Science.gov

Sample records for real-time dynamic modeling

  1. A channel dynamics model for real-time flood forecasting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoos, A.B.; Koussis, A.D.; Beale, G.O.

    1989-01-01

    A new channel dynamics scheme ASPIRE (alternative system predictor in real time), designed specifically for real-time river flow forecasting, is introduced to reduce uncertainty in the forecast. ASPIRE is a storage routing model that limits the influence of catchment model forecast errors to the downstream station closest to the catchment. Comparisons with the Muskingum routing scheme in field tests suggest that the ASPIRE scheme can provide more accurate forecasts, probably because discharge observations are used to a maximum advantage and routing reaches (and model errors in each reach) are uncoupled. Using ASPIRE in conjunction with the Kalman filter did not improve forecast accuracy relative to a deterministic updating procedure. Theoretical analysis suggests that this is due to a large process noise to measurement noise ratio. -Authors

  2. Computer Modeling of Real-Time Dynamic Lighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maida, James C.; Pace, J.; Novak, J.; Russo, Dane M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Space Station tasks involve procedures that are very complex and highly dependent on the availability of visual information. In many situations, cameras are used as tools to help overcome the visual and physical restrictions associated with space flight. However, these cameras are effected by the dynamic lighting conditions of space. Training for these is conditions is necessary. The current project builds on the findings of an earlier NRA funded project, which revealed improved performance by humans when trained with computer graphics and lighting effects such as shadows and glare.

  3. Real-Time Dynamic Modeling - Data Information Requirements and Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; Smith, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    Practical aspects of identifying dynamic models for aircraft in real time were studied. Topics include formulation of an equation-error method in the frequency domain to estimate non-dimensional stability and control derivatives in real time, data information content for accurate modeling results, and data information management techniques such as data forgetting, incorporating prior information, and optimized excitation. Real-time dynamic modeling was applied to simulation data and flight test data from a modified F-15B fighter aircraft, and to operational flight data from a subscale jet transport aircraft. Estimated parameter standard errors, prediction cases, and comparisons with results from a batch output-error method in the time domain were used to demonstrate the accuracy of the identified real-time models.

  4. Real-Time Dynamic Modeling - Data Information Requirements and Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; Smith, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    Practical aspects of identifying dynamic models for aircraft in real time were studied. Topics include formulation of an equation-error method in the frequency domain to estimate non-dimensional stability and control derivatives in real time, data information content for accurate modeling results, and data information management techniques such as data forgetting, incorporating prior information, and optimized excitation. Real-time dynamic modeling was applied to simulation data and flight test data from a modified F-15B fighter aircraft, and to operational flight data from a subscale jet transport aircraft. Estimated parameter standard errors and comparisons with results from a batch output-error method in the time domain were used to demonstrate the accuracy of the identified real-time models.

  5. A Real-time, 3D Musculoskeletal Model for Dynamic Simulation of Arm Movements

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Edward K.; Blana, Dimitra; van den Bogert, Antonie J.; Kirsch, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroprostheses can be used to restore movement of the upper limb in individuals with high-level spinal cord injury. Development and evaluation of command and control schemes for such devices typically requires real-time, “patient-in-the-loop” experimentation. A real-time, three-dimensional, musculoskeletal model of the upper limb has been developed for use in a simulation environment to allow such testing to be carried out non-invasively. The model provides real-time feedback of human arm dynamics that can be displayed to the user in a virtual reality environment. The model has a three degree-of-freedom gleno-humeral joint as well as elbow flexion/extension and pronation/supination, and contains 22 muscles of the shoulder and elbow divided into multiple elements. The model is able to run in real time on modest desktop hardware and demonstrates that a large-scale, 3D model can be made to run in real time. This is a prerequisite for a real-time, whole arm model that will form part of a dynamic arm simulator for use in the development, testing and user training of neural prosthesis systems. PMID:19272926

  6. Development of a cyber-physical experimental platform for real-time dynamic model updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Dyke, Shirley

    2013-05-01

    Model updating procedures are traditionally performed off-line. With the significant recent advances in embedded systems and the related real-time computing capabilities, online or real-time, model updating can be performed to inform decision making and controller actions. The applications for real-time model updating are mainly in the areas of (i) condition diagnosis and prognosis of engineering systems; and (ii) control systems that benefit from accurate modeling of the system plant. Herein, the development of a cyber-physical real-time model updating experimental platform, including real-time computing environment, model updating algorithm, hardware architecture and testbed, is described. Results from two challenging experimental implementations are presented to illustrate the performance of this cyber-physical platform in achieving the goal of updating nonlinear systems in real-time. The experiments consider typical nonlinear engineering systems that exhibit hysteresis. Among the available algorithms capable of identification of such complex nonlinearities, the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is selected for these experiments as an effective method to update nonlinear dynamic system models under realistic conditions. The implementation of the platform is discussed for successful completion of these experiments, including required timing constraints and overall evaluation of the system.

  7. A practical MGA-ARIMA model for forecasting real-time dynamic rain-induced attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Shuhong; Gao, Yifeng; Shi, Houbao; Zhao, Ge

    2013-05-01

    novel and practical modified genetic algorithm (MGA)-autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model for forecasting real-time dynamic rain-induced attenuation has been established by combining genetic algorithm ideas with the ARIMA model. It is proved that due to the introduction of MGA into the ARIMA(1,1,7) model, the MGA-ARIMA model has the potential to be conveniently applied in every country or area by creating a parameter database used by the ARIMA(1,1,7) model. The parameter database is given in this paper based on attenuation data measured in Xi'an, China. The methods to create the parameter databases in other countries or areas are offered, too. Based on the experimental results, the MGA-ARIMA model has been proved practical for forecasting dynamic rain-induced attenuation in real time. The novel model given in this paper is significant for developing adaptive fade mitigation technologies at millimeter wave bands.

  8. Connectivity-based neurofeedback: dynamic causal modeling for real-time fMRI.

    PubMed

    Koush, Yury; Rosa, Maria Joao; Robineau, Fabien; Heinen, Klaartje; W Rieger, Sebastian; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Vuilleumier, Patrik; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Scharnowski, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Neurofeedback based on real-time fMRI is an emerging technique that can be used to train voluntary control of brain activity. Such brain training has been shown to lead to behavioral effects that are specific to the functional role of the targeted brain area. However, real-time fMRI-based neurofeedback so far was limited to mainly training localized brain activity within a region of interest. Here, we overcome this limitation by presenting near real-time dynamic causal modeling in order to provide feedback information based on connectivity between brain areas rather than activity within a single brain area. Using a visual-spatial attention paradigm, we show that participants can voluntarily control a feedback signal that is based on the Bayesian model comparison between two predefined model alternatives, i.e. the connectivity between left visual cortex and left parietal cortex vs. the connectivity between right visual cortex and right parietal cortex. Our new approach thus allows for training voluntary control over specific functional brain networks. Because most mental functions and most neurological disorders are associated with network activity rather than with activity in a single brain region, this novel approach is an important methodological innovation in order to more directly target functionally relevant brain networks. PMID:23668967

  9. Modeling of galfenol bending actuator considering nonlinear hysteresis and dynamic real-time control strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Liang; Wu, Guichu; Chen, Dingfang; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-03-01

    On active bending structures, the actuation direction and the excitation field direction are not the same. Simple lumped parameter models are inadequate to describe the relationship between output displacement and input field. In this paper, a dynamic distributed parameter model is presented to describe the system dynamics of a galfenol bending actuator. To consider nonlinearities and hysteresis in bending, a nonlinear magnetomechanical model is developed to characterize the hysteretic magnetostriction generated by the galfenol layer. A dynamic real-time control strategy is proposed to compensate for hysteresis. A nonlinear inverse filter is constructed to linearize the hysteresis based on the proposed distributed parameter model. In order to increase the calculation efficiency, a new iteration method is proposed to calculate the filter. The iteration stepsize of the input field can be adaptively updated according to the inverting error. Simulation results show that significant enhancement of convergence efficiency can be achieved by using the proposed method compared with the existing fixed step size method. Experiments have been conducted to verify the real-time control strategy.

  10. Dynamic fuel cell stack model for real-time simulation based on system identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiler, M.; Schmid, O.; Schudy, M.; Hofer, E. P.

    The authors have been developing an empirical mathematical model to predict the dynamic behaviour of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack. Today there is a great number of models, describing steady-state behaviour of fuel cells by estimating the equilibrium voltage for a certain set of operating parameters, but models capable of predicting the transient process between two steady-state points are rare. However, in automotive applications round about 80% of operating situations are dynamic. To improve the reliability of fuel cell systems by model-based control for real-time simulation dynamic fuel cell stack model is needed. Physical motivated models, described by differential equations, usually are complex and need a lot of computing time. To meet the real-time capability the focus is set on empirical models. Fuel cells are highly nonlinear systems, so often used auto-regressive (AR), output-error (OE) or Box-Jenkins (BJ) models do not accomplish satisfying accuracy. Best results are achieved by splitting the behaviour into a nonlinear static and a linear dynamic subsystem, a so-called Uryson-Model. For system identification and model validation load steps with different amplitudes are applied to the fuel cell stack at various operation points and the voltage response is recorded. The presented model is implemented in MATLAB environment and has a computing time of less than 1 ms per step on a standard desktop computer with a 2.8 MHz CPU and 504 MB RAM. Lab tests are carried out at DaimlerChrysler R&D Centre with DaimlerChrysler PEMFC hardware and a good agreement is found between model simulations and lab tests.

  11. Dynamics of symmetry breaking during quantum real-time evolution in a minimal model system.

    PubMed

    Heyl, Markus; Vojta, Matthias

    2014-10-31

    One necessary criterion for the thermalization of a nonequilibrium quantum many-particle system is ergodicity. It is, however, not sufficient in cases where the asymptotic long-time state lies in a symmetry-broken phase but the initial state of nonequilibrium time evolution is fully symmetric with respect to this symmetry. In equilibrium, one particular symmetry-broken state is chosen as a result of an infinitesimal symmetry-breaking perturbation. From a dynamical point of view the question is: Can such an infinitesimal perturbation be sufficient for the system to establish a nonvanishing order during quantum real-time evolution? We study this question analytically for a minimal model system that can be associated with symmetry breaking, the ferromagnetic Kondo model. We show that after a quantum quench from a completely symmetric state the system is able to break its symmetry dynamically and discuss how these features can be observed experimentally. PMID:25396355

  12. Modeling Charge Transfer in Fullerene Collisions via Real-Time Electron Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jakowski, Jacek; Irle, Stephan; Sumpter, Bobby G; Morokuma, Keiji

    2012-06-01

    An approach for performing real-time dynamics of electron transfer in a prototype redox reaction that occurs in reactive collisions between neutral and ionic fullerenes is discussed. The quantum dynamical simulations show that the electron transfer occurs within 60 fs directly preceding the collision of the fullerenes, followed by structural changes and relaxation of electron charge. The consequences of real-time electron dynamics are fully elucidated for the far from equilibrium processes of collisions between neutral and multiply charged fullerenes. PMID:26285634

  13. Transfer of Real-time Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model; Research to Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, K. S. F.; Hwang, J.; Shin, D. K.; Kim, G. J.; Morley, S.; Henderson, M. G.; Friedel, R. H.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    Real-time Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (rtDREAM) was developed by LANL for nowcast of energetic electrons' flux at the radiation belt to quantify potential risks from radiation damage at the satellites. Assimilated data are from multiple sources including LANL assets (GEO, GPS). For transfer from research to operation of the rtDREAM code, LANL/KSWC/NOAA makes a Memorandum Of Understanding (MOU) on the collaboration between three parts. By this MOU, KWSC/RRA provides all the support for transitioning the research version of DREAM to operations. KASI is primarily responsible for providing all the interfaces between the current scientific output formats of the code and useful space weather products that can be used and accessed through the web. In the second phase, KASI will be responsible in performing the work needed to transform the Van Allen Probes beacon data into "DREAM ready" inputs. KASI will also provide the "operational" code framework and additional data preparation, model output, display and web page codes back to LANL and SWPC. KASI is already a NASA partnering ground station for the Van Allen Probes' space weather beacon data and can here show use and utility of these data for comparison between rtDREAM and observations by web. NOAA has offered to take on some of the data processing tasks specific to the GOES data.

  14. Test Cases for Wind Power Plant Dynamic Models on Real-Time Digital Simulator: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M.; Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to present test cases for wind turbine generator and wind power plant models commonly used during commissioning of wind power plants to ensure grid integration compatibility. In this paper, different types of wind power plant models based on the Western Electricity Coordinating Council Wind Generator Modeling Group's standardization efforts are implemented on a real-time digital simulator, and different test cases are used to gauge their grid integration capability. The low-voltage ride through and reactive power support capability and limitations of wind turbine generators under different grid conditions are explored. Several types of transient events (e.g., symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults, frequency dips) are included in the test cases. The differences in responses from different types of wind turbine are discussed in detail.

  15. A simple dynamic engine model for use in a real-time aircraft simulation with thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Steven A.

    1990-01-01

    A simple dynamic engine model was developed for use in thrust vectoring control law development and real-time aircraft simulation. Engine dynamics were simulated using a throttle rate limiter and low-pass filter. This paper includes a description of a method to account for axial thrust loss resulting from thrust vectoring and the development of the simple dynamic engine model and its incorporation into the F-18 high alpha research vehicle (HARV) thrust vectoring simulation. The simple dynamic engine model was evaluated at Mach 0.2, 35,000-ft altitude and at Mach 0.7, 35,000-ft altitude. The simple dynamic engine model is within 3 percent of the steady state response, and within 25 percent of the transient response of the complete nonlinear dynamic engine model.

  16. A tool for modeling concurrent real-time computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, D. D.; Huang, Shie-Rei; Bhatt, Rahul; Sridharan, N. S.

    1990-01-01

    Real-time computation is a significant area of research in general, and in AI in particular. The complexity of practical real-time problems demands use of knowledge-based problem solving techniques while satisfying real-time performance constraints. Since the demands of a complex real-time problem cannot be predicted (owing to the dynamic nature of the environment) powerful dynamic resource control techniques are needed to monitor and control the performance. A real-time computation model for a real-time tool, an implementation of the QP-Net simulator on a Symbolics machine, and an implementation on a Butterfly multiprocessor machine are briefly described.

  17. A simple dynamic engine model for use in a real-time aircraft simulation with thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Steven A.

    1990-01-01

    A simple dynamic engine model was developed at the NASA Ames Research Center, Dryden Flight Research Facility, for use in thrust vectoring control law development and real-time aircraft simulation. The simple dynamic engine model of the F404-GE-400 engine (General Electric, Lynn, Massachusetts) operates within the aircraft simulator. It was developed using tabular data generated from a complete nonlinear dynamic engine model supplied by the manufacturer. Engine dynamics were simulated using a throttle rate limiter and low-pass filter. Included is a description of a method to account for axial thrust loss resulting from thrust vectoring. In addition, the development of the simple dynamic engine model and its incorporation into the F-18 high alpha research vehicle (HARV) thrust vectoring simulation. The simple dynamic engine model was evaluated at Mach 0.2, 35,000 ft altitude and at Mach 0.7, 35,000 ft altitude. The simple dynamic engine model is within 3 percent of the steady state response, and within 25 percent of the transient response of the complete nonlinear dynamic engine model.

  18. Real-time prediction of respiratory motion based on a local dynamic model in an augmented space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, S.-M.; Jung, B.-H.; Ruan, D.

    2011-03-01

    Motion-adaptive radiotherapy aims to deliver ablative radiation dose to the tumor target with minimal normal tissue exposure, by accounting for real-time target movement. In practice, prediction is usually necessary to compensate for system latency induced by measurement, communication and control. This work focuses on predicting respiratory motion, which is most dominant for thoracic and abdominal tumors. We develop and investigate the use of a local dynamic model in an augmented space, motivated by the observation that respiratory movement exhibits a locally circular pattern in a plane augmented with a delayed axis. By including the angular velocity as part of the system state, the proposed dynamic model effectively captures the natural evolution of respiratory motion. The first-order extended Kalman filter is used to propagate and update the state estimate. The target location is predicted by evaluating the local dynamic model equations at the required prediction length. This method is complementary to existing work in that (1) the local circular motion model characterizes 'turning', overcoming the limitation of linear motion models; (2) it uses a natural state representation including the local angular velocity and updates the state estimate systematically, offering explicit physical interpretations; (3) it relies on a parametric model and is much less data-satiate than the typical adaptive semiparametric or nonparametric method. We tested the performance of the proposed method with ten RPM traces, using the normalized root mean squared difference between the predicted value and the retrospective observation as the error metric. Its performance was compared with predictors based on the linear model, the interacting multiple linear models and the kernel density estimator for various combinations of prediction lengths and observation rates. The local dynamic model based approach provides the best performance for short to medium prediction lengths under relatively

  19. Real-time dynamics and proposal for feasible experiments of lattice gauge-Higgs model simulated by cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuno, Yoshihito; Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Takahashi, Yoshiro; Ichinose, Ikuo; Matsui, Tetsuo

    2015-06-01

    Lattice gauge theory has provided a crucial non-perturbative method in studying canonical models in high-energy physics such as quantum chromodynamics. Among other models of lattice gauge theory, the lattice gauge-Higgs model is a quite important one because it describes a wide variety of phenomena/models related to the Anderson-Higgs mechanism, such as superconductivity, the standard model of particle physics, and the inflation process of the early Universe. In this paper, we first show that atomic description of the lattice gauge model allows us to explore real-time dynamics of the gauge variables by using the Gross-Pitaevskii equations. Numerical simulations of the time development of an electric flux reveal some interesting characteristics of the dynamic aspect of the model and determine its phase diagram. Next, to realize a quantum simulator of the U(1) lattice gauge-Higgs model on an optical lattice filled by cold atoms, we propose two feasible methods: (i) Wannier states in the excited bands and (ii) dipolar atoms in a multilayer optical lattice. We pay attention to the constraint of Gauss's law and avoid nonlocal gauge interactions.

  20. Dynamic Quality of Service Model for Improving Performance of Multimedia Real-Time Transmission in Industrial Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, Ravichandran C.; Karunakaran, Manivannan

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, quality of service (QoS) is very popular in various research areas like distributed systems, multimedia real-time applications and networking. The requirements of these systems are to satisfy reliability, uptime, security constraints and throughput as well as application specific requirements. The real-time multimedia applications are commonly distributed over the network and meet various time constraints across networks without creating any intervention over control flows. In particular, video compressors make variable bit-rate streams that mismatch the constant-bit-rate channels typically provided by classical real-time protocols, severely reducing the efficiency of network utilization. Thus, it is necessary to enlarge the communication bandwidth to transfer the compressed multimedia streams using Flexible Time Triggered- Enhanced Switched Ethernet (FTT-ESE) protocol. FTT-ESE provides automation to calculate the compression level and change the bandwidth of the stream. This paper focuses on low-latency multimedia transmission over Ethernet with dynamic quality-of-service (QoS) management. This proposed framework deals with a dynamic QoS for multimedia transmission over Ethernet with FTT-ESE protocol. This paper also presents distinct QoS metrics based both on the image quality and network features. Some experiments with recorded and live video streams show the advantages of the proposed framework. To validate the solution we have designed and implemented a simulator based on the Matlab/Simulink, which is a tool to evaluate different network architecture using Simulink blocks. PMID:25170768

  1. Dynamic quality of service model for improving performance of multimedia real-time transmission in industrial networks.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Ravichandran C; Karunakaran, Manivannan

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, quality of service (QoS) is very popular in various research areas like distributed systems, multimedia real-time applications and networking. The requirements of these systems are to satisfy reliability, uptime, security constraints and throughput as well as application specific requirements. The real-time multimedia applications are commonly distributed over the network and meet various time constraints across networks without creating any intervention over control flows. In particular, video compressors make variable bit-rate streams that mismatch the constant-bit-rate channels typically provided by classical real-time protocols, severely reducing the efficiency of network utilization. Thus, it is necessary to enlarge the communication bandwidth to transfer the compressed multimedia streams using Flexible Time Triggered- Enhanced Switched Ethernet (FTT-ESE) protocol. FTT-ESE provides automation to calculate the compression level and change the bandwidth of the stream. This paper focuses on low-latency multimedia transmission over Ethernet with dynamic quality-of-service (QoS) management. This proposed framework deals with a dynamic QoS for multimedia transmission over Ethernet with FTT-ESE protocol. This paper also presents distinct QoS metrics based both on the image quality and network features. Some experiments with recorded and live video streams show the advantages of the proposed framework. To validate the solution we have designed and implemented a simulator based on the Matlab/Simulink, which is a tool to evaluate different network architecture using Simulink blocks. PMID:25170768

  2. An Optimization Framework for Dynamic, Distributed Real-Time Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, Klaus; Juedes, David; Welch, Lonnie; Chelberg, David; Bruggerman, Carl; Drews, Frank; Fleeman, David; Parrott, David; Pfarr, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    Abstract. This paper presents a model that is useful for developing resource allocation algorithms for distributed real-time systems .that operate in dynamic environments. Interesting aspects of the model include dynamic environments, utility and service levels, which provide a means for graceful degradation in resource-constrained situations and support optimization of the allocation of resources. The paper also provides an allocation algorithm that illustrates how to use the model for producing feasible, optimal resource allocations.

  3. Real-time DIRCM system modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersson, Mikael

    2004-12-01

    Directed infrared countermeasures (DIRCM) play an increasingly important role in electronic warfare to counteract threats posed by infrared seekers. The usefulness and performance of such countermeasures depend, for example, on atmospheric conditions (attenuation and turbulence) and platform vibrations, causing pointing and tracking errors for the laser beam and reducing the power transferred to the seeker aperture. These problems make it interesting to simulate the performance of a DIRCM system in order to understand how easy or difficult it is to counteract an approaching threat and evaluate limiting factors in various situations. This paper describes a DIRCM model that has been developed, including atmospheric effects such as attenuation and turbulence as well as closed loop tracking algorithms, where the retro reflex of the laser is used for the pointing control of the beam. The DIRCM model is part of a large simulation framework (EWSim), which also incorporates several descriptions of different seekers (e.g. reticle, rosette, centroid, nutating cross) and models of robot dynamics. Effects of a jamming laser on a specific threat can be readily verified by simulations within this framework. The duel between missile and countermeasure is simulated in near real-time and visualized graphically in 3D. A typical simulation with a reticle seeker jammed by a modulated laser is included in the paper.

  4. A wavelet-based non-linear autoregressive with exogenous inputs (WNARX) dynamic neural network model for real-time flood forecasting using satellite-based rainfall products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanda, Trushnamayee; Sahoo, Bhabagrahi; Beria, Harsh; Chatterjee, Chandranath

    2016-08-01

    Although flood forecasting and warning system is a very important non-structural measure in flood-prone river basins, poor raingauge network as well as unavailability of rainfall data in real-time could hinder its accuracy at different lead times. Conversely, since the real-time satellite-based rainfall products are now becoming available for the data-scarce regions, their integration with the data-driven models could be effectively used for real-time flood forecasting. To address these issues in operational streamflow forecasting, a new data-driven model, namely, the wavelet-based non-linear autoregressive with exogenous inputs (WNARX) is proposed and evaluated in comparison with four other data-driven models, viz., the linear autoregressive moving average with exogenous inputs (ARMAX), static artificial neural network (ANN), wavelet-based ANN (WANN), and dynamic nonlinear autoregressive with exogenous inputs (NARX) models. First, the quality of input rainfall products of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), viz., TRMM and TRMM-real-time (RT) rainfall products is assessed through statistical evaluation. The results reveal that the satellite rainfall products moderately correlate with the observed rainfall, with the gauge-adjusted TRMM product outperforming the real-time TRMM-RT product. The TRMM rainfall product better captures the ground observations up to 95 percentile range (30.11 mm/day), although the hit rate decreases for high rainfall intensity. The effect of antecedent rainfall (AR) and climate forecast system reanalysis (CFSR) temperature product on the catchment response is tested in all the developed models. The results reveal that, during real-time flow simulation, the satellite-based rainfall products generally perform worse than the gauge-based rainfall. Moreover, as compared to the existing models, the flow forecasting by the WNARX model is way better than the other four models studied herein with the

  5. Real-time remote scientific model validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frainier, Richard; Groleau, Nicolas

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes flight results from the use of a CLIPS-based validation facility to compare analyzed data from a space life sciences (SLS) experiment to an investigator's preflight model. The comparison, performed in real-time, either confirms or refutes the model and its predictions. This result then becomes the basis for continuing or modifying the investigator's experiment protocol. Typically, neither the astronaut crew in Spacelab nor the ground-based investigator team are able to react to their experiment data in real time. This facility, part of a larger science advisor system called Principal Investigator in a Box, was flown on the space shuttle in October, 1993. The software system aided the conduct of a human vestibular physiology experiment and was able to outperform humans in the tasks of data integrity assurance, data analysis, and scientific model validation. Of twelve preflight hypotheses associated with investigator's model, seven were confirmed and five were rejected or compromised.

  6. Real-time dynamic simulation of the Cassini spacecraft using DARTS. Part 2: Parallel/vectorized real-time implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, A.; Roberts, J. A.; Jain, A.; Man, G. K.

    1993-01-01

    Part 1 of this paper presented the requirements for the real-time simulation of Cassini spacecraft along with some discussion of the DARTS algorithm. Here, in Part 2 we discuss the development and implementation of parallel/vectorized DARTS algorithm and architecture for real-time simulation. Development of the fast algorithms and architecture for real-time hardware-in-the-loop simulation of spacecraft dynamics is motivated by the fact that it represents a hard real-time problem, in the sense that the correctness of the simulation depends on both the numerical accuracy and the exact timing of the computation. For a given model fidelity, the computation should be computed within a predefined time period. Further reduction in computation time allows increasing the fidelity of the model (i.e., inclusion of more flexible modes) and the integration routine.

  7. Dynamic shape modeling of the mitral valve from real-time 3D ultrasound images using continuous medial representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouch, Alison M.; Yushkevich, Paul A.; Jackson, Benjamin M.; Gorman, Joseph H., III; Gorman, Robert C.; Sehgal, Chandra M.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Patient-specific shape analysis of the mitral valve from real-time 3D ultrasound (rt-3DUS) has broad application to the assessment and surgical treatment of mitral valve disease. Our goal is to demonstrate that continuous medial representation (cm-rep) is an accurate valve shape representation that can be used for statistical shape modeling over the cardiac cycle from rt-3DUS images. Methods: Transesophageal rt-3DUS data acquired from 15 subjects with a range of mitral valve pathology were analyzed. User-initialized segmentation with level sets and symmetric diffeomorphic normalization delineated the mitral leaflets at each time point in the rt-3DUS data series. A deformable cm-rep was fitted to each segmented image of the mitral leaflets in the time series, producing a 4D parametric representation of valve shape in a single cardiac cycle. Model fitting accuracy was evaluated by the Dice overlap, and shape interpolation and principal component analysis (PCA) of 4D valve shape were performed. Results: Of the 289 3D images analyzed, the average Dice overlap between each fitted cm-rep and its target segmentation was 0.880+/-0.018 (max=0.912, min=0.819). The results of PCA represented variability in valve morphology and localized leaflet thickness across subjects. Conclusion: Deformable medial modeling accurately captures valve geometry in rt-3DUS images over the entire cardiac cycle and enables statistical shape analysis of the mitral valve.

  8. Modeling fibril fragmentation in real-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Pengzhen; Hong, Liu

    2013-08-01

    During the application of the mass-action-equation models to the study of amyloid fiber formation, time-consuming numerical calculations constitute a major bottleneck. To conquer this difficulty, here an alternative efficient method is introduced for the fragmentation-only model. It includes two basic steps: (1) simulate close-formed time-evolutionary equations for the number concentration P(t) derived from the moment-closure method; (2) reconstruct the detailed fiber length distribution based on the knowledge of moments obtained in the first step. Compared to direct calculation, our method speeds up the performance by at least 10 000 times (from days to seconds). The accuracy is also satisfactory if suitable functions for the approximate fibril length distribution are taken. Further application to the sonication studies on PI264-b-PFS48 micelles performed by Guerin et al. confirms our method is very promising for the real-time analysis of the experiments on fibril fragmentation.

  9. Dissecting protein-induced DNA looping dynamics in real time

    PubMed Central

    Laurens, Niels; Bellamy, Stuart R. W.; Harms, August F.; Kovacheva, Yana S.; Halford, Stephen E.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    2009-01-01

    Many proteins that interact with DNA perform or enhance their specific functions by binding simultaneously to multiple target sites, thereby inducing a loop in the DNA. The dynamics and energies involved in this loop formation influence the reaction mechanism. Tethered particle motion has proven a powerful technique to study in real time protein-induced DNA looping dynamics while minimally perturbing the DNA–protein interactions. In addition, it permits many single-molecule experiments to be performed in parallel. Using as a model system the tetrameric Type II restriction enzyme SfiI, that binds two copies of its recognition site, we show here that we can determine the DNA–protein association and dissociation steps as well as the actual process of protein-induced loop capture and release on a single DNA molecule. The result of these experiments is a quantitative reaction scheme for DNA looping by SfiI that is rigorously compared to detailed biochemical studies of SfiI looping dynamics. We also present novel methods for data analysis and compare and discuss these with existing methods. The general applicability of the introduced techniques will further enhance tethered particle motion as a tool to follow DNA–protein dynamics in real time. PMID:19586932

  10. Real-time dynamics in electron-lattice coupled system: Numerical study on an extended double-exchange model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshibae, Wataru; Furukawa, Nobuo; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2013-03-01

    We have developed a new theoretical method to study the photo-induced insulator-to-metal (IM) transition in strongly correlated electron systems [PRL 103, 266402 ('09) EPL 94, 27003 ('11).]. In the manganese oxides, it has been observed that the photo-induced dynamics with several tens of THz in frequency can drive IM transition [Nature Materials 6, 643 ('07).]. The excitation energy with several tens of THz in frequency is fairly lower than the insulating energy gap of the electronic state. In this study, we introduce an extended double exchange model where the conduction electron couples with the orbital-ordering field and lattice distortion, and numerically examine the lattice vibration induced IM transition in the electron-lattice coupled system. To simplify the numerical calculation, the electronic states are restricted in the Hilbert space for perfect ferromagnetic states involving the ground state. In the numerical simulation, we find that the low frequency vibration of Jahn-Teller distortion can change the orbital-ordering pattern and trigger the IM transition. A threshold behavior of the lattice-vibration induced IM transition and the electron-hole excitation by continuous forced lattice-vibration are also examined.

  11. Real-time nonequilibrium dynamics of quantum glassy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cugliandolo, Leticia F.; Lozano, Gustavo

    1999-01-01

    We develop a systematic analytic approach to aging effects in quantum disordered systems in contact with an environment. Within the closed-time path-integral formalism we include dissipation by coupling the system to a set of independent harmonic oscillators that mimic a quantum thermal bath. After integrating over the bath variables and averaging over disorder we obtain an effective action that determines the real-time dynamics of the system. The classical limit yields the Martin-Siggia-Rose generating functional associated to a colored noise. We apply this general formalism to a prototype model related to the p spin glass. We show that the model has a dynamic phase transition separating the paramagnetic from the spin-glass phase and that quantum fluctuations depress the transition temperature until a quantum critical point is reached. We show that the dynamics in the paramagnetic phase is stationary but presents an interesting crossover from a region controlled by the classical critical point to another one controlled by the quantum critical point. The most characteristic property of the dynamics in a glassy phase, namely, aging, survives the quantum fluctuations. In the subcritical region the quantum fluctuation-dissipation theorem is modified in a way that is consistent with the notion of effective temperatures introduced for the classical case. We discuss these results in connection with recent experiments in dipolar quantum spin glasses and the relevance of the effective temperatures with respect to the understanding of the low-temperature dynamics.

  12. A Dynamic Real Time In Vivo and Static Ex Vivo Analysis of Granulomonocytic Cell Migration in the Collagen-Induced Arthritis Model

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Ruth; Rath, Eva; Hladik, Anastasiya; Niederreiter, Birgit; Bonelli, Michael; Frantal, Sophie; Smolen, Josef S.; Scheinecker, Clemens

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophilic granulocytes and monocytes (granulomonocytic cells; GMC) drive the inflammatory process at the earliest stages of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The migratory behavior and functional properties of GMC within the synovial tissue are, however, only incompletely characterized. Here we have analyzed GMC in the murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model of RA using multi-photon real time in vivo microscopy together with ex vivo analysis of GMC in tissue sections. GMC were abundant as soon as clinical arthritis was apparent. GMC were motile and migrated randomly through the synovial tissue. In addition, we observed the frequent formation of cell clusters consisting of both neutrophilic granulocytes and monocytes that actively contributed to the inflammatory process of arthritis. Treatment of animals with a single dose of prednisolone reduced the mean velocity of cell migration and diminished the overall immigration of GMC. In summary, our study shows that the combined application of real time in vivo microscopy together with elaborate static post-mortem analysis of GMC enables the description of dynamic migratory characteristics of GMC together with their precise location in a complex anatomical environment. Moreover, this approach is sensitive enough to detect subtle therapeutic effects within a very short period of time. PMID:22529989

  13. A new computational structure for real-time dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Izaguirre, A. ); Hashimoto, Minoru )

    1992-08-01

    The authors present an efficient structure for the computation of robot dynamics in real time. The fundamental characteristic of this structure is the division of the computation into a high-priority synchronous task and low-priority background tasks, possibly sharing the resources of a conventional computing unit based on commercial microprocessors. The background tasks compute the inertial and gravitational coefficients as well as the forces due to the velocities of the joints. In each control sample period, the high-priority synchronous task computes the product of the inertial coefficients by the accelerations of the joints and performs the summation of the torques due to the velocities and gravitational forces. Kircanski et al. (1986) have shown that the bandwidth of the variation of joint angles and of their velocities is an order of magnitude less than the variation of joint accelerations. This result agrees with the experiments the authors have carried out using a PUMA 260 robot. Two main strategies contribute to reduce the computational burden associated with the evaluation of the dynamic equations. The first involves the use of efficient algorithms for the evaluation of the equations. The second is aimed at reducing the number of dynamic parameters by identifying beforehand the linear dependencies among these parameters, as well as carrying out a significance analysis of the parameters' contribution to the final joint torques. The actual code used to evaluate this dynamic model is entirely computer generated from experimental data, requiring no other manual intervention than performing a campaign of measurements.

  14. Coordinated scheduling for dynamic real-time systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natarajan, Swaminathan; Zhao, Wei

    1994-01-01

    In this project, we addressed issues in coordinated scheduling for dynamic real-time systems. In particular, we concentrated on design and implementation of a new distributed real-time system called R-Shell. The design objective of R-Shell is to provide computing support for space programs that have large, complex, fault-tolerant distributed real-time applications. In R-shell, the approach is based on the concept of scheduling agents, which reside in the application run-time environment, and are customized to provide just those resource management functions which are needed by the specific application. With this approach, we avoid the need for a sophisticated OS which provides a variety of generalized functionality, while still not burdening application programmers with heavy responsibility for resource management. In this report, we discuss the R-Shell approach, summarize the achievement of the project, and describe a preliminary prototype of R-Shell system.

  15. Dynamic Bayesian filtering for real-time seismic analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Blough, D.K.; Rohay, A.C.; Anderson, K.K.; Nicholson, W.L.

    1994-04-01

    State space modeling, which includes techniques such as the Kalman filter, has been used to analyze many non-stationary time series. The ability of these dynamic models to adapt and track changes in the underlying process makes them attractive for application to the real-time analysis of three-component seismic waveforms. The authors are investigating the application of state space models formulated as Bayesian time series models to phase detection, polarization, and spectrogram estimation of seismograms. This approach removes the need to specify data windows in the time series for time averaging estimation (e.g., spectrum estimation). They are using this model to isolate particular seismic phases based on polarization parameters that are determined at a spectrum of frequencies. They plan to use polarization parameters, frequency spectra, and magnitudes to discriminate between different types of seismic sources. They present the application of this technique to artificial time series and to several real seismic events including the Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE) two nuclear tests and three earthquakes from the Nevada Test site, as recorded on several regional broadband seismic stations. A preliminary result of this analysis indicates that earthquakes and explosions can potentially be discriminated on the bass of the polarization characteristics of scattered seismic phases. However, the chemical (NPE) and nuclear explosions appear to have very similar polarization characteristics.

  16. Real-time simulation of dynamic fluoroscopy of ERCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hoeryong; Lee, Doo Yong

    2010-02-01

    This paper discusses the methods for real-time rendering of time-varying dynamic fluoroscope images including fluid flow for the ERCP (Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography) simulation. A volume rendering technique is used to generate virtual fluoroscopy images. This paper develops an image-overlaying method which overlaps the timevarying images onto the constant background image. The full size fluoroscopy image is computed from the initial volume data set during the pre-processing stage, which is then saved as the background image. Only the time-varying images are computed from the time-varying volume data set during the actual simulation. This involves relatively small computation compared with the background image. The time-varying images are then overlaid onto the background image to obtain the complete images. This method reduces computational overhead by removing redundant computations. A simplified particle dynamics model is employed for fast simulation of the fluid flow. The fluid model, a collection of particles, interacts only with the ducts based on principles of a complete elastic collision. Hence, the velocity of the particles, when they collide with the duct, can be computed by using simple algebraic equations. The methods are implemented for fast simulation of the ERCP.

  17. Real-time high dynamic range laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinegoni, C.; Leon Swisher, C.; Fumene Feruglio, P.; Giedt, R. J.; Rousso, D. L.; Stapleton, S.; Weissleder, R.

    2016-01-01

    In conventional confocal/multiphoton fluorescence microscopy, images are typically acquired under ideal settings and after extensive optimization of parameters for a given structure or feature, often resulting in information loss from other image attributes. To overcome the problem of selective data display, we developed a new method that extends the imaging dynamic range in optical microscopy and improves the signal-to-noise ratio. Here we demonstrate how real-time and sequential high dynamic range microscopy facilitates automated three-dimensional neural segmentation. We address reconstruction and segmentation performance on samples with different size, anatomy and complexity. Finally, in vivo real-time high dynamic range imaging is also demonstrated, making the technique particularly relevant for longitudinal imaging in the presence of physiological motion and/or for quantification of in vivo fast tracer kinetics during functional imaging. PMID:27032979

  18. Real-Time Dynamics Monitoring System with Synchronized Phasor Measurements

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-01-01

    The Real-Time Dynamics Monitoring System is designed to monitor the dynamics within the power grid and assess the system behavior during normal and disturbance conditions. The RTDMS application was built on the Grid-3P technology platform and takes real-time information collected by Synchronized Phasor Measurement Units (PMU5) or other collection devices and transmitted to a central Phasor Data Concentrator (PDC) for monitoring grid dynamics. The data is sampled 30 times per second and is time-synchronized. Thismore » data is processed to create graphical and geographical displays to provide visualization for frequency/frequency response, voltage magnitudes and angles, voltage angle differences across critical paths as well as real and reactive power-flows on a sub-second and second basis. Software allows for monitoring, tracking, historical data archiving and electric system troubleshooting for reliability management.« less

  19. Real-time high dynamic range laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinegoni, C.; Leon Swisher, C.; Fumene Feruglio, P.; Giedt, R. J.; Rousso, D. L.; Stapleton, S.; Weissleder, R.

    2016-04-01

    In conventional confocal/multiphoton fluorescence microscopy, images are typically acquired under ideal settings and after extensive optimization of parameters for a given structure or feature, often resulting in information loss from other image attributes. To overcome the problem of selective data display, we developed a new method that extends the imaging dynamic range in optical microscopy and improves the signal-to-noise ratio. Here we demonstrate how real-time and sequential high dynamic range microscopy facilitates automated three-dimensional neural segmentation. We address reconstruction and segmentation performance on samples with different size, anatomy and complexity. Finally, in vivo real-time high dynamic range imaging is also demonstrated, making the technique particularly relevant for longitudinal imaging in the presence of physiological motion and/or for quantification of in vivo fast tracer kinetics during functional imaging.

  20. A real-time, dynamic early-warning model based on uncertainty analysis and risk assessment for sudden water pollution accidents.

    PubMed

    Hou, Dibo; Ge, Xiaofan; Huang, Pingjie; Zhang, Guangxin; Loáiciga, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    A real-time, dynamic, early-warning model (EP-risk model) is proposed to cope with sudden water quality pollution accidents affecting downstream areas with raw-water intakes (denoted as EPs). The EP-risk model outputs the risk level of water pollution at the EP by calculating the likelihood of pollution and evaluating the impact of pollution. A generalized form of the EP-risk model for river pollution accidents based on Monte Carlo simulation, the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) method, and the risk matrix method is proposed. The likelihood of water pollution at the EP is calculated by the Monte Carlo method, which is used for uncertainty analysis of pollutants' transport in rivers. The impact of water pollution at the EP is evaluated by expert knowledge and the results of Monte Carlo simulation based on the analytic hierarchy process. The final risk level of water pollution at the EP is determined by the risk matrix method. A case study of the proposed method is illustrated with a phenol spill accident in China. PMID:24781332

  1. Real-time extended dynamic range imaging in shearography

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, Roger M.; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2008-10-20

    Extended dynamic range (EDR) imaging is a postprocessing technique commonly associated with photography. Multiple images of a scene are recorded by the camera using different shutter settings and are merged into a single higher dynamic range image. Speckle interferometry and holography techniques require a well-modulated intensity signal to extract the phase information, and of these techniques shearography is most sensitive to different object surface reflectivities as it uses self-referencing from a sheared image. In this paper the authors demonstrate real-time EDR imaging in shearography and present experimental results from a difficult surface reflectivity sample: a wooden panel painting containing gold and dark earth color paint.

  2. Real-time extended dynamic range imaging in shearography.

    PubMed

    Groves, Roger M; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2008-10-20

    Extended dynamic range (EDR) imaging is a postprocessing technique commonly associated with photography. Multiple images of a scene are recorded by the camera using different shutter settings and are merged into a single higher dynamic range image. Speckle interferometry and holography techniques require a well-modulated intensity signal to extract the phase information, and of these techniques shearography is most sensitive to different object surface reflectivities as it uses self-referencing from a sheared image. In this paper the authors demonstrate real-time EDR imaging in shearography and present experimental results from a difficult surface reflectivity sample: a wooden panel painting containing gold and dark earth color paint. PMID:18936802

  3. Method for Real-Time Model Based Structural Anomaly Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Timothy A. (Inventor); Urnes, James M., Sr. (Inventor); Reichenbach, Eric Y. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A system and methods for real-time model based vehicle structural anomaly detection are disclosed. A real-time measurement corresponding to a location on a vehicle structure during an operation of the vehicle is received, and the real-time measurement is compared to expected operation data for the location to provide a modeling error signal. A statistical significance of the modeling error signal to provide an error significance is calculated, and a persistence of the error significance is determined. A structural anomaly is indicated, if the persistence exceeds a persistence threshold value.

  4. Architecture for dynamically reconfigurable real-time lossless compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Alison J.; Audsley, Neil C.

    2004-05-01

    Image compression is a computationally intensive task, which can be undertaken most efficiently by dedicated hardware. If a portable device is to carry out real-time compression on a variety of image types, then it may be useful to reconfigure the circuitry dynamically. Using commercial off-the shelf (COTS) chips, reconfiguration is usually implemented by a complete re-load from memory, but it is also possible to perform a partial reconfiguration. This work studies the use of programmable hardware devices to implement the lossless JPEG compression algorithm in real-time on a stream of independent image frames. The data rate is faster than can be compressed serially in hardware by a single processor, so the operation is split amongst several processors. These are implemented as programmable circuits, together with necessary buffering of input and output data. The timing of input and output, bearing in mind the different, and context-dependent amounts of data due to Huffman coding, is analyzed using storage-timing graphs. Because there may be differing parameters from one frame to the next, several different configurations are prepared and stored, ready to load as required. The scheduling of these reconfigurations, and the distribution/recombination of data streams is studied, giving an analysis of the real-time performance.

  5. Capturing Real-Time Power System Dynamics: Opportunities and Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenyu; Zhou, Ning; Diao, Ruisheng; Wang, Shaobu; Elbert, Stephen T.; Meng, Da; Lu, Shuai

    2015-09-01

    The power grid evolves towards a new mix of generation and consumption that introduces new dynamic and stochastic behaviors. These emerging grid behaviors would invalidate the steady-state assumption in today’s state estimation – an essential function for real-time power grid operation. This paper examines this steady-state assumption and identifies the need for estimating dynamic states. Supporting technologies are presented as well as a proposed formulation for estimating dynamic states. Metrics for evaluating methods for solving the dynamic state estimation problem are proposed, with example results to illustrate the use of these metrics. The overall objective of this paper is to provide a basis that more research on this topic can follow.

  6. Distributed real-time model-based diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, A. C.; Chung, S. H.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to onboard anomaly diagnosis that combines the simplicity and real-time guarantee of a rule-based diagnosis system with the specification ease and coverage guarantees of a model-based diagnosis system.

  7. Real-Time Bioluminescent Tracking of Cellular Population Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Close, Dan; Sayler, Gary Steven; Xu, Tingting; Ripp, Steven Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Cellular population dynamics are routinely monitored across many diverse fields for a variety of purposes. In general, these dynamics are assayed either through the direct counting of cellular aliquots followed by extrapolation to the total population size, or through the monitoring of signal intensity from any number of externally stimulated reporter proteins. While both viable methods, here we describe a novel technique that allows for the automated, non-destructive tracking of cellular population dynamics in real-time. This method, which relies on the detection of a continuous bioluminescent signal produced through expression of the bacterial luciferase gene cassette, provides a low cost, low time-intensive means for generating additional data compared to alternative methods.

  8. Real time pre-detection dynamic range compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A real time, pre-detection optical dynamic range compression system uses a photorefractive crystal, such as BaTiO3 or LiNbO3, in which light induced scattering from crystal inhomogeneities of the optical input occurs as a nonlinear function of the input intensity. The greater the intensity, the faster random interference gratings are created to scatter the incident light. The unscattered portion of the optical signal is therefore reduced in dynamic range over time. The amount or range of dynamic range compression may be controlled by adjusting the time of application of the unscattered crystal output to the photodetector with regard to the time of application of the optical input to the crystal.

  9. Application of a dynamic in vitro model with real-time determination of acetylcholinesterase activity for the investigation of tabun analogues and oximes.

    PubMed

    Worek, Franz; Herkert, Nadja M; Koller, Marianne; Thiermann, Horst; Wille, Timo

    2015-12-25

    Tabun-inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is rather resistant towards reactivation by oximes in vitro while in vivo experiments showed some protection of animals poisoned by this chemical warfare nerve agent after treatment with an oxime and atropine. In addition, AChE inhibited by close tabun analogues, N,N-diethyltabun and N,N-di-n-propyltabun was completely resistant towards reactivation by oximes. In order to get more insight into potential mechanisms of this oxime resistance experiments with these toxic agents and the oximes obidoxime, 2-PAM, MMB-4 and HI-6 were performed utilizing a dynamic model with real-time determination of AChE activity. This experimental setup allowed the investigation of reactivation with minimized side reactions. The determined reactivation constants with tabun-inhibited human AChE were in good agreement with previously reported constants determined with a static model. N,N-diethyl- and N,N-di-n-propyltabun-inhibited human AChE could not be reactivated by oximes which indicates that the inadequate oxime effect was not due to re-inhibition by phosphonyloximes. Additional experiments with tabun-inhibited human and Rhesus monkey AChE revealed that no reactivation occurred with HI-6. These data give further support to the assumption that an interaction of tabun with residues in the active site gorge of AChE prevents effective reactivation by oximes, a mechanism which may also be the reason for the total oxime resistance of N,N-diethyl- and N,N-di-n-propyltabun-inhibited human AChE. PMID:26368669

  10. Dynamics of traffic flow with real-time traffic information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoya, Yasushi

    2004-01-01

    We studied dynamics of traffic flow with real-time information provided. Provision of the real-time traffic information based on advancements in telecommunication technology is expected to facilitate the efficient utilization of available road capacity. This system has a potentiality of not only engineering for road usage but also the science of complexity series. In the system, the information plays a role of feedback connecting microscopic and macroscopic phenomena beyond the hierarchical structure of statistical physics. In this paper, we tried to clarify how the information works in a network of traffic flow from the perspective of statistical physics. The dynamical feature of the traffic flow is abstracted by a contrastive study between the nonequilibrium statistical physics and a computer simulation based on cellular automaton. We found that the information disrupts the local equilibrium of traffic flow by a characteristic dissipation process due to interaction between the information and individual vehicles. The dissipative structure was observed in the time evolution of traffic flow driven far from equilibrium as a consequence of the breakdown of the local-equilibrium hypothesis.

  11. Real-time dynamics of the confining string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loshaj, Frasher

    Quantum chromodynamics (QCD) describes the interaction of quarks and gluons, which are charged under the color group. Due to confinement of color charge, only colorless hadrons are observed in experiment. At very short distances (hard processes), perturbation theory is a valid tool for calculations and predictions can be made which agree well with experiment. Confinement, which is not yet understood from first principles, is important even for hard processes, because after the perturbative evolution is finished, the final colored particles combine to create the final state hadrons. There are many effective theories of confinement developed over the years. We will consider the Abelian projection; the gauge theory becomes Abelian-like and the theory contains magnetic monopoles. Confinement happens due to the dual Meissner effect, where dual in this case means the roles of the electric and magnetic fields are reversed. The field between charges resembles that of an Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen vortex or string. Based on the Abelian nature of the confining string, because fermion zero modes are localized along the vortex and by considering very energetic jets, we assume that the dynamics along this string is described by massless quantum electrodynamics in 1+1 dimensions. This theory shares with QCD many important properties: confinement, chiral symmetry breaking, theta-vacuum, and is exactly soluble. We use the model to compute the fragmentation functions of jets in electron-positron annihilation and after fixing two adjustable parameters, we study the modification of fragmentation functions of jets in the QCD medium. We address an important puzzle in hadron scattering: the soft photon yield in processes with hadrons in the final state is much larger than what is expected from the Low theorem. We find that soft photons produced from currents induced during the real-time dynamics of jet fragmentation can contribute in the enhancement of photons. We compare the result with

  12. Real-Time Statistical Modeling of Blood Sugar.

    PubMed

    Otoom, Mwaffaq; Alshraideh, Hussam; Almasaeid, Hisham M; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Bravo, José

    2015-10-01

    Diabetes is considered a chronic disease that incurs various types of cost to the world. One major challenge in the control of Diabetes is the real time determination of the proper insulin dose. In this paper, we develop a prototype for real time blood sugar control, integrated with the cloud. Our system controls blood sugar by observing the blood sugar level and accordingly determining the appropriate insulin dose based on patient's historical data, all in real time and automatically. To determine the appropriate insulin dose, we propose two statistical models for modeling blood sugar profiles, namely ARIMA and Markov-based model. Our experiment used to evaluate the performance of the two models shows that the ARIMA model outperforms the Markov-based model in terms of prediction accuracy. PMID:26303151

  13. Spatio-temporal modeling for real-time ozone forecasting

    PubMed Central

    Paci, Lucia; Gelfand, Alan E.; Holland, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The accurate assessment of exposure to ambient ozone concentrations is important for informing the public and pollution monitoring agencies about ozone levels that may lead to adverse health effects. High-resolution air quality information can offer significant health benefits by leading to improved environmental decisions. A practical challenge facing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is to provide real-time forecasting of current 8-hour average ozone exposure over the entire conterminous United States. Such real-time forecasting is now provided as spatial forecast maps of current 8-hour average ozone defined as the average of the previous four hours, current hour, and predictions for the next three hours. Current 8-hour average patterns are updated hourly throughout the day on the EPA-AIRNow web site. The contribution here is to show how we can substantially improve upon current real-time forecasting systems. To enable such forecasting, we introduce a downscaler fusion model based on first differences of real-time monitoring data and numerical model output. The model has a flexible coefficient structure and uses an efficient computational strategy to fit model parameters. Our hybrid computational strategy blends continuous background updated model fitting with real-time predictions. Model validation analyses show that we are achieving very accurate and precise ozone forecasts. PMID:24010052

  14. Monte Carlo techniques for real-time quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dowling, Mark R. . E-mail: dowling@physics.uq.edu.au; Davis, Matthew J.; Drummond, Peter D.; Corney, Joel F.

    2007-01-10

    The stochastic-gauge representation is a method of mapping the equation of motion for the quantum mechanical density operator onto a set of equivalent stochastic differential equations. One of the stochastic variables is termed the 'weight', and its magnitude is related to the importance of the stochastic trajectory. We investigate the use of Monte Carlo algorithms to improve the sampling of the weighted trajectories and thus reduce sampling error in a simulation of quantum dynamics. The method can be applied to calculations in real time, as well as imaginary time for which Monte Carlo algorithms are more-commonly used. The Monte-Carlo algorithms are applicable when the weight is guaranteed to be real, and we demonstrate how to ensure this is the case. Examples are given for the anharmonic oscillator, where large improvements over stochastic sampling are observed.

  15. Real-time dynamic holographic image storage device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafleur, Sharon S. (Inventor); Montgomery, Raymond C. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A real-time dynamic holographic image storage device uses four-wave mixing in a pair of photorefractive crystals. An oscillation is produced between the crystals which can be maintained indefinitely after the initial object beam is discontinued. The object beam produces an interference pattern in a first crystal to produce phase-conjugated object beam which is directed towards the second crystal. In the second crystal another interference pattern is created which produces a reconstructed object beam. The reconstructed object beam is directed back towards the first crystal. The interference patterns are produced by interaction of the object and phase-conjugated object beam with a read and write beam in each of the crystals. By manipulation of the ratio of the read and write beam intensities in at least one of the crystals, the phase-conjugate or reconstructed object beam output therefrom can be amplified to maintain stable oscillation between the two crystals.

  16. ARTEMIS: Ares Real Time Environments for Modeling, Integration, and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Ryan; Walker, David

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of ARTEMIS in the development and testing of the ARES launch vehicles. Ares Real Time Environment for Modeling, Simulation and Integration (ARTEMIS) is the real time simulation supporting Ares I hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing. ARTEMIS accurately models all Ares/Orion/Ground subsystems which interact with Ares avionics components from pre-launch through orbit insertion The ARTEMIS System integration Lab, and the STIF architecture is reviewed. The functional components of ARTEMIS are outlined. An overview of the models and a block diagram is presented.

  17. Dynamic, in vivo, real-time detection of retinal oxidative status in a model of elevated intraocular pressure using a novel, reversibly responsive, profluorescent nitroxide probe.

    PubMed

    Rayner, Cassie L; Gole, Glen A; Bottle, Steven E; Barnett, Nigel L

    2014-12-01

    Changes to the redox status of biological systems have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of disorders including cancer, Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and neurodegeneration. In times of metabolic stress e.g. ischaemia/reperfusion, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production overwhelms the intrinsic antioxidant capacity of the cell, damaging vital cellular components. The ability to quantify ROS changes in vivo, is therefore essential to understanding their biological role. Here we evaluate the suitability of a novel reversible profluorescent probe containing a redox-sensitive nitroxide moiety (methyl ester tetraethylrhodamine nitroxide, ME-TRN), as an in vivo, real-time reporter of retinal oxidative status. The reversible nature of the probe's response offers the unique advantage of being able to monitor redox changes in both oxidizing and reducing directions in real time. After intravitreal administration of the ME-TRN probe, we induced ROS production in rat retina using an established model of complete, acute retinal ischaemia followed by reperfusion. After restoration of blood flow, retinas were imaged using a Micron III rodent fundus fluorescence imaging system, to quantify the redox-response of the probe. Fluorescent intensity declined during the first 60 min of reperfusion. The ROS-induced change in probe fluorescence was ameliorated with the retinal antioxidant, lutein. Fluorescence intensity in non-Ischemia eyes did not change significantly. This new probe and imaging technology provide a reversible and real-time response to oxidative changes and may allow the in vivo testing of antioxidant therapies of potential benefit to a range of diseases linked to oxidative stress. PMID:25447708

  18. Gaussian Molecular Dynamics in Imaginary and Real Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, Ionut; Mandelshtam, Vladimir

    2010-03-01

    The variational Gaussian wavepacket (VGW) method can be used to estimate the equilibrium density matrix by propagating Gaussian wavepackets in imaginary time [1,2]. It has proven to be practically accurate and computationally less expensive than the path integral methods. We compare the VGW method to the Feynman-Kleinert approximation (FKA), which has comparable computational cost. Although both methods are variational, they utilize different variational principles: In FKA the partition function is optimized, while in VGW it is the imaginary-time-dependent wave packet. We show that the VGW method is more accurate for a wide variety of systems. The differences are particularly important when thermodynamic properties, such as heat capacity, are of main interest. Moreover, unlike the case of FKA, in the VGW method the imaginary frequencies do not arise. In the spirit of the Centroid Molecular Dynamics the VGW method has also been extended to simulate the real-time dynamics, e.g., it can be used to estimate the Kubo-transformed quantum time correlation functions. The latter are exact in the high-temperature and harmonic limits. [1] P. Frantsuzov and V.A. Mandelshtam, J. Chem. Phys 121, 9247 (2004)[2] C. Predescu, P. Frantsuzov and V.A. Mandelshtam J. Chem. Phys 122, 154305 (2005)

  19. Waste collection multi objective model with real time traceability data.

    PubMed

    Faccio, Maurizio; Persona, Alessandro; Zanin, Giorgia

    2011-12-01

    Waste collection is a highly visible municipal service that involves large expenditures and difficult operational problems, plus it is expensive to operate in terms of investment costs (i.e. vehicles fleet), operational costs (i.e. fuel, maintenances) and environmental costs (i.e. emissions, noise and traffic congestions). Modern traceability devices, like volumetric sensors, identification RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) systems, GPRS (General Packet Radio Service) and GPS (Global Positioning System) technology, permit to obtain data in real time, which is fundamental to implement an efficient and innovative waste collection routing model. The basic idea is that knowing the real time data of each vehicle and the real time replenishment level at each bin makes it possible to decide, in function of the waste generation pattern, what bin should be emptied and what should not, optimizing different aspects like the total covered distance, the necessary number of vehicles and the environmental impact. This paper describes a framework about the traceability technology available in the optimization of solid waste collection, and introduces an innovative vehicle routing model integrated with the real time traceability data, starting the application in an Italian city of about 100,000 inhabitants. The model is tested and validated using simulation and an economical feasibility study is reported at the end of the paper. PMID:21821406

  20. Real-time Control and Modeling of Plasma Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarfaty, M.; Baum, C.; Harper, M.; Hershkowitz, N.; Shohet, J. L.

    1997-10-01

    The relatively high process rates in high density plasma tools as well as the shrinking thickness of the films, require fast estimate of the process state in order to implement real-time advanced process control. The fast etch rate estimate, within one second, in a single spot size of 1-2 mm and the time averaged rates across the wafer are obtained by a combined use of an in-situ two-color laser interferometer and a full wafer image interferometer, respectively. The gas phase state is monitored by optical emission spectroscopy and a residual gas analyzer. The magnetically confined ICP tool state, including gas flow, pressure, and RF power to the antenna and the electrostatic chuck, is computer controlled and monitored. The absolute thickness of the film is determined during the process, thus providing an end-point prediction. The advantages of two-color laser interferometry for real-time process monitoring, development and control will be described. Langmuir kinetics modeling of the measured etch rates of polysilicon and SiO2 films in Cl2 and CF4 discharges using tool state parameters will be described. The etch rate model enabled us to develop a model-based real-time control algorithm. The achieved real-time control of plasma etch rates of un-patterned SiO2 and polysilicon films will be described. This work is funded by NSF grant No. EEC-8721545.

  1. Real time dynamic behavior of vertex frustrated artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, Yuyang; Sklenar, Joseph; Gilbert, Ian; Carrasquilo, Isaac; Scholl, Andreas; Young, Anthony; Nisoli, Cristiano; Schiffer, Peter

    Artificial spin ice systems comprise two dimensional arrays of nanoscale single domain ferromagnets designed to have frustrated interactions among the moments. By decimating islands from the common square artificial spin ice, one can design lattices with so called `vertex frustration'. In such lattices, the geometry prevents all vertices from occupying local ground states simultaneously. Using Photoemission Electron Microscopy (PEEM), we access the real time thermally induced dynamics of the moment behavior in those lattices. Operating at a proper temperature, the moment direction of each island fluctuates with a sufficiently slow frequency that it can be resolvable by acquiring successive PEEM images. We can extract information regarding the collective excitations of the moments and understand how they reflect the frustration of lattice. Supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division under Grant No. DE-SC0010778. The work of C.N. was carried out under the auspices of the US Department of Energy at LANL under Contract no. DE-AC52-06NA253962. The ALS is supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the US Department of Energy under Contract no. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  2. Etch rate Modeling and Real-time Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershkowitz, N.; Sarfaty, M.; Baum, C.; Harper, M.; Shohet, J. L.

    1997-11-01

    The relatively high process rates in high density plasma tools as well as the shrinking thickness of the films, require fast estimate of the process state in order to implement real-time advanced process control. The fast etch rate estimate, within one second, in a spot size of 1-2 mm and the time averaged rates across the wafer are obtained by a combined use of an in-situ two-color laser interferometer and a full wafer image interferometer, respectively. The gas phase state is monitored by optical emission spectroscopy and a residual gas analyzer. The magnetically confined ICP tool state, including gas flow, pressure, and RF power to the antenna and the electrostatic chuck, is computer controlled and monitored. The absolute thickness of the film is determined during the process, thus providing an end-point prediction. Splitting the two-color laser beam to two spots on the wafer that are coated with different films provides real-time etch selectivity. The advantages of two-color laser interferometry for real-time process monitoring, development and control will be described. Langmuir kinetics modeling of the measured etch rates of polysilicon and SiO2 films in Cl2 and CF4 discharges using tool state parameters will be described. The etch rate model enabled us to develop a model-based real-time control algorithm. The achieved real-time control of plasma etch rates of un-patterned SiO2 and polysilicon films will be described. This work is funded by NSF grant No. EEC-8721545.

  3. Model Checking Real Time Java Using Java PathFinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, Gary; Mehlitz, Peter C.; Visser, Willem

    2005-01-01

    The Real Time Specification for Java (RTSJ) is an augmentation of Java for real time applications of various degrees of hardness. The central features of RTSJ are real time threads; user defined schedulers; asynchronous events, handlers, and control transfers; a priority inheritance based default scheduler; non-heap memory areas such as immortal and scoped, and non-heap real time threads whose execution is not impeded by garbage collection. The Robust Software Systems group at NASA Ames Research Center has JAVA PATHFINDER (JPF) under development, a Java model checker. JPF at its core is a state exploring JVM which can examine alternative paths in a Java program (e.g., via backtracking) by trying all nondeterministic choices, including thread scheduling order. This paper describes our implementation of an RTSJ profile (subset) in JPF, including requirements, design decisions, and current implementation status. Two examples are analyzed: jobs on a multiprogramming operating system, and a complex resource contention example involving autonomous vehicles crossing an intersection. The utility of JPF in finding logic and timing errors is illustrated, and the remaining challenges in supporting all of RTSJ are assessed.

  4. Real-time atomic resolution dynamics of glass surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Sumit Ravindra

    Although glasses are commonplace materials found in every walk of life, they have managed to remain mysterious for centuries. The origins of the defining characteristic of glasses, the glass transition, remain unknown. The glass transition is accompanied by a catastrophic increase in viscosity with a superexponential pace whose underlying reason has been difficult to pin down. Cooperatively rearranging regions (CRR) are playing an increasingly important role in explaining these phenomena. As CRR are only a few nanometers in size, much information can be gained by imaging studies of glasses at the atomic scale. This thesis employs the atomic resolution capabilities of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to study glass surfaces in real-time. Initial experiments on metallic glass surfaces discovered localized two-state dynamics of atomic clusters (2-8 atomic diameters) active even below the glass transition temperature (Tg). Atomic scale evidence of spatial and temporal heterogeneity was acquired. After multiple metallic glass surfaces were shown to exhibit these dynamics, it was proposed to be a universal phenomenon on glass surfaces with similar size distribution in terms of their average weighted diameter. The clusters were also shown to be thermally-activated by studying their temperature behavior. Similar dynamics were discovered on amorphous-silicon, which is an important electronic material, amidst the debate whether or not it is a glass. Further, the two-state dynamics were demonstrated to be quenched after the incorporation of hydrogen during the growth process. Individual CRRs are studied while simultaneously ramping their temperature. The single cluster traces showed marked shifts in the local equilibria illustrating a temperature-sensitive energy landscape. It was deduced that spatial heterogeneity (differences in rates at different sites) is the major contributor to the non-exponential glassy relaxations rather than temporal heterogeneity (differences in

  5. Modeling Real-Time Applications with Reusable Design Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekhis, Saoussen; Bouassida, Nadia; Bouaziz, Rafik

    Real-Time (RT) applications, which manipulate important volumes of data, need to be managed with RT databases that deal with time-constrained data and time-constrained transactions. In spite of their numerous advantages, RT databases development remains a complex task, since developers must study many design issues related to the RT domain. In this paper, we tackle this problem by proposing RT design patterns that allow the modeling of structural and behavioral aspects of RT databases. We show how RT design patterns can provide design assistance through architecture reuse of reoccurring design problems. In addition, we present an UML profile that represents patterns and facilitates further their reuse. This profile proposes, on one hand, UML extensions allowing to model the variability of patterns in the RT context and, on another hand, extensions inspired from the MARTE (Modeling and Analysis of Real-Time Embedded systems) profile.

  6. Modeling heterogeneous processor scheduling for real time systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leathrum, J. F.; Mielke, R. R.; Stoughton, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    A new model is presented to describe dataflow algorithms implemented in a multiprocessing system. Called the resource/data flow graph (RDFG), the model explicitly represents cyclo-static processor schedules as circuits of processor arcs which reflect the order that processors execute graph nodes. The model also allows the guarantee of meeting hard real-time deadlines. When unfolded, the model identifies statically the processor schedule. The model therefore is useful for determining the throughput and latency of systems with heterogeneous processors. The applicability of the model is demonstrated using a space surveillance algorithm.

  7. The Near Real Time Ionospheric Model of Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaļinka, M.; Zvirgzds, J.; Dobelis, D.; Lazdāns, E.; Reiniks, M.

    2015-11-01

    A highly accurate ionosphere model is necessary to enable a fast and reliable coordinate determination with GNSS in real time. It is a partially ionized atmospheric region ranging up to 1,000 km height, affected by spatial variations, space weather, seasonal and solar cycle dependence. New approaches and algorithms of modelling techniques are sought to provide better solutions in the territory of Latvia. Ionospheric TEC value has large differences in Western Latvia and Eastern Latvia. Actual ionospheric map should be calculated and delivered to the surveyors near real time and published on the WEB. Delivering actual map to rover GNSS devices in a field will provide the surveyors with ionospheric conditions and allow choosing best time for surveying and making geodetic measurements with higher accuracy and reliability.

  8. Real-Time Bioluminescence Imaging of Nitroreductase in Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ping; Zhang, Huateng; Deng, Quankun; Liu, Wei; Yang, Linghui; Li, Guobo; Chen, Guo; Du, Lupei; Ke, Bowen; Li, Minyong

    2016-06-01

    Nitroreductase (NTR) is an endogenous reductase overexpressed in hypoxic tumors; however, its precise detection in living cells and animals remains a considerable challenge. Herein, we developed three reaction-based probes and a related bioluminescence assay for the real-time NTR detection. The high sensitivity and selectivity of probe 3, combined with its remarkable potential of bioluminescence imaging, affords a valuable approach for in vivo imaging of NTR in a tumor model mouse. PMID:27197544

  9. A Formal Model for Real-Time Parallel Computation

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, Peter SY; Chikkagoudar, Satish

    2012-12-29

    The imposition of real-time constraints on a parallel computing environment--- specifically high-performance, cluster-computing systems--- introduces a variety of challenges with respect to the formal verification of the system's timing properties. In this paper, we briefly motivate the need for such a system, and we introduce an automaton-based method for performing such formal verification. We define the concept of a consistent parallel timing system: a hybrid system consisting of a set of timed automata (specifically, timed Buechi automata as well as a timed variant of standard finite automata), intended to model the timing properties of a well-behaved real-time parallel system. Finally, we give a brief case study to demonstrate the concepts in the paper: a parallel matrix multiplication kernel which operates within provable upper time bounds. We give the algorithm used, a corresponding consistent parallel timing system, and empirical results showing that the system operates under the specified timing constraints.

  10. Modelling the world in real time: how robots engineer information.

    PubMed

    Davison, Andrew J

    2003-12-15

    Programming robots and other autonomous systems to interact with the world in real time is bringing into sharp focus general questions about representation, inference and understanding. These artificial agents use digital computation to interpret the data gleaned from sensors and produce decisions and actions to guide their future behaviour. In a physical system, however, finite computational resources unavoidably impose the need to approximate and make selective use of the information available to reach prompt deductions. Recent research has led to widespread adoption of the methodology of Bayesian inference, which provides the absolute framework to understand this process fully via modelling as informed, fully acknowledged approximation. The performance of modern systems has improved greatly on the heuristic methods of the early days of artificial intelligence. We discuss the general problem of real-time inference and computation, and draw on examples from recent research in computer vision and robotics: specifically visual tracking and simultaneous localization and mapping. PMID:14667303

  11. D Model Visualization Enhancements in Real-Time Game Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, A.; Sánchez Belenguer, C.; Vendrell Vidal, E.; Fantini, F.; Aliperta, A.

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes two procedures used to disseminate tangible cultural heritage through real-time 3D simulations providing accurate-scientific representations. The main idea is to create simple geometries (with low-poly count) and apply two different texture maps to them: a normal map and a displacement map. There are two ways to achieve models that fit with normal or displacement maps: with the former (normal maps), the number of polygons in the reality-based model may be dramatically reduced by decimation algorithms and then normals may be calculated by rendering them to texture solutions (baking). With the latter, a LOD model is needed; its topology has to be quad-dominant for it to be converted to a good quality subdivision surface (with consistent tangency and curvature all over). The subdivision surface is constructed using methodologies for the construction of assets borrowed from character animation: these techniques have been recently implemented in many entertainment applications known as "retopology". The normal map is used as usual, in order to shade the surface of the model in a realistic way. The displacement map is used to finish, in real-time, the flat faces of the object, by adding the geometric detail missing in the low-poly models. The accuracy of the resulting geometry is progressively refined based on the distance from the viewing point, so the result is like a continuous level of detail, the only difference being that there is no need to create different 3D models for one and the same object. All geometric detail is calculated in real-time according to the displacement map. This approach can be used in Unity, a real-time 3D engine originally designed for developing computer games. It provides a powerful rendering engine, fully integrated with a complete set of intuitive tools and rapid workflows that allow users to easily create interactive 3D contents. With the release of Unity 4.0, new rendering features have been added, including Direct

  12. A system for EPID-based real-time treatment delivery verification during dynamic IMRT treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Fuangrod, Todsaporn; Woodruff, Henry C.; O’Connor, Daryl J.; Uytven, Eric van; McCurdy, Boyd M. C.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Greer, Peter B.

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To design and develop a real-time electronic portal imaging device (EPID)-based delivery verification system for dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) which enables detection of gross treatment delivery errors before delivery of substantial radiation to the patient.Methods: The system utilizes a comprehensive physics-based model to generate a series of predicted transit EPID image frames as a reference dataset and compares these to measured EPID frames acquired during treatment. The two datasets are using MLC aperture comparison and cumulative signal checking techniques. The system operation in real-time was simulated offline using previously acquired images for 19 IMRT patient deliveries with both frame-by-frame comparison and cumulative frame comparison. Simulated error case studies were used to demonstrate the system sensitivity and performance.Results: The accuracy of the synchronization method was shown to agree within two control points which corresponds to approximately ∼1% of the total MU to be delivered for dynamic IMRT. The system achieved mean real-time gamma results for frame-by-frame analysis of 86.6% and 89.0% for 3%, 3 mm and 4%, 4 mm criteria, respectively, and 97.9% and 98.6% for cumulative gamma analysis. The system can detect a 10% MU error using 3%, 3 mm criteria within approximately 10 s. The EPID-based real-time delivery verification system successfully detected simulated gross errors introduced into patient plan deliveries in near real-time (within 0.1 s).Conclusions: A real-time radiation delivery verification system for dynamic IMRT has been demonstrated that is designed to prevent major mistreatments in modern radiation therapy.

  13. Real-Time Simulation of Three-Dimensional Shoulder Girdle and Arm Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Edward K.; Blana, Dimitra; Kirsch, Robert F.; van den Bogert, Antonie J.

    2014-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is a promising technology for the restoration of arm function in paralysed individuals. Control of the paralysed arm under electrical stimulation, however, is a challenging problem that requires advanced controllers and command interfaces for the user. A real-time model describing the complex dynamics of the arm would allow user-in-the-loop type experiments where the command interface and controller could be assessed. Real-time models of the arm previously described have not included the ability to model the independently controlled scapula and clavicle, limiting their utility for clinical applications of this nature. The goal of this study therefore was to evaluate the performance and mechanical behaviour of a real-time, dynamic model of the arm and shoulder girdle. The model comprises seven segments linked by eleven degrees of freedom and actuated by 138 muscle elements. Polynomials were generated to describe the muscle lines of action to reduce computation time, and an implicit, first-order Rosenbrock formulation of the equations of motion was used to increase simulation step-size. The model simulated flexion of the arm faster than real time, simulation time being 92% of actual movement time on standard desktop hardware. Modelled maximum isometric torque values agreed well with values from the literature, showing that the model simulates the moment-generating behaviour of a real human arm. The speed of the model enables experiments where the user controls the virtual arm and receives visual feedback in real time. The ability to optimise potential solutions in simulation greatly reduces the burden on the user during development. PMID:24956613

  14. Real-time simulation of three-dimensional shoulder girdle and arm dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Edward K; Blana, Dimitra; Kirsch, Robert F; van den Bogert, Antonie J

    2014-07-01

    Electrical stimulation is a promising technology for the restoration of arm function in paralyzed individuals. Control of the paralyzed arm under electrical stimulation, however, is a challenging problem that requires advanced controllers and command interfaces for the user. A real-time model describing the complex dynamics of the arm would allow user-in-the-loop type experiments where the command interface and controller could be assessed. Real-time models of the arm previously described have not included the ability to model the independently controlled scapula and clavicle, limiting their utility for clinical applications of this nature. The goal of this study therefore was to evaluate the performance and mechanical behavior of a real-time, dynamic model of the arm and shoulder girdle. The model comprises seven segments linked by eleven degrees of freedom and actuated by 138 muscle elements. Polynomials were generated to describe the muscle lines of action to reduce computation time, and an implicit, first-order Rosenbrock formulation of the equations of motion was used to increase simulation step-size. The model simulated flexion of the arm faster than real time, simulation time being 92% of actual movement time on standard desktop hardware. Modeled maximum isometric torque values agreed well with values from the literature, showing that the model simulates the moment-generating behavior of a real human arm. The speed of the model enables experiments where the user controls the virtual arm and receives visual feedback in real time. The ability to optimize potential solutions in simulation greatly reduces the burden on the user during development. PMID:24956613

  15. Real-Time System for Water Modeling and Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Zhao, T.; David, C. H.; Minsker, B.

    2012-12-01

    Working closely with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) and the University of Texas at Austin (UT-Austin), we are developing a real-time system for water modeling and management using advanced cyberinfrastructure, data integration and geospatial visualization, and numerical modeling. The state of Texas suffered a severe drought in 2011 that cost the state $7.62 billion in agricultural losses (crops and livestock). Devastating situations such as this could potentially be avoided with better water modeling and management strategies that incorporate state of the art simulation and digital data integration. The goal of the project is to prototype a near-real-time decision support system for river modeling and management in Texas that can serve as a national and international model to promote more sustainable and resilient water systems. The system uses National Weather Service current and predicted precipitation data as input to the Noah-MP Land Surface model, which forecasts runoff, soil moisture, evapotranspiration, and water table levels given land surface features. These results are then used by a river model called RAPID, along with an error model currently under development at UT-Austin, to forecast stream flows in the rivers. Model forecasts are visualized as a Web application for TCEQ decision makers, who issue water diversion (withdrawal) permits and any needed drought restrictions; permit holders; and reservoir operation managers. Users will be able to adjust model parameters to predict the impacts of alternative curtailment scenarios or weather forecasts. A real-time optimization system under development will help TCEQ to identify optimal curtailment strategies to minimize impacts on permit holders and protect health and safety. To develop the system we have implemented RAPID as a remotely-executed modeling service using the Cyberintegrator workflow system with input data downloaded from the North American Land Data Assimilation System. The

  16. A real time Pegasus propulsion system model for VSTOL piloted simulation evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihaloew, J. R.; Roth, S. P.; Creekmore, R.

    1981-01-01

    A Pegasus-Harrier propulsion system is selected as a baseline for developing mathematical modeling and simulation techniques for VSTOL. Initially, static and dynamic propulsion system characteristics are modeled in detail to form a nonlinear aerothermodynamic digital computer simulation of a Pegasus engine. From this high fidelity simulation, a real-time propulsion model is formulated by applying a piecewise linear state variable methodology. A hydromechanical and water injection control system is also simulated. It is noted that the real-time dynamic model includes the detail and flexibility required for evaluating critical control parameters and propulsion component limits over a limited flight envelope.

  17. Application of real time systems to the analysis of neuronal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cymbalyuk, Gennady; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2008-03-01

    Neurons exhibit various activity regimes and transitions in between. The central pattern generator controlling the leech's heartbeat contains identified pairs of mutually inhibitory neurons (Calabrese et al. 1995). We describe real time systems approaches to the analysis of their activity. The hybrid system consists of a living neuron and a model neuron (or an artificial silicon neuron) interacting in the real time. Dynamic clamp is used to implement artificial ionic currents and synapses in the system (Sharp et al. 1993). Our study determines the mechanisms underlying and regulating bursting activity, based on intrinsic membrane dynamics and network interactions. The complexity of endogenous dynamics originates from the diversity of ionic currents operating on different time scales. Hybrid system analysis and slow-fast dynamical systems analysis have been combined in our studies of bursting, its origin and transformations in heart interneurons both as single cells and in the mutually inhibitory configuration.

  18. Sensing winter soil respiration dynamics in near-real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contosta, A.; Burakowski, E. A.; Varner, R. K.; Frey, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Some of the largest reductions in seasonal snow cover are projected to occur in temperate latitudes. Limited measurements from these ecosystems indicate that winter soil respiration releases as much as 30% of carbon fixed during the previous growing season. This respiration is possible with a snowpack that insulates soil from ambient fluctuations in climate. However, relationships among snowpack, soil temperature, soil moisture, and winter soil respiration in temperate regions are not well-understood. Most studies have infrequently sampled soil respiration and its drivers, and most measurements have been limited to the soil surface. We made near-real time, continuous measurements of temperature, moisture, and CO2 fluxes from the soil profile, through the snowpack, and into the atmosphere in a deciduous forest of New Hampshire, USA. We coupled these data with daily sampling of snow depth and snow water equivalent (SWE). Our objectives were to continuously measure soil CO2 production (Psoil) and CO2 flux through the snowpack (Fsnow) and to compare Fsnow and Psoil with environmental drivers. We found that Fsnow was more dynamic than Psoil, changing as much as 30% over several days with shifting environmental conditions. Multiple regression indicated that SWE, air temperature, surface soil temperature, surface soil CO2 concentrations, and soil moisture at 15 cm were significant predictors of Fsnow. The transition of surface temperature from below to above 0°C was particularly important as it represented a phase change from ice to liquid water. Only air temperature and soil moisture at 15 cm were significant drivers of Psoil, where higher moisture at 15 cm resulted in lower Psoil rates. Time series analysis showed that Fsnow lagged 40 days behind Psoil. This lag may be due to slow CO2 diffusion through soil to overlying snow under high moisture conditions. Our results suggest that surface soil CO2 losses are driven by rapid changes in snow cover, surface temperature

  19. A real-time groundwater management model using data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei-Chen; Putti, Mario; Kendall, Donald R.; Yeh, William W.-G.

    2011-06-01

    This study develops a groundwater management model for real-time operation of an aquifer system. A groundwater flow model is allied with a nudging data assimilation algorithm that reduces the forecast error, minimizes the risk of system failure, and improves management strategies. The nudging algorithm treats the unknown private pumping as an additional sink term in the groundwater flow equation and provides a consistently physical interpretation for the identification of pumping rates. The system response due to pumping and injection is represented by a response matrix that is generated by the influence coefficient method. The response matrix (with a much smaller dimension) is used as a reduced model and is embedded directly in the management model as a part of the constraint set. Additionally, the influence coefficient method is utilized to include the nudging effect in the reduced model. The management model optimizes the monthly operation for 12 months into the future and determines the optimal strategy using the information provided by nudging. The management model is updated at the beginning of each month when new head observations and pumping data become available. We also discuss the utility, accuracy, and efficiency of the proposed management model for real-time operation.

  20. A real time Pegasus propulsion system model for VSTOL piloted simulation evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihaloew, J. R.; Roth, S. P.; Creekmore, R.

    1981-01-01

    A real time propulsion system modeling technique suitable for use in man-in-the-loop simulator studies was developd. This technique provides the system accuracy, stability, and transient response required for integrated aircraft and propulsion control system studies. A Pegasus-Harrier propulsion system was selected as a baseline for developing mathematical modeling and simulation techniques for VSTOL. Initially, static and dynamic propulsion system characteristics were modeled in detail to form a nonlinear aerothermodynamic digital computer simulation of a Pegasus engine. From this high fidelity simulation, a real time propulsion model was formulated by applying a piece-wise linear state variable methodology. A hydromechanical and water injection control system was also simulated. The real time dynamic model includes the detail and flexibility required for the evaluation of critical control parameters and propulsion component limits over a limited flight envelope. The model was programmed for interfacing with a Harrier aircraft simulation. Typical propulsion system simulation results are presented.

  1. A global, real-time flood monitoring model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2014-07-01

    Floods kill thousands of people and cause billions of dollars in damage each year, and many floods occur in areas of the world that lack resources for flood monitoring and forecasting systems. Wu et al. report on an experimental real-time global flood monitoring system that employs a widely used land surface model coupled with a hierarchical dominant river tracing-based runoff routing model and satellite-based precipitation data to provide streamflow and flood detection/estimation information over most of the globe every 3 hours.

  2. Taming the Dynamical Sign Problem in Real-Time Evolution of Quantum Many-Body Problems.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Guy; Gull, Emanuel; Reichman, David R; Millis, Andrew J

    2015-12-31

    Current nonequilibrium Monte Carlo methods suffer from a dynamical sign problem that makes simulating real-time dynamics for long times exponentially hard. We propose a new "inchworm algorithm," based on iteratively reusing information obtained in previous steps to extend the propagation to longer times. The algorithm largely overcomes the dynamical sign problem, changing the scaling from exponential to quadratic. We use the method to solve the Anderson impurity model in the Kondo and mixed valence regimes, obtaining results both for quenches and for spin dynamics in the presence of an oscillatory magnetic field. PMID:26765013

  3. System for real-time generation of georeferenced terrain models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Howard J.; Hanson, Allen R.; Riseman, Edward M.; Stolle, Frank; Zhu, Zhigang; Hayward, Christopher D.; Slaymaker, Dana

    2001-02-01

    A growing number of law enforcement applications, especially in the areas of border security, drug enforcement and anti- terrorism require high-resolution wide area surveillance from unmanned air vehicles. At the University of Massachusetts we are developing an aerial reconnaissance system capable of generating high resolution, geographically registered terrain models (in the form of a seamless mosaic) in real-time from a single down-looking digital video camera. The efficiency of the processing algorithms, as well as the simplicity of the hardware, will provide the user with the ability to produce and roam through stereoscopic geo-referenced mosaic images in real-time, and to automatically generate highly accurate 3D terrain models offline in a fraction of the time currently required by softcopy conventional photogrammetry systems. The system is organized around a set of integrated sensor and software components. The instrumentation package is comprised of several inexpensive commercial-off-the-shelf components, including a digital video camera, a differential GPS, and a 3-axis heading and reference system. At the heart of the system is a set of software tools for image registration, mosaic generation, geo-location and aircraft state vector recovery. Each process is designed to efficiently handle the data collected by the instrument package. Particular attention is given to minimizing geospatial errors at each stage, as well as modeling propagation of errors through the system. Preliminary results for an urban and forested scene are discussed in detail.

  4. Model-based approach to real-time target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackett, Jay K.; Gold, Ed V.; Long, Daniel T.; Cloud, Eugene L.; Duvoisin, Herbert A.

    1992-09-01

    Land mine detection and extraction from infra-red (IR) scenes using real-time parallel processing is of significant interest to ground based infantry. The mine detection algorithms consist of several sub-processes to progress from raw input IR imagery to feature based mine nominations. Image enhancement is first applied; this consists of noise and sensor artifact removal. Edge grouping is used to determine the boundary of the objects. The generalized Hough Transform tuned to the land mine signature acts as a model based matched nomination filter. Once the object is found, the model is used to guide the labeling of each pixel as background, object, or object boundary. Using these labels to identify object regions, feature primitives are extracted in a high speed parallel processor. A feature based screener then compares each object's feature primitives to acceptable values and rejects all objects that do not resemble mines. This operation greatly reduces the number of objects that must be passed from a real-time parallel processor to the classifier. We will discuss details of this model- based approach, including results from actual IR field test imagery.

  5. A Real-Time Groundwater Management Model Using Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, W.; Putti, M.; Kendall, D.; Yeh, W. W.

    2009-12-01

    This study develops a groundwater management model for real time operation of an aquifer system. A groundwater flow model is allied with a nudging data assimilation algorithm that reduces the forecast error, minimizes the risk of system failure, and improves management strategies. The nudging algorithm treats the unknown private pumping as an additional sink term in the groundwater flow equations and provides a consistently physical interpretation for pumping rates identification. The response of the groundwater simulation model due to pumping/injection is represented by a response matrix which is generated by the influence coefficient method. The response matrix with a much smaller dimension (referred to as the reduced simulation model) is directly embedded in the management model as a part of the constraint set. Additionally, the influence coefficient method is utilized to include the nudging effect as additional terms in the reduced simulation model. The management model optimizes monthly operational policy for 12 months into the future with given initial condition and system constraints. We apply the developed management model to the Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) project of the Las Posas Groundwater Basin in southern California. We consider both the injection and pumping scenarios. In the case studies, six unknown pumping rates from private wells are estimated using measured heads from four observation wells. The management model determines the optimal operational strategies using the information provided by nudging and is updated at the beginning of each month when new head observations become available. We also discuss the utility, accuracy, and efficiency of the proposed management model for real time operation.

  6. Real Time Land-Surface Hydrologic Modeling Over Continental US

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houser, Paul R.

    1998-01-01

    The land surface component of the hydrological cycle is fundamental to the overall functioning of the atmospheric and climate processes. Spatially and temporally variable rainfall and available energy, combined with land surface heterogeneity cause complex variations in all processes related to surface hydrology. The characterization of the spatial and temporal variability of water and energy cycles are critical to improve our understanding of land surface-atmosphere interaction and the impact of land surface processes on climate extremes. Because the accurate knowledge of these processes and their variability is important for climate predictions, most Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) centers have incorporated land surface schemes in their models. However, errors in the NWP forcing accumulate in the surface and energy stores, leading to incorrect surface water and energy partitioning and related processes. This has motivated the NWP to impose ad hoc corrections to the land surface states to prevent this drift. A proposed methodology is to develop Land Data Assimilation schemes (LDAS), which are uncoupled models forced with observations, and not affected by NWP forcing biases. The proposed research is being implemented as a real time operation using an existing Surface Vegetation Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (SVATS) model at a 40 km degree resolution across the United States to evaluate these critical science questions. The model will be forced with real time output from numerical prediction models, satellite data, and radar precipitation measurements. Model parameters will be derived from the existing GIS vegetation and soil coverages. The model results will be aggregated to various scales to assess water and energy balances and these will be validated with various in-situ observations.

  7. Real-time path planning in dynamic virtual environments using multiagent navigation graphs.

    PubMed

    Sud, Avneesh; Andersen, Erik; Curtis, Sean; Lin, Ming C; Manocha, Dinesh

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel approach for efficient path planning and navigation of multiple virtual agents in complex dynamic scenes. We introduce a new data structure, Multi-agent Navigation Graph (MaNG), which is constructed using first- and second-order Voronoi diagrams. The MaNG is used to perform route planning and proximity computations for each agent in real time. Moreover, we use the path information and proximity relationships for local dynamics computation of each agent by extending a social force model [Helbing05]. We compute the MaNG using graphics hardware and present culling techniques to accelerate the computation. We also address undersampling issues and present techniques to improve the accuracy of our algorithm. Our algorithm is used for real-time multi-agent planning in pursuit-evasion, terrain exploration and crowd simulation scenarios consisting of hundreds of moving agents, each with a distinct goal. PMID:18369262

  8. Real-time probing of ultrafast residual charge dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Li Junjie; Wang Xuan; Zhou Jun; Cao Jianming; Chen Zhaoyang; Mao, Samuel S.

    2011-01-03

    The temporal evolution of residual charges during laser ablation of metal and dielectric materials was investigated by measuring the correlated transient electric field using femtosecond electron shadow imaging and deflectometry. The results indicate that residual charges in metals can redistribute themselves almost instantly, abiding by the boundary conditions and Maxwell equations in the same way as they would at electrostatic equilibrium condition, but residual charges in dielectrics are confined within the excited area for hundreds of picoseconds and beyond. These observations provide an experimental support to the alleged Coulomb explosion phenomenon in previous studies as well as a reference for modeling residual charge dynamics.

  9. A Circuit Model of Real Time Human Body Hydration.

    PubMed

    Asogwa, Clement Ogugua; Teshome, Assefa K; Collins, Stephen F; Lai, Daniel T H

    2016-06-01

    Changes in human body hydration leading to excess fluid losses or overload affects the body fluid's ability to provide the necessary support for healthy living. We propose a time-dependent circuit model of real-time human body hydration, which models the human body tissue as a signal transmission medium. The circuit model predicts the attenuation of a propagating electrical signal. Hydration rates are modeled by a time constant τ, which characterizes the individual specific metabolic function of the body part measured. We define a surrogate human body anthropometric parameter θ by the muscle-fat ratio and comparing it with the body mass index (BMI), we find theoretically, the rate of hydration varying from 1.73 dB/min, for high θ and low τ to 0.05 dB/min for low θ and high τ. We compare these theoretical values with empirical measurements and show that real-time changes in human body hydration can be observed by measuring signal attenuation. We took empirical measurements using a vector network analyzer and obtained different hydration rates for various BMI, ranging from 0.6 dB/min for 22.7 [Formula: see text] down to 0.04 dB/min for 41.2 [Formula: see text]. We conclude that the galvanic coupling circuit model can predict changes in the volume of the body fluid, which are essential in diagnosing and monitoring treatment of body fluid disorder. Individuals with high BMI would have higher time-dependent biological characteristic, lower metabolic rate, and lower rate of hydration. PMID:26485354

  10. A Real-Time Assimilative Model for IRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, B. W.; Huang, X.; Galkin, I.; Bilitza, D.

    2012-04-01

    Ionospheric models are mostly unable to correctly predict the effects of space weather events and atmospheric disturbances on the ionosphere. This is especially true for the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) which by design is a monthly median (climatological) model [Bilitza et al., 2011]. We propose a Real-Time Assimilative Model "RTAM" for IRI that is ingesting, initially, the available real-time Digisonde GIRO [Reinisch and Galkin, 2011] data streams: foF2/hmF2, MUF3000F2, foF1/hmF1, and foE/hmF2 [Galkin et al., 2011]. Deviations of these characteristics, especially foF2, from the monthly median values are the main cause for errors in the IRI model prediction. The assimilative modeling will provide a high-resolution, global picture of the ionospheric response to various short-term events observed during periods of storm activity or the impact of gravity waves coupling the ionosphere to the lower atmosphere, including timelines of the vertical restructuring of the plasma distribution. GIRO currently provides reliable real-time data from 42 stations at a cadence of 15 min or 5 min. The number of stations is rapidly growing and is likely to soon be complemented by satellite borne topside sounders. IRI uses the characteristics predictions based on CCIR/URSI maps of coefficients. The diurnal variation of the foF2 characteristic, for example, is presented by the Fourier series Σ6 foF 2(T, φ,λ,χ) = a0(φ,λ,χ)+ (an(φ,λ,χ)cosnT + bn(φ,λ,χ)sin nT), n=1 where T is Universal Time in hours, and φ, λ, χ are the geographic latitude, longitude, and modified dip latitude, respectively. The coefficients an are in turn expanded as functions φ, λ, χ resulting in a set of 24 global maps of 988 coefficients each, one for each month of the year and for two levels of solar activity, R12=10 and 100, where R12 is the 12-month running-mean of the monthly sunspot number Rm (2*12*988 = 23,712 coefficients in all) [ITU-R, 2011]. For a given point in time, 988

  11. Real-time dynamic simulator for the Topaz II reactor power system

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, K.S.

    1994-10-01

    A dynamic simulator of the TOPAZ II reactor system has been developed for the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program. The simulator is a self-contained IBM-PC compatible based system that executes at a speed faster than real-time. The simulator combines first-principle modeling and empirical correlations in its algorithm to attain the modeling accuracy and computational through-put that are required for real-time execution. The overall execution time of the simulator for each time step is 15 ms when no data is written to the disk, and 18 ms when nine double precision data points are written to the disk once in every time step. The simulation program has been tested and it is able to handle a step decrease of $8 worth of reactivity. It also provides simulation of fuel, emitter, collector, stainless steel, and ZrH moderator failures. Presented in this paper are the models used in the calculations, a sample simulation session, and a discussion of the performance and limitations of the simulator. The simulator has been found to provide realistic real-time dynamic response of the TOPAZ II reactor system under both normal and causality conditions.

  12. Tracing molecular electronic excitation dynamics in real time and space.

    PubMed

    Dutoi, Anthony D; Cederbaum, Lorenz S; Wormit, Michael; Starcke, Jan Hendrik; Dreuw, Andreas

    2010-04-14

    We present a method for studying the movement of electrons and energy within and between electronically excited molecules. The dynamically changing state is a many-electron wavepacket, for which we numerically integrate the Schrodinger equation using the ADC(2) effective Hamiltonian for the particle-hole propagator. We develop the tools necessary for following the separate motions of the particles and holes. Total particle and hole densities can be used to give an overview of the dynamics, which can be atomically decomposed in a Mulliken fashion, or individual particle and hole states give a more detailed look at the structure of an excitation. We apply our model to a neon chain, as an illustrative example, projecting an excited eigenstate of an isolated atom onto the coupled system as the initial state. In addition to demonstrating our propagation and analysis machinery, the results show a dramatic difference in excitation-energy transfer rates as a consequence of initial polarization. Furthermore, already in a system with three constituents, an important aspect of multiple coupled systems appears, in that one absorbing system essentially shields another, changing the effective sitewise coupling parameters. PMID:20405991

  13. Math modeling and computer mechanization for real time simulation of rotary-wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical modeling and computer mechanization for real time simulation of rotary wing aircraft is discussed. Error analysis in the digital simulation of dynamic systems, such as rotary wing aircraft is described. The method for digital simulation of nonlinearities with discontinuities, such as exist in typical flight control systems and rotor blade hinges, is discussed.

  14. Advanced feedback control of indoor air quality using real-time computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ratnam, E.; Campbell, T.; Bradley, R.

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes the partial implementation of a novel method of controlling indoor air quality (IAQ) for critical applications. The proposed method uses a numerical modeling technique known as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for modeling the effect of variable ventilation rates for intelligent and rapid control of air contamination in space. This paper describes how a CFD model is made to run in real time linked to a feedback control loop. The technique was simulated in a graphical programming language. The simulation results indicate that a quasi-transient potential flow CFD model is a viable technique for feedback control of IAQ, and it is currently being implemented in an experimental validation.

  15. Application of linear programming techniques for controlling linear dynamic plants in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabasov, R.; Kirillova, F. M.; Ha, Vo Thi Thanh

    2016-03-01

    The problem of controlling a linear dynamic plant in real time given its nondeterministic model and imperfect measurements of the inputs and outputs is considered. The concepts of current distributions of the initial state and disturbance parameters are introduced. The method for the implementation of disclosable loop using the separation principle is described. The optimal control problem under uncertainty conditions is reduced to the problems of optimal observation, optimal identification, and optimal control of the deterministic system. To extend the domain where a solution to the optimal control problem under uncertainty exists, a two-stage optimal control method is proposed. Results are illustrated using a dynamic plant of the fourth order.

  16. Real-time estimation of lead-acid battery parameters: A dynamic data-driven approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue; Shen, Zheng; Ray, Asok; Rahn, Christopher D.

    2014-12-01

    This short paper presents a recently reported dynamic data-driven method, Symbolic Dynamic Filtering (SDF), for real-time estimation of the state-of-health (SOH) and state-of-charge (SOC) in lead-acid batteries, as an alternative to model-based analysis techniques. In particular, SOC estimation relies on a k-NN regression algorithm while SOH estimation is obtained from the divergence between extracted features. The results show that the proposed data-driven method successfully distinguishes battery voltage responses under different SOC and SOH situations.

  17. Designers Workbench: Towards Real-Time Immersive Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kuester, F; Duchaineau, M A; Hamann, B; Joy, K I; Ma, K L

    2001-10-03

    This paper introduces the DesignersWorkbench, a semi-immersive virtual environment for two-handed modeling, sculpting and analysis tasks. The paper outlines the fundamental tools, design metaphors and hardware components required for an intuitive real-time modeling system. As companies focus on streamlining productivity to cope with global competition, the migration to computer-aided design (CAD), computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), and computer-aided engineering (CAE) systems has established a new backbone of modern industrial product development. However, traditionally a product design frequently originates from a clay model that, after digitization, forms the basis for the numerical description of CAD primitives. The DesignersWorkbench aims at closing this technology or ''digital gap'' experienced by design and CAD engineers by transforming the classical design paradigm into its filly integrated digital and virtual analog allowing collaborative development in a semi-immersive virtual environment. This project emphasizes two key components from the classical product design cycle: freeform modeling and analysis. In the freeform modeling stage, content creation in the form of two-handed sculpting of arbitrary objects using polygonal, volumetric or mathematically defined primitives is emphasized, whereas the analysis component provides the tools required for pre- and post-processing steps for finite element analysis tasks applied to the created models.

  18. [Real-time forecasting model for monitoring pollutant with differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Wen; Liu, Wen-Qing; Xie, Pin-Hua; Wang, Feng-Sui; Yang, Yi-Jun

    2009-11-01

    For real-time and on-line monitoring DOAS (differential optical absorption spectroscopy) system, a model based on an improved Elman network for monitoring pollutant concentrations was proposed. In order to reduce the systematical complexity, the forecasting factors have been obtained based on the step-wise regression method. The forecasting factors were current concentrations, temperature and relative humidity, and wind speed and wind direction. The dynamic back propagation (BP) algorithm was used for creating training set. The experiment results show that the predicted value follows the real well. So the modified Elman network can meet the demand of DOAS system's real time forecasting. PMID:20101985

  19. Real-time application of the drag based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žic, Tomislav; Temmer, Manuela; Vršnak, Bojan

    2016-04-01

    The drag-based model (DBM) is an analytical model which is usually used for calculating kinematics of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the interplanetary space, prediction of the CME arrival times and impact speeds at arbitrary targets in the heliosphere. The main assumption of the model is that beyond a distance of about 20 solar radii from the Sun, the drag is dominant in the interplanetary space. The previous version of DBM relied on the rough assumption of averaged, unperturbed and constant environmental conditions as well as constant CME properties throughout the entire interplanetary CME propagation. The continuation of our work consists of enhancing the model into a form which uses a time dependent and perturbed environment without constraints on CME properties and distance forecasting. The extension provides the possibility of application in various scenarios, such as automatic least-square fitting on initial CME kinematic data suitable for a real-time forecasting of CME kinematics, or embedding the DBM into pre-calculated interplanetary ambient conditions provided by advanced numerical simulations (for example, codes of ENLIL, EUHFORIA, etc.). A demonstration of the enhanced DBM is available on the web-site: http://www.geof.unizg.hr/~tzic/dbm.html. We acknowledge the support of European Social Fund under the "PoKRet" project.

  20. Geomagnetic Storm and Substorm Predictions with the Real-Time WINDMI Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, Mona; Horton, Wendell; Kozyra, Janet

    The Real-Time WINDMI model is an implementation of WINDMI, a low dimensional, plasma physics-based, nonlinear dynamical model of the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system. The system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which describes energy transfer into, and between dominant components of the nightside magnetosphere and ionosphere, is solved numerically to determine the state of each component. The model characterizes the energy stored in the ring current and the region 1 field-aligned current which are compared to the Dst and AL indices. Solar wind parameter measurements from ACE are automatically downloaded every 10 minutes and used to derive the input solar wind driving voltage to the model. This allows the computation of model Dst and AL values by Real-Time WINDMI about 1-2 hours before index data is available at the Kyoto WDC Quicklook website. Model results are shown on the website (http://orion.ph.utexas.edu/ windmi/realtime/). The model has captured about 15 storm and/or substorm events in the past 2 years it has been running. Model validation for the AL and Dst predictions is being implemented. Real-Time WINDMI performance is also studied for the rectified driving voltage compared to the Siscoe et al. voltage as input. We plan to compare the database of Real-Time WINDMI Dst predictions with other ring current models which contain different loss and energization processes. The work is supported by NSF grant ATM-0638480.

  1. Real-time simulation model of the HL-20 lifting body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, E. Bruce; Cruz, Christopher I.; Ragsdale, W. A.

    1992-01-01

    A proposed manned spacecraft design, designated the HL-20, has been under investigation at Langley Research Center. Included in that investigation are flight control design and flying qualities studies utilizing a man-in-the-loop real-time simulator. This report documents the current real-time simulation model of the HL-20 lifting body vehicle, known as version 2.0, presently in use at NASA Langley Research Center. Included are data on vehicle aerodynamics, inertias, geometries, guidance and control laws, and cockpit displays and controllers. In addition, trim case and dynamic check case data is provided. The intent of this document is to provide the reader with sufficient information to develop and validate an equivalent simulation of the HL-20 for use in real-time or analytical studies.

  2. Toward real-time dynamic close-range photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquhart, Colin W.; Siebert, J. P.

    1993-10-01

    The goal of the Active Stereo Probe (ASP) project is the on-line recovery of 3D surfaces from stereo images captured using a dynamic binocular robot vision system. In this paper, we present results of 3D surface recovery using scale-space automatic stereo-matching. These results have been considerably enhanced by bathing the scene in textured light provided by the ASP active illumination source. We also describe a two stage approach that incorporates photogrammetric techniques into the ASP system to maintain calibration during dynamic system operation. Direct Linear Transform based calibration provides an initial static calibration. Thereafter, dynamic calibration is maintained by exploiting high resolution encoders to track the systems external orientation parameters and thereby constrain the search space of subsequent bundle adjustment. We expect this strategy to achieve the speed and accuracy required to satisfy many on-line 3D surface recovery applications.

  3. Development of a dynamic model for real-time determination of membrane-bound acetylcholinesterase activity upon perfusion with inhibitors and reactivators.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Saskia; Eyer, Peter; Mückter, Harald; Worek, Franz

    2006-07-28

    Quantitative predictions of the course of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, following interference of inhibitors and reactivators, are usually obscured by the time-dependent changes of all reaction partners. To mimic these dynamics we developed an in vitro model. Immobilized human erythrocyte ghosts in a bioreactor were continuously perfused while AChE activity was monitored by a modified Ellman method. The perfusion system consisted of two HPLC pumps with integrated quaternary low-pressure gradient formers that were programmed by a computer using commercial HPLC software. The combined eluates passed a particle filter (Millex-GS, 0.22 microm) containing a thin layer of erythrocytes that was immersed in a temperature-controlled water bath. The effluent passed a flow cell in a UV-vis detector, the signal of which was digitized, written to disc and calculated with curve fitting programs. AChE activity decreased by 3.4% within 2.5 h. The day-to-day variation of the freshly prepared bioreactor using the same enzyme source was +/-3.3%. Residual activity of 0.2% marked the limit of quantification. Following perfusion with paraoxon, pseudo first-order rate constants of inhibition were established that did not differ from results obtained in conventional assays. The same holds true for reactivation with obidoxime. The set-up presented allows freely programmable time-dependent changes of up to eight solvents to mimic pharmacokinetic profiles without accumulation of products. Due to some hysteresis in the system, reaction half-lives should be >3 min and concentration changes in critical compounds should exceed half-lives of 5 min. Otherwise, the system offers much flexibility and operates with high precision. PMID:16725113

  4. Real-Time, Holographic, Dynamic Image-Storage Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Raymond C.; Lafleur, Sharon S.

    1995-01-01

    Solid-state device developed for high-speed acquisition, dynamic storage, and amplification of three-dimensional holographic images. Holograms generated via four-wave mixing in two or more photorefractive crystals (or subelements of single crystal) to create single-crystal or multicrystal oscillator. Apparatus provides dynamic storage of holographic image of object after electronic shutter closed to turn off object beam. Provides capability to store, amplify, process, and transmit time-varying, two-dimensional, spatial information. Developments include sensors, actuators, and optical computers operating at speeds on order of speed of light. Potential in applications in which need for high-speed acquisition and storage of three-dimensional holographic images.

  5. Real-time Visualization of Dynamic Particle Contact Failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wayne

    2015-06-01

    Granular materials have been widely used for shock isolation and ballistic protection. Particles constituting granular materials come under dynamic compressive loading during projectile penetration, materials processing, transportation, and construction. The resulting integrity of the spherical particles plays a significant role in both the subsequent processing and the energy absorption capabilities of the material. In this study, failure mechanisms in two contacting brittle particles under dynamic compressive loading are investigated using high speed X-ray phase contrast imaging. Controlled dynamic compression is applied using a modified Kolsky bar apparatus. Particles investigated in study are composed of five different materials: soda-lime glass (SLG), polycrystalline silicon, polycrystalline silicon dioxide (silica), barium titanate glass (BTG), and yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ). For both SLG and silica particles, one of the particles pulverize, thus breaking into many small pieces, when compressed. For Silicon and BTG particles, a finite number of cracks are observed in one of the particles causing it to fracture. For YSZ particles, a single meridonial crack develops in one of the particles, breaking it into two parts.

  6. Real-time dynamics of lattice gauge theories with a few-qubit quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Esteban A; Muschik, Christine A; Schindler, Philipp; Nigg, Daniel; Erhard, Alexander; Heyl, Markus; Hauke, Philipp; Dalmonte, Marcello; Monz, Thomas; Zoller, Peter; Blatt, Rainer

    2016-06-23

    Gauge theories are fundamental to our understanding of interactions between the elementary constituents of matter as mediated by gauge bosons. However, computing the real-time dynamics in gauge theories is a notorious challenge for classical computational methods. This has recently stimulated theoretical effort, using Feynman's idea of a quantum simulator, to devise schemes for simulating such theories on engineered quantum-mechanical devices, with the difficulty that gauge invariance and the associated local conservation laws (Gauss laws) need to be implemented. Here we report the experimental demonstration of a digital quantum simulation of a lattice gauge theory, by realizing (1 + 1)-dimensional quantum electrodynamics (the Schwinger model) on a few-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer. We are interested in the real-time evolution of the Schwinger mechanism, describing the instability of the bare vacuum due to quantum fluctuations, which manifests itself in the spontaneous creation of electron-positron pairs. To make efficient use of our quantum resources, we map the original problem to a spin model by eliminating the gauge fields in favour of exotic long-range interactions, which can be directly and efficiently implemented on an ion trap architecture. We explore the Schwinger mechanism of particle-antiparticle generation by monitoring the mass production and the vacuum persistence amplitude. Moreover, we track the real-time evolution of entanglement in the system, which illustrates how particle creation and entanglement generation are directly related. Our work represents a first step towards quantum simulation of high-energy theories using atomic physics experiments-the long-term intention is to extend this approach to real-time quantum simulations of non-Abelian lattice gauge theories. PMID:27337339

  7. Real-time dynamics of lattice gauge theories with a few-qubit quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Esteban A.; Muschik, Christine A.; Schindler, Philipp; Nigg, Daniel; Erhard, Alexander; Heyl, Markus; Hauke, Philipp; Dalmonte, Marcello; Monz, Thomas; Zoller, Peter; Blatt, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    Gauge theories are fundamental to our understanding of interactions between the elementary constituents of matter as mediated by gauge bosons. However, computing the real-time dynamics in gauge theories is a notorious challenge for classical computational methods. This has recently stimulated theoretical effort, using Feynman’s idea of a quantum simulator, to devise schemes for simulating such theories on engineered quantum-mechanical devices, with the difficulty that gauge invariance and the associated local conservation laws (Gauss laws) need to be implemented. Here we report the experimental demonstration of a digital quantum simulation of a lattice gauge theory, by realizing (1 + 1)-dimensional quantum electrodynamics (the Schwinger model) on a few-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer. We are interested in the real-time evolution of the Schwinger mechanism, describing the instability of the bare vacuum due to quantum fluctuations, which manifests itself in the spontaneous creation of electron–positron pairs. To make efficient use of our quantum resources, we map the original problem to a spin model by eliminating the gauge fields in favour of exotic long-range interactions, which can be directly and efficiently implemented on an ion trap architecture. We explore the Schwinger mechanism of particle–antiparticle generation by monitoring the mass production and the vacuum persistence amplitude. Moreover, we track the real-time evolution of entanglement in the system, which illustrates how particle creation and entanglement generation are directly related. Our work represents a first step towards quantum simulation of high-energy theories using atomic physics experiments—the long-term intention is to extend this approach to real-time quantum simulations of non-Abelian lattice gauge theories.

  8. Real-time dynamic security assessment of power grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerin, Uros; Heyde, Chris; Krebs, Rainer; Lerch, Edwin

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a dynamic security assessment solution, which can be used in the power system control room to improve system stability. It is based on a set of security indices. The indices are able of establishing contingencies' severity levels as a measure of different aspects of power system security. A system based on fuzzy logic is used to combine the indices into a single composite index. The composite index is able to alert the control operator to the network conditions that represent a significant risk to system security based on over-all system performance.

  9. Real-time dynamic security assessment of power grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerin, Uros; Heyde, Chris; Krebs, Rainer; Lerch, Edwin

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a dynamic security assessment solution, which can be used in the power system control room to improve system stability. It is based on a set of security indices. The indices are able of establishing contingencies' severity levels as a measure of different aspects of power system security. A system based on fuzzy logic is used to combine the indices into a single composite index. The composite index is able to alert the control operator to the network conditions that represent a significant risk to system security based on over-all system performance.

  10. A Real-Time Hybrid Heliospheric Modeling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detman, T.; Arge, C.; Fry, C.; Dryer, M.; Smith, Z.; Pizzo, V.

    2001-12-01

    match available source surface maps) the HHMS runs about 800 times faster than real time on a single node of SEC's Linux Beowulf cluster, thus making ensemble forecasting highly feasible.

  11. In vivo dynamic process imaging using real-time optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Shao, Peng; Hajireza, Parsin; Forbrich, Alexander; Zemp, Roger J.

    2013-02-01

    The authors demonstrate in vivo dynamic process imaging using a label-free real-time optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope (OR-PAM). This reflection-mode system takes advantage of a 532-nm fiber laser source with a high pulse repetition rate of up to 600 kHz combined with a fast-scanning mirror system. Microvasculature in SCID mouse ears is imaged at near real-time (0.5 fps) for a 1×1 mm2 field of view (FOV) with micron-scale lateral resolution. We also demonstrate imaging of cardiac-induced microhemodynamics in murine microvasculature at real-time frame-rates (30 fps) over a 250×250 μ FOV using real-time C-scan OR-PAM with ability to provide sustained imaging with near real-time feedback for focusing and positioning.

  12. In vivo dynamic process imaging using real-time optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Shao, Peng; Hajireza, Parsin; Forbrich, Alexander; Zemp, Roger J

    2013-02-01

    The authors demonstrate in vivo dynamic process imaging using a label-free real-time optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope (OR-PAM). This reflection-mode system takes advantage of a 532-nm fiber laser source with a high pulse repetition rate of up to 600 kHz combined with a fast-scanning mirror system. Microvasculature in SCID mouse ears is imaged at near real-time (0.5 fps) for a 1×1 mm2 field of view (FOV) with micron-scale lateral resolution. We also demonstrate imaging of cardiac-induced microhemodynamics in murine microvasculature at real-time frame-rates (30 fps) over a 250×250 μm2 FOV using real-time C-scan OR-PAM with ability to provide sustained imaging with near real-time feedback for focusing and positioning. PMID:23377002

  13. A Provenance Model for Real-Time Water Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Bai, Q.; Zednik, S.; Taylor, P.; Fox, P. A.; Taylor, K.; Kloppers, C.; Peters, C.; Terhorst, A.; West, P.; Compton, M.; Shu, Y.; Provenance Management Team

    2010-12-01

    Generating hydrological data products, such as flow forecasts, involves complex interactions among instruments, data simulation models, computational facilities and data providers. Correct interpretation of the data produced at various stages requires good understanding of how data was generated or processed. Provenance describes the lineage of a data product. Making provenance information accessible to hydrologists and decision makers not only helps to determine the data’s value, accuracy and authorship, but also enables users to determine the trustworthiness of the data product. In the water domain, WaterML2 [1] is an emerging standard which describes an information model and format for the publication of water observations data in XML. The W3C semantic sensor network incubator group (SSN-XG) [3] is producing ontologies for the description of sensor configurations. By integrating domain knowledge of this kind into the provenance information model, the integrated information model will enable water domain researchers and water resource managers to better analyse how observations and derived data products were generated. We first introduce the Proof Mark Language (PML2) [2], WaterML2 and the SSN-XG sensor ontology as the proposed provenance representation formalism. Then we describe some initial implementations how these standards could be integrated to represent the lineage of water information products. Finally we will highlight how the provenance model for a distributed real-time water information system assists the interpretation of the data product and establishing trust. Reference [1] Taylor, P., Walker, G., Valentine, D., Cox, Simon: WaterML2.0: Harmonising standards for water observation data. Geophysical Research Abstracts. Vol. 12. [2] da Silva, P.P., McGuinness, D.L., Fikes, R.: A proof markup language for semantic web services. Inf. Syst. 31(4) (2006), 381-395. [3] W3C Semantic Sensor Network Incubator Group http://www.w3.org/2005/Incubator

  14. Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim; Gilbert, Bob; Lake, Larry W.; Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett; Thomas, Sunil G.; Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo; Klie, Hector; Banchs, Rafael; Nunez, Emilio J.; Jablonowski, Chris

    2006-11-01

    The project objective was to detail better ways to assess and exploit intelligent oil and gas field information through improved modeling, sensor technology, and process control to increase ultimate recovery of domestic hydrocarbons. To meet this objective we investigated the use of permanent downhole sensors systems (Smart Wells) whose data is fed real-time into computational reservoir models that are integrated with optimized production control systems. The project utilized a three-pronged approach (1) a value of information analysis to address the economic advantages, (2) reservoir simulation modeling and control optimization to prove the capability, and (3) evaluation of new generation sensor packaging to survive the borehole environment for long periods of time. The Value of Information (VOI) decision tree method was developed and used to assess the economic advantage of using the proposed technology; the VOI demonstrated the increased subsurface resolution through additional sensor data. Our findings show that the VOI studies are a practical means of ascertaining the value associated with a technology, in this case application of sensors to production. The procedure acknowledges the uncertainty in predictions but nevertheless assigns monetary value to the predictions. The best aspect of the procedure is that it builds consensus within interdisciplinary teams The reservoir simulation and modeling aspect of the project was developed to show the capability of exploiting sensor information both for reservoir characterization and to optimize control of the production system. Our findings indicate history matching is improved as more information is added to the objective function, clearly indicating that sensor information can help in reducing the uncertainty associated with reservoir characterization. Additional findings and approaches used are described in detail within the report. The next generation sensors aspect of the project evaluated sensors and packaging

  15. Characteristics and control response of the TOPAZ II Reactor System Real-time Dynamic Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, K.S.

    1993-11-12

    A dynamic simulator of the TOPAZ II reactor system has been developed for the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program. The simulator combines first-principle modeling and empirical correlations in its algorithm to attain the modeling accuracy and computational through-put that are required for real-time execution. The overall execution time of the simulator for each time step is 15 ms when no data is written to the disk, and 18 ms when nine double precision data points are written to the disk once in every time step. The simulation program has been tested and it is able to handle a step decrease of $8 worth of reactivity. It also provides simulations of fuel, emitter, collector, stainless steel, and ZrH moderator failures. Presented in this paper are the models used in the calculations, a sample simulation session, and a discussion of the performance and limitations of the simulator. The simulator has been found to provide realistic real-time dynamic response of the TOPAZ II reactor system under both normal and casualty conditions.

  16. Holographic entropy and real-time dynamics of quarkonium dissociation in non-Abelian plasma

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Iatrakis, Ioannis; Kharzeev, Dmitri E.

    2016-04-26

    The peak of the heavy quark pair entropy at the deconfinement transition, observed in lattice QCD, suggests that the transition is effectively driven by the increase of the entropy of bound states. The growth of the entropy with the interquark distance leads to the emergent entropic force that induces dissociation of quarkonium states. Since the quark-gluon plasma around the transition point is a strongly coupled system, we use the gauge-gravity duality to study the entropy of heavy quarkonium and the real-time dynamics of its dissociation. In particular, we employ the improved holographic QCD model as a dual description of largemore » Nc Yang-Mills theory. Studying the dynamics of the fundamental string between the quarks placed on the boundary, we find that the entropy peaks at the transition point. We also study the real-time dynamics of the system by considering the holographic string falling in the black hole horizon where it equilibrates. As a result, in the vicinity of the deconfinement transition, the dissociation time is found to be less than a fermi, suggesting that the entropic destruction is the dominant dissociation mechanism in this temperature region.« less

  17. Holographic entropy and real-time dynamics of quarkonium dissociation in non-Abelian plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iatrakis, Ioannis; Kharzeev, Dmitri E.

    2016-04-01

    The peak of the heavy quark pair entropy at the deconfinement transition, observed in lattice QCD, suggests that the transition is effectively driven by the increase of the entropy of bound states. The growth of the entropy with the interquark distance leads to the emergent entropic force that induces dissociation of quarkonium states. Since the quark-gluon plasma around the transition point is a strongly coupled system, we use the gauge-gravity duality to study the entropy of heavy quarkonium and the real-time dynamics of its dissociation. In particular, we employ the improved holographic QCD model as a dual description of large Nc Yang-Mills theory. Studying the dynamics of the fundamental string between the quarks placed on the boundary, we find that the entropy peaks at the transition point. We also study the real-time dynamics of the system by considering the holographic string falling in the black hole horizon where it equilibrates. In the vicinity of the deconfinement transition, the dissociation time is found to be less than a fermi, suggesting that the entropic destruction is the dominant dissociation mechanism in this temperature region.

  18. Dynamic calibration and analysis of crack tip propagation in energetic materials using real-time radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, Ali

    Crack propagation in a solid rocket motor environment is difficult to measure directly. This experimental and analytical study evaluated the viability of real-time radiography for detecting bore regression and propellant crack propagation speed. The scope included the quantitative interpretation of crack tip velocity from simulated radiographic images of a burning, center-perforated grain and actual real-time radiographs taken on a rapid-prototyped model that dynamically produced the surface movements modeled in the simulation. The simplified motor simulation portrayed a bore crack that propagated radially at a speed that was 10 times the burning rate of the bore. Comparing the experimental image interpretation with the calibrated surface inputs, measurement accuracies were quantified. The average measurements of the bore radius were within 3% of the calibrated values with a maximum error of 7%. The crack tip speed could be characterized with image processing algorithms, but not with the dynamic calibration data. The laboratory data revealed that noise in the transmitted X-Ray intensity makes sensing the crack tip propagation using changes in the centerline transmitted intensity level impractical using the algorithms employed.

  19. Flexible algorithm for real-time convolution supporting dynamic event-related fMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Brent L.; Frank, Randall J.; Bolinger, Lizann; Grabowski, Thomas J.

    2002-04-01

    An efficient algorithm for generation of the task reference function has been developed that allows real-time statistical analysis of fMRI data, within the framework of the general linear model, for experiments with event-related stimulus designs. By leveraging time-stamped data collection in the Input/Output time-aWare Architecture (I/OWA), we detect the onset time of a stimulus as it is delivered to a subject. A dynamically updated list of detected stimulus event times is maintained in shared memory as a data stream and delivered as input to a real-time convolution algorithm. As each image is acquired from the MR scanner, the time-stamp of its acquisition is delivered via a second dynamically updated stream to the convolution algorithm, where a running convolution of the events with an estimated hemodynamic response function is computed at the image acquisition time and written to a third stream in memory. Output is interpreted as the activation reference function and treated as the covariate of interest in the I/OWA implementation of the general linear model. Statistical parametric maps are computed and displayed to the I/OWA user interface in less than the time between successive image acquisitions.

  20. Nonradiative Relaxation in Real-Time Electronic Dynamics OSCF2: Organolead Triiodide Perovskite.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Triet S; Parkhill, John

    2016-09-01

    We apply our recently developed nonequilibrium real-time time-dependent density functional theory (OSCF2) to investigate the transient spectrum and relaxation dynamics of the tetragonal structure of methylammonium lead triiodide perovskite (MAPbI3). We obtain an estimate of the interband relaxation kinetics and identify multiple ultrafast cooling channels for hot electrons and hot holes that largely corroborate the dual valence-dual conduction model. The computed relaxation rates and absorption spectra are in good agreement with the existing experimental data. We present the first ab initio simulations of the perovskite transient absorption (TA) spectrum, substantiating the assignment of induced bleaches and absorptions including a Pauli-bleach signal. This paper validates both OSCF2 as a good qualitative model of electronic dynamics, and the dominant interpretation of the TA spectrum of this material. PMID:27523194

  1. FPGA-Based Real Time, Multichannel Emulated-Digital Retina Model Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vörösházi, Zsolt; Nagy, Zoltán; Szolgay, Péter

    2009-12-01

    The function of the low-level image processing that takes place in the biological retina is to compress only the relevant visual information to a manageable size. The behavior of the layers and different channels of the neuromorphic retina has been successfully modeled by cellular neural/nonlinear networks (CNNs). In this paper, we present an extended, application-specific emulated-digital CNN-universal machine (UM) architecture to compute the complex dynamic of this mammalian retina in video real time. The proposed emulated-digital implementation of multichannel retina model is compared to the previously developed models from three key aspects, which are processing speed, number of physical cells, and accuracy. Our primary aim was to build up a simple, real-time test environment with camera input and display output in order to mimic the behavior of retina model implementation on emulated digital CNN by using low-cost, moderate-sized field-programmable gate array (FPGA) architectures.

  2. Tracking magmatic intrusions in real-time by means of free-shaped volcanic source modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannavo', Flavio; Camacho, Antonio G.; Scandura, Danila; González, Pablo J.; Mattia, Mario; Fernández, José

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays continuous measurements of geophysical parameters provide a general real-time view of current state of the volcano. Nonetheless, a current challenge is to localize and track in real-time the evolution of the magma source beneath the volcano. Here we present a new methodology to rapidly estimate magmatic sources from surface geodetic data and track their evolution in time without any a priori assumption about source geometry. Indeed, the proposed approach takes the advantages of fast calculation from the analytical models and adds the capability to model free-shape distributed sources. Assuming homogenous elastic conditions, the approach can determine general geometrical configurations of pressured and/or density source and/or sliding structures corresponding to prescribed values of anomalous density, pressure and slip. These source bodies are described as aggregation of elemental point sources for pressure, density and slip, and they fit the whole data (keeping some 3D regularity conditions). In this work we show an application of the methodology to model the real-time evolution of the volcanic source for 2008 eruption of Mount Etna (Italy). To this aim the High-Rate GPS data, coming from the Continuous GPS network, are processed in real-time to obtain sub-daily solutions for tracking the fast dynamics of the magma migration. In our test case we reproduced the real-time scenario of the eruption. Though the data of the test were processed after data collection, real-time operation was emulated. From the results, it is possible to extrapolate the dynamic of a deep and a shallow magma source and the dyke intrusion. In particular, results show at 5 am UTC a magma batch likely migrating towards the surface leaving behind a deflating volume at about 2 km bsl and a deep elongated body from 2 km bsl to 10 km bsl which runs along the High Vp Body and likely represents the deep conduit from where the magma rises up. We demonstrate that the proposed methodology is

  3. Optical Response of Warm Dense Matter Using Real-Time Electron Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baczewski, Andrew; Shulenburger, Luke; Desjarlais, Michael; Magyar, Rudolph

    2014-03-01

    The extreme temperatures and solid-like densities in warm dense matter present a unique challenge for theory, wherein neither conventional models from condensed matter nor plasma physics capture all of the relevant phenomenology. While Kubo-Greenwood DFT calculations have proven capable of reproducing optical properties of WDM, they require a significant number of virtual orbitals to reach convergence due to their perturbative nature. Real-time TDDFT presents a complementary framework with a number of computationally favorable properties, including reduced cost complexity and better scalability, and has been used to reproduce the optical response of finite and ordered extended systems. We will describe the use of Ehrenfest-TDDFT to evolve coupled electron-nuclear dynamics in WDM systems, and the subsequent evaluation of optical response functions from the real-time electron dynamics. The advantages and disadvantages of this approach will be discussed relative to the current state-of-the-art. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. A real-time, interactive steering environment for integrated ground water modeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Guang; Liu, Qun

    2006-01-01

    We present in this note an innovative software environment, called Interactive Ground Water (IGW), for unified deterministic and stochastic ground water modeling. Based on efficient computational algorithms, IGW allows simulating three-dimensional (3D) unsteady flow and transport in saturated media subject to systematic and "random" stresses and geological and chemical heterogeneity. Adopting a new computing paradigm, IGW eliminates the fragmentation in the traditional modeling schemes and allows fully utilizing today's dramatically increased computing power. For many problems, IGW enables real-time modeling, visualization, mapping, and analysis. The software environment functions as a "numerical laboratory" in which an investigator may freely explore the following: creating visually an aquifer system of desired configurations, interactively applying stresses and boundary conditions, and then investigating and visualizing on the fly the geology and flow and transport dynamics. At any time, a researcher can pause to interact dynamically with virtually any aspects of the modeling process and then resume the integrated visual exploration; he or she can initiate, pause, or resume particle tracking, plume modeling, subscale modeling, stochastic modeling, monitoring, and budget analyses. IGW continually provides results that are dynamically processed, overlaid, and displayed. It dynamically merges modeling inputs and outputs into composite two-dimensional/3D images-integrating related data to provide a more complete view of the complex interplay among the geology, hydrology, flow system, and transport. These unique capabilities of real-time modeling, steering, analysis, and mapping expand the utility of models as tools for research, education, and professional investigations. PMID:16961499

  5. A generalised Dynamic Overflow Risk Assessment (DORA) for Real Time Control of urban drainage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vezzaro, Luca; Grum, Morten

    2014-07-01

    An innovative and generalised approach to the integrated Real Time Control of urban drainage systems is presented. The Dynamic Overflow Risk Assessment (DORA) strategy aims to minimise the expected Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) risk by considering (i) the water volume presently stored in the drainage network, (ii) the expected runoff volume (calculated by radar-based nowcast models) and - most important - (iii) the estimated uncertainty of the runoff forecasts. The inclusion of uncertainty allows for a more confident use of Real Time Control (RTC). Overflow risk is calculated by a flexible function which allows for the prioritisation of the discharge points according to their sensitivity and intended use. DORA was tested on a hypothetical example inspired by the main catchment in the city of Aarhus (Denmark). An analysis of DORA’s performance over a range of events with different return periods, using a simple conceptual model, is presented. Compared to a traditional local control approach, DORA contributed to reduce CSO volumes from the most sensitive points while reducing total CSO volumes discharged from the catchment. Additionally, the results show that the inclusion of forecasts and their uncertainty contributed to further improving the performance of drainage systems. The results of this paper will contribute to the wider usage of global RTC methods in the management of urban drainage networks.

  6. Geomagnetic Storm and Substorm Predictions with the Real-Time WINDMI Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, M. L.; Horton, W.; Kozyra, J. U.

    2007-12-01

    The Real-Time WINDMI model is an implementation of WINDMI, a low dimensional, plasma physics-based, nonlinear dynamical model of the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system. The system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which describes energy transfer into, and between dominant components of the nightside magnetosphere and ionosphere, is solved numerically to determine the state of each component. The model characterizes the energy stored in the ring current and the region 1 field-aligned current which are compared to the Dst and AL indices. Solar wind parameter measurements are available from the ACE satellite in real-time. These quantities are automatically downloaded every 10 minutes and used to derive the input solar wind driving voltage to the model. This allows the computation of model Dst and AL values by Real-Time WINDMI about 1-2 hours before index data is available at the Kyoto WDC Quicklook website. Model results are shown on the website (http://orion.ph.utexas.edu/~windmi/realtime/) and there is also an email alert system which sends a notification when Dst activity is predicted below -50 nT or AL activity below -500 nT. When data is available the model parameters are optimized every hour using a genetic algorithm, which has already been implemented for WINDMI. The model has captured about 13 storm and/or substorm events in the past 1.5 years it has been running. For these events, the Real-Time WINDMI output is studied for the rectified driving voltage compared to the Siscoe et al. voltage as input. The events the model did not capture are also investigated. The work is supported by NSF grant ATM-0638480.

  7. REAL-TIME MODEL-BASED ELECTRICAL POWERED WHEELCHAIR CONTROL

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongwu; Salatin, Benjamin; Grindle, Garrett G.; Ding, Dan; Cooper, Rory A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of three different control methods on driving speed variation and wheel-slip of an electric-powered wheelchair (EPW). A kinematic model as well as 3-D dynamic model was developed to control the velocity and traction of the wheelchair. A smart wheelchair platform was designed and built with a computerized controller and encoders to record wheel speeds and to detect the slip. A model based, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) and an open-loop controller were applied with the EPW driving on four different surfaces at three specified speeds. The speed errors, variation, rise time, settling time and slip coefficient were calculated and compared for a speed step-response input. Experimental results showed that model based control performed best on all surfaces across the speeds. PMID:19733494

  8. Dynamic real-time 4D cardiac MDCT image display using GPU-accelerated volume rendering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Eagleson, Roy; Peters, Terry M

    2009-09-01

    Intraoperative cardiac monitoring, accurate preoperative diagnosis, and surgical planning are important components of minimally-invasive cardiac therapy. Retrospective, electrocardiographically (ECG) gated, multidetector computed tomographical (MDCT), four-dimensional (3D + time), real-time, cardiac image visualization is an important tool for the surgeon in such procedure, particularly if the dynamic volumetric image can be registered to, and fused with the actual patient anatomy. The addition of stereoscopic imaging provides a more intuitive environment by adding binocular vision and depth cues to structures within the beating heart. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a comprehensive stereoscopic 4D cardiac image visualization and manipulation platform, based on the opacity density radiation model, which exploits the power of modern graphics processing units (GPUs) in the rendering pipeline. In addition, we present a new algorithm to synchronize the phases of the dynamic heart to clinical ECG signals, and to calculate and compensate for latencies in the visualization pipeline. A dynamic multiresolution display is implemented to enable the interactive selection and emphasis of volume of interest (VOI) within the entire contextual cardiac volume and to enhance performance, and a novel color and opacity adjustment algorithm is designed to increase the uniformity of the rendered multiresolution image of heart. Our system provides a visualization environment superior to noninteractive software-based implementations, but with a rendering speed that is comparable to traditional, but inferior quality, volume rendering approaches based on texture mapping. This retrospective ECG-gated dynamic cardiac display system can provide real-time feedback regarding the suspected pathology, function, and structural defects, as well as anatomical information such as chamber volume and morphology. PMID:19467840

  9. Real-time dynamic simulation of angular velocity and suppression of dead zone in IFOG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hong; Huan, Yunpeng; Wang, Ansu; Luan, Jinwen

    2015-02-01

    The mechanism of the dead zone in closed-loop IFOGs is theoretically analyzed. The digital closed-loop transfer model for fiber-optic gyroscope is modified and the electronic cross-coupling interference from the feedback channel in the output signal of the detector in the forward channel is added. Using this model, we achieve a real-time dynamic simulation for the dead zone. The simulation results are basically consistent with experiment results. Before the electronic cross-coupling has been eliminated, the dead zone of the high-precision fiber-optic gyro is about , while the medium precision fiber-optic gyro is . After modifying the modulator circuit boards, the dead zone and the noise of the IFOG are of the same order of magnitude, better than and , respectively.

  10. Generic Spacecraft Model for Real-Time Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenney, Patrick S.; Ragsdale, William; Neuhaus, Jason R.

    2008-01-01

    Generic Spacecraft is the name of an evolving library of software that provides for simulation of a generic spacecraft that can orbit the Earth and land on the Moon (and, eventually, on Mars). This library is incorporated into the Langley Standard Realtime Simulation in C++ (LaSRS++) software framework. The generic-spacecraft simulation serves as a test bed for modeling spacecraft dynamics, propulsion, control systems, guidance, and displays. The Generic Spacecraft library supplements the LaSRS++ framework with an interface that facilitates the connection of new models into the LaSRS++ simulation by eliminating what would otherwise be the necessity of writing additional C++ classes to record data from the models and code to display values on graphical user interfaces (GUIs): The library includes routines for integrating new models into the LaSRS++ framework, identifying model inputs and outputs with full descriptions and units identified, recording data, and automatically generating graphical user interfaces (GUIs). The library is designed to be used in a manner similar to that of LaSRS++ software components for simulating vehicles other than the generic spacecraft. The user specifies (1) a spacecraft and individual models to be constructed and (2) connections between individual model inputs and outputs.

  11. Real-time Visualization of Tissue Dynamics during Embryonic Development and Malignant Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kenneth

    Tissues undergo dramatic changes in organization during embryonic development, as well as during cancer progression and invasion. Recent advances in microscopy now allow us to visualize and track directly the dynamic movements of tissues, their constituent cells, and cellular substructures. This behavior can now be visualized not only in regular tissue culture on flat surfaces (`2D' environments), but also in a variety of 3D environments that may provide physiological cues relevant to understanding dynamics within living organisms. Acquisition of imaging data using various microscopy modalities will provide rich opportunities for determining the roles of physical factors and for computational modeling of complex processes in living tissues. Direct visualization of real-time motility is providing insight into biology spanning multiple spatio-temporal scales. Many cells in our body are known to be in contact with connective tissue and other forms of extracellular matrix. They do so through microscopic cellular adhesions that bind to matrix proteins. In particular, fluorescence microscopy has revealed that cells dynamically probe and bend the matrix at the sites of cell adhesions, and that 3D matrix architecture, stiffness, and elasticity can each regulate migration of the cells. Conversely, cells remodel their local matrix as organs form or tumors invade. Cancer cells can invade tissues using microscopic protrusions that degrade the surrounding matrix; in this case, the local matrix protein concentration is more important for inducing the micro-invasive protrusions than stiffness. On the length scales of tissues, transiently high rates of individual cell movement appear to help establish organ architecture. In fact, isolated cells can self-organize to form tissue structures. In all of these cases, in-depth real-time visualization will ultimately provide the extensive data needed for computer modeling and for testing hypotheses in which physical forces interact

  12. Can the ring polymer molecular dynamics method be interpreted as real time quantum dynamics?

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Seogjoo; Sinitskiy, Anton V.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2014-04-21

    The ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method has gained popularity in recent years as a simple approximation for calculating real time quantum correlation functions in condensed media. However, the extent to which RPMD captures real dynamical quantum effects and why it fails under certain situations have not been clearly understood. Addressing this issue has been difficult in the absence of a genuine justification for the RPMD algorithm starting from the quantum Liouville equation. To this end, a new and exact path integral formalism for the calculation of real time quantum correlation functions is presented in this work, which can serve as a rigorous foundation for the analysis of the RPMD method as well as providing an alternative derivation of the well established centroid molecular dynamics method. The new formalism utilizes the cyclic symmetry of the imaginary time path integral in the most general sense and enables the expression of Kubo-transformed quantum time correlation functions as that of physical observables pre-averaged over the imaginary time path. Upon filtering with a centroid constraint function, the formulation results in the centroid dynamics formalism. Upon filtering with the position representation of the imaginary time path integral, we obtain an exact quantum dynamics formalism involving the same variables as the RPMD method. The analysis of the RPMD approximation based on this approach clarifies that an explicit quantum dynamical justification does not exist for the use of the ring polymer harmonic potential term (imaginary time kinetic energy) as implemented in the RPMD method. It is analyzed why this can cause substantial errors in nonlinear correlation functions of harmonic oscillators. Such errors can be significant for general correlation functions of anharmonic systems. We also demonstrate that the short time accuracy of the exact path integral limit of RPMD is of lower order than those for finite discretization of path. The

  13. A Comprehensive Software System for Interactive, Real-time, Visual 3D Deterministic and Stochastic Groundwater Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.

    2002-05-01

    Taking advantage of the recent developments in groundwater modeling research and computer, image and graphics processing, and objected oriented programming technologies, Dr. Li and his research group have recently developed a comprehensive software system for unified deterministic and stochastic groundwater modeling. Characterized by a new real-time modeling paradigm and improved computational algorithms, the software simulates 3D unsteady flow and reactive transport in general groundwater formations subject to both systematic and "randomly" varying stresses and geological and chemical heterogeneity. The software system has following distinct features and capabilities: Interactive simulation and real time visualization and animation of flow in response to deterministic as well as stochastic stresses. Interactive, visual, and real time particle tracking, random walk, and reactive plume modeling in both systematically and randomly fluctuating flow. Interactive statistical inference, scattered data interpolation, regression, and ordinary and universal Kriging, conditional and unconditional simulation. Real-time, visual and parallel conditional flow and transport simulations. Interactive water and contaminant mass balance analysis and visual and real-time flux update. Interactive, visual, and real time monitoring of head and flux hydrographs and concentration breakthroughs. Real-time modeling and visualization of aquifer transition from confined to unconfined to partially de-saturated or completely dry and rewetting Simultaneous and embedded subscale models, automatic and real-time regional to local data extraction; Multiple subscale flow and transport models Real-time modeling of steady and transient vertical flow patterns on multiple arbitrarily-shaped cross-sections and simultaneous visualization of aquifer stratigraphy, properties, hydrological features (rivers, lakes, wetlands, wells, drains, surface seeps), and dynamically adjusted surface flooding area

  14. Traffic dynamics: Method for estimating freeway travel times in real time from flow measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, D.H.; Drew, D.R.

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents a method for estimating freeway travel times in real time directly from flow measurements, which is desirable for present and future Intelligent Vehicle-Highway Systems (IVHS) applications. An inductive modeling approach adapted here is based on stochastic queuing theory and the principle of conservation of vehicles. The analytical expression for link travel times satisfies traffic dynamics where the new form of the conservation of vehicles has been derived under generalized traffic conditions. A computer program has been developed to implement the algorithm. Analysis results show that the estimates have good agreement with empirical data measured at 30-s intervals. This methodology has potential applicable to automatic traffic control and automatic incident detection.

  15. Resolving dynamics of cell signaling via real-time imaging of the immunological synapse.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Mark A.; Pfeiffer, Janet R.; Wilson, Bridget S.; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Thomas, James L.; Lidke, Keith A.; Spendier, Kathrin; Oliver, Janet M.; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Aaron, Jesse S.; Mirijanian, Dina T.; Carson, Bryan D.; Burns, Alan Richard; Rebeil, Roberto

    2009-10-01

    This highly interdisciplinary team has developed dual-color, total internal reflection microscopy (TIRF-M) methods that enable us to optically detect and track in real time protein migration and clustering at membrane interfaces. By coupling TIRF-M with advanced analysis techniques (image correlation spectroscopy, single particle tracking) we have captured subtle changes in membrane organization that characterize immune responses. We have used this approach to elucidate the initial stages of cell activation in the IgE signaling network of mast cells and the Toll-like receptor (TLR-4) response in macrophages stimulated by bacteria. To help interpret these measurements, we have undertaken a computational modeling effort to connect the protein motion and lipid interactions. This work provides a deeper understanding of the initial stages of cellular response to external agents, including dynamics of interaction of key components in the signaling network at the 'immunological synapse,' the contact region of the cell and its adversary.

  16. Model-based planning and real-time predictive control for laser-induced thermal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yusheng; Fuentes, David

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the major idea and mathematical aspects of model-based planning and real-time predictive control for laser-induced thermal therapy (LITT) are presented. In particular, a computational framework and its major components developed by authors in recent years are reviewed. The framework provides the backbone for not only treatment planning but also real-time surgical monitoring and control with a focus on MR thermometry enabled predictive control and applications to image-guided LITT, or MRgLITT. Although this computational framework is designed for LITT in treating prostate cancer, it is further applicable to other thermal therapies in focal lesions induced by radio-frequency (RF), microwave and high-intensity-focused ultrasound (HIFU). Moreover, the model-based dynamic closed-loop predictive control algorithms in the framework, facilitated by the coupling of mathematical modelling and computer simulation with real-time imaging feedback, has great potential to enable a novel methodology in thermal medicine. Such technology could dramatically increase treatment efficacy and reduce morbidity. PMID:22098360

  17. Integration of domain and resource-based reasoning for real-time control in dynamic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Keith; Whitebread, Kenneth R.; Kendus, Michael; Cromarty, Andrew S.

    1993-01-01

    A real-time software controller that successfully integrates domain-based and resource-based control reasoning to perform task execution in a dynamically changing environment is described. The design of the controller is based on the concept of partitioning the process to be controlled into a set of tasks, each of which achieves some process goal. It is assumed that, in general, there are multiple ways (tasks) to achieve a goal. The controller dynamically determines current goals and their current criticality, choosing and scheduling tasks to achieve those goals in the time available. It incorporates rule-based goal reasoning, a TMS-based criticality propagation mechanism, and a real-time scheduler. The controller has been used to build a knowledge-based situation assessment system that formed a major component of a real-time, distributed, cooperative problem solving system built under DARPA contract. It is also being employed in other applications now in progress.

  18. Real time monitoring of superoxide dynamics in vivo through fluorescent proteins using a sensitive fiber probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu-Chung; Ken, Chuian-Fu; Hsu, Che-Wei; Liu, Ya-Ging

    2014-03-01

    Superoxide anion is the primary oxygen free radical generated in mitochondria that causes intracellular oxidative stress. The lack of a method to directly monitor superoxide concentration in vivo in real time has severely hindered our understanding on its pathophysiology. We made transgenic zebrafish to specifically express fluorescent proteins, which are recently developed as reversible superoxide-specific indicators, in the liver. A fiber-optic fluorescent probe was used to noninvasively monitor superoxide generation in the liver in real time. The fish were placed in microfluidic channels for manipulation and reagents administration. Several superoxide-inducing and scavenging reagents were administrated onto the fish to investigate their effects on superoxide anion balancing. The biochemical dynamics of superoxide due to the application reagents were revealed in the transient behaviors of fluorescence time courses. With the ability to monitor superoxide dynamics in vivo in real time, this method can be used as an in vivo pharmaceutical screening platform.

  19. Experimental model and analytic solution for real-time observation of vehicle's additional steer angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Li, Liang; Pan, Deng; Cao, Chengmao; Song, Jian

    2014-03-01

    The current research of real-time observation for vehicle roll steer angle and compliance steer angle(both of them comprehensively referred as the additional steer angle in this paper) mainly employs the linear vehicle dynamic model, in which only the lateral acceleration of vehicle body is considered. The observation accuracy resorting to this method cannot meet the requirements of vehicle real-time stability control, especially under extreme driving conditions. The paper explores the solution resorting to experimental method. Firstly, a multi-body dynamic model of a passenger car is built based on the ADAMS/Car software, whose dynamic accuracy is verified by the same vehicle's roadway test data of steady static circular test. Based on this simulation platform, several influencing factors of additional steer angle under different driving conditions are quantitatively analyzed. Then ɛ-SVR algorithm is employed to build the additional steer angle prediction model, whose input vectors mainly include the sensor information of standard electronic stability control system(ESC). The method of typical slalom tests and FMVSS 126 tests are adopted to make simulation, train model and test model's generalization performance. The test result shows that the influence of lateral acceleration on additional steer angle is maximal (the magnitude up to 1°), followed by the longitudinal acceleration-deceleration and the road wave amplitude (the magnitude up to 0.3°). Moreover, both the prediction accuracy and the calculation real-time of the model can meet the control requirements of ESC. This research expands the accurate observation methods of the additional steer angle under extreme driving conditions.

  20. Real-time modulated nanoparticle separation with an ultra-large dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Zeming, Kerwin Kwek; Thakor, Nitish V; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles exhibit size-dependent properties which make size-selective purification of proteins, DNA or synthetic nanoparticles essential for bio-analytics, clinical medicine, nano-plasmonics and nano-material sciences. Current purification methods of centrifugation, column chromatography and continuous-flow techniques suffer from particle aggregation, multi-stage process, complex setups and necessary nanofabrication. These increase process costs and time, reduce efficiency and limit dynamic range. Here, we achieve an unprecedented real-time nanoparticle separation (51-1500 nm) using a large-pore (2 μm) deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) device. No external force fields or nanofabrication are required. Instead, we investigated innate long-range electrostatic influences on nanoparticles within a fluid medium at different NaCl ionic concentrations. In this study we account for the electrostatic forces beyond Debye length and showed that they cannot be assumed as negligible especially for precise nanoparticle separation methods such as DLD. Our findings have enabled us to develop a model to simultaneously quantify and modulate the electrostatic force interactions between nanoparticle and micropore. By simply controlling buffer solutions, we achieve dynamic nanoparticle size separation on a single device with a rapid response time (<20 s) and an enlarged dynamic range (>1200%), outperforming standard benchtop centrifuge systems. This novel method and model combines device simplicity, isolation precision and dynamic flexibility, opening opportunities for high-throughput applications in nano-separation for industrial and biological applications. PMID:26575003

  1. Applying MDA to SDR for Space to Model Real-time Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaser, Tammy M.

    2007-01-01

    NASA space communications systems have the challenge of designing SDRs with highly-constrained Size, Weight and Power (SWaP) resources. A study is being conducted to assess the effectiveness of applying the MDA Platform-Independent Model (PIM) and one or more Platform-Specific Models (PSM) specifically to address NASA space domain real-time issues. This paper will summarize our experiences with applying MDA to SDR for Space to model real-time issues. Real-time issues to be examined, measured, and analyzed are: meeting waveform timing requirements and efficiently applying Real-time Operating System (RTOS) scheduling algorithms, applying safety control measures, and SWaP verification. Real-time waveform algorithms benchmarked with the worst case environment conditions under the heaviest workload will drive the SDR for Space real-time PSM design.

  2. Real-Time Dynamics in U(1) Lattice Gauge Theories with Tensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichler, T.; Dalmonte, M.; Rico, E.; Zoller, P.; Montangero, S.

    2016-01-01

    Tensor network algorithms provide a suitable route for tackling real-time-dependent problems in lattice gauge theories, enabling the investigation of out-of-equilibrium dynamics. We analyze a U(1) lattice gauge theory in (1 +1 ) dimensions in the presence of dynamical matter for different mass and electric-field couplings, a theory akin to quantum electrodynamics in one dimension, which displays string breaking: The confining string between charges can spontaneously break during quench experiments, giving rise to charge-anticharge pairs according to the Schwinger mechanism. We study the real-time spreading of excitations in the system by means of electric-field and particle fluctuations. We determine a dynamical state diagram for string breaking and quantitatively evaluate the time scales for mass production. We also show that the time evolution of the quantum correlations can be detected via bipartite von Neumann entropies, thus demonstrating that the Schwinger mechanism is tightly linked to entanglement spreading. To present a variety of possible applications of this simulation platform, we show how one could follow the real-time scattering processes between mesons and the creation of entanglement during scattering processes. Finally, we test the quality of quantum simulations of these dynamics, quantifying the role of possible imperfections in cold atoms, trapped ions, and superconducting circuit systems. Our results demonstrate how entanglement properties can be used to deepen our understanding of basic phenomena in the real-time dynamics of gauge theories such as string breaking and collisions.

  3. HF channel modeling for real-time packet transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostami, Mehdi; Angeja, Joao; Tavares, Joao; Navarro, Antonio

    2003-07-01

    The recent rapid growth of multimedia communications has efficiently allowed delivering different services, formats and contents over an enormous variety of digital networks with IP acting as an integration protocol. The main objective of this research work is to evaluate the performance of an high frequency (HF) wireless network for transporting multimedia services according to UDP/IP protocol stack. Besides, allowing civil/amateur communications, HF bands are also used for long distance wireless military communications. Therefore, our work is based on NATO Link and Physical layer standards, STANAG 5066 and STANAG 4539, respectively. A typical transmission bandwidth is about 3 kHz resulting in a varying bit rate in the range between 75 and 12800 bps. This very low bit rate by itself imposes serious challenges for reliable real time multimedia communications. This paper discusses optimal combinations of channel coders, modulators and packet sizes in order to achieve the greatest throughput in function of the signal-to-noise ratio and HF channel conditions.

  4. Real-Time Monitoring of TP Load in a Mississippi Delta Stream Using a Dynamic Data Driven Application System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Y.; Leininger, T.; Hatten, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Elevated phosphorus (P) in surface waters can cause eutrophication of aquatic ecosystems and can impair water for drinking, industry, agriculture, and recreation. Currently, little effort has been devoted to monitoring real-time variation and load of total P (TP) in surface waters due to the lack of suitable and/or cost-effective wireless sensors. However, when considering human health, drinking water supply, and rapidly developing events such as algal blooms, the availability of timely P information is very critical. In this study, we developed a new approach in the form of a dynamic data driven application system (DDDAS) for monitoring the real-time variation and load of TP in surface water. This DDDAS consisted of the following three major components: (1) a User Control that interacts with Schedule Run to implement the DDDAS with starting and ending times; (2) a Schedule Run that activates the Hydstra model; and (3) a Hydstra model that downloads the real-time data from a US Geological Survey (USGS) website that is updated every 15 minutes with data from USGS monitoring stations, predicts real-time variation and load of TP, graphs the variables in real-time on a computer screen, and sends email alerts when the TP exceeds a certain value. The DDDAS was applied to monitor real-time variation and load of TP for 30 days in Deer Creek, a stream located east of Leland, Mississippi, USA. Results showed that the TP contents in the stream ranged from 0.24 to 0.48 mg L-1 with an average of 0.30 mg L-1 for a 30-day monitoring period, whereas the cumulative load of TP from the stream was about 2.8kg for the same monitoring period. Our study suggests that the DDDAS developed in this study was useful for estimating the real-time variation and load of TP in surface water ecosystems.

  5. Real-time dynamics of a hot Yang-Mills theory: a numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjørn, J.; Anagnostopoulos, K. N.; Krasnitz, A.

    2002-03-01

    We discuss recent results obtained from simulations of high temperature, classical, real time dynamics of SU(2) Yang-Mills theory at temperatures of the order of the electroweak scale. Measurements of gauge covariant and gauge invariant autocorrelations of the fields indicate that the ASY-Bödecker scenario is irrelevant at these temperatures.

  6. Real-time dynamics of a hot Yang-Mills theory: a numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjørn, J.; Anagnostopoulos, K. N.; Krasnitz, A.

    We discuss recent results obtained from simulations of high temperature, classical, real time dynamics of SU(2) Yang-Mills theory at temperatures of the order of the electroweak scale. Measurements of gauge covariant and gauge invariant autocorrelations of the fields indicate that the ASY-Bödecker scenario is irrelevant at these temperatures.

  7. A Sarsa(λ)-based control model for real-time traffic light coordination.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoke; Zhu, Fei; Liu, Quan; Fu, Yuchen; Huang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Traffic problems often occur due to the traffic demands by the outnumbered vehicles on road. Maximizing traffic flow and minimizing the average waiting time are the goals of intelligent traffic control. Each junction wants to get larger traffic flow. During the course, junctions form a policy of coordination as well as constraints for adjacent junctions to maximize their own interests. A good traffic signal timing policy is helpful to solve the problem. However, as there are so many factors that can affect the traffic control model, it is difficult to find the optimal solution. The disability of traffic light controllers to learn from past experiences caused them to be unable to adaptively fit dynamic changes of traffic flow. Considering dynamic characteristics of the actual traffic environment, reinforcement learning algorithm based traffic control approach can be applied to get optimal scheduling policy. The proposed Sarsa(λ)-based real-time traffic control optimization model can maintain the traffic signal timing policy more effectively. The Sarsa(λ)-based model gains traffic cost of the vehicle, which considers delay time, the number of waiting vehicles, and the integrated saturation from its experiences to learn and determine the optimal actions. The experiment results show an inspiring improvement in traffic control, indicating the proposed model is capable of facilitating real-time dynamic traffic control. PMID:24592183

  8. Real-time dynamics of high-velocity micro-particle impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veysset, David; Hsieh, Alex; Kooi, Steve; Maznev, Alex A.; Tang, Shengchang; Olsen, Bradley D.; Nelson, Keith A.

    High-velocity micro-particle impact is important for many areas of science and technology, from space exploration to the development of novel drug delivery platforms. We present real-time observations of supersonic micro-particle impacts using multi-frame imaging. In an all optical laser-induced projectile impact test, a monolayer of micro-particles is placed on a transparent substrate coated with a laser absorbing polymer layer. Ablation of a laser-irradiated polymer region accelerates the micro-particles into free space with speeds up to 1.0 km/s. The particles are monitored during the impact on the target with an ultrahigh-speed multi-frame camera that can record up to 16 images with time resolution as short as 3 ns. In particular, we investigated the high-velocity impact deformation response of poly(urethane urea) (PUU) elastomers to further the fundamental understanding of the molecular influence on dynamical behaviors of PUUs. We show the dynamic-stiffening response of the PUUs and demonstrate the significance of segmental dynamics in the response. We also present movies capturing individual particle impact and penetration in gels, and discuss the observed dynamics. The results will provide an impetus for modeling high-velocity microscale impact responses and high strain rate deformation in polymers, gels, and other materials.

  9. Real-time submillisecond single-molecule FRET dynamics of freely diffusing molecules with liposome tethering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Yeol; Kim, Cheolhee; Lee, Nam Ki

    2015-04-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) is one of the powerful techniques for deciphering the dynamics of unsynchronized biomolecules. However, smFRET is limited in its temporal resolution for observing dynamics. Here, we report a novel method for observing real-time dynamics with submillisecond resolution by tethering molecules to freely diffusing 100-nm-sized liposomes. The observation time for a diffusing molecule is extended to 100 ms with a submillisecond resolution, which allows for direct analysis of the transition states from the FRET time trace using hidden Markov modelling. We measure transition rates of up to 1,500 s-1 between two conformers of a Holliday junction. The rapid diffusional migration of Deinococcus radiodurans single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB) on single-stranded DNA is resolved by FRET, faster than that of Escherichia coli SSB by an order of magnitude. Our approach is a powerful method for studying the dynamics and movements of biomolecules at submillisecond resolution.

  10. Designing a Dynamic Data Driven Application System for Estimating Real-Time Load of DOC in a River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Y.; None

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the dynamics of naturally occurring dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in a river is central to estimating surface water quality, aquatic carbon cycling, and climate change. Currently, determination of DOC in surface water is primarily accomplished by manually collecting samples for laboratory analysis, which requires at least 24 hours. In other words, no effort has been devoted to monitoring real-time variations of DOC in a river due to the lack of suitable and/or cost-effective wireless sensors. However, when considering human health, carbon footprints, and effects of urbanization, industry, and agriculture on water resource supply, timely DOC information may be critical. We have developed here a new paradigm, a dynamic data driven application system (DDDAS), for estimating the real-time load of DOC into a river. This DDDAS consisted of the following four components: (1) a Visual Basic (VB) program for downloading US Geological Survey real-time chlorophyll and discharge data; (2) a STELLA model for evaluating real-time DOC load based on the relationship between chlorophyll a, DOC, and river discharge; (3) a batch file for linking the VB program and STELLA model; and (4) a Microsoft Windows Scheduled Tasks wizard for executing the model and displaying output on a computer screen at selected times. Results show that the real-time load of DOC into the St. Johns River basin near Satsuma, Putnam County, Florida, USA varied over a range from -13,143 to 29,248 kg/h at the selected site in Florida, USA. The negative loads occurred because of the back flow in the estuarine reach of the river. The cumulative load of DOC in the river for the selected site at the end of the simulation (178 hours) was about 1.2 tons. Our results support the utility of the DDDAS developed in this study for estimating the real-time variations of DOC in river ecosystems.

  11. Real-time image processing for non-contact monitoring of dynamic displacements using smartphone technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Jae-Hong; Gelo, Nikolas J.; Jo, Hongki

    2016-04-01

    The newly developed smartphone application, named RINO, in this study allows measuring absolute dynamic displacements and processing them in real time using state-of-the-art smartphone technologies, such as high-performance graphics processing unit (GPU), in addition to already powerful CPU and memories, embedded high-speed/ resolution camera, and open-source computer vision libraries. A carefully designed color-patterned target and user-adjustable crop filter enable accurate and fast image processing, allowing up to 240fps for complete displacement calculation and real-time display. The performances of the developed smartphone application are experimentally validated, showing comparable accuracy with those of conventional laser displacement sensor.

  12. Fast photochromism in polymer matrix with plasticizer and real-time dynamic holographic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Norihito; Abe, Jiro

    2013-04-01

    We have developed a photochromic polymer film for the use of real-time dynamic hologram, fabricated by the plasticized polymer doped with the fast photochromic molecule. The addition of a plasticizer into the conventional polymer is proved to be effective to improve the photochromic performances for the polymer film doped with the fast photochromic molecule that shows instantaneous coloration upon exposure to UV light and rapid fading in the dark. The plasticized photochromic polymers enable the real-time control of the writing and erasing of a holographic grating and show a higher recording sensitivity compared with other organic holographic materials.

  13. Real-time Models at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center and their Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Real-time models at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center and their capabilities The Community Coordinated Modeling Center serves both scientific research and space weather operations communities through access to and evaluation of modern space environment models. Critical to both objectives is an unbiased assessment of model capabilities, which includes scientific validity, performance verification, and model robustness. While all of these assessments are relevant to operational customers, the latter plays a particularly important role. For this reason, as well as for testing model validity, CCMC established a set of fully automated real-time execution systems, which are based on models provided by the research community. This presentation will provide a summary of these activities, and a report on experiences and model validity. Finally, this presentation will invite feedback from CCMC customers regarding future directions of real time modeling at CCMC.

  14. Real Time Tracking of Magmatic Intrusions by means of Ground Deformation Modeling during Volcanic Crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannavò, Flavio; Camacho, Antonio G.; González, Pablo J.; Mattia, Mario; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Fernández, José

    2015-06-01

    Volcano observatories provide near real-time information and, ultimately, forecasts about volcano activity. For this reason, multiple physical and chemical parameters are continuously monitored. Here, we present a new method to efficiently estimate the location and evolution of magmatic sources based on a stream of real-time surface deformation data, such as High-Rate GPS, and a free-geometry magmatic source model. The tool allows tracking inflation and deflation sources in time, providing estimates of where a volcano might erupt, which is important in understanding an on-going crisis. We show a successful simulated application to the pre-eruptive period of May 2008, at Mount Etna (Italy). The proposed methodology is able to track the fast dynamics of the magma migration by inverting the real-time data within seconds. This general method is suitable for integration in any volcano observatory. The method provides first order unsupervised and realistic estimates of the locations of magmatic sources and of potential eruption sites, information that is especially important for civil protection purposes.

  15. Real Time Tracking of Magmatic Intrusions by means of Ground Deformation Modeling during Volcanic Crises

    PubMed Central

    Cannavò, Flavio; Camacho, Antonio G.; González, Pablo J.; Mattia, Mario; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Fernández, José

    2015-01-01

    Volcano observatories provide near real-time information and, ultimately, forecasts about volcano activity. For this reason, multiple physical and chemical parameters are continuously monitored. Here, we present a new method to efficiently estimate the location and evolution of magmatic sources based on a stream of real-time surface deformation data, such as High-Rate GPS, and a free-geometry magmatic source model. The tool allows tracking inflation and deflation sources in time, providing estimates of where a volcano might erupt, which is important in understanding an on-going crisis. We show a successful simulated application to the pre-eruptive period of May 2008, at Mount Etna (Italy). The proposed methodology is able to track the fast dynamics of the magma migration by inverting the real-time data within seconds. This general method is suitable for integration in any volcano observatory. The method provides first order unsupervised and realistic estimates of the locations of magmatic sources and of potential eruption sites, information that is especially important for civil protection purposes. PMID:26055494

  16. Real Time Tracking of Magmatic Intrusions by means of Ground Deformation Modeling during Volcanic Crises.

    PubMed

    Cannavò, Flavio; Camacho, Antonio G; González, Pablo J; Mattia, Mario; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Fernández, José

    2015-01-01

    Volcano observatories provide near real-time information and, ultimately, forecasts about volcano activity. For this reason, multiple physical and chemical parameters are continuously monitored. Here, we present a new method to efficiently estimate the location and evolution of magmatic sources based on a stream of real-time surface deformation data, such as High-Rate GPS, and a free-geometry magmatic source model. The tool allows tracking inflation and deflation sources in time, providing estimates of where a volcano might erupt, which is important in understanding an on-going crisis. We show a successful simulated application to the pre-eruptive period of May 2008, at Mount Etna (Italy). The proposed methodology is able to track the fast dynamics of the magma migration by inverting the real-time data within seconds. This general method is suitable for integration in any volcano observatory. The method provides first order unsupervised and realistic estimates of the locations of magmatic sources and of potential eruption sites, information that is especially important for civil protection purposes. PMID:26055494

  17. Community Coordinated Modeling Center Support of Operations: Real-Time Simulations and V & V.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M.; Hesse, M.; Rastaetter, L.; Maddox, M.; Macneice, P.; Chulaki, A.; Berrios, D.

    2007-01-01

    In support of Operations Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) performing validation and verification of space weather models. To identify suitable metrics the CCMC focus on parameters most useful to operations that CCMC resident models can provide. The real time simulations carried out at CCMC are an essential tool to test model performance and stability by using input conditions that may occur in nature at any time. Since 2001, the magnetospheric MHD model BATSRUS has been run in real time using ACE real time data. CCMC staff developed an experimental real-time system that controls uploading of the real-time ACE data, monitors continuous model execution, initiates automatic recovery procedure in case of data gaps or hardware failures, synchronizes BATSRUS and FRC runs, and periodically runs IDL based visualization software.

  18. A real-time transmission line model for a digital TNA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Woodford, D.A.; Kuffel, R.; Wierckx, R.

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents a validation of a real-time digital simulation of a transmission line model with frequency dependent parameters. The real-time transmission line model is based on Marti`s time domain formulation which is adopted in the EMTP and EMTDC programs. Improvements to speed up the calculation are made in order to realize electromagnetic transient simulation in real-time by parallel processing using two digital signal processors (DSP`s) for each line. 41 {micro}s and 71 {micro}s time steps are readily achieved in real time with the new line model for three phase and double circuit (6 conductors) transmission lines respectively. The new line model is now installed in a Real-Time Digital Simulator (RTDS). Field test results are presented in this paper for validating the new line model.

  19. VTI Driving Simulator: Mathematical Model of a Four-wheeled Vehicle for Simulation in Real Time. VTI Rapport 267A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordmark, Staffan

    1984-01-01

    This report contains a theoretical model for describing the motion of a passenger car. The simulation program based on this model is used in conjunction with an advanced driving simulator and run in real time. The mathematical model is complete in the sense that the dynamics of the engine, transmission and steering system is described in some…

  20. Substructurability: the effect of interface location on a real-time dynamic substructuring test

    PubMed Central

    Neild, S. A.; Lowenberg, M.; Szalai, R.; Krauskopf, B.

    2016-01-01

    A full-scale experimental test for large and complex structures is not always achievable. This can be due to many reasons, the most prominent one being the size limitations of the test. Real-time dynamic substructuring is a hybrid testing method where part of the system is modelled numerically and the rest of the system is kept as the physical test specimen. The numerical–physical parts are connected via actuators and sensors and the interface is controlled by advanced algorithms to ensure that the tested structure replicates the emulated system with sufficient accuracy. The main challenge in such a test is to overcome the dynamic effects of the actuator and associated controller, that inevitably introduce delay into the substructured system which, in turn, can destabilize the experiment. To date, most research concentrates on developing control strategies for stable recreation of the full system when the interface location is given a priori. Therefore, substructurability is mostly studied in terms of control. Here, we consider the interface location as a parameter and study its effect on the stability of the system in the presence of delay due to actuator dynamics and define substructurability as the system’s tolerance to delay in terms of the different interface locations. It is shown that the interface location has a major effect on the tolerable delays in an experiment and, therefore, careful selection of it is necessary. PMID:27616930

  1. A real-time dynamic holographic material using a fast photochromic molecule

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Norihito; Kato, Tetsuya; Abe, Jiro

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a real-time, dynamic holographic material that exhibits rapid colouration upon irradiation with UV light and successive fast thermal bleaching within tens of milliseconds at room temperature. Photochromic polymer films were prepared by a simple solution-casting method from the benzene solution of the mixture of the photochromic molecule, poly(ethyl acrylate), and poly(phenoxyethyl acrylate). The real-time control of holographic images using the photochromic polymer film yields a speed equivalent to the time resolution of the human eye. This new type of dynamic holographic material based on fast photochromism opens up an exciting new area of research in the future development of a large dynamic 3D display. PMID:23139865

  2. A real-time dynamic holographic material using a fast photochromic molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Norihito; Kato, Tetsuya; Abe, Jiro

    2012-11-01

    We have developed a real-time, dynamic holographic material that exhibits rapid colouration upon irradiation with UV light and successive fast thermal bleaching within tens of milliseconds at room temperature. Photochromic polymer films were prepared by a simple solution-casting method from the benzene solution of the mixture of the photochromic molecule, poly(ethyl acrylate), and poly(phenoxyethyl acrylate). The real-time control of holographic images using the photochromic polymer film yields a speed equivalent to the time resolution of the human eye. This new type of dynamic holographic material based on fast photochromism opens up an exciting new area of research in the future development of a large dynamic 3D display.

  3. Efficient DMFT impurity solver using real-time dynamics with matrix product states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganahl, Martin; Aichhorn, Markus; Evertz, Hans Gerd; Thunström, Patrik; Held, Karsten; Verstraete, Frank

    2015-10-01

    We propose to calculate spectral functions of quantum impurity models using the time evolving block decimation (TEBD) for matrix product states. The resolution of the spectral function is improved by a so-called linear prediction approach. We apply the method as an impurity solver within the dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) for the single- and two-band Hubbard model on the Bethe lattice. For the single-band model, we observe sharp features at the inner edges of the Hubbard bands. A finite-size scaling shows that they remain present in the thermodynamic limit. We analyze the real time-dependence of the double occupation after adding a single electron and observe oscillations at the same energy as the sharp feature in the Hubbard band, indicating a long-lived coherent superposition of states that correspond to the Kondo peak and the side peaks. For a two-band Hubbard model, we observe an even richer structure in the Hubbard bands, which cannot be related to a multiplet structure of the impurity, in addition to sharp excitations at the band edges of a type similar to the single-band case.

  4. Automatic mathematical modeling for real time simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Caroline; Purinton, Steve

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for automatic mathematical modeling and generating simulation models is described. The models will be verified by running in a test environment using standard profiles with the results compared against known results. The major objective is to create a user friendly environment for engineers to design, maintain, and verify their model and also automatically convert the mathematical model into conventional code for conventional computation. A demonstration program was designed for modeling the Space Shuttle Main Engine Simulation. It is written in LISP and MACSYMA and runs on a Symbolic 3670 Lisp Machine. The program provides a very friendly and well organized environment for engineers to build a knowledge base for base equations and general information. It contains an initial set of component process elements for the Space Shuttle Main Engine Simulation and a questionnaire that allows the engineer to answer a set of questions to specify a particular model. The system is then able to automatically generate the model and FORTRAN code. The future goal which is under construction is to download the FORTRAN code to VAX/VMS system for conventional computation. The SSME mathematical model will be verified in a test environment and the solution compared with the real data profile. The use of artificial intelligence techniques has shown that the process of the simulation modeling can be simplified.

  5. Three real-time architectures - A study using reward models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjogren, J. A.; Smith, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Numerous applications in the area of computer system analysis can be effectively studied with Markov reward models. These models describe the evolutionary behavior of the computer system by a continuous-time Markov chain, and a reward rate is associated with each state. In reliability/availability models, upstates have reward rate 1, and down states have reward rate zero associated with them. In a combined model of performance and reliability, the reward rate of a state may be the computational capacity, or a related performance measure. Steady-state expected reward rate and expected instantaneous reward rate are clearly useful measures which can be extracted from the Markov reward model. The diversity of areas where Markov reward models may be used is illustrated with a comparative study of three examples of interest to the fault tolerant computing community.

  6. Real-time dynamics simulation of the Cassini spacecraft using DARTS. Part 1: Functional capabilities and the spatial algebra algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A.; Man, G. K.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the Dynamics Algorithms for Real-Time Simulation (DARTS) real-time hardware-in-the-loop dynamics simulator for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cassini spacecraft. The spacecraft model consists of a central flexible body with a number of articulated rigid-body appendages. The demanding performance requirements from the spacecraft control system require the use of a high fidelity simulator for control system design and testing. The DARTS algorithm provides a new algorithmic and hardware approach to the solution of this hardware-in-the-loop simulation problem. It is based upon the efficient spatial algebra dynamics for flexible multibody systems. A parallel and vectorized version of this algorithm is implemented on a low-cost, multiprocessor computer to meet the simulation timing requirements.

  7. A meshless EFG-based algorithm for 3D deformable modeling of soft tissue in real-time.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Elahe; Farahmand, Farzam; Durali, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The meshless element-free Galerkin method was generalized and an algorithm was developed for 3D dynamic modeling of deformable bodies in real time. The efficacy of the algorithm was investigated in a 3D linear viscoelastic model of human spleen subjected to a time-varying compressive force exerted by a surgical grasper. The model remained stable in spite of the considerably large deformations occurred. There was a good agreement between the results and those of an equivalent finite element model. The computational cost, however, was much lower, enabling the proposed algorithm to be effectively used in real-time applications. PMID:22356947

  8. Modeling in Real Time During the Ebola Response.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Martin I; Santibanez, Scott; Fischer, Leah S; Merlin, Toby L; Adhikari, Bishwa B; Atkins, Charisma Y; Campbell, Caresse; Fung, Isaac Chun-Hai; Gambhir, Manoj; Gift, Thomas; Greening, Bradford; Gu, Weidong; Jacobson, Evin U; Kahn, Emily B; Carias, Cristina; Nerlander, Lina; Rainisch, Gabriel; Shankar, Manjunath; Wong, Karen; Washington, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    To aid decision-making during CDC's response to the 2014-2016 Ebola virus disease (Ebola) epidemic in West Africa, CDC activated a Modeling Task Force to generate estimates on various topics related to the response in West Africa and the risk for importation of cases into the United States. Analysis of eight Ebola response modeling projects conducted during August 2014-July 2015 provided insight into the types of questions addressed by modeling, the impact of the estimates generated, and the difficulties encountered during the modeling. This time frame was selected to cover the three phases of the West African epidemic curve. Questions posed to the Modeling Task Force changed as the epidemic progressed. Initially, the task force was asked to estimate the number of cases that might occur if no interventions were implemented compared with cases that might occur if interventions were implemented; however, at the peak of the epidemic, the focus shifted to estimating resource needs for Ebola treatment units. Then, as the epidemic decelerated, requests for modeling changed to generating estimates of the potential number of sexually transmitted Ebola cases. Modeling to provide information for decision-making during the CDC Ebola response involved limited data, a short turnaround time, and difficulty communicating the modeling process, including assumptions and interpretation of results. Despite these challenges, modeling yielded estimates and projections that public health officials used to make key decisions regarding response strategy and resources required. The impact of modeling during the Ebola response demonstrates the usefulness of modeling in future responses, particularly in the early stages and when data are scarce. Future modeling can be enhanced by planning ahead for data needs and data sharing, and by open communication among modelers, scientists, and others to ensure that modeling and its limitations are more clearly understood. The activities summarized in

  9. Real-Time Global Nonlinear Aerodynamic Modeling for Learn-To-Fly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2016-01-01

    Flight testing and modeling techniques were developed to accurately identify global nonlinear aerodynamic models for aircraft in real time. The techniques were developed and demonstrated during flight testing of a remotely-piloted subscale propeller-driven fixed-wing aircraft using flight test maneuvers designed to simulate a Learn-To-Fly scenario. Prediction testing was used to evaluate the quality of the global models identified in real time. The real-time global nonlinear aerodynamic modeling algorithm will be integrated and further tested with learning adaptive control and guidance for NASA Learn-To-Fly concept flight demonstrations.

  10. Real-time imaging of glutamate clearance reveals normal striatal uptake in Huntington disease mouse models.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Matthew P; Vanni, Matthieu P; Woodard, Cameron L; Kang, Rujun; Murphy, Timothy H; Raymond, Lynn A

    2016-01-01

    It has become well accepted that Huntington disease (HD) is associated with impaired glutamate uptake, resulting in a prolonged time-course of extracellular glutamate that contributes to excitotoxicity. However, the data supporting this view come largely from work in synaptosomes, which may overrepresent nerve-terminal uptake over astrocytic uptake. Here, we quantify real-time glutamate dynamics in HD mouse models by high-speed imaging of an intensity-based glutamate-sensing fluorescent reporter (iGluSnFR) and electrophysiological recordings of synaptically activated transporter currents in astrocytes. These techniques reveal a disconnect between the results obtained in synaptosomes and those in situ. Exogenous glutamate uptake is impaired in synaptosomes, whereas real-time measures of glutamate clearance in the HD striatum are normal or even accelerated, particularly in the aggressive R6/2 model. Our results highlight the importance of quantifying glutamate dynamics under endogenous release conditions, and suggest that the widely cited uptake impairment in HD does not contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:27052848

  11. Real-time imaging of glutamate clearance reveals normal striatal uptake in Huntington disease mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Matthew P.; Vanni, Matthieu P.; Woodard, Cameron L.; Kang, Rujun; Murphy, Timothy H.; Raymond, Lynn A.

    2016-01-01

    It has become well accepted that Huntington disease (HD) is associated with impaired glutamate uptake, resulting in a prolonged time-course of extracellular glutamate that contributes to excitotoxicity. However, the data supporting this view come largely from work in synaptosomes, which may overrepresent nerve-terminal uptake over astrocytic uptake. Here, we quantify real-time glutamate dynamics in HD mouse models by high-speed imaging of an intensity-based glutamate-sensing fluorescent reporter (iGluSnFR) and electrophysiological recordings of synaptically activated transporter currents in astrocytes. These techniques reveal a disconnect between the results obtained in synaptosomes and those in situ. Exogenous glutamate uptake is impaired in synaptosomes, whereas real-time measures of glutamate clearance in the HD striatum are normal or even accelerated, particularly in the aggressive R6/2 model. Our results highlight the importance of quantifying glutamate dynamics under endogenous release conditions, and suggest that the widely cited uptake impairment in HD does not contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:27052848

  12. Revealing Real-Time Emotional Responses: a Personalized Assessment based on Heartbeat Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenza, Gaetano; Citi, Luca; Lanatá, Antonio; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2014-05-01

    Emotion recognition through computational modeling and analysis of physiological signals has been widely investigated in the last decade. Most of the proposed emotion recognition systems require relatively long-time series of multivariate records and do not provide accurate real-time characterizations using short-time series. To overcome these limitations, we propose a novel personalized probabilistic framework able to characterize the emotional state of a subject through the analysis of heartbeat dynamics exclusively. The study includes thirty subjects presented with a set of standardized images gathered from the international affective picture system, alternating levels of arousal and valence. Due to the intrinsic nonlinearity and nonstationarity of the RR interval series, a specific point-process model was devised for instantaneous identification considering autoregressive nonlinearities up to the third-order according to the Wiener-Volterra representation, thus tracking very fast stimulus-response changes. Features from the instantaneous spectrum and bispectrum, as well as the dominant Lyapunov exponent, were extracted and considered as input features to a support vector machine for classification. Results, estimating emotions each 10 seconds, achieve an overall accuracy in recognizing four emotional states based on the circumplex model of affect of 79.29%, with 79.15% on the valence axis, and 83.55% on the arousal axis.

  13. Revealing Real-Time Emotional Responses: a Personalized Assessment based on Heartbeat Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Valenza, Gaetano; Citi, Luca; Lanatá, Antonio; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Emotion recognition through computational modeling and analysis of physiological signals has been widely investigated in the last decade. Most of the proposed emotion recognition systems require relatively long-time series of multivariate records and do not provide accurate real-time characterizations using short-time series. To overcome these limitations, we propose a novel personalized probabilistic framework able to characterize the emotional state of a subject through the analysis of heartbeat dynamics exclusively. The study includes thirty subjects presented with a set of standardized images gathered from the international affective picture system, alternating levels of arousal and valence. Due to the intrinsic nonlinearity and nonstationarity of the RR interval series, a specific point-process model was devised for instantaneous identification considering autoregressive nonlinearities up to the third-order according to the Wiener-Volterra representation, thus tracking very fast stimulus-response changes. Features from the instantaneous spectrum and bispectrum, as well as the dominant Lyapunov exponent, were extracted and considered as input features to a support vector machine for classification. Results, estimating emotions each 10 seconds, achieve an overall accuracy in recognizing four emotional states based on the circumplex model of affect of 79.29%, with 79.15% on the valence axis, and 83.55% on the arousal axis. PMID:24845973

  14. Model for LMFBR core transient analysis in real-time

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C.P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the modeling of LMFBR core transients. It is shown that with a proper choice of shape functions a nodal approximation of the coolant, cladding, and fuel temperature distributions leads to adequately accurate power and temperature predictions, as well as adequately short computation times.

  15. Empirical modeling for intelligent, real-time manufacture control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Xiaoshu

    1994-01-01

    Artificial neural systems (ANS), also known as neural networks, are an attempt to develop computer systems that emulate the neural reasoning behavior of biological neural systems (e.g. the human brain). As such, they are loosely based on biological neural networks. The ANS consists of a series of nodes (neurons) and weighted connections (axons) that, when presented with a specific input pattern, can associate specific output patterns. It is essentially a highly complex, nonlinear, mathematical relationship or transform. These constructs have two significant properties that have proven useful to the authors in signal processing and process modeling: noise tolerance and complex pattern recognition. Specifically, the authors have developed a new network learning algorithm that has resulted in the successful application of ANS's to high speed signal processing and to developing models of highly complex processes. Two of the applications, the Weld Bead Geometry Control System and the Welding Penetration Monitoring System, are discussed in the body of this paper.

  16. Method of modeling transmissions for real-time simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hebbale, Kumaraswamy V.

    2012-09-25

    A transmission modeling system includes an in-gear module that determines an in-gear acceleration when a vehicle is in gear. A shift module determines a shift acceleration based on a clutch torque when the vehicle is shifting between gears. A shaft acceleration determination module determines a shaft acceleration based on at least one of the in-gear acceleration and the shift acceleration.

  17. Advanced real-time dynamic scene generation techniques for improved performance and fidelity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Mark H.; Buford, James A.; Mayhall, Anthony J.

    2000-07-01

    Recent advances in real-time synthetic scene generation for Hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM) Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) improve both performance and fidelity. Modeling ground target scenarios requires tradeoffs because of limited texture memory for imagery and limited main memory for elevation data. High- resolution insets have been used in the past to provide better fidelity in specific areas, such as in the neighborhood of a target. Improvements for ground scenarios include smooth transitions for high-resolution insets to reduce high spatial frequency artifacts at the borders of the inset regions and dynamic terrain paging to support large area databases. Transport lag through the scene generation system, including sensor emulation and interface components, has been dealt with in the past through the use of sub-window extraction from oversize scenes. This compensates for spatial effects of transport lag but not temporal effects. A new system has been developed and used successfully to compensate for a flashing coded beacon in the scene. Other techniques have been developed to synchronize the scene generator with the seeker under test (SUT) and to model atmospheric effects, sensor optic and electronics, and angular emissivity attenuation.

  18. Real-time robot path planning based on a modified pulse-coupled neural network model.

    PubMed

    Qu, Hong; Yang, Simon X; Willms, Allan R; Yi, Zhang

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents a modified pulse-coupled neural network (MPCNN) model for real-time collision-free path planning of mobile robots in nonstationary environments. The proposed neural network for robots is topologically organized with only local lateral connections among neurons. It works in dynamic environments and requires no prior knowledge of target or barrier movements. The target neuron fires first, and then the firing event spreads out, through the lateral connections among the neurons, like the propagation of a wave. Obstacles have no connections to their neighbors. Each neuron records its parent, that is, the neighbor that caused it to fire. The real-time optimal path is then the sequence of parents from the robot to the target. In a static case where the barriers and targets are stationary, this paper proves that the generated wave in the network spreads outward with travel times proportional to the linking strength among neurons. Thus, the generated path is always the global shortest path from the robot to the target. In addition, each neuron in the proposed model can propagate a firing event to its neighboring neuron without any comparing computations. The proposed model is applied to generate collision-free paths for a mobile robot to solve a maze-type problem, to circumvent concave U-shaped obstacles, and to track a moving target in an environment with varying obstacles. The effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed approach is demonstrated through simulation and comparison studies. PMID:19775961

  19. Real time solution of parameterised problems via Model Reduction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnik, Sergio; Signorini, Marianna; Modesto, David

    2016-04-01

    Parameterised problems, in which the solution depends on space, time and a set of predefined parameters (e.g. material properties, boundary conditions, domain geometry, initial conditions, ...), can be solved with extremely high efficiency with Model Reduction techniques. Among these techniques the Proper Generalized Decomposition (PGD), has some very interesting features that will be investigated and presented in this work. The PGD technique involves two computational phases: first, one "offline" phase that can be computationally expensive but it is executed only once in a lifetime and, second, an "online" phase that is extremely fast and lightweight in computer resources. The possibilities of PGD are shown here via several example problems: i) heat transport parameterised in the material properties, boundary conditions and interface locations, ii) Stokes flow parameterised in the geometry domain, and iii) wave propagation parameterised in boundary conditions, material properties and interface locations. The extremely fast evaluation of PGD-solutions make them ideal to be used within inverse problems where the unknowns are the values of the parameters and the data consist in some partial observation of the solution field.

  20. A Comparison and Evaluation of Real-Time Software Systems Modeling Languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evensen, Kenneth D.; Weiss, Kathryn Anne

    2010-01-01

    A model-driven approach to real-time software systems development enables the conceptualization of software, fostering a more thorough understanding of its often complex architecture and behavior while promoting the documentation and analysis of concerns common to real-time embedded systems such as scheduling, resource allocation, and performance. Several modeling languages have been developed to assist in the model-driven software engineering effort for real-time systems, and these languages are beginning to gain traction with practitioners throughout the aerospace industry. This paper presents a survey of several real-time software system modeling languages, namely the Architectural Analysis and Design Language (AADL), the Unified Modeling Language (UML), Systems Modeling Language (SysML), the Modeling and Analysis of Real-Time Embedded Systems (MARTE) UML profile, and the AADL for UML profile. Each language has its advantages and disadvantages, and in order to adequately describe a real-time software system's architecture, a complementary use of multiple languages is almost certainly necessary. This paper aims to explore these languages in the context of understanding the value each brings to the model-driven software engineering effort and to determine if it is feasible and practical to combine aspects of the various modeling languages to achieve more complete coverage in architectural descriptions. To this end, each language is evaluated with respect to a set of criteria such as scope, formalisms, and architectural coverage. An example is used to help illustrate the capabilities of the various languages.

  1. Growth dynamics of pentacene thin films: Real-time synchrotron x-ray scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Alex C.; Ruiz, Ricardo; Malliaras, George G.; Zhou, Hua; Headrick, Randall L.; Kazimirov, Alexander

    2006-05-15

    Real-time synchrotron x-ray scattering in the anti-Bragg configuration was used to monitor the dynamics of pentacene film growth on inert substrates. A distributed-growth model, according to which pentacene molecules adsorbed on the nth layer can either nucleate and contribute to the growth of the (n+1)th layer or transfer downward and contribute to the growth of the nth layer, gave a good description of the data. For molecules adsorbed on the first and second layers, the probability of downward transfer was found to be dependent on the substrate, and independent of temperature within the range from 25 to 60 deg. C. For films grown on SiO{sub 2}, an Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier of the order of 70 meV dominated downward transfer of pentacene molecules in layers away from the substrate. For films grown on an alkylated self-assembled monolayer, significant desorption of pentacene molecules from the substrate at elevated temperatures forced the growth mode toward the three-dimensional limit.

  2. Real-time tracking mitochondrial dynamic remodeling with two-photon phosphorescent iridium (III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huaiyi; Yang, Liang; Zhang, Pingyu; Qiu, Kangqiang; Huang, Juanjuan; Chen, Yu; Diao, JiaJie; Liu, Jiankang; Ji, Liangnian; Long, Jiangang; Chao, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial fission and fusion control the shape, size, number, and function of mitochondria in the cells of organisms from yeast to mammals. The disruption of mitochondrial fission and fusion is involved in severe human diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, metabolic diseases, and cancers. Agents that can real-time track the mitochondrial dynamics are of great importance. However, the short excitation wavelengths and rapidly photo-bleaching properties of commercial mitochondrial dyes render them unsuitable for tracking mitochondrial dynamics. Thus, mitochondrial targeting agents that exhibit superior photo-stability under continual light irradiation, deep tissue penetration and at intrinsically high three-dimensional resolutions are urgently needed. Two-photon-excited compounds employ low-energy near-infrared light and have emerged as a non-invasive tool for real-time cell imaging. Here, cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes (Ir1-Ir5) are demonstrated as one- and two-photon phosphorescent probes for the real-time imaging and tracking of mitochondrial fission and fusion. The results indicate that Ir2 is well suited for two-photon phosphorescent tracking of mitochondrial fission and fusion in living cells and in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). This study provides a practical use for mitochondrial targeting two-photon phosphorescent Ir(III) complexes. PMID:26796044

  3. Real-time visual tracking system modelling in MPSoC using platform based design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zai Jian; Bautista, Tomás; Núñez, Antonio; Guerra, Cayetano; Hernández, Mario

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we present the modelling of a real-time tracking system on a Multi-Processor System on Chip (MPSoC). Our final goal is to build a more complex computer vision system (CVS) by integrating several applications in a modular way, which performs different kind of data processing issues but sharing a common platform, and this way, a solution for a set of applications using the same architecture is offered and not just for one application. In our current work, a visual tracking system with real-time behaviour (25 frames/sec) is used like a reference application, and also, guidelines for our future CVS applications development. Our algorithm written in C++ is based on correlation technique and the threshold dynamic update approach. After an initial computational complexity analysis, a task-graph was generated from this tracking algorithm. Concurrently with this functionality correctness analysis, a generic model of multi-processor platform was developed. Finally, the tracking system performance mapped onto the proposed architecture and shared resource usage were analyzed to determine the real architecture capacity, and also to find out possible bottlenecks in order to propose new solutions which allow more applications to be mapped on the platform template in the future.

  4. Real Time Implementation of Wiener Model PI (WMPI) Controller in a Conical Tank Liquid Level Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaba, P. K.; Sathishbabu, S.; Asokan, A.; Karunanithi, T.

    Level control is very important for the successful operation of most chemical and biochemical industries since it is through the proper control of flows and levels that the desired production rates and inventories can be achieved. The aim of this study was the development and real time implementation of a Wiener Model based PI Controller (WMPIC) for a conical tank level process. The conical tank level process exhibits severe static non-linear behavior and dynamic characteristics. Here, a WMPIC structure was developed by the way of compensating the process static non-linearity. Tuning rules suggested by PadmaSree-Srinivas-Chidambaram (2004) and Ziegler-Nichols (1942) were considered here for designing the controller. The real time implementation results of wiener model based PI controller were compared with those obtained using a conventional Linear PI Controller (LPIC). The performance of these controllers was analyzed in terms of Integral Square Error (ISE) criterion. In addition to this, the robustness of the controllers was also analyzed.

  5. Dynamic assessment of cell viability, proliferation and migration using real time cell analyzer system (RTCA).

    PubMed

    Roshan Moniri, Mani; Young, Ada; Reinheimer, Kelsey; Rayat, Jarrett; Dai, Long-Jun; Warnock, Garth L

    2015-03-01

    Cell viability and cell migration capacities are critical parameters for cell culture-related studies. It is essential to monitor the dynamic changes of cell properties under various co-culture conditions to our better understanding of their behaviours and characteristics. The real time cell analyzer (RTCA, xCELLigence, Roche) is an impedance-based technology that can be used for label-free and real-time monitoring of cell properties, such as cell adherence, proliferation, migration and cytotoxicity. The practicality of this system has been proven in our recent cancer studies. In the present method, we intend to use co-cultures of pancreatic cancer cells (HP62) and mesenchymal stem cells to describe in detail, the procedures and benefits of RTCA. PMID:24443077

  6. Monte Carlo Study of Real Time Dynamics on the Lattice.

    PubMed

    Alexandru, Andrei; Başar, Gökçe; Bedaque, Paulo F; Vartak, Sohan; Warrington, Neill C

    2016-08-19

    Monte Carlo studies involving real time dynamics are severely restricted by the sign problem that emerges from a highly oscillatory phase of the path integral. In this Letter, we present a new method to compute real time quantities on the lattice using the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism via Monte Carlo simulations. The key idea is to deform the path integration domain to a complex manifold where the phase oscillations are mild and the sign problem is manageable. We use the previously introduced "contraction algorithm" to create a Markov chain on this alternative manifold. We substantiate our approach by analyzing the quantum mechanical anharmonic oscillator. Our results are in agreement with the exact ones obtained by diagonalization of the Hamiltonian. The method we introduce is generic and, in principle, applicable to quantum field theory albeit very slow. We discuss some possible improvements that should speed up the algorithm. PMID:27588844

  7. Dynamical theory of spin noise and relaxation: Prospects for real-time NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Field, Timothy R

    2014-11-01

    Recent developments in theoretical aspects of spin noise and relaxation and their interrelationship reveal a modified spin density, distinct from the density matrix, as the necessary object to describe fluctuations in spin systems. These fluctuations are to be viewed as an intrinsic quantum mechanical property of such systems immersed in random magnetic environments and are observed as "spin noise" in the absence of any radio frequency excitation. With the prospect of ultrafast digitization, the role of spin noise in real-time parameter extraction for (NMR) spin systems, and the advantage over standard techniques, is of essential importance, especially for systems containing a small number of spins. In this article we outline prospects for harnessing the recent dynamical theory in terms of spin-noise measurement, with attention to real-time properties. PMID:25493776

  8. High-resolution intracellular recordings using a real-time computational model of the electrode.

    PubMed

    Brette, Romain; Piwkowska, Zuzanna; Monier, Cyril; Rudolph-Lilith, Michelle; Fournier, Julien; Levy, Manuel; Frégnac, Yves; Bal, Thierry; Destexhe, Alain

    2008-08-14

    Intracellular recordings of neuronal membrane potential are a central tool in neurophysiology. In many situations, especially in vivo, the traditional limitation of such recordings is the high electrode resistance and capacitance, which may cause significant measurement errors during current injection. We introduce a computer-aided technique, Active Electrode Compensation (AEC), based on a digital model of the electrode interfaced in real time with the electrophysiological setup. The characteristics of this model are first estimated using white noise current injection. The electrode and membrane contribution are digitally separated, and the recording is then made by online subtraction of the electrode contribution. Tests performed in vitro and in vivo demonstrate that AEC enables high-frequency recordings in demanding conditions, such as injection of conductance noise in dynamic-clamp mode, not feasible with a single high-resistance electrode until now. AEC should be particularly useful to characterize fast neuronal phenomena intracellularly in vivo. PMID:18701064

  9. Review of Real-Time Simulator and the Steps Involved for Implementation of a Model from MATLAB/SIMULINK to Real-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkili, Suresh; Panda, Anup Kumar; Prattipati, Jayanthi

    2014-07-01

    Nowadays the researchers want to develop their model in real-time environment. Simulation tools have been widely used for the design and improvement of electrical systems since the mid twentieth century. The evolution of simulation tools has progressed in step with the evolution of computing technologies. In recent years, computing technologies have improved dramatically in performance and become widely available at a steadily decreasing cost. Consequently, simulation tools have also seen dramatic performance gains and steady cost decreases. Researchers and engineers now have the access to affordable, high performance simulation tools that were previously too cost prohibitive, except for the largest manufacturers. This work has introduced a specific class of digital simulator known as a real-time simulator by answering the questions "what is real-time simulation", "why is it needed" and "how it works". The latest trend in real-time simulation consists of exporting simulation models to FPGA. In this article, the Steps involved for implementation of a model from MATLAB to REAL-TIME are provided in detail.

  10. Real-Time Aircraft Cosmic Ray Radiation Exposure Predictions from the NAIRAS Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, C. J.; Tobiska, W.; Kress, B. T.; Xu, X.

    2012-12-01

    The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a prototype operational model for predicting commercial aircraft radiation exposure from galactic and solar cosmic rays. NAIRAS predictions are currently streaming live from the project's public website, and the exposure rate nowcast is also available on the SpaceWx smartphone app for iPhone, IPad, and Android. Cosmic rays are the primary source of human exposure to high linear energy transfer radiation at aircraft altitudes, which increases the risk of cancer and other adverse health effects. Thus, the NAIRAS model addresses an important national need with broad societal, public health and economic benefits. There is also interest in extending NAIRAS to the LEO environment to address radiation hazard issues for the emerging commercial spaceflight industry. The processes responsible for the variability in the solar wind, interplanetary magnetic field, solar energetic particle spectrum, and the dynamical response of the magnetosphere to these space environment inputs, strongly influence the composition and energy distribution of the atmospheric ionizing radiation field. Real-time observations are required at a variety of locations within the geospace environment. The NAIRAS model is driven by real-time input data from ground-, atmospheric-, and space-based platforms. During the development of the NAIRAS model, new science questions and observational data gaps were identified that must be addressed in order to obtain a more reliable and robust operational model of atmospheric radiation exposure. The focus of this talk is to present the current capabilities of the NAIRAS model, discuss future developments in aviation radiation modeling and instrumentation, and propose strategies and methodologies of bridging known gaps in current modeling and observational capabilities.

  11. Model-integrated program synthesis environment for parallel/real-time image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Michael S.; Sztipanovitz, Janos; Karsai, Gabor; Nichols, James A.

    1997-09-01

    In this paper, it is shown that, through the use of model- integrated program synthesis (MIPS), parallel real-time implementations of image processing data flows can be synthesized from high level graphical specifications. The complex details in inherent to parallel and real-time software development become transparent to the programmer, enabling the cost-effective exploitation of parallel hardware for building more flexible and powerful real-time imaging systems. The model integrated real-time image processing system (MIRTIS) is presented as an example. MIRTIS employs the multigraph architecture (MGA), a framework and set of tools for building MIPS systems, to generate parallel real-time image processing software which runs under the control of a parallel run-time kernel on a network of Texas Instruments TMS320C40 DSPs (C40s). The MIRTIS models contain graphical declarations of the image processing computations to be performed, the available hardware resources, and the timing constraints of the application. The MIRTIS model interpreter performs the parallelization, scaling, and mapping of the computations to the resources automatically or determines that the timing constraints cannot be met with the available resources. MIRTIS is a clear example of how parallel real-time image processing systems can be built which are (1) cost-effectively programmable, (2) flexible, (3) scalable, and (4) built from commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components.

  12. Optimizing Real-Time Vaccine Allocation in a Stochastic SIR Model

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Chantal; Carlson, Jean M.

    2016-01-01

    Real-time vaccination following an outbreak can effectively mitigate the damage caused by an infectious disease. However, in many cases, available resources are insufficient to vaccinate the entire at-risk population, logistics result in delayed vaccine deployment, and the interaction between members of different cities facilitates a wide spatial spread of infection. Limited vaccine, time delays, and interaction (or coupling) of cities lead to tradeoffs that impact the overall magnitude of the epidemic. These tradeoffs mandate investigation of optimal strategies that minimize the severity of the epidemic by prioritizing allocation of vaccine to specific subpopulations. We use an SIR model to describe the disease dynamics of an epidemic which breaks out in one city and spreads to another. We solve a master equation to determine the resulting probability distribution of the final epidemic size. We then identify tradeoffs between vaccine, time delay, and coupling, and we determine the optimal vaccination protocols resulting from these tradeoffs. PMID:27043931

  13. Ground target infrared signature model validation for real-time hardware-in-the-loop simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Jeffrey S.; Rodgers, Jeremy B.; Siddique, Ahmed A.

    1998-07-01

    Techniques and tools for validation of real-time infrared target signature models are presented. The model validation techniques presented in this paper were developed for hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulations at the U.S. Army Missile Command's Research, Development, and Engineering Center. Real-time target model validation is a required deliverable to the customer of a HWIL simulation facility and is a critical part of ensuring the fidelity of a HWIL simulation. There are two levels of real-time target model validation. The first level is comparison of the target model to some baseline or measured data which answers the question 'are the simulation inputs correct?' The second level of validation is a simulation validation which answers the question 'for a given target model input are the simulation hardware and software generating the correct output?' This paper deals primarily with the first level of target model validation.

  14. Real-time capable first principle based modelling of tokamak turbulent transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citrin, J.; Breton, S.; Felici, F.; Imbeaux, F.; Aniel, T.; Artaud, J. F.; Baiocchi, B.; Bourdelle, C.; Camenen, Y.; Garcia, J.

    2015-09-01

    A real-time capable core turbulence tokamak transport model is developed. This model is constructed from the regularized nonlinear regression of quasilinear gyrokinetic transport code output. The regression is performed with a multilayer perceptron neural network. The transport code input for the neural network training set consists of five dimensions, and is limited to adiabatic electrons. The neural network model successfully reproduces transport fluxes predicted by the original quasilinear model, while gaining five orders of magnitude in computation time. The model is implemented in a real-time capable tokamak simulator, and simulates a 300 s ITER discharge in 10 s. This proof-of-principle for regression based transport models anticipates a significant widening of input space dimensionality and physics realism for future training sets. This aims to provide unprecedented computational speed coupled with first-principle based physics for real-time control and integrated modelling applications.

  15. Real-time high-resolution heterodyne-based measurements of spectral dynamics in fibre lasers

    PubMed Central

    Sugavanam, Srikanth; Fabbri, Simon; Le, Son Thai; Lobach, Ivan; Kablukov, Sergey; Khorev, Serge; Churkin, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Conventional tools for measurement of laser spectra (e.g. optical spectrum analysers) capture data averaged over a considerable time period. However, the generation spectrum of many laser types may involve spectral dynamics whose relatively fast time scale is determined by their cavity round trip period, calling for instrumentation featuring both high temporal and spectral resolution. Such real-time spectral characterisation becomes particularly challenging if the laser pulses are long, or they have continuous or quasi-continuous wave radiation components. Here we combine optical heterodyning with a technique of spatio-temporal intensity measurements that allows the characterisation of such complex sources. Fast, round-trip-resolved spectral dynamics of cavity-based systems in real-time are obtained, with temporal resolution of one cavity round trip and frequency resolution defined by its inverse (85 ns and 24 MHz respectively are demonstrated). We also show how under certain conditions for quasi-continuous wave sources, the spectral resolution could be further increased by a factor of 100 by direct extraction of phase information from the heterodyned dynamics or by using double time scales within the spectrogram approach. PMID:26984634

  16. A real-time model of the synchronous machine based on digital signal processors

    SciTech Connect

    Do, Vanque; Barry, A.O. )

    1993-02-01

    A real-time digital model of a complete hydraulic synchronous machine is presented. The model is based on parallel processing using digital-signal processors (DSP) for fast calculation. The paper describes the modeling of the machine using block diagrams to represent the generator, voltage regulator, stabilizer, turbine, penstock and governor. Details of the hardware and software used to implement the real-time model of the machine are given. A first series of tests has been done and results are shown to evaluate the steady-state and transient performance of the model.

  17. Dynamical jumping real-time fault-tolerant routing protocol for wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guowei; Lin, Chi; Xia, Feng; Yao, Lin; Zhang, He; Liu, Bing

    2010-01-01

    In time-critical wireless sensor network (WSN) applications, a high degree of reliability is commonly required. A dynamical jumping real-time fault-tolerant routing protocol (DMRF) is proposed in this paper. Each node utilizes the remaining transmission time of the data packets and the state of the forwarding candidate node set to dynamically choose the next hop. Once node failure, network congestion or void region occurs, the transmission mode will switch to jumping transmission mode, which can reduce the transmission time delay, guaranteeing the data packets to be sent to the destination node within the specified time limit. By using feedback mechanism, each node dynamically adjusts the jumping probabilities to increase the ratio of successful transmission. Simulation results show that DMRF can not only efficiently reduce the effects of failure nodes, congestion and void region, but also yield higher ratio of successful transmission, smaller transmission delay and reduced number of control packets. PMID:22294933

  18. Real-Time Probing of Electron Dynamics Using Attosecond Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasesha, Krupa; Leone, Stephen R.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2016-05-01

    Attosecond science has paved the way for direct probing of electron dynamics in gases and solids. This review provides an overview of recent attosecond measurements, focusing on the wealth of knowledge obtained by the application of isolated attosecond pulses in studying dynamics in gases and solid-state systems. Attosecond photoelectron and photoion measurements in atoms reveal strong-field tunneling ionization and a delay in the photoemission from different electronic states. These measurements applied to molecules have shed light on ultrafast intramolecular charge migration. Similar approaches are used to understand photoemission processes from core and delocalized electronic states in metal surfaces. Attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy is used to follow the real-time motion of valence electrons and to measure the lifetimes of autoionizing channels in atoms. In solids, it provides the first measurements of bulk electron dynamics, revealing important phenomena such as the timescales governing the switching from an insulator to a metallic state and carrier-carrier interactions.

  19. Real-Time Probing of Electron Dynamics Using Attosecond Time-Resolved Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ramasesha, Krupa; Leone, Stephen R; Neumark, Daniel M

    2016-05-27

    Attosecond science has paved the way for direct probing of electron dynamics in gases and solids. This review provides an overview of recent attosecond measurements, focusing on the wealth of knowledge obtained by the application of isolated attosecond pulses in studying dynamics in gases and solid-state systems. Attosecond photoelectron and photoion measurements in atoms reveal strong-field tunneling ionization and a delay in the photoemission from different electronic states. These measurements applied to molecules have shed light on ultrafast intramolecular charge migration. Similar approaches are used to understand photoemission processes from core and delocalized electronic states in metal surfaces. Attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy is used to follow the real-time motion of valence electrons and to measure the lifetimes of autoionizing channels in atoms. In solids, it provides the first measurements of bulk electron dynamics, revealing important phenomena such as the timescales governing the switching from an insulator to a metallic state and carrier-carrier interactions. PMID:26980312

  20. Real time acousto-ultrasonic NDE technique for monitoring damage in ceramic composites under dynamic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Anil

    1995-01-01

    Research effort was directed towards developing a near real-time, acousto-ultrasonic (AU), nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tool to study the failure mechanisms of ceramic composites. Progression of damage is monitored in real-time by observing the changes in the received AU signal during the actual test. During the real-time AU test, the AU signals are generated and received by the AU transducers attached to the specimen while it is being subjected to increasing quasi-static loads or cyclic loads (10 Hz, R = 1.0). The received AU signals for 64 successive pulses were gated in the time domain (T = 40.96 micro sec) and then averaged every second over ten load cycles and stored in a computer file during fatigue tests. These averaged gated signals are representative of the damage state of the specimen at that point of its fatigue life. This is also the first major attempt in the development and application of real-time AU for continuously monitoring damage accumulation during fatigue without interrupting the test. The present work has verified the capability of the AU technique to assess the damage state in silicon carbide/calcium aluminosilicate (SiC/CAS) and silicon carbide/ magnesium aluminosilicate (SiC/MAS) ceramic composites. Continuous monitoring of damage initiation and progression under quasi-static ramp loading in tension to failure of unidirectional and cross-ply SiC/CAS and quasi-isotropic SiC/MAS ceramic composite specimens at room temperature was accomplished using near real-time AU parameters. The AU technique was shown to be able to detect the stress levels for the onset and saturation of matrix cracks, respectively. The critical cracking stress level is used as a design stress for brittle matrix composites operating at elevated temperatures. The AU technique has found that the critical cracking stress level is 10-15% below the level presently obtained for design purposes from analytical models. An acousto-ultrasonic stress-strain response (AUSSR) model

  1. A New Model for Real-Time Regional Vertical Total Electron Content and Differential Code Bias Estimation Using IGS Real-Time Service (IGS-RTS) Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelazeem, Mohamed; Çelik, Rahmi N.; El-Rabbany, Ahmed

    2016-04-01

    The international global navigation satellite system (GNSS) real-time service (IGS-RTS) products have been used extensively for real-time precise point positioning and ionosphere modeling applications. In this study, we develop a regional model for real-time vertical total electron content (RT-VTEC) and differential code bias (RT-DCB) estimation over Europe using the IGS-RTS satellite orbit and clock products. The developed model has a spatial and temporal resolution of 1°×1° and 15 minutes, respectively. GPS observations from a regional network consisting of 60 IGS and EUREF reference stations are processed in the zero-difference mode using the Bernese-5.2 software package in order to extract the geometry-free linear combination of the smoothed code observations. The spherical harmonic expansion function is used to model the VTEC, the receiver and the satellite DCBs. To validate the proposed model, the RT-VTEC values are computed and compared with the final IGS-global ionospheric map (IGS-GIM) counterparts in three successive days under high solar activity including one of an extreme geomagnetic activity. The real-time satellite DCBs are also estimated and compared with the IGS-GIM counterparts. Moreover, the real-time receiver DCB for six IGS stations are obtained and compared with the IGS-GIM counterparts. The examined stations are located in different latitudes with different receiver types. The findings reveal that the estimated RT-VTEC values show agreement with the IGS-GIM counterparts with root mean-square-errors (RMSEs) values less than 2 TEC units. In addition, RMSEs of both the satellites and receivers DCBs are less than 0.85 ns and 0.65 ns, respectively in comparison with the IGS-GIM.

  2. Design of real-time locomotion generator with map-based neuronal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulkov, Nikolai; Ayers, Joseph; Hunt, Mark

    2008-03-01

    We are developing an electronic nervous system for a biomimetic robot based on an established neurobiological model system, the Sea Lamprey. Undulatory locomotion of the lamprey is coordinated by a concatenated network of over 100 segmental central pattern generators (CPGs). To achieve real time operation in a DSP chip, we are using simple phenomenological models of neurons and synapses based on the dynamics of nonlinear maps. CPG networks based on known neuronal circuitry have replicated main properties of the dynamical behavior of the animal model. The results of numerical studies of the neuronal activity coordinating various swimming patterns in the reduced model of the CPG are considered. Both ascending and descending connections between segmental CPGs can mediate both forward and backward propagating flexion waves based on anterior or posterior bias by descending premotor commands. Bilaterally asymmetric biases of descending commands can mediate turning. The CPG outputs control 5 shape memory alloy actuators on each side to generate coordinated undulations. Two dorsal and ventral pitch actuators control the angle between the hull and undulator to control dive and climb. Descending commands are modulated by an analog compass, inclinometers, accelerometers and a short baseline sonar array to mediate homing by the vehicle on a sonar beacon.

  3. A Mixed Model for Real-Time, Interactive Simulation of a Cable Passing Through Several Pulleys

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Fernandez, Ignacio; Pla-Castells, Marta; Martinez-Dura, Rafael J.

    2007-09-06

    A model of a cable and pulleys is presented that can be used in Real Time Computer Graphics applications. The model is formulated by the coupling of a damped spring and a variable coefficient wave equation, and can be integrated in more complex mechanical models of lift systems, such as cranes, elevators, etc. with a high degree of interactivity.

  4. A macro traffic flow model accounting for real-time traffic state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tie-Qiao; Chen, Liang; Wu, Yong-Hong; Caccetta, Lou

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a traffic flow model to study the effects of the real-time traffic state on traffic flow. The numerical results show that the proposed model can describe oscillation in traffic and stop-and-go traffic, where the speed-density relationship is qualitatively accordant with the empirical data of the Weizikeng segment of the Badaling freeway in Beijing, which means that the proposed model can qualitatively reproduce some complex traffic phenomena associated with real-time traffic state.

  5. Real-time data acquisition system for the NASA Langley transonic dynamics tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, P. H.

    1979-01-01

    The hardware configuration of the Transonic Dynamics Wind Tunnel Data Acquisition System (DAS) which consists of an analog front end that can process up to 260 channels of data is presented. The DAS also has a multi-channel analog-to-digital subsystem that can process up to 50,000 samples of data per sec, and a digital computer with standard and nonstandard devices, with graphics capability. The software configuration of the DAS and complex hardware/software interfaces are described, which can provide automatic amplifier gain and offset adjustment for each data channel. Finally, a summary of specific DAS applications is given including the real-time processing of dynamic deflection data, unsteady pressure measurements, and flutter and buffet data.

  6. Real-time cell analysis--a new method for dynamic, quantitative measurement of infectious viruses and antiserum neutralizing activity.

    PubMed

    Teng, Zheng; Kuang, Xiaozhou; Wang, Jiayu; Zhang, Xi

    2013-11-01

    A newly developed electronic cell sensor array--the xCELLigence real-time cell analysis (RTCA) system is tested currently for dynamic monitoring of cell attachment, proliferation, damage, and death. In this study, human enterovirus (HEV71) infection of human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) was used as an in vitro model to validate the application of this novel system as a straightforward and efficient assay for quantitative measurement of infectious viruses based on virus-induced cytopathic effect (CPE). Several experimental tests were performed including the determination of optimal seeding density of the RD cells in 96-well E-plates, RTCA real-time monitoring of the virus induced CPE and virus titer calculation, and viral neutralization test to determine HEV71 antibody titer. Traditional 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) assay was also conducted for methodology comparison and validation, which indicated a consistent result between the two assays. These findings indicate that the xCELLigence RTCA system can be a valuable addition to current viral assays for quantitative measurement of infectious viruses and quantitation of neutralization antibody titer in real-time, warranting for future research and exploration of applications to many other animal and human viruses. PMID:23835032

  7. Real-time modeling and simulation of distribution feeder and distributed resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Pawan

    The analysis of the electrical system dates back to the days when analog network analyzers were used. With the advent of digital computers, many programs were written for power-flow and short circuit analysis for the improvement of the electrical system. Real-time computer simulations can answer many what-if scenarios in the existing or the proposed power system. In this thesis, the standard IEEE 13-Node distribution feeder is developed and validated on a real-time platform OPAL-RT. The concept and the challenges of the real-time simulation are studied and addressed. Distributed energy resources include some of the commonly used distributed generation and storage devices like diesel engine, solar photovoltaic array, and battery storage system are modeled and simulated on a real-time platform. A microgrid encompasses a portion of an electric power distribution which is located downstream of the distribution substation. Normally, the microgrid operates in paralleled mode with the grid; however, scheduled or forced isolation can take place. In such conditions, the microgrid must have the ability to operate stably and autonomously. The microgrid can operate in grid connected and islanded mode, both the operating modes are studied in the last chapter. Towards the end, a simple microgrid controller modeled and simulated on the real-time platform is developed for energy management and protection for the microgrid.

  8. FPGA-based Fused Smart Sensor for Real-Time Plant-Transpiration Dynamic Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Millan-Almaraz, Jesus Roberto; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, Rene; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon Gerardo; Contreras-Medina, Luis Miguel; Carrillo-Serrano, Roberto Valentin; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; Duarte-Galvan, Carlos; Rios-Alcaraz, Miguel Angel; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo

    2010-01-01

    Plant transpiration is considered one of the most important physiological functions because it constitutes the plants evolving adaptation to exchange moisture with a dry atmosphere which can dehydrate or eventually kill the plant. Due to the importance of transpiration, accurate measurement methods are required; therefore, a smart sensor that fuses five primary sensors is proposed which can measure air temperature, leaf temperature, air relative humidity, plant out relative humidity and ambient light. A field programmable gate array based unit is used to perform signal processing algorithms as average decimation and infinite impulse response filters to the primary sensor readings in order to reduce the signal noise and improve its quality. Once the primary sensor readings are filtered, transpiration dynamics such as: transpiration, stomatal conductance, leaf-air-temperature-difference and vapor pressure deficit are calculated in real time by the smart sensor. This permits the user to observe different primary and calculated measurements at the same time and the relationship between these which is very useful in precision agriculture in the detection of abnormal conditions. Finally, transpiration related stress conditions can be detected in real time because of the use of online processing and embedded communications capabilities. PMID:22163656

  9. FPGA-based fused smart sensor for real-time plant-transpiration dynamic estimation.

    PubMed

    Millan-Almaraz, Jesus Roberto; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, Rene; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon Gerardo; Contreras-Medina, Luis Miguel; Carrillo-Serrano, Roberto Valentin; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; Duarte-Galvan, Carlos; Rios-Alcaraz, Miguel Angel; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo

    2010-01-01

    Plant transpiration is considered one of the most important physiological functions because it constitutes the plants evolving adaptation to exchange moisture with a dry atmosphere which can dehydrate or eventually kill the plant. Due to the importance of transpiration, accurate measurement methods are required; therefore, a smart sensor that fuses five primary sensors is proposed which can measure air temperature, leaf temperature, air relative humidity, plant out relative humidity and ambient light. A field programmable gate array based unit is used to perform signal processing algorithms as average decimation and infinite impulse response filters to the primary sensor readings in order to reduce the signal noise and improve its quality. Once the primary sensor readings are filtered, transpiration dynamics such as: transpiration, stomatal conductance, leaf-air-temperature-difference and vapor pressure deficit are calculated in real time by the smart sensor. This permits the user to observe different primary and calculated measurements at the same time and the relationship between these which is very useful in precision agriculture in the detection of abnormal conditions. Finally, transpiration related stress conditions can be detected in real time because of the use of online processing and embedded communications capabilities. PMID:22163656

  10. Development of a real-time bogie test rig model based on railway specialised multibody software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiryagin, Maksym; Sun, Yan Quan; Cole, Colin; McSweeney, Tim; Simson, Scott; Persson, Ingemar

    2013-02-01

    The design of mechatronic systems of rail vehicles requires performing verification and validation in the real-time mode. One useful validation instrument is the application of software-in-the-loop, hardware-in-the-loop or processor-in-the-loop simulation approaches. All of these approaches require development of a real-time model of the physical system. In this paper, the investigation of the usage of the model of the locomotive's bogie test rig created in Gensys multibody software has been performed and the calculation time for each time step has been analysed. The verification of the possibility of the usage of such an approach for real-time simulation has been made by means of a simple data transferring process between Gensys and Simulink through the TCP/IP interface. The limitations and further development issues for the proposed approach have been discussed in this paper.

  11. Real-time infrared signature model validation for hardware-in-the-loop simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Jeffrey S.; Peters, Trina S.

    1997-07-01

    Techniques and tools for validation of real-time infrared target signature models are presented. The model validation techniques presented in this paper were developed for hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulations at the U.S. Army Missile Command's Research, Development, and Engineering Center. Real-time target model validation is a required deliverable to the customer of a HWIL simulation facility and is a critical part of ensuring the fidelity of a HWIL simulation. There are two levels of real-time target model validation. The first level is comparison of the target model to some baseline or measured data which answers the question `are the simulation inputs correct?'. The second level of validation is a simulation validation which answers the question `for a given target model input is the simulation hardware and software generating the correct output?'. This paper deals primarily with the first level of target model validation. IR target signature models have often been validated by subjective visual inspection or by objective, but limited, statistical comparisons. Subjective methods can be very satisfying to the simulation developer but offer little comfort to the simulation customer since subjective methods cannot be documented. Generic statistical methods offer a level of documentation, yet are often not robust enough to fully test the fidelity of an IR signature. Advances in infrared seeker and sensor technology have led to the necessity of system specific target model validation. For any HWIL simulation it must be demonstrated that the sensor responds to the real-time signature model in a manner which is functionally equivalent to the sensor's response to a baseline model. Depending on the application, a baseline method can be measured IR imagery or the output of a validated IR signature prediction code. Tools are described that generate validation data for HWIL simulations at MICOM and example real-time model validations are presented.

  12. Real-time detection of musical onsets with linear prediction and sinusoidal modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, John; Lazzarini, Victor; Timoney, Joseph

    2011-12-01

    Real-time musical note onset detection plays a vital role in many audio analysis processes, such as score following, beat detection and various sound synthesis by analysis methods. This article provides a review of some of the most commonly used techniques for real-time onset detection. We suggest ways to improve these techniques by incorporating linear prediction as well as presenting a novel algorithm for real-time onset detection using sinusoidal modelling. We provide comprehensive results for both the detection accuracy and the computational performance of all of the described techniques, evaluated using Modal, our new open source library for musical onset detection, which comes with a free database of samples with hand-labelled note onsets.

  13. Real-Time Dynamics of Quantized Vortices in a Unitary Fermi Superfluid

    SciTech Connect

    Bulgac, Aurel; Luo, Yuan-Lung; Magierski, Piotr; Roche, Kenneth J; Yu, Yongle

    2011-06-10

    We introduce a comprehensive theoretical framework for the fermionic su- perfluid dynamics, grounded on a local extension of the time-dependent den- sity functional theory. With this approach we describe the generation and the real-time evolution and interaction of quantized vortices, the large amplitude collective modes, as well as the loss of superfluidity at high flow velocities. We demonstrate the formation of vortex rings and provide for the first time a microscopic description of the crossing and the reconnection of quantized vortex lines in a fermion superfluid, which provide the mechanism for the emergence of quantum turbulence at very low temperatures. We observe that superfluidity often survives when these systems are stirred with velocities far exceeding the speed of sound.

  14. Real-time dynamics of quantized vortices in a unitary Fermi superfluid.

    PubMed

    Bulgac, Aurel; Luo, Yuan-Lung; Magierski, Piotr; Roche, Kenneth J; Yu, Yongle

    2011-06-10

    We introduce a comprehensive theoretical framework for the fermionic superfluid dynamics, grounded on a local extension of the time-dependent density functional theory. With this approach, we describe the generation and the real-time evolution and interaction of quantized vortices, the large-amplitude collective modes, as well as the loss of superfluidity at high flow velocities. We demonstrate the formation of vortex rings and provide a microscopic description of the crossing and reconnection of quantized vortex lines in a fermion superfluid, which provide the mechanism for the emergence of quantum turbulence at very low temperatures. We observe that superfluidity often survives when these systems are stirred with velocities far exceeding the speed of sound. PMID:21659597

  15. Strength of the vortex-pinning interaction from real-time dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bulgac, Aurel; Forbes, Michael McNeil; Sharma, Rishi

    2013-06-14

    We present an efficient and general method to compute vortex-pinning interactions--which arise in neutron stars, superconductors, and trapped cold atoms--at arbitrary separations using real-time dynamics. This method overcomes uncertainties associated with matter redistribution by the vortex position and the related choice of ensemble that plague the typical approach of comparing energy differences between stationary pinned and unpinned configurations: uncertainties that prevent agreement in the literature on the sign and magnitude of the vortex-nucleus interaction in the crust of neutron stars. We demonstrate and validate the method with Gross-Pitaevskii-like equations for the unitary Fermi gas, and demonstrate how the technique of adiabatic state preparation with time-dependent simulation can be used to calculate vortex-pinning interactions in fermionic systems such as the vortex-nucleus interaction in the crust of neutron stars. PMID:25165904

  16. Real-Time Local Range On-Demand and Dynamic Regional Range Images

    SciTech Connect

    Tsap, L.V.

    2000-02-22

    This paper presents a new approach to a gesture tracking system using real-time range on-demand. The system represents a gesture-controlled interface for interactive visual exploration of large data sets. The paper describes a method performing range processing only when necessary and where necessary. Range data is processed only for non-static regions of interest. This is accomplished by a set of filters on the color, motion, and range data. The speedup achieved is between 41% and 54%. The algorithm also includes a robust skin color segmentation insensitive to illumination changes. Selective range processing results in dynamic regional range images (DRRIs). This development is also placed in a broader context of a biological visual system emulation, specifically redundancies and attention mechanisms.

  17. Real-Time Local Range On-Demand for Tracking Gestures and Dynamic Regional Range Images

    SciTech Connect

    Tsap, L.V.

    2000-05-30

    This paper presents a new approach to a gesture-tracking system using real-time range on-demand. The system represents a gesture-controlled interface for interactive visual exploration of large data sets. The paper describes a method performing range processing only when necessary and where necessary. Range data is processed only for non-static regions of interest. This is accomplished by a set of filters on the color, motion, and range data. The speedup achieved is between 41% and 54%. The algorithm also includes a robust skin-color segmentation insensitive to illumination changes. Selective range processing results in dynamic regional range images (DRRIs). This development is also placed in a broader context of a biological visual system emulation, specifically redundancies and attention mechanisms.

  18. Dynamics of supersonic microparticle impact on elastomers revealed by real-time multi-frame imaging.

    PubMed

    Veysset, David; Hsieh, Alex J; Kooi, Steven; Maznev, Alexei A; Masser, Kevin A; Nelson, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding high-velocity microparticle impact is essential for many fields, from space exploration to medicine and biology. Investigations of microscale impact have hitherto been limited to post-mortem analysis of impacted specimens, which does not provide direct information on the impact dynamics. Here we report real-time multi-frame imaging studies of the impact of 7 μm diameter glass spheres traveling at 700-900 m/s on elastomer polymers. With a poly(urethane urea) (PUU) sample, we observe a hyperelastic impact phenomenon not seen on the macroscale: a microsphere undergoes a full conformal penetration into the specimen followed by a rebound which leaves the specimen unscathed. The results challenge the established interpretation of the behaviour of elastomers under high-velocity impact. PMID:27156501

  19. A Dynamic Time Warping Approach to Real-Time Activity Recognition for Food Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Cuong; Plötz, Thomas; Olivier, Patrick

    We present a dynamic time warping based activity recognition system for the analysis of low-level food preparation activities. Accelerometers embedded into kitchen utensils provide continuous sensor data streams while people are using them for cooking. The recognition framework analyzes frames of contiguous sensor readings in real-time with low latency. It thereby adapts to the idiosyncrasies of utensil use by automatically maintaining a template database. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the classification approach by a number of real-world practical experiments on a publically available dataset. The adaptive system shows superior performance compared to a static recognizer. Furthermore, we demonstrate the generalization capabilities of the system by gradually reducing the amount of training samples. The system achieves excellent classification results even if only a small number of training samples is available, which is especially relevant for real-world scenarios.

  20. Real-time quantification of single RNA translation dynamics in living cells.

    PubMed

    Morisaki, Tatsuya; Lyon, Kenneth; DeLuca, Keith F; DeLuca, Jennifer G; English, Brian P; Zhang, Zhengjian; Lavis, Luke D; Grimm, Jonathan B; Viswanathan, Sarada; Looger, Loren L; Lionnet, Timothee; Stasevich, Timothy J

    2016-06-17

    Although messenger RNA (mRNA) translation is a fundamental biological process, it has never been imaged in real time in vivo with single-molecule precision. To achieve this, we developed nascent chain tracking (NCT), a technique that uses multi-epitope tags and antibody-based fluorescent probes to quantify protein synthesis dynamics at the single-mRNA level. NCT reveals an elongation rate of ~10 amino acids per second, with initiation occurring stochastically every ~30 seconds. Polysomes contain ~1 ribosome every 200 to 900 nucleotides and are globular rather than elongated in shape. By developing multicolor probes, we showed that most polysomes act independently; however, a small fraction (~5%) form complexes in which two distinct mRNAs can be translated simultaneously. The sensitivity and versatility of NCT make it a powerful new tool for quantifying mRNA translation kinetics. PMID:27313040

  1. Development and Implementation of a Real-Time 30-Day Readmission Predictive Model

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Patrick R.; Greenwald, Jeffrey L.; Crevensten, Gwen C.; Chueh, Henry C.; Zai, Adrian H.

    2014-01-01

    Hospitals are under great pressure to reduce readmissions of patients. Being able to reliably predict patients at increased risk for rehospitalization would allow for tailored interventions to be offered to them. This requires the creation of a functional predictive model specifically designed to support real-time clinical operations. A predictive model for readmissions within 30 days of discharge was developed using retrospective data from 45,924 MGH admissions between 2/1/2012 and 1/31/2013 only including factors that would be available by the day after admission. It was then validated prospectively in a real-time implementation for 3,074 MGH admissions between 10/1/2013 and 10/31/2013. The model developed retrospectively had an AUC of 0.705 with good calibration. The real-time implementation had an AUC of 0.671 although the model was overestimating readmission risk. A moderately discriminative real-time 30-day readmission predictive model can be developed and implemented in a large academic hospital. PMID:25954346

  2. Crash Frequency Modeling Using Real-Time Environmental and Traffic Data and Unbalanced Panel Data Models

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Chen, Suren; Ma, Xiaoxiang

    2016-01-01

    Traffic and environmental conditions (e.g., weather conditions), which frequently change with time, have a significant impact on crash occurrence. Traditional crash frequency models with large temporal scales and aggregated variables are not sufficient to capture the time-varying nature of driving environmental factors, causing significant loss of critical information on crash frequency modeling. This paper aims at developing crash frequency models with refined temporal scales for complex driving environments, with such an effort providing more detailed and accurate crash risk information which can allow for more effective and proactive traffic management and law enforcement intervention. Zero-inflated, negative binomial (ZINB) models with site-specific random effects are developed with unbalanced panel data to analyze hourly crash frequency on highway segments. The real-time driving environment information, including traffic, weather and road surface condition data, sourced primarily from the Road Weather Information System, is incorporated into the models along with site-specific road characteristics. The estimation results of unbalanced panel data ZINB models suggest there are a number of factors influencing crash frequency, including time-varying factors (e.g., visibility and hourly traffic volume) and site-varying factors (e.g., speed limit). The study confirms the unique significance of the real-time weather, road surface condition and traffic data to crash frequency modeling. PMID:27322306

  3. Crash Frequency Modeling Using Real-Time Environmental and Traffic Data and Unbalanced Panel Data Models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Chen, Suren; Ma, Xiaoxiang

    2016-01-01

    Traffic and environmental conditions (e.g., weather conditions), which frequently change with time, have a significant impact on crash occurrence. Traditional crash frequency models with large temporal scales and aggregated variables are not sufficient to capture the time-varying nature of driving environmental factors, causing significant loss of critical information on crash frequency modeling. This paper aims at developing crash frequency models with refined temporal scales for complex driving environments, with such an effort providing more detailed and accurate crash risk information which can allow for more effective and proactive traffic management and law enforcement intervention. Zero-inflated, negative binomial (ZINB) models with site-specific random effects are developed with unbalanced panel data to analyze hourly crash frequency on highway segments. The real-time driving environment information, including traffic, weather and road surface condition data, sourced primarily from the Road Weather Information System, is incorporated into the models along with site-specific road characteristics. The estimation results of unbalanced panel data ZINB models suggest there are a number of factors influencing crash frequency, including time-varying factors (e.g., visibility and hourly traffic volume) and site-varying factors (e.g., speed limit). The study confirms the unique significance of the real-time weather, road surface condition and traffic data to crash frequency modeling. PMID:27322306

  4. [Dynamic road vehicle emission inventory simulation study based on real time traffic information].

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng; Liu, Juan; Chen, Chang-Hong; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Deng-Guo; Zhu, Jing-Yu; Huang, Wei-Ming; Chao, Yuan

    2012-11-01

    The vehicle activity survey, including traffic flow distribution, driving condition, and vehicle technologies, were conducted in Shanghai. The databases of vehicle flow, VSP distribution and vehicle categories were established according to the surveyed data. Based on this, a dynamic vehicle emission inventory simulation method was designed by using the real time traffic information data, such as traffic flow and average speed. Some roads in Shanghai city were selected to conduct the hourly vehicle emission simulation as a case study. The survey results show that light duty passenger car and taxi are major vehicles on the roads of Shanghai city, accounting for 48% - 72% and 15% - 43% of the total flow in each hour, respectively. VSP distribution has a good relationship with the average speed. The peak of VSP distribution tends to move to high load section and become lower with the increase of average speed. Vehicles achieved Euro 2 and Euro 3 standards are majorities of current vehicle population in Shanghai. Based on the calibration of vehicle travel mileage data, the proportions of Euro 2 and Euro 3 standard vehicles take up 11% - 70% and 17% - 51% in the real-world situation, respectively. The emission simulation results indicate that the ratios of emission peak and valley for the pollutants of CO, VOC, NO(x) and PM are 3.7, 4.6, 9.6 and 19.8, respectively. CO and VOC emissions mainly come from light-duty passenger car and taxi, which has a good relationship with the traffic flow. NO(x) and PM emissions are mainly from heavy-duty bus and public buses and mainly concentrate in the morning and evening peak hours. The established dynamic vehicle emission simulation method can reflect the change of actual road emission and output high emission road sectors and hours in real time. The method can provide an important technical means and decision-making basis for transportation environment management. PMID:23323399

  5. Effects of Real-Time NASA Vegetation Data on Model Forecasts of Severe Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Bell, Jordan R.; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed a Greenness Vegetation Fraction (GVF) dataset, which is updated daily using swaths of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data aboard the NASA-EOS Aqua and Terra satellites. NASA SPoRT started generating daily real-time GVF composites at 1-km resolution over the Continental United States beginning 1 June 2010. A companion poster presentation (Bell et al.) primarily focuses on impact results in an offline configuration of the Noah land surface model (LSM) for the 2010 warm season, comparing the SPoRT/MODIS GVF dataset to the current operational monthly climatology GVF available within the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) models. This paper/presentation primarily focuses on individual case studies of severe weather events to determine the impacts and possible improvements by using the real-time, high-resolution SPoRT-MODIS GVFs in place of the coarser-resolution NCEP climatological GVFs in model simulations. The NASA-Unified WRF (NU-WRF) modeling system is employed to conduct the sensitivity simulations of individual events. The NU-WRF is an integrated modeling system based on the Advanced Research WRF dynamical core that is designed to represents aerosol, cloud, precipitation, and land processes at satellite-resolved scales in a coupled simulation environment. For this experiment, the coupling between the NASA Land Information System (LIS) and the WRF model is utilized to measure the impacts of the daily SPoRT/MODIS versus the monthly NCEP climatology GVFs. First, a spin-up run of the LIS is integrated for two years using the Noah LSM to ensure that the land surface fields reach an equilibrium state on the 4-km grid mesh used. Next, the spin-up LIS is run in two separate modes beginning on 1 June 2010, one continuing with the climatology GVFs while the

  6. Real-time characterization of partially observed epidemics using surrogate models.

    SciTech Connect

    Safta, Cosmin; Ray, Jaideep; Lefantzi, Sophia; Crary, David; Sargsyan, Khachik; Cheng, Karen

    2011-09-01

    We present a statistical method, predicated on the use of surrogate models, for the 'real-time' characterization of partially observed epidemics. Observations consist of counts of symptomatic patients, diagnosed with the disease, that may be available in the early epoch of an ongoing outbreak. Characterization, in this context, refers to estimation of epidemiological parameters that can be used to provide short-term forecasts of the ongoing epidemic, as well as to provide gross information on the dynamics of the etiologic agent in the affected population e.g., the time-dependent infection rate. The characterization problem is formulated as a Bayesian inverse problem, and epidemiological parameters are estimated as distributions using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, thus quantifying the uncertainty in the estimates. In some cases, the inverse problem can be computationally expensive, primarily due to the epidemic simulator used inside the inversion algorithm. We present a method, based on replacing the epidemiological model with computationally inexpensive surrogates, that can reduce the computational time to minutes, without a significant loss of accuracy. The surrogates are created by projecting the output of an epidemiological model on a set of polynomial chaos bases; thereafter, computations involving the surrogate model reduce to evaluations of a polynomial. We find that the epidemic characterizations obtained with the surrogate models is very close to that obtained with the original model. We also find that the number of projections required to construct a surrogate model is O(10)-O(10{sup 2}) less than the number of samples required by the MCMC to construct a stationary posterior distribution; thus, depending upon the epidemiological models in question, it may be possible to omit the offline creation and caching of surrogate models, prior to their use in an inverse problem. The technique is demonstrated on synthetic data as well as observations from

  7. Real-time dynamic display of registered 4D cardiac MR and ultrasound images using a GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Huang, X.; Eagleson, R.; Guiraudon, G.; Peters, T. M.

    2007-03-01

    In minimally invasive image-guided surgical interventions, different imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and real-time three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US), can provide complementary, multi-spectral image information. Multimodality dynamic image registration is a well-established approach that permits real-time diagnostic information to be enhanced by placing lower-quality real-time images within a high quality anatomical context. For the guidance of cardiac procedures, it would be valuable to register dynamic MRI or CT with intraoperative US. However, in practice, either the high computational cost prohibits such real-time visualization of volumetric multimodal images in a real-world medical environment, or else the resulting image quality is not satisfactory for accurate guidance during the intervention. Modern graphics processing units (GPUs) provide the programmability, parallelism and increased computational precision to begin to address this problem. In this work, we first outline our research on dynamic 3D cardiac MR and US image acquisition, real-time dual-modality registration and US tracking. Then we describe image processing and optimization techniques for 4D (3D + time) cardiac image real-time rendering. We also present our multimodality 4D medical image visualization engine, which directly runs on a GPU in real-time by exploiting the advantages of the graphics hardware. In addition, techniques such as multiple transfer functions for different imaging modalities, dynamic texture binding, advanced texture sampling and multimodality image compositing are employed to facilitate the real-time display and manipulation of the registered dual-modality dynamic 3D MR and US cardiac datasets.

  8. Real-time Assessment of Flow Reversal in an Eccentric Arterial Stenotic Model

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Lisong; Zhang, Lequan; Dai, Wangde; Hu, Changhong; Shung, K. Kirk; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2010-01-01

    Plaque rupture is the leading cause of acute coronary syndromes and stroke. Plaque formation, or otherwise known as stenosis, preferentially occurs in the regions of arterial bifurcation or curvatures. To date, real-time assessment of stenosis-induced flow reversal remains a clinical challenge. By interfacing Micro-electro-mechanical Systems (MEMS) thermal sensors with the high frequency Pulsed Wave (PW) Doppler ultrasound, we proposed to assess flow reversal in the presence of an eccentric stenosis. We developed a 3-D stenotic model (inner diameter of 6 mm, an eccentric stenosis with a height of 2.75mm and width of 21 mm) simulating a superficial arterial vessel. We demonstrated that heat transfer from the sensing element (2 × 80 μm) to the flow field peaked as a function of flow rates at the throat of the stenosis alone the center/midline of arterial model, and dropped downstream from the stenosis where flow reversal was detected by the high frequency ultrasound device at 45 MHz. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes were in agreement with the ultrasound-acquired flow profiles upstream, downstream, and at the throat of the stenosis. Hence, we characterized regions of eccentric stenosis in terms of changes in heat transfer alone the midline of vessel and identified points of flow reversal with high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:20655537

  9. AL and Dst Predictions with the Real-Time WINDMI Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, L.; Horton, W.; Spencer, E.; Weigel, R.; Vassiliadis, D.; Kozyra, J.

    2006-12-01

    First results are presented of the space weather forecasting capability of the real-time WINDMI model that has been operating since February 2006 as a physics based AL and Dst prediction tool. The well documented WINDMI model is a network of eight coupled ordinary differential equations which describe the transfer of power from the solar wind through the geomagnetic tail, the ionosphere, and ring current in the solar WIND driven Magnetosphere-Ionosphere system. WINDMI includes ring current energization physics from substrom injections and outputs a predicted westward auroral electojet index (AL) and equatorial geomagnetic disturbance storm time index (Dst). At the time of abstract submission (August 2006) real-time WINDMI has captured two storms with the first alarm being sent by email for a moderate -150 nT storm on 14-15 April 2006 and a second -100 nT storm on 19-20 August 2006. During the August 2006 storm period the WINDMI model was a more consistent Dst predictor than the Kyoto WDC Quicklook Dst data which has an incorrect offset of ~-100 nT. Real-time WINDMI uses real-time solar wind data from received from ACE every ten minutes to derive in less than one minute of computational time a predicted AL and Dst and magnetopause standoff distance. Real-time WINDMI predicts the AL index one hour earlier than the data is available from the Kyoto WDC Quicklook website and the Dst index two hours earlier. Every ten minutes real-time AL and Dst data and WINDMI predictions are shown on this website: http://orion.ph.utexas.edu/~windmi/realtime/. The 18 physical parameters of WINDMI are approximated analytically from planetary parameters and optimized within physically allowable ranges using the genetic algorithm. Real-time WINDMI parameters are optimized every hour based on 8 hours of past model/data comparison. In addition to the geomagnetic indices the model predicts the major energy components and power transfers in the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere system. The

  10. Real-time monitoring of cell protrusion dynamics by impedance responses.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Paolo Armando; Puliafito, Alberto; di Blasio, Laura; Chianale, Federica; Somale, Desiana; Seano, Giorgio; Bussolino, Federico; Primo, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Cellular protrusions are highly dynamic structures involved in fundamental processes, including cell migration and invasion. For a cell to migrate, its leading edge must form protrusions, and then adhere or retract. The spatial and temporal coordination of protrusions and retraction is yet to be fully understood. The study of protrusion dynamics mainly relies on live-microscopy often coupled to fluorescent labeling. Here we report the use of an alternative, label-free, quantitative and rapid assay to analyze protrusion dynamics in a cell population based on the real-time recording of cell activity by means of electronic sensors. Cells are seeded on a plate covered with electrodes and their shape changes map into measured impedance variations. Upon growth factor stimulation the impedance increases due to protrusive activity and decreases following retraction. Compared to microscopy-based methods, impedance measurements are suitable to high-throughput studies on different cell lines, growth factors and chemical compounds. We present data indicating that this assay lends itself to dissect the biochemical signaling pathways controlling adhesive protrusions. Indeed, we show that the protrusion phase is sustained by actin polymerization, directly driven by growth factor stimulation. Contraction instead mainly relies on myosin action, pointing at a pivotal role of myosin in lamellipodia retraction. PMID:25976978

  11. Real-Time In Situ Monitoring of Coupled Dynamics in Ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branco, B.; Torgersen, T.; Bean, J.

    2002-05-01

    Shallow (< 2 m) ponds represent an important water quality component of the landscape. The bio- and chemodynamics are coupled to physical processes through diel cycles of thermal stratification and destratification as well as aperiodic precipitation events. Thus, a pond's coupled biological, physical and chemical dynamics and it's time scales of reaction and transport are of the order of minutes to days and requires hourly sampling at a minimum. The MyPond project has developed equipment and techniques to examine these dynamics in real-time through an Internet-based monitoring system that delivers streaming data for use in research and education. The MyPond system is currently being used to monitor the coupled dynamics of Mirror Lake (mean depth ~ 1.2 m) at the Storrs campus of the University of Connecticut. The diel stratification/destratification cycle is monitored using a thermistor array extending from the top of the water column to 10 cm into the sediments. An in-house designed pump profiler system allows high frequency (one sample every 5 minutes) automatic sampling of 6 to 8 sequential depths (one profile every ~ 30 minutes). A programmable microprocessor controls the timing and sequence of the sampling. Pond water is measured in a flow cell with a single YSI multi-parameter sonde for temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, ORP, ammonium, turbidity, fluorescence and specific conductivity for each depth interval The datalogger is remotely queried via UCONN's data network. Graphical displays of the data are created automatically and served as images to the MyPond website. Pond water level and weather data are also provided in real-time. Thermal gradients as high as 0.14 deg C/cm are seen during daylight in summer months with daily `turnover' just before dawn. Strong diurnal patterns and top to bottom differences in e.g. photosynthetic oxygen production and carbon dioxide consumption as well as an ammonium flux from the sediment are clearly visible. It is commonly

  12. Research on transformation and optimization of large scale 3D modeling for real time rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hu; Yang, Yongchao; Zhao, Gang; He, Bin; Shen, Guosheng

    2011-12-01

    During the simulation process of real-time three-dimensional scene, the popular modeling software and the real-time rendering platform are not compatible. The common solution is to create three-dimensional scene model by using modeling software and then transform the format supported by rendering platform. This paper takes digital campus scene simulation as an example, analyzes and solves the problems of surface loss; texture distortion and loss; model flicker and so on during the transformation from 3Ds Max to MultiGen Creator. Besides, it proposes the optimization strategy of model which is transformed. The operation results show that this strategy is a good solution to all kinds of problems existing in transformation and it can speed up the rendering speed of the model.

  13. Real-Time Onboard Global Nonlinear Aerodynamic Modeling from Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Jay M.; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2014-01-01

    Flight test and modeling techniques were developed to accurately identify global nonlinear aerodynamic models onboard an aircraft. The techniques were developed and demonstrated during piloted flight testing of an Aermacchi MB-326M Impala jet aircraft. Advanced piloting techniques and nonlinear modeling techniques based on fuzzy logic and multivariate orthogonal function methods were implemented with efficient onboard calculations and flight operations to achieve real-time maneuver monitoring and analysis, and near-real-time global nonlinear aerodynamic modeling and prediction validation testing in flight. Results demonstrated that global nonlinear aerodynamic models for a large portion of the flight envelope were identified rapidly and accurately using piloted flight test maneuvers during a single flight, with the final identified and validated models available before the aircraft landed.

  14. Applying an integrated neuro-expert system model in a real-time alarm processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosla, Rajiv; Dillon, Tharam S.

    1993-03-01

    In this paper we propose an integrated model which is derived from the combination of a generic neuro-expert system model, an object model, and unix operating system process (UOSP) model. This integrated model reflects the strengths of both artificial neural nets (ANNs) and expert systems (ESs). A formalism of ES object, ANN object, UOSP object, and problem domain object is used for developing a set of generic data structures and methods. These generic data structures and methods help us to build heterogeneous ES-ANN objects with uniform communication interface. The integrated model is applied in a real-time alarm processing system for a non-trivial terminal power station. It is shown how features like hierarchical/distributed ES/ANN objects, inter process communication, and fast concurrent execution help to cope with real-time system constraints like, continuity, data variability, and fast response time.

  15. Functional Fault Modeling Conventions and Practices for Real-Time Fault Isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrell, Bob; Lewis, Mark; Perotti, Jose; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Brown, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the conventions, best practices, and processes that were established based on the prototype development of a Functional Fault Model (FFM) for a Cryogenic System that would be used for real-time Fault Isolation in a Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR) system. The FDIR system is envisioned to perform health management functions for both a launch vehicle and the ground systems that support the vehicle during checkout and launch countdown by using a suite of complimentary software tools that alert operators to anomalies and failures in real-time. The FFMs were created offline but would eventually be used by a real-time reasoner to isolate faults in a Cryogenic System. Through their development and review, a set of modeling conventions and best practices were established. The prototype FFM development also provided a pathfinder for future FFM development processes. This paper documents the rationale and considerations for robust FFMs that can easily be transitioned to a real-time operating environment.

  16. Real-Time Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Coryphaeus Software, founded in 1989 by former NASA electronic engineer Steve Lakowske, creates real-time 3D software. Designer's Workbench, the company flagship product, is a modeling and simulation tool for the development of both static and dynamic 3D databases. Other products soon followed. Activation, specifically designed for game developers, allows developers to play and test the 3D games before they commit to a target platform. Game publishers can shorten development time and prove the "playability" of the title, maximizing their chances of introducing a smash hit. Another product, EasyT, lets users create massive, realistic representation of Earth terrains that can be viewed and traversed in real time. Finally, EasyScene software control the actions among interactive objects within a virtual world. Coryphaeus products are used on Silican Graphics workstation and supercomputers to simulate real-world performance in synthetic environments. Customers include aerospace, aviation, architectural and engineering firms, game developers, and the entertainment industry.

  17. Queueing analysis of a canonical model of real-time multiprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishna, C. M.; Shin, K. G.

    1983-01-01

    A logical classification of multiprocessor structures from the point of view of control applications is presented. A computation of the response time distribution for a canonical model of a real time multiprocessor is presented. The multiprocessor is approximated by a blocking model. Two separate models are derived: one created from the system's point of view, and the other from the point of view of an incoming task.

  18. Real-time performance modelling of a Sustained Attention to Response Task.

    PubMed

    Larue, Grégoire S; Rakotonirainy, Andry; Pettitt, Anthony N

    2010-10-01

    Vigilance declines when exposed to highly predictable and uneventful tasks. Monotonous tasks provide little cognitive and motor stimulation and contribute to human errors. This paper aims to model and detect vigilance decline in real time through participants' reaction times during a monotonous task. A laboratory-based experiment adapting the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) is conducted to quantify the effect of monotony on overall performance. Relevant parameters are then used to build a model detecting hypovigilance throughout the experiment. The accuracy of different mathematical models is compared to detect in real time - minute by minute - the lapses in vigilance during the task. It is shown that monotonous tasks can lead to an average decline in performance of 45%. Furthermore, vigilance modelling enables the detection of vigilance decline through reaction times with an accuracy of 72% and a 29% false alarm rate. Bayesian models are identified as a better model to detect lapses in vigilance as compared with neural networks and generalised linear mixed models. This modelling could be used as a framework to detect vigilance decline of any human performing monotonous tasks. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Existing research on monotony is largely entangled with endogenous factors such as sleep deprivation, fatigue and circadian rhythm. This paper uses a Bayesian model to assess the effects of a monotonous task on vigilance in real time. It is shown that the negative effects of monotony on the ability to sustain attention can be mathematically modelled and predicted in real time using surrogate measures, such as reaction times. This allows the modelling of vigilance fluctuations. PMID:20865604

  19. Real-Time Cognitive Computing Architecture for Data Fusion in a Dynamic Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Tuan A.; Duong, Vu A.

    2012-01-01

    A novel cognitive computing architecture is conceptualized for processing multiple channels of multi-modal sensory data streams simultaneously, and fusing the information in real time to generate intelligent reaction sequences. This unique architecture is capable of assimilating parallel data streams that could be analog, digital, synchronous/asynchronous, and could be programmed to act as a knowledge synthesizer and/or an "intelligent perception" processor. In this architecture, the bio-inspired models of visual pathway and olfactory receptor processing are combined as processing components, to achieve the composite function of "searching for a source of food while avoiding the predator." The architecture is particularly suited for scene analysis from visual data and odorant.

  20. Evaluation of the predictability of real-time crash risk models.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chengcheng; Liu, Pan; Wang, Wei

    2016-09-01

    The primary objective of the present study was to investigate the predictability of crash risk models that were developed using high-resolution real-time traffic data. More specifically the present study sought answers to the following questions: (a) how to evaluate the predictability of a real-time crash risk model; and (b) how to improve the predictability of a real-time crash risk model. The predictability is defined as the crash probability given the crash precursor identified by the crash risk model. An equation was derived based on the Bayes' theorem for estimating approximately the predictability of crash risk models. The estimated predictability was then used to quantitatively evaluate the effects of the threshold of crash precursors, the matched and unmatched case-control design, and the control-to-case ratio on the predictability of crash risk models. It was found that: (a) the predictability of a crash risk model can be measured as the product of prior crash probability and the ratio between sensitivity and false alarm rate; (b) there is a trade-off between the predictability and sensitivity of a real-time crash risk model; (c) for a given level of sensitivity, the predictability of the crash risk model that is developed using the unmatched case-controlled sample is always better than that of the model developed using the matched case-controlled sample; and (d) when the control-to-case ratio is beyond 4:1, the increase in control-to-case ratio does not lead to clear improvements in predictability. PMID:27332063

  1. Model for Correlating Real-Time Survey Results to Contaminant Concentrations - 12183

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Stuart A.

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund program is developing a new Counts Per Minute (CPM) calculator to correlate real-time survey results, which are often expressed as counts per minute, to contaminant concentrations that are more typically provided in risk assessments or for cleanup levels, usually expressed in pCi/g or pCi/m{sup 2}. Currently there is no EPA guidance for Superfund sites on correlating count per minute field survey readings back to risk, dose, or other ARAR based concentrations. The CPM calculator is a web-based model that estimates a gamma detector response for a given level of contamination. The intent of the CPM calculator is to facilitate more real-time measurements within a Superfund response framework. The draft of the CPM calculator is still undergoing internal EPA review. This will be followed by external peer review. It is expected that the CPM calculator will at least be in peer review by the time of WM2012 and possibly finalized at that time. The CPM calculator should facilitate greater use of real-time measurement at Superfund sites. The CPM calculator may also standardize the process of converting lab data to real time measurements. It will thus lessen the amount of lab sampling that is needed for site characterization and confirmation surveys, but it will not remove the need for sampling. (authors)

  2. Real-time deployment of artificial neural network forecasting models: Understanding the range of applicability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Gavin J.; Maier, Holger R.; Dandy, Graeme C.

    2012-10-01

    When an operational artificial neural network (ANN) model is deployed, new input patterns are collected in order to make real-time forecasts. However, ANNs (like other empirical and statistical methods) are unable to reliably extrapolate beyond the calibration range. Consequently, when deployed in real-time operation there is a need to determine if new input patterns are representative of the data used in calibrating the model. To address this problem, a novel detection system for identifying uncharacteristic data patterns is presented. This approach combines a self-organizing map (SOM), to partition the data set, with nonparametric kernel density estimators to calculate local density estimates (LDE). The SOM-LDE method determines the degree to which a new input pattern can be considered to be contained within the domain of the calibration set. If a new pattern is found to be uncharacteristic, a warning can be issued with the forecast, and the ANN model retrained to include the new pattern. This approach of selectively retraining the model is compared to no retraining and the more computationally onerous case of retraining the model after each new sample. These three approaches are applied to forecast flow in the Kentucky River, USA, using multilayer perceptron (MLP) models. The results demonstrate that there is a significant advantage in retraining an ANN that has been deployed as a real-time, operational model, and that the SOM-LDE classifier is an effective approach for identifying the model's range of applicability and assessing the usefulness of the forecast.

  3. Extended Time-lapse Intravital Imaging of Real-time Multicellular Dynamics in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Harney, Allison S.; Wang, Yarong; Condeelis, John S.; Entenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    In the tumor microenvironment, host stromal cells interact with tumor cells to promote tumor progression, angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. Multicellular interactions in the tumor microenvironment can lead to transient events including directional tumor cell motility and vascular permeability. Quantification of tumor vascular permeability has frequently used end-point experiments to measure extravasation of vascular dyes. However, due to the transient nature of multicellular interactions and vascular permeability, the kinetics of these dynamic events cannot be discerned. By labeling cells and vasculature with injectable dyes or fluorescent proteins, high-resolution time-lapse intravital microscopy has allowed the direct, real-time visualization of transient events in the tumor microenvironment. Here we describe a method for using multiphoton microscopy to perform extended intravital imaging in live mice to directly visualize multicellular dynamics in the tumor microenvironment. This method details cellular labeling strategies, the surgical preparation of a mammary skin flap, the administration of injectable dyes or proteins by tail vein catheter and the acquisition of time-lapse images. The time-lapse sequences obtained from this method facilitate the visualization and quantitation of the kinetics of cellular events of motility and vascular permeability in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27341448

  4. Extended Time-lapse Intravital Imaging of Real-time Multicellular Dynamics in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Harney, Allison S; Wang, Yarong; Condeelis, John S; Entenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    In the tumor microenvironment, host stromal cells interact with tumor cells to promote tumor progression, angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. Multicellular interactions in the tumor microenvironment can lead to transient events including directional tumor cell motility and vascular permeability. Quantification of tumor vascular permeability has frequently used end-point experiments to measure extravasation of vascular dyes. However, due to the transient nature of multicellular interactions and vascular permeability, the kinetics of these dynamic events cannot be discerned. By labeling cells and vasculature with injectable dyes or fluorescent proteins, high-resolution time-lapse intravital microscopy has allowed the direct, real-time visualization of transient events in the tumor microenvironment. Here we describe a method for using multiphoton microscopy to perform extended intravital imaging in live mice to directly visualize multicellular dynamics in the tumor microenvironment. This method details cellular labeling strategies, the surgical preparation of a mammary skin flap, the administration of injectable dyes or proteins by tail vein catheter and the acquisition of time-lapse images. The time-lapse sequences obtained from this method facilitate the visualization and quantitation of the kinetics of cellular events of motility and vascular permeability in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27341448

  5. Dynamics formulations for the real-time simulation of constrained motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Frederick A.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Shuttle program has relied heavily on simulation throughout all phases of development and operation. Real-time, man-in-the-loop simulation has served the NASA manned space flight program by providing the means to evaluate systems design and integrated systems performance in a simulated flight environment as well as provide a means to train flight crews. New challenges are presented by the development and operation of a permanently manned space station. The assembly of the space station, the transferral of payloads and the use of the space station manipulator to berth the Orbiter are operations critical to the success of the space station. All these operations are examples of constrained motion among the bodies associated with the Orbiter and space station system. The state of the art of formulating the governing dynamical equations of motion for constrained systems are described. The uses of the two basic problems in multibody dynamics are discussed. The most efficient formulations of the equations of motion are addressed from the point of view of completeness. The issues surrounding incorporating the constraints into the equation of motion are presented.

  6. Real-time intravital microscopy of individual nanoparticle dynamics in liver and tumors of live mice

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Anne L; Kim, Pilhan; Ferrari, Mauro; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is emerging as an important experimental tool for the research and development of multi-functional therapeutic nanoconstructs. The direct visualization of nanoparticle dynamics within live animals provides invaluable insights into the mechanisms that regulate nanotherapeutics transport and cell-particle interactions. Here we present a protocol to image the dynamics of nanoparticles within the liver and tumors of live mice immediately following systemic injection using a high-speed (30-400 fps) confocal or multi-photon laser-scanning fluorescence microscope. Techniques for quantifying the real-time accumulation and cellular association of individual particles with a size ranging from several tens of nanometers to micrometers are described, as well as an experimental strategy for labeling Kupffer cells in the liver in vivo. Experimental design considerations and controls are provided, as well as minimum equipment requirements. The entire protocol takes approximately 4-8 hours and yields quantitative information. These techniques can serve to study a wide range of kinetic parameters that drive nanotherapeutics delivery, uptake, and treatment response. PMID:25383179

  7. Analysis of real-time mixture cytotoxicity data following repeated exposure using BK/TD models.

    PubMed

    Teng, S; Tebby, C; Barcellini-Couget, S; De Sousa, G; Brochot, C; Rahmani, R; Pery, A R R

    2016-08-15

    Cosmetic products generally consist of multiple ingredients. Thus, cosmetic risk assessment has to deal with mixture toxicity on a long-term scale which means it has to be assessed in the context of repeated exposure. Given that animal testing has been banned for cosmetics risk assessment, in vitro assays allowing long-term repeated exposure and adapted for in vitro - in vivo extrapolation need to be developed. However, most in vitro tests only assess short-term effects and consider static endpoints which hinder extrapolation to realistic human exposure scenarios where concentration in target organs is varies over time. Thanks to impedance metrics, real-time cell viability monitoring for repeated exposure has become possible. We recently constructed biokinetic/toxicodynamic models (BK/TD) to analyze such data (Teng et al., 2015) for three hepatotoxic cosmetic ingredients: coumarin, isoeugenol and benzophenone-2. In the present study, we aim to apply these models to analyze the dynamics of mixture impedance data using the concepts of concentration addition and independent action. Metabolic interactions between the mixture components were investigated, characterized and implemented in the models, as they impacted the actual cellular exposure. Indeed, cellular metabolism following mixture exposure induced a quick disappearance of the compounds from the exposure system. We showed that isoeugenol substantially decreased the metabolism of benzophenone-2, reducing the disappearance of this compound and enhancing its in vitro toxicity. Apart from this metabolic interaction, no mixtures showed any interaction, and all binary mixtures were successfully modeled by at least one model based on exposure to the individual compounds. PMID:27317371

  8. Development of a real-time model based safety monitoring algorithm for the SSME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, A. M.; Maram, J.; Coleman, P.; D'Valentine, M.; Steffens, A.

    1992-07-01

    A safety monitoring system for the SSME incorporating a real time model of the engine has been developed for LeRC as a task of the LeRC Life Prediction for Rocket Engines contract, NAS3-25884. This paper describes the development of the algorithm and model to date, their capabilities and limitations, results of simulation tests, lessons learned, and the plans for implementation and test of the system.

  9. Near-real-time regional troposphere models for the GNSS precise point positioning technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadas, T.; Kaplon, J.; Bosy, J.; Sierny, J.; Wilgan, K.

    2013-05-01

    The GNSS precise point positioning (PPP) technique requires high quality product (orbits and clocks) application, since their error directly affects the quality of positioning. For real-time purposes it is possible to utilize ultra-rapid precise orbits and clocks which are disseminated through the Internet. In order to eliminate as many unknown parameters as possible, one may introduce external information on zenith troposphere delay (ZTD). It is desirable that the a priori model is accurate and reliable, especially for real-time application. One of the open problems in GNSS positioning is troposphere delay modelling on the basis of ground meteorological observations. Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformatics of Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences (IGG WUELS) has developed two independent regional troposphere models for the territory of Poland. The first one is estimated in near-real-time regime using GNSS data from a Polish ground-based augmentation system named ASG-EUPOS established by Polish Head Office of Geodesy and Cartography (GUGiK) in 2008. The second one is based on meteorological parameters (temperature, pressure and humidity) gathered from various meteorological networks operating over the area of Poland and surrounding countries. This paper describes the methodology of both model calculation and verification. It also presents results of applying various ZTD models into kinematic PPP in the post-processing mode using Bernese GPS Software. Positioning results were used to assess the quality of the developed models during changing weather conditions. Finally, the impact of model application to simulated real-time PPP on precision, accuracy and convergence time is discussed.

  10. Design of a complex terrain meteorological monitoring program for real-time air quality modeling analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Militana, L.M.; Karpovich, R.; Cimorelli, A.; Scire, J.S.

    1998-12-31

    A multi-station meteorological monitoring program has been designed and developed for a complex terrain air quality modeling study. The purpose of the program is to collect representative on site data as input to complex terrain air quality models and to predict in real-time the potential air quality impact of a rotary kiln incinerator The program is a state-of the science design using the best science air quality dispersion models (CALMET/CALPUFF) and meteorological monitoring equipment (RASS/SODAR Systems monostatic and phased array and multiple towers). The real-time meteorological monitoring program consisted of two monitoring stations using meteorological towers and Doppler SODAR and phased array RASS systems to determine the temperature and wind profile of the atmospheric boundary layer. The primary station were located adjacent to the site and consisted of a 150 ft meteorological tower and RASS/SODAR system. The secondary station was located approximately 1,600 meters northeast of the site and consisted of a 10 meter tower and a SODAR system. These monitoring stations provided 15-minute values of wind speed, wind direction, ambient temperature, and thermal and mechanical turbulence measurements for use in a complex terrain air quality modeling study and a real-time modeling system.

  11. Evolution of titanium arc weldment macro and microstructures -- Modeling and real time mapping of phases

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z.; Elmer, J.W.; Wong, J.; Debroy, T.

    2000-04-01

    Macro and microstructural features in gas tungsten arc (GTA) welded titanium were modeled for the first time based on a combination of transport phenomena and phase transformation theory. A transient, three-dimensional, turbulent heat transfer and fluid flow model was developed to calculate the temperature and velocity fields, thermal cycles, and the shape and size of the fusion zone. The kinetics of the {alpha}{r_arrow}{beta} allotropic transformation during continuous heating and the corresponding ({alpha}+{beta})/{beta} phase boundary were calculated using a modified Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation and the calculated thermal cycles. The modeling results were compared with the real-time phase mapping data obtained using a unique spatially resolved X-ray diffraction technique with synchrotron radiation. The real-time evolution of grain structure within the entire weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) was modeled in three dimensions using a Monte Carlo technique. The following are the major findings. First, the rates of heat transfer and fluid flow in the titanium weld pool during gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) are significantly enhanced by turbulence, and previous calculations of laminar fluid flow and heat transfer in arc-melted pools need to be re-examined. The fusion zone geometry, and the {alpha}/({alpha}+{beta})/{beta} phase boundaries in the HAZ could be satisfactorily predicted. Second, comparison of real-time {alpha}{r_arrow}{beta} transformation kinetics with the rates computed assuming various alternative reaction mechanisms indicates the transition was most likely controlled by the transport of Ti atoms across the {alpha}/{beta} interface. Third, comparison of the experimental data with the simulated results indicates the real-time evolution of the grain structure around the weld pool could be simulated by the Monte Carlo technique. Finally, the insight developed in this research could not have been achieved without concomitant modeling and experiments.

  12. Formal Verification of a Power Controller Using the Real-Time Model Checker UPPAAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Skou, Arne

    1999-01-01

    A real-time system for power-down control in audio/video components is modeled and verified using the real-time model checker UPPAAL. The system is supposed to reside in an audio/video component and control (read from and write to) links to neighbor audio/video components such as TV, VCR and remote-control. In particular, the system is responsible for the powering up and down of the component in between the arrival of data, and in order to do so in a safe way without loss of data, it is essential that no link interrupts are lost. Hence, a component system is a multitasking system with hard real-time requirements, and we present techniques for modeling time consumption in such a multitasked, prioritized system. The work has been carried out in a collaboration between Aalborg University and the audio/video company B&O. By modeling the system, 3 design errors were identified and corrected, and the following verification confirmed the validity of the design but also revealed the necessity for an upper limit of the interrupt frequency. The resulting design has been implemented and it is going to be incorporated as part of a new product line.

  13. Real-time dynamics of RNA Polymerase II clustering in live human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisse, Ibrahim

    2014-03-01

    Transcription is the first step in the central dogma of molecular biology, when genetic information encoded on DNA is made into messenger RNA. How this fundamental process occurs within living cells (in vivo) is poorly understood,[1] despite extensive biochemical characterizations with isolated biomolecules (in vitro). For high-order organisms, like humans, transcription is reported to be spatially compartmentalized in nuclear foci consisting of clusters of RNA Polymerase II, the enzyme responsible for synthesizing all messenger RNAs. However, little is known of when these foci assemble or their relative stability. We developed an approach based on photo-activation localization microscopy (PALM) combined with a temporal correlation analysis, which we refer to as tcPALM. The tcPALM method enables the real-time characterization of biomolecular spatiotemporal organization, with single-molecule sensitivity, directly in living cells.[2] Using tcPALM, we observed that RNA Polymerase II clusters form transiently, with an average lifetime of 5.1 (+/- 0.4) seconds. Stimuli affecting transcription regulation yielded orders of magnitude changes in the dynamics of the polymerase clusters, implying that clustering is regulated and plays a role in the cells ability to effect rapid response to external signals. Our results suggest that the transient crowding of enzymes may aid in rate-limiting steps of genome regulation.

  14. Real-time monitoring of molecular dynamics of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate glass former.

    PubMed

    Viciosa, M T; Correia, N T; Salmerón Sanchez, M; Carvalho, A L; Romão, M J; Gómez Ribelles, J L; Dionísio, M

    2009-10-29

    The isothermal cold-crystallization of the glass-former low-molecular-weight compound, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA), was monitored by real-time dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (DRS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The alpha-relaxation associated with the dynamic glass transition as detected by DRS was followed at different crystallization temperatures, T(cr), nearly above the glass transition temperature, 176 K (1.06 < or = T(cr)/T(g) < or = 1.12). It was found that the alpha-process depletes upon cold-crystallization with no significant changes in either shape or location. At advanced crystallization states, a new relaxation, alpha'-process, evolves that was assigned to the mobility of molecules lying adjacent to crystalline surfaces. From the time evolution of the normalized permittivity, it was possible to get kinetic information that was complemented with the calorimetric data. From DSC measurements that were also carried out under melt-crystallization, an enlarged temperature range was covered (up to T(cr)/T(g) = 1.24), allowing us to draw a diagram of time-temperature crystallization for this system. Dielectric relaxation spectroscopy proved to be a sensitive tool to probe the mobility in the remaining amorphous regions even at high crystallinities. PMID:19803485

  15. Real-Time TD-DFT with Classical Ion Dynamics: Methodology and Applications.

    PubMed

    Kolesov, Grigory; Grånäs, Oscar; Hoyt, Robert; Vinichenko, Dmitry; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2016-02-01

    We present a method for real-time propagation of electronic wave functions, within time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT), coupled to ionic motion through mean-field classical dynamics. The goal of our method is to treat large systems and complex processes, in particular photocatalytic reactions and electron transfer events on surfaces and thin films. Due to the complexity of these processes, computational approaches are needed to provide insight into the underlying physical mechanisms and are therefore crucial for the rational design of new materials. Because of the short time step required for electron propagation (of order ∼10 attoseconds), these simulations are computationally very demanding. Our methodology is based on numerical atomic-orbital-basis sets for computational efficiency. In the computational package, to which we refer as TDAP-2.0 (Time-evolving Deterministic Atom Propagator), we have implemented a number of important features and analysis tools for more accurate and efficient treatment of large, complex systems and time scales that reach into a fraction of a picosecond. We showcase the capabilities of our method using four different examples: (i) photodissociation into radicals of opposite spin, (ii) hydrogen adsorption on aluminum surfaces, (iii) optical absorption of spin-polarized organic molecule containing a metal ion, and (iv) electron transfer in a prototypical dye-sensitized solar cell. PMID:26680129

  16. Vocal tract in female registers--a dynamic real-time MRI study.

    PubMed

    Echternach, Matthias; Sundberg, Johan; Arndt, Susan; Markl, Michael; Schumacher, Martin; Richter, Bernhard

    2010-03-01

    The area of vocal registers is still unclarified. In a previous investigation, dynamic real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is able to produce up to 10 frames per second, was successfully applied for examinations of vocal tract modifications in register transitions in male singers. In the present study, the same MRI technique was used to study vocal tract shapes during four professional young sopranos' lower and upper register transitions. The subjects were asked to sing a scale on the vowel /a/ across their transitions. The transitions were acoustically identified by four raters. In neither of these transitions, clear vocal tract changes could be ascertained. However, substantial changes, that is, widening of the lips, opening of the jaw, elevation of the tongue dorsum, and continuous widening of the pharynx, were observed when the singers reached fundamental frequencies that were close to the frequency of the first formant of the vowel sung. These findings suggest that in these subjects register transition was not primarily the result of modifications of the vocal tract. PMID:19185452

  17. Model compilation for real-time planning and diagnosis with feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes MEXEC, an implemented micro executive that compiles a device model that can have feedback into a structure for subsequent evaluation. This system computes both the most likely current device mode from n sets of sensor measurements and the n-1 step reconfiguration plan that is most likely to result in reaching a target mode - if such a plan exists. A user tunes the system by increasing n to improve system capability at the cost of real-time performance.

  18. Real-time modeling of transverse emittance growth due to ground motion

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.D.; Parkhomchuk, V.V. |

    1993-09-01

    Ground motion noise at frequencies around 1 kHz causes growth of transverse emittance of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) collider beams. The effect was quantitatively investigated using real-time signals from seismometers installed at the tunnel depth and on the surface. The SSC beam was modeled as an ensemble of oscillators with a spread of betatron frequencies. The effect of transverse feedback on emittance growth was investigated.

  19. Real-Time Robust Adaptive Modeling and Scheduling for an Electronic Commerce Server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Bing; Ruan, Chun

    With the increasing importance and pervasiveness of Internet services, it is becoming a challenge for the proliferation of electronic commerce services to provide performance guarantees under extreme overload. This paper describes a real-time optimization modeling and scheduling approach for performance guarantee of electronic commerce servers. We show that an electronic commerce server may be simulated as a multi-tank system. A robust adaptive server model is subject to unknown additive load disturbances and uncertain model matching. Overload control techniques are based on adaptive admission control to achieve timing guarantees. We evaluate the performance of the model using a complex simulation that is subjected to varying model parameters and massive overload.

  20. Computational Modeling and Real-Time Control of Patient-Specific Laser Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, D.; Oden, J. T.; Diller, K. R.; Hazle, J. D.; Elliott, A.; Shetty, A.; Stafford, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    An adaptive feedback control system is presented which employs a computational model of bioheat transfer in living tissue to guide, in real-time, laser treatments of prostate cancer monitored by magnetic resonance thermal imaging (MRTI). The system is built on what can be referred to as cyberinfrastructure - a complex structure of high-speed network, large-scale parallel computing devices, laser optics, imaging, visualizations, inverse-analysis algorithms, mesh generation, and control systems that guide laser therapy to optimally control the ablation of cancerous tissue. The computational system has been successfully tested on in-vivo, canine prostate. Over the course of an 18 minute laser induced thermal therapy (LITT) performed at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) in Houston, Texas, the computational models were calibrated to intra-operative real time thermal imaging treatment data and the calibrated models controlled the bioheat transfer to within 5°C of the predetermined treatment plan. The computational arena is in Austin, Texas and managed at the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES). The system is designed to control the bioheat transfer remotely while simultaneously providing real-time remote visualization of the on-going treatment. Post operative histology of the canine prostate reveal that the damage region was within the targeted 1.2cm diameter treatment objective. PMID:19148754

  1. Application of a prognostic model validation system to real-time dispersion modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, J C

    1999-10-18

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory uses the U.S. Navy's Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) to supply high-resolution wind data for use in its real-time dispersion modeling system. ARAC has used COAMPS products to support several events and exercises, and COAMPS forecasts appear accurate, based on qualitative examination. Recently ARAC has developed a quantitative verification system which calculates COAMPS error and bias statistics, comparing COAMPS forecasts of various lengths with observational data. This paper shows how this system has been used to guide ARAC operators, who need an estimate of the likely behavior of COAMPS forecasts of various lengths in different regions, seasons, and weather patterns.

  2. Parsimonious model development for real-time monitoring of moisture in red meat using hyperspectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Kamruzzaman, Mohammed; Makino, Yoshio; Oshita, Seiichi

    2016-04-01

    A hyperspectral imaging system in the spectral range of 400-1000 nm was investigated to develop a multispectral real-time imaging system allowing the meat industry to determine moisture content in red meat including beef, lamb, and pork. Multivariate calibration models were developed using partial least-squares regression (PLSR) and least-squares support vector machines (LS-SVM) in the full spectral range. Instead of selection of different sets of feature wavelengths for beef, lamb, and pork, a set of 10 feature wavelengths was selected for convenient industrial application for the determination of moisture content in red meat. A quantitative linear function was then established using MLR based on these key feature wavelengths for predicting moisture content of red meat in an online system and creating moisture distribution maps. The results reveal that the combination of hyperspectral imaging and multivariate has great potential in the meat industry for real-time determination of moisture content. PMID:26593592

  3. A real-time infrared imaging simulation method with physical effects modeling of infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ni; Huai, Wenqing; Wang, Shaodan; Ren, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Infrared imaging simulation technology can provide infrared data sources for the development, improvement and evaluation of infrared imaging systems under different environment, status and weather conditions, which is reusable and more economic than physical experiments. A real-time infrared imaging simulation process is established to reproduce a complete physical imaging process. Our emphasis is put on the modeling of infrared sensors, involving physical effects of both spatial domain and frequency domain. An improved image convolution method is proposed based on GPU parallel processing to enhance the real-time simulation ability with ensuring its simulation accuracy at the same time. Finally the effectiveness of the above methods is validated by simulation analysis and result comparison.

  4. Data modeling augmentation of JPEG for real-time streaming video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaenisch, Holger M.; Handley, James W.

    2005-05-01

    This paper explores sub-sampling in conjunction with JPEG compression algorithms. Rather than directly compressing large high-resolution images, we propose decimation to thumbnails followed by compression. This enables Redundant Array of Independent Disks (RAID) compression and facilitates real-time streaming video with small bandwidth requirements. Image reconstruction occurs on demand at the receiver to any resolution required using Data Modeling based fractal interpolation. The receive side first uncompresses JPEG and then fractal interpolates to any required resolution. This device independent resolution capability is useful for real-time sharing of image data across virtual networks where each node has a different innate resolution capability. The same image is constructed to whatever limitations exist at each individual node, keeping image data device independent and image resolution scalable up or down as hardware/bandwidth limitations and options evolve.

  5. Real Time Optima Tracking Using Harvesting Models of the Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baskaran, Subbiah; Noever, D.

    1999-01-01

    Tracking optima in real time propulsion control, particularly for non-stationary optimization problems is a challenging task. Several approaches have been put forward for such a study including the numerical method called the genetic algorithm. In brief, this approach is built upon Darwinian-style competition between numerical alternatives displayed in the form of binary strings, or by analogy to 'pseudogenes'. Breeding of improved solution is an often cited parallel to natural selection in.evolutionary or soft computing. In this report we present our results of applying a novel model of a genetic algorithm for tracking optima in propulsion engineering and in real time control. We specialize the algorithm to mission profiling and planning optimizations, both to select reduced propulsion needs through trajectory planning and to explore time or fuel conservation strategies.

  6. Functional Fault Modeling of a Cryogenic System for Real-Time Fault Detection and Isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrell, Bob; Lewis, Mark; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Perotti, Jose

    2009-01-01

    When setting out to model and/or simulate a complex mechanical or electrical system, a modeler is faced with a vast array of tools, software, equations, algorithms and techniques that may individually or in concert aid in the development of the model. Mature requirements and a well understood purpose for the model may considerably shrink the field of possible tools and algorithms that will suit the modeling solution. Is the model intended to be used in an offline fashion or in real-time? On what platform does it need to execute? How long will the model be allowed to run before it outputs the desired parameters? What resolution is desired? Do the parameters need to be qualitative or quantitative? Is it more important to capture the physics or the function of the system in the model? Does the model need to produce simulated data? All these questions and more will drive the selection of the appropriate tools and algorithms, but the modeler must be diligent to bear in mind the final application throughout the modeling process to ensure the model meets its requirements without needless iterations of the design. The purpose of this paper is to describe the considerations and techniques used in the process of creating a functional fault model of a liquid hydrogen (LH2) system that will be used in a real-time environment to automatically detect and isolate failures.

  7. Logic Model Checking of Time-Periodic Real-Time Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florian, Mihai; Gamble, Ed; Holzmann, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report on the work we performed to extend the logic model checker SPIN with built-in support for the verification of periodic, real-time embedded software systems, as commonly used in aircraft, automobiles, and spacecraft. We first extended the SPIN verification algorithms to model priority based scheduling policies. Next, we added a library to support the modeling of periodic tasks. This library was used in a recent application of the SPIN model checker to verify the engine control software of an automobile, to study the feasibility of software triggers for unintended acceleration events.

  8. Near Real{time Data Assimilation for the HYSPLIT Aerosol Dispersion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalpakis, K.; Yang, S.; Yesha, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Konstantinos Kalpakis, Shiming Yang, and Yaacov Yesha Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering University of Maryland Baltimore County 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD, U.S.A. {kalpakis, shiming1, yayeshag}@csee.umbc.edu ABSTRACT We are working on an IBM-funded project seeking to develop a prototype system for real-time plume dispersion and fire and smoke detection and monitoring. Our prototype system utilizes HYSPLIT and observation data from various sources. HYSPLIT is a model developed by NOAA's Air Resources Laboratory for forecasting aerosol trajectories, dispersion, and concentration from emission sources. It is used extensively by NOAA to routinely provide a number of data products. We develop a data assimilation system for assimilating observational data into the forecasting model in order to improve its forecasting accuracy. Our system is based on the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (LETKF) algorithm and it is computationally efficient. We evaluate our data assimilation system with real in-situ observational data, and find that our system improves upon HYSPLIT's forecast by reducing the normalized mean squared error and the bias. We are also experimenting with assimilating MODIS data with HYSPLIT model forecasts. To this end, we extrapolate ground concentrations from MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) data. Our extrapolation approach relies on spatially localized linear regressions of aerosol concentrations from ground stations in the Air Quality System (AQS) network and MODIS AOD data. We expect that assimilating the extrapolated concentrations leads into further improvements of HYSPLIT forecasts. Furthermore, we are investigating using additional sources of in-situ and remotely sensed observations, such as GOES AOD 30-minute data, and UAV data from the Ikhana AMS fire missions. These sources provide higher spatial resolution and more frequent temporal coverage. Moreover, GOES and UAVs provide near-real time data which should be

  9. Platform for Real-Time Simulation of Dynamic Systems and Hardware-in-the-Loop for Control Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Isaac D. T.; Silva, Sergio N.; Teles, Rafael M.; Fernandes, Marcelo A. C.

    2014-01-01

    The development of new embedded algorithms for automation and control of industrial equipment usually requires the use of real-time testing. However, the equipment required is often expensive, which means that such tests are often not viable. The objective of this work was therefore to develop an embedded platform for the distributed real-time simulation of dynamic systems. This platform, called the Real-Time Simulator for Dynamic Systems (RTSDS), could be applied in both industrial and academic environments. In industrial applications, the RTSDS could be used to optimize embedded control algorithms. In the academic sphere, it could be used to support research into new embedded solutions for automation and control and could also be used as a tool to assist in undergraduate and postgraduate teaching related to the development of projects concerning on-board control systems. PMID:25320906

  10. Platform for real-time simulation of dynamic systems and hardware-in-the-loop for control algorithms.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Isaac D T; Silva, Sergio N; Teles, Rafael M; Fernandes, Marcelo A C

    2014-01-01

    The development of new embedded algorithms for automation and control of industrial equipment usually requires the use of real-time testing. However, the equipment required is often expensive, which means that such tests are often not viable. The objective of this work was therefore to develop an embedded platform for the distributed real-time simulation of dynamic systems. This platform, called the Real-Time Simulator for Dynamic Systems (RTSDS), could be applied in both industrial and academic environments. In industrial applications, the RTSDS could be used to optimize embedded control algorithms. In the academic sphere, it could be used to support research into new embedded solutions for automation and control and could also be used as a tool to assist in undergraduate and postgraduate teaching related to the development of projects concerning on-board control systems. PMID:25320906

  11. [Research progress on real-time deformable models of soft tissues for surgery simulation].

    PubMed

    Xu, Shaoping; Liu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Hua; Luo, Jie

    2010-04-01

    Biological tissues generally exhibit nonlinearity, anisotropy, quasi-incompressibility and viscoelasticity about material properties. Simulating the behaviour of elastic objects in real time is one of the current objectives of virtual surgery simulation which is still a challenge for researchers to accurately depict the behaviour of human tissues. In this paper, we present a classification of the different deformable models that have been developed. We present the advantages and disadvantages of each one. Finally, we make a comparison of deformable models and perform an evaluation of the state of the art and the future of deformable models. PMID:20481334

  12. Holographic interferometry applied to real-time dynamic modal analysis of an advanced exotic metal alloy airfoil structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fein, Howard

    1999-07-01

    Holographic Interferometry has been successfully employed to characterize the materials and behavior of diverse types of structures under stress. Specialized variations of this technology have also been applied to define dynamic and vibration related structural behavior. Such applications of holographic technique offer some of the most effective methods of modal and dynamic analysis available. Real-time dynamic testing of the structural behavior of aerodynamic control and airfoil structures for advanced aircraft and missile systems has traditionally required advanced instrumentation for data collection in either actual flight test or wind-tunnel simulations. Advanced optical holography techniques are alternate methods which result in full-field behavioral data on the ground in a nondestructive hardware- in-the-loop environment. These methods offer significant insight in both the development and subsequent operational test and modeling of advanced control and airfoil structures and their integration with total vehicle system dynamics. Aerodynamic control structures and components can be analyzed in place with very low amplitude excitation and the resultant data can be used to adjust the accuracy of mathematically derived structural and behavioral models as well actual performance.

  13. Real-time dynamics and control strategies for space operations of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alvin, K. F.; Alexander, S.

    1993-01-01

    This project (NAG9-574) was meant to be a three-year research project. However, due to NASA's reorganizations during 1992, the project was funded only for one year. Accordingly, every effort was made to make the present final report as if the project was meant to be for one-year duration. Originally, during the first year we were planning to accomplish the following: we were to start with a three dimensional flexible manipulator beam with articulated joints and with a linear control-based controller applied at the joints; using this simple example, we were to design the software systems requirements for real-time processing, introduce the streamlining of various computational algorithms, perform the necessary reorganization of the partitioned simulation procedures, and assess the potential speed-up realization of the solution process by parallel computations. The three reports included as part of the final report address: the streamlining of various computational algorithms; the necessary reorganization of the partitioned simulation procedures, in particular the observer models; and an initial attempt of reconfiguring the flexible space structures.

  14. Quantitative detection of Vibrio cholera toxin by real-time and dynamic cytotoxicity monitoring.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dazhi; Luo, Yun; Zheng, Min; Li, Haijing; Zhang, Jing; Stampfl, Melinda; Xu, Xiao; Ding, Gangqiang; Zhang, Yanjun; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2013-12-01

    We report here the quantitative detection of Vibrio cholerae toxin (CT) in isolates and stool specimens by dynamic monitoring of the full course of CT-mediated cytotoxicity in a real-time cell analysis (RTCA) system. Four cell lines, including Y-1 mouse adrenal tumor cells, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, small intestine epithelial (FHs74Int) cells, and mouse adrenal gland (PC12-Adh) cells, were evaluated for their suitability for CT-induced cytotoxicity testing. Among them, the Y-1 line was demonstrated to be the most sensitive for CT-mediated cytotoxicity, with limits of detection of 7.0 pg/ml for purified CT and 0.11 ng/ml for spiked CT in pooled negative stool specimens. No CT-mediated cytotoxicity was observed for nontoxigenic V. cholerae, non-V. cholerae species, or non-V. cholerae enterotoxins. The CT-RTCA assay was further validated with 100 stool specimens consecutively collected from patients with diarrhea and 200 V. cholerae isolates recovered from patients and the environment, in comparison to a reference using three detection methods. The CT-RTCA assay had sensitivities and specificities of 97.5% and 100.0%, respectively, for V. cholerae isolates and 90.0% and 97.2% for stool specimens. For stool specimens spiked with CT concentrations ranging from 3.5 pg/ml to 1.8 ng/ml, the inoculation-to-detection time was 1.12 ± 0.38 h, and the values were inversely correlated with CT concentrations (ρ = -1; P = 0.01). The results indicate that the CT-RTCA assay with the Y-1 cell line provides a rapid and sensitive tool for the quantitative detection of CT activities in clinical specimens. PMID:24048535

  15. Unattended real-time re-establishment of visibility in high dynamic range video and stills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidi, B.

    2014-05-01

    We describe a portable unattended persistent surveillance system that corrects for harsh illumination conditions, where bright sun light creates mixed contrast effects, i.e., heavy shadows and washouts. These effects result in high dynamic range scenes, where illuminance can vary from few luxes to a 6 figure value. When using regular monitors and cameras, such wide span of illuminations can only be visualized if the actual range of values is compressed, leading to the creation of saturated and/or dark noisy areas and a loss of information in these areas. Images containing extreme mixed contrast cannot be fully enhanced from a single exposure, simply because all information is not present in the original data. The active intervention in the acquisition process is required. A software package, capable of integrating multiple types of COTS and custom cameras, ranging from Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) data links to digital single-lens reflex cameras (DSLR), is described. Hardware and software are integrated via a novel smart data acquisition algorithm, which communicates to the camera the parameters that would maximize information content in the final processed scene. A fusion mechanism is then applied to the smartly acquired data, resulting in an enhanced scene where information in both dark and bright areas is revealed. Multi-threading and parallel processing are exploited to produce automatic real time full motion corrected video. A novel enhancement algorithm was also devised to process data from legacy and non-controllable cameras. The software accepts and processes pre-recorded sequences and stills, enhances visible, night vision, and Infrared data, and successfully applies to night time and dark scenes. Various user options are available, integrating custom functionalities of the application into intuitive and easy to use graphical interfaces. The ensuing increase in visibility in surveillance video and intelligence imagery will expand the performance and

  16. Real-time measurements to characterize dynamics of emulsion interface during simulated intestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuanjie; Nitin, N

    2016-05-01

    Efficient delivery of bioactives remains a critical challenge due to their limited bioavailability and solubility. While many encapsulation systems are designed to modulate the digestion and release of bioactives within the human gastrointestinal tract, there is limited understanding of how engineered structures influence the delivery of bioactives. The objective of this study was to develop a real-time quantitative method to measure structural changes in emulsion interface during simulated intestinal digestion and to correlate these changes with the release of free fatty acids (FFAs). Fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) was used for rapid in-situ measurement of the structural changes in emulsion interface during simulated intestinal digestion. By using FRET, changes in the intermolecular spacing between the two different fluorescent probes labeled emulsifier were characterized. Changes in FRET measurements were compared with the release of FFAs. The results showed that bile salts and pancreatic lipase interacted immediately with the emulsion droplets and disrupted the emulsion interface as evidenced by reduction in FRET efficacy compared to the control. Similarly, a significant amount of FFAs was released during digestion. Moreover, addition of a second layer of polymers at emulsion interface decreased the extent of interface disruption by bile salts and pancreatic lipase and impacted the amount or rate of FFA release during digestion. These results were consistent with the lower donor/acceptor ratio of the labeled probes from the FRET result. Overall, this study provides a novel approach to analyze the dynamics of emulsion interface during digestion and their relationship with the release of FFAs. PMID:26854582

  17. The Real-Time Dynamic Monitoring of microRNA Function in Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zihao; Sun, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Background Although many studies have confirmed a relationship between microRNAs (miRNAs) and cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), the real-time dynamics of miRNA function have not been examined. Methods miRNA reporter constructs were generated using a recombinant adeno-associated virus vector, which contained complementary sequences for six miRNAs (miR-200a, miR-200b, miR-21, miR-146a, miR-155, and miR-221), along with two independent expression cassettes encoding the fluorescent reporter genes Fluc and Gluc. The spatio-temporal function of each miRNA was monitored both in CCA and control tissues. Results All miRNAs participated in CCA development, with distinct patterns of expression over time. The activity of miR-21 was significantly lower in female T3N0M0 CCA tissue relative to controls at three time points, yet was higher in two male T3N1M0 CCA tissues. The difference in miR-200b function between two male T3N1M0 CCA tissues and their corresponding controls peaked at 24 h, while function in a female T3N0M0 CCA was detected only at 72 h. The four remaining miRNAs (miR-200a, miR146a, miR-155, and miR-221) displayed patient-specific activity patterns in both CCA and control tissues. Conclusion Significant variability was observed in the temporal function of all six miRNAs, which may play an important role in the development of CCA. PMID:24918778

  18. Real-time forecasting urban drainage models: full or simplified networks?

    PubMed

    Leitão, J P; Simões, N E; Maksimović, C; Ferreira, F; Prodanović, D; Matos, J S; Sá Marques, A

    2010-01-01

    Lead time between rainfall prediction results and flood prediction results obtained by hydraulic simulations is one of the crucial factors in the implementation of real-time flood forecasting systems. Therefore, hydraulic simulation times must be as short as possible, with sufficient spatial and temporal flood distribution modelling accuracy. One of the ways to reduce the time required to run hydraulic model simulations is increasing computational speed by simplifying the model networks. This simplification can be conducted by removing and changing some secondary elements using network simplification techniques. The emphasis of this paper is to assess how the level of urban drainage network simplification influences the computational time and overall simulation results' accuracy. The models used in this paper comprise a sewer network and an overland flow drainage system in both 1D/1D and 1D/2D approaches. The 1D/1D model is used as the reference model to generate several models with different levels of simplifications. The results presented in this paper suggest that the 1D/2D models are not yet suitable to be used in real-time flood prediction applications due to long simulation time, while on the other hand, the simplified 1D/1D models show that considerable reductions in simulation time can be achieved without compromising simulation results (flow and water depth) accuracy. PMID:21045338

  19. OneRTM: an online real-time modelling platform for the next generation of numerical environmental modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Kingdon, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Numerical modelling has been applied in many fields to better understand and predict the behaviours of different processes. In our increasingly dynamic world there is an imperative to identify potential stresses and threats in the environment and to respond quickly with sound decisions. However, the limitations in traditional modelling methodologies make it difficult to respond quickly to rapidly developing environmental events, such as floods, droughts and pollution incidents. For example, it is both time consuming and costly to keep model data up-to-date and also to disseminate models results and modelled output datasets to end-users. Crucially it is difficult for people who has limited numerical modelling skills to understand and interact with models and modelled results. In response to these challenges, a proof-of-concept online real-time modelling platform (OneRTM) has been developed as a mechanism for maintaining and disseminating numerical models and datasets. This automatically keeps models current for the most recent input data, links models based on data flow; it makes models and modelled datasets (historic, real-time and forecasted) immediately available via the internet as easy-to-understand dynamic GIS layers and graphs; and it provides online modelling functions to allow non-modellers to manipulate model including running pre-defined scenarios with a few mouse clicks. OneRTM has been successfully applied and tested in the Chalk groundwater flow modelling in the Thames Basin, UK. The system hosts and links groundwater recharge and groundwater flow models in the case study area, and automatically publishes the latest groundwater level layers on the internet once the current weather datasets becomes available. It also provides online functions of generating groundwater hydrograph and running groundwater abstraction scenarios. Although OneRTM is currently tested using groundwater flow modelling as an example, it could be further developed into a platform

  20. Building Cyberinfrastructure to Support a Real-time National Flood Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, F. R.; Maidment, D. R.; Tolle, K.; Navarro, C.; David, C. H.; Corby, R.

    2014-12-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS) is divided into 13 regional forecast centers across the country where the Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting (SAC-SMA) model is run on average over a 10 day period, 5 days in the past and 5 days in the future. Model inputs and outputs such as precipitation and surface runoff are spatially aggregated over approximately 6,600 forecast basins with an average area of 1,200 square kilometers. In contrast, the NHDPlus dataset, which represents the geospatial fabric of the country, defines over 3 million catchments with an average area of 3 square kilometers. Downscaling the NWS land surface model outputs to the NHDPlus catchment scale in real-time requires the development of cyberinfrastructure to manage, share, compute and visualize large quantities of hydrologic data; streamflow computations through time for over 3 million river reaches. Between September 2014 and May 2015, the National Flood Interoperability Experiment (NFIE), coordinated through the Integrated Water Resource Science and Services (IWRSS) partners, will focus on building a national flood model for the country. This experiment will work to seamlessly integrate data and model services available on local and cloud servers (e.g. Azure) through disparate data sources operating at various spatial and temporal scales. As such, this paper will present a scalable information model that leverages the Routing Application for Parallel Computation of Discharge (RAPID) model to produce real-time flow estimates for approximately 67,000 NHDPlus river reaches in the NWS West Gulf River Forecast Center region.

  1. The Ionosphere Real-Time Assimilative Model, IRTAM - A Status Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, Bodo; Galkin, Ivan; Huang, Xueqin; Vesnin, Artem; Bilitza, Dieter

    2014-05-01

    Ionospheric models are generally unable to correctly predict the effects of space weather events on the ionosphere. Taking advantage of today's real-time availability of measured electron density profiles of the bottomside ionosphere, we have developed a technique "IRTAM" to specify real-time foF2 and hmF2 global maps. The measured data arrive at the Lowell GIRO Data Center (LGDC) from some ~70 ionosonde stations of the Global Ionosphere Radio Observatory (GIRO) [Reinisch and Galkin, 2011], usually at a 15 min cadence, and are ingested in LGDC's databases (http://ulcar.uml.edu/DIDBase/). We use the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) electron density model [Bilitza et al., 2011] as the background model. It is an empirical monthly median model that critically depends on the correct values of the F2 layer peak height hmF2 and density NmF2 (or critical frequency foF2). The IRI model uses the so-called CCIR (or URSI) coefficients for the specification of the median foF2 and hmF2 maps. IRTAM assimilates the measured GIRO data in IRI by "adjusting" the CCIR coefficients on-the-fly. The updated maps of foF2 and hmF2 for the last 24 hours before now-time are continuously displayed on http://giro.uml.edu/RTAM [Galkin et al., 2012]. The "adjusted" bottomside profiles can be extended to the topside by using the new Vary-Chap topside profile model [Nsumei et al., 2012] which extends the profile from hmF2 to the plasmasphere. References Bilitza D., L.-A. McKinnell, B. Reinisch, and T. Fuller-Rowell (2011), The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) today and in the future, J. Geodesy, 85:909-920, DOI 10.1007/s00190-010-0427-x Galkin, I. A., B. W. Reinisch, X. Huang, and D. Bilitza (2012), Assimilation of GIRO Data into a Real-Time IRI, Radio Sci., 47, RS0L07, doi:10.1029/2011RS004952. Nsumei, P., B. W. Reinisch, X. Huang, and D. Bilitza (2012), New Vary-Chap profile of the topside ionosphere electron density distribution for use with the IRI Model and the GIRO real time

  2. Real-time visualization of domain coverage by dynamically moving sensors.

    PubMed

    Miller, James R

    2012-01-01

    A collection of algorithms, visualizations, and interactive operations allow operators controlling the movement of a collection of sensors through an environment to monitor in real time the portion of the environment that can or can't be seen by some subset of the sensors. The visualization allows preattentive detection of the number of sensors that can see a given location, and the coloring lets users identify the sensors' exact identities. This method employs two ray-tracing-based algorithms. A GPU implementation using CUDA (Compute-Unified Device Architecture) allows real-time processing and display of all scene updates and sensor movements. PMID:24806628

  3. Interdyad Differences in Early Mother-Infant Face-to-Face Communication: Real-Time Dynamics and Developmental Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavelli, Manuela; Fogel, Alan

    2013-01-01

    A microgenetic research design with a multiple case study method and a combination of quantitative and qualitative analyses was used to investigate interdyad differences in real-time dynamics and developmental change processes in mother-infant face-to-face communication over the first 3 months of life. Weekly observations of 24 mother-infant dyads…

  4. A model-based, multichannel, real-time capable sawtooth crash detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Brand, H.; de Baar, M. R.; van Berkel, M.; Blanken, T. C.; Felici, F.; Westerhof, E.; Willensdorfer, M.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team; The EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-07-01

    Control of the time between sawtooth crashes, necessary for ITER and DEMO, requires real-time detection of the moment of the sawtooth crash. In this paper, estimation of sawtooth crash times is demonstrated using the model-based interacting multiple model (IMM) estimator, based on simplified models for the sawtooth crash. In contrast to previous detectors, this detector uses the spatial extent of the sawtooth crash as detection characteristic. The IMM estimator is tuned and applied to multiple ECE channels at once. A model for the sawtooth crash is introduced, which is used in the IMM algorithm. The IMM algorithm is applied to seven datasets from the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. Five crash models with different mixing radii are used. All sawtooth crashes that have been identified beforehand by visual inspection of the data, are detected by the algorithm. A few additional detections are made, which upon closer inspection are seen to be sawtooth crashes, which show a partial reconnection. A closer inspection of the detected normal crashes shows that about 42% are not well fitted by any of the full reconnection models and show some characteristics of a partial reconnection. In some case, the measurement time is during the sawtooth crashes, which also results in an incorrect estimate of the mixing radius. For data provided at a sampling rate of 1 kHz, the run time of the IMM estimator is below 1 ms, thereby fulfilling real-time requirements.

  5. Real-time estimation of battery internal temperature based on a simplified thermoelectric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Li, Kang; Deng, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Li-ion batteries have been widely used in the EVs, and the battery thermal management is a key but challenging part of the battery management system. For EV batteries, only the battery surface temperature can be measured in real-time. However, it is the battery internal temperature that directly affects the battery performance, and large temperature difference may exist between surface and internal temperatures, especially in high power demand applications. In this paper, an online battery internal temperature estimation method is proposed based on a novel simplified thermoelectric model. The battery thermal behaviour is first described by a simplified thermal model, and battery electrical behaviour by an electric model. Then, these two models are interrelated to capture the interactions between battery thermal and electrical behaviours, thus offer a comprehensive description of the battery behaviour that is useful for battery management. Finally, based on the developed model, the battery internal temperature is estimated using an extended Kalman filter. The experimental results confirm the efficacy of the proposed method, and it can be used for online internal temperature estimation which is a key indicator for better real-time battery thermal management.

  6. A robust approach to battery fuel gauging, part I: Real time model identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasingam, B.; Avvari, G. V.; Pattipati, B.; Pattipati, K. R.; Bar-Shalom, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the first of a series of papers on battery fuel gauge (BFG), we present a real time parameter estimation strategy for robust state of charge (SOC) tracking. The proposed parameter estimation scheme has the following novel features: it models hysteresis as an error in the open circuit voltage (OCV) and employs a combination of real time, linear parameter estimation and SOC tracking technique to compensate for it. This obviates the need for modeling of hysteresis as a function of SOC and load current. We identify the presence of correlated noise that has been so far ignored in the literature and use it to enhance the accuracy of model identification. As a departure from the conventional "one model fits all" strategy, we identify four different equivalent models of the battery that represent four modes of typical battery operation and develop the framework for seamless SOC tracking by switching. The proposed parameter approach enables a robust initialization/re-initialization strategy for continuous operation of the BFG. The performance of the online parameter estimation scheme was first evaluated through simulated data. Then, the proposed algorithm was validated using hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) data collected from commercially available Li-ion batteries.

  7. Real-time modeling of primitive environments through wavelet sensors and Hebbian learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccaro, James M.; Yaworsky, Paul S.

    1999-06-01

    Modeling the world through sensory input necessarily provides a unique perspective for the observer. Given a limited perspective, objects and events cannot always be encoded precisely but must involve crude, quick approximations to deal with sensory information in a real- time manner. As an example, when avoiding an oncoming car, a pedestrian needs to identify the fact that a car is approaching before ascertaining the model or color of the vehicle. In our methodology, we use wavelet-based sensors with self-organized learning to encode basic sensory information in real-time. The wavelet-based sensors provide necessary transformations while a rank-based Hebbian learning scheme encodes a self-organized environment through translation, scale and orientation invariant sensors. Such a self-organized environment is made possible by combining wavelet sets which are orthonormal, log-scale with linear orientation and have automatically generated membership functions. In earlier work we used Gabor wavelet filters, rank-based Hebbian learning and an exponential modulation function to encode textural information from images. Many different types of modulation are possible, but based on biological findings the exponential modulation function provided a good approximation of first spike coding of `integrate and fire' neurons. These types of Hebbian encoding schemes (e.g., exponential modulation, etc.) are useful for quick response and learning, provide several advantages over contemporary neural network learning approaches, and have been found to quantize data nonlinearly. By combining wavelets with Hebbian learning we can provide a real-time front-end for modeling an intelligent process, such as the autonomous control of agents in a simulated environment.

  8. Tailored motivational message generation: A model and practical framework for real-time physical activity coaching.

    PubMed

    Op den Akker, Harm; Cabrita, Miriam; Op den Akker, Rieks; Jones, Valerie M; Hermens, Hermie J

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive and practical framework for automatic generation of real-time tailored messages in behavior change applications. Basic aspects of motivational messages are time, intention, content and presentation. Tailoring of messages to the individual user may involve all aspects of communication. A linear modular system is presented for generating such messages. It is explained how properties of user and context are taken into account in each of the modules of the system and how they affect the linguistic presentation of the generated messages. The model of motivational messages presented is based on an analysis of existing literature as well as the analysis of a corpus of motivational messages used in previous studies. The model extends existing 'ontology-based' approaches to message generation for real-time coaching systems found in the literature. Practical examples are given on how simple tailoring rules can be implemented throughout the various stages of the framework. Such examples can guide further research by clarifying what it means to use e.g. user targeting to tailor a message. As primary example we look at the issue of promoting daily physical activity. Future work is pointed out in applying the present model and framework, defining efficient ways of evaluating individual tailoring components, and improving effectiveness through the creation of accurate and complete user- and context models. PMID:25843359

  9. A real-time monitoring/emergency response modeling workstation for a tritium facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lawver, B.S.; Sims, J.M.; Baskett, R.L.

    1993-07-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we developed a real-time system to monitor two stacks on our tritium handling facility. The monitors transmit the stack data to a workstation which computes a 3D numerical model of atmospheric dispersion. The workstation also collects surface and upper air data from meteorological towers and a sodar. The complex meteorological and terrain setting in the Livermore Valley demands more sophisticated resolution of the three-dimensional structure of the atmosphere to reliably calculate plume dispersion than afforded by Gaussian models. We experience both mountain valley and sea breeze flows. To address these complexities, we have implemented the three-dimensional diagnostic MATHEW mass-adjusted wind field and ADPIC particle-in-cell dispersion models on the workstation for use in real-time emergency response modeling. Both MATHEW and ADPIC have shown their utility in a variety of complex settings over the last 15 years within the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC[1,2]) project.

  10. Computer considerations for real time simulation of a generalized rotor model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, R. M.; Fogarty, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    Scaled equations were developed to meet requirements for real time computer simulation of the rotor system research aircraft. These equations form the basis for consideration of both digital and hybrid mechanization for real time simulation. For all digital simulation estimates of the required speed in terms of equivalent operations per second are developed based on the complexity of the equations and the required intergration frame rates. For both conventional hybrid simulation and hybrid simulation using time-shared analog elements the amount of required equipment is estimated along with a consideration of the dynamic errors. Conventional hybrid mechanization using analog simulation of those rotor equations which involve rotor-spin frequencies (this consititutes the bulk of the equations) requires too much analog equipment. Hybrid simulation using time-sharing techniques for the analog elements appears possible with a reasonable amount of analog equipment. All-digital simulation with affordable general-purpose computers is not possible because of speed limitations, but specially configured digital computers do have the required speed and consitute the recommended approach.

  11. Performance modeling and measurement of real-time multiprocessors with time-shared buses

    SciTech Connect

    Woodbury, M.H.; Shin, K.G.

    1988-02-01

    A closed queueing network model is constructed to address workload effects on computer performance for a highly reliable unibus multiprocessor used in real-time control. The queueing model consists of multiserver nodes and a nonpreemptive priority queue. Use of this model requires partitioning the workload into task classes. The time average steady-state solution of the queuing model directly produces useful results that are necessary in performance evaluation. The model is experimentally justified with the Fault-Tolerant Multiprocessor (FTMP) located at the NASA AIRLAB. Extensive experiments are performed on FTMP with a synthetic workload generator (SWG) to directly measure performance parameters, such as processor idle time, system bus contention, and task processing times. These measurements determine values for parameters in the queueing model. Experimental and analytic results are then compared.

  12. A viscoelastic model of a breast phantom for real-time palpation.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Antoine; Hu, Yaoping

    2011-01-01

    Palpation of soft tissues helps to diagnose varying diseases within the tissues. Using a phantom, the current method of training palpation lacks for feedback of the training. Similar to a robot-assisted surgical system, a virtual reality (VR) system could be potential for such training due to its interactive nature. In such a VR system, studies revealed the observation that the human perception of objects is insensitive to subtle discrepancies in a simulation. Based upon this observation, we propose a real-time viscoelastic model of a breast phantom (as soft tissues). The model consists of a surface membrane and an inside gel. We evaluate this model through a comparison with a Finite Element Method (FEM) model, featuring physical parameters and different force contacts. The results show that the model can handle multi vertex force contact on an arbitrary location and yields reasonable accurate deformation compared to the FEM model. PMID:22255349

  13. Real-time emissions from construction equipment compared with model predictions.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Bardia; Marr, Linsey C

    2015-02-01

    The construction industry is a large source of greenhouse gases and other air pollutants. Measuring and monitoring real-time emissions will provide practitioners with information to assess environmental impacts and improve the sustainability of construction. We employed a portable emission measurement system (PEMS) for real-time measurement of carbon dioxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), hydrocarbon, and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions from construction equipment to derive emission rates (mass of pollutant emitted per unit time) and emission factors (mass of pollutant emitted per unit volume of fuel consumed) under real-world operating conditions. Measurements were compared with emissions predicted by methodologies used in three models: NONROAD2008, OFFROAD2011, and a modal statistical model. Measured emission rates agreed with model predictions for some pieces of equipment but were up to 100 times lower for others. Much of the difference was driven by lower fuel consumption rates than predicted. Emission factors during idling and hauling were significantly different from each other and from those of other moving activities, such as digging and dumping. It appears that operating conditions introduce considerable variability in emission factors. Results of this research will aid researchers and practitioners in improving current emission estimation techniques, frameworks, and databases. PMID:25947047

  14. Modeling Real-Time Coordination of Distributed Expertise and Event Response in NASA Mission Control Center Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onken, Jeffrey

    This dissertation introduces a multidisciplinary framework for the enabling of future research and analysis of alternatives for control centers for real-time operations of safety-critical systems. The multidisciplinary framework integrates functional and computational models that describe the dynamics in fundamental concepts of previously disparate engineering and psychology research disciplines, such as group performance and processes, supervisory control, situation awareness, events and delays, and expertise. The application in this dissertation is the real-time operations within the NASA Mission Control Center in Houston, TX. This dissertation operationalizes the framework into a model and simulation, which simulates the functional and computational models in the framework according to user-configured scenarios for a NASA human-spaceflight mission. The model and simulation generates data according to the effectiveness of the mission-control team in supporting the completion of mission objectives and detecting, isolating, and recovering from anomalies. Accompanying the multidisciplinary framework is a proof of concept, which demonstrates the feasibility of such a framework. The proof of concept demonstrates that variability occurs where expected based on the models. The proof of concept also demonstrates that the data generated from the model and simulation is useful for analyzing and comparing MCC configuration alternatives because an investigator can give a diverse set of scenarios to the simulation and the output compared in detail to inform decisions about the effect of MCC configurations on mission operations performance.

  15. Real-time modeling of complex atmospheric releases in urban areas

    SciTech Connect

    Baskett, R.L.; Ellis, J.S.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1994-08-01

    If a nuclear installation in or near an urban area has a venting, fire, or explosion, airborne radioactivity becomes the major concern. Dispersion models are the immediate tool for estimating the dose and contamination. Responses in urban areas depend on knowledge of the amount of the release, representative meteorological data, and the ability of the dispersion model to simulate the complex flows as modified by terrain or local wind conditions. A centralized dispersion modeling system can produce realistic assessments of radiological accidents anywhere in a country within several minutes if it is computer-automated. The system requires source-term, terrain, mapping and dose-factor databases, real-time meteorological data acquisition, three-dimensional atmospheric transport and dispersion models, and experienced staff. Experience with past responses in urban areas by the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory illustrate the challenges for three-dimensional dispersion models.

  16. Real-time synthesis of clarinet-like instruments using digital impedance models.

    PubMed

    Guillemain, Philippe; Kergomard, Jean; Voinier, Thierry

    2005-07-01

    A real-time synthesis model of wind instruments sounds, based upon a classical physical model, is presented. The physical model describes the nonlinear coupling between the resonator and the excitor through the Bernoulli equation. While most synthesis methods use wave variables and their sampled equivalent in order to describe the resonator of the instrument, the synthesis model presented here uses sampled versions of the physical variables all along the synthesis process, and hence constitutes a straightforward digital transposition of each part of the physical model. Moreover, the resolution scheme of the problem (i.e., the synthesis algorithm) is explicit and all the parameters of the algorithm are expressed analytically as functions of the physical and the control parameters. PMID:16119367

  17. Real-time synthesis of clarinet-like instruments using digital impedance models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemain, Philippe; Kergomard, Jean; Voinier, Thierry

    2005-07-01

    A real-time synthesis model of wind instruments sounds, based upon a classical physical model, is presented. The physical model describes the nonlinear coupling between the resonator and the excitor through the Bernoulli equation. While most synthesis methods use wave variables and their sampled equivalent in order to describe the resonator of the instrument, the synthesis model presented here uses sampled versions of the physical variables all along the synthesis process, and hence constitutes a straightforward digital transposition of each part of the physical model. Moreover, the resolution scheme of the problem (i.e., the synthesis algorithm) is explicit and all the parameters of the algorithm are expressed analytically as functions of the physical and the control parameters.

  18. Assimilation of Real-Time Satellite And Human Sensor Networks for Modeling Natural Disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulov, O.; Halem, M.; Lary, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    We describe the development of underlying technologies needed to address the merging of a web of real time satellite sensor Web (SSW) and Human Sensor Web (HSW) needed to augment the US response to extreme events. As an initial prototyping step and use case scenario, we consider the development of two major system tools that can be transitioned from research to the responding operational agency for mitigating coastal oil spills. These tools consist of the capture of Situation Aware (SA) Social Media (SM) Data, and assimilation of the processed information into forecasting models to provide incident decision managers with interactive virtual spatial temporal animations superimposed with probabilistic data estimates. The system methodologies are equally applicable to the wider class of extreme events such as plume dispersions from volcanoes or massive fires, major floods, hurricane impacts, radioactive isotope dispersions from nuclear accidents, etc. A successful feasibility demonstration of this technology has been shown in the case of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill where Human Sensor Networks have been combined with a geophysical model to perform parameter assessments. Flickr images of beached oil were mined from the spill area, geolocated and timestamped and converted into geophysical data. This data was incorporated into General NOAA Operational Modeling Environment (GNOME), a Lagrangian forecast model that uses near real-time surface winds, ocean currents, and satellite shape profiles of oil to generate a forecast of plume movement. As a result, improved estimates of diffusive coefficients and rates of oil spill were determined. Current approaches for providing satellite derived oil distributions are collected from a satellite sensor web of operational and research sensors from many countries, and a manual analysis is performed by NESDIS. A real time SA HSW processing system based on geolocated SM data from sources such as Twitter, Flickr, YouTube etc., greatly

  19. Numerical modelling for real-time forecasting of marine oil pollution and hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Dominicis, Michela; Pinardi, Nadia; Bruciaferri, Diego; Liubartseva, Svitlana

    2015-04-01

    (MEDESS4MS) system, which is an integrated operational multi-model oil spill prediction service, that can be used by different users to run simulations of oil spills at sea, even in real time, through a web portal. The MEDESS4MS system gathers different oil spill modelling systems and data from meteorological and ocean forecasting systems, as well as operational information on response equipment, together with environmental and socio-economic sensitivity maps. MEDSLIK-II has been also used to provide an assessment of hazard stemming from operational oil ship discharges in the Southern Adriatic and Northern Ionian (SANI) Seas. Operational pollution resulting from ships consists of a movable hazard with a magnitude that changes dynamically as a result of a number of external parameters varying in space and time (temperature, wind, sea currents). Simulations of oil releases have been performed with realistic oceanographic currents and the results show that the oil pollution hazard distribution has an inherent spatial and temporal variability related to the specific flow field variability.

  20. Utilization of near real-time satellite data in atmospheric transport and dispersion modeling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, U. S.; Christopher, S. A.; Wu, Y.; Yang, E.; Keiser, K.

    2010-12-01

    Prior studies show that satellite derived land and aerosols products may be utilized to improve numerical model predictions of atmospheric transport and dispersion. Satellite derived smoke emissions can be effectively utilized in numerical modeling of smoke transport. Satellite derived aerosol optical thickness (AOT) provide an effective constraint for the column loading in aerosol transport models. Land surface heterogeneity has substantial impact on mesoscale and small scale atmospheric dispersion. Satellite derived land products such as albedo and leaf area index provide an effective constraint for land surface heterogeneity. Utilization of NASA MODIS land and aerosol products in multiple applications related to atmospheric dispersion, nutrient deposition and air quality modeling will be discussed. These applications are developed for near-real time use in a decision support related to emergency and environmental management in the State of Alabama. Experiences and lessons learned form the development of these applications will also be discussed.

  1. Real-Time Flood Estimation by Using Radar Rainfall data and Distributed Rainfall-Runoff Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, P.; Chou, J.; Chiu, Y.; Yang, T.; Kuo, C.

    2011-12-01

    This study aims to establish a flood prediction model in Dajia River by using a grid-based distributed rainfall-runoff model (GDRRM) combined with the predicted QPESUMS radar rainfalls. Flood disasters caused damage to human and property. A proper flood prediction model can provide warning messages against disasters. Since the radar rainfall technology has been developed for years, it has the ability to represent the precipitation in each location. Coupling the real-time radar rainfall with the distributed rainfall-runoff model, it can be used to provide the probable flow in downstream. The study area, Dajia River basin, is located in central Taiwan. The river flow is mainly controlled by two major reservoirs, Shih-Kang Dam in downstream and Te-Chi Reservoir in upstream. Thus, three components are considered for establishing the flood prediction model. The first one is the application of radar rainfalls. The real-time and predicted (1-3hr ahead) radar rainfall data provided by the Central Weather Bureau, Taiwan were set as the input data. It can represent the actual distributed rainfalls of the basin. The second one is the estimation of reservoir inflow by using a GDRRM. The basin was divided into 1234 regular grids (1km by 1km) to exhibit the heterogeneity in the watershed. The parameters of GDRRM were generated by using DEM, Formosat-2 satellite image and soil map to represent the actual geography and physiography of each grid. With the input of real-time and predicted radar rainfall data, the inflow of Te-Chi Reservoir and Shih-Kang Dam can be calculated by using two GDRRMs respectively. The third one is the operation rules of reservoir used for simulating the outflow of the reservoirs during the flow simulation. Then, the downstream (Shih-Kang Dam) GDRRM coupled with the operation rules was used to calculate the outflow of the Te-Chi Reservoir. Thus, the flood can be predicted in advance during typhoon period. The results revealed that the flood prediction

  2. Toward a Global Model for Predicting Earthquake-Induced Landslides in Near-Real Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowicki, M. A.; Wald, D. J.; Hamburger, M. W.; Hearne, M.; Thompson, E.

    2013-12-01

    We present a newly developed statistical model for estimating the distribution of earthquake-triggered landslides in near-real time, which is designed for use in the USGS Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) and ShakeCast systems. We use standardized estimates of ground shaking from the USGS ShakeMap Atlas 2.0 to develop an empirical landslide probability model by combining shaking estimates with broadly available landslide susceptibility proxies, including topographic slope, surface geology, and climatic parameters. While the initial model was based on four earthquakes for which digitally mapped landslide inventories and well constrained ShakeMaps are available--the Guatemala (1976), Northridge, California (1994), Chi-Chi, Taiwan (1999), and Wenchuan, China (2008) earthquakes, our improved model includes observations from approximately ten other events from a variety of tectonic and geomorphic settings for which we have obtained landslide inventories. Using logistic regression, this database is used to build a predictive model of the probability of landslide occurrence. We assess the performance of the regression model using statistical goodness-of-fit metrics to determine which combination of the tested landslide proxies provides the optimum prediction of observed landslides while minimizing ';false alarms' in non-landslide zones. Our initial results indicate strong correlations with peak ground acceleration and maximum slope, and weaker correlations with surface geological and soil wetness proxies. In terms of the original four events included, the global model predicts landslides most accurately when applied to the Wenchuan and Chi-Chi events, and less accurately when applied to the Northridge and Guatemala datasets. Combined with near-real time ShakeMaps, the model can be used to make generalized predictions of whether or not landslides are likely to occur (and if so, where) for future earthquakes around the globe, and these estimates

  3. V/STOL tilt rotor aircraft study mathematical model for a real time simulation of a tilt rotor aircraft (Boeing Vertol Model 222), volume 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenstein, H.; Mcveigh, M. A.; Mollenkof, P. A.

    1973-01-01

    A mathematical model for a real time simulation of a tilt rotor aircraft was developed. The mathematical model is used for evaluating aircraft performance and handling qualities. The model is based on an eleven degree of freedom total force representation. The rotor is treated as a point source of forces and moments with appropriate response time lags and actuator dynamics. The aerodynamics of the wing, tail, rotors, landing gear, and fuselage are included.

  4. The Drive-Reinforcement Neuronal Model: A Real-Time Learning Mechanism For Unsupervised Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klopf, A. H.

    1988-05-01

    The drive-reinforcement neuronal model is described as an example of a newly discovered class of real-time learning mechanisms that correlate earlier derivatives of inputs with later derivatives of outputs. The drive-reinforcement neuronal model has been demonstrated to predict a wide range of classical conditioning phenomena in animal learning. A variety of classes of connectionist and neural network models have been investigated in recent years (Hinton and Anderson, 1981; Levine, 1983; Barto, 1985; Feldman, 1985; Rumelhart and McClelland, 1986). After a brief review of these models, discussion will focus on the class of real-time models because they appear to be making the strongest contact with the experimental evidence of animal learning. Theoretical models in physics have inspired Boltzmann machines (Ackley, Hinton, and Sejnowski, 1985) and what are sometimes called Hopfield networks (Hopfield, 1982; Hopfield and Tank, 1986). These connectionist models utilize symmetric connections and adaptive equilibrium processes during which the networks settle into minimal energy states. Networks utilizing error-correction learning mechanisms go back to Rosenblatt's (1962) perception and Widrow's (1962) adaline and currently take the form of back propagation networks (Parker, 1985; Rumelhart, Hinton, and Williams, 1985, 1986). These networks require a "teacher" or "trainer" to provide error signals indicating the difference between desired and actual responses. Networks employing real-time learning mechanisms, in which the temporal association of signals is of fundamental importance, go back to Hebb (1949). Real-time learning mechanisms may require no teacher or trainer and thus may lend themselves to unsupervised learning. Such models have been extended by Klopf (1972, 1982), who introduced the notions of synaptic eligibility and generalized reinforcement. Sutton and Barto (1981) advanced this class of models by proposing that a derivative of the theoretical neuron's out

  5. Dynamic keyhole: A novel method to improve MR images in the presence of respiratory motion for real-time MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Danny; Pollock, Sean; Whelan, Brendan; Keall, Paul; Kim, Taeho

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors present a novel magnetic resonance imaging reconstruction method to improve the quality of MR images in the presence of respiratory motion for real-time thoracic image-guided radiotherapy. Methods: This new reconstruction method is called dynamic keyhole and utilizes a library of previously acquired, peripheral k-space datasets from the same (or similar) respiratory state in conjunction with central k-space datasets acquired in real-time. Internal or external respiratory signals are utilized to sort, match, and combine the two separate peripheral and central k-space datasets with respect to respiratory displacement, thereby reducing acquisition time and improving image quality without respiratory-related artifacts. In this study, the dynamic keyhole, conventional keyhole, and zero-filling methods were compared to full k-space acquisition (ground truth) for 60 coronal datasets acquired from 15 healthy human subjects. Results: For the same image-quality difference from the ground-truth image, the dynamic keyhole method reused 79% of the prior peripheral phase-encoding lines, while the conventional keyhole reused 73% and zero-filling 63% (p-value < 0.0001), corresponding to faster acquisition speed of dynamic keyhole for real-time imaging applications. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the dynamic keyhole method is a promising technique for clinical applications such as image-guided radiotherapy requiring real-time MR monitoring of the thoracic region. Based on the results from this study, the dynamic keyhole method could increase the temporal resolution by a factor of five compared with full k-space methods.

  6. Multi-phase intelligent decision model for reservoir real-time flood control during typhoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Nien-Sheng; Huang, Chien-Lin; Wei, Chih-Chiang

    2015-03-01

    This study applies an Adaptive Network-based Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) and a Real-Time Recurrent Learning Neural Network (RTRLNN) with an optimized reservoir release hydrograph using Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) from historical typhoon events to develop a multi-phase intelligent real-time reservoir operation model for flood control. The flood control process is divided into three stages: (1) before flood (Stage I); (2) before peak flow (Stage II); and (3) after peak flow (Stage III). The models are then constructed with either three phase modules (ANFIS-3P and RTRLNN-3P) or two phase (Stage I + II and Stage III) modules (ANFIS-2P and RTRLNN-2P). The multi-phase modules are developed with consideration of the difference in operational decision mechanisms, decision information, release functions, and targets between each flood control stage to solve the problem of time-consuming computation and difficult system integration of MILP. In addition, the model inputs include the coupled short lead time and total reservoir inflow forecast information that are developed using radar- and satellite-based meteorological monitoring techniques, forecasted typhoon tracks, meteorological image similarity analysis, ANFIS and RTRLNN. This study uses the Tseng-Wen Reservoir basin as the study area, and the model results showed that RTRLNN outperformed ANFIS in the simulated outcomes from the optimized hydrographs. This study also applies the models to Typhoons Kalmaegi and Morakot to compare the simulations to historical operations. From the operation results, the RTRLNN-3P model is better than RTRLNN-2P and historical operations. Further, because the RTRLNN-3P model combines the innovative multi-phase module with monitored and forecasted decision information, the operation can simultaneously, effectively and automatically achieve the dual goals of flood detention at peak flow periods and water supply at the end of a typhoon event.

  7. Near real time weather and ocean model data access with rNOMADS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D. C.; Lees, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Operational Model Archive and Distribution System (NOMADS) facilitates rapid delivery of real time and archived atmospheric and oceanic model outputs from multiple agencies. These data are free to the scientific community, industry, and the public. The rNOMADS package provides an interface between NOMADS and the R programming language. Like R itself, rNOMADS is open source and cross platform. It utilizes server-side functionality on the NOMADS system to subset model outputs for delivery to client R users. We discuss rNOMADS implementation and usage as well as provide two case studies. Users can download rNOMADS from within the R interpreter or from the Comprehensive R Archive Network (CRAN).

  8. Surrogate Modeling of High-Fidelity Fracture Simulations for Real-Time Residual Strength Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spear, Ashley D.; Priest, Amanda R.; Veilleux, Michael G.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.

    2011-01-01

    A surrogate model methodology is described for predicting in real time the residual strength of flight structures with discrete-source damage. Starting with design of experiment, an artificial neural network is developed that takes as input discrete-source damage parameters and outputs a prediction of the structural residual strength. Target residual strength values used to train the artificial neural network are derived from 3D finite element-based fracture simulations. A residual strength test of a metallic, integrally-stiffened panel is simulated to show that crack growth and residual strength are determined more accurately in discrete-source damage cases by using an elastic-plastic fracture framework rather than a linear-elastic fracture mechanics-based method. Improving accuracy of the residual strength training data would, in turn, improve accuracy of the surrogate model. When combined, the surrogate model methodology and high-fidelity fracture simulation framework provide useful tools for adaptive flight technology.

  9. A Target Model Construction Algorithm for Robust Real-Time Mean-Shift Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoo-Joo; Kim, Yong-Goo

    2014-01-01

    Mean-shift tracking has gained more interests, nowadays, aided by its feasibility of real-time and reliable tracker implementation. In order to reduce background clutter interference to mean-shift object tracking, this paper proposes a novel indicator function generation method. The proposed method takes advantage of two ‘a priori’ knowledge elements, which are inherent to a kernel support for initializing a target model. Based on the assured background labels, a gradient-based label propagation is performed, resulting in a number of objects differentiated from the background. Then the proposed region growing scheme picks up one largest target object near the center of the kernel support. The grown object region constitutes the proposed indicator function and this allows an exact target model construction for robust mean-shift tracking. Simulation results demonstrate the proposed exact target model could significantly enhance the robustness as well as the accuracy of mean-shift object tracking. PMID:25372619

  10. Verification of model development technique for NIR-based real-time monitoring of ingredient concentration during blending.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Kano, Manabu; Hasebe, Shinji; Miyano, Takuya; Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Wakiyama, Naoki

    2014-08-25

    There has been a considerable research on the process analytical technology (PAT) and real-time monitoring based on NIR, but the model development is still an important issue and persons in charge have difficulty in building good models. In this study, to realize efficient NIR-based real-time monitoring of ingredient concentration and establish a model development method, we investigated the effect of a calibration set, spectral preprocessing, wavelengths, and other factors on the prediction error through pilot and commercial scale blending experiments. The results confirmed that the small prediction error was realized by a calibration set, including dynamic measurement spectra acquired with the target blender. In addition, the results demonstrated that locally weighted partial least squares (LW-PLS) achieved the smaller prediction error than conventional PLS. The present study has also clarified that spectral preprocessing methods and wavelengths selected to build a model affect the prediction error of ingredient concentration interactively. A wide wavelength range should be selected when the spectral preprocessing does not lessen the effect of baseline variation, while a narrow wavelength range should be selected when it strongly decreases the effect. PMID:24834879

  11. Development of a globally applicable model for near real-time prediction of seismically induced landslides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowicki, M. Anna; Wald, David J.; Hamburger, Michael W.; Hearne, Mike; Thompson, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial effort has been invested to understand where seismically induced landslides may occur in the future, as they are a costly and frequently fatal threat in mountainous regions. The goal of this work is to develop a statistical model for estimating the spatial distribution of landslides in near real-time around the globe for use in conjunction with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system. This model uses standardized outputs of ground shaking from the USGS ShakeMap Atlas 2.0 to develop an empirical landslide probability model, combining shaking estimates with broadly available landslide susceptibility proxies, i.e., topographic slope, surface geology, and climate parameters. We focus on four earthquakes for which digitally mapped landslide inventories and well-constrainedShakeMaps are available. The resulting database is used to build a predictive model of the probability of landslide occurrence. The landslide database includes the Guatemala (1976), Northridge (1994), Chi-Chi (1999), and Wenchuan (2008) earthquakes. Performance of the regression model is assessed using statistical goodness-of-fit metrics and a qualitative review to determine which combination of the proxies provides both the optimum prediction of landslide-affected areas and minimizes the false alarms in non-landslide zones. Combined with near real-time ShakeMaps, these models can be used to make generalized predictions of whether or not landslides are likely to occur (and if so, where) for earthquakes around the globe, and eventually to inform loss estimates within the framework of the PAGER system.

  12. Validation of real-time PCR assays for bioforensic detection of model plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    James, Mindy; Blagden, Trenna; Moncrief, Ian; Burans, James P; Schneider, Katherine; Fletcher, Jacqueline

    2014-03-01

    The U.S. agricultural sector is vulnerable to intentionally introduced microbial threats because of its wide and open distribution and economic importance. To investigate such events, forensically valid assays for plant pathogen detection are needed. In this work, real-time PCR assays were developed for three model plant pathogens: Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato, Xylella fastidiosa, and Wheat streak mosaic virus. Validation included determination of the linearity and range, limit of detection, sensitivity, specificity, and exclusivity of each assay. Additionally, positive control plasmids, distinguishable from native signature by restriction enzyme digestion, were developed to support forensic application of the assays. Each assay displayed linear amplification of target nucleic acid, detected 100 fg or less of target nucleic acid, and was specific to its target pathogen. Results obtained with these model pathogens provide the framework for development and validation of similar assays for other plant pathogens of high consequence. PMID:24261870

  13. An ex vivo laser-induced spinal cord injury model to assess mechanisms of axonal degeneration in real-time.

    PubMed

    Okada, Starlyn L M; Stivers, Nicole S; Stys, Peter K; Stirling, David P

    2014-01-01

    Injured CNS axons fail to regenerate and often retract away from the injury site. Axons spared from the initial injury may later undergo secondary axonal degeneration. Lack of growth cone formation, regeneration, and loss of additional myelinated axonal projections within the spinal cord greatly limits neurological recovery following injury. To assess how central myelinated axons of the spinal cord respond to injury, we developed an ex vivo living spinal cord model utilizing transgenic mice that express yellow fluorescent protein in axons and a focal and highly reproducible laser-induced spinal cord injury to document the fate of axons and myelin (lipophilic fluorescent dye Nile Red) over time using two-photon excitation time-lapse microscopy. Dynamic processes such as acute axonal injury, axonal retraction, and myelin degeneration are best studied in real-time. However, the non-focal nature of contusion-based injuries and movement artifacts encountered during in vivo spinal cord imaging make differentiating primary and secondary axonal injury responses using high resolution microscopy challenging. The ex vivo spinal cord model described here mimics several aspects of clinically relevant contusion/compression-induced axonal pathologies including axonal swelling, spheroid formation, axonal transection, and peri-axonal swelling providing a useful model to study these dynamic processes in real-time. Major advantages of this model are excellent spatiotemporal resolution that allows differentiation between the primary insult that directly injures axons and secondary injury mechanisms; controlled infusion of reagents directly to the perfusate bathing the cord; precise alterations of the environmental milieu (e.g., calcium, sodium ions, known contributors to axonal injury, but near impossible to manipulate in vivo); and murine models also offer an advantage as they provide an opportunity to visualize and manipulate genetically identified cell populations and subcellular

  14. A new device for real time monitoring of microbial population dynamics during in situ and ex situ bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, R.E.; Malone, R.W.

    1995-12-31

    Monitoring of microbial population dynamics is an important operating parameter for successful bioremediation projects. The traditional method of plate counts or most probable number (MPN) requires 2 to 7 days for development and therefore provides a historical measurement of little real-time operational significance. Selected enzyme activity is directly proportional to microbial population density and is linear in the population range from 10{sub 4} to 10{sup 8} CFU/mL. This paper summarizes the use of this enzyme based, real-time measurement of microbial population dynamics for the management of four bioremediation projects: (1) differentiation of assimilation from nitrification during the metabolism of ammonia in an industrial waste stream, (2) treatability assessment and management of activated sludge processes during the treatment of a hazardous, petrochemical waste, (3) measurement of intrinsic microbial activity in soil cores at a spill site, and (4) non-invasive monitoring of microbial populations during in situ bioremediation of two aquifers.

  15. Review of RT-LAB and Steps Involved for Implementation of a Simulink Model from MATLAB to REAL-TIME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkili, Suresh; Panda, Anup Kumar

    2013-11-01

    In recent days, every researcher wants to develop his/her model in real-time. Simulation tools have been widely used for the design and improvement of electrical systems since the mid-twentieth century. The evolution of simulation tools has progressed in step with the evolution of computing technologies. Now a days, computing technologies have improved dramatically in performance and become widely available at a steadily decreasing cost. Consequently, simulation tools have also seen dramatic performance gains and steady cost decreases. Researchers and engineers now have access to affordable, high-performance simulation tools that were previously too cost prohibitive, except for the largest manufacturers and utilities.This article has introduced a specific class of digital simulator known as a real-time simulator by answering the questions "What is real-time simulation?" "Why is it needed" and "How it works". The latest trend in real-time simulation consists of exporting simulation models to FPGA. In this article, the steps involved for implementation of a model from MATLAB to REAL-TIME are provided in detail. The detailed real-time results are presented to support the feasibility of real-time digital simulator.

  16. Real-time high-resolution measurement of collagen alignment in dynamically loaded soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    York, Timothy; Kahan, Lindsey; Lake, Spencer P.; Gruev, Viktor

    2014-06-01

    A technique for creating maps of the direction and strength of fiber alignment in collagenous soft tissues is presented. The method uses a division of focal plane polarimeter to measure circularly polarized light transmitted through the tissue. The architecture of the sensor allows measurement of the retardance and fiber alignment at the full frame rate of the sensor without any moving optics. The technique compares favorably to the standard method of using a rotating polarizer. How the new technique enables real-time capture of the full angular spread of fiber alignment and retardance under various cyclic loading conditions is illustrated.

  17. Real-time Imaging of Tumor Progression in a Fluorescent Orthotopic Mouse Model of Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    TRAN CAO, HOP S.; KAUSHAL, SHARMEELA; SNYDER, CYNTHIA S.; ONGKEKO, WEG M.; HOFFMAN, ROBERT M.; BOUVET, MICHAEL

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for a clinically relevant mouse model of thyroid cancer that enables real-time, non-invasive monitoring of tumor growth, progression, and drug response over time. Human thyroid cancer cell lines NPA (papillary) and KAK-1 (anaplastic) were stably transfected to express either red or green fluorescent protein. Cancer cells were injected into the thyroid glands of 8-week-old athymic mice. The animals were imaged with whole-body fluorescence imaging weekly and sacrificed when premorbid. At necropsy, the primary tumor was resected en bloc with the respiratory system for processing and analysis. Histology was performed on fixed tissue specimens for review of morphologic findings. Both anaplastic and papillary thyroid cancer cell lines led to robust development of orthotopic fluorescent tumors in nude mice. Injection of 5×105 cancer cells was sufficient for tumor development. Tumors were visualized for both cell lines via non-invasive imaging as early as 3 weeks post-implantation and were monitored over time. Time to premorbid condition varied between mice and was associated with a primary tumor growth pattern (early local compression of the esophagus vs. late metastatic disease) rather than tumor size. At necropsy, tumor fluorescence demonstrated metastases in the lungs, lymph nodes and vessels that were not visible under white light. Thus an orthotopic mouse model of thyroid cancer has been developed that replicates the major clinical features of thyroid cancer and enables real-time, non-invasive monitoring of tumor progression. This model should permit preclinical evaluation of novel thyroid cancer therapeutics. PMID:21115887

  18. Toward Global Real Time Hydrologic Modeling - An "Open" View From the Trenches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, J.

    2015-12-01

    Big Data has become a popular term to describe the exponential growth of data and related cyber infrastructure to process it so that better analysis can be performed and lead to improved decision-making. How are we doing in the hydrologic sciences? As part of a significant collaborative effort that brought together scientists from public, private, and academic organizations a new transformative hydrologic forecasting modeling infrastructure has been developed. How was it possible to go from deterministic hydrologic forecasts largely driven through manual interactions at 3600 stations to automated 15-day ensemble forecasts at 2.67 million stations? Earth observations of precipitation, temperature, moisture, and other atmospheric and land surface conditions form the foundation of global hydrologic forecasts, but this project demonstrates a critical component to harness these resources can be summed up in one word: OPEN. Whether it is open data sources, open software solutions with open standards, or just being open to collaborations and building teams across institutions, disciplines, and international boundaries, time and time again through my involvement in the development of a high-resolution real time global hydrologic forecasting model I have discovered that in every aspect the sum has always been greater than the parts. While much has been accomplished, much more remains to be done, but the most important lesson learned has been to the degree that we can remain open and work together, the greater our ability will be to use big data hydrologic modeling resources to solve the world's most vexing water related challenges. This presentation will demonstrate a transformational global real time hydrologic forecasting application based on downscaled ECMWF ensemble forecasts, RAPID routing, and Tethys Platform for cloud computing and visualization with discussions of the human and cyber infrastructure connections that make it successful and needs moving forward.

  19. A Real-Time MODIS Vegetation Composite for Land Surface Models and Short-Term Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center is producing real-time, 1- km resolution Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) gridded composites over a Continental U.S. domain. These composites are updated daily based on swath data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor aboard the polar orbiting NASA Aqua and Terra satellites, with a product time lag of about one day. A simple time-weighting algorithm is applied to the NDVI swath data that queries the previous 20 days of data to ensure a continuous grid of data populated at all pixels. The daily composites exhibited good continuity both spatially and temporally during June and July 2010. The composites also nicely depicted high greenness anomalies that resulted from significant rainfall over southwestern Texas, Mexico, and New Mexico during July due to early-season tropical cyclone activity. The SPoRT Center is in the process of computing greenness vegetation fraction (GVF) composites from the MODIS NDVI data at the same spatial and temporal resolution for use in the NASA Land Information System (LIS). The new daily GVF dataset would replace the monthly climatological GVF database (based on Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer [AVHRR] observations from 1992-93) currently available to the Noah land surface model (LSM) in both LIS and the public version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The much higher spatial resolution (1 km versus 0.15 degree) and daily updates based on real-time satellite observations have the capability to greatly improve the simulation of the surface energy budget in the Noah LSM within LIS and WRF. Once code is developed in LIS to incorporate the daily updated GVFs, the SPoRT Center will conduct simulation sensitivity experiments to quantify the impacts and improvements realized by the MODIS real-time GVF data. This presentation will describe the methodology used to develop the 1-km MODIS NDVI composites and

  20. Real-time inverse-model analysis and control on data collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesselinov, V. V.; Robinson, B. A.; Vrugt, J. A.; Zyvoloski, G. A.

    2005-12-01

    Sophisticated numerical models are commonly used to simulate fluid and chemical flow in the subsurface. The science of flow in porous media is composed of general physical principles (transferable knowledge) and site-specific details. All sites are unique, so even if the physics is well understood, we need detailed, site-specific information to develop a model for each site (subsurface heterogeneity, initial and boundary conditions, etc.). In this respect, at each new site, we "start over". The most time- and resource-consuming step in reducing predictive uncertainty bounds in subsurface systems is the process of uncovering the site-specific details. The current paradigm is to perform a lengthy reconnaissance phase to understand the site, followed by additional data collection and modeling to synthesize the information. Model development methods are slow and labor-intensive for complex sites; therefore, model results generally lag behind the data collection by a considerable length of time. This delay limits the usefulness of the model as a tool to guide data collection: any given iteration of the model is out of date by the time it is completed. The whole process is unacceptably protracted in an era in which, for example, in the U.S. alone we may ultimately need hundreds of sites to implement CO2 geologic sequestration. Our technical capabilities for efficiently collecting and organizing subsurface data have progressed recently with the advent of modern data collection and transmission systems. However, our ability to process this information in the form of numerical models has lagged behind. We propose a new paradigm for the development of complex subsurface flow and transport models in which the inverse analysis is performed in real time, simultaneously with the data collection. Furthermore, we propose to use the inverse model to control the data collection or the operating conditions of an extraction system in real time. This is extremely important because post

  1. Enabling Real-time Water Decision Support Services Using Model as a Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, T.; Minsker, B. S.; Lee, J. S.; Salas, F. R.; Maidment, D. R.; David, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    Through application of computational methods and an integrated information system, data and river modeling services can help researchers and decision makers more rapidly understand river conditions under alternative scenarios. To enable this capability, workflows (i.e., analysis and model steps) are created and published as Web services delivered through an internet browser, including model inputs, a published workflow service, and visualized outputs. The RAPID model, which is a river routing model developed at University of Texas Austin for parallel computation of river discharge, has been implemented as a workflow and published as a Web application. This allows non-technical users to remotely execute the model and visualize results as a service through a simple Web interface. The model service and Web application has been prototyped in the San Antonio and Guadalupe River Basin in Texas, with input from university and agency partners. In the future, optimization model workflows will be developed to link with the RAPID model workflow to provide real-time water allocation decision support services.

  2. The NIST Real-Time Control System (RCS): A Reference Model Architecture for Computational Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albus, James S.

    1996-01-01

    The Real-time Control System (RCS) developed at NIST and elsewhere over the past two decades defines a reference model architecture for design and analysis of complex intelligent control systems. The RCS architecture consists of a hierarchically layered set of functional processing modules connected by a network of communication pathways. The primary distinguishing feature of the layers is the bandwidth of the control loops. The characteristic bandwidth of each level is determined by the spatial and temporal integration window of filters, the temporal frequency of signals and events, the spatial frequency of patterns, and the planning horizon and granularity of the planners that operate at each level. At each level, tasks are decomposed into sequential subtasks, to be performed by cooperating sets of subordinate agents. At each level, signals from sensors are filtered and correlated with spatial and temporal features that are relevant to the control function being implemented at that level.

  3. Real-time model-based vision system for object acquisition and tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian; Gennery, Donald B.; Bon, Bruce; Litwin, Todd

    1987-01-01

    A machine vision system is described which is designed to acquire and track polyhedral objects moving and rotating in space by means of two or more cameras, programmable image-processing hardware, and a general-purpose computer for high-level functions. The image-processing hardware is capable of performing a large variety of operations on images and on image-like arrays of data. Acquisition utilizes image locations and velocities of the features extracted by the image-processing hardware to determine the three-dimensional position, orientation, velocity, and angular velocity of the object. Tracking correlates edges detected in the current image with edge locations predicted from an internal model of the object and its motion, continually updating velocity information to predict where edges should appear in future frames. With some 10 frames processed per second, real-time tracking is possible.

  4. A real-time inverse quantised transform for multi-standard with dynamic resolution support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chi-Chia; Lin, Chun-Ying; Zhang, Ce

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a real-time configurable intelligent property (IP) core is presented for image/video decoding process in compatibility with the standard MPEG-4 Visual and the standard H.264/AVC. The inverse quantised discrete cosine and integer transform can be used to perform inverse quantised discrete cosine transform and inverse quantised inverse integer transforms which only required shift and add operations. Meanwhile, COordinate Rotation DIgital Computer iterations and compensation steps are adjustable in order to compensate for the video compression quality regarding various data throughput. The implementations are embedded in publicly available software XVID Codes 1.2.2 for the standard MPEG-4 Visual and the H.264/AVC reference software JM 16.1, where the experimental results show that the balance between the computational complexity and video compression quality is retained. At the end, FPGA synthesised results show that the proposed IP core can bring advantages to low hardware costs and also provide real-time performance for Full HD and 4K-2K video decoding.

  5. Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Instrumentation for Real-time Enzymatic Reaction Rate Measurements by NMR.

    PubMed

    Balzan, Riccardo; Fernandes, Laetitia; Comment, Arnaud; Pidial, Laetitia; Tavitian, Bertrand; Vasos, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    The main limitation of NMR-based investigations is low sensitivity. This prompts for long acquisition times, thus preventing real-time NMR measurements of metabolic transformations. Hyperpolarization via dissolution DNP circumvents part of the sensitivity issues thanks to the large out-of-equilibrium nuclear magnetization stemming from the electron-to-nucleus spin polarization transfer. The high NMR signal obtained can be used to monitor chemical reactions in real time. The downside of hyperpolarized NMR resides in the limited time window available for signal acquisition, which is usually on the order of the nuclear spin longitudinal relaxation time constant, T1, or, in favorable cases, on the order of the relaxation time constant associated with the singlet-state of coupled nuclei, TLLS. Cellular uptake of endogenous molecules and metabolic rates can provide essential information on tumor development and drug response. Numerous previous hyperpolarized NMR studies have demonstrated the relevancy of pyruvate as a metabolic substrate for monitoring enzymatic activity in vivo. This work provides a detailed description of the experimental setup and methods required for the study of enzymatic reactions, in particular the pyruvate-to-lactate conversion rate in presence of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), by hyperpolarized NMR. PMID:26967906

  6. Providing Real-time Sea Ice Modeling Support to the U.S. Coast Guard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, Richard; Dykes, James; Hebert, David; Posey, Pamela; Rogers, Erick; Wallcraft, Alan; Phelps, Michael; Smedstad, Ole Martin; Wang, Shouping; Geiszler, Dan

    2016-04-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) supported the U.S. Coast Guard Research Development Center (RDC) through a demonstration project during the summer and autumn of 2015. Specifically, a modeling system composed of a mesoscale atmospheric model, regional sea ice model, and regional wave model were loosely coupled to provide real-time 72-hr forecasts of environmental conditions for the Beaufort/Chukchi Seas. The system components included a 2-km regional Community Ice CodE (CICE) sea ice model, 15-km Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) atmospheric model, and a 5-km regional WAVEWATCH III wave model. The wave model utilized modeled sea ice concentration fields to incorporate the effects of sea ice on waves. The other modeling components assimilated atmosphere, ocean, and ice observations available from satellite and in situ sources. The modeling system generated daily 72-hr forecasts of synoptic weather (including visibility), ice drift, ice thickness, ice concentration and ice strength for missions within the economic exclusion zone off the coast of Alaska and a transit to the North Pole in support of the National Science Foundation GEOTRACES cruise. Model forecasts graphics were shared on a common web page with selected graphical products made available via ftp for bandwidth limited users. Model ice thickness and ice drift show very good agreement compared with Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) Ice Mass Balance buoys. This demonstration served as a precursor to a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave-ice modeling system under development. National Ice Center (NIC) analysts used these model data products (CICE and COAMPS) along with other existing model and satellite data to produce the predicted 48-hr position of the ice edge. The NIC served as a liaison with the RDC and NRL to provide feedback on the model predictions. This evaluation provides a baseline analysis of the current models for future comparison studies

  7. Real-time source deformation modeling through GNSS permanent stations at Merapi volcano (Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauducel, F.; Nurnaning, A.; Iguchi, M.; Fahmi, A. A.; Nandaka, M. A.; Sumarti, S.; Subandriyo, S.; Metaxian, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Mt. Merapi (Java, Indonesia) is one of the most active and dangerous volcano in the world. A first GPS repetition network was setup and periodically measured since 1993, allowing detecting a deep magma reservoir, quantifying magma flux in conduit and identifying shallow discontinuities around the former crater (Beauducel and Cornet, 1999;Beauducel et al., 2000, 2006). After the 2010 centennial eruption, when this network was almost completely destroyed, Indonesian and Japanese teams installed a new continuous GPS network for monitoring purpose (Iguchi et al., 2011), consisting of 3 stations located at the volcano flanks, plus a reference station at the Yogyakarta Observatory (BPPTKG).In the framework of DOMERAPI project (2013-2016) we have completed this network with 5 additional stations, which are located on the summit area and volcano surrounding. The new stations are 1-Hz sampling, GNSS (GPS + GLONASS) receivers, and near real-time data streaming to the Observatory. An automatic processing has been developed and included in the WEBOBS system (Beauducel et al., 2010) based on GIPSY software computing precise daily moving solutions every hour, and for different time scales (2 months, 1 and 5 years), time series and velocity vectors. A real-time source modeling estimation has also been implemented. It uses the depth-varying point source solution (Mogi, 1958; Williams and Wadge, 1998) in a systematic inverse problem model exploration that displays location, volume variation and 3-D probability map.The operational system should be able to better detect and estimate the location and volume variations of possible magma sources, and to follow magma transfer towards the surface. This should help monitoring and contribute to decision making during future unrest or eruption.

  8. Improving Computational Efficiency of Model Predictive Control Genetic Algorithms for Real-Time Decision Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsker, B. S.; Zimmer, A. L.; Ostfeld, A.; Schmidt, A.

    2014-12-01

    Enabling real-time decision support, particularly under conditions of uncertainty, requires computationally efficient algorithms that can rapidly generate recommendations. In this paper, a suite of model predictive control (MPC) genetic algorithms are developed and tested offline to explore their value for reducing CSOs during real-time use in a deep-tunnel sewer system. MPC approaches include the micro-GA, the probability-based compact GA, and domain-specific GA methods that reduce the number of decision variable values analyzed within the sewer hydraulic model, thus reducing algorithm search space. Minimum fitness and constraint values achieved by all GA approaches, as well as computational times required to reach the minimum values, are compared to large population sizes with long convergence times. Optimization results for a subset of the Chicago combined sewer system indicate that genetic algorithm variations with coarse decision variable representation, eventually transitioning to the entire range of decision variable values, are most efficient at addressing the CSO control problem. Although diversity-enhancing micro-GAs evaluate a larger search space and exhibit shorter convergence times, these representations do not reach minimum fitness and constraint values. The domain-specific GAs prove to be the most efficient and are used to test CSO sensitivity to energy costs, CSO penalties, and pressurization constraint values. The results show that CSO volumes are highly dependent on the tunnel pressurization constraint, with reductions of 13% to 77% possible with less conservative operational strategies. Because current management practices may not account for varying costs at CSO locations and electricity rate changes in the summer and winter, the sensitivity of the results is evaluated for variable seasonal and diurnal CSO penalty costs and electricity-related system maintenance costs, as well as different sluice gate constraint levels. These findings indicate

  9. Model-based assessment of erlotinib effect in vitro measured by real-time cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Benay, Stephan; Meille, Christophe; Kustermann, Stefan; Walter, Isabelle; Walz, Antje; Gonsard, P Alexis; Pietilae, Elina; Kratochwil, Nicole; Iliadis, Athanassios; Roth, Adrian; Lave, Thierry

    2015-06-01

    Real time cell analysis (RTCA) is an impedance-based technology which tracks various living cell characteristics over time, such as their number, morphology or adhesion to the extra cellular matrix. However, there is no consensus about how RTCA data should be used to quantitatively evaluate pharmacodynamic parameters which describe drug efficacy or toxicity. The purpose of this work was to determine how RTCA data can be analyzed with mathematical modeling to explore and quantify drug effect in vitro. The pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic erlotinib concentration profile predicted by the model and its effect on the human epidermoïd carcinoma cell line A431 in vitro was measured through RTCA output, designated as cell index. A population approach was used to estimate model parameter values, considering a plate well as the statistical unit. The model related the cell index to the number of cells by means of a proportionality factor. Cell growth was described by an exponential model. A delay between erlotinib pharmacokinetics and cell killing was described by a transit compartment model, and the effect potency, by an E max function of erlotinib concentration. The modeling analysis performed on RTCA data distinguished drug effects in vitro on cell number from other effects likely to modify the relationship between cell index and cell number. It also revealed a time-dependent decrease of erlotinib concentration over time, described by a mono-exponential pharmacokinetic model with nonspecific binding. PMID:25822652

  10. Real-Time PCR Assay for Clostridium perfringens in Broiler Chickens in a Challenge Model of Necrotic Enteritis▿

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shu-Biao; Rodgers, Nicholas; Choct, Mingan

    2011-01-01

    We compared ileal Clostridium perfringens quantification results produced by real-time PCR and culture-based methods in broiler chickens in a challenge model of necrotic enteritis. Assessment of the relative standard deviations (RSDs) revealed that the real-time PCR assay generated a smaller standard deviation and thus was more precise than the culture-based method. Linear regression analysis indicated that the bacterial counts of these two methods were highly correlated (R2 = 0.845). We suggest that real-time PCR could be a replacement of the culture method for quantifying C. perfringens in the intestinal tracts of broiler chickens. PMID:21148703

  11. The JPL GRIP Portal - Serving Near Real-time Observation and Model Forecast for Hurricane Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P.; Hristova-Veleva, S. M.; Turk, F. J.; Vu, Q.; Knosp, B. W.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Poulsen, W. L.; Shen, T. J.; Licata, S. J.

    2010-12-01

    NASA conducted a field experiment, the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP), in the summer of 2010 to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. The DC-8 aircraft and the Global Hawk Unmanned Airborne System (UAS) were deployed loaded with instruments for measurements including lightning, temperature, 3D wind, precipitation, liquid and ice water contents, aerosol and cloud profiles. JPL created a web portal to collect, process and display both the satellite and the airborne observations in near real-time (NRT) and integrated then with the hurricane forecast models. The objective of the JPL GRIP portal is to provide environmental context and temporal continuity for the field campaign observations to help: (1) mission planning, (2) understanding of the physical processes, and (3) improving models through validation and data assimilation. Built on top of the JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) infrastructure, we developed a GRIP portal presenting a near-real time (NRT) basin-scale view of the atmospheric and surface conditions over the Atlantic, characterizing large-scale and storm-scale processes, as depicted by satellites and models. Using Google Earth embedded in the web browser and two independent calendars, we provide 3D visualization of a comprehensive collection of observations and model results as overlapping image overlays, wind vectors, curtain plots, or clickable tracks. We also provide Google Earth time animations of multiple data and model variables. In the portal, we offer more than two dozen NRT satellite products from a wide variety of instruments, model forecasts from four large-scale models (i.e., NOGAPS, GFS, ECMWF, and UKMET), and the best tracks and the forecast tracks from National Hurricane Center’s ATCF models. As they become available, we also display the airborne observations from HAMSR, APR2 and Dropsonde. It is a great challenge to set up a reliable infrastructure to collect data

  12. IPS - a System for Real-Time Navigation and 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grießbach, D.; Baumbach, D.; Börner, A.; Buder, M.; Ernst, I.; Funk, E.; Wohlfeil, J.; Zuev, S.

    2012-07-01

    fdaReliable navigation and 3D modeling is a necessary requirement for any autonomous system in real world scenarios. German Aerospace Center (DLR) developed a system providing precise information about local position and orientation of a mobile platform as well as three-dimensional information about its environment in real-time. This system, called Integral Positioning System (IPS) can be applied for indoor environments and outdoor environments. To achieve high precision, reliability, integrity and availability a multi-sensor approach was chosen. The important role of sensor data synchronization, system calibration and spatial referencing is emphasized because the data from several sensors has to be fused using a Kalman filter. A hardware operating system (HW-OS) is presented, that facilitates the low-level integration of different interfaces. The benefit of this approach is an increased precision of synchronization at the expense of additional engineering costs. It will be shown that the additional effort is leveraged by the new design concept since the HW-OS methodology allows a proven, flexible and fast design process, a high re-usability of common components and consequently a higher reliability within the low-level sensor fusion. Another main focus of the paper is on IPS software. The DLR developed, implemented and tested a flexible and extensible software concept for data grabbing, efficient data handling, data preprocessing (e.g. image rectification) being essential for thematic data processing. Standard outputs of IPS are a trajectory of the moving platform and a high density 3D point cloud of the current environment. This information is provided in real-time. Based on these results, information processing on more abstract levels can be executed.

  13. Techniques for increasing the update rate of real-time dynamic computer graphic displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahlbaum, W. M., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes several techniques which may be used to increase the animation update rate of real-time computer raster graphic displays. The techniques were developed on the ADAGE RDS 3000 graphic system in support of the Advanced Concepts Simulator at the NASA Langley Research Center. The first technique involves pre-processing of the next animation frame while the previous one is being erased from the screen memory. The second technique involves the use of a parallel processor, the AGG4, for high speed character generation. The description of the AGG4 includes the Barrel Shifter which is a part of the hardware and is the key to the high speed character rendition. The final result of this total effort was a four fold increase in the update rate of an existing primary flight display from 4 to 16 frames per second.

  14. Real-time dynamic calibration of a tunable frequency laser source using a Fabry-Pérot interferometer.

    PubMed

    Mandula, Gábor; Kis, Zsolt; Lengyel, Krisztián

    2015-12-01

    We report on a method for real-time dynamic calibration of a tunable external cavity diode laser by using a partially mode-matched plano-concave Fabry-Pérot interferometer in reflection geometry. Wide range laser frequency scanning is carried out by piezo-driven tilting of a diffractive grating playing the role of a frequency selective mirror in the laser cavity. The grating tilting system has a considerable mechanical inertness, so static laser frequency calibration leads to false results. The proposed real-time dynamic calibration based on the identification of primary- and Gouy-effect type secondary interference peaks with known frequency and temporal history can be used for a wide scanning range (from 0.2 GHz to more than 1 GHz). A concave spherical mirror with a radius of R = 100 cm and a plain 1% transmitting mirror was used as a Fabry-Pérot interferometer with various resonator lengths to investigate and demonstrate real-time calibration procedures for two kinds of laser frequency scanning functions. PMID:26724003

  15. Real-time dynamic calibration of a tunable frequency laser source using a Fabry-Pérot interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Mandula, Gábor Kis, Zsolt; Lengyel, Krisztián

    2015-12-15

    We report on a method for real-time dynamic calibration of a tunable external cavity diode laser by using a partially mode-matched plano-concave Fabry-Pérot interferometer in reflection geometry. Wide range laser frequency scanning is carried out by piezo-driven tilting of a diffractive grating playing the role of a frequency selective mirror in the laser cavity. The grating tilting system has a considerable mechanical inertness, so static laser frequency calibration leads to false results. The proposed real-time dynamic calibration based on the identification of primary- and Gouy-effect type secondary interference peaks with known frequency and temporal history can be used for a wide scanning range (from 0.2 GHz to more than 1 GHz). A concave spherical mirror with a radius of R = 100 cm and a plain 1% transmitting mirror was used as a Fabry-Pérot interferometer with various resonator lengths to investigate and demonstrate real-time calibration procedures for two kinds of laser frequency scanning functions.

  16. High dynamic range adaptive real-time smart camera: an overview of the HDR-ARTiST project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapray, Pierre-Jean; Heyrman, Barthélémy; Ginhac, Dominique

    2015-04-01

    Standard cameras capture only a fraction of the information that is visible to the human visual system. This is specifically true for natural scenes including areas of low and high illumination due to transitions between sunlit and shaded areas. When capturing such a scene, many cameras are unable to store the full Dynamic Range (DR) resulting in low quality video where details are concealed in shadows or washed out by sunlight. The imaging technique that can overcome this problem is called HDR (High Dynamic Range) imaging. This paper describes a complete smart camera built around a standard off-the-shelf LDR (Low Dynamic Range) sensor and a Virtex-6 FPGA board. This smart camera called HDR-ARtiSt (High Dynamic Range Adaptive Real-time Smart camera) is able to produce a real-time HDR live video color stream by recording and combining multiple acquisitions of the same scene while varying the exposure time. This technique appears as one of the most appropriate and cheapest solution to enhance the dynamic range of real-life environments. HDR-ARtiSt embeds real-time multiple captures, HDR processing, data display and transfer of a HDR color video for a full sensor resolution (1280 1024 pixels) at 60 frames per second. The main contributions of this work are: (1) Multiple Exposure Control (MEC) dedicated to the smart image capture with alternating three exposure times that are dynamically evaluated from frame to frame, (2) Multi-streaming Memory Management Unit (MMMU) dedicated to the memory read/write operations of the three parallel video streams, corresponding to the different exposure times, (3) HRD creating by combining the video streams using a specific hardware version of the Devebecs technique, and (4) Global Tone Mapping (GTM) of the HDR scene for display on a standard LCD monitor.

  17. Real time in vivo investigation of superoxide dynamics in zebrafish liver using a single-fiber fluorescent probe

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Chung; Ken, Chuian-Fu; Hsu, Che-Wei; Liu, Ya-Ging

    2013-01-01

    Superoxide anion is the key radical that causes intracellular oxidative stress. The lack of a method to directly monitor superoxide concentration in vivo in real time has severely hindered our understanding on its pathophysiology. We made transgenic zebrafish to specifically express yellow fluorescent proteins, a reversible superoxide-specific indicator, in the liver and used a fiber-optic fluorescent probe to noninvasively monitor the superoxide concentration in real time. Several superoxide-inducing and scavenging reagents were administrated onto the fish to alter superoxide concentrations. The distinct biochemical pathways of the reagents can be discerned from the transient behaviors of fluorescence time courses. These results demonstrate the feasibility of this method for analyzing superoxide dynamics and its potential as an in vivo pharmaceutical screening platform. PMID:24049691

  18. Real-Time Dynamic Spectrum Analysis for Plasma Electron Density and Faraday Rotation Angle Measurement on HL-2A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Baogang; Wu, Jun; Fan, Weiwei; Wu, Tongyu; Zhou, Yan; Yin, Zejie

    2015-12-01

    Electron density and Faraday rotation angle are important physical parameters in nuclear fusion research. To measure them simultaneously, the three-wave polarimeter/interferometer diagnostic system is applied. Both the final probe output signal and the reference signal contain three frequency components. The time-varying phase difference curve of each frequency component can be measured by the Real-time Dynamic Spectrum Analysis (RDSA) method based on Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The phase difference precision is better than 0.1° and the real-time feedback delay is less than 1 ms, which satisfy the requirements of HL-2A. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11375195 and 11275059) and the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB104003, 2014GB109001)

  19. Design and application of real-time visual attention model for the exploration of 3D virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Hillaire, Sébastien; Lécuyer, Anatole; Regia-Corte, Tony; Cozot, Rémi; Royan, Jérôme; Breton, Gaspard

    2012-03-01

    This paper studies the design and application of a novel visual attention model designed to compute user's gaze position automatically, i.e., without using a gaze-tracking system. The model we propose is specifically designed for real-time first-person exploration of 3D virtual environments. It is the first model adapted to this context which can compute in real time a continuous gaze point position instead of a set of 3D objects potentially observed by the user. To do so, contrary to previous models which use a mesh-based representation of visual objects, we introduce a representation based on surface-elements. Our model also simulates visual reflexes and the cognitive processes which take place in the brain such as the gaze behavior associated to first-person navigation in the virtual environment. Our visual attention model combines both bottom-up and top-down components to compute a continuous gaze point position on screen that hopefully matches the user's one. We conducted an experiment to study and compare the performance of our method with a state-of-the-art approach. Our results are found significantly better with sometimes more than 100 percent of accuracy gained. This suggests that computing a gaze point in a 3D virtual environment in real time is possible and is a valid approach, compared to object-based approaches. Finally, we expose different applications of our model when exploring virtual environments. We present different algorithms which can improve or adapt the visual feedback of virtual environments based on gaze information. We first propose a level-of-detail approach that heavily relies on multiple-texture sampling. We show that it is possible to use the gaze information of our visual attention model to increase visual quality where the user is looking, while maintaining a high-refresh rate. Second, we introduce the use of the visual attention model in three visual effects inspired by the human visual system namely: depth-of-field blur, camera

  20. Real-time inversions for finite fault slip models and rupture geometry based on high-rate GPS data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minson, Sarah E.; Murray, Jessica R.; Langbein, John O.; Gomberg, Joan S.

    2015-01-01

    We present an inversion strategy capable of using real-time high-rate GPS data to simultaneously solve for a distributed slip model and fault geometry in real time as a rupture unfolds. We employ Bayesian inference to find the optimal fault geometry and the distribution of possible slip models for that geometry using a simple analytical solution. By adopting an analytical Bayesian approach, we can solve this complex inversion problem (including calculating the uncertainties on our results) in real time. Furthermore, since the joint inversion for distributed slip and fault geometry can be computed in real time, the time required to obtain a source model of the earthquake does not depend on the computational cost. Instead, the time required is controlled by the duration of the rupture and the time required for information to propagate from the source to the receivers. We apply our modeling approach, called Bayesian Evidence-based Fault Orientation and Real-time Earthquake Slip, to the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake, 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake, and a simulated Hayward fault earthquake. In all three cases, the inversion recovers the magnitude, spatial distribution of slip, and fault geometry in real time. Since our inversion relies on static offsets estimated from real-time high-rate GPS data, we also present performance tests of various approaches to estimating quasi-static offsets in real time. We find that the raw high-rate time series are the best data to use for determining the moment magnitude of the event, but slightly smoothing the raw time series helps stabilize the inversion for fault geometry.

  1. Real-time inversions for finite fault slip models and rupture geometry based on high-rate GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minson, S. E.; Murray, Jessica R.; Langbein, John O.; Gomberg, Joan S.

    2014-04-01

    We present an inversion strategy capable of using real-time high-rate GPS data to simultaneously solve for a distributed slip model and fault geometry in real time as a rupture unfolds. We employ Bayesian inference to find the optimal fault geometry and the distribution of possible slip models for that geometry using a simple analytical solution. By adopting an analytical Bayesian approach, we can solve this complex inversion problem (including calculating the uncertainties on our results) in real time. Furthermore, since the joint inversion for distributed slip and fault geometry can be computed in real time, the time required to obtain a source model of the earthquake does not depend on the computational cost. Instead, the time required is controlled by the duration of the rupture and the time required for information to propagate from the source to the receivers. We apply our modeling approach, called Bayesian Evidence-based Fault Orientation and Real-time Earthquake Slip, to the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake, 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake, and a simulated Hayward fault earthquake. In all three cases, the inversion recovers the magnitude, spatial distribution of slip, and fault geometry in real time. Since our inversion relies on static offsets estimated from real-time high-rate GPS data, we also present performance tests of various approaches to estimating quasi-static offsets in real time. We find that the raw high-rate time series are the best data to use for determining the moment magnitude of the event, but slightly smoothing the raw time series helps stabilize the inversion for fault geometry.

  2. A search for model parsimony in a real time flood forecasting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, G.; Balistrocchi, M.

    2009-04-01

    As regards the hydrological simulation of flood events, a physically based distributed approach is the most appealing one, especially in those areas where the spatial variability of the soil hydraulic properties as well as of the meteorological forcing cannot be left apart, such as in mountainous regions. On the other hand, dealing with real time flood forecasting systems, less detailed models requiring a minor number of parameters may be more convenient, reducing both the computational costs and the calibration uncertainty. In fact in this case a precise quantification of the entire hydrograph pattern is not necessary, while the expected output of a real time flood forecasting system is just an estimate of the peak discharge, the time to peak and in some cases the flood volume. In this perspective a parsimonious model has to be found in order to increase the efficiency of the system. A suitable case study was identified in the northern Apennines: the Taro river is a right tributary to the Po river and drains about 2000 km2 of mountains, hills and floodplain, equally distributed . The hydrometeorological monitoring of this medium sized watershed is managed by ARPA Emilia Romagna through a dense network of uptodate gauges (about 30 rain gauges and 10 hydrometers). Detailed maps of the surface elevation, land use and soil texture characteristics are also available. Five flood events were recorded by the new monitoring network in the years 2003-2007: during these events the peak discharge was higher than 1000 m3/s, which is actually quite a high value when compared to the mean discharge rate of about 30 m3/s. The rainfall spatial patterns of such storms were analyzed in previous works by means of geostatistical tools and a typical semivariogram was defined, with the aim of establishing a typical storm structure leading to flood events in the Taro river. The available information was implemented into a distributed flood event model with a spatial resolution of 90m

  3. Real time acousto-ultrasonic NDE technique for monitoring damage in ceramic composites under dynamic loads. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, ANIL

    1995-08-01

    Research effort was directed towards developing a near real-time, acousto-ultrasonic (AU), nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tool to study the failure mechanisms of ceramic composites. Progression of damage is monitored in real-time by observing the changes in the received AU signal during the actual test. During the real-time AU test, the AU signals are generated and received by the AU transducers attached to the specimen while it is being subjected to increasing quasi-static loads or cyclic loads (10 Hz, R = 1.0). The received AU signals for 64 successive pulses were gated in the time domain (T = 40.96 micro sec) and then averaged every second over ten load cycles and stored in a computer file during fatigue tests. These averaged gated signals are representative of the damage state of the specimen at that point of its fatigue life. This is also the first major attempt in the development and application of real-time AU for continuously monitoring damage accumulation during fatigue without interrupting the test. The present work has verified the capability of the AU technique to assess the damage state in silicon carbide/calcium aluminosilicate (SiC/CAS) and silicon carbide/ magnesium aluminosilicate (SiC/MAS) ceramic composites. Continuous monitoring of damage initiation and progression under quasi-static ramp loading in tension to failure of unidirectional and cross-ply SiC/CAS and quasi-isotropic SiC/MAS ceramic composite specimens at room temperature was accomplished using near real-time AU parameters. The AU technique was shown to be able to detect the stress levels for the onset and saturation of matrix cracks, respectively. The critical cracking stress level is used as a design stress for brittle matrix composites operating at elevated temperatures. The AU technique has found that the critical cracking stress level is 10-15% below the level presently obtained for design purposes from analytical models.

  4. Real-time classification of humans versus animals using profiling sensors and hidden Markov tree model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossen, Jakir; Jacobs, Eddie L.; Chari, Srikant

    2015-07-01

    Linear pyroelectric array sensors have enabled useful classifications of objects such as humans and animals to be performed with relatively low-cost hardware in border and perimeter security applications. Ongoing research has sought to improve the performance of these sensors through signal processing algorithms. In the research presented here, we introduce the use of hidden Markov tree (HMT) models for object recognition in images generated by linear pyroelectric sensors. HMTs are trained to statistically model the wavelet features of individual objects through an expectation-maximization learning process. Human versus animal classification for a test object is made by evaluating its wavelet features against the trained HMTs using the maximum-likelihood criterion. The classification performance of this approach is compared to two other techniques; a texture, shape, and spectral component features (TSSF) based classifier and a speeded-up robust feature (SURF) classifier. The evaluation indicates that among the three techniques, the wavelet-based HMT model works well, is robust, and has improved classification performance compared to a SURF-based algorithm in equivalent computation time. When compared to the TSSF-based classifier, the HMT model has a slightly degraded performance but almost an order of magnitude improvement in computation time enabling real-time implementation.

  5. Near-real Time Interpretation of Micro-earthquake Data for Reservoir Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchings, L. J.; Boyle, K.; Bonner, B. P.

    2009-12-01

    Geothermal, CO2 sequestration, oil and gas reservoir modeling depends on identifying reservoir geology, fractures, fluids, and permeable zones. We present an approach that utilizes passive seismic methods to update reservoir models in near-real time. Recent developments of inexpensive micro-earthquake recorders and sensors, high performance desktop computer capabilities, high resolution tomographic imaging techniques, high resolution micro-earthquake location programs, and new developments in interpretation can significantly improve reservoir exploration, exploitation, and management at reasonable costs in time and dollars. We have developed a rapid and inexpensive reservoir modeling package based on interpretation of micro-earthquake recordings analysis. The package includes an automated P- and S-wave picker, high-resolution double-difference earthquake locations, 3-D tomographic inversions for P- and S-wave velocity structure and attenuation (Qp and Qs) structure, and seismic moments and stress drops. We utilize a three-dimensional visualization program to examine spatial associations and correlations of reservoir properties, and apply rock physics (including effective medium theories) in interpretation. Modeling is typically in the depth range of reservoirs of interest, usually surface to 5 Km depth, and depends upon sufficient numbers of earthquakes, usually 100 - 500 events. This can be updated regularly to monitor temporal changes. We demonstrate this package with The Geysers and Salton Sea geothermal fields.

  6. Source modeling and inversion with near real-time GPS: a GITEWS perspective for Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babeyko, A. Y.; Hoechner, A.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2010-07-01

    We present the GITEWS approach to source modeling for the tsunami early warning in Indonesia. Near-field tsunami implies special requirements to both warning time and details of source characterization. To meet these requirements, we employ geophysical and geological information to predefine a maximum number of rupture parameters. We discretize the tsunamigenic Sunda plate interface into an ordered grid of patches (150×25) and employ the concept of Green's functions for forward and inverse rupture modeling. Rupture Generator, a forward modeling tool, additionally employs different scaling laws and slip shape functions to construct physically reasonable source models using basic seismic information only (magnitude and epicenter location). GITEWS runs a library of semi- and fully-synthetic scenarios to be extensively employed by system testing as well as by warning center personnel teaching and training. Near real-time GPS observations are a very valuable complement to the local tsunami warning system. Their inversion provides quick (within a few minutes on an event) estimation of the earthquake magnitude, rupture position and, in case of sufficient station coverage, details of slip distribution.

  7. Computer optimization techniques for NASA Langley's CSI evolutionary model's real-time control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Kenny B.; Ugoletti, Roberto; Sulla, Jeff

    1992-01-01

    The evolution and optimization of a real-time digital control system is presented. The control system is part of a testbed used to perform focused technology research on the interactions of spacecraft platform and instrument controllers with the flexible-body dynamics of the platform and platform appendages. The control system consists of Computer Automated Measurement and Control (CAMAC) standard data acquisition equipment interfaced to a workstation computer. The goal of this work is to optimize the control system's performance to support controls research using controllers with up to 50 states and frame rates above 200 Hz. The original system could support a 16-state controller operating at a rate of 150 Hz. By using simple yet effective software improvements, Input/Output (I/O) latencies and contention problems are reduced or eliminated in the control system. The final configuration can support a 16-state controller operating at 475 Hz. Effectively the control system's performance was increased by a factor of 3.

  8. Finite Fault Modeling in Near-Real Time for Tsunami Warning Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, S. A.; Lundgren, P.

    2004-12-01

    The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) provides notification to its clients in the Pacific basin of large earthquakes with an assessment of their potential for tsunamigenesis. It is our goal to issue our message products as soon as possible after the detection of a Pacific basin earthquake. Typically, our first official messages are issued within 15 minutes of an earthquake. The Achilles heel of the warning system has been its inability to predict the size of the waves when they arrive on shore. Due to taking a conservative posture, this has resulted in false evacuations. The tsunami modeling community has developed tools that give the tsunami warning system a nascent ability to forecast wave heights. This study is a step towards using a more realistic source, rather than rule of thumb source prescriptions based on Mw, which may be inadequate for complex events resulting in modeling errors in the near and regional fields. We are experimenting with computing slip distributions in near real time in an effort to provide a more realistic source for the purpose of tsunami modeling. The PTWC currently receives broadband data from as many as 100 stations at any given time. Hence we are well situated to do the fault modeling in near real time. The procedure requires a fault plane solution. We use a variant of the method used by Mendoza (SRL, Vol. 67, 19-26, 1996) to perform the inversion. Tests on synthetic earthquakes illustrate the limitations and parameter trade-offs inherent to bodywave inverse solutions. We have so far applied this technique to the Mw 8.4 2001 Peru earthquake and have obtained results that are broadly consistent with those found by previous studies Giovanni et al., ( GRL, Vol. 29, 14-1 - 14-4, 2002), Bilek and Ruff (GRL Vol. 29, 21-1 - 21-4, 2002) and Kikuchi ( wwweic.eri.u-tokyo.ac.jp/EIC/EIC_News/105E.html ). The resulting source time function as found by other studies is primarily bimodal, with one peak occurring at 15 sec, and a much larger

  9. Improving real-time inflow forecasting into hydropower reservoirs through a complementary modelling framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gragne, A. S.; Sharma, A.; Mehrotra, R.; Alfredsen, K.

    2015-08-01

    Accuracy of reservoir inflow forecasts is instrumental for maximizing the value of water resources and benefits gained through hydropower generation. Improving hourly reservoir inflow forecasts over a 24 h lead time is considered within the day-ahead (Elspot) market of the Nordic exchange market. A complementary modelling framework presents an approach for improving real-time forecasting without needing to modify the pre-existing forecasting model, but instead formulating an independent additive or complementary model that captures the structure the existing operational model may be missing. We present here the application of this principle for issuing improved hourly inflow forecasts into hydropower reservoirs over extended lead times, and the parameter estimation procedure reformulated to deal with bias, persistence and heteroscedasticity. The procedure presented comprises an error model added on top of an unalterable constant parameter conceptual model. This procedure is applied in the 207 km2 Krinsvatn catchment in central Norway. The structure of the error model is established based on attributes of the residual time series from the conceptual model. Besides improving forecast skills of operational models, the approach estimates the uncertainty in the complementary model structure and produces probabilistic inflow forecasts that entrain suitable information for reducing uncertainty in the decision-making processes in hydropower systems operation. Deterministic and probabilistic evaluations revealed an overall significant improvement in forecast accuracy for lead times up to 17 h. Evaluation of the percentage of observations bracketed in the forecasted 95 % confidence interval indicated that the degree of success in containing 95 % of the observations varies across seasons and hydrologic years.

  10. Real-time quantum trajectories for classically allowed dynamics in strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plimak, L. I.; Ivanov, Misha Yu.

    2015-10-01

    Both the physical picture of the dynamics of atoms and molecules in intense infrared fields and its theoretical description use the concept of electron trajectories. Here, we address a key question which arises in this context: Are distinctly quantum features of these trajectories, such as the complex-valued coordinates, physically relevant in the classically allowed region of phase space, and what is their origin? First, we argue that solutions of classical equations of motion can account for quantum effects. To this end, we construct an exact solution to the classical Hamilton-Jacobi equation which accounts for dynamics of the wave packet, and show that this solution is physically correct in the limit ?. Second, we show that imaginary components of classical trajectories are directly linked to the finite size of the initial wave packet in momentum space. This way, if the electronic wave packet produced by optical tunnelling in strong infrared fields is localised both in coordinate and momentum, its motion after tunnelling ipso facto cannot be described with purely classical trajectories - in contrast to popular models in the literature.

  11. Hydraulic Modeling and Evolutionary Optimization for Enhanced Real-Time Decision Support of Combined Sewer Overflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, A. L.; Minsker, B. S.; Schmidt, A. R.; Ostfeld, A.

    2011-12-01

    Real-time mitigation of combined sewer overflows (CSOs) requires evaluation of multiple operational strategies during rapidly changing rainfall events. Simulation models for hydraulically complex systems can effectively provide decision support for short time intervals when coupled with efficient optimization. This work seeks to reduce CSOs for a test case roughly based on the North Branch of the Chicago Tunnel and Reservoir Plan (TARP), which is operated by the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRDGC). The North Branch tunnel flows to a junction with the main TARP system. The Chicago combined sewer system alleviates potential CSOs by directing high interceptor flows through sluice gates and dropshafts to a deep tunnel. Decision variables to control CSOs consist of sluice gate positions that control water flow to the tunnel as well as a treatment plant pumping rate that lowers interceptor water levels. A physics-based numerical model is used to simulate the hydraulic effects of changes in the decision variables. The numerical model is step-wise steady and conserves water mass and momentum at each time step by iterating through a series of look-up tables. The look-up tables are constructed offline to avoid extensive real-time calculations, and describe conduit storage and water elevations as a function of flow. A genetic algorithm (GA) is used to minimize CSOs at each time interval within a moving horizon framework. Decision variables are coded at 15-minute increments and GA solutions are two hours in duration. At each 15-minute interval, the algorithm identifies a good solution for a two-hour rainfall forecast. Three GA modifications help reduce optimization time. The first adjustment reduces the search alphabet by eliminating sluice gate positions that do not influence overflow volume. The second GA retains knowledge of the best decision at the previous interval by shifting the genes in the best previous sequence to initialize search at

  12. Model Integration for Real-Time Flood Forecasting Inundation Mapping for Nashville Tributaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charley, W.; Moran, B.; LaRosa, J.

    2012-12-01

    In May of 2010, between 14 and 19 inches of rain fell on the Nashville metro area in two days, quickly overwhelming tributaries to the Cumberland River and causing wide-spread, serious flooding. Tractor-trailers and houses were seen floating down Mill Creek, a primary tributary in the south eastern area of Nashville. Twenty-six people died and over 2 billion dollars in damage occurred as a result of the flood. Since that time, several other significant rainfall events have occurred in the area. Emergency responders were unable to deliver aid or preventive measures to areas under threat of flooding (or under water) in time to reduce damages because they could not identify those areas far enough in advance of the floods. Nashville Metro Water, the National Weather Service, the US Geological Survey and the US Army Corps of Engineers established a joint venture to seek ways to better forecast short-term flood events in the region. One component of this effort was a pilot project to compute and display real time inundation maps for Mill Creek, a 108 square-mile basin to the south east of Nashville. HEC-RTS (Real-Time Simulation) was used to assimilate and integrate the hydrologic model HEC-HMS with the hydraulics model HEC-RAS and the inundation mapping program HEC-RAS Mapper. The USGS, along with the other agencies, installed additional precipitation and flow/stage gages in the area. Measurements are recorded every 5-30 minutes and are posted on the USGS NWIS database, which are downloaded by HEC-RTS. Using this data in combination with QPFs (Quantitative Precipitation Forecasts) from the NWS, HEC-RTS applies HEC-HMS and HEC-RAS to estimate current and forecast stage hydrographs. The peak stages are read by HEC-RAS Mapper to compute inundation depths for 6 by 6 foot grid cells. HEC-RTS displays the inundation on a high resolution MrSid aerial photo, along with subbasin boundary, street and various other layers. When a user zooms in and "mouses" over a cell, the

  13. Real-time radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Bossi, R.H.; Oien, C.T.

    1981-02-26

    Real-time radiography is used for imaging both dynamic events and static objects. Fluorescent screens play an important role in converting radiation to light, which is then observed directly or intensified and detected. The radiographic parameters for real-time radiography are similar to conventional film radiography with special emphasis on statistics and magnification. Direct-viewing fluoroscopy uses the human eye as a detector of fluorescent screen light or the light from an intensifier. Remote-viewing systems replace the human observer with a television camera. The remote-viewing systems have many advantages over the direct-viewing conditions such as safety, image enhancement, and the capability to produce permanent records. This report reviews real-time imaging system parameters and components.

  14. Real-time filtering and detection of dynamics for compression of HDTV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, Ken D.; Bauer, Peter

    1991-01-01

    The preprocessing of video sequences for data compressing is discussed. The end goal associated with this is a compression system for HDTV capable of transmitting perceptually lossless sequences at under one bit per pixel. Two subtopics were emphasized to prepare the video signal for more efficient coding: (1) nonlinear filtering to remove noise and shape the signal spectrum to take advantage of insensitivities of human viewers; and (2) segmentation of each frame into temporally dynamic/static regions for conditional frame replenishment. The latter technique operates best under the assumption that the sequence can be modelled as a superposition of active foreground and static background. The considerations were restricted to monochrome data, since it was expected to use the standard luminance/chrominance decomposition, which concentrates most of the bandwidth requirements in the luminance. Similar methods may be applied to the two chrominance signals.

  15. Earthquake and failure forecasting in real-time: A Forecasting Model Testing Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filgueira, Rosa; Atkinson, Malcolm; Bell, Andrew; Main, Ian; Boon, Steven; Meredith, Philip

    2013-04-01

    Across Europe there are a large number of rock deformation laboratories, each of which runs many experiments. Similarly there are a large number of theoretical rock physicists who develop constitutive and computational models both for rock deformation and changes in geophysical properties. Here we consider how to open up opportunities for sharing experimental data in a way that is integrated with multiple hypothesis testing. We present a prototype for a new forecasting model testing centre based on e-infrastructures for capturing and sharing data and models to accelerate the Rock Physicist (RP) research. This proposal is triggered by our work on data assimilation in the NERC EFFORT (Earthquake and Failure Forecasting in Real Time) project, using data provided by the NERC CREEP 2 experimental project as a test case. EFFORT is a multi-disciplinary collaboration between Geoscientists, Rock Physicists and Computer Scientist. Brittle failure of the crust is likely to play a key role in controlling the timing of a range of geophysical hazards, such as volcanic eruptions, yet the predictability of brittle failure is unknown. Our aim is to provide a facility for developing and testing models to forecast brittle failure in experimental and natural data. Model testing is performed in real-time, verifiably prospective mode, in order to avoid selection biases that are possible in retrospective analyses. The project will ultimately quantify the predictability of brittle failure, and how this predictability scales from simple, controlled laboratory conditions to the complex, uncontrolled real world. Experimental data are collected from controlled laboratory experiments which includes data from the UCL Laboratory and from Creep2 project which will undertake experiments in a deep-sea laboratory. We illustrate the properties of the prototype testing centre by streaming and analysing realistically noisy synthetic data, as an aid to generating and improving testing methodologies in

  16. REAL-TIME WATER QUALITY MONITORING AND MODELING FOR EQUITABLE RECREATION ON THE MYSTIC RIVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    City of Somerville, Massachusetts, in collaboration with Tufts University and the Mystic River Watershed Association, proposes this project that combines advanced technology for real-time water quality and meteorological monitoring with sampling of bacterial levels...

  17. Improved Strategies and Optimization of Calibration Models for Real-time PCR Absolute Quantification

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time PCR absolute quantification applications rely on the use of standard curves to make estimates of DNA target concentrations in unknown samples. Traditional absolute quantification approaches dictate that a standard curve must accompany each experimental run. However, t...

  18. Modelling real-time control of WWTP influent flow under data scarcity.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Stefan; Dirckx, Geert; Donckels, Brecht M R; Van Dorpe, Mieke; Weemaes, Marjoleine; Willems, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In order to comply with effluent standards, wastewater operators need to avoid hydraulic overloading of the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), as this can result in the washout of activated sludge from secondary settling tanks. Hydraulic overloading can occur in a systematic way, for instance when sewer network connections are extended without increasing the WWTP's capacity accordingly. This study demonstrates the use of rule-based real-time control (RTC) to reduce the load to the WWTP while restricting the overall overflow volume of the sewer system to a minimum. Further, it shows the added value of RTC despite the limited availability of monitoring data and information on the catchment through a parsimonious simulation approach, using relocation of spatial system boundaries and creating required input data through reverse modelling. Focus was hereby on the accurate modelling of pump hydraulics and control. Finally, two different methods of global sensitivity analysis were employed to verify the influence of parameters of both the model and the implemented control algorithm. Both methods show the importance of good knowledge of the system properties, but that monitoring errors play a minor role. PMID:27054735

  19. Real-Time Flood Forecasting System Using Channel Flow Routing Model with Updating by Particle Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, R.; Chikamori, H.; Nagai, A.

    2008-12-01

    A real-time flood forecasting system using channel flow routing model was developed for runoff forecasting at water gauged and ungaged points along river channels. The system is based on a flood runoff model composed of upstream part models, tributary part models and downstream part models. The upstream part models and tributary part models are lumped rainfall-runoff models, and the downstream part models consist of a lumped rainfall-runoff model for hillslopes adjacent to a river channel and a kinematic flow routing model for a river channel. The flow forecast of this model is updated by Particle filtering of the downstream part model as well as by the extended Kalman filtering of the upstream part model and the tributary part models. The Particle filtering is a simple and powerful updating algorithm for non-linear and non-gaussian system, so that it can be easily applied to the downstream part model without complicated linearization. The presented flood runoff model has an advantage in simlecity of updating procedure to the grid-based distributed models, which is because of less number of state variables. This system was applied to the Gono-kawa River Basin in Japan, and flood forecasting accuracy of the system with both Particle filtering and extended Kalman filtering and that of the system with only extended Kalman filtering were compared. In this study, water gauging stations in the objective basin were divided into two types of stations, that is, reference stations and verification stations. Reference stations ware regarded as ordinary water gauging stations and observed data at these stations are used for calibration and updating of the model. Verification stations ware considered as ungaged or arbitrary points and observed data at these stations are used not for calibration nor updating but for only evaluation of forecasting accuracy. The result confirms that Particle filtering of the downstream part model improves forecasting accuracy of runoff at

  20. Real-time dynamic MLC tracking for inversely optimized arc radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Marianne; Rosenschöld, Per Munck Af; Keall, Paul; Cattell, Herbert; Cho, Byung Chul; Poulsen, Per; Povzner, Sergey; Sawant, Amit; Zimmerman, Jens; Korreman, Stine

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Motion compensation with MLC tracking was tested for inversely optimized arc radiotherapy with special attention to the impact of the size of the target displacements and the angle of the leaf trajectory. Material and methods An MLC tracking algorithm was used to adjust the MLC positions according to the target movements using information from an optical real-time positioning management system. Two plans with collimator angles of 45° and 90°, respectively, were delivered and measured using the Delta4® dosimetric device moving in the superior-inferior direction with peak-to-peak displacements of 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 mm and a cycle time of 6 s. Results Gamma index evaluation for plan delivery with MLC tracking gave a pass rate higher than 98% for criteria 3% and 3 mm for both plans and for all sizes of the target displacement. With no motion compensation, the average pass rate was 75% for plan 1 and 70% for plan 2 for 25 mm peak-to-peak displacement. Conclusion MLC tracking improves the accuracy of inversely optimized arc delivery for the cases studied. With MLC tracking, the dosimetric accuracy was independent of the magnitude of the peak-to-peak displacement of the target and not significantly affected by the angle between the leaf trajectory and the target movements. PMID:20089322

  1. Real-Time Manganese Phase Dynamics during Biological and Abiotic Manganese Oxide Reduction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jena E; Savalia, Pratixa; Davis, Ryan; Kocar, Benjamin D; Webb, Samuel M; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fischer, Woodward W

    2016-04-19

    Manganese oxides are often highly reactive and easily reduced, both abiotically, by a variety of inorganic chemical species, and biologically during anaerobic respiration by microbes. To evaluate the reaction mechanisms of these different reduction routes and their potential lasting products, we measured the sequence progression of microbial manganese(IV) oxide reduction mediated by chemical species (sulfide and ferrous iron) and the common metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under several endmember conditions, using synchrotron X-ray spectroscopic measurements complemented by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy on precipitates collected throughout the reaction. Crystalline or potentially long-lived phases produced in these experiments included manganese(II)-phosphate, manganese(II)-carbonate, and manganese(III)-oxyhydroxides. Major controls on the formation of these discrete phases were alkalinity production and solution conditions such as inorganic carbon and phosphate availability. The formation of a long-lived Mn(III) oxide appears to depend on aqueous Mn(2+) production and the relative proportion of electron donors and electron acceptors in the system. These real-time measurements identify mineralogical products during Mn(IV) oxide reduction, contribute to understanding the mechanism of various Mn(IV) oxide reduction pathways, and assist in interpreting the processes occurring actively in manganese-rich environments and recorded in the geologic record of manganese-rich strata. PMID:27018915

  2. Real-time Electrophysiology: Using Closed-loop Protocols to Probe Neuronal Dynamics and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Linaro, Daniele; Couto, João; Giugliano, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Experimental neuroscience is witnessing an increased interest in the development and application of novel and often complex, closed-loop protocols, where the stimulus applied depends in real-time on the response of the system. Recent applications range from the implementation of virtual reality systems for studying motor responses both in mice and in zebrafish, to control of seizures following cortical stroke using optogenetics. A key advantage of closed-loop techniques resides in the capability of probing higher dimensional properties that are not directly accessible or that depend on multiple variables, such as neuronal excitability and reliability, while at the same time maximizing the experimental throughput. In this contribution and in the context of cellular electrophysiology, we describe how to apply a variety of closed-loop protocols to the study of the response properties of pyramidal cortical neurons, recorded intracellularly with the patch clamp technique in acute brain slices from the somatosensory cortex of juvenile rats. As no commercially available or open source software provides all the features required for efficiently performing the experiments described here, a new software toolbox called LCG was developed, whose modular structure maximizes reuse of computer code and facilitates the implementation of novel experimental paradigms. Stimulation waveforms are specified using a compact meta-description and full experimental protocols are described in text-based configuration files. Additionally, LCG has a command-line interface that is suited for repetition of trials and automation of experimental protocols. PMID:26132434

  3. Dynamic Engagement of Cognitive Control Modulates Recovery From Misinterpretation During Real-Time Language Processing.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Nina S; Novick, Jared M

    2016-04-01

    Speech unfolds swiftly, yet listeners keep pace by rapidly assigning meaning to what they hear. Sometimes, though, initial interpretations turn out to be wrong. How do listeners revise misinterpretations of language input moment by moment to avoid comprehension errors? Cognitive control may play a role by detecting when processing has gone awry and then initiating behavioral adjustments accordingly. However, no research to date has investigated a cause-and-effect interplay between cognitive-control engagement and the overriding of erroneous interpretations in real time. Using a novel cross-task paradigm, we showed that Stroop-conflict detection, which mobilizes cognitive-control procedures, subsequently facilitates listeners' incremental processing of temporarily ambiguous spoken instructions that induce brief misinterpretation. When instructions followed incongruent Stroop items, compared with congruent Stroop items, listeners' eye movements to objects in a scene reflected more transient consideration of the false interpretation and earlier recovery of the correct one. Comprehension errors also decreased. Cognitive-control engagement therefore accelerates sentence-reinterpretation processes, even as linguistic input is still unfolding. PMID:26957521

  4. USC/JPL GAIM: A Real-Time Global Ionospheric Data Assimilation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandrake, L.; Wilson, B. D.; Hajj, G.; Wang, C.; Pi, X. `; Iijima, B.

    2004-12-01

    We are in the midst of a revolution in ionospheric remote sensing driven by the illuminating powers of ground and space-based GPS receivers, new UV remote sensing satellites, and the advent of data assimilation techniques for space weather. The University of Southern Califronia (USC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) have jointly developed a Global Assimilative Ionospheric Model (GAIM) to monitor space weather, study storm effects, and provide ionospheric calibration for DoD customers and NASA flight projects. GAIM is a physics-based 3D data assimilation model that uses both 4DVAR and Kalman filter techniques to solve for the ion & electron density state and key drivers such as equatorial electrodynamics, neutral winds, and production terms. GAIM accepts as input ground GPS TEC data from 900+ sites, occultation links from CHAMP, SAC-C, IOX, and the coming COSMIC constellation, UV limb and nadir scans from the TIMED and DMSP satellites, and in situ data from a variety of satellites (C/NOFS & DMSP). GAIM can ingest multiple data sources in real time, updates the 3D electron density grid every 5 minutes, and solves for improved drivers every 1-2 hours. GAIM density retrievals have been validated by comparisons to vertical TEC measurements from TOPEX & JASON, slant TEC measurements from independent GPS sites, density profiles from ionosondes & incoherent scatter radars, and alternative tomographic retrievals. Daily USC/JPL GAIM runs have been operational since March 2003 using 100-200 ground GPS sites as input and TOPEX/JASON and ionosondes for daily validation. A prototype real-time GAIM system has been running since May 2004. RT GAIM ingests TEC data from 77+ streaming GPS sites every 5 minutes, adds more TEC for better global coverage every hour from hourly GPS sites, and updates the ionospheric state every 5 minutes using the Kalman filter. We plan to add TEC links from COSMIC occultations and UV radiance data from the DMSP satellites, when they become

  5. Evapotranspiration modelling at large scale using near-real time MSG SEVIRI derived data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghilain, N.; Arboleda, A.; Gellens-Meulenberghs, F.

    2010-09-01

    We present an evapotranspiration (ET) model developed in the framework of the EUMETSAT "Satellite Application Facility" (SAF) on Land Surface Analysis (LSA). The model is a simplified Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer (SVAT) scheme that uses as input a combination of remote sensed data and atmospheric model outputs. The inputs based on remote sensing are LSA-SAF products: the Albedo (AL), the Downwelling Surface Shortwave Flux (DSSF) and the Downwelling Surface Longwave Flux (DSLF). They are available with the spatial resolution of the MSG SEVIRI instrument. ET maps covering the whole MSG field of view are produced by the model every 30 min, in near-real-time, for all weather conditions. This paper presents the adopted methodology and a set of validation results. The model quality is evaluated in two ways. First, ET results are compared with ground observations (from CarboEurope and national weather services), for different land cover types, over a full vegetation cycle in the Northern Hemisphere in 2007. This validation shows that the model is able to reproduce the observed ET temporal evolution from the diurnal to annual time scales for the temperate climate zones: the mean bias is less than 0.02 mm h-1 and the root-mean square error is between 0.06 and 0.10 mm h-1. Then, ET model outputs are compared with those from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) and the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS). From this comparison, a high spatial correlation is noted, between 80 to 90%, around midday time frame. Nevertheless, some discrepancies are also observed and are due to the different input variables and parameterisations used.

  6. Toward real-time three-dimensional mapping of surficial aquifers using a hybrid modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedel, Michael J.; Esfahani, Akbar; Iwashita, Fabio

    2016-02-01

    A hybrid modeling approach is proposed for near real-time three-dimensional (3D) mapping of surficial aquifers. First, airborne frequency-domain electromagnetic (FDEM) measurements are numerically inverted to obtain subsurface resistivities. Second, a machine-learning (ML) algorithm is trained using the FDEM measurements and inverted resistivity profiles, and borehole geophysical and hydrogeologic data. Third, the trained ML algorithm is used together with independent FDEM measurements to map the spatial distribution of the aquifer system. Efficacy of the hybrid approach is demonstrated for mapping a heterogeneous surficial aquifer and confining unit in northwestern Nebraska, USA. For this case, independent performance testing reveals that aquifer mapping is unbiased with a strong correlation (0.94) among numerically inverted and ML-estimated binary (clay-silt or sand-gravel) layer resistivities (5-20 ohm-m or 21-5,000 ohm-m), and an intermediate correlation (0.74) for heterogeneous (clay, silt, sand, gravel) layer resistivities (5-5,000 ohm-m). Reduced correlation for the heterogeneous model is attributed to over-estimating the under-sampled high-resistivity gravels (about 0.5 % of the training data), and when removed the correlation increases (0.87). Independent analysis of the numerically inverted and ML-estimated resistivities finds that the hybrid procedure preserves both univariate and spatial statistics for each layer. Following training, the algorithms can map 3D surficial aquifers as fast as leveled FDEM measurements are presented to the ML network.

  7. Real-time scattered light dark-field microscopic imaging of the dynamic degradation process of sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Gang; Gao, Peng Fei; Liu, Hui; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2015-12-01

    Single nanoparticle analysis (SNA) technique with the aid of a dark-field microscopic imaging (iDFM) technique has attracted wide attention owing to its high sensitivity. Considering that the degradation of pesticides can bring about serious problems in food and the environment, and that the real-time monitoring of the dynamic degradation process of pesticides can help understand and define their degradation mechanisms, herein we real-time monitored the decomposition dynamics of sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate (NaDDC) under neutral and alkaline conditions by imaging single silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) under a dark-field microscope (DFM); the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) scattering signals were measured at a single nanoparticle level. As a result, the chemical mechanism of the degradation of NaDDC under neutral and alkaline conditions was proposed, and the inhibition effects of metal ions including Zn(ii) and Cu(ii) were investigated in order to understand the decomposition process in different environments. It was found that Cu(ii) forms the most stable complex with NaDDC with a stoichiometric ratio of 1 : 2, which greatly reduces the toxicity.Single nanoparticle analysis (SNA) technique with the aid of a dark-field microscopic imaging (iDFM) technique has attracted wide attention owing to its high sensitivity. Considering that the degradation of pesticides can bring about serious problems in food and the environment, and that the real-time monitoring of the dynamic degradation process of pesticides can help understand and define their degradation mechanisms, herein we real-time monitored the decomposition dynamics of sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate (NaDDC) under neutral and alkaline conditions by imaging single silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) under a dark-field microscope (DFM); the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) scattering signals were measured at a single nanoparticle level. As a result, the chemical mechanism of the degradation of Na

  8. Demand response-enabled model predictive HVAC load control in buildings using real-time electricity pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avci, Mesut

    A practical cost and energy efficient model predictive control (MPC) strategy is proposed for HVAC load control under dynamic real-time electricity pricing. The MPC strategy is built based on a proposed model that jointly minimizes the total energy consumption and hence, cost of electricity for the user, and the deviation of the inside temperature from the consumer's preference. An algorithm that assigns temperature set-points (reference temperatures) to price ranges based on the consumer's discomfort tolerance index is developed. A practical parameter prediction model is also designed for mapping between the HVAC load and the inside temperature. The prediction model and the produced temperature set-points are integrated as inputs into the MPC controller, which is then used to generate signal actions for the AC unit. To investigate and demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, a simulation based experimental analysis is presented using real-life pricing data. An actual prototype for the proposed HVAC load control strategy is then built and a series of prototype experiments are conducted similar to the simulation studies. The experiments reveal that the MPC strategy can lead to significant reductions in overall energy consumption and cost savings for the consumer. Results suggest that by providing an efficient response strategy for the consumers, the proposed MPC strategy can enable the utility providers to adopt efficient demand management policies using real-time pricing. Finally, a cost-benefit analysis is performed to display the economic feasibility of implementing such a controller as part of a building energy management system, and the payback period is identified considering cost of prototype build and cost savings to help the adoption of this controller in the building HVAC control industry.

  9. Model-based real-time control for laser induced thermal therapy with applications to prostate cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yusheng; Fuentes, David; Stafford, R. Jason; Oden, J. Tinsley

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we present a model-based predictive control system that is capable of capturing physical and biological variations of laser-tissue interaction as well as heterogeneity in real-time during laser induced thermal therapy (LITT). Using a three-dimensional predictive bioheat transfer model, which is built based on regular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) anatomic scan and driven by imaging data produced by real-time magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI), the computational system provides a regirous real-time predictive control during surgical operation process. The unique feature of the this system is its ability for predictive control based on validated model with high precision in real-time, which is made possible by implementation of efficient parallel algorithms. The major components of the current computational systems involves real-time finite element solution of the bioheat transfer induced by laser-tissue interaction, solution module of real-time calibration problem, optimal laser source control, goal-oriented error estimation applied to the bioheat transfer equation, and state-of-the-art imaging process module to characterize the heterogeneous biological domain. The system was tested in vivo in a canine animal model in which an interstitial laser probe was placed in the prostate region and the desired treatment outcome in terms of ablation temperature and damage zone were achieved. Using the guidance of the predictive model driven by real-time MRTI data while applying the optimized laser heat source has the potential to provide unprecedented control over the treatment outcome for laser ablation.

  10. V/STOL tilt rotor study. Volume 5: A mathematical model for real time flight simulation of the Bell model 301 tilt rotor research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harendra, P. B.; Joglekar, M. J.; Gaffey, T. M.; Marr, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    A mathematical model for real-time flight simulation of a tilt rotor research aircraft was developed. The mathematical model was used to support the aircraft design, pilot training, and proof-of-concept aspects of the development program. The structure of the mathematical model is indicated by a block diagram. The mathematical model differs from that for a conventional fixed wing aircraft principally in the added requirement to represent the dynamics and aerodynamics of the rotors, the interaction of the rotor wake with the airframe, and the rotor control and drive systems. The constraints imposed on the mathematical model are defined.

  11. Ocean-Science Mission Needs: Real-Time AUV Data for Command, Control, and Model Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, Kendall L.; Costello, D. K.; Warrior, H.; Langebrake, L. C.; Hou, W.; Patten, J. T.; Kaltenbacher, E.

    2001-01-01

    Predictive models for tides, hydrodynamics, and bio-optical properties affecting the visibility and buoyancy of coastal waters are needed to evaluate the safety of personnel and equipment engaged in maritime operations under potentially hazardous conditions. Predicted currents can be markedly different for two-layer systems affected by terrestrial runoff than for well-mixed conditions because the layering decouples the surface and bottom Ekman layers and rectifies the current response to oscillatory upwelling-and downwelling-favorable winds. Standard ocean models (e.g. Princeton Ocean Model) require initial-and boundary data on the physical and optical properties of the multilayered water column to provide accurate simulations of heat budgets and circulation. Two observational systems are designed to measure vertically structured conditions on the West Florida Shelf (WFS): a tethered buoy network and an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) observational system. The AUV system is described with a focus on the observational systems that challenge or limit the communications command and control network for various types of measurement programs. These include vertical oscillatory missions on shelf transects to observe the optical and hydrographic properties of the water column, and bottom-following missions for measuring the bottom albedo. Models of light propagation, absorption, and conversion to heat as well as determination of the buoyancy terms for physical models require these measurements. High data rates associated with video bottom imagery are the most challenging for the real-time, command and control communications system, but they are met through a combination of loss-less and lossy data-compression methods, depending upon the data-rate of the radio links.

  12. A Human Sensor Network Framework in Support of Near Real Time Situational Geophysical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulov, O.; Price, A.; Smith, J. A.; Halem, M.

    2013-12-01

    The area of Disaster Management is well established among Federal Agencies such as FEMA, EPA, NOAA and NASA. These agencies have well formulated frameworks for response and mitigation based on near real time satellite and conventional observing networks for assimilation into geophysical models. Forecasts from these models are used to communicate with emergency responders and the general public. More recently, agencies have started using social media to broadcast warnings and alerts to potentially affected communities. In this presentation, we demonstrate the added benefits of mining and assimilating the vast amounts of social media data available from heterogeneous hand held devices and social networks into established operational geophysical modeling frameworks as they apply to the five cornerstones of disaster management - Prevention, Mitigation, Preparedness, Response and Recovery. Often, in situations of extreme events, social media provide the earliest notification of adverse extreme events. However, various forms of social media data also can provide useful geolocated and time stamped in situ observations, complementary to directly sensed conventional observations. We use the concept of a Human Sensor Network where one views social media users as carrying field deployed "sensors" whose posts are the remotely "sensed instrument measurements.' These measurements can act as 'station data' providing the resolution and coverage needed for extreme event specific modeling and validation. Here, we explore the use of social media through the use of a Human Sensor Network (HSN) approach as another data input source for assimilation into geophysical models. Employing the HSN paradigm can provide useful feedback in near real-time, but presents software challenges for rapid access, quality filtering and transforming massive social media data into formats consistent with the operational models. As a use case scenario, we demonstrate the value of HSN for disaster management

  13. WE-G-18C-08: Real Time Tumor Imaging Using a Novel Dynamic Keyhole MRI Reconstruction Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Whelan, B; Keall, P; Greer, P; Kim, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the novel Dynamic Keyhole MRI reconstruction technique can accelerate image acquisition whilst maintaining high image quality for lung cancer patients. Methods: 18 MRI datasets from 5 lung cancer patients were acquired using a 3T MRI scanner. These datasets were retrospectively reconstructed using (A) The novel Dynamic Keyhole technique, (B) The conventional keyhole technique and (C) the conventional zero filling technique. The dynamic keyhole technique in MRI refers to techniques in which previously acquired k-space data is used to supplement under sampled data obtained in real time. The novel Dynamic Keyhole technique utilizes a previously acquired a library of kspace datasets in conjunction with central k-space datasets acquired in realtime. A simultaneously acquired respiratory signal is utilized to sort, match and combine the two k-space streams with respect to respiratory displacement. Reconstruction performance was quantified by (1) comparing the keyhole size (which corresponds to imaging speed) required to achieve the same image quality, and (2) maintaining a constant keyhole size across the three reconstruction methods to compare the resulting image quality to the ground truth image. Results: (1) The dynamic keyhole method required a mean keyhole size which was 48% smaller than the conventional keyhole technique and 60% smaller than the zero filling technique to achieve the same image quality. This directly corresponds to faster imaging. (2) When a constant keyhole size was utilized, the Dynamic Keyhole technique resulted in the smallest difference of the tumor region compared to the ground truth. Conclusion: The dynamic keyhole is a simple and adaptable technique for clinical applications requiring real-time imaging and tumor monitoring such as MRI guided radiotherapy. Based on the results from this study, the dynamic keyhole method could increase the imaging frequency by a factor of five compared with full k

  14. A Distributed Web-based Solution for Ionospheric Model Real-time Management, Monitoring, and Short-term Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulchitsky, A.; Maurits, S.; Watkins, B.

    2006-12-01

    With the widespread availability of the Internet today, many people can monitor various scientific research activities. It is important to accommodate this interest providing on-line access to dynamic and illustrative Web-resources, which could demonstrate different aspects of ongoing research. It is especially important to explain and these research activities for high school and undergraduate students, thereby providing more information for making decisions concerning their future studies. Such Web resources are also important to clarify scientific research for the general public, in order to achieve better awareness of research progress in various fields. Particularly rewarding is dissemination of information about ongoing projects within Universities and research centers to their local communities. The benefits of this type of scientific outreach are mutual, since development of Web-based automatic systems is prerequisite for many research projects targeting real-time monitoring and/or modeling of natural conditions. Continuous operation of such systems provide ongoing research opportunities for the statistically massive validation of the models, as well. We have developed a Web-based system to run the University of Alaska Fairbanks Polar Ionospheric Model in real-time. This model makes use of networking and computational resources at the Arctic Region Supercomputing Center. This system was designed to be portable among various operating systems and computational resources. Its components can be installed across different computers, separating Web servers and computational engines. The core of the system is a Real-Time Management module (RMM) written Python, which facilitates interactions of remote input data transfers, the ionospheric model runs, MySQL database filling, and PHP scripts for the Web-page preparations. The RMM downloads current geophysical inputs as soon as they become available at different on-line depositories. This information is processed to

  15. Double point source W-phase inversion: Real-time implementation and automated model selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nealy, Jennifer L.; Hayes, Gavin P.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid and accurate characterization of an earthquake source is an extremely important and ever evolving field of research. Within this field, source inversion of the W-phase has recently been shown to be an effective technique, which can be efficiently implemented in real-time. An extension to the W-phase source inversion is presented in which two point sources are derived to better characterize complex earthquakes. A single source inversion followed by a double point source inversion with centroid locations fixed at the single source solution location can be efficiently run as part of earthquake monitoring network operational procedures. In order to determine the most appropriate solution, i.e., whether an earthquake is most appropriately described by a single source or a double source, an Akaike information criterion (AIC) test is performed. Analyses of all earthquakes of magnitude 7.5 and greater occurring since January 2000 were performed with extended analyses of the September 29, 2009 magnitude 8.1 Samoa earthquake and the April 19, 2014 magnitude 7.5 Papua New Guinea earthquake. The AIC test is shown to be able to accurately select the most appropriate model and the selected W-phase inversion is shown to yield reliable solutions that match published analyses of the same events.

  16. A model system using confocal fluorescence microscopy for examining real-time intracellular sodium ion regulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jacqueline A; Collings, David A; Glover, Chris N

    2016-08-15

    The gills of euryhaline fish are the ultimate ionoregulatory tissue, achieving ion homeostasis despite rapid and significant changes in external salinity. Cellular handling of sodium is not only critical for salt and water balance but is also directly linked to other essential functions such as acid-base homeostasis and nitrogen excretion. However, although measurement of intracellular sodium ([Na(+)]i) is important for an understanding of gill transport function, it is challenging and subject to methodological artifacts. Using gill filaments from a model euryhaline fish, inanga (Galaxias maculatus), the suitability of the fluorescent dye CoroNa Green as a probe for measuring [Na(+)]i in intact ionocytes was confirmed via confocal microscopy. Cell viability was verified, optimal dye loading parameters were determined, and the dye-ion dissociation constant was measured. Application of the technique to freshwater- and 100% seawater-acclimated inanga showed salinity-dependent changes in branchial [Na(+)]i, whereas no significant differences in branchial [Na(+)]i were determined in 50% seawater-acclimated fish. This technique facilitates the examination of real-time changes in gill [Na(+)]i in response to environmental factors and may offer significant insight into key homeostatic functions associated with the fish gill and the principles of sodium ion transport in other tissues and organisms. PMID:27235170

  17. Modeling solvation effects in real-space and real-time within density functional approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado, Alain; Corni, Stefano; Pittalis, Stefano; Rozzi, Carlo Andrea

    2015-10-14

    The Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) can be used in conjunction with Density Functional Theory (DFT) and its time-dependent extension (TDDFT) to simulate the electronic and optical properties of molecules and nanoparticles immersed in a dielectric environment, typically liquid solvents. In this contribution, we develop a methodology to account for solvation effects in real-space (and real-time) (TD)DFT calculations. The boundary elements method is used to calculate the solvent reaction potential in terms of the apparent charges that spread over the van der Waals solute surface. In a real-space representation, this potential may exhibit a Coulomb singularity at grid points that are close to the cavity surface. We propose a simple approach to regularize such singularity by using a set of spherical Gaussian functions to distribute the apparent charges. We have implemented the proposed method in the OCTOPUS code and present results for the solvation free energies and solvatochromic shifts for a representative set of organic molecules in water.

  18. Double point source W-phase inversion: Real-time implementation and automated model selection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nealy, Jennifer; Hayes, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and accurate characterization of an earthquake source is an extremely important and ever evolving field of research. Within this field, source inversion of the W-phase has recently been shown to be an effective technique, which can be efficiently implemented in real-time. An extension to the W-phase source inversion is presented in which two point sources are derived to better characterize complex earthquakes. A single source inversion followed by a double point source inversion with centroid locations fixed at the single source solution location can be efficiently run as part of earthquake monitoring network operational procedures. In order to determine the most appropriate solution, i.e., whether an earthquake is most appropriately described by a single source or a double source, an Akaike information criterion (AIC) test is performed. Analyses of all earthquakes of magnitude 7.5 and greater occurring since January 2000 were performed with extended analyses of the September 29, 2009 magnitude 8.1 Samoa earthquake and the April 19, 2014 magnitude 7.5 Papua New Guinea earthquake. The AIC test is shown to be able to accurately select the most appropriate model and the selected W-phase inversion is shown to yield reliable solutions that match published analyses of the same events.

  19. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of model neurons: imaging and real-time detection of morphological changes.

    PubMed

    Liebetrau, Johanna M; Miller, Heather M; Baur, John E; Takacs, Sara A; Anupunpisit, Vipavee; Garris, Paul A; Wipf, David O

    2003-02-01

    Living PC12 cells, a model cell type for studying neuronal function, were imaged using the negative feedback mode of a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM). Six biocompatible redox mediators were successfully identified from a large pool of candidates and were then used for imaging PC12 cells before and after exposure to nerve growth factor (NGF). When exposed to NGF, cells differentiate into a neuron phenotype by growing narrow neurites (1-2 microm wide) that can extend > 100 microm from the cell proper. We demonstrate that carbon fiber electrodes with reduced tip diameters can be used for imaging both the cell proper and these neurites. Regions of decreased current, possibly resulting from raised features not identifiable by light microscopy, are clearly evident in the SECM images. Changes in the morphology of undifferentiated PC12 cells could be detected in real time with the SECM. After exposure to hypotonic and hypertonic solutions, reversible changes in cell height of <2 microm were measured. PMID:12585485

  20. Real-time observation of dynamics in rotational molecular wave packets by use of air-laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Bin; Chu, Wei; Li, Guihua; Yao, Jinping; Zhang, Haisu; Ni, Jielei; Jing, Chenrui; Xie, Hongqiang; Cheng, Ya

    2014-04-01

    Molecular rotational spectroscopy based on a strong-field-ionization-induced nitrogen laser is employed to investigate the time evolution of the rotational wave packet composed by a coherent superposition of quantum rotational states created in a field-free molecular alignment. We show that this technique uniquely allows real-time observation of the ultrafast dynamics of the molecular rotational wave packet. Our analysis also shows that there exist two channels of generation of the nitrogen laser, shedding light on the population inversion mechanism behind the air laser generated by intense femtosecond laser pulses.

  1. Spatial filtering velocimetry for real-time measurements of speckle dynamics due to out-of-plane motion.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Anders Sig; Jakobsen, Michael Linde

    2016-05-10

    This paper describes an optical spatial filtering velocimetry technique that converts an expanding or contracting speckle pattern into a photocurrent. This photocurrent will have a quasi-sinusoidal dependency on this specific speckle motion. The spatial filter consists of a series of concentric rings. Each ring divides the incoming light into two radial-wise, almost even contributions and directs them by refraction toward two half-rings of photodetectors. The corresponding two photocurrents are balanced and provide a differential photocurrent. In this paper the optical spatial filtering velocimetry technique is used to demonstrate real-time measurements of speckle dynamics due to out-of-plane motion. PMID:27168304

  2. LANL* V1.0: a radiation belt drift shell model suitable for real-time and reanalysis applications

    SciTech Connect

    Koller, Josep; Reeves, Geoffrey D; Friedel, Reiner H W

    2008-01-01

    Space weather modeling, forecasts, and predictions, especially for the radiation belts in the inner magnetosphere, require detailed information about the Earth's magnetic field. Results depend on the magnetic field model and the L* (pron. L-star) values which are used to describe particle drift shells. Space wather models require integrating particle motions along trajectories that encircle the Earth. Numerical integration typically takes on the order of 10{sup 5} calls to a magnetic field model which makes the L* calculations very slow, in particular when using a dynamic and more accurate magnetic field model. Researchers currently tend to pick simplistic models over more accurate ones but also risking large inaccuracies and even wrong conclusions. For example, magnetic field models affect the calculation of electron phase space density by applying adiabatic invariants including the drift shell value L*. We present here a new method using a surrogate model based on a neural network technique to replace the time consuming L* calculations made with modern magnetic field models. The advantage of surrogate models (or meta-models) is that they can compute the same output in a fraction of the time while adding only a marginal error. Our drift shell model LANL* (Los Alamos National Lab L-star) is based on L* calculation using the TSK03 model. The surrogate model has currently been tested and validated only for geosynchronous regions but the method is generally applicable to any satellite orbit. Computations with the new model are several million times faster compared to the standard integration method while adding less than 1% error. Currently, real-time applications for forecasting and even nowcasting inner magnetospheric space weather is limited partly due to the long computing time of accurate L* values. Without them, real-time applications are limited in accuracy. Reanalysis application of past conditions in the inner magnetosphere are used to understand physical

  3. Insights into explosion dynamics at Stromboli in 2009 from ash samples collected in real-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddeucci, J.; Lautze, N.; Andronico, D.; D'Auria, L.; Niemeijer, A.; Houghton, B.; Scarlato, P.

    2012-04-01

    Rapid characterization of tephra during explosive eruptions can provide valuable insights into eruptive mechanisms, also integrating other monitoring systems. Here we reveal a perspective on Stromboli's conduit processes by linking ash textures to geophysical estimates of eruption parameters of observed explosions. A three day campaign at Stromboli was undertaken by Italy's Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) in October 2009. At this time activity was moderately intense, with an average 4 to 5, both ash-rich and ash-poor, explosions per hour at each the SW and NE vents. A total of fifteen ash samples were collected in real time. We used binocular and scanning electron microscopes to analyze the components, grain size and morphology distributions, and surface chemistry of ash particles within eight selected samples. In addition, the INGV monitoring network provided visual, thermal, and seismic information on the explosions that generated the sampled ash. In each sample, the proportion of fluidal, glassy sideromelane (as opposed to blocky, microcrystalline tachylite plus lithics), the degree of "chemical freshness" (as opposed to chemical alteration), and the average size of particles appear to correlate directly with the maximum height and the seismic amplitude of the corresponding explosion, and inversely correlate with the amount of ash erupted, as estimated by monitoring videos. These observations suggest that more violent explosions (i.e., those driven by the release of larger and more pressurized gas volumes) produce ash via the fragmentation of hotter, more fluid magma, while weaker ones mostly erupt ash-sized particles derived by the fragmentation of colder magma and incorporation of conduit wall debris. The formation of fluidal ash particles (up to Pele's hairs) requires aerodynamic deformation of a relatively low-viscosity magma, in agreement with the strong acceleration imposed upon fragmented magma clots by the rapid expansion of

  4. Diffusion Modelling as a Useful Petrological Tool for Near-Real-Time Volcanic Eruption Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couperthwaite, F.; Morgan, D. J.; Thordarson, T.; Shea, T.; Harvey, J.; Trusdell, F.; Pankhurst, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Diffusion modelling is a well-established petrological technique for investigating the timescales of sub-surface processes occurring within magma storage bodies and transport systems prior to eruption. The technique typically produces - at best - results some weeks after a volcanic eruption has commenced. This contribution describes progress made on a user-friendly, easy-to-use petrological 'tool' that can be deployed in near-real time at the onset of and during an eruption. This is important for fast timescale retrieval (within days rather than weeks) without compromising the reliability of the timescale retrieved. This has implications for eruption monitoring and hazard mitigation, providing a petrological time-series complementing existing geophysical monitoring techniques. Current methods are constrained by data processing rates and the geometrical corrections required to control for random sectioning, crystal shape uncertainties and mineral anisotropy. Using a set of Piton de la Fournaise (Réunion Island) lava flow samples and a suite of Mauna Loa (HI, US) air fall and lava flow samples, magmatic timescales for Mg-Fe diffusion in olivine have been retrieved. Piton has a monodisperse crystal population, making a near-perfect baseline from which to pick apart the current diffusion modelling method. In so doing, a greater understanding of the sources of scatter and uncertainty in the process of timescale retrieval was obtained. The variety of potential sectioning orientations and their interaction with diffusion processes led to the proposal by Shea et al, 2015, in press, of selection rules to select boundaries, based on numerical models. Combined with evaluations of crystal shape, crystal axial ratios, interfacial angles, U-stage measurements and a statistical approach, such selection rules should allow the orientation of the grain within a sample to be inferred, negating the need for independent EBSD measurements and enabling a faster processing technique.

  5. Near Real-Time Computer Assisted Surgery for Brain Shift Correction Using Biomechanical Models

    PubMed Central

    Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Simpson, Amber L.; Weis, Jared A.; Thompson, Reid C.; Miga, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional image-guided neurosurgery relies on preoperative images to provide surgical navigational information and visualization. However, these images are no longer accurate once the skull has been opened and brain shift occurs. To account for changes in the shape of the brain caused by mechanical (e.g., gravity-induced deformations) and physiological effects (e.g., hyperosmotic drug-induced shrinking, or edema-induced swelling), updated images of the brain must be provided to the neuronavigation system in a timely manner for practical use in the operating room. In this paper, a novel preoperative and intraoperative computational processing pipeline for near real-time brain shift correction in the operating room was developed to automate and simplify the processing steps. Preoperatively, a computer model of the patient’s brain with a subsequent atlas of potential deformations due to surgery is generated from diagnostic image volumes. In the case of interim gross changes between diagnosis, and surgery when reimaging is necessary, our preoperative pipeline can be generated within one day of surgery. Intraoperatively, sparse data measuring the cortical brain surface is collected using an optically tracked portable laser range scanner. These data are then used to guide an inverse modeling framework whereby full volumetric brain deformations are reconstructed from precomputed atlas solutions to rapidly match intraoperative cortical surface shift measurements. Once complete, the volumetric displacement field is used to update, i.e., deform, preoperative brain images to their intraoperative shifted state. In this paper, five surgical cases were analyzed with respect to the computational pipeline and workflow timing. With respect to postcortical surface data acquisition, the approximate execution time was 4.5 min. The total update process which included positioning the scanner, data acquisition, inverse model processing, and image deforming was ∼ 11–13 min. In

  6. Electron dynamics in complex environments with real-time time dependent density functional theory in a QM-MM framework

    SciTech Connect

    Morzan, Uriel N.; Ramírez, Francisco F.; Scherlis, Damián A. E-mail: mcgl@qb.ffyb.uba.ar; Lebrero, Mariano C. González E-mail: mcgl@qb.ffyb.uba.ar

    2014-04-28

    This article presents a time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) implementation to propagate the Kohn-Sham equations in real time, including the effects of a molecular environment through a Quantum-Mechanics Molecular-Mechanics (QM-MM) hamiltonian. The code delivers an all-electron description employing Gaussian basis functions, and incorporates the Amber force-field in the QM-MM treatment. The most expensive parts of the computation, comprising the commutators between the hamiltonian and the density matrix—required to propagate the electron dynamics—, and the evaluation of the exchange-correlation energy, were migrated to the CUDA platform to run on graphics processing units, which remarkably accelerates the performance of the code. The method was validated by reproducing linear-response TDDFT results for the absorption spectra of several molecular species. Two different schemes were tested to propagate the quantum dynamics: (i) a leap-frog Verlet algorithm, and (ii) the Magnus expansion to first-order. These two approaches were confronted, to find that the Magnus scheme is more efficient by a factor of six in small molecules. Interestingly, the presence of iron was found to seriously limitate the length of the integration time step, due to the high frequencies associated with the core-electrons. This highlights the importance of pseudopotentials to alleviate the cost of the propagation of the inner states when heavy nuclei are present. Finally, the methodology was applied to investigate the shifts induced by the chemical environment on the most intense UV absorption bands of two model systems of general relevance: the formamide molecule in water solution, and the carboxy-heme group in Flavohemoglobin. In both cases, shifts of several nanometers are observed, consistently with the available experimental data.

  7. Electron dynamics in complex environments with real-time time dependent density functional theory in a QM-MM framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzan, Uriel N.; Ramírez, Francisco F.; Oviedo, M. Belén; Sánchez, Cristián G.; Scherlis, Damián A.; Lebrero, Mariano C. González

    2014-04-01

    This article presents a time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) implementation to propagate the Kohn-Sham equations in real time, including the effects of a molecular environment through a Quantum-Mechanics Molecular-Mechanics (QM-MM) hamiltonian. The code delivers an all-electron description employing Gaussian basis functions, and incorporates the Amber force-field in the QM-MM treatment. The most expensive parts of the computation, comprising the commutators between the hamiltonian and the density matrix—required to propagate the electron dynamics—, and the evaluation of the exchange-correlation energy, were migrated to the CUDA platform to run on graphics processing units, which remarkably accelerates the performance of the code. The method was validated by reproducing linear-response TDDFT results for the absorption spectra of several molecular species. Two different schemes were tested to propagate the quantum dynamics: (i) a leap-frog Verlet algorithm, and (ii) the Magnus expansion to first-order. These two approaches were confronted, to find that the Magnus scheme is more efficient by a factor of six in small molecules. Interestingly, the presence of iron was found to seriously limitate the length of the integration time step, due to the high frequencies associated with the core-electrons. This highlights the importance of pseudopotentials to alleviate the cost of the propagation of the inner states when heavy nuclei are present. Finally, the methodology was applied to investigate the shifts induced by the chemical environment on the most intense UV absorption bands of two model systems of general relevance: the formamide molecule in water solution, and the carboxy-heme group in Flavohemoglobin. In both cases, shifts of several nanometers are observed, consistently with the available experimental data.

  8. Real-Time Target Position Estimation Using Stereoscopic Kilovoltage/Megavoltage Imaging and External Respiratory Monitoring for Dynamic Multileaf Collimator Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Byungchul; Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Sawant, Amit; Ruan, Dan; Keall, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a real-time target position estimation method using stereoscopic kilovoltage (kV)/megavoltage (MV) imaging and external respiratory monitoring, and to investigate the performance of a dynamic multileaf collimator tracking system using this method. Methods and Materials: The real-time three-dimensional internal target position estimation was established by creating a time-varying correlation model that connected the external respiratory signals with the internal target motion measured intermittently using kV/MV imaging. The method was integrated into a dynamic multileaf collimator tracking system. Tracking experiments were performed for 10 thoracic/abdominal traces. A three-dimensional motion platform carrying a gold marker and a separate one-dimensional motion platform were used to reproduce the target and external respiratory motion, respectively. The target positions were detected by kV (1 Hz) and MV (5.2 Hz) imaging, and external respiratory motion was captured by an optical system (30 Hz). The beam-target alignment error was quantified as the positional difference between the target and circular beam center on the MV images acquired during tracking. The correlation model error was quantified by comparing a model estimate and measured target positions. Results: The root-mean-square errors in the beam-target alignment that had ranged from 3.1 to 7.6 mm without tracking were reduced to <1.5 mm with tracking, except during the model building period (6 s). The root-mean-square error in the correlation model was submillimeters in all directions. Conclusion: A novel real-time target position estimation method was developed and integrated into a dynamic multileaf collimator tracking system and demonstrated an average submillimeter geometric accuracy after initializing the internal/external correlation model. The method used hardware tools available on linear accelerators and therefore shows promise for clinical implementation.

  9. Real-Time Monitoring of Non-linear Suicidal Dynamics: Methodology and a Demonstrative Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Fartacek, Clemens; Schiepek, Günter; Kunrath, Sabine; Fartacek, Reinhold; Plöderl, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a number of different authors have stressed the usefulness of non-linear dynamic systems approach in suicide research and suicide prevention. This approach applies specific methods of time series analysis and, consequently, it requires a continuous and fine-meshed assessment of the processes under consideration. The technical means for this kind of process assessment and process analysis are now available. This paper outlines how suicidal dynamics can be monitored in high-risk patients by an Internet-based application for continuous self-assessment with integrated tools of non-linear time series analysis: the Synergetic Navigation System. This procedure is illustrated by data from a patient who attempted suicide at the end of a 90-day monitoring period. Additionally, future research topics and clinical applications of a non-linear dynamic systems approach in suicidology are discussed. PMID:26913016

  10. Real-time monitoring of metabolic function in liver-on-chip microdevices tracks the dynamics of mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bavli, Danny; Prill, Sebastian; Ezra, Elishai; Levy, Gahl; Cohen, Merav; Vinken, Mathieu; Vanfleteren, Jan; Jaeger, Magnus; Nahmias, Yaakov

    2016-04-19

    Microfluidic organ-on-a-chip technology aims to replace animal toxicity testing, but thus far has demonstrated few advantages over traditional methods. Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in the development of chemical and pharmaceutical toxicity, as well as pluripotency and disease processes. However, current methods to evaluate mitochondrial activity still rely on end-point assays, resulting in limited kinetic and prognostic information. Here, we present a liver-on-chip device capable of maintaining human tissue for over a month in vitro under physiological conditions. Mitochondrial respiration was monitored in real time using two-frequency phase modulation of tissue-embedded phosphorescent microprobes. A computer-controlled microfluidic switchboard allowed contiguous electrochemical measurements of glucose and lactate, providing real-time analysis of minute shifts from oxidative phosphorylation to anaerobic glycolysis, an early indication of mitochondrial stress. We quantify the dynamics of cellular adaptation to mitochondrial damage and the resulting redistribution of ATP production during rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and troglitazone (Rezulin)-induced mitochondrial stress. We show troglitazone shifts metabolic fluxes at concentrations previously regarded as safe, suggesting a mechanism for its observed idiosyncratic effect. Our microfluidic platform reveals the dynamics and strategies of cellular adaptation to mitochondrial damage, a unique advantage of organ-on-chip technology. PMID:27044092

  11. Real Time Dynamics of Laser Activated Interface Processes at the Molecular Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Borguet

    2007-12-30

    Nanotechnology is one of the most interesting and challenging frontiers of science and technology. We are motivated by the belief that progress will come from improved understanding and control of structure, dynamics and reactivity at interfaces. First, we provide a summary of our projects and key findings. The following pages provide a more detailed account.

  12. Real-Time Dynamics of Emerging Actin Networks in Cell-Mimicking Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Siddharth; Pfohl, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the cytoskeletal functionality and its relation to other cellular components and properties is a prominent question in biophysics. The dynamics of actin cytoskeleton and its polymorphic nature are indispensable for the proper functioning of living cells. Actin bundles are involved in cell motility, environmental exploration, intracellular transport and mechanical stability. Though the viscoelastic properties of actin-based structures have been extensively probed, the underlying microstructure dynamics, especially their disassembly, is not fully understood. In this article, we explore the rich dynamics and emergent properties exhibited by actin bundles within flow-free confinements using a microfluidic set-up and epifluorescence microscopy. After forming entangled actin filaments within cell-sized quasi two-dimensional confinements, we induce their bundling using three different fundamental mechanisms: counterion condensation, depletion interactions and specific protein-protein interactions. Intriguingly, long actin filaments form emerging networks of actin bundles via percolation leading to remarkable properties such as stress generation and spindle-like intermediate structures. Simultaneous sharing of filaments in different links of the network is an important parameter, as short filaments do not form networks but segregated clusters of bundles instead. We encounter a hierarchical process of bundling and its subsequent disassembly. Additionally, our study suggests that such percolated networks are likely to exist within living cells in a dynamic fashion. These observations render a perspective about differential cytoskeletal responses towards numerous stimuli. PMID:25785606

  13. Decision Consequence Model (DCM): Integrating environmental data and analysis into real time decision making

    SciTech Connect

    Cimorelli, A.J.; Stahl, C.H.; Chow, A.H.; Fernandez, C.

    1999-07-01

    A critical evaluation of the many environmental issues facing EPA Region 3 has established five major priorities: (1) ozone pollution (and its precursors); (2) impacts of acidification (acid deposition and acid mine drainage); (3) eutrophication of the Chesapeake Bay from atmospheric nitrogen deposition; (4) Cities/Urban Environment (ozone, particulate matter (PM), air toxics are some of the air components); and (5) Climate Change. Recognizing the complex nature of the systems controlling these issues, Region III's Air Protection Division (APD) is developing a decision support tool, i.e., the Decision Consequence Model (DCM), that will integrate and automate the analysis of environmental impacts in a manner that allows them to holistically address these regional priorities. Using this tool the authors intend to consider the interdependency of pollutants and their environmental impacts in order to support real-time decision making. The purpose of this paper is to outline the basic concept of the DCM and to present an example set of environmental indicators to illustrate how the DCM will be used to evaluate environmental impacts. The authors will discuss their process of indicator development, and present an example suite of indicators to provide a concrete example of the concepts presented above and, to illustrate the utility of the DCM to simultaneously evaluate multiple effects of a single pollutant. They will discuss the type of indicators chosen for this example as well as the general criteria the DCM indicators must satisfy. The framework that was developed to construct the indicators is discussed and used to calculate the example indicators. The yearly magnitudes of these example indicators are calculated for various multi-year periods to show their behavior over time.

  14. Aircraft Conflict Analysis and Real-Time Conflict Probing Using Probabilistic Trajectory Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Lee C.; Kuchar, James K.

    2000-01-01

    Methods for maintaining separation between aircraft in the current airspace system have been built from a foundation of structured routes and evolved procedures. However, as the airspace becomes more congested and the chance of failures or operational error become more problematic, automated conflict alerting systems have been proposed to help provide decision support and to serve as traffic monitoring aids. The problem of conflict detection and resolution has been tackled from a number of different ways, but in this thesis, it is recast as a problem of prediction in the presence of uncertainties. Much of the focus is concentrated on the errors and uncertainties from the working trajectory model used to estimate future aircraft positions. The more accurate the prediction, the more likely an ideal (no false alarms, no missed detections) alerting system can be designed. Additional insights into the problem were brought forth by a review of current operational and developmental approaches found in the literature. An iterative, trial and error approach to threshold design was identified. When examined from a probabilistic perspective, the threshold parameters were found to be a surrogate to probabilistic performance measures. To overcome the limitations in the current iterative design method, a new direct approach is presented where the performance measures are directly computed and used to perform the alerting decisions. The methodology is shown to handle complex encounter situations (3-D, multi-aircraft, multi-intent, with uncertainties) with relative ease. Utilizing a Monte Carlo approach, a method was devised to perform the probabilistic computations in near realtime. Not only does this greatly increase the method's potential as an analytical tool, but it also opens up the possibility for use as a real-time conflict alerting probe. A prototype alerting logic was developed and has been utilized in several NASA Ames Research Center experimental studies.

  15. Real-Time Multispectral Imaging System for Online Poultry Fecal Inspection using Unified Modeling Language.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A prototype real-time multispectral imaging system for fecal detection on broiler carcasses has been developed. The prototype system included a common aperture camera with three optical trim filters (517, 565 and 802-nm wavelength), which were selected by visible/NIR spectroscopy and validated by a...

  16. Breaking Computational Barriers: Real-time Analysis and Optimization with Large-scale Nonlinear Models via Model Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Carlberg, Kevin Thomas; Drohmann, Martin; Tuminaro, Raymond S.; Boggs, Paul T.; Ray, Jaideep; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf

    2014-10-01

    Model reduction for dynamical systems is a promising approach for reducing the computational cost of large-scale physics-based simulations to enable high-fidelity models to be used in many- query (e.g., Bayesian inference) and near-real-time (e.g., fast-turnaround simulation) contexts. While model reduction works well for specialized problems such as linear time-invariant systems, it is much more difficult to obtain accurate, stable, and efficient reduced-order models (ROMs) for systems with general nonlinearities. This report describes several advances that enable nonlinear reduced-order models (ROMs) to be deployed in a variety of time-critical settings. First, we present an error bound for the Gauss-Newton with Approximated Tensors (GNAT) nonlinear model reduction technique. This bound allows the state-space error for the GNAT method to be quantified when applied with the backward Euler time-integration scheme. Second, we present a methodology for preserving classical Lagrangian structure in nonlinear model reduction. This technique guarantees that important properties--such as energy conservation and symplectic time-evolution maps--are preserved when performing model reduction for models described by a Lagrangian formalism (e.g., molecular dynamics, structural dynamics). Third, we present a novel technique for decreasing the temporal complexity --defined as the number of Newton-like iterations performed over the course of the simulation--by exploiting time-domain data. Fourth, we describe a novel method for refining projection-based reduced-order models a posteriori using a goal-oriented framework similar to mesh-adaptive h -refinement in finite elements. The technique allows the ROM to generate arbitrarily accurate solutions, thereby providing the ROM with a 'failsafe' mechanism in the event of insufficient training data. Finally, we present the reduced-order model error surrogate (ROMES) method for statistically quantifying reduced- order-model errors. This

  17. Dynamics of gel isoelectric focusing with ampholytic dyes monitored by camera in real-time.

    PubMed

    Stastná, Miroslava; Slais, Karel

    2003-08-01

    The dynamics of gel isoelectric focusing were studied by using amphoteric low-molecular-mass colored substances (isoelectric point markers). The polyacrylamide gel in slab format was in direct contact with the electrodes. In addition to isoelectric focusing with a pH gradient composed of synthetic carrier ampholytes, pH gradients created by simple buffers of acetic acid, 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid, histidine and N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine were applied. The progress of the electrofocusing process was monitored by a charge-coupled device camera and video recording. The gradient profile and dynamics were approximated from the positions of isoelectric point markers, which were focused both on boundaries between individual zones of simple buffers and within the zones themselves. The obtained animated records enabled the observation of the entire real focusing run within fractions of a minute, which is useful both for the understanding and optimization of the focusing. PMID:12967184

  18. Time-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques for real-time studies of interfacial charge transfer dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shavorskiy, Andrey; Hertlein, Marcus; Guo Jinghua; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Cordones, Amy; Vura-Weis, Josh; Siefermann, Katrin; Slaughter, Daniel; Sturm, Felix; Weise, Fabian; Khurmi, Champak; Belkacem, Ali; Weber, Thorsten; Gessner, Oliver; Bluhm, Hendrik; Strader, Matthew; Cho, Hana; Coslovich, Giacomo; Kaindl, Robert A.; Lin, Ming-Fu; and others

    2013-04-19

    X-ray based spectroscopy techniques are particularly well suited to gain access to local oxidation states and electronic dynamics in complex systems with atomic pinpoint accuracy. Traditionally, these techniques are applied in a quasi-static fashion that usually highlights the steady-state properties of a system rather than the fast dynamics that often define the system function on a molecular level. Novel x-ray spectroscopy techniques enabled by free electron lasers (FELs) and synchrotron based pump-probe schemes provide the opportunity to monitor intramolecular and interfacial charge transfer processes in real-time and with element and chemical specificity. Two complementary time-domain xray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques are presented that are applied at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to study charge transfer processes in N3 dye-sensitized ZnO semiconductor nanocrystals, which are at the heart of emerging light-harvesting technologies.

  19. Real-time dose computation: GPU-accelerated source modeling and superposition/convolution

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques, Robert; Wong, John; Taylor, Russell; McNutt, Todd

    2011-01-15

    } times were 8.3 and 94 s, respectively, on an AMD (Sunnyvale, CA) Opteron 254 (two cores, 2.8 GHz). Conclusions: The authors have completed a comprehensive, GPU-accelerated dose engine in order to provide a substantial performance gain over CPU based implementations. Real-time dose computation is feasible with the accuracy levels of the superposition/convolution algorithm.

  20. Real-Time and High-Fidelity Simulation Environment for Autonomous Ground Vehicle Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Jonathan; Myint, Steven; Kuo, Calvin; Jain, Abhi; Grip, Havard; Jayakumar, Paramsothy; Overholt, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a collaborative project between U.S. Army TARDEC and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to develop a unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) simulation model using the ROAMS vehicle modeling framework. Besides modeling the physical suspension of the vehicle, the sensing and navigation of the HMMWV vehicle are simulated. Using models of urban and off-road environments, the HMMWV simulation was tested in several ways, including navigation in an urban environment with obstacle avoidance and the performance of a lane change maneuver.

  1. Highly Dynamic and Adaptive Traffic Congestion Avoidance in Real-Time Inspired by Honey Bee Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedde, Horst F.; Lehnhoff, Sebastian; van Bonn, Bernhard; Bay, Z.; Becker, S.; Böttcher, S.; Brunner, C.; Büscher, A.; Fürst, T.; Lazarescu, A. M.; Rotaru, E.; Senge, S.; Steinbach, B.; Yilmaz, F.; Zimmermann, T.

    Traffic congestions have become a major problem in metropolitan areas world-wide, within and between cities, to an extent where they make driving and transportation times largely unpredictable. Due to the highly dynamic character of congestion building and dissolving this phenomenon appears even to resist a formal treatment. Static approaches, and even more their global management, have proven counterproductive in practice. Given the latest progress in VANET technology and the remarkable commercially driven efforts like in the European C2C consortium, or the VSC Project in the US, allow meanwhile to tackle various aspects of traffic regulation through VANET communication. In this paper we introduce a novel, completely decentralized multi-agent routing algorithm (termed BeeJamA) which we have derived from the foraging behavior of honey bees. It is highly dynamic, adaptive, robust, and scalable, and it allows for both avoiding congestions, and minimizing traveling times to individual destinations. Vehicle guidance is provided well ahead of every intersection, depending on the individual speeds. Thus strict deadlines are imposed on, and respected by, the BeeJamA algorithm. We report on extensive simulation experiments which show the superior performance of BeeJamA over conventional approaches.

  2. Real time imaging of mRNA expression dynamics in live cells using protein complementation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meller, Amit

    2009-03-01

    Traditional methods for mRNA quantification in cells, such as northern blots, quantitative PCR or microarrays assays, require cell lysis and therefore do not preserve its dynamics. These methods cannot be used to probe the spatio-temporal localization of mRNA in cells, which provide useful information for a wide range biomolecular process, including RNA metabolizim, expression kinetics and RNA interference. To probe mRNA dynamics in live prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, we develop a method, which exploit the strong affinity of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4A (eIF4A) to specific RNA aptamers. Two parts of the eIF4A are fused to a split Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP), and are expressed in the cells at high abundance. However, only when the RNA apatmer is also present, the two protein parts complement and become fluorescent. Thus, the fluorescent background remains low, allowing us to directly image the expression of mRNA molecules in live e-coli cells from its early onset, over hours. We find that the expression kinetics can be classified in one out of at least three forms, which also display distinct spatial distributions. I will discuss the possible biological origin for these distributions and their time evolution.

  3. Real-time imaging of hydrogen peroxide dynamics in vegetative and pathogenic hyphae of Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Mentges, Michael; Bormann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Balanced dynamics of reactive oxygen species in the phytopathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum play key roles for development and infection. To monitor those dynamics, ratiometric analysis using the novel hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) sensitive fluorescent indicator protein HyPer-2 was established for the first time in phytopathogenic fungi. H2O2 changes the excitation spectrum of HyPer-2 with an excitation maximum at 405 nm for the reduced and 488 nm for the oxidized state, facilitating ratiometric readouts with maximum emission at 516 nm. HyPer-2 analyses were performed using a microtiter fluorometer and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Addition of external H2O2 to mycelia caused a steep and transient increase in fluorescence excited at 488 nm. This can be reversed by the addition of the reducing agent dithiothreitol. HyPer-2 in F. graminearum is highly sensitive and specific to H2O2 even in tiny amounts. Hyperosmotic treatment elicited a transient internal H2O2 burst. Hence, HyPer-2 is suitable to monitor the intracellular redox balance. Using CLSM, developmental processes like nuclear division, tip growth, septation, and infection structure development were analyzed. The latter two processes imply marked accumulations of intracellular H2O2. Taken together, HyPer-2 is a valuable and reliable tool for the analysis of environmental conditions, cellular development, and pathogenicity. PMID:26446493

  4. Quantification of mitral apparatus dynamics in functional and ischemic mitral regurgitation using real-time 3-dimensional echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Federico; Corsi, Cristiana; Sugeng, Lissa; Caiani, Enrico G; Weinert, Lynn; Mor-Avi, Victor; Cerutti, Sergio; Lamberti, Claudio; Lang, Roberto M

    2008-04-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM-MR) and MR in ischemic cardiomyopathy (ISC-MR) usually occurs as a result of mitral annulus (MA) dilatation and papillary muscle displacement secondary to global left ventricle remodelling. We propose a method to determine MA area and motion throughout the cardiac cycle and to define papillary muscle position in 3-dimensional space using real-time 3-dimensional echocardiography. Real-time 3-dimensional echocardiography was performed in 24 healthy individuals, and in 30 patients with DCM-MR (n = 15) or ISC-MR (n = 15). Significant intergroup differences were noted in MA surface area (control: 6.4 +/- 1.7 cm(2); DCM-MR: 11.1 +/- 2.6 cm(2); ISC-MR: 9.0 +/- 2.0 cm(2)) and in peak MA motion (control: 8.7 +/- 3.0 mm; DCM-MR: 3.4 +/- 1.7 mm; ISC-MR: 4.9 +/- 1.5 mm). In patients with DCM-MR, papillary muscle symmetry was preserved, whereas in patients with ISC-MR, papillary tethering lengths were unequal as a result of wall-motion abnormalities. Our methodology for dynamic volumetric measurements of the mitral apparatus allows better understanding of MR mechanisms. PMID:17681731

  5. Towards a real-time interface between a biomimetic model of sensorimotor cortex and a robotic arm

    PubMed Central

    Dura-Bernal, Salvador; Chadderdon, George L; Neymotin, Samuel A; Francis, Joseph T; Lytton, William W

    2015-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces can greatly improve the performance of prosthetics. Utilizing biomimetic neuronal modeling in brain machine interfaces (BMI) offers the possibility of providing naturalistic motor-control algorithms for control of a robotic limb. This will allow finer control of a robot, while also giving us new tools to better understand the brain’s use of electrical signals. However, the biomimetic approach presents challenges in integrating technologies across multiple hardware and software platforms, so that the different components can communicate in real-time. We present the first steps in an ongoing effort to integrate a biomimetic spiking neuronal model of motor learning with a robotic arm. The biomimetic model (BMM) was used to drive a simple kinematic two-joint virtual arm in a motor task requiring trial-and-error convergence on a single target. We utilized the output of this model in real time to drive mirroring motion of a Barrett Technology WAM robotic arm through a user datagram protocol (UDP) interface. The robotic arm sent back information on its joint positions, which was then used by a visualization tool on the remote computer to display a realistic 3D virtual model of the moving robotic arm in real time. This work paves the way towards a full closed-loop biomimetic brain-effector system that can be incorporated in a neural decoder for prosthetic control, to be used as a platform for developing biomimetic learning algorithms for controlling real-time devices. PMID:26709323

  6. Real-time investigation of dynamic protein crystallization in living cellsa)

    PubMed Central

    Schönherr, R.; Klinge, M.; Rudolph, J. M.; Fita, K.; Rehders, D.; Lübber, F.; Schneegans, S.; Majoul, I. V.; Duszenko, M.; Betzel, C.; Brandariz-Nuñez, A.; Martinez-Costas, J.; Duden, R.; Redecke, L.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray crystallography requires sufficiently large crystals to obtain structural insights at atomic resolution, routinely obtained in vitro by time-consuming screening. Recently, successful data collection was reported from protein microcrystals grown within living cells using highly brilliant free-electron laser and third-generation synchrotron radiation. Here, we analyzed in vivo crystal growth of firefly luciferase and Green Fluorescent Protein-tagged reovirus μNS by live-cell imaging, showing that dimensions of living cells did not limit crystal size. The crystallization process is highly dynamic and occurs in different cellular compartments. In vivo protein crystallization offers exciting new possibilities for proteins that do not form crystals in vitro. PMID:26798811

  7. Real-time Detection of Precursors to Epileptic Seizures: Non-Linear Analysis of System Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Nesaei, Sahar; Sharafat, Ahmad R.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel approach for detecting precursors to epileptic seizures in intracranial electroencephalograms (iEEG), which is based on the analysis of system dynamics. In the proposed scheme, the largest Lyapunov exponent of the discrete wavelet packet transform (DWPT) of the segmented EEG signals is considered as the discriminating features. Such features are processed by a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to identify whether the corresponding segment of the EEG signal contains a precursor to an epileptic seizure. When consecutive EEG segments contain such precursors, a decision is made that a precursor is in fact detected. The proposed scheme is applied to the Freiburg dataset, and the results show that seizure precursors are detected in a time frame that unlike other existing schemes is very much convenient to patients, with sensitivity of 100% and negligible false positive detection rates. PMID:24761374

  8. Monitoring of Dynamic Microbiological Processes Using Real-Time Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Arnoldini, Markus; Heck, Tobias; Blanco-Fernández, Alfonso; Hammes, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    We describe a straightforward approach to continuously monitor a variety of highly dynamic microbiological processes in millisecond resolution with flow cytometry, using standard bench-top instrumentation. Four main experimental examples are provided, namely: (1) green fluorescent protein expression by antibiotic-stressed Escherichia coli, (2) fluorescent labeling of heat-induced membrane damage in an autochthonous freshwater bacterial community, (3) the initial growth response of late stationary E. coli cells inoculated into fresh growth media, and (4) oxidative disinfection of a mixed culture of auto-fluorescent microorganisms. These examples demonstrate the broad applicability of the method to diverse biological experiments, showing that it allows the collection of detailed, time-resolved information on complex processes. PMID:24244624

  9. Dynamics of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes in water by real-time visualization.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Rajat; Pasquali, Matteo

    2006-06-23

    Individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in aqueous suspension are visualized directly by fluorescence video microscopy. The fluorescent tagging is simple, biocompatible, and does not modify the SWNTs. The dynamics of individual SWNTs in water are observed and quantified for the first time. We measure the confined rotational diffusion coefficient and find it in reasonable agreement with predictions based on confined diffusion of dilute Brownian rods. We determine the critical concentration at which SWNTs in suspensions start interacting. By analyzing the fluctuating shape of SWNTs in the 3 to 5 microm range, we determine that their persistence length ranges between 32 and 174 microm, in agreement with theoretical estimates; thus, commonly available SWNTs in liquids can be considered as rigid Brownian rods in the absence of imposed external fields or self-attractive forces. PMID:16907258

  10. Advanced fluorescence microscopy methods for the real-time study of transcription and chromatin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Annibale, Paolo; Gratton, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution we provide an overview of the recent advances allowed by the use of fluorescence microscopy methods in the study of transcriptional processes and their interplay with the chromatin architecture in living cells. Although the use of fluorophores to label nucleic acids dates back at least to about half a century ago,1 two recent breakthroughs have effectively opened the way to use fluorescence routinely for specific and quantitative probing of chromatin organization and transcriptional activity in living cells: namely, the possibility of labeling first the chromatin loci and then the mRNA synthesized from a gene using fluorescent proteins. In this contribution we focus on methods that can probe rapid dynamic processes by analyzing fast fluorescence fluctuations. PMID:25764219

  11. Buildup of the Kondo effect from real-time effective action for the Anderson impurity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Sebastian; Liluashvili, Alexander; Gasenzer, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The nonequilibrium time evolution of a quantum dot is studied by means of dynamic equations for time-dependent Green's functions derived from a two-particle-irreducible (2PI) effective action for the Anderson impurity model. Coupling the dot between two leads at different voltages, the dynamics of the current through the dot is investigated. We show that the 2PI approach is capable of describing the dynamical buildup of the Kondo effect, which shows up as a sharp resonance in the spectral function, with a width exponentially suppressed in the electron self-coupling on the dot. An external voltage applied to the dot is found to deteriorate the Kondo effect at the hybridization scale. The dynamic equations are evaluated within different nonperturbative resummation schemes, within the direct, particle-particle, and particle-hole channels, as well as their combination, and the results compared with those from other methods.

  12. Mathematical Models Based on Transfer Functions to Estimate Tissue Temperature During RF Cardiac Ablation in Real Time

    PubMed Central

    Alba-Martínez, Jose; Trujillo, Macarena; Blasco-Gimenez, Ramon; Berjano, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency cardiac ablation (RFCA) has been used to treat certain types of cardiac arrhythmias by producing a thermal lesion. Even though a tissue temperature higher than 50ºC is required to destroy the target, thermal mapping is not currently used during RFCA. Our aim was thus to develop mathematical models capable of estimating tissue temperature from tissue characteristics acquired or estimated at the beginning of the procedure (electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, specific heat and density) and the applied voltage at any time. Biological tissue was considered as a system with an input (applied voltage) and output (tissue temperature), and so the mathematical models were based on transfer functions relating these variables. We used theoretical models based on finite element method to verify the mathematical models. Firstly, we solved finite element models to identify the transfer functions between the temperature at a depth of 4 mm and a constant applied voltage using a 7Fr and 4 mm electrode. The results showed that the relationships can be expressed as first-order transfer functions. Changes in electrical conductivity only affected the static gain of the system, while specific heat variations produced a change in the dynamic system response. In contrast, variations in thermal conductivity modified both the static gain and the dynamic system response. Finally, to assess the performance of the transfer functions obtained, we conducted a new set of computer simulations using a controlled temperature protocol and considering the temperature dependence of the thermal and electrical conductivities, i.e. conditions closer to those found in clinical use. The results showed that the difference between the values estimated from transfer functions and the temperatures obtained from finite element models was less than 4ºC, which suggests that the proposed method could be used to estimate tissue temperature in real time. PMID:22715345

  13. Real-time automated 3D sensing, detection, and recognition of dynamic biological micro-organic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javidi, Bahram; Yeom, Seokwon; Moon, Inkyu; Daneshpanah, Mehdi

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we present an overview of three-dimensional (3D) optical imaging techniques for real-time automated sensing, visualization, and recognition of dynamic biological microorganisms. Real time sensing and 3D reconstruction of the dynamic biological microscopic objects can be performed by single-exposure on-line (SEOL) digital holographic microscopy. A coherent 3D microscope-based interferometer is constructed to record digital holograms of dynamic micro biological events. Complex amplitude 3D images of the biological microorganisms are computationally reconstructed at different depths by digital signal processing. Bayesian segmentation algorithms are applied to identify regions of interest for further processing. A number of pattern recognition approaches are addressed to identify and recognize the microorganisms. One uses 3D morphology of the microorganisms by analyzing 3D geometrical shapes which is composed of magnitude and phase. Segmentation, feature extraction, graph matching, feature selection, and training and decision rules are used to recognize the biological microorganisms. In a different approach, 3D technique is used that are tolerant to the varying shapes of the non-rigid biological microorganisms. After segmentation, a number of sampling patches are arbitrarily extracted from the complex amplitudes of the reconstructed 3D biological microorganism. These patches are processed using a number of cost functions and statistical inference theory for the equality of means and equality of variances between the sampling segments. Also, we discuss the possibility of employing computational integral imaging for 3D sensing, visualization, and recognition of biological microorganisms illuminated under incoherent light. Experimental results with several biological microorganisms are presented to illustrate detection, segmentation, and identification of micro biological events.

  14. Modelling, Simulation, Animation, and Real-Time Control (Mosart) for a Class of Electromechanical Systems: A System-Theoretic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Armando A.; Metzger, Richard P.; Cifdaloz, Oguzhan; Dhirasakdanon, Thanate; Welfert, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes an interactive modelling, simulation, animation, and real-time control (MoSART) environment for a class of 'cart-pendulum' electromechanical systems that may be used to enhance learning within differential equations and linear algebra classes. The environment is useful for conveying fundamental mathematical/systems concepts…

  15. REAL-TIME MODELING AND MEASUREMENT OF MOBILE SOURCE POLLUTANT CONCENTRATIONS FOR ESTIMATING HUMAN EXPOSURES IN COMMUNITIES NEAR ROADWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) is pursuing a project to improve the methodology for real-time site specific modeling of human exposure to pollutants from motor vehicles. The overall project goal is to deve...

  16. REAL-TIME MEASUREMENT OF AIRWAY RESPONSES TO SULOFUR DIOXIDE (SO2) IN AN INTACT, AWAKE GUINEA PIG MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time measurment of airway responses to Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) in an intact, awake guinea pig model. J Stanek1,2, Q Krantz2, J Nolan2, D Winsett2, W Watkinson2, and D Costa2. 1College of Veterinary Medicine, NCSU, Raleigh, NC, USA; 2Pulmonary Toxicology Branch, ETD, NHEERL, US...

  17. An independent system for real-time dynamic multileaf collimation trajectory verification using EPID.

    PubMed

    Fuangrod, Todsaporn; Woodruff, Henry C; Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; O'Connor, Daryl J; Middleton, Richard H; Greer, Peter B

    2014-01-01

    A new tool has been developed to verify the trajectory of dynamic multileaf collimators (MLCs) used in advanced radiotherapy techniques using only the information provided by the electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) measured image frames. The prescribed leaf positions are resampled to a higher resolution in a pre-processing stage to improve the verification precision. Measured MLC positions are extracted from the EPID frames using a template matching method. A cosine similarity metric is then applied to synchronise measured and planned leaf positions for comparison. Three additional comparison functions were incorporated to ensure robust synchronisation. The MLC leaf trajectory error detection was simulated for both intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) (prostate) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) (head-and-neck) deliveries with anthropomorphic phantoms in the beam. The overall accuracy for MLC positions automatically extracted from EPID image frames was approximately 0.5 mm. The MLC leaf trajectory verification system can detect leaf position errors during IMRT and VMAT with a tolerance of 3.5 mm within 1 s. PMID:24334552

  18. The Star, A Dynamically Configured Dataflow Director for Real Time Control

    SciTech Connect

    Matt Bickley; J. Kewisch

    1993-05-01

    The CEBAF accelerator is controlled by an automated system consisting of 50 computers connected to machine hardware and another 20 to 30 computers used for displaying machine data. The control system communication software must manage the inter-machine communication of those computers. Each of the different segments of software that make up the machine control system is treated as data sources and data sinks, with a single process mediating the transfer of all data between any data source/data sink pair. The mediating process is called the Star. This dynamically configured process keeps track of all available machine data posted by data sources and of all data requested by data sinks. Data transmission rates through the Star are kept low by sending only data that is requested by other control software, and then only when the value of the data changes. The system is entirely response-driven, with the Star process taking action only at the request of either a data source or a sink. The software for the communication is written using standard C code and TCP/IP sockets, making the communication platform independent.

  19. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging of highly dynamic granular phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penn, Alexander; Pruessmann, Klaas P.; Müller, Christoph

    Probing non-intrusively the interior of three-dimensional granular systems is a challenging task for which a number of imaging techniques have been applied including positron emission particle tracking, X-ray tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A particular advantage of MRI is its versatility allowing quantitative velocimetry through phase contrast encoding and tagging, arbitrary slice orientations and the flexibility to trade spatial for temporal resolution and vice versa during image reconstruction. However, previous attempts to image granular systems using MRI were often limited to (pseudo-) steady state systems due to the poor temporal resolution of conventional imaging methodology. Here we present an experimental approach that overcomes previous limitations in temporal resolution by implementing a variety of methodological advances, viz. parallel data acquisition through tailored multiple receiver coils, fast gradient readouts for time-efficient data sampling and engineered granular materials that contain signal sources of high proton density. Achieving a spatial and temporal resolution of, respectively, 2 mm x 2 mm and 50 ms, we were able to image highly dynamic phenomena in granular media such as bubble coalescence and granular compaction waves.

  20. Real-time Observation of Vo ordering dynamics in LaCoO3 /STO superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jae Hyuck; Mishra, Rohan; Kim, Young-Min; He, Qian; Qiao, Liang; Biegalski, Michael D.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Oak Ridge National Lab. Collaboration; Vanderbilt University Collaboration; Korea Basic Science Institute Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Properties of solid oxide fuel cell, catalysts etc. is dependent on the distribution and transport behavior of oxygen ions. In this study, we observe the dynamics of vacancy ordering in LaCoO3/SrTiO3 (LCO/STO) superlattice and LCO films using high angle annular dark field and annular bright field (ABF) STEM. Vo ordering was directly observed by tracking interatomic spacings, withs nucleation, propagation and interaction of different Vo nuclei demonstrated. Moreover, ABF images show that on 1-D (110) vacancy channels form in the depleted layers.In the case for superlattice, very small contribution of vacancy injection was observed. When this approach is applied to 15 u.c. LCO film, however, a sequence of different phases is observed, starting from disordered perovskite LaCoO3-x to a brownmillerite La3Co3O8-x to eventually brownmillerite La2Co2O5-x. Kinetics of the ordering and vacancy injection, as well as implications for beam-driven phase-transformation at an atomic scale, will be discussed. Research at ORNL supported by the MSE division, BES U.S. DOE, and through a user project supported by ORNL's CMMS, which is also sponsored by BES U.S. DOE.

  1. Inferential modeling and predictive feedback control in real-time motion compensation using the treatment couch during radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Peng; D'Souza, Warren D; McAvoy, Thomas J; Ray Liu, K J

    2007-10-01

    Tumor motion induced by respiration presents a challenge to the reliable delivery of conformal radiation treatments. Real-time motion compensation represents the technologically most challenging clinical solution but has the potential to overcome the limitations of existing methods. The performance of a real-time couch-based motion compensation system is mainly dependent on two aspects: the ability to infer the internal anatomical position and the performance of the feedback control system. In this paper, we propose two novel methods for the two aspects respectively, and then combine the proposed methods into one system. To accurately estimate the internal tumor position, we present partial-least squares (PLS) regression to predict the position of the diaphragm using skin-based motion surrogates. Four radio-opaque markers were placed on the abdomen of patients who underwent fluoroscopic imaging of the diaphragm. The coordinates of the markers served as input variables and the position of the diaphragm served as the output variable. PLS resulted in lower prediction errors compared with standard multiple linear regression (MLR). The performance of the feedback control system depends on the system dynamics and dead time (delay between the initiation and execution of the control action). While the dynamics of the system can be inverted in a feedback control system, the dead time cannot be inverted. To overcome the dead time of the system, we propose a predictive feedback control system by incorporating forward prediction using least-mean-square (LMS) and recursive least square (RLS) filtering into the couch-based control system. Motion data were obtained using a skin-based marker. The proposed predictive feedback control system was benchmarked against pure feedback control (no forward prediction) and resulted in a significant performance gain. Finally, we combined the PLS inference model and the predictive feedback control to evaluate the overall performance of the

  2. Dynamic regulation of mechanosensitive channels: capacitance used to monitor patch tension in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchyna, Thomas M.; Besch, Steven R.; Sachs, Frederick

    2004-03-01

    All cells, from bacteria to human, are mechanically sensitive. The most rapid of these membrane protein transducers are mechanosensitive ion channels, ionic pores in the membrane that open and close in response to membrane tension. In specific sensory organs, these channels serve the senses of touch and hearing, and inform the central nervous system about the filling of hollow organs such as the bladder. Non-specialized cells use these channels to report on changes in cell volume and local strain. To preserve dynamic sensitivity, sensory receptors adapt to steady-state stimuli. Here we show that in rat astrocytes, the most abundant cells in the brain, this apparent adaptation to the stimulus is actually an inactivation. We have been able to track the time course of local strain by measuring attofarad changes in membrane capacitance and show that it is not correlated with loss of channel activity. The reduction in current with time is caused by an increased occupancy of low conductance states, and a reduction in the probability of opening, not a relaxation of local stress. The occupancy of these substates depends on the integrity of the cell's cytoplasm. However, while disruption of the cytoskeleton leads to a loss of inactivation, it leaves activation unaffected. The activation process is voltage-insensitive, closely correlated with changes in capacitance, and seems to arise solely from stress in the bilayer. The inactivation rate decreases with depolarization, and kinetic analysis suggests that the process involves multiple cytoplasmic ligands. Surprisingly, multivalent ions such as Gd+3 and Ca+2 that bind to the lipids and affect channel gating, do not affect the strain-induced increase in membrane capacitance; contrary to expectations, membrane elasticity is unchanged.

  3. Application of blind source separation to real-time dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Hilty, Christian; Ragavan, Mukundan

    2015-01-20

    The use of a blind source separation (BSS) algorithm is demonstrated for the analysis of time series of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. This type of data is obtained commonly from experiments, where analytes are hyperpolarized using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (D-DNP), both in in vivo and in vitro contexts. High signal gains in D-DNP enable rapid measurement of data sets characterizing the time evolution of chemical or metabolic processes. BSS is based on an algorithm that can be applied to separate the different components contributing to the NMR signal and determine the time dependence of the signals from these components. This algorithm requires minimal prior knowledge of the data, notably, no reference spectra need to be provided, and can therefore be applied rapidly. In a time-resolved measurement of the enzymatic conversion of hyperpolarized oxaloacetate to malate, the two signal components are separated into computed source spectra that closely resemble the spectra of the individual compounds. An improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio of the computed source spectra is found compared to the original spectra, presumably resulting from the presence of each signal more than once in the time series. The reconstruction of the original spectra yields the time evolution of the contributions from the two sources, which also corresponds closely to the time evolution of integrated signal intensities from the original spectra. BSS may therefore be an approach for the efficient identification of components and estimation of kinetics in D-DNP experiments, which can be applied at a high level of automation. PMID:25506716

  4. Real-time global flood estimation using satellite-based precipitation and a coupled land surface and routing model

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Huan; Adler, Robert F.; Tian, Yudong; Huffman, George J.; Li, Hongyi; Wang, JianJian

    2014-03-01

    A widely used land surface model, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, is coupled with a newly developed hierarchical dominant river tracing-based runoff-routing model to form the Dominant river tracing-Routing Integrated with VIC Environment (DRIVE) model, which serves as the new core of the real-time Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS). The GFMS uses real-time satellite-based precipitation to derive flood monitoring parameters for the latitude band 50°N–50°S at relatively high spatial (~12 km) and temporal (3 hourly) resolution. Examples of model results for recent flood events are computed using the real-time GFMS (http://flood.umd.edu). To evaluate the accuracy of the new GFMS, the DRIVE model is run retrospectively for 15 years using both research-quality and real-time satellite precipitation products. Evaluation results are slightly better for the research-quality input and significantly better for longer duration events (3 day events versus 1 day events). Basins with fewer dams tend to provide lower false alarm ratios. For events longer than three days in areas with few dams, the probability of detection is ~0.9 and the false alarm ratio is ~0.6. In general, these statistical results are better than those of the previous system. Streamflow was evaluated at 1121 river gauges across the quasi-global domain. Validation using real-time precipitation across the tropics (30°S–30°N) gives positive daily Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficients for 107 out of 375 (28%) stations with a mean of 0.19 and 51% of the same gauges at monthly scale with a mean of 0.33. Finally, there were poorer results in higher latitudes, probably due to larger errors in the satellite precipitation input.

  5. Real-Time Global Flood Estimation Using Satellite-Based Precipitation and a Coupled Land Surface and Routing Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Huan; Adler, Robert F.; Tian, Yudong; Huffman, George J.; Li, Hongyi; Wang, JianJian

    2014-01-01

    A widely used land surface model, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, is coupled with a newly developed hierarchical dominant river tracing-based runoff-routing model to form the Dominant river tracing-Routing Integrated with VIC Environment (DRIVE) model, which serves as the new core of the real-time Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS). The GFMS uses real-time satellite-based precipitation to derive flood monitoring parameters for the latitude band 50 deg. N - 50 deg. S at relatively high spatial (approximately 12 km) and temporal (3 hourly) resolution. Examples of model results for recent flood events are computed using the real-time GFMS (http://flood.umd.edu). To evaluate the accuracy of the new GFMS, the DRIVE model is run retrospectively for 15 years using both research-quality and real-time satellite precipitation products. Evaluation results are slightly better for the research-quality input and significantly better for longer duration events (3 day events versus 1 day events). Basins with fewer dams tend to provide lower false alarm ratios. For events longer than three days in areas with few dams, the probability of detection is approximately 0.9 and the false alarm ratio is approximately 0.6. In general, these statistical results are better than those of the previous system. Streamflow was evaluated at 1121 river gauges across the quasi-global domain. Validation using real-time precipitation across the tropics (30 deg. S - 30 deg. N) gives positive daily Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficients for 107 out of 375 (28%) stations with a mean of 0.19 and 51% of the same gauges at monthly scale with a mean of 0.33. There were poorer results in higher latitudes, probably due to larger errors in the satellite precipitation input.

  6. Real-time simulation of power transmission lines using Marti model with optimal fitting on dual-DSP card

    SciTech Connect

    Dufour, C.; Le-Huy, H.; El Hakimi, A.; Soumagne, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    Real-time simulation of a small power network containing a Marti modeled transmission line is made using 2 parallel DSP`s. A new fitting method is used in the modeling of the Marti line which is optimized with regards to the fitting error curve. Results are presented which show the time costs of the Marti line modeling versus constant-parameter line modeling and the time savings by using two parallel DSP`s.

  7. A real time dynamic data acquisition and processing system for velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clukey, Steven J.

    1991-01-01

    The real time Dynamic Data Acquisition and Processing System (DDAPS) is described which provides the capability for the simultaneous measurement of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations. The system of hardware and software is described in context of the wind tunnel environment. The DDAPS replaces both a recording mechanism and a separate data processing system. DDAPS receives input from hot wire anemometers. Amplifiers and filters condition the signals with computer controlled modules. The analog signals are simultaneously digitized and digitally recorded on disk. Automatic acquisition collects necessary calibration and environment data. Hot wire sensitivities are generated and applied to the hot wire data to compute fluctuations. The presentation of the raw and processed data is accomplished on demand. The interface to DDAPS is described along with the internal mechanisms of DDAPS. A summary of operations relevant to the use of the DDAPS is also provided.

  8. Real time detecting of harmful dinoflagellate Cochlodinium polykrikoides using unmanned surface vehicle in dynamic environments.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sung Mok; Chung, Wan Kyun; Cho, Eun Seob

    2014-05-01

    Since the first occurrence in 1982, red tides have been observed annually in Korean coastal waters in the form of harmful dinoflagellate Cochlodinium polykrikoides blooms. The distinction in the proposed method for red tide monitoring is the focus on the narrow stripe red tide at an early stage to allow for advanced actions. The distance graph between Head of Narrow Red tide (HNR) and location of the robot have suggested in reference to unknown searching area. With mapping and path planning, then, it can quickly keep tracking out even if the magnitude and direction of current flow was changed. The one-hundred times simulations of different situations were attempted to comparison by box plot both algorithms of speed by reaching the right side of simulation window. Consequently, the red tide tracking algorithm is based on the red tide probability map and the tracking & recovering path planner. Inputs to the algorithm include the measured flow velocities and the detection or non-detection state at each robot location. Furthermore, a USV (Unmanned Surface Vehicle) model is added to evaluate the effectiveness of the algorithm. This approach for red tide monitoring may lead to a breakthrough in the field of environmental surveillance. PMID:24813014

  9. Using an external surrogate for predictor model training in real-time motion management of lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rottmann, Joerg; Berbeco, Ross

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Precise prediction of respiratory motion is a prerequisite for real-time motion compensation techniques such as beam, dynamic couch, or dynamic multileaf collimator tracking. Collection of tumor motion data to train the prediction model is required for most algorithms. To avoid exposure of patients to additional dose from imaging during this procedure, the feasibility of training a linear respiratory motion prediction model with an external surrogate signal is investigated and its performance benchmarked against training the model with tumor positions directly. Methods: The authors implement a lung tumor motion prediction algorithm based on linear ridge regression that is suitable to overcome system latencies up to about 300 ms. Its performance is investigated on a data set of 91 patient breathing trajectories recorded from fiducial marker tracking during radiotherapy delivery to the lung of ten patients. The expected 3D geometric error is quantified as a function of predictor lookahead time, signal sampling frequency and history vector length. Additionally, adaptive model retraining is evaluated, i.e., repeatedly updating the prediction model after initial training. Training length for this is gradually increased with incoming (internal) data availability. To assess practical feasibility model calculation times as well as various minimum data lengths for retraining are evaluated. Relative performance of model training with external surrogate motion data versus tumor motion data is evaluated. However, an internal–external motion correlation model is not utilized, i.e., prediction is solely driven by internal motion in both cases. Results: Similar prediction performance was achieved for training the model with external surrogate data versus internal (tumor motion) data. Adaptive model retraining can substantially boost performance in the case of external surrogate training while it has little impact for training with internal motion data. A minimum

  10. Draft Forecasts from Real-Time Runs of Physics-Based Models - A Road to the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Rastatter, Lutz; MacNeice, Peter; Kuznetsova, Masha

    2008-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a US inter-agency activity aiming at research in support of the generation of advanced space weather models. As one of its main functions, the CCMC provides to researchers the use of space science models, even if they are not model owners themselves. The second focus of CCMC activities is on validation and verification of space weather models, and on the transition of appropriate models to space weather forecast centers. As part of the latter activity, the CCMC develops real-time simulation systems that stress models through routine execution. A by-product of these real-time calculations is the ability to derive model products, which may be useful for space weather operators. After consultations with NOAA/SEC and with AFWA, CCMC has developed a set of tools as a first step to make real-time model output useful to forecast centers. In this presentation, we will discuss the motivation for this activity, the actions taken so far, and options for future tools from model output.

  11. Network dynamics with BrainX3: a large-scale simulation of the human brain network with real-time interaction

    PubMed Central

    Arsiwalla, Xerxes D.; Zucca, Riccardo; Betella, Alberto; Martinez, Enrique; Dalmazzo, David; Omedas, Pedro; Deco, Gustavo; Verschure, Paul F. M. J.

    2015-01-01

    BrainX3 is a large-scale simulation of human brain activity with real-time interaction, rendered in 3D in a virtual reality environment, which combines computational power with human intuition for the exploration and analysis of complex dynamical networks. We ground this simulation on structural connectivity obtained from diffusion spectrum imaging data and model it on neuronal population dynamics. Users can interact with BrainX3 in real-time by perturbing brain regions with transient stimulations to observe reverberating network activity, simulate lesion dynamics or implement network analysis functions from a library of graph theoretic measures. BrainX3 can thus be used as a novel immersive platform for exploration and analysis of dynamical activity patterns in brain networks, both at rest or in a task-related state, for discovery of signaling pathways associated to brain function and/or dysfunction and as a tool for virtual neurosurgery. Our results demonstrate these functionalities and shed insight on the dynamics of the resting-state attractor. Specifically, we found that a noisy network seems to favor a low firing attractor state. We also found that the dynamics of a noisy network is less resilient to lesions. Our simulations on TMS perturbations show that even though TMS inhibits most of the network, it also sparsely excites a few regions. This is presumably due to anti-correlations in the dynamics and suggests that even a lesioned network can show sparsely distributed increased activity compared to healthy resting-state, over specific brain areas. PMID:25759649

  12. The Elastic Body Model: A Pedagogical Approach Integrating Real Time Measurements and Modelling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, C.; Guastella, I.; Tarantino, G.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a pedagogical approach to elastic body movement based on measurements of the contact times between a metallic rod and small bodies colliding with it and on modelling of the experimental results by using a microcomputer-based laboratory and simulation tools. The experiments and modelling activities have been built in the…

  13. First Demonstration of Combined kV/MV Image-Guided Real-Time Dynamic Multileaf-Collimator Target Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Byungchul Poulsen, Per R.; Sloutsky, Alex; Sawant, Amit; Keall, Paul J.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: For intrafraction motion management, a real-time tracking system was developed by combining fiducial marker-based tracking via simultaneous kilovoltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) imaging and a dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) beam-tracking system. Methods and Materials: The integrated tracking system employed a Varian Trilogy system equipped with kV/MV imaging systems and a Millennium 120-leaf MLC. A gold marker in elliptical motion (2-cm superior-inferior, 1-cm left-right, 10 cycles/min) was simultaneously imaged by the kV and MV imagers at 6.7 Hz and segmented in real time. With these two-dimensional projections, the tracking software triangulated the three-dimensional marker position and repositioned the MLC leaves to follow the motion. Phantom studies were performed to evaluate time delay from image acquisition to MLC adjustment, tracking error, and dosimetric impact of target motion with and without tracking. Results: The time delay of the integrated tracking system was {approx}450 ms. The tracking error using a prediction algorithm was 0.9 {+-} 0.5 mm for the elliptical motion. The dose distribution with tracking showed better target coverage and less dose to surrounding region over no tracking. The failure rate of the gamma test (3%/3-mm criteria) was 22.5% without tracking but was reduced to 0.2% with tracking. Conclusion: For the first time, a complete tracking system combining kV/MV image-guided target tracking and DMLC beam tracking was demonstrated. The average geometric error was less than 1 mm, and the dosimetric error was negligible. This system is a promising method for intrafraction motion management.

  14. Retrieving of atmospheric parameters from multi-GNSS in real time: Validation with water vapor radiometer and numerical weather model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingxing; Zus, Florian; Lu, Cuixian; Dick, Galina; Ning, Tong; Ge, Maorong; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2015-07-01

    The multiconstellation Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) (e.g., GPS, GLObal NAvigation Satellite System (GLONASS), Galileo, and BeiDou) offers great opportunities for real-time retrieval of atmospheric parameters for supporting numerical weather prediction nowcasting or severe weather event monitoring. In this study, the observations from different GNSS are combined to retrieve atmospheric parameters based on the real-time precise point positioning technique. The atmospheric parameters, retrieved from multi-GNSS observations of a 180 day period from about 100 globally distributed stations, including zenith total delay, integrated water vapor, horizontal gradient, and slant total delay (STD), are analyzed and evaluated. The water vapor radiometer data and a numerical weather model, the operational analysis of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), are used to independently validate the performance of individual GNSS and also demonstrate the benefits of multiconstellation GNSS for real-time atmospheric monitoring. Our results show that the GLONASS and BeiDou have the potential capability for real-time atmospheric parameter retrieval for time-critical meteorological applications as GPS does, and the combination of multi-GNSS observations can improve the performance of a single-system solution in meteorological applications with higher accuracy and robustness. The multi-GNSS processing greatly increases the number of STDs. The mean and standard deviation of STDs between each GNSS and ECMWF exhibit a good stability as function of the elevation angle, the azimuth angle, and time, in general. An obvious latitude dependence is confirmed by a map of station specific mean and standard deviations. Such real-time atmospheric products, provided by multi-GNSS processing with higher accuracy, stronger reliability, and better distribution, might be highly valuable for atmospheric sounding systems, especially for nowcasting of extreme weather.

  15. Advantages of estimating rate corrections during dynamic propagation of spacecraft rates: Applications to real-time attitude determination of SAMPEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Challa, M. S.; Natanson, G. A.; Baker, D. F.; Deutschmann, J. K.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes real-time attitude determination results for the Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX), a gyroless spacecraft, using a Kalman filter/Euler equation approach denoted the real-time sequential filter (RTSF). The RTSF is an extended Kalman filter whose state vector includes the attitude quaternion and corrections to the rates, which are modeled as Markov processes with small time constants. The rate corrections impart a significant robustness to the RTSF against errors in modeling the environmental and control torques, as well as errors in the initial attitude and rates, while maintaining a small state vector. SAMPLEX flight data from various mission phases are used to demonstrate the robustness of the RTSF against a priori attitude and rate errors of up to 90 deg and 0.5 deg/sec, respectively, as well as a sensitivity of 0.0003 deg/sec in estimating rate corrections in torque computations. In contrast, it is shown that the RTSF attitude estimates without the rate corrections can degrade rapidly. RTSF advantages over single-frame attitude determination algorithms are also demonstrated through (1) substantial improvements in attitude solutions during sun-magnetic field coalignment and (2) magnetic-field-only attitude and rate estimation during the spacecraft's sun-acquisition mode. A robust magnetometer-only attitude-and-rate determination method is also developed to provide for the contingency when both sun data as well as a priori knowledge of the spacecraft state are unavailable. This method includes a deterministic algorithm used to initialize the RTSF with coarse estimates of the spacecraft attitude and rates. The combined algorithm has been found effective, yielding accuracies of 1.5 deg in attitude and 0.01 deg/sec in the rates and convergence times as little as 400 sec.

  16. Neutrino geoscience with real-time modeling in the web browser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barna, A.; Jocher, G.; Dye, S.

    2014-12-01

    We present a real-time, interactive, web-based visualization of the Earth's antineutrino flux from both natural and man-made sources. The initial phase of development displays crust layer thicknesses, surface heat flux due to heat-producing elements, uranium, thorium and potassium, and the surface geo-neutrino flux from these elements in the mantle and crust. It permits users to define heat-producing element concentrations in the mantle, including a global constraint on the radiogenic power and the Th/U and K/U ratios of the bulk silicate Earth. Moreover, users have various output visualization options for geo-neutrinos, including flux or detectable signal from relevant heat-producing elements. The mantle signal is available in several forms as a function of the background from the crust and nuclear reactors. Our goal is to implement a tool for education and outreach as well as the research community.

  17. A Real-Time Rover Executive based On Model-Based Reactive Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bias, M. Bernardine; Lemai, Solange; Muscettola, Nicola; Korsmeyer, David (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on the experimental verification of the ability of IDEA (Intelligent Distributed Execution Architecture) effectively operate at multiple levels of abstraction in an autonomous control system. The basic hypothesis of IDEA is that a large control system can be structured as a collection of interacting control agents, each organized around the same fundamental structure. Two IDEA agents, a system-level agent and a mission-level agent, are designed and implemented to autonomously control the K9 rover in real-time. The system is evaluated in the scenario where the rover must acquire images from a specified set of locations. The IDEA agents are responsible for enabling the rover to achieve its goals while monitoring the execution and safety of the rover and recovering from dangerous states when necessary. Experiments carried out both in simulation and on the physical rover, produced highly promising results.

  18. In vivo imaging of dynamic biological specimen by real-time single-shot full-field optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrebesh, Molly Subhash; Dabu, Razvan; Sato, Manabu

    2009-02-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of a compact single-shot full-field time domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) for imaging dynamic biological sample in real-time. The system is based on a Linnik type polarization Michelson interferometer and a four-quadrature phase-stepper optics, which can simultaneously capture four quadraturely phase-stepped interferograms on a single CCD. Using a superluminescent diode as light source with center wavelength of 842 nm and spectral width of 16.2 nm, the system yields an axial resolution of 19.8 μm, and covers a field of view of 280 × 320 μm2 (220 × 250 pixels) with a transverse resolution of 4.4 μm by using a 10× microscope objective (0.3 NA). Three-dimensional OCT images of biological samples such as an onion slice and a diaptomus were obtained without any image averaging or pixel binning. In addition, in vivo depth resolved dynamic imaging was demonstrated to show the beating internal structure of a diaptomus with a fame rate of 5 fps.

  19. Intraoperative, Real-Time Monitoring of Blood Flow Dynamics Associated With Laser Surgery of Port Wine Stain Birthmarks

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bruce; Yang, Owen; Guzman, John; Nguyen, Paul; Crouzet, Christian; Osann, Kathryn E.; Kelly, Kristen M.; Nelson, J. Stuart; Choi, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Port-wine stain (PWS) birthmarks affect ~22 million people worldwide. After several treatment sessions, complete disappearance of the PWS occurs in only ~10% of treated patients. There is a need to develop a new strategy to improve the efficacy of each treatment session and the overall treatment outcome. The study objective was to determine how intraoperative measurements of blood flow correlate with treatment response assessed several weeks post treatment. Study Design/Materials and Methods We employed Laser Speckle Imaging (LSI) to measure intraoperative blood-flow dynamics. We collected data from 24 subjects undergoing laser therapy for facial PWS birthmarks. Photographs were taken before treatment and at a follow-up visit, and analyzed by two expert observers. Results Intraoperative LSI enables real-time monitoring of blood-flow dynamics in response to laser treatment and can inform clinicians on the need for focused re-treatment. The degree of PWS blanching achieved is positively correlated with the log-transformed acute blood-flow reduction (P =0.022). Conclusion LSI is a simple, intraoperative monitoring tool during laser therapy of PWS birthmarks. LSI provides a single value for blood flow that correlates well with the degree of blanching achieved with laser therapy. Lasers Surg. Med. PMID:26040983

  20. Real-time monitoring of nutrients and dissolved organic matter in rivers: Capturing event dynamics, technological opportunities and future directions.

    PubMed

    Blaen, Phillip J; Khamis, Kieran; Lloyd, Charlotte E M; Bradley, Chris; Hannah, David; Krause, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    Excessive riverine nutrient concentrations threaten aquatic ecosystem structure and functioning and can pose substantial risks to human health. Robust monitoring strategies are therefore required to generate reliable estimates of river nutrient loads and to improve understanding of the catchment processes that drive nutrient fluxes. Furthermore, these data are vital for prediction of future trends under changing environmental conditions and thus the development of appropriate mitigation measures. In recent years, technological developments have led to an increase in the use of in-situ nutrient analysers, which enable measurements at far higher temporal resolutions than can be achieved with discrete sampling and subsequent laboratory analysis. In this paper, we review the principles underlying the key techniques used for in-situ nutrient monitoring and highlight both the advantages, opportunities and challenges associated with high-resolution sampling programs. We then suggest how adaptive monitoring strategies, comprising several different temporal sample frequencies, controlled by one or more 'trigger variables' (e.g. river stage, turbidity, or nutrient concentration), can advance our understanding of catchment nutrient dynamics while simultaneously overcoming many of the practical and economic challenges encountered in typical in-situ river nutrient monitoring applications. We present examples of short-term variability in river nutrient dynamics, driven by complex catchment behaviour, which support our case for the development of monitoring systems that can adapt in real-time to rapid changes in environmental conditions. Finally, we suggest future research directions based on emerging technologies in this field. PMID:27376920

  1. Real-time Non-contact Millimeter Wave Characterization of Water-Freezing and Ice-Melting Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Sudhandra; Sundaram, S. K.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2009-04-01

    We applied millimeter wave radiometry for the first time to monitor water-freezing and ice-melting dynamics in real-time non-contact. The measurements were completed at a frequency of 137 GHz. Small amounts (about 2 mL) of freshwater or saltwater were frozen over a Peltier cooler and the freezing and melting sequence was recorded. Saltwater was prepared in the laboratory that contained 3.5% of table salt to simulate the ocean water. The dynamics of freezing-melting was observed by measuring the millimeter wave temperature as well as the changes in the ice or water surface reflectivity and position. This was repeated using large amounts of freshwater and saltwater (800 mL) mimicking glaciers. Millimeter wave surface level fluctuations indicated as the top surface melted, the light ice below floated up indicating lower surface temperature until the ice completely melted. Our results are useful for remote sensing and tracking temperature for potentially large-scale environmental applications, e.g., global warming.

  2. Real-time Non-contact Millimeter Wave Characterization of Water-Freezing and Ice-Melting Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, S. K.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2008-11-12

    We applied millimeter wave radiometry for the first time to monitor water-freezing and ice-melting dynamics in real-time non-contact. The measurements were completed at a frequency of 137 GHz. Small amounts (about 2 mL) of freshwater or saltwater were frozen over a Peltier cooler and the freezing and melting sequence was recorded. Saltwater was prepared in the laboratory that contained 3.5% of table salt to simulate the ocean water. The dynamics of freezing-melting was observed by measuring the millimeter wave temperature as well as the changes in the ice or water surface reflectivity and position. This was repeated using large amounts of freshwater and saltwater (800 mL) mimicking glaciers. Millimeter wave surface level fluctuations indicated as the top surface melted, the light ice below floated up indicating lower surface temperature until the ice completely melted. Our results are useful for remote sensing and tracking temperature for potentially large-scale environmental applications, e.g., global warming.

  3. Parallel processing of real-time dynamic systems simulation on OSCAR (Optimally SCheduled Advanced multiprocessoR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasahara, Hironori; Honda, Hiroki; Narita, Seinosuke

    1989-01-01

    Parallel processing of real-time dynamic systems simulation on a multiprocessor system named OSCAR is presented. In the simulation of dynamic systems, generally, the same calculation are repeated every time step. However, we cannot apply to Do-all or the Do-across techniques for parallel processing of the simulation since there exist data dependencies from the end of an iteration to the beginning of the next iteration and furthermore data-input and data-output are required every sampling time period. Therefore, parallelism inside the calculation required for a single time step, or a large basic block which consists of arithmetic assignment statements, must be used. In the proposed method, near fine grain tasks, each of which consists of one or more floating point operations, are generated to extract the parallelism from the calculation and assigned to processors by using optimal static scheduling at compile time in order to reduce large run time overhead caused by the use of near fine grain tasks. The practicality of the scheme is demonstrated on OSCAR (Optimally SCheduled Advanced multiprocessoR) which has been developed to extract advantageous features of static scheduling algorithms to the maximum extent.

  4. Modelling, Simulation, Fabrication, Experiments and Real-Time Linear State Variable Feedback Control of Cuk Converter using Pole Placement Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanda, S.; Sengupta, M.; Sengupta, A.

    2014-01-01

    Using a suitable combination of some of the basic converter topologies representing the Buck, the Boost and the Buck-Boost converters, one may obtain some other useful dc-to-dc converters. A typical example is the cascade connection of the Boost and the Buck converter which produces the well known Cuk converter. This work emphasises on the modelling, real-time simulations, fabrication and closed-loop control of a Cuk converter. For the modelling and real time simulation, FPGA platform has been used. Small signal modelling and conventional control aspects (compensator) of Cuk converter are discussed. A 200W, 10kHz Cuk converter is designed, fabricated and tested in the laboratory. The converter model is of fourth order. The transfer function being a non-minimum phase one with two right-half plane zeroes, a limited work has been done on this. For such systems, conventional control methods are demonstrated to fail. Pole placement technique, which is envisaged to be a suitable control technique for a higher order non-minimum phase system has been adopted. Excellent correlation between off-line and real-time simulation results establishes the accuracy of the work. Agreement between open-loop results obtained from the experimental set-up under steady state vis-a-vis those obtained from simulation is also a major highlight of the paper.

  5. A Satellite Driven Real-time Forecasting Platform in the Upper Zambezi Basin: A Multi-model Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes, J. B.; Wi, S.; Serrat-Capdevila, A.; Demaria, E. M.; Durcik, M.

    2015-12-01

    In large basins such as the Upper Zambezi where concentration times are of many days or even weeks, satellite precipitation products available in real-time become a key component enabling - with the use of hydrologic models - streamflow forecasts for downstream locations with enough lead time to inform decision-making. We present a real-time streamflow forecasting application based on this concept, using the TMPA and CMORPH rainfall products (which we bias-correct using the CHIRPS product) to force four distributed hydrologic models (VIC, HyMod, HBV, Sacramento) covering a variety of levels of model complexity. This study aims at establishing a multi-model satellite-based streamflow forecasting platform as a tool that can inform water management in real-time. This work is part of the efforts of the SERVIR Applied Sciences Team to bring NASA Earth Observation Applications into decision support tools for managing water resources in the Upper Zambezi, in collaboration with the Southern African Development Community Climate Services Center and the Zambezi Watercourse Commission.

  6. Error propagation in relative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction quantification models: the balance between accuracy and precision.

    PubMed

    Nordgård, Oddmund; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Farmen, Ragne Kristin; Heikkilä, Reino

    2006-09-15

    Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has gained wide popularity as a sensitive and reliable technique for mRNA quantification. The development of new mathematical models for such quantifications has generally paid little attention to the aspect of error propagation. In this study we evaluate, both theoretically and experimentally, several recent models for relative real-time RT-PCR quantification of mRNA with respect to random error accumulation. We present error propagation expressions for the most common quantification models and discuss the influence of the various components on the total random error. Normalization against a calibrator sample to improve comparability between different runs is shown to increase the overall random error in our system. On the other hand, normalization against multiple reference genes, introduced to improve accuracy, does not increase error propagation compared to normalization against a single reference gene. Finally, we present evidence that sample-specific amplification efficiencies determined from individual amplification curves primarily increase the random error of real-time RT-PCR quantifications and should be avoided. Our data emphasize that the gain of accuracy associated with new quantification models should be validated against the corresponding loss of precision. PMID:16899212

  7. Couch-based motion compensation: modelling, simulation and real-time experiments.

    PubMed

    Haas, Olivier C L; Skworcow, Piotr; Paluszczyszyn, Daniel; Sahih, Abdelhamid; Ruta, Mariusz; Mills, John A

    2012-09-21

    The paper presents a couch-based active motion compensation strategy evaluated in simulation and validated experimentally using both a research and a clinical Elekta Precise Table™. The control strategy combines a Kalman filter to predict the surrogate motion used as a reference by a linear model predictive controller with the control action calculation based on estimated position and velocity feedback provided by an observer as well as predicted couch position and velocity using a linearized state space model. An inversion technique is used to compensate for the dead-zone nonlinearity. New generic couch models are presented and applied to model the Elekta Precise Table™ dynamics and nonlinearities including dead zone. Couch deflection was measured for different manufacturers and found to be up to 25 mm. A feed-forward approach is proposed to compensate for such couch deflection. Simultaneous motion compensation for longitudinal, lateral and vertical motions was evaluated using arbitrary trajectories generated from sensors or loaded from files. Tracking errors were between 0.5 and 2 mm RMS. A dosimetric evaluation of the motion compensation was done using a sinusoidal waveform. No notable differences were observed between films obtained for a fixed- or motion-compensated target. Further dosimetric improvement could be made by combining gating, based on tracking error together with beam on/off time, and PSS compensation. PMID:22951301

  8. Real-Time Decision Making and Aggressive Behavior in Youth: A Heuristic Model of Response Evaluation and Decision (RED)

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Reid Griffith; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    Considerable scientific and intervention attention has been paid to judgment and decision-making systems associated with aggressive behavior in youth. However, most empirical studies have investigated social-cognitive correlates of stable child and adolescent aggressiveness, and less is known about real-time decision making to engage in aggressive behavior. A model of real-time decision making must incorporate both impulsive actions and rational thought. The present paper advances a process model (response evaluation and decision; RED) of real-time behavioral judgments and decision making in aggressive youths with mathematic representations that may be used to quantify response strength. These components are a heuristic to describe decision making, though it is doubtful that individuals always mentally complete these steps. RED represents an organization of social–cognitive operations believed to be active during the response decision step of social information processing. The model posits that RED processes can be circumvented through impulsive responding. This article provides a description and integration of thoughtful, rational decision making and nonrational impulsivity in aggressive behavioral interactions. PMID:20802851

  9. Towards real-time communication between in vivo neurophysiological data sources and simulator-based brain biomimetic models

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Giljae; Matsunaga, Andréa; Dura-Bernal, Salvador; Zhang, Wenjie; Lytton, William W; Francis, Joseph T; Fortes, José AB

    2015-01-01

    Development of more sophisticated implantable brain-machine interface (BMI) will require both interpretation of the neurophysiological data being measured and subsequent determination of signals to be delivered back to the brain. Computational models are the heart of the machine of BMI and therefore an essential tool in both of these processes. One approach is to utilize brain biomimetic models (BMMs) to develop and instantiate these algorithms. These then must be connected as hybrid systems in order to interface the BMM with in vivo data acquisition devices and prosthetic devices. The combined system then provides a test bed for neuroprosthetic rehabilitative solutions and medical devices for the repair and enhancement of damaged brain. We propose here a computer network-based design for this purpose, detailing its internal modules and data flows. We describe a prototype implementation of the design, enabling interaction between the Plexon Multichannel Acquisition Processor (MAP) server, a commercial tool to collect signals from microelectrodes implanted in a live subject and a BMM, a NEURON-based model of sensorimotor cortex capable of controlling a virtual arm. The prototype implementation supports an online mode for real-time simulations, as well as an offline mode for data analysis and simulations without real-time constraints, and provides binning operations to discretize continuous input to the BMM and filtering operations for dealing with noise. Evaluation demonstrated that the implementation successfully delivered monkey spiking activity to the BMM through LAN environments, respecting real-time constraints. PMID:26702394

  10. Binary versus non-binary information in real time series: empirical results and maximum-entropy matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almog, Assaf; Garlaschelli, Diego

    2014-09-01

    The dynamics of complex systems, from financial markets to the brain, can be monitored in terms of multiple time series of activity of the constituent units, such as stocks or neurons, respectively. While the main focus of time series analysis is on the magnitude of temporal increments, a significant piece of information is encoded into the binary projection (i.e. the sign) of such increments. In this paper we provide further evidence of this by showing strong nonlinear relations between binary and non-binary properties of financial time series. These relations are a novel quantification of the fact that extreme price increments occur more often when most stocks move in the same direction. We then introduce an information-theoretic approach to the analysis of the binary signature of single and multiple time series. Through the definition of maximum-entropy ensembles of binary matrices and their mapping to spin models in statistical physics, we quantify the information encoded into the simplest binary properties of real time series and identify the most informative property given a set of measurements. Our formalism is able to accurately replicate, and mathematically characterize, the observed binary/non-binary relations. We also obtain a phase diagram allowing us to identify, based only on the instantaneous aggregate return of a set of multiple time series, a regime where the so-called ‘market mode’ has an optimal interpretation in terms of collective (endogenous) effects, a regime where it is parsimoniously explained by pure noise, and a regime where it can be regarded as a combination of endogenous and exogenous factors. Our approach allows us to connect spin models, simple stochastic processes, and ensembles of time series inferred from partial information.

  11. Real-time sonoelastography of hepatic thermal lesions in a swine model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Man; Castaneda, Benjamin; Christensen, Jared; Saad, Wael; Bylund, Kevin; Hoyt, Kenneth; Strang, John G.; Rubens, Deborah J.; Parker, Kevin J.

    2008-01-01

    Sonoelastography has been developed as an ultrasound-based elasticity imaging technique. In this technique, external vibration is induced into the target tissue. In general, tissue stiffness is inversely proportional to the amplitude of tissue vibration. Imaging tissue vibration will provide the elasticity distribution in the target region. This study investigated the feasibility of using real-time sonoelastography to detect and estimate the volume of thermal lesions in porcine livers in vivo. A total of 32 thermal lesions with volumes ranging from 0.2 to 5.3 cm3 were created using radiofrequency ablation (RFA) or high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) technique. Lesions were imaged using sonoelastography and coregistered B-mode ultrasound. Volumes were reconstructed from a sequence of two-dimensional scans. The comparison of sonoelastographic measurements and pathology findings showed good correlation with respect to the area of the lesions (r2=0.8823 for RFA lesions, r2=0.9543 for HIFU lesions). In addition, good correspondence was found between three-dimensional sonoelastography and gross pathology (3.6% underestimate), demonstrating the feasibility of sonoelastography for volume estimation of thermal lesions. These results support that sonoelastography outperforms conventional B-mode ultrasound and could potentially be used for assessment of thermal therapies. PMID:18841866

  12. Lipid tethering of breast tumor cells enables real-time imaging of free-floating cell dynamics and drug response

    PubMed Central

    Whipple, Rebecca A.; Zhang, Peipei; Sooklal, Elisabeth L.; Martin, Stuart S.; Jewell, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Free-floating tumor cells located in the blood of cancer patients, known as circulating tumor cells (CTCs), have become key targets for studying metastasis. However, effective strategies to study the free-floating behavior of tumor cells in vitro have been a major barrier limiting the understanding of the functional properties of CTCs. Upon extracellular-matrix (ECM) detachment, breast tumor cells form tubulin-based protrusions known as microtentacles (McTNs) that play a role in the aggregation and re-attachment of tumor cells to increase their metastatic efficiency. In this study, we have designed a strategy to spatially immobilize ECM-detached tumor cells while maintaining their free-floating character. We use polyelectrolyte multilayers deposited on microfluidic substrates to prevent tumor cell adhesion and the addition of lipid moieties to tether tumor cells to these surfaces through interactions with the cell membranes. This coating remains optically clear, allowing capture of high-resolution images and videos of McTNs on viable free-floating cells. In addition, we show that tethering allows for the real-time analysis of McTN dynamics on individual tumor cells and in response to tubulin-targeting drugs. The ability to image detached tumor cells can vastly enhance our understanding of CTCs under conditions that better recapitulate the microenvironments they encounter during metastasis. PMID:26871289

  13. Real-time hyperspectral fluorescence imaging of pancreatic β-cell dynamics with the image mapping spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Amicia D.; Gao, Liang; Ustione, Alessandro; Bedard, Noah; Kester, Robert; Piston, David W.; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The development of multi-colored fluorescent proteins, nanocrystals and organic fluorophores, along with the resulting engineered biosensors, has revolutionized the study of protein localization and dynamics in living cells. Hyperspectral imaging has proven to be a useful approach for such studies, but this technique is often limited by low signal and insufficient temporal resolution. Here, we present an implementation of a snapshot hyperspectral imaging device, the image mapping spectrometer (IMS), which acquires full spectral information simultaneously from each pixel in the field without scanning. The IMS is capable of real-time signal capture from multiple fluorophores with high collection efficiency (∼65%) and image acquisition rate (up to 7.2 fps). To demonstrate the capabilities of the IMS in cellular applications, we have combined fluorescent protein (FP)-FRET and [Ca2+]i biosensors to measure simultaneously intracellular cAMP and [Ca2+]i signaling in pancreatic β-cells. Additionally, we have compared quantitatively the IMS detection efficiency with a laser-scanning confocal microscope. PMID:22854044

  14. A Flexible Client-Driven 3DTV System for Real-Time Acquisition, Transmission, and Display of Dynamic Scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xun; Liu, Yebin; Dai, Qionghai

    2008-12-01

    3D experience and free-viewpoint navigation are expected to be two essential features of next generation television. In this paper, we present a flexible 3DTV system in which multiview video streams are captured, compressed, transmitted, and finally converted to high-quality 3D video in real time. Our system consists of an [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] camera array, 16 producer PCs, a streaming server, multiple clients, and several autostereoscopic displays. The whole system is implemented over IP network to provide multiple users with interactive 2D/3D switching, viewpoint control, and synthesis for dynamic scenes. In our approach, multiple video streams are first captured by a synchronized camera array. Then, we adopt a lengthened-B-field and region of interest- (ROI-) based coding scheme to guarantee a seamless view switching for each user as well as saving per-user transmission bandwidth. Finally, a convenient rendering algorithm is used to synthesize a visually pleasing result by introducing a new metric called Clarity Degree (CD). Experiments on both synthetic and real-world data have verified the feasibility, flexibility, and good performance of our system.

  15. Dynamic resource allocation engine for cloud-based real-time video transcoding in mobile cloud computing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adedayo, Bada; Wang, Qi; Alcaraz Calero, Jose M.; Grecos, Christos

    2015-02-01

    The recent explosion in video-related Internet traffic has been driven by the widespread use of smart mobile devices, particularly smartphones with advanced cameras that are able to record high-quality videos. Although many of these devices offer the facility to record videos at different spatial and temporal resolutions, primarily with local storage considerations in mind, most users only ever use the highest quality settings. The vast majority of these devices are optimised for compressing the acquired video using a single built-in codec and have neither the computational resources nor battery reserves to transcode the video to alternative formats. This paper proposes a new low-complexity dynamic resource allocation engine for cloud-based video transcoding services that are both scalable and capable of being delivered in real-time. Firstly, through extensive experimentation, we establish resource requirement benchmarks for a wide range of transcoding tasks. The set of tasks investigated covers the most widely used input formats (encoder type, resolution, amount of motion and frame rate) associated with mobile devices and the most popular output formats derived from a comprehensive set of use cases, e.g. a mobile news reporter directly transmitting videos to the TV audience of various video format requirements, with minimal usage of resources both at the reporter's end and at the cloud infrastructure end for transcoding services.

  16. Highly sensitive real-time in vivo imaging of an influenza reporter virus reveals dynamics of replication and spread.

    PubMed

    Tran, Vy; Moser, Lindsey A; Poole, Daniel S; Mehle, Andrew

    2013-12-01

    The continual public health threat posed by the emergence of novel influenza viruses necessitates the ability to rapidly monitor infection and spread in experimental systems. To analyze real-time infection dynamics, we have created a replication-competent influenza reporter virus suitable for in vivo imaging. The reporter virus encodes the small and bright NanoLuc luciferase whose activity serves as an extremely sensitive readout of viral infection. This virus stably maintains the reporter construct and replicates in culture and in mice with near-native properties. Bioluminescent imaging of the reporter virus permits serial observations of viral load and dissemination in infected animals, even following clearance of a sublethal challenge. We further show that the reporter virus recapitulates known restrictions due to host range and antiviral treatment, suggesting that this technology can be applied to studying emerging influenza viruses and the impact of antiviral interventions on infections in vivo. These results describe a generalizable method to quickly determine the replication and pathogenicity potential of diverse influenza strains in animals. PMID:24089552

  17. Real-time pressure monitoring for dynamic control during paper mill operation using fiber optic pressure sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielder, Robert S.; Boyd, Clark; Palmer, Matthew; Eriksen, Oddbjørn

    2006-03-01

    Fiber optic pressure sensors were integrated into the grinding plates of an operational paper pulp mill for real-time monitoring of the pulp grinding process. On-line system monitoring will allow smart, active control of the grinding plates thereby improving the quality and consistency of the pulp produced. Sensors were constructed and calibrated for use in the harsh environment of an operating paper pulp grinder. The sensors were 1.65mm in diameter including titanium housing, and were installed directly into the grooves of the grinding plates. The sensing elements were flush-mounted with the wall and exposed to the wood pulp slurry. Nine sensors were calibrated up to 1000psi. During operation, pressure was sampled at 1.0MHz, and pressure spikes up to 175psi were observed. Pressure pulses measured are due to the relative motion between the grooves and channels on two pulp grinding plates. The consistency, size distribution, and quality of paper pulp exiting from the grinder are directly related to the distance between the channels on the two rotating elements. The pressure pulses produced are also proportional to the distance between channels. Therefore, by monitoring pressure fluctuations, grinding elements can be dynamically controlled thereby producing a "smart mill."

  18. Continuous real-time photoacoustic demodulation via field programmable gate array for dynamic imaging of zebrafish cardiac cycle.

    PubMed

    Mattison, Scott P; Shelton, Ryan L; Maxson, Ryan T; Applegate, Brian E

    2013-01-01

    A four dimensional data set of the cardiac cycle of a zebrafish embryo was acquired using postacquisition synchronization of real time photoacoustic b-scans. Utilizing an off-axis photoacoustic microscopy (OA-PAM) setup, we have expanded upon our previous work with OA-PAM to develop a system that can sustain 100 kHz line rates while demodulating the bipolar photoacoustic signal in real-time. Real-time processing was accomplished by quadrature demodulation on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) in line with the signal digitizer. Simulated data acquisition verified the system is capable of real-time processing up to a line rate of 1 MHz. Galvanometer-scanning of the excitation laser inside the focus of the ultrasonic transducer enables real data acquisition of a 200 by 200 by 200 pixel, volumetric data set across a 2 millimeter field of view at a rate of 2.5 Hz. PMID:24010007

  19. A real-time recording model of key indicators for energy consumption and carbon emissions of sustainable buildings.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weiwei; Yang, Huanjia; Chew, David; Hou, Yanhong; Li, Qiming

    2014-01-01

    Buildings' sustainability is one of the crucial parts for achieving urban sustainability. Applied to buildings, life-cycle assessment encompasses the analysis and assessment of the environmental effects of building materials, components and assemblies throughout the entire life of the building construction, use and demolition. Estimate of carbon emissions is essential and crucial for an accurate and reasonable life-cycle assessment. Addressing the need for more research into integrating analysis of real-time and automatic recording of key indicators for a more accurate calculation and comparison, this paper aims to design a real-time recording model of these crucial indicators concerning the calculation and estimation of energy use and carbon emissions of buildings based on a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)-based system. The architecture of the RFID-based carbon emission recording/tracking system, which contains four functional layers including data record layer, data collection/update layer, data aggregation layer and data sharing/backup layer, is presented. Each of these layers is formed by RFID or network devices and sub-systems that operate at a specific level. In the end, a proof-of-concept system is developed to illustrate the implementation of the proposed architecture and demonstrate the feasibility of the design. This study would provide the technical solution for real-time recording system of building carbon emissions and thus is of great significance and importance to improve urban sustainability. PMID:24831109

  20. A Real-Time Recording Model of Key Indicators for Energy Consumption and Carbon Emissions of Sustainable Buildings

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weiwei; Yang, Huanjia; Chew, David; Hou, Yanhong; Li, Qiming

    2014-01-01

    Buildings' sustainability is one of the crucial parts for achieving urban sustainability. Applied to buildings, life-cycle assessment encompasses the analysis and assessment of the environmental effects of building materials, components and assemblies throughout the entire life of the building construction, use and demolition. Estimate of carbon emissions is essential and crucial for an accurate and reasonable life-cycle assessment. Addressing the need for more research into integrating analysis of real-time and automatic recording of key indicators for a more accurate calculation and comparison, this paper aims to design a real-time recording model of these crucial indicators concerning the calculation and estimation of energy use and carbon emissions of buildings based on a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)-based system. The architecture of the RFID-based carbon emission recording/tracking system, which contains four functional layers including data record layer, data collection/update layer, data aggregation layer and data sharing/backup layer, is presented. Each of these layers is formed by RFID or network devices and sub-systems that operate at a specific level. In the end, a proof-of-concept system is developed to illustrate the implementation of the proposed architecture and demonstrate the feasibility of the design. This study would provide the technical solution for real-time recording system of building carbon emissions and thus is of great significance and importance to improve urban sustainability. PMID:24831109

  1. Processor core for real time background identification of HD video based on OpenCV Gaussian mixture model algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genovese, Mariangela; Napoli, Ettore

    2013-05-01

    The identification of moving objects is a fundamental step in computer vision processing chains. The development of low cost and lightweight smart cameras steadily increases the request of efficient and high performance circuits able to process high definition video in real time. The paper proposes two processor cores aimed to perform the real time background identification on High Definition (HD, 1920 1080 pixel) video streams. The implemented algorithm is the OpenCV version of the Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM), an high performance probabilistic algorithm for the segmentation of the background that is however computationally intensive and impossible to implement on general purpose CPU with the constraint of real time processing. In the proposed paper, the equations of the OpenCV GMM algorithm are optimized in such a way that a lightweight and low power implementation of the algorithm is obtained. The reported performances are also the result of the use of state of the art truncated binary multipliers and ROM compression techniques for the implementation of the non-linear functions. The first circuit has commercial FPGA devices as a target and provides speed and logic resource occupation that overcome previously proposed implementations. The second circuit is oriented to an ASIC (UMC-90nm) standard cell implementation. Both implementations are able to process more than 60 frames per second in 1080p format, a frame rate compatible with HD television.

  2. Benchmarking flood models from space in near real-time: accommodating SRTM height measurement errors with low resolution flood imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, G.; di Baldassarre, G.; Alsdorf, D.; Bates, P. D.

    2009-04-01

    In February 2000, the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) measured the elevation of most of the Earth's surface with spatially continuous sampling and an absolute vertical accuracy greater than 9 m. The vertical error has been shown to change with topographic complexity, being less important over flat terrain. This allows water surface slopes to be measured and associated discharge volumes to be estimated for open channels in large basins, such as the Amazon. Building on these capabilities, this paper demonstrates that near real-time coarse resolution radar imagery of a recent flood event on a 98 km reach of the River Po (Northern Italy) combined with SRTM terrain height data leads to a water slope remarkably similar to that derived by combining the radar image with highly accurate airborne laser altimetry. Moreover, it is shown that this space-borne flood wave approximation compares well to a hydraulic model and thus allows the performance of the latter, calibrated on a previous event, to be assessed when applied to an event of different magnitude in near real-time. These results are not only of great importance to real-time flood management and flood forecasting but also support the upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission that will routinely provide water levels and slopes with higher precision around the globe.

  3. An integrated approach for real-time model-based state-of-charge estimation of lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Li, Kang; Pei, Lei; Zhu, Chunbo

    2015-06-01

    Lithium-ion batteries have been widely adopted in electric vehicles (EVs), and accurate state of charge (SOC) estimation is of paramount importance for the EV battery management system. Though a number of methods have been proposed, the SOC estimation for Lithium-ion batteries, such as LiFePo4 battery, however, faces two key challenges: the flat open circuit voltage (OCV) vs SOC relationship for some SOC ranges and the hysteresis effect. To address these problems, an integrated approach for real-time model-based SOC estimation of Lithium-ion batteries is proposed in this paper. Firstly, an auto-regression model is adopted to reproduce the battery terminal behaviour, combined with a non-linear complementary model to capture the hysteresis effect. The model parameters, including linear parameters and non-linear parameters, are optimized off-line using a hybrid optimization method that combines a meta-heuristic method (i.e., the teaching learning based optimization method) and the least square method. Secondly, using the trained model, two real-time model-based SOC estimation methods are presented, one based on the real-time battery OCV regression model achieved through weighted recursive least square method, and the other based on the state estimation using the extended Kalman filter method (EKF). To tackle the problem caused by the flat OCV-vs-SOC segments when the OCV-based SOC estimation method is adopted, a method combining the coulombic counting and the OCV-based method is proposed. Finally, modelling results and SOC estimation results are presented and analysed using the data collected from LiFePo4 battery cell. The results confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed approach, in particular the joint-EKF method.

  4. Real-Time In Vivo Imaging of Butterfly Wing Development: Revealing the Cellular Dynamics of the Pupal Wing Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Masaki; Ohno, Yoshikazu; Otaki, Joji M.

    2014-01-01

    Butterfly wings are covered with regularly arranged single-colored scales that are formed at the pupal stage. Understanding pupal wing development is therefore crucial to understand wing color pattern formation. Here, we successfully employed real-time in vivo imaging techniques to observe pupal hindwing development over time in the blue pansy butterfly, Junonia orithya. A transparent sheet of epithelial cells that were not yet regularly arranged was observed immediately after pupation. Bright-field imaging and autofluorescent imaging revealed free-moving hemocytes and tracheal branches of a crinoid-like structure underneath the epithelium. The wing tissue gradually became gray-white, epithelial cells were arranged regularly, and hemocytes disappeared, except in the bordering lacuna, after which scales grew. The dynamics of the epithelial cells and scale growth were also confirmed by fluorescent imaging. Fluorescent in vivo staining further revealed that these cells harbored many mitochondria at the surface of the epithelium. Organizing centers for the border symmetry system were apparent immediately after pupation, exhibiting a relatively dark optical character following treatment with fluorescent dyes, as well as in autofluorescent images. The wing tissue exhibited slow and low-frequency contraction pulses with a cycle of approximately 10 to 20 minutes, mainly occurring at 2 to 3 days postpupation. The pulses gradually became slower and weaker and eventually stopped. The wing tissue area became larger after contraction, which also coincided with an increase in the autofluorescence intensity that might have been caused by scale growth. Examination of the pattern of color development revealed that the black pigment was first deposited in patches in the central areas of an eyespot black ring and a parafocal element. These results of live in vivo imaging that covered wide wing area for a long time can serve as a foundation for studying the cellular dynamics of living

  5. Behavioral Model Architectures: A New Way Of Doing Real-Time Planning In Intelligent Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassinis, Riccardo; Biroli, Ernesto; Meregalli, Alberto; Scalise, Fabio

    1987-01-01

    Traditional hierarchical robot control systems, although well suited for manufacturing applications, appear to be inefficient for innovative applications, such as mobile robots. The research we present aims to the development of a new architecture, designed to overcome actual limitations. The control system was named BARCS (Behavioral Architecture Robot Control System). It is composed of several modules, that exchange information through a blackboard. The original point is that the functions of the modules were selected according to a behavioral rather than a functional decomposition model. Therefore, the system includes, among other, purpose, strategy, movement, sensor handling and safety modules. Both the hardware structure and the logical decomposition allow a great freedom in the design of each module and of the connections between modules, that have to be as flexible and efficient as possible. In order to obtain an "intelligent" behavior, a mixture of traditional programming, artificial intelligence techniques and fuzzy logic are used, according to the needs of each moddle. The approach is particularly interesting because the robot can be quite easily "specialized", i.e. it can be given behaviors and problem solving strategies that suit some applications better than other. Another interesting aspect of the proposed architecture is that sensor information handling and fusion can be dynamically tailored to the robot's situation, thus eliminating all time-consuming useless processing.

  6. A real-time solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field model for space radiation analysis and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, C. D.; Detman, T. R.; Dryer, M.; Smith, Z.; Sun, W.; Deehr, C. S.; Akasofu, S.-I.; Wu, C.-C.

    We describe an observation-driven model for assessing and predicting the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) environment. High energy particles generated during solar/interplanetary disturbances will pose a serious hazard to crew members traveling beyond low-Earth orbit. In order to provide warnings of dangerous radiation conditions, mission operators will need accurate forecasts of solar energetic particle (SEP) fluxes and fluences in interplanetary space. However, physics-based models for accelerating and propagating SEPs require specifications and predictions of the solar wind conditions and IMF configuration near the evolving interplanetary shock region, and along the IMF lines connecting the shock to the observation point. We are presently using the Hakamada-Akasofu-Fry kinematic solar wind model to predict, in real time, solar wind conditions in the heliosphere, including at the location of Mars, and beyond. This model is being extended via a hybrid approach to include a 3D MHD model, the Interplanetary Global Model, Vectorized (IGMV). We present our modeling results and conclude that uncertainties in determining, from real-time solar observations, the physical parameters used for model inputs are the biggest factors limiting the accuracy of solar wind models used for space radiation analysis and prediction.

  7. A Real-Time Mathematical Model for the Two-Dimensional Temperature Field of Petroleum Coke Calcination in Vertical Shaft Calciner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jin; Huang, Jindi; Zhong, Qifan; Li, Fachuang; Zhang, Hongliang; Li, Jie

    2016-02-01

    A real-time mathematical model for the two-dimensional temperature field of petroleum coke calcination in vertical shaft calciner was developed based on computational fluid dynamics. In the modeling process, the petroleum coke discharging process was described by the solid viscous flow, the dynamic heat flux boundary condition was adopted to specify the heat transfer between the flue wall and the gas in the flue, and the Arrhenius equation was used to characterize the pyrolysis process of petroleum coke. The model was validated with both measurement data and data from the literature. The effects of discharge rate per pot, volatile content of green coke, and excess air coefficient on the temperature field of the vertical shaft calciner were investigated with the use of the developed model. The following reasonable operating conditions were obtained: the discharge rate per pot should be less than 90 kg/h, the volatile content of green coke should be in the range of 9-11%, and the excess air coefficient should be in the range of 1.10-1.20. In this work, the governing equations were discretized by using the finite volume method, and the discrete linear equations were solved by using sparse matrix package UMFPACK. The model calculating process takes about less than 15 s. Therefore, the model is beneficial in realizing real-time online temperature detection of petroleum coke calcination in a vertical shaft calciner.

  8. The Stomatogastric Nervous System as a Model for Studying Sensorimotor Interactions in Real-Time Closed-Loop Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Daur, Nelly; Diehl, Florian; Mader, Wolfgang; Stein, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The perception of proprioceptive signals that report the internal state of the body is one of the essential tasks of the nervous system and helps to continuously adapt body movements to changing circumstances. Despite the impact of proprioceptive feedback on motor activity it has rarely been studied in conditions in which motor output and sensory activity interact as they do in behaving animals, i.e., in closed-loop conditions. The interaction of motor and sensory activities, however, can create emergent properties that may govern the functional characteristics of the system. We here demonstrate a method to use a well-characterized model system for central pattern generation, the stomatogastric nervous system, for studying these properties in vitro. We created a real-time computer model of a single-cell muscle tendon organ in the gastric mill of the crab foregut that uses intracellular current injections to control the activity of the biological proprioceptor. The resulting motor output of a gastric mill motor neuron is then recorded intracellularly and fed into a simple muscle model consisting of a series of low-pass filters. The muscle output is used to activate a one-dimensional Hodgkin–Huxley type model of the muscle tendon organ in real-time, allowing closed-loop conditions. Model properties were either hand tuned to achieve the best match with data from semi-intact muscle preparations, or an exhaustive search was performed to determine the best set of parameters. We report the real-time capabilities of our models, its performance and its interaction with the biological motor system. PMID:22435059

  9. Model- based filtering for artifact and noise suppression with state estimation for electrodermal activity measurements in real time.

    PubMed

    Tronstad, Christian; Staal, Odd M; Saelid, Steinar; Martinsen, Orjan G

    2015-08-01

    Measurement of electrodermal activity (EDA) has recently made a transition from the laboratory into daily life with the emergence of wearable devices. Movement and nongelled electrodes make these devices more susceptible to noise and artifacts. In addition, real-time interpretation of the measurement is needed for user feedback. The Kalman filter approach may conveniently deal with both these issues. This paper presents a biophysical model for EDA implemented in an extended Kalman filter. Employing the filter on data from Physionet along with simulated noise and artifacts demonstrates noise and artifact suppression while implicitly providing estimates of model states and parameters such as the sudomotor nerve activation. PMID:26736861

  10. Real-Time Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station High-Resolution Model Implementation and Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Jaclyn; Watson, Leela R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Launch Services Program, Ground Systems Development and Operations, Space Launch System and other programs at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) use the daily and weekly weather forecasts issued by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) as decision tools for their day-to-day and launch operations on the Eastern Range (ER). Examples include determining if they need to limit activities such as vehicle transport to the launch pad, protect people, structures or exposed launch vehicles given a threat of severe weather, or reschedule other critical operations. The 45 WS uses numerical weather prediction models as a guide for these weather forecasts, particularly the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA) 1.67 km Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Considering the 45 WS forecasters' and Launch Weather Officers' (LWO) extensive use of the AFWA model, the 45 WS proposed a task at the September 2013 Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) Tasking Meeting requesting the AMU verify this model. Due to the lack of archived model data available from AFWA, verification is not yet possible. Instead, the AMU proposed to implement and verify the performance of an ER version of the high-resolution WRF Environmental Modeling System (EMS) model configured by the AMU (Watson 2013) in real time. Implementing a real-time version of the ER WRF-EMS would generate a larger database of model output than in the previous AMU task for determining model performance, and allows the AMU more control over and access to the model output archive. The tasking group agreed to this proposal; therefore the AMU implemented the WRF-EMS model on the second of two NASA AMU modeling clusters. The AMU also calculated verification statistics to determine model performance compared to observational data. Finally, the AMU made the model output available on the AMU Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System II (AWIPS II) servers, which allows the 45 WS and AMU staff to customize

  11. Coupling Modified Constitutive Relation Error, Model Reduction and Kalman Filtering Algorithms for Real-Time Parameters Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, Basile; Chamoin, Ludovic; Rey, Christian

    2015-11-01

    In this work we propose a new identification strategy based on the coupling between a probabilistic data assimilation method and a deterministic inverse problem approach using the modified Constitutive Relation Error energy functional. The idea is thus to offer efficient identification despite of highly corrupted data for time-dependent systems. In order to perform real-time identification, the modified Constitutive Relation Error is here associated to a model reduction method based on Proper Generalized Decomposition. The proposed strategy is applied to two thermal problems with identification of time-dependent boundary conditions, or material parameters.

  12. Real-time flutter identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, R.; Walker, R.

    1985-01-01

    The techniques and a FORTRAN 77 MOdal Parameter IDentification (MOPID) computer program developed for identification of the frequencies and damping ratios of multiple flutter modes in real time are documented. Physically meaningful model parameterization was combined with state of the art recursive identification techniques and applied to the problem of real time flutter mode monitoring. The performance of the algorithm in terms of convergence speed and parameter estimation error is demonstrated for several simulated data cases, and the results of actual flight data analysis from two different vehicles are presented. It is indicated that the algorithm is capable of real time monitoring of aircraft flutter characteristics with a high degree of reliability.

  13. Real-time human motion estimation using biomechanical models and non-linear state-space filters.

    PubMed

    Cerveri, P; Rabuffetti, M; Pedotti, A; Ferrigno, G

    2003-03-01

    In the field of sports biomechanics and rehabilitation engineering, the possibility of computing, in real time, the angular displacements and derivatives of human joints, from a video of motion sequences, represents an appealing goal. In particular, applications of biofeedback protocols in rehabilitation can benefit from this capability. The focus of the investigation was concerned with the application of biomechanical models, comprising of a kinematic chain and surface envelopes, and state-space filters, to the computation, in real time and with high accuracy, of the angular data and derivatives. By minimising the distances, measured with TV cameras, between the 2D marker projections and the corresponding back-projected markers located on the mannequin, the configuration of the biomechanical model was automatically updated. The use of state-space estimation allowed the computation of smooth derivatives of the orientation data. Owing to the non-linearity of the functions involved, the derivatives of the observation model were obtained through a multidimensional extension of Stirling's interpolation formula. Proper algorithms were developed to cope with the model calibration, initialisation and data labelling. Extensive experiments on real and simulated motions proved the reliability (maximum angular error less than 1 degree, maximum point reconstruction less than 1 mm) of the developed system, which is robust to false matching caused by marker occlusions. Moreover, orientation artifacts due to skin motion can be reduced by a factor of 50%. PMID:12691430

  14. Predictive modeling in Clostridium acetobutylicum fermentations employing Raman spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis for real-time culture monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Theresah N. K.; Liu, Sanchao; Germane, Katherine L.; Servinsky, Matthew D.; Gerlach, Elliot S.; Mackie, David M.; Sund, Christian J.

    2016-05-01

    The coupling of optical fibers with Raman instrumentation has proven to be effective for real-time monitoring of chemical reactions and fermentations when combined with multivariate statistical data analysis. Raman spectroscopy is relatively fast, with little interference from the water peak present in fermentation media. Medical research has explored this technique for analysis of mammalian cultures for potential diagnosis of some cancers. Other organisms studied via this route include Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and some Bacillus sp., though very little work has been performed on Clostridium acetobutylicum cultures. C. acetobutylicum is a gram-positive anaerobic bacterium, which is highly sought after due to its ability to use a broad spectrum of substrates and produce useful byproducts through the well-known Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol (ABE) fermentation. In this work, real-time Raman data was acquired from C. acetobutylicum cultures grown on glucose. Samples were collected concurrently for comparative off-line product analysis. Partial-least squares (PLS) models were built both for agitated cultures and for static cultures from both datasets. Media components and metabolites monitored include glucose, butyric acid, acetic acid, and butanol. Models were cross-validated with independent datasets. Experiments with agitation were more favorable for modeling with goodness of fit (QY) values of 0.99 and goodness of prediction (Q2Y) values of 0.98. Static experiments did not model as well as agitated experiments. Raman results showed the static experiments were chaotic, especially during and shortly after manual sampling.

  15. The dosimetric impact of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plan modulation for real-time dynamic MLC tracking delivery

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Marianne; Larsson, Tobias; Keall, Paul; Chul Cho, Byung; Aznar, Marianne; Korreman, Stine; Poulsen, Per; af Rosenschöld, Per Munck

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking for management of intrafraction tumor motion can be challenging for highly modulated beams, as the leaves need to travel far to adjust for target motion perpendicular to the leaf travel direction. The plan modulation can be reduced by using a leaf position constraint (LPC) that reduces the difference in the position of adjacent MLC leaves in the plan. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the LPC on the quality of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plans and the effect of the MLC motion pattern on the dosimetric accuracy of MLC tracking delivery. Specifically, the possibility of predicting the accuracy of MLC tracking delivery based on the plan modulation was investigated. Methods: Inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plans were created on CT-data of three lung cancer patients. For each case, five plans with a single 358° arc were generated with LPC priorities of 0 (no LPC), 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1 (highest possible LPC), respectively. All the plans had a prescribed dose of 2 Gy × 30, used 6 MV, a maximum dose rate of 600 MU/min and a collimator angle of 45° or 315°. To quantify the plan modulation, an average adjacent leaf distance (ALD) was calculated by averaging the mean adjacent leaf distance for each control point. The linear relationship between the plan quality [i.e., the calculated dose distributions and the number of monitor units (MU)] and the LPC was investigated, and the linear regression coefficient as well as a two tailed confidence level of 95% was used in the evaluation. The effect of the plan modulation on the performance of MLC tracking was tested by delivering the plans to a cylindrical diode array phantom moving with sinusoidal motion in the superior–inferior direction with a peak-to-peak displacement of 2 cm and a cycle time of 6 s. The delivery was adjusted to the target motion using MLC tracking, guided in real-time by an infrared optical system. The

  16. The dosimetric impact of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plan modulation for real-time dynamic MLC tracking delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Falk, Marianne; Larsson, Tobias; Keall, Paul; Chul Cho, Byung; Aznar, Marianne; Korreman, Stine; Poulsen, Per; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking for management of intrafraction tumor motion can be challenging for highly modulated beams, as the leaves need to travel far to adjust for target motion perpendicular to the leaf travel direction. The plan modulation can be reduced by using a leaf position constraint (LPC) that reduces the difference in the position of adjacent MLC leaves in the plan. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the LPC on the quality of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plans and the effect of the MLC motion pattern on the dosimetric accuracy of MLC tracking delivery. Specifically, the possibility of predicting the accuracy of MLC tracking delivery based on the plan modulation was investigated. Methods: Inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plans were created on CT-data of three lung cancer patients. For each case, five plans with a single 358 deg. arc were generated with LPC priorities of 0 (no LPC), 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1 (highest possible LPC), respectively. All the plans had a prescribed dose of 2 Gy x 30, used 6 MV, a maximum dose rate of 600 MU/min and a collimator angle of 45 deg. or 315 deg. To quantify the plan modulation, an average adjacent leaf distance (ALD) was calculated by averaging the mean adjacent leaf distance for each control point. The linear relationship between the plan quality [i.e., the calculated dose distributions and the number of monitor units (MU)] and the LPC was investigated, and the linear regression coefficient as well as a two tailed confidence level of 95% was used in the evaluation. The effect of the plan modulation on the performance of MLC tracking was tested by delivering the plans to a cylindrical diode array phantom moving with sinusoidal motion in the superior-inferior direction with a peak-to-peak displacement of 2 cm and a cycle time of 6 s. The delivery was adjusted to the target motion using MLC tracking, guided in real-time by an infrared optical system

  17. Enhanced Self Tuning On-Board Real-Time Model (eSTORM) for Aircraft Engine Performance Health Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volponi, Al; Simon, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2008-01-01

    A key technological concept for producing reliable engine diagnostics and prognostics exploits the benefits of fusing sensor data, information, and/or processing algorithms. This report describes the development of a hybrid engine model for a propulsion gas turbine engine, which is the result of fusing two diverse modeling methodologies: a physics-based model approach and an empirical model approach. The report describes the process and methods involved in deriving and implementing a hybrid model configuration for a commercial turbofan engine. Among the intended uses for such a model is to enable real-time, on-board tracking of engine module performance changes and engine parameter synthesis for fault detection and accommodation.

  18. 4-D imaging of sub-second dynamics in pore-scale processes using real-time synchrotron X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Katherine J.; Coban, Sophia B.; McDonald, Samuel A.; Walsh, Joanna N.; Atwood, Robert C.; Withers, Philip J.

    2016-07-01

    A variable volume flow cell has been integrated with state-of-the-art ultra-high-speed synchrotron X-ray tomography imaging. The combination allows the first real-time (sub-second) capture of dynamic pore (micron)-scale fluid transport processes in 4-D (3-D + time). With 3-D data volumes acquired at up to 20 Hz, we perform in situ experiments that capture high-frequency pore-scale dynamics in 5-25 mm diameter samples with voxel (3-D equivalent of a pixel) resolutions of 2.5 to 3.8 µm. The data are free from motion artefacts and can be spatially registered or collected in the same orientation, making them suitable for detailed quantitative analysis of the dynamic fluid distribution pathways and processes. The methods presented here are capable of capturing a wide range of high-frequency nonequilibrium pore-scale processes including wetting, dilution, mixing, and reaction phenomena, without sacrificing significant spatial resolution. As well as fast streaming (continuous acquisition) at 20 Hz, they also allow larger-scale and longer-term experimental runs to be sampled intermittently at lower frequency (time-lapse imaging), benefiting from fast image acquisition rates to prevent motion blur in highly dynamic systems. This marks a major technical breakthrough for quantification of high-frequency pore-scale processes: processes that are critical for developing and validating more accurate multiscale flow models through spatially and temporally heterogeneous pore networks.

  19. DEVELOPING EMISSION INVENTORIES FOR BIOMASS BURNING FOR REAL-TIME AND RETROSPECTIVE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA uses chemical transport models to simulate historic meteorological episodes for developing air quality management strategies. In addition, chemical transport models are now being used operationally to create air quality forecasts. There are currently a number of methods a...

  20. NEAR REAL TIME MODELING OF WEATHER, AIR POLLUTION, AND HEALTH OUTCOME INDICATORS IN NEW YORK CITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Impact of heat wave on mortality: We evaluated model performance for an exhaustive set of alternative weather models, using both parametric and non-parametric time-series Poisson models, to predict the heat wave effects on natural mortality. The re...

  1. Ocean Model Analysis and Prediction System (Ocean Maps): Operational Ocean Forecasting Base on Near Real-Time Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brassington, G. B.

    2006-07-01

    BLU Elink> is a join t Australian governmen t initiative to develop Austr alia's f irst operational ocean forecasting system called O cean MAPS. The project has transitioned to th e implemen tation and trial phase using the infrastructure of the Bureau of Meteorology. OceanMAPS has a g lobal grid with 1/10° by 1/10° resolution in the Australian region (90E-180E, 70S- 16N) and uses the Modular Ocean Model version 4 optimised for the NEC SX6. The analysis uses an ensemb le based multi-variate optimal interpolation scheme wh ere model error cov ariances ar e der ived from a 72-member ensemble of in tra-seasonal anomalies based on a 12-year ocean only model integration. The scheme has been formulated to assimilate near real- time sea level heigh t anomalies processed from Jason-1, ENVISAT and Geosat Follow-On and profile observations including Argo, X BT and the TAO array. The operation al configuration including the data manag emen t of the near real- time observ ations is review ed.

  2. RAPTOR: Optimization, real-time simulation and control of the tokamak q profile evolution using a simplified transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felici, Federico; Sauter, Olivier; Goodman, Timothy; Paley, James

    2010-11-01

    Control of the plasma current density and safety factor profile evolution in a tokamak is crucial for accessing advanced regimes. The evolution of the current density profile is steered by a combination of inductive voltage and auxiliary current drive actuators, and is nonlinearly coupled to the evolution of the (ion/electron) temperature and density profiles. Using appropriate simplifications, a model has been obtaine