Science.gov

Sample records for ready software development

  1. A Community-Developed Measurement of the Reusability of Software Through Reuse Readiness Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. J.; Berrick, S. W.; Bertolli, A.; Burrows, H.; Delnore, V. E.; Downs, R. R.; Enloe, Y.; Falke, S.; Folk, M.; Gerard, N.; Gerard, R.; Hunter, M.; Jasmin, T.; McComas, D.; Samadi, S.; Sherman, M.; Swick, R.; Tilmes, C.; Wolfe, R. E.

    2007-12-01

    When software is developed with reuse purposes in mind from the start, the resulting product will often be more mature, in a reuse sense, than products which are modified for reuse purposes after they have been developed. But it can be difficult to assess the maturity level of a software product due to the variety of factors that influence its reusability. If these factors could be measured, assessed, and combined into a single scale measuring the maturity of the software in terms of reusability, it would be of great benefit to developers. They will more easily be able to determine how ready the software is for their purposes, and how much modification may be necessary before it can fill their needs. The NASA Earth Science Data Systems (ESDS) Software Reuse Working Group is in the process of developing a set of Reuse Readiness Levels (RRLs) for the purpose of determining the reuse maturity of software assets. These levels are modeled after NASA's Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs), which have been used for many years, particularly for assessing hardware's readiness for spaceflight purposes. To assess the reuse maturity of software, a number of factors are included in the Working Group's development of the RRL scale including portability, extensibility, documentation, support, packaging, intellectual property and licensing issues, standards compliance, verification and testing, and modularity. Members of the working group have described the levels reusable software goes through as it becomes more mature in each of these areas. These individual levels will be combined into a single RRL scale that will allow a single number to describe the reuse maturity of software. This presentation will describe the Working Group's efforts in the creation of the Reuse Readiness Level (RRL) scale.

  2. Software Technology Readiness for the Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Tugurlan, Maria C.; Kirkham, Harold; Chassin, David P.

    2011-06-13

    Abstract Budget and schedule overruns in product development due to the use of immature technologies constitute an important matter for program managers. Moreover, unexpected lack of technology maturity is also a problem for buyers. Both sides of the situation would benefit from an unbiased measure of technology maturity. This paper presents the use of a software maturity metric called Technology Readiness Level (TRL), in the milieu of the smart grid. For most of the time they have been in existence, power utilities have been protected monopolies, guaranteed a return on investment on anything they could justify adding to the rate base. Such a situation did not encourage innovation, and instead led to widespread risk-avoidance behavior in many utilities. The situation changed at the end of the last century, with a series of regulatory measures, beginning with the Public Utility Regulatory Policy Act of 1978. However, some bad experiences have actually served to strengthen the resistance to innovation by some utilities. Some aspects of the smart grid, such as the addition of computer-based control to the power system, face an uphill battle. It is our position that the addition of TRLs to the decision-making process for smart grid power-system projects, will lead to an environment of more confident adoption.

  3. Developing Cost Accounting and Decision Support Software for Comprehensive Community-Based Support Systems: An Analysis of Needs, Interest, and Readiness in the Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Robert; Jenkins, Peter; Marzke, Carolyn; Cohen, Carol

    Prominent among the new models of social service delivery are organizations providing comprehensive, community-based supports and services (CCBSS) to children and their families. A needs analysis explored CCBSS sites' interest in and readiness to use a software tool designed to help them make more effective internal resource allocation decisions…

  4. The use of nutrient-optimizing/cost-minimizing software to develop ready-to-use therapeutic foods for malnourished pregnant women in Mali

    PubMed Central

    Bechman, Allison; Phillips, Robert D; Chen, Jinru

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition affects people of all ages in many countries in the developing world. One treatment for malnutrition is the intervention involving ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTFs). This study developed RUTFs for pregnant women in Mali using formulation computer software and largely local, plant-based ingredients. Mali has the world's second highest birth rate and infant mortality rate. Nutrient profiles of possible ingredients and their prices from 2004 to 2009 were entered into the software. Computer-selected ingredients included peanuts, cowpeas, and millet as well as rice or barley koji (sources of α-amylase and ingredients). Components of the six selected formulations were milled, hydrolyzed with koji α-amylase, and heated at 121°C for 15 min. The contents of protein, fat, ash, fiber, carbohydrates, amino acid, and energy of dehydrated products were determined and compared with software-predicted values. Actual and predicted values were comparable: the protein content was 1.45–2.04% higher, and ash content was 0.60–0.89% higher than the predicted values, while the fat content was 0.18–0.88% lower, the lysine content was 0.17–0.25% lower, and fiber content was 0.16% lower to 2.06% higher than the predicted values. The difference in actual and predicted energy levels were 14.8–22.2%. The amount of RUTF needed to meet the requirement of most limiting nutrients, lysine and energy, ranged from 2620 to 3002 g. The costs for producing the RUTFs were substantially lower than importing commercial RUTFs even with increased ingredient prices in Mali from 2004 to 2009. PMID:25838889

  5. Agile Software Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biju, Soly Mathew

    2008-01-01

    Many software development firms are now adopting the agile software development method. This method involves the customer at every level of software development, thus reducing the impact of change in the requirement at a later stage. In this article, the principles of the agile method for software development are explored and there is a focus on…

  6. Gammasphere software development

    SciTech Connect

    Piercey, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    Activities of the nuclear physics group are described. Progress was made in organizing the Gammasphere Software Working Group, establishing a nuclear computing facility, participating in software development at Lawrence Berkeley, developing a common data file format, and adapting the ORNL UPAK software to run at Gammasphere. A universal histogram object was developed that defines a file format and provides for an objective-oriented programming model. An automated liquid nitrogen fill system was developed for Gammasphere (110 Ge detectors comprise the sphere).

  7. Software Model Of Software-Development Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chi Y.; Synott, Debra J.; Levary, Reuven R.

    1990-01-01

    Collection of computer programs constitutes software tool for simulation of medium- to large-scale software-development projects. Necessary to include easily identifiable and more-readily quantifiable characteristics like costs, times, and numbers of errors. Mathematical model incorporating these and other factors of dynamics of software-development process implemented in the Software Life Cycle Simulator (SLICS) computer program. Simulates dynamics of software-development process. In combination with input and output expert software systems and knowledge-based management software system, develops information for use in managing large software-development project. Intended to aid managers in planning, managing, and controlling software-development processes by reducing uncertainties in budgets, required personnel, and schedules.

  8. Cleanroom software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, M.; Mills, H. D.

    1981-01-01

    The 'cleanroom' software development process is a technical and organizational approach to developing software with certifiable reliability. Key ideas behind the process are well structured software specifications, randomized testing methods and the introduction of statistical controls; but the main point is to deny entry for defects during the development of software. This latter point suggests the use of the term 'cleanroom' in analogy to the defect prevention controls used in the manufacturing of high technology hardware. In the 'cleanroom', the entire software development process is embedded within a formal statistical design, in contrast to executing selected tests and appealing to the randomness of operational settings for drawing statistical inferences. Instead, random testing is introduced as a part of the statistical design itself so that when development and testing are completed, statistical inferences are made about the operation of the system.

  9. UWB Tracking Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Julia; Arndt, Dickey; Ngo, Phong; Phan, Chau; Dusl, John; Ni, Jianjun; Rafford, Melinda

    2006-01-01

    An Ultra-Wideband (UWB) two-cluster Angle of Arrival (AOA) tracking prototype system is currently being developed and tested at NASA Johnson Space Center for space exploration applications. This talk discusses the software development efforts for this UWB two-cluster AOA tracking system. The role the software plays in this system is to take waveform data from two UWB radio receivers as an input, feed this input into an AOA tracking algorithm, and generate the target position as an output. The architecture of the software (Input/Output Interface and Algorithm Core) will be introduced in this talk. The development of this software has three phases. In Phase I, the software is mostly Matlab driven and calls C++ socket functions to provide the communication links to the radios. This is beneficial in the early stage when it is necessary to frequently test changes in the algorithm. Phase II of the development is to have the software mostly C++ driven and call a Matlab function for the AOA tracking algorithm. This is beneficial in order to send the tracking results to other systems and also to improve the tracking update rate of the system. The third phase is part of future work and is to have the software completely C++ driven with a graphics user interface. This software design enables the fine resolution tracking of the UWB two-cluster AOA tracking system.

  10. Speakeasy software development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskinger, Patricia J.; Ozarow, Larry; Chruscicki, Mary C.

    1993-08-01

    The Speakeasy Software Development Project had three primary objectives. The first objective was to perform Independent Verification and Validation (IV & V) of the software and documentation associated with the signal processor being developed by Hazeltine and TRW under the Speakeasy program. The IV & V task also included an analysis and assessment of the ability of the signal processor software to provide LPI communications functions. The second objective was to assist in the enhancement and modification of an existing Rome Lab signal processor workstation. Finally, TASC developed project management support tools and provided program management support to the Speakeasy Program Office.

  11. Space Flight Software Development Software for Intelligent System Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis C.; Crumbley, Tim

    2004-01-01

    The slide presentation examines the Marshall Space Flight Center Flight Software Branch, including software development projects, mission critical space flight software development, software technical insight, advanced software development technologies, and continuous improvement in the software development processes and methods.

  12. Development toward School Readiness: A Holistic Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaynor, Alan Kibbe

    2015-01-01

    A systemic analysis of early childhood development factors explains the variance in school readiness among representative U.S. 5-year-olds. The underlying theory incorporates a set of causally interactive endogenous variables that are hypothesized to be driven by the effects of three exogenous variables: parental education, immigrant status and…

  13. VOUS Software Facilitates Development Of Other Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliger, Joseph; Pichumani, Ramini; Ponceleon, Dulce

    1992-01-01

    Visual Object Oriented Unification System (VOUS) computer program provides facility for development of other, high-level software. Does not replace, but rather extends, preexisting software tools for development of other software. Provides comprehensive, graphical, interactive medium for all phases in development of computer code from early exploration of concepts, through detailed coding-and-error-checking process, to final reporting of finished code and compilation of instruction manual for its use. Simplifies and partly automates programmer's task.

  14. Automated software development workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Engineering software development was automated using an expert system (rule-based) approach. The use of this technology offers benefits not available from current software development and maintenance methodologies. A workstation was built with a library or program data base with methods for browsing the designs stored; a system for graphical specification of designs including a capability for hierarchical refinement and definition in a graphical design system; and an automated code generation capability in FORTRAN. The workstation was then used in a demonstration with examples from an attitude control subsystem design for the space station. Documentation and recommendations are presented.

  15. Astronomers as Software Developers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pildis, Rachel A.

    2016-01-01

    Astronomers know that their research requires writing, adapting, and documenting computer software. Furthermore, they often have to learn new computer languages and figure out how existing programs work without much documentation or guidance and with extreme time pressure. These are all skills that can lead to a software development job, but recruiters and employers probably won't know that. I will discuss all the highly useful experience that astronomers may not know that they already have, and how to explain that knowledge to others when looking for non-academic software positions. I will also talk about some of the pitfalls I have run into while interviewing for jobs and working as a developer, and encourage you to embrace the curiosity employers might have about your non-standard background.

  16. Payload software technology: Software technology development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Programmatic requirements for the advancement of software technology are identified for meeting the space flight requirements in the 1980 to 1990 time period. The development items are described, and software technology item derivation worksheets are presented along with the cost/time/priority assessments.

  17. Software For Simulation Of Development Of Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    SOFTREL is prototype software package simulating creation, detection, and repair of defects and faults during software-development project. Personnel, resources, errors, and other realistic factors represented in simulation. Available in executable form only for IBM PC. SOFTREL is copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA.

  18. Software development in Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, V. R.; Katz, E. E.

    1985-01-01

    Ada will soon become a part of systems developed for the US Department of Defense. NASA must determine whether it will become part of its environment and particularly whether it will become a part fo the space station development. However, there are several issues about Ada which should be considered before this decision is made. One means of considering these issues is the examination of other developments in Ada. Unfortunately, few full scale developments have been completed or made publicly available for observation. Therefore, it will probably be necessary to study an Ada development in a NASA environment. Another means related to the first is the development of Ada metrics which can be used to characterize and evaluate Ada developments. These metrics need not be confined to full scale developments and could be used to evaluate on going projects as well. An early development in Ada, some observations from that development, metrics which were developed for use with Ada, and future directions for research into the use of Ada in software development in general and in the NASA Goddard environment in particular are described.

  19. Development of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) Metrics and Risk Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Anderson, K. K.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Lansing, Carina

    2012-10-01

    This is an internal project milestone report to document the CCSI Element 7 team's progress on developing Technology Readiness Level (TRL) metrics and risk measures. In this report, we provide a brief overview of the current technology readiness assessment research, document the development of technology readiness levels (TRLs) specific to carbon capture technologies, describe the risk measures and uncertainty quantification approaches used in our research, and conclude by discussing the next steps that the CCSI Task 7 team aims to accomplish.

  20. Software developments for gammasphere

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritsen, T.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M.P.

    1995-08-01

    This year marked the year when data acquisition development for Gammasphere evolved from planning to accomplishment, both in hardware and software. Two VME crates now contain about 10 crate-processors which are used to handle the data from VXI processors - which in turn collect the data from germanium and BGO detectors in the array. The signals from the detectors are processed and digitized in custom-built electronics boards. The processing power in the VME crates is used to digitally filter the data before they are written to tape. The goal is to have highly processed data flowing to tape, eliminating the off-line filtering and manipulation of data that was standard procedure in earlier experiments.

  1. Gammasphere software development. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Piercey, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the activities of the nuclear physics group at Mississippi State University which were performed during 1993. Significant progress has been made in the focus areas: chairing the Gammasphere Software Working Group (SWG); assisting with the porting and enhancement of the ORNL UPAK histogramming software package; and developing standard formats for Gammasphere data products. In addition, they have established a new public ftp archive to distribute software and software development tools and information.

  2. Young Children's Emotional Development and School Readiness. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raver, C. Cybele

    The current emphasis on children's academic preparedness continues to overshadow the importance of children's social and emotional development for school readiness. This Digest presents a brief overview of longitudinal research linking children's emotional development to school readiness and early childhood success, and then discusses…

  3. Gammasphere software development. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Piercey, R.B.

    1993-05-01

    Activities of the nuclear physics group are described. Progress was made in organizing the Gammasphere Software Working Group, establishing a nuclear computing facility, participating in software development at Lawrence Berkeley, developing a common data file format, and adapting the ORNL UPAK software to run at Gammasphere. A universal histogram object was developed that defines a file format and provides for an objective-oriented programming model. An automated liquid nitrogen fill system was developed for Gammasphere (110 Ge detectors comprise the sphere).

  4. Learner Readiness for Online Learning: Scale Development and Student Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Min-Ling; Chou, Chien; Chen, Chao-Hsiu; Own, Zang-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a multidimensional instrument for college students' readiness for online learning. Through a confirmatory factor analysis, the Online Learning Readiness Scale (OLRS) was validated in five dimensions: self-directed learning, motivation for learning, computer/Internet self-efficacy, learner…

  5. Development methodology for scientific software

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, G.; Goldstone, J.A.; Nelson, R.O.; Poore, R.V.; Miller, L.; Barrus, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    We present the details of a software development methodology that addresses all phases of the software life cycle, yet is well suited for application by small projects with limited resources. The methodology has been developed at the Los Alamos Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) Facility and was utilized during the recent development of the WNR Data Acquisition Command Language. The methodology emphasizes the development and maintenance of comprehensive documentation for all software components. The impact of the methodology upon software quality and programmer productivity is assessed.

  6. Managers Handbook for Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agresti, W.; Mcgarry, F.; Card, D.; Page, J.; Church, V.; Werking, R.

    1984-01-01

    Methods and aids for the management of software development projects are presented. The recommendations are based on analyses and experiences with flight dynamics software development. The management aspects of organizing the project, producing a development plan, estimation costs, scheduling, staffing, preparing deliverable documents, using management tools, monitoring the project, conducting reviews, auditing, testing, and certifying are described.

  7. Starlink Software Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, P. W.; Allan, A.; Berry, D. S.; Currie, M. J.; Giaretta, D.; Rankin, S.; Gray, N.; Taylor, M. B.

    2005-12-01

    Various recent changes to the software produced by Starlink are demonstrated. These cover areas such as table handling, time-series analysis, pipeline processing, astrometric calibration, spectral and cube visualisation, and ports to the Mac OS X and Cygwin environments. Particular emphasis was given to the applicability to the Virtual Observatory.

  8. Managing the Software Development Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubelczyk, J.; Parra, A.

    The goal of any software development project is to produce a product that is delivered on time, within the allocated budget, and with the capabilities expected by the customer and unfortunately, this goal is rarely achieved. However, a properly managed project in a mature software engineering environment can consistently achieve this goal. In this paper we provide an introduction to three project success factors, a properly managed project, a competent project manager, and a mature software engineering environment. We will also present an overview of the benefits of a mature software engineering environment based on 24 years of data from the Software Engineering Lab, and suggest some first steps that an organization can take to begin benefiting from this environment. The depth and breadth of software engineering exceeds this paper, various references are cited with a goal of raising awareness and encouraging further investigation into software engineering and project management practices.

  9. Managing the Software Development Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubelczky, Jeffrey T.; Parra, Amy

    1999-01-01

    The goal of any software development project is to produce a product that is delivered on time, within the allocated budget, and with the capabilities expected by the customer and unfortunately, this goal is rarely achieved. However, a properly managed project in a mature software engineering environment can consistently achieve this goal. In this paper we provide an introduction to three project success factors, a properly managed project, a competent project manager, and a mature software engineering environment. We will also present an overview of the benefits of a mature software engineering environment based on 24 years of data from the Software Engineering Lab, and suggest some first steps that an organization can take to begin benefiting from this environment. The depth and breadth of software engineering exceeds this paper, various references are cited with a goal of raising awareness and encouraging further investigation into software engineering and project management practices.

  10. Automated Software Development Workstation (ASDW)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridge, Ernie

    1990-01-01

    Software development is a serious bottleneck in the construction of complex automated systems. An increase of the reuse of software designs and components has been viewed as a way to relieve this bottleneck. One approach to achieving software reusability is through the development and use of software parts composition systems. A software parts composition system is a software development environment comprised of a parts description language for modeling parts and their interfaces, a catalog of existing parts, a composition editor that aids a user in the specification of a new application from existing parts, and a code generator that takes a specification and generates an implementation of a new application in a target language. The Automated Software Development Workstation (ASDW) is an expert system shell that provides the capabilities required to develop and manipulate these software parts composition systems. The ASDW is now in Beta testing at the Johnson Space Center. Future work centers on responding to user feedback for capability and usability enhancement, expanding the scope of the software lifecycle that is covered, and in providing solutions to handling very large libraries of reusable components.

  11. Educational Software: A Developer's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Timothy C.; Loane, Russell F.

    1994-01-01

    Examines the current status and short-term future of computer software development in higher education. Topics discussed include educational advantages of software; current program development techniques, including object oriented programming; and market trends, including IBM versus Macintosh and multimedia programs. (LRW)

  12. Resource utilization during software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses resource utilization over the life cycle of software development and discusses the role that the current 'waterfall' model plays in the actual software life cycle. Software production in the NASA environment was analyzed to measure these differences. The data from 13 different projects were collected by the Software Engineering Laboratory at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and analyzed for similarities and differences. The results indicate that the waterfall model is not very realistic in practice, and that as technology introduces further perturbations to this model with concepts like executable specifications, rapid prototyping, and wide-spectrum languages, we need to modify our model of this process.

  13. Software Development at Belle II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhr, Thomas; Hauth, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Belle II is a next generation B-factory experiment that will collect 50 times more data than its predecessor Belle. This requires not only a major upgrade of the detector hardware, but also of the simulation, reconstruction, and analysis software. The challenges of the software development at Belle II and the tools and procedures to address them are reviewed in this article.

  14. Software development without languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Haywood S.

    1988-01-01

    Automatic programming generally involves the construction of a formal specification; i.e., one which allows unambiguous interpretation by tools for the subsequent production of the corresponding software. Previous practical efforts in this direction have focused on the serious problems of: (1) designing the optimum specification language; and (2) mapping (translating or compiling) from this specification language to the program itself. The approach proposed bypasses the above problems. It postulates that the specification proper should be an intermediate form, with the sole function of containing information sufficient to facilitate construction of programs and also of matching documentation. Thus, the means of forming the intermediary becomes a human factors task rather than a linguistic one; human users will read documents generated from the specification, rather than the specification itself.

  15. Documenting the Development of Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Some routine supervisory functions performed automatically. Program Management Facility (PMF) computer program integrated software-development and control system. Applicable to large software systems involving as many as several hundred programmers and one million lines of codes, it ensures timely and orderly planning, development, implementation, and documentation of software. Designed as support tool. Has many features providing efficient processing and utilization of space for development programmer. Incorporates security system to prevent improper maintenance. Provides full set of cross-referenced reports and supervisory functions for detailed management information. Written in assembler. IBM program TSO required.

  16. Software Development Standard Processes (SDSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavin, Milton L.; Wang, James J.; Morillo, Ronald; Mayer, John T.; Jamshidian, Barzia; Shimizu, Kenneth J.; Wilkinson, Belinda M.; Hihn, Jairus M.; Borgen, Rosana B.; Meyer, Kenneth N.; Crean, Kathleen A.; Rinker, George C.; Smith, Thomas P.; Lum, Karen T.; Hanna, Robert A.; Erickson, Daniel E.; Gamble, Edward B., Jr.; Morgan, Scott C.; Kelsay, Michael G.; Newport, Brian J.; Lewicki, Scott A.; Stipanuk, Jeane G.; Cooper, Tonja M.; Meshkat, Leila

    2011-01-01

    A JPL-created set of standard processes is to be used throughout the lifecycle of software development. These SDSPs cover a range of activities, from management and engineering activities, to assurance and support activities. These processes must be applied to software tasks per a prescribed set of procedures. JPL s Software Quality Improvement Project is currently working at the behest of the JPL Software Process Owner to ensure that all applicable software tasks follow these procedures. The SDSPs are captured as a set of 22 standards in JPL s software process domain. They were developed in-house at JPL by a number of Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) residing primarily within the Engineering and Science Directorate, but also from the Business Operations Directorate and Safety and Mission Success Directorate. These practices include not only currently performed best practices, but also JPL-desired future practices in key thrust areas like software architecting and software reuse analysis. Additionally, these SDSPs conform to many standards and requirements to which JPL projects are beholden.

  17. Impact of Agile Software Development Model on Software Maintainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gawali, Ajay R.

    2012-01-01

    Software maintenance and support costs account for up to 60% of the overall software life cycle cost and often burdens tightly budgeted information technology (IT) organizations. Agile software development approach delivers business value early, but implications on software maintainability are still unknown. The purpose of this quantitative study…

  18. Advanced Software Development Workstation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Daniel

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Software Development Workstation Project, funded by Johnson Space Center, is investigating knowledge-based techniques for software reuse in NASA software development projects. Two prototypes have been demonstrated and a third is now in development. The approach is to build a foundation that provides passive reuse support, add a layer that uses domain-independent programming knowledge, add a layer that supports the acquisition of domain-specific programming knowledge to provide active support, and enhance maintainability and modifiability through an object-oriented approach. The development of new application software would use specification-by-reformulation, based on a cognitive theory of retrieval from very long-term memory in humans, and using an Ada code library and an object base. Current tasks include enhancements to the knowledge representation of Ada packages and abstract data types, extensions to support Ada package instantiation knowledge acquisition, integration with Ada compilers and relational databases, enhancements to the graphical user interface, and demonstration of the system with a NASA contractor-developed trajectory simulation package. Future work will focus on investigating issues involving scale-up and integration.

  19. Post-Modern Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filman, Robert E.

    2005-01-01

    The history of software development includes elements of art, science, engineering, and fashion(though very little manufacturing). In all domains, old ideas give way or evolve to new ones: in the fine arts, the baroque gave way to rococo, romanticism, modernism, postmodernism, and so forth. What is the postmodern programming equivalent? That is, what comes after object orientation?

  20. Software development environment, appendix F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddle, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    The current status in the area of software development environments is assessed. The purposes of environments, the types of environments, the constituents of an environment, the issue of environment integration, and the problems which must be solved in preparing an environment are discussed. Some general maxims to guide near-term future work are proposed.

  1. Impacts of the Arizona System Ready/Child Ready Professional Development Project on Preschool Teachers' Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciyer, Aysegul; Nagasawa, Mark; Swadener, Beth Blue; Patet, Pradnya

    2010-01-01

    Funded through a No Child Left Behind of 2001 (NCLB) grant, this research examines the effects of the Arizona System Ready/Child Ready Early Childhood Professional Development Project (AzSRCR) on the self-efficacy of 256 educators who participated in AzSRCR over a 3-year period. The AzSRCR program was a federally funded, statewide higher education…

  2. Definition of Technology Readiness Levels for Transmutation Fuel Development

    SciTech Connect

    Jon Carmack; Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu

    2008-01-01

    To quantitatively assess the maturity of a given technology, the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) process is used. The TRL process has been developed and successfully used by the Department of Defense (DOD) for development and deployment of new technology and systems for defense applications. In addition, NASA has also successfully used the TRL process to develop and deploy new systems for space applications. Transmutation fuel development is a critical technology needed for closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Because the deployment of a new nuclear fuel forms requires a lengthy and expensive research, development, and demonstration program, applying the TRL concept to the transmutation fuel development program is very useful as a management and tracking tool. This report provides definition of the technology readiness level assessment process as defined for use in assessing nuclear fuel technology development for the Transuranic Fuel Development Campaign.

  3. Development and Validation of the HIV Medication Readiness Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfour, Louise; Tasca, Giorgio A.; Kowal, John; Corace, Kimberly; Cooper, Curtis L.; Angel, Jonathan B.; Garber, Gary; MacPherson, Paul A.; Cameron, D. William

    2007-01-01

    Excellent medication adherence (greater than 95%) is required for optimal HIV treatment success. This study aimed to develop and validate a brief scale to assess psychological readiness for successfully starting and adhering to HIV medications. HIV-positive men and women (N = 142) from an HIV outpatient clinic completed the proposed HIV Medication…

  4. Managing MDO Software Development Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.; Salas, A. O.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past decade, the NASA Langley Research Center developed a series of 'grand challenge' applications demonstrating the use of parallel and distributed computation and multidisciplinary design optimization. All but the last of these applications were focused on the high-speed civil transport vehicle; the final application focused on reusable launch vehicles. Teams of discipline experts developed these multidisciplinary applications by integrating legacy engineering analysis codes. As teams became larger and the application development became more complex with increasing levels of fidelity and numbers of disciplines, the need for applying software engineering practices became evident. This paper briefly introduces the application projects and then describes the approaches taken in project management and software engineering for each project; lessons learned are highlighted.

  5. Technology Readiness Levels for Advanced Nuclear Fuels and Materials Development

    SciTech Connect

    Jon Carmack

    2014-01-01

    The Technology Readiness Level (TRL) process is used to quantitatively assess the maturity of a given technology. The TRL process has been developed and successfully used by the Department of Defense (DOD) for development and deployment of new technology and systems for defense applications. In addition, NASA has also successfully used the TRL process to develop and deploy new systems for space applications. Advanced nuclear fuels and materials development is a critical technology needed for closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Because the deployment of a new nuclear fuel forms requires a lengthy and expensive research, development, and demonstration program, applying the TRL concept to the advanced fuel development program is very useful as a management and tracking tool. This report provides definition of the technology readiness level assessment process as defined for use in assessing nuclear fuel technology development for the Advanced Fuel Campaign (AFC).

  6. Software Development as Music Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Andrew R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses how software development can be used as a method for music education research. It explains how software development can externalize ideas, stimulate action and reflection, and provide evidence to support the educative value of new software-based experiences. Parallels between the interactive software development process and…

  7. Software based controls module development

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, v.b.; kelley, g; welch, j.c.

    1999-12-10

    A project was initiated at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to implement software geometric error compensation within a PC-based machine tool controller from Manufacturing Data Systems, Inc. This project may be the first in which this type of compensation system was implemented in a commercially available machine tool controller totally in software. Previous implementations typically required using an external computer and hardware to interface through the position feedback loop of the controller because direct access to the controller software was not available. The test-bed machine for this project was a 2-axis Excello 921 T-base lathe. A mathematical error model of the lathe was created using homogeneous transformation matrices to relate the positions of the machine's slides to each other and to a world reference system. Equations describing the effects of the geometric errors were derived from the model. A software architecture was developed to support geometric error compensation for machine tools with up to 3 linear axes. Rotary axes were not supported in this implementation, but the developed architecture would not preclude their support in the future. Specific implementations will be dependent upon the configuration of the machine tool. A laser measuring system from Automated Precision, Inc. was used to characterize the lathe's geometric errors as functions of axis position and direction of motion. Multiple data files generated by the laser system were combined into a single Error File that was read at system startup and used by the compensation system to provide real-time position adjustments to the axis servos. A Renishaw Ballbar was used to evaluate the compensation system. Static positioning tests were conducted in an attempt to observe improved positioning accuracy with the compensation system enabled. These tests gave inconsistent results due to the lathe's inability to position the tool repeatably. The development of the architecture and compensation

  8. A Legal Guide for the Software Developer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Small Business Assistance Office, St. Paul.

    This booklet has been prepared to familiarize the inventor, creator, or developer of a new computer software product or software invention with the basic legal issues involved in developing, protecting, and distributing the software in the United States. Basic types of software protection and related legal matters are discussed in detail,…

  9. Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software: Phase 2 Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cianciolo, Alicia D.; Maddock, Robert W.; Prince, Jill L.; Bowes, Angela; Powell, Richard W.; White, Joseph P.; Tolson, Robert; O'Shaughnessy, Daniel; Carrelli, David

    2013-01-01

    NASA has used aerobraking at Mars and Venus to reduce the fuel required to deliver a spacecraft into a desired orbit compared to an all-propulsive solution. Although aerobraking reduces the propellant, it does so at the expense of mission duration, large staff, and DSN coverage. These factors make aerobraking a significant cost element in the mission design. By moving on-board the current ground-based tasks of ephemeris determination, atmospheric density estimation, and maneuver sizing and execution, a flight project would realize significant cost savings. The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) sponsored Phase 1 and 2 of the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software (AADS) study, which demonstrated the initial feasibility of moving these current ground-based functions to the spacecraft. This paper highlights key state-of-the-art advancements made in the Phase 2 effort to verify that the AADS algorithms are accurate, robust and ready to be considered for application on future missions that utilize aerobraking. The advancements discussed herein include both model updates and simulation and benchmark testing. Rigorous testing using observed flight atmospheres, operational environments and statistical analysis characterized the AADS operability in a perturbed environment.

  10. Software Development Group. Software Review Center. Microcomputing Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkey, Nadine; Smith, Shirley C.

    Two papers describe the roles of the Software Development Group (SDG) and the Software Review Center (SRC) at Drexel University. The first paper covers the primary role of the SDG, which is designed to assist Drexel faculty with the technical design and programming of courseware for the Apple Macintosh microcomputer; the relationship of the SDG…

  11. Development of the writing readiness inventory tool in context (WRITIC).

    PubMed

    van Hartingsveldt, Margo J; de Vries, Liesbeth; Cup, Edith H C; de Groot, Imelda J M; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2014-11-01

    This article describes the development of the Writing Readiness Inventory Tool in Context (WRITIC), a measurement evaluating writing readiness in Dutch kindergarten children (5 and 6 years old). Content validity was established through 10 expert evaluations in three rounds. Construct validity was established with 251 children following regular education. To identify scale constructs, factor analysis was performed. Discriminative validity was established by examining contrast groups with good (n = 142) and poor (n = 109) performers in paper-and-pencil tasks. Content validity was high with 94.4% agreement among the experts. Two reliable factors were found in the performance of paper-and-pencil tasks with Cronbach's alphas of 0.82 and 0.69 respectively. The contrast groups differed significantly in two WRITIC subdomains: "Sustained attention" and "Task performance". Our findings indicated that the WRITIC is feasible for use in the classroom. PMID:24666171

  12. YAM- A Framework for Rapid Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Abhinandan; Biesiadecki, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    YAM is a software development framework with tools for facilitating the rapid development and integration of software in a concurrent software development environment. YAM provides solutions for thorny development challenges associated with software reuse, managing multiple software configurations, the development of software product-lines, multiple platform development and build management. YAM uses release-early, release-often development cycles to allow developers to incrementally integrate their changes into the system on a continual basis. YAM facilitates the creation and merging of branches to support the isolated development of immature software to avoid impacting the stability of the development effort. YAM uses modules and packages to organize and share software across multiple software products. It uses the concepts of link and work modules to reduce sandbox setup times even when the code-base is large. One side-benefit is the enforcement of a strong module-level encapsulation of a module s functionality and interface. This increases design transparency, system stability as well as software reuse. YAM is in use by several mid-size software development teams including ones developing mission-critical software.

  13. Reliable software and communication 2: Controlling the software development process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalal, Siddhartha R.; Horgan, Joseph R.; Kettenring, Jon R.

    1994-01-01

    The software created by industrial, educational, and research organizations is increasingly large and complex. It also occupies a central role in the reliability and safety of many essential services. We examine the software development process and suggest opportunities for improving the process by using a combination of statistical and other process control techniques. Data, analysis of data, and tools for collecting data are crucial to our approach. Although our views are based upon experiences with large telecommunications systems, they are likely to be useful to many other developers of large software systems.

  14. Autonomous robot software development using simple software components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Thomas M.; Chung, Chan-Jin

    2004-10-01

    Developing software to control a sophisticated lane-following, obstacle-avoiding, autonomous robot can be demanding and beyond the capabilities of novice programmers - but it doesn"t have to be. A creative software design utilizing only basic image processing and a little algebra, has been employed to control the LTU-AISSIG autonomous robot - a contestant in the 2004 Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC). This paper presents a software design equivalent to that used during the IGVC, but with much of the complexity removed. The result is an autonomous robot software design, that is robust, reliable, and can be implemented by programmers with a limited understanding of image processing. This design provides a solid basis for further work in autonomous robot software, as well as an interesting and achievable robotics project for students.

  15. Experimental Internet Environment Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddux, Gary A.

    1998-01-01

    Geographically distributed project teams need an Internet based collaborative work environment or "Intranet." The Virtual Research Center (VRC) is an experimental Intranet server that combines several services such as desktop conferencing, file archives, on-line publishing, and security. Using the World Wide Web (WWW) as a shared space paradigm, the Graphical User Interface (GUI) presents users with images of a lunar colony. Each project has a wing of the colony and each wing has a conference room, library, laboratory, and mail station. In FY95, the VRC development team proved the feasibility of this shared space concept by building a prototype using a Netscape commerce server and several public domain programs. Successful demonstrations of the prototype resulted in approval for a second phase. Phase 2, documented by this report, will produce a seamlessly integrated environment by introducing new technologies such as Java and Adobe Web Links to replace less efficient interface software.

  16. Modular Infrastructure for Rapid Flight Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pires, Craig

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of modular infrastructure to assist in the development of flight software. A feature of this program is the use of model based approach for application unique software. A review of two programs that this approach was use on are: the development of software for Hover Test Vehicle (HTV), and Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Experiment (LADEE).

  17. Learning Human Aspects of Collaborative Software Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadar, Irit; Sherman, Sofia; Hazzan, Orit

    2008-01-01

    Collaboration has become increasingly widespread in the software industry as systems have become larger and more complex, adding human complexity to the technological complexity already involved in developing software systems. To deal with this complexity, human-centric software development methods, such as Extreme Programming and other agile…

  18. Development of a comprehensive software engineering environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartrum, Thomas C.; Lamont, Gary B.

    1987-01-01

    The generation of a set of tools for software lifecycle is a recurring theme in the software engineering literature. The development of such tools and their integration into a software development environment is a difficult task because of the magnitude (number of variables) and the complexity (combinatorics) of the software lifecycle process. An initial development of a global approach was initiated in 1982 as the Software Development Workbench (SDW). Continuing efforts focus on tool development, tool integration, human interfacing, data dictionaries, and testing algorithms. Current efforts are emphasizing natural language interfaces, expert system software development associates and distributed environments with Ada as the target language. The current implementation of the SDW is on a VAX-11/780. Other software development tools are being networked through engineering workstations.

  19. Software requirements: Guidance and control software development specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withers, B. Edward; Rich, Don C.; Lowman, Douglas S.; Buckland, R. C.

    1990-01-01

    The software requirements for an implementation of Guidance and Control Software (GCS) are specified. The purpose of the GCS is to provide guidance and engine control to a planetary landing vehicle during its terminal descent onto a planetary surface and to communicate sensory information about that vehicle and its descent to some receiving device. The specification was developed using the structured analysis for real time system specification methodology by Hatley and Pirbhai and was based on a simulation program used to study the probability of success of the 1976 Viking Lander missions to Mars. Three versions of GCS are being generated for use in software error studies.

  20. Developing Software for Corpus Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Despite the central role of the computer in corpus research, programming is generally not seen as a core skill within corpus linguistics. As a consequence, limitations in software for text and corpus analysis slow down the progress of research while analysts often have to rely on third party software or even manual data analysis if no suitable…

  1. Support activities to maintain SUMS flight readiness, volume 9. Attachment C: Flight STS-40 report. Attachment D: SUMS software listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Willie

    1992-01-01

    The Shuttle Upper Atmosphere Mass Spectrometer (SUMS), a component experiment of the NASA Orbital Experiments Program (OEX), was flown aboard the shuttle Columbia (OV102) mounted at the forward end of the nose landing gear well with an atmospheric gas inlet system fitted to the lower fuselage (chin panel) surface. The SUMS was designed to provide atmospheric data in flow regimes inaccessible prior to the development of the Space Transportation System (STS). The experiment mission operation begins about 1 hour prior to shuttle de-orbit entry maneuver and continues until reaching 1.6 torr (about 86 km altitude). The SUMS flew a total of three missions, 61C, STS-35, STS-40. Between flights, the SUMS was maintained in flight ready status. The flight data has been analyzed by the NASA LaRC Aerothermodynamics Branch. Flight data spectrum plots and reports are presented in the Appendices to the Final Technical Report for NAS1-17399. This volume provides a software listing and graphical data gathered from flight STS-40.

  2. Effective Software Engineering Leadership for Development Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cagle West, Marsha

    2010-01-01

    Software is a critical component of systems ranging from simple consumer appliances to complex health, nuclear, and flight control systems. The development of quality, reliable, and effective software solutions requires the incorporation of effective software engineering processes and leadership. Processes, approaches, and methodologies for…

  3. Teaching Agile Software Development: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devedzic, V.; Milenkovic, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the authors' experience of teaching agile software development to students of computer science, software engineering, and other related disciplines, and comments on the implications of this and the lessons learned. It is based on the authors' eight years of experience in teaching agile software methodologies to various groups…

  4. Insights into software development in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Lorraine M.

    1992-01-01

    The interdependence of the U.S.-Japanese economies makes it imperative that we in the United States understand how business and technology developments take place in Japan. We can gain insight into these developments in software engineering by studying the context in which Japanese software is developed, the practices that are used, the problems encountered, the setting surrounding these problems, and the resolution of these problems. Context includes the technological and sociological characteristics of the software development environment, the software processes applied, personnel involved in the development process, and the corporate and social culture surrounding the development. Presented in this paper is a summary of results of a study that addresses these issues. Data for this study was collected during a three month visit to Japan where the author interviewed 20 software managers representing nine companies involved in developing software in Japan. These data are compared to similar data from the United States in which 12 managers from five companies were interviewed.

  5. Continuous Software Integration and Quality Control during Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettl, M.; Neidhardt, A.; Brisken, W.; Dassing, R.

    2012-12-01

    Modern software has to be stable, portable, fast, and reliable. This requires a sophisticated infrastructure supporting and providing the developers with additional information about the state and the quality of the project. That is why we have created a centralized software repository, where the whole code-base is managed and version controlled on a centralized server. Based on this, a hierarchical build system has been developed where each project and their sub-projects can be compiled by simply calling the top level Makefile. On the top of this, a nightly build system has been created where the top level Makefiles of each project are called every night. The results of the build including the compiler warnings are reported to the developers using generated HTML pages. In addition, all the source code is automatically checked using a static code analysis tool, called "cppcheck". This tool produces warnings, similar to those of a compiler, but more pedantic. The reports of this analysis are translated to HTML and reported to the developers similar to the nightly builds. Armed with this information,the developers can discover issues in their projects at an early development stage. In combination it reduces the number of possible issues in our software to ensure quality of our projects at different development stages. These checks are also offered to the community. They are currently used within the DiFX software correlator project.

  6. Recommended approach to software development, revision 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Linda; Waligora, Sharon; Mcgarry, Frank; Pajerski, Rose; Stark, Mike; Johnson, Kevin Orlin; Cover, Donna

    1992-01-01

    Guidelines for an organized, disciplined approach to software development that is based on studies conducted by the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) since 1976 are presented. It describes methods and practices for each phase of a software development life cycle that starts with requirements definition and ends with acceptance testing. For each defined life cycle phase, guidelines for the development process and its management, and for the products produced and their reviews are presented.

  7. Manager's handbook for software development, revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Methods and aids for the management of software development projects are presented. The recommendations are based on analyses and experiences of the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) with flight dynamics software development. The management aspects of the following subjects are described: organizing the project, producing a development plan, estimating costs, scheduling, staffing, preparing deliverable documents, using management tools, monitoring the project, conducting reviews, auditing, testing, and certifying.

  8. Current Practice in Software Development for Computational Neuroscience and How to Improve It

    PubMed Central

    Gewaltig, Marc-Oliver; Cannon, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Almost all research work in computational neuroscience involves software. As researchers try to understand ever more complex systems, there is a continual need for software with new capabilities. Because of the wide range of questions being investigated, new software is often developed rapidly by individuals or small groups. In these cases, it can be hard to demonstrate that the software gives the right results. Software developers are often open about the code they produce and willing to share it, but there is little appreciation among potential users of the great diversity of software development practices and end results, and how this affects the suitability of software tools for use in research projects. To help clarify these issues, we have reviewed a range of software tools and asked how the culture and practice of software development affects their validity and trustworthiness. We identified four key questions that can be used to categorize software projects and correlate them with the type of product that results. The first question addresses what is being produced. The other three concern why, how, and by whom the work is done. The answers to these questions show strong correlations with the nature of the software being produced, and its suitability for particular purposes. Based on our findings, we suggest ways in which current software development practice in computational neuroscience can be improved and propose checklists to help developers, reviewers, and scientists to assess the quality of software and whether particular pieces of software are ready for use in research. PMID:24465191

  9. Software development: A paradigm for the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, Victor R.

    1989-01-01

    A new paradigm for software development that treats software development as an experimental activity is presented. It provides built-in mechanisms for learning how to develop software better and reusing previous experience in the forms of knowledge, processes, and products. It uses models and measures to aid in the tasks of characterization, evaluation and motivation. An organization scheme is proposed for separating the project-specific focus from the organization's learning and reuse focuses of software development. The implications of this approach for corporations, research and education are discussed and some research activities currently underway at the University of Maryland that support this approach are presented.

  10. The distributed development environment for SDSS software

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, E.; Gurbani, V.; Mackinnon, B.; Newberg, H.; Nicinski, T.; Petravick, D.; Pordes, R.; Sergey, G.; Stoughton, C.; Lupton, R.

    1994-04-01

    The authors present an integrated science software development environment, code maintenance and support system for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) now being actively used throughout the collaboration.

  11. Development of a Production Ready Automated Wire Delivery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The current development effort is a Phase 3 research study entitled "A Production Ready Automated Wire Delivery System", contract number NAS8-39933, awarded to Nichols Research Corporation (NRC). The goals of this research study were to production harden the existing Automated Wire Delivery (AWDS) motion and sensor hardware and test the modified AWDS in a range of welding applications. In addition, the prototype AWDS controller would be moved to the VME bus platform by designing, fabricating and testing a single board VME bus AWDS controller. This effort was to provide an AWDS that could transition from the laboratory environment to production operations. The project was performed in two development steps. Step 1 modified and tested an improved MWG. Step 2 developed and tested the AWDS single board VME bus controller. Step 3 installed the Wire Pilot in a Weld Controller with the imbedded VME bus controller.

  12. Software Development Life Cycle Security Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Daljit; Kaur, Parminder

    2011-12-01

    Security is now-a-days one of the major problems because of many reasons. Security is now-a-days one of the major problems because of many reasons. The main cause is that software can't withstand security attacks because of vulnerabilities in it which are caused by defective specifications design and implementation. We have conducted a survey asking software developers, project managers and other people in software development about their security awareness and implementation in Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC). The survey was open to participation for three weeks and this paper explains the survey results.

  13. A toolbox for developing bioinformatics software

    PubMed Central

    Potrzebowski, Wojciech; Puton, Tomasz; Rother, Magdalena; Wywial, Ewa; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2012-01-01

    Creating useful software is a major activity of many scientists, including bioinformaticians. Nevertheless, software development in an academic setting is often unsystematic, which can lead to problems associated with maintenance and long-term availibility. Unfortunately, well-documented software development methodology is difficult to adopt, and technical measures that directly improve bioinformatic programming have not been described comprehensively. We have examined 22 software projects and have identified a set of practices for software development in an academic environment. We found them useful to plan a project, support the involvement of experts (e.g. experimentalists), and to promote higher quality and maintainability of the resulting programs. This article describes 12 techniques that facilitate a quick start into software engineering. We describe 3 of the 22 projects in detail and give many examples to illustrate the usage of particular techniques. We expect this toolbox to be useful for many bioinformatics programming projects and to the training of scientific programmers. PMID:21803787

  14. A toolbox for developing bioinformatics software.

    PubMed

    Rother, Kristian; Potrzebowski, Wojciech; Puton, Tomasz; Rother, Magdalena; Wywial, Ewa; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2012-03-01

    Creating useful software is a major activity of many scientists, including bioinformaticians. Nevertheless, software development in an academic setting is often unsystematic, which can lead to problems associated with maintenance and long-term availibility. Unfortunately, well-documented software development methodology is difficult to adopt, and technical measures that directly improve bioinformatic programming have not been described comprehensively. We have examined 22 software projects and have identified a set of practices for software development in an academic environment. We found them useful to plan a project, support the involvement of experts (e.g. experimentalists), and to promote higher quality and maintainability of the resulting programs. This article describes 12 techniques that facilitate a quick start into software engineering. We describe 3 of the 22 projects in detail and give many examples to illustrate the usage of particular techniques. We expect this toolbox to be useful for many bioinformatics programming projects and to the training of scientific programmers. PMID:21803787

  15. Developing the E-Scape Software System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derrick, Karim

    2012-01-01

    Most innovations have contextual pre-cursors that prompt new ways of thinking and in their turn help to give form to the new reality. This was the case with the e-scape software development process. The origins of the system existed in software components and ideas that we had developed through previous projects, but the ultimate direction we took…

  16. Software Development Management: Empirical and Analytical Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Keumseok

    2011-01-01

    Managing software development is a very complex activity because it must deal with people, organizations, technologies, and business processes. My dissertation consists of three studies that examine software development management from various perspectives. The first study empirically investigates the impacts of prior experience with similar…

  17. Workflow-Based Software Development Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izygon, Michel E.

    2013-01-01

    The Software Developer's Assistant (SDA) helps software teams more efficiently and accurately conduct or execute software processes associated with NASA mission-critical software. SDA is a process enactment platform that guides software teams through project-specific standards, processes, and procedures. Software projects are decomposed into all of their required process steps or tasks, and each task is assigned to project personnel. SDA orchestrates the performance of work required to complete all process tasks in the correct sequence. The software then notifies team members when they may begin work on their assigned tasks and provides the tools, instructions, reference materials, and supportive artifacts that allow users to compliantly perform the work. A combination of technology components captures and enacts any software process use to support the software lifecycle. It creates an adaptive workflow environment that can be modified as needed. SDA achieves software process automation through a Business Process Management (BPM) approach to managing the software lifecycle for mission-critical projects. It contains five main parts: TieFlow (workflow engine), Business Rules (rules to alter process flow), Common Repository (storage for project artifacts, versions, history, schedules, etc.), SOA (interface to allow internal, GFE, or COTS tools integration), and the Web Portal Interface (collaborative web environment

  18. Firing Room Remote Application Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Kan

    2015-01-01

    The Engineering and Technology Directorate (NE) at National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is designing a new command and control system for the checkout and launch of Space Launch System (SLS) and future rockets. The purposes of the semester long internship as a remote application software developer include the design, development, integration, and verification of the software and hardware in the firing rooms, in particular with the Mobile Launcher (ML) Launch Accessories (LACC) subsystem. In addition, a software test verification procedure document was created to verify and checkout LACC software for Launch Equipment Test Facility (LETF) testing.

  19. Software systems development in petroleum engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, D. J.; Cain, G. M.; Carmichael, N. P.; Gouldstone, F. G.; Wadsley, A. W.; Webb, S. J.; Winder, P.

    1985-10-01

    Many approaches to designing software systems have been developed for use in commercial or business environments. These development methods and procedures have improved dramatically over the last ten years although it is only recently that these have been employed in scientific and technological applications. Many of these implementations have been unsuccessful because the design methodology has been divorced from the practical requirements of the industry in which the software system is to operate. This paper discusses a modern approach to software development which directly relates to an engineering environment and which is designed to satisfy practical criteria of acceptability of the software when delivered to the petroleum engineer. Since all field developments nowadays rely heavily on associated software systems, the approach presented here can lead to improved mechanical systems reliability and shorter development/design cycles.

  20. Monitoring software development through dynamic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doerflinger, Carl W.; Basili, Victor R.

    1983-01-01

    Research conducted by the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) on the use of dynamic variables as a tool to monitor software development is described. Project independent measures which may be used in a management tool for monitoring software development are identified. Several FORTRAN projects with similar profiles are examined. The staff was experienced in developing these types of projects. The projects developed serve similar functions. Because these projects are similar some underlying relationships exist that are invariant between projects. These relationships, once well defined, may be used to compare the development of different projects to determine whether they are evolving the same way previous projects in this environment evolved.

  1. Monitoring software development through dynamic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doerflinger, C. W.; Basili, V. R.

    1985-01-01

    Research conducted by the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) on the use of dynamic variables as a tool to monitor software development is described. Project independent measures which may be used in a management tool for monitoring software development are identified. Several FORTRAN projects with similar profiles are examined. The staff was experienced in developing these types of projects. The projects developed serve similar functions. Because these projects are similar some underlying relationships exist that are invariant between the projects. These relationships, once well defined, may be used to compare the development of different projects to determine whether they are evolving the same way previous projects in this environment evolved.

  2. Monitoring software development through dynamic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doerflinger, C. W.; Basili, V. R.

    1983-01-01

    Research conducted by the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) on the use of dynamic variables as a tool to monitor software development is described. Project independent measures which may be used in a management tool for monitoring software development are identified. Several FORTRAN projects with similar profiles are examined. The staff was experienced in developing these types of projects. The projects developed serve similar functions. Because these projects are similar some underlying relationships exist that are invariant between the projects. These relationships, once well defined, may be used to compare the development of different projects to determine whether they are evolving the same way previous projects in this environment evolved.

  3. A view of software development environment issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, B.

    1985-01-01

    The unique and challenging nature of the Space Station Program requires that software standards be effectively used to control costs, facilitate enhancements and ensure safety. The Software Standards Panel identified and developed recommendations in four areas to help the Space Station Program achieve these objectives. The areas in which recommendations are offered are policy, organization, process and candidate software standards for the Space Station Program. The concensus process employed by the panel is given and recommendations are made.

  4. Developing Confidence Limits For Reliability Of Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J.

    1991-01-01

    Technique developed for estimating reliability of software by use of Moranda geometric de-eutrophication model. Pivotal method enables straightforward construction of exact bounds with associated degree of statistical confidence about reliability of software. Confidence limits thus derived provide precise means of assessing quality of software. Limits take into account number of bugs found while testing and effects of sampling variation associated with random order of discovering bugs.

  5. Space Shuttle Software Development and Certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, James K.; Henderson, Johnnie A

    2000-01-01

    Man-rated software, "software which is in control of systems and environments upon which human life is critically dependent," must be highly reliable. The Space Shuttle Primary Avionics Software System is an excellent example of such a software system. Lessons learn from more than 20 years of effort have identified basic elements that must be present to achieve this high degree of reliability. The elements include rigorous application of appropriate software development processes, use of trusted tools to support those processes, quantitative process management, and defect elimination and prevention. This presentation highlights methods used within the Space Shuttle project and raises questions that must be addressed to provide similar success in a cost effective manner on future long-term projects where key application development tools are COTS rather than internally developed custom application development tools

  6. Computer-aided software development process design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chi Y.; Levary, Reuven R.

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe an intelligent tool designed to aid managers of software development projects in planning, managing, and controlling the development process of medium- to large-scale software projects. Its purpose is to reduce uncertainties in the budget, personnel, and schedule planning of software development projects. It is based on dynamic model for the software development and maintenance life-cycle process. This dynamic process is composed of a number of time-varying, interacting developmental phases, each characterized by its intended functions and requirements. System dynamics is used as a modeling methodology. The resulting Software LIfe-Cycle Simulator (SLICS) and the hybrid expert simulation system of which it is a subsystem are described.

  7. Educational Software--New Guidelines for Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Patricia Cohen

    1984-01-01

    Discusses standards developed by the Educational Computer Service of the National Education Association that incorporate technical, educational, and documentation components to guide authors in the development of quality educational software. (Author/MBR)

  8. Towards Archetypes-Based Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piho, Gunnar; Roost, Mart; Perkins, David; Tepandi, Jaak

    We present a framework for the archetypes based engineering of domains, requirements and software (Archetypes-Based Software Development, ABD). An archetype is defined as a primordial object that occurs consistently and universally in business domains and in business software systems. An archetype pattern is a collaboration of archetypes. Archetypes and archetype patterns are used to capture conceptual information into domain specific models that are utilized by ABD. The focus of ABD is on software factories - family-based development artefacts (domain specific languages, patterns, frameworks, tools, micro processes, and others) that can be used to build the family members. We demonstrate the usage of ABD for developing laboratory information management system (LIMS) software for the Clinical and Biomedical Proteomics Group, at the Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds.

  9. Critical Considerations for WORM Software Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Brian A.

    1987-01-01

    Addresses advantages and disadvantages of write-once read-many (WORM) optical disks and other software considerations resulting from the write-once nature of WORM media to provide guidelines for determining whether this technology is appropriate for an application. Three brief case studies describe WORM software development efforts. (MES)

  10. Issues in Software Development in Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Thomas T.

    Noting the increase in the number of teachers developing computer software for composition instruction, this paper explores the issues that are shaping the direction of computer assistance in writing instruction. The first half of the paper deals with specific questions teachers must consider as they design software. These are divided into…

  11. Interactive Programming Support for Secure Software Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xie, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Software vulnerabilities originating from insecure code are one of the leading causes of security problems people face today. Unfortunately, many software developers have not been adequately trained in writing secure programs that are resistant from attacks violating program confidentiality, integrity, and availability, a style of programming…

  12. The Early Development Instrument: Translating School Readiness Assessment into Community Actions and Policy Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guhn, Martin; Janus, Magdalena; Hertzman, Clyde

    2007-01-01

    This invited special issue of "Early Education and Development" presents research related to the Early Development Instrument (EDI; Janus & Offord, 2007), a community tool to assess children's school readiness at a population level. In this editorial introduction, we first sketch out recent trends in school readiness research that call for a…

  13. Perspex Machine X: software development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Sam; Thomas, Benjamin A.; Anderson, James A. D. W.

    2007-01-01

    The Perspex Machine arose from the unification of computation with geometry. We now report significant redevelopment of both a partial C compiler that generates perspex programs and of a Graphical User Interface (GUI). The compiler is constructed with standard compiler-generator tools and produces both an explicit parse tree for C and an Abstract Syntax Tree (AST) that is better suited to code generation. The GUI uses a hash table and a simpler software architecture to achieve an order of magnitude speed up in processing and, consequently, an order of magnitude increase in the number of perspexes that can be manipulated in real time (now 6,000). Two perspex-machine simulators are provided, one using trans-floating-point arithmetic and the other using transrational arithmetic. All of the software described here is available on the world wide web. The compiler generates code in the neural model of the perspex. At each branch point it uses a jumper to return control to the main fibre. This has the effect of pruning out an exponentially increasing number of branching fibres, thereby greatly increasing the efficiency of perspex programs as measured by the number of neurons required to implement an algorithm. The jumpers are placed at unit distance from the main fibre and form a geometrical structure analogous to a myelin sheath in a biological neuron. Both the perspex jumper-sheath and the biological myelin-sheath share the computational function of preventing cross-over of signals to neurons that lie close to an axon. This is an example of convergence driven by similar geometrical and computational constraints in perspex and biological neurons.

  14. Development of Software Correlator for KJJVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, J. H.; Oh, S. J.; Roh, D. G.; Kang, Y. W.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, C. H.; Chung, H. S.

    2009-12-01

    Korea-Japan Joint VLBI Correlator (KJJVC) is being developed by collaborating KASI (Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute), Korea, and NAOJ(National Observatory of Japan), Japan. In early 2010, KJJVC will work in normal operation. In this study, we developed the software correlator which is based on VCS (VLBI Correlation Subsystem) hardware specification as the core component of KJJVC. The main specification of software correlator is 8 Gbps, 8192 output channels, and 262,144-points FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) function same as VCS. And the functional algorithm which is same as specification of VCS and arithmetic register are adopted in this software correlator. To verify the performance of developed software correlator, the correlation experiments were carried out using the spectral line and continuum sources which were observed by VERA (VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry), NAOJ. And the experimental results were compared to the output of Mitaka FX correlator by referring spectrum shape, phase rate, and fringe detection and so on. Through the experimental results, we confirmed that the correlation results of software correlator are the same as Mitaka FX correlator and verified the effectiveness of it. In future, we expect that the developed software correlator will be the possible software correlator of KVN (Korean VLBI Network) with KJJVC by introducing the correlation post-processing and modifying the user interface as like GUI (Graphic User Interface).

  15. Developing Software that Supports State Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burney, James D.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses Alabama's attempt to provide computer aided instruction in remedial and initial instruction. Describes the program's funding, obstacles, and mileposts. Lists five phases for program development of competency software. Notes that 125 mathematics and five reading programs are available. (MVL)

  16. Concept Development for Software Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riecks, Jung; Storm, Walter; Hollingsworth, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the work performed by Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (LM Aero) under NASA contract NNL06AA08B, delivery order NNL07AB06T. The Concept Development for Software Health Management (CDSHM) program was a NASA funded effort sponsored by the Integrated Vehicle Health Management Project, one of the four pillars of the NASA Aviation Safety Program. The CD-SHM program focused on defining a structured approach to software health management (SHM) through the development of a comprehensive failure taxonomy that is used to characterize the fundamental failure modes of safety-critical software.

  17. Software Engineering Approaches to Ontology Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaševic, Dragan; Djuric, Dragan; Devedžic, Vladan

    Ontologies, as formal representations of domain knowledge, enable knowledge sharing between different knowledge-based applications. Diverse techniques originating from the field of artificial intelligence are aimed at facilitating ontology development. However, these techniques, although well known to AI experts, are typically unknown to a large population of software engineers. In order to overcome the gap between the knowledge of software engineering practitioners and AI techniques, a few proposals have been made suggesting the use of well-known software engineering techniques, such as UML, for ontology development (Cranefield 2001a).

  18. Community Readiness Survey: Norm Development Using a Q-Sort Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Anu; Botzet, Andria M.; Sechrist, Rebecca A. J.; Arthur, Nikki; Winters, Ken C.

    2006-01-01

    This study reports on norms developed for the Minnesota Institute of Public Health's (1999) Community Readiness Survey. Prevention experts from ten states and the Red Lake Nation sorted data from 50 communities into high and low readiness groups using a Q-sort process. High inter-rater agreement was achieved on communities sorted. Tests of…

  19. Automated computer software development standards enforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Yule, H.P.; Formento, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Uniform Development Environment (UDE) is being investigated as a means of enforcing software engineering standards. For the programmer, it provides an environment containing the tools and utilities necessary for orderly and controlled development and maintenance of code according to requirements. In addition, it provides DoD management and developer management the tools needed for all phases of software life cycle management and control, from project planning and management, to code development, configuration management, version control, and change control. This paper reports the status of UDE development and field testing. 5 refs.

  20. Measures and metrics for software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The evaluations of and recommendations for the use of software development measures based on the practical and analytical experience of the Software Engineering Laboratory are discussed. The basic concepts of measurement and system of classification for measures are described. The principal classes of measures defined are explicit, analytic, and subjective. Some of the major software measurement schemes appearing in the literature are derived. The applications of specific measures in a production environment are explained. These applications include prediction and planning, review and assessment, and evaluation and selection.

  1. Hierarchy Software Development Framework (h-dp-fwk) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaytsev, A.

    2010-04-01

    Hierarchy Software Development Framework provides a lightweight tool for building portable modular applications for performing automated data analysis tasks in a batch mode. The history of design and development activities devoted to the project has begun in March 2005 and from the very beginning it was targeting the case of building experimental data processing applications for the CMD-3 experiment which is being commissioned at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP, Novosibirsk, Russia). Its design addresses the generic case of modular data processing application operating within the well defined distributed computing environment. The main features of the framework are modularity, built-in message and data exchange mechanisms, XInclude and XML schema enabled XML configuration management tools, dedicated log management tools, internal debugging tools, both dynamic and static module chains support, internal DSO version and consistency checking, well defined API for developing specialized frameworks. It is supported on Scientific Linux 4 and 5 and planned to be ported to other platforms as well. The project is provided with the comprehensive set of technical documentation and users' guides. The licensing schema for the source code, binaries and documentation implies that the product is free for non-commercial use. Although the development phase is not over and many features are to be implemented yet the project is considered ready for public use and creating applications in various fields including development of events reconstruction software for small and moderate scale HEP experiments.

  2. Developing Generic Software for Spacecraft Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    A proposed approach to the development of software for spacecraft avionics is based partly on a concept of generic software that could be tailored to satisfy requirements for specific missions. The proposed approach would stand in contrast to the conventional approach of first defining avionics requirements for a specific mission, then developing software specific to those requirements. The proposed approach might also be adaptable to programming computers that control and monitor other complex equipment systems that range in scale from automobiles to factories. The concept of a spacecraft avionics functional model (SAFM) is a major element of the proposed approach. An SAFM would be, essentially, a systematic and hierarchical description of the functionality required of the avionics software (and hardware) for a given mission. Although the initial input information used to start the construction of an SAFM would typically amount to a high-level description, the SAFM would thereafter be decomposed to a low level. The resulting low-level version of the model would be used to develop a set of generic requirements that could be expected to include a large fraction of all requirements for a large fraction of all missions. The generic requirements would be used to develop software modules that could be included in, or excluded from, the final flight software to satisfy the requirements of a specific mission.

  3. Image analysis library software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guseman, L. F., Jr.; Bryant, J.

    1977-01-01

    The Image Analysis Library consists of a collection of general purpose mathematical/statistical routines and special purpose data analysis/pattern recognition routines basic to the development of image analysis techniques for support of current and future Earth Resources Programs. Work was done to provide a collection of computer routines and associated documentation which form a part of the Image Analysis Library.

  4. Advanced Software Development Workstation Project, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    ACCESS provides a generic capability to develop software information system applications which are explicitly intended to facilitate software reuse. In addition, it provides the capability to retrofit existing large applications with a user friendly front end for preparation of input streams in a way that will reduce required training time, improve the productivity even of experienced users, and increase accuracy. Current and past work shows that ACCESS will be scalable to much larger object bases.

  5. A software development environment utilizing PAMELA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flick, R. L.; Connelly, Richard W.

    1986-01-01

    Hardware capability and efficiency has increased dramatically since the invention of the computer, while software programmer productivity and efficiency has remained at a relatively low level. A user-friendly, adaptable, integrated software development environment is needed to alleviate this problem. The environment should be designed around the Ada language and a design methodology which takes advantage of the features of the Ada language as the Process Abstraction Method for Embedded Large Applications (PAMELA).

  6. A framework for teaching software development methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinsky, Yael; Hazzan, Orit

    2005-12-01

    This article presents a study that aims at constructing a teaching framework for software development methods in higher education. The research field is a capstone project-based course, offered by the Technion's Department of Computer Science, in which Extreme Programming is introduced. The research paradigm is an Action Research that involves cycles of data collection, examination, evaluation, and application of results. The research uses several research tools for data gathering, as well as several research methods for data interpretation. The article describes in detail the research background, the research method, and the gradual emergence process of a framework for teaching software development methods. As part of the comprehensive teaching framework, a set of measures is developed to assess, monitor, and improve the teaching and the actual process of software development projects.

  7. Distributed agile software development for the SKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicenec, Andreas; Parsons, Rebecca; Kitaeff, Slava; Vinsen, Kevin; Wu, Chen; Nelson, Paul; Reed, David

    2012-09-01

    The SKA software will most probably be developed by many groups distributed across the globe and coming from dierent backgrounds, like industries and research institutions. The SKA software subsystems will have to cover a very wide range of dierent areas, but still they have to react and work together like a single system to achieve the scientic goals and satisfy the challenging data ow requirements. Designing and developing such a system in a distributed fashion requires proper tools and the setup of an environment to allow for ecient detection and tracking of interface and integration issues in particular in a timely way. Agile development can provide much faster feedback mechanisms and also much tighter collaboration between the customer (scientist) and the developer. Continuous integration and continuous deployment on the other hand can provide much faster feedback of integration issues from the system level to the subsystem developers. This paper describes the results obtained from trialing a potential SKA development environment based on existing science software development processes like ALMA, the expected distribution of the groups potentially involved in the SKA development and experience gained in the development of large scale commercial software projects.

  8. Is Web Conferencing Software Ready for the Big Time? Accessible IT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Tom; Bell, Lori

    2006-01-01

    This month's column focuses on online Web conferencing software. This year promises to have the right mix of conditions to create significant growth in the use of these systems among libraries; library consortia, networks, and associations; and other library-related organizations. Travel budgets are being cut, librarian positions are being…

  9. Development Process for Science Operation Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballester, Pascal

    2015-12-01

    Scientific software development at ESO involves defined processes for the main phases of project inception, monitoring of development performed by instrument consortia, application maintenance, and application support. We discuss the lessons learnt and evolution of the process for the next generation of tools and observing facilities.

  10. Engineering software development with HyperCard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darko, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    The successful and unsuccessful techniques used in the development of software using HyperCard are described. The viability of the HyperCard for engineering is evaluated and the future use of HyperCard by this particular group of developers is discussed.

  11. Global Software Development with Cloud Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yara, Pavan; Ramachandran, Ramaseshan; Balasubramanian, Gayathri; Muthuswamy, Karthik; Chandrasekar, Divya

    Offshore and outsourced distributed software development models and processes are facing challenges, previously unknown, with respect to computing capacity, bandwidth, storage, security, complexity, reliability, and business uncertainty. Clouds promise to address these challenges by adopting recent advances in virtualization, parallel and distributed systems, utility computing, and software services. In this paper, we envision a cloud-based platform that addresses some of these core problems. We outline a generic cloud architecture, its design and our first implementation results for three cloud forms - a compute cloud, a storage cloud and a cloud-based software service- in the context of global distributed software development (GSD). Our ”compute cloud” provides computational services such as continuous code integration and a compile server farm, ”storage cloud” offers storage (block or file-based) services with an on-line virtual storage service, whereas the on-line virtual labs represent a useful cloud service. We note some of the use cases for clouds in GSD, the lessons learned with our prototypes and identify challenges that must be conquered before realizing the full business benefits. We believe that in the future, software practitioners will focus more on these cloud computing platforms and see clouds as a means to supporting a ecosystem of clients, developers and other key stakeholders.

  12. Developing educational software for publisher vendors.

    PubMed

    Joseph, L S; Joseph, A F

    1985-09-01

    This article has provided the principles of CAI development, marketing strategies, information on getting started with CAI, and how to approach publisher vendors. Guidelines for software development proposals have been synthesized from major software publishers in nursing. There is a great demand for courseware that teaches critical thinking skills, problem solving, application, and analysis. Tutorials and simulations are much needed. Computer-assisted testing courseware will also be highly used by teachers at all levels in the future. Opportunity awaits the CAI author in the publishing arena! PMID:3903670

  13. Automated real-time software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Walker, Carrie K.; Turkovich, John J.

    1993-01-01

    A Computer-Aided Software Engineering (CASE) system has been developed at the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory (CSDL) under the direction of the NASA Langley Research Center. The CSDL CASE tool provides an automated method of generating source code and hard copy documentation from functional application engineering specifications. The goal is to significantly reduce the cost of developing and maintaining real-time scientific and engineering software while increasing system reliability. This paper describes CSDL CASE and discusses demonstrations that used the tool to automatically generate real-time application code.

  14. Firing Room Remote Application Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Kan

    2014-01-01

    The Engineering and Technology Directorate (NE) at National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is designing a new command and control system for the checkout and launch of Space Launch System (SLS) and future rockets. The purposes of the semester long internship as a remote application software developer include the design, development, integration, and verification of the software and hardware in the firing rooms, in particular with the Mobile Launcher (ML) Launch Accessories subsystem. In addition, a Conversion Fusion project was created to show specific approved checkout and launch engineering data for public-friendly display purposes.

  15. Software development methodology for high consequence systems

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, L.S.; Bouchard, J.F.; Collins, E.W.; Eisenhour, M.; Neidigk, D.D.; Shortencarier, M.J.; Trellue, P.A.

    1997-10-01

    This document describes a Software Development Methodology for High Consequence Systems. A High Consequence System is a system whose failure could lead to serious injury, loss of life, destruction of valuable resources, unauthorized use, damaged reputation or loss of credibility or compromise of protected information. This methodology can be scaled for use in projects of any size and complexity and does not prescribe any specific software engineering technology. Tasks are described that ensure software is developed in a controlled environment. The effort needed to complete the tasks will vary according to the size, complexity, and risks of the project. The emphasis of this methodology is on obtaining the desired attributes for each individual High Consequence System.

  16. The advanced software development workstation project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridge, Ernest M., III; Pitman, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Software Development Workstation (ASDW) task is researching and developing the technologies required to support Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) with the emphasis on those advanced methods, tools, and processes that will be of benefit to support all NASA programs. Immediate goals are to provide research and prototype tools that will increase productivity, in the near term, in projects such as the Software Support Environment (SSE), the Space Station Control Center (SSCC), and the Flight Analysis and Design System (FADS) which will be used to support the Space Shuttle and Space Station Freedom. Goals also include providing technology for development, evolution, maintenance, and operations. The technologies under research and development in the ASDW project are targeted to provide productivity enhancements during the software life cycle phase of enterprise and information system modeling, requirements generation and analysis, system design and coding, and system use and maintenance. On-line user's guides will assist users in operating the developed information system with knowledge base expert assistance.

  17. Developing Software For Monitoring And Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, S. J.; Caglayan, A. K.

    1993-01-01

    Expert-system software shell produces executable code. Report discusses beginning phase of research directed toward development of artificial intelligence for real-time monitoring of, and diagnosis of faults in, complicated systems of equipment. Motivated by need for onboard monitoring and diagnosis of electronic sensing and controlling systems of advanced aircraft. Also applicable to such equipment systems as refineries, factories, and powerplants.

  18. Software Tools for Empowering Instructional Developers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayeski, Diane M.

    1991-01-01

    Software systems are being created to assist both novice and expert instructional technologists in response to perceived need of organizations to increase their training. Underlying philosophies and goals of instructional developer automation tools and their potential effects upon the organizations who adopt them must be examined so they will help…

  19. Communal Resources in Open Source Software Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaeth, Sebastian; Haefliger, Stefan; von Krogh, Georg; Renzl, Birgit

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Virtual communities play an important role in innovation. The paper focuses on the particular form of collective action in virtual communities underlying as Open Source software development projects. Method: Building on resource mobilization theory and private-collective innovation, we propose a theory of collective action in…

  20. A Framework for Teaching Software Development Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubinsky, Yael; Hazzan, Orit

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a study that aims at constructing a teaching framework for software development methods in higher education. The research field is a capstone project-based course, offered by the Technion's Department of Computer Science, in which Extreme Programming is introduced. The research paradigm is an Action Research that involves…

  1. Selecting Software for a Development Information Database.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geethananda, Hemamalee

    1991-01-01

    Describes software selection criteria considered for use with the bibliographic database of the Development Information Network for South Asia (DEVINSA), which is located in Sri Lanka. Highlights include ease of database creation, database size, input, editing, data validation, inverted files, searching, storing searches, vocabulary control, user…

  2. Development and Testing of "Math Insight" Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zucker, Andrew A.

    2006-01-01

    Computers running appropriate software hold great promise for teaching and learning mathematics. To this end, SRI International developed an integrated, computer-based problem solving environment called "Math Insight" that included interactive tools, such as a spreadsheet and dynamic geometric sketches, and professionally produced videos used to…

  3. Development of a New ReadiStep™ Scale Linked to the PSAT/NMSQT® Scale. Research Report 2013-4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, YoungKoung; Hendrickson, Amy; Patel, Priyank; Melican, Gerald; Sweeney, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the procedure for revising the ReadiStep™ score scale using the field trial data, and to provide technical information about the development of the new ReadiStep scale score. In doing so, this report briefly introduces the three assessments--ReadiStep, PSAT/NMSQT®, and SAT®--in the College Board Pathway…

  4. Development of the PCAL Reconstruction Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Craig; Wood, Michael; CLAS Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The 12-GeV upgrade at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility requires that the CLAS in Hall B be upgraded for the new kinematics at the higher beam energies. The new CLAS12 detector will include a component called the Pre-shower Calorimeter or PCAL. The PCAL will enhance the capabilities of the existing calorimeters and allow for greater acceptance over a wider range of momenta of particles like the neutral pion. The responsibility of the group at Canisius College is the PCAL reconstruction software. This poster will describe the software development and how it utilizes the Service-Oriented Architecture of CLAS12.

  5. Development of a flight software testing methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccluskey, E. J.; Andrews, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The research to develop a testing methodology for flight software is described. An experiment was conducted in using assertions to dynamically test digital flight control software. The experiment showed that 87% of typical errors introduced into the program would be detected by assertions. Detailed analysis of the test data showed that the number of assertions needed to detect those errors could be reduced to a minimal set. The analysis also revealed that the most effective assertions tested program parameters that provided greater indirect (collateral) testing of other parameters. In addition, a prototype watchdog task system was built to evaluate the effectiveness of executing assertions in parallel by using the multitasking features of Ada.

  6. Developing collaborative environments - A Holistic software development methodology

    SciTech Connect

    PETERSEN,MARJORIE B.; MITCHINER,JOHN L.

    2000-03-08

    Sandia National Laboratories has been developing technologies to support person-to-person collaboration and the efforts of teams in the business and research communities. The technologies developed include knowledge-based design advisors, knowledge management systems, and streamlined manufacturing supply chains. These collaborative environments in which people can work together sharing information and knowledge have required a new approach to software development. The approach includes an emphasis on the requisite change in business practice that often inhibits user acceptance of collaborative technology. Leveraging the experience from this work, they have established a multidisciplinary approach for developing collaborative software environments. They call this approach ``A Holistic Software Development Methodology''.

  7. Lean Development with the Morpheus Simulation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brogley, Aaron C.

    2013-01-01

    The Morpheus project is an autonomous robotic testbed currently in development at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) with support from other centers. Its primary objectives are to test new 'green' fuel propulsion systems and to demonstrate the capability of the Autonomous Lander Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) sensor, provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) on a lunar landing trajectory. If successful, these technologies and lessons learned from the Morpheus testing cycle may be incorporated into a landing descent vehicle used on the moon, an asteroid, or Mars. In an effort to reduce development costs and cycle time, the project employs lean development engineering practices in its development of flight and simulation software. The Morpheus simulation makes use of existing software packages where possible to reduce the development time. The development and testing of flight software occurs primarily through the frequent test operation of the vehicle and incrementally increasing the scope of the test. With rapid development cycles, risk of loss of the vehicle and loss of the mission are possible, but efficient progress in development would not be possible without that risk.

  8. The Development of Model for Measuring Railway Wheels Manufacturing Readiness Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inrawan Wiratmadja, Iwan; Mufid, Anas

    2016-02-01

    In an effort to grow the railway wheel industry in Indonesia and reduce the dependence on imports, Metal Industries Development Center (MIDC) makes the implementation of the railway wheel manufacturing technology in Indonesia. MIDC is an institution based on research and development having a task to research the production of railway wheels prototype and acts as a supervisor to the industry in Indonesia, for implementing the railway wheel manufacturing technology. The process of implementing manufacturing technology requires a lot of resources. Therefore it is necessary to measure the manufacturing readiness process. Measurement of railway wheels manufacturing readiness was in this study done using the manufacturing readiness level (MRL) model from the United States Department of Defense. MRL consists of 10 manufacturing readiness levels described by 90 criteria and 184 sub-criteria. To get a manufacturing readiness measurement instrument that is good and accurate, the development process involved experts through expert judgment method and validated with a content validity ratio (CVR). Measurement instrument developed in this study consist of 448 indicators. The measurement results show that MIDC's railway wheels manufacturing readiness is at the level 4. This shows that there is a gap between the current level of manufacturing readiness owned by MIDC and manufacturing readiness levels required to achieve the program objectives, which is level 5. To achieve the program objectives at level 5, a number of actions were required to be done by MIDC. Indicators that must be improved to be able to achieve level 5 are indicators related to the cost and financing, process capability and control, quality management, workers, and manufacturing management criteria.

  9. Software development tools: A bibliography, appendix C.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddle, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    A bibliography containing approximately 200 citations on tools which help software developers perform some development task (such as text manipulation, testing, etc.), and which would not necessarily be found as part of a computing facility is given. The bibliography comes from a relatively random sampling of the literature and is not complete. But it is indicative of the nature and range of tools currently being prepared or currently available.

  10. Development of a software security assessment instrument to reduce software security risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliam, D. P.; Kelly, J. C.; Powell, J. D.; Bishop, M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses development of a security assessment instrument for the software development and maintenance life cycle. The assessment instrument is a collection of tools and procedures to support development of secure software.

  11. Ethics and Morality in Software Development: A Developer's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Computers and other digital devices have become ubiquitous in our lives. Almost all aspects of our lives are in part or wholly impacted by computers and the software that runs on them. Unknowingly, we are placing our livelihoods and even our lives in the hands unknown software developers. Ethical and moral decisions made during software…

  12. Documenting the decision structure in software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wild, J. Christian; Maly, Kurt; Shen, Stewart N.

    1990-01-01

    Current software development paradigms focus on the products of the development process. Much of the decision making process which produces these products is outside the scope of these paradigms. The Decision-Based Software Development (DBSD) paradigm views the design process as a series of interrelated decisions which involve the identification and articulation of problems, alternates, solutions and justifications. Decisions made by programmers and analysts are recorded in a project data base. Unresolved problems are also recorded and resources for their resolution are allocated by management according to the overall development strategy. This decision structure is linked to the products affected by the relevant decision and provides a process oriented view of the resulted system. Software maintenance uses this decision view of the system to understand the rationale behind the decisions affecting the part of the system to be modified. D-HyperCase, a prototype Decision-Based Hypermedia System is described and results of applying the DBSD approach during its development are presented.

  13. Embracing Open Software Development in Solar Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughitt, V. K.; Ireland, J.; Christe, S.; Mueller, D.

    2012-12-01

    We discuss two ongoing software projects in solar physics that have adopted best practices of the open source software community. The first, the Helioviewer Project, is a powerful data visualization tool which includes online and Java interfaces inspired by Google Maps (tm). This effort allows users to find solar features and events of interest, and download the corresponding data. Having found data of interest, the user now has to analyze it. The dominant solar data analysis platform is an open-source library called SolarSoft (SSW). Although SSW itself is open-source, the programming language used is IDL, a proprietary language with licensing costs that are prohibative for many institutions and individuals. SSW is composed of a collection of related scripts written by missions and individuals for solar data processing and analysis, without any consistent data structures or common interfaces. Further, at the time when SSW was initially developed, many of the best software development processes of today (mirrored and distributed version control, unit testing, continuous integration, etc.) were not standard, and have not since been adopted. The challenges inherent in developing SolarSoft led to a second software project known as SunPy. SunPy is an open-source Python-based library which seeks to create a unified solar data analysis environment including a number of core datatypes such as Maps, Lightcurves, and Spectra which have consistent interfaces and behaviors. By taking advantage of the large and sophisticated body of scientific software already available in Python (e.g. SciPy, NumPy, Matplotlib), and by adopting many of the best practices refined in open-source software development, SunPy has been able to develop at a very rapid pace while still ensuring a high level of reliability. The Helioviewer Project and SunPy represent two pioneering technologies in solar physics - simple yet flexible data visualization and a powerful, new data analysis environment. We

  14. An improved approach for flight readiness certification: Methodology for failure risk assessment and application examples. Volume 2: Software documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, N. R.; Ebbeler, D. H.; Newlin, L. E.; Sutharshana, S.; Creager, M.

    1992-01-01

    An improved methodology for quantitatively evaluating failure risk of spaceflight systems to assess flight readiness and identify risk control measures is presented. This methodology, called Probabilistic Failure Assessment (PFA), combines operating experience from tests and flights with engineering analysis to estimate failure risk. The PFA methodology is of particular value when information on which to base an assessment of failure risk, including test experience and knowledge of parameters used in engineering analyses of failure phenomena, is expensive or difficult to acquire. The PFA methodology is a prescribed statistical structure in which engineering analysis models that characterize failure phenomena are used conjointly with uncertainties about analysis parameters and/or modeling accuracy to estimate failure probability distributions for specific failure modes, These distributions can then be modified, by means of statistical procedures of the PFA methodology, to reflect any test or flight experience. Conventional engineering analysis models currently employed for design of failure prediction are used in this methodology. The PFA methodology is described and examples of its application are presented. Conventional approaches to failure risk evaluation for spaceflight systems are discussed, and the rationale for the approach taken in the PFA methodology is presented. The statistical methods, engineering models, and computer software used in fatigue failure mode applications are thoroughly documented.

  15. An improved approach for flight readiness certification: Methodology for failure risk assessment and application examples. Volume 2: Software documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, N. R.; Ebbeler, D. H.; Newlin, L. E.; Sutharshana, S.; Creager, M.

    1992-06-01

    An improved methodology for quantitatively evaluating failure risk of spaceflight systems to assess flight readiness and identify risk control measures is presented. This methodology, called Probabilistic Failure Assessment (PFA), combines operating experience from tests and flights with engineering analysis to estimate failure risk. The PFA methodology is of particular value when information on which to base an assessment of failure risk, including test experience and knowledge of parameters used in engineering analyses of failure phenomena, is expensive or difficult to acquire. The PFA methodology is a prescribed statistical structure in which engineering analysis models that characterize failure phenomena are used conjointly with uncertainties about analysis parameters and/or modeling accuracy to estimate failure probability distributions for specific failure modes, These distributions can then be modified, by means of statistical procedures of the PFA methodology, to reflect any test or flight experience. Conventional engineering analysis models currently employed for design of failure prediction are used in this methodology. The PFA methodology is described and examples of its application are presented. Conventional approaches to failure risk evaluation for spaceflight systems are discussed, and the rationale for the approach taken in the PFA methodology is presented. The statistical methods, engineering models, and computer software used in fatigue failure mode applications are thoroughly documented.

  16. An improved approach for flight readiness certification: Probabilistic models for flaw propagation and turbine blade failure. Volume 2: Software documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, N. R.; Ebbeler, D. H.; Newlin, L. E.; Sutharshana, S.; Creager, M.

    1992-01-01

    An improved methodology for quantitatively evaluating failure risk of spaceflights systems to assess flight readiness and identify risk control measures is presented. This methodology, called Probabilistic Failure Assessment (PFA), combines operating experience from tests and flights with analytical modeling of failure phenomena to estimate failure risk. The PFA methodology is of particular value when information on which to base an assessment of failure risk, including test experience and knowledge of parameters used in analytical modeling, is expensive or difficult to acquire. The PFA methodology is a prescribed statistical structure in which analytical models that characterize failure phenomena are used conjointly with uncertainties about analysis parameters and/or modeling accuracy to estimate failure probability distributions for specific failure modes. These distributions can then be modified, by means of statistical procedures of the PFA methodology, to reflect any test or flight experience. State-of-the-art analytical models currently employed for design, failure prediction, or performance analysis are used in this methodology. The rationale for the statistical approach taken in the PFA methodology is discussed, the PFA methodology is described, and examples of its application to structural failure modes are presented. The engineering models and computer software used in fatigue crack growth and fatigue crack initiation applications are thoroughly documented.

  17. New softwares for automated microsatellite marker development.

    PubMed

    Martins, Wellington; de Sousa, Daniel; Proite, Karina; Guimarães, Patrícia; Moretzsohn, Marcio; Bertioli, David

    2006-01-01

    Microsatellites are repeated small sequence motifs that are highly polymorphic and abundant in the genomes of eukaryotes. Often they are the molecular markers of choice. To aid the development of microsatellite markers we have developed a module that integrates a program for the detection of microsatellites (TROLL), with the sequence assembly and analysis software, the Staden Package. The module has easily adjustable parameters for microsatellite lengths and base pair quality control. Starting with large datasets of unassembled sequence data in the form of chromatograms and/or text data, it enables the creation of a compact database consisting of the processed and assembled microsatellite containing sequences. For the final phase of primer design, we developed a program that accepts the multi-sequence 'experiment file' format as input and produces a list of primer pairs for amplification of microsatellite markers. The program can take into account the quality values of consensus bases, improving success rate of primer pairs in PCR. The software is freely available and simple to install in both Windows and Unix-based operating systems. Here we demonstrate the software by developing primer pairs for 427 new candidate markers for peanut. PMID:16493138

  18. Software Quality Perceptions of Stakeholders Involved in the Software Development Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padmanabhan, Priya

    2013-01-01

    Software quality is one of the primary determinants of project management success. Stakeholders involved in software development widely agree that quality is important (Barney and Wohlin 2009). However, they may differ on what constitutes software quality, and which of its attributes are more important than others. Although, software quality…

  19. General object-oriented software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidewitz, Edwin V.; Stark, Mike

    1986-01-01

    Object-oriented design techniques are gaining increasing popularity for use with the Ada programming language. A general approach to object-oriented design which synthesizes the principles of previous object-oriented methods into the overall software life-cycle, providing transitions from specification to design and from design to code. It therefore provides the basis for a general object-oriented development methodology.

  20. Math Description Engine Software Development Kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Robert O.; Smith, Stephanie L.; Dexter, Dan E.; Hodgson, Terry R.

    2010-01-01

    The Math Description Engine Software Development Kit (MDE SDK) can be used by software developers to make computer-rendered graphs more accessible to blind and visually-impaired users. The MDE SDK generates alternative graph descriptions in two forms: textual descriptions and non-verbal sound renderings, or sonification. It also enables display of an animated trace of a graph sonification on a visual graph component, with color and line-thickness options for users having low vision or color-related impairments. A set of accessible graphical user interface widgets is provided for operation by end users and for control of accessible graph displays. Version 1.0 of the MDE SDK generates text descriptions for 2D graphs commonly seen in math and science curriculum (and practice). The mathematically rich text descriptions can also serve as a virtual math and science assistant for blind and sighted users, making graphs more accessible for everyone. The MDE SDK has a simple application programming interface (API) that makes it easy for programmers and Web-site developers to make graphs accessible with just a few lines of code. The source code is written in Java for cross-platform compatibility and to take advantage of Java s built-in support for building accessible software application interfaces. Compiled-library and NASA Open Source versions are available with API documentation and Programmer s Guide at http:/ / prim e.jsc.n asa. gov.

  1. School Readiness Language Development Program: A Teacher Survey Report. Publication No. 701, Part C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padi-Sandamela, Ambition; Maddahian, Ebrahim

    The School Readiness Language Development Program (SRLDP) is one of several programs developed in response to a court order to racially integrate the Los Angeles Unified School District (California). The program, developed for schools with high proportions of minority students, includes oral language development opportunities for 4 year-olds, a…

  2. APPLICATION OF SOFTWARE QUALITY ASSURANCE CONCEPTS AND PROCEDURES TO ENVIORNMENTAL RESEARCH INVOLVING SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    As EPA’s environmental research expands into new areas that involve the development of software, quality assurance concepts and procedures that were originally developed for environmental data collection may not be appropriate. Fortunately, software quality assurance is a ...

  3. Control of research oriented software development

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, L.C.; Dronkers, J.J.; Pitsker, B.

    1985-12-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 directs the Department of Energy (DOE) to dispose permanently high level radioactive waste and civilian spent nuclear fuel by January 31, 1998. DOE has responded by creating an organizational structure that directs all the activities necessary to carry out the legislative demands. LLNL is conducting research in the earth sciences and is developing some unique computer codes to help establish the feasibility of geologic repositories for nuclear waste. LLNL has several codes under development. This paper examines the administrative and organizational measures that were and still are being undertaken in order to control the development of the two major codes. In the case of one code, the software quality assurance requirements were imposed five years after the code began its development. This required a retroactive application of requirements. The other code is still in the conceptual stages of development and here requirements can be applied as soon as the initial code design begins. Both codes are being developed by scientists, not computer programmers, and both are modeling codes, not data acquisition and reduction codes. Also the projects for which these codes are being developed have slightly different software quality assurance requirements. All these factors contribute unique difficulties in attempts to assure that the development not only results in a reliable prediction, but that whatever the reliability, it can be objectively shown to exist. The paper will examine a software management model. It will also discuss the reasons why it is felt that this particular model would stand a reasonable chance for success. The paper will then describe the way in which the model should be integrated into the existing management configuration and tradition.

  4. Computer-Aided Software Engineering - An approach to real-time software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Carrie K.; Turkovich, John J.

    1989-01-01

    A new software engineering discipline is Computer-Aided Software Engineering (CASE), a technology aimed at automating the software development process. This paper explores the development of CASE technology, particularly in the area of real-time/scientific/engineering software, and a history of CASE is given. The proposed software development environment for the Advanced Launch System (ALS CASE) is described as an example of an advanced software development system for real-time/scientific/engineering (RT/SE) software. The Automated Programming Subsystem of ALS CASE automatically generates executable code and corresponding documentation from a suitably formatted specification of the software requirements. Software requirements are interactively specified in the form of engineering block diagrams. Several demonstrations of the Automated Programming Subsystem are discussed.

  5. Software Development Plan for DESCARTES and CIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, P.W.

    1992-12-08

    This Software Development Plan (SDP) outlines all software activities required to obtain functional environmental accumulation and individual dose codes for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) project. The modeling activities addressed use the output of the air transport-code HATCHET to compute radionuclide concentrations in environmental pathways, and continue on through calculations of dose for individuals. The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project has a deliverable in the June 1993 time frame to be able to start computing doses to individuals from nuclear-related activities on the Hanford Site during and following World War II. The CIDER code will compute doses and their uncertainties for individuals living in the contaminated environment computed by DESCARTES. The projected size of the code is 3000 lines.

  6. Global Software Development Patterns for Project Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Välimäki, Antti; Kääriäinen, Jukka; Koskimies, Kai

    Global software development with the agile or waterfall development process has been taken into use in many companies. GSD offers benefits but also new challenges without known, documented solutions. The goal of this research is to present current best practices for GSD in the form of process patterns for project management, evaluated by using a scenario-based assessment method. The best practices have been collected from a large company operating in process automation. It is expected that the resulting pattern language helps other companies to improve their GSD processes by incorporating the patterns in the processes.

  7. The Effects of Development Team Skill on Software Product Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaver, Justin M.; Schiavone, Guy A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the effect of the skill/experience of the software development team on the quality of the final software product. A method for the assessment of software development team skill and experience is proposed, and was derived from a workforce management tool currently in use by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Using data from 26 smallscale software development projects, the team skill measures are correlated to 5 software product quality metrics from the ISO/IEC 9126 Software Engineering Product Quality standard. in the analysis of the results, development team skill is found to be a significant factor in the adequacy of the design and implementation. In addition, the results imply that inexperienced software developers are tasked with responsibilities ill-suited to their skill level, and thus have a significant adverse effect on the quality of the software product. Keywords: software quality, development skill, software metrics

  8. Understanding Acceptance of Software Metrics--A Developer Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umarji, Medha

    2009-01-01

    Software metrics are measures of software products and processes. Metrics are widely used by software organizations to help manage projects, improve product quality and increase efficiency of the software development process. However, metrics programs tend to have a high failure rate in organizations, and developer pushback is one of the sources…

  9. Development of GENOA Progressive Failure Parallel Processing Software Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdi, Frank; Minnetyan, Levon

    1999-01-01

    A capability consisting of software development and experimental techniques has been developed and is described. The capability is integrated into GENOA-PFA to model polymer matrix composite (PMC) structures. The capability considers the physics and mechanics of composite materials and structure by integration of a hierarchical multilevel macro-scale (lamina, laminate, and structure) and micro scale (fiber, matrix, and interface) simulation analyses. The modeling involves (1) ply layering methodology utilizing FEM elements with through-the-thickness representation, (2) simulation of effects of material defects and conditions (e.g., voids, fiber waviness, and residual stress) on global static and cyclic fatigue strengths, (3) including material nonlinearities (by updating properties periodically) and geometrical nonlinearities (by Lagrangian updating), (4) simulating crack initiation. and growth to failure under static, cyclic, creep, and impact loads. (5) progressive fracture analysis to determine durability and damage tolerance. (6) identifying the percent contribution of various possible composite failure modes involved in critical damage events. and (7) determining sensitivities of failure modes to design parameters (e.g., fiber volume fraction, ply thickness, fiber orientation. and adhesive-bond thickness). GENOA-PFA progressive failure analysis is now ready for use to investigate the effects on structural responses to PMC material degradation from damage induced by static, cyclic (fatigue). creep, and impact loading in 2D/3D PMC structures subjected to hygrothermal environments. Its use will significantly facilitate targeting design parameter changes that will be most effective in reducing the probability of a given failure mode occurring.

  10. Evaluating software development by analysis of changes: The data from the software engineering laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    An effective data collection methodology for evaluating software development methodologies was applied to four different software development projects. Goals of the data collection included characterizing changes and errors, characterizing projects and programmers, identifying effective error detection and correction techniques, and investigating ripple effects. The data collected consisted of changes (including error corrections) made to the software after code was written and baselined, but before testing began. Data collection and validation were concurrent with software development. Changes reported were verified by interviews with programmers.

  11. Software Development Infrastructure for the FAIR Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, F.; Al-Turany, M.; Bertini, D.; Karabowicz, R.

    2011-12-01

    The proposed project FAIR (Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research) is an international accelerator facility of the next generation. It builds on top of the experience and technological developments already made at the existing GSI facility, and incorporate new technological concepts. The four scientific pillars of FAIR are NUSTAR (nuclear structure and astrophysics), PANDA (QCD studies with cooled beams of anti-protons), CBM (physics of hadronic matter at highest baryon densities), and APPA (atomic physics, plasma physics, and applications). The FairRoot framework used by all of the big FAIR experiments as a base for their own specific developments, provides basic functionality like IO, geometry handling etc. The challenge is to support all the different experiments with their heterogeneous requirements. Due to the limited manpower, one of the first design decisions was to (re)use as much as possible already available and tested software and to focus on the development of the framework. Beside the framework itself, the FairRoot core team also provides some software development tools. We will describe the complete set of tools in this article. The Makefiles for all projects are generated using CMake. For software testing and the corresponding quality assurance, we use CTest to generate the results and CDash as web front end. The tools are completed by subversion as source code repository and trac as tool for the complete source code management. This set of tools allows us to offer the full functionality we have for FairRoot also to the experiments based on FairRoot.

  12. Quality Assurance in Software Development: An Exploratory Investigation in Software Project Failures and Business Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ichu, Emmanuel A.

    2010-01-01

    Software quality is perhaps one of the most sought-after attributes in product development, however; this goal is unattained. Problem factors in software development and how these have affected the maintainability of the delivered software systems requires a thorough investigation. It was, therefore, very important to understand software…

  13. SNS-NSTG Collaborative Software Development

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Vickie E; Chen, Meili; Cobb, John W; Farhi, Emmanuel N; Kohl, James Arthur; Miller, Stephen D; Peterson, Peter F; Reuter, Michael A; Travierso, Jessica Anna; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S

    2008-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway (NSTG) are collaborating on software development. SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a world center for materials research with neutron scattering. NSTG connects large neutron science instrument facilities with the cyber infrastructure of the TeraGrid. The TeraGrid is a network of high performance computers supported by the US National Science Foundation. There are eleven partner facilities with over a petaflop of peak computing performance, 136,740 CPU-cores, and sixty petabytes of long-term storage.

  14. Software Development Cost Estimation Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hihn, Jairus M.; Menzies, Tim

    2006-01-01

    Identify simple fully validated cost models that provide estimation uncertainty with cost estimate. Based on COCOMO variable set. Use machine learning techniques to determine: a) Minimum number of cost drivers required for NASA domain based cost models; b) Minimum number of data records required and c) Estimation Uncertainty. Build a repository of software cost estimation information. Coordinating tool development and data collection with: a) Tasks funded by PA&E Cost Analysis; b) IV&V Effort Estimation Task and c) NASA SEPG activities.

  15. User involvement in IPAD software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, W. A.; Crowell, H. A.

    1980-01-01

    The extensive user involvement in the software development of IPAD and the functionality of the IPAD prototype as viewed by the user are addressed. Although not a production system that can support an ongoing design process, the IPAD prototype is useful for the potential user as well as the interested system designer and is an essential tool for the companies committed to the use of the IPAD system. User refers to the engineer or manager responsible for the design, manufacture, or maintenance of a product, together with those supporting these functions.

  16. Development and Evaluation of a Toolkit to Assess Partnership Readiness for Community-Based Participatory Research

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Jeannette O.; Cox, Melissa J.; Newman, Susan D.; Meadows, Otha

    2012-01-01

    An earlier investigation by academic and community co-investigators led to the development of the Partnership Readiness for Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) Model, which defined major dimensions and key indicators of partnership readiness. As a next step in this process, we used qualitative methods, cognitive pretesting, and expert reviews to develop a working guide, or toolkit, based on the model for academic and community partners to assess and leverage their readiness for CBPR. The 75-page toolkit is designed as a qualitative assessment promoting equal voice and transparent, bi-directional discussions among all the partners. The toolkit is formatted to direct individual partner assessments, followed by team assessments, discussions, and action plans to optimize their goodness of fit, capacity, and operations to conduct CBPR. The toolkit has been piloted with two cohorts in the Medical University of South Carolina’s (MUSC) Community Engaged Scholars (CES) Program with promising results from process and outcome evaluation data. PMID:21623021

  17. Concept of Readiness: Assessing Factors in the Development, Implementation, and Sustainability of a PDS Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolpin, Thierry; Shoemaker, Emily; Cosenza, Michael; Allen, Jacquelyn; Cary, Cindy; Ensey, Patricia; McCambridge, Michael; Morris, Judy; Trotter, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Two universities and their prospective partnership schools collected data to help ascertain the perceived readiness of school-university Professional Development School (PDS) partnerships. The measurement tool, ''The Professional Development School Exploration and Assessment'' (PDSEA) includes a five-step process that makes use of survey and focus…

  18. Development of a Community Readiness Survey for Coalitions to Address Prescription Opioid Misuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trudeau, Kimberlee J.

    2015-01-01

    A community readiness survey for coalitions to address the growing epidemic of prescription opioid misuse was developed in this four-part study. A total of 70 coalition members participated. 1) We conducted 30-minute phone interviews with coalition members (n = 30) and a literature review to develop an item list. 2) Coalition members rated these…

  19. SOFIA's CORBA Experiences: Instances of Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graybeal, J.; Krzaczek, R.; Milburn, J.

    Developing data systems for special purpose applications---like one-of-a-kind telescopes---is a singular, if not idiosyncratic, process. Developers must master and wisely use rapidly changing software technologies to produce systems faster, better, and cheaper, meanwhile keeping up with iterative requirements and schedules. Architectural standards such as CORBA may help---or may lead to slow, hard to change, and expensive data systems. The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) will use CORBA in several different environments---the airborne mission systems (MCS), the ground support system (DCS), and a Facility Science Instrument (FLITECAM). A review of CORBA development experiences on the MCS reflects the challenges and choices made, while comparison with other SOFIA implementations shows the variety of CORBA applications and benefits.

  20. Using Cots Components in Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilani, Abdul Khader

    2008-10-01

    As commercial off-the-shelf components starts used effectively, in building Component based Systems and new methodologies and processes not only for development and maintenance, but also for other lifecycle phases that are strongly affected. For example, some software vendors have begun to successfully sell and license commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components, and this fact leads to a considerable number of components being available for use. Thus, requirements engineering techniques have to change to deal with more flexible requirements to provide a match between stakeholder requirements and COTS component's services. In addition to changes in activities such as composition and component specification, that are specific to Component-Based Software Engineering (CBSE), there are also a number of managerial issues that require change. Many of these issues are not yet established in practice or even developed. The main goal of this article is to present some characteristics of a CBSD and discuss some of the current issues associated with applying CBSE.

  1. Prometheus Reactor I&C Software Development Methodology, for Action

    SciTech Connect

    T. Hamilton

    2005-07-30

    The purpose of this letter is to submit the Reactor Instrumentation and Control (I&C) software life cycle, development methodology, and programming language selections and rationale for project Prometheus to NR for approval. This letter also provides the draft Reactor I&C Software Development Process Manual and Reactor Module Software Development Plan to NR for information.

  2. Large-scale GW software development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minjung; Mandal, Subhasish; Mikida, Eric; Jindal, Prateek; Bohm, Eric; Jain, Nikhil; Kale, Laxmikant; Martyna, Glenn; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    Electronic excitations are important in understanding and designing many functional materials. In terms of ab initio methods, the GW and Bethe-Saltpeter Equation (GW-BSE) beyond DFT methods have proved successful in describing excited states in many materials. However, the heavy computational loads and large memory requirements have hindered their routine applicability by the materials physics community. We summarize some of our collaborative efforts to develop a new software framework designed for GW calculations on massively parallel supercomputers. Our GW code is interfaced with the plane-wave pseudopotential ab initio molecular dynamics software ``OpenAtom'' which is based on the Charm++ parallel library. The computation of the electronic polarizability is one of the most expensive parts of any GW calculation. We describe our strategy that uses a real-space representation to avoid the large number of fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) common to most GW methods. We also describe an eigendecomposition of the plasmon modes from the resulting dielectric matrix that enhances efficiency. This work is supported by NSF through Grant ACI-1339804.

  3. Software Development for an Airborne Wind LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jishan; Li, Zhigang; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Zhishen

    2014-11-01

    Currently, Wind lidar offers an important way to obtain clear air wind field [1]. The principle of the wind lidar is based on the Doppler frequency shift in the air of the laser. The received signal of the lidar is scattered by the air molecular and particles [2]. They are Rayleigh scattering and Mie scattering. Coherent detection technique is an effective method to get the Doppler shift from the scattering in the air. From the Doppler shift we can get the radial wind speed. Generally, the horizontal wind field is that people concerned about. Based on the radial wind speed of more than 3 directions, we can use the VAD technique to retrieve the horizontal wind field. For an airborne lidar, some corrections such as the air plane posture, the air plane velocity must be performed. We developed a set of software for an airborne wind lidar using the MFC visual C++ Programming technology. Functions of the software are raw data decoding, radial wind speed inversion, horizontal wind field retrieve by VAD technique, air plane posture correction, air plane velocity correction, and so on. It also has functions for data display and saves. The results can be saved as picture or numerical values.

  4. Firing Room Remote Application Software Development & Swamp Works Laboratory Robot Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Janette

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is creating a way to send humans beyond low Earth orbit, and later to Mars. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is working to make this possible by developing a Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) which will allow the launch of Space Launch System (SLS). This paper's focus is on the work performed by the author in her first and second part of the internship as a remote application software developer. During the first part of her internship, the author worked on the SCCS's software application layer by assisting multiple ground subsystems teams including Launch Accessories (LACC) and Environmental Control System (ECS) on the design, development, integration, and testing of remote control software applications. Then, on the second part of the internship, the author worked on the development of robot software at the Swamp Works Laboratory which is a research and technology development group which focuses on inventing new technology to help future In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) missions.

  5. Management Guidelines for Database Developers' Teams in Software Development Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Lazar; Lin, Yifeng; Hodosi, Georg

    Worldwide job market for database developers (DBDs) is continually increasing in last several years. In some companies, DBDs are organized as a special team (DBDs team) to support other projects and roles. As a new role, the DBDs team is facing a major problem that there are not any management guidelines for them. The team manager does not know which kinds of tasks should be assigned to this team and what practices should be used during DBDs work. Therefore in this paper we have developed a set of management guidelines, which includes 8 fundamental tasks and 17 practices from software development process, by using two methodologies Capability Maturity Model (CMM) and agile software development in particular Scrum in order to improve the DBDs team work. Moreover the management guidelines developed here has been complemented with practices from authors' experience in this area and has been evaluated in the case of a software company. The management guidelines for DBD teams presented in this paper could be very usefully for other companies too that are using a DBDs team and could contribute towards an increase of the efficiency of these teams in their work on software development projects.

  6. Development of Updated ABsorption SIMulation Software (ABSIM)

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhiyao; Tang, Xin; Qu, Ming; Abdelaziz, Omar; Gluesenkamp, Kyle R

    2014-01-01

    ABsorption SIMulation, ABSIM, was developed for the simulation of absorption systems by The Oak Ridge National Laboratory during 1980s and 1990s. ABSIM provides a platform for users to investigate various cycle configurations and working fluids, to calculate their operating parameters, to predict their performance, and to compare them with each other on a uniform basis. ABSIM is indeed a very useful and accurate tool for researchers to investigate various absorption systems. However, it has not been well maintained: it is incompatible with recent operating systems; the interface needs improved user-friendliness, and the system needs better parameter setting and debugging tools to help achieve convergence. Therefore, it is highly needed to update and improve ABSIM. The paper presents recent efforts to improve ABSIM s compatibility with current operating systems, user interface, and analysis capabilities. The paper details the features and functions of the newly updated ABSIM software. The new ABSIM still uses the previously validated calculation engine of the old ABSIM. The new graphic user interfaces (GUI) were developed in Qt, which is an open source license GUI software based on C++. XML was used as the database for data storage in the new ABSIM. The new ABSIM has been designed to be easily learned and used. It has enhanced editing and construction functions, plus enhanced analysis features including parametric tables, plotting, property plots, and master panels for debugging. A single effect water/LiBr absorption system is used as a case study in this paper to illustrate the features, capabilities, and functions of the new ABSIM. This case study was actually an example system available in the old ABSIM. The new version of ABSIM will be continuously developed to include additional subroutines for the components in liquid desiccant systems. The new ABSIM will be available to public for free. The ultimate goal of the new ABSIM is to allow it to become a simulation

  7. Student Identity Development in Higher Education: Implications for Graduate Attributes and Work-Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Jeannie; Brooker, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Background: As universities in many countries engage more directly with industry, the learning emphasis has moved from the student experience to the work-readiness of the graduate. This focus on the student as potential worker is expressed through graduate attributes: particular sets of employability skills developed by institutions and embedded…

  8. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Brookside Development — Singer Village, Derby, CT

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-09-01

    This DOE Zero Energy Ready Home is one of a development of seven two-story homes that garnered a Production Builder award in the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards. Exceptional construction quality allowed the home to achieve a HERS score of 45 without photovoltaic, or HERS 26 with a 7-kW photovoltaic system included.

  9. The Development of a Multidimensional College Readiness Index. Research Report 2010-3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Andrew; Wyatt, Jeffrey; Camara, Wayne J.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents a methodology for the measurement and tracking of the college readiness level of high school students who are engaged in the college admission process. The proposed index uses the three distinct hurdles of SAT scores, high school GPA and a newly developed measure of academic rigor. Appendix A contains tables and numerical…

  10. Developing food supplements for moderately malnourished children: Lessons learned from ready-to-use therapeutic foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTFs) are solid foods that were developed by changing the formulation of the existing liquid diet, F-100, recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for the rapid catch-up phase of the treatment of children suffering from severe acute malnutrition (SAM). The ...

  11. Professional Development. State Implementation of College- and Career-Readiness Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Kimberly; Mira, Mary Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The following profiles address how the state departments of education are helping educators prepare for and implement their states' new college- and career-readiness standards and aligned assessments, through professional learning. SREB researchers examined each state's major professional development efforts around its new standards in order to…

  12. The distributed development environment for SDSS software

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, E.; Gurbani, V.; Mackinnon, B.; Newberg, H.; Nicinski, T.; Petravick, D.; Pordes, R.; Sergey, G.; Stoughton, C.; Lupton, R.

    1994-12-31

    The authors present an integrated science software development environment, code maintenance and support system for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) now being actively used throughout the collaboration. The SDSS is a collaborative effort between Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the U. of Chicago, Princeton University, the Institute for Advanced Study, The John Hopkins University, U. of Washington, the U.S. Naval Observatory and the Japan Promotion Group. Its main results will be an imaging survey of 10{sup 4}deg{sup 2} and a red shift spectroscopic survey of 10{sup 6} galaxies and 10{sup 5} quasars producing approximately 1.2 {times} 10{sup 13} bytes of data over the 5 year running period (1995-2000). This will produce a three dimensional map of the Universe.

  13. Recent software developments for biomechanical assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaves, John O. B.

    1990-08-01

    While much of the software developed in research laboratories is narrow in focus and suited for a specific experiment, some of it is broad enough and of high enough quality to be useful to others in solving similar problems. Several biomechanical assessment packages are now beginning to emerge, including: * 3D research biomechanics (5- and 6-DOF) with kinematics, kinetics, 32-channel analog data subsystem, and project management. * 3D full-body gait analysis with kinematics, kinetics, EMG charts, and force plate charts. * 2D dynamic rear-foot assessment. * 2D occupational biomechanics lifting task and personnel assessments. * 2D dynamic gait analysis. * Multiple 2D dynamic spine assessments. * 2D sport and biomechanics assessments with kinematics and kinetics. * 2D and 3D equine gait assessments.

  14. Interdependent figure-of-merit software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K.; Kirsch, T.

    1989-01-01

    This program was undertaken in order to understand the complex nature of interdependent performance in space missions. At the first step in a planned sequence of progress, a spread sheet program was developed to evaluate different fuel/oxidizer combinations for a specific Martian mission. This program is to be linked with output attained using sophisticated software produced by Gordon and McBride. The programming to date makes use of 11 independent parameters. Optimization is essential when faced with the incredible magnitude of costs, risks, and benefits involved with space exploration. A system of weights needs to be devised on which to measure the options. It was the goal to devise a Figure of Merit (FoM) on which different choices can be presented and made. The plan was to model typical missions to Mars, identify the parameters, and vary them until the best one is found. Initially, most of the focus was placed on propellant selection.

  15. Advanced software development workstation project: Engineering scripting language. Graphical editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Software development is widely considered to be a bottleneck in the development of complex systems, both in terms of development and in terms of maintenance of deployed systems. Cost of software development and maintenance can also be very high. One approach to reducing costs and relieving this bottleneck is increasing the reuse of software designs and software components. A method for achieving such reuse is a software parts composition system. Such a system consists of a language for modeling software parts and their interfaces, a catalog of existing parts, an editor for combining parts, and a code generator that takes a specification and generates code for that application in the target language. The Advanced Software Development Workstation is intended to be an expert system shell designed to provide the capabilities of a software part composition system.

  16. REDD+ readiness: early insights on monitoring, reporting and verification systems of project developers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Shijo; Herold, Martin; Sunderlin, William D.; Verchot, Louis V.

    2013-09-01

    A functional measuring, monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) system is essential to assess the additionality and impact on forest carbon in REDD+ (reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation) projects. This study assesses the MRV capacity and readiness of project developers at 20 REDD+ projects in Brazil, Peru, Cameroon, Tanzania, Indonesia and Vietnam, using a questionnaire survey and field visits. Nineteen performance criteria with 76 indicators were formulated in three categories, and capacity was measured with respect to each category. Of the 20 projects, 11 were found to have very high or high overall MRV capacity and readiness. At the regional level, capacity and readiness tended to be highest in the projects in Brazil and Peru and somewhat lower in Cameroon, Tanzania, Indonesia and Vietnam. Although the MRV capacities of half the projects are high, there are capacity deficiencies in other projects that are a source of concern. These are not only due to limitations in technical expertise, but can also be attributed to the slowness of international REDD+ policy formulation and the unclear path of development of the forest carbon market. Based on the study results, priorities for MRV development and increased investment in readiness are proposed.

  17. Avionics Simulation, Development and Software Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    During this reporting period, all technical responsibilities were accomplished as planned. A close working relationship was maintained with personnel of the MSFC Avionics Department Software Group (ED14), the MSFC EXPRESS Project Office (FD31), and the Huntsville Boeing Company. Accomplishments included: performing special tasks; supporting Software Review Board (SRB), Avionics Test Bed (ATB), and EXPRESS Software Control Panel (ESCP) activities; participating in technical meetings; and coordinating issues between the Boeing Company and the MSFC Project Office.

  18. Standardized development of computer software. Part 2: Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    This monograph contains standards for software development and engineering. The book sets forth rules for design, specification, coding, testing, documentation, and quality assurance audits of software; it also contains detailed outlines for the documentation to be produced.

  19. Software For Development Of Expert Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark L.; Atkinson, David J.

    1990-01-01

    Modular software system helps create efficient artificial-intelligence computer programs. STAR*TOOL system: Set of high-level software tools; assists programmers in creation of efficient knowledge-based software systems. Provides language and capabilities for compilation of application programs written in Common LISP. Features modularity enabling elimination of unnecessary capabilities from final application program and achieves greater computing performance. Runs on any computer that supports Common LISP and has sufficient memory. Provides programmer with necessary software tools to build wide variety of reasoning and inference engines for such applications as planning, diagnosis and analysis, and simulation.

  20. A high order approach to flight software development and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinbacher, J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of a software development facility is discussed as a means of producing a reliable and maintainable ECS software system, and as a means of providing efficient use of the ECS hardware test facility. Principles applied to software design are given, including modularity, abstraction, hiding, and uniformity. The general objectives of each phase of the software life cycle are also given, including testing, maintenance, code development, and requirement specifications. Software development facility tools are summarized, and tool deficiencies recognized in the code development and testing phases are considered. Due to limited lab resources, the functional simulation capabilities may be indispensable in the testing phase.

  1. College Readiness Practices at 38 High Schools and the Development of the CollegeCareerReady School Diagnostic Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conley, David T.; McGaughy, Charis L.; Kirtner, Jody; van der Valk, Adrienne; Martinez-Wenzl, Mary Theresa

    2010-01-01

    Educational Policy Improvement Center (EPIC) researchers visited 38 public high schools around the United States in 2007 and 2008 with the goal of validating and operationalizing a definition of college readiness. Schools in the sample were selected because they were demonstrating success at enabling more students from underrepresented groups to…

  2. Developing a Survey to Determine Student Perceptions of Readiness at the Beginning of an Educational Leadership Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Michael D.; Gratto, John

    2015-01-01

    In this study, researchers developed a survey to determine student perceptions of readiness prior to entering an educational leadership program. The researchers analyzed and established the reliability and validity of the survey created to understand student readiness as they enter the program. The information garnered from this survey will help…

  3. Software development environments: Status and trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffel, Larry E.

    1988-01-01

    Currently software engineers are the essential integrating factors tying several components together. The components consist of process, methods, computers, tools, support environments, and software engineers. The engineers today empower the tools versus the tools empowering the engineers. Some of the issues in software engineering are quality, managing the software engineering process, and productivity. A strategy to accomplish this is to promote the evolution of software engineering from an ad hoc, labor intensive activity to a managed, technology supported discipline. This strategy may be implemented by putting the process under management control, adopting appropriate methods, inserting the technology that provides automated support for the process and methods, collecting automated tools into an integrated environment and educating the personnel.

  4. The Advanced Software Development and Commercialization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gallopoulos, E. . Center for Supercomputing Research and Development); Canfield, T.R.; Minkoff, M.; Mueller, C.; Plaskacz, E.; Weber, D.P.; Anderson, D.M.; Therios, I.U. ); Aslam, S.; Bramley, R.; Chen, H.-C.; Cybenko, G.; Gallopoulos, E.; Gao, H.; Malony, A.; Sameh, A. . Center for Supercomputing Research

    1990-09-01

    This is the first of a series of reports pertaining to progress in the Advanced Software Development and Commercialization Project, a joint collaborative effort between the Center for Supercomputing Research and Development of the University of Illinois and the Computing and Telecommunications Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The purpose of this work is to apply techniques of parallel computing that were pioneered by University of Illinois researchers to mature computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and structural dynamics (SD) computer codes developed at Argonne. The collaboration in this project will bring this unique combination of expertise to bear, for the first time, on industrially important problems. By so doing, it will expose the strengths and weaknesses of existing techniques for parallelizing programs and will identify those problems that need to be solved in order to enable wide spread production use of parallel computers. Secondly, the increased efficiency of the CFD and SD codes themselves will enable the simulation of larger, more accurate engineering models that involve fluid and structural dynamics. In order to realize the above two goals, we are considering two production codes that have been developed at ANL and are widely used by both industry and Universities. These are COMMIX and WHAMS-3D. The first is a computational fluid dynamics code that is used for both nuclear reactor design and safety and as a design tool for the casting industry. The second is a three-dimensional structural dynamics code used in nuclear reactor safety as well as crashworthiness studies. These codes are currently available for both sequential and vector computers only. Our main goal is to port and optimize these two codes on shared memory multiprocessors. In so doing, we shall establish a process that can be followed in optimizing other sequential or vector engineering codes for parallel processors.

  5. Technology-driven dietary assessment: a software developer's perspective.

    PubMed

    Buday, R; Tapia, R; Maze, G R

    2014-01-01

    Dietary researchers need new software to improve nutrition data collection and analysis, although the creation of information technology is difficult. Software development projects may be unsuccessful as a result of an inadequate understanding of needs, management problems, technology barriers or legal hurdles. Cost over-runs and schedule delays are common. Barriers facing scientific researchers developing software include workflow, cost, schedule and team issues. Different methods of software development and the role that intellectual property rights play are discussed. A dietary researcher must carefully consider multiple issues to maximise the likelihood of success when creating new software. PMID:22591224

  6. Formal methods in the development of safety critical software systems

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L.G.

    1991-11-15

    As the use of computers in critical control systems such as aircraft controls, medical instruments, defense systems, missile controls, and nuclear power plants has increased, concern for the safety of those systems has also grown. Much of this concern has focused on the software component of those computer-based systems. This is primarily due to historical experience with software systems that often exhibit larger numbers of errors than their hardware counterparts and the fact that the consequences of a software error may endanger human life, property, or the environment. A number of different techniques have been used to address the issue of software safety. Some are standard software engineering techniques aimed at reducing the number of faults in a software protect, such as reviews and walkthroughs. Others, including fault tree analysis, are based on identifying and reducing hazards. This report examines the role of one such technique, formal methods, in the development of software for safety critical systems. The use of formal methods to increase the safety of software systems is based on their role in reducing the possibility of software errors that could lead to hazards. The use of formal methods in the development of software systems is controversial. Proponents claim that the use of formal methods can eliminate errors from the software development process, and produce programs that are probably correct. Opponents claim that they are difficult to learn and that their use increases development costs unacceptably. This report discusses the potential of formal methods for reducing failures in safety critical software systems.

  7. Software Development Offshoring Competitiveness: A Case Study of ASEAN Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bui, Minh Q.

    2011-01-01

    With the success of offshoring within the American software industry, corporate executives are moving their software developments overseas. The member countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) have become a preferred destination. However, there is a lack of published studies on the region's software competitiveness in…

  8. Software Released by LEWICE 2.0 Ice Accretion Software Development Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, Mark G.

    2000-01-01

    Computational icing simulation methods are making the transition from the realm of research to commonplace use in design and certification. As such, standards of software management, design, validation, and documentation must be adjusted to accommodate the increased expectations of the user community with respect to accuracy, reliability, capability, and usability. With this in mind, in collaboration with Glenn's Engineering Design and Analysis Division, the Icing Branch of the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field began a software improvement project focused on the two-dimensional ice accretion simulation tool LEWICE. This project is serving as an introduction to the concepts of software management and is intended to serve as a pilot project for future icing simulation code development. The LEWICE 2.0 Software Development Project consisted of two major elements: software management and software validation. The software management element consisted of identifying features of well-designed and well-managed software that are appropriate for an analytical prediction tool such as LEWICE and applying them to a revised version of the code. This element included tasks such as identification of software requirements, development and implementation of coding standards, and implementation of software revision control practices. With the application of these techniques, the LEWICE ice accretion code became a more stable and reliable software product. In addition, the lessons learned about software development and maintenance can be factored into future software projects at the outset. The software validation activity was an integral part of our effort to make LEWICE a more accurate and reliable analysis tool. Because of the efforts taken to extensively validate this software, LEWICE 2.0 is more robust than previous releases and can reproduce results accurately across several computing platforms. It also differs from previous versions in the extensive quantitative

  9. Happy software developers solve problems better: psychological measurements in empirical software engineering.

    PubMed

    Graziotin, Daniel; Wang, Xiaofeng; Abrahamsson, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    For more than thirty years, it has been claimed that a way to improve software developers' productivity and software quality is to focus on people and to provide incentives to make developers satisfied and happy. This claim has rarely been verified in software engineering research, which faces an additional challenge in comparison to more traditional engineering fields: software development is an intellectual activity and is dominated by often-neglected human factors (called human aspects in software engineering research). Among the many skills required for software development, developers must possess high analytical problem-solving skills and creativity for the software construction process. According to psychology research, affective states-emotions and moods-deeply influence the cognitive processing abilities and performance of workers, including creativity and analytical problem solving. Nonetheless, little research has investigated the correlation between the affective states, creativity, and analytical problem-solving performance of programmers. This article echoes the call to employ psychological measurements in software engineering research. We report a study with 42 participants to investigate the relationship between the affective states, creativity, and analytical problem-solving skills of software developers. The results offer support for the claim that happy developers are indeed better problem solvers in terms of their analytical abilities. The following contributions are made by this study: (1) providing a better understanding of the impact of affective states on the creativity and analytical problem-solving capacities of developers, (2) introducing and validating psychological measurements, theories, and concepts of affective states, creativity, and analytical-problem-solving skills in empirical software engineering, and (3) raising the need for studying the human factors of software engineering by employing a multidisciplinary viewpoint. PMID

  10. Development of Poincare Software to Predict Arrythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maaliki, Samer

    2003-01-01

    The most distressing types of heart malfunction occur because of an abnormal rhythm of the heart. Cardiac arrythmias can be caused by abnormal rhythmicity of the pacemaker, electrolyte disturbances, blockage of the transmission of the electric impulse through the heart, and other abnormalities. There is strong evidence that space flight is associated with decreased cardiac electrical stability that may pose a life threatening risk to astronauts. For example, during the Skylab missions, a crewmember had a five beat run of ventricular tachycardia during lower body negative pressure. Also, analysis of nine 24-hour Holter monitor recordings obtained during long term spaceflight on Mir revealed one 14-beat run of ventricular tachycardia. A Mir cosmonaut was replaced in 1986 because of cardiac dysrhythmias. Most recently, in July of 1997, a Mir commander was unable to participate in the Spektr module repair due to complaints of an irregular heart rhythm. Despite these examples, possible mechanisms of arrhythmias and countermeasure strategies have barely been addressed. The Poincare method has been proposed as a technique that might potentially predict life-threatening arrhythmias before they occur. According to this method, each RR interval obtained from an EKG recording is plotted sequentially vs. the previous RR interval. Several studies using the method have demonstrated a strong correlation between the shape of the Poincare plot and ventricular arrhythmia. Our purpose was to develop an automated software program that detects the R peaks from an EKG recording while simultaneously displaying the Poincare plot and other related parameters.

  11. Metrics. [measurement for effective software development and management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgarry, Frank

    1991-01-01

    A development status evaluation is presented for practical software performance measurement, or 'metrics', in which major innovations have recently occurred. Metrics address such aspects of software performance as whether a software project is on schedule, how many errors can be expected from it, whether the methodology being used is effective and the relative quality of the software employed. Metrics may be characterized as explicit, analytical, and subjective. Attention is given to the bases for standards and the conduct of metrics research.

  12. Happy software developers solve problems better: psychological measurements in empirical software engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Abrahamsson, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    For more than thirty years, it has been claimed that a way to improve software developers’ productivity and software quality is to focus on people and to provide incentives to make developers satisfied and happy. This claim has rarely been verified in software engineering research, which faces an additional challenge in comparison to more traditional engineering fields: software development is an intellectual activity and is dominated by often-neglected human factors (called human aspects in software engineering research). Among the many skills required for software development, developers must possess high analytical problem-solving skills and creativity for the software construction process. According to psychology research, affective states—emotions and moods—deeply influence the cognitive processing abilities and performance of workers, including creativity and analytical problem solving. Nonetheless, little research has investigated the correlation between the affective states, creativity, and analytical problem-solving performance of programmers. This article echoes the call to employ psychological measurements in software engineering research. We report a study with 42 participants to investigate the relationship between the affective states, creativity, and analytical problem-solving skills of software developers. The results offer support for the claim that happy developers are indeed better problem solvers in terms of their analytical abilities. The following contributions are made by this study: (1) providing a better understanding of the impact of affective states on the creativity and analytical problem-solving capacities of developers, (2) introducing and validating psychological measurements, theories, and concepts of affective states, creativity, and analytical-problem-solving skills in empirical software engineering, and (3) raising the need for studying the human factors of software engineering by employing a multidisciplinary viewpoint

  13. Open Source Software Development Models—A State of Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Parminder; Singh, Hardeep

    2011-12-01

    The objective of Open Source as well as Free Software is to encourage the involvement in the form of improvement, modification and distribution of the licensed work. Open source software proved itself highly suited, both as a software product and as a development methodology. The Open source software development model supports all aspects of various processes like defining requirements, system—level design, detailed design, implementation, integration, field testing, and support in order to produce high quality products implementing client requirements. This paper analysis open source development models on the basis of common attributes like parallel development, peer review, prompt feedback to user, parallel debugging, user involvement, and developer contributions.

  14. The development model of software product line based AOP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, JingHai

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we proposed a development model of MIS (management information system) software based aspect-oriented programming. MIS software will be the full separation of concerns, and establish corresponding platform-independent model, the dynamic weaving of aspects does not require all the static or fixed in weaver weaving in specific areas and at the same time Optimization, reducing system complexity and improve software development efficiency and speed. While the description and implementation of all aspects of the software industry chain assigned to the various levels of development team to complete, MIS can help resolve the current heavy workload of the software development process, low developing level, low software reuse rate, more duplication work of effort Problems.

  15. Team Software Development for Aerothermodynamic and Aerodynamic Analysis and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, N.; Atkins, H. L.; Bibb, K. L.; Biedron, R. T.; Carpenter, M. H.; Gnoffo, P. A.; Hammond, D. P.; Jones, W. T.; Kleb, W. L.; Lee-Rausch, E. M.

    2003-01-01

    A collaborative approach to software development is described. The approach employs the agile development techniques: project retrospectives, Scrum status meetings, and elements of Extreme Programming to efficiently develop a cohesive and extensible software suite. The software product under development is a fluid dynamics simulator for performing aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic analysis and design. The functionality of the software product is achieved both through the merging, with substantial rewrite, of separate legacy codes and the authorship of new routines. Examples of rapid implementation of new functionality demonstrate the benefits obtained with this agile software development process. The appendix contains a discussion of coding issues encountered while porting legacy Fortran 77 code to Fortran 95, software design principles, and a Fortran 95 coding standard.

  16. The maintenance, distribution and development of biomedical computer software: an exercise in software engineering.

    PubMed

    Boston, R C; Granek, H; Sutton, N; Weber, K; Greif, P; Zech, L

    1986-06-01

    The growing reliance of biomedical investigations on computer software in almost all facets of their work places considerable emphasis on the need for the integrated management of the software. In order to efficiently develop, distribute, and maintain the software, tools are required which not only automate these tasks but also, wherever possible, 'semi-intelligently', alert their user to irregular situation. We describe an assortment of such tools routinely used in the management of the SAAM/CONSAM biokinetic software and illustrate their application. Furthermore, using these techniques we have presented some comparative performances of numerical integrators and of computer processors. PMID:3637127

  17. Overview of software development at the parabolic dish test site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyazono, C. K.

    1985-01-01

    The development history of the data acquisition and data analysis software is discussed. The software development occurred between 1978 and 1984 in support of solar energy module testing at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Parabolic Dish Test Site, located within Edwards Test Station. The development went through incremental stages, starting with a simple single-user BASIC set of programs, and progressing to the relative complex multi-user FORTRAN system that was used until the termination of the project. Additional software in support of testing is discussed including software in support of a meteorological subsystem and the Test Bed Concentrator Control Console interface. Conclusions and recommendations for further development are discussed.

  18. Evaluating software development characteristics: Assessment of software measures in the Software Engineering Laboratory. [reliability engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, V. R.

    1981-01-01

    Work on metrics is discussed. Factors that affect software quality are reviewed. Metrics is discussed in terms of criteria achievements, reliability, and fault tolerance. Subjective and objective metrics are distinguished. Product/process and cost/quality metrics are characterized and discussed.

  19. An evaluation of the Interactive Software Invocation System (ISIS) for software development applications. [flight software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noland, M. S.

    1981-01-01

    The Interactive Software Invocation System (ISIS), which allows a user to build, modify, control, and process a total flight software system without direct communications with the host computer, is described. This interactive data management system provides the user with a file manager, text editor, a tool invoker, and an Interactive Programming Language (IPL). The basic file design of ISIS is a five level hierarchical structure. The file manager controls this hierarchical file structure and permits the user to create, to save, to access, and to purge pages of information. The text editor is used to manipulate pages of text to be modified and the tool invoker allows the user to communicate with the host computer through a RUN file created by the user. The IPL is based on PASCAL and contains most of the statements found in a high-level programming language. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the system as applied to a flight project, the collection of software components required to support the Annular Suspension and Pointing System (ASPS) flight project were integrated using ISIS. The ASPS software system and its integration into ISIS is described.

  20. AcquiTools: A new Software Toolkit for the Efficient Preparation of DMC-Ready Waveform Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, S.

    2009-12-01

    Many Seismic projects make use of the excellent infrastructure provided by the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC) for archival and distribution of waveform data. This usually requires the data to be submitted to the DMC in SEED (Standard for the Exchange of Earthquake Data) format. Therefore some current data loggers are already recording data in a waveform-only subset of the SEED format called miniSEED. Nevertheless, recordings from other data loggers, such as the Reftek RT130, first need to be converted. One standard procedure to do this for RT130 data involves a software package distributed by the IRIS PASSCAL Instrument Center. Its use requires the sequential application of a minimum of two conversion programs. This number of conversion programs will increase, if more than a minimum of manipulations is needed. A new tool, named “ckreftekt”, was developed to combine several of these processing steps into one. Thereby, it simplifies the low-level data processing to a point, where a relatively simple shell script is sufficient to process the data set of an entire experiment. This makes the low-level data processing automatically reproducible. As side effects, computation time and disk usage are significantly reduced. So far the tool has only been used in-house. Thereby, more than 2 TB of waveform data have been processed and submitted to the DMC, mostly from the High Lava Plains (HLP), and Structural Change projects. The program “ckreftek” is part of a larger new software toolkit named AcquiTools, which attempts to simplify a series of similar low-level data handling processes. This contribution is an attempt to introduce AcquiTools as an open source tool to the community, and to gather feedback on where its development should be headed in the future.

  1. Development of a New VLBI Data Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolotin, Sergei; Gipson, John M.; MacMillan, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    We present an overview of a new VLBI analysis software under development at NASA GSFC. The new software will replace CALC/SOLVE and many related utility programs. It will have the capabilities of the current system as well as incorporate new models and data analysis techniques. In this paper we give a conceptual overview of the new software. We formulate the main goals of the software. The software should be flexible and modular to implement models and estimation techniques that currently exist or will appear in future. On the other hand it should be reliable and possess production quality for processing standard VLBI sessions. Also, it needs to be capable of processing observations from a fully deployed network of VLBI2010 stations in a reasonable time. We describe the software development process and outline the software architecture.

  2. An Investigation of an Open-Source Software Development Environment in a Software Engineering Graduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ge, Xun; Huang, Kun; Dong, Yifei

    2010-01-01

    A semester-long ethnography study was carried out to investigate project-based learning in a graduate software engineering course through the implementation of an Open-Source Software Development (OSSD) learning environment, which featured authentic projects, learning community, cognitive apprenticeship, and technology affordances. The study…

  3. Framework Based Guidance Navigation and Control Flight Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McComas, David

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes NASA's guidance navigation and control flight software development background. The contents include: 1) NASA/Goddard Guidance Navigation and Control (GN&C) Flight Software (FSW) Development Background; 2) GN&C FSW Development Improvement Concepts; and 3) GN&C FSW Application Framework.

  4. Flight dynamics system software development environment (FDS/SDE) tutorial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buell, John; Myers, Philip

    1986-01-01

    A sample development scenario using the Flight Dynamics System Software Development Environment (FDS/SDE) is presented. The SDE uses a menu-driven, fill-in-the-blanks format that provides online help at all steps, thus eliminating lengthy training and allowing immediate use of this new software development tool.

  5. Measuring Ada as a software development technology in the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agresti, W. W.

    1985-01-01

    An experiment is in progress to measure the effectiveness of Ada in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center flight dynamics software development environment. The experiment features the parallel development of software in FORTRAN and Ada. The experiment organization, objectives, and status are discussed. Experiences with an Ada training program and data from the development of a 5700-line Ada training exercise are reported.

  6. Software Engineering Research/Developer Collaborations in 2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pressburger, Tom

    2006-01-01

    In CY 2005, three collaborations between software engineering technology providers and NASA software development personnel deployed three software engineering technologies on NASA development projects (a different technology on each project). The main purposes were to benefit the projects, infuse the technologies if beneficial into NASA, and give feedback to the technology providers to improve the technologies. Each collaboration project produced a final report. Section 2 of this report summarizes each project, drawing from the final reports and communications with the software developers and technology providers. Section 3 indicates paths to further infusion of the technologies into NASA practice. Section 4 summarizes some technology transfer lessons learned. Also included is an acronym list.

  7. Guidance and Control Software Project Data - Volume 2: Development Documents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J. (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    The Guidance and Control Software (GCS) project was the last in a series of software reliability studies conducted at Langley Research Center between 1977 and 1994. The technical results of the GCS project were recorded after the experiment was completed. Some of the support documentation produced as part of the experiment, however, is serving an unexpected role far beyond its original project context. Some of the software used as part of the GCS project was developed to conform to the RTCA/DO-178B software standard, "Software Considerations in Airborne Systems and Equipment Certification," used in the civil aviation industry. That standard requires extensive documentation throughout the software development life cycle, including plans, software requirements, design and source code, verification cases and results, and configuration management and quality control data. The project documentation that includes this information is open for public scrutiny without the legal or safety implications associated with comparable data from an avionics manufacturer. This public availability has afforded an opportunity to use the GCS project documents for DO-178B training. This report provides a brief overview of the GCS project, describes the 4-volume set of documents and the role they are playing in training, and includes the development documents from the GCS project. Volume 2 contains three appendices: A. Guidance and Control Software Development Specification; B. Design Description for the Pluto Implementation of the Guidance and Control Software; and C. Source Code for the Pluto Implementation of the Guidance and Control Software

  8. Development of Efficient Authoring Software for e-Learning Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozono, Kazutake; Teramoto, Akemi; Akiyama, Hidenori

    The contents creation in e-Learning system becomes an important problem. The contents of e-Learning should include figure and voice media for a high-level educational effect. However, the use of figure and voice complicates the operation of authoring software considerably. A new authoring software, which can build e-Learning contents efficiently, has been developed to solve this problem. This paper reports development results of the authoring software.

  9. Software development predictors, error analysis, reliability models and software metric analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, Victor

    1983-01-01

    The use of dynamic characteristics as predictors for software development was studied. It was found that there are some significant factors that could be useful as predictors. From a study on software errors and complexity, it was shown that meaningful results can be obtained which allow insight into software traits and the environment in which it is developed. Reliability models were studied. The research included the field of program testing because the validity of some reliability models depends on the answers to some unanswered questions about testing. In studying software metrics, data collected from seven software engineering laboratory (FORTRAN) projects were examined and three effort reporting accuracy checks were applied to demonstrate the need to validate a data base. Results are discussed.

  10. Readiness Checklist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Consortia for Bilingual Education, Fort Worth, TX.

    The Readiness Checklist is a 69-item instrument that provides a measure of the psychomotor development of children. It covers seven main areas: general health, movement patterns and muscular coordination, auditory skills, visual skills, speech and language, personal independence, and social adjustment. The checklist is designed to measure a…

  11. Case study on selecting an environment for software development

    SciTech Connect

    Doak, J.

    1997-05-01

    To explore the various issues and options surrounding software development, the author has selected a specific Safeguards Systems Group (NIS-7) project to serve as a case study. The opinions expressed are solely those of the author and any reference to {open_quotes}we{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}our{close_quotes} refers to this single author. The goal of the selected project is to produce software that can accurately analyze data from sensors in tanks containing solutions of nuclear material (solution monitoring). This project focuses on data from Japanese reprocessing facilities. The software is to be used by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors back at headquarters in Vienna after obtaining data from a site. I feel that the ideas presented in this paper may be applicable to numerous software developers whose project requirements are similar to those for this project. Two considerations for developing software for use by others are discussed. (1) What software tools should be used during the development process? (2) What is the most effective way of distributing the software and documentation? The requirements for the software environment and distribution of software and documentation include the following: portability; cross-platform compatibility; graphical user interface and builder, creating modular/reusable software components; generic libraries; environment should facilitate development of solutions to large real-world problems; no special privileges are necessary to access the software and documentation; software should be visible to a large number of people; documentation should be in a format that everyone can read and should support equations and graphics; transmission of software and documentation should be hands-off.

  12. An assessment of space shuttle flight software development processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In early 1991, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Office of Space Flight commissioned the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board (ASEB) of the National Research Council (NRC) to investigate the adequacy of the current process by which NASA develops and verifies changes and updates to the Space Shuttle flight software. The Committee for Review of Oversight Mechanisms for Space Shuttle Flight Software Processes was convened in Jan. 1992 to accomplish the following tasks: (1) review the entire flight software development process from the initial requirements definition phase to final implementation, including object code build and final machine loading; (2) review and critique NASA's independent verification and validation process and mechanisms, including NASA's established software development and testing standards; (3) determine the acceptability and adequacy of the complete flight software development process, including the embedded validation and verification processes through comparison with (1) generally accepted industry practices, and (2) generally accepted Department of Defense and/or other government practices (comparing NASA's program with organizations and projects having similar volumes of software development, software maturity, complexity, criticality, lines of code, and national standards); (4) consider whether independent verification and validation should continue. An overview of the study, independent verification and validation of critical software, and the Space Shuttle flight software development process are addressed. Findings and recommendations are presented.

  13. Nuclear Energy Readiness Indicator Index (NERI): A benchmarking tool for assessing nuclear capacity in developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Saum-Manning,L.

    2008-07-13

    Declining natural resources, rising oil prices, looming climate change and the introduction of nuclear energy partnerships, such as GNEP, have reinvigorated global interest in nuclear energy. The convergence of such issues has prompted countries to move ahead quickly to deal with the challenges that lie ahead. However, developing countries, in particular, often lack the domestic infrastructure and public support needed to implement a nuclear energy program in a safe, secure, and nonproliferation-conscious environment. How might countries become ready for nuclear energy? What is needed is a framework for assessing a country's readiness for nuclear energy. This paper suggests that a Nuclear Energy Readiness Indicator (NERI) Index might serve as a meaningful basis for assessing a country's status in terms of progress toward nuclear energy utilization under appropriate conditions. The NERI Index is a benchmarking tool that measures a country's level of 'readiness' for nonproliferation-conscious nuclear energy development. NERI first identifies 8 key indicators that have been recognized by the International Atomic Energy Agency as key nonproliferation and security milestones to achieve prior to establishing a nuclear energy program. It then measures a country's progress in each of these areas on a 1-5 point scale. In doing so NERI illuminates gaps or underdeveloped areas in a country's nuclear infrastructure with a view to enable stakeholders to prioritize the allocation of resources toward programs and policies supporting international nonproliferation goals through responsible nuclear energy development. On a preliminary basis, the indicators selected include: (1) demonstrated need; (2) expressed political support; (3) participation in nonproliferation and nuclear security treaties, international terrorism conventions, and export and border control arrangements; (4) national nuclear-related legal and regulatory mechanisms; (5) nuclear infrastructure; (6) the

  14. Development of a COTS Mass Storage Unit for the Space Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liggin, Karl; Clark, Porter

    1999-01-01

    The technology to develop a Mass Storage Unit (MSU) using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) hard drives is an on-going challenge to meet the Space Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment (SPARCLE) program requirements. A conceptual view of SPARCLE's laser collecting atmospheric data from the shuttle is shown in Figure 1. The determination to develop this technology required several in depth studies before an actual COTS hard drive was selected to continue this effort. Continuing the development of the MSU can, and will, serve future NASA programs that require larger data storage and more on-board processing.

  15. Avionics Simulation, Development and Software Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, Ronald C.; Settle, Gray; Tobbe, Patrick A.; Kissel, Ralph; Glaese, John; Blanche, Jim; Wallace, L. D.

    2001-01-01

    This monthly report summarizes the work performed under contract NAS8-00114 for Marshall Space Flight Center in the following tasks: 1) Purchase Order No. H-32831D, Task Order 001A, GPB Program Software Oversight; 2) Purchase Order No. H-32832D, Task Order 002, ISS EXPRESS Racks Software Support; 3) Purchase Order No. H-32833D, Task Order 003, SSRMS Math Model Integration; 4) Purchase Order No. H-32834D, Task Order 004, GPB Program Hardware Oversight; 5) Purchase Order No. H-32835D, Task Order 005, Electrodynamic Tether Operations and Control Analysis; 6) Purchase Order No. H-32837D, Task Order 007, SRB Command Receiver/Decoder; and 7) Purchase Order No. H-32838D, Task Order 008, AVGS/DART SW and Simulation Support

  16. A Capstone Course on Agile Software Development Using Scrum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahnic, V.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an undergraduate capstone course in software engineering is described that not only exposes students to agile software development, but also makes it possible to observe the behavior of developers using Scrum for the first time. The course requires students to work as Scrum Teams, responsible for the implementation of a set of user…

  17. Product assurance policies and procedures for flight dynamics software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Sandra; Jordan, Leon; Decker, William; Page, Gerald; Mcgarry, Frank E.; Valett, Jon

    1987-01-01

    The product assurance policies and procedures necessary to support flight dynamics software development projects for Goddard Space Flight Center are presented. The quality assurance and configuration management methods and tools for each phase of the software development life cycles are described, from requirements analysis through acceptance testing; maintenance and operation are not addressed.

  18. Software Development through ACOT Teachers' Eyes. ACOT Report #4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Linda

    Eight Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow (ACOT) teachers met with software developers at the Florida Instructional Computing Conference in January 1989. During the session, the panel of ACOT teachers expressed their wants and wishes for educational software and developers responded with their own concerns. The face-to-face communication provided a…

  19. Training Software Developers and Designers to Conduct Usability Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skov, Mikael Brasholt; Stage, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Many efforts to improve the interplay between usability evaluation and software development rely either on better methods for conducting usability evaluations or on better formats for presenting evaluation results in ways that are useful for software designers and developers. Both of these approaches depend on a complete division of work between…

  20. Software development environments: Present and future, appendix D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddle, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    Computerized environments which facilitate the development of appropriately functioning software systems are discussed. Their current status is reviewed and several trends exhibited by their history are identified. A number of principles, some at (slight) variance with the historical trends, are suggested and it is argued that observance of these principles is critical to achieving truly effective and efficient software development support environments.

  1. Simulation Modeling of Software Development Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calavaro, G. F.; Basili, V. R.; Iazeolla, G.

    1996-01-01

    A simulation modeling approach is proposed for the prediction of software process productivity indices, such as cost and time-to-market, and the sensitivity analysis of such indices to changes in the organization parameters and user requirements. The approach uses a timed Petri Net and Object Oriented top-down model specification. Results demonstrate the model representativeness, and its usefulness in verifying process conformance to expectations, and in performing continuous process improvement and optimization.

  2. The development of automated behavior analysis software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaana, Yuki; Prima, Oky Dicky A.; Imabuchi, Takashi; Ito, Hisayoshi; Hosogoe, Kumiko

    2015-03-01

    The measurement of behavior for participants in a conversation scene involves verbal and nonverbal communications. The measurement validity may vary depending on the observers caused by some aspects such as human error, poorly designed measurement systems, and inadequate observer training. Although some systems have been introduced in previous studies to automatically measure the behaviors, these systems prevent participants to talk in a natural way. In this study, we propose a software application program to automatically analyze behaviors of the participants including utterances, facial expressions (happy or neutral), head nods, and poses using only a single omnidirectional camera. The camera is small enough to be embedded into a table to allow participants to have spontaneous conversation. The proposed software utilizes facial feature tracking based on constrained local model to observe the changes of the facial features captured by the camera, and the Japanese female facial expression database to recognize expressions. Our experiment results show that there are significant correlations between measurements observed by the observers and by the software.

  3. A modernized PDL approach for Ada software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usavage, Paul, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The desire to integrate newly available, graphically-oriented Computed Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tools with existing software design approaches is changing the way Program Design Language (PDL) or Process Description Language is used for large system development. In the approach documented here, Software Engineers use graphics tools to model the problem and to describe high level software design in diagrams. An Ada-based PDL is used to document low level design. Some results are provided along with an analysis for each of three smaller General Electric (GE) Ada development projects that utilized variations on this approach. Finally some considerations are identified for larger scale implementation.

  4. A proven approach for more effective software development and maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pajerski, Rose; Hall, Dana; Sinclair, Craig

    1994-01-01

    Modern space flight mission operations and associated ground data systems are increasingly dependent upon reliable, quality software. Critical functions such as command load preparation, health and status monitoring, communications link scheduling and conflict resolution, and transparent gateway protocol conversion are routinely performed by software. Given budget constraints and the ever increasing capabilities of processor technology, the next generation of control centers and data systems will be even more dependent upon software across all aspects of performance. A key challenge now is to implement improved engineering, management, and assurance processes for the development and maintenance of that software; processes that cost less, yield higher quality products, and that self-correct for continual improvement evolution. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has a unique experience base that can be readily tapped to help solve the software challenge. Over the past eighteen years, the Software Engineering Laboratory within the code 500 Flight Dynamics Division has evolved a software development and maintenance methodology that accommodates the unique characteristics of an organization while optimizing and continually improving the organization's software capabilities. This methodology relies upon measurement, analysis, and feedback much analogous to that of control loop systems. It is an approach with a time-tested track record proven through repeated applications across a broad range of operational software development and maintenance projects. This paper describes the software improvement methodology employed by the Software Engineering Laboratory, and how it has been exploited within the Flight Dynamics Division with GSFC Code 500. Examples of specific improvement in the software itself and its processes are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the methodology. Finally, the initial findings are given when this methodology was applied across the

  5. Software Development Environment with Integrated Code Rocket Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, Steve; Paterson, David; Spark, Alan; Yu, Bruce Guoxia

    2013-08-01

    The development of software for embedded systems such as spacecraft instruments, data processing or other on-board applications, faces a number of challenges not always fully met by many of the currently available software development environments. In this paper we describe a new suite of software tools, the STAR Software Development Environment (SSDE), which is intended to address many of these challenges, and which should simplify the development of software for spacecraft applications, and for other embedded environments. The SSDE includes Code Rocket, a code visualisation and documentation tool, which provides both pseudocode and flowchart editing facilities. These are fully integrated with the code editing and debugging features of the underlying integrated development environment (IDE).

  6. Section 508 Electronic Information Accessibility Requirements for Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Section 508 Subpart B 1194.21 outlines requirements for operating system and software development in order to create a product that is accessible to users with various disabilities. This portion of Section 508 contains a variety of standards to enable those using assistive technology and with visual, hearing, cognitive and motor difficulties to access all information provided in software. The focus on requirements was limited to the Microsoft Windows® operating system as it is the predominant operating system used at this center. Compliance with this portion of the requirements can be obtained by integrating the requirements into the software development cycle early and by remediating issues in legacy software if possible. There are certain circumstances with software that may arise necessitating an exemption from these requirements, such as design or engineering software using dynamically changing graphics or numbers to convey information. These exceptions can be discussed with the Section 508 Coordinator and another method of accommodation used.

  7. NDE Software Developed at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Donald J.; Martin, Richard E.; Rauser, Richard W.; Nichols, Charles; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has developed several important Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) related software packages for different projects in the last 10 years. Three of the software packages have been created with commercial-grade user interfaces and are available to United States entities for download on the NASA Technology Transfer and Partnership Office server (https://sr.grc.nasa.gov/). This article provides brief overviews of the software packages.

  8. Architecture independent environment for developing engineering software on MIMD computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valimohamed, Karim A.; Lopez, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    Engineers are constantly faced with solving problems of increasing complexity and detail. Multiple Instruction stream Multiple Data stream (MIMD) computers have been developed to overcome the performance limitations of serial computers. The hardware architectures of MIMD computers vary considerably and are much more sophisticated than serial computers. Developing large scale software for a variety of MIMD computers is difficult and expensive. There is a need to provide tools that facilitate programming these machines. First, the issues that must be considered to develop those tools are examined. The two main areas of concern were architecture independence and data management. Architecture independent software facilitates software portability and improves the longevity and utility of the software product. It provides some form of insurance for the investment of time and effort that goes into developing the software. The management of data is a crucial aspect of solving large engineering problems. It must be considered in light of the new hardware organizations that are available. Second, the functional design and implementation of a software environment that facilitates developing architecture independent software for large engineering applications are described. The topics of discussion include: a description of the model that supports the development of architecture independent software; identifying and exploiting concurrency within the application program; data coherence; engineering data base and memory management.

  9. Definition and Development of Habitation Readiness Levels (HRLs) for Planetary Surface Habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Janis H.; Toups, Larry

    2007-01-01

    One could argue that NASA has never developed a true habitat for a planetary surface, with only the Lunar Module from the 1960's-era Apollo Program providing for a sparse 2 person, 3 day capability. An integral part of NASA's current National Vision for Space Exploration is missions back to the moon and eventually to Mars. One of the largest leaps i11 lunar surface exploration beyond the Apollo lunar missions will be the conduct of these extended duration human missions. These missions could range from 30 to 90 days in length initially and may eventually range up to 500 days in length. To enable these extended duration human missions, probably the single-most important lunar surface element is the Surface Habitat. The requirements that must be met by the Surface Habitat will go far beyond the safety, performance and operational requirements of the Lunar Module, and NASA needs to develop a basis for making intelligent, technically correct habitat design decisions. This paper will discuss the possibilities of the definition and development of a Habitation Readiness Level (HRL) scale that might be mapped to current Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) for technology development. HRLs could help measure how well a particular technology thrust is advanced by a proposed planetary habitat concept. The readiness level would have to be measured differently than TRLs, and may include such milestones as habitat design performance under simulated mission operations and constraints (including relevant field testing), functional allocation demonstrations, crew interface evaluation and post-occupancy evaluation. With many concepts for planetary habitats proposed over the past 20 years, there are many strategic technical challenges facing designers of planetary habitats that will support NASA's exploration of the moon and Mars. The systematic assessment of a variety of planetary habitat options will be an important approach and will influence the associated requirements for human

  10. Development of software for airborne photos analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudowicz-Nawrocka, J.; Tomczak, R. J.; Nowakowski, K.; Mueller, W.; Kujawa, S.

    2014-04-01

    Systems type UAV / UAS enable acquisition of huge amounts of data, such as images. For their storage and analysis IT systems are necessary. Existing systems do not always allow you to perform such operations as researchers wish to [1]. The purpose of the research is to automate the process of recognizing objects and phenomena occurring on grasslands. The basis for action are numerous collections of images taken from the oktokopter [2]. For the purpose of the collection, management and analysis of image data and character acquired in the course of research, in accordance with the principles of software engineering several computer programs has been produced. The resulting software is different functionality and type. Applications were made using a number of popular technologies. The choice of so many technology was primarily dictated by the possibilities of their use for specific tasks and availability on different platforms and the ability to distribute open source. Applications presented by the authors, designed to assess the status of grassland based on aerial photography, show the complexity of the issues but at the same time tend to further research.

  11. Software Architecture for Simultaneous Process Control and Software Development/Modification

    SciTech Connect

    Lenarduzzi, Roberto; Hileman, Michael S; McMillan, David E; Holmes Jr, William; Blankenship, Mark; Wilder, Terry

    2011-01-01

    A software architecture is described that allows modification of some application code sections while the remainder of the application continues executing. This architecture facilitates long term testing and process control because the overall process need not be stopped and restarted to allow modifications or additions to the software. A working implementation using National Instruments LabVIEW{trademark} sub-panel and shared variable features is described as an example. This architecture provides several benefits in both the program development and execution environments. The software is easier to maintain and it is not necessary to recompile the entire program after a modification.

  12. Improving the Software Development Process Using Testability Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voas, Jeffrey M.; Miller, Keith W.

    1991-01-01

    Software testability is the the tendency of code to reveal existing faults during random testing. This paper proposes to take software testability predictions into account throughout the development process. These predictions can be made from formal specifications, design documents, and the code itself. The insight provided by software testability is valuable during design, coding, testing, and quality assurance. We further believe that software testability analysis can play a crucial role in quantifying the likelihood that faults are not hiding after testing does not result in any failures for the current version.

  13. Seq4SNPs: new software for retrieval of multiple, accurately annotated DNA sequences, ready formatted for SNP assay design

    PubMed Central

    Field, Helen I; Scollen, Serena A; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Morrison, Jonathan; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Pharoah, Paul DP

    2009-01-01

    Background In moderate-throughput SNP genotyping there was a gap in the workflow, between choosing a set of SNPs and submitting their sequences to proprietary assay design software, which was not met by existing software. Retrieval and formatting of sequences flanking each SNP, prior to assay design, becomes rate-limiting for more than about ten SNPs, especially if annotated for repetitive regions and adjacent variations. We routinely process up to 50 SNPs at once. Implementation We created Seq4SNPs, a web-based, walk-away software that can process one to several hundred SNPs given rs numbers as input. It outputs a file of fully annotated sequences formatted for one of three proprietary design softwares: TaqMan's Primer-By-Design FileBuilder, Sequenom's iPLEX or SNPstream's Autoprimer, as well as unannotated fasta sequences. We found genotyping assays to be inhibited by repetitive sequences or the presence of additional variations flanking the SNP under test, and in multiplexes, repetitive sequence flanking one SNP adversely affects multiple assays. Assay design software programs avoid such regions if the input sequences are appropriately annotated, so we used Seq4SNPs to provide suitably annotated input sequences, and improved our genotyping success rate. Adjacent SNPs can also be avoided, by annotating sequences used as input for primer design. Conclusion The accuracy of annotation by Seq4SNPs is significantly better than manual annotation (P < 1e-5). Using Seq4SNPs to incorporate all annotation for additional SNPs and repetitive elements into sequences, for genotyping assay designer software, minimizes assay failure at the design stage, reducing the cost of genotyping. Seq4SNPs provides a rapid route for replacement of poor test SNP sequences. We routinely use this software for assay sequence preparation. Seq4SNPs is available as a service at and , currently for human SNPs, but easily extended to include any species in dbSNP. PMID:19523221

  14. Standardized development of computer software. Part 1: Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    This work is a two-volume set on standards for modern software engineering methodology. This volume presents a tutorial and practical guide to the efficient development of reliable computer software, a unified and coordinated discipline for design, coding, testing, documentation, and project organization and management. The aim of the monograph is to provide formal disciplines for increasing the probability of securing software that is characterized by high degrees of initial correctness, readability, and maintainability, and to promote practices which aid in the consistent and orderly development of a total software system within schedule and budgetary constraints. These disciplines are set forth as a set of rules to be applied during software development to drastically reduce the time traditionally spent in debugging, to increase documentation quality, to foster understandability among those who must come in contact with it, and to facilitate operations and alterations of the program as requirements on the program environment change.

  15. Developing a Decision Support System: The Software and Hardware Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Phillip M.

    1989-01-01

    Describes some of the available software and hardware tools that can be used to develop a decision support system implemented on microcomputers. Activities that should be supported by software are discussed, including data entry, data coding, finding and combining data, and data compatibility. Hardware considerations include speed, storage…

  16. Development Of Software To Recognize Parts Of Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Despain, Ronald R.; Tharpe, Roy, Jr.; Davis, Leon; Hauss, Sharon; Shawaga, Larry; Biro, Ron

    1993-01-01

    Report describes first phase in development of digital image-processing subsystem recognizing parts of plants. Subsystem part of robotic system tending and harvesting plants in automated plant-growth chamber. Initial focus on image-processing software that distinguishes among seed heads, stems, and leaves of wheat plants and further distinguishes between these parts and background. Software adaptable to other types of plants.

  17. Hospital readiness for health information exchange: development of metrics associated with successful collaboration for quality improvement

    PubMed Central

    Korst, Lisa M.; Aydin, Carolyn E.; Signer, Jordana M. K.; Fink, Arlene

    2011-01-01

    Objective The development of readiness metrics for organizational participation in health information exchange is critical for monitoring progress toward, and achievement of, successful inter-organizational collaboration. In preparation for the development of a tool to measure readiness for data-sharing, we tested whether organizational capacities known to be related to readiness were associated with successful participation in an American data-sharing collaborative for quality improvement. Design Cross-sectional design, using an on-line survey of hospitals in a large, mature data-sharing collaborative organized for benchmarking and improvement in nursing care quality. Measurements Factor analysis was used to identify salient constructs, and identified factors were analyzed with respect to “successful” participation. “Success” was defined as the incorporation of comparative performance data into the hospital dashboard. Results The most important factor in predicting success included survey items measuring the strength of organizational leadership in fostering a culture of quality improvement (QI Leadership): 1) presence of a supportive hospital executive; 2) the extent to which a hospital values data; 3) the presence of leaders’ vision for how the collaborative advances the hospital’s strategic goals; 4) hospital use of the collaborative data to track quality outcomes; and 5) staff recognition of a strong mandate for collaborative participation (α = 0.84, correlation with Success 0.68 [P < 0.0001]). Conclusion The data emphasize the importance of hospital QI Leadership in collaboratives that aim to share data for QI or safety purposes. Such metrics should prove useful in the planning and development of this complex form of inter-organizational collaboration. PMID:21330191

  18. Novice and Experienced Instructional Software Developers: Effects on Materials Created with Instructional Software Templates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boot, Eddy W.; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.; Veerman, Arja L.

    2007-01-01

    The development of instructional software is a complex process, posing high demands to the technical and didactical expertise of developers. Domain specialists rather than professional developers are often responsible for it, but authoring tools with pre-structured templates claim to compensate for this limited experience. This study compares…

  19. Estimating Software-Development Costs With Greater Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Dan; Hihn, Jairus; Lum, Karen

    2008-01-01

    COCOMOST is a computer program for use in estimating software development costs. The goal in the development of COCOMOST was to increase estimation accuracy in three ways: (1) develop a set of sensitivity software tools that return not only estimates of costs but also the estimation error; (2) using the sensitivity software tools, precisely define the quantities of data needed to adequately tune cost estimation models; and (3) build a repository of software-cost-estimation information that NASA managers can retrieve to improve the estimates of costs of developing software for their project. COCOMOST implements a methodology, called '2cee', in which a unique combination of well-known pre-existing data-mining and software-development- effort-estimation techniques are used to increase the accuracy of estimates. COCOMOST utilizes multiple models to analyze historical data pertaining to software-development projects and performs an exhaustive data-mining search over the space of model parameters to improve the performances of effort-estimation models. Thus, it is possible to both calibrate and generate estimates at the same time. COCOMOST is written in the C language for execution in the UNIX operating system.

  20. Lean and Agile Development of the AITS Ground Software System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richters, Mark; Dutruel, Etienne; Mecredy, Nicolas

    2013-08-01

    We present the ongoing development of a new ground software system used for integrating, testing and operating spacecraft. The Advanced Integration and Test Services (AITS) project aims at providing a solution for electrical ground support equipment and mission control systems in future Astrium Space Transportation missions. Traditionally ESA ground or flight software development projects are conducted according to a waterfall-like process as specified in the ECSS-E-40 standard promoted by ESA in the European industry. In AITS a decision was taken to adopt an agile development process. This work could serve as a reference for future ESA software projects willing to apply agile concepts.

  1. Pragmatic quality metrics for evolutionary software development models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royce, Walker

    1990-01-01

    Due to the large number of product, project, and people parameters which impact large custom software development efforts, measurement of software product quality is a complex undertaking. Furthermore, the absolute perspective from which quality is measured (customer satisfaction) is intangible. While we probably can't say what the absolute quality of a software product is, we can determine the relative quality, the adequacy of this quality with respect to pragmatic considerations, and identify good and bad trends during development. While no two software engineers will ever agree on an optimum definition of software quality, they will agree that the most important perspective of software quality is its ease of change. We can call this flexibility, adaptability, or some other vague term, but the critical characteristic of software is that it is soft. The easier the product is to modify, the easier it is to achieve any other software quality perspective. This paper presents objective quality metrics derived from consistent lifecycle perspectives of rework which, when used in concert with an evolutionary development approach, can provide useful insight to produce better quality per unit cost/schedule or to achieve adequate quality more efficiently. The usefulness of these metrics is evaluated by applying them to a large, real world, Ada project.

  2. Ideas for a Cooperative Software Development for Future GGOS Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neidhardt, A.; Ettl, M.

    2012-12-01

    The development of software is a creative process, which offers a huge degree of freedom. In scientific fields a lot of researchers develop their own software for specific needs. Everyone has their own preferences and backgrounds regarding the used programming languages, styles, and platforms. This complexity results in software which is not always directly usable by others in the communities. In addition, the software is often error-prone as hidden bugs are not always revealed. Therefore ideas came up to solve these problems at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell. The results were coding layouts and policies, documentation strategies, the usage of version control, and a consistent process of continuous integration. Within this, the discussed quality factors can define quality metrics which help to quantize code quality. The resulting software is a repository of tested modules that can be used in different programs for the geodetic space techniques. This is one possible contribution to future GGOS stations.

  3. COSTMODL: An automated software development cost estimation tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, George B.

    1991-01-01

    The cost of developing computer software continues to consume an increasing portion of many organizations' total budgets, both in the public and private sector. As this trend develops, the capability to produce reliable estimates of the effort and schedule required to develop a candidate software product takes on increasing importance. The COSTMODL program was developed to provide an in-house capability to perform development cost estimates for NASA software projects. COSTMODL is an automated software development cost estimation tool which incorporates five cost estimation algorithms including the latest models for the Ada language and incrementally developed products. The principal characteristic which sets COSTMODL apart from other software cost estimation programs is its capacity to be completely customized to a particular environment. The estimation equations can be recalibrated to reflect the programmer productivity characteristics demonstrated by the user's organization, and the set of significant factors which effect software development costs can be customized to reflect any unique properties of the user's development environment. Careful use of a capability such as COSTMODL can significantly reduce the risk of cost overruns and failed projects.

  4. New Developments in the Technology Readiness Assessment Process in US DOE-EM - 13247

    SciTech Connect

    Krahn, Steven; Sutter, Herbert; Johnson, Hoyt

    2013-07-01

    A Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) is a systematic, metric-based process and accompanying report that evaluates the maturity of the technologies used in systems; it is designed to measure technology maturity using the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) scale pioneered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the 1980's. More recently, DoD has adopted and provided systematic guidance for performing TRAs and determining TRLs. In 2007 the GAO recommended that the DOE adopt the NASA/DoD methodology for evaluating technology maturity. Earlier, in 2006-2007, DOE-EM had conducted pilot TRAs on a number of projects at Hanford and Savannah River. In March 2008, DOE-EM issued a process guide, which established TRAs as an integral part of DOE-EM's Project Management Critical Decision Process. Since the development of its detailed TRA guidance in 2008, DOE-EM has continued to accumulate experience in the conduct of TRAs and the process for evaluating technology maturity. DOE has developed guidance on TRAs applicable department-wide. DOE-EM's experience with the TRA process, the evaluations that led to recently developed proposed revisions to the DOE-EM TRA/TMP Guide; the content of the proposed changes that incorporate the above lessons learned and insights are described. (authors)

  5. The development process for the space shuttle primary avionics software system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, T. W.

    1987-01-01

    Primary avionics software system; software development approach; user support and problem diagnosis; software releases and configuration; quality/productivity programs; and software development/production facilities are addressed. Also examined are the external evaluations of the IBM process.

  6. Development of ShakeAlert Performance Evaluation Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maechling, P. J.; Liukis, M.; Jordan, T. H.; CISN EEW Team

    2011-12-01

    The CISN Testing Center (CTC) is designed to provide automated and interactive performance evaluations of ShakeAlert earthquake early warning system performance. The CTC software consists of two main parts: (1) software programs that input ShakeAlert EEW performance reports, match ShakeAlert forecasts to observational data, and generate a variety of EEW system performance summaries, and (2) an automated testing framework that can input ShakeAlert EEW performance reports, retrieve ANSS observational data, and produce performance summaries on a daily, or event, basis. The interactive capabilities of the CTC software may be useful for offline testing of ShakeAlert system. The automated capabilities of the CTC software are designed to support ongoing ShakeAlert performance evaluations. The CTC software implements a number of standard EEW performance summaries including magnitude forecast error and location forecast error with evaluation of ShakeAlert ground motion forecasts such as peak velocity under development. The CTC software is distributed as open-source scientific software to support transparency in evaluation processing and to support testing software re-use within ShakeAlert development groups.

  7. X-ray enhancement software development and test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butterfield, R. L.; Dillon, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    A repertoire of software to optimally analyze various X-ray imagery was successfully developed. Computer techniques are presented to solve many common problems involved in nondestructive testing X-ray analysis.

  8. Perspectives on NASA flight software development - Apollo, Shuttle, Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garman, John R.

    1990-01-01

    Flight data systems' software development is chronicled for the period encompassing NASA's Apollo, Space Shuttle, and (ongoing) Space Station Freedom programs, with attention to the methodologies and 'development tools' employed in each case and their mutual relationships. A dominant concern in all three programs has been the accommodation of software change; it has also been noted that any such long-term program carries the additional challenge of identifying which elements of its software-related 'institutional memory' are most critical, in order to preclude their loss through the retirement, promotion, or transfer of its 'last expert'.

  9. The Development Process of the LUCIFER Control Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jütte, M.; Polsterer, K.; Lehmitz, M.

    2004-07-01

    We present the design and development process of the control software for the LBT NIR spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral-Field Unit for Extragalactic Research (LUCIFER) which is one of the first-light instruments for the LBT on Mt. Graham, Arizona. The LBT will be equipped with two identical LUCIFER instruments for both mirrors. We give an overview of the software architecture and the current state of the software package and describe the development process by using a virtual LUCIFER instrument.

  10. Developing and validating the French-Canadian version of the practitioner and organizational telehealth readiness assessment tools.

    PubMed

    Légaré, Emilie; Vincent, Claude; Lehoux, Pascale; Anderson, Donna; Kairy, Dahlia; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Jennett, Penny

    2010-01-01

    Only one telehealth readiness assessment tool, that of Jennett et al., covers all types of telehealth projects, regardless of health-care provision context. However, this instrument is only available in English and has not undergone psychometric evaluation. We developed a French-Canadian version of the Practitioner Telehealth Readiness Assessment Tool and the Organizational Telehealth Readiness Assessment Tool. Transcultural validity was assessed by nine practitioners and 12 clinical project co-ordinators or administrators. For practitioners and managers, there was no significant difference between the scores of the English and the French versions of the questionnaires. The results showed that the telehealth readiness of co-ordinators or administrators was greater than that of practitioners when the range in scores was taken into account. The French-Canadian versions of the two questionnaires make it possible to assess telehealth readiness among French speakers. However, other studies involving patients will be necessary to validate the Patient-Public Telehealth Readiness Assessment Tool. PMID:20386034

  11. WIPDash: Work Item and People Dashboard for Software Development Teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, Mikkel R.; Fernandez, Roland; Czerwinski, Mary; Inkpen, Kori; Kulyk, Olga; Robertson, George G.

    We present WIPDash, a visualization for software development teams designed to increase group awareness of work items and code base activity. WIPDash was iteratively designed by working with two development teams, using interviews, observations, and focus groups, as well as sketches of the prototype. Based on those observations and feedback, we prototyped WIPDash and deployed it with two software teams for a one week field study. We summarize the lessons learned, and include suggestions for a future version.

  12. Spacelab software development and integration concepts study report, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, P. L.; Willis, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    The proposed software guidelines to be followed by the European Space Research Organization in the development of software for the Spacelab being developed for use as a payload for the space shuttle are documented. Concepts, techniques, and tools needed to assure the success of a programming project are defined as they relate to operation of the data management subsystem, support of experiments and space applications, use with ground support equipment, and for integration testing.

  13. Development and Application of New Quality Model for Software Projects

    PubMed Central

    Karnavel, K.; Dillibabu, R.

    2014-01-01

    The IT industry tries to employ a number of models to identify the defects in the construction of software projects. In this paper, we present COQUALMO and its limitations and aim to increase the quality without increasing the cost and time. The computation time, cost, and effort to predict the residual defects are very high; this was overcome by developing an appropriate new quality model named the software testing defect corrective model (STDCM). The STDCM was used to estimate the number of remaining residual defects in the software product; a few assumptions and the detailed steps of the STDCM are highlighted. The application of the STDCM is explored in software projects. The implementation of the model is validated using statistical inference, which shows there is a significant improvement in the quality of the software projects. PMID:25478594

  14. Trilinos developers SQE guide : ASC software quality engineering practices.

    SciTech Connect

    Willenbring, James Michael; Heroux, Michael Allen

    2013-05-01

    The Trilinos Project is an effort to develop algorithms and enabling technologies within an object-oriented software framework for the solution of large-scale, complex multi-physics engineering and scientific problems. A new software capability is introduced into Trilinos as a package. A Trilinos package is an integral unit and, although there are exceptions such as utility packages, each package is typically developed by a small team of experts in a particular algorithms area such as algebraic preconditioners, nonlinear solvers, etc. The Trilinos Developers SQE Guide is a resource for Trilinos package developers who are working under Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) and are therefore subject to the ASC Software Quality Engineering Practices as described in the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan: ASC Software Quality Engineering Practices Version 3.0 document [1]. The Trilinos Developer Policies webpage [2] contains a lot of detailed information that is essential for all Trilinos developers. The Trilinos Software Lifecycle Model [3]defines the default lifecycle model for Trilinos packages and provides a context for many of the practices listed in this document.

  15. TWiki as a platform for collaborative software development management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radziwill, Nicole M.; Shelton, Amy L.

    2004-09-01

    The software development process in Green Bank is managed in six-week development cycles, where two cycles fall within one quarter. Each cycle, a Plan of Record is devised which outlines the team's commitments, deliverables, technical leads and scientific sponsors. To be productive and efficient, the team must not only be able to track its progress towards meeting commitments, but also to communicate and circulate the information that will help it meet its goals effectively. In the early summer of 2003, the Software Development Division installed a wiki web site using the TWiki product to improve the effectiveness of the team. Wiki sites contain web pages that are maintainable using a web interface by anyone who becomes a registered user of the site. Because the site naturally supports group involvement, the Plan of Record on the wiki now serves as the central dashboard for project tracking each development cycle. As an example of how the wiki improves productivity, software documentation is now tracked as evidence of the software deliverable. Written status reports are thus not required when the Plan of Record and associated wiki pages are kept up to date. The wiki approach has been quite successful in Green Bank for document management as well as software development management, and has rapidly extended beyond the bounds of the software development group for information management.

  16. Implementation and development of an automated, ultra-high-capacity, acoustic, flexible dispensing platform for assay-ready plate delivery.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Dylan; Northwood, Roger; Owen, Paul; Simkiss, Ellen; Brierley, Andrew; Cross, Kevin; Slaney, Andrew; Davis, Miranda; Bath, Colin

    2012-10-01

    Compound management faces the daily challenge of providing high-quality samples to drug discovery. The advent of new screening technologies has seen demand for liquid samples move toward nanoliter ranges, dispensed by contactless acoustic droplet ejection. Within AstraZeneca, a totally integrated assay-ready plate production platform has been created to fully exploit the advantages of this technology. This enables compound management to efficiently deliver large throughputs demanded by high-throughput screening while maintaining regular delivery of smaller numbers of compounds in varying plate formats for cellular or biochemical concentration-response curves in support of hit and lead optimization (structure-activity relationship screening). The automation solution, CODA, has the capability to deliver compounds on demand for single- and multiple-concentration ranges, in batch sizes ranging from 1 sample to 2 million samples, integrating seamlessly into local compound and test management systems. The software handles compound orders intelligently, grouping test requests together dependent on output plate type and serial dilution ranges so that source compound vessels are shared among numerous tests, ensuring conservation of sample, reduced labware and costs, and efficiency of work cell logistics. We describe the development of CODA to address the customer demand, challenges experienced, learning made, and subsequent enhancements. PMID:22922543

  17. Adoption of Requirements Engineering Practices in Malaysian Software Development Companies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solemon, Badariah; Sahibuddin, Shamsul; Ghani, Abdul Azim Abd

    This paper presents exploratory survey results on Requirements Engineering (RE) practices of some software development companies in Malaysia. The survey attempted to identify patterns of RE practices the companies are implementing. Information required for the survey was obtained through a survey, mailed self-administered questionnaires distributed to project managers and software developers who are working at software development companies operated across the country. The results showed that the overall adoption of the RE practices in these companies is strong. However, the results also indicated that fewer companies in the survey have use appropriate CASE tools or software to support their RE process and practices, define traceability policies and maintain traceability manual in their projects.

  18. Developing satellite ground control software through graphical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailin, Sidney; Henderson, Scott; Paterra, Frank; Truszkowski, Walt

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses a program of investigation into software development as graphical modeling. The goal of this work is a more efficient development and maintenance process for the ground-based software that controls unmanned scientific satellites launched by NASA. The main hypothesis of the program is that modeling of the spacecraft and its subsystems, and reasoning about such models, can--and should--form the key activities of software development; by using such models as inputs, the generation of code to perform various functions (such as simulation and diagnostics of spacecraft components) can be automated. Moreover, we contend that automation can provide significant support for reasoning about the software system at the diagram level.

  19. Readying Health Services for Climate Change: A Policy Framework for Regional Development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Climate change presents the biggest threat to human health in the 21st century. However, many public health leaders feel ill equipped to face the challenges of climate change and have been unable to make climate change a priority in service development. I explore how to achieve a regionally responsive whole-of-systems approach to climate change in the key operational areas of a health service: service governance and culture, service delivery, workforce development, asset management, and financing. The relative neglect of implementation science means that policymakers need to be proactive about sourcing and developing models and processes to make health services ready for climate change. Health research funding agencies should urgently prioritize applied, regionally responsive health services research for a future of climate change. PMID:21421953

  20. Interferometer software development at JPL: using software engineering to reduce integration headaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deck, Michael D.; Hines, Braden E.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes some of the software engineering practices that are being used by the Realtime Interferometer Control Systems Testbed (RICST) project at JPL to address integration and integratability issues.New documentation and review techniques based on formal methods permit early identification of potential interface problems. An incremental life cycle improves the manageability of the software development process. A 'cleanroom mindset' reduces the number of defects that have to be removed during integration and test. And team ownership of work products permits the project to grow while providing a variety of opportunities to team members. This paper presents data, including software metrics and analysis, from the first several incremental deliveries developed by the RICST project.

  1. Framework Support For Knowledge-Based Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huseth, Steve

    1988-03-01

    The advent of personal engineering workstations has brought substantial information processing power to the individual programmer. Advanced tools and environment capabilities supporting the software lifecycle are just beginning to become generally available. However, many of these tools are addressing only part of the software development problem by focusing on rapid construction of self-contained programs by a small group of talented engineers. Additional capabilities are required to support the development of large programming systems where a high degree of coordination and communication is required among large numbers of software engineers, hardware engineers, and managers. A major player in realizing these capabilities is the framework supporting the software development environment. In this paper we discuss our research toward a Knowledge-Based Software Assistant (KBSA) framework. We propose the development of an advanced framework containing a distributed knowledge base that can support the data representation needs of tools, provide environmental support for the formalization and control of the software development process, and offer a highly interactive and consistent user interface.

  2. Recent developments in the ABINIT software package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonze, X.; Jollet, F.; Abreu Araujo, F.; Adams, D.; Amadon, B.; Applencourt, T.; Audouze, C.; Beuken, J.-M.; Bieder, J.; Bokhanchuk, A.; Bousquet, E.; Bruneval, F.; Caliste, D.; Côté, M.; Dahm, F.; Da Pieve, F.; Delaveau, M.; Di Gennaro, M.; Dorado, B.; Espejo, C.; Geneste, G.; Genovese, L.; Gerossier, A.; Giantomassi, M.; Gillet, Y.; Hamann, D. R.; He, L.; Jomard, G.; Laflamme Janssen, J.; Le Roux, S.; Levitt, A.; Lherbier, A.; Liu, F.; Lukačević, I.; Martin, A.; Martins, C.; Oliveira, M. J. T.; Poncé, S.; Pouillon, Y.; Rangel, T.; Rignanese, G.-M.; Romero, A. H.; Rousseau, B.; Rubel, O.; Shukri, A. A.; Stankovski, M.; Torrent, M.; Van Setten, M. J.; Van Troeye, B.; Verstraete, M. J.; Waroquiers, D.; Wiktor, J.; Xu, B.; Zhou, A.; Zwanziger, J. W.

    2016-08-01

    ABINIT is a package whose main program allows one to find the total energy, charge density, electronic structure and many other properties of systems made of electrons and nuclei, (molecules and periodic solids) within Density Functional Theory (DFT), Many-Body Perturbation Theory (GW approximation and Bethe-Salpeter equation) and Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT). ABINIT also allows to optimize the geometry according to the DFT forces and stresses, to perform molecular dynamics simulations using these forces, and to generate dynamical matrices, Born effective charges and dielectric tensors. The present paper aims to describe the new capabilities of ABINIT that have been developed since 2009. It covers both physical and technical developments inside the ABINIT code, as well as developments provided within the ABINIT package. The developments are described with relevant references, input variables, tests and tutorials.

  3. SIRU development. Volume 3: Software description and program documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehrle, J.

    1973-01-01

    The development and initial evaluation of a strapdown inertial reference unit (SIRU) system are discussed. The SIRU configuration is a modular inertial subsystem with hardware and software features that achieve fault tolerant operational capabilities. The SIRU redundant hardware design is formulated about a six gyro and six accelerometer instrument module package. The six axes array provides redundant independent sensing and the symmetry enables the formulation of an optimal software redundant data processing structure with self-contained fault detection and isolation (FDI) capabilities. The basic SIRU software coding system used in the DDP-516 computer is documented.

  4. The development process of the LUCIFER control software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juette, Marcus; Polsterer, Kai L.; Lehmitz, Michael; Knierim, Volker

    2004-09-01

    In this paper we present the software development process and history of the LUCIFER (LBT NIR spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral- Field Unit for Extragalactic Research) multi-mode near-infrared instrument, which is one of the first light instruments of the LBT on Mt. Graham, Arizona. The software is realised as a distributed system in Java using its remote method invocation service (RMI). We describe the current status of the software and give an overview of the planned computer hardware architecture.

  5. A Methodology for Developing Environmental Information Systems with Software Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanasiadis, Ioannis N.; Mitkas, Pericles A.

    This article presents a unifying methodology for developing environmental information systems with software agents. Based on the experience reported in recent literature, we abstract common requirements of environmental information systems into agent types, combine state-of-the-art tools from computer science, service-oriented software engineering and artificial intelligence domains, as software agents and machine learning, and illustrate their potential for solving real-world problems. Specifically, two generic agent types are specified that behave as information carriers and decision makers, which provide an appropriate abstraction for deployment of added-value services in environmental information systems.

  6. Study on Spacelab software development and integration concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to define the complexity and magnitude of the Spacelab software challenge. The study was based on current Spacelab program concepts, anticipated flight schedules, and ground operation plans. The study was primarily directed toward identifying and solving problems related to the experiment flight application and tests and checkout software executing in the Spacelab onboard command and data management subsystem (CDMS) computers and electrical ground support equipment (EGSE). The study provides a conceptual base from which it is possible to proceed into the development phase of the Software Test and Integration Laboratory (STIL) and establishes guidelines for the definition of standards which will ensure that the total Spacelab software is understood prior to entering development.

  7. Software Development and Test Methodology for a Distributed Ground System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritter, George; Guillebeau, Pat; McNair, Ann R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Payload Operations Center (POC) ground system has evolved over a period of about 10 years. During this time the software processes have migrated from more traditional to more contemporary development processes in an effort to minimize unnecessary overhead while maximizing process benefits. The Software processes that have evolved still emphasize requirements capture, software configuration management, design documenting, and making sure the products that have been developed are accountable to initial requirements. This paper will give an overview of how the Software Processes have evolved, highlighting the positives as well as the negatives. In addition, we will mention the COTS tools that have been integrated into the processes and how the COTS have provided value to the project.

  8. Implementation and Simulation Results using Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddock, Robert W.; DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.; Bowes, Angela; Prince, Jill L. H.; Powell, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    An Autonomous Aerobraking software system is currently under development with support from the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) that would move typically ground-based operations functions to onboard an aerobraking spacecraft, reducing mission risk and mission cost. The suite of software that will enable autonomous aerobraking is the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software (AADS) and consists of an ephemeris model, onboard atmosphere estimator, temperature and loads prediction, and a maneuver calculation. The software calculates the maneuver time, magnitude and direction commands to maintain the spacecraft periapsis parameters within design structural load and/or thermal constraints. The AADS is currently tested in simulations at Mars, with plans to also evaluate feasibility and performance at Venus and Titan.

  9. Development and implementation of software systems for imaging spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boardman, J.W.; Clark, R.N.; Mazer, A.S.; Biehl, L.L.; Kruse, F.A.; Torson, J.; Staenz, K.

    2006-01-01

    Specialized software systems have played a crucial role throughout the twenty-five year course of the development of the new technology of imaging spectroscopy, or hyperspectral remote sensing. By their very nature, hyperspectral data place unique and demanding requirements on the computer software used to visualize, analyze, process and interpret them. Often described as a marriage of the two technologies of reflectance spectroscopy and airborne/spaceborne remote sensing, imaging spectroscopy, in fact, produces data sets with unique qualities, unlike previous remote sensing or spectrometer data. Because of these unique spatial and spectral properties hyperspectral data are not readily processed or exploited with legacy software systems inherited from either of the two parent fields of study. This paper provides brief reviews of seven important software systems developed specifically for imaging spectroscopy.

  10. Software Engineering Research/Developer Collaborations in 2004 (C104)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pressburger, Tom; Markosian, Lawrance

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, six collaborations between software engineering technology providers and NASA software development personnel deployed a total of five software engineering technologies (for references, see Section 7.2) on the NASA projects. The main purposes were to benefit the projects, infuse the technologies if beneficial into NASA, and give feedback to the technology providers to improve the technologies. Each collaboration project produced a final report (for references, see Section 7.1). Section 2 of this report summarizes each project, drawing from the final reports and communications with the software developers and technology providers. Section 3 indicates paths to further infusion of the technologies into NASA practice. Section 4 summarizes some technology transfer lessons learned. Section 6 lists the acronyms used in this report.

  11. Development of the ISS EMU Dashboard Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, Craig; Hill, Terry R.

    2011-01-01

    The EMU (Extra-Vehicular Mobility Unit) Dashboard was developed at NASA s Johnson Space Center to aid in real-time mission support for the ISS (International Space Station) and Shuttle EMU space suit by time synchronizing down-linked video, space suit data and audio from the mission control audio loops. Once the input streams are synchronized and recorded, the data can be replayed almost instantly and has proven invaluable in understanding in-flight hardware anomalies and playing back information conveyed by the crew to missions control and the back room support. This paper will walk through the development from an engineer s idea brought to life by an intern to real time mission support and how this tool is evolving today and its challenges to support EVAs (Extra-Vehicular Activities) and human exploration in the 21st century.

  12. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system subsystem 143 software development plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, D. A.

    1994-11-01

    This plan describes the activities to be performed and the controls to be applied to the process of specifying, developing, and qualifying the data acquisition software for the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System Subsystem 143 Instrumentation and Data Acquisition System (IDAS). This plan will serve as a software quality assurance plan, a verification and validation (V and V) plan, and a configuration management plan.

  13. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system subsystem 143 software development plan

    SciTech Connect

    King, D.A.

    1994-11-10

    This plan describes the activities to be performed and the controls to be applied to the process of specifying, developing, and qualifying the data acquisition software for the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System Subsystem 143 Instrumentation and Data Acquisition System (IDAS). This plan will serve as a software quality assurance plan, a verification and validation (V and V) plan, and a configuration management plan.

  14. Project management in the development of scientific software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platz, Jochen

    1986-08-01

    This contribution is a rough outline of a comprehensive project management model for the development of software for scientific applications. The model was tested in the unique environment of the Siemens AG Corporate Research and Technology Division. Its focal points are the structuring of project content - the so-called phase organization, the project organization and the planning model used, and its particular applicability to innovative projects. The outline focuses largely on actual project management aspects rather than associated software engineering measures.

  15. Need for multiple approaches in collaborative software development.

    SciTech Connect

    LePoire, D. J.

    2002-02-26

    The need to share software and reintegrate it into new applications presents a difficult but important challenge. Component-based development as an approach to this problem is receiving much attention in professional journals and academic curricula. However, there are many other approaches to collaborative software development that might be more appropriate. This paper reviews a few of these approaches and discusses criteria for the conditions and contexts in which these alternative approaches might be more appropriate. This paper complements the discussion of context-based development team organizations and processes. Examples from a small development team that interacts with a larger professional community are analyzed.

  16. Dependability modeling and assessment in UML-based software development.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Simona; Merseguer, José; Petriu, Dorina C

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of software nonfunctional properties (NFP) is an important problem in software development. In the context of model-driven development, an emerging approach for the analysis of different NFPs consists of the following steps: (a) to extend the software models with annotations describing the NFP of interest; (b) to transform automatically the annotated software model to the formalism chosen for NFP analysis; (c) to analyze the formal model using existing solvers; (d) to assess the software based on the results and give feedback to designers. Such a modeling→analysis→assessment approach can be applied to any software modeling language, be it general purpose or domain specific. In this paper, we focus on UML-based development and on the dependability NFP, which encompasses reliability, availability, safety, integrity, and maintainability. The paper presents the profile used to extend UML with dependability information, the model transformation to generate a DSPN formal model, and the assessment of the system properties based on the DSPN results. PMID:22988428

  17. Semi-automatic development of Payload Operations Control Center software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballin, Sidney

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes the current status of CTA's investigation of methods and tools for automating the software development process in NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 500. The emphasis in this effort has been on methods and tools in support of software reuse. The most recent phase of the effort has been a domain analysis of Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) software. This report summarizes the results of the domain analysis, and proposes an approach to semi-automatic development of POCC Application Processor (AP) software based on these results. The domain analysis enabled us to abstract, from specific systems, the typical components of a POCC AP. We were also able to identify patterns in the way one AP might be different from another. These two perspectives--aspects that tend to change from AP to AP, and aspects that tend to remain the same--suggest an overall approach to the reuse of POCC AP software. We found that different parts of an AP require different development technologies. We propose a hybrid approach that combines constructive and generative technologies. Constructive methods emphasize the assembly of pre-defined reusable components. Generative methods provide for automated generation of software from specifications in a very-high-level language (VHLL).

  18. Dependability Modeling and Assessment in UML-Based Software Development

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Simona; Merseguer, José; Petriu, Dorina C.

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of software nonfunctional properties (NFP) is an important problem in software development. In the context of model-driven development, an emerging approach for the analysis of different NFPs consists of the following steps: (a) to extend the software models with annotations describing the NFP of interest; (b) to transform automatically the annotated software model to the formalism chosen for NFP analysis; (c) to analyze the formal model using existing solvers; (d) to assess the software based on the results and give feedback to designers. Such a modeling→analysis→assessment approach can be applied to any software modeling language, be it general purpose or domain specific. In this paper, we focus on UML-based development and on the dependability NFP, which encompasses reliability, availability, safety, integrity, and maintainability. The paper presents the profile used to extend UML with dependability information, the model transformation to generate a DSPN formal model, and the assessment of the system properties based on the DSPN results. PMID:22988428

  19. Open environment for image processing and software development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasure, John R.; Young, Mark

    1992-04-01

    The main goal of the Khoros software project is to create and provide an integrated software development environment for information processing and data visualization. The Khoros software system is now being used as a foundation to improve productivity and promote software reuse in a wide variety of application domain. A powerful feature of the Khoros system is the high-level, abstract visual language that can be employed to significantly boost the productivity of the researcher. Central to the Khoros system is the need for a consistent yet flexible user interface development system that provides cohesiveness to the vast number of programs that make up the Khoros system. Automated tools assist in maintenance as well as development of programs. The software structure that embodies this system provides for extensibility and portability, and allows for easy tailoring to target specific application domains and processing environments. First, an overview of the Khoros software environment is given. Then this paper presents the abstract applications programmer interface, API, the data services that are provided in Khoros to support it, and the Khoros visualization and image file format. The authors contend that Khoros is an excellent environment for the exploration and implementation of imaging standards.

  20. SCaN Testbed Software Development and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacpura, Thomas J.; Varga, Denise M.

    2012-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed an on-orbit, adaptable, Software Defined Radio (SDR)Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS)-based testbed facility to conduct a suite of experiments to advance technologies, reduce risk, and enable future mission capabilities on the International Space Station (ISS). The SCAN Testbed Project will provide NASA, industry, other Government agencies, and academic partners the opportunity to develop and field communications, navigation, and networking technologies in the laboratory and space environment based on reconfigurable, SDR platforms and the STRS Architecture.The SDRs are a new technology for NASA, and the support infrastructure they require is different from legacy, fixed function radios. SDRs offer the ability to reconfigure on-orbit communications by changing software for new waveforms and operating systems to enable new capabilities or fix any anomalies, which was not a previous option. They are not stand alone devices, but required a new approach to effectively control them and flow data. This requires extensive software to be developed to utilize the full potential of these reconfigurable platforms. The paper focuses on development, integration and testing as related to the avionics processor system, and the software required to command, control, monitor, and interact with the SDRs, as well as the other communication payload elements. An extensive effort was required to develop the flight software and meet the NASA requirements for software quality and safety. The flight avionics must be radiation tolerant, and these processors have limited capability in comparison to terrestrial counterparts. A big challenge was that there are three SDRs onboard, and interfacing with multiple SDRs simultaneously complicatesd the effort. The effort also includes ground software, which is a key element for both the command of the payload, and displaying data created by the payload. The verification of

  1. DPOI: Distributed software system development platform for ocean information service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhongwen; Hu, Keyong; Jiang, Yongguo; Sun, Zhaosui

    2015-02-01

    Ocean information management is of great importance as it has been employed in many areas of ocean science and technology. However, the developments of Ocean Information Systems (OISs) often suffer from low efficiency because of repetitive work and continuous modifications caused by dynamic requirements. In this paper, the basic requirements of OISs are analyzed first, and then a novel platform DPOI is proposed to improve development efficiency and enhance software quality of OISs by providing off-the-shelf resources. In the platform, the OIS is decomposed hierarchically into a set of modules, which can be reused in different system developments. These modules include the acquisition middleware and data loader that collect data from instruments and files respectively, the database that stores data consistently, the components that support fast application generation, the web services that make the data from distributed sources syntactical by use of predefined schemas and the configuration toolkit that enables software customization. With the assistance of the development platform, the software development needs no programming and the development procedure is thus accelerated greatly. We have applied the development platform in practical developments and evaluated its efficiency in several development practices and different development approaches. The results show that DPOI significantly improves development efficiency and software quality.

  2. Framework for Development of Object-Oriented Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Poveda, Gus; Ciavarella, Tony; Nieten, Dan

    2004-01-01

    The Real-Time Control (RTC) Application Framework is a high-level software framework written in C++ that supports the rapid design and implementation of object-oriented application programs. This framework provides built-in functionality that solves common software development problems within distributed client-server, multi-threaded, and embedded programming environments. When using the RTC Framework to develop software for a specific domain, designers and implementers can focus entirely on the details of the domain-specific software rather than on creating custom solutions, utilities, and frameworks for the complexities of the programming environment. The RTC Framework was originally developed as part of a Space Shuttle Launch Processing System (LPS) replacement project called Checkout and Launch Control System (CLCS). As a result of the framework s development, CLCS software development time was reduced by 66 percent. The framework is generic enough for developing applications outside of the launch-processing system domain. Other applicable high-level domains include command and control systems and simulation/ training systems.

  3. Laser transit anemometer software development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbiss, John B.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms were developed for the extraction of two components of mean velocity, standard deviation, and the associated correlation coefficient from laser transit anemometry (LTA) data ensembles. The solution method is based on an assumed two-dimensional Gaussian probability density function (PDF) model of the flow field under investigation. The procedure consists of transforming the data ensembles from the data acquisition domain (consisting of time and angle information) to the velocity space domain (consisting of velocity component information). The mean velocity results are obtained from the data ensemble centroid. Through a least squares fitting of the transformed data to an ellipse representing the intersection of a plane with the PDF, the standard deviations and correlation coefficient are obtained. A data set simulation method is presented to test the data reduction process. Results of using the simulation system with a limited test matrix of input values is also given.

  4. Software development for a Ring Imaging Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torisky, Benjamin; Benmokhtar, Fatiha

    2015-04-01

    Jefferson Lab (Jlab) is performing a large-scale upgrade to their Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) up to 12 GeV beam. The Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) in Hall B is being upgraded and a new Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector is being developed to provide better kaon - pion separation throughout the 3 to 12 GeV range. With this addition, when the electron beam hits the target, the resulting pions, kaons, and other particles will pass through a wall of translucent aerogel tiles and create Cherenkov radiation. This light can then be accurately detected by a large array of Multi-Anode PhotoMultiplier Tubes (MA-PMT). I am presenting my work on the implementation of Java based reconstruction programs for the RICH in the CLAS12 main analysis package.

  5. Development of Fuel Accounting Software Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eun, Jong Won; Suk, Juil

    1996-12-01

    A successful spacecraft mission depends on the proper maintenance of the orbit and attitude. One important requirement for the orbit and attitude planning is the accurate estimation of the propellant remaining onboard the spacecraft. For GEO communi-cations satellite, a precise fuel remaining estimation is of particular importance. This paper focuses on the bookkeeping method that was developed for calculating the pro-pellant budget by recording fuel consumption history. In general, the bookkeeping method includes detailed observation of spacecraft maneuver operations throughout the whole mission life. Application of this method is illustrated using a communica-tions satellite. In this the fuel accounting s/w tool, a PC-based spread sheet is utilized to provide an overall view of input/output elements, and to provide strong numerical and graphical merits for analyses.

  6. Software Development for Ring Imaging Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torisky, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    Jefferson Lab (Jlab) is performing a large-scale upgrade to their Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) up to 12GeV beam. The Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) in Hall B is being upgraded and a new Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector is being developed to provide better kaon - pion separation throughout the 3 to 12 GeV range. With this addition, when the electron beam hits the target, the resulting pions, kaons, and other particles will pass through a wall of translucent aerogel tiles and create Cherenkov radiation. This light can then be accurately detected by a large array of Multi-Anode PhotoMultiplier Tubes (MA-PMT). I am presenting an update on my work on the implementation of Java based reconstruction programs for the RICH in the CLAS12 main analysis package.

  7. Development and evaluation of garlic incorporated ready-to-eat extruded snacks.

    PubMed

    Haritha, D; Vijayalakshmi, V; Gulla, S

    2014-11-01

    The present study was carried out to develop and evaluate ready to eat extruded snacks incorporated with garlic powder at various levels (5 %, 10 %, 15 %, 20 %). The organoleptic evaluation was conducted for the developed products and the well accepted products were selected for further studies like physical properties and shelf life (stored at room temperature for 2 months). The organoleptic evaluation of the developed snacks revealed that 15 % and 20 % garlic incorporated snacks were not acceptable due to strong garlic flavor, therefore T1 (control), T2 (5 % garlic) and T3 ( 10 % garlic) were selected for further studies. The physical properties showed significant changes with incorporation of garlic powder at 0 %-10 % level. There was an increase in mass flow rate, tap density and bulk density but decrease in the water holding capacity, oil absorption capacity and expansion ratio. The water soluble index and moisture retention of the products showed the same values for all the three selected treatments. The products were packed by ordinary, nitrogen and vacuum packing and stored for 2 months. It was found that there was an increase in moisture content and microbial load, however the increase was within limits. The increase in the moisture content was low in nitrogen packed products where as the microbial load decreased with increase in the percentage of garlic incorporation. The nitrogen and vacuum packed products showed less microbial load than the ordinary packed products. Garlic powder can be incorporated at 5 and 10 % levels in ready-to-eat extruded snacks with well acceptability and can be stored for a period of 2 months with nitrogen packing as an effective packaging. PMID:26396341

  8. Development of N-version software samples for an experiment in software fault tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauterbach, L.

    1987-01-01

    The report documents the task planning and software development phases of an effort to obtain twenty versions of code independently designed and developed from a common specification. These versions were created for use in future experiments in software fault tolerance, in continuation of the experimental series underway at the Systems Validation Methods Branch (SVMB) at NASA Langley Research Center. The 20 versions were developed under controlled conditions at four U.S. universities, by 20 teams of two researchers each. The versions process raw data from a modified Redundant Strapped Down Inertial Measurement Unit (RSDIMU). The specifications, and over 200 questions submitted by the developers concerning the specifications, are included as appendices to this report. Design documents, and design and code walkthrough reports for each version, were also obtained in this task for use in future studies.

  9. Chaste: using agile programming techniques to develop computational biology software.

    PubMed

    Pitt-Francis, Joe; Bernabeu, Miguel O; Cooper, Jonathan; Garny, Alan; Momtahan, Lee; Osborne, James; Pathmanathan, Pras; Rodriguez, Blanca; Whiteley, Jonathan P; Gavaghan, David J

    2008-09-13

    Cardiac modelling is the area of physiome modelling where the available simulation software is perhaps most mature, and it therefore provides an excellent starting point for considering the software requirements for the wider physiome community. In this paper, we will begin by introducing some of the most advanced existing software packages for simulating cardiac electrical activity. We consider the software development methods used in producing codes of this type, and discuss their use of numerical algorithms, relative computational efficiency, usability, robustness and extensibility. We then go on to describe a class of software development methodologies known as test-driven agile methods and argue that such methods are more suitable for scientific software development than the traditional academic approaches. A case study is a project of our own, Cancer, Heart and Soft Tissue Environment, which is a library of computational biology software that began as an experiment in the use of agile programming methods. We present our experiences with a review of our progress thus far, focusing on the advantages and disadvantages of this new approach compared with the development methods used in some existing packages. We conclude by considering whether the likely wider needs of the cardiac modelling community are currently being met and suggest that, in order to respond effectively to changing requirements, it is essential that these codes should be more malleable. Such codes will allow for reliable extensions to include both detailed mathematical models--of the heart and other organs--and more efficient numerical techniques that are currently being developed by many research groups worldwide. PMID:18565813

  10. The ALMA Common Software as a Basis for a Distributed Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffi, Gianni; Chiozzi, Gianluca; Glendenning, Brian

    The Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) is a joint project involving astronomical organizations in Europe, North America and Japan. ALMA will consist of 64 12-m antennas operating in the millimetre and sub-millimetre wavelength range, with baselines of more than 10 km. It will be located at an altitude above 5000 m in the Chilean Atacama desert. The ALMA Computing group is a joint group with staff scattered on 3 continents and is responsible for all the control and data flow software related to ALMA, including tools ranging from support of proposal preparation to archive access of automatically created images. Early in the project it was decided that an ALMA Common Software (ACS) would be developed as a way to provide to all partners involved in the development a common software platform. The original assumption was that some key middleware like communication via CORBA and the use of XML and Java would be part of the project. It was intended from the beginning to develop this software in an incremental way based on releases, so that it would then evolve into an essential embedded part of all ALMA software applications. In this way we would build a basic unity and coherence into a system that will have been developed in a distributed fashion. This paper evaluates our progress after 1.5 year of work, following a few tests and preliminary releases. It analyzes the advantages and difficulties of such an ambitious approach, which creates an interface across all the various control and data flow applications.

  11. Final Report. Center for Scalable Application Development Software

    SciTech Connect

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    2014-10-26

    The Center for Scalable Application Development Software (CScADS) was established as a part- nership between Rice University, Argonne National Laboratory, University of California Berkeley, University of Tennessee – Knoxville, and University of Wisconsin – Madison. CScADS pursued an integrated set of activities with the aim of increasing the productivity of DOE computational scientists by catalyzing the development of systems software, libraries, compilers, and tools for leadership computing platforms. Principal Center activities were workshops to engage the research community in the challenges of leadership computing, research and development of open-source software, and work with computational scientists to help them develop codes for leadership computing platforms. This final report summarizes CScADS activities at Rice University in these areas.

  12. Development of Data Processing Software for NBI Spectroscopic Analysis System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaodan; Hu, Chundong; Sheng, Peng; Zhao, Yuanzhe; Wu, Deyun; Cui, Qinglong

    2015-04-01

    A set of data processing software is presented in this paper for processing NBI spectroscopic data. For better and more scientific managment and querying these data, they are managed uniformly by the NBI data server. The data processing software offers the functions of uploading beam spectral original and analytic data to the data server manually and automatically, querying and downloading all the NBI data, as well as dealing with local LZO data. The set software is composed of a server program and a client program. The server software is programmed in C/C++ under a CentOS development environment. The client software is developed under a VC 6.0 platform, which offers convenient operational human interfaces. The network communications between the server and the client are based on TCP. With the help of this set software, the NBI spectroscopic analysis system realizes the unattended automatic operation, and the clear interface also makes it much more convenient to offer beam intensity distribution data and beam power data to operators for operation decision-making. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11075183), the Chinese Academy of Sciences Knowledge Innovation

  13. A software framework for developing measurement applications under variable requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arpaia, Pasquale; Buzio, Marco; Fiscarelli, Lucio; Inglese, Vitaliano

    2012-11-01

    A framework for easily developing software for measurement and test applications under highly and fast-varying requirements is proposed. The framework allows the software quality, in terms of flexibility, usability, and maintainability, to be maximized. Furthermore, the development effort is reduced and finalized, by relieving the test engineer of development details. The framework can be configured for satisfying a large set of measurement applications in a generic field for an industrial test division, a test laboratory, or a research center. As an experimental case study, the design, the implementation, and the assessment inside the application to a measurement scenario of magnet testing at the European Organization for Nuclear Research is reported.

  14. EPICS: A control system software co-development success story

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, M.; Gurd, D.; Lewis, S.; Thuot, M.

    1993-11-01

    The Experimental Physics and Industrial Control Systems (EPICS) is the result of a software sharing and co-development effort of major importance now underway. The initial two participants, LANL and ANL, have now been joined by three other labs, and an earlier version of the software has been transferred to three commercial firms and is currently undergoing separate development. The reasons for EPICS`s success may be useful to enumerate and explain and the desire and prospects for its continued development are certainly worth examining.

  15. Development of Low-Cost High Efficiency Commercial Ready Advanced Silicon Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Zimbardi, Francesco

    2015-01-30

    As a result of the work within this project manufacturing ready devices were developed using 4 different promising Si material technologies with final efficiencies between 20.1% and 21.2%. The starting efficiencies for the FPACE I project were based on best manufactured p-type and n-type cells at the start of the project in 2011. Target efficiencies proposed for the project were 21% for p-type CZ, 20% for p-type cast Si, 21% for n-type and 20% for epi. All Target efficiencies were met or exceeded by the end of the project in 2014. The figure below list displays the 4 highest performing structures for each material with corresponding achieved efficiencies.

  16. Development of a calibrated software reliability model for flight and supporting ground software for avionic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Stella

    1991-01-01

    The object of this project was to develop and calibrate quantitative models for predicting the quality of software. Reliable flight and supporting ground software is a highly important factor in the successful operation of the space shuttle program. The models used in the present study consisted of SMERFS (Statistical Modeling and Estimation of Reliability Functions for Software). There are ten models in SMERFS. For a first run, the results obtained in modeling the cumulative number of failures versus execution time showed fairly good results for our data. Plots of cumulative software failures versus calendar weeks were made and the model results were compared with the historical data on the same graph. If the model agrees with actual historical behavior for a set of data then there is confidence in future predictions for this data. Considering the quality of the data, the models have given some significant results, even at this early stage. With better care in data collection, data analysis, recording of the fixing of failures and CPU execution times, the models should prove extremely helpful in making predictions regarding the future pattern of failures, including an estimate of the number of errors remaining in the software and the additional testing time required for the software quality to reach acceptable levels. It appears that there is no one 'best' model for all cases. It is for this reason that the aim of this project was to test several models. One of the recommendations resulting from this study is that great care must be taken in the collection of data. When using a model, the data should satisfy the model assumptions.

  17. Rapid Development of Interferometric Software Using MIRIAD and Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Peter K. G.; Law, Casey J.; Bower, Geoffrey C.

    2012-06-01

    State-of-the-art radio interferometers are complex systems that unleash torrents of data. If current and planned instruments are to routinely meet their performance goals, standard analysis techniques must be significantly improved, becoming simultaneously more sophisticated, more automatic, and more scalable. While there is no shortage of ideas for next-generation algorithms, there is a shortage of development resources, so it is vital that programming environments for interferometric software allow for rapid, flexible development. We present an open-source software package, miriad-python, that provides access to the MIRIAD interferometric reduction system in the Python programming language. The modular design of MIRIAD and the high productivity and accessibility of Python provide an excellent foundation for rapid development of interferometric software. Several other projects with similar goals exist, and we describe them and compare miriad-python with them in detail. Along with an overview of the package design, we present sample code and applications, including the detection of millisecond astrophysical transients, determination and application of nonstandard calibration parameters, interactive data visualization, and a reduction pipeline using a directed acyclic graph dependency model analogous to that of the traditional UNIX tool make. The key aspects of the miriad-python software project are documented. We find that miriad-python provides an extremely effective environment for prototyping new interferometric software, though certain existing packages provide far more infrastructure for some applications. While equivalent software written in compiled languages can be much faster than Python, there are many situations in which execution time is profitably exchanged for speed of development, code readability, accessibility to nonexpert programmers, quick interlinking with foreign software packages, and other virtues of the Python language.

  18. Individual Readiness for Organizational Change and Its Implications for Human Resource and Organization Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Myungweon; Ruona, Wendy E. A.

    2011-01-01

    Individual readiness for organizational change reflects the concept of "unfreezing" proposed by Lewin (1947/1997b) and is critical to successful change implementation. Understanding the conditions conducive to individual readiness for organizational change, instead of the more traditional focus on resistance to change, can be useful for designing…

  19. Advanced program development management software system. Software description and user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to apply emerging techniques and tools from the computer science discipline of paperless management to the activities of the Space Transportation and Exploration Office (PT01) in Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Program Development, thereby enhancing the productivity of the workforce, the quality of the data products, and the collection, dissemination, and storage of information. The approach used to accomplish the objectives emphasized the utilization of finished form (off-the-shelf) software products to the greatest extent possible without impacting the performance of the end product, to pursue developments when necessary in the rapid prototyping environment to provide a mechanism for frequent feedback from the users, and to provide a full range of user support functions during the development process to promote testing of the software.

  20. Evaluating software development by analysis of changes - Some data from the Software Engineering Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, D. M.; Basili, V. R.

    1985-01-01

    Basili and Weiss (1984) have discussed an approach for obtaining valid data which may be used to evaluate software development methodologies in a production environment. The methodology consists of five elements, including the identification of goals, the determination of questions of interest from the goals, the development of a data collection form, the development of data collection procedures, and the validation and analysis of the data. The current investigation is concerned with the presentation of the results from such an evaluation. The presented data were collected as part of studies reported by Basili et al. (1977). These studies had been conducted by NASA's Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL). Attention is given to an overview of the SEL, the application of the considered methodology, the results of a data analysis, and conclusions about the SEL environment.

  1. Designing Better Camels: Developing Effective Documentation for Computer Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacher, Candace M.

    This guide to the development of effective documentation for users of computer software begins by identifying five types of documentation, i.e., training manuals, user guides, tutorials, on-screen help comments, and troubleshooting manuals. Six steps in the development process are then outlined and briefly described: (1) planning and preparation;…

  2. Prospective Teachers' Experiences in Developing Lessons with Dynamic Mathematics Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haciomeroglu, Erhan Selcuk; Bu, Lingguo; Schoen, Robert C.; Hohenwarter, Markus

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to examine the development of prospective secondary mathematics teachers' Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge as they worked individually and in small groups to develop and present lessons with dynamic mathematics software. In a three-semester long study, data were collected from 68 prospective secondary mathematics…

  3. Accelerating NASA GN&C Flight Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamblyn, Scott; Henry, Joel; Rapp, John

    2010-01-01

    When the guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) system for the Orion crew vehicle undergoes Critical Design Review (CDR), more than 90% of the flight software will already be developed - a first for NASA on a project of this scope and complexity. This achievement is due in large part to a new development approach using Model-Based Design.

  4. Courseware Development Center: Electronic Sharing of Instructional Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusk, Mike D.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the Courseware Development Center at Tulsa Junior College (Oklahoma), which serves as a network hub for statewide sharing of locally developed audiovisual and microcomputer software. Considers the center's three major components: an electronic bulletin board, a courseware database, and a newsletter for instructional designers. (DMM)

  5. Using Web Metric Software to Drive: Mobile Website Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tidal, Junior

    2011-01-01

    Many libraries have developed mobile versions of their websites. In order to understand their users, web developers have conducted both usability tests and focus groups, yet analytical software and web server logs can also be used to better understand users. Using data collected from these tools, the Ursula C. Schwerin Library has made informed…

  6. A Study of Collaborative Software Development Using Groupware Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defranco-Tommarello, Joanna; Deek, Fadi P.

    2005-01-01

    The experimental results of a collaborative problem solving and program development model that takes into consideration the cognitive and social activities that occur during software development is presented in this paper. This collaborative model is based on the Dual Common Model that focuses on individual cognitive aspects of problem solving and…

  7. The 2GCHAS: A high productivity software development environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babb, Larry

    1986-01-01

    To the user, the most visible feature of the Transportable Applications Executive (TAE) is its very powerful user interface. To the programmer, TAE's user interface, proc concept, standardized interface definitions, and hierarchy search provide a set of tools for rapidly prototyping or developing production software. The 2GCHAS (Second Generation Comprehensive Helicopter Analysis System) project has extended and enhanced these mechanisms, creating a powerful and high productivity programming environment where the 2GCHAS development environment is 2GCHAS itself and where a sustained rate for certified, documented, and tested software above 30 delivered source instructions per programmer day has been achieved. The 2GCHAS environment is not limited to helicopter analysis, but is applicable to other disciplines where software development is important.

  8. WILDFIRE IGNITION RESISTANCE ESTIMATOR WIZARD SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.; Robinson, C.; Gupta, N.; Werth, D.

    2012-10-10

    This report describes the development of a software tool, entitled “WildFire Ignition Resistance Estimator Wizard” (WildFIRE Wizard, Version 2.10). This software was developed within the Wildfire Ignition Resistant Home Design (WIRHD) program, sponsored by the U. S. Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate, Infrastructure Protection & Disaster Management Division. WildFIRE Wizard is a tool that enables homeowners to take preventive actions that will reduce their home’s vulnerability to wildfire ignition sources (i.e., embers, radiant heat, and direct flame impingement) well in advance of a wildfire event. This report describes the development of the software, its operation, its technical basis and calculations, and steps taken to verify its performance.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF EMITTANCE ANALYSIS SOFTWARE FOR ION BEAM CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, M. J.; Liu, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Transverse beam emittance is a crucial property of charged particle beams that describes their angular and spatial spread. It is a fi gure of merit frequently used to determine the quality of ion beams, the compatibility of an ion beam with a given beam transport system, and the ability to suppress neighboring isotopes at on-line mass separator facilities. Generally a high quality beam is characterized by a small emittance. In order to determine and improve the quality of ion beams used at the Holifi eld Radioactive Ion beam Facility (HRIBF) for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics research, the emittances of the ion beams are measured at the off-line Ion Source Test Facilities. In this project, emittance analysis software was developed to perform various data processing tasks for noise reduction, to evaluate root-mean-square emittance, Twiss parameters, and area emittance of different beam fractions. The software also provides 2D and 3D graphical views of the emittance data, beam profi les, emittance contours, and RMS. Noise exclusion is essential for accurate determination of beam emittance values. A Self-Consistent, Unbiased Elliptical Exclusion (SCUBEEx) method is employed. Numerical data analysis techniques such as interpolation and nonlinear fi tting are also incorporated into the software. The software will provide a simplifi ed, fast tool for comprehensive emittance analysis. The main functions of the software package have been completed. In preliminary tests with experimental emittance data, the analysis results using the software were shown to be accurate.

  10. Object oriented development of engineering software using CLIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, C. John

    1991-01-01

    Engineering applications involve numeric complexity and manipulations of a large amount of data. Traditionally, numeric computation has been the concern in developing an engineering software. As engineering application software became larger and more complex, management of resources such as data, rather than the numeric complexity, has become the major software design problem. Object oriented design and implementation methodologies can improve the reliability, flexibility, and maintainability of the resulting software; however, some tasks are better solved with the traditional procedural paradigm. The C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS), with deffunction and defgeneric constructs, supports the procedural paradigm. The natural blending of object oriented and procedural paradigms has been cited as the reason for the popularity of the C++ language. The CLIPS Object Oriented Language's (COOL) object oriented features are more versatile than C++'s. A software design methodology based on object oriented and procedural approaches appropriate for engineering software, and to be implemented in CLIPS was outlined. A method for sensor placement for Space Station Freedom is being implemented in COOL as a sample problem.

  11. Mechatronic objects for real-time control software development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, Patrick F.; Horner, Jeremy W.

    1998-12-01

    The design of real-time control software for a mechatronic system must be effectively integrated with the system hardware in order to achieve useful qualitative benefits beyond basic functionality. The sought-after benefits include: rapid development, flexibility, maintainability, extensively, and reusability. In this work we focus upon the interface between the device drivers and the control software with the aim to properly design this interface to best realize the aforementioned benefits. The results of this fundamental research include the development of an easily manageable set of four C++ object classes following an object-oriented approach to software design. These Universal Mechatronic Objects (UMOs) are applicable to a wide spectrum of actuators including dc motors, stepper motors, and solenoids; and sensors including pressure sensors, microswitches, and encoders. UMOs encapsulate the interface between the electrical subsystem and the control subsystem, providing the control software developer with a powerful abstraction that facilitates the development of hardware-independent control code and providing the electrical subsystem developer with an effective abstraction that facilitates the development of application-independent device drivers. Objects which are intuitively related to hardware components of the mechatronic system can be declared using the UMOs early in the system development process to facilitate the rapid concurrent development of both the electrical and the control subsystems. Our UMOs were developed as part of a project to implement a real-time control system for a z-theta robotic manipulator. The z- theta manipulator is one component of the Minifactory project in the Microdynamic Systems Laboratory at Carnegie Mellon University. The goals of this agile assembly project include the reduction of factory setup and changeover times, plug-and-play type modularity, and the reuse of its components. The application of UMOs to the manipulator

  12. Development of output user interface software to support analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wahanani, Nursinta Adi Natsir, Khairina Hartini, Entin

    2014-09-30

    Data processing software packages such as VSOP and MCNPX are softwares that has been scientifically proven and complete. The result of VSOP and MCNPX are huge and complex text files. In the analyze process, user need additional processing like Microsoft Excel to show informative result. This research develop an user interface software for output of VSOP and MCNPX. VSOP program output is used to support neutronic analysis and MCNPX program output is used to support burn-up analysis. Software development using iterative development methods which allow for revision and addition of features according to user needs. Processing time with this software 500 times faster than with conventional methods using Microsoft Excel. PYTHON is used as a programming language, because Python is available for all major operating systems: Windows, Linux/Unix, OS/2, Mac, Amiga, among others. Values that support neutronic analysis are k-eff, burn-up and mass Pu{sup 239} and Pu{sup 241}. Burn-up analysis used the mass inventory values of actinide (Thorium, Plutonium, Neptunium and Uranium). Values are visualized in graphical shape to support analysis.

  13. Development of output user interface software to support analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahanani, Nursinta Adi; Natsir, Khairina; Hartini, Entin

    2014-09-01

    Data processing software packages such as VSOP and MCNPX are softwares that has been scientifically proven and complete. The result of VSOP and MCNPX are huge and complex text files. In the analyze process, user need additional processing like Microsoft Excel to show informative result. This research develop an user interface software for output of VSOP and MCNPX. VSOP program output is used to support neutronic analysis and MCNPX program output is used to support burn-up analysis. Software development using iterative development methods which allow for revision and addition of features according to user needs. Processing time with this software 500 times faster than with conventional methods using Microsoft Excel. PYTHON is used as a programming language, because Python is available for all major operating systems: Windows, Linux/Unix, OS/2, Mac, Amiga, among others. Values that support neutronic analysis are k-eff, burn-up and mass Pu239 and Pu241. Burn-up analysis used the mass inventory values of actinide (Thorium, Plutonium, Neptunium and Uranium). Values are visualized in graphical shape to support analysis.

  14. Practical methods to improve the development of computational software

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, A. G.; Harding, D. W.; Deinert, M. R.

    2013-07-01

    The use of computation has become ubiquitous in science and engineering. As the complexity of computer codes has increased, so has the need for robust methods to minimize errors. Past work has show that the number of functional errors is related the number of commands that a code executes. Since the late 1960's, major participants in the field of computation have encouraged the development of best practices for programming to help reduce coder induced error, and this has lead to the emergence of 'software engineering' as a field of study. Best practices for coding and software production have now evolved and become common in the development of commercial software. These same techniques, however, are largely absent from the development of computational codes by research groups. Many of the best practice techniques from the professional software community would be easy for research groups in nuclear science and engineering to adopt. This paper outlines the history of software engineering, as well as issues in modern scientific computation, and recommends practices that should be adopted by individual scientific programmers and university research groups. (authors)

  15. Wellbore inertial navigation system (WINS) software development and test results

    SciTech Connect

    Wardlaw, R. Jr.

    1982-09-01

    The structure and operation of the real-time software developed for the Wellbore Inertial Navigation System (WINS) application are described. The procedure and results of a field test held in a 7000-ft well in the Nevada Test Site are discussed. Calibration and instrumentation error compensation are outlined, as are design improvement areas requiring further test and development. Notes on Kalman filtering and complete program listings of the real-time software are included in the Appendices. Reference is made to a companion document which describes the downhole instrumentation package.

  16. Solar Constant (SOLCON) Experiment: Ground Support Equipment (GSE) software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, M. Alan; Thomas, Susan; Wilson, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The Solar Constant (SOLCON) Experiment, the objective of which is to determine the solar constant value and its variability, is scheduled for launch as part of the Space Shuttle/Atmospheric Laboratory for Application and Science (ATLAS) spacelab mission. The Ground Support Equipment (GSE) software was developed to monitor and analyze the SOLCON telemetry data during flight and to test the instrument on the ground. The design and development of the GSE software are discussed. The SOLCON instrument was tested during Davos International Solar Intercomparison, 1989 and the SOLCON data collected during the tests are analyzed to study the behavior of the instrument.

  17. Software development to support sensor control of robot arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silas, F. R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The development of software for a Digital Equipment Corporation MINC-23 Laboratory Computer to provide functions of a workcell host computer for Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) robotic welding is documented. Routines were written to transfer robot programs between the MINC and an Advanced Robotic Cyro 750 welding robot. Other routines provide advanced program editing features while additional software allows communicatin with a remote computer aided design system. Access to special robot functions were provided to allow advanced control of weld seam tracking and process control for future development programs.

  18. Application of software to development of reactor-safety codes

    SciTech Connect

    Wilburn, N.P.; Niccoli, L.G.

    1980-09-01

    Over the past two-and-a-half decades, the application of new techniques has reduced hardware cost for digital computer systems and increased computational speed by several orders of magnitude. A corresponding cost reduction in business and scientific software development has not occurred. The same situation is seen for software developed to model the thermohydraulic behavior of nuclear systems under hypothetical accident situations. For all cases this is particularly noted when costs over the total software life cycle are considered. A solution to this dilemma for reactor safety code systems has been demonstrated by applying the software engineering techniques which have been developed over the course of the last few years in the aerospace and business communities. These techniques have been applied recently with a great deal of success in four major projects at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL): 1) a rewrite of a major safety code (MELT); 2) development of a new code system (CONACS) for description of the response of LMFBR containment to hypothetical accidents, and 3) development of two new modules for reactor safety analysis.

  19. Development of software for human muscle force estimation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Gang; Qian, Li-wei; Wei, Gao-feng; Wang, Hong-sheng; Wang, Cheng-tao

    2012-01-01

    Muscle force estimation (MFE) has become more and more important in exploring principles of pathological movement, studying functions of artificial muscles, making surgery plan for artificial joint replacement, improving the biomechanical effects of treatments and so on. At present, existing software are complex for professionals, so we have developed a new software named as concise MFE (CMFE). CMFE which provides us a platform to analyse muscle force in various actions includes two MFE methods (static optimisation method and electromyographic-based method). Common features between these two methods have been found and used to improve CMFE. A case studying the major muscles of lower limb of a healthy subject walking at normal speed has been presented. The results are well explained from the effect of the motion produced by muscles during movement. The development of this software can improve the accuracy of the motion simulations and can provide a more extensive and deeper insight in to muscle study. PMID:21607886

  20. Emotional Intelligence and Self-Directed Learning Readiness among College Students Participating in a Leadership Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radnitzer, Karl David

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate possible relationships between self-directed learning readiness and emotional intelligence in a leadership development program and if self-directed learning leads to greater self-directed learning capabilities. Prior research has examined self-directed learning and emotional intelligence but never have…

  1. Assessing Learners' Perceived Readiness for Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL): A Study on Initial Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiong, Yao; So, Hyo-Jeong; Toh, Yancy

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to develop an instrument that assesses university students' perceived readiness for computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL). Assessment in CSCL research had predominantly focused on measuring "after-collaboration" outcomes and "during-collaboration" behaviors while…

  2. Development of a ginger-based appetizer in the form of ready-to-reconstitute mix and ready-to-drink beverage.

    PubMed

    Wadikar, D D; Madhura, C V; Premavalli, K S

    2011-06-01

    Ginger is well known as gastric stimulant and the curd is consumed for its probiotic properties. Based on these two functional ingredients, an appetizer drink mix has been developed and optimized for its ingredient composition with the help of response surface methodology. The appetizer mix is cold water reconstitutable and provides 77 kCal per serving of 100 ml. The dry appetizer mix was modified by replacing the curd powder with fresh curd and was processed at 95 °C for 30 sec and aseptically packed as a ready-to-drink beverage. The product has a shelf-life of 6 months at ambient conditions in both forms. The product was very well accepted during field trials at army units. PMID:21401406

  3. Custom software development for use in a clinical laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Sinard, John H.; Gershkovich, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In-house software development for use in a clinical laboratory is a controversial issue. Many of the objections raised are based on outdated software development practices, an exaggeration of the risks involved, and an underestimation of the benefits that can be realized. Buy versus build analyses typically do not consider total costs of ownership, and unfortunately decisions are often made by people who are not directly affected by the workflow obstacles or benefits that result from those decisions. We have been developing custom software for clinical use for over a decade, and this article presents our perspective on this practice. A complete analysis of the decision to develop or purchase must ultimately examine how the end result will mesh with the departmental workflow, and custom-developed solutions typically can have the greater positive impact on efficiency and productivity, substantially altering the decision balance sheet. Involving the end-users in preparation of the functional specifications is crucial to the success of the process. A large development team is not needed, and even a single programmer can develop significant solutions. Many of the risks associated with custom development can be mitigated by a well-structured development process, use of open-source tools, and embracing an agile development philosophy. In-house solutions have the significant advantage of being adaptable to changing departmental needs, contributing to efficient and higher quality patient care. PMID:23372985

  4. Software development tools for the CDF MX scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Stuermer, W.; Turner, K.; Littleton-Sestini, S.

    1991-11-01

    This paper discuses the design of the high level assembler and diagnostic control program developed for the MX, a high speed, custom designed computer used in the CDF data acquisition system at Fermilab. These programs provide a friendly productive environment for the development of software on the MX. Details of their implementation and special features, and some of the lessons learned during their development are included.

  5. Preservice elementary teachers' development of PCK-readiness about learners' science ideas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithey, Julie Faye

    Preservice elementary teachers face many daunting challenges as they learn to teach science. Teacher educators try to design methods courses that help them meet these challenges and prepare them for the experiences they will have as student teachers and new teachers. Because they often do not spend much time with students, it is a general assumption that preservice teachers are unable to develop pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) with respect to their learners. Rather than focus on what they are unable to do, however, this dissertation explores how a methods course might foster consideration of learners' science ideas, an important component of PCK. Perhaps preservice teachers can learn to develop PCK-readiness, thus putting them in a good position to develop rich usable PCK once they have more experience in the classroom. This study follows a class of preservice teachers through an elementary science methods course. It describes the trajectories of eight focus preservice teachers' thinking about their learners. It also explores how the entire class made sense of a set of activities designed to foster consideration of learners' ideas. Results indicate that with scaffolds, preservice teachers are able to think in complex ways about their learners' ideas, including considering how to use those ideas in instruction. The trajectories of the preservice teachers varied but generally showed growth in thinking about learners' ideas, although some were focused on or influenced by particular aspects while others made more consistent growth in several areas. Generally, the course activities supported thinking about how to deal with learners' ideas but not the characteristics of those ideas. This study contributes to the field by providing a description of how a range of preservice teachers engaged with the activities in the methods course. In addition, it describes the kind of influence that a methods course might have on preservice teachers' development of a crucial aspect

  6. Improving Reuse in Software Development for the Life Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannotti, Nicholas V.

    2013-01-01

    The last several years have seen unprecedented advancements in the application of technology to the life sciences, particularly in the area of data generation. Novel scientific insights are now often driven primarily by software development supporting new multidisciplinary and increasingly multifaceted data analysis. However, despite the…

  7. A Software Development Approach for Computer Assisted Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushion, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Over the last 5 years we have developed, produced, tested, and evaluated an authoring software package to produce web-based, interactive, audio-enhanced language-learning material. That authoring package has been used to produce language-learning material in French, Spanish, German, Arabic, and Tamil. We are currently working on increasing…

  8. Using "Facebook" to Improve Communication in Undergraduate Software Development Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlton, Terence; Devlin, Marie; Drummond, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    As part of the CETL ALiC initiative (Centre of Excellence in Teaching and Learning: Active Learning in Computing), undergraduate computing science students at Newcastle and Durham universities participated in a cross-site team software development project. To ensure we offer adequate resources to support this collaboration, we conducted an…

  9. Agile Software Development Methods: A Comparative Review1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamsson, Pekka; Oza, Nilay; Siponen, Mikko T.

    Although agile software development methods have caught the attention of software engineers and researchers worldwide, scientific research still remains quite scarce. The aim of this study is to order and make sense of the different agile approaches that have been proposed. This comparative review is performed from the standpoint of using the following features as the analytical perspectives: project management support, life-cycle coverage, type of practical guidance, adaptability in actual use, type of research objectives and existence of empirical evidence. The results show that agile software development methods cover, without offering any rationale, different phases of the software development life-cycle and that most of these methods fail to provide adequate project management support. Moreover, quite a few methods continue to offer little concrete guidance on how to use their solutions or how to adapt them in different development situations. Empirical evidence after ten years of application remains quite limited. Based on the results, new directions on agile methods are outlined.

  10. GLOED - GLOBAL EMISSIONS DATABASE SOFTWARE DEVELOPED BY EPA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes an EPA-developed, powerful software package called the Global Emissions Database (GloED). loED is a user-friendly, menu-driven tool for storage and retrieval of emissions factors and activity data on a country-specific basis. ata can be selected from databases...

  11. Open Crowdsourcing: Leveraging Community Software Developers for IT Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phair, Derek

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative exploratory single-case study was designed to examine and understand the use of volunteer community participants as software developers and other project related roles, such as testers, in completing a web-based application project by a non-profit organization. This study analyzed the strategic decision to engage crowd…

  12. Development of the Law of Computer Software Protection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimtz, Robert O.

    1979-01-01

    Traces the history of the development of the law dealing with the protection of computer software. The available forms of protection are the patent, copyright, and trade secret laws. Available from Business Manager, P. O. Box 2600, Arlington, Virginia 22202; sc $1.25. (Author/IRT)

  13. QFD Application to a Software - Intensive System Development Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, T. L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Quality Function Deployment (QFD), adapted to requirements engineering for a software-intensive system development project, and sysnthesizes the lessons learned from the application of QFD to the Network Control System (NCS) pre-project of the Deep Space Network.

  14. Development of data acquisition and analysis software for multichannel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y.

    1988-06-01

    This report describes the development of data acquisition and analysis software for Apple Macintosh computers, capable of controlling two multichannel detectors. With the help of outstanding graphics capabilities, easy-to-use user interface, and several other built-in convenience features, this application has enhanced the productivity and the efficiency of data analysis. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Advanced software development workstation. OOPSLA 1992 Conference. Trip report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izygon, Michel E.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the main trends observed at the Object Oriented Programming Systems, Languages, and Applications Conference held in Vancouver, British Columbia. This conference is the main object-oriented event that allows us to assess the dynamism of the technology and to meet the main actors of the field. It is an invaluable source of information for the advanced software development project.

  16. Institutional Logics, Indie Software Developers and Platform Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiu, Yixin

    2013-01-01

    This two-essay dissertation aims to study institutional logics in the context of Apple's independent third-party software developers. In essay 1, I investigate the embedded agency aspect of the institutional logics theory. It builds on the premise that logics constrain preferences, interests and behaviors of individuals and organizations, thereby…

  17. The Messiness of Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Pamela Jane

    2010-01-01

    School readiness is a quality that adults believe exists within the child, but it actually is an artifact of age-graded schools. Even in a single grade, there will be a one-year spread in ages and, therefore, in development. Instead of sorting children into those who are ready to learn and those who are not, schools should provide opportunities…

  18. Developing capacitive equipment on-line monitoring intelligence software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weicong; Yang, Lichun

    2011-12-01

    In order to improve the safety and reliability of capacitive equipment developed online monitoring system of capacitive equipment dielectric loss. Introduce the structure and function of the software, based on the B/S skeleton, uses the modular design, improve the readability and scalability. Detail the design of communication module, parameter setting module, data acquisition and processing module, the user management module, database systems, etc. The entire process is given. By testing the monitoring software work is stable, reliable, long-term continuous and effective monitoring capacitive equipment various insulation data, can satisfy the requirements on site application.

  19. Developing capacitive equipment on-line monitoring intelligence software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weicong; Yang, Lichun

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the safety and reliability of capacitive equipment developed online monitoring system of capacitive equipment dielectric loss. Introduce the structure and function of the software, based on the B/S skeleton, uses the modular design, improve the readability and scalability. Detail the design of communication module, parameter setting module, data acquisition and processing module, the user management module, database systems, etc. The entire process is given. By testing the monitoring software work is stable, reliable, long-term continuous and effective monitoring capacitive equipment various insulation data, can satisfy the requirements on site application.

  20. Developing an Open Source Option for NASA Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Patrick J.; Parks, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    We present arguments in favor of developing an Open Source option for NASA software; in particular we discuss how Open Source is compatible with NASA's mission. We compare and contrast several of the leading Open Source licenses, and propose one - the Mozilla license - for use by NASA. We also address some of the related issues for NASA with respect to Open Source. In particular, we discuss some of the elements in the External Release of NASA Software document (NPG 2210.1A) that will likely have to be changed in order to make Open Source a reality withm the agency.

  1. An Introduction to Flight Software Development: FSW Today, FSW 2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouvela, John

    2004-01-01

    Experience and knowledge gained from ongoing maintenance of Space Shuttle Flight Software and new development projects including Cockpit Avionics Upgrade are applied to projected needs of the National Space Exploration Vision through Spiral 2. Lessons learned from these current activities are applied to create a sustainable, reliable model for development of critical software to support Project Constellation. This presentation introduces the technologies, methodologies, and infrastructure needed to produce and sustain high quality software. It will propose what is needed to support a Vision for Space Exploration that places demands on the innovation and productivity needed to support future space exploration. The technologies in use today within FSW development include tools that provide requirements tracking, integrated change management, modeling and simulation software. Specific challenges that have been met include the introduction and integration of Commercial Off the Shelf (COTS) Real Time Operating System for critical functions. Though technology prediction has proved to be imprecise, Project Constellation requirements will need continued integration of new technology with evolving methodologies and changing project infrastructure. Targets for continued technology investment are integrated health monitoring and management, self healing software, standard payload interfaces, autonomous operation, and improvements in training. Emulation of the target hardware will also allow significant streamlining of development and testing. The methodologies in use today for FSW development are object oriented UML design, iterative development using independent components, as well as rapid prototyping . In addition, Lean Six Sigma and CMMI play a critical role in the quality and efficiency of the workforce processes. Over the next six years, we expect these methodologies to merge with other improvements into a consolidated office culture with all processes being guided by

  2. Lab-On-a-Chip Application Development (LOCAD): Bridging Technology Readiness for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearing, Scott F.; Jenkins, Andy

    2004-01-01

    At Marshall Space Flight Center we have established a capability to investigate the use of microfluidics for space flight. The Lab-On-a-Chip Application Development (LOCAD) team has created a program for advancing Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) of 1 and 2 to TRL 6 and 7, quickly and economically for Lab-On-a-Chip (LOC) applications. Scientists and engineers can utilize LOCAD'S process to efficiently learn about microfluidics and determine if microfluidics is applicable to their needs. Once the applicability has been determined, LOCAD can then perform tests to develop the new fluidic protocols which are different from macro-scale chemical reaction protocols. With this information new micro-fluidic devices can be created and tested. Currently, LOCAD is focused on using microfluidics for both Environmental Monitoring & Control, and Medical Systems. Eventually, handheld portable units utilizing LOC technology will perform rapid tests to determine water quality, and microbial contamination levels. Since LOC technology is drastically reduced in physical size, it thereby reduces power, weight, volume, and sample requirements, a big advantage considering the resource constraints associated with spaceflight. Another one of LOCAD's current activities is the development of a microfluidic system to aid in the search for life on Mars.

  3. [Development of a software for 3D virtual phantom design].

    PubMed

    Zou, Lian; Xie, Zhao; Wu, Qi

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we present a 3D virtual phantom design software, which was developed based on object-oriented programming methodology and dedicated to medical physics research. This software was named Magical Phan tom (MPhantom), which is composed of 3D visual builder module and virtual CT scanner. The users can conveniently construct any complex 3D phantom, and then export the phantom as DICOM 3.0 CT images. MPhantom is a user-friendly and powerful software for 3D phantom configuration, and has passed the real scene's application test. MPhantom will accelerate the Monte Carlo simulation for dose calculation in radiation therapy and X ray imaging reconstruction algorithm research. PMID:24804488

  4. Supporting Development of Satellite's Guidance Navigation and Control Software: A Product Line Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McComas, David; Stark, Michael; Leake, Stephen; White, Michael; Morisio, Maurizio; Travassos, Guilherme H.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Flight Software Branch (FSB) is developing a Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) Flight Software (FSW) product line. The demand for increasingly more complex flight software in less time while maintaining the same level of quality has motivated us to look for better FSW development strategies. The GNC FSW product line has been planned to address the core GNC FSW functionality very similar on many recent low/near Earth missions in the last ten years. Unfortunately these missions have not accomplished significant drops in development cost since a systematic approach towards reuse has not been adopted. In addition, new demands are continually being placed upon the FSW which means the FSB must become more adept at providing GNC FSW functionality's core so it can accommodate additional requirements. These domain features together with engineering concepts are influencing the specification, description and evaluation of FSW product line. Domain engineering is the foundation for emerging product line software development approaches. A product line is 'A family of products designed to take advantage of their common aspects and predicted variabilities'. In our product line approach, domain engineering includes the engineering activities needed to produce reusable artifacts for a domain. Application engineering refers to developing an application in the domain starting from reusable artifacts. The focus of this paper is regarding the software process, lessons learned and on how the GNC FSW product line manages variability. Existing domain engineering approaches do not enforce any specific notation for domain analysis or commonality and variability analysis. Usually, natural language text is the preferred tool. The advantage is the flexibility and adapt ability of natural language. However, one has to be ready to accept also its well-known drawbacks, such as ambiguity, inconsistency, and contradictions. While most domain analysis

  5. COSTMODL - AN AUTOMATED SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT COST ESTIMATION TOOL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, G. B.

    1994-01-01

    The cost of developing computer software consumes an increasing portion of many organizations' budgets. As this trend continues, the capability to estimate the effort and schedule required to develop a candidate software product becomes increasingly important. COSTMODL is an automated software development estimation tool which fulfills this need. Assimilating COSTMODL to any organization's particular environment can yield significant reduction in the risk of cost overruns and failed projects. This user-customization capability is unmatched by any other available estimation tool. COSTMODL accepts a description of a software product to be developed and computes estimates of the effort required to produce it, the calendar schedule required, and the distribution of effort and staffing as a function of the defined set of development life-cycle phases. This is accomplished by the five cost estimation algorithms incorporated into COSTMODL: the NASA-developed KISS model; the Basic, Intermediate, and Ada COCOMO models; and the Incremental Development model. This choice affords the user the ability to handle project complexities ranging from small, relatively simple projects to very large projects. Unique to COSTMODL is the ability to redefine the life-cycle phases of development and the capability to display a graphic representation of the optimum organizational structure required to develop the subject project, along with required staffing levels and skills. The program is menu-driven and mouse sensitive with an extensive context-sensitive help system that makes it possible for a new user to easily install and operate the program and to learn the fundamentals of cost estimation without having prior training or separate documentation. The implementation of these functions, along with the customization feature, into one program makes COSTMODL unique within the industry. COSTMODL was written for IBM PC compatibles, and it requires Turbo Pascal 5.0 or later and Turbo

  6. Software metrics: The quantitative impact of four factors on work rates experienced during software development. [reliability engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffney, J. E., Jr.; Judge, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    A model of a software development process is described. The software development process is seen to consist of a sequence of activities, such as 'program design' and 'module development' (or coding). A manpower estimate is made by multiplying code size by the rates (man months per thousand lines of code) for each of the activities relevant to the particular case of interest and summing up the results. The effect of four objectively determinable factors (organization, software product type, computer type, and code type) on productivity values for each of nine principal software development activities was assessed. Four factors were identified which account for 39% of the observed productivity variation.

  7. Ground Systems Development Environment (GSDE) software configuration management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, Victor E.; Long, D.; Hartenstein, Ray; Perez-Davila, Alfredo

    1992-01-01

    This report presents a review of the software configuration management (CM) plans developed for the Space Station Training Facility (SSTF) and the Space Station Control Center. The scope of the CM assessed in this report is the Systems Integration and Testing Phase of the Ground Systems development life cycle. This is the period following coding and unit test and preceding delivery to operational use. This report is one of a series from a study of the interfaces among the Ground Systems Development Environment (GSDE), the development systems for the SSTF and the SSCC, and the target systems for SSCC and SSTF. This is the last report in the series. The focus of this report is on the CM plans developed by the contractors for the Mission Systems Contract (MSC) and the Training Systems Contract (TSC). CM requirements are summarized and described in terms of operational software development. The software workflows proposed in the TSC and MSC plans are reviewed in this context, and evaluated against the CM requirements defined in earlier study reports. Recommendations are made to improve the effectiveness of CM while minimizing its impact on the developers.

  8. Integrating HCI Specialists into Open Source Software Development Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedberg, Henrik; Iivari, Netta

    Typical open source software (OSS) development projects are organized around technically talented developers, whose communication is based on technical aspects and source code. Decision-making power is gained through proven competence and activity in the project, and non-technical end-user opinions are too many times neglected. In addition, also human-computer interaction (HCI) specialists have encountered difficulties in trying to participate in OSS projects, because there seems to be no clear authority and responsibility for them. In this paper, based on HCI and OSS literature, we introduce an extended OSS development project organization model that adds a new level of communication and roles for attending human aspects of software. The proposed model makes the existence of HCI specialists visible in the projects, and promotes interaction between developers and the HCI specialists in the course of a project.

  9. Selecting a software development methodology. [of digital flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The state of the art analytical techniques for the development and verification of digital flight control software is studied and a practical designer oriented development and verification methodology is produced. The effectiveness of the analytic techniques chosen for the development and verification methodology are assessed both technically and financially. Technical assessments analyze the error preventing and detecting capabilities of the chosen technique in all of the pertinent software development phases. Financial assessments describe the cost impact of using the techniques, specifically, the cost of implementing and applying the techniques as well as the relizable cost savings. Both the technical and financial assessment are quantitative where possible. In the case of techniques which cannot be quantitatively assessed, qualitative judgements are expressed about the effectiveness and cost of the techniques. The reasons why quantitative assessments are not possible will be documented.

  10. Software developments for gamma-ray data with high multiplicity

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritsen, T.; Crowell, B.; Ahmad, I.

    1995-08-01

    Software capabilities for angle sort of data from the new powerful gamma detector arrays like Gammasphere and EUROGAM which were developed in preceding years, were enhanced and extended to read new data formats. In addition, we can now sort the data for directional correlation ratios (DCO). This version of the software was exported to a university group. For the analysis of, e.g., the quasi-continuum of gamma-rays it is necessary to angle sort the high multiplicity data and perform a careful background subtraction in order to extract the continuum of gamma rays from the feeding and decay of superdeformed bands. We need to angle sort in order to untangle the parts of the spectra which are of E1 nature from those of quadrupole or of M1/E2 nature. We further developed software running on new fast SUN workstations. We now have two such workstations, each equipped with a stacker and a secondary 8-mm tape drive. We enhanced the software to apply an energy-dependent time gate. We can enhance the events that are in true prompt coincidence, and reject random and signals in the germanium detectors coming from neutrons hitting the detector in coincidence with the gamma-ray burst. By applying energy-dependent time gates, in form of a {open_quotes}reduced time{close_quotes}, we can perform this rejection without the loss of efficiency at low energy. Effort has gone into developing low-level tape reader routines for data from the new EUROGAM array with cluster detectors as well as from the new flexible data format from Gammasphere phase II. In addition, we developed software to read data tapes from the local DAPHNE and MSU data-acquisition systems on the new fast UNIX platforms.

  11. Development and applicability of a ready-to-use PCR system for GMO screening.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Sabrina F; Gatto, Francesco; Angers-Loustau, Alexandre; Petrillo, Mauro; Kreysa, Joachim; Querci, Maddalena

    2016-06-15

    With the growing number of GMOs introduced to the market, testing laboratories have seen their workload increase significantly. Ready-to-use multi-target PCR-based detection systems, such as pre-spotted plates (PSP), reduce analysis time while increasing capacity. This paper describes the development and applicability to GMO testing of a screening strategy involving a PSP and its associated web-based Decision Support System. The screening PSP was developed to detect all GMOs authorized in the EU in one single PCR experiment, through the combination of 16 validated assays. The screening strategy was successfully challenged in a wide inter-laboratory study on real-life food/feed samples. The positive outcome of this study could result in the adoption of a PSP screening strategy across the EU; a step that would increase harmonization and quality of GMO testing in the EU. Furthermore, this system could represent a model for other official control areas where high-throughput DNA-based detection systems are needed. PMID:26868555

  12. Hardware impacts to software development strategies - The history of the development of the Mars Observer Payload Data Subsystem embedded real-time software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elson, Anne B.

    1989-01-01

    Ways in which parallel hardware development and high level requirements changes have influenced Mars Observer Payload Data Subsystem (PDS) flight software development are discussed. Particular attention is given to ways in which the evolving hardware product and changing requirements have led to repeated modification to software requirements, design, code, and test tools and a delay in the closure of corresponding phases of the software development life cycle. Design and implementation problems which were encountered during the PDS software development effort are described.

  13. The Development of a Measure of Readiness to Volunteer as a Peer Support Provider for an Organization Serving Parents of Children with Special Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Robin Lynn

    2015-01-01

    The question of who is ready to serve as a help-giver reflects an unresolved question in the research on parents of children with disabilities. There is little consensus as to whether or not there are regular, predictable phases of adaptation to a child's disability. The purpose of this research was to develop a measure of readiness to be trained…

  14. Sculpting in cyberspace: Parallel processing the development of new software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Rob

    1993-01-01

    Stimulating creativity in problem solving, particularly where software development is involved, is applicable to many disciplines. Metaphorical thinking keeps the problem in focus but in a different light, jarring people out of their mental ruts and sparking fresh insights. It forces the mind to stretch to find patterns between dissimilar concepts, in the hope of discovering unusual ideas in odd associations (Technology Review January 1993, p. 37). With a background in Engineering and Visual Design from MIT, I have for the past 30 years pursued a career as a sculptor of interdisciplinary monumental artworks that bridge the fields of science, engineering and art. Since 1979, I have pioneered the application of computer simulation to solve the complex problems associated with these projects. A recent project for the roof of the Carnegie Science Center in Pittsburgh made particular use of the metaphoric creativity technique described above. The problem-solving process led to the creation of hybrid software combining scientific, architectural and engineering visualization techniques. David Steich, a Doctoral Candidate in Electrical Engineering at Penn State, was commissioned to develop special software that enabled me to create innovative free-form sculpture. This paper explores the process of inventing the software through a detailed analysis of the interaction between an artist and a computer programmer.

  15. Self-service for software development projects and HPC activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husejko, M.; Høimyr, N.; Gonzalez, A.; Koloventzos, G.; Asbury, D.; Trzcinska, A.; Agtzidis, I.; Botrel, G.; Otto, J.

    2014-05-01

    This contribution describes how CERN has implemented several essential tools for agile software development processes, ranging from version control (Git) to issue tracking (Jira) and documentation (Wikis). Running such services in a large organisation like CERN requires many administrative actions both by users and service providers, such as creating software projects, managing access rights, users and groups, and performing tool-specific customisation. Dealing with these requests manually would be a time-consuming task. Another area of our CERN computing services that has required dedicated manual support has been clusters for specific user communities with special needs. Our aim is to move all our services to a layered approach, with server infrastructure running on the internal cloud computing infrastructure at CERN. This contribution illustrates how we plan to optimise the management of our of services by means of an end-user facing platform acting as a portal into all the related services for software projects, inspired by popular portals for open-source developments such as Sourceforge, GitHub and others. Furthermore, the contribution will discuss recent activities with tests and evaluations of High Performance Computing (HPC) applications on different hardware and software stacks, and plans to offer a dynamically scalable HPC service at CERN, based on affordable hardware.

  16. Effects of Home and School Computer Use on School Readiness and Cognitive Development among Head Start Children: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xiaoming; Atkins, Melissa S.; Stanton, Bonita

    2006-01-01

    Data from 122 Head Start children were analyzed to examine the impact of computer use on school readiness and psychomotor skills. Children in the experimental group were given the opportunity to work on a computer for 15-20 minutes per day with their choice of developmentally appropriate educational software, while the control group received a…

  17. A software framework for developing measurement applications under variable requirements.

    PubMed

    Arpaia, Pasquale; Buzio, Marco; Fiscarelli, Lucio; Inglese, Vitaliano

    2012-11-01

    A framework for easily developing software for measurement and test applications under highly and fast-varying requirements is proposed. The framework allows the software quality, in terms of flexibility, usability, and maintainability, to be maximized. Furthermore, the development effort is reduced and finalized, by relieving the test engineer of development details. The framework can be configured for satisfying a large set of measurement applications in a generic field for an industrial test division, a test laboratory, or a research center. As an experimental case study, the design, the implementation, and the assessment inside the application to a measurement scenario of magnet testing at the European Organization for Nuclear Research is reported. PMID:23206094

  18. Wyoming Early Childhood Readiness Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming State Dept. of Education, Cheyenne.

    Because children entering kindergarten come with a variety of preschool and home experiences, and accordingly, with varying levels of school readiness, the Wyoming Early Childhood Readiness Standards have been developed to provide a more consistent definition of school readiness. The goal for the Standards is to provide early childhood educators…

  19. Developing food supplements for moderately malnourished children: lessons learned from ready-to-use therapeutic foods.

    PubMed

    Briend, André; Akomo, Peter; Bahwere, Paluku; De Pee, Saskia; Dibari, Filippo; Golden, Michael H; Manary, Mark; Ryan, Kelsey

    2015-03-01

    Ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTFs) are solid foods that were developed by changing the formulation of the existing liquid diet, F-100, recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for the rapid catch-up phase of the treatment of children suffering from severe acute malnutrition (SAM). The resulting products proved highly effective in promoting weight gain in both severely and moderately wasted children and adults, including those infected with HIV. The formulation of the existing RUTFs, however, has never been optimized to maximize linear growth, vitamin and mineral status, and functional outcomes. The high milk content of RUTFs makes it an expensive product, and using lower quantities of milk seems desirable. However, the formulation of alternative, less expensive but more effective versions of RUTF faces difficult challenges, as there are uncertainties regarding the effect in terms of protein quality, antinutrient content, and flatulence factors that will result from the replacement of current dairy ingredients by less expensive protein-rich ingredients. The formulation of alternative RUTFs will require further research on these aspects, followed by efficacy studies comparing the future RUTFs to the existing formulations. PMID:25902615

  20. Assessing organizational readiness and capacity for developing an integrated child health information system.

    PubMed

    Wild, Ellen L; Fehrenbach, S Nicole

    2004-11-01

    The Tool for Assessment and Planning (the Tool) assists public health teams in designing child health information integration projects from planning through early implementation. The tool is a companion to Integration of Newborn Screening and Genetic Services Systems with Other Maternal and Child Health Systems: A Sourcebook for Planning and Development (the Sourcebook). The Tool and the Sourcebook focus on 9 key elements considered critical to supporting information systems integration. The 9 key elements are: leadership, project governance, project management, stakeholder involvement, organizational and technical strategies, technical support and coordination, financial support and management, policy support, and evaluation. Project teams can use the Tool to assess their organizational readiness and capacity by examining the critical components and strategies required to support success based on the 9 key elements. The questions are intended to promote discussion among project team members and to identify specific action steps. The Tool includes a planning matrix to track those action steps and to identify accountable personnel. Strategically examining the critical elements and documenting next steps increases the likelihood of a successful integration project. PMID:15643358

  1. Model for Simulating a Spiral Software-Development Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizell, Carolyn; Curley, Charles; Nayak, Umanath

    2010-01-01

    A discrete-event simulation model, and a computer program that implements the model, have been developed as means of analyzing a spiral software-development process. This model can be tailored to specific development environments for use by software project managers in making quantitative cases for deciding among different software-development processes, courses of action, and cost estimates. A spiral process can be contrasted with a waterfall process, which is a traditional process that consists of a sequence of activities that include analysis of requirements, design, coding, testing, and support. A spiral process is an iterative process that can be regarded as a repeating modified waterfall process. Each iteration includes assessment of risk, analysis of requirements, design, coding, testing, delivery, and evaluation. A key difference between a spiral and a waterfall process is that a spiral process can accommodate changes in requirements at each iteration, whereas in a waterfall process, requirements are considered to be fixed from the beginning and, therefore, a waterfall process is not flexible enough for some projects, especially those in which requirements are not known at the beginning or may change during development. For a given project, a spiral process may cost more and take more time than does a waterfall process, but may better satisfy a customer's expectations and needs. Models for simulating various waterfall processes have been developed previously, but until now, there have been no models for simulating spiral processes. The present spiral-process-simulating model and the software that implements it were developed by extending a discrete-event simulation process model of the IEEE 12207 Software Development Process, which was built using commercially available software known as the Process Analysis Tradeoff Tool (PATT). Typical inputs to PATT models include industry-average values of product size (expressed as number of lines of code

  2. Development of Software for a Lidar-Altimeter Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, Jacob S.; Trujillo, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    A report describes the development of software for a digital processor that operates in conjunction with a finite-impulse-response (FIR) chip in a spaceborne lidar altimeter. Processing is started by a laser-fire interrupt signal that is repeated at intervals of 25 ms. For the purpose of discriminating between returns from the ground and returns from such things as trees, buildings, and clouds, the software is required to scan digitized lidar-return data in reverse of the acquisition sequence in order to distinguish the last return pulse from within a commanded ground-return range window. The digitized waveform information within this range window is filtered through 6 matched filters, in the hardware electronics, in order to maximize the probability of finding echoes from sloped or rough terrain and minimize the probability of selecting cloud returns. From the data falling past the end of the range window, there is obtained a noise baseline that is used to calculate a threshold value for each filter. The data from each filter is analyzed by a complex weighting scheme and the filter with the greatest weight is selected. A region around the peak of the ground return pulse associated with the selected filter is placed in telemetry, as well as information on its location, height, and other characteristics. The software requires many uplinked parameters as input. Included in the report is a discussion of major software-development problems posed by the design of the FIR chip and the need for the software to complete its process within 20 ms to fit within the overall 25-ms cycle.

  3. Getting Ready: The 2010-2011 Maryland School Readiness Report. Children Entering School Ready to Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report was developed in partnership with Ready At Five. It lays out the critical importance of children starting school fully prepared to succeed in kindergarten. Most importantly, the report shares what everyone has learned from the 2010-2011 Maryland Model for School Readiness (MMSR) data about the school readiness of Maryland's children:…

  4. Modeling and managing risk early in software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briand, Lionel C.; Thomas, William M.; Hetmanski, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    In order to improve the quality of the software development process, we need to be able to build empirical multivariate models based on data collectable early in the software process. These models need to be both useful for prediction and easy to interpret, so that remedial actions may be taken in order to control and optimize the development process. We present an automated modeling technique which can be used as an alternative to regression techniques. We show how it can be used to facilitate the identification and aid the interpretation of the significant trends which characterize 'high risk' components in several Ada systems. Finally, we evaluate the effectiveness of our technique based on a comparison with logistic regression based models.

  5. Application and systems software in Ada: Development experiences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuschill, Jim

    1986-01-01

    In its most basic sense software development involves describing the tasks to be solved, including the given objects and the operations to be performed on those objects. Unfortunately, the way people describe objects and operations usually bears little resemblance to source code in most contemporary computer languages. There are two ways around this problem. One is to allow users to describe what they want the computer to do in everyday, typically imprecise English. The PRODOC methodology and software development environment is based on a second more flexible and possibly even easier to use approach. Rather than hiding program structure, PRODOC represents such structure graphically using visual programming techniques. In addition, the program terminology used in PRODOC may be customized so as to match the way human experts in any given application area naturally describe the relevant data and operations. The PRODOC methodology is described in detail.

  6. Development of Software to Model AXAF-I Image Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Anees; Hawkins, Lamar

    1996-01-01

    This draft final report describes the work performed under the delivery order number 145 from May 1995 through August 1996. The scope of work included a number of software development tasks for the performance modeling of AXAF-I. A number of new capabilities and functions have been added to the GT software, which is the command mode version of the GRAZTRACE software, originally developed by MSFC. A structural data interface has been developed for the EAL (old SPAR) finite element analysis FEA program, which is being used by MSFC Structural Analysis group for the analysis of AXAF-I. This interface utility can read the structural deformation file from the EAL and other finite element analysis programs such as NASTRAN and COSMOS/M, and convert the data to a suitable format that can be used for the deformation ray-tracing to predict the image quality for a distorted mirror. There is a provision in this utility to expand the data from finite element models assuming 180 degrees symmetry. This utility has been used to predict image characteristics for the AXAF-I HRMA, when subjected to gravity effects in the horizontal x-ray ground test configuration. The development of the metrology data processing interface software has also been completed. It can read the HDOS FITS format surface map files, manipulate and filter the metrology data, and produce a deformation file, which can be used by GT for ray tracing for the mirror surface figure errors. This utility has been used to determine the optimum alignment (axial spacing and clocking) for the four pairs of AXAF-I mirrors. Based on this optimized alignment, the geometric images and effective focal lengths for the as built mirrors were predicted to cross check the results obtained by Kodak.

  7. A Software Development Simulation Model of a Spiral Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizell, Carolyn; Malone, Linda

    2007-01-01

    There is a need for simulation models of software development processes other than the waterfall because processes such as spiral development are becoming more and more popular. The use of a spiral process can make the inherently difficult job of cost and schedule estimation even more challenging due to its evolutionary nature, but this allows for a more flexible process that can better meet customers' needs. This paper will present a discrete event simulation model of spiral development that can be used to analyze cost and schedule effects of using such a process in comparison to a waterfall process.

  8. Communication and Organization in Software Development: An Empirical Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seaman, Carolyn B.; Basili, Victor R.

    1996-01-01

    The empirical study described in this paper addresses the issue of communication among members of a software development organization. The independent variables are various attributes of organizational structure. The dependent variable is the effort spent on sharing information which is required by the software development process in use. The research questions upon which the study is based ask whether or not these attributes of organizational structure have an effect on the amount of communication effort expended. In addition, there are a number of blocking variables which have been identified. These are used to account for factors other than organizational structure which may have an effect on communication effort. The study uses both quantitative and qualitative methods for data collection and analysis. These methods include participant observation, structured interviews, and graphical data presentation. The results of this study indicate that several attributes of organizational structure do affect communication effort, but not in a simple, straightforward way. In particular, the distances between communicators in the reporting structure of the organization, as well as in the physical layout of offices, affects how quickly they can share needed information, especially during meetings. These results provide a better understanding of how organizational structure helps or hinders communication in software development.

  9. Developing Software for NASA Missions in the New Millennia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walt; Rash, James; Rouff, Christopher; Hinchey, Mike

    2004-01-01

    NASA is working on new mission concepts for exploration of the solar system. The concepts for these missions include swarms of hundreds of cooperating intelligent spacecraft which will be able to work in teams and gather more data than current single spacecraft missions. These spacecraft will not only have to operate independently for long periods of time on their own and in teams, but will also need to have autonomic properties of self healing, self configuring, self optimizing and self protecting for them to survive in the harsh space environment. Software for these types of missions has never been developed before and represents some of the challenges of software development in the new millennia. The Autonomous Nano Technology Swarm (ANTS) mission is an example of one of the swarm missions NASA is considering. The ANTS mission will use a swarm of one thousand pico-spacecraft that weigh less than five pounds. Using an insect colony analog, ANTS will explore the asteroid belt and catalog the mass, density, morphology, and chemical composition of the asteroids. Due to the size of the spacecraft, each will only carry a single miniaturized science instrument which will require them to cooperate in searching for asteroids that are of scientific interest. This article also discusses the ANTS mission, the properties the spacecraft will need and how that will effect future software development.

  10. Verification and Validation in a Rapid Software Development Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, John R.; Easterbrook, Steve M.

    1997-01-01

    The high cost of software production is driving development organizations to adopt more automated design and analysis methods such as rapid prototyping, computer-aided software engineering (CASE) tools, and high-level code generators. Even developers of safety-critical software system have adopted many of these new methods while striving to achieve high levels Of quality and reliability. While these new methods may enhance productivity and quality in many cases, we examine some of the risks involved in the use of new methods in safety-critical contexts. We examine a case study involving the use of a CASE tool that automatically generates code from high-level system designs. We show that while high-level testing on the system structure is highly desirable, significant risks exist in the automatically generated code and in re-validating releases of the generated code after subsequent design changes. We identify these risks and suggest process improvements that retain the advantages of rapid, automated development methods within the quality and reliability contexts of safety-critical projects.

  11. Domain analysis for the reuse of software development experiences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, V. R.; Briand, L. C.; Thomas, W. M.

    1994-01-01

    We need to be able to learn from past experiences so we can improve our software processes and products. The Experience Factory is an organizational structure designed to support and encourage the effective reuse of software experiences. This structure consists of two organizations which separates project development concerns from organizational concerns of experience packaging and learning. The experience factory provides the processes and support for analyzing, packaging, and improving the organization's stored experience. The project organization is structured to reuse this stored experience in its development efforts. However, a number of questions arise: What past experiences are relevant? Can they all be used (reused) on our current project? How do we take advantage of what has been learned in other parts of the organization? How do we take advantage of experience in the world-at-large? Can someone else's best practices be used in our organization with confidence? This paper describes approaches to help answer these questions. We propose both quantitative and qualitative approaches for effectively reusing software development experiences.

  12. Incremental development and prototyping in current laboratory software development projects: Preliminary analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griesel, Martha Ann

    1988-01-01

    Several Laboratory software development projects that followed nonstandard development processes, which were hybrids of incremental development and prototyping, are being studied. Factors in the project environment leading to the decision to use a nonstandard development process and affecting its success are analyzed. A simple characterization of project environment based on this analysis is proposed, together with software development approaches which have been found effective for each category. These approaches include both documentation and review requirements.

  13. Development of the auto-steering software and equipment technology (ASSET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Mark D.; Anderson, Matthew O.; Wadsworth, Derek C.

    2003-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), through collaboration with INSAT Co., has developed a low cost robotic auto-steering system for parallel contour swathing. The capability to perform parallel contour swathing while minimizing "skip" and "overlap" is a necessity for cost-effective crop management within precision agriculture. Current methods for performing parallel contour swathing consist of using a Differential Global Position System (DGPS) coupled with a light bar system to prompt an operator where to steer. The complexity of operating heavy equipment, ensuring proper chemical mixture and application, and steering to a light bar indicator can be overwhelming to an operator. To simplify these tasks, an inexpensive robotic steering system has been developed and tested on several farming implements. This development leveraged research conducted by the INEEL and Utah State University. The INEEL-INSAT Auto-Steering Software and Equipment Technology provides the following: 1) the ability to drive in a straight line within +/- 2 feet while traveling at least 15 mph, 2) interfaces to a Real Time Kinematic (RTK) DGPS and sub-meter DGPS, 3) safety features such as Emergency-stop, steering wheel deactivation, computer watchdog deactivation, etc., and 4) a low-cost, field-ready system that is easily adapted to other systems.

  14. Transrapid (the first high-speed Maglev train system certified ready for application): Development status and prospects for deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luerken, Reinhard F.

    1994-01-01

    The Transrapid maglev technology is at the threshold of commercial deployment and technologically all prerequisites for the successful operation of the system in public service are given. In post unification Germany the domestic maglev technology is envisioned to be applied in the Berlin-Hamburg project. At present, a public-private funding concept is being prepared and the lengthy planning process is about to be initiated. In the USA the AMG has presented a program to Americanize the technology and to make it available for commercial use in the U.S. in the very near future. The paramount features of this program are to generate economic development, provide a basis for transportation technology development, create opportunities for U.S. industry, improve the U.S. transportation infrastructure, and improve the environment and traveler safety. Maglev is ready for the U.S.; is the U.S. ready for maglev?

  15. Application of software engineering to development of reactor-safety codes

    SciTech Connect

    Wilburn, N P; Niccoli, L G

    1980-11-01

    As a result of the drastically increasing cost of software and the lack of an engineering approach, the technology of Software Engineering is being developed. Software Engineering provides an answer to the increasing cost of developing and maintaining software. It has been applied extensively in the business and aerospace communities and is just now being applied to the development of scientific software and, in particular, to the development of reactor safety codes at HEDL.

  16. SCOS 2: An object oriented software development approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symonds, Martin; Lynenskjold, Steen; Mueller, Christian

    1994-01-01

    The Spacecraft Control and Operations System 2 (SCOS 2), is intended to provide the generic mission control system infrastructure for future ESA missions. It represents a bold step forward in order to take advantage of state-of-the-art technology and current practices in the area of software engineering. Key features include: (1) use of object oriented analysis and design techniques; (2) use of UNIX, C++ and a distributed architecture as the enabling implementation technology; (3) goal of re-use for development, maintenance and mission specific software implementation; and (4) introduction of the concept of a spacecraft control model. This paper touches upon some of the traditional beliefs surrounding Object Oriented development and describes their relevance to SCOS 2. It gives rationale for why particular approaches were adopted and others not, and describes the impact of these decisions. The development approach followed is discussed, highlighting the evolutionary nature of the overall process and the iterative nature of the various tasks carried out. The emphasis of this paper is on the process of the development with the following being covered: (1) the three phases of the SCOS 2 project - prototyping & analysis, design & implementation and configuration / delivery of mission specific systems; (2) the close cooperation and continual interaction with the users during the development; (3) the management approach - the split between client staff, industry and some of the required project management activities; (4) the lifecycle adopted being an enhancement of the ESA PSS-05 standard with SCOS 2 specific activities and approaches defined; and (5) an examination of some of the difficulties encountered and the solutions adopted. Finally, the lessons learned from the SCOS 2 experience are highlighted, identifying those issues to be used as feedback into future developments of this nature. This paper does not intend to describe the finished product and its operation

  17. Software safety analysis activities during software development phases of the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Hui-Yin; Sherif, Joseph S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the MLS software safety analysis activities and documents the SSA results. The scope of this software safety effort is consistent with the MLS system safety definition and is concentrated on the software faults and hazards that may have impact on the personnel safety and the environment safety.

  18. Integrity Constraint Monitoring in Software Development: Proposed Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Francisco G.

    1997-01-01

    In the development of complex software systems, designers are required to obtain from many sources and manage vast amounts of knowledge of the system being built and communicate this information to personnel with a variety of backgrounds. Knowledge concerning the properties of the system, including the structure of, relationships between and limitations of the data objects in the system, becomes increasingly more vital as the complexity of the system and the number of knowledge sources increases. Ensuring that violations of these properties do not occur becomes steadily more challenging. One approach toward managing the enforcement or system properties, called context monitoring, uses a centralized repository of integrity constraints and a constraint satisfiability mechanism for dynamic verification of property enforcement during program execution. The focus of this paper is to describe possible software architectures that define a mechanism for dynamically checking the satisfiability of a set of constraints on a program. The next section describes the context monitoring approach in general. Section 3 gives an overview of the work currently being done toward the addition of an integrity constraint satisfiability mechanism to a high-level program language, SequenceL, and demonstrates how this model is being examined to develop a general software architecture. Section 4 describes possible architectures for a general constraint satisfiability mechanism, as well as an alternative approach that, uses embedded database queries in lieu of an external monitor. The paper concludes with a brief summary outlining the, current state of the research and future work.

  19. WEST-3 wind turbine simulator development: Volume 3, Software

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, J.A.; Sridhar, S.

    1985-07-01

    This report deals with the software developed for WEST-3, a new, all digital, and fully programmable wind turbine simulator developed by Paragon Pacific Inc. The process of wind turbine simulation on WEST-3 is described in detail. The major steps are, the processing of the mathematical models, the preparation of the constant data, and the use of system software to generate executable code for running on WEST-3. The mechanics of reformulation, normalization, and scaling of the mathematical models is discussed in detail, in particular, the significance of reformulation which leads to accurate simulations. Descriptions for the preprocessor computer programs which are used to prepare the constant data needed in the simulation are given. These programs, in addition to scaling and normalizing all the constants, relieve the user from having to generate a large number of constants used in the simulation. Also given in the report are brief descriptions of the components of the WEST-3 system software: Translator, Assembler, Linker, and Loader. Also included in the report are: details of the aeroelastic rotor analysis, which is the center piece of a wind turbine simulation model; analysis of the gimbal subsystem; and listings of the variables, constants, and equations used in the simulation.

  20. Development, comparison, and evaluation of software for radial distortion elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadaki, A. I.; Georgopoulos, A.

    2015-05-01

    Lately the interest of Computer Vision and Photogrammetry community has been focused on the automation of the processes of identification and elimination of the radial distortion, with the aim to correct the image coordinates and finally to obtain digital images with reliable geometric information. This effort has reached the point of development of commercial or free image processing software, claiming that it can automatically identify and remove the radial distortion from an image. In this paper in depth research has been conducted about the radial distortion and the methods of its identification and elimination. Specifically, it has been attempted to evaluate software as the aforementioned, about its effectiveness, accuracy and applicability on the elimination of the radial distortion from images. For the attainment of the desired aim, four different methods of comparison and evaluation of the performance of the software, with respect to the correction of an image, have been employed. The applied methods are (i) the optical evaluation of the produced digital images, (ii) the subtraction of the images, (iii) the comparison of the curves of the remaining radial distortion in the images and (iv) the comparison of the results from the orientation of an image pair. However, it was really important to have a benchmark for the evaluation, in order to ensure the objectivity and accuracy of the comparison. Therefore, a new reliable algorithm has been developed, which was of known and controllable accuracy. The results of these comparisons are presented and evaluated for their reliability and usefulness.

  1. Preliminary software development for optical mirror figure control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackinnon, D.

    1970-01-01

    The maintenance of accurate primary mirror figure in the face of environmental disturbances is the key to the achievement of diffraction-limited performance in a large space telescope. In order to develop the concepts of optical mirror figure control, an experimental program was initiated. A major component in this experiment will be an XDS Sigma 5.7 digital computer which will realize the control algorithm. A software package is described which realizes linear optimal, simplified linear, and iterative optimal control algorithms. The software, in addition, provides for interactive communication between the operator and the computer, and interaction between the computer and the experimental hardware elements. A brief description of a small hybrid computer system is also presented.

  2. A software engineering approach for medical workstations development.

    PubMed

    Jean, F C; Lavril, M; Lemaitre, D; Sauquet, D; Degoulet, P

    1994-01-01

    Multimedia medical workstations represent the natural tool for accessing the hospital information system environment. They are complex medical systems that have to gather, in a single framework, a large collection of components dealing with multimedia medical objects. To remain current with both medical practice and with advances in the computer science field, they have to allow the iterative addition of new functions to the set of existing ones. In this paper, after a survey of commonly required medical workstation functional components, we shall try to discuss how a software engineering approach can streamline the development of a medical workstation. Different software engineering tools needed to build the functional components of a workstation are described. Their integration in a single dedicated environment is considered through four perspectives: data, presentation, communication and control. Benefits and limitations of an object-oriented approach are discussed. PMID:8125636

  3. Reliability measurement during software development. [for a multisensor tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, H.; Sturm, W. A.; Trattner, S.

    1977-01-01

    During the development of data base software for a multi-sensor tracking system, reliability was measured. The failure ratio and failure rate were found to be consistent measures. Trend lines were established from these measurements that provided good visualization of the progress on the job as a whole as well as on individual modules. Over one-half of the observed failures were due to factors associated with the individual run submission rather than with the code proper. Possible application of these findings for line management, project managers, functional management, and regulatory agencies is discussed. Steps for simplifying the measurement process and for use of these data in predicting operational software reliability are outlined.

  4. Use of software tools in the development of real time software systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvey, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The transformation of a preexisting software system into a larger and more versatile system with different mission requirements is discussed. The history of this transformation is used to illustrate the use of structured real time programming techniques and tools to produce maintainable and somewhat transportable systems. The predecessor system is a single ground diagnostic system; its purpose is to exercise a computer controlled hardware set prior to its deployment in its functional environment, as well as test the equipment set by supplying certain well known stimulas. The successor system (FTE) is required to perform certain testing and control functions while this hardware set is in its functional environment. Both systems must deal with heavy user input/output loads and a new I/O requirement is included in the design of the FTF system. Human factors are enhanced by adding an improved console interface and special function keyboard handler. The additional features require the inclusion of much new software to the original set from which FTF was developed. As a result, it is necessary to split the system into a duel programming configuration with high rates of interground communications. A generalized information routing mechanism is used to support this configuration.

  5. Generic Safety Requirements for Developing Safe Insulin Pump Software

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Jetley, Raoul; Jones, Paul L; Ray, Arnab

    2011-01-01

    Background The authors previously introduced a highly abstract generic insulin infusion pump (GIIP) model that identified common features and hazards shared by most insulin pumps on the market. The aim of this article is to extend our previous work on the GIIP model by articulating safety requirements that address the identified GIIP hazards. These safety requirements can be validated by manufacturers, and may ultimately serve as a safety reference for insulin pump software. Together, these two publications can serve as a basis for discussing insulin pump safety in the diabetes community. Methods In our previous work, we established a generic insulin pump architecture that abstracts functions common to many insulin pumps currently on the market and near-future pump designs. We then carried out a preliminary hazard analysis based on this architecture that included consultations with many domain experts. Further consultation with domain experts resulted in the safety requirements used in the modeling work presented in this article. Results Generic safety requirements for the GIIP model are presented, as appropriate, in parameterized format to accommodate clinical practices or specific insulin pump criteria important to safe device performance. Conclusions We believe that there is considerable value in having the diabetes, academic, and manufacturing communities consider and discuss these generic safety requirements. We hope that the communities will extend and revise them, make them more representative and comprehensive, experiment with them, and use them as a means for assessing the safety of insulin pump software designs. One potential use of these requirements is to integrate them into model-based engineering (MBE) software development methods. We believe, based on our experiences, that implementing safety requirements using MBE methods holds promise in reducing design/implementation flaws in insulin pump development and evolutionary processes, therefore improving

  6. 77 FR 50724 - Developing Software Life Cycle Processes for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission) is issuing for public comment draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-1210, ``Developing Software Life Cycle Processes for Digital Computer Software used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants.'' The DG-1210 is proposed Revision 1 of RG 1.173, dated September 1997. This revision endorses, with clarifications, the enhanced consensus......

  7. Building Bridges: A Comprehensive System for Healthy Development and School Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halfon, Neal; Uyeda, Kimberly; Inkelas, Moira; Rice, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    This policy brief describes the State Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (SECCS) Initiative, a policy designed to improve early childhood programs to ensure that all children arrive at school healthy and ready to learn. The SECCS is intended to help states build a bridge from birth to school and addresses how states will support children and…

  8. Developing MOOCs to Narrow the College Readiness Gap: Challenges and Recommendations for a Writing Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandi-Rao, Shoba; Devers, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have demonstrated the potential to deliver quality and cost effective course materials to large numbers of students. Approximately 60% of first-year students at community colleges are underprepared for college-level coursework. One reason for low graduation rates is the lack of the overall college readiness.…

  9. Development and Initial Validation of a Measure of Academic Behaviors Associated with College and Career Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, Allison; Seburn, Mary; Conley, David

    2011-01-01

    In this cross-validation study, the authors examined the psychometric properties of a measure of academic behaviors associated with college and career readiness intended for high school students. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted with a randomly selected portion of the sample (n = 413) and resulted in four reliable factors:…

  10. Preliminary Development of a Kindergarten School Readiness Assessment for Latino Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quirk, Matthew; Furlong, Michael; Lilles, Elena; Felix, Erika; Chin, Jenna

    2011-01-01

    The low achievement of students from non-English-speaking households living in low socioeconomic contexts is associated with academic skill gaps evident at kindergarten entry. Yet, few cost-effective, valid instruments are available to assess these students' school readiness. To examine this topic, this longitudinal study followed 1,069 primarily…

  11. Leading Change and Innovation in Teacher Preparation: A Blueprint for Developing TPACK Ready Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Tommye; Herring, Mary; Redmond, Pamela; Smaldino, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    When preparing TPACK ready teacher candidates, faculty must incorporate and model TPACK within the teacher education curriculum, which often requires an ongoing change process. But for change to take place we must consider the role leadership plays in the innovation of change. Leaders, deans and department heads must be an integral part of this…

  12. Patterns of School Readiness Forecast Achievement and Socioemotional Development at the End of Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabol, Terri J.; Pianta, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    A person-oriented approach examined patterns of functioning in social and executive function domains at 54 months and in turn forecasted 5th-grade socioemotional and achievement outcomes for 944 children. Six distinct profiles of 54-month school readiness patterns predicted outcomes in 5th grade with indications of cross-domain association between…

  13. Systematic Task Allocation Evaluation in Distributed Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münch, Jürgen; Lamersdorf, Ansgar

    Systematic task allocation to different development sites in global software development projects can open business and engineering perspectives and help to reduce risks and problems inherent in distributed development. Relying only on a single evaluation criterion such as development cost when distributing tasks to development sites has shown to be very risky and often does not lead to successful solutions in the long run. Task allocation in global software projects is challenging due to a multitude of impact factors and constraints. Systematic allocation decisions require the ability to evaluate and compare task allocation alternatives and to effectively establish customized task allocation practices in an organization. In this article, we present a customizable process for task allocation evaluation that is based on results from a systematic interview study with practitioners. In this process, the relevant criteria for evaluating task allocation alternatives are derived by applying principles from goal-oriented measurement. In addition, the customization of the process is demonstrated, related work and limitations are sketched, and an outlook on future work is given.

  14. Software Testing and Verification in Climate Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clune, Thomas L.; Rood, RIchard B.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 30 years most climate models have grown from relatively simple representations of a few atmospheric processes to a complex multi-disciplinary system. Computer infrastructure over that period has gone from punch card mainframes to modem parallel clusters. Model implementations have become complex, brittle, and increasingly difficult to extend and maintain. Existing verification processes for model implementations rely almost exclusively upon some combination of detailed analysis of output from full climate simulations and system-level regression tests. In additional to being quite costly in terms of developer time and computing resources, these testing methodologies are limited in terms of the types of defects that can be detected, isolated and diagnosed. Mitigating these weaknesses of coarse-grained testing with finer-grained "unit" tests has been perceived as cumbersome and counter-productive. In the commercial software sector, recent advances in tools and methodology have led to a renaissance for systematic fine-grained testing. We discuss the availability of analogous tools for scientific software and examine benefits that similar testing methodologies could bring to climate modeling software. We describe the unique challenges faced when testing complex numerical algorithms and suggest techniques to minimize and/or eliminate the difficulties.

  15. The Bayesian Analysis Software Developed At Washington University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marutyan, Karen R.; Bretthorst, G. Larry

    2009-12-01

    Over the last few years there has been an ongoing effort at the Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Laboratory within Washington University to develop data analysis applications using Bayesian probability theory. A few of these applications are specific to Magnetic Resonance data, however, most are general and can analyze data from a wide variety of sources. These data analysis applications are server based and they have been written in such a way as to allow them to utilize as many processors as are available. The interface to these Bayesian applications is a client based Java interface. The client, usually a Windows PC, runs the interface, sets up an analysis, sends the analysis to the server, fetches the results and displays the appropriate plots on the users client machine. Together, the client and server software can be used to solve a host of interesting problems that occur regularly in the sciences. In this paper, we describe both the client and server software and briefly discuss how to acquire, install and maintain this software.

  16. Towards a general object-oriented software development methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidewitz, ED; Stark, Mike

    1986-01-01

    An object is an abstract software model of a problem domain entity. Objects are packages of both data and operations of that data (Goldberg 83, Booch 83). The Ada (tm) package construct is representative of this general notion of an object. Object-oriented design is the technique of using objects as the basic unit of modularity in systems design. The Software Engineering Laboratory at the Goddard Space Flight Center is currently involved in a pilot program to develop a flight dynamics simulator in Ada (approximately 40,000 statements) using object-oriented methods. Several authors have applied object-oriented concepts to Ada (e.g., Booch 83, Cherry 85). It was found that these methodologies are limited. As a result a more general approach was synthesized with allows a designer to apply powerful object-oriented principles to a wide range of applications and at all stages of design. An overview is provided of this approach. Further, how object-oriented design fits into the overall software life-cycle is considered.

  17. Development of visual 3D virtual environment for control software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirose, Michitaka; Myoi, Takeshi; Amari, Haruo; Inamura, Kohei; Stark, Lawrence

    1991-01-01

    Virtual environments for software visualization may enable complex programs to be created and maintained. A typical application might be for control of regional electric power systems. As these encompass broader computer networks than ever, construction of such systems becomes very difficult. Conventional text-oriented environments are useful in programming individual processors. However, they are obviously insufficient to program a large and complicated system, that includes large numbers of computers connected to each other; such programming is called 'programming in the large.' As a solution for this problem, the authors are developing a graphic programming environment wherein one can visualize complicated software in virtual 3D world. One of the major features of the environment is the 3D representation of concurrent process. 3D representation is used to supply both network-wide interprocess programming capability (capability for 'programming in the large') and real-time programming capability. The authors' idea is to fuse both the block diagram (which is useful to check relationship among large number of processes or processors) and the time chart (which is useful to check precise timing for synchronization) into a single 3D space. The 3D representation gives us a capability for direct and intuitive planning or understanding of complicated relationship among many concurrent processes. To realize the 3D representation, a technology to enable easy handling of virtual 3D object is a definite necessity. Using a stereo display system and a gesture input device (VPL DataGlove), our prototype of the virtual workstation has been implemented. The workstation can supply the 'sensation' of the virtual 3D space to a programmer. Software for the 3D programming environment is implemented on the workstation. According to preliminary assessments, a 50 percent reduction of programming effort is achieved by using the virtual 3D environment. The authors expect that the 3D

  18. The Web Interface Template System (WITS), a software developer`s tool

    SciTech Connect

    Lauer, L.J.; Lynam, M.; Muniz, T.

    1995-11-01

    The Web Interface Template System (WITS) is a tool for software developers. WITS is a three-tiered, object-oriented system operating in a Client/Server environment. This tool can be used to create software applications that have a Web browser as the user interface and access a Sybase database. Development, modification, and implementation are greatly simplified because the developer can change and test definitions immediately, without writing or compiling any code. This document explains WITS functionality, the system structure and components of WITS, and how to obtain, install, and use the software system.

  19. A Prototype for the Support of Integrated Software Process Development and Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porrawatpreyakorn, Nalinpat; Quirchmayr, Gerald; Chutimaskul, Wichian

    An efficient software development process is one of key success factors for quality software. Not only can the appropriate establishment but also the continuous improvement of integrated project management and of the software development process result in efficiency. This paper hence proposes a software process maintenance framework which consists of two core components: an integrated PMBOK-Scrum model describing how to establish a comprehensive set of project management and software engineering processes and a software development maturity model advocating software process improvement. Besides, a prototype tool to support the framework is introduced.

  20. Framework programmable platform for the advanced software development workstation. Integration mechanism design document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, Richard J.; Blinn, Thomas M.; Mayer, Paula S. D.; Reddy, Uday; Ackley, Keith; Futrell, Mike

    1991-01-01

    The Framework Programmable Software Development Platform (FPP) is a project aimed at combining effective tool and data integration mechanisms with a model of the software development process in an intelligent integrated software development environment. Guided by this model, this system development framework will take advantage of an integrated operating environment to automate effectively the management of the software development process so that costly mistakes during the development phase can be eliminated.

  1. Spaceport Command and Control System - Support Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tremblay, Shayne

    2016-01-01

    The Information Architecture Support (IAS) Team, the component of the Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) that is in charge of all the pre-runtime data, was in need of some report features to be added to their internal web application, Information Architecture (IA). Development of these reports is crucial for the speed and productivity of the development team, as they are needed to quickly and efficiently make specific and complicated data requests against the massive IA database. These reports were being put on the back burner, as other development of IA was prioritized over them, but the need for them resulted in internships being created to fill this need. The creation of these reports required learning Ruby on Rails development, along with related web technologies, and they will continue to serve IAS and other support software teams and their IA data needs.

  2. Software Engineering Research/Developer Collaborations (C104)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shell, Elaine; Shull, Forrest

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this collaboration was to produce Flight Software Branch (FSB) process standards for software inspections which could be used across three new missions within the FSB. The standard was developed by Dr. Forrest Shull (Fraunhofer Center for Experimental Software Engineering, Maryland) using the Perspective-Based Inspection approach, (PBI research has been funded by SARP) , then tested on a pilot Branch project. Because the short time scale of the collaboration ruled out a quantitative evaluation, it would be decided whether the standard was suitable for roll-out to other Branch projects based on a qualitative measure: whether the standard received high ratings from Branch personnel as to usability and overall satisfaction. The project used for piloting the Perspective-Based Inspection approach was a multi-mission framework designed for reuse. This was a good choice because key representatives from the three new missions would be involved in the inspections. The perspective-based approach was applied to produce inspection procedures tailored for the specific quality needs of the branch. The technical information to do so was largely drawn through a series of interviews with Branch personnel. The framework team used the procedures to review requirements. The inspections were useful for indicating that a restructuring of the requirements document was needed, which led to changes in the development project plan. The standard was sent out to other Branch personnel for review. Branch personnel were very positive. However, important changes were identified because the perspective of Attitude Control System (ACS) developers had not been adequately represented, a result of the specific personnel interviewed. The net result is that with some further work to incorporate the ACS perspective, and in synchrony with the roll out of independent Branch standards, the PBI approach will be implemented in the FSB. Also, the project intends to continue its collaboration with

  3. The Khoros software development environment for image and signal processing.

    PubMed

    Konstantinides, K; Rasure, J R

    1994-01-01

    Data flow visual language systems allow users to graphically create a block diagram of their applications and interactively control input, output, and system variables. Khoros is an integrated software development environment for information processing and visualization. It is particularly attractive for image processing because of its rich collection of tools for image and digital signal processing. This paper presents a general overview of Khoros with emphasis on its image processing and DSP tools. Various examples are presented and the future direction of Khoros is discussed. PMID:18291923

  4. The development of an interim generalized gate logic software simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgough, J. G.; Nemeroff, S.

    1985-01-01

    A proof-of-concept computer program called IGGLOSS (Interim Generalized Gate Logic Software Simulator) was developed and is discussed. The simulator engine was designed to perform stochastic estimation of self test coverage (fault-detection latency times) of digital computers or systems. A major attribute of the IGGLOSS is its high-speed simulation: 9.5 x 1,000,000 gates/cpu sec for nonfaulted circuits and 4.4 x 1,000,000 gates/cpu sec for faulted circuits on a VAX 11/780 host computer.

  5. IMS software developments for the detection of chemical warfare agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klepel, ST.; Graefenhain, U.; Lippe, R.; Stach, J.; Starrock, V.

    1995-01-01

    Interference compounds like gasoline, diesel, burning wood or fuel, etc. are presented in common battlefield situations. These compounds can cause detectors to respond as a false positive or interfere with the detector's ability to respond to target compounds such as chemical warfare agents. To ensure proper response of the ion mobility spectrometer to chemical warfare agents, two special software packages were developed and incorporated into the Bruker RAID-1. The programs suppress interferring signals caused by car exhaust or smoke gases resulting from burning materials and correct the influence of variable sample gas humidity which is important for detection and quantification of blister agents like mustard gas or lewisite.

  6. A Software Development Platform for Wearable Medical Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruikai; Lin, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Wearable medical devices have become a leading trend in healthcare industry. Microcontrollers are computers on a chip with sufficient processing power and preferred embedded computing units in those devices. We have developed a software platform specifically for the design of the wearable medical applications with a small code footprint on the microcontrollers. It is supported by the open source real time operating system FreeRTOS and supplemented with a set of standard APIs for the architectural specific hardware interfaces on the microcontrollers for data acquisition and wireless communication. We modified the tick counter routine in FreeRTOS to include a real time soft clock. When combined with the multitasking features in the FreeRTOS, the platform offers the quick development of wearable applications and easy porting of the application code to different microprocessors. Test results have demonstrated that the application software developed using this platform are highly efficient in CPU usage while maintaining a small code foot print to accommodate the limited memory space in microcontrollers. PMID:26276017

  7. Definition, technology readiness, and development cost of the orbit transfer vehicle engine integrated control and health monitoring system elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, I.; Balcer, S.; Cochran, M.; Klop, J.; Peterson, S.

    1991-01-01

    An Integrated Control and Health Monitoring (ICHM) system was conceived for use on a 20 Klb thrust baseline Orbit Transfer Vehicle (OTV) engine. Considered for space used, the ICHM was defined for reusability requirements for an OTV engine service free life of 20 missions, with 100 starts and a total engine operational time of 4 hours. Functions were derived by flowing down requirements from NASA guidelines, previous OTV engine or ICHM documents, and related contracts. The elements of an ICHM were identified and listed, and these elements were described in sufficient detail to allow estimation of their technology readiness levels. These elements were assessed in terms of technology readiness level, and supporting rationale for these assessments presented. The remaining cost for development of a minimal ICHM system to technology readiness level 6 was estimated. The estimates are within an accuracy range of minus/plus 20 percent. The cost estimates cover what is needed to prepare an ICHM system for use on a focussed testbed for an expander cycle engine, excluding support to the actual test firings.

  8. Computer Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Alan

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature and development of computer software. Programing, programing languages, types of software (including dynamic spreadsheets), and software of the future are among the topics considered. (JN)

  9. Development of Total Knee Replacement Digital Templating Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Siti Fairuz; Sulaiman, Riza; Thian Seng, Lee; Mohd. Kassim, Abdul Yazid; Abdullah, Suhail; Yusof, Shahril; Omar, Masbah; Abdul Hamid, Hamzaini

    In this study, by taking full advantage of digital X-ray and computer technology, we have developed a semi-automated procedure to template knee implants, by making use of digital templating method. Using this approach, a software system called OrthoKneeTMhas been designed and developed. The system is to be utilities as a study in the Department of Orthopaedic and Traumatology in medical faculty, UKM (FPUKM). OrthoKneeTMtemplating process employs uses a technique similar to those used by many surgeons, using acetate templates over X-ray films. Using template technique makes it easy to template various implant from every Implant manufacturers who have with a comprehensive database of templates. The templating functionality includes, template (knee) and manufactures templates (Smith & Nephew; and Zimmer). From an image of patient x-ray OrthoKneeTMtemplates help in quickly and easily reads to the approximate template size needed. The visual templating features then allow us quickly review multiple template sizes against the X-ray and thus obtain the nearly precise view of the implant size required. The system can assist by templating on one patient image and will generate reports that can accompany patient notes. The software system was implemented in Visual basic 6.0 Pro using the object-oriented techniques to manage the graphics and objects. The approaches for image scaling will be discussed. Several of measurement in orthopedic diagnosis process have been studied and added in this software as measurement tools features using mathematic theorem and equations. The study compared the results of the semi-automated (using digital templating) method to the conventional method to demonstrate the accuracy of the system.

  10. Investigating the effect of software project type on accuracy of software development effort estimation in COCOMO model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatibi. B, Vahid; Khatibi, Elham

    2011-12-01

    Software development effort is one of the most important metrics in field of software engineering. Since accurate estimating of this metric affects the project manager plans, numerous research works have been performed to increase the accuracy of estimations in this field. Almost all the previous publications in this area used several project features as independent features and considered the development effort as dependent one. Constructive Cost Model (COCOMO) is the most famous algorithmic model for estimating the software development effort. Despite the fact that many researchers have tried to improve the performance of COCOMO using non-algorithmic methods, all of which have estimated the development effort regardless of the project type. In this paper, the effect of considering the project type in estimating was investigated by means of neural networks. The obtained results were compared with the original COCOMO and neural network. The comparisons showed that the software project type can affect the accuracy of estimations significantly.

  11. Effort Drivers Estimation for Brazilian Geographically Distributed Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Ana Carina M.; Souza, Renata; Aquino, Gibeon; Meira, Silvio

    To meet the requirements of today’s fast paced markets, it is important to develop projects on time and with the minimum use of resources. A good estimate is the key to achieve this goal. Several companies have started to work with geographically distributed teams due to cost reduction and time-to-market. Some researchers indicate that this approach introduces new challenges, because the teams work in different time zones and have possible differences in culture and language. It is already known that the multisite development increases the software cycle time. Data from 15 DSD projects from 10 distinct companies were collected. The analysis shows drivers that impact significantly the total effort planned to develop systems using DSD approach in Brazil.

  12. A Role-Playing Game for a Software Engineering Lab: Developing a Product Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuppiroli, Sara; Ciancarini, Paolo; Gabbrielli, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Software product line development refers to software engineering practices and techniques for creating families of similar software systems from a basic set of reusable components, called shared assets. Teaching how to deal with software product lines in a university lab course is a challenging task, because there are several practical issues that…

  13. Software Effort Estimation Accuracy: A Comparative Study of Estimations Based on Software Sizing and Development Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafferty, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    The number of project failures and those projects completed over cost and over schedule has been a significant issue for software project managers. Among the many reasons for failure, inaccuracy in software estimation--the basis for project bidding, budgeting, planning, and probability estimates--has been identified as a root cause of a high…

  14. Development of a Questionnaire and Cross-Sectional Survey of Patient eHealth Readiness and eHealth Inequalities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many speak of the digital divide, but variation in the opportunity of patients to use the Internet for health (patient eHealth readiness) is not a binary difference, rather a distribution influenced by personal capability, provision of services, support, and cost. Digital divisions in health have been addressed by various initiatives, but there was no comprehensive validated measure to know if they are effective that could be used in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) covering both non-Internet-users and the range of Internet-users. Objective The aim of this study was to develop and validate a self-completed questionnaire and scoring system to assess patient eHealth readiness by examining the spread of scores and eHealth inequalities. The intended use of this questionnaire and scores is in RCTs of interventions aiming to improve patient eHealth readiness and reduce eHealth inequalities. Methods Based on four factors identified from the literature, a self-completed questionnaire, using a pragmatic combination of factual and attitude questions, was drafted and piloted in three stages. This was followed by a final population-based, cross-sectional household survey of 344 people used to refine the scoring system. Results The Patient eHealth Readiness Questionnaire (PERQ) includes questions used to calculate four subscores: patients’ perception of (1) provision, (2) their personal ability and confidence, (3) their interpersonal support, and (4) relative costs in using the Internet for health. These were combined into an overall PERQ score (0-9) which could be used in intervention studies. Reduction in standard deviation of the scores represents reduction in eHealth inequalities. Conclusions PERQ appears acceptable for participants in British studies. The scores produced appear valid and will enable assessment of the effectiveness of interventions to improve patient eHealth readiness and reduce eHealth inequalities. Such methods need continued evolution and

  15. Ready Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koltay, Emery

    1999-01-01

    Includes the following ready reference information: "Publishers' Toll-Free Telephone Numbers"; "How to Obtain an ISBN (International Standard Book Number)"; "How to Obtain an ISSN (International Standard Serial Number)"; and "How to Obtain an SAN (Standard Address Number)". (AEF)

  16. Software Development Of XML Parser Based On Algebraic Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Bozhidar; Georgieva, Adriana

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, is presented one software development and implementation of an algebraic method for XML data processing, which accelerates XML parsing process. Therefore, the proposed in this article nontraditional approach for fast XML navigation with algebraic tools contributes to advanced efforts in the making of an easier user-friendly API for XML transformations. Here the proposed software for XML documents processing (parser) is easy to use and can manage files with strictly defined data structure. The purpose of the presented algorithm is to offer a new approach for search and restructuring hierarchical XML data. This approach permits fast XML documents processing, using algebraic model developed in details in previous works of the same authors. So proposed parsing mechanism is easy accessible to the web consumer who is able to control XML file processing, to search different elements (tags) in it, to delete and to add a new XML content as well. The presented various tests show higher rapidity and low consumption of resources in comparison with some existing commercial parsers.

  17. Developing a protocol for an educational software competition.

    PubMed Central

    Schleyer, T.; Johnson, L.

    2001-01-01

    This project developed a protocol for the inaugural Instructional Software Competition of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA). The evaluation instrument was derived from the Guidelines for the Design of Educational Software developed by the ANSI-accredited Standards Committee for Dental Informatics. Eleven judges were calibrated in a conference call and rated a total of 30 submissions using a 66-question instrument. The maximum score was 204 points. The mean score of WWW-based programs was 106.7 points, and of CD-ROM-based programs 109.5 points. The summative review of the judging process identified several potential improvements, such as distinguishing between standalone programs and educational support material; increasing the number of answer choices on rating scales; differential weighting of criteria; and a more discriminative approach to judging formative and summative evaluations. We plan to improve the protocol by supporting the process through a Web-based application; calibrating judges with an online handbook; improving and adapting the rating instrument itself; using at least three judges for each program; and conducting a measurement study. PMID:11825257

  18. An object-oriented class library for medical software development.

    PubMed

    O'Kane, K C; McColligan, E E

    1996-12-01

    The objective of this research is the development of a Medical Object Library (MOL) consisting of reusable, inheritable, portable, extendable C++ classes that facilitate rapid development of medical software at reduced cost and increased functionality. The result of this research is a library of class objects that range in function from string and hierarchical file handling entities to high level, procedural agents that perform increasingly complex, integrated tasks. A system built upon these classes is compatible with any other system similarly constructed with respect to data definitions, semantics, data organization and storage. As new objects are built, they can be added to the class library for subsequent use. The MOL is a toolkit of software objects intended to support a common file access methodology, a unified medical record structure, consistent message processing, standard graphical display facilities and uniform data collection procedures. This work emphasizes the relationship that potentially exists between the structure of a hierarchical medical record and procedural language components by means of a hierarchical class library and tree structured file access facility. In doing so, it attempts to establish interest in and demonstrate the practicality of the hierarchical medical record model in the modern context of object oriented programming. PMID:9019098

  19. Widespread Piracy by Students Frustrates Developers of Computer Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLoughry, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    Computer software producers view students' illegal copying of programs as lost revenue and feel powerless to stop the piracy. Some propose to change student attitudes about copying, others suggest reducing software prices, and still others are calling for prosecution. (MSE)

  20. Lessons learned from development and quality assurance of software systems at the Halden Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorlo, T.J.; Berg, O.; Pehrsen, M.; Dahll, G.; Sivertsen, T.

    1996-03-01

    The OECD Halden Reactor Project has developed a number of software systems within the research programmes. These programmes have comprised a wide range of topics, like studies of software for safety-critical applications, development of different operator support systems, and software systems for building and implementing graphical user interfaces. The systems have ranged from simple prototypes to installations in process plants. In the development of these software systems, Halden has gained much experience in quality assurance of different types of software. This paper summarises the accumulated experience at the Halden Project in quality assurance of software systems. The different software systems being developed at the Halden Project may be grouped into three categories. These are plant-specific software systems (one-of-a-kind deliveries), generic software products, and safety-critical software systems. This classification has been found convenient as the categories have different requirements to the quality assurance process. In addition, the experience from use of software development tools and proprietary software systems at Halden, is addressed. The paper also focuses on the experience gained from the complete software life cycle, starting with the software planning phase and ending with software operation and maintenance.

  1. Development of the free-space optical communications analysis software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeganathan, Muthu; Mecherle, G. Stephen; Lesh, James R.

    1998-05-01

    The Free-space Optical Communication Analysis Software (FOCAS) was developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to provide mission planners, systems engineers and communications engineers with an easy to use tool to analyze direct-detection optical communication links. The FOCAS program, implemented in Microsoft Excel, gives it all the power and flexibility built into the spreadsheet. An easy-to-use interface, developed using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), to the spreadsheet allows easy input of data and parameters. A host of pre- defined components allow an analyst to configure a link without having to know the details of the components. FOCAS replaces the over-a-decade-old FORTRAN program called OPTI widely used previously at JPL. This paper describes the features and capabilities of the Excel-spreadsheet-based FOCAS program.

  2. Development of software for the MSFC solar vector magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kineke, Jack

    1996-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Vector Magnetograph is a special purpose telescope used to measure the vector magnetic field in active areas on the surface of the sun. This instrument measures the linear and circular polarization intensities (the Stokes vectors Q, U and V) produced by the Zeeman effect on a specific spectral line due to the solar magnetic field from which the longitudinal and transverse components of the magnetic field may be determined. Beginning in 1990 as a Summer Faculty Fellow in project JOVE and continuing under NASA Grant NAG8-1042, the author has been developing computer software to perform these computations, first using a DEC MicroVAX system equipped with a high speed array processor, and more recently using a DEC AXP/OSF system. This summer's work is a continuation of this development.

  3. Using Tabu Search to Estimate Software Development Effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrucci, Filomena; Gravino, Carmine; Oliveto, Rocco; Sarro, Federica

    The use of optimization techniques has been recently proposed to build models for software development effort estimation. In particular, some studies have been carried out using search-based techniques, such as genetic programming, and the results reported seem to be promising. At the best of our knowledge nobody has analyzed the effectiveness of Tabu search for development effort estimation. Tabu search is a meta-heuristic approach successful used to address several optimization problems. In this paper we report on an empirical analysis carried out exploiting Tabu Search on a publicity available dataset, i.e., Desharnais dataset. The achieved results show that Tabu Search provides estimates comparable with those achieved with some widely used estimation techniques.

  4. A Case Study of Coordination in Distributed Agile Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hole, Steinar; Moe, Nils Brede

    Global Software Development (GSD) has gained significant popularity as an emerging paradigm. Companies also show interest in applying agile approaches in distributed development to combine the advantages of both approaches. However, in their most radical forms, agile and GSD can be placed in each end of a plan-based/agile spectrum because of how work is coordinated. We describe how three GSD projects applying agile methods coordinate their work. We found that trust is needed to reduce the need of standardization and direct supervision when coordinating work in a GSD project, and that electronic chatting supports mutual adjustment. Further, co-location and modularization mitigates communication problems, enables agility in at least part of a GSD project, and renders the implementation of Scrum of Scrums possible.

  5. Software Development Processes Applied to Computational Icing Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinson, Laurie H.; Potapezuk, Mark G.; Mellor, Pamela A.

    1999-01-01

    The development of computational icing simulation methods is making the transition form the research to common place use in design and certification efforts. As such, standards of code management, design validation, and documentation must be adjusted to accommodate the increased expectations of the user community with respect to accuracy, reliability, capability, and usability. This paper discusses these concepts with regard to current and future icing simulation code development efforts as implemented by the Icing Branch of the NASA Lewis Research Center in collaboration with the NASA Lewis Engineering Design and Analysis Division. With the application of the techniques outlined in this paper, the LEWICE ice accretion code has become a more stable and reliable software product.

  6. Development and validation of techniques for improving software dependability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, John C.

    1992-01-01

    A collection of document abstracts are presented on the topic of improving software dependability through NASA grant NAG-1-1123. Specific topics include: modeling of error detection; software inspection; test cases; Magnetic Stereotaxis System safety specifications and fault trees; and injection of synthetic faults into software.

  7. The IceCube Data Acquisition Software: Lessons Learned during Distributed, Collaborative, Multi-Disciplined Software Development.

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, Keith S; Beattie, Keith; Day Ph.D., Christopher; Glowacki, Dave; Hanson Ph.D., Kael; Jacobsen Ph.D., John; McParland, Charles; Patton Ph.D., Simon

    2007-09-21

    In this experiential paper we report on lessons learned during the development ofthe data acquisition software for the IceCube project - specifically, how to effectively address the unique challenges presented by a distributed, collaborative, multi-institutional, multi-disciplined project such as this. While development progress in software projects is often described solely in terms of technical issues, our experience indicates that non- and quasi-technical interactions play a substantial role in the effectiveness of large software development efforts. These include: selection and management of multiple software development methodologies, the effective useof various collaborative communication tools, project management structure and roles, and the impact and apparent importance of these elements when viewed through the differing perspectives of hardware, software, scientific and project office roles. Even in areas clearly technical in nature, success is still influenced by non-technical issues that can escape close attention. In particular we describe our experiences on software requirements specification, development methodologies and communication tools. We make observations on what tools and techniques have and have not been effective in this geographically disperse (including the South Pole) collaboration and offer suggestions on how similarly structured future projects may build upon our experiences.

  8. Software-Based Challenges of Developing the Future Distribution Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Emma; Kiliccote, Sila; McParland, Charles

    2014-06-01

    The software that the utility industry currently uses may be insufficient to analyze the distribution grid as it rapidly modernizes to include active resources such as distributed generation, switch and voltage control, automation, and increasingly complex loads. Although planners and operators have traditionally viewed the distribution grid as a passive load, utilities and consultants increasingly need enhanced analysis that incorporates active distribution grid loads in order to ensure grid reliability. Numerous commercial and open-source tools are available for analyzing distribution grid systems. These tools vary in complexity from providing basic load-flow and capacity analysis under steady-state conditions to time-series analysis and even geographical representations of dynamic and transient events. The need for each type of analysis is not well understood in the industry, nor are the reasons that distribution analysis requires different techniques and tools both from those now available and from those used for transmission analysis. In addition, there is limited understanding of basic capability of the tools and how they should be practically applied to the evolving distribution system. The study reviews the features and state of the art capability of current tools, including usability and visualization, basic analysis functionality, advanced analysis including inverters, and renewable generation and load modeling. We also discuss the need for each type of distribution grid system analysis. In addition to reviewing basic functionality current models, we discuss dynamics and transient simulation in detail and draw conclusions about existing software?s ability to address the needs of the future distribution grid as well as the barriers to modernization of the distribution grid that are posed by the current state of software and model development. Among our conclusions are that accuracy, data transfer, and data processing abilities are key to future

  9. The Comprehensive Evaluation of Professional Development Software: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liaupsin, Carl J.

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of the development of professional development software for special education teachers reviews the literature to (1) consolidate the database of literature regarding professional development software; (2) examine the degree to which the described software has been comprehensively evaluated; and (3) provide suggestions for future…

  10. The New Microcomputer Development Technology: Implications for the Economics Instructor and Software Author.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, David W.

    1993-01-01

    Asserts that a new generation of software authoring applications has led to improvements in the development of economics education software. Describes new software development applications and discusses how to use them. Concludes that object-oriented programming helps economists develop their own courseware. (CFR)

  11. Development of Advanced Multi-Modality Radiation Treatment Planning Software

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D W; Hartmann Siantar, C

    2002-02-19

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has long been active in development of advanced Monte-Carlo based computational dosimetry and treatment planning methods and software for advanced radiotherapy, with a particular focus on Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) and, to a somewhat lesser extent, Fast-Neutron Therapy. The most recent INEEL software product system of this type is known as SERA, Simulation Environment for Radiotherapy Applications. SERA is at a mature level in its life cycle, it has been licensed for research use worldwide, and it has become well established as a computational tool for research. However, along with its strengths, SERA also has some limitations in its structure and computational methodologies. More specifically, it is optimized only for neutron-based applications. Although photon transport can be computed with SERA, the simplified model that is used is designed primarily for photons produced in the neutron transport process. Thus SERA is not appropriate for applications to, for example, standard external-beam photon radiotherapy, which is by far more commonly used in the clinic than neutron based therapy.

  12. Achieving dependability throughout the development process - A distributed software experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, John P. J.; Murphy, Susan C.

    1990-01-01

    Distributed software engineering techniques and methods for improving the specification and testing phases are considered. With multiversion development, multiple implementations allow the use of an automated approach to testing called back-to-back (B/B) testing in which the outputs are compared to detect any discrepancies. However, a specification defect may lead to similar errors in the multiple versions and the underlying fault may not be detected with a B/B testing approach. The use of diverse formal specifications has been proposed as a solution to this problem, since defects in independently written specifications are likely to be different. To examine these issues, an experiment was performed using the design diversity approach in the specification, design, implementation, and testing of distributed software. In the experiment, three diverse formal specifications were used to produce multiple independent implementations of a distributed communication protocol in Ada. The problems encountered in building complex concurrent processing systems in Ada were also studied. Many pitfalls were discovered in mapping the formal specifications into Ada implementations.

  13. Predicting Numbers of Problems in Development of Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonds, Charles H.

    2005-01-01

    A method has been formulated to enable prediction of the amount of work that remains to be performed in developing flight software for a spacecraft. The basic concept embodied in the method is that of using an idealized curve (specifically, the Weibull function) to interpolate from (1) the numbers of problems discovered thus far to (2) a goal of discovering no new problems after launch (or six months into the future for software already in use in orbit). The steps of the method can be summarized as follows: 1. Take raw data in the form of problem reports (PRs), including the dates on which they are generated. 2. Remove, from the data collection, PRs that are subsequently withdrawn or to which no response is required. 3. Count the numbers of PRs created in 1-week periods and the running total number of PRs each week. 4. Perform the interpolation by making a least-squares fit of the Weibull function to (a) the cumulative distribution of PRs gathered thus far and (b) the goal of no more PRs after the currently anticipated launch date. The interpolation and the anticipated launch date are subject to iterative re-estimation.

  14. Software Development and Testing for Machine Learning Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Takaki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    It is not easy to test software used in studies of machine learning with statistical frameworks. In particular, software for randomized algorithms such as Monte Carlo methods compromises testing process. Combined with underestimation of the importance of software testing in academic fields, many software programs without appropriate validation are being used and causing problems. In this article, we discuss the importance of writing test codes for software used in research, and present a practical way for testing, focusing on programs using Monte Carlo methods.

  15. Development of the Write Process for Pipeline-Ready Heavy Oil

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Brecher; Charles Mones; Frank Guffey

    2009-03-07

    Work completed under this program advances the goal of demonstrating Western Research Institute's (WRI's) WRITE{trademark} process for upgrading heavy oil at field scale. MEG Energy Corporation (MEG) located in Calgary, Alberta, Canada supported efforts at WRI to develop the WRITE{trademark} process as an oil sands, field-upgrading technology through this Task 51 Jointly Sponsored Research project. The project consisted of 6 tasks: (1) optimization of the distillate recovery unit (DRU), (2) demonstration and design of a continuous coker, (3) conceptual design and cost estimate for a commercial facility, (4) design of a WRITE{trademark} pilot plant, (5) hydrotreating studies, and (6) establish a petroleum analysis laboratory. WRITE{trademark} is a heavy oil and bitumen upgrading process that produces residuum-free, pipeline ready oil from heavy material with undiluted density and viscosity that exceed prevailing pipeline specifications. WRITE{trademark} uses two processing stages to achieve low and high temperature conversion of heavy oil or bitumen. The first stage DRU operates at mild thermal cracking conditions, yielding a light overhead product and a heavy residuum or bottoms material. These bottoms flow to the second stage continuous coker that operates at severe pyrolysis conditions, yielding light pyrolyzate and coke. The combined pyrolyzate and mildly cracked overhead streams form WRITE{trademark}'s synthetic crude oil (SCO) production. The main objectives of this project were to (1) complete testing and analysis at bench scale with the DRU and continuous coker reactors and provide results to MEG for process evaluation and scale-up determinations and (2) complete a technical and economic assessment of WRITE{trademark} technology to determine its viability. The DRU test program was completed and a processing envelope developed. These results were used for process assessment and for scaleup. Tests in the continuous coker were intended to determine the

  16. Built To Last: Using Iterative Development Models for Sustainable Scientific Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasiak, M. E.; Truslove, I.; Savoie, M.

    2013-12-01

    In scientific research, software development exists fundamentally for the results they create. The core research must take focus. It seems natural to researchers, driven by grant deadlines, that every dollar invested in software development should be used to push the boundaries of problem solving. This system of values is frequently misaligned with those of the software being created in a sustainable fashion; short-term optimizations create longer-term sustainability issues. The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) has taken bold cultural steps in using agile and lean development and management methodologies to help its researchers meet critical deadlines, while building in the necessary support structure for the code to live far beyond its original milestones. Agile and lean software development and methodologies including Scrum, Kanban, Continuous Delivery and Test-Driven Development have seen widespread adoption within NSIDC. This focus on development methods is combined with an emphasis on explaining to researchers why these methods produce more desirable results for everyone, as well as promoting developers interacting with researchers. This presentation will describe NSIDC's current scientific software development model, how this addresses the short-term versus sustainability dichotomy, the lessons learned and successes realized by transitioning to this agile and lean-influenced model, and the current challenges faced by the organization.

  17. Development of seismic tomography software for hybrid supercomputers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, Alexandr; Serdyukov, Alexandr; Duchkov, Anton

    2015-04-01

    Seismic tomography is a technique used for computing velocity model of geologic structure from first arrival travel times of seismic waves. The technique is used in processing of regional and global seismic data, in seismic exploration for prospecting and exploration of mineral and hydrocarbon deposits, and in seismic engineering for monitoring the condition of engineering structures and the surrounding host medium. As a consequence of development of seismic monitoring systems and increasing volume of seismic data, there is a growing need for new, more effective computational algorithms for use in seismic tomography applications with improved performance, accuracy and resolution. To achieve this goal, it is necessary to use modern high performance computing systems, such as supercomputers with hybrid architecture that use not only CPUs, but also accelerators and co-processors for computation. The goal of this research is the development of parallel seismic tomography algorithms and software package for such systems, to be used in processing of large volumes of seismic data (hundreds of gigabytes and more). These algorithms and software package will be optimized for the most common computing devices used in modern hybrid supercomputers, such as Intel Xeon CPUs, NVIDIA Tesla accelerators and Intel Xeon Phi co-processors. In this work, the following general scheme of seismic tomography is utilized. Using the eikonal equation solver, arrival times of seismic waves are computed based on assumed velocity model of geologic structure being analyzed. In order to solve the linearized inverse problem, tomographic matrix is computed that connects model adjustments with travel time residuals, and the resulting system of linear equations is regularized and solved to adjust the model. The effectiveness of parallel implementations of existing algorithms on target architectures is considered. During the first stage of this work, algorithms were developed for execution on

  18. Making It Real: How High Schools Can Be Held Accountable for Developing Students' Career Readiness. Policy Brief 13-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darche, Svetlana; Stern, David

    2013-01-01

    There is widespread agreement on the goal of preparing every high school student for both postsecondary education and a lifetime of fulfilling work, that every graduate should be "college and career ready." The authors' view is that career readiness and college readiness entail many of the same skills, bodies of knowledge, and…

  19. Buy, don`t build -- What does that mean for a software developer?

    SciTech Connect

    Little, T.; Rahi, M.A.; Sinclair, C.

    1995-06-01

    The buzz phrase of the 1990`s for the petroleum software industry has become ``buy, don`t build.`` For an end user in an oil company, this generally means acquiring application software rather than developing it internally. The concept of buy, don`t build can also apply for a software developer. Purchasing software toolkit components can expedite the development of an application as well as reduce future support requirements.

  20. Ed Tech Developer's Guide: A Primer for Software Developers, Startups, and Entrepreneurs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bienkowski, Marie; Gerard, Sarah Nixon; Rubin, Shawn; Sanford, Cathy; Borrelli-Murray, Dana; Driscoll, Tom; Arora, Jessie; Hruska, Mike; Beck, Katie; Murray, Thomas; Hoekstra, Jason; Gannes, Stuart; Metz, Edward; Midgley, Steve; Castilla, Stephanie; Tomassini, Jason; Madda, Mary Jo; Chase, Zac; Martin, Erik; Noel, Marcus; Styles, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Opportunities abound for software designers and developers to create impactful tools for teachers, school leaders, students, and their families. This guide for developers, startups, and entrepreneurs addresses key questions about the education ecosystem and highlights critical needs and opportunities to develop digital tools and apps for learning.…

  1. An evolutionary morphological approach for software development cost estimation.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Ricardo de A; Oliveira, Adriano L I; Soares, Sergio; Meira, Silvio

    2012-08-01

    In this work we present an evolutionary morphological approach to solve the software development cost estimation (SDCE) problem. The proposed approach consists of a hybrid artificial neuron based on framework of mathematical morphology (MM) with algebraic foundations in the complete lattice theory (CLT), referred to as dilation-erosion perceptron (DEP). Also, we present an evolutionary learning process, called DEP(MGA), using a modified genetic algorithm (MGA) to design the DEP model, because a drawback arises from the gradient estimation of morphological operators in the classical learning process of the DEP, since they are not differentiable in the usual way. Furthermore, an experimental analysis is conducted with the proposed model using five complex SDCE problems and three well-known performance metrics, demonstrating good performance of the DEP model to solve SDCE problems. PMID:22560678

  2. Modifying the Crystal Ball and Developing Data Acquisition Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strakovsky, Alexey; Oussena, Baya

    2010-11-01

    This poster describes work done with the A2 Collaboration at the Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet (JGU) in Mainz, Germany. In 2009, we modified the cabling of the Crystal Ball detector, housed at the Mainzer Mikrotron facility (MAMI) at JGU. This reduced the length of the 672 signal cables by approximately 43.68 km to reduce weight on the frame of the detector and make room for a frozen-spin hydrogen target. This involved cutting cables in half and resoldering the ends to new interface cards and photomultiplier tube connectors. More recently in 2010, our focus has been to develop new data acquisition software to replace the one currently in use. The new version, AcquDAQ, is based on C++ rather than the old C programming language. When completed, AcquDAQ will control and read data from the new electronics hardware utilized at MAMI, including the Crystal Ball.

  3. Knowledge-based requirements analysis for automating software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markosian, Lawrence Z.

    1988-01-01

    We present a new software development paradigm that automates the derivation of implementations from requirements. In this paradigm, informally-stated requirements are expressed in a domain-specific requirements specification language. This language is machine-understable and requirements expressed in it are captured in a knowledge base. Once the requirements are captured, more detailed specifications and eventually implementations are derived by the system using transformational synthesis. A key characteristic of the process is that the required human intervention is in the form of providing problem- and domain-specific engineering knowledge, not in writing detailed implementations. We describe a prototype system that applies the paradigm in the realm of communication engineering: the prototype automatically generates implementations of buffers following analysis of the requirements on each buffer.

  4. Meta-tools for software development and knowledge acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksson, Henrik; Musen, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    The effectiveness of tools that provide support for software development is highly dependent on the match between the tools and their task. Knowledge-acquisition (KA) tools constitute a class of development tools targeted at knowledge-based systems. Generally, KA tools that are custom-tailored for particular application domains are more effective than are general KA tools that cover a large class of domains. The high cost of custom-tailoring KA tools manually has encouraged researchers to develop meta-tools for KA tools. Current research issues in meta-tools for knowledge acquisition are the specification styles, or meta-views, for target KA tools used, and the relationships between the specification entered in the meta-tool and other specifications for the target program under development. We examine different types of meta-views and meta-tools. Our current project is to provide meta-tools that produce KA tools from multiple specification sources--for instance, from a task analysis of the target application.

  5. Conceptions of Software Development by Project Managers: A Study of Managing the Outsourced Development of Software Applications for United States Federal Government Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisen, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This study explores how project managers, working for private federal IT contractors, experience and understand managing the development of software applications for U.S. federal government agencies. Very little is known about how they manage their projects in this challenging environment. Software development is a complex task and only grows in…

  6. Recommendations for Tritium Science and Technology Research and Development in Support of the Tritium Readiness Campaign, TTP-7-084

    SciTech Connect

    Senor, David J.

    2013-10-30

    Between 2006 and 2012 the Tritium Readiness Campaign Development and Testing Program produced significant advances in the understanding of in-reactor TPBAR performance. Incorporating these data into existing TPBAR performance models has improved permeation predictions, and the discrepancy between predicted and observed tritium permeation in the WBN1 coolant has been decreased by about 30%. However, important differences between predicted and observed permeation still remain, and there are significant knowledge gaps that hinder the ability to reliably predict other aspects of TPBAR performance such as tritium distribution, component integrity, and performance margins. Based on recommendations from recent Tritium Readiness Campaign workshops and reviews coupled with technical and programmatic priorities, high-priority activities were identified to address knowledge gaps in the near- (3-5 year), middle- (5-10 year), and long-term (10+ year) time horizons. It is important to note that there are many aspects to a well-integrated research and development program. The intent is not to focus exclusively on one aspect or another, but to approach the program in a holistic fashion. Thus, in addition to small-scale tritium science studies, ex-reactor tritium technology experiments such as TMED, and large-scale in-reactor tritium technology experiments such as TMIST, a well-rounded research and development program must also include continued analysis of WBN1 performance data and post-irradiation examination of TPBARs and lead use assemblies to evaluate model improvements and compare separate-effects and integral component behavior.

  7. Fostering Multirepresentational Levels of Chemical Concepts: A Framework to Develop Educational Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marson, Guilherme A.; Torres, Bayardo B.

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a convenient framework for developing interactive chemical education software to facilitate the integration of macroscopic, microscopic, and symbolic dimensions of chemical concepts--specifically, via the development of software for gel permeation chromatography. The instructional role of the software was evaluated in a study…

  8. 78 FR 47012 - Developing Software Life Cycle Processes Used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing a revised regulatory guide (RG), revision 1 of RG 1.173, ``Developing Software Life Cycle Processes for Digital Computer Software used in Safety Systems of Nuclear Power Plants.'' This RG endorses the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) Standard (Std.) 1074-2006, ``IEEE Standard for Developing a Software Project Life......

  9. Development of software standards for advanced transportation control systems. Final report. Volume 1. A model for roadway traffic control software

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, D.; Hendrickson, C.

    1993-06-01

    A systematic approach to traffic engineering software development could provide significant advantages with regard to software capability, flexibility and maintenance. Improved traffic controllers will likely be essential for many of the proposed intelligent vehicle highway systems (IVHS) applications. The report proposes a computable language, called TCBLKS (Traffic Control BLocKS), that could provide the foundation for constructing real time traffic engineering software. This computable language is designed to be configured by a graphical user interface that does not require extensive software engineering training to use, yet provides much more flexibility and capability than possible by simply changing program parameters. The model is based upon the function block metaphor commonly used for constructing robust and efficient real time industrial control systems.

  10. Developing sustainable software solutions for bioinformatics by the “ Butterfly” paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Zeeshan; Zeeshan, Saman; Dandekar, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Software design and sustainable software engineering are essential for the long-term development of bioinformatics software. Typical challenges in an academic environment are short-term contracts, island solutions, pragmatic approaches and loose documentation. Upcoming new challenges are big data, complex data sets, software compatibility and rapid changes in data representation. Our approach to cope with these challenges consists of iterative intertwined cycles of development (“ Butterfly” paradigm) for key steps in scientific software engineering. User feedback is valued as well as software planning in a sustainable and interoperable way. Tool usage should be easy and intuitive. A middleware supports a user-friendly Graphical User Interface (GUI) as well as a database/tool development independently. We validated the approach of our own software development and compared the different design paradigms in various software solutions. PMID:25383181

  11. Decreasing costs of ground data processing system development using a software product line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaffin, Brian

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, I describe software product lines and why a Ground Data Processing System should use one. I also describe how to develop a software product line, using examples from an imaginary Ground Data Processing System.

  12. Software and electronic developments for TUG - T60 robotic telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmaksizoglu, M.; Dindar, M.; Kirbiyik, H.; Helhel, S.

    2014-12-01

    A robotic telescope is a telescope that can make observations without hands-on human control. Its low level behavior is automatic and computer-controlled. Robotic telescopes usually run under the control of a scheduler, which provides high-level control by selecting astronomical targets for observation. TUBITAK National Observatory (TUG) T60 Robotic Telescope is controlled by open source OCAAS software, formally named TALON. This study introduces the improvements on TALON software, new electronic and mechanic designs. The designs and software improvements were implemented in the T60 telescope control software and tested on the real system successfully.

  13. Software development for safety-critical medical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, John C.

    1992-01-01

    There are many computer-based medical applications in which safety and not reliability is the overriding concern. Reduced, altered, or no functionality of such systems is acceptable as long as no harm is done. A precise, formal definition of what software safety means is essential, however, before any attempt can be made to achieve it. Without this definition, it is not possible to determine whether a specific software entity is safe. A set of definitions pertaining to software safety will be presented and a case study involving an experimental medical device will be described. Some new techniques aimed at improving software safety will also be discussed.

  14. The Pandora Software Development Kit for Particle Flow Calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. S.; Thomson, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Pandora is a robust and efficient framework for developing and running pattern-recognition algorithms. It was designed to perform particle flow calorimetry, which requires many complex pattern-recognition techniques to reconstruct the paths of individual particles through fine granularity detectors. The Pandora C++ software development kit (SDK) consists of a single library and a number of carefully designed application programming interfaces (APIs). A client application can use the Pandora APIs to pass details of tracks and hits/cells to the Pandora framework, which then creates and manages named lists of self-describing objects. These objects can be accessed by Pandora algorithms, which perform the pattern-recognition reconstruction. Development with the Pandora SDK promotes the creation of small, re-usable algorithms containing just the kernel of a specific operation. The algorithms are configured via XML and can be nested to perform complex reconstruction tasks. As the algorithms only access the Pandora objects in a controlled manner, via the APIs, the framework can perform most book-keeping and memory-management operations. The Pandora SDK has been fully exploited in the implementation of PandoraPFA, which uses over 60 algorithms to provide the state of the art in particle flow calorimetry for ILC and CLIC.

  15. Software development for the PBX-M plasma control system

    SciTech Connect

    Lagin, L.; Bell, R.; Chu, J.; Hatcher, R.; Hirsch, J.; Okabayashi, M.; Sichta, P.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the software development effort for the PBX-M plasma control system. The algorithms being developed for the system will serve to test advanced control concepts for TPX and ITER. This will include real-time algorithms for shaping control, vertical position control, current and density profile control and MHD avoidance. The control system consists of an interactive Host Processor (SPARC-10) interfaced through VME with four real-time Computer Processors (i860) which run at a maximum computational speed of 320 MFLOPs. Plasma shaping programs are being tested to duplicate the present PBX-M analog control system. Advanced algorithms for vertical control and x-point control will then be developed. Interactive graphical user interface programs running on the Host Processor will allow operators to control and monitor shot parameters. A waveform edit program will be used to download pre-programmed waveforms into the Compute Processor memory. Post-shot display programs will be used to interactively display data after the shot. Automatic pre-shot arming and data acquisition programs will run on the Host Processor. Event system programs will process interrupts and activate programs on the Host and Compute Processors. These programs are being written in C and Fortran and use system service routines to communicate with the Compute Processors and its memory. IDL and IDL widgets are being used to build the graphical user interfaces.

  16. Managing distributed software development in the Virtual Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Janet D.; Plante, Raymond L.; Boneventura, Nina; Busko, Ivo; Cresitello-Dittmar, Mark; D'Abrusco, Raffaele; Doe, Stephen; Ebert, Rick; Laurino, Omar; Pevunova, Olga; Refsdal, Brian; Thomas, Brian

    2012-09-01

    The U.S. Virtual Astronomical Observatory (VAO) is a product-driven organization that provides new scientific research capabilities to the astronomical community. Software development for the VAO follows a lightweight framework that guides development of science applications and infrastructure. Challenges to be overcome include distributed development teams, part-time efforts, and highly constrained schedules. We describe the process we followed to conquer these challenges while developing Iris, the VAO application for analysis of 1-D astronomical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Iris was successfully built and released in less than a year with a team distributed across four institutions. The project followed existing International Virtual Observatory Alliance inter-operability standards for spectral data and contributed a SED library as a by-product of the project. We emphasize lessons learned that will be folded into future development efforts. In our experience, a well-defined process that provides guidelines to ensure the project is cohesive and stays on track is key to success. Internal product deliveries with a planned test and feedback loop are critical. Release candidates are measured against use cases established early in the process, and provide the opportunity to assess priorities and make course corrections during development. Also key is the participation of a stakeholder such as a lead scientist who manages the technical questions, advises on priorities, and is actively involved as a lead tester. Finally, frequent scheduled communications (for example a bi-weekly tele-conference) assure issues are resolved quickly and the team is working toward a common vision.

  17. Measuring the development process: A tool for software design evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moy, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    The design metrics evaluator (DME), a component of an automated software design analysis system, is described. The DME quantitatively evaluates software design attributes. Its use directs attention to areas of a procedure, module, or complete program having a high potential for error.

  18. From Concept to Software: Developing a Framework for Understanding the Process of Software Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Punyashloke; Zhao, Yong; Tan, Sophia

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of technological innovation and the process of design focuses on the design of computer software. Offers a framework for understanding the design process by examining two computer programs: FliPS, a multimedia program for learning complex problems in chemistry; and Tiger, a Web-based program for managing and publishing electronic…

  19. Developing Information Power Grid Based Algorithms and Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dongarra, Jack

    1998-01-01

    This was an exploratory study to enhance our understanding of problems involved in developing large scale applications in a heterogeneous distributed environment. It is likely that the large scale applications of the future will be built by coupling specialized computational modules together. For example, efforts now exist to couple ocean and atmospheric prediction codes to simulate a more complete climate system. These two applications differ in many respects. They have different grids, the data is in different unit systems and the algorithms for inte,-rating in time are different. In addition the code for each application is likely to have been developed on different architectures and tend to have poor performance when run on an architecture for which the code was not designed, if it runs at all. Architectural differences may also induce differences in data representation which effect precision and convergence criteria as well as data transfer issues. In order to couple such dissimilar codes some form of translation must be present. This translation should be able to handle interpolation from one grid to another as well as construction of the correct data field in the correct units from available data. Even if a code is to be developed from scratch, a modular approach will likely be followed in that standard scientific packages will be used to do the more mundane tasks such as linear algebra or Fourier transform operations. This approach allows the developers to concentrate on their science rather than becoming experts in linear algebra or signal processing. Problems associated with this development approach include difficulties associated with data extraction and translation from one module to another, module performance on different nodal architectures, and others. In addition to these data and software issues there exists operational issues such as platform stability and resource management.

  20. Remotely Accessible Testbed for Software Defined Radio Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lux, James P.; Lang, Minh; Peters, Kenneth J.; Taylor, Gregory H.

    2012-01-01

    Previous development testbeds have assumed that the developer was physically present in front of the hardware being used. No provision for remote operation of basic functions (power on/off or reset) was made, because the developer/operator was sitting in front of the hardware, and could just push the button manually. In this innovation, a completely remotely accessible testbed has been created, with all diagnostic equipment and tools set up for remote access, and using standardized interfaces so that failed equipment can be quickly replaced. In this testbed, over 95% of the operating hours were used for testing without the developer being physically present. The testbed includes a pair of personal computers, one running Linux and one running Windows. A variety of peripherals is connected via Ethernet and USB (universal serial bus) interfaces. A private internal Ethernet is used to connect to test instruments and other devices, so that the sole connection to the outside world is via the two PCs. An important design consideration was that all of the instruments and interfaces used stable, long-lived industry standards, such as Ethernet, USB, and GPIB (general purpose interface bus). There are no plug-in cards for the two PCs, so there are no problems with finding replacement computers with matching interfaces, device drivers, and installation. The only thing unique to the two PCs is the locally developed software, which is not specific to computer or operating system version. If a device (including one of the computers) were to fail or become unavailable (e.g., a test instrument needed to be recalibrated), replacing it is a straightforward process with a standard, off-the-shelf device.

  1. A portable solar adaptive optics system: software and laboratory developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Deqing; Penn, Matt; Plymate, Claude; Wang, Haimin; Zhang, Xi; Dong, Bing; Brown, Nathan; Denio, Andrew

    2010-07-01

    We present our recent process on a portable solar adaptive Optics system, which is aimed for diffraction-limited imaging in the 1.0 ~ 5.0-μm infrared wavelength range with any solar telescope with an aperture size up to 1.6 meters. The realtime wave-front sensing, image processing and computation are based on a commercial multi-core personal computer. The software is developed in LabVIEW. Combining the power of multi-core imaging processing and LabVIEW parallel programming, we show that our solar adaptive optics can achieve excellent performance that is competitive with other systems. In addition, the LabVIEW's block diagram based programming is especially suitable for rapid development of a prototype system, which makes a low-cost and high-performance system possible. Our adaptive optics system is flexible; it can work with any telescope with or without central obstruction with any aperture size in the range of 0.6~1.6 meters. In addition, the whole system is compact and can be brought to a solar observatory to perform associated scientific observations. According to our knowledge, this is the first adaptive optics that adopts the LabVIEW high-level programming language with a multi-core commercial personal computer, and includes the unique features discussed above.

  2. Software Developed for Analyzing High- Speed Rolling-Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David P.

    2005-01-01

    COBRA-AHS (Computer Optimized Ball & Roller Bearing Analysis--Advanced High Speed, J.V. Poplawski & Associates, Bethlehem, PA) is used for the design and analysis of rolling element bearings operating at high speeds under complex mechanical and thermal loading. The code estimates bearing fatigue life by calculating three-dimensional subsurface stress fields developed within the bearing raceways. It provides a state-of-the-art interactive design environment for bearing engineers within a single easy-to-use design-analysis package. The code analyzes flexible or rigid shaft systems containing up to five bearings acted upon by radial, thrust, and moment loads in 5 degrees of freedom. Bearing types include high-speed ball, cylindrical roller, and tapered roller bearings. COBRA-AHS is the first major upgrade in 30 years of such commercially available bearing software. The upgrade was developed under a Small Business Innovation Research contract from the NASA Glenn Research Center, and incorporates the results of 30 years of NASA and industry bearing research and technology.

  3. The Development of Software Testing in Finland 1950-2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohjolainen, Pentti A.

    The paper presents the development of software testing in Finland. This topic has received little academic attention and it is frequently forgotten. The existing publications concentrate more on the history of machines and programming languages than on the history of the development of testing. The analysis made so far proves that the problems in the early times were very different from nowadays. For example, during the 1950s and 1960s, it was difficult to get computation time for testing. Meanwhile, during the 1990s, and after that, the greatest source of problems has been the complexity and the massiveness of programs. On the other hand, it seems that the education of testing has not been sufficient until the end of 1990s. Hence, the knowledge of diverse testing methods, test automation, and outsourcing are now better than in the past. In our research, we have interviewed over fifty persons. The interviewees vary from pioneers of Finnish computing, having tens of years career, to young professionals of testing. Their selection is from Finnish universities and over twenty companies in Finland.

  4. The Five 'R's' for Developing Trusted Software Frameworks to increase confidence in, and maximise reuse of, Open Source Software.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Ryan; Gross, Lutz; Wyborn, Lesley; Evans, Ben; Klump, Jens

    2015-04-01

    Recent investments in HPC, cloud and Petascale data stores, have dramatically increased the scale and resolution that earth science challenges can now be tackled. These new infrastructures are highly parallelised and to fully utilise them and access the large volumes of earth science data now available, a new approach to software stack engineering needs to be developed. The size, complexity and cost of the new infrastructures mean any software deployed has to be reliable, trusted and reusable. Increasingly software is available via open source repositories, but these usually only enable code to be discovered and downloaded. As a user it is hard for a scientist to judge the suitability and quality of individual codes: rarely is there information on how and where codes can be run, what the critical dependencies are, and in particular, on the version requirements and licensing of the underlying software stack. A trusted software framework is proposed to enable reliable software to be discovered, accessed and then deployed on multiple hardware environments. More specifically, this framework will enable those who generate the software, and those who fund the development of software, to gain credit for the effort, IP, time and dollars spent, and facilitate quantification of the impact of individual codes. For scientific users, the framework delivers reviewed and benchmarked scientific software with mechanisms to reproduce results. The trusted framework will have five separate, but connected components: Register, Review, Reference, Run, and Repeat. 1) The Register component will facilitate discovery of relevant software from multiple open source code repositories. The registration process of the code should include information about licensing, hardware environments it can be run on, define appropriate validation (testing) procedures and list the critical dependencies. 2) The Review component is targeting on the verification of the software typically against a set of

  5. Job Ready.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easter Seal Society for Crippled Children and Adults of Washington, Seattle.

    Intended for use by employers for assessing how "job-ready" their particular business environment may be, the booklet provides information illustrating what physical changes could be made to allow persons with mobility limitations to enter and conduct business independently in a particular building. Illustrations along with brief explanations are…

  6. College Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapa, Marisa; Galvan-De Leon, Vanessa; Solis, Judith; Mundy, Marie-Anne

    2014-01-01

    During the 79th Texas Legislature, the bill "Advancement of College Readiness in Curriculum" was passed (THECB). As a response to this, high schools and colleges have combined forming an early college high school. The result of this union was a program that condensed the time it took to complete both the high school diploma and up to two…

  7. Ready Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koltay, Emery

    2001-01-01

    Includes four articles that relate to ready reference, including a list of publishers' toll-free telephone numbers and Web sites; how to obtain an ISBN (International Standard Book Number) and an ISSN (International Standard Serial Number); and how to obtain an SAN (Standard Address Number), for organizations that are involved in the book…

  8. A simple way of evaluating the healthiness of ready-to-eat foods and developing healthy foods in the food industry.

    PubMed

    Outila, Terhi A; Simulainen, Helena; Laukkanen, Tuula H A; Maarit Kyyrö, A

    2006-01-01

    In this study we have developed a new way of evaluating the healthiness of ready-to-eat foods. In the developed method, ready-to-eat foods were classified into specific product categories, and the nutritional quality of classified foods was analysed using the national dietary recommendations and the national dietary survey as a basis for the dietary calculations. The method was tested with the products of 'Saarioinen', which is the leading brand in the Finnish ready-to-eat food market. Results indicate that this low-cost method can easily be used in the food industry as a tool in product development and marketing in order to develop healthy foods. The method could also be applied to the restaurant and catering trade, as well as to other public institutions serving food. By using this model, nutritional researchers and the food industry could work together to prevent nutrition-related health problems. PMID:16849121

  9. The development and technology transfer of software engineering technology at NASA. Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitman, C. L.; Erb, D. M.; Izygon, M. E.; Fridge, E. M., III; Roush, G. B.; Braley, D. M.; Savely, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    The United State's big space projects of the next decades, such as Space Station and the Human Exploration Initiative, will need the development of many millions of lines of mission critical software. NASA-Johnson (JSC) is identifying and developing some of the Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) technology that NASA will need to build these future software systems. The goal is to improve the quality and the productivity of large software development projects. New trends are outlined in CASE technology and how the Software Technology Branch (STB) at JSC is endeavoring to provide some of these CASE solutions for NASA is described. Key software technology components include knowledge-based systems, software reusability, user interface technology, reengineering environments, management systems for the software development process, software cost models, repository technology, and open, integrated CASE environment frameworks. The paper presents the status and long-term expectations for CASE products. The STB's Reengineering Application Project (REAP), Advanced Software Development Workstation (ASDW) project, and software development cost model (COSTMODL) project are then discussed. Some of the general difficulties of technology transfer are introduced, and a process developed by STB for CASE technology insertion is described.

  10. Exploratory research for the development of a computer aided software design environment with the software technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardwick, Charles

    1991-01-01

    Field studies were conducted by MCC to determine areas of research of mutual interest to MCC and JSC. NASA personnel from the Information Systems Directorate and research faculty from UHCL/RICIS visited MCC in Austin, Texas to examine tools and applications under development in the MCC Software Technology Program. MCC personnel presented workshops in hypermedia, design knowledge capture, and design recovery on site at JSC for ISD personnel. The following programs were installed on workstations in the Software Technology Lab, NASA/JSC: (1) GERM (Graphic Entity Relations Modeler); (2) gIBIS (Graphic Issues Based Information System); and (3) DESIRE (Design Recovery tool). These applications were made available to NASA for inspection and evaluation. Programs developed in the MCC Software Technology Program run on the SUN workstation. The programs do not require special configuration, but they will require larger than usual amounts of disk space and RAM to operate properly.

  11. Stakeholder co-development of farm level nutrient management software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Cathal; Mechan, Sarah; Macken-Walsh, Aine; Heanue, Kevin

    2013-04-01

    Over the last number of decades intensification in the use nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in agricultural production has lead to excessive accumulations of these nutrients in soils, groundwaters and surface water bodies (Sutton et al., 2011). According to the European Environment Agency (2012) despite some progress diffuse pollution from agriculture is still significant in more than 40% of Europe's water bodies in rivers and coastal waters, and in one third of the water bodies in lakes and transitional waters. Recently it was estimated that approximately 29% of monitored river channel length is polluted to some degree across the Republic of Ireland. Agricultural sources were suspected in 47 per cent of cases (EPA, 2012). Farm level management practices to reduce nutrient transfers from agricultural land to watercourses can be divided into source reduction and source interception approaches (Ribaudo et al., 2001). Source interception approaches involve capturing nutrients post mobilisation through policy instruments such as riparian buffer zones or wetlands. Conversely, the source reduction approach is preventative in nature and promotes strict management of nutrient at farm and field level to reduce risk of mobilisation in the first instance. This has the potential to deliver a double dividend of reduced nutrient loss to the wider ecosystem while maximising economic return to agricultural production at the field and farm levels. Adoption and use of nutrient management plans among farmers is far from the norm. This research engages key farmer and extension stakeholders to explore how current nutrient management planning software and outputs should be developed to make it more user friendly and usable in a practical way. An open innovation technology co-development approach was adopted to investigate what is demanded by the end users - farm advisors and farmers. Open innovation is a knowledge management strategy that uses the input of stakeholders to improve

  12. Development of a case tool to support decision based software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wild, Christian J.

    1993-01-01

    A summary of the accomplishments of the research over the past year are presented. Achievements include: made demonstrations with DHC, a prototype supporting decision based software development (DBSD) methodology, for Paramax personnel at ODU; met with Paramax personnel to discuss DBSD issues, the process of integrating DBSD and Refinery and the porting process model; completed and submitted a paper describing DBSD paradigm to IFIP '92; completed and presented a paper describing the approach for software reuse at the Software Reuse Workshop in April 1993; continued to extend DHC with a project agenda, facility necessary for a better project management; completed a primary draft of the re-engineering process model for porting; created a logging form to trace all the activities involved in the process of solving the reengineering problem, and developed a primary chart with the problems involved by the reengineering process.

  13. IDEAS and App Development Internship in Hardware and Software Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alrayes, Rabab D.

    2016-01-01

    In this report, I will discuss the tasks and projects I have completed while working as an electrical engineering intern during the spring semester of 2016 at NASA Kennedy Space Center. In the field of software development, I completed tasks for the G-O Caching Mobile App and the Asbestos Management Information System (AMIS) Web App. The G-O Caching Mobile App was written in HTML, CSS, and JavaScript on the Cordova framework, while the AMIS Web App is written in HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and C# on the AngularJS framework. My goals and objectives on these two projects were to produce an app with an eye-catching and intuitive User Interface (UI), which will attract more employees to participate; to produce a fully-tested, fully functional app which supports workforce engagement and exploration; to produce a fully-tested, fully functional web app that assists technicians working in asbestos management. I also worked in hardware development on the Integrated Display and Environmental Awareness System (IDEAS) wearable technology project. My tasks on this project were focused in PCB design and camera integration. My goals and objectives for this project were to successfully integrate fully functioning custom hardware extenders on the wearable technology headset to minimize the size of hardware on the smart glasses headset for maximum user comfort; to successfully integrate fully functioning camera onto the headset. By the end of this semester, I was able to successfully develop four extender boards to minimize hardware on the headset, and assisted in integrating a fully-functioning camera into the system.

  14. SWS CoCo: Lessons Learned about Distributed Multi-Platform Software Development and Configuration Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huygen, R.; Boxhoorn, D.; Roelfsema, P. R.; Sym, N.; Vandenbussche, B.; Wieprecht, E.

    This paper describes how the ISO-SWS development team developed the Interactive Analysis (IA) software in a distributed environment. When it became clear that IA would be developed by at least three institutes that were geographically distributed, a platform-independent configuration control system (CoCo) was designed that could control the software development in terms of version control and access control, and distribute the software in a consistent and automatic way. The CoCo system incorporates also tracking of problem reports. Over the years the development team has gained experience in distributed software development and maintenance. The lessons learned from this experience are discussed.

  15. Configuration management and software measurement in the Ground Systems Development Environment (GSDE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, Victor E.; Long, D.; Hartenstein, Ray; Perez-Davila, Alfredo

    1992-01-01

    A set of functional requirements for software configuration management (CM) and metrics reporting for Space Station Freedom ground systems software are described. This report is one of a series from a study of the interfaces among the Ground Systems Development Environment (GSDE), the development systems for the Space Station Training Facility (SSTF) and the Space Station Control Center (SSCC), and the target systems for SSCC and SSTF. The focus is on the CM of the software following delivery to NASA and on the software metrics that relate to the quality and maintainability of the delivered software. The CM and metrics requirements address specific problems that occur in large-scale software development. Mechanisms to assist in the continuing improvement of mission operations software development are described.

  16. [Evaluation of a newly-developed ready-to-use commercial PCR kit for the molecular diagnosis of Francisella tularensis].

    PubMed

    Celebi, Bekir; Kılıç, Selçuk; Yeşilyurt, Murat; Acar, Bülent

    2014-01-01

    Tularemia is a rare zoonotic infection, however, considerations of tularemia as a biological weapon and several recent major epidemics have caused renewed interest in this disease. Laboratory diagnosis of tularemia is done in the presence of appropriate epidemiological data, by the demonstration of specific antibodies in the serum samples obtained with 1-2 week intervals following the development of symptoms. It is an a posteriori analysis with limited use for prompt diagnosis of the patient during the early symptomatic phase and deliberate release of biological agents. Limitations in both culture and serology have led to substantial research in the development of new diagnostic techniques. Several PCR methods for tularemia have been developed, both for conventional and real-time polymerase chain reaction (rtPCR). However, PCR methods are hard to be deployed in remote endemic areas that lack sufficient infrastructure. Recently a "Toolbox" which includes all instruments, equipments and solutions [DNA4U® Bacteria Genomic DNA Isolation Kit, CubeCycler® (Personal Thermal Cycler), PCR4U® Bioterrorism Agents Detection Kit, electrophoresis tank, power supply, ready-agarose gel and electrophoresis buffer] necessary for conventional PCR, was developed for the identification of bioterrorism agents in the field. In this study we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a ready-to-use commercial PCR kit (Nanobiz, Ankara, Turkey) targeting the tul4 gene, for the diagnosis of tularemia and to compare the results with an in-house conventional PCR and a rtPCR test. We applied the assay to a collection of four F.tularensis standard strains, 15 field isolates (from humans, animals, water), 13 non-Francisella strains which are phylogenetically related to F.tularensis and a total of 60 lymph node aspirates obtained from suspected tularemia cases. Compared to the in-house PCR method used in our laboratory, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of Nanobiz PCR

  17. Advanced software development workstation project ACCESS user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    ACCESS is a knowledge based software information system designed to assist the user in modifying retrieved software to satisfy user specifications. A user's guide is presented for the knowledge engineer who wishes to create for ACCESS a knowledge base consisting of representations of objects in some software system. This knowledge is accessible to an end user who wishes to use the catalogued software objects to create a new application program or an input stream for an existing system. The application specific portion of an ACCESS knowledge base consists of a taxonomy of object classes, as well as instances of these classes. All objects in the knowledge base are stored in an associative memory. ACCESS provides a standard interface for the end user to browse and modify objects. In addition, the interface can be customized by the addition of application specific data entry forms and by specification of display order for the taxonomy and object attributes. These customization options are described.

  18. Software Piracy Forensics: The Need for Further Developing AFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baboo, S. Santhosh; Bhattathiripad, P. Vinod

    Among all the available approaches for software piracy forensics, one existing and exceptional approach is the theoretical frame work called AFC (Abstraction-Filtering-Comparison), an accepted approach in US courts for evaluating copyright infringement claims involving computer software. Through this paper, the authors would like to approach AFC in a threefold manner: One, to discuss the nature and efficacy of AFC; two, to recount some existing observations on it, and three, to identify areas, if any, where there is scope and need for appropriate modifications to further increase the efficacy and validate the legitimacy of the AFC approach, and in particular from the view point of a researcher who believes that software intelligence offered by the automated tools for software piracy investigation needs to be supplemented with manual intelligence for making the expert report more judiciary-friendly.

  19. Software development for avionics SSME control and diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudry, A.

    1989-01-01

    A study was made of software to integrate data from about 500 sensors that monitor the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and to make decisions for real-time control. Such software is expected to be applicable to other distributed systems as well. This study investigated the use of pattern recognition and other techniques to detect trends that could lead to major damage to the SSME and which would allow an orderly shutdown of the SSME before such damage could occur.

  20. Development of evaluation method for software hazard identification techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H. W.; Chen, M. H.; Shih, C.; Yih, S.; Kuo, C. T.; Wang, L. H.; Yu, Y. C.; Chen, C. W.

    2006-07-01

    This research evaluated the applicable software hazard identification techniques nowadays, such as, Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA), Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA), Fault Tree Analysis (FTA), Markov chain modeling, Dynamic Flow-graph Methodology (DFM), and simulation-based model analysis; and then determined indexes in view of their characteristics, which include dynamic capability, completeness, achievability, detail, signal/noise ratio, complexity, and implementation cost. By this proposed method, the analysts can evaluate various software hazard identification combinations for specific purpose. According to the case study results, the traditional PHA + FMEA + FTA (with failure rate) + Markov chain modeling (with transfer rate) combination is not competitive due to the dilemma for obtaining acceptable software failure rates. However, the systematic architecture of FTA and Markov chain modeling is still valuable for realizing the software fault structure. The system centric techniques, such as DFM and simulation-based model-analysis, show the advantage on dynamic capability, achievability, detail, signal/noise ratio. However, their disadvantages are the completeness complexity and implementation cost. This evaluation method can be a platform to reach common consensus for the stakeholders. Following the evolution of software hazard identification techniques, the evaluation results could be changed. However, the insight of software hazard identification techniques is much more important than the numbers obtained by the evaluation. (authors)

  1. Development of the Galileo Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem flight software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasner, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    The ongoing design and implementation of the Project Galileo Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem (AACS) flight software is outlined, as well as the more important problems that were experienced in the development of this software. The important characteristics of the Galileo spacecraft are described, as are the major requirements driving the software design. The important features of the design are stated and discussed, and a modes and tasks transition diagram is presented. The AACS software implementation is covered, and the algorithms active in each task are shown. Finally, some of the design and management techniques used in the course of the software development are discussed.

  2. Software Testbed for Developing and Evaluating Integrated Autonomous Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, James; Remolina, Emilio; Prompt, Axel; Robinson, Peter; Sweet, Adam; Nishikawa, David

    2015-01-01

    To implement fault tolerant autonomy in future space systems, it will be necessary to integrate planning, adaptive control, and state estimation subsystems. However, integrating these subsystems is difficult, time-consuming, and error-prone. This paper describes Intelliface/ADAPT, a software testbed that helps researchers develop and test alternative strategies for integrating planning, execution, and diagnosis subsystems more quickly and easily. The testbed's architecture, graphical data displays, and implementations of the integrated subsystems support easy plug and play of alternate components to support research and development in fault-tolerant control of autonomous vehicles and operations support systems. Intelliface/ADAPT controls NASA's Advanced Diagnostics and Prognostics Testbed (ADAPT), which comprises batteries, electrical loads (fans, pumps, and lights), relays, circuit breakers, invertors, and sensors. During plan execution, an experimentor can inject faults into the ADAPT testbed by tripping circuit breakers, changing fan speed settings, and closing valves to restrict fluid flow. The diagnostic subsystem, based on NASA's Hybrid Diagnosis Engine (HyDE), detects and isolates these faults to determine the new state of the plant, ADAPT. Intelliface/ADAPT then updates its model of the ADAPT system's resources and determines whether the current plan can be executed using the reduced resources. If not, the planning subsystem generates a new plan that reschedules tasks, reconfigures ADAPT, and reassigns the use of ADAPT resources as needed to work around the fault. The resource model, planning domain model, and planning goals are expressed using NASA's Action Notation Modeling Language (ANML). Parts of the ANML model are generated automatically, and other parts are constructed by hand using the Planning Model Integrated Development Environment, a visual Eclipse-based IDE that accelerates ANML model development. Because native ANML planners are currently

  3. Development of Usability Criteria for E-Learning Content Development Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, Serkan

    2012-01-01

    Revolutionary advancements have been observed in e-learning technologies though an amalgamated evaluation methodology for new generation e-learning content development tools is not available. The evaluation of educational software for online use must consider its usability and as well as its pedagogic effectiveness. This study is a first step…

  4. Framework Programmable Platform for the advanced software development workstation: Framework processor design document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, Richard J.; Blinn, Thomas M.; Mayer, Paula S. D.; Ackley, Keith A.; Crump, Wes; Sanders, Les

    1991-01-01

    The design of the Framework Processor (FP) component of the Framework Programmable Software Development Platform (FFP) is described. The FFP is a project aimed at combining effective tool and data integration mechanisms with a model of the software development process in an intelligent integrated software development environment. Guided by the model, this Framework Processor will take advantage of an integrated operating environment to provide automated support for the management and control of the software development process so that costly mistakes during the development phase can be eliminated.

  5. An Approach to Building a Traceability Tool for Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Nelly; Watson, Tom

    1997-01-01

    It is difficult in a large, complex computer program to ensure that it meets the specified requirements. As the program evolves over time, a11 program constraints originally elicited during the requirements phase must be maintained. In addition, during the life cycle of the program, requirements typically change and the program must consistently reflect those changes. Imagine the following scenario. Company X wants to develop a system to automate its assembly line. With such a large system, there are many different stakeholders, e.g., managers, experts such as industrial and mechanical engineers, and end-users. Requirements would be elicited from all of the stake holders involved in the system with each stakeholder contributing their point of view to the requirements. For example, some of the requirements provided by an industrial engineer may concern the movement of parts through the assembly line. A point of view provided by the electrical engineer may be reflected in constraints concerning maximum power usage. End-users may be concerned with comfort and safety issues, whereas managers are concerned with the efficiency of the operation. With so many points of view affecting the requirements, it is difficult to manage them, communicate information to relevant stakeholders. and it is likely that conflicts in the requirements will arise. In the coding process, the implementors will make additional assumptions and interpretations on the design and the requirements of the system. During any stage of development, stakeholders may request that a requirement be added or changed. In such a dynamic environment, it is difficult to guarantee that the system will preserve the current set of requirements. Tracing, the mapping between objects in the artifacts of the system being developed, addresses this issue. Artifacts encompass documents such as the system definition, interview transcripts, memoranda, the software requirements specification, user's manuals, the functional

  6. Demographic-Based Perceptions of Adequacy of Software Security's Presence within Individual Phases of the Software Development Life Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Aleksey

    2013-01-01

    The topic of software security has become paramount in information technology (IT) related scholarly research. Researchers have addressed numerous software security topics touching on all phases of the Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC): requirements gathering phase, design phase, development phase, testing phase, and maintenance phase.…

  7. The dynamics of software development project management: An integrative systems dynamic perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandervelde, W. E.; Abdel-Hamid, T.

    1984-01-01

    Rather than continuing to focus on software development projects per se, the system dynamics modeling approach outlined is extended to investigate a broader set of issues pertaining to the software development organization. Rather than trace the life cycle(s) of one or more software projects, the focus is on the operations of a software development department as a continuous stream of software products are developed, placed into operation, and maintained. A number of research questions are ""ripe'' for investigating including: (1) the efficacy of different organizational structures in different software development environments, (2) personnel turnover, (3) impact of management approaches such as management by objectives, and (4) the organizational/environmental determinants of productivity.

  8. A Project Management Approach to Using Simulation for Cost Estimation on Large, Complex Software Development Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizell, Carolyn; Malone, Linda

    2007-01-01

    It is very difficult for project managers to develop accurate cost and schedule estimates for large, complex software development projects. None of the approaches or tools available today can estimate the true cost of software with any high degree of accuracy early in a project. This paper provides an approach that utilizes a software development process simulation model that considers and conveys the level of uncertainty that exists when developing an initial estimate. A NASA project will be analyzed using simulation and data from the Software Engineering Laboratory to show the benefits of such an approach.

  9. Developing and validating a model to predict the success of an IHCS implementation: the Readiness for Implementation Model

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, David H; Hawkins, Robert P; Brennan, Patricia F; Dinauer, Susan; Johnson, Pauley R; Siegler, Tracy

    2010-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate the Readiness for Implementation Model (RIM). This model predicts a healthcare organization's potential for success in implementing an interactive health communication system (IHCS). The model consists of seven weighted factors, with each factor containing five to seven elements. Design Two decision-analytic approaches, self-explicated and conjoint analysis, were used to measure the weights of the RIM with a sample of 410 experts. The RIM model with weights was then validated in a prospective study of 25 IHCS implementation cases. Measurements Orthogonal main effects design was used to develop 700 conjoint-analysis profiles, which varied on seven factors. Each of the 410 experts rated the importance and desirability of the factors and their levels, as well as a set of 10 different profiles. For the prospective 25-case validation, three time-repeated measures of the RIM scores were collected for comparison with the implementation outcomes. Results Two of the seven factors, ‘organizational motivation’ and ‘meeting user needs,’ were found to be most important in predicting implementation readiness. No statistically significant difference was found in the predictive validity of the two approaches (self-explicated and conjoint analysis). The RIM was a better predictor for the 1-year implementation outcome than the half-year outcome. Limitations The expert sample, the order of the survey tasks, the additive model, and basing the RIM cut-off score on experience are possible limitations of the study. Conclusion The RIM needs to be empirically evaluated in institutions adopting IHCS and sustaining the system in the long term. PMID:20962135

  10. MacMouse. Developing Preschool Readiness Concepts and Skills with HyperCard and MacRecorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitterman, L. Jeffrey

    Through developments with the use of the "Apple Macintosh" computer, "HyperCard," and "MacRecorder," children in preschool handicapped programs are now capable of participating in appropriate computerized learning experiences. "HyperCard" allows educators to produce their own computerized instructional lessons with a software program that…

  11. Enhancing Individual Readiness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on enhancing individual readiness through human resource development (HRD). "Secondary School Administrator's Perception of Enhancing Self-Worth through Service" (Thomas Li-Ping Tang, Emily James Weatherford) presents results of a study to examine secondary school administrators' endorsement of…

  12. Open Source Software Development and Lotka's Law: Bibliometric Patterns in Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newby, Gregory B.; Greenberg, Jane; Jones, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Applies Lotka's Law to metadata on open source software development. Authoring patterns found in software development productivity are found to be comparable to prior studies of Lotka's Law for scientific and scholarly publishing, and offer promise in predicting aggregate behavior of open source developers. (Author/LRW)

  13. Application of software quality assurance to a specific scientific code development task

    SciTech Connect

    Dronkers, J.J.

    1986-03-01

    This paper describes an application of software quality assurance to a specific scientific code development program. The software quality assurance program consists of three major components: administrative control, configuration management, and user documentation. The program attempts to be consistent with existing local traditions of scientific code development while at the same time providing a controlled process of development.

  14. Software Development in the Water Sciences: a view from the divide (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, B.; Band, L. E.

    2013-12-01

    While training in statistical methods is an important part of many earth scientists' training, these scientists often learn the bulk of their software development skills in an ad hoc, just-in-time manner. Yet to carry out contemporary research scientists are spending more and more time developing software. Here I present perspectives - as an earth sciences graduate student with professional software engineering experience - on the challenges scientists face adopting software engineering practices, with an emphasis on areas of the science software development lifecycle that could benefit most from improved engineering. This work builds on experience gained as part of the NSF-funded Water Science Software Institute (WSSI) conceptualization award (NSF Award # 1216817). Throughout 2013, the WSSI team held a series of software scoping and development sprints with the goals of: (1) adding features to better model green infrastructure within the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System (RHESSys); and (2) infusing test-driven agile software development practices into the processes employed by the RHESSys team. The goal of efforts such as the WSSI is to ensure that investments by current and future scientists in software engineering training will enable transformative science by improving both scientific reproducibility and researcher productivity. Experience with the WSSI indicates: (1) the potential for achieving this goal; and (2) while scientists are willing to adopt some software engineering practices, transformative science will require continued collaboration between domain scientists and cyberinfrastructure experts for the foreseeable future.

  15. Does University Campus Experience Develop Motivation to Lead or Readiness to Lead among Undergraduate Students? "A Malaysian Perspective"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamid, Jamaliah Abdul; Krauss, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    Do students' experiences on university campuses cultivate motivation to lead or a sense of readiness to lead that does not necessarily translate to active leadership? To address this question, a study was conducted with 369 undergraduates from Malaysia. Campus experience was more predictive of leadership readiness than motivation. Student…

  16. Space Station Mission Planning Study (MPS) development study. Volume 3: Software development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klus, W. L.

    1987-01-01

    A software development plan is presented for the definition, design, and implementation of the Space Station (SS) Payload Mission Planning System (MPS). This plan is an evolving document and must be updated periodically as the SS design and operations concepts as well as the SS MPS concept evolve. The major segments of this plan are as follows: an overview of the SS MPS and a description of its required capabilities including the computer programs identified as configurable items with an explanation of the place and function of each within the system; an overview of the project plan and a detailed description of each development project activity breaking each into lower level tasks where applicable; identification of the resources required and recommendations for the manner in which they should be utilized including recommended schedules and estimated manpower requirements; and a description of the practices, standards, and techniques recommended for the SS MPS Software (SW) development.

  17. Software Development Cost: How Much? You Sure? Technical Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hihn, Jairus; Menzies, Tim

    2006-01-01

    This slide presentation reports on findings from analyzing a NASA COCOMO 81 dataset with 93 records. The current tool is called COSEEKMO, using a methodology can be applied to any set of cost models and data. The effort was part of a research initiative funded by the NASA Office of Safety and Mission and Assurance (OSMA) aimed at improving software reliability.

  18. Developing Digital Competences Using an Educational Software. A Pedagogical Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magdas, Ioana; Bontea, Timea

    2011-01-01

    Many teachers and people in educational institutions consider it necessary to prepare children for living in a computerized society. The Internet offers an incredible number of opportunities for teachers. The Web offer of e-learning open source platforms reached an impressive configuration. In this article, we present an educational software for…

  19. Root Shock Revisited: Perspectives of Early Head Start Mothers on Community and Policy Environments and Their Effects on Child Health, Development, and School Readiness

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Carol L.; Thomas, Tammy L.; Green, Beth L.

    2009-01-01

    Racial differences in school readiness are a form of health disparity. By examining, from the perspective of low-income minority families participating in an Early Head Start study, community and policy environments as they shape and inform lived experiences, we identified several types of social and economic dislocation that undermine the efforts of parents to ready their children for school. The multiple dislocations of community triggered by housing and welfare reform and “urban renewal” are sources of stress for parents and children and affect the health and development of young children. Our findings suggest that racial differences in school readiness result not from race but from poverty and structural racism in American society. PMID:19059871

  20. Orbit determination software development for microprocessor based systems: Evaluation and recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shenitz, C. M.; Mcgarry, F. E.; Tasaki, K. K.

    1980-01-01

    A guide is presented for National Aeronautics and Space Administration management personnel who stand to benefit from the lessons learned in developing microprocessor-based flight dynamics software systems. The essential functional characteristics of microprocessors are presented. The relevant areas of system support software are examined, as are the distinguishing characteristics of flight dynamics software. Design examples are provided to illustrate the major points presented, and actual development experience obtained in this area is provided as evidence to support the conclusions reached.