperature. The board translates LVDS clock signals to biased clocks and returns digitized analog data via LVDS. Monitoring and control messages are sent from the BEE to the FEE using a standard serial interface. The Pre-amplifier board resides behind the detectors and acts as an interface to the two Hamamatsu CCDs. The Pre-amplifier passes clocks and biases to the CCDs, and analog CCD data is buffered and amplified prior to being returned to the FEE. In this paper we describe the

  15. Unfulfilled needs in IR astronomy focal-plane readout electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    The NOAO's 8-m IR optimized telescope for Mauna Kea and NASA's SIRTF show that from 1 to 200 microns there are a number of unfulfilled needs in readout electronics. These include: extremely low readnoise, less than 10 electrons, stable operation at temperatures as low as 2 K, high well capacity, greater than 1 e 7 electrons, and integration times from 30 msec to over 100 sec. Sensors for adaptive optics systems are required with readnoise less than 10 electrons and response times of 30 msec. They should be highly efficient from 1 to 2.5 microns, but may have small formats. Ground-based imagers at these wavelengths need comparable readnoise but longer integration times, and the largest possible formats are essential. To achieve these goals improved cryogenic MOSFETS are essential and complete cryogenic CMOS circuits are highly desirable. Experimental cryoptimized MFETS promise to exceed the above noise requirements at 77 K and approach the needs at 2 K.

  16. The STAR Heavy Flavor Tracker PXL detector readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schambach, J.; Contin, G.; Greiner, L.; Stezelberger, T.; Sun, X.; Szelezniak, M.; Vu, C.

    2016-01-01

    The Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) is a recently installed micro-vertex detector upgrade to the STAR experiment at RHIC, consisting of three subsystems with various technologies of silicon sensors arranged in 4 concentric cylinders. The two innermost layers of the HFT close to the beam pipe, the Pixel ("PXL") subsystem, employ CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) technology that integrate the sensor, front-end electronics, and zero-suppression circuitry in one silicon die. This paper presents selected characteristics of the PXL detector part of the HFT and the hardware, firmware and software associated with the readout system for this detector.

  17. Electronic heterodyne readout of fringes in moire deflectometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stricker, J.

    1985-01-01

    An electronic heterodyne technique is described for the readout of fringes in moire deflectometry. The technique is based on phase measurements of signals generated by a photodetector observing the light transmitted through a traveling moire fringe pattern. The phase of the signal is proportional to the fringe deviation and thus to the deflection angle of the light ray. The phase is measured on line by a standard phase meter with an accuracy of 1 deg or 1:360 of a fringe. The technique, which is precise and sensitive, is demonstrated by detecting and measuring a fringe shift of 0.15 mm corresponding to 0.029 of a fringe.

  18. Analysis of electron multiplying charge coupled device and scientific CMOS readout noise models for Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, Alastair G.

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, detectors with subelectron readout noise have been used very effectively in astronomical adaptive optics systems. Here, we compare readout noise models for the two key faint flux level detector technologies that are commonly used: electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) and scientific CMOS (sCMOS) detectors. We find that in almost all situations, EMCCD technology is advantageous, and that the commonly used simplified model for EMCCD readout is appropriate. We also find that the commonly used simple models for sCMOS readout noise are optimistic, and we recommend that a proper treatment of the sCMOS root mean square readout noise probability distribution should be considered during instrument performance modeling and development.

  19. Low background signal readout electronics for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinn, I.; Abgrall, N.; Arnquist, I. J.; Avignone, F. T.; Baldenegro-Barrera, C. X.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Bradley, A. W.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Buuck, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y.-D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Efremenko, Yu.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilliss, T.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Jasinski, B. R.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; MacMullin, J.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Poon, A. W. P.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Shanks, B.; Shirchenko, M.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, A. M.; Tedeschi, D.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yu, C.-H.; Yumatov, V.; Zhitnikov, I.

    2015-08-01

    The MAJORANA Collaboration will seek neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in 76Ge using isotopically enriched p-type point contact (PPC) high purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors. A tonne-scale array of HPGe detectors would require background levels below 1 count/ROI-tonne-year in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039 keV Q-value of the decay. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of such an experiment, the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, a 40 kg HPGe detector array, is being constructed with a background goal of < 3 count/ROI-tonne-year, which is expected to scale down to < 1 count/ROI-tonne-year for a tonne-scale experiment. The signal readout electronics, which must be placed in close proximity to the detectors, present a challenge toward reaching this background goal. This talk will discuss the materials and design used to construct signal readout electronics with low enough backgrounds for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR.

  20. Low Background Signal Readout Electronics for the Majorana Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Guinn, Ian; Rielage, Keith Robert; Elliott, Steven Ray; Xu, Wenqin; Goett, John Jerome III

    2015-06-11

    The MAJORANA Collaboration will seek neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in 76Ge using isotopically enriched p-type point contact (PPC) high purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors. A tonne-scale array of HPGe detectors would require background levels below 1 count/ROI-tonne-year in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039 keV Q-value of the decay. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of such an experiment, the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, a 40 kg HPGe detector array, is being constructed. The DEMONSTRATOR has a background goal of < 3 counts/ROI-tonne-year, which is expected to scale down to < 1 count/ROI-tonne-year for a one tonne experiment. The signal readout electronics, which must be placed in close proximity to the detectors, present a challenge toward reaching this background goal. This paper discusses the materials and design used to construct signal readout electronics with low enough backgrounds for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR.

  1. Low background signal readout electronics for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Guinn, I.; Buuck, M.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Gruszko, J.; Leon, J.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Abgrall, N.; Bradley, A. W.; Chan, Y-D.; Mertens, S.; Poon, A. W. P.; Arnquist, I. J.; Hoppe, E. W.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Orrell, J. L.; Avignone, F. T.; Baldenegro-Barrera, C. X.; Bertrand, F. E.; and others

    2015-08-17

    The MAJORANA Collaboration will seek neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in {sup 76}Ge using isotopically enriched p-type point contact (PPC) high purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors. A tonne-scale array of HPGe detectors would require background levels below 1 count/ROI-tonne-year in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039 keV Q-value of the decay. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of such an experiment, the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, a 40 kg HPGe detector array, is being constructed with a background goal of < 3 count/ROI-tonne-year, which is expected to scale down to < 1 count/ROI-tonne-year for a tonne-scale experiment. The signal readout electronics, which must be placed in close proximity to the detectors, present a challenge toward reaching this background goal. This talk will discuss the materials and design used to construct signal readout electronics with low enough backgrounds for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR.

  2. Design on the readout electronics for the mobile direct detection Doppler wind LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Wen, Fei; Yao, Yuan; Sang, Zi-ru; Jin, Ge

    2013-12-01

    A readout electronics system is presented for the mobile direct detection Doppler Wind LIDAR (DWL). The structure of the readout electronics is compact to fit the mobile DWL which is fixed on a truck. According to the wind measurement principle of double-edge technique with triple-channel Fabry-Perot etalon, the readout electronics system is designed adjustable for wind speed detection due to the multi-channel technique and reconfiguration of the FPGA. The experimental results indicate that there is good consistency between the readout electronics and the current commercial devices. The detection range of the experiments can cover the troposphere and low stratosphere even in daylight.

  3. Handheld readout electronics to fully exploit the particle discrimination capabilities of elpasolite scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budden, B. S.; Stonehill, L. C.; Warniment, A.; Michel, J.; Storms, S.; Dallmann, N.; Coupland, D. D. S.; Stein, P.; Weller, S.; Borges, L.; Proicou, M.; Duran, G.; Kamto, J.

    2015-09-01

    A new class of elpasolite scintillators has garnered recent attention due to the ability to perform as simultaneous gamma spectrometers and thermal neutron detectors. Such a dual-mode capability is made possible by pulse-shape discrimination (PSD), whereby the emission waveform profiles of gamma and neutron events are fundamentally unique. To take full advantage of these materials, we have developed the Compact Advanced Readout Electronics for Elpasolites (CAREE). This handheld instrument employs a multi-channel PSD-capable ASIC, custom micro-processor board, front-end electronics, power supplies, and a 2 in. photomultiplier tube for readout of the scintillator. The unit is highly configurable to allow for performance optimization amongst a wide sample of elpasolites which provide PSD in fundamentally different ways. We herein provide an introduction to elpasolites, then describe the motivation for the work, mechanical and electronic design, and preliminary performance results.

  4. Handheld readout electronics to fully exploit the particle discrimination capabilities of elpasolite scintillators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Budden, B. S.; Stonehill, L. C.; Warniment, A.; Michel, J.; Storms, S.; Dallmann, N.; Coupland, D. D. S.; Stein, P.; Weller, S.; Borges, L.; et al

    2015-06-10

    In this study, a new class of elpasolite scintillators has garnered recent attention due to the ability to perform as simultaneous gamma spectrometers and thermal neutron detectors. Such a dual-mode capability is made possible by pulse-shape discrimination (PSD), whereby the emission waveform profiles of gamma and neutron events are fundamentally unique. To take full advantage of these materials, we have developed the Compact Advanced Readout Electronics for Elpasolites (CAREE). This handheld instrument employs a multi-channel PSD-capable ASIC, custom micro-processor board, front-end electronics, power supplies, and a 2 in. photomultiplier tube for readout of the scintillator. The unit is highly configurablemore » to allow for performance optimization amongst a wide sample of elpasolites which provide PSD in fundamentally different ways. We herein provide an introduction to elpasolites, then describe the motivation for the work, mechanical and electronic design, and preliminary performance results.« less

  5. Handheld readout electronics to fully exploit the particle discrimination capabilities of elpasolite scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Budden, B. S.; Stonehill, L. C.; Warniment, A.; Michel, J.; Storms, S.; Dallmann, N.; Coupland, D. D. S.; Stein, P.; Weller, S.; Borges, L.; Proicou, M.; Duran, G.; Kamto, J.

    2015-06-10

    In this study, a new class of elpasolite scintillators has garnered recent attention due to the ability to perform as simultaneous gamma spectrometers and thermal neutron detectors. Such a dual-mode capability is made possible by pulse-shape discrimination (PSD), whereby the emission waveform profiles of gamma and neutron events are fundamentally unique. To take full advantage of these materials, we have developed the Compact Advanced Readout Electronics for Elpasolites (CAREE). This handheld instrument employs a multi-channel PSD-capable ASIC, custom micro-processor board, front-end electronics, power supplies, and a 2 in. photomultiplier tube for readout of the scintillator. The unit is highly configurable to allow for performance optimization amongst a wide sample of elpasolites which provide PSD in fundamentally different ways. We herein provide an introduction to elpasolites, then describe the motivation for the work, mechanical and electronic design, and preliminary performance results.

  6. Recent Developments of HEP Pixel Detector Readout Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caminada, Lea

    This article reviews the development of readout integrated circuits for hybrid pixel particle physics detectors. The 250-nm feature size chips in the presently operating ATLAS and CMS experiments are compared with the current state of the art in 130-nm feature size represented by the FE-I4 chip that will be used to add a new beam pipe layer for the ATLAS experiment in 2013 and the upgrade options of the CMS pixel readout chip. This includes a discussion of the array and pixel size, analog performance, readout architecture, power consumption, power distribution options and radiation hardness. Finally, recent work in 65-nm feature size as a means to continue the evolution of readout chip technology towards smaller feature size, higher rate, and lower power is presented.

  7. Breakup of loosely bound nuclei at intermediate energies for nuclear astrophysics and the development of a position sensitive microstrip detector system and its readout electronics using ASICs technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Tribble, Robert E.; Sobotka, Lee G.; Blackmon, Jeff C.; Bertulani, Carlos A.

    2015-12-29

    The work performed under this grant has led to the development of a detection system that will be used to measure reaction rates for proton or neutron capture reactions at stellar energies on radioactive ions far from stability. The reaction rates are needed to better understand the physics of nucleosynthesis in explosive stellar processes such as supernovae and x-ray burst events. The radioactive ions will be produced at the Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (RIBF) at RIKEN near Tokyo, Japan. During the course of this work, the group involved in this project has expanded by several institutions in Europe and Japan and now involves collaborators from the U.S., Japan, Hungary, Romania, Germany, Spain, Italy, China, and South Korea. As part of the project, a novel design based on large-area silicon detectors has been built and tested and the performance characterized in a series of tests using particle beams with a variety of atomic numbers at the Cyclotron Institute of Texas A&M University and the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba facility (HIMAC) in Chiba, Japan. The work has involved mechanical construction of a special purpose vacuum chamber, with a precision mounting system for the silicon detectors, development of a new ASICs readout system that has applications with a wide variety of silicon detector systems, and the development of a data acquisition system that is integrated into the computer system being used at RIBF. The parts noted above that are needed to carry out the research program are completed and ready for installation. Several approved experiments that will use this system will be carried out in the near future. The experimental work has been delayed due to a large increase in the cost and availability of electrical power for RIBF that occurred following the massive earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan in the spring of 2011. Another component of the research carried out with this grant involved developing the theoretical tools that are required

  8. Electron spin manipulation and readout through an optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Fedotov, I V; Doronina-Amitonova, L V; Voronin, A A; Levchenko, A O; Zibrov, S A; Sidorov-Biryukov, D A; Fedotov, A B; Velichansky, V L; Zheltikov, A M

    2014-01-01

    The electron spin of nitrogen--vacancy (NV) centers in diamond offers a solid-state quantum bit and enables high-precision magnetic-field sensing on the nanoscale. Implementation of these approaches in a fiber format would offer unique opportunities for a broad range of technologies ranging from quantum information to neuroscience and bioimaging. Here, we demonstrate an ultracompact fiber-optic probe where a diamond microcrystal with a well-defined orientation of spin quantization NV axes is attached to the fiber tip, allowing the electron spins of NV centers to be manipulated, polarized, and read out through a fiber-optic waveguide integrated with a two-wire microwave transmission line. The microwave field transmitted through this line is used to manipulate the orientation of electron spins in NV centers through the electron-spin resonance tuned by an external magnetic field. The electron spin is then optically initialized and read out, with the initializing laser radiation and the photoluminescence spin-readout return from NV centers delivered by the same optical fiber. PMID:25028257

  9. Electron spin manipulation and readout through an optical fiber

    PubMed Central

    Fedotov, I. V.; Doronina-Amitonova, L. V.; Voronin, A. A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Zibrov, S. A.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Fedotov, A. B.; Velichansky, V. L.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    The electron spin of nitrogen--vacancy (NV) centers in diamond offers a solid-state quantum bit and enables high-precision magnetic-field sensing on the nanoscale. Implementation of these approaches in a fiber format would offer unique opportunities for a broad range of technologies ranging from quantum information to neuroscience and bioimaging. Here, we demonstrate an ultracompact fiber-optic probe where a diamond microcrystal with a well-defined orientation of spin quantization NV axes is attached to the fiber tip, allowing the electron spins of NV centers to be manipulated, polarized, and read out through a fiber-optic waveguide integrated with a two-wire microwave transmission line. The microwave field transmitted through this line is used to manipulate the orientation of electron spins in NV centers through the electron-spin resonance tuned by an external magnetic field. The electron spin is then optically initialized and read out, with the initializing laser radiation and the photoluminescence spin-readout return from NV centers delivered by the same optical fiber. PMID:25028257

  10. Infrared readout electronics; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 21, 22, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossum, Eric R.

    The present volume on IR readout electronics discusses cryogenic readout using silicon devices, cryogenic readout using III-V and LTS devices, multiplexers for higher temperatures, and focal-plane signal processing electronics. Attention is given to the optimization of cryogenic CMOS processes for sub-10-K applications, cryogenic measurements of aerojet GaAs n-JFETs, inP-based heterostructure device technology for ultracold readout applications, and a three-terminal semiconductor-superconductor transimpedance amplifier. Topics addressed include unfulfilled needs in IR astronomy focal-plane readout electronics, IR readout integrated circuit technology for tactical missile systems, and radiation-hardened 10-bit A/D for FPA signal processing. Also discussed are the implementation of a noise reduction circuit for spaceflight IR spectrometers, a real-time processor for staring receivers, and a fiber-optic link design for INMOS transputers.

  11. Infrared readout electronics; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 21, 22, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The present volume on IR readout electronics discusses cryogenic readout using silicon devices, cryogenic readout using III-V and LTS devices, multiplexers for higher temperatures, and focal-plane signal processing electronics. Attention is given to the optimization of cryogenic CMOS processes for sub-10-K applications, cryogenic measurements of aerojet GaAs n-JFETs, inP-based heterostructure device technology for ultracold readout applications, and a three-terminal semiconductor-superconductor transimpedance amplifier. Topics addressed include unfulfilled needs in IR astronomy focal-plane readout electronics, IR readout integrated circuit technology for tactical missile systems, and radiation-hardened 10-bit A/D for FPA signal processing. Also discussed are the implementation of a noise reduction circuit for spaceflight IR spectrometers, a real-time processor for staring receivers, and a fiber-optic link design for INMOS transputers.

  12. Development of the quality control system of the readout electronics for the large size telescope of the Cherenkov Telescope Array observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Masuda, S.; Paoletti, R.; Poulios, S.; Rugliancich, A.; Saito, T.

    2016-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is the next generation VHE γ-ray observatory which will improve the currently available sensitivity by a factor of 10 in the range 100 GeV to 10 TeV. The array consists of different types of telescopes, called large size telescope (LST), medium size telescope (MST) and small size telescope (SST). A LST prototype is currently being built and will be installed at the Observatorio Roque de los Muchachos, island of La Palma, Canary islands, Spain. The readout system for the LST prototype has been designed and around 300 readout boards will be produced in the coming months. In this note we describe an automated quality control system able to measure basic performance parameters and quickly identify faulty boards.

  13. Electronic heterodyne readout of fringes in moiré deflectometry.

    PubMed

    Stricker, J

    1985-06-01

    An electronic heterodyne technique is described for the readout of fringes in moiré deflectometry. The technique is based on phase measurements of signals generated by a photodetector observing the light transmitted through a traveling moiré fringe pattern. The phase of the signal is proportional to the fringe deviation and thus to the deflection angle of the light ray. The phase is measured on line by a standard phase meter with an accuracy of 1 degrees or 1:360 of a fringe. The technique, which is precise and sensitive, is demonstrated by detecting and measuring a fringe shift of 0.15 mm corresponding to 0.029 of a fringe. PMID:19724409

  14. GaAs cryogenic readout electronics for high impedance detector arrays for far-infrared and submillimeter wavelength region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, H.; Matsuo, H.; Hibi, Y.; Kobayashi, J.; Nakahashi, M.; Ikeda, H.; Fujiwara, M.

    2009-11-01

    We have been developing cryogenic readout integrate circuits (ROICs) for high impedance submillimeter and far-infrared detectors: Our ROICs are constructed from SONY GaAs-JFETs, which have excellent performance even at less than 1 K. We designed ROICs consisting of analog readouts and digital circuits for 32-element SIS photon detectors fabricated in RIKEN. The analog readout is ac-coupled capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA), which is composed of the two-stage amplifier. Some initial test results of the ac-coupled CTIA gave us the following performance; open loop gain of >740, power consumption ≈1.4 μW. The input referred noise is ≈4 μV/ √{Hz} at 1 Hz. These results suggest that low power and high sensitive cryogenic readout electronics are successfully developed for high impedance detectors.

  15. Proposed STAR Time of Flight Readout Electronics and DAQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schambach, Joachim

    2006-04-01

    A novel Time-of-Flight (TOF) subsystem is under design for the STAR detector at RHIC. A total of 3840 Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPC) of 6 pads each are distributed over 120 trays. The total number of channels is 23040. Each TOF tray consists of 192 detector channels and three different types of electronic circuit cards, called "TINO", "TDIG", and "TCPU", listed in order of the data flow. Every 30 trays send their data to a "THUB" card that interfaces to the STAR trigger and transmits the data over a fiber to a fiber receiver which is part of STAR DAQ. The TINO contains the analog front end electronics based on a custom IC called NINO. The output of TINO is passed to the TDIG, where the data are digitized (using the CERN HPTDC ASIC). The TCPU formats and buffers the digital detector information. This formatted data is passed to THUB, which transmits it over an optical fiber to a data receiver in the STAR DAQ room. The architecture of this readout chain and DAQ will be described, and first results from prototypes of the component boards will be discussed.

  16. Development of the Readout Controller for Infrared Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seounghyun; Jin, Ho; Nam, Uk-Won; Cha, Sang-Mok; Lee, Sungho; Yuk, In-Soo; Park, Youngsik; Pak, Soojong; Han, Wonyong; Kim, Sungsoo

    2006-12-01

    We have developed a control electronics system for an infrared detector array of KASINICS (KASI Near Infrared Camera System), which is a new ground-based instrument of the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI). Equipped with a 512×512 InSb array (ALADDIN III Quadrant, manufactured by Raytheon) sensitive from 1 to 5 μm, KASINICS will be used at J, H, Ks, and L-bands. The controller consists of DSP (Digital Signal Processor), Bias, Clock, and Video boards which are installed on a single VME-bus backplane. TMS320C6713DSP, FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array), and 384-MB SDRAM (Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory) are included in the DSP board. DSP board manages entire electronics system, generates digital clock patterns and communicates with a PC using USB 2.0 interface. The clock patterns are downloaded from a PC and stored on the FPGA. UART is used for the communication with peripherals. Video board has 4 channel ADC which converts video signal into 16-bit digital numbers. Two video boards are installed on the controller for ALADDIN array. The Bias board provides 16 dc bias voltages and the Clock board has 15 clock channels. We have also coded a DSP firmware and a test version of control software in C-language. The controller is flexible enough to operate a wide range of IR array and CCD. Operational tests of the controller have been successfully finished using a test ROIC (Read-Out Integrated Circuit).

  17. Development of arrays of Silicon Drift Detectors and readout ASIC for the SIDDHARTA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaglia, R.; Schembari, F.; Bellotti, G.; Butt, A. D.; Fiorini, C.; Bombelli, L.; Giacomini, G.; Ficorella, F.; Piemonte, C.; Zorzi, N.

    2016-07-01

    This work deals with the development of new Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) and readout electronics for the upgrade of the SIDDHARTA experiment. The detector is based on a SDDs array organized in a 4×2 format with each SDD square shaped with 64 mm2 (8×8) active area. The total active area of the array is therefore 32×16 mm2 while the total area of the detector (including 1 mm border dead area) is 34 × 18mm2. The SIDDHARTA apparatus requires 48 of these modules that are designed and manufactured by Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK). The readout electronics is composed by CMOS preamplifiers (CUBEs) and by the new SFERA (SDDs Front-End Readout ASIC) circuit. SFERA is a 16-channels readout ASIC designed in a 0.35 μm CMOS technology, which features in each single readout channel a high order shaping amplifier (9th order Semi-Gaussian complex-conjugate poles) and a high efficiency pile-up rejection logic. The outputs of the channels are connected to an analog multiplexer for the external analog to digital conversion. An on-chip 12-bit SAR ADC is also included. Preliminary measurements of the detectors in the single SDD format are reported. Also measurements of low X-ray energies are reported in order to prove the possible extension to the soft X-ray range.

  18. Development of Frequency-Division Multiplexing Readout System for Large-Format TES X-ray Microcalorimeter Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, K.; Yamamoto, R.; Takei, Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Hidaka, M.; Nagasawa, S.; Kohjiro, S.; Miyazaki, T.

    2016-07-01

    We are developing the frequency-division multiplexing (FDM) readout system aimed to realize the 400-pixel transition edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter array for the DIOS mission as well as large-format arrays with more than a thousand of TES for future space missions such as the ATHENA mission. The developed system consists of the low-power superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), the digital FDM electronics, and the analog front-end to bridge the SQUID and the digital electronics. Using the developed readout system, we performed a TES readout experiment and succeeded to multiplex four TES signals with the single-staged cryogenic setup. We have experienced two issues during the experiment: an excess noise and crosstalk. The brief overview of the developed system and the details, results, and issues of the TES multiplexing readout experiment is discussed.

  19. Development of Frequency-Division Multiplexing Readout System for Large-Format TES X-ray Microcalorimeter Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, K.; Yamamoto, R.; Takei, Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Hidaka, M.; Nagasawa, S.; Kohjiro, S.; Miyazaki, T.

    2016-03-01

    We are developing the frequency-division multiplexing (FDM) readout system aimed to realize the 400-pixel transition edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter array for the DIOS mission as well as large-format arrays with more than a thousand of TES for future space missions such as the ATHENA mission. The developed system consists of the low-power superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), the digital FDM electronics, and the analog front-end to bridge the SQUID and the digital electronics. Using the developed readout system, we performed a TES readout experiment and succeeded to multiplex four TES signals with the single-staged cryogenic setup. We have experienced two issues during the experiment: an excess noise and crosstalk. The brief overview of the developed system and the details, results, and issues of the TES multiplexing readout experiment is discussed.

  20. R&D studies of the ATLAS LAr calorimeter readout electronics for super-LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.

    2010-11-01

    The ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters are high precision, high sensitivity and high granularity detectors. A total of 182,468 signals are digitized and processed real-time on detector, to provide energy and time deposited in each detector element at every occurrence of the L1-trigger. The current readout electronics will need to be upgraded to sustain the higher radiation levels expected with the increase of a factor 10 in luminosity at the LHC in the years {approx}2017. A completely innovative readout scheme is being developed. The front-end readout will send out data continuously at each bunch crossing through high speed radiation resistant optical links, the data will be processed real-time with the possibility of implementing trigger algorithms. This article is an overview of the R&D activities and architectural studies the ATLAS LAr Calorimeter Group is developing: front-end analog and mixed-signal ASIC design, radiation resistance optical-links in SOS, high-speed back-end processing units based on FPGA architectures and power supply distribution schemes.

  1. Front End Readout Electronics of the MicroBooNE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; De Geronimo, G.; Lanni, F.; Lissauer, D.; Makowiecki, D.; Radeka, V.; Rescia, S.; Thorn, C.; Yu, B.

    MicroBooNE experiment is to build a ˜170 tons Liquid Argon (LAr) Time Projection Chamber (TPC) detector that will observe interactions of neutrinos from the on-axis Booster Neutrino Beam and off-axis NuMI Beam at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The experiment will address the low energy excess observed by the MiniBooNE experiment, measure low energy neutrino cross sections, and serve as the necessary next step in a phased program towards massive Liquid Argon TPC detectors. MicroBooNE TPC will have 3 readout wire planes with 8,256 wires/signal channels. All the signals will be pre-amplified, shaped, digitized and pre-processed online before recording for offline analysis of a wide variety of physics programs. To optimize the detector performance and signal-to-noise ratio, analog front end ASIC designed in 180 nm CMOS technology will be deployed and operated in LAr. Pre-amplified and shaped detector signals will be differentially driven to ADC boards operated in detector hall where signals are digitized and prepared for online data pre-processing in FPGAs. This article is an overview of the front end readout architecture of the MicroBooNE experiment, which describes the development of the front end readout electronics and preliminary test results.

  2. The readout electronic of EUSO-Balloon experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.; Blaksley, C.; Blin-Bondil, S.; Ebersoldt, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; de la Taille, C.; Dulucq, F.; Gorodetzky, P.; Miyamoto, H.; Moretto, C.; Prévôt, G.; Reina, J. A. R.

    2014-03-01

    The EUSO-Balloon experiment is a pathfinder for the satellite mission JEM-EUSO whose goal will be to observe Extensive Air Showers produced in the atmosphere by the passage can detect fluorescent UV photons released by the EAS thanks to Multi-anode photomultipliers (MAPMT) arranged in 6 × 6 matrices inside Photo Detector Modules (PDM). A set of lenses is used to focus the photons on the PDM which can be compared to a UV camera taking pictures every 2.5 μs period (GTU: Gate Time Unit). The experiment consists in launching a balloon, at an altitude of 40 km, equipped with complete PDM and Data Processing systems. This project, supported by CNES and constructed by the JEM-EUSO collaboration, is meant to prove that the technology of such an instrument is possible and that the performance is satisfying, raising the Technical Readiness Level (TRL) of JEM-EUSO. Moreover, complex trigger algorithms will be assessed and the main back ground (night glow plus star light) will be studied. A complex readout electronic chain has been designed for the EUSO-Balloon project. It contains two elements: the 9 EC units and the 6 EC-ASIC boards. The EC unit includes four 64-channel Multi-Anode Photomultipliers and a set of pcbs used to supply the 14 different high voltages needed by the MAPMTs and to read out the analog anode signals. These signals are transmitted to the EC-ASIC boards which contain 6 SPACIROC ASICs each. During the year 2012, prototypes of each board were produced and tested successfully, leading to the production of the flight model PCBs in 2013.

  3. Sensor Development and Readout Prototyping for the STAR Pixel Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, L.; Anderssen, E.; Matis, H.S.; Ritter, H.G.; Stezelberger, T.; Szelezniak, M.; Sun, X.; Vu, C.; Wieman, H.

    2009-01-14

    The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designing a new vertex detector. The purpose of this upgrade detector is to provide high resolution pointing to allow for the direct topological reconstruction of heavy flavor decays such as the D{sup 0} by finding vertices displaced from the collision vertex by greater than 60 microns. We are using Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) as the sensor technology and have a coupled sensor development and readout system plan that leads to a final detector with a <200 {micro}s integration time, 400 M pixels and a coverage of -1 < {eta} < 1. We present our coupled sensor and readout development plan and the status of the prototyping work that has been accomplished.

  4. World's Cheapest Readout Electronics for Kinetic Inductance Detector by Using RedPitaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, N.; Jeong, H.; Choi, J.; Ishitsuka, H.; Mima, S.; Nagasaki, T.; Oguri, S.; Tajima, O.

    2016-01-01

    The kinetic inductance detector (KID) is a cutting-edge superconducting detector. The number of KID developers is growing. Most of them have switched from their previous study to superconducting technologies. Therefore, infrastructures for the fabrication of KIDs and cooling systems for their tests have already been established. However, readout electronics have to be newly prepared. Neither a commercial system nor low-cost standard electronics are available despite various attempts to create a standard one. We suggest the use of RedPitaya as readout electronics for the initial step of KID development, which is low cost (≈ 400 USD) and easy to set up. The RedPitaya consists of an all-programmable FPGA-CPU module and a dual-channel 14 bit DAC (ADC) to generate (measure) fast analog signals with 125 MSpS. Each port can be synchronized in-phase or quadrature-phase, and functions for generating and sampling analog signal are prepared. It is straightforward to construct vector network analyzer-like logic by using a combination of these default functions. Up-conversion and down-conversion of its frequency range are also possible by using commercial equipment, i.e., mixers, couplers, and a local oscillator. We implemented direct down-conversion logic on the RedPitaya, and successfully demonstrated KID signal measurements.

  5. World's Cheapest Readout Electronics for Kinetic Inductance Detector by Using RedPitaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, N.; Jeong, H.; Choi, J.; Ishitsuka, H.; Mima, S.; Nagasaki, T.; Oguri, S.; Tajima, O.

    2016-07-01

    The kinetic inductance detector (KID) is a cutting-edge superconducting detector. The number of KID developers is growing. Most of them have switched from their previous study to superconducting technologies. Therefore, infrastructures for the fabrication of KIDs and cooling systems for their tests have already been established. However, readout electronics have to be newly prepared. Neither a commercial system nor low-cost standard electronics are available despite various attempts to create a standard one. We suggest the use of RedPitaya as readout electronics for the initial step of KID development, which is low cost (≈ 400 USD) and easy to set up. The RedPitaya consists of an all-programmable FPGA-CPU module and a dual-channel 14 bit DAC (ADC) to generate (measure) fast analog signals with 125 MSpS. Each port can be synchronized in-phase or quadrature-phase, and functions for generating and sampling analog signal are prepared. It is straightforward to construct vector network analyzer-like logic by using a combination of these default functions. Up-conversion and down-conversion of its frequency range are also possible by using commercial equipment, i.e., mixers, couplers, and a local oscillator. We implemented direct down-conversion logic on the RedPitaya, and successfully demonstrated KID signal measurements.

  6. A simple SQUID system with one operational amplifier as readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kai; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Yongliang; Zeng, Jia; Xu, Xiaofeng; Qiu, Yang; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Xie, Xiaoming; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    We describe a dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) readout electronics in Flux Locked Loop (FLL) mode without integrator and with only one operational amplifier, which is called Single Chip Readout Electronics (SCRE). A weakly damped niobium-SQUID magnetometer with a large flux-to-voltage transfer coefficient of about ∂V/∂Φ ≈ 380 μV/Φ0 and SCRE results in a very simple SQUID system. We characterize the system and demonstrate its applicability to Magnetocardiography (MCG) and measurements using the Transient ElectroMagnetic (TEM) method. SCRE not only simplifies the readout scheme, but also improves the system stability, the bandwidth and the slew rate. The difference between SCRE and a conventional readout scheme (preamplifier + amplifier + integrator) is also discussed.

  7. RF Single Electron Transistor Readout Amplifiers for Superconducting Astronomical Detectors for X-Ray to Sub-mm Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Thomas; Aassime, Abdelhanin; Delsing, Per; Frunzio, Luigi; Li, Li-Qun; Prober, Daniel; Schoelkopf, Robert; Segall, Ken; Wilson, Chris; Stahle, Carl

    2000-01-01

    We report progress on using a new type of amplifier, the Radio-Frequency Single-Electron Transistor (RF-SET), to develop multi-channel sensor readout systems for fast and sensitive readout of high impedance cryogenic photodetectors such as Superconducting Tunnel Junctions and Single Quasiparticle Photon Counters. Although cryogenic, these detectors are desirable because of capabilities not other-wise attainable. However, high impedances and low output levels make low-noise, high-speed readouts challenging, and large format arrays would be facilitated by compact, low-power, on-chip integrated amplifiers. Well-suited for this application are RF-SETs, very high performance electrometers which use an rf readout technique to provide 100 MHz bandwidth. Small size, low power, and cryogenic operation allow direct integration with detectors, and using multiple rf carrier frequencies permits simultaneous readout of 20-50 amplifiers with a common electrical connection. We describe both the first 2-channel demonstration of this wavelength division multiplexing technique for RF-SETs, and Charge-Locked-Loop operation with 100 kHz of closed-loop bandwidth.

  8. Prototype design of DAMPE Calorimeter readout electronics and performance in CERN beam test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Changqing; Hu, Yiming; Gao, Shanshan; Zhang, Deliang; Zhang, Yunlong; Liu, Shubin; An, Qi

    A high energy cosmic ray detector to be in space, called DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE), is now being developed in China. The major scientific objectives of the DAMPE mission are primary cosmic ray, gamma ray astronomy and dark matter particles, by observing high energy primary cosmic rays, especially positrons/electrons and gamma rays with an energy range from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. The DAMPE detector is intended to operate in a 500 km satellite orbit, and a calorimeter, which is composed of 308 BGO (Bismuth Germanate) crystal logs with a size of 2.5cm*2.5cm*60cm for each log, is a critical sub-detector for measuring the energy of cosmic particles, distinguishing positrons/electrons and gamma rays from hadron background, and providing trigger information. Each BGO crystal log is viewed by two Hamamatsu R5610A PMTs (photomultiplier tubes), from both sides respectively. In order to achieve a large dynamic range, each PMT base incorporates a three dynode (2, 5, 8) pick off, which results in 616 PMTs and 1848 signal channels. According to the design specification, a dynamic range of 10(5) is need for each BGO detector units. The large amount of detector components and signal channels, as well as large dynamic range, greatly challenge the design of readout electronics, because the physical space of PCB (Printed Circuit Board) and cable layout, crosstalk between signal channels and power budget, are strictly constrained. In year 2012, a prototype of DAMPE was accomplished, including a scaled-down BGO calorimeter with 132 short BGO bars. Each short BGO bar, with a size of 2.5cm*2.5cm*30cm, is coupled with a R5610A PMT on one end, while the other end is wrapped by heat-shrinkable black sleeves. A prototype of the readout electronics, using VA32 ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) and Actel Flash-based FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array), are developed and assembled with the detector. After 1 month ground-based cosmic ray tests in China, an accelerator

  9. Front-end module readout and control electronics for the PHENIX Multiplicity Vertex Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ericson, M.N.; Allen, M.D.; Boissevain, J.

    1997-11-01

    Front-end module (FEM) readout and control are implemented as modular, high-density, reprogrammable functions in the PHENIX Multiplicity Vertex Detector. FEM control is performed by the heap manager, an FPGA-based circuit in the FEM unit. Each FEM has 256 channels of front-end electronics, readout, and control, all located on an MCM. Data readout, formatting, and control are performed by the heap manager along with 4 interface units that reside outside the MVD detector cylinder. This paper discusses the application of a generic heap manager and the addition of 4 interface module types to meet the specific control and data readout needs of the MVD. Unit functioning, interfaces, timing, data format, and communication rates will be discussed in detail. In addition, subsystem issues regarding mode control, serial architecture and functions, error handling, and FPGA implementation and programming will be presented.

  10. High-Fidelity Rapid Initialization and Read-Out of an Electron Spin via the Single Donor D- Charge State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, T. F.; Weber, B.; House, M. G.; Büch, H.; Simmons, M. Y.

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate high-fidelity electron spin read-out of a precision placed single donor in silicon via spin selective tunneling to either the D+ or D- charge state of the donor. By performing read-out at the stable two electron D0↔D- charge transition we can increase the tunnel rates to a nearby single electron transistor charge sensor by nearly 2 orders of magnitude, allowing faster qubit read-out (1 ms) with minimum loss in read-out fidelity (98.4%) compared to read-out at the D+↔D0 transition (99.6%). Furthermore, we show that read-out via the D- charge state can be used to rapidly initialize the electron spin qubit in its ground state with a fidelity of FI=99.8 %.

  11. Common Bias Readout for TES Array on Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, R.; Sakai, K.; Maehisa, K.; Nagayoshi, K.; Hayashi, T.; Muramatsu, H.; Nakashima, Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Takei, Y.; Hidaka, M.; Nagasawa, S.; Maehata, K.; Hara, T.

    2016-07-01

    A transition edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter array as an X-ray sensor for a scanning transmission electron microscope system is being developed. The technical challenge of this system is a high count rate of ˜ 5000 counts/second/array. We adopted a 64 pixel array with a parallel readout. Common SQUID bias, and common TES bias are planned to reduce the number of wires and the resources of a room temperature circuit. The reduction rate of wires is 44 % when a 64 pixel array is read out by a common bias of 8 channels. The possible degradation of the energy resolution has been investigated by simulations and experiments. The bias fluctuation effects of a series connection are less than those of a parallel connection. Simple calculations expect that the fluctuations of the common SQUID bias and common TES bias in a series connection are 10^{-7} and 10^{-3}, respectively. We constructed 8 SQUIDs which are connected to 8 TES outputs and a room temperature circuit for common bias readout and evaluated experimentally. Our simulation of crosstalk indicates that at an X-ray event rate of 500 cps/pixel, crosstalk will broaden a monochromatic line by about 0.01 %, or about 1.5 eV at 15 keV. Thus, our design goal of 10 eV energy resolution across the 0.5-15 keV band should be achievable.

  12. Common Bias Readout for TES Array on Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, R.; Sakai, K.; Maehisa, K.; Nagayoshi, K.; Hayashi, T.; Muramatsu, H.; Nakashima, Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Takei, Y.; Hidaka, M.; Nagasawa, S.; Maehata, K.; Hara, T.

    2016-03-01

    A transition edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter array as an X-ray sensor for a scanning transmission electron microscope system is being developed. The technical challenge of this system is a high count rate of ˜ 5000 counts/second/array. We adopted a 64 pixel array with a parallel readout. Common SQUID bias, and common TES bias are planned to reduce the number of wires and the resources of a room temperature circuit. The reduction rate of wires is 44 % when a 64 pixel array is read out by a common bias of 8 channels. The possible degradation of the energy resolution has been investigated by simulations and experiments. The bias fluctuation effects of a series connection are less than those of a parallel connection. Simple calculations expect that the fluctuations of the common SQUID bias and common TES bias in a series connection are 10^{-7} and 10^{-3} , respectively. We constructed 8 SQUIDs which are connected to 8 TES outputs and a room temperature circuit for common bias readout and evaluated experimentally. Our simulation of crosstalk indicates that at an X-ray event rate of 500 cps/pixel, crosstalk will broaden a monochromatic line by about 0.01 %, or about 1.5 eV at 15 keV. Thus, our design goal of 10 eV energy resolution across the 0.5-15 keV band should be achievable.

  13. A front-end readout Detector Board for the OpenPET electronics system

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Choong, W. -S.; Abu-Nimeh, F.; Moses, W. W.; Peng, Q.; Vu, C. Q.; Wu, J. -Y.

    2015-08-12

    Here, we present a 16-channel front-end readout board for the OpenPET electronics system. A major task in developing a nuclear medical imaging system, such as a positron emission computed tomograph (PET) or a single-photon emission computed tomograph (SPECT), is the electronics system. While there are a wide variety of detector and camera design concepts, the relatively simple nature of the acquired data allows for a common set of electronics requirements that can be met by a flexible, scalable, and high-performance OpenPET electronics system. The analog signals from the different types of detectors used in medical imaging share similar characteristics, whichmore » allows for a common analog signal processing. The OpenPET electronics processes the analog signals with Detector Boards. Here we report on the development of a 16-channel Detector Board. Each signal is digitized by a continuously sampled analog-to-digital converter (ADC), which is processed by a field programmable gate array (FPGA) to extract pulse height information. A leading edge discriminator creates a timing edge that is "time stamped" by a time-to-digital converter (TDC) implemented inside the FPGA. In conclusion, this digital information from each channel is sent to an FPGA that services 16 analog channels, and then information from multiple channels is processed by this FPGA to perform logic for crystal lookup, DOI calculation, calibration, etc.« less

  14. A front-end readout Detector Board for the OpenPET electronics system

    PubMed Central

    Choong, W.-S.; Abu-Nimeh, F.; Moses, W.W.; Peng, Q.; Vu, C.Q.; Wu, J.-Y.

    2016-01-01

    We present a 16-channel front-end readout board for the OpenPET electronics system. A major task in developing a nuclear medical imaging system, such as a positron emission computed tomograph (PET) or a single-photon emission computed tomograph (SPECT), is the electronics system. While there are a wide variety of detector and camera design concepts, the relatively simple nature of the acquired data allows for a common set of electronics requirements that can be met by a flexible, scalable, and high-performance OpenPET electronics system. The analog signals from the different types of detectors used in medical imaging share similar characteristics, which allows for a common analog signal processing. The OpenPET electronics processes the analog signals with Detector Boards. Here we report on the development of a 16-channel Detector Board. Each signal is digitized by a continuously sampled analog-to-digital converter (ADC), which is processed by a field programmable gate array (FPGA) to extract pulse height information. A leading edge discriminator creates a timing edge that is “time stamped” by a time-to-digital converter (TDC) implemented inside the FPGA. This digital information from each channel is sent to an FPGA that services 16 analog channels, and then information from multiple channels is processed by this FPGA to perform logic for crystal lookup, DOI calculation, calibration, etc. PMID:27134641

  15. A front-end readout Detector Board for the OpenPET electronics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choong, W.-S.; Abu-Nimeh, F.; Moses, W. W.; Peng, Q.; Vu, C. Q.; Wu, J.-Y.

    2015-08-01

    We present a 16-channel front-end readout board for the OpenPET electronics system. A major task in developing a nuclear medical imaging system, such as a positron emission computed tomograph (PET) or a single-photon emission computed tomograph (SPECT), is the electronics system. While there are a wide variety of detector and camera design concepts, the relatively simple nature of the acquired data allows for a common set of electronics requirements that can be met by a flexible, scalable, and high-performance OpenPET electronics system. The analog signals from the different types of detectors used in medical imaging share similar characteristics, which allows for a common analog signal processing. The OpenPET electronics processes the analog signals with Detector Boards. Here we report on the development of a 16-channel Detector Board. Each signal is digitized by a continuously sampled analog-to-digital converter (ADC), which is processed by a field programmable gate array (FPGA) to extract pulse height information. A leading edge discriminator creates a timing edge that is ``time stamped'' by a time-to-digital converter (TDC) implemented inside the FPGA . This digital information from each channel is sent to an FPGA that services 16 analog channels, and then information from multiple channels is processed by this FPGA to perform logic for crystal lookup, DOI calculation, calibration, etc.

  16. A front-end readout Detector Board for the OpenPET electronics system

    SciTech Connect

    Choong, W. -S.; Abu-Nimeh, F.; Moses, W. W.; Peng, Q.; Vu, C. Q.; Wu, J. -Y.

    2015-08-12

    Here, we present a 16-channel front-end readout board for the OpenPET electronics system. A major task in developing a nuclear medical imaging system, such as a positron emission computed tomograph (PET) or a single-photon emission computed tomograph (SPECT), is the electronics system. While there are a wide variety of detector and camera design concepts, the relatively simple nature of the acquired data allows for a common set of electronics requirements that can be met by a flexible, scalable, and high-performance OpenPET electronics system. The analog signals from the different types of detectors used in medical imaging share similar characteristics, which allows for a common analog signal processing. The OpenPET electronics processes the analog signals with Detector Boards. Here we report on the development of a 16-channel Detector Board. Each signal is digitized by a continuously sampled analog-to-digital converter (ADC), which is processed by a field programmable gate array (FPGA) to extract pulse height information. A leading edge discriminator creates a timing edge that is "time stamped" by a time-to-digital converter (TDC) implemented inside the FPGA. In conclusion, this digital information from each channel is sent to an FPGA that services 16 analog channels, and then information from multiple channels is processed by this FPGA to perform logic for crystal lookup, DOI calculation, calibration, etc.

  17. Image readout device with electronically variable spatial resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, H. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An invention relating to the use of a standing acoustic wave charge storage device as an image readout device is described. A frequency f sub 1 was applied to the storage transfer device to create a traveling electric field in the device in one direction along a straight line. A second frequency f sub 2 was applied to the charge transfer device to create a traveling electric field opposite to the first traveling electric field. A standing wave was created. When an image was focused on the charge transfer device, light was stored in the wells of the standing wave. When the frequency f sub 2 is removed from the device, the standing wave tends to break up and the charges stored move to an electrode connected to an output terminal and to a utilization device where the received charges represent the image on the surface of the charge transfer device along a projection of said straight line.

  18. Cool Timepix - Electronic noise of the Timepix readout chip down to -125 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schön, R.; Alfonsi, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; Koffeman, E.

    2015-01-01

    The Timepix readout chip with its 65k pixels on a sensitive area of 14 mm×14 mm provides a fine spatial resolution for particle tracking or medical imaging. We explore the operation of Timepix in a dual-phase xenon environment (around -110 °C). Used in dual-phase xenon time projection chambers, e.g. for dark matter search experiments, the readout must have a sufficiently low detection limit for small energy deposits. We measured the electronic pixel noise of three bare Timepix chips. For the first time Timepix readout chips were cooled to temperatures as low as -125 °C. In this work, we present the results of analysing noise transition curves recorded while applying a well-defined charge to the pixel's input. The electronic noise reduces to an average of 99e-, a reduction of 23% compared to operation at room temperature.

  19. A multi-channel readout electronics system for GEM and MICROMEGAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Z.; Li, Y. L.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Luo, J.; Liu, Y. N.

    2009-11-01

    A multi-channel readout electronics system for GEM and MICROMEGAS has been developed. It consists of a front-end ASIC, a multi-channel ADC and a FPGA to sample the signal waveforms in real time. The gain of the front-end ASIC can be programmable from 1 mV/fC to 19 mV/fC and the output pulse width can be adjusted from 200 ns to 800 ns. The ENC is measured to be below 2000 e for Cin < 20 pF and below 5000 e for Cin < 60 pF. Detailed circuit performance and test results with detectors will be described in this paper.

  20. Development of a PMT Readout System with Viking Chips for the SciFi Detector of CALET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, T.; Torii, S.; Hibino, K.; Yoshida, K.; Okuno, S.; Anraku, K.; Yamashita, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Kitamura, H.; Katayose, Y.; Inoue, T.; Kasahara, K.; Hubo, S.; Battiston, R.; Menichelli, M.

    2003-07-01

    The CALET (CALorimetric Electron telescope) experiment on the International Space Station (ISS) is designed to observe cosmic-ray electrons, γ -rays, and heavy nuclei. The CALET detector will comprise an imaging calorimeter (IMC) and a total absorption calorimeter (TASC). The IMC part will be assembled with several ten thousand scintillating fibers (SciFi). In order to read the SciFi's, we have been developing a readout system for multi-ano de PMT (MAPMT). We assembled a test detector using 512 SciFi's and a MA-PMT readout unit composed of "Viking" chips (VA32HDR2). We report the performance of the readout unit as proved by beam tests.

  1. A fast readout and processing electronics for photon counting intensified charge-coupled device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamini, P.; Bonelli, G.; Tanzi, E. G.; Uslenghi, M.; Poletto, L.; Tondello, G.

    2000-04-01

    The design features and the performances of a prototype photon counting imaging detector, being developed for the international ultraviolet (UV) space mission Spectrum UV, are presented. The photon counter is an intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) in which photon events, generating an electron cascade through a high gain microchannel plate (MCP) stack, are transduced, via a phosphor screen and a fiber optics reducer, into a 3×3 pixel2, quasi-Gaussian charge distributions on a 15×15 μm2,512×512 pixel2 format CCD matrix. The CCD is read out in the frame-transfer mode at a pixel rate of 19.75 MHz, and its output data flow is acquired serially as to generate a 3×3 pixel2 event sash that sweeps dynamically the CCD matrix at the 50.6 ns rate of the readout clock. Each and every event sash is searched for the presence of events whose charge content lie within proper limits and satisfy a given set of morphological rules, i.e., a single peak charge profile. The centroid coordinates of identified events are determined with subpixel accuracy (up to a 210 bin/pixel) and subsequently stored as photon list coordinate pairs. The data acquisition and processing system is based on field programmable gate array technology and is capable of satisfying the requirements of real-time operation. The modular construction of the data acquisition and processing electronics provides a great deal of flexibility for supporting advancements in CCD readout techniques (multiple output and higher clocking speed) and of MCPs (larger formats, smaller pore, and higher dynamic range). The results of the performance verification of the data acquisition and processing system integrated with a laboratory ICCD prototype are presented and discussed.

  2. A rack-mounted precision waveguide-below-cutoff attenuator with an absolute electronic readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    A coaxial precision waveguide-below-cutoff attenuator is described which uses an absolute (unambiguous) electronic digital readout of displacement in inches in addition to the usual gear driven mechanical counter-dial readout in decibels. The attenuator is rack-mountable and has the input and output RF connectors in a fixed position. The attenuation rate for 55, 50, and 30 MHz operation is given along with a discussion of sources of errors. In addition, information is included to aid the user in making adjustments on the attenuator should it be damaged or disassembled for any reason.

  3. Orthogonal sequencing multiplexer for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors with RSFQ electronics readout circuit.

    PubMed

    Hofherr, Matthias; Wetzstein, Olaf; Engert, Sonja; Ortlepp, Thomas; Berg, Benjamin; Ilin, Konstantin; Henrich, Dagmar; Stolz, Ronny; Toepfer, Hannes; Meyer, Hans-Georg; Siegel, Michael

    2012-12-17

    We propose an efficient multiplexing technique for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors based on an orthogonal detector bias switching method enabling the extraction of the average count rate of a set of detectors by one readout line. We implemented a system prototype where the SNSPDs are connected to an integrated cryogenic readout and a pulse merger system based on rapid single flux quantum (RSFQ) electronics. We discuss the general scalability of this concept, analyze the environmental requirements which define the resolvability and the accuracy and demonstrate the feasibility of this approach with experimental results for a SNSPD array with four pixels. PMID:23263106

  4. Dispersive Readout of a Few-Electron Double Quantum Dot with Fast rf Gate Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colless, J. I.; Mahoney, A. C.; Hornibrook, J. M.; Doherty, A. C.; Lu, H.; Gossard, A. C.; Reilly, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the dispersive charge-state readout of a double quantum dot in the few-electron regime using the in situ gate electrodes as sensitive detectors. We benchmark this gate sensing technique against the well established quantum point contact charge detector and find comparable performance with a bandwidth of ˜10MHz and an equivalent charge sensitivity of ˜6.3×10-3e/Hz. Dispersive gate sensing alleviates the burden of separate charge detectors for quantum dot systems and promises to enable readout of qubits in scaled-up arrays.

  5. Medipix2 parallel readout system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanti, V.; Marzeddu, R.; Randaccio, P.

    2003-08-01

    A fast parallel readout system based on a PCI board has been developed in the framework of the Medipix collaboration. The readout electronics consists of two boards: the motherboard directly interfacing the Medipix2 chip, and the PCI board with digital I/O ports 32 bits wide. The device driver and readout software have been developed at low level in Assembler to allow fast data transfer and image reconstruction. The parallel readout permits a transfer rate up to 64 Mbytes/s. http://medipix.web.cern ch/MEDIPIX/

  6. An 8×8 Row-Column Summing Readout Electronics for Preclinical Positron Emission Tomography Scanners.

    PubMed

    Shih, Y C; Sun, F W; Macdonald, L R; Otis, B P; Miyaoka, R S; McDougald, W; Lewellen, T K

    2009-10-24

    This work presents a row/column summing readout electronics for an 8×8 silicon photomultiplier array. The summation circuit greatly reduces the number of electronic channels, which is desirable for pursuing higher resolution positron emission tomography scanners. By using a degenerated common source topology in the summation circuit, more fan-in is possible and therefore a greater reduction in the number of electronic channels can be achieved. The timing signal is retrieved from a common anode, which allows the use of a single fast-sampling analog to digital converter (ADC) for the timing channel and slower, lower power ADCs for the 64 spatial channels. Preliminary results of one row summation of the 8×8 readout electronics exhibited FWHM energy resolution of 17.8% and 18.3% with and without multiplexing, respectively. The measured timing resolution is 2.9ns FWHM. PMID:20729983

  7. Digitally controlled high-performance dc SQUID readout electronics for a 304-channel vector magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechstein, S.; Petsche, F.; Scheiner, M.; Drung, D.; Thiel, F.; Schnabel, A.; Schurig, Th

    2006-06-01

    Recently, we have developed a family of dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) readout electronics for several applications. These electronics comprise a low-noise preamplifier followed by an integrator, and an analog SQUID bias circuit. A highly-compact low-power version with a flux-locked loop bandwidth of 0.3 MHz and a white noise level of 1 nV/√Hz was specially designed for a 304-channel low-Tc dc SQUID vector magnetometer, intended to operate in the new Berlin Magnetically Shielded Room (BMSR-2). In order to minimize the space needed to mount the electronics on top of the dewar and to minimize the power consumption, we have integrated four electronics channels on one 3 cm × 10 cm sized board. Furthermore we embedded the analog components of these four channels into a digitally controlled system including an in-system programmable microcontroller. Four of these integrated boards were combined to one module with a size of 4 cm × 4 cm × 16 cm. 19 of these modules were implemented, resulting in a total power consumption of about 61 W. To initialize the 304 channels and to service the system we have developed software tools running on a laptop computer. By means of these software tools the microcontrollers are fed with all required data such as the working points, the characteristic parameters of the sensors (noise, voltage swing), or the sensor position inside of the vector magnetometer system. In this paper, the developed electronics including the software tools are described, and first results are presented.

  8. Hyper Suprime-Cam: back-end electronics for CCD readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Tomohisa; Miyatake, Hironao; Nakaya, Hidehiko; Aihara, Hiroaki; Miyazaki, Satoshi

    2008-07-01

    The development status of a prototype readout module for Hyper Suprime-Cam, a next-generation prime-focus camera for the 8.2 m Subaru Telescope, is presented. The camera has a field of view 1.5° in diameter, and produces 2.1 Gbyte of data per exposure. The module transfers the data to computers of a data acquisition system using TCP/IP and Gigabit Ethernet. We have measured the performance of data processing and data transfer of the developed module. The results indicated sufficient performance to read data from all CCDs within the required readout time.

  9. Readout electronics validation and target detector assessment for the Neutrinos Angra experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarenga, T. A.; Anjos, J. C.; Azzi, G.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Chimenti, P.; Costa, J. A.; Dornelas, T. I.; Farias, P. C. M. A.; Guedes, G. P.; Gonzalez, L. F. G.; Kemp, E.; Lima, H. P.; Machado, R.; Nóbrega, R. A.; Pepe, I. M.; Ribeiro, D. B. S.; Simas Filho, E. F.; Valdiviesso, G. A.; Wagner, S.

    2016-09-01

    A compact surface detector designed to identify the inverse beta decay interaction produced by anti-neutrinos coming from near operating nuclear reactors is being developed by the Neutrinos Angra Collaboration. In this document we describe and test the detector and its readout system by means of cosmic rays acquisition. In this measurement campaign, the target detector has been equipped with 16 8-in PMTs and two scintillator paddles have been used to trigger cosmic ray events. The achieved results disclosed the main operational characteristics of the Neutrinos Angra system and have been used to assess the detector and to validate its readout system.

  10. Development of a 3-DOF Micro Accelerometer with Wireless Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Bui Thanh; Dao, Dzung Viet; Amarasinghe, Ranjith; Wada, Naoki; Tokunaga, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Susumu

    This paper describes the design, simulation and fabrication of a 3-DOF (degree of freedom) micro accelerometer with wireless readout system. The fabricated accelerometer has dimensions of 1000μm×1000μm×500μm (Length×Width×Thickness) and can detect three components of linear acceleration simultaneously. The sensitivities to X-axis, Y-axis and Z-axis are 30μV/g, 30μV/g and 23μV/g, respectively. A three input-channels wireless transceiver system has been developed and integrated with the sensing element to form a sensor node. The antenna has been designed to transmit the signal from sensor node to a server at a communication frequency of 2.4GHz over a distance of 20m. Three output signals, i.e. X-axis, Y-axis and Z-axis, from the accelerometer are transmitted to the server by time division multiplexing protocol. This allows our wireless sensor system to detect three components of acceleration independently.

  11. Study on FPGA SEU Mitigation for the Readout Electronics of DAMPE BGO Calorimeter in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhongtao; Feng, Changqing; Gao, Shanshan; Zhang, Deliang; Jiang, Di; Liu, Shubin; An, Qi

    2015-06-01

    The BGO calorimeter, which provides a wide measurement range of the primary cosmic ray spectrum, is a key sub-detector of Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE). The readout electronics of calorimeter consists of 16 pieces of Actel ProASIC Plus FLASH-based FPGA, of which the design-level flip-flops and embedded block RAMs are single event upset (SEU) sensitive in the harsh space environment. Therefore to comply with radiation hardness assurance (RHA), SEU mitigation methods, including partial triple modular redundancy (TMR), CRC checksum, and multi-domain reset are analyzed and tested by the heavy-ion beam test. Composed of multi-level redundancy, a FPGA design with the characteristics of SEU tolerance and low resource consumption is implemented for the readout electronics.

  12. Readout electronics for the Wide Field of view Cherenkov/Fluorescence Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, R.; Bai, L.; Zhang, J.; Huang, J.; Yang, C.; Cao, Z.

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO), supported by IHEP of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, is a multipurpose project with a complex detectors array for high energy gamma ray and cosmic ray detection. The Wide Field of view Cherenkov Telescope Array (WFCTA), as one of the components of the LHAASO project, aim to tag each primary particle that causes an air shower. The WFCTA is a portable telescope array used to detect cosmic ray spectra. The design of the readout electronics of the WFCTA is described in this paper Sixteen photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), together with their readout electronics are integrated into a single sub-cluster. To maintain good resolution and linearity over a wide dynamic range, a dual-gain amplification configuration on an analog board is used The digital board contains two 16channel 14-bit, 50 Msps analog-to-digital converters (ADC) and its power consumption, noise level, and relative deviation are all tested.

  13. Coherent operation of detector systems and their readout electronics in a complex experiment control environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koestner, Stefan

    2009-09-01

    With the increasing size and degree of complexity of today's experiments in high energy physics the required amount of work and complexity to integrate a complete subdetector into an experiment control system is often underestimated. We report here on the layered software structure and protocols used by the LHCb experiment to control its detectors and readout boards. The experiment control system of LHCb is based on the commercial SCADA system PVSS II. Readout boards which are outside the radiation area are accessed via embedded credit card sized PCs which are connected to a large local area network. The SPECS protocol is used for control of the front end electronics. Finite state machines are introduced to facilitate the control of a large number of electronic devices and to model the whole experiment at the level of an expert system.

  14. Low Background Signal Readout Electronics for the Majorana Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinn, I.; Abgrall, N.; Avignone, F. T., III; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Buuck, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y.-D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Efremenko, Yu; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Jasinski, B. R.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; MacMullin, J.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Shanks, B.; Shirchenko, M.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, A. M.; Tedeschi, D.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yu, C.-H.; Yumatov, V.; Majorana Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator is a planned 40 kg array of Germanium detectors intended to demonstrate the feasibility of constructing a tonne-scale experiment that will seek neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in 76Ge. Such an experiment would require backgrounds of less than 1 count/tonne-year in the 4 keV region of interest around the 2039 keV Q-value of the ββ decay. Designing low-noise electronics, which must be placed in close proximity to the detectors, presents a challenge to reaching this background target. This paper will discuss the Majorana collaboration's solutions to some of these challenges.

  15. The telescope readout electronics for the Gravity Probe B satellite.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demroff, H. P.; Babu, S.; Bye, M. R.; Coleman, K. L.; Das, N.; Debra, D. B.; Ehrensberger, P. D., Jr.; Farley, R. P.; Gill, D. K.; Goebel, J. H.; Jhabvala, M.; Kashani, A.; Romero, E.; Sullivan, M. T.

    1998-06-01

    The pointing and stability requirements for the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) Relativity Mission pose a number of challenges for the star-tracking electronics. Because the telescope-gyroscope assembly operates at 2.8K, the detector circuit's Si JFETs at the telescope focal plane must be thermally isolated and heated to at least 50K through self-heating or with the aid of heating resistors. The authors have designed a low noise, thermally stable photodetector circuit that meets the GP-B requirements as well as fabricated an isolator to give the required thermal isolation and mechanical stability. Test results of the detector-isolator assembly are presented.

  16. On Certain New Methodology for Reducing Sensor and Readout Electronics Circuitry Noise in Digital Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Miko, Joseph; Bradley, Damon; Heinzen, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and upcoming cosmology science missions carry instruments with multiple focal planes populated with many large sensor detector arrays. These sensors are passively cooled to low temperatures for low-level light (L3) and near-infrared (NIR) signal detection, and the sensor readout electronics circuitry must perform at extremely low noise levels to enable new required science measurements. Because we are at the technological edge of enhanced performance for sensors and readout electronics circuitry, as determined by thermal noise level at given temperature in analog domain, we must find new ways of further compensating for the noise in the signal digital domain. To facilitate this new approach, state-of-the-art sensors are augmented at their array hardware boundaries by non-illuminated reference pixels, which can be used to reduce noise attributed to sensors. There are a few proposed methodologies of processing in the digital domain the information carried by reference pixels, as employed by the Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope Projects. These methods involve using spatial and temporal statistical parameters derived from boundary reference pixel information to enhance the active (non-reference) pixel signals. To make a step beyond this heritage methodology, we apply the NASA-developed technology known as the Hilbert- Huang Transform Data Processing System (HHT-DPS) for reference pixel information processing and its utilization in reconfigurable hardware on-board a spaceflight instrument or post-processing on the ground. The methodology examines signal processing for a 2-D domain, in which high-variance components of the thermal noise are carried by both active and reference pixels, similar to that in processing of low-voltage differential signals and subtraction of a single analog reference pixel from all active pixels on the sensor. Heritage methods using the aforementioned statistical parameters in the

  17. Single Electron Detection in Quadruple-GEM Detector with Pad Readout

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, Jaroslav

    2001-03-07

    Using a system of four GEMs operating in tandem and coupled to pad readout, we have demonstrated the detection of single electrons in ethane at 1 bar. The paper presents measurements of single electron pulse height distributions, total gas gain measurement and calculation, pad-to-pad cross-talk, quenching capability, high rate capability, charging effects, etc. We describe the overall operational experience, including addition of a gaseous photocathode, TMAE, and compare it to the SLD CRID single-electron detector [1], which has been operational during the past decade.

  18. The detection of single electrons using a Micromegas gas amplification and a MediPix2 CMOS pixel readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaini, A.; Campbell, M.; Chefdeville, M.; Colas, P.; Colijn, A. P.; van der Graaf, H.; Giomataris, Y.; Heijne, E. H. M.; Kluit, P.; Llopart, X.; Schmitz, J.; Timmermans, J.; Visschers, J. L.

    2005-07-01

    By placing a Micromegas gas gain grid on top of a CMOS pixel readout circuit (MediPix2), we developed a device which acts as a pixel-segmented direct anode in gas-filled detectors. With a He/Isobutane 80/20 mixture (capable of achieving gas gain factors up to 20×103) and employing a drift length of 15 mm, signals from radioactive sources and cosmic radiation were measured. Single primary electrons originating from the passage of cosmic muons through the gas volume were detected with an efficiency higher than 90%.

  19. Development of a hadron blind detector using a finely segmented pad readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Koki; Aoki, Kazuya; Aramaki, Yoki; En`yo, Hideto; Kawama, Daisuke; Komatsu, Yusuke; Masumoto, Shinichi; Nakai, Wataru; Obara, Yuki; Ozawa, Kyoichiro; Sekimoto, Michiko; Shibukawa, Takuya; Takahashi, Tomonori; Watanabe, Yosuke; Yokkaichi, Satoshi

    2016-05-01

    We constructed a hadron blind detector (HBD) using a finely segmented pad readout. The finely segmented pad readout enabled us to adopt an advanced particle identification method which applies a threshold to the number of pad hits in addition to the total amount of collected charge. The responses of the detector to electrons and pions were evaluated using a negatively charged secondary beam at 1.0 GeV/c containing 20% electrons at the J-PARC K1.1BR beam line. We observed 7.3 photoelectrons per incident electron. Using the advanced particle identification method, an electron detection efficiency of 83% was achieved with a pion rejection factor of 120. The method improved the pion rejection by approximately a factor of five, compared to the one which just applies a threshold to the amount of collected charge. The newly introduced finely segmented pad readout was found to be effective in rejecting pions.

  20. System Architecture of the Dark Energy Survey Camera Readout Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Theresa; Ballester, Otger; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Castilla, Javier; Chappa, Steve; de Vicente, Juan; Holm, Scott; Huffman, Dave; Kozlovsky, Mark; Martinez, Gustavo; Moore, Todd; /Madrid, CIEMAT /Fermilab /Illinois U., Urbana /Fermilab

    2010-05-27

    The Dark Energy Survey makes use of a new camera, the Dark Energy Camera (DECam). DECam will be installed in the Blanco 4M telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). DECam is presently under construction and is expected to be ready for observations in the fall of 2011. The focal plane will make use of 62 2Kx4K and 12 2kx2k fully depleted Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) for guiding, alignment and focus. This paper will describe design considerations of the system; including, the entire signal path used to read out the CCDs, the development of a custom crate and backplane, the overall grounding scheme and early results of system tests.

  1. Front-end readout electronics considerations for Silicon Tracking System and Muon Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasinski, K.; Kleczek, R.; Szczygiel, R.

    2016-02-01

    Silicon Tracking System (STS) and Muon Chamber (MUCH) are components of the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR, Germany. STS will be built from 8 detector stations located in the aperture of the magnet. Each station will be built from double-sided silicon strip detectors and connected via kapton microcables to the readout electronics at the perimeter of each station. The challenging physics program of the CBM experiment requires from the detector systems very high performance. Design of the readout ASIC requires finding an optimal solution for interaction time and input charge measurements in the presence of: tight area (channel pitch: 58 μ m), noise (< 1000 e- rms), power (< 10 mW/channel), radiation hardness and speed requirements (average hit rate: 250 khit/s/channel). This paper presents the front-end electronics' analysis towards prototype STS and MUCH readout ASIC implementation in the UMC 180 nm CMOS process and in-system performance with the emphasis on preferable detector and kapton microcable parameters and input amplifiers' architecture and design.

  2. Gafchromic EBT3 film dosimetry in electron beams - energy dependence and improved film read-out.

    PubMed

    Sipilä, Petri; Ojala, Jarkko; Kaijaluoto, Sampsa; Jokelainen, Ilkka; Kosunen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    For megavoltage photon radiation, the fundamental dosimetry characteristics of Gafchromic EBT3 film were determined in 60Co gamma ray beam with addition of experimental and Monte Carlo (MC)-simulated energy dependence of the film for 6 MV photon beam and 6 MeV, 9 MeV, 12 MeV, and 16 MeV electron beams in water phantom. For the film read-out, two phase correction of scanner sensitivity was applied: a matrix correction for scanning area and dose-dependent correction by iterative procedure. With these corrections, the uniformity of response can be improved to be within ± 50 pixel values (PVs). To improve the read-out accuracy, a procedure with flipped film orientations was established. With the method, scanner uniformity can be improved further and dust particles, scratches and/or dirt on scan-ner glass can be detected and eliminated. Responses from red and green channels were averaged for read-out, which decreased the effect of noise present in values from separate channels. Since the signal level with the blue channel is considerably lower than with other channels, the signal variation due to different perturbation effects increases the noise level so that the blue channel is not recommended to be used for dose determination. However, the blue channel can be used for the detection of emulsion thickness variations for film quality evaluations with unexposed films. With electron beams ranging from 6 MeV to 16 MeV and at reference measurement conditions in water, the energy dependence of the EBT3 film is uniform within 0.5%, with uncertainties close to 1.6% (k = 2). Including 6 MV photon beam and the electron beams mentioned, the energy dependence is within 1.1%. No notable differences were found between the experimental and MC-simulated responses, indicating negligible change in intrinsic energy dependence of the EBT3 film for 6 MV photon beam and 6 MeV-16 MeV electron beams. Based on the dosimetric characteristics of the EBT3 film, the read-out procedure established

  3. Digital frequency domain multiplexing readout electronics for the next generation of millimeter telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Amy N.; Cliche, Jean-François; de Haan, Tijmen; Dobbs, Matt A.; Gilbert, Adam J.; Montgomery, Joshua; Rowlands, Neil; Smecher, Graeme M.; Smith, Ken; Wilson, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    Frequency domain multiplexing (fMux) is an established technique for the readout of transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers in millimeter-wavelength astrophysical instrumentation. In fMux, the signals from multiple detectors are read out on a single pair of wires reducing the total cryogenic thermal loading as well as the cold component complexity and cost of a system. The current digital fMux system, in use by POLARBEAR, EBEX, and the South Pole Telescope, is limited to a multiplexing factor of 16 by the dynamic range of the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device pre-amplifier and the total system bandwidth. Increased multiplexing is key for the next generation of large format TES cameras, such as SPT-3G and POLARBEAR2, which plan to have on the of order 15,000 detectors. Here, we present the next generation fMux readout, focusing on the warm electronics. In this system, the multiplexing factor increases to 64 channels per module (2 wires) while maintaining low noise levels and detector stability. This is achieved by increasing the system bandwidth, reducing the dynamic range requirements though active feedback, and digital synthesis of voltage biases with a novel polyphase filter algorithm. In addition, a version of the new fMux readout includes features such as low power consumption and radiation-hard components making it viable for future space-based millimeter telescopes such as the LiteBIRD satellite.

  4. Electric readout and storage concepts for electron and nuclear spin states in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehme, Christoph

    2011-10-01

    A variety of concepts utilizing spins in semiconductors for information storage and processing have been proposed in recent years. One of these concepts [1] uses the phosphorous nucleus in crystalline silicon as a quantum bit, an approach which combines longest known spin coherence times and, therefore, spin storage times, with already existing, well developed and highly reliable, crystalline silicon nano-technology. Our research is focused on implementations of electric readout devices for electron- and nuclear-spins in silicon. I will review different experiments which show how donor electrons [2-4] and nuclear [5] spins of phosphorous atoms in crystalline silicon can be used as a electrically readable spin memories with long storage times for classical and quantum information and how nuclear spin qubits can be initialized [6].[4pt] [1] B. E. Kane, Nature 393, 133 (1998).[0pt] [2] A. R. Stegner, C. Boehme, H. Huebl, M. Stutzmann, K. Lips, M. S. Brandt, Nature Physics 2, 835 (2006). [0pt] [3] S.-Y. Paik, S.-Y. Lee, W. J. Baker, D. R. McCamey, and C. Boehme, Phys. Rev. B 81, 075214 (2010).[0pt] [4] G. W. Morley, D. R. McCamey, H. A. Seipel, L.-C. Brunel, J. van Tol, C. Boehme, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 207602 (2008).[0pt] [5] D. R. McCamey, J. van Tol, G. W. Morley, C. Boehme, Science 330, 1652 (2010).[0pt] [6] D. R. McCamey, J. van Tol, G. W. Morley, C. Boehme, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 027601 (2009).

  5. Readout Electronics for BGO Calorimeter of DAMPE: Status during the First Half-year after Launching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Siyuan; Feng, Changqing; Zhang, Deliang; Wang, Qi

    2016-07-01

    The DAMPE (DArk Matter Particle Explorer) is a scientic satellite which was successfully launched into a 500 Km sun-synchronous orbit, on December 17th, 2015, from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center of China. The major scientific objective of DAMPE mission is indirect searching for dark matter by observing high energy primary cosmic rays, especially positrons/electrons and gamma rays with an energy range from 5 GeV to 10 TeV. The BGO (Bismuth Germanate Oxide) calorimeter, which is a critical sub-detector of DAMPE payload, was developed for measuring the energy of cosmic particles, distinguishing positrons/electrons and gamma rays from hadron background, and providing trigger information. It is composed of 308 BGO crystal logs, with the size of 2.5cm*2.5cm*60cm for each log to form a total absorption electromagnetic calorimeter. All the BGO logs are stacked in 14 layers, with each layer consisting of 22 BGO crystal logs and each log is viewed by two Hamamatsu R5610A PMTs (photomultiplier tubes), from both sides respectively. Each PMT incorporates a three dynode pick off to achieve a large dynamic range, which results in 616 PMTs and 1848 signal channels. The main function of readout electronics system, which consists of 16 FEE(Front End Electronics) modules, is to precisely measure the charge of PMT signals and providing "hit" signals. The hit signals are sent to the trigger module of PDPU (Payload Data Process Unit) to generate triggers for the payload. The calibration of the BGO calorimeter is composed of pedestal testing and electronic linear scale, which are executed frequently in the space after launching. The data of the testing is transmitted to ground station in the form of scientific data. The monitor status consists of temperature, current and status words of the FEE, which are measured and recorded every 16 seconds and packed in the engineering data, then transmitted to ground station. The status of the BGO calorimeter can be evaluated by the calibration

  6. The Silicon Tracker Readout Electronics of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Baldini, Luca; Brez, Alessandro; Himel, Thomas; Hirayama, Masaharu; Johnson, R.P.; Kroeger, Wilko; Latronico, Luca; Minuti, Massimo; Nelson, David; Rando, Riccardo; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Sgro, Carmelo; Spandre, Gloria; Spencer, E.N.; Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Tajima, Hiro; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Ziegler, Marcus; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /SLAC /Maryland U. /UC, Santa Cruz /Padua U. /INFN, Padua

    2006-02-27

    A unique electronics system has been built and tested for reading signals from the silicon-strip detectors of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope mission. The system amplifies and processes signals from 884,736 36-cm strips using only 160 W of power, and it achieves close to 100% detection efficiency with noise occupancy sufficiently low to allow it to self trigger. The design of the readout system is described, and results are presented from ground-based testing of the completed detector system.

  7. The SPICA-SAFARI TES Bolometer Readout: Developments Towards a Flight System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Kuur, J.; Beyer, J.; Bruijn, M.; Gao, J. R.; den Hartog, R.; Heijmering, R.; Hoevers, H.; Jackson, B.; van Leeuwen, B. J.; Lindeman, M.; Kiviranta, M.; de Korte, P.; Mauskopf, P.; de Korte, P.; van Weers, H.; Withington, S.

    2012-06-01

    SAFARI is an imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer for 35-200 μm under development for flight on the Japanese IR-satellite SPICA (2018). The 3.25 m diameter actively cooled telescope (<6K) will provide a sky background limited signal, which implies that detectors will need to have an NEP of 3.5 \\cdot10^{-19} {W/}sqrt{Hz} in order not to be limiting the sensitivity. The instrument will utilize three TES-based detector arrays, covering the 2×2 arcmin field-of-view in three octaves of wave length. This contribution will present an overview of the detector sub-system, i.e.: the detector arrays and radiation coupling, the focal plane assembly, the amplification chain and the frequency-domain- multiplexed electronics. The focus will be on the implications on the system design of the readout under the stringent power dissipation, heat load, and weight limitations.

  8. SiPM arrays and miniaturized readout electronics for compact gamma camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, N.; Imando, T. Ait; Nagai, A.; Pinot, L.; Puill, V.; Callier, S.; Janvier, B.; Esnault, C.; Verdier, M.-A.; Raux, L.; Vandenbussche, V.; Charon, Y.; Menard, L.

    2015-07-01

    This article reports on the design and features of a very compact and light gamma camera based on SiPM arrays and miniaturized readout electronics dedicated to tumor localization during radio-guided cancer surgery. This gamma camera, called MAGICS, is composed of four (2×2) photo-detection elementary modules coupled to an inorganic scintillator. The 256 channels photo-detection system covers a sensitive area of 54×53 m2. Each elementary module is based on four (2×2) SiPM monolithic arrays, each array consisting of 16 SiPM photo-sensors (4×4) with 3×3 mm2 sensitive area, coupled to a miniaturized readout electronics and a dedicated ASIC. The overall dimensions of the electronics fit the size of the detector, enabling to assemble side-by-side several elementary modules in a close-packed arrangement. The preliminary performances of the system are very encouraging, showing an energy resolution of 9.8% and a spatial resolution of less than 1 mm at 122 keV.

  9. Ultra-low noise high electron mobility transistors for high-impedance and low-frequency deep cryogenic readout electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Q.; Liang, Y. X.; Ferry, D.; Cavanna, A.; Gennser, U.; Couraud, L.; Jin, Y.

    2014-07-07

    We report on the results obtained from specially designed high electron mobility transistors at 4.2 K: the gate leakage current can be limited lower than 1 aA, and the equivalent input noise-voltage and noise-current at 1 Hz can reach 6.3 nV/Hz{sup 1∕2} and 20 aA/Hz{sup 1∕2}, respectively. These results open the way to realize high performance low-frequency readout electronics under very low-temperature conditions.

  10. Ultra-low noise high electron mobility transistors for high-impedance and low-frequency deep cryogenic readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Q.; Liang, Y. X.; Ferry, D.; Cavanna, A.; Gennser, U.; Couraud, L.; Jin, Y.

    2014-07-01

    We report on the results obtained from specially designed high electron mobility transistors at 4.2 K: the gate leakage current can be limited lower than 1 aA, and the equivalent input noise-voltage and noise-current at 1 Hz can reach 6.3 nV/Hz1/2 and 20 aA/Hz1/2, respectively. These results open the way to realize high performance low-frequency readout electronics under very low-temperature conditions.

  11. The prototype readout electronics system for the External Target Experiment in CSR of HIRFL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Kang, L.; Li, M.; Liu, S.; Zhou, J.; An, Q.

    2014-07-01

    A prototype readout electronics system was designed for the External Target Experiment in the Cooling Storage Ring (CSR) of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). The kernel parts include the 128-channel 100 ps high-resolution time digitization module, the 16-channel 25 ps high-resolution time and charge measurement module, and the trigger electronics, as well as the clock generation circuits, which are all integrated within the PXI-6U crate. The laboratory test results indicate that a good resolution is achieved, better than the requirement. We also have conducted initial commissioning tests with the detectors to confirm the functions of the system. Through the research of this prototype electronics, preparation for the future extended system is made.

  12. CMOS Integrated Single Electron Transistor Electrometry (CMOS-SET) circuit design for nanosecond quantum-bit read-out.

    SciTech Connect

    Gurrieri, Thomas M.; Lilly, Michael Patrick; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Levy, James E.

    2008-08-01

    Novel single electron transistor (SET) read-out circuit designs are described. The circuits use a silicon SET interfaced to a CMOS voltage mode or current mode comparator to obtain a digital read-out of the state of the qubit. The design assumes standard submicron (0.35 um) CMOS SOI technology using room temperature SPICE models. Implications and uncertainties related to the temperature scaling of these models to 100mK operation are discussed. Using this technology, the simulations predict a read-out operation speed of approximately Ins and a power dissipation per cell as low as 2nW for single-shot read-out, which is a significant advantage over currently used radio frequency SET (RF-SET) approaches.

  13. BLASTbus electronics: general-purpose readout and control for balloon-borne experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benton, S. J.; Ade, P. A.; Amiri, M.; Angilè, F. E.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Bryan, S. A.; Chiang, H. C.; Contaldi, C. R.; Crill, B. P.; Devlin, M. J.; Dober, B.; Doré, O. P.; Farhang, M.; Filippini, J. P.; Fissel, L. M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Fukui, Y.; Galitzki, N.; Gambrel, A. E.; Gandilo, N. N.; Golwala, S. R.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hilton, G. C.; Holmes, W. A.; Hristov, V. V.; Irwin, K. D.; Jones, W. C.; Kermish, Z. D.; Klein, J.; Korotkov, A. L.; Kuo, C. L.; MacTavish, C. J.; Mason, P. V.; Matthews, T. G.; Megerian, K. G.; Moncelsi, L.; Morford, T. A.; Mroczkowski, T. K.; Nagy, J. M.; Netterfield, C. B.; Novak, G.; Nutter, D.; O'Brient, R.; Ogburn, R. W.; Pascale, E.; Poidevin, F.; Rahlin, A. S.; Reintsema, C. D.; Ruhl, J. E.; Runyan, M. C.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shariff, J. A.; Soler, J. D.; Thomas, N. E.; Trangsrud, A.; Truch, M. D.; Tucker, C. E.; Tucker, G. S.; Tucker, R. S.; Turner, A. D.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Weber, A. C.; Wiebe, D. V.; Young, E. Y.

    2014-07-01

    We present the second generation BLASTbus electronics. The primary purposes of this system are detector readout, attitude control, and cryogenic housekeeping, for balloon-borne telescopes. Readout of neutron transmutation doped germanium (NTD-Ge) bolometers requires low noise and parallel acquisition of hundreds of analog signals. Controlling a telescope's attitude requires the capability to interface to a wide variety of sensors and motors, and to use them together in a fast, closed loop. To achieve these different goals, the BLASTbus system employs a flexible motherboard-daughterboard architecture. The programmable motherboard features a digital signal processor (DSP) and field-programmable gate array (FPGA), as well as slots for three daughterboards. The daughterboards provide the interface to the outside world, with versions for analog to digital conversion, and optoisolated digital input/output. With the versatility afforded by this design, the BLASTbus also finds uses in cryogenic, thermometry, and power systems. For accurate timing control to tie everything together, the system operates in a fully synchronous manner. BLASTbus electronics have been successfully deployed to the South Pole, and own on stratospheric balloons.

  14. Development of a new readout system for the near-infrared detector of HONIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ui, Takahiro; Sako, Shigeyuki; Yamashita, Takuya; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Kawabata, Koji S.; Nakaya, Hidehiko; Moritani, Yuki; Itoh, Ryosuke; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Urano, Takeshi; Ueno, Issei; Ohsugi, Takashi; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Nakao, Hikaru; Hashiba, Yasuhito

    2014-08-01

    We developed a new readout system for the near-infrared detector VIRGO-2K (2kx2k HgCdTe array) installed in the optical-infrared simultaneous camera, HONIR, for the 1.5 m Kanata telescope at Higashi-Hiroshima observatory. The main goal of this development is to read out one frame within ~ 1 second through 16 output readout mode of the detector, in order to reduce the overhead time per exposure. The system is based on a CCD controller, Kiso Array Controller (KAC). We redesigned the analog part of KAC to fit VIRGO-2K. We employed a fully differential input circuit and a third order Bessel low-pass filter for noise reduction and a constant current system to improve the linearity of the detector. We set the cutoff frequency of the Bessel low-pass filter at the readout clock rate (120 kHz). We also set the constant current at 200 μA according to the data sheet of VIRGO-2K. We tested the new readout system at room temperature and confirmed that the low-pass filter works well as designed. The fluctuation of the current level of the constant current system is less than 2% for the typical output voltage range of VIRGO-2K (3.2-4.4 V). We measured the readout noise caused by the new readout system (connected to cooled multiplexer) and found that it is 30-40 μV rms, being comparable to or slightly higher than the typical readout noise of VIRGO-2K, ˜ 37 μV rms.

  15. Prototype of readout electronics for the LHAASO KM2A electromagnetic particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang; Chang, Jing-Fan; Wang, Zheng; Fan, Lei

    2016-07-01

    The KM2A (one kilometer square extensive air shower array) is the largest detector array in the LHAASO (Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory) project. The KM2A consists of 5242 EDs (Electromagnetic particle Detectors) and 1221 MDs (Muon Detectors). The EDs are distributed and exposed in the wild. Two channels, anode and dynode, are employed for the PMT (photomultiplier tube) signal readout. The readout electronics designed in this paper aims at accurate charge and arrival time measurement of the PMT signals, which cover a large amplitude range from 20 P.E. (photoelectrons) to 2 × 105 P.E. By using a “trigger-less” architecture, we digitize signals close to the PMTs. All digitized data is transmitted to DAQ (Data Acquisition) via a simplified White Rabbit protocol. Compared with traditional high energy experiments, high precision of time measurement over such a large area and suppression of temperature effects in the wild become the key techniques. Experiments show that the design has fulfilled the requirements in this project. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375210) and the Knowledge Innovation Fund of IHEP, Beijing

  16. Development of an ASIC for the readout and control of near-infrared large array detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Dirk; Berge, Hans Kristian Otnes; Hasanbegovic, Amir; Altan, Mehmet A.; Najafiuchevler, Bahram; Azman, Suleyman; Talebi, Jahanzad; Olsen, Alf; Øya, Petter; Paahlsson, Philip; Gheorghe, Codin; Maehlum, Gunnar

    2014-07-01

    The article describes the near infrared readout and controller ASIC (NIRCA) developed by Integrated Detector Electronics AS (IDEAS). The project aims at future astronomical science and Earth observation missions, where the ASIC will be used with image sensors based on mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe, or MCT). NIRCA is designed to operate from cryogenic temperatures (77 K) to higher than room temperature (328 K) and in a high radiation environment (LET > 60 MeVcm2/mg). The ASIC connects to the readout integrated circuit (ROIC) and delivers fully digitized data via serial digital output. The ASIC contains an analogue front-end (AFE) with 4 analogue-to-digital converters (ADCs) and programmable gain amplifiers with offset adjustment. The ADCs have a differential input swing of +/-2 V, 12-bit resolution, and a maximum sample rate of 3 MSps. The ASIC contains a programmable sequencer (microcontroller) to generate up to 40 digital signals for the ROIC and to control the analogue front-end and DACs on the chip. The ASIC has two power supply voltage regulators that provide the ROIC with 1.8 V and 3.3 V, and programmable 10-bit DACs to generate 16 independent reference and bias voltages from 0.3 V to 3 V. In addition NIRCA allows one to read 8 external digital signals, and monitor external and internal analogue signals including onchip temperature. NIRCA can be programmed and controlled via SPI interface for all internal functions and allows data forwarding from and to the ROIC SPI interface.

  17. Development of superconducting contacts for the CRESST II 66-channel superconducting quantum interference device readout system.

    PubMed

    Majorovits, B; Henry, S; Kraus, H

    2007-07-01

    The CRESST experiment is designed to search for weakly interacting massive particle dark matter with cryogenic detectors. CRESST II will use up to 33 CaWO(4) crystals with a total mass of approximately 10 kg. These many detectors require a readout system based on 66-channel superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). In this article we report on the development of a modular superconducting connector for the 66-channel SQUID readout circuit. We show that the technique developed reliably produces superconducting contacts. PMID:17672757

  18. Development of superconducting contacts for the CRESST II 66-channel superconducting quantum interference device readout system

    SciTech Connect

    Majorovits, B.; Henry, S.; Kraus, H.

    2007-07-15

    The CRESST experiment is designed to search for weakly interacting massive particle dark matter with cryogenic detectors. CRESST II will use up to 33 CaWO{sub 4} crystals with a total mass of {approx}10 kg. These many detectors require a readout system based on 66-channel superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). In this article we report on the development of a modular superconducting connector for the 66-channel SQUID readout circuit. We show that the technique developed reliably produces superconducting contacts.

  19. Fabrication of Tunnel Junctions For Direct Detector Arrays With Single-Electron Transistor Readout Using Electron-Beam Lithography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, T. R.; Hsieh, W.-T.; Li, M. J.; Stahle, C. M.; Rhee, K. W.; Teufel, J.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper will describe the fabrication of small aluminum tunnel junctions for applications in astronomy. Antenna-coupled superconducting tunnel junctions with integrated single-electron transistor readout have the potential for photon-counting sensitivity at sub-millimeter wavelengths. The junctions for the detector and single-electron transistor can be made with electron-beam lithography and a standard self-aligned double-angle deposition process. However, high yield and uniformity of the junctions is required for large-format detector arrays. This paper will describe how measurement and modification of the sensitivity ratio in the resist bilayer was used to greatly improve the reliability of forming devices with uniform, sub-micron size, low-leakage junctions.

  20. Low-noise ultra-high-speed dc SQUID readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drung, Dietmar; Hinnrichs, Colmar; Barthelmess, Henry-Jobes

    2006-05-01

    User-friendly ultra-high-speed readout electronics for dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) are presented. To maximize the system bandwidth, the SQUID is directly read out without flux modulation. A composite preamplifier is used consisting of a slow dc amplifier in parallel with a fast ac amplifier. In this way, excellent dc precision and a high amplifier bandwidth of 50 MHz are achieved, simultaneously. A virtual 50 Ω amplifier input resistance with negligible excess noise is realized by active shunting, i.e., by applying feedback from preamplifier output to input via a high resistance. The white voltage and current noise levels are 0.33 nV Hz-1 and 2.6 pA Hz-1/2, respectively. The electronics is fully computer controlled via a microcontroller integrated into the flux-locked loop (FLL) board. Easy-to-use software makes the various electronic settings accessible. A wide bias voltage range of 1.3 mV enables the readout of series SQUID arrays. Furthermore, additional current sources allow the operation of two-stage SQUIDs or transition edge sensors. The electronics was tested using various SQUIDs with input inductances between 30 nH and 1.5 µH. Typically, the maximum FLL bandwidth was 20 MHz, which is close to the theoretical limit given by transmission line delay within the FLL. Slew rates of up to 4.6 Φ0 µs-1 were achieved with series SQUID arrays. Current noise levels as low as 0.47 pA Hz-1/2 and coupled energy sensitivities between 90 h and 500 h were measured at 4.2 K, where h is the Planck constant. The noise did not degrade when the system bandwidth was increased to the maximum value of about 20 MHz. With a two-stage set-up, intrinsic white energy sensitivities of 30 h and 2.3 h were measured at 4.2 and 0.3 K, respectively.

  1. Development of readout system for FE-I4 pixel module using SiTCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teoh, J. J.; Hanagaki, K.; Ikegami, Y.; Takubo, Y.; Terada, S.; Unno, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector will be replaced in the future High Luminosity-Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) upgrade to preserve or improve the detector performance at high luminosity environment. To meet the tight requirements of the upgrade, a new pixel Front-End (FE) Integrated Circuit (IC) called FE-I4 has been developed. We have then devised a readout system for the new FE IC. Our system incorporates Silicon Transmission Control Protocol (SiTCP) technology (Uchida, 2008 [1]) which utilizes the standard TCP/IP and UDP communication protocols. This technology allows direct data access and transfer between a readout hardware chain and PC via a high speed Ethernet. In addition, the communication protocols are small enough to be implemented in a single Field-Programable Gate Array (FPGA). Relying on this technology, we have been able to construct a very compact, versatile and fast readout system. We have developed a firmware and software together with the readout hardware chain. We also have established basic functionalities for reading out FE-I4.

  2. Ultra-low-drift and very fast dc SQUID readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oukhanski, N.; Stolz, R.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2006-06-01

    High-slew rate and thermo-stable readout electronics for dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) is presented. This electronics represents an optimum combination of the most important parameters for the SQUID-system user. In the new flux-locked loop (FLL) - unit design we have decreased a voltage white noise level down to the 0.32 nV/Hz{1/2}, with a flicker noise corner frequency of 0.1 Hz. By making use of electro-thermal feedback in the first stage amplifier, and multi-loop conventional feedback throughout the whole amplifier we have achieved a very low thermal drift <10 nV/K for T = 20 - 65 °C. FLL gain stability is improved down to 1% for the temperature range 10 - 60 °C and for 5 V (peak-peak) ± 30% of the power supplier voltage range. The maximum gain bandwidth product of the FLL-unit was increased 10 times up to 5 GHz. In turn, we could reach more than 10 Mphi0/s slew rate while using a conventional LTS SQUID (connected to the FLL by a 1.2 meterlength twisted pair), with a maximum voltage of the field-to-flux transfer function of >=60 µV (peak-peak). At the same time, we reduced by 40% the number of chips used in the FLL unit.

  3. Investigation of high sensitivity radio-frequency readout circuit based on AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Tan, Ren-Bing; Sun, Jian-Dong; Li, Xin-Xing; Zhou, Yu; Lü, Li; Qin, Hua

    2015-10-01

    An AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) device is prepared by using a semiconductor nanofabrication process. A reflective radio-frequency (RF) readout circuit is designed and the HEMT device is assembled in an RF circuit through a coplanar waveguide transmission line. A gate capacitor of the HEMT and a surface-mounted inductor on the transmission line are formed to generate LC resonance. By tuning the gate voltage Vg, the variations of gate capacitance and conductance of the HEMT are reflected sensitively from the resonance frequency and the magnitude of the RF reflection signal. The aim of the designed RF readout setup is to develop a highly sensitive HEMT-based detector. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61107093), the Suzhou Science and Technology Project, China (Grant No. ZXG2012024), and the Youth Innovation Promotion Association, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. 2012243).

  4. Electronic component design and testing for multielement IR arrays with CCD readout devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darchuk, Sergey D.; Derkach, Yurii P.; Kononenko, Yu. G.; Reva, Vladimir P.; Sizov, Fiodor F.; Tetyorkin, Vladimir V.

    1997-08-01

    P-channel silicon direct injection read-out devices with p- type buried channel CD multiplexers which consist of input circuits, shift register and output circuits were designed, fabricated and tested. Read-out devices were designed for using with IR p-n-photodiode linear arrays. The dynamical range of p-type read-out devices was estimated to be of the order of 60 dB at T equals 80 K. The two-phase p-channel CCD shift register was designed with 5 MHz clock frequency operation. Transfer efficiency without fat zero was 0.99985 at 1.0 MHz.

  5. Testing the GP-B telescope readout electronics on a flight quality telescope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Gwo, D.-H.; Bower, K. A.; Huff, L. W.; Kirschman, R. K.; Lipa, J. A.; Jhabvala, M.; Babu, S.; Das, N.

    1998-06-01

    Integrated photodiodes and silicon JFET preamps are used for the optical readout of the Gravity Probe B cryogenic star tracking telescope. The heated circuit assembly is mounted on a thermal isolator so that it can be heated to around 80K while the telescope remains at its operating temperature of 2.8K. The authors present test results of the readout with a flight quality telescope.

  6. Developing scintillation light readout simulation for the SBND experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Gamez, D.

    2016-01-01

    Detection of scintillation light can play several important roles in LArTPCs. Increased collection efficiency could result in the improvement of time, energy, and position resolution. The SBND collaboration is developing detailed MC simulations to study the performance of different types of light systems in the LArSoft framework. Due to the vast number of photons typically produced in neutrino physics events, a full optical simulation becomes extremely hard to run on reasonable time scales. I will describe how the SBND simulation tackles these problems and its current status for two of the light detection systems considered by SBND: (i) a traditional TPB-coated PMT based system and (ii) a system based on TPB-coated reflector foils to increase collection efficiency without increasing the number of photodetectors.

  7. Detection of single electrons by means of a Micromegas-covered MediPix2 pixel CMOS readout circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, M.; Chefdeville, M.; Colas, P.; Colijn, A. P.; Fornaini, A.; Giomataris, Y.; van der Graaf, H.; Heijne, E. H. M.; Kluit, P.; Llopart, X.; Schmitz, J.; Timmermans, J.; Visschers, J. L.

    2005-03-01

    A small drift chamber was read out by means of a MediPix2 readout chip as a direct anode. A Micromegas foil was placed 50 μm above the chip, and electron multiplication occurred in the gap. With a He/isobutane 80/20 mixture, gas multiplication factors up to tens of thousands were achieved, resulting in an efficiency for detecting single electrons of better than 90%. We recorded many frames containing 2D images with tracks from cosmic muons. Along these tracks, electron clusters were observed, as well as δ-rays.

  8. Development of a cylindrical tracking detector with multichannel scintillation fibers and pixelated photon detector readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akazawa, Y.; Miwa, K.; Honda, R.; Shiozaki, T.; Chiga, N.

    2015-07-01

    We are developing a cylindrical tracking detector for a Σp scattering experiment in J-PARC with scintillation fibers and the Pixelated Photon Detector (PPD) readout, which is called as cylindrical fiber tracker (CFT), in order to reconstruct trajectories of charged particles emitted inside CFT. CFT works not only as a tracking detector but also a particle identification detector from energy deposits. A prototype CFT consisting of two straight layers and one spiral layer was constructed. About 1100 scintillation fibers with a diameter of 0.75 mm (Kuraray SCSF-78 M) were used. Each fiber signal was read by Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC, HPK S10362-11-050P, 1×1 mm2, 400 pixels) fiber by fiber. MPPCs were handled with Extended Analogue Silicon Photomultipliers Integrated ReadOut Chip (EASIROC) boards, which were developed for the readout of a large number of MPPCs. The energy resolution of one layer was 28% for a 70 MeV proton where the energy deposit in fibers was 0.7 MeV.

  9. A 4 V, ns-range pulse generator for the test of Cherenkov Telescopes readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoranz, P.; Vegas, I.; Miranda, J. M.

    2010-08-01

    We present in this paper the design, fabrication and verification of a ns-range pulse generator based on a Step Recovery Diode (SRD). This device needs only a 5 V DC power supply, delivers 1 ns pulses with peak amplitudes in excess of 4 V and features state of the art jitter figures. In addition, the pulser contains a trigger channel. The long standing problem of the SRD simulation via circuital analysis is addressed. It is shown that the dynamic properties of the Step Recovery Diode can accurately be reproduced via a small signal circuital simulation for the rise times needed in a ns-range pulser. It is also demonstrated that strong inaccuracies in the pulse shape prediction are obtained if the wave propagation through the lines typically used in this type of circuits is simulated by a simple Transverse Electromagnetic Mode (TEM) line model. Instead, it is necessary to account for non-TEM effects. By means of broadband resistive power splitters and high dynamic range amplifiers, a prototype of 4 channels was also fabricated. This prototype is particularly useful for testing the readout electronics of Cherenkov Telescopes, but additional applications to other large-scale experiments are expected, any of those where calibration or verification with compact ns-range pulsers featuring low jitter, large dynamic ranges and multichannel operation is needed. In addition, the fabrication cost of this pulser is almost negligible as compared with bulky, commercially available waveform generators, which rarely deliver ns pulses in excess of 3 V. Furthermore, the small size of the pulser presented here and its low power consumption allow an easy integration into more complex systems.

  10. Precision muon tracking detectors and read-out electronics for operation at very high background rates at future colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortner, O.; Kroha, H.; Nowak, S.; Richter, R.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K.; Schwegler, Ph.

    2016-07-01

    The experience of the ATLAS MDT muon spectrometer shows that drift-tube chambers provide highly reliable precision muon tracking over large areas. The ATLAS muon chambers are exposed to unprecedentedly high background of photons and neutrons induced by the proton collisions. Still higher background rates are expected at future high-energy and high-luminosity colliders beyond HL-LHC. Therefore, drift-tube detectors with 15 mm tube diameter (30 mm in ATLAS), optimised for high rate operation, have been developed for such conditions. Several such full-scale sMDT chambers have been constructed with unprecedentedly high sense wire positioning accuracy of better than 10 μm. The chamber design and assembly methods have been optimised for large-scale production, reducing considerably cost and construction time while maintaining the high mechanical accuracy and reliability. Tests at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN showed that the rate capability of sMDT chambers is improved by more than an order of magnitude compared to the MDT chambers. By using read-out electronics optimised for high counting rates, the rate capability can be further increased.

  11. FERA readout system for APEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazes, S. B.; Perera, P. A. A.; Wolfs, F. L. H.

    1993-12-01

    A data acquisition system is described for processing energy and timing signals from large arrays of solid-state detectors and photomultiplier tubes. Signals are digitized using Fast Encoding and Readout ADCs (FERAs), and then downloaded to Data Stacks for subsequent readout via CAMAC. The acquisition electronics uses additional ECL modules to make logical decisions about data compression and synchronization. Three modes of readout are available, providing varying degrees of event compression. The system is characterized by a very short readout period, as well as the ease with which readout mode can be reconfigured. This FERA readout system is currently being used in the ATLAS Positron EXperiment (APEX) at Argonne National Laboratory.

  12. Front-end electronics development for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, M.

    1990-12-01

    This is a status report on electronics development undertaken by the Front-End Electronics Collaboration. The overall goal of the collaboration remains the development by 1992 of complete, architecturally compatible, front end electronic systems for calorimeter, wire drift chamber, and silicon strip readout. We report here a few highlights to give a brief overview of the work underway. Performance requirements and capabilities, selected architectures, circuit designs and test results are presented. 13 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Development of Readout Interconnections for the Si-W Calorimeter of SiD

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, M.; Fields, R.G.; Holbrook, B.; Lander, R.L.; Moskaleva, A.; Neher, C.; Pasner, J.; Tripathi, M.; Brau, J.E.; Frey, R.E.; Strom, D.; Breidenbach, M.; Freytag, D.; Haller, G.; Herbst, R.; Nelson, T.; Schier, S.; Schumm, B.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2012-09-14

    The SiD collaboration is developing a Si-W sampling electromagnetic calorimeter, with anticipated application for the International Linear Collider. Assembling the modules for such a detector will involve special bonding technologies for the interconnections, especially for attaching a silicon detector wafer to a flex cable readout bus. We review the interconnect technologies involved, including oxidation removal processes, pad surface preparation, solder ball selection and placement, and bond quality assurance. Our results show that solder ball bonding is a promising technique for the Si-W ECAL, and unresolved issues are being addressed.

  14. Single shot spin readout with a cryogenic high-electron-mobility transistor amplifier at sub-Kelvin temperatures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tracy, Lisa A.; Luhman, Dwight R.; Carr, Stephen M.; Bishop, Nathaniel C.; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.; Pluym, Tammy; Wendt, Joel R.; Lilly, Michael P.; Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2016-02-08

    We use a cryogenic high-electron-mobility transistor circuit to amplify the current from a single electron transistor, allowing for demonstration of single shot readout of an electron spin on a single P donor in Si with 100 kHz bandwidth and a signal to noise ratio of ~9. In order to reduce the impact of cable capacitance, the amplifier is located adjacent to the Si sample, at the mixing chamber stage of a dilution refrigerator. For a current gain of ~2.7 x 103 the power dissipation of the amplifier is 13 μW, the bandwidth is ~1.3 MHz, and for frequencies above 300more » kHz the current noise referred to input is ≤ 70 fA/√Hz. Furthermore, with this amplification scheme, we are able to observe coherent oscillations of a P donor electron spin in isotopically enriched 28Si with 96% visibility.« less

  15. Single shot spin readout using a cryogenic high-electron-mobility transistor amplifier at sub-Kelvin temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, L. A.; Luhman, D. R.; Carr, S. M.; Bishop, N. C.; Ten Eyck, G. A.; Pluym, T.; Wendt, J. R.; Lilly, M. P.; Carroll, M. S.

    2016-02-01

    We use a cryogenic high-electron-mobility transistor circuit to amplify the current from a single electron transistor, allowing for demonstration of single shot readout of an electron spin on a single P donor in Si with 100 kHz bandwidth and a signal to noise ratio of ˜9. In order to reduce the impact of cable capacitance, the amplifier is located adjacent to the Si sample, at the mixing chamber stage of a dilution refrigerator. For a current gain of ˜ 2.7 × 10 3 , the power dissipation of the amplifier is 13 μW, the bandwidth is ˜ 1.3 MHz, and for frequencies above 300 kHz the current noise referred to input is ≤ 70 fA/ √{ Hz } . With this amplification scheme, we are able to observe coherent oscillations of a P donor electron spin in isotopically enriched 28Si with 96% visibility.

  16. Development and simulation results of a sparsification and readout circuit for wide pixel matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielli, A.; Giorgi, F.; Morsani, F.; Villa, M.

    2011-06-01

    In future collider experiments, the increasing luminosity and centre of mass energy are rising challenging problems in the design of new inner tracking systems. In this context we develop high-efficiency readout architectures for large binary pixel matrices that are meant to cope with the high-stressing conditions foreseen in the innermost layers of a tracker [The SuperB Conceptual Design Report, INFN/AE-07/02, SLAC-R-856, LAL 07-15, Available online at: http://www.pi.infn.it/SuperB]. We model and design digital readout circuits to be integrated on VLSI ASICs. These architectures can be realized with different technology processes and sensors: they can be implemented on the same silicon sensor substrate of a CMOS MAPS devices (Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor), on the CMOS tier of a hybrid pixel sensor or in a 3D chip where the digital layer is stacked on the sensor and the analog layers [V. Re et al., Nuc. Instr. and Meth. in Phys. Res. A, doi:10.1016/j.nima.2010.05.039]. In the presented work, we consider a data-push architecture designed for a sensor matrix of an area of about 1.3 cm 2 with a pitch of 50 microns. The readout circuit tries to take great advantage of the high density of in-pixel digital logic allowed by vertical integration. We aim at sustaining a rate density of 100 Mtrack ṡ s -1 ṡ cm -2 with a temporal resolution below 1 μs. We show how this architecture can cope with these stressing conditions presenting the results of Monte Carlo simulations.

  17. High-speed, multi-channel detector readout electronics for fast radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hennig, Wolfgang

    2012-06-22

    In this project, we are developing a high speed digital spectrometer that a) captures detector waveforms at rates up to 500 MSPS b) has upgraded event data acquisition with additional data buffers for zero dead time operation c) moves energy calculations to the FPGA to increase spectrometer throughput in fast scintillator applications d) uses a streamlined architecture and high speed data interface for even faster readout to the host PC These features are in addition to the standard functions in our existing spectrometers such as digitization, programmable trigger and energy filters, pileup inspection, data acquisition with energy and time stamps, MCA histograms, and run statistics. In Phase I, we upgraded one of our existing spectrometer designs to demonstrate the key principle of fast waveform capture using a 500 MSPS, 12 bit ADC and a Xilinx Virtex-4 FPGA. This upgraded spectrometer, named P500, performed well in initial tests of energy resolution, pulse shape analysis, and timing measurements, thus achieving item (a) above. In Phase II, we are revising the P500 to build a commercial prototype with the improvements listed in items (b)-(d). As described in the previous report, two devices were built to pursue this goal, named the Pixie-500 and the Pixie-500 Express. The Pixie-500 has only minor improvements from the Phase I prototype and is intended as an early commercial product (its production and part of its development were funded outside the SBIR). It also allows testing of the ADC performance in real applications.The Pixie-500 Express (or Pixie-500e) includes all of the improvements (b)-(d). At the end of Phase II of the project, we have tested and debugged the hardware, firmware and software of the Pixie-500 Express prototype boards delivered 12/3/2010. This proved substantially more complex than anticipated. At the time of writing, all hardware bugs have been fixed, the PCI Express interface is working, the SDRAM has been successfully tested and the SHARC

  18. Front-End Electronics for the Array Readout of a Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector Towards Observation of Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishitsuka, H.; Ikeno, M.; Oguri, S.; Tajima, O.; Tomita, N.; Uchida, T.

    2016-07-01

    Precise measurements of polarization patterns in cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide deep knowledge about the begin of the Universe. The GroundBIRD experiment aims to measure the CMB polarization by using microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) arrays. The MKID is suited to multiplexing. One of our requirements is a MUX factor (the number of readout channels for a single wire pair) of at least 100. If we make frequency combs of the MKIDs with 2-MHz spacing, a bandwidth of 200 MHz satisfies 100 MUX. The analog electronics must consist of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC), digital-to-analog converter (DAC), and local oscillator. We developed our own analog electronics board " RHEA." Two outputs/inputs of DAC/ADC with a 200-MHz clock provide an effective bandwidth of 200 MHz. The RHEA allows us to measure both the amplitude and phase responses of each MKID simultaneously. These data are continuously sampled at a high rate (e.g., 1 kSPS) and with no dead time. We achieved 12 and 14 bits resolution for ADC and DAC, respectively. This corresponds to achieve that our electronics achieved low noise: 1/1000 compared with the detector noise. We also achieved low power consumption compared with that of other electronics development for other experiments. Another important feature is that the board is completely separated from the digital part. Each user can choose their preferred field-programmable array. With the combination of the Kintex-7 evaluation kit from Xilinx, we demonstrated readout of MKID response.

  19. Front-End Electronics for the Array Readout of a Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector Towards Observation of Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishitsuka, H.; Ikeno, M.; Oguri, S.; Tajima, O.; Tomita, N.; Uchida, T.

    2016-01-01

    Precise measurements of polarization patterns in cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide deep knowledge about the begin of the Universe. The GroundBIRD experiment aims to measure the CMB polarization by using microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) arrays. The MKID is suited to multiplexing. One of our requirements is a MUX factor (the number of readout channels for a single wire pair) of at least 100. If we make frequency combs of the MKIDs with 2-MHz spacing, a bandwidth of 200 MHz satisfies 100 MUX. The analog electronics must consist of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC), digital-to-analog converter (DAC), and local oscillator. We developed our own analog electronics board "RHEA." Two outputs/inputs of DAC/ADC with a 200-MHz clock provide an effective bandwidth of 200 MHz. The RHEA allows us to measure both the amplitude and phase responses of each MKID simultaneously. These data are continuously sampled at a high rate (e.g., 1 kSPS) and with no dead time. We achieved 12 and 14 bits resolution for ADC and DAC, respectively. This corresponds to achieve that our electronics achieved low noise: 1/1000 compared with the detector noise. We also achieved low power consumption compared with that of other electronics development for other experiments. Another important feature is that the board is completely separated from the digital part. Each user can choose their preferred field-programmable array. With the combination of the Kintex-7 evaluation kit from Xilinx, we demonstrated readout of MKID response.

  20. An open-source readout for MKIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ran; McHugh, Sean; Serfass, Bruno; Mazin, Benjamin A.; Merrill, A.; Golwala, Sunil R.; Downes, Thomas P.; Czakon, Nicole G.; Day, Peter K.; Gao, Jiansong; Glenn, Jason; Hollister, Matthew I.; Leduc, Henry G.; Maloney, Philip R.; Noroozian, Omid; Nguyen, Hien T.; Sayers, Jack; Schlaerth, James A.; Siegel, Seth; Vaillancourt, John E.; Vayonakis, Anastasios; Wilson, Philip R.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2010-07-01

    This paper will present the design, implementation, performance analysis of an open source readout system for arrays of microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKID) for mm/submm astronomy. The readout system will perform frequency domain multiplexed real-time complex microwave transmission measurements in order to monitor the instantaneous resonance frequency and dissipation of superconducting microresonators. Each readout unit will be able to cover up to 550 MHz bandwidth and readout 256 complex frequency channels simultaneously. The digital electronics include the customized DAC, ADC, IF system and the FPGA based signal processing hardware developed by CASPER group.1-7 The entire system is open sourced, and can be customized to meet challenging requirement in many applications: e.g. MKID, MSQUID etc.

  1. Cross strip anode readouts for microchannel plate detectors: developing flight qualified prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerga, John; Cooney, M.; Raffanti, R.; Varner, G.; Siegmund, O.; McPhate, J. B.; Tremsin, A.

    2014-01-01

    Photon counting microchannel plate (MCP) imagers have been the detector of choice for most UV astronomical missions over the last two decades (eg. EUVE, FUSE, COS on Hubble etc.). Over this duration, improvements in the MCP laboratory readout technology have resulted in better spatial resolution (x10), temporal resolution (x 1000) and output event rate (x100), all the while operating at lower gain (x 10) resulting in lower high voltage requirements and longer MCP lifetimes. One such technology is the parallel cross strip (PXS) readout. The PXS anode is a set of orthogonal conducting strips (80 x 80), typically spaced at a 635 micron pitch onto which charge clouds from MCP amplified events land. Each strip has its own charge sensitive amplifier that is sampled continuously by a dedicated analog to digital (ADC) converter at 50MHz. All of the 160 ADC digital output lines are fed into a field programmable gate array (FGPA) which can detect charge events landing on the strips, measure the peak amplitudes of those charge events and calculate their spatial centroid along with their time of arrival (X,Y,T). Laboratory versions of these electronics have demonstrated < 20 microns FWHM spatial resolution, count rates on the order of 2 MHz, and temporal resolution of ~ 1ns. In 2012 the our group at U.C. Berkeley, along with our partners at the U. Hawaii, received a Strategic Astrophysics Technology grant to raise the TRL of the PXS detector from 4 to 6 by replacing most of the 19" rack mounted, high powered electronics with application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) which will lower the power, mass and volume requirements of the PXS detector. We were also tasked to design and fabricate a "standard" 50mm square active area MCP detector incorporating these electronics that can be environmentally qualified for flight (temperature, vacuum, vibration). This detector design could then be modified for individual flight opportunities with a higher level of confidence than

  2. Radiation tolerance tests of SRAM-based FPGAs for the potential usage in the readout electronics for the LHCb experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Färber, C.; Uwer, U.; Wiedner, D.; Leverington, B.; Ekelhof, R.

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes radiation studies of a SRAM-based FPGA as a central component for a upgrade of the LHCb Outer Tracker front-end electronics to a readout frequency of 40 MHz. Two Arria GX FPGAs were irradiated with 20 MeV protons to radiation doses of up to 7 Mrad. During and between the irradiation periods the different FPGA currents, the package temperature, the firmware error rate, the PLL stability, and the stability of a 32 channel TDC implemented on the FPGA were monitored. Results on the radiation tolerance of the FPGA and the measured firmware error rates will be presented. The Arria GX FPGA fulfills the radiation tolerance required for the LHCb upgrade (30 krad) and an expected firmware error rate of roughly 10-6 Hz makes the chip a possible component for the upgraded front-end electronics.

  3. Development of low mass optical readout for high data bandwidth systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, D.; DeLurgio, P.; Drake, G.; Fernando, W.; Lopez, D.; Salvachua-Ferrando, B.; Stanek, R.

    2010-10-01

    At Argonne National Laboratory the High Energy Physics and Center for Nanoscale Materials Divisions are working on a project to develop a new generation of detector readout using high speed data transfer optical devices that can be implemented in particle physics or for long distances. Free-space communications devices offer the potential for reductions in mass, power, and cost of data paths for on-board trigger and readout of tracking detectors. The project involves three areas of study: light modulation, the design and construction of MEMS optical devices, and the control systems for maintaining precise laser light positioning. We demonstrate an optical link in air over one meter and with low error rate at 1 Gb/s. We demonstrate steering of an optical beam over a meter with a precision of 5 micrometers utilizing a MEMS mirror and reflected light in the feedback loop. For early testing, light modulation tests with a fiber link using Li-Niobate modulators and a data generation and error checking chip are done at 1 Gb/s. Many companies and universities are developing modulators which will be incorporated into CMOS chips. We are doing radiation hardness studies for one of the materials involved. Laser light will need to be steered on to and kept centered on the detector in the presence of thermal or mechanical motion, etc. This steering will be controlled by MEMS mirrors. Polycrystalline and crystalline silicon based mirror designs are being studied. We review the current status of the project and outline plans for the future development of the system.

  4. Development of noncryogenic cooled carbon nanotube-based infrared focal plane array with integrated readout circuitry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Ning; Lai, King Wai Chiu; Chen, Hongzhi; Chen, Liangliang; Fung, Carmen Kar Man

    2011-06-01

    Infrared (IR) detectors are enormously important for various applications including medical diagnosis, night vision etc. The current bottleneck of high-sensitive IR detectors is the requirement of cryogenic cooling to reduce the noise. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit low dark current which allows CNTs to work without cooling. This paper presents the development of noncryogenic cooled IR focal plane array (FPA) using CNTs. The FPA consists of an array of CNTbased IR detectors which are sensitive to IR signal at room temperature. The CNT-based detectors can be made by our nanomanufacturing process. And the sensitivity of the detectors at a special wavelength can be achieved by selecting and controlling the bandgap of CNTs during the process. Besides, a readout circuitry has been integrated with the FPA to retrieve signals from the detectors for high throughput applications.

  5. Single-event upset tests on the readout electronics for the pixel detectors of the PANDA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, G.; Balossino, I.; Calvo, D.; De Mori, F.; De Remigis, P.; Filippi, A.; Marcello, S.; Mignone, M.; Wheadon, R.; Zotti, L.; Candelori, A.; Mattiazzo, S.; Silvestrin, L.

    2014-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) of the future PANDA experiment is the closest one to the interaction point and therefore the sensor and its electronics are the most exposed to radiation. The Total Ionizing Dose (TID) issue has been addressed by the use of a deep-submicron technology (CMOS 0.13 μm) for the readout ASICs. While this technology is very effective in reducing radiation induced oxide damage, it is also more sensitive to Single Event Upset (SEU) effects due to their extremely reduced dimensions. This problem has to be addressed at the circuit level and generally leads to an area penalty. Several techniques have been proposed in literature with different trade-off between level of protection and cell size. A subset of these techniques has been implemented in the PANDA SPD ToPiX readout ASIC prototypes, ranging from DICE cells to triple redundancy. Two prototypes have been tested with different ion beams at the INFN-LNL facility in order to measure the SEU cross section. Comparative results of the SEU test will be shown, together with an analysis of the SEU tolerance of the various protection schemes and future plans for the SEU protection strategy which will be implemented in the next ToPiX prototype.

  6. Amorphous silicon pixel radiation detectors and associated thin film transistor electronics readout

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Drewery, J.; Hong, W.S.; Jing, T.; Kaplan, S.N.; Lee, H.; Mireshghi, A.

    1994-10-01

    We describe the characteristics of thin (1 {mu}m) and thick (>30 {mu}m) hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n diodes which are optimized for detecting and recording the spatial distribution of charged particles, x-rays and {gamma} rays. For x-ray, {gamma} ray, and charged particle detection we can use thin p-i-n photosensitive diode arrays coupled to evaporated layers of suitable scintillators. For direct detection of charged particles with high resistance to radiation damage, we use the thick p-i-n diode arrays. Deposition techniques using helium dilution, which produce samples with low stress are described. Pixel arrays for flux exposures can be readout by transistor, single diode or two diode switches. Polysilicon charge sensitive pixel amplifiers for single event detection are described. Various applications in nuclear, particle physics, x-ray medical imaging, neutron crystallography, and radionuclide chromatography are discussed.

  7. The data acquisition system for a fixed target experiment at NICA complex at JINR and its connection to the ATLAS TileCal readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiwa, K. G.; Slepnev, I.; Bazylev, S.

    2015-10-01

    Today's large-scale science projects have always encountered challenges in processing large data flow from the experiments, the ATLAS detector records proton-proton collisions provided by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN every 50 ns which results in a total data flow of 10 Pb/s. These data must be reduced to the science data product for further analysis, thus a very fast decisions need to be executed, to modify this large amounts of data at high rates. The capabilities required to support this scale of data movement is development and improvement of high-throughput electronics. The upgraded LHC will provide collisions at rates that will be at least 10 times higher than those of today due to it's luminosity by 2022. This will require a complete redesign of the read-out electronics and Processing Units (PU) in the Tile-calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS experiment. A general purpose, high-throughput PU has been developed for the TileCal at CERN, by using several ARM-processors in cluster configuration. The PU is capable of handling large data throughput and apply advanced operations at high rates. This system has been proposed for the fixed target experiment at NICA complex to handle the first level processes and event building. The aim of this work is to have a look at the architecture of the data acquisition system (DAQ) of the fixed target experiment at the NICA complex at JINR, by compiling the data-flow requirements of all the subcomponents. Furthermore, the VME DAQ modules characteristics to control, triggering and data acquisition will be described in order to define the DAQ with maximum readout efficiency, no dead time and data selection and compression.

  8. Ultrafast soft x-ray two-dimensional plasma imaging system based on gas electron multiplier detector with pixel readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacella, D.; Pizzicaroli, G.; Gabellieri, L.; Leigheb, M.; Bellazzini, R.; Brez, A.; Gariano, G.; Latronico, L.; Lumb, N.; Spandre, G.; Massai, M. M.; Reale, S.

    2001-02-01

    In the present article a new diagnostic device in the soft x-ray range, for magnetic fusion plasmas, is proposed based on a gas electron multiplier detector with 2.5×2.5 cm active area, equipped with a true two-dimensional readout system. The readout printed circuit board, designed for these experiments, has 128 pads. Each pad is 2 mm square and covers a roughly circular area. The operational conditions of the detector are settled to work in the x-ray range 3-15 keV at very high counting rates, with a linear response up to 2 MHz/pixel. This limitation is due to the electronic dead time. Images of a wrench and two pinholes were done at rates of 2.5 MHz/pixel with a powerful x-ray laboratory source showing an excellent imaging capability. Finally preliminary measurements of x-ray emission from a magnetic fusion plasma were performed on the Frascati tokamak upgrade experiment. The system was able to image the plasma with a wide dynamic range (more than a factor of 100), with a sampling frequency of 20 kHz and with counting rates up to 4 MHz/pixel, following the changes of the x-ray plasma emissivity due to additional radio frequency heating. The spatial resolution and imaging properties of this detector have been studied in this work for conditions of high counting rates and high gain, with the detector fully illuminated by very intense x-ray sources (laboratory tube and tokamak plasma).

  9. Developing electronic textbooks

    SciTech Connect

    Zadoks, R.I.; Ratner, J.A.

    1996-03-01

    This paper discusses a new approach to the development of engineering education materials. The ``Electronic Textbook`` represents the logical progression of the printed textbook in the Electronic Age. The concept behind this approach is simple; to place all of the information contained in a textbook in electronic form. Currently, paper texts exist on the market with electronic supplements, however, this Electronic Textbook would include supplements fully integrated in the whole text. The computer hardware and software needed to make this advance possible have existed for nearly ten years, and they have been readily available to engineering educators and students for over three years. Computer based ``tools`` in engineering textbooks as are prevalent today range from computer styled algorithms and code snippets, to fully developed software applications with graphical user interfaces on floppy disks attached to the back covers of books. The next logical step in publishing is to dispense with the paper book entirely, by distributing textbooks via electronic media such as CD-ROM. Electronic Textbooks use the full range of multi-media technologies in the learning and teaching process including video clips, computer animations and fully functional numerical engines as integral parts of the textbook material. This is very appealing since interactive media provide teaching tools that appeal to divergent learning styles. The advantages of Electronic Textbooks lead to several challenges. Special attention must be paid to the development of user interfaces; navigation is of particular importance when non- linear exploration is encouraged. These issues are being addressed at the Sandia National Laboratories by an electronic documentation development team. This team includes experts in engineering, in human factors, and in computer hardware and software development. Guidelines for the development of electronic textbooks based on the experiences of this team are provided.

  10. Cryogenic readout electronics with silicon P-MOSFETS for the infrared astronomical satellite, ASTRO-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirao, T.; Hibi, Y.; Kawada, M.; Nagata, H.; Shibai, H.; Watabe, T.; Noda, M.; Nakagawa, T.

    We have successfully developed a low-power, low-noise silicon p-channel MOSFET working at 1.8 K. This MOSFET was produced by a standard 0.5μm BiCMOS process. From the typical current-voltage characteristics of this p-channel MOSFET at 1.8K, we obtained that the drain resistance r d is ˜2Mω, the transconductance g m is ˜35μS, and the input referred noise voltage is as low as ˜2μV/√Hz at 1Hz under low-drain current condition (˜1μA). No "kink"-like behavior was observed within the nominal operation range (-1.5Velectronics. The purpose of the present work is to develop the capacitive transimpedance amplifiers (CTIA) for the Far-infrared Surveyor (FIS) on board the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite, ASTRO-F. The cryogenic amplifier that is essential for CTIAs was successfully made by employing this p-channel MOSFET. The open-loop gain was ˜1000, and the power consumption was less than 10μW at 4.2K. We have finally demonstrated that the CTIA consisting of this cryogenic amplifier worked well at 4.2 K.

  11. Demountable readout technologies for optical image intensifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapington, J. S.; Howorth, J. R.; Milnes, J. S.

    2007-04-01

    We describe a generic microchannel plate intensifier design for use with a variety of demountable readout devices manufactured using standard multi-layer PCB techniques. We present results obtained using a 50 Ω multi-element design optimized for high speed operation and a four electrode multi-layer device developed from the wedge and strip anode with enhanced image resolution. The benefits of this intensifier design are discussed and a project to develop a detector system for bio-medical applications using a demountable readout device with integrated multi-channel ASIC-based electronics is announced.

  12. Highly sensitive hBN/graphene hot electron bolometers with a Johnson noise readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efetov, Dmitri; Gao, Yuanda; Walsh, Evan; Shiue, Ren-Jye; Grosso, Gabriele; Peng, Cheng; Hone, James; Fong, Kin Chun; Englund, Dirk

    Graphene has remarkable opto-electronic and thermo-electric properties that make it an exciting functional material for various photo-detection applications. In particular, owed to graphenes unique combination of an exceedingly low electronic heat capacity and a strongly suppressed electron-phonon thermal conductivity Gth, the electronic and phononic temperatures are highly decoupled allowing an operation principle as a hot electron bolometer (HEB). Here we demonstrate highly sensitive HEBs made of high quality hBN/graphene/hBN stacks and employ a direct electronic temperature read out scheme via Johnson noise thermometry (JNT). We perform combined pump-probe and JNT measurements to demonstrate strongly damped Ce and Gth in the ultra-low impurity σi = 109 cm-2 hBN/G/hBN stacks, which result in unprecedented photo-detection sensitivity and noise equivalent power for graphene HEBs.

  13. Ultrafast electronic readout of diamond nitrogen-vacancy centres coupled to graphene.

    PubMed

    Brenneis, Andreas; Gaudreau, Louis; Seifert, Max; Karl, Helmut; Brandt, Martin S; Huebl, Hans; Garrido, Jose A; Koppens, Frank H L; Holleitner, Alexander W

    2015-02-01

    Non-radiative transfer processes are often regarded as loss channels for an optical emitter because they are inherently difficult to access experimentally. Recently, it has been shown that emitters, such as fluorophores and nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, can exhibit a strong non-radiative energy transfer to graphene. So far, the energy of the transferred electronic excitations has been considered to be lost within the electron bath of the graphene. Here we demonstrate that the transferred excitations can be read out by detecting corresponding currents with a picosecond time resolution. We detect electronically the spin of nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond and control the non-radiative transfer to graphene by electron spin resonance. Our results open the avenue for incorporating nitrogen-vacancy centres into ultrafast electronic circuits and for harvesting non-radiative transfer processes electronically. PMID:25437746

  14. Quantum logic readout and cooling of a single dark electron spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fazhan; Zhang, Qi; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor; Du, Jiangfeng; Reinhard, Friedemann; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2013-05-01

    We study a single dark N2 electron spin defect in diamond, which is magnetically coupled to a nearby nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center. We perform pulsed electron spin resonance on this single spin by mapping its state to the NV center spin and optically reading out the latter. Moreover, we show that the NV center's spin polarization can be transferred to the electron spin by combined two decoupling control-NOT gates. These two results allow us to extend the NV center's two key properties—optical spin polarization and detection—to any electron spin in its vicinity. This enables dark electron spins to be used as local quantum registers and engineerable memories.

  15. A high performance Front End Electronics for drift chamber readout in MEG experiment upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarello, G.; Chiri, C.; Corvaglia, A.; Grancagnolo, F.; Panareo, M.; Pepino, A.; Pinto, C.; Tassielli, G.

    2016-07-01

    Front End (FE) Electronics plays an essential role in Drift Chambers (DC) for time resolution and, therefore, spatial resolution. The use of cluster timing techniques, by measuring the timing of all the individual ionization clusters after the first one, may enable to reach resolutions even below 100 μm in the measurement of the impact parameter. To this purpose, a Front End Electronics with a wide bandwidth and low noise is mandatory in order to acquire and amplify the drift chamber signals.

  16. Inexpensive read-out for coincident electron spectroscopy with a transmission electron microscope at nanometer scale using micro channel plates and multistrip anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollander, R. W.; Bom, V. R.; van Eijk, C. W. E.; Faber, J. S.; Hoevers, H.; Kruit, P.

    1994-09-01

    The elemental composition of a sample at nanometer scale is determined by measurement of the characteristic energy of Auger electrons, emitted in coincidence with incoming primary electrons from a microbeam in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). Single electrons are detected with position sensitive detectors, consisting of MicroChannel Plates (MCP) and MultiStrip Anodes (MSA), one for the energy of the Auger electrons (Auger-detector) and one for the energy loss of primary electrons (EELS-detector). The MSAs are sensed with LeCroy 2735DC preamplifiers. The fast readout is based on LeCroy's PCOS III system. On the detection of a coincidence (Event) energy data of Auger and EELS are combined with timing data to an Event word. Event words are stored in list mode in a VME memory module. Blocks of Event words are scanned by transputers in VME and two-dimensional energy histograms are filled using the timing information to obtain a maximal true/accidental ratio. The resulting histograms are stored on disk of a PC-386, which also controls data taking. The system is designed to handle 10 5 Events per second, 90% of which are accidental. In the histograms the "true" to "accidental" ratio will be 5. The dead time is 15%.

  17. Development of a dedicated readout ASIC for TPC based X-ray polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongyan; Deng, Zhi; Li, Hong; Liu, Yinong; Feng, Hua

    2016-07-01

    X-ray polarimetry with time projection chambers was firstly proposed by JK Black in 2007 and has been greatly developed since then. It measured two dimensional photoelectron tracks with one dimensional strip and the other dimension was estimated by the drift time from the signal waveforms. A readout ASIC, APV25, originally developed for CMS silicon trackers was used and has shown some limitations such as waveform sampling depth. A dedicated ASIC was developed for TPC based X-ray polarimeters in this paper. It integrated 32 channel circuits and each channel consisted of an analog front-end and a waveform sampler based on switched capacitor array. The analog front-end has a charge sensitive preamplifier with a gain of 25 mV/fC, a CR-RC shaper with a peaking time of 25 ns, a baseline holder and a discriminator for self-triggering. The SCA has a buffer latency of 3.2 μs with 64 cells operating at 20 MSPS. The ASIC was fabricated in a 0.18 μm CMOS process. The equivalent noise charge (ENC) of the analog front-end was measured to be 274.8 e+34.6 e/pF. The effective resolution of the SCA was 8.8 bits at sampling rate up to 50 MSPS. The total power consumption was 2.8 mW per channel. The ASIC was also tested with real TPC detectors and two dimensional photoelectron tracks have been successfully acquired. More tests and analysis on the sensitivity to the polarimetry are undergoing and will be presented in this paper.

  18. Frequency division multiplexed readout of TES detectors with baseband feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Hartog, R.; Audley, M. D.; Beyer, J.; Bruijn, M. P.; de Korte, P.; Gottardi, L.; Hijmering, R.; Jackson, B.; Nieuwenhuizen, A.; van der Kuur, J.; van Leeuwen, B.-J.; Van Loon, D.

    2012-09-01

    SRON is developing an electronic system for the multiplexed read-out of an array of transition edge sensors (TES) by combining the techniques of frequency domain multiplexing (FDM) with base-band feedback (BBFB). The astronomical applications are the read-out of soft X-ray microcalorimeters and the far-infrared bolometers for the SAFARI instrument on the Japanese mission SPICA. In this paper we derive the requirements for the read-out system regarding noise and dynamic range in the context of the SAFARI instrument, and demonstrate that the current experimental prototype is capable of simultaneously locking 57 channels and complies with these requirements.

  19. 3-D readout-electronics packaging for high-bandwidth massively paralleled imager

    DOEpatents

    Kwiatkowski, Kris; Lyke, James

    2007-12-18

    Dense, massively parallel signal processing electronics are co-packaged behind associated sensor pixels. Microchips containing a linear or bilinear arrangement of photo-sensors, together with associated complex electronics, are integrated into a simple 3-D structure (a "mirror cube"). An array of photo-sensitive cells are disposed on a stacked CMOS chip's surface at a 45.degree. angle from light reflecting mirror surfaces formed on a neighboring CMOS chip surface. Image processing electronics are held within the stacked CMOS chip layers. Electrical connections couple each of said stacked CMOS chip layers and a distribution grid, the connections for distributing power and signals to components associated with each stacked CSMO chip layer.

  20. Development of a fast read-out system of a single photon counting detector for mammography with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, F. C.; Rigon, L.; Longo, R.; Arfelli, F.; Bergamaschi, A.; Chen, R. C.; Dreossi, D.; Schmitt, B.; Vallazza, E.; Castelli, E.

    2011-12-01

    A single-photon counting detector read-out system for mammography with synchrotron radiation has been developed with the aim to meet the needs of the mammographic imaging station of the SYRMEP beamline at ELETTRA. The system called PICASSO (Phase Imaging for Clinical Application with Silicon detector and Synchrotron radiatiOn) is a modular detector that implements a read-out system with MYTHEN II ASICs, an embedded Linux-based controller board and a Scientific Linux acquisition workstation. The system architecture and characteristics are herein presented. The system was tested at the SYRMEP beamline and achieved a frame rate of 33 Hz for 8448 channels at 24-bit dynamic range, and it is capable of continuously acquiring up to 2000 frames. Standard mammographic phantoms were imaged and good quality images were obtained at doses comparable with what is delivered in conventional full field mammographic systems.

  1. A fast and flexible multichannel electron detector with parallel readout for photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, P. P.; Clague, N. J.; Kirkman, I. W.; Quinn, F. M.; Hicks, P. J.

    1997-02-01

    To satisfy end user requirements for higher throughput and reliability in photoelectron spectroscopy, a new multichannel electron detector with discrete electronics has been designed and commissioned at Daresbury Laboratory. Count rate performance has been enhanced by the use of low resistance microchannel plates which amplify the electron pulses incident on the anode array. The low resistance microchannel plates are linear to 2.5 × 10 4 s -1 mm -2 for a bias voltage of 900 V per plate, providing more than an order of magnitude improvement in count rate performance over high resistance microchannel plates, microchannel plate outgassing in the ultra-high vacuum environment limits the scale of this improvement. A novel anode design maximizes the collection efficiency, while minimising crosstalk between channels (< 0.6% after discrimination) and provides up to 40 parallel channels on a 1 mm pitch. The collection efficiency is increased from 50% to 70% (for the present geometry) by applying a 50 V bias between the guard rail and electrodes on the anode. Each data collection channel comprises a fast current amplifier and discriminator, capable of a throughput of 2.5 × 10 7 s -1, and a 24 bit scaler. The integral non-linearity for flat-field illumination is better than 10% with no correction. The fast multichannel detection system gives a throughput enhancement of 10-20 on single-channel detection systems. It has also proved to be significantly better than previous multichannel detection systems with discrete electronics due to its high throughput, modular design and flexible structure.

  2. Frequency-domain multiplex with eight-input SQUID and readout electronics over 1 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masui, K.; Takei, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Kimura, S.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.

    2006-04-01

    In a magnetic summation method, TES and SQUID driving circuits are isolated and thus small crosstalk and stray impedance are expected. Since a FLL circuit with a large bandwidth and a small noise level is required for a SQUID, we designed and produced an electronics to meet our design of multiplexing with an 8-input SQUID. The FLL circuit achieved an open loop-gain bandwidth product of 8 MHz with 1 m wire length, which is enough for a TES to be operated with a bias current of 70 μA, and a noise level of 30 pA/√{Hz}.

  3. Development of a beam test telescope based on the Alibava readout system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco-Hernández, R.

    2011-01-01

    A telescope for a beam test have been developed as a result of a collaboration among the University of Liverpool, Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica (CNM) of Barcelona and Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC) of Valencia. This system is intended to carry out both analogue charge collection and spatial resolution measurements with different types of microstrip or pixel silicon detectors in a beam test environment. The telescope has four XY measurement as well as trigger planes (XYT board) and it can accommodate up to twelve devices under test (DUT board). The DUT board uses two Beetle ASICs for the readout of chilled silicon detectors. The board could operate in a self-triggering mode. The board features a temperature sensor and it can be mounted on a rotary stage. A peltier element is used for cooling the DUT. Each XYT board measures the track space points using two silicon strip detectors connected to two Beetle ASICs. It can also trigger on the particle tracks in the beam test. The board includes a CPLD which allows for the synchronization of the trigger signal to a common clock frequency, delaying and implementing coincidence with other XYT boards. An Alibava mother board is used to read out and to control each XYT/DUT board from a common trigger signal and a common clock signal. The Alibava board has a TDC on board to have a time stamp of each trigger. The data collected by each Alibava board is sent to a master card by means of a local data/address bus following a custom digital protocol. The master board distributes the trigger, clock and reset signals. It also merges the data streams from up to sixteen Alibava boards. The board has also a test channel for testing in a standard mode a XYT or DUT board. This board is implemented with a Xilinx development board and a custom patch board. The master board is connected with the DAQ software via 100M Ethernet. Track based alignment software has also been developed for the data obtained with the DAQ software.

  4. Study and optimization of the spatial resolution for detectors with binary readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonamine, R.; Maerschalk, T.; Lentdecker, G. De

    2016-09-01

    Using simulations and analytical approaches, we have studied single hit resolutions obtained with a binary readout, which is often proposed for high granularity detectors to reduce the generated data volume. Our simulations considering several parameters (e.g. strip pitch) show that the detector geometry and an electronics parameter of the binary readout chips could be optimized for binary readout to offer an equivalent spatial resolution to the one with an analog readout. To understand the behavior as a function of simulation parameters, we developed analytical models that reproduce simulation results with a few parameters. The models can be used to optimize detector designs and operation conditions with regard to the spatial resolution.

  5. Microwave multiplex readout for superconducting sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferri, E.; Becker, D.; Bennett, D.; Faverzani, M.; Fowler, J.; Gard, J.; Giachero, A.; Hays-Wehle, J.; Hilton, G.; Maino, M.; Mates, J.; Puiu, A.; Nucciotti, A.; Reintsema, C.; Schmidt, D.; Swetz, D.; Ullom, J.; Vale, L.

    2016-07-01

    The absolute neutrino mass scale is still an outstanding challenge in both particle physics and cosmology. The calorimetric measurement of the energy released in a nuclear beta decay is a powerful tool to determine the effective electron-neutrino mass. In the last years, the progress on low temperature detector technologies has allowed to design large scale experiments aiming at pushing down the sensitivity on the neutrino mass below 1 eV. Even with outstanding performances in both energy (~ eV on keV) and time resolution (~ 1 μs) on the single channel, a large number of detectors working in parallel is required to reach a sub-eV sensitivity. Microwave frequency domain readout is the best available technique to readout large array of low temperature detectors, such as Transition Edge Sensors (TESs) or Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs). In this way a multiplex factor of the order of thousands can be reached, limited only by the bandwidth of the available commercial fast digitizers. This microwave multiplexing system will be used to readout the HOLMES detectors, an array of 1000 microcalorimeters based on TES sensors in which the 163Ho will be implanted. HOLMES is a new experiment for measuring the electron neutrino mass by means of the electron capture (EC) decay of 163Ho. We present here the microwave frequency multiplex which will be used in the HOLMES experiment and the microwave frequency multiplex used to readout the MKID detectors developed in Milan as well.

  6. A low-noise low-power readout electronics circuit at 4 K in standard CMOS technology for PACS/Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merken, Patrick; Creten, Ybe; Putzeys, Jan; Souverijns, Tim; Van Hoof, Chris

    2004-10-01

    IMEC has designed, in the framework of the PACS project (for the European Herschel Space Observatory) the Cold Readout Electronics (CRE) for the Ge:Ga far-infrared detector array. Key specifications for the CRE were high linearity (3 %), low power consumption (80 μW for an 18 channel array), and very low noise (200 e-) at an operating temperature of 4.2 K (LHT - Liquid Helium Temperature). IMEC has implemented this circuit in a standard CMOS technology (AMIS 0.7 μm), which guarantees high production yield and uniformity, relatively easy availability of the technology and portability of the design. However, the drawback of this approach is the anomalous behavior of CMOS transistors at temperatures below 30-40K, known as kink and hysteresis effects and under certain conditions the presence of excess noise. These cryogenic phenomena disturb the normal functionality of commonly used circuits or building blocks like buffer amplifiers and opamps. We were able to overcome these problems and developed a library of digital and analog building blocks based on the modeling of cryogenic behavior, and on adapted design and layout techniques. These techniques have been validated in an automated cryogenic test set-ups developed at IMEC. We will present here in detail the full design of the 18 channel CRE circuit, its interface with the Ge:Ga sensor, and its electrical performance and demonstrate that all major specifications at 4.2 K were met. Future designs and implementations will be equally presented.

  7. Characterisation of an electron collecting CdTe strip sensor using the MYTHEN readout chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbracht-Leong, S.; Bergamaschi, A.; Greiffenberg, D.; Peake, D.; Rassool, R.; Schmitt, B.; Toyokawa, H.; Sobbott, B.

    2015-01-01

    MYTHEN is a single photon counting hybrid strip X-ray detector that has found application in x-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) experiments at synchrotrons worldwide. Originally designed to operate with hole collecting silicon sensors, MYTHEN is suited for detecting X-rays above 5 keV, however many PD beamlines have been designed for energies above 50 keV where silicon sensors have an efficiency of only few percent. In order to adapt MYTHEN to meet these energies the absorption efficiency of the sensor must be substantially increased. Cadmium-Telluride (CdTe) has an absorption efficiency approximately 30 times that of silicon at 50 keV, and is therefore a very promising replacement candidate for silicon. Furthermore, the large dynamic range of the pre-amplifier of MYTHEN and its double polarity capability has enabled the characterisation of an electron collecting Schottky type CdTe sensor. A CdTe MYTHEN system has undergone a series of characterisation experiments including stress test of bias and radiation induced polarizations. The performance of this system will be presented and discussed.

  8. Advances in Discrete GaAs JFETs and Simple Amplifiers for Deep Cryogenic Readouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, T. J.; Fitzsimmons, M.

    1998-01-01

    The progress of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in developing gallium arsenide junction field-effect transistors (GaAs JFETs) for application in infrared readout electronics operating below 10 Kelvin is discussed.

  9. Measurement of MKID Performance with High-Speed and Wide-Band Readout System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatsu, Kenichi; Naruse, M.; Nitta, T.; Sekine, M.; Sekiguchi, S.; Sekimoto, Y.; Noguchi, T.; Uzawa, Y.; Matsuo, H.; Kiuchi, H.

    2014-08-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) are being developed at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan to enable precise measurements of the cosmic microwave background. One of the features of MKIDs is scalability using a frequency-division multiplexing (FDMUX) readout scheme. A digital fast fourier transform spectrometer (FFTS) is a good way to read out a number of resonance frequencies simultaneously and fully utilize the advantage of FDMUX of MKIDs. We have developed FFTS readout electronics using an ADC/DAC with 1 Gsps (sample per second) sampling rate and 270 MHz bandwidth. We measured the noise characteristics of a single MKID in the frequency range of 60 Hz-30 kHz with this readout system, and found the noise was almost equivalent to the noise measured by ordinary analog IQ down-converter readout. This indicates our FFTS electronics do not add any additional noise to the MKID readout system over the frequency range.

  10. Development and experimental study of the readout ASIC for muon chambers of the CBM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkin, E.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanov, P.; Khanzadeev, A.; Malankin, E.; Normanov, D.; Roshchin, E.; Samsonov, V.; Shumikhin, V.; Voronin, A.

    2016-01-01

    The measurement results of the front-end ASIC for the GEM detector read-out are presented. The MUCH ASIC v2 was designed and prototyped via Europractice by means of the 0.18 um CMOS MMRF process of UMC (Taiwan). The parameters of the analog channels, including the CSA, fast and slow shapers, discriminators, were measured. The channels provide a sufficient dynamic range of 100 fC, low power consumption of 10 mW per channel and ENC of 1550 el at a 50 pF detector capacitance.

  11. Development of the read-out ASIC for muon chambers of the CBM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkin, E.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanov, P.; Malankin, E.; Normanov, D.; Osipov, D.; Samsonov, V.; Shumikhin, V.; Voronin, A.

    2015-04-01

    A front-end ASIC for GEM detectors readout in the CBM experiment is presented. The design has the following features: dynamic range of 100 fC, channel hit rate of 2 MHz, ENC of 1000 e- at 50 pF, power comsumption of 10 mW per channel, 6 bit SAR ADC. The chip includes 8 analog processing chains, each consisting of preamplifier, two shapers (fast and slow), differential comparator and an area efficient 6 bit SAR ADC with 1.2 mW power consunption at 50 Msps. The chip also includes the threshold DAC and the digital part.

  12. Development of a Broadband NbTiN Traveling Wave Parametric Amplifier for MKID Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockstiegel, C.; Gao, J.; Vissers, M. R.; Sandberg, M.; Chaudhuri, S.; Sanders, A.; Vale, L. R.; Irwin, K. D.; Pappas, D. P.

    2014-08-01

    The sensitivity of microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) using dissipation readout is limited by the noise temperature of the cryogenic amplifier, usually a HEMT with 5 K. A lower noise amplifier is required to improve NEP and reach the photon noise limit at millimeter wavelengths. Eom et al. have proposed a kinetic inductance traveling wave (KIT) parametric amplifier (also called the dispersion-engineered travelling wave kinetic inductance parametric amplifier) that utilizes the nonlinearity with very low dissipation of NbTiN. This amplifier has the promise to achieve quantum limited noise, broad bandwidth, and high dynamic range, all of which are required for ideal MKID dissipation readout. We have designed a KIT amplifier which consists of a 2.2 m long coplanar waveguide transmission line fabricated in a double spiral format, with periodic loadings and impedance transformers at the input/output ports on a 2 by 2 cm Si chip. The design was fabricated with 20 nm NbTiN films. The device has shown over 10 dB of gain from 4 to 11 GHz. We have found the maximum gain is limited by abrupt breakdown at defects in the transmission line in the devices. By cascading two devices, more than 20 dB of gain was achieved from 4.5 to 12.5 GHz, with a peak of 27 dB.

  13. The GBT-based readout concept for the silicon tracking system of the CBM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Jörg; Müller, Walter F. J.; Schmidt, Christian J.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the readout concept for the Silicon Tracking System (STS) of the CBM experiment at FAIR, which is designed to handle interaction rates up to 10 MHz with hundreds of tracks in fixed target heavy ion collisions of up to 35 AGeV. For data readout from the frontend electronics located close to the silicon strip sensors, the radiation tolerant Gigabit Transceiver ASICs (GBTx) and Versatile Link optical modules developed at CERN are used. The usage of these devices in the STS readout and the readout concept from the frontend electronics to the GBT based STS readout board (ROB) are detailed. Special emphasis is put on the implementation of the interface between the frontend boards (FEBs) and the ROB layer.

  14. Development of an Optical Read-Out System for the LISA/NGO Gravitational Reference Sensor: A Status Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fiore, L.; De Rosa, R.; Garufi, F.; Grado, A.; Milano, L.; Spagnuolo, V.; Russano, G.

    2013-01-01

    The LISA group in Napoli is working on the development of an Optical Read-Out (ORO) system, based on optical levers and position sensitive detectors, for the LISA gravitational reference sensor. ORO is not meant as an alternative, but as an addition, to capacitive readout, that is the reference solution for LISA/NGO and will be tested on flight by LISA-Pathfinder. The main goal is the introduction of some redundancy with consequent mission risk mitigation. Furthermore, the ORO system is more sensitive than the capacitive one and its usage would allow a significant relaxation of the specifications on cross-couplings in the drag free control loops. The reliability of the proposed ORO device and the fulfilment of the sensitivity requirements have been already demonstrated in bench-top measurements and tests with the four mass torsion pendulum developed in Trento as a ground testing facility for LISA-Pathfinder and LISA hardware. In this paper we report on the present status of this activity presenting the last results and perspectives on some relevant aspects. 1) System design, measured sensitivity and noise characterization. 2) Possible layouts for integration in LISA/NGO and bench-top tests on real scale prototypes. 3) Search for space compatible components and preliminary tests. We will also discuss next steps in view of a possible application in LISA/NGO.

  15. Readout of the upgraded ALICE-ITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepankiewicz, A.

    2016-07-01

    The ALICE experiment will undergo a major upgrade during the second long shutdown of the CERN LHC. As part of this program, the present Inner Tracking System (ITS), which employs different layers of hybrid pixels, silicon drift and strip detectors, will be replaced by a completely new tracker composed of seven layers of monolithic active pixel sensors. The upgraded ITS will have more than twelve billion pixels in total, producing 300 Gbit/s of data when tracking 50 kHz Pb-Pb events. Two families of pixel chips realized with the TowerJazz CMOS imaging process have been developed as candidate sensors: the ALPIDE, which uses a proprietary readout and sparsification mechanism and the MISTRAL-O, based on a proven rolling shutter architecture. Both chips can operate in continuous mode, with the ALPIDE also supporting triggered operations. As the communication IP blocks are shared among the two chip families, it has been possible to develop a common Readout Electronics. All the sensor components (analog stages, state machines, buffers, FIFOs, etc.) have been modelled in a system level simulation, which has been extensively used to optimize both the sensor and the whole readout chain design in an iterative process. This contribution covers the progress of the R&D efforts and the overall expected performance of the ALICE-ITS readout system.

  16. A readout for large arrays of microwave kinetic inductance detectors.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Sean; Mazin, Benjamin A; Serfass, Bruno; Meeker, Seth; O'Brien, Kieran; Duan, Ran; Raffanti, Rick; Werthimer, Dan

    2012-04-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) are superconducting detectors capable of counting single photons and measuring their energy in the UV, optical, and near-IR. MKIDs feature intrinsic frequency domain multiplexing (FDM) at microwave frequencies, allowing the construction and readout of large arrays. Due to the microwave FDM, MKIDs do not require the complex cryogenic multiplexing electronics used for similar detectors, such as transition edge sensors, but instead transfer this complexity to room temperature electronics where they present a formidable signal processing challenge. In this paper, we describe the first successful effort to build a readout for a photon counting optical/near-IR astronomical instrument, the ARray Camera for Optical to Near-infrared Spectrophotometry. This readout is based on open source hardware developed by the Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research. Designed principally for radio telescope backends, it is flexible enough to be used for a variety of signal processing applications. PMID:22559560

  17. Development and tests of an anode readout TPC with high track separability for large solid angle relativistic ion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenbaum, S.J.; Foley, K.J.; Eiseman, S.E.; Etkin, A.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.; Chan, C.; Kramer, M.A.; Hallman, T.J.; Madansky, L.; Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Clement, J.M.; Corcoran, M.D.; Kruk, J.W.; Miettinen, H.E.; Mutchler, G.S.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Nessi, M.; Phillips, G.C.; Roberts, J.B.

    1988-07-18

    We have developed, constructed and tested an anode readout TPC with high track separability which is suitable for large solid angle relativistic ion experiments. The readout via rows of short anode wires parallel to the beam has been found in tests to allow two-track separability of approx.2-3 mm. The efficiency of track reconstruction for events from a target, detected inside the MPS 5 KG magnet, is estimated to be >90% for events made by incident protons and pions. 15 GeV/c x A Si ion beams at a rate of approx.25 K per AGS pulse were permitted to course through the chamber and did not lead to any problems. When the gain was reduced to simulate the total output of a minimum ionizing particle, many Si ion tracks were also detected simultaneously with high efficiency. The resolution along the drift direction (parallel to the MPS magnetic field and perpendicular to the beam direction) was <1 mm and the resolution along the other direction /perpendicular/ to the beam direction was <1 mm also. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  18. The electronics readout and data acquisition system of the KM3NeT neutrino telescope node

    SciTech Connect

    Real, Diego [IFIC, Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, C Collaboration: KM3NeT Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    The KM3NeT neutrino telescope will be composed by tens of thousands of glass spheres, called Digital Optical Module (DOM), each of them containing 31 PMTs of small photocathode area (3'). The readout and data acquisition system of KM3NeT have to collect, treat and send to shore, in an economic way, the enormous amount of data produced by the photomultipliers and at the same time to provide time synchronization between each DOM at the level of 1 ns. It is described in the present article the Central Logic Board, that integrates the Time to Digital Converters and the White Rabbit protocol used for the DOM synchronization in a transparent way, the Power Board used in the DOM, the PMT base to readout the photomultipliers and the respective collecting boards, the so called Octopus Board.

  19. PANDA straw tube detectors and readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzempek, P.

    2016-07-01

    PANDA is a detector under construction dedicated to studies of production and interaction of particles in the charmonium mass range using antiproton beams in the momentum range of 1.5 - 15 GeV/c at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. PANDA consists of two spectrometers: a Target Spectrometer with a superconducting solenoid and a Forward Spectrometer using a large dipole magnet and covering the most forward angles (Θ < 10 °). In both spectrometers, the particle's trajectories in the magnetic field are measured using self-supporting straw tube detectors. The expected high count rates, reaching up to 1 MHz/straw, are one of the main challenges for the detectors and associated readout electronics. The paper presents the readout chain of the tracking system and the results of tests performed with realistic prototype setups. The readout chain consists of a newly developed ASIC chip (PASTTREC < PANDASTTReadoutChip >) with amplification, signal shaping, tail cancellation, discriminator stages and Time Readout Boards as digitizer boards.

  20. Developing a Quantum Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohstall, Christoph; Klopfer, Brannon; Francis, Josh; Skulason, Gunnar; Juffmann, Thomas; Kasevich, Mark; QEM Team

    2014-03-01

    We develop a new electron microscope based on the interaction-free measurement principle. Such a Quantum Electron Microscope (QEM) may enable imaging of biological samples with radiation doses so small that they are non-lethal. The realization of the QEM will require precise control over the quantum motion of free electrons. On this poster, we discuss our approach to build a QEM including the realization of an electron resonator and an electron amplitude beam-splitter. On top of the QEM application, these developments will advance the electron analogue to photon quantum optics. Funded by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

  1. Functional Description of Read-out Electronics for Time-Domain Multiplexed Bolometers for Millimeter and Sub-millimeter Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battistelli, E. S.; Amiri, M.; Burger, B.; Halpern, M.; Knotek, S.; Ellis, M.; Gao, X.; Kelly, D.; Macintosh, M.; Irwin, K.; Reintsema, C.

    2008-05-01

    We have developed multi-channel electronics (MCE) which work in concert with time-domain multiplexors developed at NIST, to control and read signals from large format bolometer arrays of superconducting transition edge sensors (TESs). These electronics were developed as part of the Submillimeter Common-User Bolometer Array-2 (SCUBA2 ) camera, but are now used in several other instruments. The main advantages of these electronics compared to earlier versions is that they are multi-channel, fully programmable, suited for remote operations and provide a clean geometry, with no electrical cabling outside of the Faraday cage formed by the cryostat and the electronics chassis. The MCE is used to determine the optimal operating points for the TES and the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) amplifiers autonomously. During observation, the MCE execute a running PID-servo and apply to each first stage SQUID a feedback signal necessary to keep the system in a linear regime at optimal gain. The feedback and error signals from a ˜1000-pixel array can be written to hard drive at up to 2 kHz.

  2. Development of a cryogenic GaAs AC-coupled CTIA readout for far-infrared and submillimeter detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Hirohisa; Kobayashi, Jun; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Hibi, Yasunori; Nakahashi, Misato; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Fujiwara, Mikio

    2008-07-01

    We have been developing cryogenic readout integrated circuits (ROICs) for sensitive detectors at far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths: The ROICs are constructed from SONY GaAs-JFETs, which have excellent performance even at less than 1 K. In addition, it is suitable device for ultra low background applications because of the extremely low gate leakage current. In the spring of 2008, we have designed and fabricated 4-ch AC-coupled capacitive transimpedance amplifiers and several basic digital circuits giving multiplex function for 32-element SIS photon detector array. The expected performance of the amplifier is as follows; open loop gain of >2000, power consumption <1.5 μW, and input referred noise ~ 1 μV/√Hz@1Hz. A summary of this 2008's experimental production and initial test results are presented in this paper.

  3. Development of two-dimensional multiwire-type neutron detector system with individual line readout and optical signal transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, K.; Nakamura, T.; Sakasai, K.; Soyama, K.; Hino, M.; Kitaguchi, M.; Yamagishi, H.

    2013-10-01

    A multiwire-type two-dimensional neutron detector system with a sensitive area of 128×128 mm2 is developed for use in the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. The system can achieve a short response time and high spatial resolution using the individual line readout method. Optical devices have been incorporated in the system for long-distance signal transmission and insulation between a detector head in the neutron shielding and signal processing circuits in the data acquisition room. The detector system exhibits a pulse-pair resolution of 1 μs, an average spatial resolution of less than 2 mm full width at half-maximum in the sensitive region, and a two-dimensional homogeneity of 8.3% in all pixels.

  4. Development of the analog ASIC for multi-channel readout X-ray CCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Daisuke; Idehara, Toshihiro; Anabuki, Naohisa; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Doty, John P.; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Katayama, Haruyoshi; Kitamura, Hisashi; Uchihori, Yukio

    2011-03-01

    We report on the performance of an analog application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) developed aiming for the front-end electronics of the X-ray CCD camera system onboard the next X-ray astronomical satellite, ASTRO-H. It has four identical channels that simultaneously process the CCD signals. Distinctive capability of analog-to-digital conversion enables us to construct a CCD camera body that outputs only digital signals. As the result of the front-end electronics test, it works properly with low input noise of ≤30μV at the pixel rate below 100 kHz. The power consumption is sufficiently low of ˜150mW/chip. The input signal range of ±20 mV covers the effective energy range of the typical X-ray photon counting CCD (up to 20 keV). The integrated non-linearity is 0.2% that is similar as those of the conventional CCDs in orbit. We also performed a radiation tolerance test against the total ionizing dose (TID) effect and the single event effect. The irradiation test using 60Co and proton beam showed that the ASIC has the sufficient tolerance against TID up to 200 krad, which absolutely exceeds the expected amount of dose during the period of operating in a low-inclination low-earth orbit. The irradiation of Fe ions with the fluence of 5.2×108 Ion/cm2 resulted in no single event latchup (SEL), although there were some possible single event upsets. The threshold against SEL is higher than 1.68 MeV cm2/mg, which is sufficiently high enough that the SEL event should not be one of major causes of instrument downtime in orbit.

  5. Enabling more capability within smaller pixels: advanced wafer-level process technologies for integration of focal plane arrays with readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temple, Dorota S.; Vick, Erik P.; Lueck, Matthew R.; Malta, Dean; Skokan, Mark R.; Masterjohn, Christopher M.; Muzilla, Mark S.

    2014-05-01

    Over the past decade, the development of infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs) has seen two trends: decreasing of the pixel size and increasing of signal-processing capability at the device level. Enabling more capability within smaller pixels can be achieved through the use of advanced wafer-level processes for the integration of FPAs with silicon (Si) readout integrated circuits (ROICs). In this paper, we review the development of these wafer-level integration technologies, highlighting approaches in which the infrared sensor is integrated with three-dimensional ROIC stacks composed of multiple layers of Si circuitry interconnected using metal-filled through-silicon vias.

  6. Vertically integrated pixel readout chip for high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Grzegorz; Demarteau, Marcel; Hoff, James; Khalid, Farah; Lipton, Ronald; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Yarema, Raymond; Zimmerman, Tom; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    We report on the development of the vertex detector pixel readout chips based on multi-tier vertically integrated electronics for the International Linear Collider. Some testing results of the VIP2a prototype are presented. The chip is the second iteration of the silicon implementation of the prototype, data-pushed concept of the readout developed at Fermilab. The device was fabricated in the 3D MIT-LL 0.15 {micro}m fully depleted SOI process. The prototype is a three-tier design, featuring 30 x 30 {micro}m{sup 2} pixels, laid out in an array of 48 x 48 pixels.

  7. Development of a front-end analog circuit for multi-channel SiPM readout and performance verification for various PET detector designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Guen Bae; Yoon, Hyun Suk; Kwon, Sun Il; Lee, Chan Mi; Ito, Mikiko; Hong, Seong Jong; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae Sung

    2013-03-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are outstanding photosensors for the development of compact imaging devices and hybrid imaging systems such as positron emission tomography (PET)/ magnetic resonance (MR) scanners because of their small size and MR compatibility. The wide use of this sensor for various types of scintillation detector modules is being accelerated by recent developments in tileable multichannel SiPM arrays. In this work, we present the development of a front-end readout module for multi-channel SiPMs. This readout module is easily extendable to yield a wider detection area by the use of a resistive charge division network (RCN). We applied this readout module to various PET detectors designed for use in small animal PET/MR, optical fiber PET/MR, and double layer depth of interaction (DOI) PET. The basic characteristics of these detector modules were also investigated. The results demonstrate that the PET block detectors developed using the readout module and tileable multi-channel SiPMs had reasonable performance.

  8. VCSELs for interferometric readout of MEMS sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkland, Darwin K.; Geib, Kent M.; Peake, Gregory M.; Keeler, Gordon A.; Shaw, Michael J.; Baker, Michael S.; Okandan, Murat

    2016-03-01

    We report on the development of single-frequency VCSELs (vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers) for sensing the position of a moving MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical system) object with resolution much less than 1nm. Position measurement is the basis of many different types of MEMS sensors, including accelerometers, gyroscopes, and pressure sensors. Typically, by switching from a traditional capacitive electronic readout to an interferometric optical readout, the resolution can be improved by an order of magnitude with a corresponding improvement in MEMS sensor performance. Because the VCSEL wavelength determines the scale of the position measurement, laser wavelength (frequency) stability is desirable. This paper discusses the impact of VCSEL amplitude and frequency noise on the position measurement.

  9. LYSO crystal calorimeter readout with silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berra, A.; Bonvicini, V.; Cecchi, C.; Germani, S.; Guffanti, D.; Lietti, D.; Lubrano, P.; Manoni, E.; Prest, M.; Rossi, A.; Vallazza, E.

    2014-11-01

    Large area Silicon PhotoMultipliers (SiPMs) are the new frontier of the development of readout systems for scintillating detectors. A SiPM consists of a matrix of parallel-connected silicon micropixels operating in limited Geiger-Muller avalanche mode, and thus working as independent photon counters with a very high gain (~106). This contribution presents the performance in terms of linearity and energy resolution of an electromagnetic homogeneous calorimeter composed of 9 ~ 18X0 LYSO crystals. The crystals were readout by 36 4×4 mm2 SiPMs (4 for each crystal) produced by FBK-irst. This calorimeter was tested at the Beam Test Facility at the INFN laboratories in Frascati with a single- and multi-particle electron beam in the 100-500 MeV energy range.

  10. New methods for trigger electronics development

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, W.E.; Stern, E.G.

    1991-12-31

    The large and complex nature of RHIC experiments and the tight time schedule for their construction requires that new techniques for designing the electronics should be employed. This is particularly true of the trigger and data acquisition electronics which has to be ready for turn-on of the experiment. We describe the use of the Workview package from VIEWlogic Inc. for design, simulation, and verification of a flash ADC readout system. We also show how field-programmable gate arrays such as the Xilinx 4000 might be employed to construct or prototype circuits with a large number of gates while preserving flexibility.

  11. Formation flying metrology for the ESA-PROBA3 mission: the Shadow Position Sensors (SPS) silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focardi, M.; Bemporad, A.; Buckley, S.; O'Neill, K.; Fineschi, S.; Noce, V.; Pancrazzi, M.; Landini, F.; Baccani, C.; Capobianco, G.; Romoli, M.; Loreggia, D.; Nicolini, G.; Massone, G.; Thizy, C.; Servaye, J. S.; Renotte, E.

    2015-09-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) is planning to launch in 2018 the PROBA3 Mission, designed to demonstrate the inorbit formation flying (FF) attitude capability of its two satellites and to observe the inner part of the visible solar corona as the main scientific objective. The solar corona will be observed thanks to the presence on the first satellite, facing the Sun, of an external occulter producing an artificial eclipse of the Sun disk. The second satellite will carry on the coronagraph telescope and the digital camera system in order to perform imaging of the inner part of the corona in visible polarized light, from 1.08 R⦿ up to about 3 R⦿. One of the main metrological subsystems used to control and to maintain the relative (i.e. between the two satellites) and absolute (i.e. with respect to the Sun) FF attitude is the Shadow Position Sensor (SPS) assembly. It is composed of eight micro arrays of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) able to measure with the required sensitivity and dynamic range the penumbral light intensity on the Coronagraph entrance pupil. In the following of the present paper we describe the overall SPS subsystem and its readout electronics with respect to the capability to satisfy the mission requirements, from the light conversion process on board the silicon-based SPS devices up to the digital signal readout and sampling.

  12. Cold Electronics Development for the LBNE LAr TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorn, C.; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; D'Andragora, Alessio; Li, Shaorui; Nambiar, Neena; Rescia, Sergio; Vernon, Emerson; Chen, Hucheng; Lanni, Francesco; Makowiecki, Don; Radeka, Veljko; Yu, Bo

    The LBNE Project is developing a design for multiple 20 kiloton liquid argon (LAr) time projection chambers to be used as the far detector for the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment. An essential component of this design is a complete electronic readout system designed to operate in LAr (at 90K). This system is being implemented as a CMOS ASIC, in 180 nm commercial technology, that will provide low-noise readout of the signals induced on the TPC wires, digitization of those signals at 2 MS/s, zero-suppression, buffering and output multiplexing to a small number of cryostat feed-throughs. A resolution better than 1000 rms electrons at 200 pF input capacitance for an input range of 300 fC is required, along with low power (<15mW/channel) and operation in LAr with a lifetime greater than 15 years. An analog-only frontend has been successfully completed and fully evaluated, and will be used in the MicroBooNE LAr TPC. A prototype of the digital section has been fabricated and is being evaluated. The results demonstrate that CMOS transistors have lower noise and much improved dc characteristics at LAr temperature. We will describe the progress to date and plans for the remaining development.

  13. An array of cold-electron bolometers with SIN tunnel junctions and JFET readout for cosmology instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, L.

    2008-02-01

    A novel concept of the parallel/series array of Cold-Electron Bolometers (CEB) with Superconductor-Insulator-Normal (SIN) Tunnel Junctions has been proposed. The concept was developed specially for matching the CEB with JFET amplifier at conditions of high optical power load. The CEB is a planar antenna-coupled superconducting detector with high sensitivity. For combination of effective HF operation and low noise properties the current-biased CEBs are connected in series for DC and in parallel for HF signal. A signal is concentrated from an antenna to the absorber through the capacitance of the tunnel junctions and through additional capacitance for coupling of superconducting islands. Using array of CEBs the applications can be considerably extended to higher power load by distributing the power between N CEBs and decreasing the electron temperature. Due to increased responsivity the noise matching is so effective that photon NEP could be easily achieved at 300 mK with a room temperature JFET for wide range of optical power loads. The concept of the CEB array has been developed for the BOOMERanG balloon telescope and other Cosmology instruments.

  14. Upgrade of the D0 luminosity monitor readout system

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, John; Bridges, Lloyd; Casey, Brendan; Enari, Yuji; Green, Johnny; Johnson, Marvin; Kwarciany, Rick; Miao, Chyi-Chiang; Partridge, Richard; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Wang, Jigang; /Brown U. /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    We describe upgrades to the readout system for the D0 Luminosity Monitor. The D0 Luminosity Monitor consists of plastic scintillation detectors with fine-mesh photomultiplier readout that cover the pseudorapidity range 2.7 < |{eta}| < 4.4. The detector is designed to provide a precise measurement of the rate for non-diffractive inelastic collisions that is used to calculate the TeVatron luminosity at D0. The new readout system is based on custom VME electronics that make precise time-of-flight and charge measurements for each luminosity counter. These measurements are used to identify beam crossings with non-diffractive interactions by requiring in-time hits in both the forward and backward luminosity counters. We have also significantly increased signal/noise for the photomultiplier signals by developing a new front-end preamplifier and improving the grounding scheme.

  15. Looking at Earth from space: Direct readout from environmental satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Direct readout is the capability to acquire information directly from meteorological satellites. Data can be acquired from NASA-developed, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-operated satellites, as well as from other nations' meteorological satellites. By setting up a personal computer-based ground (Earth) station to receive satellite signals, direct readout may be obtained. The electronic satellite signals are displayed as images on the computer screen. The images can display gradients of the Earth's topography and temperature, cloud formations, the flow and direction of winds and water currents, the formation of hurricanes, the occurrence of an eclipse, and a view of Earth's geography. Both visible and infrared images can be obtained. This booklet introduces the satellite systems, ground station configuration, and computer requirements involved in direct readout. Also included are lists of associated resources and vendors.

  16. The NA62 liquid Krypton calorimeter's new readout system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccucci, A.; Fantechi, R.; Farthouat, P.; Lamanna, G.; Rouet, J.; Ryjov, V.; Venditti, S.

    2014-01-01

    The NA62 experiment [1] at CERN SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) accelerator aims at studying Kaon decays with high precision. The high resolution Liquid Krypton (LKr) calorimeter, built for the NA48 [2] experiment, is a crucial part of the experiment photon-veto system; to cope with the new requirements, the back-end electronics of the LKr had to be completely renewed. Due to the huge number of the calorimeter readout channels ( ~ 14 K) and the maintenance requirement over 10 years of the experiment lifetime, the decision to sub-contract the development and production to industry was taken in 2011. This paper presents the primary test results of the Calorimeter REAdout Module (CREAM) [3] prototype delivered by the manufacturer in March 2013. All essential features, analog performance, data processing and readout, are covered.

  17. Investigation and optimization of low-frequency noise performance in readout electronics of dc superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Lee, Yong-Ho

    2014-05-15

    We investigated and optimized the low-frequency noise characteristics of a preamplifier used for readout of direct current superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). When the SQUID output was detected directly using a room-temperature low-voltage-noise preamplifier, the low-frequency noise of a SQUID system was found to be dominated by the input current noise of the preamplifiers in case of a large dynamic resistance of the SQUID. To reduce the current noise of the preamplifier in the low-frequency range, we investigated the dependence of total preamplifier noise on the collector current and source resistance. When the collector current was decreased from 8.4 mA to 3 mA in the preamplifier made of 3 parallel SSM2220 transistor pairs, the low-frequency total voltage noise of the preamplifier (at 0.1 Hz) decreased by about 3 times for a source resistance of 30 Ω whereas the white noise level remained nearly unchanged. Since the relative contribution of preamplifier's input voltage and current noise is different depending on the dynamic resistance or flux-to-voltage transfer of the SQUID, the results showed that the total noise of a SQUID system at low-frequency range can be improved significantly by optimizing the preamplifier circuit parameters, mainly the collector current in case of low-noise bipolar transistor pairs.

  18. Investigation and optimization of low-frequency noise performance in readout electronics of dc superconducting quantum interference device.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Lee, Yong-Ho; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2014-05-01

    We investigated and optimized the low-frequency noise characteristics of a preamplifier used for readout of direct current superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). When the SQUID output was detected directly using a room-temperature low-voltage-noise preamplifier, the low-frequency noise of a SQUID system was found to be dominated by the input current noise of the preamplifiers in case of a large dynamic resistance of the SQUID. To reduce the current noise of the preamplifier in the low-frequency range, we investigated the dependence of total preamplifier noise on the collector current and source resistance. When the collector current was decreased from 8.4 mA to 3 mA in the preamplifier made of 3 parallel SSM2220 transistor pairs, the low-frequency total voltage noise of the preamplifier (at 0.1 Hz) decreased by about 3 times for a source resistance of 30 Ω whereas the white noise level remained nearly unchanged. Since the relative contribution of preamplifier's input voltage and current noise is different depending on the dynamic resistance or flux-to-voltage transfer of the SQUID, the results showed that the total noise of a SQUID system at low-frequency range can be improved significantly by optimizing the preamplifier circuit parameters, mainly the collector current in case of low-noise bipolar transistor pairs. PMID:24880395

  19. Fabrication techniques for superconducting readout loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Procedures for the fabrication of superconducting readout loops out of niobium on glass substrates were developed. A computer program for an existing fabrication system was developed. Both positive and negative resist procedures for the production of the readout loops were investigated. Methods used to produce satisfactory loops are described and the various parameters affecting the performance of the loops are analyzed.

  20. Development of a readout technique for the high data rate BTeV pixel detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley K Hall et al.

    2001-11-05

    The pixel detector for the BTeV experiment at Fermilab provides digitized data from approximately 22 million silicon pixel channels. Portions of the detector are six millimeters from the beam providing a substantial hit rate and high radiation dose. The pixel detector data will be employed by the lowest level trigger system for track reconstruction every beam crossing. These requirements impose a considerable constraint on the readout scheme. This paper presents a readout technique that provides the bandwidth that is adequate for high hit rates, minimizes the number of radiation hard components, and satisfies all other design constraints.

  1. Development of electronic cinema projectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, William E.

    2001-03-01

    All of the components for the electronic cinema are now commercially available. Sony has a high definition progressively scanned 24 frame per second electronic cinema camera. This can be recorded digitally on tape or film on hard drives in RAID recorders. Much of the post production processing is now done digitally by scanning film, processing it digitally, and recording it on film for release. Fiber links and satellites can transmit cinema program material to theaters in real time. RAID or tape recorders can play programs for viewing at a much lower cost than storage on film. Two companies now have electronic cinema projectors on the market. Of all of the components, the electronic cinema projector is the most challenging. Achieving the resolution, light, output, contrast ratio, and color rendition all at the same time without visible artifacts is a difficult task. Film itself is, of course, a form of light-valve. However, electronically modulated light uses other techniques rather than changes in density to control the light. The optical techniques that have been the basis for many electronic light-valves have been under development for over 100 years. Many of these techniques are based on optical diffraction to modulate the light. This paper will trace the history of these techniques and show how they may be extended to produce electronic cinema projectors in the future.

  2. Development of prototype PET scanner using dual-sided readout DOI-PET modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, T.; Kataoka, J.; Kishimoto, A.; Kurei, Y.; Nishiyama, T.; Ohshima, T.; Taya, T.

    2014-12-01

    In our previous work, we proposed a novel design for a gamma-ray detector module capable of measuring the depth of interaction (DOI). In this paper, we further developed DOI-PET detector modules and a data acquisition system, and evaluated its performance. Each detector module was composed of a 3-D scintillator array and two large-area monolithic Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) arrays coupled to both ends of the 3-D scintillator array, leading to only 8-ch signal outputs from a module. The 3-D scintillator array was composed of 9 × 9 × 7 matrices of 1.0 × 1.0 × 3.0 mm3 Ce:GAGG crystals. The detector module showed good energy resolution of 10.6% as measured at 511 keV and a high average peak to valley ratio higher than 8 for each pixel crystal identified in the X-Y-Z directions. Moreover, we evaluated the spatial resolution of a virtual 18-ch PET gantry simulated by using two detector modules that were flexibly controlled using both the X-stage and θ-stage in 20-degree steps. By measuring a 22Na point source (0.25 mm in diameter), we showed that spatial resolution substantially degrades from 1.0 mm to 7.8 mm (FWHM; as measured at 0 mm and 28 mm off-center) with a non-DOI configuration, whereas the corresponding values for the DOI configuration were 0.9 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively (FWHM; as measured at 0 mm and 28 mm off-center). This preliminary study confirms that our DOI-PET module is useful for future high spatial resolution and compact small-animal PET scanners without radial image distortions at the peripheral regions of the field of view (FOV).

  3. Compensated digital readout family

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, David E.; Skow, Michael

    1991-01-01

    ISC has completed test on an IC which has 32 channels of amplifiers, low pass anti-aliasing filters, 13-bit analog-to-digital (A/D) converters with non-uniformity correction per channel and a digital multiplexer. The single slope class of A/D conversion is described, as are the unique variations required for incorporation of this technique for use with on-focal plane detector readout electronics. This paper describes the architecture used to implement the digital on-focal plane signal processing functions. Results from measured data on a test IC are presented for a circuit containing these functions operating at a sensor frame rate of 1000 hertz.

  4. Development of a compact radiation-hardened low-noise front-end readout ASIC for CZT-based hard X-ray imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, W.; Gan, B.; Li, X.; Wei, T.; Gao, D.; Hu, Y.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we present the development and performances of a radiation-hardened front-end readout application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) dedicated to CZT detectors for a hard X-ray imager in space applications. The readout channel consists of a charge sensitive amplifier (CSA), a CR-RC shaper, a fast shaper, a discriminator and a driving buffer. With the additional digital filtering, the readout channel can achieve very low noise performances and low power dissipation. An eight-channel prototype ASIC is designed and fabricated in 0.35 μm CMOS process. The energy range of the detected X-rays is evaluated as 1.45 keV to 281 keV. The gain is larger than 100 mV/fC. The equivalent noise charge (ENC) of the ASIC is 53 e- at zero farad plus 10 e- per picofarad. The power dissipation is less than 4.4 mW/channel. Through the measurement with a CZT detector, the energy resolution is less than 3.45 keV (FWHM) under the irradiation of the radioactive source 241Am. The radiation effect experiments indicate that the proposed ASIC can resist the total ionization dose (TID) irradiation of higher than 200 krad (Si).

  5. Advanced data readout technique for Multianode Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tube applicable in radiation imaging detectors

    SciTech Connect

    V. Popov

    2011-01-01

    Most of the best performing PSPMT tubes from Hamamatsu and Burle are designed with a pad-matrix anode layout. However, for obtaining a high resolution, a small-sized anode photomultiplier tubes are preferable; these tubes may have 64, 256 or 1024 anodes per tube. If the tubes are used in array to get a larger area detector, the number of analog channels may range from hundreds to thousands. Multichannel analog readout requires special electronics ICs, ASICs etc., which are attached to multichannel DAQ system. As a result, the data file and data processing time will be increased. Therefore, this readout could not be performed in a small project. Usually, most of radiation imaging applications allow the use of analog data processing in front-end electronics, significantly reducing the number of the detector's output lines to data acquisition without reducing the image quality. The idea of pad-matrix decoupling circuit with gain correction was invented and intensively tested in JLab. Several versions of PSPMT readout electronics were produced and studied. All developments were done and optimized specifically for radiation imaging projects. They covered high resolution SPECT, high speed PET, fast neutron imaging, and single tube and multi tube array systems. This paper presents and discusses the summary of the observed results in readout electronics evaluation with different PSPMTs and radiation imaging systems, as well as the advantages and limitations of the developed approach to radiation imaging detectors readout.

  6. Readout control for high luminosity accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belusevic, R.; Nixon, G.

    1991-09-01

    In this article we discuss some aspects of data acquisition at high luminosities and offer a set of design principles concerning readout control electronics and related software. As an example we include a brief description of a data transfer and processing system for future hadron colliders, featuring a transputer-based crate controller and a set of readout cards. This is a simplified and more efficient version of our design recently published in Nuclear Instruments and Methods. [A295 (1991) 391].

  7. Development of a radiation-hardened SRAM with EDAC algorithm for fast readout CMOS pixel sensors for charged particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, X.; Li, B.; Chen, N.; Wang, J.; Zheng, R.; Gao, W.; Wei, T.; Gao, D.; Hu, Y.

    2014-08-01

    CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) are attractive for use in the innermost particle detectors for charged particle tracking due to their good trade-off between spatial resolution, material budget, radiation hardness, and readout speed. With the requirements of high readout speed and high radiation hardness to total ionizing dose (TID) for particle tracking, fast readout CPS are composed by integrating a data compression block and two SRAM IP cores. However, the radiation hardness of the SRAM IP cores is not as high as that of the other parts in CPS, and thus the radiation hardness of the whole CPS chip is lowered. Especially, when CPS are migrated into 0.18-μm processes, the single event upset (SEU) effects should be also considered besides TID and single event latchup (SEL) effects. This paper presents a radiation-hardened SRAM with enhanced radiation hardness to SEU. An error detection and correction (EDAC) algorithm and a bit-interleaving storage strategy are adopted in the design. The prototype design has been fabricated in a 0.18-μm process. The area of the new SRAM is increased 1.6 times as compared with a non-radiation-hardened SRAM due to the integration of EDAC algorithm and the adoption of radiation hardened layout. The access time is increased from 5 ns to 8 ns due to the integration of EDAC algorithm. The test results indicate that the design satisfy requirements of CPS for charged particle tracking.

  8. An ac bridge readout for bolometric detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, F. M.; Lange, A. E.; Beeman, J. W.; Haller, E. E.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have developed a bolometer readout circuit which greatly improves the low-frequency stability of bolometric detectors. The circuit uses an ac bias voltage and two matched bolometers and allows stable dc bolometer operation for integration times greater than 10 s. In astronomical applications the readout allows for qualitatively different observation modes (e.g. staring or slow-drift scanning) which are particularly well suited for space observations and for the use of arrays. In many applications the readout can increase sensitivity. The authors present noise spectra for 4He temperature bolometers with no excess noise at frequencies greater than 0.1 Hz. The measured optical responsivity of a bolometer operated with the present readout is the same as that of a bolometer operated with a conventional readout.

  9. Antenna-Coupled Superconducting Tunnel Junctions with Single-Electron Transistor Readout for Detection of Sub-mm Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, T. R.; Hsieh, W.-T.; Li, M. J.; Stahle, C. M.; Wollack, E. J.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Teufel, J.; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Antenna-coupled superconducting tunnel junction detectors have the potential for photon-counting sensitivity at sub-mm wavelengths. The device consists of an antenna structure to couple radiation into a small superconducting volume and cause quasiparticle excitations, and a single-electron transistor to measure currents through tunnel junction contacts to the absorber volume. We will describe optimization of device parameters, and recent results on fabrication techniques for producing devices with high yield for detector arrays. We will also present modeling of expected saturation power levels, antenna coupling, and rf multiplexing schemes.

  10. Development of a GEM Electronic Board (GEB) for triple-GEM detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspell, P.; Dabrowski, M.; Conde Garcia, A.; De Lentdecker, G.; Marinov, A.; De Oliveira, R.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Yang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Developed for use with triple GEM detectors, the GEM Electronic Board (GEB) forms a crucial part of the electronics readout system being developed as part of the CMS muon upgrade program. The objective of the GEB is threefold; to provide stable powering and ground for the VFAT3 front ends, to enable high-speed communication between 24 VFAT3 front ends and an optohybrid, and to shield the GEM detector from electromagnetic interference. The paper describes the concept and design of a large-size GEB in detail, highlighting the challenges in terms of design and feasibility of this deceptively difficult system component.

  11. Implementation of the Timepix ASIC in the Scalable Readout System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupberger, M.; Desch, K.; Kaminski, J.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the development of electronics hardware, FPGA firmware and software to provide a flexible multi-chip readout of the Timepix ASIC within the framework of the Scalable Readout System (SRS). The system features FPGA-based zero-suppression and the possibility to read out up to 4×8 chips with a single Front End Concentrator (FEC). By operating several FECs in parallel, in principle an arbitrary number of chips can be read out, exploiting the scaling features of SRS. Specifically, we tested the system with a setup consisting of 160 Timepix ASICs, operated as GridPix devices in a large TPC field cage in a 1 T magnetic field at a DESY test beam facility providing an electron beam of up to 6 GeV. We discuss the design choices, the dedicated hardware components, the FPGA firmware as well as the performance of the system in the test beam.

  12. An Analog Low-Power Frequency Readout ASIC for a SAW Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Shih-Wen; Li, Chen-Han; Tang, Kea-Tiong

    2011-11-01

    A polymer coated surface acoustic wave (SAW) array has potential as a gas sensing material for electronic nose (eNose) applications. But the bulky and costly SAW frequency readout instruments such as spectrum analyzers and frequency counters have made SAW based eNose applications unpopular for portable use. In previous research, SAW interface electronics comprising discrete components have been developed to implement a portable eNose. However, the system consumes considerable dynamic power due to SAW device operating at high center frequencies. This work proposes a low-power analog CMOS frequency readout application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for potential portable applications.

  13. TDC-based readout electronics for real-time acquisition of high resolution PET bio-images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, N.; Saponara, S.; Ambrosi, G.; Baronti, F.; Bisogni, M. G.; Cerello, P.,; Ciciriello, F.; Corsi, F.; Fanucci, L.; Ionica, M.; Licciulli, F.; Marzocca, C.; Morrocchi, M.; Pennazio, F.; Roncella, R.; Santoni, C.; Wheadon, R.; Del Guerra, A.

    2013-02-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a clinical and research tool for in vivo metabolic imaging. The demand for better image quality entails continuous research to improve PET instrumentation. In clinical applications, PET image quality benefits from the time of flight (TOF) feature. Indeed, by measuring the photons arrival time on the detectors with a resolution less than 100 ps, the annihilation point can be estimated with centimeter resolution. This leads to better noise level, contrast and clarity of detail in the images either using analytical or iterative reconstruction algorithms. This work discusses a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM)-based magnetic-field compatible TOF-PET module with depth of interaction (DOI) correction. The detector features a 3D architecture with two tiles of SiPMs coupled to a single LYSO scintillator on both its faces. The real-time front-end electronics is based on a current-mode ASIC where a low input impedance, fast current buffer allows achieving the required time resolution. A pipelined time to digital converter (TDC) measures and digitizes the arrival time and the energy of the events with a timestamp of 100 ps and 400 ps, respectively. An FPGA clusters the data and evaluates the DOI, with a simulated z resolution of the PET image of 1.4 mm FWHM.

  14. A generic readout environment for prototype pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turqueti, Marcos; Rivera, Ryan; Prosser, Alan; Kwan, Simon

    2010-11-01

    Pixel detectors for experimental particle physics research have been implemented with a variety of readout formats and potentially generate massive amounts of data. Examples include the PSI46 device for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment which implements an analog readout, the Fermilab FPIX2.1 device with a digital readout, and the Fermilab Vertically Integrated Pixel device. The Electronic Systems Engineering Department of the Computing Division at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has developed a data acquisition system flexible and powerful enough to meet the various needs of these devices to support laboratory test bench as well as test beam applications. The system is called CAPTAN (Compact And Programmable daTa Acquisition Node) and is characterized by its flexibility, versatility and scalability by virtue of several key architectural features. These include a vertical bus that permits the user to stack multiple boards, a gigabit Ethernet link that permits high speed communications to the system and a core group of boards that provide specific processing and readout capabilities for the system. System software based on distributed computing techniques supports an expandable network of CAPTANs. In this paper, we describe the system architecture and give an overview of its capabilities.

  15. SU-8 Cantilevers for Bio/chemical Sensing; Fabrication, Characterisation and Development of Novel Read-out Methods

    PubMed Central

    Nordström, Maria; Keller, Stephan; Lillemose, Michael; Johansson, Alicia; Dohn, Søren; Haefliger, Daniel; Blagoi, Gabriela; Havsteen-Jakobsen, Mogens; Boisen, Anja

    2008-01-01

    Here, we present the activities within our research group over the last five years with cantilevers fabricated in the polymer SU-8. We believe that SU-8 is an interesting polymer for fabrication of cantilevers for bio/chemical sensing due to its simple processing and low Young's modulus. We show examples of different integrated read-out methods and their characterisation. We also show that SU-8 cantilevers have a reduced sensitivity to changes in the environmental temperature and pH of the buffer solution. Moreover, we show that the SU-8 cantilever surface can be functionalised directly with receptor molecules for analyte detection, thereby avoiding gold-thiol chemistry.

  16. Design and evaluation of a 2D array PIN photodiode bump bonded to readout IC for the low energy x-ray detector.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Sunwoo; Park, Shin-Woong; Yi, Yun

    2006-01-01

    A 2D array radiation sensor, consisting of an array of PIN photodiodes bump bonded to readout integrated circuit (IC), has been developed for operation with low energy X-rays. The PIN photodiode array and readout IC for this system have been fabricated. The main performance measurements are the following: a few pA-scale leakage current, 350 pF junction capacitance, 30 microm-depth depletion layer and a 250 microm intrinsic layer at zero bias. This PIN photodiode array and readout IC were fabricated using a PIN photodiode process and standard 0.35 microm CMOS technology, respectively. The readout circuit is operated from a 3.3 V single power supply. Finally, a 2D array radiation sensor has been developed using bump bonding between the PIN photodiode and the readout electronics. PMID:17946079

  17. Single-Shot Charge Readout Using a Cryogenic Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor Preamplifier Inline with a Silicon Single Electron Transistor at Millikelvin Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Matthew; England, Troy; Wendt, Joel; Pluym, Tammy; Lilly, Michael; Carr, Stephen; Carroll, Malcolm

    Single-shot readout is a requirement for many implementations of quantum information processing. The single-shot readout fidelity is dependent on the signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and bandwidth of the readout detection technique. Several different approaches are being pursued to enhance read-out including RF-reflectometry, RF-transmission, parametric amplification, and transistor-based cryogenic preamplification. The transistor-based cryogenic preamplifier is attractive in part because of the reduced experimental complexity compared with the RF techniques. Here we present single-shot charge readout using a cryogenic Heterojunction-Bipolar-Transistor (HBT) inline with a silicon SET charge-sensor at millikelvin temperatures. For the relevant range of HBT DC-biasing, the current gain is 100 to 2000 and the power dissipation is 50 nW to 5 μW, with the microfabricated SET and discrete HBT in an integrated package mounted to the mixing chamber stage of a dilution refrigerator. We experimentally demonstrate a SNR of up to 10 with a bandwidth of 1 MHz, corresponding to a single-shot time-domain charge-sensitivity of approximately 10-4 e / √Hz. This measured charge-sensitivity is comparable to the values reported using the RF techniques. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Development of a multi-channel readout ASIC for a fast neutron spectrometer based on GEM-TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Li; Deng, Zhi; Liu, Yi-Nong; Li, Yu-Lan

    2014-10-01

    A multi-channel front-end ASIC has been developed for a fast neutron spectrometer based on Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM)-Time Projection Chamber (TPC). Charge Amplifier and Shaping Amplifier for GEM (CASAGEM) integrates 16+1 channels: 16 channels for anodes and 1 channel for cathode. The gain and the shaping time are adjustable from 2 to 40 mV/fC and from 20 to 80 ns, respectively. The prototype ASIC is fabricated in 0.35 μm CMOS process. An evaluation Print Circuit Board (PCB) was also developed for chip tests. In total 20 chips have been tested. The integrated nonlinearity is less than 1%. The equivalent noise electrons is less than 2000e when the input capacitor is 50 pF. The time jitter is less than 1 ns. The design and the test results are presented in the paper.

  19. A new readout control system for the LHCb upgrade at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessio, F.; Jacobsson, R.

    2012-11-01

    The LHCb experiment has proposed an upgrade towards a full 40 MHz readout system in order to run between five and ten times its initial design luminosity. The entire readout architecture will be upgraded in order to cope with higher sub-detector occupancies, higher rate and higher network load. In this paper, we describe the architecture, functionalities and a first hardware implementation of a new fast Readout Control system for the LHCb upgrade, which will be entirely based on FPGAs and bi-directional links. We also outline the real-time implementations of the new Readout Control system, together with solutions on how to handle the synchronous distribution of timing and synchronous information to the complex upgraded LHCb readout architecture. One section will also be dedicated to the control and usage of the newly developed CERN GBT chipset to transmit fast and slow control commands to the upgraded LHCb Front-End electronics. At the end, we outline the plans for the deployment of the system in the global LHCb upgrade readout architecture.

  20. Characterization results of the JUNGFRAU full scale readout ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozzanica, A.; Bergamaschi, A.; Brueckner, M.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Jungmann-Smith, J.; Maliakal, D.; Mezza, D.; Ramilli, M.; Ruder, C.; Schaedler, L.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.

    2016-02-01

    The two-dimensional pixel detector JUNGFRAU is designed for high performance photon science applications at free electron lasers and synchrotron light sources. It is developed for the SwissFEL currently under construction at the Paul Scherrer Institut, Switzerland. The detector is a hybrid pixel detector with a charge integration readout ASIC characterized by single photon sensitivity and a low noise performance over a dynamic range of 104 12 keV photons. Geometrically, a JUNGFRAU readout chip consists of 256×256 pixels of 75×75 μm2. The chips are bump bonded to 320 μm thick silicon sensors. Arrays of 2×4 chips are tiled to form modules of 4×8 cm2 area. Several multi-module systems with up to 16 Mpixels per system will be delivered to the two end stations at SwissFEL. The JUNGFRAU full scale readout ASIC and module design are presented along with characterization results of the first systems. Experiments from fluorescence X-ray, visible light illumination, and synchrotron irradiation are shown. The results include an electronic noise of ~50 electrons r.m.s., which enables single photon detection energies below 2 keV and a noise well below the Poisson statistical limit over the entire dynamic range. First imaging experiments are also shown.

  1. Performance of the Demonstrator System for the Phase-I Upgrade of the Trigger Readout Electronics of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont Dayot, N.

    2016-01-01

    For the Phase-I luminosity upgrade of the LHC a higher granularity trigger readout of the ATLAS LAr Calorimeters is foreseen to enhance the trigger feature extraction and background rejection. The new readout system digitizes the detector signals, which are grouped into 34000 so-called Super Cells, with 12 bit precision at 40 MHz and transfers the data on optical links to the digital processing system, which extracts the Super Cell energies. A demonstrator version of the complete system has now been installed and operated on the ATLAS detector. Results from the commissioning and performance measurements are reported.

  2. Evaluation of charge-integrating amplifier with silicon MOSFETs for cryogenic readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Manabu; Shibai, Hiroshi; Watabe, Toyoki; Hirao, Takanori; Yoda, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Hirohisa; Nakagawa, Takao; Kawada, Mitsunobu

    1998-08-01

    Low-noise and low-power cryogenic readout electronics are developed for a focal plane instrument of the IR Imaging Surveyor. We measured the static characteristics and the noise spectra of several types of silicon MOSFETs at the cryogenic temperature where silicon JFETs do not work well due to the carrier freeze-out. The 'kink' behavior of n- channel MOSFETs was observed below the carrier freeze-out temperature, but it was not obvious for the p-channel MOSFET. It was demonstrated the p-channel MOSFETs can be used for the cryogenic readout electronics of the IRIS's far-IR array with an acceptable performance. The amplifier integrated with these MOSFETs showed low-noise at 2K under a low power consumption of 1 (mu) W per MOSFET. We now design and evaluate several circuits that are fabricated by the CMOS process for cryogenic readout.

  3. THERMOCOUPLE READOUT INSTRUMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    An electronic circuit has been developed which acts as an electronic ice bath for chromel-constantan thermocouples. The electronic ice bath is accurate to within plus or minus 0.2C from -25C to +50C. Simultaneously, the thermocouple output is scaled and linearized such that the t...

  4. Readout system of TPC/MPD NICA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averyanov, A. V.; Bajajin, A. G.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cheremukhina, G. A.; Fateev, O. V.; Korotkova, A. M.; Levchanovskiy, F. V.; Lukstins, J.; Movchan, S. A.; Razin, S. V.; Rybakov, A. A.; Vereschagin, S. V.; Zanevsky, Yu. V.; Zaporozhets, S. A.; Zruyev, V. N.

    2015-12-01

    The time-projection chamber (TPC) is the main tracking detector in the MPD/NICA. The information on charge-particle tracks in the TPC is registered by the MWPG with cathode pad readout. The frontend electronics (FEE) are developed with use of modern technologies such as application specific integrated circuits (ASIC), field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA), and data transfer to a concentrator via a fast optical interface. The main parameters of the FEE are as follows: total number of channels, ~95 000; data stream from the whole TPC, 5 GB/s; low power consumption, less than 100 mW/ch; signal to noise ratio (S/N), 30; equivalent noise charge (ENC), <1000e- ( C in = 10-20 pF); and zero suppression (pad signal rejection ~90%). The article presents the status of the readout chamber construction and the data acquisition system. The results of testing FEE prototypes are presented.

  5. Research and development for a free-running readout system for the ATLAS LAr Calorimeters at the high luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hils, Maximilian

    2016-07-01

    The ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeters were designed and built to measure electromagnetic and hadronic energy in proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at centre-of-mass energies up to 14 TeV and instantaneous luminosities up to 1034 cm-2 s-1. The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) programme is now developed for up to 5-7 times the design luminosity, with the goal of accumulating an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1. In the HL-LHC phase, the increased radiation levels and an improved ATLAS trigger system require a replacement of the Front-end (FE) and Back-end (BE) electronics of the LAr Calorimeters. Results from research and development of individual components and their radiation qualification as well as the overall system design will be presented.

  6. Transputer-based readout controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belusevic, R.; Nixon, G.

    1989-05-01

    A bus-oriented readout controller is described that uses a transputer both as a direct memory access (DMA) device and a crate processor. It achieves data transfer rates of up to 13 Mbytes/s, yet is very simple in design. Data transfer is reduced to moving arrays within memory, which eliminates the need for bus arbitration and interfacing logic. A trivial extension of the basic design results in a twofold increase in the maximum data transfer speed, to 27 Mbytes/s. A second transputer, added to the crate controller for extra flexibility and processing power, enables it to form part of a second level data acquisition system, with a total of 8 links (maximum link speed 20 Mbits/s) available for intercrate communications. This design was developed for the readout system of the ZEUS Central Tracking Detector.

  7. Design and performance of a modular low-radioactivity readout system for cryogenic detectors in the CDMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerib, D. S.; Barnes, P. D., Jr.; Brink, P. L.; Cabrera, B.; Clarke, R. M.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Golwala, S. R.; Huber, M. E.; Kurylowicz, M.; Mandic, V.; Martinis, J. M.; Meunier, P.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Nam, S. W.; Perillo-Isaac, M.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Schnee, R. W.; Seitz, D. N.; Shutt, T.; Smith, G. W.; Stockwell, W. K.; Sundqvist, K. M.; White, S.

    2008-07-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment employs ultra-cold solid-state detectors to search for rare events resulting from WIMP-nucleus scattering. An innovative detector packaging and readout system has been developed to meet the unusual combination of requirements for: low temperature, low radioactivity, low energy threshold, and large channel count. Features include use of materials with low radioactivity such as multi-layer KAPTON laminates for circuit boards; immunity to microphonic noise via a vacuum coaxial wiring design, manufacturability, and modularity. The detector readout design had to accommodate various electronic components which have to be operated in close proximity to the detector as well maintaining separate individual temperatures (ranging from 600 mK to 150 K) in order to achieve optimal noise performance. The paper will describe the general electrical, thermal, and mechanical designs of the CDMS readout system, as well as presenting the theoretical and measured performance of the detector readout channels.

  8. High-fidelity projective read-out of a solid-state spin quantum register.

    PubMed

    Robledo, Lucio; Childress, Lilian; Bernien, Hannes; Hensen, Bas; Alkemade, Paul F A; Hanson, Ronald

    2011-09-29

    Initialization and read-out of coupled quantum systems are essential ingredients for the implementation of quantum algorithms. Single-shot read-out of the state of a multi-quantum-bit (multi-qubit) register would allow direct investigation of quantum correlations (entanglement), and would give access to further key resources such as quantum error correction and deterministic quantum teleportation. Although spins in solids are attractive candidates for scalable quantum information processing, their single-shot detection has been achieved only for isolated qubits. Here we demonstrate the preparation and measurement of a multi-spin quantum register in a low-temperature solid-state system by implementing resonant optical excitation techniques originally developed in atomic physics. We achieve high-fidelity read-out of the electronic spin associated with a single nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond, and use this read-out to project up to three nearby nuclear spin qubits onto a well-defined state. Conversely, we can distinguish the state of the nuclear spins in a single shot by mapping it onto, and subsequently measuring, the electronic spin. Finally, we show compatibility with qubit control: we demonstrate initialization, coherent manipulation and single-shot read-out in a single experiment on a two-qubit register, using techniques suitable for extension to larger registers. These results pave the way for a test of Bell's inequalities on solid-state spins and the implementation of measurement-based quantum information protocols. PMID:21937989

  9. Readout of silicon strip detectors with position and timing information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, M.; Irmler, C.; Pernicka, M.

    2009-01-01

    Low-noise front-end amplifiers for silicon strip detectors are already available for decades, providing excellent signal-to-noise ratio and thus very precise spatial resolution, but at the cost of a long shaping time in the microsecond range. Due to occupancy and pile-up issues, modern experiments need much faster electronics. With submicron ASICs, adequate readout and data processing, it is possible to obtain not only spatial hit data, but also accurate timing information—a feature which is rarely exploited so far. We present the concept of a silicon vertex detector readout system intended for an upgrade of the Belle experiment at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan). The APV25 front-end chip, originally developed for CMS at CERN, is used in a way where it delivers multiple samples along the shaped waveform, such that not only the analog pulse height, but also the timing of each particle hit can be determined. We developed a complete readout system including an FADC +Processor VME module which performs zero-suppression in FPGAs. The hit time measurement is also planned on the same module. As fast amplifiers are inherently more susceptible to noise, which largely depends on the load capacitance, the front-end chips should be located as close to the detector as possible. On the other hand, the material budget, especially in a low-energy electron-positron machine such as Belle, should be minimized. We tried to merge those demands with a fully functional "Flex_Module", where thinned APV25 readout chips are mounted on the silicon sensor.

  10. Methods development for electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapol, Barry D.

    1992-04-01

    This report consists of two code manuals and an article recently published in the proceedings of the American Nuclear Society Mathematics and Computation Topical Meeting held in Pittsburgh. In these presentations, deterministic calculational methods simulating electron transport in solids are detailed. The first method presented (Section 2) is for the solution of the Spencer-Lewis equation in which electron motion is characterized by continuous slowing down theory and a pathlength formulation. The FN solution to the standard monoenergetic transport equation for electron transport with isotropic scattering in finite media is given in Section 3. For both codes, complete flow charts, operational instructions and sample problems are included. Finally, in Section 4, an application of the multigroup formulation of electron transport in an infinite medium is used to verify an equivalent SN formulation. For this case, anisotropic scattering is also included.

  11. Hodoscope readout system

    DOEpatents

    Lee, L.Y.

    1973-12-01

    A readout system has been provided for reading out a radiation multidetector device with a reduced number of signal sensors. A radiation hodoscope, such as an array of scintillation counters, multiwire proportional counter array, or a set of multidetectors which do not receive signals simultaneously, is divided into equal numbered groups. A first group of signal terminals is connected to the equal numbered groups of detectors so that a signal from any one of the detectors of a group will be fed to one of the first group of terminals. A second group of signal terminals is connected to the detector groups so that a signal from a particular numbered detector of each of the detector groups is connected to one of the second group of terminals. Both groups of signal terminals are, in turn, coupled to signal sensors so that when a signal is simultaneously observed in one of the first group of terminals and one of the second group of tenniinals the specific detector detecting a radiation event is determined. The sensors are arranged in such a manner that a binary code is developed from their outputs which can be stored in a digital storage means according to the location of the event in the multidetector device. (Official Gazette)

  12. Cryogenic direct current superconducting quantum interference device readout circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mück, Michael; Korn, Matthias; Mugford, C. G. A.; Kycia, J. B.

    2005-07-01

    We have designed and tested a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) readout circuit, which can be operated at liquid helium temperatures. Although room-temperature SQUID electronics perform well, it is sometimes desirable to keep the wires between SQUID, readout electronics, and feedback coil as short as possible to minimize phase shifts and time delays. Cooling the readout circuit to low temperatures can also decrease its thermal noise. Our readout circuit uses conventional ac-flux modulation, which significantly reduces low frequency excess noise and drift in the preamplifier. In this case, simple complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits with low power dissipation can be used as amplifier, phase-sensitive detector and integrator. The power dissipation of the complete readout is less than 15mW at 5V supply voltage.

  13. Electronic Collection Development: A Practical Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Stuart D.

    Chapter 1, "Preliminary Issues," explores the historical importance of the electronic publishing revolution, some of the terminology to be used in the book, and the differences and similarities between traditional and electronic collection development. Chapter 2, "What Is an Offer? The Electronic Resources Landscape," covers the main issues that…

  14. Low-Noise Readout of TES Detectors with Baseband Feedback Frequency Domain Multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Hartog, R.; Audley, M. D.; Beyer, J.; Boersma, D.; Bruijn, M.; Gottardi, L.; Hoevers, H.; Hou, R.; Keizer, G.; Khosropanah, P.; Kiviranta, M.; de Korte, P.; van der Kuur, J.; van Leeuwen, B.-J.; Nieuwenhuizen, A. C. T.; van Winden, P.

    2012-06-01

    SRON is developing an electronic read-out system for an array of transition edge sensors (TES) based on the techniques of frequency domain multiplexing (FDM) and base-band feedback (BBFB). The astronomical applications of our system are the read-out of soft X-ray micro-calorimeters in a potential instrument on the European X-ray mission-under-study Athena and far-IR bolometers for the SAFARI instrument on the Japanese mission SPICA. In this paper we demonstrate the simultaneous locking of up to 51 BBFB loops. While locked, the in-band read-out noise of the loops is shown to reach the {10 pA/}sqrt{Hz} level required for these missions.

  15. Dead-time free pixel readout architecture for ATLAS front-end IC

    SciTech Connect

    Einsweiler, K.; Joshi, A.; Kleinfelder, S.; Luo, L.; Marchesini, R.; Milgrome, O.; Pengg, F.

    1999-06-01

    A low-power, sparse-scan, readout architecture has been developed for the ATLAS pixel front-end electronics. The architecture supports a dual discriminator and extracts the time over threshold (TOT) information along with a 2-D spatial address of the hits and associates them with a unique 7-bit beam crossing number. The IC implements level-1 trigger filtering along with event building (grouping together all hits in a beam crossing) in the end of column (EOC) buffer. The events are transmitted over a 40 MHz serial data link with the protocol supporting buffer overflow handling by appending error flags to events. This mixed-mode full custom IC is implemented in 0.8 {micro} HP process to meet the requirements for the pixel readout in the ATLAS inner detector. The circuits have been tested and the IC has been found to provide dead-time-less ambiguity-free readout at 40 MHz data rate.

  16. Modern developments in electron-beam fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattolica, Robert J.

    Recent developments in the area of electron-beam fluorescence are discussed with special attention given to the experience in the use of the electron-beam fluorescence in flight research. A new measurement approach, called electron-photon fluorescence (EPF), is described, and it is shown that EPF offers the potential of overcoming some of the disadvantages of electron-beam fluorescence in high-density flows. Examples of using the EPF technique are presented.

  17. Modern developments in electron-beam fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattolica, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    Recent developments in the area of electron-beam fluorescence are discussed with special attention given to the experience in the use of the electron-beam fluorescence in flight research. A new measurement approach, called electron-photon fluorescence (EPF), is described, and it is shown that EPF offers the potential of overcoming some of the disadvantages of electron-beam fluorescence in high-density flows. Examples of using the EPF technique are presented.

  18. Recent Developments in Electronic Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, D.A.; Claytor, T.N.; Davis, A.W.; Jones, M.H.; Sheats, M.J.; Stupin, D.M.; Summa, D.A.; White, S.M.; Hefele, J.; Watson, S.A.; Kauppila, T.J.; Mueller, K.H.

    1999-07-18

    An overview of the radiographic capabilities with emphasis on electronic image detection and processing at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is presented. Fixed facilities and portable x-ray sources and imaging systems make up the Los Alamos capability. Examples of imaging with large area amorphous silicon imaging panels, a portable computed tomography system, high speed x-ray imaging applications and equipment, and small area, high resolution imagers are given. Radiographic simulation and reverse engineering from radiographic images to computer aided design files and solid models is also presented.

  19. Readout of Epigenetic Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dinshaw J.; Wang, Zhanxin

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on a structure-based analysis of histone posttranslational modification (PTM) readout, where the PTMs serve as docking sites for reader modules as part of larger complexes displaying chromatin modifier and remodeling activities, with the capacity to alter chromatin architecture and templated processes. Individual topics addressed include the diversity of reader-binding pocket architectures and common principles underlying readout of methyl-lysine and methyl-arginine marks, their unmodified counterparts, as well as acetyl-lysine and phosphoserine marks. The review also discusses the impact of multivalent readout of combinations of PTMs localized at specific genomic sites by linked binding modules on processes ranging from gene transcription to repair. Additional topics include cross talk between histone PTMs, histone mimics, epigenetic-based diseases, and drug-based therapeutic intervention. The review ends by highlighting new initiatives and advances, as well as future challenges, toward the promise of enhancing our structural and mechanistic understanding of the readout of histone PTMs at the nucleosomal level. PMID:23642229

  20. X2000 power system electronics development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Greg; Deligiannis, Frank; Franco, Lauro; Jones, Loren; Lam, Barbara; Nelson, Ron; Pantaleon, Jose; Ruiz, Ian; Treichler, John; Wester, Gene; Sauers, Jim; Giampoli, Paul; Haskell, Russ; Mulvey, Jim; Repp, John

    2005-01-01

    The X2000 Power System Electronics (PSE) is a Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) task to develop a new generation of power system building blocks for potential use on future deep space missions. The effort includes the development of electronic components and modules that can be used as building blocks in the design of generic spacecraft power systems.

  1. Flexible Electronics Development Supported by NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The commercial electronics industry is leading development in most areas of electronics for NASA applications; however, working in partnership with industry and the academic community, results from NASA research could lead to better understanding and utilization of electronic materials by the flexible electronics industry. Innovative ideas explored by our partners in industry and the broader U.S. research community help NASA execute our missions and bring new American products and services to the global technology marketplace. [Mike Gazarik, associate administrator for Space Technology, NASA Headquarters, Washington DC] This presentation provides information on NASA needs in electronics looking towards the future, some of the work being supported by NASA in flexible electronics, and the capabilities of the Glenn Research Center supporting the development of flexible electronics.

  2. Development of a 64-channel APD detector module with individual pixel readout for submillimetre spatial resolution in PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérard, Philippe; Bergeron, Mélanie; Pepin, Catherine M.; Cadorette, Jules; Tétrault, Marc-André; Viscogliosi, Nicolas; Fontaine, Réjean; Dautet, Henri; Davies, Murray; Deschamps, Pierre; Lecomte, Roger

    2009-10-01

    Visualization and quantification of biological processes by molecular imaging in small animals such as rats and especially mice require the best possible spatial resolution in positron emission tomography (PET). A new avalanche photodiode (APD) detector module, the LabPET II, was developed to achieve submillimetre spatial resolution for this purpose. The module consists of two monolithic APD arrays of 4×8 pixels, each with an active area of 1.1×1.1 mm 2 at a 1.2 mm pitch. The two APD arrays mounted in a custom ceramic PGA holder are coupled to an 8×8 tapered LYSO scintillator array designed to accommodate one-to-one coupling between individual APDs and crystal pixels. To investigate the module performance, an analog test board with four 16-channel preamplifier ASICs was designed to be interfaced with the LabPET™ digital processing electronics. At a standard APD operating bias, a mean energy resolution of 27.5±2.1% was typically obtained with a relative standard deviation of 13.8% in signal amplitude for the 64 individual pixels when irradiated with 511 keV photons. With two modules in coincidence, a mean timing resolution of 5.0±0.2 ns FWHM was measured. Finally, an intrinsic spatial resolution of 0.82 mm FWHM was measured by sweeping a 22Na point source between the two detector arrays. The LabPET II detector module demonstrates promising characteristics for dedicated small animal PET imaging at submillimetre resolution and, with some further optimization, would be suitable as the building block for a dual-modality combined PET/CT system.

  3. 100 Gbps PCI-Express readout for the LHCb upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, P.; Neufeld, N.; Schwemmer, R.; Balbi, G.; Marconi, U.

    2015-04-01

    We present a new data acquisition system under development for the next upgrade of the LHCb experiment at CERN. We focus in particular on the design of a new generation of readout boards, the PCIe40, and on the viability of PCI-Express as an interconnect technology for high speed readout. We show throughput measurements across the PCI-Express bus, on Altera Stratix 5 devices, using a DMA mechanism and different synchronization schemes between the FPGA and the readout unit. Finally we discuss hardware and software design considerations necessary to achieve a data throughput of 100 Gbps in the final readout board.

  4. A new readout system for bolometers with improved low frequency stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, S.; Benoit, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Giard, M.; Bret, J.-L.; Chabaud, J.-P.; Desert, F.-X.; Faure, J.-P.; Jegoudez, G.; Lande, J.; Leblanc, J.; Lepeltier, J.-P.; Narbonne, J.; Piat, M.; Pons, R.; Serra, G.; Simiand, G.

    1997-11-01

    A new readout electronic system for bolometers is presented in this paper. The bolometer resistance is measured in a bridge with a capacitive load, using a periodic square wave bias current. The bias voltages at both ends of the bridge are balanced in order to keep the middle point around zero. Only changes around this zero value are amplified and detected synchronously with the bias signal. These features shift the measurement frequency out of the electrical low frequency noises (JFETs), and reduces the dynamics required from the amplification chain. The bias voltages are fully controlled by computer, and the lock-in detection is digital. This readout electronic has many advantages over previous ones. In particular, it proved to be able to read the total power of the radiation reaching the bolometer, and to perform measurements down to low frequencies (<= 0.1 Hz) without significant additional noise. These features open new observation strategies such as full sky scanning to bolometer instruments on board future submillimetre space projects having high thermal background levels (warm telescope). The different steps of the development of this new readout electronics on the ground-based Diabolo experiment are described, the performances reached are discussed, and a version suitable for the readout of the arrays of bolometers on the COBRAS/SAMBA satellite mission is presented.

  5. Low noise signal-to-noise ratio enhancing readout circuit for current-mediated active pixel sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Ottaviani, Tony; Karim, Karim S.; Nathan, Arokia; Rowlands, John A.

    2006-05-15

    Diagnostic digital fluoroscopic applications continuously expose patients to low doses of x-ray radiation, posing a challenge to both the digital imaging pixel and readout electronics when amplifying small signal x-ray inputs. Traditional switch-based amorphous silicon imaging solutions, for instance, have produced poor signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) at low exposure levels owing to noise sources from the pixel readout circuitry. Current-mediated amorphous silicon pixels are an improvement over conventional pixel amplifiers with an enhanced SNR across the same low-exposure range, but whose output also becomes nonlinear with increasing dosage. A low-noise SNR enhancing readout circuit has been developed that enhances the charge gain of the current-mediated active pixel sensor (C-APS). The solution takes advantage of the current-mediated approach, primarily integrating the signal input at the desired frequency necessary for large-area imaging, while adding minimal noise to the signal readout. Experimental data indicates that the readout circuit can detect pixel outputs over a large bandwidth suitable for real-time digital diagnostic x-ray fluoroscopy. Results from hardware testing indicate that the minimum achievable C-APS output current that can be discerned at the digital fluoroscopic output from the enhanced SNR readout circuit is 0.341 nA. The results serve to highlight the applicability of amorphous silicon current-mediated pixel amplifiers for large-area flat panel x-ray imagers.

  6. Progress towards microwave readout of a silicon double quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A. R.; Henry, E.; House, M.; Wang, Y. T.; Lo, C. C.; Li, H.; Greenman, L.; Pan, H.; Xiao, M.; Whaley, K. B.; Jiang, H.-W.; Yablonovitch, E.; Bokor, J.; Siddiqi, I.

    2013-03-01

    Microwave resonators coupled to quantum systems have been used for fast dispersive measurement in several different architectures in solid state and atomic physics. The electronic states of a semiconductor quantum dot represent a promising candidate for quantum information processing. Our work is geared toward developing a fast, non-demolition readout of a semiconductor qubit in silicon through coupling to a superconducting microwave resonator. We report progress on a novel design of a lateral This work is supported by the DARPA QuEST program.

  7. Development of the doppler electron velocimeter: theory.

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.

    2007-03-01

    Measurement of dynamic events at the nano-scale is currently impossible. This paper presents the theoretical underpinnings of a method for making these measurements using electron microscopes. Building on the work of Moellenstedt and Lichte who demonstrated Doppler shifting of an electron beam with a moving electron mirror, further work is proposed to perfect and utilize this concept in dynamic measurements. Specifically, using the concept of ''fringe-counting'' with the current principles of transmission electron holography, an extension of these methods to dynamic measurements is proposed. A presentation of the theory of Doppler electron wave shifting is given, starting from the development of the de Broglie wave, up through the equations describing interference effects and Doppler shifting in electron waves. A mathematical demonstration that Doppler shifting is identical to the conceptually easier to understand idea of counting moving fringes is given by analogy to optical interferometry. Finally, potential developmental experiments and uses of a Doppler electron microscope are discussed.

  8. Spectral contents readout of birefringent sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redner, Alex S.

    1989-01-01

    The technical objective of this research program was to develop a birefringent sensor, capable of measuring strain/stress up to 2000 F and a readout system based on Spectral Contents analysis. As a result of the research work, a data acquisition system was developed, capable of measuring strain birefringence in a sensor at 2000 F, with multi-point static and dynamic capabilities. The system uses a dedicated spectral analyzer for evaluation of stress-birefringence and a PC-based readout. Several sensor methods were evaluated. Fused silica was found most satisfactory. In the final evaluation, measurements were performed up to 2000 F and the system performance exceeded expectations.

  9. Developing Electronic Performance Support Systems for Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Michael P.; And Others

    This paper discusses a variety of development strategies and issues involved in the development of electronic performance support systems (EPSS) for professionals. The topics of front-end analysis, development, and evaluation are explored in the context of a case study involving the development of an EPSS to support teachers in the use of…

  10. Development for Germanium Blocked Impurity Band Far-Infrared Image Sensors with Fully-Depleted Silicon-On-Insulator CMOS Readout Integrated Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, T.; Arai, Y.; Baba, S.; Hanaoka, M.; Hattori, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Kaneda, H.; Kochi, C.; Miyachi, A.; Nagase, K.; Nakaya, H.; Ohno, M.; Oyabu, S.; Suzuki, T.; Ukai, S.; Watanabe, K.; Yamamoto, K.

    2016-02-01

    We are developing far-infrared (FIR) imaging sensors for low-background and high-sensitivity applications such as infrared astronomy. Previous FIR monolithic imaging sensors, such as an extrinsic germanium photo-conductor (Ge PC) with a PMOS readout integrated circuit (ROIC) hybridized by indium pixel-to-pixel interconnection, had three difficulties: (1) short cut-off wavelength (120 \\upmu m), (2) large power consumption (10 \\upmu W/pixel), and (3) large mismatch in thermal expansion between the Ge PC and the Si ROIC. In order to overcome these difficulties, we developed (1) a blocked impurity band detector fabricated by a surface- activated bond technology, whose cut-off wavelength is longer than 160 \\upmu m, (2) a fully-depleted silicon-on-insulator CMOS ROIC which works below 4 K with 1 \\upmu W/pixel operating power, and (3) a new concept, Si-supported Ge detector, which shows tolerance to thermal cycling down to 3 K. With these new techniques, we are now developing a 32 × 32 FIR imaging sensor.

  11. Development for Germanium Blocked Impurity Band Far-Infrared Image Sensors with Fully-Depleted Silicon-On-Insulator CMOS Readout Integrated Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, T.; Arai, Y.; Baba, S.; Hanaoka, M.; Hattori, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Kaneda, H.; Kochi, C.; Miyachi, A.; Nagase, K.; Nakaya, H.; Ohno, M.; Oyabu, S.; Suzuki, T.; Ukai, S.; Watanabe, K.; Yamamoto, K.

    2016-07-01

    We are developing far-infrared (FIR) imaging sensors for low-background and high-sensitivity applications such as infrared astronomy. Previous FIR monolithic imaging sensors, such as an extrinsic germanium photo-conductor (Ge PC) with a PMOS readout integrated circuit (ROIC) hybridized by indium pixel-to-pixel interconnection, had three difficulties: (1) short cut-off wavelength (120 μm), (2) large power consumption (10 μ W/pixel), and (3) large mismatch in thermal expansion between the Ge PC and the Si ROIC. In order to overcome these difficulties, we developed (1) a blocked impurity band detector fabricated by a surface- activated bond technology, whose cut-off wavelength is longer than 160 μm, (2) a fully-depleted silicon-on-insulator CMOS ROIC which works below 4 K with 1 μW/pixel operating power, and (3) a new concept, Si-supported Ge detector, which shows tolerance to thermal cycling down to 3 K. With these new techniques, we are now developing a 32 × 32 FIR imaging sensor.

  12. Development for Germanium Blocked Impurity Band Far-Infrared Image Sensors with Fully-Depleted Silicon-On-Insulator CMOS Readout Integrated Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, T.; Arai, Y.; Baba, S.; Hanaoka, M.; Hattori, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Kaneda, H.; Kochi, C.; Miyachi, A.; Nagase, K.; Nakaya, H.; Ohno, M.; Oyabu, S.; Suzuki, T.; Ukai, S.; Watanabe, K.; Yamamoto, K.

    2016-07-01

    We are developing far-infrared (FIR) imaging sensors for low-background and high-sensitivity applications such as infrared astronomy. Previous FIR monolithic imaging sensors, such as an extrinsic germanium photo-conductor (Ge PC) with a PMOS readout integrated circuit (ROIC) hybridized by indium pixel-to-pixel interconnection, had three difficulties: (1) short cut-off wavelength (120 \\upmu m), (2) large power consumption (10 \\upmu W/pixel), and (3) large mismatch in thermal expansion between the Ge PC and the Si ROIC. In order to overcome these difficulties, we developed (1) a blocked impurity band detector fabricated by a surface- activated bond technology, whose cut-off wavelength is longer than 160 \\upmu m, (2) a fully-depleted silicon-on-insulator CMOS ROIC which works below 4 K with 1 \\upmu W/pixel operating power, and (3) a new concept, Si-supported Ge detector, which shows tolerance to thermal cycling down to 3 K. With these new techniques, we are now developing a 32 × 32 FIR imaging sensor.

  13. The New APD Based Readout for the Crystal Barrel Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, M.; Honisch, Ch; Steinacher, M.; CBELSA/TAPS Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The CBELSA/TAPS experiment at ELSA measures double polarization observables in meson photoproduction off protons and neutrons. To be able to measure purely neutral reactions off polarized neutrons with high efficiency, the main calorimeter has to be integrated into the first level trigger. This requires to exchange the existing PIN photo diode by a new avalanche photo diode (APD) readout. The newly developed readout electronics will provide an energy resolution compatible to the previous set-up and a fast trigger signal down to 10 MeV energy deposit per crystal. After the successful final tests with a 3x3 CsI crystal matrix in Bonn at ELSA and in Mainz at MAMI all front-end electronics were produced in fall 2013. Automated test routines for the front-end electronics were developed and the characterization measurements of all APDs were successfully accomplished in Bonn. The project is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (SFB/TR16) and Schweizerischer Nationalfonds.

  14. Sensor readout detector circuit

    DOEpatents

    Chu, D.D.; Thelen, D.C. Jr.

    1998-08-11

    A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems. 6 figs.

  15. Sensor readout detector circuit

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Dahlon D.; Thelen, Jr., Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems.

  16. Individualized Development Plan for Female Electronic Technicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whyte, Helena; D'Anna, Lee

    1991-01-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory, 17 female electronic technicians participated in an individual development plan involving mentoring, basic education, and technical training. Four have been promoted, six are pursuing associate or bachelor's degrees, and two are pursuing certification. (SK)

  17. SPiRIT-TPC with GET readout electronics for the study of density dependent symmetry energy of high dense matter with Heavy RI collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Tadaaki; SPiRIT Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The nuclear Equation of State (EoS) is a fundamental property of nuclear matter that describes the relationships between the parameters for a nuclear system, such as energy, density and temperature. An international collaboration, named SPiRIT, to study the nuclear EoS has been formed recently. One of the main devices of experimental setup is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) which will be installed into the SAMURAI dipole magnet at RIKEN-RIBF. The TPC can measure charged pions, protons and light ions simultaneously in heavy RI collisions, and those will be used as probes to study the asymmetric dense nuclear matter. In addition to the status of the SPiRIT project, testing of SPiRIT-TPC with GET electronics will be presented in this talk. GET, general electronics for TPC, is a project for the development of novel electronics for TPC supported by NSF and ANR. This work is supported in part by the Japan Grant-in-Aide award and the US DOE grant DE-SC0004835 and JUSEIPEN.

  18. Readout Circuit System for In2O3/RGO Nanocomposite Gas Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Cheng-Yi

    A readout circuit system for In2O3/RGO nanocomposite gas sensors using open-source software has been developed for the first time. The readout system adopts a Raspberry Pi as an electronic control unit and incorporates different electronics components to realize the function of a source measure unit (SMU). During the operation, real-time results of measured gas concentrations can be accessed through the Internet and alarm functions are also included. All control programs were written in Python language. Using this readout system, current response of gas sensors toward oxygen concentrations (2,000---32,000 ppm) in argon environment at 140 °C are in a good agreement with the data measured by Agilent SMU (B2902A). Furthermore, temperature effects and transient response of the proposed system are investigated. The success of this readout system demonstrates the potential use of open-source hardware to construct scientific instruments with the advantages of miniaturization, low cost, flexible design, and Internet access.

  19. TES Detector Noise Limited Readout Using SQUID Multiplexers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staguhn, J. G.; Benford, D. J.; Chervenak, J. A.; Khan, S. A.; Moseley, S. H.; Shafer, R. A.; Deiker, S.; Grossman, E. N.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.

    2004-01-01

    The availability of superconducting Transition Edge Sensors (TES) with large numbers of individual detector pixels requires multiplexers for efficient readout. The use of multiplexers reduces the number of wires needed between the cryogenic electronics and the room temperature electronics and cuts the number of required cryogenic amplifiers. We are using an 8 channel SQUID multiplexer to read out one-dimensional TES arrays which are used for submillimeter astronomical observations. We present results from test measurements which show that the low noise level of the SQUID multiplexers allows accurate measurements of the TES Johnson noise, and that in operation, the readout noise is dominated by the detector noise. Multiplexers for large number of channels require a large bandwidth for the multiplexed readout signal. We discuss the resulting implications for the noise performance of these multiplexers which will be used for the readout of two dimensional TES arrays in next generation instruments.

  20. Daily weather direct readout microprocessor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davisson, L. D.; Davisson, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    The work completed included a study of the requirements and hardware and software implementation techniques for NIMBUS ESMR and TWERLE direct readout applications using microprocessors. Many microprocessors were studied for this application. Because of the available Interdata development capabilities, it was concluded that future implementations be on an Interdata microprocessor which was found adequate for the task.

  1. New readout and data-acquisition system in an electron-tracking Compton camera for MeV gamma-ray astronomy (SMILE-II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizumoto, T.; Matsuoka, Y.; Mizumura, Y.; Tanimori, T.; Kubo, H.; Takada, A.; Iwaki, S.; Sawano, T.; Nakamura, K.; Komura, S.; Nakamura, S.; Kishimoto, T.; Oda, M.; Miyamoto, S.; Takemura, T.; Parker, J. D.; Tomono, D.; Sonoda, S.; Miuchi, K.; Kurosawa, S.

    2015-11-01

    For MeV gamma-ray astronomy, we have developed an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) as a MeV gamma-ray telescope capable of rejecting the radiation background and attaining the high sensitivity of near 1 mCrab in space. Our ETCC comprises a gaseous time-projection chamber (TPC) with a micro pattern gas detector for tracking recoil electrons and a position-sensitive scintillation camera for detecting scattered gamma rays. After the success of a first balloon experiment in 2006 with a small ETCC (using a 10×10×15 cm3 TPC) for measuring diffuse cosmic and atmospheric sub-MeV gamma rays (Sub-MeV gamma-ray Imaging Loaded-on-balloon Experiment I; SMILE-I), a (30 cm)3 medium-sized ETCC was developed to measure MeV gamma-ray spectra from celestial sources, such as the Crab Nebula, with single-day balloon flights (SMILE-II). To achieve this goal, a 100-times-larger detection area compared with that of SMILE-I is required without changing the weight or power consumption of the detector system. In addition, the event rate is also expected to dramatically increase during observation. Here, we describe both the concept and the performance of the new data-acquisition system with this (30 cm)3 ETCC to manage 100 times more data while satisfying the severe restrictions regarding the weight and power consumption imposed by a balloon-borne observation. In particular, to improve the detection efficiency of the fine tracks in the TPC from ~10% to ~100%, we introduce a new data-handling algorithm in the TPC. Therefore, for efficient management of such large amounts of data, we developed a data-acquisition system with parallel data flow.

  2. Commercial and Cost Effective Production of Two-Dimensional Read-Out Boards for Sub-Atomic Particle Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Crary, David; Majka, Richard

    2010-10-22

    We report results from research aimed at developing and demonstrating production of 2-D readout structures for GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier) charged particle tracking chambers at Tech-Etch. Readout boards of two types, bi-planar and single plane, were fabricated and evaluated. The results show that Tech-Etch can produce suitable boards of either type however the single plane board has a number of advantages both in production and use that will likely make it the preferred choice for GEM tracking chambers.

  3. Adaptive Readout Technique For A Sixteen Channel Peak Sensing ADC In the FERA Format

    SciTech Connect

    Yaver, H.; Maier, M.R.; Lindstrom, D.; Ludewigt, B.A.

    1998-11-01

    An adaptive, variable block-size readout technique for use with multiple, sixteen-channel CAMAC ADCs with a FERA-bus readout has been developed and designed. It can be used to read data from experiments with or without coincidence, i.e. singles, without having to change the readout protocol. Details of the implementation are discussed and initial results are presented. Further applications of the adaptive readout are also discussed.

  4. Adaptive readout technique for a sixteen channel peak sensing ADC in the FERA format

    SciTech Connect

    Yaver, H.; Maier, M.R.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Lindstroem, D.

    1999-08-01

    An adaptive variable block size readout technique for use with multiple sixteen channel CAMAC ADCs with a FERA-bus readout has been developed and designed. It can be used to read data from experiments with or without coincidence, i.e. singles, without having to change the readout protocol. Details of the implementation are discussed and initial results are presented. Further applications of the adaptive readout are also discussed.

  5. Readout chip for the CMS pixel detector upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossini, Marco

    2014-11-01

    For the CMS experiment a new pixel detector is planned for installation during the extended shutdown in winter 2016/2017. Among the changes of the detector modified front end electronics will be used for higher efficiency at peak luminosity of the LHC and faster readout. The first prototype versions of the new readout chip have been designed and produced. The results of qualification and calibration for the new chip are presented in this paper.

  6. Development and performance of a suprathermal electron spectrometer to study auroral precipitations.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Keiichi; Grubbs, Guy; Michell, Robert G; Samara, Marilia; Stange, Jason L; Trevino, John A; Webster, James; Jahn, Jörg-Micha

    2016-05-01

    The design, development, and performance of Medium-energy Electron SPectrometer (MESP), dedicated to the in situ observation of suprathermal electrons in the auroral ionosphere, are summarized in this paper. MESP employs a permanent magnet filter with a light tight structure to select electrons with proper energies guided to the detectors. A combination of two avalanche photodiodes and a large area solid-state detector (SSD) provided 46 total energy bins (1 keV resolution for 3-20 keV range for APDs, and 7 keV resolution for >20 keV range for SSDs). Multi-channel ultra-low power application-specific integrated circuits are also verified for the flight operation to read-out and analyze the detector signals. MESP was launched from Poker Flat Research Range on 3 March 2014 as a part of ground-to-rocket electrodynamics-electrons correlative experiment (GREECE) mission. MESP successfully measured the precipitating electrons from 3 to 120 keV in 120-ms time resolution and characterized the features of suprathermal distributions associated with auroral arcs throughout the flight. The measured electrons were showing the inverted-V type spectra, consistent with the past measurements. In addition, investigations of the suprathermal electron population indicated the existence of the energetic non-thermal distribution corresponding to the brightest aurora. PMID:27250414

  7. Development and performance of a suprathermal electron spectrometer to study auroral precipitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogasawara, Keiichi; Grubbs, Guy; Michell, Robert G.; Samara, Marilia; Stange, Jason L.; Trevino, John A.; Webster, James; Jahn, Jörg-Micha

    2016-05-01

    The design, development, and performance of Medium-energy Electron SPectrometer (MESP), dedicated to the in situ observation of suprathermal electrons in the auroral ionosphere, are summarized in this paper. MESP employs a permanent magnet filter with a light tight structure to select electrons with proper energies guided to the detectors. A combination of two avalanche photodiodes and a large area solid-state detector (SSD) provided 46 total energy bins (1 keV resolution for 3-20 keV range for APDs, and 7 keV resolution for >20 keV range for SSDs). Multi-channel ultra-low power application-specific integrated circuits are also verified for the flight operation to read-out and analyze the detector signals. MESP was launched from Poker Flat Research Range on 3 March 2014 as a part of ground-to-rocket electrodynamics-electrons correlative experiment (GREECE) mission. MESP successfully measured the precipitating electrons from 3 to 120 keV in 120-ms time resolution and characterized the features of suprathermal distributions associated with auroral arcs throughout the flight. The measured electrons were showing the inverted-V type spectra, consistent with the past measurements. In addition, investigations of the suprathermal electron population indicated the existence of the energetic non-thermal distribution corresponding to the brightest aurora.

  8. Jefferson Laboratory Hall A SuperBigBite spectrometer GEM readout scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camsonne, Alexandre; Hall A SuperBigBite Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The SuperBigBite spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory in Hall A will rely on Gas Electron Multiplier trackers to achieve the required luminosity for large momentum transfer experiments. The readout electronics is based on the APV25 ASIC and the INFN VME board Multi Purpose Digitizer (MPD) Board. By using the optical readout of readout of the boards, all boards can be readout in parallel effectively increasing the data bandwidth for one crate by more than a factor of 10. With such scheme the readout of several samples become possible and background rejection can be applied to reduce the large quantity of data due to the high occupancy of detector before it is recorded. This special readout scheme based on the JLab electronics will be presented along with the online data reduction strategy for the GEM data.

  9. Automatic readout micrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritzen, T.

    1982-03-23

    A measuring system is disclosed for surveying and very accurately positioning objects with respect to a reference line. A principal use of this surveying system is for accurately aligning the electromagnets which direct a particle beam emitted from a particle accelerator. Prior art surveying systems require highly skilled surveyors. Prior art systems include, for example, optical surveying systems which are susceptible to operator reading errors, and celestial navigation-type surveying systems, with their inherent complexities. The present invention provides an automatic readout micrometer which can very accurately measure distances. The invention has a simplicity of operation which practically eliminates the possibilities of operator optical reading error, owning to the elimination of traditional optical alignments for making measurements. The invention has an extendable arm which carries a laser surveying target. The extendable arm can be continuously positioned over its entire length of travel by either a coarse or fine adjustment without having the fine adjustment outrun the coarse adjustment until a reference laser beam is centered on the target as indicated by a digital readout. The length of the micrometer can then be accurately and automatically read by a computer and compared with a standardized set of alignment measurements. Due to its construction, the micrometer eliminates any errors due to temperature changes when the system is operated within a standard operating temperature range.

  10. Automatic readout micrometer

    DOEpatents

    Lauritzen, T.

    A measuring system is described for surveying and very accurately positioning objects with respect to a reference line. A principle use of this surveying system is for accurately aligning the electromagnets which direct a particle beam emitted from a particle accelerator. Prior art surveying systems require highly skilled surveyors. Prior art systems include, for example, optical surveying systems which are susceptible to operator reading errors, and celestial navigation-type surveying systems, with their inherent complexities. The present invention provides an automatic readout micrometer which can very accurately measure distances. The invention has a simplicity of operation which practically eliminates the possibilities of operator optical reading error, owning to the elimination of traditional optical alignments for making measurements. The invention has an extendable arm which carries a laser surveying target. The extendable arm can be continuously positioned over its entire length of travel by either a coarse of fine adjustment without having the fine adjustment outrun the coarse adjustment until a reference laser beam is centered on the target as indicated by a digital readout. The length of the micrometer can then be accurately and automatically read by a computer and compared with a standardized set of alignment measurements. Due to its construction, the micrometer eliminates any errors due to temperature changes when the system is operated within a standard operating temperature range.

  11. Automatic readout micrometer

    DOEpatents

    Lauritzen, Ted

    1982-01-01

    A measuring system is disclosed for surveying and very accurately positioning objects with respect to a reference line. A principal use of this surveying system is for accurately aligning the electromagnets which direct a particle beam emitted from a particle accelerator. Prior art surveying systems require highly skilled surveyors. Prior art systems include, for example, optical surveying systems which are susceptible to operator reading errors, and celestial navigation-type surveying systems, with their inherent complexities. The present invention provides an automatic readout micrometer which can very accurately measure distances. The invention has a simplicity of operation which practically eliminates the possibilities of operator optical reading error, owning to the elimination of traditional optical alignments for making measurements. The invention has an extendable arm which carries a laser surveying target. The extendable arm can be continuously positioned over its entire length of travel by either a coarse or fine adjustment without having the fine adjustment outrun the coarse adjustment until a reference laser beam is centered on the target as indicated by a digital readout. The length of the micrometer can then be accurately and automatically read by a computer and compared with a standardized set of alignment measurements. Due to its construction, the micrometer eliminates any errors due to temperature changes when the system is operated within a standard operating temperature range.

  12. Electronic Thesis Development at Cranfield University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bevan, Simon J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the issues involved in the introduction of mandatory submission of electronic theses at Cranfield University. Design/methodology/approach: Background information on how the availability of e-theses has developed at Cranfield University is provided along with discussions and advice on issues such as the choice of software,…

  13. Electron Storage Ring Development for ICS Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Loewen, Roderick

    2015-09-30

    There is an increasing world-wide interest in compact light sources based on Inverse Compton Scattering. Development of these types of light sources includes leveraging the investment in accelerator technology first developed at DOE National Laboratories. Although these types of light sources cannot replace the larger user-supported synchrotron facilities, they offer attractive alternatives for many x-ray science applications. Fundamental research at the SLAC National Laboratory in the 1990’s led to the idea of using laser-electron storage rings as a mechanism to generate x-rays with many properties of the larger synchrotron light facilities. This research led to a commercial spin-off of this technology. The SBIR project goal is to understand and improve the performance of the electron storage ring system of the commercially available Compact Light Source. The knowledge gained from studying a low-energy electron storage ring may also benefit other Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) source development. Better electron storage ring performance is one of the key technologies necessary to extend the utility and breadth of applications of the CLS or related ICS sources. This grant includes a subcontract with SLAC for technical personnel and resources for modeling, feedback development, and related accelerator physics studies.

  14. Electronic Portfolios for Authentic Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Marilyn

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the use of electronic portfolios by school library media specialists for professional development as a resume, an evaluation instrument, or other types of credential documentation. Includes guidelines for building a successful portfolio, including appropriate software selection; audience considerations; and technology skill…

  15. Development of plasma cathode electron guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, Efim M.; Schanin, Peter M.

    1999-05-01

    The status of experimental research and ongoing development of plasma cathode electron guns in recent years is reviewed, including some novel upgrades and applications to various technological fields. The attractiveness of this kind of e-gun is due to its capability of creating high current, broad or focused beams, both in pulsed and steady-state modes of operation. An important characteristic of the plasma cathode electron gun is the absence of a thermionic cathode, a feature which leads to long lifetime and reliable operation even in the presence of aggressive background gas media and at fore-vacuum gas pressure ranges such as achieved by mechanical pumps. Depending on the required beam parameters, different kinds of plasma discharge systems can be used in plasma cathode electron guns, such as vacuum arcs, constricted gaseous arcs, hollow cathode glows, and two kinds of discharges in crossed E×B fields: Penning and magnetron. At the present time, plasma cathode electron guns provide beams with transverse dimension from fractional millimeter up to about one meter, beam current from microamperes to kiloamperes, beam current density up to about 100 A/cm2, pulse duration from nanoseconds to dc, and electron energy from several keV to hundreds of keV. Applications include electron beam melting and welding, surface treatment, plasma chemistry, radiation technologies, laser pumping, microwave generation, and more.

  16. A PCIe Gen3 based readout for the LHCb upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellato, M.; Collazuol, G.; D'Antone, I.; Durante, P.; Galli, D.; Jost, B.; Lax, I.; Liu, G.; Marconi, U.; Neufeld, N.; Schwemmer, R.; Vagnoni, V.

    2014-06-01

    The architecture of the data acquisition system foreseen for the LHCb upgrade, to be installed by 2018, is devised to readout events trigger-less, synchronously with the LHC bunch crossing rate at 40 MHz. Within this approach the readout boards act as a bridge between the front-end electronics and the High Level Trigger (HLT) computing farm. The baseline design for the LHCb readout is an ATCA board requiring dedicated crates. A local area standard network protocol is implemented in the on-board FPGAs to read out the data. The alternative solution proposed here consists in building the readout boards as PCIe peripherals of the event-builder servers. The main architectural advantage is that protocol and link-technology of the event-builder can be left open until very late, to profit from the most cost-effective industry technology available at the time of the LHC LS2.

  17. Multikilowatt power electronics development for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, D. K.; Inouye, L. Y.; Rolandelli, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    Attention is given to several multikilowatt power electronic components developed by TRW for the Space Station Power Management and Distribution test bed at NASA Lewis Research Center. These components include a 12.5-kW DC-DC converter, a 6.25-kW battery charge/discharge regulator, an 82-channel sequential shunt unit, a 10-A remote power controllers, and three different types of 1-kW load converters. TRW is also monitoring the development of 120-V fuses for space applications. The authors discuss these developments and provide steady-state and dynamic performance parameters.

  18. Frequency multiplexed dispersive readout of transmon qubits with the UCSB paramp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sank, Daniel; Barends, R.; Bochmann, J.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Y.; Chiaro, B.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Mariantoni, M.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P.; Ohya, S.; Roushan, P.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, J. M.

    2013-03-01

    Our new Xmon qubit shows good coherence, controllability and simplified coupling to other circuit elements, making it a good candidate for a large scale quantum computer. Like all qubits, it requires high fidelity readout. To this end we have developed a new parametric amplifier circuit. Simplified input coupling of the amplifier allows straightforward interfacing with our frequency multiplexed dispersive readout circuitry. The amplifier features five different modes of pump power delivery, some of which allow us to reduce the microwave component count in our readout chain. We characterize our readout system using each of these modes of operation, as well as multi qubit readout.

  19. Low-Temperature Electronic Components Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammond, Ahmad

    1999-01-01

    In many future NASA missions, such as deep space planetary exploration and the Next Generation Space Telescope, electrical components and systems must operate reliably and efficiently in extremely low temperature environments. Most modern electronic components cannot operate below moderately low operating temperatures (-40 to -55 C). The low-temperature electronics program at the NASA Lewis Research Center is focusing on the development and characterization of low-temperature components and the integration of the developed devices into demonstrable very low-temperature (-200 C) power systems such as dc-dc converters. Such low-temperature electronics will not only tolerate hostile environments but also will reduce system size and weight by eliminating radioisotope heating units, thereby reducing launch cost, improving reliability and lifetime, and increasing energy densities. Low-temperature electronic components will also have a great influence on terrestrial applications such as medical instrumentation, magnetic levitation transportation systems, and arctic and antarctic exploration. Lewis researchers are now performing extensive evaluations of commercially available as well as custom-made devices. These include various types of energy storage and signal capacitors, power switching devices, magnetic and superconducting materials, and primary lithium batteries, to name a few.

  20. A High-Speed, Event-Driven, Active Pixel Sensor Readout for Photon-Counting Microchannel Plate Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Pain, B.; Norton, T. J.; Haas, P.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Silicon array readouts for microchannel plate intensifiers offer several attractive features. In this class of detector, the electron cloud output of the MCP intensifier is converted to visible light by a phosphor; that light is then fiber-optically coupled to the silicon array. In photon-counting mode, the resulting light splashes on the silicon array are recognized and centroided to fractional pixel accuracy by off-chip electronics. This process can result in very high (MCP-limited) spatial resolution for the readout while operating at a modest MCP gain (desirable for dynamic range and long term stability). The principal limitation of intensified CCD systems of this type is their severely limited local dynamic range, as accurate photon counting is achieved only if there are not overlapping event splashes within the frame time of the device. This problem can be ameliorated somewhat by processing events only in pre-selected windows of interest or by using an addressable charge injection device (CID) for the readout array. We are currently pursuing the development of an intriguing alternative readout concept based on using an event-driven CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. APS technology permits the incorporation of discriminator circuitry within each pixel. When coupled with suitable CMOS logic outside the array area, the discriminator circuitry can be used to trigger the readout of small sub-array windows only when and where an event splash has been detected, completely eliminating the local dynamic range problem, while achieving a high global count rate capability and maintaining high spatial resolution. We elaborate on this concept and present our progress toward implementing an event-driven APS readout.

  1. Cryogenic Electronics Being Developed for Space Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Gerber, Scott S.

    2002-01-01

    Planetary exploration missions and deep space probes require electrical power management and control systems that can operate efficiently and reliably in very low temperature environments. Presently, spacecraft operating in the cold environment of deep space carry a large number of radioisotope heating units to maintain the surrounding temperature of the onboard electronics at approximately 20 C. Electronics capable of operation at cryogenic temperatures would not only tolerate the hostile environment of deep space but also reduce system size and weight by eliminating or reducing the radioisotope heating units and their associate structures. Thereby, such electronics would reduce system development as well as launch costs. In addition, power electronic circuits designed for operation at low temperatures are expected to result in more efficient systems than those at room temperature. This improvement results because semiconductor and dielectric materials have better behavior and tolerance in their electrical and thermal properties at low temperatures. The Low Temperature Electronics Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center is focusing on the research and development of electrical components, circuits, and systems suitable for applications in the aerospace environment and in deep space exploration missions. Research is being conducted on devices and systems for reliable use down to cryogenic temperatures. Some of the commercial off-the-shelf as well as developed components that are being characterized include semiconductor switching devices, resistors, magnetics, and capacitors. Semiconductor devices and integrated circuits including digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters, dc-dc converters, operational amplifiers, and oscillators are also being investigated for potential use in low-temperature applications. For example, the output response of an advanced oscillator at room temperature and at -190 C is shown. Most oscillators can operate at temperatures

  2. READOUT SYSTEM FOR ARRAYS OF FRISCH-RING CDZNTE DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    CUI, Y.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CAMARDA, G.S.; DE GERONIMO, G.; O'CONNOR, P.; JAMES, R.B.; KARGAR, A.; HARRISON, M.J.; MCGREGOR, D.S.

    2006-10-29

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated good energy resolution for identifying isotopes, <1% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency for detecting gamma rays. We will fabricate and test at Brookhaven National Laboratory an integrated module of a 64-element array of 6 x 6 x 12 mm{sup 3} Frisch-ring detectors, coupled with a readout electronics system. It supports 64 readout channels, and includes front-end electronics, signal processing circuit, USB interface and high-voltage power supply. The data-acquisition software is used to process the data stream, which includes amplitude and timing information for each detected event. This paper describes the design and assembly of the detector modules, readout electronics, and a conceptual prototype system. Some test results are also reported.

  3. New Approach for 2D Readout of GEM Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hasell, Douglas K

    2011-10-29

    Detectors based on Gas Electron Multiplication (GEM) technology are becoming more and more widely used in nuclear and high energy physics and are being applied in astronomy, medical physics, industry, and homeland security. GEM detectors are thin, low mass, insensitive to magnetic fields, and can currently provide position resolutions down to {approx}50 microns. However, the designs for reconstructing the position, in two dimensions (2D), of the charged particles striking a GEM detector are often complicated to fabricate and expensive. The objective of this proposal is to investigate a simpler procedure for producing the two dimensional readout layer of GEM detectors using readily available printed circuit board technology which can be tailored to the detector requirements. We will use the established GEM laboratory and facilities at M.I.T. currently employed in developing GEM detectors for the STAR forward tracking upgrade to simplify the testing and evaluation of the new 2D readout designs. If this new design proves successful it will benefit future nuclear and high energy physics experiments already being planned and will similarly extend and simplify the application of GEM technology to other branches of science, medicine, and industry. These benefits would be not only in lower costs for fabrication but also it increased flexibility for design and application.

  4. Readout system of TPC/MPD NICA project

    SciTech Connect

    Averyanov, A. V.; Bajajin, A. G.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cheremukhina, G. A.; Fateev, O. V.; Korotkova, A. M.; Levchanovskiy, F. V.; Lukstins, J.; Movchan, S. A.; Razin, S. V.; Rybakov, A. A.; Vereschagin, S. V. Zanevsky, Yu. V.; Zaporozhets, S. A.; Zruyev, V. N.

    2015-12-15

    The time-projection chamber (TPC) is the main tracking detector in the MPD/NICA. The information on charge-particle tracks in the TPC is registered by the MWPG with cathode pad readout. The frontend electronics (FEE) are developed with use of modern technologies such as application specific integrated circuits (ASIC), field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA), and data transfer to a concentrator via a fast optical interface. The main parameters of the FEE are as follows: total number of channels, ∼95 000; data stream from the whole TPC, 5 GB/s; low power consumption, less than 100 mW/ch; signal to noise ratio (S/N), 30; equivalent noise charge (ENC), <1000e{sup –} (C{sub in} = 10–20 pF); and zero suppression (pad signal rejection ∼90%). The article presents the status of the readout chamber construction and the data acquisition system. The results of testing FEE prototypes are presented.

  5. Position algorithm for monolithic scintillation crystals based on charge projection readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, R.; Bettiol, M.; Preziosi, E.; Cinti, M. N.; Borrazzo, C.; Pellegrini, R.; Di Castro, E.; Fabbri, A.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging devices commonly use multi-element photo detection systems, composed of an array of N × N elements, each one providing an individual signal. Many strategies have been developed to reduce the number of readout channels, one of the main approaches is the Rows and Columns (R/C) projection logic. In this paper we proposed a modified version of Raised To the Power (RTP) algorithm adapted to R/C logic. In order to validate its efficiency a linear scanning irradiation on two 49× 49 mm2 LaBr3:Ce (0.5%) crystals with different thickness (4 mm and 10 mm) was carried out. Imaging performance analysis was made in terms of position linearity, Field-of-View (FoV) enlargement and spatial resolution. Imaging results from Anger Logic, RTP algorithm based on single element readout and RTP algorithm based on R/C readout were compared. A notable advantage of using RTP algorithms instead of Anger Logic was found: the FoV widens from about 30% to more than 70% of the detector area whereas the spatial resolution is highly improved, especially for off-center interactions, both for 4 mm-thick and 10 mm-thick crystals. Furthermore, imaging performance with the R/C readout is just slightly different from the single element one (FoV reduction less than 7% and SR worsening less than 10%). The R/C adapted RTP algorithm opens doors to high imaging performance with a substantial reduction of complexity and cost in the readout electronics.

  6. Enhancements to a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) Multiplexer Readout and Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forgione, J.; Benford, D. J.; Buchanan, E. D.; Moseley, S. H.; Rebar, J.; Shafer, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    Far-infrared detector arrays such as the 16x32 superconducting bolometer array for the SAFIRE instrument (flying on the SOFIA airborne observatory) require systems of readout and control electronics to provide translation between a user-driven, digital PC and the cold, analog world of the cryogenic detector. In 2001, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed their Mark III electronics for purposes of control and readout of their 1x32 SQUID Multiplexer chips. We at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center acquired a Mark 111 system and subsequently designed upgrades to suit our and our collaborators purposes. We developed an arbitrary, programmable multiplexing system that allows the user to cycle through rows in a SQUID array in an infinite number of combinations. We provided hooks in the Mark III system to allow readout of signals from outside the Mark 111 system, such as telescope status information. Finally, we augmented the heart of the system with a new feedback algorithm implementation, flexible diagnostic tools, and informative telemetry.

  7. Enhancements to a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer readout and control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgione, Joshua B.; Benford, Dominic J.; Buchanan, Ernest D.; Moseley, S. H., Jr.; Rebar, Joyce; Shafer, Richard A.

    2004-10-01

    Far-infrared detector arrays such as the 16x32 superconducting bolometer array for the SAFIRE instrument (flying on the SOFIA airborne observatory) require systems of readout and control electronics to provide translation between a user-driven, digital PC and the cold, analog world of the cryogenic detector. In 2001, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed their Mark III electronics for purposes of control and readout of their 1x32 SQUID Multiplexer chips. We at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center acquired a Mark III system and subsequently designed upgrades to suit our and our collaborators' purposes. We developed an arbitrary, programmable multiplexing system that allows the user to cycle through rows in a SQUID array in an infinite number of combinations. We provided 'hooks' in the Mark III system to allow readout of signals from outside the Mark III system, such as telescope status information. Finally, we augmented the heart of the system with a new feedback algorithm implementation, flexible diagnostic tools, and informative telemetry.

  8. Comparative analysis of 4x288 readouts and FPAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizov, Fiodor F.; Reva, Vladimir P.; Derkach, Yurii P.; Vasiliev, Vladimir V.

    2005-10-01

    electronics. Comparative analysis shows that the readouts mentioned are different in numbers of outputs, external service but have rather similar parameters.

  9. A generic readout system for astrophysical detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doumayrou, E.; Lortholary, M.

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a generic digital platform to fulfill the needs for the development of new detectors in astrophysics, which is used in lab, for ground-based telescopes instruments and also in prototype versions for space instruments development. This system is based on hardware FPGA electronic board (called MISE) together with software on a PC computer (called BEAR). The MISE board generates the fast clocking which reads the detectors thanks to a programmable digital sequencer and performs data acquisition, buffering of digitalized pixels outputs and interfaces with others boards. The data are then sent to the PC via a SpaceWire or Usb link. The BEAR software sets the MISE board up, makes data acquisition and enables the visualization, processing and the storage of data in line. These software tools are made of C++ and Labview (NI) on a Linux OS. MISE and BEAR make a generic acquisition architecture, on which dedicated analog boards are plugged, so that to accommodate with detectors specificity: number of pixels, the readout channels and frequency, analog bias and clock interfaces. We have used this concept to build a camera for the P-ARTEMIS project including a 256 pixels sub-millimeter bolometer detector at 10Kpixel/s (SPIE 7741-12 (2010)). For the EUCLID project, a lab camera is now working for the test of CCDs 4Mpixels at 4*200Kpixel/s. Another is working for the testing of new near infrared detectors (NIR LFSA for the ESA TRP program) 110Kpixels at 2*100Kpixels/s. Other projects are in progress for the space missions PLATO and SPICA.

  10. FPIX2, the BTeV pixel readout chip

    SciTech Connect

    David C. Christian et al.

    2003-12-10

    A radiation tolerant pixel readout chip, FPIX2, has been developed at Fermilab for use by BTeV. Some of the requirements of the BTeV pixel readout chip are reviewed and contrasted with requirements for similar devices in LHC experiments. A description of the FPIX2 is given, and results of initial tests of its performance are presented, as is a summary of measurements planned for the coming year.

  11. Self-triggering readout system for the neutron lifetime experiment PENeLOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaisbauer, D.; Konorov, I.; Steffen, D.; Paul, S.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of PENeLOPE (Precision Experiment on Neutron Lifetime Operating with Proton Extraction) at the Forschungsreaktor München II is a high-precision measurement of the neutron lifetime and thereby an improvement of the parameter's precision by one order of magnitude. In order to achieve a higher accuracy, modern experiments naturally require state-of-the-art readout electronics, as well as high-performance data acquisition systems. This paper presents the self-triggering readout system designed for PENeLOPE which features a continuous pedestal tracking, configurable signal detection logic, floating ground up to 30 kV, cryogenic environment and the novel Switched Enabling Protocol (SEP). The SEP is a time-division multiplexing transport level protocol developed for a star network topology.

  12. Time and position sensitive single photon detector for scintillator read-out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schössler, S.; Bromberger, B.; Brandis, M.; Schmidt, L. Ph H.; Tittelmeier, K.; Czasch, A.; Dangendorf, V.; Jagutzki, O.

    2012-02-01

    We have developed a photon counting detector system for combined neutron and γ radiography which can determine position, time and intensity of a secondary photon flash created by a high-energy particle or photon within a scintillator screen. The system is based on a micro-channel plate photomultiplier concept utilizing image charge coupling to a position- and time-sensitive read-out anode placed outside the vacuum tube in air, aided by a standard photomultiplier and very fast pulse-height analyzing electronics. Due to the low dead time of all system components it can cope with the high throughput demands of a proposed combined fast neutron and dual discrete energy γ radiography method (FNDDER). We show tests with different types of delay-line read-out anodes and present a novel pulse-height-to-time converter circuit with its potential to discriminate γ energies for the projected FNDDER devices for an automated cargo container inspection system (ACCIS).

  13. Design of a ballistic fluxon qubit readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herr Kidiyarova-Shevchenko, Anna; Fedorov, Arkady; Shnirman, Alexander; Il'ichev, Evgeny; Schön, Gerd

    2007-11-01

    A detailed design is given for a flux qubit readout using ballistic fluxons. In this scheme, fluxons propagate through an underdamped Josephson transmission line (JTL) coupled to the qubit, whose state affects the fluxon propagation time. For strong qubit-JTL coupling, and far from the symmetry point, a qubit can be measured with fidelity greater than 99% and measurement time of 4 ns. The readout circuit requires additional rapid single flux quantum (RSFQ) interface circuitry to launch and receive the delayed flux solitons. The parameters of this driver and receiver have been optimized to produce low fluxon speed at launch and impedance matching at the receiver. The delayed solitons are compared to a reference line using a detector with time resolution of better than 16 ps. Both the JTL and RSFQ interface were designed for the Nb 30 A cm-2 process developed at VTT, Finland, with postdeposition of the Al qubit at IPHT, Germany.

  14. The Front-End Concentrator card for the RD51 Scalable Readout System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, J.; Muller, H.; Esteve, R.; Monzó, J. M.; Tarazona, A.; Martoiu, S.

    2011-11-01

    Conventional readout systems exist in many variants since the usual approach is to build readout electronics for one given type of detector. The Scalable Readout System (SRS) developed within the RD51 collaboration relaxes this situation considerably by providing a choice of frontends which are connected over a customizable interface to a common SRS DAQ architecture. This allows sharing development and production costs among a large base of users as well as support from a wide base of developers. The Front-end Concentrator card (FEC), a RD51 common project between CERN and the NEXT Collaboration, is a reconfigurable interface between the SRS online system and a wide range of frontends. This is accomplished by using application-specific adapter cards between the FEC and the frontends. The ensemble (FEC and adapter card are edge mounted) forms a 6U × 220 mm Eurocard combo that fits on a 19'' subchassis. Adapter cards exist already for the first applications and more are in development.

  15. Pad readout for gas detectors using 128-channel integrated preamplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, P.; Drees, A.; Glassel, P.; Lamade, G.; Ries, H.; Schon, A.; Specht, H.; Breskin, A.; Chechik, R.; Fraenkel, Z.

    1988-02-01

    A novel two-dimensional readout scheme for gas detectors is presented which uses small metal pads with 2.54 mm pitch as an anode. The pads are read out via 128-channel VLSI low-noise preamplifier/multiplexer chips. These chips are mounted on 2.8x2.8 cm/sup 2/ modules which are directly plugged onto the detector backplane, daisy-chained with jumpers and read out sequentially. The readout has been successfully tested with a low-pressure, two-step, TMAE-filled UV-RICH detector prototype. A single electron efficiently of >90% was observed at moderate chamber gains (<10/sup 6/). The method offers high electronic amplification, low noise, and high readout speed with a very flexible and compact design, suited for space-limited applications.

  16. Qubit readout with the Josephson Photomultiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeill, Guilhem

    Recent demonstrations of error correction in many qubit circuits, as well as efforts to build a logical qubit, have shown the need for a simple and scalable superconducting quantum bit (qubit) readout. Current solutions based on heterodyne detection and cryogenic amplification of microwave readout tones may prove difficult to scale, while photon counting presents an attractive alternative. However, the development of counters operating at these frequencies has proved technically challenging. In this thesis, we describe the development of the Josephson Photomultiplier (JPM), a microwave photon counting circuit. We discuss the JPM theoretically, and describe the fabrication of the JPM using standard thin film lithography techniques. We measure its properties as a microwave photon counter using a qubit as an in-situ calibrated source of photons. We measure a JPM quantum efficiency at the few percent level. We then use the JPM to perform readout of a transmon qubit in both the dispersive and bright regimes. We observe raw measurement fidelities of 35% and 62% respectively. We discuss how the JPM and measurement protocol could be further optimized to achieve fidelities in excess of 90%.

  17. A near-infrared 64-pixel superconducting nanowire single photon detector array with integrated multiplexed readout

    SciTech Connect

    Allman, M. S. Verma, V. B.; Stevens, M.; Gerrits, T.; Horansky, R. D.; Lita, A. E.; Mirin, R.; Nam, S. W.; Marsili, F.; Beyer, A.; Shaw, M. D.; Kumor, D.

    2015-05-11

    We demonstrate a 64-pixel free-space-coupled array of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors optimized for high detection efficiency in the near-infrared range. An integrated, readily scalable, multiplexed readout scheme is employed to reduce the number of readout lines to 16. The cryogenic, optical, and electronic packaging to read out the array as well as characterization measurements are discussed.

  18. A Silicon-Tungsten Electromagnetic Calorimeter with Integrated Electronics for the International Linear Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brau, J.; Breidenbach, M.; Frey, R.; Freytag, D.; Gallagher, C.; Graf, N.; Haller, G.; Herbst, R.; Holbrook, B.; Jaros, J.; Lander, R.; Radloff, P.; Strom, D.; Tripathi, M.; Woods, M.

    2012-12-01

    We present an update of the development of an electromagnetic calorimeter for the Silicon Detector concept for a future linear electron-positron collider. After reviewing the design criteria and related simulation studies, we discuss progress in the research and development of the detector. This concept has from the outset made the case for highly integrated electronic readout with small (1 mm) readout gaps in order to maintain a small Moliere radius for electromagnetic showers and to avoid active heat removal. We now have fully functioning 1024-channel readout chips which have been successfully bonded to 15 cm silicon sensors. We present initial results from these assemblies.

  19. The readout of a GEM or Micromegas-equipped TPC by means of the Medipix2 CMOS sensor as direct anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, P.; Colijn, A. P.; Fornaini, A.; Giomataris, Y.; van der Graaf, H.; Heijne, E. H. M.; Llopart, X.; Schmitz, J.; Timmermans, J.; Visschers, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    We have applied the Medipix2 pixel CMOS chip as direct anode readout for a TPC. For the gas amplification two options have been investigated: (i) a three-stage GEM system and (ii) a Micromegas mesh. The structure of the cloud of primary electrons, left after interactions of 55Fe quanta with the gas is visible with unprecedented precision. This proof-of-principle is an essential step in our project to realize a monolithic pixel sensor with integrated Micromegas, to be developed specially for the readout of TPCs, and applicable for drift chambers in general.

  20. AC Read-Out Circuits for Single Pixel Characterization of TES Microcalorimeters and Bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottardi, L.; van de Kuur, J.; Bandler, S.; Bruijn, M.; de Korte, P.; Gao, J. R.; den Hartog, R.; Hijmering, R. A.; Hoevers, H.; Koshropanah, P.; Kilbourne, C.; Lindemann, M. A.; Parra Borderias, M.; Ridder, M.

    2011-01-01

    SRON is developing Frequency Domain Multiplexing (FDM) for the read-out of transition edge sensor (TES) soft x-ray microcalorimeters for the XMS instrument of the International X-ray Observatory and far-infrared bolometers for the SAFARI instrument on the Japanese mission SPICA. In FDM the TESs are AC voltage biased at frequencies from 0.5 to 6 MHz in a superconducting LC resonant circuit and the signal is read-out by low noise and high dynamic range SQUIDs amplifiers. The TES works as an amplitude modulator. We report on several AC bias experiments performed on different detectors. In particular, we discuss the results on the characterization of Goddard Space Flight Center x-ray pixels and SRON bolometers. The paper focuses on the analysis of different read-out configurations developed to optimize the noise and the impedance matching between the detectors and the SQUID amplifier. A novel feedback network electronics has been developed to keep the SQUID in flux locked loop, when coupled to superconducting high Q circuits, and to optimally tune the resonant bias circuit. The achieved detector performances are discussed in view of the instrument requirement for the two space missions.

  1. XAMPS Detectors Readout ASIC for LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Dragone, A; Pratte, J.F.; Rehak, P.; Carini, G.A.; Herbst, R.; O'Connor, P.; Siddons, D.P.; /BNL, NSLS

    2008-12-18

    An ASIC for the readout of signals from X-ray Active Matrix Pixel Sensor (XAMPS) detectors to be used at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is presented. The X-ray Pump Probe (XPP) instrument, for which the ASIC has been designed, requires a large input dynamic range on the order of 104 photons at 8 keV with a resolution of half a photon FWHM. Due to the size of the pixel and the length of the readout line, large input capacitance is expected, leading to stringent requirement on the noise optimization. Furthermore, the large number of pixels needed for a good position resolution and the fixed LCLS beam period impose limitations on the time available for the single pixel readout. Considering the periodic nature of the LCLS beam, the ASIC developed for this application is a time-variant system providing low-noise charge integration, filtering and correlated double sampling. In order to cope with the large input dynamic range a charge pump scheme implementing a zero-balance measurement method has been introduced. It provides an on chip 3-bit coarse digital conversion of the integrated charge. The residual charge is sampled using correlated double sampling into analog memory and measured with the required resolution. The first 64 channel prototype of the ASIC has been fabricated in TSMC CMOS 0.25 {micro}m technology. In this paper, the ASIC architecture and performances are presented.

  2. Commercial and Cost Effective Production of Two-Dimensional Read-Out Boards for Sub-Atomic Particle Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Crary, David; Majka, Richard

    2010-10-22

    Tech-Etch has considerable experience in numerous related high precision etched Kapton® products including production of GEM foils. The required precision and production process for 2-D readout boards is similar to that developed for GEM foil production. Additionally, Tech-Etch has strong ties with several research institutions (namely Brookhaven National Laboratory, MIT and Yale University) that can help design and evaluate the performance of the readout boards produced at Tech-Etch. Since Tech-Etch is a small company, it also has the capability to produce a large variety of part configurations, optimized for a particular customer's requirements. We report results from research aimed at developing and demonstrating production of 2-D readout structures for GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier) charged particle tracking chambers at Tech-Etch. Readout boards of two types, bi-planar and single plane, were fabricated and evaluated. The results show that Tech-Etch can produce suitable boards of either type however the single plane board has a number of advantages both in production and use that will likely make it the preferred choice for GEM tracking chambers.

  3. Development of ferroelectric electron beam diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Flechtner, D.; Ivers, J.D.; Kerslick, G.A.; Nation, J.A.; Schaechter, L.; Zhang, G.

    1995-12-31

    The authors are currently investigating the use of ferroelectric ceramics for electron beam generation. These materials exhibit a spontaneous (saturation) polarization, P{sub s}, of up to 100{mu}C/cm{sup 2}. Emission occurs when the polarization state of the ferroelectric is changed rapidly by an applied electric field, and a fraction of the surface screening charge is released at a gridded electrode. Using a Lead-Zirconate-Titanate (PZT) ceramic as the electron source in a planar 14kV diode geometry they have measured diode current densities of up to 40A/cm{sup 2} with a 5cm gap. The normalized rms emittance of this beam has been measured to be 12{pi} mm-mrad at 8A. Recent results from experiments to extend operation of this diode up to 70 kV, 300 ns pulses will be reported. They are also designing a 20--30 kV, 1 {micro}s system that will be operated in a repetition rate mode. They are planning to use such a system as part of their program to develop compact X-band sources with average power levels in the hundreds of watts range. Using simulation codes, such as EGUN, together with results from analytical work TWT structures are being designed for use with these sources. The advantages of using PPM focusing in both cylindrical or sheet beam configurations are also under investigation.

  4. Front-end electronics development at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, P.

    1995-09-01

    AT BNL the monolithic front-end electronics development effort is an outgrowth of work in discrete and hybrid circuits over the past 30 years. BNL`s area of specialization centers on circuits for precision amplitude measurement, with signal-to-noise ratios of 100:1 and calibration to the same level of precision. Circuits are predominantly classical, continuous-time implementation of the functions now performed by hybrids, with little or no loss of performance. Included in this category are charge and current-sensitive preamplifiers, pulse shapers, sample/hold, multiplexing, and associated calibration and control circuits. Presently integration densities are limited to 16 channels per chip. Two examples are presented to illustrate the techniques needed to adopt hybrid circuits to the constraints of monolithic CMOS technology. They are programmable pulse shapes and a charge-sensitive preamp for very low detector capacitance.

  5. Focal plane infrared readout circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An infrared imager, such as a spectrometer, includes multiple infrared photodetectors and readout circuits for reading out signals from the photodetectors. Each readout circuit includes a buffered direct injection input circuit including a differential amplifier with active feedback provided through an injection transistor. The differential amplifier includes a pair of input transistors, a pair of cascode transistors and a current mirror load. Photocurrent from a photodetector can be injected onto an integration capacitor in the readout circuit with high injection efficiency at high speed. A high speed, low noise, wide dynamic range linear infrared multiplexer array for reading out infrared detectors with large capacitances can be achieved even when short exposure times are used. The effect of image lag can be reduced.

  6. Optical Link For Readout From Focal-Plane Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Larsson, Anders G.; Maserjian, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Outputs of photodetectors modulate beam of light. Proposed optical link carries analog readout signals from photodetectors in focal-plane array to external signal-processing circuitry. Insensitive to electromagnetic interference at suboptical frequencies, and imposes smaller heat load on cryogenic apparatus because it does not include high-power electronic amplifier or laser transmitter within cold chamber.

  7. Spindt cold cathode electron gun development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    A thin film field emission cathode array and an electron gun based on this emitter array are summarized. Fabricating state of the art cathodes for testing at NASA and NRL, advancing the fabrication technology, developing wedge shaped emitters, and performing emission tests are covered. An anistropic dry etching process (reactive ion beam etching) developed that leads to increasing the packing density of the emitter tips to about 5 x 10 to the 6th power/square cm. Tests with small arrays of emitter tips having about 10 tips has demonstrated current densities of over 100 A/sq cm. Several times using cathodes having a packing density of 1.25 x 10 to the 6th power tips/sq cm. Indications are that the higher packing density achievable with the dry etch process may extend this capability to the 500 A/sq cm range and beyond. The wedge emitter geometry was developed and shown to produce emission. This geometry can (in principle) extend the current density capability of the cathodes beyond the 500 A/sq cm level. An emission microscope was built and tested for use with the cathodes.

  8. Survey of developing electronic photography standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Jack M.

    1996-01-01

    The ISO TC42/WG18 and ANSI/NAPM IT10 Technical Committees are developing the following standards related to electronic still photography: ISO 12231 -- Glossary of technical terms; ISO 12232 -- Determination of ISO speed; ISO 12233 -- Resolution measurements; ISO 12234 -- Removable memory; and ISO 14524 -- OECF measurement methods. ISO 12231 is at the DIS stage, ISO 12234 and 14524 are at the CD stage, and ISO 12232 and 12233 will most likely reach the CD stage within a year. Since most of these documents are approaching final form, it is useful to examine them in some detail. Presented here are summaries of the contents of these standards accompanied by comments on their application and state of development. These standards are viewed from a broad digital photography perspective, and placed in context with other work in this area. Significant research has been accomplished in these committees, and is discussed in relation to fundamental imaging issues. Also discussed are future projects and areas where standardization is needed but little has been accomplished. In addition to providing a forum for the development of standards, technical committees are an important avenue for interaction between companies, user groups, and the government. Such avenues can have a great impact on emerging technologies.

  9. Cryogenic SiGe ASICs for readout and multiplexing of superconducting detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voisin, F.; Prêle, D.; Bréelle, E.; Piat, M.; Sou, G.; Klisnick, G.; Redon, M.

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents an ultra low noise instrumentation based on cryogenic electronic integrated circuits (ASICs : Application Specific Integrated Circuits). We have designed successively two ASICs in standard BiCMOS SiGe 0.35 μm technology that have proved to be operating at cryogenic temperatures. The main functions of these circuits are the readout and the multiplexing of SQUID/TES arrays. We report the cryogenic operation of a first ASIC version dedicated to the readout of a 2×4 pixel demonstrator array. We particularly emphasize on the development and the test phases of an ultra low noise (0.2 nV/√Hz) cryogenic amplifier designed with two multiplexed inputs. The cryogenic SiGe amplifier coupled to a SQUID in a FLL operating at 4.2 K is also presented. We finally report on the development of a second version of this circuit to readout a 3×8 detectors array with improved noise performances and upgraded functionalities.

  10. Cryogenic SiGe ASICs for readout and multiplexing of superconducting detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sou, G.; Klisnick, G.; Redon, M.; Voisin, F.; Prêle, D.; Bréelle, E.; Piat, M.

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents an ultra low noise instrumentation based on cryogenic electronic integrated circuits (ASICs: Application Specific Integrated Circuits). We have designed successively two ASICs in standard BiCMOS SiGe 0.35 μm technology that have proved to be operating at cryogenic temperatures. The main functions of these circuits are the readout and the multiplexing of TES/SQUID arrays. We report the cryogenic operation of a first ASIC version dedicated to the readout of a 2 × 4 pixel demonstrator array. We particularly emphasize on the development and the test phases of an ultra low white noise (0.2 nV/sqrtHz) cryogenic amplifier designed with two multiplexed inputs. The cryogenic SiGe amplifier coupled to a SQUID in a FLL operating at 4.2 K is also presented. We finally report on the development of a second version of this circuit to readout a 3 × 8 detectors array with improved noise performances and upgraded functionalities.

  11. Readout and Data Acquisition of the Icarus T600 Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Sandro

    2004-07-01

    Icarus T600 readout electronics is hosted on one hundred racks all over the top of the detector, interconnected through a Fast/GigaEthernet network. The readout has to handle a huge volume of raw digitized data, about 250GB/s, while avoiding to impact on detector performance with the introduction of deadtime. The talk will illustrate the data acquisition system architecture, which were first tested during the technical validation run held in summer 2001 in Pavia, collecting more than 28000 triggers from cosmic ray events.

  12. Fully digital readout of segmented solid state detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenhagen, K. H.; Badura, E.; Bräuning, H.; Hoffmann, J.; Koch, K.; Kurz, N.; Märtin, R.; Minami, S.; Ott, W.; Spillmann, U.; Stöhlker, Th; Weber, G.; Weber, M.

    2013-09-01

    In this work, the digital readout of semiconductor detectors in combination with digital filters was investigated. Both non-segmented high-purity germanium and segmented planar lithium-drifted silicon detectors were used. In each case, photons from a stationary americium (241Am) gamma source were detected. The resulting preamplifier output pulses were digitized at a fixed sampling frequency and stored entirely. Digital filters were applied to the stored waveforms to extract time and energy information. The performance of different digital filters was compared. The optimum energy resolution obtained was comparable with the value resulting from an analogue readout system based on standard nuclear instrumentation module and versatile module Europe bus electronics.

  13. Linear readout of object manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, SueYeon; Lee, Daniel D.; Sompolinsky, Haim

    2016-06-01

    Objects are represented in sensory systems by continuous manifolds due to sensitivity of neuronal responses to changes in physical features such as location, orientation, and intensity. What makes certain sensory representations better suited for invariant decoding of objects by downstream networks? We present a theory that characterizes the ability of a linear readout network, the perceptron, to classify objects from variable neural responses. We show how the readout perceptron capacity depends on the dimensionality, size, and shape of the object manifolds in its input neural representation.

  14. Development FD-SOI MOSFET Amplifiers for Integrated Read-Out Circuit of Superconducting-Tunnel-Junction Single-Photon-Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kiuchi, Kenji; et al.

    2015-07-27

    We proposed a new high-resolution single-photon infrared spectrometer for search for radiative decay of cosmic neutrino background (Cν#23;B). The superconducting-tunnel-junctions(STJs) are used as a single-photon counting device. Each STJ consists of Nb/Al/AlxOy/Al/Nb layers, and their thicknesses are optimized for the operation temperature at 370 mK cooled by a 3He sorption refrigerator. Our STJs achieved the leak current 250 pA, and the measured data implies that a smaller area STJ fulfills our requirement. FD-SOI MOSFETs are employed to amplify the STJ signal current in order to increase signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). FD-SOI MOSFETs can be operated at cryogenic temperature of 370 mK, which reduces the noise of the signal amplification system. FD-SOI MOSFET characteristics are measured at cryogenic temperature. The Id-Vgs curve shows a sharper turn on with a higher threshold voltage and the Id-Vds curve shows a nonlinear shape in linear region at cryogenic temperature. Taking into account these effects, FD-SOI MOSFETs are available for read-out circuit of STJ detectors. The bias voltage for STJ detectors is 0.4 mV, and it must be well stabilized to deliver high performance. We proposed an FD-SOI MOSFET-based charge integrated amplifier design as a read-out circuit of STJ detectors. The requirements for an operational amplifier used in the amplifier is estimated using SPICE simulation. The op-amp is required to have a fast response (GBW ≥ #21;100 MHz), and it must have low power dissipation as compared to the cooling power of refrigerator.

  15. A High-Speed, Event-Driven, Active Pixel Sensor Readout for Photon-Counting Microchannel Plate Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Pain, Bedabrata; Norton, Timothy J.; Haas, J. Patrick; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon array readouts for microchannel plate intensifiers offer several attractive features. In this class of detector, the electron cloud output of the MCP intensifier is converted to visible light by a phosphor; that light is then fiber-optically coupled to the silicon array. In photon-counting mode, the resulting light splashes on the silicon array are recognized and centroided to fractional pixel accuracy by off-chip electronics. This process can result in very high (MCP-limited) spatial resolution while operating at a modest MCP gain (desirable for dynamic range and long term stability). The principal limitation of intensified CCD systems of this type is their severely limited local dynamic range, as accurate photon counting is achieved only if there are not overlapping event splashes within the frame time of the device. This problem can be ameliorated somewhat by processing events only in pre-selected windows of interest of by using an addressable charge injection device (CID) for the readout array. We are currently pursuing the development of an intriguing alternative readout concept based on using an event-driven CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. APS technology permits the incorporation of discriminator circuitry within each pixel. When coupled with suitable CMOS logic outside the array area, the discriminator circuitry can be used to trigger the readout of small sub-array windows only when and where an event splash has been detected, completely eliminating the local dynamic range problem, while achieving a high global count rate capability and maintaining high spatial resolution. We elaborate on this concept and present our progress toward implementing an event-driven APS readout.

  16. The readout system for the ArTeMis camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doumayrou, E.; Lortholary, M.; Dumaye, L.; Hamon, G.

    2014-07-01

    During ArTeMiS observations at the APEX telescope (Chajnantor, Chile), 5760 bolometric pixels from 20 arrays at 300mK, corresponding to 3 submillimeter focal planes at 450μm, 350μm and 200μm, have to be read out simultaneously at 40Hz. The read out system, made of electronics and software, is the full chain from the cryostat to the telescope. The readout electronics consists of cryogenic buffers at 4K (NABU), based on CMOS technology, and of warm electronic acquisition systems called BOLERO. The bolometric signal given by each pixel has to be amplified, sampled, converted, time stamped and formatted in data packets by the BOLERO electronics. The time stamping is obtained by the decoding of an IRIG-B signal given by APEX and is key to ensure the synchronization of the data with the telescope. Specifically developed for ArTeMiS, BOLERO is an assembly of analogue and digital FPGA boards connected directly on the top of the cryostat. Two detectors arrays (18*16 pixels), one NABU and one BOLERO interconnected by ribbon cables constitute the unit of the electronic architecture of ArTeMiS. In total, the 20 detectors for the tree focal planes are read by 10 BOLEROs. The software is working on a Linux operating system, it runs on 2 back-end computers (called BEAR) which are small and robust PCs with solid state disks. They gather the 10 BOLEROs data fluxes, and reconstruct the focal planes images. When the telescope scans the sky, the acquisitions are triggered thanks to a specific network protocol. This interface with APEX enables to synchronize the acquisition with the observations on sky: the time stamped data packets are sent during the scans to the APEX software that builds the observation FITS files. A graphical user interface enables the setting of the camera and the real time display of the focal plane images, which is essential in laboratory and commissioning phases. The software is a set of C++, Labview and Python, the qualities of which are respectively used

  17. Preliminary validation results of an ASIC for the readout and control of near-infrared large array detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pâhlsson, Philip; Meier, Dirk; Otnes Berge, Hans Kristian; Øya, Petter; Steenari, David; Olsen, Alf; Hasanbegovic, Amir; Altan, Mehmet A.; Najafiuchevler, Bahram; Talebi, Jahanzad; Azman, Suleyman; Gheorghe, Codin; Ackermann, Jörg; Mæhlum, Gunnar

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we present initial test results of the Near Infrared Readout and Controller ASIC (NIRCA), designed for large area image sensors under contract from the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Norwegian Space Center. The ASIC is designed to read out image sensors based on mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe, or MCT) operating down to 77 K. IDEAS has developed, designed and initiated testing of NIRCA with promising results, showing complete functionality of all ASIC sub-components. The ASIC generates programmable digital signals to clock out the contents of an image array and to amplify, digitize and transfer the resulting pixel charge. The digital signals can be programmed into the ASIC during run-time and allows for windowing and custom readout schemes. The clocked out voltages are amplified by programmable gain amplifiers and digitized by 12-bit, 3-Msps successive approximation register (SAR) analogue-to-digital converters (ADC). Digitized data is encoded using 8-bit to 10-bit encoding and transferred over LVDS to the readout system. The ASIC will give European researchers access to high spectral sensitivity, very low noise and radiation hardened readout electronics for astronomy and Earth observation missions operating at 77 K and room temperature. The versatility of the chip makes the architecture a possible candidate for other research areas, or defense or industrial applications that require analog and digital acquisition, voltage regulation, and digital signal generation.

  18. A digital 25 µm pixel-pitch uncooled amorphous silicon TEC-less VGA IRFPA with massive parallel Sigma-Delta-ADC readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Dirk; Russ, Marco; Würfel, Daniel; Lerch, Renee; Yang, Pin; Bauer, Jochen; Vogt, Holger

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents an advanced 640 x 480 (VGA) IRFPA based on uncooled microbolometers with a pixel-pitch of 25μm developed by Fraunhofer-IMS. The IRFPA is designed for thermal imaging applications in the LWIR (8 .. 14μm) range with a full-frame frequency of 30 Hz and a high sensitivity with NETD < 100 mK @ f/1. A novel readout architecture which utilizes massively parallel on-chip Sigma-Delta-ADCs located under the microbolometer array results in a high performance digital readout. Sigma-Delta-ADCs are inherently linear. A high resolution of 16 bit for a secondorder Sigma-Delta-modulator followed by a third-order digital sinc-filter can be obtained. In addition to several thousand Sigma-Delta-ADCs the readout circuit consists of a configurable sequencer for controlling the readout clocking signals and a temperature sensor for measuring the temperature of the IRFPA. Since packaging is a significant part of IRFPA's price Fraunhofer-IMS uses a chip-scaled package consisting of an IR-transparent window with antireflection coating and a soldering frame for maintaining the vacuum. The IRFPAs are completely fabricated at Fraunhofer-IMS on 8" CMOS wafers with an additional surface micromachining process. In this paper the architecture of the readout electronics, the packaging, and the electro-optical performance characterization are presented.

  19. 3D reconstruction of nuclear reactions using GEM TPC with planar readout

    SciTech Connect

    Bihałowicz, Jan Stefan

    2015-02-24

    The research program of the Extreme Light Infrastructure – Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) laboratory under construction in Magurele, Romania facilities the need of developing a gaseous active-target detector providing 3D reconstruction of charged products of nuclear reactions induced by gamma beam. The monoenergetic, high-energy (E{sub γ} > 19 MeV) gamma beam of intensity 10{sup 13}γ/s allows studying nuclear reactions in astrophysics. A Time Projection Chamber with crossed strip readout (eTPC) is proposed as one of the imaging detectors. The special feature of the readout electrode structure is a 2D reconstruction based on the information read out simultaneously from three arrays of strips that form virtual pixels. It is expected to reach similar spatial resolution as for pixel readout at largely reduced cost of electronics. The paper presents the current progress and first results of the small scale prototype TPC which is a one of implementation steps towards eTPC detector proposed in the Technical Design Report of Charged Particles Detection at ELI-NP.

  20. A Digital Readout System For The CSO Microwave Kinetic Inductance Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max-Moerbeck, Walter; Mazin, B. A.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2007-12-01

    Submillimeter galaxies are important to the understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. Determination of the spectral energy distribution in the millimeter and submillimeter regimes allows important and powerful diagnostics. Our group is developing a camera for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) using Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs). MKIDs are superconducting devices whose impedance changes with the absorption of photons. The camera will have 600 spatial pixels and 4 bands at 750 μm, 850 μm, 1.1 mm and 1.3 mm. For each spatial pixel of the camera the radiation is coupled to the MKIDs using phased-array antennas. This signal is split into 4 different bands using filters and detected using the superconductor as part of a MKID's resonant circuit. The detection process consists of measurement of the changes in the transmission through the resonator when it is illuminated. By designing resonant circuits to have different resonant frequencies and high transmission out resonance, MKIDs can be frequency-domain multiplexed. This allows the simultaneous readout of many detectors through a single coaxial cable. The readout system makes use of microwave IQ modulation and is based on commercial electronics components operating at room temperature. The basic readout has been demonstrated on the CSO. We are working on the implementation of an improved design to be tested on a prototype system with 6x6 pixels and 4 colors next April on the CSO.

  1. Radiation tolerance of prototype BTeV pixel detector readout chips

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriele Chiodini et al.

    2002-07-12

    High energy and nuclear physics experiments need tracking devices with increasing spatial precision and readout speed in the face of ever-higher track densities and increased radiation environments. The new generation of hybrid pixel detectors (arrays of silicon diodes bump bonded to arrays of front-end electronic cells) is the state of the art technology able to meet these challenges. We report on irradiation studies performed on BTeV pixel readout chip prototypes exposed to a 200 MeV proton beam at Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. Prototype pixel readout chip preFPIX2 has been developed at Fermilab for collider experiments and implemented in standard 0.25 micron CMOS technology following radiation tolerant design rules. The tests confirmed the radiation tolerance of the chip design to proton total dose up to 87 MRad. In addition, non destructive radiation-induced single event upsets have been observed in on-chip static registers and the single bit upset cross section has been extensively measured.

  2. Frequency multiplexed superconducting quantum interference device readout of large bolometer arrays for cosmic microwave background measurements.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, M A; Lueker, M; Aird, K A; Bender, A N; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cho, H-M; Clarke, J; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; Flanigan, D I; de Haan, T; George, E M; Halverson, N W; Holzapfel, W L; Hrubes, J D; Johnson, B R; Joseph, J; Keisler, R; Kennedy, J; Kermish, Z; Lanting, T M; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Luong-Van, D; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Montroy, T E; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Richards, P L; Ruhl, J E; Schaffer, K K; Schwan, D; Shirokoff, E; Spieler, H G; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Vu, C; Westbrook, B; Williamson, R

    2012-07-01

    A technological milestone for experiments employing transition edge sensor bolometers operating at sub-Kelvin temperature is the deployment of detector arrays with 100s-1000s of bolometers. One key technology for such arrays is readout multiplexing: the ability to read out many sensors simultaneously on the same set of wires. This paper describes a frequency-domain multiplexed readout system which has been developed for and deployed on the APEX-SZ and South Pole Telescope millimeter wavelength receivers. In this system, the detector array is divided into modules of seven detectors, and each bolometer within the module is biased with a unique ∼MHz sinusoidal carrier such that the individual bolometer signals are well separated in frequency space. The currents from all bolometers in a module are summed together and pre-amplified with superconducting quantum interference devices operating at 4 K. Room temperature electronics demodulate the carriers to recover the bolometer signals, which are digitized separately and stored to disk. This readout system contributes little noise relative to the detectors themselves, is remarkably insensitive to unwanted microphonic excitations, and provides a technology pathway to multiplexing larger numbers of sensors. PMID:22852677

  3. Advanced Electronics. Curriculum Development. Bulletin 1778.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eppler, Thomas

    This document is a curriculum guide for a 180-hour course in advanced electronics for 11th and 12th grades that has four instructional units. The instructional units are orientation, discrete components, integrated circuits, and electronic systems. The document includes a course flow chart; a two-page section that describes the course, lists…

  4. Germanium JFET for Cryogenic Readout Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, N. C.; Monroy, C.; Jhabvala, M.; Shu, P.

    1999-01-01

    The n-channel Germanium junction field effect transistor (Ge-JFET) was designed and fabricated for cryogenic applications. The Ge-JFET exhibits superior noise performance at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). From the device current voltage characteristics of n-channel JFETs, it is seen that transconductance increases monotonically with the lowering of temperature to 4.2 K (liquid helium temperature).

  5. Comparing interferometry techniques for multi-degree of freedom test mass readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isleif, Katharina-Sophie; Gerberding, Oliver; Mehmet, Moritz; Schwarze, Thomas S.; Heinzel, Gerhard; Danzmann, Karsten

    2016-05-01

    Laser interferometric readout systems with 1pm/Hz precision over long time scales have successfully been developed for LISA and LISA Pathfinder. Future gravitational physics experiments, for example in the fields of gravitational wave detection and geodesy, will potentially require similar levels of displacement and tilt readouts of multiple test masses in multiple degrees of freedom. In this article we compare currently available classic interferometry schemes with new techniques using phase modulations and complex readout algorithms. Based on a simple example we show that the new techniques have great potential to simplify interferometric readouts.

  6. Semiconductor detectors with proximity signal readout

    SciTech Connect

    Asztalos, Stephen J.

    2014-01-30

    Semiconductor-based radiation detectors are routinely used for the detection, imaging, and spectroscopy of x-rays, gamma rays, and charged particles for applications in the areas of nuclear and medical physics, astrophysics, environmental remediation, nuclear nonproliferation, and homeland security. Detectors used for imaging and particle tracking are more complex in that they typically must also measure the location of the radiation interaction in addition to the deposited energy. In such detectors, the position measurement is often achieved by dividing or segmenting the electrodes into many strips or pixels and then reading out the signals from all of the electrode segments. Fine electrode segmentation is problematic for many of the standard semiconductor detector technologies. Clearly there is a need for a semiconductor-based radiation detector technology that can achieve fine position resolution while maintaining the excellent energy resolution intrinsic to semiconductor detectors, can be fabricated through simple processes, does not require complex electrical interconnections to the detector, and can reduce the number of required channels of readout electronics. Proximity electrode signal readout (PESR), in which the electrodes are not in physical contact with the detector surface, satisfies this need.

  7. Asynchronous data readout system for multichannel ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, P. Y.; Atkin, E. V.

    2016-02-01

    The data readout system of multichannel data-driven ASIC, requiring high-speed (320 Mb/s) output data serialization is described. Its structure, based on a limited number of FIFO blocks, provides a lossless data transfer. The solution has been realized as a separate test IP block in the prototyped 8 channel ASIC, intended for the muon chamber of CBM experiment at FAIR. The block was developed for the UMC 0.18 μm MMRF CMOS process and prototyped via Europractice. Main parameters of the chip are given.

  8. Small-Scale Readout Systems Prototype for the STAR PIXEL Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Szelezniak, Michal A.; Besson, Auguste; Colledani, Claude; Dorokhov, Andrei; Dulinski, Wojciech; Greiner, Leo C.; Himmi, Abdelkader; Hu, Christine; Matis, Howard S.; Ritter, Hans Georg; Rose, Andrew; Shabetai, Alexandre; Stezelberger, Thorsten; Sun, Xiangming; Thomas, Jim H.; Valin, Isabelle; Vu, Chinh Q.; Wieman, Howard H.; Winter, Marc

    2008-10-01

    A prototype readout system for the STAR PIXEL detector in the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) vertex detector upgrade is presented. The PIXEL detector is a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) based silicon pixel vertex detector fabricated in a commercial CMOS process that integrates the detector and front-end electronics layers in one silicon die. Two generations ofMAPS prototypes designed specifically for the PIXEL are discussed. We have constructed a prototype telescope system consisting of three small MAPS sensors arranged in three parallel and coaxial planes with a readout system based on the readout architecture for PIXEL. This proposed readout architecture is simple and scales to the size required to readout the final detector. The real-time hit finding algorithm necessary for data rate reduction in the 400 million pixel detector is described, and aspects of the PIXEL system integration into the existing STAR framework are addressed. The complete system has been recently tested and shown to be fully functional.

  9. 3 ns single-shot read-out in a quantum dot-based memory structure

    SciTech Connect

    Nowozin, T. Bimberg, D.; Beckel, A.; Lorke, A.; Geller, M.

    2014-02-03

    Fast read-out of two to six charges per dot from the ground and first excited state in a quantum dot (QD)-based memory is demonstrated using a two-dimensional electron gas. Single-shot measurements on modulation-doped field-effect transistor structures with embedded InAs/GaAs QDs show read-out times as short as 3 ns. At low temperature (T = 4.2 K) this read-out time is still limited by the parasitics of the setup and the device structure. Faster read-out times and a larger read-out signal are expected for an improved setup and device structure.

  10. Development of the superconducting detectors and read-out for the X-IFU instrument on board of the X-ray observatory Athena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottardi, L.; Akamatsu, H.; Bruijn, M. P.; den Hartog, R.; den Herder, J.-W.; Jackson, B.; Kiviranta, M.; van der Kuur, J.; van Weers, H.

    2016-07-01

    The Advanced Telescope for High-Energy Astrophysics (Athena) has been selected by ESA as its second large-class mission. The future European X-ray observatory will study the hot and energetic Universe with its launch foreseen in 2028. Microcalorimeters based on superconducting Transition-edge sensor (TES) are the chosen technology for the detectors array of the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) on board of Athena. The X-IFU is a 2-D imaging integral-field spectrometer operating in the soft X-ray band (0.3-12 keV). The detector consists of an array of 3840 TESs coupled to X-ray absorbers and read out in the MHz bandwidth using Frequency Domain Multiplexing (FDM) based on Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs). The proposed design calls for devices with a high filling-factor, high quantum efficiency, relatively high count-rate capability and an energy resolution of 2.5 eV at 5.9 keV. The paper will review the basic principle and the physics of the TES-based microcalorimeters and present the state-of-the art of the FDM read-out.

  11. Ion age transport: developing devices beyond electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2014-03-01

    There is more to current devices than conventional electronics. Increasingly research into the controlled movement of ions and molecules is enabling a range of new technologies. For example, as Weihua Guan, Sylvia Xin Li and Mark Reed at Yale University explain, 'It offers a unique opportunity to integrate wet ionics with dry electronics seamlessly'. In this issue they provide an overview of voltage-gated ion and molecule transport in engineered nanochannels. They cover the theory governing these systems and fabrication techniques, as well as applications, including biological and chemical analysis, and energy conversion [1]. Studying the movement of particles in nanochannels is not new. The transport of materials in rock pores led Klinkenberg to describe an analogy between diffusion and electrical conductivity in porous rocks back in 1951 [2]. And already in 1940, Harold Abramson and Manuel Gorin noted that 'When an electric current is applied across the living human skin, the skin may be considered to act like a system of pores through which transfer of substances like ragweed pollen extract may be achieved both by electrophoretic and by diffusion phenomena' [3]. Transport in living systems through pore structures on a much smaller scale has attracted a great deal of research in recent years as well. The selective transport of ions and small organic molecules across the cell membrane facilitates a number of functions including communication between cells, nerve conduction and signal transmission. Understanding these processes may benefit a wide range of potential applications such as selective separation, biochemical sensing, and controlled release and drug delivery processes. In Germany researchers have successfully demonstrated controlled ionic transport through nanopores functionalized with amine-terminated polymer brushes [4]. The polymer nanobrushes swell and shrink in response to changes in temperature, thus opening and closing the nanopore passage to ionic

  12. Design and development of a position-sensitive γ-camera for SPECT imaging based on PCI electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanoudaki, V.; Giokaris, N. D.; Karabarbounis, A.; Loudos, G. K.; Maintas, D.; Papanicolas, C. N.; Paschalis, P.; Stiliaris, E.

    2004-07-01

    A position-sensitive γ-camera is being currently designed at IASA. This camera will be used experimentally (development mode) in order to obtain an integrated knowledge of its function and perhaps to improve its performance in parallel with an existing one, which has shown a very good performance in phantom, small animal, SPECT technique and is currently being tested for clinical applications. The new system is a combination of a PSPMT (Hamamatsu, R2486-05) and a PMT for simultaneous or independent acquisition of energy and position information, respectively. The resistive chain technique resulting in two signals at each ( X, Y) direction will perform the readout of the PSPMT's anode signals; the system is based on PCI electronics. Status of the system's development and the ongoing progress is presented.

  13. Common read-out receiver card for ALICE Run2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, H.; Kebschull, U.

    2013-12-01

    ALICE at CERN LHC uses custom FPGA-based computer plug-in cards as interface between the optical detector read-out link and the PC clusters of Data Acquisition (DAQ) and High-Level Trigger (HLT). The cards used at DAQ and HLT during Run1 have been developed as independent projects and are now facing similar problems with obsolete major interfaces and limited link speeds and processing capabilities. A new common card has been developed to enable the upgrade of the read-out chain towards higher link rates while providing backward compatibility with the current architecture. First prototypes could be tested successfully and raised interest from other collaborations.

  14. A Triggerless readout system for the bar PANDA electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemens, M.; PANDA Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    One of the physics goals of the future bar PANDA experiment at FAIR is to research newly discovered exotic states. Because the detector response created by these particles is very similar to the background channels, a new type of data readout had to be developed, called "triggerless" readout. In this concept, each detector subsystem preprocesses the signal, so that in a later stage, high-level phyiscs constraints can be applied to select events of interest. A dedicated clock source using a protocol called SODANET over optical fibers ensures proper synchronisation between the components. For this new type of readout, a new way of simulating the detector response also needed to be developed, taking into account the effects of pile-up caused by the 20 MHz interaction rate.

  15. Ion age transport: developing devices beyond electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2014-03-01

    There is more to current devices than conventional electronics. Increasingly research into the controlled movement of ions and molecules is enabling a range of new technologies. For example, as Weihua Guan, Sylvia Xin Li and Mark Reed at Yale University explain, 'It offers a unique opportunity to integrate wet ionics with dry electronics seamlessly'. In this issue they provide an overview of voltage-gated ion and molecule transport in engineered nanochannels. They cover the theory governing these systems and fabrication techniques, as well as applications, including biological and chemical analysis, and energy conversion [1]. Studying the movement of particles in nanochannels is not new. The transport of materials in rock pores led Klinkenberg to describe an analogy between diffusion and electrical conductivity in porous rocks back in 1951 [2]. And already in 1940, Harold Abramson and Manuel Gorin noted that 'When an electric current is applied across the living human skin, the skin may be considered to act like a system of pores through which transfer of substances like ragweed pollen extract may be achieved both by electrophoretic and by diffusion phenomena' [3]. Transport in living systems through pore structures on a much smaller scale has attracted a great deal of research in recent years as well. The selective transport of ions and small organic molecules across the cell membrane facilitates a number of functions including communication between cells, nerve conduction and signal transmission. Understanding these processes may benefit a wide range of potential applications such as selective separation, biochemical sensing, and controlled release and drug delivery processes. In Germany researchers have successfully demonstrated controlled ionic transport through nanopores functionalized with amine-terminated polymer brushes [4]. The polymer nanobrushes swell and shrink in response to changes in temperature, thus opening and closing the nanopore passage to ionic

  16. Readout for a large area neutron sensitive microchannel plate detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiming; Yang, Yigang; Wang, Xuewu; Li, Yuanjing

    2015-06-01

    A neutron sensitive microchannel plate (MCP) detector was developed for neutron imaging on the beamline of a compact pulsed hadron source (CPHS). The detector was set up with a Wedge-and-Strip Anode (WSA) and a delay line anode readout to compare the spatial resolution and throughput with these two anodes. Tests show that the WSA readout is suitable for small area imaging with a spatial resolution of 200 μm with low energy X-rays in a 50 mm diameter MCP-WSA assembly. However, the spatial resolution deteriorated to ~2 mm in a 106 mm diameter MCP-WSA assembly because the noise caused by the parasitic capacitance is 10 times larger in the larger assembly than in the 50 mm diameter assembly. A 120 mm by 120 mm delay line anode was then used for the 106 mm MCP readout. The spatial resolution was evaluated for various voltages applied to the MCP V-stack, various readout voltages and various distances between the MCP V-stack rear face and the delay line. The delay line readout had resolutions of 65.6 μm in the x direction and 63.7 μm in the y direction and the throughput was greater than 600 kcps. The MCP was then used to acquire a neutron image of an USAF1951 Gd-mask.

  17. Double side read-out technique for mitigation of radiation damage effects in PbWO4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchini, M. T.; Auffray, E.; Benaglia, A.; Cavallari, F.; Cockerill, D.; Dolgopolov, A.; Faure, J. L.; Golubev, N.; Hobson, P. R.; Jain, S.; Korjik, M.; Mechinski, V.; Singovski, A.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Tarasov, I.; Zahid, S.

    2016-04-01

    Test beam results of a calorimetric module based on 3×3×22 cm3 PbWO4 crystals, identical to those used in the CMS ECAL Endcaps, read out by a pair of photodetectors coupled to the two opposite sides (front and rear) of each crystal are presented. Nine crystals with different level of induced absorption, from 0 to 20 m‑1, have been tested using electrons in the 50–200 GeV energy range. Photomultiplier tubes have been chosen as photodetectors to allow for a precise measurement of highly damaged crystals. The information provided by this double side read-out configuration allows to correct for event-by-event fluctuations of the longitudinal development of electromagnetic showers. By strongly mitigating the effect of non-uniform light collection efficiency induced by radiation damage, the double side read-out technique significantly improves the energy resolution with respect to a single side read-out configuration. The non-linearity of the response arising in damaged crystals is also corrected by a double side read-out configuration and the response linearity of irradiated crystals is restored. In high radiation environments at future colliders, as it will be the case for detectors operating during the High Luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider, defects can be created inside the scintillator volume leading to a non-uniform response of the calorimetric cell. The double side read-out technique presented in this study provides a valuable way to improve the performance of calorimeters based on scintillators whose active volumes are characterized by high aspect ratio cells similar to those used in this study.

  18. MAROC, a generic photomultiplier readout chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blin, S.; Barrillon, P.; de La Taille, C.

    2010-12-01

    The MAROC ASICs family is dedicated to the readout of 64-channel Multi Anode PMT and similar detectors. Its main roles are to correct the gain spread of MAPMT channels thanks to an individual variable gain preamplifier and to discriminate the input signals (from 50fC i.e 1/3 photo-electron) in order to produce 64 trigger outputs. A multiplexed analog charge output is also available with a dynamic range around 10 pe ( ~ 1.6 pC) and a 12 bit Wilkinson ADC is embedded. Three versions of this chip have been submitted. MAROC 2 is the production version for the ATLAS luminometer and MAROC3 is a version with lower dissipation and significant improvements concerning the charge (30 pe: ~ 5 pC) and trigger (discrimination from 10fC). This third version showed very good characteristics that are presented here.

  19. Developing Novel Explanatory Models for Electronics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pule, Sarah; McCardle, John

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores how representations of technological concepts may be designed to help students with visual learning styles achieve successful comprehension in the field of electronics. The work accepts a wide definition of what is understood by the visualisation of a model in that it can take different external forms, but also include an…

  20. The Human Element: Staff Development in the Electronic Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conroy, Barbara

    1981-01-01

    Stresses the importance of staff development as a key to effective operations in the electronic library, with emphasis upon the importance of staff development in the transition to the computerized library. Current library staffing, personnel in the electronic library, and the responsibility for staff development are discussed. (Author/JL)

  1. Waveshifting fiber readout of lanthanum halide scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, G. L.; Cherry, M. L.; Stacy, J. G.

    2006-07-01

    Newly developed high-light-yield inorganic scintillators coupled to waveshifting optical fibers provide the capability of efficient X-ray detection and millimeter scale position resolution suitable for high-energy cosmic ray instruments, hard X-ray/gamma ray astronomy telescopes and applications to national security. The CASTER design for NASA's proposed Black Hole Finder Probe mission, in particular, calls for a 6 8 m2 hard X-ray coded aperture imaging telescope operating in the 20 600 keV energy band, putting significant constraints on cost and readout complexity. The development of new inorganic scintillator materials (e.g., cerium-doped LaBr3 and LaCl3) provides improved energy resolution and timing performance that is well suited to the requirements for national security and astrophysics applications. LaBr3 or LaCl3 detector arrays coupled with waveshifting fiber optic readout represent a significant advance in the performance capabilities of scintillator-based gamma cameras and provide the potential for a feasible approach to affordable, large area, extremely sensitive detectors. We describe some of the applications and present laboratory test results demonstrating the expected scintillator performance.

  2. CMS electromagnetic calorimeter readout

    SciTech Connect

    Denes, P.; Wixted, R.

    1997-12-31

    The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter will consist of 109,008 crystals of Lead Tungstate (PbWO{sub 4}) arranged in a barrel (92880 crystals) and 2 endcaps (8064 crystals each). The crystals will be 25 radiation lengths long and cut in tapered shapes to make a hermetic calorimeter. The scintillation light from the crystals is captured by a photodetector, amplified and digitized. The properties of PbWO4, which is a new crystal still very much under development.

  3. Sub-10ps monolithic and low-power photodetector readout

    SciTech Connect

    Varner, Gary S.; Ruckman, Larry L.

    2009-02-20

    Recent advances in photon detectors have resulted in high-density imaging arrays that offer many performance and cost advantages. In particular, the excellent transit time spread of certain devices show promise to provide tangible benefits in applications such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Meanwhile, high-density, high-performance readout techniques have not kept on pace for exploiting these developments. Photodetector readout for next generation high event rate particle identification and time-resolved PET requires a highly-integrated, low-power, and cost-effective readout technique. We propose fast waveform sampling as a method that meets these criteria and demonstrate that sub-10ps resolution can be obtained for an existing device.

  4. A summary of high-temperature electronics research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Thome, F.V.; King, D.B.

    1991-10-18

    Current and future needs in automative, aircraft, space, military, and well logging industries require operation of electronics at higher temperatures than today's accepted limit of 395 K. Without the availability of high-temperature electronics, many systems must operate under derated conditions or must accept severe mass penalties required by coolant systems to maintain electronic temperatures below critical levels. This paper presents ongoing research and development in the electronics community to bring high-temperature electronics to commercial realization. Much of this work was recently reviewed at the First International High-Temperature Electronics Conference held 16--20 June 1991 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. 4 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Photon-to-electron quantum information transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaka, Hideo

    2011-05-01

    Spin is a fundamental property of electrons and plays an important role in information storage. For spin-based quantum information technology, preparation and read-out of the electron spin state must be spin coherent, but both the traditional preparation and read-out of the spin state are projective to up/down spin states, which do not have spin coherence. We have recently demonstrated that the polarization coherence of light can be coherently transferred to the spin coherence of electrons in a semiconductor. We have also developed a new scheme named tomographic Kerr rotation (TKR) by generalizing the traditional KR to directly readout the spin coherence of optically prepared electrons without the need for the spin dynamics, which allows the spin projection measurement in an arbitrary set of basis states. These demonstrations were performed using g-factor-controlled semiconductor quantum wells with precessing and nonprecessing electrons. The developed scheme offers a tool for performing basis-independent preparation and read-out of a spin quantum state in a solid. These results encourage us to make a quantum media converter between flying photon qubits and stationary electron spin qubits in semiconductors.

  6. Very Low Noise Multiplexing with SQUIDs and SiGe Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors for Readout of Large Superconducting Bolometer Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voisin, F.; Bréelle, E.; Piat, M.; Prêle, D.; Klisnick, G.; Sou, G.; Redon, M.

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents an ultra low noise instrumentation based on a standard BiCMOS SiGe 0.35 μm ASIC operating at cryogenic temperatures. The main functions of the electronic circuit are the readout and the multiplexing of SQUIDs/TES. We report the cryogenic operation of the ASIC dedicated to the readout of a 2×4 pixel demonstrator array. We particularly emphasize on the development and the test phases of an ultra low noise ( 0.2 nV/sqrt{Hz} ) cryogenic amplifier designed with two multiplexed inputs. The cryogenic SiGe amplifier coupled to a SQUID in a FLL operating at 4.2 K is also presented.

  7. Very-low-noise multiplexing with SQUIDs and SiGe HBTs for readout of large superconducting bolometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prêle, D.; Klisnick, G.; Sou, G.; Redon, M.; Bréelle, E.; Voisin, F.; Piat, M.

    2007-08-01

    We present an ultra-low-noise instrumentation based on a standard BiCMOS SiGe 0.35 μm ASIC operating at cryogenic temperatures. The main functions of the electronic circuit are the readout and the multiplexing of SQUIDs/TES arrays. We report the cryogenic operation of the ASIC dedicated to the readout of a 2×4 pixel demonstrator array. We particularly emphasise on the development, and the test phases of an ultra-low-noise (0.2 nV/√Hz) cryogenic amplifier designed with two multiplexed input. The cryogenic SiGe amplifier coupled to a SQUID in a FLL operating at 4.2 K is also presented.

  8. Readout, Sensing, and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajente, Gabriele

    Suspending the mirrors is one of the most crucial tasks in gravitational wave interferometer technology. The performance of the suspensions must provide the required attenuation of seismic noise and reduction of thermal noise, two fundamental limits to the sensitivity of any gravitational wave detector. Moreover, the suspension system must be equipped with sensors and actuators which are used to actively control some relevant degrees of freedom, so to be able to keep the interferometer at its working point (i.e., "locked"). In the first part of this chapter we deal with the basic principles behind the super attenuator chains developed in Virgo to reduce the seismic noise. In the second part, we illustrate the techniques to suspend the mirror reducing the thermal noise in the detection bandwidth, according to the theory illustrated in Chap. 8, 10.1007/978-3-319-03792-9_8.

  9. Development of fast data processing electronics for a stacked x-ray detector system with application as a polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Daniel; Dick, Jürgen; Distratis, Giuseppe; Kendziorra, Eckhard; Santangelo, Andrea; Schanz, Thomas; Tenzer, Christoph; Warth, Gabriele

    2012-09-01

    We have assembled a stacked setup consisting of a soft and hard X-ray detector with cooling capability and control-, readout-, and data processing electronics at the Institut für Astronomie und Astrophysik Tübingen (IAAT). The detector system is a 64 ×64 DePFET-Matrix in front of a CdTe-Caliste module. The detectors were developed at the Max-Planck Institute Semiconductor Laboratory (HLL) in Neuperlach and the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) in Saclay, respectively. In this combined structure the DePFET detector works as Low Energy Detector (LED) while the Caliste module (HED) only detects the high energy photons that have passed through the LED. In this work we present the current status of the setup. Furthermore, an intended application of the detector system as a polarimeter is described.

  10. Common Readout Unit (CRU) - A new readout architecture for the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, J.; Khan, S. A.; Mukherjee, S.; Paul, R.

    2016-03-01

    The ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is presently going for a major upgrade in order to fully exploit the scientific potential of the upcoming high luminosity run, scheduled to start in the year 2021. The high interaction rate and the large event size will result in an experimental data flow of about 1 TB/s from the detectors, which need to be processed before sending to the online computing system and data storage. This processing is done in a dedicated Common Readout Unit (CRU), proposed for data aggregation, trigger and timing distribution and control moderation. It act as common interface between sub-detector electronic systems, computing system and trigger processors. The interface links include GBT, TTC-PON and PCIe. GBT (Gigabit transceiver) is used for detector data payload transmission and fixed latency path for trigger distribution between CRU and detector readout electronics. TTC-PON (Timing, Trigger and Control via Passive Optical Network) is employed for time multiplex trigger distribution between CRU and Central Trigger Processor (CTP). PCIe (Peripheral Component Interconnect Express) is the high-speed serial computer expansion bus standard for bulk data transport between CRU boards and processors. In this article, we give an overview of CRU architecture in ALICE, discuss the different interfaces, along with the firmware design and implementation of CRU on the LHCb PCIe40 board.

  11. Cryogenic THGEM-GPM for the readout of scintillation light from liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wenqing; Fu, Yidong; Li, Yulan; Li, Jin; Li, Yuanjing; Yue, Qian

    2015-02-01

    A GPM (Gaseous Photo Multiplier) based on GEMs (Gas Electron Multipliers) and THGEMs (Thick Gas Electron Multipliers) is a promising detector for VUV (Vacuum Ultra Violet) photon readouts in rare event experiments which use cryogenic two-phase detectors with detection media of Ar and Xe. A GPM based on THGEM made of PTFE (herein named PTFE-THGEM) was developed inspired by the wide use of PTFE (polytetrafluoroethene) boards as low radioactive background PCB in rare event experiments. The efficiencies of the THGEM, a CsI photocathode, and finally a GPM are presented here. At low temperature (113 K) and 1.1 atm, the quantum efficiency of the GPM for VUV photons from liquid Ar in a two-phase detector is estimated to be 8.1% and the low threshold of the detector system for initial electrons prior to multiplication is 12 using 5 N purity Ar (0.99999).

  12. Sources of noise in magneto-optical readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansuripur, M.

    1991-01-01

    The various sources of noise which are often encountered in magneto-optical readout systems are analyzed. Although the focus is on magneto-optics, most sources of noise are common among the various optical recording systems and one can easily adapt the results to other media and systems. A description of the magneto-optical readout system under consideration is given, and the standard methods and the relevant terminology of signal and noise measurement are described. The characteristics of thermal noise, which originates in the electronic circuitry of the readout system, are described. The most fundamental of all sources of noise, the shot noise, is considered, and a detailed account of its statistical properties is given. Shot noise, which is due to random fluctuations in photon arrival times, is an ever-present noise in optical detection. Since the performance of magneto-optical recording devices in use today is approaching the limit imposed by the shot noise, it is important that the reader have a good grasp of this particular source of noise. A model for the laser noise is described, and measurement results which yield numerical values for the strength of the laser power fluctuations are presented. Spatial variations of the disk reflectivity and random depolarization phenomena also contribute to the overall level of noise in readout; these and related issues are treated. Numerical simulation results describing some of the more frequently encountered sources of noise which accompany the recorded waveform itself, namely, jitter noise and signal-amplitude fluctuation noise are presented.

  13. Spatial distribution read-out system for thermoluminescence sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, I.; Tomiyama, T.; Imaeda, K.; Ninagawa, K.; Wada, T.; Yamashita, Y.; Misaki, A.

    1985-01-01

    A spatial distribution read-out system of thermoluminescence (TL) sheets is developed. This system consists of high gain image intensifier, a CCD-TV camera, a video image processor and a host computer. This system has been applied to artificial TL sheets (BaSO4:Eu doped) for detecting high energy electromagnetic shower and heavy nuclei tracks.

  14. Nanosecond monolithic CMOS readout cell

    DOEpatents

    Souchkov, Vitali V.

    2004-08-24

    A pulse shaper is implemented in monolithic CMOS with a delay unit formed of a unity gain buffer. The shaper is formed of a difference amplifier having one input connected directly to an input signal and a second input connected to a delayed input signal through the buffer. An elementary cell is based on the pulse shaper and a timing circuit which gates the output of an integrator connected to the pulse shaper output. A detector readout system is formed of a plurality of elementary cells, each connected to a pixel of a pixel array, or to a microstrip of a plurality of microstrips, or to a detector segment.

  15. Progress on the FDM Development at SRON: Toward 160 Pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Hartog, R. H.; Bruijn, M. P.; Clenet, A.; Gottardi, L.; Hijmering, R.; Jackson, B. D.; van der Kuur, J.; van Leeuwen, B. J.; van der Linden, A. J.; van Loon, D.; Nieuwenhuizen, A.; Ridder, M.; van Winden, P.

    2014-08-01

    SRON is developing the electronic read-out for arrays of transition edge sensors using frequency domain multiplexing in combination with base-band feedback. The astronomical applications of this system are the read-out of soft X-ray micro-calorimeters in a potential instrument on the European X-ray mission-under-study Athena+ and far-IR bolometers for the Safari instrument on the Japanese mission SPICA. In this paper we demonstrate the simultaneous read-out of 38 bolometer pixels at a 12 aW/Hz dark NEP level. The stability of the read-out is assessed over 400 s. time spans. Although some 1/f noise is present, there are several bolometers for which 1/f-free read-out can be demonstrated.

  16. Scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout for low dose x-ray imaging: Lag

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Zhao, Wei; Nanba, Masakazu; Egami, Norifomi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: A new concept of indirect conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated. It is referred to as scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout (SAPHIRE). The present work investigates the temporal performance, i.e., lag, of SAPHIRE. Methods: Since the temporal performance of the x-ray detection materials, i.e., the structured scintillator and avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor, has been studied previously, the investigation is focused on lag due to the FEA readout method. The principle of FEA readout is similar to that of scanning electron beam readout used in camera tubes, where the dominant source of lag is the energy spread of electrons. Since the principles of emission and beam focusing methods for FEA are different from thermionic emission used in camera tubes, its electron beam energy spread and hence lag is expected to be different. In the present work, the energy spread of the electrons emitted from a FEA was investigated theoretically by analyzing different contributing factors due to the FEA design and operations: The inherent energy spread of field emission, the FEA driving pulse delay, and the angular distribution of emitted electrons. The electron energy spread determined the beam acceptance characteristic curve of the photoconductive target, i.e., the accepted beam current (Ia) as a function of target potential (Vt), from which lag could be calculated numerically. Lag calculation was performed using FEA parameters of two prototype HARP-FEA image sensors, and the results were compared with experimental measurements. Strategies for reducing lag in SAPHIRE were proposed and analyzed. Results: The theoretical analysis shows that the dominant factor for lag is the angular distribution of electrons emitted from the FEA. The first frame lags for two prototype sensors with 4 and 25 μm HARP layer thicknesses were 62.1% and 9.1%, respectively. A

  17. Single-shot readout of spin qubits in Si/SiGe quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Christie

    2012-02-01

    Si/SiGe quantum dots are an attractive option for spin qubit development, because of the long coherence times for electron spins in silicon, arising from weak hyperfine interaction and low spin orbit coupling. I will present measurements of gate-defined single and double quantum dots formed in Si/SiGe semiconductor heterostuctures. Control of the gate voltages on these dots enables tuning of the tunnel coupling to the leads and to other dots. Careful tuning of these tunnel rates, in combination with fast, pulsed-gate manipulation and spin-to-charge conversion, allow spin state measurement using an integrated quantum point contact as a local charge detector. Single spin qubit readout relies on the Zeeman energy splitting from an external magnetic field for spin-to-charge conversion. Two-electron singlet-triplet qubits, on the other hand, can be measured by using Pauli spin blockade of tunneling between the dots to readout the qubit even at zero magnetic field. I will present real-time, single-shot readout measurements of both individual spin [1] and singlet-triplet qubits [2] in gated Si/SiGe quantum dots. Work performed in collaboration with J. R. Prance, Zhan Shi, B. J. Van Bael, Teck Seng Koh, D. E. Savage, M. G. Lagally, R. Joynt, L. R. Schreiber, L. M. K. Vandersypen, M. Friesen, S. N. Coppersmith, and M. A. Eriksson. [4pt] [1] C. B. Simmons et al. Physical Review Letters 106, 156804 (2011). [0pt] [2] J. R. Prance, et al., e-print: http://lanl.arxiv.org/abs/1110.6431

  18. Pulsed Laser’s Influence on the Readout Characteristics of a CAD Type MSR Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Noguchi, Hitoshi; Sumi, Satoshi; Tanemura, Sakae

    We developed a high-density magnet-optical disk system named “iD (intelligent or image Disk) PHOTO" for use in mobile storage devices such as digital still cameras. This system achieved a recording density as high as 4.6 Gb/in2 by adopting technologies, such as CAD type MSR (Center Aperture Detection type Magnetically induced Super Resolution) readout method, LP-MFM (Laser Pumped Magnetic Field Modulation) recording method, etc. It was reported that using the pulsed laser instead of the continuous laser in the readout process improved the carrier level of the CAD type MSR media at the shorter mark length. The purpose of this study is to clarify the effect of the laser pumped readout method on the characteristics of the "iD PHOTO" system. Using the laser pumped readout method, we can get larger readout margin than the continuous irradiation. At lower duty ratio, the readout margin is larger, but the erased ratio is lower than that of higher duty ratio. At the optimum bottom power there is a large readout margin and a high erased ratio. The erased ratio at 1.2 mW of bottom power was up to 26 % higher than that of continuous irradiation. The influence of the laser pumped readout method on the characteristics of the erased ratio makes it a useful technique for the CAD type MSR disk.

  19. On readout of vibrational qubits using quantum beats.

    PubMed

    Shyshlov, Dmytro; Berrios, Eduardo; Gruebele, Martin; Babikov, Dmitri

    2014-12-14

    Readout of the final states of qubits is a crucial step towards implementing quantum computation in experiment. Although not scalable to large numbers of qubits per molecule, computational studies show that molecular vibrations could provide a significant (factor 2-5 in the literature) increase in the number of qubits compared to two-level systems. In this theoretical work, we explore the process of readout from vibrational qubits in thiophosgene molecule, SCCl2, using quantum beat oscillations. The quantum beats are measured by first exciting the superposition of the qubit-encoding vibrational states to the electronically excited readout state with variable time-delay pulses. The resulting oscillation of population of the readout state is then detected as a function of time delay. In principle, fitting the quantum beat signal by an analytical expression should allow extracting the values of probability amplitudes and the relative phases of the vibrational qubit states. However, we found that if this procedure is implemented using the standard analytic expression for quantum beats, a non-negligible phase error is obtained. We discuss the origin and properties of this phase error, and propose a new analytical expression to correct the phase error. The corrected expression fits the quantum beat signal very accurately, which may permit reading out the final state of vibrational qubits in experiments by combining the analytic fitting expression with numerical modelling of the readout process. The new expression is also useful as a simple model for fitting any quantum beat experiments where more accurate phase information is desired. PMID:25494748

  20. The Electronic Nose Training Automation Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schattke, Nathan

    2002-01-01

    The electronic nose is a method of using several sensors in conjunction to identify an unknown gas. Statistical analysis has shown that a large number of training exposures need to be performed in order to get a model that can be depended on. The number of training exposures needed is on the order of 1000. Data acquisition from the noses are generally automatic and built in. The gas generation equipment consists of a Miller-Nelson (MN) flow/temperature/humidity controller and a Kin-Tek (KT) trace gas generator. This equipment has been controlled in the past by an old data acquisition and control system. The new system will use new control boards and an easy graphical user interface. The programming for this is in the LabVIEW G programming language. A language easy for the user to make modifications to. This paper details some of the issues in selecting the components and programming the connections. It is not a primer on LabVIEW programming, a separate CD is being delivered with website files to teach that.

  1. Thermal Neutron Detectors with Discrete Anode Pad Readout

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,B.; Schaknowski, N.A., Smith, G.C., DeGeronimo, G., Vernon, E.O.

    2008-10-19

    A new two-dimensional thermal neutron detector concept that is capable of very high rates is being developed. It is based on neutron conversion in {sup 3}He in an ionization chamber (unity gas gain) that uses only a cathode and anode plane; there is no additional electrode such as a Frisch grid. The cathode is simply the entrance window, and the anode plane is composed of discrete pads, each with their own readout electronics implemented via application specific integrated circuits. The aim is to provide a new generation of detectors with key characteristics that are superior to existing techniques, such as higher count rate capability, better stability, lower sensitivity to background radiation, and more flexible geometries. Such capabilities will improve the performance of neutron scattering instruments at major neutron user facilities. In this paper, we report on progress with the development of a prototype device that has 48 x 48 anode pads and a sensitive area of 24cm x 24cm.

  2. Electronically Mentoring to Develop Accomplished Professional Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gareis, Christopher R.; Nussbaum-Beach, Sheryl

    2007-01-01

    With nearly half of all new teachers leaving the classroom within 5 years, schools are faced with the challenge of retaining early-career teachers while simultaneously providing them with the support they need to develop into effective professionals. Mentoring novice teachers by pairing them with experienced teachers in schools is a widely adopted…

  3. Optimized readout system for cooled optically stimulated luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. D.; Eschbach, P. A.

    1990-09-01

    Cooled Optically Stimulated Luminescence (COSL) in CaF2:Mn is an ionizing radiation dosimetry method recently developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). In this method CaF2:Mn crystals irradiated by gamma radiation at room temperature are cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K), stimulated by ultraviolet laser light at 326 nm, and allowed to warm to room temperature. Light emission proportional to the gamma exposure occurs as the TLD warms from liquid nitrogen temperature to room temperature. The new method is an example of a highly sensitive phototransfer technique which could form the basis for future radiation dosimetry applications. Measurements to date have shown high potential for measuring gamma exposures in the range of 10 microR. The high sensitivity of the COSL technique is due in part to the larger quantum efficiency of radiative recombination at low temperatures and to the complete absence of the incandescent background associated with conventional thermoluminescent readout methods. Along with the potential for a system which is more sensitive than thermoluminescent readers, multiple COSL readouts can be performed with minimal reduction in the COSL intensity. The multiple readout capability can serve as a possible permanent dosimetry record, thus allowing the reanalysis of a questionable reading. In an attempt to optimize the sensitivity of the COSL method, a new readout system is being developed.

  4. The development of a multi-cathode electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, L. A.

    1973-01-01

    A multicathode electron gun, capable of automatically interchanging cathode structures of a microwave electron tube upon command was developed. This technique extends the life of a microwave electron tube into the range of fifty to one hundred years. The concept consists of mounting a number of cathode structures on a rotating platform. Rotation of the platform moves the different cathodes into operating position. The component tests, construction and operation of the gun are described.

  5. Architecture and settings optimization procedure of a TES frequency domain multiplexed readout firmware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clenet, A.; Ravera, L.; Bertrand, B.; den Hartog, R.; Jackson, B.; van Leeuwen, B.-J.; van Loon, D.; Parot, Y.; Pointecouteau, E.; Sournac, A.

    2014-11-01

    IRAP is developing the readout electronics of the SPICA-SAFARI's TES bolometer arrays. Based on the frequency domain multiplexing technique the readout electronics provides the AC-signals to voltage-bias the detectors; it demodulates the data; and it computes a feedback to linearize the detection chain. The feedback is computed with a specific technique, so called baseband feedback (BBFB) which ensures that the loop is stable even with long propagation and processing delays (i.e. several μ s) and with fast signals (i.e. frequency carriers of the order of 5 MHz). To optimize the power consumption we took advantage of the reduced science signal bandwidth to decouple the signal sampling frequency and the data processing rate. This technique allowed a reduction of the power consumption of the circuit by a factor of 10. Beyond the firmware architecture the optimization of the instrument concerns the characterization routines and the definition of the optimal parameters. Indeed, to operate an array TES one has to properly define about 21000 parameters. We defined a set of procedures to automatically characterize these parameters and find out the optimal settings.

  6. Wavelength-shifter Readout of Scintillation Counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauletta, Giovanni

    1998-04-01

    A compact system for reading out the scintillation counters of the CDF muon upgrade has been developed and tested. The system relies on wavelength-shifter (wls) fiber ribbon, glued to the side of 1.5 to 2 cm - thick counters, to collect and transfer the light from the scintillator to a small(Hamamatsu R5600) phototube, embedded in one corner of the counter. Prototype counters were constructed from polystyrene-based scintillator(Manufactured by Monocristal Institute at Kharkov under Dubna supervision.) using y11 - doped wls fibers(Manufactured by Kuraray.) for readout. Their response to cosmic ray muons was measured and found to be adequate for up to more than 3 m when the light collection was enhanced by mirroring the wls fiber ends furthest from the photomultiplier.

  7. Integrated multi-crate FERA readout system

    SciTech Connect

    Kistryn, S.; Bee, C.P.; Eberhardt, P.

    1997-12-31

    We discuss a moderate-size readout system based entirely on FERA compatible units. The implementation of a specially developed FERA Extender module is presented, whose main feature is the ability to distribute the system over many CAMAC crates. This provides a convenient way of splitting the FERA bus into several virtually independent sub-systems driven by individual gate signals. Tagging of the event fragments from each sub-system with an event number incremented on the arrival of each master gate, provides a convenient means of reconstructing the full event at a later stage. An example of the external supplementary FERA control logic required for a complex multi-crate and multi-gate system controlled by a single FERA Manager, is also discussed together with some remarks on the system performance.

  8. Development of Electronic Resources across Networks in Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratchatavorn, Phandao

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the development of electronic resources across library networks in Thailand to meet user needs, particularly electronic journals. Topics include concerns about journal access; limited budgets for library acquisitions of journals; and sharing resources through a centralized database system that allows Web access to journals via Internet…

  9. Gate dielectric development for flexible electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, P. C.; Voutsas, A. T.; Hartzell, J. W.

    2007-07-15

    Thin film transistors integrated on flexible substrates are becoming increasingly attractive for low cost displays, sensors, and rf communication applications. The successful development of the flexible devices will be dictated by the enhancement in the thermal stability of the substrates and the low temperature (<300 deg. C) processing of the gate dielectric. The plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition (PECVD) technique has successfully met the demands of the gate dielectric for display devices at processing temperatures lower than 600 deg. C. However, a further reduction in the processing temperatures below 300 deg. C is essential to realize low cost, highly functional devices on flexible substrates. The low temperature processing of gate dielectric films necessitates the development of processes and techniques with plasma controlled reaction kinetics dominating the thin film growth rather than the thermal state of the substrate. In the present work, the authors report on the processing of high quality gate dielectric films by high density PECVD technique at process temperatures lower than 300 deg. C. The bulk and interfacial electrical quality and reliability of the metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors as a function of process temperature are discussed in this article. A comparison with the high temperature gate oxide films deposited by PECVD technique employing capacitively coupled plasma source has been made to establish the film quality and reliability. The films processed at low temperatures have shown good electrical performance and reliability as evaluated in terms of the leakage current, flatband voltage, midgap interface trap concentration, and bias temperature stress reliability characteristics.

  10. Demonstration of single-flux-quantum readout circuits for time-of-flight mass spectrometry systems using superconducting strip ion detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Kyosuke; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki; Zen, Nobuyuki; Ohkubo, Masataka

    2015-07-01

    We have been developing a superconducting time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) system that consists of a superconducting strip ion detector (SSID) and a single-flux-quantum (SFQ) time-to-digital converter. In this study, we implement a prototype TOF-MS system using an SSID and an SFQ readout circuit in which output signals from the SSID are read out by the SFQ readout circuit and output to room-temperature electronics. The SFQ readout circuit, which consists of a current discriminator, a Josephson transmission line and an SFQ/dc converter, was fabricated using the AIST Nb standard process (STP2), and installed in a 4.2 K cryostat with a meander-shaped NbN SSID measuring 200 μm square. The dark count rate for the SSID was measured as increasing exponentially with the increase in the bias current of the SSID by using the SFQ readout circuit. Mass spectrum measurements of biomolecules, Angiotensin I, which has a molecular weight of 1296 Da, were demonstrated by using the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization method, and a clear corresponding peak was observed in the mass spectrum.

  11. Twelve tips for the development of electronic study guides.

    PubMed

    Montemayor, Luz Leticia Elizondo

    2002-09-01

    With recent advances in technology, electronic study guides are becoming extraordinary management, learning and assessment tools in the teaching-learning process, replacing printed study guides. The educational advantages they offer are listed here. During the elaboration of an electronic study guide, there are important issues to consider, such as the student's capabilities in the use of electronic media, the type of software to be used, proper authorizations and accessibility, the inclusion of all information and links needed, as well as a clear explanation on the use of the software. This paper offers twelve useful tips for the development of electronic study guides. PMID:12450466

  12. Polycrystalline Mercuric Iodide Films on CMOS Readout Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Hartsough, Neal E.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Nygard, Einar; Malakhov, Nail; Barber, William C.; Gandhi, Thulasidharan

    2009-01-01

    We have created high-resolution x-ray imaging devices using polycrystalline mercuric iodide (HgI2) films grown directly onto CMOS readout chips using a thermal vapor transport process. Images from prototype 400×400 pixel HgI2-coated CMOS readout chips are presented, where the pixel grid is 30 μm × 30 μm. The devices exhibited sensitivity of 6.2 μC/Rcm2 with corresponding dark current of ∼2.7 nA/cm2, and a 80 μm FWHM planar image response to a 50 μm slit aperture. X-ray CT images demonstrate a point spread function sufficient to obtain a 50 μm spatial resolution in reconstructed CT images at a substantially reduced dose compared to phosphor-coated readouts. The use of CMOS technology allows for small pixels (30 μm), fast readout speeds (8 fps for a 3200×3200 pixel array), and future design flexibility due to the use of well-developed fabrication processes. PMID:20161098

  13. Compact, Low-power and Precision Timing Photodetector Readout

    SciTech Connect

    Varner, Gary S.; Ruckman, Larry L.; Schwiening, Jochen; Vavra, Jaroslav; /SLAC

    2011-06-14

    Photodetector readout for next generation high event rate particle identification and single-photon detection requires a digitizer capable of integrated recording of dense arrays of sensor elements with high analog bandwidth (precision timing) and large record depth, in a cost-effective, compact and low-power way. Simply stated, one cannot do better than having a high-fidelity 'oscilloscope on a chip' for every sensor channel. A firs version of the Buffered Large Analog Bandwidth (BLAB1) ASIC has been designed based upon the lessons learned from the development of the Large Analog Bandwidth Recorder and Digitizer with Ordered Readout (LABRADOR) ASIC. While this LABRADOR ASIC has been very successful and forms the readout basis of a generation of new, large-scale radio neutrino detectors, its limited sampling depth is a major drawback. To address this shortcoming, a prototype intended for photodetector readout has been designed and fabricated with 64k deep sampling at multi-GSa/s operation. An evaluation system has been constructed for instrumentation of Time-Of-Propagation (TOP) and focusing DIRC prototypes and test results will be reported.

  14. Atmospheric electron-induced x-ray spectrometer development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Jaroslava Z.; Urgiles, Eduardo; Toda, Risaku; Crisp, Joy

    2005-01-01

    This paper extends the work reported at the IEEE Aerospace conference in 2001 and 2003 where the concept and progress in the development of the so called atmospheric Electron X-ray Spectrometer (AEXS) has been described.

  15. 23. CURRENT VELOCITYDIRECTION INDICATOR DEVELOPED BY WES ELECTRONICS ENGINEER LEILAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CURRENT VELOCITY-DIRECTION INDICATOR DEVELOPED BY WES ELECTRONICS ENGINEER LEILAND M. DUKE. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  16. Readout of relaxation rates by nonadiabatic pumping spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riwar, Roman-Pascal; Roche, Benoît; Jehl, Xavier; Splettstoesser, Janine

    2016-06-01

    We put forward nonadiabatic charge pumping as a method for accessing the different charge relaxation rates as well as the relaxation rates of excited orbital states in double-quantum-dot setups, based on extremely size-limited quantum dots and dopant systems. The rates are obtained in a well-separated manner from plateaus, occurring when comparing the steady-state current for reversed driving cycles. This yields a reliable readout independent of any fitting parameters. Importantly, the nonadiabatic pumping spectroscopy essentially exploits the same driving scheme that the operation of these devices generally employs. We provide a detailed analysis of the working principle of the readout scheme as well as of possible errors, thereby demonstrating its broad applicability. The precise knowledge of relaxation rates is highly relevant for the implementation of time-dependently operated devices, such as electron pumps for metrology or qubits in quantum information.

  17. X-ray and gamma ray detector readout system

    DOEpatents

    Tumer, Tumay O; Clajus, Martin; Visser, Gerard

    2010-10-19

    A readout electronics scheme is under development for high resolution, compact PET (positron emission tomography) imagers based on LSO (lutetium ortho-oxysilicate, Lu.sub.2SiO.sub.5) scintillator and avalanche photodiode (APD) arrays. The key is to obtain sufficient timing and energy resolution at a low power level, less than about 30 mW per channel, including all required functions. To this end, a simple leading edge level crossing discriminator is used, in combination with a transimpedance preamplifier. The APD used has a gain of order 1,000, and an output noise current of several pA/ Hz, allowing bipolar technology to be used instead of CMOS, for increased speed and power efficiency. A prototype of the preamplifier and discriminator has been constructed, achieving timing resolution of 1.5 ns FWHM, 2.7 ns full width at one tenth maximum, relative to an LSO/PMT detector, and an energy resolution of 13.6% FWHM at 511 keV, while operating at a power level of 22 mW per channel. Work is in progress towards integration of this preamplifier and discriminator with appropriate coincidence logic and amplitude measurement circuits in an ASIC suitable for a high resolution compact PET instrument. The detector system and/or ASIC can also be used for many other applications for medical to industrial imaging.

  18. Fast, High-Precision Readout Circuit for Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rider, David M.; Hancock, Bruce R.; Key, Richard W.; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Wrigley, Chris J.; Seshadri, Suresh; Sander, Stanley P.; Blavier, Jean-Francois L.

    2013-01-01

    The GEO-CAPE mission described in NASA's Earth Science and Applications Decadal Survey requires high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution measurements to monitor and characterize the rapidly changing chemistry of the troposphere over North and South Americas. High-frame-rate focal plane arrays (FPAs) with many pixels are needed to enable such measurements. A high-throughput digital detector readout integrated circuit (ROIC) that meets the GEO-CAPE FPA needs has been developed, fabricated, and tested. The ROIC is based on an innovative charge integrating, fast, high-precision analog-to-digital circuit that is built into each pixel. The 128×128-pixel ROIC digitizes all 16,384 pixels simultaneously at frame rates up to 16 kHz to provide a completely digital output on a single integrated circuit at an unprecedented rate of 262 million pixels per second. The approach eliminates the need for off focal plane electronics, greatly reducing volume, mass, and power compared to conventional FPA implementations. A focal plane based on this ROIC will require less than 2 W of power on a 1×1-cm integrated circuit. The ROIC is fabricated of silicon using CMOS technology. It is designed to be indium bump bonded to a variety of detector materials including silicon PIN diodes, indium antimonide (InSb), indium gallium arsenide (In- GaAs), and mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) detector arrays to provide coverage over a broad spectral range in the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet spectral ranges.

  19. Toward Paper-Based Sensors: Turning Electrical Signals into an Optical Readout System.

    PubMed

    Liana, Devi D; Raguse, Burkhard; Gooding, J Justin; Chow, Edith

    2015-09-01

    Paper-based sensors are gaining increasing attention for their potential applications in resource-limited settings and for point-of-care analysis. However, chemical analysis of paper-based electronic sensors is frequently interpreted using complex software and electronic displays which compromise the advantages of using paper. In this work, we present two semiquantitative paper-based readout systems that can visually measure a change in resistance of a resistive-based sensor. The readout systems use electrochromic Prussian blue/polyaniline as an electrochromic indicator on a resistive gold nanoparticle film that is fabricated on paper. When the readout system is integrated with a resistive sensor in an electrical circuit, and a voltage is applied, the voltage drop along the readout system varies depending on the sensor's resistance. Due to the voltage gradient formed along the gold nanoparticle film, the overlaying Prussian blue/polyaniline will change color at voltages greater than its reduction voltage (green/blue for oxidized state and transparent for reduced state). Thus, the changes in resistances of a sensor can be semiquantified through color visualization by either measuring the length of the transparent film (analog readout system) or by counting the number of transparent segments (digital readout system). The work presented herein can potentially serve as an alternative paper-based display system for resistive sensors in instances where cost and weight is a premium. PMID:26329490

  20. Development of contact materials for flexible electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hauk

    Tansparent Oxide Semiconductors (TOSs) are one of the key materials in many devices technology. All Flat Panel Display (FPD) devices require transparent oxide semiconductors as electrodes. High conductivity and transparency is an essential feature of transparent conducting oxides. Transparent oxide semiconductors can also be applied to improve channel mobility in thin-film-transistors, current spreading on light emitting diodes, adhesion on dielectrics materials, and in general, enhance device performance. Silver (Ag) has been investigated as a future interconnection material for Ultra-Large-Scale-Integration (ULSI), electrodes for Organic Light Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) display, and contact materials for Flip-Chip Light Emitting Diodes (FCLEDs) because of its low resistivity (about 1.57 micro-ohm centimeter for bulk), higher oxidation resistance than copper (Cu), and high reflectivity. The research of TOS involves engineering and producing of indium tin oxide and zinc oxide on polymer substrate for flexible display applications. Moreover it involves a new class of TOS with greatly improved conductivity and transmittance using silver. In this part indium tin oxide (ITO) and zinc oxide/silver/zinc oxide layered composite structures on polymer substrates are investigated. This study focuses on understanding the roles of oxygen, annealing environments, and defects in the films on electrical conduction and transmittance of TOS thin films. The research of silver films is targeted to develop silver metallization in the silicon (Si) and gallium nitride semiconductor-based devices. It has been shown that silver alloys can increase the adhesion of thin silver films on silicon wafer and withstand higher temperatures during high temperature processing. In silicon semiconductors, silver work involved the improvement of the thermal stability, surface morphology, and texture in silver metallization by alloying silver films with aluminum and copper. Thin films of silver combined

  1. Readout circuitry for continuous high-rate photon detection with arrays of InP Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frechette, Jonathan; Grossmann, Peter J.; Busacker, David E.; Jordy, George J.; Duerr, Erik K.; McIntosh, K. Alexander; Oakley, Douglas C.; Bailey, Robert J.; Ruff, Albert C.; Brattain, Michael A.; Funk, Joseph E.; MacDonald, Jason G.; Verghese, Simon

    2012-06-01

    An asynchronous readout integrated circuit (ROIC) has been developed for hybridization to a 32x32 array of single-photon sensitive avalanche photodiodes (APDs). The asynchronous ROIC is capable of simultaneous detection and readout of photon times of arrival, with no array blind time. Each pixel in the array is independently operated by a finite state machine that actively quenches an APD upon a photon detection event, and re-biases the device into Geiger mode after a programmable hold-off time. While an individual APD is in hold-off mode, other elements in the array are biased and available to detect photons. This approach enables high pixel refresh frequency (PRF), making the device suitable for applications including optical communications and frequency-agile ladar. A built-in electronic shutter that de-biases the whole array allows the detector to operate in a gated mode or allows for detection to be temporarily disabled. On-chip data reduction reduces the high bandwidth requirements of simultaneous detection and readout. Additional features include programmable single-pixel disable, region of interest processing, and programmable output data rates. State-based on-chip clock gating reduces overall power draw. ROIC operation has been demonstrated with hybridized InP APDs sensitive to 1.06-μm and 1.55-μm wavelength, and fully packaged focal plane arrays (FPAs) have been assembled and characterized.

  2. Readout concept employing a novel on-chip 16-bit ADC for smart IR focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringh, Ulf; Jansson, Christer; Liddiard, Kevin C.

    1996-06-01

    This paper discusses CMOS readout for an uncooled 2D IR array of resistance bolometers. Factors influencing the architectural choice and detailed noise considerations for the pixel select switch are covered. A parallel readout concept using one ADC per column is the suggested architecture for an uncooled CMOS IR array. In order to meet the requirement on speed and resolution a new ADC principle had to be developed. The ADC is however of general interest where resolution above 10 bits at medium speed and low cost are desired. High linearity is obtained utilizing the first- order delta-sigma converter technique, while resolution and speed is enhanced by a successive approximation of the delta-sigma integrator residual voltage. An experimental 16 X 16 infrared bolometer detector array has been designed where a row-by-row readout operation of the bolometer array is supported by a column-wise 16-bit A/D conversion. The 16- column preamplifiers and ADC structure has been implemented in a standard 0.8 micrometers CMOS process with 40 micrometers column pitch. Measured results of the experimental array is presented, including both electronics and detectors.

  3. Development of High Power Electron Beam Measuring and Analyzing System for Microwave Vacuum Electron Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, C. J.; Wu, X. L.; Li, Q. S.; Li, C. S.

    The measurement and analysis of high power electron beam during its formation and transmission are the basic scientific problems and key techniques for the development of high performance microwave vacuum electron devices, which are widely used in the fields of military weapon, microwave system and scientific instruments. In this paper, the dynamic parameters measurement and analysis system being built in Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IECAS) recently are introduced. The instrument are designed to determine the cross-section, the current density, and the energy resolution of the high power electron beam during its formation and transmission process, which are available both for the electron gun and the electron optics system respectively. Then the three dimension trajectory images of the electron beam can be rebuilt and display with computer controlled data acquisition and processing system easily. Thus, much more complicated structures are considered and solved completely to achieve its detection and analysis, such as big chamber with 10-6 Pa high vacuum system, the controlled detector movement system in axis direction with distance of 600 mm inside the vacuum chamber, the electron beam energy analysis system with high resolution of 0.5%, and the electron beam cross-section and density detector using the YAG: Ce crystal and CCD imaging system et al. At present, the key parts of the instrument have been finished, the cross-section experiment of the electron beam have been performed successfully. Hereafter, the instrument will be used to measure and analyze the electron beam with the electron gun and electron optics system for the single beam and multiple beam klystron, gyrotron, sheet beam device, and traveling wave tube etc. thoroughly.

  4. Flexible readout and integration sensor (FRIS): a bio-inspired, system-on-chip, event-based readout architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Joseph H.; Pouliquen, Philippe O.; Andreou, Andreas G.; Goldberg, Arnold C.; Rizk, Charbel G.

    2012-06-01

    We present a bio-inspired system-on-chip focal plane readout architecture which at the system level, relies on an event based sampling scheme where only pixels within a programmable range of photon flux rates are output. At the pixel level, a one bit oversampled analog-to-digital converter together with a decimator allows for the quantization of signals up to 26 bits. Furthermore, digital non-uniformity correction of both gain and offset errors is applied at the pixel level prior to readout. We report test results for a prototype array fabricated in a standard 90nm CMOS process. Tests performed at room and cryogenic temperatures demonstrate the capability to operate at a temporal noise ratio as low as 1.5, an electron well capacity over 100Ge-, and an ADC LSB down to 1e-.

  5. Chapter 9: Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Grupen, Claus; Shwartz, Boris A.

    2006-12-19

    Sophisticated front-end electronics are a key part of practically all modern radiation detector systems. This chapter introduces the basic principles and their implementation. Topics include signal acquisition, electronic noise, pulse shaping (analog and digital), and data readout techniques.

  6. Digital readouts for large microwave low-temperature detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazin, Benjamin A.; Day, Peter K.; Irwin, Kent D.; Reintsema, Carl D.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2006-04-01

    Over the last several years many different types of low-temperature detectors (LTDs) have been developed that use a microwave resonant circuit as part of their readout. These devices include microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKID), microwave SQUID readouts for transition edge sensors (TES), and NIS bolometers. Current readout techniques for these devices use analog frequency synthesizers and IQ mixers. While these components are available as microwave integrated circuits, one set is required for each resonator. We are exploring a new readout technique for this class of detectors based on a commercial-off-the-shelf technology called software defined radio (SDR). In this method a fast digital to analog (D/A) converter creates as many tones as desired in the available bandwidth. Our prototype system employs a 100 MS/s 16-bit D/A to generate an arbitrary number of tones in 50 MHz of bandwidth. This signal is then mixed up to the desired detector resonant frequency (˜10 GHz), sent through the detector, then mixed back down to baseband. The baseband signal is then digitized with a series of fast analog to digital converters (80 MS/s, 14-bit). Next, a numerical mixer in a dedicated integrated circuit or FPGA mixes the resonant frequency of a specified detector to 0 Hz, and sends the complex detector output over a computer bus for processing and storage. In this paper we will report on our results in using a prototype system to readout a MKID array, including system noise performance, X-ray pulse response, and cross-talk measurements. We will also discuss how this technique can be scaled to read out many thousands of detectors.

  7. Design and Development of a Dense, Fine Grained Silicon Tungsten Calorimeter with Integrated Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, D.; Frey, R.; Breidenbach, M.; Freytag, D.; Graf, N.; Haller, G.; Milgrome, O.; Radeka, V.

    2005-02-01

    A fine grained silicon-tungsten calorimeter is ideal for use as the electromagnetic calorimeter in a linear collider detector that is optimized for particle-flow reconstruction. Our design is based on readout chips which are bump bonded to the silicon wafers that serve as the active medium in the calorimeter. By using integrated electronics we plan to demonstrate that fine granularity can be achieved at a reasonable price. Our design minimizes the gap between tungsten layers leading to a small Molière radius. The size of the Molière radius is an important figure of merit for energy-flow detectors.

  8. Polarized Electron Gun Development at the Brookhaven National Laboratoy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kewisch, J.; Chang, X. Y.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Litvinenko, V.; Rao, T.; Skaritka, J.; Sheehy, B.; Pikin, A.; Meng, W.; Wang, E.; Wu, Q.; Pate, D.; Burrill, A.; Xin, T.; Holmes, D.

    2011-05-01

    Development of two different polarized electron guns is ongoing at BNL. One aims at extremely high brightness at a moderate beam current. This design uses a superconducting RF gun and a test setup is built to show that a Gallium-Arsenide cathode with negative affinity has a sufficiently long quantum efficiency lifetime in such an environment. An electron injector using this technology may eliminate the need of the electron damping ring and a long transport line at the International Linear Collider. The other project aims at producing a high beam current with moderate emittance requirements, dubbed the "Gatling gun". In this DC gun, bunches are extracted from 20 separate cathodes and merged into a single beam using a rotating magnetic field. Such an electron gun could serve as an injector for the electron-ion collider eRHIC, which is planned at BNL. We will report on the status of these projects.

  9. Compact pulse width modulation circuitry for silicon photomultiplier readout.

    PubMed

    Bieniosek, M F; Olcott, P D; Levin, C S

    2013-08-01

    The adoption of solid-state photodetectors for positron emission tomography (PET) system design and the interest in 3D interaction information from PET detectors has lead to an increasing number of readout channels in PET systems. To handle these additional readout channels, PET readout electronics should be simplified to reduce the power consumption, cost, and size of the electronics for a single channel. Pulse-width modulation (PWM), where detector pulses are converted to digital pulses with width proportional to the detected photon energy, promises to simplify PET readout by converting the signals to digital form at the beginning of the processing chain, and allowing a single time-to-digital converter to perform the data acquisition for many channels rather than routing many analogue channels and digitizing in the back end. Integrator based PWM systems, also known as charge-to-time converters (QTCs), are especially compact, reducing the front-end electronics to an op-amp integrator with a resistor discharge, and a comparator. QTCs, however, have a long dead-time during which dark count noise is integrated, reducing the output signal-to-noise ratio. This work presents a QTC based PWM circuit with a gated integrator that shows performance improvements over existing QTC based PWM. By opening and closing an analogue switch on the input of the integrator, the circuit can be controlled to integrate only the portions of the signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio. It also allows for multiplexing different detectors into the same PWM circuit while avoiding uncorrelated noise propagation between photodetector channels. Four gated integrator PWM circuits were built to readout the spatial channels of two position sensitive solid-state photomultiplier (PS-SSPM). Results show a 4 × 4 array 0.9 mm × 0.9 mm × 15 mm of LYSO crystals being identified on the 5 mm × 5 mm PS-SSPM at room temperature with no degradation for twofold multiplexing. In principle, much larger

  10. Compact Pulse Width Modulation Circuitry for Silicon Photomultiplier Readout

    PubMed Central

    Bieniosek, M F; Olcott, P D; Levin, C S

    2013-01-01

    The adoption of solid state photo-detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) system design and the interest in 3D interaction information from PET detectors has lead to an increasing number of readout channels in PET systems. To handle these additional readout channels, PET readout electronics should be simplified to reduce the power consumption, cost, and size of the electronics for a single channel. Pulse width modulation (PWM), where detector pulses are converted to digital pulses with width proportional to the detected photon energy, promises to simplify PET readout by converting the signals to digital form at the beginning of the processing chain, and allowing a single time-to-digital converter to perform the data acquisition for many channels rather than routing many analog channels and digitizing in the back end. Integrator based PWM systems, also known as charge-to-time converters (QTC), are especially compact, reducing the front-end electronics to an op-amp integrator with a resistor discharge, and a comparator. QTCs, however, have a long dead-time during which dark count noise is integrated, reducing the output signal to noise ratio. This work presents a QTC based PWM circuit with a gated integrator that shows performance improvements over existing QTC based PWM. By opening and closing an analog switch on the input of the integrator, the circuit can be controlled to integrate only the portions of the signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio. It also allows for multiplexing different detectors into the same PWM circuit while avoiding uncorrelated noise propagation between photodetector channels. Four gated integrator PWM circuits were built to readout the spatial channels of two position sensitive solid state photomultiplier (PS-SSPM). Results show a 4×4 array 0.9mm×0.9mm×15mm of LYSO crystals being identified on the 5mm×5mm PS-SSPM at room temperature with no degradation for 2-fold multiplexing. In principle, much larger multiplexing ratios are

  11. Compact pulse width modulation circuitry for silicon photomultiplier readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieniosek, M. F.; Olcott, P. D.; Levin, C. S.

    2013-08-01

    The adoption of solid-state photodetectors for positron emission tomography (PET) system design and the interest in 3D interaction information from PET detectors has lead to an increasing number of readout channels in PET systems. To handle these additional readout channels, PET readout electronics should be simplified to reduce the power consumption, cost, and size of the electronics for a single channel. Pulse-width modulation (PWM), where detector pulses are converted to digital pulses with width proportional to the detected photon energy, promises to simplify PET readout by converting the signals to digital form at the beginning of the processing chain, and allowing a single time-to-digital converter to perform the data acquisition for many channels rather than routing many analogue channels and digitizing in the back end. Integrator based PWM systems, also known as charge-to-time converters (QTCs), are especially compact, reducing the front-end electronics to an op-amp integrator with a resistor discharge, and a comparator. QTCs, however, have a long dead-time during which dark count noise is integrated, reducing the output signal-to-noise ratio. This work presents a QTC based PWM circuit with a gated integrator that shows performance improvements over existing QTC based PWM. By opening and closing an analogue switch on the input of the integrator, the circuit can be controlled to integrate only the portions of the signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio. It also allows for multiplexing different detectors into the same PWM circuit while avoiding uncorrelated noise propagation between photodetector channels. Four gated integrator PWM circuits were built to readout the spatial channels of two position sensitive solid-state photomultiplier (PS-SSPM). Results show a 4 × 4 array 0.9 mm × 0.9 mm × 15 mm of LYSO crystals being identified on the 5 mm × 5 mm PS-SSPM at room temperature with no degradation for twofold multiplexing. In principle, much larger

  12. SMARTPIX, a photon-counting pixel detector for synchrotron applications based on Medipix3RX readout chip and active edge pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponchut, C.; Collet, E.; Hervé, C.; Le Caer, T.; Cerrai, J.; Siron, L.; Dabin, Y.; Ribois, J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Photon-counting pixel detectors are now routinely used on synchrotron beamlines. Many applications benefit from their noiseless mode of operation, single-pixel point spread function and high frame rates. One of their drawbacks is a discontinuous detection area due to the space-consuming wirebonded connections of the readout chips. Moreover, charge sharing limits their efficiency and their energy discrimination capabilities. In order to overcome these issues the ESRF is developing SMARTPIX,a scalable and versatile pixel detector system with minimized dead areas and with energy resolving capabilities based on the MEDIPIX3RX readout chip. SMARTPIX exploits the through-silicon via technology implemented on MEDIPIX3RX, the active edge sensor processing developed in particular at ADVACAM, and the on-chip analog charge summing feature of MEDIPIX3RX. This article reports on system architecture, unit module structure, data acquisition electronics, target characteristics and applications.

  13. Developments in low energy electron beam machinery and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nablo, S. V.; Chrusciel, J.; Cleghorn, D. A.; Rangwalla, I.

    2003-08-01

    The engineering and development of a new generation of low energy, high power electron beam equipment is presented. Operating voltages range from 80 to 125 kV at widths to 1.65 m. At 110 kV these systems deliver 1000 Mrad m min -1 at 110 kV. Equipment operating power levels and their impact on reducing equipment size and cost are reviewed. The advantages of electron curing at these reduced operating voltages are described. The principles of the electron beam fluidized bed process for the treatment of powders and particulates in high-speed pneumatic transport are discussed. Typical system performances for polymer dissociation and crosslinking, or for agroproduct disinfestation and disinfection are presented. A process for the sterilization of polymer food containers employing the injection of low energy electrons through the open mouth has been developed. Some of its sterilization capabilities for bottles up to 2 l capacity are described.

  14. Active pixel sensor array with multiresolution readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node. There is also a readout circuit, part of which can be disposed at the bottom of each column of cells and be common to all the cells in the column. The imaging device can also include an electronic shutter formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate, and/or a storage section to allow for simultaneous integration. In addition, the imaging device can include a multiresolution imaging circuit to provide images of varying resolution. The multiresolution circuit could also be employed in an array where the photosensitive portion of each pixel cell is a photodiode. This latter embodiment could further be modified to facilitate low light imaging.

  15. Electronic Technology Curriculum Development and Program Articulation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, William S.; And Others

    A project was conducted at Washburn University to develop full curriculum materials for the first-year courses in an electronic maintenance technology program. The courses were articulated with a local high school. The curriculum materials were developed, pilot tested, and refined. The bulk of the report consists of the curriculum materials for…

  16. Courseware Development Center: Electronic Sharing of Instructional Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusk, Mike D.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the Courseware Development Center at Tulsa Junior College (Oklahoma), which serves as a network hub for statewide sharing of locally developed audiovisual and microcomputer software. Considers the center's three major components: an electronic bulletin board, a courseware database, and a newsletter for instructional designers. (DMM)

  17. The Development Model Electronic Commerce of Regional Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jun; Cai, Lecai; Li, Hongchan

    With the developing of the agricultural information, it is inevitable trend of the development of agricultural electronic commercial affairs. On the basis of existing study on the development application model of e-commerce, combined with the character of the agricultural information, compared with the developing model from the theory and reality, a new development model electronic commerce of regional agriculture base on the government is put up, and such key issues as problems of the security applications, payment mode, sharing mechanisms, and legal protection are analyzed, etc. The among coordination mechanism of the region is discussed on, it is significance for regulating the development of agricultural e-commerce and promoting the regional economical development.

  18. Development of an (e,2e) electron momentum spectroscopy apparatus using an ultrashort pulsed electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, M.; Kasai, Y.; Oishi, K.; Nakazawa, H.; Takahashi, M.

    2013-06-15

    An (e,2e) apparatus for electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS) has been developed, which employs an ultrashort-pulsed incident electron beam with a repetition rate of 5 kHz and a pulse duration in the order of a picosecond. Its instrumental design and technical details are reported, involving demonstration of a new method for finding time-zero. Furthermore, EMS data for the neutral Ne atom in the ground state measured by using the pulsed electron beam are presented to illustrate the potential abilities of the apparatus for ultrafast molecular dynamics, such as by combining EMS with the pump-and-probe technique.

  19. SiGe HBT cryogenic preamplification for higher bandwidth donor spin read-out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Matthew; Carr, Stephen; Ten-Eyck, Greg; Wendt, Joel; Pluym, Tammy; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    2014-03-01

    Single-shot read-out of a donor spin can be performed using the response of a single-electron-transistor (SET). This technique can produce relatively large changes in current, on the order of 1 (nA), to distinguish between the spin states. Despite the relatively large signal, the read-out time resolution has been limited to approximately 100 (kHz) of bandwidth because of noise. Cryogenic pre-amplification has been shown to extend the response of certain detection circuits to shorter time resolution and thus higher bandwidth. We examine a SiGe HBT circuit configuration for cryogenic preamplification, which has potential advantages over commonly used HEMT configurations. Here we present 4 (K) measurements of a circuit consisting of a Silicon-SET inline with a Heterojunction-Bipolar-Transistor (HBT). We compare the measured bandwidth with and without the HBT inline and find that at higher frequencies the signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) with the HBT inline exceeds the SNR without the HBT inline. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Dedicated multichannel readout ASIC coupled with single crystal diamond for dosimeter application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, A.; Falco, M. D.; De Notaristefani, F.; Galasso, M.; Marinelli, M.; Orsolini Cencelli, V.; Tortora, L.; Verona, C.; Verona Rinati, G.

    2013-02-01

    This paper reports on the tests of a low-noise, multi-channel readout integrated circuit used as a readout electronic front-end for a diamond multi-pixel dosimeter. The system is developed for dose distribution measurement in radiotherapy applications. The first 10-channel prototype chip was designed and fabricated in a 0.18 um CMOS process. Every channel includes a charge integrator with a 10 pF capacitor and a double slope A/D converter. The diamond multi-pixel detector, based on CVD synthetic single crystal diamond Schottky diodes, is made by a 3 × 3 sensor matrix. The overall device has been tested under irradiation with 6 MeV radio therapeutic photon beams at the Policlinico ``Tor Vergata'' (PTV) hospital. Measurements show a 20 fA RMS leakage current from the front-end input stage and a negligible dark current from the diamond detector, a stable temporal response and a good linear behaviour as a function of both dose and dose rate. These characteristics were common to each tested channel.

  1. Back-Side Readout Silicon Photomultiplier

    PubMed Central

    Choong, Woon-Seng; Holland, Stephen E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel structure for the back-side readout silicon photomultipler (SiPM). Current SiPMs are front-illuminated structures with front-side readout, which have relatively small geometric fill factor leading to degradation in their photon detection efficiency (PDE). Back-side readout devices will provide an advantageous solution to achieve high PDE. We designed and investigated a novel structure that would allow back-side readout while creating a region of high electric field optimized for avalanche breakdown. In addition, this structure has relatively high fill factor and also allow direct coupling of individual micro-cell of the SiPM to application-specific integrated circuits. We will discuss the performance that can be attained with this structure through device simulation and the process flow that can be used to fabricate this structure through process simulation. PMID:23564969

  2. Back-Side Readout Silicon Photomultiplier.

    PubMed

    Choong, Woon-Seng; Holland, Stephen E

    2012-07-19

    We present a novel structure for the back-side readout silicon photomultipler (SiPM). Current SiPMs are front-illuminated structures with front-side readout, which have relatively small geometric fill factor leading to degradation in their photon detection efficiency (PDE). Back-side readout devices will provide an advantageous solution to achieve high PDE. We designed and investigated a novel structure that would allow back-side readout while creating a region of high electric field optimized for avalanche breakdown. In addition, this structure has relatively high fill factor and also allow direct coupling of individual micro-cell of the SiPM to application-specific integrated circuits. We will discuss the performance that can be attained with this structure through device simulation and the process flow that can be used to fabricate this structure through process simulation. PMID:23564969

  3. Advances in Electronic-Nose Technologies Developed for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Alphus D.; Baietto, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    The research and development of new electronic-nose applications in the biomedical field has accelerated at a phenomenal rate over the past 25 years. Many innovative e-nose technologies have provided solutions and applications to a wide variety of complex biomedical and healthcare problems. The purposes of this review are to present a comprehensive analysis of past and recent biomedical research findings and developments of electronic-nose sensor technologies, and to identify current and future potential e-nose applications that will continue to advance the effectiveness and efficiency of biomedical treatments and healthcare services for many years. An abundance of electronic-nose applications has been developed for a variety of healthcare sectors including diagnostics, immunology, pathology, patient recovery, pharmacology, physical therapy, physiology, preventative medicine, remote healthcare, and wound and graft healing. Specific biomedical e-nose applications range from uses in biochemical testing, blood-compatibility evaluations, disease diagnoses, and drug delivery to monitoring of metabolic levels, organ dysfunctions, and patient conditions through telemedicine. This paper summarizes the major electronic-nose technologies developed for healthcare and biomedical applications since the late 1980s when electronic aroma detection technologies were first recognized to be potentially useful in providing effective solutions to problems in the healthcare industry. PMID:22346620

  4. A study on dual readout crystal calorimeter for hadron and jet energy measurement at a future lepton collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Studies of requirements and specifications of crystals are necessary to develop a new generation of crystals for dual readout crystal hadron or total absorption calorimeter. This is a short and basic study of the characteristics and hadron energy measurement of PbWO4 and BGO crystals for scintillation and Cerenkov Dual Readout hadron calorimeter.

  5. Atmospheric Electron-Induced X-Ray Spectrometer (AEXS) Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Jaroslava Z.; Urgiles, Eduardo; Toda, Risaku; George, Thomas; Douglas, Susanne; Crisp, Joy

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the progress in the development of the so-called Atmospheric Electron X-ray Spectrometer (AEXS) instrument in our laboratory at JPL. The AEXS is a novel miniature instrument concept based on the excitation of characteristic X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and luminescence spectra using a focused electron beam, for non-destructive evaluation of surfaces of samples in situ, in planetary ambient atmosphere. In situ operation is obtained through the use of a thin electron transmissive membrane to isolate the vacuum within the AEXS electron source from the outside ambient atmosphere. By using a focused electron beam, the impinging electrons on samples in the external atmosphere excite XRF spectra from the irradiated spots with high-to-medium spatial resolution. The XRF spectra are analyzed using an energy-dispersive detector to determine surface elemental composition. The use of high- intensity electron beam results in rapid spectrum acquisition (several minutes), and consequently low energy consumption (several tens of Joules) per acquired XRF spectrum in comparison to similar portable instruments.

  6. Developing electron beam bunching technology for improving light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Chan, K.C.D.; Feldman, D.W.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this project was to develop a new electron bunch compression technology, experimentally demonstrate subpicosecond compression of bunches with charges on the order of 1 nC, and to theoretically investigate fundamental limitations to electron bunch compression. All of these goals were achieved, and in addition, the compression system built for this project was used to generate 22 nm light in a plasma-radiator light source.

  7. Superconductive digital readout for IR FPA sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, D. J.; Abelson, L. A.; Dalrymple, B. J.; Eaton, L.; Heflinger, L. O.; Leung, M.; Pham, T.; Sandell, R. D.; Silver, A. H.; Spargo, J. W.

    1992-07-01

    We have built and demonstrated an all superconductive digital readout for use in an IR focal plane array sensor. High performance, ultralow power superconductive circuits perform the functions of low noise preamplification and analog to digital conversion. The superconductive readout was tested with a variety of detectors, including InSb, Si:As, and a thin film NbN superconducting detector. Light sources included a HeNe laser (0.6 micron), a CO2 laser (10 microns), and a blackbody (400 to 900 K). In each case, the detector and readout circuitry was assembled into a 2 inch diameter, 6 inch long test package cooled in a single dewar. We demonstrated the functionality of the detector/readout channel from input photons to output digital signal. The superconductive readout reported here used Nb-based circuits operating at 4 K. An NbN squid amplifier and detector have subsequently been demonstrated above 10 K. We discuss the extension of the entire digital readout to operating temperatures above 10 K.

  8. Study of the spatial resolution for binary readout detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonamine, R.; Maerschalk, T.; Lentdecker, G. De

    2016-07-01

    Often the binary readout is proposed for high granularity detectors to reduce the generated data volume to be readout at the price of a somewhat reduced spatial resolution compared to an analogue readout. We have been studying single hit resolutions obtained with a binary readout using simulations as well as analytical approaches. In this note we show that the detector geometry could be optimized to offer an equivalent spatial resolution than with an analogue readout.

  9. Development of Electronics for Low Temperature Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Dickman, John E.; Gerber, Scott; Overton, Eric

    2000-01-01

    The operation of electronic systems at cryogenic temperatures is anticipated for many future NASA space missions such as deep space probes and planetary surface exploration. For example, an unheated interplanetary probe launched to explore the rings of Saturn would reach an average temperature near Saturn of about -183 C. In addition to surviving the deep space harsh environment, electronics capable of low temperature operation would contribute to improving circuit performance, increasing system efficiency, and reducing payload development and launch costs. Terrestrial applications where components and systems must operate in low temperature environments include cryogenic instrumentation, superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetic levitation transportation system, and arctic exploration. An on-going research and development program on low temperature electronics at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on the development of efficient power systems capable of surviving and exploiting the advantages of low temperature environments. Inhouse efforts include the design, fabrication, and characterization of low temperature power systems and the development of supporting technologies for low temperature operations, such as dielectric and insulating materials, semiconductor devices, passive power components, opto-electronic devices, as well as packaging and integration of the developed components into prototype flight hardware.

  10. Ultracapacitor/battery electronic interface development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.D.; Salasoo, L.; Schwartz, J.; Cardinal, M.

    1998-06-30

    A flexible, highly efficient laboratory proof-of-concept Ultracapacitor/Battery Interface power electronic circuit with associated controls was developed on a cost-shared contract funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), and the General Electric Company (GE). This power electronic interface translates the varying dc voltage on an ultracapacitor with bi-directional power flow to the dc bus of an inverter-supplied ac propulsion system in an electric vehicle application. In a related application, the electronic interface can also be utilized to interface a low-voltage battery to a dc bus of an inverter supplied ac propulsion system. Variations in voltage for these two intended applications occur (1) while extracting energy (discharge) or supplying energy (charge) to an ultracapacitor, and (2) while extracting energy (discharge) or supplying energy (charge) to a low-voltage battery. The control electronics of this interface is designed to be operated as a stand-alone unit acting in response to an external power command. However, the interface unit`s control is not configured to provide any of the vehicle system control functions associated with load leveling or power splitting between the propulsion battery and the ultracapacitor in an electric or hybrid vehicle application. A system study/preliminary design effort established the functional specification of the interface unit, including voltage, current, and power ratings, to meet the program objectives and technical goals for the development of a highly efficient ultracapacitor/battery electronic interface unit; and performed a system/application study of a hybrid-electric transit bus including an ultracapacitor and appropriate electronic interface. The maximum power capability of the ultracapacitor/battery electronic interface unit is 25 kW.

  11. First look at the beam test results of the FPIX2 readout chip for the BTeV silicon pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Uplegger, L.; Appel, J.A.; Artuso, M.; Cardoso, G.; Cease, H.P.; Chiodini, G.; Christian, D.C.; Cinabro, D.A.; Coluccia, R.; Hoff, J.; Kwan, S.; Magni, S.; Mekkaoui, A.; Menasce, D.; Newsom, C.; Papavassiliou, V.; Schreiner, A.; Turqueti, M.A.; Yarema, R.; Wang, J.C.; /Fermilab /Syracuse U. /INFN, Lecce /Wayne State U. /INFN, Milan /Iowa U. /New Mexico State U.

    2004-11-01

    High energy and nuclear physics experiments need tracking devices with excellent spatial precision and readout speed in the face of ever-higher track densities and increased radiation environments. The new generation of hybrid pixel detectors (arrays of silicon diodes bump bonded to arrays of front-end electronic cells) is a technology able to meet these challenges. We report the first results of the BTeV silicon pixel detector beam test carried out at Fermilab in summer 2004. Tests were performed using a 120 GeV/c proton beam incident on a 6 planes pixel detector telescope. The last prototype developed for the BTeV experiment (FPIX2) is tested in the middle of the telescope. There is no external trigger and events were built using the time-stamp information provided by the readout chips.

  12. Development of a high data-throughput ADC board for the PROMETEO portable test-bench for the upgraded front-end electronics of the ATLAS TileCal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoor, Matthew; Kureba, Oscar; Sandrock, Charles

    2015-10-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is preparing for a major Phase-II upgrade scheduled for 2022 [1]. The upgrade will require a complete redesign of both on- and off-detector electronics systems in the ATLAS Tile hadron Calorimeter (TileCal) [2]. The PROMETEO (A Portable ReadOut ModulE for Tilecal ElectrOnics) stand-alone test-bench system is currently in development and will be used for the certification and quality checks of the new front- end electronics. The Prometeo is designed to read in digitized samples from 12 channels simultaneously at the bunch crossing frequency while accessing quality of information in realtime. The main board used for the design is a Xilinx VC707 evaluation board with a dual QSFP+ FMC (FPGA Mezzanine Card) module for read-out and control of the front-end electronics. All other functions are provided by a HV board, LED board and a 16 channel ADC daughter board. The paper relates to the development and testing of the ADC board that will be used in the new Prometeo system.

  13. Towards a new generation of pixel detector readout chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, M.; Alozy, J.; Ballabriga, R.; Frojdh, E.; Heijne, E.; Llopart, X.; Poikela, T.; Tlustos, L.; Valerio, P.; Wong, W.

    2016-01-01

    The Medipix3 Collaboration has broken new ground in spectroscopic X-ray imaging and in single particle detection and tracking. This paper will review briefly the performance and limitations of the present generation of pixel detector readout chips developed by the Collaboration. Through Silicon Via technology has the potential to provide a significant improvement in the tile-ability and more flexibility in the choice of readout architecture. This has been explored in the context of 3 projects with CEA-LETI using Medipix3 and Timepix3 wafers. The next generation of chips will aim to provide improved spectroscopic imaging performance at rates compatible with human CT. It will also aim to provide full spectroscopic images with unprecedented energy and spatial resolution. Some of the opportunities and challenges posed by moving to a more dense CMOS process will be discussed.

  14. Developing Electronic Cooperation Tools: A Case From Norwegian Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Mydske, Per Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Background Many countries aim to create electronic cooperational tools in health care, but the progress is rather slow. Objective The study aimed to uncover how the authoritys’ financing policies influence the development of electronic cooperational tools within public health care. Methods An interpretative approach was used in this study. We performed 30 semistructured interviews with vendors, policy makers, and public authorities. Additionally, we conducted an extensive documentation study and participated in 18 workshops concerning information and communication technology (ICT) in Norwegian health care. Results We found that the interorganizational communication in sectors like health care, that have undergone an independent development of their internal information infrastructure would find it difficult to create electronic services that interconnect the organizations because such connections would affect all interconnected organizations within the heterogenic structure. The organizations would, to a large extent, depend on new functionality in existing information systems. Electronic patient records play a central role in all parts of the health care sector and therefore dependence is established to the information systems and theirs vendors. The Norwegian government authorities, which run more than 80% of the Norwegian health care, have not taken extraordinary steps to compensate for this dependency–the government's political philosophy is that each health care institution should pay for further electronic patient record development. However, cooperational tools are complex due to the number of players involved and the way they are intertwined with the overall workflow. The customers are not able to buy new functionalities on the drawing table, while the electronic patient record vendors are not willing to take the economic risk in developing cooperational tools. Thus, the market mechanisms in the domain are challenged. We also found that public projects

  15. A CMOS readout system for very large detector capacitances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeneberg, U.; Hosticka, B. J.; Fent, J.; Oberlack, H.; Zimmer, G.

    1990-03-01

    In this contribution we present readout electronics for a liquid-argon calorimeter. It has been designed and optimized for operation at cryogenic temperatures and it is integrated in an n-well 2 μm CMOS technology. The chip contains 16 analog channels with switched-capacitor circuits for charge collection, storage, and amplification, and averaging and correlated double sampling circuits for noise reduction. Further components include a trigger generator, an analog multiplexer, digital control circuits for analog switching, and 50 ω cable drivers.

  16. Mixed species radioiodine air sampling readout and dose assessment system

    DOEpatents

    Distenfeld, Carl H.; Klemish, Jr., Joseph R.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a simple, reliable, inexpensive and portable means and method for determining the thyroid dose rate of mixed airborne species of solid and gaseous radioiodine without requiring highly skilled personnel, such as health physicists or electronics technicians. To this end, this invention provides a means and method for sampling a gas from a source of a mixed species of solid and gaseous radioiodine for collection of the mixed species and readout and assessment of the emissions therefrom by cylindrically, concentrically and annularly molding the respective species around a cylindrical passage for receiving a conventional probe-type Geiger-Mueller radiation detector.

  17. Development of an X-ray pixel detector with multi-port charge-coupled device for X-ray free-electron laser experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kameshima, Takashi; Ono, Shun; Kudo, Togo; Ozaki, Kyosuke; Kirihara, Yoichi; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Inubushi, Yuichi; Yabashi, Makina; Hatsui, Takaki; Horigome, Toshio; Holland, Andrew; Holland, Karen; Burt, David; Murao, Hajime

    2014-03-15

    This paper presents development of an X-ray pixel detector with a multi-port charge-coupled device (MPCCD) for X-ray Free-Electron laser experiments. The fabrication process of the CCD was selected based on the X-ray radiation hardness against the estimated annual dose of 1.6 × 10{sup 14} photon/mm{sup 2}. The sensor device was optimized by maximizing the full well capacity as high as 5 Me- within 50 μm square pixels while keeping the single photon detection capability for X-ray photons higher than 6 keV and a readout speed of 60 frames/s. The system development also included a detector system for the MPCCD sensor. This paper summarizes the performance, calibration methods, and operation status.

  18. Directions for Research and Development on Electronic Portfolios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrami, Philip C.; Barrett, Helen

    2005-01-01

    This lead article for the special issue of the "Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology" explores directions for research and development on electronic portfolios, which are digital containers capable of storing visual and auditory content; software for which may also be designed to support a variety of pedagogical processes and…

  19. Development program on a cold cathode electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.; Holland, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    During this phase of the cathode development program, SRI improved the multiple electron beam exposure system used to print hole patterns for the cathode arrays, studied anisotropic etch processes, conducted cathode investigations using an emission microscope, reviewed possible alternate materials for cathode fabrication, studied cathode storage techniques, conducted high power operation experiments, and demonstrated high-current-density operation with small arrays of tips.

  20. Time-division SQUID multiplexer for the readout of X-ray microcalorimeter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doriese, W. B.; Beall, J. A.; Beyer, J.; Deiker, S.; Ferreira, L.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; Martinis, J. M.; Nam, S. W.; Reintsema, C. D.; Ullom, J. N.; Vale, L. R.; Xu, Y.

    2004-03-01

    Large-format (>1000 pixel) arrays of transition-edge sensors are being developed for applications ranging from X-ray materials analysis to submillimeter (SCUBA-2, ACT, SAFIRE) and X-ray (Constellation-X) astronomy. Cryogenic multiplexing allows instrumentation of these large detector arrays with a manageable number of wires and readout channels. We describe a SQUID-based, time-division multiplexer for X-ray microcalorimeter arrays, including a three-stage SQUID amplifier chain and room-temperature digital-feedback electronics. The prototype system has passed two milestone tests. First, energy resolution of 6.6 eV obtained from measuring 5.2 keV joule-heat pulses was not degraded by multiplexing 2, 4, or 8 biased detectors. Second, 55Fe spectra obtained with four multiplexed detectors showed essentially the same resolution as those obtained from the same detectors while not multiplexed.

  1. A multiplex readout method for position sensitive boron coated straw neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hao; Gong, Hui; Li, Jianmin; Wang, Yongqiang; Wang, Xuewu; Li, Yuanjing; Kang, Kejun

    2015-10-01

    A 1 m×1 m boron coated straw neutron detector is expected to be used to build the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument of the Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) in Tsinghua University. A multiplex readout method based on summing circuits in columns and rows is studied for this large area position sensitive detector. In this method, the outputs of charge sensitive preamplifiers are combined by columns and rows at two ends of the detector, and then the shaped signals are sampled by flash ADCs. With the position reconstructed algorithm implemented in FPGA which analyzes the charge division and column and row number of signals, the 3-D position information of neutron events can be obtained. The position resolution and counting rate performance of this method are analyzed, and the comparison to the delay-line readout method is also given. With the multiplex readout method, the scale of readout electronics can be greatly reduced and a good position resolution can be reached. A readout electronics system for a detector module which consists 4 × 10 straw tubes is designed based on this method, and the test with neutron beam shows an average 3-D spatial resolution of 4 × 4 × 6.8mm3.

  2. Ga:Ge array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Erick T.; Rieke, G. H.; Low, Frank J.; Haller, E. E.; Beeman, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    Work at the University of Arizona and at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory on the development of a far infrared array camera for the Multiband Imaging Photometer on the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) is discussed. The camera design uses stacked linear arrays of Ge:Ga photoconductors to make a full two-dimensional array. Initial results from a 1 x 16 array using a thermally isolated J-FET readout are presented. Dark currents below 300 electrons s(exp -1) and readout noises of 60 electrons were attained. Operation of these types of detectors in an ionizing radiation environment are discussed. Results of radiation testing using both low energy gamma rays and protons are given. Work on advanced C-MOS cascode readouts that promise lower temperature operation and higher levels of performance than the current J-FET based devices is described.

  3. Collimated Photo-Electron Gun (CPEG) Development for Spaceflight Applications: Electronics Design and Preliminary Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, A.; Everding, D.; Krause, L. H.

    2012-12-01

    In previous decades, active space experiments have been conducted with electron beams generate artificial aurora, trace magnetic field lines, and stimulate Very Low Frequency (VLF) emissions. A new electron source called the collimated photo-electron gun (CPEG) is presently under development for spaceflight applications. High-energy Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are used to photo-eject electrons off a target material, and these photoelectrons are then focused into a beam using electrostatic lenses. The beam electron energy is controlled by the voltage on the lenses, and the electron flux is controlled by the brightness of the LEDs. The LEDs require a narrow range of both voltage and current setpoints, and thus must be pulse-width modulated at a high frequency to control the brightness. Because the lens and target voltages must be kept at fixed ratio to ensure a laminar beam, the target is powered by a voltage-controlled current source. An Arduino is used to provide command and data handling for the electron gun and the telemetry interface with the host spacecraft. To measure the current flowing to the target, an instrumentation amplifier boosts the voltage from a current-viewing resistor and feeds this voltage to one of the analog inputs of the Arduino. The LEDs are powered using a highly-specialized integrated circuit designed for sourcing high-power LEDs: The LM3500-21. The detailed design and preliminary results of the calibration of the electronics will be presented with this paper. The CPEG is presently under consideration for numerous flight opportunities, and a prototype is scheduled for environmental and functional testing in the fourth quarter of 2012.

  4. Proposal for a shift register approach to RPC calorimeter readout for test beam, cosmics, and sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, D. G.

    2004-09-28

    Resistive Plate Chambers for Hadronic Particle-Flow calorimetry will have a large number of pixels. We present tests of a system for readout with parallel vertical shift registers, somewhat like that used in CCD imaging. In our case we discriminate on the signal immediately after amplification and shaping, and only shift single bits. We discuss the issues involved in a particular model for using off-the-shelf commercial chips for readout on a moderate scale. We have a 32 channel prototype in operation on an RPC, and we describe tests with the amplifiers etc leading up to this. The prototype is an example of a layout for the chips to be mounted on the readout pad for an RPC to make a thin assembly. Comparisons to other systems are made for cost scaling, modes of operation, etc. This particular implementation uses analog delay instead of a digital pipeline, and has no clock on the board during detector live time. This RPC readout system could be implemented quickly. Production of this system should have minimal start-up costs and minimal start-up times. One advantage of the present system would be to provide readout of large numbers of channels on a short development time scale at low cost. This would allow initial tuning of the reconstruction and analysis software in a test beam before other readout systems are ready. It also provides risk management by development of another technology at small additional cost.

  5. A discrete component low-noise preamplifier readout for a linear (1×16) SiC photodiode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahle, Duncan; Aslam, Shahid; Herrero, Federico A.; Waczynski, Augustyn

    2016-09-01

    A compact, low-noise and inexpensive preamplifier circuit has been designed and fabricated to optimally readout a common cathode (1×16) channel 4H-SiC Schottky photodiode array for use in ultraviolet experiments. The readout uses an operational amplifier with 10 pF capacitor in the feedback loop in parallel with a low leakage switch for each of the channels. This circuit configuration allows for reiterative sample, integrate and reset. A sampling technique is given to remove Johnson noise, enabling a femtoampere level readout noise performance. Commercial-off-the-shelf acquisition electronics are used to digitize the preamplifier analog signals. The data logging acquisition electronics has a different integration circuit, which allows the bandwidth and gain to be independently adjusted. Using this readout, photoresponse measurements across the array between spectral wavelengths 200 nm and 370 nm are made to establish the array pixels external quantum efficiency, current responsivity and noise equivalent power.

  6. Technology Developments in Radiation-Hardened Electronics for Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Howell, Joe T.

    2008-01-01

    The Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE) project consists of a series of tasks designed to develop and mature a broad spectrum of radiation hardened and low temperature electronics technologies. Three approaches are being taken to address radiation hardening: improved material hardness, design techniques to improve radiation tolerance, and software methods to improve radiation tolerance. Within these approaches various technology products are being addressed including Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA), Field Programmable Analog Arrays (FPAA), MEMS, Serial Processors, Reconfigurable Processors, and Parallel Processors. In addition to radiation hardening, low temperature extremes are addressed with a focus on material and design approaches. System level applications for the RHESE technology products are discussed.

  7. Electron beam weld development on a Filter Pack Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dereskiewicz, J. P.

    1994-06-01

    A continuous electron beam welding procedure was developed to replace the manual gas tungsten arc welding procedure on the Filter Pack Assembly. A statistical study was used to evaluate the feasibility of electron beam welding 6061-T6 aluminum covers to A356 cast weldments throughout the joint tolerance range specified on product drawings. Peak temperature exposures were not high enough to degrade the heat sensitive electrical components inside the cast weldment. Actual weldments with alodine coating on the weld joint area were successfully cleaned using a nonmetallic fiberglass brush cleaning method.

  8. Electronic ballasts: Developments in the U.S. market

    SciTech Connect

    Houghton, D.J.; Sardinsky, R.; Hawthorne, S.; Lovins, A.B.; Kiernan, P.

    1992-12-31

    Sales of electronic fluorescent ballasts are soaring as manufacturers continue to introduce better-performing models. Improvements include higher power factor, lower harmonic distortion, better reliability, four-lamp capability, and applicability to a wider variety of lamps. However, the juiciest plum -- a modestly priced, highly reliable, high-power-quality, continuously dimming ballast -- is still awaited. Manufacturers are addressing reported problems with batch failures, power quality, and unpredictable equipment incompatibilities, but are having difficulty keeping up with growing demand. Back orders of several months are common. This update summarizes technical data on current offerings and describes recent developments in making electronic ballasts.

  9. Development program on a Spindt cold-cathode electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    A thin film field emission cathode (TFFEC) array and a cold cathode electron gun based on the emitter were developed. A microwave tube gun that uses the thin film field emission cathode as an electron source is produced. State-of-the-art cathodes were fabricated and tested. The tip-packing density of the arrays were increased thereby increasing the cathode's current density capability. The TFFEC is based on the well known field emission effect and was conceived to exploit the advantages of that phenomenon while minimizing the difficulties associated with conventional field emission structures, e.g. limited life and high voltage requirements. Field emission follows the Fowler-Nordheim equation.

  10. Power Electronics Being Developed for Deep Space Cryogenic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2003-01-01

    Electronic circuits and systems designed for deep space missions need to operate reliably and efficiently in harsh environments that include very low temperatures. Spacecraft that operate in such cold environments carry a large number of heaters so that the ambient temperature for the onboard electronics remains near 20 C. Electronics that can operate at cryogenic temperatures will simplify system design and reduce system size and weight by eliminating the heaters and their associated structures. As a result, system development and launch cost will be reduced. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, an ongoing program is focusing on the development of power electronics geared for deep space low-temperature environments. The research and development efforts include electrical components design, circuit design and construction, and system integration and demonstration at cryogenic temperatures. Investigations are being carried out on circuits and systems that are targeted for use in NASA missions where low temperatures will be encountered: devices such as ceramic and tantalum capacitors, metal film resistors, semiconductor switches, magnetics, and integrated circuits including dc/dc converters, operational amplifiers, voltage references, and motor controllers. Test activities cover a wide range of device and circuit performance under simple as well as complex test conditions, such as multistress and thermal cycling. The effect of low-temperature conditions on the switching characteristics of an advanced silicon-on-insulator field effect transistor is shown. For gate voltages (VGS) below 2.6 V, drain currents at -190 C are lower than drain currents at room temperature (20 C).

  11. Centroiding algorithms for high speed crossed strip readout of microchannel plate detectors.

    PubMed

    Vallerga, John; Tremsin, Anton; Raffanti, Rick; Siegmund, Oswald

    2011-05-01

    Imaging microchannel plate (MCP) detectors with cross strip (XS) readout anodes require centroiding algorithms to determine the location of the amplified charge cloud from the incident radiation, be it photon or particle. We have developed a massively parallel XS readout electronic system that employs an amplifier and ADC for each strip and uses this digital data to calculate the centroid of each event in real time using a field programmable gate array (FPGA). Doing the calculations in real time in the front end electronics using an FPGA enables a much higher input event rate, nearly two orders of magnitude faster, by avoiding the bandwidth limitations of the raw data transfer to a computer. We report on our detailed efforts to optimize the algorithms used on both an 18 mm and 40 mm diameter XS MCP detector with strip pitch of 640 microns and read out with multiple 32 channel "Preshape32" ASIC amplifiers (developed at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory). Each strip electrode is continuously digitized to 12 bits at 50 MHz with all 64 digital channels (128 for the 40 mm detector) transferred to a Xilinx Virtex 5 FPGA. We describe how events are detected in the continuous data stream and then multiplexed into firmware modules that spatially and temporally filter and weight the input after applying offset and gain corrections. We will contrast a windowed "center of gravity" algorithm to a convolution with a special centroiding kernel in terms of resolution and distortion and show results with < 20 microns FWHM resolution at input rates > 1 MHz. PMID:21918588

  12. Architectural development of an advanced EVA Electronic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavelle, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    An advanced electronic system for future EVA missions (including zero gravity, the lunar surface, and the surface of Mars) is under research and development within the Advanced Life Support Division at NASA Ames Research Center. As a first step in the development, an optimum system architecture has been derived from an analysis of the projected requirements for these missions. The open, modular architecture centers around a distributed multiprocessing concept where the major subsystems independently process their own I/O functions and communicate over a common bus. Supervision and coordination of the subsystems is handled by an embedded real-time operating system kernel employing multitasking software techniques. A discussion of how the architecture most efficiently meets the electronic system functional requirements, maximizes flexibility for future development and mission applications, and enhances the reliability and serviceability of the system in these remote, hostile environments is included.

  13. The Development of Lightweight Electronics Enclosures for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenske, Matthew T.; Barth, Jane L.; Didion, Jeffrey R.; Mule, Peter

    1999-01-01

    This paper outlines the end to end effort to produce lightweight electronics enclosures for NASA GSFC electronics applications with the end goal of presenting an array of lightweight box options for a flight opportunity. Topics including the development of requirements, design of three different boxes, utilization of advanced materials and processes, and analysis and test will be discussed. Three different boxes were developed independently and in parallel. A lightweight machined Aluminum box, a cast Aluminum box and a composite box were designed, fabricated, and tested both mechanically and thermally. There were many challenges encountered in meeting the requirements with a non-metallic enclosure and the development of the composite box employed several innovative techniques.

  14. Development of the electronic health record in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, H

    1998-03-01

    In Japan, the order entry system has been employed in almost all university hospitals and popularisation of this system has also started in medium-sized hospitals. However, there has been a tendency in general hospitals in Japan to consider the electronic chart system where there has been no order entry system. Moreover, in small-scale clinics, there is no benefit in using the order entry system. Young doctors in Japan are beginning to employ the electronic chart system directly for the first time, without experience with the order entry system. In this paper, the development of the hospital information system in Japan and that of the electronic health record system are described. PMID:9723801

  15. Development of scanning electron and x-ray microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Tomokazu; Hirano, Tomohiko; Suyama, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a new type of microscope possessing a unique feature of observing both scanning electron and X-ray images under one unit. Unlike former X-ray microscopes using SEM [1, 2], this scanning electron and X-ray (SELX) microscope has a sample in vacuum, thus it enables one to observe a surface structure of a sample by SEM mode, to search the region of interest, and to observe an X-ray image which transmits the region. For the X-ray observation, we have been focusing on the soft X-ray region from 280 eV to 3 keV to observe some bio samples and soft materials. The resolutions of SEM and X-ray modes are 50 nm and 100 nm, respectively, at the electron energy of 7 keV.

  16. The CECAM Electronic Structure Library: community-driven development of software libraries for electronic structure simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Micael

    The CECAM Electronic Structure Library (ESL) is a community-driven effort to segregate shared pieces of software as libraries that could be contributed and used by the community. Besides allowing to share the burden of developing and maintaining complex pieces of software, these can also become a target for re-coding by software engineers as hardware evolves, ensuring that electronic structure codes remain at the forefront of HPC trends. In a series of workshops hosted at the CECAM HQ in Lausanne, the tools and infrastructure for the project were prepared, and the first contributions were included and made available online (http://esl.cecam.org). In this talk I will present the different aspects and aims of the ESL and how these can be useful for the electronic structure community.

  17. Development of BPM Electronics at the JLAB FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Sexton; Pavel Evtushenko; Kevin Jordan; Jianxun Yan; Steven Dutton; Steven Moore; Richard Evans; James Coleman

    2006-05-01

    A new version of BPM electronics based on the AD8362 RMS detector, which is a direct RF to DC converter, is under development at the JLAB FEL. Each of these new BPM electronics utilizes an embedded ColdFire Microprocessor for data processing and communication with the EPICS control system via TCP/IP. The ColdFire runs RTEMS, which is an open source real-time operating system. The JLAB FEL is a SRF Energy Recovery LINAC capable of running up to 10 mA CW beam with the micropulse up to 74.85 MHz. For diagnostic reasons and for the machine tune up, the micropulse frequency can be reduced to 1.17 MHz, which corresponds to about 160 ?A of beam current. It is required that the BPM system would be functional for all micropulse frequencies. By taking into account the headroom for the beam steering and current variations the dynamic range of the RF front end is required to be about 60 dB. A BPM resolution of at least 100 ?m is required, whereas better resolution is very desirable to make it possible for more accurate measurements of the electron beam optics. Some results of the RF front end development are presented as well as the first measurements made with an electron beam.

  18. Development of electron energy-loss spectroscopy for nanoscience.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jun; Wang, Zhiwei; Fu, Xin; Xie, Lin; Sun, Yuekui; Gao, Shangpeng; Jiang, Jun; Hu, Xuerang; Xu, Chen

    2008-08-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) has been well established in providing the composition and chemical bonding information of materials, particularly for light elements. Its potential for structural determination has long been known but has yet to be fully explored. With the convergence of rapid development in computing power and improvement in the efficiency of the material specific electronic structure simulation, plus the recent breakthrough in the development of C(s)-corrected electron microscopy, the reconstruction of the local three dimensional structure of nanomaterial using EELS in conjunction with advanced structural imaging and diffraction techniques is becoming increasingly feasible. In this paper, we will review from our own examples the progress in EELS instrumentation, methods and simulation to illustrate the progress that has been made. They include the density-function-theory-based ab initio spectroscopic simulation for standard-less fingerprint applications for metastable polymorph identification, magic angle electron energy-loss spectroscopy as well as recent results from the dual-detectors EELS system which allows the energy instability of the spectrometer to be analyzed in real-time and eventually compensated on-line. PMID:18166483

  19. Alumina Based 500 C Electronic Packaging Systems and Future Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liang-Yu

    2012-01-01

    NASA space and aeronautical missions for probing the inner solar planets as well as for in situ monitoring and control of next-generation aeronautical engines require high-temperature environment operable sensors and electronics. A 96% aluminum oxide and Au thick-film metallization based packaging system including chip-level packages, printed circuit board, and edge-connector is in development for high temperature SiC electronics. An electronic packaging system based on this material system was successfully tested and demonstrated with SiC electronics at 500 C for over 10,000 hours in laboratory conditions previously. In addition to the tests in laboratory environments, this packaging system has more recently been tested with a SiC junction field effect transistor (JFET) on low earth orbit through the NASA Materials on the International Space Station Experiment 7 (MISSE7). A SiC JFET with a packaging system composed of a 96% alumina chip-level package and an alumina printed circuit board mounted on a data acquisition circuit board was launched as a part of the MISSE7 suite to International Space Station via a Shuttle mission and tested on the orbit for eighteen months. A summary of results of tests in both laboratory and space environments will be presented. The future development of alumina based high temperature packaging using co-fired material systems for improved performance at high temperature and more feasible mass production will also be discussed.

  20. Development of BPM Electronics at the JLAB FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, D.; Evtushenko, P.; Jordan, K.; Yan, J.; Dutton, S.; Moore, W.; Evans, R.; Coleman, J.

    2006-11-01

    A new version of BPM electronics based on the AD8362 RMS detector, which is a direct RF to DC converter, is under development at the JLAB FEL. Each of these new BPM electronics utilizes an embedded ColdFire Microprocessor for data processing and communication with the EPICS control system via TCP/IP. The ColdFire runs RTEMS, which is an open source real-time operating system. The JLAB FEL is a SRF Energy Recovery LINAC capable of running up to 10 mA CW beam with a 74.85 MHz micropulse frequency. For diagnostic reasons and for machine tune up, the micropulse frequency can be reduced to 1.17 MHz, which corresponds to about 160 μA of beam current. It is required that the BPM system would be functional for all micropulse frequencies. By taking into account the headroom for the beam steering and current variations the dynamic range of the RF front end is required to be about 60 dB. A BPM resolution of at least 100 μm is required, whereas better resolution is very desirable to make it possible for more accurate measurements of the electron beam optics. Some results of the RF front end development are presented as well as the first measurements made with an electron beam.

  1. Studies on sampling and homogeneous dual readout calorimetry with meta-crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromanolakis, G.; Auffray, E.; Lecoq, P.

    2011-10-01

    The meta-crystals concept is an approach that consists of using both undoped and properly doped heavy crystal fibers of identical material as the active medium of a calorimeter. The undoped fibers behave as Cherenkov radiators while the doped ones behave as scintillators. A dual readout calorimeter can be built with its sensitive volume composed of a mixture of both types of crystals. In addition if the calorimeter is adequately finely segmented it can also function as a particle flow calorimeter at the same time. In this way one could possibly combine the advantages of both the particle flow concept and the dual readout scheme. We discuss the approach of dual readout calorimetry with meta-crystals made of Lutetium Aluminium Garnet (LuAG). We briefly present studies on the material development and first testbeam activities and then focus on performance expectation studies based on simulation. We discuss in more detail the results from generic systematic scannings of the design parameters of a dual readout calorimeter. The parameters under study include the transverse and longitudinal granularity, the sampling frequency and readout fraction of the scintillation and the Cherenkov signals, the total calorimeter length, the mixture of homogeneous and sampling dual readout components, their corresponding composition etc. We close with a brief outlook on open issues and further R&D needed to proceed from an ideal conceptual case to the design of a realistic detector.

  2. The capacitive division image readout: a novel imaging device for microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapington, J. S.; Conneely, T. M.; Leach, S. A.; Moore, L.

    2013-09-01

    The Capacitive Division Image Readout (C-DIR) is a simple and novel image readout for photon counting detectors offering major performance advantages. C-DIR is a charge centroiding device comprising three elements; (i) a resistive anode providing event charge localization, event current return path and electrical isolation from detector high voltage, (ii) a dielectric substrate which capacitively couples the event transient signal to the third element, (iii) the readout device; an array of capacitively coupled electrodes which divides the signal among the readout charge measurement nodes. The resistive anode and dielectric substrate constitute the rear interface of the detector and capacitively couple the signal to the external C-DIR readout device. The C-DIR device is a passive, multilayer printed circuit board type device comprising a matrix of isolated electrodes whose geometries define the capacitive network. C-DIR is manufactured using conventional PCB geometries and is straightforward and economical to construct. C-DIR's robustness and simplicity belie its performance advantages. Its capacitive nature avoids partition noise, the Poisson noise associated with collection of discrete charges. The dominant noise limiting position resolution is electronic noise. However C-DIR also presents a low input capacitance to the readout electronics, minimising this noise component thus maximising spatial resolution. Optimisation of the C-DIR pattern-edge geometry can provide ~90% linear dynamic range. We present data showing image resolution and linearity of the C-DIR device in a microchannel plate detector and describe various electronic charge measurement scheme designed to exploit the full performance potential of the C-DIR device.

  3. Soft decoding of a qubit readout apparatus.

    PubMed

    D'Anjou, B; Coish, W A

    2014-12-01

    Qubit readout is commonly performed by thresholding a collection of analog detector signals to obtain a sequence of single-shot bit values. The intrinsic irreversibility of the mapping from analog to digital signals discards soft information associated with an a posteriori confidence that can be assigned to each bit value when a detector is well characterized. Accounting for soft information, we show significant improvements in enhanced state detection with the quantum repetition code as well as quantum state or parameter estimation. These advantages persist in spite of non-Gaussian features of realistic readout models, experimentally relevant small numbers of qubits, and finite encoding errors. These results show useful and achievable advantages for a wide range of current experiments on quantum state tomography, parameter estimation, and qubit readout. PMID:25526105

  4. Characteristics of a large system of pad readout wire proportional chambers for the HPC calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Camporesi, T.; Cavallo, F.R.; Giordano, V.; Laurenti, G.; Molinari, G.; Navarria, F.L.; Privitera, P.; Rovelli, T.; Valenti, G.; Zucchini, A.

    1989-02-01

    A large system of wire proportional chambers is being constructed for the readout of the High-Density Projection Chamber (HPC) of the DELPHI experiment at the Large Electron-Positron storage ring. The system consists of 144 chambers, each 0.3 m/sup 2/ wide and read out via cathode pads, located at the end of the HPC drift volume.

  5. Practical aspects of monochromators developed for transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kimoto, Koji

    2014-01-01

    A few practical aspects of monochromators recently developed for transmission electron microscopy are briefly reviewed. The basic structures and properties of four monochromators, a single Wien filter monochromator, a double Wien filter monochromator, an omega-shaped electrostatic monochromator and an alpha-shaped magnetic monochromator, are outlined. The advantages and side effects of these monochromators in spectroscopy and imaging are pointed out. A few properties of the monochromators in imaging, such as spatial or angular chromaticity, are also discussed. PMID:25125333

  6. MSAT mobile electronically steered phased array antenna development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Fred

    1988-01-01

    The Mobile Satellite Experiment (MSAT-X) breadboard antenna design demonstrates the feasibility of using a phased array in a mobile satellite application. An electronically steerable phased array capable of tracking geosynchronous satellites from anywhere in the Continental United States has been developed. The design is reviewed along with the test data. Cost analysis are presented which indicate that this design can be produced at a cost of $1620 per antenna.

  7. A continuous read-out TPC for the ALICE upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippmann, C.

    2016-07-01

    The largest gaseous Time Projection Chamber (TPC) in the world, the ALICE TPC, will be upgraded based on Micro Pattern Gas Detector technology during the second long shutdown of the CERN Large Hadron Collider in 2018/19. The upgraded detector will operate continuously without the use of a triggered gating grid. It will thus be able to read all minimum bias Pb-Pb events that the LHC will deliver at the anticipated peak interaction rate of 50 kHz for the high luminosity heavy-ion era. New read-out electronics will send the continuous data stream to a new online farm at rates up to 1 TByte/s. A fractional ion feedback of below 1% is required to keep distortions due to space charge in the TPC drift volume at a tolerable level. The new read-out chambers will consist of quadruple stacks of Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM), combining GEM foils with a different hole pitch. Other key requirements such as energy resolution and operational stability have to be met as well. A careful optimisation of the performance in terms of all these parameters was achieved during an extensive R&D program. A working point well within the design specifications was identified with an ion backflow of 0.63%, a local energy resolution of 11.3% (sigma) and a discharge probability comparable to that of standard triple GEM detectors.

  8. Development of Electronics for Low-Temperature Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Dickman, John E.; Gerber, Scott S.; Overton, Eric

    2001-01-01

    Electronic systems that are capable of operating at cryogenic temperatures will be needed for many future NASA space missions, including deep space probes and spacecraft for planetary surface exploration. In addition to being able to survive the harsh deep space environment, low-temperature electronics would help improve circuit performance, increase system efficiency, and reduce payload development and launch costs. Terrestrial applications where components and systems must operate in low-temperature environments include cryogenic instrumentation, superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetic levitation transportation systems, and arctic exploration. An ongoing research and development project for the design, fabrication, and characterization of low-temperature electronics and supporting technologies at NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on efficient power systems capable of surviving in and exploiting the advantages of low-temperature environments. Supporting technologies include dielectric and insulating materials, semiconductor devices, passive power components, optoelectronic devices, and packaging and integration of the developed components into prototype flight hardware. An overview of the project is presented, including a description of the test facilities, a discussion of selected data from component testing, and a presentation of ongoing research activities being performed in collaboration with various organizations.

  9. A large dynamic range readout design for the plastic scintillator detector of DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Sun, Zhiyu; Yu, Yuhong; Zhang, Yongjie; Fang, Fang; Chen, Junling; Hu, Bitao

    2016-08-01

    A large dynamic range is required by the Plastic Scintillator Detector (PSD) of DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) to detect particles from electron to heavy ions with Z ≤ 20. To expand the dynamic range, the readout design based on the double-dynodes signal extraction from the photomultiplier tube has been proposed and adopted by PSD. To verify this design, a prototype detector module has been constructed and tested with cosmic ray and relativistic ion beam. The results match with the estimation and the readout unit could easily cover the required dynamic range of about 4 orders of magnitude.

  10. A 40 GByte/s read-out system for GEM

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, M.; Carrel, J.; Dorenbosch, J.; Kapoor, V.

    1994-04-01

    The preliminary design of the read-out system for the GEM (Gammas, Electrons, Muons) detector at the Superconducting Super Collider is presented. The system reads all digitized data from the detector data sources at a Level 1 trigger rate of up to 100 kHz. A total read-out bandwidth of 40 GBytes/s is available. Data are stored in buffers that are accessible for further event filtering by an on-line, processor farm. Data are transported to the farm only as they are needed by the higher-level trigger algorithms, leading to a reduced bandwidth requirement in the Data Acquisition System.

  11. Gravity Probe B gyroscope readout system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhlfelder, B.; Lockhart, J.; Aljabreen, H.; Clarke, B.; Gutt, G.; Luo, M.

    2015-11-01

    We describe the Gravity Probe B London-moment readout system successfully used on-orbit to measure two gyroscope spin axis drift rates predicted by general relativity. The system couples the magnetic signal of a spinning niobium-coated rotor into a low noise superconducting quantum interference device. We describe the multi-layered magnetic shield needed to attenuate external fields that would otherwise degrade readout performance. We discuss the ∼35 nrad/yr drift rate sensitivity that was achieved on-orbit.

  12. Energy and Timing Measurement with Time-Based Detector Readout for PET Applications: Principle and Validation with Discrete Circuit Components.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xishan; Lan, Allan K; Bircher, Chad; Deng, Zhi; Liu, Yinong; Shao, Yiping

    2011-06-11

    A new signal processing method for PET application has been developed, with discrete circuit components to measure energy and timing of a gamma interaction based solely on digital timing processing without using an amplitude-to-digital convertor (ADC) or a constant fraction discriminator (CFD). A single channel discrete component time-based readout (TBR) circuit was implemented in a PC board. Initial circuit functionality and performance evaluations have been conducted. Accuracy and linearity of signal amplitude measurement were excellent, as measured with test pulses. The measured timing accuracy from test pulses reached to less than 300 ps, a value limited mainly by the timing jitter of the prototype electronics circuit. Both suitable energy and coincidence timing resolutions (~18% and ~1.0 ns) have been achieved with 3 × 3 × 20 mm(3) LYSO scintillator and photomultiplier tube-based detectors. With its relatively simple circuit and low cost, TBR is expected to be a suitable front-end signal readout electronics for compact PET or other radiation detectors requiring the reading of a large number of detector channels and demanding high performance for energy and timing measurement. PMID:21743761

  13. On the comparison of analog and digital SiPM readout in terms of expected timing performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundacker, S.; Auffray, E.; Jarron, P.; Meyer, T.; Lecoq, P.

    2015-07-01

    In time of flight positron emission tomography (TOF-PET) and in particular for the EndoTOFPET-US Project (Frisch, 2013 [1]), and other applications for high energy physics, the multi-digital silicon photomultiplier (MD-SiPM) was recently proposed (Mandai and Charbon, 2012 [2]), in which the time of every single photoelectron is being recorded. If such a photodetector is coupled to a scintillator, the largest and most accurate timing information can be extracted from the cascade of the scintillation photons, and the most probable time of positron emission determined. The readout concept of the MD-SiPM is very different from that of the analog SiPM, where the individual photoelectrons are merely summed up and the output signal fed into the readout electronics. We have developed a comprehensive Monte Carlo (MC) simulation tool that describes the timing properties of the photodetector and electronics, the scintillation properties of the crystal and the light transfer within the crystal. In previous studies we have compared MC simulations with coincidence time resolution (CTR) measurements and found good agreement within less than 10% for crystals of different lengths (from 3 mm to 20 mm) coupled to SiPMs from Hamamatsu. In this work we will use the developed MC tool to directly compare the highest possible time resolution for both the analog and digital readout of SiPMs with different scintillator lengths. The presented studies reveal that the analog readout of SiPMs with microcell signal pile-up and leading edge discrimination can lead to nearly the same time resolution as compared to the maximum likelihood time estimation applied to MD-SiPMs. Consequently there is no real preference for either a digital or analog SiPM for the sake of achieving highest time resolution. However, the best CTR in the analog SiPM is observed for a rather small range of optimal threshold values, whereas the MD-SiPM provides stable CTR after roughly 20 registered photoelectron timestamps in

  14. Development of cryogenic readout electronics using fully-depleted-silicon-on-insulator CMOS process for future space borne far-infrared image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Hirohisa; Wada, Takehiko; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Arai, Yasuo; Ohno, Morifumi

    2009-12-01

    We measured the static characteristics and noise spectra of FD-SOI-CMOS at liquid helium temperature where many bulk-CMOS transistors suffer from anomalous behaviors on the current-voltage curves such as kink phenomena. The test results showed that the static characteristics depend on the layouts of the FD-SOI-CMOS transistor. While a body floating FD-SOI-CMOS transistor showed strong anomalous effects on the I-V curves, body-tied and ST ones showed much better static characteristics than the body floating one. Using the characteristics derived from the FET measurements, we show that a low power and high gain preamplifier suitable for far-infrared detectors can be designed.

  15. Development of mobile electron beam plant for environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bumsoo; Kim, Jinkyu; Kang, Wongu; Choi, Jang Seung; Jeong, Kwang-Young

    2016-07-01

    Due to the necessity of pilot scale test facility for continuous treatment of wastewater and gases on site, a mobile electron beam irradiation system mounted on a trailer has developed. This mobile electron beam irradiation system is designed for the individual field application with self-shielded structure of steel plate and lead block which will satisfy the required safety figures of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Shielding of a mobile electron accelerator of 0.7 MeV, 30 mA has been designed and examined by Monte Carlo technique. Based on a 3-D model of electron accelerator shielding which is designed with steel and lead shield, radiation leakage was examined using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport (MCNP) Code. Simulations with two different versions (version 4c2 and version 5) of MCNP code showed agreements within statistical uncertainties, and the highest leakage expected is 5.5061×10-01 (1±0.0454) μSv/h, which is far below the tolerable radiation dose limit for occupational workers. This unit could treat up to 500 m3 of liquid waste per day at 2 kGy or 10,000 N m3 of gases per hour at 15 kGy.

  16. A microfabricated fringing field capacitive pH sensor with an integrated readout circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefin, Md Shamsul; Bulut Coskun, M.; Alan, Tuncay; Redoute, Jean-Michel; Neild, Adrian; Rasit Yuce, Mehmet

    2014-06-01

    This work presents a microfabricated fringe-field capacitive pH sensor using interdigitated electrodes and an integrated modulation-based readout circuit. The changes in capacitance of the sensor result from the permittivity changes due to pH variations and are converted to frequency shifts using a crossed-coupled voltage controlled oscillator readout circuit. The shift in resonant frequency of the readout circuit is 30.96 MHz for a change in pH of 1.0-5.0. The sensor can be used for the measurement of low pH levels, such as gastric acid, and can be integrated with electronic pills. The measurement results show high repeatability, low noise, and a stable output.

  17. A microfabricated fringing field capacitive pH sensor with an integrated readout circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Arefin, Md Shamsul Redoute, Jean-Michel; Rasit Yuce, Mehmet; Bulut Coskun, M.; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    2014-06-02

    This work presents a microfabricated fringe-field capacitive pH sensor using interdigitated electrodes and an integrated modulation-based readout circuit. The changes in capacitance of the sensor result from the permittivity changes due to pH variations and are converted to frequency shifts using a crossed-coupled voltage controlled oscillator readout circuit. The shift in resonant frequency of the readout circuit is 30.96 MHz for a change in pH of 1.0–5.0. The sensor can be used for the measurement of low pH levels, such as gastric acid, and can be integrated with electronic pills. The measurement results show high repeatability, low noise, and a stable output.

  18. An online proton beam monitor for cancer therapy based on ionization chambers with micro pattern readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, E.; Carloni, A.; Castelluccio, D. M.; Cisbani, E.; Colilli, S.; De Angelis, G.; Fratoni, R.; Frullani, S.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Santavenere, F.; Vacca, G.

    2012-03-01

    A unique compact LINAC accelerator for proton therapy is under development in Italy within the TOP-IMPLART project. The proton beam will reach the kinetic energy of 230 MeV, it will have a widely variable current intensity (0.1-10 μA, with average up to 3.5 nA) associated with a high pulse repetition frequency (1-3.5 μs long pulses at 10-100 Hz). The TOP-IMPLART system will provide a fully active 3+1D dose delivery, that is longitudinal (energy modulation), transverse active spot scanning, and current intensity modulation. These accelerator features will permit a highly conformational dose distribution, which therefore requires an effective, online, beam monitor system with wide dynamic range, good sensitivity, adequate spatial resolution and rapid response. In order to fulfill these requisites a new device is under development for the monitoring of the beam intensity profile, its centroid and direction; it is based on transmission, segmented, ionization chambers with typical active area of 100 × 100 mm2. Micro pattern x/y pad like design has been used for the readout plane in order to maximize the field uniformity, reduce the chamber thickness and obtain both beam coordinates on a single chamber. The chamber prototype operates in ionization region to minimize saturation and discharge effects. Simulations (based on FLUKA) have been carried on to study the perturbation of the chamber on the beam parameters and the effects on the delivered dose (on a water phantom). The charge collected in each channel is integrated by dedicated auto-ranging readout electronics: an original scheme has been developed in order to have an input dynamic range greater than 104 with sensitivity better than 3%. This is achieved by a dynamical adjustment of the integrating capacitance to the signal intensity.

  19. Latest Diagnostic Electronics Development for the PROSCAN Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Duperrex, P.A.; Frei, U.; Gamma, G.; Mueller, U.; Rezzonico, L.

    2004-11-10

    New VME-based diagnostic electronics are being developed for PROSCAN, a proton accelerator for medical application presently under construction at PSI. One new development is a VME-based multi-channel logarithmic amplifier for converting current to voltage (LogIV). The LogIV boards are used for measuring current from the multiple wire (harp) profile monitors. The LogIV calibration method, current dependant bandwidth and temperature stability are presented. Another development is a BPM front end, based on the newest digital receiver techniques. Features of this new system are the remote control of the preamplifier stage and the continuous monitoring of each individual signal overall gain. Characteristics of the developed prototype are given.

  20. Improved Readout For Micromagnet/Hall-Effect Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiin-Chuan; Stadler, Henry L.; Katti, Romney R.

    1993-01-01

    Two improved readout circuits for micromagnet/Hall-effect random-access memories designed to eliminate current shunts introducing errors into outputs of older readout circuits. Incorporate additional switching transistors to isolate Hall sensors as needed.

  1. Electronic materials with a wide band gap: recent developments

    PubMed Central

    Klimm, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    The development of semiconductor electronics is reviewed briefly, beginning with the development of germanium devices (band gap E g = 0.66 eV) after World War II. A tendency towards alternative materials with wider band gaps quickly became apparent, starting with silicon (E g = 1.12 eV). This improved the signal-to-noise ratio for classical electronic applications. Both semiconductors have a tetrahedral coordination, and by isoelectronic alternative replacement of Ge or Si with carbon or various anions and cations, other semiconductors with wider E g were obtained. These are transparent to visible light and belong to the group of wide band gap semiconductors. Nowadays, some nitrides, especially GaN and AlN, are the most important materials for optical emission in the ultraviolet and blue regions. Oxide crystals, such as ZnO and β-Ga2O3, offer similarly good electronic properties but still suffer from significant difficulties in obtaining stable and technologically adequate p-type conductivity. PMID:25295170

  2. Electronic materials with a wide band gap: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Klimm, Detlef

    2014-09-01

    The development of semiconductor electronics is reviewed briefly, beginning with the development of germanium devices (band gap E g = 0.66 eV) after World War II. A tendency towards alternative materials with wider band gaps quickly became apparent, starting with silicon (E g = 1.12 eV). This improved the signal-to-noise ratio for classical electronic applications. Both semiconductors have a tetrahedral coordination, and by isoelectronic alternative replacement of Ge or Si with carbon or various anions and cations, other semiconductors with wider E g were obtained. These are transparent to visible light and belong to the group of wide band gap semiconductors. Nowadays, some nitrides, especially GaN and AlN, are the most important materials for optical emission in the ultraviolet and blue regions. Oxide crystals, such as ZnO and β-Ga2O3, offer similarly good electronic properties but still suffer from significant difficulties in obtaining stable and technologically adequate p-type conductivity. PMID:25295170

  3. Design and development of pulsed electron beam accelerator 'AMBICA - 600'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Rishi; Deb, Pankaj; Shukla, Rohit; Sharma, Surender; Shyam, Anurag

    2012-11-01

    Short duration, high power pulses with fast rise time and good flat-top are essentially required for driving pulsed electron beam diodes. To attain this objective, a dual resonant Tesla transformer based pulsed power accelerator 'AMBICA-600' has been developed. In this newly developed system, a coaxial water line is charged through single turn Tesla transformer that operates in the dual resonant mode. For making the accelerator compact, in the high power pulse forming line, water has been used as dielectric medium because of its high dielectric constant, high dielectric strength and high energy density. The coaxial waterline can be pulsed charged up to 600kV, has impedance of ~5Ω and generates pulse width of ~60ns. The integrated system is capable of producing intense electron beam of 300keV, 60kA when connected to impedance matched vacuum diode. In this paper, system hardware details and experimental results of gigawatt electron beam generation have been presented.

  4. Development of flagella bio-templated nanomaterials for electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Wonjin; Cheang, U. Kei; Kim, Min Jun

    2014-03-01

    Bacterial flagella with their unique structural properties have proven to be promising bio-templates and can be exploited for the creation of nanomaterial with very high aspect ratio and surface area. Their chemically modifiable surfaces allow the flagella be modified to possess electrical/electronic properties. Their extraordinary physical properties along with the many possibilities for manipulation make them ideal systems to study for the purpose of developing nanoelectronics. First, this article reviews the characteristics of bacterial flagella and their utilization as biologically inspired templates. Next, the use of bio-templates for electronic systems such as dye-sensitized solar cell and lithium ion battery is discussed. Finally, we show the future directions for the use of flagella biotemplatednanomaterials for applications in electrical engineering fields.

  5. Development of a Francium Electron Electric Dipole Moment Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munger, Charles T., Jr.; Feinberg, B.; Gould, Harvey; Kalnins, Juris; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Jentschura, Ulrich; Behr, John; Pearson, Matt

    2014-09-01

    An experiment to discover or rule out a permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron, at a sensitivity well beyond the present experimental limit, is being developed. The experiment will use 211Fr, obtainable online at TRIUMF at rates of 109/s, in a laser-cooled fountain. The experiment is done in free space and free fall, with an electric field, but no applied magnetic field, between optical state preparation and analysis. The relation between an electron EDM and an EDM of a francium atom has recently been recalculated using field theory alone (Blundell, Griffith & Sapirstein, Phys. Rev. D 86, 025023 [2012]), confirming previous atomic physics calculations and removing any ambiguity in the experimental interpretation.

  6. The process of developing an instrument: the JPL electronic nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, M. A.

    2012-06-01

    An electronic nose is a sensing array designed to monitor for targeted chemical species or mixtures. From 1995 to 2008, an electronic nose was developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to monitor the environment in human occupied spacecraft for the sudden release, such as leaks or spills, of targeted chemical species. The JPL ENose was taken through three generations of device, from basic exploratory research into polymer-carbon composite chemiresistive sensors to a fully operating instrument which was demonstrated on the International Space Station for several months. The Third Generation JPL ENose ran continuously in the U.S. Lab on the International Space Station to monitor for sudden releases of a targeted group of chemical species. It is capable of detecting, identifying and quantifying targeted species in the parts-per-million range in air, and of operating at a range of temperatures, humidities and pressures.

  7. Coplanar interdigitated grid detector with single electrode readout

    DOEpatents

    Luke, Paul N.

    2001-01-01

    The coplanar interdigitated grid technique with single electrode readout provides substantial spectral performance improvement over that of conventional full-area planar electrode detectors and over coplanar interdigitated grid detectors which measure the difference between the induced charge signals from two interdigitated coplanar grid electrodes. The signal from only one interdigitated grid electrode is read out. The signal response is optimized by changing the relative areas of the two grid electrodes and the bias applied across the detector. Only one preamplifier is needed and signal subtraction is not necessary. This eliminates the electronic noise contribution from the additional preamplifier used in the normal coplanar grid implementation, and conventional single-amplifier detector electronics can be used.

  8. Raman-based microarray readout: a review.

    PubMed

    Haisch, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    For a quarter of a century, microarrays have been part of the routine analytical toolbox. Label-based fluorescence detection is still the commonest optical readout strategy. Since the 1990s, a continuously increasing number of label-based as well as label-free experiments on Raman-based microarray readout concepts have been reported. This review summarizes the possible concepts and methods and their advantages and challenges. A common label-based strategy is based on the binding of selective receptors as well as Raman reporter molecules to plasmonic nanoparticles in a sandwich immunoassay, which results in surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals of the reporter molecule. Alternatively, capture of the analytes can be performed by receptors on a microarray surface. Addition of plasmonic nanoparticles again leads to a surface-enhanced Raman scattering signal, not of a label but directly of the analyte. This approach is mostly proposed for bacteria and cell detection. However, although many promising readout strategies have been discussed in numerous publications, rarely have any of them made the step from proof of concept to a practical application, let alone routine use. Graphical Abstract Possible realization of a SERS (Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering) system for microarray readout. PMID:26973235

  9. Latest generation of ASICs for photodetector readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguin-Moreau, N.

    2013-08-01

    The OMEGA microelectronics group has designed a new generation of multichannel integrated circuits, the "ROC" family, in AustrianMicroSystem (AMS) SiGe 0.35 μm technology to read out signals from various families of photodetectors. The chip named MAROC (standing for Multi Anode ReadOut Chip) has been designed to read out MultiAnode Photomultipliers (MAPMT), Photomultiplier ARray In SiGe ReadOut Chip (PARISROC) to read out Photomultipliers (PMTs) and SiPM Integrated ReadOut Chip (SPIROC) to readout Silicon PhotoMultiplier (SiPM) detectors and which was the first ASIC to do so. The three of them fulfill the stringent requirements of the future photodetectors, in particular in terms of low noise, radiation hardness, large dynamic range, high density and high speed while keeping low power thanks to the SiGe technology. These multi-channel ASICs are real System on Chip (SoC) as they provide charge, time and photon-counting information which are digitized internally. Their complexity and versatility enable innovative frontier detectors and also cover spin off of these detectors in adjacent fields such as medical or material imaging as well as smart detectors. In this presentation, the three ASIC architectures and test results will be described to give a general panorama of the "ROC" chips.

  10. National Skills Standards Development Program: Organization and Operation of Technical Committees To Develop National Skill Standards for Competency in the Electronics Industry. The Third Party Summative Evaluation of the Electronic Industries Foundation Project. Phase I & II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Losh, Charles

    The Electronics Industries Foundation was awarded a project to develop national entry-level standards and a certification system. Ten specialties were included: automotive electronics, avionics, biomedical electronics, business machines, consumer products electronics, general electronics, industrial electronics, instrumentation, microcomputer, and…

  11. Half-State Readout In Vertical-Bloch-Line Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.; Wu, Jiin-Chuan; Stadler, Henry L.

    1994-01-01

    Potentially narrow margins of chirality-based chopping of magnetic stripes avoided. Half-state readout is experimental method of readout in Vertical-Bloch-Line (VBL) memory. Based on differential deflections of magnetic stripe domains in which data bits stored. To give meaning to explanation of half-state readout, see "Vertical-Bloch-Line Memory" (NPO-18467).

  12. Implementing electronic medical record systems in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Hamish S F; Biondich, Paul; Moodley, Deshen; Choi, Sharon; Mamlin, Burke W; Szolovits, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The developing world faces a series of health crises including HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis that threaten the lives of millions of people. Lack of infrastructure and trained, experienced staff are considered important barriers to scaling up treatment for these diseases. In this paper we explain why information systems are important in many healthcare projects in the developing world. We discuss pilot projects demonstrating that such systems are possible and can expand to manage hundreds of thousands of patients. We also pass on the most important practical lessons in design and implementation from our experience in doing this work. Finally, we discuss the importance of collaboration between projects in the development of electronic medical record systems rather than reinventing systems in isolation, and the use of open standards and open source software. PMID:15992493

  13. CALORIC: A readout chip for high granularity calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, L.; Bonnard, J.; Manen, S.; Gay, P.; Soumpholphakdy, X.

    2011-07-01

    A very-front-end electronics has been developed to fulfil requirements for the next generation of electromagnetic calorimeters. The compactness of this kind of detector and its large number of channels (up to several millions) impose a drastic limitation of the power consumption and a high level of integration. The electronic channel proposed is first of all composed of a low-noise Charge Sensitive Amplifier (CSA) able to amplify the charge delivered by a silicon diode up to 10 pC. Next, a two-gain shaping, based on a Gated Integration (G.I.), is implemented to cover the 15 bits dynamic range required: a high gain shaper processes signals from 4 fC (charge corresponding to the MIP) up to 1 pC, and a low gain filter handles charges up to 10 pC. The G.I. performs also the analog memorization of the signal until it is digitalized. Hence, the analog-to-digital conversion is carried out through a low-power 12-bit cyclic ADC. If the signal overloads the high-gain channel dynamic range, a comparator selects the low-gain channel instead. Moreover, an auto-trigger channel has been implemented in order to select and store a valid event over the noise. The timing sequence of the channel is managed by a digital IP. It controls the G.I. switches, generates all needed clocks, drives the ADC and delivers the final result over 12 bits. The whole readout channel is power controlled, which permits to reduce the consumption according to the duty cycle of the beam collider. Simulations have been performed with Spectre simulator on the prototype chip designed with the 0.35 {mu}m CMOS technology from Austriamicrosystems. Results show a non-linearity better than 0.1% for the high-gain channel, and a non-linearity limited to 1% for the low-gain channel. The Equivalent Noise Charge referred to the input of the channel is evaluated to 0.4 fC complying with the MIP/10 limit. With the timing sequence of the International Linear Collider, which presents a duty cycle of 1%, the power

  14. High charge short electron bunches for wakefield accelerator structures development.

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, M. E.

    1998-09-25

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator group develops accelerating structures based on dielectric loaded waveguides. We use high charge short electron bunches to excite wakefields in dielectric loaded structures, and a second (low charge) beam to probe the wakefields left behind by the drive beam. We report measurements of beam parameters and also initial results of the dielectric loaded accelerating structures. We have studied acceleration of the probe beam in these structures and we have also made measurements on the RF pulses that are generated by the drive beam. Single drive bunches, as well as multiple bunches separated by an integer number of RF periods have been used to generate the accelerating wakefields.

  15. Electrothermal gas generator: Development and qualification of the control electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthaeus, G.; Schmitz, H. D.

    1986-07-01

    The development and qualification of an electronic control circuitry for an electrothermal or catalytic hydrazine gas generator system is described. The circuitry, named manual override, controls the gas pressure in a tank using a pressure transducer and the gas generator to keep the pressure constant within narrow tolerances. The present pressure can be varied by ground command, enabling a variable thrust of the gas fed cold gas thrusters. The automatic loop can be switched off and the tank pressure be controlled by ground command. Two manual overrides SN01 and SN02 were qualified.

  16. Readout architecture for sub-nanosecond resolution TDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marteau, J.; Carlus, B.; Gardien, S.; Girerd, C.; Ianigro, J.-C.; Montorio, J.-L.; Gibert, D.; Nicollin, F.

    2012-04-01

    The DIAPHANE project is pluri-disciplinary collaboration between particle physicists and geophysicists to perform the tomography of large geological structure mainly devoted to the study of active volcanoes. The detector used for this tomography, hereafter referred to as telescope, uses a standard, robust, cost-effective and well-known technology based on solid plastic scintillator readout by photomultiplier(s) (either multichannel pixelized PM or silicon PM). The electronics system is built on the concept of autonomous, triggerless, smart sensor directly connected on a standard fast Ethernet network. First radiographies have been performed on the Mont-Terri underground laboratory (St-Ursanne, Switzerland) and on the active volcano of La Soufrière (Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles, France). We present an upgrade of the readout architecture allowing to embed a sub-nanosecond resolution TDC within the existing programmable logic to help in the background rejection (rear flux, random coincidences) and to improve the detection purity and the radiography quality. First results obtained are also presented and briefly discussed.

  17. VME-Macintosh data acquisition system with ECL readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzalone, A.; Manno, C. M. Iacono; Ferrera, F.; Barbagallo, G.; Cali, C.; Yingmei, Gu.; Giustolist, F.

    1994-02-01

    A new data acquisition system has been developed at LNS to match the experimental request of handling hundreds of parameters and spectra with a input event frequency of a few kHz. Both the traditional CAMAC and a few faster ECL readout dataways are supported. To enhance the system flexibility three different kinds of CAMAC ADCs can be used (GAN'ELEC QDC1612F, FERA 43008, SILENA ADC4418/V). Two HSM8170 interfaces are adopted between the EXB-8200 tape unit is connected to the system for off-line processing data storage.

  18. A VME-Macintosh data acquisition system with ECL readout

    SciTech Connect

    Anzalone, A.; Manno, C.M.I.; Ferrera, F.; Barbagallo, G.; Cali, C. . Lab. Nazionali del Sud); Yingmei, G. . Inst. of Nuclear Research); Giustolisi, F. . Dipt. di Fisica)

    1994-02-01

    A new Data Acquisition System has been developed at LNS to match the experimental request of handling hundreds of parameters and spectra with an input event frequency of a few kHz. Both the traditional CAMAC and a new faster ECL readout dataways are supported. To enhance the system flexibility three different kinds of CAMAC ADCs can be used (GAN'ELEC QDC1612F, FERA 4300B, SILENA ADC4418/V.) Two HSM8170 interfaces are adopted between the ECLbus and the VMEbus as ECL-VME buffers. An EXB-8200 tape unit is connected to the system for off-line processing data storage.

  19. Development of Portable Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC (the “Contractor”) and Sense Holdings, Inc. (the “Participant”) was for the development of hand-held detectors with high sensitivity and selectivity for the detection of explosives, toxic industrial chemicals and materials, and other materials of interest for security applications. The two parties built a series of demonstration and prototype handheld sensors based upon micoelectromechanical systems (MEMS) with electronic readout.

  20. Advanced Diagnostics for Developing High-Brightness Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Babzien, M.; Malone, R.; Wang, X.-J.; Yakimenko, V.

    1998-11-24

    The production of high-brightness particle beams calls for the development of advanced beam diagnostics. High brightness beams, meaning beams with a high density in phase space, are important for many applications, such as short-wavelength Free-Electron Lasers and advanced accelerator systems. A diagnostic that provides detailed information on the density distribution of the electron bunch in multi-dimensional phase-space is an essential tool for obtaining small emittance at a high charge. This diagnostic system has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. One component of the system is the measurement of a slice emittance which provides a measurement of transverse beam properties (such as emittance) as a function of the longitudinal position. Changing the laser pulse profile of a photocathode RF gun has been suggested as one way to achieve non-linear emittance compensation and improve the brightness and that can be diagnosed by the slice emittance system. The other element of the diagnostic is the tomographic reconstruction of the transverse phase. In our work we give special attention to the accuracy of the phase space reconstruction and present an analysis using a transport line with nine focusing magnets and techniques to control the optical functions and phases. This high precision phase space tomography together with the ability to modify the radial charge distribution of the electron beam presents an opportunity to improve the emittance and apply non-linear radial emittance corrections. Combining the slice emittance and tomography diagnostics leads to an unprecedented visualization of phase space distributions in 5 dimensional phase-space and an opportunity to perform high-order emittance corrections. This should lead to great improvements in the beam brightness.