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Sample records for real-time ultrasound elastography

  1. Real-time ultrasound elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Unmin; Kim, Yongmin

    2007-03-01

    Ultrasound elastography can provide tissue stiffness information that is complementary to the anatomy and blood flow information offered by conventional ultrasound machines, but it is computationally challenging due to many time-consuming modules and a large amount of data. To facilitate real-time implementations of ultrasound elastography, we have developed new methods that can significantly reduce the computational burden of common processing components in ultrasound elastography, such as the crosscorrelation analysis and spatial filtering applied to displacement and strain estimates. Using the new correlation-based search algorithm, the computational requirement of correlation-based search does not increase with the correlation window size. For typical parameters used in ultrasound elastography, the computation in correlation-based search can be reduced by a factor of more than 30. Median filtering is often performed to suppress the spike-like noise that results from correlation-based search. For fast median filtering, we have developed a method that efficiently finds a new median value utilizing the sort result of the previous pixel. With careful mapping of the new algorithms on digital signal processors, our work has led to development of a clinical ultrasound machine supporting real-time elastography. Our methods can help real-time implementations of various applications including ultrasound elastography, which could lead to increased use of ultrasound elastography in the clinic.

  2. Real-time quasi-static ultrasound elastography

    PubMed Central

    Treece, Graham; Lindop, Joel; Chen, Lujie; Housden, James; Prager, Richard; Gee, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography is a technique used for clinical imaging of tissue stiffness with a conventional ultrasound machine. It was first proposed two decades ago, but active research continues in this area to the present day. Numerous clinical applications have been investigated, mostly related to cancer imaging, and though these have yet to prove conclusive, the technique has seen increasing commercial and clinical interest. This paper presents a review of the most widely adopted, non-quantitative, techniques focusing on technical innovations rather than clinical applications. The review is not intended to be exhaustive, concentrating instead on placing the various techniques in context according to the authors' perspective of the field. PMID:22866230

  3. System for robot-assisted real-time laparoscopic ultrasound elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billings, Seth; Deshmukh, Nishikant; Kang, Hyun Jae; Taylor, Russell; Boctor, Emad M.

    2012-02-01

    Surgical robots provide many advantages for surgery, including minimal invasiveness, precise motion, high dexterity, and crisp stereovision. One limitation of current robotic procedures, compared to open surgery, is the loss of haptic information for such purposes as palpation, which can be very important in minimally invasive tumor resection. Numerous studies have reported the use of real-time ultrasound elastography, in conjunction with conventional B-mode ultrasound, to differentiate malignant from benign lesions. Several groups (including our own) have reported integration of ultrasound with the da Vinci robot, and ultrasound elastography is a very promising image guidance method for robotassisted procedures that will further enable the role of robots in interventions where precise knowledge of sub-surface anatomical features is crucial. We present a novel robot-assisted real-time ultrasound elastography system for minimally invasive robot-assisted interventions. Our system combines a da Vinci surgical robot with a non-clinical experimental software interface, a robotically articulated laparoscopic ultrasound probe, and our GPU-based elastography system. Elasticity and B-mode ultrasound images are displayed as picture-in-picture overlays in the da Vinci console. Our system minimizes dependence on human performance factors by incorporating computer-assisted motion control that automatically generates the tissue palpation required for elastography imaging, while leaving high-level control in the hands of the user. In addition to ensuring consistent strain imaging, the elastography assistance mode avoids the cognitive burden of tedious manual palpation. Preliminary tests of the system with an elasticity phantom demonstrate the ability to differentiate simulated lesions of varied stiffness and to clearly delineate lesion boundaries.

  4. Ultrasound real-time elastography can predict malignancy in BI-RADS®-US 3 lesions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lesions of the breast that are classified BI-RADS®-US 3 by ultrasound are probably benign and observation is recommended, although malignancy may occasionally occur. In our study, we focus exclusively on BI-RADS®-US 3 lesions and hypothesize that sonoelastography as an adjunct to conventional ultrasound can identify a high-risk-group and a low-risk-group within these patients. Methods A group of 177 breast lesions that were classified BI-RADS®-US 3 were additionally examined with real-time sonoelastography. Elastograms were evaluated according to the Tsukuba Elasticity Score. Pretest and posttest probability of disease (POD), sensitivity (SE), specificity (SP), positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) and likelihood-ratios (LR) were calculated. Furthermore, we analyzed the false-negative and false-positive cases and performed a model calculation to determine how elastography could affect the proceedings in population screening. Results In our collection of BI-RADS®-US 3 cases there were 169 benign and eight malignant lesions. The pretest POD was 4.5% (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.1–9.0). In patients with a suspicious elastogram (high-risk group), the posttest POD was significantly higher (13.2%, p = 0.041) and the positive LR was 3.2 (95% CI: 1.7–5.9). With a benign elastogram (low-risk group), the posttest POD decreased to 2.2%. SE, SP, PPV and NPV for sonoelastography in BI-RADS®-US 3 lesions were 62.5% (95% CI: 25.9–89.8), 80.5% (95% CI: 73.5–86.0), 13.2% (95% CI: 5.0–28.9) and 97.8% (95% CI: 93.3–99.4), respectively. Conclusions Sonoelastography yields additional diagnostic information in the evaluation of BI-RADS®-US 3 lesions of the breast. The examiner can identify a low-risk group that can be vigilantly observed and a high-risk group that should receive immediate biopsy due to an elevated breast cancer risk. PMID:23530903

  5. Endobronchial ultrasound elastography

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F.; Jenssen, Christian; Herth, Felix J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Elastographic techniques have recently become available as advanced diagnostic tools for tissue characterization. Strain elastography is a real-time technique used with transcutaneous ultrasound (US) and endoscopic US. Convincing evidence is available demonstrating a significant value of strain elastography for the discrimination of benign and malignant lymph nodes (LNs). This paper reviews preliminary data demonstrating the feasibility of performing real-time elastography during endobronchial US (EBUS) and a potential application of this technique for selection of LNs for EBUS-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in patients with lung cancer and extrathoracic malignancies. PMID:27503154

  6. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound and real-time elastography in the differential diagnosis of malignant and benign thyroid nodules

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Xin; Liu, Huai-Jun; Jia, Hong-Li; Fang, Qin-Mao

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) or real-time elastography (RTE) alone, as well as a combination of CEUS and RTE, in distinguishing benign from malignant thyroid nodules was investigated. Between August 2012 and June 2014, a total of 97 consecutive patients (50 male and 47 female patients; mean age, 48.6±12.4; age range, 27–70 years) with thyroid nodules referred for surgical treatment were examined by CEUS and RTE. The final diagnosis was obtained based on histological findings. Image analysis of the CEUS and RTE scans was performed. Considering the postoperative pathological results as the golden standard, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was constructed. Subsequently, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy of CEUS alone, RTE alone and CEUS + RTE combination were calculated. Pathological examination showed 66 papillary carcinomas and 43 benign lesions, including 21 adenomas and 22 nodular goiters. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy of CEUS were 81.82, 90.70, 93.10, 90.70 and 85.32%, respectively. In the case of RTE, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy were 80.30, 88.37, 91.38, 88.37 and 83.49%, respectively. Furthermore, the combination of CEUS + RTE had a sensitivity of 95.45%, specificity of 95.35%, PPV of 96.92%, NPV of 95.35% and accuracy of 95.41%. Therefore, the CEUS + RTE combination showed a significantly higher sensitivity and specificity compared with CEUS or RTE alone (all P<0.05). Based on ROC analysis, the area under the curve (AUC) for CEUS, RTE and CEUS + RTE combination was 0.883, 0.863 and 0.959, respectively. The AUC of RTE alone was significantly lower compared with that of the CEUS + RTE combination. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that CEUS + RTE combination significantly increases the diagnostic performance for differential diagnosis of malignant and benign thyroid nodules compared with

  7. B-Mode Ultrasound Imaging, Doppler Imaging, and Real-Time Elastography in Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma and Lymph Node Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Uematsu, Takayoshi; Kasami, Masako; Kiyohara, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    Examination by ultrasonography (US) is a rapid, sensitive, cost-effective, and even portable technique for confirming the presence of tumors. However, US is not routinely used worldwide for the diagnostic work-up of cutaneous malignant melanoma. High-resolution US using a 6–14 MHz or 5–13 MHz linear transducer enables the preoperative assessment of tumor size and thickness. Compared with physical examination, US is also very effective in the early detection of lymph node metastases. It can be easily repeated for the follow-up of cutaneous malignant melanoma and lymph node metastases. Ultrasonographic appearance of some lymph nodes may overlap, thus producing diagnostic pitfalls. In such cases with overlapping findings, Doppler imaging and elastography may additionally facilitate the evaluation of cutaneous malignant melanoma and lymph node metastases. US-guided fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) finally helps to confirm ultrasonographic results, thus improving the specificity and sensitivity in difficult situations in which US alone gives unclear results in lymph node assessment.

  8. Real-time ultrasound elastography in 180 axillary lymph nodes: elasticity distribution in healthy lymph nodes and prediction of breast cancer metastases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To determine the general appearance of normal axillary lymph nodes (LNs) in real-time tissue sonoelastography and to explore the method′s potential value in the prediction of LN metastases. Methods Axillary LNs in healthy probands (n=165) and metastatic LNs in breast cancer patients (n=15) were examined with palpation, B-mode ultrasound, Doppler and sonoelastography (assessment of the elasticity of the cortex and the medulla). The elasticity distributions were compared and sensitivity (SE) and specificity (SP) were calculated. In an exploratory analysis, positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV) were calculated based upon the estimated prevalence of LN metastases in different risk groups. Results In the elastogram, the LN cortex was significantly harder than the medulla in both healthy (p=0.004) and metastatic LNs (p=0.005). Comparing healthy and metastatic LNs, there was no difference in the elasticity distribution of the medulla (p=0.281), but we found a significantly harder cortex in metastatic LNs (p=0.006). The SE of clinical examination, B-mode ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound and sonoelastography was revealed to be 13.3%, 40.0%, 14.3% and 60.0%, respectively, and SP was 88.4%, 96.8%, 95.6% and 79.6%, respectively. The highest SE was achieved by the disjunctive combination of B-mode and elastographic features (cortex >3mm in B-mode or blue cortex in the elastogram, SE=73.3%). The highest SP was achieved by the conjunctive combination of B-mode ultrasound and elastography (cortex >3mm in B-mode and blue cortex in the elastogram, SP=99.3%). Conclusions Sonoelastography is a feasible method to visualize the elasticity distribution of LNs. Moreover, sonoelastography is capable of detecting elasticity differences between the cortex and medulla, and between metastatic and healthy LNs. Therefore, sonoelastography yields additional information about axillary LN status and can improve the PPV, although this method is still experimental. PMID

  9. Tracked ultrasound elastography (TRUE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroughi, Pezhman

    Medical ultrasound research has experienced a renaissance in the past decade leading to innovations in flow mapping, elasticity and thermal imaging, measurement of optical properties, beamforming, and image enhancement. In this thesis, we focus on ultrasound elastography, an emerging imaging modality with great potential to become a part of several ultrasound diagnostic applications. Elastography images the stiffness of soft tissue by applying a mechanical stimulus and estimating the disturbance created by this stimulus. In freehand elastography, soft tissue is palpated by hand using the ultrasound transducer. The elastography image is generated by comparing the pre- and post-compression images to form a displacement map which is then differentiated to produce the final strain map. To achieve the best result in freehand elastography, the sonographer must compress and decompress the tissue uniformly in a specific direction with adequate compression. This can be a difficult task even for trained users. A small rotational or out-of-plane motion in the collected ultrasound frames can render them unusable for elastography. This has made freehand elastography highly qualitative and user-dependent. We tackle this issue by incorporating the extra information from a position sensor attached to the ultrasound transducer. Our aim is to show that the localization information of ultrasound images may be utilized to improve the quality and reliability of freehand elastography. For this purpose, we have developed a frame selection scheme that finds pairs of images with optimal compression and minimal lateral and out-of-plane displacement. Relying on the localization information, our algorithm merges multiple strain images computed from the selected frame pairs. This method is applicable to both 2D and 3D elastography. Our 3D elastography does not require for the transducer to be held still during the acquisition of each volume. Instead, the sonographer freely palpates the tissue

  10. A class of kernel based real-time elastography algorithms.

    PubMed

    Kibria, Md Golam; Hasan, Md Kamrul

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a novel real-time kernel-based and gradient-based Phase Root Seeking (PRS) algorithm for ultrasound elastography is proposed. The signal-to-noise ratio of the strain image resulting from this method is improved by minimizing the cross-correlation discrepancy between the pre- and post-compression radio frequency signals with an adaptive temporal stretching method and employing built-in smoothing through an exponentially weighted neighborhood kernel in the displacement calculation. Unlike conventional PRS algorithms, displacement due to tissue compression is estimated from the root of the weighted average of the zero-lag cross-correlation phases of the pair of corresponding analytic pre- and post-compression windows in the neighborhood kernel. In addition to the proposed one, the other time- and frequency-domain elastography algorithms (Ara et al., 2013; Hussain et al., 2012; Hasan et al., 2012) proposed by our group are also implemented in real-time using Java where the computations are serially executed or parallely executed in multiple processors with efficient memory management. Simulation results using finite element modeling simulation phantom show that the proposed method significantly improves the strain image quality in terms of elastographic signal-to-noise ratio (SNRe), elastographic contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRe) and mean structural similarity (MSSIM) for strains as high as 4% as compared to other reported techniques in the literature. Strain images obtained for the experimental phantom as well as in vivo breast data of malignant or benign masses also show the efficacy of our proposed method over the other reported techniques in the literature. PMID:25929595

  11. Ultrasound elastography for imaging tendons and muscles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography is a recently developed ultrasound-based method which allows the qualitative or quantitative evaluation of the mechanical properties of tissue. Strain (compression) ultrasound elastography is the commonest technique performed by applying mild compression with the hand-held transducer to create real-time strain distribution maps, which are color-coded and superimposed on the B-mode images. There is increasing evidence that ultrasound elastography can be used in the investigation of muscle, tendon and soft tissue disease in the clinical practice, as a supplementary tool to conventional ultrasound examination. Based on preliminary data, potential clinical applications include early diagnosis, staging, and guiding interventions musculotendinous and neuromuscular disease as well as monitoring disease during rehabilitation. Ultrasound elastography could also be used for research into the biomechanics and pathophysiology of musculotendinous disease. Despite the great interest in the technique, there is still limited evidence in the literature and there are several technical issues which limit the reproducibility of the method, including differences in quantification methods, artefacts, limitations and variation in the application of the technique by different users. This review presents the published evidence on musculoskeletal applications of strain elastography, discusses the technical issues and future perspectives of this method and emphasizes the need for standardization and further research. PMID:26673318

  12. Ultrasound elastography for musculoskeletal applications

    PubMed Central

    Drakonaki, E E; Allen, G M; Wilson, D J

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography (EUS) is a method to assess the mechanical properties of tissue, by applying stress and detecting tissue displacement using ultrasound. There are several EUS techniques used in clinical practice; strain (compression) EUS is the most common technique that allows real-time visualisation of the elastographic map on the screen. There is increasing evidence that EUS can be used to measure the mechanical properties of musculoskeletal tissue in clinical practice, with the future potential for early diagnosis to both guide and monitor therapy. This review describes the various EUS techniques available for clinical use, presents the published evidence on musculoskeletal applications of EUS and discusses the technical issues, limitations and future perspectives of this method in the assessment of the musculoskeletal system. PMID:23091287

  13. Introduction to ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Andrzej; Dobruch-Sobczak, Katarzyna

    2016-06-01

    For centuries tissue palpation has been an important diagnostic tool. During palpation, tumors are felt as tissues harder than the surrounding tissues. The significance of palpation is related to the relationship between mechanical properties of different tissue lesions. The assessment of tissue stiffness through palpation is based on the fact that mechanical properties of tissues are changing as a result of various diseases. A higher tissue stiffness translates into a higher elasticity modulus. In the 90's, ultrasonography was extended by the option of examining the stiffness of tissue by estimating the difference in backscattering of ultrasound in compressed and non-compressed tissue. This modality is referred to as the static, compression elastography and is based on tracking the deformation of tissue subjected to the slowly varying compression through the recording of the backscattered echoes. The displacement is estimated using the methods of cross-correlation between consecutive ultrasonic lines of examined tissue, so calculating the degree of similarity of ultrasonic echoes acquired from tissue before and after the compression was applied. The next step in the development of ultrasound palpation was to apply the local remote tissue compression by using the acoustic radiation force generated through the special beam forming of the ultrasonic beam probing the tissue. The acoustic radiation force causes a slight deformation the tissue thereby forming a shear wave propagating in the tissue at different speeds dependent on the stiffness of the tissue. Shear wave elastography, carries great hopes in the field of quantitative imaging of tissue lesions. This article describes the physical basis of both elastographic methods: compression elastography and shear wave elastography. PMID:27446596

  14. Introduction to ultrasound elastography

    PubMed Central

    Dobruch-Sobczak, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    For centuries tissue palpation has been an important diagnostic tool. During palpation, tumors are felt as tissues harder than the surrounding tissues. The significance of palpation is related to the relationship between mechanical properties of different tissue lesions. The assessment of tissue stiffness through palpation is based on the fact that mechanical properties of tissues are changing as a result of various diseases. A higher tissue stiffness translates into a higher elasticity modulus. In the 90's, ultrasonography was extended by the option of examining the stiffness of tissue by estimating the difference in backscattering of ultrasound in compressed and non-compressed tissue. This modality is referred to as the static, compression elastography and is based on tracking the deformation of tissue subjected to the slowly varying compression through the recording of the backscattered echoes. The displacement is estimated using the methods of cross-correlation between consecutive ultrasonic lines of examined tissue, so calculating the degree of similarity of ultrasonic echoes acquired from tissue before and after the compression was applied. The next step in the development of ultrasound palpation was to apply the local remote tissue compression by using the acoustic radiation force generated through the special beam forming of the ultrasonic beam probing the tissue. The acoustic radiation force causes a slight deformation the tissue thereby forming a shear wave propagating in the tissue at different speeds dependent on the stiffness of the tissue. Shear wave elastography, carries great hopes in the field of quantitative imaging of tissue lesions. This article describes the physical basis of both elastographic methods: compression elastography and shear wave elastography. PMID:27446596

  15. Ultrasound Elastography in Breast Cancer Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, J; Ewertsen, C; Sletting, S; Vejborg, I; Schäfer, F K W; Cosgrove, D; Bachmann Nielsen, M

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasound elastography is an established method for characterization of focal lesions in the breast. Different techniques and analyses of the images may be used for the characterization. This article addresses the use of ultrasound elastography in breast cancer diagnosis. In the first part of the article the techniques behind both strain- and shear-wave-elastography are explained and followed by a section on how to obtain adequate elastography images and measurements. In the second part of the article the application of elastography as an adjunct to B-mode ultrasound in clinical practice is described, and the potential diagnostic gains and limitations of elastography are discussed. PMID:26274379

  16. Real-time 2-D temperature imaging using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S

    2010-01-01

    We have previously introduced methods for noninvasive estimation of temperature change using diagnostic ultrasound. The basic principle was validated both in vitro and in vivo by several groups worldwide. Some limitations remain, however, that have prevented these methods from being adopted in monitoring and guidance of minimally invasive thermal therapies, e.g., RF ablation and high-intensity-focused ultrasound (HIFU). In this letter, we present first results from a real-time system for 2-D imaging of temperature change using pulse-echo ultrasound. The front end of the system is a commercially available scanner equipped with a research interface, which allows the control of imaging sequence and access to the RF data in real time. A high-frame-rate 2-D RF acquisition mode, M2D, is used to capture the transients of tissue motion/deformations in response to pulsed HIFU. The M2D RF data is streamlined to the back end of the system, where a 2-D temperature imaging algorithm based on speckle tracking is implemented on a graphics processing unit. The real-time images of temperature change are computed on the same spatial and temporal grid of the M2D RF data, i.e., no decimation. Verification of the algorithm was performed by monitoring localized HIFU-induced heating of a tissue-mimicking elastography phantom. These results clearly demonstrate the repeatability and sensitivity of the algorithm. Furthermore, we present in vitro results demonstrating the possible use of this algorithm for imaging changes in tissue parameters due to HIFU-induced lesions. These results clearly demonstrate the value of the real-time data streaming and processing in monitoring, and guidance of minimally invasive thermotherapy. PMID:19884075

  17. Clinical experience with real-time ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimiak, William J.; Wolfman, Neil T.; Covitz, Wesley

    1995-05-01

    After testing the extended multimedia interface (EMMI) product which is an asynchronous transmission mode (ATM) user to network interface (UNI) of AT&T at the Society for Computer Applications in Radiology conference in Winston-Salem, the Department of Radiology together with AT&T are implementing a tele-ultrasound system to combine real- time ultrasound with the static imaging features of more traditional digital ultrasound systems. Our current ultrasound system archives digital images to an optical disk system. Static images are sent using our digital radiology systems. This could be transferring images from one digital imaging and communications (DICOM)-compliant machine to another, or the current image transfer methodologies. The prototype of a live ultrasound system using the EMMI demonstrated the feasibility of doing live ultrasound. We now are developing the scenarios using a mix of the two methodologies. Utilizing EMMI technology, radiologists at the BGSM review at a workstation both static images and real-time scanning done by a technologist on patients at a remote site in order to render on-line primary diagnosis. Our goal is to test the feasibility of operating an ultrasound laboratory at a remote site utilizing a trained technologist without the necessity of having a full-time radiologist at that site. Initial plans are for a radiologist to review an initial set of static images on a patient taken by the technologist. If further scanning is required, the EMMI is used to transmit real-time imaging and audio using the audio input of a standard microphone system and the National Television Standards Committee (NTSC) output of the ultrasound equipment from the remote site to the radiologist in the department review station. The EMMI digitally encodes this data and places it in an ATM format. This ATM data stream goes to the GCNS2000 and then to the other EMMI where the ATM data stream is decoded into the live studies and voice communication which are then

  18. Dynamic programming on a tree for ultrasound elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Roozbeh; Boily, Mathieu; Martineau, Paul A.; Rivaz, Hassan

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound Elastography is an emerging imaging technique that allows estimation of the mechanical characteristics of tissue. Two issues that need to be addressed before widespread use of elastography in clinical environments are real time constraints and deteriorating effects of signal decorrelation between pre- and post-compression images. Previous work has used Dynamic Programming (DP) to estimate tissue deformation. However, in case of large signal decorrelation, DP can fail. In this paper we, have proposed a novel solution to this problem by solving DP on a tree instead of a single Radio-Frequency line. Formulation of DP on a tree allows exploiting significantly more information, and as such, is more robust and accurate. Our results on phantom and in-vivo human data show that DP on tree significantly outperforms traditional DP in ultrasound elastography.

  19. Ultrasound elastography: principles, techniques, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Dewall, Ryan J

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography is an emerging set of imaging modalities used to image tissue elasticity and are often referred to as virtual palpation. These techniques have proven effective in detecting and assessing many different pathologies, because tissue mechanical changes often correlate with tissue pathological changes. This article reviews the principles of ultrasound elastography, many of the ultrasound-based techniques, and popular clinical applications. Originally, elastography was a technique that imaged tissue strain by comparing pre- and postcompression ultrasound images. However, new techniques have been developed that use different excitation methods such as external vibration or acoustic radiation force. Some techniques track transient phenomena such as shear waves to quantitatively measure tissue elasticity. Clinical use of elastography is increasing, with applications including lesion detection and classification, fibrosis staging, treatment monitoring, vascular imaging, and musculoskeletal applications. PMID:23510006

  20. Liver fibrosis grading using multiresolution histogram information in real-time elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albouy-Kissi, A.; Sarry, L.; Massoulier, S.; Bonny, C.; Randl, K.; Abergel, A.

    2010-03-01

    Despites many limitations, liver biopsy remains the gold standard method for grading and staging liver biopsy. Several modalities have been developed for a non invasive assessment of liver diseases. Real-time elastography may constitute a true alternative to liver biopsy by providing an image of tissular elasticity distribution correlated to the fibrosis grade. In this paper, we investigate a new approach for the assessment of liver fibrosis by the classification of fibrosis morphometry. Multiresolution histogram, based on a combination of intensity and texture features, has been tested as feature space. Thus, the ability of such multiresolution histograms to discriminate fibrosis grade has been proven. The results have been tested on seventeen patients that underwent a real time elastography and FibroScan examination.

  1. Real-time two-dimensional shear wave ultrasound elastography of the liver is a reliable predictor of clinical outcomes and the presence of esophageal varices in patients with compensated liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Grgurević, Ivica; Bokun, Tomislav; Mustapić, Sanda; Trkulja, Vladimir; Heinzl, Renata; Banić, Marko; Puljiz, Željko; Lukšić, Boris; Kujundžić, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Aim Primary: to evaluate predictivity of liver stiffness (LS), spleen stiffness (SS), and their ratio assessed by real-time 2D shear wave elastography (RT-2D-SWE) for adverse outcomes (hepatic decompensation, hepatocellular carcinoma or death; “event”) in compensated liver cirrhosis (LC) patients. Secondary: to evaluate ability of these measures to discriminate between cirrhotic patients with/without esophageal varices (EV). Methods Predictivity of LS, SS, and LS/SS was assessed in a retrospectively analyzed cohort of compensated LC patients (follow-up cohort) and through comparison with incident patients with decompensated cirrhosis (DC) (cross-sectional cohort). Both cohorts were used to evaluate diagnostic properties regarding EV. Results In the follow-up cohort (n = 44) 18 patients (40.9%) experienced an “event” over a median period of 28 months. LS≥21.5 kPa at baseline was independently associated with 3.4-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16-10.4, P = 0.026) higher risk of event. Association between SS and outcomes was weaker (P = 0.056), while there was no association between LS/SS ratio and outcomes. Patients with DC (n = 43) had higher LS (35.3 vs 18.3 kPa, adjusted difference 65%, 95% CI 43%-90%; P < 0.001) than compensated patients at baseline. Adjusted odds of EV increased by 13% (95% CI 7.0%-20.0%; P < 0.001) with 1 kPa increase in LS. At cut-offs of 19.7 and 30.3 kPa, LS and SS had 90% and 86.6% negative predictive value, respectively, to exclude EV in compensated patients. Conclusion This is the first evaluation of RT-2D-SWE as a prognostic tool in LC. Although preliminary and gathered in a limited sample, our data emphasize the potential of LS to be a reliable predictor of clinical outcomes and the presence of EV in LC patients. PMID:26526884

  2. JSUM ultrasound elastography practice guidelines: breast.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Kazutaka; Shiina, Tsuyoshi; Sakurai, Masaru; Enokido, Katsutoshi; Endo, Tokiko; Tsunoda, Hiroko; Takada, Etsuo; Umemoto, Takeshi; Ueno, Ei

    2013-10-01

    Ten years have passed since the first elastography application: Real-time Tissue Elastography™. Now there are several elastography applications in existence. The Quality Control Research Team of The Japan Association of Breast and Thyroid Sonology (JABTS) and the Breast Elasticity Imaging Terminology and Diagnostic Criteria Subcommittee, Terminology and Diagnostic Criteria Committee of the Japan Society of Ultrasonics in Medicine (JSUM) have advocated breast elastography classifications for exact knowledge and good clinical use. We suggest two types of classifications: the technical classification and the classification for interpretation. The technical classification has been created to use vibration energy and to make images, and also shows how to obtain a good elastic image. The classification for interpretation has been prepared on the basis of interpretation of evidence in this decade. Finally, we describe the character and specificity of each vender equipment. We expect the present guidelines to be useful for many physicians and examiners throughout the world. PMID:27277451

  3. Pulmonary ultrasound elastography: a feasibility study with phantoms and ex-vivo tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Man Minh; Xie, Hua; Paluch, Kamila; Stanton, Douglas; Ramachandran, Bharat

    2013-03-01

    Elastography has become widely used for minimally invasive diagnosis in many tumors as seen with breast, liver and prostate. Among different modalities, ultrasound-based elastography stands out due to its advantages including being safe, real-time, and relatively low-cost. While lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality among both men and women, the use of ultrasound elastography for lung cancer diagnosis has hardly been investigated due to the limitations of ultrasound in air. In this work, we investigate the use of static-compression based endobronchial ultrasound elastography by a 3D trans-oesophageal echocardiography (TEE) transducer for lung cancer diagnosis. A water-filled balloon was designed to 1) improve the visualization of endobronchial ultrasound and 2) to induce compression via pumping motion inside the trachea and bronchiole. In a phantom study, we have successfully generated strain images indicating the stiffness difference between the gelatin background and agar inclusion. A similar strain ratio was confirmed with Philips ultrasound strain-based elastography product. For ex-vivo porcine lung study, different tissue ablation methods including chemical injection, Radio Frequency (RF) ablation, and direct heating were implemented to achieve tumor-mimicking tissue. Stiff ablated lung tissues were obtained and detected with our proposed method. These results suggest the feasibility of pulmonary elastography to differentiate stiff tumor tissue from normal tissue.

  4. Real-time elastography as a noninvasive assessment of liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C Egyptian patients: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Mobarak, Lamiaa; Nabeel, Mohammed M.; Hassan, Ehsan; Omran, Dalia; Zakaria, Zeinab

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus is a worldwide problem. Noninvasive methods for liver fibrosis assessment as ultrasound-based approaches have emerged to replace liver biopsy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of real-time elastography (RTE) in the assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC), compared with transient elastography and liver biopsy. Methods RTE, FibroScan and liver biopsy were performed in 50 CHC patients. In addition, aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI) and routine laboratory values were included in the analysis. Results RTE was able to diagnose significant hepatic fibrosis (F ≥2) according to METAVIR scoring system at cut-off value of 2.49 with sensitivity 100%, specificity 66%, and area under the receiver-operating characteristics (AUROC) 0.8. FibroScan was able to predict significant fibrosis at cut-off value 7.5 KPa with sensitivity 88%, specificity 100%, and AUROC 0.94.APRI was able to predict significant hepatic fibrosis (F ≥2) with sensitivity 54%, specificity 80%, and AUROC 0.69. There was a significant positive correlation between the FibroScan score and RTE score (r=0.6, P=0.001). Conclusions Although FibroScan is superior in determining significant hepatic fibrosis, our data suggest that RTE may be a useful and promising noninvasive method for liver fibrosis assessment in CHC patients especially in cases with technical limitations for FibroScan. PMID:27366038

  5. Prostate clinical study of a full inversion unconstrained ultrasound elastography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, S. Reza; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Czarnota, Gregory J.; Samani, Abbas

    2014-03-01

    Prostate cancer detection at early stages is crucial for desirable treatment outcome. Among available imaging modalities, ultrasound (US) elastography is being developed as an effective clinical tool for prostate cancer diagnosis. Current clinical US elastography systems utilise strain imaging where tissue strain images are generated to approximate the tissue elastic modulus distribution. While strain images can be generated in real-time fashion, they lack the accuracy necessary for having desirable sensitivity and specificity. To improve strain imaging, full inversion based elastography techniques were proposed. Among these techniques, a constrained elastography technique was developed which showed promising results as long as the tumor and prostate geometry can be obtained accurately from the imaging modality used in conjunction with the elastography system. This requirement is not easy to fulfill, especially with US imaging. To address this issue, we present an unconstrained full inversion prostate elastography method in conjunction with US imaging where knowledge of tissue geometry is not necessary. One of the reasons that full inversion elastography techniques have not been routinely used in the clinic is lack of clinical validation studies. To our knowledge, no quasistatic full inversion based prostate US elastography technique has been applied in vivo before. In this work, the proposed method was applied to clinical prostate data and reconstructed elasticity images were compared to corresponding annotated histopathology images which is the first quasi-static full inversion based prostate US elastography technique applied successfully in vivo. Results demonstrated a good potential for clinical utility of the proposed method.

  6. Real-time SPECT and 2D ultrasound image registration.

    PubMed

    Bucki, Marek; Chassat, Fabrice; Galdames, Francisco; Asahi, Takeshi; Pizarro, Daniel; Lobo, Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a technique for fully automatic, real-time 3D SPECT (Single Photon Emitting Computed Tomography) and 2D ultrasound image registration. We use this technique in the context of kidney lesion diagnosis. Our registration algorithm allows a physician to perform an ultrasound exam after a SPECT image has been acquired and see in real time the registration of both modalities. An automatic segmentation algorithm has been implemented in order to display in 3D the positions of the acquired US images with respect to the organs. PMID:18044572

  7. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Real-Time Elastography and Shear Wave Elastography in Differentiation Malignant From Benign Thyroid Nodules.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wuguo; Hao, Shuai; Gao, Bo; Jiang, Yan; Zhang, Shu; Guo, Lingji; Gu, Lingji; Luo, Donglin

    2015-12-01

    Thyroid nodules are relatively more prevalent in iodine-deficiency area, and the incidence increased sharply in the past decade in these areas. Workup of malignant from benign nodules in clinic was the main problem for managing thyroid nodules.An overall search for the articles about the diagnostic performance of real-time elastography (RTE) and shear wave elastography (SWE) before April 2015 in the databases of PubMed, Embase, and Google scholar. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve were obtained from individual studies with a random-effects model. Subgroup and meta-regression analysis were also performed.Fifty-six studies involved in 2621 malignant nodules and 7380 benign nodules were contained in our meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of RTE was 83.0% and 81.2%, which is higher than SWE (sensitivity: 78.7%, specificity: 80.5%). The areas under the SROC curve of RTE and SWE were 0.885 and 0.842 respectively. RTE had higher diagnostic value for Caucasians than Asians. Stran ratio (SR) assessment had higher diagnostic performance than elasticity score (ES) system. Similarly, it had higher diagnostic value when malignant nodules were more than 50.In summary, the results revealed that RTE had higher diagnostic performance than SWE in differentiating malignant from benign nodules. However, future international multicenter studies in the region of thyroid risk need to further assess the diagnostic performance of RTE. PMID:26717367

  8. Development of a Wireless and Near Real-Time 3D Ultrasound Strain Imaging System.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaohong; Chen, Yongdong; Huang, Qinghua

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound elastography is an important medical imaging tool for characterization of lesions. In this paper, we present a wireless and near real-time 3D ultrasound strain imaging system. It uses a 3D translating device to control a commercial linear ultrasound transducer to collect pre-compression and post-compression radio-frequency (RF) echo signal frames. The RF frames are wirelessly transferred to a high-performance server via a local area network (LAN). A dynamic programming strain estimation algorithm is implemented with the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) on the graphic processing unit (GPU) in the server to calculate the strain image after receiving a pre-compression RF frame and a post-compression RF frame at the same position. Each strain image is inserted into a strain volume which can be rendered in near real-time. We take full advantage of the translating device to precisely control the probe movement and compression. The GPU-based parallel computing techniques are designed to reduce the computation time. Phantom and in vivo experimental results demonstrate that our system can generate strain volumes with good quality and display an incrementally reconstructed volume image in near real-time. PMID:26954841

  9. Ultrasound elastography: enabling technology for image guided laparoscopic prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Ioana N.; Rivaz, Hassan; Macura, Katarzyna; Su, Li-Ming; Hamper, Ulrike; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L., II; Lotan, Tamara; Taylor, Russell H.; Hager, Gregory D.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2009-02-01

    Radical prostatectomy using the laparoscopic and robot-assisted approach lacks tactile feedback. Without palpation, the surgeon needs an affordable imaging technology which can be easily incorporated into the laparoscopic surgical procedure, allowing for precise real time intraoperative tumor localization that will guide the extent of surgical resection. Ultrasound elastography (USE) is a novel ultrasound imaging technology that can detect differences in tissue density or stiffness based on tissue deformation. USE was evaluated here as an enabling technology for image guided laparoscopic prostatectomy. USE using a 2D Dynamic Programming (DP) algorithm was applied on data from ex vivo human prostate specimens. It proved consistent in identification of lesions; hard and soft, malignant and benign, located in the prostate's central gland or in the peripheral zone. We noticed the 2D DP method was able to generate low-noise elastograms using two frames belonging to the same compression or relaxation part of the palpation excitation, even at compression rates up to 10%. Good preliminary results were validated by pathology findings, and also by in vivo and ex vivo MR imaging. We also evaluated the use of ultrasound elastography for imaging cavernous nerves; here we present data from animal model experiments.

  10. Wireless communication of real-time ultrasound data and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, Richard J.

    2015-03-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is expected to grow to 26 billion connected devices by 2020, plus the PC, smart phone, and tablet segment that includes mobile Health (mHealth) connected devices is projected to account for another 7.3 billion units by 2020. This paper explores some of the real-time constraints on the data-flow and control of a wireless connected ultrasound machine. The paper will define an ultrasound server and the capabilities necessary for real-time use of the device. The concept of an ultrasound server wirelessly (or over any network) connected to multiple lightweight clients on devices like an iPad, iPhone, or Android-based tablet, smartphone and other network-attached displays (i.e., Google Glass) is explored. Latency in the ultrasound data stream is one of the key areas to measure and to focus on keeping as small as possible (<30ms) so that the ultrasound operator can see what is at the probe at that moment, instead of where the probe was a short period earlier. By keeping the latency less than 30ms, the operator will feel like the data he sees on the wireless connected devices is running in real-time with the operator. The second parameter is the management of bandwidth. At minimum we need to be able to see 20 frames-per- second. It is possible to achieve ultrasound in triplex mode at >20 frames-per-second on a properly configured wireless network. The ultrasound server needs to be designed to accept multiple ultrasound data clients and multiple control clients. A description of the server and some of its key features will be described.

  11. Real-Time Elastography and Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography in the Evaluation of Testicular Masses: A Comparative Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Claudia; Lock, Guntram; Schmidt, Christa; Löning, Thomas; Dieckmann, Klaus-Peter

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates the usefulness of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and real-time elastography (RTE) for the characterization of testicular masses by comparing pre-operative ultrasound findings with post-operative histology. Sixty-seven patients with 68 sonographically detected testicular masses underwent B-mode, color-coded Doppler sonography (CCDS), CEUS and RTE according to defined criteria. For RTE, elasticity score (ES), difference of elasticity score (D-ES), strain ratio (SR) and size quotient (Qsize) were evaluated. Histopathologically, 54/68 testicular lesions were neoplastic (47 malignant, 7 benign). Descriptive statistics revealed the following results (neoplastic vs. non-neoplastic) for sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy, respectively: B-mode, 100%, 43%, 87%, 100%, 88%; CCDS 81%, 86%, 96%, 55%, 82%; CEUS 93%, 85%, 96%, 73%, 91%; ES 98%, 25%, 85%, 75%, 85%; D-ES 98%, 50%, 90%, 83%, 89%; SR 90%, 45%, 86%, 56%, 81%; and Qsize 57%, 83%, 94%, 28%, 61%. B-mode with CCDS remains the standard for assessing testicular masses. In characterization of testicular lesions, CEUS clearly outperformed all other modalities. Our study does not support the routine use of RTE in testicular ultrasonography because of its low specificity. PMID:27181687

  12. Monitoring Radiofrequency Ablation Using Real-Time Ultrasound Nakagami Imaging Combined with Frequency and Temporal Compounding Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wu, Shuicai; Wang, Chiao-Yin; Ma, Hsiang-Yang; Lin, Chung-Chih; Tsui, Po-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Gas bubbles induced during the radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of tissues can affect the detection of ablation zones (necrosis zone or thermal lesion) during ultrasound elastography. To resolve this problem, our previous study proposed ultrasound Nakagami imaging for detecting thermal-induced bubble formation to evaluate ablation zones. To prepare for future applications, this study (i) created a novel algorithmic scheme based on the frequency and temporal compounding of Nakagami imaging for enhanced ablation zone visualization, (ii) integrated the proposed algorithm into a clinical scanner to develop a real-time Nakagami imaging system for monitoring RFA, and (iii) investigated the applicability of Nakagami imaging to various types of tissues. The performance of the real-time Nakagami imaging system in visualizing RFA-induced ablation zones was validated by measuring porcine liver (n = 18) and muscle tissues (n = 6). The experimental results showed that the proposed algorithm can operate on a standard clinical ultrasound scanner to monitor RFA in real time. The Nakagami imaging system effectively monitors RFA-induced ablation zones in liver tissues. However, because tissue properties differ, the system cannot visualize ablation zones in muscle fibers. In the future, real-time Nakagami imaging should be focused on the RFA of the liver and is suggested as an alternative monitoring tool when advanced elastography is unavailable or substantial bubbles exist in the ablation zone. PMID:25658424

  13. Endoscopic Ultrasound Elastography: Current Clinical Use in Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Utpal; Henkes, Nichole; Patel, Sandeep; Rosenkranz, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Elastography is a newer technique for the assessment of tissue elasticity using ultrasound. Cancerous tissue is known to be stiffer (hence, less elastic) than corresponding healthy tissue, and as a result, could be identified in an elasticity-based imaging. Ultrasound elastography has been used in the breast, thyroid, and cervix to differentiate malignant from benign neoplasms and to guide or avoid unnecessary biopsies. In the liver, elastography has enabled a noninvasive and reliable estimate of fibrosis. Endoscopic ultrasound has become a robust diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the management of pancreatic diseases. The addition of elastography to endoscopic ultrasound enabled further characterization of pancreas lesions, and several European and Asian studies have reported encouraging results. The current clinical role of endoscopic ultrasound elastography in the management of pancreas disorders and related literature are reviewed. PMID:26825864

  14. Quantitative analysis of real-time tissue elastography for evaluation of liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ying; Wang, Xing-Hua; Zhang, Huan-Hu; Zhang, Hai-Qing; Tu, Ji-Zheng; Wei, Kun; Li, Juan; Liu, Xiao-Li

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the feasibility of quantitative analysis of liver fibrosis using real-time tissue elastography (RTE) and its pathological and molecule biological basis. Methods: Fifty-four New Zealand rabbits were subcutaneously injected with thioacetamide (TAA) to induce liver fibrosis as the model group, and another eight New Zealand rabbits served as the normal control group. Four rabbits were randomly taken every two weeks for real-time tissue elastography (RTE) and quantitative analysis of tissue diffusion. The obtained twelve characteristic quantities included relative mean value (MEAN), standard deviation (SD), blue area % (% AREA), complexity (COMP), kurtosis (KURT), skewness (SKEW), contrast (CONT), entropy (ENT), inverse different moment (IDM), angular secon moment (ASM), correlation (CORR) and liver fibrosis index (LF Index). Rabbits were executed and liver tissues were taken for pathological staging of liver fibrosis (grouped by pathological stage into S0 group, S1 group, S2 group, S3 group and S4 group). In addition, the collagen I (Col I) and collagen III (Col III) expression levels in liver tissue were detected by Western blot. Results: Except for KURT, there were significant differences among the other eleven characteristic quantities (P < 0.05). LF Index, Col I and Col III expression levels showed a rising trend with increased pathological staging of liver fibrosis, presenting a positive correlation with the pathological staging of liver fibrosis (r = 0.718, r = 0.693, r = 0.611, P < 0.05). Conclusion: RTE quantitative analysis is expected for noninvasive evaluation of the pathological staging of liver fibrosis. PMID:24955175

  15. Real-time ultrasound simulation using the GPU.

    PubMed

    Gjerald, Sjur Urdson; Brekken, Reidar; Hergum, Torbjørn; D'hooge, Jan

    2012-05-01

    Ultrasound simulators can be used for training ultrasound image acquisition and interpretation. In such simulators, synthetic ultrasound images must be generated in real time. Anatomy can be modeled by computed tomography (CT). Shadows can be calculated by combining reflection coefficients and depth dependent, exponential attenuation. To include speckle, a pre-calculated texture map is typically added. Dynamic objects must be simulated separately. We propose to increase the speckle realism and allow for dynamic objects by using a physical model of the underlying scattering process. The model is based on convolution of the point spread function (PSF) of the ultrasound scanner with a scatterer distribution. The challenge is that the typical field-of-view contains millions of scatterers which must be selected by a virtual probe from an even larger body of scatterers. The main idea of this paper is to select and sample scatterers in parallel on the graphic processing unit (GPU). The method was used to image a cyst phantom and a movable needle. Speckle images were produced in real time (more than 10 frames per second) on a standard GPU. The ultrasound images were visually similar to images calculated by a reference method. PMID:22622973

  16. Ultrasound Elastography and MR Elastography for Assessing Liver Fibrosis: Part 1, Principles and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Tang, An; Cloutier, Guy; Szeverenyi, Nikolaus M.; Sirlin, Claude B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of ultrasound and magnetic resonance elastography, including a glossary of relevant terminology, a classification of elastography techniques, and a discussion of their respective strengths and limitations. Conclusion Elastography is an emerging technique for the non-invasive assessment of mechanical tissue properties. These techniques report metrics related to tissue stiffness such as shear wave speed, magnitude of the complex shear modulus, and Young’s modulus. PMID:25905647

  17. Ultrasound Elastography: The New Frontier in Direct Measurement of Muscle Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Joline E.; Eby, Sarah F.; Song, Pengfei; Zhao, Heng; Brault, Jeffrey S.; Chen, Shigao; An, Kai-Nan

    2014-01-01

    The use of brightness-mode ultrasound and Doppler ultrasound in physical medicine and rehabilitation has increased dramatically. The continuing evolution of ultrasound technology has also produced ultrasound elastography, a cutting-edge technology that can directly measure the mechanical properties of tissue, including muscle stiffness. Its real-time and direct measurements of muscle stiffness can aid the diagnosis and rehabilitation of acute musculoskeletal injuries and chronic myofascial pain. It can also help monitor outcomes of interventions affecting muscle in neuromuscular and musculoskeletal diseases, and it can better inform the functional prognosis. This technology has implications for even broader use of ultrasound in physical medicine and rehabilitation practice, but more knowledge about its uses and limitations is essential to its appropriate clinical implementation. In this review, we describe different ultrasound elastography techniques for studying muscle stiffness, including strain elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging, and shear-wave elastography. We discuss the basic principles of these techniques, including the strengths and limitations of their measurement capabilities. We review the current muscle research, discuss physiatric clinical applications of these techniques, and note directions for future research. PMID:25064780

  18. Accuracy of localization of prostate lesions using manual palpation and ultrasound elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kut, Carmen; Schneider, Caitlin; Carter-Monroe, Naima; Su, Li-Ming; Boctor, Emad; Taylor, Russell

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of detecting tumor location and size in the prostate using both manual palpation and ultrasound elastography (UE). Methods: Tumors in the prostate were simulated using both synthetic and ex vivo tissue phantoms. 25 participants were asked to provide the presence, size and depth of these simulated lesions using manual palpation and UE. Ultrasound images were captured using a laparoscopic ultrasound probe, fitted with a Gore-Tetrad transducer with frequency of 7.5 MHz and a RF capture depth of 4-5 cm. A MATLAB GUI application was employed to process the RF data for ex vivo phantoms, and to generate UE images using a cross-correlation algorithm. Ultrasonix software was used to provide real time elastography during laparoscopic palpation of the synthetic phantoms. Statistical analyses were performed based on a two-tailed, student t-test with α = 0.05. Results: UE displays both a higher accuracy and specificity in tumor detection (sensitivity = 84%, specificity = 74%). Tumor diameters and depths are better estimated using ultrasound elastography when compared with manual palpation. Conclusions: Our results indicate that UE has strong potential in assisting surgeons to intra-operatively evaluate the tumor depth and size. We have also demonstrated that ultrasound elastography can be implemented in a laparoscopic environment, in which manual palpation would not be feasible. With further work, this application can provide accurate and clinically relevant information for surgeons during prostate resection.

  19. Ultrasound elastography in the head and neck. Part I. Basic principles and practical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Kunwar S.S.; Lee, Yolanda Y.P.; Yuen, Edmund H.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Ultrasound elastography (USE) is a rapidly developing field of imaging that measures and displays tissue elasticity or stiffness properties using ultrasound. In recent years, real-time USE modes have appeared on commercially available clinical ultrasound machines, stimulating an explosion of research into potential oncologic and non-oncologic clinical applications of USE. Preliminary evidence suggests that USE can differentiate benign and malignant conditions accurately in several different tissues. This article presents an overview of the basic principles of different USE technologies that are currently under investigation in the head and neck region. In addition, more practical aspects pertaining to the optimal performance of USE at this site are discussed. PMID:23876352

  20. Elastography Using Multi-Stream GPU: An Application to Online Tracked Ultrasound Elastography, In-Vivo and the da Vinci Surgical System

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Nishikant P.; Kang, Hyun Jae; Billings, Seth D.; Taylor, Russell H.; Hager, Gregory D.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-01-01

    A system for real-time ultrasound (US) elastography will advance interventions for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer by advancing methods such as thermal monitoring of tissue ablation. A multi-stream graphics processing unit (GPU) based accelerated normalized cross-correlation (NCC) elastography, with a maximum frame rate of 78 frames per second, is presented in this paper. A study of NCC window size is undertaken to determine the effect on frame rate and the quality of output elastography images. This paper also presents a novel system for Online Tracked Ultrasound Elastography (O-TRuE), which extends prior work on an offline method. By tracking the US probe with an electromagnetic (EM) tracker, the system selects in-plane radio frequency (RF) data frames for generating high quality elastograms. A novel method for evaluating the quality of an elastography output stream is presented, suggesting that O-TRuE generates more stable elastograms than generated by untracked, free-hand palpation. Since EM tracking cannot be used in all systems, an integration of real-time elastography and the da Vinci Surgical System is presented and evaluated for elastography stream quality based on our metric. The da Vinci surgical robot is outfitted with a laparoscopic US probe, and palpation motions are autonomously generated by customized software. It is found that a stable output stream can be achieved, which is affected by both the frequency and amplitude of palpation. The GPU framework is validated using data from in-vivo pig liver ablation; the generated elastography images identify the ablated region, outlined more clearly than in the corresponding B-mode US images. PMID:25541954

  1. Elastography using multi-stream GPU: an application to online tracked ultrasound elastography, in-vivo and the da Vinci Surgical System.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Nishikant P; Kang, Hyun Jae; Billings, Seth D; Taylor, Russell H; Hager, Gregory D; Boctor, Emad M

    2014-01-01

    A system for real-time ultrasound (US) elastography will advance interventions for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer by advancing methods such as thermal monitoring of tissue ablation. A multi-stream graphics processing unit (GPU) based accelerated normalized cross-correlation (NCC) elastography, with a maximum frame rate of 78 frames per second, is presented in this paper. A study of NCC window size is undertaken to determine the effect on frame rate and the quality of output elastography images. This paper also presents a novel system for Online Tracked Ultrasound Elastography (O-TRuE), which extends prior work on an offline method. By tracking the US probe with an electromagnetic (EM) tracker, the system selects in-plane radio frequency (RF) data frames for generating high quality elastograms. A novel method for evaluating the quality of an elastography output stream is presented, suggesting that O-TRuE generates more stable elastograms than generated by untracked, free-hand palpation. Since EM tracking cannot be used in all systems, an integration of real-time elastography and the da Vinci Surgical System is presented and evaluated for elastography stream quality based on our metric. The da Vinci surgical robot is outfitted with a laparoscopic US probe, and palpation motions are autonomously generated by customized software. It is found that a stable output stream can be achieved, which is affected by both the frequency and amplitude of palpation. The GPU framework is validated using data from in-vivo pig liver ablation; the generated elastography images identify the ablated region, outlined more clearly than in the corresponding B-mode US images. PMID:25541954

  2. Elastography: A New Ultrasound and MRI Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Pavan, Theo Z.; Vieira, Silvio L.; Carneiro, Antonio A. O.

    2008-08-11

    Elastography is an imaging technique whereby local tissue strains are estimated from small displacements of internal tissue structure. These displacements are generated from a weak, quasi-static or dynamic stress field. Displacement evaluation through ultrasound is based on time delay estimation between speckle patterns of echo maps acquired for different levels of tissue deformation. A classical model of deformation is applying a quasi-static compression on a sample during echoes acquisition. The elastogram map corresponds to the spatial derivation of the displacement map. By magnetic resonance, the displacement is evaluated from a map of phase acquired using a sequence gradient echo synchronized with a mechanical end sinusoidal excitation. The map of shear elastic modulus is obtained from the phase map.

  3. [Radiology Update Ultrasound Elastography – Quintessence for the Primary Care Physician].

    PubMed

    Franckenberg, Sabine; Gubler, Christoph; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Rominger, Marga

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound elastography visualizes and measures elasticity of tissue. Depending on the methods there are four types of elastography: strain elastography (SE), transient elastography (TE), acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) and shear wave elastography (SWE). Due to the fact that pathological changes in the tissue in most of the cases mean a lower elasticity, ultrasound elastography is able to diagnose diseases such as liver fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, to help in the diagnosis of suspicious lesions in mamma, prostate and thyroid gland. So far, ultrasound elastography is not yet able to replace other standardized diagnostic tools but can add valuable diagnostic information. PMID:26837322

  4. A miniature real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wygant, Ira O.; Yeh, David T.; Zhuang, Xuefeng; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Oralkan, Omer; Ergun, Arif S.; Karaman, Mustafa; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2005-04-01

    Progress made in the development of a miniature real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging system is presented. This system is targeted for use in a 5-mm endoscopic channel and will provide real-time, 30-mm deep, volumetric images. It is being developed as a clinically useful device, to demonstrate a means of integrating the front-end electronics with the transducer array, and to demonstrate the advantages of the capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) technology for medical imaging. Presented here is the progress made towards the initial implementation of this system, which is based on a two-dimensional, 16x16 CMUT array. Each CMUT element is 250 um by 250 um and has a 5 MHz center frequency. The elements are connected to bond pads on the back side of the array with 400-um long through-wafer interconnects. The transducer array is flip-chip bonded to a custom-designed integrated circuit that comprises the front-end electronics. The result is that each transducer element is connected to a dedicated pulser and low-noise preamplifier. The pulser generates 25-V, 100-ns wide, unipolar pulses. The preamplifier has an approximate transimpedance gain of 500 kOhm and 3-dB bandwidth of 10 MHz. In the first implementation of the system, one element at a time can be selected for transmit and receive and thus synthetic aperture images can be generated. In future implementations, 16 channels will be active at a given time. These channels will connect to an FPGA-based data acquisition system for real-time image reconstruction.

  5. Ultrasound-based transient elastography compared to magnetic resonance elastography in soft tissue-mimicking gels.

    PubMed

    Oudry, Jennifer; Vappou, Jonathan; Choquet, Philippe; Willinger, Rémy; Sandrin, Laurent; Constantinesco, André

    2009-11-21

    Ultrasound-based transient elastography (TE) and magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) are increasingly used methods for the clinical evaluation of soft tissue mechanical properties and their alteration under diseased conditions. This study proposes a comparison between magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) and ultrasound-based transient elastography (TE). Both methods were tested on the same soft tissue-mimicking gels in a common frequency range in order to allow for direct quantitative comparison. For the four gels tested, relatively good agreement was found between the shear moduli measured by both methods, with an averaged relative difference of 23%. This study demonstrates that under the assumption of homogeneous media that are significantly more elastic than viscous, quantitative results obtained by both methods are comparable. PMID:19887718

  6. In vivo real-time volumetric synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Rasmussen, Morten F.; Brandt, Andreas H.; Stuart, Matthias B.; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen A.

    2015-03-01

    Synthetic aperture (SA) imaging can be used to achieve real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging using 2-D array transducers. The sensitivity of SA imaging is improved by maximizing the acoustic output, but one must consider the limitations of an ultrasound system, both technical and biological. This paper investigates the in vivo applicability and sensitivity of volumetric SA imaging. Utilizing the transmit events to generate a set of virtual point sources, a frame rate of 25 Hz for a 90° × 90° field-of-view was achieved. data were obtained using a 3.5 MHz 32 × 32 elements 2-D phased array transducer connected to the experimental scanner (SARUS). Proper scaling is applied to the excitation signal such that intensity levels are in compliance with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations for in vivo ultrasound imaging. The measured Mechanical Index and spatial-peak-temporal-average intensity for parallel beam-forming (PB) are 0.83 and 377.5mW/cm2, and for SA are 0.48 and 329.5mW/cm2. A human kidney was volumetrically imaged with SA and PB techniques simultaneously. Two radiologists for evaluation of the volumetric SA were consulted by means of a questionnaire on the level of details perceivable in the beam-formed images. The comparison was against PB based on the in vivo data. The feedback from the domain experts indicates that volumetric SA images internal body structures with a better contrast resolution compared to PB at all positions in the entire imaged volume. Furthermore, the autocovariance of a homogeneous area in the in vivo SA data, had 23.5% smaller width at the half of its maximum value compared to PB.

  7. Liver ultrasound elastography: More than staging the disease

    PubMed Central

    Gherlan, George S

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography is perhaps the most important breakthrough in the evolution of ultrasonography in the last 15 years. Since transient elastography was introduced, many other methods have been developed and became more and more widely available. The value of ultrasound elastography in staging a chronic liver disease has been established by numerous studies. There have been many studies that have shown that using liver elastography it is possible to predict the presence of the complications of cirrhosis: portal hypertension, presence of esophageal varices (and even their risk of bleeding) and hepatocellular carcinoma. It has been shown that liver elastography can predict the progression of liver fibrosis and also the survival (hepatic events - free) of the patients with chronic liver diseases. These are the real quests of the clinicians, this is the ultimate scope of any medical investigation - to predict the outcome of a patient and to help making therapeutic decisions. I brought together only a small amount of the data that has already been written on this subject to support my affirmation that liver ultrasound elastography is more than a tool for staging the liver disease, but it is also comparable to a crystal ball which in the hands of a skilled clinician can reveal the future of the patient and can help to improve this future. PMID:26140079

  8. Liver ultrasound elastography: More than staging the disease.

    PubMed

    Gherlan, George S

    2015-06-28

    Ultrasound elastography is perhaps the most important breakthrough in the evolution of ultrasonography in the last 15 years. Since transient elastography was introduced, many other methods have been developed and became more and more widely available. The value of ultrasound elastography in staging a chronic liver disease has been established by numerous studies. There have been many studies that have shown that using liver elastography it is possible to predict the presence of the complications of cirrhosis: portal hypertension, presence of esophageal varices (and even their risk of bleeding) and hepatocellular carcinoma. It has been shown that liver elastography can predict the progression of liver fibrosis and also the survival (hepatic events - free) of the patients with chronic liver diseases. These are the real quests of the clinicians, this is the ultimate scope of any medical investigation - to predict the outcome of a patient and to help making therapeutic decisions. I brought together only a small amount of the data that has already been written on this subject to support my affirmation that liver ultrasound elastography is more than a tool for staging the liver disease, but it is also comparable to a crystal ball which in the hands of a skilled clinician can reveal the future of the patient and can help to improve this future. PMID:26140079

  9. Real-time, 3-D ultrasound with multiple transducer arrays.

    PubMed

    Fronheiser, Matthew P; Light, Edward D; Idriss, Salim F; Wolf, Patrick D; Smith, Stephen W

    2006-01-01

    Modifications were made to a commercial real-time, three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound system for near simultaneous 3-D scanning with two matrix array transducers. As a first illustration, a transducer cable assembly was modified to incorporate two independent, 3-D intra-cardiac echo catheters, a 7 Fr (2.3 mm O.D.) side scanning catheter and a 14 Fr (4.7 mm O.D) forward viewing catheter with accessory port, each catheter using 85 channels operating at 5 MHz. For applications in treatment of atrial fibrillation, the goal is to place the sideviewing catheter within the coronary sinus to view the whole left atrium, including a pulmonary vein. Meanwhile, the forward-viewing catheter inserted within the left atrium is directed toward the ostium of a pulmonary vein for therapy using the integrated accessory port. Using preloaded, phasing data, the scanner switches between catheters automatically, at the push of a button, with a delay of about 1 second, so that the clinician can view the therapy catheter with the coronary sinus catheter and vice versa. Preliminary imaging studies in a tissue phantom and in vivo show that our system successfully guided the forward-viewing catheter toward a target while being imaged with the sideviewing catheter. The forward-viewing catheter then was activated to monitor the target while we mimicked therapy delivery. In the future, the system will switch between 3-D probes on a line-by-line basis and display both volumes simultaneously. PMID:16471436

  10. Robust real-time instrument tracking in ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortmaier, Tobias; Vitrani, Marie-Aude; Morel, Guillaume; Pinault, Samuel

    2005-04-01

    Minimally invasive surgery in combination with ultrasound (US) imaging imposes high demands on the surgeon's hand-eye-coordination capabilities. A possible solution to reduce these requirements is minimally invasive robotic surgery in which the instrument is guided by visual servoing towards the goal defined by the surgeon in the US image. This approach requires robust tracking of the instrument in the US image sequences which is known to be difficult due to poor image quality. This paper presents algorithms and results of first tracking experiments. Adaptive thresholding based on Otsu's method allows to cope with large intensity variations of the instrument echo. Median filtering of the binary image and subsequently applied morphological operations suppress noise and echo artefacts. A fast run length code based labelling algorithm allows for real-time labelling of the regions. A heuristic exploiting region size and region velocity helps to overcome ambiguities. The overall computation time is less than 20 ms per frame on a standard PC. The tracking algorithm requires no information about texture and shape which are known to be very unreliable in US image sequences. Experimental results for two different instrument materials (polyvinyl chloride and polyurethane) are given, showing the performance of the proposed approach. Choosing the appropriate material, trajectories are smooth and only few outliers occur.

  11. Ultrasound elastography using empirical mode decomposition analysis.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Sajjad; Behnam, Hamid; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography is a non-invasive method which images the elasticity of soft-tissues. To make an image, pre and after a small compression, ultrasound radio frequency (RF) signals are acquired and the time delays between them are estimated. The first differentiation of displacement estimations is called elastogram. In this study, we are going to make an elastogram using the processing method named empirical mode decomposition (EMD). EMD is an analytic technique which decomposes a complicated signal to a collection of simple signals called intrinsic mode functions (IMFs). The idea of paper is using these IMFs instead of primary RF signals. To implement the algorithms two different datasets selected. The first one was data from a sandwich structure of normal and cooked tissue. The second dataset consisted of around 180 frames acquired from a malignant breast tumor. For displacement estimating, two different methods, cross-correlation and wavelet transform, were used too and for evaluating the quality, two conventional parameters, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) calculated for each image. Results show that in both methods after using EMD the quality improves. In first dataset and cross correlation technique CNR and SNR improve about 16 dB and 9 dB respectively. In same dataset by using wavelet technique, the parameters show 14 dB and 10 dB improvement respectively. In second dataset (breast tumor data) CNR and SNR in cross correlation method improve 18 dB and 7 dB and in wavelet technique improve 17 dB and 6 dB respectively. PMID:24696805

  12. Real-Time Ellipsometry-Based Transmission Ultrasound Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kallman, J S; Poco, J F; Ashby, A E

    2007-02-14

    Ultrasonic imaging is a valuable tool for non-destructive evaluation and medical diagnosis. Reflection mode is exclusively used for medical imaging, and is most frequently used for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) because of the relative speed of acquisition. Reflection mode imaging is qualitative, yielding little information about material properties, and usually only about material interfaces. Transmission imaging can be used in 3D reconstructions to yield quantitative information: sound speed and attenuation. Unfortunately, traditional scanning methods of acquiring transmission data are very slow, requiring on the order of 20 minutes per image. The sensing of acoustic pressure fields as optical images can significantly speed data acquisition. An entire 2D acoustic pressure field can be acquired in under a second. The speed of data acquisition for a 2D view makes it feasible to obtain multiple views of an object. With multiple views, 3D reconstruction becomes possible. A fast, compact (no big magnets or accelerators), inexpensive, 3D imaging technology that uses no ionizing radiation could be a boon to the NDE and medical communities. 2D transmission images could be examined in real time to give the ultrasonic equivalent of a fluoroscope, or accumulated in such a way as to acquire phase and amplitude data over multiple views for 3D reconstruction (for breast cancer imaging, for example). Composite panels produced for the aircraft and automobile industries could be inspected in near real time, and inspection of attenuating materials such as ceramics and high explosives would be possible. There are currently three optical-readout imaging transmission ultrasound technologies available. One is based on frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR) [1,2], one on Fabry-Perot interferometry [3], and another on critical angle modulation [4]. Each of these techniques has its problems. The FTIR based system cannot currently be scaled to large aperture sizes, the Fabry

  13. Ultrasound Elastography and MR Elastography for Assessing Liver Fibrosis: Part 2, Diagnostic Performance, Confounders, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Tang, An; Cloutier, Guy; Szeverenyi, Nikolaus M.; Sirlin, Claude B.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of the article is to review the diagnostic performance of ultrasound and MR elastography techniques for detection and staging of liver fibrosis, the main current clinical applications of elastography in the abdomen. CONCLUSION Technical and instrument-related factors and biologic and patient-related factors may constitute potential confounders of stiffness measurements for assessment of liver fibrosis. Future developments may expand the scope of elastography for monitoring liver fibrosis and predict complications of chronic liver disease. PMID:25905762

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound elastography: Current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xin-Wu; Chang, Jian-Min; Kan, Quan-Cheng; Chiorean, Liliana; Ignee, Andre; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2015-12-21

    Elastography is a new ultrasound modality that provides images and measurements related to tissue stiffness. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has played an important role in the diagnosis and management of numerous abdominal and mediastinal diseases. Elastography by means of EUS examination can assess the elasticity of tumors in the proximity of the digestive tract that are hard to reach with conventional transcutaneous ultrasound probes, such as pancreatic masses and mediastinal or abdominal lymph nodes, thus improving the diagnostic yield of the procedure. Results from previous studies have promised benefits for EUS elastography in the differential diagnosis of lymph nodes, as well as for assessing masses with pancreatic or gastrointestinal (GI) tract locations. It is important to mention that EUS elastography is not considered a modality that can replace biopsy. However, it may be a useful adjunct, improving the accuracy of EUS-fine needle aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNAB) by selecting the most suspicious area to be targeted. Even more, it may be useful for guiding further clinical management when EUS-FNAB is negative or inconclusive. In the present paper we will discuss the current knowledge of EUS elastography, including the technical aspects, along with its applications in the differential diagnosis between benign and malignant solid pancreatic masses and lymph nodes, as well as its aid in the differentiation between normal pancreatic tissues and chronic pancreatitis. Moreover, the emergent indication and future perspectives are summarized, such as the benefit of EUS elastography in EUS-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy, and its uses for characterization of lesions in liver, biliary tract, adrenal glands and GI tract. PMID:26715804

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound elastography: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xin-Wu; Chang, Jian-Min; Kan, Quan-Cheng; Chiorean, Liliana; Ignee, Andre; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2015-01-01

    Elastography is a new ultrasound modality that provides images and measurements related to tissue stiffness. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has played an important role in the diagnosis and management of numerous abdominal and mediastinal diseases. Elastography by means of EUS examination can assess the elasticity of tumors in the proximity of the digestive tract that are hard to reach with conventional transcutaneous ultrasound probes, such as pancreatic masses and mediastinal or abdominal lymph nodes, thus improving the diagnostic yield of the procedure. Results from previous studies have promised benefits for EUS elastography in the differential diagnosis of lymph nodes, as well as for assessing masses with pancreatic or gastrointestinal (GI) tract locations. It is important to mention that EUS elastography is not considered a modality that can replace biopsy. However, it may be a useful adjunct, improving the accuracy of EUS-fine needle aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNAB) by selecting the most suspicious area to be targeted. Even more, it may be useful for guiding further clinical management when EUS-FNAB is negative or inconclusive. In the present paper we will discuss the current knowledge of EUS elastography, including the technical aspects, along with its applications in the differential diagnosis between benign and malignant solid pancreatic masses and lymph nodes, as well as its aid in the differentiation between normal pancreatic tissues and chronic pancreatitis. Moreover, the emergent indication and future perspectives are summarized, such as the benefit of EUS elastography in EUS-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy, and its uses for characterization of lesions in liver, biliary tract, adrenal glands and GI tract. PMID:26715804

  16. High-resolution imaging with a real-time synthetic aperture ultrasound system: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lianjie; Labyed, Yassin; Simonetti, Francesco; Williamson, Michael; Rosenberg, Robert; Heintz, Philip; Sandoval, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    It is difficult for ultrasound to image small targets such as breast microcalcifications. Synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging has recently developed as a promising tool to improve the capabilities of medical ultrasound. We use two different tissueequivalent phantoms to study the imaging capabilities of a real-time synthetic aperture ultrasound system for imaging small targets. The InnerVision ultrasound system DAS009 is an investigational system for real-time synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging. We use the system to image the two phantoms, and compare the images with those obtained from clinical scanners Acuson Sequoia 512 and Siemens S2000. Our results show that synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging produces images with higher resolution and less image artifacts than Acuson Sequoia 512 and Siemens S2000. In addition, we study the effects of sound speed on synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging and demonstrate that an accurate sound speed is very important for imaging small targets.

  17. Measurement of real-time tissue elastography in a phantom model and comparison with transient elastography in pediatric patients with liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Jens-Peter; Alzen, Gerhard; Klingmüller, Volker; Teufel, Ulrike; Sakka, Saroa El; Engelmann, Guido; Selmi, Buket

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to determine the comparability of real-time tissue elastography (RTE) and transient elastography (TE) in pediatric patients with liver diseases. MATERIALS AND METHODS RTE was performed on the Elasticity QA Phantom Model 049 (Computerized Imaging Reference Systems Company Inc., Norfolk, Virginia, USA), which has five areas with different levels of stiffness. RTE measurements of relative stiffness (MEAN [mean value of tissue elasticity], AREA [% of blue color-coded stiffer tissue]) in the phantom were compared with the phantom stiffness specified in kPa (measurement unit of TE). RTE and TE were performed on 147 pediatric patients with various liver diseases. A total of 109 measurements were valid. The participants had following diseases: metabolic liver disease (n=25), cystic fibrosis (n=20), hepatopathy of unknown origin (n=11), autoimmune hepatitis (n=12), Wilson’s disease (n=11), and various liver parenchyma alterations (n=30). Correlations between RTE and TE measurements in the patients were calculated. In addition, RTE was performed on a control group (n=30), and the RTE values between the patient and control groups were compared. RESULTS The RTE parameters showed good correlation in the phantom model with phantom stiffness (MEAN/kPa, r=−0.97; AREA/kPa, r=0.98). However, the correlation of RTE and TE was weak in the patient group (MEAN/kPa, r=−0.23; AREA/kPa, r=0.24). A significant difference was observed between the patient and control groups (MEAN, P = 5.32 e-7; AREA, P = 1.62 e-6). CONCLUSION In the phantom model, RTE was correlated with kPa, confirming the presumed comparability of the methods. However, there was no direct correlation between RTE and TE in patients with defined liver diseases under real clinical conditions. PMID:24317333

  18. Evaluation of Liver Stiffness After Radioembolization by Real-Time ShearWave™ Elastography: Preliminary Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bas, Ahmet; Samanci, Cesur; Gulsen, Fatih Cantasdemir, Murat; Kabasakal, Levent; Kantarci, Fatih; Numan, Furuzan

    2015-08-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the effect of ShearWave™ elastography (SWE) for the assessment of liver fibrosis after radioembolization (RE) in patients with liver malignancies.Materials and MethodsWe prospectively examined the effects of SWE before and after RE in 17 adult patients, from June 2012 to September 2013. All patients underwent SWE within 1 month before and 3 months (96.3 ± 22.9 days) after RE. Measurements were taken in segments III, IV, V, and VI (lateral/medial left lobe and anterior/posterior right lobe, respectively). Liver stiffness was studied in the 39 treated segments.ResultsThe mean stiffness of liver tissue according to the pre-RE SWE measurements was not different from the post-RE SWE measurements in the segments that did not undergo RE. Conversely, segments treated with RE were significantly stiffer according to the post-RE SWE measurements (mean SWE 17.4 kPa) than according to the baseline measurements (7.0 kPa) (p < 0.001). Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and preexisting infection with hepatitis B and C viruses had higher pre-embolization stiffness, and the post-embolization stiffness of the treated segments in these patients was higher than that in the remainder of the study population.ConclusionThese data suggest that SWE measurements of liver stiffness increase as early as the third month after RE. SWE could be used as a noninvasive complementary imaging method for preliminary assessment of liver fibrosis before and after RE.

  19. Localization of Parathyroid Adenoma With Real-Time Ultrasound: Freehand SPECT Fusion.

    PubMed

    Bluemel, Christina; Kirchner, Paul; Kajdi, Georg W; Werner, Rudolf A; Herrmann, Ken

    2016-03-01

    Preoperative localization of parathyroid adenoma in primary hyperparathyroidism gains in importance as there is a trend toward minimally invasive parathyroid surgery. Besides MRI, 4-dimensional CT, PET/CT, invasive-selective venous sampling, or angiography, both ultrasound and scintigraphy are standard of care for lesion localization. Here we report on a 53-year-old woman with suspicion of primary hyperparathyroidism using real-time fusion of scintigraphic (freehand SPECT) and ultrasound imaging for adenoma localization. Real-time fusion of ultrasound and freehand SPECT allowed noninvasive dedicated metabolic and anatomic adenoma localization and treatment planning. PMID:26284776

  20. FPGA-based real-time anisotropic diffusion filtering of 3D ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Pareja, Carlos R.; Dandekar, Omkar S.; Shekhar, Raj

    2005-02-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasonic imaging, especially the emerging real-time version of it, is particularly valuable in medical applications such as echocardiography, obstetrics and surgical navigation. A known problem with ultrasound images is their high level of speckle noise. Anisotropic diffusion filtering has been shown to be effective in enhancing the visual quality of 3D ultrasound images and as preprocessing prior to advanced image processing. However, due to its arithmetic complexity and the sheer size of 3D ultrasound images, it is not possible to perform online, real-time anisotropic diffusion filtering using standard software implementations. We present an FPGA-based architecture that allows performing anisotropic diffusion filtering of 3D images at acquisition rates, thus enabling the use of this filtering technique in real-time applications, such as visualization, registration and volume rendering.

  1. Real-time monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound thermal therapy using the manifold learning method.

    PubMed

    Rangraz, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Sobhebidari, Pooya; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-12-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) induces thermal lesions by increasing the tissue temperature in a tight focal region. The main ultrasound imaging techniques currently used to monitor HIFU treatment are standard pulse-echo B-mode ultrasound imaging, ultrasound temperature estimation and elastography-based methods. The present study was carried out on ex vivo animal tissue samples, in which backscattered radiofrequency (RF) signals were acquired in real time at time instances before, during and after HIFU treatment. The manifold learning algorithm, a non-linear dimensionality reduction method, was applied to RF signals whichconstruct B-mode images to detect the HIFU-induced changes among the image frames obtained during HIFU treatment. In this approach, the embedded non-linear information in the region of interest of sequential images is represented in a 2-D manifold with the Isomap algorithm, and each image is depicted as a point on the reconstructed manifold. Four distinct regions are chosen in the manifold corresponding to the four phases of HIFU treatment (before HIFU treatment, during HIFU treatment, immediately after HIFU treatment and 10-min after HIFU treatment). It was found that disorganization of the points is achieved by increasing the acoustic power, and if the thermal lesion has been formed, the regions of points related to pre- and post-HIFU significantly differ. Moreover, the manifold embedding was repeated on 2-D moving windows in RF data envelopes related to pre- and post-HIFU exposure data frames. It was concluded that if mean values of the points related to pre- and post-exposure frames in the reconstructed manifold are estimated, and if the Euclidean distance between these two mean values is calculated and the sliding window is moved and this procedure is repeated for the whole image, a new image based on the Euclidean distance can be formed in which the HIFU thermal lesion is detectable. PMID:25438863

  2. Elasticity-based three dimensional ultrasound real-time volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boctor, Emad M.; Matinfar, Mohammad; Ahmad, Omar; Rivaz, Hassan; Choti, Michael; Taylor, Russell H.

    2009-02-01

    Volumetric ultrasound imaging has not gained wide recognition, despite the availability of real-time 3D ultrasound scanners and the anticipated potential of 3D ultrasound imaging in diagnostic and interventional radiology. Their use, however, has been hindered by the lack of real-time visualization methods that are capable of producing high quality 3D rendering of the target/surface of interest. Volume rendering is a known visualization method, which can display clear surfaces out of the acquired volumetric data, and has an increasing number of applications utilizing CT and MRI data. The key element of any volume rendering pipeline is the ability to classify the target/surface of interest by setting an appropriate opacity function. Practical and successful real-time 3D ultrasound volume rendering can be achieved in Obstetrics and Angio applications where setting these opacity functions can be done rapidly, and reliably. Unfortunately, 3D ultrasound volume rendering of soft tissues is a challenging task due to the presence of significant amount of noise and speckle. Recently, several research groups have shown the feasibility of producing 3D elasticity volume from two consecutive 3D ultrasound scans. This report describes a novel volume rendering pipeline utilizing elasticity information. The basic idea is to compute B-mode voxel opacity from the rapidly calculated strain values, which can also be mixed with conventional gradient based opacity function. We have implemented the volume renderer using GPU unit, which gives an update rate of 40 volume/sec.

  3. Clinical value of real-time elastography quantitative parameters in evaluating the stage of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    GE, LAN; SHI, BAOMIN; SONG, YE; LI, YUAN; WANG, SHUO; WANG, XIUYAN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the value of real-time elastography (RTE) quantitative parameters, namely the liver fibrosis (LF) index and the ratio of blue area (%AREA), in evaluating the stage of liver fibrosis. RTE quantitative analysis software was used to examine 120 patients with chronic hepatitis in order to obtain the values for 12 quantitative parameters from the elastic images. The diagnostic performance of two such parameters, the LF index and %AREA, were assessed with a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve to determine the optimal diagnostic cut-off values for liver cirrhosis and fibrosis. A good correlation was observed between the LF index and %AREA with the fibrosis stage. The areas under the ROC curve for the LF index were 0.985 for the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis and 0.790 for liver fibrosis. With regard to %AREA, the areas under the ROC curve for the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis and fibrosis were 0.963 and 0.770, respectively. An LF index of >3.25 and a %AREA of >28.83 for the diagnosis of cirrhosis stage resulted in sensitivity values of 100 and 100%, specificity values of 88.9 and 85.9% and accuracy values of 90.8 and 88.3%, respectively. The LF index and %AREA parameters exhibited higher reliability in the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis compared with the diagnosis of the liver fibrosis stage. However, the two parameters possessed a similar efficacy in the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis and the stage of liver fibrosis. Therefore, the quantitative RTE parameters of the LF index and %AREA may be clinically applicable as reliable indices for the early diagnosis of liver cirrhosis, without the requirement of an invasive procedure. PMID:26622426

  4. Toward real-time bent-ray breast ultrasound tomography using GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labyed, Yassin; Huang, Lianjie

    2014-03-01

    Breast ultrasound tomography is a promising imaging modality that has the potential to improve the diagnosis and screening of breast cancer. We develop a bent-ray ultrasound tomography algorithm to reconstruct sound-speed images of the breast. We investigate the acceleration of the algorithm using graphical processing units (GPUs). We adapt the algorithmic steps of ultrasound bent-ray tomography to a GPU cluster, and use multi-GPU scaling to speed up the computation. Our results show that it is very promising to use a GPU cluster with multiple GPU cards to achieve nearly real-time tomographic reconstruction.

  5. A new shear wave imaging system for ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weibao; Wang, Congzhi; Xiao, Yang; Qian, Ming; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-08-01

    Ultrasound elastography is able to provide a non-invasive measurement of tissue elasticity properties. Shear wave imaging (SWI) technique is a quantitative method for tissue stiffness assessment. However, traditional SWI implementations cannot acquire 2D quantitative images of tissue elasticity distribution. In this study, a new shear wave imaging system is proposed and evaluated. Detailed delineation of hardware and image processing algorithms are presented. Programmable devices are selected to support flexible control of the system and the image processing algorithms. Analytic signal based cross-correlation method and a Radon transform based shear wave speed determination method are proposed with parallel computation ability. Tissue mimicking phantom imaging, and in vitro imaging measurements are conducted to demonstrate the performance of the proposed system. The system has the ability to provide a new choice for quantitative mapping of the tissue elasticity, and has good potential to be implemented into commercial ultrasound scanner. PMID:26737133

  6. Assessment of Diffuse Thyroid Disease by Strain Ratio in Ultrasound Elastography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Haixian; Wang, Kun; Cui, Guanghe; Fu, Fengkui

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the value of strain ratio from real-time elastography in the semi-quantitative assessment of diffuse thyroid disease. Fifty-one patients with primary hyperthyroidism, 70 with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, 8 with subacute thyroiditis and 43 with normal healthy thyroids were recruited to measure the strain ratio (SR) of thyroid tissue and sternocleidomastoid muscle (on the same side of the thyroid). SR values of all groups were subjected to statistical analysis. The SRs (mean ± standard deviation) of patients with hyperthyroidism, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and subacute thyroiditis were 2.30 ± 1.08, 7.04 ± 7.74 and 24.09 ± 13.56, respectively. The SR of the control group was 1.76 ± 0.54. SR values ranked in ascending order were control group < hyperthyroidism group < Hashimoto's thyroiditis group < subacute thyroiditis group. There were statistically significant (p < 0.05) differences in thyroid hardness between groups with different diffuse thyroid diseases. SR values of the hyperthyroidism and control groups did not statistically differ (p > 0.05). It is feasible to assess diffuse thyroid disease with strain ratios obtained with ultrasound elastography. PMID:26306430

  7. Diagnostic Accuracy of Real-Time Shear Wave Elastography for Staging of Liver Fibrosis: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Changtian; Zhang, Changsheng; Li, Junlai; Huo, Huiping; Song, Danfei

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The present meta-analysis, based on previous studies, was aimed to evaluate the test accuracy of real-time shear wave elastography (SWE) for the staging of liver fibrosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS A systematic search on MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar databases was conducted, and data on SWE tests and liver fibrosis staging were collected. For each cut-off stage of fibrosis (F≥2, F≥3, and F≥4), pooled results of sensitivity, specificity, and area under summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve were analyzed. The study heterogeneity was evaluated by χ2 and I2 tests. I2>50% or P≤0.05 indicates there was heterogeneity, and then a random-effects model was applied. Otherwise, the fixed-effects model was used. The publication bias was evaluated using Deeks funnel plots asymmetry test and Fagan plot analysis was performed. RESULTS Finally, 934 patients from 8 published studies were included in the analysis. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of SWE for F≥2 were 85.0% (95% CI, 82-88%) and 81% (95% CI, 71-88%), respectively. The area under the SROC curve with 95% CI was presented as 0.88 (95% CI, 85-91%). The pooled sensitivity and specificity of SWE for F≥3 were 90.0% (95% CI, 83.0-95.0%) and 81.0% (95% CI, 75.0-86.0%), respectively, corresponding to an area of SROC of 0.94 (95% CI, 92-96%). The pooled sensitivity and specificity of SWE for F≥4 were 87.0% (95% CI, 80.0-92.0%) and 88.0% (95% CI, 80.0-93.0%), respectively, corresponding to an area of SROC of 0.92 (95% CI, 89-94%). CONCLUSIONS The overall accuracy of SWE is high and clinically useful for the staging of liver fibrosis. Compared to the results of meta-analyses on other tests, such as RTE, TE, and ARFI, the performance of SWE is nearly identical in accuracy for the evaluation of cirrhosis. For the evaluation of significant liver fibrosis (F≥2), the overall accuracy of SWE seems to be similar to ARFI, but more accurate than RTE and TE. PMID:27102449

  8. Diagnostic Accuracy of Real-Time Shear Wave Elastography for Staging of Liver Fibrosis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changtian; Zhang, Changsheng; Li, Junlai; Huo, Huiping; Song, Danfei

    2016-01-01

    Background The present meta-analysis, based on previous studies, was aimed to evaluate the test accuracy of real-time shear wave elastography (SWE) for the staging of liver fibrosis. Material/Methods A systematic search on MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar databases was conducted, and data on SWE tests and liver fibrosis staging were collected. For each cut-off stage of fibrosis (F≥2, F≥3, and F≥4), pooled results of sensitivity, specificity, and area under summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve were analyzed. The study heterogeneity was evaluated by χ2 and I2 tests. I2>50% or P≤0.05 indicates there was heterogeneity, and then a random-effects model was applied. Otherwise, the fixed-effects model was used. The publication bias was evaluated using Deeks funnel plots asymmetry test and Fagan plot analysis was performed. Results Finally, 934 patients from 8 published studies were included in the analysis. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of SWE for F≥2 were 85.0% (95% CI, 82–88%) and 81% (95% CI, 71–88%), respectively. The area under the SROC curve with 95% CI was presented as 0.88 (95% CI, 85–91%). The pooled sensitivity and specificity of SWE for F≥3 were 90.0% (95% CI, 83.0–95.0%) and 81.0% (95% CI, 75.0–86.0%), respectively, corresponding to an area of SROC of 0.94 (95% CI, 92–96%). The pooled sensitivity and specificity of SWE for F≥4 were 87.0% (95% CI, 80.0–92.0%) and 88.0% (95% CI, 80.0–93.0%), respectively, corresponding to an area of SROC of 0.92 (95% CI, 89–94%). Conclusions The overall accuracy of SWE is high and clinically useful for the staging of liver fibrosis. Compared to the results of meta-analyses on other tests, such as RTE, TE, and ARFI, the performance of SWE is nearly identical in accuracy for the evaluation of cirrhosis. For the evaluation of significant liver fibrosis (F≥2), the overall accuracy of SWE seems to be similar to ARFI, but more accurate than RTE and TE. PMID

  9. Use of Ultrasound Elastography in the Assessment of the Musculoskeletal System

    PubMed Central

    Paluch, Łukasz; Nawrocka-Laskus, Ewa; Wieczorek, Janusz; Mruk, Bartosz; Frel, Małgorzata; Walecki, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Summary This article presents possible applications of ultrasound elastography in musculoskeletal imaging based on the available literature, as well as the possibility of extending indications for the use of elastography in the future. Ultrasound elastography (EUS) is a new method that shows structural changes in tissues following application of physical stress. Elastography techniques have been widely used to assess muscles and tendons in vitro since the early parts of the twentieth century. Only recently with the advent of new technology and creation of highly specialized ultrasound devices, has elastography gained widespread use in numerous applications. The authors performed a search of the Medline/PubMed databases for original research and reviewed publications on the application of ultrasound elastography for musculoskeletal imaging. All publications demonstrate possible uses of ultrasound elastography in examinations of the musculoskeletal system. The most widely studied areas include the muscles, tendons and rheumatic diseases. There are also reports on the employment in vessel imaging. The main limitation of elastography as a technique is above all the variability of applied pressure during imaging, which is operator-dependent. It would therefore be reasonable to provide clear guidelines on the technique applied, as well as clear indications for performing the test. It is important to develop methods for creating artifact-free, closed-loop, compression-decompression cycles. The main advantages include cost-effectiveness, short duration of the study, non-invasive nature of the procedure, as well as a potentially broader clinical availability. There are no clear guidelines with regard to indications as well as examination techniques. Ultrasound elastography is a new and still poorly researched method. We conclude, however, that it can be widely used in the examinations of musculoskeletal system. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct large, multi

  10. Use of Ultrasound Elastography in the Assessment of the Musculoskeletal System.

    PubMed

    Paluch, Łukasz; Nawrocka-Laskus, Ewa; Wieczorek, Janusz; Mruk, Bartosz; Frel, Małgorzata; Walecki, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    This article presents possible applications of ultrasound elastography in musculoskeletal imaging based on the available literature, as well as the possibility of extending indications for the use of elastography in the future. Ultrasound elastography (EUS) is a new method that shows structural changes in tissues following application of physical stress. Elastography techniques have been widely used to assess muscles and tendons in vitro since the early parts of the twentieth century. Only recently with the advent of new technology and creation of highly specialized ultrasound devices, has elastography gained widespread use in numerous applications. The authors performed a search of the Medline/PubMed databases for original research and reviewed publications on the application of ultrasound elastography for musculoskeletal imaging. All publications demonstrate possible uses of ultrasound elastography in examinations of the musculoskeletal system. The most widely studied areas include the muscles, tendons and rheumatic diseases. There are also reports on the employment in vessel imaging. The main limitation of elastography as a technique is above all the variability of applied pressure during imaging, which is operator-dependent. It would therefore be reasonable to provide clear guidelines on the technique applied, as well as clear indications for performing the test. It is important to develop methods for creating artifact-free, closed-loop, compression-decompression cycles. The main advantages include cost-effectiveness, short duration of the study, non-invasive nature of the procedure, as well as a potentially broader clinical availability. There are no clear guidelines with regard to indications as well as examination techniques. Ultrasound elastography is a new and still poorly researched method. We conclude, however, that it can be widely used in the examinations of musculoskeletal system. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct large, multi-center studies to

  11. Real-time needle guidance with photoacoustic and laser-generated ultrasound probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colchester, Richard J.; Mosse, Charles A.; Nikitichev, Daniil I.; Zhang, Edward Z.; West, Simeon; Beard, Paul C.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2015-03-01

    Detection of tissue structures such as nerves and blood vessels is of critical importance during many needle-based minimally invasive procedures. For instance, unintentional injections into arteries can lead to strokes or cardiotoxicity during interventional pain management procedures that involve injections in the vicinity of nerves. Reliable detection with current external imaging systems remains elusive. Optical generation and reception of ultrasound allow for depth-resolved sensing and they can be performed with optical fibers that are positioned within needles used in clinical practice. The needle probe developed in this study comprised separate optical fibers for generating and receiving ultrasound. Photoacoustic generation of ultrasound was performed on the distal end face of an optical fiber by coating it with an optically absorbing material. Ultrasound reception was performed using a high-finesse Fabry-Pérot cavity. The sensor data was displayed as an M-mode image with a real-time interface. Imaging was performed on a biological tissue phantom.

  12. Real-time compressed video ultrasound using the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Brent K.; Carter, Stephen J.; Cook, Jay F.; Abbe, Brian S.; Pinck, Deborah; Rowberg, Alan H.

    1996-05-01

    The authors have an in-kind grant from NASA to investigate the application of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to teleradiology and telemedicine using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) uplink. We have recently completed three series of experiments with the ACTS/AMT. Although these experiments were multifaceted, the primary objective was the determination and evaluation of transmitting real- time compressed ultrasound video imagery over the ACTS/AMT satellite link, a primary focus of the author's current ARPA Advanced Biomedical Technology contract. These experiments have demonstrated that real-time compressed ultrasound video imagery can be transmitted over multiple ISDN line bandwidth links with sufficient temporal, contrast and spatial resolution for clinical diagnosis of multiple disease and pathology states to provide subspecialty consultation and education at a distance.

  13. Preliminary work of real-time ultrasound imaging system for 2-D array transducer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Yang, Jiali; Ding, Mingyue; Yuchi, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) has emerged as a non-invasive imaging modality that can provide anatomical structure information in real time. To enable the experimental analysis of new 2-D array ultrasound beamforming methods, a pre-beamformed parallel raw data acquisition system was developed for 3-D data capture of 2D array transducer. The transducer interconnection adopted the row-column addressing (RCA) scheme, where the columns and rows were active in sequential for transmit and receive events, respectively. The DAQ system captured the raw data in parallel and the digitized data were fed through the field programmable gate array (FPGA) to implement the pre-beamforming. Finally, 3-D images were reconstructed through the devised platform in real-time. PMID:26405923

  14. Real-Time 3D Contrast-Enhanced Transcranial Ultrasound and Aberration Correction

    PubMed Central

    Ivancevich, Nikolas M.; Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Nicoletto, Heather A.; Bennett, Ellen; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2008-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced (CE) transcranial ultrasound (US) and reconstructed 3D transcranial ultrasound have shown advantages over traditional methods in a variety of cerebrovascular diseases. We present the results from a novel ultrasound technique, namely real-time 3D contrast-enhanced transcranial ultrasound. Using real-time 3D (RT3D) ultrasound and micro-bubble contrast agent, we scanned 17 healthy volunteers via a single temporal window and 9 via the sub-occipital window and report our detection rates for the major cerebral vessels. In 71% of subjects, both of our observers identified the ipsilateral circle of Willis from the temporal window, and in 59% we imaged the entire circle of Willis. From the sub-occipital window, both observers detected the entire vertebrobasilar circulation in 22% of subjects, and in 44% the basilar artery. After performing phase aberration correction on one subject, we were able to increase the diagnostic value of the scan, detecting a vessel not present in the uncorrected scan. These preliminary results suggest that RT3D CE transcranial US and RT3D CE transcranial US with phase aberration correction have the potential to greatly impact the field of neurosonology. PMID:18395321

  15. Real-time digital processing of Doppler ultrasound signals and calculation of flow parameters.

    PubMed

    Schlindwein, F S; Vieira, M H; Vasconcelos, C F; Simpson, D M

    1994-01-01

    Vascular diseases and their complications are responsible for around 27% of deaths in Brazil. Doppler ultrasound is a non-invasive technique that has been used to study blood flow in intact blood vessels since Satomura first reported the potential of the technique in 1959. Because it is non-invasive it makes sequential studies and those in normals feasible. Whereas in contrast angiography only vessel anatomy is displayed, Doppler ultrasound produces dynamic information on blood-flow. It may be used to estimate flow-rates, to image regions of blood flow (colour Doppler), and to help in locating sites of arterial disease, thus complementing X-ray examinations. This paper describes a system based on a Digital Signal Processor for real-time spectrum analysis of Doppler ultrasound signals, real-time display of sonograms, and calculation and analysis of three parameters of clinical interest derived from the Doppler signal. The system comprises a TMS320C25 development board, which acquires the signal and performs spectrum analysis, and a microcomputer, which reads the spectral estimates, displays them as a sonogram in real-time and calculates a set of spectral parameters proposed in the literature. The system permits a maximum sampling frequency of 40.96 kHz, and in the sonogram, 80 power spectra per second (each with 128 frequency bins) are displayed. In a preliminary study, the stability of the haemodynamic parameters and their dependence on a user-defined threshold value is investigated. PMID:7968870

  16. Real-Time Imaging of the Process of Stone Crushing by Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Akira; Yoshizawa, Shin; Kaneko, Yukio; Kume, Haruki; Kitamura, Tadaichi; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2007-05-01

    A new method of lithotripsy combining high and low frequency ultrasound has been investigated. This method controls generation of cavitation only on the stone surface and utilizes collapse pressure of the bubbles. In order to apply this method for clinical practice, it is important to monitor the process of stone crushing and behavior of cavitation from outside the body. In this study, ultrasound imaging was coupled with a therapeutic ultrasound system for real-time monitoring and targeting of stones. Stone crushing tests have been conducted in vitro and in vivo experiments. In vitro experiment, crushing process of a model stone in a polyacrylamide gel was observed with both ultrasound imaging and a digital video camera. It was observed with ultrasound imaging that the stone was crushed with ultrasound. In vivo experiment, a stone crushing experiment has been conducted in a pig bladder. And a mark of crushing was found on the surface of the stone taken out from the bladder after the irradiation, as well as in vitro experiment. The process of stone crushing in a pig bladder could be monitored with bi-plane ultrasound imaging from outside the body.

  17. Real-time interleaved photoacoustic/ultrasound (PAUS) imaging for interventional procedure guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chen-wei; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Xia, Jinjun; Arnal, Bastien; Pelivanov, Ivan; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-guided photoacoustic imaging has shown great potential for many clinical applications including vascular visualization, detection of nanoprobes sensing molecular profiles, and guidance of interventional procedures. However, bulky and costly lasers are usually required to provide sufficient pulse energies for deep imaging. The low pulse repetition rate also limits potential real-time applications of integrated photoacoustic/ultrasound (PAUS) imaging. With a compact and low-cost laser operating at a kHz repetition rate, we aim to integrate photoacoustics (PA) into a commercial ultrasound (US) machine utilizing an interleaved scanning approach for clinical translation, with imaging depth up to a few centimeters and frame rates > 30 Hz. Multiple PA sub-frames are formed by scanning laser firings covering a large scan region with a rotating galvo mirror, and then combined into a final frame. Ultrasound pulse-echo beams are interleaved between laser firings/PA receives. The approach was implemented with a diode-pumped laser, a commercial US scanner, and a linear array transducer. Insertion of an 18-gauge needle into a piece of chicken tissue, with subsequent injection of an absorptive agent into the tissue, was imaged with an integrated PAUS frame rate of 30 Hz, covering a 2.8 cm × 2.8 cm imaging plane. Given this real-time image rate and high contrast (> 40 dB at more than 1-cm depth in the PA image), we have demonstrated that this approach is potentially attractive for clinical procedure guidance.

  18. Real-time interlaced ultrasound and photoacoustic system for in vivo ovarian tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Yuan, Guangqian; Kumavor, Patrick; Zanganeh, Saeid; Zhu, Quing

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we report an ultrafast co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system based on FPGA parallel processing. The system features 128-channel parallel acquisition and digitization, along with FPGA-based reconfigurable processing for real-time co-registered imaging of up to 15 frames per second that is only limited by the laser pulse repetition frequency of 15 Hz. We demonstrated the imaging capability of the system by live imaging of a mouse tumor model in vivo, and imaging of human ovaries ex vivo. A compact transvaginal probe that includes the PAT illumination using a fiber-optic assembly was used for this purpose. The system has the potential ability to assist a clinician to perform transvaginal ultrasound scanning and to localize the ovarian mass, while simultaneously mapping the light absorption of the ultrasound detected mass to reveal its vasculature using the co-registered PAT.

  19. The feasibility of an infrared system for real-time visualization and mapping of ultrasound fields.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Adam; Nunn, John

    2010-06-01

    In treatment planning for ultrasound therapy, it is desirable to know the 3D structure of the ultrasound field. However, mapping an ultrasound field in 3D is very slow, with even a single planar raster scan taking typically several hours. Additionally, hydrophones that are used for field mapping are expensive and can be damaged in some therapy fields. So there is value in rapid methods which enable visualization and mapping of the ultrasound field in about 1 min. In this note we explore the feasibility of mapping the intensity distribution by measuring the temperature distribution produced in a thin sheet of absorbing material. A 0.2 mm thick acetate sheet forms a window in the wall of a water tank containing the transducer. The window is oriented at 45 degrees to the beam axis, and the distance from the transducer to the window can be varied. The temperature distribution is measured with an infrared camera; thermal images of the inclined plane could be viewed in real time or images could be captured for later analysis and 3D field reconstruction. We conclude that infrared thermography can be used to gain qualitative information about ultrasound fields. Thermal images are easily visualized with good spatial and thermal resolutions (0.044 mm and 0.05 degrees C in our system). The focus and field structure such as side lobes can be identified in real time from the direct video output. 3D maps and image planes at arbitrary orientations to the beam axis can be obtained and reconstructed within a few minutes. In this note we are primarily interested in the technique for characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields, but other applications such as physiotherapy fields are also possible. PMID:20442463

  20. Registration of Real-Time 3-D Ultrasound to Tomographic Images of the Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Brekken, Reidar; Iversen, Daniel Høyer; Tangen, Geir Arne; Dahl, Torbjørn

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an image-based method for registration of real-time 3-D ultrasound to computed tomography (CT) of the abdominal aorta, targeting future use in ultrasound-guided endovascular intervention. We proposed a method in which a surface model of the aortic wall was segmented from CT, and the approximate initial location of this model relative to the ultrasound volume was manually indicated. The model was iteratively transformed to automatically optimize correspondence to the ultrasound data. Feasibility was studied using data from a silicon phantom and in vivo data from a volunteer with previously acquired CT. Through visual evaluation, the ultrasound and CT data were seen to correspond well after registration. Both aortic lumen and branching arteries were well aligned. The processing was done offline, and the registration took approximately 0.2 s per ultrasound volume. The results encourage further patient studies to investigate accuracy, robustness and clinical value of the approach. PMID:27156015

  1. Two-dimensional shear-wave elastography on conventional ultrasound scanners with time-aligned sequential tracking (TAST) and comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE).

    PubMed

    Song, Pengfei; Macdonald, Michael; Behler, Russell; Lanning, Justin; Wang, Michael; Urban, Matthew; Manduca, Armando; Zhao, Heng; Callstrom, Matthew; Alizad, Azra; Greenleaf, James; Chen, Shigao

    2015-02-01

    Two-dimensional shear-wave elastography presents 2-D quantitative shear elasticity maps of tissue, which are clinically useful for both focal lesion detection and diffuse disease diagnosis. Realization of 2-D shear-wave elastography on conventional ultrasound scanners, however, is challenging because of the low tracking pulse-repetition-frequency (PRF) of these systems. Although some clinical and research platforms support software beamforming and plane-wave imaging with high PRF, the majority of current clinical ultrasound systems do not have the software beamforming capability, which presents a critical challenge for translating the 2-D shear-wave elastography technique from laboratory to clinical scanners. To address this challenge, this paper presents a time-aligned sequential tracking (TAST) method for shear-wave tracking on conventional ultrasound scanners. TAST takes advantage of the parallel beamforming capability of conventional systems and realizes high-PRF shear-wave tracking by sequentially firing tracking vectors and aligning shear wave data in the temporal direction. The comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE) technique was used to simultaneously produce multiple shear wave sources within the field-of-view (FOV) to enhance shear wave SNR and facilitate robust reconstructions of 2-D elasticity maps. TAST and CUSE were realized on a conventional ultrasound scanner. A phantom study showed that the shear-wave speed measurements from the conventional ultrasound scanner were in good agreement with the values measured from other 2-D shear wave imaging technologies. An inclusion phantom study showed that the conventional ultrasound scanner had comparable performance to a state-of-the-art shear-wave imaging system in terms of bias and precision in measuring different sized inclusions. Finally, in vivo case analysis of a breast with a malignant mass, and a liver from a healthy subject demonstrated the feasibility of using the conventional ultrasound

  2. On the synthesis of sample volumes for real-time spectral Doppler ultrasound simulation.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Luis A; Steinman, David A; Cobbold, Richard S C

    2010-12-01

    A variety of methods for simulating the ultrasound field produced by transducers are currently used in ultrasound imaging system design. However, simulations can be time-consuming, making them difficult to apply in real-time environments when the observation field changes rapidly with time. This is particularly true for interactive real-time Doppler and B-mode ultrasound simulators designed for use as training tools. In this paper, it is demonstrated that the use of a distribution of monopole sources can be used to simulate the field from a phased linear array and the accuracy should be sufficient for simulating pulsed spectral Doppler. Very good agreement can be achieved in comparison with that obtained by a more exact method and, because of the simplicity of the calculations, real-time simulations of flow in the arterial system becomes possible. Specifically, quantitative measurements were made and compared against an analytic solution for the case of a piston transducer and against Field II for the phased array. The root-mean-square error shows that it is possible to achieve 10% or less error for the latter case. For comparable conditions, the computational speed for the transmit field of phased array using the Field II method as compared with the monopole approach was found to be at least an order of magnitude faster. It is pointed out that the simplicity of the monopole approach provides the opportunity for a further order of magnitude gain. Our findings can have direct application on the simulation of spectral Doppler and other ultrasound techniques for the purpose of teaching and training. PMID:20950935

  3. Real-time simulation of ultrasound refraction phenomena using ray-trace based wavefront construction method.

    PubMed

    Szostek, Kamil; Piórkowski, Adam

    2016-10-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging is one of the most popular techniques used in clinical diagnosis, mainly due to lack of adverse effects on patients and the simplicity of US equipment. However, the characteristics of the medium cause US imaging to imprecisely reconstruct examined tissues. The artifacts are the results of wave phenomena, i.e. diffraction or refraction, and should be recognized during examination to avoid misinterpretation of an US image. Currently, US training is based on teaching materials and simulators and ultrasound simulation has become an active research area in medical computer science. Many US simulators are limited by the complexity of the wave phenomena, leading to intensive sophisticated computation that makes it difficult for systems to operate in real time. To achieve the required frame rate, the vast majority of simulators reduce the problem of wave diffraction and refraction. The following paper proposes a solution for an ultrasound simulator based on methods known in geophysics. To improve simulation quality, a wavefront construction method was adapted which takes into account the refraction phenomena. This technique uses ray tracing and velocity averaging to construct wavefronts in the simulation. Instead of a geological medium, real CT scans are applied. This approach can produce more realistic projections of pathological findings and is also capable of providing real-time simulation. PMID:27586490

  4. Interlaced photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system with real-time coregistration for ovarian tissue characterization

    PubMed Central

    Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Yuan, Guangqian; Kumavor, Patrick; Zanganeh, Saeid; Zhu, Quing

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Coregistered ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic imaging are emerging techniques for mapping the echogenic anatomical structure of tissue and its corresponding optical absorption. We report a 128-channel imaging system with real-time coregistration of the two modalities, which provides up to 15 coregistered frames per second limited by the laser pulse repetition rate. In addition, the system integrates a compact transvaginal imaging probe with a custom-designed fiber optic assembly for in vivo detection and characterization of human ovarian tissue. We present the coregistered US and photoacoustic imaging system structure, the optimal design of the PC interfacing software, and the reconfigurable field programmable gate array operation and optimization. Phantom experiments of system lateral resolution and axial sensitivity evaluation, examples of the real-time scanning of a tumor-bearing mouse, and ex vivo human ovaries studies are demonstrated. PMID:25069009

  5. Interlaced photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system with real-time coregistration for ovarian tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Yuan, Guangqian; Kumavor, Patrick; Zanganeh, Saeid; Zhu, Quing

    2014-07-01

    Coregistered ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic imaging are emerging techniques for mapping the echogenic anatomical structure of tissue and its corresponding optical absorption. We report a 128-channel imaging system with real-time coregistration of the two modalities, which provides up to 15 coregistered frames per second limited by the laser pulse repetition rate. In addition, the system integrates a compact transvaginal imaging probe with a custom-designed fiber optic assembly for in vivo detection and characterization of human ovarian tissue. We present the coregistered US and photoacoustic imaging system structure, the optimal design of the PC interfacing software, and the reconfigurable field programmable gate array operation and optimization. Phantom experiments of system lateral resolution and axial sensitivity evaluation, examples of the real-time scanning of a tumor-bearing mouse, and ex vivo human ovaries studies are demonstrated.

  6. A real-time device for converting Doppler ultrasound audio signals into fluid flow velocity.

    PubMed

    Herr, Michael D; Hogeman, Cynthia S; Koch, Dennis W; Krishnan, Anandi; Momen, Afsana; Leuenberger, Urs A

    2010-05-01

    A Doppler signal converter has been developed to facilitate cardiovascular and exercise physiology research. This device directly converts audio signals from a clinical Doppler ultrasound imaging system into a real-time analog signal that accurately represents blood flow velocity and is easily recorded by any standard data acquisition system. This real-time flow velocity signal, when simultaneously recorded with other physiological signals of interest, permits the observation of transient flow response to experimental interventions in a manner not possible when using standard Doppler imaging devices. This converted flow velocity signal also permits a more robust and less subjective analysis of data in a fraction of the time required by previous analytic methods. This signal converter provides this capability inexpensively and requires no modification of either the imaging or data acquisition system. PMID:20173048

  7. A real-time device for converting Doppler ultrasound audio signals into fluid flow velocity

    PubMed Central

    Hogeman, Cynthia S.; Koch, Dennis W.; Krishnan, Anandi; Momen, Afsana; Leuenberger, Urs A.

    2010-01-01

    A Doppler signal converter has been developed to facilitate cardiovascular and exercise physiology research. This device directly converts audio signals from a clinical Doppler ultrasound imaging system into a real-time analog signal that accurately represents blood flow velocity and is easily recorded by any standard data acquisition system. This real-time flow velocity signal, when simultaneously recorded with other physiological signals of interest, permits the observation of transient flow response to experimental interventions in a manner not possible when using standard Doppler imaging devices. This converted flow velocity signal also permits a more robust and less subjective analysis of data in a fraction of the time required by previous analytic methods. This signal converter provides this capability inexpensively and requires no modification of either the imaging or data acquisition system. PMID:20173048

  8. Feasibility of using ultrasound for real-time tracking during radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, A; Miller, N R; Evans, P M; Bamber, J C; Webb, S

    2005-06-01

    This study was designed to examine the feasibility of utilizing transabdominal ultrasound for real-time monitoring of target motion during a radiotherapy fraction. A clinical Acuson 128/XP ultrasound scanner was used to image various stationary and moving phantoms while an Elekta SL25 linear accelerator radiotherapy treatment machine was operating. The ultrasound transducer was positioned to image from the outer edge of the treatment field at all times. Images were acquired to videotape and analyzed using in-house motion tracking algorithms to determine the effect of the SL25 on the quality of the displacement measurements. To determine the effect on the dosimetry of the presence of the transducer, dose distributions were examined using thermoluminescent dosimeters loaded into an Alderson Rando phantom and exposed to a 10 x 10 cm2 treatment field with and without the ultrasound transducer mounted 2.5 cm outside the field edge. The ultrasound images acquired a periodic noise that was shown to occur at the pulsing frequency of the treatment machine. Images of moving tissue were analyzed and the standard deviation on the displacement estimates within the tissue was identical with the SL25 on and off. This implies that the periodic noise did not significantly degrade the precision of the tracking algorithm (which was better than 0.01 mm). The presence of the transducer at the surface of the phantom presented only a 2.6% change to the dose distribution to the volume of the phantom. The feasibility of ultrasonic motion tracking during radiotherapy treatment is demonstrated. This presents the possibility of developing a noninvasive, real-time and low-cost method of tracking target motion during a treatment fraction. PMID:16013706

  9. Feasibility of using ultrasound for real-time tracking during radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, A.; Miller, N.R.; Evans, P.M.; Bamber, J.C.; Webb, S.

    2005-06-15

    This study was designed to examine the feasibility of utilizing transabdominal ultrasound for real-time monitoring of target motion during a radiotherapy fraction. A clinical Acuson 128/XP ultrasound scanner was used to image various stationary and moving phantoms while an Elekta SL25 linear accelerator radiotherapy treatment machine was operating. The ultrasound transducer was positioned to image from the outer edge of the treatment field at all times. Images were acquired to videotape and analyzed using in-house motion tracking algorithms to determine the effect of the SL25 on the quality of the displacement measurements. To determine the effect on the dosimetry of the presence of the transducer, dose distributions were examined using thermoluminescent dosimeters loaded into an Alderson Rando phantom and exposed to a 10x10 cm{sup 2} treatment field with and without the ultrasound transducer mounted 2.5 cm outside the field edge. The ultrasound images acquired a periodic noise that was shown to occur at the pulsing frequency of the treatment machine. Images of moving tissue were analyzed and the standard deviation on the displacement estimates within the tissue was identical with the SL25 on and off. This implies that the periodic noise did not significantly degrade the precision of the tracking algorithm (which was better than 0.01 mm). The presence of the transducer at the surface of the phantom presented only a 2.6% change to the dose distribution to the volume of the phantom. The feasibility of ultrasonic motion tracking during radiotherapy treatment is demonstrated. This presents the possibility of developing a noninvasive, real-time and low-cost method of tracking target motion during a treatment fraction.

  10. Evaluation of cervical stiffness during pregnancy using semiquantitative ultrasound elastography

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Hassan, Sonia S; Ahn, Hyunyoung; Korzeniewski, Steven J.; Yeo, Lami; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Romero, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate cervical stiffness during pregnancy using ultrasound-derived elastography, a method used to estimate the average tissue displacement (strain) on a defined region of interest when oscillatory compression is applied. Methods Strain was calculated in two regions of interest, the endocervical canal and the entire cervix, from three anatomical planes of the cervix: mid-sagittal in the plane used for cervical length measurement, and in cross-sectional planes located at the internal and external cervical os. Associations between strain values, method of ascertainment and patient characteristics were assessed using linear mixed models to account for within-subject correlation. Inter-rater agreement in defining the degree of cervical stiffness was evaluated in 120 regions of interest acquired by two operators in 20 patients. Results A total of 1557 strain estimations were performed in 262 patients at 8-40 weeks of gestation. Adjusting for other sources of variation, 1) cervical tissue strain estimates obtained in the endocervical canal were on average 33% greater than those obtained in the entire cervix; 2) measures obtained in the cross-sectional plane of the external cervical os and sagittal plane were 45% and 13% greater compared to those measured in the cross-sectional plane of the internal cervical os, respectively; 3) mean strain rate was 14% and 5% greater among multiparous women with and without a history of preterm delivery compared to nulliparous women, respectively, and was on average 13% greater among women with a cervical length between 25-30mm compared to those with a cervical length >30mm; and 4) cervical tissue strain was more strongly associated with cervical length than with gestational age. Conclusion Semiquantitative elastography can be employed to evaluate changes in cervical stiffness during pregnancy. PMID:23151941

  11. Integrated Interventional Devices For Real Time 3D Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Stephen W.; Lee, Warren; Gentry, Kenneth L.; Pua, Eric C.; Light, Edward D.

    2006-05-01

    Two recent advances have expanded the potential of medical ultrasound: the introduction of real-time 3-D ultrasound imaging with catheter, transesophageal and laparoscopic probes and the development of interventional ultrasound therapeutic systems for focused ultrasound surgery, ablation and ultrasound enhanced drug delivery. This work describes devices combining both technologies. A series of transducer probes have been designed, fabricated and tested including: 1) a 12 French side scanning catheter incorporating a 64 element matrix array for imaging at 5MHz and a piston ablation transducer operating at 10 MHz. 2) a 14 Fr forward-scanning catheter integrating a 112 element 2-D array for imaging at 5 MHz encircled by an ablation annulus operating at 10 MHz. Finite element modeling was then used to simulate catheter annular and linear phased array transducers for ablation. 3) Linear phased array transducers were built to confirm the finite element analysis at 4 and 8 MHz including a mechanically focused 86 element 9 MHz array which transmits an ISPTA of 29.3 W/cm2 and creates a lesion in 2 minutes. 4) 2-D arrays of 504 channels operating at 5 MHz have been developed for transesophageal and laparascopic 3D imaging as well as therapeutic heating. All the devices image the heart anatomy including atria, valves, septa and en face views of the pulmonary veins.

  12. Diaphragmatic paralysis evaluated by phrenic nerve stimulation during fluoroscopy or real-time ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    McCauley, R.G.K.; Labib, K.B.

    1984-10-01

    Stimulation of the phrenic nerve by supplying an electrical impulse to the neck during fluoroscopy or real-time ultrasound (sonoscopy) of the diaphragm allows more precise functional evaluation than fluoroscopy and/or sonoscopy alone. This is especially true of patients who are unable to cooperate because the are on a ventilator, unconscious, or very young. The authors cite cases in which diaphragmatic paralysis was diagnosed by conventional methods but stimulation of the phrenic nerve demonstrated good diaphragmatic motion, leading to a change in prognosis in some cases and a change in therapy in others.

  13. WFUMB guidelines and recommendations for clinical use of ultrasound elastography: Part 3: liver.

    PubMed

    Ferraioli, Giovanna; Filice, Carlo; Castera, Laurent; Choi, Byung Ihn; Sporea, Ioan; Wilson, Stephanie R; Cosgrove, David; Dietrich, Christoph F; Amy, Dominique; Bamber, Jeffrey C; Barr, Richard; Chou, Yi-Hong; Ding, Hong; Farrokh, Andre; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen; Hall, Timothy J; Nakashima, Kazutaka; Nightingale, Kathryn R; Palmeri, Mark L; Schafer, Fritz; Shiina, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Shinichi; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2015-05-01

    The World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (WFUMB) has produced these guidelines for the use of elastography techniques in liver disease. For each available technique, the reproducibility, results, and limitations are analyzed, and recommendations are given. Finally, recommendations based on the international literature and the findings of the WFUMB expert group are established as answers to common questions. The document has a clinical perspective and is aimed at assessing the usefulness of elastography in the management of liver diseases. PMID:25800942

  14. A comparison of radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging and real-time ultrasound for the detection of acute cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Samuels, B.I.; Freitas, J.E.; Bree, R.L.; Schwab, R.E.; Heller, S.T.

    1983-04-01

    The relative value of hepatobiliary scintigraphy vs. real-time ultrasound for the identification of acute cholecystitis was evaluated. No significant difference in sensitivity (97% vs. 97%) existed between the two modalities. Scintigraphy demonstrated better specificity (93% vs. 64%) and predictive value (77% vs. 40%). Although real-time ultrasound provided improved sensitivity over static gray-scale imaging for identification of gallbadder disease, hepatobiliary scintigraphy remains the procedure of choice for acute cholecystitis detection.

  15. 2D array transducers for real-time 3D ultrasound guidance of interventional devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Light, Edward D.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2009-02-01

    We describe catheter ring arrays for real-time 3D ultrasound guidance of devices such as vascular grafts, heart valves and vena cava filters. We have constructed several prototypes operating at 5 MHz and consisting of 54 elements using the W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc. micro-miniature ribbon cables. We have recently constructed a new transducer using a braided wiring technology from Precision Interconnect. This transducer consists of 54 elements at 4.8 MHz with pitch of 0.20 mm and typical -6 dB bandwidth of 22%. In all cases, the transducer and wiring assembly were integrated with an 11 French catheter of a Cook Medical deployment device for vena cava filters. Preliminary in vivo and in vitro testing is ongoing including simultaneous 3D ultrasound and x-ray fluoroscopy.

  16. Real-time feedback control for high-intensity focused ultrasound system using localized motion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Ryusuke; Kanazawa, Kengo; Seki, Mika; Azuma, Takashi; Sasaki, Akira; Takeuchi, Hideki; Fujiwara, Keisuke; Itani, Kazunori; Tamano, Satoshi; Yoshinaka, Kiyoshi; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2015-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is one of the noninvasive treatment for tumors. Visualizing the treated area inside the human body is necessary to control the HIFU exposure. Localized motion imaging (LMI) using ultrasound to induce and detect tissue deformation is one technique to detect a change in tissue stiffness caused by thermal coagulation. In experiments with porcine liver, LMI has shown to detect deformation with less than 20% accuracy. We have developed a prototype feedback control system using real-time LMI. In this system, coagulation size was measured every 1 s and controlled to correspond to a targeted size. The typical size error was reduced to 14% from 35%. LMI displacements in normal and coagulated tissues were sufficiently different to discriminate between coagulated areas and noncoagulated ones after HIFU sonication and to visualize treated areas after HIFU treatment.

  17. Real-Time Classification of Hand Motions Using Ultrasound Imaging of Forearm Muscles.

    PubMed

    Akhlaghi, Nima; Baker, Clayton A; Lahlou, Mohamed; Zafar, Hozaifah; Murthy, Karthik G; Rangwala, Huzefa S; Kosecka, Jana; Joiner, Wilsaan M; Pancrazio, Joseph J; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2016-08-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) has been the predominant method for sensing electrical activity for a number of applications involving muscle-computer interfaces, including myoelectric control of prostheses and rehabilitation robots. Ultrasound imaging for sensing mechanical deformation of functional muscle compartments can overcome several limitations of sEMG, including the inability to differentiate between deep contiguous muscle compartments, low signal-to-noise ratio, and lack of a robust graded signal. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of real-time graded control using a computationally efficient method to differentiate between complex hand motions based on ultrasound imaging of forearm muscles. Dynamic ultrasound images of the forearm muscles were obtained from six able-bodied volunteers and analyzed to map muscle activity based on the deformation of the contracting muscles during different hand motions. Each participant performed 15 different hand motions, including digit flexion, different grips (i.e., power grasp and pinch grip), and grips in combination with wrist pronation. During the training phase, we generated a database of activity patterns corresponding to different hand motions for each participant. During the testing phase, novel activity patterns were classified using a nearest neighbor classification algorithm based on that database. The average classification accuracy was 91%. Real-time image-based control of a virtual hand showed an average classification accuracy of 92%. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using ultrasound imaging as a robust muscle-computer interface. Potential clinical applications include control of multiarticulated prosthetic hands, stroke rehabilitation, and fundamental investigations of motor control and biomechanics. PMID:26560865

  18. Integrated endoscope for real-time 3D ultrasound imaging and hyperthermia: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Pua, Eric C; Qiu, Yupeng; Smith, S W

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this research is to determine the feasibility of using a single endoscopic probe for the combined purpose of real-time 3D (RT3D) ultrasound imaging of a target organ and the delivery of ultrasound therapy to facilitate the absorption of compounds for cancer treatment. Recent research in ultrasound therapy has shown that ultrasound-mediated drug delivery improves absorption of treatments for prostate, cervical and esophageal cancer. The ability to combine ultrasound hyperthermia and 3D imaging could improve visualization and targeting of cancerous tissues. In this study, numerical modeling and experimental measurements were developed to determine the feasibility of combined therapy and imaging with a 1 cm diameter endoscopic RT3D probe with 504 transmitters and 252 receive channels. This device operates at 5 MHz and has a 6.3 mm x 6.3 mm aperture to produce real time 3D pyramidal scans of 60-120 degrees incorporating 64 x 64 = 4096 image lines at 30 volumes/sec interleaved with a 3D steerable therapy beam. A finite-element mesh was constructed with over 128,000 elements in LS-DYNA to simulate the induced temperature rise from our transducer with a 3 cm deep focus in tissue. Quarter-symmetry of the transducer was used to reduce mesh size and computation time. Based on intensity values calculated in Field II using the transducer's array geometry, a minimum I(SPTA) of 3.6 W/cm2 is required from our endoscope probe in order to induce a temperature rise of 4 degrees C within five minutes. Experimental measurements of the array's power output capabilities were conducted using a PVDF hydrophone placed 3 cm away from the face of the transducer in a watertank. Using a PDA14 Signatec data acquisition board to capture full volumes of transmitted ultrasound data, it was determined that the probe can presently maintain intensity values up to 2.4 W/cm2 over indefinite times for therapeutic applications combined with intermittent 3D scanning to maintain targeting

  19. Clinical real-time photoacoustic/ultrasound imaging system at POSTECH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeesu; Park, Sara; Jung, Yuhan; Zhang, Yumiao; Lovell, Jonathan F.; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    We have successfully developed a clinical real-time photoacoustic/ultrasound (PA/US) imaging system. The PA/US imaging system was adapted with a FDA approved commercial US imaging system and a portable pulsed laser system. All image processing and display tasks were performed in real-time by using a graphical processing unit of the US imaging system. We have tested performances of the system by measuring maximum penetration depth, noise equivalent sensitivity, and axial resolution of contrast agent deposited microtubes under chicken breast tissues. By adapting various US transducers (i.e., linear, convex, phased, and endocavity), adaptable capability of the system was verified. In addition, volumetric PA/US imaging was performed by applying a linear scanning along an elevational direction. We have successfully acquired volumetric PA/US images of human forearms in vivo. We believe that the developed clinical real-time PA/US imaging system can be utilized in various preclinical and clinical studies in the near future.

  20. Comparison of ultrasound B-mode, strain imaging, acoustic radiation force impulse displacement and shear wave velocity imaging using real time clinical breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manickam, Kavitha; Machireddy, Ramasubba Reddy; Raghavan, Bagyam

    2016-04-01

    It has been observed that many pathological process increase the elastic modulus of soft tissue compared to normal. In order to image tissue stiffness using ultrasound, a mechanical compression is applied to tissues of interest and local tissue deformation is measured. Based on the mechanical excitation, ultrasound stiffness imaging methods are classified as compression or strain imaging which is based on external compression and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging which is based on force generated by focused ultrasound. When ultrasound is focused on tissue, shear wave is generated in lateral direction and shear wave velocity is proportional to stiffness of tissues. The work presented in this paper investigates strain elastography and ARFI imaging in clinical cancer diagnostics using real time patient data. Ultrasound B-mode imaging, strain imaging, ARFI displacement and ARFI shear wave velocity imaging were conducted on 50 patients (31 Benign and 23 malignant categories) using Siemens S2000 machine. True modulus contrast values were calculated from the measured shear wave velocities. For ultrasound B-mode, ARFI displacement imaging and strain imaging, observed image contrast and Contrast to Noise Ratio were calculated for benign and malignant cancers. Observed contrast values were compared based on the true modulus contrast values calculated from shear wave velocity imaging. In addition to that, student unpaired t-test was conducted for all the four techniques and box plots are presented. Results show that, strain imaging is better for malignant cancers whereas ARFI imaging is superior than strain imaging and B-mode for benign lesions representations.

  1. Investigation of therapy improvement using real-time photoacoustic imaging guided high intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Huizhong

    There are a lot of risks in cancer treatment by invasive surgery, such as bleeding, wound infection, and long recovery time, etc. Therefore, there is great need for minimally- or non-invasive treatment. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a rapidly growing and truly non-invasive technology. It has been widely used in therapeutic applications, such as rapid tissue heating and tissue ablation. With proper imaging guidance, HIFU treatment can be performed totally noninvasively. Currently, ultrasound imaging-guided HIFU has been extensively studied. However, ultrasound imaging guidance is less precise because of the relatively low imaging contrast, sensitivity, and specificity for noninvasive detection. In this study, we employed photoacoustic imaging (PAI) technique, which has been developed a novel promising imaging technique for early cancer detection, to guide HIFU treatment. The goal of this study is to investigate the feasibility of PAI to guide, monitor in real time and enhance the HIFU therapy. In this dissertation, as the first step, the integrated PAI and HIFU system had been shown to have the feasibility to guide HIFU both ex vivo and in vivo. Then, the system was improved and developed to a real-time PAI-guided HIFU system. It is demonstrated that the sensitivity of PA detection for HIFU lesion is very high and the saturation of PA signals can be used as the indicator for tissue coagulation. During the temperature measurement using this system, laser-enhanced HIFU heating was found. Thus, we further investigated the laser enhanced technique in both HIFU heating and pulsed HIFU thrombolysis. In the HIFU therapy, laser light was employed to illuminate the sample concurrently with HIFU radiation. The resulting cavitation was detected with a passive cavitation detector. We demonstrated that concurrent light illumination during HIFU has the potential to significantly enhance HIFU by reducing cavitation threshold.

  2. Relationship between ultrasound elastography and myofibroblast distribution in breast cancer and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yi; Guo, Xia; Ma, Binlin; Zhu, Lin; Liu, Lisha

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the relationship between ultrasound elastography (USE) scoring and myofibroblast distribution with expression features of α-SMA +/CD34- in patients of Uyghur and Han ethnicities with breast masses in Xinjiang, China. The data was used to evaluate its clinical significance in the early diagnosis of breast cancer. A total of 300 patients with breast masses were included in the study, which involved conventional sonography and USE, with histopathologic diagnosis as the reference standard. Myofibroblast distribution was investigated by detecting the expression levels of α-SMA and CD34 in lesions using immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. Out of 300 lesions, 185 were histologically malignant and 115 benign. The mean elasticity score for malignant lesions was significantly higher than for benign lesions. The expression level of α-SMA was elevated while the expression level of CD34 was lower in malignancies, compared with benign lesions. The expression of α-SMA was positively associated with the USE scores, while a negative relationship was observed between CD34 expression and USE scoring. The combination of USE and molecular diagnosis provides a promising modality for the early diagnosis and evaluation of the risks in particular types of breast cancer. PMID:26846996

  3. Relationship between ultrasound elastography and myofibroblast distribution in breast cancer and its clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yi; Guo, Xia; Ma, Binlin; Zhu, Lin; Liu, Lisha

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the relationship between ultrasound elastography (USE) scoring and myofibroblast distribution with expression features of α-SMA + /CD34− in patients of Uyghur and Han ethnicities with breast masses in Xinjiang, China. The data was used to evaluate its clinical significance in the early diagnosis of breast cancer. A total of 300 patients with breast masses were included in the study, which involved conventional sonography and USE, with histopathologic diagnosis as the reference standard. Myofibroblast distribution was investigated by detecting the expression levels of α-SMA and CD34 in lesions using immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. Out of 300 lesions, 185 were histologically malignant and 115 benign. The mean elasticity score for malignant lesions was significantly higher than for benign lesions. The expression level of α-SMA was elevated while the expression level of CD34 was lower in malignancies, compared with benign lesions. The expression of α-SMA was positively associated with the USE scores, while a negative relationship was observed between CD34 expression and USE scoring. The combination of USE and molecular diagnosis provides a promising modality for the early diagnosis and evaluation of the risks in particular types of breast cancer. PMID:26846996

  4. WFUMB guidelines and recommendations for clinical use of ultrasound elastography: Part 2: breast.

    PubMed

    Barr, Richard G; Nakashima, Kazutaka; Amy, Dominique; Cosgrove, David; Farrokh, Andre; Schafer, Fritz; Bamber, Jeffrey C; Castera, Laurent; Choi, Byung Ihn; Chou, Yi-Hong; Dietrich, Christoph F; Ding, Hong; Ferraioli, Giovanna; Filice, Carlo; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen; Hall, Timothy J; Nightingale, Kathryn R; Palmeri, Mark L; Shiina, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Shinichi; Sporea, Ioan; Wilson, Stephanie; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2015-05-01

    The breast section of these Guidelines and Recommendations for Elastography produced under the auspices of the World Federation of Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (WFUMB) assesses the clinically used applications of all forms of elastography used in breast imaging. The literature on various breast elastography techniques is reviewed, and recommendations are made on evidence-based results. Practical advice is given on how to perform and interpret breast elastography for optimal results, with emphasis placed on avoiding pitfalls. Artifacts are reviewed, and the clinical utility of some artifacts is discussed. Both strain and shear wave techniques have been shown to be highly accurate in characterizing breast lesions as benign or malignant. The relationship between the various techniques is discussed, and recommended interpretation based on a BI-RADS-like malignancy probability scale is provided. This document is intended to be used as a reference and to guide clinical users in a practical way. PMID:25795620

  5. Ultrasound elastography using carotid artery pulsation in the differential diagnosis of sonographically indeterminate thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo Jung; Park, Jeong Seon; Koo, Hye Ryoung; Kim, Soo-Yeon; Chung, Min Sung; Tae, Kyung

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of gray-scale ultrasound and a new method of thyroid ultrasound elastography using carotid artery pulsation in the differential diagnosis of sonographically indeterminate thyroid nodules. MATERIALS AND METHODS. A total of 102 thyroid nodules with indeterminate gray-scale ultrasound features from 102 patients (20 males and 82 females; age range, 16-74 years; mean age, 51 years) were included. The gray-scale ultrasound images of each nodule were reviewed and assigned a score from 1 (low) to 5 (high) according to the possibility of malignancy. Ultrasound elastography was performed using carotid pulsation as the compression source. The elasticity contrast index (ECI), which quantifies local strain contrast within a nodule, was automatically calculated. The radiologist reassessed the scores after concurrently reviewing gray-scale ultrasound and elastography. ROC curve analysis was used to evaluate the diagnostic performances of each dataset and to compare the AUC (Az) values of gray-scale ultrasound score alone, ECI alone, and a combined assessment. RESULTS. Significantly more malignant thyroid nodules were hypoechoic than benign nodules (p = 0.014). The ECI was significantly higher in malignant nodules than in benign thyroid nodules. The Az values of each dataset were 0.755 (95% CI, 0.660-0.835) for gray-scale ultrasound score, 0.835 (0.748-0.901) for ECI, and 0.853 (0.769-0.915) for a combined assessment. The Az value for a combined assessment of the gray-scale ultrasound score and the ECI was significantly higher than that for the gray-scale ultrasound score alone (p = 0.022). CONCLUSION. Combined assessment with gray-scale ultrasound and elastography using carotid artery pulsation is helpful for characterizing sonographically indeterminate thyroid nodules as benign or malignant. PMID:25615763

  6. A modified technique for real time ultrasound guided pediatric percutaneous renal biopsy: the angled tangential approach

    PubMed Central

    Caliskan, Kosti Can; Turkoglu, Ozlem Kolcak; Cakmakci, Selma; Ozcelik, Gul; Yilmaz, Engin; Turk, Sebnem; Ozagari, Aysim; Ucan, Berna

    2014-01-01

    Aim Pediatric renal biopsy may result in serious hemorrhagic complications, requiring additional diagnostic procedures, blood transfusion, vascular interventions, and prolongation of hospitalization. The aim of the present study was to propose the angled tangential approach technique for real-time ultrasound-guided pediatric percutaneous renal biopsy. Methods A retrospective analysis of 166 percutaneous biopsies from June 2004 to May 2009 was performed. Patients’ medical records, pathology results, and complications were reviewed. Results No major complications were seen in the study group. The most frequently occurring minor complication was macroscopic hematuria, which occurred at the rate of 9.6%. Hematoma was detected in three cases and regressed spontaneously in all cases. Conclusions The angled tangential approach is a safe technique and an alternative option in pediatric percutaneous renal biopsies. PMID:24914420

  7. Toward a generic real-time compression correction framework for tracked ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Miga, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Tissue compression during ultrasound imaging leads to error in the location and geometry of subsurface targets during soft tissue interventions. We present a novel compression correction method, which models a generic block of tissue and its subsurface tissue displacements resulting from application of a probe to the tissue surface. The advantages of the new method are that it can be realized independent of preoperative imaging data and is capable of near-video framerate compression compensation for real-time guidance. Methods The block model is calibrated to the tip of any tracked ultrasound probe. Intraoperative digitization of the tissue surface is used to measure the depth of compression and provide boundary conditions to the biomechanical model of the tissue. The tissue displacement field solution of the model is inverted to nonrigidly transform the ultrasound images to an estimation of the tissue geometry prior to compression. This method was compared to a previously developed method using a patient-specific model and within the context of simulation, phantom, and clinical data. Results Experimental results with gel phantoms demonstrated that the proposed generic method reduced the mock tumor margin modified Hausdorff distance (MHD) from 5.0 ± 1.6 to 2.1 ± 0.7 mm and reduced mock tumor centroid alignment error from 7.6 ± 2.6 to 2.6 ± 1.1 mm. The method was applied to a clinical case and reduced the in vivo tumor margin MHD error from 5.4 ± 0.1 to 2.9 ± 0.1 mm, and the centroid alignment error from 7.2 ± 0.2 to 3.8 ± 0.4 mm. Conclusions The correction method was found to effectively improve alignment of ultrasound and tomographic images and was more efficient compared to a previously proposed correction. PMID:25903777

  8. Three Dimensional Motion Compensation for Real-Time MRI Guided Focused Ultrasound Treatment of Abdominal Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, M.; De Senneville, B. D.; Roujol, S.; Hey, S.; Maclair, G.; Köhler, M. O.; Quesson, B.; Moonen, C. T. W.

    2010-03-01

    MR-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has evolved into a promising non-invasive technique for the ablation of pathological tissue in abdominal organs. However, since the high perfusion rates of these organs lead to effective cooling, sustained sonications of 30-90 s are required to achieve a sufficiently high temperature elevation to induce necrosis. This is complicated by the constant displacement of the target due to the respiratory cycle. This study proposes sub-second 3D HIFU-beam steering under MR-guidance for the near real-time compensation of respiratory motion as a possible solution. The target position is observed in 3D space by coupling rapid 2D MR-imaging with prospective slice tracking (PST) based on pencil-beam navigator echoes. Continuous real-time image processing provides temperature maps, thermal dose estimates and the target position at a frequency of 10 Hz and an update latency of less than 120 ms. The suggested method is evaluated with phantom experiments and its feasibility is verified in-vivo with an ablation experiment on a porcine kidney where it allows to achieve a thermal energy deposition which is comparable to static control experiments.

  9. Visual detectability of elastic contrast in real-time ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Naomi R.; Bamber, Jeffery C.; Doyley, Marvin M.; Leach, Martin O.

    1997-04-01

    Elasticity imaging (EI) has recently been proposed as a technique for imaging the mechanical properties of soft tissue. However, dynamic features, known as compressibility and mobility, are already employed to distinguish between different tissue types in ultrasound breast examination. This method, which involves the subjective interpretation of tissue motion seen in real-time B-mode images during palpation, is hereafter referred to as differential motion imaging (DMI). The purpose of this study was to develop the methodology required to perform a series of perception experiments to measure elastic lesion detectability by means of DMI and to obtain preliminary results for elastic contrast thresholds for different lesion sizes. Simulated sequences of real-time B-scans of tissue moving in response to an applied force were generated. A two-alternative forced choice (2-AFC) experiment was conducted and the measured contrast thresholds were compared with published results for lesions detected by EI. Although the trained observer was found to be quite skilled at the task of differential motion perception, it would appear that lesion detectability is improved when motion information is detected by computer processing and converted to gray scale before presentation to the observer. In particular, for lesions containing fewer than eight speckle cells, a signal detection rate of 100% could not be achieved even when the elastic contrast was very high.

  10. Value of ultrasound elastography in the diagnosis of native kidney fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Peride, Ileana; Rădulescu, Daniela; Niculae, Andrei; Ene, Vladimir; Bratu, Ovidiu Gabriel; Checheriță, Ionel Alexandru

    2016-09-01

    In the last decade, ultrasound elastography, an already widely used technique in the diagnosis of hepatic fibrosis, has raised the attention of nephrologists as a potential valuable noninvasive tool for the diagnosis of renal fibrosis. Due to renal deep location and anatomic complexity, the shear wave techniques are the most appropriate elastography methods for exploring native kidneys. Recent research offers promising results, but further larger studies are required for a better standardization of this method and also for establishing reference values of normal kidney elasticity. This article reviews the studies conducted for exploring the native kidney, highlighting the advantages and limitations of ultrasound elastography for assessing fibrosis development in chronic kidney diseases. PMID:27622414

  11. Real-time Interpolation for True 3-Dimensional Ultrasound Image Volumes

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Songbai; Roberts, David W.; Hartov, Alex; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2013-01-01

    We compared trilinear interpolation to voxel nearest neighbor and distance-weighted algorithms for fast and accurate processing of true 3-dimensional ultrasound (3DUS) image volumes. In this study, the computational efficiency and interpolation accuracy of the 3 methods were compared on the basis of a simulated 3DUS image volume, 34 clinical 3DUS image volumes from 5 patients, and 2 experimental phantom image volumes. We show that trilinear interpolation improves interpolation accuracy over both the voxel nearest neighbor and distance-weighted algorithms yet achieves real-time computational performance that is comparable to the voxel nearest neighbor algrorithm (1–2 orders of magnitude faster than the distance-weighted algorithm) as well as the fastest pixel-based algorithms for processing tracked 2-dimensional ultrasound images (0.035 seconds per 2-dimesional cross-sectional image [76,800 pixels interpolated, or 0.46 ms/1000 pixels] and 1.05 seconds per full volume with a 1-mm3 voxel size [4.6 million voxels interpolated, or 0.23 ms/1000 voxels]). On the basis of these results, trilinear interpolation is recommended as a fast and accurate interpolation method for rectilinear sampling of 3DUS image acquisitions, which is required to facilitate subsequent processing and display during operating room procedures such as image-guided neurosurgery. PMID:21266563

  12. Ultrasound assessment of endothelial function in real-time (Honorable Mention Poster Award)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faita, Francesco; Gemignani, Vincenzo; Demi, Marcello

    2005-04-01

    The characterization of the endothelial function is one of the most attractive research topics in modern vascular medicine. The evaluation of the flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) of the brachial artery is a widely used measurement technique. Despite its widespread use, this technique has some limitations due to the difficulties in obtaining an accurate measurement of such a small vessel (3 to 5 mm) by using ultrasounds. The system we present in this paper can automatically measure the diameter of the artery with high accuracy on each image of a video sequence. Furthermore, it processes the data in real-time, thus providing the physician with an immediate response while the examination is still in progress. The main part of the system is a video processing board based on a state-of-the-art digital signal processor (DSP). The board acquires the video signal generated by the ultrasound equipment which furnishes a longitudinal section of the artery vessel. For each image, the DSP automatically locates the two borders of the vessel and subsequently computes the diameter. The algorithm used to automatically locate the borders of the vessel is based on a new operator of edge detection which was derived from the first absolute central moment. Tests in many clinical centers proved that the system provides very accurate measurements and is a remarkable step forward toward a more systematic evaluation of the FMD.

  13. Ultrasound-based elastography for the diagnosis of portal hypertension in cirrhotics

    PubMed Central

    Şirli, Roxana; Sporea, Ioan; Popescu, Alina; Dănilă, Mirela

    2015-01-01

    Progressive fibrosis is encountered in almost all chronic liver diseases. Its clinical signs are diagnostic in advanced cirrhosis, but compensated liver cirrhosis is harder to diagnose. Liver biopsy is still considered the reference method for staging the severity of fibrosis, but due to its drawbacks (inter and intra-observer variability, sampling errors, unequal distribution of fibrosis in the liver, and risk of complications and even death), non-invasive methods were developed to assess fibrosis (serologic and elastographic). Elastographic methods can be ultrasound-based or magnetic resonance imaging-based. All ultrasound-based elastographic methods are valuable for the early diagnosis of cirrhosis, especially transient elastography (TE) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography, which have similar sensitivities and specificities, although ARFI has better feasibility. TE is a promising method for predicting portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients, but it cannot replace upper digestive endoscopy. The diagnostic accuracy of using ARFI in the liver to predict portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients is debatable, with controversial results in published studies. The accuracy of ARFI elastography may be significantly increased if spleen stiffness is assessed, either alone or in combination with liver stiffness and other parameters. Two-dimensional shear-wave elastography, the ElastPQ technique and strain elastography all need to be evaluated as predictors of portal hypertension. PMID:26556985

  14. Towards intraoperative monitoring of ablation using tracked 3D ultrasound elastography and internal palpation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroughi, Pezhman; Burgner, Jessica; Choti, Michael A.; Webster, Robert J., III; Hager, Gregory D.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2012-03-01

    B-mode ultrasound is widely used in liver ablation. However, the necrosis zone is typically not visible under b-mode ultrasound, since ablation does not necessarily change the acoustic properties of the tissue. In contrast, the change in tissue stiffness makes elastography ideal for monitoring ablation. Tissue palpation for elastography is typically applied at the imaging probe, by indenting it slightly into the tissue surface. However, in this paper we propose an alternate approach, where palpation is applied by a surgical instrument located inside the tissue. In our approach, the ablation needle is placed inside a steerable device called an active cannula and inserted into the tissue. A controlled motion is applied to the center of the ablation zone via the active cannula. Since the type and direction of motion is known, displacement can then be computed from two frames with the desired motion. The elastography results show the ablated region around the needle. While internal palpation provides excellent local contrast, freehand palpation from outside of the tissue via the transducer can provide a more global view of the region of the interest. For this purpose, we used a tracked 3D transducer to generate volumetric elastography images covering the ablated region. The tracking information is employed to improve the elastography results by selecting volume pairs suitable for elastography. This is an extension of our 2D frame selection technique which can cope with uncertainties associated with intra-operative elastography. In our experiments with phantom and ex-vivo tissue, we were able to generate high-quality images depicting the boundaries of the hard lesions.

  15. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Peruzzini, D.; Viti, J.; Tortoli, P.; Verweij, M. D.; Jong, N. de; Vos, H. J.

    2015-10-28

    Currently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the third or higher harmonics, i.e. “superharmonic” imaging, shows better contrast. However, the superharmonic scattering has a lower signal level compared to e.g. second harmonic signals. This study investigates the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of superharmonic UCA scattering in a tissue/vessel mimicking phantom using a real-time clinical scanner. Numerical simulations were performed to estimate the level of harmonics generated by the microbubbles. Data were acquired with a custom built dual-frequency cardiac phased array probe. Fundamental real-time images were produced while beam formed radiofrequency (RF) data was stored for further offline processing. The phantom consisted of a cavity filled with UCA surrounded by tissue mimicking material. The acoustic pressure in the cavity of the phantom was 110 kPa (MI = 0.11) ensuring non-destructivity of UCA. After processing of the acquired data from the phantom, the UCA-filled cavity could be clearly observed in the images, while tissue signals were suppressed at or below the noise floor. The measured CTR values were 36 dB, >38 dB, and >32 dB, for the second, third, and fourth harmonic respectively, which were in agreement with those reported earlier for preliminary contrast superharmonic imaging. The single frame SNR values (in which ‘signal’ denotes the signal level from the UCA area) were 23 dB, 18 dB, and 11 dB, respectively. This indicates that noise, and not the tissue signal, is the limiting factor for the UCA detection when using the superharmonics in nondestructive mode.

  16. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peruzzini, D.; Viti, J.; Tortoli, P.; Verweij, M. D.; de Jong, N.; Vos, H. J.

    2015-10-01

    Currently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the third or higher harmonics, i.e. "superharmonic" imaging, shows better contrast. However, the superharmonic scattering has a lower signal level compared to e.g. second harmonic signals. This study investigates the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of superharmonic UCA scattering in a tissue/vessel mimicking phantom using a real-time clinical scanner. Numerical simulations were performed to estimate the level of harmonics generated by the microbubbles. Data were acquired with a custom built dual-frequency cardiac phased array probe. Fundamental real-time images were produced while beam formed radiofrequency (RF) data was stored for further offline processing. The phantom consisted of a cavity filled with UCA surrounded by tissue mimicking material. The acoustic pressure in the cavity of the phantom was 110 kPa (MI = 0.11) ensuring non-destructivity of UCA. After processing of the acquired data from the phantom, the UCA-filled cavity could be clearly observed in the images, while tissue signals were suppressed at or below the noise floor. The measured CTR values were 36 dB, >38 dB, and >32 dB, for the second, third, and fourth harmonic respectively, which were in agreement with those reported earlier for preliminary contrast superharmonic imaging. The single frame SNR values (in which `signal' denotes the signal level from the UCA area) were 23 dB, 18 dB, and 11 dB, respectively. This indicates that noise, and not the tissue signal, is the limiting factor for the UCA detection when using the superharmonics in nondestructive mode.

  17. Real-Time MRI Navigated Ultrasound for Preoperative Tumor Evaluation in Breast Cancer Patients: Technique and Clinical Implementation.

    PubMed

    Park, Ah Young; Seo, Bo Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) navigated ultrasound is an image fusion technique to display the results of both MRI and ultrasonography on the same monitor. This system is a promising technique to improve lesion detection and analysis, to maximize advantages of each imaging modality, and to compensate the disadvantages of both MRI and ultrasound. In evaluating breast cancer stage preoperatively, MRI and ultrasound are the most representative imaging modalities. However, sometimes difficulties arise in interpreting and correlating the radiological features between these two different modalities. This pictorial essay demonstrates the technical principles of the real-time MRI navigated ultrasound, and clinical implementation of the system in preoperative evaluation of tumor extent, multiplicity, and nodal status in breast cancer patients. PMID:27587958

  18. Real-Time MRI Navigated Ultrasound for Preoperative Tumor Evaluation in Breast Cancer Patients: Technique and Clinical Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ah Young

    2016-01-01

    Real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) navigated ultrasound is an image fusion technique to display the results of both MRI and ultrasonography on the same monitor. This system is a promising technique to improve lesion detection and analysis, to maximize advantages of each imaging modality, and to compensate the disadvantages of both MRI and ultrasound. In evaluating breast cancer stage preoperatively, MRI and ultrasound are the most representative imaging modalities. However, sometimes difficulties arise in interpreting and correlating the radiological features between these two different modalities. This pictorial essay demonstrates the technical principles of the real-time MRI navigated ultrasound, and clinical implementation of the system in preoperative evaluation of tumor extent, multiplicity, and nodal status in breast cancer patients. PMID:27587958

  19. Single-Camera Closed-Form Real-Time Needle Tracking for Ultrasound-Guided Needle Insertion.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Mohammad; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Rohling, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Many common needle intervention procedures are performed with ultrasound guidance because it is a flexible, cost-effective and widely available intra-operative imaging modality. In a needle insertion procedure with ultrasound guidance, real-time calculation and visualization of the needle trajectory can help to guide the choice of puncture site and needle angle to reach the target depicted in the ultrasound image. We found that it is feasible to calculate the needle trajectory with a single camera mounted directly on the ultrasound transducer by using the needle markings. Higher accuracy is achieved compared with other similar transducer-mounted needle trackers. We used an inexpensive, real-time and easy-to-use tracking method based on an automatic feature extraction algorithm and a closed-form method for pose estimation of the needle. The overall accuracy was 0.94 ± 0.46 mm. PMID:26215491

  20. Generating Shear Waves in the Human Brain for Ultrasound Elastography: A new Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, Emmanuel; Callé, Samuel; Remenieras, Jean-Pierre

    One of the challenges of brain elastography is the generation of the shear waves inside the brain. The generation system has to bypass the body's natural protection while keeping a good level of comfort for the patient. We propose a shear wave inducing system for brain ultrasound elastography. In this paper we will validate this system in vitro on a tissue mimicking phantom by doing shear wave velocity measurements. The system proves to work well on phantoms and to be comfortable for the patient. Further work will include measurements in vivo.

  1. Assessing feasibility of real-time ultrasound monitoring in stereotactic body radiotherapy of liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yahua; Stephans, Kevin; Qi, Peng; Yu, Naiching; Wong, John; Xia, Ping

    2013-06-01

    Probe-Para plans, 38.48 Gy ± 0.31 (р = 0.33) for Probe-Vert plans, and 38.72 Gy ± 0.14 for clinical SBRT plans. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in CI and HI of all SBRT plans. The endpoint doses to the liver, heart, esophagus, right kidney, and stomach also had no significant differences (p > 0.05). Except for superficial lesions, real-time ultrasound monitoring during liver SBRT is clinically feasible. Placing the ultrasound probe parallel to the longitudinal axis of the patient allows a greater probability of utilizing preferred coplanar beams. PMID:23369158

  2. Real-time Focused Ultrasound Surgery (FUS) Monitoring Using Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI)

    SciTech Connect

    Maleke, Caroline; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2009-04-14

    Monitoring changes in tissue mechanical properties to optimally control thermal exposure is important in thermal therapies. The amplitude-modulated (AM) harmonic motion imaging (HMI) for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) technique is a radiation force technique, which has the capability of tracking tissue stiffness during application of an oscillatory force. The feasibility of HMIFU for assessing mechanical tissue properties has been previously demonstrated. In this paper, a confocal transducer, combining a 4.5 MHz FUS transducer and a 3.3 MHz phased array imaging transducer, was used. The FUS transducer was driven by AM wave at 15 Hz with an acoustic intensity (I{sub spta}) was equal to 1050 W/cm{sup 2}. A lowpass digital filter was used to remove the spectrum of the higher power beam prior to displacement estimation. The resulting axial tissue displacement was estimated using 1D cross-correlation with a correlation window of 2 mm and a 92.5% overlap. A thermocouple was also used to measure the temperature near the ablated region. 2D HMI-images from six-bovine-liver specimens indicated the onset of coagulation necrosis through changes in amplitude displacement after coagulation due to its simultaneous probing and heating capability. The HMI technique can thus be used to monitor temperature-related stiffness changes of tissues during thermal therapies in real-time, i.e., without interrupting or modifying the treatment protocol.

  3. Real time studies of Elastic Moduli Pu Aging using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorov, Boris

    Elastic moduli are fundamental thermodynamic susceptibilities that connect directly to thermodynamics, electronic structure and give important information about mechanical properties. To determine the time evolution of the elastic properties in 239Pu and it Ga alloys, is imperative to study its phase stability and self-irradiation damage process. The most-likely sources of these changes include a) ingrowth of radioactive decay products like He and U, b) the introduction of radiation damage, c) δ-phase instabilities towards α-Pu or to Pu3Ga. The measurement of mechanical resonance frequencies can be made with extreme precision and used to compute the elastic moduli without corrections giving important insight in this problem. Using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy, we measured the time dependence of the mechanical resonance frequencies of fine-grained polycrystalline δ-phase 239Pu, from 300K up to 480K. At room temperature, the shear modulus shows an increase in time (stiffening), but the bulk modulus decreases (softening). These are the first real-time measurements of room temperature aging of the elastic moduli, and the changes are consistent with elastic moduli measurements performed on 44 year old δ-Pu. As the temperature is increased, the rate of change increases exponentially, with both moduli becoming stiffer with time. For T>420K an abrupt change in the time dependence is observed indicating that the bulk and shear moduli have opposite rates of change. Our measurements provide a basis for ruling out the decomposition of δ-Pu towards α-Pu or Pu3Ga, and indicate a complex defect-related scenario from which we are gathering important clues.

  4. Real-time 3D ultrasound imaging on a next-generation media processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagoulatos, Niko; Noraz, Frederic; Kim, Yongmin

    2001-05-01

    3D ultrasound (US) provides physicians with a better understanding of human anatomy. By manipulating the 3D US data set, physicians can observe the anatomy in 3D from a number of different view directions and obtain 2D US images that would not be possible to directly acquire with the US probe. In order for 3D US to be in widespread clinical use, creation and manipulation of the 3D US data should be done at interactive times. This is a challenging task due to the large amount of data to be processed. Our group previously reported interactive 3D US imaging using a programmable mediaprocessor, Texas Instruments TMS320C80, which has been in clinical use. In this work, we present the algorithms we have developed for real-time 3D US using a newer and more powerful mediaprocessor, called MAP-CA. MAP-CA is a very long instruction word (VLIW) processor developed for multimedia applications. It has multiple execution units, a 32-kbyte data cache and a programmable DMA controller called the data streamer (DS). A forward mapping 6 DOF (for a freehand 3D US system based on magnetic position sensor for tracking the US probe) reconstruction algorithm with zero- order interpolation is achieved in 11.8 msec (84.7 frame/sec) per 512x512 8-bit US image. For 3D visualization of the reconstructed 3D US data sets, we used volume rendering and in particular the shear-warp factorization with the maximum intensity projection (MIP) rendering. 3D visualization is achieved in 53.6 msec (18.6 frames/sec) for a 128x128x128 8-bit volume and in 410.3 msec (2.4 frames/sec) for a 256x256x256 8-bit volume.

  5. Rapidly-steered single-element ultrasound for real-time volumetric imaging and guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauber, Mark; Western, Craig; Solek, Roman; Salisbury, Kenneth; Hristov, Dmitre; Schlosser, Jeffrey

    2016-03-01

    Volumetric ultrasound (US) imaging has the potential to provide real-time anatomical imaging with high soft-tissue contrast in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic guidance applications. However, existing volumetric US machines utilize "wobbling" linear phased array or matrix phased array transducers which are costly to manufacture and necessitate bulky external processing units. To drastically reduce cost, improve portability, and reduce footprint, we propose a rapidly-steered single-element volumetric US imaging system. In this paper we explore the feasibility of this system with a proof-of-concept single-element volumetric US imaging device. The device uses a multi-directional raster-scan technique to generate a series of two-dimensional (2D) slices that were reconstructed into three-dimensional (3D) volumes. At 15 cm depth, 90° lateral field of view (FOV), and 20° elevation FOV, the device produced 20-slice volumes at a rate of 0.8 Hz. Imaging performance was evaluated using an US phantom. Spatial resolution was 2.0 mm, 4.7 mm, and 5.0 mm in the axial, lateral, and elevational directions at 7.5 cm. Relative motion of phantom targets were automatically tracked within US volumes with a mean error of -0.3+/-0.3 mm, -0.3+/-0.3 mm, and -0.1+/-0.5 mm in the axial, lateral, and elevational directions, respectively. The device exhibited a mean spatial distortion error of 0.3+/-0.9 mm, 0.4+/-0.7 mm, and -0.3+/-1.9 in the axial, lateral, and elevational directions. With a production cost near $1000, the performance characteristics of the proposed system make it an ideal candidate for diagnostic and image-guided therapy applications where form factor and low cost are paramount.

  6. New fabrication techniques for ring-array transducers for real-time 3D intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Light, Edward D; Lieu, Victor; Smith, Stephen W

    2009-10-01

    We have previously described miniature 2D array transducers integrated into a Cook Medical, Inc. vena cava filter deployment device. While functional, the fabrication technique was very labor intensive and did not lend itself well to efficient fabrication of large numbers of devices. We developed two new fabrication methods that we believe can be used to efficiently manufacture these types of devices in greater than prototype numbers. One transducer consisted of 55 elements operating near 5 MHz. The interelement spacing is 0.20 mm. It was constructed on a flat piece of copper-clad polyimide and then wrapped around an 11 French catheter of a Cook Medical, Inc. inferior vena cava (IVC) filter deployment device. We used a braided wiring technology from Tyco Electronics Corp. to connect the elements to our real-time 3D ultrasound scanner. Typical measured transducer element bandwidth was 20% centered at 4.7 MHz and the 50 Omega round trip insertion loss was --82 dB. The mean of the nearest neighbor cross talk was -37.0 dB. The second method consisted of a 46-cm long single layer flex circuit from MicroConnex that terminates in an interconnect that plugs directly into our system cable. This transducer had 70 elements at 0.157 mm interelement spacing operating at 4.8 MHz. Typical measured transducer element bandwidth was 29% and the 50 Omega round trip insertion loss was -83 dB. The mean of the nearest neighbor cross talk was -33.0 dB. PMID:20458877

  7. Cross-Validation of Magnetic Resonance Elastography and Ultrasound-Based Transient Elastography: A Preliminary Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Glaser, Kevin J; Miette, Véronique; Sandrin, Laurent; Ehman, Richard L

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To cross-validate two recent noninvasive elastographic techniques, Ultrasound-based Transient Elastography (UTE) and Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE). As potential alternatives to liver biopsy, UTE and MRE are undergoing clinical investigations for liver fibrosis diagnosis and liver disease management around the world. These two techniques use tissue stiffness as a marker for disease state and it is important to do a cross-validation study of both elastographic techniques to determine the consistency with which the two techniques can measure the mechanical properties of materials. Materials and Methods In this paper, 19 well-characterized phantoms with a range of stiffness values were measured by two clinical devices (a Fibroscan and a MRE system based respectively on the UTE and MRE techniques) successively with the operators double-blinded. Results Statistical analysis showed that the correlation coefficient was r2=0.93 between MRE and UTE, and there was no evidence of a systematic difference between them within the range of stiffnesses examined. Conclusion These two noninvasive methods, MRE and UTE, provide clinicians with important new options for improving patient care regarding liver diseases in terms of the diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring of fibrosis progression, as well for evaluating the efficacy of treatment. PMID:19856447

  8. Fluorescent microscope system to monitor real-time interactions between focused ultrasound, echogenic drug delivery vehicles, and live cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Ibsen, Stuart; Benchimol, Michael; Esener, Sadik

    2013-01-01

    Rapid development in the field of ultrasound triggered drug delivery has made it essential to study the real-time interaction between the membranes of live cells and the membranes of echogenic delivery vehicles under exposure to focused ultrasound. The objective of this work was to design an analysis system that combined fluorescent imagining, high speed videography, and definable pulse sequences of focused ultrasound to allow for real time observations of both cell and vehicle membranes. Documenting the behavior of the membranes themselves has not previously been possible due to limitations with existing optical systems used to understand the basic physics of microbubble/ultrasound interaction and the basic interaction between microbubbles and cells. The performance of this new system to monitor membrane behavior was demonstrated by documenting the modes of vehicle fragmentation at different ultrasound intensity levels. At 1.5MPa the membranes were shown to completely fragment while at intensities below 1MPa the membranes pop open and slowly unfold. The interaction between these vehicles and cell membranes was also documented by the removal of fluorescent particles from the surfaces of live cells out to 20μm from the microbubble location. The fluid flow created by microstreaming around ensonated microbubbles was documented at video recording speeds from 60 to 18,000 frames per second. This information about membrane behavior allows the chemical and physical properties of the drug delivery vehicle to be designed along with the ultrasound pulse sequence to cause the most efficient drug delivery. PMID:22749476

  9. Real-time dynamic display of registered 4D cardiac MR and ultrasound images using a GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Huang, X.; Eagleson, R.; Guiraudon, G.; Peters, T. M.

    2007-03-01

    In minimally invasive image-guided surgical interventions, different imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and real-time three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US), can provide complementary, multi-spectral image information. Multimodality dynamic image registration is a well-established approach that permits real-time diagnostic information to be enhanced by placing lower-quality real-time images within a high quality anatomical context. For the guidance of cardiac procedures, it would be valuable to register dynamic MRI or CT with intraoperative US. However, in practice, either the high computational cost prohibits such real-time visualization of volumetric multimodal images in a real-world medical environment, or else the resulting image quality is not satisfactory for accurate guidance during the intervention. Modern graphics processing units (GPUs) provide the programmability, parallelism and increased computational precision to begin to address this problem. In this work, we first outline our research on dynamic 3D cardiac MR and US image acquisition, real-time dual-modality registration and US tracking. Then we describe image processing and optimization techniques for 4D (3D + time) cardiac image real-time rendering. We also present our multimodality 4D medical image visualization engine, which directly runs on a GPU in real-time by exploiting the advantages of the graphics hardware. In addition, techniques such as multiple transfer functions for different imaging modalities, dynamic texture binding, advanced texture sampling and multimodality image compositing are employed to facilitate the real-time display and manipulation of the registered dual-modality dynamic 3D MR and US cardiac datasets.

  10. Real-time elastography as a noninvasive technique for quantification of fibrosis in patients with chronic viral liver disease: Preliminary findings☆

    PubMed Central

    Fiorini, E.; Cipriano, V.; De Molo, C.; Righi, S.; Ainora, M.E.; Arcelli, A.; Bertusi, C.; Montanari, M.; Bianchi, G.; Serra, C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Real-time elastography (RTE) is a novel technique for measuring tissue elasticity. The aims of this study were to prospectively measure liver stiffness with RTE in patients with chronic viral hepatitis and to evaluate the possible correlation between RTE data and the extent of fibrosis based on liver biopsy findings (Ishak score). Material and methods Between February and October 2011, 26 patients (18M, 8F, mean age 41 ± 13 [standard deviation], range 22–62) with chronic viral hepatitis were prospectively evaluated with ultrasonography (US) that included RTE. All patients then underwent US-guided percutaneous liver biopsy (right lobe) for evaluation of fibrosis. Examinations were performed with a iU22 scanner (Philips, Bothell, WA, USA); a convex transducer (C5-1) was used for the US examination, and a linear transducer (L12-5) for RTE. In the RTE images, relative tissue stiffness is expressed according to a color scale with soft areas represented in green/red and hard areas in blue. Patients were examined in the supine position in suspended normal respiration; three loops of 20 RTE frames were recorded for each case. For each patient, we calculated the mean strain ratio (MSR) for the 3 loops. The Spearman correlation coefficient was used to assess correlation between the ASR and fibrosis stage (F) reflected by the Ishak score. Results The Spearman coefficient showed significant correlation between the MSR and F (Rho = 0.470, p = 0.015). Conclusions RTE appears to be a useful tool for noninvasive evaluation of fibrosis in patients with chronic viral hepatitis although these findings need to be confirmed in larger case series. PMID:23730385

  11. Object detection in ultrasound elastography for use in HIFU treatment of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Alex; Mankani, Soumya; Choo, Chang

    2014-03-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), has applications in treating various cancers, such as prostate, liver and breast cancer. In order for HIFU to be effective and efficient it needs to be guided by an imaging modality. While there are several options for guiding HIFU treatment, one of the most promising is ultrasound elastography. Current commercial devices use Brightness-Mode (B-mode) imaging or MRI, and are manual processes. Ultrasound elastography, allows complete automation of HIFU treatment due to the enhanced image, that elastography provides. The elastic image provides more information and less noise. To show that segmentation was possible on elastic images, nine algorithms were implemented in matlab and used on three distinct images for object detection. The three images used, have varying properties regarding object intensity and placement, as well as different noise patterns. Using PSNR, to gauge the effectiveness of each algorithm, it was shown that segmentation was possible on all images using different algorithms. The bilateral-shock-bilateral algorithm proved to be an overall effective algorithm in every situation with a PSNR of 83.87db on the phantom image. The segmentation results clearly highlight any object in the images. Future work includes fine tuning the algorithm with different phantom images and in-vivo images to distinguish between noise and desired object.

  12. An H∞ Strategy for Strain Estimation in Ultrasound Elastography Using Biomechanical Modeling Constraint

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jinwei; Lu, Minhua; Chen, Siping; Liu, Huafeng

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of ultrasound elastography is to identify lesions by reconstructing the hardness characteristics of tissue reconstructed from ultrasound data. Conventional quasi-static ultrasound elastography is easily applied to obtain axial strain components along the compression direction, with the results inverted to represent the distribution of tissue hardness under the assumption of constant internal stresses. However, previous works of quasi-static ultrasound elastography have found it difficult to obtain the lateral and shear strain components, due to the poor lateral resolution of conventional ultrasound probes. The physical nature of the strain field is a continuous vector field, which should be fully described by the axial, lateral, and shear strain components, and the clinical value of lateral and shear strain components of deformed tissue is gradually being recognized by both engineers and clinicians. Therefore, a biomechanical-model-constrained filtering framework is proposed here for recovering a full displacement field at a high spatial resolution from the noisy ultrasound data. In our implementation, after the biomechanical model constraint is integrated into the state-space equation, both the axial and lateral displacement components can be recovered at a high spatial resolution from the noisy displacement measurements using a robust filter, which only requires knowledge of the worst-case noise levels in the measurements. All of the strain components can then be calculated by applying a gradient operator to the recovered displacement field. Numerical experiments on synthetic data demonstrated the robustness and effectiveness of our approach, and experiments on phantom data and in-vivo clinical data also produced satisfying results. PMID:24058460

  13. SU-E-J-205: Monte Carlo Modeling of Ultrasound Probes for Real-Time Ultrasound Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hristov, D; Schlosser, J; Bazalova, M; Chen, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the effect of ultrasound (US) probe beam attenuation for radiation therapy delivered under real-time US image guidance by means of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: MC models of two Philips US probes, an X6-1 matrix-array transducer and a C5-2 curved-array transducer, were built based on their CT images in the EGSnrc BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc codes. Due to the metal parts, the probes were scanned in a Tomotherapy machine with a 3.5 MV beam. Mass densities in the probes were assigned based on an electron density calibration phantom consisting of cylinders with mass densities between 0.2–8.0 g/cm{sup 3}. Beam attenuation due to the probes was measured in a solid water phantom for a 6 MV and 15 MV 15x15 cm{sup 2} beam delivered on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator. The dose was measured with the PTW-729 ionization chamber array at two depths and compared to MC simulations. The extreme case beam attenuation expected in robotic US image guided radiotherapy for probes in upright position was quantified by means of MC simulations. Results: The 3.5 MV CT number to mass density calibration curve was found to be linear with R{sup 2} > 0.99. The maximum mass densities were 4.6 and 4.2 g/cm{sup 3} in the C5-2 and X6-1 probe, respectively. Gamma analysis of the simulated and measured doses revealed that over 98% of measurement points passed the 3%/3mm criteria for both probes and measurement depths. The extreme attenuation for probes in upright position was found to be 25% and 31% for the C5-2 and X6-1 probe, respectively, for both 6 and 15 MV beams at 10 cm depth. Conclusion: MC models of two US probes used for real-time image guidance during radiotherapy have been built. As a Result, radiotherapy treatment planning with the imaging probes in place can now be performed. J Schlosser is an employee of SoniTrack Systems, Inc. D Hristov has financial interest in SoniTrack Systems, Inc.

  14. The use of 2D ultrasound elastography for measuring tendon motion and strain.

    PubMed

    Chernak Slane, Laura; Thelen, Darryl G

    2014-02-01

    The goal of the current study was to investigate the fidelity of a 2D ultrasound elastography method for the measurement of tendon motion and strain. Ultrasound phantoms and ex vivo porcine flexor tendons were cyclically stretched to 4% strain while cine ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data and video data were simultaneously collected. 2D ultrasound elastography was used to estimate tissue motion and strain from RF data, and surface tissue motion and strain were separately estimated using digital image correlation (DIC). There were strong correlations (R(2)>0.97) between DIC and RF measurements of phantom displacement and strain, and good agreement in estimates of peak phantom strain (DIC: 3.5±0.2%; RF: 3.7±0.1%). For tendon, elastographic estimates of displacement profiles also correlated well with DIC measurements (R(2)>0.92), and exhibited similar estimated peak tendon strain (DIC: 2.6±1.4%; RF: 2.2±1.3%). Elastographic tracking with B-Mode images tended to under-predict peak strain for both the phantom and tendon. This study demonstrates the capacity to use quantitative elastographic techniques to measure tendon displacement and strain within an ultrasound image window. The approach may be extendible to in vivo use on humans, which would allow for the non-invasive analysis of tendon deformation in both normal and pathological states. PMID:24388164

  15. The Use of 2D Ultrasound Elastography for Measuring Tendon Motion and Strain

    PubMed Central

    Slane, Laura Chernak; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to investigate the fidelity of a 2D ultrasound elastography method for the measurement of tendon motion and strain. Ultrasound phantoms and ex vivo porcine flexor tendons were cyclically stretched to 4% strain while cine ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data and video data were simultaneously collected. 2D ultrasound elastography was used to estimate tissue motion and strain from RF data, and surface tissue motion and strain were separately estimated using digital image correlation (DIC). There were strong correlations (R2 > 0.97) between DIC and RF measurements of phantom displacement and strain, and good agreement in estimates of peak phantom strain (DIC: 3.5 ± 0.2%; RF: 3.7 ± 0.1%). For tendon, elastographic estimates of displacement profiles also correlated well with DIC measurements (R2 > 0.92), and exhibited similar estimated peak tendon strain (DIC: 2.6 ± 1.4%; RF: 2.2 ± 1.3%). Elastographic tracking with B-Mode images tended to under-predict peak strain for both the phantom and tendon. This study demonstrates the capacity to use quantitative elastographic techniques to measure tendon displacement and strain within an ultrasound image window. The approach may be extendible to in vivo use on humans, which would allow for the non-invasive analysis of tendon deformation in both normal and pathological states. PMID:24388164

  16. Comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE) with various ultrasound push beams.

    PubMed

    Song, Pengfei; Urban, Matthew W; Manduca, Armando; Zhao, Heng; Greenleaf, James F; Chen, Shigao

    2013-08-01

    Comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE) has recently been shown to be a fast and accurate 2-D elasticity imaging technique that can provide a full field-of-view (FOV) shear wave speed map with only one rapid data acquisition. The initial version of CUSE was termed U-CUSE because unfocused ultrasound push beams were used. In this paper, we present two new versions of CUSE-focused CUSE (F-CUSE) and marching CUSE (M-CUSE), which use focused ultrasound push beams to improve acoustic radiation force penetration and produce stronger shear waves in deep tissues (e.g., kidney and liver). F-CUSE divides transducer elements into several subgroups which transmit multiple focused ultrasound beams simultaneously. M-CUSE uses more elements for each focused push beam and laterally marches the push beams. Both F-CUSE and M-CUSE can generate comb-shaped shear wave fields that have shear wave motion at each imaging pixel location so that a full FOV 2-D shear wave speed map can be reconstructed with only one data acquisition. Homogeneous phantom experiments showed that U-CUSE, F-CUSE, and M-CUSE can all produce smooth shear wave speed maps with accurate shear wave speed estimates. An inclusion phantom experiment showed that all CUSE methods could provide good contrast between the inclusion and background with sharp boundaries while F-CUSE and M-CUSE require shorter push durations to achieve shear wave speed maps with comparable SNR to U-CUSE. A more challenging inclusion phantom experiment with a very stiff and deep inclusion shows that better shear wave penetration could be gained by using F-CUSE and M-CUSE. Finally, a shallow inclusion experiment showed that good preservations of inclusion shapes could be achieved by both U-CUSE and F-CUSE in the near field. Safety measurements showed that all safety parameters are below FDA regulatory limits for all CUSE methods. These promising results suggest that, using various push beams, CUSE is capable of reconstructing a 2-D full FOV

  17. In Vivo Experiments with Intraluminal Ultrasound Applicator Compatible with ``Real-Time'' MR Temperature Mapping, designed for Oesophagus Tumour Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melodelima, D.; Salomir, R.; Mougenot, C.; Theillère, Y.; Moonen, C.; Cathignol, D.

    2005-03-01

    High intensity ultrasound has shown considerable ability to produce precise and deep thermal coagulation necrosis. Focused, cylindrical, spherical or plane transducers have been used to induce high temperature elevation in tissues, in order to coagulate proteins and kill cells. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been used, with focused transducers and cylindrical interstitial applicators, to monitor temperature distribution and provide temperature feedback control during heating procedures. The active part of intraluminal applicators is positioned very close to the target region. It is therefore essential to provide accurate monitoring of heat deposition in the tissue layer near the transducer, in order to control the extension of coagulation necrosis. The purpose of this study was to develop a 10-mm diameter intraluminal ultrasound applicator, designed to treat oesophageal cancers and compatible with "real-time" MR temperature mapping. The ultrasound applicator was tested in vivo under real time, PRF based, fast MR temperature monitoring. Experiments were performed in vivo on pig oesophagus. Respiratory-gated, MR thermometry was performed with segmented EPI gradient echo sequences. Post treatment follow up was performed with MRI in oesophagus and liver. Excellent MR compatibility was demonstrated. Thermal lesions identified on post-treatment follow up showed good correlation with on line MR thermometry data. This study demonstrated the feasibility of oesophageal thermal ablation using intraluminal ultrasound and on line MR temperature monitoring.

  18. Tendon motion and strain patterns evaluated with two-dimensional ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Chernak, Laura A; Thelen, Darryl G

    2012-10-11

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of 2D ultrasound elastography to assess tendon tissue motion and strain under axial loading conditions. Four porcine flexor tendons were cyclically loaded to 4% peak strain using a servo hydraulic test system. An ultrasound transducer was positioned to image a longitudinal cross-section of the tendon during loading. Ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data were collected at 63 frames per second simultaneously with applied force and crosshead displacement. A grid of nodes was manually positioned on an ultrasound image of the unloaded tendon. Small kernels (2×1 mm) centered at each node were then cross-correlated with search regions centered at corresponding nodal locations in the subsequent frame. Frame-to-frame nodal displacements were defined as the values that maximized the normalized cross-correlations. This process was repeated across all frames in the loading cycle, providing a measurement of the 2D trajectories of tissue motion throughout the loading cycle. The high resolution displacement measures along the RF beam direction were spatially differentiated to estimate the transverse (relative to tendon fibers) tissue strains. The nodal displacements obtained using this method were very repeatable, with average along-fiber trajectories that were highly correlated (average r=0.99) with the prescribed crosshead displacements. The elastography transverse strains were also repeatable and were consistent with average transverse strains estimated via changes in tendon width. The apparent Poisson's ratios (0.82-1.64) exceeded the incompressibility limit, but are comparable to values found for tendon in prior experimental and computational studies. The results demonstrate that 2D ultrasound elastography is a promising approach for noninvasively assessing localized tissue motion and strain patterns. PMID:22939179

  19. Tendon motion and strain patterns evaluated with two-dimensional ultrasound elastography

    PubMed Central

    Chernak, Laura A.; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of 2D ultrasound elastography to assess tendon tissue motion and strains under axial loading conditions. Four porcine flexor tendons were cyclically loaded to 4% peak strain using a servo hydraulic test system. An ultrasound transducer was positioned to image a longitudinal cross-section of the tendon during loading. Ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data were collected at 63 frames per second simultaneously with applied force and crosshead displacement. A grid of nodes was manually positioned on an ultrasound image of the unloaded tendon. Small kernels (2 × 1 mm) centered at each node were then cross-correlated with search regions centered at corresponding nodal locations in the subsequent frame. Frame-to-frame nodal displacements were defined as the values that maximized the normalized cross-correlations. This process was repeated across all frames in the loading cycle, providing a measurement of the 2D trajectories of tissue motion through out the loading cycle. The high resolution displacement measures along the RF beam direction were spatially differentiated to estimate the transverse (relative to tend on fibers) tissue strains. The nodal displacements obtained using this method were very repeatable, with average along-fiber trajectories that were highly correlated (r2>0.98) with the prescribed crosshead displacements. The elastography transverse strains were also repeatable and were consistent with average transverse strains estimated via changes in tendon width. The apparent Poisson’s ratios (0.82-1.64) exceeded the incompressibility limit, but are comparable to values found for tendon in prior experimental and computational studies. The results demonstrate that 2D ultrasound elastography is a promising approach for noninvasively assessing localized tissue motion and strain patterns. PMID:22939179

  20. Real-time registration of video with ultrasound using stereo disparity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jihang; Horvath, Samantha; Stetten, George; Siegel, Mel; Galeotti, John

    2012-02-01

    Medical ultrasound typically deals with the interior of the patient, with the exterior left to the original medical imaging modality, direct human vision. For the human operator scanning the patient, the view of the external anatomy is essential for correctly locating the ultrasound probe on the body and making sense of the resulting ultrasound images in their proper anatomical context. The operator, after all, is not expected to perform the scan with his eyes shut. Over the past decade, our laboratory has developed a method of fusing these two information streams in the mind of the operator, the Sonic Flashlight, which uses a half silvered mirror and miniature display mounted on an ultrasound probe to produce a virtual image within the patient at its proper location. We are now interested in developing a similar data fusion approach within the ultrasound machine itself, by, in effect, giving vision to the transducer. Our embodiment of this concept consists of an ultrasound probe with two small video cameras mounted on it, with software capable of locating the surface of an ultrasound phantom using stereo disparity between the two video images. We report its first successful operation, demonstrating a 3D rendering of the phantom's surface with the ultrasound data superimposed at its correct relative location. Eventually, automated analysis of these registered data sets may permit the scanner and its associated computational apparatus to interpret the ultrasound data within its anatomical context, much as the human operator does today.

  1. External Vibration Multi-directional Ultrasound Shearwave Elastography (EVMUSE): Application in Liver Fibrosis Staging

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Heng; Song, Pengfei; Meixner, Duane D.; Kinnick, Randall R.; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Sanchez, William; Urban, Matthew W.; Manduca, Armando; Greenleaf, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Shear wave speed can be used to assess tissue elasticity, which is associated with tissue health. Ultrasound shear wave elastography techniques based on measuring the propagation speed of the shear waves induced by acoustic radiation force are becoming promising alternatives to biopsy in liver fibrosis staging. However, shear waves generated by such methods are typically very weak. Therefore, the penetration may become problematic, especially for overweight or obese patients. In this study, we developed a new method called External Vibration Multi-directional Ultrasound Shearwave Elastography (EVMUSE), in which external vibration from a loudspeaker was used to generate a multi-directional shear wave field. A directional filter was then applied to separate the complex shear wave field into several shear wave fields propagating in different directions. A two-dimensional (2D) shear wave speed map was reconstructed from each individual shear wave field, and a final 2D shear wave speed map was constructed by compounding these individual wave speed maps. The method was validated using two homogeneous phantoms and one multi-purpose tissue-mimicking phantom. Ten patients undergoing liver Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) were also studied with EVMUSE to compare results between the two methods. Phantom results showed EVMUSE was able to quantify tissue elasticity accurately with good penetration. In vivo EVMUSE results were well correlated with MRE results, indicating the promise of using EVMUSE for liver fibrosis staging. PMID:25020066

  2. Ultrasound Elastography for Estimation of Regional Strain of Multilayered Hydrogels and Tissue-Engineered Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chen-Yuan; Heebner, Joseph; Baskaran, Harihara; Welter, Jean F; Mansour, Joseph M

    2015-12-01

    Tissue-engineered (TE) cartilage constructs tend to develop inhomogeneously, thus, to predict the mechanical performance of the tissue, conventional biomechanical testing, which yields average material properties, is of limited value. Rather, techniques for evaluating regional and depth-dependent properties of TE cartilage, preferably non-destructively, are required. The purpose of this study was to build upon our previous results and to investigate the feasibility of using ultrasound elastography to non-destructively assess the depth-dependent biomechanical characteristics of TE cartilage while in a sterile bioreactor. As a proof-of-concept, and to standardize an assessment protocol, a well-characterized three-layered hydrogel construct was used as a surrogate for TE cartilage, and was studied under controlled incremental compressions. The strain field of the construct predicted by elastography was then validated by comparison with a poroelastic finite-element analysis (FEA). On average, the differences between the strains predicted by elastography and the FEA were within 10%. Subsequently engineered cartilage tissue was evaluated in the same test fixture. Results from these examinations showed internal regions where the local strain was 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than that near the surface. These studies document the feasibility of using ultrasound to evaluate the mechanical behaviors of maturing TE constructs in a sterile environment. PMID:26077987

  3. External vibration multi-directional ultrasound shearwave elastography (EVMUSE): application in liver fibrosis staging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Heng; Song, Pengfei; Meixner, Duane D; Kinnick, Randall R; Callstrom, Matthew R; Sanchez, William; Urban, Matthew W; Manduca, Armando; Greenleaf, James F; Chen, Shigao

    2014-11-01

    Shear wave speed can be used to assess tissue elasticity, which is associated with tissue health. Ultrasound shear wave elastography techniques based on measuring the propagation speed of the shear waves induced by acoustic radiation force are becoming promising alternatives to biopsy in liver fibrosis staging. However, shear waves generated by such methods are typically very weak. Therefore, the penetration may become problematic, especially for overweight or obese patients. In this study, we developed a new method called external vibration multi-directional ultrasound shearwave elastography (EVMUSE), in which external vibration from a loudspeaker was used to generate a multi-directional shear wave field. A directional filter was then applied to separate the complex shear wave field into several shear wave fields propagating in different directions. A 2-D shear wave speed map was reconstructed from each individual shear wave field, and a final 2-D shear wave speed map was constructed by compounding these individual wave speed maps. The method was validated using two homogeneous phantoms and one multi-purpose tissue-mimicking phantom. Ten patients undergoing liver magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) were also studied with EVMUSE to compare results between the two methods. Phantom results showed EVMUSE was able to quantify tissue elasticity accurately with good penetration. In vivo EVMUSE results were well correlated with MRE results, indicating the promise of using EVMUSE for liver fibrosis staging. PMID:25020066

  4. NOTE: The feasibility of an infrared system for real-time visualization and mapping of ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Adam; Nunn, John

    2010-06-01

    In treatment planning for ultrasound therapy, it is desirable to know the 3D structure of the ultrasound field. However, mapping an ultrasound field in 3D is very slow, with even a single planar raster scan taking typically several hours. Additionally, hydrophones that are used for field mapping are expensive and can be damaged in some therapy fields. So there is value in rapid methods which enable visualization and mapping of the ultrasound field in about 1 min. In this note we explore the feasibility of mapping the intensity distribution by measuring the temperature distribution produced in a thin sheet of absorbing material. A 0.2 mm thick acetate sheet forms a window in the wall of a water tank containing the transducer. The window is oriented at 45° to the beam axis, and the distance from the transducer to the window can be varied. The temperature distribution is measured with an infrared camera; thermal images of the inclined plane could be viewed in real time or images could be captured for later analysis and 3D field reconstruction. We conclude that infrared thermography can be used to gain qualitative information about ultrasound fields. Thermal images are easily visualized with good spatial and thermal resolutions (0.044 mm and 0.05 °C in our system). The focus and field structure such as side lobes can be identified in real time from the direct video output. 3D maps and image planes at arbitrary orientations to the beam axis can be obtained and reconstructed within a few minutes. In this note we are primarily interested in the technique for characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields, but other applications such as physiotherapy fields are also possible.

  5. Hybrid optoacoustic and ultrasound imaging in three dimensions and real time by optical excitation of a passive element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehm, Thomas F.; Deán-Ben, Xosé L.; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Pulse-echo ultrasound and optoacoustic imaging possess very different, yet highly complementary, advantages of mechanical and optical contrast in living tissues. Integration of pulse-echo ultrasound with optoacoustic imaging may therefore significantly enhance the potential range of clinical applications. Nonetheless, efficient integration of these modalities remains challenging owing to the fundamental differences in the underlying physical contrast, optimal signal acquisition and image reconstruction approaches. We report on a new method for hybrid three-dimensional optoacoustic and pulse-echo ultrasound imaging based on passive generation of ultrasound with a spherical optical absorber, thus avoiding the hardware complexity of active ultrasound generation. The proposed approach allows for acquisition of complete hybrid datasets with a single laser interrogation pulse, resulting in simultaneous rendering of ultrasound and optoacoustic images at a rate of 10 volumetric frames per second. Real time image rendering for both modalities is enabled by using parallel GPU-based implementation of the reconstruction algorithms. Performance is first characterized in tubing phantoms followed by in vivo measurements in healthy human volunteers, confirming general clinical applicability of the method.

  6. Detection and Measurement of Stones With Ultrasound Strain Elastography: A Phantom Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Chen, Lei; Halpern, Elkan F; Samir, Anthony E

    2015-12-01

    The sonoelastographic appearances of stones in a phantom were evaluated in this study. Ten stones were embedded into a tissue-mimicking meat phantom. The stone axial (vertical) and transverse (horizontal) dimensions measured by an electronic digital caliper, gray-scale ultrasound, and strain elastography (SE) were compared in 5 groups with stones embedded at different depths. In this study, physically measured axial and transverse stone dimensions were 1.17 to 6.86 and 1.30 to 11.15 mm, respectively. Strain elastography showed a characteristic 3-layer pattern associated with stones, comprising a superficial transition region, a hard region, and a deep transition region. As SE data were available in group 5, only data of groups 1 to 4 were analyzed. Compared with physical measurements, measurement mean errors of SE horizontal and SE vertical dimensions ranged from -0.20 to 0.42 mm and from -1.28 to -0.05 mm, respectively, in the 4 groups. Paired t testing demonstrated a significant horizontal dimension measurement error difference between B mode and SE method in group 4 (0.44 vs -0.20 mm, P < 0.05; F = 1.18, P > 0.05), but not in the other groups. Strain elastography horizontal dimension measurement error was not statistically correlated with stone size in the 4 groups. Strain elastography vertical dimension measurement error significantly correlated with stone size only in group 4 (P < 0.05). Preliminary results indicate that stone horizontal and vertical dimensions can be measured using SE in a soft tissue phantom, including when shadowing precludes measurement of vertical dimension on conventional 2-dimensional ultrasound. These results provide substantial motivation to further investigate SE as a modality to image stones in clinical practice. PMID:26656990

  7. Magnetic Resonance Thermometry at 7T for Real-Time Monitoring and Correction of Ultrasound Induced Mild Hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Fite, Brett Z.; Liu, Yu; Kruse, Dustin E.; Caskey, Charles F.; Walton, Jeffrey H.; Lai, Chun-Yen; Mahakian, Lisa M.; Larrat, Benoit; Dumont, Erik; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2012-01-01

    While Magnetic Resonance Thermometry (MRT) has been extensively utilized for non-invasive temperature measurement, there is limited data on the use of high field (≥7T) scanners for this purpose. MR-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS) is a promising non-invasive method for localized hyperthermia and drug delivery. MRT based on the temperature sensitivity of the proton resonance frequency (PRF) has been implemented in both a tissue phantom and in vivo in a mouse Met-1 tumor model, using partial parallel imaging (PPI) to speed acquisition. An MRgFUS system capable of delivering a controlled 3D acoustic dose during real time MRT with proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) feedback control was developed and validated. Real-time MRT was validated in a tofu phantom with fluoroptic temperature measurements, and acoustic heating simulations were in good agreement with MR temperature maps. In an in vivo Met-1 mouse tumor, the real-time PID feedback control is capable of maintaining the desired temperature with high accuracy. We found that real time MR control of hyperthermia is feasible at high field, and k-space based PPI techniques may be implemented for increasing temporal resolution while maintaining temperature accuracy on the order of 1°C. PMID:22536396

  8. Improved image guidance technique for minimally invasive mitral valve repair using real-time tracked 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, Adam; Moore, John; Bainbridge, Daniel; Peters, Terry

    2016-03-01

    In the past ten years, numerous new surgical and interventional techniques have been developed for treating heart valve disease without the need for cardiopulmonary bypass. Heart valve repair is now being performed in a blood-filled environment, reinforcing the need for accurate and intuitive imaging techniques. Previous work has demonstrated how augmenting ultrasound with virtual representations of specific anatomical landmarks can greatly simplify interventional navigation challenges and increase patient safety. These techniques often complicate interventions by requiring additional steps taken to manually define and initialize virtual models. Furthermore, overlaying virtual elements into real-time image data can also obstruct the view of salient image information. To address these limitations, a system was developed that uses real-time volumetric ultrasound alongside magnetically tracked tools presented in an augmented virtuality environment to provide a streamlined navigation guidance platform. In phantom studies simulating a beating-heart navigation task, procedure duration and tool path metrics have achieved comparable performance to previous work in augmented virtuality techniques, and considerable improvement over standard of care ultrasound guidance.

  9. [Mobile hospital -real time mobile telehealthcare system with ultrasound and CT van using high-speed satellite communication-].

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Masaomi; Miyashita, Toyohisa; Murase, Sumio; Kanda, Hirohito; Karaki, Yoshiaki; Yagi, Kazuo; Ohue, Toru

    2003-01-01

    A real-time telescreening system is developed to detect early diseases for rural area residents using two types of mobile vans with a portable satellite station. The system consists of a satellite communication system with 1.5Mbps of the JCSAT-1B satellite, a spiral CT van, an ultrasound imaging van with two video conference system, a DICOM server and a multicast communication unit. The video image and examination image data are transmitted from the van to hospitals and the university simultaneously. Physician in the hospital observes and interprets exam images from the van and watches the video images of the position of ultrasound transducer on screenee in the van. After the observation images, physician explains a results of the examination by the video conference system. Seventy lung CT screening and 203 ultrasound screening were done from March to June 2002. The trial of this real time screening suggested that rural residents are given better healthcare without visit to the hospital. And it will open the gateway to reduce the medical cost and medical divide between city area and rural area. PMID:12832865

  10. Real-time ultrasound-tagging to track the 2D motion of the common carotid artery wall in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Zahnd, Guillaume; Salles, Sébastien; Liebgott, Hervé; Vray, Didier; Sérusclat, André; Moulin, Philippe

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Tracking the motion of biological tissues represents an important issue in the field of medical ultrasound imaging. However, the longitudinal component of the motion (i.e., perpendicular to the beam axis) remains more challenging to extract due to the rather coarse resolution cell of ultrasound scanners along this direction. The aim of this study is to introduce a real-time beamforming strategy dedicated to acquire tagged images featuring a distinct pattern in the objective to ease the tracking. Methods: Under the conditions of the Fraunhofer approximation, a specific apodization function was applied to the received raw channel data, in real-time during image acquisition, in order to introduce a periodic oscillations pattern along the longitudinal direction of the radio frequency signal. Analytic signals were then extracted from the tagged images, and subpixel motion tracking of the intima–media complex was subsequently performed offline, by means of a previously introduced bidimensional analytic phase-based estimator. Results: The authors’ framework was applied in vivo on the common carotid artery from 20 young healthy volunteers and 6 elderly patients with high atherosclerosis risk. Cine-loops of tagged images were acquired during three cardiac cycles. Evaluated against reference trajectories manually generated by three experienced analysts, the mean absolute tracking error was 98 ± 84 μm and 55 ± 44 μm in the longitudinal and axial directions, respectively. These errors corresponded to 28% ± 23% and 13% ± 9% of the longitudinal and axial amplitude of the assessed motion, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed framework enables tagged ultrasound images of in vivo tissues to be acquired in real-time. Such unconventional beamforming strategy contributes to improve tracking accuracy and could potentially benefit to the interpretation and diagnosis of biomedical images.

  11. Application of real-time B-mode ultrasound in posterior decompression and reduction for thoracolumbar burst fracture.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wu-Peng; Wang, Zhe; Feng, Nai-Qi; Wang, Chun-Mei; DU, Shao-Long

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of real-time B-mode ultrasound in posterior decompression and reduction and to observe the signal changes in spinal cord blood flow in a thoracolumbar burst fracture (TBF). Between February 2004 and December 2008, 138 patients with TBF were divided into group A (108 cases) and group B (30 cases). In group A, under the assistance of real-time B-mode ultrasound, posterior decompression and fracture piece reduction were performed, and we observed the signal changes in spinal cord blood flow. In group B, posterior fenestration was combined with pushing the fracture piece into the fractured vertebral body using an L-shaped operative tool. Presurgical and postsurgical recovery of neurological function was evaluated according to American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) standards, and the range of spinal decompression was determined by measuring the proportion of encroached fracture piece in the spinal canal (spinal stenosis rate) on the computed tomography (CT) image. In group A, 12 patients had a grade A spinal injury according to the Frankel grading system, and there were six cases without neurological recovery. In the other patients, neurological function increased by 1-3 grades. There were no aggravated spinal cord injuries or other serious complications. In group B, three patients were categorized as grade A and there were two cases without neurological recovery. In the other patients, neurological function increased by 1-3 grades. In groups A and B, the postsurgical spinal stenosis rate was significantly lower than the presurgical stenosis rate (P<0.05). The postsurgical spinal stenosis rate in group B was significantly higher compared with group A (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in neurological function recovery between the groups (P>0.05). Real-time B-mode ultrasound is an effective method for posterior decompression and reduction and to observe signal changes in spinal cord blood flow in TBF. PMID:24137306

  12. Application of real-time B-mode ultrasound in posterior decompression and reduction for thoracolumbar burst fracture

    PubMed Central

    YANG, WU-PENG; WANG, ZHE; FENG, NAI-QI; WANG, CHUN-MEI; DU, SHAO-LONG

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of real-time B-mode ultrasound in posterior decompression and reduction and to observe the signal changes in spinal cord blood flow in a thoracolumbar burst fracture (TBF). Between February 2004 and December 2008, 138 patients with TBF were divided into group A (108 cases) and group B (30 cases). In group A, under the assistance of real-time B-mode ultrasound, posterior decompression and fracture piece reduction were performed, and we observed the signal changes in spinal cord blood flow. In group B, posterior fenestration was combined with pushing the fracture piece into the fractured vertebral body using an L-shaped operative tool. Presurgical and postsurgical recovery of neurological function was evaluated according to American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) standards, and the range of spinal decompression was determined by measuring the proportion of encroached fracture piece in the spinal canal (spinal stenosis rate) on the computed tomography (CT) image. In group A, 12 patients had a grade A spinal injury according to the Frankel grading system, and there were six cases without neurological recovery. In the other patients, neurological function increased by 1–3 grades. There were no aggravated spinal cord injuries or other serious complications. In group B, three patients were categorized as grade A and there were two cases without neurological recovery. In the other patients, neurological function increased by 1–3 grades. In groups A and B, the postsurgical spinal stenosis rate was significantly lower than the presurgical stenosis rate (P<0.05). The postsurgical spinal stenosis rate in group B was significantly higher compared with group A (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in neurological function recovery between the groups (P>0.05). Real-time B-mode ultrasound is an effective method for posterior decompression and reduction and to observe signal changes in spinal cord blood flow in TBF. PMID

  13. Mechanical effects of surgical procedures on osteochondral grafts elucidated by osmotic loading and real-time ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Osteochondral grafts have become popular for treating small, isolated and full-thickness cartilage lesions. It is recommended that a slightly oversized, rather than an exact-sized, osteochondral plug is transplanted to achieve a tight fit. Consequently, impacting forces are required to insert the osteochondral plug into the recipient site. However, it remains controversial whether these impacting forces affect the biomechanical condition of the grafted articular cartilage. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanical effects of osteochondral plug implantation using osmotic loading and real-time ultrasound. Methods A full-thickness cylindrical osteochondral defect (diameter, 3.5 mm; depth, 5 mm) was created in the lateral lower quarter of the patella. Using graft-harvesting instruments, an osteochondral plug (diameter, 3.5 mm as exact-size or 4.5 mm as oversize; depth, 5 mm) was harvested from the lateral upper quarter of the patella and transplanted into the defect. Intact patella was used as a control. The samples were monitored by real-time ultrasound during sequential changes of the bathing solution from 0.15 M to 2 M saline (shrinkage phase) and back to 0.15 M saline (swelling phase). For cartilage sample assessment, three indices were selected, namely the change in amplitude from the cartilage surface (amplitude recovery rate: ARR) and the maximum echo shifts from the cartilage surface and the cartilage-bone interface. Results The ARR is closely related to the cartilage surface integrity, while the echo shifts from the cartilage surface and the cartilage-bone interface are closely related to tissue deformation and NaCl diffusion, respectively. The ARR values of the oversized plugs were significantly lower than those of the control and exact-sized plugs. Regarding the maximum echo shifts from the cartilage surface and the cartilage-bone interface, no significant differences were observed among the three groups. Conclusions These findings

  14. Versatile utilization of real-time intraoperative contrast-enhanced ultrasound in cranial neurosurgery: technical note and retrospective case series.

    PubMed

    Lekht, Ilya; Brauner, Noah; Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Chang, Ki-Eun; Gulati, Mittul; Shiroishi, Mark S; Grant, Edward G; Christian, Eisha; Zada, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Intraoperative contrast-enhanced ultrasound (iCEUS) offers dynamic imaging and provides functional data in real time. However, no standardized protocols or validated quantitative data exist to guide its routine use in neurosurgery. The authors aimed to provide further clinical data on the versatile application of iCEUS through a technical note and illustrative case series. METHODS Five patients undergoing craniotomies for suspected tumors were included. iCEUS was performed using a contrast agent composed of lipid shell microspheres enclosing perflutren (octafluoropropane) gas. Perfusion data were acquired through a time-intensity curve analysis protocol obtained using iCEUS prior to biopsy and/or resection of all lesions. RESULTS Three primary tumors (gemistocytic astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme, and meningioma), 1 metastatic lesion (melanoma), and 1 tumefactive demyelinating lesion (multiple sclerosis) were assessed using real-time iCEUS. No intraoperative complications occurred following multiple administrations of contrast agent in all cases. In all neoplastic cases, iCEUS replicated enhancement patterns observed on preoperative Gd-enhanced MRI, facilitated safe tumor debulking by differentiating neoplastic tissue from normal brain parenchyma, and helped identify arterial feeders and draining veins in and around the surgical cavity. Intraoperative CEUS was also useful in guiding a successful intraoperative needle biopsy of a cerebellar tumefactive demyelinating lesion obtained during real-time perfusion analysis. CONCLUSIONS Intraoperative CEUS has potential for safe, real-time, dynamic contrast-based imaging for routine use in neurooncological surgery and image-guided biopsy. Intraoperative CEUS eliminates the effect of anatomical distortions associated with standard neuronavigation and provides quantitative perfusion data in real time, which may hold major implications for intraoperative diagnosis, tissue differentiation, and quantification of

  15. Combined real-time ultrasound plane wave compounding and linear array optoacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournelle, Marc; Bost, Wolfgang; Tretbar, Steffen

    2015-07-01

    In optoacoustic imaging, the high optical contrast between different tissue types is combined with the high resolution and low scattering of ultrasound. Using adapted reconstruction algorithms, images of the distribution of light absorption in tissue can be obtained. Such as in any emerging modality, there is limited experience regarding the interpretation of optoacoustic images. For this reason, we developed a flexible hardware platform combining ultrasound imaging with optoacoustics. The system is based on the software processing of channel data and different types of reconstruction algorithms are implemented. It combines optoacoustic imaging based on linear arrays for detection with plane wave compounding ultrasound. Our system further includes a custom made probe based on a 7,5 MHz array, custom made fibre bundles for targeted light delivery and an acoustic coupling pad. The system was characterized on phantoms and first in-vivo datasets from subcutaneous vasculature were acquired.

  16. Ultrasound elastography assessment of bone/soft tissue interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, Biren J.; Yang, Xu; Chaudhry, Anuj; Shafeeq Shajudeen, Peer; Nair, Sanjay P.; Weiner, Bradley K.; Tasciotti, Ennio; Krouskop, Thomas A.; Righetti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    We report on the use of elastographic imaging techniques to assess the bone/soft tissue interface, a region that has not been previously investigated but may provide important information about fracture and bone healing. The performance of axial strain elastograms and axial shear strain elastograms at the bone/soft tissue interface was studied ex vivo on intact and fractured canine and ovine tibias. Selected ex vivo results were corroborated on intact sheep tibias in vivo. The elastography results were statistically analyzed using elastographic image quality tools. The results of this study demonstrate distinct patterns in the distribution of the normalized local axial strains and axial shear strains at the bone/soft tissue interface with respect to the background soft tissue. They also show that the relative strength and distribution of the elastographic parameters change in the presence of a fracture and depend on the degree of misalignment between the fracture fragments. Thus, elastographic imaging modalities might be used in the future to obtain information regarding the integrity of bones and to assess the severity of fractures, alignment of bone fragments as well as to follow bone healing.

  17. Real-Time Automatic Artery Segmentation, Reconstruction and Registration for Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anaesthesia of the Femoral Nerve.

    PubMed

    Smistad, Erik; Lindseth, Frank

    2016-03-01

    The goal is to create an assistant for ultrasound- guided femoral nerve block. By segmenting and visualizing the important structures such as the femoral artery, we hope to improve the success of these procedures. This article is the first step towards this goal and presents novel real-time methods for identifying and reconstructing the femoral artery, and registering a model of the surrounding anatomy to the ultrasound images. The femoral artery is modelled as an ellipse. The artery is first detected by a novel algorithm which initializes the artery tracking. This algorithm is completely automatic and requires no user interaction. Artery tracking is achieved with a Kalman filter. The 3D artery is reconstructed in real-time with a novel algorithm and a tracked ultrasound probe. A mesh model of the surrounding anatomy was created from a CT dataset. Registration of this model is achieved by landmark registration using the centerpoints from the artery tracking and the femoral artery centerline of the model. The artery detection method was able to automatically detect the femoral artery and initialize the tracking in all 48 ultrasound sequences. The tracking algorithm achieved an average dice similarity coefficient of 0.91, absolute distance of 0.33 mm, and Hausdorff distance 1.05 mm. The mean registration error was 2.7 mm, while the average maximum error was 12.4 mm. The average runtime was measured to be 38, 8, 46 and 0.2 milliseconds for the artery detection, tracking, reconstruction and registration methods respectively. PMID:26513782

  18. Real-time pulse echo and photoacoustic imaging using an ultrasound array and in-line reflective illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montilla, Leonardo G.; Olafsson, Ragnar; Witte, Russell S.

    2010-02-01

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that photoacoustic (PA) imaging, in conjunction with pulse echo (PE) ultrasound is a promising modality for diagnosing breast cancer. However, existing devices are unwieldy and are hard to integrate into the clinical environment. In addition, it is difficult to illuminate thick samples because light must be directed around the transducer. Conventional PA imaging designs involve off-axis illumination or transillumination through the object. Whereas transillumination works best with thin objects, off-axis illumination may not uniformly illuminate the region of interest. To overcome these problems we have developed an attachment to an existing clinical linear array that can efficiently deliver light in line with the image plane. This photoacoustic enabling device (PED) exploits an optically transparent acoustic reflector to co-align the illumination with the acoustic waves, enabling realtime PA and PE imaging. Based on this concept, we describe results from three types of PEDs in phantoms and rat tissue. The most recent version is fabricated by rapid prototyping, and attached to a 10 MHz linear array. Real-time PA and PE images of a 127-μm diameter wire were consistent with our expectations based on the properties of the ultrasound transducer. Comparisons with and without the PED of another test phantom printed on transparency demonstrated that the PED does not appreciably degrade or distort image quality. The PED offers a simple and inexpensive solution towards a real-time dual-modality imaging system for breast cancer detection. It could also be adapted for virtually any kind of ultrasound transducer array and integrated into routine ultrasound exams for detection of cancerous lesions within 1-2 cm from the probe surface.

  19. "Filarial dance sign" real-time ultrasound diagnosis of filarial oophoritis.

    PubMed

    Panditi, Surekha; Shelke, Ashwini G; Thummalakunta, Laxmi Narasimha Praveen

    2016-10-01

    Filariasis is a parasitic disease caused by Filarial nematodes (Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, and Brugia timori) that commonly causes lymphatic obstruction resulting in edema and increase in the size of the affected organ. Filariasis is diagnosed by identifying microfilariae on Giemsa stain. The immunochromatographic card test is diagnostic. Ultrasound is the imaging modality of choice for detecting adult filarial worms/microfilaria in the lymphatic system, which are responsible for the classic "filarial dance sign" caused by twirling movements of the microfilariae. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 44:500-501, 2016. PMID:27130361

  20. Elastography Assessment of Liver Fibrosis: Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound Consensus Conference Statement.

    PubMed

    Barr, Richard G; Ferraioli, Giovanna; Palmeri, Mark L; Goodman, Zachary D; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe; Rubin, Jonathan; Garra, Brian; Myers, Robert P; Wilson, Stephanie R; Rubens, Deborah; Levine, Deborah

    2015-09-01

    The Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound convened a panel of specialists from radiology, hepatology, pathology, and basic science and physics to arrive at a consensus regarding the use of elastography in the assessment of liver fibrosis in chronic liver disease. The panel met in Denver, Colo, on October 21-22, 2014, and drafted this consensus statement. The recommendations in this statement are based on analysis of current literature and common practice strategies and are thought to represent a reasonable approach to the noninvasive assessment of diffuse liver fibrosis. PMID:26079489

  1. Optimal transcostal high-intensity focused ultrasound with combined real-time 3D movement tracking and correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquet, F.; Aubry, J. F.; Pernot, M.; Fink, M.; Tanter, M.

    2011-11-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the feasibility of transcostal high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment in liver. However, two factors limit thermal necrosis of the liver through the ribs: the energy deposition at focus is decreased by the respiratory movement of the liver and the energy deposition on the skin is increased by the presence of highly absorbing bone structures. Ex vivo ablations were conducted to validate the feasibility of a transcostal real-time 3D movement tracking and correction mode. Experiments were conducted through a chest phantom made of three human ribs immersed in water and were placed in front of a 300 element array working at 1 MHz. A binarized apodization law introduced recently in order to spare the rib cage during treatment has been extended here with real-time electronic steering of the beam. Thermal simulations have been conducted to determine the steering limits. In vivo 3D-movement detection was performed on pigs using an ultrasonic sequence. The maximum error on the transcostal motion detection was measured to be 0.09 ± 0.097 mm on the anterior-posterior axis. Finally, a complete sequence was developed combining real-time 3D transcostal movement correction and spiral trajectory of the HIFU beam, allowing the system to treat larger areas with optimized efficiency. Lesions as large as 1 cm in diameter have been produced at focus in excised liver, whereas no necroses could be obtained with the same emitted power without correcting the movement of the tissue sample.

  2. Towards real time 2D to 3D registration for ultrasound-guided endoscopic and laparoscopic procedures

    PubMed Central

    Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Vosburgh, Kirby G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose A method to register endoscopic and laparoscopic ultrasound (US) images in real time with pre-operative computed tomography (CT) data sets has been developed with the goal of improving diagnosis, biopsy guidance, and surgical interventions in the abdomen. Methods The technique, which has the potential to operate in real time, is based on a new phase correlation technique: LEPART, which specifies the location of a plane in the CT data which best corresponds to the US image. Validation of the method was carried out using an US phantom with cyst regions and with retrospective analysis of data sets from animal model experiments. Results The phantom validation study shows that local translation displacements can be recovered for each US frame with a root mean squared error of 1.56 ± 0.78 mm in less than 5 sec, using non-optimized algorithm implementations. Conclusion A new method for multimodality (preoperative CT and intraoperative US endoscopic images) registration to guide endoscopic interventions was developed and found to be efficient using clinically realistic datasets. The algorithm is inherently capable of being implemented in a parallel computing system so that full real time operation appears likely. PMID:20033331

  3. A-scan ultrasound system for real-time puncture safety assessment during percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Pedro L.; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; Fonseca, Jaime C.; von Krüger, M. A.; Pereira, W. C. A.; Vilaça, João. L.

    2015-03-01

    Background: Kidney stone is a major universal health problem, affecting 10% of the population worldwide. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is a first-line and established procedure for disintegration and removal of renal stones. Its surgical success depends on the precise needle puncture of renal calyces, which remains the most challenging task for surgeons. This work describes and tests a new ultrasound based system to alert the surgeon when undesirable anatomical structures are in between the puncture path defined through a tracked needle. Methods: Two circular ultrasound transducers were built with a single 3.3-MHz piezoelectric ceramic PZT SN8, 25.4 mm of radius and resin-epoxy matching and backing layers. One matching layer was designed with a concave curvature to work as an acoustic lens with long focusing. The A-scan signals were filtered and processed to automatically detect reflected echoes. Results: The transducers were mapped in water tank and tested in a study involving 45 phantoms. Each phantom mimics different needle insertion trajectories with a percutaneous path length between 80 and 150 mm. Results showed that the beam cross-sectional area oscillates around the ceramics radius and it was possible to automatically detect echo signals in phantoms with length higher than 80 mm. Conclusions: This new solution may alert the surgeon about anatomical tissues changes during needle insertion, which may decrease the need of X-Ray radiation exposure and ultrasound image evaluation during percutaneous puncture.

  4. [Non-linear real-time adaptive filtration of ultrasound TI628A echotomoscope images].

    PubMed

    Barannik, E A; Volokhov, Iu V; Marusenko, A I

    1997-01-01

    The statistical uncertainty caused by speckle noise artifacts is the reason for the great importance of the problem which is the optimum choice between the medical diagnostic systems resolution and the statistical accuracy of histological tissue identification. The way of speckle noise suppression, which is closely associated with the well-known idea of adaptive filtration and based on the physical analysis of the origin of true and false signals, is very promising. The testing results of the nonlinear real-time adaptive filter which has been designed for a TI628A echotomoscope are presented. The filter has been shown to have a rather high contrast and space resolution and reduces the speckle noise and other artifacts of the images. PMID:9445983

  5. Visualizing the stress distribution within vascular tissues using intravascular ultrasound elastography: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Richards, Michael S; Perucchio, Renato; Doyley, Marvin M

    2015-06-01

    A methodology for computing the stress distribution of vascular tissue using finite element-based, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) reconstruction elastography is described. This information could help cardiologists detect life-threatening atherosclerotic plaques and predict their propensity to rupture. The calculation of vessel stresses requires the measurement of strain from the ultrasound images, a calibrating pressure measurement and additional model assumptions. In this work, we conducted simulation studies to investigate the effect of varying the model assumptions, specifically Poisson's ratio and the outer boundary conditions, on the resulting stress fields. In both simulation and phantom studies, we created vessel geometries with two fibrous cap thicknesses to determine if we could detect a difference in peak stress (spatially) between the two. The results revealed that (i) Poisson's ratios had negligible impact on the accuracy of stress elastograms, (ii) the outer boundary condition assumption had the greatest effect on the resulting modulus and stress distributions and (iii) in simulation and in phantom experiments, our stress imaging technique was able to detect an increased peak stress for the vessel geometry with the smaller cap thickness. This work is a first step toward understanding and creating a robust stress measurement technique for evaluating atherosclerotic plaques using IVUS elastography. PMID:25837424

  6. VISUALIZING THE STRESS DISTRIBUTION WITHIN VASCULAR TISSUES USING INTRAVASCULAR ULTRASOUND ELASTOGRAPHY: A PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Michael S.; Perucchio, Renato; Doyley, Marvin M.

    2015-01-01

    A methodology for computing the stress distribution of vascular tissue using finite element-based, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) reconstruction elastography is described. This information could help cardiologists detect life-threatening atherosclerotic plaques and predict their propensity to rupture. The calculation of vessel stresses requires the measurement of strain from the ultrasound images, a calibrating pressure measurement and additional model assumptions. In this work, we conducted simulation studies to investigate the effect of varying the model assumptions, specifically Poisson’s ratio and the outer boundary conditions, on the resulting stress fields. In both simulation and phantom studies, we created vessel geometries with two fibrous cap thicknesses to determine if we could detect a difference in peak stress (spatially) between the two. The results revealed that (i) Poisson’s ratios had negligible impact on the accuracy of stress elastograms, (ii) the outer boundary condition assumption had the greatest effect on the resulting modulus and stress distributions and (iii) in simulation and in phantom experiments, our stress imaging technique was able to detect an increased peak stress for the vessel geometry with the smaller cap thickness. This work is a first step toward understanding and creating a robust stress measurement technique for evaluating atherosclerotic plaques using IVUS elastography. PMID:25837424

  7. Modeling transversely isotropic, viscoelastic, incompressible tissue-like materials with application in ultrasound shear wave elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Bo; Brigham, John C.; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F.; Zhang, Xiaoming; Urban, Matthew W.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to model the shear wave propagation in transversely isotropic, viscoelastic and incompressible media. The targeted application is ultrasound-based shear wave elastography for viscoelasticity measurements in anisotropic tissues such as the kidney and skeletal muscles. The proposed model predicts that if the viscoelastic parameters both across and along fiber directions can be characterized as a Voigt material, then the spatial phase velocity at any angle is also governed by a Voigt material model. Further, with the aid of Taylor expansions, it is shown that the spatial group velocity at any angle is close to a Voigt type for weakly attenuative materials within a certain bandwidth. The model is implemented in a finite element code by a time domain explicit integration scheme and shear wave simulations are conducted. The results of the simulations are analyzed to extract the shear wave elasticity and viscosity for both the spatial phase and group velocities. The estimated values match well with theoretical predictions. The proposed theory is further verified by an ex vivo tissue experiment measured in a porcine skeletal muscle by an ultrasound shear wave elastography method. The applicability of the Taylor expansion to analyze the spatial velocities is also discussed. We demonstrate that the approximations from the Taylor expansions are subject to errors when the viscosities across or along the fiber directions are large or the maximum frequency considered is beyond the bandwidth defined by radii of convergence of the Taylor expansions.

  8. Modeling Transversely Isotropic, Viscoelastic, Incompressible Tissue-like Materials with Application in Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Bo; Brigham, John C.; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F.; Zhang, Xiaoming; Urban, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to model the shear wave propagation in transversely isotropic, viscoelastic and incompressible media. The targeted application is ultrasound-based shear wave elastography for viscoelasticity measurements in anisotropic tissues such as the kidney and skeletal muscles. The proposed model predicts that if the viscoelastic parameters both across and along fiber directions can be characterized as a Voigt material, then the spatial phase velocity at any angle is also governed by a Voigt material model. Further, with the aid of Taylor expansions, it is shown that the spatial group velocity at any angle is close to a Voigt type for weakly attenuative materials within a certain bandwidth. The model is implemented in a finite element code by a time domain explicit integration scheme and shear wave simulations are conducted. The results of the simulations are analyzed to extract the shear wave elasticity and viscosity for both the spatial phase and group velocities. The estimated values match well with theoretical predictions. The proposed theory is further verified by an ex vivo tissue experiment measured in a porcine skeletal muscle by an ultrasound shear wave elastography method. The applicability of the Taylor expansion to analyze the spatial velocities is also discussed. We demonstrate that the approximations from the Taylor expansions are subject to errors when the viscosities across or along the fiber directions are large or the maximum frequency considered is beyond the bandwidth defined by radii of convergence of the Taylor expansions. PMID:25591921

  9. Usefulness of strain elastography of the musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography is a widely used technique for assessing the mechanical characteristics of tissues. Although there are several ultrasound elastography techniques, strain elastography (SE) is currently the most widely used technique for visualizing an elastographic map in real time. Among its various indications, SE is especially useful in evaluating the musculoskeletal system. In this article, we review the SE techniques for clinical practice and describe the images produced by these techniques in the context of the musculoskeletal system. SE provides information about tissue stiffness and allows real-time visualization of the image; however, SE cannot completely replace gray-scale, color, or power Doppler ultrasonography. SE can increase diagnostic accuracy and may be useful for the follow-up of benign lesions. PMID:26810195

  10. SIMULTANEOUS BILATERAL REAL-TIME 3-D TRANSCRANIAL ULTRASOUND IMAGING AT 1 MHZ THROUGH POOR ACOUSTIC WINDOWS

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Brooks D.; Nicoletto, Heather A.; Bennett, Ellen R.; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging has been proposed as a rapid, portable alternative imaging modality to examine stroke patients in pre-hospital or emergency room settings. However, in performing transcranial ultrasound examinations, 8%–29% of patients in a general population may present with window failure, in which case it is not possible to acquire clinically useful sonographic information through the temporal bone acoustic window. In this work, we describe the technical considerations, design and fabrication of low-frequency (1.2 MHz), large aperture (25.3 mm) sparse matrix array transducers for 3-D imaging in the event of window failure. These transducers are integrated into a system for real-time 3-D bilateral transcranial imaging—the ultrasound brain helmet—and color flow imaging capabilities at 1.2 MHz are directly compared with arrays operating at 1.8 MHz in a flow phantom with attenuation comparable to the in vivo case. Contrast-enhanced imaging allowed visualization of arteries of the Circle of Willis in 5 of 5 subjects and 8 of 10 sides of the head despite probe placement outside of the acoustic window. Results suggest that this type of transducer may allow acquisition of useful images either in individuals with poor windows or outside of the temporal acoustic window in the field. PMID:23415287

  11. Real-time 3D curved needle segmentation using combined B-mode and power Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Greer, Joseph D; Adebar, Troy K; Hwang, Gloria L; Okamura, Allison M

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a real-time segmentation method for curved needles in biological tissue based on analysis of B-mode and power Doppler images from a tracked 2D ultrasound transducer. Mechanical vibration induced by an external voice coil results in a Doppler response along the needle shaft, which is centered around the needle section in the ultrasound image. First, B-mode image analysis is performed within regions of interest indicated by the Doppler response to create a segmentation of the needle section in the ultrasound image. Next, each needle section is decomposed into a sequence of points and transformed into a global coordinate system using the tracked transducer pose. Finally, the 3D shape is reconstructed from these points. The results of this method differ from manual segmentation by 0.71 ± 0.55 mm in needle tip location and 0.38 ± 0.27 mm along the needle shaft. This method is also fast, taking 5-10 ms to run on a standard PC, and is particularly advantageous in robotic needle steering, which involves thin, curved needles with poor echogenicity. PMID:25485402

  12. Development of the new physical method for real time spot weld quality evaluation using ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chertov, Andriy M.

    Since the invention of resistance spot welding, the manufacturers have been concerned about the quality assurance of the joints. One of the most promising directions in quality inspection is the real time ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation. In such a system, the acoustic signals are sent through the spot weld during welding and then analyzed to characterize the quality of the joint. Many research groups are currently working to develop a reliable inspection method. In this dissertation the new physical method of resistance spot weld quality monitoring is presented. It differs from all other ultrasonic methods by the physical principles of inspection. The multilayered structure of the spot weld with varying physical properties is investigated with short pulses of longitudinal ultrasonic waves. Unlike other methods, the developed technology works in reflection mode. The waves bring back the information which, after careful analysis, can be used to evaluate the weld quality. The complex structure of the weldment modifies the waves in different ways which, makes it hard to accurately measure the physical properties of the weldment. The frequency-dependent attenuation of the sound, diffraction, and beam divergence - all contribute to the signal distraction. These factors are fully studied, and ways to minimize them are presented. After application of pattern recognition routines, the weld characteristics are submitted to fuzzy logic algorithm, and the weld is characterized. The current level of the system development allowed the installation of two prototype machines at one assembly plant. The technology is now under thorough evaluation for robustness and accuracy in an industrial environment.

  13. Non-invasive and real-time passive acoustic mapping of ultrasound-mediated drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, James J.; Carlisle, Robert C.; Coviello, Christian; Seymour, Len; Coussios, Constantin-C.

    2014-09-01

    New classes of biologically active materials, such as viruses, siRNA, antibodies and a wide range of engineered nanoparticles have emerged as potent agents for diagnosing and treating diseases, yet many of these agents fail because there is no effective route of delivery to their intended targets. Focused ultrasound and its ability to drive microbubble-seeded cavitation have been shown to facilitate drug delivery. However, cavitation is difficult to control temporally and spatially, making prediction of therapeutic outcomes deep in the body difficult. Here, we utilized passive acoustic mapping in vivo to understand how ultrasound parameters influence cavitation dynamics and to correlate spatial maps of cavitation to drug delivery. Focused ultrasound (center frequency: 0.5 MHz, peak-rarefactional pressure: 1.2 MPa, pulse length: 25 cycles or 50,000 cycles, pulse repetition interval: 0.02, 0.2, 1 or 3 s, number of pulses: 80 pulses) was applied to murine xenograft-model tumors in vivo during systemic injection of microbubbles with and without cavitation-sensitive liposomes or type 5 adenoviruses. Analysis of in vivo cavitation dynamics through several pulses revealed that cavitation was more efficiently produced at a lower pulse repetition frequency of 1 Hz than at 50 Hz. Within a pulse, inertial cavitation activity was shown to persist but reduced to 50% and 25% of its initial magnitude in 4.3 and 29.3 ms, respectively. Both through several pulses and within a pulse, the spatial distribution of cavitation was shown to change in time due to variations in microbubble distribution present in tumors. Finally, we demonstrated that the centroid of the mapped cavitation activity was within 1.33  ±  0.6 mm and 0.36 mm from the centroid location of drug release from liposomes and expression of the reporter gene encoded by the adenovirus, respectively. Thus passive acoustic mapping not only unraveled key mechanisms whereby a successful outcome is achieved

  14. Real-time ultrasound-guided PCNL using a novel SonixGPS needle tracking system.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Long, Qingzhi; Chen, Xingfa; He, Dalin; Dalin, He; He, Hui

    2014-08-01

    SonixGPS is a successful ultrasound guidance position system. It helps to improve accuracy in performing complex puncture operations. This study firstly used SonixGPS to perform kidney calyx access in PCNL to investigate its effectiveness and safety. This was a prospectively randomized controlled study performed from September 2011 to October 2012. A total of 97 patients were prospectively randomized into two groups using random number generated from SAS software. 47 Patients were enrolled in conventional ultrasound-guided (US-guided) group and 50 patients were classified into SonixGPS-guided group. Nine patients were lost during follow-up. Hence, a total of 88 patients were qualified and analyzed. Preoperative examinations included urine analysis, urine culture, kidney function, coagulation profile and routine analysis of blood. Ultrasonography was used to evaluate the degree of hydronephrosis. The intraoperative findings, including blood loss, operating time, time to successful puncture, the number of attempts for successful puncture and hospital stay were recorded. The stone clearance rate and complications were analyzed. The present study showed no significant difference between the two groups in terms of demographic data, preoperative markers, stone clearance rate and the stone composition. However, the time to successful puncture, the number of trials for successful puncture, operating time and hospital length of stay were significantly decreased in the SonixGPS-guided group. Furthermore, the hemoglobin decrease was also obviously lower in the SonixGPS group than that in conventional US-guided group. SonixGPS needle tacking system guided PCNL is safe and effective in treating upper urinary tract stones. This novel technology makes puncturing more accuracy and can significantly decrease the incidence of relative hemorrhage and accelerate recovery. PMID:24965272

  15. Role of oral cholecystography, real-time ultrasound, and CT in evaluation of gallstones and gallbladder function.

    PubMed

    Marzio, L; Innocenti, P; Genovesi, N; Di Felice, F; Napolitano, A M; Contantini, R; Di Giandomenico, E

    1992-01-01

    The capacity of oral cholecystography (OCG), real-time ultrasound (RUS), and computed tomography (CT) to detect gallstones and to analyze their size, number, and composition was tested preoperatively in 37 patients undergoing elective cholecystectomy. Gallbladder response to a standard meal was also evaluated by OCG and RUS. Gallstones were analyzed chemically for calcium, cholesterol, and bilirubin content. The results show that RUS is the most valuable test for detecting gallstones and is similar to OCG in measuring their size and number, whereas CT underestimates the stone size. Gallbladder function in terms of contractibility can be evaluated by RUS and OCG, but RUS provides useful information even if the gallbladder is not opacified at OCG. CT is more accurate than OCG in detecting the presence of calcium, and CT attenuation numbers are positively correlated with calcium content of the stone (r = 0.87, p less than 0.01). PMID:1612312

  16. In vivo feasibility of real-time monitoring of focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) using harmonic motion imaging (HMI).

    PubMed

    Maleke, Caroline; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) technique is applied to monitor changes in mechanical properties of tissues during thermal therapy in a transgenic breast cancer mouse model in vivo. An HMIFU system, composed of a 4.5-MHz focused ultrasound (FUS) and a 3.3-MHz phased-array imaging transducer, was mechanically moved to image and ablate the entire tumor. The FUS transducer was driven by an amplitude-modulated (AM) signal at 15 Hz. The acoustic intensity ( I(spta)) was equal to 1050 W/cm(2) at the focus. A digital low-pass filter was used to filter out the spectrum of the FUS beam and its harmonics prior to displacement estimation. The resulting axial displacement was estimated using 1-D cross-correlation on the acquired RF signals. Results from two mice with eight lesions formed in each mouse (16 lesions total) showed that the average peak-to-peak displacement amplitude before and after lesion formation was respectively equal to 17.34 +/- 1.34 microm and 10.98 +/- 1.82 microm ( p < 0.001). Cell death was also confirmed by hematoxylin and eosin histology. HMI displacement can be used to monitor the relative tissue stiffness changes in real time during heating so that the treatment procedure can be performed in a time-efficient manner. The HMIFU system may, therefore, constitute a cost-efficient and reliable alternative for real-time monitoring of thermal ablation. PMID:19643703

  17. Real-Time Integrated Photoacoustic and Ultrasound (PAUS) Imaging System to Guide Interventional Procedures: Ex Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chen-Wei; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Xia, Jinjun; Arnal, Bastien; Wong, Emily Y.; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Because of depth-dependent light attenuation, bulky, low-repetition-rate lasers are usually used in most photoacoustic (PA) systems to provide sufficient pulse energies to image at depth within the body. However, integrating these lasers with real-time clinical ultrasound (US) scanners has been problematic because of their size and cost. In this paper, an integrated PA/US (PAUS) imaging system is presented operating at frame rates >30 Hz. By employing a portable, low-cost, low-pulse-energy (~2 mJ/pulse), high-repetition-rate (~1 kHz), 1053-nm laser, and a rotating galvo-mirror system enabling rapid laser beam scanning over the imaging area, the approach is demonstrated for potential applications requiring a few centimeters of penetration. In particular, we demonstrate here real-time (30 Hz frame rate) imaging (by combining multiple single-shot sub-images covering the scan region) of an 18-gauge needle inserted into a piece of chicken breast with subsequent delivery of an absorptive agent at more than 1-cm depth to mimic PAUS guidance of an interventional procedure. A signal-to-noise ratio of more than 35 dB is obtained for the needle in an imaging area 2.8 × 2.8 cm (depth × lateral). Higher frame rate operation is envisioned with an optimized scanning scheme. PMID:25643081

  18. Real-time photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging system facilitated with graphics processing unit and code parallel optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jie; Xu, Guan; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Yu; Carson, Paul L.; Wang, Xueding; Liu, Xiaojun

    2013-08-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with highly sensitive optical absorption contrast and excellent spatial resolution comparable to medical ultrasound (US) imaging. We report the development of a fully integrated PAT and US dual-modality imaging system, which performs signal scanning, image reconstruction, and display for both photoacoustic (PA) and US imaging all in a truly real-time manner. The back-projection (BP) algorithm for PA image reconstruction is optimized to reduce the computational cost and facilitate parallel computation on a state of the art graphics processing unit (GPU) card. For the first time, PAT and US imaging of the same object can be conducted simultaneously and continuously, at a real-time frame rate, presently limited by the laser repetition rate of 10 Hz. Noninvasive PAT and US imaging of human peripheral joints in vivo were achieved, demonstrating the satisfactory image quality realized with this system. Another experiment, simultaneous PAT and US imaging of contrast agent flowing through an artificial vessel, was conducted to verify the performance of this system for imaging fast biological events. The GPU-based image reconstruction software code for this dual-modality system is open source and available for download from http://sourceforge.net/projects/patrealtime.

  19. A real-time photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging system facilitated with GPU and code parallel optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jie; Xu, Guan; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Yu; Carson, Paul L.; Wang, Xueding; Liu, Xiaojun

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with highly sensitive optical absorption contrast and excellent spatial resolution comparable to medical ultrasound (US) imaging. We report the development of a fully integrated PAT and US dual-modality imaging system, which performs signal scanning, image reconstruction and display for both photoacoustic (PA) and US imaging all in a truly real-time manner. The backprojection (BP) algorithm for PA image reconstruction is optimized to reduce the computational cost and facilitate parallel computation on a state of the art graphics processing unit (GPU) card. For the first time, PAT and US imaging of the same object can be conducted simultaneously and continuously, at a real time frame rate, presently limited by the laser repetition rate of 10 Hz. Noninvasive PAT and US imaging of human peripheral joints in vivo were achieved, demonstrating the satisfactory image quality realized with this system. Another experiment, simultaneous PAT and US imaging of contrast agent flowing through an artificial vessel was conducted to verify the performance of this system for imaging fast biological events. The GPU based image reconstruction software code for this dual-modality system is open source and available for download from http://sourceforge.net/projects/pat realtime .

  20. Real-time photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging: a simple solution for clinical ultrasound systems with linear arrays.

    PubMed

    Montilla, Leonardo G; Olafsson, Ragnar; Bauer, Daniel R; Witte, Russell S

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that photoacoustic imaging (PAI) provides important diagnostic information during a routine breast exam for cancer. PAI enhances contrast between blood vessels and background tissue, which can help characterize suspicious lesions. However, most PAI systems are either not compatible with commercial ultrasound systems or inefficiently deliver light to the region of interest, effectively reducing the sensitivity of the technique. To address and potentially overcome these limitations, we developed an accessory for a standard linear ultrasound array that optimizes light delivery for PAI. The photoacoustic enabling device (PED) exploits an optically transparent acoustic reflector to help direct laser illumination to the region of interest. This study compares the PED with standard fiber bundle illumination in scattering and non-scattering media. In scattering media with the same incident fluence, the PED enhanced the photoacoustic signal by 18 dB at a depth of 5 mm and 6 dB at a depth of 20 mm. To demonstrate in vivo feasibility, we also used the device to image a mouse with a pancreatic tumor. The PED identified blood vessels at the periphery of the tumor, suggesting that PAI provides complementary contrast to standard pulse echo ultrasound. The PED is a simple and inexpensive solution that facilitates the translation of PAI technology to the clinic for routine screening of breast cancer. PMID:23221479

  1. Real-time photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging: a simple solution for clinical ultrasound systems with linear arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montilla, Leonardo G.; Olafsson, Ragnar; Bauer, Daniel R.; Witte, Russell S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that photoacoustic imaging (PAI) provides important diagnostic information during a routine breast exam for cancer. PAI enhances contrast between blood vessels and background tissue, which can help characterize suspicious lesions. However, most PAI systems are either not compatible with commercial ultrasound systems or inefficiently deliver light to the region of interest, effectively reducing the sensitivity of the technique. To address and potentially overcome these limitations, we developed an accessory for a standard linear ultrasound array that optimizes light delivery for PAI. The photoacoustic enabling device (PED) exploits an optically transparent acoustic reflector to help direct laser illumination to the region of interest. This study compares the PED with standard fiber bundle illumination in scattering and non-scattering media. In scattering media with the same incident fluence, the PED enhanced the photoacoustic signal by 18 dB at a depth of 5 mm and 6 dB at a depth of 20 mm. To demonstrate in vivo feasibility, we also used the device to image a mouse with a pancreatic tumor. The PED identified blood vessels at the periphery of the tumor, suggesting that PAI provides complementary contrast to standard pulse echo ultrasound. The PED is a simple and inexpensive solution that facilitates the translation of PAI technology to the clinic for routine screening of breast cancer.

  2. Real-time co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system based on FPGA and DSP architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Aguirre, Andres; Zhu, Quing

    2011-03-01

    Co-registering ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a logical extension to conventional ultrasound because both modalities provide complementary information of tumor morphology, tumor vasculature and hypoxia for cancer detection and characterization. In addition, both modalities are capable of providing real-time images for clinical applications. In this paper, a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and Digital Signal Processor (DSP) module-based real-time US/PA imaging system is presented. The system provides real-time US/PA data acquisition and image display for up to 5 fps* using the currently implemented DSP board. It can be upgraded to 15 fps, which is the maximum pulse repetition rate of the used laser, by implementing an advanced DSP module. Additionally, the photoacoustic RF data for each frame is saved for further off-line processing. The system frontend consists of eight 16-channel modules made of commercial and customized circuits. Each 16-channel module consists of two commercial 8-channel receiving circuitry boards and one FPGA board from Analog Devices. Each receiving board contains an IC† that combines. 8-channel low-noise amplifiers, variable-gain amplifiers, anti-aliasing filters, and ADC's‡ in a single chip with sampling frequency of 40MHz. The FPGA board captures the LVDSξ Double Data Rate (DDR) digital output of the receiving board and performs data conditioning and subbeamforming. A customized 16-channel transmission circuitry is connected to the two receiving boards for US pulseecho (PE) mode data acquisition. A DSP module uses External Memory Interface (EMIF) to interface with the eight 16-channel modules through a customized adaptor board. The DSP transfers either sub-beamformed data (US pulse-echo mode or PAI imaging mode) or raw data from FPGA boards to its DDR-2 memory through the EMIF link, then it performs additional processing, after that, it transfer the data to the PC** for further image processing. The PC code

  3. Effect of Calcifications on Breast Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography: An Investigational Study

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Adriana; Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Denis, Max; Bayat, Mahdi; Stan, Daniela L.; Fatemi, Mostafa; Alizad, Azra

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of macrocalcifications and clustered microcalcifications associated with benign breast masses on shear wave elastography (SWE). Methods SuperSonic Imagine (SSI) and comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE) were performed on three sets of phantoms to investigate how calcifications of different sizes and distributions influence measured elasticity. To demonstrate the effect in vivo, three female patients with benign breast masses associated with mammographically-identified calcifications were evaluated by CUSE. Results Apparent maximum elasticity (Emax) estimates resulting from individual macrocalcifications (with diameters of 2mm, 3mm, 5mm, 6mm, 9mm, 11mm, and 15mm) showed values over 50 kPa for all cases, which represents more than 100% increase over background (~21kPa). We considered a 2cm-diameter circular region of interest for all phantom experiments. Mean elasticity (Emean) values varied from 26 kPa to 73 kPa, depending on the macrocalcification size. Highly dense clusters of microcalcifications showed higher Emax values than clusters of microcalcification with low concentrations, but the difference in Emean values was not significant. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the presence of large isolated macrocalcifications and highly concentrated clusters of microcalcifications can introduce areas with apparent high elasticity in SWE. Considering that benign breast masses normally have significantly lower elasticity values than malignant tumors, such areas with high elasticity appearing due to presence of calcification in benign breast masses may lead to misdiagnosis. PMID:26368939

  4. Comb-push Ultrasound Shear Elastography (CUSE) for Evaluation of Thyroid Nodules: Preliminary In vivo Results

    PubMed Central

    Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Song, Pengfei; Meixner, Duane D.; Fazzio, Robert T.; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F.; Fatemi, Mostafa; Alizad, Azra

    2014-01-01

    In clinical practice, an overwhelming majority of biopsied thyroid nodules are benign. Therefore, there is a need for a complementary and noninvasive imaging tool to provide clinically relevant diagnostic information about thyroid nodules to reduce the rate of unnecessary biopsies. The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing Comb-push Ultrasound Shear Elastography (CUSE) to measure the mechanical properties (i.e., stiffness) of thyroid nodules and use this information to help classify nodules as benign or malignant. CUSE is a fast and robust 2D shear elastography technique in which multiple laterally distributed acoustic radiation force beams are utilized simultaneously to produce shear waves. Unlike other shear elasticity imaging modalities, CUSE does not suffer from limited field of view (FOV) due to shear wave attenuation and can provide a large FOV at high frame rates. To evaluate the utility of CUSE in thyroid imaging, a preliminary study was performed on a group of 5 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with ultrasound (US)-detected thyroid nodules prior to fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB). The measured shear wave speeds in normal thyroid tissue and thyroid nodules were converted to Young's modulus (E), indicating a measure of tissue stiffness. Our results indicate an increase in E for thyroid nodules compared to normal thyroid tissue. This increase was significantly higher in malignant nodules compared to benign. The Young's modulus in normal thyroid tissue, benign and malignant nodules were found to be 23.2±8.29 kPa, 91.2±34.8 kPa, and 173.0±17.1 kPa, respectively. Results of this study suggest the utility of CUSE in differentiating between benign and malignant thyroid nodules. PMID:25122532

  5. Cervical strain determined by ultrasound elastography and its association with spontaneous preterm delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Romero, Roberto; Korzeniewski, Steven J.; Ahn, Hyunyoung; Aurioles-Garibay, Alma; Garcia, Maynor; Schwartz, Alyse G.; Yeo, Lami; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Hassan, Sonia S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if there is an association between cervical strain, evaluated using ultrasound elastography, and spontaneous preterm delivery (sPTD) <37 weeks of gestation. Methods One hundred and eighty nine (189) women at 16–24 weeks of gestation were evaluated. Ultrasound elastography was used to estimate cervical strain in three anatomical planes: one mid-sagittal in the same plane used for cervical length measurement, and two cross sectional images: one at the level of the internal cervical os, and the other at the level of the external cervical os. In each plane, two regions of interest (endocervix and entire cervix) were examined; a total of six regions of interest were evaluated. Results The prevalence of sPTD was 11% (21/189). Strain values from each of the six cervical regions correlated weakly with cervical length (r= −0.24, p<0.001 to r= −0.03, p=0.69). Strain measurements obtained in a cross sectional view of the internal cervical os were significantly associated with sPTD. Women with strain values ≤25th centile in the endocervical canal (0.19) and in the entire cervix (0.14) were 80% less likely to have a sPTD than women with strain values >25th centile (endocervical: odds ratio [OR] 0.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.03–0.96; entire cervix: OR 0.17; 95% CI, 0.03–0.9). Additional adjustment for gestational age, race, smoking status, parity, maternal age, pre-pregnancy body mass index and previous preterm delivery did not appreciably alter the magnitude or statistical significance of these associations. Strain values obtained from the external cervical os and from the sagittal view were not associated with sPTD. Conclusion Low strain values in the internal cervical os were associated with a significantly lower risk of spontaneous preterm delivery <37 weeks of gestation. PMID:24356388

  6. Real-time Monitoring of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Ablation of In Vitro Canine Livers Using Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU).

    PubMed

    Grondin, Julien; Payen, Thomas; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a technique that can perform and monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. An oscillatory motion is generated at the focus of a 93-element and 4.5 MHz center frequency HIFU transducer by applying a 25 Hz amplitude-modulated signal using a function generator. A 64-element and 2.5 MHz imaging transducer with 68kPa peak pressure is confocally placed at the center of the HIFU transducer to acquire the radio-frequency (RF) channel data. In this protocol, real-time monitoring of thermal ablation using HIFU with an acoustic power of 7 W on canine livers in vitro is described. HIFU treatment is applied on the tissue during 2 min and the ablated region is imaged in real-time using diverging or plane wave imaging up to 1,000 frames/second. The matrix of RF channel data is multiplied by a sparse matrix for image reconstruction. The reconstructed field of view is of 90° for diverging wave and 20 mm for plane wave imaging and the data are sampled at 80 MHz. The reconstruction is performed on a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) in order to image in real-time at a 4.5 display frame rate. 1-D normalized cross-correlation of the reconstructed RF data is used to estimate axial displacements in the focal region. The magnitude of the peak-to-peak displacement at the focal depth decreases during the thermal ablation which denotes stiffening of the tissue due to the formation of a lesion. The displacement signal-to-noise ratio (SNRd) at the focal area for plane wave was 1.4 times higher than for diverging wave showing that plane wave imaging appears to produce better displacement maps quality for HMIFU than diverging wave imaging. PMID:26556647

  7. Real-time optoacoustic imaging of breast cancer using an interleaved two laser imaging system coregistered with ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermilov, Sergey A.; Fronheiser, Matthew P.; Nadvoretsky, Vyacheslav; Brecht, Hans-Peter; Su, Richard; Conjusteau, André; Mehta, Ketan; Otto, Pamela; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2010-02-01

    We present results from a clinical case study on imaging breast cancer using a real-time interleaved two laser optoacoustic imaging system co-registered with ultrasound. The present version of Laser Optoacoustic Ultrasonic Imaging System (LOUIS) utilizes a commercial linear ultrasonic transducer array, which has been modified to include two parallel rectangular optical bundles, to operate in both ultrasonic (US) and optoacoustic (OA) modes. In OA mode, the images from two optical wavelengths (755 nm and 1064 nm) that provide opposite contrasts for optical absorption of oxygenated vs deoxygenated blood can be displayed simultaneously at a maximum rate of 20 Hz. The real-time aspect of the system permits probe manipulations that can assist in the detection of the lesion. The results show the ability of LOUIS to co-register regions of high absorption seen in OA images with US images collected at the same location with the dual modality probe. The dual wavelength results demonstrate that LOUIS can potentially provide breast cancer diagnostics based on different intensities of OA images of the lesion obtained at 755 nm and 1064 nm. We also present new data processing based on deconvolution of the LOUIS impulse response that helps recover original optoacoustic pressure profiles. Finally, we demonstrate the image analysis tool that provides automatic detection of the tumor boundary and quantitative metrics of the optoacoustic image quality. Using a blood vessel phantom submerged in a tissue-like milky background solution we show that the image contrast is minimally affected by the phantom distance from the LOUIS probe until about 60-65 mm. We suggest using the image contrast for quantitative assessment of an OA image of a breast lesion, as a part of the breast cancer diagnostics procedure.

  8. Microscale characterization of the viscoelastic properties of hydrogel biomaterials using dual-mode ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xiaowei; Stegemann, Jan P; Deng, Cheri X

    2016-05-01

    Characterization of the microscale mechanical properties of biomaterials is a key challenge in the field of mechanobiology. Dual-mode ultrasound elastography (DUE) uses high frequency focused ultrasound to induce compression in a sample, combined with interleaved ultrasound imaging to measure the resulting deformation. This technique can be used to non-invasively perform creep testing on hydrogel biomaterials to characterize their viscoelastic properties. DUE was applied to a range of hydrogel constructs consisting of either hydroxyapatite (HA)-doped agarose, HA-collagen, HA-fibrin, or preosteoblast-seeded collagen constructs. DUE provided spatial and temporal mapping of local and bulk displacements and strains at high resolution. Hydrogel materials exhibited characteristic creep behavior, and the maximum strain and residual strain were both material- and concentration-dependent. Burger's viscoelastic model was used to extract characteristic parameters describing material behavior. Increased protein concentration resulted in greater stiffness and viscosity, but did not affect the viscoelastic time constant of acellular constructs. Collagen constructs exhibited significantly higher modulus and viscosity than fibrin constructs. Cell-seeded collagen constructs became stiffer with altered mechanical behavior as they developed over time. Importantly, DUE also provides insight into the spatial variation of viscoelastic properties at sub-millimeter resolution, allowing interrogation of the interior of constructs. DUE presents a novel technique for non-invasively characterizing hydrogel materials at the microscale, and therefore may have unique utility in the study of mechanobiology and the characterization of hydrogel biomaterials. PMID:26928595

  9. Breast-lesion Segmentation Combining B-Mode and Elastography Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Pons, Gerard; Martí, Joan; Martí, Robert; Ganau, Sergi; Noble, J Alison

    2016-05-01

    Breast ultrasound (BUS) imaging has become a crucial modality, especially for providing a complementary view when other modalities (i.e., mammography) are not conclusive in the task of assessing lesions. The specificity in cancer detection using BUS imaging is low. These false-positive findings often lead to an increase of unnecessary biopsies. In addition, increasing sensitivity is also challenging given that the presence of artifacts in the B-mode ultrasound (US) images can interfere with lesion detection. To deal with these problems and improve diagnosis accuracy, ultrasound elastography was introduced. This paper validates a novel lesion segmentation framework that takes intensity (B-mode) and strain information into account using a Markov Random Field (MRF) and a Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) approach, by applying it to clinical data. A total of 33 images from two different hospitals are used, composed of 14 cancerous and 19 benign lesions. Results show that combining both the B-mode and strain data in a unique framework improves segmentation results for cancerous lesions (Dice Similarity Coefficient of 0.49 using B-mode, while including strain data reaches 0.70), which are difficult images where the lesions appear with blurred and not well-defined boundaries. PMID:26062760

  10. Automated 3D ultrasound elastography of the breast: a phantom validation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, Gijs A. G. M.; Holländer, Branislav; Menssen, Jan; Milkowski, Andy; Hansen, Hendrik H. G.; de Korte, Chris L.

    2016-04-01

    In breast cancer screening, the automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) was introduced as an alternative for mammography since the latter technique is less suitable for women with dense breasts. Although clinical studies show promising results, clinicians report two disadvantages: long acquisition times (>90 s) introducing breathing artefacts, and high recall rates due to detection of many small lesions of uncertain malignant potential. Technical improvements for faster image acquisition and better discrimination between benign and malignant lesions are thus required. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if 3D ultrasound elastography using plane-wave imaging is feasible. Strain images of a breast elastography phantom were acquired by an ABVS-mimicking device that allowed axial and elevational movement of the attached transducer. Pre- and post-deformation volumes were acquired with different constant speeds (between 1.25 and 40.0 mm s-1) and by three protocols: Go-Go (pre- and post-volumes with identical start and end positions), Go-Return (similar to Go-Go with opposite scanning directions) and Control (pre- and post-volumes acquired per position, this protocol can be seen as reference). Afterwards, 2D and 3D cross-correlation and strain algorithms were applied to the acquired volumes and the results were compared. The Go-Go protocol was shown to be superior with better strain image quality (CNRe and SNRe) than Go-Return and to be similar as Control. This can be attributed to applying opposite mechanical forces to the phantom during the Go-Return protocol, leading to out-of-plane motion. This motion was partly compensated by using 3D cross-correlation. However, the quality was still inferior to Go-Go. Since these results were obtained in a phantom study with controlled deformations, the effect of possible uncontrolled in vivo tissue motion artefacts has to be addressed in future studies. In conclusion, it seems feasible to implement 3D ultrasound

  11. Automated 3D ultrasound elastography of the breast: a phantom validation study.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Gijs A G M; Holländer, Branislav; Menssen, Jan; Milkowski, Andy; Hansen, Hendrik H G; de Korte, Chris L

    2016-04-01

    In breast cancer screening, the automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) was introduced as an alternative for mammography since the latter technique is less suitable for women with dense breasts. Although clinical studies show promising results, clinicians report two disadvantages: long acquisition times (>90 s) introducing breathing artefacts, and high recall rates due to detection of many small lesions of uncertain malignant potential. Technical improvements for faster image acquisition and better discrimination between benign and malignant lesions are thus required. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if 3D ultrasound elastography using plane-wave imaging is feasible. Strain images of a breast elastography phantom were acquired by an ABVS-mimicking device that allowed axial and elevational movement of the attached transducer. Pre- and post-deformation volumes were acquired with different constant speeds (between 1.25 and 40.0 mm s(-1)) and by three protocols: Go-Go (pre- and post-volumes with identical start and end positions), Go-Return (similar to Go-Go with opposite scanning directions) and Control (pre- and post-volumes acquired per position, this protocol can be seen as reference). Afterwards, 2D and 3D cross-correlation and strain algorithms were applied to the acquired volumes and the results were compared. The Go-Go protocol was shown to be superior with better strain image quality (CNRe and SNRe) than Go-Return and to be similar as Control. This can be attributed to applying opposite mechanical forces to the phantom during the Go-Return protocol, leading to out-of-plane motion. This motion was partly compensated by using 3D cross-correlation. However, the quality was still inferior to Go-Go. Since these results were obtained in a phantom study with controlled deformations, the effect of possible uncontrolled in vivo tissue motion artefacts has to be addressed in future studies. In conclusion, it seems feasible to implement 3D

  12. Comparison of Real-Time Intraoperative Ultrasound-Based Dosimetry With Postoperative Computed Tomography-Based Dosimetry for Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, Subir; Shi Peipei; Liu Bingren; Gupta, Nilendu; Bahnson, Robert R.; Wang, Jian Z.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether real-time intraoperative ultrasound (US)-based dosimetry can replace conventional postoperative computed tomography (CT)-based dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between December 2001 and November 2002, 82 patients underwent {sup 103}Pd prostate brachytherapy. An interplant treatment planning system was used for real-time intraoperative transrectal US-guided treatment planning. The dose distribution was updated according to the estimated seed position to obtain the dose-volume histograms. Postoperative CT-based dosimetry was performed a few hours later using the Theraplan-Plus treatment planning system. The dosimetric parameters obtained from the two imaging modalities were compared. Results: The results of this study revealed correlations between the US- and CT-based dosimetry. However, large variations were found in the implant-quality parameters of the two modalities, including the doses covering 100%, 90%, and 80% of the prostate volume and prostate volumes covered by 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescription dose. The mean relative difference was 38% and 16% for doses covering 100% and 90% of the prostate volume and 10% and 21% for prostate volumes covered by 100% and 150% of the prescription dose, respectively. The CT-based volume covered by 200% of the prescription dose was about 30% greater than the US-based one. Compared with CT-based dosimetry, US-based dosimetry significantly underestimated the dose to normal organs, especially for the rectum. The average US-based maximal dose and volume covered by 100% of the prescription dose for the rectum was 72 Gy and 0.01 cm{sup 3}, respectively, much lower than the 159 Gy and 0.65 cm{sup 3} obtained using CT-based dosimetry. Conclusion: Although dosimetry using intraoperative US-based planning provides preliminary real-time information, it does not accurately reflect the postoperative CT-based dosimetry. Until studies have determined whether US-based dosimetry

  13. Dynamic shape modeling of the mitral valve from real-time 3D ultrasound images using continuous medial representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouch, Alison M.; Yushkevich, Paul A.; Jackson, Benjamin M.; Gorman, Joseph H., III; Gorman, Robert C.; Sehgal, Chandra M.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Patient-specific shape analysis of the mitral valve from real-time 3D ultrasound (rt-3DUS) has broad application to the assessment and surgical treatment of mitral valve disease. Our goal is to demonstrate that continuous medial representation (cm-rep) is an accurate valve shape representation that can be used for statistical shape modeling over the cardiac cycle from rt-3DUS images. Methods: Transesophageal rt-3DUS data acquired from 15 subjects with a range of mitral valve pathology were analyzed. User-initialized segmentation with level sets and symmetric diffeomorphic normalization delineated the mitral leaflets at each time point in the rt-3DUS data series. A deformable cm-rep was fitted to each segmented image of the mitral leaflets in the time series, producing a 4D parametric representation of valve shape in a single cardiac cycle. Model fitting accuracy was evaluated by the Dice overlap, and shape interpolation and principal component analysis (PCA) of 4D valve shape were performed. Results: Of the 289 3D images analyzed, the average Dice overlap between each fitted cm-rep and its target segmentation was 0.880+/-0.018 (max=0.912, min=0.819). The results of PCA represented variability in valve morphology and localized leaflet thickness across subjects. Conclusion: Deformable medial modeling accurately captures valve geometry in rt-3DUS images over the entire cardiac cycle and enables statistical shape analysis of the mitral valve.

  14. Progress in Ring Array Transducers for Real-Time 3D Ultrasound Guidance of Cardiac Interventional Devices

    PubMed Central

    Light, Edward D.; Lieu, Victor; Suhocki, Paul; Wolf, Patrick D.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    As a treatment for aortic stenosis, several companies have recently introduced prosthetic heart valves designed to be deployed through a catheter using an intravenous or trans-apical approach. This procedure can either take the place of open heart surgery with some of the devices, or delay it with others. Real-time 3D ultrasound could enable continuous monitoring of these structures before, during and after deployment. We have developed a 2D ring array integrated with a 30 French catheter that is used for trans-apical prosthetic heart valve implantation. The transducer array was built using three 46 cm long flex circuits from MicroConnex (Snoqualmie, WA) which terminate in an interconnect that plugs directly into our system cable, thus no cable soldering is required. This transducer consists of 210 elements at .157 mm inter-element spacing and operates at 5 MHz. Average measured element bandwidth was 26% and average round-trip 50 Ohm insertion loss was -81.1 dB. The transducer were wrapped around the 1 cm diameter lumen of a heart valve deployment catheter. Prosthetic heart valve images were obtained in water tank studies. PMID:21842583

  15. Ultrasound Elastography Used for Preventive Non-Invasive Screening in Early Detection of Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bert, Florian; Stahmeyer, Jona T.; Rossol, Siegbert

    2016-01-01

    Background Early discovery of liver fibrosis is becoming more popular because of enhanced incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma. Ultrasound-based liver elastography is a method used to approve suspected liver fibrosis or cirrhosis. We assessed the clinical usefulness of acoustic radiation force impulse shear wave elasticity imaging (ARFI-SWEI) as a preventive screening method to uncover fibrosis. Methods We screened 382 patients by native routine sonography for abnormal liver results and divided them into six groups: group 1: normal liver, groups 2-4: fatty liver grade I-III, group 5: liver cirrhosis, and group 6: inhomogenic liver tissue. Then ARFI-SWEI was performed and the results were compared with published shear wave velocity cut-off values that were predictive of each fibrosis stage (F0-4). A control group consisted of 20 healthy volunteers. Results The part of liver fibrosis ≥ F2 was in groups 1-4: 20-32%, group 5: 100%, and group 6: 91%. Main causes for fibrosis stage ≥ F2 were (non)-alcoholic steatohepatitis, chronic viral or autoimmune hepatitis and chronic heart failure. Conclusions Screening of the liver tissue in b-mode ultrasound can underestimate possible liver fibrosis; by using ARFI-SWEI, liver fibrosis can be uncovered early. It is a suitable preventive method comparable to colonoscopy for colon cancer. PMID:27540438

  16. C-plane Reconstructions from Sheaf Acquisition for Ultrasound Electrode Vibration Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Ingle, Atul; Varghese, Tomy

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for reconstructing and visualizing ablated volumes using radiofrequency ultrasound echo data acquired with the electrode vibration elastography approach. The ablation needle is vibrated using an actuator to generate shear wave pulses that are tracked in the ultrasound image plane at different locations away from the needle. This data is used for reconstructing shear wave velocity maps for each imaging plane. A C-plane reconstruction algorithm is proposed which estimates shear wave velocity values on a collection of transverse planes that are perpendicular to the imaging planes. The algorithm utilizes shear wave velocity maps from different imaging planes that share a common axis of intersection. These C-planes can be used to generate a 3D visualization of the ablated region. Experimental validation of this approach was carried out using data from a tissue mimicking phantom. The shear wave velocity estimates were within 20% of those obtained from a clinical scanner, and a contrast of over 4 dB was obtained between the stiff and soft regions of the phantom. PMID:25530690

  17. Multi-frame elastography using a handheld force-controlled ultrasound probe.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, Andrey; Zakrzewski, Aaron M; Anthony, Brian W; Lempitsky, Victor

    2015-08-01

    We propose a new method for strain field estimation in quasi-static ultrasound elastography based on matching RF data frames of compressed tissues. The method benefits from using a handheld force-controlled ultrasound probe, which provides the contact force magnitude and therefore improves repeatability of displacement field estimation. The displacement field is estimated in a two-phase manner using triplets of RF data frames consisting of a pre-compression image and two post-compression images obtained with lower and higher compression ratios. First, a reliable displacement field estimate is calculated for the first post-compression frame. Second, we use this displacement estimate to warp the second post-compression frame while using linear elasticity to obtain an initial approximation. Final displacement estimation is refined using the warped image. The two-phase displacement estimation allows for higher compression ratios, thus increasing the practical resolution of the strain estimates. The strain field is computed from a displacement field using a smoothness- regularized energy functional, which takes into consideration local displacement estimation quality. The minimization is performed using an efficient primal-dual hybrid gradient algorithm, which can leverage the architecture of a graphical processing unit. The method is quantitatively evaluated using finite element simulations. We compute strain estimates for tissue-mimicking phantoms with known elastic properties and finally perform a qualitative validation using in vivo patient data. PMID:26276958

  18. WFUMB guidelines and recommendations for clinical use of ultrasound elastography: Part 1: basic principles and terminology.

    PubMed

    Shiina, Tsuyoshi; Nightingale, Kathryn R; Palmeri, Mark L; Hall, Timothy J; Bamber, Jeffrey C; Barr, Richard G; Castera, Laurent; Choi, Byung Ihn; Chou, Yi-Hong; Cosgrove, David; Dietrich, Christoph F; Ding, Hong; Amy, Dominique; Farrokh, Andre; Ferraioli, Giovanna; Filice, Carlo; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen; Nakashima, Kazutaka; Schafer, Fritz; Sporea, Ioan; Suzuki, Shinichi; Wilson, Stephanie; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2015-05-01

    Conventional diagnostic ultrasound images of the anatomy (as opposed to blood flow) reveal differences in the acoustic properties of soft tissues (mainly echogenicity but also, to some extent, attenuation), whereas ultrasound-based elasticity images are able to reveal the differences in the elastic properties of soft tissues (e.g., elasticity and viscosity). The benefit of elasticity imaging lies in the fact that many soft tissues can share similar ultrasonic echogenicities but may have different mechanical properties that can be used to clearly visualize normal anatomy and delineate pathologic lesions. Typically, all elasticity measurement and imaging methods introduce a mechanical excitation and monitor the resulting tissue response. Some of the most widely available commercial elasticity imaging methods are 'quasi-static' and use external tissue compression to generate images of the resulting tissue strain (or deformation). In addition, many manufacturers now provide shear wave imaging and measurement methods, which deliver stiffness images based upon the shear wave propagation speed. The goal of this review is to describe the fundamental physics and the associated terminology underlying these technologies. We have included a questions and answers section, an extensive appendix, and a glossary of terms in this manuscript. We have also endeavored to ensure that the terminology and descriptions, although not identical, are broadly compatible across the WFUMB and EFSUMB sets of guidelines on elastography (Bamber et al. 2013; Cosgrove et al. 2013). PMID:25805059

  19. NON-RIGID IMAGE REGISTRATION BASED STRAIN ESTIMATOR FOR INTRAVASCULAR ULTRASOUND ELASTOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Michael S.; Doyley, Marvin M.

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound elastography (IVUSe) could improve the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease by revealing vulnerable plaques through their mechanical tissue properties. To improve the performance of IVUSe, we developed and implemented a non-rigid image-registration method to visualize the radial and circumferential component of strain within vascular tissues. We evaluated the algorithm’s performance with four initialization schemes using simulated and experimentally acquired ultrasound images. Applying the registration method to radio-frequency (RF) echo frames improved the accuracy of displacements compared to when B-mode images were employed. However, strain elastograms measured from RF echo frames produce erroneous results when both the zero-initialization method and the mesh-refinement scheme were employed. For most strain levels, the cross-correlation-initialization method produced the best performance. The simulation study predicted that elastograms obtained from vessels with average strains in the range of 3%–5% should have high elastographic signal-to-noise ratio (SNRe)–on the order of 4.5 and 7.5 for the radial and circumferential components of strain, respectively. The preliminary in vivo validation study (phantom and an atherosclerotic rabbit) demonstrated that the non-rigid registration method could produce useful radial and circumferential strain elastograms under realistic physiologic conditions. The results of this investigation were sufficiently encouraging to warrant a more comprehensive in vivo validation. PMID:23245827

  20. Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography for Liver Disease. A Critical Appraisal of the Many Actors on the Stage.

    PubMed

    Piscaglia, F; Salvatore, V; Mulazzani, L; Cantisani, V; Schiavone, C

    2016-02-01

    In the last 12 - 18 months nearly all ultrasound manufacturers have arrived to implement ultrasound shear wave elastography modality in their equipment for the assessment of chronic liver disease; the few remaining players are expected to follow in 2016.When all manufacturers rush to a new technology at the same time, it is evident that the clinical demand for this information is of utmost value. Around 1990, there was similar demand for color Doppler ultrasound; high demand for contrast-enhanced ultrasonography was evident at the beginning of this century, and around 2010 demand increased for strain elastography. However, some issues regarding the new shear wave ultrasound technologies must be noted to avoid misuse of the resulting information for clinical decisions. As new articles are expected to appear in 2016 reporting the findings of the new technologies from various companies, we felt that the beginning of this year was the right time to present an appraisal of these issues. We likewise expect that in the meantime EFSUMB will release a new update of the existing guidelines 1 2.The first ultrasound elastography method became available 13 years ago in the form of transient elastography with Fibroscan(®) 3. It was the first technique providing non-invasive quantitive information about the stiffness of the liver and hence regarding the amount of fibrosis in chronic liver disease 3. The innovation was enormous, since a non-invasive modality was finally available to provide findings otherwise achievable only by liver biopsy. In fact, prior to ultrasound elastography, a combination of conventional and Doppler ultrasound parameters were utilized to inform the physician about the presence of cirrhosis and portal hypertension 4. However, skilled operators were required, reproducibility and diagnostic accuracy were suboptimal, and it was not possible to differentiate the pre-cirrhotic stages of fibrosis. All these limitations were substantially improved by

  1. Performance study of a new time-delay estimation algorithm in ultrasonic echo signals and ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Shaswary, Elyas; Xu, Yuan; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2016-07-01

    Time-delay estimation has countless applications in ultrasound medical imaging. Previously, we proposed a new time-delay estimation algorithm, which was based on the summation of the sign function to compute the time-delay estimate (Shaswary et al., 2015). We reported that the proposed algorithm performs similar to normalized cross-correlation (NCC) and sum squared differences (SSD) algorithms, even though it was significantly more computationally efficient. In this paper, we study the performance of the proposed algorithm using statistical analysis and image quality analysis in ultrasound elastography imaging. Field II simulation software was used for generation of ultrasound radio frequency (RF) echo signals for statistical analysis, and a clinical ultrasound scanner (Sonix® RP scanner, Ultrasonix Medical Corp., Richmond, BC, Canada) was used to scan a commercial ultrasound elastography tissue-mimicking phantom for image quality analysis. The statistical analysis results confirmed that, in overall, the proposed algorithm has similar performance compared to NCC and SSD algorithms. The image quality analysis results indicated that the proposed algorithm produces strain images with marginally higher signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios compared to NCC and SSD algorithms. PMID:27010697

  2. Accuracy of pregnancy diagnosis and prediction of foetal numbers in sheep with linear-array real-time ultrasound scanning.

    PubMed

    Taverne, M A; Lavoir, M C; van Oord, R; van der Weyden, G C

    1985-10-01

    Pregnancy diagnosis was carried out in sheep by means of transabdominal linear-array real-time ultrasound scanning. Animals were restrained standing, and the transducer was placed on the hairless area of the ventral abdominal wall just in front of the udder. Of a total of 818 tests, 724 were performed between days 29 and 89 of pregnancy, 598 animals subsequently lambed and 126 were non-lambing animals. Only 8 of these tests were wrong: 3 false positive and 5 false negative diagnoses. Sensitivity, specificity, positive- and negative predictive values for these tests were 99.2%, 97.6%, 99.5%, and 96% respectively. There was evidence to indicate that the three false positive tests were caused by foetal mortality or unobserved abortions that took place after testing. Only 2 of the 5 false negative tests were carried out after day 39 of gestation. Counting of foetal numbers (1, 2 or 3) was performed in only some animals (n = 210) between days 45 and 77 of gestation. Three groups of animals (A: 89 ewes; B: 27 PMSG-treated ewes; C: 94 ewes) were analyzed separately. Overall accuracy of all predictions was 83.1%, 37.0% and 78.7% for the 3 groups respectively. Animals in group B produced only 3 or more lambs. Sensitivity of the countings of singles, twins and triplets or more were 90.4%, 90.4% and 50% respectively for the animals from group A and 91.9%, 86% and 21.4% for the animals from group C.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3907116

  3. Very High Resolution Ultrasound Imaging for Real-Time Quantitative Visualization of Vascular Disruption after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Soubeyrand, Marc; Badner, Anna; Vawda, Reaz; Chung, Young Sun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Spinal cord injury (SCI) is characterized by vascular disruption with intramedullary hemorrhage, alterations in blood-spinal cord barrier integrity, and perilesional ischemia. A safe and easily applied imaging technique to quantify evolving intraspinal vascular changes after SCI is lacking. We evaluated the utility of very high resolution ultrasound (VHRUS) imaging to assess SCI-induced vascular disruption in a clinically relevant rodent model. The spinal cords of Wistar rats were lesioned at the 11th thoracic vertebra (Th11) by a 35 g 1-minute clip compression. Three-dimensional quantification of intraspinal hemorrhage using VHRUS (at an acute 90-min and subacute 24-h time point post-SCI) was compared with lesional hemoglobin and extravasated Evans blue dye measured spectrophotometrically. The anatomy of hemorrhage was comparatively assessed using VHRUS and histology. Time-lapse videos demonstrated the evolution of parenchymal hemorrhage. VHRUS accurately depicted the structural (gray and white matter) and vascular anatomy of the spinal cord (after laminectomy) and was safely repeated in the same animal. After SCI, a hyperechoic signal extended from the lesion epicenter. Significant correlations were found between VHRUS signal and hemorrhage in the acute (r=0.88, p<0.0001) and subacute (r=0.85, p<0.0001) phases and extravasated Evans blue (a measure of vascular disruption) in the subacute phase (r=0.94, p<0.0001). Time-lapse videos demonstrated that the expanding parenchymal hemorrhage is preceded by new perilesional hemorrhagic foci. VHRUS enables real-time quantitative live anatomical imaging of acute and subacute vascular disruption after SCI in rats. This technique has important scientific and clinical translational applications. PMID:24831774

  4. Very high resolution ultrasound imaging for real-time quantitative visualization of vascular disruption after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Soubeyrand, Marc; Badner, Anna; Vawda, Reaz; Chung, Young Sun; Fehlings, Michael G

    2014-11-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is characterized by vascular disruption with intramedullary hemorrhage, alterations in blood-spinal cord barrier integrity, and perilesional ischemia. A safe and easily applied imaging technique to quantify evolving intraspinal vascular changes after SCI is lacking. We evaluated the utility of very high resolution ultrasound (VHRUS) imaging to assess SCI-induced vascular disruption in a clinically relevant rodent model. The spinal cords of Wistar rats were lesioned at the 11th thoracic vertebra (Th11) by a 35 g 1-minute clip compression. Three-dimensional quantification of intraspinal hemorrhage using VHRUS (at an acute 90-min and subacute 24-h time point post-SCI) was compared with lesional hemoglobin and extravasated Evans blue dye measured spectrophotometrically. The anatomy of hemorrhage was comparatively assessed using VHRUS and histology. Time-lapse videos demonstrated the evolution of parenchymal hemorrhage. VHRUS accurately depicted the structural (gray and white matter) and vascular anatomy of the spinal cord (after laminectomy) and was safely repeated in the same animal. After SCI, a hyperechoic signal extended from the lesion epicenter. Significant correlations were found between VHRUS signal and hemorrhage in the acute (r=0.88, p<0.0001) and subacute (r=0.85, p<0.0001) phases and extravasated Evans blue (a measure of vascular disruption) in the subacute phase (r=0.94, p<0.0001). Time-lapse videos demonstrated that the expanding parenchymal hemorrhage is preceded by new perilesional hemorrhagic foci. VHRUS enables real-time quantitative live anatomical imaging of acute and subacute vascular disruption after SCI in rats. This technique has important scientific and clinical translational applications. PMID:24831774

  5. A coupled subsample displacement estimation method for ultrasound-based strain elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jingfeng; Hall, Timothy J.

    2015-11-01

    Obtaining accurate displacement estimates along both axial (parallel to the acoustic beam) and lateral (perpendicular to the beam) directions is an important task for several clinical applications such as shear strain imaging, modulus reconstruction and temperature imaging, where a full description of the two or three-dimensional (2D/3D) deformation field is required. In this study we propose an improved speckle tracking algorithm where axial and lateral motion estimations are simultaneously performed to enhance motion tracking accuracy. More specifically, using conventional ultrasound echo data, this algorithm first finds an iso-contour in the vicinity of the peak correlation between two segments of the pre- and post-deformation ultrasound radiofrequency echo data. The algorithm then attempts to find the center of the iso-contour of the correlation function that corresponds to the unknown (sub-sample) motion vector between these two segments of echo data. This algorithm has been tested using computer-simulated data, studies with a tissue-mimicking phantom, and in vivo breast lesion data. Computer simulation results show that the method improves the accuracy of both lateral and axial tracking. Such improvements are more significant when the deformation is small or along the lateral direction. Results from the tissue-mimicking phantom study are consistent with findings observed in computer simulations. Using in vivo breast lesion data we found that, compared to the 2D quadratic subsample displacement estimation methods, higher quality axial strain and shear strain images (e.g. 18.6% improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio for shear strain images) can be obtained for large deformations (up to 5% frame-to-frame and 15% local strains) in a multi-compression technique. Our initial results demonstrated that this conceptually and computationally simple method could improve the image quality of ultrasound-based strain elastography with current clinical equipment.

  6. A noninvasive ultrasound elastography technique for measuring surface waves on the lung.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Osborn, Thomas; Kalra, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate an ultrasound based surface wave elastography (SWE) technique for generating and detecting surface waves on the lung. The motivation was to develop a noninvasive technique for assessing superficial lung tissue disease including interstitial lung disease (ILD). ILD comprises a number of lung disorders in which the lung tissue is stiffened and damaged due to fibrosis of the lung tissue. Currently, chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are the most common clinical methods for evaluating lung disease, but they are associated with radiation and cannot measure lung mechanical properties. The novelty of SWE is to develop a noninvasive and nonionizing technique to measure the elastic properties of superficial lung tissue. We propose to generate waves on the lung surface through wave propagation from a local harmonic vibration excitation on the chest through an intercostal space. The resulting surface wave propagation on the lung is detected using an ultrasound probe through the intercostal space. To demonstrate that surface waves can be generated on the lung, an ex vivo muscle-lung model was developed to evaluate lung surface wave generation and detection. In this model, swine muscle was laid atop a swine lung. A vibration excitation of 0.1s 100Hz wave was generated on the muscle surface and the surface waves on the lung were detected using a linear array ultrasound probe at 5MHz. To test its feasibility for patient use, SWE was used to measure both lungs of an ILD patient through eight intercostal spaces. The mean wave speed was 1.71±0.20m/s (±SD) at the functional residual capacity, while the mean wave speed was 2.36±0.33m/s at the total lung capacity. These studies support the feasibility of SWE for noninvasive measurement of elastic properties of lung and demonstrate potential for assessment of ILD. PMID:27392204

  7. Monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment by shear wave elastography induced by two-dimensional-array therapeutic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Takagi, Ryo; Nagaoka, Ryo; Jimbo, Hayato; Yoshizawa, Shin; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography (SWE) is expected to be a noninvasive monitoring method of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. However, conventional SWE techniques encounter difficulty in inducing shear waves with adequate displacements in deep tissue. To observe tissue coagulation at the HIFU focal depth via SWE, in this study, we propose using a two-dimensional-array therapeutic transducer for not only HIFU exposure but also creating shear sources. The results show that the reconstructed shear wave velocity maps detected the coagulated regions as the area of increased propagation velocity even in deep tissue. This suggests that “HIFU-push” shear elastography is a promising solution for the purpose of coagulation monitoring in deep tissue, because push beams irradiated by the HIFU transducer can naturally reach as deep as the tissue to be coagulated by the same transducer.

  8. Comparison between shear wave dispersion magneto motive ultrasound and transient elastography for measuring tissue-mimicking phantom viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Thiago W J; Sampaio, Diego R Thomaz; Bruno, Alexandre Colello; Pavan, Theo Z; Carneiro, Antonio A O

    2015-12-01

    Several methods have been developed over the last several years to analyze the mechanical properties of soft tissue. Elastography, for example, was proposed to evaluate soft tissue stiffness in an attempt to reduce the need for invasive procedures, such as breast biopsies; however, its qualitative nature and the fact that it is operator-dependent have proven to be limitations of the technique. Quantitative shearwave- based techniques have been proposed to obtain information about tissue stiffness independent of the operator. This paper describes shear wave dispersion magnetomotive ultrasound (SDMMUS), a new shear-wave-based method in which a viscoelastic medium labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles is displaced by an external tone burst magnetic field. As in magnetomotive ultrasound (MMUS), SDMMUS uses ultrasound to detect internal mechanical vibrations induced by the interaction between a magnetic field and magnetic nanoparticles. These vibrations generated shear waves that were evaluated to estimate the viscoelastic properties of tissue-mimicking phantoms. These phantoms were manufactured with different concentrations of gelatin and labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles. The elasticity and viscosity obtained with SDMMUS agreed well with the results obtained by traditional ultrasound-based transient elastography. PMID:26670853

  9. Fusion of ultrasound B-mode and vibro-elastography images for automatic 3D segmentation of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, S Sara; Moradi, Mehdi; Morris, William J; Goldenberg, S Larry; Salcudean, Septimiu E

    2012-11-01

    Prostate segmentation in B-mode images is a challenging task even when done manually by experts. In this paper we propose a 3D automatic prostate segmentation algorithm which makes use of information from both ultrasound B-mode and vibro-elastography data.We exploit the high contrast to noise ratio of vibro-elastography images of the prostate, in addition to the commonly used B-mode images, to implement a 2D Active Shape Model (ASM)-based segmentation algorithm on the midgland image. The prostate model is deformed by a combination of two measures: the gray level similarity and the continuity of the prostate edge in both image types. The automatically obtained mid-gland contour is then used to initialize a 3D segmentation algorithm which models the prostate as a tapered and warped ellipsoid. Vibro-elastography images are used in addition to ultrasound images to improve boundary detection.We report a Dice similarity coefficient of 0.87±0.07 and 0.87±0.08 comparing the 2D automatic contours with manual contours of two observers on 61 images. For 11 cases, a whole gland volume error of 10.2±2.2% and 13.5±4.1% and whole gland volume difference of -7.2±9.1% and -13.3±12.6% between 3D automatic and manual surfaces of two observers is obtained. This is the first validated work showing the fusion of B-mode and vibro-elastography data for automatic 3D segmentation of the prostate. PMID:22829391

  10. Vascular plaque characterization using intravascular ultrasound elastography and NIR Raman spectroscopy in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Korte, Chris L.; Buschman, Hendrik P. J.; van de Poll, Sweder W. E.; van der Steen, Anton F. W.; Puppels, Gerwin J.; van der Laarse, Arnoud

    2000-04-01

    The composition and morphology of the atherosclerotic lesion are considered to be important determinants of acute coronary ischemic syndromes. We investigated the potentials of a combination of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) elastography and intravascular Near Infrared Raman (NIR) spectroscopy, to assess the physical and chemical composition of the vessel wall and plaque. Intact human coronary arteries were mounted in an in vitro pressurized perfusion setup and investigated with a 20 MHz VisionsR IVUS catheter. At selected cross- sections, two echo-frames were acquired at intraluminal pressures of 80 and 100 mmHg to strain the tissue in order to obtain elastograms. Next, Raman spectra were obtained during 30 seconds at 4 angles (0, 90, 180 and 270 degrees) using a sideways viewing probe. Spectra were modeled to obtain quantitative chemical information, while leaving the specimens intact. Calcified areas were identifiable on the echograms, elastograms and Raman spectra. A combination of geometric information provided by the echogram, chemical information as obtained with Raman spectroscopy, and high stress regions determined by the elastogram, may prove to be a valuable tool to identify plaque vulnerability.

  11. The Feasibility of Integrating Elastography Measurements into MRI-Guided Transurethral Ultrasound Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arani, Arvin; Huang, Yuexi; Bronskill, Michael; Chopra, Rajiv

    2009-04-01

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy is being developed as a minimally invasive treatment for localized prostate cancer. The capability to identify target regions prior to therapy would provide an integrated diagnostic and therapeutic solution to the management of this disease. The objective of this project is to evaluate the feasibility of performing elastography using a transurethral actuator. Shear waves were generated in the prostate by vibrating the transurethral actuator longitudinally and resolving the tissue displacements with a 1.5 Tesla MRI. A piezoelectric actuator was used to vibrate the transurethral device with an amplitude of 32 um at frequencies of 100 and 250 Hz. GRE imaging sequences with displacement encoded along the direction of vibration were acquired transverse and parallel to the rod to visualize the dynamics of wave propagation. Experiments were performed in phantoms (8% gelatin) and in a canine model (n = 5). Vibration was achieved in the MRI without significant loss of SNR in the images. The shear waves produced in the gel were cylindrical in nature, and extended along the length of the rod. Shear wave propagation in the canine prostate gland was observed at 100 and 250 Hz, and shear modulus values agreed with previously published values.

  12. Feasibility Study of Texture Analysis Using Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography to Predict Malignancy in Thyroid Nodules.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Kunwar Suryaveer Singh; Lam, Absalom Chung Lung; Pang, Sze Wing Angel; Wang, Defeng; Ahuja, Anil Tejbhan

    2016-07-01

    Textural analysis of ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE) was evaluated to discriminate benign and malignant thyroid nodules. Sixteen papillary thyroid cancers and 89 benign hyperplastic nodules in 105 patients underwent SWE using four static pre-compression levels. Fifteen gray level co-occurrence matrix textural features and six absolute SWE indices were computed from SWE images. Diagnostic performances of each SWE index for malignancy were calculated and compared using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and optimal models were generated at each pre-compression level. The optimal model comprised two SWE textural features at the highest pre-compression level, which attained AUC, sensitivity and specificity of 0.973, 97.5% and 90.0%, respectively. By comparison, absolute SWE indices attained AUC of 0.709 as well as 18.8% sensitivity and 95.8% specificity. These preliminary results suggest SWE textural analysis can distinguish benign and malignant thyroid nodules and SWE spatial heterogeneity is greater in malignant nodules. PMID:27126245

  13. Validation of Ultrasound Elastography Imaging for Nondestructive Characterization of Stiffer Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haoyan; Goss, Monika; Hernandez, Christopher; Mansour, Joseph M; Exner, Agata

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound elastography (UE) has been widely used as a "digital palpation" tool to characterize tissue mechanical properties in the clinic. UE benefits from the capability of noninvasively generating 2-D elasticity encoded maps. This spatial distribution of elasticity can be especially useful in the in vivo assessment of tissue engineering scaffolds and implantable drug delivery platforms. However, the detection limitations have not been fully characterized and thus its true potential has not been completely discovered. Characterization studies have focused primarily on the range of moduli corresponding to soft tissues, 20-600 kPa. However, polymeric biomaterials used in biomedical applications such as tissue scaffolds, stents, and implantable drug delivery devices can be much stiffer. In order to explore UE's potential to assess mechanical properties of biomaterials in a broader range of applications, this work investigated the detection limit of UE strain imaging beyond soft tissue range. To determine the detection limit, measurements using standard mechanical testing and UE on the same polydimethylsiloxane samples were compared and statistically evaluated. The broadest detection range found based on the current optimized setup is between 47 kPa and 4 MPa which exceeds the modulus of normal soft tissue suggesting the possibility of using this technique for stiffer materials' mechanical characterization. The detectable difference was found to be as low as 157 kPa depending on sample stiffness and experimental setup. PMID:26369634

  14. Ultrasound Transducer and System for Real-Time Simultaneous Therapy and Diagnosis for Noninvasive Surgery of Prostate Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jong Seob; Chang, Jin Ho; Shung, K. Kirk

    2009-01-01

    For noninvasive treatment of prostate tissue using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), this paper proposes a design of an integrated multi-functional confocal phased array (IMCPA) and a strategy to perform both imaging and therapy simultaneously with this array. IMCPA is composed of triple-row phased arrays: a 6 MHz array in the center row for imaging and two 4 MHz arrays in the outer rows for therapy. Different types of piezoelectric materials and stack configurations may be employed to maximize their respective functionalities, i.e., therapy and imaging. Fabrication complexity of IMCPA may be reduced by assembling already constructed arrays. In IMCPA, reflected therapeutic signals may corrupt the quality of imaging signals received by the center row array. This problem can be overcome by implementing a coded excitation approach and/or a notch filter when B-mode images are formed during therapy. The 13-bit Barker code, which is a binary code with unique autocorrelation properties, is preferred for implementing coded excitation, although other codes may also be used. From both Field II simulation and experimental results, whether these remedial approaches would make it feasible to simultaneously carry out imaging and therapy by IMCPA was verifeid. The results showed that the 13-bit Barker code with 3 cycles per bit provided acceptable performances. The measured −6 dB and −20 dB range mainlobe widths were 0.52 mm and 0.91 mm, respectively, and a range sidelobe level was measured to be −48 dB regardless of whether a notch filter was used. The 13-bit Barker code with 2 cycles per bit yielded −6dB and −20dB range mainlobe widths of 0.39 mm and 0.67 mm. Its range sidelobe level was found to be −40 dB after notch filtering. These results indicate the feasibility of the proposed transducer design and system for real-time imaging during therapy. PMID:19811994

  15. A unified approach to combine temperature estimation and elastography for thermal lesion determination in focused ultrasound thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Li; Li, Meng-Lin; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Lin, Ming-Shi; Huang, Sheng-Min; Bai, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Sonogram-based temperature estimation and elastography have both shown promise as methods of monitoring focused ultrasound (FUS) treatments to induce thermal ablation in tissue. However, each method has important limitations. Temperature estimates based on echo delays become invalid when the relationship between sound speed and temperature is nonlinear, and are further complicated by thermal expansion and other changes in tissue. Elastography can track thermal lesion formation over a wider range of elasticity, but with low specificity and high noise. Furthermore, this method is poor at small lesion detection. This study proposes integrating the two estimates to improve the quality of monitoring FUS-induced thermal lesions. Our unified computational kernel is tested on three types of phantoms. Experiments with type I and type II phantoms were conducted to calibrate the thermal mapping and elastography methods, respectively. The optimal settings were then used in experiments with the type III phantom, which contains ex vivo swine liver tissue. Three different spatial-peak temporal-average intensities (I(spta); 35, 133 and 240 W cm(-2)) were delivered with a sonication time of 60 s. The new procedure can closely monitor heating while identifying the dimensions of the thermal lesion, and is significantly better at the latter task than either approach alone. This work may help improve the current clinical practice, which employs sonograms to guide the FUS-induced thermal ablation procedure. PMID:21149945

  16. A unified approach to combine temperature estimation and elastography for thermal lesion determination in focused ultrasound thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Li, Meng-Lin; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Lin, Ming-Shi; Huang, Sheng-Min; Bai, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Sonogram-based temperature estimation and elastography have both shown promise as methods of monitoring focused ultrasound (FUS) treatments to induce thermal ablation in tissue. However, each method has important limitations. Temperature estimates based on echo delays become invalid when the relationship between sound speed and temperature is nonlinear, and are further complicated by thermal expansion and other changes in tissue. Elastography can track thermal lesion formation over a wider range of elasticity, but with low specificity and high noise. Furthermore, this method is poor at small lesion detection. This study proposes integrating the two estimates to improve the quality of monitoring FUS-induced thermal lesions. Our unified computational kernel is tested on three types of phantoms. Experiments with type I and type II phantoms were conducted to calibrate the thermal mapping and elastography methods, respectively. The optimal settings were then used in experiments with the type III phantom, which contains ex vivo swine liver tissue. Three different spatial-peak temporal-average intensities (Ispta; 35, 133 and 240 W cm-2) were delivered with a sonication time of 60 s. The new procedure can closely monitor heating while identifying the dimensions of the thermal lesion, and is significantly better at the latter task than either approach alone. This work may help improve the current clinical practice, which employs sonograms to guide the FUS-induced thermal ablation procedure.

  17. A PDE-Based Regularization Algorithm Toward Reducing Speckle Tracking Noise: A Feasibility Study for Ultrasound Breast Elastography.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Xu, Yan; Xu, Zhengfu; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2015-10-01

    Obtaining accurate ultrasonically estimated displacements along both axial (parallel to the acoustic beam) and lateral (perpendicular to the beam) directions is an important task for various clinical elastography applications (e.g., modulus reconstruction and temperature imaging). In this study, a partial differential equation (PDE)-based regularization algorithm was proposed to enhance motion tracking accuracy. More specifically, the proposed PDE-based algorithm, utilizing two-dimensional (2D) displacement estimates from a conventional elastography system, attempted to iteratively reduce noise contained in the original displacement estimates by mathematical regularization. In this study, tissue incompressibility was the physical constraint used by the above-mentioned mathematical regularization. This proposed algorithm was tested using computer-simulated data, a tissue-mimicking phantom, and in vivo breast lesion data. Computer simulation results demonstrated that the method significantly improved the accuracy of lateral tracking (e.g., a factor of 17 at 0.5% compression). From in vivo breast lesion data investigated, we have found that, as compared with the conventional method, higher quality axial and lateral strain images (e.g., at least 78% improvements among the estimated contrast-to-noise ratios of lateral strain images) were obtained. Our initial results demonstrated that this conceptually and computationally simple method could be useful for improving the image quality of ultrasound elastography with current clinical equipment as a post-processing tool. PMID:25452434

  18. The diagnosis value of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography for thyroid malignancy without highly suspicious features on conventional ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo-Ji; Lu, Feng; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Guo, Le-Hang; Li, Dan-Dan; Bo, Xiao-Wan; Li, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Yi-Feng; Xu, Jun-Mei; Xu, Xiao-Hong; Qu, Shen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential diagnostic performance of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography in identifying malignancy in nodules that do not appear highly suspicious on conventional ultrasound (US). Methods: 330 pathologically confirmed thyroid nodules (40 malignant and 290 benign; mean size, 22.0±11.6 mm) not suspicious of malignancy on conventional US in 330 patients (mean age 52.8±11.7 years) underwent ARFI elastography before surgery. ARFI elastography included qualitative ARFI-induced strain elastography (SE) and quantitative point shear wave elastography (p-SWE). ARFI-induced SE image was assessed by SE score, while p-SWE was denoted with shear wave velocity (SWV, m/s). The diagnostic performance of four criteria sets was evaluated: criteria set 1 (ARFI-induced SE), criteria set 2 (p-SWE), criteria set 3 (either set 1 or 2), criteria set 4 (both set 1 and 2). Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analyses were performed to assess the diagnostic performance. Results: SE score ≥4 was more frequently found in malignant nodules (32/40) than in benign nodules (30/290, P<0.001). The mean SWV of malignant nodules (3.64±2.23 m/s) was significantly higher than that of benign nodules (2.02±0.69 m/s) (P<0.001). ARFI-induced SE (set 1) had a sensitivity of 80.0% (32/40) and a specificity of 89.7% (260/290) with a cut-off point of SE score ≥4; p-SWE (set 2) had a sensitivity of 80.0% (32/40) and a specificity of 57.9% (168/290) with a cut-off point of SWV ≥2.15 m/s. When ARFI-induced SE and p-SWE were combined, set 3 had the highest sensitivity (92.5%, 37/40) while set 4 had the highest specificity (95.2%, 276/290). Conclusion: ARFI elastography can be used for differential diagnosis of malignant thyroid nodules without highly suspicious features on US. The combination of ARFI-induced SE and p-SWE leads to improved sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26629025

  19. Performance of 2-D ultrasound shear wave elastography in liver fibrosis detection using magnetic resonance elastography as the reference standard: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Pengfei; Mellema, Daniel C.; Sheedy, Shannon P.; Meixner, Duane D.; Karshen, Ryan M.; Urban, Matthew W.; Manduca, Armando; Sanchez, William; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Greenleaf, James F.; Chen, Shigao

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the correlation between 2-D ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE) and magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in liver stiffness measurement and the diagnostic performance of 2-D SWE for liver fibrosis when imaging from different intercostal spaces and using MRE as the reference standard. Methods 2-D SWE was performed on 47 patients (22 females and 25 males, age 19–77) using the GE LOGIQ E9 scanner. Each of the 47 patients had same day MRE obtained for clinical purposes. The study was HIPAA-compliant and approved by the institutional review board. Informed consent was obtained from each subject. 2-D SWE measurements were acquired from the 9th, 8th, and 7th intercostal spaces. Correlation with MRE was calculated at each intercostal space and multiple intercostal spaces combined. The performance of 2-D SWE in diagnosing liver fibrosis was evaluated with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis using MRE as the standard. Results The highest correlation between 2-D SWE and MRE was from the 8th and 7th intercostal spaces (r = 0.68 – 0.76). The range of the areas under the ROC curve for separating normal or inflamed livers from fibrotic livers using MRE as the clinical reference were 0.84 – 0.92 when using 8th and 7th intercostal spaces individually, and 0.89 –0.9 when combined. Conclusion The results suggest that 2-D SWE and MRE are well correlated when SWE is performed at the 8th and 7th intercostal spaces. The 9th intercostal space is less reliable for diagnosing fibrosis using 2-D SWE. Combining measurements from multiple intercostal spaces does not significantly improve 2-D SWE performance for the detection of fibrosis. PMID:26782164

  20. Feasibility of real-time treatment feedback using novel filter for eliminating therapeutic ultrasound noise with high-speed ultrasonic imaging in ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Ryo; Jimbo, Hayato; Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Tomiyasu, Kentaro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    In the conventional ultrasonic monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment, a significant interval between HIFU shots is required when monitoring target tissue to avoid interference between HIFU noise and RF echo signals. In our previous study, a new filtering method to eliminate only HIFU noise while maintaining tissue signals intact was proposed, and it was shown that the thermal coagulation could be detected during simultaneous HIFU irradiation through off-line processing. In this study, the filtering method and a real-time coagulation detection algorithm were implemented in an ultrasound imaging system, whose use for sequential exposure with multiple foci was demonstrated similarly to a commercial HIFU ablation system. The coagulation was automatically detected by the proposed method during real-time simultaneous HIFU irradiation, and the HIFU exposure time was controlled according to the changes in the tissue. The results imply that ultrasonic monitoring with the filtering and detection methods is useful for true real-time detection of changes in the tissue due to thermal coagulation during HIFU exposure.

  1. A Hertzian contact mechanics based formulation to improve ultrasound elastography assessment of uterine cervical tissue stiffness.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Brandi N; Stender, Michael E; Muljadi, Patrick M; Donnelly, Meghan A; Winn, Virginia D; Ferguson, Virginia L

    2015-06-25

    Clinical practice requires improved techniques to assess human cervical tissue properties, especially at the internal os, or orifice, of the uterine cervix. Ultrasound elastography (UE) holds promise for non-invasively monitoring cervical stiffness throughout pregnancy. However, this technique provides qualitative strain images that cannot be linked to a material property (e.g., Young's modulus) without knowledge of the contact pressure under a rounded transvaginal transducer probe and correction for the resulting non-uniform strain dissipation. One technique to standardize elastogram images incorporates a material of known properties and uses one-dimensional, uniaxial Hooke's law to calculate Young's modulus within the compressed material half-space. However, this method does not account for strain dissipation and the strains that evolve in three-dimensional space. We demonstrate that an analytical approach based on 3D Hertzian contact mechanics provides a reasonable first approximation to correct for UE strain dissipation underneath a round transvaginal transducer probe and thus improves UE-derived estimates of tissue modulus. We validate the proposed analytical solution and evaluate sources of error using a finite element model. As compared to 1D uniaxial Hooke's law, the Hertzian contact-based solution yields significantly improved Young's modulus predictions in three homogeneous gelatin tissue phantoms possessing different moduli. We also demonstrate the feasibility of using this technique to image human cervical tissue, where UE-derived moduli estimations for the uterine cervix anterior lip agreed well with published, experimentally obtained values. Overall, UE with an attached reference standard and a Hertzian contact-based correction holds promise for improving quantitative estimates of cervical tissue modulus. PMID:26003483

  2. Reconstruction of elasticity: a stochastic model-based approach in ultrasound elastography

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The convectional strain-based algorithm has been widely utilized in clinical practice. It can only provide the information of relative information of tissue stiffness. However, the exact information of tissue stiffness should be valuable for clinical diagnosis and treatment. Methods In this study we propose a reconstruction strategy to recover the mechanical properties of the tissue. After the discrepancies between the biomechanical model and data are modeled as the process noise, and the biomechanical model constraint is transformed into a state space representation the reconstruction of elasticity can be accomplished through one filtering identification process, which is to recursively estimate the material properties and kinematic functions from ultrasound data according to the minimum mean square error (MMSE) criteria. In the implementation of this model-based algorithm, the linear isotropic elasticity is adopted as the biomechanical constraint. The estimation of kinematic functions (i.e., the full displacement and velocity field), and the distribution of Young’s modulus are computed simultaneously through an extended Kalman filter (EKF). Results In the following experiments the accuracy and robustness of this filtering framework is first evaluated on synthetic data in controlled conditions, and the performance of this framework is then evaluated in the real data collected from elastography phantom and patients using the ultrasound system. Quantitative analysis verifies that strain fields estimated by our filtering strategy are more closer to the ground truth. The distribution of Young’s modulus is also well estimated. Further, the effects of measurement noise and process noise have been investigated as well. Conclusions The advantage of this model-based algorithm over the conventional strain-based algorithm is its potential of providing the distribution of elasticity under a proper biomechanical model constraint. We address the model

  3. A scanning-mode 2D shear wave imaging (s2D-SWI) system for ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weibao; Wang, Congzhi; Li, Yongchuan; Zhou, Juan; Yang, Ge; Xiao, Yang; Feng, Ge; Jin, Qiaofeng; Mu, Peitian; Qian, Ming; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound elastography is widely used for the non-invasive measurement of tissue elasticity properties. Shear wave imaging (SWI) is a quantitative method for assessing tissue stiffness. SWI has been demonstrated to be less operator dependent than quasi-static elastography, and has the ability to acquire quantitative elasticity information in contrast with acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging. However, traditional SWI implementations cannot acquire two dimensional (2D) quantitative images of the tissue elasticity distribution. This study proposes and evaluates a scanning-mode 2D SWI (s2D-SWI) system. The hardware and image processing algorithms are presented in detail. Programmable devices are used to support flexible control of the system and the image processing algorithms. An analytic signal based cross-correlation method and a Radon transformation based shear wave speed determination method are proposed, which can be implemented using parallel computation. Imaging of tissue mimicking phantoms, and in vitro, and in vivo imaging test are conducted to demonstrate the performance of the proposed system. The s2D-SWI system represents a new choice for the quantitative mapping of tissue elasticity, and has great potential for implementation in commercial ultrasound scanners. PMID:26025508

  4. [Renal elastography].

    PubMed

    Correas, Jean-Michel; Anglicheau, Dany; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael

    2016-04-01

    Renal elastography has become available with the development of noninvasive quantitative techniques (including shear-wave elastography), following the rapidly growing field of diagnosis and quantification of liver fibrosis, which has a demonstrated major clinical impact. Ultrasound or even magnetic resonance techniques are leaving the pure research area to reach the routine clinical use. With the increased incidence of chronic kidney disease and its specific morbidity and mortality, the noninvasive diagnosis of renal fibrosis can be of critical value. However, it is difficult to simply extend the application from one organ to the other due to a large number of anatomical and technical issues. Indeed, the kidney exhibits various features that make stiffness assessment more complex, such as the presence of various tissue types (cortex, medulla), high spatial orientation (anisotropy), local blood flow, fatty sinus with variable volume and echotexture, perirenal space with variable fatty content, and the variable depth of the organ. Furthermore, the stiffness changes of the renal parenchyma are not exclusively related to fibrosis, as renal perfusion or hydronephrosis will impact the local elasticity. Renal elastography might be able to diagnose acute or chronic obstruction, or to renal tumor or pseudotumor characterization. Today, renal elastography appears as a promising application that still requires optimization and validation, which is the contrary for liver stiffness assessment. PMID:26976058

  5. Micromachined silicon parallel acoustic delay lines as time-delayed ultrasound detector array for real-time photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y.; Chang, C.-C.; Wang, L. V.; Zou, J.

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the development of a new 16-channel parallel acoustic delay line (PADL) array for real-time photoacoustic tomography (PAT). The PADLs were directly fabricated from single-crystalline silicon substrates using deep reactive ion etching. Compared with other acoustic delay lines (e.g., optical fibers), the micromachined silicon PADLs offer higher acoustic transmission efficiency, smaller form factor, easier assembly, and mass production capability. To demonstrate its real-time photoacoustic imaging capability, the silicon PADL array was interfaced with one single-element ultrasonic transducer followed by one channel of data acquisition electronics to receive 16 channels of photoacoustic signals simultaneously. A PAT image of an optically-absorbing target embedded in an optically-scattering phantom was reconstructed, which matched well with the actual size of the imaged target. Because the silicon PADL array allows a signal-to-channel reduction ratio of 16:1, it could significantly simplify the design and construction of ultrasonic receivers for real-time PAT.

  6. Real-time ultrasound-guided percutaneous renal biopsy with needle guide by nephrologists decreases post-biopsy complications

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Narayan; Kumar, Shashi; Manjunath, Revanasiddappa; Bhadauria, Dharmendra; Kaul, Anupama; Sharma, Raj K; Gupta, Amit; Lal, Hira; Jain, Manoj; Agrawal, Vinita

    2015-01-01

    Background Percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) can result in serious complications. The study is aimed to compare the biopsy yield and complications rate of the real-time ultrasonagram (USG)-guided PRB and needle tracking with and without needle guide in two different study periods. Methods We compared the yield and complications of 2138 kidney biopsies performed in two different periods, 1510 biopsies during the first period from April 2004–December 2010 and 628 biopsies during second period from January 2011–March 2013. All biopsies in both periods were performed by nephrologists. Radiologists provided the real-time image without needle guide during the first period while nephrologists performed both imaging and biopsy with needle guide during the second period. Results Of all the 2138 patients, 226 (10.5%) patients developed 118 minor and 108 major complications. Only 13 (2.1%) major complications occurred in the second period and 95 (6.7%) in the first period (P < 0.001). The relative risk of developing a major complication without guide was 3.04 times greater than that of the biopsies performed with use of the guide. The mean number of glomeruli per biopsy obtained during the second period (17.98 ± 6.75) was significantly greater than that of the first period (14.14 ± 6.01) (P = 0.004). The number of passes to acquire adequate tissue (P = 0.001) and percentage of cortex on biopsy (P = 0.001) were also significantly better in the second period. The optimal observation period post biopsy is 24 h. Conclusions Real-time USG imaging supported by needle guide device is associated with better biopsy yield and fewer complications. PMID:25815170

  7. Contrast enhancement and elastography in endoscopic ultrasound: an update of clinical applications in pancreatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Serrani, Marta; Lisotti, Andrea; Caletti, Giancarlo; Fusaroli, Pietro

    2016-08-01

    It is well established that endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is fundamental in the characterization of many diseases concerning different organs, i.e. pancreaticobiliary diseases, gastrointestinal pathologic conditions, and lymph nodes of unknown origin. It is also well known that many factors can hamper the accuracy of EUS, i.e. biliary stents, chronic pancreatitis, poor operator's expertise. These factors can also lead to suboptimal accuracy when cytological confirmation through EUS-fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is indicated. In recent years, new technological tools have rapidly increased their clinical impact improving the diagnostic power of EUS and EUS-FNA. Among these new tools, the most investigated and useful ones are represented by contrast harmonic-EUS (CH-EUS) and EUS-elastography (EUS-E). The purpose of this paper is to provide, through a review of the literature, an update of the applications of CH-EUS and EUS-E in the routine clinical practice in pancreatic diseases. We discussed the first reports and applications of these techniques in our previous review published in Minerva Medica. The applications of CH-EUS and EUS-E to the study of pancreatic diseases appear feasible and safe. The use of both techniques is very simple and does not require any relevant additional workload for the endoscopic personnel. CH-EUS is now considered an important and accurate tool in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses and in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions. CH-EUS targeted FNA is an active field of research. However the available studies show that CH-EUS increases FNA accuracy by a little extent, without statistical significance; moreover, CH-EUS FNA showed a trend toward being more efficient vs. simple EUS FNA (less needle passes and more abundance in cytological material) but this trend did not reach statistical significance. On the other hand, the clinical impact of EUS-E in terms of differential diagnosis of pancreatic masses is still under

  8. Real-time ultrasound-guided comparison of adductor canal block and psoas compartment block combined with sciatic nerve block in laparoscopic knee surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Messeha, Medhat M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lumbar plexus block, combined with a sciatic nerve block, is an effective locoregional anesthetic technique for analgesia and anesthesia of the lower extremity. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical results outcome of the adductor canal block versus the psoas compartment block combined with sciatic nerve block using real time ultrasound guidance in patients undergoing elective laparoscopic knee surgeries. Patients and Methods: Ninety patients who were undergoing elective laparoscopic knee surgeries were randomly allocated to receive a sciatic nerve block in addition to lumbar plexus block using either an adductor canal block (ACB) or a posterior psoas compartment approach (PCB) using 25 ml of bupivacine 0.5% with adrenaline 1:400,000 injection over 2-3 minutes while observing the distribution of the local anesthetic in real time. Successful nerve block was defined as a complete loss of pinprick sensation in the region that is supplied by the three nerves along with adequate motor block, 30 minutes after injection. The degree of motor block was evaluated 30 minutes after the block procedure. The results of the present study showed that the real time ultrasound guidance of PCB is more effective than ACB approach. Although the sensory blockade of the femoral nerve achieved equally by both techniques, the LFC and OBT nerves were faster and more effectively blocked with PCB technique. Also PCB group showed significant complete sensory block without need for general anesthesia, significant decrease in the post-operative VAS and significant increase time of first analgesic requirement as compared to the ACB group. Result and Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that blockade of lumber plexus by psoas compartment block is more effective in complete sensory block without general anesthesia supplementation in addition to decrease post-operative analgesic requirement than adductor canal block. PMID:27212766

  9. Real-Time Tissue Change Monitoring on the Sonablate® 500 during High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wo-Hsing; Sanghvi, Narendra T.; Carlson, Roy; Uchida, Toyoaki

    2011-09-01

    Sonablate® 500 (SB-500) HIFU devices have been successfully used to treat prostate cancer non-invasively. In addition, Visually Directed HIFU with the SB-500 has demonstrated higher efficacy. Visually Directed HIFU works by displaying hyperechoic changes on the B-mode ultrasound images. However, small changes in the grey-scale images are not detectable by Visually Directed HIFU. To detect all tissue changes reliably, the SB-500 was enhanced with quantitative, real-time Tissue Change Monitoring (TCM) software. TCM uses pulse-echo ultrasound backscattered RF signals in 2D to estimate changes in the tissue properties caused by HIFU. The RF signal energy difference is calculated in selected frequency bands (pre and post HIFU) for each treatment site. The results are overlaid on the real-time ultrasound image in green, yellow and orange to represent low, medium and high degree of change in backscattered energy levels. The color mapping scheme was derived on measured temperature and backscattered RF signals from in vitro chicken tissue experiments. The TCM software was installed and tested in a clinical device to obtain human RF data. Post HIFU contrast enhanced MRI scans verified necrotic regions of the prostate. The color mapping success rate at higher HIFU power levels was 94% in the initial clinical test. Based on these results, TCM software has been released for wider usage. The clinical studies with TCM in Japan and The Bahamas have provided the following PSA (ng/ml) results. Japan (n = 97), PSA pre-treatment/post-treatment; minimum 0.7/0.0, maximum 76.0/4.73, median 6.89/0.07, standard deviation 11.19/0.62. The Bahamas (n = 59), minimum 0.4/0.0, maximum 13.0/1.4, median 4.7/0.1, standard deviation 2.8/0.3.

  10. Two-photon microscopy for real-time monitoring of focused ultrasound-mediated drug delivery to the brain in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Alison; Eterman, Naomi; Aubert, Isabelle; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2013-02-01

    There is substantial evidence that focused ultrasound (FUS) in combination with microbubble contrast agent can cause disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to aid in drug delivery to the brain. We have previously demonstrated that FUS efficiently delivers antibodies against amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) through the BBB, leading to a reduction in amyloid pathology at 4 days in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. In the current study, we used two-photon microscopy to characterize the effect of FUS in real time on amyloid pathology in the mouse brain. Mice were anesthetized and a cranial window was made in the skull. A custom-built ultrasound transducer was fixed to a coverslip and attached to the skull, covering the cranial window. Methoxy-X04 [2-5mg/kg] delivered intravenously 1 hr prior to the experiment clearly labelled the Aβ surrounding the vessels and the amyloid plaques in the cortex. Dextran conjugated Texas Red (70kDa) administered intravenously, confirmed BBB disruption. BBB disruption occurred in transgenic and non-transgenic animals at similar ultrasound pressures tested. However, the time required for BBB closure following FUS was longer in the Tg mice. We have conjugated Aβ antibodies to the fluorescent molecule FITC for real time monitoring of the antibody distribution in the brain. Our current experiments are aimed at optimizing the parameters to achieve maximal fluorescent intensity of the BAM10 antibody at the plaque surface. Two-photon microscopy has proven to be a valuable tool for evaluating the efficacy of FUS mediated drug delivery, including antibodies, to the Alzheimer brain.

  11. Three different strategies for real-time prostate capsule volume computation from 3-D end-fire transrectal ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Barqawi, Albaha B; Lu, Li; Crawford, E David; Fenster, Aaron; Werahera, Priya N; Kumar, Dinesh; Miller, Steve; Suri, Jasjit S

    2007-01-01

    estimation of prostate capsule volume via segmentation of the prostate from 3-D ultrasound volumetric ultrasound images is a valuable clinical tool, especially during biopsy. Normally, a physician traces the boundaries of the prostate manually, but this process is tedious, laborious, and subject to errors. The prostate capsule edge is computed using three different strategies: (a) least square approach, (b) level set approach, and (c) Discrete Dynamic Contour approach. (a) In the least square method, edge points are defined by searching for the optimal edge based on the average signal characteristics. These edge points constitute an initial curve which is later refined; (b) Level set approach. The images are modeled as piece-wise constant, and the energy functional is defined and minimized. This method is also automated; and (c) The Discrete Dynamic Contour (DDC). A trained user selects several points in the first image and an initial contour is obtained by a model based initialization. Based on this initialization condition, the contour is deformed automatically to better fit the image. This method is semi-automatic. The three methods were tested on database consisting of 15 prostate phantom volumes acquired using a Philips ultrasound machine using an end-fire TRUS. The ground truth (GT) is developed by tracing the boundary of prostate on a slice-by-slice basis. The mean volumes using the least square, level set and DDC techniques were 15.84 cc, 15.55 cc and 16.33 cc, respectively. We validated the methods by calculating the volume with GT and we got an average volume of 15. PMID:18002081

  12. SU-D-BRF-06: A Brachytherapy Simulator with Realistic Haptic Force Feedback and Real-Time Ultrasounds Image Simulation for Training and Teaching

    SciTech Connect

    Beaulieu, L; Carette, A; Comtois, S; Lavigueur, M; Cardou, P; Laurendeau, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Surgical procedures require dexterity, expertise and repetition to reach optimal patient outcomes. However, efficient training opportunities are usually limited. This work presents a simulator system with realistic haptic force-feedback and full, real-time ultrasounds image simulation. Methods: The simulator is composed of a custom-made Linear-DELTA force-feedback robotic platform. The needle tip is mounted on a force gauge at the end effector of the robot, which responds to needle insertion by providing reaction forces. 3D geometry of the tissue is using a tetrahedral finite element mesh (FEM) mimicking tissue properties. As the needle is inserted/retracted, tissue deformation is computed using a mass-tensor nonlinear visco-elastic FEM. The real-time deformation is fed to the L-DELTA to take into account the force imparted to the needle, providing feedback to the end-user when crossing tissue boundaries or needle bending. Real-time 2D US image is also generated synchronously showing anatomy, needle insertion and tissue deformation. The simulator is running on an Intel I7 6- core CPU at 3.26 MHz. 3D tissue rendering and ultrasound display are performed on a Windows 7 computer; the FEM computation and L-DELTA control are executed on a similar PC using the Neutrino real-time OS. Both machines communicate through an Ethernet link. Results: The system runs at 500 Hz for a 8333-tetrahedron tissue mesh and a 100-node angular spring needle model. This frame rate ensures a relatively smooth displacement of the needle when pushed or retracted (±20 N in all directions at speeds of up to 2 m/s). Unlike commercially-available haptic platforms, the oblong workspace of the L-DELTA robot complies with that required for brachytherapy needle displacements of 0.1m by 0.1m by 0.25m. Conclusion: We have demonstrated a real-life, realistic brachytherapy simulator developed for prostate implants (LDR/HDR). The platform could be adapted to other sites or training for other

  13. Real time observation of the ultrasound stimulated disintegration of optically trapped microbubbles in proximity to biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, Paul; MacDonald, Michael P.; Cuschieri, Alfred; Dholakia, Kishan; Campbell, Paul

    2005-08-01

    Cells that are exposed to varying amounts of ultrasonic energy in the presence of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) may undergo either permanent cell membrane damage (lethal sonoporation), or a transient enhancement of membrane permeability (reversible or non lethal sonoporation). The merits of each mode are clear; lethal sonoporation constitutes a significant tumour therapy weapon, whilst its less intrusive counterpart, reversible sonoporation, represents an effective non-invasive targeted drug delivery technique. Our working hypothesis for understanding this problem was that the root cause and effect in sonoporation involves the interaction of individual cells with single microbubbles, and to that end we devised an experiment that facilitates video rate observation of this specific scenario under well defined optical control. Specifically, we have constructed an innovative hybridization apparatus involving holographic optical trapping of single and multiple UCA microbubbles, together with the facility to irradiate with MHz pulsed ultrasound energy in the presence cancerous cells. This approach allows the isolation of a target microbubble from a resident population and the relocation to a [controllable] predetermined position relative to a cell within a monolayer. Frame extraction from standard framing rate video microscopy demonstrates the individuality of single microbubble-cell interactions. We describe a fluorescence microscopy protocol that will allow future study of the potential to deliver molecular species to cells, the dependence of the delivery on the initial microbubble-cell distance and to determine the targeted cell survival.

  14. Real time ultrasound-guided percutaneous tracheostomy: Is it a better option than bronchoscopic guided percutaneous tracheostomy?

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Parli Raghavan; Vijay, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of ultrasound guided percutaneous tracheostomy (USPCT) and bronchoscopic guided percutaneous tracheostomy (BPCT) and the incidence of complications in critically ill, obese patients. Methods Seventy four consecutive patients were included in a prospective study and randomly divided into USPCT and BPCT. Incidence of complications, ease and efficacy were compared in obese USPCT (n = 38)and BPCT (n = 36). Results are expressed as the median (25th–75th percentile) or number (percentage). Results The median times for tracheostomy were 12 min (9–14) in USPCT patients and 18 min (12–21.5) in BPCT (p = 0.05). The overall complication rate was higher in BPCT than USPCT patient group (75% vs. 321%, p < 0.05). Most complications were minor (hypotension, desaturation, tracheal cuff puncture and minor bleeding) and of higher number in the BPCT. Ultrasound-guided PCT was possible in all enrolled patients and there were no surgical conversions or deaths. Conclusions This study demonstrated that real US-guided PCT is a favourable alternative to BPCT with a low complication rate and ease, thus proving more efficacious. A US examination provides information on cervical anatomy, vasculature etc. and hence modifies and guides choice of the PCT puncture site. PMID:25859079

  15. Real-time monitoring of focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier opening via subharmonic acoustic emission detection: implementation of confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chih-Hung; Zhang, Jia-Wei; Liao, Yi-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-04-01

    Burst-tone focused ultrasound exposure in the presence of microbubbles has been demonstrated to be effective at inducing temporal and local opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which promises significant clinical potential to deliver therapeutic molecules into the central nervous system (CNS). Traditional contrast-enhanced imaging confirmation after focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure serves as a post-operative indicator of the effectiveness of FUS-BBB opening, however, an indicator that can concurrently report the BBB status and BBB-opening effectiveness is required to provide effective feedback to implement this treatment clinically. In this study, we demonstrate the use of subharmonic acoustic emission detection with implementation on a confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric ceramic structure to perform real-time monitoring of FUS-BBB opening. A confocal dual-frequency (0.55 MHz/1.1 MHz) focused ultrasound transducer was designed. The 1.1 MHz spherically-curved ceramic was employed to deliver FUS exposure to induce BBB-opening, whereas the outer-ring 0.55 MHz ceramic was employed to detect the subharmonic acoustic emissions originating from the target position. In stage-1 experiments, we employed spectral analysis and performed an energy spectrum density (ESD) calculation. An optimized 0.55 MHz ESD level change was shown to effectively discriminate the occurrence of BBB-opening. Wideband acoustic emissions received from 0.55 MHz ceramics were also analyzed to evaluate its correlations with erythrocyte extravasations. In stage-2 real-time monitoring experiments, we applied the predetermined ESD change as a detection threshold in PC-controlled algorithm to predict the FUS exposure intra-operatively. In stage-1 experiment, we showed that subharmonic ESD presents distinguishable dynamics between intact BBB and opened BBB, and therefore a threshold ESD change level (5.5 dB) can be identified for BBB-opening prediction. Using this ESD change threshold detection as a

  16. The effects of fatty deposits on the accuracy of the Fibroscan® liver transient elastography ultrasound system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cournane, S.; Browne, J. E.; Fagan, A. J.

    2012-06-01

    A new generation of ultrasound transient elastography (TE) systems have emerged which exploit the well-known correlation between the liver's pathological and mechanical properties through measurements of the Young's elastic modulus; however, little work has been carried out to examine the effect that fatty deposits may have on the TE measurement accuracy. An investigation was carried out on the effects on the measurement accuracy of a TE ultrasound system, the Fibroscan®, caused by overlaying fat layers of varying thickness on healthy liver-mimicking phantoms, simulating in vivo conditions for obese patients. Furthermore, a steatosis effect similar to that in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and alcoholic liver disease (ALD) was simulated to investigate its effect on the TE system. A range of novel elastography fat-mimicking materials were developed using 6-10 wt% poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogel capable of achieving a range of acoustic velocities (1482-1530 m s-1) and attenuation coefficients (0.4-1 dB MHz-1 cm-1) for simulating different liver states. Laboratory-based acoustic velocities and attenuation coefficients were measured while the Young's modulus was established through a gold standard compression testing method. A significant variation of the Young's elastic modulus was measured in healthy phantoms with overlaying fat layers of thicknesses exceeding 45 mm, impinging on the scanners region of interest, overestimating the compression tested values by up to 11 kPa in some cases. Furthermore, Fibroscan® measurements of the steatosis phantoms showed a consistent overestimation (˜54%), which strongly suggests that the speed of sound mismatch between that of liver tissue and that assumed by the scanner is responsible for the high clinical cut-offs established in the case of ALD and NAFLD.

  17. Ultrasound strain elastography in assessment of cortical mechanical behavior in acute renal vein occlusion: in vivo animal model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; He, Wen; Cheng, Ling-Gang; Li, Xiao-Ya; Zhang, Xiou-Ru; Juluru, Krishna; Al Khori, Noor; Coya, Adrienne; Min, Robert

    2015-01-01

    To assess the correlation of quantitative ultrasound strain parameters with the severity of cortical edema in renal vein occlusion, we prospectively performed ultrasound strain elastography on a canine acute renal vein occlusion model prior to and following 10, 20, and 40min of renal vein ligation. Strain and strain relaxation time representing the deformation and relaxation of the renal cortices and reference soft tissue were produced by the external compression with the ultrasound transducer and estimated using commercially available 2-D speckle tracking software. Cortical thickness was additionally measured. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to examine the difference in cortical thickness, strain ratio (mean cortical strain divided by mean reference tissue strain), and strain relaxation time ratio (cortical relaxation time divided by reference tissue relaxation time) prior to and after renal vein ligation. Pearson's correlation coefficient was applied to test the relationship between strain parameters and the time of the renal vein ligation. There was a strong positive correlation between the duration of renal vein ligation and strain (R(2)=0.97) and strain relaxation time (R(2)=0.98) ratios. Significant differences in strain and strain relaxation time ratios were found at all measured timepoints (all P≪.001). Cortical thickness, however, showed no significant difference between timepoints (P=.065). Our result suggest that strain and strain relaxation time ratios may be used as quantitative markers for the assessment of the renal cortical mechanical behavior in subclinical acute renal vein occlusion. PMID:25481219

  18. Comb-push Ultrasound Shear Elastography (CUSE): A Novel Method for Two-dimensional Shear Elasticity Imaging of Soft Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Song, Pengfei; Zhao, Heng; Manduca, Armando; Urban, Matthew W.; Greenleaf, James F.; Chen, Shigao

    2012-01-01

    Fast and accurate tissue elasticity imaging is essential in studying dynamic tissue mechanical properties. Various ultrasound shear elasticity imaging techniques have been developed in the last two decades. However, to reconstruct a full field-of-view 2D shear elasticity map, multiple data acquisitions are typically required. In this paper, a novel shear elasticity imaging technique, comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE), is introduced in which only one rapid data acquisition (less than 35 ms) is needed to reconstruct a full field-of-view 2D shear wave speed map (40 mm × 38 mm). Multiple unfocused ultrasound beams arranged in a comb pattern (comb-push) are used to generate shear waves. A directional filter is then applied upon the shear wave field to extract the left-to-right (LR) and right-to-left (RL) propagating shear waves. Local shear wave speed is recovered using a time-of-flight method based on both LR and RL waves. Finally a 2D shear wave speed map is reconstructed by combining the LR and RL speed maps. Smooth and accurate shear wave speed maps are reconstructed using the proposed CUSE method in two calibrated homogeneous phantoms with different moduli. Inclusion phantom experiments demonstrate that CUSE is capable of providing good contrast (contrast-to-noise-ratio ≥ 25 dB) between the inclusion and background without artifacts and is insensitive to inclusion positions. Safety measurements demonstrate that all regulated parameters of the ultrasound output level used in CUSE sequence are well below the FDA limits for diagnostic ultrasound. PMID:22736690

  19. Real-Time Monitoring and Quantitative Evaluation of Cavitation Bubbles Induced by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Using B-Mode Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jie; Chen, Chu-Yi; Chen, Gong; Guo, Xia-Sheng; Ma, Yong; Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong

    2014-03-01

    A software-based method is proposed to eliminate the flooding interference strips in B-mode images, and to evaluate the cavitation bubbles generated during high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) exposures. In vitro tissue phantoms are exposed to 1.12 MHz HIFU pulses with a fixed 100 Hz pulse repetition frequency. HIFU-induced cavitation bubbles are detected as hyperechoic regions in B-mode images. The temporal evolution of cavitation bubbles, generated by HIFU pulses with varying driving amplitude and pulse length, is analyzed by measuring the time-varying area of the hyperechoic region. The results show that: first, it is feasible to monitor HIFU-induced cavitation bubble activity in real-time using B-mode imaging; second, more cavitation bubbles can be generated with higher acoustic energy delivered; third, the hyperechoic region is observed to shrink gradually after ceasing the HIFU pulses, which indicates the dissolution of cavitation bubbles. This work will be helpful for developing an effective tool to realize real-time monitoring and quantitative evaluation of HIFU-induced cavitation bubble activity using a current commercialized B-mode machine.

  20. Validation of tissue change monitoring (TCM) on the Sonablate® 500 during high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment of prostate cancer with real-time thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wo-Hsing; Sanghvi, Narendra T.; Carlson, Roy; Schatzl, Georg; Marberger, Michael

    2012-10-01

    The Sonablate® 500 has quantitative, real-time Tissue Change Monitoring (TCM) software that estimates changes in tissue properties due to HIFU treatment of prostate cancer. This study validates the Sonablate 500 TCM system using real-time thermometry. Five patients with histologically confirmed, organ-confined prostate cancer were enrolled. Four patients with focal cancer had hemiablation and one had whole gland ablation. TCM generates energy reading based on spectral analysis on the RF backscattered ultrasound signals; results are used as an estimator of tissue temperature. Needle thermocouples were placed transperineally under TRUS guidance in the prostate to monitor temperatures from focal zone, posterior to the focal zone and on the lateral gland where no HIFU was applied. The HIFU treatments averaged 37, 35 and 19.7 Watts for the treatment for anterior, middle and posterior zones. The measured temperatures (Average, Max, and Min) in the HIFU treatment zones were 84, 114 and 70 degrees C. The temperature estimated by TCM energy readings were 83% 75-100 degrees C and 17% 60-75 degrees C with an average of 91 degrees C. Outside the focal zone, average recorded temperature was 50 degrees C. Average temperature in the lateral lobe where no HIFU was applied was 40.7 degrees C.

  1. Fast and Accurate Data Extraction for Near Real-Time Registration of 3-D Ultrasound and Computed Tomography in Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Brounstein, Anna; Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Guy, Pierre; Hodgson, Antony; Abugharbieh, Rafeef

    2015-12-01

    Automatic, accurate and real-time registration is an important step in providing effective guidance and successful anatomic restoration in ultrasound (US)-based computer assisted orthopedic surgery. We propose a method in which local phase-based bone surfaces, extracted from intra-operative US data, are registered to pre-operatively segmented computed tomography data. Extracted bone surfaces are downsampled and reinforced with high curvature features. A novel hierarchical simplification algorithm is used to further optimize the point clouds. The final point clouds are represented as Gaussian mixture models and iteratively matched by minimizing the dissimilarity between them using an L2 metric. For 44 clinical data sets from 25 pelvic fracture patients and 49 phantom data sets, we report mean surface registration accuracies of 0.31 and 0.77 mm, respectively, with an average registration time of 1.41 s. Our results suggest the viability and potential of the chosen method for real-time intra-operative registration in orthopedic surgery. PMID:26365924

  2. Estimation of Genetic Parameters for Real-time Ultrasound Measurements for Hanwoo Cows at Different Ages and Pregnancy Status

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. H.; Lee, Y. M.; Oh, S.-H.; Son, H. J.; Jeong, D. J.; Whitley, Niki; Kim, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate genetic parameters of ultrasound measurements for longissimus dorsi muscle area (LMA), backfat thickness (BFT), and marbling score (MS) in Hanwoo cows (N = 3,062) at the ages between 18 and 42 months. Data were collected from 100 Hanwoo breeding farms in Gyeongbuk province, Korea, in 2007 and 2008. The cows were classified into four different age groups, i.e. 18 to 22 months (the first pregnancy period), 23 to 27 (the first parturition), 28 to 32 (the second pregnancy), and 33 to 42 (the second parturition), respectively. For each age group, a multi-trait animal model was used to estimate variance components and heritabilities of the three traits. The averages of LMA, BFT, and MS measurements across the cows of all age groups were 50.1 cm2, 4.62 mm, and 3.04, respectively and heritability estimates were 0.09, 0.10, and 0.08 for the respective traits. However, when the data were analyzed in different age groups, heritability estimates of LMA and BFT were 0.24 and 0.47, respectively, for the cows of 18 to 22 months of age, and 0.21 for MS in the 28 to 32 months old cows. When the cows of all age groups were used, the estimates of genetic (phenotypic) correlations were 0.43 (0.35), −0.06 (0.34) and 0.21 (0.32) between LMA and BFT, LMA and MS, and BFT and MS, respectively. However, in the cow age group between 28 and 32 (18 and 22) months, the estimates of genetic (phenotypic) correlations were 0.05 (0.29), −0.15 (0.24) and 0.38 (0.24), for the respective pairs of traits. These results suggest that genetic, environmental, and phenotypic variations differ depending on cow age, such that care must be taken when ultrasound measurements are applied to selection of cows for meat quality. PMID:25049938

  3. Real-Time Assessment of Tissue Hypoxia In Vivo with Combined Photoacoustics and High-Frequency Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Gerling, Marco; Zhao, Ying; Nania, Salvatore; Norberg, K. Jessica; Verbeke, Caroline S.; Englert, Benjamin; Kuiper, Raoul V.; Bergström, Åsa; Hassan, Moustapha; Neesse, Albrecht; Löhr, J. Matthias; Heuchel, Rainer L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In preclinical cancer studies, non-invasive functional imaging has become an important tool to assess tumor development and therapeutic effects. Tumor hypoxia is closely associated with tumor aggressiveness and is therefore a key parameter to be monitored. Recently, photoacoustic (PA) imaging with inherently co-registered high-frequency ultrasound (US) has reached preclinical applicability, allowing parallel collection of anatomical and functional information. Dual-wavelength PA imaging can be used to quantify tissue oxygen saturation based on the absorbance spectrum differences between hemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. Experimental Design: A new bi-modal PA/US system for small animal imaging was employed to test feasibility and reliability of dual-wavelength PA for measuring relative tissue oxygenation. Murine models of pancreatic and colon cancer were imaged, and differences in tissue oxygenation were compared to immunohistochemistry for hypoxia in the corresponding tissue regions. Results: Functional studies proved feasibility and reliability of oxygenation detection in murine tissue in vivo. Tumor models exhibited different levels of hypoxia in localized regions, which positively correlated with immunohistochemical staining for hypoxia. Contrast-enhanced imaging yielded complementary information on tissue perfusion using the same system. Conclusion: Bimodal PA/US imaging can be utilized to reliably detect hypoxic tumor regions in murine tumor models, thus providing the possibility to collect anatomical and functional information on tumor growth and treatment response live in longitudinal preclinical studies. PMID:24723982

  4. Use of real-time ultrasound to evaluate live animal carcass traits in young performance-tested beef bulls.

    PubMed

    Bergen, R D; McKinnon, J J; Christensen, D A; Kohle, N; Belanger, A

    1997-09-01

    Young bulls were ultrasonically scanned to 1) study breed differences for 12th rib fat depth (USFAT) and longissimus muscle area (USREA), 2) evaluate the nature and predictability of USFAT and USREA development, and 3) determine the effect of age (YFAT and YREA, respectively) or weight (WREA) adjustments on USFAT and USREA. Angus (AA), Charolais (CH), Hereford (HH), Shorthorn (SS), and Simmental (SM) bulls (n = 886) were studied in 2 yr at two stations. Breed differences were observed for end of test USFAT (AA = SS > HH > CH = SM, P < .05) and USREA (CH = SM > SS = AA > HH, P < .05). Within-breed coefficients of variation were 29.8 to 48.4% for end of test USFAT and from 9.0 to 10.8% for end of test USREA. In most bulls, USFAT development was neither linear nor quadratic (P > .05), but USREA development was linear (P < .05). Prediction equations were characterized by low r2 and high residual standard deviation (RSD) values, although those for d-84 USREA had r2 values from .63 to .70 and RSD values from 4.09 to 5.80 cm2. High associations were obtained between end of test USFAT with YFAT (r = .83 to .91, P < .05) and USREA with YREA (r = .74 to .84, P < .05) but not for end of test USREA with WREA (r = .31 to .56, P < .05). These results indicate that end of test ultrasound measurements may be a useful addition to performance testing programs. PMID:9303445

  5. Registration of 2D cardiac images to real-time 3D ultrasound volumes for 3D stress echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, K. Y. Esther; van Stralen, Marijn; Voormolen, Marco M.; van Burken, Gerard; Nemes, Attila; ten Cate, Folkert J.; Geleijnse, Marcel L.; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Reiber, Johan H. C.; Bosch, Johan G.

    2006-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) stress echocardiography is a novel technique for diagnosing cardiac dysfunction, by comparing wall motion of the left ventricle under different stages of stress. For quantitative comparison of this motion, it is essential to register the ultrasound data. We propose an intensity based rigid registration method to retrieve two-dimensional (2D) four-chamber (4C), two-chamber, and short-axis planes from the 3D data set acquired in the stress stage, using manually selected 2D planes in the rest stage as reference. The algorithm uses the Nelder-Mead simplex optimization to find the optimal transformation of one uniform scaling, three rotation, and three translation parameters. We compared registration using the SAD, SSD, and NCC metrics, performed on four resolution levels of a Gaussian pyramid. The registration's effectiveness was assessed by comparing the 3D positions of the registered apex and mitral valve midpoints and 4C direction with the manually selected results. The registration was tested on data from 20 patients. Best results were found using the NCC metric on data downsampled with factor two: mean registration errors were 8.1mm, 5.4mm, and 8.0° in the apex position, mitral valve position, and 4C direction respectively. The errors were close to the interobserver (7.1mm, 3.8mm, 7.4°) and intraobserver variability (5.2mm, 3.3mm, 7.0°), and better than the error before registration (9.4mm, 9.0mm, 9.9°). We demonstrated that the registration algorithm visually and quantitatively improves the alignment of rest and stress data sets, performing similar to manual alignment. This will improve automated analysis in 3D stress echocardiography.

  6. Evaluation of carcass, live, and real-time ultrasound measures in feedlot cattle: I. Assessment of sex and breed effects.

    PubMed

    Hassen, A; Wilson, D E; Rouse, G H

    1999-02-01

    Carcass and live-animal measures from 1,029 cattle were collected at the Iowa State University Rhodes and McNay research farms over a 6-yr period. Data were from bull, heifer, and steer progeny of composite, Angus, and Simmental sires mated to three composite lines of dams. The objectives of this study were to estimate genetic parameters for carcass traits, to evaluate effects of sex and breed of sire on growth models (curves), and to suggest a strategy to adjust serially measured data to a constant age end point. Estimation of genetic parameters using a three-trait mixed model showed differences between bulls and steers in estimates of h2 and genetic correlations. Heritability for carcass weight, percentage of retail product, retail product weight, fat thickness, and longissimus muscle area from bull data were .43, .04, .46, .05, and .21, respectively. The corresponding values for steer data were in order of .32, .24, .40, .42, and .07, respectively. Analysis of serially measured fat thickness, longissimus muscle area, body weight, hip height, and ultrasound percentage of intramuscular fat using a repeated measures model showed a limitation in the use of growth models based on pooled data. In further evaluation of regression parameters using a linear mixed model analysis, sex and breed of sire showed an important (P < .05) effect on intercept and slope values. Regression of serially measured traits on age within animal showed a relatively larger R2 (62 to 98%) and a smaller root mean square error (RMSE, .09 to 8.85) as compared with R2 (0 to 58%) and RMSE (.31 to 67.9) values when the same model was used on pooled data. We concluded that regression parameters from a within-animal regression of a serially measured trait on age, averaged by sex and breed, are the best choice in describing growth and adjusting data to a constant age end point. PMID:10100654

  7. Portable high-intensity focused ultrasound system with 3D electronic steering, real-time cavitation monitoring, and 3D image reconstruction algorithms: a preclinical study in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and accuracy of a new portable ultrasonography-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USg-HIFU) system with a 3-dimensional (3D) electronic steering transducer, a simultaneous ablation and imaging module, real-time cavitation monitoring, and 3D image reconstruction algorithms. Methods: To address the accuracy of the transducer, hydrophones in a water chamber were used to assess the generation of sonic fields. An animal study was also performed in five pigs by ablating in vivo thighs by single-point sonication (n=10) or volume sonication (n=10) and ex vivo kidneys by single-point sonication (n=10). Histological and statistical analyses were performed. Results: In the hydrophone study, peak voltages were detected within 1.0 mm from the targets on the y- and z-axes and within 2.0-mm intervals along the x-axis (z-axis, direction of ultrasound propagation; y- and x-axes, perpendicular to the direction of ultrasound propagation). Twenty-nine of 30 HIFU sessions successfully created ablations at the target. The in vivo porcine thigh study showed only a small discrepancy (width, 0.5-1.1 mm; length, 3.0 mm) between the planning ultrasonograms and the pathological specimens. Inordinate thermal damage was not observed in the adjacent tissues or sonic pathways in the in vivo thigh and ex vivo kidney studies. Conclusion: Our study suggests that this new USg-HIFU system may be a safe and accurate technique for ablating soft tissues and encapsulated organs. PMID:25038809

  8. Feasibility of remote real-time guidance of a cardiac examination performed by novices using a pocket-sized ultrasound device.

    PubMed

    Mai, Tuan V; Ahn, David T; Phillips, Colin T; Agan, Donna L; Kimura, Bruce J

    2013-01-01

    Background. The potential of pocket-sized ultrasound devices (PUDs) to improve global healthcare delivery is limited by the lack of a suitable imaging protocol and trained users. Therefore, we investigated the feasibility of performing a brief, evidence-based cardiac limited ultrasound exam (CLUE) through wireless guidance of novice users. Methods. Three trainees applied PUDs on 27 subjects while directed by an off-site cardiologist to obtain a CLUE to screen for LV systolic dysfunction (LVSD), LA enlargement (LAE), ultrasound lung comets (ULC+), and elevated CVP (eCVP). Real-time remote audiovisual guidance and interpretation by the cardiologist were performed using the iPhone 4/iPod (FaceTime, Apple, Inc.) attached to the PUD and transmitted data wirelessly. Accuracy and technical quality of transmitted images were compared to on-site, gold-standard echo thresholds. Results. Novice versus sonographer imaging yielded technically adequate views in 122/135 (90%) versus 130/135 (96%) (P < 0.05). CLUE's combined SN, SP, and ACC were 0.67, 0.96, and 0.90. Technical adequacy (%) and accuracy for each abnormality (n) were LVSD (85%, 0.93, n = 5), LAE (89%, 0.74, n = 16), ULC+ (100%, 0.94, n = 5), and eCVP (78%, 0.91, n = 1). Conclusion. A novice can perform the CLUE using PUD when wirelessly guided by an expert. This method could facilitate PUD use for off-site bedside medical decision making and triaging of patients. PMID:24024032

  9. Amplitude-modulated ultrasound radiation force combined with phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography for shear wave elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Song, Shaozhen; Arnal, Bastien; Wong, Emily Y.; Shen, Tueng T.; Wang, Ruikang K.; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Tissue stiffness can be measured from the propagation speed of shear waves. Acoustic radiation force (ARF) can generate shear waves by focusing ultrasound in tissue for ~100 μs. Safety considerations and electronics abilities limit ultrasound pressures. We previously presented shear wave elastography combining ARF and phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT) [1]. Here, we use amplitude-modulated ARF to enhance shear wave signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at low pressures. Experiments were performed on tissue-mimicking phantoms. ARF was applied using a single-element transducer, driven by a 7.5 MHz, 3-ms, sine wave modulated in amplitude by a linear-swept frequency (1 to 7 kHz). Pressures between 1 to 3 MPa were tested. Displacements were tracked using PhS-OCT and numerically compressed using pulse compression methods detailed in previous work [2]. SNR was compared to that of 200-μs bursts. Stiffness maps were reconstructed using time-of-flight computations. 200-μs bursts give barely detectable displacements at 1 MPa (3.7 dB SNR). Pulse compression gives 36.2 dB at 1.5 MPa. In all cases with detectable displacements, shear wave speeds were determined in 5%-gelatin and 10%-gelatin phantoms and compared to literature values. Applicability to ocular tissues (cornea, intraocular lens) is under investigation.

  10. Monitoring Radiofrequency Ablation Using Ultrasound Envelope Statistics and Shear Wave Elastography in the Periablation Period: An In Vitro Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Wang, Chiao-Yin; Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wan, Yung-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive method for treating tumors. Shear wave elastography (SWE) has been widely applied in evaluating tissue stiffness and final ablation size after RFA. However, the usefulness of periablation SWE imaging in assessing RFA remains unclear. Therefore, this study investigated the correlation between periablation SWE imaging and final ablation size. An in vitro porcine liver model was used for experimental validation (n = 36). During RFA with a power of 50 W, SWE images were collected using a clinical ultrasound system. To evaluate the effects of tissue temperature and gas bubbles during RFA, changes in the ablation temperature were recorded, and image echo patterns were measured using B-mode and ultrasound statistical parametric images. After RFA, the gross pathology of each tissue sample was compared with the region of change in the corresponding periablation SWE image. The experimental results showed that the tissue temperature at the ablation site varied between 70°C and 100°C. Hyperechoic regions and changes were observed in the echo amplitude distribution induced by gas bubbles. Under this condition, the confounding effects (including the temperature increase, tissue stiffness increase, and presence of gas bubbles) resulted in artifacts in the periablation SWE images, and the corresponding region correlated with the estimated final ablation size obtained from the gross pathology (r = 0.8). The findings confirm the feasibility of using periablation SWE imaging in assessing RFA. PMID:27603012