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Sample records for real-time phase-contrast x-ray

  1. Real-time measurement of alveolar size and population using phase contrast x-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Andrew F.T.; Buckley, Genevieve A.; Paganin, David M.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Wallace, Megan J.; Kitchen, Marcus J.

    2014-01-01

    Herein a propagation-based phase contrast x-ray imaging technique for measuring particle size and number is presented. This is achieved with an algorithm that utilizes the Fourier space signature of the speckle pattern associated with the images of particles. We validate this algorithm using soda-lime glass particles, demonstrating its effectiveness on random and non-randomly packed particles. This technique is then applied to characterise lung alveoli, which are difficult to measure dynamically in vivo with current imaging modalities due to inadequate temporal resolution and/or depth of penetration and field-of-view. We obtain an important result in that our algorithm is able to measure changes in alveolar size on the micron scale during ventilation and shows the presence of alveolar recruitment/de-recruitment in newborn rabbit kittens. This technique will be useful for ventilation management and lung diagnostic procedures. PMID:25426328

  2. Real-time measurement of alveolar size and population using phase contrast x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Leong, Andrew F T; Buckley, Genevieve A; Paganin, David M; Hooper, Stuart B; Wallace, Megan J; Kitchen, Marcus J

    2014-11-01

    Herein a propagation-based phase contrast x-ray imaging technique for measuring particle size and number is presented. This is achieved with an algorithm that utilizes the Fourier space signature of the speckle pattern associated with the images of particles. We validate this algorithm using soda-lime glass particles, demonstrating its effectiveness on random and non-randomly packed particles. This technique is then applied to characterise lung alveoli, which are difficult to measure dynamically in vivo with current imaging modalities due to inadequate temporal resolution and/or depth of penetration and field-of-view. We obtain an important result in that our algorithm is able to measure changes in alveolar size on the micron scale during ventilation and shows the presence of alveolar recruitment/de-recruitment in newborn rabbit kittens. This technique will be useful for ventilation management and lung diagnostic procedures. PMID:25426328

  3. Real-time phase-contrast x-ray imaging: a new technique for the study of animal form and function

    PubMed Central

    Socha, John J; Westneat, Mark W; Harrison, Jon F; Waters, James S; Lee, Wah-Keat

    2007-01-01

    Background Despite advances in imaging techniques, real-time visualization of the structure and dynamics of tissues and organs inside small living animals has remained elusive. Recently, we have been using synchrotron x-rays to visualize the internal anatomy of millimeter-sized opaque, living animals. This technique takes advantage of partially-coherent x-rays and diffraction to enable clear visualization of internal soft tissue not viewable via conventional absorption radiography. However, because higher quality images require greater x-ray fluxes, there exists an inherent tradeoff between image quality and tissue damage. Results We evaluated the tradeoff between image quality and harm to the animal by determining the impact of targeted synchrotron x-rays on insect physiology, behavior and survival. Using 25 keV x-rays at a flux density of 80 μW/mm-2, high quality video-rate images can be obtained without major detrimental effects on the insects for multiple minutes, a duration sufficient for many physiological studies. At this setting, insects do not heat up. Additionally, we demonstrate the range of uses of synchrotron phase-contrast imaging by showing high-resolution images of internal anatomy and observations of labeled food movement during ingestion and digestion. Conclusion Synchrotron x-ray phase contrast imaging has the potential to revolutionize the study of physiology and internal biomechanics in small animals. This is the only generally applicable technique that has the necessary spatial and temporal resolutions, penetrating power, and sensitivity to soft tissue that is required to visualize the internal physiology of living animals on the scale from millimeters to microns. PMID:17331247

  4. Factors influencing real time internal structural visualization and dynamic process monitoring in plants using synchrotron-based phase contrast X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunakaran, Chithra; Lahlali, Rachid; Zhu, Ning; Webb, Adam M.; Schmidt, Marina; Fransishyn, Kyle; Belev, George; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Olson, Jeremy; Cooper, David M. L.; Hallin, Emil

    2015-07-01

    Minimally invasive investigation of plant parts (root, stem, leaves, and flower) has good potential to elucidate the dynamics of plant growth, morphology, physiology, and root-rhizosphere interactions. Laboratory based absorption X-ray imaging and computed tomography (CT) systems are extensively used for in situ feasibility studies of plants grown in natural and artificial soil. These techniques have challenges such as low contrast between soil pore space and roots, long X-ray imaging time, and low spatial resolution. In this study, the use of synchrotron (SR) based phase contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) has been demonstrated as a minimally invasive technique for imaging plants. Above ground plant parts and roots of 10 day old canola and wheat seedlings grown in sandy clay loam soil were successfully scanned and reconstructed. Results confirmed that SR-PCI can deliver good quality images to study dynamic and real time processes such as cavitation and water-refilling in plants. The advantages of SR-PCI, effect of X-ray energy, and effective pixel size to study plant samples have been demonstrated. The use of contrast agents to monitor physiological processes in plants was also investigated and discussed.

  5. Factors influencing real time internal structural visualization and dynamic process monitoring in plants using synchrotron-based phase contrast X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, Chithra; Lahlali, Rachid; Zhu, Ning; Webb, Adam M; Schmidt, Marina; Fransishyn, Kyle; Belev, George; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Olson, Jeremy; Cooper, David M L; Hallin, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive investigation of plant parts (root, stem, leaves, and flower) has good potential to elucidate the dynamics of plant growth, morphology, physiology, and root-rhizosphere interactions. Laboratory based absorption X-ray imaging and computed tomography (CT) systems are extensively used for in situ feasibility studies of plants grown in natural and artificial soil. These techniques have challenges such as low contrast between soil pore space and roots, long X-ray imaging time, and low spatial resolution. In this study, the use of synchrotron (SR) based phase contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) has been demonstrated as a minimally invasive technique for imaging plants. Above ground plant parts and roots of 10 day old canola and wheat seedlings grown in sandy clay loam soil were successfully scanned and reconstructed. Results confirmed that SR-PCI can deliver good quality images to study dynamic and real time processes such as cavitation and water-refilling in plants. The advantages of SR-PCI, effect of X-ray energy, and effective pixel size to study plant samples have been demonstrated. The use of contrast agents to monitor physiological processes in plants was also investigated and discussed. PMID:26183486

  6. Factors influencing real time internal structural visualization and dynamic process monitoring in plants using synchrotron-based phase contrast X-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Karunakaran, Chithra; Lahlali, Rachid; Zhu, Ning; Webb, Adam M.; Schmidt, Marina; Fransishyn, Kyle; Belev, George; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Olson, Jeremy; Cooper, David M. L.; Hallin, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive investigation of plant parts (root, stem, leaves, and flower) has good potential to elucidate the dynamics of plant growth, morphology, physiology, and root-rhizosphere interactions. Laboratory based absorption X-ray imaging and computed tomography (CT) systems are extensively used for in situ feasibility studies of plants grown in natural and artificial soil. These techniques have challenges such as low contrast between soil pore space and roots, long X-ray imaging time, and low spatial resolution. In this study, the use of synchrotron (SR) based phase contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) has been demonstrated as a minimally invasive technique for imaging plants. Above ground plant parts and roots of 10 day old canola and wheat seedlings grown in sandy clay loam soil were successfully scanned and reconstructed. Results confirmed that SR-PCI can deliver good quality images to study dynamic and real time processes such as cavitation and water-refilling in plants. The advantages of SR-PCI, effect of X-ray energy, and effective pixel size to study plant samples have been demonstrated. The use of contrast agents to monitor physiological processes in plants was also investigated and discussed. PMID:26183486

  7. Real-time phase-contrast x-ray imaging using two-dimensionally expanded synchrotron radiation x-rays at the BL24XU (Hyogo-BL) of the SPring-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagoshima, Y.; Tsusaka, Y.; Matsui, J.; Yokoyama, K.; Takai, K.; Takeda, S.; Kobayashi, K.; Kimura, H.; Kimura, S.; Izumi, K.

    2000-05-01

    Phase-contrast x-ray imaging has been studied for materials, biological and medical sciences at the Hyogo-prefectural beamline (BL24XU) of the SPring-8. Its optical system consists of a successive arrangement of horizontal and vertical (+, -) silicon double crystals taking asymmetric Bragg reflection. A living insect and a frog were observed in real time at the photon energy of 15 keV. Boundary structures in samples were clearly observed with much higher contrast than those obtained in absorption-contrast imaging. The beamline BL24XU, optical system and experimental results are described.

  8. Phased Contrast X-Ray Imaging

    ScienceCinema

    Erin Miller

    2012-12-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a range of technologies to broaden the field of explosives detection. Phased contrast X-ray imaging, which uses silicon gratings to detect distortions in the X-ray wave front, may be applicable to mail or luggage scanning for explosives; it can also be used in detecting other contraband, small-parts inspection, or materials characterization.

  9. X-ray phase-contrast methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lider, V. V. Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2013-11-15

    This review is devoted to a comparative description of the methods for forming X-ray phase-contrast images of weakly absorbing (phase) objects. These include the crystal interferometer method, the Talbot interferometer method, diffraction-enhanced X-ray imaging, and the in-line method. The potential of their practical application in various fields of science and technology is discussed. The publications on the development and optimization of X-ray phase-contrast methods and the experimental study of phase objects are analyzed.

  10. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    DOEpatents

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-07-01

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  11. Real-Time X-Ray Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulthuis, Ronald V.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray imaging instrument adapted to continuous scanning. Modern version of fluoroscope enables rapid x-ray inspection of parts. Developed for detection of buckling in insulated ducts. Uses radiation from radioactive gadolinium or thallium source. Instrument weighs only 6 1/2 lb. Quickly scanned by hand along duct surface, providing real-time image. Based on Lixiscope, developed at Goddard Space Flight Center.

  12. Phase-contrast x-ray tomography using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonse, Ulrich; Beckmann, Felix; Bartscher, Markus; Biermann, Theodor; Busch, Frank; Guennewig, Olaf

    1997-10-01

    The principle and experimental l realization of x-ray phase- contrast in compute assisted microtomography ((mu) CT) at the micrometer resolution level is described. The camera used is a modification of a setup previously developed by us for attenuation-contrast (mu) CT using synchrotron x-rays. Phase detection is accomplished by employing the x-ray interferometer. By using x-ray phase contrast it is possible to image structural details in low-z biological tissues much better than with absorption contrast. The advantage of phase over attenuation contrast is not limited to light element or to low x-ray energies. Examples of applying phase contrast (mu) CT to the structural investigation of rat trigeminal nerve are given.

  13. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging of breast.

    PubMed

    Keyriläinen, Jani; Bravin, Alberto; Fernández, Manuel; Tenhunen, Mikko; Virkkunen, Pekka; Suortti, Pekka

    2010-10-01

    When an X-ray wave traverses an object, its amplitude and phase change, resulting in attenuation, interference, and refraction, and in phase-contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) these are converted to intensity changes. The relative change of the X-ray phase per unit path length is even orders of magnitude larger than that of the X-ray amplitude, so that the image contrast based on variation of the X-ray phase is potentially much stronger than the contrast based on X-ray amplitude (absorption contrast). An important medical application of PCI methods is soft-tissue imaging, where the absorption contrast is inherently weak. It is shown by in vitro examples that signs of malignant human breast tumor are enhanced in PCI images. Owing to the strong contrast, the radiation dose can be greatly reduced, so that a high-resolution phase-contrast X-ray tomography of the breast is possible with about 1 mGy mean glandular dose. Scattered radiation carries essential information on the atomic and molecular structure of the object, and particularly small-angle X-ray scattering can be used to trace cancer. The imaging methods developed at the synchrotron radiation facilities will become available in the clinical environment with the ongoing development of compact radiation sources, which produce intense X-ray beams of sufficient coherence. Several developments that are under way are described here. PMID:20799921

  14. Phase contrast imaging with micro focus x-ray tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shovkun, V. Y.; Kumakhov, M. A.

    2005-07-01

    Now the phase-contrast (PC) radiography with monochromatic synchmtron radiation sources is very promising for use in non-destructive industrial control, medical and biological X-ray imaging. Unfortunately synchrotron sources are rather expensive for laboratory practice. We are developing a phase-contrast imaging with a micro focus X-ray tube. We performed numerical calculations with Fresnel-Kirchhgoff formalism to obtain values of PC-signals taking into account polychromatic nature of X-ray radiation, a finite size of a source, and a finite resolution of a detector including spectral sensitivity of the detector. We conducted experiments with a micro focus X-ray tube to find absolute values of PC signals for some models of biological tissue and technical materials in presence of scattering X-rays that emerge from the object. By means of simple set of the experimental arrangement it is possible to obtain the phase-contrast image map of the boundaries between regions with the density difference of order ~1 g/cm3. Under experimental conditions the minimal detected PC-signal is found for the plastic fiber 45 tm in diameter. Examples ofthe X-ray PC-images of fishes, images of air bubbles and ribs, slag inclusions in joint weld of Al-Li alloy materials, and images of sapphire microspheres for cellular metallic structures are presented.

  15. Phase contrast imaging with coherent high energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Snigireva, I.

    1997-02-01

    X-ray imaging concern high energy domain (>6 keV) like a contact radiography, projection microscopy and tomography is used for many years to discern the features of the internal structure non destructively in material science, medicine and biology. In so doing the main contrast formation is absorption that makes some limitations for imaging of the light density materials and what is more the resolution of these techniques is not better than 10-100 {mu}m. It was turned out that there is now way in which to overcome 1{mu}m or even sub-{mu}m resolution limit except phase contrast imaging. It is well known in optics that the phase contrast is realised when interference between reference wave front and transmitted through the sample take place. Examples of this imaging are: phase contrast microscopy suggested by Zernike and Gabor (in-line) holography. Both of this techniques: phase contrast x-ray microscopy and holography are successfully progressing now in soft x-ray region. For imaging in the hard X-rays to enhance the contrast and to be able to resolve phase variations across the beam the high degree of the time and more importantly spatial coherence is needed. Because of this it was reasonable that the perfect crystal optics was involved like Bonse-Hart interferometry, double-crystal and even triple-crystal set-up using Laue and Bragg geometry with asymmetrically cut crystals.

  16. Helical x-ray differential phase contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhihua; Thériault-Lauzier, Pascal; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-03-01

    Helical computed tomography revolutionized the field of x-ray computed tomography two decades ago. The simultaneous translation of an image object with a standard computed tomography acquisition allows for fast volumetric scan for long image objects. X-ray phase sensitive imaging methods have been studied over the past few decades to provide new contrast mechanisms for imaging an object. A Talbot-Lau grating interferometer based differential phase contrast imaging method has recently demonstrated its potential for implementation in clinical and industrial applications. In this work, the principles of helical computed tomography are extended to differential phase contrast imaging to produce volumetric reconstructions based on fan-beam data. The method demonstrates the potential for helical differential phase contrast CT to scan long objects with relatively small detector coverage in the axial direction.

  17. Various clinical application of phase contrast X-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Chilhwan; Park, Sangyong; Ha, Seunghan; Park, Gyuman; Lee, Gunwoo; Lee, Onseok; Je, Jungho

    2008-02-01

    In biomedical application study using phase contrast X-ray, both sample thickness or density and absorption difference are very important factors in aspects of contrast enhancement. We present experimental evidence that synchrotron hard X-ray are suitable for radiological imaging of biological samples down to the cellular level. We investigated the potential of refractive index radiology using un-monochromatized synchrotron hard X-rays for the imaging of cell and tissue in various diseases. Material had been adopted various medical field, such as apoE knockout mouse in cardiologic field, specimen from renal and prostatic carcinoma patient in urology, basal cell epithelioma in dermatology, brain tissue from autosy sample of pakinson's disease, artificially induced artilrtis tissue from rabbits and extracted tooth from patients of crack tooth syndrome. Formalin and paraffin fixed tissue blocks were cut in 3 mm thickness for the X-ray radiographic imaging. From adjacent areas, 4 μm thickness sections were also prepared for hematoxylin-eosin staining. Radiographic images of dissected tissues were obtained using the hard X-rays from the 7B2 beamline of the Pohang Light Source (PLS). The technique used for the study was the phase contrast images were compared with the optical microscopic images of corresponding histological slides. Radiographic images of various diseased tissues showed clear histological details of organelles in normal tissues. Most of cancerous lesions were well differentiated from adjacent normal tissues and detailed histological features of each tumor were clearly identified. Also normal microstructures were identifiable by the phase contrast imaging. Tissue in cancer or other disease showed clearly different findings from those of surrounding normal tissue. For the first time we successfully demonstrated that synchrotron hard X-rays can be used for radiological imaging of relatively thick tissue samples with great histological details.

  18. Helical differential X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Willner, Marian; Chen, Liyuan; Tan, Renbo; Achterhold, Klaus; Bech, Martin; Herzen, Julia; Kunka, Danays; Mohr, Juergen; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2014-05-01

    We report on the first experimental results of helical differential phase-contrast computed tomography (helical DPC-CT) with a laboratory X-ray tube source and a Talbot-Lau grating interferometer. The results experimentally verify the feasibility of helical data acquisition and reconstruction in phase-contrast imaging, in analogy to its use in clinical CT systems. This allows fast and continuous volumetric scans for long objects with lengths exceeding the dimension of the detector. Since helical CT revolutionized the field of medical CT several years ago, we anticipate that this method will bring the same significant impact on the future medical and industrial applications of X-ray DPC-CT. PMID:24518822

  19. Dynamic measures of regional lung air volume using phase contrast x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchen, M. J.; Lewis, R. A.; Morgan, M. J.; Wallace, M. J.; Siew, M. L.; Siu, K. K. W.; Habib, A.; Fouras, A.; Yagi, N.; Uesugi, K.; Hooper, S. B.

    2008-11-01

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging can provide detailed images of lung morphology with sufficient spatial resolution to observe the terminal airways (alveoli). We demonstrate that quantitative functional and anatomical imaging of lung ventilation can be achieved in vivo using two-dimensional phase contrast x-ray images with high contrast and spatial resolution (<100 µm) in near real time. Changes in lung air volume as small as 25 µL were calculated from the images of term and preterm rabbit pup lungs (n = 28) using a single-image phase retrieval algorithm. Comparisons with plethysmography and computed tomography showed that the technique provided an accurate and robust method of measuring total lung air volumes. Furthermore, regional ventilation was measured by partitioning the phase contrast images, which revealed differences in aeration for different ventilation strategies.

  20. X-ray elastography: Modification of x-ray phase contrast images using ultrasonic radiation pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Theron J.; Bailat, Claude; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J.; Gehring, Stephan; Laperle, Christopher M.; Wands, Jack

    2009-05-15

    The high resolution characteristic of in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging can be used in conjunction with directed ultrasound to detect small displacements in soft tissue generated by differential acoustic radiation pressure. The imaging method is based on subtraction of two x-ray images, the first image taken with, and the second taken without the presence of ultrasound. The subtraction enhances phase contrast features and, to a large extent, removes absorption contrast so that differential movement of tissues with different acoustic impedances or relative ultrasonic absorption is highlighted in the image. Interfacial features of objects with differing densities are delineated in the image as a result of both the displacement introduced by the ultrasound and the inherent sensitivity of x-ray phase contrast imaging to density variations. Experiments with ex vivo murine tumors and human tumor phantoms point out a diagnostic capability of the method for identifying tumors.

  1. Phase Contrast X-ray Imaging Signatures for Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Erin A.; White, Timothy A.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Seifert, Allen

    2013-02-01

    Abstract: Differential phase contrast imaging with a grating interferometer is a promising new radiographic technique providing three distinct contrast mechanisms - absorption, phase, and scatter (or dark field) - using a conventional x-ray tube source. We investigate the signatures available in these three contrast mechanisms with attention towards potential security applications. We find that the scatter mode in particular is sensitive to textured materials, enabling lowered detection limits than absorption for materials such as powders. We investigate the length scales to which our imaging system is sensitive.

  2. Dynamic imaging of the lungs using x-ray phase contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, R. A.; Yagi, N.; Kitchen, M. J.; Morgan, M. J.; Paganin, D.; Siu, K. K. W.; Pavlov, K.; Williams, I.; Uesugi, K.; Wallace, M. J.; Hall, C. J.; Whitley, J.; Hooper, S. B.

    2005-11-01

    High quality real-time imaging of lungs in vivo presents considerable challenges. We demonstrate here that phase contrast x-ray imaging is capable of dynamically imaging the lungs. It retains many of the advantages of simple x-ray imaging, whilst also being able to map weakly absorbing soft tissues based on refractive index differences. Preliminary results reported herein show that this novel imaging technique can identify and locate airway liquid and allows lung aeration in newborn rabbit pups to be dynamically visualized.

  3. Acoustic radiation pressure: A 'phase contrast' agent for x-ray phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bailat, Claude J.; Hamilton, Theron J.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J.

    2004-11-08

    We show that the radiation pressure exerted by a beam of ultrasound can be used for contrast enhancement in high-resolution x-ray imaging of tissue and soft materials. Interfacial features of objects are highlighted as a result of both the displacement introduced by the ultrasound and the inherent sensitivity of x-ray phase contrast imaging to density variations. The potential of the method is demonstrated by imaging microscopic tumor phantoms embedded into tissue with a thickness typically presented in mammography. The detection limit of micrometer size masses exceeds the resolution of currently available mammography imaging systems. The directionality of the acoustic radiation force and its localization in space permits the imaging of ultrasound-selected tissue volumes. The results presented here suggest that the method may permit the detection of tumors in soft tissue in their early stage of development.

  4. In-line phase-contrast imaging based on Tsinghua Thomson scattering x-ray source.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Du, Yingchao; Yan, Lixin; Hua, Jianfei; Yang, Jin; Xiao, Yongshun; Huang, Wenhui; Chen, Huaibi; Tang, Chuanxiang

    2014-08-01

    Thomson scattering x-ray sources can produce ultrashort, energy tunable x-ray pulses characterized by high brightness, quasi-monochromatic, and high spatial coherence, which make it an ideal source for in-line phase-contrast imaging. We demonstrate the capacity of in-line phase-contrast imaging based on Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray source. Clear edge enhancement effect has been observed in the experiment. PMID:25173262

  5. Enhancing Tabletop X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Nano-Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Houxun; Gomella, Andrew A.; Harmon, Katherine J.; Bennett, Eric E.; Chedid, Nicholas; Znati, Sami; Panna, Alireza; Foster, Barbara A.; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2015-08-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a promising approach for improving soft-tissue contrast and lowering radiation dose in biomedical applications. While current tabletop imaging systems adapt to common x-ray tubes and large-area detectors by employing absorptive elements such as absorption gratings or monolithic crystals to filter the beam, we developed nanometric phase gratings which enable tabletop x-ray far-field interferometry with only phase-shifting elements, leading to a substantial enhancement in the performance of phase contrast imaging. In a general sense the method transfers the demands on the spatial coherence of the x-ray source and the detector resolution to the feature size of x-ray phase masks. We demonstrate its capabilities in hard x-ray imaging experiments at a fraction of clinical dose levels and present comparisons with the existing Talbot-Lau interferometer and with conventional digital radiography.

  6. Enhancing Tabletop X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Nano-Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Miao, Houxun; Gomella, Andrew A; Harmon, Katherine J; Bennett, Eric E; Chedid, Nicholas; Znati, Sami; Panna, Alireza; Foster, Barbara A; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a promising approach for improving soft-tissue contrast and lowering radiation dose in biomedical applications. While current tabletop imaging systems adapt to common x-ray tubes and large-area detectors by employing absorptive elements such as absorption gratings or monolithic crystals to filter the beam, we developed nanometric phase gratings which enable tabletop x-ray far-field interferometry with only phase-shifting elements, leading to a substantial enhancement in the performance of phase contrast imaging. In a general sense the method transfers the demands on the spatial coherence of the x-ray source and the detector resolution to the feature size of x-ray phase masks. We demonstrate its capabilities in hard x-ray imaging experiments at a fraction of clinical dose levels and present comparisons with the existing Talbot-Lau interferometer and with conventional digital radiography. PMID:26315891

  7. Enhancing Tabletop X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Nano-Fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Houxun; Gomella, Andrew A.; Harmon, Katherine J.; Bennett, Eric E.; Chedid, Nicholas; Znati, Sami; Panna, Alireza; Foster, Barbara A.; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a promising approach for improving soft-tissue contrast and lowering radiation dose in biomedical applications. While current tabletop imaging systems adapt to common x-ray tubes and large-area detectors by employing absorptive elements such as absorption gratings or monolithic crystals to filter the beam, we developed nanometric phase gratings which enable tabletop x-ray far-field interferometry with only phase-shifting elements, leading to a substantial enhancement in the performance of phase contrast imaging. In a general sense the method transfers the demands on the spatial coherence of the x-ray source and the detector resolution to the feature size of x-ray phase masks. We demonstrate its capabilities in hard x-ray imaging experiments at a fraction of clinical dose levels and present comparisons with the existing Talbot-Lau interferometer and with conventional digital radiography. PMID:26315891

  8. X-Ray Grating Interferometry for Phase-Contrast Imaging and Optics Metrology Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Christian; Rutishauser, Simon; Thüring, Thomas; Donath, Tilman; Stampanoni, Marco

    2010-04-01

    We report on a hard x-ray interferometry technique based on diffraction gratings fabricated using microlithography techniques. Compared to other x-ray phase-contrast imaging methods, the grating interferometer only has very moderate requirements in terms of coherence. This makes it possible to use the method with standard x-ray tubes, which opens up a huge range of applications e.g. in medical imaging.

  9. Grating-based X-ray phase contrast for biomedical imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia; Willner, Marian; Chabior, Michael; Auweter, Sigrid; Reiser, Maximilian; Bamberg, Fabian

    2013-09-01

    In this review article we describe the development of grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging, with particular emphasis on potential biomedical applications of the technology. We review the basics of image formation in grating-based phase-contrast and dark-field radiography and present some exemplary multimodal radiography results obtained with laboratory X-ray sources. Furthermore, we discuss the theoretical concepts to extend grating-based multimodal radiography to quantitative transmission, phase-contrast, and dark-field scattering computed tomography. PMID:23453793

  10. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging with synchrotron radiation for materials science applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, A. W.; Gureyev, T. E.; Paganin, D.; Wilkins, S. W.; Weitkamp, T.; Snigirev, A.; Rau, C.; Snigireva, I.; Youn, H. S.; Dolbnya, I. P.; Yun, W.; Lai, B.; Garrett, R. F.; Cookson, D. J.; Hyodo, K.; Ando, M.

    2003-01-01

    Since Röntgen's discovery of X-rays just over a century ago the vast majority of radiographs have been collected and interpreted on the basis of absorption contrast and geometrical (ray) optics. Recently the possibility of obtaining new and complementary information in X-ray images by utilizing phase-contrast effects has received considerable attention, both in the laboratory context and at synchrotron sources (where much of this activity is a consequence of the highly coherent X-ray beams which can be produced). Phase-contrast X-ray imaging is capable of providing improved information from weakly absorbing features in a sample, together with improved edge definition. Four different experimental arrangements for achieving phase contrast in the hard X-ray regime, for the purpose of non-destructive characterization of materials, will be described. Two of these, demonstrated at ESRF in France and AR in Japan, are based on parallel-beam geometry; the other two, demonstrated at PLS in Korea and APS in USA, are based on spherical-beam geometry. In each case quite different X-ray optical arrangements were used. Some image simulations will be employed to demonstrate salient features of hard X-ray phase-contrast imaging and examples of results from each of the experiments will be shown.

  11. Development of microperiodic mirrors for hard x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Stutman, Dan; Finkenthal, Michael; Moldovan, Nicolae

    2010-09-01

    Differential phase-contrast imaging with hard x rays can have important applications in medicine, material sciences, and energy research. Phase-contrast methods based on microperiodic optics, such as shearing interferometry, are particularly attractive because they allow the use of conventional x-ray tubes. To enable shearing interferometry with x rays up to 100 keV, we propose using grazing-incidence microperiodic mirrors. In addition, a simple lithographic method is proposed for the production of the microperiodic x-ray mirrors, based on the difference in grazing-incidence reflectivity between a low-Z substrate and a high-Z film. Using this method, we produced prototype mirrors with 5-100 {mu}m periods and 90 mm active length. Experimental tests with x rays up to 60 keV indicate good microperiodic mirror reflectivity and high-contrast fringe patterns, encouraging further development of the proposed imaging concept.

  12. Ethanol fixed brain imaging by phase-contrast X-ray technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Thet-Thet-Lwin; Kunii, Takuya; Sirai, Ryota; Ohizumi, Takahito; Maruyama, Hiroko; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Yoneyama, Akio; Ueda, Kazuhiro

    2013-03-01

    The two-crystal phase-contrast X-ray imaging technique using an X-ray crystal interferometer can depict the fine structures of rat's brain such as cerebral cortex, white matter, and basal ganglia. Image quality and contrast by ethanol fixed brain showed significantly better than those by usually used formalin fixation at 35 keV X-ray energy. Image contrast of cortex by ethanol fixation was more than 3-times higher than that by formalin fixation. Thus, the technique of ethanol fixation might be better suited to image cerebral structural detail at 35 keV X-ray energy.

  13. Image segmentation of nanoscale Zernike phase contrast X-ray computed tomography images

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Arjun S.; Mandal, Pratiti; Zhang, Yongjie; Litster, Shawn

    2015-05-14

    Zernike phase contrast is a useful technique for nanoscale X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging of materials with a low X-ray absorption coefficient. It enhances the image contrast by phase shifting X-ray waves to create changes in amplitude. However, it creates artifacts that hinder the use of traditional image segmentation techniques. We propose an image restoration method that models the X-ray phase contrast optics and the three-dimensional image reconstruction method. We generate artifact-free images through an optimization problem that inverts this model. Though similar approaches have been used for Zernike phase contrast in visible light microscopy, this optimization employs an effective edge detection method tailored to handle Zernike phase contrast artifacts. We characterize this optics-based restoration method by removing the artifacts in and thresholding multiple Zernike phase contrast X-ray CT images to produce segmented results that are consistent with the physical specimens. We quantitatively evaluate and compare our method to other segmentation techniques to demonstrate its high accuracy.

  14. X-ray phase-contrast imaging of the breast—advances towards clinical implementation

    PubMed Central

    Herzen, J; Willner, M; Grandl, S; Scherer, K; Bamberg, F; Reiser, M F; Pfeiffer, F; Hellerhoff, K

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer constitutes about one-quarter of all cancers and is the leading cause of cancer death in women. To reduce breast cancer mortality, mammographic screening programmes have been implemented in many Western countries. However, these programmes remain controversial because of the associated radiation exposure and the need for improvement in terms of diagnostic accuracy. Phase-contrast imaging is a new X-ray-based technology that has been shown to provide enhanced soft-tissue contrast and improved visualization of cancerous structures. Furthermore, there is some indication that these improvements of image quality can be maintained at reduced radiation doses. Thus, X-ray phase-contrast mammography may significantly contribute to advancements in early breast cancer diagnosis. Feasibility studies of X-ray phase-contrast breast CT have provided images that allow resolution of the fine structure of tissue that can otherwise only be obtained by histology. This implies that X-ray phase-contrast imaging may also lead to the development of entirely new (micro-) radiological applications. This review provides a brief overview of the physical characteristics of this new technology and describes recent developments towards clinical implementation of X-ray phase-contrast imaging of the breast. PMID:24452106

  15. Real time adaptive filtering for digital X-ray applications.

    PubMed

    Bockenbach, Olivier; Mangin, Michel; Schuberth, Sebastian

    2006-01-01

    Over the last decade, many methods for adaptively filtering a data stream have been proposed. Those methods have applications in two dimensional imaging as well as in three dimensional image reconstruction. Although the primary objective of this filtering technique is to reduce the noise while avoiding to blur the edges, diagnostic, automated segmentation and surgery show a growing interest in enhancing the features contained in the image flow. Most of the methods proposed so far emerged from thorough studies of the physics of the considered modality and therefore show only a marginal capability to be extended across modalities. Moreover, adaptive filtering belongs to the family of processing intensive algorithms. Existing technology has often driven to simplifications and modality specific optimization to sustain the expected performances. In the specific case of real time digital X-ray as used surgery, the system has to sustain a throughput of 30 frames per second. In this study, we take a generalized approach for adaptive filtering based on multiple oriented filters. Mapping the filtering part to the embedded real time image processing while a user/application defined adaptive recombination of the filter outputs allow to change the smoothing and edge enhancement properties of the filter without changing the oriented filter parameters. We have implemented the filtering on a Cell Broadband Engine processor and the adaptive recombination on an off-the-shelf PC, connected via Gigabit Ethernet. This implementation is capable of filtering images of 5122 pixels at a throughput in excess of 40 frames per second while allowing to change the parameters in real time. PMID:17354937

  16. Interferometric hard x-ray phase contrast imaging at 204 nm grating period

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Han; Gomella, Andrew A.; Miao, Houxun; Lynch, Susanna K.; Wolfe, Douglas E.; Xiao Xianghui; Liu Chian; Morgan, Nicole

    2013-01-15

    We report on hard x-ray phase contrast imaging experiments using a grating interferometer of approximately 1/10th the grating period achieved in previous studies. We designed the gratings as a staircase array of multilayer stacks which are fabricated in a single thin film deposition process. We performed the experiments at 19 keV x-ray energy and 0.8 {mu}m pixel resolution. The small grating period resulted in clear separation of different diffraction orders and multiple images on the detector. A slitted beam was used to remove overlap of the images from the different diffraction orders. The phase contrast images showed detailed features as small as 10 {mu}m, and demonstrated the feasibility of high resolution x-ray phase contrast imaging with nanometer scale gratings.

  17. Analytical reconstructions of intensity modulated x-ray phase-contrast imaging of human scale phantoms.

    PubMed

    Włodarczyk, Bartłomiej; Pietrzak, Jakub

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents analytical approach to modeling of a full planar and volumetric acquisition system with image reconstructions originated from partial illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging at a human scale using graphics processor units. The model is based on x-ray tracing and wave optics methods to develop a numerical framework for predicting the performance of a preclinical phase-contrast imaging system of a human-scaled phantom. In this study, experimental images of simple numerical phantoms and high resolution anthropomorphic phantoms of head and thorax based on non-uniform rational b-spline shapes (NURBS) prove the correctness of the model. Presented results can be used to simulate the performance of partial illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging system on various preclinical applications. PMID:26600991

  18. Analytical reconstructions of intensity modulated x-ray phase-contrast imaging of human scale phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Włodarczyk, Bartłomiej; Pietrzak, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents analytical approach to modeling of a full planar and volumetric acquisition system with image reconstructions originated from partial illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging at a human scale using graphics processor units. The model is based on x-ray tracing and wave optics methods to develop a numerical framework for predicting the performance of a preclinical phase-contrast imaging system of a human-scaled phantom. In this study, experimental images of simple numerical phantoms and high resolution anthropomorphic phantoms of head and thorax based on non-uniform rational b-spline shapes (NURBS) prove the correctness of the model. Presented results can be used to simulate the performance of partial illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging system on various preclinical applications. PMID:26600991

  19. Fast grating-based X-ray phase-contrast tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yan; Zhao, Jun

    2013-01-01

    As an imaging technique with low radiation dose and improved contrast, digital x-ray tomosynthesis is widely used in clinical diagnoses. Based on the superior capability of x-ray phase-contrast imaging (PCI) techniques for imaging low density materials, the combination of X-ray tomosynthesis and PCI can potentially provide higher efficiency in the detection of soft tissues. The goal of this work was to develop a fast imaging method for phase-contrast tomosynthesis, called fast grating-based phase-contrast tomosynthesis (GPC-Tomo), which integrates tomosynthesis with a grating-based PCI technique. Following the interlaced phase-stepping (PS) data collection method, which is much faster than conventional PS method, we propose a novel image reconstruction method called inner-focusing (IF) reconstruction for the fast GPC-Tomo. The proposed IF reconstruction method was validated by real experiments and the results suggested its effectiveness in achieving a fast GPC-Tomo. PMID:24110189

  20. Quantitative Characterization of Inertial Confinement Fusion Capsules Using Phase Contrast Enhanced X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B J; Koch, J A; Barty, A; Martz, H E; Lee, W; Fezzaa, K

    2004-05-07

    Current designs for inertial confinement fusion capsules for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) consist of a solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layer inside of a copper doped beryllium capsule. Phase contrast enhanced x-ray imaging is shown to render the D-T layer visible inside the Be(Cu) capsule. Phase contrast imaging is experimentally demonstrated for several surrogate capsules and validates computational models. Polyimide and low density divinyl benzene foam capsules were imaged at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron. The surrogates demonstrate that phase contrast enhanced imaging provides a method to characterize surfaces when absorption imaging cannot be used. Our computational models demonstrate that a rough surface can be accurately reproduced in phase contrast enhanced x-ray images.

  1. Benchmarking the x-ray phase contrast imaging for ICF DT ice characterization using roughened surrogates

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E; Kozioziemski, B; Moody, J; Koch, J; Mapoles, E; Montesanti, R; Youngblood, K; Letts, S; Nikroo, A; Sater, J; Atherton, J

    2008-06-26

    We use x-ray phase contrast imaging to characterize the inner surface roughness of DT ice layers in capsules planned for future ignition experiments. It is therefore important to quantify how well the x-ray data correlates with the actual ice roughness. We benchmarked the accuracy of our system using surrogates with fabricated roughness characterized with high precision standard techniques. Cylindrical artifacts with azimuthally uniform sinusoidal perturbations with 100 um period and 1 um amplitude demonstrated 0.02 um accuracy limited by the resolution of the imager and the source size of our phase contrast system. Spherical surrogates with random roughness close to that required for the DT ice for a successful ignition experiment were used to correlate the actual surface roughness to that obtained from the x-ray measurements. When comparing average power spectra of individual measurements, the accuracy mode number limits of the x-ray phase contrast system benchmarked against surface characterization performed by Atomic Force Microscopy are 60 and 90 for surrogates smoother and rougher than the required roughness for the ice. These agreement mode number limits are >100 when comparing matching individual measurements. We will discuss the implications for interpreting DT ice roughness data derived from phase-contrast x-ray imaging.

  2. Refracting Roentgen's rays: Propagation-based x-ray phase contrast for biomedical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gureyev, T. E.; Mayo, S. C.; Nesterets, Ya.; Pogany, A.; Stevenson, A. W.; Wilkins, S. W.; Myers, D. E.; Paganin, D. M.

    2009-05-15

    Absorption-contrast x-ray imaging serves to visualize the variation in x-ray attenuation within the volume of a given sample, whereas phase contrast allows one to visualize variations in x-ray refractive index. The former imaging mechanism has been well known and widely utilized since the time of Roentgen's Nobel prize winning work, whereas the latter mechanism--sought for, but not found, by Roentgen himself--has laid the foundation for a revolution in x-ray imaging which is the central topic of this review. We consider the physical imaging mechanisms underlying both absorption contrast and phase contrast, together with the associated inverse problem of how one may obtain quantitative two- or three-dimensional information regarding a sample, given one or more phase-contrast images of the same. Practical questions are considered, regarding optimized phase-contrast imaging geometries as a function of detector resolution, source size, x-ray spectrum, and dose. Experimental examples pertaining to biomedical applications are given, and prospects for the future outlined.

  3. Three-dimensional characterization of electrodeposited lithium microstructures using synchrotron X-ray phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, David S; Bayley, Paul M; Chang, Hee Jung; Taiwo, Oluwadamilola O; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Brett, Daniel J L; Rau, Christoph; Withers, Philip J; Shearing, Paul R; Grey, Clare P; Lee, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    The electrodeposition of metallic lithium is a major cause of failure in lithium batteries. The 3D microstructure of electrodeposited lithium 'moss' in liquid electrolytes has been characterised at sub-micron resolution for the first time. Using synchrotron X-ray phase contrast imaging we distinguish mossy metallic lithium microstructures from high surface area lithium salt formations by their contrasting X-ray attenuation. PMID:24898258

  4. Grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging at PETRA III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hipp, A.; Beckmann, F.; Lytaev, P.; Greving, I.; Lottermoser, L.; Dose, T.; Kirchhof, R.; Burmester, H.; Schreyer, A.; Herzen, J.

    2014-09-01

    Conventional absorption-based imaging often lacks in good contrast at special applications like visualization of soft tissue or weak absorbing material in general. To overcome this limitation, several new X-ray phase-contrast imaging methods have been developed at synchrotron radiation facilities. Our aim was to establish the possibility of different phase-contrast imaging modalities at the Imaging Beamline (IBL, P05) and the High Energy Material Science beamline (HEMS, P07) at Petra III (DESY, Germany). Here we present the instrumentation and the status of the currently successfully established phase-contrast imaging techniques. First results from measurements of biomedical samples will be presented as demonstration.

  5. Halo suppression in full-field x-ray Zernike phase contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, Ismo; Mokso, Rajmund; Stampanoni, Marco; David, Christian

    2014-03-15

    Visible light Zernike phase contrast (ZPC) microscopy is a well established method for imaging weakly absorbing samples. The method is also used with hard x-ray photon energies for structural evaluation of material science and biological applications. However, the method suffers from artifacts that are inherent for the Zernike image formation. In this Letter, we investigate their origin and experimentally show how to suppress them in x-ray full-field ZPC microscopy based on diffractive x-ray optics. PMID:24690848

  6. Single-shot x-ray phase contrast imaging with an algorithmic approach using spectral detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Mini; Park, Chan-Soo; Fredette, Nathaniel R.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging has been investigated during the last two decades for potential benefits in soft tissue imaging. Long imaging time, high radiation dose and general measurement complexity involving motion of x-ray optical components have prevented the clinical translation of these methods. In all existing popular phase contrast imaging methods, multiple measurements per projection angle involving motion of optical components are required to achieve quantitatively accurate estimation of absorption, phase and differential phase. Recently we proposed an algorithmic approach to use spectral detection data in a phase contrast imaging setup to obtain absorption, phase and differential phase in a single-step. Our generic approach has been shown via simulations in all three types of phase contrast imaging: propagation, coded aperture and grating interferometry. While other groups have used spectral detector in phase contrast imaging setups, our proposed method is unique in outlining an approach to use this spectral data to simplify phase contrast imaging. In this abstract we show the first experimental proof of our single-shot phase retrieval using a Medipix3 photon counting detector in an edge illumination aperture (also referred to as coded aperture) phase contrast set up as well as for a free space propagation setup. Our preliminary results validate our new transport equation for edge illumination PCI and our spectral phase retrieval algorithm for both PCI methods being investigated. Comparison with simulations also point to excellent performance of Medipix3 built-in charge sharing correction mechanism.

  7. Phase-contrast imaging using ultrafast x-rays in laser-shocked materials

    SciTech Connect

    Workman, Jonathan B; Cobble, James A; Flippo, Kirk; Gautier, Donald C; Montgomery, David S; Offermann, Dustin T

    2010-01-01

    High-energy x-rays, > 10-keV, can be efficiently produced from ultrafast laser target interactions with many applications to dense target materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High-Energy Density Physics (HEDP). These same x-rays can also be applied to measurements of low-density materials inside high-density hohlraum environments. In the experiments presented, high-energy x-ray images of laser-shocked polystyrene are produced through phase contrast imaging. The plastic targets are nominally transparent to traditional x-ray absorption but show detailed features in regions of high density gradients due to refractive effects often called phase contrast imaging. The 200-TW Trident laser is used both to produce the x-ray source and to shock the polystyrene target. X-rays at 17-keV produced from 2-ps, 100-J laser interactions with a 12-micron molybdenum wire are used to produce a small source size, required for optimizing refractive effects. Shocks are driven in the 1-mm thick polystyrene target using 2-ns, 250-J, 532-nm laser drive with phase plates. X-ray images of shocks compare well to 1-D hydro calculations, HELIOS-CR.

  8. Quantitative X-ray phase-contrast microtomography from a compact laser-driven betatron source.

    PubMed

    Wenz, J; Schleede, S; Khrennikov, K; Bech, M; Thibault, P; Heigoldt, M; Pfeiffer, F; Karsch, S

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has recently led to a revolution in resolving power and tissue contrast in biomedical imaging, microscopy and materials science. The necessary high spatial coherence is currently provided by either large-scale synchrotron facilities with limited beamtime access or by microfocus X-ray tubes with rather limited flux. X-rays radiated by relativistic electrons driven by well-controlled high-power lasers offer a promising route to a proliferation of this powerful imaging technology. A laser-driven plasma wave accelerates and wiggles electrons, giving rise to a brilliant keV X-ray emission. This so-called betatron radiation is emitted in a collimated beam with excellent spatial coherence and remarkable spectral stability. Here we present a phase-contrast microtomogram of a biological sample using betatron X-rays. Comprehensive source characterization enables the reconstruction of absolute electron densities. Our results suggest that laser-based X-ray technology offers the potential for filling the large performance gap between synchrotron- and current X-ray tube-based sources. PMID:26189811

  9. Quantitative X-ray phase-contrast microtomography from a compact laser-driven betatron source

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, J.; Schleede, S.; Khrennikov, K.; Bech, M.; Thibault, P.; Heigoldt, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Karsch, S.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has recently led to a revolution in resolving power and tissue contrast in biomedical imaging, microscopy and materials science. The necessary high spatial coherence is currently provided by either large-scale synchrotron facilities with limited beamtime access or by microfocus X-ray tubes with rather limited flux. X-rays radiated by relativistic electrons driven by well-controlled high-power lasers offer a promising route to a proliferation of this powerful imaging technology. A laser-driven plasma wave accelerates and wiggles electrons, giving rise to a brilliant keV X-ray emission. This so-called betatron radiation is emitted in a collimated beam with excellent spatial coherence and remarkable spectral stability. Here we present a phase-contrast microtomogram of a biological sample using betatron X-rays. Comprehensive source characterization enables the reconstruction of absolute electron densities. Our results suggest that laser-based X-ray technology offers the potential for filling the large performance gap between synchrotron- and current X-ray tube-based sources. PMID:26189811

  10. Quantitative X-ray phase-contrast microtomography from a compact laser-driven betatron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenz, J.; Schleede, S.; Khrennikov, K.; Bech, M.; Thibault, P.; Heigoldt, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Karsch, S.

    2015-07-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has recently led to a revolution in resolving power and tissue contrast in biomedical imaging, microscopy and materials science. The necessary high spatial coherence is currently provided by either large-scale synchrotron facilities with limited beamtime access or by microfocus X-ray tubes with rather limited flux. X-rays radiated by relativistic electrons driven by well-controlled high-power lasers offer a promising route to a proliferation of this powerful imaging technology. A laser-driven plasma wave accelerates and wiggles electrons, giving rise to a brilliant keV X-ray emission. This so-called betatron radiation is emitted in a collimated beam with excellent spatial coherence and remarkable spectral stability. Here we present a phase-contrast microtomogram of a biological sample using betatron X-rays. Comprehensive source characterization enables the reconstruction of absolute electron densities. Our results suggest that laser-based X-ray technology offers the potential for filling the large performance gap between synchrotron- and current X-ray tube-based sources.

  11. A tilted grating interferometer for full vector field differential x-ray phase contrast tomography.

    PubMed

    Rutishauser, Simon; Donath, Tilman; David, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz; Marone, Federica; Modregger, Peter; Stampanoni, Marco

    2011-12-01

    We report on a setup for differential x-ray phase-contrast imaging and tomography, that measures the full 2D phase-gradient information. The setup uses a simple one-dimensional x-ray grating interferometer, in which the grating structures of the interferometer are oriented at a tilt angle with respect to the sample rotation axis. In such a configuration, the differential phase images from opposing tomography projections can be combined to yield both components of the gradient vector. We show how the refractive index distribution as well as its x, y, and z gradient components can be reconstructed directly from the recorded projection data. The method can equally well be applied at conventional x-ray tube sources, to analyzer based x-ray imaging or neutron imaging. It is demonstrated with measurements of an x-ray phantom and a rat brain using synchrotron radiation. PMID:22273882

  12. Observation of a Soft Tissue by a Zernike Phase Contrast Hard X-ray Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Sadao; Namikawa, Tadahiro; Hoshino, Masato; Watanabe, Norio

    2007-01-19

    A Zernike-type phase contrast hard X-ray microscope was constructed at the Photon Factory BL3C2 (KEK). A white beam from a bending magnet was monochromatized by a silicon double crystal monochromator. Monochromatic parallel X-ray beam illuminated a sample, and transmitted and diffracted X-ray beams were imaged by a Fresnel zone plate (FZP) which had the outer zone width of 100 nm. A phase plate made of a thin aluminum foil with a pinhole was set at the back focal plane of the FZP. The phase plate modulated the diffraction beam from the FZP, whereas a direct beam passed through the pinhole. The resolution of the microscope was measured by observing a tantalum test pattern at an X-ray energy of 9 keV. A 100nm line-and-space pattern could be resolved. X-ray montage pictures of growing eggs of artemia (plankton) were obtained.

  13. Observation of a Soft Tissue by a Zernike Phase Contrast Hard X-ray Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Sadao; Namikawa, Tadahiro; Hoshino, Masato; Watanabe, Norio

    2007-01-01

    A Zernike-type phase contrast hard X-ray microscope was constructed at the Photon Factory BL3C2 (KEK). A white beam from a bending magnet was monochromatized by a silicon double crystal monochromator. Monochromatic parallel X-ray beam illuminated a sample, and transmitted and diffracted X-ray beams were imaged by a Fresnel zone plate (FZP) which had the outer zone width of 100 nm. A phase plate made of a thin aluminum foil with a pinhole was set at the back focal plane of the FZP. The phase plate modulated the diffraction beam from the FZP, whereas a direct beam passed through the pinhole. The resolution of the microscope was measured by observing a tantalum test pattern at an X-ray energy of 9 keV. A 100nm line-and-space pattern could be resolved. X-ray montage pictures of growing eggs of artemia (plankton) were obtained.

  14. Hard X-Ray Phase-Contrast Imaging for Medical Applications - Physicist's Dream or Radiologist's Mainstream?

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, S. W.; Gureyev, T. E.; Mayo, S. C.; Nesterets, Ya. I.; Pogany, A.; Stevenson, A. W.; Paganin, D. M.

    2007-03-30

    We briefly review currently practiced methods of X-ray phase contrast imaging and consider some of their relative features, especially in regard to applicability to clinical medical studies. Various related technological issues and promising future areas of development are also briefly discussed.

  15. Artifact characterization and reduction in scanning X-ray Zernike phase contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, Ismo; Holzner, Christian; Mohacsi, Istvan; Karvinen, Petri; Diaz, Ana; Pigino, Gaia; David, Christian

    2015-05-18

    Zernike phase contrast microscopy is a well-established method for imaging specimens with low absorption contrast. It has been successfully implemented in full-field microscopy using visible light and X-rays. In microscopy Cowley's reciprocity principle connects scanning and full-field imaging. Even though the reciprocity in Zernike phase contrast has been discussed by several authors over the past thirty years, only recently it was experimentally verified using scanning X-ray microscopy. In this paper, we investigate the image and contrast formation in scanning Zernike phase contrast microscopy with a particular and detailed focus on the origin of imaging artifacts that are typically associated with Zernike phase contrast. We demonstrate experimentally with X-rays the effect of the phase mask design on the contrast and halo artifacts and present an optimized design of the phase mask with respect to photon efficiency and artifact reduction. Similarly, due to the principle of reciprocity the observations and conclusions of this work have direct applicability to Zernike phase contrast in full-field microscopy as well. PMID:26074579

  16. Phase contrast imaging using a micro focus x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-09-01

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging, a new technique to increase the imaging contrast for the tissues with close attenuation coefficients, has been studied since mid 1990s. This technique reveals the possibility to show the clear details of the soft tissues and tumors in small scale resolution. A compact and low cost phase contrast imaging system using a conventional x-ray source is described in this paper. Using the conventional x-ray source is of great importance, because it provides the possibility to use the method in hospitals and clinical offices. Simple materials and components are used in the setup to keep the cost in a reasonable and affordable range.Tungsten Kα1 line with the photon energy 59.3 keV was used for imaging. Some of the system design details are discussed. The method that was used to stabilize the system is introduced. A chicken thigh bone tissue sample was used for imaging followed by the image quality, image acquisition time and the potential clinical application discussion. High energy x-ray beam can be used in phase contrast imaging. Therefore the radiation dose to the patients can be greatly decreased compared to the traditional x-ray radiography.

  17. Cone-beam differential phase-contrast laminography with x-ray tube source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, J.; Biernath, T.; Willner, M.; Amberger, M.; Meiser, J.; Kunka, D.; Mohr, J.; Herzen, J.; Bech, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-06-01

    We report on an x-ray cone-beam differential phase-contrast computed laminography (DPC-CL) method for tomographic reconstruction of thin and lamellar objects. We describe the specific scan geometry of DPC-CL, which consists of a Talbot-Lau grating interferometer and a lab-based x-ray tube source, and derive a filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. The experimental results of a flat sphere phantom and a piece of ham demonstrate the validity of the proposed technique. The existing DPC-CL methods are based on synchrotron sources and the parallel-beam geometry. In contrast, our approach adopts a more accessible x-ray tube source and a cone-beam geometry. Therefore it significantly widens the application range of phase-contrast laminography, particularly in practical laboratory settings, beyond applications at large-scale synchrotron facilities.

  18. Image fusion in x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, W.; Polyanskaya, M.; Bayer, F.; Gödel, K.; Hofmann, H.; Rieger, J.; Ritter, A.; Weber, T.; Wucherer, L.; Durst, J.; Michel, T.; Anton, G.; Hornegger, J.

    2012-02-01

    Phase-contrast imaging is a novel modality in the field of medical X-ray imaging. The pioneer method is the grating-based interferometry which has no special requirements to the X-ray source and object size. Furthermore, it provides three different types of information of an investigated object simultaneously - absorption, differential phase-contrast and dark-field images. Differential phase-contrast and dark-field images represent a completely new information which has not yet been investigated and studied in context of medical imaging. In order to introduce phase-contrast imaging as a new modality into medical environment the resulting information about the object has to be correctly interpreted. The three output images reflect different properties of the same object the main challenge is to combine and visualize these data in such a way that it diminish the information explosion and reduce the complexity of its interpretation. This paper presents an intuitive image fusion approach which allows to operate with grating-based phase-contrast images. It combines information of the three different images and provides a single image. The approach is implemented in a fusion framework which is aimed to support physicians in study and analysis. The framework provides the user with an intuitive graphical user interface allowing to control the fusion process. The example given in this work shows the functionality of the proposed method and the great potential of phase-contrast imaging in medical practice.

  19. Quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Willner, M; Herzen, J; Grandl, S; Auweter, S; Mayr, D; Hipp, A; Chabior, M; Sarapata, A; Achterhold, K; Zanette, I; Weitkamp, T; Sztrókay, A; Hellerhoff, K; Reiser, M; Pfeiffer, F

    2014-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has received growing interest in recent years due to its high capability in visualizing soft tissue. Breast imaging became the focus of particular attention as it is considered the most promising candidate for a first clinical application of this contrast modality. In this study, we investigate quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) at conventional polychromatic x-ray sources. Different breast specimens have been scanned at a laboratory phase-contrast imaging setup and were correlated to histopathology. Ascertained tumor types include phylloides tumor, fibroadenoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma. Identified tissue types comprising adipose, fibroglandular and tumor tissue have been analyzed in terms of phase-contrast Hounsfield units and are compared to high-quality, high-resolution data obtained with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, as well as calculated values based on tabulated tissue properties. The results give a good impression of the method's prospects and limitations for potential tumor detection and the associated demands on such a phase-contrast breast CT system. Furthermore, the evaluated quantitative tissue values serve as a reference for simulations and the design of dedicated phantoms for phase-contrast mammography. PMID:24614413

  20. Quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willner, M.; Herzen, J.; Grandl, S.; Auweter, S.; Mayr, D.; Hipp, A.; Chabior, M.; Sarapata, A.; Achterhold, K.; Zanette, I.; Weitkamp, T.; Sztrókay, A.; Hellerhoff, K.; Reiser, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has received growing interest in recent years due to its high capability in visualizing soft tissue. Breast imaging became the focus of particular attention as it is considered the most promising candidate for a first clinical application of this contrast modality. In this study, we investigate quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) at conventional polychromatic x-ray sources. Different breast specimens have been scanned at a laboratory phase-contrast imaging setup and were correlated to histopathology. Ascertained tumor types include phylloides tumor, fibroadenoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma. Identified tissue types comprising adipose, fibroglandular and tumor tissue have been analyzed in terms of phase-contrast Hounsfield units and are compared to high-quality, high-resolution data obtained with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, as well as calculated values based on tabulated tissue properties. The results give a good impression of the method’s prospects and limitations for potential tumor detection and the associated demands on such a phase-contrast breast CT system. Furthermore, the evaluated quantitative tissue values serve as a reference for simulations and the design of dedicated phantoms for phase-contrast mammography.

  1. X-ray phase contrast tomography by tracking near field speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongchang; Berujon, Sebastien; Herzen, Julia; Atwood, Robert; Laundy, David; Hipp, Alexander; Sawhney, Kawal

    2015-03-01

    X-ray imaging techniques that capture variations in the x-ray phase can yield higher contrast images with lower x-ray dose than is possible with conventional absorption radiography. However, the extraction of phase information is often more difficult than the extraction of absorption information and requires a more sophisticated experimental arrangement. We here report a method for three-dimensional (3D) X-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) which gives quantitative volumetric information on the real part of the refractive index. The method is based on the recently developed X-ray speckle tracking technique in which the displacement of near field speckle is tracked using a digital image correlation algorithm. In addition to differential phase contrast projection images, the method allows the dark-field images to be simultaneously extracted. After reconstruction, compared to conventional absorption CT images, the 3D phase CT images show greatly enhanced contrast. This new imaging method has advantages compared to other X-ray imaging methods in simplicity of experimental arrangement, speed of measurement and relative insensitivity to beam movements. These features make the technique an attractive candidate for material imaging such as in-vivo imaging of biological systems containing soft tissue.

  2. X-ray phase contrast tomography by tracking near field speckle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongchang; Berujon, Sebastien; Herzen, Julia; Atwood, Robert; Laundy, David; Hipp, Alexander; Sawhney, Kawal

    2015-01-01

    X-ray imaging techniques that capture variations in the x-ray phase can yield higher contrast images with lower x-ray dose than is possible with conventional absorption radiography. However, the extraction of phase information is often more difficult than the extraction of absorption information and requires a more sophisticated experimental arrangement. We here report a method for three-dimensional (3D) X-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) which gives quantitative volumetric information on the real part of the refractive index. The method is based on the recently developed X-ray speckle tracking technique in which the displacement of near field speckle is tracked using a digital image correlation algorithm. In addition to differential phase contrast projection images, the method allows the dark-field images to be simultaneously extracted. After reconstruction, compared to conventional absorption CT images, the 3D phase CT images show greatly enhanced contrast. This new imaging method has advantages compared to other X-ray imaging methods in simplicity of experimental arrangement, speed of measurement and relative insensitivity to beam movements. These features make the technique an attractive candidate for material imaging such as in-vivo imaging of biological systems containing soft tissue. PMID:25735237

  3. X-Ray Phase-Contrast CT of a Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Tapfer, Arne; Braren, Rickmer; Bech, Martin; Willner, Marian; Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm; Trajkovic-Arsic, Marija; Siveke, Jens T.; Settles, Marcus; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2013-01-01

    To explore the potential of grating-based x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) for preclinical research, a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) was investigated. One ex-vivo mouse specimen was scanned with different grating-based phase-contrast CT imaging setups covering two different settings: i) high-resolution synchrotron radiation (SR) imaging and ii) dose-reduced imaging using either synchrotron radiation or a conventional x-ray tube source. These experimental settings were chosen to assess the potential of phase-contrast imaging for two different types of application: i) high-performance imaging for virtual microscopy applications and ii) biomedical imaging with increased soft-tissue contrast for in-vivo applications. For validation and as a reference, histological slicing and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed on the same mouse specimen. For each x-ray imaging setup, attenuation and phase-contrast images were compared visually with regard to contrast in general, and specifically concerning the recognizability of lesions and cancerous tissue. To quantitatively assess contrast, the contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) of selected regions of interest (ROI) in the attenuation images and the phase images were analyzed and compared. It was found that both for virtual microscopy and for in-vivo applications, there is great potential for phase-contrast imaging: in the SR-based benchmarking data, fine details about tissue composition are accessible in the phase images and the visibility of solid tumor tissue under dose-reduced conditions is markedly superior in the phase images. The present study hence demonstrates improved diagnostic value with phase-contrast CT in a mouse model of a complex endogenous cancer, promoting the use and further development of grating-based phase-contrast CT for biomedical imaging applications. PMID:23536795

  4. Phase retrieval and differential phase-contrast imaging with low-brilliance X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, Franz; Weitkamp, Timm; Bunk, Oliver; David, Christian

    2006-04-01

    X-ray radiographic absorption imaging is an invaluable tool in medical diagnostics and materials science. For biological tissue samples, polymers or fibre composites, however, the use of conventional X-ray radiography is limited due to their weak absorption. This is resolved at highly brilliant X-ray synchrotron or micro-focus sources by using phase-sensitive imaging methods to improve the contrast. However, the requirements of the illuminating radiation mean that hard-X-ray phase-sensitive imaging has until now been impractical with more readily available X-ray sources, such as X-ray tubes. In this letter, we report how a setup consisting of three transmission gratings can efficiently yield quantitative differential phase-contrast images with conventional X-ray tubes. In contrast with existing techniques, the method requires no spatial or temporal coherence, is mechanically robust, and can be scaled up to large fields of view. Our method provides all the benefits of contrast-enhanced phase-sensitive imaging, but is also fully compatible with conventional absorption radiography. It is applicable to X-ray medical imaging, industrial non-destructive testing, and to other low-brilliance radiation, such as neutrons or atoms.

  5. Design of a novel phase contrast x-ray imaging system for mammography.

    PubMed

    Munro, Peter R T; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Speller, Robert D; Olivo, Alessandro

    2010-07-21

    It is hoped that x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) will provide a generational improvement in the effectiveness of mammography. XPCi is sensitive to the refraction which x-rays undergo as a result of the variation in x-ray propagation speeds within an object. XPCi is, however, seldom used in clinical applications owing mainly to a lack of suitable systems. The radiation physics group at UCL has previously designed and built an XPCi system sensitive to phase gradients in one dimension for application in security inspection. We present here the design methodology and final design of a prototype XPCi system sensitive to phase gradients in two directions for use in mammography. The technique makes efficient use of the flux available from a laboratory x-ray source, thus making it suitable for clinical use. PMID:20601778

  6. Visualization of water drying in porous materials by X-ray phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Griffa, M; Bonnin, A; Mokso, R; DI Bella, C; Münch, B; Kaufmann, R; Lura, P

    2015-01-01

    We present in this study results from X-ray tomographic microscopy with synchrotron radiation performed both in attenuation and phase contrast modes on a limestone sample during two stages of water drying. No contrast agent was used in order to increase the X-ray attenuation by water. We show that only by using the phase contrast mode it is possible to achieve enough water content change resolution to investigate the drying process at the pore-scale. We performed 3D image analysis of the time-differential phase contrast tomogram. We show by the results of such analysis that it is possible to obtain a reliable characterization of the spatial redistribution of water in the resolved pore system in agreement with what expected from the theory of drying in porous media and from measurements performed with other approaches. We thus show the potential of X-ray phase contrast imaging for pore-scale investigations of reactive water transport processes which cannot be imaged by adding a contrast agent for exploiting the standard attenuation contrast imaging mode. PMID:26469285

  7. Theoretical analysis of x-ray CT phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Sheng; Liu, Song; Zhang, Xuelong

    2008-12-01

    Recently phase contrast imaging has attracted much attention. An obvious advantage of using X-rays for imaging the internal structure of relatively thick samples lies in its high degree of penetration of solid objects. However, often leads to poor image contrast for soft tissue. Phase contrast imaging can be very useful in such situation, as the phase of the transmitted beam may often be more sensitive indicator of density of sample than convention contrast. On the other hand, Computed Tomography is the best technology in the aspect of X-rays detection. Using the technology, the detected object can be imaged to three-dimensional image, so as to observe the inner structure of object, and be convenient to the disease examination. If the phase contrast imaging can be used to the technology of Computed Tomography, the high resolution image can be gained. The technology will become the development orientation of medical image. The aim of this article was to apply the theory of X-rays phase contrast imaging to the traditional X-CT technique. For this purpose, the formula deduced from the imaging theory with parallel monochromatic X-rays illuminating the object based on the Fresnel-Kircohhof theory had been completed and a formula similar to that of the traditional X-CT reconstruction had been gained, which was Radon transform formula. At last, X-rays reconstruction simulation had been carried out according to the formula, and proved that the method could be used in clinical medical imaging. The method discussed in this paper had a very bright prospect for application.

  8. Simple phase extraction in x-ray differential phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Liu; Jin-Chuan, Guo; Yao-Hu, Lei; Ji, Li; Han-Ben, Niu

    2016-02-01

    A fast and simple method to extract phase-contrast images from interferograms is proposed, and its effectiveness is demonstrated through simulation and experiment. For x-ray differential phase contrast imaging, a strong attenuation signal acts as an overwhelming background intensity that obscures the weak phase signal so that no obvious phase-gradient information is detectable in the raw image. By subtracting one interferogram from another, chosen at particular intervals, the phase signal can be isolated and magnified. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61101175, 61571305, and 61227802).

  9. Potential for Imaging Engineered Tissues with X-Ray Phase Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Alyssa; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    As the field of tissue engineering advances, it is crucial to develop imaging methods capable of providing detailed three-dimensional information on tissue structure. X-ray imaging techniques based on phase-contrast (PC) have great potential for a number of biomedical applications due to their ability to provide information about soft tissue structure without exogenous contrast agents. X-ray PC techniques retain the excellent spatial resolution, tissue penetration, and calcified tissue contrast of conventional X-ray techniques while providing drastically improved imaging of soft tissue and biomaterials. This suggests that X-ray PC techniques are very promising for evaluation of engineered tissues. In this review, four different implementations of X-ray PC imaging are described and applications to tissues of relevance to tissue engineering reviewed. In addition, recent applications of X-ray PC to the evaluation of biomaterial scaffolds and engineered tissues are presented and areas for further development and application of these techniques are discussed. Imaging techniques based on X-ray PC have significant potential for improving our ability to image and characterize engineered tissues, and their continued development and optimization could have significant impact on the field of tissue engineering. PMID:21682604

  10. A coded-aperture technique allowing x-ray phase contrast imaging with conventional sources

    SciTech Connect

    Olivo, Alessandro; Speller, Robert

    2007-08-13

    Phase contrast imaging (PCI) solves the basic limitation of x-ray imaging, i.e., poor image contrast resulting from small absorption differences. Up to now, it has been mostly limited to synchrotron radiation facilities, due to the stringent requirements on the x-ray source and detectors, and only one technique was shown to provide PCI images with conventional sources but with limits in practical implementation. The authors propose a different approach, based on coded apertures, which provides high PCI signals with conventional sources and detectors and imposes practically no applicability limits. They expect this method to cast the basis of a widespread diffusion of PCI.

  11. Source effects in analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging with conventional sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hoennicke, M. G.; Manica, J.; Mazzaro, I.; Cusatis, C.; Huang, X.-R.

    2012-11-15

    Several recent papers have shown the implementation of analyzer based X-ray phase contrast imaging (ABI) with conventional X-ray sources. The high flux is always a requirement to make the technique useful for bio-medical applications. Here, we present and discuss three important parameters, which need to be taken into account, when searching for the high flux ABI: anisotropic magnification, double image, and source size spread due to intrinsic dispersive diffraction by asymmetrically cut crystals. These parameters, if not well optimized, may cause important features in the acquired images which can mislead the interpretation. A few ways to minimize these effects are implemented and discussed, including some experimental results.

  12. Hard x-ray phase contrast imaging of black lipid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Beerlink, A.; Mell, M.; Tolkiehn, M.; Salditt, T.

    2009-11-16

    We report hard x-ray phase contrast imaging of black lipid membranes, freely suspended over a micromachined aperture in an aqueous solution. Biomolecular and organic substances can thus be probed in hydrated environments by parallel beam propagation imaging, using coherent multi-kilo-electronvolt x-ray radiation. The width of the thinning film can be resolved from analysis of the intensity fringes in the Fresnel diffraction regime down to about 200 nm. The thinning process, in which solvent is expelled from the space in between two opposing monolayers, is monitored, and the domain walls between coexisting domains of swollen and thinned membrane patches are characterized.

  13. Object localization with 10 nm accuracy by x-ray phase contrast projection imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ollinger, C.; Fuhse, C.; Kalbfleisch, S.; Tucoulou, R.; Salditt, T.

    2007-07-30

    The present work focuses on the question of localizing single object by hard x-ray phase contrast projection imaging. The authors present a setup where an x-ray channel waveguide defines a 'quasi-point source' used to illuminate and image an object in a highly coherent cone beam. Knife edge fluorescence scans revealed a beam diameter of 75 nm at a distance of 30 {mu}m behind the guide. The recorded image corresponds to an in-line hologram of the object which can be reconstructed numerically. Object translations and associated shifts in the hologram allow for the 10 nm localization accuracy.

  14. Quantitative In-Line Phase-Contrast Imaging with Multienergy X Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gureyev, T. E.; Mayo, S.; Wilkins, S. W.; Paganin, D.; Stevenson, A. W.

    2001-06-01

    We present a new method for quantitative nondestructive characterization of objects by x-ray phase-contrast imaging. Spatial distributions of the projected values of the complex refractive index in the sample are reconstructed by processing near-field images collected at a fixed sample-to-detector distance using a polychromatic incident beam and an energy-sensitive area detector, such as a CCD used in the photon-counting spectroscopy mode. The method has the potential advantages of decreased radiation dose and increased accuracy compared to conventional techniques of x-ray imaging.

  15. Quantitative in-line phase-contrast imaging with multienergy X rays.

    PubMed

    Gureyev, T E; Mayo, S; Wilkins, S W; Paganin, D; Stevenson, A W

    2001-06-18

    We present a new method for quantitative nondestructive characterization of objects by x-ray phase-contrast imaging. Spatial distributions of the projected values of the complex refractive index in the sample are reconstructed by processing near-field images collected at a fixed sample-to-detector distance using a polychromatic incident beam and an energy-sensitive area detector, such as a CCD used in the photon-counting spectroscopy mode. The method has the potential advantages of decreased radiation dose and increased accuracy compared to conventional techniques of x-ray imaging. PMID:11415368

  16. Myelinated mouse nerves studied by X-ray phase contrast zoom tomography.

    PubMed

    Bartels, M; Krenkel, M; Cloetens, P; Möbius, W; Salditt, T

    2015-12-01

    We have used X-ray phase contrast tomography to resolve the structure of uncut, entire myelinated optic, saphenous and sciatic mouse nerves. Intrinsic electron density contrast suffices to identify axonal structures. Specific myelin labeling by an osmium tetroxide stain enables distinction between axon and surrounding myelin sheath. Utilization of spherical wave illumination enables zooming capabilities which enable imaging of entire sciatic internodes as well as identification of sub-structures such as nodes of Ranvier and Schmidt-Lanterman incisures. PMID:26546551

  17. A quantitative, non-interferometric X-ray phase contrast imaging technique

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Peter R.T.; Rigon, Luigi; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Lopez, Frances C.M.; Dreossi, Diego; Speller, Robert D.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    We present a quantitative, non-interferometric, X-ray differential phase contrast imaging technique based on the edge illumination principle. We derive a novel phase retrieval algorithm which requires only two images to be acquired and verify the technique experimentally using synchrotron radiation. The technique is useful for planar imaging but is expected to be important for quantitative phase tomography also. The properties and limitations of the technique are studied in detail. PMID:23388958

  18. X-ray computed tomography of wood-adhesive bondlines: Attenuation and phase-contrast effects

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, Jesse L.; Kamke, Frederick A.; Xiao, Xianghui

    2015-07-29

    Microscale X-ray computed tomography (XCT) is discussed as a technique for identifying 3D adhesive distribution in wood-adhesive bondlines. Visualization and material segmentation of the adhesives from the surrounding cellular structures require sufficient gray-scale contrast in the reconstructed XCT data. Commercial wood-adhesive polymers have similar chemical characteristics and density to wood cell wall polymers and therefore do not provide good XCT attenuation contrast in their native form. Here, three different adhesive types, namely phenol formaldehyde, polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate, and a hybrid polyvinyl acetate, are tagged with iodine such that they yield sufficient X-ray attenuation contrast. However, phase-contrast effects at material edges complicate image quality and segmentation in XCT data reconstructed with conventional filtered backprojection absorption contrast algorithms. A quantitative phase retrieval algorithm, which isolates and removes the phase-contrast effect, was demonstrated. The paper discusses and illustrates the balance between material X-ray attenuation and phase-contrast effects in all quantitative XCT analyses of wood-adhesive bondlines.

  19. Performance analysis of quantitative phase retrieval method in Zernike phase contrast X-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Chen; Kun, Gao; Da-Jiang, Wang; Li, Song; Zhi-Li, Wang

    2016-02-01

    Since the invention of Zernike phase contrast method in 1930, it has been widely used in optical microscopy and more recently in X-ray microscopy. Considering the image contrast is a mixture of absorption and phase information, we recently have proposed and demonstrated a method for quantitative phase retrieval in Zernike phase contrast X-ray microscopy. In this contribution, we analyze the performance of this method at different photon energies. Intensity images of PMMA samples are simulated at 2.5 keV and 6.2 keV, respectively, and phase retrieval is performed using the proposed method. The results demonstrate that the proposed phase retrieval method is applicable over a wide energy range. For weakly absorbing features, the optimal photon energy is 2.5 keV, from the point of view of image contrast and accuracy of phase retrieval. On the other hand, in the case of strong absorption objects, a higher photon energy is preferred to reduce the error of phase retrieval. These results can be used as guidelines to perform quantitative phase retrieval in Zernike phase contrast X-ray microscopy with the proposed method. Supported by the State Key Project for Fundamental Research (2012CB825801), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11475170, 11205157 and 11179004) and Anhui Provincial Natural Science Foundation (1508085MA20).

  20. Contrast enhancement of propagation based X-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Adam; Xu, Ling; Petruccelli, Jon C.; Gupta, Rajiv; Barbastathis, George

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate a quantitative X-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) technique derived from propagation dependent phase change. We assume that the absorption and phase components are correlated and solve the Transport of Intensity Equation (TIE). The experimental setup is simple compared to other XPCI techniques; the only requirements are a micro-focus X-ray source with sufficient temporal coherence and an X-ray detector of sufficient spatial resolution. This method was demonstrated in three scenarios, the first of which entails identification of an index-matched sphere. A rubber and nylon sphere were immersed in water and imaged. While the rubber sphere could be plainly seen on a radiograph, the nylon sphere was only visible in the phase reconstruction. Next, the technique was applied to differentiating liquid samples. In this scenario, three liquid samples (acetone, water, and hydrogen peroxide) were analyzed using both conventional computed tomography (CT) and phase contrast CT. While conventional CT was capable of differentiating between acetone and the other two liquids, it failed to distinguish between water and hydrogen peroxide; only phase CT was capable of differentiating all three samples. Finally, the technique was applied to CT imaging of a human artery specimen with extensive atherosclerotic plaque. This scenario demonstrated the increased sensitivity to soft tissue compared to conventional CT; it also uncovered some drawbacks of the method, which will be the target of future work. In all cases, the signal-to-noise ratio of phase contrast was greatly enhanced relative to conventional attenuation-based imaging.

  1. Reverse projection retrieval in edge illumination x-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Charlotte K.; Endrizzi, Marco; Diemoz, Paul C.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    Edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) can provide three-dimensional distributions of the real and imaginary parts of the complex refractive index (n=1-δ +\\text{i}β ) of the sample. Phase retrieval, i.e. the separation of attenuation and refraction data from projections that contain a combination of both, is a key step in the image reconstruction process. In EI-based x-ray phase contrast CT, this is conventionally performed on the basis of two projections acquired in opposite illumination configurations (i.e. with different positions of the pre-sample mask) at each CT angle. Displacing the pre-sample mask at each projection makes the scan susceptible to motor-induced misalignment and prevents a continuous sample rotation. We present an alternative method for the retrieval of attenuation and refraction data that does not require repositioning the pre-sample mask. The method is based on the reverse projection relation published by Zhu et al (2010 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 107 13576–81) for grating interferometry-based x-ray phase contrast CT. We use this relation to derive a simplified acquisition strategy that allows acquiring data with a continuous sample rotation, which can reduce scan time when combined with a fast read-out detector. Besides discussing the theory and the necessary alignment of the experimental setup, we present tomograms obtained with reverse projection retrieval and demonstrate their agreement with those obtained with the conventional EI retrieval.

  2. X-ray computed tomography of wood-adhesive bondlines: Attenuation and phase-contrast effects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Paris, Jesse L.; Kamke, Frederick A.; Xiao, Xianghui

    2015-07-29

    Microscale X-ray computed tomography (XCT) is discussed as a technique for identifying 3D adhesive distribution in wood-adhesive bondlines. Visualization and material segmentation of the adhesives from the surrounding cellular structures require sufficient gray-scale contrast in the reconstructed XCT data. Commercial wood-adhesive polymers have similar chemical characteristics and density to wood cell wall polymers and therefore do not provide good XCT attenuation contrast in their native form. Here, three different adhesive types, namely phenol formaldehyde, polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate, and a hybrid polyvinyl acetate, are tagged with iodine such that they yield sufficient X-ray attenuation contrast. However, phase-contrast effects at material edgesmore » complicate image quality and segmentation in XCT data reconstructed with conventional filtered backprojection absorption contrast algorithms. A quantitative phase retrieval algorithm, which isolates and removes the phase-contrast effect, was demonstrated. The paper discusses and illustrates the balance between material X-ray attenuation and phase-contrast effects in all quantitative XCT analyses of wood-adhesive bondlines.« less

  3. High-energy x-ray grating-based phase-contrast radiography of human anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Florian; Hauke, Christian; Lachner, Sebastian; Ludwig, Veronika; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Schuster, Max; Seifert, Maria; Wandner, Johannes; Wolf, Andreas; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2016-03-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast Talbot-Lau interferometry is a promising imaging technology that has the potential to raise soft tissue contrast in comparison to conventional attenuation-based imaging. Additionally, it is sensitive to attenuation, refraction and scattering of the radiation and thus provides complementary and otherwise inaccessible information due to the dark-field image, which shows the sub-pixel size granularity of the measured object. Until recent progress the method has been mainly limited to photon energies below 40 keV. Scaling the method to photon energies that are sufficient to pass large and spacious objects represents a challenging task. This is caused by increasing demands regarding the fabrication process of the gratings and the broad spectra that come along with the use of polychromatic X-ray sources operated at high acceleration voltages. We designed a setup that is capable to reach high visibilities in the range from 50 to 120 kV. Therefore, spacious and dense parts of the human body with high attenuation can be measured, such as a human knee. The authors will show investigations on the resulting attenuation, differential phase-contrast and dark-field images. The images experimentally show that X-ray grating-based phase-contrast radiography is feasible with highly absorbing parts of the human body containing massive bones.

  4. Beam hardening effects in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chabior, Michael; Donath, Tilman; David, Christian; Bunk, Oliver; Schuster, Manfred; Schroer, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors investigate how beam hardening affects the image formation in x-ray phase-contrast imaging and consecutively develop a correction algorithm based on the results of the analysis. Methods: The authors' approach utilizes a recently developed x-ray imaging technique using a grating interferometer capable of visualizing the differential phase shift of a wave front traversing an object. An analytical description of beam hardening is given, highlighting differences between attenuation and phase-contrast imaging. The authors present exemplary beam hardening artifacts for a number of well-defined samples in measurements at a compact laboratory setup using a polychromatic source. Results: Despite the differences in image formation, the authors show that beam hardening leads to a similar reduction of image quality in phase-contrast imaging as in conventional attenuation-contrast imaging. Additionally, the authors demonstrate that for homogeneous objects, beam hardening artifacts can be corrected by a linearization technique, applicable to all kinds of phase-contrast methods using polychromatic sources. Conclusions: The evaluated correction algorithm is shown to yield good results for a number of simple test objects and can thus be advocated in medical imaging and nondestructive testing.

  5. Energy weighting in grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelzer, Georg; Weber, Thomas; Anton, Gisela; Ballabriga Sune, Rafael; Bayer, Florian; Campbell, Michael; Haas, Wilhelm; Horn, Florian; Llopart Cudie, Xavi; Michel, Norbert; Mollenbauer, Uwe; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Ritter, Ina; Wölfel, Stefan; Wong, Winnie S.; Zang, Andrea; Michel, Thilo

    2014-03-01

    With energy-resolving photon-counting detectors in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging it is possible to reduce the dose needed and optimize the imaging chain towards better performance. The advantage of photon- counting detector's linear energy response and absence of electronic noise in attenuation based imaging is known. The access to the energy information of the photons counted provides even further potential for optimization by applying energy weighting factors. We have evaluated energy weighting for grating-based phase-contrast imaging. Measurements with the hybrid photon-counting detector Dosepix were performed. The concept of energy binning implemented in the pixel electronics allows individual storing of the energy information of the incoming photons in 16 energy bins for each pixel. With this technique the full spectral information can be obtained pixel wise from one single acquisition. On the differential phase-contrast data taken, we applied different types of energy weighting factors. The results presented in this contribution demonstrate the advantages of energy-resolved photon-counting in differential phase-contrast imaging. Using a x-ray spectrum centred significantly above the interferometers design energy leads to poor image quality. But with the proposed method and detector the quality was enhanced by 2.8 times in signal-to-noise ratio squared. As this is proportional to dose, energy- resolved photon-counting might be valuable especially for medical applications.

  6. Preliminary research on dual-energy X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hua-Jie; Wang, Sheng-Hao; Gao, Kun; Wang, Zhi-Li; Zhang, Can; Yang, Meng; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Pei-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) has been widely applied to measure the bone mineral density (BMD) and soft-tissue composition of the human body. However, the use of DEXA is greatly limited for low-Z materials such as soft tissues due to their weak absorption, while X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI) shows significantly improved contrast in comparison with the conventional standard absorption-based X-ray imaging for soft tissues. In this paper, we propose a novel X-ray phase-contrast method to measure the area density of low-Z materials, including a single-energy method and a dual-energy method. The single-energy method is for the area density calculation of one low-Z material, while the dual-energy method aims to calculate the area densities of two low-Z materials simultaneously. Comparing the experimental and simulation results with the theoretical ones, the new method proves to have the potential to replace DEXA in area density measurement. The new method sets the prerequisites for a future precise and low-dose area density calculation method for low-Z materials. Supported by Major State Basic Research Development Program (2012CB825800), Science Fund for Creative Research Groups (11321503) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11179004, 10979055, 11205189, 11205157)

  7. Microdissection of Human Esophagogastric Junction Wall with Phase-contrast X-ray CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianfa; Zhou, Guangzhao; Tian, Dongping; Lin, Runhua; Peng, Guanyun; Su, Min

    2015-01-01

    Phase-contrast x-ray imaging using an x-ray interferometer has great potential to reveal the structures inside soft tissues, because the sensitivity of this method to hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen is about 1000 times higher than that of the absorption-contrast x-ray method. In this study, we used phase-contrast X-ray CT to investigate human resected esophagogastric junction. This technology revealed the three-layer structure of the esophagogastric junction wall—mucous, submucosa and muscular layers. The mucous and muscular layers were clearly separated by a loose submucosa layer with a honeycomb appearance. The shape of the mucous and muscular layers was intact. The boundary between the mucous and submucosa layers was distinct, as was the border of the muscular and submucosa layers. The surface of the esophagogastric junction was displayed clearly through 3D reconstruction. The technology might be helpful in the diagnosis of esophagogastric junction lesion, especially for the early adenocarcinoma. PMID:26346099

  8. Phase contrast x-ray velocimetry of small animal lungs: optimising imaging rates

    PubMed Central

    Murrie, R. P.; Paganin, D. M.; Fouras, A.; Morgan, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lung diseases affect a vast portion of the world’s population. One of the key difficulties in accurately diagnosing and treating chronic lung disease is our inability to measure dynamic motion of the lungs in vivo. Phase contrast x-ray imaging (PCXI) allows us to image the lungs in high resolution by exploiting the difference in refractive indices between tissue and air. Combining PCXI with x-ray velocimetry (XV) allows us to track the local motion of the lungs, improving our ability to locate small regions of disease under natural ventilation conditions. Via simulation, we investigate the optimal imaging speed and sequence to capture lung motion in vivo in small animals using XV on both synchrotron and laboratory x-ray sources, balancing the noise inherent in a short exposure with motion blur that results from a long exposure. PMID:26819819

  9. Phase contrast enhanced high resolution X-ray imaging and tomography of soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubek, Jan; Granja, Carlos; Dammer, Jiri; Hanus, Robert; Holy, Tomas; Pospisil, Stanislav; Tykva, Richard; Uher, Josef; Vykydal, Zdenek

    2007-02-01

    A tabletop system for digital high resolution and high sensitivity X-ray micro-radiography has been developed for small-animal and soft-tissue imaging. The system is based on a micro-focus X-ray tube and the semiconductor hybrid position sensitive Medipix2 pixel detector. Transmission radiography imaging, conventionally based only on absorption, is enhanced by exploiting phase-shift effects induced in the X-ray beam traversing the sample. Phase contrast imaging is realized by object edge enhancement. DAQ is done by a novel fully integrated USB-based readout with online image generation. Improved signal reconstruction techniques make use of advanced statistical data analysis, enhanced beam hardening correction and direct thickness calibration of individual pixels. 2D and 3D micro-tomography images of several biological samples demonstrate the applicability of the system for biological and medical purposes including in-vivo and time dependent physiological studies in the life sciences.

  10. Note: Gratings on low absorbing substrates for x-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, F. J.; Schröter, T. J.; Kunka, D.; Meyer, P.; Meiser, J.; Faisal, A.; Khalil, M. I.; Birnbacher, L.; Viermetz, M.; Walter, M.; Schulz, J.; Pfeiffer, F.; Mohr, J.

    2015-12-01

    Grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging is on the verge of being applied in clinical settings. To achieve this goal, compact setups with high sensitivity and dose efficiency are necessary. Both can be increased by eliminating unwanted absorption in the beam path, which is mainly due to the grating substrates. Fabrication of gratings via deep X-ray lithography can address this issue by replacing the commonly used silicon substrate with materials with lower X-ray absorption that fulfill certain boundary conditions. Gratings were produced on both graphite and polymer substrates without compromising on structure quality. These gratings were tested in a three-grating setup with a source operated at 40 kVp and lead to an increase in the detector photon count rate of almost a factor of 4 compared to a set of gratings on silicon substrates. As the visibility was hardly affected, this corresponds to a significant increase in sensitivity and therefore dose efficiency.

  11. Compressed X-ray phase-contrast imaging using a coded source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Yongjin; Xu, Ling; Nagarkar, Vivek; Gupta, Rajiv

    2014-12-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI) holds great promise for medical X-ray imaging with high soft-tissue contrast. Obviating optical elements in the imaging chain, propagation-based XPCI (PB-XPCI) has definite advantages over other XPCI techniques in terms of cost, alignment and scalability. However, it imposes strict requirements on the spatial coherence of the source and the resolution of the detector. In this study, we demonstrate that using a coded X-ray source and sparsity-based reconstruction, we can significantly relax these requirements. Using numerical simulation, we assess the feasibility of our approach and study the effect of system parameters on the reconstructed image. The results are demonstrated with images obtained using a bench-top micro-focus XPCI system.

  12. Asymmetric masks for laboratory-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging with edge illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endrizzi, Marco; Astolfo, Alberto; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Millard, Thomas P.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    We report on an asymmetric mask concept that enables X-ray phase-contrast imaging without requiring any movement in the system during data acquisition. The method is compatible with laboratory equipment, namely a commercial detector and a rotating anode tube. The only motion required is that of the object under investigation which is scanned through the imaging system. Two proof-of-principle optical elements were designed, fabricated and experimentally tested. Quantitative measurements on samples of known shape and composition were compared to theory with good agreement. The method is capable of measuring the attenuation, refraction and (ultra-small-angle) X-ray scattering, does not have coherence requirements and naturally adapts to all those situations in which the X-ray image is obtained by scanning a sample through the imaging system.

  13. Compact laser accelerators for X-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Najmudin, Z; Kneip, S; Bloom, M S; Mangles, S P D; Chekhlov, O; Dangor, A E; Döpp, A; Ertel, K; Hawkes, S J; Holloway, J; Hooker, C J; Jiang, J; Lopes, N C; Nakamura, H; Norreys, P A; Rajeev, P P; Russo, C; Streeter, M J V; Symes, D R; Wing, M

    2014-03-01

    Advances in X-ray imaging techniques have been driven by advances in novel X-ray sources. The latest fourth-generation X-ray sources can boast large photon fluxes at unprecedented brightness. However, the large size of these facilities means that these sources are not available for everyday applications. With advances in laser plasma acceleration, electron beams can now be generated at energies comparable to those used in light sources, but in university-sized laboratories. By making use of the strong transverse focusing of plasma accelerators, bright sources of betatron radiation have been produced. Here, we demonstrate phase-contrast imaging of a biological sample for the first time by radiation generated by GeV electron beams produced by a laser accelerator. The work was performed using a greater than 300 TW laser, which allowed the energy of the synchrotron source to be extended to the 10-100 keV range. PMID:24470414

  14. Asymmetric masks for laboratory-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging with edge illumination

    PubMed Central

    Endrizzi, Marco; Astolfo, Alberto; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Millard, Thomas P.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We report on an asymmetric mask concept that enables X-ray phase-contrast imaging without requiring any movement in the system during data acquisition. The method is compatible with laboratory equipment, namely a commercial detector and a rotating anode tube. The only motion required is that of the object under investigation which is scanned through the imaging system. Two proof-of-principle optical elements were designed, fabricated and experimentally tested. Quantitative measurements on samples of known shape and composition were compared to theory with good agreement. The method is capable of measuring the attenuation, refraction and (ultra-small-angle) X-ray scattering, does not have coherence requirements and naturally adapts to all those situations in which the X-ray image is obtained by scanning a sample through the imaging system. PMID:27145924

  15. Note: Gratings on low absorbing substrates for x-ray phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, F. J. Schröter, T. J.; Kunka, D.; Meyer, P.; Meiser, J.; Faisal, A.; Khalil, M. I.; Mohr, J.; Birnbacher, L.; Viermetz, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Walter, M.; Schulz, J.

    2015-12-15

    Grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging is on the verge of being applied in clinical settings. To achieve this goal, compact setups with high sensitivity and dose efficiency are necessary. Both can be increased by eliminating unwanted absorption in the beam path, which is mainly due to the grating substrates. Fabrication of gratings via deep X-ray lithography can address this issue by replacing the commonly used silicon substrate with materials with lower X-ray absorption that fulfill certain boundary conditions. Gratings were produced on both graphite and polymer substrates without compromising on structure quality. These gratings were tested in a three-grating setup with a source operated at 40 kVp and lead to an increase in the detector photon count rate of almost a factor of 4 compared to a set of gratings on silicon substrates. As the visibility was hardly affected, this corresponds to a significant increase in sensitivity and therefore dose efficiency.

  16. Asymmetric masks for laboratory-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging with edge illumination.

    PubMed

    Endrizzi, Marco; Astolfo, Alberto; Vittoria, Fabio A; Millard, Thomas P; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We report on an asymmetric mask concept that enables X-ray phase-contrast imaging without requiring any movement in the system during data acquisition. The method is compatible with laboratory equipment, namely a commercial detector and a rotating anode tube. The only motion required is that of the object under investigation which is scanned through the imaging system. Two proof-of-principle optical elements were designed, fabricated and experimentally tested. Quantitative measurements on samples of known shape and composition were compared to theory with good agreement. The method is capable of measuring the attenuation, refraction and (ultra-small-angle) X-ray scattering, does not have coherence requirements and naturally adapts to all those situations in which the X-ray image is obtained by scanning a sample through the imaging system. PMID:27145924

  17. Phase-contrast x-ray imaging and tomography of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olendrowitz, C.; Bartels, M.; Krenkel, M.; Beerlink, A.; Mokso, R.; Sprung, M.; Salditt, T.

    2012-08-01

    We have analyzed the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans with the help of phase-contrast x-ray tomography. This work combines techniques from x-ray imaging studies of single biological cells by in-line holography with three-dimensional reconstruction and furthermore extends these studies to the multicellular level. To preserve the sub-cellular ultrastructure of the nematodes, we used the near-native sample preparation of high-pressure freezing as commonly used in the field of electron microscopy. For the presented samples, a standard, non-magnifying parallel-beam setting, as well as a magnifying, divergent-beam setting using nanofocusing optics is evaluated based on their tomographic reconstruction potential. In this paper, we address difficulties in sample preparation and issues of image processing. By experimental refinement and through optimized reconstruction procedures, we were able to perform x-ray imaging studies on a living specimen.

  18. Compact laser accelerators for X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Najmudin, Z.; Kneip, S.; Bloom, M. S.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Chekhlov, O.; Dangor, A. E.; Döpp, A.; Ertel, K.; Hawkes, S. J.; Holloway, J.; Hooker, C. J.; Jiang, J.; Lopes, N. C.; Nakamura, H.; Norreys, P. A.; Rajeev, P. P.; Russo, C.; Streeter, M. J. V.; Symes, D. R.; Wing, M.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in X-ray imaging techniques have been driven by advances in novel X-ray sources. The latest fourth-generation X-ray sources can boast large photon fluxes at unprecedented brightness. However, the large size of these facilities means that these sources are not available for everyday applications. With advances in laser plasma acceleration, electron beams can now be generated at energies comparable to those used in light sources, but in university-sized laboratories. By making use of the strong transverse focusing of plasma accelerators, bright sources of betatron radiation have been produced. Here, we demonstrate phase-contrast imaging of a biological sample for the first time by radiation generated by GeV electron beams produced by a laser accelerator. The work was performed using a greater than 300 TW laser, which allowed the energy of the synchrotron source to be extended to the 10–100 keV range. PMID:24470414

  19. Breast tumor segmentation in high resolution x-ray phase contrast analyzer based computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, E.; Grandl, S.; Sztrókay-Gaul, A.; Gasilov, S.; Barbone, G.; Mittone, A.; Coan, P.; Bravin, A.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Phase contrast computed tomography has emerged as an imaging method, which is able to outperform present day clinical mammography in breast tumor visualization while maintaining an equivalent average dose. To this day, no segmentation technique takes into account the specificity of the phase contrast signal. In this study, the authors propose a new mathematical framework for human-guided breast tumor segmentation. This method has been applied to high-resolution images of excised human organs, each of several gigabytes. Methods: The authors present a segmentation procedure based on the viscous watershed transform and demonstrate the efficacy of this method on analyzer based phase contrast images. The segmentation of tumors inside two full human breasts is then shown as an example of this procedure’s possible applications. Results: A correct and precise identification of the tumor boundaries was obtained and confirmed by manual contouring performed independently by four experienced radiologists. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate that applying the watershed viscous transform allows them to perform the segmentation of tumors in high-resolution x-ray analyzer based phase contrast breast computed tomography images. Combining the additional information provided by the segmentation procedure with the already high definition of morphological details and tissue boundaries offered by phase contrast imaging techniques, will represent a valuable multistep procedure to be used in future medical diagnostic applications.

  20. Evaluation of microbubble contrast agents for dynamic imaging with x-ray phase contrast

    PubMed Central

    Millard, T. P.; Endrizzi, M.; Everdell, N.; Rigon, L.; Arfelli, F.; Menk, R. H.; Stride, E.; Olivo, A.

    2015-01-01

    X-rays are commonly used as a means to image the inside of objects opaque to visible light, as their short wavelength allows penetration through matter and the formation of high spatial resolution images. This physical effect has found particular importance in medicine where x-ray based imaging is routinely used as a diagnostic tool. Increasingly, however, imaging modalities that provide functional as well as morphological information are required. In this study the potential to use x-ray phase based imaging as a functional modality through the use of microbubbles that can be targeted to specific biological processes is explored. We show that the concentration of a microbubble suspension can be monitored quantitatively whilst in flow using x-ray phase contrast imaging. This could provide the basis for a dynamic imaging technique that combines the tissue penetration, spatial resolution, and high contrast of x-ray phase based imaging with the functional information offered by targeted imaging modalities. PMID:26219661

  1. Noise properties of grating-based x-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Thomas; Juergen Engel, Klaus; Roessl, Ewald

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate the properties of tomographic grating-based phase contrast imaging with respect to its noise power spectrum and the energy dependence of the achievable contrast to noise ratio. Methods: Tomographic simulations of an object with 11 cm diameter constituted of materials of biological interest were conducted at different energies ranging from 25 to 85 keV by using a wave propagation approach. Using a Monte Carlo simulation of the x-ray attenuation within the object, it is verified that the simulated measurement deposits the same dose within the object at each energy. Results: The noise in reconstructed phase contrast computed tomography images shows a maximum at low spatial frequencies. The contrast to noise ratio reaches a maximum around 45 keV for the simulated object. The general dependence of the contrast to noise on the energy appears to be independent of the material. Compared with reconstructed absorption contrast images, the reconstructed phase contrast images show sometimes better, sometimes worse, and sometimes similar contrast to noise, depending on the material and the energy. Conclusions: Phase contrast images provide additional information to the conventional absorption contrast images and might thus be useful for medical applications. However, the observed noise power spectrum in reconstructed phase contrast images implies that the usual trade-off between noise and resolution is less efficient for phase contrast imaging compared with absorption contrast imaging. Therefore, high-resolution imaging is a strength of phase contrast imaging, but low-resolution imaging is not. This might hamper the clinical application of the method, in cases where a low spatial resolution is sufficient for diagnosis.

  2. Evaluation of a new reconstruction algorithm for x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Maria; Hauke, Christian; Horn, Florian; Lachner, Sebastian; Ludwig, Veronika; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Schuster, Max; Wandner, Johannes; Wolf, Andreas; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2016-04-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging might open up entirely new opportunities in medical imaging. However, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, vibrations or distortions of the system lead to inaccuracies within the phase-stepping procedure. Given insufficient stability of the phase-step positions, up to now, artifacts in phase-contrast images occur, which lower the image quality. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging in clinical routine as for example tiny structures of the human anatomy cannot be observed. In this contribution we evaluate an algorithm proposed by Vargas et.al.1 and applied to X-ray imaging by Pelzer et.al. that enables us to reconstruct a differential phase-contrast image without the knowledge of the specific phase-step positions. This method was tested in comparison to the standard reconstruction by Fourier analysis. The quality of phase-contrast images remains stable, even if the phase-step positions are completely unknown and not uniformly distributed. To also achieve attenuation and dark-field images the proposed algorithm has been combined with a further algorithm of Vargas et al.3 Using this algorithm, the phase-step positions can be reconstructed. With the help of the proper phase-step positions it is possible to get information about the phase, the amplitude and the offset of the measured data. We evaluated this algorithm concerning the measurement of thick objects which show a high absorbency.

  3. Phase contrast: the frontier of x-ray and electron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwu, Y.; Margaritondo, G.

    2013-12-01

    Phase contrast has been a fundamental component of microscopy since the early 1940s. In broad terms, it refers to the formation of images using not the combination of wave intensities but their amplitudes with the corresponding phase factors. The impact on visible microscopy of biological specimens has been major. This contrast mechanism is now playing an increasingly important role in other kinds of microscopy, notably those based on electrons or x-rays. It notably solves the background problem of weak absorption contrast. New breakthroughs and new techniques are continuously produced, unfortunately unknown to most of the scientists that could exploit them. The present special cluster issue of reviews was inspired by this situation. The case of x-rays is very interesting. Phase contrast requires a high degree of longitudinal and lateral coherence. But conventional x-ray sources are not coherent. The progress of synchrotron sources yielded high coherence as a key byproduct—and started a rapid expansion of phase contrast radiology. No review—or cluster of reviews—can possibly cover all the facets of the recent progress. Without trying to be absolutely comprehensive, the present special cluster issue touches a variety of issues, giving a very broad picture. Liu et al review in general terms the different phase-based hard-x-ray techniques, with an interesting variety of examples. Then, Suortti et al and Wang et al present more specialized overviews of crystal and grating based x-ray imaging techniques, very powerful in the analysis of biological specimens. Mokso et al discuss the many facets of tomography using phase effects, expanding the picture of tomographic reconstruction of the three previous reviews. Wu et al treat the rapid progress in hard-x-ray focusing and its impact on radiology and tomography for materials science and biomedical research. The next two reviews deal with special and very interesting classes of applications. Specifically, Lee et al

  4. The application of phase contrast X-ray techniques for imaging Li-ion battery electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastwood, D. S.; Bradley, R. S.; Tariq, F.; Cooper, S. J.; Taiwo, O. O.; Gelb, J.; Merkle, A.; Brett, D. J. L.; Brandon, N. P.; Withers, P. J.; Lee, P. D.; Shearing, P. R.

    2014-04-01

    In order to accelerate the commercialization of fuel cells and batteries across a range of applications, an understanding of the mechanisms by which they age and degrade at the microstructural level is required. Here, the most widely commercialized Li-ion batteries based on porous graphite based electrodes which de/intercalate Li+ ions during charge/discharge are studied by two phase contrast enhanced X-ray imaging modes, namely in-line phase contrast and Zernike phase contrast at the micro (synchrotron) and nano (laboratory X-ray microscope) level, respectively. The rate of charge cycling is directly dependent on the nature of the electrode microstructure, which are typically complex multi-scale 3D geometries with significant microstructural heterogeneities. We have been able to characterise the porosity and the tortuosity by micro-CT as well as the morphology of 5 individual graphite particles by nano-tomography finding that while their volume varied significantly their sphericity was surprisingly similar. The volume specific surface areas of the individual grains measured by nano-CT are significantly larger than the total volume specific surface area of the electrode from the micro-CT imaging, which can be attributed to the greater particle surface area visible at higher resolution.

  5. High-Resolution and Quantitative X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography for Mouse Brain Research

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Yan; Lin, Xiaojie; Yuan, Falei; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Zhao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Imaging techniques for visualizing cerebral vasculature and distinguishing functional areas are essential and critical to the study of various brain diseases. In this paper, with the X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique, we proposed an experiment scheme for the ex vivo mouse brain study, achieving both high spatial resolution and improved soft-tissue contrast. This scheme includes two steps: sample preparation and volume reconstruction. In the first step, we use heparinized saline to displace the blood inside cerebral vessels and then replace it with air making air-filled mouse brain. After sample preparation, X-ray phase-contrast tomography is performed to collect the data for volume reconstruction. Here, we adopt a phase-retrieval combined filtered backprojection method to reconstruct its three-dimensional structure and redesigned the reconstruction kernel. To evaluate its performance, we carried out experiments at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The results show that the air-tissue structured cerebral vasculatures are highly visible with propagation-based phase-contrast imaging and can be clearly resolved in reconstructed cross-images. Besides, functional areas, such as the corpus callosum, corpus striatum, and nuclei, are also clearly resolved. The proposed method is comparable with hematoxylin and eosin staining method but represents the studied mouse brain in three dimensions, offering a potential powerful tool for the research of brain disorders. PMID:26576198

  6. Phase-contrast x-ray imaging of the breast: recent developments towards clinics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coan, P.; Bravin, A.; Tromba, G.

    2013-12-01

    Breast imaging is one of the most demanding and delicate radiological applications. Mammography is the primary diagnosis tool in breast cancer detection and national screening programmes. Recognition of breast cancer depends on the detection of subtle architectural distortion, masses showing near normal breast tissue density, skin thickening and microcalcifications. The small differences in attenuation of x-rays between normal and malignant tissue result in low contrast and make cancer detection difficult in conventional x-ray absorption mammography. Because of these challenging aspects, breast imaging has been the first and most explored diagnostic field in phase-contrast imaging research. This novel imaging method has been extensively used and has demonstrated a unique capability in producing high-contrast and sensitive images at quasi-histological resolution. The most recent and significant technical developments are introduced and results obtained by the application of various phase-contrast imaging techniques for breast imaging are reported. The first phase-contrast mammography clinical trials project is also presented and the short- and long-term future perspectives of the method are discussed.

  7. Cryo X-ray microscopy with high spatial resolution in amplitude and phase contrast.

    PubMed

    Schneider, G

    1998-11-01

    The resolution of transmission X-ray microscopes (TXMs) using zone plate optics is presently about 30 nm. Theory and experiments presented here show that this resolution can be obtained in radiation sensitive hydrated biological material by using shock frozen samples. For this purpose the interaction of X-rays with matter and the image formation with zone plates is described. For the first time the influence of the limited apertures of the condenser and the zone plate objective are in included in calculations of the image contrast, the photon density and radiation dose required for the object illumination. Model considerations show that lowest radiation dose and high image contrast are obtained in optimized phase contrast which exploits absorption as well as phase shift. The damaging effect of the absorbed X-rays is quantitatively evaluated by radiation-induced kinetics showing that cryogenic samples are structurally stable. To verify these theoretical models the TXM was modified to allow imaging of frozen-hydrated samples at atmospheric pressure. Details inside cells and algae as small as 35 nm are visible at 2.4 nm wavelength in amplitude contrast mode. At this resolution the cryogenic samples show no structural changes. As predicted, optimized phase contrast shows structures inside the frozen-hydrated objects with high contrast. Stereo-pair images of algae reveal the 3D organization of the organelles. Element analysis and micro-tomography of whole cryogenic cells are possible. PMID:9836467

  8. Absorption and Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging in Paleontology Using Laboratory and Synchrotron Sources.

    PubMed

    Bidola, Pidassa; Stockmar, Marco; Achterhold, Klaus; Pfeiffer, Franz; Pacheco, Mírian L A F; Soriano, Carmen; Beckmann, Felix; Herzen, Julia

    2015-10-01

    X-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT) is commonly used for imaging of samples in biomedical or materials science research. Owing to the ability to visualize a sample in a nondestructive way, X-ray μCT is perfectly suited to inspect fossilized specimens, which are mostly unique or rare. In certain regions of the world where important sedimentation events occurred in the Precambrian geological time, several fossilized animals are studied to understand questions related to their origin, environment, and life evolution. This article demonstrates the advantages of applying absorption and phase-contrast CT on the enigmatic fossil Corumbella werneri, one of the oldest known animals capable of building hard parts, originally discovered in Corumbá (Brazil). Different tomographic setups were tested to visualize the fossilized inner structures: a commercial laboratory-based μCT device, two synchrotron-based imaging setups using conventional absorption and propagation-based phase contrast, and a commercial X-ray microscope with a lens-coupled detector system, dedicated for radiography and tomography. Based on our results we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the different imaging setups for paleontological studies. PMID:26306692

  9. Absorption and Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging in Paleontology Using Laboratory and Synchrotron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bidola, Pidassa; Stockmar, Marco; Achterhold, Klaus; Pfeiffer, Franz; Pacheco, Mirian L.A.F.; Soriano, Carmen; Beckmann, Felix; Herzen, Julia

    2015-10-01

    X-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) is commonly used for imaging of samples in biomedical or materials science research. Owing to the ability to visualize a sample in a nondestructive way, X-ray CT is perfectly suited to inspect fossilized specimens, which are mostly unique or rare. In certain regions of the world where important sedimentation events occurred in the Precambrian geological time, several fossilized animals are studied to understand questions related to their origin, environment, and life evolution. This article demonstrates the advantages of applying absorption and phase-contrast CT on the enigmatic fossil Corumbella werneri, one of the oldest known animals capable of building hard parts, originally discovered in Corumba (Brazil). Different tomographic setups were tested to visualize the fossilized inner structures: a commercial laboratory-based CT device, two synchrotron-based imaging setups using conventional absorption and propagation-based phase contrast, and a commercial X-ray microscope with a lens-coupled detector system, dedicated for radiography and tomography. Based on our results we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the different imaging setups for paleontological studies.

  10. Complex dark-field contrast in grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Tang, Xiangyang

    2015-03-01

    Without assuming that the sub-pixel microstructures of an object to be imaged distribute in space randomly, we investigate the influence of the object's microstructures on grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging. Our theoretical analysis and 3D computer simulation study based on the paraxial Fresnel-Kirchhoff theory show that the existing dark-field contrast can be generalized into a complex dark-field contrast in a way such that its imaginary part quantifies the effect of the object's sub-pixel microstructures on the phase of intensity oscillations. A method based on the phase-attenuation duality that holds for soft tissues to be imaged at high x-ray energies is proposed to retrieve the imaginary part of the complex dark-field contrast for imaging. In comparison to the existing dark-field contrast, the imaginary part of complex dark-field contrast exhibits significantly stronger selectivity on the shape of the object's sub-pixel microstructures. Thus the x-ray imaging corresponding to the imaginary part of complex dark-field contrast can provide additional and complementary information to that corresponding to the attenuation contrast, phase contrast and the existing dark-field contrast.

  11. Contrast transfer function in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianheng; Du, Yang; Lin, Danying; Liu, Xin; Niu, Hanben

    2014-05-01

    x-Ray grating interferometry is a method for x-ray wave front sensing and phase-contrast imaging that has been developed over past few years. Contrast and resolution are the criteria used to specify the quality of an image. In characterizing the performance of this interferometer, the contrast transfer function is considered in this paper. The oscillatory nature of the contrast transfer function (CTF) is derived and quantified for this interferometer. The illumination source and digital detector are both considered as significant factors controlling image quality, and it can be noted that contrast and resolution in turn depends primarily on the projected intensity profile of the array source and the pixel size of the detector. Furthermore, a test pattern phantom with a well-controlled range of spatial frequencies was designed and imaging of this phantom was simulated by a computer. Contrast transfer function behavior observed in the simulated image is consistent with our theoretical CTF. This might be beneficial for the evaluation and optimization of a grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging system.

  12. Phase-contrast X-ray CT Imaging of Esophagus and Esophageal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianfa; Tian, Dongping; Lin, Runhua; zhou, Guangzhao; Peng, Guanyun; Su, Min

    2014-01-01

    The electron density resolution is 1000 times higher for synchrotron-radiation phase-contrast CT imaging than conventional X-ray absorption imaging in light elements, with which high-resolution X-ray imaging of biological soft tissue can be achieved. In the present study, we used phase-contrast X-ray CT to investigate human resected esophagus and esophageal carcinoma specimens. This technology revealed the three-layer structure of the esophageal wall-- mucous, submucosa and muscular layers. The mucous and muscular layers were clearly separated by a loose submucosa layer with a honeycomb appearance. The surface of the mucous layer was smooth. In esophageal carcinoma, because of tumor tissue infiltration, the submucosa layer was absent, which indicated destruction of the submucosa. The boundary between normal tissue and tumor was comparatively fuzzy, the three-layer structure of the esophageal wall was indistinct. The surface of the mucous layer was rugose. The technology might be helpful in tumor staging of esophageal carcinoma. PMID:24939041

  13. Hard x-ray phase contrast imaging using single absorption grating and hybrid semiconductor pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Krejci, Frantisek; Jakubek, Jan; Kroupa, Martin

    2010-11-01

    A method for x-ray phase contrast imaging is introduced in which only one absorption grating and a microfocus x-ray source in a tabletop setup are used. The method is based on precise subpixel position determination of the x-ray pattern projected by the grating directly from the pattern image. For retrieval of the phase gradient and absorption image (both images obtained from one exposure), it is necessary to measure only one projection of the investigated object. Thus, our method is greatly simplified compared with the phase-stepping method and our method can significantly reduce the time-consuming scanning and possibly the unnecessary dose. Furthermore, the technique works with a fully polychromatic spectrum and gives ample variability in object magnification. Consequently, the approach can open the way to further widespread application of phase contrast imaging, e.g., into clinical practice. The experimental results on a simple testing object as well as on complex biological samples are presented. PMID:21133473

  14. Phase Contrast Cone Beam Tomography with an X-Ray Grating Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerjen, I.; Revol, V.; Kottler, C.; Luethi, Th.; Sennhauser, U.; Kaufmann, R.; Urban, C.

    2010-04-01

    We report on our recent developments of reconstruction algorithms for Differential Phase Contrast X-ray Computed Tomography (DPC CT). DPC images provide information about the real and imaginary part of the refractive index which is an advantage when objects with poor absorption but good phase contrast are inspected. In order to promote DPC CT for industrial applications we developed an adapted Feldkamp algorithm which allows reconstructing the three-dimensional image of the refractive index of an object from the DPC projections obtained with our large field of view, high energy grating interferometer set up in a cone beam geometry. We present slice images of a test object and show different ways of visualization of the phase and absorption information.

  15. Sensitivity of edge illumination X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Diemoz, P. C.; Endrizzi, M.; Bravin, A.; Robinson, I. K.; Olivo, A.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we developed a theoretical model that can predict the signal-to-noise ratio for edge-like features in phase-contrast images. This model was then applied for the estimation of the sensitivity of three different X-ray phase-contrast techniques: propagation-based imaging, analyser-based imaging and grating interferometry. We show here how the same formalism can be used also in the case of the edge illumination (EI) technique, providing results that are consistent with those of a recently developed method for the estimation of noise in the retrieved refraction image. The new model is then applied to calculate, in the case of a given synchrotron radiation set-up, the optimum positions of the pre-sample aperture and detector edge to maximize the sensitivity. Finally, an example of the extremely high angular resolution achievable with the EI technique is presented. PMID:24470420

  16. A fast-converging iterative method for X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Vo, Nghia T.; Breese, Mark B. H.; Atwood, Robert C.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Moser, Herbert O.; Lee, Peter D.

    2012-11-26

    X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography holds great promise for the quantitative analysis of soft materials. However, its applications have been limited, so far, by the fact that direct methods based on the transport-of-intensity equation and the contrast transfer function are sensitive to noise and applicable only to limited types of samples. Here, we propose an iterative method based on the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm (R. W. Gerchberg and W. O. Saxton, Optik 35, 237 (1972)), but overcoming its slow convergence by an acceleration technique, named random signed feedback, which shows an excellent performance, both in numerical simulation and tomographic experiment, of discriminating various polymers even when using 53 keV synchrotron X-rays.

  17. Microbubbles as contrast agent for in-line x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Xi Yan; Zhao Jun; Tang Rongbiao; Wang Yujie

    2011-07-04

    In the present study, we investigated the potential of gas-filled microbubbles as contrast agents for in-line x-ray phase-contrast imaging (PCI) in biomedical applications. When imaging parameters are optimized, the microbubbles function as microlenses that focus the incoming x-rays to form bright spots, which can significantly enhance the image contrast. Since microbubbles have been shown to be safe contrast agents in clinical ultrasonography, this contrast-enhancement procedure for PCI may have promising utility in biomedical applications, especially when the dose of radiation is a serious concern. In this study, we performed both numerical simulations and ex vivo experiments to investigate the formation of the contrast and the effectiveness of microbubbles as contrast agents in PCI.

  18. A fast-converging iterative method for X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, Nghia T.; Atwood, Robert C.; Moser, Herbert O.; Lee, Peter D.; Breese, Mark B. H.; Drakopoulos, Michael

    2012-11-01

    X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography holds great promise for the quantitative analysis of soft materials. However, its applications have been limited, so far, by the fact that direct methods based on the transport-of-intensity equation and the contrast transfer function are sensitive to noise and applicable only to limited types of samples. Here, we propose an iterative method based on the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm (R. W. Gerchberg and W. O. Saxton, Optik 35, 237 (1972)), but overcoming its slow convergence by an acceleration technique, named random signed feedback, which shows an excellent performance, both in numerical simulation and tomographic experiment, of discriminating various polymers even when using 53 keV synchrotron X-rays.

  19. Comparison of two x-ray phase-contrast imaging methods with a microfocus source.

    PubMed

    Zhou, T; Lundström, U; Thüring, T; Rutishauser, S; Larsson, D H; Stampanoni, M; David, C; Hertz, H M; Burvall, A

    2013-12-16

    We present a comparison for high-resolution imaging with a laboratory source between grating-based (GBI) and propagation-based (PBI) x-ray phase-contrast imaging. The comparison is done through simulations and experiments using a liquid-metal-jet x-ray microfocus source. Radiation doses required for detection in projection images are simulated as a function of the diameter of a cylindrical sample. Using monochromatic radiation, simulations show a lower dose requirement for PBI for small object features and a lower dose for GBI for larger object features. Using polychromatic radiation, such as that from a laboratory microfocus source, experiments and simulations show a lower dose requirement for PBI for a large range of feature sizes. Tested on a biological sample, GBI shows higher noise levels than PBI, but its advantage of quantitative refractive index reconstruction for multi-material samples becomes apparent. PMID:24514597

  20. Monte Carlo model of a polychromatic laboratory based edge illumination x-ray phase contrast system.

    PubMed

    Millard, T P; Endrizzi, M; Diemoz, P C; Hagen, C K; Olivo, A

    2014-05-01

    A Monte Carlo model of a polychromatic laboratory based (coded aperture) edge illumination x-ray phase contrast imaging system has been developed and validated against experimental data. The ability for the simulation framework to be used to model two-dimensional images is also shown. The Monte Carlo model has been developed using the McXtrace engine and is polychromatic, i.e., results are obtained through the use of the full x-ray spectrum rather than an effective energy. This type of simulation can in future be used to model imaging of objects with complex geometry, for system prototyping, as well as providing a first step towards the development of a simulation for modelling dose delivery as a part of translating the imaging technique for use in clinical environments. PMID:24880377

  1. Towards the clinical application of X-ray phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Williams, I M; Siu, K K W; Gan, R; Runxuan, G; He, X; Hart, S A; Styles, C B; Lewis, R A

    2008-12-01

    Synchrotron-based propagation-based imaging, a type of phase contrast imaging, produces better soft tissue image contrast than conventional radiography. To determine whether the technique is directly transferable to the clinical environment for routine diagnostic or screening imaging, a micro-focus (100 microm spot-size) Molybdenum X-ray source with 0.03 mm molybdenum filtration was installed at a local hospital. Breast tissue samples, excised masses and mastectomies, were obtained directly from surgery and imaged at three geometries. The first geometry was optimised for visualizing phase contrast effects using a ray-line argument, the second was the same as that employed by Konica-Minolta in their commercial phase contrast system, and the third was the conventional contact arrangement. The three images taken of each tissue sample were comparatively scored in a pair-wise fashion. Scoring was performed by radiologist expert in mammography, general radiologists, associated clinicians and radiographers on high-resolution mammography rated monitors at two separate locations. Scoring indicated that the optimised and Konica geometries both outperformed the conventional mammographic geometry. An unexpected complication within the trial was the effect that the scoring platform and the associated display tools had on some of the scorer's responses. Additionally, the trial revealed that none of the conventional descriptors for image quality were adequate in the presence of phase contrast enhancements. PMID:18996661

  2. Optimization Of Phase-Contrast Enhanced X-Ray Imaging Of D-T Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B

    2005-06-17

    Phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging has been demonstrated for characterization of D-T layers inside of beryllium shells. These first demonstrations used both scintillator and direct-detection imaging. This memo details tradeoffs between the two methods in order to optimize the imaging. The guiding principle for optimization is to minimize the exposure time while maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio at the D-T solid-vapor interface. Direct-detection and scintillator performance are comparable when imaging the full capsule. However, a scintillator allows for higher-resolution images necessary for studying local defects in the D-T layer.

  3. Interlaced phase stepping in phase-contrast x-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanette, I.; Bech, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Weitkamp, T.

    2011-02-01

    We report on an interlaced acquisition scheme in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography in which different viewing angles are used to retrieve a single differential phase projection. This interlaced acquisition scheme is particularly beneficial for region-of-interest tomography since it substantially reduces the artifacts caused by the external region and can eliminate the need for stop-and-go motion of the tomography rotation axis. In this letter, the higher accuracy of the region-of-interest phase reconstructions obtained with the interlaced approach is demonstrated by numerical simulation and experimental results.

  4. Phase contrast tomography of the mouse cochlea at microfocus x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bartels, Matthias; Krenkel, Martin; Hernandez, Victor H.; Moser, Tobias; Salditt, Tim

    2013-08-19

    We present phase contrast x-ray tomography of functional soft tissue within the bony cochlear capsule of mice, carried out at laboratory microfocus sources with well-matched source, detector, geometry, and reconstruction algorithms at spatial resolutions down to 2 μm. Contrast, data quality and resolution enable the visualization of thin membranes and nerve fibers as well as automated segmentation of surrounding bone. By complementing synchrotron radiation imaging techniques, a broad range of biomedical applications becomes possible as demonstrated for optogenetic cochlear implant research.

  5. Phase contrast tomography of the mouse cochlea at microfocus x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Matthias; Hernandez, Victor H.; Krenkel, Martin; Moser, Tobias; Salditt, Tim

    2013-08-01

    We present phase contrast x-ray tomography of functional soft tissue within the bony cochlear capsule of mice, carried out at laboratory microfocus sources with well-matched source, detector, geometry, and reconstruction algorithms at spatial resolutions down to 2 μm. Contrast, data quality and resolution enable the visualization of thin membranes and nerve fibers as well as automated segmentation of surrounding bone. By complementing synchrotron radiation imaging techniques, a broad range of biomedical applications becomes possible as demonstrated for optogenetic cochlear implant research.

  6. Projection phase contrast microscopy with a hard x-ray nanofocused beam: Defocus and contrast transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Salditt, T.; Giewekemeyer, K.; Fuhse, C.; Krueger, S. P.; Tucoulou, R.; Cloetens, P.

    2009-05-01

    We report a projection phase contrast microscopy experiment using hard x-ray pink beam undulator radiation focused by an adaptive mirror system to 100-200 nm spot size. This source is used to illuminate a lithographic test pattern with a well-controlled range of spatial frequencies. The oscillatory nature of the contrast transfer function with source-to-sample distance in this holographic imaging scheme is quantified and the validity of the weak phase object approximation is confirmed for the experimental conditions.

  7. Diffraction enhance x-ray imaging for quantitative phase contrast studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, A. K.; Singh, B.; Kashyap, Y. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sarkar, P. S.; Sinha, Amar

    2016-05-01

    Conventional X-ray imaging based on absorption contrast permits limited visibility of feature having small density and thickness variations. For imaging of weakly absorbing material or materials possessing similar densities, a novel phase contrast imaging techniques called diffraction enhanced imaging has been designed and developed at imaging beamline Indus-2 RRCAT Indore. The technique provides improved visibility of the interfaces and show high contrast in the image forsmall density or thickness gradients in the bulk. This paper presents basic principle, instrumentation and analysis methods for this technique. Initial results of quantitative phase retrieval carried out on various samples have also been presented.

  8. Small animal lung imaging with an in-line X-ray phase contrast benchtop system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garson, A. B.; Gunsten, S.; Guan, H.; Vasireddi, S.; Brody, S.; Anastasio, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present the results from a benchtop X-ray phase-contrast (XPC) method for lung imaging that represents a paradigm shift in the way small animal lung imaging is performed. In our method, information regarding airway microstructure that is encoded within speckle texture of a single XPC radiograph is decoded to spatially resolve changes in lung properties such as microstructure sizes, air volumes, and compliance, to name a few. Such functional information cannot be derived from conventional lung radiography or any other 2D imaging modality. By computing these images at different time points within a breathing cycle, dynamic functional imaging can be potentially achieved without the need for tomography.

  9. X-ray micro-beam techniques and phase contrast tomography applied to biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, Michela; Campi, Gaetano; Bukreeva, Inna; Pelliccia, Daniele; Burghammer, Manfred; Tromba, Giuliana; Cancedda, Ranieri; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena; Cedola, Alessia

    2015-12-01

    A deeper comprehension of the biomineralization (BM) process is at the basis of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine developments. Several in-vivo and in-vitro studies were dedicated to this purpose via the application of 2D and 3D diagnostic techniques. Here, we develop a new methodology, based on different complementary experimental techniques (X-ray phase contrast tomography, micro-X-ray diffraction and micro-X-ray fluorescence scanning technique) coupled to new analytical tools. A qualitative and quantitative structural investigation, from the atomic to the micrometric length scale, is obtained for engineered bone tissues. The high spatial resolution achieved by X-ray scanning techniques allows us to monitor the bone formation at the first-formed mineral deposit at the organic-mineral interface within a porous scaffold. This work aims at providing a full comprehension of the morphology and functionality of the biomineralization process, which is of key importance for developing new drugs for preventing and healing bone diseases and for the development of bio-inspired materials.

  10. Coded apertures allow high-energy x-ray phase contrast imaging with laboratory sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatyev, K.; Munro, P. R. T.; Chana, D.; Speller, R. D.; Olivo, A.

    2011-07-01

    This work analyzes the performance of the coded-aperture based x-ray phase contrast imaging approach, showing that it can be used at high x-ray energies with acceptable exposure times. Due to limitations in the used source, we show images acquired at tube voltages of up to 100 kVp, however, no intrinsic reason indicates that the method could not be extended to even higher energies. In particular, we show quantitative agreement between the contrast extracted from the experimental x-ray images and the theoretical one, determined by the behavior of the material's refractive index as a function of energy. This proves that all energies in the used spectrum contribute to the image formation, and also that there are no additional factors affecting image contrast as the x-ray energy is increased. We also discuss the method flexibility by displaying and analyzing the first set of images obtained while varying the relative displacement between coded-aperture sets, which leads to image variations to some extent similar to those observed when changing the crystal angle in analyzer-based imaging. Finally, we discuss the method's possible advantages in terms of simplification of the set-up, scalability, reduced exposure times, and complete achromaticity. We believe this would helpful in applications requiring the imaging of highly absorbing samples, e.g., material science and security inspection, and, in the way of example, we demonstrate a possible application in the latter.

  11. Analyzer-based phase-contrast imaging system using a micro focus x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Wei; Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-08-15

    Here we describe a new in-laboratory analyzer based phase contrast-imaging (ABI) instrument using a conventional X-ray tube source (CXS) aimed at bio-medical imaging applications. Phase contrast-imaging allows visualization of soft tissue details usually obscured in conventional X-ray imaging. The ABI system design and major features are described in detail. The key advantage of the presented system, over the few existing CXS ABI systems, is that it does not require high precision components, i.e., CXS, X-ray detector, and electro-mechanical components. To overcome a main problem introduced by these components, identified as temperature stability, the system components are kept at a constant temperature inside of three enclosures, thus minimizing the electrical and mechanical thermal drifts. This is achieved by using thermoelectric (Peltier) cooling/heating modules that are easy to control precisely. For CXS we utilized a microfocus X-ray source with tungsten (W) anode material. In addition the proposed system eliminates tungsten's multiple spectral lines by selecting monochromator crystal size appropriately therefore eliminating need for the costly mismatched, two-crystal monochromator. The system imaging was fine-tuned for tungsten Kα{sub 1} line with the energy of 59.3 keV since it has been shown to be of great clinical significance by a number of researchers at synchrotron facilities. In this way a laboratory system that can be used for evaluating and quantifying tissue properties, initially explored at synchrotron facilities, would be of great interest to a larger research community. To demonstrate the imaging capability of our instrument we use a chicken thigh tissue sample.

  12. Analyzer-based phase-contrast imaging system using a micro focus X-ray source.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G

    2014-08-01

    Here we describe a new in-laboratory analyzer based phase contrast-imaging (ABI) instrument using a conventional X-ray tube source (CXS) aimed at bio-medical imaging applications. Phase contrast-imaging allows visualization of soft tissue details usually obscured in conventional X-ray imaging. The ABI system design and major features are described in detail. The key advantage of the presented system, over the few existing CXS ABI systems, is that it does not require high precision components, i.e., CXS, X-ray detector, and electro-mechanical components. To overcome a main problem introduced by these components, identified as temperature stability, the system components are kept at a constant temperature inside of three enclosures, thus minimizing the electrical and mechanical thermal drifts. This is achieved by using thermoelectric (Peltier) cooling/heating modules that are easy to control precisely. For CXS we utilized a microfocus X-ray source with tungsten (W) anode material. In addition the proposed system eliminates tungsten's multiple spectral lines by selecting monochromator crystal size appropriately therefore eliminating need for the costly mismatched, two-crystal monochromator. The system imaging was fine-tuned for tungsten Kα1 line with the energy of 59.3 keV since it has been shown to be of great clinical significance by a number of researchers at synchrotron facilities. In this way a laboratory system that can be used for evaluating and quantifying tissue properties, initially explored at synchrotron facilities, would be of great interest to a larger research community. To demonstrate the imaging capability of our instrument we use a chicken thigh tissue sample. PMID:25173319

  13. Design and characterization of a phase contrast X-ray CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambelli, Joseph N.

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging has recently attracted wide research interest, as it offers the possibility to exploit different contrast mechanisms than conventional absorption imaging, with the potential for higher quality images or more available information as a result. This work details design and construction of au experimental grating-interferometer-based differential phase contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) imaging system, presents measurements of performance, and compares this new imaging technique with conventional absorption imaging. Details of the fabrication of the specialized x-ray phase and absorption gratings are also provided. This system is unique in that makes use of a conventional rotating-anode x-ray tube, unlike previous designs which were based upon stationary anode x-ray tubes or synchrotron sources. The imaging system described here enables simultaneous reconstruction of electron density, effective atomic number, attenuation coefficient, and small-angle scatter density with data acquired from a single scan. It is theoretically shown and experimentally verified that DPC-CT imaging allows imaging of electron density at high spatial resolution with a much less severe dose penalty compared with conventional absorption imaging. Improved object visibility using electron density imaging is demonstrated with CNR measurements in physical phantoms and comparisons of reconstructions of breast tissue samples. The ability to directly image both electron density and effective atomic number provides a truly quantitative imaging technique and accuracy of the technique is shown using phantoms and potential applications are demonstrated using breast tissue samples. A new reconstruction algorithm which allows a doubling of the diameter of the scanning field of view, a potential enabling technology for eventual clinical use, is also demonstrated.

  14. Quantitative and dynamic measurements of biological fresh samples with X-ray phase contrast tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Tsukube, Takuro; Yagi, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase contrast tomography using a Talbot grating interferometer was applied to biological fresh samples which were not fixed by any fixatives. To achieve a high-throughput measurement for the fresh samples the X-ray phase contrast tomography measurement procedure was improved. The three-dimensional structure of a fresh mouse fetus was clearly depicted as a mass density map using X-ray phase contrast tomography. The mouse fetus measured in the fresh state was then fixed by formalin and measured in the fixed state. The influence of the formalin fixation on soft tissue was quantitatively evaluated by comparing the fresh and fixed samples. X-ray phase contrast tomography was also applied to the dynamic measurement of a biological fresh sample. Morphological changes of a ring-shaped fresh pig aorta were measured tomographically under different degrees of stretching. PMID:25343804

  15. Speckle-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging with a laboratory source and the scanning technique.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tunhe; Zanette, Irene; Zdora, Marie-Christine; Lundström, Ulf; Larsson, Daniel H; Hertz, Hans M; Pfeiffer, Franz; Burvall, Anna

    2015-06-15

    The speckle-based scanning method for x-ray phase-contrast imaging is implemented with a liquid-metal-jet source. Using the two-dimensional scanning technique, the phase shift introduced by the object is retrieved in both transverse orientations, and the limitations on spatial resolution inherent to the speckle-tracking technique are avoided. This method opens up possibilities of new high-resolution multimodal applications for lab-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging. PMID:26076271

  16. Noise in x-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Thomas; Bartl, Peter; Bayer, Florian; Durst, Juergen; Haas, Wilhelm; Michel, Thilo; Ritter, Andre; Anton, Gisela

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging is a fast developing new modality not only for medical imaging, but as well for other fields such as material sciences. While these many possible applications arise, the knowledge of the noise behavior is essential. Methods: In this work, the authors used a least squares fitting algorithm to calculate the noise behavior of the three quantities absorption, differential phase, and dark-field image. Further, the calculated error formula of the differential phase image was verified by measurements. Therefore, a Talbot interferometer was setup, using a microfocus x-ray tube as source and a Timepix detector for photon counting. Additionally, simulations regarding this topic were performed. Results: It turned out that the variance of the reconstructed phase is only dependent of the total number of photons used to generate the phase image and the visibility of the experimental setup. These results could be evaluated in measurements as well as in simulations. Furthermore, the correlation between absorption and dark-field image was calculated. Conclusions: These results provide the understanding of the noise characteristics of grating-based phase-contrast imaging and will help to improve image quality.

  17. X-ray phase-contrast tomography for high-spatial-resolution zebrafish muscle imaging

    PubMed Central

    Vågberg, William; Larsson, Daniel H.; Li, Mei; Arner, Anders; Hertz, Hans M.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of muscular structure with cellular or subcellular detail in whole-body animal models is of key importance for understanding muscular disease and assessing interventions. Classical histological methods for high-resolution imaging methods require excision, fixation and staining. Here we show that the three-dimensional muscular structure of unstained whole zebrafish can be imaged with sub-5 μm detail with X-ray phase-contrast tomography. Our method relies on a laboratory propagation-based phase-contrast system tailored for detection of low-contrast 4–6 μm subcellular myofibrils. The method is demonstrated on 20 days post fertilization zebrafish larvae and comparative histology confirms that we resolve individual myofibrils in the whole-body animal. X-ray imaging of healthy zebrafish show the expected structured muscle pattern while specimen with a dystrophin deficiency (sapje) displays an unstructured pattern, typical of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The method opens up for whole-body imaging with sub-cellular detail also of other types of soft tissue and in different animal models. PMID:26564785

  18. X-ray phase-contrast tomography for high-spatial-resolution zebrafish muscle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vågberg, William; Larsson, Daniel H.; Li, Mei; Arner, Anders; Hertz, Hans M.

    2015-11-01

    Imaging of muscular structure with cellular or subcellular detail in whole-body animal models is of key importance for understanding muscular disease and assessing interventions. Classical histological methods for high-resolution imaging methods require excision, fixation and staining. Here we show that the three-dimensional muscular structure of unstained whole zebrafish can be imaged with sub-5 μm detail with X-ray phase-contrast tomography. Our method relies on a laboratory propagation-based phase-contrast system tailored for detection of low-contrast 4-6 μm subcellular myofibrils. The method is demonstrated on 20 days post fertilization zebrafish larvae and comparative histology confirms that we resolve individual myofibrils in the whole-body animal. X-ray imaging of healthy zebrafish show the expected structured muscle pattern while specimen with a dystrophin deficiency (sapje) displays an unstructured pattern, typical of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The method opens up for whole-body imaging with sub-cellular detail also of other types of soft tissue and in different animal models.

  19. Quantitative analysis of contrast to noise ratio using a phase contrast x-ray imaging prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, Muhammad U.; Wu, Di; Li, Yuhua; Kang, Minhua; Chen, Wei R.; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) of the x-ray images taken with the phase contrast imaging mode and compare them with the CNR of the images taken under the conventional mode. For each mode, three images were taken under three exposure conditions of 100 kVp (2.8mAs), 120 kVp (1.9mAs) and 140kVp (1.42mAs). A 1.61cm thick contrast detail phantom was used as an imaging object. For phase contrast, the source to image detector distance (SID) was 182.88 cm and the source to object (SOD) distance was 73.15 cm. The SOD was the same as SID in the conventional imaging mode. A computed radiography (CR) plate was used as a detector and the output CR images were converted to linear form in relation with the incident x-ray exposure. To calculate CNR, an image processing software was used to determine the mean pixel value and the standard deviation of the pixels in the region of interest (ROI) and in the nearby background around ROI. At any given exposure condition investigated in this study, the CNR values for the phase contrast images were better as compared to the corresponding conventional mode images. The superior image quality in terms of CNR is contributed by the phase-shifts resulted contrast, as well as the reduced scatters due to the air gap between the object and the detector.

  20. Differential X-ray phase-contrast imaging with a grating interferometer using a laboratory X-ray micro-focus tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Ryu, Jong Hyun; Jung, Chang Won; Ryu, Cheol Woo; Kim, Young Jo; Kwon, Young Man; Park, Miran; Cho, Seungryong; Chon, Kwon Su

    2014-12-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging can provide images with much greater soft-tissue contrast than conventional absorption-based images. In this paper, we describe differential X-ray phase-contrast images of insect specimens that were obtained using a grating-based Talbot interferometer and a laboratory X-ray source with a spot size of a few tens of micrometers. We developed the interferometer on the basis of the wavelength, periods, and height of the gratings; the field of view depends on the size of the grating, considering the refractive index of the specimen. The phase-contrast images were acquired using phase-stepping methods. The phase contrast imaging provided a significantly enhanced soft-tissue contrast compared with the attenuation data. The contour of the sample was clearly visible because the refraction from the edges of the object was strong in the differential phase-contrast image. Our results demonstrate that a grating-based Talbot interferometer with a conventional X-ray tube may be attractive as an X-ray imaging system for generating phase images. X-ray phase imaging obviously has sufficient potential and is expected to soon be a great tool for medical diagnostics.

  1. Helical X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography without phase stepping.

    PubMed

    Marschner, M; Willner, M; Potdevin, G; Fehringer, A; Noël, P B; Pfeiffer, F; Herzen, J

    2016-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) using grating interferometry provides enhanced soft-tissue contrast. The possibility to use standard polychromatic laboratory sources enables an implementation into a clinical setting. Thus, PCCT has gained significant attention in recent years. However, phase-contrast CT scans still require significantly increased measurement times in comparison to conventional attenuation-based CT imaging. This is mainly due to a time-consuming stepping of a grating, which is necessary for an accurate retrieval of the phase information. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel scan technique, which directly allows the determination of the phase signal without a phase-stepping procedure. The presented work is based on moiré fringe scanning, which allows fast data acquisition in radiographic applications such as mammography or in-line product analysis. Here, we demonstrate its extension to tomography enabling a continuous helical sample rotation as routinely performed in clinical CT systems. Compared to standard phase-stepping techniques, the proposed helical fringe-scanning procedure enables faster measurements, an extended field of view and relaxes the stability requirements of the system, since the gratings remain stationary. Finally, our approach exceeds previously introduced methods by not relying on spatial interpolation to acquire the phase-contrast signal. PMID:27052368

  2. Helical X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography without phase stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschner, M.; Willner, M.; Potdevin, G.; Fehringer, A.; Noël, P. B.; Pfeiffer, F.; Herzen, J.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) using grating interferometry provides enhanced soft-tissue contrast. The possibility to use standard polychromatic laboratory sources enables an implementation into a clinical setting. Thus, PCCT has gained significant attention in recent years. However, phase-contrast CT scans still require significantly increased measurement times in comparison to conventional attenuation-based CT imaging. This is mainly due to a time-consuming stepping of a grating, which is necessary for an accurate retrieval of the phase information. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel scan technique, which directly allows the determination of the phase signal without a phase-stepping procedure. The presented work is based on moiré fringe scanning, which allows fast data acquisition in radiographic applications such as mammography or in-line product analysis. Here, we demonstrate its extension to tomography enabling a continuous helical sample rotation as routinely performed in clinical CT systems. Compared to standard phase-stepping techniques, the proposed helical fringe-scanning procedure enables faster measurements, an extended field of view and relaxes the stability requirements of the system, since the gratings remain stationary. Finally, our approach exceeds previously introduced methods by not relying on spatial interpolation to acquire the phase-contrast signal.

  3. Experimental results from a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner

    PubMed Central

    Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Velroyen, Astrid; Meiser, Jan; Mohr, Jürgen; Walter, Marco; Schulz, Joachim; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Liu, Xuan; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-01-01

    To explore the future clinical potential of improved soft-tissue visibility with grating-based X-ray phase contrast (PC), we have developed a first preclinical computed tomography (CT) scanner featuring a rotating gantry. The main challenge in the transition from previous bench-top systems to a preclinical scanner are phase artifacts that are caused by minimal changes in the grating alignment during gantry rotation. In this paper, we present the first experimental results from the system together with an adaptive phase recovery method that corrects for these phase artifacts. Using this method, we show that the scanner can recover quantitatively accurate Hounsfield units in attenuation and phase. Moreover, we present a first tomography scan of biological tissue with complementary information in attenuation and phase contrast. The present study hence demonstrates the feasibility of grating-based phase contrast with a rotating gantry for the first time and paves the way for future in vivo studies on small animal disease models (in the mid-term future) and human diagnostics applications (in the long-term future). PMID:23019354

  4. Helical X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography without phase stepping

    PubMed Central

    Marschner, M.; Willner, M.; Potdevin, G.; Fehringer, A.; Noël, P. B.; Pfeiffer, F.; Herzen, J.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) using grating interferometry provides enhanced soft-tissue contrast. The possibility to use standard polychromatic laboratory sources enables an implementation into a clinical setting. Thus, PCCT has gained significant attention in recent years. However, phase-contrast CT scans still require significantly increased measurement times in comparison to conventional attenuation-based CT imaging. This is mainly due to a time-consuming stepping of a grating, which is necessary for an accurate retrieval of the phase information. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel scan technique, which directly allows the determination of the phase signal without a phase-stepping procedure. The presented work is based on moiré fringe scanning, which allows fast data acquisition in radiographic applications such as mammography or in-line product analysis. Here, we demonstrate its extension to tomography enabling a continuous helical sample rotation as routinely performed in clinical CT systems. Compared to standard phase-stepping techniques, the proposed helical fringe-scanning procedure enables faster measurements, an extended field of view and relaxes the stability requirements of the system, since the gratings remain stationary. Finally, our approach exceeds previously introduced methods by not relying on spatial interpolation to acquire the phase-contrast signal. PMID:27052368

  5. Differential phase contrast with a segmented detector in a scanning X-ray microprobe

    PubMed Central

    Hornberger, B.; de Jonge, M. D.; Feser, M.; Holl, P.; Holzner, C.; Jacobsen, C.; Legnini, D.; Paterson, D.; Rehak, P.; Strüder, L.; Vogt, S.

    2008-01-01

    Scanning X-ray microprobes are unique tools for the nanoscale investigation of specimens from the life, environmental, materials and other fields of sciences. Typically they utilize absorption and fluorescence as contrast mechanisms. Phase contrast is a complementary technique that can provide strong contrast with reduced radiation dose for weakly absorbing structures in the multi-keV range. In this paper the development of a segmented charge-integrating silicon detector which provides simultaneous absorption and differential phase contrast is reported. The detector can be used together with a fluorescence detector for the simultaneous acquisition of transmission and fluorescence data. It can be used over a wide range of photon energies, photon rates and exposure times at third-generation synchrotron radiation sources, and is currently operating at two beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source. Images obtained at around 2 keV and 10 keV demonstrate the superiority of phase contrast over absorption for specimens composed of light elements. PMID:18552427

  6. X-ray phase contrast imaging of calcified tissue and biomaterial structure in bioreactor engineered tissues.

    PubMed

    Appel, Alyssa A; Larson, Jeffery C; Garson, Alfred B; Guan, Huifeng; Zhong, Zhong; Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc B; Fisher, John P; Anastasio, Mark A; Brey, Eric M

    2015-03-01

    Tissues engineered in bioreactor systems have been used clinically to replace damaged tissues and organs. In addition, these systems are under continued development for many tissue engineering applications. The ability to quantitatively assess material structure and tissue formation is critical for evaluating bioreactor efficacy and for preimplantation assessment of tissue quality. Techniques that allow for the nondestructive and longitudinal monitoring of large engineered tissues within the bioreactor systems will be essential for the translation of these strategies to viable clinical therapies. X-ray Phase Contrast (XPC) imaging techniques have shown tremendous promise for a number of biomedical applications owing to their ability to provide image contrast based on multiple X-ray properties, including absorption, refraction, and scatter. In this research, mesenchymal stem cell-seeded alginate hydrogels were prepared and cultured under osteogenic conditions in a perfusion bioreactor. The constructs were imaged at various time points using XPC microcomputed tomography (µCT). Imaging was performed with systems using both synchrotron- and tube-based X-ray sources. XPC µCT allowed for simultaneous three-dimensional (3D) quantification of hydrogel size and mineralization, as well as spatial information on hydrogel structure and mineralization. Samples were processed for histological evaluation and XPC showed similar features to histology and quantitative analysis consistent with the histomorphometry. These results provide evidence of the significant potential of techniques based on XPC for noninvasive 3D imaging engineered tissues grown in bioreactors. PMID:25257802

  7. X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging of Calcified Tissue and Biomaterial Structure in Bioreactor Engineered Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Alyssa A.; Larson, Jeffery C.; Garson, III, Alfred B.; Guan, Huifeng; Zhong, Zhong; Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc; Fisher, John P.; Anastasio, Mark A.; Brey, Eric M.

    2014-11-04

    Tissues engineered in bioreactor systems have been used clinically to replace damaged tissues and organs. In addition, these systems are under continued development for many tissue engineering applications. The ability to quantitatively assess material structure and tissue formation is critical for evaluating bioreactor efficacy and for preimplantation assessment of tissue quality. These techniques allow for the nondestructive and longitudinal monitoring of large engineered tissues within the bioreactor systems and will be essential for the translation of these strategies to viable clinical therapies. X-ray Phase Contrast (XPC) imaging techniques have shown tremendous promise for a number of biomedical applications owing to their ability to provide image contrast based on multiple X-ray properties, including absorption, refraction, and scatter. In this research, mesenchymal stem cell-seeded alginate hydrogels were prepared and cultured under osteogenic conditions in a perfusion bioreactor. The constructs were imaged at various time points using XPC microcomputed tomography (µCT). Imaging was performed with systems using both synchrotron- and tube-based X-ray sources. XPC µCT allowed for simultaneous three-dimensional (3D) quantification of hydrogel size and mineralization, as well as spatial information on hydrogel structure and mineralization. Samples were processed for histological evaluation and XPC showed similar features to histology and quantitative analysis consistent with the histomorphometry. Furthermore, these results provide evidence of the significant potential of techniques based on XPC for noninvasive 3D imaging engineered tissues grown in bioreactors.

  8. Low-dose phase contrast tomography with conventional x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, C. K. Endrizzi, M.; Diemoz, P. C.; Olivo, A.; Munro, P. R. T.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) method has been recently further developed to perform tomographic and, thus, volumetric imaging. In this paper, the first tomographic EI XPCi images acquired with a conventional x-ray source at dose levels below that used for preclinical small animal imaging are presented. Methods: Two test objects, a biological sample and a custom-built phantom, were imaged with a laboratory-based EI XPCi setup in tomography mode. Tomographic maps that show the phase shift and attenuating properties of the object were reconstructed, and analyzed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and quantitative accuracy. Dose measurements using thermoluminescence devices were performed. Results: The obtained images demonstrate that phase based imaging methods can provide superior results compared to attenuation based modalities for weakly attenuating samples also in 3D. Moreover, and, most importantly, they demonstrate the feasibility of low-dose imaging. In addition, the experimental results can be considered quantitative within the constraints imposed by polychromaticity. Conclusions: The results, together with the method's dose efficiency and compatibility with conventional x-ray sources, indicate that tomographic EI XPCi can become an important tool for the routine imaging of biomedical samples.

  9. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Sarapata, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. Methods: DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Results: Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. Conclusions: DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as

  10. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers

    PubMed Central

    Sarapata, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Finkenthal, M.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Pfeiffer, F.; Stutman, D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. Methods: DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Results: Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. Conclusions: DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as

  11. Revealing letters in rolled Herculaneum papyri by X-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Mocella, Vito; Brun, Emmanuel; Ferrero, Claudio; Delattre, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Hundreds of papyrus rolls, buried by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD and belonging to the only library passed on from Antiquity, were discovered 260 years ago at Herculaneum. These carbonized papyri are extremely fragile and are inevitably damaged or destroyed in the process of trying to open them to read their contents. In recent years, new imaging techniques have been developed to read the texts without unwrapping the rolls. Until now, specialists have been unable to view the carbon-based ink of these papyri, even when they could penetrate the different layers of their spiral structure. Here for the first time, we show that X-ray phase-contrast tomography can reveal various letters hidden inside the precious papyri without unrolling them. This attempt opens up new opportunities to read many Herculaneum papyri, which are still rolled up, thus enhancing our knowledge of ancient Greek literature and philosophy. PMID:25603114

  12. Revealing letters in rolled Herculaneum papyri by X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocella, Vito; Brun, Emmanuel; Ferrero, Claudio; Delattre, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Hundreds of papyrus rolls, buried by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD and belonging to the only library passed on from Antiquity, were discovered 260 years ago at Herculaneum. These carbonized papyri are extremely fragile and are inevitably damaged or destroyed in the process of trying to open them to read their contents. In recent years, new imaging techniques have been developed to read the texts without unwrapping the rolls. Until now, specialists have been unable to view the carbon-based ink of these papyri, even when they could penetrate the different layers of their spiral structure. Here for the first time, we show that X-ray phase-contrast tomography can reveal various letters hidden inside the precious papyri without unrolling them. This attempt opens up new opportunities to read many Herculaneum papyri, which are still rolled up, thus enhancing our knowledge of ancient Greek literature and philosophy.

  13. Big-data x-ray phase contrast imaging simulation challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Edward S.; Dagel, Amber L.

    2015-08-01

    This position paper describes a potential implementation of a large-scale grating-based X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging System (XPCI) simulation tool along with the associated challenges in its implementation. This work proposes an implementation based off of an implementation by Peterzol et. al. where each grating is treated as an object imaged in the field-of-view. Two main challenges exist; the first, is the required sampling and information management in object space due to the micron-scale periods of each grating propagating over significant distances. The second is maintaining algorithmic numerical stability for imaging systems relevant to industrial applications. We present preliminary results for a numerical stability study using a simplified algorithm that performs Talbot imaging in a big-data context

  14. Virtual unrolling and deciphering of Herculaneum papyri by X-ray phase-contrast tomography.

    PubMed

    Bukreeva, I; Mittone, A; Bravin, A; Festa, G; Alessandrelli, M; Coan, P; Formoso, V; Agostino, R G; Giocondo, M; Ciuchi, F; Fratini, M; Massimi, L; Lamarra, A; Andreani, C; Bartolino, R; Gigli, G; Ranocchia, G; Cedola, A

    2016-01-01

    A collection of more than 1800 carbonized papyri, discovered in the Roman 'Villa dei Papiri' at Herculaneum is the unique classical library survived from antiquity. These papyri were charred during 79 A.D. Vesuvius eruption, a circumstance which providentially preserved them until now. This magnificent collection contains an impressive amount of treatises by Greek philosophers and, especially, Philodemus of Gadara, an Epicurean thinker of 1st century BC. We read many portions of text hidden inside carbonized Herculaneum papyri using enhanced X-ray phase-contrast tomography non-destructive technique and a new set of numerical algorithms for 'virtual-unrolling'. Our success lies in revealing the largest portion of Greek text ever detected so far inside unopened scrolls, with unprecedented spatial resolution and contrast, all without damaging these precious historical manuscripts. Parts of text have been decoded and the 'voice' of the Epicurean philosopher Philodemus is brought back again after 2000 years from Herculaneum papyri. PMID:27265417

  15. Image reconstruction exploiting object sparsity in boundary-enhanced X-ray phase-contrast tomography.

    PubMed

    Sidky, Emil Y; Anastasio, Mark A; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2010-05-10

    Propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast tomography (PCT) seeks to reconstruct information regarding the complex-valued refractive index distribution of an object. In many applications, a boundary-enhanced image is sought that reveals the locations of discontinuities in the real-valued component of the refractive index distribution. We investigate two iterative algorithms for few-view image reconstruction in boundary-enhanced PCT that exploit the fact that a boundary-enhanced PCT image, or its gradient, is often sparse. In order to exploit object sparseness, the reconstruction algorithms seek to minimize the l(1)-norm or TV-norm of the image, subject to data consistency constraints. We demonstrate that the algorithms can reconstruct accurate boundary-enhanced images from highly incomplete few-view projection data. PMID:20588896

  16. Phase Contrast X-Ray Synchrotron Microtomography for Virtual Dissection of the Head of Rhodnius prolixus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sena, G.; Almeida, A. P.; Braz, D.; Nogueira, L. P.; Colaço, M. V.; Soares, J.; Cardoso, S. C.; Garcia, E. S.; Azambuja, P.; Gonzalez, M. S.; Mohammadi, S.; Tromba, G.; Barroso, R. C.

    2014-04-01

    Phase Contrast X-Ray Synchroton Microtomography is a non-destructive technique that allows the microanatomical investigations of Rhodnius prolixus, one of the most important insect vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi. In this work complete series of virtual thin sections through the heads of selected Rhodnius prolixus were obtained. The sections of the head were important to compare the difference in use the spatial resolution of 2 μm or 4.5 μm and to see anatomical details that couldn't be seen with other technique. Three different groups of Rhodnius prolixus were used. One group was fed with defibrinated rabbit blood and after 10 days was sacrificed, other group was sacrificed 4 days after feeding and the last group remained unfed. The results show some differences for each kind of groups and for the different resolutions.

  17. High sensitivity phase retrieval method in grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zhao; Gao, Kun; Chen, Jian; Wang, Dajiang; Wang, Shenghao; Chen, Heng; Bao, Yuan; Shao, Qigang; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Peiping; Wu, Ziyu

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging is considered as one of the most promising techniques for future medical imaging. Many different methods have been developed to retrieve phase signal, among which the phase stepping (PS) method is widely used. However, further practical implementations are hindered, due to its complex scanning mode and high radiation dose. In contrast, the reverse projection (RP) method is a novel fast and low dose extraction approach. In this contribution, the authors present a quantitative analysis of the noise properties of the refraction signals retrieved by the two methods and compare their sensitivities. Methods: Using the error propagation formula, the authors analyze theoretically the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the refraction images retrieved by the two methods. Then, the sensitivities of the two extraction methods are compared under an identical exposure dose. Numerical experiments are performed to validate the theoretical results and provide some quantitative insight. Results: The SNRs of the two methods are both dependent on the system parameters, but in different ways. Comparison between their sensitivities reveals that for the refraction signal, the RP method possesses a higher sensitivity, especially in the case of high visibility and/or at the edge of the object. Conclusions: Compared with the PS method, the RP method has a superior sensitivity and provides refraction images with a higher SNR. Therefore, one can obtain highly sensitive refraction images in grating-based phase contrast imaging. This is very important for future preclinical and clinical implementations.

  18. Statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm for X-ray phase-contrast CT

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Dieter; Thibault, Pierre; Fehringer, Andreas; Bech, Martin; Koehler, Thomas; Pfeiffer, Franz; Noël, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) is a promising imaging tool on the horizon for pre-clinical and clinical applications. Until now PCCT has been plagued by strong artifacts when dense materials like bones are present. In this paper, we present a new statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm which overcomes this limitation. It makes use of the fact that an X-ray interferometer provides a conventional absorption as well as a dark-field signal in addition to the phase-contrast signal. The method is based on a statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm utilizing maximum-a-posteriori principles and integrating the statistical properties of the raw data as well as information of dense objects gained from the absorption signal. Reconstruction of a pre-clinical mouse scan illustrates that artifacts caused by bones are significantly reduced and image quality is improved when employing our approach. Especially small structures, which are usually lost because of streaks, are recovered in our results. In comparison with the current state-of-the-art algorithms our approach provides significantly improved image quality with respect to quantitative and qualitative results. In summary, we expect that our new statistical iterative reconstruction method to increase the general usability of PCCT imaging for medical diagnosis apart from applications focused solely on soft tissue visualization. PMID:26067714

  19. Quantitative hard x-ray phase contrast imaging of micropipes in SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, V. G.; Argunova, T. S.; Je, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    Peculiarities of quantitative hard x-ray phase contrast imaging of micropipes in SiC are discussed. The micropipe is assumed as a hollow cylinder with an elliptical cross section. The major and minor diameters can be restored using the least square fitting procedure by comparing the experimental data, i.e. the profile across the micropipe axis, with those calculated based on phase contrast theory. It is shown that one projection image gives an information which does not allow a complete determination of the elliptical cross section, if an orientation of micropipe is not known. Another problem is a weak accuracy in estimating the diameters, partly because of using pink synchrotron radiation, which is necessary because a monochromatic beam intensity is not sufficient to reveal the weak contrast from a very small object. The general problems of accuracy in estimating the two diameters using the least square procedure are discussed. Two experimental examples are considered to demonstrate small as well as modest accuracies in estimating the diameters.

  20. Quantitative hard x-ray phase contrast imaging of micropipes in SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, V. G.; Argunova, T. S.; Je, J. H.

    2013-12-15

    Peculiarities of quantitative hard x-ray phase contrast imaging of micropipes in SiC are discussed. The micropipe is assumed as a hollow cylinder with an elliptical cross section. The major and minor diameters can be restored using the least square fitting procedure by comparing the experimental data, i.e. the profile across the micropipe axis, with those calculated based on phase contrast theory. It is shown that one projection image gives an information which does not allow a complete determination of the elliptical cross section, if an orientation of micropipe is not known. Another problem is a weak accuracy in estimating the diameters, partly because of using pink synchrotron radiation, which is necessary because a monochromatic beam intensity is not sufficient to reveal the weak contrast from a very small object. The general problems of accuracy in estimating the two diameters using the least square procedure are discussed. Two experimental examples are considered to demonstrate small as well as modest accuracies in estimating the diameters.

  1. X-ray phase contrast with injected gas for tumor microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundström, U.; Westermark, U. K.; Larsson, D. H.; Burvall, A.; Arsenian Henriksson, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2014-06-01

    We show that the microvasculature of mouse tumors can be visualized using propagation-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging with gas as the contrast agent. The large density difference over the gas-tissue interface provides high contrast, allowing the imaging of small-diameter blood vessels with relatively short exposure times and low dose using a compact liquid-metal-jet x-ray source. The method investigated is applied to tumors (E1A/Ras-transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts) grown in mouse ears, demonstrating sub-15-µm-diameter imaging of their blood vessels. The exposure time for a 2D projection image is a few seconds and a full tomographic 3D map takes some minutes. The method relies on the strength of the vasculature to withstand the gas pressure. Given that tumor vessels are known to be more fragile than normal vessels, we investigate the tolerance of the vasculature of 12 tumors to gas injection and find that a majority withstand 200 mbar pressures, enough to fill 12-µm-diameter vessels with gas. A comparison of the elasticity of tumorous and non-tumorous vessels supports the assumption of tumor vessels being more fragile. Finally, we conclude that the method has the potential to be extended to the imaging of 15 µm vessels in thick tissue, including mouse imaging, making it of interest for, e.g., angiogenesis research.

  2. X-ray phase contrast with injected gas for tumor microangiography.

    PubMed

    Lundström, U; Westermark, U K; Larsson, D H; Burvall, A; Arsenian Henriksson, M; Hertz, H M

    2014-06-01

    We show that the microvasculature of mouse tumors can be visualized using propagation-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging with gas as the contrast agent. The large density difference over the gas-tissue interface provides high contrast, allowing the imaging of small-diameter blood vessels with relatively short exposure times and low dose using a compact liquid-metal-jet x-ray source. The method investigated is applied to tumors (E1A/Ras-transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts) grown in mouse ears, demonstrating sub-15-µm-diameter imaging of their blood vessels. The exposure time for a 2D projection image is a few seconds and a full tomographic 3D map takes some minutes. The method relies on the strength of the vasculature to withstand the gas pressure. Given that tumor vessels are known to be more fragile than normal vessels, we investigate the tolerance of the vasculature of 12 tumors to gas injection and find that a majority withstand 200 mbar pressures, enough to fill 12-µm-diameter vessels with gas. A comparison of the elasticity of tumorous and non-tumorous vessels supports the assumption of tumor vessels being more fragile. Finally, we conclude that the method has the potential to be extended to the imaging of 15 µm vessels in thick tissue, including mouse imaging, making it of interest for, e.g., angiogenesis research. PMID:24801363

  3. Towards x-ray differential phase contrast imaging on a compact setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thüring, T.; Modregger, P.; Pinzer, B. R.; Wang, Z.; Rutishauser, S.; David, C.; Grund, T.; Kenntner, J.; Stampanoni, M.

    2011-03-01

    A new imaging setup, aimed to perform differential X-ray phase contrast (DPC) imaging with a Talbot interferometer on a microfocus X-ray tube, is demonstrated. The main features compared to recently proposed setups are an extremely short source to detector distance, high spatial resolution and a large field of view. The setup is designed for an immediate integration into a industrial micro CT scanner. In this paper, technical challenges of a compact setup, namely the critical source coherence and divergence, are discussed. A theoretical analysis using wave optics based computer simulations is performed to estimate the DPC signal visibility and the size of the field of view for a given setup geometry. The maximization of the signal visibility as a function of the inter-grating distance yields the optimal grating parameters. Imaging results using the optimized grating parameters are presented. The reduction of the field of view, being a consequence of the high beam divergence, was solved by fabricating new, cylindrically bent diffraction gratings. The fabrication process of these gratings required a change of the currently used wafer materials and an adaption of the manufacturing techniques. The implementation of the new setup represents a major step forward for the industrial application of the DPC technique.

  4. X-ray Phase Contrast Allows Three Dimensional, Quantitative Imaging of Hydrogel Implants.

    PubMed

    Appel, Alyssa A; Larson, Jeffery C; Jiang, Bin; Zhong, Zhong; Anastasio, Mark A; Brey, Eric M

    2016-03-01

    Three dimensional imaging techniques are needed for the evaluation and assessment of biomaterials used for tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. Hydrogels are a particularly popular class of materials for medical applications but are difficult to image in tissue using most available imaging modalities. Imaging techniques based on X-ray Phase Contrast (XPC) have shown promise for tissue engineering applications due to their ability to provide image contrast based on multiple X-ray properties. In this manuscript, we investigate the use of XPC for imaging a model hydrogel and soft tissue structure. Porous fibrin loaded poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels were synthesized and implanted in a rodent subcutaneous model. Samples were explanted and imaged with an analyzer-based XPC technique and processed and stained for histology for comparison. Both hydrogel and soft tissues structures could be identified in XPC images. Structure in skeletal muscle adjacent could be visualized and invading fibrovascular tissue could be quantified. There were no differences between invading tissue measurements from XPC and the gold-standard histology. These results provide evidence of the significant potential of techniques based on XPC for 3D imaging of hydrogel structure and local tissue response. PMID:26487123

  5. Quantitative X-ray phase contrast waveguide imaging of bacterial endospores1

    PubMed Central

    Wilke, R. N.; Hoppert, M.; Krenkel, M.; Bartels, M.; Salditt, T.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative waveguide-based X-ray phase contrast imaging has been carried out on the level of single, unstained, unsliced and freeze-dried bacterial cells of Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus subtilis using hard X-rays of 7.9 keV photon energy. The cells have been prepared in the metabolically dormant state of an endospore. The quantitative phase maps obtained by iterative phase retrieval using a modified hybrid input–output algorithm allow for mass and mass density determinations on the level of single individual endospores but include also large field of view investigations. Additionally, a direct reconstruction based on the contrast transfer function is investigated, and the two approaches are compared. Depending on the field of view and method, a resolution down to 65 nm was achieved at a maximum applied dose of below 5 × 105 Gy. Masses in the range of about ∼110–190 (20) fg for isolated endospores have been obtained. PMID:25844079

  6. X-ray differential phase-contrast tomographic reconstruction with a phase line integral retrieval filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jian; Hu, Xinhua; Li, Chen

    2015-04-01

    We report an alternative reconstruction technique for x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT). This approach is based on a new phase line integral projection retrieval filter, which is rooted in the derivative property of the Fourier transform and counteracts the differential nature of the DPC-CT projections. It first retrieves the phase line integral from the DPC-CT projections. Then the standard filtered back-projection (FBP) algorithms popular in x-ray absorption-contrast CT are directly applied to the retrieved phase line integrals to reconstruct the DPC-CT images. Compared with the conventional DPC-CT reconstruction algorithms, the proposed method removes the Hilbert imaginary filter and allows for the direct use of absorption-contrast FBP algorithms. Consequently, FBP-oriented image processing techniques and reconstruction acceleration softwares that have already been successfully used in absorption-contrast CT can be directly adopted to improve the DPC-CT image quality and speed up the reconstruction.

  7. Interior tomography in x-ray differential phase contrast CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thériault Lauzier, Pascal; Qi, Zhihua; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2012-05-01

    Differential phase contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) is an x-ray imaging method that uses the wave properties of imaging photons as the contrast mechanism. It has been demonstrated that DPC images can be obtained using a conventional x-ray tube and a Talbot-Lau-type interferometer. Due to the limited size of the gratings, current data acquisition systems only offer a limited field of view, and thus are prone to data truncation. As a result, the reconstructed DPC-CT image may suffer from image artifacts and increased inaccuracy in the reconstructed image values. In this paper, we demonstrate that a small region of interest (ROI) within a large object can be accurately and stably reconstructed using fully truncated projection datasets provided that a priori information on electron density is known for a small region inside the ROI. The method reconstructs an image iteratively to satisfy a group of physical conditions by using a projection onto convex set (POCS) approach. In this work, this POCS algorithm is validated using both numerical simulations and physical phantom experimental data. In both cases, the root mean square error is reduced by an order of magnitude with respect to the truncated analytic reconstructions. Truncation artifacts observed in the latter reconstructions are eliminated using the POCS algorithm.

  8. Noise texture and signal detectability in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: X-ray phase-contrast tomography (PCT) is a rapidly emerging imaging modality for reconstructing estimates of an object's three-dimensional x-ray refractive index distribution. Unlike conventional x-ray computed tomography methods, the statistical properties of the reconstructed images in PCT remain unexplored. The purpose of this work is to quantitatively investigate noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. Methods: The authors derived explicit expressions for the autocovariance of the reconstructed absorption and refractive index images to characterize noise texture and understand how the noise properties are influenced by the imaging geometry. Concepts from statistical detection theory were employed to understand how the imaging geometry-dependent statistical properties affect the signal detection performance in a signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly task. Results: The analytical formulas for the phase and absorption autocovariance functions were implemented numerically and compared to the corresponding empirical values, and excellent agreement was found. They observed that the reconstructed refractive images are highly spatially correlated, while the absorption images are not. The numerical results confirm that the strength of the covariance is scaled by the detector spacing. Signal detection studies were conducted, employing a numerical observer. The detection performance was found to monotonically increase as the detector-plane spacing was increased. Conclusions: The authors have conducted the first quantitative investigation of noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. The reconstructed refractive images were found to be highly spatially correlated, while absorption images were not. This is due to the presence of a Fourier space singularity in the reconstruction formula for the refraction images. The statistical analysis may facilitate the use of task-based image quality measures to further develop and optimize this emerging

  9. Combined mixed approach algorithm for in-line phase-contrast x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    De Caro, Liberato; Scattarella, Francesco; Giannini, Cinzia; Tangaro, Sabina; Rigon, Luigi; Longo, Renata; Bellotti, Roberto

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: In the past decade, phase-contrast imaging (PCI) has been applied to study different kinds of tissues and human body parts, with an increased improvement of the image quality with respect to simple absorption radiography. A technique closely related to PCI is phase-retrieval imaging (PRI). Indeed, PCI is an imaging modality thought to enhance the total contrast of the images through the phase shift introduced by the object (human body part); PRI is a mathematical technique to extract the quantitative phase-shift map from PCI. A new phase-retrieval algorithm for the in-line phase-contrast x-ray imaging is here proposed. Methods: The proposed algorithm is based on a mixed transfer-function and transport-of-intensity approach (MA) and it requires, at most, an initial approximate estimate of the average phase shift introduced by the object as prior knowledge. The accuracy in the initial estimate determines the convergence speed of the algorithm. The proposed algorithm retrieves both the object phase and its complex conjugate in a combined MA (CMA). Results: Although slightly less computationally effective with respect to other mixed-approach algorithms, as two phases have to be retrieved, the results obtained by the CMA on simulated data have shown that the obtained reconstructed phase maps are characterized by particularly low normalized mean square errors. The authors have also tested the CMA on noisy experimental phase-contrast data obtained by a suitable weakly absorbing sample consisting of a grid of submillimetric nylon fibers as well as on a strongly absorbing object made of a 0.03 mm thick lead x-ray resolution star pattern. The CMA has shown a good efficiency in recovering phase information, also in presence of noisy data, characterized by peak-to-peak signal-to-noise ratios down to a few dBs, showing the possibility to enhance with phase radiography the signal-to-noise ratio for features in the submillimetric scale with respect to the attenuation

  10. Fast X-ray micro-CT for real-time 4D observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, H.; Yoshida, K.; Tsuji, T.; Koyama, T.; Tsusaka, Y.; Kagoshima, Y.

    2009-09-01

    Fast X-ray computed tomography (CT) system with sub-second order measurement for single CT acquisition has been developed. The system, consisting of a high-speed sample rotation stage and a high-speed X-ray camera, is constructed at synchrotron radiation beamline in order to utilize fully intense X-rays. A time-resolving CT movie (i.e. 4D CT) can be available by operating the fast CT system continuously. Real-time observation of water absorbing process of super-absorbent polymer (SAP) has been successfully performed with the 4D CT operation.

  11. Optimization of in-line phase contrast particle image velocimetry using a laboratory x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, I.; Fouras, A.; Paganin, D. M.

    2012-10-01

    Phase contrast particle image velocimetry (PIV) using a laboratory x-ray microfocus source is investigated using a numerical model. Phase contrast images of 75 {mu}m air bubbles, embedded within water exhibiting steady-state vortical flow, are generated under the paraxial approximation using a tungsten x-ray spectrum at 30 kVp. Propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast speckle images at a range of source-object and object-detector distances are generated, and used as input into a simulated PIV measurement. The effects of source-size-induced penumbral blurring, together with the finite dynamic range of the detector, are accounted for in the simulation. The PIV measurement procedure involves using the cross-correlation between temporally sequential speckle images to estimate the transverse displacement field for the fluid. The global error in the PIV reconstruction, for the set of simulations that was performed, suggests that geometric magnification is the key parameter for designing a laboratory-based x-ray phase-contrast PIV system. For the modeled system, x-ray phase-contrast PIV data measurement can be optimized to obtain low error (<0.2 effective pixel of the detector) in the system with magnification lying in the range between 1.5 and 3. For large effective pixel size (>15 {mu}m) of the detector, high geometric magnification (>2.5) is desired, while for large source size system (FWHM > 30 {mu}m), low magnification (<1.5) would be suggested instead. The methods developed in this paper can be applied to optimizing phase-contrast velocimetry using a variety of laboratory x-ray sources.

  12. Milestones and basic principles of grating-based x-ray and neutron phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-31

    This is a review of the most important milestones in the last ten years of development in the field of grating-based x-ray and neutron imaging. It provides a description of the basic imaging principles of grating-based phase-contrast and dark-field radiography and present some exemplary multimodal radiography results obtained with x-rays and neutrons. Furthermore, it reviews the theory of grating-based quantitative transmission, phase-contrast, and dark-field scattering computed tomography.

  13. Small-animal microangiography using phase-contrast X-ray imaging and gas as contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundström, Ulf; Larsson, Daniel H.; Westermark, Ulrica K.; Burvall, Anna; Hertz, Hans M.

    2014-03-01

    We use propagation-based phase-contrast X-ray imaging with gas as contrast agent to visualize the microvasculature in small animals like mice and rats. The radiation dose required for absorption X-ray imaging is proportional to the minus fourth power of the structure size to be detected. This makes small vessels impossible to image at reasonable radiation doses using the absorption of conventional iodinated contrast agents. Propagation-based phase contrast gives enhanced contrast for high spatial frequencies by moving the detector away from the sample to let phase variations in the transmitted X-rays develop into intensity variations at the detector. Blood vessels are normally difficult to observe in phase contrast even with iodinated contrast agents as the density difference between blood and most tissues is relatively small. By injecting gas into the blood stream this density difference can be greatly enhanced giving strong phase contrast. One possible gas to use is carbon dioxide, which is a clinically accepted X-ray contrast agent. The gas is injected into the blood stream of patients to temporarily displace the blood in a region and thereby reduce the X-ray absorption in the blood vessels. We have shown that this method can be used to image blood vessels down to 8 μm in diameter in mouse ears. The low dose requirements of this method indicate a potential for live small-animal imaging and longitudinal studies of angiogenesis.

  14. Talbot phase-contrast x-ray imaging for the small joints of the hand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutman, Dan; Beck, Thomas J.; Carrino, John A.; Bingham, Clifton O.

    2011-09-01

    A high-resolution radiographic method for soft tissues in the small joints of the hand would aid in the study and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA), which often attacks these joints. Of particular interest would be imaging with <100 µm resolution the joint cartilage, whose integrity is a main indicator of disease. Differential phase-contrast (DPC) or refraction-based x-ray imaging with Talbot grating interferometers could provide such a method, since it enhances soft tissue contrast and can be implemented with conventional x-ray tubes. A numerical joint phantom was first developed to assess the angular sensitivity and spectrum needed for a hand DPC system. The model predicts that, due to quite similar refraction indexes for joint soft tissues, the refraction effects are very small, requiring high angular resolution. To compare our model to experiment we built a high-resolution bench-top interferometer using 10 µm period gratings, a W anode tube and a CCD-based detector. Imaging experiments on animal cartilage and on a human finger support the model predictions. For instance, the estimated difference between the index of refraction of cartilage and water is of only several percent at ~25 keV mean energy, comparable to that between the linear attenuation coefficients. The potential advantage of DPC imaging thus comes mainly from the edge enhancement at the soft tissue interfaces. Experiments using a cadaveric human finger are also qualitatively consistent with the joint model, showing that refraction contrast is dominated by tendon embedded in muscle, with the cartilage layer difficult to observe in our conditions. Nevertheless, the model predicts that a DPC radiographic system for the small hand joints of the hand could be feasible using a low energy quasi-monochromatic source, such as a K-edge filtered Rh or Mo tube, in conjunction with a ~2 m long 'symmetric' interferometer operated in a high Talbot order.

  15. Investigating biofilm structure using x-ray microtomography and gratings-based phase contrast

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Erin A.; Xiao, Xianghui; Miller, Micah D.; Keller, Paul E.; White, Timothy A.; Marshall, Matthew J.

    2012-10-17

    Direct examination of natural and engineered environments has revealed that the majority of microorganisms in these systems live in structured communities termed biofilms. To gain a better understanding for how biofilms function and interact with their local environment, fundamental capabilities for enhanced visualization, compositional analysis, and functional characterization of biofilms are needed. For pore-scale and community-scale analysis (100’s of nm to 10’s of microns), a variety of surface tools are available. However, understanding biofilm structure in complex three-dimensional (3-D) environments is considerably more difficult. X-ray microtomography can reveal a biofilm’s internal structure, but the obtaining sufficient contrast to image low-Z biological material against a higher-Z substrate makes detecting biofilms difficult. Here we present results imaging Shewanella oneidensis biofilms on a Hollow-fiber Membrane Biofilm Reactor (HfMBR), using the x-ray microtomography system at sector 2-BM of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), at energies ranging from 13-15.4 keV and pixel sizes of 0.7 and 1.3 μm/pixel. We examine the use of osmium (Os) as a contrast agent to enhance biofilm visibility and demonstrate that staining improves imaging of hydrated biofilms. We also present results using a Talbot interferometer to provide phase and scatter contrast information in addition to absorption. Talbot interferometry allows imaging of unstained hydrated biofilms with phase contrast, while absorption contrast primarily highlights edges and scatter contrast provides little information. However, the gratings used here limit the spatial resolution to no finer than 2 μm, which hinders the ability to detect small features. Future studies at higher resolution or higher Talbot order for greater sensitivity to density variations may improve imaging.

  16. Investigating biofilm structure using x-ray microtomography and gratings-based phase contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Erin A.; Xiao, Xianghui; Miller, Micah; Keller, Paul; White, Timothy A.; Marshall, Matthew

    2012-10-01

    Direct examination of natural and engineered environments has revealed that the majority of microorganisms in these systems live in structured communities termed biofilms. To gain a better understanding for how biofilms function and interact with their local environment, fundamental capabilities for enhanced visualization, compositional analysis, and functional characterization of biofilms are needed. For pore-scale and community-scale analysis (100's of nm to 10's of microns), a variety of surface tools are available. However, understanding biofilm structure in complex three-dimensional (3-D) environments is considerably more difficult. X-ray microtomography can reveal a biofilm's internal structure, but obtaining sufficient contrast to image low atomic number (Z) biological material against a higher-Z substrate makes detecting biofilms difficult. Here we present results imaging Shewanella oneidensis biofilms on a Hollow-fiber Membrane Biofilm Reactor (HfMBR), using the x-ray microtomography system at sector 2-BM of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), at energies ranging from 12.9-15.4 keV and pixel sizes of 0.7 and 1.3 μm/pixel. We examine the use of osmium (Os) as a contrast agent to enhance biofilm visibility and demonstrate that staining improves imaging of hydrated biofilms. We also present results using a Talbot interferometer to provide phase and scatter contrast information in addition to absorption. Talbot interferometry allows imaging of unstained hydrated biofilms with phase contrast, while absorption contrast primarily highlights edges and scatter contrast provides little information. However, the gratings used here limit the spatial resolution to no finer than 2 μm, which hinders the ability to detect small features. Future studies at higher resolution or higher Talbot order for greater sensitivity to density variations may improve imaging.

  17. Volumetric characterization of human patellar cartilage matrix on phase contrast x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, Anas Z.; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Checefsky, Walter A.; Coan, Paola; Diemoz, Paul C.; Hobbs, Susan K.; Huber, Markus B.; Wismüller, Axel

    2015-03-01

    Phase contrast X-ray computed tomography (PCI-CT) has recently emerged as a novel imaging technique that allows visualization of cartilage soft tissue, subsequent examination of chondrocyte patterns, and their correlation to osteoarthritis. Previous studies have shown that 2D texture features are effective at distinguishing between healthy and osteoarthritic regions of interest annotated in the radial zone of cartilage matrix on PCI-CT images. In this study, we further extend the texture analysis to 3D and investigate the ability of volumetric texture features at characterizing chondrocyte patterns in the cartilage matrix for purposes of classification. Here, we extracted volumetric texture features derived from Minkowski Functionals and gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) from 496 volumes of interest (VOI) annotated on PCI-CT images of human patellar cartilage specimens. The extracted features were then used in a machine-learning task involving support vector regression to classify ROIs as healthy or osteoarthritic. Classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). The best classification performance was observed with GLCM features correlation (AUC = 0.83 +/- 0.06) and homogeneity (AUC = 0.82 +/- 0.07), which significantly outperformed all Minkowski Functionals (p < 0.05). These results suggest that such quantitative analysis of chondrocyte patterns in human patellar cartilage matrix involving GLCM-derived statistical features can distinguish between healthy and osteoarthritic tissue with high accuracy.

  18. Virtual unrolling and deciphering of Herculaneum papyri by X-ray phase-contrast tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bukreeva, I.; Mittone, A.; Bravin, A.; Festa, G.; Alessandrelli, M.; Coan, P.; Formoso, V.; Agostino, R. G.; Giocondo, M.; Ciuchi, F.; Fratini, M.; Massimi, L.; Lamarra, A.; Andreani, C.; Bartolino, R.; Gigli, G.; Ranocchia, G.; Cedola, A.

    2016-01-01

    A collection of more than 1800 carbonized papyri, discovered in the Roman ‘Villa dei Papiri’ at Herculaneum is the unique classical library survived from antiquity. These papyri were charred during 79 A.D. Vesuvius eruption, a circumstance which providentially preserved them until now. This magnificent collection contains an impressive amount of treatises by Greek philosophers and, especially, Philodemus of Gadara, an Epicurean thinker of 1st century BC. We read many portions of text hidden inside carbonized Herculaneum papyri using enhanced X-ray phase-contrast tomography non-destructive technique and a new set of numerical algorithms for ‘virtual-unrolling’. Our success lies in revealing the largest portion of Greek text ever detected so far inside unopened scrolls, with unprecedented spatial resolution and contrast, all without damaging these precious historical manuscripts. Parts of text have been decoded and the ‘voice’ of the Epicurean philosopher Philodemus is brought back again after 2000 years from Herculaneum papyri. PMID:27265417

  19. Micro Soft Tissues Visualization Based on X-Ray Phase-Contrast Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Luo, Shuqian

    2011-01-01

    The current imaging methods have a limited ability to visualize microstructures of biological soft tissues. Small lesions cannot be detected at the early stage of the disease. Phase contrast imaging (PCI) is a novel non-invasive imaging technique that can provide high contrast images of soft tissues by the use of X-ray phase shift. It is a new choice in terms of non-invasively revealing soft tissue details. In this study, the lung and hepatic fibrosis models of mice and rats were used to investigate the ability of PCI in microstructures observation of soft tissues. Our results demonstrated that different liver fibrosis stages could be distinguished non-invasively by PCI. The three-dimensional morphology of a segment of blood vessel was constructed. Noteworthy, the blood clot inside the vessel was visualized in three dimensions which provided a precise description of vessel stenosis. Furthermore, the whole lung airways including the alveoli were obtained. We had specifically highlighted its use in the visualization and assessment of the alveoli. To our knowledge, this was the first time for non-invasive alveoli imaging using PCI. This finding may offer a new perspective on the diagnosis of respiratory disease. All the results confirmed that PCI will be a valuable tool in biological soft tissues imaging. PMID:21892370

  20. Combined use of hard X-ray phase contrast imaging and X-ray fluorescence microscopy for sub-cellular metal quantification.

    PubMed

    Kosior, Ewelina; Bohic, Sylvain; Suhonen, Heikki; Ortega, Richard; Devès, Guillaume; Carmona, Asuncion; Marchi, Florence; Guillet, Jean Francois; Cloetens, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Hard X-ray fluorescence microscopy and magnified phase contrast imaging are combined to obtain quantitative maps of the projected metal concentration in whole cells. The experiments were performed on freeze dried cells at the nano-imaging station ID22NI of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). X-ray fluorescence analysis gives the areal mass of most major, minor and trace elements; it is validated using a biological standard of known composition. Quantitative phase contrast imaging provides maps of the projected mass and is validated using calibration samples and through comparison with Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy. Up to now, absolute quantification at the sub-cellular level was impossible using X-ray fluorescence microscopy but can be reached with the use of the proposed approach. PMID:22182730

  1. X-ray phase contrast imaging of the breast: Analysis of tissue simulating materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Phase contrast imaging, particularly of the breast, is being actively investigated. The purpose of this work is to investigate the x-ray phase contrast properties of breast tissues and commonly used breast tissue substitutes or phantom materials with an aim of determining the phantom materials best representative of breast tissues. Methods: Elemental compositions of breast tissues including adipose, fibroglandular, and skin were used to determine the refractive index, n= 1 -{delta}+i {beta}. The real part of the refractive index, specifically the refractive index decrement ({delta}), over the energy range of 5-50 keV were determined using XOP software (version 2.3, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, France). Calcium oxalate and calcium hydroxyapatite were considered to represent the material compositions of microcalcifications in vivo. Nineteen tissue substitutes were considered as possible candidates to represent adipose tissue, fibroglandular tissue and skin, and four phantom materials were considered as possible candidates to represent microcalcifications. For each material, either the molecular formula, if available, or the elemental composition based on weight fraction, was used to determine {delta}. At each x-ray photon energy, the absolute percent difference in {delta} between the breast tissue and the substitute material was determined, from which three candidates were selected. From these candidate tissue substitutes, the material that minimized the absolute percent difference in linear attenuation coefficient {mu}, and hence {beta}, was considered to be best representative of that breast tissue. Results: Over the energy range of 5-50 keV, while the {delta} of CB3 and fibroglandular tissue-equivalent material were within 1% of that of fibroglandular tissue, the {mu} of fibroglandular tissue-equivalent material better approximated the fibroglandular tissue. While the {delta} of BR10 and adipose tissue-equivalent material were within 1% of

  2. Hard X-Ray Phase-Contrast Imaging for Medical Applications — Physicist's Dream or Radiologist's Mainstream?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, S. W.; Gureyev, T. E.; Mayo, S. C.; Nesterets, Ya. I.; Paganin, D. M.; Pogany, A.; Stevenson, A. W.

    2007-03-01

    We briefly review currently practiced methods of X-ray phase contrast imaging and consider some of their relative features, especially in regard to applicability to clinical medical studies. Various related technological issues and promising future areas of development are also briefly discussed.

  3. Experimental Realisation of High-sensitivity Laboratory X-ray Grating-based Phase-contrast Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnbacher, Lorenz; Willner, Marian; Velroyen, Astrid; Marschner, Mathias; Hipp, Alexander; Meiser, Jan; Koch, Frieder; Schröter, Tobias; Kunka, Danays; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2016-04-01

    The possibility to perform high-sensitivity X-ray phase-contrast imaging with laboratory grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (gbPC-CT) setups is of great interest for a broad range of high-resolution biomedical applications. However, achieving high sensitivity with laboratory gbPC-CT setups still poses a challenge because several factors such as the reduced flux, the polychromaticity of the spectrum, and the limited coherence of the X-ray source reduce the performance of laboratory gbPC-CT in comparison to gbPC-CT at synchrotron facilities. In this work, we present our laboratory X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometry setup operating at 40 kVp and describe how we achieve the high sensitivity yet unrivalled by any other laboratory X-ray phase-contrast technique. We provide the angular sensitivity expressed via the minimum resolvable refraction angle both in theory and experiment, and compare our data with other differential phase-contrast setups. Furthermore, we show that the good stability of our high-sensitivity setup allows for tomographic scans, by which even the electron density can be retrieved quantitatively as has been demonstrated in several preclinical studies.

  4. Study of phase contrast imaging for carbon fiber, polystyrene and lung tissue using monochromatic and polychromatic X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, P. S.; Kashyap, Yogesh; Sarkar, P. S.; Sinha, Amar; Godwal, B. K.

    2006-08-01

    Phase contrast imaging is a new method of radiography in which the information of change in phase of the X-rays as it passes through the object gets reflected in the intensity. This leads to a better sensitivity and contrast than the conventional absorption radiography. In this paper we discuss the simulation studies of phase contrast imaging using monochromatic and polychromatic X-ray point source for simple two- and three-dimensional objects like circular and spherical objects (made up of carbon-fiber, polystyrene and lung tissue). The advantages of refraction contrast images are discussed in terms of contrast and resolution, and a comparison is made with absorption images. The result obtained shows considerable improvement in contrast with phase contrast imaging as compared to conventional absorption radiography. These results also guide us in proper selection of source to object distance, object to detector distance, etc. These results are proposed to be used in our experiment on phase contrast imaging with microfocus X-rays. The technique is going to be very useful in improving the resolution in the X-ray imaging for the composites, and in detection of cracks at micron level resolution. Moreover, if the doses can be controlled by proper selection of the detector or the source, it can have clinical application in the mammography.

  5. Experimental Realisation of High-sensitivity Laboratory X-ray Grating-based Phase-contrast Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Birnbacher, Lorenz; Willner, Marian; Velroyen, Astrid; Marschner, Mathias; Hipp, Alexander; Meiser, Jan; Koch, Frieder; Schröter, Tobias; Kunka, Danays; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to perform high-sensitivity X-ray phase-contrast imaging with laboratory grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (gbPC-CT) setups is of great interest for a broad range of high-resolution biomedical applications. However, achieving high sensitivity with laboratory gbPC-CT setups still poses a challenge because several factors such as the reduced flux, the polychromaticity of the spectrum, and the limited coherence of the X-ray source reduce the performance of laboratory gbPC-CT in comparison to gbPC-CT at synchrotron facilities. In this work, we present our laboratory X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometry setup operating at 40 kVp and describe how we achieve the high sensitivity yet unrivalled by any other laboratory X-ray phase-contrast technique. We provide the angular sensitivity expressed via the minimum resolvable refraction angle both in theory and experiment, and compare our data with other differential phase-contrast setups. Furthermore, we show that the good stability of our high-sensitivity setup allows for tomographic scans, by which even the electron density can be retrieved quantitatively as has been demonstrated in several preclinical studies. PMID:27040492

  6. A theoretical study on phase-contrast mammography with Thomson-scattering x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    De Caro, Liberato; Giannini, Cinzia; Bellotti, Roberto; Tangaro, Sabina

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: The x-ray transmitted beam from any material/tissue depends on the complex refractive index (n=1-{delta}+i{beta}), where {delta} is responsible for the phase shift and {beta} is for the beam attenuation. Although for human tissues, the {delta} cross section is about 1000 times greater than the {beta} ones in the x-ray energy range from 10 to 150 keV, the gain in breast tumor visualization of phase-contrast mammography (PCM) with respect to absorption contact imaging (AI) is limited by the maximum dose that can be delivered to the patient. Moreover, in-line PC imaging (PCI) is the simplest experimental mode among all available x-ray PCI techniques since no optics are needed. The latter is a fundamental requirement in order to transfer the results of laboratory research into hospitals. Alternative to synchrotron radiation sources, the implementation of relativistic Thomson-scattering (TS) x-ray sources is particularly suitable for hospital use because of their high peak brightness within a relatively compact and affordable system. In this work, the possibility to realize PCM using a TS source in a hospital environment is studied, accounting for the effect of a finite deliverable dose on the PC visibility enhancement with respect to AI. Methods: The contrast-to-noise ratio of tumor-tissue lesions in PCM has been studied on the bases of a recent theoretical model, describing image contrast formation by means of both wave-optical theory and the mutual coherence formalism. The latter is used to describe the evolution, during wave propagation, of the coherence of the wave field emitted by a TS source. The contrast-to-noise ratio for both PCI and AI has been analyzed in terms of tumor size, beam energy, detector, and source distances, studying optimal conditions for performing PCM. Regarding other relevant factors which could influence ''tumor'' visibility, the authors have assumed simplified conditions such as a spherical shape description of the tumor inclusion

  7. Characterization of an x-ray phase contrast imaging system based on the miniature synchrotron MIRRORCLE-6X

    SciTech Connect

    Heekeren, Joop van; Kostenko, Alexander; Hanashima, Takayasu; Yamada, Hironari; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Offerman, S. Erik; Vliet, Lucas J. van

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: The implementation of in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) for soft-tissue patient imaging is hampered by the lack of a bright and spatially coherent x-ray source that fits into the hospital environment. This article provides a quantitative characterization of the phase-contrast enhancement of a PCI system based on the miniature synchrotron technology MIRRORCLE-6X. Methods: The phase-contrast effect was measured using an edge response of a plexiglass plate as a function of the incident angle of radiation. We have developed a comprehensive x-ray propagation model based on the system's components, properties, and geometry in order to interpret the measurement data. Monte-Carlo simulations are used to estimate the system's spectral properties and resolution. Results: The measured ratio of the detected phase-contrast to the absorption contrast is currently in the range 100% to 200%. Experiments show that with the current implementation of the MIRRORCLE-6X, a target smaller than 30-40 {mu}m does not lead to a larger phase-contrast. The reason for this is that the fraction of x-rays produced by the material (carbon filament and glue) that is used for mounting the target in the electron beam is more than 25% of the total amount of x-rays produced. This increases the apparent source size. The measured phase-contrast is at maximum two times larger than the absorption contrast with the current set-up. Conclusions: Calculations based on our model of the present imaging system predict that the phase-contrast can be up to an order of magnitude larger than the absorption contrast in case the materials used for mounting the target in the electron beam do not (or hardly) produce x-rays. The methods described in this paper provide vital feedback for guiding future modifications to the design of the x-ray target of MIRRORCLE-type system and configuration of the in-line PCI systems in general.

  8. Contrast transfer functions for Zernike phase contrast in full-field transmission hard X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Cheng, Yin; Heine, Ruth; Baumbach, Tilo

    2016-03-21

    Full-field transmission hard X-ray microscopy (TXM) has been widely applied to study morphology and structures with high spatial precision and to dynamic processes. Zernike phase contrast (ZPC) in hard X-ray TXM is often utilized to get an in-line phase contrast enhancement for weak-absorbing materials with little contrast differences. Here, following forward image formation, we derive and simplify the contrast transfer functions (CTFs) of the Zernike phase imaging system in TXM based on a linear space-shift-invariant imaging mode under certain approximations. The CTFs in ZPC in their simplified forms show a high similarity to the one in free-space propagation X-ray imaging systems. PMID:27136800

  9. Robustness of phase retrieval methods in x-ray phase contrast imaging: A comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Aimin; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: The robustness of the phase retrieval methods is of critical importance for limiting and reducing radiation doses involved in x-ray phase contrast imaging. This work is to compare the robustness of two phase retrieval methods by analyzing the phase maps retrieved from the experimental images of a phantom. Methods: Two phase retrieval methods were compared. One method is based on the transport of intensity equation (TIE) for phase contrast projections, and the TIE-based method is the most commonly used method for phase retrieval in the literature. The other is the recently developed attenuation-partition based (AP-based) phase retrieval method. The authors applied these two methods to experimental projection images of an air-bubble wrap phantom for retrieving the phase map of the bubble wrap. The retrieved phase maps obtained by using the two methods are compared. Results: In the wrap's phase map retrieved by using the TIE-based method, no bubble is recognizable, hence, this method failed completely for phase retrieval from these bubble wrap images. Even with the help of the Tikhonov regularization, the bubbles are still hardly visible and buried in the cluttered background in the retrieved phase map. The retrieved phase values with this method are grossly erroneous. In contrast, in the wrap's phase map retrieved by using the AP-based method, the bubbles are clearly recovered. The retrieved phase values with the AP-based method are reasonably close to the estimate based on the thickness-based measurement. The authors traced these stark performance differences of the two methods to their different techniques employed to deal with the singularity problem involved in the phase retrievals. Conclusions: This comparison shows that the conventional TIE-based phase retrieval method, regardless if Tikhonov regularization is used or not, is unstable against the noise in the wrap's projection images, while the AP-based phase retrieval method is shown in these

  10. In vivo x-ray phase contrast analyzer-based imaging for longitudinal osteoarthritis studies in guinea pigs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coan, Paola; Wagner, Andreas; Bravin, Alberto; Diemoz, Paul C.; Keyriläinen, Jani; Mollenhauer, Juergen

    2010-12-01

    Over the last two decades phase contrast x-ray imaging techniques have been extensively studied for applications in the biomedical field. Published results demonstrate the high capability of these imaging modalities of improving the image contrast of biological samples with respect to standard absorption-based radiography and routinely used clinical imaging techniques. A clear depiction of the anatomic structures and a more accurate disease diagnosis may be provided by using radiation doses comparable to or lower than those used in current clinical methods. In the literature many works show images of phantoms and excised biological samples proving the high sensitivity of the phase contrast imaging methods for in vitro investigations. In this scenario, the applications of the so-called analyzer-based x-ray imaging (ABI) phase contrast technique are particularly noteworthy. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo x-ray ABI phase contrast imaging for biomedical applications and in particular with respect to joint anatomic depiction and osteoarthritis detection. ABI in planar and tomographic modes was performed in vivo on articular joints of guinea pigs in order to investigate the animals with respect to osteoarthritis by using highly monochromatic x-rays of 52 keV and a low noise detector with a pixel size of 47 × 47 µm2. Images give strong evidence of the ability of ABI in depicting both anatomic structures in complex systems as living organisms and all known signs of osteoarthritis with high contrast, high spatial resolution and with an acceptable radiation dose. This paper presents the first proof of principle study of in vivo application of ABI. The technical challenges encountered when imaging an animal in vivo are discussed. This experimental study is an important step toward the study of clinical applications of phase contrast x-ray imaging techniques.

  11. Observations of breakup processes of liquid jets using real-time X-ray radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Char, J. M.; Kuo, K. K.; Hsieh, K. C.

    1988-01-01

    To unravel the liquid-jet breakup process in the nondilute region, a newly developed system of real-time X-ray radiography, an advanced digital image processor, and a high-speed video camera were used. Based upon recorded X-ray images, the inner structure of a liquid jet during breakup was observed. The jet divergence angle, jet breakup length, and fraction distributions along the axial and transverse directions of the liquid jets were determined in the near-injector region. Both wall- and free-jet tests were conducted to study the effect of wall friction on the jet breakup process.

  12. Quantitative Assessment of Murine Articular Cartilage and Bone Using X-Ray Phase-Contrast Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Yuan, Huihui; Wu, Mingshu; Dong, Linan; Zhang, Lu; Shi, Hongli; Luo, Shuqian

    2014-01-01

    Murine models for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) research can provide important insights for understanding RA pathogenesis and evaluating the efficacy of novel treatments. However, simultaneously imaging both murine articular cartilage and subchondral bone using conventional techniques is challenging because of low spatial resolution and poor soft tissue contrast. X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI) is a new technique that offers high spatial resolution for the visualisation of cartilage and skeletal tissues. The purpose of this study was to utilise XPCI to observe articular cartilage and subchondral bone in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) murine model and quantitatively assess changes in the joint microstructure. XPCI was performed on the two treatment groups (the control group and CIA group, n = 9 per group) to monitor the progression of damage to the femur from the knee joint in a longitudinal study (at 0, 4 and 8 weeks after primary injection). For quantitative assessment, morphologic parameters were measured in three-dimensional (3D) images using appropriate image analysis software. Our results showed that the average femoral cartilage volume, surface area and thickness were significantly decreased (P<0.05) in the CIA group compared to the control group. Meanwhile, these decreases were accompanied by obvious destruction of the surface of subchondral bone and a loss of trabecular bone in the CIA group. This study confirms that XPCI technology has the ability to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate microstructural changes in mouse joints. This technique has the potential to become a routine analysis method for accurately monitoring joint damage and comprehensively assessing treatment efficacy. PMID:25369528

  13. Three-dimensional imaging of nerve tissue by x-ray phase-contrast microtomography.

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, F; Heise, K; Kölsch, B; Bonse, U; Rajewsky, M F; Bartscher, M; Biermann, T

    1999-01-01

    We show that promising information about the three-dimensional (3D) structure of a peripheral nerve can be obtained by x-ray phase-contrast microtomography (p-microCT; Beckmann, F., U. Bonse, F. Busch, and O. Günnewig, 1997. J. Comp. Assist. Tomogr. 21:539-553). P-microCT measures electronic charge density, which for most substances is proportional to mass density in fairly good approximation. The true point-by-point variation of density is thus determined in 3D at presently 1 mg/cm3 standard error (SE). The intracranial part of the rat trigeminal nerve analyzed for the presence of early schwannoma "microtumors" displayed a detailed density structure on p-microCT density maps. The average density of brain and nerve tissue was measured to range from 0.990 to 0.994 g/cm3 and from 1.020 to 1.035 g/cm3, respectively. The brain-nerve interface was well delineated. Within the nerve tissue, a pattern of nerve fibers could be seen that followed the nerve axis and contrasted against the bulk by 7 to 10 mg/cm3 density modulation. Based on the fact that regions of tumor growth have an increased number density of cell nuclei, and hence of the higher z element phosphorus, it may become possible to detect very early neural "microtumors" through increases of average density on the order of 10 to 15 mg/cm3 by using this method. PMID:9876126

  14. Experimental setup and the system performance for single-grid-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging (PCXI) with a microfocus x-ray tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyunwoo; Park, Yeonok; Cho, Hyosung; Je, Uikyu; Hong, Daeki; Park, Chulkyu; Woo, Taeho; Lee, Minsik; Kim, Jinsoo; Chung, Nagkun; Kim, Jinwon; Kim, Jinguk

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we investigated a simplified approach to phase-contrast x-ray imaging (PCXI) by using a single antiscatter grid and a microfocus x-ray tube, which has potential to open the way to further widespread use of PCXI into the related application areas. We established a table-top setup for PCXI studies of biological and non-biological samples and investigated the system performance. The PCXI system consists of a focused-linear grid having a strip density of 200 lines/in. (JPI Healthcare Corp.), a microfocus x-ray tube having a focal spot size of about 5 μm (Hamamatsu, L7910), and a high-resolution CMOS imaging detector having a pixel size of 48 μm (Rad-icon Imaging Corp., Shad-o-Box 2048). By using our prototype system, we successfully obtained attenuation, scattering, and differential phase-contrast x-ray images of improved visibility from the raw images of several samples at x-ray tube conditions of 50 kVp and 6 mAs. Our initial results indicate that the single-grid-based approach seems a useful method for PCXI with great simplicity and minimal requirements on the setup alignment.

  15. Real-time observation of X-ray diffraction patterns with the Lixiscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, D. Y.; Tsang, T.; Yin, L. I.; Anderson, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of the Lixiscope (Low Intensity X-ray Imaging Scope) is demonstrated for real-time observation of transmission Laue patterns. Making use of the high-gain capability of microchannel plate (MCP) visible-light image intensifier tubes, X-ray images are converted to visible-light images by a scintillator. Pb discs are taped to the center of the Lixiscope input face, and crystal samples are held on a goniometer stage with modeling clay. With a compact size to facilitate off axis viewing, and real-time viewing to allow instantaneous response, the Lixiscope may prove useful in dynamic studies of the effects of plastic flows, stresses, high pressures, and low temperatures.

  16. Development of a Laser-Produced Plasma X-ray source for Phase-Contrast Radiography of DT Ice layers

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N; Dewald, E; Kozioziemski, B; Landen, O L; Koch, J A

    2008-07-21

    Refraction enhanced x-ray phase contrast imaging is crucial for characterization of deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer roughness in optically opaque inertial confinement fusion capsules. To observe the time development of DT ice roughness over {approx} second timescales, we need a bright x-ray source that can produce an image faster than the evolution of the ice surface roughness. A laser produced plasma x-ray source is one of the candidates that can meet this requirement. We performed experiments at the Janus laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and assessed the characteristics of the laser produced plasma x-ray source as a potential backlight for in situ target characterization.

  17. Talbot interferometry with curved quasi-periodic gratings: towards large field of view X-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yangyang; Cong, Wenxiang; Xi, Yan; Wang, Ge; Pang, Shuo

    2015-10-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging based on grating interferometry has become a common method due to its superior contrast in biological soft tissue imaging. The high sensitivity relies on the high-aspect ratio structures of the planar gratings, which prohibit the large field of view applications with a diverging X-ray source. Curved gratings allow a high X-ray flux for a wider angular range, but the interference fringes are only visible within ~10° range due to the geometrical mismatch with the commonly used flat array detectors. In this paper, we propose a design using a curved quasi-periodic grating for large field of view imaging with a flat detector array. Our scheme is numerically verified in the X-ray regime and experimentally verified in the visible optical regime. The interference fringe pattern is observed over 25°, with less than 10% of decrease in visibility in our experiments. PMID:26480170

  18. Towards tender X-rays with Zernike phase-contrast imaging of biological samples at 50 nm resolution.

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, Ismo; Warmer, Martin; Goeries, Dennis; Herker, Eva; Reimer, Rudolph; David, Christian; Meents, Alke

    2014-07-01

    X-ray microscopy is a commonly used method especially in material science application, where the large penetration depth of X-rays is necessary for three-dimensional structural studies of thick specimens with high-Z elements. In this paper it is shown that full-field X-ray microscopy at 6.2 keV can be utilized for imaging of biological specimens with high resolution. A full-field Zernike phase-contrast microscope based on diffractive optics is used to study lipid droplet formation in hepatoma cells. It is shown that the contrast of the images is comparable with that of electron microscopy, and even better contrast at tender X-ray energies between 2.5 keV and 4 keV is expected. PMID:24971976

  19. Fundamental Studies of Solidification in Microgravity Using Real-Time X-Ray Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.; Kaukler, William; Sen, Subhayu; Bhat, Biliyar N.

    1999-01-01

    This research applies a state of the art X-ray Transmission Microscope, XTM, to image (with resolutions up to 3 micrometers) the solidification of metallic or semiconductor alloys in real-time. We have successfully imaged in real-time: interfacial morphologies, phase growth, coalescence, incorporation of phases into the growing interface, and the solute boundary layer in the liquid at the solid-liquid interface. We have also measured true local growth rates and can evaluate segregation structures in the solid; a form of in-situ metallography. During this study, the growth of secondary phase fibers and lamellae from eutectic and monotectic alloys have been imaged during solidification, in real-time, for the first time in bulk metal alloys. Current high resolution X-ray sources and high contrast X-ray detectors have advanced to allow systematic study of solidification dynamics and the resulting microstructure. We have employed a state-of-the-art sub-micron source with acceleration voltages of 10-100 kV to image solidification of metals. One useful strength of the XTM stems from the manner an image is formed. The radiographic image is a shadow formed by x-ray photons that are not absorbed as they pass through the specimen. Composition gradients within the specimen cause variations in absorption of the flux such that the final image represents a spatial integral of composition (or thickness). The ability to image these features in real-time enables more fundamental and detailed understanding of solidification dynamics than has previously been possible. Hence, application of this technique towards microgravity experiments will allow rigorous testing of critical solidification models.

  20. A user-friendly LabVIEW software platform for grating based X-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shenghao; Han, Huajie; Gao, Kun; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Can; Yang, Meng; Wu, Zhao; Wu, Ziyu

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging can provide greatly improved contrast over conventional absorption-based imaging for weakly absorbing samples, such as biological soft tissues and fibre composites. In this study, we introduced an easy and fast way to develop a user-friendly software platform dedicated to the new grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging setup at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory of the University of Science and Technology of China. The control of 21 motorized stages, of a piezoelectric stage and of an X-ray tube are achieved with this software, it also covers image acquisition with a flat panel detector for automatic phase stepping scan. Moreover, a data post-processing module for signals retrieval and other custom features are in principle available. With a seamless integration of all the necessary functions in one software package, this platform greatly facilitate users' activities during experimental runs with this grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging setup. PMID:25882730

  1. Increasing the field of view of x-ray phase contrast imaging using stitched gratings on low absorbent carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiser, J.; Amberger, M.; Willner, M.; Kunka, D.; Meyer, P.; Koch, F.; Hipp, A.; Walter, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Mohr, J.

    2014-03-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging has become a promising biomedical imaging technique for enhancing soft-tissue contrast. In addition to an absorption contrast image it provides two more types of image, a phase contrast and a small-angle scattering contrast image recorded at the same time. In biomedical imaging their combination allows for the conventional investigation of e.g. bone fractures on the one hand and for soft-tissue investigation like cancer detection on the other hand. Among the different methods of X-ray phase contrast imaging the grating based approach, the Talbot-Lau interferometry, has the highest potential for commercial use in biomedical imaging at the moment, because commercially available X-ray sources can be used in a compact setup. In Talbot-Lau interferometers, core elements are phase and absorption gratings with challenging specifications because of their high aspect ratios (structure height over width). For the long grating lamellas structural heights of more than 100 μm together with structural width in the micron range are requested. We are developing a fabrication process based on deep x-ray lithography and electroforming (LIGA) to fabricate these challenging structures. In case of LIGA gratings the structural area is currently limited to several centimeters by several centimeters which limit the field of view in grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging. In order to increase the grating area significantly we are developing a stitching method for gratings using a 625 μm thick silicon wafer as a carrier substrate. In this work we compare the silicon carrier with an alternative one, polyimide, for patient dose reduction and for the use at lower energies in terms of transmission and image reconstruction problems.

  2. Glancing angle Talbot-Lau grating interferometers for phase contrast imaging at high x-ray energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.

    2012-08-01

    A Talbot-Lau interferometer is demonstrated using micro-periodic gratings inclined at a glancing angle along the light propagation direction. Due to the increase in the effective thickness of the absorption gratings, the device enables differential phase contrast imaging at high x-ray energy, with improved fringe visibility (contrast). For instance, at 28° glancing angle, we obtain up to ˜35% overall interferometer contrast with a spectrum having ˜43 keV mean energy, suitable for medical applications. In addition, glancing angle interferometers could provide high contrast at energies above 100 keV, enabling industrial and security applications of phase contrast imaging.

  3. Quantitative evaluation of single-shot inline phase contrast imaging using an inverse compton x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Oliva, P.; Carpinelli, M.; Golosio, B.; Delogu, P.; Endrizzi, M.; Park, J.; Pogorelsky, I.; Yakimenko, V.; Williams, O.; Rosenzweig, J.

    2010-09-27

    Inverse compton scattering (ICS) x-ray sources are of current interest in biomedical imaging. We present an experimental demonstration of inline phase contrast imaging using a single picosecond pulse of the ICS source located at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility. The phase contrast effect is clearly observed. Its qualities are shown to be in agreement with the predictions of theoretical models through comparison of experimental and simulated images of a set of plastic wires of differing composition and size. Finally, we display an application of the technique to a biological sample, confirming the possibility of time-resolved imaging on the picosecond scale.

  4. Ultrafast phase contrast imaging of laser driven shocks using betatron X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, D. J.; Rutherford, M. E.; White, T. G.; Eakins, D. E.; Wood, J. C.; Poder, K.; Lopes, N. C.; Bryant, J. S. J.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Cole, J. S.; Albert, F.; Pollack, B. B.; Behm, K. T.; Zhao, Z.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Schumaker, W.; Glenzer, S.

    2015-06-01

    Bright, high-energy photon sources, such as synchrotrons and more recently the new generation of X-ray free-electron lasers, offer the attractive combination of high brilliance, short pulse duration and high-energy X-rays. Betatron X-rays produced within a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator provide an exciting complementary energetic photon source to these large scale facilities. We describe the first proof-of-principle experiments imaging shock-front evolution in laser driven targets using wakefield betatron X-rays. These pioneering experiments were performed on the 400TW Gemini laser at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK. Shock waves were driven into silicon wafers along the [100] direction, and stroboscopically imaged perpendicular to the shock propagation direction using a ~ 40 fs betatron X-ray pulse. These initial results showcase a promising, potentially table top sized X-ray source suitable for probing the response of materials under extreme condition.

  5. Hummingbird: monitoring and analyzing flash X-ray imaging experiments in real time1

    PubMed Central

    Daurer, Benedikt J.; Hantke, Max F.; Nettelblad, Carl; Maia, Filipe R. N. C.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in X-ray detectors and increases in the brightness of X-ray sources combined with more efficient sample delivery techniques have brought about tremendous increases in the speed of data collection in diffraction experiments. Using X-ray free-electron lasers such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), more than 100 diffraction patterns can be collected in a second. These high data rates are invaluable for flash X-ray imaging (FXI), where aerosolized samples are exposed to the X-ray beam and the resulting diffraction patterns are used to reconstruct a three-dimensional image of the sample. Such experiments require immediate feedback on the quality of the data collected to adjust or validate experimental parameters, such as aerosol injector settings, beamline geometry or sample composition. The scarcity of available beamtime at the laser facilities makes any delay extremely costly. This paper presents Hummingbird, an open-source scalable Python-based software tool for real-time analysis of diffraction data with the purpose of giving users immediate feedback during their experiments. Hummingbird provides a fast, flexible and easy-to-use framework. It has already proven to be of great value in numerous FXI experiments at the LCLS. PMID:27275147

  6. Interferometric phase-contrast X-ray CT imaging of VX2 rabbit cancer at 35keV X-ray energy

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Tohoru; Wu Jin; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Lwin, Thet-Thet; Itai, Yuji; Yoneyama, Akio; Hyodo, Kazuyuki

    2004-05-12

    Imaging of large objects at 17.7-keV low x-ray energy causes huge x-ray exposure to the objects even using interferometric phase-contrast x-ray CT (PCCT). Thus, we tried to obtain PCCT images at high x-ray energy of 35keV and examined the image quality using a formalin-fixed VX2 rabbit cancer specimen with 15-mm in diameter. The PCCT system consisted of an asymmetrically cut silicon (220) crystal, a monolithic x-ray interferometer, a phase-shifter, an object cell and an x-ray CCD camera. The PCCT at 35 keV clearly visualized various inner structures of VX2 rabbit cancer such as necrosis, cancer, the surrounding tumor vessels, and normal liver tissue. Besides, image-contrast was not degraded significantly. These results suggest that the PCCT at 35 KeV is sufficient to clearly depict the histopathological morphology of VX2 rabbit cancer specimen.

  7. Single-step, quantitative x-ray differential phase contrast imaging using spectral detection in a coded aperture setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Mini; Liang, Zhihua

    2015-03-01

    In this abstract we describe the first non-interferometric x-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) method that uses only a single-measurement step to retrieve with quantitative accuracy absorption, phase and differential phase. Our approach is based on utilizing spectral information from photon counting spectral detectors in conjunction with a coded aperture PCI setting to simplify the x-ray "phase problem" to a one-step method. The method by virtue of being single-step with no motion of any component for a given projection image has significantly high potential to overcome the barriers currently faced by PCI.

  8. Ultrafast x-ray phase-contrast imaging of the initial coalescence phase of two water droplets.

    SciTech Connect

    Fezzaa, K.; Wang, Y.; X-Ray Science Division

    2008-03-14

    We report an ultrafast x-ray phase-contrast imaging study of the early merging dynamics of two water drops in air. Owing to the edge-enhancement capability, the high penetrability, and the unprecedented temporal and spatial resolutions offered by this new x-ray technique, the coalescence singularity of two water drops was revisited. A finite initial contact radius was identified and the evolvement of the trapped toroidal air bubble was studied for the first time. Despite the existence of this finite initial contact radius, the subsequent meniscus radius followed power laws which agree with theoretical predictions for the inviscid regime.

  9. Limited-angle tomography for analyzer-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, Keivan; Wernick, Miles N.; Li, Jun; Muehleman, Carol; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-07-01

    Multiple-image radiography (MIR) is an analyzer-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging method, which is emerging as a potential alternative to conventional radiography. MIR simultaneously generates three planar parametric images containing information about scattering, refraction and attenuation properties of the object. The MIR planar images are linear tomographic projections of the corresponding object properties, which allows reconstruction of volumetric images using computed tomography (CT) methods. However, when acquiring a full range of linear projections around the tissue of interest is not feasible or the scanning time is limited, limited-angle tomography techniques can be used to reconstruct these volumetric images near the central plane, which is the plane that contains the pivot point of the tomographic movement. In this work, we use computer simulations to explore the applicability of limited-angle tomography to MIR. We also investigate the accuracy of reconstructions as a function of number of tomographic angles for a fixed total radiation exposure. We use this function to find an optimal range of angles over which data should be acquired for limited-angle tomography MIR (LAT-MIR). Next, we apply the LAT-MIR technique to experimentally acquired MIR projections obtained in a cadaveric human thumb study. We compare the reconstructed slices near the central plane to the same slices reconstructed by CT-MIR using the full angular view around the object. Finally, we perform a task-based evaluation of LAT-MIR performance for different numbers of angular views, and use template matching to detect cartilage in the refraction image near the central plane. We use the signal-to-noise ratio of this test as the detectability metric to investigate an optimum range of tomographic angles for detecting soft tissues in LAT-MIR. Both results show that there is an optimum range of angular view for data acquisition where LAT-MIR yields the best performance, comparable to CT

  10. Limited-angle tomography for analyzer-based phase-contrast X-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Majidi, Keivan; Wernick, Miles N; Li, Jun; Muehleman, Carol; Brankov, Jovan G

    2014-01-01

    Multiple-Image Radiography (MIR) is an analyzer-based phase-contrast X-ray imaging method (ABI), which is emerging as a potential alternative to conventional radiography. MIR simultaneously generates three planar parametric images containing information about scattering, refraction and attenuation properties of the object. The MIR planar images are linear tomographic projections of the corresponding object properties, which allows reconstruction of volumetric images using computed tomography (CT) methods. However, when acquiring a full range of linear projections around the tissue of interest is not feasible or the scanning time is limited, limited-angle tomography techniques can be used to reconstruct these volumetric images near the central plane, which is the plane that contains the pivot point of the tomographic movement. In this work, we use computer simulations to explore the applicability of limited-angle tomography to MIR. We also investigate the accuracy of reconstructions as a function of number of tomographic angles for a fixed total radiation exposure. We use this function to find an optimal range of angles over which data should be acquired for limited-angle tomography MIR (LAT-MIR). Next, we apply the LAT-MIR technique to experimentally acquired MIR projections obtained in a cadaveric human thumb study. We compare the reconstructed slices near the central plane to the same slices reconstructed by CT-MIR using the full angular view around the object. Finally, we perform a task-based evaluation of LAT-MIR performance for different numbers of angular views, and use template matching to detect cartilage in the refraction image near the central plane. We use the signal-to-noise ratio of this test as the detectability metric to investigate an optimum range of tomographic angles for detecting soft tissues in LAT-MIR. Both results show that there is an optimum range of angular view for data acquisition where LAT-MIR yields the best performance, comparable to

  11. Real-time wavelet denoising with edge enhancement for medical x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Gaoyong; Osypiw, David; Hudson, Chris

    2006-02-01

    X-ray image visualized in real-time plays an important role in clinical applications. The real-time system design requires that images with the highest perceptual quality be acquired while minimizing the x-ray dose to the patient, which can result in severe noise that must be reduced. The approach based on the wavelet transform has been widely used for noise reduction. However, by removing noise, high frequency components belonging to edges that hold important structural information of an image are also removed, which leads to blurring the features. This paper presents a new method of x-ray image denoising based on fast lifting wavelet thresholding for general noise reduction and spatial filtering for further denoising by using a derivative model to preserve edges. General denoising is achieved by estimating the level of the contaminating noise and employing an adaptive thresholding scheme with variance analysis. The soft thresholding scheme is to remove the overall noise including that attached to edges. A new edge identification method of using approximation of spatial gradient at each pixel location is developed together with a spatial filter to smooth noise in the homogeneous areas but preserve important structures. Fine noise reduction is only applied to the non-edge parts, such that edges are preserved and enhanced. Experimental results demonstrate that the method performs well both visually and in terms of quantitative performance measures for clinical x-ray images contaminated by natural and artificial noise. The proposed algorithm with fast computation and low complexity provides a potential solution for real-time applications.

  12. Quantitative Three-Dimensional Imaging of Lipid, Protein, and Water Contents via X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography.

    PubMed

    Willner, Marian; Viermetz, Manuel; Marschner, Mathias; Scherer, Kai; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander; Noël, Peter; Rummeny, Ernst; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2016-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography is an emerging imaging technology with powerful capabilities for three-dimensional (3D) visualization of weakly absorbing objects such as biological soft tissues. This technique is an extension of existing X-ray applications because conventional attenuation-contrast images are simultaneously acquired. The complementary information provided by both the contrast modalities suggests that enhanced material characterization is possible when performing combined data analysis. In this study, we describe how protein, lipid, and water concentrations in each 3D voxel can be quantified by vector decomposition. Experimental results of dairy products, porcine fat and rind, and different human soft tissue types are presented. The results demonstrate the potential of phase-contrast imaging as a new analysis tool. The 3D representations of protein, lipid, and water contents open up new opportunities in the fields of biology, medicine, and food science. PMID:27003308

  13. Aerosol-induced lung injuries observed by synchrotron radiation X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Weisheng; Zhang, Guilin; Liu, Ping; Sun, Jianqi; Hwu, Yeukuang; Je, Jung Ho; Tan, Mingguang; Li, Yan

    2007-09-01

    Adverse health effects are associated with the inhalation of a variety of atmospheric particles. To study the lung injuries caused by aerosol PM2.5, synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique was used. Nude mice were inoculated with PM2.5 samples collected from suburban area (JD), industrial area (BS) and traffic tunnel (DPQ) of Shanghai. From X-ray phase-contrast images of lung tissues, apart from blood vessels and structures of alveoli, even hemorrhage spots of several microns caused by the inflammation were clearly observed. The studies showed that the PM2.5 samples collected from the traffic tunnel (DPQ) produced higher level of lung injury, followed by the aerosol samples collected from industrial area (BS) and suburban area (JD). Our studies also helped us to understand the process of lung injuries caused by aerosol particles.

  14. Quantitative Three-Dimensional Imaging of Lipid, Protein, and Water Contents via X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Willner, Marian; Viermetz, Manuel; Marschner, Mathias; Scherer, Kai; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander; Noël, Peter; Rummeny, Ernst; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2016-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography is an emerging imaging technology with powerful capabilities for three-dimensional (3D) visualization of weakly absorbing objects such as biological soft tissues. This technique is an extension of existing X-ray applications because conventional attenuation-contrast images are simultaneously acquired. The complementary information provided by both the contrast modalities suggests that enhanced material characterization is possible when performing combined data analysis. In this study, we describe how protein, lipid, and water concentrations in each 3D voxel can be quantified by vector decomposition. Experimental results of dairy products, porcine fat and rind, and different human soft tissue types are presented. The results demonstrate the potential of phase-contrast imaging as a new analysis tool. The 3D representations of protein, lipid, and water contents open up new opportunities in the fields of biology, medicine, and food science. PMID:27003308

  15. Realistic wave-optics simulation of X-ray phase-contrast imaging at a human scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Yongjin; Segars, W. Paul; Pan, Adam; Ando, Masami; Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Gupta, Rajiv

    2015-07-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI) can dramatically improve soft tissue contrast in X-ray medical imaging. Despite worldwide efforts to develop novel XPCI systems, a numerical framework to rigorously predict the performance of a clinical XPCI system at a human scale is not yet available. We have developed such a tool by combining a numerical anthropomorphic phantom defined with non-uniform rational B-splines (NURBS) and a wave optics-based simulator that can accurately capture the phase-contrast signal from a human-scaled numerical phantom. Using a synchrotron-based, high-performance XPCI system, we provide qualitative comparison between simulated and experimental images. Our tool can be used to simulate the performance of XPCI on various disease entities and compare proposed XPCI systems in an unbiased manner.

  16. Realistic wave-optics simulation of X-ray phase-contrast imaging at a human scale

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Yongjin; Segars, W. Paul; Pan, Adam; Ando, Masami; Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Gupta, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI) can dramatically improve soft tissue contrast in X-ray medical imaging. Despite worldwide efforts to develop novel XPCI systems, a numerical framework to rigorously predict the performance of a clinical XPCI system at a human scale is not yet available. We have developed such a tool by combining a numerical anthropomorphic phantom defined with non-uniform rational B-splines (NURBS) and a wave optics-based simulator that can accurately capture the phase-contrast signal from a human-scaled numerical phantom. Using a synchrotron-based, high-performance XPCI system, we provide qualitative comparison between simulated and experimental images. Our tool can be used to simulate the performance of XPCI on various disease entities and compare proposed XPCI systems in an unbiased manner. PMID:26169570

  17. Realistic wave-optics simulation of X-ray phase-contrast imaging at a human scale.

    PubMed

    Sung, Yongjin; Segars, W Paul; Pan, Adam; Ando, Masami; Sheppard, Colin J R; Gupta, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI) can dramatically improve soft tissue contrast in X-ray medical imaging. Despite worldwide efforts to develop novel XPCI systems, a numerical framework to rigorously predict the performance of a clinical XPCI system at a human scale is not yet available. We have developed such a tool by combining a numerical anthropomorphic phantom defined with non-uniform rational B-splines (NURBS) and a wave optics-based simulator that can accurately capture the phase-contrast signal from a human-scaled numerical phantom. Using a synchrotron-based, high-performance XPCI system, we provide qualitative comparison between simulated and experimental images. Our tool can be used to simulate the performance of XPCI on various disease entities and compare proposed XPCI systems in an unbiased manner. PMID:26169570

  18. X-ray phase-contrast tomography with a compact laser-driven synchrotron source

    PubMed Central

    Eggl, Elena; Schleede, Simone; Bech, Martin; Achterhold, Klaus; Loewen, Roderick; Ruth, Ronald D.; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Between X-ray tubes and large-scale synchrotron sources, a large gap in performance exists with respect to the monochromaticity and brilliance of the X-ray beam. However, due to their size and cost, large-scale synchrotrons are not available for more routine applications in small and medium-sized academic or industrial laboratories. This gap could be closed by laser-driven compact synchrotron light sources (CLS), which use an infrared (IR) laser cavity in combination with a small electron storage ring. Hard X-rays are produced through the process of inverse Compton scattering upon the intersection of the electron bunch with the focused laser beam. The produced X-ray beam is intrinsically monochromatic and highly collimated. This makes a CLS well-suited for applications of more advanced––and more challenging––X-ray imaging approaches, such as X-ray multimodal tomography. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first results of a first successful demonstration experiment in which a monochromatic X-ray beam from a CLS was used for multimodal, i.e., phase-, dark-field, and attenuation-contrast, X-ray tomography. We show results from a fluid phantom with different liquids and a biomedical application example in the form of a multimodal CT scan of a small animal (mouse, ex vivo). The results highlight particularly that quantitative multimodal CT has become feasible with laser-driven CLS, and that the results outperform more conventional approaches. PMID:25902493

  19. X-ray phase-contrast tomography with a compact laser-driven synchrotron source.

    PubMed

    Eggl, Elena; Schleede, Simone; Bech, Martin; Achterhold, Klaus; Loewen, Roderick; Ruth, Ronald D; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-05-01

    Between X-ray tubes and large-scale synchrotron sources, a large gap in performance exists with respect to the monochromaticity and brilliance of the X-ray beam. However, due to their size and cost, large-scale synchrotrons are not available for more routine applications in small and medium-sized academic or industrial laboratories. This gap could be closed by laser-driven compact synchrotron light sources (CLS), which use an infrared (IR) laser cavity in combination with a small electron storage ring. Hard X-rays are produced through the process of inverse Compton scattering upon the intersection of the electron bunch with the focused laser beam. The produced X-ray beam is intrinsically monochromatic and highly collimated. This makes a CLS well-suited for applications of more advanced--and more challenging--X-ray imaging approaches, such as X-ray multimodal tomography. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first results of a first successful demonstration experiment in which a monochromatic X-ray beam from a CLS was used for multimodal, i.e., phase-, dark-field, and attenuation-contrast, X-ray tomography. We show results from a fluid phantom with different liquids and a biomedical application example in the form of a multimodal CT scan of a small animal (mouse, ex vivo). The results highlight particularly that quantitative multimodal CT has become feasible with laser-driven CLS, and that the results outperform more conventional approaches. PMID:25902493

  20. Microscopic identification of Chinese medicinal materials based on X-ray phase contrast imaging: from qualitative to quantitative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Y.; Liang, Z.; Tan, H.; Ni, L.; Zhao, Z.; Xiao, T.; Xu, H.

    2016-07-01

    Although a variety of methods, ranging from simple morphological examination to physical and chemical analysis, and DNA molecular biology, exist for authenticating Chinese medicinal materials(CMMs), no methods can achieve both the source species identification and quality evaluation of CMMs simultaneously. Furthermore, the methods that are currently available for the identification of CMMs, including both optical and electronic microscopy, usually entail strict requirements for sample preparation or testing environment, such as the slicing of super-thin sections, or processing with specific chemical reagents. These treatments not only damage the CMMs but may also cause some of the original microstructures to be missed. Additionally, they may even yield false results. Owing to the unique penetrating character of X-rays, X-ray phase contrast imaging(XPCI) can be used to realize the inner microstructures of CMMs through nondestructive imaging. With the higher flux and luminance of the third generation of synchrotron radiation facility, XPCI can provides clearer and finer microstructures of CMMs, which are mainly composed of C, H, O, and N elements, with better spatial and density resolutions. For more than ten years, the X-ray imaging group at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics has investigated the microstructures of CMMs by XPCI and they have established and developed a quantitative X-ray phase contrast micro-CT for investigating the characteristic microstructures of CMMs. During this period, a variety of typical CMMs have been investigated, from two-dimensional (2D) radiography to three-dimensional (3D) micro-CT, from qualitative to quantitative. Taken together, these results verify that quantitative X-ray phase contrast micro-CT is a practical tool for the microscopic investigation of CMMs. Additionally, further efforts are being made to find the relationship between the microstructures' quantitative factors and active chemical components. At present

  1. High-resolution, low-dose phase contrast X-ray tomography for 3D diagnosis of human breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunzhe; Brun, Emmanuel; Coan, Paola; Huang, Zhifeng; Sztrókay, Aniko; Diemoz, Paul Claude; Liebhardt, Susanne; Mittone, Alberto; Gasilov, Sergei; Miao, Jianwei; Bravin, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    Mammography is the primary imaging tool for screening and diagnosis of human breast cancers, but ~10-20% of palpable tumors are not detectable on mammograms and only about 40% of biopsied lesions are malignant. Here we report a high-resolution, low-dose phase contrast X-ray tomographic method for 3D diagnosis of human breast cancers. By combining phase contrast X-ray imaging with an image reconstruction method known as equally sloped tomography, we imaged a human breast in three dimensions and identified a malignant cancer with a pixel size of 92 μm and a radiation dose less than that of dual-view mammography. According to a blind evaluation by five independent radiologists, our method can reduce the radiation dose and acquisition time by ~74% relative to conventional phase contrast X-ray tomography, while maintaining high image resolution and image contrast. These results demonstrate that high-resolution 3D diagnostic imaging of human breast cancers can, in principle, be performed at clinical compatible doses. PMID:23091003

  2. Real-time X-ray transmission microscopy of solidifying Al-In alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Curreri, P.A.; Kaukler, W.F.

    1996-03-01

    Real-time observations of transparent analog materials have provided insight, yet the results of these observations are not necessarily representative of opaque metallic systems. In order to study the detailed dynamics of the solidification process, the authors develop the technologies needed for real-time X-ray microscopy of solidifying metallic systems, which has not previously been feasible with the necessary resolution, speed, and contrast. In initial studies of Al-In monotectic alloys unidirectionally solidified in an X-ray transparent furnace, in situ records of the evolution of interface morphologies, interfacial solute accumulation, and formation of the monotectic droplets were obtained for the first time: a radiomicrograph of Al-30In grown during aircraft parabolic maneuvers is presented, showing the volumetric phase distribution in this specimen. The benefits of using X-ray microscopy for postsolidification metallography include ease of specimen preparation, increased sensitivity, and three-dimensional analysis of phase distribution. Imaging of the solute boundary layer revealed that the isoconcentration lines are not parallel (as is often assumed) to the growth interface. Striations in the solidified crystal did not accurately decorate the interface position and shape. The monotectic composition alloy under some conditions grew in an uncoupled manner.

  3. Real-Time X-Ray Transmission Microscopy of Solidifying Al-In Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.; Kaukler, William F.

    1997-01-01

    Real-time observations of transparent analog materials have provided insight, yet the results of these observations are not necessarily representative of opaque metallic systems. In order to study the detailed dynamics of the solidification process, we develop the technologies needed for real-time X ray microscopy of solidifying metallic systems, which has not previously been feasible with the necessary resolution, speed, and contrast. In initial studies of Al-In monotectic alloys unidirectionally solidified in an X-ray transparent furnace, in situ records of the evolution of interface morphologies, interfacial solute accumulation, and formation of the monotectic droplets were obtained for the first time: A radiomicrograph of Al-30In grown during aircraft parabolic maneuvers is presented, showing the volumetric phase distribution in this specimen. The benefits of using X-ray microscopy for postsolidification metallography include ease of specimen preparation, increased sensitivity, and three-dimensional analysis of phase distribution. Imaging of the solute boundary layer revealed that the isoconcentration lines are not parallel (as is often assumed) to the growth interface. Striations in the solidified crystal did not accurately decorate the interface position and shape. The monotectic composition alloy under some conditions grew in an uncoupled manner.

  4. Quantitative studies on inner interfaces in conical metal joints using hard x-ray inline phase contrast radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabler, S.; Rack, T.; Rack, A.; Nelson, K.

    2010-10-01

    Quantitative investigation of micrometer and submicrometer gaps between joining metal surfaces is applied to conical plug-socket connections in dental titanium implants. Microgaps of widths well beyond the resolving power of industrial x-ray systems are imaged by synchrotron phase contrast radiography. Furthermore, by using an analytical model for the relatively simple sample geometry and applying it to numerical forward simulations of the optical Fresnel propagation, we show that quantitative measurements of the microgap width down to 0.1 μm are possible. Image data recorded at the BAMline (BESSY-II light source, Germany) are presented, with the resolving power of the imaging system being 4 μm in absorption mode and ˜14 μm in phase contrast mode (z2=0.74 m). Thus, phase contrast radiography, combined with numerical forward simulations, is capable of measuring the widths of gaps that are two orders of magnitude thinner than the conventional detection limit.

  5. Nondestructive volumetric imaging of tissue microstructure with benchtop x-ray phase-contrast tomography and critical point drying

    PubMed Central

    Zysk, Adam M.; Garson, Alfred B.; Xu, Qiaofeng; Brey, Eric M.; Zhou, Wei; Brankov, Jovan G.; Wernick, Miles N.; Kuszak, Jerome R.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    The in vitro investigation of many optically opaque biological microstructures requires 3D analysis at high resolution over a large field of view. We demonstrate a new nondestructive volumetric imaging technique that eliminates the structural and computational limitations of conventional 2D optical microscopy by combining x-ray phase-contrast tomography with critical point drying sample preparation. We experimentally demonstrate the enhancement of small features afforded by phase-contrast imaging and show the contrast improvement afforded by the drying of a hydrated specimen. We further demonstrate the biological application of this technique by imaging the microstructure of the accommodative apparatus in a primate eye using a benchtop phase-contrast tomography system. PMID:22876355

  6. Differential Phase-Contrast Scanning X-Ray Microscope For Observation Of Low-Z element Specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2010-07-23

    Differential phase-contrast scanning x-ray microscope/microtomography have been developed. A fast readout charge-coupled device (CCD) camera coupled with a visible-light conversion unit is used as a detector to record the transmitted intensity distribution of far-field image for every pixel in a scan. Simultaneous absorption and phase-contrast images are given from a single scan by image-processing of the CCD frames. The system is constructed at BL20XU of SPring-8, and its feasibility is demonstrated at the photon energy of 8 keV. A tantalum test chart is observed and its finest structure of 140 nm pitch pattern is clearly observed. Measured phase sensitivity is approximately {lambda}/270. Some low-Z element specimens are observed and obtained phase contrast image shows much higher sensitivity than that of absorption contrast.

  7. Measurements and simulations analysing the noise behaviour of grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, T.; Bartl, P.; Durst, J.; Haas, W.; Michel, T.; Ritter, A.; Anton, G.

    2011-08-01

    In the last decades, phase-contrast imaging using a Talbot-Lau grating interferometer is possible even with a low-brilliance X-ray source. With the potential of increasing the soft-tissue contrast, this method is on its way into medical imaging. For this purpose, the knowledge of the underlying physics of this technique is necessary.With this paper, we would like to contribute to the understanding of grating-based phase-contrast imaging by presenting results on measurements and simulations regarding the noise behaviour of the differential phases.These measurements were done using a microfocus X-ray tube with a hybrid, photon-counting, semiconductor Medipix2 detector. The additional simulations were performed by our in-house developed phase-contrast simulation tool “SPHINX”, combining both wave and particle contributions of the simulated photons.The results obtained by both of these methods show the same behaviour. Increasing the number of photons leads to a linear decrease of the standard deviation of the phase. The number of used phase steps has no influence on the standard deviation, if the total number of photons is held constant.Furthermore, the probability density function (pdf) of the reconstructed differential phases was analysed. It turned out that the so-called von Mises distribution is the physically correct pdf, which was also confirmed by measurements.This information advances the understanding of grating-based phase-contrast imaging and can be used to improve image quality.

  8. X-ray phase-contrast imaging at 100 keV on a conventional source

    PubMed Central

    Thüring, T.; Abis, M.; Wang, Z.; David, C.; Stampanoni, M.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray grating interferometry is a promising imaging technique sensitive to attenuation, refraction and scattering of the radiation. Applications of this technique in the energy range between 80 and 150 keV pose severe technical challenges, and are still mostly unexplored. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging at such high energies is of relevant scientific and industrial interest, in particular for the investigation of strongly absorbing or thick materials as well as for medical imaging. Here we show the successful implementation of a Talbot-Lau interferometer operated at 100 keV using a conventional X-ray tube and a compact geometry, with a total length of 54 cm. We present the edge-on illumination of the gratings in order to overcome the current fabrication limits. Finally, the curved structures match the beam divergence and allow a large field of view on a short and efficient setup. PMID:24903579

  9. Source size and temporal coherence requirements of coded aperture type x-ray phase contrast imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Munro, Peter R T; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Speller, Robert D; Olivo, Alessandro

    2010-09-13

    There is currently much interest in developing X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging (XPCI) systems which employ laboratory sources in order to deploy the technique in real world applications. The challenge faced by nearly all XPCI techniques is that of efficiently utilising the x-ray flux emitted by an x-ray tube which is polychromatic and possesses only partial spatial coherence. Techniques have, however, been developed which overcome these limitations. Such a technique, known as coded aperture XPCI, has been under development in our laboratories in recent years for application principally in medical imaging and security screening. In this paper we derive limitations imposed upon source polychromaticity and spatial extent by the coded aperture system. We also show that although other grating XPCI techniques employ a different physical principle, they satisfy design constraints similar to those of the coded aperture XPCI. PMID:20940863

  10. Increasing the field of view in grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging using stitched gratings.

    PubMed

    Meiser, J; Willner, M; Schröter, T; Hofmann, A; Rieger, J; Koch, F; Birnbacher, L; Schüttler, M; Kunka, D; Meyer, P; Faisal, A; Amberger, M; Duttenhofer, T; Weber, T; Hipp, A; Ehn, S; Walter, M; Herzen, J; Schulz, J; Pfeiffer, F; Mohr, J

    2016-03-17

    Grating based X-ray differential phase contrast imaging (DPCI) allows for high contrast imaging of materials with similar absorption characteristics. In the last years' publications, small animals or parts of the human body like breast, hand, joints or blood vessels have been studied. Larger objects could not be investigated due to the restricted field of view limited by the available grating area. In this paper, we report on a new stitching method to increase the grating area significantly: individual gratings are merged on a carrier substrate. Whereas the grating fabrication process is based on the LIGA technology (X-ray lithography and electroplating) different cutting and joining methods have been evaluated. First imaging results using a 2×2 stitched analyzer grating in a Talbot-Lau interferometer have been generated using a conventional polychromatic X-ray source. The image quality and analysis confirm the high potential of the stitching method to increase the field of view considerably. PMID:27257876

  11. Spectral x-ray phase contrast imaging for single-shot retrieval of absorption, phase, and differential-phase imagery.

    PubMed

    Das, Mini; Liang, Zhihua

    2014-11-01

    In this Letter, we propose the first single-shot, noninterferometric x-ray imaging method for simultaneous retrieval of absorption, phase, and differential-phase imagery with quantitative accuracy. Our method utilizes a photon-counting spectral x-ray detector in conjunction with a simplified transport-of-intensity equation for coded-aperture phase-contrast imaging to efficiently solve the retrieval problem. This method can utilize an incoherent and polychromatic (clinical or laboratory) x-ray tube and can enable retrieval for a wide range and composition of material properties. The proposed method has been validated via computer simulations and is expected to significantly benefit applications that are sensitive to complexity of measurement, radiation dose and imaging time. PMID:25361350

  12. In-vivo dark-field and phase-contrast x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, M.; Tapfer, A.; Velroyen, A.; Yaroshenko, A.; Pauwels, B.; Hostens, J.; Bruyndonckx, P.; Sasov, A.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2013-11-01

    Novel radiography approaches based on the wave nature of x-rays when propagating through matter have a great potential for improved future x-ray diagnostics in the clinics. Here, we present a significant milestone in this imaging method: in-vivo multi-contrast x-ray imaging of a mouse using a compact scanner. Of particular interest is the enhanced contrast in regions related to the respiratory system, indicating a possible application in diagnosis of lung diseases (e.g. emphysema).

  13. In-vivo dark-field and phase-contrast x-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bech, M.; Tapfer, A.; Velroyen, A.; Yaroshenko, A.; Pauwels, B.; Hostens, J.; Bruyndonckx, P.; Sasov, A.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2013-01-01

    Novel radiography approaches based on the wave nature of x-rays when propagating through matter have a great potential for improved future x-ray diagnostics in the clinics. Here, we present a significant milestone in this imaging method: in-vivo multi-contrast x-ray imaging of a mouse using a compact scanner. Of particular interest is the enhanced contrast in regions related to the respiratory system, indicating a possible application in diagnosis of lung diseases (e.g. emphysema). PMID:24220606

  14. A real-time electronic imaging system for solar X-ray observations from sounding rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. M.; Ting, J. W.; Gerassimenko, M.

    1979-01-01

    A real-time imaging system for displaying the solar coronal soft X-ray emission, focussed by a grazing incidence telescope, is described. The design parameters of the system, which is to be used primarily as part of a real-time control system for a sounding rocket experiment, are identified. Their achievement with a system consisting of a microchannel plate, for the conversion of X-rays into visible light, and a slow-scan vidicon, for recording and transmission of the integrated images, is described in detail. The system has a quantum efficiency better than 8 deg above 8 A, a dynamic range of 1000 coupled with a sensitivity to single photoelectrons, and provides a spatial resolution of 15 arc seconds over a field of view of 40 x 40 square arc minutes. The incident radiation is filtered to eliminate wavelengths longer than 100 A. Each image contains 3.93 x 10 to the 5th bits of information and is transmitted to the ground where it is processed by a mini-computer and displayed in real-time on a standard TV monitor.

  15. Development and validation of real-time simulation of X-ray imaging with respiratory motion.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Franck P; Villard, Pierre-Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    We present a framework that combines evolutionary optimisation, soft tissue modelling and ray tracing on GPU to simultaneously compute the respiratory motion and X-ray imaging in real-time. Our aim is to provide validated building blocks with high fidelity to closely match both the human physiology and the physics of X-rays. A CPU-based set of algorithms is presented to model organ behaviours during respiration. Soft tissue deformation is computed with an extension of the Chain Mail method. Rigid elements move according to kinematic laws. A GPU-based surface rendering method is proposed to compute the X-ray image using the Beer-Lambert law. It is provided as an open-source library. A quantitative validation study is provided to objectively assess the accuracy of both components: (i) the respiration against anatomical data, and (ii) the X-ray against the Beer-Lambert law and the results of Monte Carlo simulations. Our implementation can be used in various applications, such as interactive medical virtual environment to train percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography in interventional radiology, 2D/3D registration, computation of digitally reconstructed radiograph, simulation of 4D sinograms to test tomography reconstruction tools. PMID:26773644

  16. A grating-based single-shot x-ray phase contrast and diffraction method for in vivo imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Eric E.; Kopace, Rael; Stein, Ashley F.; Wen Han

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a single-shot version of the grating-based phase contrast x-ray imaging method and demonstrate its capability of in vivo animal imaging. Here, the authors describe the principle and experimental results. They show the source of artifacts in the phase contrast signal and optimal designs that minimize them. They also discuss its current limitations and ways to overcome them. Methods: A single lead grid was inserted midway between an x-ray tube and an x-ray camera in the planar radiography setting. The grid acted as a transmission grating and cast periodic dark fringes on the camera. The camera had sufficient spatial resolution to resolve the fringes. Refraction and diffraction in the imaged object manifested as position shifts and amplitude attenuation of the fringes, respectively. In order to quantify these changes precisely without imposing a fixed geometric relationship between the camera pixel array and the fringes, a spatial harmonic method in the Fourier domain was developed. The level of the differential phase (refraction) contrast as a function of hardware specifications and device geometry was derived and used to guide the optimal placement of the grid and object. Both ex vivo and in vivo images of rodent extremities were collected to demonstrate the capability of the method. The exposure time using a 50 W tube was 28 s. Results: Differential phase contrast images of glass beads acquired at various grid and object positions confirmed theoretical predictions of how phase contrast and extraneous artifacts vary with the device geometry. In anesthetized rats, a single exposure yielded artifact-free images of absorption, differential phase contrast, and diffraction. Differential phase contrast was strongest at bone-soft tissue interfaces, while diffraction was strongest in bone. Conclusions: The spatial harmonic method allowed us to obtain absorption, differential phase contrast, and diffraction images, all from a

  17. Real-time x-ray studies of indium island growth kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Demasi, Alexander; Rainville, Meliha G.; Ludwig, Karl F.

    2015-03-15

    The authors have investigated the early stages of indium island formation and growth by vapor phase deposition on room temperature sapphire using real-time grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS), followed by ex-situ atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results are consistent with the formation and coalescence of hemispherical islands, as described by Family and Meakin. Monte Carlo simulations of systems of coalescing islands were used to supplement and quantify the results of GISAXS, and a good agreement is seen between the data and the simulations.

  18. Investigation of gastric cancers in nude mice using X-ray in-line phase contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper is to report the new imaging of gastric cancers without the use of imaging agents. Both gastric normal regions and gastric cancer regions can be distinguished by using the principal component analysis (PCA) based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). Methods Human gastric cancer BGC823 cells were implanted into the stomachs of nude mice. Then, 3, 5, 7, 9 or 11 days after cancer cells implantation, the nude mice were sacrificed and their stomachs were removed. X-ray in-line phase contrast imaging (XILPCI), an X-ray phase contrast imaging method, has greater soft tissue contrast than traditional absorption radiography and generates higher-resolution images. The gastric specimens were imaged by an XILPCIs’ charge coupled device (CCD) of 9 μm image resolution. The PCA of the projective images’ region of interests (ROIs) based on GLCM were extracted to discriminate gastric normal regions and gastric cancer regions. Different stages of gastric cancers were classified by using support vector machines (SVMs). Results The X-ray in-line phase contrast images of nude mice gastric specimens clearly show the gastric architectures and the details of the early gastric cancers. The phase contrast computed tomography (CT) images of nude mice gastric cancer specimens are better than the traditional absorption CT images without the use of imaging agents. The results of the PCA of the texture parameters based on GLCM of normal regions is (F1 + F2) > 8.5, but those of cancer regions is (F1 + F2) < 8.5. The classification accuracy is 83.3% that classifying gastric specimens into different stages using SVMs. Conclusions This is a very preliminary feasibility study. With further researches, XILPCI could become a noninvasive method for future the early detection of gastric cancers or medical researches. PMID:25060352

  19. Real-Time X-Ray Microscopy of Al-Cu Eutectic Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.; Curreri, Peter A.; Sen, Subhayu

    1998-01-01

    Recent improvements in the resolution of the X-ray Transmission Microscope (XTM) for Solidification Studies provide microstructure feature detectability down to 5 micrometers during solidification. This presentation will show the recent results from observations made in real-time of the solid-liquid interfacial morphologies of the Al-CuAI2 eutectic alloy. Lamellar dimensions and spacings, transitions of morphology caused by growth rate changes, and eutectic grain structures are open to measurements. A unique vantage point viewing the face of the interface isotherm is possible for the first time with the XTM due to its infinite depth of field. A video of the solid-liquid interfaces seen in-situ and in real-time will be shown.

  20. High-resolution brain tumor visualization using three-dimensional x-ray phase contrast tomography.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, F; Bunk, O; David, C; Bech, M; Le Duc, G; Bravin, A; Cloetens, P

    2007-12-01

    We report on significant advances and new results concerning a recently developed method for grating-based hard x-ray phase tomography. We demonstrate how the soft tissue sensitivity of the technique is increased and show in vitro tomographic images of a tumor bearing rat brain sample, without use of contrast agents. In particular, we observe that the brain tumor and the white and gray brain matter structure in a rat's cerebellum are clearly resolved. The results are potentially interesting from a clinical point of view, since a similar approach using three transmission gratings can be implemented with more readily available x-ray sources, such as standard x-ray tubes. Moreover, the results open the way to in vivo experiments in the near future. PMID:18029984

  1. 'Taking X-ray phase contrast imaging into mainstream applications' and its satellite workshop 'Real and reciprocal space X-ray imaging'.

    PubMed

    Olivo, Alessandro; Robinson, Ian

    2014-03-01

    A double event, supported as part of the Royal Society scientific meetings, was organized in February 2013 in London and at Chicheley Hall in Buckinghamshire by Dr A. Olivo and Prof. I. Robinson. The theme that joined the two events was the use of X-ray phase in novel imaging approaches, as opposed to conventional methods based on X-ray attenuation. The event in London, led by Olivo, addressed the main roadblocks that X-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) is encountering in terms of commercial translation, for clinical and industrial applications. The main driver behind this is the development of new approaches that enable XPCI, traditionally a synchrotron method, to be performed with conventional laboratory sources, thus opening the way to its deployment in clinics and industrial settings. The satellite meeting at Chicheley Hall, led by Robinson, focused on the new scientific developments that have recently emerged at specialized facilities such as third-generation synchrotrons and free-electron lasers, which enable the direct measurement of the phase shift induced by a sample from intensity measurements, typically in the far field. The two events were therefore highly complementary, in terms of covering both the more applied/translational and the blue-sky aspects of the use of phase in X-ray research.  PMID:24470423

  2. Single shot x-ray phase contrast imaging using a direct conversion microstrip detector with single photon sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagias, M.; Cartier, S.; Wang, Z.; Bergamaschi, A.; Dinapoli, R.; Mozzanica, A.; Schmitt, B.; Stampanoni, M.

    2016-06-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging enables the measurement of the electron density of a sample with high sensitivity compared to the conventional absorption contrast. This is advantageous for the study of dose-sensitive samples, in particular, for biological and medical investigations. Recent developments relaxed the requirement for the beam coherence, such that conventional X-ray sources can be used for phase contrast imaging and thus clinical applications become possible. One of the prominent phase contrast imaging methods, Talbot-Lau grating interferometry, is limited by the manufacturing, alignment, and photon absorption of the analyzer grating, which is placed in the beam path in front of the detector. We propose an alternative improved method based on direct conversion charge integrating detectors, which enables a grating interferometer to be operated without an analyzer grating. Algorithms are introduced, which resolve interference fringes with a periodicity of 4.7 μm recorded with a 25 μm pitch Si microstrip detector (GOTTHARD). The feasibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated by an experiment at the TOMCAT beamline of the Swiss Light Source on a polyethylene sample.

  3. The dynamic response of high pressure phase of Si using phase contrast imaging and X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. J.; Galtier, E.; Xing, Z.; Gleason, A.; Granados, E.; Tavella, F.; Schropp, A.; Seiboth, F.; Schroer, C.; Higginbotham, A.; Brown, S.; Arnold, B.; Curiel, R.; Peterswright, D.; Fry, A.; Nagler, B.

    2015-11-01

    Static compression studies have revealed that crystalline silicon undergoes phase transitions from a cubic diamond structure to a variety of phases including body-centered tetragonal phase, an orthorhombic phase, and a hexagonal primitive phase. However, the dynamic response of silicon at high pressure is not well understood. Phase contrast imaging has proven to be a powerful tool for probing density changes caused by the shock propagation into a material. With respect to the elastic and plastic compression, we image shock waves in Si with high spatial resolution using the LCLS X-ray free electron laser and Matter in Extreme Conditions instrument. In this study, the long pulse optical laser with pseudoflat top shape creates high pressures up to 60 GPa. We also measure the crystal structure by observing the X-ray diffraction orthogonal to the shock propagation direction over a range of pressure. In this talk, we will present the capability of simultaneously performing phase contrast imaging and in situ X-ray diffraction during shock loading and will discuss the dynamic response of Si in high pressure phases

  4. Asymmetric rotational axis reconstruction of grating-based x-ray phase contrast tomography of the human cerebellum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Georg; Weitkamp, Timm; Zanette, Irene; Pfeiffer, Franz; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena; David, Christian; Müller, Bert

    2012-10-01

    The brain has an outstanding functional importance in the human organism. Therefore, there is a strong need for three-dimensional brain imaging modalities. Magnetic resonance imaging provides deep insights but its spatial resolution is insufficient to study the structure on the cellular level. X-ray absorption microtomography yields the necessary spatial resolution, but shows only marginal contrast between the different types of brain tissue. Alternatively, differential X-ray phase contrast obtained with grating interferometry, which is known for much better differentiations between soft tissues can be used for the visualization of the human brain. As important structures of the human brain such as the human thalamus have dimensions of several centimeters, a large field of view is required. In the present communication, we report an evaluation of grating-based X-ray phase contrast microtomography in the off-axis modus which allows to expand the field of view up to a factor of two but may reduce the image quality. We demonstrate that tomograms with comparable contrast-to-noise values, about 10%, and 50% inferior spatial resolution can be generated with off-axis measurements. As one can reduce the effective pixel size up to a factor of two, the choice of an asymmetrical rotation axis can give rise to an improvement of the spatial resolution by 20%.

  5. Real-Time X-Ray transmission microscopy of solidifying Al-In Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curreri, Peter A.; Kaukler, William F.

    1996-03-01

    Real-time observations of transparent analog materials have provided insight, yet the results of these observations are not necessarily representative of opaque metallic systems. In order to study the detailed dynamics of the solidification process, we develop the technologies needed for real-time Xray microscopy of solidifying metallic systems, which has not previously been feasible with the necessary resolution, speed, and contrast. In initial studies of Al-ln monotectic alloys unidirectionally solidified in an X-ray transparent furnace, in situ records of the evolution of interface morphologies, interfacial solute accumulation, and formation of the monotectic droplets were obtained for the first time: A radiomicrograph of Al-30In grown during aircraft parabolic maneuvers is presented, showing the volumetric phase distribution in this specimen. The benefits of using X-ray microscopy for postsolidification metallography include ease of specimen preparation, increased sensitivity, and three-dimensional analysis of phase distribution. Imaging of the solute boundary layer revealed that the isoconcentration lines are not parallel (as is often assumed) to the growth interface. Striations in the solidified crystal did not accurately decorate the interface position and shape. The monotectic composition alloy under some conditions grew in an uncoupled manner.

  6. Real-Time X-Ray μ-IMAGING of Living Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammer, Jiri; Holy, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jakubek, Martin; Pospisil, Stanislav; Vavrik, Daniel; Hanus, Robert; Weyda, Frantisek

    2008-06-01

    We present an X-ray μ-radiographic system developed for dynamic high spatial resolution imaging of living small animals. Our system is based on a micro-focus X-ray tube and the hybrid single photon counting silicon pixel detector Medipix2 (matrix 256 × 256 sq. pixels of 55 μm pitch). As soft tissue exhibits low contrast in classical absorption radiography, we exploit a new method of phase-enhanced imaging. Picture quality is further improved by statistical data analysis and extended calibration of individual pixel's response. Computing tomography provides 3D images of studied samples from radiographic projections. For 3D reconstruction of measured objects we use iterative algorithms which are advantageous for low statistics data, low or incomplete number of projections and complex physical model. This diagnostic system allows real-time observation of inner processes in living organisms and dynamic diagnose of living animals for biological studies. The obtained results and real-time stream video capability is demonstrated on samples of a mouse and living worm, caterpillar, etc.

  7. In-Vivo Real-Time X-ray μ-Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammer, Jiri; Holy, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jakubek, Martin; Pospisil, Stanislav; Vavrík, Daniel

    2007-11-01

    The technique of X-ray transmission imaging is available for more than 100 years and it is still one of the fastest and easiest ways how to study the internal structure of living biological samples. The advances in semiconductor technology in last years make possible to fabricate new types of X-ray detectors with direct conversion of interacting X-ray photon to an electric signal. Especially semiconductor pixel detectors seem to be very promising. Compared to the film technique they bring single-quantum and real-time digital information about the studied object with high resolution, high sensitivity and broad dynamic range. These pixel detector-based imaging stand promising as a new tool in the field of small animal imaging, for cancer research and for observation of dynamic processes inside organisms. These detectors open up for instance new possibilities for researchers to perform non-invasive studies of tissue for mutations or pathologies and to monitor disease progression or response to therapy.

  8. Real-time X-ray Imaging of Lung Fluid Volumes in Neonatal Mouse Lung.

    PubMed

    Van Avermaete, Ashley E; Trac, Phi T; Gauthier, Theresa W; Helms, My N

    2016-01-01

    At birth, the lung undergoes a profound phenotypic switch from secretion to absorption, which allows for adaptation to breathing independently. Promoting and sustaining this phenotype is critically important in normal alveolar growth and gas exchange throughout life. Several in vitro studies have characterized the role of key regulatory proteins, signaling molecules, and steroid hormones that can influence the rate of lung fluid clearance. However, in vivo examinations must be performed to evaluate whether these regulatory factors play important physiological roles in regulating perinatal lung liquid absorption. As such, the utilization of real time X-ray imaging to determine perinatal lung fluid clearance, or pulmonary edema, represents a technological advancement in the field. Herein, we explain and illustrate an approach to assess the rate of alveolar lung fluid clearance and alveolar flooding in C57BL/6 mice at post natal day 10 using X-ray imaging and analysis. Successful implementation of this protocol requires prior approval from institutional animal care and use committees (IACUC), an in vivo small animal X-ray imaging system, and compatible molecular imaging software. PMID:27500410

  9. Visualisation by high resolution synchrotron X-ray phase contrast micro-tomography of gas films on submerged superhydrophobic leaves.

    PubMed

    Lauridsen, Torsten; Glavina, Kyriaki; Colmer, Timothy David; Winkel, Anders; Irvine, Sarah; Lefmann, Kim; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Pedersen, Ole

    2014-10-01

    Floods can completely submerge terrestrial plants but some wetland species can sustain O2 and CO2 exchange with the environment via gas films forming on superhydrophobic leaf surfaces. We used high resolution synchrotron X-ray phase contrast micro-tomography in a novel approach to visualise gas films on submerged leaves of common cordgrass (Spartina anglica). 3D tomograms enabled a hitherto unmatched level of detail regarding the micro-topography of leaf gas films. Gas films formed only on the superhydrophobic adaxial leaf side (water droplet contact angle, Φ=162°) but not on the abaxial side (Φ=135°). The adaxial side of the leaves of common cordgrass is plicate with a longitudinal system of parallel grooves and ridges and the vast majority of the gas film volume was found in large ∼180μm deep elongated triangular volumes in the grooves and these volumes were connected to each neighbouring groove via a fine network of gas tubules (∼1.7μm diameter) across the ridges. In addition to the gas film retained on the leaf exterior, the X-ray phase contrast micro-tomography also successfully distinguished gas spaces internally in the leaf tissues, and the tissue porosity (gas volume per unit tissue volume) ranged from 6.3% to 20.3% in tip and base leaf segments, respectively. We conclude that X-ray phase contrast micro-tomography is a powerful tool to obtain quantitative data of exterior gas features on biological samples because of the significant difference in electron density between air, biological tissues and water. PMID:25175398

  10. System for phase-contrast x-ray radiography using X pinch radiation and a method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Chandler, Katherine; Chelkovenko, Tatiana; Hammer, David; Pikuz, Sergei; Sinars, Daniel; Song, Byungmoo

    2007-11-06

    A radiograph system with an anode plate, a cathode plate, and a power source coupled to said anode plate and the cathode plate. At least two wires coupled between the anode plate and the cathode plate provide a configuration to form an X-pinch having a photon source size of less than five microns at energies above 2.5 keV. Material at the configuration forming the X-pinch vaporizes upon application of a suitable current to the wires forming a dense hot plasma and emitting a single x-ray pulse with sufficient photons having energies in the range of from about 2.5 keV to about 20 keV to provide a phase contrast image of an object in the path of the photons. Multiple simultaneous images may be formed of a plurality of objects. Suitable filters and x-ray detectors are provided.

  11. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION Far-field x-ray phase contrast imaging has no detailed information on the object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, V. G.; Argunova, T. S.; Je, J. H.

    2010-11-01

    We show that x-ray phase contrast images of some objects with a small cross-section diameter d satisfy a condition for a far-field approximation d Lt r1 where r1 = (λz)1/2, λ is the x-ray wavelength, z is the distance from the object to the detector. In this case the size of the image does not match the size of the object contrary to the edge detection technique. Moreover, the structure of the central fringes of the image is universal, i.e. it is independent of the object cross-section structure. Therefore, these images have no detailed information on the object.

  12. Initial experimentation with in-line holography x-ray phase-contrast imaging with an ultrafast laser-based x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Kincaid, Russell; Servol, Marina; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Nesterets, Yakov; Gureyev, Tim; Stevenson, Andrew; Wilkins, Steve; Ye, Hongwei; Lipson, Edward; Toth, Remy; Pogany, Andrew; Coman, Ioana

    2007-03-01

    We have investigated experimentally and theoretically the imaging performance of our newly constructed in-line holography x-ray phase-contrast imaging system with an ultrafast laser-based x-ray source. Projection images of nylon fibers with diameters in the 10-330 μm range were obtained using an ultrafast (100 Hz, 28 fs, 40 mJ) laser-based x-ray source with Mo and Ta targets and Be filter, and Gaussian spatial-intensity distribution (FWHMS = 5 μm). A cooled CCD camera (24 μm pitch) with a Gd IIOS II screen coupled via 1:1 optical taper was used (FWHMD = 50 μm). We have investigated nylon-fiber image quality vs. imaging setup geometry and x-ray spectra. The following parameters were evaluated: contrast, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), resolution, and sampling. In addition, we performed theoretical simulation of image formation for the same objects but within a wide range of geometrical parameters. The rigorous wave-optical formalism was used for modeling of the free-space propagation of x-rays from the object plane to the detector, and the "projection approximation" was used. We found reasonable agreement between predictions of our analytical model and the experiments. We conclude that: a) Optimum magnification maximizing contrast and SNR is almost independent of the source-to-detector (R) distance and depends strongly on the diameter of the fiber. b) The corresponding maximum values of the contrast and SNR are almost linear with respect to R; the optimum magnification decreases with fiber diameter. c) The minimum diameter of fiber defines the minimum source-to-object distance R I if R is fixed and the object is moved.

  13. Phase contrast X-ray microtomography of the Rhodnius prolixus head: Comparison of direct reconstruction and phase retrieval approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, A. P.; Braz, D.; Nogueira, L. P.; Colaço, M. V.; Soares, J.; Cardoso, S. C.; Garcia, E. S.; Azambuja, P.; Gonzalez, M. S.; Mohammadi, S.; Tromba, G.; Barroso, R. C.

    2014-02-01

    We have used phase-contrast X-ray microtomography (PPC-μCT) to study the head of the blood-feeding bug, Rhodnius prolixus, which is one of the most important insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, ethiologic agent of Chagas disease in Latin America. Images reconstructed from phase-retrieved projections processed by ANKA phase are compared to those obtained through direct tomographic reconstruction of the flat-field-corrected transmission radiographs. It should be noted that the relative locations of the important morphological internal structures are observable with a precision that is difficult to obtain without the phase retrieval approach.

  14. Real Time Space Weather Support for Chandra X-ray Observatory Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, S. L.; Miller, S.; Minow, J. I.; Wolk, S.; Aldcroft, T. L.; Spitzbart, B. D.; Swartz, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    NASA launched the Chandra X-ray Observatory in July 1999. Soon after first light in August 1999, however, degradation in the energy resolution and charge transfer efficiency of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) x-ray detectors was observed. The source of the degradation was quickly identified as radiation damage in the charge-transfer channel of the front-illuminated CCDs, by weakly penetrating ("soft", 100-500 keV) protons as Chandra passed through the Earth's radiation belts and ring currents. As soft protons were not considered a risk to spacecraft health before launch, the only on-board radiation monitoring system is the Electron, Proton, and Helium Instrument (EPHIN) which was included on Chandra with the primary purpose of monitoring energetic solar particle events. Further damage to the ACIS detector has been successfully mitigated through a combination of careful mission planning, autonomous on-board radiation protection, and manual intervention based upon real-time monitoring of the soft-proton environment. The AE-8 and AP-8 trapped radiation models and Chandra Radiation Models are used to schedule science operations in regions of low proton flux. EPHIN has been used as the primary autonomous in-situ radiation trigger; but, it is not sensitive to the soft protons that damage the front-illuminated CCDs. Monitoring of near-real-time space weather data sources provides critical information on the proton environment outside the Earth's magnetosphere due to solar proton events and other phenomena. The operations team uses data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) to provide near-real-time monitoring of the proton environment; however, these data do not give a representative measure of the soft-proton (< 1 MeV) flux in Chandra's high elliptical orbit. The only source of relevant measurements of sub-MeV protons is the Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (EPAM) aboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite at L1

  15. Real Time Space Weather Support for Chandra X-Ray Observatory Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Minow, Joseph I.; Miller, J. Scott; Wolk, Scott J.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Spitzbart, Bradley D.; Swartz. Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA launched the Chandra X-ray Observatory in July 1999. Soon after first light in August 1999, however, degradation in the energy resolution and charge transfer efficiency of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) x-ray detectors was observed. The source of the degradation was quickly identified as radiation damage in the charge-transfer channel of the front-illuminated CCDs, by weakly penetrating ( soft , 100 500 keV) protons as Chandra passed through the Earth s radiation belts and ring currents. As soft protons were not considered a risk to spacecraft health before launch, the only on-board radiation monitoring system is the Electron, Proton, and Helium Instrument (EPHIN) which was included on Chandra with the primary purpose of monitoring energetic solar particle events. Further damage to the ACIS detector has been successfully mitigated through a combination of careful mission planning, autonomous on-board radiation protection, and manual intervention based upon real-time monitoring of the soft-proton environment. The AE-8 and AP-8 trapped radiation models and Chandra Radiation Models are used to schedule science operations in regions of low proton flux. EPHIN has been used as the primary autonomous in-situ radiation trigger; but, it is not sensitive to the soft protons that damage the front-illuminated CCDs. Monitoring of near-real-time space weather data sources provides critical information on the proton environment outside the Earth s magnetosphere due to solar proton events and other phenomena. The operations team uses data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) to provide near-real-time monitoring of the proton environment; however, these data do not give a representative measure of the soft-proton (< 1 MeV) flux in Chandra s high elliptical orbit. The only source of relevant measurements of sub-MeV protons is the Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (EPAM) aboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite at L1

  16. Real Time Space Weather Support for Chandra X-ray Observatory Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Miller, J. Scott; Minow, Joseph I.; Wolk, Scott J.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Spitzbart, Bradley D.; Swartz, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA launched the Chandra X-ray Observatory in July 1999. Soon after first light in August 1999, however, degradation in the energy resolution and charge transfer efficiency of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) x-ray detectors was observed. The source of the degradation was quickly identified as radiation damage in the charge-transfer channel of the front-illuminated CCDs, by weakly penetrating ("soft", 100-500 keV) protons as Chandra passed through the Earth s radiation belts and ring currents. As soft protons were not considered a risk to spacecraft health before launch, the only on-board radiation monitoring system is the Electron, Proton, and Helium Instrument (EPHIN) which was included on Chandra with the primary purpose of monitoring energetic solar particle events. Further damage to the ACIS detector has been successfully mitigated through a combination of careful mission planning, autonomous on-board radiation protection, and manual intervention based upon real-time monitoring of the soft-proton environment. The AE-8 and AP-8 trapped radiation models and Chandra Radiation Models are used to schedule science operations in regions of low proton flux. EPHIN has been used as the primary autonomous in-situ radiation trigger; but, it is not sensitive to the soft protons that damage the front-illuminated CCDs. Monitoring of near-real-time space weather data sources provides critical information on the proton environment outside the Earth's magnetosphere due to solar proton events and other phenomena. The operations team uses data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) to provide near-real-time monitoring of the proton environment; however, these data do not give a representative measure of the soft-proton (less than 1 MeV) flux in Chandra s high elliptical orbit. The only source of relevant measurements of sub-MeV protons is the Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (EPAM) aboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE

  17. Dynamic Multi-frame X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging of Impact Experiments at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Brian; Fredenburg, Anthony; Iverson, Adam; Carlson, Carl; Fezzaa, Kamel; Clements, Bradford; Short, Mark

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in coupling synchrotron X-ray diagnostics to dynamic compression experiments are providing new information about the response of materials at extremes conditions. For example, propagation based X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) which is sensitive to differences in density (or index of refraction) has been successfully used to study a wide range of phenomena including jet-formation in metals, crack nucleation and propagation, and detonator dynamics. These experimental results have relied, in part, on the development of a robust, optically multiplexed detector system that captures single X-ray bunch images with micrometer spatial resolution on the nanosecond time scale. In this work, the multi-frame PCI (MPCI) system is described along with experiments designed to examine the compression of an idealized system of spheres subjected to impact loading. Additional advances to the detector system will be presented that are designed to retrieve phase information from the X-ray images for fast tomography applications. Experimental results, implications, and future work will be discussed.

  18. Multi-frame X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging of Impact Experiments at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Brian; Iverson, Adam; Carlson, Carl; Teel, Matthew; Morrow, Benjamin; Fredenburg, David

    Recent advances in coupling synchrotron X-ray diagnostics to dynamic compression experiments are providing new information about the response of materials at extremes conditions. For example, propagation based X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) which is sensitive to differences in density (or index of refraction) has been successfully used to study a wide range of phenomena including jet-formation in metals, crack nucleation and propagation, and detonator dynamics. These experimental results have relied, in part, on the development of a robust, optically multiplexed detector system that captures single X-ray bunch images with micrometer spatial resolution on the nanosecond time scale. In this work, the multi-frame PCI (MPCI) system is described along with experiment highlights that include the compression of an idealized system of spheres subjected to impact loading. Additional advances to the detector system will be presented that are designed to increase the efficiency of the detector system and to retrieve phase information from the X-ray images which is required for determining the density during dynamic loading. Experimental results, implications, and future work will be discussed.

  19. X-ray differential phase contrast imaging using a grating interferometer and a single photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yongshuai; Zhang, Ran; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-03-01

    For grating interferometer-based x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging systems, their noise performance is strongly dependent on both the visibility of the interference fringe pattern and the total number of photons used to acquire and extract the DPC signal. For a given interferometer, it is usually designed to work at a specific x-ray energy, therefore any deviation from the designed energy may result in certain visibility loss. In this work, a single photon counting detector (PCD) was incorporated into a DPC imaging system, which enabled photons with energies close to the designed operation energy of the interferometer to be selectively used for DPC signal extraction. This approach led to significant boost in the fringe visibility, but it also discarded x-ray photons with other energies incident on the detector and might result in degradations of the overall radiation dose efficiency of the DPC imaging systems. This work presents a novel singular value decomposition (SVD)-based method to leverage the entire spectrum of x-ray photons detected by the PCD, enabling both fringe visibility improvement and reduction in image noise. As evidenced by the results of experimental phantom studies, the contrast-to-noise ratio of the final DPC images could be effectively improved by the proposed method.

  20. Motionless electromagnetic phase stepping versus mechanical phase stepping in x-ray phase-contrast imaging with a compact source.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Katherine J; Miao, Houxun; Gomella, Andrew A; Bennett, Eric E; Foster, Barbara A; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2015-04-21

    X-ray phase contrast imaging based on grating interferometers detects the refractive index distribution of an object without relying on radiation attenuation, thereby having the potential for reduced radiation absorption. These techniques belong to the broader category of optical wavefront measurement, which requires stepping the phase of the interference pattern to obtain a pixel-wise map of the phase distortion of the wavefront. While phase stepping traditionally involves mechanical scanning of a grating or mirror, we developed electromagnetic phase stepping (EPS) for imaging with compact sources to obviate the need for mechanical movement. In EPS a solenoid coil is placed outside the x-ray tube to shift its focal spot with a magnetic field, causing a relative movement between the projection of the sample and the interference pattern in the image. Here we present two embodiments of this method. We verified experimentally that electromagnetic and mechanical phase stepping give the same results and attain the same signal-to-noise ratios under the same radiation dose. We found that the relative changes of interference fringe visibility were within 3.0% when the x-ray focal spot was shifted by up to 1.0 mm in either direction. We conclude that when using x-ray tube sources, EPS is an effective means of phase stepping without the need for mechanical movement. PMID:25803511

  1. Phase-contrast x-ray imaging of microstructure and fatigue-crack propagation in single-crystal nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husseini, Naji Sami

    Single-crystal nickel-base superalloys are ubiquitous in demanding turbine-blade applications, and they owe their remarkable resilience to their dendritic, hierarchical microstructure and complex composition. During normal operations, they endure rapid low-stress vibrations that may initiate fatigue cracks. This failure mode in the very high-cycle regime is poorly understood, in part due to inadequate testing and diagnostic equipment. Phase-contrast imaging with coherent synchrotron x rays, however, is an emergent technique ideally suited for dynamic processes such as crack initiation and propagation. A specially designed portable ultrasonic-fatigue apparatus, coupled with x-ray radiography, allows real-time, in situ imaging while simulating service conditions. Three contrast mechanisms - absorption, diffraction, and phase contrast - span the immense breadth of microstructural features in superalloys. Absorption contrast is sensitive to composition and crack displacements, and diffraction contrast illuminates dislocation aggregates and crystallographic misorientations. Phase contrast enhances electron-density gradients and is particularly useful for fatigue-crack studies, sensitive to internal crack tips and openings less than one micrometer. Superalloy samples were imaged without external stresses to study microstructure and mosaicity. Maps of rhenium and tungsten concentrations revealed strong segregation to the center of dendrites, as manifested by absorption contrast. Though nominally single crystals, dendrites were misoriented from the bulk by a few degrees, as revealed by diffraction contrast. For dynamic studies of cyclic fatigue, superalloys were mounted in the portable ultrasonic-fatigue apparatus, subjected to a mean tensile stress of ˜50-150 MPa, and cycled in tension to initiate and propagate fatigue cracks. Radiographs were recorded every thousand cycles over the multimillion-cycle lifetime to measure micron-scale crack growth. Crack

  2. Real-Time X-Ray Transmission Microscopy for Fundamental Studies Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.; Kaukler, William F.; Sen, Subhayu; Peters, Palmer

    1998-01-01

    High resolution real-time X-ray Transmission Microscopy, XTM, has been applied to obtain information fundamental to solidification of optically opaque metallic systems. We have previously reported the measurement of solute profile in the liquid, phase growth, and detailed solid-liquid interfacial morphology of aluminum based alloys with exposure times less than 2 seconds. Recent advances in XTM furnace design have provided an increase in real-time magnification (during solidification) for the XTM from 4OX to 16OX. The increased magnification has enabled for the first time the XTM imaging of real-time growth of fibers and particles with diameters of 5 micrometers. We have applied this system to study of the kinetics of formation and morphological evolution of secondary fibers and particles in Al-Bi monotectic alloys to observe a previously unreported velocity dependent thermo-capillary depletion mechanism for Bi rich liquid which can penetrate many fiber diameters into the solid-liquid interface. In this talk we will discuss application of the XTM to the study the fundamentals of monotectic and eutectic solidification, the enhancement of XTM data with precise solid liquid interfacial temperature and thermal gradient measurement techniques, and the application of this technology to the study of the fundamentals of solidification in microgravity,

  3. SOFT-X RAY DIAGNOSTICS AND TREATMENTS FOR FUTURE REAL TIME APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pacella, D.; Mazon, D.

    2008-03-12

    This paper offers a preliminary review of the present diagnostics and data analysis techniques in the domain of Soft X-ray (SXR) emissions of fusion magnetic plasmas, including a short description of the theoretical background as well. Particular attention is devoted to the wide use of SXR tomography and impurity transport simulation. In their actual form, these techniques are not adequate to future real time applications. For this goal a step forward in the diagnosing and analysis of SXR emissions is required. The following part of the paper is therefore dedicated to the discussion of these improvements. The first one is the SXR tomography optimized for real time applications, like that one developed at Tore Supra (Cadarache, France). Fast 2-D tomographic inversions using different techniques (regularisation of Minimum Fisher, Maximum entropy, Zernicke polynomial expansions), will be optimized to be performed in a few millisecond time scale, crucial for MHD analysis, mode detection and localisation. The other goal to be pursued is the energy resolved imaging, now possible with a gas Micro Pattern Gas Detector with pixel read-out, as recently demonstrated at FTU (Frascati, Italy) and at NSTX (Princeton NJ, US), together with an ad hoc modeling of SXR emissions, compatible with future real time applications.

  4. Improvement of the visibility for x-ray phase contrast imaging using photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, S.; Tanabe, K.; Yoshimuta, T.; Kimura, K.; Shirai, T.; Doki, T.; Horiba, A.; Sato, T.

    2016-03-01

    In the case of employing Talbot interferometer to the medical imaging, a practical X-ray tube should be combined with the interferometer. Practical x-ray tubes radiate continuous X-rays and the interference intensity (so-called visibility) becomes worse because of the wide spectrum of continuous X-rays. In order to achieve high visibility, we have estimated the visibility improvement effect using the photon counting detector (PCD). The detected spectra using a 2D imaging PCD are distorted due to charge sharing and pileup, which would make visibility worse. First, we have made a model for Monte-Calro calculation to calculate the distorted spectra and point spread function (PSF) for the charge sharing. The calculation model is based on the summation of the monochromatic response function which is the detected charge on the interested pixel for one photon injection. Distortion of spectra was calculated taking into account the charge sharing effect and pulse pileup. Then we have obtained an estimation result of the visibility improvement effect using the PCD of CdTe. The visibilities of the energy integrating detector (EID) of CdTe and the PCD are calculated and compared, where the Talbot interferometer type is a fringe scanning using phase grating and absorption grating. Visibility of the EID is 36% and that of PCD is 60% without pileup effect. In high dose rate condition, the CNR decreasing ratio is remarkable. The visibility decreasing effect and quantum noise increasing effect are correlated and the both effect worsen the CNR.

  5. Real-time microstructure of shocked LiF crystals: Use of synchrotron x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turneaure, Stefan J.; Gupta, Y. M.; Zimmerman, K.; Perkins, K.; Yoo, C. S.; Shen, G.

    2009-03-01

    We describe the use of a third generation synchrotron facility to obtain in situ, real-time, x-ray diffraction measurements in plate impact experiments. Subnanosecond duration x-ray pulses were utilized to record diffraction data from pure and magnesium-doped LiF single crystals shocked along the [111] and [100] orientations. The peak stresses were 3.0 GPa for the [111] oriented LiF and between 3.0 and 5.0 GPa for the [100] oriented LiF. For these stresses, shock compression along [111] results in elastic deformation and shock compression along [100] results in elastic-plastic deformation. Because of the quality of the synchrotron x-ray pulses, both shifting and broadening of the diffraction data were obtained simultaneously. As expected, shifts for elastic compression and elastic-plastic compression in shocked LiF were consistent with uniaxial and isotropic lattice compression, respectively. More importantly, diffraction patterns from crystals shocked along [100] exhibited substantial broadening due to elastic-plastic deformation. The broadening indicates that the shocked LiF(100) crystals developed substructure with a characteristic size for coherently diffracting domains (0.1-10 μm) and a distribution of (100) microlattice-plane rotations (˜1° wide). In contrast to the LiF(100) results, broadening of the diffraction pattern did not occur for elastically deformed LiF(111). Another important finding was that the amount of lattice disorder for shocked LiF(100) depends on the loading history; the broadening was larger for the magnesium-doped LiF(100) (large elastic precursor) than for ultrapure LiF(100) (small elastic precursor) shocked to the same peak stress. The data are simulated by calculating the diffraction pattern from LiF(100) with a model microstructure consisting of coherently diffracting domains. The lattice orientation and longitudinal strain is assumed uniform within domains, but they vary from domain to domain with Gaussian distributions

  6. On filtration for high-energy phase-contrast x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riess, Christian; Mohamed, Ashraf; Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-03-01

    Phase-sensitive x-ray imaging promises unprecedented soft-tissue contrast and resolution. However, several practical challenges have to be overcome when using the setup in a clinical environment. The system design that is currently closest to clinical use is the grating-based Talbot-Lau interferometer (GBI).1-3 The requirements for patient imaging are low patient dose, fast imaging time, and high image quality. For GBI, these requirements can be met most successfully with a narrow energy width, high- ux spectrum. Additionally, to penetrate a human-sized object, the design energy of the system has to be well above 40 keV. To our knowledge, little research has been done so far to investigate optimal GBI filtration at such high x-ray energies. In this paper, we study different filtration strategies and their impact on high-energy GBI. Specifically, we compare copper filtration at low peak voltage with equal-absorption, equal-imaging time K-edge filtration of spectra with higher peak voltage under clinically realistic boundary conditions. We specifically focus on a design energy of 59 keV and investigate combinations of tube current, peak voltage, and filtration that lead to equal patient absorption. Theoretical considerations suggest that the K edge of tantalum might provide a transmission pocket at around 59 keV, yielding a well-shaped spectrum. Although one can observe a slight visibility benefit when using tungsten or tantalum filtration, experimental results indicate that visibility benefits most from a low x-ray tube peak voltage.

  7. Real time cumulant approach for charge-transfer satellites in x-ray photoemission spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kas, Joshua J.; Vila, Fernando D.; Rehr, John J.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2015-03-01

    X-ray photoemission spectra generally exhibit satellite features in addition to quasi-particle peaks due to many-body excitations which have been of considerable theoretical and experimental interest. However, the satellites attributed to charge-transfer (CT) excitations in correlated materials have proved difficult to calculate from first principles. Here we report a real-time, real-space approach for such calculations based on a cumulant representation of the core-hole Green’s function and time-dependent density functional theory. This approach also yields an interpretation of CT satellites in terms of a complex oscillatory, transient response to a suddenly created core hole. Illustrative results for TiO2 and NiO are in good agreement with experiment.

  8. In Vitro Validation of an Artefact Suppression Algorithm in X-Ray Phase-Contrast Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hirano, Shin-Ichi; Gupta, Rajiv; Ando, Masami

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast tomography can significantly increase the contrast-resolution of conventional attenuation-contrast imaging, especially for soft-tissue structures that have very similar attenuation. Just as in attenuation-based tomography, phase contrast tomography requires a linear dependence of aggregate beam direction on the incremental direction alteration caused by individual voxels along the path of the X-ray beam. Dense objects such as calcifications in biological specimens violate this condition. There are extensive beam deflection artefacts in the vicinity of such structures because they result in large distortion of wave front due to the large difference of refractive index; for such large changes in beam direction, the transmittance of the silicon analyzer crystal saturates and is no longer linearly dependent on the angle of refraction. This paper describes a method by which these effects can be overcome and excellent soft-tissue contrast of phase tomography can be preserved in the vicinity of such artefact-producing structures. PMID:26295713

  9. In Vitro Validation of an Artefact Suppression Algorithm in X-Ray Phase-Contrast Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hirano, Shin-ichi; Gupta, Rajiv; Ando, Masami

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast tomography can significantly increase the contrast-resolution of conventional attenuation-contrast imaging, especially for soft-tissue structures that have very similar attenuation. Just as in attenuation-based tomography, phase contrast tomography requires a linear dependence of aggregate beam direction on the incremental direction alteration caused by individual voxels along the path of the X-ray beam. Dense objects such as calcifications in biological specimens violate this condition. There are extensive beam deflection artefacts in the vicinity of such structures because they result in large distortion of wave front due to the large difference of refractive index; for such large changes in beam direction, the transmittance of the silicon analyzer crystal saturates and is no longer linearly dependent on the angle of refraction. This paper describes a method by which these effects can be overcome and excellent soft-tissue contrast of phase tomography can be preserved in the vicinity of such artefact-producing structures. PMID:26295713

  10. X-ray phase-contrast CO2 angiography for sub-10 μm vessel imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundström, U.; Larsson, D. H.; Burvall, A.; Scott, L.; Westermark, U. K.; Wilhelm, M.; Arsenian Henriksson, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2012-11-01

    X-ray in-line phase contrast has recently been combined with CO2 angiography for high-resolution small-animal vascular imaging at low radiation dose. In this paper we further investigate the potential and limitations of this method and demonstrate observation of vessels down to 8 μm in diameter, considerably smaller than the 60 μm previously reported. Our in-line phase-contrast imaging system is based on a liquid-metal-jet-anode x-ray source and utilizes free-space propagation to convert phase shifts, caused by refractive index variations, into intensity differences. Enhanced refractive index variations are obtained through injection of CO2 gas into the vascular system to replace the blood. We show rat-kidney images with blood vessels down to 27 μm in diameter and mouse-ear images with vessels down to 8 μm. The minimum size of observable blood vessels is found to be limited by the penetration of gas into the vascular system and the signal-to-noise ratio, i.e. the allowed dose. The diameters of vessels being gas-filled depend on the gas pressure and follow a simple model based on surface tension. A theoretical signal-to-noise comparison shows that this method requires 1000 times less radiation dose than conventional iodine-based absorption contrast for observing sub-50 μm vessels.

  11. Visualization of microvasculature by x-ray in-line phase contrast imaging in rat spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jian-Zhong; Wu, Tian-Ding; Zeng, Lei; Liu, Hui-Qiang; He, You; Du, Guo-Hao; Lu, Hong-Bin

    2012-03-01

    Computed tomography combined with angiography has recently been developed to visualize three-dimensional (3D) vascular structure in experi-mental and clinical studies. However, there remain difficulties in using conventional x-ray angiography to detect small vessels with a diameter less than 200 µm. This study attempted to develop a novel method for visualizing the micro-angioarchitecture of rat spinal cord. Herein, synchrotron radiation-based x-ray in-line phase contrast computed tomography (IL-XPCT) was used to obtain 3D micro-vessel structure without angiography. The digital phase contrast images were compared with conventional histological sections. Our results clearly demonstrated that the resolution limit of the spatial blood supply network in the normal rat thoracic cord appeared to be as small as ∼10 µm. The rendered images were consistent with that obtained from histo-morphology sections. In summary, IL-XPCT is a potential tool to investigate the 3D neurovascular morphology of the rat spinal cord without the use of contrast agents, and it could help to evaluate the validity of the pro- or anti-angiogenesis therapeutic strategies on microvasculature repair or regeneration.

  12. A compressed sensing based reconstruction algorithm for synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melli, Seyed Ali; Wahid, Khan A.; Babyn, Paul; Montgomery, James; Snead, Elisabeth; El-Gayed, Ali; Pettitt, Murray; Wolkowski, Bailey; Wesolowski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography is increasingly used in pre-clinical imaging. However, it typically requires a large number of projections, and subsequently a large radiation dose, to produce high quality images. To improve the applicability of this imaging technique, reconstruction algorithms that can reduce the radiation dose and acquisition time without degrading image quality are needed. The proposed research focused on using a novel combination of Douglas-Rachford splitting and randomized Kaczmarz algorithms to solve large-scale total variation based optimization in a compressed sensing framework to reconstruct 2D images from a reduced number of projections. Visual assessment and quantitative performance evaluations of a synthetic abdomen phantom and real reconstructed image of an ex-vivo slice of canine prostate tissue demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is competitive in reconstruction process compared with other well-known algorithms. An additional potential benefit of reducing the number of projections would be reduction of time for motion artifact to occur if the sample moves during image acquisition. Use of this reconstruction algorithm to reduce the required number of projections in synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography is an effective form of dose reduction that may pave the way for imaging of in-vivo samples.

  13. Multilayer-coated micro-grating array for x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Susanna K.; Liu, Chian; Assoufid, Lahsen; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Mazilu, Dumitru; Bennett, Eric; Kemble, Camille K.; Wen, Han H.

    2011-05-01

    X-ray imaging techniques based on grating interferometers rely on transmission gratings to detect x-ray refraction and scattering in a sample. Gratings periods below 2 microns are challenging to realize due to the high aspect ratio of the structures. We propose a method to fabricate transmission gratings with sub-micron periods over centimeter areas by multilayer coating of a staircase (echelle) substrate. The advantage of this approach is the high aspect ratio of multilayer coating and the large area of the echelle substrate. The staircase pattern is etched on the surface of a silicon wafer through anisotropic etching. Multiple layers are deposited on the horizontal surfaces of the stairs by magnetron sputtering in a single run. The layers alternate between two materials of different absorption coefficients or refractive indices. The layer thickness d is designed to be (stair height)/2N, where 2N is the total number of layers. The incident xray beam is parallel to the layers and oblique to the wafer surface. Each stair of the echelle substrate forms a micro grating of period 2d, and the array of micro gratings together act as a single grating over a large area given the right continuity conditions. The grating period potentially can be below 100 nm. We present theoretical description of wave diffraction by the grating array, and results of the first fabrication test with magnetron sputtering deposition.

  14. Advancement of Solidification Processing Technology Through Real Time X-Ray Transmission Microscopy: Sample Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.; Curreri, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    Two types of samples were prepared for the real time X-ray transmission microscopy (XTM) characterization. In the first series directional solidification experiments were carried out to evaluate the critical velocity of engulfment of zirconia particles in the Al and Al-Ni eutectic matrix under ground (l-g) conditions. The particle distribution in the samples was recorded on video before and after the samples were directionally solidified. In the second series samples of the above two type of composites were prepared for directional solidification runs to be carried out on the Advanced Gradient Heating Facility (AGHF) aboard the space shuttle during the LMS mission in June 1996. X-ray microscopy proved to be an invaluable tool for characterizing the particle distribution in the metal matrix samples. This kind of analysis helped in determining accurately the critical velocity of engulfment of ceramic particles by the melt interface in the opaque metal matrix composites. The quality of the cast samples with respect to porosity and instrumented thermocouple sheath breakage or shift could be easily viewed and thus helped in selecting samples for the space shuttle experiments. Summarizing the merits of this technique it can be stated that this technique enabled the use of cast metal matrix composite samples since the particle location was known prior to the experiment.

  15. In-situ X-ray Synchrotron Microtomography: Real Time Pore Structure Evolution during Olivine Carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Fusseis, F.; Lisabeth, H. P.; Xiao, X.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral carbonation has been proposed as a promising method for long-term, secure sequestration of carbon dioxide. In porous rocks, fluid-rock interactions can significantly alter the pore space and thus exert important controls over the rate and extent of carbonation. We constructed an x-ray transparent pressure cell [Fusseis et al., 2013] to investigate the real time pore structure evolution during mineral carbonation in porous olivine aggregates. In each experiment, a sintered olivine sample was subjected to a confining pressure of 13 MPa and a pore pressure of 10 MPa, with a sodium bicarbonate solution (NaHCO3 at 1.5 M) as pore fluid. At these pressure conditions, the cell was heated to 473 K. Constant pressure and temperature conditions were maintained during the length of the experiments, lasting 72-120 hours. Using a polychromatic beam in the 2-BM upstream hutch at the Advanced Photon Source, 3-dimensional (3-D) microtomography data were collected in 20 seconds with 30-minute interval. A novel phase retrieval reconstruction algorithm [Paganin et al., 2002] was used to reconstruct microtomographic datasets with a voxel size of ~1.1 micron. The microtomography images at different stages of the carbonation process reveal progressive growth of new crystals in the pore space. Integration of a x-ray transparent pressure vessel with flow through capacity and 3-D microtomography provides a novel research direction of studying the coupled chemo-hydro-thermal-mechanical processes in rocks.

  16. Flat x-ray image intensifier system for real-time fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onihashi, Hiroshi; Aida, Hiroshi; No, Kiyumi; Noji, Takashi; Murakoshi, Yuichi; Saito, Keiichi; Koma, Junsuke

    2000-04-01

    A new flat X-ray image intensifier (Flat II) system, using a large-area electron multiplier for applications in real-time fluoroscopy imaging, is under development by the authors. The Flat II system, mainly consists of two devices; the image processing equipment and the image acquisition system by charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera. The image processing is performed as follows. The X-ray is converted to visual light by cesium iodide scintillator and to electrons by photo- cathode. A large-area electron multiplier is located adjacent to the photo-cathode, and amplifies electron current up to a few hundred times. Amplified electrons are again converted to bright visual image by the output phosphor screen. The bright visual image is subsequently detected with a CCD camera system. The electron multiplier used for present work is that of metal-dynode array construction. The principle of metal- dynode electron multipliers is well known. Since it is technically difficult to make the electron multiplier with a fine pitch, sufficient resolution could not be obtained until now. However, we could manufacture that of 6-inches (15 cm) size with 0.3 mm and 0.2 mm pitch, and manufactured the prototype Flat II system using the 0.3 mm pitch multiplier as an experiment. We acquired the fundamental characteristics and the image quality of prototype Flat II system. In this paper, the physical characteristics such as modulation transfer function (MTF), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), etc. are discussed.

  17. Quantitative studies on inner interfaces in conical metal joints using hard x-ray inline phase contrast radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Zabler, S.; Rack, T.; Nelson, K.; Rack, A.

    2010-10-15

    Quantitative investigation of micrometer and submicrometer gaps between joining metal surfaces is applied to conical plug-socket connections in dental titanium implants. Microgaps of widths well beyond the resolving power of industrial x-ray systems are imaged by synchrotron phase contrast radiography. Furthermore, by using an analytical model for the relatively simple sample geometry and applying it to numerical forward simulations of the optical Fresnel propagation, we show that quantitative measurements of the microgap width down to 0.1 {mu}m are possible. Image data recorded at the BAMline (BESSY-II light source, Germany) are presented, with the resolving power of the imaging system being 4 {mu}m in absorption mode and {approx}14 {mu}m in phase contrast mode (z{sub 2}=0.74 m). Thus, phase contrast radiography, combined with numerical forward simulations, is capable of measuring the widths of gaps that are two orders of magnitude thinner than the conventional detection limit.

  18. Real-Time X-ray Radiography Diagnostics of Components in Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cortopassi, A. C.; Martin, H. T.; Boyer, E.; Kuo, K. K.

    2012-01-01

    the recession of the solid propellant grain can drastically alter the flow-field and effect the recession of internal insulation and nozzle materials. Simultaneous measurement of the overall erosion rate, the development of the char layer, and the recession of the char-virgin interface during the motor operation can be rather difficult. While invasive techniques have been used with limited success, they have serious drawbacks. Break wires or make wire sensors can be installed into a sufficient number of locations in the charring material from which a time history of the charring surface can be deduced. These sensors fundamentally alter the local structure of the material in which they are imbedded. Also, the location of these sensors within the material is not known precisely without the use of an X-ray. To determine instantaneous recession rates, real-time X-ray radiography (X-ray RTR) has been utilized in several SRM experiments at PSU. The X-ray RTR system discussed in this paper consists of an X-ray source, X-ray image intensifier, and CCD camera connected to a capture computer. The system has been used to examine the ablation process of internal insulation as well as nozzle material erosion in a subscale SRM. The X-ray source is rated to 320 kV at 10 mA and has both a large (5.5 mm) and small (3.0 mm) focal spot. The lead-lined cesium iodide X-ray image intensifier produces an image which is captured by a CCD camera with a 1,000 x 1,000 pixel resolution. To produce accurate imagery of the object of interest, the alignment of the X-ray source to the X-ray image intensifier is crucial. The image sequences captured during the operation of an SRM are then processed to enhance the quality of the images. This procedure allows for computer software to extract data on the total erosion rate and the char layer thickness. Figure 1 Error! Reference source not found.shows a sequence of images captured during the operation the subscale SRM with the X-ray RTR system. The X-ray

  19. Real-time direct and diffraction X-ray imaging of irregular silicon wafer breakage

    PubMed Central

    Rack, Alexander; Scheel, Mario; Danilewsky, Andreas N.

    2016-01-01

    Fracture and breakage of single crystals, particularly of silicon wafers, are multi-scale problems: the crack tip starts propagating on an atomic scale with the breaking of chemical bonds, forms crack fronts through the crystal on the micrometre scale and ends macroscopically in catastrophic wafer shattering. Total wafer breakage is a severe problem for the semiconductor industry, not only during handling but also during temperature treatments, leading to million-dollar costs per annum in a device production line. Knowledge of the relevant dynamics governing perfect cleavage along the {111} or {110} faces, and of the deflection into higher indexed {hkl} faces of higher energy, is scarce due to the high velocity of the process. Imaging techniques are commonly limited to depicting only the state of a wafer before the crack and in the final state. This paper presents, for the first time, in situ high-speed crack propagation under thermal stress, imaged simultaneously in direct transmission and diffraction X-ray imaging. It shows how the propagating crack tip and the related strain field can be tracked in the phase-contrast and diffracted images, respectively. Movies with a time resolution of microseconds per frame reveal that the strain and crack tip do not propagate continuously or at a constant speed. Jumps in the crack tip position indicate pinning of the crack tip for about 1–2 ms followed by jumps faster than 2–6 m s−1, leading to a macroscopically observed average velocity of 0.028–0.055 m s−1. The presented results also give a proof of concept that the described X-ray technique is compatible with studying ultra-fast cracks up to the speed of sound. PMID:27006774

  20. Real-time direct and diffraction X-ray imaging of irregular silicon wafer breakage.

    PubMed

    Rack, Alexander; Scheel, Mario; Danilewsky, Andreas N

    2016-03-01

    Fracture and breakage of single crystals, particularly of silicon wafers, are multi-scale problems: the crack tip starts propagating on an atomic scale with the breaking of chemical bonds, forms crack fronts through the crystal on the micrometre scale and ends macroscopically in catastrophic wafer shattering. Total wafer breakage is a severe problem for the semiconductor industry, not only during handling but also during temperature treatments, leading to million-dollar costs per annum in a device production line. Knowledge of the relevant dynamics governing perfect cleavage along the {111} or {110} faces, and of the deflection into higher indexed {hkl} faces of higher energy, is scarce due to the high velocity of the process. Imaging techniques are commonly limited to depicting only the state of a wafer before the crack and in the final state. This paper presents, for the first time, in situ high-speed crack propagation under thermal stress, imaged simultaneously in direct transmission and diffraction X-ray imaging. It shows how the propagating crack tip and the related strain field can be tracked in the phase-contrast and diffracted images, respectively. Movies with a time resolution of microseconds per frame reveal that the strain and crack tip do not propagate continuously or at a constant speed. Jumps in the crack tip position indicate pinning of the crack tip for about 1-2 ms followed by jumps faster than 2-6 m s(-1), leading to a macroscopically observed average velocity of 0.028-0.055 m s(-1). The presented results also give a proof of concept that the described X-ray technique is compatible with studying ultra-fast cracks up to the speed of sound. PMID:27006774

  1. a Laboratory-Based X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging Scanner with Applications in Biomedical and Non-Medical Disciplines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, C. K.; Diemoz, P. C.; Endrizzi, M.; Munro, P. R. T.; Szafraniec, M. B.; Millard, T. P.; Speller, R.; Olivo, D. A.

    2014-02-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) provides a much higher visibility of low-absorbing details than conventional, attenuation-based radiography. This is due to the fact that image contrast is determined by the unit decrement of the real part of the complex refractive index of an object rather than by its imaginary part (the absorption coefficient), which can be up to 1000 times larger for energies in the X-ray regime. This finds applications in many areas, including medicine, biology, material testing, and homeland security. Until lately, XPCi has been restricted to synchrotron facilities due to its demanding coherence requirements on the radiation source. However, edge illumination XPCi, first developed by one of the authors at the ELETTRA Synchrotron in Italy, substantially relaxes these requirements and therefore provides options to overcome this problem. Our group has built a prototype scanner that adapts the edge-illumination concept to standard laboratory conditions and extends it to large fields of view. This is based on X-ray sources and detectors available off the shelf, and its use has led to impressive results in mammography, cartilage imaging, testing of composite materials and security inspection. This article presents the method and the scanner prototype, and reviews its applications in selected biomedical and non-medical disciplines.

  2. A sensitive x-ray phase contrast technique for rapid imaging using a single phase grid analyzer.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Kaye S; Modregger, Peter; Irvine, Sarah C; Rutishauser, Simon; Guzenko, Vitaliy A; Stampanoni, Marco; David, Christian

    2013-11-15

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging (PCXI) is a promising imaging modality, capable of sensitively differentiating soft tissue structures at high spatial resolution. However, high sensitivity often comes at the cost of a long exposure time or multiple exposures per image, limiting the imaging speed and possibly increasing the radiation dose. Here, we demonstrate a PCXI method that uses a single short exposure to sensitively capture sample phase information, permitting high speed x-ray movies and live animal imaging. The method illuminates a checkerboard phase grid to produce a fine grid-like intensity reference pattern at the detector, then spatially maps sample-induced distortions of this pattern to recover differential phase images of the sample. The use of a phase grid is an improvement on our previous absorption grid work in two ways. There is minimal loss in x-ray flux, permitting faster imaging, and, a very fine pattern is produced for homogenous high spatial resolution. We describe how this pattern permits retrieval of five images from a single exposure; the sample phase gradient images in the horizontal and vertical directions, a projected phase depth image, an edge-enhanced image, and a type of scattering image. Finally, we describe how the reconstruction technique can achieve subpixel distortion retrieval and study the behavior of the technique in regard to analysis technique, Talbot distance, and exposure time. PMID:24322085

  3. Investigation of discrete imaging models and iterative image reconstruction in differential X-ray phase-contrast tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiaofeng; Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan, Xiaochuan; Stampanoni, Marco; Modregger, Peter; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Differential X-ray phase-contrast tomography (DPCT) refers to a class of promising methods for reconstructing the X-ray refractive index distribution of materials that present weak X-ray absorption contrast. The tomographic projection data in DPCT, from which an estimate of the refractive index distribution is reconstructed, correspond to one-dimensional (1D) derivatives of the two-dimensional (2D) Radon transform of the refractive index distribution. There is an important need for the development of iterative image reconstruction methods for DPCT that can yield useful images from few-view projection data, thereby mitigating the long data-acquisition times and large radiation doses associated with use of analytic reconstruction methods. In this work, we analyze the numerical and statistical properties of two classes of discrete imaging models that form the basis for iterative image reconstruction in DPCT. We also investigate the use of one of the models with a modern image reconstruction algorithm for performing few-view image reconstruction of a tissue specimen. PMID:22565698

  4. A K-alpha x-ray source using high energy and high repetition rate laser system for phase contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fourmaux, Sylvain; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Kincaid, Russell; Krol, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    K-alpha x-ray sources from laser produced plasmas provide completely new possibilities for x-ray phase-contrast imaging applications. By tightly focusing intense femtosecond laser pulses onto a solid target K-alpha x-ray pulses are generated through the interaction of energetic electrons created in the plasma with the bulk target. In this paper, we present a continuous and efficient Mo K-alpha x-ray source produced by a femtosecond laser system operating at 100 Hz repetition rate with maximum pulse energy of 110 mJ before compression. The source has an x-ray conversion efficiency of greater than 10−5 into K-alpha line emission. In preparation for phase contrast imaging applications, the size of the resultant K-alpha x-ray emission spot has been also characterized. The source exhibits sufficient spatial coherence to observe phase contrast. We observe a relatively small broadening of the K-alpha source size compared to the size of the laser beam itself. Detailed characterization of the source including the x-ray spectrum and the x-ray average yield along with phase contrast images of test objects will be presented. PMID:20046807

  5. Bilateral filtering using the full noise covariance matrix applied to x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allner, S.; Koehler, T.; Fehringer, A.; Birnbacher, L.; Willner, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Noël, P. B.

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an image-based de-noising algorithm that exploits complementary information and noise statistics from multi-modal images, as they emerge in x-ray tomography techniques, for instance grating-based phase-contrast CT and spectral CT. Among the noise reduction methods, image-based de-noising is one popular approach and the so-called bilateral filter is a well known algorithm for edge-preserving filtering. We developed a generalization of the bilateral filter for the case where the imaging system provides two or more perfectly aligned images. The proposed generalization is statistically motivated and takes the full second order noise statistics of these images into account. In particular, it includes a noise correlation between the images and spatial noise correlation within the same image. The novel generalized three-dimensional bilateral filter is applied to the attenuation and phase images created with filtered backprojection reconstructions from grating-based phase-contrast tomography. In comparison to established bilateral filters, we obtain improved noise reduction and at the same time a better preservation of edges in the images on the examples of a simulated soft-tissue phantom, a human cerebellum and a human artery sample. The applied full noise covariance is determined via cross-correlation of the image noise. The filter results yield an improved feature recovery based on enhanced noise suppression and edge preservation as shown here on the example of attenuation and phase images captured with grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography. This is supported by quantitative image analysis. Without being bound to phase-contrast imaging, this generalized filter is applicable to any kind of noise-afflicted image data with or without noise correlation. Therefore, it can be utilized in various imaging applications and fields.

  6. Bilateral filtering using the full noise covariance matrix applied to x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Allner, S; Koehler, T; Fehringer, A; Birnbacher, L; Willner, M; Pfeiffer, F; Noël, P B

    2016-05-21

    The purpose of this work is to develop an image-based de-noising algorithm that exploits complementary information and noise statistics from multi-modal images, as they emerge in x-ray tomography techniques, for instance grating-based phase-contrast CT and spectral CT. Among the noise reduction methods, image-based de-noising is one popular approach and the so-called bilateral filter is a well known algorithm for edge-preserving filtering. We developed a generalization of the bilateral filter for the case where the imaging system provides two or more perfectly aligned images. The proposed generalization is statistically motivated and takes the full second order noise statistics of these images into account. In particular, it includes a noise correlation between the images and spatial noise correlation within the same image. The novel generalized three-dimensional bilateral filter is applied to the attenuation and phase images created with filtered backprojection reconstructions from grating-based phase-contrast tomography. In comparison to established bilateral filters, we obtain improved noise reduction and at the same time a better preservation of edges in the images on the examples of a simulated soft-tissue phantom, a human cerebellum and a human artery sample. The applied full noise covariance is determined via cross-correlation of the image noise. The filter results yield an improved feature recovery based on enhanced noise suppression and edge preservation as shown here on the example of attenuation and phase images captured with grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography. This is supported by quantitative image analysis. Without being bound to phase-contrast imaging, this generalized filter is applicable to any kind of noise-afflicted image data with or without noise correlation. Therefore, it can be utilized in various imaging applications and fields. PMID:27100408

  7. New signal extraction method in x-ray differential phase contrast imaging with a tilted collinear analyzer grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yongshuai; Garrett, John; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2015-03-01

    In a grating interferometer-based x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging system, an analyzer grating (i.e. a G2 grating) is typically used to help record the important refraction information obtained with the phase stepping technique. Such a method requires the sequential movement of the G2 grating as well as multiple x-ray exposures to perform phase stepping, and thus conventional DPC imaging is very time-consuming. Additionally, it also has some mechanical instability issues due to the movement of the G2 grating. To accelerate the data acquisition speed and achieve single shot x-ray DPC imaging with a collinear type G2 grating, in this study, a new signal extraction method had been investigated. With this alternative approach, a non-zero angle of rotation between the diffraction pattern (generated by the G1 grating) and the collinear G2 grating is used during the entire data acquisition. Due to this deliberate grating misalignment, a visible moiré pattern with a certain period shall be detected. Initial experiments have demonstrated that this new signal extraction method is able to provide us with three different types of signal: absorption, differential phase, and the dark field image signals. Although the spatial resolution for both the differential phase and the dark field images is blurred by several pixel length due to the used interpolation operation, the absorption image maintains the same spatial resolution as in the conventional x-ray imaging. This developed novel signal analysis method enables single shot DPC imaging and can greatly reduce the data acquisition time, thus facilitating the implementation of DPC imaging in the medical field.

  8. Construction and evaluation of a high-energy grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauke, Christian; Horn, Florian; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Lachner, Sebastian; Ludwig, Veronika; Seifert, Maria; Schuster, Max; Wandner, Johannes; Wolf, Andreas; Weber, Thomas; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2016-03-01

    Interferometric x-ray imaging becomes more and more attractive for applications such as medical imaging or non-destructive testing, because it provides the opportunity to obtain additional information on the internal structure of radiographed objects.12 Therefore, three types of images are acquired: An attenuation image like in conventional x-ray imaging, an image of the differential phase-shift generated by the object and the so called dark-field image, which contains information about the object's granularity even on sub-pixel scale.3 However, most experiments addressing grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging with polychromatic sources are restricted to energies up to about 40 keV. For the application of this imaging method to thicker objects like human specimens or dense components, higher tube voltages are required. This is why we designed and constructed a laboratory setup for high energies, which is able to image larger objects.4 To evaluate the performance of the setup, the mean visibility of the field of view was measured for several tube voltages. The result shows that the mean visibility has a peak value of 23% at a tube voltage of 60 kV and is constantly greater than 16% up to a tube voltage of 120 kV. Thus, good image quality is provided even for high energies. To further substantiate the performance of the setup at high energies, a human ex-vivo foot was examined at a tube voltage of 75 kV. The interferometric x-ray images show a good image quality and a promising diagnostic power.

  9. Three-dimensional phase-contrast X-ray microtomography with scanning–imaging X-ray microscope optics

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) X-ray tomographic micro-imaging system has been developed. The optical system is based on a scanning–imaging X-ray microscope (SIXM) optics, which is a hybrid system consisting of a scanning microscope optics with a one-dimensional (1D) focusing (line-focusing) device and an imaging microscope optics with a 1D objective. In the SIXM system, each 1D dataset of a two-dimensional (2D) image is recorded independently. An object is illuminated with a line-focused beam. Positional information of the region illuminated by the line-focused beam is recorded with the 1D imaging microscope optics as line-profile data. By scanning the object with the line focus, 2D image data are obtained. In the same manner as for a scanning microscope optics with a multi-pixel detector, imaging modes such as phase contrast and absorption contrast can be arbitrarily configured after the image data acquisition. By combining a tomographic scan method and the SIXM system, quantitative 3D imaging is performed. Results of a feasibility study of the SIXM for 3D imaging are shown. PMID:23955044

  10. Spontaneous brain tumor imaging of aged rat by crystal X-ray interferometer-based phase-contrast X-ray CT

    PubMed Central

    Yoneyama, Akio; Hara, Atsuko; Ohbu, Makoto; Maruyama, Hiroko; Taguchi, Masaya; Esashi, Shogo; Matsushima, Tsubasa; Terazaki, Kei; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Takeda, Tohoru

    2016-01-01

    Background Crystal X-ray interferometer-based phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography (C-PCCT) enables the depiction of internal structures of biological tissue without contrast agents. Purpose To determine the advantage of this technique in visualizing detailed morphological structures of a rare spontaneous brain tumor in an aged rat. Material and Methods An aged rat’s spontaneous brain tumor was imaged by C-PCCT without contrast agent. Three-dimensional (3D) images of the tumor microvasculature were reconstructed and compared with pathological pictures. Results C-PCCT depicted the tumor’s various pathological features clearly, e.g. its cell density and vasculature, and blood clots caused by hemorrhaging and/or hematomas. The obtained images resembled pathological pictures with a magnification of ×20 and were used to reconstruct 3D images of the tumor vascularity up to approximately 26 µm in diameter. Conclusion Since C-PCCT is able to depict various pathological conditions, it might be useful for cancer research. PMID:26962462

  11. X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography of Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Damage

    PubMed Central

    Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Zanette, Irene; Schwarz, Jolanda; Rack, Alexander; Tympner, Christiane; Herrler, Tanja; Staab-Weijnitz, Claudia; Braunagel, Margarita; Reiser, Maximilian; Bamberg, Fabian; Pfeiffer, Franz; Notohamiprodjo, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to investigate microstructural changes occurring in unilateral renal ischemia-reperfusion injury in a murine animal model using synchrotron radiation. Material and Methods The effects of renal ischemia-reperfusion were investigated in a murine animal model of unilateral ischemia. Kidney samples were harvested on day 18. Grating-Based Phase-Contrast Imaging (GB-PCI) of the paraffin-embedded kidney samples was performed at a Synchrotron Radiation Facility (beam energy of 19 keV). To obtain phase information, a two-grating Talbot interferometer was used applying the phase stepping technique. The imaging system provided an effective pixel size of 7.5 µm. The resulting attenuation and differential phase projections were tomographically reconstructed using filtered back-projection. Semi-automated segmentation and volumetry and correlation to histopathology were performed. Results GB-PCI provided good discrimination of the cortex, outer and inner medulla in non-ischemic control kidneys. Post-ischemic kidneys showed a reduced compartmental differentiation, particularly of the outer stripe of the outer medulla, which could not be differentiated from the inner stripe. Compared to the contralateral kidney, after ischemia a volume loss was detected, while the inner medulla mainly retained its volume (ratio 0.94). Post-ischemic kidneys exhibited severe tissue damage as evidenced by tubular atrophy and dilatation, moderate inflammatory infiltration, loss of brush borders and tubular protein cylinders. Conclusion In conclusion GB-PCI with synchrotron radiation allows for non-destructive microstructural assessment of parenchymal kidney disease and vessel architecture. If translation to lab-based approaches generates sufficient density resolution, and with a time-optimized image analysis protocol, GB-PCI may ultimately serve as a non-invasive, non-enhanced alternative for imaging of pathological changes of the kidney. PMID:25299243

  12. Real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements on shocked crystals at a synchrotron facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Y. M.; Turneaure, Stefan J.; Perkins, K.; Zimmerman, K.; Arganbright, N.; Shen, G.; Chow, P.

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory was used to obtain real-time, high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements to determine the microscopic response of shock-compressed single crystals. Disk shaped samples were subjected to plane shock wave compression by impacting them with half-inch diameter, flat-faced projectiles. The projectiles were accelerated to velocities ranging between 300 and 1200 m/s using a compact powder gun designed specifically for use at a synchrotron facility. The experiments were designed to keep the sample probed volume under uniaxial strain and constant stress for a duration longer than the 153.4 ns spacing between x-ray bunches. X-rays from a single pulse (<100 ps duration) out of the periodic x-ray pulses emitted by the synchrotron were used for the diffraction measurements. A synchronization and x-ray detection technique was developed to ensure that the measured signal was obtained unambiguously from the desired x-ray pulse incident on the sample while the sample was in a constant uniaxial strain state. The synchronization and x-ray detection techniques described can be used for a variety of x-ray measurements on shock compressed solids and liquids at the APS. Detailed procedures for applying the Bragg-Brentano parafocusing approach to single crystals at the APS are presented. Analytic developments to determine the effects of crystal substructure and non-ideal geometry on the diffraction pattern position and shape are presented. Representative real-time x-ray diffraction data, indicating shock-induced microstructural changes, are presented for a shock-compressed Al(111) sample. The experimental developments presented here provided, in part, the impetus for the Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) currently under development at the APS. Both the synchronization/x-ray detection methods and the analysis equations for high-resolution single crystal x-ray diffraction can be used at the DCS.

  13. Development of a laser-produced plasma x-ray source for phase-contrast imaging of DT fuel ice layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, N.; Dewald, E.; Kozioziemski, B.; Koch, J. A.

    2007-11-01

    Because beryllium capsules for NIF experiments are not transparent to visible light, optical microscopy is not applicable for metrology of deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layers. X-ray absorption radiography cannot be used either because absorption in DT ice is negligible, so to quantify the quality of the DT ice surface, x-ray phase-contrast imaging is used in order to enhance contrast of surface imperfections. Phase contrast imaging of ice layers typically utilizes micro-focus x-ray tube sources, but available x-ray fluxes are limited, and these sources cannot be used to quantify changes in the ice surface quality over the second timescales appropriate for rapidly-cooled layers. We have therefore explored the use of a laser-produced plasma x-ray source in order to determine if it has sufficient brightness to produce high-quality phase-contrast flash radiographs of DT ice layers. We irradiated Ti, Fe, Cu, and Au targets with 5-ns, 300-J, 527-nm laser light at the Janus laser facility, and measured absolute x-ray conversion efficiency and x-ray spot size. We will discuss this data as well as phase-contrast radiographs we obtained of non-cryogenic shells.

  14. External and internal structure of weevils (Insecta: Coleoptera) investigated with phase-contrast X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hönnicke, M. G.; Cusatis, C.; Rigon, L.; Menk, R.-H.; Arfelli, F.; Foerster, L. A.; Rosado-Neto, G. H.

    2010-08-01

    Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are identified by the external structure (dorsal, ventral and lateral features) and also by internal structure. The genitalia can be used to distinguish the sex and to identify the insects when the external structure appears identical. For this purpose, a destructive dissecting microscopy procedure is usually employed. In this paper, phase contrast X-ray imaging (radiography and tomography) is employed to investigate the internal structure (genitalia) of two entire species of weevils that presents very similar external structures ( Sitophilus oryzae and Sitophilus zeamais). The detection of features, which looks like the genital structure, shows that such non-destructive technique could be used as an alternative method for identification of insects. This method is especially useful in examining the internal features of precious species from museum collections, as already described in the recent literature.

  15. Degradation of Li/S Battery Electrodes On 3D Current Collectors Studied Using X-ray Phase Contrast Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zielke, L.; Barchasz, C.; Waluś, S.; Alloin, F.; Leprêtre, J.-C.; Spettl, A.; Schmidt, V.; Hilger, A.; Manke, I.; Banhart, J.; Zengerle, R.; Thiele, S.

    2015-01-01

    Lithium/sulphur batteries are promising candidates for future energy storage systems, mainly due to their high potential capacity. However low sulphur utilization and capacity fading hinder practical realizations. In order to improve understanding of the system, we investigate Li/S electrode morphology changes for different ageing steps, using X-ray phase contrast tomography. Thereby we find a strong decrease of sulphur loading after the first cycle, and a constant loading of about 15% of the initial loading afterwards. While cycling, the mean sulphur particle diameters decrease in a qualitatively similar fashion as the discharge capacity fades. The particles spread, migrate into the current collector and accumulate in the upper part again. Simultaneously sulphur particles lose contact area with the conducting network but regain it after ten cycles because their decreasing size results in higher surface areas. Since the capacity still decreases, this regain could be associated with effects such as surface area passivation and increasing charge transfer resistance. PMID:26043280

  16. Fast one-dimensional wave-front propagation for x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Johannes; Malecki, Andreas; Sperl, Jonathan; Chabior, Michael; Schüttler, Markus; Bequé, Dirk; Cozzini, Cristina; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2014-01-01

    Numerical wave-optical simulations of X-ray differential phase-contrast imaging using grating interferometry require the oversampling of gratings and object structures in the range of few micrometers. Consequently, fields of view of few millimeters already use large amounts of a computer’s main memory to store the propagating wave front, limiting the scope of the investigations to only small-scale problems. In this study, we apply an approximation to the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory to overcome these restrictions by dividing the two-dimensional wave front up into 1D lines, which are processed separately. The approach enables simulations with samples of clinically relevant dimensions by significantly reducing the memory footprint and the execution time and, thus, allows the qualitative comparison of different setup configurations. We analyze advantages as well as limitations and present the simulation of a virtual mammography phantom of several centimeters of size. PMID:25360386

  17. Fast one-dimensional wave-front propagation for x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Johannes; Malecki, Andreas; Sperl, Jonathan; Chabior, Michael; Schüttler, Markus; Bequé, Dirk; Cozzini, Cristina; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2014-10-01

    Numerical wave-optical simulations of X-ray differential phase-contrast imaging using grating interferometry require the oversampling of gratings and object structures in the range of few micrometers. Consequently, fields of view of few millimeters already use large amounts of a computer's main memory to store the propagating wave front, limiting the scope of the investigations to only small-scale problems. In this study, we apply an approximation to the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory to overcome these restrictions by dividing the two-dimensional wave front up into 1D lines, which are processed separately. The approach enables simulations with samples of clinically relevant dimensions by significantly reducing the memory footprint and the execution time and, thus, allows the qualitative comparison of different setup configurations. We analyze advantages as well as limitations and present the simulation of a virtual mammography phantom of several centimeters of size. PMID:25360386

  18. Boundary-enhancement in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomosynthesis improves depth position characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Huifeng; Xu, Qiaofeng; Garson, Alfred B., III; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2015-04-01

    Propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast (PB XPC) tomosynthesis combines the concepts of tomosynthesis and XPC imaging to realize the advantages of both for biological imaging applications. Tomosynthesis permits reductions in acquisition times compared with full-view tomography, while XPC imaging provides the opportunity to resolve weakly absorbing structures. In this note, an investigation of the depth resolving properties of PB XPC tomosynthesis is conducted. The results demonstrate that in-plane structures display strong boundary-enhancement while out-of-plane structures do not. This effect can facilitate the identification of in-plane structures in PB XPC tomosynthesis that could normally not be distinguished from out-of-plane structures in absorption-based tomosynthesis.

  19. Using X-Ray In-Line Phase-Contrast Imaging for the Investigation of Nude Mouse Hepatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Luo, Shuqian

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the noninvasive imaging of hepatic tumors without contrast agents. Both normal tissues and tumor tissues can be detected, and tumor tissues in different stages can be classified quantitatively. We implanted BEL-7402 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells into the livers of nude mice and then imaged the livers using X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging (ILPCI). The projection images' texture feature based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) and dual-tree complex wavelet transforms (DTCWT) were extracted to discriminate normal tissues and tumor tissues. Different stages of hepatic tumors were classified using support vector machines (SVM). Images of livers from nude mice sacrificed 6 days after inoculation with cancer cells show diffuse distribution of the tumor tissue, but images of livers from nude mice sacrificed 9, 12, or 15 days after inoculation with cancer cells show necrotic lumps in the tumor tissue. The results of the principal component analysis (PCA) of the texture features based on GLCM of normal regions were positive, but those of tumor regions were negative. The results of PCA of the texture features based on DTCWT of normal regions were greater than those of tumor regions. The values of the texture features in low-frequency coefficient images increased monotonically with the growth of the tumors. Different stages of liver tumors can be classified using SVM, and the accuracy is 83.33%. Noninvasive and micron-scale imaging can be achieved by X-ray ILPCI. We can observe hepatic tumors and small vessels from the phase-contrast images. This new imaging approach for hepatic cancer is effective and has potential use in the early detection and classification of hepatic tumors. PMID:22761929

  20. Using X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging for the investigation of nude mouse hepatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qiang; Li, Dongyue; Zhang, Lu; Luo, Shuqian

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the noninvasive imaging of hepatic tumors without contrast agents. Both normal tissues and tumor tissues can be detected, and tumor tissues in different stages can be classified quantitatively. We implanted BEL-7402 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells into the livers of nude mice and then imaged the livers using X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging (ILPCI). The projection images' texture feature based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) and dual-tree complex wavelet transforms (DTCWT) were extracted to discriminate normal tissues and tumor tissues. Different stages of hepatic tumors were classified using support vector machines (SVM). Images of livers from nude mice sacrificed 6 days after inoculation with cancer cells show diffuse distribution of the tumor tissue, but images of livers from nude mice sacrificed 9, 12, or 15 days after inoculation with cancer cells show necrotic lumps in the tumor tissue. The results of the principal component analysis (PCA) of the texture features based on GLCM of normal regions were positive, but those of tumor regions were negative. The results of PCA of the texture features based on DTCWT of normal regions were greater than those of tumor regions. The values of the texture features in low-frequency coefficient images increased monotonically with the growth of the tumors. Different stages of liver tumors can be classified using SVM, and the accuracy is 83.33%. Noninvasive and micron-scale imaging can be achieved by X-ray ILPCI. We can observe hepatic tumors and small vessels from the phase-contrast images. This new imaging approach for hepatic cancer is effective and has potential use in the early detection and classification of hepatic tumors. PMID:22761929

  1. Optimisation of image reconstruction for phase-contrast x-ray Talbot–Lau imaging with regard to mechanical robustness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, M.; Kaeppler, S.; Hauke, C.; Horn, F.; Pelzer, G.; Rieger, J.; Michel, T.; Riess, C.; Anton, G.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging opens new opportunities, inter alia, in medical imaging and non-destructive testing. Because, information about the attenuation properties and about the refractive properties of an object are gained simultaneously. Talbot–Lau imaging requires the knowledge of a reference or free-field image. The long-term stability of a Talbot–Lau interferometer is related to the time span of the validity of a measured reference image. It would be desirable to keep the validity of the reference image for a day or longer to improve feasibility of Talbot–Lau imaging. However, for example thermal and other long-term external influences result in drifting effects of the phase images. Therefore, phases are shifting over time and the reference image is not valid for long-term measurements. Thus, artifacts occur in differential phase-contrast images. We developed an algorithm to determine the differential phase-contrast image with the help of just one calibration image, which is valid for a long time-period. With the help of this algorithm, called phase-plane-fit method, it is possible to save measurement-time, as it is not necessary to take a reference image for each measurement. Additionally, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, short-term effects like vibrations or distortions of the system lead to imperfections within the phase-stepping procedure. Consequently, artifacts occur in all three image modalities (differential phase-contrast image, attenuation image and dark-field image) of Talbot–Lau imaging. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging for example in clinical routine or non-destructive testing. In this publication an algorithm of Vargas et al is applied and complemented to correct inaccurate phase-step positions with the help of a principal component analysis

  2. Optimisation of image reconstruction for phase-contrast x-ray Talbot-Lau imaging with regard to mechanical robustness.

    PubMed

    Seifert, M; Kaeppler, S; Hauke, C; Horn, F; Pelzer, G; Rieger, J; Michel, T; Riess, C; Anton, G

    2016-09-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging opens new opportunities, inter alia, in medical imaging and non-destructive testing. Because, information about the attenuation properties and about the refractive properties of an object are gained simultaneously. Talbot-Lau imaging requires the knowledge of a reference or free-field image. The long-term stability of a Talbot-Lau interferometer is related to the time span of the validity of a measured reference image. It would be desirable to keep the validity of the reference image for a day or longer to improve feasibility of Talbot-Lau imaging. However, for example thermal and other long-term external influences result in drifting effects of the phase images. Therefore, phases are shifting over time and the reference image is not valid for long-term measurements. Thus, artifacts occur in differential phase-contrast images. We developed an algorithm to determine the differential phase-contrast image with the help of just one calibration image, which is valid for a long time-period. With the help of this algorithm, called phase-plane-fit method, it is possible to save measurement-time, as it is not necessary to take a reference image for each measurement. Additionally, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, short-term effects like vibrations or distortions of the system lead to imperfections within the phase-stepping procedure. Consequently, artifacts occur in all three image modalities (differential phase-contrast image, attenuation image and dark-field image) of Talbot-Lau imaging. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging for example in clinical routine or non-destructive testing. In this publication an algorithm of Vargas et al is applied and complemented to correct inaccurate phase-step positions with the help of a principal component analysis (PCA

  3. Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography Visualizes Microvasculature Changes in Mice Brains after Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yuanyuan; Xie, Bohua; Lin, Xiaojie

    2016-01-01

    Imaging brain microvasculature is important in plasticity studies of cerebrovascular diseases. Applying contrast agents, traditional μCT and μMRI methods gain imaging contrast for vasculature. The aim of this study is to develop a synchrotron radiation X-ray inline phase-contrast tomography (SRXPCT) method for imaging the intact mouse brain (micro)vasculature in high resolution (~3.7 μm) without contrast agent. A specific preparation protocol was proposed to enhance the phase contrast of brain vasculature by using density difference over gas-tissue interface. The CT imaging system was developed and optimized to obtain 3D brain vasculature of adult male C57BL/6 mice. The SRXPCT method was further applied to investigate the microvasculature changes in mouse brains (n = 14) after 14-day reperfusion from transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). 3D reconstructions of brain microvasculature demonstrated that the branching radius ratio (post- to preinjury) of small vessels (radius < 7.4 μm) in the injury group was significantly smaller than that in the sham group (p < 0.05). This result revealed the active angiogenesis in the recovery brain after stroke. As a high-resolution and contrast-agent-free method, the SRXPCT method demonstrates higher potential in investigations of functional plasticity in cerebrovascular diseases. PMID:27563468

  4. Alignment of low-dose X-ray fluorescence tomography images using differential phase contrast

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Young Pyo; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; O’Halloran, Thomas V.; Que, Emily L.; Bleher, Reiner; Vogt, Stefan; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2014-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence nanotomography provides unprecedented sensitivity for studies of trace metal distributions in whole biological cells. Dose fractionation, in which one acquires very low dose individual projections and then obtains high statistics reconstructions as signal from a voxel is brought together (Hegerl & Hoppe, 1976 ▶), requires accurate alignment of these individual projections so as to correct for rotation stage runout. It is shown here that differential phase contrast at 10.2 keV beam energy offers the potential for accurate cross-correlation alignment of successive projections, by demonstrating that successive low dose, 3 ms per pixel, images acquired at the same specimen position and rotation angle have a narrower and smoother cross-correlation function (1.5 pixels FWHM at 300 nm pixel size) than that obtained from zinc fluorescence images (25 pixels FWHM). The differential phase contrast alignment resolution is thus well below the 700 nm × 500 nm beam spot size used in this demonstration, so that dose fractionation should be possible for reduced-dose, more rapidly acquired, fluorescence nanotomography experiments. PMID:24365941

  5. 2D grating simulation for X-ray phase-contrast and dark-field imaging with a Talbot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanette, Irene; David, Christian; Rutishauser, Simon; Weitkamp, Timm

    2010-04-01

    Talbot interferometry is a recently developed and an extremely powerful X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique. Besides giving access to ultra-high sensitivity differential phase contrast images, it also provides the dark field image, which is a map of the scattering power of the sample. In this paper we investigate the potentialities of an improved version of the interferometer, in which two dimensional gratings are used instead of standard line grids. This approach allows to overcome the difficulties that might be encountered in the images produced by a one dimensional interferometer. Among these limitations there are the phase wrapping and quantitative phase retrieval problems and the directionality of the differential phase and dark-field signals. The feasibility of the 2D Talbot interferometer has been studied with a numerical simulation on the performances of its optical components under different circumstances. The gratings can be obtained either by an ad hoc fabrication of the 2D structures or by a superposition of two perpendicular linear grids. Through this simulation it has been possible to find the best parameters for a practical implementation of the 2D Talbot interferometer.

  6. Alignment of low-dose X-ray fluorescence tomography images using differential phase contrast.

    PubMed

    Hong, Young Pyo; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Que, Emily L; Bleher, Reiner; Vogt, Stefan; Woodruff, Teresa K; Jacobsen, Chris

    2014-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence nanotomography provides unprecedented sensitivity for studies of trace metal distributions in whole biological cells. Dose fractionation, in which one acquires very low dose individual projections and then obtains high statistics reconstructions as signal from a voxel is brought together (Hegerl & Hoppe, 1976), requires accurate alignment of these individual projections so as to correct for rotation stage runout. It is shown here that differential phase contrast at 10.2 keV beam energy offers the potential for accurate cross-correlation alignment of successive projections, by demonstrating that successive low dose, 3 ms per pixel, images acquired at the same specimen position and rotation angle have a narrower and smoother cross-correlation function (1.5 pixels FWHM at 300 nm pixel size) than that obtained from zinc fluorescence images (25 pixels FWHM). The differential phase contrast alignment resolution is thus well below the 700 nm × 500 nm beam spot size used in this demonstration, so that dose fractionation should be possible for reduced-dose, more rapidly acquired, fluorescence nanotomography experiments. PMID:24365941

  7. 3D Algebraic Iterative Reconstruction for Cone-Beam X-Ray Differential Phase-Contrast Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jian; Hu, Xinhua; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Jiang, Ming; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Due to the potential of compact imaging systems with magnified spatial resolution and contrast, cone-beam x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) has attracted significant interest. The current proposed FDK reconstruction algorithm with the Hilbert imaginary filter will induce severe cone-beam artifacts when the cone-beam angle becomes large. In this paper, we propose an algebraic iterative reconstruction (AIR) method for cone-beam DPC-CT and report its experiment results. This approach considers the reconstruction process as the optimization of a discrete representation of the object function to satisfy a system of equations that describes the cone-beam DPC-CT imaging modality. Unlike the conventional iterative algorithms for absorption-based CT, it involves the derivative operation to the forward projections of the reconstructed intermediate image to take into account the differential nature of the DPC projections. This method is based on the algebraic reconstruction technique, reconstructs the image ray by ray, and is expected to provide better derivative estimates in iterations. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a three-grating interferometer and a mini-focus x-ray tube source. It is shown that the proposed method can reduce the cone-beam artifacts and performs better than FDK under large cone-beam angles. This algorithm is of interest for future cone-beam DPC-CT applications. PMID:25775480

  8. Simultaneous X-ray diffraction and phase-contrast imaging for investigating material deformation mechanisms during high-rate loading

    SciTech Connect

    Hudspeth, M.; Sun, T.; Parab, N.; Guo, Z.; Fezzaa, K.; Luo, S.; Chen, W.

    2015-01-01

    Using a high-speed camera and an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD), a simultaneous X-ray imaging and diffraction technique has been developed for studying dynamic material behaviors during high-rate tensile loading. A Kolsky tension bar has been used to pull samples at 1000 s–1and 5000 s–1strain-rates for super-elastic equiatomic NiTi and 1100-O series aluminium, respectively. By altering the ICCD gating time, temporal resolutions of 100 ps and 3.37 µs have been achieved in capturing the diffraction patterns of interest, thus equating to single-pulse and 22-pulse X-ray exposure. Furthermore, the sample through-thickness deformation process has been simultaneously imagedviaphase-contrast imaging. It is also shown that adequate signal-to-noise ratios are achieved for the detected white-beam diffraction patterns, thereby allowing sufficient information to perform quantitative data analysis diffractionviain-house software (WBXRD_GUI). Finally, of current interest is the ability to evaluate crystald-spacing, texture evolution and material phase transitions, all of which will be established from experiments performed at the aforementioned elevated strain-rates.

  9. Simultaneous X-ray diffraction and phase-contrast imaging for investigating material deformation mechanisms during high-rate loading

    PubMed Central

    Hudspeth, M.; Sun, T.; Parab, N.; Guo, Z.; Fezzaa, K.; Luo, S.; Chen, W.

    2015-01-01

    Using a high-speed camera and an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD), a simultaneous X-ray imaging and diffraction technique has been developed for studying dynamic material behaviors during high-rate tensile loading. A Kolsky tension bar has been used to pull samples at 1000 s−1 and 5000 s−1 strain-rates for super-elastic equiatomic NiTi and 1100-O series aluminium, respectively. By altering the ICCD gating time, temporal resolutions of 100 ps and 3.37 µs have been achieved in capturing the diffraction patterns of interest, thus equating to single-pulse and 22-pulse X-ray exposure. Furthermore, the sample through-thickness deformation process has been simultaneously imaged via phase-contrast imaging. It is also shown that adequate signal-to-noise ratios are achieved for the detected white-beam diffraction patterns, thereby allowing sufficient information to perform quantitative data analysis diffraction via in-house software (WBXRD_GUI). Of current interest is the ability to evaluate crystal d-spacing, texture evolution and material phase transitions, all of which will be established from experiments performed at the aforementioned elevated strain-rates. PMID:25537588

  10. Fusion imaging of fluorescent and phase-contrast x-ray computed tomography using synchrotron radiation in medical biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jin; Takeda, Tohoru; Lwin, Thet Thet; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Fukami, Tadanori; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Minami, Manabu; Akatsuka, Takao

    2006-08-01

    We integrated fluorescent X-ray computed tomography (FXCT) and phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography (PCCT), and the feasibility of this fusion imaging was assessed for small animals. Brain tumor model of mouse and cardiomyopathic model of hamsters were examined. The brain and heart were extracted after intravenous injection of cerebral perfusion agent 127I-IMP and myocardial fatty acid metabolic agent 127I-BMIPP, respectively. Each target organ was fixed by formalin for FXCT and PCCT. Images were obtained three-dimensionally (3D), and the surface contour of brain and heart were determined from 3D-image after re-sampling for the description with the same spatial resolution. These images were fused interactively on displayed images by 3D image manipulation software. In FXCT, cerebral perfusion image with IMP and fatty acid metabolic image with BMIPP were clearly demonstrated at 0.5 mm and 0.2 mm spatial resolution, respectively. PCCT image with 0.03 mm spatial resolution depicted clearly the morphological structures of brain such as cerebral cortex, hippocampus, lateral ventricle and cerebellum, and for heart such as cardiac lumen, papillary muscle, left and right ventricle. On fusion image, localization and degree of abnormality of cerebral perfusion and myocardial fatty acid metabolism were easily recognized. Our results suggested that the integration of FXCT and PCCT is very useful to understand biological state corresponding to its anatomical localization even in small animal.

  11. X-ray Diffraction and Multi-Frame Phase Contrast Imaging Diagnostics for IMPULSE at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, Adam; Carlson, Carl; Young, Jason; Curtis, Alden; Jensen, Brian; Ramos, Kyle; Yeager, John; Montgomery, David; Fezza, Kamel

    2013-07-08

    The diagnostic needs of any dynamic loading platform present unique technical challenges that must be addressed in order to accurately measure in situ material properties in an extreme environment. The IMPULSE platform (IMPact system for Ultrafast Synchrotron Experiments) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is no exception and, in fact, may be more challenging, as the imaging diagnostics must be synchronized to both the experiment and the 60 ps wide x-ray bunches produced at APS. The technical challenges of time-resolved x-ray diffraction imaging and high-resolution multi-frame phase contrast imaging (PCI) are described in this paper. Example data from recent IMPULSE experiments are shown to illustrate the advances and evolution of these diagnostics with a focus on comparing the performance of two intensified CCD cameras and their suitability for multi-frame PCI. The continued development of these diagnostics is fundamentally important to IMPULSE and many other loading platforms and will benefit future facilities such as the Dynamic Compression Sector at APS and MaRIE at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  12. Proof-of-concept demonstration of edge-illumination x-ray phase contrast imaging combined with tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szafraniec, Magdalena B.; Millard, Thomas P.; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Speller, Robert D.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2014-03-01

    In this note we present the first proof-of-concept results on the potential effectiveness of the edge-illumination x-ray phase contrast method (in its ‘coded-aperture’ based lab implementation) combined with tomosynthesis. We believe that, albeit admittedly preliminary (e.g. we only present phantom work), these results deserve early publication in a note primarily for four reasons. First, we fully modelled the imaging acquisition method, and validated the simulation directly with experimental results. This shows that the implementation of the method in the new geometry is understood, and thus that it will be possible to use the model to simulate more complex scenarios in the future. Secondly, we show that a strong phase contrast signal is preserved in the reconstructed tomosynthesis slices: this was a concern, as the high spatial frequency nature of the signal makes it sensitive to any filtration-related procedure. Third, we show that, despite the non-optimized nature of the imaging prototype used, we can perform a full angular scan at acceptable dose levels and with exposure times not excessively distant from what is required by clinical practice. Finally, we discuss how the proposed phase contrast method, unlike other approaches apart from free-space propagation (which however requires a smaller focal spot, thus reducing the flux and increasing exposure times), can be easily implemented in a tomosynthesis geometry suitable for clinical use. In summary, we find that these technical results indicate a high potential for the combination of the two methods. Combining slice separation with detail enhancement provided by phase effects would substantially increase the detectability of small lesions and/or calcifications, which we aim to demonstrate in the next steps of this study.

  13. Growth dynamics of pentacene thin films: Real-time synchrotron x-ray scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Alex C.; Ruiz, Ricardo; Malliaras, George G.; Zhou, Hua; Headrick, Randall L.; Kazimirov, Alexander

    2006-05-15

    Real-time synchrotron x-ray scattering in the anti-Bragg configuration was used to monitor the dynamics of pentacene film growth on inert substrates. A distributed-growth model, according to which pentacene molecules adsorbed on the nth layer can either nucleate and contribute to the growth of the (n+1)th layer or transfer downward and contribute to the growth of the nth layer, gave a good description of the data. For molecules adsorbed on the first and second layers, the probability of downward transfer was found to be dependent on the substrate, and independent of temperature within the range from 25 to 60 deg. C. For films grown on SiO{sub 2}, an Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier of the order of 70 meV dominated downward transfer of pentacene molecules in layers away from the substrate. For films grown on an alkylated self-assembled monolayer, significant desorption of pentacene molecules from the substrate at elevated temperatures forced the growth mode toward the three-dimensional limit.

  14. Powerful conveyer belt real-time online detection system based on x-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Feng; Miao, Chang-yun; Meng, Wei

    2009-07-01

    The powerful conveyer belt is widely used in the mine, dock, and so on. After used for a long time, internal steel rope of the conveyor belt may fracture, rust, joints moving, and so on .This would bring potential safety problems. A kind of detection system based on x-ray is designed in this paper. Linear array detector (LDA) is used. LDA cost is low, response fast; technology mature .Output charge of LDA is transformed into differential voltage signal by amplifier. This kind of signal have great ability of anti-noise, is suitable for long-distance transmission. The processor is FPGA. A IP core control 4-channel A/D convertor, achieve parallel output data collection. Soft-core processor MicroBlaze which process tcp/ip protocol is embedded in FPGA. Sampling data are transferred to a computer via Ethernet. In order to improve the image quality, algorithm of getting rid of noise from the measurement result and taking gain normalization for pixel value is studied and designed. Experiments show that this system work well, can real-time online detect conveyor belt of width of 2.0m and speed of 5 m/s, does not affect the production. Image is clear, visual and can easily judge the situation of conveyor belt.

  15. Investigation of the application of phase contrast imaging using a point X-ray source to industrial non-destructive testing.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazuaki; Haig, Ian

    2014-03-01

    X-Tek Systems, a division of Nikon Metrology UK, designs, develops and manufactures microfocus X-ray radiography and computed tomography systems for industrial non-destructive testing. The range of X-ray acceleration voltages of its current standard products is 130-450 kV. It is widely known that X-ray images can be created using phase contrast formed by the natural propagation of X-rays. Simulation of the natural propagation of X-rays through a cylindrical test sample predicted a small contrast peak at the boundary between the cylinder material and air. Comparison data were obtained using an X-ray source with acceleration voltage above 100 kV. The simulation results correlated well with the experimental data. A further practical example (a 'magic mirror' amulet from an old Japanese shrine) is introduced and discussed. In this specimen, we detected intensity variation including the effect of phase contrast in the operating region above 100 kV. In summary, natural propagation phase contrast was observed in radiographic images from a standard point X-ray source with acceleration voltages exceeding 100 kV. PMID:24470417

  16. Real-time x-ray scattering study of the initial growth of organic crystals on polymer brushes

    SciTech Connect

    An, Sung Yup; Ahn, Kwangseok; Kim, Doris Yangsoo; Lee, Dong Ryeol; Lee, Hyun-Hwi; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2014-04-21

    We studied the early-stage growth structures of pentacene organic crystals grown on polymer brushes using real-time x-ray scattering techniques. In situ x-ray reflectivity and atomic force microscopy analyses revealed that at temperatures close to the glass transition temperature of polymer brush, the pentacene overlayer on a polymer brush film showed incomplete condensation and 3D island structures from the first monolayer. A growth model based on these observations was used to quantitatively analyze the real-time anti-Bragg x-ray scattering intensities measured during pentacene growth to obtain the time-dependent layer coverage of the individual pentacene monolayers. The extracted total coverage confirmed significant desorption and incomplete condensation in the pentacene films deposited on the polymer brushes. These effects are ascribed to the change in the surface viscoelasticity of the polymer brushes around the glass transition temperature.

  17. Quantitative electron density characterization of soft tissue substitute plastic materials using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sarapata, A.; Chabior, M.; Zanette, I.; Pfeiffer, F.; Cozzini, C.; Sperl, J. I.; Bequé, D.; Langner, O.; Coman, J.; Ruiz-Yaniz, M.

    2014-10-15

    Many scientific research areas rely on accurate electron density characterization of various materials. For instance in X-ray optics and radiation therapy, there is a need for a fast and reliable technique to quantitatively characterize samples for electron density. We present how a precise measurement of electron density can be performed using an X-ray phase-contrast grating interferometer in a radiographic mode of a homogenous sample in a controlled geometry. A batch of various plastic materials was characterized quantitatively and compared with calculated results. We found that the measured electron densities closely match theoretical values. The technique yields comparable results between a monochromatic and a polychromatic X-ray source. Measured electron densities can be further used to design dedicated X-ray phase contrast phantoms and the additional information on small angle scattering should be taken into account in order to exclude unsuitable materials.

  18. Quantitative electron density characterization of soft tissue substitute plastic materials using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Sarapata, A; Chabior, M; Cozzini, C; Sperl, J I; Bequé, D; Langner, O; Coman, J; Zanette, I; Ruiz-Yaniz, M; Pfeiffer, F

    2014-10-01

    Many scientific research areas rely on accurate electron density characterization of various materials. For instance in X-ray optics and radiation therapy, there is a need for a fast and reliable technique to quantitatively characterize samples for electron density. We present how a precise measurement of electron density can be performed using an X-ray phase-contrast grating interferometer in a radiographic mode of a homogenous sample in a controlled geometry. A batch of various plastic materials was characterized quantitatively and compared with calculated results. We found that the measured electron densities closely match theoretical values. The technique yields comparable results between a monochromatic and a polychromatic X-ray source. Measured electron densities can be further used to design dedicated X-ray phase contrast phantoms and the additional information on small angle scattering should be taken into account in order to exclude unsuitable materials. PMID:25362404

  19. Quantitative electron density characterization of soft tissue substitute plastic materials using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarapata, A.; Chabior, M.; Cozzini, C.; Sperl, J. I.; Bequé, D.; Langner, O.; Coman, J.; Zanette, I.; Ruiz-Yaniz, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-10-01

    Many scientific research areas rely on accurate electron density characterization of various materials. For instance in X-ray optics and radiation therapy, there is a need for a fast and reliable technique to quantitatively characterize samples for electron density. We present how a precise measurement of electron density can be performed using an X-ray phase-contrast grating interferometer in a radiographic mode of a homogenous sample in a controlled geometry. A batch of various plastic materials was characterized quantitatively and compared with calculated results. We found that the measured electron densities closely match theoretical values. The technique yields comparable results between a monochromatic and a polychromatic X-ray source. Measured electron densities can be further used to design dedicated X-ray phase contrast phantoms and the additional information on small angle scattering should be taken into account in order to exclude unsuitable materials.

  20. High spatiotemporal resolution measurement of regional lung air volumes from 2D phase contrast x-ray images

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, Andrew F. T.; Islam, M. Sirajul; Kitchen, Marcus J.; Fouras, Andreas; Wallace, Megan J.; Hooper, Stuart B.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Described herein is a new technique for measuring regional lung air volumes from two-dimensional propagation-based phase contrast x-ray (PBI) images at very high spatial and temporal resolution. Phase contrast dramatically increases lung visibility and the outlined volumetric reconstruction technique quantifies dynamic changes in respiratory function. These methods can be used for assessing pulmonary disease and injury and for optimizing mechanical ventilation techniques for preterm infants using animal models. Methods: The volumetric reconstruction combines the algorithms of temporal subtraction and single image phase retrieval (SIPR) to isolate the image of the lungs from the thoracic cage in order to measure regional lung air volumes. The SIPR algorithm was used to recover the change in projected thickness of the lungs on a pixel-by-pixel basis (pixel dimensions {approx}16.2 {mu}m). The technique has been validated using numerical simulation and compared results of measuring regional lung air volumes with and without the use of temporal subtraction for removing the thoracic cage. To test this approach, a series of PBI images of newborn rabbit pups mechanically ventilated at different frequencies was employed. Results: Regional lung air volumes measured from PBI images of newborn rabbit pups showed on average an improvement of at least 20% in 16% of pixels within the lungs in comparison to that measured without the use of temporal subtraction. The majority of pixels that showed an improvement was found to be in regions occupied by bone. Applying the volumetric technique to sequences of PBI images of newborn rabbit pups, it is shown that lung aeration at birth can be highly heterogeneous. Conclusions: This paper presents an image segmentation technique based on temporal subtraction that has successfully been used to isolate the lungs from PBI chest images, allowing the change in lung air volume to be measured over regions as small as the pixel size. Using

  1. Application of X-ray phase contrast micro-tomography to the identification of traditional Chinese medicines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, L. L.; Xue, Y. L.; Ni, L. H.; Tan, H.; Wang, Y. D.; Xiao, T. Q.

    2013-07-01

    Nondestructive and in situ investigation to the characteristic microstructures are important to the identification of traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs), especially for precious specimens and samples with oil contains. X-ray phase contrast micro-tomography (XPCMT) could be a practical solution for this kind of investigation. Fructus Foeniculi, a fruit kind of TCMs, is selected as the test sample. Experimental results show that the characteristic microstructures of Fructus Foeniculi, including vittae, vascular bundles, embryo, endosperm and the mesocarp reticulate cells around the vittae can be clearly distinguished and the integrated dissepiments microstructure in the vittae was observed successfully. Especially, for the first time, with virtual slice technique, it can investigate the liquid contains inside the TCMs. The results show that the vittae filled with volatile oil in the oil chamber were observed with this nondestructive and in situ 3-dimensional imaging technique. Furthermore, taking the advantage of micro-computed tomography, we can obtain the characteristic microstructures' quantitative information of the volume in liquid state. The volume of the oil chambers and the volatile oil, which are contained inside the vittae, was quantitatively analyzed. Accordingly, it can calculate the volume ratio of the volatile oil easily and accurately. As a result, we could conclude that XPCMT could be a useful tool for the nondestructive identification and quantitative analysis to TCMs.

  2. Visualization of microvasculature and thrombi by X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jian, Jianbo; Yang, Hao; Zhao, Xinyan; Xuan, Ruijiao; Zhang, Yujie; Li, Dongyue; Hu, Chunhong

    2016-03-01

    Visualization of the microvascular network and thrombi in the microvasculature is a key step to evaluating the development of tumor growth and metastasis, and influences treatment selection. X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) is a new imaging technique that can detect minute changes of density and reveal soft tissues discrimination at micrometer-scale resolution. In this study, six human resected hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues were investigated with PCCT. A histological stain was added to estimate the accuracy of PCCT. The results showed that the fine structures of the microvasculature (measuring 30-100 µm) and thrombi in tiny blood vessels were displayed clearly on imaging the HCC tissues by PCCT. Moreover, density distributions of the thrombi were obtained, which could be reliably used to distinguish malignant from benign thrombi in HCC. In conclusion, PCCT can clearly show the three-dimensional subtle structures of HCC that cannot be detected by conventional absorption-based computed tomography and provides a new method for the imageology of HCC. PMID:26917149

  3. Morphological Evolution of Electrochemically Plated/Stripped Lithium Microstructures Investigated by Synchrotron X-ray Phase Contrast Tomography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fu; Zielke, Lukas; Markötter, Henning; Hilger, André; Zhou, Dong; Moroni, Riko; Zengerle, Roland; Thiele, Simon; Banhart, John; Manke, Ingo

    2016-08-23

    Due to its low redox potential and high theoretical specific capacity, Li metal has drawn worldwide research attention because of its potential use in next-generation battery technologies such as Li-S and Li-O2. Unfortunately, uncontrollable growth of Li microstructures (LmSs, e.g., dendrites, fibers) during electrochemical Li stripping/plating has prevented their practical commercialization. Despite various strategies proposed to mitigate LmS nucleation and/or block its growth, a fundamental understanding of the underlying evolution mechanisms remains elusive. Herein, synchrotron in-line phase contrast X-ray tomography was employed to investigate the morphological evolution of electrochemically deposited/dissolved LmSs nondestructively. We present a 3D characterization of electrochemically stripped Li electrodes with regard to electrochemically plated LmSs. We clarify fundamentally the origin of the porous lithium interface growing into Li electrodes. Moreover, cleavage of the separator caused by growing LmS was experimentally observed and visualized in 3D. Our systematic investigation provides fundamental insights into LmS evolution and enables us to understand the evolution mechanisms in Li electrodes more profoundly. PMID:27463258

  4. Laboratory implementation of edge illumination X-ray phase-contrast imaging with energy-resolved detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diemoz, P. C.; Endrizzi, M.; Vittoria, F. A.; Hagen, C. K.; Kallon, G.; Basta, D.; Marenzana, M.; Delogu, P.; Vincenzi, A.; De Ruvo, L.; Spandre, G.; Brez, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Olivo, A.

    2015-03-01

    Edge illumination (EI) X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI) has potential for applications in different fields of research, including materials science, non-destructive industrial testing, small-animal imaging, and medical imaging. One of its main advantages is the compatibility with laboratory equipment, in particular with conventional non-microfocal sources, which makes its exploitation in normal research laboratories possible. In this work, we demonstrate that the signal in laboratory implementations of EI can be correctly described with the use of the simplified geometrical optics. Besides enabling the derivation of simple expressions for the sensitivity and spatial resolution of a given EI setup, this model also highlights the EI's achromaticity. With the aim of improving image quality, as well as to take advantage of the fact that all energies in the spectrum contribute to the image contrast, we carried out EI acquisitions using a photon-counting energy-resolved detector. The obtained results demonstrate that this approach has great potential for future laboratory implementations of EI.

  5. Phase contrast imaging X-ray computed tomography: quantitative characterization of human patellar cartilage matrix with topological and geometrical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B.; Diemoz, Paul C.; Wismüller, Axel

    2014-03-01

    Current assessment of cartilage is primarily based on identification of indirect markers such as joint space narrowing and increased subchondral bone density on x-ray images. In this context, phase contrast CT imaging (PCI-CT) has recently emerged as a novel imaging technique that allows a direct examination of chondrocyte patterns and their correlation to osteoarthritis through visualization of cartilage soft tissue. This study investigates the use of topological and geometrical approaches for characterizing chondrocyte patterns in the radial zone of the knee cartilage matrix in the presence and absence of osteoarthritic damage. For this purpose, topological features derived from Minkowski Functionals and geometric features derived from the Scaling Index Method (SIM) were extracted from 842 regions of interest (ROI) annotated on PCI-CT images of healthy and osteoarthritic specimens of human patellar cartilage. The extracted features were then used in a machine learning task involving support vector regression to classify ROIs as healthy or osteoarthritic. Classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). The best classification performance was observed with high-dimensional geometrical feature vectors derived from SIM (0.95 ± 0.06) which outperformed all Minkowski Functionals (p < 0.001). These results suggest that such quantitative analysis of chondrocyte patterns in human patellar cartilage matrix involving SIM-derived geometrical features can distinguish between healthy and osteoarthritic tissue with high accuracy.

  6. A multi-channel image reconstruction method for grating-based X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qiaofeng; Sawatzky, Alex; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we report on the development of an advanced multi-channel (MC) image reconstruction algorithm for grating-based X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (GB-XPCT). The MC reconstruction method we have developed operates by concurrently, rather than independently as is done conventionally, reconstructing tomographic images of the three object properties (absorption, small-angle scattering, refractive index). By jointly estimating the object properties by use of an appropriately defined penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) estimator, the 2nd order statistical properties of the object property sinograms, including correlations between them, can be fully exploited to improve the variance vs. resolution tradeoff of the reconstructed images as compared to existing methods. Channel-independent regularization strategies are proposed. To solve the MC reconstruction problem, we developed an advanced algorithm based on the proximal point algorithm and the augmented Lagrangian method. By use of experimental and computer-simulation data, we demonstrate that by exploiting inter-channel noise correlations, the MC reconstruction method can improve image quality in GB-XPCT.

  7. High speed synchrotron x-ray phase contrast imaging of dynamic material response to split Hopkinson bar loading.

    PubMed

    Hudspeth, M; Claus, B; Dubelman, S; Black, J; Mondal, A; Parab, N; Funnell, C; Hai, F; Qi, M L; Fezzaa, K; Luo, S N; Chen, W

    2013-02-01

    The successful process of amalgamating both the time-resolved imaging capabilities present at the Advanced Photon Source beamline 32ID-B and the proficiency of high-rate loading offered by the split Hopkinson or Kolsky compression/tension bar apparatus is discussed and verification of system effectiveness is expressed via dynamic experiments on various material systems. Single particle sand interaction along with glass cracking during dynamic compression, and fiber-epoxy interfacial failure, ligament-bone debonding, and single-crystal silicon fragmentation due to dynamic tension, were imaged with 0.5 μs temporal resolution and μm-level spatial resolution. Synchrotron x-ray phase contrast imaging of said material systems being loaded with the Kolsky bar apparatus demonstratively depicts the effectiveness of the novel union between these two powerful techniques, thereby allowing for in situ analysis of the interior of the material system during high-rate loading for a variety of applications. PMID:23464246

  8. Detector, collimator and real-time reconstructor for a new scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) prototype

    PubMed Central

    Speidel, Michael A.; Tomkowiak, Michael T.; Raval, Amish N.; Dunkerley, David A. P.; Slagowski, Jordan M.; Kahn, Paul; Ku, Jamie; Funk, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry fluoroscopy system for low dose cardiac imaging. The use of a narrow scanned x-ray beam in SBDX reduces detected x-ray scatter and improves dose efficiency, however the tight beam collimation also limits the maximum achievable x-ray fluence. To increase the fluence available for imaging, we have constructed a new SBDX prototype with a wider x-ray beam, larger-area detector, and new real-time image reconstructor. Imaging is performed with a scanning source that generates 40,328 narrow overlapping projections from 71 × 71 focal spot positions for every 1/15 s scan period. A high speed 2-mm thick CdTe photon counting detector was constructed with 320×160 elements and 10.6 cm × 5.3 cm area (full readout every 1.28 μs), providing an 86% increase in area over the previous SBDX prototype. A matching multihole collimator was fabricated from layers of tungsten, brass, and lead, and a multi-GPU reconstructor was assembled to reconstruct the stream of captured detector images into full field-of-view images in real time. Thirty-two tomosynthetic planes spaced by 5 mm plus a multiplane composite image are produced for each scan frame. Noise equivalent quanta on the new SBDX prototype measured 63%–71% higher than the previous prototype. X-ray scatter fraction was 3.9–7.8% when imaging 23.3–32.6 cm acrylic phantoms, versus 2.3–4.2% with the previous prototype. Coronary angiographic imaging at 15 frame/s was successfully performed on the new SBDX prototype, with live display of either a multiplane composite or single plane image. PMID:26236071

  9. Detector, collimator and real-time reconstructor for a new scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speidel, Michael A.; Tomkowiak, Michael T.; Raval, Amish N.; Dunkerley, David A. P.; Slagowski, Jordan M.; Kahn, Paul; Ku, Jamie; Funk, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    Scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry fluoroscopy system for low dose cardiac imaging. The use of a narrow scanned x-ray beam in SBDX reduces detected x-ray scatter and improves dose efficiency, however the tight beam collimation also limits the maximum achievable x-ray fluence. To increase the fluence available for imaging, we have constructed a new SBDX prototype with a wider x-ray beam, larger-area detector, and new real-time image reconstructor. Imaging is performed with a scanning source that generates 40,328 narrow overlapping projections from 71 x 71 focal spot positions for every 1/15 s scan period. A high speed 2-mm thick CdTe photon counting detector was constructed with 320x160 elements and 10.6 cm x 5.3 cm area (full readout every 1.28 μs), providing an 86% increase in area over the previous SBDX prototype. A matching multihole collimator was fabricated from layers of tungsten, brass, and lead, and a multi-GPU reconstructor was assembled to reconstruct the stream of captured detector images into full field-of-view images in real time. Thirty-two tomosynthetic planes spaced by 5 mm plus a multiplane composite image are produced for each scan frame. Noise equivalent quanta on the new SBDX prototype measured 63%-71% higher than the previous prototype. X-ray scatter fraction was 3.9-7.8% when imaging 23.3-32.6 cm acrylic phantoms, versus 2.3- 4.2% with the previous prototype. Coronary angiographic imaging at 15 frame/s was successfully performed on the new SBDX prototype, with live display of either a multiplane composite or single plane image.

  10. Hygromorphic behaviour of cellular material: hysteretic swelling and shrinkage of wood probed by phase contrast X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derome, Dominique; Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Patera, Alessandra; Guyer, Robert; Carmeliet, Jan

    2012-10-01

    Wood is a hygromorphic material, meaning it responds to changes in environmental humidity by changing its geometry. Its cellular biological structure swells during wetting and shrinks during drying. The origin of the moisture-induced deformation lies at the sub-cellular scale. The cell wall can be considered a composite material with stiff cellulose fibrils acting as reinforcement embedded in a hemicellulose/lignin matrix. The bulk of the cellulose fibrils, forming 50% of the cell wall, are oriented longitudinally, forming long-pitched helices. Both components of cell wall matrix are displaying swelling. Moisture sorption and, to a lesser degree, swelling/shrinkage are known to be hysteretic. We quantify the affine strains during the swelling and shrinkage using high resolution images obtained by phase contrast synchrotron X-ray tomography of wood samples of different porosities. The reversibility of the swelling/shrinkage is found for samples with controlled moisture sorption history. The deformation is more hysteretic for high than for low density samples. Swelling/shrinkage due to ad/desorption of water vapour displays also a non-affine component. The reversibility of the swelling/shrinkage indicates that the material has a structural capacity to show a persistent cellular geometry for a given moisture state and a structural composition that allows for moisture-induced transitional states. A collection of qualitative observations of small subsets of cells during swelling/shrinkage is further studied by simulating the observed behaviour. An anisotropic swelling coefficient of the cell wall is found to emerge and its origin is linked to the anisotropy of the cellulose fibrils arrangement in cell wall layers.

  11. Visualization of small lesions in rat cartilage by means of laboratory-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marenzana, Massimo; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Das Neves Borges, Patricia; Endrizzi, Marco; Szafraniec, Magdalena B.; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Olivo, Alessandro

    2012-12-01

    Being able to quantitatively assess articular cartilage in three-dimensions (3D) in small rodent animal models, with a simple laboratory set-up, would prove extremely important for the development of pre-clinical research focusing on cartilage pathologies such as osteoarthritis (OA). These models are becoming essential tools for the development of new drugs for OA, a disease affecting up to 1/3 of the population older than 50 years for which there is no cure except prosthetic surgery. However, due to limitations in imaging technology, high-throughput 3D structural imaging has not been achievable in small rodent models, thereby limiting their translational potential and their efficiency as research tools. We show that a simple laboratory system based on coded-aperture x-ray phase contrast imaging (CAXPCi) can correctly visualize the cartilage layer in slices of an excised rat tibia imaged both in air and in saline solution. Moreover, we show that small, surgically induced lesions are also correctly detected by the CAXPCi system, and we support this finding with histopathology examination. Following these successful proof-of-concept results in rat cartilage, we expect that an upgrade of the system to higher resolutions (currently underway) will enable extending the method to the imaging of mouse cartilage as well. From a technological standpoint, by showing the capability of the system to detect cartilage also in water, we demonstrate phase sensitivity comparable to other lab-based phase methods (e.g. grating interferometry). In conclusion, CAXPCi holds a strong potential for being adopted as a routine laboratory tool for non-destructive, high throughput assessment of 3D structural changes in murine articular cartilage, with a possible impact in the field similar to the revolution that conventional microCT brought into bone research.

  12. Real-time Studies of Shocked Polycrystalline Materials with Single-Pulse X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Dane V. Morgan

    2011-05-25

    Characteristic K-α x-rays used for single-pulse XRD are conventionally produced by a 37-stage high-voltage Marx pulse generator coupled to a vacuum needle-and-washer x-ray diode via coaxial transmission line. A large field-of-view x-ray image plate detection system typically enables observation of several Debye-Scherrer rings. Recently, we have developed a fiber-optic reducer, coupled to a CCD camera, to obtain low-noise, large field-of-view images. The direct beam spot is produced by bremsstrahlung radiation attenuated by a twomillimeter tungsten beam stop. Determination of the direct beam position is necessary to perform the ring integration.

  13. A feasibility study of X-ray phase-contrast mammographic tomography at the Imaging and Medical beamline of the Australian Synchrotron.

    PubMed

    Nesterets, Yakov I; Gureyev, Timur E; Mayo, Sheridan C; Stevenson, Andrew W; Thompson, Darren; Brown, Jeremy M C; Kitchen, Marcus J; Pavlov, Konstantin M; Lockie, Darren; Brun, Francesco; Tromba, Giuliana

    2015-11-01

    Results are presented of a recent experiment at the Imaging and Medical beamline of the Australian Synchrotron intended to contribute to the implementation of low-dose high-sensitivity three-dimensional mammographic phase-contrast imaging, initially at synchrotrons and subsequently in hospitals and medical imaging clinics. The effect of such imaging parameters as X-ray energy, source size, detector resolution, sample-to-detector distance, scanning and data processing strategies in the case of propagation-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) have been tested, quantified, evaluated and optimized using a plastic phantom simulating relevant breast-tissue characteristics. Analysis of the data collected using a Hamamatsu CMOS Flat Panel Sensor, with a pixel size of 100 µm, revealed the presence of propagation-based phase contrast and demonstrated significant improvement of the quality of phase-contrast CT imaging compared with conventional (absorption-based) CT, at medically acceptable radiation doses. PMID:26524316

  14. Digital x-ray cameras for real-time stereotactic breast needle biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehrig, Hans; Fajardo, Laurie L.; Yu, Tong

    1993-09-01

    This paper describes experiments performed to determine image quality of three x-ray imaging systems designed for stereotactic breast needle biopsy: A system developed in-house, a LoRad DSM and a Fischer MammoVision. All systems have been successfully used to perform stereotactic breast needle biopsies and preoperative needle localizations. They all successfully decrease the time for stereotactic needle biopsy procedures. The systems are being characterized with respect to image quality for a variety of mammographic x-ray screens. The sensitivity can be as high as 96 ADU/mR and as low as 28 ADU/mR, depending on the phosphor screen and the gain used. The response is linear with respect to x-ray exposure. The highest spatial resolution found was on the order of 10 lp/mm, which is the Nyquist frequency for systems with 1024 pixels at a linear field of 5 cm. The noise at zero spatial frequency was found to be mainly determined by x-ray photon noise.

  15. Development of a large-area CMOS-based detector for real-time x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Sung Kyn; Park, Sung Kyu; Hwang, Sung Ha; Im, Dong Ak; Kosonen, Jari; Kim, Tae Woo; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2010-04-01

    Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors (APSs) with high electrical and optical performances are now being attractive for digital radiography (DR) and dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). In this study, we report our prototype CMOS-based detectors capable of real-time imaging. The field-of-view of the detector is 12 × 14.4 cm. The detector employs a CsI:Tl scintillator as an x-ray-to-light converter. The electrical performance of the CMOS APS, such as readout noise and full-well capacity, was evaluated. The x-ray imaging characteristics of the detector were evaluated in terms of characteristic curve, pre-sampling modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, detective quantum efficiency, and image lag. The overall performance of the detector is demonstrated with phantom images obtained for DR and CBCT applications. The detailed development description and measurement results are addressed. With the results, we suggest that the prototype CMOS-based detector has the potential for CBCT and real-time x-ray imaging applications.

  16. Gas gun shock experiments with single-pulse x-ray phase contrast imaging and diffraction at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, S. N.; Jensen, B. J.; Hooks, D. E.; Ramos, K. J.; Yeager, J. D.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Shimada, T.; Fezzaa, K.

    2012-07-15

    The highly transient nature of shock loading and pronounced microstructure effects on dynamic materials response call for in situ, temporally and spatially resolved, x-ray-based diagnostics. Third-generation synchrotron x-ray sources are advantageous for x-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) and diffraction under dynamic loading, due to their high photon fluxes, high coherency, and high pulse repetition rates. The feasibility of bulk-scale gas gun shock experiments with dynamic x-ray PCI and diffraction measurements was investigated at the beamline 32ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source. The x-ray beam characteristics, experimental setup, x-ray diagnostics, and static and dynamic test results are described. We demonstrate ultrafast, multiframe, single-pulse PCI measurements with unprecedented temporal (<100 ps) and spatial ({approx}2 {mu}m) resolutions for bulk-scale shock experiments, as well as single-pulse dynamic Laue diffraction. The results not only substantiate the potential of synchrotron-based experiments for addressing a variety of shock physics problems, but also allow us to identify the technical challenges related to image detection, x-ray source, and dynamic loading.

  17. Hybrid quantitative simulation on the in-line phase-contrast x-ray imaging of three dimensional samples under actual clinic imaging parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Hong; Han Shensheng; Ding Jianhui; Jiang Zhaoxia; Peng Weijun

    2009-07-06

    A hybrid model combining Monte Carlo method with diffraction theory of wave optics has been developed and applied to quantitatively simulate the in-line diffractive phase-contrast x-ray imaging of three dimensional tissue samples under actual clinic imaging parameters. The primary microcosmic interactions of medical-energy x-ray within matter including photoabsorption, Compton scattering, and coherent scattering, have been taken into account in the Monte Carlo simulation. A diffraction processing based on Fresnel diffraction theory is carried out to simulate the macroscopic diffraction effect. A comparison with experiment results has also been performed.

  18. Demonstration of synchrotron x-ray phase contrast imaging computed tomography of infiltrative transitional cell carcinoma of the prostatic urethra in a dog.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, James E; Wesolowski, Michal J; Wolkowski, Bailey; Chibbar, Rajni; Snead, Elisabeth C R; Singh, Jaswant; Pettitt, Murray; Malhi, Pritpal S; Barboza, Trinita; Adams, Gregg

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic urethral transitional cell carcinoma with prostatic invasion in a dog was imaged with abdominal radiography and abdominal ultrasonography antemortem. Synchrotron in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging computed tomography (XPCI-CT) was performed on the prostate ex vivo at the Canadian Light Source Synchrotron and compared to histology. XPCI-CT imaging provides greater soft tissue contrast than conventional absorption-based x-ray imaging modalities, permitting visualization of regions of inflammatory cell infiltration, differentiation of invasive versus noninvasive tumor regions, and areas of necrosis and mineralization. This represents the first report of XPCI-CT images of an invasive prostatic urothelial neoplasm in a dog. PMID:27014719

  19. Equally-sloped tomography and its applications in biological imaging and x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Edwin Edward

    Tomography has made revolutionary impacts in a number of fields ranging from medical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging to electron microscopy. Conventional tomography reconstructs a 3D object from a set of equally angled 2D projections. Since the set of projections are in polar coordinates and the object in Cartesian coordinates, interpolation has to be used in the reconstruction process, which introduces artifacts in the reconstructed 3D object. In application to biology and medicine, there are two more difficulties: (i) a limited number of projections due to radiation damage to biological specimens and the patients; and (ii) the missing wedge problem (i.e. specimens cannot be tilted beyond +/- 70° in cryo-electron microscopy). Here we apply equally-sloped tomography (EST) to significantly alleviate these difficulties and to demonstrate that EST can dramatically reduce the required radiation dose for achieving a desired resolution. We applied EST to reconstructing frozen-hydrated keyhole limpet hemocyanin molecules, a frozen-hydrated bacterial cell and a single human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In comparison with traditional weighted back-projection (WBP), the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) and the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART), EST reconstructions exhibited higher contrast, less peripheral noise, more easily detectable molecular boundaries and reduced missing wedge effects. More importantly, EST reconstructions including only two-thirds the original images appeared to have the same resolution as full WBP reconstructions, suggesting that EST can either reduce the dose required to reach a given resolution or allow higher resolutions to be achieved with a given dose. The development of the tomographic implementation of x-ray phase contrast imaging holds great promise for biological and medical imaging; however, the radiation dose imparted to biological specimens and patients presents a major obstacle in such an implementation

  20. Soft x-ray scattering facility at the Advanced Light Source with real-time data processing and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gann, E.; Collins, B. A.; Ade, H.; Young, A. T.; Nasiatka, J.; Padmore, H. A.; Hexemer, A.; Wang, C.; Yan, H.

    2012-04-15

    We present the development and characterization of a dedicated resonant soft x-ray scattering facility. Capable of operation over a wide energy range, the beamline and endstation are primarily used for scattering from soft matter systems around the carbon K-edge ({approx}285 eV). We describe the specialized design of the instrument and characteristics of the beamline. Operational characteristics of immediate interest to users such as polarization control, degree of higher harmonic spectral contamination, and detector noise are delineated. Of special interest is the development of a higher harmonic rejection system that improves the spectral purity of the x-ray beam. Special software and a user-friendly interface have been implemented to allow real-time data processing and preliminary data analysis simultaneous with data acquisition.

  1. Time-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques for real-time studies of interfacial charge transfer dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shavorskiy, Andrey; Hertlein, Marcus; Guo Jinghua; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Cordones, Amy; Vura-Weis, Josh; Siefermann, Katrin; Slaughter, Daniel; Sturm, Felix; Weise, Fabian; Khurmi, Champak; Belkacem, Ali; Weber, Thorsten; Gessner, Oliver; Bluhm, Hendrik; Strader, Matthew; Cho, Hana; Coslovich, Giacomo; Kaindl, Robert A.; Lin, Ming-Fu; and others

    2013-04-19

    X-ray based spectroscopy techniques are particularly well suited to gain access to local oxidation states and electronic dynamics in complex systems with atomic pinpoint accuracy. Traditionally, these techniques are applied in a quasi-static fashion that usually highlights the steady-state properties of a system rather than the fast dynamics that often define the system function on a molecular level. Novel x-ray spectroscopy techniques enabled by free electron lasers (FELs) and synchrotron based pump-probe schemes provide the opportunity to monitor intramolecular and interfacial charge transfer processes in real-time and with element and chemical specificity. Two complementary time-domain xray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques are presented that are applied at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to study charge transfer processes in N3 dye-sensitized ZnO semiconductor nanocrystals, which are at the heart of emerging light-harvesting technologies.

  2. In-line phase-contrast imaging of a biological specimen using a compact laser-Compton scattering-based x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeura-Sekiguchi, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yasumoto, M.; Toyokawa, H.; Koike, M.; Yamada, K.; Sakai, F.; Mori, K.; Maruyama, K.; Oka, H.; Kimata, T.

    2008-03-31

    Laser-Compton scattering (LCS) x-ray sources have recently attracted much attention for their potential use at local medical facilities because they can produce ultrashort pulsed, high-brilliance, and quasimonochromatic hard x rays with a small source size. The feasibility of in-line phase-contrast imaging for a 'thick' biological specimens of rat lumbar vertebrae using the developed compact LCS-X in AIST was investigated for the promotion of clinical imaging. In the higher-quality images, anatomical details of the spinous processes of the vertebrae are more clearly observable than with conventional absorption radiography. The results demonstrate that phase-contrast radiography can be performed using LCS-X.

  3. A Bayesian approach to real-time 3D tumor localization via monoscopic x-ray imaging during treatment delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruijiang; Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Xing, Lei

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Monoscopic x-ray imaging with on-board kV devices is an attractive approach for real-time image guidance in modern radiation therapy such as VMAT or IMRT, but it falls short in providing reliable information along the direction of imaging x-ray. By effectively taking consideration of projection data at prior times and/or angles through a Bayesian formalism, the authors develop an algorithm for real-time and full 3D tumor localization with a single x-ray imager during treatment delivery. Methods: First, a prior probability density function is constructed using the 2D tumor locations on the projection images acquired during patient setup. Whenever an x-ray image is acquired during the treatment delivery, the corresponding 2D tumor location on the imager is used to update the likelihood function. The unresolved third dimension is obtained by maximizing the posterior probability distribution. The algorithm can also be used in a retrospective fashion when all the projection images during the treatment delivery are used for 3D localization purposes. The algorithm does not involve complex optimization of any model parameter and therefore can be used in a ''plug-and-play'' fashion. The authors validated the algorithm using (1) simulated 3D linear and elliptic motion and (2) 3D tumor motion trajectories of a lung and a pancreas patient reproduced by a physical phantom. Continuous kV images were acquired over a full gantry rotation with the Varian TrueBeam on-board imaging system. Three scenarios were considered: fluoroscopic setup, cone beam CT setup, and retrospective analysis. Results: For the simulation study, the RMS 3D localization error is 1.2 and 2.4 mm for the linear and elliptic motions, respectively. For the phantom experiments, the 3D localization error is < 1 mm on average and < 1.5 mm at 95th percentile in the lung and pancreas cases for all three scenarios. The difference in 3D localization error for different scenarios is small and is not

  4. Real-time x-ray diffraction measurements of shocked polycrystalline tin and aluminum.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Dane V; Macy, Don; Stevens, Gerald

    2008-11-01

    A new, fast, single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) diagnostic for determining phase transitions in shocked polycrystalline materials has been developed. The diagnostic consists of a 37-stage Marx bank high-voltage pulse generator coupled to a needle-and-washer electron beam diode via coaxial cable, producing line and bremsstrahlung x-ray emission in a 35 ns pulse. The characteristic K(alpha) lines from the selected anodes of silver and molybdenum are used to produce the diffraction patterns, with thin foil filters employed to remove the characteristic K(beta) line emission. The x-ray beam passes through a pinhole collimator and is incident on the sample with an approximately 3 x 6 mm(2) spot and 1 degrees full width half maximum angular divergence in a Bragg-reflecting geometry. For the experiments described in this report, the angle between the incident beam and the sample surface was 8.5 degrees . A Debye-Scherrer diffraction image was produced on a phosphor located 76 mm from the polycrystalline sample surface. The phosphor image was coupled to a charge-coupled device camera through a coherent fiber-optic bundle. Dynamic single-pulse XRD experiments were conducted with thin foil samples of tin, shock loaded with a 1 mm vitreous carbon back window. Detasheet high explosive with a 2-mm-thick aluminum buffer was used to shock the sample. Analysis of the dynamic shock-loaded tin XRD images revealed a phase transformation of the tin beta phase into an amorphous or liquid state. Identical experiments with shock-loaded aluminum indicated compression of the face-centered-cubic aluminum lattice with no phase transformation. PMID:19045900

  5. Real-time X-ray Diffraction Measurements of Shocked Polycrystalline Tin and Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Dane V. Morgan, Don Macy, Gerald Stevens

    2008-11-22

    A new, fast, single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) diagnostic for determining phase transitions in shocked polycrystalline materials has been developed. The diagnostic consists of a 37-stage Marx bank high-voltage pulse generator coupled to a needle-and-washer electron beam diode via coaxial cable, producing line and bremsstrahlung x-ray emission in a 35-ns pulse. The characteristic Kα lines from the selected anodes of silver and molybdenum are used to produce the diffraction patterns, with thin foil filters employed to remove the characteristic Kβ line emission. The x-ray beam passes through a pinhole collimator and is incident on the sample with an approximately 3-mm by 6-mm spot and 1° full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) angular divergence in a Bragg-reflecting geometry. For the experiments described in this report, the angle between the incident beam and the sample surface was 8.5°. A Debye-Scherrer diffraction image was produced on a phosphor located 76 mm from the polycrystalline sample surface. The phosphor image was coupled to a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera through a coherent fiberoptic bundle. Dynamic single-pulse XRD experiments were conducted with thin foil samples of tin, shock loaded with a 1-mm vitreous carbon back window. Detasheet high explosive with a 2-mm-thick aluminum buffer was used to shock the sample. Analysis of the dynamic shock-loaded tin XRD images revealed a phase transformation of the tin beta phase into an amorphous or liquid state. Identical experiments with shock-loaded aluminum indicated compression of the face-centered-cubic (fcc) aluminum lattice with no phase transformation.

  6. Performance investigation of a hospital-grade x-ray tube-based differential phase-contrast cone beam CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Ning, Ruola; Cai, Weixing; Liu, Jiangkun; Conover, David

    2012-03-01

    Differential phase contrast technique could be the next breakthrough in the field of CT imaging. While traditional absorption-based X-ray CT imaging is inefficient at differentiating soft tissues, phase-contrast technique offers great advantage as being able to produce higher contrast images utilizing the phase information of objects. Our long term goal is to develop a gantry-based hospital-grade X-ray tube differential phase contrast cone-beam CT (DPC-CBCT) technology which is able to achieve higher contrast noise ratio (CNR) in soft tissue imaging without increasing the dose level. Based on the micro-focus system built last year, a bench-top hospital-grade X-ray tube DPC-CBCT system is designed and constructed. The DPC-CBCT system consists of an X-ray source, i.e. a hospital-grade X-ray tube and a source grating, a high-resolution detector, a rotating phantom holder, a phase grating and an analyzer grating. Threedimensional (3-D) phase-coefficients are reconstructed, providing us with images enjoying higher CNR than, yet equivalent dose level to, a conventional CBCT scan. Three important aspects of the system are investigated: a) The The system's performance in term of CNR of the reconstruction image with regard to dose levels, b) the impacts of different phase stepping schemes, i.e. 5 steps to 8 steps, in term of CNR on the reconstruction images, and c) the influence of magnification or position of the phantom on image quality, chiefly CNR. The investigations are accomplished via phantom study.

  7. X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography visualizes the microstructure and degradation profile of implanted biodegradable scaffolds after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Kenta; Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto; Matsuda, Shojiro; Nakahira, Atsushi; Osumi, Noriko; Kohzuki, Masahiro; Onodera, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering strategies for spinal cord repair are a primary focus of translational medicine after spinal cord injury (SCI). Many tissue engineering strategies employ three-dimensional scaffolds, which are made of biodegradable materials and have microstructure incorporated with viable cells and bioactive molecules to promote new tissue generation and functional recovery after SCI. It is therefore important to develop an imaging system that visualizes both the microstructure of three-dimensional scaffolds and their degradation process after SCI. Here, X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography imaging based on the Talbot grating interferometer is described and it is shown how it can visualize the polyglycolic acid scaffold, including its microfibres, after implantation into the injured spinal cord. Furthermore, X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography images revealed that degradation occurred from the end to the centre of the braided scaffold in the 28 days after implantation into the injured spinal cord. The present report provides the first demonstration of an imaging technique that visualizes both the microstructure and degradation of biodegradable scaffolds in SCI research. X-ray phase-contrast imaging based on the Talbot grating interferometer is a versatile technique that can be used for a broad range of preclinical applications in tissue engineering strategies. PMID:25537600

  8. Near-isothermal furnace for in situ and real time X-ray radiography solidification experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, M.; Dreißigacker, C.; Klein, S.; Kargl, F.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present a newly developed near-isothermal X-ray transparent furnace for in situ imaging of solidification processes in thin metallic samples. We show that the furnace is ideally suited to study equiaxed microstructure evolution and grain interaction. To observe the growth dynamics of equiaxed dendritic structures, a minimal temperature gradient across the sample is required. A uniform thermal profile inside a circular sample is achieved by positioning the sample in the center of a cylindrical furnace body surrounded by a circular heater arrangement. Performance tests with the hypo-eutectic Al-15wt.%Cu and the near-eutectic Al-33wt.%Cu alloys validate the near-isothermal character of the sample environment. Controlled cooling rates of less than 0.5 K min-1 up to 10 K min-1 can be achieved in a temperature range of 720 K-1220 K. Integrated in our rotatable laboratory X-ray facility, X-RISE, the furnace provides a large field of view of 10.5 mm in diameter and a high spatial resolution of ˜4 μm. With the here presented furnace, equiaxed dendrite growth models can be rigorously tested against experiments on metal alloys by, e.g., enabling dendrite growth velocities to be determined as a function of undercooling or solutal fields in front of the growing dendrite to be measured.

  9. Near-isothermal furnace for in situ and real time X-ray radiography solidification experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, M. Dreißigacker, C.; Klein, S.; Kargl, F.

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we present a newly developed near-isothermal X-ray transparent furnace for in situ imaging of solidification processes in thin metallic samples. We show that the furnace is ideally suited to study equiaxed microstructure evolution and grain interaction. To observe the growth dynamics of equiaxed dendritic structures, a minimal temperature gradient across the sample is required. A uniform thermal profile inside a circular sample is achieved by positioning the sample in the center of a cylindrical furnace body surrounded by a circular heater arrangement. Performance tests with the hypo-eutectic Al-15wt.%Cu and the near-eutectic Al-33wt.%Cu alloys validate the near-isothermal character of the sample environment. Controlled cooling rates of less than 0.5 K min{sup −1} up to 10 K min{sup −1} can be achieved in a temperature range of 720 K–1220 K. Integrated in our rotatable laboratory X-ray facility, X-RISE, the furnace provides a large field of view of 10.5 mm in diameter and a high spatial resolution of ∼4 μm. With the here presented furnace, equiaxed dendrite growth models can be rigorously tested against experiments on metal alloys by, e.g., enabling dendrite growth velocities to be determined as a function of undercooling or solutal fields in front of the growing dendrite to be measured.

  10. Near-isothermal furnace for in situ and real time X-ray radiography solidification experiments.

    PubMed

    Becker, M; Dreißigacker, C; Klein, S; Kargl, F

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present a newly developed near-isothermal X-ray transparent furnace for in situ imaging of solidification processes in thin metallic samples. We show that the furnace is ideally suited to study equiaxed microstructure evolution and grain interaction. To observe the growth dynamics of equiaxed dendritic structures, a minimal temperature gradient across the sample is required. A uniform thermal profile inside a circular sample is achieved by positioning the sample in the center of a cylindrical furnace body surrounded by a circular heater arrangement. Performance tests with the hypo-eutectic Al-15wt.%Cu and the near-eutectic Al-33wt.%Cu alloys validate the near-isothermal character of the sample environment. Controlled cooling rates of less than 0.5 K min(-1) up to 10 K min(-1) can be achieved in a temperature range of 720 K-1220 K. Integrated in our rotatable laboratory X-ray facility, X-RISE, the furnace provides a large field of view of 10.5 mm in diameter and a high spatial resolution of ∼4 μm. With the here presented furnace, equiaxed dendrite growth models can be rigorously tested against experiments on metal alloys by, e.g., enabling dendrite growth velocities to be determined as a function of undercooling or solutal fields in front of the growing dendrite to be measured. PMID:26133847

  11. X-ray phase contrast imaging of biological specimens with femtosecond pulses of betatron radiation from a compact laser plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kneip, S.; McGuffey, C.; Dollar, F.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Matsuoka, T.; Schumaker, W.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Yanovsky, V.; Bloom, M. S.; Najmudin, Z.; Palmer, C. A. J.; Schreiber, J.

    2011-08-29

    We show that x-rays from a recently demonstrated table top source of bright, ultrafast, coherent synchrotron radiation [Kneip et al., Nat. Phys. 6, 980 (2010)] can be applied to phase contrast imaging of biological specimens. Our scheme is based on focusing a high power short pulse laser in a tenuous gas jet, setting up a plasma wakefield accelerator that accelerates and wiggles electrons analogously to a conventional synchrotron, but on the centimeter rather than tens of meter scale. We use the scheme to record absorption and phase contrast images of a tetra fish, damselfly and yellow jacket, in particular highlighting the contrast enhancement achievable with the simple propagation technique of phase contrast imaging. Coherence and ultrafast pulse duration will allow for the study of various aspects of biomechanics.

  12. Real-time X-ray transmission microscopy for fundamental studies solidification: Al-Al2Au eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curreri, Peter A.; Kaukler, William F.; Sen, Subhayu

    1998-01-01

    High resolution real-time X-ray Transmission Microscopy, XTM, has been applied to obtain information fundamental to solidification of optically opaque metallic systems. We have previously reported the measurement of the solute profile in the liquid, phase growth, and detailed solid-liquid interfacial morphology of aluminum based alloys with exposure times less than 2 seconds. Recent advances in XTM furnace design have provided an increase in real-time magnification (during solidification) for the XTM from 40X to 160X. The increased magnification has enabled for the first time the XTM imaging of real-time growth of fibers and particles with diameters of 5 μm. We have previously applied this system to study the kinetics of formation and morphological evolution of secondary fibers and particles in Al-Bi monotectic alloys. In this paper we present the preliminary results of the first real-time observations of fiber morphology evolution in optically opaque bulk metal sample of Aluminum-Gold eutectic alloy. These studies show that the XTM can be applied to study the fundamentals of eutectic and monotectic solidification. We are currently attempting to apply this technology in the fundamentals of solidification in microgravity.

  13. Real-time X-ray transmission microscopy for fundamental studies solidification: Al-Al{sub 2}Au eutectic

    SciTech Connect

    Curreri, Peter A.; Kaukler, William F.; Sen, Subhayu

    1998-01-15

    High resolution real-time X-ray Transmission Microscopy, XTM, has been applied to obtain information fundamental to solidification of optically opaque metallic systems. We have previously reported the measurement of the solute profile in the liquid, phase growth, and detailed solid-liquid interfacial morphology of aluminum based alloys with exposure times less than 2 seconds. Recent advances in XTM furnace design have provided an increase in real-time magnification (during solidification) for the XTM from 40X to 160X. The increased magnification has enabled for the first time the XTM imaging of real-time growth of fibers and particles with diameters of 5 {mu}m. We have previously applied this system to study the kinetics of formation and morphological evolution of secondary fibers and particles in Al-Bi monotectic alloys. In this paper we present the preliminary results of the first real-time observations of fiber morphology evolution in optically opaque bulk metal sample of Aluminum-Gold eutectic alloy. These studies show that the XTM can be applied to study the fundamentals of eutectic and monotectic solidification. We are currently attempting to apply this technology in the fundamentals of solidification in microgravity.

  14. "Real-time" core formation experiments using X-ray tomography at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, H. C.; Anzures, B.; Yu, T.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The process of differentiation is a defining moment in a planet's history. Direct observation of this process at work is impossible in our solar system because it was complete within the first few tens of millions of years. Geochemical and geophysical evidence points to magma ocean scenarios to explain differentiation of large planets such as Earth. Smaller planets and planetesimals likely never achieved the high temperatures necessary for wide scale melting. In these smaller bodies, silicates may have only partially melted, or not melted at all. Furthermore, isotopic signatures in meteorites suggest that some planetesimals differentiated within just a few million years. Achieving efficient core segregation on this rapid timescale is difficult, particularly in a solid or semi-solid silicate matrix. Direct measurements of metallic melt migration velocities have been difficult due to experimental limitations and most previous work has relied on geometric models based on 2-D observations in quenched samples. We have employed a relatively new technique of in-situ, high pressure, high temperature, X-ray micro-tomography coupled with 3-D numerical simulations to evaluate the efficiency of melt percolation in metal/silicate systems. From this, we can place constraints on the timing of core formation in early solar system bodies. Mixtures of olivine and KLB-1 peridotite and up to 12 vol% FeS were pre-synthesized to achieve an initial equilibrium microstructure of silicate and sulfide. The samples were then were then pressed again to ~2GPa, and heated to ~1300°C to collect X-ray tomography images as the partially molten samples were undergoing shear deformation. The reconstructed 3-D images of melt distribution were used as the input for lattice Boltzmann simulations of fluid flow through the melt network and calculations of permeability and melt migration velocity. Our in-situ x-ray tomography results are complemented by traditional 2-D image analysis and high

  15. Real-time contrast medium detection in x-ray images by mathematical morphology operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Dieu Sang; Beucher, Serge; Bilodeau, Michel

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes a solution to contrast agent (CA) detection in angiograms by considering x-ray images as intensity images and applying mathematical morphology operators. We present two detection approaches, one based on the intensity infimum and the other based on the dual reconstruction. The evaluation using several data sets shows that both techniques are able to detect the presence of the contrast medium volume. Moreover, the dual reconstruction-based method is proven to be faster in processing time and more effective than the intensity infimum-based method in distinguishing the intensity change at the same location from the displacement of the same region. In addition, we show how to track the CA passage through a region of interest by observing the intensity evolution in successive submasks.

  16. Real-time 3-D X-ray and gamma-ray viewer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A multi-pinhole aperture lead screen forms an equal plurality of invisible mini-images having dissimilar perspectives of an X-ray and gamma-ray emitting object (ABC) onto a near-earth phosphor layer. This layer provides visible light mini-images directly into a visible light image intensifier. A viewing screen having an equal number of dissimilar perspective apertures distributed across its face in a geometric pattern identical to the lead screen, provides a viewer with a real, pseudoscopic image (A'B'C') of the object with full horizontal and vertical parallax. Alternatively, a third screen identical to viewing screen and spaced apart from a second visible light image intensifier, may be positioned between the first image intensifier and the viewing screen, thereby providing the viewer with a virtual, orthoscopic image (A"B"C") of the object (ABC) with full horizontal and vertical parallax.

  17. Development of a Real-Time Pulse Processing Algorithm for TES-Based X-Ray Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Hui; Hennig, Wolfgang; Warburton, William K.; Doriese, W. Bertrand; Kilbourne, Caroline A.

    2011-01-01

    We report here a real-time pulse processing algorithm for superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) based x-ray microcalorimeters. TES-based. microca1orimeters offer ultra-high energy resolutions, but the small volume of each pixel requires that large arrays of identical microcalorimeter pixe1s be built to achieve sufficient detection efficiency. That in turn requires as much pulse processing as possible must be performed at the front end of readout electronics to avoid transferring large amounts of data to a host computer for post-processing. Therefore, a real-time pulse processing algorithm that not only can be implemented in the readout electronics but also achieve satisfactory energy resolutions is desired. We have developed an algorithm that can be easily implemented. in hardware. We then tested the algorithm offline using several data sets acquired with an 8 x 8 Goddard TES x-ray calorimeter array and 2x16 NIST time-division SQUID multiplexer. We obtained an average energy resolution of close to 3.0 eV at 6 keV for the multiplexed pixels while preserving over 99% of the events in the data sets.

  18. Breakup phenomena of a coaxial jet in the non-dilute region using real-time X-ray radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, F. B.; Kuo, K. K.; Woodward, R. D.; Garner, K. N.

    1990-07-01

    An innovative approach to the investigation of liquid jet breakup processes in the near-injector region has been developed to overcome the experimental difficulties associated with optically opaque, dense sprays. Real-time X-ray radiography (RTR) has been employed to observe the inner structure and breakup phenomena of coaxial jets. In the atomizing regime, droplets much smaller than the exit diameter are formed beginning essentially at the injector exit. Through the use of RTR, the instantaneous contour of the liquid core was visualized. Experimental results consist of controlled-exposure digital video images of the liquid jet breakup process. Time-averaged video images have also been recorded for comparison. A digital image processing system is used to analyze the recorded images by creating radiance level distributions of the jet. A rudimentary method for deducing intact-liquid-core length has been suggested. The technique of real-time X-ray radiography has been shown to be a viable approach to the study of the breakup processes of high-speed liquid jets.

  19. Real-time image equalization for coronary X-ray angiography.

    PubMed

    Robert, Normand; Komljenovic, Philip T; Fort, Stephen; Rowlands, J A

    2005-06-01

    Coronary angiograms, which provide detailed images of contrast-filled coronary arteries, also show other large structures such as the diaphragm, spine and adjacent lung field. A real-time image processing method to attenuate these unwanted features is presented. Side-by-side comparisons of images selected from cine runs before and after processing show that the arteries in the processed images can be visualized more easily due to their higher contrast as other structures are made less prominent. It is also shown experimentally that this method allows more quantitative comparisons of the contrast of vessels in different parts of an image. PMID:15791604

  20. Real-time x-ray fluoroscopy-based catheter detection and tracking for cardiac electrophysiology interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Yingliang; Housden, R. James; Razavi, Reza; Rhode, Kawal S.; Gogin, Nicolas; Cathier, Pascal; Gijsbers, Geert; Cooklin, Michael; O'Neill, Mark; Gill, Jaswinder; Rinaldi, C. Aldo

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: X-ray fluoroscopically guided cardiac electrophysiology (EP) procedures are commonly carried out to treat patients with arrhythmias. X-ray images have poor soft tissue contrast and, for this reason, overlay of a three-dimensional (3D) roadmap derived from preprocedural volumetric images can be used to add anatomical information. It is useful to know the position of the catheter electrodes relative to the cardiac anatomy, for example, to record ablation therapy locations during atrial fibrillation therapy. Also, the electrode positions of the coronary sinus (CS) catheter or lasso catheter can be used for road map motion correction.Methods: In this paper, the authors present a novel unified computational framework for image-based catheter detection and tracking without any user interaction. The proposed framework includes fast blob detection, shape-constrained searching and model-based detection. In addition, catheter tracking methods were designed based on the customized catheter models input from the detection method. Three real-time detection and tracking methods are derived from the computational framework to detect or track the three most common types of catheters in EP procedures: the ablation catheter, the CS catheter, and the lasso catheter. Since the proposed methods use the same blob detection method to extract key information from x-ray images, the ablation, CS, and lasso catheters can be detected and tracked simultaneously in real-time.Results: The catheter detection methods were tested on 105 different clinical fluoroscopy sequences taken from 31 clinical procedures. Two-dimensional (2D) detection errors of 0.50 {+-} 0.29, 0.92 {+-} 0.61, and 0.63 {+-} 0.45 mm as well as success rates of 99.4%, 97.2%, and 88.9% were achieved for the CS catheter, ablation catheter, and lasso catheter, respectively. With the tracking method, accuracies were increased to 0.45 {+-} 0.28, 0.64 {+-} 0.37, and 0.53 {+-} 0.38 mm and success rates increased to 100%, 99

  1. Real-time segmentation of multiple implanted cylindrical liver markers in kilovoltage and megavoltage x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fledelius, W.; Worm, E.; Høyer, M.; Grau, C.; Poulsen, P. R.

    2014-06-01

    Gold markers implanted in or near a tumor can be used as x-ray visible landmarks for image based tumor localization. The aim of this study was to develop and demonstrate fast and reliable real-time segmentation of multiple liver tumor markers in intra-treatment kV and MV images and in cone-beam CT (CBCT) projections, for real-time motion management. Thirteen patients treated with conformal stereotactic body radiation therapy in three fractions had 2-3 cylindrical gold markers implanted in the liver prior to treatment. At each fraction, the projection images of a pre-treatment CBCT scan were used for automatic generation of a 3D marker model that consisted of the size, orientation, and estimated 3D trajectory of each marker during the CBCT scan. The 3D marker model was used for real-time template based segmentation in subsequent x-ray images by projecting each marker's 3D shape and likely 3D motion range onto the imager plane. The segmentation was performed in intra-treatment kV images (526 marker traces, 92 097 marker projections) and MV images (88 marker traces, 22 382 marker projections), and in post-treatment CBCT projections (42 CBCT scans, 71 381 marker projections). 227 kV marker traces with low mean contrast-to-noise ratio were excluded as markers were not visible due to MV scatter. Online segmentation times measured for a limited dataset were used for estimating real-time segmentation times for all images. The percentage of detected markers was 94.8% (kV), 96.1% (MV), and 98.6% (CBCT). For the detected markers, the real-time segmentation was erroneous in 0.2-0.31% of the cases. The mean segmentation time per marker was 5.6 ms [2.1-12 ms] (kV), 5.5 ms [1.6-13 ms] (MV), and 6.5 ms [1.8-15 ms] (CBCT). Fast and reliable real-time segmentation of multiple liver tumor markers in intra-treatment kV and MV images and in CBCT projections was demonstrated for a large dataset.

  2. Real-time segmentation of multiple implanted cylindrical liver markers in kilovoltage and megavoltage x-ray images.

    PubMed

    Fledelius, W; Worm, E; Høyer, M; Grau, C; Poulsen, P R

    2014-06-01

    Gold markers implanted in or near a tumor can be used as x-ray visible landmarks for image based tumor localization. The aim of this study was to develop and demonstrate fast and reliable real-time segmentation of multiple liver tumor markers in intra-treatment kV and MV images and in cone-beam CT (CBCT) projections, for real-time motion management. Thirteen patients treated with conformal stereotactic body radiation therapy in three fractions had 2-3 cylindrical gold markers implanted in the liver prior to treatment. At each fraction, the projection images of a pre-treatment CBCT scan were used for automatic generation of a 3D marker model that consisted of the size, orientation, and estimated 3D trajectory of each marker during the CBCT scan. The 3D marker model was used for real-time template based segmentation in subsequent x-ray images by projecting each marker's 3D shape and likely 3D motion range onto the imager plane. The segmentation was performed in intra-treatment kV images (526 marker traces, 92,097 marker projections) and MV images (88 marker traces, 22,382 marker projections), and in post-treatment CBCT projections (42 CBCT scans, 71,381 marker projections). 227 kV marker traces with low mean contrast-to-noise ratio were excluded as markers were not visible due to MV scatter. Online segmentation times measured for a limited dataset were used for estimating real-time segmentation times for all images. The percentage of detected markers was 94.8% (kV), 96.1% (MV), and 98.6% (CBCT). For the detected markers, the real-time segmentation was erroneous in 0.2-0.31% of the cases. The mean segmentation time per marker was 5.6 ms [2.1-12 ms] (kV), 5.5 ms [1.6-13 ms] (MV), and 6.5 ms [1.8-15 ms] (CBCT). Fast and reliable real-time segmentation of multiple liver tumor markers in intra-treatment kV and MV images and in CBCT projections was demonstrated for a large dataset. PMID:24801205

  3. Fiber-optic detector for real time dosimetry of a micro-planar x-ray beam

    PubMed Central

    Belley, Matthew D.; Stanton, Ian N.; Hadsell, Mike; Ger, Rachel; Langloss, Brian W.; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Chang, Sha X.; Therien, Michael J.; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Here, the authors describe a dosimetry measurement technique for microbeam radiation therapy using a nanoparticle-terminated fiber-optic dosimeter (nano-FOD). Methods: The nano-FOD was placed in the center of a 2 cm diameter mouse phantom to measure the deep tissue dose and lateral beam profile of a planar x-ray microbeam. Results: The continuous dose rate at the x-ray microbeam peak measured with the nano-FOD was 1.91 ± 0.06 cGy s−1, a value 2.7% higher than that determined via radiochromic film measurements (1.86 ± 0.15 cGy s−1). The nano-FOD-determined lateral beam full-width half max value of 420 μm exceeded that measured using radiochromic film (320 μm). Due to the 8° angle of the collimated microbeam and resulting volumetric effects within the scintillator, the profile measurements reported here are estimated to achieve a resolution of ∼0.1 mm; however, for a beam angle of 0°, the theoretical resolution would approach the thickness of the scintillator (∼0.01 mm). Conclusions: This work provides proof-of-concept data and demonstrates that the novel nano-FOD device can be used to perform real-time dosimetry in microbeam radiation therapy to measure the continuous dose rate at the x-ray microbeam peak as well as the lateral beam shape. PMID:25832087

  4. Real time synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements to determine material strength of shocked single crystals following compression and release

    SciTech Connect

    Turneaure, Stefan J.; Gupta, Y.M.

    2009-09-15

    We present a method to use real time, synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements to determine the strength of shocked single crystals following compression and release during uniaxial strain loading. Aluminum and copper single crystals shocked along [111] were examined to peak stresses ranging from 2 to 6 GPa. Synchrotron x rays were used to probe the longitudinal lattice strains near the rear free surface (16 and 5 {micro}m depths for Al and Cu, respectively) of the metal crystals following shock compression and release. The 111 diffraction peaks showed broadening indicating a heterogeneous microstructure in the released state. The diffraction peaks also shifted to lower Bragg angles relative to the ambient Bragg angle; the magnitude of the shift increased with increasing impact stress. The Bragg angle shifts and appropriate averaging procedures were used to determine the macroscopic or continuum strength following compression and release. For both crystals, the strengths upon release increased with increasing impact stress and provide a quantitative measure of the strain hardening that occurs in Al(111) and Cu(111) during the shock and release process. Our results for Al(111) are in reasonable agreement with a previous determination based solely on continuum measurements. Two points are noteworthy about the developments presented here: Synchrotron x rays are needed because they provide the resolution required for analyzing the data in the released state; the method presented here can be extended to the shocked state but will require additional measurements.

  5. Anti-VEGFR2-conjugated PLGA microspheres as an x-ray phase contrast agent for assessing the VEGFR2 expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rongbiao; Chai, Wei-Min; Ying, Weihai; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Xie, Honglan; Liu, Hui-Qiang; Chen, Ke-Min

    2012-05-01

    The primary goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-conjugated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres as an x-ray phase contrast agent to assess the VEGFR2 expression in cell cultures. The cell lines, mouse LLC (Lewis lung carcinoma) and HUVEC (human umbilical vein endothelial cell), were selected for cell adhesion studies. The bound PLGA microspheres were found to better adhere to LLC cells or HUVECs than unbound ones. Absorption and phase contrast images of PLGA microspheres were acquired and compared in vitro. Phase contrast imaging (PCI) greatly improves the detection of the microspheres as compared to absorption contrast imaging. The cells incubated with PLGA microspheres were imaged by PCI, which provided clear 3D visualization of the beads, indicating the feasibility of using PLGA microspheres as a contrast agent for phase contrast CT. In addition, the microspheres could be clearly distinguished from the wall of the vessel on phase contrast CT images. Therefore, the approach holds promise for assessing the VEGFR2 expression on endothelial cells of tumor-associated vessels. We conclude that PLGA microsphere-based PCI of the VEGFR2 expression might be a novel, promising biomarker for future studies of tumor angiogenesis.

  6. Simulations of x-ray speckle-based dark-field and phase-contrast imaging with a polychromatic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zdora, Marie-Christine; Thibault, Pierre; Pfeiffer, Franz; Zanette, Irene

    2015-09-21

    Following the first experimental demonstration of x-ray speckle-based multimodal imaging using a polychromatic beam [I. Zanette et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112(25), 253903 (2014)], we present a simulation study on the effects of a polychromatic x-ray spectrum on the performance of this technique. We observe that the contrast of the near-field speckles is only mildly influenced by the bandwidth of the energy spectrum. Moreover, using a homogeneous object with simple geometry, we characterize the beam hardening artifacts in the reconstructed transmission and refraction angle images, and we describe how the beam hardening also affects the dark-field signal provided by speckle tracking. This study is particularly important for further implementations and developments of coherent speckle-based techniques at laboratory x-ray sources.

  7. Real-time digital filtering, event triggering, and tomographic reconstruction of JET soft x-ray data (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, A. W.; Blackler, K.; Gill, R. D.; van der Goot, E.; Holm, J.

    1990-10-01

    Based upon the experience gained with the present soft x-ray data acquisition system, new techniques are being developed which make extensive use of digital signal processors (DSPs). Digital filters make 13 further frequencies available in real time from the input sampling frequency of 200 kHz. In parallel, various algorithms running on further DSPs generate triggers in response to a range of events in the plasma. The sawtooth crash can be detected, for example, with a delay of only 50 μs from the onset of the collapse. The trigger processor interacts with the digital filter boards to ensure data of the appropriate frequency is recorded throughout a plasma discharge. An independent link is used to pass 780 and 24 Hz filtered data to a network of transputers. A full tomographic inversion and display of the 24 Hz data is carried out in real time using this 15 transputer array. The 780 Hz data are stored for immediate detailed playback following the pulse. Such a system could considerably improve the quality of present plasma diagnostic data which is, in general, sampled at one fixed frequency throughout a discharge. Further, it should provide valuable information towards designing diagnostic data acquisition systems for future long pulse operation machines when a high degree of real-time processing will be required, while retaining the ability to detect, record, and analyze events of interest within such long plasma discharges.

  8. The behavior of single-crystal silicon to dynamic loading using in-situ X-ray diffraction and phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hae Ja; Xing, Zhou; Galtier, Eric; Arnold, Brice; Granados, Eduardo; Brown, Shaughnessy B.; Tavella, Franz; McBride, Emma; Fry, Alan; Nagler, Bob; Schropp, Andreas; Seiboth, Frank; Samberg, Dirk; Schroer, Christian; Gleason, Arianna E.; Higginbotham, Andrew

    Hydrostatic and uniaxial compression studies have revealed that crystalline silicon undergoes phase transitions from a cubic diamond structure to a variety of phases including orthorhombic Imma phase, body-centered tetragonal phase, and a hexagonal primitive phase. The dynamic response of silicon at high pressure, however, is not well understood. Phase contrast imaging has proven to be a powerful tool for probing density changes caused by the shock propagation into a material. In order to characterize the elastic and phase transitions, we image shock waves in Si with high spatial resolution using the LCLS X-ray free electron laser and Matter in Extreme Conditions instrument. In this study, the long pulse optical laser with pseudo-flat top shape creates high pressures up to 60 GPa. We measure the crystal structure by observing X-ray diffraction orthogonal to the shock propagation direction over a range of pressures. We describe the capability of simultaneously performing phase contrast imaging and in situ X-ray diffraction during shock loading and discuss the dynamic response of Si in high-pressure phases Use of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515. The MEC instrument is supported by.

  9. Real-time image-content-based beamline control for smart 4D X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Vogelgesang, Matthias; Farago, Tomas; Morgeneyer, Thilo F; Helfen, Lukas; Dos Santos Rolo, Tomy; Myagotin, Anton; Baumbach, Tilo

    2016-09-01

    Real-time processing of X-ray image data acquired at synchrotron radiation facilities allows for smart high-speed experiments. This includes workflows covering parameterized and image-based feedback-driven control up to the final storage of raw and processed data. Nevertheless, there is presently no system that supports an efficient construction of such experiment workflows in a scalable way. Thus, here an architecture based on a high-level control system that manages low-level data acquisition, data processing and device changes is described. This system is suitable for routine as well as prototypical experiments, and provides specialized building blocks to conduct four-dimensional in situ, in vivo and operando tomography and laminography. PMID:27577784

  10. [Investigation of characteristic microstructures of adhesive interface in wood/bamboo composite material by synchrotron radiation X-ray phase contrast microscopy].

    PubMed

    Peng, Guan-Yun; Wang, Yu-Rong; Ren, Hai-Qing; Yang, Shu-Min; Ma, Hong-Xia; Xie, Hong-Lan; Deng, Biao; Du, Guo-Hao; Xiao, Ti-Qiao

    2013-03-01

    Third-generation synchrotron radiation X-ray phase-contrast microscopy(XPCM)can be used for obtaining image with edge enhancement, and achieve the high contrast imaging of low-Z materials with the spatial coherence peculiarity of X-rays. In the present paper, the characteristic microstructures of adhesive at the interface and their penetration in wood/bamboo composite material were investigated systematically by XPCM at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). And the effect of several processing techniques was analyzed for the adhesive penetration in wood/bamboo materials. The results show that the synchrotron radiation XPCM is expected to be one of the important precision detection methods for wood-based panels. PMID:23705464

  11. Preliminary comparison of grating-based and in-line phase contrast X-ray imaging with synchrotron radiation for mouse kidney at TOMCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Liu, P.; Irvine, S.; Pinzer, B.; Stampanoni, M.; Xu, L. X.

    2013-06-01

    Phase contrast imaging has been demonstrated to be advantageous in revealing detailed structures inside biological specimens without contrast agents. Grating-based differential phase contrast (DPC) and in-line phase contrast (ILPC) X-ray imaging are the two modalities frequently used at the beamline of TOmographic Microscopy and Coherent rAdiology experimenTs (TOMCAT) at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). In this paper, we preliminarily compared the abilities of two types of phase contrast imaging in distinguishing micro structures in mouse kidneys. The 3D reconstructions showed that the microstructures in kidney, such as micro vessels and renal tubules, were displayed clearly with both imaging modalities. The two techniques may be viewed as complementary. For larger features with very small density variations DPC is the desirable method. In cases where dose and time limits may prohibit the multiple steps required for DPC, and when the focus is on finer features, the ILPC method may be considered as a more viable alternative. Moreover, high resolution ILPC images are comparable with histological results.

  12. Characterization of the in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging beam line developed at ALLS and based on laser driven betatron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourmaux, S.; Otani, K.; Saraf, A.; MacLean, S.; Wesolowski, M. J.; Babyn, P. S.; Hallin, E.; Krol, A.; Kieffer, J. C.

    2015-05-01

    The 200TW ALLS laser system (30 fs, 5J) is used to accelerate electrons through laser wakefield and generate betatron emission in the 10keV range. Single shot phase contrast images of a series of nylon fibers with diameter ranging from 10μm to 400μm have been obtained in different geometries and are interpreted with a comprehensive model of x-ray propagation integrating the properties and geometries of the imaging beam line. A simple figure of merit, which can give indication on the interface sharpness of a phase object, is used to assess the quality of the imaging beam line.

  13. Fiber-optic detector for real time dosimetry of a micro-planar x-ray beam

    SciTech Connect

    Belley, Matthew D.; Stanton, Ian N.; Langloss, Brian W.; Therien, Michael J.; Hadsell, Mike; Ger, Rachel; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Chang, Sha X.; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Here, the authors describe a dosimetry measurement technique for microbeam radiation therapy using a nanoparticle-terminated fiber-optic dosimeter (nano-FOD). Methods: The nano-FOD was placed in the center of a 2 cm diameter mouse phantom to measure the deep tissue dose and lateral beam profile of a planar x-ray microbeam. Results: The continuous dose rate at the x-ray microbeam peak measured with the nano-FOD was 1.91 ± 0.06 cGy s{sup −1}, a value 2.7% higher than that determined via radiochromic film measurements (1.86 ± 0.15 cGy s{sup −1}). The nano-FOD-determined lateral beam full-width half max value of 420 μm exceeded that measured using radiochromic film (320 μm). Due to the 8° angle of the collimated microbeam and resulting volumetric effects within the scintillator, the profile measurements reported here are estimated to achieve a resolution of ∼0.1 mm; however, for a beam angle of 0°, the theoretical resolution would approach the thickness of the scintillator (∼0.01 mm). Conclusions: This work provides proof-of-concept data and demonstrates that the novel nano-FOD device can be used to perform real-time dosimetry in microbeam radiation therapy to measure the continuous dose rate at the x-ray microbeam peak as well as the lateral beam shape.

  14. In situ and real-time monitoring of mechanochemical milling reactions using synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Halasz, Ivan; Kimber, Simon A J; Beldon, Patrick J; Belenguer, Ana M; Adams, Frank; Honkimäki, Veijo; Nightingale, Richard C; Dinnebier, Robert E; Friščić, Tomislav

    2013-09-01

    We describe the only currently available protocol for in situ, real-time monitoring of mechanochemical reactions and intermediates by X-ray powder diffraction. Although mechanochemical reactions (inducing transformations by mechanical forces such as grinding and milling) are normally performed in commercially available milling assemblies, such equipment does not permit direct reaction monitoring. We now describe the design and in-house modification of milling equipment that allows the reaction jars of the operating mill to be placed in the path of a high-energy (∼90 keV) synchrotron X-ray beam while the reaction is taking place. Resulting data are analyzed using conventional software, such as TOPAS. Reaction intermediates and products are identified using the Cambridge Structural Database or Inorganic Crystal Structure Database. Reactions are analyzed by fitting the time-resolved diffractograms using structureless Pawley refinement for crystalline phases that are not fully structurally characterized (such as porous frameworks with disordered guests), or the Rietveld method for solids with fully determined crystal structures (metal oxides, coordination polymers). PMID:23949378

  15. Analytical evaluation of the signal and noise propagation in x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raupach, Rainer; Flohr, Thomas G.

    2011-04-01

    We analyze the signal and noise propagation of differential phase-contrast computed tomography (PCT) compared with conventional attenuation-based computed tomography (CT) from a theoretical point of view. This work focuses on grating-based differential phase-contrast imaging. A mathematical framework is derived that is able to analytically predict the relative performance of both imaging techniques in the sense of the relative contrast-to-noise ratio for the contrast of any two materials. Two fundamentally different properties of PCT compared with CT are identified. First, the noise power spectra show qualitatively different characteristics implying a resolution-dependent performance ratio. The break-even point is derived analytically as a function of system parameters such as geometry and visibility. A superior performance of PCT compared with CT can only be achieved at a sufficiently high spatial resolution. Second, due to periodicity of phase information which is non-ambiguous only in a bounded interval statistical phase wrapping can occur. This effect causes a collapse of information propagation for low signals which limits the applicability of phase-contrast imaging at low dose.

  16. Phase unwrapping in spectral X-ray differential phase-contrast imaging with an energy-resolving photon-counting pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Epple, Franz M; Ehn, Sebastian; Thibault, Pierre; Koehler, Thomas; Potdevin, Guillaume; Herzen, Julia; Pennicard, David; Graafsma, Heinz; Noël, Peter B; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-03-01

    Grating-based differential phase-contrast imaging has proven to be feasible with conventional X-ray sources. The polychromatic spectrum generally limits the performance of the interferometer but benefit can be gained with an energy-sensitive detector. In the presented work, we employ the energy-discrimination capability to correct for phase-wrapping artefacts. We propose to use the phase shifts, which are measured in distinct energy bins, to estimate the optimal phase shift in the sense of maximum likelihood. We demonstrate that our method is able to correct for phase-wrapping artefacts, to improve the contrast-to-noise ratio and to reduce beam hardening due to the modelled energy dependency. The method is evaluated on experimental data which are measured with a laboratory Talbot-Lau interferometer equipped with a conventional polychromatic X-ray source and an energy-sensitive photon-counting pixel detector. Our work shows, that spectral imaging is an important step to move differential phase-contrast imaging closer to pre-clinical and clinical applications, where phase wrapping is particularly problematic. PMID:25163054

  17. Efficient Decoding of 2D Structured Illumination with Linear Phase Stepping in X-Ray Phase Contrast and Dark-Field Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Katherine J.; Bennett, Eric E.; Gomella, Andrew A.; Wen, Han

    2014-01-01

    The ability to map the phase distribution and lateral coherence of an x-ray wavefront offers the potential for imaging the human body through phase contrast, without the need to deposit significant radiation energy. The classic means to achieve this goal is structured illumination, in which a periodic intensity modulation is introduced into the image, and changes in the phase distribution of the wavefront are detected as distortions of the modulation pattern. Two-dimensional periodic patterns are needed to fully characterize a transverse wavefront. Traditionally, the information in a 2D pattern is retrieved at high resolution by acquiring multiple images while shifting the pattern over a 2D matrix of positions. Here we describe a method to decode 2D periodic patterns with single-axis phase stepping, without either a loss of information or increasing the number of sampling steps. The method is created to reduce the instrumentation complexity of high-resolution 2D wavefront sensing in general. It is demonstrated with motionless electromagnetic phase stepping and a flexible processing algorithm in x-ray dark-field and phase contrast imaging. PMID:24489853

  18. Efficient decoding of 2D structured illumination with linear phase stepping in X-ray phase contrast and dark-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Katherine J; Bennett, Eric E; Gomella, Andrew A; Wen, Han

    2014-01-01

    The ability to map the phase distribution and lateral coherence of an x-ray wavefront offers the potential for imaging the human body through phase contrast, without the need to deposit significant radiation energy. The classic means to achieve this goal is structured illumination, in which a periodic intensity modulation is introduced into the image, and changes in the phase distribution of the wavefront are detected as distortions of the modulation pattern. Two-dimensional periodic patterns are needed to fully characterize a transverse wavefront. Traditionally, the information in a 2D pattern is retrieved at high resolution by acquiring multiple images while shifting the pattern over a 2D matrix of positions. Here we describe a method to decode 2D periodic patterns with single-axis phase stepping, without either a loss of information or increasing the number of sampling steps. The method is created to reduce the instrumentation complexity of high-resolution 2D wavefront sensing in general. It is demonstrated with motionless electromagnetic phase stepping and a flexible processing algorithm in x-ray dark-field and phase contrast imaging. PMID:24489853

  19. Simultaneous X-ray diffraction and phase-contrast imaging for investigating material deformation mechanisms during high-rate loading

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hudspeth, M.; Sun, T.; Parab, N.; Guo, Z.; Fezzaa, K.; Luo, S.; Chen, W.

    2015-01-01

    Using a high-speed camera and an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD), a simultaneous X-ray imaging and diffraction technique has been developed for studying dynamic material behaviors during high-rate tensile loading. A Kolsky tension bar has been used to pull samples at 1000 s–1and 5000 s–1strain-rates for super-elastic equiatomic NiTi and 1100-O series aluminium, respectively. By altering the ICCD gating time, temporal resolutions of 100 ps and 3.37 µs have been achieved in capturing the diffraction patterns of interest, thus equating to single-pulse and 22-pulse X-ray exposure. Furthermore, the sample through-thickness deformation process has been simultaneously imagedviaphase-contrast imaging. It is also shownmore » that adequate signal-to-noise ratios are achieved for the detected white-beam diffraction patterns, thereby allowing sufficient information to perform quantitative data analysis diffractionviain-house software (WBXRD_GUI). Finally, of current interest is the ability to evaluate crystald-spacing, texture evolution and material phase transitions, all of which will be established from experiments performed at the aforementioned elevated strain-rates.« less

  20. Analysis of Flame Retardancy in Polymer Blends by Synchrotron X-ray K-edge Tomography and Interferometric Phase Contrast Movies.

    PubMed

    Olatinwo, Mutairu B; Ham, Kyungmin; McCarney, Jonathan; Marathe, Shashidhara; Ge, Jinghua; Knapp, Gerry; Butler, Leslie G

    2016-03-10

    Underwriters Laboratories 94 test bars have been imaged with X-ray K-edge tomography between 12 and 32 keV to assess the bromine and antimony concentration gradient across char layers of partially burnt samples. Phase contrast tomography on partially burnt samples showed gas bubbles and dark-field scattering ascribed to residual blend inhomogeneity. In addition, single-shot grating interferometry was used to record X-ray movies of test samples during heating (IR and flame) intended to mimic the UL 94 plastics flammability test. The UL 94 test bars were formulated with varying concentrations of a brominated flame retardant, Saytex 8010, and a synergist, Sb2O3, blended into high-impact polystyrene (HIPS). Depending on the sample composition, samples will pass or fail the UL 94 plastics flammability test. Tomography and interferometry imaging show differences that correlate with UL 94 performance. Key features such as char layer, gas bubble formation, microcracks, and dissolution of the flame retardant in the char layer regions are used in understanding the efficiency of the flame retardant and synergist. The samples that pass the UL 94 test have a thick, highly visible char layer as well as an interior rich in gas bubbles. Growth of gas bubbles from flame-retardant thermal decomposition is noted in the X-ray phase contrast movies. Also noteworthy is an absence of bubbles near the burning surface of the polymer; dark-field images after burning suggest a microcrack structure between interior bubbles and the surface. The accepted mechanism for flame retardant activity includes free radical quenching in the flame by bromine and antimony species. The imaging supports this as well as provides a fast inspection of other parameters, such as viscosity and surface tension. PMID:26846254

  1. Translation of Atherosclerotic Plaque Phase-Contrast CT Imaging from Synchrotron Radiation to a Conventional Lab-Based X-Ray Source

    PubMed Central

    Saam, Tobias; Herzen, Julia; Hetterich, Holger; Fill, Sandra; Willner, Marian; Stockmar, Marco; Achterhold, Klaus; Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm; Schüller, Ulrich; Auweter, Sigrid; Adam-Neumair, Silvia; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Bamberg, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Phase-contrast imaging is a novel X-ray based technique that provides enhanced soft tissue contrast. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of visualizing human carotid arteries by grating-based phase-contrast tomography (PC-CT) at two different experimental set-ups: (i) applying synchrotron radiation and (ii) using a conventional X-ray tube. Materials and Methods Five ex-vivo carotid artery specimens were examined with PC-CT either at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility using a monochromatic X-ray beam (2 specimens; 23 keV; pixel size 5.4 µm), or at a laboratory set-up on a conventional X-ray tube (3 specimens; 35-40 kVp; 70 mA; pixel size 100 µm). Tomographic images were reconstructed and compared to histopathology. Two independent readers determined vessel dimensions and one reader determined signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) between PC-CT and absorption images. Results In total, 51 sections were included in the analysis. Images from both set-ups provided sufficient contrast to differentiate individual vessel layers. All PCI-based measurements strongly predicted but significantly overestimated lumen, intima and vessel wall area for both the synchrotron and the laboratory-based measurements as compared with histology (all p<0.001 with slope >0.53 per mm2, 95%-CI: 0.35 to 0.70). Although synchrotron-based images were characterized by higher SNRs than laboratory-based images; both PC-CT set-ups had superior SNRs compared to corresponding conventional absorption-based images (p<0.001). Inter-reader reproducibility was excellent (ICCs >0.98 and >0.84 for synchrotron and for laboratory-based measurements; respectively). Conclusion Experimental PC-CT of carotid specimens is feasible with both synchrotron and conventional X-ray sources, producing high-resolution images suitable for vessel characterization and atherosclerosis research. PMID:24039969

  2. In-line x-ray phase-contrast tomography and diffraction-contrast tomography study of the ferrite-cementite microstructure in steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostenko, Alexander; Sharma, Hemant; Dere, E. Gözde; King, Andrew; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Van Oel, Wim; Offerman, S. Erik; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Vliet, Lucas J. van

    2012-05-01

    This work presents the development of a non-destructive imaging technique for the investigation of the microstructure of cementite grains embedded in a ferrite matrix of medium-carbon steel. The measurements were carried out at the material science beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) ID11. It was shown that in-line X-ray phase-contrast tomography (PCT) can be used for the detection of cementite grains of several microns in size. X-ray PCT of the cementite structure can be achieved by either a `single distance' or a `multiple distance' acquisition protocol. The latter permits quantitative phase retrieval. A second imaging technique, X-ray diffraction-contrast tomography (DCT), was employed to obtain information about the shapes and crystallographic orientations of the distinct ferrite grains surrounding the cementite structures. The initial results demonstrate the feasibility of determining the geometry of the cementite grains after the austenite-ferrite phase-transformation in a non-destructive manner. The results obtained with PCT and DCT are verified with ex-situ optical microscopy studies of the same specimen.

  3. Three dimensional visualization of engineered bone and soft tissue by combined x-ray micro-diffraction and phase contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cedola, Alessia; Campi, Gaetano; Pelliccia, Daniele; Bukreeva, Inna; Fratini, Michela; Burghammer, Manfred; Rigon, Luigi; Arfelli, Fulvia; Chen, Rong Chang; Dreossi, Diego; Sodini, Nicola; Mohammadi, Sara; Tromba, Giuliana; Cancedda, Ranieri; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena

    2014-01-01

    Computed x-ray phase contrast micro-tomography is the most valuable tool for a three dimensional (3D) and non destructive analysis of the tissue engineered bone morphology. We used a Talbot interferometer installed at SYRMEP beamline of the ELETTRA synchrotron (Trieste, Italy) for a precise 3D reconstruction of both bone and soft connective tissue, regenerated in vivo within a porous scaffold. For the first time the x-ray tomographic reconstructions have been combined with x-ray scanning micro-diffraction measurement on the same sample, in order to give an exhaustive identification of the different tissues participating to the biomineralization process. As a result, we were able to investigate in detail the different densities in the tissues, distinguishing the 3D organization of the amorphous calcium phosphate from the collagen matrix. Our experimental approach allows for a deeper understanding of the role of collagen matrix in the organic-mineral transition, which is a crucial issue for the development of new bio-inspired composites.

  4. Three dimensional visualization of engineered bone and soft tissue by combined x-ray micro-diffraction and phase contrast tomography.

    PubMed

    Cedola, Alessia; Campi, Gaetano; Pelliccia, Daniele; Bukreeva, Inna; Fratini, Michela; Burghammer, Manfred; Rigon, Luigi; Arfelli, Fulvia; Chang Chen, Rong; Dreossi, Diego; Sodini, Nicola; Mohammadi, Sara; Tromba, Giuliana; Cancedda, Ranieri; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena

    2014-01-01

    Computed x-ray phase contrast micro-tomography is the most valuable tool for a three dimensional (3D) and non destructive analysis of the tissue engineered bone morphology. We used a Talbot interferometer installed at SYRMEP beamline of the ELETTRA synchrotron (Trieste, Italy) for a precise 3D reconstruction of both bone and soft connective tissue, regenerated in vivo within a porous scaffold. For the first time the x-ray tomographic reconstructions have been combined with x-ray scanning micro-diffraction measurement on the same sample, in order to give an exhaustive identification of the different tissues participating to the biomineralization process. As a result, we were able to investigate in detail the different densities in the tissues, distinguishing the 3D organization of the amorphous calcium phosphate from the collagen matrix. Our experimental approach allows for a deeper understanding of the role of collagen matrix in the organic-mineral transition, which is a crucial issue for the development of new bio-inspired composites. PMID:24334371

  5. Gauging low-dose X-ray phase-contrast imaging at a single and large propagation distance.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Ralf; Schober, Alexander; Hahn, Steffen; Moosmann, Julian; Kashef, Jubin; Hertel, Madeleine; Weinhardt, Venera; Hänschke, Daniel; Helfen, Lukas; Sánchez Salazar, Iván A; Guigay, Jean-Pierre; Xiao, Xianghui; Baumbach, Tilo

    2016-02-22

    The interactions of a beam of hard and spatio-temporally coherent X-rays with a soft-matter sample primarily induce a transverse distribution of exit phase variations δϕ (retardations or advancements in pieces of the wave front exiting the object compared to the incoming wave front) whose free-space propagation over a distance z gives rise to intensity contrast gz. For single-distance image detection and |δϕ| ≪ 1 all-order-in-z phase-intensity contrast transfer is linear in δϕ. Here we show that ideal coherence implies a decay of the (shot-)noise-to-signal ratio in gz and of the associated phase noise as z-1/2 and z-1, respectively. Limits on X-ray dose thus favor large values of z. We discuss how a phase-scaling symmetry, exact in the limit δϕ → 0 and dynamically unbroken up to |δϕ| ∼ 1, suggests a filtering of gz in Fourier space, preserving non-iterative quasi-linear phase retrieval for phase variations up to order unity if induced by multi-scale objects inducing phase variations δϕ of a broad spatial frequency spectrum. Such an approach continues to be applicable under an assumed phase-attenuation duality. Using synchrotron radiation, ex and in vivo microtomography on frog embryos exemplifies improved resolution compared to a conventional single-distance phase-retrieval algorithm. PMID:26907079

  6. Single-image phase retrieval using an edge illumination X-ray phase-contrast imaging setup

    PubMed Central

    Diemoz, Paul C.; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Endrizzi, Marco; Coan, Paola; Brun, Emmanuel; Wagner, Ulrich H.; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian K.; Bravin, Alberto; Olivo, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed which enables the retrieval of the thickness or of the projected electron density of a sample from a single input image acquired with an edge illumination phase-contrast imaging setup. The method assumes the case of a quasi-homogeneous sample, i.e. a sample with a constant ratio between the real and imaginary parts of its complex refractive index. Compared with current methods based on combining two edge illumination images acquired in different configurations of the setup, this new approach presents advantages in terms of simplicity of acquisition procedure and shorter data collection time, which are very important especially for applications such as computed tomography and dynamical imaging. Furthermore, the fact that phase information is directly extracted, instead of its derivative, can enable a simpler image interpretation and be beneficial for subsequent processing such as segmentation. The method is first theoretically derived and its conditions of applicability defined. Quantitative accuracy in the case of homogeneous objects as well as enhanced image quality for the imaging of complex biological samples are demonstrated through experiments at two synchrotron radiation facilities. The large range of applicability, the robustness against noise and the need for only one input image suggest a high potential for investigations in various research subjects. PMID:26134813

  7. Research, development and optimization of real time radioscopic characterization of remote handled waste and intermediate level waste, using X-ray imaging at MeV energies

    SciTech Connect

    Halliwell, Stephen

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Real time radioscopy (RTR) using X-ray energies of up to 450 keV, is used extensively in the characterization of nuclear waste. The majority of LLW and some ILW in drums and boxes can be penetrated, for successful imaging, by X-rays with energies of up to 450 keV. However, the shielding of many waste packages, and the range of higher density waste matrices, require X-rays at MeV energies, for X-ray imaging to achieve the performance criteria. A broad imaging performance is required to enable the identification of a range of prohibited items, including the ability to see a moving liquid meniscus which indicates the presence of free liquid, in a high density or a waste matrix with substantial containment shielding. Enhanced, high energy X-ray imaging technology to meet the future characterization demands of the nuclear industry required the design and build of a high energy facility, and the implementation of a program of research and development. The initial phase of development has confirmed that digital images meeting the required performance criteria can be made using high energy X-rays. The evaluation of real time imaging and the optimization of imaging with high energy X-rays is currently in progress. (author)

  8. Aluminum Nitride Grown by Atomic Layer Epitaxy Characterized with Real-Time Grazing Incidence Small Angle X-ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Virginia; Nepal, Neeraj; Johnson, Scooter; Robinson, Zachary; Demasi, Alexander; Hite, Jennifer; Ludwig, Karl; Eddy, Charles

    Aluminum nitride, gallium nitride, and indium nitride are being considered for many applications, and are currently being used commercially for LEDs. These III-nitride films are conventionally deposited by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition and molecular beam epitaxy. Research into depositing III-nitrides with atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) is underway as it is a fabrication friendly technique for thin films at lower temperatures. AlN deposited with ALE at 500°C have been shown to have good crystallinity, but relatively high carbon and oxygen impurities, and understanding the film deposition mechanism is an ongoing project. Grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) is sensitive to surface features, making it useful for real time monitoring of deposition processes. AlN was monitored by GISAXS while being deposited with ALE using trimethylaluminum and hydrogen/nitrogen plasma at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source and the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source. The GISAXS of AlN ALE at nominally 400°C, 450°C, and 500°C was compared to ex situ characterization with XPS and AFM.

  9. Soft x-ray tomography for real-time applications: present status at Tore Supra and possible future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazon, D.; Vezinet, D.; Pacella, D.; Moreau, D.; Gabelieri, L.; Romano, A.; Malard, P.; Mlynar, J.; Masset, R.; Lotte, P.

    2012-06-01

    This paper is focused on the soft x-ray (SXR) tomography system setup at Tore Supra (DTOMOX) and the recent developments made to automatically get precise information about plasma features from inverted data. The first part describes the main aspects of the tomographic inversion optimization process. Several observations are made using this new tool and a set of shape factors is defined to help characterizing the emissivity field in a real-time perspective. The second part presents a detailed off-line analysis comparing the positions of the magnetic axis obtained from a magnetic equilibrium solver, and the maximum of the reconstructed emissivity field for ohmic and heated pulses. A systematic discrepancy of about 5 cm is found in both cases and it is shown that this discrepancy increases during sawtooth crashes. Finally, evidence of radially localized tungsten accumulation with an in-out asymmetry during a lower hybrid current drive pulse is provided to illustrate the DTOMOX capabilities for a precise observation of local phenomena.

  10. Real-time x-ray absorption spectroscopy of uranium, iron, and manganese in contaminated sediments during bioreduction

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu; Tokunaga, T.K.; Wan, J.; Kim, Y.; Sutton, S.R.; Newville, M.; Lanzirotti, A.; Rao, W.

    2008-01-15

    The oxidation status of uranium in sediments is important because the solubility of this toxic and radioactive element is much greater for U(VI) than for U(IV) species. Thus, redox manipulation to promote precipitation of UO{sub 2} is receiving interest as a method to remediate U-contaminated sediments. Presence of Fe and Mn oxides in sediments at much higher concentrations than U requires understanding of their redox status as well. This study was conducted to determine changes in oxidation states of U, Fe, and Mn in U-contaminated sediments from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Oxidation states of these elements were measured in real-time and nondestructively using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, on sediment columns supplied with synthetic groundwater containing organic carbon (OC, 0, 3, 10, 30 and 100 mM OC as lactate) for over 400 days. In sediments supplied with OC {ge} 30 mM, 80% of the U was reduced to U(IV), with transient reoxidation at about 150 days. Mn(III,IV) oxides were completely reduced to Mn(II) in sediments infused with OC {ge} 3 mM. However, Fe remained largely unreduced in all sediment columns, showing that Fe(III) can persist as an electron acceptor in reducing sediments over long times. This result in combination with the complete reduction of all other potential electron acceptors supports the hypothesis that the reactive Fe(III) fraction was responsible for reoxidizing U(IV).

  11. A new image reconstruction method to improve noise properties in x-ray differential phase contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2012-03-01

    The noise properties of differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT) demonstrate some peculiar features. It has been both theoretically and experimentally demonstrated that the noise variance of DPC-CT scales with spatial resolution following an inverse first order relationship. This is in stark contrast to absorption CT, where the noise variance scales with spatial resolution following an inverse third power. In addition to the scaling relationship, the noise power spectrum (NPS) of DPC-CT is dominated by low spatial frequencies and demonstrates a singular behavior when approaching zero frequency. This focuses the peak noise power within low spatial frequencies while high-frequency noise is suppressed. This is again in contrast to the absorption CT case where the NPS smoothly transitions to zero at zero frequency. The singular behavior of the DPC-CT NPS visually affects image noise texture and may hinder observer perception. In this paper, a method is proposed to improve the noise properties in DPC-CT and potentially improve observer performance. Specifically, the low frequency component of the filtering kernel used in reconstruction has been regularized to modify the noise power at low spatial frequencies. This results in a high-pass filtering of the image. The high-pass filtered image is combined with the original image to generate the final image. As a result of these two operations, the noise power is shifted to the high spatial frequency direction, improving visual perception, while image reconstruction accuracy is maintained. Experimental phantom results are presented to validate the proposed method.

  12. Effect of fuel and nozzle geometry on the off-axis oscillation of needle in diesel injectors using high-speed X-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Liu, J.; Wang, J.

    2016-05-01

    The diesel spray characteristics are strongly influenced by the flow dynamics inside the injector nozzle. Moreover, the off-axis oscillation of needle could lead to variation of orifice flow in the nozzle. In this paper, the needle oscillation was investigated using high-speed X-ray phase contrast imaging and quantitative image processing. The effects of fuel, injection pressure and nozzle geometry on the needle oscillation were analyzed. The results showed that the vertical and horizontal oscillation of needle was independent on the injection pressure. The maximum oscillation range of 14μ m was found. Biodiesel application slightly decreased the needle oscillation due to high viscosity. The needle oscillation range increased generally with increasing hole number. The larger needle oscillation in multi-hole injectors was dominated by the geometry problem or production issue at lower needle lift. In addition, the influence of needle oscillation on the spray morphology was also discussed.

  13. Concept of contrast transfer function for edge illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging and its comparison with the free-space propagation technique.

    PubMed

    Diemoz, Paul C; Vittoria, Fabio A; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-05-16

    Previous studies on edge illumination (EI) X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCi) have investigated the nature and amplitude of the signal provided by this technique. However, the response of the imaging system to different object spatial frequencies was never explicitly considered and studied. This is required in order to predict the performance of a given EI setup for different classes of objects. To this scope, in the present work we derive analytical expressions for the contrast transfer function of an EI imaging system, using the approximation of near-field regime, and study its dependence upon the main experimental parameters. We then exploit these results to compare the frequency response of an EI system with respect of that of a free-space propagation XPCi one. The results achieved in this work can be useful for predicting the signals obtainable for different types of objects and also as a basis for new retrieval methods. PMID:27409946

  14. Improving radiation dose efficiency of X-ray differential phase contrast imaging using an energy-resolving grating interferometer and a novel rank constraint.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yongshuai; Zhang, Ran; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-06-13

    In this paper, a novel method was developed to improve the radiation dose efficiency, viz., contrast to noise ratio normalized by dose (CNRD), of the grating-based X-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging system that is integrated with an energy-resolving photon counting detector. The method exploits the low-dimensionality of the spatial-spectral DPC image matrix acquired from different energy windows. A low rank approximation of the spatial-spectral image matrix was developed to reduce image noise while retaining the DPC signal accuracy for every energy window. Numerical simulations and experimental phantom studies have been performed to validate the proposed method by showing noise reduction and CNRD improvement for each energy window. PMID:27410315

  15. Quantification of signal detection performance degradation induced by phase-retrieval in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-04-01

    In propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast (PB XPC) imaging, the measured image contains a mixture of absorption- and phase-contrast. To obtain separate images of the projected absorption and phase (i.e., refractive) properties of a sample, phase retrieval methods can be employed. It has been suggested that phase-retrieval can always improve image quality in PB XPC imaging. However, when objective (task-based) measures of image quality are employed, this is not necessarily true and phase retrieval can be detrimental. In this work, signal detection theory is utilized to quantify the performance of a Hotelling observer (HO) for detecting a known signal in a known background. Two cases are considered. In the first case, the HO acts directly on the measured intensity data. In the second case, the HO acts on either the retrieved phase or absorption image. We demonstrate that the performance of the HO is superior when acting on the measured intensity data. The loss of task-specific information induced by phase-retrieval is quantified by computing the efficiency of the HO as the ratio of the test statistic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the two cases. The effect of the system geometry on this efficiency is systematically investigated. Our findings confirm that phase-retrieval can impair signal detection performance in XPC imaging.

  16. Validity of Fusion Imaging of Hamster Heart obtained by Fluorescent and Phase-Contrast X-Ray CT with Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Takeda, T.; Lwin, Thet Thet; Huo, Q.; Sunaguchi, N.; Murakami, T.; Mouri, S.; Nasukawa, S.; Fukami, T.; Yuasa, T.; Hyodo, K.; Hontani, H.; Minami, M.; Akatsuka, T.

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescent X-ray CT (FXCT) to depict functional information and phase-contrast X-ray CT (PCCT) to demonstrate morphological information are being developed to analyze the disease model of small animal. To understand the detailed pathological state, integration of both functional and morphological image is very useful. The feasibility of image fusion between FXCT and PCCT were examined by using ex-vivo hearts injected fatty acid metabolic agent (127I-BMIPP) in normal and cardiomyopathic hamsters. Fusion images were reconstructed from each 3D image of FXCT and PCCT. 127I-BMIPP distribution within the heart was clearly demonstrated by FXCT with 0.25 mm spatial resolution. The detailed morphological image was obtained by PCCT at about 0.03 mm spatial resolution. Using image integration technique, metabolic abnormality of fatty acid in cardiomyopathic myocardium was easily recognized corresponding to anatomical structures. Our study suggests that image fusion provides important biomedical information even in FXCT and PCCT imaging.

  17. Validity of Fusion Imaging of Hamster Heart obtained by Fluorescent and Phase-Contrast X-Ray CT with Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Takeda, T.; Lwin, Thet Thet; Huo, Q.; Minami, M.; Sunaguchi, N.; Murakami, T.; Mouri, S.; Nasukawa, S.; Fukami, T.; Yuasa, T.; Akatsuka, T.; Hyodo, K.; Hontani, H.

    2007-01-19

    Fluorescent X-ray CT (FXCT) to depict functional information and phase-contrast X-ray CT (PCCT) to demonstrate morphological information are being developed to analyze the disease model of small animal. To understand the detailed pathological state, integration of both functional and morphological image is very useful. The feasibility of image fusion between FXCT and PCCT were examined by using ex-vivo hearts injected fatty acid metabolic agent (127I-BMIPP) in normal and cardiomyopathic hamsters. Fusion images were reconstructed from each 3D image of FXCT and PCCT. 127I-BMIPP distribution within the heart was clearly demonstrated by FXCT with 0.25 mm spatial resolution. The detailed morphological image was obtained by PCCT at about 0.03 mm spatial resolution. Using image integration technique, metabolic abnormality of fatty acid in cardiomyopathic myocardium was easily recognized corresponding to anatomical structures. Our study suggests that image fusion provides important biomedical information even in FXCT and PCCT imaging.

  18. Synchrotron- and laboratory-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging for imaging mouse articular cartilage in the absence of radiopaque contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Marenzana, Massimo; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Borges, Patricia Das Neves; Endrizzi, Marco; Szafraniec, Magdalena B.; Vincent, Tonia L.; Rigon, Luigi; Arfelli, Fulvia; Menk, Ralf-Hendrik; Olivo, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The mouse model of osteoarthritis (OA) has been recognized as the most promising research tool for the identification of new OA therapeutic targets. However, this model is currently limited by poor throughput, dependent on the extremely time-consuming histopathology assessment of the articular cartilage (AC). We have recently shown that AC in the rat tibia can be imaged both in air and in saline solution using a laboratory system based on coded-aperture X-ray phase-contrast imaging (CAXPCi). Here, we explore ways to extend the methodology for imaging the much thinner AC of the mouse, by means of gold-standard synchrotron-based phase-contrast methods. Specifically, we have used analyser-based phase-contrast micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) for its high sensitivity to faint phase changes, coupled with a high-resolution (4.5 μm pixel) detector. Healthy, diseased (four weeks post induction of OA) and artificially damaged mouse AC was imaged at the Elettra synchrotron in Trieste, Italy, using the above method. For validation, we used conventional micro-CT combined with radiopaque soft-tissue staining and standard histomorphometry. We show that mouse cartilage can be visualized correctly by means of the synchrotron method. This suggests that: (i) further developments of the laboratory-based CAXPCi system, especially in terms of pushing the resolution limits, might have the potential to resolve mouse AC ex vivo and (ii) additional improvements may lead to a new generation of CAXPCi micro-CT scanners which could be used for in vivo longitudinal pre-clinical imaging of soft tissue at resolutions impossible to achieve by current MRI technology. PMID:24470419

  19. High-resolution real-time x-ray and 3D imaging for physical contamination detection in deboned poultry meat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Jing, Hansong; Tao, Yang; Cheng, Xuemei

    2004-03-01

    This paper describes a novel approach for detection of foreign materials in deboned poultry patties based on real-time imaging technologies. Uneven thickness of poultry patties could lead to a significant classification error in a typical X-ray imaging system, and we addressed this issue successfully by fusing laser range imaging (3D imaging) into the x-ray inspection system. In order for this synergic technology to work effectively for on-line industrial applications, the vision system should be able to identify various physical contaminations automatically and have viable real-time capabilities. To meet these challenges, a rule-based approach was formulated under a unified framework for detection of diversified subjects, and a multithread scheme was developed for real-time image processing. Algorithms of data fusion, feature extraction and pattern classification of this approach are described in this paper. Detection performance and overall throughput of the system are also discussed.

  20. Real Time Observation of X-ray-Induced Surface Modification Using Simultaneous XANES and XEOL-XANES

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In experiments preliminary to the design of an X-ray-excited optical luminescence (XEOL)-based chemical mapping tool we have used X-ray micro (4.5 × 5.2 μm) and macro (1 × 6 mm) beams with similar total fluxes to assess the effects of a high flux density beam of X-rays at energies close to an absorption edge on inorganic surfaces in air. The near surface composition of corroded cupreous alloys was analyzed using parallel X-ray and optical photoemission channels to collect X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) data at the Cu K edge. The X-ray fluorescence channel is characteristic of the composition averages over several micrometers into the surface, whereas the optical channel is surface specific to about 200 nm. While the X-ray fluorescence data were mostly insensitive to the X-ray dose, the XEOL-XANES data from the microbeam showed significant dose-dependent changes to the superficial region, including surface cleaning, changes in the oxidation state of the copper, and destruction of surface compounds responsible for pre-edge fluorescence or phosphorescence in the visible. In one case, there was evidence that the lead phase in a bronze had melted. Conversely, data from the macrobeam were stable over several hours. Apart from localized heating effects, the microbeam damage is probably associated with the O3 loading of the surface and increased reaction rate with atmospheric water vapor. PMID:24044633

  1. X-ray absorption resonances near L2,3-edges from real-time propagation of the Dirac-Kohn-Sham density matrix.

    PubMed

    Kadek, Marius; Konecny, Lukas; Gao, Bin; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-09-21

    The solution of the Liouville-von Neumann equation in the relativistic Dirac-Kohn-Sham density matrix formalism is presented and used to calculate X-ray absorption cross sections. Both dynamical relaxation effects and spin-orbit corrections are included, as demonstrated by calculations of the X-ray absorption of SF6 near the sulfur L2,3-edges. We also propose an analysis facilitating the interpretation of spectral transitions from real-time simulations, and a selective perturbation that eliminates nonphysical excitations that are artifacts of the finite basis representation. PMID:26268195

  2. SU-E-I-90: Characterizing Small Animal Lung Properties Using Speckle Observed with An In-Line X-Ray Phase Contrast Benchtop System

    SciTech Connect

    Garson, A; Gunsten, S; Guan, H; Brody, S; Anastasio, M; Vasireddi, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We demonstrate a novel X-ray phase-contrast (XPC) method for lung imaging representing a paradigm shift in the way small animal functional imaging is performed. In our method, information regarding airway microstructure that is encoded within speckle texture of a single XPC radiograph is decoded to produce 2D parametric images that will spatially resolve changes in lung properties such as microstructure sizes and air volumes. Such information cannot be derived from conventional lung radiography or any other 2D imaging modality. By computing these images at different points within a breathing cycle, dynamic functional imaging will be readily achieved without the need for tomography. Methods: XPC mouse lung radiographs acquired in situ with an in-line X-ray phase contrast benchtop system. The lung air volume is varied and controlled with a small animal ventilator. XPC radiographs will be acquired for various lung air volume levels representing different phases of the respiratory cycle. Similar data will be acquired of microsphere-based lung phantoms containing hollow glass spheres with known distributions of diameters. Image texture analysis is applied to the data to investigate relationships between texture characteristics and airspace/microsphere physical properties. Results: Correlations between Fourier-based texture descriptors (FBTDs) and regional lung air volume indicate that the texture features in 2D radiographs reveal information on 3D properties of the lungs. For example, we find for a 350 × 350 πm2 lung ROI a linear relationship between injected air volume and FBTD value with slope and intercept of 8.9×10{sup 5} and 7.5, respectively. Conclusion: We demonstrate specific image texture measures related to lung speckle features are correlated with physical characteristics of refracting elements (i.e. lung air spaces). Furthermore, we present results indicating the feasibility of implementing the technique with a simple imaging system design, short

  3. Linear, position-sensitive x-ray detector used for real-time calculations of small-angle scattering parameters with submillisecond resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Borso, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    The advent of high-intensity X-ray synchrotron sources has made possible the measurement of fluctuations in small-angle scattering parameters from typical specimens on a submillisecond time scale in real-time. The fundamental design of any fast detector system optimized for such measurements will incorporate some type of solid state detector array capable of rapid encoding algorithms. A prototype with a self-scanning photodiode array has been designed and tested at beamline 1 to 4 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL), and the results indicate that the device will operate at speeds yielding submillisecond temporal resolution in real-time.

  4. On-site Real-Time Inspection System for Pump-impeller using X-band Linac X-ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Natsui, Takuya; Taguchi, Hiroki; Taniguchi, Yoshihiro; Lee, Ki woo; Hashimoto, Eiko; Sakamoto, Fumito; Sakumi, Akira; Yusa, Noritaka; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Nakamura, Naoki; Yamamoto, Masashi; Tanabe, Eiji

    2009-03-01

    The methods of nondestructive testing (NDT) are generally ultrasonic, neutron, eddy-current and X-rays, NDT by using X-rays, in particular, is the most useful inspection technique having high resolution. We can especially evaluate corroded pipes of petrochemical complex, nuclear and thermal-power plants by the high energy X-ray NDT system. We develop a portable X-ray NDT system with X-band linac and magnetron. This system can generate a 950 keV electron beam. We are able to get X-ray images of samples with 1 mm spatial resolution. This system has application to real time impeller inspection because linac based X-ray sources are able to generate pulsed X-rays. So, we can inspect the rotating impeller if the X-ray pulse rate is synchronized with the impeller rotation rate. This system has application in condition based maintenance (CBM) of nuclear plants, for example. However, 950 keV X-ray source can only be used for thin tubes with 20 mm thickness. We have started design of a 3.95 MeV X-band linac for broader X-ray NDT application. We think that this X-ray NDT system will be useful for corrosion wastage and cracking in thicker tubes at nuclear plants and impeller of larger pumps. This system consists of X-band linac, thermionic cathode electron gun, magnetron and waveguide components. For achieving higher electric fields the 3.95 MeV X-band linac structure has the side-coupled acceleration structure. This structure has more efficient acceleration than the 950 keV linac with alternating periodic structure (APS). We adopt a 1.3 MW magnetron for the RF source. This accelerator system is about 30 cm long. The beam current is about 150 mA, and X-ray dose rate is 10 Gy@1 m/500 pps. In this paper, the detail of the whole system concept and the electromagnetic field of designed linac structure will be reported.

  5. On-site Real-Time Inspection System for Pump-impeller using X-band Linac X-ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Natsui, Takuya; Taguchi, Hiroki; Taniguchi, Yoshihiro; Lee, Ki woo; Hashimoto, Eiko; Sakamoto, Fumito; Sakumi, Akira; Yusa, Noritaka; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Nakamura, Naoki; Yamamoto, Masashi; Tanabe, Eiji

    2009-03-10

    The methods of nondestructive testing (NDT) are generally ultrasonic, neutron, eddy-current and X-rays, NDT by using X-rays, in particular, is the most useful inspection technique having high resolution. We can especially evaluate corroded pipes of petrochemical complex, nuclear and thermal-power plants by the high energy X-ray NDT system. We develop a portable X-ray NDT system with X-band linac and magnetron. This system can generate a 950 keV electron beam. We are able to get X-ray images of samples with 1 mm spatial resolution. This system has application to real time impeller inspection because linac based X-ray sources are able to generate pulsed X-rays. So, we can inspect the rotating impeller if the X-ray pulse rate is synchronized with the impeller rotation rate. This system has application in condition based maintenance (CBM) of nuclear plants, for example. However, 950 keV X-ray source can only be used for thin tubes with 20 mm thickness. We have started design of a 3.95 MeV X-band linac for broader X-ray NDT application. We think that this X-ray NDT system will be useful for corrosion wastage and cracking in thicker tubes at nuclear plants and impeller of larger pumps. This system consists of X-band linac, thermionic cathode electron gun, magnetron and waveguide components. For achieving higher electric fields the 3.95 MeV X-band linac structure has the side-coupled acceleration structure. This structure has more efficient acceleration than the 950 keV linac with alternating periodic structure (APS). We adopt a 1.3 MW magnetron for the RF source. This accelerator system is about 30 cm long. The beam current is about 150 mA, and X-ray dose rate is 10 Gy at 1 m/500 pps. In this paper, the detail of the whole system concept and the electromagnetic field of designed linac structure will be reported.

  6. In situ and real-time characterization of metal-organic chemical vapor deposition growth by high resolution x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kharchenko, A.; Lischka, K.; Schmidegg, K.; Sitter, H.; Bethke, J.; Woitok, J.

    2005-03-01

    We present an x-ray diffractometer for the analysis of epitaxial layers during (in situ) metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Our diffractometer has a conventional x-ray source, does not need a goniometer stage, and is not sensitive to precise adjustment of the samples before measurement. It allows us to perform measurements within a few seconds even from rotating and wobbling samples. The first results of laboratory tests performed with our x-ray diffraction system show that it is well suited for in situ and real-time monitoring of the MOCVD growth process. We were able to measure the growth rate of a cubic GaN layer and the intensity and peak position of Bragg reflections of the growing layer in less than 20 s only.

  7. Real time x-ray studies during nanostructure formation on silicon via low energy ion beam irradiation using ultrathin iron films

    SciTech Connect

    El-Atwani, Osman; Suslova, Anastassiya; Gonderman, Sean; Fowler, Justin; El-Atwani, Mohamad; DeMasi, Alexander; Ludwig, Karl; Paul Allain, Jean

    2012-12-24

    Real time grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) are used to elucidate nanodot formation on silicon surfaces during low energy ion beam irradiation of ultrathin iron-coated silicon substrates. Four surface modification stages were identified: (1) surface roughening due to film erosion, (2) surface smoothing and silicon-iron mixing, (3) structure formation, and (4) structure smoothing. The results conclude that 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} iron atoms in a 50 nm depth triggers surface nanopatterning with a correlated nanodots distance of 25 nm. Moreover, there is a wide window in time where the surface can have correlated nanostructures even after the removal of all the iron atoms from the sample as confirmed by XRF and ex-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In addition, in-situ XPS results indicated silicide formation, which plays a role in the structure formation mechanism.

  8. Real-time x-ray response of biocompatible solution gate AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, Markus; Funk, Maren; Paretzke, Herwig G.; Thalhammer, Stefan; Howgate, John; Sharp, Ian D.; Stutzmann, Martin

    2010-03-01

    We present the real-time x-ray irradiation response of charge and pH sensitive solution gate AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors. The devices show stable and reproducible behavior under and following x-ray radiation, including a linear integrated response with dose into the muGy range. Titration measurements of devices in solution reveal that the linear pH response and sensitivity are not only retained under x-ray irradiation, but an irradiation response could also be measured. Since the devices are biocompatible, and can be simultaneously operated in aggressive fluids and under hard radiation, they are well-suited for both medical radiation dosimetry and biosensing applications.

  9. In situ 3-D mapping of pore structures and hollow grains of interplanetary dust particles with phase contrast X-ray nanotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Winarski, R. P.

    2016-06-01

    Unlocking the 3-D structure and properties of intact chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) in nanoscale detail is challenging, which is also complicated by atmospheric entry heating, but is important for advancing our understanding of the formation and origins of IDPs and planetary bodies as well as dust and ice agglomeration in the outer protoplanetary disk. Here, we show that indigenous pores, pristine grains, and thermal alteration products throughout intact particles can be noninvasively visualized and distinguished morphologically and microstructurally in 3-D detail down to ~10 nm by exploiting phase contrast X-ray nanotomography. We have uncovered the surprisingly intricate, submicron, and nanoscale pore structures of a ~10-μm-long porous IDP, consisting of two types of voids that are interconnected in 3-D space. One is morphologically primitive and mostly submicron-sized intergranular voids that are ubiquitous; the other is morphologically advanced and well-defined intragranular nanoholes that run through the approximate centers of ~0.3 μm or lower submicron hollow grains. The distinct hollow grains exhibit complex 3-D morphologies but in 2-D projections resemble typical organic hollow globules observed by transmission electron microscopy. The particle, with its outer region characterized by rough vesicular structures due to thermal alteration, has turned out to be an inherently fragile and intricately submicron- and nanoporous aggregate of the sub-μm grains or grain clumps that are delicately bound together frequently with little grain-to-grain contact in 3-D space.

  10. Robust phase retrieval for high resolution edge illumination x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography in non-ideal environments

    PubMed Central

    Zamir, Anna; Endrizzi, Marco; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Urbani, Luca; De Coppi, Paolo; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Edge illumination x-ray phase contrast tomography is a recently developed imaging technique which enables three-dimensional visualisation of low-absorbing materials. Dedicated phase retrieval algorithms can provide separate computed tomography (CT) maps of sample absorption, refraction and scattering properties. In this paper we propose a novel “modified local retrieval” method which is capable of accurately retrieving sample properties in a range of realistic, non-ideal imaging environments. These include system misalignment, defects in the used optical elements and system geometry variations over time due to vibrations or temperature fluctuations. System instabilities were analysed, modelled and incorporated into a simulation study. As a result, an additional modification was introduced to the retrieval procedure to account for changes in the imaging system over time, as well as local variations over the field of view. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated in comparison to a previously used “global retrieval” method by applying both approaches to experimental CT data of a rat’s heart acquired in a non-ideal environment. The use of the proposed method resulted in the removal of major artefacts, leading to a significant improvement in image quality. This method will therefore enable acquiring high-resolution, reliable CT data of large samples in realistic settings. PMID:27502296

  11. Joint reconstruction of absorption and refractive properties in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography via a non-linear image reconstruction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yujia; Wang, Kun; Gursoy, Doga; Soriano, Carmen; De Carlo, Francesco; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    Propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast tomography (XPCT) provides the opportunity to image weakly absorbing objects and is being explored actively for a variety of important pre-clinical applications. Quantitative XPCT image reconstruction methods typically involve a phase retrieval step followed by application of an image reconstruction algorithm. Most approaches to phase retrieval require either acquiring multiple images at different object-to-detector distances or introducing simplifying assumptions, such as a single-material assumption, to linearize the imaging model. In order to overcome these limitations, a non-linear image reconstruction method has been proposed previously that jointly estimates the absorption and refractive properties of an object from XPCT projection data acquired at a single propagation distance, without the need to linearize the imaging model. However, the numerical properties of the associated non-convex optimization problem remain largely unexplored. In this study, computer simulations are conducted to investigate the feasibility of the joint reconstruction problem in practice. We demonstrate that the joint reconstruction problem is ill-posed and sensitive to system inconsistencies. Particularly, the method can generate accurate refractive index images only if the object is thin and has no phase-wrapping in the data. However, we also observed that, for weakly absorbing objects, the refractive index images reconstructed by the joint reconstruction method are, in general, more accurate than those reconstructed using methods that simply ignore the object's absorption.

  12. Robust phase retrieval for high resolution edge illumination x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography in non-ideal environments.

    PubMed

    Zamir, Anna; Endrizzi, Marco; Hagen, Charlotte K; Vittoria, Fabio A; Urbani, Luca; De Coppi, Paolo; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Edge illumination x-ray phase contrast tomography is a recently developed imaging technique which enables three-dimensional visualisation of low-absorbing materials. Dedicated phase retrieval algorithms can provide separate computed tomography (CT) maps of sample absorption, refraction and scattering properties. In this paper we propose a novel "modified local retrieval" method which is capable of accurately retrieving sample properties in a range of realistic, non-ideal imaging environments. These include system misalignment, defects in the used optical elements and system geometry variations over time due to vibrations or temperature fluctuations. System instabilities were analysed, modelled and incorporated into a simulation study. As a result, an additional modification was introduced to the retrieval procedure to account for changes in the imaging system over time, as well as local variations over the field of view. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated in comparison to a previously used "global retrieval" method by applying both approaches to experimental CT data of a rat's heart acquired in a non-ideal environment. The use of the proposed method resulted in the removal of major artefacts, leading to a significant improvement in image quality. This method will therefore enable acquiring high-resolution, reliable CT data of large samples in realistic settings. PMID:27502296

  13. Robust phase retrieval for high resolution edge illumination x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography in non-ideal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamir, Anna; Endrizzi, Marco; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Urbani, Luca; de Coppi, Paolo; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Edge illumination x-ray phase contrast tomography is a recently developed imaging technique which enables three-dimensional visualisation of low-absorbing materials. Dedicated phase retrieval algorithms can provide separate computed tomography (CT) maps of sample absorption, refraction and scattering properties. In this paper we propose a novel “modified local retrieval” method which is capable of accurately retrieving sample properties in a range of realistic, non-ideal imaging environments. These include system misalignment, defects in the used optical elements and system geometry variations over time due to vibrations or temperature fluctuations. System instabilities were analysed, modelled and incorporated into a simulation study. As a result, an additional modification was introduced to the retrieval procedure to account for changes in the imaging system over time, as well as local variations over the field of view. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated in comparison to a previously used “global retrieval” method by applying both approaches to experimental CT data of a rat’s heart acquired in a non-ideal environment. The use of the proposed method resulted in the removal of major artefacts, leading to a significant improvement in image quality. This method will therefore enable acquiring high-resolution, reliable CT data of large samples in realistic settings.

  14. Three-dimensional visualization of the microvasculature of bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis in rats by x-ray phase-contrast imaging computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Ruijiao; Zhao, Xinyan; Hu, Doudou; Jian, Jianbo; Wang, Tailing; Hu, Chunhong

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging (PCI) can substantially enhance contrast, and is particularly useful in differentiating biological soft tissues with small density differences. Combined with computed tomography (CT), PCI-CT enables the acquisition of accurate microstructures inside biological samples. In this study, liver microvasculature was visualized without contrast agents in vitro with PCI-CT using liver fibrosis samples induced by bile duct ligation (BDL) in rats. The histological section examination confirmed the correspondence of CT images with the microvascular morphology of the samples. By means of the PCI-CT and three-dimensional (3D) visualization technique, 3D microvascular structures in samples from different stages of liver fibrosis were clearly revealed. Different types of blood vessels, including portal veins and hepatic veins, in addition to ductular proliferation and bile ducts, could be distinguished with good sensitivity, excellent specificity and excellent accuracy. The study showed that PCI-CT could assess the morphological changes in liver microvasculature that result from fibrosis and allow characterization of the anatomical and pathological features of the microvasculature. With further development of PCI-CT technique, it may become a novel noninvasive imaging technique for the auxiliary analysis of liver fibrosis. PMID:26212186

  15. Increasing the darkfield contrast-to-noise ratio using a deconvolution-based information retrieval algorithm in X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas; Pelzer, Georg; Bayer, Florian; Horn, Florian; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Zang, Andrea; Durst, Jürgen; Anton, Gisela; Michel, Thilo

    2013-07-29

    A novel information retrieval algorithm for X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging based on the deconvolution of the object and the reference phase stepping curve (PSC) as proposed by Modregger et al. was investigated in this paper. We applied the method for the first time on data obtained with a polychromatic spectrum and compared the results to those, received by applying the commonly used method, based on a Fourier analysis. We confirmed the expectation, that both methods deliver the same results for the absorption and the differential phase image. For the darkfield image, a mean contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) increase by a factor of 1.17 using the new method was found. Furthermore, the dose saving potential was estimated for the deconvolution method experimentally. It is found, that for the conventional method a dose which is higher by a factor of 1.66 is needed to obtain a similar CNR value compared to the novel method. A further analysis of the data revealed, that the improvement in CNR and dose efficiency is due to the superior background noise properties of the deconvolution method, but at the cost of comparability between measurements at different applied dose values, as the mean value becomes dependent on the photon statistics used. PMID:23938672

  16. In situ 3-D mapping of pore structures and hollow grains of interplanetary dust particles with phase contrast X-ray nanotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Winarski, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    Unlocking the 3-D structure and properties of intact chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) in nanoscale detail is challenging, which is also complicated by atmospheric entry heating, but is important for advancing our understanding of the formation and origins of IDPs and planetary bodies as well as dust and ice agglomeration in the outer protoplanetary disk. Here, we show that indigenous pores, pristine grains, and thermal alteration products throughout intact particles can be noninvasively visualized and distinguished morphologically and microstructurally in 3-D detail down to ~10 nm by exploiting phase contrast X-ray nanotomography. We have uncovered the surprisingly intricate, submicron, and nanoscale pore structures of a ~10-μm-long porous IDP, consisting of two types of voids that are interconnected in 3-D space. One is morphologically primitive and mostly submicron-sized intergranular voids that are ubiquitous; the other is morphologically advanced and well-defined intragranular nanoholes that run through the approximate centers of ~0.3 μm or lower submicron hollow grains. The distinct hollow grains exhibit complex 3-D morphologies but in 2-D projections resemble typical organic hollow globules observed by transmission electron microscopy. The particle, with its outer region characterized by rough vesicular structures due to thermal alteration, has turned out to be an inherently fragile and intricately submicron- and nanoporous aggregate of the sub-μm grains or grain clumps that are delicately bound together frequently with little grain-to-grain contact in 3-D space.

  17. Three-dimensional visualization of the microvasculature of bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis in rats by x-ray phase-contrast imaging computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Ruijiao; Zhao, Xinyan; Hu, Doudou; Jian, Jianbo; Wang, Tailing; Hu, Chunhong

    2015-07-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging (PCI) can substantially enhance contrast, and is particularly useful in differentiating biological soft tissues with small density differences. Combined with computed tomography (CT), PCI-CT enables the acquisition of accurate microstructures inside biological samples. In this study, liver microvasculature was visualized without contrast agents in vitro with PCI-CT using liver fibrosis samples induced by bile duct ligation (BDL) in rats. The histological section examination confirmed the correspondence of CT images with the microvascular morphology of the samples. By means of the PCI-CT and three-dimensional (3D) visualization technique, 3D microvascular structures in samples from different stages of liver fibrosis were clearly revealed. Different types of blood vessels, including portal veins and hepatic veins, in addition to ductular proliferation and bile ducts, could be distinguished with good sensitivity, excellent specificity and excellent accuracy. The study showed that PCI-CT could assess the morphological changes in liver microvasculature that result from fibrosis and allow characterization of the anatomical and pathological features of the microvasculature. With further development of PCI-CT technique, it may become a novel noninvasive imaging technique for the auxiliary analysis of liver fibrosis.

  18. Synchrotron X-ray phase contrast imaging of leaf venation in soybean (Glycine max) after exclusion of solar UV (280-400 nm) radiation.

    PubMed

    Fatima, A; Kataria, S; Guruprasad, K N; Agrawal, A K; Singh, B; Sarkar, P S; Shripathi, T; Kashyap, Y; Sinha, A

    2016-05-01

    The hydraulic efficiency of a leaf depends on its vascular structure as this is responsible for transport activities. To investigate the effect of exclusion of UVAB and UVB radiation from the solar spectrum on the micro-structure of leaves of soybean (Glycine max, variety JS-335), a field experiment was conducted using synchrotron-based phase contrast imaging (PCI). Plants were grown in specially designed UV exclusion chambers, and wrapped with filters that excluded UVB (280-315 nm) or UVAB (280-400 nm), or transmitted all the ambient solar UV (280-400 nm) radiation (filter control). Qualitative observation of high-resolution X-ray PCI images obtained at 10 keV has shown the differences in major and minor vein structures of the leaves. The mid-rib width of the middle leaflet of third trifoliate leaves, for all treatments, were obtained using quantitative image analysis. The width of the mid-rib of the middle leaflet of third trifoliate leaves of UVB excluded plants was found to be more compared to leaves of filter control plants, which are exposed to ambient UV. The mid-rib or the main conducting vein transports water and sugars to the whole plant; therefore, mid-rib enhancement by the exclusion of solar UV radiation possibly implies enhancement in the leaf area which in turn causes an increased rate of photosynthesis. PMID:27140160

  19. Real-time observation of coherent acoustic phonons generated by an acoustically mismatched optoacoustic transducer using x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, A. I. H.; Andreasson, B. P.; Enquist, H.; Jurgilaitis, A.; Larsson, J.

    2015-11-14

    The spectrum of laser-generated acoustic phonons in indium antimonide coated with a thin nickel film has been studied using time-resolved x-ray diffraction. Strain pulses that can be considered to be built up from coherent phonons were generated in the nickel film by absorption of short laser pulses. Acoustic reflections at the Ni–InSb interface leads to interference that strongly modifies the resulting phonon spectrum. The study was performed with high momentum transfer resolution together with high time resolution. This was achieved by using a third-generation synchrotron radiation source that provided a high-brightness beam and an ultrafast x-ray streak camera to obtain a temporal resolution of 10 ps. We also carried out simulations, using commercial finite element software packages and on-line dynamic diffraction tools. Using these tools, it is possible to calculate the time-resolved x-ray reflectivity from these complicated strain shapes. The acoustic pulses have a peak strain amplitude close to 1%, and we investigated the possibility to use this device as an x-ray switch. At a bright source optimized for hard x-ray generation, the low reflectivity may be an acceptable trade-off to obtain a pulse duration that is more than an order of magnitude shorter.

  20. Radioluminescence characterization of in situ x-ray nanodosimeters: Potential real-time monitors and modulators of external beam radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souris, Jeffrey S.; Cheng, Shih-Hsun; Pelizzari, Charles; Chen, Nai-Tzu; La Riviere, Patrick; Chen, Chin-Tu; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2014-11-01

    Europium-doped yttrium oxide (Y2O3:Eu) has garnered considerable interest recently for its use as a highly efficient, red phosphor in a variety of lighting applications that include fluorescent lamps, plasma, and field emission display panels, light emitting diodes (LEDs), and lasers. In the present work, we describe the development of Y2O3:Eu nanoparticles for a very different application: in situ, in vivo x-ray dosimetry. Spectroscopic analyses of these nanoparticles during x-ray irradiation reveal surprisingly bright and stable radioluminescence at near-infrared wavelengths, with markedly linear response to changes in x-ray flux and energy. Monte Carlo modeling of incident flux and broadband, wide-field imaging of mouse phantoms bearing both Y2O3:Eu nanoparticles and calibrated LEDs of similar spectral emission demonstrated significant transmission of radioluminescence, in agreement with spectroscopic studies; with approximately 15 visible photons being generated for every x-ray photon incident. Unlike the dosimeters currently employed in clinical practice, these nanodosimeters can sample both dose and dose rate rapidly enough as to provide real-time feedback for x-ray based external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The technique's use of remote sensing and absence of supporting structures enable perturbation-free dosing of the targeted region and complete sampling from any direction. With the conjugation of pathology-targeting ligands onto their surfaces, these nanodosimeters offer a potential paradigm shift in the real-time monitoring and modulation of delivered dose in the EBRT of cancer in situ.

  1. Radioluminescence characterization of in situ x-ray nanodosimeters: Potential real-time monitors and modulators of external beam radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Souris, Jeffrey S.; Cheng, Shih-Hsun; Pelizzari, Charles; Chen, Nai-Tzu; La Riviere, Patrick; Chen, Chin-Tu; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Europium-doped yttrium oxide (Y2O3:Eu) has garnered considerable interest recently for its use as a highly efficient, red phosphor in a variety of lighting applications that include fluorescent lamps, plasma, and field emission display panels, light emitting diodes (LEDs), and lasers. In the present work, we describe the development of Y2O3:Eu nanoparticles for a very different application: in situ, in vivo x-ray dosimetry. Spectroscopic analyses of these nanoparticles during x-ray irradiation reveal surprisingly bright and stable radioluminescence at near-infrared wavelengths, with markedly linear response to changes in x-ray flux and energy. Monte Carlo modeling of incident flux and broadband, wide-field imaging of mouse phantoms bearing both Y2O3:Eu nanoparticles and calibrated LEDs of similar spectral emission demonstrated significant transmission of radioluminescence, in agreement with spectroscopic studies; with approximately 15 visible photons being generated for every x-ray photon incident. Unlike the dosimeters currently employed in clinical practice, these nanodosimeters can sample both dose and dose rate rapidly enough as to provide real-time feedback for x-ray based external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The technique's use of remote sensing and absence of supporting structures enable perturbation-free dosing of the targeted region and complete sampling from any direction. With the conjugation of pathology-targeting ligands onto their surfaces, these nanodosimeters offer a potential paradigm shift in the real-time monitoring and modulation of delivered dose in the EBRT of cancer in situ. PMID:25425747

  2. Radioluminescence characterization of in situ x-ray nanodosimeters: Potential real-time monitors and modulators of external beam radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Souris, Jeffrey S; Cheng, Shih-Hsun; Pelizzari, Charles; Chen, Nai-Tzu; La Riviere, Patrick; Chen, Chin-Tu; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2014-11-17

    Europium-doped yttrium oxide (Y2O3:Eu) has garnered considerable interest recently for its use as a highly efficient, red phosphor in a variety of lighting applications that include fluorescent lamps, plasma, and field emission display panels, light emitting diodes (LEDs), and lasers. In the present work, we describe the development of Y2O3:Eu nanoparticles for a very different application: in situ, in vivo x-ray dosimetry. Spectroscopic analyses of these nanoparticles during x-ray irradiation reveal surprisingly bright and stable radioluminescence at near-infrared wavelengths, with markedly linear response to changes in x-ray flux and energy. Monte Carlo modeling of incident flux and broadband, wide-field imaging of mouse phantoms bearing both Y2O3:Eu nanoparticles and calibrated LEDs of similar spectral emission demonstrated significant transmission of radioluminescence, in agreement with spectroscopic studies; with approximately 15 visible photons being generated for every x-ray photon incident. Unlike the dosimeters currently employed in clinical practice, these nanodosimeters can sample both dose and dose rate rapidly enough as to provide real-time feedback for x-ray based external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The technique's use of remote sensing and absence of supporting structures enable perturbation-free dosing of the targeted region and complete sampling from any direction. With the conjugation of pathology-targeting ligands onto their surfaces, these nanodosimeters offer a potential paradigm shift in the real-time monitoring and modulation of delivered dose in the EBRT of cancer in situ. PMID:25425747

  3. Radioluminescence characterization of in situ x-ray nanodosimeters: Potential real-time monitors and modulators of external beam radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Souris, Jeffrey S.; La Riviere, Patrick; Chen, Chin-Tu; Cheng, Shih-Hsun; Chen, Nai-Tzu; Lo, Leu-Wei; Pelizzari, Charles

    2014-11-17

    Europium-doped yttrium oxide (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu) has garnered considerable interest recently for its use as a highly efficient, red phosphor in a variety of lighting applications that include fluorescent lamps, plasma, and field emission display panels, light emitting diodes (LEDs), and lasers. In the present work, we describe the development of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu nanoparticles for a very different application: in situ, in vivo x-ray dosimetry. Spectroscopic analyses of these nanoparticles during x-ray irradiation reveal surprisingly bright and stable radioluminescence at near-infrared wavelengths, with markedly linear response to changes in x-ray flux and energy. Monte Carlo modeling of incident flux and broadband, wide-field imaging of mouse phantoms bearing both Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu nanoparticles and calibrated LEDs of similar spectral emission demonstrated significant transmission of radioluminescence, in agreement with spectroscopic studies; with approximately 15 visible photons being generated for every x-ray photon incident. Unlike the dosimeters currently employed in clinical practice, these nanodosimeters can sample both dose and dose rate rapidly enough as to provide real-time feedback for x-ray based external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The technique's use of remote sensing and absence of supporting structures enable perturbation-free dosing of the targeted region and complete sampling from any direction. With the conjugation of pathology-targeting ligands onto their surfaces, these nanodosimeters offer a potential paradigm shift in the real-time monitoring and modulation of delivered dose in the EBRT of cancer in situ.

  4. Integrating Dimension Reduction and Out-of-Sample Extension in Automated Classification of Ex Vivo Human Patellar Cartilage on Phase Contrast X-Ray Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B.; Diemoz, Paul C.; Wismüller, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Phase contrast X-ray computed tomography (PCI-CT) has been demonstrated as a novel imaging technique that can visualize human cartilage with high spatial resolution and soft tissue contrast. Different textural approaches have been previously investigated for characterizing chondrocyte organization on PCI-CT to enable classification of healthy and osteoarthritic cartilage. However, the large size of feature sets extracted in such studies motivates an investigation into algorithmic feature reduction for computing efficient feature representations without compromising their discriminatory power. For this purpose, geometrical feature sets derived from the scaling index method (SIM) were extracted from 1392 volumes of interest (VOI) annotated on PCI-CT images of ex vivo human patellar cartilage specimens. The extracted feature sets were subject to linear and non-linear dimension reduction techniques as well as feature selection based on evaluation of mutual information criteria. The reduced feature set was subsequently used in a machine learning task with support vector regression to classify VOIs as healthy or osteoarthritic; classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). Our results show that the classification performance achieved by 9-D SIM-derived geometric feature sets (AUC: 0.96 ± 0.02) can be maintained with 2-D representations computed from both dimension reduction and feature selection (AUC values as high as 0.97 ± 0.02). Thus, such feature reduction techniques can offer a high degree of compaction to large feature sets extracted from PCI-CT images while maintaining their ability to characterize the underlying chondrocyte patterns. PMID:25710875

  5. Integrating dimension reduction and out-of-sample extension in automated classification of ex vivo human patellar cartilage on phase contrast X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B; Diemoz, Paul C; Wismüller, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Phase contrast X-ray computed tomography (PCI-CT) has been demonstrated as a novel imaging technique that can visualize human cartilage with high spatial resolution and soft tissue contrast. Different textural approaches have been previously investigated for characterizing chondrocyte organization on PCI-CT to enable classification of healthy and osteoarthritic cartilage. However, the large size of feature sets extracted in such studies motivates an investigation into algorithmic feature reduction for computing efficient feature representations without compromising their discriminatory power. For this purpose, geometrical feature sets derived from the scaling index method (SIM) were extracted from 1392 volumes of interest (VOI) annotated on PCI-CT images of ex vivo human patellar cartilage specimens. The extracted feature sets were subject to linear and non-linear dimension reduction techniques as well as feature selection based on evaluation of mutual information criteria. The reduced feature set was subsequently used in a machine learning task with support vector regression to classify VOIs as healthy or osteoarthritic; classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). Our results show that the classification performance achieved by 9-D SIM-derived geometric feature sets (AUC: 0.96 ± 0.02) can be maintained with 2-D representations computed from both dimension reduction and feature selection (AUC values as high as 0.97 ± 0.02). Thus, such feature reduction techniques can offer a high degree of compaction to large feature sets extracted from PCI-CT images while maintaining their ability to characterize the underlying chondrocyte patterns. PMID:25710875

  6. Differential X-ray phase contrast tomography of Alzheimer plaques in mouse models: perspectives for drug development and clinical imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinzer, B. R.; Cacquevel, M.; Modregger, P.; Thuering, T.; Stampanoni, M.

    2013-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a looming threat on an ever-ageing population, with devastating effects on the human intellect. A particular characteristic lesion — the extracellular amyloid plaque — accumulates in the brain of AD patients during the course of the disease, and could therefore be used to monitor the progression of the disease, years before the first neurological symptoms appear. In addition, strategies for drug intervention in AD are often based on amyloid reduction, since amyloid plaques are hypothesized to be involved in a chain of reactions leading to the death of neurons. Developments in both fields would benefit from a microscopic technique that is capable of single plaque imaging, ideally in 3D. While such a non-destructive, single-plaque imaging technique does not yet exist for humans, it has been recently shown that synchrotron based differential X-ray phase contrast imaging can be used to visualize individual plaques at μm resolution in mouse models of AD ex-vivo. This method, which relies on a grating interferometer to measure refraction angles induced by fluctuations in the refractive index, yields a precise three-dimensional distribution of single plaques. These data could not only improve the understanding of the evolution of AD or the effectiveness of drugs, but could also help to improve reliable markers for current and future non-invasive clinical imaging techniques. In particular, validation of PET markers with small animal models could be rapidly carried out by co-registration of PET and DPC signals.

  7. A deep look into the spray coating process in real-time-the crucial role of x-rays.

    PubMed

    Roth, Stephan V

    2016-10-12

    Tailoring functional thin films and coating by rapid solvent-based processes is the basis for the fabrication of large scale high-end applications in nanotechnology. Due to solvent loss of the solution or dispersion inherent in the installation of functional thin films and multilayers the spraying and drying processes are strongly governed by non-equilibrium kinetics, often passing through transient states, until the final structure is installed. Therefore, the challenge is to observe the structural build-up during these coating processes in a spatially and time-resolved manner on multiple time and length scales, from the nanostructure to macroscopic length scales. During installation, the interaction of solid-fluid interfaces and between the different layers, the flow and evaporation themselves determine the structure of the coating. Advanced x-ray scattering methods open a powerful pathway for observing the involved processes in situ, from the spray to the coating, and allow for gaining deep insight in the nanostructuring processes. This review first provides an overview over these rapidly evolving methods, with main focus on functional coatings, organic photovoltaics and organic electronics. Secondly the role and decisive advantage of x-rays is outlined. Thirdly, focusing on spray deposition as a rapidly emerging method, recent advances in investigations of spray deposition of functional materials and devices via advanced x-ray scattering methods are presented. PMID:27537198

  8. Nanopatterning of metal-coated silicon surfaces via ion beam irradiation: Real time x-ray studies reveal the effect of silicide bonding

    SciTech Connect

    El-Atwani, Osman; Gonderman, Sean; Suslova, Anastassiya; Fowler, Justin; El-Atwani, Mohamad; DeMasi, Alexander; Ludwig, Karl; Paul Allain, Jean

    2013-03-28

    We investigated the effect of silicide formation on ion-induced nanopatterning of silicon with various ultrathin metal coatings. Silicon substrates coated with 10 nm Ni, Fe, and Cu were irradiated with 200 eV argon ions at normal incidence. Real time grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) were performed during the irradiation process and real time measurements revealed threshold conditions for nanopatterning of silicon at normal incidence irradiation. Three main stages of the nanopatterning process were identified. The real time GISAXS intensity of the correlated peaks in conjunction with XRF revealed that the nanostructures remain for a time period after the removal of the all the metal atoms from the sample depending on the binding energy of the metal silicides formed. Ex-situ XPS confirmed the removal of all metal impurities. In-situ XPS during the irradiation of Ni, Fe, and Cu coated silicon substrates at normal incidence demonstrated phase separation and the formation of different silicide phases that occur upon metal-silicon mixing. Silicide formation leads to nanostructure formation due the preferential erosion of the non-silicide regions and the weakening of the ion induced mass redistribution.

  9. Phase Transformation of Se/(Cu,In,Ga)/Mo/Glass Thin Films: A Real-Time Synchrotron X-ray Scattering Study.

    PubMed

    Son, Yeon Su; Cho, Tae Sik; Kim, Yong Bae

    2015-11-01

    The phase transformation of Se/(Cu,In,Ga)/Mo/glass thin films during annealing in a vacuum on and off state was studied in a real-time synchrotron X-ray scattering experiment. The crystalline CIGS phase is a solid solution of crystalline CIS and CGS phases. The crystalline CIS phase was formed first at lower temperature. By increasing the temperature, the crystalline CIS phase disappeared, while the crystalline Ga2Se3, In2Se3, Cu2In phases grew simultaneously. Finally, the crystalline CIGS phase was formed at higher temperature, while the crystalline Ga2Se3, In2Se3, Cu2In phases disappeared gradually. The behavior of the crystal domain sizes was consistent with the changes of X-ray powder diffraction profiles. The high crystallization temperature of the CIGS phase was attributed to the activation energy barrier for the diffusion of Ga ions into the intermediate CIS phase. PMID:26726585

  10. Operation of beam line facilities for real-time x-ray studies at Sector 7 of the advanced photon source. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Roy

    2003-09-10

    This Final Report documents the research accomplishments achieved in the first phase of operations of a new Advanced Photon Source beam line (7-ID MHATT-CAT) dedicated to real-time x-ray studies. The period covered by this report covers the establishment of a world-class facility for time-dependent x-ray studies of materials. During this period many new and innovative research programs were initiated at Sector 7 with support of this grant, most notably using a combination of ultrafast lasers and pulsed synchrotron radiation. This work initiated a new frontier of materials research: namely, the study of the dynamics of materials under extreme conditions of high intensity impulsive laser irradiation.

  11. A real-time regional adaptive exposure method for saving dose-area product in x-ray fluoroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Burion, Steve; Speidel, Michael A.; Funk, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Reduction of radiation dose in x-ray imaging has been recognized as a high priority in the medical community. Here the authors show that a regional adaptive exposure method can reduce dose-area product (DAP) in x-ray fluoroscopy. The authors' method is particularly geared toward providing dose savings for the pediatric population. Methods: The scanning beam digital x-ray system uses a large-area x-ray source with 8000 focal spots in combination with a small photon-counting detector. An imaging frame is obtained by acquiring and reconstructing up to 8000 detector images, each viewing only a small portion of the patient. Regional adaptive exposure was implemented by varying the exposure of the detector images depending on the local opacity of the object. A family of phantoms ranging in size from infant to obese adult was imaged in anteroposterior view with and without adaptive exposure. The DAP delivered to each phantom was measured in each case, and noise performance was compared by generating noise arrays to represent regional noise in the images. These noise arrays were generated by dividing the image into regions of about 6 mm2, calculating the relative noise in each region, and placing the relative noise value of each region in a one-dimensional array (noise array) sorted from highest to lowest. Dose-area product savings were calculated as the difference between the ratio of DAP with adaptive exposure to DAP without adaptive exposure. The authors modified this value by a correction factor that matches the noise arrays where relative noise is the highest to report a final dose-area product savings. Results: The average dose-area product saving across the phantom family was (42 ± 8)% with the highest dose-area product saving in the child-sized phantom (50%) and the lowest in the phantom mimicking an obese adult (23%). Conclusions: Phantom measurements indicate that a regional adaptive exposure method can produce large DAP savings without compromising the

  12. A real-time regional adaptive exposure method for saving dose-area product in x-ray fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Burion, Steve; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Reduction of radiation dose in x-ray imaging has been recognized as a high priority in the medical community. Here the authors show that a regional adaptive exposure method can reduce dose-area product (DAP) in x-ray fluoroscopy. The authors' method is particularly geared toward providing dose savings for the pediatric population. Methods: The scanning beam digital x-ray system uses a large-area x-ray source with 8000 focal spots in combination with a small photon-counting detector. An imaging frame is obtained by acquiring and reconstructing up to 8000 detector images, each viewing only a small portion of the patient. Regional adaptive exposure was implemented by varying the exposure of the detector images depending on the local opacity of the object. A family of phantoms ranging in size from infant to obese adult was imaged in anteroposterior view with and without adaptive exposure. The DAP delivered to each phantom was measured in each case, and noise performance was compared by generating noise arrays to represent regional noise in the images. These noise arrays were generated by dividing the image into regions of about 6 mm{sup 2}, calculating the relative noise in each region, and placing the relative noise value of each region in a one-dimensional array (noise array) sorted from highest to lowest. Dose-area product savings were calculated as the difference between the ratio of DAP with adaptive exposure to DAP without adaptive exposure. The authors modified this value by a correction factor that matches the noise arrays where relative noise is the highest to report a final dose-area product savings. Results: The average dose-area product saving across the phantom family was (42 {+-} 8)% with the highest dose-area product saving in the child-sized phantom (50%) and the lowest in the phantom mimicking an obese adult (23%). Conclusions: Phantom measurements indicate that a regional adaptive exposure method can produce large DAP savings without

  13. High-Energy X-ray Studies of Real Materials Under Real Conditions and in Real Time

    SciTech Connect

    Almer, Jonathan

    2011-05-11

    High-energy x-rays from 3rd generation synchrotron sources, including the APS, possess a unique combination of high penetration power and high spatial, reciprocal space, and temporal resolution. These characteristics can be exploited to non-destructively measure phase, texture and strain distributions under extreme environments including thermo-mechanical loading, high-pressure, irradiation and supercritical environments. Over the past several years, the 1-ID beamline has developed a number of programs for these purposes, namely (i) high-energy diffraction microscopy, in which grain and sub-grain volumes are mapped in polycrystalline aggregates, and (ii) combined small-and wide-angle x-ray scattering which permits information over a broad range of length scales to be collected from the same (micron-level) volume. These programs have been increasingly used to test and extend predictive simulations of materials behavior over size scales ranging from nm to mm. Select studies will be presented including nucleation and growth of nanomaterials, void and structural evolution in complex composites under thermo-mechanical and irradiated environments, and microstructural changes in layered systems including thermal-barrier coatings, batteries and fuel cells. Finally, extension of these programs, through the planned APS upgrade, to higher spatio-temporal resolution will be described.

  14. A real-time flat-panel X-ray pixel imaging system for low-dose medical diagnostics and craniofacial applications.

    PubMed

    Chapuy, S; Dimcovski, D; Dimcovski, Z; Grigoriev, E; Grob, E; Ligier, Y; Pachoud, M; Riondel, F; Rüfenacht, D; Sayegh, C; Terrier, F; Valley, J F; Verdun, F R

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate on-line performance of a real-time digital imaging system based on amorphous silicon technology and to compare it with conventional film-screen equipment. The digital detecting imager consists of (1) a converter, which transforms the energy of the incident X rays into light; (2) a real-time digital detecting system, capable of producing as many as 10 pictures per second using a large-area pixel matrix (20 x 20 cm2) based on solid-state amorphous silicon sensor technology with a pitch of 400 microns; and (3) appropriate computer tools for control, real-time image treatment, data representation, and off-line analysis. Different phantoms were used for qualitative comparison with the conventional film-screen technique, with images obtained with both systems at the normal dose (used as a reference), as well as with dose reduction by a factor of 10 to 100. Basic image quality parameters evaluated showed that the response of the detector is linear in a wide range of entrance air kerma; the dynamic range is higher compared with the conventional film-screen combination; the spatial resolution is 1.25 lp per millimeter, as expected from the pixel size; and good image quality is ensured at doses substantially lower than for the film-screen technique. The flat-panel X-ray imager based on amorphous silicon technology implemented in standard radiographic equipment permits acquisition of real-time images in radiology (as many as 10 images per second) of diagnostic quality with a marked reduction of dose (as much as 100 times) and better contrast compared with the standard film technique. Preliminary results obtained with a 100-micron pitch imager based on the same technology show better quality but a less substantial dose reduction. Applications in craniofacial surgery look promising. PMID:11314093

  15. Kinetics of the self-assembly of nanocrystal superlattices measured by real-time in situ X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Weidman, Mark C; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Tisdale, William A

    2016-07-01

    On solvent evaporation, non-interacting monodisperse colloidal particles self-assemble into a close-packed superlattice. Although the initial and final states can be readily characterized, little is known about the dynamic transformation from colloid to superlattice. Here, by using in situ grazing-incidence X-ray scattering, we tracked the self-assembly of lead sulfide nanocrystals in real time. Following the first appearance of an ordered arrangement, the superlattice underwent uniaxial contraction and collective rotation as it approached its final body-centred cubic structure. The nanocrystals became crystallographically aligned early in the overall self-assembly process, showing that nanocrystal ordering occurs on a faster timescale than superlattice densification. Our findings demonstrate that synchrotron X-ray scattering is a viable method for studying self-assembly in its native environment, with ample time resolution to extract kinetic rates and observe intermediate configurations. The method could be used for real-time direction of self-assembly processes and to better understand the forces governing self-organization of soft materials. PMID:26998914

  16. Using dual-energy x-ray imaging to enhance automated lung tumor tracking during real-time adaptive radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Menten, Martin J. Fast, Martin F.; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Real-time, markerless localization of lung tumors with kV imaging is often inhibited by ribs obscuring the tumor and poor soft-tissue contrast. This study investigates the use of dual-energy imaging, which can generate radiographs with reduced bone visibility, to enhance automated lung tumor tracking for real-time adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: kV images of an anthropomorphic breathing chest phantom were experimentally acquired and radiographs of actual lung cancer patients were Monte-Carlo-simulated at three imaging settings: low-energy (70 kVp, 1.5 mAs), high-energy (140 kVp, 2.5 mAs, 1 mm additional tin filtration), and clinical (120 kVp, 0.25 mAs). Regular dual-energy images were calculated by weighted logarithmic subtraction of high- and low-energy images and filter-free dual-energy images were generated from clinical and low-energy radiographs. The weighting factor to calculate the dual-energy images was determined by means of a novel objective score. The usefulness of dual-energy imaging for real-time tracking with an automated template matching algorithm was investigated. Results: Regular dual-energy imaging was able to increase tracking accuracy in left–right images of the anthropomorphic phantom as well as in 7 out of 24 investigated patient cases. Tracking accuracy remained comparable in three cases and decreased in five cases. Filter-free dual-energy imaging was only able to increase accuracy in 2 out of 24 cases. In four cases no change in accuracy was observed and tracking accuracy worsened in nine cases. In 9 out of 24 cases, it was not possible to define a tracking template due to poor soft-tissue contrast regardless of input images. The mean localization errors using clinical, regular dual-energy, and filter-free dual-energy radiographs were 3.85, 3.32, and 5.24 mm, respectively. Tracking success was dependent on tumor position, tumor size, imaging beam angle, and patient size. Conclusions: This study has highlighted the influence of

  17. Simulating stress-dependent fluid flow in a fractured core sample using real-time X-ray CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, Tobias; Huo, Da; Schwarz, Jens-Oliver; Enzmann, Frieder; Benson, Sally; Blum, Philipp

    2016-07-01

    Various geoscientific applications require a fast prediction of fracture permeability for an optimal workflow. Hence, the objective of the current study is to introduce and validate a practical method to characterize and approximate single flow in fractures under different stress conditions by using a core-flooding apparatus, in situ X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans and a finite-volume method solving the Navier-Stokes-Brinkman equations. The permeability of the fractured sandstone sample was measured stepwise during a loading-unloading cycle (0.7 to 22.1 MPa and back) to validate the numerical results. Simultaneously, the pressurized core sample was imaged with a medical X-ray CT scanner with a voxel dimension of 0.5 × 0.5 × 1.0 mm3. Fracture geometries were obtained by CT images based on a modification of the simplified missing attenuation (MSMA) approach. Simulation results revealed both qualitative plausibility and a quantitative approximation of the experimentally derived permeabilities. The qualitative results indicate flow channeling along several preferential flow paths with less pronounced tortuosity. Significant changes in permeability can be assigned to temporal and permanent changes within the fracture due to applied stresses. The deviations of the quantitative results appear to be mainly caused by both local underestimation of hydraulic properties due to compositional matrix heterogeneities and the low CT resolution affecting the accurate capturing of sub-grid-scale features. Both affect the proper reproduction of the actual connectivity and therefore also the depiction of the expected permeability hysteresis. Furthermore, the threshold value CTmat (1862.6 HU) depicting the matrix material represents the most sensitive input parameter of the simulations. Small variations of CTmat can cause enormous changes in simulated permeability by up to a factor of 2.6 ± 0.1 and, thus, have to be defined with caution. Nevertheless, comparison with further CT

  18. A computer-graphic display for real-time operator feedback during interventional x-ray procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugh, Kevin; Dinu, Petru; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Wobschall, Darold; Rudin, Stephen; Hoffmann, Kenneth; Peterson, Ron; Zeng, Ming

    2004-05-01

    The harmful effects of ionizing radiation, as employed in a variety of medical imaging procedures, have been well studied and documented. To minimize risk to patients, operators must continually assess the dose rate and cumulative dose to the patient at each area of exposure. We have developed a computer graphic dose management display system which provides this operator feedback. The system is comprised of a signal processing module which reads the state of a fluoroscopy machine, a transmission ionization chamber for exposure measurement, and a visualization of the patient that displays the current level of radiation intensity and accumulated dose at every location on the body. The system shows the beam projection and orientation of the machine and color-coded dose metrics on the patient graphic model in real time. Additionally, a database system has been incorporated to allow for recording and playback of the entire procedure.

  19. The real-time, high-resolution x-ray video microscopy of solidification in aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnberg, Lars; Mathiesen, Ragnvald H.

    2007-08-01

    The directional solidification of thin alloy sheets in a Bridgman furnace has been studied by x-radiography using high-brilliance synchrotron x-radiation in combination with a low-noise, fast-readout camera. Spatial resolutions down to 1.5 μm and a temporal resolution of about 0.15 s have permitted real-time video microscopy of microstructural evolution during columnar and equiaxed dendrite growth and eutectic and monotectic growth. The technique has also allowed for direct observations of important solidification phenomena such as dendrite fragmentation and porosity formation, primarily in aluminium alloys. As a result, insights have been gained into mechanisms of dendrite fragmentation, criteria for dendrite tip kinetics and interface stability during transient growth, and microstructure formation mechanisms during monotectic solidification. The results are expected to be important for validation of dendrite growth models. This paper presents a review of the technique as well as examples of images obtained during solidification of aluminum alloys.

  20. Real-time observation of the dry oxidation of the Si (100) surface with ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Enta, Y.; Mun, B.S.; Rossi, M.; Ross Jr, P.N.; Hussain, Zahid; Fadley, C.S.; Lee, K.-S.; Kim, S.-K.

    2007-09-20

    We have applied ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with Si 2p chemical shifts to study the real-time dry oxidation of Si(100), using pressures in the range of 0.01-1 Torr and temperatures of 300-530 oC, and examining the oxide thickness range from 0 to ~;;25 Angstrom. The oxidation rate is initially very high (with rates of up to ~;;225 Angstrom/h) and then, after a certain initial thickness of the oxide in the range of 6-22 Angstrom is formed, decreases to a slow state (with rates of ~;;1.5-4.0 Angstrom/h). Neither the rapid nor the slow regime is explained by the standard Deal-Grove model for Si oxidation.

  1. Non-negative matrix factorization for the near real-time interpretation of absorption effects in elemental distribution images acquired by X-ray fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Alfeld, Matthias; Wahabzada, Mirwaes; Bauckhage, Christian; Kersting, Kristian; Wellenreuther, Gerd; Barriobero-Vila, Pere; Requena, Guillermo; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Falkenberg, Gerald

    2016-03-01

    Elemental distribution images acquired by imaging X-ray fluorescence analysis can contain high degrees of redundancy and weakly discernible correlations. In this article near real-time non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) is described for the analysis of a number of data sets acquired from samples of a bi-modal α+β Ti-6Al-6V-2Sn alloy. NMF was used for the first time to reveal absorption artefacts in the elemental distribution images of the samples, where two phases of the alloy, namely α and β, were in superposition. The findings and interpretation of the NMF results were confirmed by Monte Carlo simulation of the layered alloy system. Furthermore, it is shown how the simultaneous factorization of several stacks of elemental distribution images provides uniform basis vectors and consequently simplifies the interpretation of the representation. PMID:26917147

  2. Real-time implementation of distortion corrections for a tiled EMCCD-based Solid State X-ray Image Intensifier (SSXII)

    PubMed Central

    Keleshis, C; Hoffmann, KR; Lee, J; Hamwi, H; Wang, W; Ionita, CN; Bednarek, DR; Verevkin, A.; Rudin, S

    2009-01-01

    The new Solid State X-ray Image Intensifier (SSXII) is being designed based on a modular imaging array of Electron Multiplying Charge Couple Devices (EMCCD). Each of the detector modules consists of a CsI(Tl) phosphor coupled to a fiber-optic plate, a fiber-optic taper (FOT), and an EMCCD sensor with its electronics. During the optical coupling and alignment of the modules into an array form, small orientation misalignments, such as rotation and translation of the EMCCD sensors, are expected. In addition, barrel distortion will result from the FOTs. Correction algorithms have been developed by our group for all the above artifacts. However, it is critical for the system’s performance to correct these artifacts in real-time (30 fps). To achieve this, we will use two-dimensional Look-Up-Tables (LUT) (each for x and y coordinates), which map the corrected pixel locations to the acquired-image pixel locations. To evaluate the feasibility of this approach, this process is simulated making use of parallel coding techniques to allow real-time distortion corrections for up to sixteen modules when a standard quad processor is used. The results of this simulation confirm that tiled field-of-views (FOV) comparable with those of flat panel detectors can be generated in ~17 ms (>30 fps). The increased FOV enabled through correction of tiled images, combined with the EMCCD characteristics of low noise, negligible lag and high sensitivity, should make possible the practical use of the SSXII with substantial advantages over conventional clinical systems. PMID:19777121

  3. 4-D imaging of sub-second dynamics in pore-scale processes using real-time synchrotron X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Katherine J.; Coban, Sophia B.; McDonald, Samuel A.; Walsh, Joanna N.; Atwood, Robert C.; Withers, Philip J.

    2016-07-01

    A variable volume flow cell has been integrated with state-of-the-art ultra-high-speed synchrotron X-ray tomography imaging. The combination allows the first real-time (sub-second) capture of dynamic pore (micron)-scale fluid transport processes in 4-D (3-D + time). With 3-D data volumes acquired at up to 20 Hz, we perform in situ experiments that capture high-frequency pore-scale dynamics in 5-25 mm diameter samples with voxel (3-D equivalent of a pixel) resolutions of 2.5 to 3.8 µm. The data are free from motion artefacts and can be spatially registered or collected in the same orientation, making them suitable for detailed quantitative analysis of the dynamic fluid distribution pathways and processes. The methods presented here are capable of capturing a wide range of high-frequency nonequilibrium pore-scale processes including wetting, dilution, mixing, and reaction phenomena, without sacrificing significant spatial resolution. As well as fast streaming (continuous acquisition) at 20 Hz, they also allow larger-scale and longer-term experimental runs to be sampled intermittently at lower frequency (time-lapse imaging), benefiting from fast image acquisition rates to prevent motion blur in highly dynamic systems. This marks a major technical breakthrough for quantification of high-frequency pore-scale processes: processes that are critical for developing and validating more accurate multiscale flow models through spatially and temporally heterogeneous pore networks.

  4. The DFP 9200 Digital Noise Reducer, A Real-Time High-Resolution Digital Video Processing System For X-Ray Fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMann, Renville H.; Baron, Stanley; Kreinik, Stephen; Epperson, Don; Kruger, Robert A.

    1981-11-01

    A dedicated digital processor is described capable of digitizing a high resolution video signal from a fluoroscopic TV camera into an 810 x 600 matrix in real time. For less demanding applications, a 512 x 512 matrix can be substituted. The sampling clock frequency is 15 Megahertz giving a Nyquist bandwidth limit of 7.5 MHz. A 7 MHz phase equalized eliptical filter at the input prevents aliasing and the production of false artifacts in the picture. Eleven bit digital processing follows an 8 bit analog to digital converter. Noise reduction is accomplished by a one frame recursive filter in which the filter coefficients are adjusted by a patented motion detector on a pixel by pixel basis to reduce motion smear. The lower perceived noise permits X-ray dose reduction of 2 to 8 times while retaining high quality pictures. A noise reduced spot picture can be frozen by a foot controlled switch permitting a further reduction of dosage and eliminating the need for a troublesome disc recorder. This noise reduced picture can also be used as a subtraction mask in an optional version of the equipment. A minimum of front panel operator controls for best human interface is accomplished by the use of a programmed read only memories to control all functions including noise reduction and frame storage.

  5. Examination of Cr(VI) treatment by zero-valent iron using in situ, real-time X-ray absorption spectroscopy and Cr isotope measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson-Hanes, Julia H.; Lentz, Adam M.; Amos, Richard T.; Ptacek, Carol J.; Blowes, David W.

    2014-10-01

    A series of replicate flow-through cell experiments was conducted to characterize Cr isotope fractionation during Cr(VI) treatment by granular zero-valent iron (ZVI). Synthetic groundwater containing 50 mg L-1 Cr(VI) was pumped upward through a custom-made cell packed with ZVI under anaerobic conditions. The geochemical evolution of the system was monitored using pH and redox measurements, while aqueous effluent samples were retained for analysis of cations and Cr isotopes. Real-time, in situ X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy collected via a Kapton® window in the cell provided additional information on the speciation of the reaction products. Increases in δ53Cr values corresponding to decreases in Cr(VI) concentration suggested the occurrence of redox processes. Spectroscopic results correlated well with the isotope data, indicating reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The isotope data did not appear to follow a single trend. A two-stage system was proposed to explain the complex isotope trend, where the rapid Cr removal was associated with very little fractionation (ε = -0.2‰), whereas slower removal was associated with a greater degree of fractionation (ε = -1.2‰ to -1.5‰). Reactive transport modeling was used to quantify distinct isotope fractionation values (ε), differentiated by a significant change in the Cr removal rate.

  6. Real-time synchrotoron radiation X-ray diffraction and abnormal temperature dependence of photoluminescence from erbium silicates on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Omi, H.; Tawara, T.; Tateishi, M.

    2012-03-15

    The erbium silicate formation processes during annealing in Ar gas were monitored by synchrotron radiation grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) in real time and the optical properties of the silicates were investigated by photoluminescence measurements in spectral and time-resolved domains. The GIXD measurements show that erbium silicates and erbium oxide are formed by interface reactions between silicon oxide and erbium oxides deposited on silicon oxide by reactive sputtering in Ar gas and O{sub 2}/Ar mixture gas ambiences. The erbium silicates are formed above 1060 degree sign C in Ar gas ambience and above 1010 degree sign C in O{sub 2}/Ar gas ambience, and erbium silicides are dominantly formed above 1250 degree sign C. The I{sub 15/2}-I{sub 13/2} Er{sup 3+} photoluminescence from the erbium oxide and erbium silicate exhibits abnormal temperature dependence, which can be explained by the phonon-assisted resonant absorption of the 532-nm excitation photons into the {sup 2}H{sub 11/2} levels of Er{sup 3+} ions of the erbium compounds.

  7. Real-time phase-contrast imaging of photothermal treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: an in vitro study of macrophages as a vector for the delivery of gold nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Taeseok Daniel; Choi, Wonshik; Yoon, Tai Hyun; Lee, Kyoung Jin; Lee, Jae-Seung; Han, Sang Hun; Lee, Min-Goo; Yim, Hong Soon; Choi, Kyung Min; Park, Min Woo; Jung, Kwang-Yoon; Baek, Seung-Kuk

    2012-12-01

    Photothermal treatment (PTT) using nanoparticles has gained attention as a promising alternative therapy for malignant tumors. One strategy for increasing the selectivity of PTT is the use of macrophages as a cellular vector for delivering nanoparticles. The aim of the present study is to examine the use of macrophages as a cellular vector for efficient PTT and determine the appropriate irradiation power and time of a near-infrared (NIR) laser using real-time phase-contrast imaging. Thermally induced injury and death of cancer cells were found to begin at 44°C to 45°C, which was achieved using the PTT effect with gold nanoshells (NS) and irradiation with a NIR laser at a power of 2 W for 5 min. The peritoneal macrophage efficiently functioned as a cellular vector for the NS, and the cancer cells surrounding the NS-loaded macrophages selectively lost their cellular viability after being irradiated with the NIR laser.

  8. Computer-aided diagnosis for phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography: quantitative characterization of human patellar cartilage with high-dimensional geometric features.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B; Diemoz, Paul C; Glaser, Christian; Wismüller, Axel

    2014-02-01

    Phase-contrast computed tomography (PCI-CT) has shown tremendous potential as an imaging modality for visualizing human cartilage with high spatial resolution. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of PCI-CT to visualize (1) structural details of the human patellar cartilage matrix and (2) changes to chondrocyte organization induced by osteoarthritis. This study investigates the use of high-dimensional geometric features in characterizing such chondrocyte patterns in the presence or absence of osteoarthritic damage. Geometrical features derived from the scaling index method (SIM) and statistical features derived from gray-level co-occurrence matrices were extracted from 842 regions of interest (ROI) annotated on PCI-CT images of ex vivo human patellar cartilage specimens. These features were subsequently used in a machine learning task with support vector regression to classify ROIs as healthy or osteoarthritic; classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC). SIM-derived geometrical features exhibited the best classification performance (AUC, 0.95 ± 0.06) and were most robust to changes in ROI size. These results suggest that such geometrical features can provide a detailed characterization of the chondrocyte organization in the cartilage matrix in an automated and non-subjective manner, while also enabling classification of cartilage as healthy or osteoarthritic with high accuracy. Such features could potentially serve as imaging markers for evaluating osteoarthritis progression and its response to different therapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:24043594

  9. Compressive phase contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, F.; MacDowell, A.; Marchesini, S.; Padmore, H. A.; Parkinson, D. Y.; Pien, J.; Schirotzek, A.; Yang, C.

    2010-08-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  10. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Maia, Filipe; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Padmore, Howard A.; Parkinson, Dula Y.; Pien, Jack; Schirotzek, Andre; Yang, Chao

    2010-09-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  11. SU-E-I-91: Quantitative Assessment of Early Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Cavernous Hemangioma of Live Using In-Line Phase-Contrast X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the potential utility of in-line phase-contrast imaging (ILPCI) technique with synchrotron radiation in detecting early hepatocellular carcinoma and cavernous hemangioma of live using in vitro model system. Methods: Without contrast agents, three typical early hepatocellular carcinoma specimens and three typical cavernous hemangioma of live specimens were imaged using ILPCI. To quantitatively discriminate early hepatocellular carcinoma tissues and cavernous hemangioma tissues, the projection images texture feature based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) were extracted. The texture parameters of energy, inertia, entropy, correlation, sum average, sum entropy, difference average, difference entropy and inverse difference moment, were obtained respectively. Results: In the ILPCI planar images of early hepatocellular carcinoma specimens, vessel trees were clearly visualized on the micrometer scale. Obvious distortion deformation was presented, and the vessel mostly appeared as a ‘dry stick’. Liver textures appeared not regularly. In the ILPCI planar images of cavernous hemangioma of live specimens, typical vessels had not been found compared with the early hepatocellular carcinoma planar images. The planar images of cavernous hemangioma of live specimens clearly displayed the dilated hepatic sinusoids with the diameter of less than 100 microns, but all of them were overlapped with each other. The texture parameters of energy, inertia, entropy, correlation, sum average, sum entropy, and difference average, showed a statistically significant between the two types specimens image (P<0.01), except the texture parameters of difference entropy and inverse difference moment(P>0.01). Conclusion: The results indicate that there are obvious changes in morphological levels including vessel structures and liver textures. The study proves that this imaging technique has a potential value in evaluating early hepatocellular carcinoma and cavernous

  12. A Table-Driven Control Method to Meet Continuous, Near-Real-Time Observation Requirements for the Solar X-Ray Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Shawn; Brown, Terry; Freestone, Kathleen

    1998-01-01

    The design of the Solar X-Ray Imager (SXI) for the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) presents an unusual scenario for controlling the observing sequences. The SXI is an operational instrument, designed not primarily for scientific research, but for providing "operational" data used by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to forecast the near-term space weather. To this end, a sequence of images selected to cover the full dynamic range of the sun will be executed routinely. As the dynamics of the sun have differing temporal cadences, the frequency of various images will differ. These images must be routinely received at the forecast center in near real-time, 24-hours a day, with a minimum of interruptions. While these requirements clearly lead to a 'routine patrol' of images, the parameters for each do not form a static set. The dynamics of the sun will change with the I 1-year solar cycle. The performance of the imaging will vary with on-orbit conditions and time. And while the SXI is not intended as a research instrument, forecasting techniques may change with time, which in turn will further alter the imaging sequences. An additional complication is the highly restricted commanding window, and a very slow commanding rate. To fulfill these requirements, the SXI was designed to utilize a table-driven approach. Sequences are defined using structured loops, with nested repetitions and delays. These sequences reference combinations of imaging parameters which in turn reference tables of parameters than can be loaded by ground commands. Multiple sequences can be built and stored in preparation for execution when determined appropriate by the NOAA forecasters. The result is an approach that can be used to provide a flexible, yet autonomous SXI capable of meeting both arbitrary forecasting requirements, and operating within the commanding constraints.

  13. In situ real-time study on potential induced structure change at Au(111) and Au(100) single crystal electrode/sulfuric acid solution interfaces by surface x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Toshihiro; Zegenhagen, Jörg; Takakusagi, Satoru; Uosaki, Kohei

    2015-01-01

    Surface X-ray scattering (SXS) measurements were carried out to monitor the potential induced structure changes such as surface reconstruction lifting, adsorption of oxygen species, formation of surface oxide bilayer, reduction of surface oxide, and surface reconstruction at Au(111)/H2SO4 and Au(100)/H2SO4 interfaces in situ in real time using intense high energy X-ray. The phase transition of the reconstruction/lifting, adsorption of oxygen species, and surface oxide formation/reduction at the Au(100) electrode proceed much slower, slightly slower, and faster, respectively, than at the Au(111) electrode.

  14. Real-time out-of-plane artifact subtraction tomosynthesis imaging using prior CT for scanning beam digital x-ray system

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Meng; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The scanning beam digital x-ray system (SBDX) is an inverse geometry fluoroscopic system with high dose efficiency and the ability to perform continuous real-time tomosynthesis in multiple planes. This system could be used for image guidance during lung nodule biopsy. However, the reconstructed images suffer from strong out-of-plane artifact due to the small tomographic angle of the system. Methods: The authors propose an out-of-plane artifact subtraction tomosynthesis (OPAST) algorithm that utilizes a prior CT volume to augment the run-time image processing. A blur-and-add (BAA) analytical model, derived from the project-to-backproject physical model, permits the generation of tomosynthesis images that are a good approximation to the shift-and-add (SAA) reconstructed image. A computationally practical algorithm is proposed to simulate images and out-of-plane artifacts from patient-specific prior CT volumes using the BAA model. A 3D image registration algorithm to align the simulated and reconstructed images is described. The accuracy of the BAA analytical model and the OPAST algorithm was evaluated using three lung cancer patients’ CT data. The OPAST and image registration algorithms were also tested with added nonrigid respiratory motions. Results: Image similarity measurements, including the correlation coefficient, mean squared error, and structural similarity index, indicated that the BAA model is very accurate in simulating the SAA images from the prior CT for the SBDX system. The shift-variant effect of the BAA model can be ignored when the shifts between SBDX images and CT volumes are within ±10 mm in the x and y directions. The nodule visibility and depth resolution are improved by subtracting simulated artifacts from the reconstructions. The image registration and OPAST are robust in the presence of added respiratory motions. The dominant artifacts in the subtraction images are caused by the mismatches between the real object and the prior CT

  15. Real-time out-of-plane artifact subtraction tomosynthesis imaging using prior CT for scanning beam digital x-ray system

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meng; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The scanning beam digital x-ray system (SBDX) is an inverse geometry fluoroscopic system with high dose efficiency and the ability to perform continuous real-time tomosynthesis in multiple planes. This system could be used for image guidance during lung nodule biopsy. However, the reconstructed images suffer from strong out-of-plane artifact due to the small tomographic angle of the system. Methods: The authors propose an out-of-plane artifact subtraction tomosynthesis (OPAST) algorithm that utilizes a prior CT volume to augment the run-time image processing. A blur-and-add (BAA) analytical model, derived from the project-to-backproject physical model, permits the generation of tomosynthesis images that are a good approximation to the shift-and-add (SAA) reconstructed image. A computationally practical algorithm is proposed to simulate images and out-of-plane artifacts from patient-specific prior CT volumes using the BAA model. A 3D image registration algorithm to align the simulated and reconstructed images is described. The accuracy of the BAA analytical model and the OPAST algorithm was evaluated using three lung cancer patients’ CT data. The OPAST and image registration algorithms were also tested with added nonrigid respiratory motions. Results: Image similarity measurements, including the correlation coefficient, mean squared error, and structural similarity index, indicated that the BAA model is very accurate in simulating the SAA images from the prior CT for the SBDX system. The shift-variant effect of the BAA model can be ignored when the shifts between SBDX images and CT volumes are within ±10 mm in the x and y directions. The nodule visibility and depth resolution are improved by subtracting simulated artifacts from the reconstructions. The image registration and OPAST are robust in the presence of added respiratory motions. The dominant artifacts in the subtraction images are caused by the mismatches between the real object and the prior CT

  16. Timescales of quartz crystallization estimated from glass inclusion faceting using 3D propagation phase-contrast x-ray tomography: examples from the Bishop (California, USA) and Oruanui (Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand) Tuffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamukcu, A.; Gualda, G. A.; Anderson, A. T.

    2012-12-01

    Compositions of glass inclusions have long been studied for the information they provide on the evolution of magma bodies. Textures - sizes, shapes, positions - of glass inclusions have received less attention, but they can also provide important insight into magmatic processes, including the timescales over which magma bodies develop and erupt. At magmatic temperatures, initially round glass inclusions will become faceted (attain a negative crystal shape) through the process of dissolution and re-precipitation, such that the extent to which glass inclusions are faceted can be used to estimate timescales. The size and position of the inclusion within a crystal will influence how much faceting occurs: a larger inclusion will facet more slowly; an inclusion closer to the rim will have less time to facet. As a result, it is critical to properly document the size, shape, and position of glass inclusions to assess faceting timescales. Quartz is an ideal mineral to study glass inclusion faceting, as Si is the only diffusing species of concern, and Si diffusion rates are relatively well-constrained. Faceting time calculations to date (Gualda et al., 2012) relied on optical microscopy to document glass inclusions. Here we use 3D propagation phase-contrast x-ray tomography to image glass inclusions in quartz. This technique enhances inclusion edges such that images can be processed more successfully than with conventional tomography. We have developed a set of image processing tools to isolate inclusions and more accurately obtain information on the size, shape, and position of glass inclusions than with optical microscopy. We are studying glass inclusions from two giant tuffs. The Bishop Tuff is ~1000 km3 of high-silica rhyolite ash fall, ignimbrite, and intracaldera deposits erupted ~760 ka in eastern California (USA). Glass inclusions in early-erupted Bishop Tuff range from non-faceted to faceted, and faceting times determined using both optical microscopy and x-ray

  17. Technical and clinical results of an experimental flat dynamic (digital) x-ray image detector (FDXD) system with real-time corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruijns, Tom J. C.; Alving, P. L.; Baker, Edmund L.; Bury, Robert F.; Cowen, Arnold R.; Jung, Norbert; Luijendijk, Hans A.; Meulenbrugge, Henk J.; Stouten, Hans J.

    1998-07-01

    A clinical imaging system based upon an amorphous-Silicon (a- Si) flat dynamic (digital) X-ray image detector (FDXD) has been developed. The objectives of this experimental set-up were to determine the physical image quality and to establish the clinical feasibility of a flat-panel x-ray detector for radiography and fluoroscopy (R&F) applications. The FDXD acquires dynamic X-ray images at high frame rates in both continuous and pulsed fluoroscopic modes, lower frame rate exposures and single shots. The system has been installed in a clinical research room at The General Infirmary, Leeds (UK; is being evaluated in a variety of universal R&F contrast medium aided examinations, including barium swallows, meals and enema examinations. In addition, general radiographic examinations have been performed. Both the established benefits and possible drawbacks of this type of system, together with the potential solutions, are discussed in this paper. Approach, design and set-up of the system are presented, and the dose efficiency and image quality achieved in clinical operation are explained. The technical and medical phantom images have been evaluated and analyzed. The results of the clinical examinations in mixed applications are discussed. The results of the measurements and examinations performed to date on this experimental FDXD system confirm the potential of this new type of digital X-ray image detector.

  18. Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Menk, Ralf Hendrik

    2008-11-13

    All standard (medical) x-ray imaging technologies, rely primarily on the amplitude properties of the incident radiation, and do not depend on its phase. This is unchanged since the discovery by Roentgen that the intensity of an x-ray beam, as measured by the exposure on a film, was related to the relative transmission properties of an object. However, recently various imaging techniques have emerged which depend on the phase of the x-rays as well as the amplitude. Phase becomes important when the beam is coherent and the imaging system is sensitive to interference phenomena. Significant new advances have been made in coherent optic theory and techniques, which now promise phase information in medical imaging. The development of perfect crystal optics and the increasing availability of synchrotron radiation facilities have contributed to a significant increase in the application of phase based imaging in materials and life sciences. Unique source characteristics such as high intensity, monochromaticity, coherence and high collimating provide an ideal source for advanced imaging. Phase contrast imaging has been applied in both projection and computed tomography modes, and recent applications have been made in the field of medical imaging. Due to the underlying principle of X-ray detection conventional image receptors register only intensities of wave fields and not their phases. During the last decade basically five different methods were developed that translate the phase information into intensity variations. These methods are based on measuring the phase shift {phi} directly (using interference phenomena), the gradient {nabla}{sub {phi}}, or the Laplacian {nabla}{sup 2}{phi}. All three methods can be applied to polychromatic X-ray sources keeping in mind that the native source is synchrotron radiation, featuring monochromatic and reasonable coherent X-ray beams. Due to the vast difference in the coefficients that are driven absorption and phase effects (factor 1

  19. Learning algorithms for both real-time detection of solder shorts and for SPC measurement correction using cross-sectional x-ray images of PCBA solder joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roder, Paul A.

    1994-03-01

    Learning algorithms are introduced for use in the inspection of cross-sectional X-ray images of solder joints. These learning algorithms improve measurement accuracy by accounting for localized shading effects that can occur when inspecting double- sided printed circuit board assemblies. Two specific examples are discussed. The first is an algorithm for detection of solder short defects. The second algorithm utilizes learning to generate more accurate statistical process control measurements.

  20. SU-E-I-37: Low-Dose Real-Time Region-Of-Interest X-Ray Fluoroscopic Imaging with a GPU-Accelerated Spatially Different Bilateral Filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H; Lee, J; Pua, R; Cho, S; Jung, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of our study is to reduce imaging radiation dose while maintaining image quality of region of interest (ROI) in X-ray fluoroscopy. A low-dose real-time ROI fluoroscopic imaging technique which includes graphics-processing-unit- (GPU-) accelerated image processing for brightness compensation and noise filtering was developed in this study. Methods: In our ROI fluoroscopic imaging, a copper filter is placed in front of the X-ray tube. The filter contains a round aperture to reduce radiation dose to outside of the aperture. To equalize the brightness difference between inner and outer ROI regions, brightness compensation was performed by use of a simple weighting method that applies selectively to the inner ROI, the outer ROI, and the boundary zone. A bilateral filtering was applied to the images to reduce relatively high noise in the outer ROI images. To speed up the calculation of our technique for real-time application, the GPU-acceleration was applied to the image processing algorithm. We performed a dosimetric measurement using an ion-chamber dosimeter to evaluate the amount of radiation dose reduction. The reduction of calculation time compared to a CPU-only computation was also measured, and the assessment of image quality in terms of image noise and spatial resolution was conducted. Results: More than 80% of dose was reduced by use of the ROI filter. The reduction rate depended on the thickness of the filter and the size of ROI aperture. The image noise outside the ROI was remarkably reduced by the bilateral filtering technique. The computation time for processing each frame image was reduced from 3.43 seconds with single CPU to 9.85 milliseconds with GPU-acceleration. Conclusion: The proposed technique for X-ray fluoroscopy can substantially reduce imaging radiation dose to the patient while maintaining image quality particularly in the ROI region in real-time.

  1. Application of real-time, stroboscopic x-ray diffraction with dynamical mechanical analysis to characterize the motion of ferroelastic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Richard J.; Redfern, Simon A. T.; Buckley, Andrew; Salje, Ekhard K. H.

    2004-02-01

    The dynamic response of ferroelastic twins to an alternating stress has been studied in situ at high temperature using a stroboscopic x-ray diffractometer and combined dynamical mechanical analyzer (XRD-DMA). The XRD-DMA is designed to allow x-ray rocking curves to be collected while the sample is undergoing simultaneous dynamical mechanical analysis in three-point-bend geometry. The detection of diffracted x-rays is synchronized with the applied load, so that rocking curves corresponding to different parts of the dynamic load cycle can be obtained separately. The technique is applied to single-crystal LaAlO3, which undergoes a cubic to rhombohedral phase transition at 550 °C, leading to the generation of characteristic "chevron" twins. The rocking-curve topology is calculated as a function of crystal orientation for each chevron type. Systematic changes in the rocking curves during heating and cooling under dynamic load demonstrate a clear preference for chevrons containing {100}pc walls perpendicular to the sample surface and {110}pc walls oriented at 45° to the sample surface. These domain walls are oriented favorably with respect to the applied stress (i.e., they separate domains with contrasting components of spontaneous strain parallel to the sample length). Below 200 °C, the superelastic strain is accommodated by rapid advancement/retraction of vertical {100}pc needle domains, with little effect on the dynamic rocking curves. Above 200 °C, a dynamic shift in peak position between rocking curves measured at the maximum and minimum applied loads is detected. The onset of a dynamic response correlates with the loss of the {100}pc needle domains and the transformation of the microstructure to 45° {110}pc walls. Superelastic strain is then accommodated by domain wall displacement/rotation, causing the wall to sweep back and forth across the x-ray beam and diffraction to occur from alternate domains at the maximum and minimum points of the stress cycle. A

  2. Real-time observation of irradiated HeLa-cell modified by fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator using synchrotron X-ray microbeam.

    PubMed

    Narita, A; Kaminaga, K; Yokoya, A; Noguchi, M; Kobayashi, K; Usami, N; Fujii, K

    2015-09-01

    Fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator (FUCCI) human cancer (HeLa) cells (red indicates G1; green, S/G2) were exposed to a synchrotron X-ray microbeam. Cells in either G1 or S/G2 were irradiated selectively according to their colour in the same microscopic field. Time-lapse micrographs of the irradiated cells were acquired for 24 h after irradiation. For fluorescent immunostaining, phosphorylated histone proteins (γ-H2AX) indicated the induction of DNA double-strand breaks. The cell cycle was arrested by irradiation at S/G2. In contrast, cells irradiated at G1 progressed to S/G2. The foci were induced in cells irradiated at both G1 and S/G2, suggesting that the G1-S (or S) checkpoint pathway does not function in HeLa cells due to the fact that the cells are functionally p53 deficient, even though X-ray microbeam irradiation significantly induces double-strand breaks. These results demonstrate that single FUCCI cell exposure and live cell imaging are powerful methods for studying the effects of radiation on the cell cycle. PMID:25870438

  3. Picosecond Photobiology: Watching a Signaling Protein Function in Real Time via Time-Resolved Small- and Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun Sun; Schotte, Friedrich; Dashdorj, Naranbaatar; Kyndt, John; Henning, Robert; Anfinrud, Philip A

    2016-07-20

    The capacity to respond to environmental changes is crucial to an organism's survival. Halorhodospira halophila is a photosynthetic bacterium that swims away from blue light, presumably in an effort to evade photons energetic enough to be genetically harmful. The protein responsible for this response is believed to be photoactive yellow protein (PYP), whose chromophore photoisomerizes from trans to cis in the presence of blue light. We investigated the complete PYP photocycle by acquiring time-resolved small and wide-angle X-ray scattering patterns (SAXS/WAXS) over 10 decades of time spanning from 100 ps to 1 s. Using a sequential model, global analysis of the time-dependent scattering differences recovered four intermediates (pR0/pR1, pR2, pB0, pB1), the first three of which can be assigned to prior time-resolved crystal structures. The 1.8 ms pB0 to pB1 transition produces the PYP signaling state, whose radius of gyration (Rg = 16.6 Å) is significantly larger than that for the ground state (Rg = 14.7 Å) and is therefore inaccessible to time-resolved protein crystallography. The shape of the signaling state, reconstructed using GASBOR, is highly anisotropic and entails significant elongation of the long axis of the protein. This structural change is consistent with unfolding of the 25 residue N-terminal domain, which exposes the β-scaffold of this sensory protein to a potential binding partner. This mechanistically detailed description of the complete PYP photocycle, made possible by time-resolved crystal and solution studies, provides a framework for understanding signal transduction in proteins and for assessing and validating theoretical/computational approaches in protein biophysics. PMID:27305463

  4. Investigation of real-time microstructure evolution in steep thermal gradients using in-situ spatially resolved X-ray diffraction: A case study for Ti fusion welds

    SciTech Connect

    Ressler, T.; Wong, J.; Elmer, J.W. |

    1998-12-24

    A recently developed spatially resolved X-ray diffraction (SRXRD) technique utilizing intense synchrotron radiation has been refined to yield phase and microstructural information down to 200 {micro}m in spatial extent in materials subjected to steep thermal gradients during processing. This SRXRD technique has been applied to map completely the phases and their solid-state transformation in the so-called heat-affected zone (HAZ) in titanium fusion welds in situ during the welding process. Detailed profile analysis of the SRXRD patterns revealed four principal microstructural regions at temperature in the vicinity of the HAZ surrounding the liquid weld pool: (i) a completely transformed {beta}-Ti zone 2--3 mm adjacent to the liquid weld pool; (ii) a mixed {alpha} + {beta}-it region surrounding the pure {beta}-Ti zone, (iii) a back-transformed {alpha}-Ti zone on the backside of the HAZ where pure {beta}-Ti once existed at temperature well above the {alpha} {r_arrow} {beta} transformation isotherm, and (iv) a more diffused region outside the HAZ where annealing and recrystallization of the {alpha}-it base metal occur. The high-temperature microstructures so derived corroborate well the expected transformation kinetics in pure titanium, and the observed phase transformation boundaries are in good agreement with those predicted from the transformation isotherms calculated from a simplified heat-flow model. Based on a detailed assessment of the SRXRD setup employed, improved experimentations such as a smaller beam spot emitted from third generation synchrotron sources, better mechanical stability (tighter scattering geometry), and use of an area detector would enable more quantitative structural information for future phase dynamics studies exemplified by this work.

  5. Opening and Closing of Nanocavities under Stress in Soft Nanocomposites: A Real Time Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huan; de Crevoisier, Jordan; Scholz, Arthur; Vion-Loisel, Fabien; Kramer, Edward J.; Creton, Costantino

    2012-02-01

    Cavitation occurring at the nanometer length scale has been recently demonstrated conclusively in rubbers^1. Real time SAXS with synchrotron radiation is employed to probe the structure changes in carbon black filled styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) under uniaxial tension. The scattering invariant Q(λ), where λ is the extension ratio, increases sharply, which we attribute to void formation, above a critical true stress (˜25 MPa) that is roughly independent of both filler content and crosslinking density. During step-cycle tests Q decreases on unloading to Q0, its value before any testing, and does not increase again until λ exceeds the maximum previous λ=λmax, showing that the voids close upon unloading and only reappear upon reloading when λ > λmax (Mullins effect). We attribute the increase of the scattering invariant once λ exceeds λmax to the creation of new voids rather than to the reopening of old ones. The scattering of the voids in the region q < 0.1 nm-1 can be separated from that of the carbon black particles and provides information on average void size and shape.

  6. Portable, real-time alloy identification of metallic wear debris from machinery lubrication systems: laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy versus x-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Pooja

    2014-05-01

    Alloy identification of oil-borne wear debris captured on chip detectors, filters and magnetic plugs allows the machinery maintainer to assess the health of the engine or gearbox and identify specific component damage. Today, such identification can be achieved in real time using portable, at-line laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Xray fluorescence (XRF) instruments. Both techniques can be utilized in various industries including aviation, marine, railways, heavy diesel and other industrial machinery with, however, some substantial differences in application and instrument performance. In this work, the performances of a LIBS and an XRF instrument are compared based on measurements of a wide range of typical aerospace alloys including steels, titanium, aluminum and nickel alloys. Measurement results were analyzed with a staged correlation technique specifically developed for the purposes of this study - identifying the particle alloy composition using a pre-recorded library of spectral signatures. The analysis is performed in two stages: first, the base element of the alloy is determined by correlation with the stored elemental spectra and then, the alloy is identified by matching the particle's spectral signature using parametric correlation against the stored spectra of all alloys that have the same base element. The correlation analysis has achieved highly repeatable discrimination between alloys of similar composition. Portable LIBS demonstrates higher detection accuracy and better identification of alloys comprising lighter elements as compared to that of the portable XRF system, and reveals a significant reduction in the analysis time over XRF.

  7. Cross-sectional void fraction distribution measurements in a vertical annulus two-phase flow by high speed X-ray computed tomography and real-time neutron radiography techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Harvel, G.D. |; Hori, K.; Kawanishi, K.

    1995-09-01

    A Real-Time Neutron Radiography (RTNR) system and a high speed X-ray Computed tomography (X-CT) system are compared for measurement of two-phase flow. Each system is used to determine the flow regime, and the void fraction distribution in a vertical annulus flow channel. A standard optical video system is also used to observe the flow regime. The annulus flow channel is operated as a bubble column and measurements obtained for gas flow rates from 0.0 to 30.01/min. The flow regimes observed by all three measurement systems through image analysis shows that the two-dimensional void fraction distribution can be obtained. The X-CT system is shown to have a superior temporal resolution capable of resolving the void fraction distribution in an (r,{theta}) plane in 33.0 ms. Void fraction distribution for bubbly flow and slug flow is determined.

  8. Effects of damping-off caused by Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group 2-1 on roots of wheat and oil seed rape quantified using X-ray Computed Tomography and real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, Craig J.; Woodhall, James; Brown, Matthew; Walker, Catherine; Mooney, Sacha J.; Ray, Rumiana V.

    2015-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is a plant pathogenic fungus that causes significant establishment and yield losses to several important food crops globally. This is the first application of high resolution X-ray micro Computed Tomography (X-ray μCT) and real-time PCR to study host–pathogen interactions in situ and elucidate the mechanism of Rhizoctonia damping-off disease over a 6-day period caused by R. solani, anastomosis group (AG) 2-1 in wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Gallant) and oil seed rape (OSR, Brassica napus cv. Marinka). Temporal, non-destructive analysis of root system architectures was performed using RooTrak and validated by the destructive method of root washing. Disease was assessed visually and related to pathogen DNA quantification in soil using real-time PCR. R. solani AG2-1 at similar initial DNA concentrations in soil was capable of causing significant damage to the developing root systems of both wheat and OSR. Disease caused reductions in primary root number, root volume, root surface area, and convex hull which were affected less in the monocotyledonous host. Wheat was more tolerant to the pathogen, exhibited fewer symptoms and developed more complex root systems. In contrast, R. solani caused earlier damage and maceration of the taproot of the dicot, OSR. Disease severity was related to pathogen DNA accumulation in soil only for OSR, however, reductions in root traits were significantly associated with both disease and pathogen DNA. The method offers the first steps in advancing current understanding of soil-borne pathogen behavior in situ at the pore scale, which may lead to the development of mitigation measures to combat disease influence in the field. PMID:26157449

  9. Effects of damping-off caused by Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group 2-1 on roots of wheat and oil seed rape quantified using X-ray Computed Tomography and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Sturrock, Craig J; Woodhall, James; Brown, Matthew; Walker, Catherine; Mooney, Sacha J; Ray, Rumiana V

    2015-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is a plant pathogenic fungus that causes significant establishment and yield losses to several important food crops globally. This is the first application of high resolution X-ray micro Computed Tomography (X-ray μCT) and real-time PCR to study host-pathogen interactions in situ and elucidate the mechanism of Rhizoctonia damping-off disease over a 6-day period caused by R. solani, anastomosis group (AG) 2-1 in wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Gallant) and oil seed rape (OSR, Brassica napus cv. Marinka). Temporal, non-destructive analysis of root system architectures was performed using RooTrak and validated by the destructive method of root washing. Disease was assessed visually and related to pathogen DNA quantification in soil using real-time PCR. R. solani AG2-1 at similar initial DNA concentrations in soil was capable of causing significant damage to the developing root systems of both wheat and OSR. Disease caused reductions in primary root number, root volume, root surface area, and convex hull which were affected less in the monocotyledonous host. Wheat was more tolerant to the pathogen, exhibited fewer symptoms and developed more complex root systems. In contrast, R. solani caused earlier damage and maceration of the taproot of the dicot, OSR. Disease severity was related to pathogen DNA accumulation in soil only for OSR, however, reductions in root traits were significantly associated with both disease and pathogen DNA. The method offers the first steps in advancing current understanding of soil-borne pathogen behavior in situ at the pore scale, which may lead to the development of mitigation measures to combat disease influence in the field. PMID:26157449

  10. Real-time high-resolution X-ray imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance study of the hydration of pure and Na-doped C3A in the presence of sulfates

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchheim,, A. P.; Dal Molin, D.C.; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid; Provis, J.L.; Fischer, P.; Monteiro, P.J.M.

    2010-12-01

    This study details the differences in real-time hydration between pure tricalcium aluminate (cubic C{sub 3}A or 3CaO {center_dot} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and Na-doped tricalcium aluminate (orthorhombic C{sub 3}A or Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 8}Al{sub 6}O{sub 18}), in aqueous solutions containing sulfate ions. Pure phases were synthesized in the laboratory to develop an independent benchmark for the reactions, meaning that their reactions during hydration in a simulated early age cement pore solution (saturated with respect to gypsum and lime) were able to be isolated. Because the rate of this reaction is extremely rapid, most microscopy methods are not adequate to study the early phases of the reactions in the early stages. Here, a high-resolution full-field soft X-ray imaging technique operating in the X-ray water window, combined with solution analysis by {sup 27}Al nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, was used to capture information regarding the mechanism of C{sub 3}A hydration during the early stages. There are differences in the hydration mechanism between the two types of C{sub 3}A, which are also dependent on the concentration of sulfate ions in the solution. The reactions with cubic C{sub 3}A (pure) seem to be more influenced by higher concentrations of sulfate ions, forming smaller ettringite needles at a slower pace than the orthorhombic C{sub 3}A (Na-doped) sample. The rate of release of aluminate species into the solution phase is also accelerated by Na doping.

  11. Phase contrast imaging of cochlear soft tissue.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.; Hwang, M.; Rau, C.; Fishman, A.; Lee, W.; Richter, C.

    2011-01-01

    A noninvasive technique to image soft tissue could expedite diagnosis and disease management in the auditory system. We propose inline phase contrast imaging with hard X-rays as a novel method that overcomes the limitations of conventional absorption radiography for imaging soft tissue. In this study, phase contrast imaging of mouse cochleae was performed at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source. The phase contrast tomographic reconstructions show soft tissue structures of the cochlea, including the inner pillar cells, the inner spiral sulcus, the tectorial membrane, the basilar membrane, and the Reissner's membrane. The results suggest that phase contrast X-ray imaging and tomographic techniques hold promise to noninvasively image cochlear structures at an unprecedented cellular level.

  12. Design, development and first experiments on the X-ray imaging beamline at Indus-2 synchrotron source RRCAT, India.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, A K; Singh, B; Kashyap, Y S; Shukla, M; Sarkar, P S; Sinha, Amar

    2015-11-01

    A full-field hard X-ray imaging beamline (BL-4) was designed, developed, installed and commissioned recently at the Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source at RRCAT, Indore, India. The bending-magnet beamline is operated in monochromatic and white beam mode. A variety of imaging techniques are implemented such as high-resolution radiography, propagation- and analyzer-based phase contrast imaging, real-time imaging, absorption and phase contrast tomography etc. First experiments on propagation-based phase contrast imaging and micro-tomography are reported. PMID:26524319

  13. Ultrafast, high resolution, phase contrast imaging of impact response with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, B. J.; Luo, S. N.; Hooks, D. E.; Ramos, K. J.; Yeager, J. D.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Shimada, T.; Dattelbaum, D. M.; Fezzaa, K.

    2012-03-15

    Understanding the dynamic response of materials at extreme conditions requires diagnostics that can provide real-time, in situ, spatially resolved measurements on the nanosecond timescale. The development of methods such as phase contrast imaging (PCI) typically used at synchrotron sources offer unique opportunities to examine dynamic material response. In this work, we report ultrafast, high-resolution, dynamic PCI measurements of shock compressed materials with 3 {mu}m spatial resolution using a single 60 ps synchrotron X-ray bunch. These results firmly establish the use of PCI to examine dynamic phenomena at ns to {mu}s timescales.

  14. Zernike x-ray ptychography.

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, Ismo; Mohacsi, Istvan; Stachnik, Karolina; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; David, Christian; Meents, Alke

    2016-02-15

    We present an imaging technique combining Zernike phase-contrast imaging and ptychography. The contrast formation is explained by following the theory of Zernike phase-contrast imaging. The method is demonstrated with x-rays at a photon energy of 6.2 keV, showing how ptychographic reconstruction of a phase sample leads to a Zernike phase-contrast image appearing in the amplitude reconstruction. In addition, the results presented in this Letter indicate an improvement of the resolution of the reconstructed object in the case of Zernike ptychography compared with the conventional one. PMID:26872172

  15. Toward Clinically Compatible Phase-Contrast Mammography

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Kai; Willer, Konstantin; Gromann, Lukas; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Braig, Eva; Grandl, Susanne; Sztrókay-Gaul, Anikó; Herzen, Julia; Mayr, Doris; Hellerhoff, Karin; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Phase-contrast mammography using laboratory X-ray sources is a promising approach to overcome the relatively low sensitivity and specificity of clinical, absorption-based screening. Current research is mostly centered on identifying potential diagnostic benefits arising from phase-contrast and dark-field mammography and benchmarking the latter with conventional state-of-the-art imaging methods. So far, little effort has been made to adjust this novel imaging technique to clinical needs. In this article, we address the key points for a successful implementation to a clinical routine in the near future and present the very first dose-compatible and rapid scan-time phase-contrast mammograms of both a freshly dissected, cancer-bearing mastectomy specimen and a mammographic accreditation phantom. PMID:26110618

  16. Surface metrology by phase contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Lionel R.

    1990-08-01

    Increasing use of electrooptical imaging and detection systems in thermography high density information storage laser instrumentation and X-ray optics has led to a pressing need for machinecompatible sensors for the measurement of surface texture. This paper reviews recent advances in the use of deterministic and parametric noncontact methods for texture measurement and justifies the need for objective simple and yet precise means for displaying the microfinish of a machined surface. The design of a simple two channel phase contrast microscope is described which can be calibrated by test pieces and used as a means for optimising the process parameters involved in the generation of high quality surfaces. Typical results obtained with this technique including dynamic range and ultimate sensitivity are discussed. 1 . NEED FOR SURFACE METROLOGY Surface quality has a direct influence on product acceptability in many different industries including those concerned with optoelectronics and engineering. The influence may be cosmetic as with paint finish on a motor car body or functional for example when excessive wear rates may occur in a bearing surface with inadequate oil retention. Since perfection can never be achieved and overspecification can be costly it is clearly necessary to be able to define thresholds of acceptance in relation to different situations. Such thresholds do of course require agreed methods of measurement with traceability to national standards. The current trends in surface metrology are towards higher

  17. Upconversion nanophosphors Naluf₄:Yb,Tm for lymphatic imaging in vivo by real-time upconversion luminescence imaging under ambient light and high-resolution X-ray CT.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yun; Peng, Juanjuan; Feng, Wei; Li, Fuyou

    2013-01-01

    Lanthanide upconversion nanophosphor (UCNP) has attracted increasing attention for potential applications in bioimaging due to its excellence in deep and high contrast imaging. To date, most upconversion imaging applications were demonstrated in dark surroundings without ambient light for higher signal-to-noise ratio, which hindered the application of optical imaging guided surgery. Herein, the new established NaLuF₄-based UCNP (NaLuF₄:Yb,Tm, ~17 nm) with bright upconversion emission around 800 nm as imaging signal was used to realize imaging under ambient light to provide more convenient for clinician. Moreover, due to the existance of heavy element lutetium (Lu) in the host lattice, the NaLuF₄:Yb,Tm nanoparticles can also be used as an X-ray CT imaging agent to enhance the imaging depth and in vivo imaging resolution. PMID:23650481

  18. Upconversion Nanophosphors Naluf4:Yb,Tm for Lymphatic Imaging In Vivo by Real-Time Upconversion Luminescence Imaging under Ambient Light and High-Resolution X-ray CT

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yun; Peng, Juanjuan; Feng, Wei; Li, Fuyou

    2013-01-01

    Lanthanide upconversion nanophosphor (UCNP) has attracted increasing attention for potential applications in bioimaging due to its excellence in deep and high contrast imaging. To date, most upconversion imaging applications were demonstrated in dark surroundings without ambient light for higher signal-to-noise ratio, which hindered the application of optical imaging guided surgery. Herein, the new established NaLuF4-based UCNP (NaLuF4:Yb,Tm, ~17 nm) with bright upconversion emission around 800 nm as imaging signal was used to realize imaging under ambient light to provide more convenient for clinician. Moreover, due to the existance of heavy element lutetium (Lu) in the host lattice, the NaLuF4:Yb,Tm nanoparticles can also be used as an X-ray CT imaging agent to enhance the imaging depth and in vivo imaging resolution. PMID:23650481

  19. Reconstruction methods for phase-contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Raven, C.

    1997-02-01

    Phase contrast imaging with coherent x-rays can be distinguished in outline imaging and holography, depending on the wavelength {lambda}, the object size d and the object-to-detector distance r. When r << d{sup 2}{lambda}, phase contrast occurs only in regions where the refractive index fastly changes, i.e. at interfaces and edges in the sample. With increasing object-to-detector distance we come in the area of holographic imaging. The image contrast outside the shadow region of the object is due to interference of the direct, undiffracted beam and a beam diffracted by the object, or, in terms of holography, the interference of a reference wave with the object wave. Both, outline imaging and holography, offer the possibility to obtain three dimensional information of the sample in conjunction with a tomographic technique. But the data treatment and the kind of information one can obtain from the reconstruction is different.

  20. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  1. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-15

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  2. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Images Aortic rupture, chest x-ray Lung cancer, frontal chest x-ray Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray Coal ... cancer - chest x-ray Lung nodule, right middle lobe - chest x-ray Lung mass, right upper lung - ...

  3. Unraveling the Hydrogenation of TiO 2 and Graphene Oxide/TiO 2 Composites in Real Time by in Situ Synchrotron X-ray Powder Diffraction and Pair Distribution Function Analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nguyen-Phan, Thuy-Duong; Liu, Zongyuan; Luo, Si; Gamalski, Andrew D.; Vovchok, Dimitry; Xu, Wenqian; Stach, Eric A.; Polyansky, Dmitry E.; Fujita, Etsuko; Rodriguez, José A.; et al

    2016-02-18

    The functionalization of graphene oxide (GO) and graphene by TiO2 and other metal oxides has attracted considerable attention due to numerous promising applications in catalysis, energy conversion, and storage. We propose hydrogenation of this class of materials as a promising way to tune catalytic properties by altering the structural and chemical transformations that occur upon H incorporation. We also investigate the structural changes that occur during the hydrogenation process using in situ powder X-ray diffraction and pair distribution function analysis of GO–TiO2 and TiO2 under H2 reduction. Sequential Rietveld refinement was employed to gain insight into the evolution of crystalmore » growth of TiO2 nanoparticles in the presence of two-dimensional (2D) GO nanosheets. GO sheets not only significantly retarded the nucleation and growth of rutile impurities, stabilizing the anatase structure, but was also partially reduced to hydrogenated graphene by the introduction of atomic hydrogen into the honeycomb lattice. We discuss the hydrogenation processes and the resulting composite structure that occurs during the incorporation of atomic H and the dynamic structural transformations that leads to a highly active photocatalyst.« less

  4. Real-time x-ray studies of crystal growth modes during metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of GaN on c- and m-plane single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, Edith; Highland, M. J.; Stephenson, G. B.; Streiffer, S. K.; Zapol, P.; Fuoss, P. H.; Munkholm, A.; Thompson, Carol

    2014-08-01

    Non-polar orientations of III-nitride semiconductors have attracted significant interest due to their potential application in optoelectronic devices with enhanced efficiency. Using in situ surface x-ray scattering during metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) of GaN on non-polar (m-plane) and polar (c-plane) orientations of single crystal substrates, we have observed the homoepitaxial growth modes as a function of temperature and growth rate. On the m-plane surface, we observe all three growth modes (step-flow, layer-by-layer, and three-dimensional) as conditions are varied. In contrast, the +c-plane surface exhibits a direct crossover between step-flow and 3D growth, with no layer-by-layer regime. The apparent activation energy of 2.8 ± 0.2 eV observed for the growth rate at the layer-by-layer to step-flow boundary on the m-plane surface is consistent with those observed for MOVPE growth of other III-V compounds, indicating a large critical nucleus size for islands.

  5. Some aspects of analytical chemistry as applied to water quality assurance techniques for reclaimed water: The potential use of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for automated on-line fast real-time simultaneous multi-component analysis of inorganic pollutants in reclaimed water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, A. C.; Macpherson, L. H.; Rey, M.

    1981-01-01

    The potential use of isotopically excited energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry for automated on line fast real time (5 to 15 minutes) simultaneous multicomponent (up to 20) trace (1 to 10 parts per billion) analysis of inorganic pollutants in reclaimed water was examined. Three anionic elements (chromium 6, arsenic and selenium) were studied. The inherent lack of sensitivity of XRF spectrometry for these elements mandates use of a preconcentration technique and various methods were examined, including: several direct and indirect evaporation methods; ion exchange membranes; selective and nonselective precipitation; and complexation processes. It is shown tha XRF spectrometry itself is well suited for automated on line quality assurance, and can provide a nondestructive (and thus sample storage and repeat analysis capabilities) and particularly convenient analytical method. Further, the use of an isotopically excited energy dispersive unit (50 mCi Cd-109 source) coupled with a suitable preconcentration process can provide sufficient sensitivity to achieve the current mandated minimum levels of detection without the need for high power X-ray generating tubes.

  6. Real-time radiographic inspection facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A real time radiographic inspection facility has been developed for nondestructive evaluation applications. It consists of an X-ray source, an X-ray sensitive television imaging system, an electronic analog image processing system, and a digital image processing system. The digital image processing system is composed of a computer with the necessary software to drive the overall facility. Descriptions are given of the design strategy, the facility's components, and its current capabilities.

  7. Axial Tomography from Digitized Real Time Radiography

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Zolnay, A. S.; McDonald, W. M.; Doupont, P. A.; McKinney, R. L.; Lee, M. M.

    1985-01-18

    Axial tomography from digitized real time radiographs provides a useful tool for industrial radiography and tomography. The components of this system are: x-ray source, image intensifier, video camera, video line extractor and digitizer, data storage and reconstruction computers. With this system it is possible to view a two dimensional x-ray image in real time at each angle of rotation and select the tomography plane of interest by choosing which video line to digitize. The digitization of a video line requires less than a second making data acquisition relatively short. Further improvements on this system are planned and initial results are reported.

  8. Visualization of neurons in the brain with phase-contrast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onodera, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Masato; Takashima, Kenta; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto

    2012-07-01

    Three-dimensional structural analysis of brain is essential to understand neuronal function and brain pathology. The phase-contrast X-ray imaging technique uses an X-ray interferometer and is an extremely sensitive method to visualize structures with low X-ray absorbance. Since the phase shifts caused by light elements can be detected as interference patterns in spite of nearly zero absorption coefficients, the signal/noise ratio for the phase-contrast images of the brain is expected to be hundreds times higher than that obtained with the conventional X-ray absorption contrast method. With phase-contrast imaging technique, we could visualize brain microstructures and specific types of neurons, such as the pyramidal cells in the hippocampus. Phase-contrast CT is a promising technique for nondestructive visualization of brain and spinal cord.

  9. Phase contrast image guidance for synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Larkin, Kieran G.

    2016-08-01

    Recent image guidance developments for preclinical synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy represent a necessary step for future clinical translation of the technique. Image quality can be further improved using x-ray phase contrast, which is readily available at synchrotron facilities. We here describe a methodology for phase contrast image guidance at the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Differential phase contrast is measured alongside conventional attenuation and used to improve the image quality. Post-processing based on the inverse Riesz transform is employed on the measured data to obtain noticeably sharper images. The procedure is extremely well suited for applications such as image guidance which require both visual assessment and sample alignment based on semi automatic image registration. Moreover, our approach can be combined with all other differential phase contrast imaging techniques, in all cases where a quantitative evaluation of the refractive index is not required.

  10. Phase contrast image guidance for synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Crosbie, Jeffrey C; Larkin, Kieran G

    2016-08-21

    Recent image guidance developments for preclinical synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy represent a necessary step for future clinical translation of the technique. Image quality can be further improved using x-ray phase contrast, which is readily available at synchrotron facilities. We here describe a methodology for phase contrast image guidance at the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Differential phase contrast is measured alongside conventional attenuation and used to improve the image quality. Post-processing based on the inverse Riesz transform is employed on the measured data to obtain noticeably sharper images. The procedure is extremely well suited for applications such as image guidance which require both visual assessment and sample alignment based on semi automatic image registration. Moreover, our approach can be combined with all other differential phase contrast imaging techniques, in all cases where a quantitative evaluation of the refractive index is not required. PMID:27436750

  11. Phase contrast image segmentation using a Laue analyser crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchen, Marcus J.; Paganin, David M.; Uesugi, Kentaro; Allison, Beth J.; Lewis, Robert A.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Pavlov, Konstantin M.

    2011-02-01

    Dual-energy x-ray imaging is a powerful tool enabling two-component samples to be separated into their constituent objects from two-dimensional images. Phase contrast x-ray imaging can render the boundaries between media of differing refractive indices visible, despite them having similar attenuation properties; this is important for imaging biological soft tissues. We have used a Laue analyser crystal and a monochromatic x-ray source to combine the benefits of both techniques. The Laue analyser creates two distinct phase contrast images that can be simultaneously acquired on a high-resolution detector. These images can be combined to separate the effects of x-ray phase, absorption and scattering and, using the known complex refractive indices of the sample, to quantitatively segment its component materials. We have successfully validated this phase contrast image segmentation (PCIS) using a two-component phantom, containing an iodinated contrast agent, and have also separated the lungs and ribcage in images of a mouse thorax. Simultaneous image acquisition has enabled us to perform functional segmentation of the mouse thorax throughout the respiratory cycle during mechanical ventilation.

  12. Evaluation of edge effect due to phase contrast imaging for mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, Satoru; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Tohyama, Keiko; Morishita, Junji; Yamada, Katsuhiko; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2005-08-15

    It is well-known that the edge effect produced by phase contrast