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Sample records for reca-mediated strand invasion

  1. Strand invasion promoted by recombination protein of coliphage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybalchenko, Nataliya; Golub, Efim I.; Bi, Baoyuan; Radding, Charles M.

    2004-12-01

    Studies of phage in vivo have indicated that its own recombination enzymes, protein and exonuclease, are capable of catalyzing two dissimilar pathways of homologous recombination that are widely distributed in nature: single-strand annealing and strand invasion. The former is an enzymatic splicing of overlapping ends of broken homologous DNA molecules, whereas the latter is characterized by the formation of a three-stranded synaptic intermediate and subsequent strand exchange. Previous studies in vitro have shown that protein has annealing activity, and that exonuclease, acting on branched substrates, can produce a perfect splice that requires only ligation for completion. The present study shows that protein can initiate strand invasion in vitro, as evidenced both by the formation of displacement loops (D-loops) in superhelical DNA and by strand exchange between colinear single-stranded and double-stranded molecules. Thus, protein can catalyze steps that are central to both strand annealing and strand invasion pathways of recombination. These observations add protein to a set of diverse proteins that appear to promote recognition of homology by a unitary mechanism governed by the intrinsic dynamic properties of base pairs in DNA. genetic recombination | phage λ

  2. Evidence for multiple cycles of strand invasion during repair of double-strand gaps in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    McVey, Mitch; Adams, Melissa; Staeva-Vieira, Eric; Sekelsky, Jeff J

    2004-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), a major source of genome instability, are often repaired through homologous recombination pathways. Models for these pathways have been proposed, but the precise mechanisms and the rules governing their use remain unclear. In Drosophila, the synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) model can explain most DSB repair. To investigate SDSA, we induced DSBs by excision of a P element from the male X chromosome, which produces a 14-kb gap relative to the sister chromatid. In wild-type males, repair synthesis tracts are usually long, resulting in frequent restoration of the P element. However, repair synthesis is often incomplete, resulting in internally deleted P elements. We examined the effects of mutations in spn-A, which encodes the Drosophila Rad51 ortholog. As expected, there is little or no repair synthesis in homozygous spn-A mutants after P excision. However, heterozygosity for spn-A mutations also resulted in dramatic reductions in the lengths of repair synthesis tracts. These findings support a model in which repair DNA synthesis is not highly processive. We discuss a model wherein repair of a double-strand gap requires multiple cycles of strand invasion, synthesis, and dissociation of the nascent strand. After dissociation, the nascent strand may anneal to a complementary single strand, reinvade a template to be extended by additional synthesis, or undergo end joining. This model can explain aborted SDSA repair events and the prevalence of internally deleted transposable elements in genomes. PMID:15238522

  3. Role of Saccharomyces Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Protein RPA in the Strand Invasion Step of Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein replication protein A (RPA) is essential for both DNA replication and recombination. Chromatin immunoprecipitation techniques were used to visualize the kinetics and extent of RPA binding following induction of a double-strand break (DSB) and during its repair by homologous recombination in yeast. RPA assembles at the HO endonuclease-cut MAT locus simultaneously with the appearance of the DSB, and binding spreads away from the DSB as 5′ to 3′ exonuclease activity creates more ssDNA. RPA binding precedes binding of the Rad51 recombination protein. The extent of RPA binding is greater when Rad51 is absent, supporting the idea that Rad51 displaces RPA from ssDNA. RPA plays an important role during RAD51-mediated strand invasion of the MAT ssDNA into the donor sequence HML. The replication-proficient but recombination-defective rfa1-t11 (K45E) mutation in the large subunit of RPA is normal in facilitating Rad51 filament formation on ssDNA, but is unable to achieve synapsis between MAT and HML. Thus, RPA appears to play a role in strand invasion as well as in facilitating Rad51 binding to ssDNA, possibly by stabilizing the displaced ssDNA. PMID:14737196

  4. Optimizing anti-gene oligonucleotide ‘Zorro-LNA’ for improved strand invasion into duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zaghloul, Eman M.; Madsen, Andreas S.; Moreno, Pedro M. D.; Oprea, Iulian I.; El-Andaloussi, Samir; Bestas, Burcu; Gupta, Pankaj; Pedersen, Erik B.; Lundin, Karin E.; Wengel, Jesper; Smith, C. I. Edvard

    2011-01-01

    Zorro-LNA (Zorro) is a newly developed, oligonucleotide (ON)-based, Z-shaped construct with the potential of specific binding to each strand of duplex DNA. The first-generation Zorros are formed by two hybridized LNA/DNA mixmers (2-ON Zorros) and was hypothesized to strand invade. We have now established a method, which conclusively demonstrates that an LNA ON can strand invade into duplex DNA. To make Zorros smaller in size and easier to design, we synthesized 3′–5′–5′–3′ single-stranded Zorro-LNA (ssZorro) by using both 3′- and 5′-phosphoramidites. With ssZorro, a significantly greater extent and rate of double-strand invasion (DSI) was obtained than with conventional 2-ON Zorros. Introducing hydrophilic PEG-linkers connecting the two strands did not significantly change the rate or extent of DSI as compared to ssZorro with a nucleotide-based linker, while the longest alkyl-chain linker tested (36 carbons) resulted in a very slow DSI. The shortest alkyl-chain linker (3 carbons) did not reduce the extent of DSI of ssZorro, but significantly decreased the DSI rate. Collectively, ssZorro is smaller in size, easier to design and more efficient than conventional 2-ON Zorro in inducing DSI. Analysis of the chemical composition of the linker suggests that it could be of importance for future therapeutic considerations. PMID:20860997

  5. Probing 3D Collective Cancer Invasion Using Double-Stranded Locked Nucleic Acid Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Dean, Zachary S; Elias, Paul; Jamilpour, Nima; Utzinger, Urs; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and metastases are responsible for over 90% of human cancer deaths. There is an urgent need to develop novel therapeutics for suppressing cancer invasion, the initial step of metastasis. Nevertheless, the regulation of cancer invasion is poorly understood due to a paucity of tools for monitoring the invasion process in 3D microenvironments. Here, we report a double-stranded locked nucleic acid (dsLNA) biosensor for investigating 3D collective cancer invasion. By incorporating multiphoton microscopy and the dsLNA biosensor, we perform dynamic single cell gene expression analysis while simultaneously characterizing the biomechanical interaction between the invading sprouts and the extracellular matrix. Gene profiling of invasive leader cells and detached cells suggest distinctive signaling mechanisms involved in collective and individual invasion in the 3D microenvironment. Our results underscore the involvement of Notch signaling in 3D collective cancer invasion, which warrants further investigation toward antimetastasis therapy in the future. PMID:27529634

  6. Effective strand invasion ODN incorporating a new bicyclic nucleoside analogue (WNA).

    PubMed

    Aoki, Eriko; Taniguchi, Yosuke; Sasaki, Shigeki

    2007-01-01

    Efficient and specific targeting of DNA sequences by synthetic ligands is a major goal in chemical biology. Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are sequence-specific DNA-binding agents, but are limited to homopurine/homopyrimidine target sequences. We have previously reported two useful analogues (WNA: W-shaped nucleoside analogues), WNA-bT and WNAbC, which recognize a TA and a CG interrupting site forming triplexes with high stability and selectivity, respectively. However, their ability to form triplexes depended on their neighbouring bases in the TFO. Subsequent studies have shown that the sequence-dependency of the WNA analogues, for the formation of triplexes, has been partially solved by use of a WNA analogue bearing a substituted aromatic ring. Investigations into the effects of the substituted aromatic ring of WNA derivatives on the stability of triplexes led to the discovery of strand invasion by the TFO incorporating the new WNA analogue to form a highly stable duplex. PMID:18029683

  7. Equilibrious Strand Exchange Promoted by DNA Conformational Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiguo; Xie, Xiao; Li, Puzhen; Zhao, Jiayi; Huang, Lili; Zhou, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Most of DNA strand exchange reactions in vitro are based on toehold strategy which is generally nonequilibrium, and intracellular strand exchange mediated by proteins shows little sequence specificity. Herein, a new strand exchange promoted by equilibrious DNA conformational switching is verified. Duplexes containing c-myc sequence which is potentially converted into G-quadruplex are designed in this strategy. The dynamic equilibrium between duplex and G4-DNA is response to the specific exchange of homologous single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The SER is enzyme free and sequence specific. No ATP is needed and the displaced ssDNAs are identical to the homologous ssDNAs. The SER products and exchange kenetics are analyzed by PAGE and the RecA mediated SER is performed as the contrast. This SER is a new feature of G4-DNAs and a novel strategy to utilize the dynamic equilibrium of DNA conformations.

  8. Equilibrious Strand Exchange Promoted by DNA Conformational Switching

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiguo; Xie, Xiao; Li, Puzhen; Zhao, Jiayi; Huang, Lili; Zhou, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Most of DNA strand exchange reactions in vitro are based on toehold strategy which is generally nonequilibrium, and intracellular strand exchange mediated by proteins shows little sequence specificity. Herein, a new strand exchange promoted by equilibrious DNA conformational switching is verified. Duplexes containing c-myc sequence which is potentially converted into G-quadruplex are designed in this strategy. The dynamic equilibrium between duplex and G4-DNA is response to the specific exchange of homologous single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The SER is enzyme free and sequence specific. No ATP is needed and the displaced ssDNAs are identical to the homologous ssDNAs. The SER products and exchange kenetics are analyzed by PAGE and the RecA mediated SER is performed as the contrast. This SER is a new feature of G4-DNAs and a novel strategy to utilize the dynamic equilibrium of DNA conformations. PMID:23350029

  9. Equilibrious strand exchange promoted by DNA conformational switching.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiguo; Xie, Xiao; Li, Puzhen; Zhao, Jiayi; Huang, Lili; Zhou, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Most of DNA strand exchange reactions in vitro are based on toehold strategy which is generally nonequilibrium, and intracellular strand exchange mediated by proteins shows little sequence specificity. Herein, a new strand exchange promoted by equilibrious DNA conformational switching is verified. Duplexes containing c-myc sequence which is potentially converted into G-quadruplex are designed in this strategy. The dynamic equilibrium between duplex and G4-DNA is response to the specific exchange of homologous single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The SER is enzyme free and sequence specific. No ATP is needed and the displaced ssDNAs are identical to the homologous ssDNAs. The SER products and exchange kenetics are analyzed by PAGE and the RecA mediated SER is performed as the contrast. This SER is a new feature of G4-DNAs and a novel strategy to utilize the dynamic equilibrium of DNA conformations. PMID:23350029

  10. Evidence that creation of invasion sites determines the rate of strand transfer mediated by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Mark Nils; Balakrishnan, Mini; Roques, Bernard P; Bambara, Robert A

    2006-11-10

    Strand transfer during reverse transcription can produce genetic recombination in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) when two genomic RNAs, that are not identical, are co-packaged in the virus. Strand transfer was measured in vitro, in reactions involving primer switching from a donor to acceptor RNA template. The transfer product appeared with much slower kinetics than full-length synthesis on the donor template. The goal of this study was to learn more about the transfer mechanism by defining the steps that limit its rate. We previously proposed transfer to include the steps of acceptor invasion, hybrid propagation, terminus transfer, and re-initiation of synthesis on the acceptor template. Unexpectedly, with our templates increasing acceptor concentration increased the transfer efficiency but had no effect on the rate of transfer. Templates with a short region of homology limiting hybrid propagation exhibited a slow accumulation of transfer products, suggesting that for tested long homology templates hybrid propagation was not rate limiting. Substituting a DNA acceptor and adding Klenow polymerase accelerated re-initiation and extension exclusively on the DNA acceptor. This lead to a small rate increase due to faster extension on the acceptor, suggesting re-initiation of synthesis on the tested RNA acceptors was not rate limiting. A substrate was designed in which the 5' end of the primer was single stranded, and complimentary to the acceptor, i.e. having a pre-made invasion site. With this substrate, increasing concentrations of acceptor increased the rate of transfer. Together these data suggest that RNase H cleavage, and dissociation of RNA fragments creating an invasion site was rate limiting on most tested templates. When an accessible invasion site was present, acceptor interaction at that site influence the rate. PMID:16997325

  11. Site-Selective Binding of Nanoparticles to Double-Stranded DNA via Peptide Nucleic Acid "Invasion"

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, A.L.; van der Lelie, D.; Sun, D.; Maye, M. M.; Gang, O.

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a novel method for by-design placement of nano-objects along double-stranded (ds) DNA. A molecular intercalator, designed as a peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-DNA chimera, is able to invade dsDNA at the PNA-side due to the hybridization specificity between PNA and one of the duplex strands. At the same time, the single-stranded (ss) DNA tail of the chimera, allows for anchoring of nano-objects that have been functionalized with complementary ssDNA. The developed method is applied for interparticle attachment and for the fabrication of particle clusters using a dsDNA template. This method significantly broadens the molecular toolbox for constructing nanoscale systems by including the most conventional not yet utilized DNA motif, double helix DNA.

  12. Multiplex Strand Invasion Based Amplification (mSIBA) assay for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Eboigbodin, Kevin E; Hoser, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests have become a common method for diagnosis of STIs due to their improved sensitivity over immunoassays and traditional culture-based methods. Isothermal nucleic acid amplification methods offer significant advantages over polymerase chain reaction (PCR) because they do not require sophisticated instruments needed for thermal cycling of PCR. We recently reported a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification method, Strand Invasion-Based Amplification (SIBA), which exhibited high analytical sensitivity and specificity for amplification of DNA. However, because the reactions were detected using an intercalating dye, this method was only suitable for amplifying a single genomic target. Here, we report the development of multiplexed SIBA (mSIBA) that allows simultaneous detection of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), and an internal control in the same reaction tube. SIBA is compatible with probes, allowing the detection of multiple DNA targets in the same reaction tube. The IC was developed to assess the quality of the isolated DNA and the integrity of the enzyme system, as well as to test oligonucleotides. The mSIBA assay retained high analytical sensitivity and specificity for the detection of CT and NG. The development of mSIBA enables rapid screening for CT and NG within point-of-care or central laboratory settings. PMID:26837460

  13. Reverse transcription strand invasion based amplification (RT-SIBA): a method for rapid detection of influenza A and B.

    PubMed

    Eboigbodin, Kevin; Filén, Sanna; Ojalehto, Tuomas; Brummer, Mirko; Elf, Sonja; Pousi, Kirsi; Hoser, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Rapid and accurate diagnosis of influenza viruses plays an important role in infection control, as well as in preventing the misuse of antibiotics. Isothermal nucleic acid amplification methods offer significant advantages over the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), since they are more rapid and do not require the sophisticated instruments needed for thermal cycling. We previously described a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification method, 'Strand Invasion Based Amplification' (SIBA®), with high analytical sensitivity and specificity, for the detection of DNA. In this study, we describe the development of a variant of the SIBA method, namely, reverse transcription SIBA (RT-SIBA), for the rapid detection of viral RNA targets. The RT-SIBA method includes a reverse transcriptase enzyme that allows one-step reverse transcription of RNA to complementary DNA (cDNA) and simultaneous amplification and detection of the cDNA by SIBA under isothermal reaction conditions. The RT-SIBA method was found to be more sensitive than PCR for the detection of influenza A and B and could detect 100 copies of influenza RNA within 15 min. The development of RT-SIBA will enable rapid and accurate diagnosis of viral RNA targets within point-of-care or central laboratory settings. PMID:27063012

  14. Multiplex Strand Invasion Based Amplification (mSIBA) assay for detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Eboigbodin, Kevin E.; Hoser, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests have become a common method for diagnosis of STIs due to their improved sensitivity over immunoassays and traditional culture-based methods. Isothermal nucleic acid amplification methods offer significant advantages over polymerase chain reaction (PCR) because they do not require sophisticated instruments needed for thermal cycling of PCR. We recently reported a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification method, Strand Invasion-Based Amplification (SIBA), which exhibited high analytical sensitivity and specificity for amplification of DNA. However, because the reactions were detected using an intercalating dye, this method was only suitable for amplifying a single genomic target. Here, we report the development of multiplexed SIBA (mSIBA) that allows simultaneous detection of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), and an internal control in the same reaction tube. SIBA is compatible with probes, allowing the detection of multiple DNA targets in the same reaction tube. The IC was developed to assess the quality of the isolated DNA and the integrity of the enzyme system, as well as to test oligonucleotides. The mSIBA assay retained high analytical sensitivity and specificity for the detection of CT and NG. The development of mSIBA enables rapid screening for CT and NG within point-of-care or central laboratory settings. PMID:26837460

  15. Strand Invasion Based Amplification (SIBA®): a novel isothermal DNA amplification technology demonstrating high specificity and sensitivity for a single molecule of target analyte.

    PubMed

    Hoser, Mark J; Mansukoski, Hannu K; Morrical, Scott W; Eboigbodin, Kevin E

    2014-01-01

    Isothermal nucleic acid amplification technologies offer significant advantages over polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in that they do not require thermal cycling or sophisticated laboratory equipment. However, non-target-dependent amplification has limited the sensitivity of isothermal technologies and complex probes are usually required to distinguish between non-specific and target-dependent amplification. Here, we report a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification technology, Strand Invasion Based Amplification (SIBA). SIBA technology is resistant to non-specific amplification, is able to detect a single molecule of target analyte, and does not require target-specific probes. The technology relies on the recombinase-dependent insertion of an invasion oligonucleotide (IO) into the double-stranded target nucleic acid. The duplex regions peripheral to the IO insertion site dissociate, thereby enabling target-specific primers to bind. A polymerase then extends the primers onto the target nucleic acid leading to exponential amplification of the target. The primers are not substrates for the recombinase and are, therefore unable to extend the target template in the absence of the IO. The inclusion of 2'-O-methyl RNA to the IO ensures that it is not extendible and that it does not take part in the extension of the target template. These characteristics ensure that the technology is resistant to non-specific amplification since primer dimers or mis-priming are unable to exponentially amplify. Consequently, SIBA is highly specific and able to distinguish closely-related species with single molecule sensitivity in the absence of complex probes or sophisticated laboratory equipment. Here, we describe this technology in detail and demonstrate its use for the detection of Salmonella. PMID:25419812

  16. Sequence Conversion by Single Strand Oligonucleotide Donors via Non-homologous End Joining in Mammalian Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Majumdar, Alokes; Liu, Jilan; Thompson, Lawrence H.; Seidman, Michael M.

    2010-01-01

    Double strand breaks (DSBs) can be repaired by homology independent nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathways involving proteins such as Ku70/80, DNAPKcs, Xrcc4/Ligase 4, and the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN) complex. DSBs can also be repaired by homology-dependent pathways (HDR), in which the MRN and CtIP nucleases produce single strand ends that engage homologous sequences either by strand invasion or strand annealing. The entry of ends into HDR pathways underlies protocols for genomic manipulation that combine site-specific DSBs with appropriate informational donors. Most strategies utilize long duplex donors that participate by strand invasion. Work in yeast indicates that single strand oligonucleotide (SSO) donors are also active, over considerable distance, via a single strand annealing pathway. We examined the activity of SSO donors in mammalian cells at DSBs induced either by a restriction nuclease or by a targeted interstrand cross-link. SSO donors were effective immediately adjacent to the break, but activity declined sharply beyond ∼100 nucleotides. Overexpression of the resection nuclease CtIP increased the frequency of SSO-mediated sequence modulation distal to the break site, but had no effect on the activity of an SSO donor adjacent to the break. Genetic and in vivo competition experiments showed that sequence conversion by SSOs in the immediate vicinity of the break was not by strand invasion or strand annealing pathways. Instead these donors competed for ends that would have otherwise entered NHEJ pathways. PMID:20489199

  17. Sense antisense DNA strand?

    PubMed

    Boldogkói, Z; Kaliman, A V; Murvai, J; Fodor, I

    1994-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that alphaherpesviruses express latency associated transcripts (LATs) from the antisense strand of immediate-early (IE) genes of the viral genome. It has been suggested that LATs containing extended open reading frames (ORFs), might be translated into (a) protein product(s). We found that a salient feature of some herpesvirus DNAs is a high GC preference at the third codon positions. The consequence of this feature is that the probability of a stop-codon appearing at two of the six reading frames of the DNA strand is very low. Therefore, the presence of an extended ORF does not necessarily mean that it is relevant to real translation. PMID:7810418

  18. DNA strand displacement, strand annealing and strand swapping by the Drosophila Bloom's syndrome helicase.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Brian T; Rio, Donald C

    2007-01-01

    Genetic analysis of the Drosophila Bloom's syndrome helicase homolog (mus309/DmBLM) indicates that DmBLM is required for the synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) pathway of homologous recombination. Here we report the first biochemical study of DmBLM. Recombinant, epitope-tagged DmBLM was expressed in Drosophila cell culture and highly purified protein was prepared from nuclear extracts. Purified DmBLM exists exclusively as a high molecular weight ( approximately 1.17 MDa) species, is a DNA-dependent ATPase, has 3'-->5' DNA helicase activity, prefers forked substrate DNAs and anneals complementary DNAs. High-affinity DNA binding is ATP-dependent and low-affinity ATP-independent interactions contribute to forked substrate DNA binding and drive strand annealing. DmBLM combines DNA strand displacement with DNA strand annealing to catalyze the displacement of one DNA strand while annealing a second complementary DNA strand. PMID:17272294

  19. Does acoustic testing strand whales?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frantzis, A.

    1998-03-01

    Mass strandings of live whales have been explained by proposing many `natural' or human-related causes. I found that a recent stranding of Cuvier's beaked whale coincided closely in time and location with military tests of an acoustic system for submarine detection being carried out by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO).

  20. Investigating Invasives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightbody, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Invasive species, commonly known as "invasives," are nonnative plants, animals, and microbes that completely take over and change an established ecosystem. The consequences of invasives' spread are significant. In fact, many of the species that appear on the Endangered Species list are threatened by invasives. Therefore, the topic of invasive…

  1. Strand-invading linear probe combined with unmodified PNA.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Hiroyuki; Niwa, Rie; Akahane, Mariko; Murayama, Keiji; Kashida, Hiromu; Kamiya, Yukiko

    2016-09-15

    Efficient strand invasion by a linear probe to fluorescently label double-stranded DNA has been implemented by employing a probe and unmodified PNA. As a fluorophore, we utilized ethynylperylene. Multiple ethynylperylene residues were incorporated into the DNA probe via a d-threoninol scaffold. The ethynylperylene did not significantly disrupt hybridization with complementary DNA. The linear probe self-quenched in the absence of target DNA and did not hybridize with PNA. A gel-shift assay revealed that linear probe and PNA combination invaded the central region of double-stranded DNA upon heat-shock treatment to form a double duplex. To further suppress the background emission and increase the stability of the probe/DNA duplex, a probe containing anthraquinones as well as ethynylperylene was synthesized. This probe and PNA invader pair detected an internal sequence in a double-stranded DNA with high sensitivity when heat shock treatment was used. The probe and PNA pair was able to invade at the terminus of a long double-stranded DNA at 40°C at 100mM NaCl concentration. PMID:27394693

  2. Invasive Candidiasis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Invasive candidiasis is an infection caused by a yeast (a type of fungus) called Candida . Unlike Candida ... mouth and throat (also called “thrush”) or vaginal “yeast infections,” invasive candidiasis is a serious infection that ...

  3. Thermodynamically based DNA strand design

    PubMed Central

    Tulpan, Dan; Andronescu, Mirela; Chang, Seo Bong; Shortreed, Michael R.; Condon, Anne; Hoos, Holger H.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a new algorithm for design of strand sets, for use in DNA computations or universal microarrays. Our algorithm can design sets that satisfy any of several thermodynamic and combinatorial constraints, which aim to maximize desired hybridizations between strands and their complements, while minimizing undesired cross-hybridizations. To heuristically search for good strand sets, our algorithm uses a conflict-driven stochastic local search approach, which is known to be effective in solving comparable search problems. The PairFold program of Andronescu et al. [M. Andronescu, Z. C. Zhang and A. Condon (2005) J. Mol. Biol., 345, 987–1001; M. Andronescu, R. Aguirre-Hernandez, A. Condon, and H. Hoos (2003) Nucleic Acids Res., 31, 3416–3422.] is used to calculate the minimum free energy of hybridization between two mismatched strands. We describe new thermodynamic measures of the quality of strand sets. With respect to these measures of quality, our algorithm consistently finds, within reasonable time, sets that are significantly better than previously published sets in the literature. PMID:16145053

  4. Report on marine mammal stranding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2006-06-01

    The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released a report on 27 April indicating that U.S. Navy sonar transmissions may have played a role in the stranding of more than 150 melon-headed whales on 3 July 2004 off the coast of Kauai, Hawaii. At the time of the stranding, which resulted in one whale death, the Navy was preparing to conduct sonar activities as part of a military exercise. The report notes that six naval surface vessels transiting to the area on the previous night intermittenly transmitted mid-frequency active sonar. That activity is ``a plausible, if not likely, contributing factor'' to the stranding event. There was no significant weather, natural oceanographic event, or known biological factors that would explain the animals' movement into the bay nor the group's continued presence in the bay, according to report lead author Teri Rowles, NOAA marine mammal veterinarian.

  5. Cryptography with DNA binary strands.

    PubMed

    Leier, A; Richter, C; Banzhaf, W; Rauhe, H

    2000-06-01

    Biotechnological methods can be used for cryptography. Here two different cryptographic approaches based on DNA binary strands are shown. The first approach shows how DNA binary strands can be used for steganography, a technique of encryption by information hiding, to provide rapid encryption and decryption. It is shown that DNA steganography based on DNA binary strands is secure under the assumption that an interceptor has the same technological capabilities as sender and receiver of encrypted messages. The second approach shown here is based on steganography and a method of graphical subtraction of binary gel-images. It can be used to constitute a molecular checksum and can be combined with the first approach to support encryption. DNA cryptography might become of practical relevance in the context of labelling organic and inorganic materials with DNA 'barcodes'. PMID:10963862

  6. Double stranded nucleic acid biochips

    DOEpatents

    Chernov, Boris; Golova, Julia

    2006-05-23

    This invention describes a new method of constructing double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) microarrays based on the use of pre-synthesized or natural DNA duplexes without a stem-loop structure. The complementary oligonucleotide chains are bonded together by a novel connector that includes a linker for immobilization on a matrix. A non-enzymatic method for synthesizing double-stranded nucleic acids with this novel connector enables the construction of inexpensive and robust dsDNA/dsRNA microarrays. DNA-DNA and DNA-protein interactions are investigated using the microarrays.

  7. Library construction for ancient genomics: single strand or double strand?

    PubMed

    Bennett, E Andrew; Massilani, Diyendo; Lizzo, Giulia; Daligault, Julien; Geigl, Eva-Maria; Grange, Thierry

    2014-06-01

    A novel method of library construction that takes advantage of a single-stranded DNA ligase has been recently described and used to generate high-resolution genomes from ancient DNA samples. While this method is effective and appears to recover a greater fraction of endogenous ancient material, there has been no direct comparison of results from different library construction methods on a diversity of ancient DNA samples. In addition, the single-stranded method is limited by high cost and lengthy preparation time and is restricted to the Illumina sequencing platform. Here we present in-depth comparisons of the different available library construction methods for DNA purified from 16 ancient and modern faunal and human remains, covering a range of different taphonomic and climatic conditions. We further present a DNA purification method for ancient samples that permits the concentration of a large volume of dissolved extract with minimal manipulation and methodological improvements to the single-stranded method to render it more economical and versatile, in particular to expand its use to both the Illumina and the Ion Torrent sequencing platforms. We show that the single-stranded library construction method improves the relative recovery of endogenous to exogenous DNA for most, but not all, of our ancient extracts. PMID:24924389

  8. Stranded cost securitization: Analytical considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, S.

    1997-10-01

    Securitization is a promising financing approach by which utilities may recover their stranded costs while lowering their cost of capital, permitting them to offer rate reductions to customers. However, there are important issues to analyze before determining that securitization will be an attractive option for bondholders. To facilitate the transition to a competitive electric market, numerous state legislatures have passed or are considering legislation that, while mandating competition, allows utilities to recover their stranded costs through the imposition of a competitive transition fee. To accommodate securitization of revenues from the fees, statutes typically designate as a property right the future revenues from these fees and the utility may sell, assign, or transfer the rights to a financing vehicle. Securities may be issued by a trust or other special purpose vehicle supported by future revenues from these fees. Because of the unique characteristics of the highly regulated utility industry and the {open_quotes}asset{close_quotes} that is securitized, the credit analysis of stranded cost securities differs from that of most other assets. For example, underwriting and servicing issues, which are key items of interest in other segments of the ABS market, are less of a concern in a stranded cost context.

  9. Structure and development of Nostoc strands in Leiosporoceros dussii (Anthocerotophyta): a novel symbiosis in land plants.

    PubMed

    Villarreal A, Juan Carlos; Renzaglia, Karen Sue

    2006-05-01

    The presence of Nostoc in longitudinally oriented schizogenous canals is a feature that separates Leiosporoceros from all other hornworts and represents a novel symbiotic arrangement in land plants. In surface view, Nostoc canals are visible as elongated, dichotomously branched blue-green strands. All other hornworts develop numerous discrete globose colonies through continuous production of mucilage clefts as avenues for multiple invasions within a single thallus. To elucidate the anatomy and development of the unusual Nostoc strands in Leiosporoceros, we examined sporeling development in culture and the structure of strands in field-collected plants using light and electron microscopy. Rosette-like sporelings have mucilage clefts scattered along swollen apices. All field specimens were strap-shaped, contained Nostoc, and lacked mucilage clefts. Nostoc strands are located in the center of the thallus and develop behind the apical cell by separation of the middle lamella between apical derivatives. Strands elongate and branch in synchrony with apical growth, and thus only a single invasion is required for strand production. Two distinct ultrastructural morphotypes in the collections suggest nonspecificity of Nostoc. We speculate that Nostoc enters the thallus in the sporeling stage through mucilage clefts, and once colonies are established, cleft production ceases. PMID:21642133

  10. Analysis of strand positions in CIC conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teshima, S.; Nakazawa, S.; Tsuda, M.; Hamajima, T.; Yagai, T.; Nunoya, Y.; Okuno, K.; Takahata, K.

    2011-11-01

    Information of 3D strand locations in a Cable-in-Conduit (CIC) conductor is necessary for accurate estimation of conductor performance, e.g., AC losses, current distribution or strain effect. However, it is difficult to derive strand positions after compaction, and there have been no analytical methods to accurately estimate strand positions. In our previous work, we measured strand positions in the CIC conductor, whose length is about 1 m, with 81 NbTi strands and it was verified that some strands were displaced from their original positions. In order to estimate strand locations in a long conductor, we developed a method to analyze three dimensional strand positions taking into account the cable deformation caused by compaction. In this method, we use strand positions in only one cross section of conductor and twist pitches of each sub-cable to calculate the center of gravity of each sub-cable. The strand positions are obtained in a manner that the same order sub-cables rotate around the center of gravity of one order higher sub-cable according to a function of the cabling pitch. We derive the twist pitches after compaction by using measured and calculated strand positions. The calculated strand locations by using the derived twist pitches agree well with the measured ones, with errors of about 0.7 mm.

  11. Invasive mammals.

    PubMed

    Moutou, F; Pastoret, P P

    2010-08-01

    Every region of the world is concerned by potential mammal invasions, as humans are already present on all the world's land masses. All these invasions are a result of species introductions by humans for one reason or another. The authors briefly review the known movements and observed consequences of mammal-related invasions. They take examples from all five continents, as well as from a few island systems. The ancient introduction of game species, and later of domestic species, has been followed more recently by movements of commercial species. We are now seeing the emergence of what are known as entertainment species. In a number of cases, such introductions have led to the establishment of new epidemiological cycles that previously might never have been thought possible. According to current indicators, this phenomenon is not on the wane. PMID:20919577

  12. Annealing Vs. Invasion in Phage λ Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, M. M.; Thomason, L.; Poteete, A. R.; Tarkowski, T.; Kuzminov, A.; Stahl, F. W.

    1997-01-01

    Genetic recombination catalyzed by λ's Red pathway was studied in rec(+) and recA mutant bacteria by examining both intracellular λ DNA and mature progeny particles. Recombination of nonreplicating phage chromosomes was induced by double-strand breaks delivered at unique sites in vivo. In rec(+) cells, cutting only one chromosome gave nearly maximal stimulation of recombination; the recombinants formed contained relatively short hybrid regions, suggesting strand invasion. In contrast, in recA mutant cells, cutting the two parental chromosomes at non-allelic sites was required for maximal stimulation; the recombinants formed tended to be hybrid over the entire region between the two cuts, implying strand annealing. We conclude that, in the absence of RecA and the presence of non-allelic DNA ends, the Red pathway of λ catalyzes recombination primarily by annealing. PMID:9383045

  13. Stranded costs: Is the market paying attention?

    SciTech Connect

    Ros, A.; Domagalski, J.; O`Connor, P.R.

    1996-05-15

    This article is a discussion of the effects of the stranded costs issue on the market and book value of electric utility stocks. Mathematical models were used to determine whether stranded costs, as measured by Moody`s Investor Services and S&P, can explain variability if equity performance as expressed by the market-to-book value ratio. The models adequately explain the variances and show that increased exposure to stranded costs leads to reduced market value.

  14. Heat transfer characteristics of an emergent strand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, W. E.; Witte, L. C.; Hedgcoxe, P. G.

    1974-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed to describe the heat transfer characteristics of a hot strand emerging into a surrounding coolant. A stable strand of constant efflux velocity is analyzed, with a constant (average) heat transfer coefficient on the sides and leading surface of the strand. After developing a suitable governing equation to provide an adequate description of the physical system, the dimensionless governing equation is solved with Laplace transform methods. The solution yields the temperature within the strand as a function of axial distance and time. Generalized results for a wide range of parameters are presented, and the relationship of the results and experimental observations is discussed.

  15. Unraveling the strands of Saturn's F ring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murray, C.D.; Gordon, M.K.; Giuliatti, Winter S.M.

    1997-01-01

    Several high-resolution Voyager 2 images of Saturn's F ring show that it is composed of at least four separate, non-intersecting strands extending ~45?? in longitude. Voyager 1 images show that the two brightest strands appear to intersect, giving rise to a "braided" morphology. From a study of all available Voyager images the detectable radial structure is cataloged and reviewed. Previous indications that there is fine material interior to the orbit of the F ring are confirmed. Evidence is presented that a model of four strands with comparable eccentricities and nearly aligned perichrones is consistent with all the Voyager observations. The observed perichrone offset of the two brightest strands suggests a minimum radial separation of ~20 km, which implies intersection of these strands when their finite radial widths are taken into account. The longitude range of such an intersection includes that observed in the Voyager 1 "braid" images. The proximity of these two strands at some longitudes may account for the apparent differences in the ring between the Voyager encounters, as well as provide a source for the short-lived features detected in the Hubble Space Telescope images of the F ring. There is no evidence that the locations of the individual strands are determined by resonant perturbations with known satellites. It is proposed that the radial structure is formed by the localized action of small satellites orbiting within the strand region. ?? 1997 Academic Press.

  16. Melting of persistent double-stranded polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Hertzberg, Mark Peter; Kardar, Mehran

    2008-11-01

    Motivated by recent DNA-pulling experiments, we revisit the Poland-Scheraga model of melting a double-stranded polymer. We include distinct bending rigidities for both the double-stranded segments and the single-stranded segments forming a bubble. There is also bending stiffness at the branch points between the two segment types. The transfer matrix technique for single persistent chains is generalized to describe the branching bubbles. Properties of spherical harmonics are then exploited in truncating and numerically solving the resulting transfer matrix. This allows efficient computation of phase diagrams and force-extension curves (isotherms). While the main focus is on exposition of the transfer matrix technique, we provide general arguments for a reentrant melting transition in stiff double strands. Our theoretical approach can also be extended to study polymers with bubbles of any number of strands, with potential applications to molecules such as collagen.

  17. Modelling Toehold-Mediated RNA Strand Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Šulc, Petr; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Romano, Flavio; Doye, Jonathan P.K.; Louis, Ard A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the thermodynamics and kinetics of an RNA toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction with a recently developed coarse-grained model of RNA. Strand displacement, during which a single strand displaces a different strand previously bound to a complementary substrate strand, is an essential mechanism in active nucleic acid nanotechnology and has also been hypothesized to occur in vivo. We study the rate of displacement reactions as a function of the length of the toehold and temperature and make two experimentally testable predictions: that the displacement is faster if the toehold is placed at the 5′ end of the substrate; and that the displacement slows down with increasing temperature for longer toeholds. PMID:25762335

  18. Strand-specific attachment of avidin-spheres to double-stranded poliovirus RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, O C; Ehrenfeld, E; Manning, J

    1979-01-01

    Poliovirus-specific double-stranded RNA molecules containing covalently attached protein were coupled with a biotin ester through the protein moiety. Subsequent interaction of the RNA-biotin with avidin attached to electronopaque plastic spheres led to the formation of complexes that were easily visualized in the electron microscope. Avidinspheres were associated only with one end of the RNA-biotin molecules, as seen in the electron microscope. Avidin-sphere attachment to poliovirus double-stranded RNA is strand specific, as shown by molecular hybridization of strand-specific probes to the separated strands of denatured complexes. [3H]DNA complementary to polio virion RNA hybridized exclusively to the strands bearing associated spheres [(+) strands] whereas 125I-labeled virion RNA hybridized predominantly with strands without spheres [(-)strands]. This biotin-avidin labeling technique provides a means for the isolation of full-length poliovirus (-) strands and may provide a general means for isolation of double-stranded polynucleotides containing tightly attached protein. Images PMID:218216

  19. Primary invasive extramammary Paget disease on penoscrotum: a clinicopathological analysis of 41 cases.

    PubMed

    Shu, Bo; Shen, Xu-Xia; Chen, Peng; Fang, Xin-Zhi; Guo, Yong-Lian; Kong, Yun-Yi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the clinicopathological and immunohistochemical features and prognostic factors for invasive extramammary Paget disease (EMPD) on penoscrotum, we described the clinical presentations, histopathology, and follow-up courses of 41 cases. The age of the patients ranged from 42 to 84 years. All the patients were treated with wide surgical excision, and 14 were confirmed to have lymph node metastasis. During follow-up, 18 patients (43.9%) developed local or distant recurrence, and 13 patients (31.7%) died of the disease. Histologically, glandular formation with true lumina within the epidermis was found in 29 cases, and signet ring cells were seen in 11 cases. In invasive components, nodular/micronodular growth pattern, glandular formation, and strands/solid sheets existed in 95.1% (39/41), 43.9% (18/41), and 24.4% (10/41) of the cases, respectively. More than half of the cases had at least 2 different types of invasive growth pattern. CK7 was diffusely positive in all cases, whereas CK20 was focally positive in 8 cases. GCDFP-15 was expressed to a variable degree in 24 cases. Presence of strands/solid sheets, lymphovascular invasion, and perineural invasion in invasive EMPD were found to be correlated with higher lymph node metastatic rate. Univariate analysis revealed that patients with one of the following prognostic factors: delay in diagnosis more than 7.5 years, depth of invasion more than 1 mm, invasive pattern of strands/solid sheets, marked inflammation, lymphovascular invasion, and lymph node metastasis at diagnosis, had significantly shorter cancer-specific survival. We concluded that invasive EMPD is a rare malignant skin neoplasm with morphological diversity. Invasive pattern of strands/solid sheets is significantly associated with both lymph node metastasis and worse prognosis. Delay in diagnosis, depth of invasion, marked inflammation, lymphovascular invasion, and regional lymph node status are important prognostic factors. PMID:26508372

  20. Double-Stranded RNA Is Detected by Immunofluorescence Analysis in RNA and DNA Virus Infections, Including Those by Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Son, Kyung-No; Liang, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Early biochemical studies of viral replication suggested that most viruses produce double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), which is essential for the induction of the host immune response. However, it was reported in 2006 that dsRNA could be detected by immunofluorescence antibody staining in double-stranded DNA and positive-strand RNA virus infections but not in negative-strand RNA virus infections. Other reports in the literature seemed to support these observations. This suggested that negative-strand RNA viruses produce little, if any, dsRNA or that more efficient viral countermeasures to mask dsRNA are mounted. Because of our interest in the use of dsRNA antibodies for virus discovery, particularly in pathological specimens, we wanted to determine how universal immunostaining for dsRNA might be in animal virus infections. We have detected the in situ formation of dsRNA in cells infected with vesicular stomatitis virus, measles virus, influenza A virus, and Nyamanini virus, which represent viruses from different negative-strand RNA virus families. dsRNA was also detected in cells infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, an ambisense RNA virus, and minute virus of mice (MVM), a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) parvovirus, but not hepatitis B virus. Although dsRNA staining was primarily observed in the cytoplasm, it was also seen in the nucleus of cells infected with influenza A virus, Nyamanini virus, and MVM. Thus, it is likely that most animal virus infections produce dsRNA species that can be detected by immunofluorescence staining. The apoptosis induced in several uninfected cell lines failed to upregulate dsRNA formation. IMPORTANCE An effective antiviral host immune response depends on recognition of viral invasion and an intact innate immune system as a first line of defense. Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is a viral product essential for the induction of innate immunity, leading to the production of type I interferons (IFNs) and the activation of hundreds

  1. Marine mammal strandings in the New Caledonia region, Southwest Pacific.

    PubMed

    Borsa, Philippe

    2006-04-01

    Four hundred twenty three marine mammals, in 72 stranding events, were recorded between 1877 and 2005 in New Caledonia, the Loyalty Islands, and Vanuatu in the southwest Pacific. Sixteen species were represented in this count, including: minke whale, Balaenoptera acutorostrata (1 single stranding), sei whale, B. borealis (1 single stranding), blue whale, B. musculus (1 single stranding), humpback whale, Megaptera novaeangliae (2 single strandings), giant sperm whale, Physeter macrocephalus (18 single strandings, 2 pair strandings), pygmy sperm whale, Kogia breviceps (5 single strandings), dwarf sperm whale, K. sima (2 single strandings, 1 triple stranding), Blainville's beaked whale, Mesoplodon densirostris (2 single strandings), short-finned pilot whale, Globicephala macrorhynchus (4 strandings, 56 individuals), melon-headed whale, Peponocephala electra (1 single stranding and 2 mass strandings totalling 231 individuals), common dolphin, Delphinus delphis (1 single stranding), spinner dolphin, Stenella longirostris (1 pair stranding and 2 mass strandings of groups of approximately 30 individuals each), Indian Ocean bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops aduncus (2 single strandings), dugong, Dugong dugon (14 single strandings), and New Zealand fur seal, Arctocephalus forsteri (3 single strandings). A stranded rorqual identified as an Antarctic minke whale (B. bonaerensis), with coloration patterns that did not match known descriptions, was also reported. Sei whale was recorded for the first time in the tropical Southwest Pacific region and Antarctic minke whale, melon-headed whale, and Indian Ocean bottlenose dolphin were recorded for the first time in New Caledonia. Strandings of sperm whales were most frequent in the spring, but also occurred in autumn months, suggesting a seasonal pattern of occurrence possibly related to seasonal migration. One stranded humpback whale bore the scars of a killer whale's attack and one dugong was injured by a shark. Scars left by

  2. Stranded investment and non-utility generation

    SciTech Connect

    Dismukes, D.E. . Center for Energy Studies); Maloney, M.T. )

    1999-06-01

    Stranded cost recovery continues to be a focal point of electricity deregulation. Restructuring has ground to a halt in many places largely due to the contentiousness of the issue, and even where there has been action states have granted substantial stranded cost recovery to utilities, vitiating much of the price reductions that competition is forecast to bring. While a surprisingly large amount of non-utility generation capacity already has been shut down due to obsolescence, this has not choked off capital investment. The example suggests that stranded-cost recovery is neither warranted nor necessary.

  3. Antimicrobials & cholera: are we stranded?

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amit; Ramamurthy, T

    2011-02-01

    Antimicrobial resistance poses a major threat in the treatment of infectious diseases. Though significant progress in the management of diarrhoeal diseases has been achieved by improved hygiene, development of new antimicrobials and vaccines, the burden remains the same, especially in children below 5 yr of age. In the case of cholera, though oral rehydration treatment is the mainstay, antimicrobial therapy is mandatory at times to reduce the volume of stool and shorten the duration of the disease. Though for many pathogens, antimicrobial resistance emerged soon after the introduction of antibiotics, Vibrio cholerae remained sensitive to most of the antibiotics for quite a long period. However, the scenario changed over the years and today, V. cholerae strains isolated world over are resistant to multiple antibiotics. A myriad number of mechanisms underlie this phenomenon. These include production of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases, enhanced multi-drug efflux pump activity, plasmid-mediated quinolone and fluoroquinolone resistance, and chromosomal mutations. Horizontal transfer of resistance determinants with mobile genetic elements like integrons and the integrating conjugative elements (ICEs), SXTs help in the dissemination of drug resistance. Though all strains isolated are not resistant to all antibiotics and we are not as yet "stranded", expanding spectrum of drug resistance is a definite cause for concern. Pipelines of discovery of new antibiotics are drying up as major pharmaceutical companies are losing interest in investing money in this endeavour, mainly due to the short shelf-life of the antibiotics and also due to the fast emergence of drug resistance. To address this issue, attempts are now being made to discover drugs which are pathogen specific and target their "virulence mechanisms". It is expected that development of resistance against such antibiotics would take much longer. This review briefly focuses on all these issues. PMID:21415499

  4. DNA strand displacement system running logic programs.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Patón, Alfonso; Sainz de Murieta, Iñaki; Sosík, Petr

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a DNA-based computing model which is enzyme-free and autonomous, not requiring a human intervention during the computation. The model is able to perform iterated resolution steps with logical formulae in conjunctive normal form. The implementation is based on the technique of DNA strand displacement, with each clause encoded in a separate DNA molecule. Propositions are encoded assigning a strand to each proposition p, and its complementary strand to the proposition ¬p; clauses are encoded comprising different propositions in the same strand. The model allows to run logic programs composed of Horn clauses by cascading resolution steps. The potential of the model is demonstrated also by its theoretical capability of solving SAT. The resulting SAT algorithm has a linear time complexity in the number of resolution steps, whereas its spatial complexity is exponential in the number of variables of the formula. PMID:24211259

  5. Stranded superconducting cable of improved design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, J.; Laverick, C.; Lobell, G. M.; Purcell, J.

    1970-01-01

    High-current cable developed in liquid helium cooled magnets uses aluminum wire interspersed with the superconductor strands. The aluminum maintains higher electrical conductivity, is light in weight, and has low thermal capacity.

  6. Bubbles in live-stranded dolphins

    PubMed Central

    Dennison, S.; Moore, M. J.; Fahlman, A.; Moore, K.; Sharp, S.; Harry, C. T.; Hoppe, J.; Niemeyer, M.; Lentell, B.; Wells, R. S.

    2012-01-01

    Bubbles in supersaturated tissues and blood occur in beaked whales stranded near sonar exercises, and post-mortem in dolphins bycaught at depth and then hauled to the surface. To evaluate live dolphins for bubbles, liver, kidneys, eyes and blubber–muscle interface of live-stranded and capture-release dolphins were scanned with B-mode ultrasound. Gas was identified in kidneys of 21 of 22 live-stranded dolphins and in the hepatic portal vasculature of 2 of 22. Nine then died or were euthanized and bubble presence corroborated by computer tomography and necropsy, 13 were released of which all but two did not re-strand. Bubbles were not detected in 20 live wild dolphins examined during health assessments in shallow water. Off-gassing of supersaturated blood and tissues was the most probable origin for the gas bubbles. In contrast to marine mammals repeatedly diving in the wild, stranded animals are unable to recompress by diving, and thus may retain bubbles. Since the majority of beached dolphins released did not re-strand it also suggests that minor bubble formation is tolerated and will not lead to clinically significant decompression sickness. PMID:21993505

  7. Platelets and fibrin strands during clot retraction.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, E; Korell, U; Richter, J

    1984-03-15

    The ultrastructure of platelet fibrin contacts (PFC) and the course of the strands was investigated in serial sections of retracted clots with the help of specimen tilting. We found after retraction in a test tube as well as under isometric conditions in the resonance thrombograph, after HARTERT, an uniform type of PFC. The side to side contact between platelet surface and fibrin strands displayed a 15 nm wide space which was bridged of 10 - 30 nm by filamentary structure. In each case the direction of the fibrin strands changed on contact with the platelet surface (bend). These bends recurred if the adhering strands ran over a longer distance on the platelet surface. The bends can be explained by non-directional movement of the platelets or of their pseudopodia. Microfilaments (actomyosin) which run straight in pseudopodia and often also twisted in the platelet body support this assumption. The described mechanism - contact of the thrombin activated platelets with fibrin strands and simultaneous nondirectional movement of the platelets which bind further sections of the adhering strands to their surface - would provide a more satisfactory explanation for the retraction of the clot to 1/10 of its original volume. PMID:6539004

  8. Bubbles in live-stranded dolphins.

    PubMed

    Dennison, S; Moore, M J; Fahlman, A; Moore, K; Sharp, S; Harry, C T; Hoppe, J; Niemeyer, M; Lentell, B; Wells, R S

    2012-04-01

    Bubbles in supersaturated tissues and blood occur in beaked whales stranded near sonar exercises, and post-mortem in dolphins bycaught at depth and then hauled to the surface. To evaluate live dolphins for bubbles, liver, kidneys, eyes and blubber-muscle interface of live-stranded and capture-release dolphins were scanned with B-mode ultrasound. Gas was identified in kidneys of 21 of 22 live-stranded dolphins and in the hepatic portal vasculature of 2 of 22. Nine then died or were euthanized and bubble presence corroborated by computer tomography and necropsy, 13 were released of which all but two did not re-strand. Bubbles were not detected in 20 live wild dolphins examined during health assessments in shallow water. Off-gassing of supersaturated blood and tissues was the most probable origin for the gas bubbles. In contrast to marine mammals repeatedly diving in the wild, stranded animals are unable to recompress by diving, and thus may retain bubbles. Since the majority of beached dolphins released did not re-strand it also suggests that minor bubble formation is tolerated and will not lead to clinically significant decompression sickness. PMID:21993505

  9. Correlation between Strand Stability and Magnet Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dietderich, Daniel R.; Bartlett, Scott E.; Caspi, Shlomo; Ferracin, Paolo; G ourlay, Stephen A.; Higley, Hugh C.; Lietzke, Alan F.; Mattafirri, Sara; McInturff, Alfred D.; Sabbi, GianLuca L.; Scanlan,Ronald M.

    2005-04-16

    Magnet programs at BNL, LBNL and FNAL have observed instabilities in high J{sub c} Nb{sub 3}Sn strands and magnets made from these strands. This paper correlates the strand stability determined from a short sample-strand test to the observed magnet performance. It has been observed that strands that carry high currents at high fields (greater than 10T) cannot sustain these same currents at low fields (1-3T) when the sample current is fixed and the magnetic field is ramped. This suggests that the present generation of strand is susceptible to flux jumps (FJ). To prevent flux jumps from limiting stand performance, one must accommodate the energy released during a flux jump. To better understand FJ this work has focused on wire with a given sub-element diameter and shows that one can significantly improve stability by increasing the copper conductivity (higher residual resistivity ratio, RRR, of the Cu). This increased stability significantly improves the conductor performance and permits it to carry more current.

  10. Esophagectomy - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    Minimally invasive esophagectomy; Robotic esophagectomy; Removal of the esophagus - minimally invasive; Achalasia - esophagectomy; Barrett esophagus - esophagectomy; Esophageal cancer - esophagectomy - laparoscopic; Cancer of the ...

  11. 5. CABLE STRAND ALARM: Photocopy of December 1966 photograph showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. CABLE STRAND ALARM: Photocopy of December 1966 photograph showing cable strand alarm located at Beach and Hyde Streets. A strand in the cable (see CA-12-7) forces the fork forward, alerting the powerhouse to the strand by means of an electrical warning device. This strand alarm operates in essentially the same manner as those first used in the 1880s. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  12. Convergent strand array liquid pumping system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A surface-tension liquid pumping system is provided by one or more arrays of converging solid monofilament fibers or metal wires (strands) spaced apart at an input end to gather liquid, and gathered close together at the opposite end where menisci forms between wetted strands to force liquid in the direction of convergence of the strands. The liquid pumping system is independent of gravity. It is illustrated as being used in a heat pump having a heating box to vaporize the liquid and a condensing chamber. Condensed liquid is returned by the pumping system to the heating box where it is again vaporized. A vapor tube carries the vapor to the condensing chamber. In that way, a closed system pumps heat from the heating box to the evaporating chamber and from there radiated to the atmosphere.

  13. Connecting localized DNA strand displacement reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullor Ruiz, Ismael; Arbona, Jean-Michel; Lad, Amitkumar; Mendoza, Oscar; Aimé, Jean-Pierre; Elezgaray, Juan

    2015-07-01

    Logic circuits based on DNA strand displacement reactions have been shown to be versatile enough to compute the square root of four-bit numbers. The implementation of these circuits as a set of bulk reactions faces difficulties which include leaky reactions and intrinsically slow, diffusion-limited reaction rates. In this paper, we consider simple examples of these circuits when they are attached to platforms (DNA origamis). As expected, constraining distances between DNA strands leads to faster reaction rates. However, it also induces side-effects that are not detectable in the solution-phase version of this circuitry. Appropriate design of the system, including protection and asymmetry between input and fuel strands, leads to a reproducible behaviour, at least one order of magnitude faster than the one observed under bulk conditions.Logic circuits based on DNA strand displacement reactions have been shown to be versatile enough to compute the square root of four-bit numbers. The implementation of these circuits as a set of bulk reactions faces difficulties which include leaky reactions and intrinsically slow, diffusion-limited reaction rates. In this paper, we consider simple examples of these circuits when they are attached to platforms (DNA origamis). As expected, constraining distances between DNA strands leads to faster reaction rates. However, it also induces side-effects that are not detectable in the solution-phase version of this circuitry. Appropriate design of the system, including protection and asymmetry between input and fuel strands, leads to a reproducible behaviour, at least one order of magnitude faster than the one observed under bulk conditions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C5NR02434J

  14. Aberrant Double-Strand Break Repair Resulting in Half Crossovers in Mutants Defective for Rad51 or the DNA Polymerase δ Complex▿

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Catherine E.; Lam, Alicia F.; Symington, Lorraine S.

    2009-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an error-free mechanism for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Most DSB repair events occur by gene conversion limiting loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for markers downstream of the site of repair and restricting deleterious chromosome rearrangements. DSBs with only one end available for repair undergo strand invasion into a homologous duplex DNA, followed by replication to the chromosome end (break-induced replication [BIR]), leading to LOH for all markers downstream of the site of strand invasion. Using a transformation-based assay system, we show that most of the apparent BIR events that arise in diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae rad51Δ mutants are due to half crossovers instead of BIR. These events lead to extensive LOH because one arm of chromosome III is deleted. This outcome is also observed in pol32Δ and pol3-ct mutants, defective for components of the DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ) complex. The half crossovers formed in Pol δ complex mutants show evidence of limited homology-dependent DNA synthesis and are partially Mus81 dependent, suggesting that strand invasion occurs and the stalled intermediate is subsequently cleaved. In contrast to rad51Δ mutants, the Pol δ complex mutants are proficient for repair of a 238-bp gap by gene conversion. Thus, the BIR defect observed for rad51 mutants is due to strand invasion failure, whereas the Pol δ complex mutants are proficient for strand invasion but unable to complete extensive tracts of recombination-initiated DNA synthesis. PMID:19139272

  15. Neurobrucellosis in Stranded Dolphins, Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Mora, Gabriela; González-Barrientos, Rocío; Morales, Juan-Alberto; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina; Baquero-Calvo, Elías; De-Miguel, María-Jesús; Marín, Clara-María; Blasco, José-María

    2008-01-01

    Ten striped dolphins, Stenella coeruleoalba, stranded along the Costa Rican Pacific coast, had meningoencephalitis and antibodies against Brucella spp. Brucella ceti was isolated from cerebrospinal fluid of 6 dolphins and 1 fetus. S. coeruleoalba constitutes a highly susceptible host and a potential reservoir for B. ceti transmission. PMID:18760012

  16. Untangling the Strands of the Fourteenth Amendment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lupu, Ira C.

    1979-01-01

    Explores trends in the Court's interpretation of the libertarian and egalitarian dimensions of the Fourteenth Amendment and offers a theory of the two strands. Available from Michigan Law Review, Hutchins Hall, Ann Arbor, MI 48109; single issues $3.50. (Author/IRT)

  17. Attacking invasive grasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, Jon E.

    2015-01-01

    In grasslands fire may play a role in the plant invasion process, both by creating disturbances that potentially favour non-native invasions and as a possible tool for controlling alien invasions. Havill et al. (Applied Vegetation Science, 18, 2015, this issue) determine how native and non-native species respond to different fire regimes as a first step in understanding the potential control of invasive grasses.

  18. The Parameter of Preposition Stranding: A View from Child English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugisaki, Koji; Snyder, William

    2006-01-01

    In this squib we examine the time course of children's acquisition of English to evaluate the basic insights of Kayne's (1981; 1984) proposals on preposition stranding. Kayne argued that the availability of preposition stranding (P-stranding) in English is parametrically linked to the availability of double object datives and the prepositional…

  19. Fish stranding in freshwater systems: sources, consequences, and mitigation.

    PubMed

    Nagrodski, Alexander; Raby, Graham D; Hasler, Caleb T; Taylor, Mark K; Cooke, Steven J

    2012-07-30

    Fish can become stranded when water levels decrease, often rapidly, as a result of anthropogenic (e.g., canal drawdown, hydropeaking, vessel wakes) and natural (e.g., floods, drought, winter ice dynamics) events. We summarize existing research on stranding of fish in freshwater, discuss the sources, consequences, and mitigation options for stranding, and report current knowledge gaps. Our literature review revealed that ∼65.5% of relevant peer-reviewed articles were found to focus on stranding associated with hydropower operations and irrigation projects. In fact, anthropogenic sources of fish stranding represented 81.8% of available literature compared to only 19.9% attributed to natural fish stranding events. While fish mortality as a result of stranding is well documented, our analysis revealed that little is known about the sublethal and long-term consequences of stranding on growth and population dynamics. Furthermore, the contribution of stranding to annual mortality rates is poorly understood as are the potential ecosystem-scale impacts. Mitigation strategies available to deal with stranding include fish salvage, ramping rate limitations, and physical habitat works (e.g., to contour substrate to minimize stranding). However, a greater knowledge of the factors that cause fish stranding would promote the development and refinement of mitigation strategies that are economically and ecologically sustainable. PMID:22481278

  20. Analog Computation by DNA Strand Displacement Circuits.

    PubMed

    Song, Tianqi; Garg, Sudhanshu; Mokhtar, Reem; Bui, Hieu; Reif, John

    2016-08-19

    DNA circuits have been widely used to develop biological computing devices because of their high programmability and versatility. Here, we propose an architecture for the systematic construction of DNA circuits for analog computation based on DNA strand displacement. The elementary gates in our architecture include addition, subtraction, and multiplication gates. The input and output of these gates are analog, which means that they are directly represented by the concentrations of the input and output DNA strands, respectively, without requiring a threshold for converting to Boolean signals. We provide detailed domain designs and kinetic simulations of the gates to demonstrate their expected performance. On the basis of these gates, we describe how DNA circuits to compute polynomial functions of inputs can be built. Using Taylor Series and Newton Iteration methods, functions beyond the scope of polynomials can also be computed by DNA circuits built upon our architecture. PMID:27363950

  1. Capture myopathy in live-stranded cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Herráez, P; Espinosa de los Monteros, A; Fernández, A; Edwards, J F; Sacchini, S; Sierra, E

    2013-05-01

    A group of 51 cetaceans that had been stranded alive on the coasts of the Canary Islands, experienced human capture/rescue interactions and then died, were necropsied over a 12-year period. Of these cetaceans, 25 had haemodynamic lesions indicative of multiorganic vascular shock, degenerative muscle lesions affecting both skeletal and cardiac muscles and myoglobinuric nephrosis typical of capture myopathy (CM). Because macroscopic lesions in muscles and kidneys were not always obvious, a standard protocol was developed where the longissimus dorsi muscle was examined histologically for segmental hypercontraction, contraction band necrosis and segmental muscular degeneration and cardiomyocytes studied for hypereosinophilic wavy fibres, sarcolemmal and perinuclear vacuolation and contraction band necrosis. Light microscopic skeletal and cardiac muscle lesions in all CM animals were confirmed as ante mortem by immunohistochemical assay for myoglobin loss from and fibrinogen entry into affected myofibres. All animals had tubular nephrosis with casts and tubular myoglobin. The oxidative stress-related marker HSP70 was demonstrated immunohistochemically in tubular epithelium. Although the syndrome related to death of live-stranded cetaceans is multifactorial, this study documents that a clinicopathological syndrome comparable to CM of terrestrial wildlife has a role in stranding outcomes. PMID:23146174

  2. Symmetry Reduced Dynamics of Charged Molecular Strands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, David C. P.; Gay-Balmaz, François; Holm, Darryl D.; Putkaradze, Vakhtang; Ratiu, Tudor S.

    2010-09-01

    The equations of motion are derived for the dynamical folding of charged molecular strands (such as DNA) modeled as flexible continuous filamentary distributions of interacting rigid charge conformations. The new feature is that these equations are nonlocal when the screened Coulomb interactions, or Lennard-Jones potentials between pairs of charges, are included. The nonlocal dynamics is derived in the convective representation of continuum motion by using modified Euler-Poincaré and Hamilton-Pontryagin variational formulations that illuminate the various approaches within the framework of symmetry reduction of Hamilton’s principle for exact geometric rods. In the absence of nonlocal interactions, the equations recover the classical Kirchhoff theory of elastic rods. The motion equations in the convective representation are shown to arise by a classical Lagrangian reduction associated to the symmetry group of the system. This approach uses the process of affine Euler-Poincaré reduction initially developed for complex fluids. On the Hamiltonian side, the Poisson bracket of the molecular strand is obtained by reduction of the canonical symplectic structure on phase space. A change of variables allows a direct passage from this classical point of view to the covariant formulation in terms of Lagrange-Poincaré equations of field theory. In another revealing perspective, the convective representation of the nonlocal equations of molecular strand motion is transformed into quaternionic form.

  3. Method and apparatus for testing a forward-moving strand

    DOEpatents

    Ducommun, Joel; Vulliens, Philippe

    1980-01-01

    In a method for testing a continuously forward-moving strand a light beam which passes along a plane that extends approximately perpendicularly to the longitudinal axis of the strand is introduced into the strand. The brightness value is measured on a place of the strand exterior which is distal from the light incidence place by means of at least one photoelectronic element disposed directly on the strand exterior and the measured result is evaluated in a gating circuit which is electrically connected to the photoelectronic element.

  4. Method of preparing and applying single stranded DNA probes to double stranded target DNAs in situ

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for producing single stranded non-self-complementary nucleic acid probes, and for treating target DNA for use therewith. Probe is constructed by treating DNA with a restriction enzyme and an exonuclease to form template/primers for a DNA polymerase. The digested strand is resynthesized in the presence of labeled nucleoside triphosphate precursor. Labeled single stranded fragments are separated from the resynthesized fragments to form the probe. Target DNA is treated with the same restriction enzyme used to construct the probe, and is treated with an exonuclease before application of the probe. The method significantly increases the efficiency and specificity of hybridization mixtures by increasing effective probe concentration by eliminating self-hybridization between both probe and target DNAs, and by reducing the amount of target DNA available for mismatched hybridizations.

  5. Method of preparing and applying single stranded DNA probes to double stranded target DNAs in situ

    DOEpatents

    Gray, J.W.; Pinkel, D.

    1991-07-02

    A method is provided for producing single stranded non-self-complementary nucleic acid probes, and for treating target DNA for use therewith. The probe is constructed by treating DNA with a restriction enzyme and an exonuclease to form template/primers for a DNA polymerase. The digested strand is resynthesized in the presence of labeled nucleoside triphosphate precursor. Labeled single stranded fragments are separated from the resynthesized fragments to form the probe. Target DNA is treated with the same restriction enzyme used to construct the probe, and is treated with an exonuclease before application of the probe. The method significantly increases the efficiency and specificity of hybridization mixtures by increasing effective probe concentration by eliminating self-hybridization between both probe and target DNAs, and by reducing the amount of target DNA available for mismatched hybridizations. No Drawings

  6. The role of aromatic-aromatic interactions in strand-strand stabilization of β-sheets

    PubMed Central

    Budyak, Ivan L.; Zhuravleva, Anastasia; Gierasch, Lila M.

    2013-01-01

    Aromatic-aromatic interactions have long been believed to play key roles in protein structure, folding, and binding functions. Yet we still lack full understanding of the contributions of aromatic-aromatic interactions to protein stability and the timing of their formation during folding. Here, using as a case study an aromatic ladder in the β-barrel protein, cellular retinoic acid binding protein 1 (CRABP1), we find aromatic π stacking plays a greater role in the Phe65-Phe71 cross-strand pair while in another pair, Phe50-Phe65, hydrophobic interactions are dominant. The Phe65/Phe71 pair spans β-strands 4 and 5 in the β-barrel, which lack interstrand hydrogen bonding, and we speculate that it compensates energetically for the absence of strand-strand backbone interactions. Using perturbation analysis, we find that both aromatic-aromatic pairs form after the transition state for folding of CRABP1, thus playing a role in the final stabilization of the β-sheet rather than in its nucleation as had been earlier proposed. The aromatic interaction between strands 4–5 in CRABP1 is highly conserved in the intracellular lipid-binding protein (iLBP) family, and several lines of evidence combine to support a model wherein it acts to maintain barrel structure while allowing the dynamic opening that is necessary for ligand entry. Lastly, we carried out a bioinformatic analysis and found 51 examples of aromatic-aromatic interactions across non-hydrogen-bonded β-strands outside the iLBPs, arguing for the generality of the role played by this structural motif. PMID:23810905

  7. Double-Stranded RNA Resists Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Pabit, Suzette A.; Meisburger, Steve P.; Pollack, Lois

    2011-03-01

    Much attention has been focused on DNA condensation because of its fundamental biological importance. The recent discovery of new roles for RNA duplexes demands efficient packaging of double-stranded RNA for therapeutics. Here we report measurements of short DNA and RNA duplexes in the presence of trivalent ions. Under conditions where UV spectroscopy indicates condensation of DNA duplexes into (insoluble) precipitates, RNA duplexes remain soluble. Small angle x-ray scattering results suggest that the differing surface topologies of RNA and DNA may be crucial in generating the attractive forces that result in precipitation.

  8. Making Stronger Twine With Matched Strands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkland, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    Higher tensil strength achieved with same production equipment. Strong twine made by using spools in one of two-step manufacturing process. Three primary strands twisted together in opposite direction to form threeply twine. Technique used successfully in manufacture of safety netting with 600- to 700-lb (2,700-to 3,100-N) tensil strength and 60-ton (54 x 10 to third power kg) tuna seine with area of 86 acres (3.5 x 10 to fifth power m2). Increase in tensil strength of completed twine found experimentally 10 to 12 percent.

  9. Method for producing labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, John J.; Quesada, Mark A.; Randesi, Matthew

    1999-10-19

    Disclosed is a method for the introduction of unidirectional deletions in a cloned DNA segment. More specifically, the method comprises providing a recombinant DNA construct comprising a DNA segment of interest inserted in a cloning vector, the cloning vector having an f1 endonuclease recognition sequence adjacent to the insertion site of the DNA segment of interest. The recombinant DNA construct is then contacted with the protein pII encoded by gene II of phage f1 thereby generating a single-stranded nick. The nicked DNA is then contacted with E. coli Exonuclease III thereby expanding the single-stranded nick into a single-stranded gap. The single-stranded gapped DNA is then contacted with a single-strand-specific endonuclease thereby producing a linearized DNA molecule containing a double-stranded deletion corresponding in size to the single-stranded gap. The DNA treated in this manner is then incubated with DNA ligase under conditions appropriate for ligation. Also disclosed is a method for producing single-stranded DNA probes. In this embodiment, single-stranded gapped DNA, produced as described above, is contacted with a DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides to fill in the gap. This DNA is then linearized by digestion with a restriction enzyme which cuts outside the DNA segment of interest. The product of this digestion is then denatured to produce a labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probe.

  10. Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Martin; Lukasova, Emilie; Kozubek, Stanislav

    The genetic information of cells continuously undergoes damage induced by intracellular processes including energy metabolism, DNA replication and transcription, and by environmental factors such as mutagenic chemicals and UV and ionizing radiation. This causes numerous DNA lesions, including double strand breaks (DSBs). Since cells cannot escape this damage or normally function with a damaged genome, several DNA repair mechanisms have evolved. Although most "single-stranded" DNA lesions are rapidly removed from DNA without permanent damage, DSBs completely break the DNA molecule, presenting a real challenge for repair mechanisms, with the highest risk among DNA lesions of incorrect repair. Hence, DSBs can have serious consequences for human health. Therefore, in this chapter, we will refer only to this type of DNA damage. In addition to the biochemical aspects of DSB repair, which have been extensively studied over a long period of time, the spatio-temporal organization of DSB induction and repair, the importance of which was recognized only recently, will be considered in terms of current knowledge and remaining questions.

  11. Why double-stranded RNA resists condensation

    PubMed Central

    Tolokh, Igor S.; Pabit, Suzette A.; Katz, Andrea M.; Chen, Yujie; Drozdetski, Aleksander; Baker, Nathan; Pollack, Lois; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2014-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of multivalent cations to solutions containing double-stranded DNA leads to inter-DNA attraction and eventual condensation. Surprisingly, the condensation is suppressed in double-stranded RNA, which carries the same negative charge as DNA, but assumes a different double helical form. Here, we combine experiment and atomistic simulations to propose a mechanism that explains the variations in condensation of short (25 base-pairs) nucleic acid (NA) duplexes, from B-like form of homopolymeric DNA, to mixed sequence DNA, to DNA:RNA hybrid, to A-like RNA. Circular dichroism measurements suggest that duplex helical geometry is not the fundamental property that ultimately determines the observed differences in condensation. Instead, these differences are governed by the spatial variation of cobalt hexammine (CoHex) binding to NA. There are two major NA-CoHex binding modes—internal and external—distinguished by the proximity of bound CoHex to the helical axis. We find a significant difference, up to 5-fold, in the fraction of ions bound to the external surfaces of the different NA constructs studied. NA condensation propensity is determined by the fraction of CoHex ions in the external binding mode. PMID:25123663

  12. Purification and characterization of a DNA strand transferase from broccoli.

    PubMed

    Tissier, A F; Lopez, M F; Signer, E R

    1995-05-01

    A protein with DNA binding, renaturation, and strand-transfer activities has been purified to homogeneity from broccoli (Brassica oleracea var italica). The enzyme, broccoli DNA strand transferase, has a native molecular mass of at least 200 kD and an apparent subunit molecular mass of 95 kD and is isolated as a set of isoforms differing only in charge. All three activities are saturated at very low stoichiometry, one monomer per approximately 1000 nucleotides of single-stranded DNA. Strand transfer is not effected by nuclease activity and reannealing, is only slightly dependent on ATP, and is independent of added Mg2+. Transfer requires homologous single- and double-stranded DNA and at higher enzyme concentrations results in very high molecular mass complexes. As with Escherichia coli RecA, transfer by broccoli DNA strand transferase depends strongly on the presence of 3' homologous ends. PMID:7784508

  13. LOUISIANA INVASIVE SPECIES PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identify the species, locations, and effects of invasive species within the state and the effects of these invasive species in Louisiana. Also identify how these species are spread, and the authorities that exist to manage and control them. With this information, create a m...

  14. Invasion of the Whiteflies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As invasive alien species spread, they often displace indigenous species, thus altering ecological communities and adversely affecting agricultural pest management, human health and well-being, and biodiversity. Despite the importance of invasive species, the processes enabling them to become estab...

  15. A methodology to identify stranded generation facilities and estimate stranded costs for Louisiana's electric utility industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cope, Robert Frank, III

    1998-12-01

    The electric utility industry in the United States is currently experiencing a new and different type of growing pain. It is the pain of having to restructure itself into a competitive business. Many industry experts are trying to explain how the nation as a whole, as well as individual states, will implement restructuring and handle its numerous "transition problems." One significant transition problem for federal and state regulators rests with determining a utility's stranded costs. Stranded generation facilities are assets which would be uneconomic in a competitive environment or costs for assets whose regulated book value is greater than market value. At issue is the methodology which will be used to estimate stranded costs. The two primary methods are known as "Top-Down" and "Bottom-Up." The "Top-Down" approach simply determines the present value of the losses in revenue as the market price for electricity changes over a period of time into the future. The problem with this approach is that it does not take into account technical issues associated with the generation and wheeling of electricity. The "Bottom-Up" approach computes the present value of specific strandable generation facilities and compares the resulting valuations with their historical costs. It is regarded as a detailed and difficult, but more precise, approach to identifying stranded assets and their associated costs. This dissertation develops a "Bottom-Up" quantitative, optimization-based approach to electric power wheeling within the state of Louisiana. It optimally evaluates all production capabilities and coordinates the movement of bulk power through transmission interconnections of competing companies in and around the state. Sensitivity analysis to this approach is performed by varying seasonal consumer demand, electric power imports, and transmission inter-connection cost parameters. Generation facility economic dispatch and transmission interconnection bulk power transfers, specific

  16. Why double-stranded RNA resists condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolokh, Igor S.; Pabit, Suzette; Katz, Andrea M.; Chen, Yujie; Drozdetski, Aleksander; Baker, Nathan A.; Pollack, Lois; Onufriev, Alexey

    2014-09-15

    The addition of small amounts of multivalent cations to solutions containing double-stranded DNA leads to attraction between the negatively charged helices and eventually to condensation. Surprisingly, this effect is suppressed in double-stranded RNA, which carries the same charge as the DNA, but assumes a different double helical form. However, additional characterization of short (25 base-pairs) nucleic acid (NA) duplex structures by circular dichroism shows that measured differences in condensation are not solely determined by duplex helical geometry. Here we combine experiment, theory, and atomistic simulations to propose a mechanism that connects the observed variations in condensation of short NA duplexes with the spatial variation of cobalt hexammine (CoHex) binding at the NA duplex surface. The atomistic picture that emerged showed that CoHex distributions around the NA reveals two major NA-CoHex binding modes -- internal and external -- distinguished by the proximity of bound CoHex to the helical axis. Decreasing trends in experimentally observed condensation propensity of the four studied NA duplexes (from B-like form of homopolymeric DNA, to mixed sequence DNA, to DNA:RNA hybrid, to A-like RNA) are explained by the progressive decrease of a single quantity: the fraction of CoHex ions in the external binding mode. Thus, while NA condensation depends on a complex interplay between various structural and sequence features, our coupled experimental and theoretical results suggest a new model in which a single parameter connects the NA condensation propensity with geometry and sequence dependence of CoHex binding.

  17. Asymmetric segregation of template DNA strands in basal-like human breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and methods Stem or progenitor cells from healthy tissues have the capacity to co-segregate their template DNA strands during mitosis. Here, we set out to test whether breast cancer cell lines also possess the ability to asymmetrically segregate their template DNA strands via non-random chromosome co-segregation, and whether this ability correlates with certain properties attributed to breast cancer stem cells (CSCs). We quantified the frequency of asymmetric segregation of template DNA strands in 12 human breast cancer cell lines, and correlated the frequency to molecular subtype, CD44+/CD24-/lo phenotype, and invasion/migration ability. We tested if co-culture with human mesenchymal stem cells, which are known to increase self-renewal, can alter the frequency of asymmetric segregation of template DNA in breast cancer. Results We found a positive correlation between asymmetric segregation of template DNA and the breast cancer basal-like and claudin-low subtypes. There was an inverse correlation between asymmetric segregation of template DNA and Her2 expression. Breast cancer samples with evidence of asymmetric segregation of template DNA had significantly increased invasion and borderline significantly increased migration abilities. Samples with high CD44+/CD24-/lo surface expression were more likely to harbor a consistent population of cells that asymmetrically segregated its template DNA; however, symmetric self-renewal was enriched in the CD44+/CD24-/lo population. Co-culturing breast cancer cells with human mesenchymal stem cells expanded the breast CSC pool and decreased the frequency of asymmetric segregation of template DNA. Conclusions Breast cancer cells within the basal-like subtype can asymmetrically segregate their template DNA strands through non-random chromosome segregation. The frequency of asymmetric segregation of template DNA can be modulated by external factors that influence expansion or self-renewal of CSC populations. Future

  18. New insights on single-stranded versus double-stranded DNA library preparation for ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Wales, Nathan; Carøe, Christian; Sandoval-Velasco, Marcela; Gamba, Cristina; Barnett, Ross; Samaniego, José Alfredo; Madrigal, Jazmín Ramos; Orlando, Ludovic; Gilbert, M Thomas P

    2015-12-01

    An innovative single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) library preparation method has sparked great interest among ancient DNA (aDNA) researchers, especially after reports of endogenous DNA content increases >20-fold in some samples. To investigate the behavior of this method, we generated ssDNA and conventional double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) libraries from 23 ancient and historic plant and animal specimens. We found ssDNA library preparation substantially increased endogenous content when dsDNA libraries contained <3% endogenous DNA, but this enrichment is less pronounced when dsDNA preparations successfully recover short endogenous DNA fragments (mean size < 70 bp). Our findings can help researchers determine when to utilize the time- and resource-intensive ssDNA library preparation method. PMID:26651516

  19. Closed-form analysis for elastic deformations of multilayered strands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K.; Cochran, J. E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Closed-form solutions are developed for elastic deformation characteristics of multilayered strands under tensile and torsional loads. These analytical results are successfully applied to obtain expressions for the effective extensional and torsional moduli of rigidity for the strands. Finally, a simple design criterion is established for 'nonrotating' cables.

  20. Saliva of Lygus lineolaris digests double stranded ribonucleic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The prospects for development of highly specific pesticides based on double stranded ribonucleic acid have been a recent focus of scientific research. Creative applications have been proposed and demonstrated. However, not all insects are sensitive to double stranded RNA (dsRNA) gene knockdown effec...

  1. Minimally Invasive Valve Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Nicolas H.; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac valve surgery is life saving for many patients. The advent of minimally invasive surgical techniques has historically allowed for improvement in both post-operative convalescence and important clinical outcomes. The development of minimally invasive cardiac valve repair and replacement surgery over the past decade is poised to revolutionize the care of cardiac valve patients. Here, we present a review of the history and current trends in minimally invasive aortic and mitral valve repair and replacement, including the development of sutureless bioprosthetic valves. PMID:24797148

  2. Coccidioidomycosis and other systemic mycoses of marine mammals stranding along the central California, USA coast: 1998-2012.

    PubMed

    Huckabone, Sara E; Gulland, Frances M D; Johnson, Suzanne M; Colegrove, Kathleen M; Dodd, Erin M; Pappagianis, Demosthenes; Dunkin, Robin C; Casper, David; Carlson, Erin L; Sykes, Jane E; Meyer, Weiland; Miller, Melissa A

    2015-04-01

    A wide range of systemic mycoses have been reported from captive and wild marine mammals from North America. Examples include regionally endemic pathogens such as Coccidioides and Blastomyces spp., and novel pathogens like Cryptococcus gattii, which appear may have been introduced to North America by humans. Stranding and necropsy data were analyzed from three marine mammal stranding and response facilities on the central California coast to assess the prevalence, host demographics, and lesion distribution of systemic mycoses affecting locally endemic marine mammals. Between 1 January 1998 and 30 June 2012, >7,000 stranded marine mammals were necropsied at the three facilities. Necropsy and histopathology records were reviewed to identify cases of locally invasive or systemic mycoses and determine the nature and distribution of fungal lesions. Forty-one animals (0.6%) exhibited cytological, culture- or histologically confirmed locally invasive or systemic mycoses: 36 had coccidioidomycosis, two had zygomycosis, two had cryptococcosis, and one was systemically infected with Scedosporium apiospermum (an Ascomycota). Infected animals included 18 California sea lions (Zalophus californianus), 20 southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis), two Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi), one Dall's porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli), and one northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris). Coccidioidomycosis was reported from 15 sea lions, 20 sea otters, and one harbor seal, confirming that Coccidioides spp. is the most common pathogen causing systemic mycosis in marine mammals stranding along the central California coast. We also report the first confirmation of C. gattii infection in a wild marine mammal from California and the first report of coccidioidomycosis in a wild harbor seal. Awareness of these pathogenic fungi during clinical care and postmortem examination is an important part of marine mammal population health surveillance and human health protection

  3. Computing in mammalian cells with nucleic acid strand exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, Benjamin; Chen, Yuan-Jyue; Zurla, Chiara; Pochekailov, Sergii; Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Santangelo, Philip J.; Seelig, Georg

    2016-03-01

    DNA strand displacement has been widely used for the design of molecular circuits, motors, and sensors in cell-free settings. Recently, it has been shown that this technology can also operate in biological environments, but capabilities remain limited. Here, we look to adapt strand displacement and exchange reactions to mammalian cells and report DNA circuitry that can directly interact with a native mRNA. We began by optimizing the cellular performance of fluorescent reporters based on four-way strand exchange reactions and identified robust design principles by systematically varying the molecular structure, chemistry and delivery method. Next, we developed and tested AND and OR logic gates based on four-way strand exchange, demonstrating the feasibility of multi-input logic. Finally, we established that functional siRNA could be activated through strand exchange, and used native mRNA as programmable scaffolds for co-localizing gates and visualizing their operation with subcellular resolution.

  4. Computing in mammalian cells with nucleic acid strand exchange

    PubMed Central

    Pochekailov, Sergii; Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Santangelo, Philip J.; Seelig, Georg

    2015-01-01

    DNA strand displacement has been widely used for the design of molecular circuits, motors, and sensors in cell-free settings. Recently, it has been shown that this technology can also operate in biological environments, but capabilities remain limited. Here, we look to adapt strand displacement and exchange reactions to mammalian cells and report DNA circuitry that can directly interact with a native mRNA. We began by optimizing the cellular performance of fluorescent reporters based on four-way strand exchange reactions and identified robust design principles by systematically varying the molecular structure, chemistry and delivery method. Next, we developed and tested AND and OR logic gates based on four-way strand exchange, demonstrating the feasibility of multi-input logic. Finally, we established that functional siRNA could be activated through strand exchange, and used native mRNA as programmable scaffolds for co-localizing gates and visualizing their operation with subcellular resolution. PMID:26689378

  5. Computing in mammalian cells with nucleic acid strand exchange.

    PubMed

    Groves, Benjamin; Chen, Yuan-Jyue; Zurla, Chiara; Pochekailov, Sergii; Kirschman, Jonathan L; Santangelo, Philip J; Seelig, Georg

    2016-03-01

    DNA strand displacement has been widely used for the design of molecular circuits, motors, and sensors in cell-free settings. Recently, it has been shown that this technology can also operate in biological environments, but capabilities remain limited. Here, we look to adapt strand displacement and exchange reactions to mammalian cells and report DNA circuitry that can directly interact with a native mRNA. We began by optimizing the cellular performance of fluorescent reporters based on four-way strand exchange reactions and identified robust design principles by systematically varying the molecular structure, chemistry and delivery method. Next, we developed and tested AND and OR logic gates based on four-way strand exchange, demonstrating the feasibility of multi-input logic. Finally, we established that functional siRNA could be activated through strand exchange, and used native mRNA as programmable scaffolds for co-localizing gates and visualizing their operation with subcellular resolution. PMID:26689378

  6. Quantitative cooling histories from stranded diffusion profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, E. B.; Cherniak, D. J.

    2015-06-01

    Stranded elemental or isotopic diffusion profiles in geological materials have the potential to reveal information on the thermal history of the host sample. In the specific case of a concentration step that is established at high temperature, the extent of diffusive relaxation during cooling depends on the details of the cooling path and the Arrhenius diffusion law of the species of interest: In principle, a measured profile in a sample can provide quantitative information on the nature of the cooling path if the diffusion law is known. Using a combination of mathematics and numerical simulations, we derive a simple relationship describing the extent of profile relaxation (as gauged by the slope S 0 of a diffusion profile) as a function of the initial temperature ( T i) and cooling rate () of the system and the activation energy ( E a) and pre-exponential factor ( D 0) for diffusion: The initial temperature T i is expressed in K, is in °/s, D 0 is in m2/s, and E a is in kJ/mol. The slope of the profile of interest can be estimated either at the midpoint of an interdiffusion profile or at a crystal margin. In the former case, concentrations are normalized to a difference of 100 between the upper (=100) and lower (=0) initial concentration plateaus. For profiles at crystal margins, the normalization range is 0 to 50. The equation above applies equally well to linear and exponential cooling paths because the extent of relaxation indicated by S 0 is essentially the same for a given linear cooling path and an exponential one characterized by the same initial cooling rate. Cooling from the top of parabolic T- t "dome" results in more extensive profile relaxation; this is also well described by the above equation if the leading constant 2.504 is changed to 2.165. If S 0 of a stranded profile has been characterized in the laboratory, and if the Arrhenius law of the diffusant is known, the above equation can be solved uniquely for one of the cooling path parameters ( T i

  7. Minimally invasive hip replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Smits SA, Swinford RR, Bahamonde RE. A randomized, prospective study of 3 minimally invasive surgical approaches in total hip arthroplasty: comprehensive gait analysis. J Arthroplasty . 2008;23:68-73. PMID: 18722305 ...

  8. MARveling at parasite invasion.

    PubMed

    Hager, Kristin M; Carruthers, Vern B

    2008-02-01

    Micronemal proteins (MICs) are key mediators of cytoadherence and invasion for Toxoplasma gondii. Emerging evidence indicates that carbohydrate binding facilitates Toxoplasma entry into host cells. The recently solved Toxoplasma MIC1s (TgMIC1s) structure reveals the presence of novel specialized domains that can discriminate between glycan residues. Comparison with Plasmodium erythrocyte-binding antigen 175 reveals that terminal sialic acid residues might represent a shared but tailored invasion pathway among apicomplexan parasites. PMID:18203663

  9. Recombination in Eukaryotic Single Stranded DNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Darren P.; Biagini, Philippe; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Golden, Michael; Roumagnac, Philippe; Varsani, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    Although single stranded (ss) DNA viruses that infect humans and their domesticated animals do not generally cause major diseases, the arthropod borne ssDNA viruses of plants do, and as a result seriously constrain food production in most temperate regions of the world. Besides the well known plant and animal-infecting ssDNA viruses, it has recently become apparent through metagenomic surveys of ssDNA molecules that there also exist large numbers of other diverse ssDNA viruses within almost all terrestrial and aquatic environments. The host ranges of these viruses probably span the tree of life and they are likely to be important components of global ecosystems. Various lines of evidence suggest that a pivotal evolutionary process during the generation of this global ssDNA virus diversity has probably been genetic recombination. High rates of homologous recombination, non-homologous recombination and genome component reassortment are known to occur within and between various different ssDNA virus species and we look here at the various roles that these different types of recombination may play, both in the day-to-day biology, and in the longer term evolution, of these viruses. We specifically focus on the ecological, biochemical and selective factors underlying patterns of genetic exchange detectable amongst the ssDNA viruses and discuss how these should all be considered when assessing the adaptive value of recombination during ssDNA virus evolution. PMID:21994803

  10. Development of bis-locked nucleic acid (bisLNA) oligonucleotides for efficient invasion of supercoiled duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Pedro M. D.; Geny, Sylvain; Pabon, Y. Vladimir; Bergquist, Helen; Zaghloul, Eman M.; Rocha, Cristina S. J.; Oprea, Iulian I.; Bestas, Burcu; Andaloussi, Samir EL; Jørgensen, Per T.; Pedersen, Erik B.; Lundin, Karin E.; Zain, Rula; Wengel, Jesper; Smith, C. I. Edvard

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the many developments in synthetic oligonucleotide (ON) chemistry and design, invasion into double-stranded DNA (DSI) under physiological salt and pH conditions remains a challenge. In this work, we provide a new ON tool based on locked nucleic acids (LNAs), designed for strand invasion into duplex DNA (DSI). We thus report on the development of a clamp type of LNA ON—bisLNA—with capacity to bind and invade into supercoiled double-stranded DNA. The bisLNA links a triplex-forming, Hoogsteen-binding, targeting arm with a strand-invading Watson–Crick binding arm. Optimization was carried out by varying the number and location of LNA nucleotides and the length of the triplex-forming versus strand-invading arms. Single-strand regions in target duplex DNA were mapped using chemical probing. By combining design and increase in LNA content, it was possible to achieve a 100-fold increase in potency with 30% DSI at 450 nM using a bisLNA to plasmid ratio of only 21:1. Although this first conceptual report does not address the utility of bisLNA for the targeting of DNA in a chromosomal context, it shows bisLNA as a promising candidate for interfering also with cellular genes. PMID:23345620

  11. RecA mediates MgpB and MgpC phase and antigenic variation in Mycoplasma genitalium, but plays a minor role in DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Burgos, Raul; Wood, Gwendolyn E.; Young, Lei; Glass, John I.; Totten, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Mycoplasma genitalium, a sexually transmitted human pathogen, encodes MgpB and MgpC adhesins that undergo phase and antigenic variation through recombination with archived “MgPar” donor sequences. The mechanism and molecular factors required for this genetic variation are poorly understood. In this study, we estimate that sequence variation at the mgpB/C locus occurs in vitro at a frequency of >1.25 × 10−4 events/ genome/generation using a quantitative anchored-PCR assay. This rate was dramatically reduced in a recA deletion mutant and increased in a complemented strain overexpressing RecA. Similarly, the frequency of hemadsorption-deficient phase variants was reduced in the recA mutant, but restored by complementation. Unlike Escherichia coli, inactivation of recA in M. genitalium had a minimal effect on survival after exposure to mitomycin C or UV irradiation. In contrast, a deletion mutant for the predicted nucleotide excision repair (NER) uvrC gene, showed growth defects and was exquisitely sensitive to DNA damage. We conclude that M. genitalium RecA has a primary role in mgpB/C-MgPar recombination leading to antigenic and phase variation, yet plays a minor role in DNA repair. Our results also suggest that M. genitalium possess an active NER system, possibly representing the main DNA repair pathway in this minimal bacterium. PMID:22686427

  12. Fluid mechanics of DNA double-strand filter elution.

    PubMed Central

    Rudinger, George; Blazek, Ed Robert

    2002-01-01

    Measurement of infrequent DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in mammalian cells is essential for the understanding of cell damage by ionizing radiation and many DNA-reactive drugs. One of the most important assays for measuring DSB in cellular DNA is filter elution. This study is an attempt to determine whether standard concepts of fluid mechanics can yield a self-consistent model of this process. Major assumptions of the analysis are reptation through a channel formed by surrounding strands, with only strand ends captured by filter pores. Both viscosity and entanglement with surrounding strands are considered to determine the resistance to this motion. One important result is that the average elution time of a strand depends not only on its length, but also on the size distribution of the surrounding strands. This model is consistent with experimental observations, such as the dependence of elution kinetics upon radiation dose, but independence from the size of the DNA sample up to a critical filter loading, and possible overlap of elution times for strands of different length. It indicates how the dependence of elution time on the flow rate could reveal the relative importance of viscous and entanglement resistance, and also predicts the consequences of using different filters. PMID:11751292

  13. Stranded on a Late Cambrian shoreline: Medusae from central Wisconsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagadorn, James W.; Dott, Robert H., Jr.; Damrow, Dan

    2002-02-01

    Fossilized impressions of soft-bodied organisms are exceptionally rare in coarse-grained strata. Fossilized mass-stranding events of soft-bodied organisms are even rarer. The Upper Cambrian Mt. Simon Wonewoc Sandstone in central Wisconsin contains at least seven horizons characterized by hundreds of decimeter-sized impressions of medusae; these represent one of only two fossilized mass-stranding deposits. Medusae exhibit features nearly identical to those observed in modern scyphozoan strandings, including impressions of subumbrellar margins and gastrovascular cavities. This deposit provides insights about soft-tissue preservation in Phanerozoic marginal marine sediments, and suggests that large soft-bodied pelagic organisms were abundant in Cambrian seas.

  14. Triplex-stabilizing properties of parallel clamps carrying LNA derivatives at the Hoogsteen strand.

    PubMed

    Alvira, Margarita; Eritja, Ramon

    2010-02-01

    DNA Parallel clamps with a polypurine strand linked to a polypyrimidine Hoogsteen strand containing locked nucleic acids bind their corresponding polypyrimidine targets with high affinity. PMID:20151386

  15. A unified approach for quantifying invasibility and degree of invasion.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qinfeng; Fei, Songlin; Dukes, Jeffrey S; Oswalt, Christopher M; Iannone, Basil V; Potter, Kevin M

    2015-10-01

    Habitat invasibility is a central focus of invasion biology, with implications for basic ecological patterns and processes and for effective invasion management. "Invasibility" is, however, one of the most elusive metrics and misused terms in ecology. Empirical studies and meta-analyses of invasibility have produced inconsistent and even conflicting results. This lack of consistency, and subsequent difficulty in making broad cross-habitat comparisons, stem in part from (1) the indiscriminant use of a closely related, but fundamentally different concept, that of degree of invasion (DI) or level of invasion; and (2) the lack of common invasibility metrics, as illustrated by our review of all invasibility-related papers published in 2013. To facilitate both cross-habitat comparison and more robust ecological generalizations, we clarify the definitions of invasibility and DI, and for the first time propose a common metric for quantifying invasibility based on a habitat's resource availability as inferred from relative resident species richness and biomass. We demonstrate the feasibility of our metric using empirical data collected from 2475 plots from three forest ecosystems in the eastern United States. We also propose a similar metric for DI. Our unified, resource-based metrics are scaled from 0 to 1, facilitating cross-habitat comparisons. Our proposed metrics clearly distinguish invasibility and DI from each other, which will help to (1) advance invasion ecology by allowing more robust testing of generalizations and (2) facilitate more effective invasive species control and management. PMID:26649383

  16. Critical current and strand stiffness of three types of Nb3Sn strand subjected to spatial periodic bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijhuis, A.; Ilyin, Y.; Wessel, W. A. J.; Abbas, W.

    2006-11-01

    Knowledge of the influence of bending on the critical current (Ic) of Nb3Sn strands is essential for the understanding of the reduction in performance due to transverse electromagnetic load. In particular, for the large cable-in-conduit conductors (CICCs) meant for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER), we expect that bending is the dominant mechanism for this degradation. We have measured the Ic of a bronze, a powder-in-tube and an internal tin processed Nb3Sn strand when subjected to spatial periodic bending using bending wavelengths from 5 to 10 mm. Two of these strands were applied in model coils for the ITER. We found that the tested strands behave according to the so-called low interfilament resistivity limit, confirming full current transfer between the filaments. This is supported by AC coupling loss measurements giving an indication of the interfilament current transfer length. The reduction of Ic due to bending strain can then be simply derived from the bending amplitude and the Ic versus axial applied strain (ɛ) relation. This Ic(ɛ) sensitivity can vary for different strand types but since the electromagnetic force is the driving parameter for strand bending in a CICC, the stiffness of the strands definitively plays a key role, which is confirmed by the results presented.

  17. Minimally invasive procedures

    PubMed Central

    Baltayiannis, Nikolaos; Michail, Chandrinos; Lazaridis, George; Anagnostopoulos, Dimitrios; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Lampaki, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive procedures, which include laparoscopic surgery, use state-of-the-art technology to reduce the damage to human tissue when performing surgery. Minimally invasive procedures require small “ports” from which the surgeon inserts thin tubes called trocars. Carbon dioxide gas may be used to inflate the area, creating a space between the internal organs and the skin. Then a miniature camera (usually a laparoscope or endoscope) is placed through one of the trocars so the surgical team can view the procedure as a magnified image on video monitors in the operating room. Specialized equipment is inserted through the trocars based on the type of surgery. There are some advanced minimally invasive surgical procedures that can be performed almost exclusively through a single point of entry—meaning only one small incision, like the “uniport” video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Not only do these procedures usually provide equivalent outcomes to traditional “open” surgery (which sometimes require a large incision), but minimally invasive procedures (using small incisions) may offer significant benefits as well: (I) faster recovery; (II) the patient remains for less days hospitalized; (III) less scarring and (IV) less pain. In our current mini review we will present the minimally invasive procedures for thoracic surgery. PMID:25861610

  18. Minimally invasive pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Yiannakopoulou, E

    2015-12-01

    Minimally invasive pancreatic surgery is feasible and safe. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy should be widely adopted for benign lesions of the pancreas. Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy, although technically demanding, in the setting of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has a number of advantages including shorter hospital stay, faster recovery, allowing patients to recover in a timelier manner and pursue adjuvant treatment options. Furthermore, it seems that progression-free survival is longer in patients undergoing laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy in comparison with those undergoing open pancreaticoduodenectomy. Minimally invasive middle pancreatectomy seems appropriate for benign or borderline tumors of the neck of the pancreas. Technological advances including intraoperative ultrasound and intraoperative fluorescence imaging systems are expected to facilitate the wide adoption of minimally invasive pancreatic surgery. Although, the oncological outcome seems similar with that of open surgery, there are still concerns, as the majority of relevant evidence comes from retrospective studies. Large multicenter randomized studies comparing laparoscopic with open pancreatectomy as well as robotic assisted with both open and laparoscopic approaches are needed. Robotic approach could be possibly shown to be less invasive than conventional laparoscopic approach through the less traumatic intra-abdominal handling of tissues. In addition, robotic approach could enable the wide adoption of the technique by surgeon who is not that trained in advanced laparoscopic surgery. A putative clinical benefit of minimally invasive pancreatic surgery could be the attenuated surgical stress response leading to reduced morbidity and mortality as well as lack of the detrimental immunosuppressive effect especially for the oncological patients. PMID:26530291

  19. Alien invasive birds.

    PubMed

    Brochier, B; Vangeluwe, D; van den Berg, T

    2010-08-01

    A bird species is regarded as alien invasive if it has been introduced, intentionally or accidentally, to a location where it did not previously occur naturally, becomes capable of establishing a breeding population without further intervention by humans, spreads and becomes a pest affecting the environment, the local biodiversity, the economy and/or society, including human health. European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris), Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis) and Red-vented Bulbul (Pycnonotus cafer) have been included on the list of '100 of the World's Worst Invasive Alien Species', a subset of the Global Invasive Species Database. The 'Delivering Alien Invasive Species Inventories for Europe' project has selected Canada Goose (Branta canadensis), Ruddy Duck (Oxyura jamaicensis), Rose-ringed Parakeet (Psittacula krameri) and Sacred Ibis (Threskiornis aethiopicus) as among 100 of the worst invasive species in Europe. For each of these alien bird species, the geographic range (native and introduced range), the introduction pathway, the general impacts and the management methods are presented. PMID:20919578

  20. DNA nanotechnology. Programming colloidal phase transitions with DNA strand displacement.

    PubMed

    Rogers, W Benjamin; Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2015-02-01

    DNA-grafted nanoparticles have been called "programmable atom-equivalents": Like atoms, they form three-dimensional crystals, but unlike atoms, the particles themselves carry information (the sequences of the grafted strands) that can be used to "program" the equilibrium crystal structures. We show that the programmability of these colloids can be generalized to the full temperature-dependent phase diagram, not just the crystal structures themselves. We add information to the buffer in the form of soluble DNA strands designed to compete with the grafted strands through strand displacement. Using only two displacement reactions, we program phase behavior not found in atomic systems or other DNA-grafted colloids, including arbitrarily wide gas-solid coexistence, reentrant melting, and even reversible transitions between distinct crystal phases. PMID:25657244

  1. Mass stranding of Odontoceti caused by parasitogenic eighth cranial neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Morimitsu, T; Nagai, T; Ide, M; Kawano, H; Naichuu, A; Koono, M; Ishii, A

    1987-10-01

    Hearing organs of the Odontoceti from two mass strandings in 1983 and 1986 were examined histopathologically. In the 1983 stranding, two of three pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) were necropsied and numerous Nasitrema sp. were found close to the eighth cranial nerve (nervus vistibulo cochlearis) in both animals. Patchy degeneration of the eighth cranial nerve in and out of the modiolus of the cochlea was observed. In the 1986 stranding, five of 125 false killer whales (Pseudorca crassiclens) were examined and numerous trematodes (Nasitrema gondo) were found in the tympanic cavities. Severe degeneration of the eighth cranial nerve was discovered and there were many trematode eggs in the nervous and surrounding tissues. Parasitogenic eighth neuropathy is proposed again as the cause of mass stranding of the Odontoceti. PMID:3682083

  2. 215. Dennis Hill, Photographer May 1998 DETAIL VIEW OF STRAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    215. Dennis Hill, Photographer May 1998 DETAIL VIEW OF STRAND SHOES AND STORM CABLE EYE BARS IN YERBA BUENA ANCHORAGE, FACING EAST. - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  3. 1893 ROPE ROOM189380 TON ROPE MACHINEUPPER STRAND GUIDE John ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1893 ROPE ROOM-1893-80 TON ROPE MACHINE-UPPER STRAND GUIDE - John A. Roebling's Sons Company & American Steel & Wire Company, South Broad, Clark, Elmer, Mott & Hudson Streets, Trenton, Mercer County, NJ

  4. Diffusion and Segmental Dynamics of Double-Stranded DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, E. P.; Ohrt, T.; Winkler, R. G.; Schwille, P.

    2006-12-01

    Diffusion and segmental dynamics of the double-stranded λ-phage DNA polymer are quantitatively studied over the transition range from stiff to semiflexible chains. Spectroscopy of fluorescence fluctuations of single-end fluorescently labeled monodisperse DNA fragments unambiguously shows that double-stranded DNA in the length range of 102 2×104 base pairs behaves as a semiflexible polymer with segmental dynamics controlled by hydrodynamic interactions.

  5. Molecular architecture of tailed double-stranded DNA phages

    PubMed Central

    Fokine, Andrei; Rossmann, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    The tailed double-stranded DNA bacteriophages, or Caudovirales, constitute ~96% of all the known phages. Although these phages come in a great variety of sizes and morphology, their virions are mainly constructed of similar molecular building blocks via similar assembly pathways. Here we review the structure of tailed double-stranded DNA bacteriophages at a molecular level, emphasizing the structural similarity and common evolutionary origin of proteins that constitute these virions. PMID:24616838

  6. The N-terminal strand modulates immunoglobulin light chain fibrillogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pozo-Yauner, Luis del; Wall, Jonathan S.; González Andrade, Martín; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Rodríguez-Ambriz, Sandra L.; Pérez Carreón, Julio I.; and others

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •We evaluated the impact of mutations in the N-terminal strand of 6aJL2 protein. •Mutations destabilized the protein in a position-dependent manner. •Destabilizing mutations accelerated the fibrillogenesis by shortening the lag time. •The effect on the kinetic of fibril elongation by seeding was of different nature. •The N-terminal strand is buried in the fibrillar state of 6aJL2 protein. -- Abstract: It has been suggested that the N-terminal strand of the light chain variable domain (V{sub L}) protects the molecule from aggregation by hindering spurious intermolecular contacts. We evaluated the impact of mutations in the N-terminal strand on the thermodynamic stability and kinetic of fibrillogenesis of the V{sub L} protein 6aJL2. Mutations in this strand destabilized the protein in a position-dependent manner, accelerating the fibrillogenesis by shortening the lag time; an effect that correlated with the extent of destabilization. In contrast, the effect on the kinetics of fibril elongation, as assessed in seeding experiments was of different nature, as it was not directly dependant on the degree of destabilization. This finding suggests different factors drive the nucleation-dependent and elongation phases of light chain fibrillogenesis. Finally, taking advantage of the dependence of the Trp fluorescence upon environment, four single Trp substitutions were made in the N-terminal strand, and changes in solvent exposure during aggregation were evaluated by acrylamide-quenching. The results suggest that the N-terminal strand is buried in the fibrillar state of 6aJL2 protein. This finding suggest a possible explanation for the modulating effect exerted by the mutations in this strand on the aggregation behavior of 6aJL2 protein.

  7. Invasion triangle: an organizational framework for species invasion

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Lora B; Leger, Elizabeth A; Nowak, Robert S

    2011-01-01

    Species invasion is a complex, multifactor process. To encapsulate this complexity into an intuitively appealing, simple, and straightforward manner, we present an organizational framework in the form of an invasion triangle. The invasion triangle is an adaptation of the disease triangle used by plant pathologists to help envision and evaluate interactions among a host, a pathogen, and an environment. Our modification of this framework for invasive species incorporates the major processes that result in invasion as the three sides of the triangle: (1) attributes of the potential invader; (2) biotic characteristics of a potentially invaded site; and (3) environmental conditions of the site. The invasion triangle also includes the impact of external influences on each side of the triangle, such as climate and land use change. This paper introduces the invasion triangle, discusses how accepted invasion hypotheses are integrated in this framework, describes how the invasion triangle can be used to focus research and management, and provides examples of application. The framework provided by the invasion triangle is easy to use by both researchers and managers and also applicable at any level of data intensity, from expert opinion to highly controlled experiments. The organizational framework provided by the invasion triangle is beneficial for understanding and predicting why species are invasive in specific environments, for identifying knowledge gaps, for facilitating communication, and for directing management in regard to invasive species. PMID:22393528

  8. Intracellular Parasite Invasion Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibley, L. D.

    2004-04-01

    Intracellular parasites use various strategies to invade cells and to subvert cellular signaling pathways and, thus, to gain a foothold against host defenses. Efficient cell entry, ability to exploit intracellular niches, and persistence make these parasites treacherous pathogens. Most intracellular parasites gain entry via host-mediated processes, but apicomplexans use a system of adhesion-based motility called ``gliding'' to actively penetrate host cells. Actin polymerization-dependent motility facilitates parasite migration across cellular barriers, enables dissemination within tissues, and powers invasion of host cells. Efficient invasion has brought widespread success to this group, which includes Toxoplasma, Plasmodium, and Cryptosporidium.

  9. Mechanisms of Perineural Invasion.

    PubMed

    Bakst, Richard L; Wong, Richard J

    2016-04-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) is the neoplastic invasion of nerves. PNI is widely recognized as an important adverse pathological feature of many malignancies, including pancreatic, prostate, and head and neck cancers and is associated with a poor prognosis. Despite widespread acknowledgment of the clinical significance of PNI, the mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis remain largely unknown. Recent theories of PNI pathogenesis have placed a significant emphasis on the active role of the nerve microenvironment, with PNI resulting from well-orchestrated reciprocal interactions between cancer and host. Elucidating the mechanisms involved in PNI may translate into targeted therapies for this ominous process. PMID:27123385

  10. Minimally Invasive Radiofrequency Devices.

    PubMed

    Sadick, Neil; Rothaus, Kenneth O

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews minimally invasive radiofrequency options for skin tightening, focusing on describing their mechanism of action and clinical profile in terms of safety and efficacy and presenting peer-reviewed articles associated with the specific technologies. Treatments offered by minimally invasive radiofrequency devices (fractional, microneedling, temperature-controlled) are increasing in popularity due to the dramatic effects they can have without requiring skin excision, downtime, or even extreme financial burden from the patient's perspective. Clinical applications thus far have yielded impressive results in treating signs of the aging face and neck, either as stand-alone or as postoperative maintenance treatments. PMID:27363771

  11. Elongation of discotic liquid crystal strands and lubricant effects.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Surjya Sarathi; Galerne, Yves

    2014-05-19

    After a short review on the physics of pulled threads and their mechanical properties, the paper reports and discusses the strand elongation of disordered columnar phases, hexagonal or lamella-columnar, of small molecules or polymers. The mechanical properties appear to be relevant to the length of the columns of molecules compared to the thread length, instead of the usual correlation length. If, taking the entanglement effect into account, the column length is short, the strand exhibits rather fluid-like properties that may even look nematic-like at the macroscopic scale. The Plateau-Rayleigh instability breaks the thread shortly thereafter. However, because the hydrodynamic objects are the columns instead of the molecules, the viscosity is anomalously large. The observations show that the strands in the columnar phases are made of filaments, or fibrils, which are bundles of columns of molecules. This explains the grooves and rings, which are observed on the antenna or bamboo-like strand profiles. On pulling a strand, the elongation stress eventually exceeds the plasticity threshold, thus breaking the columns and the filaments. As a result, cracks, more exactly, giant dislocations are formed. These change the strand thickness by steps of different birefringence colors. Interestingly, the addition of a solute may drastically change the effective viscosity of the columnar phase and its mechanical properties. Some solutes, such as alkanes, exhibit lubricant and detangling properties, whereas others such as triphenylene, are antilubricant. PMID:24302445

  12. Hearing Loss in Stranded Odontocete Dolphins and Whales

    PubMed Central

    Mann, David; Hill-Cook, Mandy; Manire, Charles; Greenhow, Danielle; Montie, Eric; Powell, Jessica; Wells, Randall; Bauer, Gordon; Cunningham-Smith, Petra; Lingenfelser, Robert; DiGiovanni, Robert; Stone, Abigale; Brodsky, Micah; Stevens, Robert; Kieffer, George; Hoetjes, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The causes of dolphin and whale stranding can often be difficult to determine. Because toothed whales rely on echolocation for orientation and feeding, hearing deficits could lead to stranding. We report on the results of auditory evoked potential measurements from eight species of odontocete cetaceans that were found stranded or severely entangled in fishing gear during the period 2004 through 2009. Approximately 57% of the bottlenose dolphins and 36% of the rough-toothed dolphins had significant hearing deficits with a reduction in sensitivity equivalent to severe (70–90 dB) or profound (>90 dB) hearing loss in humans. The only stranded short-finned pilot whale examined had profound hearing loss. No impairments were detected in seven Risso's dolphins from three different stranding events, two pygmy killer whales, one Atlantic spotted dolphin, one spinner dolphin, or a juvenile Gervais' beaked whale. Hearing impairment could play a significant role in some cetacean stranding events, and the hearing of all cetaceans in rehabilitation should be tested. PMID:21072206

  13. Application of strand meshes to complex aerodynamic flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Aaron; Wissink, Andrew M.; Sankaran, Venkateswaran; Meakin, Robert L.; Chan, William M.

    2011-07-01

    We explore a new approach for viscous computational fluid dynamics calculations for external aerodynamics around geometrically complex bodies that incorporates nearly automatic mesh generation and efficient flow solution methods. A prismatic-like grid using "strands" is grown a short distance from the body surface to capture the viscous boundary layer, and adaptive Cartesian grids are used throughout the rest of the domain. The approach presents several advantages over established methods: nearly automatic grid generation from triangular or quadrilateral surface tessellations, very low memory overhead, automatic mesh adaptivity for time-dependent problems, and fast and efficient solvers from structured data in both the strand and Cartesian grids.The approach is evaluated for complex geometries and flow fields. We investigate the effects of strand length and strand vector smoothing to understand the effects on computed solutions. Results of three applications using the strand-adaptive Cartesian approach are given, including a NACA wing, isolated V-22 (TRAM) rotor in hover, and the DLR-F6 wing-body transport. The results from these cases show that the strand approach can successfully resolve near-body and off-body features as well as or better than established methods.

  14. Flap Endonuclease 1 Limits Telomere Fragility on the Leading Strand*

    PubMed Central

    Teasley, Daniel C.; Parajuli, Shankar; Nguyen, Mai; Moore, Hayley R.; Alspach, Elise; Lock, Ying Jie; Honaker, Yuchi; Saharia, Abhishek; Piwnica-Worms, Helen; Stewart, Sheila A.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of redundant replication and repair systems that ensure genome stability underscores the importance of faithful DNA replication. Nowhere is this complexity more evident than in challenging DNA templates, including highly repetitive or transcribed sequences. Here, we demonstrate that flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), a canonical lagging strand DNA replication protein, is required for normal, complete leading strand replication at telomeres. We find that the loss of FEN1 nuclease activity, but not DNA repair activities, results in leading strand-specific telomere fragility. Furthermore, we show that FEN1 depletion-induced telomere fragility is increased by RNA polymerase II inhibition and is rescued by ectopic RNase H1 expression. These data suggest that FEN1 limits leading strand-specific telomere fragility by processing RNA:DNA hybrid/flap intermediates that arise from co-directional collisions occurring between the replisome and RNA polymerase. Our data reveal the first molecular mechanism for leading strand-specific telomere fragility and the first known role for FEN1 in leading strand DNA replication. Because FEN1 mutations have been identified in human cancers, our findings raise the possibility that unresolved RNA:DNA hybrid structures contribute to the genomic instability associated with cancer. PMID:25922071

  15. Minimally Invasive Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction in the Setting of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    PubMed

    Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Barbosa, Nuno Camelo; Tuteja, Sanesh; Daggett, Matt; Kajetanek, Charles; Thaunat, Mathieu

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence on the anatomy, function, and biomechanical properties of the anterolateral ligament has led to the recognition of the importance of this structure in the rotational control of the knee. This article describes a technique that allows for minimally invasive anterolateral ligament reconstruction as a complement to most techniques of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. A gracilis tendon autograft is harvested and prepared in a double-strand, inverted V-shaped graft. The graft is percutaneously placed through a femoral stab incision, and each strand is then passed deep to the iliotibial band, emerging through each tibial stab incision. After the femoral-end loop graft is fixed, the tibial fixation of each strand is performed in full extension for optimal isometry. PMID:27274456

  16. Red Tide Strands South African Rock Lobsters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Although some red tides form a healthy part of phytoplankton production, recurrent harmful or toxic blooms also occur, with results depending upon the type of plankton and on atmospheric and oceanic conditions. At Elands Bay in South Africa's Western Cape province, about 1000 tons of rock lobsters beached themselves during February 2002, when the decay of dense blooms of phytoplankton caused a rapid reduction in the oxygen concentration of nearshore waters. The lobsters (or crayfish, as they are known locally) moved toward the breaking surf in search of oxygen, but were stranded by the retreating tide. The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer's nadir camera acquired these red, green, blue composites on February 2 and 18, 2002, during Terra orbits 11315 and 11548. The colors have been accentuated to highlight the bloom, and land and water have been enhanced separately. The two views show the shoreward migration of the algal bloom. Each image represents an area of about 205 kilometers x 330 kilometers. Elands Bay is situated near the mouth of the Doring River, about 75 kilometers northeast of the jutting Cape Columbine. The term 'red tide' is used to refer to a number of different types of phytoplankton blooms of various hues. The wine color of certain parts of this bloom are consistent with the ciliate species Mesodinium rubrum, which has been associated with recurring harmful algal blooms along the Western Cape coast. Under these conditions, the lobsters are not poisoned. During the recent event, government and military staff transported as many of the living lobsters as possible to areas that were less affected by the red tide. At the same time, people came from across South Africa to gather the undersized creatures for food. The effects of the losses on the maritime economy are expected to be felt over the next few years. MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra

  17. Red Tide Strands South African Rock Lobsters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Although some red tides form a healthy part of phytoplankton production, recurrent harmful or toxic blooms also occur, with results depending upon the type of plankton and on atmospheric and oceanic conditions. At Elands Bay in South Africa's Western Cape province, about 1000 tons of rock lobsters beached themselves during February 2002, when the decay of dense blooms of phytoplankton caused a rapid reduction in the oxygen concentration of nearshore waters. The lobsters (or crayfish, as they are known locally) moved toward the breaking surf in search of oxygen, but were stranded by the retreating tide.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer's nadir camera acquired these red, green, blue composites on February 2 and 18, 2002, during Terra orbits 11315 and 11548. The colors have been accentuated to highlight the bloom, and land and water have been enhanced separately. The two views show the shoreward migration of the algal bloom. Each image represents an area of about 205 kilometers x 330 kilometers. Elands Bay is situated near the mouth of the Doring River, about 75 kilometers northeast of the jutting Cape Columbine.

    The term 'red tide' is used to refer to a number of different types of phytoplankton blooms of various hues. The wine color of certain parts of this bloom are consistent with the ciliate species Mesodinium rubrum, which has been associated with recurring harmful algal blooms along the Western Cape coast. Under these conditions, the lobsters are not poisoned. During the recent event, government and military staff transported as many of the living lobsters as possible to areas that were less affected by the red tide. At the same time, people came from across South Africa to gather the undersized creatures for food. The effects of the losses on the maritime economy are expected to be felt over the next few years.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington

  18. CHO cell repair of single-strand and double-strand DNA breaks induced by gamma- and alpha-radiations.

    PubMed

    Cole, A; Shonka, F; Corry, P; Cooper, W G

    1975-01-01

    Neutral and alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis was used to measure double- and single-strand breaks in the DNA of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells exposed to either gamma- or alpha-radiation. After irradiation, cells were incubated for 15-180 min to test the ability of the cell to rejoin the DNA breaks. Essentially complete rejoining was observed for single-strand breaks induced by gamma- or alpha-doses below 20 krad and for double-strand breaks induced by gamma doses below 60 krad. Approximately 80% rejoining was observed for double-strand breaks induced by alpha doses below 40 krad. At higher doses, the repair system appeared to saturate in such a way that essentially no additional breaks were rejoined. PMID:1191188

  19. Early Primary Invasion Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spellman, Katie V.; Villano, Christine P.

    2011-01-01

    "We really need to get the government involved," said one student, holding his graph up to USDA scientist Steve Seefeldt. Dr. Steve studies methods to control "invasive" plants, plants that have been introduced to an area by humans and have potential to spread rapidly and negatively affect ecosystems. The first grader and his classmates had become…

  20. Mechanisms Regulating Glioma Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Paw, Ivy; Carpenter, Richard C.; Watabe, Kounosuke; Debinski, Waldemar; Lo, Hui-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive, deadliest, and most common brain malignancy in adults. Despite the advances made in surgical techniques, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the median survival for GBM patients has remained at a mere 14 months. GBM poses several unique challenges to currently available treatments for the disease. For example, GBM cells have the propensity to aggressively infiltrate/invade into the normal brain tissues and along the vascular tracks, which prevents complete resection of all malignant cells and limits the effect of localized radiotherapy while sparing normal tissue. Although anti-angiogenic treatment exerts anti-edematic effect in GBM, unfortunately, tumors progress with acquired increased invasiveness. Therefore, it is an important task to gain a deeper understanding of the intrinsic and post-treatment invasive phenotypes of GBM in hopes that the gained knowledge would lead to novel GBM treatments that are more effective and less toxic. This review will give an overview of some of the signaling pathways that have been shown to positively and negatively regulate GBM invasion, including, the PI3K/Akt, Wnt, sonic hedgehog-GLI1, and microRNAs. The review will also discuss several approaches to cancer therapies potentially altering GBM invasiveness. PMID:25796440

  1. Porocarcinoma with perineural invasion

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Ciara A.; Kazlouskaya, Viktoryia; Buchen, Daniel; Heller, Patricia; Elston, Dirk M.

    2015-01-01

    Herein we present the case of a 58 year old woman with porocarcinoma of the left forehead with perineural invasion, diagnosed after recurrence of previously excised benign poroma. This case serves as a reminder of the potential of malignant degeneration within long-standing benign adnexal tumors as well as the spectrum of histological features that may be seen in porocarcinoma. PMID:25821737

  2. Aquatic invasive species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorsteinson, Lyman

    2005-01-01

    Invasive species are plants or animals that are present in an ecosystem beyond their native range. They may have few natural controls in their new environment and proliferate. They can threaten native species and interfere with human activities. The Western Fisheries Research Center (WFRC) has been conducting research to understand how non-native species invade and affect ecosystems, thus aiding management efforts.

  3. In vivo occupancy of mitochondrial single-stranded DNA binding protein supports the strand displacement mode of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Miralles Fusté, Javier; Shi, Yonghong; Wanrooij, Sjoerd; Zhu, Xuefeng; Jemt, Elisabeth; Persson, Örjan; Sabouri, Nasim; Gustafsson, Claes M; Falkenberg, Maria

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes for proteins required for oxidative phosphorylation, and mutations affecting the genome have been linked to a number of diseases as well as the natural ageing process in mammals. Human mtDNA is replicated by a molecular machinery that is distinct from the nuclear replisome, but there is still no consensus on the exact mode of mtDNA replication. We here demonstrate that the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA binding protein (mtSSB) directs origin specific initiation of mtDNA replication. MtSSB covers the parental heavy strand, which is displaced during mtDNA replication. MtSSB blocks primer synthesis on the displaced strand and restricts initiation of light-strand mtDNA synthesis to the specific origin of light-strand DNA synthesis (OriL). The in vivo occupancy profile of mtSSB displays a distinct pattern, with the highest levels of mtSSB close to the mitochondrial control region and with a gradual decline towards OriL. The pattern correlates with the replication products expected for the strand displacement mode of mtDNA synthesis, lending strong in vivo support for this debated model for mitochondrial DNA replication. PMID:25474639

  4. The importance of becoming double-stranded: Innate immunity and the kinetic model of HIV-1 central plus strand synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Poeschla, Eric

    2013-06-20

    Central initiation of plus strand synthesis is a conserved feature of lentiviruses and certain other retroelements. This complication of the standard reverse transcription mechanism produces a transient “central DNA flap” in the viral cDNA, which has been proposed to mediate its subsequent nuclear import. This model has assumed that the important feature is the flapped DNA structure itself rather than the process that produces it. Recently, an alternative kinetic model was proposed. It posits that central plus strand synthesis functions to accelerate conversion to the double-stranded state, thereby helping HIV-1 to evade single-strand DNA-targeting antiviral restrictions such as APOBEC3 proteins, and perhaps to avoid innate immune sensor mechanisms. The model is consistent with evidence that lentiviruses must often synthesize their cDNAs when dNTP concentrations are limiting and with data linking reverse transcription and uncoating. There may be additional kinetic advantages for the artificial genomes of lentiviral gene therapy vectors. - Highlights: • Two main functional models for HIV central plus strand synthesis have been proposed. • In one, a transient central DNA flap in the viral cDNA mediates HIV-1 nuclear import. • In the other, multiple kinetic consequences are emphasized. • One is defense against APOBEC3G, which deaminates single-stranded DNA. • Future questions pertain to antiviral restriction, uncoating and nuclear import.

  5. New Views on Strand Asymmetry in Insect Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shu-Jun; Shi, Min; Chen, Xue-Xin; Sharkey, Michael J.; van Achterberg, Cornelis; Ye, Gong-Yin; He, Jun-Hua

    2010-01-01

    Strand asymmetry in nucleotide composition is a remarkable feature of animal mitochondrial genomes. Understanding the mutation processes that shape strand asymmetry is essential for comprehensive knowledge of genome evolution, demographical population history and accurate phylogenetic inference. Previous studies found that the relative contributions of different substitution types to strand asymmetry are associated with replication alone or both replication and transcription. However, the relative contributions of replication and transcription to strand asymmetry remain unclear. Here we conducted a broad survey of strand asymmetry across 120 insect mitochondrial genomes, with special reference to the correlation between the signs of skew values and replication orientation/gene direction. The results show that the sign of GC skew on entire mitochondrial genomes is reversed in all species of three distantly related families of insects, Philopteridae (Phthiraptera), Aleyrodidae (Hemiptera) and Braconidae (Hymenoptera); the replication-related elements in the A+T-rich regions of these species are inverted, confirming that reversal of strand asymmetry (GC skew) was caused by inversion of replication origin; and finally, the sign of GC skew value is associated with replication orientation but not with gene direction, while that of AT skew value varies with gene direction, replication and codon positions used in analyses. These findings show that deaminations during replication and other mutations contribute more than selection on amino acid sequences to strand compositions of G and C, and that the replication process has a stronger affect on A and T content than does transcription. Our results may contribute to genome-wide studies of replication and transcription mechanisms. PMID:20856815

  6. Stranding Events of Kogia Whales along the Brazilian Coast

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Jailson F.; Acevedo-Trejos, Esteban; Tavares, Davi C.; Meirelles, Ana C. O.; Silva, Cristine P. N.; Oliveira, Larissa R.; Santos, Roberta A.; Wickert, Janaína C.; Machado, Rodrigo; Siciliano, Salvatore; Merico, Agostino

    2016-01-01

    The genus Kogia, which comprises only two extant species, Kogia sima and Kogia breviceps, represents one of the least known groups of cetaceans in the global ocean. In some coastal regions, however, stranding events of these species have been relatively common over the last decades. Stranding provides the opportunity to investigate the biology of these cetaceans and to explore the epidemiological aspects associated with the mortality of the organisms found on the beach. A number of disturbances (including pelagic fisheries, chemical pollution, boat strikes, and noise pollution) have been confirmed to pose a particular threat to the Kogia species. However, no study has yet investigated potential relationships between environmental conditions and stranding events. Here we analyse how a collection of environmental, physical, and biological variables, such as wind, sea surface temperature (SST), water depth, and chlorophyll-a, correlate to Kogia stranding events along the Brazilian coast. The results of our statistical analyses suggest that K. sima is more likely found in warm tropical waters, which provide an explanation for the high frequency of stranding in northeastern Brazilian coast. In contrast, K. breviceps appears to have a preference for temperate and productive waters. Wind speed results to be also an important factor for predicting Kogia strandings in Brazilian coast. Additionally, literature information in combination with our own data and analyses of stomach contents confirms that oceanic cephalopods constitute the primary nutritional source of both Kogia species. By using the available information as a qualitative proxy for habitat preference and feeding ecology, our study provides a novel and comprehensive assessment of Kogia stranding data in relation to environmental conditions along the Brazilian coast. PMID:26730951

  7. Stranding Events of Kogia Whales along the Brazilian Coast.

    PubMed

    Moura, Jailson F; Acevedo-Trejos, Esteban; Tavares, Davi C; Meirelles, Ana C O; Silva, Cristine P N; Oliveira, Larissa R; Santos, Roberta A; Wickert, Janaína C; Machado, Rodrigo; Siciliano, Salvatore; Merico, Agostino

    2016-01-01

    The genus Kogia, which comprises only two extant species, Kogia sima and Kogia breviceps, represents one of the least known groups of cetaceans in the global ocean. In some coastal regions, however, stranding events of these species have been relatively common over the last decades. Stranding provides the opportunity to investigate the biology of these cetaceans and to explore the epidemiological aspects associated with the mortality of the organisms found on the beach. A number of disturbances (including pelagic fisheries, chemical pollution, boat strikes, and noise pollution) have been confirmed to pose a particular threat to the Kogia species. However, no study has yet investigated potential relationships between environmental conditions and stranding events. Here we analyse how a collection of environmental, physical, and biological variables, such as wind, sea surface temperature (SST), water depth, and chlorophyll-a, correlate to Kogia stranding events along the Brazilian coast. The results of our statistical analyses suggest that K. sima is more likely found in warm tropical waters, which provide an explanation for the high frequency of stranding in northeastern Brazilian coast. In contrast, K. breviceps appears to have a preference for temperate and productive waters. Wind speed results to be also an important factor for predicting Kogia strandings in Brazilian coast. Additionally, literature information in combination with our own data and analyses of stomach contents confirms that oceanic cephalopods constitute the primary nutritional source of both Kogia species. By using the available information as a qualitative proxy for habitat preference and feeding ecology, our study provides a novel and comprehensive assessment of Kogia stranding data in relation to environmental conditions along the Brazilian coast. PMID:26730951

  8. Role of stranded gas in increasing global gas supplies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.; Freeman, P.A.

    2013-01-01

    This report synthesizes the findings of three regional studies in order to evaluate, at the global scale, the contribution that stranded gas resources can make to global natural gas supplies. Stranded gas, as defined for this study, is natural gas in discovered conventional gas and oil fields that is currently not commercially producible for either physical or economic reasons. The regional studies evaluated the cost of bringing the large volumes of undeveloped gas in stranded gas fields to selected markets. In particular, stranded gas fields of selected Atlantic Basin countries, north Africa, Russia, and central Asia are screened to determine whether the volumes are sufficient to meet Europe’s increasing demand for gas imports. Stranded gas fields in Russia, central Asia, Southeast Asia, and Australia are also screened to estimate development, production, and transport costs and corresponding gas volumes that could be supplied to Asian markets in China, India, Japan, and South Korea. The data and cost analysis presented here suggest that for the European market and the markets examined in Asia, the development of stranded gas provides a way to meet projected gas import demands for the 2020-to-2040 period. Although this is a reconnaissance-type appraisal, it is based on volumes of gas that are associated with individual identified fields. Individual field data were carefully examined. Some fields were not evaluated because current technology was insufficient or it appeared the gas was likely to be held off the export market. Most of the evaluated stranded gas can be produced and delivered to markets at costs comparable to historical prices. Moreover, the associated volumes of gas are sufficient to provide an interim supply while additional technologies are developed to unlock gas diffused in shale and hydrates or while countries transition to making a greater use of renewable energy sources.

  9. Microvascular invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Emre; İdilman, İlkay Sedakat; Akata, Deniz; Özmen, Mustafa Nasuh; Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular invasion is a crucial histopathologic prognostic factor for hepatocellular carcinoma. We reviewed the literature and aimed to draw attention to clinicopathologic and imaging findings that may predict the presence of microvascular invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma. Imaging findings suggesting microvascular invasion are disruption of capsule, irregular tumor margin, peritumoral enhancement, multifocal tumor, increased tumor size, and increased glucose metabolism on positron emission tomography-computed tomography. In the presence of typical findings, microvascular invasion may be predicted. PMID:26782155

  10. Structure of the EMMPRIN N-terminal domain 1: Dimerization via [beta]-strand swapping

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Jinquan; Teplyakov, Alexey; Obmolova, Galina; Malia, Thomas; Wu, Sheng-Jiun; Beil, Eric; Baker, Audrey; Swencki-Underwood, Bethany; Zhao, Yonghong; Sprenkle, Justin; Dixon, Ken; Sweet, Raymond; Gilliland, Gary L.

    2010-09-27

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), also known as Hab18G, CD147, Basigin, M6, and neurothelin, is a membrane glycoprotein expressed on the surface of various cell types and many cancer cells. EMMPRIN stimulates adjacent fibroblasts and tumor cells to produce matrix metalloproteinases and plays an important role in tumor invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, spermatogensis and fertilization, cell-cell adhesion and communication, and other biological processes (reviewed in Ref. 1 and references therein). It was demonstrated that the EMMPRIN extracellular domain (ECD), which structurally belongs to the IgG superfamily, can form homo-oligomers in a cis dependent manner and the N-terminal domain 1 (residues 22-101) was necessary and sufficient to mediate this interaction. The crystal structure of the ECD of recombinant human EMMPRIN (Hab18G/CD147) expressed in E. coli was reported at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution (Yu et al. 2008). The construct consists of residues 22-205 of the mature protein and has both an N-terminal IgC2 domain (ND1, residues 22-101) and a C-terminal IgC2 domain (ND2, residues 107-205). The two domains are joined by a five amino acid residue linker that constitutes a flexible hinge between the two domains. The crystal form has four copies of the molecule in the asymmetric unit, each of which has a different inter-domain angle that varies from 121{sup o} to 144{sup o}. The two domains each have a conserved disulfide bridge and both are comprised of two {beta}-sheets formed by strands EBA and GFCC, and DEBA and AGFCC for ND1 and ND2, respectively. Based on the crystal packing in this structure, the authors proposed that lateral packing between the two IgG domains of EMMPRIN ECD represents a potential mechanism for cell adhesion. Here we report the 2.0-{angstrom} crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of EMMPRIN ECD (ND1) expressed in mammalian cells. The overall structure of the domain is very similar to that in the full length

  11. Replication of semliki forest virus: polyadenylate in plus-strand RNA and polyuridylate in minus-strand RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Sawicki, D L; Gomatos, P J

    1976-01-01

    The 42S RNA from Semliki Forest virus contains a polyadenylate [poly(A)] sequence that is 80 to 90 residues long and is the 3'-terminus of the virion RNA. A poly(A) sequence of the same length was found in the plus strand of the replicative forms (RFs) and replicative intermediates (RIs) isolated 2 h after infection. In addition, both RFs and RIs contained a polyuridylate [poly(U)] sequence. No poly(U) was found in virion RNA, and thus the poly(U) sequence is in minus-strand RNA. The poly(U) from RFs was on the average 60 residues long, whereas that isolated from the RIs was 80 residues long. Poly(U) sequences isolated from RFs and RIs by digestion with RNase T1 contained 5'-phosphorylated pUp and ppUp residues, indicating that the poly(U) sequence was the 5'-terminus of the minus-strand RNA. The poly(U) sequence in RFs or RIs was free to bind to poly(A)-Sepharose only after denaturation of the RNAs, indicating that the poly(U) was hydrogen bonded to the poly(A) at the 3'-terminus of the plus-strand RNA in these molecules. When treated with 0.02 mug of RNase A per ml, both RFs and RIs yielded the same distribution of the three cores, RFI, RFII, and RFIII. The minus-strand RNA of both RFI and RFIII contained a poly(U) sequence. That from RFII did not. It is known that RFI is the double-stranded form of the 42S plus-strand RNA and that RFIII is the experimetnally derived double-stranded form of 26S mRNA. The poly(A) sequences in each are most likely transcribed directly from the poly(U) at the 5'-end of the 42S minus-strand RNA. The 26S mRNA thus represents the nucleotide sequence in that one-third of the 42S plus-strand RNA that includes its 3'-terminus. PMID:978799

  12. Invasive species and climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, Beth A.

    2006-01-01

    Invasive species challenge managers in their work of conserving and managing natural areas and are one of the most serious problems these managers face. Because invasive species are likely to spread in response to changes in climate, managers may need to change their approaches to invasive species management accordingly.

  13. Mass stranding of wedge-tailed shearwater chicks in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Work, T M; Rameyer, R A

    1999-07-01

    Unusual numbers of wedge-tailed shearwater (Puffinus pacificus) chicks stranded on Oahu (Hawaii, USA) in 1994. Compared to healthy wedge-tailed shearwater (WTSW) chicks, stranded chicks were underweight, dehydrated, leukopenic, lymphopenic, eosinopenic, and heterophilic; some birds were toxemic and septic. Stranded chicks also were hypoglycemic and had elevated aspartate amino transferase levels. Most chicks apparently died from emaciation, dehydration, or bacteremia. Because many birds with bacteremia also had severe necrosis of the gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa associated with bacteria, we suspect the GI tract to be the source of disseminated bacterial infection. The identity of the bacteria was not confirmed. The daily number of chicks stranded was significantly related to average wind speeds, and the mortality coincided with the fledging period for WTSW. Strong southeasterly winds were a distinguishing meteorologic factor in 1994 and contributed to the distribution of stranded chicks on Oahu. More objective data on WTSW demographics would enhance future efforts to determine predisposing causes of WTSW wrecks and their effects on seabird colonies. PMID:10479083

  14. Proceedings of a Workshop on Antarctic Meteorite Stranding Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cassidy, W.A.; Whillans, I.M.

    1990-08-01

    The discovery of large numbers of meteorites on the Antarctic Ice Sheet is one of the most exciting developments in polar science in recent years. The meteorites are found on areas of ice called stranding surfaces. Because of the sudden availability of hundreds, and then thousands, of new meteorite specimens at these sites, the significance of the discovery of meteorite stranding surfaces in Antarctica had an immediate and profound impact on planetary science, but there is also in this discovery an enormous, largely unrealized potential to glaciology for records of climatic and ice sheet changes. The glaciological interest derives from the antiquity of the ice in meteorite stranding surfaces. This exposed ice covers a range of ages, probably between zero and more than 500,000 years. The Workshop on Antarctic Meteorite Stranding Surfaces was convened to explore this potential and to devise a course of action that could be recommended to granting agencies. The workshop recognized three prime functions of meteorite stranding surfaces. They provide: (1) A proxy record of climatic change (i.e., a long record of climatic change is probably preserved in the exposed ice stratigraphy); (2) A proxy record of ice volume change; and (3) A source of unique nonterrestrial material.

  15. An intercalation-locked parallel-stranded DNA tetraplex

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Shailesh; Zhang, Daoning; Paukstelis, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA has proved to be an excellent material for nanoscale construction because complementary DNA duplexes are programmable and structurally predictable. However, in the absence of Watson–Crick pairings, DNA can be structurally more diverse. Here, we describe the crystal structures of d(ACTCGGATGAT) and the brominated derivative, d(ACBrUCGGABrUGAT). These oligonucleotides form parallel-stranded duplexes with a crystallographically equivalent strand, resulting in the first examples of DNA crystal structures that contains four different symmetric homo base pairs. Two of the parallel-stranded duplexes are coaxially stacked in opposite directions and locked together to form a tetraplex through intercalation of the 5′-most A–A base pairs between adjacent G–G pairs in the partner duplex. The intercalation region is a new type of DNA tertiary structural motif with similarities to the i-motif. 1H–1H nuclear magnetic resonance and native gel electrophoresis confirmed the formation of a parallel-stranded duplex in solution. Finally, we modified specific nucleotide positions and added d(GAY) motifs to oligonucleotides and were readily able to obtain similar crystals. This suggests that this parallel-stranded DNA structure may be useful in the rational design of DNA crystals and nanostructures. PMID:25628357

  16. Proceedings of a Workshop on Antarctic Meteorite Stranding Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, W. A. (Editor); Whillans, I. M. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of large numbers of meteorites on the Antarctic Ice Sheet is one of the most exciting developments in polar science in recent years. The meteorites are found on areas of ice called stranding surfaces. Because of the sudden availability of hundreds, and then thousands, of new meteorite specimens at these sites, the significance of the discovery of meteorite stranding surfaces in Antarctica had an immediate and profound impact on planetary science, but there is also in this discovery an enormous, largely unrealized potential to glaciology for records of climatic and ice sheet changes. The glaciological interest derives from the antiquity of the ice in meteorite stranding surfaces. This exposed ice covers a range of ages, probably between zero and more than 500,000 years. The Workshop on Antarctic Meteorite Stranding Surfaces was convened to explore this potential and to devise a course of action that could be recommended to granting agencies. The workshop recognized three prime functions of meteorite stranding surfaces. They provide: (1) A proxy record of climatic change (i.e., a long record of climatic change is probably preserved in the exposed ice stratigraphy); (2) A proxy record of ice volume change; and (3) A source of unique nonterrestrial material.

  17. DNA-directed mutations. Leading and lagging strand specificity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinden, R. R.; Hashem, V. I.; Rosche, W. A.

    1999-01-01

    The fidelity of replication has evolved to reproduce B-form DNA accurately, while allowing a low frequency of mutation. The fidelity of replication can be compromised, however, by defined order sequence DNA (dosDNA) that can adopt unusual or non B-DNA conformations. These alternative DNA conformations, including hairpins, cruciforms, triplex DNAs, and slipped-strand structures, may affect enzyme-template interactions that potentially lead to mutations. To analyze the effect of dosDNA elements on spontaneous mutagenesis, various mutational inserts containing inverted repeats or direct repeats were cloned in a plasmid containing a unidirectional origin of replication and a selectable marker for the mutation. This system allows for analysis of mutational events that are specific for the leading or lagging strands during DNA replication in Escherichia coli. Deletions between direct repeats, involving misalignment stabilized by DNA secondary structure, occurred preferentially on the lagging strand. Intermolecular strand switch events, correcting quasipalindromes to perfect inverted repeats, occurred preferentially during replication of the leading strand.

  18. The Effect of Basepair Mismatch on DNA Strand Displacement.

    PubMed

    Broadwater, D W Bo; Kim, Harold D

    2016-04-12

    DNA strand displacement is a key reaction in DNA homologous recombination and DNA mismatch repair and is also heavily utilized in DNA-based computation and locomotion. Despite its ubiquity in science and engineering, sequence-dependent effects of displacement kinetics have not been extensively characterized. Here, we measured toehold-mediated strand displacement kinetics using single-molecule fluorescence in the presence of a single basepair mismatch. The apparent displacement rate varied significantly when the mismatch was introduced in the invading DNA strand. The rate generally decreased as the mismatch in the invader was encountered earlier in displacement. Our data indicate that a single base pair mismatch in the invader stalls branch migration and displacement occurs via direct dissociation of the destabilized incumbent strand from the substrate strand. We combined both branch migration and direct dissociation into a model, which we term the concurrent displacement model, and used the first passage time approach to quantitatively explain the salient features of the observed relationship. We also introduce the concept of splitting probabilities to justify that the concurrent model can be simplified into a three-step sequential model in the presence of an invader mismatch. We expect our model to become a powerful tool to design DNA-based reaction schemes with broad functionality. PMID:27074674

  19. Mass stranding of wedge-tailed shearwater chicks in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Rameyer, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    Unusual numbers of wedge-tailed shearwater (Puffinus pacificus) chicks stranded on Oahu (Hawaii, USA) in 1994. Compared to healthy wedge-tailed shearwater (WTSW) chicks, stranded chicks were underweight, dehydrated, leukopenic, lymphopenic, eosinopenic, and heterophilic; some birds were toxemic and septic. Stranded chicks also were hypoglycemic and had elevated aspartate amino transferase levels. Most chicks apparently died from emaciation, dehydration, or bacteremia. Because many birds with bacteremia also had severe necrosis of the gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa associated with bacteria, we suspect the GI tract to be the source of disseminated bacterial infection. The identity of the bacteria was not confirmed. The daily number of chicks stranded was significantly related to average wind speeds, and the mortality coincided with the fledging period for WTSW. Strong southeasterly winds were a distinguishing meteorologic factor in 1994 and contributed to the distribution of stranded chicks on Oahu. More objective data on WTSW demographics would enhance future efforts to determine predisposing causes of WTSW wrecks and their effects on seabird colonies.

  20. An intercalation-locked parallel-stranded DNA tetraplex

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tripathi, S.; Zhang, D.; Paukstelis, P. J.

    2015-01-27

    DNA has proved to be an excellent material for nanoscale construction because complementary DNA duplexes are programmable and structurally predictable. However, in the absence of Watson–Crick pairings, DNA can be structurally more diverse. Here, we describe the crystal structures of d(ACTCGGATGAT) and the brominated derivative, d(ACBrUCGGABrUGAT). These oligonucleotides form parallel-stranded duplexes with a crystallographically equivalent strand, resulting in the first examples of DNA crystal structures that contains four different symmetric homo base pairs. Two of the parallel-stranded duplexes are coaxially stacked in opposite directions and locked together to form a tetraplex through intercalation of the 5'-most A–A base pairs betweenmore » adjacent G–G pairs in the partner duplex. The intercalation region is a new type of DNA tertiary structural motif with similarities to the i-motif. 1H–1H nuclear magnetic resonance and native gel electrophoresis confirmed the formation of a parallel-stranded duplex in solution. Finally, we modified specific nucleotide positions and added d(GAY) motifs to oligonucleotides and were readily able to obtain similar crystals. This suggests that this parallel-stranded DNA structure may be useful in the rational design of DNA crystals and nanostructures.« less

  1. An intercalation-locked parallel-stranded DNA tetraplex

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, S.; Zhang, D.; Paukstelis, P. J.

    2015-01-27

    DNA has proved to be an excellent material for nanoscale construction because complementary DNA duplexes are programmable and structurally predictable. However, in the absence of Watson–Crick pairings, DNA can be structurally more diverse. Here, we describe the crystal structures of d(ACTCGGATGAT) and the brominated derivative, d(ACBrUCGGABrUGAT). These oligonucleotides form parallel-stranded duplexes with a crystallographically equivalent strand, resulting in the first examples of DNA crystal structures that contains four different symmetric homo base pairs. Two of the parallel-stranded duplexes are coaxially stacked in opposite directions and locked together to form a tetraplex through intercalation of the 5'-most A–A base pairs between adjacent G–G pairs in the partner duplex. The intercalation region is a new type of DNA tertiary structural motif with similarities to the i-motif. 1H–1H nuclear magnetic resonance and native gel electrophoresis confirmed the formation of a parallel-stranded duplex in solution. Finally, we modified specific nucleotide positions and added d(GAY) motifs to oligonucleotides and were readily able to obtain similar crystals. This suggests that this parallel-stranded DNA structure may be useful in the rational design of DNA crystals and nanostructures.

  2. USGS invasive species solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Annie

    2011-01-01

    Land managers must meet the invasive species challenge every day, starting with identification of problem species, then the collection of best practices for their control, and finally the implementation of a plan to remove the problem. At each step of the process, the availability of reliable information is essential to success. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed a suite of resources for early detection and rapid response, along with data management and sharing.

  3. Hop2 and Sae3 Are Required for Dmc1-Mediated Double-Strand Break Repair via Homolog Bias during Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hong-Rae; Kong, Yoon-Ju; Hong, Soo-Gil; Kim, Keun Pil

    2016-01-01

    During meiosis, exchange of DNA segments occurs between paired homologous chromosomes in order to produce recombinant chromosomes, helping to increase genetic diversity within a species. This genetic exchange process is tightly controlled by the eukaryotic RecA homologs Rad51 and Dmc1, which are involved in strand exchange of meiotic recombination, with Rad51 participating specifically in mitotic recombination. Meiotic recombination requires an interaction between homologous chromosomes to repair programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs). In this study, we investigated the budding yeast meiosis-specific proteins Hop2 and Sae3, which function in the Dmc1-dependent pathway. This pathway mediates the homology searching and strand invasion processes. Mek1 kinase participates in switching meiotic recombination from sister bias to homolog bias after DSB formation. In the absence of Hop2 and Sae3, DSBs were produced normally, but showed defects in the DSB-to-single-end invasion transition mediated by Dmc1 and auxiliary factors, and mutant strains failed to complete proper chromosome segregation. However, in the absence of Mek1 kinase activity, Rad51-dependent recombination progressed via sister bias in the hop2Δ or sae3Δ mutants, even in the presence of Dmc1. Thus, Hop2 and Sae3 actively modulate Dmc1-dependent recombination, effectively progressing homolog bias, a process requiring Mek1 kinase activation. PMID:27329041

  4. Hop2 and Sae3 Are Required for Dmc1-Mediated Double-Strand Break Repair via Homolog Bias during Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hong-Rae; Kong, Yoon-Ju; Hong, Soo-Gil; Kim, Keun Pil

    2016-07-01

    During meiosis, exchange of DNA segments occurs between paired homologous chromosomes in order to produce recombinant chromosomes, helping to increase genetic diversity within a species. This genetic exchange process is tightly controlled by the eukaryotic RecA homologs Rad51 and Dmc1, which are involved in strand exchange of meiotic recombination, with Rad51 participating specifically in mitotic recombination. Meiotic recombination requires an interaction between homologous chromosomes to repair programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs). In this study, we investigated the budding yeast meiosis-specific proteins Hop2 and Sae3, which function in the Dmc1-dependent pathway. This pathway mediates the homology searching and strand invasion processes. Mek1 kinase participates in switching meiotic recombination from sister bias to homolog bias after DSB formation. In the absence of Hop2 and Sae3, DSBs were produced normally, but showed defects in the DSB-to-single-end invasion transition mediated by Dmc1 and auxiliary factors, and mutant strains failed to complete proper chromosome segregation. However, in the absence of Mek1 kinase activity, Rad51-dependent recombination progressed via sister bias in the hop2Δ or sae3Δ mutants, even in the presence of Dmc1. Thus, Hop2 and Sae3 actively modulate Dmc1-dependent recombination, effectively progressing homolog bias, a process requiring Mek1 kinase activation. PMID:27329041

  5. The Arabidopsis thaliana double-stranded RNA binding protein DRB1 directs guide strand selection from microRNA duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Eamens, Andrew L.; Smith, Neil A.; Curtin, Shaun J.; Wang, Ming-Bo; Waterhouse, Peter M.

    2009-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), DICER-LIKE1 (DCL1) functions together with the double-stranded RNA binding protein (dsRBP), DRB1, to process microRNAs (miRNAs) from their precursor transcripts prior to their transfer to the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). miRNA-loaded RISC directs RNA silencing of cognate mRNAs via ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1)-catalyzed cleavage. Short interefering RNAs (siRNAs) are processed from viral-derived or transgene-encoded molecules of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) by the DCL/dsRBP partnership, DCL4/DRB4, and are also loaded to AGO1-catalyzed RISC for cleavage of complementary mRNAs. Here, we use an artificial miRNA (amiRNA) technology, transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana, to produce a series of amiRNA duplexes with differing intermolecular thermostabilities at the 5′ end of duplex strands. Analyses of amiRNA duplex strand accumulation and target transcript expression revealed that strand selection (amiRNA and amiRNA*) is directed by asymmetric thermostability of the duplex termini. The duplex strand possessing a lower 5′ thermostability was preferentially retained by RISC to guide mRNA cleavage of the corresponding target transgene. In addition, analysis of endogenous miRNA duplex strand accumulation in Arabidopsis drb1 and drb2345 mutant plants revealed that DRB1 dictates strand selection, presumably by directional loading of the miRNA duplex onto RISC for passenger strand degradation. Bioinformatic and Northern blot analyses of DCL4/DRB4-dependent small RNAs (miRNAs and siRNAs) revealed that small RNAs produced by this DCL/dsRBP combination do not conform to the same terminal thermostability rules as those governing DCL1/DRB1-processed miRNAs. This suggests that small RNA processing in the DCL1/DRB1-directed miRNA and DCL4/DRB4-directed sRNA biogenesis pathways operates via different mechanisms. PMID:19861421

  6. Molecular basis for DNA strand displacement by NHEJ repair polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Edward J.; Brissett, Nigel C.; Plocinski, Przemyslaw; Carlberg, Tom; Doherty, Aidan J.

    2016-01-01

    The non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway repairs DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in all domains of life. Archaea and bacteria utilize a conserved set of multifunctional proteins in a pathway termed Archaeo-Prokaryotic (AP) NHEJ that facilitates DSB repair. Archaeal NHEJ polymerases (Pol) are capable of strand displacement synthesis, whilst filling DNA gaps or partially annealed DNA ends, which can give rise to unligatable intermediates. However, an associated NHEJ phosphoesterase (PE) resects these products to ensure that efficient ligation occurs. Here, we describe the crystal structures of these archaeal (Methanocella paludicola) NHEJ nuclease and polymerase enzymes, demonstrating their strict structural conservation with their bacterial NHEJ counterparts. Structural analysis, in conjunction with biochemical studies, has uncovered the molecular basis for DNA strand displacement synthesis in AP-NHEJ, revealing the mechanisms that enable Pol and PE to displace annealed bases to facilitate their respective roles in DSB repair. PMID:26405198

  7. Supervised Learning in Adaptive DNA Strand Displacement Networks.

    PubMed

    Lakin, Matthew R; Stefanovic, Darko

    2016-08-19

    The development of engineered biochemical circuits that exhibit adaptive behavior is a key goal of synthetic biology and molecular computing. Such circuits could be used for long-term monitoring and control of biochemical systems, for instance, to prevent disease or to enable the development of artificial life. In this article, we present a framework for developing adaptive molecular circuits using buffered DNA strand displacement networks, which extend existing DNA strand displacement circuit architectures to enable straightforward storage and modification of behavioral parameters. As a proof of concept, we use this framework to design and simulate a DNA circuit for supervised learning of a class of linear functions by stochastic gradient descent. This work highlights the potential of buffered DNA strand displacement as a powerful circuit architecture for implementing adaptive molecular systems. PMID:27111037

  8. Negative-strand RNA viruses: genetic engineering and applications.

    PubMed Central

    Palese, P; Zheng, H; Engelhardt, O G; Pleschka, S; García-Sastre, A

    1996-01-01

    The negative-strand RNA viruses are a broad group of animal viruses that comprise several important human pathogens, including influenza, measles, mumps, rabies, respiratory syncytial, Ebola, and hantaviruses. The development of new strategies to genetically manipulate the genomes of negative-strand RNA viruses has provided us with new tools to study the structure-function relationships of the viral components and their contributions to the pathogenicity of these viruses. It is also now possible to envision rational approaches--based on genetic engineering techniques--to design live attenuated vaccines against some of these viral agents. In addition, the use of different negative-strand RNA viruses as vectors to efficiently express foreign polypeptides has also become feasible, and these novel vectors have potential applications in disease prevention as well as in gene therapy. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8876139

  9. Fast micromethod DNA single-strand-break assay.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Heinz C; Batel, Renato; Schwertner, Heiko; Boreiko, Oleksandra; Müller, Werner E G

    2006-01-01

    The Fast Micromethod is a convenient and quick fluorimetric microplate assay for the assessment of DNA single-strand breaks and their repair. This method measures the rate of unwinding of cellular DNA on exposure to alkaline conditions using a fluorescent dye which preferentially binds to double-stranded DNA, but not to single-stranded DNA or protein. The advantages of this method are that it requires only minute amounts of material (30 ng of DNA or about 3000 cells per single well), it allows simultaneous measurements of multiple samples, and it can be performed within 3 h or less (for one 96-well microplate). The Fast Micromethod can be used for the routine determination of DNA damage in cells and tissue samples after irradiation, exposure to mutagenic and carcinogenic agents, or chemotherapy. PMID:16673889

  10. Double-stranded helical polymers consisting of complementary homopolymers.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Takeshi; Furusho, Yoshio; Sakurai, Shin-ichiro; Kumaki, Jiro; Okoshi, Kento; Yashima, Eiji

    2008-06-25

    Two complementary homopolymers of chiral amidines and achiral carboxylic acids with m-terphenyl-based backbones were synthesized by the copolymerization of a p-diiodobenzene derivative with the diethynyl monomers bearing a chiral amidine group and a carboxyl group using the Sonogashira reaction, respectively. Upon mixing in THF, the homopolymer strands assembled into a preferred-handed double helix through interstrand amidinium-carboxylate salt bridges, as evidenced by its absorption, circular dichroism, and IR spectra. In contrast, when mixed in less polar solvents, such as chloroform, the complementary strands kinetically formed an interpolymer complex with an imperfect double helical structure containing a randomly hybridized cross-linked structure, probably because of strong salt bridge formations. This primary complex was rearranged into the fully double helical structure by treatment with a strong acid followed by neutralization with an amine. High-resolution atomic force microscopy revealed the double-stranded helical structure and enabled the determination of the helical sense. PMID:18510315

  11. Molecular basis for DNA strand displacement by NHEJ repair polymerases.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Edward J; Brissett, Nigel C; Plocinski, Przemyslaw; Carlberg, Tom; Doherty, Aidan J

    2016-03-18

    The non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway repairs DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in all domains of life. Archaea and bacteria utilize a conserved set of multifunctional proteins in a pathway termed Archaeo-Prokaryotic (AP) NHEJ that facilitates DSB repair. Archaeal NHEJ polymerases (Pol) are capable of strand displacement synthesis, whilst filling DNA gaps or partially annealed DNA ends, which can give rise to unligatable intermediates. However, an associated NHEJ phosphoesterase (PE) resects these products to ensure that efficient ligation occurs. Here, we describe the crystal structures of these archaeal (Methanocella paludicola) NHEJ nuclease and polymerase enzymes, demonstrating their strict structural conservation with their bacterial NHEJ counterparts. Structural analysis, in conjunction with biochemical studies, has uncovered the molecular basis for DNA strand displacement synthesis in AP-NHEJ, revealing the mechanisms that enable Pol and PE to displace annealed bases to facilitate their respective roles in DSB repair. PMID:26405198

  12. Single-strand breaks in double-stranded DNA irradiated in anoxic solution: Contribution of tert-butanol radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Udovicic, L.; Mark, F.; Bothe, E.

    1996-08-01

    Yields of single-strand breaks induced by {sup 60}Co {gamma} or pulse irradiation in double-stranded calf thymus DNA have been measured in N{sub 2}O-saturated aqueous solution as a function of the concentration of tert-butanol. The yields were found to be dependent on dose rate. The experimental data were analyzed using a theoretical model based on non-homogeneous scavenging kinetics. It is concluded from this analysis after {sup 60}Co {gamma} irradiation in the absence of oxygen, aside from breaks caused by hydroxyl radicals, additional breaks occur which are initiated by hydrogen atoms and secondary radicals of tert-butanol. The efficiency of hydrogen atoms in causing single-strand breaks in double-stranded calf thymus DNA was determined to be 2.3%, while the rate constant for the reaction of tert-butanol radicals with DNA and their efficiency in causing single-strand breaks was determined to be 4.1 x 10{sup 3} dm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1} and 2%, respectively. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Method for fabricating multi-strand superconducting cable

    DOEpatents

    Borden, A.R.

    1985-04-01

    Multi-strand superconducting cables adapted to be used, for example, to wind a magnet are fabricated by directing wire strands inwardly from spools disposed on the perimeter of a rotating disk and wrapping them diagonally around a tapered mandrel with a flattened cross-sectional shape with a core having a wedge-shaped channel. As the cable is pulled axially, flexibly coupled wedge-shaped pieces are continuously passed through the channel in the mandrel and inserted into the cable as an internal support therefor.

  14. Apparatus and method for fabricating multi-strand superconducting cable

    DOEpatents

    Borden, Albert R.

    1986-01-01

    Multi-strand superconducting cables adapted to be used, for example, to wind a magnet is fabricated by directing wire strands inwardly from spools disposed on the perimeter of a rotating disk and wrapping them diagonally around a tapered mandrel with a flattened cross-sectional shape with a core having a wedge-shaped channel. As the cable is pulled axially, flexibly coupled wedge-shaped pieces are continuously passed through the channel in the mandrel and inserted into the cable as an internal support therefor.

  15. Crystal structure of four-stranded Oxytricha telomeric DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, C.; Zhang, X.; Ratliff, R.; Moyzis, R.; Rich, A.

    1992-01-01

    The sequence d(GGGGTTTTGGGG) from the 3' overhang of the Oxytricha telomere has been crystallized and its three-dimensional structure solved to 2.5 A resolution. The oligonucleotide forms hairpins, two of which join to make a four-stranded helical structure with the loops containing four thymine residues at either end. The guanine residues are held together by cyclic hydrogen bonding and an ion is located in the centre. The four guanine residues in each segment have a glycosyl conformation that alternates between anti and syn. There are two four-stranded molecules in the asymmetric unit showing that the structure has some intrinsic flexibility.

  16. Industry participation workshop: Chromium electroplating of superconductor strand. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-13

    The primary objective of the workshop was to inform US plating vendors about the opportunity to participate in the effort on Cr plating of large quantities of superconducting wires required for the ITER and the TPX projects and DOE`s interest in developing several reliable and high quality suppliers of Chromium plating services for the superconducting strand industry. The objective was also to inform plating vendors about the Cr plating technology developed in LLNL and invite interested plating vendors to get the technology. Finally the workshop was intended to inform the plating vendors about the plan to get verification of capability of two to four vendors for Cr plating of superconducting strands.

  17. Three dimensional FEM quench simulations of superconducting strands

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Ryuji; Wake, Masayoshi; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    The detailed phenomena in quench starting of Nb{sub 3}Sn strands are simulated in 3-D and in time using ANSYS and FEMLAB programs. The current sharing between the superconductor and copper stabilizer in strands at the beginning of a quench was studied and displayed in time. The differences in copper configuration and RRR value of copper were found to have large effect to the stability and quench propagation velocity. The MPZ theory was found to be effective for 3D multifilament situation.

  18. Double-Strand Breaks from a Radical Commonly Produced by DNA-Damaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Double-strand breaks are widely accepted to be the most toxic form of DNA damage. Molecules that produce double-strand breaks via a single chemical event are typically very cytotoxic and far less common than those that form single-strand breaks. It was recently reported that a commonly formed C4′-radical produces double-strand breaks under aerobic conditions. Experiments described herein indicate that a peroxyl radical initiates strand damage on the complementary strand via C4′-hydrogen atom abstraction. Inferential evidence suggests that a C3′-peroxyl radical induces complementary strand damage more efficiently than does a C4′-peroxyl radical. Complementary strand hydrogen atom abstraction by the peroxyl radical is efficiently quenched by thiols. This mechanism could contribute to the higher than expected yield of double-strand breaks produced by ionizing radiation. PMID:25749510

  19. Decidual Control of Trophoblast Invasion.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shipra; Godbole, Geeta; Modi, Deepak

    2016-03-01

    At the time of implantation, the trophoblast cells of the embryo adhere and then invade into the maternal endometrium and eventually establish placentation. The endometrium at the same time undergoes decidualization, which is essential for successful pregnancy. While the NK cells of the decidua have been implicated to play a key role in trophoblast invasion, few evidence are now available to demonstrate a pro-invasive property of decidual stromal cells. Secretions from decidualized endometrial stromal cells promote invasion of primary trophoblasts and model cell lines by activating proteases and altering expression of adhesion-related molecules. The decidual secretions contain high amounts of pro-invasive factors that include IL-1β, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-9, IL-13, IL-15, Eotaxin CCL11, IP-10 and RANTES, and anti-invasive factors IL-10, IL-12 and VEGF. It appears that these decidual factors promote invasion by regulating the protease pathways and integrin expression utilizing the STAT pathways in the trophoblast cells. At the same time the decidua also seem to secrete some anti-invasive factors that are antagonist to the matrix metalloproteinases and/or are activators of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases. This might be essential to neutralize the effects of the invasion-promoting factors and restrain overinvasion. It is tempting to propose that during the course of pregnancy, the decidua must balance the production of these pro and anti-invasive molecules and such harmonizing production would allow a timely and regulated invasion. PMID:26755153

  20. Measles Virus Host Invasion and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Laksono, Brigitta M; de Vries, Rory D; McQuaid, Stephen; Duprex, W Paul; de Swart, Rik L

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus is a highly contagious negative strand RNA virus that is transmitted via the respiratory route and causes systemic disease in previously unexposed humans and non-human primates. Measles is characterised by fever and skin rash and usually associated with cough, coryza and conjunctivitis. A hallmark of measles is the transient immune suppression, leading to increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections. At the same time, the disease is paradoxically associated with induction of a robust virus-specific immune response, resulting in lifelong immunity to measles. Identification of CD150 and nectin-4 as cellular receptors for measles virus has led to new perspectives on tropism and pathogenesis. In vivo studies in non-human primates have shown that the virus initially infects CD150⁺ lymphocytes and dendritic cells, both in circulation and in lymphoid tissues, followed by virus transmission to nectin-4 expressing epithelial cells. The abilities of the virus to cause systemic infection, to transmit to numerous new hosts via droplets or aerosols and to suppress the host immune response for several months or even years after infection make measles a remarkable disease. This review briefly highlights current topics in studies of measles virus host invasion and pathogenesis. PMID:27483301

  1. Measles Virus Host Invasion and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Laksono, Brigitta M.; de Vries, Rory D.; McQuaid, Stephen; Duprex, W. Paul; de Swart, Rik L.

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus is a highly contagious negative strand RNA virus that is transmitted via the respiratory route and causes systemic disease in previously unexposed humans and non-human primates. Measles is characterised by fever and skin rash and usually associated with cough, coryza and conjunctivitis. A hallmark of measles is the transient immune suppression, leading to increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections. At the same time, the disease is paradoxically associated with induction of a robust virus-specific immune response, resulting in lifelong immunity to measles. Identification of CD150 and nectin-4 as cellular receptors for measles virus has led to new perspectives on tropism and pathogenesis. In vivo studies in non-human primates have shown that the virus initially infects CD150+ lymphocytes and dendritic cells, both in circulation and in lymphoid tissues, followed by virus transmission to nectin-4 expressing epithelial cells. The abilities of the virus to cause systemic infection, to transmit to numerous new hosts via droplets or aerosols and to suppress the host immune response for several months or even years after infection make measles a remarkable disease. This review briefly highlights current topics in studies of measles virus host invasion and pathogenesis. PMID:27483301

  2. A single-stranded RNA copy of the Giardia lamblia virus double-stranded RNA genome is present in the infected Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed Central

    Furfine, E S; White, T C; Wang, A L; Wang, C C

    1989-01-01

    An isolate of Giardia lamblia infected with the double-stranded RNA virus (GLV) has two major species of RNA that are not present in an uninfected isolate. One of these species is the previously characterized double-stranded RNA genome of GLV (1). The second species of RNA appears to be a full length copy of one strand of the double-stranded RNA genome. This full length single-stranded RNA is not present in viral particles isolated from the growth medium. The cellular concentration of the single-stranded RNA changes during exponential and stationary phases of cell growth in a fashion consistent with a viral replicative intermediate or mRNA. The single-stranded species does not appear to be polyadenylated. Images PMID:2798099

  3. Minimally invasive parathyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Noureldine, Salem I.; Gooi, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, bilateral cervical exploration for localization of all four parathyroid glands and removal of any that are grossly enlarged has been the standard surgical treatment for primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). With the advances in preoperative localization studies and greater public demand for less invasive procedures, novel targeted, minimally invasive techniques to the parathyroid glands have been described and practiced over the past 2 decades. Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP) can be done either through the standard Kocher incision, a smaller midline incision, with video assistance (purely endoscopic and video-assisted techniques), or through an ectopically placed, extracervical, incision. In current practice, once PHPT is diagnosed, preoperative evaluation using high-resolution radiographic imaging to localize the offending parathyroid gland is essential if MIP is to be considered. The imaging study results suggest where the surgeon should begin the focused procedure and serve as a road map to allow tailoring of an efficient, imaging-guided dissection while eliminating the unnecessary dissection of multiple glands or a bilateral exploration. Intraoperative parathyroid hormone (IOPTH) levels may be measured during the procedure, or a gamma probe used during radioguided parathyroidectomy, to ascertain that the correct gland has been excised and that no other hyperfunctional tissue is present. MIP has many advantages over the traditional bilateral, four-gland exploration. MIP can be performed using local anesthesia, requires less operative time, results in fewer complications, and offers an improved cosmetic result and greater patient satisfaction. Additional advantages of MIP are earlier hospital discharge and decreased overall associated costs. This article aims to address the considerations for accomplishing MIP, including the role of preoperative imaging studies, intraoperative adjuncts, and surgical techniques. PMID:26425454

  4. Minimally invasive mediastinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Melfi, Franca M. A.; Mussi, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    In the past, mediastinal surgery was associated with the necessity of a maximum exposure, which was accomplished through various approaches. In the early 1990s, many surgical fields, including thoracic surgery, observed the development of minimally invasive techniques. These included video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), which confers clear advantages over an open approach, such as less trauma, short hospital stay, increased cosmetic results and preservation of lung function. However, VATS is associated with several disadvantages. For this reason, it is not routinely performed for resection of mediastinal mass lesions, especially those located in the anterior mediastinum, a tiny and remote space that contains vital structures at risk of injury. Robotic systems can overcome the limits of VATS, offering three-dimensional (3D) vision and wristed instrumentations, and are being increasingly used. With regards to thymectomy for myasthenia gravis (MG), unilateral and bilateral VATS approaches have demonstrated good long-term neurologic results with low complication rates. Nevertheless, some authors still advocate the necessity of maximum exposure, especially when considering the distribution of normal and ectopic thymic tissue. In recent studies, the robotic approach has shown to provide similar neurological outcomes when compared to transsternal and VATS approaches, and is associated with a low morbidity. Importantly, through a unilateral robotic technique, it is possible to dissect and remove at least the same amount of mediastinal fat tissue. Preliminary results on early-stage thymomatous disease indicated that minimally invasive approaches are safe and feasible, with a low rate of pleural recurrence, underlining the necessity of a “no-touch” technique. However, especially for thymomatous disease characterized by an indolent nature, further studies with long follow-up period are necessary in order to assess oncologic and neurologic results through minimally

  5. Minimally invasive mediastinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Melfi, Franca M A; Fanucchi, Olivia; Mussi, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    In the past, mediastinal surgery was associated with the necessity of a maximum exposure, which was accomplished through various approaches. In the early 1990s, many surgical fields, including thoracic surgery, observed the development of minimally invasive techniques. These included video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), which confers clear advantages over an open approach, such as less trauma, short hospital stay, increased cosmetic results and preservation of lung function. However, VATS is associated with several disadvantages. For this reason, it is not routinely performed for resection of mediastinal mass lesions, especially those located in the anterior mediastinum, a tiny and remote space that contains vital structures at risk of injury. Robotic systems can overcome the limits of VATS, offering three-dimensional (3D) vision and wristed instrumentations, and are being increasingly used. With regards to thymectomy for myasthenia gravis (MG), unilateral and bilateral VATS approaches have demonstrated good long-term neurologic results with low complication rates. Nevertheless, some authors still advocate the necessity of maximum exposure, especially when considering the distribution of normal and ectopic thymic tissue. In recent studies, the robotic approach has shown to provide similar neurological outcomes when compared to transsternal and VATS approaches, and is associated with a low morbidity. Importantly, through a unilateral robotic technique, it is possible to dissect and remove at least the same amount of mediastinal fat tissue. Preliminary results on early-stage thymomatous disease indicated that minimally invasive approaches are safe and feasible, with a low rate of pleural recurrence, underlining the necessity of a "no-touch" technique. However, especially for thymomatous disease characterized by an indolent nature, further studies with long follow-up period are necessary in order to assess oncologic and neurologic results through minimally invasive

  6. Invasive hemodynamic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Magder, Sheldon

    2015-01-01

    Although invasive hemodynamic monitoring requires considerable skill, studies have shown a striking lack of knowledge of the measurements obtained with the pulmonary artery catheter (PAC). This article reviews monitoring using a PAC. Issues addressed include basic physiology that determines cardiac output and blood pressure; methodology in the measurement of data obtained from a PAC; use of the PAC in making a diagnosis and for patient management, with emphasis on a responsive approach to management; and uses of the PAC that are not indications by themselves for placing the catheter, but can provide useful information when a PAC is in place. PMID:25435479

  7. Minimally Invasive Parathyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Starker, Lee F.; Fonseca, Annabelle L.; Carling, Tobias; Udelsman, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP) is an operative approach for the treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT). Currently, routine use of improved preoperative localization studies, cervical block anesthesia in the conscious patient, and intraoperative parathyroid hormone analyses aid in guiding surgical therapy. MIP requires less surgical dissection causing decreased trauma to tissues, can be performed safely in the ambulatory setting, and is at least as effective as standard cervical exploration. This paper reviews advances in preoperative localization, anesthetic techniques, and intraoperative management of patients undergoing MIP for the treatment of pHPT. PMID:21747851

  8. 75 FR 8113 - Prestressed Concrete Steel Wire Strand From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... subject investigations (75 FR 4104, January 26, 2010). On January 28, 2010, the Commission was notified by... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Prestressed Concrete Steel Wire Strand From China AGENCY: United States International...

  9. 75 FR 4104 - Prestressed Concrete Steel Wire Strand From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (``HTSUS'').'' 74 FR 30536, December 23, 2009. For further... FR 68036 (November 8, 2002). Even where electronic filing of a document is permitted, certain... COMMISSION Prestressed Concrete Steel Wire Strand From China AGENCY: United States International...

  10. The Extra Strand of the Maori Science Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Georgina

    2011-01-01

    This paper comments on the process of re-development of the Maori-medium Science (Putaiao) curriculum, as part of overall curriculum development in Aotearoa New Zealand. A significant difference from the English Science curriculum was the addition of an "extra strand" covering the history and philosophy of science. It is recommended that this…

  11. Short interfering RNA guide strand modifiers from computational screening.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Kazumitsu; Harrison, Jason G; Ball-Jones, Alexi A; Ibarra-Soza, José M; Zheng, Yuxuan; Ly, Diana; Lam, Walter; Mac, Stephanie; Tantillo, Dean J; Beal, Peter A

    2013-11-13

    Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are promising drug candidates for a wide range of targets including those previously considered "undruggable". However, properties associated with the native RNA structure limit drug development, and chemical modifications are necessary. Here we describe the structure-guided discovery of functional modifications for the guide strand 5'-end using computational screening with the high-resolution structure of human Ago2, the key nuclease on the RNA interference pathway. Our results indicate the guide strand 5'-end nucleotide need not engage in Watson-Crick (W/C) H-bonding but must fit the general shape of the 5'-end binding site in MID/PIWI domains of hAgo2 for efficient knockdown. 1,2,3-Triazol-4-yl bases formed from the CuAAC reaction of azides and 1-ethynylribose, which is readily incorporated into RNA via the phosphoramidite, perform well at the guide strand 5'-end. In contrast, purine derivatives with modified Hoogsteen faces or N2 substituents are poor choices for 5'-end modifications. Finally, we identified a 1,2,3-triazol-4-yl base incapable of W/C H-bonding that performs well at guide strand position 12, where base pairing to target was expected to be important. This work expands the repertoire of functional nucleotide analogues for siRNAs. PMID:24152142

  12. Solid phase sequencing of double-stranded nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Dong-Jing; Cantor, Charles R.; Koster, Hubert; Smith, Cassandra L.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to methods for detecting and sequencing of target double-stranded nucleic acid sequences, to nucleic acid probes and arrays of probes useful in these methods, and to kits and systems which contain these probes. Useful methods involve hybridizing the nucleic acids or nucleic acids which represent complementary or homologous sequences of the target to an array of nucleic acid probes. These probe comprise a single-stranded portion, an optional double-stranded portion and a variable sequence within the single-stranded portion. The molecular weights of the hybridized nucleic acids of the set can be determined by mass spectroscopy, and the sequence of the target determined from the molecular weights of the fragments. Nucleic acids whose sequences can be determined include nucleic acids in biological samples such as patient biopsies and environmental samples. Probes may be fixed to a solid support such as a hybridization chip to facilitate automated determination of molecular weights and identification of the target sequence.

  13. Characterization of Nb3Sn Strand for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Cheggour, Najib; Goodrich, Loren F

    2012-05-03

    We have an ongoing research program for characterization of superconductor composite strands, the principal output of which is sensitive measurements of critical current Ic over a broad range of the essential parameters: longitudinal strain µ, temperature T, and magnetic field B. This features a new apparatus for integrated measurement of Ic(µ,T,B) on the same, long-conductor sample without remounting.

  14. Antiparallel Triple-strand Architecture for Prefibrillar Aβ42 Oligomers*

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Lei; Liu, Cong; Stroud, James C.; Ngo, Sam; Jiang, Lin; Guo, Zhefeng

    2014-01-01

    Aβ42 oligomers play key roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease, but their structures remain elusive partly due to their transient nature. Here, we show that Aβ42 in a fusion construct can be trapped in a stable oligomer state, which recapitulates characteristics of prefibrillar Aβ42 oligomers and enables us to establish their detailed structures. Site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance studies provide structural restraints in terms of side chain mobility and intermolecular distances at all 42 residue positions. Using these restraints and other biophysical data, we present a novel atomic-level oligomer model. In our model, each Aβ42 protein forms a single β-sheet with three β-strands in an antiparallel arrangement. Each β-sheet consists of four Aβ42 molecules in a head-to-tail arrangement. Four β-sheets are packed together in a face-to-back fashion. The stacking of identical segments between different β-sheets within an oligomer suggests that prefibrillar oligomers may interconvert with fibrils via strand rotation, wherein β-strands undergo an ∼90° rotation along the strand direction. This work provides insights into rational design of therapeutics targeting the process of interconversion between toxic oligomers and non-toxic fibrils. PMID:25118290

  15. Short Interfering RNA Guide Strand Modifiers from Computational Screening

    PubMed Central

    Onizuka, Kazumitsu; Harrison, Jason G.; Ball-Jones, Alexi A.; Ibarra-Soza, José M.; Zheng, Yuxuan; Ly, Diana; Lam, Walter; Mac, Stephanie; Tantillo, Dean J.; Beal, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are promising drug candidates for a wide range of targets including those previously considered “undruggable”. However, properties associated with the native RNA structure limit drug development and chemical modifications are necessary. Here we describe the structure-guided discovery of functional modifications for the guide strand 5’ end using computational screening with the high resolution structure of human Ago2, the key nuclease on the RNA interference pathway. Our results indicate the guide strand 5’-end nucleotide need not engage in Watson-Crick (W/C) H-bonding but must fit the general shape of the 5’-end binding site in MID/PIWI domains of hAgo2 for efficient knockdown. 1,2,3-Triazol-4-yl bases formed from the CuAAC reaction of azides and 1-ethynylribose, which is readily incorporated into RNA via the phosphoramidite, perform well at the guide strand 5’-end. In contrast, purine derivatives with modified Hoogsteen faces or N2 substituents are poor choices for 5’-end modifications. Finally, we identified a 1,2,3-triazol-4-yl base incapable of W/C H-bonding that performs well at guide strand position 12, where base pairing to target was expected to be important. This work expands the repertoire of functional nucleotide analogs for siRNAs. PMID:24152142

  16. Unused and useless: The strange economics of stranded investment

    SciTech Connect

    Michaels, R.J.

    1994-10-01

    Stranded investment cost claims are the last gasp of cost-of-service ratemaking in the face of competition. Even if compensation were theoretically sound, efficient implementation is so problematic that the world would be better off without it. The author discusses this issue which is being raised by some electric utilities in the face of impending competition in the marketplace.

  17. The molecular biology of the positive strand RNA viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Rowlands, D.J.; Mayo, M.A.; Mahy, B.W.J.

    1987-01-01

    This book pulls together recent research findings on the molecular biology of the major families of positive strand RNA viruses infecting plants and animals. The topics covered include protein translation, processing and function, RNA replication, virus structure and antigenicity, mechanisms of infection and evolutionary relationships between the virus families.

  18. Isolating single stranded DNA using a microfluidic dialysis device

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Yixiao

    2013-01-01

    Isolating a particular strand of DNA from a double stranded DNA duplex is an important step in aptamer generation as well as many other biotechnology applications. Here we describe a microfluidic, flow-through, dialysis device for isolating single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) from double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). The device consists of two channels fabricated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) separated by a track etched polycarbonate membrane (800 nm pore size). To isolate ssDNA, dual-biotin labelled dsDNA was immobilized onto streptavidin-coated polystyrene beads. Alkaline treatment was used to denature dsDNA, releasing the non-biotinylated ssDNA. In the flow-through dialysis device the liberated ssDNA was able to cross the membrane and was collected in an outlet channel. The complementary sequence bound to the bead was unable to cross the membrane and was directed to a waste channel. The effect of NaOH concentration and flow rate on purity and yield were compared. >95% ssDNA purity was achieved at 25mM NaOH. However, lower flow rates were necessary to achieve ssDNA yields approaching the 50% theoretical maximum of the concurrent-flow device. Under optimized conditions the microfluidic isolation achieved even higher purity ssDNA than analogous manual procedures. PMID:24213273

  19. On the Distinction between Preposition Stranding and Orphan Prepositions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberge, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Poplack, Zentz and Dion (PZD; Poplack, Zentz & Dion, 2011, this issue) examine the often unquestioned assumption that the existence of preposition stranding (PS) in Canadian French is linked to the presence of a contact situation with English in the North American context. Although this issue has been the topic of previous research from a…

  20. Applications of Strand-Specific in situ Hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, E.H.; Meyne, J.; Bailey, S.M.; Quigley, D.; Smith, L.; Tennyson, R.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is used to determine the location of specific DNA sequences on chromosomes. It is an effective tool in genomic mapping and is finding increasing use in medical diagnosis. A ''strand-specific'' version of FISH has been developed in the Life Sciences Division of LANL. The new procedure, named CO-FISH, reveals not only location but also the 5'-to-3'direction of a target sequence, such as the sense strand of a gene. This project was designed to investigate applications of the new technique. Strand-specific FISH was found to be useful and informative for genomic mapping of repetitive DNA sequences. The method provide a valuable new tool for investigating the mechanisms of aneuploidy inducing agents and the cytogenetic phenomena called lateral asymmetry. Finally, using strand-specific FISH, the authors were able to detect certain types of chromosome aberrations (isochromosomes, inversions and Robertsonian translocations) that can be difficult to observe with standard techniques.

  1. Multiple Factors Drive Replicating Strand Composition Bias in Bacterial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hai-Long; Xia, Zhong-Kui; Zhang, Fa-Zhan; Ye, Yuan-Nong; Guo, Feng-Biao

    2015-01-01

    Composition bias from Chargaff’s second parity rule (PR2) has long been found in sequenced genomes, and is believed to relate strongly with the replication process in microbial genomes. However, some disagreement on the underlying reason for strand composition bias remains. We performed an integrative analysis of various genomic features that might influence composition bias using a large-scale dataset of 1111 genomes. Our results indicate (1) the bias was stronger in obligate intracellular bacteria than in other free-living species (p-value = 0.0305); (2) Fusobacteria and Firmicutes had the highest average bias among the 24 microbial phyla analyzed; (3) the strength of selected codon usage bias and generation times were not observably related to strand composition bias (p-value = 0.3247); (4) significant negative relationships were found between GC content, genome size, rearrangement frequency, Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) functional subcategories A, C, I, Q, and composition bias (p-values < 1.0 × 10−8); (5) gene density and COG functional subcategories D, F, J, L, and V were positively related with composition bias (p-value < 2.2 × 10−16); and (6) gene density made the most important contribution to composition bias, indicating transcriptional bias was associated strongly with strand composition bias. Therefore, strand composition bias was found to be influenced by multiple factors with varying weights. PMID:26404268

  2. Euler buckling and nonlinear kinking of double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Fields, Alexander P; Meyer, Elisabeth A; Cohen, Adam E

    2013-11-01

    The bending stiffness of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) at high curvatures is fundamental to its biological activity, yet this regime has been difficult to probe experimentally, and literature results have not been consistent. We created a 'molecular vise' in which base-pairing interactions generated a compressive force on sub-persistence length segments of dsDNA. Short dsDNA strands (<41 base pairs) resisted this force and remained straight; longer strands became bent, a phenomenon called 'Euler buckling'. We monitored the buckling transition via Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between appended fluorophores. For low-to-moderate concentrations of monovalent salt (up to ∼150 mM), our results are in quantitative agreement with the worm-like chain (WLC) model of DNA elasticity, without the need to invoke any 'kinked' states. Greater concentrations of monovalent salts or 1 mM Mg(2+) induced an apparent softening of the dsDNA, which was best accounted for by a kink in the region of highest curvature. We tested the effects of all single-nucleotide mismatches on the DNA bending. Remarkably, the propensity to kink correlated with the thermodynamic destabilization of the mismatched DNA relative the perfectly complementary strand, suggesting that the kinked state is locally melted. The molecular vise is exquisitely sensitive to the sequence-dependent linear and nonlinear elastic properties of dsDNA. PMID:23956222

  3. End Resection at Double-Strand Breaks: Mechanism and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Symington, Lorraine S.

    2014-01-01

    RecA/Rad51 catalyzed pairing of homologous DNA strands, initiated by polymerization of the recombinase on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), is a universal feature of homologous recombination (HR). Generation of ssDNA from a double-strand break (DSB) requires nucleolytic degradation of the 5′-terminated strands to generate 3′-ssDNA tails, a process referred to as 5′–3′ end resection. The RecBCD helicase–nuclease complex is the main end-processing machine in Gram-negative bacteria. Mre11-Rad50 and Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2/Nbs1 can play a direct role in end resection in archaea and eukaryota, respectively, by removing end-blocking lesions and act indirectly by recruiting the helicases and nucleases responsible for extensive resection. In eukaryotic cells, the initiation of end resection has emerged as a critical regulatory step to differentiate between homology-dependent and end-joining repair of DSBs. PMID:25085909

  4. Excited states in DNA strands investigated by ultrafast laser spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinquan; Zhang, Yuyuan; Kohler, Bern

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast laser experiments on carefully selected DNA model compounds probe the effects of base stacking, base pairing, and structural disorder on excited electronic states formed by UV absorption in single and double DNA strands. Direct π-orbital overlap between two stacked bases in a dinucleotide or in a longer single strand creates new excited states that decay orders of magnitude more slowly than the generally subpicosecond excited states of monomeric bases. Half or more of all excited states in single strands decay in this manner. Ultrafast mid-IR transient absorption experiments reveal that the long-lived excited states in a number of model compounds are charge transfer states formed by interbase electron transfer, which subsequently decay by charge recombination. The lifetimes of the charge transfer states are surprisingly independent of how the stacked bases are oriented, but disruption of π-stacking, either by elevating temperature or by adding a denaturing co-solvent, completely eliminates this decay channel. Time-resolved emission measurements support the conclusion that these states are populated very rapidly from initial excitons. These experiments also reveal the existence of populations of emissive excited states that decay on the nanosecond time scale. The quantum yield of these states is very small for UVB/UVC excitation, but increases at UVA wavelengths. In double strands, hydrogen bonding between bases perturbs, but does not quench, the long-lived excited states. Kinetic isotope effects on the excited-state dynamics suggest that intrastrand electron transfer may couple to interstrand proton transfer. By revealing how structure and non-covalent interactions affect excited-state dynamics, on-going experimental and theoretical studies of excited states in DNA strands can advance understanding of fundamental photophysics in other nanoscale systems. PMID:25326834

  5. Malignant cancer and invasive placentation

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Alaric W.; Wagner, Günter P.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer metastasis is an invasive process that involves the transplantation of cells into new environments. Since human placentation is also invasive, hypotheses about a relationship between invasive placentation in eutherian mammals and metastasis have been proposed. The relationship between metastatic cancer and invasive placentation is usually presented in terms of antagonistic pleiotropy. According to this hypothesis, evolution of invasive placentation also established the mechanisms for cancer metastasis. Here, in contrast, we argue that the secondary evolution of less invasive placentation in some mammalian lineages may have resulted in positive pleiotropic effects on cancer survival by lowering malignancy rates. These positive pleiotropic effects would manifest themselves as resistance to cancer cell invasion. To provide a preliminary test of this proposal, we re-analyze data from Priester and Mantel (Occurrence of tumors in domestic animals. Data from 12 United States and Canadian colleges of veterinary medicine. J Natl Cancer Inst 1971;47:1333-44) about malignancy rates in cows, horses, cats and dogs. From our analysis we found that equines and bovines, animals with less invasive placentation, have lower rates of metastatic cancer than felines and canines in skin and glandular epithelial cancers as well as connective tissue sarcomas. We conclude that a link between type of placentation and species-specific malignancy rates is more likely related to derived mechanisms that suppress invasion rather than different degrees of fetal placental aggressiveness. PMID:25324490

  6. Four-Strand Core Suture Improves Flexor Tendon Repair Compared to Two-Strand Technique in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Beyersdoerfer, Sascha Tobias; Vollmar, Brigitte; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Gierer, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study was designed to investigate the influence of the amount of suture material on the formation of peritendinous adhesions of intrasynovial flexor tendon repairs. Materials and Methods. In 14 rabbits, the flexor tendons of the third and the fourth digit of the right hind leg were cut and repaired using a 2- or 4-strand core suture technique. The repaired tendons were harvested after three and eight weeks. The range of motion of the affected toes was measured and the tendons were processed histologically. The distance between the transected tendon ends, the changes in the peritendinous space, and cellular and extracellular inflammatory reaction were quantified by different staining. Results. A 4-strand core suture resulted in significantly less gap formation. The 2-strand core suture showed a tendency to less adhesion formation. Doubling of the intratendinous suture material was accompanied by an initial increase in leukocyte infiltration and showed a greater amount of formation of myofibroblasts. From the third to the eighth week after flexor tendon repair, both the cellular and the extracellular inflammation decreased significantly. Conclusion. A 4-strand core suture repair leads to a significantly better tendon healing process with less diastasis between the sutured tendon ends despite initially pronounced inflammatory response. PMID:27446949

  7. TrmBL2 from Pyrococcus furiosus Interacts Both with Double-Stranded and Single-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Wierer, Sebastian; Daldrop, Peter; Ud Din Ahmad, Misbha; Boos, Winfried; Drescher, Malte; Welte, Wolfram; Seidel, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    In many hyperthermophilic archaea the DNA binding protein TrmBL2 or one of its homologues is abundantly expressed. TrmBL2 is thought to play a significant role in modulating the chromatin architecture in combination with the archaeal histone proteins and Alba. However, its precise physiological role is poorly understood. It has been previously shown that upon binding TrmBL2 covers double-stranded DNA, which leads to the formation of a thick and fibrous filament. Here we investigated the filament formation process as well as the stabilization of DNA by TrmBL2 from Pyroccocus furiosus in detail. We used magnetic tweezers that allow to monitor changes of the DNA mechanical properties upon TrmBL2 binding on the single-molecule level. Extended filaments formed in a cooperative manner and were considerably stiffer than bare double-stranded DNA. Unlike Alba, TrmBL2 did not form DNA cross-bridges. The protein was found to bind double- and single-stranded DNA with similar affinities. In mechanical disruption experiments of DNA hairpins this led to stabilization of both, the double- (before disruption) and the single-stranded (after disruption) DNA forms. Combined, these findings suggest that the biological function of TrmBL2 is not limited to modulating genome architecture and acting as a global repressor but that the protein acts additionally as a stabilizer of DNA secondary structure. PMID:27214207

  8. The importance of becoming double-stranded: Innate immunity and the kinetic model of HIV-1 central plus strand synthesis.

    PubMed

    Poeschla, Eric

    2013-06-20

    Central initiation of plus strand synthesis is a conserved feature of lentiviruses and certain other retroelements. This complication of the standard reverse transcription mechanism produces a transient "central DNA flap" in the viral cDNA, which has been proposed to mediate its subsequent nuclear import. This model has assumed that the important feature is the flapped DNA structure itself rather than the process that produces it. Recently, an alternative kinetic model was proposed. It posits that central plus strand synthesis functions to accelerate conversion to the double-stranded state, thereby helping HIV-1 to evade single-strand DNA-targeting antiviral restrictions such as APOBEC3 proteins, and perhaps to avoid innate immune sensor mechanisms. The model is consistent with evidence that lentiviruses must often synthesize their cDNAs when dNTP concentrations are limiting and with data linking reverse transcription and uncoating. There may be additional kinetic advantages for the artificial genomes of lentiviral gene therapy vectors. PMID:23561461

  9. The Importance of becoming double-stranded: innate immunity and the kinetic model of HIV-1 central plus strand synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Poeschla, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Central initiation of plus strand synthesis is a conserved feature of lentiviruses and certain other retroelements. This complication of the standard reverse transcription mechanism produces a transient “central DNA flap” in the viral cDNA, which has been proposed to mediate its subsequent nuclear import. This model has assumed that the important feature is the flapped DNA structure itself rather than the process that produces it. Recently, an alternative kinetic model was proposed. It posits that central plus strand synthesis functions to accelerate conversion to the double-stranded state, thereby helping HIV-1 to evade single-strand DNA-targeting antiviral restrictions such as APOBEC3 proteins, and perhaps to avoid innate immune sensor mechanisms. The model is consistent with evidence that lentiviruses must often synthesize their cDNAs when dNTP concentrations are limiting and with data linking reverse transcription and uncoating. There may be additional kinetic advantages for the artificial genomes of lentiviral gene therapy vectors. PMID:23561461

  10. Dietary Flexibility Aids Asian Earthworm Invasion in North American Forests

    EPA Science Inventory

    On a local scale, invasiveness of introduced species and invasibility of habitats together determine invasion success. A key issue in invasion ecology has been how to quantify the contribution of species invasiveness and habitat invasibility separately. Conventional approaches, s...

  11. Clarifying debates in invasion biology: a survey of invasion biologists.

    PubMed

    Young, Ashley M; Larson, Brendon M H

    2011-10-01

    Invasion biology is a relatively new field, so there are ongoing debates about foundational issues regarding terminology and assessment of the causes and consequences of invasive species. These debates largely reflect differing views about the extent to which invasion biologists should advocate on behalf of native species. We surveyed reviewers of the journal Biological Invasions to obtain a better sense of how invasion biologists evaluate several foundational issues. We received 422 replies, which represented a very good response rate for an online survey of 42.5% of those contacted. Responses to several debates in the field were distributed bimodally, but respondents consistently indicated that contemporary biological invasions are unprecedented. Even still, this was not seen as justification for exaggerated language (hyperbole). In contrast to prevalent claims in the literature, only 27.3% of respondents ranked invasive species as the first or second greatest threat to biodiversity. The responses also highlighted the interaction of invasive species with other threats and the role of human activity in their spread. Finally, the respondents agreed that they need to be both more objective and better at communicating their results so that those results can be effectively integrated into management. PMID:21757195

  12. 78 FR 54867 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program, Level A Stranding and Rehabilitation Disposition Data...

  13. Integrated assessment of biological invasions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the main annalists of the ecological and economic impacts of invasions on ecosystems around the world, ecologists should be able to provide information that can guide management practices. Managers often want to know about the potential for invasion of specific organisms in the sites under their ...

  14. Prioritizing invasive plant management strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive plants are seriously impacting rangelands by displacing desirable species. Management of these species is expensive and careful allocation of scarce dollars is necessary. Ecologically-based invasive plant management (EBIPM) has the potential to provide an improved decision-making process ...

  15. Managing the invasive species risk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Florida, California and Hawaii are on the front lines when it comes to the war with invasive species. One study documented the Florida invasion at more than one new arthropod species becoming established in the state each month with California estimated to be one every other month. This does not mea...

  16. MEDUSAHEAD INVASION, IMPLICATIONS, AND MANAGEMENT.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Medusahead invasion of western rangelands is at a cross-road, either an aggressive effort to prevent its invasion of new areas is initiated, or millions of acres will be lost. Medusahead is an aggressive, exotic, annual grass invading rangelands in the western United States. The rapid spread of me...

  17. Managing the invasive species risk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Florida, California and Hawaii are on the front lines when it comes to the war with invasive species. One study documented the Florida invasion at more than one new arthropod species becoming established in the state each month with California estimated to be one every other month. This does not me...

  18. Genetic reconstructions of invasion history.

    PubMed

    Cristescu, Melania E

    2015-05-01

    A diverse array of molecular markers and constantly evolving analytical approaches have been employed to reconstruct the invasion histories of the most notorious invasions. Detailed information on the source(s) of introduction, invasion route, type of vectors, number of independent introductions and pathways of secondary spread has been corroborated for a large number of biological invasions. In this review, I present the promises and limitations of current techniques while discussing future directions. Broad phylogeographic surveys of native and introduced populations have traced back invasion routes with surprising precision. These approaches often further clarify species boundaries and reveal complex patterns of genetic relationships with noninvasive relatives. Moreover, fine-scale analyses of population genetics or genomics allow deep inferences on the colonization dynamics across invaded ranges and can reveal the extent of gene flow among populations across various geographical scales, major demographic events such as genetic bottlenecks as well as other important evolutionary events such as hybridization with native taxa, inbreeding and selective sweeps. Genetic data have been often corroborated successfully with historical, geographical and ecological data to enable a comprehensive reconstruction of the invasion process. The advent of next-generation sequencing, along with the availability of extensive databases of repository sequences generated by barcoding projects opens the opportunity to broadly monitor biodiversity, to identify early invasions and to quantify failed invasions that would otherwise remain inconspicuous to the human eye. PMID:25703061

  19. [Minimally invasive breast surgery].

    PubMed

    Mátrai, Zoltán; Gulyás, Gusztáv; Kunos, Csaba; Sávolt, Akos; Farkas, Emil; Szollár, András; Kásler, Miklós

    2014-02-01

    Due to the development in medical science and industrial technology, minimally invasive procedures have appeared in the surgery of benign and malignant breast diseases. In general , such interventions result in significantly reduced breast and chest wall scars, shorter hospitalization and less pain, but they require specific, expensive devices, longer surgical time compared to open surgery. Furthermore, indications or oncological safety have not been established yet. It is quite likely, that minimally invasive surgical procedures with high-tech devices - similar to other surgical subspecialties -, will gradually become popular and it may form part of routine breast surgery even. Vacuum-assisted core biopsy with a therapeutic indication is suitable for the removal of benign fibroadenomas leaving behind an almost invisible scar, while endoscopically assisted skin-sparing and nipple-sparing mastectomy, axillary staging and reconstruction with latissimus dorsi muscle flap are all feasible through the same short axillary incision. Endoscopic techniques are also suitable for the diagnostics and treatment of intracapsular complications of implant-based breast reconstructions (intracapsular fluid, implant rupture, capsular contracture) and for the biopsy of intracapsular lesions with uncertain pathology. Perception of the role of radiofrequency ablation of breast tumors requires further hands-on experience, but it is likely that it can serve as a replacement of surgical removal in a portion of primary tumors in the future due to the development in functional imaging and anticancer drugs. With the reduction of the price of ductoscopes routine examination of the ductal branch system, guided microdochectomy and targeted surgical removal of terminal ducto-lobular units or a "sick lobe" as an anatomical unit may become feasible. The paper presents the experience of the authors and provides a literature review, for the first time in Hungarian language on the subject. Orv. Hetil

  20. Analysis of DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Cytotoxicity after 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Isolated Human Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Reddig, Annika; Fatahi, Mahsa; Friebe, Björn; Guttek, Karina; Hartig, Roland; Godenschweger, Frank; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Ricke, Jens; Reinhold, Dirk; Speck, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The global use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is constantly growing and the field strengths increasing. Yet, only little data about harmful biological effects caused by MRI exposure are available and published research analyzing the impact of MRI on DNA integrity reported controversial results. This in vitro study aimed to investigate the genotoxic and cytotoxic potential of 7 T ultra-high-field MRI on isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Hence, unstimulated mononuclear blood cells were exposed to 7 T static magnetic field alone or in combination with maximum permissible imaging gradients and radiofrequency pulses as well as to ionizing radiation during computed tomography and γ-ray exposure. DNA double-strand breaks were quantified by flow cytometry and automated microscopy analysis of immunofluorescence stained γH2AX. Cytotoxicity was studied by CellTiter-Blue viability assay and [3H]-thymidine proliferation assay. Exposure of unstimulated mononuclear blood cells to 7 T static magnetic field alone or combined with varying gradient magnetic fields and pulsed radiofrequency fields did not induce DNA double-strand breaks, whereas irradiation with X- and γ-rays led to a dose-dependent induction of γH2AX foci. The viability assay revealed a time- and dose-dependent decrease in metabolic activity only among samples exposed to γ-radiation. Further, there was no evidence for altered proliferation response after cells were exposed to 7 T MRI or low doses of ionizing radiation (≤ 0.2 Gy). These findings confirm the acceptance of MRI as a safe non-invasive diagnostic imaging tool, but whether MRI can induce other types of DNA lesions or DNA double-strand breaks during altered conditions still needs to be investigated. PMID:26176601

  1. Analysis of DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Cytotoxicity after 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Isolated Human Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Guttek, Karina; Hartig, Roland; Godenschweger, Frank; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Ricke, Jens; Reinhold, Dirk; Speck, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The global use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is constantly growing and the field strengths increasing. Yet, only little data about harmful biological effects caused by MRI exposure are available and published research analyzing the impact of MRI on DNA integrity reported controversial results. This in vitro study aimed to investigate the genotoxic and cytotoxic potential of 7 T ultra-high-field MRI on isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Hence, unstimulated mononuclear blood cells were exposed to 7 T static magnetic field alone or in combination with maximum permissible imaging gradients and radiofrequency pulses as well as to ionizing radiation during computed tomography and γ-ray exposure. DNA double-strand breaks were quantified by flow cytometry and automated microscopy analysis of immunofluorescence stained γH2AX. Cytotoxicity was studied by CellTiter-Blue viability assay and [3H]-thymidine proliferation assay. Exposure of unstimulated mononuclear blood cells to 7 T static magnetic field alone or combined with varying gradient magnetic fields and pulsed radiofrequency fields did not induce DNA double-strand breaks, whereas irradiation with X- and γ-rays led to a dose-dependent induction of γH2AX foci. The viability assay revealed a time- and dose-dependent decrease in metabolic activity only among samples exposed to γ-radiation. Further, there was no evidence for altered proliferation response after cells were exposed to 7 T MRI or low doses of ionizing radiation (≤ 0.2 Gy). These findings confirm the acceptance of MRI as a safe non-invasive diagnostic imaging tool, but whether MRI can induce other types of DNA lesions or DNA double-strand breaks during altered conditions still needs to be investigated. PMID:26176601

  2. Polysaccharide/polynucleotide complexes. Part 6: complementary-strand-induced release of single-stranded DNA bound in the schizophyllan complex.

    PubMed

    Koumoto, Kazuya; Mizu, Masami; Sakurai, Kazuo; Kunitake, Toyoki; Shinkai, Seiji

    2004-03-01

    Spectroscopic properties of single-stranded DNA/schizophyllan ternary complexes (ss-DNA2s-SPG), induced by addition of either complementary or noncomplementary strands, have been investigated. The addition of the complementary strands to ss-DNA2s-SPG induced the quick release of the bound ss-DNA to the complementary strands (both DNA and RNA), whereas the ternary complex was unaffected upon addition of noncomplementary strands. Our experiments imply that SPG has complexation properties indispensable to the gene carriers. As far as we know, there is no report on exploitation of such nonviral gene carriers that can accomplish an intelligent release of the bound ss-DNA toward the complementary strands. We believe, therefore, that SPG, a natural and neutral polysaccharide, has a great potential to become a new ss-DNA carrier. PMID:17191866

  3. 75 FR 36678 - Prestressed Concrete Steel Wire Strand From China; Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... publishing the notice in the Federal Register of February 23, 2010 (75 FR 8113). The hearing was held in... COMMISSION Prestressed Concrete Steel Wire Strand From China; Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... of prestressed concrete steel wire strand (PC strand), provided for in subheading 7312.10.30 of...

  4. 75 FR 62820 - Screening Framework Guidance for Providers of Synthetic Double-Stranded DNA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ...- Stranded DNA AGENCY: Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Secretary. ACTION: Notice... provides a framework for screening synthetic double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). This document, the Screening Framework Guidance for Providers of Synthetic Double-Stranded DNA (the Guidance), sets forth...

  5. Strand Line Observations for High School Students: An Exercise in the Marine Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    As tides ebb and flood, quantities of diving, dying, and dead materials are moved from place to place. Many of these materials are stranded at the littoral fringe as the tide changes from flood to ebb. This area of stranded material, sometimes a belt as much as a meter wide, is appropriately known as the strand line. In these activities, students…

  6. Three-dimensional Invasion of Human Glioblastoma Cells Remains Unchanged by X-ray and Carbon Ion Irradiation In Vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Eke, Iris; Storch, Katja; Kaestner, Ina; Vehlow, Anne; Faethe, Christina; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Temme, Achim; Schackert, Gabriele

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Cell invasion represents one of the major determinants that treatment has failed for patients suffering from glioblastoma. Contrary findings have been reported for cell migration upon exposure to ionizing radiation. Here, the migration and invasion capability of glioblastoma cells on and in collagen type I were evaluated upon irradiation with X-rays or carbon ions. Methods and Materials: Migration on and invasion in collagen type I were evaluated in four established human glioblastoma cell lines exposed to either X-rays or carbon ions. Furthermore, clonogenic radiation survival, proliferation (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine positivity), DNA double-strand breaks ({gamma}H2AX/53BP1-positive foci), and expression of invasion-relevant proteins (eg, {beta}1 integrin, FAK, MMP2, and MMP9) were explored. Migration and invasion assays for primary glioblastoma cells also were carried out with X-ray irradiation. Results: Neither X-ray nor carbon ion irradiation affected glioblastoma cell migration and invasion, a finding similarly observed in primary glioblastoma cells. Intriguingly, irradiated cells migrated unhampered, despite DNA double-strand breaks and reduced proliferation. Clonogenic radiation survival was increased when cells had contact with extracellular matrix. Specific inhibition of the {beta}1 integrin or proliferation-associated signaling molecules revealed a critical function of JNK, PI3K, and p38 MAPK in glioblastoma cell invasion. Conclusions: These findings indicate that X-rays and carbon ion irradiation effectively reduce proliferation and clonogenic survival without modifying the migration and invasion ability of glioblastoma cells in a collagen type I environment. Addition of targeted agents against members of the MAPK and PI3K signaling axis to conventional chemoradiation therapy seems potentially useful to optimize glioblastoma therapy.

  7. The dynamic DNA methylomes of double-stranded DNA viruses associated with human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Agustin F.; Rosales, Cecilia; Lopez-Nieva, Pilar; Graña, Osvaldo; Ballestar, Esteban; Ropero, Santiago; Espada, Jesus; Melo, Sonia A.; Lujambio, Amaia; Fraga, Mario F.; Pino, Irene; Javierre, Biola; Carmona, Francisco J.; Acquadro, Francesco; Steenbergen, Renske D.M.; Snijders, Peter J.F.; Meijer, Chris J.; Pineau, Pascal; Dejean, Anne; Lloveras, Belen; Capella, Gabriel; Quer, Josep; Buti, Maria; Esteban, Juan-Ignacio; Allende, Helena; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco; Castellsague, Xavier; Minarovits, Janos; Ponce, Jordi; Capello, Daniela; Gaidano, Gianluca; Cigudosa, Juan Cruz; Gomez-Lopez, Gonzalo; Pisano, David G.; Valencia, Alfonso; Piris, Miguel Angel; Bosch, Francesc X.; Cahir-McFarland, Ellen; Kieff, Elliott; Esteller, Manel

    2009-01-01

    The natural history of cancers associated with virus exposure is intriguing, since only a minority of human tissues infected with these viruses inevitably progress to cancer. However, the molecular reasons why the infection is controlled or instead progresses to subsequent stages of tumorigenesis are largely unknown. In this article, we provide the first complete DNA methylomes of double-stranded DNA viruses associated with human cancer that might provide important clues to help us understand the described process. Using bisulfite genomic sequencing of multiple clones, we have obtained the DNA methylation status of every CpG dinucleotide in the genome of the Human Papilloma Viruses 16 and 18 and Human Hepatitis B Virus, and in all the transcription start sites of the Epstein-Barr Virus. These viruses are associated with infectious diseases (such as hepatitis B and infectious mononucleosis) and the development of human tumors (cervical, hepatic, and nasopharyngeal cancers, and lymphoma), and are responsible for 1 million deaths worldwide every year. The DNA methylomes presented provide evidence of the dynamic nature of the epigenome in contrast to the genome. We observed that the DNA methylome of these viruses evolves from an unmethylated to a highly methylated genome in association with the progression of the disease, from asymptomatic healthy carriers, through chronically infected tissues and pre-malignant lesions, to the full-blown invasive tumor. The observed DNA methylation changes have a major functional impact on the biological behavior of the viruses. PMID:19208682

  8. DNA Double-Strand Breaks Induced by Cavitational Mechanical Effects of Ultrasound in Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Furusawa, Yukihiro; Fujiwara, Yoshisada; Campbell, Paul; Zhao, Qing-Li; Ogawa, Ryohei; Ali Hassan, Mariame; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Takasaki, Ichiro; Takahashi, Akihisa; Kondo, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonic technologies pervade the medical field: as a long established imaging modality in clinical diagnostics; and, with the emergence of targeted high intensity focused ultrasound, as a means of thermally ablating tumours. In parallel, the potential of [non-thermal] intermediate intensity ultrasound as a minimally invasive therapy is also being rigorously assessed. Here, induction of apoptosis in cancer cells has been observed, although definitive identification of the underlying mechanism has thus far remained elusive. A likely candidate process has been suggested to involve sonochemical activity, where reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate the generation of DNA single-strand breaks. Here however, we provide compelling new evidence that strongly supports a purely mechanical mechanism. Moreover, by a combination of specific assays (neutral comet tail and staining for γH2AX foci formation) we demonstrate for the first time that US exposure at even moderate intensities exhibits genotoxic potential, through its facility to generate DNA damage across multiple cancer lines. Notably, colocalization assays highlight that ionizing radiation and ultrasound have distinctly different signatures to their respective γH2AX foci formation patterns, likely reflecting the different stress distributions that initiated damage formation. Furthermore, parallel immuno-blotting suggests that DNA-PKcs have a preferential role in the repair of ultrasound-induced damage. PMID:22235259

  9. BETTY: prediction of beta-strand type from sequence.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Olav; Wang, Longhui; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2007-01-01

    Most secondary structure prediction programs do not distinguish between parallel and antiparallel beta-sheets. However, such knowledge would constrain the available topologies of a protein significantly, and therefore aid existing fold recognition algorithms. For this reason, we propose a technique which, in combination with existing secondary structure programs such as PSIPRED, allows one to distinguish between parallel and antiparallel beta-sheets. We propose the use of a support vector machine (SVM) procedure, BETTY, to predict parallel and antiparallel sheets from sequence. We found that there is a strong signal difference in the sequence profiles which SVMs can efficiently extract. With strand type assignment accuracies of 90.7% and 83.3% for antiparallel and parallel strands, respectively, our method adds considerably to existing information on current 3-class secondary structure predictions. BETTY has been implemented as an online service which academic researchers can access from our website http://www.fz-juelich.de/nic/cbb/service/service.php. PMID:18391242

  10. STRaND-2: Visual inspection, proximity operations & nanosatellite docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, C. P.; Taylor, B.; Horri, N.; Underwood, C. I.; Kenyon, S.; Barrera-Ars, J.; Pryce, L.; Bird, R.

    The Surrey Training Research and Nanosatellite Demonstrator (STRaND) programme has been success in identifying and creating a leading low-cost nanosatellite programme with advanced attitude and orbit control system (AOCS) and experimental computing platforms based on smart-phone technologies. The next demonstration capabilities, that provide a challenging mission to the existing STRaND platform, is to perform visual inspection, proximity operations and nanosatellite docking. Visual inspection is to be performed using a COTS LIDAR system to estimate range and pose under 100 m. Proximity operations are controlled using a comprehensive guidance, navigation and control (GNC) loop in a polar form of the Hills Clohessy Wiltshire (HCW) frame including J2 perturbations. And finally, nanosatellite docking is performed at under 30 cm using a series of tuned magnetic coils. This paper will document the initial experiments and calculations used to qualify LIDAR components, size the mission thrust and tank requirements, and air cushion table demonstrations of the docking mechanism.

  11. Targeting DNA Double-Strand Breaks with TAL Effector Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Michelle; Cermak, Tomas; Doyle, Erin L.; Schmidt, Clarice; Zhang, Feng; Hummel, Aaron; Bogdanove, Adam J.; Voytas, Daniel F.

    2010-01-01

    Engineered nucleases that cleave specific DNA sequences in vivo are valuable reagents for targeted mutagenesis. Here we report a new class of sequence-specific nucleases created by fusing transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) to the catalytic domain of the FokI endonuclease. Both native and custom TALE-nuclease fusions direct DNA double-strand breaks to specific, targeted sites. PMID:20660643

  12. Double-Stranded Water on Stepped Platinum Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Manuel J.; Farber, Rachael G.; Derouin, Jonathan; Badan, Cansin; Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Juurlink, Ludo B. F.; Killelea, Daniel R.; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2016-04-01

    The interaction of platinum with water plays a key role in (electro)catalysis. Herein, we describe a combined theoretical and experimental study that resolves the preferred adsorption structure of water wetting the Pt(111)-step type with adjacent (111) terraces. Double stranded lines wet the step edge forming water tetragons with dissimilar hydrogen bonds within and between the lines. Our results qualitatively explain experimental observations of water desorption and impact our thinking of solvation at the Pt electrochemical interface.

  13. Neural network computation with DNA strand displacement cascades.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lulu; Winfree, Erik; Bruck, Jehoshua

    2011-07-21

    The impressive capabilities of the mammalian brain--ranging from perception, pattern recognition and memory formation to decision making and motor activity control--have inspired their re-creation in a wide range of artificial intelligence systems for applications such as face recognition, anomaly detection, medical diagnosis and robotic vehicle control. Yet before neuron-based brains evolved, complex biomolecular circuits provided individual cells with the 'intelligent' behaviour required for survival. However, the study of how molecules can 'think' has not produced an equal variety of computational models and applications of artificial chemical systems. Although biomolecular systems have been hypothesized to carry out neural-network-like computations in vivo and the synthesis of artificial chemical analogues has been proposed theoretically, experimental work has so far fallen short of fully implementing even a single neuron. Here, building on the richness of DNA computing and strand displacement circuitry, we show how molecular systems can exhibit autonomous brain-like behaviours. Using a simple DNA gate architecture that allows experimental scale-up of multilayer digital circuits, we systematically transform arbitrary linear threshold circuits (an artificial neural network model) into DNA strand displacement cascades that function as small neural networks. Our approach even allows us to implement a Hopfield associative memory with four fully connected artificial neurons that, after training in silico, remembers four single-stranded DNA patterns and recalls the most similar one when presented with an incomplete pattern. Our results suggest that DNA strand displacement cascades could be used to endow autonomous chemical systems with the capability of recognizing patterns of molecular events, making decisions and responding to the environment. PMID:21776082

  14. Yields of single-strand breaks in double-stranded calf thymus DNA irradiated in aqueous solution in the presence of oxygen and scavengers

    SciTech Connect

    Udovicic, Lj.; Mark, F.; Bothe, E.

    1994-11-01

    Yields of radiation-induced single-strand breaks in double-stranded calf thymus DNA have been measured as a function of OH scavenger concentration in N{sub 2}O/O{sub 2}-saturated aqueous solution. The experimental data are well represented by a theoretical model based on non-homogeneous reaction kinetics, without the need to adjust any parameter. The good agreement between experimental and theoretical data is taken as evidence that, in the presence of oxygen, the main effect of added scavengers with respect to the formation of single-strand breaks in double-stranded DNA is OH radical scavenging. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Self-Assembly into Strands in Amphiphilic Polymer Brushes.

    PubMed

    Larin, Daniil E; Lazutin, Alexei A; Govorun, Elena N; Vasilevskaya, Valentina V

    2016-07-12

    The self-assembly of amphiphilic macromolecules end-grafted to a plane surface is studied using mean-field theory and computer simulations. Chain backbones are built from hydrophobic groups, whereas side groups are hydrophilic. The brush is immersed in a solvent, which can be good or poor, but on average is not far from θ conditions. It is demonstrated that the strong amphiphilicity of macromolecules at a monomer unit level leads to their self-assembly into a system of strands with a 2D hexagonal order in a cross-section parallel to the grafting plane. The structure period is determined by the length of side groups. In theory, this effect is explained by the orientation of strongly amphiphilic monomer units at a strand/solvent boundary that leads to an effective negative contribution to the surface tension. Computer simulations with molecular dynamics (MD) are used for a detailed study of the local brush structure. The aggregation number of strands grows with the increase of the grafting density and side group length. PMID:27267357

  16. High-pressure liquid-monopropellant strand combustion.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1972-01-01

    Examination of the influence of dissolved gases on the state of the liquid surface during high-pressure liquid-monopropellant combustion through the use of a strand burning experiment. Liquid surface temperatures were measured, using fine-wire thermocouples, during the strand combustion of ethyl nitrate, normal propyl nitrate, and propylene glycol dinitrate at pressures up to 81 atm. These measurements were compared with the predictions of a variable-property gas-phase analysis assuming an infinite activation energy for the decomposition reaction. The state of the liquid surface was estimated using a conventional low-pressure phase equilibrium model, as well as a high-pressure version that considered the presence of dissolved combustion-product gases in the liquid phase. The high-pressure model was found to give a superior prediction of measured liquid surface temperatures. Computed total pressures required for the surface to reach its critical mixing point during strand combustion were found to be in the range from 2.15 to 4.62 times the critical pressure of the pure propellant. Computed dissolved gas concentrations at the liquid surface were in the range from 35 to 50% near the critical combustion condition.

  17. Structure of the guide-strand-containing argonaute silencing complex

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanli; Sheng, Gang; Juranek, Stefan; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2009-01-15

    The slicer activity of the RNA-induced silencing complex is associated with argonaute, the RNase H-like PIWI domain of which catalyses guide-strand-mediated sequence-specific cleavage of target messenger RNA. Here we report on the crystal structure of Thermus thermophilus argonaute bound to a 5'-phosphorylated 21-base DNA guide strand, thereby identifying the nucleic-acid-binding channel positioned between the PAZ- and PIWI-containing lobes, as well as the pivot-like conformational changes associated with complex formation. The bound guide strand is anchored at both of its ends, with the solvent-exposed Watson-Crick edges of stacked bases 2 to 6 positioned for nucleation with the mRNA target, whereas two critically positioned arginines lock bases 10 and 11 at the cleavage site into an unanticipated orthogonal alignment. Biochemical studies indicate that key amino acid residues at the active site and those lining the 5'-phosphate-binding pocket made up of the Mid domain are critical for cleavage activity, whereas alterations of residues lining the 2-nucleotide 3'-end-binding pocket made up of the PAZ domain show little effect.

  18. Commercial possibilities for stranded conventional gas from Alaska's North Slope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.; Freeman, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Stranded gas resources are defined for this study as gas resources in discrete accumulations that are not currently commercially producible, or producible at full potential, for either physical or economic reasons. Approximately 35 trillion cubic feet (TCF) of stranded gas was identified on Alaska’s North Slope. The commercialization of this resource requires facilities to transport gas to markets where sales revenue will be sufficient to offset the cost of constructing and operating a gas delivery system. With the advent of the shale gas revolution, plans for a gas pipeline to the conterminous US have been shelved (at least temporarily) and the State and resource owners are considering a liquefied natural gas (LNG) export project that targets Asian markets. This paper focuses on competitive conditions for Asian gas import markets by estimating delivered costs of competing supplies from central Asia, Russia, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Australia in the context of a range of import gas demand projections for the period from 2020 to 2040. These suppliers’ costs are based on the cost of developing, producing, and delivering to markets tranches of the nearly 600 TCF of recoverable gas from their own conventional stranded gas fields. The results of these analyses imply that Alaska’s gas exports to Asia will likely encounter substantial competitive challenges. The sustainability of Asia’s oil-indexed LNG pricing is also discussed in light of a potentially intense level of competition.

  19. Force-Driven Separation of Short Double-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Dominik; Zimmermann, Julia L.; Dehmelt, Florian A.; Steinbach, Uta; Erdmann, Matthias; Severin, Philip; Falter, Katja; Gaub, Hermann E.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Short double-stranded DNA is used in a variety of nanotechnological applications, and for many of them, it is important to know for which forces and which force loading rates the DNA duplex remains stable. In this work, we develop a theoretical model that describes the force-dependent dissociation rate for DNA duplexes tens of basepairs long under tension along their axes (“shear geometry”). Explicitly, we set up a three-state equilibrium model and apply the canonical transition state theory to calculate the kinetic rates for strand unpairing and the rupture-force distribution as a function of the separation velocity of the end-to-end distance. Theory is in excellent agreement with actual single-molecule force spectroscopy results and even allows for the prediction of the rupture-force distribution for a given DNA duplex sequence and separation velocity. We further show that for describing double-stranded DNA separation kinetics, our model is a significant refinement of the conventionally used Bell-Evans model. PMID:20006953

  20. Carbon Fiber Strand Tensile Failure Dynamic Event Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kenneth L.; Reeder, James

    2016-01-01

    There are few if any clear, visual, and detailed images of carbon fiber strand failures under tension useful for determining mechanisms, sequences of events, different types of failure modes, etc. available to researchers. This makes discussion of physics of failure difficult. It was also desired to find out whether the test article-to-test rig interface (grip) played a part in some failures. These failures have nothing to do with stress rupture failure, thus representing a source of waste for the larger 13-00912 investigation into that specific failure type. Being able to identify or mitigate any competing failure modes would improve the value of the 13-00912 test data. The beginnings of the solution to these problems lay in obtaining images of strand failures useful for understanding physics of failure and the events leading up to failure. Necessary steps include identifying imaging techniques that result in useful data, using those techniques to home in on where in a strand and when in the sequence of events one should obtain imaging data.

  1. Visualizing recombination intermediates with single-stranded DNA curtains.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhi; Greene, Eric C

    2016-08-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a critical cellular process for repairing double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) - a toxic type of DNA lesion that can result in chromosomal rearrangements and cancer. During the early stages of HR, members from the Rad51/RecA family of recombinases assemble into long filaments on the single-stranded DNA overhangs that are present at processed DSBs. These nucleoprotein filaments are referred to as presynaptic complexes, and these presynaptic complexes must align and pair homologous DNA sequences during HR. Traditional ensemble methods cannot easily access the transient and often heterogeneous intermediates that are typical of DNA recombination reactions, and as a consequence, there remain many open questions with respect to the molecular details of this pathway. Novel single-molecule approaches that are capable of directly visualizing reaction intermediates in solution and in real time offer the potential for new insights into the mechanism of homologous DNA recombination. Here we highlight recently developed single stranded DNA curtain methods for studying the properties of individual Rad51 presynaptic complexes and other related recombination intermediates at the single-molecule level. PMID:27038747

  2. A Novel Bio-Sensor Based on DNA Strand Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaolong; Wang, Zhiyu; Deng, Chenyan; Song, Tao; Pan, Linqiang; Chen, Zhihua

    2014-01-01

    DNA strand displacement technology performs well in sensing and programming DNA segments. In this work, we construct DNA molecular systems based on DNA strand displacement performing computation of logic gates. Specifically, a class of so-called “DNA neurons” are achieved, in which a “smart” way inspired by biological neurons encoding information is developed to encode and deliver information using DNA molecules. The “DNA neuron” is bistable, that is, it can sense DNA molecules as input signals, and release “negative” or “positive” signals DNA molecules. We design intelligent DNA molecular systems that are constructed by cascading some particularly organized “DNA neurons”, which could perform logic computation, including AND, OR, XOR logic gates, automatically. Both simulation results using visual DSD (DNA strand displacement) software and experimental results are obtained, which shows that the proposed systems can detect DNA signals with high sensitivity and accretion; moreover, the systems can process input signals automatically with complex nonlinear logic. The method proposed in this work may provide a new way to construct a sensitive molecular signal detection system with neurons spiking behavior in vitro, and can be used to develop intelligent molecular processing systems in vivo. PMID:25303242

  3. The effect of strand bias in Illumina short-read sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background When using Illumina high throughput short read data, sometimes the genotype inferred from the positive strand and negative strand are significantly different, with one homozygous and the other heterozygous. This phenomenon is known as strand bias. In this study, we used Illumina short-read sequencing data to evaluate the effect of strand bias on genotyping quality, and to explore the possible causes of strand bias. Result We collected 22 breast cancer samples from 22 patients and sequenced their exome using the Illumina GAIIx machine. By comparing the consistency between the genotypes inferred from this sequencing data with the genotypes inferred from SNP chip data, we found that, when using sequencing data, SNPs with extreme strand bias did not have significantly lower consistency rates compared to SNPs with low or no strand bias. However, this result may be limited by the small subset of SNPs present in both the exome sequencing and the SNP chip data. We further compared the transition and transversion ratio and the number of novel non-synonymous SNPs between the SNPs with low or no strand bias and those with extreme strand bias, and found that SNPs with low or no strand bias have better overall quality. We also discovered that the strand bias occurs randomly at genomic positions across these samples, and observed no consistent pattern of strand bias location across samples. By comparing results from two different aligners, BWA and Bowtie, we found very consistent strand bias patterns. Thus strand bias is unlikely to be caused by alignment artifacts. We successfully replicated our results using two additional independent datasets with different capturing methods and Illumina sequencers. Conclusion Extreme strand bias indicates a potential high false-positive rate for SNPs. PMID:23176052

  4. Transwell(®) invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John

    2011-01-01

    The need to identify inhibitors of cancer invasion has driven the development of quantitative in vitro invasion assays. The most common assays used are based on the original Boyden assay system. Today commercially available plastic inserts for multi-well plates, which possess a cell-permeable membrane, as typified by Transwell(®) Permeable Supports, permit accurate repeatable invasion assays. When placed in the well of a multi-well tissue culture plate these inserts create a two-chamber system separated by the cell-permeable membrane. To create an invasion assay the pores in the membrane are blocked with a gel composed of extracellular matrix that is meant to mimic the typical matrices that tumour cells encounter during the invasion process in vivo. By placing the cells on one side of the gel and a chemoattractant on the other side of the gel, invasion is determined by counting those cells that have traversed the cell-permeable membrane having invaded towards the higher concentration of chemoattractant. In this chapter, in addition to protocols for performing Transwell invasion assays, there is consideration of the limitations of current assay designs with regard to available matrices and the absence of tumour microenvironment cells. PMID:21748672

  5. Hydroxyapatite-mediated separation of double-stranded DNA, single-stranded DNA, and RNA genomes from natural viral assemblages.

    PubMed

    Andrews-Pfannkoch, Cynthia; Fadrosh, Douglas W; Thorpe, Joyce; Williamson, Shannon J

    2010-08-01

    Metagenomics can be used to determine the diversity of complex, often unculturable, viral communities with various nucleic acid compositions. Here, we report the use of hydroxyapatite chromatography to efficiently fractionate double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), dsRNA, and ssRNA genomes from known bacteriophages. Linker-amplified shotgun libraries were constructed to generate sequencing reads from each hydroxyapatite fraction. Greater than 90% of the reads displayed significant similarity to the expected genomes at the nucleotide level. These methods were applied to marine viruses collected from the Chesapeake Bay and the Dry Tortugas National Park. Isolated nucleic acids were fractionated using hydroxyapatite chromatography followed by linker-amplified shotgun library construction and sequencing. Taxonomic analysis demonstrated that the majority of environmental sequences, regardless of their source nucleic acid, were most similar to dsDNA viruses, reflecting the bias of viral metagenomic sequence databases. PMID:20543058

  6. Non-invasive and invasive imaging of vulnerable coronary plaque.

    PubMed

    Celeng, Csilla; Takx, Richard A P; Ferencik, Maros; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál

    2016-08-01

    Vulnerable plaque is characterized by a large necrotic core and an overlying thin fibrous cap. Non-invasive imaging modalities such as computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allow for the assessment of morphological plaque characteristics, while positron emission tomography (PET) enables the detection of metabolic activity within the atherosclerotic lesions. Invasive imaging modalities such as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), optical-coherence tomography (OCT), and intravascular MRI (IV-MRI) display plaques at a high spatial resolution. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) allows for the detection of chemical components of atherosclerotic plaques. In this review, we describe state-of-the-art non-invasive and invasive imaging modalities and stress the combination of their advantages to identify vulnerable plaque features. PMID:27079893

  7. The human LON protease binds to mitochondrial promoters in a single-stranded, site-specific, strand-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Fu, G K; Markovitz, D M

    1998-02-17

    LON proteases, which are ATP-dependent and exhibit ATPase activity, are found in bacteria, yeast, and humans. In Escherichia coli, LON is known to regulate gene expression by targeting specific regulatory proteins for degradation. The yeast and human LON proteins are encoded in the nucleus but localize to the mitochondrial matrix. In yeast, LON has been shown to be essential for the maintenance of the integrity of the mitochondrial genome. E. coli Lon has long been known to bind DNA, but we have only recently demonstrated that it binds preferentially to a specific TG-rich double-stranded sequence. We now show that human LON recognizes a very similar site in both the light and heavy chain promoters of the mitochondrial genome, in a region which is involved in regulating both DNA replication and transcription. Unlike E. coli Lon, however, human LON specifically binds to the TG-rich element only when it is presented in the context of a single DNA strand. These findings suggest that the human LON protease might regulate mitochondrial DNA replication and/or gene expression using site-specific, single-stranded DNA binding to target the degradation of regulatory proteins binding to adjacent sites in mitochondrial promoters. PMID:9485316

  8. A kinetic model of single-strand annealing for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Taleei, Reza; Weinfeld, Michael; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2011-02-01

    Ionising radiation induces different types of DNA damage, including single-strand breaks, double-strand breaks (DSB) and base damages. DSB are considered to be the most critical lesion to be repaired. The three main competitive pathways in the repair of DSB are non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination (HR) and single-strand annealing (SSA). SSA is a non-conservative repair pathway requiring direct repeat sequences for the repair process. In this work, a biochemical kinetic model is presented to describe the SSA repair pathway. The model consists of a system of non-linear ordinary differential equations describing the steps in the repair pathway. The reaction rates were estimated by comparing the model results with the experimental data for chicken DT40 cells exposed to 20 Gy of X-rays. The model successfully predicts the repair of the DT40 cells with the reaction rates derived from the 20-Gy X-ray experiment. The experimental data and the kinetic model show fast and slow DSB repair components. The half time and fractions of the slow and the fast components of the repair were compared for the model and the experiments. Mathematical and computational modelling in biology has played an important role in predicting biological mechanisms and stimulating future experimentation. The present model of SSA adds to the modelling of NHEJ and HR to provide a more complete description of DSB repair pathways. PMID:21183536

  9. Relationships among the positive strand and double-strand RNA viruses as viewed through their RNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    PubMed Central

    Bruenn, J A

    1991-01-01

    The sequences of 50 RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRPs) from 43 positive strand and 7 double strand RNA (dsRNA) viruses have been compared. The alignment permitted calculation of distances among the 50 viruses and a resultant dendrogram based on every amino acid, rather than just those amino acids in the conserved motifs. Remarkably, a large subgroup of these viruses, including vertebrate, plant, and insect viruses, forms a single cluster whose only common characteristic is exploitation of insect hosts or vectors. This similarity may be due to molecular constraints associated with a present and/or past ability to infect insects and/or to common descent from insect viruses. If common descent is important, as it appears to be, all the positive strand RNA viruses of eucaryotes except for the picornaviruses may have evolved from an ancestral dsRNA virus. Viral RDRPs appear to be inherited as modules rather than as portions of single RNA segments, implying that RNA recombination has played an important role in their dissemination. PMID:2014162

  10. The isothermal amplification detection of double-stranded DNA based on a double-stranded fluorescence probe.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chao; Shang, Fanjin; Pan, Mei; Liu, Sen; Ma, Cuiping

    2016-06-15

    Here we have developed a novel method of isothermal amplification detection of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) based on double-stranded fluorescence probe (ds-probe). Target dsDNA repeatedly generated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) with polymerase and nicking enzyme. The ds-probe as a primer hybridized with ssDNA and extended to its 5'-end. The displaced ssDNA served as a new detection target to initiate above-described reaction. Meanwhile, the extended ds-probe could dynamically dissociate from ssDNA and self-hybridize, converting into a turn-back structure to initiate another amplification reaction. In particular, the ds-probe played a key role in the entire experimental process, which not only was as a primer but also produced the fluorescent signal by an extension and displacement reaction. Our method could detect the pBluescript II KS(+) plasmid with a detection limit of 2.3 amol, and it was also verified to exhibit a high specificity, even one-base mismatch. Overall, it was a true isothermal dsDNA detection strategy with a strongly anti-jamming capacity and one-pot, only requiring one ds-probe, which greatly reduced the cost and the probability of contamination. With its advantages, the approach of dsDNA detection will offer a promising tool in the field of point-of-care testing (POCT). PMID:26803414

  11. Current imbalance in superconducting strand-to-strand joint and its relaxation in multistage cable-in-conduit conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangil; Jeong, Sangkwon; Choi, Sung-Min

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents non-uniformity or imbalance in the transport current of the superconducting toroidal-field coil (TFC) made of multistage cable-in-conductor (CICC) due to inductive current in a strand-to-strand (STS) soldered joint of cylindrical shape and also the relaxation of the inductive current in the conductor. Using an NbTi CICC consisting of 486 strands, a joint sample is fabricated and experimented. An external magnetic field of symmetric trapezoidal waveform is vertically applied to the sample joint. The field maximum and the ramp rate (d B/d t) maximum are 1 T and 0.25 T/s, respectively. Voltage taps and Hall probes are utilized to measure the inductive voltage and current. Experimental results are analyzed numerically using an infinite electrical transmission line model, which is found to explain our sample system well. The flattop induced current is proportional to the d B/d t. Being different from our expectation that the inductive current will distribute widely over the cross-sectional surface of the joint, it localizes to a narrow region; a triplet located in the outer-most side of the joint, for instance. The relaxation phenomenon in the induced current is observed experimentally. From numerical analysis, the relaxation length is found to increase logarithmically with decreasing d B/d t and saturate at a certain value of d B/d t.

  12. Homologous DNA strand exchange activity of the human mitochondrial DNA helicase TWINKLE

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Doyel; Patel, Gayatri; Patel, Smita S.

    2016-01-01

    A crucial component of the human mitochondrial DNA replisome is the ring-shaped helicase TWINKLE—a phage T7-gene 4-like protein expressed in the nucleus and localized in the human mitochondria. Our previous studies showed that despite being a helicase, TWINKLE has unique DNA annealing activity. At the time, the implications of DNA annealing by TWINKLE were unclear. Herein, we report that TWINKLE uses DNA annealing function to actively catalyze strand-exchange reaction between the unwinding substrate and a homologous single-stranded DNA. Using various biochemical experiments, we demonstrate that the mechanism of strand-exchange involves active coupling of unwinding and annealing reactions by the TWINKLE. Unlike strand-annealing, the strand-exchange reaction requires nucleotide hydrolysis and greatly stimulated by short region of homology between the recombining DNA strands that promote joint molecule formation to initiate strand-exchange. Furthermore, we show that TWINKLE catalyzes branch migration by resolving homologous four-way junction DNA. These four DNA modifying activities of TWINKLE: strand-separation, strand-annealing, strand-exchange and branch migration suggest a dual role of TWINKLE in mitochondrial DNA maintenance. In addition to playing a major role in fork progression during leading strand DNA synthesis, we propose that TWINKLE is involved in recombinational repair of the human mitochondrial DNA. PMID:26887820

  13. Homologous DNA strand exchange activity of the human mitochondrial DNA helicase TWINKLE.

    PubMed

    Sen, Doyel; Patel, Gayatri; Patel, Smita S

    2016-05-19

    A crucial component of the human mitochondrial DNA replisome is the ring-shaped helicase TWINKLE-a phage T7-gene 4-like protein expressed in the nucleus and localized in the human mitochondria. Our previous studies showed that despite being a helicase, TWINKLE has unique DNA annealing activity. At the time, the implications of DNA annealing by TWINKLE were unclear. Herein, we report that TWINKLE uses DNA annealing function to actively catalyze strand-exchange reaction between the unwinding substrate and a homologous single-stranded DNA. Using various biochemical experiments, we demonstrate that the mechanism of strand-exchange involves active coupling of unwinding and annealing reactions by the TWINKLE. Unlike strand-annealing, the strand-exchange reaction requires nucleotide hydrolysis and greatly stimulated by short region of homology between the recombining DNA strands that promote joint molecule formation to initiate strand-exchange. Furthermore, we show that TWINKLE catalyzes branch migration by resolving homologous four-way junction DNA. These four DNA modifying activities of TWINKLE: strand-separation, strand-annealing, strand-exchange and branch migration suggest a dual role of TWINKLE in mitochondrial DNA maintenance. In addition to playing a major role in fork progression during leading strand DNA synthesis, we propose that TWINKLE is involved in recombinational repair of the human mitochondrial DNA. PMID:26887820

  14. Squamous cell carcinoma - invasive (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This irregular red nodule is an invasive squamous cell carcinoma (a form of skin cancer). Initial appearance, shown here, may be very similar to a noncancerous growth called a keratoacanthoma. Squamous cell cancers ...

  15. Squamous cell carcinoma - invasive (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... invasive squamous cell carcinoma (a form of skin cancer). Initial appearance, shown here, may be very similar to a noncancerous growth called a keratoacanthoma. Squamous cell cancers can metastasize (spread) and should be removed surgically ...

  16. Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... screen and open the door to informed medical care. Good afternoon and welcome to the Heart Institute ... be progressive and less invasive in how we care for our patients. 8 Here's one from one ...

  17. Cheatgrass invasion and wildlife habitat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The introduction and subsequent invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) has altered native plant communities and the wildlife species that depend on these communities. Cheatgrass has truncated secondary succession by outcompeting native plant species for limited resources, thus building persistent...

  18. Mitral valve surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... that does many of these procedures. Minimally invasive heart valve surgery has improved greatly in recent years. These ... WT, Mack MJ. Transcatheter cardiac valve interventions. Surg Clin North Am . 2009;89:951-66. ...

  19. Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... in 30-day outcomes in high-risk patients randomized to off-pump versus on-pump coronary bypass ... Thiele H, Neumann-Schniedewind P, Jacobs S, et al. Randomized comparison of minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass ...

  20. Common Ground for Managing Invasive Annual Grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive annual grasses often reach their full biological potential in ecosystems of the western United States. This suggests that crucial ecosystem "checks and balances" are not functioning. In other words, invasion occurs because ecosystems have lost resistance to invasion, and invasive plants a...

  1. Heavy Metal Exposure Influences Double Strand Break DNA Repair Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Maria E.; Derbes, Rebecca S.; Ade, Catherine M.; Ortego, Jonathan C.; Stark, Jeremy; Deininger, Prescott L.; Roy-Engel, Astrid M.

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metals such as cadmium, arsenic and nickel are classified as carcinogens. Although the precise mechanism of carcinogenesis is undefined, heavy metal exposure can contribute to genetic damage by inducing double strand breaks (DSBs) as well as inhibiting critical proteins from different DNA repair pathways. Here we take advantage of two previously published culture assay systems developed to address mechanistic aspects of DNA repair to evaluate the effects of heavy metal exposures on competing DNA repair outcomes. Our results demonstrate that exposure to heavy metals significantly alters how cells repair double strand breaks. The effects observed are both specific to the particular metal and dose dependent. Low doses of NiCl2 favored resolution of DSBs through homologous recombination (HR) and single strand annealing (SSA), which were inhibited by higher NiCl2 doses. In contrast, cells exposed to arsenic trioxide preferentially repaired using the “error prone” non-homologous end joining (alt-NHEJ) while inhibiting repair by HR. In addition, we determined that low doses of nickel and cadmium contributed to an increase in mutagenic recombination-mediated by Alu elements, the most numerous family of repetitive elements in humans. Sequence verification confirmed that the majority of the genetic deletions were the result of Alu-mediated non-allelic recombination events that predominantly arose from repair by SSA. All heavy metals showed a shift in the outcomes of alt-NHEJ repair with a significant increase of non-templated sequence insertions at the DSB repair site. Our data suggest that exposure to heavy metals will alter the choice of DNA repair pathway changing the genetic outcome of DSBs repair. PMID:26966913

  2. Prostate brachytherapy postimplant dosimetry: Automatic plan reconstruction of stranded implants

    SciTech Connect

    Chng, N.; Spadinger, I.; Morris, W. J.; Usmani, N.; Salcudean, S.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Plan reconstruction for permanent implant prostate brachytherapy is the process of determining the correspondence between planned and implanted seeds in postimplant analysis. Plan reconstruction informs many areas of brachytherapy quality assurance, including the verification of seed segmentation, misplacement and migration assessment, implant simulations, and the dosimetry of mixed-activity or mixed-species implants. Methods: An algorithm has been developed for stranded implants which uses the interseed spacing constraints imposed by the suture to improve the accuracy of reconstruction. Seventy randomly selected clinical cases with a mean of 23.6 (range 18-30) needles and mean density of 2.0 (range 1.6-2.6) 2.0 (range 1.6-2.6) seeds/cm{sup 3} were automatically reconstructed and the accuracy compared to manual reconstructions performed using a custom 3D graphical interface. Results: Using the automatic algorithm, the mean accuracy of the assignment relative to manual reconstruction was found to be 97.7{+-}0.5%. Fifty-two of the 70 cases (74%) were error-free; of seeds in the remaining cases, 96.7{+-}0.3% were found to be attributed to the correct strand and 97.0{+-}0.3% were correctly connected to their neighbors. Any necessary manual correction using the interface is usually straightforward. For the clinical data set tested, neither the number of seeds or needles, average density, nor the presence of clusters was found to have an effect on reconstruction accuracy using this method. Conclusions: Routine plan reconstruction of stranded implants can be performed with a high degree of accuracy to support postimplant dosimetry and quality analyses.

  3. Targeting cancer cell invasiveness using homing peptide-nanocomplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarato, Giulia; Cathcart, Jillian; Li, Weiyi; Cao, Jian; Meng, Yizhi

    Matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14) plays critical roles in digesting the basement membrane and extracellular matrix and inducing cancer migration. We recently unraveled a unique role in cell invasion of the hemopexin (PEX) domain of MMP-14. The minimal motif located at the outmost strand of the fourth blade of the PEX domain was identified to form homodimers of MMP-14. A peptide (IVS4) mimicking the binding motif was shown to interrupt MMP-14 dimerization and decrease MMP-14-mediated functions. Since most invasive cancer cells express upregulated MMP-14 at the surface, IVS4 could be used as a cancer homing peptide to specifically deliver cytotoxic drugs for cancer therapy. We developed cancer homing nanocarriers by linking IVS4 to polysaccharide-based micellar nanoparticles (NPs). To determine if conjugation of IVS4 to NPs maintains the IVS4 inhibition of MMP-14 function, substrate degradation and cell migration assays were performed. IVS4-NPs efficiently prevented MMP-14-mediated substrate degradation and cell migration, and were minimally uptaken by non-cancer cells. Importantly, IVS4 confers an uptake advantage compared to the control peptide in MMP-14-expressing cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the potential use of IVS4-NPs as novel cancer nanotherapeutics.

  4. Adenosine triphosphatases of thermophilic archaeal double-stranded DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphatases (ATPases) of double-stranded (ds) DNA archaeal viruses are structurally related to the AAA+ hexameric helicases and translocases. These ATPases have been implicated in viral life cycle functions such as DNA entry into the host, and viral genome packaging into preformed procapsids. We summarize bioinformatical analyses of a wide range of archaeal ATPases, and review the biochemical and structural properties of those archaeal ATPases that have measurable ATPase activity. We discuss their potential roles in genome delivery into the host, virus assembly and genome packaging in comparison to hexameric helicases and packaging motors from bacteriophages. PMID:25105011

  5. Acoustic emission strand burning technique for motor burning rate prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, W. N.

    1978-01-01

    An acoustic emission (AE) method is being used to measure the burning rate of solid propellant strands. This method has a precision of 0.5% and excellent burning rate correlation with both subscale and large rocket motors. The AE procedure burns the sample under water and measures the burning rate from the acoustic output. The acoustic signal provides a continuous readout during testing, which allows complete data analysis rather than the start-stop clockwires used by the conventional method. The AE method helps eliminate such problems as inhibiting the sample, pressure increase and temperature rise, during testing.

  6. Herpetic keratoconjunctivitis: Therapy with synthetic double-stranded RNA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Evans, C.; Meighan, C.W.; Foote, L.J.; Aiello, P.V.; Park, J.H.; Baron, S.

    1968-01-01

    A study was undertaken in rabbits to determine how late in the course of keratoconjunctivitis caused by herpes simplex recovery could be effected by an inducer of interferon. Interferon was induced by means of synthetic double-stranded RNA copolymer formed with polynosinic acid : polycytidilic acid RNA. Therapy promotes recovery from severe and fully established keratoconjunctivitis for which treatment was begun as late as 3 days after virus inoculation. No drug toxicity was observed in the therapeutic dose range. These findings further support the proposed role of the interferon mechanism in the natural recovery of already established viral infection. They also suggest the usefulness of interferon inducers in viral infections of man.

  7. Verification and validation of the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model for strand grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Oisin

    The strand-Cartesian grid approach provides many advantages for complex moving- body flow simulations, including fully-automatic volume grid generation, highly scalable domain connectivity, and high-order accuracy. In this work the Spalart-Allmaras model is implemented, verified, and validated for high Reynolds number turbulent flows in a strand- Cartesian solver. Second-order convergence is achieved using the Method of Manufactured Solutions implying correct implementation of the turbulence model. By using the NASA- Langley online resource, specific flow cases are validated with two independent compressible codes: FUN3D and CFL3D. The strand solver is validated with zero-pressure gradient flat plate and bump-in-channel cases, and shows excellent agreement with FUN3D and CFL3D for various aspects of turbulent flow, including: velocity profiles, turbulent viscosity profile, coefficient of surface pressure, and drag. Methods of handling sharp corners with strand grids through combinations of strand vector smoothing, multiple strands emanating from a single surface node, and telescoping Cartesian refinement into corner regions of the near- body grid are investigated for a NACA 0012 case. For standard viscous high-aspect ratio grids, smoothed strands with telescoping Cartesian refinement provide the most accurate results with the least complexity. Mesh discontinuities associated with use of multiple strands at sharp corners produce more error than with smoothed strands. With both strand approaches -- vector smoothing and multiple strands -- targeted Cartesian refinement is critical to capture features near sharp corners where strand grids alone are too coarse to capture. Other results show agreement with FUN3D and CFL3D. By using strand vector smoothing and telescoping Cartesian refinement, a NACA 4412 trailing edge separation case is validated with comparison against CFL3D and FUN3D. Velocity profiles show reasonable agreement with CFL3D; however implementing

  8. Mechanical behaviors of multi-filament twist superconducting strand under tensile and cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Li, Yingxu; Gao, Yuanwen

    2016-01-01

    The superconducting strand, serving as the basic unit cell of the cable-in-conduit-conductors (CICCs), is a typical multi-filament twist composite which is always subjected to a cyclic loading under the operating condition. Meanwhile, the superconducting material Nb3Sn in the strand is sensitive to strain frequently relating to the performance degradation of the superconductivity. Therefore, a comprehensive study on the mechanical behavior of the strand helps understanding the superconducting performance of the strained Nb3Sn strands. To address this issue, taking the LMI (internal tin) strand as an example, a three-dimensional structural finite element model, named as the Multi-filament twist model, of the strand with the real configuration of the LMI strand is built to study the influences of the plasticity of the component materials, the twist of the filament bundle, the initial thermal residual stress and the breakage and its evolution of the filaments on the mechanical behaviors of the strand. The effective properties of superconducting filament bundle with random filament breakage and its evolution versus strain are obtained based on the damage theory of fiber-reinforced composite materials proposed by Curtin and Zhou. From the calculation results of this model, we find that the occurrence of the hysteresis loop in the cyclic loading curve is determined by the reverse yielding of the elastic-plastic materials in the strand. Both the initial thermal residual stress in the strand and the pitch length of the filaments have significant impacts on the axial and hysteretic behaviors of the strand. The damage of the filaments also affects the axial mechanical behavior of the strand remarkably at large axial strain. The critical current of the strand is calculated by the scaling law with the results of the Multi-filament twist model. The predicted results of the Multi-filament twist model show an acceptable agreement with the experiment.

  9. SOST Inhibits Prostate Cancer Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Bryan D.; Hum, Nicholas R.; Thomas, Cynthia B.; Kohlgruber, Ayano; Sebastian, Aimy; Collette, Nicole M.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Christiansen, Blaine A.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of Wnt signaling have been shown to be involved in prostate cancer (PC) metastasis; however the role of Sclerostin (Sost) has not yet been explored. Here we show that elevated Wnt signaling derived from Sost deficient osteoblasts promotes PC invasion, while rhSOST has an inhibitory effect. In contrast, rhDKK1 promotes PC elongation and filopodia formation, morphological changes characteristic of an invasive phenotype. Furthermore, rhDKK1 was found to activate canonical Wnt signaling in PC3 cells, suggesting that SOST and DKK1 have opposing roles on Wnt signaling in this context. Gene expression analysis of PC3 cells co-cultured with OBs exhibiting varying amounts of Wnt signaling identified CRIM1 as one of the transcripts upregulated under highly invasive conditions. We found CRIM1 overexpression to also promote cell-invasion. These findings suggest that bone-derived Wnt signaling may enhance PC tropism by promoting CRIM1 expression and facilitating cancer cell invasion and adhesion to bone. We concluded that SOST and DKK1 have opposing effects on PC3 cell invasion and that bone-derived Wnt signaling positively contributes to the invasive phenotypes of PC3 cells by activating CRIM1 expression and facilitating PC-OB physical interaction. As such, we investigated the effects of high concentrations of SOST in vivo. We found that PC3-cells overexpressing SOST injected via the tail vein in NSG mice did not readily metastasize, and those injected intrafemorally had significantly reduced osteolysis, suggesting that targeting the molecular bone environment may influence bone metastatic prognosis in clinical settings. PMID:26545120

  10. Altered Strand Transfer Activity of a Multi-drug-resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase Mutant with a Dipeptide Fingers Domain Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Laura A.; Daddacha, Waaqo; Rigby, Sean; Bambara, Robert A.; Kim, Baek

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) with multiple nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infected patients can induce the development of an HIV-1 RT harboring a dipeptide insertion at the RT fingers domain with a background thymidine analog mutation (TAM). This mutation renders viral resistance to multiple NRTIs. We investigated the effect of the dipeptide fingers domain insertion mutation on strand transfer activity using two clinical RT variants isolated during pre- and post-treatment of an infected patient, termed pre-drug RT without the dipeptide insertion and post-drug RT with the Ser-Gly insertion mutation, respectively. First, the post-drug RT displayed elevated strand transfer activity, compared to the pre-drug RT, with two different RNA templates. Second, the post-drug RT exhibited less RNA template degradation than the pre-drug RT, but higher polymerization-dependent RNase H activity. Third, the post-drug RT had a faster association rate for template binding (kon) and lower equilibrium binding constant KD to template, leading to the tighter template binding affinity than the pre-drug RT. The koff rates for pre-drug RT and post-drug RTs were similar. Finally, the removal of the dipeptide insertion from the post-drug RT abolished the elevated strand transfer activity and RNase H activity in addition to the loss of AZT resistance. These biochemical data suggests that the dipeptide insertion mutation elevates strand transfer activity by increasing the interaction of the RT with RNA donor template, promoting cleavage that generates more invasion site for the acceptor template during DNA synthesis. PMID:22100453

  11. Characterization of CRISPR RNA transcription by exploiting stranded metatranscriptomic data.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yuzhen; Zhang, Quan

    2016-07-01

    CRISPR-Cas systems are bacterial adaptive immune systems, each typically composed of a locus of cas genes and a CRISPR array of spacers flanked by repeats. Processed transcripts of CRISPR arrays (crRNAs) play important roles in the interference process mediated by these systems, guiding targeted immunity. Here we developed computational approaches that allow us to characterize the expression of many CRISPRs in their natural environments, using community RNA-seq (metatranscriptomic) data. By exploiting public human gut metatranscriptomic data sets, we studied the expression of 56 repeat-sequence types of CRISPRs, revealing that most CRISPRs are transcribed in one direction (producing crRNAs). In rarer cases, including a type II system associated with Bacteroides fragilis, CRISPRs are transcribed in both directions. Type III CRISPR-Cas systems were found in the microbiomes, but metatranscriptomic reads were barely found for their CRISPRs. We observed individual-level variation of the crRNA transcription, and an even greater transcription of a CRISPR from the antisense strand than the crRNA strand in one sample. The orientations of CRISPR expression implicated by metatranscriptomic data are largely in agreement with prior predictions for CRISPRs, with exceptions. Our study shows the promise of exploiting community RNA-seq data for investigating the transcription of CRISPR-Cas systems. PMID:27190232

  12. Characterization of CRISPR RNA transcription by exploiting stranded metatranscriptomic data

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yuzhen; Zhang, Quan

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR–Cas systems are bacterial adaptive immune systems, each typically composed of a locus of cas genes and a CRISPR array of spacers flanked by repeats. Processed transcripts of CRISPR arrays (crRNAs) play important roles in the interference process mediated by these systems, guiding targeted immunity. Here we developed computational approaches that allow us to characterize the expression of many CRISPRs in their natural environments, using community RNA-seq (metatranscriptomic) data. By exploiting public human gut metatranscriptomic data sets, we studied the expression of 56 repeat-sequence types of CRISPRs, revealing that most CRISPRs are transcribed in one direction (producing crRNAs). In rarer cases, including a type II system associated with Bacteroides fragilis, CRISPRs are transcribed in both directions. Type III CRISPR–Cas systems were found in the microbiomes, but metatranscriptomic reads were barely found for their CRISPRs. We observed individual-level variation of the crRNA transcription, and an even greater transcription of a CRISPR from the antisense strand than the crRNA strand in one sample. The orientations of CRISPR expression implicated by metatranscriptomic data are largely in agreement with prior predictions for CRISPRs, with exceptions. Our study shows the promise of exploiting community RNA-seq data for investigating the transcription of CRISPR–Cas systems. PMID:27190232

  13. DNA strand scission by the novel antitumor antibiotic leinamycin

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Mitsunobu; Saitoh, Yutaka; Nakano, Hirofumi )

    1990-06-19

    Leinamycin is a recently discovered antitumor antibiotic with an unusual 1,3-dioxo-1,2-dithiolane structure. It preferentially inhibits the incorporation of ({sup 3}H)thymidine into the acid-insoluble fraction of Bacillus subtilis. In vitro, leinamycin causes single-strand cleavage of supercoiled double-helical pBR322 DNA in the presence of thiol cofactors. Scavengers of oxygen radical did not suppress the DNA-cleaving activity. Thiol-activated leinamycin binds calf thymus DNA at 4{degree}C and thermal treatment of the leinamycin-DNA adduct released a chemically modified leinamycin from the complex. The lack of cytotoxicity and DNA-cleaving activity for S-deoxyleinamycin indicates that the 1,3-dioxo-1,2-dithiolane moiety is essential for the activity of leinamycin. Thus, the primary cellular target of leinamycin appears to be DNA. It binds DNA and causes single-strand break at low concentrations, which may account for the potent antitumor activity.

  14. Entropy in DNA Double-Strand Break, Detection and Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Schindler, Christina; Heermann, Dieter

    2014-03-01

    In biology, the term entropy is often understood as a measure of disorder - a restrictive interpretation that can even be misleading. Recently it has become clearer and clearer that entropy, contrary to conventional wisdom, can help to order and guide biological processes in living cells. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most dangerous lesions and efficient damage detection and repair is essential for organism viability. However, what remains unknown is the precise mechanism of targeting the site of damage within billions of intact nucleotides and a crowded nuclear environment, a process which is often referred to as recruitment or signaling. Here we show that the change in entropy associated with inflicting a DSB facilitates the recruitment of damage sensor proteins. By means of computational modeling we found that higher mobility and local chromatin structure accelerate protein association at DSB ends. We compared the effect of different chromatin architectures on protein dynamics and concentrations in the vicinity of DSBs, and related these results to experiments on repair in heterochromatin. Our results demonstrate how entropy contributes to a more efficient damage detection. We identify entropy as the physical basis for DNA double-strand break signaling.

  15. Stretching and relaxation dynamics in double stranded DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, D.; Archilla, J. F. R.

    2004-01-01

    We study numerically the mechanical stability and elasticity properties of duplex DNA molecules within the frame of a network model incorporating microscopic degrees of freedom related with the arrangement of the base pairs. We pay special attention to the opening-closing dynamics of double-stranded DNA molecules which are forced into non-equilibrium conformations. Mechanical stress imposed at one terminal end of the DNA molecule brings it into a partially opened configuration. We examine the subsequent relaxation dynamics connected with energy exchange processes between the various degrees of freedom and structural rearrangements leading to complete recombination to the double-stranded conformation. The similarities and differences between the relaxation dynamics for a planar ladder-like DNA molecule and a twisted one are discussed in detail. In this way we show that the attainment of a quasi-equilibrium regime proceeds faster in the case of the twisted DNA form than for its thus less flexible ladder counterpart. Furthermore we find that the velocity of the complete recombination of the DNA molecule is lower than the velocity imposed by the forcing unit which is in compliance with the experimental observations for the opening-closing cycle of DNA molecules.

  16. Nucleolar responses to DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Dorthe Helena; Stucki, Manuel

    2016-01-29

    Maintenance of cellular homeostasis is key to prevent transformation and disease. The cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks, primarily orchestrated by the ATM/ATR kinases is one of many mechanisms that serve to uphold genome stability and homeostasis. Upon detection of double-strand breaks (DSBs), several signaling cascades are activated to halt cell cycle progression and initiate repair. Furthermore, the DNA damage response (DDR) controls cellular processes such as transcription, splicing and metabolism. Recent studies have uncovered aspects of how the DDR operates within nucleoli. It appears that the DDR controls transcription in the nucleoli, not only when DNA breaks occur in the rDNA repeats, but also when a nuclear DDR is activated. In addition, we have gained first insights into how repair of DSBs is organized in the nucleolus. Collectively, these recent studies provide a more comprehensive picture of how the DDR regulates basic cellular functions to maintain cellular homeostasis. In this review we will summarize recent findings and discuss their implications for our understanding of how the DDR regulates transcription and repair in the nucleolus. PMID:26615196

  17. Dynamics of single-stranded DNA tethered to a solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radiom, Milad; Paul, Mark R.; Ducker, William A.

    2016-06-01

    Tethering is used to deliver specific biological and industrial functions. For example, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is tethered to polymerases and long sequences of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) during replication, and to solids in DNA microarrays. However, tethering ssDNA to a large object limits not only the available ssDNA conformations, but also the range of time-scales over which the mechanical responses of ssDNA are important. In this work we examine the effect of tethering by measurement of the mechanical response of ssDNA that is tethered at each end to two separate atomic force microscope cantilevers in aqueous solution. Thermal motion of the cantilevers drives the ends of the ssDNA chain at frequencies near 2 kHz. The presence of a tethered molecule makes a large difference to the asymmetric cross-correlation of two cantilevers, which enables resolution of the mechanical properties in our experiments. By analysis of the correlated motion of the cantilevers we extract the friction and stiffness of the ssDNA. We find that the measured friction is much larger than the friction that is usually associated with the unencumbered motion of ssDNA. We also find that the measured relaxation time, ∼30 μs, is much greater than prior measurements of the free-molecule relaxation time. We attribute the difference to the loss of conformational possibilities as a result of constraining the ends of the ssDNA.

  18. Nucleolar responses to DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Dorthe Helena; Stucki, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of cellular homeostasis is key to prevent transformation and disease. The cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks, primarily orchestrated by the ATM/ATR kinases is one of many mechanisms that serve to uphold genome stability and homeostasis. Upon detection of double-strand breaks (DSBs), several signaling cascades are activated to halt cell cycle progression and initiate repair. Furthermore, the DNA damage response (DDR) controls cellular processes such as transcription, splicing and metabolism. Recent studies have uncovered aspects of how the DDR operates within nucleoli. It appears that the DDR controls transcription in the nucleoli, not only when DNA breaks occur in the rDNA repeats, but also when a nuclear DDR is activated. In addition, we have gained first insights into how repair of DSBs is organized in the nucleolus. Collectively, these recent studies provide a more comprehensive picture of how the DDR regulates basic cellular functions to maintain cellular homeostasis. In this review we will summarize recent findings and discuss their implications for our understanding of how the DDR regulates transcription and repair in the nucleolus. PMID:26615196

  19. Single-Stranded Tile Stoppers for Interlocked DNA Architectures.

    PubMed

    Valero, Julián; Lohmann, Finn; Keppner, Daniel; Famulok, Michael

    2016-06-16

    Interlocked DNA architectures are useful for DNA nanotechnology because of their mechanically bonded components, which can move relative to one another without disassembling. We describe the design, synthesis, and characterization of novel single-stranded tile (SST) stoppers for the assembly of interlocked DNA architectures. SST stoppers are shown to self-assemble into a square-shaped rigid structure upon mixing 97 oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) strands. The structures are equipped with a sticky end that is designed for hybridization with the sticky ends of a dsDNA axle of a DNA rotaxane. Because the diameter of the macrocycle threaded onto the axle is 14 nm, the dimension of the square-shaped stopper was designed to be bulky enough to prevent the dethreading of the macrocycle. An asymmetric rotaxane with a SST- and a ring-shaped stopper featuring two stations for hybridization of the macrocycle to the axle was assembled. The macrocycle can be directed towards one or the other station upon triggering with fuel ODNs. PMID:26972112

  20. Dynamic control of strand excision during human DNA mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yongmoon; Kim, Daehyung; Martín-López, Juana V.; Lee, Ryanggeun; Oh, Jungsic; Hanne, Jeungphill; Fishel, Richard; Lee, Jong-Bong

    2016-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is activated by evolutionarily conserved MutS homologs (MSH) and MutL homologs (MLH/PMS). MSH recognizes mismatched nucleotides and form extremely stable sliding clamps that may be bound by MLH/PMS to ultimately authorize strand-specific excision starting at a distant 3′- or 5′-DNA scission. The mechanical processes associated with a complete MMR reaction remain enigmatic. The purified human (Homo sapien or Hs) 5′-MMR excision reaction requires the HsMSH2–HsMSH6 heterodimer, the 5′ → 3′ exonuclease HsEXOI, and the single-stranded binding heterotrimer HsRPA. The HsMLH1–HsPMS2 heterodimer substantially influences 5′-MMR excision in cell extracts but is not required in the purified system. Using real-time single-molecule imaging, we show that HsRPA or Escherichia coli EcSSB restricts HsEXOI excision activity on nicked or gapped DNA. HsMSH2–HsMSH6 activates HsEXOI by overcoming HsRPA/EcSSB inhibition and exploits multiple dynamic sliding clamps to increase tract length. Conversely, HsMLH1–HsPMS2 regulates tract length by controlling the number of excision complexes, providing a link to 5′ MMR. PMID:26951673

  1. Chromatin modifications and DNA repair: beyond double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    House, Nealia C. M.; Koch, Melissa R.; Freudenreich, Catherine H.

    2014-01-01

    DNA repair must take place in the context of chromatin, and chromatin modifications and DNA repair are intimately linked. The study of double-strand break repair has revealed numerous histone modifications that occur after induction of a DSB, and modification of the repair factors themselves can also occur. In some cases the function of the modification is at least partially understood, but in many cases it is not yet clear. Although DSB repair is a crucial activity for cell survival, DSBs account for only a small percentage of the DNA lesions that occur over the lifetime of a cell. Repair of single-strand gaps, nicks, stalled forks, alternative DNA structures, and base lesions must also occur in a chromatin context. There is increasing evidence that these repair pathways are also regulated by histone modifications and chromatin remodeling. In this review, we will summarize the current state of knowledge of chromatin modifications that occur during non-DSB repair, highlighting similarities and differences to DSB repair as well as remaining questions. PMID:25250043

  2. The RNA synthesis machinery of negative-stranded RNA viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Ortín, Juan; Martín-Benito, Jaime

    2015-05-15

    The group of Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses (NSVs) includes many human pathogens, like the influenza, measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial or Ebola viruses, which produce frequent epidemics of disease and occasional, high mortality outbreaks by transmission from animal reservoirs. The genome of NSVs consists of one to several single-stranded, negative-polarity RNA molecules that are always assembled into mega Dalton-sized complexes by association to many nucleoprotein monomers. These RNA-protein complexes or ribonucleoproteins function as templates for transcription and replication by action of the viral RNA polymerase and accessory proteins. Here we review our knowledge on these large RNA-synthesis machines, including the structure of their components, the interactions among them and their enzymatic activities, and we discuss models showing how they perform the virus transcription and replication programmes. - Highlights: • Overall organisation of NSV RNA synthesis machines. • Structure and function of the ribonucleoprotein components: Atomic structure of the RNA polymerase complex. • Commonalities and differences between segmented- and non-segmented NSVs. • Transcription versus replication programmes.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA repairs double-strand breaks in yeast chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Ricchetti, M; Fairhead, C; Dujon, B

    1999-11-01

    The endosymbiotic theory for the origin of eukaryotic cells proposes that genetic information can be transferred from mitochondria to the nucleus of a cell, and genes that are probably of mitochondrial origin have been found in nuclear chromosomes. Occasionally, short or rearranged sequences homologous to mitochondrial DNA are seen in the chromosomes of different organisms including yeast, plants and humans. Here we report a mechanism by which fragments of mitochondrial DNA, in single or tandem array, are transferred to yeast chromosomes under natural conditions during the repair of double-strand breaks in haploid mitotic cells. These repair insertions originate from noncontiguous regions of the mitochondrial genome. Our analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial genome indicates that the yeast nuclear genome does indeed contain several short sequences of mitochondrial origin which are similar in size and composition to those that repair double-strand breaks. These sequences are located predominantly in non-coding regions of the chromosomes, frequently in the vicinity of retrotransposon long terminal repeats, and appear as recent integration events. Thus, colonization of the yeast genome by mitochondrial DNA is an ongoing process. PMID:10573425

  4. Weakly Charged Cationic Nanoparticles Induce DNA Bending and Strand Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Railsback, Justin; Singh, Abhishek; Pearce, Ryan; McKnight, Timothy E; Collazo, Ramon; Sitar, Zlatko; Yingling, Yaroslava; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich

    2012-01-01

    The understanding of interactions between double stranded (ds) DNA and charged nanoparticles will have a broad bearing on many important applications from drug delivery [ 1 4 ] to DNAtemplated metallization. [ 5 , 6 ] Cationic nanoparticles (NPs) can bind to DNA, a negatively charged molecule, through a combination of electrostatic attraction, groove binding, and intercalation. Such binding events induce changes in the conformation of a DNA strand. In nature, DNA wraps around a cylindrical protein assembly (diameter and height of 6 nm) [ 7 ] with an 220 positive charge, [ 8 ] creating the complex known as chromatin. Wrapping and bending of DNA has also been achieved in the laboratory through the binding of highly charged species such as molecular assemblies, [ 9 , 10 ] cationic dendrimers, [ 11 , 12 ] and nanoparticles. [ 13 15 ] The charge of a nanoparticle plays a crucial role in its ability to induce DNA structural changes. If a nanoparticle has a highly positive surface charge density, the DNA is likely to wrap and bend upon binding to the nanoparticle [ 13 ] (as in the case of chromatin). On the other hand, if a nanoparticle is weakly charged it will not induce dsDNA compaction. [ 9 , 10 , 15 ] Consequently, there is a transition zone from extended to compact DNA conformations which depends on the chemical nature of the nanoparticle and occurs for polycations with charges between 5 and 10. [ 9 ] While the interactions between highly charged NPs and DNA have been extensively studied, the processes that occur within the transition zone are less explored.

  5. Genome-Wide Mapping of DNA Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Frédéric; Faucher, David; Bikond Nkoma, Geneviève; Grégoire, Marie-Chantal; Arguin, Mélina; Wellinger, Raymund J.; Boissonneault, Guylain

    2011-01-01

    Determination of cellular DNA damage has so far been limited to global assessment of genome integrity whereas nucleotide-level mapping has been restricted to specific loci by the use of specific primers. Therefore, only limited DNA sequences can be studied and novel regions of genomic instability can hardly be discovered. Using a well-characterized yeast model, we describe a straightforward strategy to map genome-wide DNA strand breaks without compromising nucleotide-level resolution. This technique, termed “damaged DNA immunoprecipitation” (dDIP), uses immunoprecipitation and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin end-labeling (TUNEL) to capture DNA at break sites. When used in combination with microarray or next-generation sequencing technologies, dDIP will allow researchers to map genome-wide DNA strand breaks as well as other types of DNA damage and to establish a clear profiling of altered genes and/or intergenic sequences in various experimental conditions. This mapping technique could find several applications for instance in the study of aging, genotoxic drug screening, cancer, meiosis, radiation and oxidative DNA damage. PMID:21364894

  6. Estimation of Prestress Force Distribution in the Multi-Strand System of Prestressed Concrete Structures.

    PubMed

    Cho, Keunhee; Park, Sung Yong; Cho, Jeong-Rae; Kim, Sung Tae; Park, Young-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Prestressed concrete (PSC) is one of the most reliable, durable and widely used construction materials, which overcomes the weakness of concrete in tension by the introduction of a prestress force. Smart strands enabling measurement of the prestress force have recently been developed to maintain PSC structures throughout their lifetime. However, the smart strand cannot give a representative indication of the whole prestress force when used in multi-strand systems since each strand sustains a different prestress force. In this paper, the actual distribution of the prestress force in a multi-strand system is examined using elastomagnetic (EM) sensors to develop a method for tracking representative indicators of the prestress force using smart strands. PMID:26083230

  7. Estimation of Prestress Force Distribution in the Multi-Strand System of Prestressed Concrete Structures

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Keunhee; Park, Sung Yong; Cho, Jeong-Rae; Kim, Sung Tae; Park, Young-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Prestressed concrete (PSC) is one of the most reliable, durable and widely used construction materials, which overcomes the weakness of concrete in tension by the introduction of a prestress force. Smart strands enabling measurement of the prestress force have recently been developed to maintain PSC structures throughout their lifetime. However, the smart strand cannot give a representative indication of the whole prestress force when used in multi-strand systems since each strand sustains a different prestress force. In this paper, the actual distribution of the prestress force in a multi-strand system is examined using elastomagnetic (EM) sensors to develop a method for tracking representative indicators of the prestress force using smart strands. PMID:26083230

  8. Selective binding of the estrogen receptor to one strand of the estrogen responsive element.

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, R

    1993-01-01

    The human estrogen receptor (hER) activates gene transcription by binding to cognate palindromic sequences called estrogen responsive elements (ERE). I used gel retardation assays and oligonucleotides containing the ERE from the Xenopus vitellogenin gene to study the interaction of the hER with the ERE. I observed that the hER bound to double-stranded ERE and to the single strand of the ERE that had T in the center with nearly equal affinity, but not to the strand which had A in the center. Interchanging the two central nucleotides changed the strand specificity. Binding of the hER to a single strand is extremely sensitive to temperature. Initial recognition of one of the two strands of the ERE may be involved in the binding of the hER to the ERE. Images PMID:8332462

  9. Rapidly advancing invasive endomyocardial aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Davutoglu, Vedat; Soydinc, Serdar; Aydin, Abdullah; Karakok, Metin

    2005-02-01

    The exposure to Aspergillus organisms/spores is likely common, but disease caused by tissue invasion with these fungi is uncommon and occurs primarily in the setting of immunosuppression. We report a case of rapidly advancing invasive endomyocardial aspergillosis secondary to prolonged usage of multiple broad-spectrum antibiotics in a nonimmunocompromised host. A 36-year-old cotton textile worker presented to our institution with a 3-month history of weight loss and fatigue. He reported receiving prolonged use of multiple broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment. The echocardiogram demonstrated multiple endomyocardial vegetations and a mass in the left atrium. Myocardial biopsy specimen revealed an invasive endomyocardial aspergillosis. The patient was investigated for immune deficiency including HIV, and this workup was negative. Treatment was started with amphotericin B and heparin for presumed left atrial thrombus. The patient died because of a rupture of mycotic aneurysm that resulted in cerebral hemorrhage. This case illustrates the risk of an invasive fungal infection in a nonimmunocompromised host who is a prolonged user of antibiotics in the setting of environmental exposure of opportunistic invasive fungal infections. PMID:15682058

  10. Switching from single-stranded to double-stranded DNA limits the unwinding processivity of ring-shaped T7 DNA helicase

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yong-Joo; Rajagopal, Vaishnavi; Patel, Smita S.

    2013-01-01

    Phage T7 helicase unwinds double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) by encircling one strand while excluding the complementary strand from its central channel. When T7 helicase translocates on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), it has kilobase processivity; yet, it is unable to processively unwind linear dsDNA, even 60 base-pairs long. Particularly, the GC-rich dsDNAs are unwound with lower amplitudes under single-turnover conditions. Here, we provide evidence that T7 helicase switches from ssDNA to dsDNA during DNA unwinding. The switching propensity is higher when dsDNA is GC-rich or when the 3′-overhang of forked DNA is <15 bases. Once helicase encircles dsDNA, it travels along dsDNA and dissociates from the end of linear DNA without strand separation, which explains the low unwinding amplitude of these substrates. Trapping the displaced strand with ssDNA binding protein or changing its composition to morpholino oligomer that does not interact with helicase increases the unwinding amplitude. We conclude that the displaced strand must be continuously excluded and kept away from the central channel for processive DNA unwinding. The finding that T7 helicase can switch from ssDNA to dsDNA binding mode during unwinding provides new insights into ways of limiting DNA unwinding and triggering fork regression when stalled forks need to be restarted. PMID:23446275

  11. Conversion of Topoisomerase I Cleavage Complexes on the Leading Strand of Ribosomal DNA into 5′-Phosphorylated DNA Double-Strand Breaks by Replication Runoff

    PubMed Central

    Strumberg, Dirk; Pilon, André A.; Smith, Melanie; Hickey, Robert; Malkas, Linda; Pommier, Yves

    2000-01-01

    Topoisomerase I cleavage complexes can be induced by a variety of DNA damages and by the anticancer drug camptothecin. We have developed a ligation-mediated PCR (LM-PCR) assay to analyze replication-mediated DNA double-strand breaks induced by topoisomerase I cleavage complexes in human colon carcinoma HT29 cells at the nucleotide level. We found that conversion of topoisomerase I cleavage complexes into replication-mediated DNA double-strand breaks was only detectable on the leading strand for DNA synthesis, which suggests an asymmetry in the way that topoisomerase I cleavage complexes are metabolized on the two arms of a replication fork. Extension by Taq DNA polymerase was not required for ligation to the LM-PCR primer, indicating that the 3′ DNA ends are extended by DNA polymerase in vivo closely to the 5′ ends of the topoisomerase I cleavage complexes. These findings suggest that the replication-mediated DNA double-strand breaks generated at topoisomerase I cleavage sites are produced by replication runoff. We also found that the 5′ ends of these DNA double-strand breaks are phosphorylated in vivo, which suggests that a DNA 5′ kinase activity acts on the double-strand ends generated by replication runoff. The replication-mediated DNA double-strand breaks were rapidly reversible after cessation of the topoisomerase I cleavage complexes, suggesting the existence of efficient repair pathways for removal of topoisomerase I-DNA covalent adducts in ribosomal DNA. PMID:10805740

  12. A comprehensive classification of nucleic acid structural families based on strand direction and base pairing.

    PubMed Central

    Lavery, R; Zakrzewska, K; Sun, J S; Harvey, S C

    1992-01-01

    We propose a classification of DNA structures formed from 1 to 4 strands, based only on relative strand directions, base to strand orientation and base pairing geometries. This classification and its associated notation enable all nucleic acids to be grouped into structural families and bring to light possible structures which have not yet been observed experimentally. It also helps in understanding transitions between families and can assist in the design of multistrand structures. PMID:1383936

  13. Structural features and molecular aggregations of designed triple-stranded β-sheets in single crystals.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Anupam; Misra, Rajkumar; Gopi, Hosahudya N

    2016-04-01

    Design, synthesis and single-crystal conformations of hybrid triple-stranded β-sheets composed of E-vinylogous residues are reported. Restricting conformational flexibility of β-strands through the insertion of carbon-carbon double bonds at facing positions leads to increased peptide crystallinity, which allowed unambiguous structural characterization of three-stranded β-sheets. This strategy can be further explored for the design of functional β-sheets. PMID:26980261

  14. Interpreting the spatio-temporal patterns of sea turtle strandings: Going with the flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, K.M.; Mooreside, P.; Crowder, L.B.

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of specific mortality sources is crucial for management of species that are vulnerable to human interactions. Beachcast carcasses represent an unknown fraction of at-sea mortalities. While a variety of physical (e.g., water temperature) and biological (e.g., decomposition) factors as well as the distribution of animals and their mortality sources likely affect the probability of carcass stranding, physical oceanography plays a major role in where and when carcasses strand. Here, we evaluate the influence of nearshore physical oceanographic and wind regimes on sea turtle strandings to decipher seasonal trends and make qualitative predictions about stranding patterns along oceanfront beaches. We use results from oceanic drift-bottle experiments to check our predictions and provide an upper limit on stranding proportions. We compare predicted current regimes from a 3D physical oceanographic model to spatial and temporal locations of both sea turtle carcass strandings and drift bottle landfalls. Drift bottle return rates suggest an upper limit for the proportion of sea turtle carcasses that strand (about 20%). In the South Atlantic Bight, seasonal development of along-shelf flow coincides with increased numbers of strandings of both turtles and drift bottles in late spring and early summer. The model also predicts net offshore flow of surface waters during winter - the season with the fewest relative strandings. The drift bottle data provide a reasonable upper bound on how likely carcasses are to reach land from points offshore and bound the general timeframe for stranding post-mortem (< two weeks). Our findings suggest that marine turtle strandings follow a seasonal regime predictable from physical oceanography and mimicked by drift bottle experiments. Managers can use these findings to reevaluate incidental strandings limits and fishery takes for both nearshore and offshore mortality sources. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd

  15. Invasive aspergillosis complicating Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Walsh, T J; Mendelsohn, G

    1981-08-01

    Patients with Cushing's syndrome are susceptible to opportunistic infections. Invasive fungal infections in patients with Cushing's syndrome caused by endogenous glucocorticoid excess rarely are reported, and aspergillosis occurring in this setting, to our knowledge, has not been described. Two patients with Cushing's syndrome and notably elevated levels of circulating cortisol had invasive aspergillosis develop. A patient with endogenous hypercortisolism caused by adrenal cortical carcinoma suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage from rupture of an Aspergillus mycotic aneurysm. The other patient, who had an adrenocorticotrophic hormone-producing prostatic carcinoma, had pulmonary and disseminated aspergillosis develop. Exogenous corticosteroids are known clinically and experimentally to facilitate disseminated aspergillosis. Endogenous hypercortisolism also may bae an important factor predisposing to invasive aspergillosis. PMID:7259386

  16. Structure-spectrophotometric selectivity relationship in interactions of quercetin related flavonoids with double stranded and single stranded RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piantanida, Ivo; Mašić, Lozika; Rusak, Gordana

    2009-04-01

    Interactions of five flavonoids with dsRNA and single stranded ssRNA were studied by UV/vis titrations. The results obtained supported the intercalative binding mode as a dominant interaction of studied flavonoids with dsRNA as well as major interaction with ssRNA. Furthermore, changes of the UV/vis spectra of flavonoids induced by addition of poly G or poly C, respectively, are significantly stronger than changes induced by double stranded poly G-poly C, pointing to essential role of the free poly G or poly C sequence (not hydrogen bonded in double helix). Exclusively poly G caused significant batochromic shift of the UV/vis maxima of all studied flavonoids, whereby the intensity of batochromic shift is nicely correlated to the number of OH groups of flavonoid. Unlikely to poly G, addition of poly A and poly U induced measurable changes only in the UV/vis spectra of flavonoids characterised by no OH (galangin) or three OH groups (myricetin) on the phenyl part of the molecule. Consequently, flavonoids with one- or two-OH groups on the phenyl part of the molecule (luteolin, fisetin, kaempferol) specifically differentiate between poly A, poly U (negligible changes in the UV/Vis spectra) and poly G (strong changes in the UV/Vis spectra) as well as poly C (moderate changes in the UV/Vis spectra).

  17. Looped Versus Single-Stranded Flexor Tendon Repairs: A Cadaveric Mechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Calfee, Ryan P.; Boone, Sean; Stepan, Jeffrey G.; Osei, Daniel A.; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Boyer, Martin I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the tensile properties of 4-strand modified Kessler flexor tendon repairs using a looped or single-stranded suture. Methods We evaluated the mechanical properties of 4-strand Kessler zone II core suture repairs using either looped or single-stranded suture in human flexor digitorum profundus and flexor pollicis longus tendons. Forty repairs were performed on tendons from bilateral cadaveric hands: 20 matched tendons were divided into equal groups of 3-0 looped and 3-0 single-strand repairs and 20 additional matched tendons were divided into equal groups of 4-0 looped and 4-0 single-strand repairs. Repaired tendons were tested in uniaxial tension to failure to determine mechanical properties and failure modes. Data were analyzed to determine the effect of repair type (ie, looped vs single-stranded) for each suture caliber (ie, 3-0 and 4-0). Results Single-strand repairs with 3-0 suture demonstrated a significantly greater maximum load to failure and a significantly higher force at 2-mm gap compared with repairs with looped 3-0 suture. All 8 looped repairs with 3-0 suture failed by suture pullout whereas 7 of 8 repairs with 3-0 single-stranded suture failed by suture breakage. The mechanical properties of looped versus single-stranded repairs with 4-0 caliber suture were not statistically different. Repairs with 4-0 caliber suture failed by suture breakage in 8 of 10 single-strand repairs and failed by suture pullout in 6 of 10 repairs with looped suture. Conclusions In a time-0 ex vivo human cadaveric core suture model, the mechanical properties of a 4-strand repair using 3-0 single-stranded suture were significantly better than the same 4-strand repair performed with looped suture. Clinical relevance Four-strand flexor tendon repairs with 3-0 suture are mechanically superior when performed with single-strand suture versus looped suture. PMID:25801581

  18. A Novel Computational Method to Reduce Leaky Reaction in DNA Strand Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Wang, Xun; Song, Tao; Lu, Wei; Chen, Zhihua; Shi, Xiaolong

    2015-01-01

    DNA strand displacement technique is widely used in DNA programming, DNA biosensors, and gene analysis. In DNA strand displacement, leaky reactions can cause DNA signals decay and detecting DNA signals fails. The mostly used method to avoid leakage is cleaning up after upstream leaky reactions, and it remains a challenge to develop reliable DNA strand displacement technique with low leakage. In this work, we address the challenge by experimentally evaluating the basic factors, including reaction time, ratio of reactants, and ion concentration to the leakage in DNA strand displacement. Specifically, fluorescent probes and a hairpin structure reporting DNA strand are designed to detect the output of DNA strand displacement, and thus can evaluate the leakage of DNA strand displacement reactions with different reaction time, ratios of reactants, and ion concentrations. From the obtained data, mathematical models for evaluating leakage are achieved by curve derivation. As a result, it is obtained that long time incubation, high concentration of fuel strand, and inappropriate amount of ion concentration can weaken leaky reactions. This contributes to a method to set proper reaction conditions to reduce leakage in DNA strand displacement. PMID:26491602

  19. The isolation of strand-specific nicking endonucleases from a randomized SapI expression library

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, James C.; Zhu, Zhenyu; Xu, Shuang-yong

    2004-01-01

    The Type IIS restriction endonuclease SapI recognizes the DNA sequence 5′-GCTCTTC-3′ (top strand by convention) and cleaves downstream (N1/N4) indicating top- and bottom-strand spacing, respectively. The asymmetric nature of DNA recognition presented the possibility that one, if not two, nicking variants might be created from SapI. To explore this possibility, two parallel selection procedures were designed to isolate either top-strand nicking or bottom-strand nicking variants from a randomly mutated SapI expression library. These procedures take advantage of a SapI substrate site designed into the expression plasmid, which allows for in vitro selection of plasmid clones possessing a site-specific and strand-specific nick. A procedure designed to isolate bottom-strand nicking enzymes yielded Nb.SapI-1 containing a critical R420I substitution near the end of the protein. The top-strand procedure yielded several SapI variants with a distinct preference for top-strand cleavage. Mutations present within the selected clones were segregated to confirm a top-strand nicking phenotype for single variants Q240R, E250K, G271R or K273R. The nature of the amino acid substitutions found in the selected variants provides evidence that SapI may possess two active sites per monomer. This work presents a framework for establishing the mechanism of SapI DNA cleavage. PMID:15247348

  20. Heterogeneity of the 3' end of minus-strand RNA in the poliovirus replicative form.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, O C; Ehrenfeld, E

    1980-01-01

    The 3' terminus of the strand (minus strand) complementary to poliovirion RNA (plus strand) has been examined to see whether this sequence extends to the 5'-nucleotide terminus of the plus strand, or whether minus-strand synthesis terminates prematurely, perhaps due to the presence of a nonreplicated nucleotide primer for initiation of plus-strand synthesis. The 3' terminus was labeled with 32P using [5'-32P]pCp and RNA ligase, and complete RNase digests were performed with RNases A, T1, and U2. 32P-oligonucleotides were analyzed for size by polyacrylamide-urea gel electrophoresis. The major oligonucleotide products formed were consistent with the minus strand containing 3' ends complementary and flush with the 5' end of the plus strand. However, a variable proportion of the isolated minus strands from different preparations were heterogeneous in length and appeared to differ from each other by the presence of one, two, or three 3'-terminal A residues. Images PMID:6253664

  1. A euryarchaeal histone modulates strand displacement synthesis by replicative DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Huang, Li

    2016-07-01

    Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota, the two main lineages of the domain Archaea, encode different chromatin proteins and differ in the use of replicative DNA polymerases. Crenarchaea possess a single family B DNA polymerase (PolB), which is capable of strand displacement modulated by the chromatin proteins Cren7 and Sul7d. Euryarchaea have two distinct replicative DNA polymerases, PolB and PolD, a family D DNA polymerase. Here we characterized the strand displacement activities of PolB and PolD from the hyperthermophilic euryarchaeon Pyrococcus furiosus and investigated the influence of HPfA1, a homolog of eukaryotic histones from P. furiosus, on these activities. We showed that both PolB and PolD were efficient in strand displacement. HPfA1 inhibited DNA strand displacement by both DNA polymerases but exhibited little effect on the displacement of a RNA strand annealed to single-stranded template DNA. This is consistent with the finding that HPfA1 bound more tightly to double-stranded DNA than to a RNA:DNA hybrid. Our results suggest that, although crenarchaea and euryarchaea differ in chromosomal packaging, they share similar mechanisms in modulating strand displacement by DNA polymerases during lagging strand DNA synthesis. PMID:27333783

  2. Workshop on effects of chromium coating on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor strand: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-12

    This report discusses the following topics: Chromium coating on superconductor strand -- an overview; technology of chromium plating; comparison of wires plated by different platers; search for chromium in copper; strand manufactures` presentations; chromium plating at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; a first look at a chromium plating process development project tailored for T.P.X. and I.T.E.R. strand; and influence of chromium diffusion and related phenomena on the reference ratios of bare and chromium plated Nb{sub 3}Sn strand.

  3. Isolation of invasive Plasmodium yoelii merozoites with a long half-life to evaluate invasion dynamics and potential invasion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mutungi, Joe Kimanthi; Yahata, Kazuhide; Sakaguchi, Miako; Kaneko, Osamu

    2015-11-01

    Malaria symptoms and pathogenesis are caused by blood stage parasite burdens of Plasmodium spp., for which invasion of red blood cells (RBCs) by merozoites is essential. Successful targeting by either drugs or vaccines directed against the whole merozoite or its antigens during its transient extracellular status would contribute to malaria control by impeding RBC invasion. To understand merozoite invasion biology and mechanisms, it is desired to obtain merozoites that retain their invasion activity in vitro. Accordingly, methods have been developed to isolate invasive Plasmodium knowlesi and Plasmodium falciparum merozoites. Rodent malaria parasite models offer ease in laboratory maintenance and experimental genetic modifications; however, no methods have been reported regarding isolation of high numbers of invasive rodent malaria merozoites. In this study, Plasmodium yoelii-infected RBCs were obtained from infected mice, and mature schizont-infected RBCs enriched via Histodenz™ density gradients. Merozoites retaining invasion activity were then isolated by passing the preparations through a filter membrane. RBC-invaded parasites developed to mature stages in vitro in a synchronous manner. Isolated merozoites were evaluated for retention of invasion activity following storage at different temperatures prior to incubation with uninfected mouse RBCs. Isolated merozoites retained their invasion activity 4h after isolation at 10 or 15 °C, whereas their invasion activity reduced to 0-10% within 30 min when incubated on ice or at 37 °C prior to RBC invasion assay. Images of merozoites at successive steps during RBC invasion were captured by light and transmission electron microscopy. Synthetic peptides derived from the amino acid sequence of the P. yoelii invasion protein RON2 efficiently inhibited RBC invasion. The developed method to isolate and keep invasive P. yoelii merozoites for up to 4h is a powerful tool to study the RBC invasion biology of this parasite

  4. Developments in Plant Negative-Strand RNA Virus Reverse Genetics.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Andrew O; Li, Zhenghe

    2016-08-01

    Twenty years ago, breakthroughs for reverse genetics analyses of negative-strand RNA (NSR) viruses were achieved by devising conditions for generation of infectious viruses in susceptible cells. Recombinant strategies have subsequently been engineered for members of all vertebrate NSR virus families, and research arising from these advances has profoundly increased understanding of infection cycles, pathogenesis, and complexities of host interactions of animal NSR viruses. These strategies also permitted development of many applications, including attenuated vaccines and delivery vehicles for therapeutic and biotechnology proteins. However, for a variety of reasons, it was difficult to devise procedures for reverse genetics analyses of plant NSR viruses. In this review, we discuss advances that have circumvented these problems and resulted in construction of a recombinant system for Sonchus yellow net nucleorhabdovirus. We also discuss possible extensions to other plant NSR viruses as well as the applications that may emanate from recombinant analyses of these pathogens. PMID:27359368

  5. How positive-strand RNA viruses benefit from autophagosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Richards, Alexsia L; Jackson, William T

    2013-09-01

    The autophagic degradation pathway is a powerful tool in the host cell arsenal against cytosolic pathogens. Contents trapped inside cytosolic vesicles, termed autophagosomes, are delivered to the lysosome for degradation. In spite of the degradative nature of the pathway, some pathogens are able to subvert autophagy for their benefit. In many cases, these pathogens have developed strategies to induce the autophagic signaling pathway while inhibiting the associated degradation activity. One surprising finding from recent literature is that some viruses do not impede degradation but instead promote the generation of degradative autolysosomes, which are the endpoint compartments of autophagy. Dengue virus, poliovirus, and hepatitis C virus, all positive-strand RNA viruses, utilize the maturation of autophagosomes into acidic and ultimately degradative compartments to promote their replication. While the benefits that each virus reaps from autophagosome maturation are unique, the parallels between the viruses indicate a complex relationship between cytosolic viruses and host cell degradation vesicles. PMID:23760248

  6. Nuclear Proteins Hijacked by Mammalian Cytoplasmic Plus Strand RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups. PMID:25818028

  7. In-flight rescue of stranded TDRS-1 spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeichel, H.; Ehlers, B. J.

    On April 4, 1983, the first Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS-1), one of six to be built for SPACECOM and NASA, was launched by the Space Shuttle Challenger. During the ascent to geosynchronous orbit, the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) booster malfunctioned, leaving TDRS stranded in a low, elliptical orbit. This report describes the amazing satellite recovery from a wild tumble and the dramatic three-month rescue effort to move TDRS into synchronous orbit. It took a total burn time of 44 hours from a pair of tiny one-pound thrusters, about 800 pounds of propellant, an adaptable, robust attitude control system and much resourcefulness from ground operators to accomplish this feat. TDRS-1 reached its proper earth orbit on June 29, 1983 and then began its ten-year mission as a data relay satellite.

  8. DNA double-strand break repair inhibitors as cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Mrinal; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2015-01-22

    Among DNA damages, double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most harmful lesions to a cell. Failure in DSB repair could lead to genomic instability and cancer. Homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) are major DSB repair pathways in higher eukaryotes. It is known that expression of DSB repair genes is altered in various cancers. Activation of DSB repair genes is one of the reasons for chemo- and radioresistance. Therefore, targeting DSB repair is an attractive strategy to eliminate cancer. Besides, therapeutic agents introduce breaks in the genome as an intermediate. Therefore, blocking the residual repair using inhibitors can potentiate the efficacy of cancer treatment. In this review, we discuss the importance of targeting DSB repair pathways for the treatment of cancer. Recent advances in the development of DSB repair inhibitors and their clinical relevance are also addressed. PMID:25579208

  9. Catalysts of DNA Strand Cleavage at Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Sites.

    PubMed

    Minko, Irina G; Jacobs, Aaron C; de Leon, Arnie R; Gruppi, Francesca; Donley, Nathan; Harris, Thomas M; Rizzo, Carmelo J; McCullough, Amanda K; Lloyd, R Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are constantly formed in cellular DNA due to instability of the glycosidic bond, particularly at purines and various oxidized, alkylated, or otherwise damaged nucleobases. AP sites are also generated by DNA glycosylases that initiate DNA base excision repair. These lesions represent a significant block to DNA replication and are extremely mutagenic. Some DNA glycosylases possess AP lyase activities that nick the DNA strand at the deoxyribose moiety via a β- or β,δ-elimination reaction. Various amines can incise AP sites via a similar mechanism, but this non-enzymatic cleavage typically requires high reagent concentrations. Herein, we describe a new class of small molecules that function at low micromolar concentrations as both β- and β,δ-elimination catalysts at AP sites. Structure-activity relationships have established several characteristics that appear to be necessary for the formation of an iminium ion intermediate that self-catalyzes the elimination at the deoxyribose ring. PMID:27363485

  10. Photoactivated uranyl ion produces single strand breaks in plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    George, Shannon A; Whittaker, Aaron M; Stearns, Diane M

    2011-11-21

    Uranium is an important emerging toxicant whose use has outpaced the rate at which we are learning about its health effects. One unexplored pathway for uranium toxicity involves the photoactivation of uranyl ion by UV light to produce U(5+) and oxygen radicals. The purpose of this study was to provide proof of principle data by testing the hypothesis that coexposures of DNA to uranyl acetate and UVB irradiation should produce more DNA strand breaks than individual exposures. Results supported the hypothesis and suggest that investigations of uranium toxicity be expanded to include skin as a potential target organ for carcinogenesis, especially in populations with high uranium and high UV radiation exposures. PMID:22013951

  11. Spontaneous Formation of RNA Strands, Peptidyl RNA, and Cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Jauker, Mario; Griesser, Helmut; Richert, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    How the biochemical machinery evolved from simple precursors is an open question. Here we show that ribonucleotides and amino acids condense to peptidyl RNAs in the absence of enzymes under conditions established for genetic copying. Untemplated formation of RNA strands that can encode genetic information, formation of peptidyl chains linked to RNA, and formation of the cofactors NAD+, FAD, and ATP all occur under the same conditions. In the peptidyl RNAs, the peptide chains are phosphoramidate-linked to a ribonucleotide. Peptidyl RNAs with long peptide chains were selected from an initial pool when a lipophilic phase simulating the interior of membranes was offered, and free peptides were released upon acidification. Our results show that key molecules of genetics, catalysis, and metabolism can emerge under the same conditions, without a mineral surface, without an enzyme, and without the need for chemical pre-activation. PMID:26435376

  12. Catalysts of DNA Strand Cleavage at Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Minko, Irina G.; Jacobs, Aaron C.; de Leon, Arnie R.; Gruppi, Francesca; Donley, Nathan; Harris, Thomas M.; Rizzo, Carmelo J.; McCullough, Amanda K.; Lloyd, R. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are constantly formed in cellular DNA due to instability of the glycosidic bond, particularly at purines and various oxidized, alkylated, or otherwise damaged nucleobases. AP sites are also generated by DNA glycosylases that initiate DNA base excision repair. These lesions represent a significant block to DNA replication and are extremely mutagenic. Some DNA glycosylases possess AP lyase activities that nick the DNA strand at the deoxyribose moiety via a β- or β,δ-elimination reaction. Various amines can incise AP sites via a similar mechanism, but this non-enzymatic cleavage typically requires high reagent concentrations. Herein, we describe a new class of small molecules that function at low micromolar concentrations as both β- and β,δ-elimination catalysts at AP sites. Structure-activity relationships have established several characteristics that appear to be necessary for the formation of an iminium ion intermediate that self-catalyzes the elimination at the deoxyribose ring. PMID:27363485

  13. Carbon-negative Fuel from Stranded Energy with Carbon Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Vechten, James; Graupner, Robert

    2010-03-01

    Stranded energy can be captured as nitrogen based fuels (ammonia, urea, guanidine) produced from hydrogen from saltwater electrolysis. The use of electrodialysis enables the co-production of NaOH(aq) and HCl(aq) together with oxygen and hydrogen. The NaOH can capture atmospheric CO2 as sodium carbonate or sodium bicarbonate and together with HCl and basaltic local rocks can produce a range of valuable commodity chemicals. Depending on the form of the sequestered carbon, either 2 or 4 moles of CO2 can be captured for each mole of hydrogen gas produced. The nitrogen based fuels can be used to power conventional thermal engines or solid oxide fuel cells. They can also be used as fertilizers, thereby avoiding the release of CO2 during their conventional production using natural gas or coal. With care the produced NaOH or carbonates may be used to counter ocean acidification

  14. UV-Induced Proton Transfer between DNA Strands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuyuan; de La Harpe, Kimberly; Beckstead, Ashley A; Improta, Roberto; Kohler, Bern

    2015-06-10

    UV radiation creates excited states in DNA that lead to mutagenic photoproducts. Photoexcitation of single-stranded DNA can transfer an electron between stacked bases, but the fate of excited states in the double helix has been intensely debated. Here, photoinduced interstrand proton transfer (PT) triggered by intrastrand electron transfer (ET) is detected for the first time by time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy and quantum mechanical calculations. Long-lived excited states are shown to be oppositely charged base pair radical ions. In two of the duplexes, the base pair radical anions are present as tautomers formed by interstrand PT. Charge recombination occurs on the picosecond time scale preventing the accumulation of damaging radicals or mutagenic tautomers. PMID:26005794

  15. Do DNA Double-Strand Breaks Drive Aging?

    PubMed

    White, Ryan R; Vijg, Jan

    2016-09-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are rare, but highly toxic, lesions requiring orchestrated and conserved machinery to prevent adverse consequences, such as cell death and cancer-causing genome structural mutations. DSBs trigger the DNA damage response (DDR) that directs a cell to repair the break, undergo apoptosis, or become senescent. There is increasing evidence that the various endpoints of DSB processing by different cells and tissues are part of the aging phenotype, with each stage of the DDR associated with specific aging pathologies. In this Perspective, we discuss the possibility that DSBs are major drivers of intrinsic aging, highlighting the dynamics of spontaneous DSBs in relation to aging, the distinct age-related pathologies induced by DSBs, and the segmental progeroid phenotypes in humans and mice with genetic defects in DSB repair. A model is presented as to how DSBs could drive some of the basic mechanisms underlying age-related functional decline and death. PMID:27588601

  16. RNA-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun-Gui; Qi, Yijun

    2015-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most deleterious DNA lesions, which if unrepaired or repaired incorrectly can cause cell death or genome instability that may lead to cancer. To counteract these adverse consequences, eukaryotes have evolved a highly orchestrated mechanism to repair DSBs, namely DNA-damage-response (DDR). DDR, as defined specifically in relation to DSBs, consists of multi-layered regulatory modes including DNA damage sensors, transducers and effectors, through which DSBs are sensed and then repaired via DNAprotein interactions. Unexpectedly, recent studies have revealed a direct role of RNA in the repair of DSBs, including DSB-induced small RNA (diRNA)-directed and RNA-templated DNA repair. Here, we summarize the recent discoveries of RNA-mediated regulation of DSB repair and discuss the potential impact of these novel RNA components of the DSB repair pathway on genomic stability and plasticity. PMID:25960340

  17. Membranous replication factories induced by plus-strand RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Romero-Brey, Inés; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2014-07-01

    In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the membranous replication factories of members of plus-strand (+) RNA viruses. We discuss primarily the architecture of these complex membrane rearrangements, because this topic emerged in the last few years as electron tomography has become more widely available. A general denominator is that two "morphotypes" of membrane alterations can be found that are exemplified by flaviviruses and hepaciviruses: membrane invaginations towards the lumen of the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) and double membrane vesicles, representing extrusions also originating from the ER, respectively. We hypothesize that either morphotype might reflect common pathways and principles that are used by these viruses to form their membranous replication compartments. PMID:25054883

  18. Stranded Whole Transcriptome RNA-Seq for All RNA Types

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Pearlly X.; Fang, Fang; Buechlein, Aaron; Ford, James B.; Tang, Haixu; Huang, Tim H.; Burow, Matthew E.; Liu, Yunlong; Rusch, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    Stranded whole transcriptome RNA-Seq described in this unit captures quantitative expression data for all types of RNA including, but not limited to miRNA (microRNA), piRNA (Piwi-interacting RNA), snoRNA (small nucleolar RNA), lincRNA (large non-coding intergenic RNA), SRP RNA (signal recognition particle RNA), tRNA (transfer RNA), mtRNA (mitochondrial RNA) and mRNA (messenger RNA). The size and nature of these types of RNA are irrelevant to the approach described here. Barcoded libraries for multiplexing on the Illumina platform are generated with this approach but it can be applied to other platforms with a few modifications. PMID:25599667

  19. Current-voltage characteristics of double-strand DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerril, L. M.; Moreira, D. A.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Fulco, U. L.; de Oliveira, E. L.; de Sousa, J. S.

    2009-09-01

    We use a tight-binding formulation to investigate the transmissivity and the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of sequences of double-strand DNA molecules. In order to reveal the relevance of the underlying correlations in the nucleotides distribution, we compare the results for the genomic DNA sequence with those of artificial sequences (the long-range correlated Fibonacci and Rudin-Shapiro one) and a random sequence, which is a kind of prototype of a short-range correlated system. The random sequence is presented here with the same first neighbors pair correlations of the human DNA sequence. We found that the long-range character of the correlations is important to the transmissivity spectra, although the I-V curves seem to be mostly influenced by the short-range correlations.

  20. Two separable functions of Ctp1 in the early steps of meiotic DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lijuan; Milman, Neta; Nambiar, Mridula; Smith, Gerald R.

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic programmed DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is essential for crossing-over and viable gamete formation and requires removal of Spo11-oligonucleotide complexes from 5′ ends (clipping) and their resection to generate invasive 3′-end single-stranded DNA (resection). Ctp1 (Com1, Sae2, CtIP homolog) acting with the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex is required in both steps. We isolated multiple S. pombe ctp1 mutants deficient in clipping but proficient in resection during meiosis. Remarkably, all of the mutations clustered in or near the conserved CxxC or RHR motif in the C-terminal portion. The mutants tested, like ctp1Δ, were clipping-deficient by both genetic and physical assays­. But, unlike ctp1Δ, these mutants were recombination-proficient for Rec12 (Spo11 homolog)-independent break-repair and resection-proficient by physical assay. We conclude that the intracellular Ctp1 C-terminal portion is essential for clipping, while the N-terminal portion is sufficient for DSB end-resection. This conclusion agrees with purified human CtIP resection and endonuclease activities being independent. Our mutants provide intracellular evidence for separable functions of Ctp1. Some mutations truncate Ctp1 in the same region as one of the CtIP mutations linked to the Seckel and Jawad severe developmental syndromes, suggesting that these syndromes are caused by a lack of clipping at DSB ends that require repair. PMID:26130711

  1. Dynamics of single-stranded DNA tethered to a solid.

    PubMed

    Radiom, Milad; Paul, Mark R; Ducker, William A

    2016-06-24

    Tethering is used to deliver specific biological and industrial functions. For example, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is tethered to polymerases and long sequences of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) during replication, and to solids in DNA microarrays. However, tethering ssDNA to a large object limits not only the available ssDNA conformations, but also the range of time-scales over which the mechanical responses of ssDNA are important. In this work we examine the effect of tethering by measurement of the mechanical response of ssDNA that is tethered at each end to two separate atomic force microscope cantilevers in aqueous solution. Thermal motion of the cantilevers drives the ends of the ssDNA chain at frequencies near 2 kHz. The presence of a tethered molecule makes a large difference to the asymmetric cross-correlation of two cantilevers, which enables resolution of the mechanical properties in our experiments. By analysis of the correlated motion of the cantilevers we extract the friction and stiffness of the ssDNA. We find that the measured friction is much larger than the friction that is usually associated with the unencumbered motion of ssDNA. We also find that the measured relaxation time, ∼30 μs, is much greater than prior measurements of the free-molecule relaxation time. We attribute the difference to the loss of conformational possibilities as a result of constraining the ends of the ssDNA. PMID:27176643

  2. Unwinding of double-stranded DNA helix by dehydration.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C H; Mizusawa, H; Kakefuda, T

    1981-01-01

    Conformation changes of the double-stranded DNA helix in response to dehydration were investigated by monitoring, by agarose gel electrophoresis, the linking number of covalently closed circular DNA generated by ligation of linear DNA in the presence of different organic solvents or different temperatures. It was found that: (i) The DNA helix unwinds upon addition of certain organic solvents or elevation of temperature. (ii) The conformational change observed under the experimental conditions is a continuous process in response to the organic solvent concentration. (iii) The delta H of unwinding one linking of the DNA helix is constant at approximately 12.2 +/- 0.4 kcal/mol (1 kcal = 4.184 kJ); the corresponding delta S and d(delta S)/dn are 2nkR and 2kR, in which n is the relative equivalent linking number (referred to the state of delta S = 0 for unwinding) of the DNA, R is the gas constant, and k is equal to 1117/number of base pairs. The delta H, delta S, and d(delta S)/dn for unwinding i linkings are i X 12.2 kcal/mol, 2inkR, and 2ikR, respectively. (iv) d(delta S)/dn, like k, is inversely proportional to the number of base pairs in DNA. (v) Double-stranded DNAs of different chain lengths have average delta S = 35 cal/mol.K for unwinding one linking under the experimental conditions; this corresponds to 127 +/- 14 base pairs per "relative linking." Images PMID:7019913

  3. Non-Specific Blocking of miR-17-5p Guide Strand in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cells by Amplifying Passenger Strand Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yuan-Yuan; Andrade, Jade; Wickstrom, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom holds that only one of the two strands in a micro ribonucleic acid (miRNA) precursor duplex is selected as the active miRNA guide strand. The complementary miRNA passenger strand, however, is thought to be inactive. High levels of the oncogenic miRNA (oncomiR) guide strand called miR-17-5p is overexpressed in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) and can inhibit ribosomal translation of tumor suppressor gene mRNAs, such as programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) or phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). We hypothesized that knocking down the oncogenic microRNA (oncomiR) miR-17-5p might restore the expression levels of PDCD4 and PTEN tumor suppressor proteins, illustrating a route to oligonucleotide therapy of TNBC. Contrary to conventional wisdom, antisense knockdown of oncomiR miR-17-5p guide strand reduced PDCD4 and PTEN proteins by 1.8±0.3 fold in human TNBC cells instead of raising them. Bioinformatics analysis and folding energy calculations revealed that mRNA targets of miR-17-5p guide strand, such as PDCD4 and PTEN, could also be regulated by miR-17-3p passenger strand. Due to high sequence homology between the antisense molecules and miR-17-3p passenger strand, as well as the excess binding sites for the passenger strand on the 3’UTR of PDCD4 and PTEN mRNAs, introducing a miR-17-3p DNA-LNA mimic to knock down miR-17-5p reduced PDCD4 and PTEN protein expression instead of raising them. Our results imply that therapeutic antisense sequences against miRNAs should be designed to target the miRNA strand with the greatest number of putative binding sites in the target mRNAs, while minimizing affinity for the minor strand. PMID:26629823

  4. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Emmanuel, Sam; Moscarelli, Marco; Murana, Giacomo; Caccamo, Giuseppa; Bertolino, Emanuela Clara; Nasso, Giuseppe; Speziale, Giuseppe; Fattouch, Khalil

    2016-09-01

    Aortic valve disease is a prevalent disorder that affects approximately 2% of the general adult population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the gold standard treatment for symptomatic patients. This treatment has demonstrably proven to be both safe and effective. Over the last few decades, in an attempt to reduce surgical trauma, different minimally invasive approaches for aortic valve replacement have been developed and are now being increasingly utilized. A narrative review of the literature was carried out to describe the surgical techniques for minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and report the results from different experienced centers. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is associated with low perioperative morbidity, mortality and a low conversion rate to full sternotomy. Long-term survival appears to be at least comparable to that reported for conventional full sternotomy. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery, either with a partial upper sternotomy or a right anterior minithoracotomy provides early- and long-term benefits. Given these benefits, it may be considered the standard of care for isolated aortic valve disease. PMID:27582764

  5. Biological Warfare in Invasive Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alliaria petiolata (garlic mustard) is an invasive species in temperate forests throughout North America that has led to a decrease in species diversity and alterations in nutrient cycling. Garlic mustard produces an arsenal of secondary chemicals in the glucosinolate family that have strong biocid...

  6. Non-invasive physiological measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rolfe, P.

    1983-01-01

    This book discusses the diagnostic techniques of nondestructive type for monitoring the physiology of various organ systems. The topics covered are: non-invasive assessment of gastric activity; uterine activity, intestinal activity; monitoring of fetal cardiovascular system and bilirubin physiology of infants. Respiratory system of infants is monitored and ultrasonography of heart is discussed.

  7. Vaccines against invasive Salmonella disease

    PubMed Central

    MacLennan, Calman A; Martin, Laura B; Micoli, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Though primarily enteric pathogens, Salmonellae are responsible for a considerable yet under-appreciated global burden of invasive disease. In South and South-East Asia, this manifests as enteric fever caused by serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A. In sub-Saharan Africa, a similar disease burden results from invasive nontyphoidal Salmonellae, principally serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. The existing Ty21a live-attenuated and Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccines target S. Typhi and are not effective in young children where the burden of invasive Salmonella disease is highest. After years of lack of investment in new Salmonella vaccines, recent times have seen increased interest in the area led by emerging-market manufacturers, global health vaccine institutes and academic partners. New glycoconjugate vaccines against S. Typhi are becoming available with similar vaccines against other invasive serovars in development. With other new vaccines under investigation, including live-attenuated, protein-based and GMMA vaccines, now is an exciting time for the Salmonella vaccine field. PMID:24804797

  8. Invasive aspergillosis in primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Almyroudis, N G; Holland, S M; Segal, B H

    2005-05-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are rare and usually first manifest during childhood. Invasive aspergillosis is the leading cause of mortality in chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), reflecting the key role of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase in host defense against opportunistic fungi. Despite interferon-gamma prophylaxis, invasive filamentous fungal infections are a persistent problem in CGD. Key principles of management of fungal infections involve early recognition and aggressive treatment and appropriate surgical debridement of localized disease. Because CGD is a disorder of phagocyte stem cells in which the gene defects are well defined, it is a model disease to evaluate immune reconstitution through stem cell transplantation and gene therapy. Patients with the hyper-IgE syndrome with recurrent infections (Job syndrome) are prone to colonization of lung cavities (pneumatoceles) by Aspergillus species leading to local invasion and rarely disseminated infection. Other primary phagocytic disorders, T-cell disorders, and mitochondrial disorders are uncommonly associated with invasive aspergillosis. Taken together, these rare primary immunodeficiencies highlight the complex coordination of both innate and acquired pathways mediating host defense against Aspergillus infection. PMID:16110817

  9. Evolutionary origins of invasive populations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Carol Eunmi; Gelembiuk, Gregory William

    2008-01-01

    What factors shape the evolution of invasive populations? Recent theoretical and empirical studies suggest that an evolutionary history of disturbance might be an important factor. This perspective presents hypotheses regarding the impact of disturbance on the evolution of invasive populations, based on a synthesis of the existing literature. Disturbance might select for life-history traits that are favorable for colonizing novel habitats, such as rapid population growth and persistence. Theoretical results suggest that disturbance in the form of fluctuating environments might select for organismal flexibility, or alternatively, the evolution of evolvability. Rapidly fluctuating environments might favor organismal flexibility, such as broad tolerance or plasticity. Alternatively, longer fluctuations or environmental stress might lead to the evolution of evolvability by acting on features of the mutation matrix. Once genetic variance is generated via mutations, temporally fluctuating selection across generations might promote the accumulation and maintenance of genetic variation. Deeper insights into how disturbance in native habitats affects evolutionary and physiological responses of populations would give us greater capacity to predict the populations that are most likely to tolerate or adapt to novel environments during habitat invasions. Moreover, we would gain fundamental insights into the evolutionary origins of invasive populations. PMID:25567726

  10. Advertising and Invasion of Privacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohrer, Daniel Morgan

    The right of privacy as it relates to advertising and the use of a person's name or likeness is discussed in this paper. After an introduction that traces some of the history of invasion of privacy in court decisions, the paper examines cases involving issues such as public figures and newsworthy items, right of privacy waived, right of privacy…

  11. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Emmanuel, Sam; Moscarelli, Marco; Murana, Giacomo; Caccamo, Giuseppa; Bertolino, Emanuela Clara; Nasso, Giuseppe; Speziale, Giuseppe; Fattouch, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve disease is a prevalent disorder that affects approximately 2% of the general adult population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the gold standard treatment for symptomatic patients. This treatment has demonstrably proven to be both safe and effective. Over the last few decades, in an attempt to reduce surgical trauma, different minimally invasive approaches for aortic valve replacement have been developed and are now being increasingly utilized. A narrative review of the literature was carried out to describe the surgical techniques for minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and report the results from different experienced centers. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is associated with low perioperative morbidity, mortality and a low conversion rate to full sternotomy. Long-term survival appears to be at least comparable to that reported for conventional full sternotomy. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery, either with a partial upper sternotomy or a right anterior minithoracotomy provides early- and long-term benefits. Given these benefits, it may be considered the standard of care for isolated aortic valve disease. PMID:27582764

  12. Hybridization increases invasive knotweed success

    PubMed Central

    Parepa, Madalin; Fischer, Markus; Krebs, Christine; Bossdorf, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Hybridization is one of the fundamental mechanisms by which rapid evolution can occur in exotic species. If hybrids show increased vigour, this could significantly contribute to invasion success. Here, we compared the success of the two invasive knotweeds, Fallopia japonica and F. sachalinensis, and their hybrid, F. × bohemica, in competing against experimental communities of native plants. Using plant material from multiple clones of each taxon collected across a latitudinal gradient in Central Europe, we found that knotweed hybrids performed significantly better in competition with a native community and that they more strongly reduced the growth of the native plants. One of the parental species, F. sachalinensis, regenerated significantly less well from rhizomes, and this difference disappeared if activated carbon was added to the substrate, which suggests allelopathic inhibition of F. sachalinensis regeneration by native plants. We found substantial within-taxon variation in competitive success in all knotweed taxa, but variation was generally greatest in the hybrid. Interestingly, there was also significant variation within the genetically uniform F. japonica, possibly reflecting epigenetic differences. Our study shows that invasive knotweed hybrids are indeed more competitive than their parents and that hybridization increased the invasiveness of the exotic knotweed complex. PMID:24665343

  13. Next-generation bis-locked nucleic acids with stacking linker and 2′-glycylamino-LNA show enhanced DNA invasion into supercoiled duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Geny, Sylvain; Moreno, Pedro M. D.; Krzywkowski, Tomasz; Gissberg, Olof; Andersen, Nicolai K.; Isse, Abdirisaq J.; El-Madani, Amro M.; Lou, Chenguang; Pabon, Y. Vladimir; Anderson, Brooke A.; Zaghloul, Eman M.; Zain, Rula; Hrdlicka, Patrick J.; Jørgensen, Per T.; Nilsson, Mats; Lundin, Karin E.; Pedersen, Erik B.; Wengel, Jesper; Smith, C. I. Edvard

    2016-01-01

    Targeting and invading double-stranded DNA with synthetic oligonucleotides under physiological conditions remain a challenge. Bis-locked nucleic acids (bisLNAs) are clamp-forming oligonucleotides able to invade into supercoiled DNA via combined Hoogsteen and Watson–Crick binding. To improve the bisLNA design, we investigated its mechanism of binding. Our results suggest that bisLNAs bind via Hoogsteen-arm first, followed by Watson–Crick arm invasion, initiated at the tail. Based on this proposed hybridization mechanism, we designed next-generation bisLNAs with a novel linker able to stack to adjacent nucleobases, a new strategy previously not applied for any type of clamp-constructs. Although the Hoogsteen-arm limits the invasion, upon incorporation of the stacking linker, bisLNA invasion is significantly more efficient than for non-clamp, or nucleotide-linker containing LNA-constructs. Further improvements were obtained by substituting LNA with 2′-glycylamino-LNA, contributing a positive charge. For regular bisLNAs a 14-nt tail significantly enhances invasion. However, when two stacking linkers were incorporated, tail-less bisLNAs were able to efficiently invade. Finally, successful targeting of plasmids inside bacteria clearly demonstrates that strand invasion can take place in a biologically relevant context. PMID:26857548

  14. Next-generation bis-locked nucleic acids with stacking linker and 2'-glycylamino-LNA show enhanced DNA invasion into supercoiled duplexes.

    PubMed

    Geny, Sylvain; Moreno, Pedro M D; Krzywkowski, Tomasz; Gissberg, Olof; Andersen, Nicolai K; Isse, Abdirisaq J; El-Madani, Amro M; Lou, Chenguang; Pabon, Y Vladimir; Anderson, Brooke A; Zaghloul, Eman M; Zain, Rula; Hrdlicka, Patrick J; Jørgensen, Per T; Nilsson, Mats; Lundin, Karin E; Pedersen, Erik B; Wengel, Jesper; Smith, C I Edvard

    2016-03-18

    Targeting and invading double-stranded DNA with synthetic oligonucleotides under physiological conditions remain a challenge. Bis-locked nucleic acids (bisLNAs) are clamp-forming oligonucleotides able to invade into supercoiled DNA via combined Hoogsteen and Watson-Crick binding. To improve the bisLNA design, we investigated its mechanism of binding. Our results suggest that bisLNAs bind via Hoogsteen-arm first, followed by Watson-Crick arm invasion, initiated at the tail. Based on this proposed hybridization mechanism, we designed next-generation bisLNAs with a novel linker able to stack to adjacent nucleobases, a new strategy previously not applied for any type of clamp-constructs. Although the Hoogsteen-arm limits the invasion, upon incorporation of the stacking linker, bisLNA invasion is significantly more efficient than for non-clamp, or nucleotide-linker containing LNA-constructs. Further improvements were obtained by substituting LNA with 2'-glycylamino-LNA, contributing a positive charge. For regular bisLNAs a 14-nt tail significantly enhances invasion. However, when two stacking linkers were incorporated, tail-less bisLNAs were able to efficiently invade. Finally, successful targeting of plasmids inside bacteria clearly demonstrates that strand invasion can take place in a biologically relevant context. PMID:26857548

  15. Invasive rodent eradication on islands.

    PubMed

    Howald, Gregg; Donlan, C Josh; Galván, Juan Pablo; Russell, James C; Parkes, John; Samaniego, Araceli; Wang, Yiwei; Veitch, Dick; Genovesi, Piero; Pascal, Michel; Saunders, Alan; Tershy, Bernie

    2007-10-01

    Invasive mammals are the greatest threat to island biodiversity and invasive rodents are likely responsible for the greatest number of extinctions and ecosystem changes. Techniques for eradicating rodents from islands were developed over 2 decades ago. Since that time there has been a significant development and application of this conservation tool. We reviewed the literature on invasive rodent eradications to assess its current state and identify actions to make it more effective. Worldwide, 332 successful rodent eradications have been undertaken; we identified 35 failed eradications and 20 campaigns of unknown result. Invasive rodents have been eradicated from 284 islands (47,628 ha). With the exception of two small islands, rodenticides were used in all eradication campaigns. Brodifacoum was used in 71% of campaigns and 91% of the total area treated. The most frequent rodenticide distribution methods (from most to least) are bait stations, hand broadcasting, and aerial broadcasting. Nevertheless, campaigns using aerial broadcast made up 76% of the total area treated. Mortality of native vertebrates due to nontarget poisoning has been documented, but affected species quickly recover to pre-eradication population levels or higher. A variety of methods have been developed to mitigate nontarget impacts, and applied research can further aid in minimizing impacts. Land managers should routinely remove invasive rodents from islands <100 ha that lack vertebrates susceptible to nontarget poisoning. For larger islands and those that require nontarget mitigation, expert consultation and greater planning effort are needed. With the exception of house mice (Mus musculus), island size may no longer be the limiting factor for rodent eradications; rather, social acceptance and funding may be the main challenges. To be successful, large-scale rodent campaigns should be integrated with programs to improve the livelihoods of residents, island biosecurity, and reinvasion response

  16. LOUISIANA EXOTIC INVASIVE SPECIES SYMPOSIUM MX964256

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Louisiana Exotic Invasive Species Symposium will provide a multi-state collaboration among agency representatives, scientists, and the affected public to address the problem of exotic invasive species and to improve coastal environmental conditions in Louisiana.

  17. 77 FR 2958 - Prestressed Concrete Steel Wire Strand From Thailand: Correction to Notice of Opportunity To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ...; Opportunity To Request Administrative Review, 77 FR 83 (January 3, 2012). Subsequent to this publication, we... International Trade Administration Prestressed Concrete Steel Wire Strand From Thailand: Correction to Notice of... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on prestressed concrete steel wire strand (``PC...

  18. Selective bypass of a lagging strand roadblock by the eukaryotic replicative DNA helicase

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yu V.; Yardimci, Hasan; Long, David T.; Ho, The Vinh; Guainazzi, Angelo; Bermudez, Vladimir P.; Hurwitz, Jerard; van Oijen, Antoine; Schärer, Orlando D.; Walter, Johannes C.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The eukaryotic replicative DNA helicase, CMG, unwinds DNA by an unknown mechanism. In some models, CMG encircles and translocates along one strand of DNA while excluding the other strand. In others, CMG encircles and translocates along duplex DNA. To distinguish between these models, replisomes were confronted with strand-specific DNA roadblocks in Xenopus egg extracts. A ssDNA translocase should stall at an obstruction on the translocation strand but not the excluded strand, whereas a dsDNA translocase should stall at obstructions on either strand. We found that replisomes bypass large roadblocks on the lagging strand template much more readily than on the leading strand template. Our results indicate that CMG is a 3′ to 5′ ssDNA translocase, consistent with unwinding via “steric exclusion”. Given that MCM2-7 encircles dsDNA in G1, the data imply that formation of CMG in S phase involves remodeling of MCM2-7 from a dsDNA to a ssDNA binding mode. PMID:21925316

  19. Extrachromosomal DNA of pea (Pisum sativum) root-tip cells replicates by strand displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Krimer, D.B.; Van't Hof, J.

    1983-04-01

    In cultured pea roots there is extrachromosomal DNA associated with cells that differentiate from the G/sub 2/ phase of the cell cycle that is absent from those that differentiate from the G/sub 1/ phase. The authors examined this extrachromosomal DNA by electron microscopy and found that it consisted of three types: (i) double-stranded linear molecules with single-stranded branches (74%), (ii) double-stranded molecules without branches (26%), and (iii) free single-stranded molecules. The double-stranded molecules with or without branches were similar in length, having a modal length of 10-15 ..mu..m. The free single-stranded molecules were shorter and had a mean length of 3.8 ..mu..m. The length of the branches attached to the duplex molecules was only slightly less than that of the free form. The duplex molecules with branches were interpreted as configurations reflecting an ongoing strand-displacement process that results in free single-stranded molecules. Finally, measurements on duplex molecules with multiple branches suggested that the extrachromosomal DNA may exist in the form of tandemly repeated sequences. 8 references, 8 figures.

  20. Stability of triple helices containing RNA and DNA strands: experimental and molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed Central

    Escudé, C; François, J C; Sun, J S; Ott, G; Sprinzl, M; Garestier, T; Hélène, C

    1993-01-01

    UV-absorption spectrophotometry and molecular modeling have been used to study the influence of the chemical nature of sugars (ribose or deoxyribose) on triple helix stability. For the Pyrimidine.purine* Pyrimidine motif, all eight combinations were tested with each of the three strands composed of either DNA or RNA. The chemical nature of sugars has a dramatic influence on triple helix stability. For each double helix composition, a more stable triple helix was formed when the third strand was RNA rather than DNA. No stable triple helix was detected when the polypurine sequence was made of RNA with a third strand made of DNA. Energy minimization studies using the JUMNA program suggested that interactions between the 2'-hydroxyl group of the third strand and the phosphates of the polypurine strand play an important role in determining the relative stabilities of triple-helical structures in which the polypyrimidine third strand is oriented parallel to the polypurine sequence. These interactions are not allowed when the third strand adopts an antiparallel orientation with respect to the target polypurine sequence, as observed when the third strand contains G and A or G and T/U. We show by footprinting and gel retardation experiments that an oligoribonucleotide containing G and A or G and U fails to bind double helical DNA, while the corresponding DNA oligomers form stable triple-helical complexes. Images PMID:7506827

  1. Distinct voltage-current characteristics of Nb3Sn strands with dispersed and collective crack distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Y.; van Lanen, E. P. A.; Dhallé, M. M. J.; Nijhuis, A.

    2009-08-01

    Two ITER-type Nb3Sn superconductor strands, one prepared with the bronze route and the other with the internal-tin route, were used to investigate the impact of filament cracking on the strand's transport properties. Careful mechanical polishing allowed unambiguous identification of the microscopic fractures of filaments caused by axial straining of the strands. After application of high axial tensile strain, densely and uniformly spaced cracks were observed in the bronze strand, while fewer but more correlated cracks occurred in the internal-tin strand. Crack initiation was observed in the bronze strand after an applied tensile strain of more than 0.8%, while for the internal-tin strand cracks were found already in the unloaded specimen, with further crack growth beyond 0.3% applied strain. With the Pacman strain device, the voltage-current characteristics at zero applied strain were measured after several successive applications of incrementally increasing tensile strain. Distinct dissimilarities in the voltage-current characteristics were observed between the dispersed and the collective crack distributions. We also modelled the influence of cracks on the voltage-current characteristics of the two strands by considering two limiting cases of the crack behaviour.

  2. Targeting the MicroRNA Passenger Strand for Regulating Therapeutic Transgenes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Jin; Lee, Chang Ho; Lee, Seong-Wook

    2015-08-01

    Gene therapy strategies have been developed, which can tissue or disease specifically regulate expression of exogenous transgenes by means of endogenous microRNA (miRNA) activity. However, the use of an endogenous guide strand to regulate an exogenous transgene could affect expression of endogenous miRNA target genes. In this study, we developed a new regulatory system of exogenous transgene expression by targeting the passenger strand. We constructed reporter constructs harboring miRNA-122 guide or passenger target sites with perfect or imperfect complementarity. We observed downregulation of an exogenous transgene harboring the miRNA-122 target sites against either the guide or passenger strand in cells expressing the cognate miRNA or cells stably expressing the miRNA target site. Moreover, the transgene activity as well as the gene expression level increased specifically by intracellular introduction of the antisense RNA against the corresponding strand. Endogenous target gene expression was induced by the transgene construct harboring the miRNA guide strand target sites, but not the passenger strand target sites. Importantly, the therapeutic transgene activity was efficiently regulated by targeting the passenger strand. These results suggested that an approach to passenger strand-regulated expression of therapeutic transgenes could be applied more safely as a therapeutic tool. PMID:26076094

  3. The Cross-Case Analyses of Elementary Students' Engagement in the Strands of Science Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minogue, James; Madden, Lauren; Bedward, John; Wiebe, Eric; Carter, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Recent reports have begun to lay the foundation for a re-visioned K-8 science curriculum which includes four strands that could be used to define and assess science proficiency for all students. Using these strands as an analytic lens, this pre-post multiple-case case study explores elementary school science teachers' practices and their students'…

  4. SCDC Spanish Curricula Units. Social Science Strand, Unit 9, Grade 3, Supplement & Ditto Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spanish Curricula Development Center, Miami Beach, FL.

    Designed for use with unit nine of the grade three social science strand, this supplement and ditto packet contains visual aids to help the teacher carry out the activities described in the teacher's guide to this strand. Seatwork for individual students as well as material for group activities is included. Language on materials to be used in the…

  5. Antibiotic efficacy in eliminating leptospiruria in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) stranding with leptospirosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection of California sea lions with leptospirosis can result in stranding and death of the animals. Shedding of the infectious organism contributes to spread of the disease to other animals and also poses a threat to human health. This is both for the public interacting with stranded animals and ...

  6. Fluid flow and mass transfer over circular strands using the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Shakhawath; Chen, X. B.; Bergstrom, D. J.

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge of the fluid flow and mass transfer over circular strands is fundamental to the cell culture of tissue scaffolds in bio-reactors. This paper presents a study on the simulation of fluid flow and mass transfer over the circular strands of a tissue scaffold by using the multiple relaxation time lattice Boltzmann method for the low Reynolds number regime, with Re D = 0.01 and 0.1, respectively. The mass transfer problem approximates the transport of a scalar nutrient from the bulk fluid to the strand surface, such as is encountered in the flow through tissue scaffolds placed in bio-reactors. The circular geometry of the scaffold strand is treated and implemented by means of the interpolated bounce-back boundary condition formulation. Our simulation illustrates that the flow accelerates around the strand, resulting in the maximum shear stress at the shoulder of the strand and that diffusion mass transfer plays the dominant role in the scalar transport. The local Sherwood number varies significantly over the surface of the strand, with a peak value located on the upstream surface. Increasing the Schmidt number of the scalar and decreasing the blockage ratio results in higher mass transfer rates on the surface of the stand. Overall, the simulation results provide one with the insight into the fluid flow and mass transfer over the circular strands of a tissue scaffold in a bio-reactor, which would be impractical to obtain by experiments.

  7. Acid-induced molten globule state of a prion protein: crucial role of Strand 1-Helix 1-Strand 2 segment.

    PubMed

    Honda, Ryo P; Yamaguchi, Kei-ichi; Kuwata, Kazuo

    2014-10-31

    The conversion of a cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to its pathogenic isoform (PrP(Sc)) is a critical event in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. Pathogenic conversion is usually associated with the oligomerization process; therefore, the conformational characteristics of the pre-oligomer state may provide insights into the conversion process. Previous studies indicate that PrP(C) is prone to oligomer formation at low pH, but the conformation of the pre-oligomer state remains unknown. In this study, we systematically analyzed the acid-induced conformational changes of PrP(C) and discovered a unique acid-induced molten globule state at pH 2.0 termed the "A-state." We characterized the structure of the A-state using far/near-UV CD, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate fluorescence, size exclusion chromatography, and NMR. Deuterium exchange experiments with NMR detection revealed its first unique structure ever reported thus far; i.e. the Strand 1-Helix 1-Strand 2 segment at the N terminus was preferentially unfolded, whereas the Helix 2-Helix 3 segment at the C terminus remained marginally stable. This conformational change could be triggered by the protonation of Asp(144), Asp(147), and Glu(196), followed by disruption of key salt bridges in PrP(C). Moreover, the initial population of the A-state at low pH (pH 2.0-5.0) was well correlated with the rate of the β-rich oligomer formation, suggesting that the A-state is the pre-oligomer state. Thus, the specific conformation of the A-state would provide crucial insights into the mechanisms of oligomerization and further pathogenic conversion as well as facilitating the design of novel medical chaperones for treating prion diseases. PMID:25217639

  8. Double-strand DNA break repair with replication slippage on two strands: a novel mechanism of deletion formation.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Helen E; Favaloro, Jenny M; Warne, Garry L; Zajac, Jeffrey D

    2006-05-01

    We have characterized an unusual family with two different androgen receptor (AR) gene deletions, in which we propose a novel mechanism of deletion formation has occurred. Affected individuals have the X-linked disorder androgen insensitivity syndrome, and we previously showed that different family members have deletions of different exons of the AR gene. We have now fully sequenced the deletions from affected individuals, and confirmed the presence of different deletions in different affected family members. Most affected and heterozygote individuals have a 4,430-bp deletion of exon 5 that occurred between repeated GTGGCAT motifs in introns 4 and 5. One affected hemizygous individual has a 4,033-bp deletion of exons 6 and 7 that occurred between repeated CCTC motifs in introns 5 and 7. The intron 5 breakpoint junctions of the two deletions are only 11 bp apart. Surprisingly, the maternal grandmother of the original index case was found to be mosaic for both deletional events, as well as having the normal AR gene. Karyotyping ruled out 47,XXX trisomy, indicating triple mosaicism for the two different deleted AR alleles and a normal AR allele. This triple mosaicism must have occurred early in embryonic development, as both deletions were passed on to different children. Based on these findings, we propose a novel mechanism of deletion formation. We suggest that during AR gene replication, a double strand DNA break occurred in intron 5, and that a variant of replication slippage occurred on both newly synthesized strands between the repeat motifs of microhomology, leading to the formation of the two different AR gene deletions. PMID:16619235

  9. Cardiac Output Assessed by Invasive and Minimally Invasive Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Allison J.; Cohn, Jennifer Hochman; Ranasinghe, J. Sudharma

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac output (CO) measurement has long been considered essential to the assessment and guidance of therapeutic decisions in critically ill patients and for patients undergoing certain high-risk surgeries. Despite controversies, complications and inherent errors in measurement, pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) continuous and intermittent bolus techniques of CO measurement continue to be the gold standard. Newer techniques provide less invasive alternatives; however, currently available monitors are unable to provide central circulation pressures or true mixed venous saturations. Esophageal Doppler and pulse contour monitors can predict fluid responsiveness and have been shown to decrease postoperative morbidity. Many minimally invasive techniques continue to suffer from decreased accuracy and reliability under periods of hemodynamic instability, and so few have reached the level of interchangeability with the PAC. PMID:21776254

  10. 76 FR 68776 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ...Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, notice is hereby given of meetings of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee (ISAC). Comprised of 29 nonfederal invasive species experts and stakeholders from across the nation, the purpose of the Advisory Committee is to provide advice to the National Invasive Species Council, as authorized by Executive Order 13112, on a broad......

  11. 77 FR 23740 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ...Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, notice is hereby given of meetings of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee (ISAC). Comprised of 30 nonfederal invasive species experts and stakeholders from across the nation, the purpose of the Advisory Committee is to provide advice to the National Invasive Species Council, as authorized by Executive Order 13112, on a broad......

  12. 78 FR 11899 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... Office of the Secretary Invasive Species Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior... Invasive Species Advisory Committee. The document contained incorrect dates. This document corrects those.... Meeting of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee (OPEN): Thursday, March 7, 2013 through Friday, March...

  13. 78 FR 70317 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... Office of the Secretary Invasive Species Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Public Meeting (via Teleconference) of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee. SUMMARY... Invasive Species Advisory Committee. The purpose of the Advisory Committee is to provide advice to...

  14. Invasive Plants on Rangelands: a Global Threat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive plant species are spreading and invading rangelands at an unprecedented rate costing ranchers billions of dollars to control invasive plants each year. In its simplest form, the invasion process has four primary stages, including introduction, establishment, spread and colonization. Th...

  15. 76 FR 30955 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ...Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, notice is hereby given of meetings of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee (ISAC). Comprised of 30 nonfederal invasive species experts and stakeholders from across the nation, the purpose of the Advisory Committee is to provide advice to the National Invasive Species Council, as authorized by Executive Order 13112, on a broad......

  16. 75 FR 29359 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-25

    ...Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, notice is hereby given of meetings of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee (ISAC). Comprised of 30 nonfederal invasive species experts and stakeholders from across the nation, the purpose of the Advisory Committee is to provide advice to the National Invasive Species Council, as authorized by Executive Order 13112, on a broad......

  17. 75 FR 69698 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ...Pursuant to the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, notice is hereby given of meetings of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee (ISAC). Comprised of 30 nonfederal invasive species experts and stakeholders from across the nation, the purpose of the Advisory Committee is to provide advice to the National Invasive Species Council, as authorized by Executive Order 13112, on a broad......

  18. CONSERVATION PROGRAMS THAT PROMOTE INVASIVE SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Invasive plant species are degrading the structure and function of ecosystems throughout the world. Although most state and federal conservation agencies in the U.S. attempt to reduce the impact of invasive species, some agency activities can contribute to the spread of invasive...

  19. Enzyme-free colorimetric detection systems based on the DNA strand displacement competition reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Birkedal, V.; Gothelf, K. V.

    2016-05-01

    The strand displacement competition assay is based on the dynamic equilibrium of the competitive hybridization of two oligonucleotides (A and B) to a third oligonucleotide (S). In the presence of an analyte that binds to a specific affinity-moiety conjugated to strand B, the equilibrium shifts, which can be detected by a shift in the fluorescence resonance energy transfer signal between dyes attached to the DNA strands. In the present study we have integrated an ATP aptamer in the strand B and demonstrated the optical detection of ATP. Furthermore we explore a new readout method using a split G-quadruplex DNAzyme for colorimetric readout of the detection of streptavidin by the naked eye. Finally, we integrate the whole G-quadruplex DNAzyme system in a single DNA strand and show that it is applicable to colorimetric detection.

  20. Reconstitution of a eukaryotic replisome reveals suppression mechanisms that define leading/lagging strand operation.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, Roxana E; Schauer, Grant D; Yao, Nina Y; Langston, Lance D; Yurieva, Olga; Zhang, Dan; Finkelstein, Jeff; O'Donnell, Mike E

    2015-01-01

    We have reconstituted a eukaryotic leading/lagging strand replisome comprising 31 distinct polypeptides. This study identifies a process unprecedented in bacterial replisomes. While bacteria and phage simply recruit polymerases to the fork, we find that suppression mechanisms are used to position the distinct eukaryotic polymerases on their respective strands. Hence, Pol ε is active with CMG on the leading strand, but it is unable to function on the lagging strand, even when Pol δ is not present. Conversely, Pol δ-PCNA is the only enzyme capable of extending Okazaki fragments in the presence of Pols ε and α. We have shown earlier that Pol δ-PCNA is suppressed on the leading strand with CMG (Georgescu et al., 2014). We propose that CMG, the 11-subunit helicase, is responsible for one or both of these suppression mechanisms that spatially control polymerase occupancy at the fork. PMID:25871847

  1. [Interaction of divalent metal ions with four-stranded polyriboinosinic acid].

    PubMed

    Sorokin, V A; Valeev, V A; Gladchenko, G O; Degtiar, M V; Blagoĭ, Iu P

    2000-01-01

    Interaction of Mg2+, Ca2+, Cu2+ ions with the four-stranded poly(I) was studied using differential UV and visible spectroscopies. It was shown that, up to concentrations of approximately 0.1 M, Mg2+ and Ca2+ ions do not bind to heteroatoms of hypoxanthine of the four-stranded poly(I). Cu2+ ions interact with N7 (and/or N1) and O6 (through the water molecule of the hydrate shell of the ion). The latter seems to induce the enolization of hypoxanthine the deprotonation of N1, and, as a result, the transition of the four-stranded helix to single-stranded coils. Single-stranded chains form compact particles with an effective radius of about 100 A. PMID:11094700

  2. A NEW ROLE FOR HIV NUCLEOCAPSID PROTEIN IN MODULATING THE SPECIFICITY OF PLUS STRAND PRIMING

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Deena T.; DeStefano, Jeffrey J.

    2008-01-01

    The current study indicates a new role for HIV nucleocapsid protein (NC) in modulating the specificity of plus strand priming. RNase H cleavage by reverse transcriptase (RT) during minus strand synthesis gives rise to RNA fragments that could potentially be used as primers for synthesis of the plus strand, leading to the initiation of priming from multiple points as has been observed for other retroviruses. For HIV, the central and 3′ polypurine tracts (PPTs) are the major sites of plus strand initiation. Using reconstituted in vitro assays, results showed that NC greatly reduced the efficiency of extension of non-PPT RNA primers, but not PPT. Experiments mimicking HIV replication showed that RT generated and used both PPT and non-PPT RNAs to initiate “plus strand” synthesis, but non-PPT usage was strongly inhibited by NC. The results support a role for NC in specifying primer usage during plus strand synthesis. PMID:18632127

  3. Rapid RNA Strand Scission Following C2′-Hydrogen Atom Abstraction

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Rakesh; Greenberg, Marc M.

    2015-01-01

    C2′-Nucleotide radicals have been proposed as key intermediates in direct strand break formation in RNA exposed to ionizing radiation. Uridin-2′-yl radical (1) was independently generated in single- and double-stranded RNA via photolysis of a ketone precursor. Direct stand breaks result from heterolytic cleavage of the adjacent C3′-carbon–oxygen bond. Trapping of 1 by O2 or β-mercaptoethanol (1 M) does not compete with strand scission, indicating that phosphate elimination is >106 s−1. Uracil loss also does not compete with strand scission. When considered in conjunction with reports that nucleobase radicals produce 1, this chemistry explains why RNA is significantly more susceptible to strand scission by ionizing radiation (hydroxyl radical) than is DNA. PMID:25580810

  4. Electronic transport in DNA sequences: The role of correlations and inter-strand coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, E. L.; Lyra, M. L.; de Moura, F. A. B. F.

    2006-10-01

    We investigate the electronic properties in sequences of single and double-strand DNA molecules made up from the nucleotides guanine G, adenine A, cytosine C and thymine T. Using a tight-binding formulation we solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation to compute the spread of initially localized wave packets. We also compute the localization length in finite segments by employing a Green's function recursion method. We compare the results for the genomic DNA sequence with those of two artificial sequences, namely the quasiperiodic Rudin-Shapiro one, which has long-range correlations, and a intra-strand pair correlated DNA sequence. We found that the short-range character of the intra-strand correlations suffices for a quantitative description of the one-electron wave-packet dynamics in the double-strand real DNA sequences. Further, the inter-strand coupling promotes electronic transport over a longer segment.

  5. Minimally invasive video-assisted versus minimally invasive nonendoscopic thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Fík, Zdeněk; Astl, Jaromír; Zábrodský, Michal; Lukeš, Petr; Merunka, Ilja; Betka, Jan; Chovanec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy (MIVAT) and minimally invasive nonendoscopic thyroidectomy (MINET) represent well accepted and reproducible techniques developed with the main goal to improve cosmetic outcome, accelerate healing, and increase patient's comfort following thyroid surgery. Between 2007 and 2011, a prospective nonrandomized study of patients undergoing minimally invasive thyroid surgery was performed to compare advantages and disadvantages of the two different techniques. There were no significant differences in the length of incision to perform surgical procedures. Mean duration of hemithyroidectomy was comparable in both groups, but it was more time consuming to perform total thyroidectomy by MIVAT. There were more patients undergoing MIVAT procedures without active drainage in the postoperative course and we also could see a trend for less pain in the same group. This was paralleled by statistically significant decreased administration of both opiates and nonopiate analgesics. We encountered two cases of recurrent laryngeal nerve palsies in the MIVAT group only. MIVAT and MINET represent safe and feasible alternative to conventional thyroid surgery in selected cases and this prospective study has shown minimal differences between these two techniques. PMID:24800227

  6. Sequence-Specific DNA Photosplitting of Crosslinked DNAs Containing the 3-Cyanovinylcarbazole Nucleoside by Using DNA Strand Displacement.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shigetaka; Kawabata, Hayato; Fujimoto, Kenzo

    2016-08-17

    An oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) containing the ultrafast reversible 3-cyanovinylcarbazole ((CNV) K) photo-crosslinker was photo-crosslinked to a complementary strand upon exposure to 366 nm irradiation and photosplit by use of 312 nm irradiation. In this paper we report that the photoreaction of (CNV) K on irradiation at 366 nm involves a photostationary state and that its reaction can be controlled by temperature. Guided by this new insight, we proposed and have now demonstrated previously unknown photosplitting of (CNV) K aided by DNA strand displacement as an alternative to heating. The photo-crosslinked double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) underwent >80 % photosplitting aided by DNA strand displacement on irradiation at 366 nm without heating. In this photosplitting based on DNA strand displacement, the relative thermal stability of the invader strand with respect to the template strands plays an important role, and an invader strand/template strand system that is more stable than the passenger strand/template strand system induces photosplitting without heating. This new strand-displacement-aided photosplitting occurred in a sequence-specific manner through irradiation at 366 nm in the presence of an invader strand. PMID:27357523

  7. Inter-strand current sharing and ac loss measurements in superconducting YBCO Roebel cables

    SciTech Connect

    Majoros, M.; Sumption, M. D.; Collings, E. W.; Long, N. J.

    2015-04-08

    A Roebel cable, one twist pitch long, was modified from its as-received state by soldering copper strips between the strands to provide inter-strand connections enabling current sharing. Various DC transport currents (representing different percentages of its critical current) were applied to a single strand of such a modified cable at 77 K in a liquid nitrogen bath. Simultaneous monitoring of I–V curves in different parts of the strand as well as in its interconnections with other strands was made using a number of sensitive Keithley nanovoltmeters in combination with a multichannel high-speed data acquisition card, all controlled via LabView software. Current sharing onset was observed at about 1.02 of strand Ic. At a strand current of 1.3Ic about 5% of the current was shared through the copper strip interconnections. A finite element method modeling was performed to estimate the inter-strand resistivities required to enable different levels of current sharing. The relative contributions of coupling and hysteretic magnetization (and loss) were compared, and for our cable and tape geometry, and at dB/dt=1 T s-1, and our inter-strand resistance of 0.77 mΩ, (enabling a current sharing of 5% at 1.3Ic) the coupling component was 0.32% of the hysteretic component. However, inter-strand contact resistance values of 100–1000 times smaller (close to those of NbTi and Nb3Sn based accelerator cables) would make the coupling components comparable in size to the hysteretic components.

  8. Inter-strand current sharing and ac loss measurements in superconducting YBCO Roebel cables

    DOE PAGESBeta

    sumption, Mike; Majoros, Milan; Collings, E. W.; Van der Laan, D. C.

    2014-11-07

    A Roebel cable, one twist pitch long, was modified from its as-received state by soldering copper strips between the strands to provide inter-strand connections enabling current sharing. Various DC transport currents (representing different percentages of its critical current) were applied to a single strand of such a modified cable at 77 K in a liquid nitrogen bath. Simultaneous monitoring of I–V curves in different parts of the strand as well as in its interconnections with other strands was made using a number of sensitive Keithley nanovoltmeters in combination with a multichannel high-speed data acquisition card, all controlled via LabView software.more » Current sharing onset was observed at about 1.02 of strand Ic. At a strand current of 1.3Ic about 5% of the current was shared through the copper strip interconnections. A finite element method modeling was performed to estimate the inter-strand resistivities required to enable different levels of current sharing. The relative contributions of coupling and hysteretic magnetization (and loss) were compared, and for our cable and tape geometry, and at dB/dt=1 T s-1, and our inter-strand resistance of 0.77 mΩ, (enabling a current sharing of 5% at 1.3Ic ) the coupling component was 0.32% of the hysteretic component. However, inter-strand contact resistance values of 100–1000 times smaller (close to those of NbTi and Nb3Sn based accelerator cables) would make the coupling components comparable in size to the hysteretic components.« less

  9. Inter-strand current sharing and ac loss measurements in superconducting YBCO Roebel cables

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Majoros, M.; Sumption, M. D.; Collings, E. W.; Long, N. J.

    2015-04-08

    A Roebel cable, one twist pitch long, was modified from its as-received state by soldering copper strips between the strands to provide inter-strand connections enabling current sharing. Various DC transport currents (representing different percentages of its critical current) were applied to a single strand of such a modified cable at 77 K in a liquid nitrogen bath. Simultaneous monitoring of I–V curves in different parts of the strand as well as in its interconnections with other strands was made using a number of sensitive Keithley nanovoltmeters in combination with a multichannel high-speed data acquisition card, all controlled via LabView software.more » Current sharing onset was observed at about 1.02 of strand Ic. At a strand current of 1.3Ic about 5% of the current was shared through the copper strip interconnections. A finite element method modeling was performed to estimate the inter-strand resistivities required to enable different levels of current sharing. The relative contributions of coupling and hysteretic magnetization (and loss) were compared, and for our cable and tape geometry, and at dB/dt=1 T s-1, and our inter-strand resistance of 0.77 mΩ, (enabling a current sharing of 5% at 1.3Ic) the coupling component was 0.32% of the hysteretic component. However, inter-strand contact resistance values of 100–1000 times smaller (close to those of NbTi and Nb3Sn based accelerator cables) would make the coupling components comparable in size to the hysteretic components.« less

  10. Modelling of current distribution in Nb3Sn multifilamentary strands subjected to bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Y.; Zhou, C.; van Lanen, E. P. A.; Dhallé, M. M. J.; Nijhuis, A.

    2012-05-01

    In Nb3Sn cable-in-conduit conductors (CICCs), strands follow complex trajectories that result in a periodic bending strain acting on the strands upon electromagnetic loading and thermal contraction. Such a periodic bending strain leads to degradation of the overall transport performance of a CICC. Aiming for a better understanding and quantitative correlation between strand degradation and CICC test results, a detailed strand model is essential in combination with accurate intra-strand resistance data, the spatial filament strain distribution, and the associated filament crack distribution. Our novel numerical strand model is a 3D network of resistors including superconducting filaments, normal matrix elements, and an outer stabilizing shell or inner core. Along the strand length, matrix elements have Ohmic resistance, there is a filament-to-matrix contact resistance (Rfm) between filaments and matrix elements, while superconducting filaments have a power-law voltage-current (VI) characteristic with critical current (Ic) and an n-value described by the ITER Nb3Sn strain scaling law based on measured strand data. The model simulates the VI characteristic in a periodic bending experiment and provides the associated spatial potential distribution. The VI characteristics representing the low- and high-resistivity limits (LRL and HRL) are identified for periodic and uniform axial bending. The voltage level for the current transfer regime depends on the strand internal resistivities, i.e. the filament-to-matrix contact and the matrix resistivity, the twist pitch and the bending wavelength. The simulation results show good agreement against Ic degradation, as experimentally measured by the TARSIS facility, versus the assessed peak bending strain. In addition we discuss different methods for determining the applied peak bending strain. The model provides a basis to find a practical relationship between a strand’s VI characteristic and the periodic bending strain, as well

  11. Factors affecting stranding of juvenile salmonids by wakes from ship passage in the Lower Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Walter H.; Skalski, John R.

    2011-09-01

    The effects of deep-draft vessel traffic in confined riverine channels on shorelines and fish are of widespread concern. In the Pacific Northwest of the United States, wakes and subsequent beach run-up from ships transiting the Lower Columbia River have been observed to strand juvenile salmon and other fish. As part of a before-and-after study to assess stranding effects that may be associated with channel deepening, we measured 19 co-variables from observations of 126 vessel passages at three low-slope beaches and used multiple logistic regression to discern the significant factors influencing the frequency of stranding. Subyearling Chinook salmon were 82% of the fish stranded over all sites and seasons. Given a low-slope beach, stranding frequencies for juvenile salmon were significantly related to river location, salmon density in the shallows, a proxy for ship kinetic energy, tidal height, and two interactions. The beach types selected for our study do not include all the beach types along the Lower Columbia River so that the stranding probabilities described here cannot be extrapolated river-wide. A more sophisticated modeling effort, informed by additional field data, is needed to assess salmon losses by stranding for the entire lower river. Such modeling needs to include river-scale factors such as beach type, berms, proximity to navigation channel, and perhaps, proximity to tributaries that act as sources of out-migrating juvenile salmon. At both river and beach scales, no one factor produces stranding; rather interactions among several conditions produce a stranding event and give stranding its episodic nature.

  12. Characteristics of Cu stabilized Nb3Al strands with low Cu ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, A.; Yamada, R.; Barzi, E.; Kobayashi, M.; Lamm, M.; Nakagawa, K.; Sasaki, K.; Takeuchi, T.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.; /NIMC, Tsukuba /Fermilab /Hitachi, Tsuchiura Works /KEK, Tsukuba

    2008-12-01

    Characteristics of recently developed F4-Nb{sub 3}Al strand with low Cu ratio are described. The overall J{sub c} of the Nb{sub 3}Al strand could be easily increased by decreasing of the Cu ratio. Although the quench of a pulse-like voltage generation is usually observed in superconducting unstable conductor, the F4 strand with a low Cu ratio of 0.61 exhibited an ordinary critical transition of gradual voltage generation. The F4 strand does not have magnetic instabilities at 4.2 K because of the tantalum interfilament matrix. The overall J{sub c} of the F4 strand achieved was 80-85% of the RRP strand. In the large mechanical stress above 100 MPa, the overall J{sub c} of the F4 strand might be comparable to that of high J{sub c} RRP-Nb{sub 3}Sn strands. The Rutherford cable with a high packing factor of 86.5% has been fabricated using F4 strands. The small racetrack magnet, SR07, was also fabricated by a 14 m F4 cable. The quench current, I{sub q}, of SR07 were obtained 22.4 kA at 4.5 K and 25.2 kA at 2.2 K. The tantalum matrix Nb{sub 3}Al strands are promising for the application of super-cooled high-field magnets as well as 4.2 K operation magnets.

  13. Inter-strand current sharing and ac loss measurements in superconducting YBCO Roebel cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majoros, M.; Sumption, M. D.; Collings, E. W.; Long, N. J.

    2015-05-01

    A Roebel cable, one twist pitch long, was modified from its as-received state by soldering copper strips between the strands to provide inter-strand connections enabling current sharing. Various DC transport currents (representing different percentages of its critical current) were applied to a single strand of such a modified cable at 77 K in a liquid nitrogen bath. Simultaneous monitoring of I-V curves in different parts of the strand as well as in its interconnections with other strands was made using a number of sensitive Keithley nanovoltmeters in combination with a multi-channel high-speed data acquisition card, all controlled via LabView software. Current sharing onset was observed at about 1.02 of strand Ic. At a strand current of 1.3Ic about 5% of the current was shared through the copper strip interconnections. A finite element method modeling was performed to estimate the inter-strand resistivities required to enable different levels of current sharing. The relative contributions of coupling and hysteretic magnetization (and loss) were compared, and for our cable and tape geometry, and at dB/dt = 1 T s-1, and our inter-strand resistance of 0.77 mΩ, (enabling a current sharing of 5% at 1.3Ic ) the coupling component was 0.32% of the hysteretic component. However, inter-strand contact resistance values of 100-1000 times smaller (close to those of NbTi and Nb3Sn based accelerator cables) would make the coupling components comparable in size to the hysteretic components.

  14. Inter-strand current sharing and ac loss measurements in superconducting YBCO Roebel cables

    SciTech Connect

    sumption, Mike; Majoros, Milan; Collings, E. W.; Van der Laan, D. C.

    2014-11-07

    A Roebel cable, one twist pitch long, was modified from its as-received state by soldering copper strips between the strands to provide inter-strand connections enabling current sharing. Various DC transport currents (representing different percentages of its critical current) were applied to a single strand of such a modified cable at 77 K in a liquid nitrogen bath. Simultaneous monitoring of I–V curves in different parts of the strand as well as in its interconnections with other strands was made using a number of sensitive Keithley nanovoltmeters in combination with a multichannel high-speed data acquisition card, all controlled via LabView software. Current sharing onset was observed at about 1.02 of strand Ic. At a strand current of 1.3Ic about 5% of the current was shared through the copper strip interconnections. A finite element method modeling was performed to estimate the inter-strand resistivities required to enable different levels of current sharing. The relative contributions of coupling and hysteretic magnetization (and loss) were compared, and for our cable and tape geometry, and at dB/dt=1 T s-1, and our inter-strand resistance of 0.77 mΩ, (enabling a current sharing of 5% at 1.3Ic ) the coupling component was 0.32% of the hysteretic component. However, inter-strand contact resistance values of 100–1000 times smaller (close to those of NbTi and Nb3Sn based accelerator cables) would make the coupling components comparable in size to the hysteretic components.

  15. 78 FR 9724 - Invasive Species Advisory Committee; Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ... Office of the Secretary Invasive Species Advisory Committee; Meetings AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meetings of the Invasive Species Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: Pursuant... Invasive Species Advisory Committee (ISAC). Comprised of 31 nonfederal invasive species experts...

  16. The risk of establishment of aquatic invasive species: joining invasibility and propagule pressure

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Brian; Mandrak, Nicholas E

    2007-01-01

    Invasive species are increasingly becoming a policy priority. This has spurred researchers and managers to try to estimate the risk of invasion. Conceptually, invasions are dependent both on the receiving environment (invasibility) and on the ability to reach these new areas (propagule pressure). However, analyses of risk typically examine only one or the other. Here, we develop and apply a joint model of invasion risk that simultaneously incorporates invasibility and propagule pressure. We present arguments that the behaviour of these two elements of risk differs substantially—propagule pressure is a function of time, whereas invasibility is not—and therefore have different management implications. Further, we use the well-studied zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) to contrast predictions made using the joint model to those made by separate invasibility and propagule pressure models. We show that predictions of invasion progress as well as of the long-term invasion pattern are strongly affected by using a joint model. PMID:17711834

  17. Materials, Strands, and Cables for Superconducting Accelerator Magnets. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sumption, Mike D.; Collings, Edward W.

    2014-09-19

    This report focuses on Materials, Strands and Cables for High Energy Physics Particle accelerators. In the materials area, work has included studies of basic reactions, diffusion, transformations, and phase assemblage of Nb3Sn. These materials science aspects have been married to results, in the form of flux pinning, Bc2, Birr, and transport Jc, with an emphasis on obtaining the needed Jc for HEP needs. Attention has also been paid to the “intermediate-temperature superconductor”, magnesium diboride emphasis being placed on (i) irreversibility field enhancement, (ii) critical current density and flux pinning, and (iii) connectivity. We also report on studies of Bi-2212. The second area of the program has been in the area of “Strands” in which, aside from the materials aspect of the conductor, its physical properties and their influence on performance have been studied. Much of this work has been in the area of magnetization estimation and flux jump calculation and control. One of the areas of this work was strand instabilities in high-performance Nb3Sn conductors due to combined fields and currents. Additionally, we investigated quench and thermal propagation in YBCO coated conductors at low temperatures and high fields. The last section, “Cables”, focussed on interstrand contact resistance, ICR, it origins, control, and implications. Following on from earlier work in NbTi, the present work in Nb3Sn has aimed to make ICR intermediate between the two extremes of too little contact (no current sharing) and too much (large and unacceptable magnetization and associated beam de-focussing). Interstrand contact and current sharing measurements are being made on YBCO based Roebel cables using transport current methods. Finally, quench was investigated for YBCO cables and the magnets wound from them, presently with a focus on 50 T solenoids for muon collider applications.

  18. Imaging the changing shoreface along South Carolina's Grand Strand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, J. C.; Gayes, P. T.; McCoy, C.; Viso, R.

    2008-12-01

    The Grand Strand coastal region of South Carolina is located along Long Bay, a sediment starved embayment with few tidal inlets or fluvial sources of sediment input. The area has been the focus of ongoing coastal erosion, shoreface monitoring and geophysical/geologic framework investigations for more than a decade. We have taken a nested approach to studying shoreface morphology, looking across a range of timescales and spatial resolutions, focusing both onshore and off. Our research combines RTK-GPS beach surveys, ground-based LIDAR, beach cameras and aerial photography of the coastline, along with Chirp subbottom profiles, interferometric/multibeam bathymetry, and sidescan sonar surveys across the innershelf. Focusing on the central portion of the Grand Strand, several trends are apparent in observations across a range of time scales. In recent months, storm events and beach renourishment have influenced sediment patterns on the shoreface and innershelf. Evidence from beach profiles, shoreline surveys and sidescan sonar in the months following renourishment suggest a shift in sediment from the upper to lower shoreface and out onto the inner shelf. Pre and post surveys around Tropical Storm Hanna (September 2008) also appear to show a flux of sediment to the inner shelf. In contrast, past storm events appear to have directed sediment onshore and in many cases, the shelf appears to be the primary source of sediment to the region. Over longer time scales, we have observed seasonal variations in the geometry of the shoreface and a correlation between geologic framework and sediment distribution. Subparallel ledges along the innershelf appear to be funneling sediment offshore. Sidescan sonar and Chirp subbottom profiles suggest preservation of meandering tidal paleochannels along the innershelf that may be an important source of sediment to the region. Beach profiles over the past decade suggest a trend of lower shoreface retreat in areas with sediment cover offshore

  19. High resolution atomic force microscopy of double-stranded RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ares, Pablo; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Herrero-Galán, Elías; Valpuesta, José M.; Gil, Adriana; Gomez-Herrero, Julio; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to resolve the A-form sub-helical pitch periodicity. We have employed different high-sensitive force-detection methods and obtained images with similar spatial resolution. Therefore, we show here that the limiting factors for high-resolution AFM imaging of soft materials in liquid medium are, rather than the imaging mode, the force between the tip and the sample and the sharpness of the tip apex.Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to

  20. Human mobility and epidemic invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colizza, Vittoria

    2010-03-01

    The current H1N1 influenza pandemic is just the latest example of how human mobility helps drive infectious diseases. Travel has grown explosively in the last decades, contributing to an emerging complex pattern of traffic flows that unfolds at different scales, shaping the spread of epidemics. Restrictions on people's mobility are thus investigated to design possible containment measures. By considering a theoretical framework in terms of reaction-diffusion processes, it is possible to study the invasion dynamics of epidemics in a metapopulation system with heterogeneous mobility patterns. The system is found to exhibit a global invasion threshold that sets the critical mobility rate below which the epidemic is contained. The results provide a general framework for the understanding of the numerical evidence from detailed data-driven simulations that show the limited benefit provided by travel flows reduction in slowing down or containing an emerging epidemic.

  1. Invasive Salmonellosis in Kilifi, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Muthumbi, Esther; Morpeth, Susan C.; Ooko, Michael; Mwanzu, Alfred; Mwarumba, Salim; Mturi, Neema; Etyang, Anthony O.; Berkley, James A.; Williams, Thomas N.; Kariuki, Samuel; Scott, J. Anthony G.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Invasive salmonelloses are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Africa, but the incidence and case fatality of each disease vary markedly by region. We aimed to describe the incidence, clinical characteristics, and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of invasive salmonelloses among children and adults in Kilifi, Kenya. Methods. We analyzed integrated clinical and laboratory records for patients presenting to the Kilifi County Hospital between 1998 and 2014. We calculated incidence, and summarized clinical features and multidrug resistance. Results. Nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) accounted for 10.8% and 5.8% of bacteremia cases in children and adults, respectively, while Salmonella Typhi accounted for 0.5% and 2.1%, respectively. Among 351 NTS isolates serotyped, 160 (45.6%) were Salmonella Enteritidis and 152 (43.3%) were Salmonella Typhimurium. The incidence of NTS in children aged <5 years was 36.6 per 100 000 person-years, being highest in infants aged <7 days (174/100 000 person-years). The overall incidence of NTS in children varied markedly by location and declined significantly during the study period; the pattern of dominance of the NTS serotypes also shifted from Salmonella Enteritidis to Salmonella Typhimurium. Risk factors for invasive NTS disease were human immunodeficiency virus infection, malaria, and malnutrition; the case fatality ratio was 22.1% (71/321) in children aged <5 years and 36.7% (11/30) in adults. Multidrug resistance was present in 23.9% (84/351) of NTS isolates and 46.2% (12/26) of Salmonella Typhi isolates. Conclusions. In Kilifi, the incidence of invasive NTS was high, especially among newborn infants, but typhoid fever was uncommon. NTS remains an important cause of bacteremia in children <5 years of age. PMID:26449944

  2. Holocene geologic slip rate for Mission Creek strand of the southern San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryer, R.; Behr, W. M.; Sharp, W. D.; Gold, P. O.

    2015-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault (SAF) is the primary structure accommodating motion between the Pacific and North American plates. The Coachella Valley segment of the southern SAF has not ruptured historically, and is considered overdue for an earthquake because it has exceeded its average recurrence interval. In the northwestern Coachella Valley, this fault splits into three additional fault strands: the Mission Creek strand, which strikes northwest in the San Bernardino Mountains, and the Banning and Garnet Hill strands, which continue west, transferring slip into San Gorgonio Pass. Determining how slip is partitioned between these faults is critical for southern California seismic hazard models. Recent work near the southern end of the Mission Creek strand at Biskra Palms yielded a slip rate of ~14-17 mm/yr since 50 ka, and new measurements from Pushawalla Canyon suggest a possible rate of ~20 mm/yr since 2.5 ka and 70 ka. Slip appears to transfer away from the Mission Creek strand and to the Banning and Garnet Hill strands within the Indio Hills, but the slip rate for the Garnet Hill strand is unknown and the 4-5 mm/yr slip rate for the Banning strand is applicable only since the mid Holocene. Additional constraints on the Holocene slip rate for the Mission Creek strand are critical for resolving the total slip rate for the southern SAF, and also for comparing slip rates on all three fault strands in the northern Coachella Valley over similar time scales. We have identified a new slip rate site at the southern end of the Mission Creek strand between Pushawalla and Biskra Palms. At this site, (the Three Palms Site), three alluvial fans sourced from three distinct catchments have been displaced approximately 80 meters by the Mission Creek Strand. Initial observations from an exploratory pit excavated into the central fan show soil development consistent with Holocene fan deposition and no evidence of soil profile disruption. To more precisely constrain the minimum

  3. Development of Ta-matrix Nb3Al Strand and Cable for High-Field Accelerator Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, K.; Ghosh, A.; Kikuchi, A.; Takeuchi, T.; Banno, N.; Iijima, Y.; Nimori, S.; Takigawa, H.; Terashima, A.; Nakamoto, T.; Kuroda, Y.; Maruyama, M.; Takao, T.; Tanaka, K.; Nakagawa, K.; Barzi, E.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.

    2011-08-03

    Research and development of Nb{sub 3}Al strands and cables for a high field accelerator magnet is ongoing under the framework of the CERN-KEK collaboration. In this program, new Ta-matrix Nb{sub 3}Al strands were developed and their mechanical properties and superconducting properties were studied. The non-Cu J{sub c} values of these strands were 750 {approx} 800 A/mm{sup 2} at 15 T and 4.2 K. Using these strands, test fabrication of 27-strand Rutherford cable was carried out in collaboration with NIMS and Fermilab. The properties of the strands extracted from the cable were examined and it was found that there was no degradation of the superconducting properties of the strands. In this paper, we report the fabrication of the strands and the cable in brief and present some of the results obtained by studying their properties.

  4. Will climate change promote future invasions?

    PubMed

    Bellard, Celine; Thuiller, Wilfried; Leroy, Boris; Genovesi, Piero; Bakkenes, Michel; Courchamp, Franck

    2013-12-01

    Biological invasion is increasingly recognized as one of the greatest threats to biodiversity. Using ensemble forecasts from species distribution models to project future suitable areas of the 100 of the world's worst invasive species defined by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, we show that both climate and land use changes will likely cause drastic species range shifts. Looking at potential spatial aggregation of invasive species, we identify three future hotspots of invasion in Europe, northeastern North America, and Oceania. We also emphasize that some regions could lose a significant number of invasive alien species, creating opportunities for ecosystem restoration. From the list of 100, scenarios of potential range distributions show a consistent shrinking for invasive amphibians and birds, while for aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates distributions are projected to substantially increase in most cases. Given the harmful impacts these invasive species currently have on ecosystems, these species will likely dramatically influence the future of biodiversity. PMID:23913552

  5. Will climate change promote future invasions?

    PubMed Central

    Bellard, C.; Thuiller, W.; Leroy, B.; Genovesi, P.; Bakkenes, M.; Courchamp, F.

    2013-01-01

    Biological invasion is increasingly recognized as one of the greatest threats to biodiversity. Using ensemble forecasts from species distribution models to project future suitable areas of the “100 of the world’s worst invasive species” defined by the IUCN, we show that both climate and land use changes will likely cause drastic species range shifts. Looking at potential spatial aggregation of invasive species, we identify three future hotspots of invasion in Europe, northeastern North America, and Oceania. We also emphasize that some regions could lose a significant number of invasive alien species, creating opportunities for ecosystem restoration. From the list of 100, scenarios of potential range distributions show a consistent shrinking for invasive amphibians and birds, while for aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates distributions are projected to substantially increase in most cases. Given the harmful impacts these invasive species currently have on ecosystems, these species will likely dramatically influence the future of biodiversity. PMID:23913552

  6. Looping of anisotropic, short double-stranded DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Harold; Le, Tung

    2013-03-01

    Bending of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is associated with fundamental biological processes such as genome packaging and gene regulation, and therefore studying sequence-dependent dsDNA bending is a key to understanding biological impact of DNA sequence beyond the genetic code. Average mechanical behavior of long dsDNA is well described by the wormlike chain model, but sequence-dependent anisotropic bendability and bendedness of dsDNA can in principle lead to abnormally high looping probability at short length scales. Here, we measured the looping probability density (J factor) and kinetics of dsDNA as a function of length and curvature using single-molecule FRET (Förster Resonance Energy Transfer). For theoretical comparison, we calculated the J-factor using a discrete dinucleotide chain model, and also simulated it by Monte Carlo methods. We provide evidences that even when the intrinsic shape of dsDNA is accounted for, the wormlike chain model fails to describe looping dynamics of dsDNA below 200-bp length scale. Georgia Tech FIRE program

  7. Patterns of evolution of research strands in the hydrologic sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, F. W.; Fang, Y. C.; Parthasarathy, S.

    2005-03-01

    This paper examines issues of impact and innovation in groundwater research by using bibliometric data and citation analysis.The analysis is based on 3120 papers from the journal Water Resources Research with full contents and their citation data from the ISI Web of Science. The research is designed to develop a better understanding of the way citation numbers can be interpreted by scientists. Not surprisingly, the most highly cited papers appear to be pioneers in the field with papers departing significantly from what has come before and to be effective in creating similar, follow-on papers. Papers that are early contributions to a new research strand that is highly influential will be on average highly cited. However, the importance of a research strand as measured by citations seems to fall with time. The citation patterns of some classic papers show that the activity in the topical area and impact of follow-on papers gradually decline with time, which has similarities with Kuhn's ideas of revolutionary and normal science. The results of this study reinforce the importance of being a pioneer in a research strand, strategically shifting research strands, adopting strategies that can facilitate really major research breakthroughs. L'article examine les problèmes d'impact et d'innovation dans la recherche des eaux souterraines en utilisant les données bibliométriques et l'analyse des citations. L'analyse a été faite sur 3120 articles parus dans Water Resources Research en tenant compte de leur texte complet et de toutes citations parues dans l' ISI Web de la Science. Le but de la recherche a été de mieux comprendre comment le nombre des citations peut être interprété par les scientifiques. Ce n'est pas une surprise que les plus cités articles soient les articles-pionniers dans leurs domaines, qui s'écartent d'une manière significative de ce qui a été écrit auparavant et qui ont été suivi par des nouveaux articles. Les articles qui présentent une

  8. Buried territories: heterochromatic response to DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi-Li; Xiang, Ji-Feng; Kong, Na; Cai, Xiu-Jun; Xie, An-Yong

    2016-07-01

    Cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), the most deleterious type of DNA damage, is highly influenced by higher-order chromatin structure in eukaryotic cells. Compared with euchromatin, the compacted structure of heterochromatin not only protects heterochromatic DNA from damage, but also adds an extra layer of control over the response to DSBs occurring in heterochromatin. One key step in this response is the decondensation of heterochromatin structure. This decondensation process facilitates the DNA damage signaling and promotes proper heterochromatic DSB repair, thus helping to prevent instability of heterochromatic regions of genomes. This review will focus on the functions of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) signaling cascade involving ATM, heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), Krüppel-associated box (KRAB)-associated protein-1 (KAP-1), tat-interacting protein 60 (Tip60), and many other protein factors in DSB-induced decondensation of heterochromatin and subsequent repair of heterochromatic DSBs. As some subsets of DSBs may be repaired in heterochromatin independently of the ATM signaling, a possible repair model is also proposed for ATM-independent repair of these heterochromatic DSBs. PMID:27151295

  9. Improved single-strand DNA sizing accuracy in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, B B; Oaks, F; Menchen, S; Johnson, B

    1997-01-01

    Interpolation algorithms can be developed to size unknown single-stranded (ss) DNA fragments based on their electrophoretic mobilities, when they are compared with the mobilities of standard fragments of known sizes; however, sequence-specific anomalous electrophoretic migration can affect the accuracy and precision of the called sizes of the fragments. We used the anomalous migration of ssDNA fragments to optimize denaturation conditions for capillary electrophoresis. The capillary electrophoretic system uses a refillable polymer that both coats the capillary wall to suppress electro-osmotic flow and acts as the sieving matrix. The addition of 8 M urea to the polymer solution, as in slab gel electrophoresis, is insufficient to fully denature some anomalously migrating ssDNA fragments in this capillary electrophoresis system. The sizing accuracy of these fragments is significantly improved by the addition of 2-pyrrolidinone, or increased capillary temperature (60 degrees C). the effect of these two denaturing strategies is additive, and the best accuracy and precision in sizing results are obtained with a combination of chemical and thermal denaturation. PMID:9380518

  10. Diffusion of human Replication Protein A along single stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Binh; Sokoloski, Joshua; Galletto, Roberto; Elson, Elliot L.; Wold, Marc S.; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Replication Protein A (RPA) is a eukaryotic single stranded (ss) DNA binding protein that plays critical roles in most aspects of genome maintenance, including replication, recombination and repair. RPA binds ssDNA with high affinity, destabilizes DNA secondary structure and facilitates binding of other proteins to ssDNA. However, RPA must be removed from or redistributed along ssDNA during these processes. To probe the dynamics of RPA-DNA interactions, we combined ensemble and single molecule fluorescence approaches to examine human RPA diffusion along ssDNA and find that an hRPA hetero-trimer can diffuse rapidly along ssDNA. Diffusion of hRPA is functional in that it provides the mechanism by which hRPA can transiently disrupt DNA hairpins by diffusing in from ssDNA regions adjacent to the DNA hairpin. hRPA diffusion was also monitored by the fluctuations in fluorescence intensity of a Cy3 fluorophore attached to the end of ssDNA. Using a novel method to calibrate the Cy3 fluorescence intensity as a function of hRPA position on the ssDNA, we estimate a one-dimensional diffusion coefficient of hRPA on ssDNA of D1 ~5000 nucleotide2s−1 at 37°C. Diffusion of hRPA while bound to ssDNA enables it to be readily repositioned to allow other proteins access to ssDNA. PMID:25058683

  11. The Broken Belt: Meteorite Concentrations on Stranded Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, R. P.

    2003-01-01

    Since the first Antarctic meteorite concentrations were discovered more than 25 years ago, many theories regarding the role of iceflow in the production of meteorite concentrations have been put forward, and most agree on the basic principles. These models suggest that as the East Antarctic icesheet flows toward the margins of the continent, meteorites randomly located within the volume of ice are transported toward the icesheet margin. Where mountains or subsurface obstructions block glacial flow, diversion of ice around or over an obstruction reduces horizontal ice movement rates adjacent to the barriers and creates a vertical (upward) component of movement. If local mechanisms for ice loss (ablation) exist at such sites, an equilibrium surface will develop according to the balance between ice supply and loss, and the cargo of meteorites is exhumed on a blue ice surface. The result is a conceptual conveyor belt bringing meteorite-bearing volumes of ice from the interior of the continent to stagnant or slowmoving surfaces where ice is then lost and a precious cargo is left as a lag deposit. Cassidy et al. provides an excellent overview of how this model has been adapted to several Antarctic stranding surfaces.

  12. Herpesvirus infection in stranded Pacific harbor seals of coastal California.

    PubMed

    Gulland, F M; Lowenstine, L J; Lapointe, J M; Spraker, T; King, D P

    1997-07-01

    Histopathological examination revealed multifocal acute to chronic adrenal necrosis in 74 of 162 (45%) Pacific harbor seal pups (Phoca vitulina richardsi) dying during rehabilitation following live stranding along the coast of central and northern California (USA). Necrotic adrenal cells contained amphophilic, smudgy intranuclear inclusion bodies that were stained positive for DNA. Fifty of these seals also had lesions typical of sepsis, bacterial omphalophlebitis, pneumonia or gastroenteritis. Twenty four seals had no lesions other than thymic atrophy and occasional multifocal hepatic necrosis. Prior to death, affected seals had a marked lymphopenia. Electron microscopy revealed unenveloped intranuclear hexagonal to round viral particles approximately 100 nm in diameter, and cytoplasmic enveloped virions approximately 160 nm in diameter. These were morphologically consistent with herpesvirus. Inoculation of phocine adrenal and kidney cell lines with an adrenal tissue homogenate from affected animals produced a cytopathic effect in 5 days. Electron microscopy of cell cultures showing this cytopathic effect revealed similar viral particles to those observed in affected adrenal glands. Cases with characteristic inclusion bodies were observed in 42 of 95 (44%) male and 32 of 67 (47%) female seals. Affected animals had been in rehabilitation 0 to 63 days and were below average birth weight for this species. PMID:9249689

  13. Protein lysine methylation by seven-β-strand methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Falnes, Pål Ø; Jakobsson, Magnus E; Davydova, Erna; Ho, Angela; Małecki, Jędrzej

    2016-07-15

    Methylation of biomolecules is a frequent biochemical reaction within the cell, and a plethora of highly specific methyltransferases (MTases) catalyse the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to various substrates. The posttranslational methylation of lysine residues, catalysed by numerous lysine (K)-specific protein MTases (KMTs), is a very common and important protein modification, which recently has been subject to intense studies, particularly in the case of histone proteins. The majority of KMTs belong to a class of MTases that share a defining 'SET domain', and these enzymes mostly target lysines in the flexible tails of histones. However, the so-called seven-β-strand (7BS) MTases, characterized by a twisted beta-sheet structure and certain conserved sequence motifs, represent the largest MTase class, and these enzymes methylate a wide range of substrates, including small metabolites, lipids, nucleic acids and proteins. Until recently, the histone-specific Dot1/DOT1L was the only identified eukaryotic 7BS KMT. However, a number of novel 7BS KMTs have now been discovered, and, in particular, several recently characterized human and yeast members of MTase family 16 (MTF16) have been found to methylate lysines in non-histone proteins. Here, we review the status and recent progress on the 7BS KMTs, and discuss these enzymes at the levels of sequence/structure, catalytic mechanism, substrate recognition and biological significance. PMID:27407169

  14. Nuclear proteins hijacked by mammalian cytoplasmic plus strand RNA viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, Richard E.

    2015-05-15

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups. - Highlights: • Nuclear shuttling host proteins are commonly hijacked by RNA viruses to support replication. • A limited group of ubiquitous RNA binding proteins are commonly hijacked by a broad range of viruses. • Key virus proteins alter roles of RNA binding proteins in different stages of virus replication.

  15. Ku recruits XLF to DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Yano, Ken-ichi; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Wang, Shih-Ya; Uematsu, Naoya; Lee, Kyung-Jong; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Weterings, Eric; Chen, David J

    2008-01-01

    XRCC4-like factor (XLF)--also known as Cernunnos--has recently been shown to be involved in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), which is the main pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mammalian cells. XLF is likely to enhance NHEJ by stimulating XRCC4-ligase IV-mediated joining of DSBs. Here, we report mechanistic details of XLF recruitment to DSBs. Live cell imaging combined with laser micro-irradiation showed that XLF is an early responder to DSBs and that Ku is essential for XLF recruitment to DSBs. Biochemical analysis showed that Ku-XLF interaction occurs on DNA and that Ku stimulates XLF binding to DNA. Unexpectedly, XRCC4 is dispensable for XLF recruitment to DSBs, although photobleaching analysis showed that XRCC4 stabilizes the binding of XLF to DSBs. Our observations showed the direct involvement of XLF in the dynamic assembly of the NHEJ machinery and provide mechanistic insights into DSB recognition. PMID:18064046

  16. How a short double-stranded DNA bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jaeoh; Lee, O.-Chul; Sung, Wokyung

    2015-04-01

    A recent experiment using fluorescence microscopy showed that double-stranded DNA fragments shorter than 100 base pairs loop with the probabilities higher by the factor of 102-106 than predicted by the worm-like chain (WLC) model [R. Vafabakhsh and T. Ha, Science 337, 1101(2012)]. Furthermore, the looping probabilities were found to be nearly independent of the loop size. The results signify a breakdown of the WLC model for DNA mechanics which works well on long length scales and calls for fundamental understanding for stressed DNA on shorter length scales. We develop an analytical, statistical mechanical model to investigate what emerges to the short DNA under a tight bending. A bending above a critical level initiates nucleation of a thermally induced bubble, which could be trapped for a long time, in contrast to the bubbles in both free and uniformly bent DNAs, which are either transient or unstable. The trapped bubble is none other than the previously hypothesized kink, which releases the bending energy more easily as the contour length decreases. It leads to tremendous enhancement of the cyclization probabilities, in a reasonable agreement with experiment.

  17. High resolution atomic force microscopy of double-stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Ares, Pablo; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Herrero-Galán, Elías; Valpuesta, José M; Gil, Adriana; Gomez-Herrero, Julio; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to resolve the A-form sub-helical pitch periodicity. We have employed different high-sensitive force-detection methods and obtained images with similar spatial resolution. Therefore, we show here that the limiting factors for high-resolution AFM imaging of soft materials in liquid medium are, rather than the imaging mode, the force between the tip and the sample and the sharpness of the tip apex. PMID:26876486

  18. A Spinach molecular beacon triggered by strand displacement

    PubMed Central

    Bhadra, Sanchita; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    We have re-engineered the fluorescent RNA aptamer Spinach to be activated in a sequence-dependent manner. The original Spinach aptamer was extended at its 5′- and 3′-ends to create Spinach.ST, which is predicted to fold into an inactive conformation and thus prevent association with the small molecule fluorophore DFHBI. Hybridization of a specific trigger oligonucleotide to a designed toehold leads to toehold-initiated strand displacement and refolds Spinach into the active, fluorophore-binding conformation. Spinach.ST not only specifically detects its target oligonucleotide but can discriminate readily against single-nucleotide mismatches. RNA amplicons produced during nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) of DNA or RNA targets could be specifically detected and reported in real-time by conformational activation of Spinach.ST generated by in vitro transcription. In order to adapt any target sequence to detection by a Spinach reporter we used a primer design technique that brings together otherwise distal toehold sequences via hairpin formation. The same techniques could potentially be used to adapt common Spinach reporters to non-nucleic acid analytes, rather than by making fusions between aptamers and Spinach. PMID:24942625

  19. Prion search and cellular prion protein expression in stranded dolphins.

    PubMed

    Di Guardo, G; Cocumelli, C; Meoli, R; Barbaro, K; Terracciano, G; Di Francesco, C E; Mazzariol, S; Eleni, C

    2012-01-01

    The recent description of a prion disease (PD) case in a free-ranging bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) prompted us to carry out an extensive search for the disease-associated isoform (PrPSc) of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) in the brain and in a range of lymphoid tissues from 23 striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba), 5 bottlenose dolphins and 2 Risso s dolphins (Grampus griseus) found stranded between 2007 and 2012 along the Italian coastline. Three striped dolphins and one bottlenose dolphin showed microscopic lesions of encephalitis, with no evidence of spongiform brain lesions being detected in any of the 30 free-ranging cetaceans investigated herein. Nevertheless, we could still observe a prominent PrPC immunoreactivity in the brain as well as in lymphoid tissues from these dolphins. Although immunohistochemical and Western blot investigations yielded negative results for PrPSc deposition in all tissues from the dolphins under study, the reported occurrence of a spontaneous PD case in a wild dolphin is an intriguing issue and a matter of concern for both prion biology and intra/inter-species transmissibility, as well as for cetacean conservation medicine. PMID:23034277

  20. ATM controls meiotic double-strand-break formation.

    PubMed

    Lange, Julian; Pan, Jing; Cole, Francesca; Thelen, Michael P; Jasin, Maria; Keeney, Scott

    2011-11-10

    In many organisms, developmentally programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs) formed by the SPO11 transesterase initiate meiotic recombination, which promotes pairing and segregation of homologous chromosomes. Because every chromosome must receive a minimum number of DSBs, attention has focused on factors that support DSB formation. However, improperly repaired DSBs can cause meiotic arrest or mutation; thus, having too many DSBs is probably as deleterious as having too few. Only a small fraction of SPO11 protein ever makes a DSB in yeast or mouse and SPO11 and its accessory factors remain abundant long after most DSB formation ceases, implying the existence of mechanisms that restrain SPO11 activity to limit DSB numbers. Here we report that the number of meiotic DSBs in mouse is controlled by ATM, a kinase activated by DNA damage to trigger checkpoint signalling and promote DSB repair. Levels of SPO11-oligonucleotide complexes, by-products of meiotic DSB formation, are elevated at least tenfold in spermatocytes lacking ATM. Moreover, Atm mutation renders SPO11-oligonucleotide levels sensitive to genetic manipulations that modulate SPO11 protein levels. We propose that ATM restrains SPO11 via a negative feedback loop in which kinase activation by DSBs suppresses further DSB formation. Our findings explain previously puzzling phenotypes of Atm-null mice and provide a molecular basis for the gonadal dysgenesis observed in ataxia telangiectasia, the human syndrome caused by ATM deficiency. PMID:22002603

  1. Patterns of evolution of research strands in the hydrologic sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, F. W.; Fang, Y. C.; Parthasarathy, S.

    2005-03-01

    This paper examines issues of impact and innovation in groundwater research by using bibliometric data and citation analysis.The analysis is based on 3120 papers from the journal Water Resources Research with full contents and their citation data from the ISI Web of Science. The research is designed to develop a better understanding of the way citation numbers can be interpreted by scientists. Not surprisingly, the most highly cited papers appear to be pioneers in the field with papers departing significantly from what has come before and to be effective in creating similar, follow-on papers. Papers that are early contributions to a new research strand that is highly influential will be on average highly cited. However, the importance of a research strand as measured by citations seems to fall with time. The citation patterns of some classic papers show that the activity in the topical area and impact of follow-on papers gradually decline with time, which has similarities with Kuhn's ideas of revolutionary and normal science. The results of this study reinforce the importance of being a pioneer in a research strand, strategically shifting research strands, adopting strategies that can facilitate really major research breakthroughs. L'article examine les problèmes d'impact et d'innovation dans la recherche des eaux souterraines en utilisant les données bibliométriques et l'analyse des citations. L'analyse a été faite sur 3120 articles parus dans Water Resources Research en tenant compte de leur texte complet et de toutes citations parues dans l' ISI Web de la Science. Le but de la recherche a été de mieux comprendre comment le nombre des citations peut être interprété par les scientifiques. Ce n'est pas une surprise que les plus cités articles soient les articles-pionniers dans leurs domaines, qui s'écartent d'une manière significative de ce qui a été écrit auparavant et qui ont été suivi par des nouveaux articles. Les articles qui présentent une

  2. DNA double strand break repair, aging and the chromatin connection.

    PubMed

    Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2016-06-01

    Are DNA damage and mutations possible causes or consequences of aging? This question has been hotly debated by biogerontologists for decades. The importance of DNA damage as a possible driver of the aging process went from being widely recognized to then forgotten, and is now slowly making a comeback. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are particularly relevant to aging because of their toxicity, increased frequency with age and the association of defects in their repair with premature aging. Recent studies expand the potential impact of DNA damage and mutations on aging by linking DNA DSB repair and age-related chromatin changes. There is overwhelming evidence that increased DNA damage and mutations accelerate aging. However, an ultimate proof of causality would be to show that enhanced genome and epigenome stability delays aging. This is not an easy task, as improving such complex biological processes is infinitely more difficult than disabling it. We will discuss the possibility that animal models with enhanced DNA repair and epigenome maintenance will be generated in the near future. PMID:26923716

  3. Single-molecule assay reveals strand switching and enhanced processivity of UvrD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessinges, Marie-Noëlle; Lionnet, Timothée; Xi, Xu Guang; Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent

    2004-04-01

    DNA helicases are enzymes capable of unwinding double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) to provide the single-stranded DNA template required in many biological processes. Among these, UvrD, an essential DNA repair enzyme, has been shown to unwind dsDNA while moving 3'-5' on one strand. Here, we use a single-molecule manipulation technique to monitor real-time changes in extension of a single, stretched, nicked dsDNA substrate as it is unwound by a single enzyme. This technique offers a means for measuring the rate, lifetime, and processivity of the enzymatic complex as a function of ATP, and for estimating the helicase step size. Strikingly, we observe a feature not seen in bulk assays: unwinding is preferentially followed by a slow, enzyme-translocation-limited rezipping of the separated strands rather than by dissociation of the enzymatic complex followed by quick rehybridization of the DNA strands. We address the mechanism underlying this phenomenon and propose a fully characterized model in which UvrD switches strands and translocates backwards on the other strand, allowing the DNA to reanneal in its wake. helicase | DNA replication | DNA repair | magnetic tweezers

  4. Single-molecule assay reveals strand switching and enhanced processivity of UvrD.

    PubMed

    Dessinges, Marie-Noëlle; Lionnet, Timothée; Xi, Xu Guang; Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent

    2004-04-27

    DNA helicases are enzymes capable of unwinding double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) to provide the single-stranded DNA template required in many biological processes. Among these, UvrD, an essential DNA repair enzyme, has been shown to unwind dsDNA while moving 3'-5' on one strand. Here, we use a single-molecule manipulation technique to monitor real-time changes in extension of a single, stretched, nicked dsDNA substrate as it is unwound by a single enzyme. This technique offers a means for measuring the rate, lifetime, and processivity of the enzymatic complex as a function of ATP, and for estimating the helicase step size. Strikingly, we observe a feature not seen in bulk assays: unwinding is preferentially followed by a slow, enzyme-translocation-limited rezipping of the separated strands rather than by dissociation of the enzymatic complex followed by quick rehybridization of the DNA strands. We address the mechanism underlying this phenomenon and propose a fully characterized model in which UvrD switches strands and translocates backwards on the other strand, allowing the DNA to reanneal in its wake. PMID:15079074

  5. Direct imaging of single UvrD helicase dynamics on long single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Suk; Balci, Hamza; Jia, Haifeng; Lohman, Timothy M; Ha, Taekjip

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging of single-protein dynamics on DNA has been largely limited to double-stranded DNA or short single-stranded DNA. We have developed a hybrid approach for observing single proteins moving on laterally stretched kilobase-sized ssDNA. Here we probed the single-stranded DNA translocase activity of Escherichia coli UvrD by single fluorophore tracking, while monitoring DNA unwinding activity with optical tweezers to capture the entire sequence of protein binding, single-stranded DNA translocation and multiple pathways of unwinding initiation. The results directly demonstrate that the UvrD monomer is a highly processive single-stranded DNA translocase that is stopped by a double-stranded DNA, whereas two monomers are required to unwind DNA to a detectable degree. The single-stranded DNA translocation rate does not depend on the force applied and displays a remarkable homogeneity, whereas the unwinding rate shows significant heterogeneity. These findings demonstrate that UvrD assembly state regulates its DNA helicase activity with functional implications for its stepping mechanism, and also reveal a previously unappreciated complexity in the active species during unwinding. PMID:23695672

  6. Uniformity evaluation and optimization of fluid flow characteristics in a seven-strand tundish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Zhang, Chao-jie; Li, Rui

    2016-02-01

    The effect of flow control devices (FCDs) on the uniformity of flow characteristics in a seven-strand symmetrical trapezoidal tundish was studied using both an experimental 1:2.5 hydraulic model and a numerical simulation of a 1:1 geometric model. The variation coefficient (CV) was defined to evaluate the flow uniformity of the seven-strand tundish. An optimized FCD configuration was proposed on the basis of the evaluation of experimental results. It is concluded that a turbulence inhibitor (TI) and U-type dam are essential to improve the uniformity of fluid flow in the seven-strand tundish. In addition, the configuration of inclination T-type dams with a height of 200 mm between the second and third strands and with a height of 300 mm between the third and fourth strands can minimize the proportion of dead zone. After optimizing the configuration of FCDs, the variation coefficient reduces below 20% of the mean value, and the average proportion of dead zone is just 14.6%; in addition, the temperature fluctuation between the strands could be controlled within 0.6 K. In summary, the uniformity of flow and temperature in the seven-strand tundish is greatly improved.

  7. The kinetics of force-dependent hybridization and strand-peeling of short DNA fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, ZhouJie; Yuan, GuoHua; Zhai, WeiLi; Yan, Jie; Chen, Hu

    2016-08-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) carries the genetic information in all living organisms. It consists of two interwound single-stranded (ss) strands, forming a double-stranded (ds) DNA with a right-handed double-helical conformation. The two strands are held together by highly specific basepairing interactions and are further stabilized by stacking between adjacent basepairs. A transition from a dsDNA to two separated ssDNA is called melting and the reverse transition is called hybridization. Applying a tensile force to a dsDNA can result in a particular type of DNA melting, during which one ssDNA strand is peeled away from the other. In this work, we studied the kinetics of strand-peeling and hybridization of short DNA under tensile forces. Our results show that the force-dependent strand-peeling and hybridization can be described with a simple two-state model. Importantly, detailed analysis of the force-dependent transition rates revealed that the transition state consists of several basepairs dsDNA.

  8. The Stranding Anomaly as Population Indicator: The Case of Harbour Porpoise Phocoena phocoena in North-Western Europe

    PubMed Central

    Peltier, Helene; Baagøe, Hans J.; Camphuysen, Kees C. J.; Czeck, Richard; Dabin, Willy; Daniel, Pierre; Deaville, Rob; Haelters, Jan; Jauniaux, Thierry; Jensen, Lasse F.; Jepson, Paul D.; Keijl, Guido O.; Siebert, Ursula; Van Canneyt, Olivier; Ridoux, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Ecological indicators for monitoring strategies are expected to combine three major characteristics: ecological significance, statistical credibility, and cost-effectiveness. Strategies based on stranding networks rank highly in cost-effectiveness, but their ecological significance and statistical credibility are disputed. Our present goal is to improve the value of stranding data as population indicator as part of monitoring strategies by constructing the spatial and temporal null hypothesis for strandings. The null hypothesis is defined as: small cetacean distribution and mortality are uniform in space and constant in time. We used a drift model to map stranding probabilities and predict stranding patterns of cetacean carcasses under H0 across the North Sea, the Channel and the Bay of Biscay, for the period 1990–2009. As the most common cetacean occurring in this area, we chose the harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena for our modelling. The difference between these strandings expected under H0 and observed strandings is defined as the stranding anomaly. It constituted the stranding data series corrected for drift conditions. Seasonal decomposition of stranding anomaly suggested that drift conditions did not explain observed seasonal variations of porpoise strandings. Long-term stranding anomalies increased first in the southern North Sea, the Channel and Bay of Biscay coasts, and finally the eastern North Sea. The hypothesis of changes in porpoise distribution was consistent with local visual surveys, mostly SCANS surveys (1994 and 2005). This new indicator could be applied to cetacean populations across the world and more widely to marine megafauna. PMID:23614031

  9. The role of cytosine methylation on charge transport through a DNA strand.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jianqing; Govind, Niranjan; Anantram, M P

    2015-09-01

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modification remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Büttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and inter-strand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with the same rate. The lower conductance for the methylated strand in the experiment is suggested to be caused by the more stable structure due to the introduction of the methyl groups. We also study the role of the exchange-correlation functional and the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit. PMID:26342369

  10. The role of cytosine methylation on charge transport through a DNA strand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jianqing; Govind, Niranjan; Anantram, M. P.

    2015-09-01

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modification remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Büttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and inter-strand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with the same rate. The lower conductance for the methylated strand in the experiment is suggested to be caused by the more stable structure due to the introduction of the methyl groups. We also study the role of the exchange-correlation functional and the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit.

  11. Factors affecting harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) strandings in the Northwest Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Soulen, Brianne K; Cammen, Kristina; Schultz, Thomas F; Johnston, David W

    2013-01-01

    The effects of climate change on high latitude regions are becoming increasingly evident, particularly in the rapid decline of sea ice cover in the Arctic. Many high latitude species dependent on sea ice are being forced to adapt to changing habitats. Harp seals (Pagophilus groenlandicus) are an indicator species for changing high-latitude ecosystems. This study analyzed multiple factors including ice cover, demographics, and genetic diversity, which could affect harp seal stranding rates along the eastern coast of the United States. Ice cover assessments were conducted for the month of February in the Gulf of St. Lawrence whelping region from 1991-2010 using remote sensing data, and harp seal stranding data were collected over the same time period. Genetic diversity, which may affect how quickly species can adapt to changing climates, was assessed using ten microsatellite markers to determine mean d (2) in a subset of stranded and by-caught (presumably healthy) seals sampled along the northeast U.S. coast. Our study found a strong negative correlation (R (2) = 0.49) between ice cover in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and yearling harp seal strandings, but found no relationship between sea ice conditions and adult strandings. Our analysis revealed that male seals stranded more frequently than females during the study period and that this relationship was strongest during light ice years. In contrast, we found no significant difference in mean d (2) between stranded and by-caught harp seals. The results demonstrate that sea ice cover and demographic factors have a greater influence on harp seal stranding rates than genetic diversity, with only a little of the variance in mean d (2) among stranded seals explained by ice cover. Any changes in these factors could have major implications for harp seals, and these findings should be considered in the development of future management plans for the Arctic that incorporate climate variability. PMID:23874759

  12. A Sensor-Type PC Strand with an Embedded FBG Sensor for Monitoring Prestress Forces

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Tae; Park, YoungHwan; Park, Sung Yong; Cho, Keunhee; Cho, Jeong-Rae

    2015-01-01

    Prestressed Concrete Wire and Strand (PC) strands are the most used materials to introduce prestress in a Pre-Stressed Concrete (PSC) structure. However, it is difficult to evaluate the final prestress force of the PC strand after prestressing or its residual prestress force after completion of the structure on site. This impossibility to assess eventual loss of prestress of the PC strand has resulted in a number of serious accidents and even in the collapse of several structures. This situation stresses the necessity to maintain the prestress force residual or after prestressing for the evaluation of the health of the concrete structure throughout its lifespan. Recently, several researchers have studied methods enabling one to verify the prestress force by inserting an optical fiber sensor inside the strand but failed to provide simple techniques for the fabrication of these devices to fulfill measurement performance from the design prestress to failure. Moreover, these methods require the additional installation of electrical resistance strain gages, displacement sensors and load cells on the outer surface of the structure for long-term precise measurement. This paper proposes a method enabling one to evaluate precisely and effectively the prestress force of the PC strand and intends to verify the applicability of the proposed method on actual concrete structures. To that end, an innovative PC strand is developed by embedding a Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor in the core wire of the PC strand so as to enable short term as well as long term monitoring. The measurement performance of the developed strand is then evaluated experimentally and the reliability of the monitoring data is assessed. PMID:25580903

  13. Factors Affecting Harp Seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) Strandings in the Northwest Atlantic

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Thomas F.; Johnston, David W.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of climate change on high latitude regions are becoming increasingly evident, particularly in the rapid decline of sea ice cover in the Arctic. Many high latitude species dependent on sea ice are being forced to adapt to changing habitats. Harp seals (Pagophilus groenlandicus) are an indicator species for changing high-latitude ecosystems. This study analyzed multiple factors including ice cover, demographics, and genetic diversity, which could affect harp seal stranding rates along the eastern coast of the United States. Ice cover assessments were conducted for the month of February in the Gulf of St. Lawrence whelping region from 1991–2010 using remote sensing data, and harp seal stranding data were collected over the same time period. Genetic diversity, which may affect how quickly species can adapt to changing climates, was assessed using ten microsatellite markers to determine mean d2 in a subset of stranded and by-caught (presumably healthy) seals sampled along the northeast U.S. coast. Our study found a strong negative correlation (R2 = 0.49) between ice cover in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and yearling harp seal strandings, but found no relationship between sea ice conditions and adult strandings. Our analysis revealed that male seals stranded more frequently than females during the study period and that this relationship was strongest during light ice years. In contrast, we found no significant difference in mean d2 between stranded and by-caught harp seals. The results demonstrate that sea ice cover and demographic factors have a greater influence on harp seal stranding rates than genetic diversity, with only a little of the variance in mean d2 among stranded seals explained by ice cover. Any changes in these factors could have major implications for harp seals, and these findings should be considered in the development of future management plans for the Arctic that incorporate climate variability. PMID:23874759

  14. The role of cytosine methylation on charge transport through a DNA strand

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jianqing Anantram, M. P.; Govind, Niranjan

    2015-09-07

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modification remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Büttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and inter-strand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with the same rate. The lower conductance for the methylated strand in the experiment is suggested to be caused by the more stable structure due to the introduction of the methyl groups. We also study the role of the exchange-correlation functional and the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit.

  15. An underlying mechanism for the increased mutagenesis of lagging-strand genes in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Million-Weaver, Samuel; Samadpour, Ariana N.; Moreno-Habel, Daniela A.; Nugent, Patrick; Brittnacher, Mitchell J.; Weiss, Eli; Hayden, Hillary S.; Miller, Samuel I.; Liachko, Ivan; Merrikh, Houra

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that lagging-strand genes accumulate mutations faster than those encoded on the leading strand in Bacillus subtilis. Although we proposed that orientation-specific encounters between replication and transcription underlie this phenomenon, the mechanism leading to the increased mutagenesis of lagging-strand genes remained unknown. Here, we report that the transcription-dependent and orientation-specific differences in mutation rates of genes require the B. subtilis Y-family polymerase, PolY1 (yqjH). We find that without PolY1, association of the replicative helicase, DnaC, and the recombination protein, RecA, with lagging-strand genes increases in a transcription-dependent manner. These data suggest that PolY1 promotes efficient replisome progression through lagging-strand genes, thereby reducing potentially detrimental breaks and single-stranded DNA at these loci. Y-family polymerases can alleviate potential obstacles to replisome progression by facilitating DNA lesion bypass, extension of D-loops, or excision repair. We find that the nucleotide excision repair (NER) proteins UvrA, UvrB, and UvrC, but not RecA, are required for transcription-dependent asymmetry in mutation rates of genes in the two orientations. Furthermore, we find that the transcription-coupling repair factor Mfd functions in the same pathway as PolY1 and is also required for increased mutagenesis of lagging-strand genes. Experimental and SNP analyses of B. subtilis genomes show mutational footprints consistent with these findings. We propose that the interplay between replication and transcription increases lesion susceptibility of, specifically, lagging-strand genes, activating an Mfd-dependent error-prone NER mechanism. We propose that this process, at least partially, underlies the accelerated evolution of lagging-strand genes. PMID:25713353

  16. Coronavirus genomic and subgenomic minus-strand RNAs copartition in membrane-protected replication complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Sethna, P B; Brian, D A

    1997-01-01

    The majority of porcine transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus plus-strand RNAs (genome and subgenomic mRNAs), at the time of peak RNA synthesis (5 h postinfection), were not found in membrane-protected complexes in lysates of cells prepared by Dounce homogenization but were found to be susceptible to micrococcal nuclease (85%) or to sediment to a pellet in a cesium chloride gradient (61%). They therefore are probably free molecules in solution or components of easily dissociable complexes. By contrast, the majority of minus-strand RNAs (genome length and subgenomic mRNA length) were found to be resistant to micrococcal nuclease (69%) or to remain suspended in association with membrane-protected complexes following isopycnic sedimentation in a cesium chloride gradient (85%). Furthermore, 35% of the suspended minus strands were in a dense complex (1.20 to 1.24 g/ml) that contained an RNA plus-to-minus-strand molar ratio of approximately 8:1 and viral structural proteins S, M, and N, and 65% were in a light complex (1.15 to 1.17 g/ml) that contained nearly equimolar amounts of plus- and minus-strand RNAs and only trace amounts of proteins M and N. In no instance during fractionation were genome-length minus strands found segregated from sub-genome-length minus strands. These results indicate that all minus-strand species are components of similarly structured membrane-associated replication complexes and support the concept that all are active in the synthesis of plus-strand RNAs. PMID:9311859

  17. A sensor-type PC strand with an embedded FBG sensor for monitoring prestress forces.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Tae; Park, YoungHwan; Park, Sung Yong; Cho, Keunhee; Cho, Jeong-Rae

    2015-01-01

    Prestressed Concrete Wire and Strand (PC) strands are the most used materials to introduce prestress in a Pre-Stressed Concrete (PSC) structure. However, it is difficult to evaluate the final prestress force of the PC strand after prestressing or its residual prestress force after completion of the structure on site. This impossibility to assess eventual loss of prestress of the PC strand has resulted in a number of serious accidents and even in the collapse of several structures. This situation stresses the necessity to maintain the prestress force residual or after prestressing for the evaluation of the health of the concrete structure throughout its lifespan. Recently, several researchers have studied methods enabling one to verify the prestress force by inserting an optical fiber sensor inside the strand but failed to provide simple techniques for the fabrication of these devices to fulfill measurement performance from the design prestress to failure. Moreover, these methods require the additional installation of electrical resistance strain gages, displacement sensors and load cells on the outer surface of the structure for long-term precise measurement. This paper proposes a method enabling one to evaluate precisely and effectively the prestress force of the PC strand and intends to verify the applicability of the proposed method on actual concrete structures. To that end, an innovative PC strand is developed by embedding a Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor in the core wire of the PC strand so as to enable short term as well as long term monitoring. The measurement performance of the developed strand is then evaluated experimentally and the reliability of the monitoring data is assessed. PMID:25580903

  18. Possible age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) and corresponding change in echolocation parameters in a stranded Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin.

    PubMed

    Li, Songhai; Wang, Ding; Wang, Kexiong; Hoffmann-Kuhnt, Matthias; Fernando, Nimal; Taylor, Elizabeth A; Lin, Wenzhi; Chen, Jialin; Ng, Timothy

    2013-11-15

    The hearing and echolocation clicks of a stranded Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis) in Zhuhai, China, were studied. This animal had been repeatedly observed in the wild before it was stranded and its age was estimated to be ~40 years. The animal's hearing was measured using a non-invasive auditory evoked potential (AEP) method. Echolocation clicks produced by the dolphin were recorded when the animal was freely swimming in a 7.5 m (width)×22 m (length)×4.8 m (structural depth) pool with a water depth of ~2.5 m. The hearing and echolocation clicks of the studied dolphin were compared with those of a conspecific younger individual, ~13 years of age. The results suggested that the cut-off frequency of the high-frequency hearing of the studied dolphin was ~30-40 kHz lower than that of the younger individual. The peak and centre frequencies of the clicks produced by the older dolphin were ~16 kHz lower than those of the clicks produced by the younger animal. Considering that the older dolphin was ~40 years old, its lower high-frequency hearing range with lower click peak and centre frequencies could probably be explained by age-related hearing loss (presbycusis). PMID:24172886

  19. The Body Image Dissatisfaction and Psychological Symptoms among Invasive and Minimally Invasive Aesthetic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Y. Yazdandoost, Rokhsareh; Hayatbini, Niki; Asgharnejad Farid, Ali Asghar; Gharaee, Banafsheh; Latifi, Noor Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Elective aesthetic surgeries are increasing in the Iranian population with reasons linked to body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms. This study compared the body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms among invasive and minimally invasive aesthetic surgery patients and a control group. METHODS Data from 90 participants (invasive aesthetic surgery=30 Ss, minimally invasive aesthetic surgery=30 Ss, and control group=30 Ss) were included. Subjects were assessed on body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms to provide an evidence for a continuum of body image dissatisfaction, anxiety, depression and interpersonal sensitivity in invasive and minimally invasive aesthetic surgery clients. RESULTS Between the three groups of invasive, minimally invasive aesthetic surgeries and control on body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms (anxiety, depression and interpersonal sensitivity), there was a significant difference. CONCLUSION These findings have implications for pre-surgical assessment as well as psychological interventions rather than invasive medical interventions at first step.

  20. Edwardsiella tarda sepsis in a live-stranded sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus).

    PubMed

    Cools, Piet; Haelters, Jan; Lopes dos Santos Santiago, Guido; Claeys, Geert; Boelens, Jerina; Leroux-Roels, Isabel; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Deschaght, Pieter

    2013-09-27

    Whale strandings remain poorly understood, although bacterial infections have been suggested to contribute. We isolated Edwardsiella tarda from the blood of a stranded sperm whale. The pathogen was identified with MALDI-TOF MS, confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and quantified in blood by qPCR. We report the first case of sepsis in a sperm whale. The zoonotic potential of E. tarda and the possible role of bacterial infections in the enigmatic strandings of cetaceans are discussed. PMID:23827352

  1. Influence of Indentation on the Critical Current of Nb3Sn Strands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomone, Suwa; Yoshihiro, Nabara; Yoshikazu, Takahashi; Masayuki, Oshikiri; Fumiaki, Tsutsumi; Kazuyuki, Shibutani; Yoshihiko, Nunoya; Yukinobu, Murakami; Katsumi, Miyashita; Sim, Ki-Hong; Kwon, Soun Pil

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is procuring Central Solenoid (CS) conductorsfor all modules forITER. The superconducting properties of the Nb3Sn CS conductors will have to sustain 60,000 electromagnetic (EM) cycles. The current sharing temperatures (Tcs) were stable with EM cycles in short twist pitch conductors.However, the short twist pitch and tight cabling increases indented strands at the contact point between strands before heat treatment. The results of Ic measurement on artificially indented Nb3Sn strands indicate that Ic was almost constant within a critical depth of the indentations.

  2. Isolation and sequencing of active origins of DNA replication by nascent strand capture and release (NSCR)

    PubMed Central

    Kunnev, Dimiter; Freeland, Amy; Qin, Maochun; Wang, Jianmin; Pruitt, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Nascent strand capture and release (NSCR) is a method for isolation of short nascent strands to identify origins of DNA replication. The protocol provided involves isolation of total DNA, denaturation, size fractionation on a sucrose gradient, 5′-biotinylation of the appropriate size nucleic acids, binding to a streptavidin coated magnetic beads, intensive washing, and specific release of only the RNA-containing chimeric nascent strand DNA using ribonuclease I (RNase I). The method has been applied to mammalian cells derived from proliferative tissues and cell culture but could be used for any system where DNA replication is primed by a small RNA resulting in chimeric RNA-DNA molecules. PMID:26949711

  3. Long-Term Seasonal and Interannual Patterns of Marine Mammal Strandings in Subtropical Western South Atlantic

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Jonatas H. F.; Mattos, Paulo H.; Silva, Kleber G.; Secchi, Eduardo R.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding temporal patterns of marine mammal occurrence is useful for establishing conservation strategies. We used a 38 yr-long dataset spanning 1976 to 2013 to describe temporal patterns and trends in marine mammal strandings along a subtropical stretch of the east coast of South America. This region is influenced by a transitional zone between tropical and temperate waters and is considered an important fishing ground off Brazil. Generalized Additive Models were used to evaluate the temporal stranding patterns of the most frequently stranded species. Forty species were documented in 12,540 stranding events. Franciscana (n = 4,574), South American fur seal, (n = 3,419), South American sea lion (n = 2,049), bottlenose dolphins (n = 293) and subantarctic fur seal (n = 219) were the most frequently stranded marine mammals. The seasonality of strandings of franciscana and bottlenose dolphin coincided with periods of higher fishing effort and strandings of South American and subantarctic fur seals with post-reproductive dispersal. For South American sea lion the seasonality of strandings is associated with both fishing effort and post-reproductive dispersal. Some clear seasonal patterns were associated with occurrence of cold- (e.g. subantarctic fur seal) and warm-water (e.g. rough-toothed dolphin) species in winter and summer, respectively. Inter-annual increases in stranding rate were observed for franciscana and South American fur seal and these are likely related to increased fishing effort and population growth, respectively. For subantarctic fur seal the stranding rate showed a slight decline while for bottlenose dolphin it remained steady. No significant year to year variation in stranding rate was observed for South American sea lion. The slight decrease in frequency of temperate/polar marine mammals and the increased occurrence of subtropical/tropical species since the late 1990s might be associated with environmental changes linked to climate change

  4. A kinetic analysis of strand breaks on large DNA induced by cigarette smoke extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Takata, Tatsuya; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Mizuno, Akira

    2010-06-01

    We report a kinetic analysis of strand breakages on large DNA molecules induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE), an extract of soluble cigarette smoke components. Previously, this DNA damage was analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis, whereas we used fluorescence to kinetically analyze damage to individual DNA molecules. CSE caused a marked change in length of DNA molecules. The rate of CSE-induced double-strand breakage on large random-coiled DNA molecules was determined using a simple theoretical model, allowing the facile estimation of the rate of double-strand breaks on large DNA molecules.

  5. Long-Term Seasonal and Interannual Patterns of Marine Mammal Strandings in Subtropical Western South Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Prado, Jonatas H F; Mattos, Paulo H; Silva, Kleber G; Secchi, Eduardo R

    2016-01-01

    Understanding temporal patterns of marine mammal occurrence is useful for establishing conservation strategies. We used a 38 yr-long dataset spanning 1976 to 2013 to describe temporal patterns and trends in marine mammal strandings along a subtropical stretch of the east coast of South America. This region is influenced by a transitional zone between tropical and temperate waters and is considered an important fishing ground off Brazil. Generalized Additive Models were used to evaluate the temporal stranding patterns of the most frequently stranded species. Forty species were documented in 12,540 stranding events. Franciscana (n = 4,574), South American fur seal, (n = 3,419), South American sea lion (n = 2,049), bottlenose dolphins (n = 293) and subantarctic fur seal (n = 219) were the most frequently stranded marine mammals. The seasonality of strandings of franciscana and bottlenose dolphin coincided with periods of higher fishing effort and strandings of South American and subantarctic fur seals with post-reproductive dispersal. For South American sea lion the seasonality of strandings is associated with both fishing effort and post-reproductive dispersal. Some clear seasonal patterns were associated with occurrence of cold- (e.g. subantarctic fur seal) and warm-water (e.g. rough-toothed dolphin) species in winter and summer, respectively. Inter-annual increases in stranding rate were observed for franciscana and South American fur seal and these are likely related to increased fishing effort and population growth, respectively. For subantarctic fur seal the stranding rate showed a slight decline while for bottlenose dolphin it remained steady. No significant year to year variation in stranding rate was observed for South American sea lion. The slight decrease in frequency of temperate/polar marine mammals and the increased occurrence of subtropical/tropical species since the late 1990s might be associated with environmental changes linked to climate change

  6. Review of the Effects of Offshore Seismic Surveys in Cetaceans: Are Mass Strandings a Possibility?

    PubMed

    Castellote, Manuel; Llorens, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Displacement of cetaceans is commonly reported during offshore seismic surveys. Speculation concerning possible links between seismic survey noise and cetacean strandings is available for a dozen events but without convincing causal evidence. This lack of evidence should not be considered conclusive but rather as reflecting the absence of a comprehensive analysis of the circumstances. Current mitigation guidelines are inadequate for long-range effects such as displacements and the potential for strandings. This review presents the available information for ten documented strandings that were possibly linked to seismic surveys and recommends initial measures and actions to further evaluate this potential link. PMID:26610953

  7. Regulation of DNA methylation using different tensions of double strands constructed in a defined DNA nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Endo, Masayuki; Katsuda, Yousuke; Hidaka, Kumi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2010-02-10

    A novel strategy for regulation of an enzymatic DNA modification reaction has been developed by employing a designed nanoscale DNA scaffold. DNA modification using enzymes often requires bending of specific DNA strands to facilitate the reaction. The DNA methylation enzyme EcoRI methyltransferase (M.EcoRI) bends double helix DNA by 55 degrees-59 degrees during the reaction with flipping out of the second adenine in the GAATTC sequence as the methyl transfer reaction proceeds. In this study, two different double helical tensions, tense and relaxed states of double helices, were created to control the methyl transfer reaction of M.EcoRI and examine the structural effect on the methylation. We designed and prepared a two-dimensional (2D) DNA scaffold named the "DNA frame" using the DNA origami method that accommodates two different lengths of the double-strand DNA fragments, a tense 64mer double strand and a relaxed 74mer double strand. Fast-scanning atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging revealed the different dynamic movement of the double-strand DNAs and complexes of M.EcoRI with 64mer and 74mer double-strand DNAs. After treatment of the double strands in the DNA frame with M.EcoRI and the subsequent digestion with restriction enzyme EcoRI (R.EcoRI), AFM analysis revealed that the 74mer double-strand DNA was not effectively cleaved compared with the 64mer double-strand DNA, indicating that the methylation preferentially occurred in the relaxed 74mer double-strand DNA compared with that in the tense 64mer double strand. Biochemical analysis of the methylation and specific digestion using a real-time PCR also supported the above results. These results indicate the importance of the structural flexibility for bending of the duplex DNA during the methyl transfer reaction with M.EcoRI. Therefore, the DNA methylation can be regulated using the structurally controlled double-strand DNAs constructed in the DNA frame nanostructure. PMID:20078043

  8. Effect of Twist Pitch in the Strands on the Saturation and Losses in the Nb3Sn Strands for the ITER TF CICC

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N

    2007-12-06

    ITER TF coils will see a significant longitudinal magnetic field in the event of the plasma disruption. This abrupt change of magnetic fields results in the appearance of an additional electrical field in the strands. The mechanism of this electrical field is the induced currents that expel the flux from the strands. This effect was known since the late 1970's [1-3] and most of the details necessary for the analyses given in this report are presented in [4]. Let's assume for simplicity a zero transport current in the strand. When a longitudinal pulsed field is applied, the outer filaments will carry an induced current repelling the change of flux. The current density of this current is 'critical' in the simplification of Bean's critical state model, where superconducting transition is represented as j=j{sub c} at any non-zero electrical field and zero where the electrical field has not penetrated. In reality, since the current density is roughly logarithmic with the electrical field, E=E{sub c}*exp[(j-j{sub c})/jo], Bean's model is just a simplification, and current density is slightly nonuniform in the outer filament and more so for the interior strands. The inner portion of the filaments will carry a current of the opposite sign. Even in the Bean's model it is not uniform, but the assumption that it is uniform and less than critical simplifies mathematics significantly and does not deviate far from the real current density distribution. In certain circumstances, the average electrical field in the strands will be high enough to exceed the take-off electrical field averaged across the cross section. In this case, the multifilamentary strand will become unstable and will experience transition to the normal state. With zero transport current, it will eventually recover, of course. This phenomenon is analogous to the flux jump. If the strand carries a transport current, the situation becomes more complicated. If it goes unstable and the transport current is higher

  9. The population biology of fungal invasions.

    PubMed

    Gladieux, P; Feurtey, A; Hood, M E; Snirc, A; Clavel, J; Dutech, C; Roy, M; Giraud, T

    2015-05-01

    Fungal invasions are increasingly recognized as a significant component of global changes, threatening ecosystem health and damaging food production. Invasive fungi also provide excellent models to evaluate the generality of results based on other eukaryotes. We first consider here the reasons why fungal invasions have long been overlooked: they tend to be inconspicuous, and inappropriate methods have been used for species recognition. We then review the information available on the patterns and mechanisms of fungal invasions. We examine the biological features underlying invasion success of certain fungal species. We review population structure analyses, revealing native source populations and strengths of bottlenecks. We highlight the documented ecological and evolutionary changes in invaded regions, including adaptation to temperature, increased virulence, hybridization, shifts to clonality and association with novel hosts. We discuss how the huge census size of most fungi allows adaptation even in bottlenecked, clonal invaders. We also present new analyses of the invasion of the anther-smut pathogen on white campion in North America, as a case study illustrating how an accurate knowledge of species limits and phylogeography of fungal populations can be used to decipher the origin of invasions. This case study shows that successful invasions can occur even when life history traits are particularly unfavourable to long-distance dispersal and even with a strong bottleneck. We conclude that fungal invasions are valuable models to contribute to our view of biological invasions, in particular by providing insights into the traits as well as ecological and evolutionary processes allowing successful introductions. PMID:25469955

  10. Invader LNA – Efficient Targeting of Short Double Stranded DNA†

    PubMed Central

    Sau, Sujay P.; Kumar, T. Santhosh; Hrdlicka, Patrick J.

    2010-01-01

    Despite progress with triplex-forming oligonucleotides or helix-invading peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), there remains a need for probes facilitating sequence-unrestricted targeting of double stranded DNA (dsDNA) at physiologically relevant conditions. Invader LNA probes, i.e., DNA duplexes with “+1 interstrand zipper arrangements” of intercalator-functionalized 2’-amino-α-L-LNA monomers, are demonstrated herein to recognize short mixed sequence dsDNA targets. This approach, like pseudo-complementary PNA (pcPNA), relies on relative differences in stability between probe duplexes and the corresponding probe:target duplexes for generation of a favourable thermodynamic gradient. Unlike pcPNA, Invader LNA probes take advantage of the “nearest neighbour exclusion principle”, i.e., intercalating units of Invader LNA monomers are poorly accommodated in probe duplexes but extraordinarily well tolerated in probe-target duplexes (ΔTm/modification up to +11.5 °C). Recognition of isosequential dsDNA-targets occurs: a) at experimental temperatures much lower than the thermal denaturation temperatures (Tm’s) of Invader LNAs or dsDNA-targets, b) at a wide range of ionic strengths, and c) with good mismatch discrimination. dsDNA recognition is monitored in real-time using inherent pyrene-pyrene excimer signals of Invader LNA probes, which provides insights into reaction kinetics and enables rational design of probes. These properties render Invader LNAs as promising probes for biomedical applications entailing sequence-unrestricted recognition of dsDNA. PMID:20401378

  11. DNA Double-Strand Break Rejoining in Complex Normal Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebe, Claudia E.; Kuehne, Martin; Fricke, Andreas

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: The clinical radiation responses of different organs vary widely and likely depend on the intrinsic radiosensitivities of their different cell populations. Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most deleterious form of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation, and the cells' capacity to rejoin radiation-induced DSBs is known to affect their intrinsic radiosensitivity. To date, only little is known about the induction and processing of radiation-induced DSBs in complex normal tissues. Using an in vivo model with repair-proficient mice, the highly sensitive {gamma}H2AX immunofluorescence was established to investigate whether differences in DSB rejoining could account for the substantial differences in clinical radiosensitivity observed among normal tissues. Methods and Materials: After whole body irradiation of C57BL/6 mice (0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy), the formation and rejoining of DSBs was analyzed by enumerating {gamma}H2AX foci in various organs representative of both early-responding (small intestine) and late-responding (lung, brain, heart, kidney) tissues. Results: The linear dose correlation observed in all analyzed tissues indicated that {gamma}H2AX immunofluorescence allows for the accurate quantification of DSBs in complex organs. Strikingly, the various normal tissues exhibited identical kinetics for {gamma}H2AX foci loss, despite their clearly different clinical radiation responses. Conclusion: The identical kinetics of DSB rejoining measured in different organs suggest that tissue-specific differences in radiation responses are independent of DSB rejoining. This finding emphasizes the fundamental role of DSB repair in maintaining genomic integrity, thereby contributing to cellular viability and functionality and, thus, tissue homeostasis.

  12. Global Organization of a Positive-strand RNA Virus Genome

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Baodong; Grigull, Jörg; Ore, Moriam O.; Morin, Sylvie; White, K. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The genomes of plus-strand RNA viruses contain many regulatory sequences and structures that direct different viral processes. The traditional view of these RNA elements are as local structures present in non-coding regions. However, this view is changing due to the discovery of regulatory elements in coding regions and functional long-range intra-genomic base pairing interactions. The ∼4.8 kb long RNA genome of the tombusvirus tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) contains these types of structural features, including six different functional long-distance interactions. We hypothesized that to achieve these multiple interactions this viral genome must utilize a large-scale organizational strategy and, accordingly, we sought to assess the global conformation of the entire TBSV genome. Atomic force micrographs of the genome indicated a mostly condensed structure composed of interconnected protrusions extending from a central hub. This configuration was consistent with the genomic secondary structure model generated using high-throughput selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analysed by primer extension (i.e. SHAPE), which predicted different sized RNA domains originating from a central region. Known RNA elements were identified in both domain and inter-domain regions, and novel structural features were predicted and functionally confirmed. Interestingly, only two of the six long-range interactions known to form were present in the structural model. However, for those interactions that did not form, complementary partner sequences were positioned relatively close to each other in the structure, suggesting that the secondary structure level of viral genome structure could provide a basic scaffold for the formation of different long-range interactions. The higher-order structural model for the TBSV RNA genome provides a snapshot of the complex framework that allows multiple functional components to operate in concert within a confined context. PMID:23717202

  13. The Multithermal and Multi-stranded Nature of Coronal Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolin, P.; Vissers, G.; Pereira, T. M. D.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.; Scullion, E.

    2015-06-01

    We analyze coordinated observations of coronal rain in loops, spanning chromospheric, transition region (TR), and coronal temperatures with sub-arcsecond spatial resolution. Coronal rain is found to be a highly multithermal phenomenon with a high degree of co-spatiality in the multi-wavelength emission. EUV darkening and quasi-periodic intensity variations are found to be strongly correlated with coronal rain showers. Progressive cooling of coronal rain is observed, leading to a height dependence of the emission. A fast-slow two-step catastrophic cooling progression is found, which may reflect the transition to optically thick plasma states. The intermittent and clumpy appearance of coronal rain at coronal heights becomes more continuous and persistent at chromospheric heights just before impact, mainly due to a funnel effect from the observed expansion of the magnetic field. Strong density inhomogeneities of 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 2-0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 5 are found, in which a transition from temperatures of 105 to 104 K occurs. The 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 2-0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 8 width of the distribution of coronal rain is found to be independent of temperature. The sharp increase in the number of clumps at the coolest temperatures, especially at higher resolution, suggests that the bulk distribution of the rain remains undetected. Rain clumps appear organized in strands in both chromospheric and TR temperatures. We further find structure reminiscent of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) thermal mode (also known as entropy mode), thereby suggesting an important role of thermal instability in shaping the basic loop substructure. Rain core densities are estimated to vary between 2 × 1010 and 2.5× {{10}11} cm-3, leading to significant downward mass fluxes per loop of 1-5 × 109 g s-1, thus suggesting a major role in the chromosphere-corona mass cycle.

  14. The Invasive Species Forecasting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnase, John; Most, Neal; Gill, Roger; Ma, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Invasive Species Forecasting System (ISFS) provides computational support for the generic work processes found in many regional-scale ecosystem modeling applications. Decision support tools built using ISFS allow a user to load point occurrence field sample data for a plant species of interest and quickly generate habitat suitability maps for geographic regions of management concern, such as a national park, monument, forest, or refuge. This type of decision product helps resource managers plan invasive species protection, monitoring, and control strategies for the lands they manage. Until now, scientists and resource managers have lacked the data-assembly and computing capabilities to produce these maps quickly and cost efficiently. ISFS focuses on regional-scale habitat suitability modeling for invasive terrestrial plants. ISFS s component architecture emphasizes simplicity and adaptability. Its core services can be easily adapted to produce model-based decision support tools tailored to particular parks, monuments, forests, refuges, and related management units. ISFS can be used to build standalone run-time tools that require no connection to the Internet, as well as fully Internet-based decision support applications. ISFS provides the core data structures, operating system interfaces, network interfaces, and inter-component constraints comprising the canonical workflow for habitat suitability modeling. The predictors, analysis methods, and geographic extents involved in any particular model run are elements of the user space and arbitrarily configurable by the user. ISFS provides small, lightweight, readily hardened core components of general utility. These components can be adapted to unanticipated uses, are tailorable, and require at most a loosely coupled, nonproprietary connection to the Web. Users can invoke capabilities from a command line; programmers can integrate ISFS's core components into more complex systems and services. Taken together, these

  15. Risk prediction for invasive candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Armin; Azim, Afzal; Baronia, Arvind Kumar; Marak, K. Rungmei S. K.; Gurjar, Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Over past few years, treatment of invasive candidiasis (IC) has evolved from targeted therapy to prophylaxis, pre-emptive and empirical therapy. Numerous predisposing factors for IC have been grouped together in various combinations to design risk prediction models. These models in general have shown good negative predictive value, but poor positive predictive value. They are useful in selecting the population which is less likely to benefit from empirical antifungal therapy and thus prevent overuse of antifungal agents. Current article deals with various risk prediction models for IC and their external validation studies. PMID:25316979

  16. Inhibition of medulloblastoma cell invasion by Slit.

    PubMed

    Werbowetski-Ogilvie, T E; Seyed Sadr, M; Jabado, N; Angers-Loustau, A; Agar, N Y R; Wu, J; Bjerkvig, R; Antel, J P; Faury, D; Rao, Y; Del Maestro, R F

    2006-08-24

    Invasion of brain tumor cells has made primary malignant brain neoplasms among the most recalcitrant to therapeutic strategies. We tested whether the secreted protein Slit2, which guides the projection of axons and developing neurons, could modulate brain tumor cell invasion. Slit2 inhibited the invasion of medulloblastoma cells in a variety of in vitro models. The effect of Slit2 was inhibited by the Robo ectodomain. Time-lapse videomicroscopy indicated that Slit2 reduced medulloblastoma invasion rate without affecting cell direction or proliferation. Both medulloblastoma and glioma tumors express Robo1 and Slit2, but only medulloblastoma invasion is inhibited by recombinant Slit2 protein. Downregulation of activated Cdc42 may contribute to this differential response. Our findings reinforce the concept that neurodevelopmental cues such as Slit2 may provide insights into brain tumor invasion. PMID:16636676

  17. Nonenzymatic Role for WRN in Preserving Nascent DNA Strands after Replication Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Fengtao; Mukherjee, Shibani; Yang, Yanyong; Mori, Eiichiro; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Kobayashi, Junya; Yannone, Steven  M.; Chen, David  J.; Asaithamby, Aroumougame

    2014-11-20

    WRN, the protein defective in Werner syndrome (WS), is a multifunctional nuclease involved in DNA damage repair, replication, and genome stability maintenance. It was assumed that the nuclease activities of WRN were critical for these functions. Here, we report a nonenzymatic role for WRN in preserving nascent DNA strands following replication stress. We found that lack of WRN led to shortening of nascent DNA strands after replication stress. Furthermore, we discovered that the exonuclease activity of MRE11 was responsible for the shortening of newly replicated DNA in the absence of WRN. Mechanistically, the N-terminal FHA domain of NBS1 recruits WRN to replication-associated DNA double-stranded breaks to stabilize Rad51 and to limit the nuclease activity of its C-terminal binding partner MRE11. Thus, this previously unrecognized nonenzymatic function of WRN in the stabilization of nascent DNA strands sheds light on the molecular reason for the origin of genome instability in WS individuals.

  18. Dependence of the Contact Resistance on the Design of Stranded Conductors

    PubMed Central

    Zeroukhi, Youcef; Napieralska-Juszczak, Ewa; Vega, Guillaume; Komeza, Krzysztof; Morganti, Fabrice; Wiak, Slawomir

    2014-01-01

    During the manufacturing process multi-strand conductors are subject to compressive force and rotation moments. The current distribution in the multi-strand conductors is not uniform and is controlled by the transverse resistivity. This is mainly determined by the contact resistance at the strand crossovers and inter-strand contact resistance. The surface layer properties, and in particular the crystalline structure and degree of oxidation, are key parameters in determining the transverse resistivity. The experimental set-ups made it possible to find the dependence of contact resistivity as a function of continuous working stresses and cable design. A study based on measurements and numerical simulation is made to identify the contact resistivity functions. PMID:25196112

  19. APPLICATION OF THE DNA ALKALINE UNWINDING ASSAY TO DETECT DNA STRAND BREAKS IN MARINE BIVALVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA alkaline unwinding methods were used to detect DNA strand breaks in tissues of marine bivalves following field and laboratory exposures and subsequent recoveries in the laboratory. ield deployments of mussels (Mytilus edulis) or oysters (Crassostrea virginica) into two highly...

  20. Moloney murine sarcoma virions synthesize full-genome-length double-stranded DNA in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Benz, E W; Dina, D

    1979-01-01

    Moloney murine sarcoma virus (MSV) virions incubated under optimal conditions were shown to support extensive synthesis of double-stranded DNA. The major product, a 5950-base-pair (6-kilobase-pair DNA) double-stranded DNA, was characterized by cleavage with restriction endonucleases and shown to contain a 600-nucleotide-long direct repeat at both ends of the MSV genome. Linear DNA molecules made in vivo shortly after infection were compared to the linear double-stranded DNA synthesized in vitro. The restriction maps of both viral DNA products were indistinguishable. The 600-base-pair repeat results in a progeny DNA molecule that is longer than the parental MSV genomic RNA. The generation of this repeat must involve a mechanism that allows the viral reverse transcriptase (RNA-dependent DNA nucleotidyltransferase) to copy 5'- and 3'-terminal genomic (+) strand sequences twice. Images PMID:291003

  1. Quantitation of single- and double-strand DNA breaks in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kohen, R.; Szyf, M.; Chevion, M.

    1986-05-01

    This communication describes a rapid and convenient procedure for quantitation of strand breaks in bacterial DNA, both in vitro and in vivo, using agarose gel electrophoresis. The electrophoretic determination of single strand breaks is carried out in alkaline medium, followed by renaturation of the gel and intercalation of the fluorescent dye, ethidium bromide. Double-strand breaks are determined by electrophoresis in neutral medium containing the dye. The distribution of DNA fragment sizes, the determination of the number-average molecular weight, the quantitation of the average number of DNA breaks per molecule, and the ratio between the single- and double-strand breaks are evaluated from microdensitometric scanning of the gels. The application of this analysis to damage caused by a combination of ascorbate and copper is demonstrated.

  2. Enzymatic aminoacylation of single-stranded RNA with an RNA cofactor.

    PubMed Central

    Musier-Forsyth, K; Scaringe, S; Usman, N; Schimmel, P

    1991-01-01

    A chemically synthesized single-stranded ribonucleotide tridecamer derived from the 3' end of Escherichia coli alanine tRNA can be charged with alanine in the presence of short complementary RNA oligonucleotides that form duplexes with the 3' fragment. Complementary 5' oligomers of 9, 8, 6, and 4 nucleotides all confer charging of the 3' fragment. Furthermore, in the presence of limiting 5' oligomer, greater than stoichiometric amounts of the single-stranded 3' acceptor fragment can be aminoacylated. This is due to a reiterative process of transient duplex formation followed by charging, dissociation of the 5' oligomer, and then rebinding to an uncharged single-stranded ribotridecamer so as to create another transient duplex substrate. Thus, a short RNA oligomer serves as a cofactor for a charging enzyme, and it thereby makes possible the aminoacylation of single-stranded RNA. These results expand possibilities for flexible routes to the development of early charging and coding systems. Images PMID:1986368

  3. Molecular Design Principles Underlying beta-strand Swapping in the Adhesive Dimerization of Cadherins

    SciTech Connect

    J Vendome; S Posy; X Jin; F Bahna; G Ahlsen; L Shapiro; B Honig

    2011-12-31

    Cell adhesion by classical cadherins is mediated by dimerization of their EC1 domains through the 'swapping' of N-terminal {beta}-strands. We use molecular simulations, measurements of binding affinities and X-ray crystallography to provide a detailed picture of the structural and energetic factors that control the adhesive dimerization of cadherins. We show that strand swapping in EC1 is driven by conformational strain in cadherin monomers that arises from the anchoring of their short N-terminal strand at one end by the conserved Trp2 and at the other by ligation to Ca{sup 2+} ions. We also demonstrate that a conserved proline-proline motif functions to avoid the formation of an overly tight interface where affinity differences between different cadherins, crucial at the cellular level, are lost. We use these findings to design site-directed mutations that transform a monomeric EC2-EC3 domain cadherin construct into a strand-swapped dimer.

  4. Tester automatically checks insulation of individual conductors in multiple-strand cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, J.; Vuckovich, M.

    1967-01-01

    Insulation tester checks multiple-strand electrical cables in nuclear rocket reactors. It has both manual and automatic capabilities and can check the insulation of a cable with 200 or more conductors in a few minutes.

  5. Survey of stranded gas and delivered costs to Europe of selected gas resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.; Freeman, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Two important trends affecting the expected growth of global gas markets are (1) the shift by many industrialized countries from coal-fired electricity generation to the use of natural gas to generate electricity and (2) the industrialization of the heavily populated Asian countries of India and China. This paper surveys discovered gas in stranded conventional gas accumulations and presents estimates of the cost of developing and producing stranded gas in selected countries. Stranded gas is natural gas in discovered or identified fields that is not currently commercially producible for either physical or economic reasons. Published reserves of gas at the global level do not distinguish between volumes of gas in producing fields and volumes in nonproducing fields. Data on stranded gas reported here-that is the volumes, geographical distribution, and size distributions of stranded gas fields at the country and regional level-are based on the examination of individual-field data and represent a significant improvement in information available to industry and government decision makers. Globally, stranded gas is pervasive, but large volumes in large accumulations are concentrated in only a few areas. The cost component of the paper focuses on stranded conventional gas accumulations in Africa and South America that have the potential to augment supplies to Europe. The methods described for the computation of extraction and transport costs are innovative in that they use information on the sizes and geographical distribution of the identified stranded gas fields. The costs are based on industry data specific to the country and geologic basin where the stranded gas is located. Gas supplies to Europe can be increased significantly at competitive costs by the development of stranded gas. Net extraction costs of producing the identified gas depend critically on the natural-gas-liquids (NGLs) content, the prevailing prices of liquids, the size of the gas accumulation, and the

  6. Biological Invasions: A Challenge In Ecological Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnase, J. L.; Smith, J. A.; Stohlgren, T. J.; Graves, S.; Trees, C.; Rood, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The spread of invasive species is one of the most daunting environmental, economic, and human-health problems facing the United States and the World today. It is one of several grand challenge environmental problems being considered by NASA's Earth Science Vision for 2025. The invasive species problem is complex and presents many challenges. Developing an invasive species predictive capability could significantly advance the science and technology of ecological forecasting.

  7. Predicting invasion success in complex ecological networks

    PubMed Central

    Romanuk, Tamara N.; Zhou, Yun; Brose, Ulrich; Berlow, Eric L.; Williams, Richard J.; Martinez, Neo D.

    2009-01-01

    A central and perhaps insurmountable challenge of invasion ecology is to predict which combinations of species and habitats most effectively promote and prevent biological invasions. Here, we integrate models of network structure and nonlinear population dynamics to search for potential generalities among trophic factors that may drive invasion success and failure. We simulate invasions where 100 different species attempt to invade 150 different food webs with 15–26 species and a wide range (0.06–0.32) of connectance. These simulations yield 11 438 invasion attempts by non-basal species, 47 per cent of which are successful. At the time of introduction, whether or not the invader is a generalist best predicts final invasion success; however, once the invader establishes itself, it is best distinguished from unsuccessful invaders by occupying a lower trophic position and being relatively invulnerable to predation. In general, variables that reflect the interaction between an invading species and its new community, such as generality and trophic position, best predict invasion success; however, for some trophic categories of invaders, fundamental species traits, such as having the centre of the feeding range low on the theoretical niche axis (for non-omnivorous and omnivorous herbivores), or the topology of the food web (for tertiary carnivores), best predict invasion success. Across all invasion scenarios, a discriminant analysis model predicted successful and failed invasions with 76.5 per cent accuracy for properties at the time of introduction or 100 per cent accuracy for properties at the time of establishment. More generally, our results suggest that tackling the challenge of predicting the properties of species and habitats that promote or inhibit invasions from food web perspective may aid ecologists in identifying rules that govern invasions in natural ecosystems. PMID:19451125

  8. Cabergoline Treatment in Invasive Giant Prolactinoma

    PubMed Central

    Alsubaie, Sadeem; Almalki, Mussa H

    2014-01-01

    Patients with invasive giant prolactinoma suffer from a constellation of symptoms including headache, blurred vision, lethargy, and sexual dysfunction. Cabergoline, a potent dopamine agonist, is a known medication prescribed for the treatment of invasive giant prolactinoma. Here, we report a case of invasive giant prolactinoma in a 52-year-old Saudi male with dramatic response to cabergoline treatment clinically, biochemically, and radiologically. PMID:25002819

  9. The Drosophila HP1 homologue Rhino is required for transposon silencing and piRNA production by dual strand clusters

    PubMed Central

    Klattenhoff, Carla; Xi, Hualin; Li, Chengjian; Lee, Soohyun; Xu, Jia; Khurana, Jaspreet S.; Zhang, Fan; Schultz, Nadine; Koppetsch, Birgit S.; Nowosielska, Anetta; Seitz, Herve; Zamore, Phillip D.; Weng, Zhiping; Theurkauf, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary piRNAs silence transposons and maintain genome integrity during germ-line development. In Drosophila, transposon-rich heterochromatic clusters encode piRNAs either on both genomic strands (dual-strand clusters) or predominantly one genomic strand (uni-strand clusters). Primary piRNAs derived from these clusters are proposed to drive a ping-pong amplification cycle catalyzed by proteins that localize to the perinuclear nuage. We show that the HP1 homologue Rhino is required for nuage organization, transposon silencing, and ping-pong amplification of piRNAs. rhi mutations virtually eliminate piRNAs from the dual-strand clusters and block production of putative precursor RNAs from both strands of the major 42AB dual-strand cluster, but do not block production of transcripts or piRNAs from the uni-strand clusters. Furthermore, Rhino protein associates with the 42AB dual-strand cluster, but does not bind to uni-strand cluster 2 or flamenco. Rhino thus appears to promote transcription of dual-strand clusters, leading to production of piRNAs that drive the ping-pong amplification cycle. PMID:19732946

  10. DNA double-strand break repair: a relentless hunt uncovers new prey.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, JoAnn M; Ferguson, David O

    2006-01-27

    A major pathway for repair of DNA double-strand breaks is nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). In this issue of Cell, and report the discovery of a new NHEJ factor called Cernunnos-XLF. Both groups report that this protein is mutated in a rare inherited human syndrome characterized by severe immunodeficiency, developmental delay, and hypersensitivity to agents that cause DNA double-strand breaks. PMID:16439201

  11. Single-strand gap repair involves both RecF and RecBCD pathways.

    PubMed

    Pagès, Vincent

    2016-08-01

    Homologous recombination repairs discontinuities in DNA including single-strand gaps (SSGs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs). This commentary describes how the RecBCD and RecF pathways might be exchangeable for the repair of their respective DSB and SSG canonical substrates. In particular, I will discuss how the RecBCD pathway could engage in the repair of an SSG even when the latter is not associated with a DSB. PMID:26874520

  12. DNA strand exchange stimulated by spontaneous complex formation with cationic comb-type copolymer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Jong; Akaike, Toshihiro; Maruyama, Atsushi

    2002-10-30

    Cationic comb-type copolymers (CCCs) composed of a polycation backbone and water-soluble side chains accelerate by 4-5 orders the DNA strand exchange reaction (SER) between double helical DNA and its homologous single-strand DNA. The accelerating effect is considered due to alleviation of counterion association during transitional intermediate formation in sequential displacement pathway. CCCs stabilize not only matured hybrids but also the nucleation complex to accelerate hybridization. PMID:12392411

  13. Mortality trends of stranded marine mammals on Cape Cod and southeastern Massachusetts, USA, 2000 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Bogomolni, Andrea L; Pugliares, Katie R; Sharp, Sarah M; Patchett, Kristen; Harry, Charles T; LaRocque, Jane M; Touhey, Kathleen M; Moore, Michael

    2010-01-25

    To understand the cause of death of 405 marine mammals stranded on Cape Cod and southeastern Massachusetts between 2000 and 2006, a system for coding final diagnosis was developed and categorized as (1) disease, (2) human interaction, (3) mass-stranded with no significant findings, (4) single-stranded with no significant findings, (5) rock and/or sand ingestion, (6) predatory attack, (7) failure to thrive or dependent calf or pup, or (8) other. The cause of death for 91 animals could not be determined. For the 314 animals that could be assigned a cause of death, gross and histological pathology results and ancillary testing indicated that disease was the leading cause of mortality in the region, affecting 116/314 (37%) of cases. Human interaction, including harassment, entanglement, and vessel collision, fatally affected 31/314 (10%) of all animals. Human interaction accounted for 13/29 (45%) of all determined gray seal Halichoerus grypus mortalities. Mass strandings were most likely to occur in northeastern Cape Cod Bay; 97/106 (92%) of mass stranded animals necropsied presented with no significant pathological findings. Mass strandings were the leading cause of death in 3 of the 4 small cetacean species: 46/67 (69%) of Atlantic white-sided dolphin Lagenorhynchus acutus, 15/21 (71%) of long-finned pilot whale Globicephala melas, and 33/54 (61%) of short-beaked common dolphin Delphinus delphis. These baseline data are critical for understanding marine mammal population health and mortality trends, which in turn have significant conservation and management implications. They not only afford a better retrospective analysis of strandings, but ultimately have application for improving current and future response to live animal stranding. PMID:20225675

  14. Low concentration of arsenite exacerbates UVR-induced DNA strand breaks by inhibiting PARP-1 activity

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Xujun; Hudson, Laurie G.; Liu Wenlan; Timmins, Graham S.; Liu Kejian

    2008-10-01

    Epidemiological studies have associated arsenic exposure with many types of human cancers. Arsenic has also been shown to act as a co-carcinogen even at low concentrations. However, the precise mechanism of its co-carcinogenic action is unknown. Recent studies indicate that arsenic can interfere with DNA-repair processes. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 is a zinc-finger DNA-repair protein, which can promptly sense DNA strand breaks and initiate DNA-repair pathways. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that low concentrations of arsenic could inhibit PAPR-1 activity and so exacerbate levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced DNA strand breaks. HaCat cells were treated with arsenite and/or UVR, and then DNA strand breaks were assessed by comet assay. Low concentrations of arsenite ({<=} 2 {mu}M) alone did not induce significant DNA strand breaks, but greatly enhanced the DNA strand breaks induced by UVR. Further studies showed that 2 {mu}M arsenite effectively inhibited PARP-1 activity. Zinc supplementation of arsenite-treated cells restored PARP-1 activity and significantly diminished the exacerbating effect of arsenite on UVR-induced DNA strand breaks. Importantly, neither arsenite treatment, nor zinc supplementation changed UVR-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, suggesting that their effects upon UVR-induced DNA strand breaks are not through a direct free radical mechanism. Combination treatments of arsenite with PARP-1 inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide or PARP-1 siRNA demonstrate that PARP-1 is the target of arsenite. Together, these findings show that arsenite at low concentration exacerbates UVR-induced DNA strand breaks by inhibiting PARP-1 activity, which may represent an important mechanism underlying the co-carcinogenicity of arsenic.

  15. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of γ-ray-irradiated single-stranded DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eunmo; Hong, W.; Han, J. H.; Choi, D. M.; Lee, Cheol Eui; Kim, H. D.; Kim, J.

    2015-07-01

    The effects of γ-ray irradiation on herring sperm single-stranded DNA have been studied by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in the view of the bonding configurations and the structural modifications. The significant changes in the hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous bonding energies, as revealed by the XPS analysis, indicate that electron transfers result in the creation of radicals and in DNA strand breaks.

  16. Invasive Cervical Resorption: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kandalgaonkar, Shilpa D; Gharat, Leena A; Tupsakhare, Suyog D; Gabhane, Mahesh H

    2013-01-01

    Invasive cervical resorption is a relatively uncommon form of external root resorption exhibiting no external signs. The resorptive condition is often detected by routine radiographic examination. The clinical features vary from a small defect at the gingival margin to a pink coronal discoloration of the tooth crown resulting in ultimate cavitation of the overlying enamel which is painless unless pulpal or periodontal infection supervenes. Radiographic features of lesions vary from well-delineated to irregularly bordered mottled radiolucencies, and these can be confused with dental caries. A characteristic radiopaque line generally separates the image of the lesion from that of the root canal, because the pulp remains protected by a thin layer of predentin until late in the process. Histopathologically, the lesions contain fibrovascular tissue with resorbing clastic cells adjacent to the dentin surface. More advanced lesions display fibro-osseous characteristics with deposition of ectopic bonelike calcifications both within the resorbing tissue and directly on the dentin surface. How to cite this article: Kandalgaonkar SD, Gharat LA, Tupsakhare SD, Gabhane MH. Invasive Cervical Resorption: A Review. J Int Oral Health 2013;5(6):124-30 . PMID:24453457

  17. [Combination therapy for invasive aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Camps, Isabel

    2011-03-01

    The frequency of invasive fungal infections, and specifically invasive aspergillosis, has increased in the last few decades. Despite the development of new antifungal agents, these infections are associated with high mortality, ranging from 40% to 80%, depending on the patient and the localization of the infection. To reduce these figures, several therapeutic strategies have been proposed, including combination therapy. Most of the available data on the efficacy of these combinations are from experimental models, in vitro data and retrospective observational studies or studies with a small number of patients that have included both patients in first-line treatment and those receiving rescue therapy; in addition there are many patients with possible forms of aspergillosis and few with demonstrated or probable forms. To date, there is no evidence that combination therapy has significantly higher efficacy than monotherapy; however, combination therapy could be indicated in severe forms of aspergillosis, or forms with central nervous involvement or extensive pulmonary involvement with respiratory insufficiency, etc. Among the combinations, the association of an echinocandin--the group that includes micafungin--with voriconazole or liposomal amphotericin B seems to show synergy. These combinations are those most extensively studied in clinical trials and therefore, although the grade of evidence is low, are recommended by the various scientific societies. PMID:21420576

  18. Minimally Invasive Cardiovascular Surgery: Incisions and Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Nathaniel B.; Argenziano, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the modern era of cardiac surgery, most operations have been performed via median sternotomy with cardiopulmonary bypass. This paradigm is changing, however, as cardiovascular surgery is increasingly adopting minimally invasive techniques. Advances in patient evaluation, instrumentation, and operative technique have allowed surgeons to perform a wide variety of complex operations through smaller incisions and, in some cases, without cardiopulmonary bypass. With patients desiring less invasive operations and the literature supporting decreased blood loss, shorter hospital length of stay, improved postoperative pain, and better cosmesis, minimally invasive cardiac surgery should be widely practiced. Here, we review the incisions and approaches currently used in minimally invasive cardiovascular surgery. PMID:27127555

  19. Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines. Chest . ... bypass surgery - minimally invasive Heart failure - overview High blood cholesterol ...

  20. National Institute of Invasive Species Science (NIISS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, Tom

    2006-01-01

    The National Institute of Invasive Species Science (www.NIISS.org) is a consortium of governmental and nongovernmental partners, led by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), whose aim is to provide reliable information and advanced decision support tools for documenting, understanding, predicting, assessing, and addressing the threat of invasive species in the United States. The Institute coordinates the National Aeronautical and Space Administrationa??s (NASAa??s) Invasive Species National Application activities for the Department of the Interior and has al lead role in developing NASA-derived remote sensing and landscape-scale predictive modeling capabilities for the invasive species community.

  1. [Invasive yeast infections in neutropenic patients].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Camps, Isabel; Jarque, Isidro

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal diseases caused by yeasts still play an important role in the morbidity and mortality in neutropenic patients with haematological malignancies. Although the overall incidence of invasive candidiasis has decreased due to widespread use of antifungal prophylaxis, the incidence of non-Candida albicans Candida species is increasing compared with that of C.albicans, and mortality of invasive candidiasis continues to be high. In addition, there has been an increase in invasive infections caused by an array of uncommon yeasts, including species of the genus Malassezia, Rhodotorula, Trichosporon and Saprochaete, characterised by their resistance to echinocandins and poor prognosis. PMID:27395023

  2. Biology of invasive termites: a worldwide review.

    PubMed

    Evans, Theodore A; Forschler, Brian T; Grace, J Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    The number of recognized invasive termite species has increased from 17 in 1969 to 28 today. Fourteen species have been added to the list in the past 44 years; 10 have larger distributions and 4 have no reported change in distribution, and 3 species are no longer considered invasive. Although most research has focused on invasive termites in urban areas, molecular identification methods have answered questions about certain species and found that at least six species have invaded natural forest habitats. All invasive species share three characteristics that together increase the probability of creating viable propagules: they eat wood, nest in food, and easily generate secondary reproductives. These characteristics are most common in two families, the Kalotermitidae and Rhinotermitidae (which make up 21 species on the invasive termite list), particularly in three genera, Cryptotermes, Heterotermes, and Coptotermes (which together make up 16 species). Although it is the largest termite family, the Termitidae (comprising 70% of all termite species) have only two invasive species, because relatively few species have these characteristics. Islands have double the number of invasive species that continents do, with islands in the South Pacific the most invaded geographical region. Most invasive species originate from Southeast Asia. The standard control methods normally used against native pest termites are also employed against invasive termites; only two eradication attempts, in South Africa and New Zealand, appear to have been successful, both against Coptotermes species. PMID:23020620

  3. Detection of short single-strand DNA homopolymers with ultrathin S i3N4 nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jian; Qiu, Yinghua; Yuan, Zhishan; Zhang, Yin; Sha, Jingjie; Liu, Lei; Sun, Litao; Ni, Zhonghua; Yi, Hong; Li, Deyu; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-08-01

    A series of nanopores with diameters ranging from 2.5 to 63 nm are fabricated on a reduced S i3N4 membrane by focused ion beam and high energy electron beam. Through measuring the blocked ionic currents for DNA strands threading linearly through those solid-state nanopores, it is found that the blockade ionic current is proportional to the square of the hydrodynamic diameter of the DNA strand. With the nanopore diameter reduced to be comparable with that of DNA strands, the hydrodynamic diameter of the DNA becomes smaller, which is attributed to the size confinement effects. The duration time for the linear DNA translocation events increases monotonically with the nanopore length. By comparing the spatial configurations of DNA strands through nanopores with different diameters, it is found that the nanopore with large diameter has enough space to allow the DNA strand to translocate through with complex conformation. With the decrease of the nanopore diameter, the folded part of the DNA is prone to be straightened by the nanopore, which leads to the increase in the occurrence frequency of the linear DNA translocation events. Reducing the diameter of the nanopore to 2.5 nm allows the detection and discrimination of three nucleotide "G" and three nucleotide "T" homopolymer DNA strands based on differences in their physical dimensions.

  4. Prediction of B-strand packing interactions using the signature product.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W. Michael; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Strauss, Charlie

    2005-03-01

    The prediction of {beta}-sheet topology requires the consideration of long-range interactions between {beta}-strands that are not necessarily consecutive in sequence. Since these interactions are difficult to simulate using ab initio methods, we propose a supplementary method able to assign {beta}-sheet topology using only sequence information. We envision using the results of our method to reduce the three-dimensional search space of ab initio methods. Our method is based on the signature molecular descriptor, which has been used previously to predict protein-protein interactions successfully, and to develop quantitative structure-activity relationships for small organic drugs and peptide inhibitors. Here, we show how the signature descriptor can be used in a Support Vector Machine to predict whether or not two {beta}-strands will pack adjacently within a protein. We then show how these predictions can be used to order {beta}-strands within {beta}-sheets. Using the entire PDB database with ten-fold cross-validation, we have achieved 74.0% accuracy in packing prediction and 75.6% accuracy in the prediction of edge strands. For the case of {beta}-strand ordering, we are able to predict the correct ordering accurately for 51.3% of the {beta}-sheets. Furthermore, using a simple confidence metric, we can determine those sheets for which accurate predictions can be obtained. For the top 25% highest confidence predictions, we are able to achieve 95.7% accuracy in {beta}-strand ordering.

  5. Sequential strand displacement beacon for detection of DNA coverage on functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Paliwoda, Rebecca E; Li, Feng; Reid, Michael S; Lin, Yanwen; Le, X Chris

    2014-06-17

    Functionalizing nanomaterials for diverse analytical, biomedical, and therapeutic applications requires determination of surface coverage (or density) of DNA on nanomaterials. We describe a sequential strand displacement beacon assay that is able to quantify specific DNA sequences conjugated or coconjugated onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Unlike the conventional fluorescence assay that requires the target DNA to be fluorescently labeled, the sequential strand displacement beacon method is able to quantify multiple unlabeled DNA oligonucleotides using a single (universal) strand displacement beacon. This unique feature is achieved by introducing two short unlabeled DNA probes for each specific DNA sequence and by performing sequential DNA strand displacement reactions. Varying the relative amounts of the specific DNA sequences and spacing DNA sequences during their coconjugation onto AuNPs results in different densities of the specific DNA on AuNP, ranging from 90 to 230 DNA molecules per AuNP. Results obtained from our sequential strand displacement beacon assay are consistent with those obtained from the conventional fluorescence assays. However, labeling of DNA with some fluorescent dyes, e.g., tetramethylrhodamine, alters DNA density on AuNP. The strand displacement strategy overcomes this problem by obviating direct labeling of the target DNA. This method has broad potential to facilitate more efficient design and characterization of novel multifunctional materials for diverse applications. PMID:24848126

  6. Evidence that DNA fragmentation in apoptosis is initiated and propagated by single-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Walker, P R; LeBlanc, J; Sikorska, M

    1997-08-01

    Apoptosis is characterised by the degradation of DNA into a specific pattern of high and low molecular weight fragments seen on agarose gels as a distribution of sizes between 50-300 kb and sometimes, but not always, a ladder of smaller oligonucleosomal fragments. Using a 2D pulsed field-conventional agarose gel electrophoresis technique, where the second dimension is run under either normal or denaturing conditions, we show that single-strand breaks are introduced into DNA at the initial stages of fragmentation. Using single-strand specific nuclease probes we further show that the complete fragmentation pattern, including release of small oligonucleosomal fragments can also be generated by a single-strand endonuclease. Three classes of sites where single-strand breaks accumulate were identified. The initial breaks produce a distribution of fragment sizes (50 kb to >1 Mb) similar to those generated by Topoisomerase II inhibitors suggesting that cleavage may commence at sites of attachment of DNA to the nuclear matrix. A second class of rare sites is also cut further reducing the size distribution of the fragments to 50-300 kb. Thirdly, single-strand breaks accumulate at the linker region between nucleosomes eventually causing double-strand scissions which release oligonucleosomes. These observations further define the properties of the endonuclease responsible for DNA fragmentation in apoptosis. PMID:16465272

  7. Multiple pathways of DNA double-strand break processing in a mutant Indian muntjac cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Bouffler, S.D.; Jha, B.; Johnson, R.T. )

    1990-09-01

    DNA break processing is compared in the Indian muntjac cell lines, SVM and DM. The initial frequencies and resealing of X-ray generated single- and double-strand breaks are similar in the two cell lines. Inhibiting the repair of UV damage leads to greater double-strand breakage in SVM than in DM, and some of these breaks are not repaired; however, repair-associated single-strand breakage and resealing are normal. Dimethylsulfate also induces excess double-strand breakage in SVM, and these breaks are irreparable. Restricted plasmids are reconstituted correctly in SVM at approximately 30% of the frequency observed in DM. Thus SVM has a reduced capacity to repair certain types of double-strand break. This defect is not due to a DNA ligase deficiency. We conclude that DNA double-strand breaks are repaired by a variety of pathways within mammalian cells and that the structure of the break or its mode of formation determines its subsequent fate.

  8. On the biophysics and kinetics of toehold-mediated DNA strand displacement

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Niranjan; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Šulc, Petr; Schaeffer, Joseph M.; Yurke, Bernard; Louis, Ard A.; Doye, Jonathan P. K.; Winfree, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic DNA nanotechnology often uses toehold-mediated strand displacement for controlling reaction kinetics. Although the dependence of strand displacement kinetics on toehold length has been experimentally characterized and phenomenologically modeled, detailed biophysical understanding has remained elusive. Here, we study strand displacement at multiple levels of detail, using an intuitive model of a random walk on a 1D energy landscape, a secondary structure kinetics model with single base-pair steps and a coarse-grained molecular model that incorporates 3D geometric and steric effects. Further, we experimentally investigate the thermodynamics of three-way branch migration. Two factors explain the dependence of strand displacement kinetics on toehold length: (i) the physical process by which a single step of branch migration occurs is significantly slower than the fraying of a single base pair and (ii) initiating branch migration incurs a thermodynamic penalty, not captured by state-of-the-art nearest neighbor models of DNA, due to the additional overhang it engenders at the junction. Our findings are consistent with previously measured or inferred rates for hybridization, fraying and branch migration, and they provide a biophysical explanation of strand displacement kinetics. Our work paves the way for accurate modeling of strand displacement cascades, which would facilitate the simulation and construction of more complex molecular systems. PMID:24019238

  9. Reduce Nb3Sn Strand Deformation when Fabricating High Jc Rutherford Cables

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Xuan

    2012-12-17

    During Phase I, our efforts were to reduce subelements deformation when fabricating Nb3Sn Rutherford cables. Our first focus is on 217-sublement tube type strand. We successfully made a few billets in OD tube with different Cu spacing between subelements, and supplied the strands to Fermi Lab for cabling. Through the rolling test characterization, these types of strands did not have enough bonding between subelements to withstand the deformation. We saw copper cracking between subelements in the deformed strands. We scaled up the billet from OD to 1.5 OD, and made two billets. This greatly improves the bonding. There is no copper cracking in the deformed strands when we scaled up the diameter of the billets. Fermi Lab successfully made cables using one of this improved strands. In their cables, no Cu cracking and no filament bridging occurred. We also successfully made a couple of billets with hex OD and round ID subelements for 61-subelement restack. Due to the lack of bonding, we could not judge its cabling property properly. But we know through this experiment, we could keep the Nb round, once we select the proper Cu spacing.

  10. Guided ultrasonic waves for non-destructive monitoring of the stress levels in prestressed steel strands.

    PubMed

    Chaki, S; Bourse, G

    2009-02-01

    The safety of prestressed civil structures such as bridges, dams, nuclear power plants, etc. directly involves the security of both environment and users. Health monitoring of the tensioning components, such as strands, tendons, bars, anchorage bolts, etc. is an important research topic and a challenging task bringing together the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and civil engineering communities. This paper deals with a guided ultrasonic wave procedure for monitoring the stress levels in seven-wire steel strands (15.7 mm in diameter). The mechanical and geometrical characteristics of the prestressed strands were taken into account for optimizing the measurement configuration and then the choice of the guided ultrasonic mode at a suitable frequency. Simplified acoustoelastic formulations were derived from the acoustoelasticity theory according to either calibration test or in situ measurement. The results from acoustoelastic measurements on the seven-wire steel strands are presented and discussed in the case of calibration tests and industrially prestressed strands. They show the potential and the suitability of the proposed guided wave method for evaluating the stress levels in the tested seven-wire steel strands. PMID:18804832

  11. Corrosion of post-tensioning strands in ungrouted ducts - unstressed condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, Michael

    Recent failures and severe corrosion distress of post-tensioned (PT) bridges in Florida have revealed corrosion of the 7-wire strands in tendons. Post-tensioned duct assemblies are fitted with multiple 7-wire steel strands and ducts are subsequently filled with grout. During construction, the length of time from the moment in which the strands have been inserted into the ducts, until the ducts are grouted, is referred to as the `ungrouted' period. During this phase, the steel strands are vulnerable to corrosion and consequently the length of this period is restricted (typically to 7 days) by construction guidelines. This investigation focuses on determining the extent of corrosion that may take place during that period, but limited to strands that were in the unstressed condition. Visual inspections and tensile testing were used to identify trends in corrosion development. Corrosion induced cracking mechanisms were also investigated via wire bending and metallographic cross section evaluation. Corrosion damage on unstressed strands during ungrouted periods of durations in the order of those otherwise currently prescribed did not appear to seriously degrade mechanical performance as measured by standardized tests. However the presence of stress in the ungrouted period, as is normally the case, may activate other mechanisms (e.g., EAC) that require further investigation. As expected in the unstressed condition, no evidence of transverse cracking was observed.

  12. Findings in pinnipeds stranded along the central and northern California coast, 1984-1990.

    PubMed

    Gerber, J A; Roletto, J; Morgan, L E; Smith, D M; Gage, L J

    1993-07-01

    Personnel at The Marine Mammal Center (The Center) treated 1,446 stranded marine mammals recovered from the central and northern California (USA) coast from 1984 through 1990, including California sea lions (Zalophus californianus), northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris), Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi), northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus), Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus), and Guadalupe fur seals (Arctocephalus townsendi). The primary disease findings in stranded California sea lions were renal disease, renal disease complicated by severe verminous pneumonia, verminous pneumonia, seizures of unknown etiology, and renal disease complicated by severe pneumonia of unknown etiology. Stranded elephant seals included pups, yearlings with dermatological problems, and neonates. Most harbor seals admitted to The Center were underweight and premature pups. Stranded northern fur seals included animals with seizures of unknown etiology and emaciated pups. Stranded Steller sea lions included underweight pups and aged adult females with pneumonia. Two Guadalupe fur seals had hemorrhagic gastroenteritis. Incidental findings at the time of stranding among the six species included verminous pneumonia and pneumonia of unknown etiology, renal disease, internal parasitism, ophthalmologic problems, gastrointestinal disorders, otitis externa, and external wounds. PMID:8355344

  13. Breaking DNA strands by extreme-ultraviolet laser pulses in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nováková, Eva; Vyšín, Luděk; Burian, Tomáš; Juha, Libor; Davídková, Marie; Múčka, Viliam; Čuba, Václav; Grisham, Michael E.; Heinbuch, Scott; Rocca, Jorge J.

    2015-04-01

    Ionizing radiation induces a variety of DNA damages including single-strand breaks (SSBs), double-strand breaks (DSBs), abasic sites, modified sugars, and bases. Most theoretical and experimental studies have been focused on DNA strand scissions, in particular production of DNA double-strand breaks. DSBs have been proven to be a key damage at a molecular level responsible for the formation of chromosomal aberrations, leading often to cell death. We have studied the nature of DNA damage induced directly by the pulsed 46.9-nm (26.5 eV) radiation provided by an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) capillary-discharge Ne-like Ar laser (CDL). Doses up to 45 kGy were delivered with a repetition rate of 3 Hz. We studied the dependence of the yield of SSBs and DSBs of a simple model of DNA molecule (pBR322) on the CDL pulse fluence. Agarose gel electrophoresis method was used for determination of both SSB and DSB yields. The action cross sections of the single- and double-strand breaks of pBR322 plasmid DNA in solid state were determined. We observed an increase in the efficiency of strand-break induction in the supercoiled DNA as a function of laser pulse fluence. Results are compared to those acquired at synchrotron radiation facilities and other sources of extreme-ultraviolet and soft x-ray radiation.

  14. Breaking DNA strands by extreme-ultraviolet laser pulses in vacuum.

    PubMed

    Nováková, Eva; Vyšín, Luděk; Burian, Tomáš; Juha, Libor; Davídková, Marie; Múčka, Viliam; Čuba, Václav; Grisham, Michael E; Heinbuch, Scott; Rocca, Jorge J

    2015-04-01

    Ionizing radiation induces a variety of DNA damages including single-strand breaks (SSBs), double-strand breaks (DSBs), abasic sites, modified sugars, and bases. Most theoretical and experimental studies have been focused on DNA strand scissions, in particular production of DNA double-strand breaks. DSBs have been proven to be a key damage at a molecular level responsible for the formation of chromosomal aberrations, leading often to cell death. We have studied the nature of DNA damage induced directly by the pulsed 46.9-nm (26.5 eV) radiation provided by an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) capillary-discharge Ne-like Ar laser (CDL). Doses up to 45 kGy were delivered with a repetition rate of 3 Hz. We studied the dependence of the yield of SSBs and DSBs of a simple model of DNA molecule (pBR322) on the CDL pulse fluence. Agarose gel electrophoresis method was used for determination of both SSB and DSB yields. The action cross sections of the single- and double-strand breaks of pBR322 plasmid DNA in solid state were determined. We observed an increase in the efficiency of strand-break induction in the supercoiled DNA as a function of laser pulse fluence. Results are compared to those acquired at synchrotron radiation facilities and other sources of extreme-ultraviolet and soft x-ray radiation. PMID:25974538

  15. DNA Strand Breaks in Mitotic Germ Cells of Caenorhabditis elegans Evaluated by Comet Assay

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sojin; Choi, Seoyun; Ahn, Byungchan

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage responses are important for the maintenance of genome stability and the survival of organisms. Such responses are activated in the presence of DNA damage and lead to cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and DNA repair. In Caenorhabditis elegans, double-strand breaks induced by DNA damaging agents have been detected indirectly by antibodies against DSB recognizing proteins. In this study we used a comet assay to detect DNA strand breaks and to measure the elimination of DNA strand breaks in mitotic germline nuclei of C. elegans. We found that C. elegans brc-1 mutants were more sensitive to ionizing radiation and camptothecin than the N2 wild-type strain and repaired DNA strand breaks less efficiently than N2. This study is the first demonstration of direct measurement of DNA strand breaks in mitotic germline nuclei of C. elegans. This newly developed assay can be applied to detect DNA strand breaks in different C. elegans mutants that are sensitive to DNA damaging agents. PMID:26903030

  16. Simultaneous characterization of sense and antisense genomic processes by the double-stranded hidden Markov model.

    PubMed

    Glas, Julia; Dümcke, Sebastian; Zacher, Benedikt; Poron, Don; Gagneur, Julien; Tresch, Achim

    2016-03-18

    Hidden Markov models (HMMs) have been extensively used to dissect the genome into functionally distinct regions using data such as RNA expression or DNA binding measurements. It is a challenge to disentangle processes occurring on complementary strands of the same genomic region. We present the double-stranded HMM (dsHMM), a model for the strand-specific analysis of genomic processes. We applied dsHMM to yeast using strand specific transcription data, nucleosome data, and protein binding data for a set of 11 factors associated with the regulation of transcription.The resulting annotation recovers the mRNA transcription cycle (initiation, elongation, termination) while correctly predicting strand-specificity and directionality of the transcription process. We find that pre-initiation complex formation is an essentially undirected process, giving rise to a large number of bidirectional promoters and to pervasive antisense transcription. Notably, 12% of all transcriptionally active positions showed simultaneous activity on both strands. Furthermore, dsHMM reveals that antisense transcription is specifically suppressed by Nrd1, a yeast termination factor. PMID:26578558

  17. Minimalist Approach to Complexity: Templating the Assembly of DNA Tile Structures with Sequentially Grown Input Strands.

    PubMed

    Lau, Kai Lin; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2016-07-26

    Given its highly predictable self-assembly properties, DNA has proven to be an excellent template toward the design of functional materials. Prominent examples include the remarkable complexity provided by DNA origami and single-stranded tile (SST) assemblies, which require hundreds of unique component strands. However, in many cases, the majority of the DNA assembly is purely structural, and only a small "working area" needs to be aperiodic. On the other hand, extended lattices formed by DNA tile motifs require only a few strands; but they suffer from lack of size control and limited periodic patterning. To overcome these limitations, we adopt a templation strategy, where an input strand of DNA dictates the size and patterning of resultant DNA tile structures. To prepare these templating input strands, a sequential growth technique developed in our lab is used, whereby extended DNA strands of defined sequence and length may be generated simply by controlling their order of addition. With these, we demonstrate the periodic patterning of size-controlled double-crossover (DX) and triple-crossover (TX) tile structures, as well as intentionally designed aperiodicity of a DX tile structure. As such, we are able to prepare size-controlled DNA structures featuring aperiodicity only where necessary with exceptional economy and efficiency. PMID:27303951

  18. Metallization of double-stranded DNA triggered by bound galactose-modified naphthalene diimide.

    PubMed

    Komizo, Kohei; Ikedo, Hideyuki; Sato, Shinobu; Takenaka, Shigeori

    2014-08-20

    Naphthalene diimide (NDI) derivatives bearing galactose moieties through different spacers, NDI-DS1 and NDI-DS2, were synthesized by the click reaction of the acetylene derivatives of NDI with galactose azide. They bound to double-stranded DNA with threading intercalation, as confirmed by the topoisomerase I assay and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The binding affinities of these ligands were on the order of 10(5) M(-1) with several-fold higher affinity for double-stranded DNA than for single-stranded DNA. The silver mirror reaction on the double-stranded DNA bound to these ligands afforded silver nanowires that were converted to gold nanowires. In the atomic force microscopy measurements, the increased height of DNA areas on a mica plate was observed in the case of double-stranded DNA after NDI-DS2 treatment and subsequently silver mirror reaction, whereas the increased height of DNA areas was not observed in the case of single-stranded DNA after the same treatment. PMID:25011665

  19. Purification and characterization of a mitochondrial, single-stranded-DNA-binding protein from Paracentrotus lividus eggs.

    PubMed

    Roberti, M; Musicco, C; Loguercio Polosa, P; Gadaleta, M N; Quagliariello, E; Cantatore, P

    1997-07-01

    A binding protein for single-stranded DNA was purified from Paracentrotus lividus egg mitochondria to near homogeneity by chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel and single-stranded-DNA-cellulose. The protein consists of a single polypeptide of about 15 kDa. Glycerol gradient sedimentation analysis suggested that P. lividus mitochondrial single-stranded-DNA-binding protein exists as a homo-oligomer, possibly a tetramer, in solution. The protein shows a stronger preference for poly(dT) with respect to single-stranded M13, poly(dI) and poly(dC). Binding to poly(dA) takes place with much lower affinity. The binding-site size, determined by gel mobility-shift experiments with oligonucleotides of different length, is approximately 45 nucleotides. The binding to single-stranded DNA occurs with low or no cooperativity and is not influenced by ionic strength. The protein has a very high affinity for the DNA: its apparent macroscopic association constant is 2x10(9) M(-1), a value which is the highest among the mitochondrial single-stranded-DNA-binding proteins characterized to date. The lack of cooperativity and the high association constant represent distinctive features of this protein and might be related to the peculiar mechanism of sea urchin mitochondrial DNA replication. PMID:9249008

  20. Increase Jc by Improving the Array of Nb3Sn strands for Fusion Application

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Xuan

    2012-12-17

    During Phase I, our efforts were focusing on improving the array of subelement in the tube type strands by hardening the Sn core and the subelement matrix to effectively increase the Jc of the strands. Below is a summary of the results. 1) We were unsuccessful in improving the array using a Cu-Sn matrix approach. 2) We slightly improved the array using Sn with 1.5at%Ti doped core, and a 217-subelement restacked strand was made and drawn down without any breakage. 3) We greatly improved the array using the Glidcop Al-15 to replace the pure Cu sheath in the subelement, and a 217-subelement restacked strand was made and drawn down. Both strands have very good drawability and the array showed good improvement. 4) We also improved the array using improved wire drawing techniques using Hyper Tech's new caterpillar wire drawing machines to enable straight wire drawing for the entire wire drawing process. 5) The 919-subelement restack strand shows its non-Cu Jc over 2100 A/mm2 at 12 T/4.2 K and AC loss of 508 mJ/cm3.

  1. Magnetization, Low Field Instability and Quench of RHQT Nb(3)Al Strands

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.; Wake, M.; Kikuchi, A.; Velev, V.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Since 2005, we made and tested three RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strands, one with Nb matrix and two with Ta matrix, which are fully stabilized with Cu electroplating. We observed anomalously large magnetization curves extending beyond 1 to 1.5 Tesla with the F1 Nb matrix strand at 4.2 K, when we measured its magnetization with a balanced coil magnetometer. This problem was eliminated with the Ta matrix strands operating at 4.2 K. But with these strands a similar but smaller anomalous magnetization was observed at 1.9 K. We studied these phenomena with FEM. With the F1 Nb matrix strand, it is explained that at low external field, inter-filamentary coupling currents in the outer layers of sub-elements create a shielding effect. It reduces the inside field, keeps the inside Nb matrix superconductive, and stands against a higher outside field beyond the Hc of Nb. At an even higher external field, the superconductivity of the whole Nb matrix collapses and releases a large amount of energy, which may cause a big quench. Depending on the size of the energy in the strand or the cable, a magnet could quench, causing the low field instability. Some attempt to analyze the anomaly with FEM is presented.

  2. Magnetization anomaly of Nb3Al strands and instability of Nb3Al Rutherford cables

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Ryuji; Kikuchi, Akihiro; Wake, Masayoshi; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2006-08-01

    Using a Cu stabilized Nb{sub 3}Al strand with Nb matrix, a 30 meter long Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable was made by a collaboration of Fermilab and NIMS. Recently the strand and cable were tested. In both cases instability was observed at around 1.5 Tesla. The magnetization of this Nb{sub 3}Al strand was measured first using a balanced coil magnetometer at 4.2 K. Strands showed an anomalously large magnetization behavior around at 1.6 T, which is much higher than the usual B{sub c2} {approx} 0.5 Tesla (4.2 K) of Nb matrix. This result is compared with the magnetization data of short strand samples using a SQUID magnetometer, in which a flux-jump signal was observed at 0.5 Tesla, but not at higher field. As a possible explanation for this magnetization anomaly, the interfilament coupling through the thin Nb films in the strands is suggested. The instability problem observed in low field tests of the Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cables is attributed to this effect.

  3. Single-stranded DNA oligomers stimulate error-prone alternative repair of DNA double-strand breaks through hijacking Ku protein

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ying; Britton, Sébastien; Delteil, Christine; Coates, Julia; Jackson, Stephen P.; Barboule, Nadia; Frit, Philippe; Calsou, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In humans, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired by two mutually-exclusive mechanisms, homologous recombination or end-joining. Among end-joining mechanisms, the main process is classical non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) which relies on Ku binding to DNA ends and DNA Ligase IV (Lig4)-mediated ligation. Mostly under Ku- or Lig4-defective conditions, an alternative end-joining process (A-EJ) can operate and exhibits a trend toward microhomology usage at the break junction. Homologous recombination relies on an initial MRN-dependent nucleolytic degradation of one strand at DNA ends. This process, named DNA resection generates 3′ single-stranded tails necessary for homologous pairing with the sister chromatid. While it is believed from the current literature that the balance between joining and recombination processes at DSBs ends is mainly dependent on the initiation of resection, it has also been shown that MRN activity can generate short single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssO) that may also be implicated in repair regulation. Here, we evaluate the effect of ssO on end-joining at DSB sites both in vitro and in cells. We report that under both conditions, ssO inhibit C-NHEJ through binding to Ku and favor repair by the Lig4-independent microhomology-mediated A-EJ process. PMID:26350212

  4. Single-stranded DNA oligomers stimulate error-prone alternative repair of DNA double-strand breaks through hijacking Ku protein.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ying; Britton, Sébastien; Delteil, Christine; Coates, Julia; Jackson, Stephen P; Barboule, Nadia; Frit, Philippe; Calsou, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    In humans, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired by two mutually-exclusive mechanisms, homologous recombination or end-joining. Among end-joining mechanisms, the main process is classical non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) which relies on Ku binding to DNA ends and DNA Ligase IV (Lig4)-mediated ligation. Mostly under Ku- or Lig4-defective conditions, an alternative end-joining process (A-EJ) can operate and exhibits a trend toward microhomology usage at the break junction. Homologous recombination relies on an initial MRN-dependent nucleolytic degradation of one strand at DNA ends. This process, named DNA resection generates 3' single-stranded tails necessary for homologous pairing with the sister chromatid. While it is believed from the current literature that the balance between joining and recombination processes at DSBs ends is mainly dependent on the initiation of resection, it has also been shown that MRN activity can generate short single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssO) that may also be implicated in repair regulation. Here, we evaluate the effect of ssO on end-joining at DSB sites both in vitro and in cells. We report that under both conditions, ssO inhibit C-NHEJ through binding to Ku and favor repair by the Lig4-independent microhomology-mediated A-EJ process. PMID:26350212

  5. Coevolution between Native and Invasive Plant Competitors: Implications for Invasive Species Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive species may establish in communities because they are better competitors than natives, but in order to remain community dominants, the competitive advantage of invasive species must be persistent. Native species that are not extirpated when highly invasive species are introduced are likely...

  6. Invasive plants and their ecological strategies: Prediction and explanation of woody plant invasion in New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herron, P.M.; Martine, C.T.; Latimer, A.M.; Leicht-Young, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    Effective management of introduced species requires the early identification of species that pose a significant threat of becoming invasive. To better understand the invasive ecology of species in New England, USA, we compiled a character data set with which to compare non-native species that are known invaders to non-native species that are not currently known to be invasive. In contrast to previous biological trait-based models, we employed a Bayesian hierarchical analysis to identify sets of plant traits associated with invasiveness for each of three growth forms (vines, shrubs, and trees). The resulting models identify a suite of 'invasive traits' highlighting the ecology associated with invasiveness for each of three growth forms. The most effective predictors of invasiveness that emerged from our model were 'invasive elsewhere', 'fast growth rate', 'native latitudinal range', and 'growth form'. The contrast among growth forms was pronounced. For example, 'wind dispersal' was positively correlated with invasiveness in trees, but negatively correlated in shrubs and vines. The predictive model was able to correctly classify invasive plants 67% of the time (22/33), and non-invasive plants 95% of the time (204/215). A number of potential future invasive species in New England that deserve management consideration were identified. ?? 2007 The Authors.

  7. A functional trait perspective on plant invasion

    PubMed Central

    Drenovsky, Rebecca E.; Grewell, Brenda J.; D'Antonio, Carla M.; Funk, Jennifer L.; James, Jeremy J.; Molinari, Nicole; Parker, Ingrid M.; Richards, Christina L.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Global environmental change will affect non-native plant invasions, with profound potential impacts on native plant populations, communities and ecosystems. In this context, we review plant functional traits, particularly those that drive invader abundance (invasiveness) and impacts, as well as the integration of these traits across multiple ecological scales, and as a basis for restoration and management. Scope We review the concepts and terminology surrounding functional traits and how functional traits influence processes at the individual level. We explore how phenotypic plasticity may lead to rapid evolution of novel traits facilitating invasiveness in changing environments and then ‘scale up’ to evaluate the relative importance of demographic traits and their links to invasion rates. We then suggest a functional trait framework for assessing per capita effects and, ultimately, impacts of invasive plants on plant communities and ecosystems. Lastly, we focus on the role of functional trait-based approaches in invasive species management and restoration in the context of rapid, global environmental change. Conclusions To understand how the abundance and impacts of invasive plants will respond to rapid environmental changes it is essential to link trait-based responses of invaders to changes in community and ecosystem properties. To do so requires a comprehensive effort that considers dynamic environmental controls and a targeted approach to understand key functional traits driving both invader abundance and impacts. If we are to predict future invasions, manage those at hand and use restoration technology to mitigate invasive species impacts, future research must focus on functional traits that promote invasiveness and invader impacts under changing conditions, and integrate major factors driving invasions from individual to ecosystem levels. PMID:22589328

  8. E-commerce trade in invasive plants.

    PubMed

    Humair, Franziska; Humair, Luc; Kuhn, Fabian; Kueffer, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Biological invasions are a major concern in conservation, especially because global transport of species is still increasing rapidly. Conservationists hope to anticipate and thus prevent future invasions by identifying and regulating potentially invasive species through species risk assessments and international trade regulations. Among many introduction pathways of non-native species, horticulture is a particularly important driver of plant invasions. In recent decades, the horticultural industry expanded globally and changed structurally through the emergence of new distribution channels, including internet trade (e-commerce). Using an automated search algorithm, we surveyed, on a daily basis, e-commerce trade on 10 major online auction sites (including eBay) of approximately three-fifths of the world's spermatophyte flora. Many recognized invasive plant species (>500 species) (i.e., species associated with ecological or socio-economic problems) were traded daily worldwide on the internet. A markedly higher proportion of invasive than non-invasive species were available online. Typically, for a particular plant family, 30-80% of recognized invasive species were detected on an auction site, but only a few percentages of all species in the plant family were detected on a site. Families that were more traded had a higher proportion of invasive species than families that were less traded. For woody species, there was a significant positive relationship between the number of regions where a species was sold and the number of regions where it was invasive. Our results indicate that biosecurity is not effectively regulating online plant trade. In the future, automated monitoring of e-commerce may help prevent the spread of invasive species, provide information on emerging trade connectivity across national borders, and be used in horizon scanning exercises for early detection of new species and their geographic source areas in international trade. PMID:26249172

  9. The effect of strand architecture on the fracture propensity on niobium-tin composite wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, Matthew C.

    Nb3Sn is a brittle superconducting material used to carry electric current in large fusion and high energy physics magnets. Usually fabricated in the form of a composite multifilamentary wire, Nb 3Sn strands can be susceptible to filament-level fracture under Lorentz forces during magnet operation. This can lead to degradation of the critical electric current density and subsequent underperformance of the magnet. To understand the effect of strand architecture (filament size, spacing, and arrangement) on fracture propensity, we have developed a metallographic technique to image Nb3Sn strands in longitudinal cross-section after mechanical and/or electrical testing. Deformation conditions included pure bending at 77 K, uniaxial tension at 4.2 K, electromagnetic (TARSIS) testing at 4.2 K, and microindentation at room temperature. Under bend strain, ITER-style strands exhibit primarily individual filament cracking, with some collective cracking occurring in internal tin strands that have agglomerated filaments near the sub-bundle core. This cracking occurred primarily at local bend strain values above 0.7% for strands with reacted filaments of 3 -- 4 mum diameter, and at local bend strain values above 0.4% for strands with reacted filaments of 6 mum diameter. The high energy physics strands, by contrast, exhibited long, collective cracks under bending that propagated across entire sub-bundles and even from sub-bundle to sub-bundle, beginning at the tensile bend axis and ending near the geometric neutral bend axis. Additionally, the fracture morphology is shown to be constant for a wide variety of HEP strands, with critical current density values ranging from 1700 A/mm2 to 3000 A/mm2. Under indentation testing, crack propagation was shown to be a strong function of the local strain state, with even small tensile stresses producing extended fracture fields, while indents in a region under compressive stress showed almost no fracture at all. The clear implication is that

  10. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT].

    PubMed

    Tabata, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is defined as aortic valve replacement avoiding full sternotomy. Common approaches include a partial sternotomy right thoracotomy, and a parasternal approach. MIAVR has been shown to have advantages over conventional AVR such as shorter length of stay and smaller amount of blood transfusion and better cosmesis. However, it is also known to have disadvantages such as longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and potential complications related to peripheral cannulation. Appropriate patient selection is very important. Since the procedure is more complex than conventional AVR, more intensive teamwork in the operating room is essential. Additionally, a team approach during postoperative management is critical to maximize the benefits of MIAVR. PMID:27295772

  11. Non-invasive glucose monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A non-invasive method for determining blood level of an analyte of interest, such as glucose, comprises: generating an excitation laser beam (e.g., at a wavelength of 700 to 900 nanometers); focusing the excitation laser beam into the anterior chamber of an eye of the subject so that aqueous humor in the anterior chamber is illuminated; detecting (preferably confocally detecting) a Raman spectrum from the illuminated aqueous humor; and then determining the blood glucose level (or the level of another analyte of interest) for the subject from the Raman spectrum. Preferably, the detecting step is followed by the step of subtracting a confounding fluorescence spectrum from the Raman spectrum to produce a difference spectrum; and determining the blood level of the analyte of interest for the subject from that difference spectrum, preferably using linear or nonlinear multivariate analysis such as partial least squares analysis. Apparatus for carrying out the foregoing method is also disclosed.

  12. Minimally invasive posterior hamstring harvest.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Trent J; Lubowitz, James H

    2013-01-01

    Autogenous hamstring harvesting for knee ligament reconstruction is a well-established standard. Minimally invasive posterior hamstring harvest is a simple, efficient, reproducible technique for harvest of the semitendinosus or gracilis tendon or both medial hamstring tendons. A 2- to 3-cm longitudinal incision from the popliteal crease proximally, in line with the semitendinosus tendon, is sufficient. The deep fascia is bluntly penetrated, and the tendon or tendons are identified. Adhesions are dissected. Then, an open tendon stripper is used to release the tendon or tendons proximally; a closed, sharp tendon stripper is used to release the tendon or tendons from the pes. Layered, absorbable skin closure is performed, and the skin is covered with a skin sealant, bolster dressing, and plastic adhesive bandage for 2 weeks. PMID:24266003

  13. Minimally Invasive Spigelian Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Baucom, Catherine; Nguyen, Quan D.; Hidalgo, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Spigelian hernia is an uncommon ventral hernia characterized by a defect in the linea semilunaris. Repair of spigelian hernia has traditionally been accomplished via an open transverse incision and primary repair. The purpose of this article is to present 2 case reports of incarcerated spigelian hernia that were successfully repaired laparoscopically using Gortex mesh and to present a review of the literature regarding laparoscopic repair of spigelian hernias. Methods: Retrospective chart review and Medline literature search. Results: Two patients underwent laparoscopic mesh repair of incarcerated spigelian hernias. Both were started on a regular diet on postoperative day 1 and discharged on postoperative days 2 and 3. One patient developed a seroma that resolved without intervention. There was complete resolution of preoperative symptoms at the 12-month follow-up. Conclusion: Minimally invasive repair of spigelian hernias is an alternative to the traditional open surgical technique. Further studies are needed to directly compare the open and the laparoscopic repair. PMID:19660230

  14. Anaesthesia for minimally invasive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dec, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is rising in popularity. It offers well-known benefits to the patient. However, restricted access to the surgical site and gas insufflation into the body cavities may result in severe complications. From the anaesthetic point of view MIS poses unique challenges associated with creation of pneumoperitoneum, carbon dioxide absorption, specific positioning and monitoring a patient to whom the anaesthetist has often restricted access, in a poorly lit environment. Moreover, with refinement of surgical procedures and growing experience the anaesthetist is presented with patients from high-risk groups (obese, elderly, with advanced cardiac and respiratory disease) who once were deemed unsuitable for the laparoscopic technique. Anaesthetic management is aimed at getting the patient safely through the procedure, minimizing the specific risks arising from laparoscopy and the patient's coexisting medical problems, ensuring quick recovery and a relatively pain-free postoperative course with early return to normal function. PMID:26865885

  15. Chapter 8: Invasive fungal rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Praveen; Wise, Sarah K

    2013-01-01

    Invasive fungal rhinosinusitis (IFRS) is a disease of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity that typically affects immunocompromised patients in the acute fulminant form. Early symptoms can often mimic rhinosinusitis, while late symptoms can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Swelling and mucosal thickening can quickly progress to pale or necrotic tissue in the nasal cavity and sinuses, and the disease can rapidly spread and invade the palate, orbit, cavernous sinus, cranial nerves, skull base, carotid artery, and brain. IFRS can be life threatening if left undiagnosed or untreated. While the acute fulminant form of IFRS is the most rapidly progressive and destructive, granulomatous and chronic forms also exist. Diagnosis of IFRS often mandates imaging studies in conjunction with clinical, endoscopic, and histopathological examination. Treatment of IFRS consists of reversing the underlying immunosuppression, antifungal therapy, and aggressive surgical debridement. With early diagnosis and treatment, IFRS can be treated and increase patient survival. PMID:23711036

  16. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The physics of cancer is a relatively new emerging field of cancer research. In the last decade it has become a focus of biophysical research as well as becoming a novel focus for classical cancer research. This special section of Physical Biology focusing on invasive cancer cells and metastasis (physical oncology) will give greater insight into the different subfields where physical approaches are being applied to cancer research. This focus on the physical aspects of cancer is necessary because novel approaches in the field of genomics and proteomics have not altered the field of cancer research dramatically, due to the fact that few breakthroughs have been made. It is still not understood why some primary tumors metastasize and thus have a worse outcome compared to others that do not metastasize. As biophysicists, we and others suggest that the mechanical properties of the cancer cells, which possess the ability to transmigrate, are quite different compared to non-metastatic and non-invasive cancer cells. Furthermore, we hypothesize that these cancer cells undergo a selection process within the primary tumor that enables them to weaken their cell-cell adhesions and to alter their cell-matrix adhesions in order to be able to cross the outermost boundary of the primary tumor, as well as the surrounding basement membrane, and to invade the connective tissue. This prerequisite may also help the cancer cells to enter blood or lymph vessels, get transported with the vessel flow and form secondary tumors either within the vessel, directly on the endothelium, or in a different organ after crossing the endothelial lining a second time. This special section begins with a paper by Mark F Coughlin and Jeffrey J Fredberg on the changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology due to the metastatic capability of cancer cells from different cancer tissue types such as skin, bladder, prostate and kidney [1]. The hypothesis was that the metastatic outcome is impacted by

  17. Minimally invasive radioguided parathyroidectomy (MIRP).

    PubMed

    Goldstein, R E; Martin, W H; Richards, K

    2003-06-01

    The technique of parathyroidectomy has traditionally involved a bilateral exploration of the neck with the intent of visualizing 4 parathyroid glands and resecting pathologically enlarged glands. Parathyroid scanning using technetium-99m sestamibi has evolved and can now localize 80% to 90% of parathyroid adenomas. The technique of minimally invasive radioguided parathyroidectomy (MIRP) is a surgical option for most patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and a positive preoperative parathyroid scan. The technique makes use of a hand-held gamma probe that is used intraoperatively to guide the dissection in a highly directed manner with the procedure often performed under local anesthesia. The technique results in excellent cure rates while allowing most patients to leave the hospital within a few hours after the completion of the procedure. Current data also suggest the procedure can decrease hospital charges by approximately 50%. This technique may significantly change the management of primary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:12955045

  18. Microparasites and Placental Invasiveness in Eutherian Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Capellini, Isabella; Nunn, Charles L.; Barton, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Placental invasiveness—the number of maternal tissue layers separating fetal tissues from maternal blood—is variable across mammalian species. Although this diversity is likely to be functionally important, variation in placental invasiveness remains unexplained. Here we test the hypothesis that increased risk of transplacental transmission of pathogens from the mother to the fetus promotes the evolution of non-invasive placentation, the most likely derived condition in eutherian mammals. Specifically, we predict that non-invasive placentation is associated with increased microparasite species richness relative to more invasive placental types, based on the assumption that higher numbers of microparasites in a population reflects greater risk of transplacental transmission to fetuses. As predicted, higher bacteria species richness is associated with non-invasive placentation. Protozoa species richness, however, shows the opposite pattern. Because invasive placentae facilitate the transfer of maternal antibodies to the fetus, we propose that the ancestral condition of invasive placentation is retained under selection for protection of newborns from higher risk of postnatal protozoan infection. Hence, our findings suggest that a tradeoff exists between protection against bacterial infection prenatally and protozoan infection postnatally. Future studies are needed to investigate how maternal prevalence of infection and the relative pre- versus postnatal risk of fetal infection by different microparasite groups vary among mammalian hosts in relation to placental invasiveness. PMID:26168031

  19. Principles for ecologically based invasive plant management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land managers long have identified a critical need for a practical and effective framework to guide the implementation of successful restoration, especially where invasive plants dominate the ecosystem. A holistic, ecologically-based invasive plant management (EBIPM) framework that integrates ecosy...

  20. ECOLOGICALLY BASED INVASIVE PLANT MANAGEMENT NEWSLETTER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This manuscript describes the characteristics that make a plant invasive, and some of the existing theories of "invasions". It compares non-relational approaches (identifying characteristics that make something a weed) to relational approaches (drawing on relationships between a species and an ecos...

  1. Non-invasive assessment of intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Robba, C; Bacigaluppi, S; Cardim, D; Donnelly, J; Bertuccio, A; Czosnyka, M

    2016-07-01

    Monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) is invaluable in the management of neurosurgical and neurological critically ill patients. Invasive measurement of ventricular or parenchymal pressure is considered the gold standard for accurate measurement of ICP but is not always possible due to certain risks. Therefore, the availability of accurate methods to non-invasively estimate ICP has the potential to improve the management of these vulnerable patients. This review provides a comparative description of different methods for non-invasive ICP measurement. Current methods are based on changes associated with increased ICP, both morphological (assessed with magnetic resonance, computed tomography, ultrasound, and fundoscopy) and physiological (assessed with transcranial and ophthalmic Doppler, tympanometry, near-infrared spectroscopy, electroencephalography, visual-evoked potentials, and otoacoustic emissions assessment). At present, none of the non-invasive techniques alone seem suitable as a substitute for invasive monitoring. However, following the present analysis and considerations upon each technique, we propose a possible flowchart based on the combination of non-invasive techniques including those characterizing morphologic changes (e.g., repetitive US measurements of ONSD) and those characterizing physiological changes (e.g., continuous TCD). Such an integrated approach, which still needs to be validated in clinical practice, could aid in deciding whether to place an invasive monitor, or how to titrate therapy when invasive ICP measurement is contraindicated or unavailable. PMID:26515159

  2. Applying Ecologically-Based Invasive Plant Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Developing a guideline to assist land managers in making better decisions when they are faced with invasive annual grasses is critical to gaining greater adoption of ecologically-based invasive plant management. This manual guides users through the EBIPM decision process to assist in restoration of...

  3. Influence of Tamarisk Invasion on Bird Populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determining the effects of exotic species invasion on native plant and animal communities is of great value for land and wildlife managers. With limited resources always a concern, defining the greatest threat of an invasion is important. In desert environments of the Great Basin, riparian wood...

  4. Alien invasive species and international trade

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emergency control measures for invasive species often rely on use of pesticides and other destructive practices. Public concern about pesticide contamination of the ground water and the environment has lead to increased restrictions on the use of pesticides for control of many destructive invasive ...

  5. The Invasive Plant Species Education Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Kevin; James, Krista; Carlson, Kitrina; D'Angelo, Jean

    2010-01-01

    To help high school students gain a solid understanding of invasive plant species, university faculty and students from the University of Wisconsin-Stout (UW-Stout) and a local high school teacher worked together to develop the Invasive Plant Species (IPS) Education Guide. The IPS Education Guide includes nine lessons that give students an…

  6. Indirect effects of parasites in invasions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduced species disrupt native communities and biodiversity worldwide. Parasitic infections (and at times, their absence) are thought to be a key component in the success and impact of biological invasions by plants and animals. They can facilitate or limit invasions, and positively or negatively...

  7. Immobilizing nitrogen to control plant invasion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1. Increased soil nitrogen (N) availability may often facilitate plant invasions. Therefore, lowering N availability might be expected to reduce those invasions and favor native species. Numerous studies have examined effects of low N availability on specific invaders, but a synthesis of these stu...

  8. Mapping invasive weeds using airborne hyperspectral imagery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive plant species present a serious problem to the natural environment and have adverse ecological and economic impacts on both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems they invade. This article provides a brief overview on the use of remote sensing for mapping invasive plant species in both terrestr...

  9. Ecological Principles for Invasive Plant Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive annual grasses continue to advance at an alarming rate despite efforts of control by land managers. Ecologically-based invasive plant management (EBIPM) is a holistic framework that integrates ecosystem health assessment, knowledge of ecological processes and adaptive management into a succ...

  10. Fire Effects on Invasive Weed Seed Germination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Restoring historic fire regimes is often beneficial to rangeland structure and function. However, understanding of interactions between fire and invasive weeds is limited. We designed an experiment to determine fire effects on germination of soil surface-deposited seeds of the invasive weeds Bromu...

  11. Antarctic Crabs: Invasion or Endurance?

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Huw J.; Whittle, Rowan J.; Roberts, Stephen J.; Belchier, Mark; Linse, Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Recent scientific interest following the “discovery” of lithodid crabs around Antarctica has centred on a hypothesis that these crabs might be poised to invade the Antarctic shelf if the recent warming trend continues, potentially decimating its native fauna. This “invasion hypothesis” suggests that decapod crabs were driven out of Antarctica 40–15 million years ago and are only now returning as “warm” enough habitats become available. The hypothesis is based on a geographically and spatially poor fossil record of a different group of crabs (Brachyura), and examination of relatively few Recent lithodid samples from the Antarctic slope. In this paper, we examine the existing lithodid fossil record and present the distribution and biogeographic patterns derived from over 16,000 records of Recent Southern Hemisphere crabs and lobsters. Globally, the lithodid fossil record consists of only two known specimens, neither of which comes from the Antarctic. Recent records show that 22 species of crabs and lobsters have been reported from the Southern Ocean, with 12 species found south of 60°S. All are restricted to waters warmer than 0°C, with their Antarctic distribution limited to the areas of seafloor dominated by Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW). Currently, CDW extends further and shallower onto the West Antarctic shelf than the known distribution ranges of most lithodid species examined. Geological evidence suggests that West Antarctic shelf could have been available for colonisation during the last 9,000 years. Distribution patterns, species richness, and levels of endemism all suggest that, rather than becoming extinct and recently re-invading from outside Antarctica, the lithodid crabs have likely persisted, and even radiated, on or near to Antarctic slope. We conclude there is no evidence for a modern-day “crab invasion”. We recommend a repeated targeted lithodid sampling program along the West Antarctic shelf to fully test the validity of the “invasion

  12. Development of multifilamentary niobium titanium and niobium tin strands for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Zhang, P. X.; Tang, X. D.; Liu, X. H.; Lu, Y. F.; Weng, P. D.; Grunblatt, G.; Hoang, Gia K.; Verwaerde, C.

    2007-05-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor(ITER) device should demonstrate the scientific and technological possibility of commercial fusion energy production in large scale in order to solve the worldwide energy problem in the future. The superconducting magnet system is the key part of the ITER device to supply high magnetic fields for confining the deuterium-tritium plasma. The multifilament NbTi and Nb3Sn strands with high quality have been studied to meet the specifications of superconducting strands for fabricating poloidal field coils (PF) and toroidal field coils (TF). For NbTi strands with 8306 filaments, Jc of 2910 A mm-2 (4.2 K, 5 T, 0.1 μV cm-1) has been obtained by a conventional process. The proposed process could be used for fabrication of long strands with a unit length more than 5000 m. By an internal tin process the multifilamentary Nb3Sn strands with a diameter of 0.79 mm and a unit length longer than 5000 m have been successfully fabricated. The highest non-Cu Jcn (12 T, 4.2 K, 0.1 μV cm-1) value of 1249 A mm-2 has been obtained. The n-value of Nb3Sn strands is larger than 20 and the residual resistance ratio (RRR) value lies between 150 and 220. The formation of the Nb3Sn superconducting phase together with the evolution of microstructure has been investigated by neutron diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that the properties of NbTi and Nb3Sn strands have already met basically the specifications proposed by the ITER program.

  13. Possible Causes of a Harbour Porpoise Mass Stranding in Danish Waters in 2005

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Andrew J.; Maar, Marie; Mohn, Christian; Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob; Siebert, Ursula; Jensen, Lasse Fast; Baagøe, Hans J.; Teilmann, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    An unprecedented 85 harbour porpoises stranded freshly dead along approximately 100 km of Danish coastline from 7–15 April, 2005. This total is considerably above the mean weekly stranding rate for the whole of Denmark, both for any time of year, 1.23 animals/week (ranging from 0 to 20 during 2003–2008, excluding April 2005), and specifically in April, 0.65 animals/week (0 to 4, same period). Bycatch was established as the cause of death for most of the individuals through typical indications of fisheries interactions, including net markings in the skin and around the flippers, and loss of tail flukes. Local fishermen confirmed unusually large porpoise bycatch in nets set for lumpfish (Cyclopterus lumpus) and the strandings were attributed to an early lumpfish season. However, lumpfish catches for 2005 were not unusual in terms of season onset, peak or total catch, when compared to 2003–2008. Consequently, human activity was combined with environmental factors and the variation in Danish fisheries landings (determined through a principal component analysis) in a two-part statistical model to assess the correlation of these factors with both the presence of fresh strandings and the numbers of strandings on the Danish west coast. The final statistical model (which was forward selected using Akaike information criterion; AIC) indicated that naval presence is correlated with higher rates of porpoise strandings, particularly in combination with certain fisheries, although it is not correlated with the actual presence of strandings. Military vessels from various countries were confirmed in the area from the 7th April, en route to the largest naval exercise in Danish waters to date (Loyal Mariner 2005, 11–28 April). Although sonar usage cannot be confirmed, it is likely that ships were testing various equipment prior to the main exercise. Thus naval activity cannot be ruled out as a possible contributing factor. PMID:23460787

  14. Possible causes of a harbour porpoise mass stranding in Danish waters in 2005.

    PubMed

    Wright, Andrew J; Maar, Marie; Mohn, Christian; Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob; Siebert, Ursula; Jensen, Lasse Fast; Baagøe, Hans J; Teilmann, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    An unprecedented 85 harbour porpoises stranded freshly dead along approximately 100 km of Danish coastline from 7-15 April, 2005. This total is considerably above the mean weekly stranding rate for the whole of Denmark, both for any time of year, 1.23 animals/week (ranging from 0 to 20 during 2003-2008, excluding April 2005), and specifically in April, 0.65 animals/week (0 to 4, same period). Bycatch was established as the cause of death for most of the individuals through typical indications of fisheries interactions, including net markings in the skin and around the flippers, and loss of tail flukes. Local fishermen confirmed unusually large porpoise bycatch in nets set for lumpfish (Cyclopterus lumpus) and the strandings were attributed to an early lumpfish season. However, lumpfish catches for 2005 were not unusual in terms of season onset, peak or total catch, when compared to 2003-2008. Consequently, human activity was combined with environmental factors and the variation in Danish fisheries landings (determined through a principal component analysis) in a two-part statistical model to assess the correlation of these factors with both the presence of fresh strandings and the numbers of strandings on the Danish west coast. The final statistical model (which was forward selected using Akaike information criterion; AIC) indicated that naval presence is correlated with higher rates of porpoise strandings, particularly in combination with certain fisheries, although it is not correlated with the actual presence of strandings. Military vessels from various countries were confirmed in the area from the 7th April, en route to the largest naval exercise in Danish waters to date (Loyal Mariner 2005, 11-28 April). Although sonar usage cannot be confirmed, it is likely that ships were testing various equipment prior to the main exercise. Thus naval activity cannot be ruled out as a possible contributing factor. PMID:23460787

  15. Evolutionary dynamics of adult stem cells: Comparison of random and immortal-strand segregation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel; Sherley, James L.; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2005-04-01

    This paper develops a point-mutation model describing the evolutionary dynamics of a population of adult stem cells. Such a model may prove useful for quantitative studies of tissue aging and the emergence of cancer. We consider two modes of chromosome segregation: (1) random segregation, where the daughter chromosomes of a given parent chromosome segregate randomly into the stem cell and its differentiating sister cell and (2) “immortal DNA strand” co-segregation, for which the stem cell retains the daughter chromosomes with the oldest parent strands. Immortal strand co-segregation is a mechanism, originally proposed by [Cairns Nature (London) 255, 197 (1975)], by which stem cells preserve the integrity of their genomes. For random segregation, we develop an ordered strand pair formulation of the dynamics, analogous to the ordered strand pair formalism developed for quasispecies dynamics involving semiconservative replication with imperfect lesion repair (in this context, lesion repair is taken to mean repair of postreplication base-pair mismatches). Interestingly, a similar formulation is possible with immortal strand co-segregation, despite the fact that this segregation mechanism is age dependent. From our model we are able to mathematically show that, when lesion repair is imperfect, then immortal strand co-segregation leads to better preservation of the stem cell lineage than random chromosome segregation. Furthermore, our model allows us to estimate the optimal lesion repair efficiency for preserving an adult stem cell population for a given period of time. For human stem cells, we obtain that mispaired bases still present after replication and cell division should be left untouched, to avoid potentially fixing a mutation in both DNA strands.

  16. Chitosan: a novel platform in proton-driven DNA strand rearrangement actuation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dami; Singha, Kaushik; Jang, Mi-Kyeong; Nah, Jae-Woon; Park, In-Kyu; Kim, Won Jong

    2009-04-01

    Nanometre-scaled DNA machine based on molecular recognition properties of DNA has now become a powerful tool in nanodevices, miniaturized structure, and nanofabrication. The common principle behind designing a DNA nanomachine is DNA strand exchange or rearrangement, which is solely controlled by the stabilization through associative and dissociative forces arising from base pair interaction of DNA molecules. Thus, highly effective DNA reaction actuator will make DNA nanomachine more flexible, controllable, and powerful device. Here, we report the novel polymer-mediated platform in proton-driven DNA strand rearrangement actuation. This cationic low molecular weight water-soluble chitosan (LMWSC) exhibited pH-dependent complexation with oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN). It formed complex with ODN only at low pH and accelerated the DNA strand exchange (or rearrangement) reaction between dsDNA and its complementary ssDNA at pH 5.0. However, no complexation was observed between LMWSC and ODN at neutral pH. We assume that at physiological pH, LMWSC is not protonated enough for formation of complex with ODN. Therefore, it can not diminish the electrostatic repulsion among the negatively charged DNA strands of the three-stranded intermediate formed during the strand exchange reaction. In contrast, LMWSC becomes positively charged at acidic pH, and it stabilizes the three-stranded intermediate by spreading out the accumulated counter-ions and increasing the entropy of the system. This fascinating observation prompted us to believe that this intelligent proton-driven DNA reaction actuator has a potential for the precise control of DNA nanomachine and would be applied for operating and controlling nanoscaled machine. PMID:19396376

  17. The Role of Cytosine Methylation on Charge Transport through a DNA Strand

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jianqing; Govind, Niranjan; Anantram, M. P.

    2015-09-04

    Cytosine methylation has been found to play a crucial role in various biological processes, including a number of human diseases. The detection of this small modifi-cation remains challenging. In this work, we computationally explore the possibility of detecting methylated DNA strands through direct electrical conductance measurements. Using density functional theory and the Landauer-Buttiker method, we study the electronic properties and charge transport through an eight base-pair methylated DNA strand and its native counterpart. Specifically, we compare the results generated with the widely used B3LYP exchange-correlation (XC) functional and CAM-B3LYP based tuned range-separated hybrid density functional. We first analyze the effect of cytosine methylation on the tight-binding parameters of two DNA strands and then model the transmission of the electrons and conductance through the strands both with and without decoherence. We find that with both functionals, the main difference of the tight-binding parameters between the native DNA and the methylated DNA lies in the on-site energies of (methylated) cytosine bases. The intra- and interstrand hopping integrals between two nearest neighboring guanine base and (methylated) cytosine base also change with the addition of the methyl groups. Our calculations show that in the phase-coherent limit, the transmission of the methylated strand is close to the native strand when the energy is nearby the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level and larger than the native strand by 5 times in the bandgap. The trend in transmission also holds in the presence of the decoherence with both functionals. We also study the effect of contact coupling by choosing coupling strengths ranging from weak to strong coupling limit. Our results suggest that the effect of the two different functionals is to alter the on-site energies of the DNA bases at the HOMO level, while the transport properties don't depend much on the two functionals.

  18. Slow conduction in mixed cultured strands of primary ventricular cells and stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kucera, Jan P.; Prudat, Yann; Marcu, Irene C.; Azzarito, Michela; Ullrich, Nina D.

    2015-01-01

    Modern concepts for the treatment of myocardial diseases focus on novel cell therapeutic strategies involving stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (SCMs). However, functional integration of SCMs requires similar electrophysiological properties as primary cardiomyocytes (PCMs) and the ability to establish intercellular connections with host myocytes in order to contribute to the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. The aim of this project was to investigate the properties of cardiac conduction in a co-culture approach using SCMs and PCMs in cultured cell strands. Murine embryonic SCMs were pooled with fetal ventricular cells and seeded in predefined proportions on microelectrode arrays to form patterned strands of mixed cells. Conduction velocity (CV) was measured during steady state pacing. SCM excitability was estimated from action potentials measured in single cells using the patch clamp technique. Experiments were complemented with computer simulations of conduction using a detailed model of cellular architecture in mixed cell strands. CV was significantly lower in strands composed purely of SCMs (5.5 ± 1.5 cm/s, n = 11) as compared to PCMs (34.9 ± 2.9 cm/s, n = 21) at similar refractoriness (100% SCMs: 122 ± 25 ms, n = 9; 100% PCMs: 139 ± 67 ms, n = 14). In mixed strands combining both cell types, CV was higher than in pure SCMs strands, but always lower than in 100% PCM strands. Computer simulations demonstrated that both intercellular coupling and electrical excitability limit CV. These data provide evidence that in cultures of murine ventricular cardiomyocytes, SCMs cannot restore CV to control levels resulting in slow conduction, which may lead to reentry circuits and arrhythmias. PMID:26442264

  19. RAD51 variant proteins from human lung and kidney tumors exhibit DNA strand exchange defects.

    PubMed

    Silva, Michelle C; Morrical, Milagros D; Bryan, Katie E; Averill, April M; Dragon, Julie; Bond, Jeffrey P; Morrical, Scott W

    2016-06-01

    In human cells, error-free repair of DNA double-strand breaks requires the DNA pairing and strand exchange activities of RAD51 recombinase. Activation of RAD51 recombination activities requires the assembly of RAD51 presynaptic filaments on the single-stranded DNA that forms at resected DSB ends. Mutations in proteins that control presynaptic filament assembly, such as BRCA2, and in RAD51 itself, are associated with human breast cancer. Here we describe the properties of two mutations in RAD51 protein that derive from human lung and kidney tumors, respectively. Sequence variants Q268P and Q272L both map to the DNA binding loop 2 (L2) region of RAD51, a motif that is involved in DNA binding and in the allosteric activation of ATP hydrolysis and DNA strand exchange activities. Both mutations alter the thermal stability, DNA binding, and ATPase properties of RAD51, however both variants retain intrinsic DNA strand exchange activity towards oligonucleotide substrates under optimized conditions. In contrast, both Q268P and Q272L variants exhibit drastically reduced DNA strand exchange activity in reaction mixtures containing long homologous ssDNA and dsDNA substrates and human RPA protein. Mixtures of wild-type and variant proteins also exhibit reduced DNA strand exchange activity, suggesting that heterozygous mutations could negatively affect DNA recombination and repair processes in vivo. Together, the findings of this study suggest that hypomorphic missense mutations in RAD51 protein could be drivers of genomic instability in cancer cells, and thereby contribute to the etiology of metastatic disease. PMID:27153211

  20. Predator control promotes invasive dominated ecological states.

    PubMed

    Wallach, Arian D; Johnson, Christopher N; Ritchie, Euan G; O'Neill, Adam J

    2010-08-01

    Invasive species are regarded as one of the top five drivers of the global extinction crisis. In response, extreme measures have been applied in an attempt to control or eradicate invasives, with little success overall. We tested the idea that state shifts to invasive dominance are symptomatic of losses in ecosystem resilience, due to the suppression of apex predators. This concept was investigated in Australia where the high rate of mammalian extinctions is largely attributed to the destructive influence of invasive species. Intensive pest control is widely applied across the continent, simultaneously eliminating Australia's apex predator, the dingo (Canis lupus dingo). We show that predator management accounts for shifts between two main ecosystem states. Lethal control fractures dingo social structure and leads to bottom-up driven increases in invasive mesopredators and herbivores. Where control is relaxed, dingoes re-establish top-down regulation of ecosystems, allowing for the recovery of biodiversity and productivity. PMID:20545732