Science.gov

Sample records for realistic delivery conditions

  1. Synchronized moving aperture radiation therapy (SMART): superimposing tumor motion on IMRT MLC leaf sequences under realistic delivery conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Shi, Chengyu; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-08-01

    Synchronized moving aperture radiation therapy (SMART) has been proposed to account for tumor motions during radiotherapy in prior work. The basic idea of SMART is to synchronize the moving radiation beam aperture formed by a dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) with the tumor motion induced by respiration. In this paper, a two-dimensional (2D) superimposing leaf sequencing method is presented for SMART. A leaf sequence optimization strategy was generated to assure the SMART delivery under realistic delivery conditions. The study of delivery performance using the Varian LINAC and the Millennium DMLC showed that clinical factors such as collimator angle, dose rate, initial phase and machine tolerance affect the delivery accuracy and efficiency. An in-house leaf sequencing software was developed to implement the 2D superimposing leaf sequencing method and optimize the motion-corrected leaf sequence under realistic clinical conditions. The analysis of dynamic log (Dynalog) files showed that optimization of the leaf sequence for various clinical factors can avoid beam hold-offs which break the synchronization of SMART and fail the SMART dose delivery. Through comparison between the simulated delivered fluence map and the planed fluence map, it was shown that the motion-corrected leaf sequence can greatly reduce the dose error.

  2. Performance of Airborne Precision Spacing Under Realistic Wind Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieland, Frederick; Santos, Michel; Krueger, William; Houston, Vincent E.

    2011-01-01

    With the expected worldwide increase of air traffic during the coming decade, both the Federal Aviation Administration s (FAA s) Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen), as well as Eurocontrol s Single European Sky ATM Research (SESAR) program have, as part of their plans, air traffic management solutions that can increase performance without requiring time-consuming and expensive infrastructure changes. One such solution involves the ability of both controllers and flight crews to deliver aircraft to the runway with greater accuracy than is possible today. Previous research has shown that time-based spacing techniques, wherein the controller assigns a time spacing to each pair of arriving aircraft, is one way to achieve this goal by providing greater runway delivery accuracy that produces a concomitant increase in system-wide performance. The research described herein focuses on a specific application of time-based spacing, called Airborne Precision Spacing (APS), which has evolved over the past ten years. This research furthers APS understanding by studying its performance with realistic wind conditions obtained from atmospheric sounding data and with realistic wind forecasts obtained from the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) short-range weather forecast. In addition, this study investigates APS performance with limited surveillance range, as provided by the Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) system, and with an algorithm designed to improve APS performance when an ADS-B signal is unavailable. The results presented herein quantify the runway threshold delivery accuracy of APS un-der these conditions, and also quantify resulting workload metrics such as the number of speed changes required to maintain spacing.

  3. Foreword: In situ gas surface interactions: approaching realistic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, Edvin; Over, Herbert

    2008-03-01

    This special issue is devoted to the application of in situ surface-sensitive techniques in the elucidation of catalysed reactions at (model) catalyst surfaces. Both reaction intermediates and the nature of the catalytically active phase are the targets of these investigations. In situ surface science techniques are also used to study the interaction of water with surfaces under realistic conditions. Since 80% of all technical chemicals are manufactured by utilizing (heterogeneous) catalysis, scientific understanding and technological development of catalysis are of central practical importance in modern society [1]. Heterogeneously catalysed reactions take place at the gas/solid interface. Therefore one of the major topics in surface chemistry and physics is closely related to heterogeneous catalysis, with the aim of developing novel catalysts and to improve catalysts' performances on the basis of atomic scale based knowledge. Despite the economical and environmental rewards—if such a goal is achieved—and despite 40 years of intensive research, practical catalysis is still safely in a black box: the reactivity and selectivity of a catalyst are commercially still optimized on a trial and error basis, applying the high throughput screening approach. The reason for this discrepancy between ambition and reality lies in the inherent complexity of the catalytic system, consisting of the working catalyst and the interaction of the catalyst with the reactant mixture. Practical (solid) catalysts consist of metal or oxide nanoparticles which are dispersed and stabilized on a support and which may be promoted by means of additives. These particles catalyse a reaction in pressures as high as 100 bar. Practical catalysis is in general considered to be far too complex for gaining atomic-scale understanding of the mechanism of the catalysed reaction of an industrial catalyst during its operation. Therefore it has been necessary to introduce idealization and simplification of

  4. Foreword: In situ gas surface interactions: approaching realistic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, Edvin; Over, Herbert

    2008-03-01

    This special issue is devoted to the application of in situ surface-sensitive techniques in the elucidation of catalysed reactions at (model) catalyst surfaces. Both reaction intermediates and the nature of the catalytically active phase are the targets of these investigations. In situ surface science techniques are also used to study the interaction of water with surfaces under realistic conditions. Since 80% of all technical chemicals are manufactured by utilizing (heterogeneous) catalysis, scientific understanding and technological development of catalysis are of central practical importance in modern society [1]. Heterogeneously catalysed reactions take place at the gas/solid interface. Therefore one of the major topics in surface chemistry and physics is closely related to heterogeneous catalysis, with the aim of developing novel catalysts and to improve catalysts' performances on the basis of atomic scale based knowledge. Despite the economical and environmental rewards—if such a goal is achieved—and despite 40 years of intensive research, practical catalysis is still safely in a black box: the reactivity and selectivity of a catalyst are commercially still optimized on a trial and error basis, applying the high throughput screening approach. The reason for this discrepancy between ambition and reality lies in the inherent complexity of the catalytic system, consisting of the working catalyst and the interaction of the catalyst with the reactant mixture. Practical (solid) catalysts consist of metal or oxide nanoparticles which are dispersed and stabilized on a support and which may be promoted by means of additives. These particles catalyse a reaction in pressures as high as 100 bar. Practical catalysis is in general considered to be far too complex for gaining atomic-scale understanding of the mechanism of the catalysed reaction of an industrial catalyst during its operation. Therefore it has been necessary to introduce idealization and simplification of

  5. Boundary conditions towards realistic simulation of jet engine noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhamankar, Nitin S.

    Strict noise regulations at major airports and increasing environmental concerns have made prediction and attenuation of jet noise an active research topic. Large eddy simulation coupled with computational aeroacoustics has the potential to be a significant research tool for this problem. With the emergence of petascale computer clusters, it is now computationally feasible to include the nozzle geometry in jet noise simulations. In high Reynolds number experiments on jet noise, the turbulent boundary layer on the inner surface of the nozzle separates into a turbulent free shear layer. Inclusion of a nozzle with turbulent inlet conditions is necessary to simulate this phenomenon realistically. This will allow a reasonable comparison of numerically computed noise levels with the experimental results. Two viscous wall boundary conditions are implemented for modeling the nozzle walls. A characteristic-based approach is compared with a computationally cheaper, extrapolation-based formulation. In viscous flow over a circular cylinder under two different regimes, excellent agreement is observed between the results of the two approaches. The results agree reasonably well with reference experimental and numerical results. Both the boundary conditions are thus found to be appropriate, the extrapolation-based formulation having an edge with its low cost. This is followed with the crucial step of generation of a turbulent boundary layer inside the nozzle. A digital filter-based turbulent inflow condition, extended in a new way to non-uniform curvilinear grids is implemented to achieve this. A zero pressure gradient flat plate turbulent boundary layer is simulated at a high Reynolds number to show that the method is capable of producing sustained turbulence. The length of the adjustment region necessary for synthetic inlet turbulence to recover from modeling errors is estimated. A low Reynolds number jet simulation including a round nozzle geometry is performed and the method

  6. Lactic acid bacteria as mucosal delivery vehicles: a realistic therapeutic option.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao; Gao, Zeqian; Zhang, Yongguang; Pan, Li

    2016-07-01

    Recombinant lactic acid bacteria (LAB), in particular lactococci and lactobacilli, have gained increasing interest as mucosal delivery vehicles in recent years. With the development of mucosal vaccines, studies on LAB expression systems have been mainly focused on the generation of genetic tools for antigen expression in different locations. Recombinant LAB show advantages in a wide range of aspects over other mucosal delivery systems and represent an attractive candidate for the delivery of therapeutic and prophylactic molecules in different applications. Here, we review the recent data on the use of recombinant LAB as mucosal delivery vectors and the associated health benefits, including the prevention and treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), autoimmune disorders, and infections by pathogenic microorganisms from mucosal surfaces. In addition, we discuss the use of LAB as vehicles to deliver DNA directly to eukaryotic cells. Researches from the last 5 years demonstrate that LAB as vectors for mucosal delivery of therapeutic molecules seem to be a realistic therapeutic option both in human and animal diseases. PMID:27154346

  7. Performance of Airborne Precision Spacing Under Realistic Wind Conditions and Limited Surveillance Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieland, Frederick; Santos, Michel; Krueger, William; Houston, Vincent E.

    2011-01-01

    With the expected worldwide increase of air traffic during the coming decade, both the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen), as well as Eurocontrol's Single European Sky ATM Research (SESAR) program have, as part of their plans, air traffic management (ATM) solutions that can increase performance without requiring time-consuming and expensive infrastructure changes. One such solution involves the ability of both controllers and flight crews to deliver aircraft to the runway with greater accuracy than they can today. Previous research has shown that time-based spacing techniques, wherein the controller assigns a time spacing to each pair of arriving aircraft, can achieve this goal by providing greater runway delivery accuracy and producing a concomitant increase in system-wide performance. The research described herein focuses on one specific application of time-based spacing, called Airborne Precision Spacing (APS), which has evolved over the past ten years. This research furthers APS understanding by studying its performance with realistic wind conditions obtained from atmospheric sounding data and with realistic wind forecasts obtained from the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) short-range weather forecast. In addition, this study investigates APS performance with limited surveillance range, as provided by the Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) system, and with an algorithm designed to improve APS performance when ADS-B surveillance data is unavailable. The results presented herein quantify the runway threshold delivery accuracy of APS under these conditions, and also quantify resulting workload metrics such as the number of speed changes required to maintain spacing.

  8. Simulating Realistic Imaging Conditions For In-Situ Liquid Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Welch, David A.; Faller, Roland; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2013-01-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy enables the imaging of biological cells, macromolecular protein complexes, nanoparticles, and other systems in a near-native environment. In order to improve interpretation of image contrast features and also predict ideal imaging conditions ahead of time, new virtual electron microscopic techniques are needed. A technique for virtual fluid-stage high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy with the multislice method is presented that enables the virtual imaging of model fluid-stage systems composed of millions of atoms. The virtual technique is exemplified by simulating images of PbS nanoparticles under different imaging conditions and the results agree with previous experimental findings. General insight is obtained on the influence of the effects of fluid path length, membrane thickness, nanoparticle position, defocus and other microscope parameters on attainable image quality. PMID:23872040

  9. Simulating realistic imaging conditions for in situ liquid microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, David A.; Faller, Roland; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2013-12-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy enables the imaging of biological cells, macromolecular protein complexes, nanoparticles, and other systems in a near-native environment. In order to improve interpretation of image contrast features and also predict ideal imaging conditions ahead of time, new virtual electron microscopic techniques are needed. A technique for virtual fluid-stage high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy with the multislice method is presented that enables the virtual imaging of model fluid-stage systems composed of millions of atoms. The virtual technique is exemplified by simulating images of PbS nanoparticles under different imaging conditions and the results agree with previous experimental findings. General insight is obtained on the influence of the effects of fluid path length, membrane thickness, nanoparticle position, defocus and other microscope parameters on attainable image quality.

  10. Stereoselective Syntheses of Pentose Sugars Under Realistic Prebiotic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzarello, Sandra; Weber, Arthur L.

    2010-02-01

    Glycolaldehyde and dl-glyceraldehyde reacted in a water-buffered solution under mildly acidic conditions and in the presence of chiral dipeptide catalysts produced pentose sugars whose configuration is affected by the chirality of the catalyst. The chiral effect was found to vary between catalysts and to be largest for di-valine. Lyxose, arabinose, ribose and xylose are formed in different amounts, whose relative proportions do not change significantly with the varying of conditions. With LL-peptide catalysts, ribose was the only pentose sugar to have a significant D-enantiomeric excess ( ee) (≤44%), lyxose displayed an L- ee of ≤66%, arabinose a smaller L- ee of ≤8%, and xylose was about racemic. These data expand our previous findings for tetrose sugars and further substantiate the suggestion that interactions between simple molecules of prebiotic relevance on the early Earth might have included the transfer of chiral asymmetry and advanced molecular evolution.

  11. FORMATION OF TERRESTRIAL PLANETS FROM PROTOPLANETS UNDER A REALISTIC ACCRETION CONDITION

    SciTech Connect

    Kokubo, Eiichiro; Genda, Hidenori E-mail: genda@geo.titech.ac.jp

    2010-05-01

    The final stage of terrestrial planet formation is known as the giant impact stage where protoplanets collide with one another to form planets. So far this stage has been mainly investigated by N-body simulations with an assumption of perfect accretion in which all collisions lead to accretion. However, this assumption breaks for collisions with high velocity and/or a large impact parameter. We derive an accretion condition for protoplanet collisions in terms of impact velocity and angle and masses of colliding bodies, from the results of numerical collision experiments. For the first time, we adopt this realistic accretion condition in N-body simulations of terrestrial planet formation from protoplanets. We compare the results with those with perfect accretion and show how the accretion condition affects terrestrial planet formation. We find that in the realistic accretion model about half of collisions do not lead to accretion. However, the final number, mass, orbital elements, and even growth timescale of planets are barely affected by the accretion condition. For the standard protoplanetary disk model, typically two Earth-sized planets form in the terrestrial planet region over about 10{sup 8} yr in both realistic and perfect accretion models. We also find that for the realistic accretion model, the spin angular velocity is about 30% smaller than that for the perfect accretion model, which is as large as the critical spin angular velocity for rotational instability. The spin angular velocity and obliquity obey Gaussian and isotropic distributions, respectively, independently of the accretion condition.

  12. Use of a realistic breathing lung phantom to evaluate dose delivery errors

    SciTech Connect

    Court, Laurence E.; Seco, Joao; Lu Xingqi; Ebe, Kazuyu; Mayo, Charles; Ionascu, Dan; Winey, Brian; Giakoumakis, Nikos; Aristophanous, Michalis; Berbeco, Ross; Rottman, Joerg; Bogdanov, Madeleine; Schofield, Deborah; Lingos, Tania

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the effect of respiration-induced motion on delivered dose (the interplay effect) for different treatment techniques under realistic clinical conditions. Methods: A flexible resin tumor model was created using rapid prototyping techniques based on a computed tomography (CT) image of an actual tumor. Twenty micro-MOSFETs were inserted into the tumor model and the tumor model was inserted into an anthropomorphic breathing phantom. Phantom motion was programed using the motion trajectory of an actual patient. A four-dimensional CT image was obtained and several treatment plans were created using different treatment techniques and planning systems: Conformal (Eclipse), step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) (Pinnacle), step-and-shoot IMRT (XiO), dynamic IMRT (Eclipse), complex dynamic IMRT (Eclipse), hybrid IMRT [60% conformal, 40% dynamic IMRT (Eclipse)], volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) [single-arc (Eclipse)], VMAT [double-arc (Eclipse)], and complex VMAT (Eclipse). The complex plans were created by artificially pushing the optimizer to give complex multileaf collimator sequences. Each IMRT field was irradiated five times and each VMAT field was irradiated ten times, with each irradiation starting at a random point in the respiratory cycle. The effect of fractionation was calculated by randomly summing the measured doses. The maximum deviation for each measurement point per fraction and the probability that 95% of the model tumor had dose deviations less than 2% and 5% were calculated as a function of the number of fractions. Tumor control probabilities for each treatment plan were calculated and compared. Results: After five fractions, measured dose deviations were less than 2% for more than 95% of measurement points within the tumor model for all plans, except the complex dynamic IMRT, step-and-shoot IMRT (XiO), complex VMAT, and single-arc VMAT plans. Reducing the dose rate of the complex IMRT plans from 600 to 200 MU

  13. An additional condition for Bell experiments for accepting local realistic theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Koji; Nakamura, Tadao

    2013-12-01

    We assume that one source of two uncorrelated spin-carrying particles emits them in a state, which can be described as a spin-1/2 bipartite pure uncorrelated state. We consider a Bell-Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (Bell-CHSH) experiment with two-orthogonal-settings. We propose an additional condition for the state to be reproducible by the property of local realistic theories. We use the proposed measurement theory in order to construct the additional condition (Nagata and Nakamura in Int J Theor Phys 49:162, 2010). The condition is that local measurement outcome is . Otherwise, such an experiment does not allow for the existence of local realistic theories even in the situation that all Bell-CHSH inequalities hold. Also we derive new set of Bell inequalities when local measurement outcome is.

  14. 48 CFR 552.270-17 - Delivery and Condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Delivery and Condition. 552.270-17 Section 552.270-17 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION... Delivery and Condition. As prescribed in 570.603, insert the following clause: Delivery and Condition...

  15. Simulation Evaluation of Controller-Managed Spacing Tools under Realistic Operational Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callantine, Todd J.; Hunt, Sarah M.; Prevot, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Controller-Managed Spacing (CMS) tools have been developed to aid air traffic controllers in managing high volumes of arriving aircraft according to a schedule while enabling them to fly efficient descent profiles. The CMS tools are undergoing refinement in preparation for field demonstration as part of NASA's Air Traffic Management (ATM) Technology Demonstration-1 (ATD-1). System-level ATD-1 simulations have been conducted to quantify expected efficiency and capacity gains under realistic operational conditions. This paper presents simulation results with a focus on CMS-tool human factors. The results suggest experienced controllers new to the tools find them acceptable and can use them effectively in ATD-1 operations.

  16. Numerical investigation of aerosolized drug delivery in the human lungs under mechanical ventilator conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanrhein, Timothy; Banerjee, Arindam

    2010-11-01

    Particle deposition for aerosolized drug delivery in the human airways is heavily dependent upon flow conditions. Numerical modeling techniques have proven valuable for determining particle deposition characteristics under steady flow conditions. For the case of patients under mechanical ventilation, however, flow conditions change drastically and there is an increased importance to understand particle deposition characteristics. This study focuses on mechanically ventilated conditions in the upper trachea-bronchial (TB) region of the human airways. Solution of the continuous phase flow is done under ventilator waveform conditions with a suitable turbulence model in conjunction with a realistic model of upper TB airways. A discrete phase Euler-Lagrange approach is applied to solve for particle deposition characteristics with a focus on the effect of the ventilator inlet waveform. The purpose of this study is to accurately model flow conditions in the upper TB airways under mechanically ventilated conditions with a focus on real-time patient specific targeted aerosolized drug delivery.

  17. Simple computer program to model 3-dimensional underground heat flow with realistic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, P. D.

    A FORTRAN computer program called GROCS (GRound Coupled Systems) has been developed to study 3-dimensional underground heat flow. Features include the use of up to 30 finite elements or blocks of Earth which interact via finite difference heat flow equations and a subprogram which sets realistic time and depth dependent boundary conditions. No explicit consideration of mositure movement or freezing is given. GROCS has been used to model the thermal behavior of buried solar heat storage tanks (with and without insulation) and serpentine pipe fields for solar heat pump space conditioning systems. The program is available independently or in a form compatible with specially written TRNSYS component TYPE subroutines. The approach taken in the design of GROCS, the mathematics contained and the program architecture, are described. Then, the operation of the stand-alone version is explained. Finally, the validity of GROCS is discussed.

  18. Conditions for production of interdisciplinary teamwork outcomes in oncology teams: protocol for a realist evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interdisciplinary teamwork (ITW) is designed to promote the active participation of several disciplines in delivering comprehensive cancer care to patients. ITW provides mechanisms to support continuous communication among care providers, optimize professionals’ participation in clinical decision-making within and across disciplines, and foster care coordination along the cancer trajectory. However, ITW mechanisms are not activated optimally by all teams, resulting in a gap between desired outcomes of ITW and actual outcomes observed. The aim of the present study is to identify the conditions underlying outcome production by ITW in local oncology teams. Methods This retrospective multiple case study will draw upon realist evaluation principles to explore associations among context, mechanisms and outcomes (CMO). The cases are nine interdisciplinary cancer teams that participated in a previous study evaluating ITW outcomes. Qualitative data sources will be used to construct a picture of CMO associations in each case. For data collection, reflexive focus groups will be held to capture patients’ and professionals’ perspectives on ITW, using the guiding question, ‘What works, for whom, and under what circumstances?’ Intra-case analysis will be used to trace associations between context, ITW mechanisms, and patient outcomes. Inter-case analysis will be used to compare the different cases’ CMO associations for a better understanding of the phenomenon under study. Discussion This multiple case study will use realist evaluation principles to draw lessons about how certain contexts are more or less likely to produce particular outcomes. The results will make it possible to target more specifically the actions required to optimize structures and to activate the best mechanisms to meet the needs of cancer patients. This project could also contribute significantly to the development of improved research methods for conducting realist evaluations of

  19. Deriving realistic source boundary conditions for a CFD simulation of concentrations in workroom air.

    PubMed

    Feigley, Charles E; Do, Thanh H; Khan, Jamil; Lee, Emily; Schnaufer, Nicholas D; Salzberg, Deborah C

    2011-05-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used increasingly to simulate the distribution of airborne contaminants in enclosed spaces for exposure assessment and control, but the importance of realistic boundary conditions is often not fully appreciated. In a workroom for manufacturing capacitors, full-shift samples for isoamyl acetate (IAA) were collected for 3 days at 16 locations, and velocities were measured at supply grills and at various points near the source. Then, velocity and concentration fields were simulated by 3-dimensional steady-state CFD using 295K tetrahedral cells, the k-ε turbulence model, standard wall function, and convergence criteria of 10(-6) for all scalars. Here, we demonstrate the need to represent boundary conditions accurately, especially emission characteristics at the contaminant source, and to obtain good agreement between observations and CFD results. Emission rates for each day were determined from six concentrations measured in the near field and one upwind using an IAA mass balance. The emission was initially represented as undiluted IAA vapor, but the concentrations estimated using CFD differed greatly from the measured concentrations. A second set of simulations was performed using the same IAA emission rates but a more realistic representation of the source. This yielded good agreement with measured values. Paying particular attention to the region with highest worker exposure potential-within 1.3 m of the source center-the air speed and IAA concentrations estimated by CFD were not significantly different from the measured values (P = 0.92 and P = 0.67, respectively). Thus, careful consideration of source boundary conditions greatly improved agreement with the measured values. PMID:21422277

  20. Dynamic fluid loss in hydraulic fracturing under realistic shear conditions in high-permeability rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Navarrete, R.C.; Cawiezel, K.E.; Constien, V.G.

    1996-08-01

    A study of the dynamic fluid loss of hydraulic fracturing fluids under realistic shear conditions is presented. During a hydraulic fracturing treatment, a polymeric solution is pumped under pressure down the well to create and propagate a fracture. Part of the fluid leaks into the rock formation, leaving a skin layer of polymer or polymer filter cake, at the rock surface or in the pore space. This study focuses on the effects of shear rate and permeability on dynamic fluid-loss behavior of crosslinked and linear fracturing gels. Previous studies of dynamic fluid loss have mainly been with low-permeability cores and constant shear rates. Here, the effect of shear history and fluid-loss additive on the dynamic leakoff of high-permeability cores is examined.

  1. Blood brain barrier: An overview on strategies in drug delivery, realistic in vitro modeling and in vivo live tracking.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Pawan Kumar; Sharma, Ashok Kumar; Gupta, Umesh

    2016-01-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) is a group of astrocytes, neurons and endothelial cells, which makes restricted passage of various biological or chemical entities to the brain tissue. It gives protection to brain at one hand, but at the other hand it has very selective permeability for bio-actives and other foreign materials and is one of the major challenges for the drug delivery. Nanocarriers are promising to cross BBB utilizing alternative route of administration such as intranasal and intra-carotid drug delivery which bypasses BBB. In future more optimized drug delivery system can be achieved by compiling the best routes with the best carriers. Single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and different brain-on-a-chip in vitro models are being very reliable to study live in vivo tracking of BBB and its pathophysiology, respectively. In the current review we have tried to exploit mechanistically all these to understand and manage the various BBB disruptions in diseased condition along with crossing the hurdles occurring in drug or gene delivery across BBB. PMID:27141418

  2. Can low energy electrons lead to strand breaks in DNA under realistic conditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohanoff, Jorge; Smyth, Maeve

    2012-02-01

    It is widely accepted that low energy electrons produced by ionizing radiation play an important role in causing DNA damage [B. Bouda"iffa et al., Science 287, 1658 (2000)]. Understanding the behaviour of DNA components in the condensed phase due to such electrons is a fundamental step towards modelling this damage within a realistic environment. Here we present a computational study of the effect of low energy electrons in condensed phase models of solvated DNA fragments. First we show that excess electrons, which are initially found delocalized, quickly localize around the nucleobases within a 15 fs time scale. Energies and time scales are comparable for each of the bases [M. Smyth and J. Kohanoff, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 238108 (2011)]. The phosphodiester bond C3'-O3', which under normal conditions is very stable, weakens significantly upon electron attachment both, in the gas and in the condensed phase. Computation of free energy profiles show that barriers for bond cleavage are in the region of 5-8 kcal/mol for all the solvated nucleotides, thus suggesting that this kind of event is quite likely at ambient temperature. This supports the notion that ionizing radiation can actually lead to DNA strand breaks in the physiological environment.

  3. Understanding the motivation and performance of community health volunteers involved in the delivery of health programmes in Kampala, Uganda: a realist evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Vareilles, Gaëlle; Marchal, Bruno; Kane, Sumit; Petrič, Taja; Pictet, Gabriel; Pommier, Jeanine

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This paper presents the results of a realist evaluation that aimed to understand how, why and under what circumstances a Red Cross (RC) capacity-building intervention influences the motivation and the performance of RC community health volunteers involved in the delivery of an immunisation programme in Kampala, Uganda. Method Given the complexity of the intervention, we adopted realist evaluation as our methodological approach and the case study as our study design. Data collection included document review, participant observation and interviews. The constant comparative method was used for the analysis. Two contrasted cases were selected within the five Kampala districts. Each case covers the management of the immunisation programme implemented at a RC branch. In each case, a programme manager and 15 RC volunteers were interviewed. The selection of the volunteers was purposive. Results We found that a capacity-building programme including supervision supportive of autonomy, skills and knowledge enhancement, and adapted to the different subgroups of volunteers, leads to satisfaction of the three key drivers of volunteer motivation: feelings of autonomy, competence and connectedness. This contributes to higher retention, and better task performance and well-being among the volunteers. Enabling contextual conditions include the responsiveness of the Uganda Red Cross Society (URCS) to community needs, and recognition of the work of the volunteers, from the URCS and the community. Conclusions A management approach that caters for the different motivational states and changing needs of the volunteers will lead to better performance. The findings will inform not only the management of community health volunteers, but also the management of all kinds of health workers. PMID:26525721

  4. A comparison of spent fuel shipping cask response to 10 CFR 71 normal conditions and realistic hot day extremes

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, S.J.; Gianoulakis, S.E.

    1994-04-01

    An examination of the effect of a realistic (though conservative) hot day environment on the thermal transient behavior of spent fuel shipping casks is made. These results are compared to those that develop under the prescribed normal thermal condition of 10 CFR 71. Of specific concern are the characteristics of propagating thermal waves, which are set up by diurnal variations of temperature and insolation in the outdoor environment. In order to arrive at a realistic approximation of these variations on a conservative hot day, actual temperature and insolation measurements have been obtained from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) for representatively hot and high heat flux days. Thus, the use of authentic meteorological data ensures the realistic approach sought. Further supporting the desired realism of the modeling effort is the use of realistic cask configurations in which multiple laminations of structural, shielding, and other materials are expected to attenuate the propagating thermal waves. The completed analysis revealed that the majority of wall temperatures, for a wide variety of spent fuel shipping cask configurations, fall well below those predicted by enforcement of the regulatory environmental conditions of 10 CFR 71. It was found that maximum temperatures at the cask surface occasionally lie above temperatures predicted under the prescribed regulatory conditions. However, the temperature differences are small enough that the normal conservative assumptions that are made in the course of typical cask evaluations should correct for any potential violations. The analysis demonstrates that diurnal temperature variations that penetrate the cask wall all have maxima substantially less than the corresponding regulatory solutions. Therefore it is certain that vital cask components and the spent fuel itself will not exceed the temperatures calculated by use of the conditions of 10 CFR 71.

  5. The NetVISA automatic association tool. Next generation software testing and performance under realistic conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bras, Ronan; Arora, Nimar; Kushida, Noriyuki; Tomuta, Elena; Kebede, Fekadu; Feitio, Paulino

    2016-04-01

    The CTBTO's International Data Centre is in the process of developing the next generation software to perform the automatic association step. The NetVISA software uses a Bayesian approach with a forward physical model using probabilistic representations of the propagation, station capabilities, background seismicity, noise detection statistics, and coda phase statistics. The software has been in development for a few years and is now reaching the stage where it is being tested in a realistic operational context. An interactive module has been developed where the NetVISA automatic events that are in addition to the Global Association (GA) results are presented to the analysts. We report on a series of tests where the results are examined and evaluated by seasoned analysts. Consistent with the statistics previously reported (Arora et al., 2013), the first test shows that the software is able to enhance analysis work by providing additional event hypothesis for consideration by analysts. A test on a three-day data set was performed and showed that the system found 42 additional real events out of 116 examined, including 6 that pass the criterion for the Reviewed Event Bulletin of the IDC. The software was functional in a realistic, real-time mode, during the occurrence of the fourth nuclear test claimed by the Democratic People's Republic of Korea on January 6th, 2016. Confirming a previous statistical observation, the software found more associated stations (51, including 35 primary stations) than GA (36, including 26 primary stations) for this event. Nimar S. Arora, Stuart Russell, Erik Sudderth. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (BSSA) April 2013, vol. 103 no. 2A pp709-729.

  6. Predicting electromyographic signals under realistic conditions using a multiscale chemo–electro–mechanical finite element model

    PubMed Central

    Mordhorst, Mylena; Heidlauf, Thomas; Röhrle, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel multiscale finite element-based framework for modelling electromyographic (EMG) signals. The framework combines (i) a biophysical description of the excitation–contraction coupling at the half-sarcomere level, (ii) a model of the action potential (AP) propagation along muscle fibres, (iii) a continuum-mechanical formulation of force generation and deformation of the muscle, and (iv) a model for predicting the intramuscular and surface EMG. Owing to the biophysical description of the half-sarcomere, the model inherently accounts for physiological properties of skeletal muscle. To demonstrate this, the influence of membrane fatigue on the EMG signal during sustained contractions is investigated. During a stimulation period of 500 ms at 100 Hz, the predicted EMG amplitude decreases by 40% and the AP propagation velocity decreases by 15%. Further, the model can take into account contraction-induced deformations of the muscle. This is demonstrated by simulating fixed-length contractions of an idealized geometry and a model of the human tibialis anterior muscle (TA). The model of the TA furthermore demonstrates that the proposed finite element model is capable of simulating realistic geometries, complex fibre architectures, and can include different types of heterogeneities. In addition, the TA model accounts for a distributed innervation zone, different fibre types and appeals to motor unit discharge times that are based on a biophysical description of the α motor neurons. PMID:25844148

  7. Predicting field-scale dispersion under realistic conditions with the polar Markovian velocity process model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dünser, Simon; Meyer, Daniel W.

    2016-06-01

    In most groundwater aquifers, dispersion of tracers is dominated by flow-field inhomogeneities resulting from the underlying heterogeneous conductivity or transmissivity field. This effect is referred to as macrodispersion. Since in practice, besides a few point measurements the complete conductivity field is virtually never available, a probabilistic treatment is needed. To quantify the uncertainty in tracer concentrations from a given geostatistical model for the conductivity, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is typically used. To avoid the excessive computational costs of MC, the polar Markovian velocity process (PMVP) model was recently introduced delivering predictions at about three orders of magnitude smaller computing times. In artificial test cases, the PMVP model has provided good results in comparison with MC. In this study, we further validate the model in a more challenging and realistic setup. The setup considered is derived from the well-known benchmark macrodispersion experiment (MADE), which is highly heterogeneous and non-stationary with a large number of unevenly scattered conductivity measurements. Validations were done against reference MC and good overall agreement was found. Moreover, simulations of a simplified setup with a single measurement were conducted in order to reassess the model's most fundamental assumptions and to provide guidance for model improvements.

  8. Capture Conditions for Merging Trajectory Segments to Model Realistic Aircraft Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Yiyuan; Slattery, Rhonda A.

    1996-01-01

    A typical commercial aircraft trajectory consists of a series of flight segments. An aircraft switches from one segment to another when certain specified variables reach their desired values. Trajectory synthesis for air traffic control automation must be consistent with practical pilot procedures. We examine capture conditions for merging trajectory segments to model commercial aircraft descent in trajectory synthesis. These conditions translate into bounds on measurements of atmospheric wind, pressure, and temperature. They also define ranges of thrust and drag feasible for a descent trajectory. Capture conditions are derived for the Center-TRACON Automation System developed at NASA Ames Research Center for automated air traffic control. Various uses of capture conditions are discussed. A Boeing 727-200 aircraft is used to provide numerical examples of capture conditions.

  9. Relevant influence of limestone crystallinity on CO₂ capture in the Ca-looping technology at realistic calcination conditions.

    PubMed

    Valverde, J M; Sanchez-Jimenez, P E; Perez-Maqueda, L A

    2014-08-19

    We analyze the role of limestone crystallinity on its CO2 capture performance when subjected to carbonation/calcination cycles at conditions mimicking the Ca-looping (CaL) technology for postcombustion CO2 capture. The behavior of raw and pretreated limestones (milled and thermally annealed) is investigated by means of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) tests under realistic sorbent regeneration conditions, which necessarily involve high CO2 partial pressure in the calciner and quick heating rates. The pretreatments applied lead to contrasting effects on the solid crystal structure and, therefore, on its resistance to solid-state diffusion. Our results show that decarbonation at high CO2 partial pressure is notably promoted by decreasing solid crystallinity. CaO regeneration is fully achieved under high CO2 partial pressure at 900 °C in short residence times for the milled limestone whereas complete regeneration for raw limestone requires a minimum calcination temperature of about 950 °C. Such a reduction of the calcination temperature and the consequent mitigation of multicyclic capture capacity decay would serve to enhance the efficiency of the CaL technology. On the other hand, the results of our study suggest that the use of highly crystalline limestones would be detrimental since excessively high calcination temperatures should be required to attain full decarbonation at realistic conditions. PMID:25029532

  10. On the consequences of a realistic conditional covariance in MMM-calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorge, Stefan; Günter, Sibylle; Röpke, Gerd

    1999-02-01

    The model microfield method (MMM) may be used to include the effect of ion motion in line shape calculations. This kind of modelling of the time evolution of the microfield as a stochastic process, as is done in this method, yields a short time behaviour of the conditional covariance of the model microfield, which differs considerably from a conditional covariance calculated by considering the real motion of the plasma ions (microscopic conditional covariance). In this work purely ionic broadened hydrogen 0953-4075/32/3/011/img6 profiles are calculated using the microscopic conditional covariance within the MMM. It is shown that, depending on the reduced radiator-perturber mass, these MMM calculations may lead to unphysical line shapes. For comparison, hydrogen 0953-4075/32/3/011/img6 profiles derived within the MMM using the kangaroo process and from line shape simulations are given.

  11. Understanding the motivation and performance of community health volunteers involved in the delivery of health programmes in Kampala, Uganda: a realist evaluation protocol

    PubMed Central

    Vareilles, Gaëlle; Pommier, Jeanine; Kane, Sumit; Pictet, Gabriel; Marchal, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The recruitment of community health volunteers to support the delivery of health programmes is a well-established approach in many countries, particularly where health services are not readily available. However, studies on management of volunteers are scarce and current research on human resource management of volunteers faces methodological challenges. This paper presents the protocol of a realist evaluation that aims at identifying the factors influencing the performance of community health volunteers involved in the delivery of a Red Cross immunisation programme in Kampala (Uganda) with a specific focus on motivation. Methods and analysis The realist evaluation cycle structures the protocol. To develop the theoretical basis for the evaluation, the authors conducted interviews and reviewed the literature on community health volunteers’ performance, management and organisational behaviour. This led to the formulation of the initial programme theory, which links the intervention inputs (capacity-building strategies) to the expected outcomes (positive work behaviour) with mechanisms that point in the direction of drivers of motivation. The contextual elements include components such as organisational culture, resource availability, etc. A case study design will be adopted. We define a case as a Red Cross branch, run by a programme manager, and will select two cases at the district level in Kampala. Mixed methods will be used in data collection, including individual interviews of volunteers, participant observation and document review. The thematic analysis will be based on the initial programme theory and will seek for context-mechanism-outcome configurations. Findings from the two cases will be compared. Discussion We discuss the scope for applying realist evaluation and the methodological challenges we encountered in developing this protocol. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the Ethical Committee at Rennes University Hospital

  12. The stability of solar coronal loops with realistic photospheric boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hoven, G.; Ma, S. S.; Einaudi, G.

    1981-01-01

    Finite-length effects are the primary influence for the MHD stability of coronal loops. This paper gives a new physical description of the photospheric boundary conditions, and the first complete and uniformly convergent initial-perturbation set. A general energy-principle (or variational) stability analysis is then developed. The results of this calculation show that large classes of cylindrical-symmetry perturbations, those with separable contributions to the energy integral, are completely stable. Comparisons are also made with other more restrictive formulations of this problem.

  13. Does therapeutic writing help people with long-term conditions? Systematic review, realist synthesis and economic considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Nyssen, Olga P; Taylor, Stephanie Jc; Wong, Geoff; Steed, Elizabeth; Bourke, Liam; Lord, Joanne; Ross, Carol A; Hayman, Sheila; Field, Victoria; Higgins, Ailish; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Meads, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Writing therapy to improve physical or mental health can take many forms. The most researched model of therapeutic writing (TW) is unfacilitated, individual expressive writing (written emotional disclosure). Facilitated writing activities are less widely researched. DATA SOURCES Databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Linguistics and Language Behaviour Abstracts, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, were searched from inception to March 2013 (updated January 2015). REVIEW METHODS Four TW practitioners provided expert advice. Study procedures were conducted by one reviewer and checked by a second. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and non-randomised comparative studies were included. Quality was appraised using the Cochrane risk-of-bias tool. Unfacilitated and facilitated TW studies were analysed separately under International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision chapter headings. Meta-analyses were performed where possible using RevMan version 5.2.6 (RevMan 2012, The Cochrane Collaboration, The Nordic Cochrane Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark). Costs were estimated from a UK NHS perspective and three cost-consequence case studies were prepared. Realist synthesis followed Realist and Meta-narrative Evidence Synthesis: Evolving Standards guidelines. OBJECTIVES To review the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of TW for people with long-term conditions (LTCs) compared with no writing, or other controls, reporting any relevant clinical outcomes. To conduct a realist synthesis to understand how TW might work, and for whom. RESULTS From 14,658 unique citations, 284 full-text papers were reviewed and 64 studies (59 RCTs) were included in the final effectiveness reviews. Five studies examined facilitated TW; these were extremely heterogeneous with unclear or high risk of bias but suggested that facilitated TW interventions may be beneficial in individual LTCs. Unfacilitated

  14. Balancing student/trainee learning with the delivery of patient care in the healthcare workplace: a protocol for realist synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sholl, Sarah; Ajjawi, Rola; Allbutt, Helen; Butler, Jane; Jindal-Snape, Divya; Morrison, Jill; Rees, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A national survey was recently conducted to explore medical education research priorities in Scotland. The identified themes and underlying priority areas can be linked to current medical education drivers in the UK. The top priority area rated by stakeholders was: ‘Understanding how to balance service and training conflicts’. Despite its perceived importance, a preliminary scoping exercise revealed the least activity with respect to published literature reviews. This protocol has therefore been developed so as to understand how patient care, other service demands and student/trainee learning can be simultaneously facilitated within the healthcare workplace. The review will identify key interventions designed to balance patient care and student/trainee learning, to understand how and why such interventions produce their effects. Our research questions seek to address how identified interventions enable balanced patient care-trainee learning within the healthcare workplace, for whom, why and under what circumstances. Methods and analysis Pawson's five stages for undertaking a realist review underpin this protocol. These stages may progress in a non-linear fashion due to the iterative nature of the review process. We will: (1) clarify the scope of the review, identifying relevant interventions and existing programme theories, understanding how interventions act to produce their intended outcomes; (2) search journal articles and grey literature for empirical evidence from 1998 (introduction of the European Working Time Directive) on the UK multidisciplinary team working concerning these interventions, theories and outcomes, using databases such as ERIC, Scopus and CINAHL; (3) assess study quality; (4) extract data; and (5) synthesise data, drawing conclusions. Ethics and dissemination A formal ethical review is not required. These findings should provide an important understanding of how workplace-based interventions influence the balance of trainee

  15. 43 CFR 418.28 - Conditions of delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... deliveries. If water is delivered to ineligible land or in excess of the appropriate water duty then: (1) The... year to determine the amount of water required to enable the delivery of full entitlements at... District or individual water users....

  16. 43 CFR 418.28 - Conditions of delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... deliveries. If water is delivered to ineligible land or in excess of the appropriate water duty then: (1) The... year to determine the amount of water required to enable the delivery of full entitlements at... District or individual water users....

  17. 43 CFR 418.28 - Conditions of delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... deliveries. If water is delivered to ineligible land or in excess of the appropriate water duty then: (1) The... year to determine the amount of water required to enable the delivery of full entitlements at... District or individual water users....

  18. 43 CFR 418.28 - Conditions of delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... deliveries. If water is delivered to ineligible land or in excess of the appropriate water duty then: (1) The... year to determine the amount of water required to enable the delivery of full entitlements at... District or individual water users....

  19. Improvement in Simulation of Eurasian Winter Climate Variability with a Realistic Arctic Sea Ice Condition in an Atmospheric GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Young-Kwon; Ham, Yoo-Geun; Jeong, Jee-Hoon; Kug, Jong-Seong

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates how much a realistic Arctic sea ice condition can contribute to improve simulation of the winter climate variation over the Eurasia region. Model experiments are set up using different sea ice boundary conditions over the past 24 years (i.e., 1988-2011). One is an atmospheric model inter-comparison (AMIP) type of run forced with observed sea-surface temperature (SST), sea ice, and greenhouse gases (referred to as Exp RSI), and the other is the same as Exp RSI except for the sea ice forcing, which is a repeating climatological annual cycle (referred to as Exp CSI). Results show that Exp RSI produces the observed dominant pattern of Eurasian winter temperatures and their interannual variation better than Exp CSI (correlation difference up to approx. 0.3). Exp RSI captures the observed strong relationship between the sea ice concentration near the Barents and Kara seas and the temperature anomaly across Eurasia, including northeastern Asia, which is not well captured in Exp CSI. Lagged atmospheric responses to sea ice retreat are examined using observations to understand atmospheric processes for the Eurasian cooling response including the Arctic temperature increase, sea-level pressure increase, upper-level jet weakening and cold air outbreak toward the mid-latitude. The reproducibility of these lagged responses by Exp RSI is also evaluated.

  20. Experimental analysis of the vorticity and turbulent flow dynamics of a pitching airfoil at realistic flight (helicopter) conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Dipankar

    Improved basic understanding, predictability, and controllability of vortex-dominated and unsteady aerodynamic flows are important in enhancement of the performance of next generation helicopters. The primary objective of this research project was improved understanding of the fundamental vorticity and turbulent flow physics for a dynamically stalling airfoil at realistic helicopter flight conditions. An experimental program was performed on a large-scale (C = 0.45 m) dynamically pitching NACA 0012 wing operating in the Texas A&M University large-scale wind tunnel. High-resolution particle image velocimetry data were acquired on the first 10-15% of the wing. Six test cases were examined including the unsteady (k>0) and steady (k=0) conditions. The relevant mechanical, shear and turbulent time-scales were all of comparable magnitude, which indicated that the flow was in a state of mechanical non-equilibrium, and the expected flow separation and reattachment hystersis was observed. Analyses of the databases provided new insights into the leading-edge Reynolds stress structure and the turbulent transport processes. Both of which were previously uncharacterized. During the upstroke motion of the wing, a bubble structure formed in the leading-edge Reynolds shear stress. The size of the bubble increased with increasing angle-of-attack before being diffused into a shear layer at full separation. The turbulent transport analyses indicated that the axial stress production was positive, where the transverse production was negative. This implied that axial turbulent stresses were being produced from the axial component of the mean flow. A significant portion of the energy was transferred to the transverse stress through the pressure-strain redistribution, and then back to the transverse mean flow through the negative transverse production. An opposite trend was observed further downstream of this region.

  1. Toxicokinetics of perfluorooctane sulfonate in birds under environmentally realistic exposure conditions and development of a kinetic predictive model.

    PubMed

    Tarazona, J V; Rodríguez, C; Alonso, E; Sáez, M; González, F; San Andrés, M D; Jiménez, B; San Andrés, M I

    2015-01-22

    This article describes the toxicokinetics of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in birds under low repeated dosing, equivalent to 0.085 μg/kg per day, representing environmentally realistic exposure conditions. The best fitting was provided by a simple pseudo monocompartmental first-order kinetics model, regulated by two rates, with a pseudo first-order dissipation half-life of 230 days, accounting for real elimination as well as binding of PFOS to non-exchangeable structures. The calculated assimilation efficiency was 0.66 with confidence intervals of 0.64 and 0.68. The model calculations confirmed that the measured maximum concentrations were still far from the steady state situation, which for this dose regime, was estimated at a value of about 65 μg PFOS/L serum achieved after a theoretical 210 weeks continuous exposure. The results confirm a very different kinetics than that observed in single-dose experiments confirming clear dose-related differences in apparent elimination rates in birds, as described for humans and monkeys; suggesting that a capacity-limited saturable process should also be considered in the kinetic behavior of PFOS in birds. Pseudo first-order kinetic models are highly convenient and frequently used for predicting bioaccumulation of chemicals in livestock and wildlife; the study suggests that previous bioaccumulation models using half-lives obtained at high doses are expected to underestimate the biomagnification potential of PFOS. The toxicokinetic parameters presented here can be used for higher-tier bioaccumulation estimations of PFOS in chickens and as surrogate values for modeling PFOS kinetics in wild bird species. PMID:25445721

  2. Development of a versatile experimental setup for the evaluation of the photocatalytic properties of construction materials under realistic outdoor conditions.

    PubMed

    Suárez, S; Portela, R; Hernández-Alonso, M D; Sánchez, B

    2014-10-01

    samples at the same time. The suitability of the system for the evaluation of the DeNO x properties of construction elements at realistic outdoor conditions was demonstrated. The designed experimental device can be used 24/7 for testing materials under real fluctuations of NO x concentration, temperature, UV irradiation, and relative humidity and the presence of other outdoor air pollutants such as VOCs, SO x , or NH3. The chamber-based design allows comparing a photocatalytic material with respect to a reference substrate without the photoactive phase, or even the comparison of several outdoor elements at the same time. PMID:24652575

  3. 7 CFR 27.47 - Tender or delivery of cotton; conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tender or delivery of cotton; conditions. 27.47... CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Cotton Class Certificates § 27.47 Tender or delivery of cotton; conditions. Subject to the provisions of §§ 27.52 through...

  4. 7 CFR 27.47 - Tender or delivery of cotton; conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tender or delivery of cotton; conditions. 27.47... CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Cotton Class Certificates § 27.47 Tender or delivery of cotton; conditions. Subject to the provisions of §§ 27.52 through...

  5. 7 CFR 27.47 - Tender or delivery of cotton; conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tender or delivery of cotton; conditions. 27.47... CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Cotton Class Certificates § 27.47 Tender or delivery of cotton; conditions. Subject to the provisions of §§ 27.52 through...

  6. 7 CFR 27.47 - Tender or delivery of cotton; conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tender or delivery of cotton; conditions. 27.47... CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Cotton Class Certificates § 27.47 Tender or delivery of cotton; conditions. Subject to the provisions of §§ 27.52 through...

  7. 7 CFR 27.47 - Tender or delivery of cotton; conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tender or delivery of cotton; conditions. 27.47... CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Cotton Class Certificates § 27.47 Tender or delivery of cotton; conditions. Subject to the provisions of §§ 27.52 through...

  8. 50 CFR Table 3a to Part 680 - Crab Delivery Condition Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Crab Delivery Condition Codes 3a Table 3a... ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 3a Table 3a to Part 680—Crab Delivery Condition Codes Code Description 01 Whole crab, live. 79 Deadloss....

  9. 50 CFR Table 3a to Part 680 - Crab Delivery Condition Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Crab Delivery Condition Codes 3a Table 3a... ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 3a Table 3a to Part 680—Crab Delivery Condition Codes Code Description 01 Whole crab, live. 79 Deadloss....

  10. 50 CFR Table 3a to Part 680 - Crab Delivery Condition Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Crab Delivery Condition Codes 3a Table 3a... ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 3a Table 3a to Part 680—Crab Delivery Condition Codes Code Description 01 Whole crab, live. 79 Deadloss....

  11. 50 CFR Table 3a to Part 680 - Crab Delivery Condition Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Crab Delivery Condition Codes 3a Table 3a... ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 3a Table 3a to Part 680—Crab Delivery Condition Codes Code Description 01 Whole crab, live. 79 Deadloss....

  12. 50 CFR Table 3a to Part 680 - Crab Delivery Condition Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Crab Delivery Condition Codes 3a Table 3a to Part 680 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 3a Table 3a to Part 680—Crab Delivery Condition Codes Code...

  13. 43 CFR 418.28 - Conditions of delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... efficiency. To the extent that the actual District efficiency determined for an irrigation season is greater... discretionary use in accordance with state law. (2) Less efficient—Debited or added to Lahontan storage as an... deliveries. If water is delivered to ineligible land or in excess of the appropriate water duty then: (1)...

  14. Optical filter highlighting spectral features part II: quantitative measurements of cosmetic foundation and assessment of their spatial distributions under realistic facial conditions.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Ken; Nakamura, Mutsuko; Matsumoto, Masayuki; Tanno, Osamu; Nakauchi, Shigeki

    2011-03-28

    We previously proposed a filter that could detect cosmetic foundations with high discrimination accuracy [Opt. Express 19, 6020 (2011)]. This study extends the filter's functionality to the quantification of the amount of foundation and applies the filter for the assessment of spatial distributions of foundation under realistic facial conditions. Human faces that are applied with quantitatively controlled amounts of cosmetic foundations were measured using the filter. A calibration curve between pixel values of the image and the amount of foundation was created. The optical filter was applied to visualize spatial foundation distributions under realistic facial conditions, which clearly indicated areas on the face where foundation remained even after cleansing. Results confirm that the proposed filter could visualize and nondestructively inspect the foundation distributions. PMID:21451627

  15. Assessment of tbe Performance of Ablative Insulators Under Realistic Solid Rocket Motor Operating Conditions (a Doctoral Dissertation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Heath Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Ablative insulators are used in the interior surfaces of solid rocket motors to prevent the mechanical structure of the rocket from failing due to intense heating by the high-temperature solid-propellant combustion products. The complexity of the ablation process underscores the need for ablative material response data procured from a realistic solid rocket motor environment, where all of the potential contributions to material degradation are present and in their appropriate proportions. For this purpose, the present study examines ablative material behavior in a laboratory-scale solid rocket motor. The test apparatus includes a planar, two-dimensional flow channel in which flat ablative material samples are installed downstream of an aluminized solid propellant grain and imaged via real-time X-ray radiography. In this way, the in-situ transient thermal response of an ablator to all of the thermal, chemical, and mechanical erosion mechanisms present in a solid rocket environment can be observed and recorded. The ablative material is instrumented with multiple micro-thermocouples, so that in-depth temperature histories are known. Both total heat flux and thermal radiation flux gauges have been designed, fabricated, and tested to characterize the thermal environment to which the ablative material samples are exposed. These tests not only allow different ablative materials to be compared in a realistic solid rocket motor environment but also improve the understanding of the mechanisms that influence the erosion behavior of a given ablative material.

  16. An automated dynamic chamber system for the laboratory simulation of soil biogenic nitric oxide emissions under realistic ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W. X.; Trebs, I.; Ashuri, F.; Meixner, F. X.; van Dijk, S.; Lehmann, L.; Welling, M.

    2003-04-01

    The effects of (a) realistic ambient nitric oxide (NO) mixing ratios, (b) soil moisture, (c) soil temperature, and (c) soil nutrient availability on the emission and uptake of NO from and to soils respectively can be simulated by our laboratory dynamic chamber system. Four measurement chambers with soil samples as well as one reference (control) chamber made of polyacrylic glass are flushed continuously with air at a rate of 2.5 l min-1. The chambers are placed in a thermostat cabinet to control the soil temperature (0--30^oC). Inverted gas drying tubes are introduced into the system to maintain soil moisture at prescribed, but constant levels (0% to field capacity). A gas dilution system provides various NO mixing ratios (0--200 ppb). With this set-up we investigated production and consumption processes, as well as compensation mixing ratios of NO in soil samples as functions of soil moisture and temperature, soil nutrient concentrations, and ambient NO mixing ratio. NO emission /uptake fluxes are calculated from soil production and consumption rates with the help of the Galbally &Johansson algorithm (Galbally &Johansson, 1989). We will present a detailed description of the system, examples of derived results, as well as validation of the up-scaling procedures of chamber results to the field-size levels (South African, Brazilian, and Mid European ecosystems).

  17. System-state and operating condition sensitive control method and apparatus for electric power delivery systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, III, William Wesley (Inventor); Wilson, Thomas George (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a method and apparatus for determining a precise switching sequence for the power switching elements of electric power delivery systems of the on-off switching type and which enables extremely fast transient response, precise regulation and highly stable operation. The control utilizes the values of the power delivery system power handling network components, a desired output characteristic, a system timing parameter, and the externally imposed operating conditions to determine where steady state operations should be in order to yield desired output characteristics for the given system specifications. The actual state of the power delivery system is continuously monitored and compared to a state-space boundary which is derived from the desired equilibrium condition, and from the information obtained from this comparison, the system is moved to the desired equilibrium condition in one cycle of switching control. Since the controller continuously monitors the power delivery system's externally imposed operating conditions, a change in the conditions is immediately sensed and a new equilibrium condition is determined and achieved, again in a single cycle of switching control.

  18. Toxicokinetics of perfluorooctane sulfonate in rabbits under environmentally realistic exposure conditions and comparative assessment between mammals and birds.

    PubMed

    Tarazona, J V; Rodríguez, C; Alonso, E; Sáez, M; González, F; San Andrés, M D; Jiménez, B; San Andrés, M I

    2016-01-22

    This article describes the toxicokinetics of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in rabbits under low repeated dosing, equivalent to 0.085μg/kg per day, and the observed differences between rabbits and chickens. The best fitting for both species was provided by a simple pseudo monocompartmental first-order kinetics model, regulated by two rates, and accounting for real elimination as well as binding of PFOS to non-exchangeable structures. Elimination was more rapid in rabbits, with a pseudo first-order dissipation half-life of 88 days compared to the 230 days observed for chickens. By contrast, the calculated assimilation efficiency for rabbits was almost 1, very close to full absorption, significantly higher than the 0.66 with confidence intervals of 0.64 and 0.68 observed for chickens. The results confirm a very different kinetics than that observed in single-dose experiments confirming clear dose-related differences in apparent elimination rates in rabbits, as previously described for humans and other mammals; suggesting the role of a capacity-limited saturable process resulting in different kinetic behaviours for PFOS in high dose versus environmentally relevant low dose exposure conditions. The model calculations confirmed that the measured maximum concentrations were still far from the steady state situation, and that the different kinetics between birds and mammals should may play a significant role in the biomagnifications assessment and potential exposure for humans and predators. For the same dose regime, the steady state concentration was estimated at about 36μg PFOS/L serum for rabbits, slightly above one-half of the 65μg PFOS/L serum estimated for chickens. The toxicokinetic parameters presented here can be used for higher-tier bioaccumulation estimations of PFOS in rabbits and chickens as starting point for human health exposure assessments and as surrogate values for modeling PFOS kinetics in wild mammals and bird in exposure assessment of predatory

  19. 50 CFR Table 1a to Part 679 - Delivery Condition* and Product Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Delivery Condition* and Product Codes 1a Table 1a to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE...

  20. 50 CFR Table 1a to Part 679 - Delivery Condition* and Product Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Delivery Condition* and Product Codes 1a Table 1a to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE...

  1. 50 CFR Table 1a to Part 679 - Delivery Condition* and Product Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Delivery Condition* and Product Codes 1a Table 1a to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 1a Table 1a...

  2. 7 CFR 735.110 - Conditions for delivery of agricultural products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... product stored or handled in the warehouse on a demand made by: (1) The holder of the warehouse receipt... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Conditions for delivery of agricultural products. 735.110 Section 735.110 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM...

  3. 7 CFR 735.110 - Conditions for delivery of agricultural products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... product stored or handled in the warehouse on a demand made by: (1) The holder of the warehouse receipt... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Conditions for delivery of agricultural products. 735.110 Section 735.110 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM...

  4. 7 CFR 735.110 - Conditions for delivery of agricultural products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... product stored or handled in the warehouse on a demand made by: (1) The holder of the warehouse receipt... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Conditions for delivery of agricultural products. 735.110 Section 735.110 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM...

  5. 7 CFR 735.110 - Conditions for delivery of agricultural products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... product stored or handled in the warehouse on a demand made by: (1) The holder of the warehouse receipt... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Conditions for delivery of agricultural products. 735.110 Section 735.110 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM...

  6. 7 CFR 735.110 - Conditions for delivery of agricultural products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS FOR WAREHOUSES REGULATIONS FOR THE UNITED STATES WAREHOUSE ACT Warehouse Licensing § 735.110 Conditions for delivery of agricultural products. (a) In the absence of a lawful excuse, a warehouse operator will, without unnecessary delay, deliver the...

  7. Multi-Physics Feedback Simulations with Realistic Initial Conditions of the Formation of Star Clusters: From Large Scale Magnetized Clouds to Turbulent Clumps to Cores to Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, R. I.; Li, P.; McKee, C. F.

    2015-10-01

    Multi-physics zoom-in adaptive mesh refinement simulations with feedback and realistic initial conditions, starting from large scale turbulent molecular clouds through the formation of clumps and cores to the formation os stellar clusters are presented. I give a summary of results at the different scales undergoing gravitational collapse from cloud to core to cluster formation. Detailed comparisons with observations are made at each stage of the simulations. In particular, properties of the magnetized clumps are compared with recent observations of Crutcher et al. 2010 and Crutcher 2012 and the magnetic field orientation in cloud clumps relative to the global mean field of the inter-cloud medium (Li et al. 2009). The Initial Mass Function (IMF) obtained is compared with the Chabrier IMF and the protostellar mass function of the cluster is compared with different theories.

  8. Holdup measurements under realistic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sprinkel, J.K. Jr.; Marshall, R.; Russo, P.A.; Siebelist, R.

    1997-11-01

    This paper reviews the documentation of the precision and bias of holdup (residual nuclear material remaining in processing equipment) measurements and presents previously unreported results. Precision and bias results for holdup measurements are reported from training seminars with simulated holdup, which represent the best possible results, and compared to actual plutonium processing facility measurements. Holdup measurements for plutonium and uranium processing plants are also compared to reference values. Recommendations for measuring holdup are provided for highly enriched uranium facilities and for low enriched uranium facilities. The random error component of holdup measurements is less than the systematic error component. The most likely factor in measurement error is incorrect assumptions about the measurement, such as background, measurement geometry, or signal attenuation. Measurement precision on the order of 10% can be achieved with some difficulty. Bias of poor quality holdup measurement can also be improved. However, for most facilities, holdup measurement errors have no significant impact on inventory difference, sigma, or safety (criticality, radiation, or environmental); therefore, it is difficult to justify the allocation of more resources to improving holdup measurements. 25 refs., 10 tabs.

  9. Influence of a compost layer on the attenuation of 28 selected organic micropollutants under realistic soil aquifer treatment conditions: insights from a large scale column experiment.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Mario; Kröger, Kerrin Franziska; Nödler, Karsten; Ayora, Carlos; Carrera, Jesús; Hernández, Marta; Licha, Tobias

    2015-05-01

    Soil aquifer treatment is widely applied to improve the quality of treated wastewater in its reuse as alternative source of water. To gain a deeper understanding of the fate of thereby introduced organic micropollutants, the attenuation of 28 compounds was investigated in column experiments using two large scale column systems in duplicate. The influence of increasing proportions of solid organic matter (0.04% vs. 0.17%) and decreasing redox potentials (denitrification vs. iron reduction) was studied by introducing a layer of compost. Secondary effluent from a wastewater treatment plant was used as water matrix for simulating soil aquifer treatment. For neutral and anionic compounds, sorption generally increases with the compound hydrophobicity and the solid organic matter in the column system. Organic cations showed the highest attenuation. Among them, breakthroughs were only registered for the cationic beta-blockers atenolol and metoprolol. An enhanced degradation in the columns with organic infiltration layer was observed for the majority of the compounds, suggesting an improved degradation for higher levels of biodegradable dissolved organic carbon. Solely the degradation of sulfamethoxazole could clearly be attributed to redox effects (when reaching iron reducing conditions). The study provides valuable insights into the attenuation potential for a wide spectrum of organic micropollutants under realistic soil aquifer treatment conditions. Furthermore, the introduction of the compost layer generally showed positive effects on the removal of compounds preferentially degraded under reducing conditions and also increases the residence times in the soil aquifer treatment system via sorption. PMID:25723339

  10. Designing field-controllable graphene-dot-graphene single molecule switches: A quantum-theoretical proof-of-concept under realistic operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejov, Ljupčo; Petreska, Irina; Kocarev, Ljupčo

    2015-12-01

    A theoretical proof of the concept that a particularly designed graphene-based moletronics device, constituted by two semi-infinite graphene subunits, acting as source and drain electrodes, and a central benzenoid ring rotator (a "quantum dot"), could act as a field-controllable molecular switch is outlined and analyzed with the density functional theory approach. Besides the ideal (0 K) case, we also consider the operation of such a device under realistic operating (i.e., finite-temperature) conditions. An in-depth insight into the physics behind device controllability by an external field was gained by thorough analyses of the torsional potential of the dot under various conditions (absence or presence of an external gating field with varying strength), computing the torsional correlation time and transition probabilities within the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound formalism. Both classical and quantum mechanical tunneling contributions to the intramolecular rotation were considered in the model. The main idea that we put forward in the present study is that intramolecular rotors can be controlled by the gating field even in cases when these groups do not possess a permanent dipole moment (as in cases considered previously by us [I. Petreska et al., J. Chem. Phys. 134, 014708-1-014708-12 (2011)] and also by other groups [P. E. Kornilovitch et al., Phys. Rev. B 66, 245413-1-245413-7 (2002)]). Consequently, one can control the molecular switching properties by an external electrostatic field utilizing even nonpolar intramolecular rotors (i.e., in a more general case than those considered so far). Molecular admittance of the currently considered graphene-based molecular switch under various conditions is analyzed employing non-equilibrium Green's function formalism, as well as by analysis of frontier molecular orbitals' behavior.

  11. Designing field-controllable graphene-dot-graphene single molecule switches: A quantum-theoretical proof-of-concept under realistic operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Pejov, Ljupčo; Petreska, Irina; Kocarev, Ljupčo

    2015-12-28

    A theoretical proof of the concept that a particularly designed graphene-based moletronics device, constituted by two semi-infinite graphene subunits, acting as source and drain electrodes, and a central benzenoid ring rotator (a "quantum dot"), could act as a field-controllable molecular switch is outlined and analyzed with the density functional theory approach. Besides the ideal (0 K) case, we also consider the operation of such a device under realistic operating (i.e., finite-temperature) conditions. An in-depth insight into the physics behind device controllability by an external field was gained by thorough analyses of the torsional potential of the dot under various conditions (absence or presence of an external gating field with varying strength), computing the torsional correlation time and transition probabilities within the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound formalism. Both classical and quantum mechanical tunneling contributions to the intramolecular rotation were considered in the model. The main idea that we put forward in the present study is that intramolecular rotors can be controlled by the gating field even in cases when these groups do not possess a permanent dipole moment (as in cases considered previously by us [I. Petreska et al., J. Chem. Phys. 134, 014708-1-014708-12 (2011)] and also by other groups [P. E. Kornilovitch et al., Phys. Rev. B 66, 245413-1-245413-7 (2002)]). Consequently, one can control the molecular switching properties by an external electrostatic field utilizing even nonpolar intramolecular rotors (i.e., in a more general case than those considered so far). Molecular admittance of the currently considered graphene-based molecular switch under various conditions is analyzed employing non-equilibrium Green's function formalism, as well as by analysis of frontier molecular orbitals' behavior. PMID:26723699

  12. Designing field-controllable graphene-dot-graphene single molecule switches: A quantum-theoretical proof-of-concept under realistic operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pejov, Ljupčo; Petreska, Irina; Kocarev, Ljupčo

    2015-12-28

    A theoretical proof of the concept that a particularly designed graphene-based moletronics device, constituted by two semi-infinite graphene subunits, acting as source and drain electrodes, and a central benzenoid ring rotator (a “quantum dot”), could act as a field-controllable molecular switch is outlined and analyzed with the density functional theory approach. Besides the ideal (0 K) case, we also consider the operation of such a device under realistic operating (i.e., finite-temperature) conditions. An in-depth insight into the physics behind device controllability by an external field was gained by thorough analyses of the torsional potential of the dot under various conditions (absence or presence of an external gating field with varying strength), computing the torsional correlation time and transition probabilities within the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound formalism. Both classical and quantum mechanical tunneling contributions to the intramolecular rotation were considered in the model. The main idea that we put forward in the present study is that intramolecular rotors can be controlled by the gating field even in cases when these groups do not possess a permanent dipole moment (as in cases considered previously by us [I. Petreska et al., J. Chem. Phys. 134, 014708-1–014708-12 (2011)] and also by other groups [P. E. Kornilovitch et al., Phys. Rev. B 66, 245413-1–245413-7 (2002)]). Consequently, one can control the molecular switching properties by an external electrostatic field utilizing even nonpolar intramolecular rotors (i.e., in a more general case than those considered so far). Molecular admittance of the currently considered graphene-based molecular switch under various conditions is analyzed employing non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism, as well as by analysis of frontier molecular orbitals’ behavior.

  13. Ce K edge XAS of ceria-based redox materials under realistic conditions for the two-step solar thermochemical dissociation of water and/or CO2.

    PubMed

    Rothensteiner, Matthäus; Sala, Simone; Bonk, Alexander; Vogt, Ulrich; Emerich, Hermann; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2015-10-28

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to characterise ceria-based materials under realistic conditions present in a reactor for solar thermochemical two-step water and carbon dioxide splitting. A setup suitable for in situ measurements in transmission mode at the cerium K edge from room temperature up to 1773 K is presented. Time-resolved X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) data, collected for a 10 mol% hafnium-doped ceria sample (Ce0.9Hf0.1O2-δ) during reduction at 1773 K in a flow of inert gas and during re-oxidation by CO2 at 1073 K, enables the quantitative determination of the non-stoichiometry δ of the fluorite-type structure. XANES analysis suggests the formation of the hexagonal Ce2O3 phase upon reduction in 2% hydrogen/helium at 1773 K. We discuss the experimental limitations and possibilities of high-temperature in situ XAS at edges of lower energy as well as the importance of the technique for understanding and improving the properties of ceria-based oxygen storage materials for thermochemical solar energy conversion. PMID:26412705

  14. Sintering and reactivity of CaCO{sub 3}-based sorbents for in situ CO{sub 2} capture in fluidized beds under realistic calcination conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, D.Y.; Hughes, R.W.; Anthony, E.J.; Manovic, V.

    2009-06-15

    Sintering during calcination/carbonation may introduce substantial economic penalties for a CO{sub 2} looping cycle using limestone/dolomite-derived sorbents. Cyclic carbonation and calcination reactions were investigated for CO{sub 2} capture under fluidized bed combustion (FBC) conditions. The cyclic carbonation characteristics of CaCO{sub 3}-derived sorbents were compared at various calcination temperatures (700-925{sup o} C) and different gas stream compositions: pure -2 and a realistic calciner environment where high concentrations of CO{sub 2}>80-90% are expected. The conditions during carbonation were 700 {sup o}C and 15% CO{sub 2} in N{sub 2} and 0.18% or 0.50% SO{sub 2} in selected tests. Up to 20 calcination/carbonation cycles were conducted using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) apparatus. Three Canadian limestones were tested: Kelly Rock, Havelock, and Cadomin, using a prescreened particle size range of 400-650 {mu} m. Calcined Kelly Rock and Cadomin samples were hydrated by steam and examined. Sorbent reactivity was reduced whenever SO{sub 2} was introduced to either the calcining or carbonation streams. The multicyclic capture capacity of CaO for CO{sub 2} was substantially reduced at high concentrations of CO{sub 2} during the sorbent regeneration process and carbonation conversion of the Kelly Rock sample obtained after 20 cycles was only 10.5%. Hydrated sorbents performed better for CO{sub 2} capture but showed deterioration following calcination in high CO{sub 2} gas streams indicating that high CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} levels in the gas stream lead to lower CaO conversion because of enhanced sintering and irreversible formation of CaSO{sub 4}.

  15. Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Enthusiasm greeted the development of synthetic organic insecticides in the mid-twentieth century, only to see this give way to dismay and eventually scepticism and outright opposition by some. Regardless of how anyone feels about this issue, insecticides and other pesticides have become indispensable, which creates something of a dilemma. Possibly as a result of the shift in public attitude towards insecticides, genetic engineering of microbes was first met with scepticism and caution among scientists. Later, the development of genetically modified crop plants was met with an attitude that hardened into both acceptance and hard-core resistance. Transgenic insects, which came along at the dawn of the twenty-first century, encountered an entrenched opposition. Those of us responsible for studying the protection of crops have been affected more or less by these protagonist and antagonistic positions, and the experiences have often left one thoughtfully mystified as decisions are made by non-participants. Most of the issues boil down to concerns over delivery mechanisms. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry PMID:23852646

  16. Particulate Matter from Both Heavy Fuel Oil and Diesel Fuel Shipping Emissions Show Strong Biological Effects on Human Lung Cells at Realistic and Comparable In Vitro Exposure Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Dilger, Marco; Paur, Hanns-Rudolf; Schlager, Christoph; Mülhopt, Sonja; Diabaté, Silvia; Weiss, Carsten; Stengel, Benjamin; Rabe, Rom; Harndorf, Horst; Torvela, Tiina; Jokiniemi, Jorma K.; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; BéruBé, Kelly A.; Wlodarczyk, Anna J.; Prytherch, Zoë; Michalke, Bernhard; Krebs, Tobias; Prévôt, André S. H.; Kelbg, Michael; Tiggesbäumker, Josef; Karg, Erwin; Jakobi, Gert; Scholtes, Sorana; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Lintelmann, Jutta; Matuschek, Georg; Sklorz, Martin; Klingbeil, Sophie; Orasche, Jürgen; Richthammer, Patrick; Müller, Laarnie; Elsasser, Michael; Reda, Ahmed; Gröger, Thomas; Weggler, Benedikt; Schwemer, Theo; Czech, Hendryk; Rüger, Christopher P.; Abbaszade, Gülcin; Radischat, Christian; Hiller, Karsten; Buters, Jeroen T. M.; Dittmar, Gunnar; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Background Ship engine emissions are important with regard to lung and cardiovascular diseases especially in coastal regions worldwide. Known cellular responses to combustion particles include oxidative stress and inflammatory signalling. Objectives To provide a molecular link between the chemical and physical characteristics of ship emission particles and the cellular responses they elicit and to identify potentially harmful fractions in shipping emission aerosols. Methods Through an air-liquid interface exposure system, we exposed human lung cells under realistic in vitro conditions to exhaust fumes from a ship engine running on either common heavy fuel oil (HFO) or cleaner-burning diesel fuel (DF). Advanced chemical analyses of the exhaust aerosols were combined with transcriptional, proteomic and metabolomic profiling including isotope labelling methods to characterise the lung cell responses. Results The HFO emissions contained high concentrations of toxic compounds such as metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and were higher in particle mass. These compounds were lower in DF emissions, which in turn had higher concentrations of elemental carbon (“soot”). Common cellular reactions included cellular stress responses and endocytosis. Reactions to HFO emissions were dominated by oxidative stress and inflammatory responses, whereas DF emissions induced generally a broader biological response than HFO emissions and affected essential cellular pathways such as energy metabolism, protein synthesis, and chromatin modification. Conclusions Despite a lower content of known toxic compounds, combustion particles from the clean shipping fuel DF influenced several essential pathways of lung cell metabolism more strongly than particles from the unrefined fuel HFO. This might be attributable to a higher soot content in DF. Thus the role of diesel soot, which is a known carcinogen in acute air pollution-induced health effects should be further investigated. For the

  17. Disparity profiles in 3DV applications: overcoming the issue of heterogeneous viewing conditions in stereoscopic delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisson, Guillaume; Chamaret, Christel

    2012-03-01

    More and more numerous 3D movies are released each year. Thanks to the current spread of 3D-TV displays, these 3D Video (3DV) contents are about to enter massively the homes. Yet viewing conditions determine the stereoscopic features achievable for 3DV material. Because the conditions at home - screen size and distance to screen - differ significantly from a theater, 3D Cinema movies need to be repurposed before broadcast and replication on 3D Blu-ray Discs for being fully enjoyed at home. In that paper we tackle that particular issue of how to handle the variety of viewing conditions in stereoscopic contents delivery. To that extend we first investigate what is basically at stake for granting stereoscopic viewers' comfort, through the well-known - and sometimes dispraised - vergence-accommodation conflict. Thereby we define a set of basic rules that can serve as guidelines for 3DV creation. We propose disparity profiles as new requirements for 3DV production and repurposing. Meeting proposed background and foreground constraints prevents from visual fatigue, and occupying the whole depth budget available grants optimal 3D effects. We present an efficient algorithm for automatic disparity-based 3DV retargeting depending on the viewing conditions. Variants are proposed depending on the input format (stereoscopic binocular content or depth-based format) and the level of complexity achievable.

  18. Effect of delivery condition on desorption rate of ZrCo metal hydride bed for fusion fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, H.G.; Yun, S.H.; Chung, D.; Oh, Y.H.; Chang, M.H.; Cho, S.; Chung, H.; Song, K.M.

    2015-03-15

    For the safety of fusion fuel cycle, hydrogen isotope gases including tritium are stored as metal hydride form. To satisfy fueling requirement of fusion machine, rapid delivery from metal hydride bed is one of major factors for the development of tritium storage and delivery system. Desorption from metal hydride depends on the operation scenario by pressure and temperature control of the bed. The effect of operation scenario and pump performance on desorption rate of metal hydride bed was experimentally investigated using ZrCo bed. The results showed that the condition of pre-heating scenario before actual delivery of gas affected the delivery performance. Different pumps were connected to desorption line from bed and the effect of pump capacity on desorption rate were also found to be significant. (authors)

  19. Highly stable and degradable multifunctional microgel for self-regulated insulin delivery under physiological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinjie; Lü, Shaoyu; Gao, Chunmei; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Mingzhu

    2013-06-01

    The response to glucose, pH and temperature, high drug loading capacity, self-regulated drug delivery and degradation in vivo are simultaneously probable by applying a multifunctional microgel under a rational design in a colloid chemistry method. Such multifunctional microgels are fabricated with N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm), (2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and 3-acrylamidephenylboronic acid (AAPBA) through a precipitation emulsion method and cross-linked by reductive degradable N,N'-bis(arcyloyl)cystamine (BAC). This novel kind of microgel with a narrow size distribution (~250 nm) is suitable for diabetes because it can adapt to the surrounding medium of different glucose concentrations over a clinically relevant range (0-20 mM), control the release of preloaded insulin and is highly stable under physiological conditions (pH 7.4, 0.15 M NaCl, 37 °C). When synthesized multifunctional microgels regulate drug delivery, they gradually degrade as time passes and, as a result, show enhanced biocompatibility. This exhibits a new proof-of-concept for diabetes treatment that takes advantage of the properties of each building block from a multifunctional micro-object. These highly stable and versatile multifunctional microgels have the potential to be used for self-regulated therapy and monitoring of the response to treatment, or even simultaneous diagnosis as nanobiosensors.The response to glucose, pH and temperature, high drug loading capacity, self-regulated drug delivery and degradation in vivo are simultaneously probable by applying a multifunctional microgel under a rational design in a colloid chemistry method. Such multifunctional microgels are fabricated with N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm), (2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and 3-acrylamidephenylboronic acid (AAPBA) through a precipitation emulsion method and cross-linked by reductive degradable N,N'-bis(arcyloyl)cystamine (BAC). This novel kind of microgel with a narrow size

  20. Performance of an ARC-enabled computing grid for ATLAS/LHC physics analysis and Monte Carlo production under realistic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samset, B. H.; Cameron, D.; Ellert, M.; Filipcic, A.; Gronager, M.; Kleist, J.; Maffioletti, S.; Ould-Saada, F.; Pajchel, K.; Read, A. L.; Taga, A.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2010-04-01

    A significant amount of the computing resources available to the ATLAS experiment at the LHC are connected via the ARC grid middleware. ATLAS ARC-enabled resources, which consist of both major computing centers at the Tier-1 level and lesser, local clusters at Tier-2 and 3 level, have shown excellent performance running heavy Monte Carlo (MC) production for the experiment. However, with the imminent arrival of LHC physics data, it is imperative that the deployed grid middlewares also can handle data access patterns caused by user-defined physics analysis. These user-defined jobs can have radically different demands than systematic, centrally controlled MC production. We report on the performance of the ARC middleware, as deployed for ATLAS, for realistic situations with concurrent MC production and physics analysis running on the same resources. Data access patterns for ATLAS MC and physics analysis grid jobs will be shown, together with the performance of various possible storage and file staging models.

  1. Realistic collective nuclear Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Dufour, M.; Zuker, A.P.

    1996-10-01

    The residual part of the realistic forces{emdash}obtained after extracting the monopole terms responsible for bulk properties{emdash}is strongly dominated by pairing and quadrupole interactions, with important {sigma}{tau}{center_dot}{sigma}{tau}, octupole, and hexadecapole contributions. Their forms retain the simplicity of the traditional pairing plus multipole models, while eliminating their flaws through a normalization mechanism dictated by a universal {ital A}{sup {minus}1/3} scaling. Coupling strengths and effective charges are calculated and shown to agree with empirical values. Comparisons between different realistic interactions confirm the claim that they are very similar. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. Realistic and Schematic Visuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heuvelman, Ard

    1996-01-01

    A study examined three different visual formats (studio presenter only, realistic visuals, or schematic visuals) of an educational television program. Recognition and recall of the abstract subject matter were measured in 101 adult viewers directly after the program and 3 months later. The schematic version yielded better recall of the program,…

  3. The Educational Value of Visual Cues and 3D-Representational Format in a Computer Animation under Restricted and Realistic Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huk, Thomas; Steinke, Mattias; Floto, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Within the framework of cognitive learning theories, instructional design manipulations have primarily been investigated under tightly controlled laboratory conditions. We carried out two experiments, where the first experiment was conducted in a restricted system-paced setting and is therefore in line with the majority of empirical studies in the…

  4. Simulation of realistic retinoscopic measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Bo; Chen, Ying-Ling; Baker, K.; Lewis, J. W.; Swartz, T.; Jiang, Y.; Wang, M.

    2007-03-01

    Realistic simulation of ophthalmic measurements on normal and diseased eyes is presented. We use clinical data of ametropic and keratoconus patients to construct anatomically accurate three-dimensional eye models and simulate the measurement of a streak retinoscope with all the optical elements. The results show the clinical observations including the anomalous motion in high myopia and the scissors reflex in keratoconus. The demonstrated technique can be applied to other ophthalmic instruments and to other and more extensively abnormal eye conditions. It provides promising features for medical training and for evaluating and developing ocular instruments.

  5. Implantation of Miniosmotic Pumps and Delivery of Tract Tracers to Study Brain Reorganization in Pathophysiological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Mendoza, Eduardo H; Carballo, Jeismar; Longart, Marines; Hermann, Dirk M; Doeppner, Thorsten R

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment in animal models of cerebral disease imposes the problem of repeated injection protocols that may induce stress in animals and result in impermanent tissue levels of the drug. Additionally, drug delivery to the brain is delicate due to the blood brain barrier (BBB), thus significantly reducing intracerebral concentrations of selective drugs after systemic administration. Therefore, a system that allows both constant drug delivery without peak levels and circumvention of the BBB is in order to achieve sufficiently high intracerebral concentrations of drugs that are impermeable to the BBB. In this context, miniosmotic pumps represent an ideal system for constant drug delivery at a fixed known rate that eludes the problem of daily injection stress in animals and that may also be used for direct brain delivery of drugs. Here, we describe a method for miniosmotic pump implantation and post operatory care that should be given to animals in order to successfully apply this technique. We embed the aforementioned experimental paradigm in standard procedures that are used for studying neuroplasticity within the brain of C57BL6 mice. Thus, we exposed animals to 30 min brain infarct and implanted with miniosmotic pumps connected to the skull via a cannula in order to deliver a pro-plasticity drug. Behavioral testing was done during 30 days of treatment. After removal the animals received injections of anterograde tract tracers to analyze neuronal plasticity in the chronic phase of recovery. Results indicated that neuroprotection by the delivered drug was accompanied with increase in motor fibers crossing the midline of the brain at target structures. The results affirm the value of these techniques for drug administration and brain plasticity studies in modern neuroscience. PMID:26863287

  6. Implantation of Miniosmotic Pumps and Delivery of Tract Tracers to Study Brain Reorganization in Pathophysiological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Mendoza, Eduardo H.; Carballo, Jeismar; Longart, Marines; Hermann, Dirk M.; Doeppner, Thorsten R.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment in animal models of cerebral disease imposes the problem of repeated injection protocols that may induce stress in animals and result in impermanent tissue levels of the drug. Additionally, drug delivery to the brain is delicate due to the blood brain barrier (BBB), thus significantly reducing intracerebral concentrations of selective drugs after systemic administration. Therefore, a system that allows both constant drug delivery without peak levels and circumvention of the BBB is in order to achieve sufficiently high intracerebral concentrations of drugs that are impermeable to the BBB. In this context, miniosmotic pumps represent an ideal system for constant drug delivery at a fixed known rate that eludes the problem of daily injection stress in animals and that may also be used for direct brain delivery of drugs. Here, we describe a method for miniosmotic pump implantation and post operatory care that should be given to animals in order to successfully apply this technique. We embed the aforementioned experimental paradigm in standard procedures that are used for studying neuroplasticity within the brain of C57BL6 mice. Thus, we exposed animals to 30 min brain infarct and implanted with miniosmotic pumps connected to the skull via a cannula in order to deliver a pro-plasticity drug. Behavioral testing was done during 30 days of treatment. After removal the animals received injections of anterograde tract tracers to analyze neuronal plasticity in the chronic phase of recovery. Results indicated that neuroprotection by the delivered drug was accompanied with increase in motor fibers crossing the midline of the brain at target structures. The results affirm the value of these techniques for drug administration and brain plasticity studies in modern neuroscience. PMID:26863287

  7. A realistic lattice example

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Garren, A.A.

    1985-10-01

    A realistic, distributed interaction region (IR) lattice has been designed that includes new components discussed in the June 1985 lattice workshop. Unlike the test lattices, the lattice presented here includes utility straights and the mechanism for crossing the beams in the experimental straights. Moreover, both the phase trombones and the dispersion suppressors contain the same bending as the normal cells. Vertically separated beams and 6 Tesla, 1-in-1 magnets are assumed. Since the cells are 200 meters long, and have 60 degree phase advance, this lattice has been named RLD1, in analogy with the corresponding test lattice, TLD1. The quadrupole gradient is 136 tesla/meter in the cells, and has similar values in other quadrupoles except in those in the IR`s, where the maximum gradient is 245 tesla/meter. RLD1 has distributed IR`s; however, clustered realistic lattices can easily be assembled from the same components, as was recently done in a version that utilizes the same type of experimental and utility straights as those of RLD1.

  8. Electrokinetic transport in realistic nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Moran; Liu, Jin; Kang, Qinjun

    2009-11-01

    When an electrolyte solution contacts with a solid surface, the surface will likely be charged through an electrochemical adsorption process. The surface charge in general varies with the local bulk ionic concentration, the pH value and the temperature of the solution, and even with the double layer interactions in the narrow channel. Most of the previous studies are based on a constant zeta potential or surface charge density assumption, which does not reflect the realistic charge status at interfaces and may lead to inaccurate predictions. In this work, we first develop a generalized model for electrochemical boundary conditions on solid-liquid interfaces, which can closely approximate the known experimental properties. We further present nonequilibrium molecular dynamic (NEMD) simulations of electrokinetic transport in nanochannels. We take silica and carbon as examples of channel materials. Both monovalent and multivalent ionic solutions are considered. The electrokinetic transport properties for realistic nanochannels are therefore studied and a multiscale analysis for a new energy conversion device is performed.

  9. Clinical leadership and prevention in practice: is a needs led preventive approach to the delivery of care to improve quality, outcomes and value in primary dental care practice a realistic concept?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a need to improve access to, and the quality of, service delivery in NHS primary dental care. Building public health thinking and leadership capacity in clinicians from primary care teams was seen as an underpinning component to achieving this goal. Clinical teams contributed to service redesign concepts and were contractually supported to embrace a preventive approach. Methods Improvement in quality and preventive focus of dental practice care delivery was explored through determining the impact of several projects, to share how evidence, skill mix and clinical leadership could be utilised in design, implementation and measurement of care outcomes in general dental practice in order to champion and advocate change, during a period of substantial change within the NHS system. The projects were: 1. A needs-led, evidence informed preventive care pathway approach to primary dental care delivery with a focus on quality and outcomes. 2. Building clinical leadership to influence and advocate for improved quality of care; and spread of learning through local professional networks. This comprised two separate projects: improved access for very young children called “Baby Teeth DO Matter” and the production of a clinically led, evidence-based guidance for periodontyal treatment in primary care called “Healthy Gums DO Matter”. Results What worked and what hindered progress, is described. The projects developed understanding of how working with ‘local majorities’ of clinicians influenced, adoption and spread of learning, and the impact in prompting wider policy and contract reform in England. Conclusions The projects identified issues that required change to meet population need. Clinicians were allowed to innovate in an evironment working together with commissioners, patients and public health colleagues. Communication and the development of clinical leadership led to the development of an infrastructure to define care pathways and decision

  10. Non-Sink Dissolution Conditions for Predicting Product Quality and In Vivo Performance of Supersaturating Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dajun D; Wen, Hong; Taylor, Lynne S

    2016-09-01

    With recent advances in the development of supersaturating oral dosage forms for poorly water-soluble drugs, pharmaceutical scientists are increasingly applying in vitro dissolution testing under non-sink conditions for a direct evaluation of their ability to generate and maintain supersaturation as a predictive surrogate for ensuring product quality and in vivo performance. However, the scientific rationale for developing the appropriate non-sink dissolution methodologies has not been extensively debated. This calls for a comprehensive discussion of recent research efforts on theoretical and experimental considerations of amorphous solubility, liquid-liquid phase separation, and phase transitions of drugs in a supersaturated solution when dissolution testing is performed under supersaturated non-sink conditions. In addition, we outline the concept of "sink index" that quantifies the magnitude of deviations from perfect sink dissolution conditions in the sink/non-sink continuum and some considerations of non-sink dissolution testing for marketed drug products. These factors should be carefully considered in recommending an adequately discriminatory dissolution method in the performance assessment of supersaturating drug delivery systems. PMID:27174227

  11. Can "realist" randomised controlled trials be genuinely realist?

    PubMed

    Van Belle, Sara; Wong, Geoff; Westhorp, Gill; Pearson, Mark; Emmel, Nick; Manzano, Ana; Marchal, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we respond to a paper by Jamal and colleagues published in Trials in October 2015 and take an opportunity to continue the much-needed debate about what applied scientific realism is. The paper by Jamal et al. is useful because it exposes the challenges of combining a realist evaluation approach (as developed by Pawson and Tilley) with the randomised controlled trial (RCT) design.We identified three fundamental differences that are related to paradigmatic differences in the treatment of causation between post-positivist and realist logic: (1) the construct of mechanism, (2) the relation between mediators and moderators on one hand and mechanisms and contexts on the other hand, and (3) the variable-oriented approach to analysis of causation versus the configurational approach.We show how Jamal et al. consider mechanisms as observable, external treatments and how their approach reduces complex causal processes to variables. We argue that their proposed RCT design cannot provide a truly realist understanding. Not only does the proposed realist RCT design not deal with the RCT's inherent inability to "unpack" complex interventions, it also does not enable the identification of the dynamic interplay among the intervention, actors, context, mechanisms and outcomes, which is at the core of realist research. As a result, the proposed realist RCT design is not, as we understand it, genuinely realist in nature. PMID:27387202

  12. Realist evaluation: an immanent critique.

    PubMed

    Porter, Sam

    2015-10-01

    This paper critically analyses realist evaluation, focussing on its primary analytical concepts: mechanisms, contexts, and outcomes. Noting that nursing investigators have had difficulty in operationalizing the concepts of mechanism and context, it is argued that their confusion is at least partially the result of ambiguities, inconsistencies, and contradictions in the realist evaluation model. Problematic issues include the adoption of empiricist and idealist positions, oscillation between determinism and voluntarism, subsumption of agency under structure, and categorical confusion between context and mechanism. In relation to outcomes, it is argued that realist evaluation's adoption of the fact/value distinction prevents it from taking into account the concerns of those affected by interventions. The aim of the paper is to use these immanent critiques of realist evaluation to construct an internally consistent realist approach to evaluation that is more amenable to being operationalized by nursing researchers. PMID:26392234

  13. Testing of Icy-Soil Sample Delivery in Simulated Martian Conditions (Animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation

    This movie clip shows testing under simulated Mars conditions on Earth in preparation for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander using its robotic arm for delivering a sample to the doors of a laboratory oven.

    The icy soil used in the testing flowed easily from the scoop during all tests at Martian temperatures. On Mars, icy soil has stuck to the scoop, a surprise that may be related to composition of the soil at the landing site.

    This testing was done at Honeybee Robotics Spacecraft Mechanisms Corp., New York, which supplied the Phoenix scoop.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASAaE(TM)s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Generating realistic images using Kray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanski, Grzegorz

    2004-07-01

    Kray is an application for creating realistic images. It is written in C++ programming language, has a text-based interface, solves global illumination problem using techniques such as radiosity, path tracing and photon mapping.

  15. RAMESES publication standards: realist syntheses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in realist synthesis as an alternative systematic review method. This approach offers the potential to expand the knowledge base in policy-relevant areas - for example, by explaining the success, failure or mixed fortunes of complex interventions. No previous publication standards exist for reporting realist syntheses. This standard was developed as part of the RAMESES (Realist And MEta-narrative Evidence Syntheses: Evolving Standards) project. The project's aim is to produce preliminary publication standards for realist systematic reviews. Methods We (a) collated and summarized existing literature on the principles of good practice in realist syntheses; (b) considered the extent to which these principles had been followed by published syntheses, thereby identifying how rigor may be lost and how existing methods could be improved; (c) used a three-round online Delphi method with an interdisciplinary panel of national and international experts in evidence synthesis, realist research, policy and/or publishing to produce and iteratively refine a draft set of methodological steps and publication standards; (d) provided real-time support to ongoing realist syntheses and the open-access RAMESES online discussion list so as to capture problems and questions as they arose; and (e) synthesized expert input, evidence syntheses and real-time problem analysis into a definitive set of standards. Results We identified 35 published realist syntheses, provided real-time support to 9 on-going syntheses and captured questions raised in the RAMESES discussion list. Through analysis and discussion within the project team, we summarized the published literature and common questions and challenges into briefing materials for the Delphi panel, comprising 37 members. Within three rounds this panel had reached consensus on 19 key publication standards, with an overall response rate of 91%. Conclusion This project used multiple sources to develop and

  16. Developing an intervention to facilitate family communication about inherited genetic conditions, and training genetic counsellors in its delivery.

    PubMed

    Eisler, Ivan; Ellison, Matthew; Flinter, Frances; Grey, Jo; Hutchison, Suzanne; Jackson, Carole; Longworth, Louise; MacLeod, Rhona; McAllister, Marion; Metcalfe, Alison; Murrells, Trevor; Patch, Christine; Pritchard, Stuart; Robert, Glenn; Rowland, Emma; Ulph, Fiona

    2016-06-01

    Many families experience difficulty in talking about an inherited genetic condition that affects one or more of them. There have now been a number of studies identifying the issues in detail, however few have developed interventions to assist families. The SPRinG collaborative have used the UK Medical Research Council's guidance on Developing and Evaluating Complex Interventions, to work with families and genetic counsellors (GCs) to co-design a psycho-educational intervention to facilitate family communication and promote better coping and adaptation to living with an inherited genetic condition for parents and their children (<18 years). The intervention is modelled on multi-family discussion groups (MFDGs) used in psychiatric settings. The MFDG was developed and tested over three phases. First focus groups with parents, young people, children and health professionals discussed whether MFDG was acceptable and proposed a suitable design. Using evidence and focus group data, the intervention and a training manual were developed and three GCs were trained in its delivery. Finally, a prototype MFDG was led by a family therapist and co-facilitated by the three GCs. Data analysis showed that families attending the focus groups and intervention thought MFDG highly beneficial, and the pilot sessions had a significant impact on their family' functioning. We also demonstrated that it is possible to train GCs to deliver the MFDG intervention. Further studies are now required to test the feasibility of undertaking a definitive randomised controlled trial to evaluate its effectiveness in improving family outcomes before implementing into genetic counselling practice. PMID:26443265

  17. Developing an intervention to facilitate family communication about inherited genetic conditions, and training genetic counsellors in its delivery

    PubMed Central

    Eisler, Ivan; Ellison, Matthew; Flinter, Frances; Grey, Jo; Hutchison, Suzanne; Jackson, Carole; Longworth, Louise; MacLeod, Rhona; McAllister, Marion; Metcalfe, Alison; Murrells, Trevor; Patch, Christine; Pritchard, Stuart; Robert, Glenn; Rowland, Emma; Ulph, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Many families experience difficulty in talking about an inherited genetic condition that affects one or more of them. There have now been a number of studies identifying the issues in detail, however few have developed interventions to assist families. The SPRinG collaborative have used the UK Medical Research Council's guidance on Developing and Evaluating Complex Interventions, to work with families and genetic counsellors (GCs) to co-design a psycho-educational intervention to facilitate family communication and promote better coping and adaptation to living with an inherited genetic condition for parents and their children (<18 years). The intervention is modelled on multi-family discussion groups (MFDGs) used in psychiatric settings. The MFDG was developed and tested over three phases. First focus groups with parents, young people, children and health professionals discussed whether MFDG was acceptable and proposed a suitable design. Using evidence and focus group data, the intervention and a training manual were developed and three GCs were trained in its delivery. Finally, a prototype MFDG was led by a family therapist and co-facilitated by the three GCs. Data analysis showed that families attending the focus groups and intervention thought MFDG highly beneficial, and the pilot sessions had a significant impact on their family' functioning. We also demonstrated that it is possible to train GCs to deliver the MFDG intervention. Further studies are now required to test the feasibility of undertaking a definitive randomised controlled trial to evaluate its effectiveness in improving family outcomes before implementing into genetic counselling practice. PMID:26443265

  18. Demonstrating a Realistic IP Mission Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, James; Ferrer, Arturo B.; Goodman, Nancy; Ghazi-Tehrani, Samira; Polk, Joe; Johnson, Lorin; Menke, Greg; Miller, Bill; Criscuolo, Ed; Hogie, Keith

    2003-01-01

    Flight software and hardware and realistic space communications environments were elements of recent demonstrations of the Internet Protocol (IP) mission concept in the lab. The Operating Missions as Nodes on the Internet (OMNI) Project and the Flight Software Branch at NASA/GSFC collaborated to build the prototype of a representative space mission that employed unmodified off-the-shelf Internet protocols and technologies for end-to-end communications between the spacecraft/instruments and the ground system/users. The realistic elements used in the prototype included an RF communications link simulator and components of the TRIANA mission flight software and ground support system. A web-enabled camera connected to the spacecraft computer via an Ethernet LAN represented an on-board instrument creating image data. In addition to the protocols at the link layer (HDLC), transport layer (UDP, TCP), and network (IP) layer, a reliable file delivery protocol (MDP) at the application layer enabled reliable data delivery both to and from the spacecraft. The standard Network Time Protocol (NTP) performed on-board clock synchronization with a ground time standard. The demonstrations of the prototype mission illustrated some of the advantages of using Internet standards and technologies for space missions, but also helped identify issues that must be addressed. These issues include applicability to embedded real-time systems on flight-qualified hardware, range of applicability of TCP, and liability for and maintenance of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) products. The NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) funded the collaboration to build and demonstrate the prototype IP mission.

  19. Biodegradable nanoparticles for protein delivery: analysis of preparation conditions on particle morphology and protein loading, activity and sustained release properties.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Jason; Lowman, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    PLGA particles have been extensively used as a sustained drug-delivery system, but there are multiple drawbacks when delivering proteins. The focus of this work is to address the most significant disadvantages to the W/O/W double emulsion procedure and demonstrate that simple changes to this procedure can have significant changes to particle size and dispersity and considerable improvements to protein loading, activity and sustained active protein release. A systematic approach was taken to analyze the effects of the following variables: solvent miscibility (dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate, acetone), homogenization speed (10 000-25 000 rpm), PLGA concentration (10-30 mg/ml) and additives in both the organic (sucrose acetate isobutyrate (SAIB)) and aqueous (bovine serum albumin (BSA)) phases. Increasing solvent miscibility decreased particle size, dispersity and protein denaturation, while maintaining adequate protein loading. Increasing solvent miscibility also lowered the impact of homogenization on particle size and dispersity and protein activity. Changes to PLGA concentration demonstrated a minimum impact on particle size and dispersity, but showed an inverse relationship between protein encapsulation efficiency and particle protein weight percent. Most particles tested provided sustained release of active protein over 60 days. Increasing solvent miscibility resulted in increases in the percent of active protein released. When subjected to synthesis conditions with DCM as the solvent, BSA as a stabilizer resulted in the maximum stabilization of protein at a concentration of 100 mg/ml. At this concentration, BSA allowed for increases in the total amount of active protein delivered for all three solvents. The benefit of SAIB was primarily increased protein loading. PMID:21639993

  20. Laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy via a single-needle delivery system: Optimal conditions of ablation, pathological and ultrasonic changes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Rong; Fang, Ling-Yun; Yu, Cheng; Sun, Zhen-Xing; Huang, Yan; Chen, Juan; Guo, Tao; Xiang, Fei-Xiang; Wang, Jing; Lu, Cheng-Fa; Yan, Tian-Wei; Lv, Qing; Xie, Ming-Xing

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to examine the optimal conditions of laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) via a single-needle delivery system, and the ablation-related pathological and ultrasonic changes. Ultrasound (US)-guided LITT (EchoLaser system) was performed at the output power of 2-4 Wattage (W) for 1-10 min in ex vivo bovine liver. Based on the results of the ex vivo study, the output power of 3 and 4 W with different durations was applied to in vivo rabbit livers (n=24), and VX2 tumors implanted in the hind limbs of rabbits (n=24). The ablation area was histologically determined by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. Traditional US and contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) were used to evaluate the treatment outcomes. The results showed: (1) In the bovine liver, ablation disruption was grossly seen, including a strip-like ablation crater, a carbonization zone anteriorly along the fiber tip, and a surrounding gray-white coagulation zone. The coagulation area, 1.2 cm in length and 1.0 cm in width, was formed in the bovine liver subjected to the ablation at 3 W for 5 min and 4 W for 4 min, and it extended slightly with the ablation time. (2) In the rabbit liver, after LITT at 3 W for 3 min and more, the coagulation area with length greater than or equal to 1.2 cm, and width greater than or equal to 1.0 cm, was found. Similar coagulation area was seen in the implanted VX2 carcinoma at 3 W for 5 min. (3) Gross examination of the liver and carcinoma showed three distinct regions: ablation crater/carbonization, coagulation and congestion distributed from the center outwards. (4) Microscopy revealed four zones after LITT, including ablation crater/carbonization, coagulation, edema and congestion from the center outwards. A large area with coagulative necrosis was observed around a vessel in the peripheral area with edema and hyperemia. (5) The size of coagulation was consistent well to the CEUS findings. It was concluded that EchoLaser system at low power can produce a

  1. Electromagnetic Scattering from Realistic Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Shung- Wu; Jin, Jian-Ming

    1997-01-01

    The general goal of the project is to develop computational tools for calculating radar signature of realistic targets. A hybrid technique that combines the shooting-and-bouncing-ray (SBR) method and the finite-element method (FEM) for the radiation characterization of microstrip patch antennas in a complex geometry was developed. In addition, a hybridization procedure to combine moment method (MoM) solution and the SBR method to treat the scattering of waveguide slot arrays on an aircraft was developed. A list of journal articles and conference papers is included.

  2. Realistic Solar Surface Convection Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Robert F.; Nordlund, Ake

    2000-01-01

    We perform essentially parameter free simulations with realistic physics of convection near the solar surface. We summarize the physics that is included and compare the simulation results with observations. Excellent agreement is obtained for the depth of the convection zone, the p-mode frequencies, the p-mode excitation rate, the distribution of the emergent continuum intensity, and the profiles of weak photospheric lines. We describe how solar convection is nonlocal. It is driven from a thin surface thermal boundary layer where radiative cooling produces low entropy gas which forms the cores of the downdrafts in which most of the buoyancy work occurs. We show that turbulence and vorticity are mostly confined to the intergranular lanes and underlying downdrafts. Finally, we illustrate our current work on magneto-convection.

  3. Optomechanical considerations for realistic tolerancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Eric; Sasián, José; Youngworth, Richard N.

    2013-09-01

    Optical tolerancing simulation has improved so that the modeling of optomechanical accuracy can better predict as-built performance. A key refinement being proposed within this paper is monitoring formal interference fits and checking lens elements within their mechanical housings. Without proper checks, simulations may become physically unrealizable and pessimistic, thereby resulting in lower simulated yields. An improved simulation method has been defined and demonstrated in this paper with systems that do not have barrel constraints. The demonstration cases clearly show the trend of the beneficial impact with yield results, as a yield increase of 36.3% to 39.2% is garnered by one example. Considerations in simulating the realistic optomechanical system will assist in controlling cost and providing more accurate simulation results.

  4. Realistic glottal motion and airflow rate during human breathing.

    PubMed

    Scheinherr, Adam; Bailly, Lucie; Boiron, Olivier; Lagier, Aude; Legou, Thierry; Pichelin, Marine; Caillibotte, Georges; Giovanni, Antoine

    2015-09-01

    The glottal geometry is a key factor in the aerosol delivery efficiency for treatment of lung diseases. However, while glottal vibrations were extensively studied during human phonation, the realistic glottal motion during breathing is poorly understood. Therefore, most current studies assume an idealized steady glottis in the context of respiratory dynamics, and thus neglect the flow unsteadiness related to this motion. This is particularly important to assess the aerosol transport mechanisms in upper airways. This article presents a clinical study conducted on 20 volunteers, to examine the realistic glottal motion during several breathing tasks. Nasofibroscopy was used to investigate the glottal geometrical variations simultaneously with accurate airflow rate measurements. In total, 144 breathing sequences of 30s were recorded. Regarding the whole database, two cases of glottal time-variations were found: "static" or "dynamic" ones. Typically, the peak value of glottal area during slow breathing narrowed from 217 ± 54 mm(2) (mean ± STD) during inspiration, to 178 ± 35 mm(2) during expiration. Considering flow unsteadiness, it is shown that the harmonic approximation of the airflow rate underevaluates the inertial effects as compared to realistic patterns, especially at the onset of the breathing cycle. These measurements provide input data to conduct realistic numerical simulations of laryngeal airflow and particle deposition. PMID:26159687

  5. Realist RCTs of complex interventions - an oxymoron.

    PubMed

    Marchal, Bruno; Westhorp, Gill; Wong, Geoff; Van Belle, Sara; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Kegels, Guy; Pawson, Ray

    2013-10-01

    Bonell et al. discuss the challenges of carrying out randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate complex interventions in public health, and consider the role of realist evaluation in enhancing this design (Bonell, Fletcher, Morton, Lorenc, & Moore, 2012). They argue for a "synergistic, rather than oppositional relationship between realist and randomised evaluation" and that "it is possible to benefit from the insights provided by realist evaluation without relinquishing the RCT as the best means of examining intervention causality." We present counter-arguments to their analysis of realist evaluation and their recommendations for realist RCTs. Bonell et al. are right to question whether and how (quasi-)experimental designs can be improved to better evaluate complex public health interventions. However, the paper does not explain how a research design that is fundamentally built upon a positivist ontological and epistemological position can be meaningfully adapted to allow it to be used from within a realist paradigm. The recommendations for "realist RCTs" do not sufficiently take into account important elements of complexity that pose major challenges for the RCT design. They also ignore key tenets of the realist evaluation approach. We propose that the adjective 'realist' should continue to be used only for studies based on a realist philosophy and whose analytic approach follows the established principles of realist analysis. It seems more correct to call the approach proposed by Bonell and colleagues 'theory informed RCT', which indeed can help in enhancing RCTs. PMID:23850482

  6. Behavior of vitamin E acetate delivery systems under simulated gastrointestinal conditions: lipid digestion and bioaccessibility of low-energy nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Sinja; Weiss, Jochen; McClements, David Julian

    2013-08-15

    Colloidal delivery systems are needed to incorporate oil-soluble vitamins into aqueous-based foods and beverage products. In this study, we encapsulated vitamin E acetate into oil-in-water nanoemulsions produced using either a low-energy method (Emulsion Phase Inversion, EPI) or a high energy method (microfluidization). Oil-in-water nanoemulsions (d<200 nm) could be produced using both low- and high-energy methods from a non-ionic surfactant (Tween 80) and medium chain triglycerides (MCTs). The influence of surfactant-to-oil ratio (SOR) on lipid digestion and vitamin bioaccessibility of EPI nanoemulsions was determined using a gastrointestinal tract (GIT) model that simulated the mouth, stomach, and small intestine. There were increases in the size and negative charge of the oil droplets after passage through the GIT, which was attributed to droplet coalescence and changes in interfacial composition. The rate and extent of lipid digestion decreased with increasing surfactant concentration, but the bioaccessibility of vitamin E acetate was high in all of the samples (>95%). No appreciable influence of the preparation method (low-energy versus high-energy) on lipid digestion and vitamin bioaccessibility was observed. The major advantage of the EPI method for forming nanoemulsions is that no expensive equipment is required, but relatively high surfactant concentrations are needed compared to microfluidization. PMID:23721832

  7. Role of context in care transition interventions for medically complex older adults: a realist synthesis protocol

    PubMed Central

    Pitzul, Kristen B; Lane, Natasha E; Voruganti, Teja; Khan, Anum I; Innis, Jennifer; Wodchis, Walter P; Baker, G Ross

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 30–50% of older adults have two or more conditions and are referred to as multimorbid or complex patients. These patients often require visits to various healthcare providers in a number of settings and are therefore susceptible to fragmented healthcare delivery while transitioning to receive care. Care transition interventions have been implemented to improve continuity of care, however, current evidence suggests that some interventions or components of interventions are only effective within certain contexts. There is therefore a need to unpack the mechanisms of how and within which contexts care transition interventions and their components are effective. Realist review is a synthesis method that explains how complex programmes work within various contexts. The purpose of this study is to explain the effect of context on the activities and mechanisms of care transition interventions in medically complex older adults using a realist review approach. Methods and analysis This synthesis will be guided by Pawson and colleagues’ 2004 and 2005 protocols for conducting realist reviews. The underlying theories of care transition interventions were determined based on an initial literature search using relevant databases. English language peer-reviewed studies published after 1993 will be included. Several relevant databases will be searched using medical subject headings and text terms. A screening form will be piloted and titles, abstracts and full text of potentially relevant articles will be screened in duplicate. Abstracted data will include study characteristics, intervention type, contextual factors, intervention activities and underlying mechanisms. Patterns in Context-Activity-Mechanism-Outcome (CAMO) configurations will be reported. Ethics and dissemination Internal knowledge translation activities will occur throughout the review and existing partnerships will be leveraged to disseminate findings to frontline staff, hospital

  8. Compact entanglement distillery using realistic quantum memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakhmakhchyan, Levon; Guérin, Stéphane; Nunn, Joshua; Datta, Animesh

    2013-10-01

    We adopt the beam-splitter model for losses to analyze the performance of a recent compact continuous-variable entanglement distillation protocol [A. Datta , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.108.060502 108, 060502 (2012)] implemented using realistic quantum memories. We show that the decoherence undergone by a two-mode squeezed state while stored in a quantum memory can strongly modify the results of the preparatory step of the protocol. We find that the well-known method for locally increasing entanglement, phonon subtraction, may not result in entanglement gain when losses are taken into account. Thus, we investigate the critical number mc of phonon subtraction attempts from the matter modes of the quantum memory. If the initial state is not de-Gaussified within mc attempts, the protocol should be restarted to obtain any entanglement increase. Moreover, the condition mc>1 implies an additional constraint on the subtraction beam-splitter interaction transmissivity, viz., it should be about 50% for a wide range of protocol parameters. Additionally, we consider the average entanglement rate, which takes into account both the unavoidable probabilistic nature of the protocol and its possible failure as a result of a large number of unsuccessful subtraction attempts. We find that a higher value of the average entanglement can be achieved by increasing the subtraction beam-splitter interaction transmissivity. We conclude that the compact distillation protocol with the practical constraints coming from realistic quantum memories allows a feasible experimental realization within existing technologies.

  9. Gravity waves in a realistic atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, H. B.; Midgley, J. E.

    1966-01-01

    Internal atmospheric gravity waves in isothermal medium, solving hydrodynamic equations, determining wave propagation in realistic atmosphere for range of wave parameters, wind amplitude, reflected energy, etc

  10. Setting Standards at the Forefront of Delivery System Reform: Aligning Care Coordination Quality Measures for Multiple Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    DuGoff, Eva H.; Dy, Sydney; Giovannetti, Erin R.; Leff, Bruce; Boyd, Cynthia M.

    2015-01-01

    The primary study objective is to assess how three major health reform care coordination initiatives (Accountable Care Organizations, Independence at Home, and Community-based Care Transitions) measure concepts critical to care coordination for people with multiple chronic conditions. We find that there are major differences in quality measurement across these three large and politically important programs. Quality measures currently used or proposed for these new health reform-related programs addressing care coordination primarily capture continuity of care. Other key areas of care coordination, such as care transitions, patient-centeredness, and cross-cutting care across multiple conditions are infrequently addressed. The lack of a comprehensive and consistent measure set for care coordination will pose challenges for health care providers and policymakers who seek, respectively, to provide and reward well-coordinated care. In addition, this heterogeneity in measuring care coordination quality will generate new information, but will inhibit comparisons between these care coordination programs. PMID:24004040

  11. Setting standards at the forefront of delivery system reform: aligning care coordination quality measures for multiple chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    DuGoff, Eva H; Dy, Sydney; Giovannetti, Erin R; Leff, Bruce; Boyd, Cynthia M

    2013-01-01

    The primary study objective is to assess how three major health reform care coordination initiatives (Accountable Care Organizations, Independence at Home, and Community-Based Care Transitions) measure concepts critical to care coordination for people with multiple chronic conditions. We find that there are major differences in quality measurement across these three large and politically important programs. Quality measures currently used or proposed for these new health reform-related programs addressing care coordination primarily capture continuity of care. Other key areas of care coordination, such as care transitions, patient-centeredness, and cross-cutting care across multiple conditions are infrequently addressed. The lack of a comprehensive and consistent measure set for care coordination will pose challenges for healthcare providers and policy makers who seek, respectively, to provide and reward well-coordinated care. In addition, this heterogeneity in measuring care coordination quality will generate new information, but will inhibit comparisons between these care coordination programs. PMID:24004040

  12. Alveolar mechanics using realistic acinar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Haribalan; Lin, Ching-Long; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2009-11-01

    Accurate modeling of the mechanics in terminal airspaces of the lung is desirable for study of particle transport and pathology. The flow in the acinar region is traditionally studied by employing prescribed boundary conditions to represent rhythmic breathing and volumetric expansion. Conventional models utilize simplified spherical or polygonal units to represent the alveolar duct and sac. Accurate prediction of flow and transport characteristics may require geometries reconstructed from CT-based images and serve to understand the importance of physiologically realistic representation of the acinus. In this effort, we present a stabilized finite element framework, supplemented with appropriate boundary conditions at the alveolar mouth and septal borders for simulation of the alveolar mechanics and the resulting airflow. Results of material advection based on Lagrangian tracking are presented to complete the study of transport and compare the results with simplified acinar models. The current formulation provides improved understanding and realization of a dynamic framework for parenchymal mechanics with incorporation of alveolar pressure and traction stresses.

  13. Realistic simulations of coaxial atomisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaleski, Stephane; Fuster, Daniel; Arrufat Jackson, Tomas; Ling, Yue; Cenni, Matteo; Scardovelli, Ruben; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2015-11-01

    We discuss advances in the methodology for Direct Numerical Simulations of coaxial atomization in typical experimental conditions. Such conditions are extremely demanding for the numerical methods. The key difficulty seems to be the combination of high density ratios, surface tension, and large Reynolds numbers. We explore how using a momentum-conserving Volume-Of-Fluid scheme allows to improve the stability and accuracy of the simulations. We show computational evidence that the use of momentum conserving methods allows to reduce the required number of grid points by an order of magnitude in the simple case of a falling rain drop. We then apply these ideas to coaxial atomization. We show that in moderate-size simulations in air-water conditions close to real experiments, instabilities are still present and then discuss ways to fix them. Among those, removing small VOF debris and improving the time-stepping scheme are two important directions.The accuracy of the simulations is then discussed in comparison with experimental results and in particular the angle of ejection of the structures. The code used for this research is free and distributed at http://parissimulator.sf.net.

  14. Realist complex intervention science: Applying realist principles across all phases of the Medical Research Council framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Adam; Jamal, Farah; Moore, Graham; Evans, Rhiannon E.; Murphy, Simon; Bonell, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The integration of realist evaluation principles within randomised controlled trials (‘realist RCTs’) enables evaluations of complex interventions to answer questions about what works, for whom and under what circumstances. This allows evaluators to better develop and refine mid-level programme theories. However, this is only one phase in the process of developing and evaluating complex interventions. We describe and exemplify how social scientists can integrate realist principles across all phases of the Medical Research Council framework. Intervention development, modelling, and feasibility and pilot studies need to theorise the contextual conditions necessary for intervention mechanisms to be activated. Where interventions are scaled up and translated into routine practice, realist principles also have much to offer in facilitating knowledge about longer-term sustainability, benefits and harms. Integrating a realist approach across all phases of complex intervention science is vital for considering the feasibility and likely effects of interventions for different localities and population subgroups. PMID:27478401

  15. Preventing epileptogenesis: A realistic goal?

    PubMed

    Terrone, Gaetano; Pauletti, Alberto; Pascente, Rosaria; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2016-08-01

    The definition of the pathologic process of epileptogenesis has considerably changed over the past few years due to a better knowledge of the dynamics of the associated molecular modifications and to clinical and experimental evidence of progression of the epileptic condition beyond the occurrence of the first seizures. Interference with this chronic process may lead to the development of novel preventive therapies which are still lacking. Notably, epileptogenesis is often associated with comorbid behaviors which are now considered primary outcome measures for novel therapeutics. Anti-epileptogenic interventions may improve not only seizure onset and their frequency and severity but also comorbidities and cell loss, and when applied after the onset of the disease may provide disease-modifying effects by favorably modifying the disease course. In the preclinical arena, several novel targets for anti-epileptogenic and disease-modifying interventions are being characterized and validated in rodent models of epileptogenesis. To move proof-of-concept anti-epileptogenesis studies to validation in preclinical trials and eventually to clinical translation is a challenging task which would be greatly facilitated by the development of non invasive biomarkers of epileptogenesis. Biomarker discovery together with testing potential novel drugs would provide a major advance in the treatment of human epilepsy beyond the pure symptomatic control of seizures. PMID:27173399

  16. PET-based dose delivery verification in proton therapy: a GATE based simulation study of five PET system designs in clinical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Charlotte; Fourrier, Nicolas; Sarrut, David; Stute, Simon; Gueth, Pierre; Grevillot, Loïc; Buvat, Irène

    2013-10-01

    PET is a promising technique for in vivo treatment verification in hadrontherapy. Three main PET geometries dedicated to in-beam treatment monitoring have been proposed in the literature: the dual-head PET geometry, the OpenPET geometry and the slanted-closed ring geometry. The aim of this work is to characterize the performance of two of these dedicated PET detectors in realistic clinical conditions. Several configurations of the dual-head PET and OpenPET systems were simulated using GATE v6.2. For the dual-head configuration, two aperture angles (15° and 45°) were studied. For the OpenPET system, two gaps between rings were investigated (110 and 160 mm). A full-ring PET system was also simulated as a reference. After preliminary evaluation of the sensitivity and spatial resolution using a Derenzo phantom, a real small-field head and neck treatment plan was simulated, with and without introducing patient displacements. No wash-out was taken into account. 3D maps of the annihilation photon locations were deduced from the PET data acquired right after the treatment session (5 min acquisition) using a dedicated OS-EM reconstruction algorithm. Detection sensitivity at the center of the field-of-view (FOV) varied from 5.2% (45° dual-head system) to 7.0% (full-ring PET). The dual-head systems had a more uniform efficiency within the FOV than the OpenPET systems. The spatial resolution strongly depended on the location within the FOV for the ϕ = 45° dual-head system and for the two OpenPET systems. All investigated architectures identified the magnitude of mispositioning introduced in the simulations within a 1.5 mm accuracy. The variability on the estimated mispositionings was less than 2 mm for all PET systems.

  17. MEMS: Enabled Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Angelica; Sheybani, Roya; Meng, Ellis

    2015-05-01

    Drug delivery systems play a crucial role in the treatment and management of medical conditions. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies have allowed the development of advanced miniaturized devices for medical and biological applications. This Review presents the use of MEMS technologies to produce drug delivery devices detailing the delivery mechanisms, device formats employed, and various biomedical applications. The integration of dosing control systems, examples of commercially available microtechnology-enabled drug delivery devices, remaining challenges, and future outlook are also discussed. PMID:25703045

  18. TOWARD A REALISTIC PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Harding, Alice

    2012-04-10

    We present the magnetic and electric field structures and the currents and charge densities of pulsar magnetospheres that do not obey the ideal condition, E {center_dot} B = 0. Since the acceleration of particles and the production of radiation require the presence of an electric field component parallel to the magnetic field, E{sub ||}, the structure of non-ideal pulsar magnetospheres is intimately related to the production of pulsar radiation. Therefore, knowledge of the structure of non-ideal pulsar magnetospheres is important because their comparison (including models for the production of radiation) with observations will delineate the physics and the parameters underlying the pulsar radiation problem. We implement a variety of prescriptions that support non-zero values for E{sub ||} and explore their effects on the structure of the resulting magnetospheres. We produce families of solutions that span the entire range between the vacuum and the (ideal) force-free electrodynamic solutions. We also compute the amount of dissipation as a fraction of the Poynting flux for pulsars of different angles between the rotation and magnetic axes and conclude that this is at most 20%-40% (depending on the non-ideal prescription) in the aligned rotator and 10% in the perpendicular one. We present also the limiting solutions with the property J = {rho}c and discuss their possible implication on the determination of the 'on/off' states of the intermittent pulsars. Finally, we find that solutions with values of J greater than those needed to null E{sub ||} locally produce oscillations, potentially observable in the data.

  19. Towards a Realistic Pulsar Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Harding, Alice; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    We present the magnetic and electric field structures as well as the currents ami charge densities of pulsar magnetospberes which do not obey the ideal condition, E(raised dot) B = O. Since the acceleration of particles and the production of radiation requires the presence of an electric field component parallel to the magnetic field, E(sub ll) the structure of non-Ideal pulsar magnetospheres is intimately related to the production of pulsar radiation. Therefore, knowledge of the structure of non-Ideal pulsar maglletospheres is important because their comparison (including models for t he production of radiation) with observations will delineate the physics and the parameters underlying the pulsar radiation problem. We implement a variety of prescriptions that support nonzero values for E(sub ll) and explore their effects on the structure of the resulting magnetospheres. We produce families of solutions that span the entire range between the vacuum and the (ideal) Force-Free Electrodynamic solutions. We also compute the amount of dissipation as a fraction of the Poynting flux for pulsars of different angles between the rotation and magnetic axes and conclude that tltis is at most 20-40% (depending on t he non-ideal prescription) in the aligned rotator and 10% in the perpendicular one. We present also the limiting solutions with the property J = pc and discuss their possible implicatioll on the determination of the "on/ off" states of the intermittent pulsars. Finally, we find that solutions with values of J greater than those needed to null E(sub ll) locally produce oscillations, potentially observable in the data.

  20. Effect of simulated gastrointestinal conditions on drug release from pectin/ethylcellulose as film coating for drug delivery to the colon.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, I S

    2005-05-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of acidic pH representative of gastric fluid on the release of 5-aminosalicylic acid from beads coated with pectin/ethylcellulose as film coating intended for drug delivery to the colon, in media mimicking the lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract and representative of colonic conditions. In this work, the in vitro incubation of the beads in acid medium was found to influence the hydration and the swelling characteristics of pectin after transfer into simulated intestinal fluid and simulated cecal fluid containing pectinolytic enzymes. Moreover, the drug release profiles from the beads in simulated intestinal fluid after incubation for 2 h or 30 min in simulated gastric fluid vs. no acid incubation were found to be very different. The in vitro degradation of pectin in the coat by pectinolytic enzymes in simulated cecal fluid depended on whether the beads were placed in simulated gastric fluid prior to testing in simulated intestinal fluid. The percentage drug release also depended on the ratio of pectin to ethylcellulose in the coat. PMID:16093212

  1. Development of a realistic human airway model.

    PubMed

    Lizal, Frantisek; Elcner, Jakub; Hopke, Philip K; Jedelsky, Jan; Jicha, Miroslav

    2012-03-01

    Numerous models of human lungs with various levels of idealization have been reported in the literature; consequently, results acquired using these models are difficult to compare to in vivo measurements. We have developed a set of model components based on realistic geometries, which permits the analysis of the effects of subsequent model simplification. A realistic digital upper airway geometry except for the lack of an oral cavity has been created which proved suitable both for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and for the fabrication of physical models. Subsequently, an oral cavity was added to the tracheobronchial geometry. The airway geometry including the oral cavity was adjusted to enable fabrication of a semi-realistic model. Five physical models were created based on these three digital geometries. Two optically transparent models, one with and one without the oral cavity, were constructed for flow velocity measurements, two realistic segmented models, one with and one without the oral cavity, were constructed for particle deposition measurements, and a semi-realistic model with glass cylindrical airways was developed for optical measurements of flow velocity and in situ particle size measurements. One-dimensional phase doppler anemometry measurements were made and compared to the CFD calculations for this model and good agreement was obtained. PMID:22558834

  2. Research on ultra-realistic communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enami, Kazumasa

    2009-05-01

    A future communication method enabled by information communications technology- ultra-realistic communication - is now being investigated in Japan and research and development of the various technologies required for its realization is being conducted, such as ultra-high definition TV, 3DTV, super surround sound reproduction and multi-sensory communication including touch and smell. An organization called the Ultra-Realistic Communications Forum (URCF) was also established for the effective promotion of R&D and the standardization of relating technologies. This document explains the activities of the URCF by industry, academia and government, and introduces researches on ultra-realistic communications in the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT).

  3. Keeping It Real: How Realistic Does Realistic Fiction for Children Need to Be?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    O'Connor, an author of realistic fiction for children, shares her attempts to strike a balance between carefree, uncensored, authentic, realistic writing and age-appropriate writing. Of course, complicating that balancing act is the fact that what seems age-appropriate to her might not seem so to everyone. O'Connor suggests that while it may be…

  4. Improving Intuition Skills with Realistic Mathematics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirza, Bonita; Kusumah, Yaya S.; Darhim; Zulkardi

    2014-01-01

    The intention of the present study was to see the improvement of students' intuitive skills. This improvement was seen by comparing the Realistic Mathematics Education (RME)-based instruction with the conventional mathematics instruction. The subject of this study was 164 fifth graders of elementary school in Palembang. The design of this study…

  5. Project REALISTIC: Determining Literacy Demands of Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sticht, Thomas C.; Kern, Richard P.

    1971-01-01

    REALISTIC is an acronym based upon the three literacy skills areas studied--REAding, LIStening, and ArithmeTIC. The general objectives of the project are: (1) to provide information concerning the demands for reading, listening, and arithmetic skills in several major military occupational specialties (MOSS), and (2) to provide information and…

  6. Spatial Visualization by Realistic 3D Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yue, Jianping

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the popular Purdue Spatial Visualization Test-Visualization by Rotations (PSVT-R) in isometric drawings was recreated with CAD software that allows 3D solid modeling and rendering to provide more realistic pictorial views. Both the original and the modified PSVT-R tests were given to students and their scores on the two tests were…

  7. Making a Literature Methods Course "Realistic."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, William J.

    Recognizing that it can be a challenge to make an undergraduate literature methods course realistic, a methods instructor at a Michigan university has developed three major and several minor activities that have proven effective in preparing pre-student teachers for the "real world" of teaching and, at the same time, have been challenging and…

  8. Satellite Maps Deliver More Realistic Gaming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    When Redwood City, California-based Electronic Arts (EA) decided to make SSX, its latest snowboarding video game, it faced challenges in creating realistic-looking mountains. The solution was NASA's ASTER Global Digital Elevation Map, made available by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which EA used to create 28 real-life mountains from 9 different ranges for its award-winning game.

  9. Faculty Development for Educators: A Realist Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorinola, Olanrewaju O.; Thistlethwaite, Jill; Davies, David; Peile, Ed

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of faculty development (FD) activities for educators in UK medical schools remains underexplored. This study used a realist approach to evaluate FD and to test the hypothesis that motivation, engagement and perception are key mechanisms of effective FD activities. The authors observed and interviewed 33 course participants at one…

  10. Realistic Portrayal of Aging. An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodson, Anita E.; Hause, Judith B.

    This annotated bibliography cites selected reading materials for all age levels that present aging and the aged realistically with a full range of human behaviors. The listing is meant to serve as a resource to educators who wish to develop positive attitudes in children and in adolescents about the elderly and about themselves. Educators should…

  11. Coping with changing conditions: alternative strategies for the delivery of maternal and child health and family planning services in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Routh, S.; el Arifeen, S.; Jahan, S. A.; Begum, A.; Thwin, A. A.; Baqui, A. H.

    2001-01-01

    The door-to-door distribution of contraceptives and information on maternal and child health and family planning (MCH-FP) services, through bimonthly visits to eligible couples by trained fieldworkers, has been instrumental in increasing the contraceptive prevalence rate and immunization coverage in Bangladesh. The doorstep delivery strategy, however, is labour-intensive and costly. More cost-effective service delivery strategies are needed, not only for family planning services but also for a broader package of reproductive and other essential health services. Against this backdrop, operations research was conducted by the Centre for Health and Population Research at the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B) from January 1996 to May 1997, in collaboration with government agencies and a leading national nongovernmental organization, with a view to developing and field-testing alternative approaches to the delivery of MCH-FP services in urban areas. Two alternative strategies featuring the withdrawal of home-based distribution and the delivery of basic health care from fixed-site facilities were tested in two areas of Dhaka. The clinic-based service delivery strategy was found to be a feasible alternative to the resource-intensive doorstep system in urban Dhaka. It did not adversely affect programme performance and it allowed the needs of clients to be addressed holistically through a package of essential health and family planning services. PMID:11242821

  12. "easyMine" - realistic and systematic mine detection simulation tooltion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, U.; Beier, K.; Biering, B.; Müller, C.; Peichl, M.; Spyra, W.

    2004-05-01

    Mine detection is to date mainly performed with metal detectors, although new methods for UXO detection are explored worldwide. The main problem for the mine detection to date is, that there exist some ideas of which sensor combinations could yield a high score, but until now there is no systematic analysis of mine detection methods together with realistic environmental conditions to conclude on a physically and technically optimized sensor combination. This gap will be removed by a project "easyMine" (Realistic and systematic Mine Detection Simulation Tool) which will result in a simulation tool for optimizing land mine detection in a realistic mine field. The project idea for this software tool is presented, that will simulate the closed chain of mine detection, including the mine in its natural environment, the sensor, the evaluation and application of the measurements by an user. The tool will be modularly designed. Each chain link will be an independent, exchangeable sub- module and will describe a stand alone part of the whole mine detection procedure. The advantage of the tool will be the evaluation of very different kinds of sensor combinations in relation of their real potential for mine detection. Three detection methods (metal detector, GPR and imaging IR-radiometry) will be explained to be introduced into the easyMine software tool in a first step. An actual example for land mine detection problem will be presented and approaches for solutions with easyMine will be shown.

  13. Measurements of lateral penumbra for uniform scanning proton beams under various beam delivery conditions and comparison to the XiO treatment planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, Suresh; Zeidan, Omar; Ramirez, Eric; Rains, Michael; Gao, Junfang; Zheng, Yuanshui

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The main purposes of this study were to (1) investigate the dependency of lateral penumbra (80%–20% distance) of uniform scanning proton beams on various factors such as air gap, proton range, modulation width, compensator thickness, and depth, and (2) compare the lateral penumbra calculated by a treatment planning system (TPS) with measurements.Methods: First, lateral penumbra was measured using solid–water phantom and radiographic films for (a) air gap, ranged from 0 to 35 cm, (b) proton range, ranged from 8 to 30 cm, (c) modulation, ranged from 2 to 10 cm, (d) compensator thickness, ranged from 0 to 20 cm, and (e) depth, ranged from 7 to 15 cm. Second, dose calculations were computed in a virtual water phantom using the XiO TPS with pencil beam algorithm for identical beam conditions and geometrical configurations that were used for the measurements. The calculated lateral penumbra was then compared with the measured one for both the horizontal and vertical scanning magnets of our uniform scanning proton beam delivery system.Results: The results in the current study showed that the lateral penumbra of horizontal scanning magnet was larger (up to 1.4 mm for measurement and up to 1.0 mm for TPS) compared to that of vertical scanning magnet. Both the TPS and measurements showed an almost linear increase in lateral penumbra with increasing air gap as it produced the greatest effect on lateral penumbra. Lateral penumbra was dependent on the depth and proton range. Specifically, the width of lateral penumbra was found to be always lower at shallower depth than at deeper depth within the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) region. The lateral penumbra results were less sensitive to the variation in the thickness of compensator, whereas lateral penumbra was independent of modulation. Overall, the comparison between the results of TPS with that of measurements indicates a good agreement for lateral penumbra, with TPS predicting higher values compared to

  14. Model of lifetimes of the outer radiation belt electrons in a realistic magnetic field using realistic chorus wave parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, Ksenia; Shprits, Yuri

    2014-02-01

    The outer radiation belt electrons in the inner magnetosphere show high variability during the geomagnetically disturbed conditions. Quasi-linear diffusion theory provides both a framework for global prediction of particle loss at different energies and an understanding of the dynamics of different particle populations. It has been recently shown that the pitch angle scattering of electrons due to wave-particle interaction with chorus waves modeled in a realistic magnetic field may be significantly different from those estimated in a dipole model. In this work, we present the lifetimes of 1 keV-2 MeV electrons computed in the Tsyganenko 89 magnetic field model for the night, dawn, prenoon, and postnoon magnetic local time (MLT) sectors for different levels of geomagnetic activity and distances. The lifetimes in the realistic field are also compared to those computed in the dipole model. We develop a realistic chorus lower band and upper band wave models for each MLT sector using the recent statistical studies of wave amplitude, wave normal angle, and wave spectral density distributions as functions of magnetic latitude, distance, and Kp index. The increase of plasma trough density with increasing latitude is also included. The obtained in the Tsyganenko 89 field electron lifetimes are parameterized and can be used in 2-D/3-D/4-D convection and particle tracing codes.

  15. The Challenge of Realistic TPV System Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschaber, J.; Hebling, C.; Luther, J.

    2003-01-01

    Realistic modeling of a TPV system is a very demanding task. For a rough estimation of system limits many of assumptions simplify the complexity of a thermophotovoltaic converter. It's obvious that real systems can not be described by this way. An alternative approach that can deal with all these complexities like arbitrary geometries, participating media, temperature distributions etc. is the Monte Carlo method (MCM). This statistical method simulates radiative energy transfer by tracking the histories of a number of photons beginning with the emission by a radiating surface and ending with absorption on a surface or in a medium. All interactions in this way are considered. The disadvantage of large computation time compared to other methods is not longer a weakness with the speed of todays computers. This article points out different ways for realistic TPV system simulation focusing on statistical methods.

  16. Realistic molecular model of kerogen's nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousige, Colin; Ghimbeu, Camélia Matei; Vix-Guterl, Cathie; Pomerantz, Andrew E.; Suleimenova, Assiya; Vaughan, Gavin; Garbarino, Gaston; Feygenson, Mikhail; Wildgruber, Christoph; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-05-01

    Despite kerogen's importance as the organic backbone for hydrocarbon production from source rocks such as gas shale, the interplay between kerogen's chemistry, morphology and mechanics remains unexplored. As the environmental impact of shale gas rises, identifying functional relations between its geochemical, transport, elastic and fracture properties from realistic molecular models of kerogens becomes all the more important. Here, by using a hybrid experimental-simulation method, we propose a panel of realistic molecular models of mature and immature kerogens that provide a detailed picture of kerogen's nanostructure without considering the presence of clays and other minerals in shales. We probe the models' strengths and limitations, and show that they predict essential features amenable to experimental validation, including pore distribution, vibrational density of states and stiffness. We also show that kerogen's maturation, which manifests itself as an increase in the sp2/sp3 hybridization ratio, entails a crossover from plastic-to-brittle rupture mechanisms.

  17. Spectral tunability of realistic plasmonic nanoantennas

    SciTech Connect

    Portela, Alejandro; Matsui, Hiroaki; Tabata, Hitoshi; Yano, Takaaki; Hayashi, Tomohiro; Hara, Masahiko; Santschi, Christian; Martin, Olivier J. F.

    2014-09-01

    Single nanoantenna spectroscopy was carried out on realistic dipole nanoantennas with various arm lengths and gap sizes fabricated by electron-beam lithography. A significant difference in resonance wavelength between realistic and ideal nanoantennas was found by comparing their spectral response. Consequently, the spectral tunability (96 nm) of the structures was significantly lower than that of simulated ideal nanoantennas. These observations, attributed to the nanofabrication process, are related to imperfections in the geometry, added metal adhesion layer, and shape modifications, which are analyzed in this work. Our results provide important information for the design of dipole nanoantennas clarifying the role of the structural modifications on the resonance spectra, as supported by calculations.

  18. Realistic molecular model of kerogen's nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Bousige, Colin; Ghimbeu, Camélia Matei; Vix-Guterl, Cathie; Pomerantz, Andrew E; Suleimenova, Assiya; Vaughan, Gavin; Garbarino, Gaston; Feygenson, Mikhail; Wildgruber, Christoph; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-05-01

    Despite kerogen's importance as the organic backbone for hydrocarbon production from source rocks such as gas shale, the interplay between kerogen's chemistry, morphology and mechanics remains unexplored. As the environmental impact of shale gas rises, identifying functional relations between its geochemical, transport, elastic and fracture properties from realistic molecular models of kerogens becomes all the more important. Here, by using a hybrid experimental-simulation method, we propose a panel of realistic molecular models of mature and immature kerogens that provide a detailed picture of kerogen's nanostructure without considering the presence of clays and other minerals in shales. We probe the models' strengths and limitations, and show that they predict essential features amenable to experimental validation, including pore distribution, vibrational density of states and stiffness. We also show that kerogen's maturation, which manifests itself as an increase in the sp(2)/sp(3) hybridization ratio, entails a crossover from plastic-to-brittle rupture mechanisms. PMID:26828313

  19. PLATO Simulator: Realistic simulations of expected observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcos-Arenal, P.; Zima, W.; De Ridder, J.; Aerts, C.; Huygen, R.; Samadi, R.; Green, J.; Piotto, G.; Salmon, S.; Catala, C.; Rauer, H.

    2015-06-01

    PLATO Simulator is an end-to-end simulation software tool designed for the performance of realistic simulations of the expected observations of the PLATO mission but easily adaptable to similar types of missions. It models and simulates photometric time-series of CCD images by including models of the CCD and its electronics, the telescope optics, the stellar field, the jitter movements of the spacecraft, and all important natural noise sources.

  20. Dynamical Symmetries Reflected in Realistic Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sviratcheva, K.D.; Draayer, J.P.; Vary, J.P.; /Iowa State U. /LLNL, Livermore /SLAC

    2007-04-06

    Realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions, derived within the framework of meson theory or more recently in terms of chiral effective field theory, yield new possibilities for achieving a unified microscopic description of atomic nuclei. Based on spectral distribution methods, a comparison of these interactions to a most general Sp(4) dynamically symmetric interaction, which previously we found to reproduce well that part of the interaction that is responsible for shaping pairing-governed isobaric analog 0{sup +} states, can determine the extent to which this significantly simpler model Hamiltonian can be used to obtain an approximate, yet very good description of low-lying nuclear structure. And furthermore, one can apply this model in situations that would otherwise be prohibitive because of the size of the model space. In addition, we introduce a Sp(4) symmetry breaking term by including the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction in the analysis and examining the capacity of this extended model interaction to imitate realistic interactions. This provides a further step towards gaining a better understanding of the underlying foundation of realistic interactions and their ability to reproduce striking features of nuclei such as strong pairing correlations or collective rotational motion.

  1. A realistic evaluation: the case of protocol-based care

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background 'Protocol based care' was envisioned by policy makers as a mechanism for delivering on the service improvement agenda in England. Realistic evaluation is an increasingly popular approach, but few published examples exist, particularly in implementation research. To fill this gap, within this paper we describe the application of a realistic evaluation approach to the study of protocol-based care, whilst sharing findings of relevance about standardising care through the use of protocols, guidelines, and pathways. Methods Situated between positivism and relativism, realistic evaluation is concerned with the identification of underlying causal mechanisms, how they work, and under what conditions. Fundamentally it focuses attention on finding out what works, for whom, how, and in what circumstances. Results In this research, we were interested in understanding the relationships between the type and nature of particular approaches to protocol-based care (mechanisms), within different clinical settings (context), and what impacts this resulted in (outcomes). An evidence review using the principles of realist synthesis resulted in a number of propositions, i.e., context, mechanism, and outcome threads (CMOs). These propositions were then 'tested' through multiple case studies, using multiple methods including non-participant observation, interviews, and document analysis through an iterative analysis process. The initial propositions (conjectured CMOs) only partially corresponded to the findings that emerged during analysis. From the iterative analysis process of scrutinising mechanisms, context, and outcomes we were able to draw out some theoretically generalisable features about what works, for whom, how, and what circumstances in relation to the use of standardised care approaches (refined CMOs). Conclusions As one of the first studies to apply realistic evaluation in implementation research, it was a good fit, particularly given the growing emphasis on

  2. 43 CFR 418.11 - Valid headgate deliveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Valid headgate deliveries. 418.11 Section... Conditions of Water Delivery § 418.11 Valid headgate deliveries. The valid water deliveries at the headgate... accordance with §§ 418.8 and 418.10. The District will regularly monitor all water deliveries and report...

  3. Anderson localization for chemically realistic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terletska, Hanna

    2015-03-01

    Disorder which is ubiquitous for most materials can strongly effect their properties. It may change their electronic structures or even cause their localization, known as Anderson localization. Although, substantial progress has been achieved in the description of the Anderson localization, a proper mean-field theory of this phenomenon for more realistic systems remains elusive. Commonly used theoretical methods such as the coherent potential approximation and its cluster extensions fail to describe the Anderson transition, as the average density of states (DOS) employed in such theories is not critical at the transition. However, near the transition, due to the spatial confinement of carriers, the local DOS becomes highly skewed with a log-normal distribution, for which the most probable and the typical values differ noticeably from the average value. Dobrosavljevic et.al., incorporated such ideas in their typical medium theory (TMT), and showed that the typical (not average) DOS is critical at the transition. While the TMT is able to capture the localized states, as a local single site theory it still has several drawbacks. For the disorder Anderson model in three dimension it underestimates the critical disorder strength, and fails to capture the re-entrance behavior of the mobility edge. We have recently developed a cluster extension of the TMT, which addresses these drawbacks by systematically incorporating non-local corrections. This approach converges quickly with cluster size and allows us to incorporate the effect of interactions and realistic electronic structure. As the first steps towards realistic material modeling, we extended our TMDCA formalisms to systems with the off diagonal disorder and multiple bands structures. We also applied our TMDCA scheme to systems with both disorder and interactions and found that correlations effects tend to stabilize the metallic behavior even in two dimensions. This work was supported by DOE SciDAC Grant No. DE-FC02

  4. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  5. Adiabatic Hyperspherical Analysis of Realistic Nuclear Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, K. M.; Kievsky, Alejandro; Greene, Chris H.

    2015-12-01

    Using the hyperspherical adiabatic method with the realistic nuclear potentials Argonne V14, Argonne V18, and Argonne V18 with the Urbana IX three-body potential, we calculate the adiabatic potentials and the triton bound state energies. We find that a discrete variable representation with the slow variable discretization method along the hyperradial degree of freedom results in energies consistent with the literature. However, using a Laguerre basis results in missing energy, even when extrapolated to an infinite number of basis functions and channels. We do not include the isospin T = 3/2 contribution in our analysis.

  6. Quantum states prepared by realistic entanglement swapping

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, Artur; Howard, Regina B.; Sanders, Barry C.; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2009-12-15

    Entanglement swapping between photon pairs is a fundamental building block in schemes using quantum relays or quantum repeaters to overcome the range limits of long-distance quantum key distribution. We develop a closed-form solution for the actual quantum states prepared by realistic entanglement swapping, which takes into account experimental deficiencies due to inefficient detectors, detector dark counts, and multiphoton-pair contributions of parametric down-conversion sources. We investigate how the entanglement present in the final state of the remaining modes is affected by the real-world imperfections. To test the predictions of our theory, comparison with previously published experimental entanglement swapping is provided.

  7. A realistic renormalizable supersymmetric E₆ model

    SciTech Connect

    Bajc, Borut; Susič, Vasja

    2014-01-01

    A complete realistic model based on the supersymmetric version of E₆ is presented. It consists of three copies of matter 27, and a Higgs sector made of 2×(27+27⁻)+351´+351´⁻ representations. An analytic solution to the equations of motion is found which spontaneously breaks the gauge group into the Standard Model. The light fermion mass matrices are written down explicitly as non-linear functions of three Yukawa matrices. This contribution is based on Ref. [1].

  8. Realist model approach to quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hájíček, P.

    2013-06-01

    The paper proves that quantum mechanics is compatible with the constructive realism of modern philosophy of science. The proof is based on the observation that properties of quantum systems that are uniquely determined by their preparations can be assumed objective without the difficulties that are encountered by the same assumption about values of observables. The resulting realist interpretation of quantum mechanics is made rigorous by studying the space of quantum states—the convex set of state operators. Prepared states are classified according to their statistical structure into indecomposable and decomposable instead of pure and mixed. Simple objective properties are defined and showed to form a Boolean lattice.

  9. The realist interpretation of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anduaga, Aitor

    The discovery of a clearly stratified structure of layers in the upper atmosphere has been--and still is--invoked too often as the great paradigm of atmospheric sciences in the 20th century. Behind this vision, an emphasis--or better, an overstatement--on the reality of the concept of layer lies. One of the few historians of physics who have not ignored this phenomenon of reification, C. Stewart Gillmor, attributed it to--somewhat ambiguous-- cultural (or perhaps, more generally, contextual) factors, though he never specified their nature. In this essay, I aim to demonstrate that, in the interwar years, most radiophysicists and some atomic physicists, for reasons principally related to extrinsic influences and to a lesser extent to internal developments of their own science, fervidly embraced a realist interpretation of the ionosphere. We will focus on the historical circumstances in which a specific social and commercial environment came to exert a strong influence on upper atmospheric physicists, and in which realism as a product validating the "truth" of certain practices and beliefs arose. This realist commitment I attribute to the mutual reinforcement of atmospheric physics and commercial and imperial interests in long-distance communications.

  10. Realistic Ground Motion Scenarios: Methodological Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Nunziata, C.; Peresan, A.; Romanelli, F.; Vaccari, F.; Zuccolo, E.; Panza, G. F.

    2008-07-08

    The definition of realistic seismic input can be obtained from the computation of a wide set of time histories, corresponding to possible seismotectonic scenarios. The propagation of the waves in the bedrock from the source to the local laterally varying structure is computed with the modal summation technique, while in the laterally heterogeneous structure the finite difference method is used. The definition of shear wave velocities within the soil cover is obtained from the non-linear inversion of the dispersion curve of group velocities of Rayleigh waves, artificially or naturally generated. Information about the possible focal mechanisms of the sources can be obtained from historical seismicity, based on earthquake catalogues and inversion of isoseismal maps. In addition, morphostructural zonation and pattern recognition of seismogenic nodes is useful to identify areas prone to strong earthquakes, based on the combined analysis of topographic, tectonic, geological maps and satellite photos. We show that the quantitative knowledge of regional geological structures and the computation of realistic ground motion can be a powerful tool for a preventive definition of the seismic hazard in Italy. Then, the formulation of reliable building codes, based on the evaluation of the main potential earthquakes, will have a great impact on the effective reduction of the seismic vulnerability of Italian urban areas, validating or improving the national building code.

  11. Realistic magnetohydrodynamical simulation of solar local supergranulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustyugov, Sergey D.

    2010-12-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of solar surface magnetoconvection using realistic model physics are conducted. The thermal structure of convective motions into the upper radiative layers of the photosphere, the main scales of convective cells and the penetration depths of convection are investigated. We take part of the solar photosphere with a size of 60×60 Mm2 in the horizontal direction and of depth 20 Mm from the level of the visible solar surface. We use a realistic initial model of the sun and apply the equation of state and opacities of stellar matter. The equations of fully compressible radiation magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) with dynamical viscosity and gravity are solved. We apply (i) the conservative total variation diminishing (TVD) difference scheme for MHD, (ii) the diffusion approximation for radiative transfer and (iii) dynamical viscosity from subgrid-scale modeling. In simulation, we take a uniform two-dimensional grid in the horizontal plane and a nonuniform grid in the vertical direction with the number of cells being 600×600×204. We use 512 processors with distributed memory multiprocessors on the supercomputer MVS-100k at the Joint Computational Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

  12. Realistic Radio Communications in Pilot Simulator Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burki-Cohen, Judith; Kendra, Andrew J.; Kanki, Barbara G.; Lee, Alfred T.

    2000-01-01

    Simulators used for total training and evaluation of airline pilots must satisfy stringent criteria in order to assure their adequacy for training and checking maneuvers. Air traffic control and company radio communications simulation, however, may still be left to role-play by the already taxed instructor/evaluators in spite of their central importance in every aspect of the flight environment. The underlying premise of this research is that providing a realistic radio communications environment would increase safety by enhancing pilot training and evaluation. This report summarizes the first-year efforts of assessing the requirement and feasibility of simulating radio communications automatically. A review of the training and crew resource/task management literature showed both practical and theoretical support for the need for realistic radio communications simulation. A survey of 29 instructor/evaluators from 14 airlines revealed that radio communications are mainly role-played by the instructor/evaluators. This increases instructor/evaluators' own workload while unrealistically lowering pilot communications load compared to actual operations, with a concomitant loss in training/evaluation effectiveness. A technology review searching for an automated means of providing radio communications to and from aircraft with minimal human effort showed that while promising, the technology is still immature. Further research and the need for establishing a proof-of-concept are also discussed.

  13. Super stereoscopy technique for comfortable and realistic 3D displays.

    PubMed

    Akşit, Kaan; Niaki, Amir Hossein Ghanbari; Ulusoy, Erdem; Urey, Hakan

    2014-12-15

    Two well-known problems of stereoscopic displays are the accommodation-convergence conflict and the lack of natural blur for defocused objects. We present a new technique that we name Super Stereoscopy (SS3D) to provide a convenient solution to these problems. Regular stereoscopic glasses are replaced by SS3D glasses which deliver at least two parallax images per eye through pinholes equipped with light selective filters. The pinholes generate blur-free retinal images so as to enable correct accommodation, while the delivery of multiple parallax images per eye creates an approximate blur effect for defocused objects. Experiments performed with cameras and human viewers indicate that the technique works as desired. In case two, pinholes equipped with color filters per eye are used; the technique can be used on a regular stereoscopic display by only uploading a new content, without requiring any change in display hardware, driver, or frame rate. Apart from some tolerable loss in display brightness and decrease in natural spatial resolution limit of the eye because of pinholes, the technique is quite promising for comfortable and realistic 3D vision, especially enabling the display of close objects that are not possible to display and comfortably view on regular 3DTV and cinema. PMID:25503026

  14. A realist evaluation of the role of communities of practice in changing healthcare practice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Healthcare organisations seeking to manage knowledge and improve organisational performance are increasingly investing in communities of practice (CoPs). Such investments are being made in the absence of empirical evidence demonstrating the impact of CoPs in improving the delivery of healthcare. A realist evaluation is proposed to address this knowledge gap. Underpinned by the principle that outcomes are determined by the context in which an intervention is implemented, a realist evaluation is well suited to understand the role of CoPs in improving healthcare practice. By applying a realist approach, this study will explore the following questions: What outcomes do CoPs achieve in healthcare? Do these outcomes translate into improved practice in healthcare? What are the contexts and mechanisms by which CoPs improve healthcare? Methods The realist evaluation will be conducted by developing, testing, and refining theories on how, why, and when CoPs improve healthcare practice. When collecting data, context will be defined as the setting in which the CoP operates; mechanisms will be the factors and resources that the community offers to influence a change in behaviour or action; and outcomes will be defined as a change in behaviour or work practice that occurs as a result of accessing resources provided by the CoP. Discussion Realist evaluation is being used increasingly to study social interventions where context plays an important role in determining outcomes. This study further enhances the value of realist evaluations by incorporating a social network analysis component to quantify the structural context associated with CoPs. By identifying key mechanisms and contexts that optimise the effectiveness of CoPs, this study will contribute to creating a framework that will guide future establishment and evaluation of CoPs in healthcare. PMID:21600057

  15. Effect of realistic vegetation variability on seasonal forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, Franco; Alessandri, Andrea; De Felice, Matteo; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco J.

    2014-05-01

    A real predictability hindcast experiment with prescribed Leaf Area Index (LAI) has been performed using the state-of-the-art Earth System Model EC-Earth. LAI input to the climate model has been prescribed using a novel observational dataset based on the third generation GIMMS and MODIS satellite data. The LAI dataset has been pre-processed (monthly averaged, interpolated, gap-filled) to use it in the land surface scheme of EC-Earth (HTESSEL). The vegetation density is modeled by an exponential dependence on LAI, based on the Lambert-Beer formulation. Retrospective hindcasts have been performed with the following model setup: 7 months forecast length, 2 start dates (1st May and 1st November), 10 members, 28 years (1982-2009). Initial conditions were produced at IC3, based on ERA-40/ERA-Interim (atmosphere and land-surface) and NEMOVAR-ORAS4 (ocean and sea-ice) data. Model resolution is T159L62 for the atmosphere and the ORCA1 grid for the ocean. The effect of the realistic LAI prescribed from observation is evaluated with respect to a control experiment where LAI does not vary. Results of the retrospective hindcast experiment demonstrate that a realistic representation of vegetation has a significant effect on evaporation, temperature and precipitation. An improvement of model sensitivity to vegetation variability on the seasonal scale is also evidenced, especially during boreal winter. This may be attributed in particular to the effect of the high vegetation component on the snow cover.

  16. Realistic limits for subpixel movement detection.

    PubMed

    Mas, David; Perez, Jorge; Ferrer, Belen; Espinosa, Julian

    2016-07-01

    Object tracking with subpixel accuracy is of fundamental importance in many fields since it provides optimal performance at relatively low cost. Although there are many theoretical proposals that lead to resolution increments of several orders of magnitude, in practice this resolution is limited by the imaging systems. In this paper we propose and demonstrate through simple numerical models a realistic limit for subpixel accuracy. The final result is that maximum achievable resolution enhancement is connected with the dynamic range of the image, i.e., the detection limit is 1/2(nr.bits). The results here presented may aid in proper design of superresolution experiments in microscopy, surveillance, defense, and other fields. PMID:27409179

  17. Helioseismology of a Realistic Magnetoconvective Sunspot Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, D. C.; Birch, A. C.; Rempel, M.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    We compare helioseismic travel-time shifts measured from a realistic magnetoconvective sunspot simulation using both helioseismic holography and time-distance helioseismology, and measured from real sunspots observed with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Michelson Doppler Imager instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. We find remarkable similarities in the travel-time shifts measured between the methodologies applied and between the simulated and real sunspots. Forward modeling of the travel-time shifts using either Born or ray approximation kernels and the sound-speed perturbations present in the simulation indicates major disagreements with the measured travel-time shifts. These findings do not substantially change with the application of a correction for the reduction of wave amplitudes in the simulated and real sunspots. Overall, our findings demonstrate the need for new methods for inferring the subsurface structure of sunspots through helioseismic inversions.

  18. Field line resonances in a realistic magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, G.K.; Rajaram, R. )

    1989-04-01

    An internally consistent theoretical framework is developed to study the field line oscillations in the realistic magnetospheric magnetic field using the Mead and Fairfield (1975) model. The nondipolar contributions are numerically computed for the fundamental period of the modes that would reduce to the localized toroidal and poloidal modes described by Cummings et al. (1969) in the dipole limit. It is shown that the nondipolar contributions are not significant at the geostationary orbit but become large further out in the magnetosphere. The nondipolar contributions are very different for the two modes. The situation becomes very much more complicated in the dawn/dusk region where a continuous range of periods exist depending on the orientation of the field line oscillation.

  19. Realistic page-turning of electronic books

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Chaoran; Li, Haisheng; Bai, Yannan

    2014-01-01

    The booming electronic books (e-books), as an extension to the paper book, are popular with readers. Recently, many efforts are put into the realistic page-turning simulation o f e-book to improve its reading experience. This paper presents a new 3D page-turning simulation approach, which employs piecewise time-dependent cylindrical surfaces to describe the turning page and constructs smooth transition method between time-dependent cylinders. The page-turning animation is produced by sequentially mapping the turning page into the cylinders with different radii and positions. Compared to the previous approaches, our method is able to imitate various effects efficiently and obtains more natural animation of turning page.

  20. HELIOSEISMOLOGY OF A REALISTIC MAGNETOCONVECTIVE SUNSPOT SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, D. C.; Birch, A. C.; Rempel, M.; Duvall, T. L. Jr. E-mail: aaronb@cora.nwra.com E-mail: Thomas.L.Duvall@nasa.gov

    2012-01-01

    We compare helioseismic travel-time shifts measured from a realistic magnetoconvective sunspot simulation using both helioseismic holography and time-distance helioseismology, and measured from real sunspots observed with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Michelson Doppler Imager instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. We find remarkable similarities in the travel-time shifts measured between the methodologies applied and between the simulated and real sunspots. Forward modeling of the travel-time shifts using either Born or ray approximation kernels and the sound-speed perturbations present in the simulation indicates major disagreements with the measured travel-time shifts. These findings do not substantially change with the application of a correction for the reduction of wave amplitudes in the simulated and real sunspots. Overall, our findings demonstrate the need for new methods for inferring the subsurface structure of sunspots through helioseismic inversions.

  1. Two Realistic Beagle Models for Dose Assessment.

    PubMed

    Stabin, Michael G; Kost, Susan D; Segars, William P; Guilmette, Raymond A

    2015-09-01

    Previously, the authors developed a series of eight realistic digital mouse and rat whole body phantoms based on NURBS technology to facilitate internal and external dose calculations in various species of rodents. In this paper, two body phantoms of adult beagles are described based on voxel images converted to NURBS models. Specific absorbed fractions for activity in 24 organs are presented in these models. CT images were acquired of an adult male and female beagle. The images were segmented, and the organs and structures were modeled using NURBS surfaces and polygon meshes. Each model was voxelized at a resolution of 0.75 × 0.75 × 2 mm. The voxel versions were implemented in GEANT4 radiation transport codes to calculate specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) using internal photon and electron sources. Photon and electron SAFs were then calculated for relevant organs in both models. The SAFs for photons and electrons were compatible with results observed by others. Absorbed fractions for electrons for organ self-irradiation were significantly less than 1.0 at energies above 0.5 MeV, as expected for many of these small-sized organs, and measurable cross irradiation was observed for many organ pairs for high-energy electrons (as would be emitted by nuclides like 32P, 90Y, or 188Re). The SAFs were used with standardized decay data to develop dose factors (DFs) for radiation dose calculations using the RADAR Method. These two new realistic models of male and female beagle dogs will be useful in radiation dosimetry calculations for external or internal simulated sources. PMID:26222214

  2. Realistic texture in simulated thermal infrared imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Jason T.

    Creating a visually-realistic yet radiometrically-accurate simulation of thermal infrared (TIR) imagery is a challenge that has plagued members of industry and academia alike. The goal of imagery simulation is to provide a practical alternative to the often staggering effort required to collect actual data. Previous attempts at simulating TIR imagery have suffered from a lack of texture---the simulated scenes generally failed to reproduce the natural variability seen in actual TIR images. Realistic synthetic TIR imagery requires modeling sources of variability including surface effects such as solar insolation and convective heat exchange as well as sub-surface effects such as density and water content. This research effort utilized the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model, developed at the Rochester Institute of Technology, to investigate how these additional sources of variability could be modeled to correctly and accurately provide simulated TIR imagery. Actual thermal data were collected, analyzed, and exploited to determine the underlying thermodynamic phenomena and ascertain how these phenomena are best modeled. The underlying task was to determine how to apply texture in the thermal region to attain radiometrically-correct, visually-appealing simulated imagery. Three natural desert scenes were used to test the methodologies that were developed for estimating per-pixel thermal parameters which could then be used for TIR image simulation by DIRSIG. Additional metrics were devised and applied to the synthetic images to further quantify the success of this research. The resulting imagery demonstrated that these new methodologies for modeling TIR phenomena and the utilization of an improved DIRSIG tool improved the root mean-squared error (RMSE) of our synthetic TIR imagery by up to 88%.

  3. More Realistic Face Model Surface Improves Relevance of Pediatric In-Vitro Aerosol Studies

    PubMed Central

    Amirav, Israel; Halamish, Asaf; Gorenberg, Miguel; Omar, Hamza; Newhouse, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Various hard face models are commonly used to evaluate the efficiency of aerosol face masks. Softer more realistic “face” surface materials, like skin, deform upon mask application and should provide more relevant in-vitro tests. Studies that simultaneously take into consideration many of the factors characteristic of the in vivo face are lacking. These include airways, various application forces, comparison of various devices, comparison with a hard-surface model and use of a more representative model face based on large numbers of actual faces. Aim To compare mask to “face” seal and aerosol delivery of two pediatric masks using a soft vs. a hard, appropriately representative, pediatric face model under various applied forces. Methods Two identical face models and upper airways replicas were constructed, the only difference being the suppleness and compressibility of the surface layer of the “face.” Integrity of the seal and aerosol delivery of two different masks [AeroChamber (AC) and SootherMask (SM)] were compared using a breath simulator, filter collection and realistic applied forces. Results The soft “face” significantly increased the delivery efficiency and the sealing characteristics of both masks. Aerosol delivery with the soft “face” was significantly greater for the SM compared to the AC (p< 0.01). No statistically significant difference between the two masks was observed with the hard “face.” Conclusions The material and pliability of the model “face” surface has a significant influence on both the seal and delivery efficiency of face masks. This finding should be taken into account during in-vitro aerosol studies. PMID:26090661

  4. Controlled iontophoretic transport of huperzine A across skin in vitro and in vivo: effect of delivery conditions and comparison of pharmacokinetic models.

    PubMed

    Kalaria, Dhaval R; Patel, Pratikkumar; Merino, Virginia; Patravale, Vandana B; Kalia, Yogeshvar N

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate constant current anodal iontophoresis of Huperzine A (HupA) in vitro and in vivo and hence to evaluate the feasibility of using electrically assisted delivery to administer therapeutic amounts of the drug across the skin for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Preliminary experiments were performed using porcine and human skin in vitro. Stability studies demonstrated that HupA was not degraded upon exposure to epidermis or dermis for 12 h and that it was also stable in the presence of an electric current (0.5 mA · cm(-2)). Passive permeation of HupA (2 mM) was minimal (1.1 ± 0.1 μg · cm(-2)); iontophoresis at 0.15, 0.3, and 0.5 mA · cm(-2) produced 106-, 134-, and 184-fold increases in its transport across the skin. Surprisingly, despite the use of a salt bridge to isolate the formulation compartment from the anodal chamber, which contained 133 mM NaCl, iontophoresis of HupA was shown to increase linearly with its concentration (1, 2, and 4 mM in 25 mM MES, pH 5.0) (r(2) = 0.99). This was attributed to the low ratio of drug to Cl¯ (in the skin and in the receiver compartment) which competed strongly to carry current, its depletion, and to possible competition from the zwitterionic MES. Co-iontophoresis of acetaminophen confirmed that electromigration was the dominant electrotransport mechanism. Total delivery across human and porcine skin was found to be statistically equivalent (243.2 ± 33.1 and 235.6 ± 13.7 μg · cm(-2), respectively). Although the transport efficiency was ∼ 1%, the iontophoretic delivery efficiency (i.e., the fraction of the drug load delivered) was extremely high, in the range of 46-81% depending on the current density. Cumulative permeation of HupA from a Carbopol gel formulation after iontophoresis for 6 h at 0.5 mA · cm(-2) was less than that from solution (135.3 ± 25.2 and 202.9 ± 5.2 μg · cm(-2), respectively) but sufficient for therapeutic delivery. Pharmacokinetic parameters were

  5. A Study of Fe3O4 Magnetic Nanoparticle RF Heating in Gellan Gum Polymer Under Various Experimental Conditions for Potential Application in Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Gabriel E.

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have found use in a wide variety of biomedical applications including hyperthermia, imaging and drug delivery. Certain physical properties, such as the ability to generate heat in response to an alternating magnetic field, make these structures ideal for such purposes. This study's objective was to elucidate the mechanisms primarily responsible for RF MNP heating and determine how such processes affect polymer solutions that might be useful in drug delivery. 15-20 nm magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles at 0.2% and 0.5% concentrations were heated with RF fields of different strengths (200 Oe, 400 Oe and 600 Oe) in water and in 0.5% gellan gum solution. Mixing and fan cooling were used in an attempt to improve accuracy of data collection. Specific absorption rate (SAR) values were determined experimentally for each combination of solvent, concentration and field strength. Theoretical calculation of SAR was performed using a model based on linear response theory. Mixing yielded greater precision in experimental determination of SAR while the effects of cooling on this parameter were negligible. Solutions with gellan gum displayed smoother heating over time but no significant changes in SAR values. This was attributed to low polymer concentration and lack of structural phase transition. The LRT model was found to be adequate for calculating SAR at low polymer concentration and was useful in identifying Neel relaxation as the dominant heating process. Heating trials with MNPs in 2% agar confirmed Neel relaxation to be primarily responsible for heat generation in the particles studied.

  6. Realistic electrostatic potentials in a neutron star crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebel, Claudio; Mishustin, Igor; Greiner, Walter

    2015-10-01

    We study the electrostatic properties of inhomogeneous nuclear matter which can be formed in the crusts of neutron stars or in supernova explosions. Such matter is represented by Wigner-Seitz cells of different geometries (spherical, cylindrical, cartesian), which contain nuclei, free neutrons and electrons under the conditions of electrical neutrality. Using the Thomas-Fermi approximation, we have solved the Poisson equation for the electrostatic potential and calculated the corresponding electron density distributions in individual cells. The calculations are done for different shapes and sizes of the cells and different average baryon densities. The electron-to-baryon fraction was fixed at 0.3. Using realistic electron distributions leads to a significant reduction in electrostatic energy and electron chemical potential.

  7. Bosonic structure of realistic SO(10) supersymmetric cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allys, Erwan

    2016-05-01

    We study the bosonic structure of F -term Nambu-Goto cosmic strings forming in a realistic SO(10) implementation, assuming standard hybrid inflation. We describe the supersymmetric grand unified theory, and its spontaneous symmetry breaking scheme in parallel with the inflationary process. We also write the explicit tensor formulation of its scalar sector, focusing on the subrepresentations singlet under the standard model, which is sufficient to describe the string structure. We then introduce an ansatz for Abelian cosmic strings, discussing in details the hypothesis, and write down the field equations and boundary conditions. Finally, after doing a perturbative study of the model, we present and discuss the results obtained with numerical solutions of the string structure.

  8. Realistic calculation of the hep astrophysical factor

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Marcucci; R. Schiavilla; M. Viviani; A. Kievsky; S. Rosati

    2000-03-01

    The astrophysical factor for the proton weak capture on {sup 3}He is calculated with correlated-hyperspherical-harmonics bound and continuum wave functions corresponding to a realistic Hamiltonian consisting of the Argonne {nu}{sub 18} two-nucleon and Urbana-IX three-nucleon interactions. The nuclear weak charge and current operators have vector and axial-vector components, that include one- and many-body terms. All possible multipole transitions connecting any of the p{sup 3}He S- and P-wave channels to the {sup 4}He bound state are considered. The S-factor at a p{sup 3}He center-of-mass energy of 10 keV, close to the Gamow-peak energy, is predicted to be 10.1 x 10{sup {minus}20} keV b, a factor of five larger than the standard-solar-model value. The P-wave transitions are found to be important, contributing about 40 % of the calculated S-factor.

  9. Real-time realistic skin translucency.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Jorge; Whelan, David; Sundstedt, Veronica; Gutierrez, Diego

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion theory allows the production of realistic skin renderings. The dipole and multipole models allow for solving challenging diffusion-theory equations efficiently. By using texture-space diffusion, a Gaussian-based approximation, and programmable graphics hardware, developers can create real-time, photorealistic skin renderings. Performing this diffusion in screen space offers advantages that make diffusion approximation practical in scenarios such as games, where having the best possible performance is crucial. However, unlike the texture-space counterpart, the screen-space approach can't simulate transmittance of light through thin geometry; it yields unrealistic results in those cases. A new transmittance algorithm turns the screen-space approach into an efficient global solution, capable of simulating both reflectance and transmittance of light through a multilayered skin model. The transmittance calculations are derived from physical equations, which are implemented through simple texture access. The method performs in real time, requiring no additional memory usage and only minimal additional processing power and memory bandwidth. Despite its simplicity, this practical model manages to reproduce the look of images rendered with other techniques (both offline and real time) such as photon mapping or diffusion approximation. PMID:20650726

  10. Fast sawtooth reconnection at realistic Lundquist numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günter, S.; Yu, Q.; Lackner, K.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Huang, Y.-M.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection, a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysics, space science and magnetic confinement research, frequently proceeds much faster than predicted by simple resistive MHD theory. Acceleration can result from the break-up of the thin Sweet-Parker current sheet into plasmoids, or from two-fluid effects decoupling mass and magnetic flux transport over the ion inertial length {{v}A}/{ωci} or the drift scale \\sqrt{{{T}e}/{{m}i}}/{ωci}, depending on the absence or presence of a strong magnetic guide field. We describe new results on the modelling of sawtooth reconnection in a simple tokamak geometry (circular cylindrical equilibrium) pushed to realistic Lundquist numbers for present day tokamaks. For the resistive MHD case, the onset criteria and the influence of plasmoids on the reconnection process agree well with earlier results found in the case of vanishing magnetic guide fields. While plasmoids are also observed in two-fluid calculations, they do not dominate the reconnection process for the range of plasma parameters considered in this study. In the two-fluid case they form as a transient phenomenon only. The reconnection times become weakly dependent on the S-value and for the most complete model—including two-fluid effects and equilibrium temperature and density gradients—agree well with those experimentally found on ASDEX Upgrade ≤ft(≤slant 100 μ s\\right).

  11. Differentiability of correlations in realistic quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera, Alejandro; Faria, Edson de; Pujals, Enrique; Tresser, Charles

    2015-09-15

    We prove a version of Bell’s theorem in which the locality assumption is weakened. We start by assuming theoretical quantum mechanics and weak forms of relativistic causality and of realism (essentially the fact that observable values are well defined independently of whether or not they are measured). Under these hypotheses, we show that only one of the correlation functions that can be formulated in the framework of the usual Bell theorem is unknown. We prove that this unknown function must be differentiable at certain angular configuration points that include the origin. We also prove that, if this correlation is assumed to be twice differentiable at the origin, then we arrive at a version of Bell’s theorem. On the one hand, we are showing that any realistic theory of quantum mechanics which incorporates the kinematic aspects of relativity must lead to this type of rough correlation function that is once but not twice differentiable. On the other hand, this study brings us a single degree of differentiability away from a relativistic von Neumann no hidden variables theorem.

  12. Differentiability of correlations in realistic quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Alejandro; de Faria, Edson; Pujals, Enrique; Tresser, Charles

    2015-09-01

    We prove a version of Bell's theorem in which the locality assumption is weakened. We start by assuming theoretical quantum mechanics and weak forms of relativistic causality and of realism (essentially the fact that observable values are well defined independently of whether or not they are measured). Under these hypotheses, we show that only one of the correlation functions that can be formulated in the framework of the usual Bell theorem is unknown. We prove that this unknown function must be differentiable at certain angular configuration points that include the origin. We also prove that, if this correlation is assumed to be twice differentiable at the origin, then we arrive at a version of Bell's theorem. On the one hand, we are showing that any realistic theory of quantum mechanics which incorporates the kinematic aspects of relativity must lead to this type of rough correlation function that is once but not twice differentiable. On the other hand, this study brings us a single degree of differentiability away from a relativistic von Neumann no hidden variables theorem.

  13. Determination of Realistic Fire Scenarios in Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, Daniel L.; Ruff, Gary A.; Urban, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper expands on previous work that examined how large a fire a crew member could successfully survive and extinguish in the confines of a spacecraft. The hazards to the crew and equipment during an accidental fire include excessive pressure rise resulting in a catastrophic rupture of the vehicle skin, excessive temperatures that burn or incapacitate the crew (due to hyperthermia), carbon dioxide build-up or accumulation of other combustion products (e.g. carbon monoxide). The previous work introduced a simplified model that treated the fire primarily as a source of heat and combustion products and sink for oxygen prescribed (input to the model) based on terrestrial standards. The model further treated the spacecraft as a closed system with no capability to vent to the vacuum of space. The model in the present work extends this analysis to more realistically treat the pressure relief system(s) of the spacecraft, include more combustion products (e.g. HF) in the analysis and attempt to predict the fire spread and limiting fire size (based on knowledge of terrestrial fires and the known characteristics of microgravity fires) rather than prescribe them in the analysis. Including the characteristics of vehicle pressure relief systems has a dramatic mitigating effect by eliminating vehicle overpressure for all but very large fires and reducing average gas-phase temperatures.

  14. Comparing Realistic Subthalamic Nucleus Neuron Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njap, Felix; Claussen, Jens C.; Moser, Andreas; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2011-06-01

    The mechanism of action of clinically effective electrical high frequency stimulation is still under debate. However, recent evidence points at the specific activation of GABA-ergic ion channels. Using a computational approach, we analyze temporal properties of the spike trains emitted by biologically realistic neurons of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) as a function of GABA-ergic synaptic input conductances. Our contribution is based on a model proposed by Rubin and Terman and exhibits a wide variety of different firing patterns, silent, low spiking, moderate spiking and intense spiking activity. We observed that most of the cells in our network turn to silent mode when we increase the GABAA input conductance above the threshold of 3.75 mS/cm2. On the other hand, insignificant changes in firing activity are observed when the input conductance is low or close to zero. We thus reproduce Rubin's model with vanishing synaptic conductances. To quantitatively compare spike trains from the original model with the modified model at different conductance levels, we apply four different (dis)similarity measures between them. We observe that Mahalanobis distance, Victor-Purpura metric, and Interspike Interval distribution are sensitive to different firing regimes, whereas Mutual Information seems undiscriminative for these functional changes.

  15. Modeling and Control of Aggregated Air Conditioning Loads Under Realistic Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chin-Yao; Zhang, Wei; Lian, Jianming; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2013-02-24

    Demand-side control is playing an increasingly important role in smart grid control strategies. Modeling the dynamical behavior of a large population of appliances is especially important to evaluate the effectiveness of various load control strategies. In this paper, a high accuracy aggregated model is first developed for a population of HVAC units. The model efficiently includes statistical information of the population, systematically deals with heterogeneity, and accounts for a second-order effect necessary to accurately capture the transient dynamics in the collective response. Furthermore, the model takes into account the lockout effect of the compressor in order to represent the dynamics of the system under control more accurately. Then, a novel closed loop load control strategy is designed to track a desired demand curve and to ensure a stable and smooth response.

  16. A realistic molecular model of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Kushima, Akihiro; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.; Buehler, Markus J.; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-01-01

    Despite decades of studies of calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H), the structurally complex binder phase of concrete, the interplay between chemical composition and density remains essentially unexplored. Together these characteristics of C-S-H define and modulate the physical and mechanical properties of this “liquid stone” gel phase. With the recent determination of the calcium/silicon (C/S = 1.7) ratio and the density of the C-S-H particle (2.6 g/cm3) by neutron scattering measurements, there is new urgency to the challenge of explaining these essential properties. Here we propose a molecular model of C-S-H based on a bottom-up atomistic simulation approach that considers only the chemical specificity of the system as the overriding constraint. By allowing for short silica chains distributed as monomers, dimers, and pentamers, this C-S-H archetype of a molecular description of interacting CaO, SiO2, and H2O units provides not only realistic values of the C/S ratio and the density computed by grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation of water adsorption at 300 K. The model, with a chemical composition of (CaO)1.65(SiO2)(H2O)1.75, also predicts other essential structural features and fundamental physical properties amenable to experimental validation, which suggest that the C-S-H gel structure includes both glass-like short-range order and crystalline features of the mineral tobermorite. Additionally, we probe the mechanical stiffness, strength, and hydrolytic shear response of our molecular model, as compared to experimentally measured properties of C-S-H. The latter results illustrate the prospect of treating cement on equal footing with metals and ceramics in the current application of mechanism-based models and multiscale simulations to study inelastic deformation and cracking. PMID:19805265

  17. Realistic Detectability of Close Interstellar Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Nathaniel V.; Ragozzine, Darin; Granvik, Mikael; Stephens, Denise C.

    2016-07-01

    During the planet formation process, billions of comets are created and ejected into interstellar space. The detection and characterization of such interstellar comets (ICs) (also known as extra-solar planetesimals or extra-solar comets) would give us in situ information about the efficiency and properties of planet formation throughout the galaxy. However, no ICs have ever been detected, despite the fact that their hyperbolic orbits would make them readily identifiable as unrelated to the solar system. Moro-Martín et al. have made a detailed and reasonable estimate of the properties of the IC population. We extend their estimates of detectability with a numerical model that allows us to consider “close” ICs, e.g., those that come within the orbit of Jupiter. We include several constraints on a “detectable” object that allow for realistic estimates of the frequency of detections expected from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and other surveys. The influence of several of the assumed model parameters on the frequency of detections is explored in detail. Based on the expectation from Moro-Martín et al., we expect that LSST will detect 0.001–10 ICs during its nominal 10 year lifetime, with most of the uncertainty from the unknown number density of small (nuclei of ∼0.1–1 km) ICs. Both asteroid and comet cases are considered, where the latter includes various empirical prescriptions of brightening. Using simulated LSST-like astrometric data, we study the problem of orbit determination for these bodies, finding that LSST could identify their orbits as hyperbolic and determine an ephemeris sufficiently accurate for follow-up in about 4–7 days. We give the hyperbolic orbital parameters of the most detectable ICs. Taking the results into consideration, we give recommendations to future searches for ICs.

  18. Realistic Detectability of Close Interstellar Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Nathaniel V.; Ragozzine, Darin; Granvik, Mikael; Stephens, Denise C.

    2016-07-01

    During the planet formation process, billions of comets are created and ejected into interstellar space. The detection and characterization of such interstellar comets (ICs) (also known as extra-solar planetesimals or extra-solar comets) would give us in situ information about the efficiency and properties of planet formation throughout the galaxy. However, no ICs have ever been detected, despite the fact that their hyperbolic orbits would make them readily identifiable as unrelated to the solar system. Moro-Martín et al. have made a detailed and reasonable estimate of the properties of the IC population. We extend their estimates of detectability with a numerical model that allows us to consider “close” ICs, e.g., those that come within the orbit of Jupiter. We include several constraints on a “detectable” object that allow for realistic estimates of the frequency of detections expected from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and other surveys. The influence of several of the assumed model parameters on the frequency of detections is explored in detail. Based on the expectation from Moro-Martín et al., we expect that LSST will detect 0.001–10 ICs during its nominal 10 year lifetime, with most of the uncertainty from the unknown number density of small (nuclei of ˜0.1–1 km) ICs. Both asteroid and comet cases are considered, where the latter includes various empirical prescriptions of brightening. Using simulated LSST-like astrometric data, we study the problem of orbit determination for these bodies, finding that LSST could identify their orbits as hyperbolic and determine an ephemeris sufficiently accurate for follow-up in about 4–7 days. We give the hyperbolic orbital parameters of the most detectable ICs. Taking the results into consideration, we give recommendations to future searches for ICs.

  19. Generation of a conditionally self-eliminating HAC gene delivery vector through incorporation of a tTAVP64 expression cassette

    PubMed Central

    Kononenko, Artem V.; Lee, Nicholas C.O.; Liskovykh, Mikhail; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Earnshaw, William C.; Larionov, Vladimir; Kouprina, Natalay

    2015-01-01

    Human artificial chromosome (HAC)-based vectors represent an alternative technology for gene delivery and expression with a potential to overcome the problems caused by virus-based vectors. The recently developed alphoidtetO-HAC has an advantage over other HAC vectors because it can be easily eliminated from cells by inactivation of the HAC kinetochore via binding of chromatin modifiers, tTA or tTS, to its centromeric tetO sequences. This provides a unique control for phenotypes induced by genes loaded into the HAC. The alphoidtetO-HAC elimination is highly efficient when a high level of chromatin modifiers as tetR fusion proteins is achieved following transfection of cells by a retrovirus vector. However, such vectors are potentially mutagenic and might want to be avoided under some circumstances. Here, we describe a novel system that allows verification of phenotypic changes attributed to expression of genes from the HAC without a transfection step. We demonstrated that a single copy of tTAVP64 carrying four tandem repeats of the VP16 domain constitutively expressed from the HAC is capable to generate chromatin changes in the HAC kinetochore that are not compatible with its function. To adopt the alphoidtetO-HAC for routine gene function studies, we constructed a new TAR-BRV- tTAVP64 cloning vector that allows a selective isolation of a gene of interest from genomic DNA in yeast followed by its direct transfer to bacterial cells and subsequent loading into the loxP site of the alphoidtetO-HAC in hamster CHO cells from where the HAC may be MMCT-transferred to the recipient human cells. PMID:25712097

  20. Towards a realistic population of simulated galaxy groups and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Brun, Amandine M. C.; McCarthy, Ian G.; Schaye, Joop; Ponman, Trevor J.

    2014-06-01

    We present a new suite of large-volume cosmological hydrodynamical simulations called cosmo-OWLS. They form an extension to the OverWhelmingly Large Simulations (OWLS) project, and have been designed to help improve our understanding of cluster astrophysics and non-linear structure formation, which are now the limiting systematic errors when using clusters as cosmological probes. Starting from identical initial conditions in either the Planck or WMAP7 cosmologies, we systematically vary the most important `sub-grid' physics, including feedback from supernovae and active galactic nuclei (AGN). We compare the properties of the simulated galaxy groups and clusters to a wide range of observational data, such as X-ray luminosity and temperature, gas mass fractions, entropy and density profiles, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich flux, I-band mass-to-light ratio, dominance of the brightest cluster galaxy and central massive black hole (BH) masses, by producing synthetic observations and mimicking observational analysis techniques. These comparisons demonstrate that some AGN feedback models can produce a realistic population of galaxy groups and clusters, broadly reproducing both the median trend and, for the first time, the scatter in physical properties over approximately two decades in mass (1013 M⊙ ≲ M500 ≲ 1015 M⊙) and 1.5 decades in radius (0.05 ≲ r/r500 ≲ 1.5). However, in other models, the AGN feedback is too violent (even though they reproduce the observed BH scaling relations), implying that calibration of the models is required. The production of realistic populations of simulated groups and clusters, as well as models that bracket the observations, opens the door to the creation of synthetic surveys for assisting the astrophysical and cosmological interpretation of cluster surveys, as well as quantifying the impact of selection effects.

  1. Active and realistic passive marijuana exposure tested by three immunoassays and GC/MS in urine

    SciTech Connect

    Mule, S.J.; Lomax, P.; Gross, S.J.

    1988-05-01

    Human urine samples obtained before and after active and passive exposure to marijuana were analyzed by immune kits (Roche, Amersham, and Syva) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Seven of eight subjects were positive for the entire five-day test period with one immune kit. The latter correlated with GC/MS in 98% of the samples. Passive inhalation experiments under conditions likely to reflect realistic exposure resulted consistently in less than 10 ng/mL of cannabinoids. The 10-100-ng/mL cannabinoid concentration range essential for detection of occasional and moderate marijuana users is thus unaffected by realistic passive inhalation.

  2. A realist evaluation of the management of a well- performing regional hospital in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Realist evaluation offers an interesting approach to evaluation of interventions in complex settings, but has been little applied in health care. We report on a realist case study of a well performing hospital in Ghana and show how such a realist evaluation design can help to overcome the limited external validity of a traditional case study. Methods We developed a realist evaluation framework for hypothesis formulation, data collection, data analysis and synthesis of the findings. Focusing on the role of human resource management in hospital performance, we formulated our hypothesis around the high commitment management concept. Mixed methods were used in data collection, including individual and group interviews, observations and document reviews. Results We found that the human resource management approach (the actual intervention) included induction of new staff, training and personal development, good communication and information sharing, and decentralised decision-making. We identified 3 additional practices: ensuring optimal physical working conditions, access to top managers and managers' involvement on the work floor. Teamwork, recognition and trust emerged as key elements of the organisational climate. Interviewees reported high levels of organisational commitment. The analysis unearthed perceived organisational support and reciprocity as underlying mechanisms that link the management practices with commitment. Methodologically, we found that realist evaluation can be fruitfully used to develop detailed case studies that analyse how management interventions work and in which conditions. Analysing the links between intervention, mechanism and outcome increases the explaining power, while identification of essential context elements improves the usefulness of the findings for decision-makers in other settings (external validity). We also identified a number of practical difficulties and priorities for further methodological development

  3. Search for a Realistic Orbifold Grand Unification

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, Yoshiharu

    2008-05-13

    We review the prototype model of a grand unified theory on the orbifold S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2} and discuss topics related to the choice of boundary conditions; the dynamical rearrangement of gauge symmetry and the equivalence classes of BCs. We explore a family unification scenario by orbifolding.

  4. Towards a realistic prediction of the solar wind plasma microinstabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Marian; Poedts, Stefaan; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    2015-04-01

    Two scenarios are known for the origin of the field and density fluctuations observed in the solar wind. Thus, the fluctuations can be induced at different scales, either locally and self-consistently by the kinetic anisotropy of plasma particles, or can be injected at larger scales closer to the Sun and then decayed and transported by the super-Alfvénic wind. In both scenarios, details of the plasma microstates - the particle velocity distributions (VDFs), are needed for an accurate description of the fluctuations. In-situ measurements reveal nonequilibrium plasmas with VDFs comprising two major components, a Maxwellian (thermal) core and a less dense but hotter suprathermal halo with a power-law distribution best described by the Kappa models, and the field-aligned strahl as a third component, usually assimilated with the suprathermal populations. Despite this observational evidence, the existing attempts to parameterize the observed (anisotropic) distributions and the supporting fluctuations and instabilities are limited to simplified models, which either ignore the suprathermal halo or just minimize the role of the core assuming it cold, or artificially incorporates both the core and halo in a single, global Kappa that is nearly Maxwellian at low speeds and decreases smoothly as a power law at high speeds. Simplified models imply a reduced number of plasma parameters and are convenient computationally, but they omit important kinetic effects of the plasma particles. Realistic models imply a large number of parameters, especially in the presence of kinetic anisotropies, and make it difficult to identify the instability conditions. However, in a recent endeavor to investigate nonindealized situations when both the core and halo temperatures are finite and anisotropic, we found computationally tractable such a complex model that combines an anisotropic bi-Maxwellian core and an anisotropic bi-Kappa halo. This model is relevant for the slow wind conditions and, in

  5. Synthetic Tumor Networks for Screening Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Shen, Ming-Che; Nichols, Joseph B.; Garson, Charles J.; Mills, Ivy R.; Matar, Majed M.; Fewell, Jason G.; Pant, Kapil

    2015-01-01

    Tumor drug delivery is a complex phenomenon affected by several elements in addition to drug or delivery vehicle’s physico-chemical properties. A key factor is tumor microvasculature with complex effects including convective transport, high interstitial pressure and enhanced vascular permeability due to the presence of “leaky vessels”. Current in vitro models of the tumor microenvironment for evaluating drug delivery are oversimplified and, as a result, show poor correlation with in vivo performance. In this study, we report on the development of a novel microfluidic platform that models the tumor microenvironment more accurately, with physiologically and morphologically realistic microvasculature including endothelial cell lined leaky capillary vessels along with 3D solid tumors. Endothelial cells and 3D spheroids of cervical tumor cells were co-cultured in the networks. Drug vehicle screening was demonstrated using GFP gene delivery by different formulations of nanopolymers. The synthetic tumor network was successful in predicting in vivo delivery efficiencies of the drug vehicles. The developed assay will have critical applications both in basic research, where it can be used to develop next generation delivery vehicles, and in drug discovery where it can be used to study drug transport and delivery efficacy in realistic tumor microenvironment, thereby enabling drug compound and/or delivery vehicle screening. PMID:25599856

  6. Synthetic tumor networks for screening drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Shen, Ming-Che; Nichols, Joseph B; Garson, Charles J; Mills, Ivy R; Matar, Majed M; Fewell, Jason G; Pant, Kapil

    2015-03-10

    Tumor drug delivery is a complex phenomenon affected by several elements in addition to drug or delivery vehicle's physico-chemical properties. A key factor is tumor microvasculature with complex effects including convective transport, high interstitial pressure and enhanced vascular permeability due to the presence of "leaky vessels". Current in vitro models of the tumor microenvironment for evaluating drug delivery are oversimplified and, as a result, show poor correlation with in vivo performance. In this study, we report on the development of a novel microfluidic platform that models the tumor microenvironment more accurately, with physiologically and morphologically realistic microvasculature including endothelial cell lined leaky capillary vessels along with 3D solid tumors. Endothelial cells and 3D spheroids of cervical tumor cells were co-cultured in the networks. Drug vehicle screening was demonstrated using GFP gene delivery by different formulations of nanopolymers. The synthetic tumor network was successful in predicting in vivo delivery efficiencies of the drug vehicles. The developed assay will have critical applications both in basic research, where it can be used to develop next generation delivery vehicles, and in drug discovery where it can be used to study drug transport and delivery efficacy in realistic tumor microenvironment, thereby enabling drug compound and/or delivery vehicle screening. PMID:25599856

  7. Non-invasive, photonics-based diagnostic, imaging, monitoring, and light delivery techniques for the recognition, quantification and treatment of malignant and chronic inflammatory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, N.; Davies-Shaw, D.; Shaw, J. D.

    2007-02-01

    We report firsthand on innovative developments in non-invasive, biophotonic techniques for a wide range of diagnostic, imaging and treatment options, including the recognition and quantification of cancerous, pre-cancerous cells and chronic inflammatory conditions. These techniques have benefited from the ability to target the affected site by both monochromatic light and broad multiple wavelength spectra. The employment of such wavelength or color-specific properties embraces the fluorescence stimulation of various photosensitizing drugs, and the instigation and detection of identified fluorescence signatures attendant upon laser induced fluorescence (LIF) phenomena as transmitted and propagated by precancerous, cancerous and normal tissue. In terms of tumor imaging and therapeutic and treatment options, we have exploited the abilities of various wavelengths to penetrate to different depths, through different types of tissues, and have explored quantifiable absorption and reflection characteristics upon which diagnostic assumptions can be reliably based and formulated. These biophotonic-based diagnostic, sensing and imaging techniques have also benefited from, and have been further enhanced by, the integrated ability to provide various power levels to be employed at various stages in the procedure. Applications are myriad, including non-invasive, non destructive diagnosis of in vivo cell characteristics and functions; light-based tissue analysis; real-time monitoring and mapping of brain function and of tumor growth; real time monitoring of the surgical completeness of tumor removal during laser-imaged/guided brain resection; diagnostic procedures based on fluorescence life-time monitoring, the monitoring of chronic inflammatory conditions (including rheumatoid arthritis), and continuous blood glucose monitoring in the control of diabetes.

  8. An immersed-boundary framework for patient-specific optimization of inhaled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaou, Laura; Zaki, Tamer

    2014-11-01

    Predictive numerical simulations have the potential to significantly enhance therapies for lung disease by providing a valuable clinical aid and a platform to optimize drug delivery. A difficult challenge, however, is the influence of inter-subject variations of the airway geometries and their impact on the airflow and aerosol deposition. A personalized approach to the treatment of respiratory diseases is therefore required. An in silico framework for patient-specific predictions of the flow and aerosol deposition in the respiratory airways is presented. The approach efficiently accommodates geometric variation and airway motion in order to optimize pulmonary drug delivery. A non-rigid registration method is adopted to construct dynamic airway models conforming to the patient's breathing. Accurate predictions of the flow in realistic airway geometries are computed using direct numerical simulations (DNS) with boundary conditions enforced using a robust, implicit immersed boundary (IB) method for curvilinear meshes. A Lagrangian particle-tracking scheme is adopted to model the transport and deposition of the aerosol particles in the airways. Examples of flow and aerosol deposition in realistic extrathoracic airways and of a patient-specific dynamic lung model are presented.

  9. The use and limitation of realistic evaluation as a tool for evidence-based practice: a critical realist perspective.

    PubMed

    Porter, Sam; O'Halloran, Peter

    2012-03-01

    The use and limitation of realistic evaluation as a tool for evidence-based practice: a critical realist perspective In this paper, we assess realistic evaluation's articulation with evidence-based practice (EBP) from the perspective of critical realism. We argue that the adoption by realistic evaluation of a realist causal ontology means that it is better placed to explain complex healthcare interventions than the traditional method used by EBP, the randomized controlled trial (RCT). However, we do not conclude from this that the use of RCTs is without merit, arguing that it is possible to use both methods in combination under the rubric of realist theory. More negatively, we contend that the rejection of critical theory and utopianism by realistic evaluation in favour of the pragmatism of piecemeal social engineering means that it is vulnerable to accusations that it promotes technocratic interpretations of human problems. We conclude that, insofar as realistic evaluation adheres to the ontology of critical realism, it provides a sound contribution to EBP, but insofar as it rejects the critical turn of Bhaskar's realism, it replicates the technocratic tendencies inherent in EBP. PMID:22212367

  10. Competence of birth attendants at providing emergency obstetric care under India’s JSY conditional cash transfer program for institutional delivery: an assessment using case vignettes in Madhya Pradesh province

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Access to emergency obstetric care by competent staff can reduce maternal mortality. India has launched the Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY) conditional cash transfer program to promote institutional births. During implementation of the JSY, India witnessed a steep increase in the proportion of institutional deliveries-from 40% in 2004 to 73% in 2012. However, maternal mortality reduction follows a secular trend. Competent management of complications, when women deliver in facilities under the JSY, is essential for reduction in maternal mortality and therefore to a successful program outcome. We investigate, using clinical vignettes, whether birth attendants at institutions under the program are competent at providing appropriate care for obstetric complications. Methods A facility based cross-sectional study was conducted in three districts of Madhya Pradesh (MP) province. Written case vignettes for two obstetric complications, hemorrhage and eclampsia, were administered to 233 birth attendant nurses at 73 JSY facilities. Their competence at (a) initial assessment, (b) diagnosis, and (c) making decisions on appropriate first-line care for these complications was scored. Results The mean emergency obstetric care (EmOC) competence score was 5.4 (median = 5) on a total score of 20, and 75% of participants scored below 35% of the maximum score. The overall score, although poor, was marginally higher in respondents with Skilled Birth Attendant (SBA) training, those with general nursing and midwifery qualifications, those at higher facility levels, and those conducting >30 deliveries a month. In all, 14% of respondents were competent at assessment, 58% were competent at making a correct clinical diagnosis, and 20% were competent at providing first-line care. Conclusions Birth attendants in the JSY facilities have low competence at EmOC provision. Hence, births in the JSY program cannot be considered to have access to competent EmOC. Urgent efforts are

  11. Unsteady transonic algorithm improvements for realistic aircraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    1987-01-01

    Improvements to a time-accurate approximate factorization (AF) algorithm were implemented for steady and unsteady transonic analysis of realistic aircraft configurations. These algorithm improvements were made to the CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code developed at the Langley Research Center. The code permits the aeroelastic analysis of complete aircraft in the flutter critical transonic speed range. The AF algorithm of the CAP-TSD code solves the unsteady transonic small-disturbance equation. The algorithm improvements include: an Engquist-Osher (E-O) type-dependent switch to more accurately and efficiently treat regions of supersonic flow; extension of the E-O switch for second-order spatial accuracy in these regions; nonreflecting far field boundary conditions for more accurate unsteady applications; and several modifications which accelerate convergence to steady-state. Calculations are presented for several configurations including the General Dynamics one-ninth scale F-16C aircraft model to evaluate the algorithm modifications. The modifications have significantly improved the stability of the AF algorithm and hence the reliability of the CAP-TSD code in general.

  12. Conceptual priming for realistic auditory scenes and for auditory words.

    PubMed

    Frey, Aline; Aramaki, Mitsuko; Besson, Mireille

    2014-02-01

    Two experiments were conducted using both behavioral and Event-Related brain Potentials methods to examine conceptual priming effects for realistic auditory scenes and for auditory words. Prime and target sounds were presented in four stimulus combinations: Sound-Sound, Word-Sound, Sound-Word and Word-Word. Within each combination, targets were conceptually related to the prime, unrelated or ambiguous. In Experiment 1, participants were asked to judge whether the primes and targets fit together (explicit task) and in Experiment 2 they had to decide whether the target was typical or ambiguous (implicit task). In both experiments and in the four stimulus combinations, reaction times and/or error rates were longer/higher and the N400 component was larger to ambiguous targets than to conceptually related targets, thereby pointing to a common conceptual system for processing auditory scenes and linguistic stimuli in both explicit and implicit tasks. However, fine-grained analyses also revealed some differences between experiments and conditions in scalp topography and duration of the priming effects possibly reflecting differences in the integration of perceptual and cognitive attributes of linguistic and nonlinguistic sounds. These results have clear implications for the building-up of virtual environments that need to convey meaning without words. PMID:24378910

  13. Convective aggregation in idealised models and realistic equatorial cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, Chris

    2015-04-01

    Idealised explicit convection simulations of the Met Office Unified Model are shown to exhibit spontaneous self-aggregation in radiative-convective equilibrium, as seen previously in other models in several recent studies. This self-aggregation is linked to feedbacks between radiation, surface fluxes, and convection, and the organization is intimately related to the evolution of the column water vapour (CWV) field. To investigate the relevance of this behaviour to the real world, these idealized simulations are compared with five 15-day cases of real organized convection in the tropics, including multiple simulations of each case testing sensitivities of the convective organization and mean states to interactive radiation, interactive surface fluxes, and evaporation of rain. Despite similar large-scale forcing via lateral boundary conditions, systematic differences in mean CWV, CWV distribution shape, and the length scale of CWV features are found between the different sensitivity runs, showing that there are at least some similarities in sensitivities to these feedbacks in both idealized and realistic simulations.

  14. Challenges of nurse delivery of psychological interventions for long-term conditions in primary care: a qualitative exploration of the case of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The evidence base for a range of psychosocial and behavioural interventions in managing and supporting patients with long-term conditions (LTCs) is now well-established. With increasing numbers of such patients being managed in primary care, and a shortage of specialists in psychology and behavioural management to deliver interventions, therapeutic interventions are increasingly being delivered by general nurses with limited training in psychological interventions. It is unknown what issues this raises for the nurses or their patients. The purpose of the study was to examine the challenges faced by non-specialist nurses when delivering psychological interventions for an LTC (chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis [CFS/ME]) within a primary care setting. Methods A qualitative study nested within a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN 74156610] explored the experiences and acceptability of two different psychological interventions (pragmatic rehabilitation and supportive listening) from the perspectives of nurses, their supervisors, and patients. Semi structured in-depth interviews were conducted with three nurse therapists, three supervisors, and 46 patients. An iterative approach was used to develop conceptual categories from the dataset. Results Analyses identified four sets of challenges that were common to both interventions: (i) being a novice therapist, (ii) engaging patients in the therapeutic model, (iii) dealing with emotions, and (iv) the complexity of primary care. Each challenge had the potential to cause tension between therapist and patient. A number of strategies were developed by participants to manage the tensions. Conclusions Tensions existed for nurses when attempting to deliver psychological interventions for patients with CFS/ME in this primary care trial. Such tensions should be addressed before implementing psychological interventions within routine clinical practice. Similar tensions may be found for other LTCs. Our

  15. Effects of realistic tensor force on nuclear structure

    SciTech Connect

    Nakada, H.

    2012-10-20

    First-order tensor-force effects on nuclear structure are investigated in the self-consistent mean-field and RPA calculations with the M3Y-type semi-realistic interactions, which contain the realistic tensor force. The tensor force plays a key role in Z- or N-dependence of the shell structure, and in transitions involving spin degrees-of-freedom. It is demonstrated that the semi-realistic interactions successfully describe the N-dependence of the shell structure in the proton-magic nuclei (e.g. Ca and Sn), and the magnetic transitions (e.g. M1 transition in {sup 208}Pb).

  16. Metastable cosmic strings in realistic models

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, R.; Hsu, S.; Vachaspati, T.; Watkins, R. |

    1992-11-01

    The stability of the electroweak Z-string is investigated at high temperatures. The results show that, while finite temperature corrections can improve the stability of the Z-string, their effect is not strong enough to stabilize the Z-string in the standard electroweak model. Consequently, the Z-string will be unstable even under the conditions present during the electroweak phase transition. Phenomenologically viable models based on the gauge group SU(2){sub L} {times} SU(2) {sub R} {times} U(1){sub B-L} are then considered, and it is shown that metastable strings exist and are stable to small perturbations for a large region of the parameter space for these models. It is also shown that these strings are superconducting with bosonic charge carriers. The string superconductivity may be able to stabilize segments and loops against dynamical contraction. Possible implications of these strings for cosmology are discussed.

  17. Metastable cosmic strings in realistic models

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, R. . Dept. of Physics); Hsu, S. . Lyman Lab. of Physics); Vachaspati, T. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Watkins, R. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1992-01-01

    The stability of the electroweak Z-string is investigated at high temperatures. The results show that, while finite temperature corrections can improve the stability of the Z-string, their effect is not strong enough to stabilize the Z-string in the standard electroweak model. Consequently, the Z-string will be unstable even under the conditions present during the electroweak phase transition. Phenomenologically viable models based on the gauge group SU(2)[sub L] [times] SU(2) [sub R] [times] U(1)[sub B-L] are then considered, and it is shown that metastable strings exist and are stable to small perturbations for a large region of the parameter space for these models. It is also shown that these strings are superconducting with bosonic charge carriers. The string superconductivity may be able to stabilize segments and loops against dynamical contraction. Possible implications of these strings for cosmology are discussed.

  18. Toward a realistic low-field SSC lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Heifets, S.

    1985-10-01

    Three six-fold lattices for 3 T superferric SSC have been generated at TAC. The program based on the first order canonical transformation was used to compare lattices. On this basis the realistic race-track lattices were generated.

  19. Student Work Experience: A Realistic Approach to Merchandising Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horridge, Patricia; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Relevant and realistic experiences are needed to prepare the student for a future career. Addresses the results of a survey of colleges and universities in the United States in regard to their student work experience (SWE) in fashion merchandising. (Author)

  20. Obscurant representation for realistic IR simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozard, Patrick; Le Goff, Alain; Cathala, Thierry; Latger, Jean; Boudet, Antoine

    2003-09-01

    Obscurant representation is a key component of ground battlefield simulation, especially in the infrared domain. Obscurant are special counter measures (clouds) classically used to hide armored vehicles and deceive threatens. Obscurants are very difficult to represent especially because of multi diffusion effects of hot particles and smoke, but this representation is very important to quantify the efficiency of the decoy. This article describes a new model being involved in the simulation workshop CHORALE of the French MoD. The simulation workshop CHORALE developed in collaboration with OKTAL SE company is used by government services and industrial companies for weapon system validation and qualification trials in the infrared domain. The main operational reference for CHORALE is the assessment of the infrared guidance system of the Storm Shadow missile French version, called Scalp. This new model, integrated in CHORALE, enables to simulate the emitted radiance and the transmission of any pre computed obscurant cloud in the virtual battlefield. In the modeling step, the cloud is defined by a set of "voxels" (elementary volume elements). Each voxel contains the spectral extinction coefficient and the spectral scattering coefficients. The shape, i.e. the voxels content, is changing with time to convey the dynamic evolution of the obscurant. In the Non Real Time rendering step, primary rays are traced inside the clouds. For each voxel, scattering rays are then traced to their neighboring voxels and the local hot sources. Actually, ray tracing is used to solve the Radiative Transfer Equation. The main advantage is to be able to solve it taking into account the synthetic environment: the local terrain, the target hidden in the cloud, the atmospheric and weather conditions. The main originality is the multithreading ray tracing which enables to tackle huge quantities of rays in complex geometric environment.

  1. Realistic Image Rendition Using a Variable Exponent Functional Model for Retinex.

    PubMed

    Dou, Zeyang; Gao, Kun; Zhang, Bin; Yu, Xinyan; Han, Lu; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    The goal of realistic image rendition is to recover the acquired image under imperfect illuminant conditions, where non-uniform illumination may degrade image quality with high contrast and low SNR. In this paper, the assumption regarding illumination is modified and a variable exponent functional model for Retinex is proposed to remove non-uniform illumination and reduce halo artifacts. The theoretical derivation is provided and experimental results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed model. PMID:27338379

  2. Realistic Image Rendition Using a Variable Exponent Functional Model for Retinex

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Zeyang; Gao, Kun; Zhang, Bin; Yu, Xinyan; Han, Lu; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    The goal of realistic image rendition is to recover the acquired image under imperfect illuminant conditions, where non–uniform illumination may degrade image quality with high contrast and low SNR. In this paper, the assumption regarding illumination is modified and a variable exponent functional model for Retinex is proposed to remove non–uniform illumination and reduce halo artifacts. The theoretical derivation is provided and experimental results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed model. PMID:27338379

  3. Ocular delivery of macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo-Chun; Chiang, Bryce; Wu, Xianggen; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are making increasing impact on medicine, including treatment of indications in the eye. Macromolecular drugs are typically given by physician-administered invasive delivery methods, because non--invasive ocular delivery methods, such as eye drops, and systemic delivery, have low bioavailability and/or poor ocular targeting. There is a need to improve delivery of biopharmaceuticals to enable less-invasive delivery routes, less-frequent dosing through controlled-release drug delivery and improved drug targeting within the eye to increase efficacy and reduce side effects. This review discusses the barriers to drug delivery via various ophthalmic routes of administration in the context of macromolecule delivery and discusses efforts to develop controlled-release systems for delivery of biopharmaceuticals to the eye. The growing number of macromolecular therapies in the eye needs improved drug delivery methods that increase drug efficacy, safety and patient compliance. PMID:24998941

  4. The visualizable, the representable and the inconceivable: realist and non-realist mathematical models in physics and beyond.

    PubMed

    Plotnitsky, Arkady

    2016-01-13

    The project of this article is twofold. First, it aims to offer a new perspective on, and a new argument concerning, realist and non-realist mathematical models, and differences and affinities between them, using physics as a paradigmatic field of mathematical modelling in science. Most of the article is devoted to this topic. Second, the article aims to explore the implications of this argument for mathematical modelling in other fields, in particular in cognitive psychology and economics. PMID:26621990

  5. Non-tachyonic semi-realistic non-supersymmetric heterotic-string vacua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashfaque, Johar M.; Athanasopoulos, Panos; Faraggi, Alon E.; Sonmez, Hasan

    2016-04-01

    The heterotic-string models in the free fermionic formulation gave rise to some of the most realistic-string models to date, which possess N=1 spacetime supersymmetry. Lack of evidence for supersymmetry at the LHC instigated recent interest in non-supersymmetric heterotic-string vacua. We explore what may be learned in this context from the quasi-realistic free fermionic models. We show that constructions with a low number of families give rise to proliferation of a priori tachyon producing sectors, compared to the non-realistic examples, which typically may contain only one such sector. The reason being that in the realistic cases the internal six dimensional space is fragmented into smaller units. We present one example of a quasi-realistic, non-supersymmetric, non-tachyonic, heterotic-string vacuum and compare the structure of its massless spectrum to the corresponding supersymmetric vacuum. While in some sectors supersymmetry is broken explicitly, i.e. the bosonic and fermionic sectors produce massless and massive states, other sectors, and in particular those leading to the chiral families, continue to exhibit Fermi-Bose degeneracy. In these sectors the massless spectrum, as compared to the supersymmetric cases, will only differ in some local or global U(1) charges. We discuss the conditions for obtaining n_b=n_f at the massless level in these models. Our example model contains an anomalous U(1) symmetry, which generates a tadpole diagram at one-loop order in string perturbation theory. We speculate that this tadpole diagram may cancel the corresponding diagram generated by the one-loop non-vanishing vacuum energy and that in this respect the supersymmetric and non-supersymmetric vacua should be regarded on an equal footing. Finally we discuss vacua that contain two supersymmetry generating sectors.

  6. How does capacity building of health managers work? A realist evaluation study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Marchal, Bruno; Hoeree, Tom; Devadasan, Narayanan; Macq, Jean; Kegels, Guy; Criel, Bart

    2012-01-01

    Introduction There has been a lot of attention on the role of human resource management interventions to improve delivery of health services in low- and middle-income countries. However, studies on this subject are few due to limited research on implementation of programmes and methodological difficulties in conducting experimental studies on human resource interventions. The authors present the protocol of an evaluation of a district-level capacity-building intervention to identify the determinants of performance of health workers in managerial positions and to understand how changes (if any) are brought about. Methods and analysis The aim of this study is to understand how capacity building works. The authors will use realist evaluation to evaluate an intervention in Karnataka, India. The intervention is a capacity-building programme that seeks to improve management capacities of health managers at district and subdistrict levels through periodic classroom-based teaching and mentoring support at the workplace. The authors conducted interviews and reviewed literature on capacity building in health to draw out the programme theory of the intervention. Based on this, the authors formulated hypothetical pathways connecting the expected outcomes of the intervention (planning and supervision) to the inputs (contact classes and mentoring). The authors prepared a questionnaire to assess elements of the programme theory—organisational culture, self-efficacy and supervision. The authors shall conduct a survey among health managers as well as collect qualitative data through interviews with participants and non-participants selected purposively based on their planning and supervision performance. The authors will construct explanations in the form of context–mechanism–outcome configurations from the results. This will be iterative and the authors will use a realist evaluation framework to refine the explanatory theories that are based on the findings to explain and

  7. Realistic modeling of neurons and networks: towards brain simulation

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Egidio; Solinas, Sergio; Garrido, Jesus; Casellato, Claudia; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Mapelli, Jonathan; Gandolfi, Daniela; Prestori, Francesca

    Summary Realistic modeling is a new advanced methodology for investigating brain functions. Realistic modeling is based on a detailed biophysical description of neurons and synapses, which can be integrated into microcircuits. The latter can, in turn, be further integrated to form large-scale brain networks and eventually to reconstruct complex brain systems. Here we provide a review of the realistic simulation strategy and use the cerebellar network as an example. This network has been carefully investigated at molecular and cellular level and has been the object of intense theoretical investigation. The cerebellum is thought to lie at the core of the forward controller operations of the brain and to implement timing and sensory prediction functions. The cerebellum is well described and provides a challenging field in which one of the most advanced realistic microcircuit models has been generated. We illustrate how these models can be elaborated and embedded into robotic control systems to gain insight into how the cellular properties of cerebellar neurons emerge in integrated behaviors. Realistic network modeling opens up new perspectives for the investigation of brain pathologies and for the neurorobotic field. PMID:24139652

  8. Using polychromatic X-radiography to examine realistic imitation firearms.

    PubMed

    Austin, J C; Day, C R; Kearon, A T; Valussi, S; Haycock, P W

    2008-10-25

    Sections 36-41 of the Violent Crimes Reduction Act (2006), which came into force in England and Wales on 1st October 2007, have placed significant restrictions on the sale and possession of 'realistic imitation firearms'. This legislation attempts to produce a definition of a 'realistic imitation' which clearly differentiates these items from other imitation firearms (which are not covered by the legislation). This paper will go a stage further by demonstrating techniques by which blank firing realistic imitation firearms which may be suitable for illegal conversion to fire live rounds may be differentiated from other less 'suitable' (but visually identical) realistic imitations. The article reports on the use of X-radiography, utilizing the bremsstrahlung of a commercial broad spectrum X-ray source, to identify the differences between alloys constituting the barrels of distinct replica and/or blank firing handguns. The resulting pseudo-signatures are transmission spectra over a range from 20 to 75 kV, taken at 1 kV intervals, which are extracted from stacks of registered, field flattened images. It is shown that it is possible to quantify differences between transmission spectra for components of different realistic imitation fire arms, and apply the results to determine the suitability of particular gun barrels from blank firing imitation firearms for illegal conversion to fire live rounds, or related illegal modifications. PMID:18842365

  9. Realistic real-time outdoor rendering in augmented reality.

    PubMed

    Kolivand, Hoshang; Sunar, Mohd Shahrizal

    2014-01-01

    Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR) has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps). Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems. PMID:25268480

  10. Realistic Real-Time Outdoor Rendering in Augmented Reality

    PubMed Central

    Kolivand, Hoshang; Sunar, Mohd Shahrizal

    2014-01-01

    Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR) has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps). Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems. PMID:25268480

  11. Transdermal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Prausnitz, Mark R.; Langer, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery has made an important contribution to medical practice, but has yet to fully achieve its potential as an alternative to oral delivery and hypodermic injections. First-generation transdermal delivery systems have continued their steady increase in clinical use for delivery of small, lipophilic, low-dose drugs. Second-generation delivery systems using chemical enhancers, non-cavitational ultrasound and iontophoresis have also resulted in clinical products; the ability of iontophoresis to control delivery rates in real time provides added functionality. Third-generation delivery systems target their effects to skin’s barrier layer of stratum corneum using microneedles, thermal ablation, microdermabrasion, electroporation and cavitational ultrasound. Microneedles and thermal ablation are currently progressing through clinical trials for delivery of macromolecules and vaccines, such as insulin, parathyroid hormone and influenza vaccine. Using these novel second- and third-generation enhancement strategies, transdermal delivery is poised to significantly increase impact on medicine. PMID:18997767

  12. 43 CFR 418.7 - Who may receive irrigation deliveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Who may receive irrigation deliveries. 418.7 Section 418.7 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION... Conditions of Water Delivery § 418.7 Who may receive irrigation deliveries. Project irrigation...

  13. 43 CFR 418.7 - Who may receive irrigation deliveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Who may receive irrigation deliveries. 418.7 Section 418.7 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION... Conditions of Water Delivery § 418.7 Who may receive irrigation deliveries. Project irrigation...

  14. 43 CFR 418.7 - Who may receive irrigation deliveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Who may receive irrigation deliveries. 418.7 Section 418.7 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION... Conditions of Water Delivery § 418.7 Who may receive irrigation deliveries. Project irrigation...

  15. 43 CFR 418.7 - Who may receive irrigation deliveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Who may receive irrigation deliveries. 418.7 Section 418.7 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION... Conditions of Water Delivery § 418.7 Who may receive irrigation deliveries. Project irrigation...

  16. 43 CFR 418.7 - Who may receive irrigation deliveries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who may receive irrigation deliveries. 418.7 Section 418.7 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION... Conditions of Water Delivery § 418.7 Who may receive irrigation deliveries. Project irrigation...

  17. Optimizing Wind And Hydropower Generation Within Realistic Reservoir Operating Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, T. M.; Clement, M. A.; Zagona, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have evaluated the benefits of utilizing the flexibility of hydropower systems to balance the variability and uncertainty of wind generation. However, previous hydropower and wind coordination studies have simplified non-power constraints on reservoir systems. For example, some studies have only included hydropower constraints on minimum and maximum storage volumes and minimum and maximum plant discharges. The methodology presented here utilizes the pre-emptive linear goal programming optimization solver in RiverWare to model hydropower operations with a set of prioritized policy constraints and objectives based on realistic policies that govern the operation of actual hydropower systems, including licensing constraints, environmental constraints, water management and power objectives. This approach accounts for the fact that not all policy constraints are of equal importance. For example target environmental flow levels may not be satisfied if it would require violating license minimum or maximum storages (pool elevations), but environmental flow constraints will be satisfied before optimizing power generation. Additionally, this work not only models the economic value of energy from the combined hydropower and wind system, it also captures the economic value of ancillary services provided by the hydropower resources. It is recognized that the increased variability and uncertainty inherent with increased wind penetration levels requires an increase in ancillary services. In regions with liberalized markets for ancillary services, a significant portion of hydropower revenue can result from providing ancillary services. Thus, ancillary services should be accounted for when determining the total value of a hydropower system integrated with wind generation. This research shows that the end value of integrated hydropower and wind generation is dependent on a number of factors that can vary by location. Wind factors include wind penetration level

  18. A computer-controlled pump and realistic anthropomorphic respiratory phantom for validating image-guided systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ralph; Wilson, Emmanuel; Tang, Jonathan; Stoianovici, Dan; Cleary, Kevin

    2007-03-01

    The development of image-guided interventions requires validation studies to evaluate new protocols. So far, these validation studies have been limited to animal models and to software and physical phantoms that simulate respiratory motion but cannot accommodate needle punctures in a realistic manner. We have built a computer-controlled pump that drives an anthropomorphic respiratory phantom for simulating natural breathing patterns. This pump consists of a power supply, a motion controller with servo amplifier, linear actuator, and custom fabricated pump assembly. By generating several sample waveforms, we were able to simulate typical breathing patterns. Using this pump, we were able to produce chest wall movements similar to typical chest wall movements observed in humans. This system has potential applications for evaluating new respiratory compensation algorithms and may facilitate improved testing of image-guided protocols under realistic interventional conditions.

  19. Realistic environmental mixtures of hydrophobic compounds do not alter growth of a marine diatom.

    PubMed

    Everaert, Gert; De Laender, Frederik; Claessens, Michiel; Baert, Jan; Monteyne, Els; Roose, Patrick; Goethals, Peter L M; Janssen, Colin R

    2016-01-15

    In this paper we determine whether a realistic mixture of hydrophobic chemicals affects the growth dynamics of a marine diatom and how this effect compares to the effect of temperature, light regime and nutrient conditions. To do so, we examine the specific growth rate of Phaeodactylum tricornutum in a 72 h algal growth inhibition test using a full factorial design with three nutrient regimes, two test temperatures, three light intensities and three chemical exposures. Passive samplers were used to achieve exposure to realistic mixtures of organic chemicals close to ambient concentrations. Nutrient regime, temperature and time interval (24, 48 and 72 h) explained 85% of the observed variability in the experimental data. The variability explained by chemical exposure was about 1%. Overall, ambient concentrations of hydrophobic compounds present in Belgian coastal waters, and for which the passive samplers have affinity, are too low to affect the intrinsic growth rate of P. tricornutum. PMID:26656802

  20. A Distributed Radiator, Heavy Ion Target with Realistic Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Debra A.; Tabak, Max

    1997-11-01

    Recent efforts in heavy ion target design have centered around the distributed radiator design of Tabak(M. Tabak, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc., Vol 41, No 7, 1996.). The initial distributed radiator target assumed beams with a uniform radial density distribution aimed directly along the z axis. Chamber propagation simulations indicate that the beam distribution is more nearly Gaussian at best focus. In addition, more than two beams will be necessary to carry the required current; this means that the beams must be angled to allow space for the final focusing systems upstream. We will describe our modifications to the distributed radiator target to allow realistic beams and realistic beam angles.

  1. The effects of realistic pancake solenoids on particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.

    2011-02-01

    Solenoids are widely used to transport or focus particle beams. Usually, they are assumed as being ideal solenoids with a high axial-symmetry magnetic field. Using the Vector Field Opera program, we modeled asymmetrical solenoids with realistic geometry defects, caused by finite conductor and current jumpers. Their multipole magnetic components were analyzed with the Fourier fit method; we present some possible optimized methods for them. We also discuss the effects of 'realistic' solenoids on low energy particle transport. The finding in this paper may be applicable to some lower energy particle transport system design.

  2. Bosonic condensates in realistic supersymmetric GUT cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allys, Erwan

    2016-04-01

    We study the realistic structure of F-term Nambu-Goto cosmic strings forming in a general supersymmetric Grand Unified Theory implementation, assuming standard hybrid inflation. Examining the symmetry breaking of the unification gauge group down to the Standard Model, we discuss the minimal field content necessary to describe abelian cosmic strings appearing at the end of inflation. We find that several fields will condense in most theories, questioning the plausible occurrence of associated currents (bosonic and fermionic). We perturbatively evaluate the modification of their energy per unit length due to the condensates. We provide a criterion for comparing the usual abelian Higgs approximation used in cosmology to realistic situations.

  3. Particles and gaseous emissions from realistic operation of residential wood pellet heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Win, Kaung Myat; Persson, Tomas; Bales, Chris

    2012-11-01

    Gaseous and particulate emissions from six residential wood pellet heating systems are determined at a realistic six day operation sequence. The study aims to investigate the total emissions from a realistic operation of the heating systems including start-up and stop phases. Five combined solar and pellet heating systems and one reference boiler without solar system with an integrated DHW preparation was tested in a laboratory at realistic operation conditions. The investigated emissions comprised carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NO), total organic carbon (TOC) and particulate matter (PM2.5). In this study, the emissions are presented as accumulated total emissions from the whole six days period and the emissions from start-up and stop phases are also presented separately to evaluate the influence of the emissions from these phases on the total emissions. Emission factors of the measured systems from the six day period are between 192 and 547 mg MJ-1 for the CO emissions, between 61 and 95 mg MJ-1 for the NO, between 6 and 45 mg MJ-1 for the TOC, between 31 and 116 mg MJ-1 for the particulate matter and between 2.1 × 1013 and 4 × 1013 for the number of particles. The emissions from the start-up and stop phases are significantly high for the CO (63-95 %) and the TOC (48-93 %). NO and particles emissions are shown to dominate during stationary operation. However, 30-40 % of the particle emissions arise from the start and stop periods. It is also shown that the average emissions of CO, TOC and particles under the realistic annual conditions were higher than the limit values of two eco labels.

  4. Articulating feedstock delivery device

    DOEpatents

    Jordan, Kevin

    2013-11-05

    A fully articulable feedstock delivery device that is designed to operate at pressure and temperature extremes. The device incorporates an articulating ball assembly which allows for more accurate delivery of the feedstock to a target location. The device is suitable for a variety of applications including, but not limited to, delivery of feedstock to a high-pressure reaction chamber or process zone.

  5. The Instructional Effectiveness of Integrating Abstract and Realistic Visualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, John H.

    This study examined the question of whether the integration of abstract and realistic visualization can improve the effectiveness of visualized instruction. Two methods of integrating visualizations were investigated. The first method used hybrid illustrations, i.e., a real color photograph into which a line drawing segment has been inserted. This…

  6. Magical Realist Pathways into and under the Psychotherapeutic Imaginary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speedy, Jane

    2011-01-01

    My experience of people's life stories from my work as a narrative therapist consistently destabilised distinctions between imagined/magical and real experiences. I came to realise that the day-to-day magical realist juxtapositions I came upon were encounters with people's daily lives, as lived, that have remained unacknowledged within the…

  7. Eliciting Mathematical Thinking of Students through Realistic Mathematics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anwar, Lathifu; Budayasa, I Ketut; Amin, Siti M.; de Haan, Dede

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on an implementation a sequence of instructional activities about addition of fractions that has been developed and implemented in grade four of primary school in Surabaya, Indonesia. The theory of Realistic Mathematics Education (RME) has been applied in the sequence, which aims to assist low attaining learners in supporting…

  8. Synthesis Of Realistic Animations Of A Person Speaking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Kenneth C.; Kagels, David S.; Watson, Stephen H.; Rom, Hillel S.; Lorre, Jean J.; Wright, John R.; Duxbury, Elizabeth D.

    1995-01-01

    Actors computer program implements automated process that synthesizes realistic animations of person speaking. Produces "newscaster" type video sequences. Uses images of person and, therefore, not limited to cartoons and cartoonlike movies. Potential applications also include use of process for automatically producing on-the-fly animations for human/computer interfaces and for reducing bandwidth needed to transmit video telephone signals.

  9. A Realistic Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muske, Kenneth R.; Myers, John A.

    2007-01-01

    A realistic applied chemical engineering experimental design and statistical analysis project is documented in this article. This project has been implemented as part of the professional development and applied statistics courses at Villanova University over the past five years. The novel aspects of this project are that the students are given a…

  10. Determination of quantum-noise parameters of realistic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, A. A.; Vogel, W.; Khanbekyan, M.; Welsch, D.-G.

    2007-01-01

    A procedure is developed which allows one to measure all the parameters occurring in a complete model [A. A. Semenov , Phys. Rev. A 74, 033803 (2006)] of realistic leaky cavities with unwanted noise. The method is based on the reflection of properly chosen test pulses by the cavity.

  11. International Management: Creating a More Realistic Global Planning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Darryl G.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the need for realistic global planning environments in international business education, introducing a strategic planning model that has teams interacting with teams to strategically analyze a selected multinational company. This dynamic process must result in a single integrated written analysis that specifies an optimal strategy for…

  12. Highly realistic, immersive training for navy corpsmen: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Booth-Kewley, Stephanie; McWhorter, Stephanie K

    2014-12-01

    Highly realistic, immersive training has been developed for Navy corpsmen based on the success of the Infantry Immersion Trainer. This new training is built around scenarios that are designed to depict real-life, operational situations. Each scenario used in the training includes sights, sounds, smells, and distractions to simulate realistic and challenging combat situations. The primary objective of this study was to assess corpsmen participants' satisfaction with highly realistic training. The study sample consisted of 434 male Navy service members attending Field Medical Training Battalion-West, Camp Pendleton, California. Corpsmen participants completed surveys after receiving the training. Participants expressed high levels of satisfaction with the training overall and with several specific elements of the training. The element of the training that the corpsmen rated the highest was the use of live actors. The vast majority of the participants reported that the training had increased their overall confidence about being successful corpsmen and had strengthened their confidence in their ability to provide care under pressure. Additional research should extend highly realistic training to other military medical provider populations. PMID:25469964

  13. Two-Capacitor Problem: A More Realistic View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the two-capacitor problem by considering the self-inductance of the circuit used and by determining how well the usual series RC circuit approximates the two-capacitor problem when realistic values of L, C, and R are chosen. (GA)

  14. Critical Realist Review: Exploring the Real, beyond the Empirical

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgley, Alison; Stickley, Theodore; Timmons, Stephen; Meal, Andy

    2016-01-01

    This article defines the "critical realist review", a literature-based methodological approach to critical analysis of health care studies (or any discipline charged with social interventions) that is robust, insightful and essential for the complexities of twenty-first century evidence-based health and social care. We argue that this…

  15. A SPATIALLY REALISTIC MODEL FOR INFORMING FOREST MANAGEMENT DECISIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spatially realistic population models (SRPMs) address a fundamental
    problem commonly confronted by wildlife managers - predicting the
    effects of landscape-scale habitat management on an animal population.
    SRPMs typically consist of three submodels: (1) a habitat submodel...

  16. Developing Skills: Realistic Work Environments in Further Education. FEDA Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Paul; Hughes, Maria

    To establish the prevalence and perceived value of realistic work environments (RWEs) in colleges and their use as learning resources, all further education (FE) sector colleges in Great Britain were surveyed in the summer of 1998. Of 175 colleges that responded to 2 questionnaires for senior college managers and RWE managers, 127 had at least 1…

  17. The Potential and Challenges of Critical Realist Ethnography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Ian

    2013-01-01

    This article revisits the critical realist ethnographic process that was adopted in my doctoral thesis, which was concerned with the experiences of ethnic identity of white British and Pakistani British children as they started kindergarten in the northwest of England. The article focuses on the ethnography that emerged from the visits that I…

  18. Realistically Predicting Saturation-Excess Runoff With El-SWAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, L.; Schneiderman, E. M.; Steenhuis, T. S.; Moore, K. E.; Owens, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Saturation excess runoff (SER) is without doubt the major runoff mechanism in the humid well vegetated areas where infiltration rates often exceed the medium rainfall intensity. Despite its preponderance, incorporating SER in the distributed models has been slow and fraught with difficulties. The short term objective of this paper to adjust the generally used Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to include SER and test the results in the Catskill Mountains that is the source of most of New York City's water. The long term goal is to use the adjusted distributed runoff mechanism in water quality models to aid in the design of effective management practices. The current version of SWAT uses information of soil plant characteristics and hydrologic condition to predict runoff and thus is implicitly based on infiltration-excess runoff. Previous attempts to incorporate SER mechanism in SWAT fell short because they were unable to distribute water from a Hydrological Response Unit (HRU) to another. In the current version called El-SWAT, this shortcoming has been overcome by redefining HRU to include landscape position through the topographic index, grouping the newly defined HRU into wetness classes and by introducing a perched water table with the ability to route interflow from "dryer" to "wetter" HRU wetness classes. Mathematically, the perched aquifer is a non-linear reservoir that generates rapid subsurface stormflow as the perched water table rises. The El-SWAT model was tested in the Town Brook watershed in the upper reaches of the West Branch of the Delaware in the Catskill Mountains. The results showed that El-SWAT could predict discharge well with Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency of 0.69 and 0.84 for daily and monthly time steps. Compared to the original SWAT model, El-SWAT predicted less surface runoff and groundwater flow and a greater lateral flow component. The saturated areas in El-SWAT were concentrated in locations with high topographic index and was in

  19. Meteorological impact of realistic Terra Nova Bay polynyas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, Sandra

    2010-05-01

    The energy exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere in the Antarctic marginal sea ice zone is influenced by the extent of sea-ice cover. In areas of open water, a direct contact is established and intense energy exchanges occur, due to the large difference of temperature between the water and the air above it. This implies that the polynyas are areas where the ocean exchanges energy with the atmosphere and as a result they have an effect on the polar meteorology/climate. The work presented here concerns real polynya events in the region of Terra Nova Bay (TNB), Antarctica, where a recurring coastal polynya occurs nearby the Italian Antarctic Base. The aim is the study of the impact of polynyas on the atmosphere by three-dimensional numerical simulations. The ETA model (Mesinger et al., 2006) was used and ECMWF and NCEP data provided the initial and boundary conditions. The model had already been successfully used in the Antarctic area (Casini and Morelli, 2007) A polynya of realistic size (as observed by satellite image) was included in the initial conditions for the simulations and a study of the air circulation during the events is found in Morelli et al. (2007), Morelli and Casini (2008), Morelli et al. (2009). The Eta Model reproduced the evolution of upper and mod-level conditions in good agreement with AVHRR observations (Morelli, 2008, Morelli and Parmiggiani, 2009). Also, the simulated 10 m wind was well correlated with the observed extension of the polynya. In order to isolate the effect of the presence of the open water area on the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer and on the atmospheric circulation, further simulations were performed without the presence of the polynya, i.e. with its extent covered with sea ice. The numerical simulations show that the polynyas act to increase the speed of the air above them and generate strong heat fluxes that warm the air. The effects are found over and downwind the sea ice free area. Results from the Eta

  20. A Generalized Pyramid Matching Kernel for Human Action Recognition in Realistic Videos

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun; Zhou, Quan; Zou, Weijia; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Wenjun

    2013-01-01

    Human action recognition is an increasingly important research topic in the fields of video sensing, analysis and understanding. Caused by unconstrained sensing conditions, there exist large intra-class variations and inter-class ambiguities in realistic videos, which hinder the improvement of recognition performance for recent vision-based action recognition systems. In this paper, we propose a generalized pyramid matching kernel (GPMK) for recognizing human actions in realistic videos, based on a multi-channel “bag of words” representation constructed from local spatial-temporal features of video clips. As an extension to the spatial-temporal pyramid matching (STPM) kernel, the GPMK leverages heterogeneous visual cues in multiple feature descriptor types and spatial-temporal grid granularity levels, to build a valid similarity metric between two video clips for kernel-based classification. Instead of the predefined and fixed weights used in STPM, we present a simple, yet effective, method to compute adaptive channel weights of GPMK based on the kernel target alignment from training data. It incorporates prior knowledge and the data-driven information of different channels in a principled way. The experimental results on three challenging video datasets (i.e., Hollywood2, Youtube and HMDB51) validate the superiority of our GPMK w.r.t. the traditional STPM kernel for realistic human action recognition and outperform the state-of-the-art results in the literature. PMID:24284771

  1. Realistic prediction of solid pharmaceutical oxidation products by using a novel forced oxidation system.

    PubMed

    Ueyama, Eiji; Tamura, Kousuke; Mizukawa, Kousei; Kano, Kenji

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated a novel solid-state-based forced oxidation system to enable a realistic prediction of pharmaceutical product oxidation, a key consideration in drug development and manufacture. Polysorbate 80 and ferric(III) acetylacetonate were used as an organic hydroperoxide source and a transition metal catalyst, respectively. Homogeneous solutions of target compounds and these reagents were prepared in a mixed organic solvent. The organic solvent was removed rapidly under reduced pressure, and the oxidation of the resulting dried solid was investigated. Analysis of the oxidation products generated in test compounds by this proposed forced oxidation system using HPLC showed a high similarity with those generated during more prolonged naturalistic drug oxidation. The proposed system provided a better predictive performance in prediction of realistic oxidative degradants of the drugs tested than did other established methods. Another advantage of this system was that the generation of undesired products of hydrolysis, solvolysis, and thermolysis was prevented because efficient oxidation was achieved under mild conditions. The results of this study suggest that this system is suitable for a realistic prediction of oxidative degradation of solid pharmaceuticals. PMID:24497072

  2. Searching for the mechanisms of change: a protocol for a realist review of batterer treatment programmes

    PubMed Central

    Cheff, Rebecca; Finn, Debbie; Davloor, Whitney; O'Campo, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Conflicting results reported by evaluations of typical batterer intervention programmes leave many judicial officials and policymakers uncertain about the best way to respond to domestic violence, and whether to recommend and fund these programmes. Traditional evaluations and systematic reviews tend to focus predominantly on whether the programmes ‘worked’ (eg, reduced recidivism) often at the exclusion of understanding for whom they may or may not have worked, under what circumstances, and why. Methods and analysis We are undertaking a realist review of the batterer treatment programme literature with the aim of addressing this gap. Keeping with the goals of realist review, our primary aims are to identify the theory that underlies these programmes, highlight the mechanisms that trigger changes in participant behaviour and finally explain why these programmes help some individuals reduce their use of violence and under what conditions they are effective or not effective. We begin by describing the process of perpetrator treatment, and by proposing an initial theoretical model of behaviour change that will be tested by our review. We then describe the criteria for inclusion of an evaluation into the review, the search strategy we will use to identify the studies, and the plan for data extraction and analysis. Ethics and dissemination The results of this review will be written up using the RAMESES Guidelines for Realist Synthesis, and disseminated through peer-reviewed publications aimed at the practitioner community as well as presented at community forums, and at violence against women conferences. Ethics approval was not needed. PMID:27053268

  3. Fidelity of reduced and realistic electron mass ratio multi-scale gyrokinetic simulations of tokamak discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, N. T.; Holland, C.; White, A. E.; Greenwald, M.; Candy, J.

    2015-06-01

    The first study using multi-scale (coupled ITG/TEM/ETG) gyrokinetic simulations at both reduced and realistic electron mass ratios, μ = (mD/me).5 = 20.0, 40.0 and 60.0, has been performed on a standard, Alcator C-Mod, L-mode discharge. Ion-scale (kθρs  ∼  1.0) and multi-scale (up to kθρe  ∼  0.8) gyrokinetic simulations are compared at different simulated mass ratios to investigate the fidelity of reduced electron mass ratio, multi-scale simulation through direct comparison with realistic mass ratio, multi-scale simulation. Detailed description of both the numerical setup and the turbulent scales required to obtain meaningful coupled ITG/TEM/ETG simulation is presented. Significant high-k driven (TEM/ETG) heat flux is found to exist at scales of approximately kθρe  ∼  0.1 at all mass ratios but can only be obtained by simulation capturing turbulence up to kθρe  ∼  1.0. At slightly reduced mass ratio, μ = 40.0, qualitative agreement with realistic mass simulation can be obtained in the studied discharge, consistent with intuition obtained from linear stability analysis. However, realistic electron mass is required for any robust quantitative comparison with experimental heat fluxes for the condition studied, as significant differences are observed at even slightly reduced electron mass ratio. The details of this numerical study are presented to provide a basis for future studies utilizing coupled ITG/TEM/ETG gyrokinetic simulation.

  4. Precision robotic control of agricultural vehicles on realistic farm trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Thomas

    High-precision "autofarming", or precise agricultural vehicle guidance, is rapidly becoming a reality thanks to increasing computing power and carrier-phase differential GPS ("CPDGPS") position and attitude sensors. Realistic farm trajectories will include not only rows but also arcs created by smoothly joining rows or path-planning algorithms, spirals for farming center-pivot irrigated fields, and curved trajectories dictated by nonlinear field boundaries. In addition, fields are often sloped, and accurate control may be required either on linear trajectories or on curved contours. A three-dimensional vehicle model which adapts to changing vehicle and ground conditions was created, and a low-order model for controller synthesis was extracted based on nominal conditions. The model was extended to include a towed implement. Experimentation showed that an extended Kalman filter could identify the vehicle's state in real-time. An approximation was derived for the additional positional uncertainty introduced by the noisy "lever-arm correction" necessary to translate the GPS position measurement at the roof antenna to the vehicle's control point on the ground; this approximation was then used to support the assertion that attitude measurement accuracy was as important to control point position measurement as the original position measurement accuracy at the GPS antenna. The low-order vehicle control model was transformed to polar coordinates for control on arcs and spirals. Experimental data showed that the tractor's control, point tracked an arc to within a -0.3 cm mean and a 3.4 cm standard deviation and a spiral to within a -0.2 cm mean and a 5.3 cm standard deviation. Cubic splines were used to describe curve trajectories, and a general expression for the time-rate-of-change of curve-related parameters was derived. Four vehicle control algorithms were derived for curve tracking: linear local-error control based on linearizing the vehicle about the curve's radius of

  5. Realistic Covariance Prediction for the Earth Science Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Matthew; Long, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Routine satellite operations for the Earth Science Constellation (ESC) include collision risk assessment between members of the constellation and other orbiting space objects. One component of the risk assessment process is computing the collision probability between two space objects. The collision probability is computed using Monte Carlo techniques as well as by numerically integrating relative state probability density functions. Each algorithm takes as inputs state vector and state vector uncertainty information for both objects. The state vector uncertainty information is expressed in terms of a covariance matrix. The collision probability computation is only as good as the inputs. Therefore, to obtain a collision calculation that is a useful decision-making metric, realistic covariance matrices must be used as inputs to the calculation. This paper describes the process used by the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center's Earth Science Mission Operations Project to generate realistic covariance predictions for three of the Earth Science Constellation satellites: Aqua, Aura and Terra.

  6. Realistic Covariance Prediction For the Earth Science Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Matthew; Long, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Routine satellite operations for the Earth Science Constellations (ESC) include collision risk assessment between members of the constellations and other orbiting space objects. One component of the risk assessment process is computing the collision probability between two space objects. The collision probability is computed via Monte Carlo techniques as well as numerically integrating relative probability density functions. Each algorithm takes as inputs state vector and state vector uncertainty information for both objects. The state vector uncertainty information is expressed in terms of a covariance matrix. The collision probability computation is only as good as the inputs. Therefore, to obtain a collision calculation that is a useful decision-making metric, realistic covariance matrices must be used as inputs to the calculation. This paper describes the process used by NASA Goddard's Earth Science Mission Operations Project to generate realistic covariance predictions for three of the ESC satellites: Aqua, Aura, and Terra

  7. Realistic Parameters for the Description of Organic Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolfen, Andreas; Koch, Erik; Blum, Volker; Cano-Cortés, Laura; Merino, Jaime

    2009-03-01

    In molecular crystals correlation effects are often significant. For a non-perturbative description of the full Coulomb interaction we have therefore to resort to a model description in terms of generalized Hubbard models. The derivation of parameters for such models is crucial for realistic simulations. While hopping parameters are easily derived from density-functional theory (DFT) the Coulomb parameters pose a significant problem due to screening processes. We decompose their contributions into intra- and inter-molecular parts. The intra-molecularly screened Coulomb parameters are treated within DFT whereas the inter-molecular corrections are evaluated using classical electrostatics with DFT-derived polarizabilities and the distributed-dipole approach in combination with a Ewald summation. Even for simple lattices of polarizable point dipoles we find intriguing screening phenomena. As realistic applications we discuss the one- and two-dimensional organic metals TTF-TCNQ and θ-(BEDT-TTF)2I3.

  8. Realistic fetus skin color processing for ultrasound volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yun-Tae; Kim, Kyuhong; Park, Sung-Chan; Kang, Jooyoung; Kim, Jung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes realistic fetus skin color processing using a 2D color map and a tone mapping function (TMF) for ultrasound volume rendering. The contributions of this paper are a 2D color map generated through a gamut model of skin color and a TMF that depends on the lighting position. First, the gamut model of fetus skin color is calculated by color distribution of baby images. The 2D color map is created using a gamut model for tone mapping of ray casting. For the translucent effect, a 2D color map in which lightness is inverted is generated. Second, to enhance the contrast of rendered images, the luminance, color, and tone curve TMF parameters are changed using 2D Gaussian function that depends on the lighting position. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method achieves better realistic skin color reproduction than the conventional method.

  9. Automatic Perceptual Color Map Generation for Realistic Volume Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Jonathan C.; Parsad, Nigel M.; Tsirline, Victor

    2008-01-01

    Advances in computed tomography imaging technology and inexpensive high performance computer graphics hardware are making high-resolution, full color (24-bit) volume visualizations commonplace. However, many of the color maps used in volume rendering provide questionable value in knowledge representation and are non-perceptual thus biasing data analysis or even obscuring information. These drawbacks, coupled with our need for realistic anatomical volume rendering for teaching and surgical planning, has motivated us to explore the auto-generation of color maps that combine natural colorization with the perceptual discriminating capacity of grayscale. As evidenced by the examples shown that have been created by the algorithm described, the merging of perceptually accurate and realistically colorized virtual anatomy appears to insightfully interpret and impartially enhance volume rendered patient data. PMID:18430609

  10. Intracochlear Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Borenstein, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Advances in molecular biology and in the basic understanding of the mechanisms associated with sensorineural hearing loss and other diseases of the inner ear, are paving the way towards new approaches for treatments for millions of patients. However, the cochlea is a particularly challenging target for drug therapy, and new technologies will be required to provide safe and efficacious delivery of these compounds. Emerging delivery systems based on microfluidic technologies are showing promise as a means for direct intracochlear delivery. Ultimately, these systems may serve as a means for extended delivery of regenerative compounds to restore hearing in patients suffering from a host of auditory diseases. Areas covered in this review Recent progress in the development of drug delivery systems capable of direct intracochlear delivery is reviewed, including passive systems such as osmotic pumps, active microfluidic devices, and systems combined with currently available devices such as cochlear implants. The aim of this article is to provide a concise review of intracochlear drug delivery systems currently under development, and ultimately capable of being combined with emerging therapeutic compounds for the treatment of inner ear diseases. Expert Opinion Safe and efficacious treatment of auditory diseases will require the development of microscale delivery devices, capable of extended operation and direct application to the inner ear. These advances will require miniaturization and integration of multiple functions, including drug storage, delivery, power management and sensing, ultimately enabling closed-loop control and timed-sequence delivery devices for treatment of these diseases. PMID:21615213