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Sample records for receiving home mechanical

  1. E-cigarette use in patients receiving home oxygen therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lacasse, Yves; Légaré, Martin; Maltais, François

    2015-01-01

    Current smokers who are prescribed home oxygen may not benefit from the therapy. In addition to being an obvious fire hazard, there is some evidence that the physiological mechanisms by which home oxygen is believed to operate are inhibited by smoking. Although their effectiveness is yet to be demonstrated, electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are often regarded as an aid to smoking cessation. However, several burn accidents in e-cigarette smokers receiving home oxygen therapy have also been reported, leading Health Canada to release a warning of fire risk to oxygen therapy patients from e-cigarettes. It is the authors’ position that patients receiving oxygen should definitely not use e-cigarettes. The authors provide suggestions for addressing the delicate issue of home oxygen therapy in current cigarette and/or e-cigarette smokers. PMID:25848719

  2. E-cigarette use in patients receiving home oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Lacasse, Yves; Légaré, Martin; Maltais, François

    2015-01-01

    Current smokers who are prescribed home oxygen may not benefit from the therapy. In addition to being an obvious fire hazard, there is some evidence that the physiological mechanisms by which home oxygen is believed to operate are inhibited by smoking. Although their effectiveness is yet to be demonstrated, electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are often regarded as an aid to smoking cessation. However, several burn accidents in e-cigarette smokers receiving home oxygen therapy have also been reported, leading Health Canada to release a warning of fire risk to oxygen therapy patients from e-cigarettes. It is the authors' position that patients receiving oxygen should definitely not use e-cigarettes. The authors provide suggestions for addressing the delicate issue of home oxygen therapy in current cigarette and⁄or e-cigarette smokers. PMID:25848719

  3. The meaning of receiving help from home nursing care.

    PubMed

    Moe, Aud; Hellzen, Ove; Enmarker, Ingela

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to illuminate the meaning of receiving help from home nursing care for the chronically ill, elderly persons living in their homes. The study was carried out in Norway. Data were collected by narrative interviews and analysed by phenomenological hermeneutic interpretations. Receiving help from home nursing care sometimes meant 'Being ill and dependent on help'. Other times it meant 'Being at the mercy of help'. It could also mean 'Feeling inferior as a human being'. Sometimes help was given by nurses who were respectful and proficient at caring for an elderly person, while at other times nurses seemed to be incompetent and worked with a paternalistic attitude without respect for privacy. Receiving help also meant elderly persons wanted to be regarded and approached as equal human beings, supported in the courage to meet challenges in life. PMID:23625732

  4. X-Ray Protection Standards for Home Television Receivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, Washington, DC.

    Levels of X-Ray emission and exposure from home television receivers are being questioned and found greater than previous public health and safety cautions and measurement limits have suggested. The latest changes in television components, designs, function, and manufacturing, have caused equipment standards and the effects of radiation to be…

  5. 42 CFR 436.217 - Individuals receiving home and community-based services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Individuals receiving home and community-based... receiving home and community-based services. The agency may provide Medicaid to any group or groups of... if institutionalized. (b) In the absence of home and community-based services under a waiver...

  6. 42 CFR 436.217 - Individuals receiving home and community-based services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Individuals receiving home and community-based... receiving home and community-based services. The agency may provide Medicaid to any group or groups of... if institutionalized. (b) In the absence of home and community-based services under a waiver...

  7. 42 CFR 435.217 - Individuals receiving home and community-based services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Individuals receiving home and community-based... receiving home and community-based services. The agency may provide Medicaid to any group or groups of... if institutionalized. (b) In the absence of home and community-based services under a waiver...

  8. 42 CFR 435.217 - Individuals receiving home and community-based services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Individuals receiving home and community-based... receiving home and community-based services. The agency may provide Medicaid to any group or groups of... if institutionalized. (b) In the absence of home and community-based services under a waiver...

  9. 42 CFR 436.217 - Individuals receiving home and community-based services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Individuals receiving home and community-based... receiving home and community-based services. The agency may provide Medicaid to any group or groups of... if institutionalized. (b) In the absence of home and community-based services under a waiver...

  10. 42 CFR 435.217 - Individuals receiving home and community-based services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Individuals receiving home and community-based... receiving home and community-based services. The agency may provide Medicaid to any group or groups of... if institutionalized. (b) In the absence of home and community-based services under a waiver...

  11. 42 CFR 435.217 - Individuals receiving home and community-based services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Individuals receiving home and community-based... Families and Children and the Aged, Blind, and Disabled § 435.217 Individuals receiving home and community.... (b) In the absence of home and community-based services under a waiver granted under part 441—...

  12. 42 CFR 436.217 - Individuals receiving home and community-based services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Individuals receiving home and community-based... receiving home and community-based services. The agency may provide Medicaid to any group or groups of... if institutionalized. (b) In the absence of home and community-based services under a waiver...

  13. Quality of life in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Jeppesen, P; Langholz, E; Mortensen, P

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Quality of life is an important determinant of the effectiveness of health technologies, but it has rarely been assessed in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN).
PATIENTS/METHODS—The non-disease specific sickness impact profile (SIP) and the disease specific inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire (IBDQ) were used on a cohort of 49 patients receiving HPN, and the results compared with those for 36 non-HPN patients with either anatomical (<200 cm) or functional (faecal energy excretion >2.0 MJ/day (~488 kcal/day)) short bowel.
RESULTS—In the HPN patients the SIP scores were worse (higher) overall (17 (13)% v 8 (9)%) and with regard to physical (13 (15)% v 5 (8)%) and psychosocial (14 (12)% v 9 (11)%) dimensions and independent categories (20 (12)% v 9 (8)%) compared with the non-HPN patients (means (SD); all p<0.001). The IBDQ scores were worse (lower) in the HPN patients overall (5.0 (4.3-5.7) v 5.6 (4.8-6.2)) and with regard to systemic symptoms (3.8 (2.8-5.4) v 5.2 (3.9-5.9)) and emotional (5.3 (4.4-6.2) v 5.8 (5.4-6.4)) and social (4.3 (3.4-5.5) v 4.8 (4.5-5.8)) function (median (25-75%); all p<0.05), but only tended to be worse with regard to bowel symptoms (5.2 (4.8-6.1) v 5.7 (4.9-6.4), p = 0.08). HPN also reduced quality of life in patients with a stoma, whereas a stoma did not reduce quality of life among the non-HPN patients. Female HPN patients and HPN patients older than 45 scored worse.
CONCLUSION—Quality of life is reduced in patients on HPN compared with those with anatomical or functional short bowel not receiving HPN, and compares with that reported for patients with chronic renal failure treated by dialysis.


Keywords: parenteral nutrition; quality of life; sickness impact profile; inflammatory bowel disease PMID:10323888

  14. 42 CFR 435.217 - Individuals receiving home and community-based services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Individuals receiving home and community-based... Families and Children and the Aged, Blind, and Disabled § 435.217 Individuals receiving home and community-based services. The agency may provide Medicaid to any group or groups of individuals in the...

  15. 42 CFR 436.217 - Individuals receiving home and community-based services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Individuals receiving home and community-based... receiving home and community-based services. The agency may provide Medicaid to any group or groups of individuals in the community who meet the following requirements: (a) The group would be eligible for...

  16. Home Mechanics for the Visually Impaired.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utrup, Robert G.

    The manual is intended to be used in a course on home mechanics for the visually handicapped and is organized into 17 lessons. Lessons cover the following topics: adhesives (such as Elmer's glue), cleaning drains, faucet repairs, fire extinguishers, the flush tank, the fuse box, glazing, hammers, hand sanding, handsaws, hangers, nails and wood…

  17. 42 CFR 435.735 - Post-eligibility treatment of income and resources of individuals receiving home and community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... an individual with only a spouse at home, an additional amount for the maintenance needs of the... of individuals receiving home and community-based services furnished under a waiver: Application of... and resources of individuals receiving home and community-based services furnished under a...

  18. Homing orientation in salamanders: A mechanism involving chemical cues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madison, D. M.

    1972-01-01

    A detailed description is given of experiments made to determine the senses and chemical cues used by salamanders for homing orientation. Sensory impairment and cue manipulative techniques were used in the investigation. All experiments were carried out at night. Results show that sense impaired animals did not home as readily as those who were blind but retained their sensory mechanism. This fact suggests that the olfactory mechanism is necessary for homing in the salamander. It was determined that after the impaired salamander regenerated its sensory mechanism it too returned home. It was concluded that homing ability in salamanders is direction independent, distant dependent, and vision independent.

  19. 41 CFR 302-14.3 - Am I eligible to receive a home marketing incentive payment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Am I eligible to receive a home marketing incentive payment? 302-14.3 Section 302-14.3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RESIDENCE TRANSACTION ALLOWANCES...

  20. 41 CFR 302-14.3 - Am I eligible to receive a home marketing incentive payment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Am I eligible to receive a home marketing incentive payment? 302-14.3 Section 302-14.3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RESIDENCE TRANSACTION ALLOWANCES...

  1. 41 CFR 302-14.3 - Am I eligible to receive a home marketing incentive payment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Am I eligible to receive a home marketing incentive payment? 302-14.3 Section 302-14.3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RESIDENCE TRANSACTION ALLOWANCES...

  2. 41 CFR 302-14.3 - Am I eligible to receive a home marketing incentive payment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Am I eligible to receive a home marketing incentive payment? 302-14.3 Section 302-14.3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RESIDENCE TRANSACTION ALLOWANCES...

  3. 41 CFR 302-14.3 - Am I eligible to receive a home marketing incentive payment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Am I eligible to receive a home marketing incentive payment? 302-14.3 Section 302-14.3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RESIDENCE TRANSACTION ALLOWANCES...

  4. 42 CFR 436.219 - Individuals receiving State plan home and community-based services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Individuals receiving State plan home and community-based services. 436.219 Section 436.219 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS ELIGIBILITY IN GUAM, PUERTO RICO, AND THE VIRGIN ISLANDS Options...

  5. The importance of knowing the home conditions of patients receiving long-term oxygen therapy

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Ilda; Tanni, Suzana Erico; Hernández, Carme; Godoy, Irma

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) is one of the main treatments for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Patients receiving LTOT may have less than optimal home conditions and this may interfere with treatment. The objective of this study was, through home visits, to identify the characteristics of patients receiving LTOT and to develop knowledge regarding the home environments of these patients. Methods Ninety-seven patients with a mean age of 69 plus or minus 10.5 years were evaluated. This study was a cross-sectional descriptive analysis. Data were collected during an initial home visit, using a questionnaire standardized for the study. The results were analyzed retrospectively. Results Seventy-five percent of the patients had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and 11% were active smokers. The patients’ mean pulse oximetry values were 85.9% plus or minus 4.7% on room air and 92% plus or minus 3.9% on the prescribed flow of oxygen. Most of the patients did not use the treatment as prescribed and most used a humidifier. The extension hose had a mean length of 5 plus or minus 3.9 m (range, 1.5–16 m). In the year prior to the visit, 26% of the patients received emergency medical care because of respiratory problems. Few patients reported engaging in leisure activities. Conclusion The home visit allowed us to identify problems and interventions that could improve the way LTOT is used. The most common interventions related to smoking cessation, concentrator maintenance and cleaning, use of a humidifier, and adjustments of the length of the connector hose. Therefore, the home visit is a very important tool in providing comprehensive care to patients receiving LTOT, especially those who show lack of adequate progress and those who show uncertainty about the treatment method. PMID:22848155

  6. Ethical challenges in home mechanical ventilation: A secondary analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dybwik, Knut; Nielsen, Erik Waage; Brinchmann, Berit Støre

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the ethical challenges in home mechanical ventilation based on a secondary analysis of qualitative empirical data. The data included perceptions of healthcare professionals in hospitals and community health services and family members of children and adults using home mechanical ventilation. The findings show that a number of ethical challenges, or dilemmas, arise at all levels in the course of treatment: deciding who should be offered home mechanical ventilation, respect for patient and family wishes, quality of life, dignity and equal access to home mechanical ventilation. Other challenges were the impacts home mechanical ventilation had on the patient, the family, the healthcare services and the allocation of resources. A better and broader understanding of these issues is crucial in order to improve the quality of care for both patient and family and assist healthcare professionals involved in home mechanical ventilation to make decisions for the good of the patient and his or her family. PMID:22183963

  7. 42 CFR 435.726 - Post-eligibility treatment of income of individuals receiving home and community-based services...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... spouse at home, an additional amount for the maintenance needs of the spouse. This amount must be based... option. (3) For an individual with a family at home, an additional amount for the maintenance needs of... receiving home and community-based services furnished under a waiver: Application of patient income to...

  8. [Suicidal drug overdose while receiving palliative home care: a case report].

    PubMed

    Mosich, Veronika; Müller-Busch, H Christof

    2014-05-01

    Suicidal thoughts are a common phenomenon in palliative care which can be seen in around 10% of the patients. There is very little knowledge about attempted and committed suicide. This article is a case report about a patient with lung cancer in a terminal state of illness who ingested drugs in a toxic dose while receiving palliative home care. This article deals with ethical issues in medical treatment and various ways of decision-making. PMID:24733303

  9. Communicating While Receiving Mechanical Ventilation: Texting With a Smartphone.

    PubMed

    Shiber, Joseph; Thomas, Ayesha; Northcutt, Ashley

    2016-03-01

    Two young adults with severe facial injuries were receiving care in the trauma/surgical intensive care unit at a tertiary care, level I trauma center in the southeastern United States. Both patients were able to communicate by texting on their cellphones to family members, friends, and caregivers in the intensive care unit. Patients who are awake and already have experience texting with a smartphone or other electronic handheld device may be able to communicate well while receiving mechanical ventilation. PMID:26932926

  10. The psychosocial experience of parents receiving care closer to home for their ill child.

    PubMed

    Spiers, Gemma; Parker, Gillian; Gridley, Kate; Atkin, Karl

    2011-11-01

    Current health policy in England regarding the management of childhood illness advocates for care to be delivered as close to home as possible. The aim of this article is to report findings from a qualitative component of a larger study evaluating models of care closer to home (CCTH) for children and young people who are ill. The focus is on parents' psychosocial experience of receiving CCTH for their ill child. A qualitative case study design was used, with four Primary Care Trusts in England as the case study sites. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 27 parents and one extended family caregiver of children using CCTH services within the case study sites. Interviews were conducted face-to-face and audio-recorded with permission. Data were collected in 2009. There was an overall preference for CCTH over hospital-based care where possible. The parents in this study experienced differing levels of responsibility as part of this care, and responded to this in different ways. Being supported emotionally and socially by practitioners was an important part of receiving CCTH for parents, especially when they had increased responsibility as part of this care. Developing relationships with practitioners appeared to be a medium through which parents received support. If the provision of CCTH continues to expand in line with current policy, provision of support for parents should be considered a fundamental aspect of service development. PMID:21623985

  11. Nutritional status in cognitively intact older people receiving home care services--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Soini, H; Routasalo, P; Lagstrom, H

    2005-01-01

    Older adults are a potentially vulnerable group for malnutrition. This cross-sectional pilot study aims to assess the nutritional status of elderly patients living at home and receiving home health care services. The data were collected from patient care plans, the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), and a questionnaire on eating problems. In addition, serum nutritional status indicators were measured, and an oral examination including quantitative saliva measurement was carried out. Out of 71 eligible patients 51 (72%) patients aged 76-93 years participated. MNA results showed that 47% were at risk of malnutrition. Care plans for 26 patients made reference to questions of nutrition but provided no detailed forward planning. The mean serum albumin value was 39.1 +/- 3.8 g/l, seven patients had a value lower than 35 g/l. MNA scores were significantly lower for female patients with haemoglobin values lower than 120 g/l (p = 0.027). The dentist's estimation of dry mouth and subjective problems in energy intake were significantly associated with lower MNA scores (p = 0.049 and p = 0.015). Subjects with functioning natural dentition had higher body mass index (BMI) scores than others (p = 0.0485). The results point at the importance of using screening tools such as the MNA for purposes of nutritional assessment, the estimation of oral problems such as dry mouth, chewing and swallowing problems, and advance planning in nutritional issues within the field of home care. PMID:15980925

  12. Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, H.

    1983-07-01

    Before discussing Deep Space Network receivers, a brief description of the functions of receivers and how they interface with other elements of the Network is presented. Different types of receivers are used in the Network for various purposes. The principal receiver type is used for telemetry and tracking. This receiver provides the capability, with other elements of the Network, to track the space probe utilizing Doppler and range measurements, and to receive telemetry, including both scientific data from the onboard experiments and engineering data pertaining to the health of the probe. Another type of receiver is used for radio science applications. This receiver measures phase perturbations on the carrier signal to obtain information on the composition of solar and planetary atmospheres and interplanetary space. A third type of receiver utilizes very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) techniques for both radio science and spacecraft navigation data. Only the telemetry receiver is described in detail in this document. The integration of the Receiver-Exciter subsystem with other portions of the Deep Space Network is described.

  13. Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnelly, H.

    1983-01-01

    Before discussing Deep Space Network receivers, a brief description of the functions of receivers and how they interface with other elements of the Network is presented. Different types of receivers are used in the Network for various purposes. The principal receiver type is used for telemetry and tracking. This receiver provides the capability, with other elements of the Network, to track the space probe utilizing Doppler and range measurements, and to receive telemetry, including both scientific data from the onboard experiments and engineering data pertaining to the health of the probe. Another type of receiver is used for radio science applications. This receiver measures phase perturbations on the carrier signal to obtain information on the composition of solar and planetary atmospheres and interplanetary space. A third type of receiver utilizes very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) techniques for both radio science and spacecraft navigation data. Only the telemetry receiver is described in detail in this document. The integration of the Receiver-Exciter subsystem with other portions of the Deep Space Network is described.

  14. [A study of "sudden death" in end-stage cancer patients receiving home care].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Michiaki; Ishimaki, Shizuyo; Yamazaki, Fumio

    2013-12-01

    We retrospectively examined the actual status and management of sudden changes in end-stage cancer patients receiving home care. We defined "sudden death" as an incident in which patients who had been ambulatory suddenly experienced a change in condition and died within a day. As per this definition, 32 of 130 end-stage cancer patients (24.6%) who died at home during a period of 2 years experienced "sudden death". The reasons for sudden changes included liver rupture, liver failure, hematemesis/melena, and renal failure. It was presumed that 87.5% of patients who experienced "sudden death" had a life expectancy of days or weeks. Those who experienced sudden change in the presence of their family and died immediately thereafter or were found in a state of respiratory arrest accounted for 43.8% of cases. At the time of sudden change, sedation was performed in 34.3% of cases. Patient families were generally able to take action in a calm manner. Healthcare professionals and patient families should always be aware of the possibility of sudden changes in end-stage cancer patients. In addition, it is important for healthcare professionals to confirm how patients and their families perceive the disease condition, provide pain relief, and support families who are upset and anxious at the time of sudden changes. PMID:24712135

  15. Clinical Outcomes Associated with Home Mechanical Ventilation: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, Erika J; Asadi, Leyla; Mckim, Doug A; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2016-01-01

    Background. The prevalence of patients supported with home mechanical ventilation (HMV) for chronic respiratory failure has increased. However, the clinical outcomes associated with HMV are largely unknown. Methods. We performed a systematic review of studies evaluating patients receiving HMV for indications other than obstructive lung disease, reporting at least one clinically relevant outcome including health-related quality of life (HRQL) measured by validated tools; hospitalization requirements; caregiver burden; and health service utilization. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane library, clinical trial registries, proceedings from selected scientific meetings, and bibliographies of retrieved citations. Results. We included 1 randomized control trial (RCT) and 25 observational studies of mixed methodological quality involving 4425 patients; neuromuscular disorders (NMD) (n = 1687); restrictive thoracic diseases (RTD) (n = 481); obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) (n = 293); and others (n = 748). HRQL was generally described as good for HMV users. Mental rather than physical HRQL domains were rated higher, particularly where physical assessment was limited. Hospitalization rates and days in hospital appear to decrease with implementation of HMV. Caregiver burden associated with HMV was generally high; however, it is poorly described. Conclusion. HRQL and need for hospitalization may improve after establishment of HMV. These inferences are based on relatively few studies of marked heterogeneity and variable quality. PMID:27445559

  16. Clinical Outcomes Associated with Home Mechanical Ventilation: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    MacIntyre, Erika J.; Asadi, Leyla; Mckim, Doug A.; Bagshaw, Sean M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The prevalence of patients supported with home mechanical ventilation (HMV) for chronic respiratory failure has increased. However, the clinical outcomes associated with HMV are largely unknown. Methods. We performed a systematic review of studies evaluating patients receiving HMV for indications other than obstructive lung disease, reporting at least one clinically relevant outcome including health-related quality of life (HRQL) measured by validated tools; hospitalization requirements; caregiver burden; and health service utilization. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane library, clinical trial registries, proceedings from selected scientific meetings, and bibliographies of retrieved citations. Results. We included 1 randomized control trial (RCT) and 25 observational studies of mixed methodological quality involving 4425 patients; neuromuscular disorders (NMD) (n = 1687); restrictive thoracic diseases (RTD) (n = 481); obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) (n = 293); and others (n = 748). HRQL was generally described as good for HMV users. Mental rather than physical HRQL domains were rated higher, particularly where physical assessment was limited. Hospitalization rates and days in hospital appear to decrease with implementation of HMV. Caregiver burden associated with HMV was generally high; however, it is poorly described. Conclusion. HRQL and need for hospitalization may improve after establishment of HMV. These inferences are based on relatively few studies of marked heterogeneity and variable quality. PMID:27445559

  17. Predictors of Treatment Response in Depressed Mothers Receiving In-Home Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Concurrent Home Visiting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ammerman, Robert T.; Peugh, James L.; Putnam, Frank W.; Van Ginkel, Judith B.

    2012-01-01

    Home visiting is a child abuse prevention strategy that seeks to optimize child development by providing mothers with support, training, and parenting information. Research has consistently found high rates of depression in mothers participating in home visiting programs and low levels of obtaining mental health treatment in the community.…

  18. 41 CFR 302-10.3 - What is the maximum amount my agency may authorize me to receive for transporting a mobile home?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... amount my agency may authorize me to receive for transporting a mobile home? 302-10.3 Section 302-10.3... TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE OF PROPERTY 10-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS USED AS A... authorize me to receive for transporting a mobile home? The maximum amount your agency may authorize you...

  19. Low-cost mechanical filters for OMEGA receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burhans, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A pair of prototype low frequency mechanical filters were obtained for use as the RF front-end components of an OMEGA-VLF navigation receiver. The filter units are of interest because of very narrow bandwidths and high skirt selectivity to minimize noise and off-channel carriers in the reception of OMEGA signals. In addition, the filters have a characteristic low impedance of 75 to 5,000 ohms which results in less critical PC board circuitry compared to some previous resonators with termination resistances of 25,000 ohms to 5 megohms.

  20. Do youth in out-of-home care receive recommended mental health and educational services following screening evaluations?

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Christie L M; Culhane, Sara E; Garrido, Edward F; Taussig, Heather N

    2011-10-01

    For children in out-of-home care, a significant gap exists between those who need services and those who receive them. Screening all children in out-of-home care is recommended to reduce this gap. This study was designed to determine if recommendations from mental health and educational screening evaluations were related to service implementation for youth in out-of-home care. Screening evaluations were completed with 171 maltreated youth (ages 9 to 11) in out-of-home care within the prior year. Written reports summarizing the findings were provided to children's caseworkers. Service utilization was assessed at baseline (T1; before screening reports were completed) and follow-up (T2; 9-12 months later) interviews. For children not already receiving services at T1, logistic regression analyses tested the association between T1 recommendations for services and new service implementation by T2. Mental health (youth-report) and educational (teacher-report) outcomes were analyzed separately. Screening evaluations identified 22% of children with unmet mental health needs and 36% with unmet educational needs at T1. Children who received a recommendation for new services (i.e., all of those with unmet needs) were more likely to receive mental health (OR=2.50, p=.06) and/or educational (OR=3.54, p=.04) services by T2 than children who did not receive recommendations for services. While recommendations increased the odds of receiving services, almost half of the children with unmet mental health needs did not receive services, and 84% of children with unmet educational needs did not receive services by T2. Much work remains to ensure youth receive needed services. PMID:21912444

  1. Do youth in out-of-home care receive recommended mental health and educational services following screening evaluations?

    PubMed Central

    Petrenko, Christie L. M.; Culhane, Sara E.; Garrido, Edward F.; Taussig, Heather N.

    2011-01-01

    For children in out-of-home care, a significant gap exists between those who need services and those who receive them. Screening all children in out-of-home care is recommended to reduce this gap. This study was designed to determine if recommendations from mental health and educational screening evaluations were related to service implementation for youth in out-of-home care. Screening evaluations were completed with 171 maltreated youth (ages 9 to 11) in out-of-home care within the prior year. Written reports summarizing the findings were provided to children's caseworkers. Service utilization was assessed at baseline (T1; before screening reports were completed) and follow-up (T2; 9-12 months later) interviews. For children not already receiving services at T1, logistic regression analyses tested the association between T1 recommendations for services and new service implementation by T2. Mental health (youth-report) and educational (teacher-report) outcomes were analyzed separately. Screening evaluations identified 22% of children with unmet mental health needs and 36% with unmet educational needs at T1. Children who received a recommendation for new services (i.e., all of those with unmet needs) were more likely to receive mental health (OR=2.50, p=.06) and/or educational (OR=3.54, p=.04) services by T2 than children who did not receive recommendations for services. While recommendations increased the odds of receiving services, almost half of the children with unmet mental health needs did not receive services, and 84% of children with unmet educational needs did not receive services by T2. Much work remains to ensure youth receive needed services. PMID:21912444

  2. Those Who Have, Receive: The Matthew Effect in Early Childhood Intervention in the Home Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bradley, Robert H.

    2005-01-01

    Are preventive early childhood interventions effective in improving home environments, as assessed with the HOME inventory (Caldwell & Bradley, 1984)? The authors traced 48 published articles, presenting 56 intervention effects (N = 7,350). The combined effect size on the HOME total score was d = 0.20 (p less than 0.001). Randomized intervention…

  3. A comparison of the home-care and healthcare service use and costs of older Australians randomised to receive a restorative or a conventional home-care service

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, Gill; Allan, Janine; Patterson, Candice; Knuiman, Matthew; Boldy, Duncan; Hendrie, Delia

    2014-01-01

    Restorative home-care services, or re-ablement home-care services as they are now known in the UK, aim to assist older individuals who are experiencing difficulties in everyday living to optimise their functioning and reduce their need for ongoing home care. Until recently, the effectiveness of restorative home-care services had only been investigated in terms of singular outcomes such as length of home-care episode, admission to hospital and quality of life. This paper reports on a more complex and perhaps more significant measure – the use and cost of the home-care and healthcare services received over the 2-year period following service commencement. Seven hundred and fifty older individuals referred for government-funded home care were randomly assigned to a restorative or standard service between June 2005 and August 2007. Health and aged care service data were sourced and linked via the Western Australian Data Linkage System. Restorative clients used fewer home-care hours (mean [SD], 117.3 [129.4] vs. 191.2 [230.4]), had lower total home-care costs (AU$5570 vs. AU$8541) and were less likely to be approved for a higher level of aged care (N [%], 171 [55.2] vs. 249 [63.0]) during follow-up. They were also less likely to have presented at an emergency department (OR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.50–0.94) or have had an unplanned hospital admission [OR (95% CI), 0.69 (0.50–0.95)]. Additionally, the aggregated health and home-care costs of the restorative clients were lower by a factor of 0.83 (95% CI 0.72–0.96) over the 2-year follow-up (AU$19,090 vs. AU$23,428). These results indicate that at a time when Australia is facing the challenges of population ageing and an expected increase in demand for health and aged care services, the provision of a restorative service when an older person is referred for home care is potentially a more cost-effective option than providing conventional home care. PMID:24438385

  4. 41 CFR 302-14.7 - Are there tax consequences when I receive a home marketing incentive payment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Are there tax consequences when I receive a home marketing incentive payment? 302-14.7 Section 302-14.7 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RESIDENCE TRANSACTION...

  5. 41 CFR 302-14.7 - Are there tax consequences when I receive a home marketing incentive payment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Are there tax consequences when I receive a home marketing incentive payment? 302-14.7 Section 302-14.7 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RESIDENCE TRANSACTION...

  6. 41 CFR 302-14.5 - Under what circumstances will I receive a home marketing incentive payment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Under what circumstances will I receive a home marketing incentive payment? 302-14.5 Section 302-14.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RESIDENCE TRANSACTION...

  7. 41 CFR 302-14.5 - Under what circumstances will I receive a home marketing incentive payment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Under what circumstances will I receive a home marketing incentive payment? 302-14.5 Section 302-14.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RESIDENCE TRANSACTION...

  8. 41 CFR 302-14.7 - Are there tax consequences when I receive a home marketing incentive payment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Are there tax consequences when I receive a home marketing incentive payment? 302-14.7 Section 302-14.7 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RESIDENCE TRANSACTION...

  9. 41 CFR 302-14.5 - Under what circumstances will I receive a home marketing incentive payment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Under what circumstances will I receive a home marketing incentive payment? 302-14.5 Section 302-14.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RESIDENCE TRANSACTION...

  10. 41 CFR 302-14.7 - Are there tax consequences when I receive a home marketing incentive payment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Are there tax consequences when I receive a home marketing incentive payment? 302-14.7 Section 302-14.7 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RESIDENCE TRANSACTION...

  11. 41 CFR 302-14.5 - Under what circumstances will I receive a home marketing incentive payment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Under what circumstances will I receive a home marketing incentive payment? 302-14.5 Section 302-14.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RESIDENCE TRANSACTION...

  12. 41 CFR 302-14.5 - Under what circumstances will I receive a home marketing incentive payment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Under what circumstances will I receive a home marketing incentive payment? 302-14.5 Section 302-14.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RESIDENCE TRANSACTION...

  13. 41 CFR 302-14.7 - Are there tax consequences when I receive a home marketing incentive payment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Are there tax consequences when I receive a home marketing incentive payment? 302-14.7 Section 302-14.7 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RESIDENCE TRANSACTION...

  14. 41 CFR 302-10.300 - May I receive an advance of funds when a commercial carrier transports the mobile home?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of funds when a commercial carrier transports the mobile home? 302-10.300 Section 302-10.300 Public... STORAGE OF PROPERTY 10-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS USED AS A PRIMARY RESIDENCE... mobile home? Yes, you may receive an advance of funds when you are responsible for arranging and paying...

  15. 41 CFR 302-10.300 - May I receive an advance of funds when a commercial carrier transports the mobile home?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of funds when a commercial carrier transports the mobile home? 302-10.300 Section 302-10.300 Public... STORAGE OF PROPERTY 10-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS USED AS A PRIMARY RESIDENCE... mobile home? Yes, you may receive an advance of funds when you are responsible for arranging and paying...

  16. Evaluation of Pain Assessment Tools in Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Al Darwish, Zainab Q; Hamdi, Radwa; Fallatah, Summayah

    2016-01-01

    Pain assessment poses a great challenge for clinicians in intensive care units. This descriptive study aimed to find the most reliable, sensitive, and valid tool for assessing pain. The researcher and a nurse simultaneously assessed 47 nonverbal patients receiving mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit by using 3 tools: the Behavioral Pain Scale (BPS), the Critical-Care Pain Observation Tool (CPOT), and the adult Nonverbal Pain Scale (NVPS) before, during, and after turning and suctioning. All tools were found to be reliable and valid (Cronbach α = 0.95 for both the BPS and the CPOT, α = 0.86 for the NVPS), and all subscales of both the BPS and CPOT were highly sensitive for assessing pain (P < .001). The NVPS physiology (P = .21) and respiratory (P = .16) subscales were not sensitive for assessing pain. The BPS was the most reliable, valid, and sensitive tool, with the CPOT considered an appropriate alternative tool for assessing pain. The NVPS is not recommended because of its inconsistent psychometric properties. PMID:27153305

  17. Take-Home Experiments in Undergraduate Fluid Mechanics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimbala, John

    2007-11-01

    Hands-on take-home experiments, assigned as homework, are useful as supplements to traditional in-class demonstrations and laboratories. Students borrow the equipment from the department's equipment room, and perform the experiment either at home or in the student lounge or student shop work area. Advantages include: (1) easy implementation, especially for large classes, (2) low cost and easy duplication of multiple units, (3) no loss of lecture time since the take-home experiment is self-contained with all necessary instructions, and (4) negligible increase in student or teaching assistant work load since the experiment is assigned as a homework problem in place of a traditional pen and paper problem. As an example, a pump flow take-home experiment was developed, implemented, and assessed in our introductory junior-level fluid mechanics course at Penn State. The experimental apparatus consists of a bucket, tape measure, submersible aquarium pump, tubing, measuring cup, and extension cord. We put together twenty sets at a total cost of less than 20 dollars per set. Students connect the tube to the pump outlet, submerge the pump in water, and measure the volume flow rate produced at various outflow elevations. They record and plot volume flow rate as a function of outlet elevation, and compare with predictions based on the manufacturer's pump performance curve (head versus volume flow rate) and flow losses. The homework assignment includes an online pre-test and post-test to assess the change in students' understanding of the principles of pump performance. The results of the assessment support a significant learning gain following the completion of the take-home experiment.

  18. Outcomes for youth receiving intensive in-home therapy or residential care: a comparison using propensity scores.

    PubMed

    Barth, Richard P; Greeson, Johanna K P; Guo, Shenyang; Green, Rebecca L; Hurley, Sarah; Sisson, Jocelyn

    2007-10-01

    This study compares outcomes for behaviorally troubled children receiving intensive in-home therapy (IIHT) and those receiving residential care (RC). Propensity score matching is used to identify matched pairs of youth (n = 786) with equivalent propensity for IIHT. The majority of pretreatment differences between the IIHT and RC groups are eliminated following matching. Logistic regression is then conducted on outcome differences at 1 year postdischarge. Results show that IIHT recipients had a greater tendency (.615) toward living with family, making progress in school, not experiencing trouble with the law, and placement stability compared with RC youth (.558; p < .10). This suggests that IIHT is at least as effective for achieving positive outcomes. Given IIHT's reduced restrictiveness and cost, intensive in-home services should be the preferred treatment over RC in most cases. PMID:18194029

  19. Mechanism of Hydrogen Formation in Solar Parabolic Trough Receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Moens, L.; Blake, D. M.

    2008-03-01

    Solar parabolic trough systems for electricity production are receiving renewed attention, and new solar plants are under construction to help meet the growing demands of the power market in the Western United States. The growing solar trough industry will rely on operating experience it has gained over the last two decades. Recently, researchers found that trough plants that use organic heat transfer fluids (HTF) such as Therminol VP-1 are experiencing significant heat losses in the receiver tubes. The cause has been traced back to the accumulation of excess hydrogen gas in the vacuum annulus that surrounds the steel receiver tube, thus compromising the thermal insulation of the receiver. The hydrogen gas is formed during the thermal decomposition of the organic HTF that circulates inside the receiver loop, and the installation of hydrogen getters inside the annulus has proven to be insufficient for controlling the hydrogen build-up over the lifetime of the receivers. This paper will provide an overview of the chemical literature dealing with the thermal decomposition of diphenyl oxide and biphenyl, the two constituents of Therminol VP-1.

  20. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D, dementia, and cerebrovascular pathology in elders receiving home services

    PubMed Central

    Buell, J S.; Dawson-Hughes, B; Scott, T M.; Weiner, D E.; Dallal, G E.; Qui, W Q.; Bergethon, P; Rosenberg, I H.; Folstein, M F.; Patz, S; Bhadelia, R A.; Tucker, K L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D deficiency has potential adverse effects on neurocognitive health and subcortical function. However, no studies have examined the association between vitamin D status, dementia, and cranial MRI indicators of cerebrovascular disease (CVD). Methods: Cross-sectional investigation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], dementia, and MRI measures of CVD in elders receiving home care (aged 65–99 years) from 2003 to 2007. Results: Among 318 participants, the mean age was 73.5 ± 8.1 years, 231 (72.6%) were women, and 109 (34.3%) were black. 25(OH)D concentrations were deficient (<10 ng/mL) in 14.5% and insufficient (10–20 ng/mL) in 44.3% of participants. There were 76 participants (23.9%) with dementia, 41 of which were classified as probable AD. Mean 25(OH)D concentrations were lower in subjects with dementia (16.8 vs 20.0 ng/mL, p < 0.01). There was a higher prevalence of dementia among participants with 25(OH)D insufficiency (≤20 ng/mL) (30.5% vs 14.5%, p < 0.01). 25(OH)D deficiency was associated with increased white matter hyperintensity volume (4.9 vs 2.9 mL, p < 0.01), grade (3.0 vs 2.2, p = 0.04), and prevalence of large vessel infarcts (10.1% vs 6.9%, p < 0.01). After adjustment for age, race, sex, body mass index, and education, 25(OH)D insufficiency (≤20 ng/mL) was associated with more than twice the odds of all-cause dementia (odds ratio [OR] = 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2–4.2), Alzheimer disease (OR = 2.5, 95% CI 1.1–6.1), and stroke (with and without dementia symptoms) (OR = 2.0, 95% CI 1.0–4.0). Conclusions: Vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency was associated with all-cause dementia, Alzheimer disease, stroke (with and without dementia symptoms), and MRI indicators of cerebrovascular disease. These findings suggest a potential vasculoprotective role of vitamin D. GLOSSARY 25(OH)D = 25-hydroxyvitamin D; AIREN = Association Internationale pour la Recherché et l'Enseignement en Neurosciences; BMI = body mass index; CI

  1. Incremental Benefit of a Home Visit Following Discharge for Patients with Multiple Chronic Conditions Receiving Transitional Care.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Carlos; Kasper, Elizabeth W; Williams, Christianna; DuBard, C Annette

    2016-06-01

    Transitional care management is effective at reducing hospital readmissions among patients with multiple chronic conditions, but evidence is lacking on the relative benefit of the home visit as a component of transitional care. The sample included non-dual Medicaid recipients with multiple chronic conditions enrolled in Community Care of North Carolina (CCNC), with a hospital discharge between July 2010 and December 2012. Using claims data and care management records, this study retrospectively examined whether home visits reduced the odds of 30-day readmission compared to less intensive transitional care support, using multivariate logistic regression to control for demographic and clinical characteristics. Additionally, the researchers examined group differences within clinical risk strata on inpatient admissions and total cost of care in the 6 months following hospital discharge. Of 35,174 discharges receiving transitional care from a CCNC care manager, 21% (N = 7468) included a home visit. In multivariate analysis, home visits significantly reduced the odds of readmission within 30 days (odds ratio = 0.52, 95% confidence interval 0.48-0.57). At the 6-month follow-up, home visits were associated with fewer inpatient admissions within 4 of 6 clinical risk strata, and lower total costs of care for highest risk patients (average per member per month cost difference $970; P < 0.01). For complex chronic patients, home visits reduced the likelihood of a 30-day readmission by almost half compared to less intensive forms of nurse-led transitional care support. Higher risk patients experienced the greatest benefit in terms of number of inpatient admissions and total cost of care in the 6 months following discharge. (Population Health Management 2016;19:163-170). PMID:26431255

  2. Incremental Benefit of a Home Visit Following Discharge for Patients with Multiple Chronic Conditions Receiving Transitional Care

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Carlos; Kasper, Elizabeth W.; Williams, Christianna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Transitional care management is effective at reducing hospital readmissions among patients with multiple chronic conditions, but evidence is lacking on the relative benefit of the home visit as a component of transitional care. The sample included non-dual Medicaid recipients with multiple chronic conditions enrolled in Community Care of North Carolina (CCNC), with a hospital discharge between July 2010 and December 2012. Using claims data and care management records, this study retrospectively examined whether home visits reduced the odds of 30-day readmission compared to less intensive transitional care support, using multivariate logistic regression to control for demographic and clinical characteristics. Additionally, the researchers examined group differences within clinical risk strata on inpatient admissions and total cost of care in the 6 months following hospital discharge. Of 35,174 discharges receiving transitional care from a CCNC care manager, 21% (N = 7468) included a home visit. In multivariate analysis, home visits significantly reduced the odds of readmission within 30 days (odds ratio = 0.52, 95% confidence interval 0.48–0.57). At the 6-month follow-up, home visits were associated with fewer inpatient admissions within 4 of 6 clinical risk strata, and lower total costs of care for highest risk patients (average per member per month cost difference $970; P < 0.01). For complex chronic patients, home visits reduced the likelihood of a 30-day readmission by almost half compared to less intensive forms of nurse-led transitional care support. Higher risk patients experienced the greatest benefit in terms of number of inpatient admissions and total cost of care in the 6 months following discharge. (Population Health Management 2016;19:163–170) PMID:26431255

  3. Impact of Depression and Childhood Trauma in Mothers Receiving Home Visitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ammerman, Robert T.; Shenk, Chad E.; Teeters, Angelique R.; Noll, Jennie G.; Putnam, Frank W.; Van Ginkel, Judith B.

    2012-01-01

    Research has documented the deleterious effects of maternal depression and childhood trauma on parenting and child development. There are high rates of both depression and childhood trauma in new mothers participating in home visitation programs, a prevention approach designed to optimize mother and child outcomes. Little is known about the…

  4. Aseptic non-touch technique and catheter-related bloodstream infection in children receiving parenteral nutrition at home

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Victoria; Hughes, Anna; Hill, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Parenteral nutrition (PN) at home is an acceptable form of delivering long-term PN for children with intestinal failure. Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is one of the serious complications of long-term PN and can lead to increasing morbidity and mortality. Using aseptic non-touch technique (ANTT) was proven to decrease the incidence of CRBSI in hospital patients. In this study we aimed to review the incidence of CRBSI in children receiving PN at home in our institution using the ANTT and a simplified training programme for parents and carers. Methods We retrospectively collected clinical and microbiological data on all children with intestinal failure (IF) who were on treatment with PN at home under our specialist IF rehabilitation service between November 2012 and November 2013. Results Thirty-five children were included, 16 of whom did not have any infection recorded during the study period. The overall CRBSI rate was 1.3 infections per 1000 line-days, with Staphylococcus being the commonest organism. Twenty-one children did not require catheter change and the overall catheter changes were 1.8 per 1000 line-days. Conclusion In this article, we report a low incidence of CRBSI in a single institution by using the principle of ANTT for accessing central venous catheters combined with a simplified, nurse-led, two-week standardised training programme for parents of children going home on PN. PMID:26279849

  5. Olfactory lateralization in homing pigeons: initial orientation of birds receiving a unilateral olfactory input.

    PubMed

    Gagliardo, Anna; Pecchia, Tommaso; Savini, Maria; Odetti, Francesca; Ioalè, Paolo; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2007-03-01

    It has been shown that homing pigeons (Columba livia) rely on olfactory cues to navigate from unfamiliar locations. In fact, the integrity of the olfactory system, from the olfactory mucosa to the piriform cortex, is required for pigeons to navigate over unfamiliar areas. Recently it has been shown that there is a functional asymmetry in the piriform cortex, with the left piriform cortex more involved in the use of the olfactory navigational map than the right piriform cortex. To investigate further the lateralization of the olfactory system in relation to navigational processes in carrier pigeons, we compared their homing performance after either their left or the right nostril was plugged. Contrary to our expectations, we observed an impairment in the initial orientation of the pigeons with their right nostril plugged. However, both groups released with one nostril plugged tended to be poorer than control pigeons in their homing performance. The observed asymmetry in favour of the right nostril might be due to projections from the olfactory bulbs to the contralateral globus pallidum, a structure involved in motor responses. PMID:17425577

  6. Switching hierarchical leadership mechanism in homing flight of pigeon flocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Duxin; Vicsek, Tamás; Liu, Xiaolu; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Hai-Tao

    2016-06-01

    To explore the fascinating inter-individual interaction mechanism governing the abundant biological grouping behaviors, more and more efforts have been devoted to collective motion investigation in recent years. Therein, bird flocking is one of the most intensively studied behaviors. A previous study (Nagy M. et al., Nature, 464 (2010) 890.) claims the existence of a well-defined hierarchical structure in pigeon flocks, which implies that a multi-layer leadership network leads to the occurrence of highly coordinated pigeon flock movements. However, in this study, by using high-resolution GPS data of homing flight of pigeon flocks, we reveal an explicit switching hierarchical mechanism underlying the group motions of pigeons. That is, a pigeon flock has a long-term leader for smooth moving trajectories, whereas the leading tenure passes to a temporary one upon sudden turns or zigzags. Therefore, the present observation helps explore more deeply into the principle of a huge volume of bird flocking dynamics. Meanwhile, from the engineering point of view, it may shed some light onto industrial multi-robot coordination and unmanned air vehicle formation control.

  7. Complementary home mechanical ventilation techniques. SEPAR Year 2014.

    PubMed

    Chiner, Eusebi; Sancho-Chust, José N; Landete, Pedro; Senent, Cristina; Gómez-Merino, Elia

    2014-12-01

    This is a review of the different complementary techniques that are useful for optimizing home mechanical ventilation (HMV). Airway clearance is very important in patients with HMV and many patients, particularly those with reduced peak cough flow, require airway clearance (manual or assisted) or assisted cough techniques (manual or mechanical) and suctioning procedures, in addition to ventilation. In the case of invasive HMV, good tracheostomy cannula management is essential for success. HMV patients may have sleep disturbances that must be taken into account. Sleep studies including complete polysomnography or respiratory polygraphy are helpful for identifying patient-ventilator asynchrony. Other techniques, such as bronchoscopy or nutritional support, may be required in patients on HMV, particularly if percutaneous gastrostomy is required. Information on treatment efficacy can be obtained from HMV monitoring, using methods such as pulse oximetry, capnography or the internal programs of the ventilators themselves. Finally, the importance of the patient's subjective perception is reviewed, as this may potentially affect the success of the HMV. PMID:25138799

  8. Variation in nutritional risk among Mexican American and non-Mexican American homebound elders who receive home-delivered meals.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Joseph R

    2004-01-01

    Good nutritional health is essential to prevent functional decline and improve quality of life. Little is known of disparities in the extent of risk for poor nutritional health among homebound Mexican American (MA) elders who receive Older American Act Nutrition Program (OAANP) home-delivered meals. In order to assist OAANP service providers in understanding racial/ethnic differences in nutritional risk, this study examined routinely collected data on 908 homebound MA and non-MA in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley. Homebound MA were more likely to report poverty, risk factors for and indicators of poor nutritional health. Independent of poverty and covariates,MA were more likely to report very high nutritional risk. This underscores the importance of understanding racial/ethnic disparities in the extent of risk for poor nutritional health for the development, implementation, and evaluation of effective strategies to alleviate nutritional health disparities. PMID:15149938

  9. An analysis of 1505 consecutive patients receiving continuous interscalene analgesia at home: a multicentre prospective safety study.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, M J; Leightley, P; Wong, A; Chaddock, M; Abeysekera, A; Frampton, C

    2016-04-01

    Continuous interscalene brachial plexus block has been shown to be the most effective analgesic technique following shoulder surgery; however, its use is uncommon due to logistical and safety concerns related to ambulatory administration. We prospectively studied 1505 consecutive patients undergoing shoulder surgery who received continuous interscalene analgesia at home. Catheter removal was by the patient between postoperative days two and five. There were no major complications although 27% of patients reported mild dyspnoea, 13% hoarseness and 7% dysphagia. Twelve percent sought medical advice and 2% reported technical issues with the pump or tubing. Complications and technical issues were associated with patient age; weight; use of ultrasound or concomitant nerve stimulation as the endpoint for final needle tip position; local anaesthetic placement via the catheter or needle; whether a catheter-related intervention for pain relief was required in the recovery area; and the type of ambulatory pump. We conclude that this study supports the safety of this underused analgesic technique. PMID:26849172

  10. Lower urinary tract symptoms and falls risk among older women receiving home support: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although lower urinary tract symptoms have been associated with falls, few studies have been undertaken to understand this relationship in vulnerable community dwelling older adults. The purpose of this study was to describe the relationship over time of falls risk and lower urinary tract symptoms among community based older women receiving home support services. Methods A prospective cohort study which took place in an urban setting in western Canada. Participants were 100 older women receiving home care or residing in assisted living with home support services and were followed for six months. Demographic characteristics were collected at baseline, with the Timed Up and Go (TUG), International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Female Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (ICIQ-FLUTS), and self-report of falls collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize demographic data. Differences between the three visits were analyzed using the Friedman test with post hoc analysis and associations between variables by the Spearman Rank-Order Correlation Coefficient. Results One hundred women initially enrolled; 88 and 75 remained at three months and six months. Mean age = 84.3 years; 91% reported at least one urinary symptom at baseline and 35% reported falling in the six months prior to enrollment; 15.9% reported falling between the baseline and three months and 14.6% between three and six months. Mean TUG scores at each time point indicated falls risk (27.21, 29.18 and 27.76 seconds). Significant correlations between TUG and ICIQ-FLUTS (r = 0.33, p < .001; r = 0.39, p < .001) as well as TUG and overactive bladder scores (r = 0.25, p = .005; r = 0.28, p < .008) were found at baseline and three months, but not six months. Conclusions The association of lower urinary tract symptoms and falls risk in this group of vulnerable community dwelling older women at baseline and three months has potential

  11. Total Cost of Care Lower among Medicare Fee-for-Service Beneficiaries Receiving Care from Patient-Centered Medical Homes

    PubMed Central

    van Hasselt, Martijn; McCall, Nancy; Keyes, Vince; Wensky, Suzanne G; Smith, Kevin W

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare health care utilization and payments between NCQA-recognized patient-centered medical home (PCMH) practices and practices without such recognition. Data Sources Medicare Part A and B claims files from July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2010, 2009 Census, 2007 Health Resources and Services Administration and CMS Utilization file, Medicare's Enrollment Data Base, and the 2005 American Medical Association Physician Workforce file. Study Design This study used a longitudinal, nonexperimental design. Three annual observations (July 1, 2008–June 30, 2010) were available for each practice. We compared selected outcomes between practices with and those without NCQA PCMH recognition. Data Collection Methods Individual Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) beneficiaries and their claims and utilization data were assigned to PCMH or comparison practices based on where they received the plurality of evaluation and management services between July 1, 2007 and June 30, 2008. Principal Findings Relative to the comparison group, total Medicare payments, acute care payments, and the number of emergency room visits declined after practices received NCQA PCMH recognition. The decline was larger for practices with sicker than average patients, primary care practices, and solo practices. Conclusions This study provides additional evidence about the potential of the PCMH model for reducing health care utilization and the cost of care. PMID:25077375

  12. Under-nutrition at baseline and health services utilization and mortality over a one-year period in older adults receiving Medicare home health services

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongbin; Brown, Cynthia J.; Burgio, Kathryn L.; Kilgore, Meredith L.; Ritchie, Christine S.; Roth, David L.; West, Delia Smith; Locher, Julie L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Older adults receiving Medicare home health services who experience under-nutrition may be at increased risk of experiencing adverse outcomes. We sought to identify the association between baseline nutritional status and subsequent health service utilization and mortality over a one-year period in older adults receiving Medicare home health services. Design This was a longitudinal study using questionnaires and anthropometric measures designed to assess nutritional status (Mini-Nutritional Assessment [MNA]) at baseline and health services utilization and mortality status at six-month and one-year follow-ups. Setting Participants were evaluated in their homes. Participants 198 older adults who were receiving Medicare home health services. Results Based upon MNA, 12.0% of patients were Malnourished, 51.0% were At Risk for Malnourishment, and 36.9% had Normal Nutrition Status. Based upon body mass index (BMI), 8.1% of participants were underweight, 37.9% were normal weight, 25.3% were overweight, and 28.8% were obese. Using multivariate binary logistic regression analyses, participants who were Malnourished or At Risk for Malnourishment were more likely to experience subsequent hospitalization, emergency room visit, home health aide use, and mortality for the entire sample and hospitalization and nursing home stay for overweight and obese participants. Conclusions Experiencing under-nutrition at the time of receipt of Medicare home health services was associated with increased health services utilization and mortality for the entire sample, and with increased health services utilization only for the overweight and obese subsample. Opportunities exist to address risk of under-nutrition in patients receiving home health services, including those who are overweight or obese, to prevent subsequent adverse health outcomes. PMID:21527170

  13. Update on clinical trials in home mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Luke E.

    2016-01-01

    Home mechanical ventilation (HMV) is an increasingly common intervention and is initiated for a range of pathological processes, including neuromuscular disease (NMD), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obesity related respiratory failure. There have been important recent data published in this area, which helps to guide practice by indicating which populations may benefit from this intervention and the optimum method of setting up and controlling sleep disordered breathing. Recent superficially conflicting data has been published regarding HMV in COPD, with a trial in post-exacerbation patients suggesting no benefit, but in stable chronic hypercapnic patients suggesting a clear and sustained mortality benefit. The two studies are critiqued and the potential reasons for the differing results are discussed. Early and small trial data is frequently contradicted with larger randomised controlled trials and this has been the case with diaphragm pacing being shown to be potentially harmful in the latest data, confirming the importance of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in NMD such as motor neurone disease. Advances in ventilator technology have so far appeared quicker than the clinical data to support their use; although small and often unblinded, the current data suggests equivalence to standard modes of NIV, but with potential comfort benefits that may enhance adherence. The indications for NIV have expanded since its inception, with an effort to treat sleep disordered breathing as a result of chronic heart failure (HF). The SERVE-HF trial has recently demonstrated no clear advantage to this technology and furthermore detected a potentially deleterious effect, with a worsening of all cause and cardiovascular mortality in the treated group compared to controls. The review serves to provide the reader with a critical review of recent advances in the field of sleep disordered breathing and HMV. PMID:26904266

  14. Update on clinical trials in home mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Luke E; Murphy, Patrick B

    2016-02-01

    Home mechanical ventilation (HMV) is an increasingly common intervention and is initiated for a range of pathological processes, including neuromuscular disease (NMD), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obesity related respiratory failure. There have been important recent data published in this area, which helps to guide practice by indicating which populations may benefit from this intervention and the optimum method of setting up and controlling sleep disordered breathing. Recent superficially conflicting data has been published regarding HMV in COPD, with a trial in post-exacerbation patients suggesting no benefit, but in stable chronic hypercapnic patients suggesting a clear and sustained mortality benefit. The two studies are critiqued and the potential reasons for the differing results are discussed. Early and small trial data is frequently contradicted with larger randomised controlled trials and this has been the case with diaphragm pacing being shown to be potentially harmful in the latest data, confirming the importance of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in NMD such as motor neurone disease. Advances in ventilator technology have so far appeared quicker than the clinical data to support their use; although small and often unblinded, the current data suggests equivalence to standard modes of NIV, but with potential comfort benefits that may enhance adherence. The indications for NIV have expanded since its inception, with an effort to treat sleep disordered breathing as a result of chronic heart failure (HF). The SERVE-HF trial has recently demonstrated no clear advantage to this technology and furthermore detected a potentially deleterious effect, with a worsening of all cause and cardiovascular mortality in the treated group compared to controls. The review serves to provide the reader with a critical review of recent advances in the field of sleep disordered breathing and HMV. PMID:26904266

  15. Factors associated with the amount of public home care received by elderly and intellectually disabled individuals in a large Norwegian municipality.

    PubMed

    Døhl, Øystein; Garåsen, Helge; Kalseth, Jorid; Magnussen, Jon

    2016-05-01

    This study reports an analysis of factors associated with home care use in a setting in which long-term care services are provided within a publicly financed welfare system. We considered two groups of home care recipients: elderly individuals and intellectually disabled individuals. Routinely collected data on users of public home care in the municipality of Trondheim in October 2012, including 2493 people aged 67 years or older and 270 intellectually disabled people, were used. Multivariate regression analysis was used to analyse the relationship between the time spent in direct contact with recipients by public healthcare personnel and perceived individual determinants of home care use (i.e. physical disability, cognitive impairment, diagnoses, age and gender, as well as socioeconomic characteristics). Physical disability and cognitive impairment are routinely registered for long-term care users through a standardised instrument that is used in all Norwegian municipalities. Factor analysis was used to aggregate the individual items into composite variables that were included as need variables. Both physical disability and cognitive impairment were strong predictors of the amount of received care for both elderly and intellectually disabled individuals. Furthermore, we found a negative interaction effect between physical disability and cognitive impairment for elderly home care users. For elderly individuals, we also found significant positive associations between weekly hours of home care and having comorbidity, living alone, living in a service flat and having a safety alarm. The reduction in the amount of care for elderly individuals living with a cohabitant was substantially greater for males than for females. For intellectually disabled individuals, receiving services involuntarily due to severe behavioural problems was a strong predictor of the amount of care received. Our analysis showed that routinely collected data capture important predictors of home

  16. 25 CFR 256.26 - Can I receive Housing Improvement Program services if I am living in a mobile home?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... am living in a mobile home? 256.26 Section 256.26 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... I am living in a mobile home? Yes. If you meet the eligibility criteria in § 256.6 and there is... § 256.7. If you require Category B services and your mobile home has exterior walls of less than...

  17. 25 CFR 256.26 - Can I receive Housing Improvement Program services if I am living in a mobile home?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... am living in a mobile home? 256.26 Section 256.26 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... I am living in a mobile home? Yes. If you meet the eligibility criteria in § 256.6 and there is... § 256.7. If you require Category B services and your mobile home has exterior walls of less than...

  18. Prevalence of 'being at risk of malnutrition' and associated factors in adult patients receiving nursing care at home in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Geurden, Bart; Franck MPsych, Erik; Lopez Hartmann, Maja; Weyler, Joost; Ysebaert, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    Malnutrition is a known problem in hospitals and nursing homes. This study aims to evaluate the prevalence of being at risk of malnutrition in community living adults receiving homecare nursing and to determine factors independently associated with this risk of malnutrition. Furthermore, it also aimed to describe aspects of current nutritional nursing care. Patients (n = 100) are screened with the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool to evaluate their risk of malnutrition. A patient survey was used to analyse associated factors. In this population, 29% are at risk for malnutrition. Following a multivariate logistic regression analysis, 'loss of appetite' proved the most important factor. A survey for nurses (n = 61) revealed low awareness, poor knowledge, poor communication between stakeholders and a moderate approach of malnutrition. These findings should encourage homecare nurses to use a recommended screening tool for malnutrition and to actively observe and report loss of appetite to initiate the prescription of individual tailored interventions. Belgian homecare nurses' management does not yet fully comply with international recommendations. Additional training in nutritional nursing care and screening methods for malnutrition is needed. Systematic screening should be further developed and evaluated in this at-risk population. PMID:24810494

  19. The Relationship between Early Learning Rates and Treatment Outcome for Children with Autism Receiving Intensive Home-Based Applied Behavior Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Mary Jane; Delmolino, Lara

    2006-01-01

    The present study suggests that initial learning rates of young children with autism receiving early, intensive, home-based behavioral intervention are moderately correlated with outcome variables after four years of treatment. 20 children with autism who had Childhood Autism Rating Scale scores between 37.5 and 58 and Vineland Adaptive Behavior…

  20. A universal data access and protocol integration mechanism for smart home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Pengfei; Yang, Qi; Zhang, Xuan

    2013-03-01

    With the lack of standardized or completely missing communication interfaces in home electronics, there is no perfect solution to address every aspect in smart homes based on existing protocols and technologies. In addition, the central control unit (CCU) of smart home system working point-to-point between the multiple application interfaces and the underlying hardware interfaces leads to its complicated architecture and unpleasant performance. A flexible data access and protocol integration mechanism is required. The current paper offers a universal, comprehensive data access and protocol integration mechanism for a smart home. The universal mechanism works as a middleware adapter with unified agreements of the communication interfaces and protocols, offers an abstraction of the application level from the hardware specific and decoupling the hardware interface modules from the application level. Further abstraction for the application interfaces and the underlying hardware interfaces are executed based on adaption layer to provide unified interfaces for more flexible user applications and hardware protocol integration. This new universal mechanism fundamentally changes the architecture of the smart home and in some way meets the practical requirement of smart homes more flexible and desirable.

  1. Prognostic factors for health-related quality of life in adults and children with primary antibody deficiencies receiving SCIG home therapy.

    PubMed

    Gardulf, A; Borte, M; Ochs, H D; Nicolay, U

    2008-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to evaluate the health-related quality of life (HRQL) and treatment satisfaction (TS) of adults and children with primary antibody deficiencies (PAD) before and after the introduction of subcutaneous immunoglobulin G (SCIG) self-infusions at home and to identify prognostic factors (demographic/social, medical, patient/parent reported) for HRQL. 85 adults and 21 parents of children with PAD answered the SF-36 (adults), CHQ-PF50 (parents), and the LQI (adults and parents) at baseline and following 10 months of weekly self-administered SCIG infusions at home. The SCIG home therapy was associated with significant improvements in HRQL and TS, particularly in patients who had previously received IVIG therapy in hospital settings. Background factors that were found to be associated with HRQL changes in adults were age, serum IgG levels at month 10, concomitant joint/muscle/skeletal disorders, clinical study location and smoking status. PMID:17964220

  2. Thermo-mechanical and optical optimization of the molten salt receiver for a given heliostat field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augsburger, Germain; Das, Apurba K.; Boschek, Erik; Clark, Michael M.

    2016-05-01

    The tower type molten salt solar thermal power plant has proven to be advantageous over other utility scale solar power plant configurations due to its scalability and provision of storage, thereby improving the dispatchability. The configuration consists of a molten salt central receiver (MSCR) located atop an optimally located tower within a heliostat field with thousands of mirrors. The MSCR receives the concentrated energy from the heliostat field which heats a molten salt heat transfer fluid for thermal storage and utilization in producing steam as and when required for power generation. The MSCR heat transfer surface consists of banks of tangent tubes arranged in panels. The combined cost of the heliostat field and the receiver is 40%-50% of the total plant cost, which calls for optimization to maximize their utilization. Several previous studies have looked into the optimum solar power plant size based on various site conditions. However, the combined optimization of the receiver and the heliostat field has not been reported before. This study looks into the optimum configuration of the receiver for a given heliostat field. An in-house tool has been developed to select and rank a few receiver surface configurations (typically <50) from a list of hundreds of thousands of possible options. The operating limits which the heliostat field needs to obey are defined for the ranked surface configurations based on several different design considerations (e.g. mechanical integrity, corrosion limits). The thermal output of the receiver configurations for a given heliostat field is maximized. A combined rank indicating the optimum configurations in descending order of preference is presented based on the performance and various other practical considerations (e.g. total surface area, cost of material, ability of aiming strategies to distribute the flux). The methodology thus provided can be used as a guideline to arrive at an optimum receiver configuration for a given

  3. Home mechanical ventilation monitoring software: measure more or measure better?

    PubMed

    Luján, Manel; Sogo, Ana; Monsó, Eduard

    2012-05-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in knowing the consequences of the patient-ventilator interaction in non-invasive mechanical ventilation. Therefore, several ventilator manufacturers have incorporated into their devices the possibility to monitor ventilation on-line and download the data stored in their internal memories. However, there is not a consensus as to how these data should be presented, and said devices have still not been sufficiently validated to be used systematically in clinical practice. The objective of the present study is to develop a critical, argumentative analysis of the technical characteristics for determining the monitor variables used in the different software programs incorporated in commercial ventilators. Likewise, the study contemplates the presentation of the measurements on the screen display, emphasizing the advantages and defects of each one and analyzing their behavior in common clinical practice situations, such as changes in the interface or the presence of accidental leaks. In addition, solution mechanisms are proposed for establishing future directives for the parameters that are important for clinicians, as well as the manner for providing and interpreting said information. PMID:22206599

  4. Water purification and the incidence of fractures in patients receiving home haemodialysis supervised by a single centre: evidence for "safe" upper limit of aluminium in water.

    PubMed Central

    Platts, M M; Owen, G; Smith, S

    1984-01-01

    Between 1968 and 1980 fractures occurred in 56 of 284 patients treated by home haemodialysis in the Sheffield area for longer than one year. Patients sustained four times as many fractures while using dialysate prepared with water containing more than 1.0 mumol aluminium per 1 (2.7 micrograms/100 ml) than while using water containing a smaller concentration. When aluminium was removed from water by deionisation the incidence of fractures diminished during the next year and no patient developed dialysis encephalopathy. These findings show that 1.0 mumol/l is a safe maximum concentration of aluminium in water for use in home haemodialysis. It can be detected by the colorimetric aluminium analyses used by many water authorities. When financial resources are limited it is expedient to reserve aluminium analyses by electrothermal atomic absorption for plasma from patients receiving regular haemodialysis. Ingestion of aluminium hydroxide contributes significantly to the increased plasma aluminium concentration of these patients. PMID:6423163

  5. Advantages and disadvantages for receiving Internet-based HIV/AIDS interventions at home or at community-based organizations.

    PubMed

    Green, Shana M; Lockhart, Elizabeth; Marhefka, Stephanie L

    2015-01-01

    Within recent years, public health interventions have become technology based to reflect the digital age we currently live in and appeal to the public in innovative and novel ways. The Internet breaks down boundaries distance imposes and increases our ability to reach and connect with people. Internet-based interventions have the potential to expand access to effective behavioral interventions (EBIs). The US National HIV/AIDS Strategy states that people living with HIV should have access to EBIs such as healthy relationships (HR) to help them develop safe sex and disclosure skills. However, access to HR is limited across the country, especially for people in remote or rural areas. Internet-based healthy relationships video groups (HR-VG) delivered at home or community-based organizations (CBOs) can possibly expand access. This study assesses the preferences of women living with HIV (WLH) for participation in HR-VG among 21 WLH who participated in a randomized control trial (RCT) testing HR-VG and completed open-ended semi-structured telephone interviews. Transcripts were thematically analyzed to determine advantages and disadvantages of home or CBO delivery of HR-VG. Themes relating to convenience, technology access, privacy, distractions, HIV serostatus disclosure, and social opportunities were identified as advantages or disadvantages to participating in HR-VG at each location. Overall, privacy was the most salient concern of accessing HR-VG at home or at a CBO. Considering the concerns expressed by WLH, further studies are needed to assess how an Internet-based intervention delivered at home for WLH can maintain privacy while being cost effective. PMID:26357907

  6. Opto-mechanical subsystem of a 10 micrometer wavelength receiver terminal. Waveguide laser local oscillator. Servo system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An engineering model opto-mechanical subsystem for a 10.6-micrometer laser heterodyne receiver is developed, and a CO2 waveguide local oscillator and servo electronics are provided for the receiver. Design goals are presented for the subsystems and overall package design is described. Thermal and mechanical distortion loading tests were performed and the results are included.

  7. Paid carers' experiences of caring for mechanically ventilated children at home: implications for services and training.

    PubMed

    Maddox, Christina; Pontin, David

    2013-06-01

    UK survival rates for long-term mechanically ventilated children have increased and paid carers are trained to care for them at home, however there is limited literature on carers' training needs and experience of sharing care. Using a qualitative abductive design, we purposively sampled experienced carers to generate data via diaries, semi-structured interviews, and researcher reflexive notes. Research ethics approval was granted from NHS and University committees. Five analytical themes emerged - Parent as expert; Role definition tensions; Training and Continuing Learning Needs; Mixed Emotions; Support Mechanisms highlighting the challenges of working in family homes for carers and their associated learning needs. Further work on preparing carers to share feelings with parents, using burnout prevention techniques, and building confidence is suggested. Carers highlight the lack of clinical supervision during their night-working hours. One solution may be to provide access to registered nurse support when working out-of-office hours. PMID:23711491

  8. Mechanisms Underpinning Increased Plasma Creatinine Levels in Patients Receiving Vemurafenib for Advanced Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hurabielle, Charlotte; Pillebout, Evangéline; Stehlé, Thomas; Pagès, Cécile; Roux, Jennifer; Schneider, Pierre; Chevret, Sylvie; Chaffaut, Cendrine; Boutten, Anne; Mourah, Samia; Basset-Seguin, Nicole; Vidal-Petiot, Emmanuelle; Lebbé, Céleste; Flamant, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Context Serum creatinine has been reported to increase in patients receiving Vemurafenib, yet neither the prevalence nor the mechanism of this adverse event are known. Objective We aimed to evaluate the frequency and the mechanisms of increases in plasma creatinine level in patients receiving Vemurafenib for advanced melanoma. Methods We performed a retrospective monocentric study including consecutive patients treated with Vemurafenib for an advanced melanoma. We collected clinical and biological data concerning renal function before introduction of Vemurafenib and in the course of monthly follow-up visits from March 2013 to December 2014. Cystatin C-derived glomerular filtration rate was evaluated before and after Vemurafenib initiation, as increase in serum cystatin C is specific to a decrease in the glomerular filtration rate. We also performed thorough renal explorations in 3 patients, with measurement of tubular secretion of creatinine before and after Vemurafenib initiation and a renal biopsy in 2 patients. Results 70 patients were included: 97% of them displayed an immediate, and thereafter stable, increase in creatinine (+22.8%) after Vemurafenib initiation. In 44/52 patients in whom Vemurafenib was discontinued, creatinine levels returned to baseline. Serum cystatin C increased, although proportionally less than serum creatinine, showing that creatinine increase under vemurafenib was indeed partly due to a renal function impairment. In addition, renal explorations demonstrated that Vemurafenib induced an inhibition of creatinine tubular secretion. Conclusion Thus, Vemurafenib induces a dual mechanism of increase in plasma creatinine with both an inhibition of creatinine tubular secretion and slight renal function impairment. However, this side effect is mostly reversible when Vemurafenib is discontinued, and should not lead physicians to discontinue the treatment if it is effective. PMID:26930506

  9. Associations between quality of life and socioeconomic factors, functional impairments and dissatisfaction with received information and home-care services among survivors living at home two years after stroke onset

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Quality of life (QoL) assessment is important when monitoring over time the recovery of stroke-survivors living at home. This study explores the associations between QoL and socioeconomic factors, functional impairments and self-reported dissatisfaction with received information and home-care services among survivors two years after stroke onset. This problem remains partially addressed though optimal information and services may improve survivors’ QoL. Methods Stroke-survivors admitted to all hospitals in Luxembourg 18 months or more previously were identified using the only care-expenditure-reimbursement national system database. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed. Ninety four patients aged 65 years and living at home were interviewed to gather socioeconomic characteristics, functional impairments, dissatisfaction with information and home-care services, and QoL (using the Newcastle Stroke-Specific QoL, newsqol) assessing 11 domains. Data were analyzed using multiple linear regression models. Results About 50% of survivors had low education and lower income. Functional impairments were common: sensory (45%), motor (35%), memory (32%), language (31%), and vision (20%). Survivors with education (<12th grade) or lower income had low values for most newsqol domains (sex-age-adjusted regression coefficient saRC, i.e. mean difference, between -23 and -8). Patients who were working had better values for pain, mental feelings and sleep domains than did retired people (saRC between -3.9 and 4.2). Various functional impairments were associated with markedly low values of nearly all domains (saRC between -33.5 and -7.5) and motor, language, memory and sensory impairments had the highest impact. The survivors’ perceived QoL was markedly low, especially for the domains of interpersonal relationship, sleep, cognition, mental feelings, and pain. Various QoL domains were strongly related to dissatisfaction with information about stroke and its consequences

  10. Nonpharmacological interventions to manage common symptoms in patients receiving mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Mary Fran; Chlan, Linda

    2011-06-01

    Patients receiving mechanical ventilation can experience symptoms such as pain, anxiety, agitation, and lack of sleep while in the intensive care unit, all of which can affect healing. Nonpharmacological complementary therapies can be used as adjuncts to sedatives and analgesics. By incorporating appropriate use of complementary therapies in conjunction with mainstream medical therapies, nurses can decrease patients' anxiety, promote sleep, and promote a healing environment to improve outcomes. Minimizing noise and providing access to natural light help promote a healing environment. Methods to promote sleep include relaxation techniques such as progressive muscle relaxation and massage and communication with patients' and their families to determine the patients' normal sleep patterns. Complementary therapies to relieve anxiety and agitation include music intervention, imagery, presence, and animal-assisted therapy. PMID:21632591

  11. Integrity mechanism for eHealth tele-monitoring system in smart home environment.

    PubMed

    Mantas, Georgios; Lymberopoulos, Dimitrios; Komninos, Nikos

    2009-01-01

    During the past few years, a lot of effort has been invested in research and development of eHealth tele-monitoring systems that will provide many benefits for healthcare delivery from the healthcare provider to the patient's home. However, there is a plethora of security requirements in eHealth tele-monitoring systems. Data integrity of the transferred medical data is one of the most important security requirements that should be satisfied in these systems, since medical information is extremely sensitive information, and even sometimes life threatening information. In this paper, we present a data integrity mechanism for eHealth tele-monitoring system that operates in a smart home environment. Agent technology is applied to achieve data integrity with the use of cryptographic smart cards. Furthermore, the overall security infrastructure and its various components are described. PMID:19964802

  12. “Picking up the pieces”—Meanings of receiving home nursing care when being old and living with advanced cancer in a rural area

    PubMed Central

    Devik, Siri Andreassen; Hellzen, Ove; Enmarker, Ingela

    2015-01-01

    Rural home nursing care is a neglected area in the research of palliative care offered to older cancer patients. Because access to specialized services is hampered by long distances and fragmented infrastructure, palliative care is often provided through standard home nursing services and delivered by general district nurses. This study aimed to illuminate the lived experience and to interpret the meaning of receiving home nursing care when being old and living with advanced cancer in a rural area in Norway. Narrative interviews were conducted with nine older persons, and a phenomenological hermeneutic approach was used to interpret the meaning of the lived experience. The analysis revealed three themes, each with subthemes: being content with what one gets, falling into place, and losing one's place. The phrase picking up the pieces was found useful to sum up the meaning of this lived experience. The three respective themes refer to how the pieces symbolize the remaining parts of life or available services in their environment, and how the older persons may see themselves as pieces or bricks in a puzzle. A strong place attachment (physical insideness, social insideness, and autobiographical insideness) is demonstrated by the informants in this study and suggests that the rural context may provide an advantageous healthcare environment. Its potential to be a source of comfort, security, and identity concurs with cancer patients’ strong desire for being seen as unique persons. The study shows that district nurses play an essential role in the provision of palliative care for older rural patients. However, the therapeutic value of being in one's familiar landscape seems to depend on how homecare nurses manage to locate it and use it in a more or less person-centred manner. Communication skills and attentiveness to psychosocial aspects of patient care stand out as important attributes for nursing in this context. PMID:26362533

  13. "Picking up the pieces" - Meanings of receiving home nursing care when being old and living with advanced cancer in a rural area.

    PubMed

    Devik, Siri Andreassen; Hellzen, Ove; Enmarker, Ingela

    2015-01-01

    Rural home nursing care is a neglected area in the research of palliative care offered to older cancer patients. Because access to specialized services is hampered by long distances and fragmented infrastructure, palliative care is often provided through standard home nursing services and delivered by general district nurses. This study aimed to illuminate the lived experience and to interpret the meaning of receiving home nursing care when being old and living with advanced cancer in a rural area in Norway. Narrative interviews were conducted with nine older persons, and a phenomenological hermeneutic approach was used to interpret the meaning of the lived experience. The analysis revealed three themes, each with subthemes: being content with what one gets, falling into place, and losing one's place. The phrase picking up the pieces was found useful to sum up the meaning of this lived experience. The three respective themes refer to how the pieces symbolize the remaining parts of life or available services in their environment, and how the older persons may see themselves as pieces or bricks in a puzzle. A strong place attachment (physical insideness, social insideness, and autobiographical insideness) is demonstrated by the informants in this study and suggests that the rural context may provide an advantageous healthcare environment. Its potential to be a source of comfort, security, and identity concurs with cancer patients' strong desire for being seen as unique persons. The study shows that district nurses play an essential role in the provision of palliative care for older rural patients. However, the therapeutic value of being in one's familiar landscape seems to depend on how homecare nurses manage to locate it and use it in a more or less person-centred manner. Communication skills and attentiveness to psychosocial aspects of patient care stand out as important attributes for nursing in this context. PMID:26362533

  14. Curcumin homing to the nucleolus: mechanism for initiation of an apoptotic program.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Mistuni; Ryan, Robert O

    2014-11-01

    Curcumin is a plant-derived polyphenol that displays antitumor properties. Incubation of cultured SF-767 glioma cells with curcumin gave rise to intense intranuclear foci of curcumin fluorescence. In vitro studies revealed that nuclear homing by curcumin is not a result of DNA/chromatin binding. On the other hand, curcumin fluorescence colocalized with nucleophosmin, a nucleolus marker protein. To determine the temporal relationship between curcumin-induced apoptosis and nucleolar homing, confocal live cell imaging was performed. The data show that curcumin localization to the nucleolus occurs prior to cell surface exposure of phosphatidylserine. In studies of the mechanism of curcumin-induced apoptosis in SF-767 cells, its effect on the subcellular location of p14(ARF) was determined. Whereas p14(ARF) was confined to the nucleolus in untreated cells, 2 h following incubation with curcumin, it displayed a diffuse nuclear distribution. Given the role of nuclear p14(ARF) in binding the E3 ubiquitin ligase, mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2), the effect of curcumin treatment on cellular levels of the tumor suppressor protein, p53, was examined. Between 2 and 4 h following curcumin treatment, p53 levels increased with maximum levels reached by 8 h. Thus, curcumin homing to the nucleolus induces redistribution of p14(ARF) to the nucleoplasm where interaction with MDM2 leads to stabilization of p53, with subsequent initiation of apoptosis. PMID:25172633

  15. Update on the mechanisms of homing of adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Zhang, Haiyang

    2016-07-01

    Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs), which resemble bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs), have shown great advantages and promise in the field of regenerative medicine. They can be readily harvested in large numbers with low donor-site morbidity. To date, a great number of preclinical and clinical studies have shown ADSCs' safety and efficacy in regenerative medicine. However, a better understanding of the mechanisms of homing of ADSCs is needed to advance the clinical utility of this therapy. In this review, the reports of the homing of ADSCs were searched using Pubmed and Google Scholar to update our knowledge. ADSCs were proved to interact with endothelial cells by expressing the similar integrins with BMSCs. In addition, ADSCs do not possess the dominant ligand for P-selectin, just like BMSCs. Stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/CXCR4 and CXC ligand-5 (CXCL5)/CXCR2 interactions are the two main axes governing ADSCs extravasation from bone marrow vessels. Some more signaling pathways involved in migration of ADSCs have been investigated, including LPA/LPA1 signaling pathway, MAPK/Erk1/2 signaling pathway, RhoA/Rock signaling pathway and PDGF-BB/PDGFR-β signaling pathway. Status quo of a lack of intensive studies on the details of homing of ADSCs should be improved in the near future before clinical application. PMID:27260205

  16. [Long-term effects of home mechanical ventilation with positive pressure using a nasal mask].

    PubMed

    Escarrabill, J; Estopà, R; Robert, D; Casolivé, V; Manresa, F

    1991-10-01

    Home mechanical ventilation (HMV) is an efficient alternative in the treatment of patients with chronic respiratory failure secondary to restrictive mechanical disorders (neuromuscular disease, such as Duchenne's disease, thorax deformities due to kyphoscoliosis or tuberculosis sequelae). The case of a patient with severe kyphoscoliosis in the phase of chronic respiratory failure (PaO2 34 mmHg and PaCO2 61 mmHg, breathing ambient air) is presented in which, following the failure of negative pressure mechanical ventilation ("poncho"), positive pressure ventilation was tested with a silicon made-to-measure nasal mask as the access via. Adaptation to HMV was good with the patient using the ventilation nightly. Following 12 months of treatment the patient is able to carry out everyday activities and arterial gasometry breathing ambient air is PaO2 77 mmHg and PaCO2 43 mmHg. PMID:1961049

  17. Catheter-related Blood Stream Infection in Patients Receiving Long-term Home Parenteral Nutrition: Tertiary Care Hospital Experience in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Tawil, Esraa S.; Almuhareb, Alanoud M.; Amin, Hamdy M.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a lifesaving therapy for patients with many severe conditions, including intestinal failure. Some patients require long-term PN therapy, which makes home parenteral nutrition (HPN) an attractive option to improve the quality of life. Among the most common and serious complications observed in these patients are catheter-related blood stream infections (CRBSIs). The aim of our study is to determine the frequency of CRBSI among patients receiving long-term HPN. Patients and Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted for patients enrolled in the HPN program between 2006 and 2012. Data on the demographic characteristics, indications and duration of PN therapy, catheter type, number of admissions because of CRBSI, and blood culture results were recorded. Results: Eight pediatric patients were included (mean age of 3.5 years at the start of HPN). Microvillus inclusive disease was noted in 50% of these patients, and 75% of them received HPN under parents' care. CRBSI resulted in 60 admissions with a median of 182 days of hospital stay and 74 changes of central venous catheters. The rate of CRBSI was 2.9 per 1000 catheter days. Staphylococcus species were the most prevalent pathogens (32%), followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (5%). Conclusion: In this small group of HPN patients, the BSI rate was 2.9 infections per 1000 catheter days, and most common causative organisms were Staphylococcus species. We believe that a well-established training program for caregivers can reduce the rate of infectious complications associated with long-term PN support. PMID:27488325

  18. Characterization of the dominant structural vibration of hearing aid receivers: Towards the moderation of mechanical feedback in hearing aids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varanda, Brenno R.

    Presented are the results from the experimental, analytical, and computational analyses accomplished to characterize the mechanical vibration of hearing aid receivers, a key electro-acoustic component of hearing aids. The function of a receiver in a hearing aid is to provide an amplified sound signal into the ear canal. Unfortunately, as the receiver produces sound, it also undergoes vibration which can be transmitted through the hearing aid package to the microphones, resulting in undesirable feedback oscillations. To gain more knowledge and control on the source of these feedback oscillations, a dynamic rigid body model of the receiver is proposed. The rigid body model captures the essential dynamic features of the receiver. The model is represented by two hinged rigid bodies, under an equal and opposite dynamic moment load, and connected to each other by a torsional spring and damper. The mechanical coupling ratio between the two rigid bodies is proved to be acoustically independent. A method is introduced to estimate the parameters for the proposed model using experimental data. An equivalent finite element analysis model is established and tested against a known and characterized mechanical attachment. The simulated model successfully predicts the structural dynamic response showing excellent agreement between the finite element analysis and measured results.

  19. Transcriptional programs of lymphoid tissue capillary and high endothelium reveal control mechanisms for lymphocyte homing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mike; Kiefel, Helena; LaJevic, Melissa D.; Macauley, Matthew S.; Kawashima, Hiroto; O'Hara, Edward; Pan, Junliang; Paulson, James C.; Butcher, Eugene C.

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocytes are recruited from blood by high-endothelial venules (HEVs). We performed transcriptomic analyses and identified molecular signatures that distinguish HEVs from capillary endothelium and that define tissue-specific HEV specialization. Capillaries displayed gene programs for vascular development. HEVs were enriched in genes for immune defense and lymphocyte migration. We identify capillary and HEV markers and candidate mechanisms for regulated lymphocyte recruitment including a lymph node HEV-selective transmembrane mucin; transcriptional control of functionally specialized carbohydrate ligands for lymphocyte L-selectin; HEV expression of molecules for transendothelial migration; and metabolic programs for lipid mediators of lymphocyte motility and chemotaxis. We also elucidate a carbohydrate recognition pathway that targets B cells to intestinal lymphoid tissues, defining CD22 as a lectin-homing receptor for mucosal HEVs. PMID:25173345

  20. Interim Report on the Examination of Corrosion Damage in Homes Constructed With Imported Wallboard: Examination of Samples Received September 28, 2009.

    PubMed

    Pitchure, D J; Ricker, R E; Williams, M E; Claggett, S A

    2010-01-01

    Since many household systems are fabricated out of metallic materials, changes to the household environment that accelerate corrosion rates will increase the frequency of failures in these systems. Recently, it has been reported that homes constructed with imported wallboard have increased failure rates in appliances, air conditioner heat exchanger coils, and visible corrosion on electrical wiring and other metal components. At the request of the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) became involved through the Interagency Agreement CPSC-1-09-0023 to perform metallurgical analyses on samples and corrosion products removed from homes constructed using imported wallboard. This document reports on the analysis of the first group of samples received by NIST from CPSC. The samples received by NIST on September 28, 2009 consisted of copper tubing for supplying natural gas and two air conditioner heat exchanger coils. The examinations performed by NIST consisted of photography, metallurgical cross-sectioning, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Leak tests were also performed on the air conditioner heat exchanger coils. The objective of these examinations was to determine extent and nature of the corrosive attack, the chemical composition of the corrosion product, and the potential chemical reactions or environmental species responsible for accelerated corrosion. A thin black corrosion product was found on samples of the copper tubing. The XRD analysis of this layer indicated that this corrosion product was a copper sulfide phase and the diffraction peaks corresponded with those for the mineral digenite (Cu9S5). Corrosion products were also observed on other types of metals in the air conditioner coils where condensation would frequently wet the metals. The thickness of the corrosion product layer on a copper natural gas supply pipe with a wall thickness of 1

  1. Interim Report on the Examination of Corrosion Damage in Homes Constructed With Imported Wallboard: Examination of Samples Received September 28, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Pitchure, D. J.; Ricker, R. E.; Williams, M. E.; Claggett, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    Since many household systems are fabricated out of metallic materials, changes to the household environment that accelerate corrosion rates will increase the frequency of failures in these systems. Recently, it has been reported that homes constructed with imported wallboard have increased failure rates in appliances, air conditioner heat exchanger coils, and visible corrosion on electrical wiring and other metal components. At the request of the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) became involved through the Interagency Agreement CPSC-1-09-0023 to perform metallurgical analyses on samples and corrosion products removed from homes constructed using imported wallboard. This document reports on the analysis of the first group of samples received by NIST from CPSC. The samples received by NIST on September 28, 2009 consisted of copper tubing for supplying natural gas and two air conditioner heat exchanger coils. The examinations performed by NIST consisted of photography, metallurgical cross-sectioning, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Leak tests were also performed on the air conditioner heat exchanger coils. The objective of these examinations was to determine extent and nature of the corrosive attack, the chemical composition of the corrosion product, and the potential chemical reactions or environmental species responsible for accelerated corrosion. A thin black corrosion product was found on samples of the copper tubing. The XRD analysis of this layer indicated that this corrosion product was a copper sulfide phase and the diffraction peaks corresponded with those for the mineral digenite (Cu9S5). Corrosion products were also observed on other types of metals in the air conditioner coils where condensation would frequently wet the metals. The thickness of the corrosion product layer on a copper natural gas supply pipe with a wall thickness of 1

  2. Health Care Outcomes and Advance Care Planning in Older Adults Who Receive Home-Based Palliative Care: A Pilot Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Thorsteinsdottir, Bjorg; Cha, Stephen S.; Hanson, Gregory J.; Peterson, Stephanie M.; Rahman, Parvez A.; Naessens, James M.; Takahashi, Paul Y.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Approximately 20% of seniors live with five or more chronic medical illnesses. Terminal stages of their lives are often characterized by repeated burdensome hospitalizations and advance care directives are insufficiently addressed. This study reports on the preliminary results of a Palliative Care Homebound Program (PCHP) at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota to service these vulnerable populations. Objective: The study objective was to evaluate inpatient hospital utilization and the adequacy of advance care planning in patients who receive home-based palliative care. Methods: This is a retrospective pilot cohort study of patients enrolled in the PCHP between September 2012 and March 2013. Two control patients were matched to each intervention patient by propensity scoring methods that factor in risk and prognosis. Primary outcomes were six-month hospital utilization including ER visits. Secondary outcomes evaluated advance care directive completion and overall mortality. Results: Patients enrolled in the PCHP group (n=54) were matched to 108 controls with an average age of 87 years. Ninety-two percent of controls and 33% of PCHP patients were admitted to the hospital at least once. The average number of hospital admissions was 1.36 per patient for controls versus 0.35 in the PCHP (p<0.001). Total hospital days were reduced by 5.13 days. There was no difference between rates of ER visits. Advanced care directive were completed more often in the intervention group (98%) as compared to controls (31%), with p<0.001. Goals of care discussions were held at least once for all patients in the PCHP group, compared to 41% in the controls. PMID:25375663

  3. Stress Coping Mechanisms in Elderly Adults: An Initial Study of Recreational and Other Coping Behaviors in Nursing Home Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, I. Roy; Gillen, Mark C.

    2009-01-01

    Residents (N = 32) of 3 skilled nursing homes participated in a study designed to document the nature of the stressors they experienced and the coping mechanisms they used. Medical issues were the most common stressors. The most common coping responses were prayer, reading, watching television, listening to music, and talking to friends and…

  4. The Role of Preference on Outcomes of People Receiving Evidence-Informed Community Wound Care in Their Home or in a Nurse-Clinic Setting: A Cohort Study (n = 230)

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Margaret B.; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth G.; Hopman, Wilma M.; Carley, Meg E.

    2014-01-01

    This study followed a cohort of community-dwelling individuals receiving wound-care in a large urban-rural region. During a randomized control trial (RCT) evaluating outcomes of receiving care in a nurse-clinic or at home, many approached were willing to participate if they could choose their location of care. This provided a unique opportunity to enroll them as a “choice” cohort, following them in the same manner as the trial participants but allowing them to select their setting of care. The objective was to investigate the role of preference and location of care on care outcomes, including satisfaction with care, healing, health-related quality of life (HRQL), pain, and resource use. This is a secondary analysis of a prospective cohort of 126 individuals enrolled in an RCT to receive care at home or in a nurse-clinic (Allocated group), and an additional 104 who received care at home or in a nurse-clinic based on their preference (Choice group). Mobile individuals with a leg ulcer of venous or mixed venous etiology, referred for community leg ulcer care, were eligible. Specially-trained nurses provided care to both groups using an evidence-informed protocol. Baseline data included socio-demographic, circumstance-of-living and a detailed wound assessment. Mean age of the cohort was 68 years. Satisfaction, healing, recurrence, pain, HRQL, and resource utilization did not differ between groups. If available, individuals should have an option of care venue given almost half of those approached indicated a clear preference for clinic or home. With outcomes being similar, health care planners and decision-makers, as well as individuals and their families, can feel confident that the setting of care will not impact the outcomes. However, larger studies in other contexts are needed to explore the interaction between choice and setting. PMID:27429284

  5. A Tool for Music Preference Assessment in Critically Ill Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilatory Support

    PubMed Central

    CHLAN, LINDA; HEIDERSCHEIT, ANNIE

    2010-01-01

    Music is an ideal intervention to reduce anxiety and promote relaxation in critically ill patients. This article reviews the research studies on music-listening interventions to manage distressful symptoms in this population, and describes the development and implementation of the Music Assessment Tool (MAT) to assist professionals in ascertaining patients’ music preferences in the challenging, dynamic clinical environment of the intensive care unit (ICU). The MAT is easy to use with these patients who experience profound communication challenges due to fatigue and inability to speak because of endotracheal tube placement. The music therapist and ICU nursing staff are encouraged to work collaboratively to implement music in a personalized manner to ensure the greatest benefit for mechanically ventilated patients. PMID:24489432

  6. Perceptions of Patients and Families who Received a Music Intervention During Mechanical Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Chlan, Linda; Staugaitis, Abbey

    2015-01-01

    The intensive care unit (ICU) is a technologically-driven environment where critically ill patients and their families have significant physical and emotional experiences. Mechanically ventilated (MV) patients can experience significant distress from anxiety and pain. Music listening is one integrative intervention that has been shown to reduce anxiety as well as other symptoms that contribute to distress in MV patients. This is a report of MV patient and family experiences from a larger research study whose aim was to evaluate levels of anxiety and sedative exposure with use of a patient-directed music intervention. Understanding perceptions of MV patients and families regarding the effectiveness of music listening will guide improvement of their care. PMID:26301046

  7. The pathophysiological mechanism of fluid retention in advanced cancer patients treated with docetaxel, but not receiving corticosteroid comedication

    PubMed Central

    Béhar, A.; Pujade-Lauraine, E.; Maurel, A.; Brun, M. D.; Lagrue, G.; Feuilhade De Chauvin, F.; Oulid-Aissa, D.; Hille, D.

    1997-01-01

    Aims Fluid retention is a phenomenon associated with taxoids. The principal objective of this study was to investigate the pathophysiological mechanism of docetaxel-induced fluid retention in advanced cancer patients. Methods Docetaxel was administered as a 1 h intravenous infusion every 3 weeks, for at least 4–6 consecutive cycles, to patients with advanced breast (n=21) or ovarian (n=3) carcinoma, who had received previous chemotherapy, 21 for advanced disease. Phase II clinical trials have shown that 5 day corticosteroid comedication, starting 1 day before docetaxel infusion, significantly reduces the incidence and severity of fluid retention. This prophylactic corticosteroid regimen is currently recommended for patients receiving docetaxel but was not permitted in this study because of its possible interference with the underlying pathophysiology of the fluid retention. Results Fluid retention occurred in 21 of the 24 patients but was mainly mild to moderate, with only five patients experiencing severe fluid retention. Eighteen patients received symptomatic flavonoid treatment, commonly prescribed after the last cycle. Specific investigations for fluid retention confirmed a relationship between cumulative docetaxel dose and development of fluid retention. Capillary filtration test analysis showed a two-step process for fluid retention generation, with progressive congestion of the interstitial space by proteins and water starting between the second and the fourth cycle, followed by insufficient lymphatic drainage. Conclusions A vascular protector such as micronized diosmine hesperidine with recommended corticosteroid premedication and benzopyrones may be useful in preventing and treating docetaxel-induced fluid retention. PMID:9205828

  8. Monitoring the adequacy of catch-up growth among moderately malnourished children receiving home-based therapy using mid-upper arm circumference in Southern Malawi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Each year more children die from moderate than severe malnutrition. Home-based therapy (HBT) using Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Foods (RUTF) has proven to successfully treat uncomplicated childhood malnutrition on an outpatient basis. This study attempts to discern if Mid-upper Arm Circumference (MUAC) ...

  9. What Is Home Schooling?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Legislative Office of Education Oversight, Columbus.

    The Ohio Department of Education estimates that 15,000 children were being home-schooled in Ohio, based on a 1991 survey of school superintendents. This document presents an overview of home schooling and describes the nature and extent of home schooling in Ohio. Data are based on a review of literature, information received from national and…

  10. Description of Peripheral Muscle Strength Measurement and Correlates of Muscle Weakness in Patients Receiving Prolonged Mechanical Ventilatory Support

    PubMed Central

    Chlan, Linda L.; Tracy, Mary Fran; Guttormson, Jill; Savik, Kay

    2015-01-01

    Background Intensive Care Unit Acquired Weakness (ICUAW) is a frequent complication of critical illness due to immobility and prolonged mechanical ventilatory support. Objectives To describe daily peripheral muscle strength measurement in ventilated patients and explore relationships among factors that influence ICUAW. Methods Peripheral muscle strength of 120 ventilated ICU patients (mean age 59.8 ± 15.1; 51% female; APACHE III 61.3 ± 20.7; ICU stay 10.6 ± 8.6 days) was measured daily using a standardized hand grip dynamometry protocol. Three grip measurements for each hand were recorded in pounds-force; the mean of these three assessments was used in the analysis. Correlates of ICUAW were analyzed with mixed models to explore their relationship to grip strength (age, gender, illness severity, length of ventilatory support, medications). Results Median baseline grip strength was variable yet diminished (7.7; 0-102) with either a pattern of diminishing grip strength or maintenance of the baseline low grip strength over time. Controlling for days on protocol, female gender [β = −10.4(2.5); p = <.001], age [= −.24(.08); p = .004], and days receiving ventilatory support [= −.34(.12); p = .005] explained a significant amount of variance in grip strength over time. Conclusions Patients receiving prolonged periods of mechanical ventilatory support in this sample show marked decrements in grip strength measured by hand dynamometry, a marker for peripheral muscle strength. Hand dynamometry is a reliable method to measure muscle strength in cooperative ICU patients and can be used in future research to ultimately develop interventions to prevent ICUAW. PMID:26523017

  11. Can the Accuracy of Home Blood Glucose Monitors be affected by the Received Signal Strength of 900 MHz GSM Mobile Phones?

    PubMed Central

    Eslami, J.; Ghafaripour, F.; Mortazavi, S.A.R.; Mortazavi, S.M.J.; Shojaei-fard, M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background People who use home blood glucose monitors may use their mobile phones in the close vicinity of medical devices. This study is aimed at investigating the effect of the signal strength of 900 MHz GSM mobile phones on the accuracy of home blood glucose monitors. Methods Sixty non-diabetic volunteer individuals aged 21 - 28 years participated in this study. Blood samples were analyzed for glucose level by using a common blood glucose monitoring system. Each blood sample was analyzed twice, within ten minutes in presence and absence of electromagnetic fields generated by a common GSM mobile phone during ringing. Blood samples were divided into 3 groups of 20 samples each. Group 1: exposure to mobile phone radiation with weak signal strength. Group2: exposure to mobile phone radiation with strong signal strength. Group3: exposure to a switched–on mobile phone with no signal strength. Results The magnitude of the changes in the first, second and third group between glucose levels of two measurements (׀ΔC׀) were 7.4±3.9 mg/dl, 10.2±4.5 mg/dl, 8.7±8.4 mg/dl respectively. The difference in the magnitude of the changes between the 1st and the 3rd groups was not statistically significant. Furthermore, the difference in the magnitude of the changes between the 2nd and the 3rd groups was not statistically significant. Conclusion Findings of this study showed that the signal strength of 900 MHz GSM mobile phones cannot play a significant role in changing the accuracy of home blood glucose monitors. PMID:26688798

  12. Investigation of three home-applied bleaching agents on enamel structure and mechanical properties: an in situ study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Yue; Wang, Zhejun; Ma, Xiao; Lei, Chang; Liang, Shanshan; Sun, Lili; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Yining

    2012-03-01

    The safety of at-home tooth bleaching, based upon carbamide peroxide (CP) or hydrogen peroxide (HP) as the active agent, has been questioned. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of three differently concentrated home-applied bleaching agents on human enamel under in situ conditions. Sixty specimens were divided randomly into four groups and treated with 10% CP, 15% CP, 20% CP, and distilled water, respectively. Raman spectroscopy, attenuated total reflectance-infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), microhardness, and fracture toughness (FT) measurements were conducted to determine variations on enamel structure and mechanical properties before and after the bleaching process. Raman revealed little variation of Raman relative intensity after treatment with CP, which was consistent with the results of ATR-IR, AFM, and microhardness analyses. In addition, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) intensity, and FT showed significant decreases on CP-treated specimens. These findings suggested there were minimal demineralization effects of the three at-home bleaching agents on enamel in situ. However, the decrease of LIF intensity and FT on enamel seemed to be inevitable.

  13. The Influence of Demographic and Psychosocial Factors on the Intensity of pain Among Chronic Patients Receiving Home-based Nursing Care

    PubMed Central

    Antony, T; Merghani, Tarig Hakim

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To determine the influence of the demographic and the psychosocial factors on the intensity of pain manifestation among the chronic ill patients. Materials and Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional study was carried out among 328 chronic patients under home-based nursing care in Southern State of Kerala, India, from July to August 2015. Each patient was interviewed during a scheduled home visit by a trained health professional. The translated version of the assessment tool questionnaire Medical Outcome Study-Short Form Health Survey was used for the data collection. Results: Sixty-four (19.5%) out of 328 patients reported pain as one of the primary symptoms of their disease. The percentage of the patients who were suffering from pain increases with the improvements in both the educational level and the monthly income (P = 0.002 and 0.019, respectively). The social interaction with the relatives and other community members was significantly related to pain manifestation (P = 0.013). A higher degree of social interaction was associated with lower pain intensity (P = 0.019). Conclusion: The results of this study showed that certain demographic and psychosocial factors carry a significant level of influence on the pain manifestation and its intensity among the chronic patients. Hence, improvements in education, economic status, and psychosocial support should be considered for the management of the chronic patients.

  14. Electronic and mechanical improvement of the receiving terminal of a free-space microwave power transmission system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    Significant advancements were made in a number of areas: improved efficiency of basic receiving element at low power density levels, improved resolution and confidence in efficiency measurements mathematical modelling and computer simulation of the receiving element and the design, construction, and testing of an environmentally protected two-plane construction suitable for low cost, highly automated construction of large receiving arrays.

  15. Home Mechanical Ventilation in Childhood-Onset Hereditary Neuromuscular Diseases: 13 Years’ Experience at a Single Center in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Han, Young Joo; Park, June Dong; Lee, Bongjin; Choi, Yu Hyeon; Suh, Dong In; Lim, Byung Chan; Chae, Jong-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Children with hereditary neuromuscular diseases (NMDs) are at a high risk of morbidity and mortality related to respiratory failure. The use of home mechanical ventilation (HMV) has saved the lives of many children with NMD but, due to a lack of studies, dependable guidelines are not available. We drew upon our experience to compare the various underlying NMDs and to evaluate HMV with regard to respiratory morbidity, the proper indications and timing for its use, and to develop a policy to improve the quality of home noninvasive ventilation (NIV). Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 57 children with childhood-onset hereditary NMDs in whom HMV was initiated between January 2000 and May 2013 at Seoul National University Children's Hospital. The degree of respiratory morbidity was estimated by the frequency and duration of hospitalizations caused by respiratory distress. Results The most common NMD was spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, n = 33). Emergent mechanical ventilation was initiated in 44% of the patients before the confirmed diagnosis, and the indicators of pre-HMV respiratory morbidity (e.g., extubation trials, hypoxia, hospitalizations, and intensive care unit stay) were greater in these patients than in others. The proportion of post-HMV hospitalizations (range, 0.00−0.52; median, 0.01) was lower than that of pre-HMV hospitalizations (0.02−1.00; 0.99) (P < 0.001). Eight patients were able to maintain home NIV. The main causes of NIV failure were air leakage and a large amount of airway secretions. Conclusions The application of HMV helped reduce respiratory morbidity in children with childhood-onset hereditary NMD. Patients with SMA type I can benefit from an early diagnosis and the timely application of HMV. The choice between invasive and noninvasive HMV should be based on the patient’s age and NIV trial tolerance. Systematic follow-up guidelines provided by a multidisciplinary team are needed. PMID:25822836

  16. Acquired Genetic Mechanisms of a Multiresistant Bacterium Isolated from a Treatment Plant Receiving Wastewater from Antibiotic Production

    PubMed Central

    Johnning, Anna; Moore, Edward R. B.; Svensson-Stadler, Liselott; Shouche, Yogesh S.; Larsson, D. G. Joakim

    2013-01-01

    The external environment, particularly wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), where environmental bacteria meet human commensals and pathogens in large numbers, has been highlighted as a potential breeding ground for antibiotic resistance. We have isolated the extensively drug-resistant Ochrobactrum intermedium CCUG 57381 from an Indian WWTP receiving industrial wastewater from pharmaceutical production contaminated with high levels of quinolones. Antibiotic susceptibility testing against 47 antibiotics showed that the strain was 4 to >500 times more resistant to sulfonamides, quinolones, tetracyclines, macrolides, and the aminoglycoside streptomycin than the type strain O. intermedium LMG 3301T. Whole-genome sequencing identified mutations in the Indian strain causing amino acid substitutions in the target enzymes of quinolones. We also characterized three acquired regions containing resistance genes to sulfonamides (sul1), tetracyclines [tet(G) and tetR], and chloramphenicol/florfenicol (floR). Furthermore, the Indian strain harbored acquired mechanisms for horizontal gene transfer, including a type I mating pair-forming system (MPFI), a MOBP relaxase, and insertion sequence transposons. Our results highlight that WWTPs serving antibiotic manufacturing may provide nearly ideal conditions for the recruitment of resistance genes into human commensal and pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24038701

  17. Evidence for geomagnetic imprinting as a homing mechanism in Pacific salmon.

    PubMed

    Putman, Nathan F; Lohmann, Kenneth J; Putman, Emily M; Quinn, Thomas P; Klimley, A Peter; Noakes, David L G

    2013-02-18

    In the final phase of their spawning migration, Pacific salmon use chemical cues to identify their home river, but how they navigate from the open ocean to the correct coastal area has remained enigmatic. To test the hypothesis that salmon imprint on the magnetic field that exists where they first enter the sea and later seek the same field upon return, we analyzed a 56-year fisheries data set on Fraser River sockeye salmon, which must detour around Vancouver Island to approach the river through either a northern or southern passageway. We found that the proportion of salmon using each route was predicted by geomagnetic field drift: the more the field at a passage entrance diverged from the field at the river mouth, the fewer fish used the passage. We also found that more fish used the northern passage in years with warmer sea surface temperature (presumably because fish were constrained to more northern latitudes). Field drift accounted for 16% of the variation in migratory route used, temperature 22%, and the interaction between these variables 28%. These results provide the first empirical evidence of geomagnetic imprinting in any species and imply that forecasting salmon movements is possible using geomagnetic models. PMID:23394828

  18. CALUTRON RECEIVER

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, S.W.

    1959-06-16

    An improved receiver and receiver mount for calutrons are described. The receiver can be manipulated from outside the tank by a single control to position it with respect to the beam. A door can be operated exteriorly also to prevent undesired portions of the beam from entering the receiver. The receiver has an improved pocket which is more selective in the ions collected. (T.R.H.)

  19. CALUTRON RECEIVER

    DOEpatents

    Brunk, W.O.

    1959-09-29

    A description is given for an improved calutron receiver having a face plate lying at an angle to the direction of the entering ion beams but having an opening, the plane of which is substantially perpendicular to that of the entering ion beams. By so positioning the opening in the receiver, the effective area through which the desired material may enter the receiver is increased, and at the same time the effective area through which containattng material may enter the receiver is reduced.

  20. CALUTRON RECEIVER

    DOEpatents

    York, H.F.

    1959-07-01

    A receiver construction is presented for calutrons having two or more ion sources and an individual receiver unit for each source. Design requirements dictate that the face plate defining the receiver entrance slots be placed at an angle to the approaching beam, which means that ions striking the face plate are likely to be scattcred into the entrance slots of other receivers. According to the present invention, the face plate has a surface provided with parallel ridges so disposed that one side only of each ridge's exposed directly to the ion beam. The scattered ions are directed away from adjacent receivers by the ridges on the lace plate.

  1. A Skin-selective Homing Mechanism for Human Immune Surveillance T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schaerli, Patrick; Ebert, Lisa; Willimann, Katharina; Blaser, Andrea; Roos, Regula Stuber; Loetscher, Pius; Moser, Bernhard

    2004-01-01

    Effective immune surveillance is essential for maintaining protection and homeostasis of peripheral tissues. However, mechanisms controlling memory T cell migration to peripheral tissues such as the skin are poorly understood. Here, we show that the majority of human T cells in healthy skin express the chemokine receptor CCR8 and respond to its selective ligand I-309/CCL1. These CCR8+ T cells are absent in small intestine and colon tissue, and are extremely rare in peripheral blood, suggesting healthy skin as their physiological target site. Cutaneous CCR8+ T cells are preactivated and secrete proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor–α and interferon-γ, but lack markers of cytolytic T cells. Secretion of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, and transforming growth factor–β was low to undetectable, arguing against a strict association of CCR8 expression with either T helper cell 2 or regulatory T cell subsets. Potential precursors of skin surveillance T cells in peripheral blood may correspond to the minor subset of CCR8+CD25− T cells. Importantly, CCL1 is constitutively expressed at strategic cutaneous locations, including dermal microvessels and epidermal antigen-presenting cells. For the first time, these findings define a chemokine system for homeostatic T cell traffic in normal human skin. PMID:15123746

  2. Mechanism of Developmental Change in the PLAY Project Home Consultation Program: Evidence from a Randomized Control Trial.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Gerald; Solomon, Richard

    2016-05-01

    This investigation is a secondary analysis of data from a randomized control trial of the PLAY Home Consultation Intervention Program which was conducted with 112 preschool children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and their parents (Solomon et al. in J Dev Behav Pediatr 35:475-485, 2014). Subjects were randomly assigned to either a community standard (CS) treatment group or to the PLAY Project plus CS Treatment (PLAY). PLAY subjects received monthly parent-child intervention sessions for 1 year during which parents learned how to use the rationale and interactive strategies of the Developmental, Individual-differences, Relationship-based (DIR) intervention model (Greenspan and Weider in The child with special needs: encouraging intellectual and emotional growth. DeCapo Press, Cambridge, MA, 1998) to engage in more responsive, affective and less directive interactions with their children. This investigation examined whether PLAY intervention effects on parents' style of interacting with their children as well as on children's social engagement mediated the effects of PLAY on children's autism severity as measured by ADOS calibrated severity scores. Regression procedures were used to test for mediation. There were two main findings. First the effects of PLAY on children's social engagement were mediated by the increases in parental responsiveness and affect that were promoted by PLAY. Second, the effects of PLAY on the severity children's Social Affect disorders were mediated by changes in parental responsiveness and affect; however, the effects of Responsive/Affect were mediated by the impact these variables had on children's social engagement. Results are discussed in terms of contemporary models of developmental change including the developmental change model that is the foundation for DIR. PMID:26830414

  3. Prospective observational cohort study of patients with weaning failure admitted to a specialist weaning, rehabilitation and home mechanical ventilation centre

    PubMed Central

    Mifsud Bonnici, Denise; Sanctuary, Thomas; Murphy, Patrick B; Steier, Joerg; Marino, Philip; Pattani, Hina; Creagh-Brown, Ben C; Hart, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives According to National Health Service England (NHSE) specialist respiratory commissioning specification for complex home ventilation, patients with weaning failure should be referred to a specialist centre. However, there are limited data reporting the clinical outcomes from such centres. Setting Prospective observational cohort study of patients admitted to a UK specialist weaning, rehabilitation and home mechanical ventilation centre between February 2005 and July 2013. Participants 262 patients admitted with a median age of 64.2 years (IQR 52.6–73.2 years). 59.9% were male. Results 39.7% of patients had neuromuscular and/or chest wall disease, 21% were postsurgical, 19.5% had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), 5.3% had obesity-related respiratory failure and 14.5% had other diagnoses. 64.1% of patients were successfully weaned, with 38.2% weaned fully from ventilation, 24% weaned to nocturnal non-invasive ventilation (NIV), 1.9% weaned to nocturnal NIV with intermittent NIV during the daytime. 21.4% of patients were discharged on long-term tracheostomy ventilation. The obesity-related respiratory failure group were most likely to wean (relative risk (RR) for weaning success=1.48, 95% CI 1.35 to 1.77; p<0.001), but otherwise weaning success rates did not significantly vary by diagnostic group. The median time-to-wean was 19 days (IQR 9–33) and the median duration of stay was 31 days (IQR 16–50), with no difference observed between the groups. Weaning centre mortality was 14.5%, highest in the COPD group (RR=2.15, 95% CI 1.19 to 3.91, p=0.012) and lowest in the neuromuscular and/or chest wall disease group (RR=0.34, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.75, p=0.007). Of all patients discharged alive, survival was 71.7% at 6 months and 61.8% at 12 months postdischarge. Conclusions Following NHSE guidance, patients with weaning delay and failure should be considered for transfer to a specialist centre where available, which can demonstrate

  4. "Do you expect me to receive PTSD care in a setting where most of the other patients remind me of the perpetrator?": Home-based telemedicine to address barriers to care unique to military sexual trauma and veterans affairs hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Amanda K; Davis, Margaret T; Grubaugh, Anouk; Resnick, Heidi; Birks, Anna; Denier, Carol; Muzzy, Wendy; Tuerk, Peter; Acierno, Ron

    2016-05-01

    Home-based telemedicine (HBT) is a validated method of evidence-based treatment delivery for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and justification for its use has centered on closing gaps related to provider availability and distance to treatment centers. However, another potential use of HBT may be to overcome barriers to care that are inherent to the treatment environment, such as with female veterans who have experienced military sexual trauma (MST) and who must present to VA Medical Centers where the majority of patients share features with perpetrator (e.g. gender, clothing) and may function as reminders of the trauma. Delivering evidence-based therapies to female veterans with MST-related PTSD via HBT can provide needed treatment to this population. This manuscript describes an ongoing federally funded randomized controlled trial comparing Prolonged Exposure (PE) delivered in-person to PE delivered via HBT. Outcomes include session attendance, satisfaction with services, and clinical and quality of life indices. It is hypothesized that based on intent-to-treat analyses, HBT delivery of PE will be more effective than SD at improving both clinical and quality of life outcomes at post, 3-, and 6-month follow-up. This is because 'dose received', that is fewer sessions missed, and lower attrition, will be observed in the HBT group. Although the current manuscript focuses on female veterans with MST-related PTSD, implications for other populations facing systemic barriers are discussed. PMID:26992740

  5. Radio receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankov, V. N.; Barulin, L. G.; Zhodzishskii, M. I.; Malyshev, I. V.; Petrusinskii, V. V.

    The book is concerned with the design of microelectronic radio receivers and their components based on semiconductor and hybrid integrated circuits. Topics discussed include the hierarchical structure of radio receivers, the synthesis of structural schemes, the design of the principal functional units, and the design of radio receiver systems with digital signal processing. The discussion also covers the integrated circuits of multifunctional amplifiers, analog multipliers, charge-transfer devices, frequency filters, piezoelectronic devices, and microwave amplifiers, filters, and mixers.

  6. CALUTRON RECEIVERS

    DOEpatents

    Lofgren, E.J.

    1958-09-01

    Improvements are described in isotope separation devices of the calutron type and, in particular, deals with a novel caiutron receiver which passes the optimum portions of the ion beam to a collecting chamber. In broad aspects the receiver provides means for pass delimited pontion of the beam and an elongated collecting pocket disposed to receive ions passed by the beam delimiting means. The collecting pocket is transversely partitioned into a plurality of ion receiving compartments respectively defined by a corresponding plurality of separately removable liner elements.

  7. CALUTRON RECEIVERS

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.H.; Stone, K.F.

    1958-09-01

    S>This patent relates to improvements in calutron devices and, more specifically, describes a receiver fer collecting the ion curreot after it is formed into a beam of non-homogeneous isotropic cross-section. The invention embodies a calutron receiver having an ion receiving pocket for separately collecting and retaining ions traveling in a selected portion of the ion beam and anelectrode for intercepting ions traveling in another selected pontion of the ion beam. The electrode is disposed so as to fix the limit of one side of the pontion of the ion beam admitted iato the ion receiving pocket.

  8. Radiation receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, A.J.

    1983-09-13

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

  9. Radiation receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1983-01-01

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

  10. The use of 2% chlorhexidine gel and toothbrushing for oral hygiene of patients receiving mechanical ventilation: effects on ventilator-associated pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Meinberg, Maria Cristina de Avila; Cheade, Maria de Fátima Meinberg; Miranda, Amanda Lucia Dias; Fachini, Marcela Mascaro; Lobo, Suzana Margareth

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of oral chlorhexidine hygiene with toothbrushing on the rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia in a mixed population of critically ill patients under prolonged mechanical ventilation. Methods Prospective, randomized, and placebo-controlled pilot study. Patients who were receiving mechanical ventilation, had been admitted less than 24 hours prior, and were anticipated to require mechanical ventilation for more than 72 hours were included in the study. The patients were randomly divided into one of the following groups: chlorhexidine hygiene with toothbrushing or a placebo group (gel with the same color and consistency and toothbrushing). Results The planned interim analysis was conducted using 52 patients, and the study was terminated prematurely. In total, 28 patients were included in the chlorhexidine / toothbrushing group, and 24 patients were included in the placebo group. Ventilator-associated pneumonia occurred in 45.8% of the placebo group and in 64.3% of the chlorhexidine hygiene with toothbrushing group (RR=1.4; 95% CI=0.83-2.34; p=0.29). Conclusion Because the study was terminated due to futility, it was not possible to evaluate the impact of oral hygiene using 2% chlorhexidine and toothbrushing on the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia in this heterogeneous population of critical patients receiving long-term mechanical ventilation, and no beneficial effect was observed for this intervention. PMID:23917935

  11. What do you do with the antiplatelet agents in patients with drug eluting stents who then receive a mechanical valve?

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Michele; Serraino, Giuseppe Filiberto; Spadafora, Andrea; Renzulli, Attilio

    2012-01-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAT) with aspirin and clopidogrel is a cornerstone of treatment during and after percutaneous coronary interventions with drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation. Oral anticoagulation (OAC) is the recommended treatment for patients with mechanical heart valves. When patients with DES need a mechanical heart valve or vice versa, we face the difficult choice of their antithrombotic therapy. Different institutions empirically follow a combination of OAC and single or DAT, the so-called triple antithrombotic therapy (TT) aiming to find the best balance between the thrombotic and bleeding risk for this subset of patients. A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether there is an optimal antithrombotic management for patients with DES undergoing mechanical heart valve or vice versa. Altogether, more than 148 papers were found using the reported search, of which 16 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We conclude that DES implantation in patients who could potentially need valve surgery in the future should be discouraged and bare-metal stent or an aortic bioprosthesis preferred. However, in high-risk patients with DES, the recommendation is to postpone elective surgery for 1 year and, if surgery cannot be deferred, continue aspirin during the perioperative period. Moreover, when OAC is given in combination with clopidogrel and/or low-dose aspirin, the target INR should be 2.0–2.5 (Class IIb, level of evidence C). As per the long-term management, antithrombotic management with DAT alone in mechanical aortic valve replacement might be possible, but there is not enough evidence to support it. The available evidence suggests that triple anticoagulation (OAC + DAT) is associated with the best

  12. The structure of Tim50(164–361) suggests the mechanism by which Tim50 receives mitochondrial presequences

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jingzhi; Sha, Bingdong

    2015-08-25

    The Tim50 crystal structure indicates that the IMS domain of Tim50 exhibits significant structural plasticity within the putative presequence-binding groove. Mitochondrial preproteins are transported through the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) complex. Tim50 and Tim23 then transfer preproteins with N-terminal targeting presequences through the intermembrane space (IMS) across the inner membrane. The crystal structure of the IMS domain of Tim50 [Tim50(164–361)] has previously been determined to 1.83 Å resolution. Here, the crystal structure of Tim50(164–361) at 2.67 Å resolution that was crystallized using a different condition is reported. Compared with the previously determined Tim50(164–361) structure, significant conformational changes occur within the protruding β-hairpin of Tim50 and the nearby helix A2. These findings indicate that the IMS domain of Tim50 exhibits significant structural plasticity within the putative presequence-binding groove, which may play important roles in the function of Tim50 as a receptor protein in the TIM complex that interacts with the presequence and multiple other proteins. More interestingly, the crystal packing indicates that helix A1 from the neighboring monomer docks into the putative presequence-binding groove of Tim50(164–361), which may mimic the scenario of Tim50 and the presequence complex. Tim50 may recognize and bind the presequence helix by utilizing the inner side of the protruding β-hairpin through hydrophobic interactions. Therefore, the protruding β-hairpin of Tim50 may play critical roles in receiving the presequence and recruiting Tim23 for subsequent protein translocations.

  13. CALUTRON RECEIVERS

    DOEpatents

    MacKenzie, K.R.

    1958-09-16

    A novel calutron receiver is described for collecting the constituent material of two closely adjacent selected portions of an ion beam in separate compartments. The receiver is so conntructed that ion scatter and intermixing of the closely adjacent beam portions do nnt occur when the ions strike the receiver structure, and the beam is sharply separated Into the two compartments. In essence, these desirable results are achieved by inclining the adjoining wall of one compartment with respect to the approaching ions to reduce possible rebounding of ions from the compartment into the adjacent compartment.

  14. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nursing Homes Basic Facts & Information Nursing homes have changed ... physical health and/or mental disabilities. Is a Nursing Home Right for You? Almost half of all ...

  15. HPXML to Home Energy Score Translator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-09-08

    Home Energy Score is a simulation-based rating method for existing homes. Home Performance XML (HPXML) is a data transfer standard for home energy audit and retrofit data used throughout the industry. This software receives an HPXML document and translates the building characteristics into HEScore inputs compliant with their API.

  16. Mechanisms of homing in the fiddler crab Uca rapax. 2. Information sources and frame of reference for a path integration system.

    PubMed

    Layne, John E; Barnes, W Jon P; Duncan, Lindsey M J

    2003-12-01

    Fiddler crabs Uca rapax are central-place foragers, making feeding excursions of up to several meters from their burrows. This study investigates the sources of directional and distance information used by these crabs when returning to their burrows. We tested the spatial frame of reference (egocentric or exocentric), and the source of spatial information (idiothetic or allothetic) used during homing. We also tested which components of their locomotion they integrated (only voluntary, or voluntary plus reflexive). Fiddler crabs in their natural mudflat habitat were passively rotated during normal foraging behavior using experimenter-controlled disks, before they returned home. Crabs resisted passive rotations on the disk by counter-rotating when the disk turned, which was a compensatory response to unintended movement. Crabs were usually situated eccentrically on the disk, and therefore were also subjected to a translation when the disk rotated. No crab actively compensated for this translation. Crabs that fully compensated for disk rotation made no directional homing error. Crabs that did not fully compensate homed in a direction that reflected their new body orientation. In other words, if we succeeded in reorienting a crab (i.e. it undercompensated for disk rotation), its homing error was equal to the angle by which it had been reoriented, regardless of the magnitude of the optomotor compensation. Computer-modelled crabs, each equipped with a path integrator utilizing different combinations of external (allothetic) and path-related (idiothetic) input, traversed the digitized paths of the real crabs. The home vector computed by the model crab was then compared to the homing direction observed in the real crab. The model home vector that most closely matched that of the real crab was taken to comprise the path integration mechanism employed by fiddler crabs. The model that best matched the real crab gained direction and distance idiothetically (from internal

  17. Comparing the similarity of responses received from studies in Amazon's Mechanical Turk to studies conducted online and with direct recruitment.

    PubMed

    Bartneck, Christoph; Duenser, Andreas; Moltchanova, Elena; Zawieska, Karolina

    2015-01-01

    Computer and internet based questionnaires have become a standard tool in Human-Computer Interaction research and other related fields, such as psychology and sociology. Amazon's Mechanical Turk (AMT) service is a new method of recruiting participants and conducting certain types of experiments. This study compares whether participants recruited through AMT give different responses than participants recruited through an online forum or recruited directly on a university campus. Moreover, we compare whether a study conducted within AMT results in different responses compared to a study for which participants are recruited through AMT but which is conducted using an external online questionnaire service. The results of this study show that there is a statistical difference between results obtained from participants recruited through AMT compared to the results from the participant recruited on campus or through online forums. We do, however, argue that this difference is so small that it has no practical consequence. There was no significant difference between running the study within AMT compared to running it with an online questionnaire service. There was no significant difference between results obtained directly from within AMT compared to results obtained in the campus and online forum condition. This may suggest that AMT is a viable and economical option for recruiting participants and for conducting studies as setting up and running a study with AMT generally requires less effort and time compared to other frequently used methods. We discuss our findings as well as limitations of using AMT for empirical studies. PMID:25876027

  18. Home Hemodialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Home Hemodialysis Page Content On this page: What is home ... Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is home hemodialysis? Home hemodialysis is hemodialysis that a person can ...

  19. Mechanism of Developmental Change in the PLAY Project Home Consultation Program: Evidence from a Randomized Control Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Gerald; Solomon, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This investigation is a secondary analysis of data from a randomized control trial of the PLAY Home Consultation Intervention Program which was conducted with 112 preschool children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and their parents (Solomon et al. in "J Dev Behav Pediatr" 35:475-485, 2014). Subjects were randomly assigned to either a…

  20. Care homes. Home truths.

    PubMed

    Schneider, J; Netten, A; Mozley, C; Levin, E; Mann, A; Blizard, B; Topan, C; Abbey, A; Kharicha, K; Todd, C

    1998-01-15

    Proposed joint inspectorates of care homes open the way for health input into residential care. An investigation into quality-of-care measures concluded that health professionals should be included in inspectorate teams, particularly in view of the increasing dependency of residents. No association was shown between cost and quality, but higher costs were associated with short-term car provision. When costing residential care, the impact on community and primary healthcare services may need to be taken into account. PMID:10176463

  1. CALUTRON RECEIVER

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, S.W.

    1959-08-25

    An improvement in a calutron receiver for collecting the isotopes ts described. The electromagnetic separation of the isotopes produces a mass spectrum of closely adjacent beams of ions at the foci regions, and a dividing wall between the two pockets is arranged at an angle. Substantially all of the tons of the less abundant isotope enter one of the pockets and strike one side of the wall directly, while substantially none of the tons entering the other pocket strikes the wall directly.

  2. Comparison of exercise capacity in COPD and other etiologies of chronic respiratory failure requiring non-invasive mechanical ventilation at home: retrospective analysis of 1-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Salturk, Cuneyt; Karakurt, Zuhal; Takir, Huriye Berk; Balci, Merih; Kargin, Feyza; Mocin, Ozlem Yazıcıoglu; Gungor, Gokay; Ozmen, Ipek; Oztas, Selahattin; Yalcinsoy, Murat; Evin, Ruya; Ozturk, Murat; Adiguzel, Nalan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to compare the change in 6-minute walking distance (6MWD) in 1 year as an indicator of exercise capacity among patients undergoing home non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) due to chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure (CHRF) caused by different etiologies. Methods This retrospective cohort study was conducted in a tertiary pulmonary disease hospital in patients who had completed 1-year follow-up under home NIMV because of CHRF with different etiologies (ie, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD], obesity hypoventilation syndrome [OHS], kyphoscoliosis [KS], and diffuse parenchymal lung disease [DPLD]), between January 2011 and January 2012. The results of arterial blood gas (ABG) analyses and spirometry, and 6MWD measurements with 12-month interval were recorded from the patient files, in addition to demographics, comorbidities, and body mass indices. The groups were compared in terms of 6MWD via analysis of variance (ANOVA) and multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis (independent variables: analysis age, sex, baseline 6MWD, baseline forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and baseline partial carbon dioxide pressure, in reference to COPD group). Results A total of 105 patients with a mean age (± standard deviation) of 61±12 years of whom 37 had COPD, 34 had OHS, 20 had KS, and 14 had DPLD were included in statistical analysis. There were no significant differences between groups in the baseline and delta values of ABG and spirometry findings. Both univariate ANOVA and MLR showed that the OHS group had the lowest baseline 6MWD and the highest decrease in 1 year (linear regression coefficient −24.48; 95% CI −48.74 to −0.21, P=0.048); while the KS group had the best baseline values and the biggest improvement under home NIMV (linear regression coefficient 26.94; 95% CI −3.79 to 57.66, P=0.085). Conclusion The 6MWD measurements revealed improvement in exercise capacity test in CHRF patients receiving

  3. Home Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help Related Topics Assisted Living Community-Based Care Nursing Homes Related Video Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Home Care Basic Facts & Information Role of Health Care Professionals in Home Care Your physician is the leader ...

  4. The efficacy of a home-mechanical traction unit for patients with mild to moderate cervical osteoarthrosis: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Bagheripour, Batoul; Kamyab, Mojtaba; Azadinia, Fatemeh; Amiri, Ali; Akbari, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traction has been suggested to be an effective treatment for symptoms of neck disorder in patients with no contraindications. However, according to previous researches, the effectiveness of traction is controversial, particularly compared to other conservative treatments. This trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of sustained traction, using an over-the-door home cervical traction unit in combination with routine physical therapy on reducing cervical osteoarthrosis symptoms including neck pain, medication use and disability level compared to routine physical therapy alone. Methods: In this double- blinded pilot study with a pre-post test design and a control group, 20 women with mild to moderate osteoarthrosis were systematically assigned to the over-the-door home cervical traction (mean±SD age: 50.5±4.45yrs) or control groups (mean±SD age: 55.6±7.34yrs). Pain, level of disability, and drug consumption were evaluated before and after 10 sessions of intervention. Data were analyzed using parametric or non-parametric statistic including the paired-sample t-test, independent sample t-test, and Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney u test for intra and inter groups comparison based on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test results. Results: Patients in both groups showed a significant decrease in pain intensity and disability level (p<0.05). Despite the greater improvement in pain levels and disability in the experimental group compared to the controls, the differences were not significant (p>0.05). No significant differences were found in terms of drugs consumption within and between the groups at the end of the treatment (p>0.05). Conclusion: The results revealed that applying sustained traction using an over-the-door home cervical traction unit was not significantly superior to the routine physical therapy and ergonomic training to manage symptoms including neck pain and disability in a small group of mild to moderate cervical osteoarthrosis patients. PMID:27493930

  5. Patterns in home care use in Manitoba.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Lori; Roos, Noralou P; Shapiro, Evelyn

    2005-01-01

    Administrative home care data from the Manitoba Support Services Payroll (MSSP) system for fiscal years 1995/1996 to 1998/1999 were utilized to study home care client characteristics and changes in home care use over time. Patterns in home care access and use after hospitalization, before admission to a nursing home, and before death were examined. The study found that the majority of home care clients were female, aged 65 and over, and not married. The proportion of Manitobans using home care increased slowly, but significantly, over the 4 years. The greatest increases were found among the older age groups. The average number of days that clients received home care before death or before admission to a nursing home was stable over time, while a significant increase over time in home care use after hospitalization was experienced. These findings can be useful to regional health authorities for planning and budgeting. PMID:16080138

  6. High Performance Builder Spotlight: Treasure Homes Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Treasure Homes, Inc., achieved a HERS rating of 46 without PV on its prototype “Gem” home, located on the shores of Lake Michigan in northern Indiana, thanks in part to training received from a Building America partner, the National Association of Home Builders Research Center.

  7. High Energy-Efficiency Retrofits to Baltimore's Row Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Chalk, J.; Johnson, A.L.; Lipscomb, L.; Wendt, R.

    1999-04-19

    The purpose of the research project is to develop high-perfommnce, energy-eflicient retrofits of existing row homes in Baltimore, Maryland. These efficiency enhancements are to optimize building envelope improvements, mechanical equipment improvements and operational improvements to the highest cost-effective level. Furthermore, this project is to investigate and demonstrate the impact of high-performance energy-efficiency retrofit improvements on row homes in the Historic East area of Baltimore. Three homes awaiting renovation are planned to receive building envelope, mechanical system, and electrical system improvements that will improve their energy petiormance. An incremental additional cost ceiling of $4000 for the energy eftlciency improvements, beyond those normally installed, has been set by the project.

  8. IV treatment at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... home; PICC line - home; Infusion therapy - home; Home health care - IV treatment ... Often, home health care nurses will come to your home to give you the medicine. Sometimes, a family member, a friend, or ...

  9. Promoting continence in nursing homes in four European countries: the use of PACES as a mechanism for improving the uptake of evidence-based recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Gill; Kitson, Alison; Munn, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Background Multi-faceted approaches are generally recognised as the most effective way to support the implementation of evidence into practice. Audit and feedback often constitute one element of a multi-faceted implementation package, alongside other strategies, such as interactive education and facilitated support mechanisms. This paper describes a multi-faceted implementation strategy that used the Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System (PACES) as an online audit tool to support facilitators working to introduce evidence-based continence recommendations in nursing homes in four different European countries. Aims/objectives The paper describes the experience of using PACES with an international group of nursing home facilitators. In particular, the objectives of the paper are: to describe the process of introducing PACES to internal facilitators in eight nursing homes; to discuss the progress made during a 12-month period of collecting and analysing audit data using PACES; to summarise the collective experience of using PACES, including reflections on its strengths and limitations. Methods Descriptive data were collected during the 12-month period of working with PACES in the eight nursing home sites. These data included digital and written notes taken at an initial 3-day introductory programme, at monthly teleconferences held between the external and internal facilitators and at a final 2-day meeting. Qualitative analysis of the data was undertaken on an ongoing basis throughout the implementation period, which enabled formative evaluation of PACES. A final summative evaluation of the experience of using PACES was undertaken as part of the closing project meeting in June 2011. Results The nursing home facilitators took longer than anticipated to introduce PACES and it was only after 9–10 months that they became confident and comfortable using the system. This was due to a combination of factors, including a lack of audit

  10. Home Schooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, William M.; And Others

    Cases that address the issue of home schooling are summarized in this report. Organized chronologically, each case description includes quoted material from the court ruling. Issues involve parent actions regarding compulsory student enrollment, parent qualifications for home teaching, student certification, church-state separation, constitutional…

  11. Halfway Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandham, Jessica L.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the pros and cons of Alaska's unique Family Partnership Charter School, which oversees distribution of public funding to home-schooling families, offers support to help home-schooling parents meet district standards on their own terms, and monitors required purchase of teacher time and expenditures. A sidebar describes an Alaskan…

  12. Home Care Research: What Does It Tell Us?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Neena L.

    1994-01-01

    Assesses applied relevance of research on home care, reviewing literature on predictors of use of home care services, experience of receiving home care, and efficacy studies. Notes that efficacy studies have not concluded that home care is less costly or better for quality of life of older adults when compared with institutional care. (Author/NB)

  13. 38 CFR 59.140 - Nursing home care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nursing home care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.140 Nursing home care requirements. As a condition for receiving a grant and grant funds for a nursing home facility under this...

  14. 38 CFR 59.140 - Nursing home care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nursing home care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.140 Nursing home care requirements. As a condition for receiving a grant and grant funds for a nursing home facility under this...

  15. 38 CFR 59.140 - Nursing home care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nursing home care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.140 Nursing home care requirements. As a condition for receiving a grant and grant funds for a nursing home facility under this...

  16. 38 CFR 59.140 - Nursing home care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nursing home care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.140 Nursing home care requirements. As a condition for receiving a grant and grant funds for a nursing home facility under this...

  17. 38 CFR 59.140 - Nursing home care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nursing home care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.140 Nursing home care requirements. As a condition for receiving a grant and grant funds for a nursing home facility under this...

  18. Housing and Home Furnishings. In-Depth Curriculum. Vocational Home Economics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawatzky, Joyce

    This curriculum guide for home economics instructors of eleventh and/or twelfth grade students builds on content received in Home Economics I and II, and provides a 12- to 18-week course of study designed to increase basic knowledge and develop skills in living space and its design, home selection and finance, housing exteriors and interiors,…

  19. Emission of airborne fibers from mechanically impacted asbestos-cement sheets and concentration of fibrous aerosol in the home environment in Upper Silesia, Poland.

    PubMed

    Pastuszka, Jozef S

    2009-03-15

    The emission rate ((S)) of fibers released from asbestos-cement plates due to mechanical impact was determined experimentally. The emission rate has been defined as a number of fibers (F) emitted from a unit area (m(2)) due to the unit impact energy (J). For fiber longer than 5 microm the obtained surface emission factor for asbestos-cement slabs slightly increased with deteriorating surface, changing from 2.7 x 10(3) F/(m(2)J) for samples with a very good surface to 6.9 x 10(3) F/(m(2)J) for the sample with worn surface (in the SI system the emission rate unit should be (m(-2)J(-1))). The emission rate for short fibers (L < or = 5 microm) was little higher compared with emission of long fibers for all studied asbestos materials. The averaged emission rate for all studied samples was about 5000 and 6000 of long and short fibers, respectively, emitted per square meter (because of the impact energy equal to 1J). The dominating population of emitted fibers ranged from 2 to around 8 microm in length. The second part of this work constitutes the report on the concentration of airborne respirable fibers, and their length distribution in two different groups of homes in Upper Silesia, Poland. Mean concentration level of the respirable fibers, longer than 5 microm, was found to be 850 F/m(3) (according to the SI system the fiber concentration unit is (m(-3))) in the buildings covered with asbestos-cement sheets and 280 F/m(3) in the homes without asbestos-containing facades, located away from other asbestos sources. Although the laboratory and field measurements have been made by using the MIE Laser Fiber Monitor FM-7400 only, the obtained results indicate that the outdoor asbestos-cement building facades are significant sources of airborne fibers inside the dwellings in Upper Silesian towns. PMID:18692307

  20. Home-based renal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, G K; Lutz, L J; Gregory, M C

    1988-02-01

    About 20 percent of chronic dialysis patients receive treatment in their homes. An increasing number of these patients choose peritoneal dialysis. Physicians should be aware of the techniques and possible complications of home-based dialysis so that they can assist patients in choosing a form of dialysis and can help manage problems if they arise. An understanding of the technical and psychosocial problems is also necessary. PMID:3344646

  1. Home Hemodialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... more flexible schedule and better health. More Flexible Schedule A person can choose the schedule for home ... treat. When prepared, this content included the most current information available. For updates or for questions about ...

  2. Home Modification

    MedlinePlus

    ... it is important to consider certain safety modifications. Adaptations such as those in the following list can ... The importance of a Consumer Perspective in Home Adaptation of Alzheimer’s Households” (Chapter 6 pp 91-112) ...

  3. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... up like a hospital. The staff provides medical care, as well as physical, speech and occupational therapy. ... relationships with residents. Some nursing homes have special care units for people with serious memory problems such ...

  4. Cancer Patients Who Choose to Die At Home Live Longer

    MedlinePlus

    ... suggest that doctors shouldn't hesitate to allow dying cancer patients to receive palliative care at home, ... people would like to be at home when dying, but there have been concerns about whether the ...

  5. The Medical Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy The Medical Home KidsHealth > For Parents > The Medical Home Print ... home" for your child. What Does the Term "Medical Home" Mean? A medical home isn't a ...

  6. Home health care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skilled nursing - home health; Skilled nursing - home care; Physical therapy - at home; Occupational therapy - at home; Discharge - home ... being in the hospital, skilled nursing center, or rehabilitation facility. You should probably be able to go ...

  7. Residential Mechanical Precooling

    SciTech Connect

    German, a.; Hoeschele, M.

    2014-12-01

    This research conducted by the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation team evaluated mechanical air conditioner pre-cooling strategies in homes throughout the United States. EnergyPlus modeling evaluated two homes with different performance characteristics in seven climates. Results are applicable to new construction homes and most existing homes built in the last 10 years, as well as fairly efficient retrofitted homes.

  8. Nursing homes in China.

    PubMed

    Chu, Leung-Wing; Chi, Iris

    2008-05-01

    China will face a dramatic transition from a young to an aged society in the coming 30 to 40 years. In 2000, there were 88,110,000 persons aged 65 years and older, which represented 7% of the population. This percentage is projected to increase to 23% in 2050. Regarding health and long-term care for older adults, the current challenge is to build a comprehensive system of care for older adults. Nursing home care is an inevitable care model for frail older adults in China, which is largely sponsored by the government of China with contributions from some nongovernment organizations and private investors. China is a large country. Within the country, long-term care varies greatly between rural and urban areas, and among the different economic developing areas. In urban and better-developed areas, the range of services exists; however, in rural and less-developed areas, the range of services is limited. The "Star Light Program" and "Beloved Care Engineering" were recent government initiatives to improve aged care. They were launched in 2001 and have dramatically increased the number of both senior centers and nursing homes for older adults. While the quantity of nursing homes is still inadequate with an additional mismatch problem between the supply and demand, the quality of care in most nursing homes is suboptimal. At present, most administrative and frontline workers in nursing homes have received little training in elder care. There is a need for good-quality structured training in long-term care for all types of staff. Moreover, quality standard for care, including standard setting, assessment, and monitoring, is an important issue and needs substantial improvement for nursing homes in China. Currently, 1.5% of older people live in nursing homes and apartments for older people. Because of the peculiar 4-2-1 family structure in China, we expect the prevalence of nursing home placement of older adults will increase in the coming years. The government of China has

  9. Snails home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunstan, D. J.; Hodgson, D. J.

    2014-06-01

    Many gardeners and horticulturalists seek non-chemical methods to control populations of snails. It has frequently been reported that snails that are marked and removed from a garden are later found in the garden again. This phenomenon is often cited as evidence for a homing instinct. We report a systematic study of the snail population in a small suburban garden, in which large numbers of snails were marked and removed over a period of about 6 months. While many returned, inferring a homing instinct from this evidence requires statistical modelling. Monte Carlo techniques demonstrate that movements of snails are better explained by drift under the influence of a homing instinct than by random diffusion. Maximum likelihood techniques infer the existence of two groups of snails in the garden: members of a larger population that show little affinity to the garden itself, and core members of a local garden population that regularly return to their home if removed. The data are strongly suggestive of a homing instinct, but also reveal that snail-throwing can work as a pest management strategy.

  10. Distanciation in Ricoeur's theory of interpretation: narrations in a study of life experiences of living with chronic illness and home mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, Pia Sander; Pedersen, Birthe D

    2009-03-01

    Within the caring science paradigm, variations of a method of interpretation inspired by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur's theory of interpretation are used. This method consists of several levels of interpretation: a naïve reading, a structural analysis, and a critical analysis and discussion. Within this paradigm, the aim of this article is to present and discuss a means of creating distance in the interpretation and the text structure by using narration in a poetic language linked to the meaning of the text. Ricoeur's 'Hermeneutical function of distanciation' will be introduced, and this concept of distanciation will be illustrated with reference to narrations from a study of patient's life experiences living with chronic illness and home mechanical ventilation in Denmark. Distanciation in the interpretation objectifies the text, and narration in a poetic language creates a particular kind of mediation in the interpretation. That narration represents an interpreted understanding of the whole, which facilitates an appropriate and evocative presentation of the interpreted data. This way of objectifying the text through narration can contribute yet another perspective to Ricoeur's rich and varied theory of interpretation. PMID:19228305

  11. Home Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Under the Guaranteed Watt Savers (GWS) system, plans for a new home are computer analyzed for anticipated heat loss and gain. Specifications are specifically designed for each structure and a Smart- House Radiant Barrier is installed. Designed to reflect away 95% of the Sun's radiant energy, the radiant barrier is an adaptation of an aluminum shield used on Apollo spacecraft. On completion of a home, technicians using a machine, check for air tightness, by creating a vacuum in the house and computer calculations that measure the amount of air exchanged. A guarantee that only the specified number kilowatt hours will be used is then provided.

  12. Nursing Home Checklist

    MedlinePlus

    Nursing home checklist Name of nursing home: ____________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________ Phone number: __________________________________________________________ Date of visit: _____________________________________________________________ Basic information Yes No Notes Is the nursing home Medicare certified? Is the nursing ...

  13. Home Modifications

    MedlinePlus

    ... use, and flexible enough to be adapted for special needs. Back to top Evaluating Your Needs Before any changes are made to the home, evaluate your current and future needs room by room. Once you have explored all areas, make a list of potential problems and solutions. ...

  14. Home Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Dept. of Education, Toronto. School Planning and Building Research Section.

    This presentation of suggested layouts and specifications for home economics facilities has been prepared to be of service to school boards, architects, teachers, and administrators who are planning new schools or making renovations to existing structures. Room layouts are shown for a foods and nutrition room, or the foods and nutrition area of a…

  15. Communications Satellite Receiver Systems for Public Schools: A Technical Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Designed to aid school districts contemplating use of some of the telecommunications services now available by satellite, this document contains information on home satellite receiving dishes (Television Receive-Only--TVROs), which can receive radio signals carrying television, sound, and data. This information includes: some factors involved in…

  16. European Home Mechanical Ventilation Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-08

    Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive; Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis; Spinal Cord Injury; Muscular Dystrophies; Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome; Kyphoscoliosis; Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome; Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy; Myopathies; Myotonic Dystrophy

  17. Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Home Health Care Home health care helps older adults live independently for as long ... need for long-term nursing home care. Home health care may include occupational and physical therapy, speech therapy, ...

  18. [Home Treatment].

    PubMed

    Widmann, F; Bachhuber, G; Riedelsheimer, A; Schiele, A; Ullrich, S; Kilian, R; Becker, T; Frasch, K

    2016-01-01

    Home Treatment (HT) means acute psychiatric treatment in the patient's usual environment. Conceptually, HT is to be differentiated from other home-based services: It is limited with regard to duration and multiprofessional (e. g. psychiatrist plus psychiatric nursing staff plus social worker); the "24/7"-accessibility is frequently provided by the corresponding background hospital infrastructure. Target group are acutely mentally ill persons with an indication to inpatient treatment, who are willing to cooperate, and absence of endangerment to self and others. In contrast to the Scandinavian and many Anglophone countries where nationwide HT services are delivered, there are not many HT sites in Germany so far. Consequently, empirical data concerning HT in Germany is scarce. In summary, international studies show equivalent effects on psychopathological measures compared to inpatient treatment, reductions with regard to inpatient days, higher patient satisfaction and a trend towards cost-effectivity. PMID:26878432

  19. Home Energy Score

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-16

    The Home Energy Score allows a homeowner to compare her or his home's energy consumption to that of other homes, similar to a vehicle's mile-per-gallon rating. A home energy assessor will collect energy information during a brief home walk-through and then score that home on a scale of 1 to 10.

  20. 42 CFR 436.110 - Individuals receiving cash assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Medicaid agency must provide Medicaid to individuals receiving cash assistance under OAA, AFDC, AB, APTD... the home is considered essential to the well-being of a recipient under the State's plan for OAA,...

  1. Occupational Therapy Home Modification Assessment and Intervention.

    PubMed

    Somerville, Emily; Smallfield, Stacy; Stark, Susan; Seibert, Carol; Arbesman, Marian; Lieberman, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Evidence Connection articles describe a clinical application of a systematic review developed in conjunction with the American Occupational Therapy Association's Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) Project. This Evidence Connection provides a case report of a client referred to occupational therapy for home modification assessment and intervention, applying the evidence from the systematic review of home modifications conducted in conjunction with the EBP Project. The client received in-home occupational therapy after side effects of liver disease resulted in increased falls within her home. PMID:27548872

  2. Home teleradiology system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komo, Darmadi; Garra, Brian S.; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong K.

    1997-05-01

    The Home Teleradiology Server system has been developed and installed at the Department of Radiology, Georgetown University Medical Center. The main purpose of the system is to provide a service for on-call physicians to view patients' medical images at home during off-hours. This service will reduce the overhead time required by on-call physicians to travel to the hospital, thereby increasing the efficiency of patient care and improving the total quality of the health care. Typically when a new case is conducted, the medical images generated from CT, US, and/or MRI modalities are transferred to a central server at the hospital via DICOM messages over an existing hospital network. The server has a DICOM network agent that listens to DICOM messages sent by CT, US, and MRI modalities and stores them into separate DICOM files for sending purposes. The server also has a general purpose, flexible scheduling software that can be configured to send image files to specific user(s) at certain times on any day(s) of the week. The server will then distribute the medical images to on- call physicians' homes via a high-speed modem. All file transmissions occur in the background without human interaction after the scheduling software is pre-configured accordingly. At the receiving end, the physicians' computers consist of high-end workstations that have high-speed modems to receive the medical images sent by the central server from the hospital, and DICOM compatible viewer software to view the transmitted medical images in DICOM format. A technician from the hospital, and DICOM compatible viewer software to view the transmitted medical images in DICOM format. A technician from the hospital will notify the physician(s) after all the image files have been completely sent. The physician(s) will then examine the medical images and decide if it is necessary to travel to the hospital for further examination on the patients. Overall, the Home Teleradiology system provides the on

  3. Tracing Changes in Families Who Participated in the Home-Start Parenting Program: Parental Sense of Competence as Mechanism of Change

    PubMed Central

    Asscher, Jessica J.; Hermanns, Jo; Reitz, Ellen; Prinzie, Peter; van den Akker, Alithe L.

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed to (1) determine the long-term effectiveness of Home-Start, a preventive parenting program, and (2) test the hypothesis that changes in maternal sense of competence mediate the program’s effects. Participants were 124 mothers (n = 66 intervention, n = 58 comparison). Four assessments took place during a 1-year period. Latent growth modeling showed that Home-Start enhanced growth in maternal sense of competence and supportive parenting, and led to a decrease in the use of inept discipline. Results of mediational and cross-lagged analyses were consistent with the hypothesized model: Participation in Home-Start was related to the changes in maternal sense of competence, which in turn predicted changes in parenting. The results affirm the importance of directly targeting parental sense of competence in the context of prevention work with parents. PMID:20101464

  4. Foraging optimally for home ranges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, Michael S.; Powell, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    Economic models predict behavior of animals based on the presumption that natural selection has shaped behaviors important to an animal's fitness to maximize benefits over costs. Economic analyses have shown that territories of animals are structured by trade-offs between benefits gained from resources and costs of defending them. Intuitively, home ranges should be similarly structured, but trade-offs are difficult to assess because there are no costs of defense, thus economic models of home-range behavior are rare. We present economic models that predict how home ranges can be efficient with respect to spatially distributed resources, discounted for travel costs, under 2 strategies of optimization, resource maximization and area minimization. We show how constraints such as competitors can influence structure of homes ranges through resource depression, ultimately structuring density of animals within a population and their distribution on a landscape. We present simulations based on these models to show how they can be generally predictive of home-range behavior and the mechanisms that structure the spatial distribution of animals. We also show how contiguous home ranges estimated statistically from location data can be misleading for animals that optimize home ranges on landscapes with patchily distributed resources. We conclude with a summary of how we applied our models to nonterritorial black bears (Ursus americanus) living in the mountains of North Carolina, where we found their home ranges were best predicted by an area-minimization strategy constrained by intraspecific competition within a social hierarchy. Economic models can provide strong inference about home-range behavior and the resources that structure home ranges by offering falsifiable, a priori hypotheses that can be tested with field observations.

  5. Home haemodialysis in remote Australia.

    PubMed

    Villarba, Angelina; Warr, Kevin

    2004-12-01

    The Royal Perth Hospital provides access to dialysis treatment to Indigenous Australians living in remote areas of Western Australia who are suffering from end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The Remote Area Dialysis Programme (RADP), established in 1989, relocated traditional hospital services to remote communities and introduced home or community-based therapy. This unique state-wide programme was developed in cooperation with tribal elders in Aboriginal communities, and regional medical, nursing and community health staff. Prior to RADP's establishment, these patients faced the choice of permanent relocation to Perth for dialysis treatment or death from renal failure. Development of the RADP allowed Indigenous patients with ESRD to receive dialysis treatment in their own home/community. Requirements for home haemodialysis include establishing the suitability and capability of patients, the availability of carers and an appropriate home or community environment for dialysis machine installation. This has required novel strategies to address cultural and language impediments to home therapy. The remoteness of some isolated communities has been a technical challenge for the dialysis technicians due to the uncertainty of power supply, climatic extremes and inadequate supply or poor quality of water. A specific training program has been developed to adapt to the needs of Aboriginal patients. Patients undertaking home haemodialysis face many challenges and a number of initiatives will need to be implemented to ensure the ongoing success of the programme. PMID:15601405

  6. Assessment of Anxiety in Older Home Care Recipients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diefenbach, Gretchen J.; Tolin, David F.; Meunier, Suzanne A.; Gilliam, Christina M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study determined the psychometric properties of a variety of anxiety measures administered to older adults receiving home care services. Design and Methods: Data were collected from 66 adults aged 65 years and older who were receiving home care services. Participants completed self-report and clinician-rated measures of anxiety and…

  7. Comparing the Similarity of Responses Received from Studies in Amazon’s Mechanical Turk to Studies Conducted Online and with Direct Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Bartneck, Christoph; Duenser, Andreas; Moltchanova, Elena; Zawieska, Karolina

    2015-01-01

    Computer and internet based questionnaires have become a standard tool in Human-Computer Interaction research and other related fields, such as psychology and sociology. Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (AMT) service is a new method of recruiting participants and conducting certain types of experiments. This study compares whether participants recruited through AMT give different responses than participants recruited through an online forum or recruited directly on a university campus. Moreover, we compare whether a study conducted within AMT results in different responses compared to a study for which participants are recruited through AMT but which is conducted using an external online questionnaire service. The results of this study show that there is a statistical difference between results obtained from participants recruited through AMT compared to the results from the participant recruited on campus or through online forums. We do, however, argue that this difference is so small that it has no practical consequence. There was no significant difference between running the study within AMT compared to running it with an online questionnaire service. There was no significant difference between results obtained directly from within AMT compared to results obtained in the campus and online forum condition. This may suggest that AMT is a viable and economical option for recruiting participants and for conducting studies as setting up and running a study with AMT generally requires less effort and time compared to other frequently used methods. We discuss our findings as well as limitations of using AMT for empirical studies. PMID:25876027

  8. Spaceborne receivers: Basic principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The underlying principles of operation of microwave receivers for space observations of planetary surfaces were examined. The design philosophy of the receiver as it is applied to operate functionally as an efficient receiving system, the principle of operation of the key components of the receiver, and the important differences among receiver types are explained. The operating performance and the sensitivity expectations for both the modulated and total power receiver configurations are outlined. The expressions are derived from first principles and are developed through the important intermediate stages to form practicle and easily applied equations. The transfer of thermodynamic energy from point to point within the receiver is illustrated. The language of microwave receivers is applied statistics.

  9. Solar heat receiver

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, A.J.; Hansen, L.J.; Evans, D.B.

    1982-09-29

    A receiver is described for converting solar energy to heat a gas to temperatures from 700 to 900/sup 0/C. The receiver is formed to minimize impingement of radiation on the walls and to provide maximum heating at and near the entry of the gas exit. Also, the receiver is formed to provide controlled movement of the gas to be heated to minimize wall temperatures. The receiver is designed for use with gas containing fine heat absorbing particles, such as carbon particles.

  10. Relationships, Expertise, Incentives, and Governance: Supporting Care Home Residents' Access to Health Care. An Interview Study From England

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Claire; Davies, Sue L.; Gordon, Adam L.; Meyer, Julienne; Dening, Tom; Gladman, John R.F.; Iliffe, Steve; Zubair, Maria; Bowman, Clive; Victor, Christina; Martin, Finbarr C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore what commissioners of care, regulators, providers, and care home residents in England identify as the key mechanisms or components of different service delivery models that support the provision of National Health Service (NHS) provision to independent care homes. Methods Qualitative, semistructured interviews with a purposive sample of people with direct experience of commissioning, providing, and regulating health care provision in care homes and care home residents. Data from interviews were augmented by a secondary analysis of previous interviews with care home residents on their personal experience of and priorities for access to health care. Analysis was framed by the assumptions of realist evaluation and drew on the constant comparative method to identify key themes about what is required to achieve quality health care provision to care homes and resident health. Results Participants identified 3 overlapping approaches to the provision of NHS that they believed supported access to health care for older people in care homes: (1) Investment in relational working that fostered continuity and shared learning between visiting NHS staff and care home staff, (2) the provision of age-appropriate clinical services, and (3) governance arrangements that used contractual and financial incentives to specify a minimum service that care homes should receive. Conclusion The 3 approaches, and how they were typified as working, provide a rich picture of the stakeholder perspectives and the underlying assumptions about how service delivery models should work with care homes. The findings inform how evidence on effective working in care homes will be interrogated to identify how different approaches, or specifically key elements of those approaches, achieve different health-related outcomes in different situations for residents and associated health and social care organizations. PMID:25687930

  11. Genetics Home Reference

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Genetics Home Reference Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of ... of this page please turn Javascript on. The Genetics Home Reference (GHR) Web site — ghr.nlm.nih. ...

  12. Exercise at Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Divisions Home Health Insights Exercise Exercise at Home Exercise at Home Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... with the movement and contact your provider. Posture Exercises Better posture means better breathing and movement. Axial ...

  13. Respiratory Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources Immunizations Pollution Nutrition ... Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at home can contribute to improved ...

  14. Home Care Services

    MedlinePlus

    Home care is care that allows a person with special needs stay in their home. It might be for people who are getting ... chronically ill, recovering from surgery, or disabled. Home care services include Personal care, such as help with ...

  15. Home Kits, Home Visits, and More!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorter-Reu, Maralee S.; Anderson, Jean Marie

    1998-01-01

    The Home Kit/Home Visit Program--designed for children needing reinforcement of basic concepts and knowledge of colors, shapes, numbers, letter recognition, and letter-sound correspondence--is proving successful in encouraging parent involvement in first-graders' learning of basic skills. Parents are provided with home learning kits to guide their…

  16. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Migration Homing and Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Verfaillie, Catherine M.

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the migration and homing ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and MSC-like cells and factors influencing this. We also discuss studies related to the mechanism of migration and homing and the approaches undertaken to enhance it. Finally, we describe the different methods available and frequently used to track and identify the injected cells in vivo. PMID:24194766

  17. UWB communication receiver feedback loop

    DOEpatents

    Spiridon, Alex; Benzel, Dave; Dowla, Farid U.; Nekoogar, Faranak; Rosenbury, Erwin T.

    2007-12-04

    A novel technique and structure that maximizes the extraction of information from reference pulses for UWB-TR receivers is introduced. The scheme efficiently processes an incoming signal to suppress different types of UWB as well as non-UWB interference prior to signal detection. Such a method and system adds a feedback loop mechanism to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of reference pulses in a conventional TR receiver. Moreover, sampling the second order statistical function such as, for example, the autocorrelation function (ACF) of the received signal and matching it to the ACF samples of the original pulses for each transmitted bit provides a more robust UWB communications method and system in the presence of channel distortions.

  18. Data-fusion receiver

    DOEpatents

    Gabelmann, Jeffrey M.; Kattner, J. Stephen; Houston, Robert A.

    2006-12-19

    This invention is an ultra-low frequency electromagnetic telemetry receiver which fuses multiple input receive sources to synthesize a decodable message packet from a noise corrupted telemetry message string. Each block of telemetry data to be sent to the surface receiver from a borehole tool is digitally encoded into a data packet prior to transmission. The data packet is modulated onto the ULF EM carrier wave and transmitted from the borehole to the surface and then are simultaneously detected by multiple receive sensors disbursed within the rig environment. The receive sensors include, but are not limited to, electric field and magnetic field sensors. The spacing of the surface receive elements is such that noise generators are unequally coupled to each receive element due to proximity and/or noise generator type (i.e. electric or magnetic field generators). The receiver utilizes a suite of decision metrics to reconstruct the original, non noise-corrupted data packet from the observation matrix via the estimation of individual data frames. The receiver will continue this estimation process until: 1) the message validates, or 2) a preset "confidence threshold" is reached whereby frames within the observation matrix are no longer "trusted".

  19. Hybrid receiver study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, M. S.; Mcadam, P. L.; Saunders, O. W.

    1977-01-01

    The results are presented of a 4 month study to design a hybrid analog/digital receiver for outer planet mission probe communication links. The scope of this study includes functional design of the receiver; comparisons between analog and digital processing; hardware tradeoffs for key components including frequency generators, A/D converters, and digital processors; development and simulation of the processing algorithms for acquisition, tracking, and demodulation; and detailed design of the receiver in order to determine its size, weight, power, reliability, and radiation hardness. In addition, an evaluation was made of the receiver's capabilities to perform accurate measurement of signal strength and frequency for radio science missions.

  20. Optical superheterodyne receiver.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, K.; Lang, K.; Lucy, R. F.; Peters, C. J.

    1967-01-01

    Optical communication experiments to compare coherent and noncoherent optical detection fading characteristics in different weather conditions, using laser transmitter and optical superheterodyne receiver

  1. Home health care with telemonitoring improves health status for older adults with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Madigan, Elizabeth; Schmotzer, Brian J; Struk, Cynthia J; DiCarlo, Christina M; Kikano, George; Piña, Ileana L; Boxer, Rebecca S

    2013-01-01

    Home telemonitoring can augment home health care services during a patient's transition from hospital to home. Home health care agencies commonly use telemonitors for patients with heart failure although studies have shown mixed results in the use of telemonitors to reduce rehospitalizations. This randomized trial investigated if older patients with heart failure admitted to home health care following a hospitalization would have a reduction in rehospitalizations and improved health status if they received telemonitoring. Patients were followed up to 180 days post-discharge from home health care services. Results showed no difference in the time to rehospitalization or emergency visit between those who received telemonitoring versus usual care. Older heart failure patients who received telemonitoring had better health status by home health care discharge than those who received usual care. Therefore, for older adults with heart failure, telemonitoring may be an important adjunct to home health care services to improve health status. PMID:23438509

  2. Home seismometer for earthquake early warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Shigeki; Horiuchi, Yuko; Yamamoto, Shunroku; Nakamura, Hiromitsu; Wu, Changjiang; Rydelek, Paul A.; Kachi, Masaaki

    2009-02-01

    The Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) has started the practical service of Earthquake Early Warning (EEW) and a very dense deployment of receiving units is expected in the near future. The receiving/alarm unit of an EEW system is equipped with a CPU and memory and is on-line via the internet. By adding an inexpensive seismometer and A/D converter, this unit is transformed into a real-time seismic observatory, which we are calling a home seismometer. If the home seismometer is incorporated in the standard receiving unit of EEW, then the number of seismic observatories will be drastically increased. Since the background noise inside a house caused by human activity may be very large, we have developed specialized software for on-site warning using the home seismometer. We tested our software and found that our algorithm can correctly distinguish between noise and earthquakes for nearly all the events.

  3. Effectiveness of Home Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diehl, Grover E.; And Others

    Home study has enjoyed a slow but steady growth in popularity and acceptance. The growth of independent home study may be attributed to both the realities of the present educational environment and the consistently positive results of the home study method. At least one researcher has suggested that the initially slow growth of home study may have…

  4. Right to Receive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oborn, Richard

    The concept of a United States citizen's right to receive information is acquiring increased judicial recognition. This report traces the evolution of that right from its philosophical basis in the United States Consitution, through its interpretation by the Supreme Court, up to the current concern that the public receive certain economic…

  5. The 24-h recall instrument for home nursing to measure the activity profile of home nurses: development and psychometric testing.

    PubMed

    De Vliegher, Kristel; Aertgeerts, Bert; Declercq, Anja; Gosset, Christiane; Heyden, Isabelle; Van Geert, Michel; Moons, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Home health care today is challenged by a shift from an acute to a chronic health-care model, moving the focus of care from the hospital to home-care setting. This increased focus on care at home emphasizes the need for an efficient, effective, and transparent management of home health care. However, it is not precisely known what home-care nurses do; what kind of care is received by patients; what the performance of home nurses is; and what the impact of the increasing need for home nursing is on the current and future role of home nurses. In this respect, it is necessary to gain a clear insight into the activity profile of home nurses, but there is no gold standard to measure their activities. This study reports on the development and psychometric testing of the '24-hour recall instrument for home nursing' to measure the activity profile of home nurses. Five home nurses in Belgium, simultaneously with the researcher, registered the performed activities in a total of 69 patients, using the 24-h recall instrument for home nursing. The validity and the interrater reliability of this instrument were high: the proportions that observed agreement were very high; the strength of kappa agreement was substantial to almost perfect; the prevalence index showed great variety; and the bias index was low. The findings in this study support the validity evidence based on test content and the interrater reliability of the 24-h recall instrument. This instrument can help to shape practice and policy by making the home nursing profession more transparent: a clear insight into the kind of care that is provided by home nurses and is received by the patients in primary care contributes to the development of a clear definition of the role of home nurses in health care. PMID:24479985

  6. CALUTRON RECEIVER STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Roush, J.L.

    1959-09-01

    A receiver is described for collecting isotopes in a calutron The receiver has several compartments, formed by a sertes of parallel metal plates and an open front. Each plate has flanges which space it from the other plates and a flexible extension pressing against a common supporting red to maintain the plate in assembled relation when all but the last rod is removed. The plates may be removed individualy from the front of the receiver, cleaned ard replaced without disturbing the alignment of the other plates.

  7. Ceramic Solar Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Solar receiver uses ceramic honeycomb matrix to absorb heat from Sun and transfer it to working fluid at temperatures of 1,095 degrees and 1,650 degrees C. Drives gas turbine engine or provides heat for industrial processes.

  8. Ultrasonic pulser-receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Steven C.

    2006-09-12

    Ultrasonic pulser-receiver circuitry, for use with an ultrasonic transducer, the circuitry comprising a circuit board; ultrasonic pulser circuitry supported by the circuit board and configured to be coupled to an ultrasonic transducer and to cause the ultrasonic transducer to emit an ultrasonic output pulse; receiver circuitry supported by the circuit board, coupled to the pulser circuitry, including protection circuitry configured to protect against the ultrasonic pulse and including amplifier circuitry configured to amplify an echo, received back by the transducer, of the output pulse; and a connector configured to couple the ultrasonic transducer directly to the circuit board, to the pulser circuitry and receiver circuitry, wherein impedance mismatches that would result if the transducer was coupled to the circuit board via a cable can be avoided.

  9. Solar energy receiver

    DOEpatents

    Schwartz, Jacob

    1978-01-01

    An improved long-life design for solar energy receivers provides for greatly reduced thermally induced stress and permits the utilization of less expensive heat exchanger materials while maintaining receiver efficiencies in excess of 85% without undue expenditure of energy to circulate the working fluid. In one embodiment, the flow index for the receiver is first set as close as practical to a value such that the Graetz number yields the optimal heat transfer coefficient per unit of pumping energy, in this case, 6. The convective index for the receiver is then set as closely as practical to two times the flow index so as to obtain optimal efficiency per unit mass of material.

  10. Receiver Gain Modulation Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Hollis; Racette, Paul; Walker, David; Gu, Dazhen

    2011-01-01

    A receiver gain modulation circuit (RGMC) was developed that modulates the power gain of the output of a radiometer receiver with a test signal. As the radiometer receiver switches between calibration noise references, the test signal is mixed with the calibrated noise and thus produces an ensemble set of measurements from which ensemble statistical analysis can be used to extract statistical information about the test signal. The RGMC is an enabling technology of the ensemble detector. As a key component for achieving ensemble detection and analysis, the RGMC has broad aeronautical and space applications. The RGMC can be used to test and develop new calibration algorithms, for example, to detect gain anomalies, and/or correct for slow drifts that affect climate-quality measurements over an accelerated time scale. A generalized approach to analyzing radiometer system designs yields a mathematical treatment of noise reference measurements in calibration algorithms. By treating the measurements from the different noise references as ensemble samples of the receiver state, i.e. receiver gain, a quantitative description of the non-stationary properties of the underlying receiver fluctuations can be derived. Excellent agreement has been obtained between model calculations and radiometric measurements. The mathematical formulation is equivalent to modulating the gain of a stable receiver with an externally generated signal and is the basis for ensemble detection and analysis (EDA). The concept of generating ensemble data sets using an ensemble detector is similar to the ensemble data sets generated as part of ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) with exception of a key distinguishing factor. EEMD adds noise to the signal under study whereas EDA mixes the signal with calibrated noise. It is mixing with calibrated noise that permits the measurement of temporal-functional variability of uncertainty in the underlying process. The RGMC permits the evaluation of EDA by

  11. Home Energy Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Dispenza, Jason

    2010-01-01

    A home energy assessment, also known as a home energy audit, is the first step to assess how much energy your home consumes and to evaluate what measures you can take to make your home more energy efficient. An assessment will show you problems that may, when corrected, save you significant amounts of money over time. This video shows some of the ways that a contractor may test your home during an assessment, and helps you understand how an assessment can help you move toward energy savings. Find out more at: http://www.energysavers.gov/your_home/energy_audits/index.cfm/mytopic=11160

  12. Home Energy Assessments

    ScienceCinema

    Dispenza, Jason

    2013-05-29

    A home energy assessment, also known as a home energy audit, is the first step to assess how much energy your home consumes and to evaluate what measures you can take to make your home more energy efficient. An assessment will show you problems that may, when corrected, save you significant amounts of money over time. This video shows some of the ways that a contractor may test your home during an assessment, and helps you understand how an assessment can help you move toward energy savings. Find out more at: http://www.energysavers.gov/your_home/energy_audits/index.cfm/mytopic=11160

  13. Case-Mix, Care Processes, and Outcomes in Medically-Ill Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilation in a Low-Resource Setting from Southern India: A Prospective Clinical Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, Balasubramanian; Kadhiravan, Tamilarasu; Deepanjali, Surendran; Swaminathan, Rathinam Palamalai

    2015-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation is a resource intensive organ support treatment, and historical studies from low-resource settings had reported a high mortality. We aimed to study the outcomes in patients receiving mechanical ventilation in a contemporary low-resource setting. Methods We prospectively studied the characteristics and outcomes (disease-related, mechanical ventilation-related, and process of care-related) in 237 adults mechanically ventilated for a medical illness at a teaching hospital in southern India during February 2011 to August 2012. Vital status of patients discharged from hospital was ascertained on Day 90 or later. Results Mean age of the patients was 40 ± 17 years; 140 (51%) were men. Poisoning and envenomation accounted for 98 (41%) of 237 admissions. In total, 87 (37%) patients died in-hospital; 16 (7%) died after discharge; 115 (49%) were alive at 90-day assessment; and 19 (8%) were lost to follow-up. Weaning was attempted in 171 (72%) patients; most patients (78 of 99 [79%]) failing the first attempt could be weaned off. Prolonged mechanical ventilation was required in 20 (8%) patients. Adherence to head-end elevation and deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis were 164 (69%) and 147 (62%) respectively. Risk of nosocomial infections particularly ventilator-associated pneumonia was high (57.2 per 1,000 ventilator-days). Higher APACHE II score quartiles (adjusted HR [95% CI] quartile 2, 2.65 [1.19–5.89]; quartile 3, 2.98 [1.24–7.15]; quartile 4, 5.78 [2.45–13.60]), and new-onset organ failure (2.98 [1.94–4.56]) were independently associated with the risk of death. Patients with poisoning had higher risk of reintubation (43% vs. 20%; P = 0.001) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (75% vs. 53%; P = 0.001). But, their mortality was significantly lower compared to the rest (24% vs. 44%; P = 0.002). Conclusions The case-mix considerably differs from other settings. Mortality in this low-resource setting is similar to high-resource settings

  14. Effect of early mobilization on discharge disposition of mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Hideki; Kawai, Hideki; Sato, Makoto; Ito, Kazuaki; Fujishima, Satoshi; Suzuki, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the benefits of early mobilization for mechanically ventilated patients for their survival to discharge to home from the hospital. [Subjects and Methods] Medical records were retrospectively analyzed of patients who satisfied the following criteria: age ≥ 18 years; performance status 0–2 and independent living at their home before admission; mechanical ventilation for more than 48 h; and survival after mechanical ventilation. Mechanically ventilated patients in the early mobilization (EM) group (n = 48) received mobilization therapy, limb exercise and chest physiotherapy, whereas those in the control group (n = 60) received bed rest alone. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify clinical variables associated with discharge disposition. [Results] Early mobilization was a positive independent factor and the presence of neurological deficits was a negative factor contributing to discharge to home. Among patients surviving mechanical ventilation without neurological deficits, the rate of discharge to home was significantly higher among patients in the EM group that in the control group (76% vs. 40%). [Conclusion] Early mobilization can improve the rate of discharge to home of patients requiring mechanical ventilation because of non-neurological deficits. PMID:25931747

  15. Indicators of Home Care Use in Urban and Rural Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Lori A.; Strain, Laurel A.; Blandford, Audrey A.

    2007-01-01

    This study employs a longitudinal design to examine rural-urban differences in home care service use over time, drawing on data from the Manitoba Study of Health and Aging (MSHA). Characteristics of community-dwelling, cognitively intact adults aged 65 years or older not receiving home care services in the province of Manitoba (n = 855) were…

  16. 77 FR 26183 - Technical Revisions To Update Reference to the Required Assessment Tool for State Nursing Homes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

    ... (VA) regulations. On November 10, 2011, VA published in the Federal Register (76 FR 70076) a proposal... Tool for State Nursing Homes Receiving Per Diem Payments From VA AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs... State homes that receive per diem from VA for providing nursing home care to veterans. It requires...

  17. Alternatives to Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this website may not be available. Alternatives to nursing homes Before you make any decisions about long ... live and what help you may need. A nursing home may not be your only choice. Discharge ...

  18. Home health care

    MedlinePlus

    ... and exercises, wound care, and daily living. Home health care nurses can help manage problems with your wound, ... Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Home health care: what it is and what to expect. ... ...

  19. Home Care Services

    MedlinePlus

    ... are chronically ill, recovering from surgery, or disabled. Home care services include Personal care, such as help with bathing, ... insurance will help cover the cost of certain home care services.

  20. National Nursing Home Survey

    Cancer.gov

    The National Nursing Home Survey provides includes characteristics such as size of nursing home facilities, ownership, Medicare/Medicaid certification, occupancy rate, number of days of care provided, and expenses.

  1. Using oxygen at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... DO NOT use oil-based products, such as petroleum jelly (Vaseline). Ask your oxygen equipment provider about ... oxygen; Hypoxia - home oxygen; Hospice - home oxygen References American Thoracic Society. Why do I need oxygen therapy? ...

  2. Home Improvements Prevent Falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Falls and Older Adults Home Improvements Prevent Falls Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents ... or home modification programs to help older people prevent falls. Check with your local health department, senior ...

  3. Falls in Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... for health care providers. Learn More Falls in Nursing Homes Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... 5 Why do falls occur more often in nursing homes? Falling can be a sign of other ...

  4. Home assessment and care.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrier, C.; Lysy, P.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the scope of home care and to give practical advice for incorporating home visits into family practice. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Most of the literature is based on expert opinion, but there are some randomized trials and well done surveys. MAIN MESSAGE: Although physicians make fewer housecalls than they used to, home visiting is essential to providing good care to certain patients. An approach to evaluating patients and their home environments is presented. Management plans should be formulated in collaboration with home care teams. We offer practical advice for incorporating home visits into practice. CONCLUSION: Home visits can be a valuable and rewarding complement to family practice and are essential for the development of home care. PMID:11072585

  5. Highly directional acoustic receivers.

    PubMed

    Cray, Benjamin A; Evora, Victor M; Nuttall, Albert H

    2003-03-01

    The theoretical directivity of a single combined acoustic receiver, a device that can measure many quantities of an acoustic field at a collocated point, is presented here. The formulation is developed using a Taylor series expansion of acoustic pressure about the origin of a Cartesian coordinate system. For example, the quantities measured by a second-order combined receiver, denoted a dyadic sensor, are acoustic pressure, the three orthogonal components of acoustic particle velocity, and the nine spatial gradients of the velocity vector. The power series expansion, which can be of any order, is cast into an expression that defines the directivity of a single receiving element. It is shown that a single highly directional dyadic sensor can have a directivity index of up to 9.5 dB. However, there is a price to pay with highly directive sensors; these sensors can be significantly more sensitive to nonacoustic noise sources. PMID:12656387

  6. Central solar energy receiver

    DOEpatents

    Drost, M. Kevin

    1983-01-01

    An improved tower-mounted central solar energy receiver for heating air drawn through the receiver by an induced draft fan. A number of vertically oriented, energy absorbing, fin-shaped slats are radially arranged in a number of concentric cylindrical arrays on top of the tower coaxially surrounding a pipe having air holes through which the fan draws air which is heated by the slats which receive the solar radiation from a heliostat field. A number of vertically oriented and wedge-shaped columns are radially arranged in a number of concentric cylindrical clusters surrounding the slat arrays. The columns have two mirror-reflecting sides to reflect radiation into the slat arrays and one energy absorbing side to reduce reradiation and reflection from the slat arrays.

  7. Last 3 months of life in home-ventilated patients: the family perception.

    PubMed

    Vitacca, M; Grassi, M; Barbano, L; Galavotti, G; Sturani, C; Vianello, A; Zanotti, E; Ballerin, L; Potena, A; Scala, R; Peratoner, A; Ceriana, P; Di Buono, L; Clini, E; Ambrosino, N; Hill, N; Nava, S

    2010-05-01

    We studied the family's perception of care in patients under home mechanical ventilation during the last 3 months of life. In 11 respiratory units, we submitted a 35-item questionnaire to relatives of 168 deceased patients exploring six domains: symptoms, awareness of disease, family burden, dying, medical and technical problems. Response rate was 98.8%. The majority of patients complained respiratory symptoms and were aware of the severity and prognosis of the disease. Family burden was high especially in relation to money need. During hospitalisation, 74.4% of patients were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). 78 patients died at home, 70 patients in a medical ward and 20 in ICU. 27% of patients received resuscitation manoeuvres. Hospitalisations and family economical burden were unrelated to diagnosis and mechanical ventilation. Families of the patients did not report major technical problems on the use of ventilators. In comparison with mechanical invasively ventilated patients, noninvasively ventilated patients were more aware of prognosis, used more respiratory drugs, changed ventilation time more frequently and died less frequently when under mechanical ventilation. We have presented good points and bad points regarding end-of-life care in home mechanically ventilated patients. Noninvasive ventilation use and diagnosis have impact on this burden. PMID:19717483

  8. Impact of a Home Leisure Educational Program for Older Adults Who Have Had a Stroke (Home Leisure Educational Program).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nour, Kareen; Desrosiers, Johanne; Gauthier, Pierre; Carbonneau, Helene

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effectiveness of leisure education for older adults having difficulty adjusting psychologically after a stroke. Participants received either an experimental home leisure education program (intervention group) or a friendly home visit (control group) after discharge from rehabilitation. The intervention group performed significantly…

  9. Home Schooling Goes Mainstream

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaither, Milton

    2009-01-01

    This article reports that while home schooling may have particular appeal to celebrities, over the last decade families of all kinds have embraced the practice for widely varying reasons: no longer is home schooling exclusive to Christian fundamentalism and the countercultural Left. Along with growing acceptance of home schooling nationally has…

  10. Healthy Homes Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peek, Gina; Lyon, Melinda; Russ, Randall

    2012-01-01

    Extension is focusing on healthy homes programming. Extension educators are not qualified to diagnose consumers' medical problems as they relate to housing. We cannot give medical advice. Instead, we can help educate consumers about home conditions that may affect their well-being. Extension educators need appropriate healthy homes tools to…

  11. Home Energy Savers' Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Energy Administration, Washington, DC.

    This workbook is intended as a guide for the homeowner in taking steps to reduce home energy costs. It allows the homeowner to identify procedures applicable to his/her home and then implement those procedures most cost-effective for the particular situation. It provides methods for estimating savings in home heating and cooling costs by taking…

  12. Home Schooling, What's That?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preiss, Jane S.

    Home schooling, the educational alternative in which parents (or guardians) assume the primary responsibility for the education of their children, when responsibly done, is legally protected by the United States Constitution; however, home educators face a conglomeration of regulations, statutes, and laws. Home schools are regulated by individual…

  13. School@Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammons, Christopher W.

    2001-01-01

    Describes home schooling movement and argues home schooling is viable alternative to public education system. Discusses increase in home-schooled students applying to college, taking and performing well on college entrance exams (ACT and SAT), engaging in extracurricular activities, and succeeding in college. Addresses and refutes criticisms of…

  14. Schooling at Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Joyce Fleck

    2001-01-01

    Presents one family's experience with home schooling, explaining that no two home schools are alike, which is both a strength and a weakness of the movement. The paper discusses the parent's educational philosophy and the family's personal curriculum and pedagogical choices. It concludes by examining the growing trend in home schooling. (SM)

  15. Single Parent Adoptive Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shireman, Joan F.

    1996-01-01

    Reviews research and reports on a longitudinal study of 15 single-parent adoptive homes over a 14-year period that demonstrated that these homes have the capacity to be successful adoptive placements. Identifies unique characteristics of single-parent adoptive homes, and notes the need for additional research to identify children for whom these…

  16. Chicano Children's Literacy Learning at Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duran, Richard P.; Guerra, Elsa

    Drawing on Roger Schank's and Robert Abelson's theory of scripts as a way of viewing learning as behavior at four hierarchical levels, the study examined the literacy learning behavior of two Chicano sisters (one in the second grade and the other in kindergarten) reading orally from storybooks in a home setting. The English story books received in…

  17. The Technological Revolution in the Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Philip A.

    This exploration of possible information and communications developments in the future focuses on the picture of the family or individual depending on access to information as a key to their status in society. The scenario involves the home as the center for conducting business, banking, shopping, and receiving lifelong education, and this paper…

  18. Guidelines for Home Study in Vermont, 2002

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermont Department of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    During the 2001-2002 school year, over 2,100 Vermont children received their education in a homestudy program. Parents or guardians who decide to educate their children at home assume a great responsibility. In effect they are responsible for writing a curriculum, finding learning materials, providing resources, presenting instruction, adapting…

  19. Simplified OMEGA receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burhans, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    The details are presented of methods for providing OMEGA navigational information including the receiver problem at the antenna and informational display and housekeeping systems based on some 4 bit data processing concepts. Topics discussed include the problem of limiters, zero crossing detectors, signal envelopes, internal timing circuits, phase counters, lane position displays, signal integrators, and software mapping problems.

  20. Submillimeter wave heterodyne receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Siegel, Peter H. (Inventor); Ward, John (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    In an embodiment, a submillimeter wave heterodyne receiver includes a finline ortho-mode transducer comprising thin tapered metallic fins deposited on a thin dielectric substrate to separate a vertically polarized electromagnetic mode from a horizontally polarized electromagnetic mode. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  1. Olympus beacon receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostergaard, Jens

    1988-01-01

    A medium-size Beacon Receiving System for reception and processing of the B1 (20 GHz) and B2 (30 GHz) beacons from Olympus has been developed. Integration of B1 and B2 receiving equipment into one system using one antenna and a common computer for control and data processing provides the advantages of a compact configuration and synchronization of the two receiver chains. Range for co-polar signal attenuation meaurement is about 30 dB for both beacons, increasing to 40 dB for B2 if the receivers are synchronized to B1. The accuracy is better than 0.5 dB. Cross-polarization discriminations of the order of 10 to 30 dB may be determined with an accuracy of 1 to 2 dB. A number of radiometers for complementary measurements of atmospheric attenuation of 13 to 30 GHz has also been constructed. A small multi-frequency system for operation around 22 GHz and 31 GHz is presently under development.

  2. Are nursing homes adequately staffed? The silent epidemic of malnutrition and dehydration in nursing home residents. Until mandatory staffing standards are created and enforced, residents are at risk.

    PubMed

    Shipman, Debra; Hooten, Jack

    2007-07-01

    Providing care to produce positive resident outcomes is an ethical duty of nursing home staff. Research has shown that inadequate staffing levels present an increased health risk to nursing home residents. Nursing home residents may experience dehydration and malnutrition caused by inadequate staffing. Continued research in the area of nutrition and dehydration in nursing home residents may positively influence changes in staffing levels at nursing homes. Currently, residents living in understaffed nursing homes and not receiving proper care are the victims. It is time for nurses to forcefully lobby for national mandatory nurse staffing standards. PMID:17672164

  3. Visual homing: an insect perspective.

    PubMed

    Zeil, Jochen

    2012-04-01

    The ability to learn the location of places in the world and to revisit them repeatedly is crucial for all aspects of animal life on earth. It underpins animal foraging, predator avoidance, territoriality, mating, nest construction and parental care. Much theoretical and experimental progress has recently been made in identifying the sensory cues and the computational mechanisms that allow insects (and robots) to find their way back to places, while the neurobiological mechanisms underlying navigational abilities are beginning to be unravelled in vertebrate and invertebrate models. Studying visual homing in insects is interesting, because they allow experimentation and view-reconstruction under natural conditions, because they are likely to have evolved parsimonious, yet robust solutions to the homing problem and because they force us to consider the viewpoint of navigating animals, including their sensory and computational capacities. PMID:22221863

  4. Strategy Guideline: Demonstration Home

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, C.; Hunt, A.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  5. Strategy Guideline. Demonstration Home

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, A.; Savage, C.

    2012-12-01

    This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

  6. The Homing Frog: High Homing Performance in a Territorial Dendrobatid Frog Allobates femoralis (Dendrobatidae)

    PubMed Central

    Pašukonis, Andrius; Ringler, Max; Brandl, Hanja B; Mangione, Rosanna; Ringler, Eva; Hödl, Walter; Tregenza, T

    2013-01-01

    Dendrobatidae (dart-poison frogs) exhibit some of the most complex spatial behaviors among amphibians, such as territoriality and tadpole transport from terrestrial clutches to widely distributed deposition sites. In species that exhibit long-term territoriality, high homing performance after tadpole transport can be assumed, but experimental evidence is lacking, and the underlying orientation mechanisms are unknown. We conducted a field translocation experiment to test whether male Allobates femoralis, a dendrobatid frog with paternal extra-territorial tadpole transport, are capable of homing after experimental removal, as well as to quantify homing success and speed. Translocated individuals showed a very high homing success for distances up to 200 m and successfully returned from up to 400 m. We discuss the potential orientation mechanisms involved and selective forces that could have shaped this strong homing ability. PMID:25104869

  7. A digital beacon receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransome, Peter D.

    1988-01-01

    A digital satellite beacon receiver is described which provides measurement information down to a carrier/noise density ratio approximately 15 dB below that required by a conventional (phase locked loop) design. When the beacon signal fades, accuracy degrades gracefully, and is restored immediately (without hysteresis) on signal recovery, even if the signal has faded into the noise. Benefits of the digital processing approach used include the minimization of operator adjustments, stability of the phase measuring circuits with time, repeatability between units, and compatibility with equipment not specifically designed for propagation measuring. The receiver has been developed for the European Olympus satellite which has continuous wave (CW) beacons at 12.5 and 29.7 GHz, and a switched polarization beacon at 19.8 GHz approximately, but the system can be reconfigured for CW and polarization-switched beacons at other frequencies.

  8. Eldercare at Home: Choosing a Nursing Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... at home. Problems such as frequent incontinence, dangerous wandering, inability to sleep at night (a disrupted sleep - ... a security system to prevent confused residents from wandering out of the building? Are there accessible outdoor ...

  9. Multichannel homodyne receiver

    DOEpatents

    Landt, Jeremy A.

    1982-01-01

    A homodyne radar transmitter/receiver device which produces a single combined output which contains modulated backscatter information for all phase conditions of both modulated and unmodulated backscatter signals. The device utilizes taps along coaxial transmission lines, strip transmission line, and waveguides which are spaced by 1/8 wavelength or 1/6 wavelength, etc. This greatly reduces costs by eliminating separate transmission and reception antennas and an expensive arrangement of power splitters and mixers utilized in the prior art.

  10. Multichannel homodyne receiver

    DOEpatents

    Landt, J.A.

    1981-01-19

    A homodyne radar transmitter/receiver device which produces a single combined output which contains modulated backscatter information for all phase conditions of both modulated and unmodulated backscatter signals is described. The device utilizes taps along coaxial transmission lines, strip transmission line, and waveguides which are spaced by 1/8 wavelength or 1/6 wavelength, etc. This greatly reduces costs by eliminating separate transmission and reception antennas and an expensive arrangement of power splitters and mixers utilized in the prior art.

  11. Galileo probe relay receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prouty, D. A.; Von Der Embse, U. A.

    1982-01-01

    For the Jovian mission, the data link from the Galileo probe to the orbiter uses suppressed-carrier Manchester encoded BPSK modulation and is protected with R = 1/2, K = 7 convolutional coding. The receiver closes the link by acquiring, tracking, and demodulating the data. It has to operate in a highly stressed environment with severe frequency offset, frequency rate, wind gust, and antenna spin conditions. Salient features are described and breadboard test data presented.

  12. 75 FR 17644 - Update to NFPA 101, Life Safety Code, for State Home Facilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 51 RIN 2900-AN59 Update to NFPA 101, Life Safety Code, for State Home Facilities... Affairs (VA) proposes to update one of its regulations so that State home facilities that receive a per diem for providing nursing home care to eligible Veterans will be required to meet certain...

  13. 78 FR 21262 - Grants to States for Construction or Acquisition of State Homes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 59 RIN 2900-AO60 Grants to States for Construction or Acquisition of State Homes... VA grants for the construction or acquisition of State home facilities that furnish domiciliary... Construction or Acquisition of State Homes.'' Copies of comments received will be available for...

  14. Implementation Differences of Two Staffing Models in the German Home Visiting Program "Pro Kind"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Tilman; Jungmann, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    As different competencies or professional backgrounds may affect the quality of program implementation, staffing is a critical issue in home visiting. In this study, N = 430 women received home visits delivered either by a tandem of a midwife and a social worker or by only one home visitor (primarily midwives, continuous model). The groups were…

  15. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: New Town Builders, Denver, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-09-01

    All homes in the Stapleton community must be ENERGY STAR certified; New Town Builders has announced that it will build 250–300 new homes over the next 7–10 years, all of which will be Challenge Homes. New Town received a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the production builder category.

  16. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  17. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  18. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  19. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  20. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  1. 12 CFR 360.2 - Federal Home Loan banks as secured creditors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Federal Home Loan banks as secured creditors... OF GENERAL POLICY RESOLUTION AND RECEIVERSHIP RULES § 360.2 Federal Home Loan banks as secured... regulations, the receiver of a borrower from a Federal Home Loan Bank shall recognize the priority of...

  2. Parents' Perspectives: An Evaluation of Case Management Interventions in Home Visiting Programs for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Susan F.

    2007-01-01

    In home visiting programs for children younger than age three, home visitors work with parents to enhance the child's environment. This study examined how the home visitor-parent relationship, amount of contact, and level of need affected the intensity of case management interventions received. Researchers interviewed 90 mothers to measure the…

  3. Contingent Take-Home Incentive: Effects on Drug Use of Methadone Maintenance Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stitzer, Maxine L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined contingent methadone take-home privileges for effectiveness in reducing supplemental drug use of methadone maintenance patients. Assigned 53 new intakes to begin receiving take-home privileges after 2 consecutive weeks of drug-free urines or to noncontingent procedure in which take-homes were delivered independently of urine results.…

  4. 38 CFR 1.515 - To commanding officers of State soldiers' homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... State soldiers' homes. 1.515 Section 1.515 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... Records § 1.515 To commanding officers of State soldiers' homes. When a request is received in a... State soldiers' home for information other than information relative to the character of the...

  5. 12 CFR 360.2 - Federal Home Loan banks as secured creditors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Federal Home Loan banks as secured creditors... OF GENERAL POLICY RESOLUTION AND RECEIVERSHIP RULES § 360.2 Federal Home Loan banks as secured... regulations, the receiver of a borrower from a Federal Home Loan Bank shall recognize the priority of...

  6. 38 CFR 1.523 - To commanding officers of State soldiers' homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... State soldiers' homes. 1.523 Section 1.523 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... Records § 1.523 To commanding officers of State soldiers' homes. When a request is received in a... State soldiers' home for information other than information relative to the character of the...

  7. 12 CFR 360.2 - Federal Home Loan banks as secured creditors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Federal Home Loan banks as secured creditors... OF GENERAL POLICY RESOLUTION AND RECEIVERSHIP RULES § 360.2 Federal Home Loan banks as secured... regulations, the receiver of a borrower from a Federal Home Loan Bank shall recognize the priority of...

  8. 12 CFR 360.2 - Federal Home Loan banks as secured creditors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Federal Home Loan banks as secured creditors... OF GENERAL POLICY RESOLUTION AND RECEIVERSHIP RULES § 360.2 Federal Home Loan banks as secured... regulations, the receiver of a borrower from a Federal Home Loan Bank shall recognize the priority of...

  9. Program allows Ill. providers to cash in Medicaid receivables.

    PubMed

    Nemes, J

    1991-12-01

    The Illinois Health Facilities Authority soon will start a $100 million commercial paper program that will use a pool of Medicaid receivables from hospitals and nursing homes to back the issue. The plan is designed to provide money to improve cash flow at facilities facing long delays in reimbursement for Medicaid patients. PMID:10115262

  10. Participation Patterns among Families Receiving Part C Early Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khetani, Mary Alunkal

    2010-01-01

    Participation in the natural settings of home and community is one of four major goals for families receiving Part C early intervention services. While participation has been formally recognized as an important service-related outcome, there is a need to build knowledge about its key features to adequately apply the concept in practice. The need…

  11. Home Inotropes and Other Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Ginwalla, Mahazarin

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure is a leading case of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and patients with advanced heart failure have limited options without any available cure. These options mainly include cardiac transplantation or mechanical circulatory support device implantation. Chronic home inotropes are an option in these patients for a variety of indications. This report discusses the use of chronic home inotropes in palliated heart failure patients and reviews the role of palliative care management in end-stage heart failure. PMID:27371519

  12. Home range and travels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, L.F.

    1968-01-01

    The concept of home range was expressed by Seton (1909) in the term 'home region,' which Burr (1940, 1943) clarified with a definition of home range and exemplified in a definitive study of Peromyscus in the field. Burt pointed out the ever-changing characteristics of home-range area and the consequent absence of boundaries in the usual sense--a finding verified by investigators thereafter. In the studies summarized in this paper, sizes of home ranges of Peromyscus varied within two magnitudes, approximately from 0.1 acre to ten acres, in 34 studies conducted in a variety of habitats from the seaside dunes of Florida to the Alaskan forests. Variation in sizes of home ranges was correlated with both environmental and physiological factors; with habitat it was conspicuous, both in the same and different regions. Food supply also was related to size of home range, both seasonally and in relation to habitat. Home ranges generally were smallest in winter and largest in spring, at the onset of the breeding season. Activity and size also were affected by changes in weather. Activity was least when temperatures were low and nights were bright. Effects of rainfall were variable. Sizes varied according to sex and age; young mice remained in the parents' range until they approached maturity, when they began to travel more widely. Adult males commonly had larger home ranges than females, although there were a number of exceptions. An inverse relationship between population density and size of home range was shown in several studies and probably is the usual relationship. A basic need for activity and exploration also appeared to influence size of home range. Behavior within the home range was discussed in terms of travel patterns, travels in relation to home sites and refuges, territory, and stability of size of home range. Travels within the home range consisted of repeated use of well-worn trails to sites of food, shelter, and refuge, plus more random exploratory travels

  13. Receiver System: Lessons Learned From Solar Two

    SciTech Connect

    LITWIN, ROBERT Z.; PACHECO, JAMES E.

    2002-03-01

    The Boeing Company fabricated the Solar Two receiver as a subcontractor for the Solar Two project. The receiver absorbed sunlight reflected from the heliostat field. A molten-nitrate-salt heat transfer fluid was pumped from a storage tank at grade level, heated from 290 to 565 C by the receiver mounted on top of a tower, then flowed back down into another storage tank. To make electricity, the hot salt was pumped through a steam generator to produce steam that powered a conventional Rankine steam turbine/generator. This evaluation identifies the most significant Solar Two receiver system lessons learned from the Mechanical Design, Instrumentation and Control, Panel Fabrication, Site Construction, Receiver System Operation, and Management from the perspective of the receiver designer/manufacturer. The lessons learned on the receiver system described here consist of two parts: the Problem and one or more identified Solutions. The appendix summarizes an inspection of the advanced receiver panel developed by Boeing that was installed and operated in the Solar Two receiver.

  14. LANL receiver system development

    SciTech Connect

    Laubscher, B.; Cooke, B.; Cafferty, M.; Olivas, N.

    1997-08-01

    The CALIOPE receiver system development at LANL is the story of two technologies. The first of these technologies consists of off-the-shelf mercury-cadmium-telluride (MCT) detectors and amplifiers. The vendor for this system is Kolmar Technologies. This system was fielded in the Tan Trailer I (TTI) in 1995 and will be referred to in this paper as GEN I. The second system consists of a MCT detector procured from Santa Barbara Research Center (SBRC) and an amplifier designed and built by LANL. This system was fielded in the Tan Trailer II (TTII) system at the NTS tests in 1996 and will be referred to as GEN II. The LANL CALIOPE experimental plan for 1996 was to improve the lidar system by progressing to a higher rep rate laser to perform many shots in a much shorter period of time. In keeping with this plan, the receiver team set a goal of developing a detector system that was background limited for the projected 100 nanosecond (ns) laser pulse. A set of detailed simulations of the DIAL lidar experiment was performed. From these runs, parameters such as optimal detector size, field of view of the receiver system, nominal laser return power, etc. were extracted. With this information, detector physics and amplifier electronic models were developed to obtain the required specifications for each of these components. These derived specs indicated that a substantial improvement over commercially available, off-the-shelf, amplifier and detector technologies would be needed to obtain the goals. To determine if the original GEN I detector was usable, the authors performed tests on a 100 micron square detector at cryogenic temperatures. The results of this test and others convinced them that an advanced detector was required. Eventually, a suitable detector was identified and a number of these single element detectors were procured from SBRC. These single element detectors were witness for the detector arrays built for another DOE project.

  15. Ultra-wideband receiver

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) receiver utilizes a strobed input line with a sampler connected to an amplifier. In a differential configuration, .+-.UWB inputs are connected to separate antennas or to two halves of a dipole antenna. The two input lines include samplers which are commonly strobed by a gating pulse with a very low duty cycle. In a single ended configuration, only a single strobed input line and sampler is utilized. The samplers integrate, or average, up to 10,000 pulses to achieve high sensitivity and good rejection of uncorrelated signals.

  16. Ultra-wideband receiver

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) receiver utilizes a strobed input line with a sampler connected to an amplifier. In a differential configuration, .+-.UWB inputs are connected to separate antennas or to two halves of a dipole antenna. The two input lines include samplers which are commonly strobed by a gating pulse with a very low duty cycle. In a single ended configuration, only a single strobed input line and sampler is utilized. The samplers integrate, or average, up to 10,000 pulses to achieve high sensitivity and good rejection of uncorrelated signals.

  17. Ultra-wideband receiver

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-06-04

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) receiver utilizes a strobed input line with a sampler connected to an amplifier. In a differential configuration, {+-}UWB inputs are connected to separate antennas or to two halves of a dipole antenna. The two input lines include samplers which are commonly strobed by a gating pulse with a very low duty cycle. In a single ended configuration, only a single strobed input line and sampler is utilized. The samplers integrate, or average, up to 10,000 pulses to achieve high sensitivity and good rejection of uncorrelated signals. 21 figs.

  18. Ultra-wideband receiver

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1994-09-06

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) receiver utilizes a strobed input line with a sampler connected to an amplifier. In a differential configuration, [+-] UWB inputs are connected to separate antennas or to two halves of a dipole antenna. The two input lines include samplers which are commonly strobed by a gating pulse with a very low duty cycle. In a single ended configuration, only a single strobed input line and sampler is utilized. The samplers integrate, or average, up to 10,000 pulses to achieve high sensitivity and good rejection of uncorrelated signals. 16 figs.

  19. Facilitating home birth.

    PubMed

    Finigan, Valerie; Chadderton, Diane

    2015-06-01

    The birth of a baby is a family experience. However, in the United Kingdom birth often occurs outside the family environment, in hospital. Both home and hospital births have risks and benefits, but research shows that, for most women, it is as safe to give birth at home as it is in hospital. Women report home-birth to be satisfying with lowered risks of intervention and less likelihood of being separated from their family. It is also more cost effective for the National Health Service. Yet, whilst midwives are working hard to promote home birth as an option, it remains controversial. The aim of this paper is to raise awareness of the safety of home birth and the needs of women and midwives when a home birth is chosen. It provides an overview of care required and the role of the midwife in the ensuring care is woman-centred and personalised. PMID:26320334

  20. Weather Data Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Northern Video Graphics, Inc. developed a low-cost satellite receiving system for users such as independent meteorologists, agribusiness firms, small airports or flying clubs, marine vessels and small TV stations. Called Video Fax, it is designed for use with certain satellites; the GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) spacecraft operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the European Space Agency's Meteosat and Japan's Geostationary Meteorological Satellite. By dictum of the World Meteorological Organization, signals from satellites are available to anyone without cost so the Video Fax user can acquire signals directly from the satellite and cut out the middle man, enabling savings. Unit sells for about one-fifth the cost of the equipment used by TV stations. It consists of a two-meter antenna; a receiver; a microprocessor-controlled display computer; and a video monitor. Computer stores data from the satellites and converts it to an image which is displayed on the monitor. Weather map can be preserved as signal data on tape, or it can be stored in a video cassette as a permanent image.

  1. Volunteer Support for Mothers with New Babies: Perceptions of Need and Support Received

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacPherson, Kristen; Barnes, Jacqueline; Nichols, Michelle; Dixon, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 55 mothers of infants. Some had received Home-Start during their infant's first year, others were offered the support but declined and the remainder were not offered Home-Start. Most of their support had come from informal sources, such as family and friends with less from professionals. Mothers who…

  2. Ozark Mountain solar home

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.

    1998-03-01

    If seeing is believing, Kyle and Christine Sarratt are believers. The couple has been living in their passive solar custom home for almost two years, long enough to see a steady stream of eye-opening utility bills and to experience the quality and comfort of energy-efficient design. Skeptical of solar homes at first, the Sarratts found an energy-conscious designer that showed them how they could realize their home-building dreams and live in greater comfort while spending less money. As Kyle says, {open_quotes}We knew almost nothing about solar design and weren`t looking for it, but when we realized we could get everything we wanted in a home and more, we were sold.{close_quotes} Now the couple is enjoying the great feeling of solar and wood heat in the winter, natural cooling in the summer and heating/cooling bills that average less than $20/month. The Sarratts` home overlooks a large lake near the town of Rogers, tucked up in the northwest corner of Arkansas. It is one of three completed homes out of 29 planned for the South Sun Estates subdivision, where homes are required by covenant to incorporate passive solar design principles. Orlo Stitt, owner of Stitt Energy Systems and developer of the subdivision, has been designing passive solar, energy-efficient homes for twenty years. His passive solar custom home development is the first in Arkansas.

  3. Digital Receiver Phase Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcin, Martin; Abramovici, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The software of a commercially available digital radio receiver has been modified to make the receiver function as a two-channel low-noise phase meter. This phase meter is a prototype in the continuing development of a phase meter for a system in which radiofrequency (RF) signals in the two channels would be outputs of a spaceborne heterodyne laser interferometer for detecting gravitational waves. The frequencies of the signals could include a common Doppler-shift component of as much as 15 MHz. The phase meter is required to measure the relative phases of the signals in the two channels at a sampling rate of 10 Hz at a root power spectral density <5 microcycle/(Hz)1/2 and to be capable of determining the power spectral density of the phase difference over the frequency range from 1 mHz to 1 Hz. Such a phase meter could also be used on Earth to perform similar measurements in laser metrology of moving bodies. To illustrate part of the principle of operation of the phase meter, the figure includes a simplified block diagram of a basic singlechannel digital receiver. The input RF signal is first fed to the input terminal of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC). To prevent aliasing errors in the ADC, the sampling rate must be at least twice the input signal frequency. The sampling rate of the ADC is governed by a sampling clock, which also drives a digital local oscillator (DLO), which is a direct digital frequency synthesizer. The DLO produces samples of sine and cosine signals at a programmed tuning frequency. The sine and cosine samples are mixed with (that is, multiplied by) the samples from the ADC, then low-pass filtered to obtain in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) signal components. A digital signal processor (DSP) computes the ratio between the Q and I components, computes the phase of the RF signal (relative to that of the DLO signal) as the arctangent of this ratio, and then averages successive such phase values over a time interval specified by the user.

  4. Autism-Specific Primary Care Medical Home Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golnik, Allison; Scal, Peter; Wey, Andrew; Gaillard, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Forty-six subjects received primary medical care within an autism-specific medical home intervention (www.autismmedicalhome.com) and 157 controls received standard primary medical care. Subjects and controls had autism spectrum disorder diagnoses. Thirty-four subjects (74%) and 62 controls (40%) completed pre and post surveys. Controlling for…

  5. Solar thermal energy receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Karl W. (Inventor); Dustin, Miles O. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A plurality of heat pipes in a shell receive concentrated solar energy and transfer the energy to a heat activated system. To provide for even distribution of the energy despite uneven impingement of solar energy on the heat pipes, absence of solar energy at times, or failure of one or more of the heat pipes, energy storage means are disposed on the heat pipes which extend through a heat pipe thermal coupling means into the heat activated device. To enhance energy transfer to the heat activated device, the heat pipe coupling cavity means may be provided with extensions into the device. For use with a Stirling engine having passages for working gas, heat transfer members may be positioned to contact the gas and the heat pipes. The shell may be divided into sections by transverse walls. To prevent cavity working fluid from collecting in the extensions, a porous body is positioned in the cavity.

  6. Home Start: How a Home-Based Preschool Program Raised Black Achievements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Ralph

    This presentation discusses longitudinal results of a home-based program for low SES black and white children whose parents received weekly visits designed to chart children's individualized enrichment when they were from 2 to 5 years of age. The program drew upon school and community resource personnel when appropriate, to provide parents with…

  7. The "H" Word: Home Schooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Shery

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses home schooling gifted children, including reasons families choose to home school their children, laws regulating home schooling, the educational background of parents who home school, and curriculum options. Advantages and disadvantages of home schooling are explored, along with data indicating the higher achievement of home…

  8. A Fiber-Optic Coupled Telescope for Water Vapor DIAL Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeYoung, Russell J.; Lonn, Frederick

    1998-01-01

    A fiber-optic coupled telescope of low complexity was constructed and tested. The major loss mechanisms of the optical system have been characterized. Light collected by the receiver mirror is focused onto an optical fiber, and the output of the fiber is filtered by an interference filter and then focused onto an APD detector. This system was used in lidar field measurements with a 532-nm Nd:YAG laser beam. The results were encouraging. A numerical model used for calculation of the expected return signal agreed with the lidar return signal obtained. The assembled system was easy to align and operate and weighed about 8 kg for a 30 cm (12") mirror system. This weight is low enough to allow mounting of the fiber-optic telescope receiver system in a UAV. Furthermore, the good agreement between the numerical lidar model and the performance of the actual receiver system, suggests that this model may be used for estimation of the performance of this and other lidar systems in the future. Such telescopes are relatively easy to construct and align. The fiber optic cable allows easy placement of the optical detector in any position. These telescope systems should find widespread use in aircraft and space home DIAL water vapor receiver systems.

  9. Pigeons home faster through polluted air

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongqiu; Courchamp, Franck; Blumstein, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution, especially haze pollution, is creating health issues for both humans and other animals. However, remarkably little is known about how animals behaviourally respond to air pollution. We used multiple linear regression to analyse 415 pigeon races in the North China Plain, an area with considerable air pollution, and found that while the proportion of pigeons successfully homed was not influenced by air pollution, pigeons homed faster when the air was especially polluted. Our results may be explained by an enhanced homing motivation and possibly an enriched olfactory environment that facilitates homing. Our study provides a unique example of animals’ response to haze pollution; future studies are needed to identify proposed mechanisms underlying this effect. PMID:26728113

  10. Pigeons home faster through polluted air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongqiu; Courchamp, Franck; Blumstein, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution, especially haze pollution, is creating health issues for both humans and other animals. However, remarkably little is known about how animals behaviourally respond to air pollution. We used multiple linear regression to analyse 415 pigeon races in the North China Plain, an area with considerable air pollution, and found that while the proportion of pigeons successfully homed was not influenced by air pollution, pigeons homed faster when the air was especially polluted. Our results may be explained by an enhanced homing motivation and possibly an enriched olfactory environment that facilitates homing. Our study provides a unique example of animals’ response to haze pollution; future studies are needed to identify proposed mechanisms underlying this effect.

  11. Pigeons home faster through polluted air.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongqiu; Courchamp, Franck; Blumstein, Daniel T

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution, especially haze pollution, is creating health issues for both humans and other animals. However, remarkably little is known about how animals behaviourally respond to air pollution. We used multiple linear regression to analyse 415 pigeon races in the North China Plain, an area with considerable air pollution, and found that while the proportion of pigeons successfully homed was not influenced by air pollution, pigeons homed faster when the air was especially polluted. Our results may be explained by an enhanced homing motivation and possibly an enriched olfactory environment that facilitates homing. Our study provides a unique example of animals' response to haze pollution; future studies are needed to identify proposed mechanisms underlying this effect. PMID:26728113

  12. Advanced space solar dynamic receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strumpf, Hal J.; Coombs, Murray G.; Lacy, Dovie E.

    1988-01-01

    A study has been conducted to generate and evaluate advanced solar heat receiver concepts suitable for orbital application with Brayton and Stirling engine cycles in the 7-kW size range. The generated receiver designs have thermal storage capability (to enable power production during the substantial eclipse period which accompanies typical orbits) and are lighter and smaller than state-of-the-art systems, such as the Brayton solar receiver being designed and developed by AiResearch for the NASA Space Station. Two receiver concepts have been developed in detail: a packed bed receiver and a heat pipe receiver. The packed bed receiver is appropriate for a Brayton engine; the heat pipe receiver is applicable for either a Brayton or Stirling engine. The thermal storage for both concepts is provided by the melting and freezing of a salt. Both receiver concepts offer substantial improvements in size and weight compared to baseline receivers.

  13. Home Maintenance Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Jim; And Others

    This manual, written especially for the Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation Commission, is a simply worded, step-by-step guide to home maintenance for new homeowners. It can be used for self-study or it can serve as instructional material for a training class on home ownership. The manual is organized in nine sections that cover the following…

  14. The Home Microbiome Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Jack

    2014-08-25

    The Home Microbiome Project is an initiative aimed at uncovering the dynamic co-associations between people's bacteria and the bacteria found in their homes.The hope is that the data and project will show that routine monitoring of the microbial diversity of your body and of the environment in which you live is possible.

  15. The Home Microbiome Project

    ScienceCinema

    Gilbert, Jack

    2014-09-15

    The Home Microbiome Project is an initiative aimed at uncovering the dynamic co-associations between people's bacteria and the bacteria found in their homes.The hope is that the data and project will show that routine monitoring of the microbial diversity of your body and of the environment in which you live is possible.

  16. Inside Home Visiting Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Douglas R.

    1993-01-01

    Examines the wide variation that exists among home visiting programs in their content, theory, and operation, outlining the theoretical goals and operational dimensions of such programs. Numerous home visiting programs that focus on parents of young children are highlighted. Observes that few programs have been rigorously evaluated using the…

  17. Microcomputers in Home Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This document is an information guide for teachers that introduces computers into vocational home economics education classes. The first part points out implications of microcomputers for home economics classes, while the second part provides information on selecting, using, and maintaining computer hardware. The final section describes procedures…

  18. Sex Away from Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwald, Harold

    1971-01-01

    The reasons why people who are normally truthful to their spouses engage in sex away from home are discussed. These reasons can include loneliness, ego building or the opportunity to have homosexual relations. Sex away from home is likely to increase since the number of people traveling is increasing. (Author/CG)

  19. Home Education in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staroverova, T. I.

    2011-01-01

    From the eighteenth through the early twentieth centuries, home education (home schooling) by tutors and governesses in Russia was a customary form of schooling for an overwhelming majority of members of the nobility. Social and political transformations of the twentieth century led to substantial changes as the state got actively involved with…

  20. Home Study Advertising Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Michael P., Ed.; Welch, Sally R., Ed.

    This handbook contains a collections of nine articles on the subject of direct-response advertising. The handbook gives advice on how to create effective advertisements for home study courses. The nine articles are the following: "Overview of Home Study Advertising in the 1990s" (Michael P. Lambert); "Ad Features that Sell" (Nancie E. Robertson);…

  1. Children and Home Fires

    MedlinePlus

    CHILDREN AND HOME FIRES Fast Facts Children under the age of five are twice as likely to die in a home fire than the rest of the population, and child-playing fires are the leading cause of fire deaths among ...

  2. Marketing home care services.

    PubMed

    Moore, S T

    1987-08-01

    With the decline in inpatients, hospital administrators and marketers are seeking revenue opportunities in meeting the needs of a new market, home care patients. The challenge for managers in the home care arena is to target their marketing efforts towards the important decision makers. Managers who can best meet the goal of patients, families and professionals will be most successful. PMID:10301949

  3. IV treatment at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... 24 hours a day. If there is a problem with the IV, you can call your home health care agency for help. If the IV comes out of ... bleeding stops. Then call the home health care agency or the doctor right away.

  4. A Home Intervention Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafayette County School District, Oxford, MS.

    A home intervention program for 18 learning disabled and educable mentally retarded elementary school children and their families included biweekly home visits during which parents were shown specific learning activities or games. Analysis of pre and post tests on the Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT), the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for…

  5. No Place Like Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    To fight rampant consumerism (Martha Stewart Inc.), reduce the divorce rate, prevent cancer and heart disease, and ensure domestic tranquility, educators should bring back home economics. Workers must put more energy into the home front, and we must begin teaching our children how to live well on less. (MLH)

  6. Asbestos in the Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    The United States Government is concerned about asbestos-containing products in the home because sometimes asbestos fibers can be released from these produces. If asbestos fibers are inhaled, certain types of cancer may later develop. Asbestos in homes poses several problems. Household members have little or no protection from exposure to asbestos…

  7. Home Schooling: The Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menendez, Albert J.

    Home schooling, practiced as an alternative to both public and private schooling, is on the increase. This booklet provides an overview of the home schooling movement's statistical and demographic background. It also describes the legal context in states across the United States; the advocacy groups that are involved; the reasons why parents home…

  8. Home Health in Chinatown.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Services Administration (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Community Health Services.

    The document reports on the successful efforts of the San Francisco Home Health Service, which brings much needed homemaker/home health aide services to hundreds of elderly people in the San Francisco Chinatown area. Providing historical and cultural background information about the area, its residents, and its particular health problems, the…

  9. Measure Guideline: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, R.

    2014-02-01

    This document addresses adding -or improving - mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including some discussion of relevant codes and standards. Advantages, disadvantages, and approximate costs of various system types are presented along with general guidelines for implementing the systems in homes. CARB intends for this document to be useful to decision makers and contractors implementing ventilation systems in homes. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors. It is the intent of this document to assist contractors in making more informed decisions when selecting systems. Ventilation is an integral part of a high-performance home. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability.

  10. ADMX Receiver and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malagon, Ana; ADMX Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    ADMX looks for the excess radiation deposited into a cavity from the conversion of a dark matter axion into a microwave photon. The sensitivity of the experiment increases by reducing the background thermal noise and minimizing the electronic noise of the readout system. The axion masses that the experiment can detect are determined by the resonant frequency of the cavity mode of interest, which is tuned using a two rod configuration. One can also increase the search rate by measuring the output from two cavity modes at once, which requires two separate readout schemes. I will discuss the ADMX dual-channel receiver which has been upgraded to have near quantum-limited sensitivity on both channels, and describe how the correct modes are verified, using simulations, in the presence of dense electromagnetic structure. I conclude by describing upgrades to the ADMX analysis which allow for real-time exclusion limits. Supported by DOE Grants DE-FG02-97ER41029, DE-FG02-96ER40956, DE- AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC03-76SF00098, and the Livermore LDRD program.

  11. Anchorage Receives Record Snowfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The forecast called for flurries, but the snow accumulated on the ground in Anchorage, Alaska, at the rate of 2 inches per hour (5 cm per hour) for much of Saturday, March 16, 2002. By the time the winter storm passed on Sunday afternoon, Anchorage had received 28.6 inches (72.6 cm) of snow, surpassing by far the previous record of 15.6 inches (39.6 cm) set on December 29, 1955. Flights were canceled and schools were closed as a result of the storm. This true-color image of Alaska was acquired by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the OrbView-2 satellite, on March 18. It appears another large, low-pressure system is heading toward the Anchorage region, which could bring substantially more snowfall. The low-pressure system can be identified by the characteristic spiral pattern of clouds located off Alaska's southwestern coast in this scene.

  12. Going Home: Analysis of Nursing Home Discharges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Retsinas, Joan; Garrity, Patricia

    1986-01-01

    Previous research has shown that only nursing home "short stayers" will return to the community. Analyzed data to predict factors important both to discharge and tenure. Independent variables included age, sex, past residence, prognosis, and family ties. Results point to prognosis as a key predictor both of discharge and of tenure. (Author/ABB)

  13. Comprehensive Home Economics. Vocational Home Economics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This curriculum guide is one of a number of curriculum guides developed for use in vocational home economics education in Texas. The guide is correlated closely with the essential elements prescribed by the State Board of Education. The competencies in the guide are the essential elements, and the subcompetencies are the subelements prescribed in…

  14. Paranal Receives New Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-04-01

    A 4.1-metre diameter primary mirror, a vital part of the world's newest and fastest survey telescope, VISTA (the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy) has been delivered to its new mountaintop home at Cerro Paranal, Chile. The mirror will now be coupled with a small camera for initial testing prior to installing the main camera in June. Full scientific operations are due to start early next year. VISTA will form part of ESO's Very Large Telescope facility. ESO PR Photo 10d/08 ESO PR Photo 10d/08 The VISTA Mirror The mirror arrived over the Easter weekend at the Paranal Observatory where the telescope is being assembled at an altitude of 2518m, in Chile's Atacama Desert. VISTA Project Manager Alistair McPherson from STFC's UK Astronomy Technology Centre (UK ATC) accompanied the mirror on its journey to Chile: "This is a major milestone for the VISTA project. The precious mirror was loaded on to a plane in a special cradle that used tennis balls to cushion it from impact for its arduous journey across three continents. " "The mirror had a difficult four-day journey, by air and by road. It arrived in perfect condition and now that it has been coated, we will install the mirror in the telescope with a small test camera for about four weeks testing. We plan to install the main camera in June," said the Project Scientist on VISTA, Will Sutherland of Queen Mary, University of London, UK. The VISTA 4.1-metre diameter primary mirror is the most strongly curved large mirror ever polished to such a precise and exacting surface accuracy - deviations from a perfect surface of less than 1/3000th of the thickness of a human hair. On arrival at Cerro Paranal it was safely craned into the telescope dome where it was washed and coated with a thin layer of protected silver in the facility's coating plant. Silver is the best metal for the purpose since it reflects over 98% of near-infrared light, better than the more commonly used aluminium. To date, the reflectivity

  15. Advance distribution of misoprostol for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) at home births in two districts of Liberia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A postpartum hemorrhage prevention program to increase uterotonic coverage for home and facility births was introduced in two districts of Liberia. Advance distribution of misoprostol was offered during antenatal care (ANC) and home visits. Feasibility, acceptability, effectiveness of distribution mechanisms and uterotonic coverage were evaluated. Methods Eight facilities were strengthened to provide PPH prevention with oxytocin, PPH management and advance distribution of misoprostol during ANC. Trained traditional midwives (TTMs) as volunteer community health workers (CHWs) provided education to pregnant women, and district reproductive health supervisors (DRHSs) distributed misoprostol during home visits. Data were collected through facility and DRHS registers. Postpartum interviews were conducted with a sample of 550 women who received advance distribution of misoprostol on place of delivery, knowledge, misoprostol use, and satisfaction. Results There were 1826 estimated deliveries during the seven-month implementation period. A total of 980 women (53.7%) were enrolled and provided misoprostol, primarily through ANC (78.2%). Uterotonic coverage rate of all deliveries was 53.5%, based on 97.7% oxytocin use at recorded facility vaginal births and 24.9% misoprostol use at home births. Among 550 women interviewed postpartum, 87.7% of those who received misoprostol and had a home birth took the drug. Sixty-three percent (63.0%) took it at the correct time, and 54.0% experienced at least one minor side effect. No serious adverse events reported among enrolled women. Facility-based deliveries appeared to increase during the program. Conclusions The program was moderately effective at achieving high uterotonic coverage of all births. Coverage of home births was low despite the use of two channels of advance distribution of misoprostol. Although ANC reached a greater proportion of women in late pregnancy than home visits, 46.3% of expected deliveries did not

  16. Nursing home deficiency citations for safety

    PubMed Central

    Castle, NG; Wagner, LM; Ferguson, JC; Handler, SM

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency citations for safety violations in U.S. nursing homes from 2000 to 2007 are examined (representing a panel of 119,472 observations). Internal (i.e., operating characteristics of the facility), organizational (i.e., characteristics of the facility itself) and external (i.e., characteristics outside of the influence of the organization) factors associated with these deficiency citations are examined. The findings show that nursing homes increasingly receive deficiency citations for resident safety issues. Low staffing levels, poor quality of care, and an unfavorable Medicaid mix (occupancy and reimbursement) are associated with the likelihood of receiving deficiency citations for safety violations. In many cases, this likely influences the quality of life and quality of care of residents. PMID:21207305

  17. Nursing home deficiency citations for safety.

    PubMed

    Castle, Nicholas G; Wagner, Laura M; Ferguson, Jamie C; Handler, Steven M

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency citations for safety violations in U.S. nursing homes from 2000 to 2007 are examined (representing a panel of 119,472 observations). Internal (i.e., operating characteristics of the facility), organizational factors (i.e., characteristics of the facility itself), and external factors (i.e., characteristics outside of the influence of the organization) associated with these deficiency citations are examined. The findings show that nursing homes increasingly receive deficiency citations for resident safety issues. Low staffing levels, poor quality of care, and an unfavorable Medicaid mix (occupancy and reimbursement) are associated with the likelihood of receiving deficiency citations for safety violations. In many cases, this likely influences the quality of life and quality of care of residents. PMID:21207305

  18. A 30 GHz monolithic receive module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondal, J.; Contolatis, T.; Geddes, J.; Bauhahn, P.; Sokolov, V.

    1990-01-01

    The technical achievements and deliveries made during the duration of the program to develop a 30 GHz monolithic receive module for communication feed array applications and to deliver submodules and 30 GHz monolithic receive modules for experimental evaluation are discussed. Key requirements include an overall receive module noise figure of 5 dB, a 30 dB RF-to-RF gain with six levels of intermediate gain control, a five bit phase shifter, and a maximum power consumption of 250 mW. In addition, the monolithic receive module design addresses a cost goal of less than one thousand dollars (1980 dollars) per module in unit buys of 5,000 or more, and a mechanical configuration that is applicable to a spaceborne phase array system. An additional task for the development and delivery of 32 GHz phase shifter integrated circuit (IC) for deep space communication is also described.

  19. Home Versus Nonhome Neighborhood

    PubMed Central

    Hurvitz, Philip M.; Moudon, Anne Vernez

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Built environment and health research have focused on characteristics of home neighborhoods, whereas overall environmental exposures occur over larger spatial ranges. Purpose Differences in built environment characteristics were analyzed for home and nonhome locations using GPS data. Methods GPS data collected in 2007–2008 were analyzed for 41 subjects in the Seattle area in 2010. Environmental characteristics for 3.8 million locations were measured using novel GIS data sets called SmartMaps, representing spatially continuous values of local built environment variables in the domains of neighborhood composition, utilitarian destinations, transportation infrastructure, and traffic conditions. Using bootstrap sampling, CIs were estimated for differences in built environment values for home (<833 m of home address) and nonhome (>1666 m) GPS locations. Results Home and nonhome built environment values were significantly different for over 90% of variables across subjects (p<0.001). Only 51% of subjects had higher counts of supermarkets near than away from home. Different measures of neighborhood parks yielded varying results. Conclusions SmartMaps helped measure local built environment characteristics for a large set of GPS locations. Most subjects had significantly different home and nonhome built environment exposures. Considering the full range of individuals’ environmental exposures may improve understanding of effects of the built environment on behavior and health outcomes. PMID:22424255

  20. Prediction of Advisability of Returning Home Using the Home Care Score.

    PubMed

    Matsugi, Akiyoshi; Tani, Keisuke; Tamaru, Yoshiki; Yoshioka, Nami; Yamashita, Akira; Mori, Nobuhiko; Oku, Kosuke; Ikeda, Masashi; Nagano, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess whether the home care score (HCS), which was developed by the Ministry of Health and Welfare in Japan in 1992, is useful for the prediction of advisability of home care. Methods. Subjects living at home and in assisted-living facilities were analyzed. Binominal logistic regression analyses, using age, sex, the functional independence measure score, and the HCS, along with receiver operating characteristic curve analyses, were conducted. Findings/Conclusions. Only HCS was selected for the regression equation. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the area under the curve (0.9), sensitivity (0.82), specificity (0.83), and positive predictive value (0.84) for HCS were higher than those for the functional independence measure, indicating that the HCS is a powerful predictor for advisability of home care. Clinical Relevance. Comprehensive measurements of the condition of provided care and the activities of daily living of the subjects, which are included in the HCS, are required for the prediction of advisability of home care. PMID:26491568

  1. Prediction of Advisability of Returning Home Using the Home Care Score

    PubMed Central

    Matsugi, Akiyoshi; Tani, Keisuke; Tamaru, Yoshiki; Yoshioka, Nami; Yamashita, Akira; Mori, Nobuhiko; Oku, Kosuke; Ikeda, Masashi; Nagano, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess whether the home care score (HCS), which was developed by the Ministry of Health and Welfare in Japan in 1992, is useful for the prediction of advisability of home care. Methods. Subjects living at home and in assisted-living facilities were analyzed. Binominal logistic regression analyses, using age, sex, the functional independence measure score, and the HCS, along with receiver operating characteristic curve analyses, were conducted. Findings/Conclusions. Only HCS was selected for the regression equation. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the area under the curve (0.9), sensitivity (0.82), specificity (0.83), and positive predictive value (0.84) for HCS were higher than those for the functional independence measure, indicating that the HCS is a powerful predictor for advisability of home care. Clinical Relevance. Comprehensive measurements of the condition of provided care and the activities of daily living of the subjects, which are included in the HCS, are required for the prediction of advisability of home care. PMID:26491568

  2. Client involvement in home care practice: a relational sociological perspective.

    PubMed

    Glasdam, Stinne; Henriksen, Nina; Kjær, Lone; Praestegaard, Jeanette

    2013-12-01

    'Client involvement' has been a mantra within health policies, education curricula and healthcare institutions over many years, yet very little is known about how 'client involvement' is practised in home-care services. The aim of this article is to analyse 'client involvement' in practise seen from the positions of healthcare professionals, an elderly person and his relative in a home-care setting. A sociologically inspired single case study was conducted, consisting of three weeks of observations and interviews. The study has a focus on the relational aspects of home care and the structural, political and administrative frames that rule home- care practice. Client involvement is shown within four constructed analytical categories: 'Structural conditions of providing and receiving home care'; 'Client involvement inside the home: performing a professional task and living an everyday life'; 'Client involvement outside the home: liberal business and mutual goal setting'; and 'Converting a home to a working place: refurnishing a life'. The meaning of involvement is depending on which position it is viewed from. On the basis of this analysis, we raise the question of the extent to which involvement of the client in public home-care practice remains limited. PMID:23217061

  3. Real-time software receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledvina, Brent M. (Inventor); Psiaki, Mark L. (Inventor); Powell, Steven P. (Inventor); Kintner, Jr., Paul M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A real-time software receiver that executes on a general purpose processor. The software receiver includes data acquisition and correlator modules that perform, in place of hardware correlation, baseband mixing and PRN code correlation using bit-wise parallelism.

  4. Real-time software receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledvina, Brent M. (Inventor); Psiaki, Mark L. (Inventor); Powell, Steven P. (Inventor); Kintner, Jr., Paul M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A real-time software receiver that executes on a general purpose processor. The software receiver includes data acquisition and correlator modules that perform, in place of hardware correlation, baseband mixing and PRN code correlation using bit-wise parallelism.

  5. High-temperature ceramic receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, P. O.

    1980-01-01

    An advanced ceramic dome cavity receiver is discussed which heats pressurized gas to temperatures above 1800/sup 0/F (1000/sup 0/C) for use in solar Brayton power systems of the dispersed receiver/dish or central receiver type. Optical, heat transfer, structural, and ceramic material design aspects of the receiver are reported and the development and experimental demonstration of a high-temperature seal between the pressurized gas and the high-temperature silicon carbide dome material is described.

  6. High temperature solar thermal receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A design concept for a high temperature solar thermal receiver to operate at 3 atmospheres pressure and 2500 F outlet was developed. The performance and complexity of windowed matrix, tube-header, and extended surface receivers were evaluated. The windowed matrix receiver proved to offer substantial cost and performance benefits. An efficient and cost effective hardware design was evaluated for a receiver which can be readily interfaced to fuel and chemical processes or to heat engines for power generation.

  7. Receiving signals of any polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlson, J. E.; Seidel, B. L.; Stelzried, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    Two-channel detection accomodates linear, circular, and elliptical polarization in one receiving unit. Receiver employs orthomode transducer which breaks any type signal into one left and one right circular component. These are processed in separate receiver channels with equal time-delay, and then recombined for data extraction. System eliminates losses due to polarization mismatch.

  8. Bringing Your Baby Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... avoid suffocation. Chances are much better that you'll bring home a calm, contented baby if you ... by the manufacturer before the second birthday, you'll need to use a convertible seat designed for ...

  9. Using oxygen at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... home. They will restore power sooner to your house or neighborhood if the power goes out. Keep ... nervous than usual Your lips or fingernails are blue You feel drowsy or confused Your breathing is ...

  10. Pervasive Home Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, P.; Limb, R.; Payne, R.

    An increasing number of computers and other equipment, such as games consoles and multimedia appliances for the home, have networking capability. The rapid growth of broadband in the home is also fuelling the demand for people to network their homes. In the near future we will see a number of market sectors trying to 'own' the home by providing gateways either from the traditional ISP or from games and other service providers. The consumer is bombarded with attractive advertising to acquire the latest technological advances, but is left with a plethora of different appliances, which have a bewildering range of requirements and features in terms of networking, user interface, and higher-level communications protocols. In many cases, these are proprietary, preventing interworking. Such technical and usability anarchy confuses the consumer and could ultimately suppress market adoption.

  11. Home blood sugar testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000324.htm Home blood sugar testing To use the sharing features on this ... with their nutrition and activity plans. Check Your Blood Sugar Often Usual times to test your blood sugar ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: anencephaly

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions anencephaly anencephaly Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Anencephaly is a condition that prevents the normal development ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: neuroblastoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions neuroblastoma neuroblastoma Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Neuroblastoma is a type of cancer that most often ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: adermatoglyphia

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions adermatoglyphia adermatoglyphia Enable Javascript to ...

  15. Heart failure - home monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000113.htm Heart failure - home monitoring To use the sharing features on ... body and the symptoms that tell you your heart failure is getting worse will help you stay healthier ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: hemophilia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions hemophilia hemophilia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Hemophilia is a bleeding disorder that slows the blood ...

  17. Bringing cancer care home.

    PubMed

    Treco-Jones, S

    1991-01-01

    Community hospitals in the South are seeing new and more cancer patients. Hospitals aggressively seeking new and faster methods to treat patients in their home towns bring benefits to both. PMID:10115667

  18. Eye Injuries at Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating Eye ... Sports Eye Injuries by the Numbers — Infographic Eye Injuries at Home Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD ...

  19. MASTER HOME ENVIRONMENTALIST PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Master Home Environmentalist (MHE) program is an innovative approach to address issues of indoor pollution, such as molds and biological contaminants that cause allergies and asthma, dust, indoor air pollution (including asbestos, formaldehyde, radon, combustion sources, tob...

  20. Twelve Home Cleaning Recipes

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Safe and Effective Disinfection Twelve Home Cleaning Recipes Safer alternatives to hazardous cleaning products exist for ... 24 hours at room temperature. All Purpose Cleaner recipes for use on counters, floors and other hard ...

  1. School in Model Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lander, Kathleen

    1973-01-01

    A model home complex solved a critical housing shortage for the San Joaquin school district in Orange County, California, last fall and will be in use again this year as a school for primary grades. (Author)

  2. The Home Medicine Cabinet

    PubMed Central

    McGuigan, Michael A.

    1983-01-01

    The home medicine cabinet contains both drug and non-drug poisons, of varying toxicity. The more seriously toxic ones and old medications, should be removed, since the `steps' of toilet and sink make medicine cabinets accessible even to young children. This article describes the degree of toxicity of items commonly found in medicine cabinets, and recommends storage methods which prevent accidents. Ipecac syrup should be in every medicine cabinet of every home in which there are children.

  3. Effect of a Consumer-Directed Voucher and a Disease-Management-Health-Promotion Nurse Intervention on Home Care Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Hongdao; Friedman, Bruce; Wamsley, Brenda R.; Mukamel, Dana; Eggert, Gerald M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We describe the impact of two interventions, a consumer-directed voucher for in-home supportive services and a chronic disease self-management-health-promotion nurse intervention, on the probability of use of two types of home care-skilled home health care and personal assistance services-received by functionally impaired Medicare…

  4. Reflux solar receiver design considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diver, R. B.

    Reflux heat-pipe and pool-boiler receivers are being developed to improve upon the performance and life of directly-illuminated tube receiver technology used in previous successful demonstrations of dish-Stirling systems. The design of a reflux receiver involves engineering tradeoffs. In this paper, on-sun performance measurements of the Sandia pool-boiler receiver are compared with results from the reflux receiver thermal analysis model, AEETES. Flux and performance implications of various design options are analyzed and discussed.

  5. Advanced solar thermal receiver technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudirka, A. A.; Leibowitz, L. P.

    1980-01-01

    Development of advanced receiver technology for solar thermal receivers designed for electric power generation or for industrial applications, such as fuels and chemical production or industrial process heat, is described. The development of this technology is focused on receivers that operate from 1000 F to 3000 F and above. Development strategy is mapped in terms of application requirements, and the related system and technical requirements. Receiver performance requirements and current development efforts are covered for five classes of receiver applications: high temperature, advanced Brayton, Stirling, and Rankine cycle engines, and fuels and chemicals.

  6. 75 FR 47899 - Bayside Savings Bank, Port St. Joe, FL; Notice of Appointment of Receiver

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-09

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Bayside Savings Bank, Port St. Joe, FL; Notice of Appointment of Receiver Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the authority contained in section 5(d)(2) of the Home Owners... as sole Receiver for Bayside Savings Bank, Port St. Joe, Florida, (OTS No. 17957) on July 30,...

  7. Bragg-cell receiver study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Lonnie A.

    1987-01-01

    Bragg-cell receivers are employed in specialized Electronic Warfare (EW) applications for the measurement of frequency. Bragg-cell receiver characteristics are fully characterized for simple RF emitter signals. This receiver is early in its development cycle when compared to the IFM receiver. Functional mathematical models are derived and presented in this report for the Bragg-cell receiver. Theoretical analysis is presented and digital computer signal processing results are presented for the Bragg-cell receiver. Probability density function analysis are performed for output frequency. Probability density function distributions are observed to depart from assumed distributions for wideband and complex RF signals. This analysis is significant for high resolution and fine grain EW Bragg-cell receiver systems.

  8. RFI receiver. [deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, R.

    1980-01-01

    An S-band radio frequency interference (RFI) receiver to analyze and identify sources of RFI problems in the Deep Space Network DSN tracking stations is described. The RFI receiver is a constant gain, double conversion, open loop receiver with dual sine/cosine channel outputs, providing a total of 20 MHZ monitoring capability. This receiver is computer controlled using a MODCOMP II miniprocessor. The RFI receiver has been designed to operate at a 150 Kelvin system noise temperature accomplished by cascading two low noise field effect transistor (FET) amplifiers for the receiver front-end. The first stage low noise FET amplifier is mounted at the feed horn to minimize any cable losses to achieve a lower system noise temperature. The receiver is tunable over the frequency range of 2150 to 2450 MHz in both sine/cosine output channels with a resolution of 100 kHz.

  9. Performance testing of lidar receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, M. Y.

    1986-01-01

    In addition to the considerations about the different types of noise sources, dynamic range, and linearity of a lidar receiver, one requires information about the pulse shape retaining capabilities of the receiver. For this purpose, relatively precise information about the height resolution as well as the recovery time of the receiver, due both to large transients and to fast changes in the received signal, is required. As more and more analog receivers using fast analog to digital converters and transient recorders will be used in the future lidar systems, methods to test these devices are essential. The method proposed for this purpose is shown. Tests were carried out using LCW-10, LT-20, and FTVR-2 as optical parts of the optical pulse generator circuits. A commercial optical receiver, LNOR, and a transient recorder, VK 220-4, were parts of the receiver system.

  10. Protect Your Home from Wildfire!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PTA Today, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Homes in wooded areas or in the wildland/urban interface are at special risk for wildfire. The article provides a checklist of what to keep on hand to make homes safer from wildfire, focusing on vegetation around the home and maintenance of the yard and home. (SM)

  11. Terminal patients in Belgian nursing homes: a cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Simoens, Steven; Kutten, Betty; Keirse, Emmanuel; Vanden Berghe, Paul; Beguin, Claire; Desmedt, Marianne; Deveugele, Myriam; Léonard, Christian; Paulus, Dominique; Menten, Johan

    2013-06-01

    Policy makers and health care payers are concerned about the costs of treating terminal patients. This study was done to measure the costs of treating terminal patients during the final month of life in a sample of Belgian nursing homes from the health care payer perspective. Also, this study compares the costs of palliative care with those of usual care. This multicenter, retrospective cohort study enrolled terminal patients from a representative sample of nursing homes. Health care costs included fixed nursing home costs, medical fees, pharmacy charges, other charges, and eventual hospitalization costs. Data sources consisted of accountancy and invoice data. The analysis calculated costs per patient during the final month of life at 2007/2008 prices. Nineteen nursing homes participated in the study, generating a total of 181 patients. Total mean nursing home costs amounted to 3,243 € per patient during the final month of life. Total mean nursing home costs per patient of 3,822 € for patients receiving usual care were higher than costs of 2,456 € for patients receiving palliative care (p = 0.068). Higher costs of usual care were driven by higher hospitalization costs (p < 0.001). This study suggests that palliative care models in nursing homes need to be supported because such care models appear to be less expensive than usual care and because such care models are likely to better reflect the needs of terminal patients. PMID:22367732

  12. The Submillimeter Array Antennas and Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, R.

    band, typically 80 - 100 GHz, and provide for relatively low receiver noise, typically 5 - 10 hv/k for the low frequency bands, and 10 - 15 hv/k for the 650 GHz receivers. Local oscillator power to each receiver is provided by a mechanically tunable Gunn oscillator followed by the appropriate diode frequency multiplier or multiplier combination.

  13. Neurobiology of the homing pigeon—a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehlhorn, Julia; Rehkämper, Gerd

    2009-09-01

    Homing pigeons are well known as good homers, and the knowledge of principal parameters determining their homing behaviour and the neurological basis for this have been elucidated in the last decades. Several orientation mechanisms and parameters—sun compass, earth’s magnetic field, olfactory cues, visual cues—are known to be involved in homing behaviour, whereas there are still controversial discussions about their detailed function and their importance. This paper attempts to review and summarise the present knowledge about pigeon homing by describing the known orientation mechanisms and factors, including their pros and cons. Additionally, behavioural features like motivation, experience, and track preferences are discussed. All behaviour has its origin in the brain and the neuronal basis of homing and the neuroanatomical particularities of homing pigeons are a main topic of this review. Homing pigeons have larger brains in comparison to other non-homing pigeon breeds and particularly show increased size of the hippocampus. This underlines our hypothesis that there is a relationship between hippocampus size and spatial ability. The role of the hippocampus in homing and its plasticity in response to navigational experience are discussed in support of this hypothesis.

  14. Reducing Energy Use in Existing Homes by 30%: Learning From Home Performance with ENERGY STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Liaukus, C.

    2014-12-01

    The improvement of existing homes in the United States can have a much greater impact on overall residential energy use than the construction of highly efficient new homes. There are over 130 million existing housing units in the U.S., while annually new construction represents less than two percent of the total supply (U.S. Census Bureau, 2013). Therefore, the existing housing stock presents a clear opportunity and responsibility for Building America (BA) to guide the remodeling and retrofit market toward higher performance existing homes. There are active programs designed to improve the energy performance of existing homes. Home Performance with ENERGY STAR (HPwES) is a market-rate program among them. BARA's research in this project verified that the New Jersey HPwES program is achieving savings in existing homes that meet or exceed BA's goal of 30%. Among the 17 HPwES projects with utility data included in this report, 15 have actual energy savings ranging from 24% to 46%. Further, two of the homes achieved that level of energy savings without the costly replacement of heating and cooling equipment, which indicates that less costly envelope packages could be offered to consumers unable to invest in more costly mechanical packages, potentially creating broader market impact.

  15. Feasibility of BCI Control in a Realistic Smart Home Environment

    PubMed Central

    Kosmyna, Nataliya; Tarpin-Bernard, Franck; Bonnefond, Nicolas; Rivet, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Smart homes have been an active area of research, however despite considerable investment, they are not yet a reality for end-users. Moreover, there are still accessibility challenges for the elderly or the disabled, two of the main potential targets for home automation. In this exploratory study we design a control mechanism for smart homes based on Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) and apply it in the “Domus”1 smart home platform in order to evaluate the potential interest of users about BCIs at home. We enable users to control lighting, a TV set, a coffee machine and the shutters of the smart home. We evaluate the performance (accuracy, interaction time), usability and feasibility (USE questionnaire) on 12 healthy subjects and 2 disabled subjects. We find that healthy subjects achieve 77% task accuracy. However, disabled subjects achieved a better accuracy (81% compared to 77%). PMID:27616986

  16. Feasibility of BCI Control in a Realistic Smart Home Environment.

    PubMed

    Kosmyna, Nataliya; Tarpin-Bernard, Franck; Bonnefond, Nicolas; Rivet, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Smart homes have been an active area of research, however despite considerable investment, they are not yet a reality for end-users. Moreover, there are still accessibility challenges for the elderly or the disabled, two of the main potential targets for home automation. In this exploratory study we design a control mechanism for smart homes based on Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) and apply it in the "Domus" smart home platform in order to evaluate the potential interest of users about BCIs at home. We enable users to control lighting, a TV set, a coffee machine and the shutters of the smart home. We evaluate the performance (accuracy, interaction time), usability and feasibility (USE questionnaire) on 12 healthy subjects and 2 disabled subjects. We find that healthy subjects achieve 77% task accuracy. However, disabled subjects achieved a better accuracy (81% compared to 77%). PMID:27616986

  17. Montessori-based training makes a difference for home health workers & their clients.

    PubMed

    Gorzelle, Gregg J; Kaiser, Kathy; Camp, Cameron J

    2003-01-01

    Home care visits can last several hours. Home care workers are often at a loss on how to fill time spent in homes of clients. The challenge is how to use this time in ways that are productive and engaging for both clients and home health workers. The authors trained home health aides to implement Montessori-based activities while interacting with clients who have dementia. The results were amazing. Among other positive results, the authors found a statistically significant increase in the amount of pleasure displayed by clients after health workers received training. PMID:12557465

  18. Using growth curve analysis to examine challenges in instrumentation in longitudinal measurement in home visiting.

    PubMed

    Goltz, Heather Honoré; Mena, Kristin Cotter; Swank, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    Home visitation programs aim to decrease child maltreatment, yet limited longitudinal data exists concerning their screening and assessment instruments. "At risk" families (N = 2,054) were screened using the Family Stress Checklist and referred to Healthy Families Indiana. The Home Observation Measurement of the Environment Scale (HOME) and Community Life Skills Scale (CLS) were administered at multiple intervals. Growth curve analyses indicate families with lower HOME and CLS scores received more home visits and visits between assessments. However, these instruments may have "ceiling effects" and may be unsuitable for longitudinal assessment and program evaluation. Programmatic changes were made based on evaluation results. PMID:24405137

  19. Fluid absorption solar energy receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, Edward J.

    1993-01-01

    A conventional solar dynamic system transmits solar energy to the flowing fluid of a thermodynamic cycle through structures which contain the gas and thermal energy storage material. Such a heat transfer mechanism dictates that the structure operate at a higher temperature than the fluid. This investigation reports on a fluid absorption receiver where only a part of the solar energy is transmitted to the structure. The other part is absorbed directly by the fluid. By proportioning these two heat transfer paths the energy to the structure can preheat the fluid, while the energy absorbed directly by the fluid raises the fluid to its final working temperature. The surface temperatures need not exceed the output temperature of the fluid. This makes the output temperature of the gas the maximum temperature in the system. The gas can have local maximum temperatures higher than the output working temperature. However local high temperatures are quickly equilibrated, and since the gas does not emit radiation, local high temperatures do not result in a radiative heat loss. Thermal radiation, thermal conductivity, and heat exchange with the gas all help equilibrate the surface temperature.

  20. Home care for older people in Sweden: a universal model in transition.

    PubMed

    Szebehely, Marta; Trydegård, Gun-Britt

    2012-05-01

    One aspect of universalism in Swedish eldercare services is that publicly financed and publicly provided services have been both affordable for the poor and attractive enough to be preferred by the middle class. This article identifies two trends in home care for older people in Sweden: a decline in the coverage of publicly funded services and their increasing marketisation. We explore the mechanisms behind these trends by reviewing policy documents and official reports, and discuss the distributional consequences of the changes by analysing two data sets from Statistics Sweden: the Swedish Level of Living surveys from 1988/1989 and 2004/2005 and a database on all users of tax deductions on household and care services in 2009. The analysis shows that the decline of tax-funded home care is not the result of changing eldercare legislation and was not intended by national policy-makers. Rather the decline was caused by a complex interplay of decision-making at central and local levels, resulting in stricter municipal targeting. The trend towards marketisation has been more clearly intended by national policy-makers. Legislative changes have opened up tax-funded services to private provision, and a customer-choice (voucher) model and a tax deduction for household- and care services have been introduced. As a result of declining tax-funded home-care services, older persons with lower education increasingly receive family care, while those with higher education are more likely to buy private services. The combination of income-related user fees, customer-choice models and the tax deduction has created an incentive for high-income older persons to turn to the market instead of using public home-care services. Thus, Swedish home care, as a universal welfare service, is now under threat and may become increasingly dominated by groups with less education and lower income which, in turn, could jeopardise the quality of care. PMID:22141377

  1. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes — Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque, NM

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-09-01

    This builder was honored for Most DOE Zero Energy Ready Homes Built in the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards. By July 2014, Palo Duro had completed 152 homes since the program began in 2013 (under the original program title DOE Challenge Home), all of them certified to the stringent efficiency requirements of DOE’s Zero Energy Ready Home program.

  2. Low Vision Rehabilitation in a Nursing Home Population: The SEEING Study

    PubMed Central

    Deremeik, James; Broman, Aimee T.; Friedman, David; West, Sheila K.; Massof, Robert; Park, William; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Frick, Kevin; Muñoz, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    As part of a study of 198 residents with low vision in 28 nursing homes, 91 participated in a low vision rehabilitation intervention. Among the rehabilitation participants, 78% received simple environmental modifications, such as lighting; 75% received low vision instruction; 73% benefited from staff training; and 69% received simple nonoptical devices. Because of the cognitive and physical fragility of many nursing home residents, the authors recommend an approach that centers on training nursing home staff and improving the environment of the facilities, especially in the area of illumination. PMID:22942491

  3. 76 FR 55570 - Per Diem Payments for the Care Provided to Eligible Veterans Evacuated From a State Home as a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-08

    ... veteran receiving nursing home care, domiciliary care, and adult day health care in State home facilities... document published in the Federal Register on March 23, 2011 (76 FR 16354), VA proposed to amend those... continues to provide care. VA provided a 60-day comment period that ended May 23, 2011. VA received...

  4. Racial segregation and quality of care disparity in US nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Momotazur; Foster, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the contributions of travel distance and preferences for racial homogeneity as sources of nursing home segregation and racial disparities in nursing home quality. We first theoretically characterize the distinctive implications of these mechanisms for nursing home racial segregation. We then use this model to structure an empirical analysis of nursing home sorting. We find little evidence of differential willingness to pay for quality by race among first-time nursing home entrants, but do find significant distance and race-based preference effects. Simulation exercises suggest that both effects contribute importantly to racial disparities in nursing home quality. PMID:25461895

  5. Racial Segregation and Quality of Care Disparity in US Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Momotazur; Foster, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we examine the contributions of travel distance and preferences for racial homogeneity as sources of nursing home segregation and racial disparities in nursing home quality. We first theoretically characterize the distinctive implications of these mechanisms for nursing home racial segregation. We then use this model to structure an empirical analysis of nursing home sorting. We find little evidence of differential willingness to pay for quality by race among first-time nursing home entrants, but do find significant distance and race-based preference effects. Simulation exercises suggest that both effects contribute importantly to racial disparities in nursing home quality. PMID:25461895

  6. Immigration: perspectives from receiving countries.

    PubMed

    Weiner, M

    1990-01-01

    The author examines the issue of international migration from the standpoint of receiving countries. He attempts "to understand how and why migrant-receiving countries respond as they do, and to suggest some of the new issues in international migration that arise in a world in which the supply of would-be migrants and refugees is now greater than receiving countries are willing to accept." PMID:12283227

  7. Hospitalization Among Medicare-Reimbursed Skilled Home Health Recipients

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a summary and critique of the published empirical evidence between the years 2002 and 2011 regarding rehospitalization among Medicare-reimbursed, skilled home health recipients. The knowledge gained will be applied to a discussion regarding ACH among geriatric home health recipients and areas for future research. The referenced literature in MEDLINE, PubMed and Cochrane databases was searched using combinations of the following search terms: home care and home health and Medicare combined with acute care hospitalization, rehospitalization, hospitalization, and adverse events and limited to studies conducted in the United States. Twenty-five research studies published in the last eight years investigated hospitalization among patients receiving Medicare-reimbursed, skilled home health. Empirical findings indicate telehomecare can reduce hospitalizations and emergency room use. The identification of risk factors for hospitalization relate to an elder’s sociodemographic, clinical and functional status that can be identified upon admission and interventions taken in order to reduce hospitalizations. Disease management, frontloading nurse visits, the structure of home health services and OBQI are also among the interventions identified to reduce hospitalizations. However, the body of evidence is limited by a paucity of research and the over reliance on small sample sizes. Few published studies have explored methods that effectively reduce hospitalization among Medicare-reimbursed skilled home health recipients. Further research is needed to clarify the most effective ways to structure home health services to maximize benefits and reduce hospitalization among this chronically ill geriatric population. PMID:26709341

  8. Coming to Terms: African-Americans' Complex Ways of Coping with Life in a Nursing Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groger, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    Based on qualitative interviews with 14 nursing home residents and 13 caregivers, this article explores how elders adapted to life in a nursing home, and how their caregivers came to embrace nursing home placement as the optimal way to meet their elders' need for care. These processes were mediated by two mechanisms: the function the institution…

  9. Low Vision Rehabilitation in a Nursing Home Population: The SEEING Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deremeik, James; Broman, Aimee T.; Friedman, David; West, Sheila K.; Massof, Robert; Park, William; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Frick, Kevin; Munoz, Beatriz

    2007-01-01

    As part of a study of 198 residents with low vision in 28 nursing homes, 91 participated in a low vision rehabilitation intervention. Among the rehabilitation participants, 78% received simple environmental modifications, such as lighting; 75% received low vision instruction; 73% benefited from staff training; and 69% received simple nonoptical…

  10. Spread Spectrum Receiver Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Test Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Mark L.

    1998-01-01

    This program consisted of: (1) a study to define appropriate EMI test guidelines and test methods for direct sequence (DS) spread spectrum receivers; and (2) preparation of a written test guide to document the recommended test methods. The scope of this test guide includes: (1) a discussion of generic DS receiver performance characteristics; (2) a summary of S-band TDRSS receiver operation; (3) a discussion of DS receiver EMI susceptibility mechanisms and characteristics; (4) a summary of military standard test guidelines; (5) recommended test approach and methods; and (6) general conclusions and recommendations for future studies in the area of spread spectrum receiver testing.

  11. Mining the Home Environment

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Diane J.; Krishnan, Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    Individuals spend a majority of their time in their home or workplace and for many, these places are our sanctuaries. As society and technology advance there is a growing interest in improving the intelligence of the environments in which we live and work. By filling home environments with sensors and collecting data during daily routines, researchers can gain insights on human daily behavior and the impact of behavior on the residents and their environments. In this article we provide an overview of the data mining opportunities and challenges that smart environments provide for researchers and offer some suggestions for future work in this area. PMID:25506128

  12. Mountain Home Well - Photos

    DOE Data Explorer

    Shervais, John

    2012-01-11

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  13. UWB delay and multiply receiver

    DOEpatents

    Dallum, Gregory E.; Pratt, Garth C.; Haugen, Peter C.; Romero, Carlos E.

    2013-09-10

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) delay and multiply receiver is formed of a receive antenna; a variable gain attenuator connected to the receive antenna; a signal splitter connected to the variable gain attenuator; a multiplier having one input connected to an undelayed signal from the signal splitter and another input connected to a delayed signal from the signal splitter, the delay between the splitter signals being equal to the spacing between pulses from a transmitter whose pulses are being received by the receive antenna; a peak detection circuit connected to the output of the multiplier and connected to the variable gain attenuator to control the variable gain attenuator to maintain a constant amplitude output from the multiplier; and a digital output circuit connected to the output of the multiplier.

  14. Accurate route demonstration by experienced homing pigeons does not improve subsequent homing performance in naive conspecifics.

    PubMed Central

    Banks, A N; Guilford, T

    2000-01-01

    We describe an experiment that uses the grouping tendencies and navigational abilities of the homing pigeon (Columba livia) to investigate the possibility of socially mediated information transfer in a field setting. By varying the composition of paired-release types, we allowed some naive birds to receive an accurate demonstration of the home route whilst others were paired with similarly naive conspecifics. After this 'paired phase', we predicted that if any learning of spatial information occurred then naive members of the former pairs would outperform their untutored conspecifics when re-released individually during the subsequent 'single phase' of the experiment. This prediction was not confirmed. Neither homing speed nor initial orientation was superior in individually released tutored versus untutored birds, despite the fact that both performance measures were better in the earlier 'paired phase' with experienced demonstrators. Our results suggest that although naive homing pigeons clearly interact with their experienced partners, they are unable to transfer any individually useful spatial information to subsequent homing flights. PMID:11413647

  15. Accurate route demonstration by experienced homing pigeons does not improve subsequent homing performance in naive conspecifics.

    PubMed

    Banks, A N; Guilford, T

    2000-11-22

    We describe an experiment that uses the grouping tendencies and navigational abilities of the homing pigeon (Columba livia) to investigate the possibility of socially mediated information transfer in a field setting. By varying the composition of paired-release types, we allowed some naive birds to receive an accurate demonstration of the home route whilst others were paired with similarly naive conspecifics. After this 'paired phase', we predicted that if any learning of spatial information occurred then naive members of the former pairs would outperform their untutored conspecifics when re-released individually during the subsequent 'single phase' of the experiment. This prediction was not confirmed. Neither homing speed nor initial orientation was superior in individually released tutored versus untutored birds, despite the fact that both performance measures were better in the earlier 'paired phase' with experienced demonstrators. Our results suggest that although naive homing pigeons clearly interact with their experienced partners, they are unable to transfer any individually useful spatial information to subsequent homing flights. PMID:11413647

  16. Coming Home at Paranal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-02-01

    Unique "Residencia" Opens at the VLT Observatory Summary The Paranal Residencia at the ESO VLT Observatory is now ready and the staff and visitors have moved into their new home. This major architectural project has the form of a unique subterranean construction with a facade opening towards the Pacific Ocean , far below at a distance of about 12 km. Natural daylight is brought into the building through a 35-m wide glass-covered dome, a rectangular courtyard roof and various skylight hatches. Located in the middle of the Atacama Desert, one of the driest areas on Earth, the Residencia incorporates a small garden and a swimming pool, allowing the inhabitants to retreat from time to time from the harsh outside environment. Returning from long shifts at the VLT and other installations on the mountain, here they can breathe moist air and receive invigorating sensory impressions. With great originality of the design, it has been possible to create an interior with a feeling of open space - this is a true "home in the desert" . Moreover, with strict ecological power, air and water management , the Paranal Residencia has already become a symbol of innovative architecture in its own right. Constructed with robust, but inexpensive materials, it is an impressively elegant and utilitarian counterpart to the VLT high-tech facilities poised some two hundred meters above, on the top of the mountain. PR Photo 05a/02 : Aerial view of the Paranal Observatory area. PR Photo 05b/02 : Aerial view of the Paranal Residencia . PR Photo 05c/02 : Outside view of the Paranal Residencia . PR Photo 05d/02 : The Entry Hall (fisheye view). PR Photo 05e/02 : The Entry Hall with garden and pool. PR Photo 05f/02 : The Reception Area . PR Photo 05g/02 : The Reception Area - decoration. PR Photo 05h/02 : The Reception Area - decoration. PR Photo 05i/02 : The Reception Area - decoration. PR Photo 05j/02 : View towards the Cantine . PR Photo 05k/02 : View towards the Kitchen . PR Photo 05l/02 : View

  17. Customizable Digital Receivers for Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moller, Delwyn; Heavey, Brandon; Sadowy, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Compact, highly customizable digital receivers are being developed for the system described in 'Radar Interferometer for Topographic Mapping of Glaciers and Ice Sheets' (NPO-43962), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 7 (August 2007), page 72. The receivers are required to operate in unison, sampling radar returns received by the antenna elements in a digital beam-forming (DBF) mode. The design of these receivers could also be adapted to commercial radar systems. At the time of reporting the information for this article, there were no commercially available digital receivers capable of satisfying all of the operational requirements and compact enough to be mounted directly on the antenna elements. A provided figure depicts the overall system of which the digital receivers are parts. Each digital receiver includes an analog-to-digital converter (ADC), a demultiplexer (DMUX), and a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The ADC effects 10-bit band-pass sampling of input signals having frequencies up to 3.5 GHz. The input samples are demultiplexed at a user-selectable rate of 1:2 or 1:4, then buffered in part of the FPGA that functions as a first-in/first-out (FIFO) memory. Another part of the FPGA serves as a controller for the ADC, DMUX, and FIFO memory and as an interface between (1) the rest of the receiver and (2) a front-panel data port (FPDP) bus, which is an industry-standard parallel data bus that has a high data-rate capability and multichannel configuration suitable for DBF. Still other parts of the FPGA in each receiver perform signal-processing functions. The digital receivers can be configured to operate in a stand-alone mode, or in a multichannel mode as needed for DBF. The customizability of the receiver makes it applicable to a broad range of system architectures. The capability for operation of receivers in either a stand-alone or a DBF mode enables the use of the receivers in an unprecedentedly wide variety of radar systems.

  18. The impact of home health length of stay and number of skilled nursing visits on hospitalization among Medicare-reimbursed skilled home health beneficiaries.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Melissa; Hanlon, Alexandra; Naylor, Mary D; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2015-08-01

    The implementation of the Home Health Prospective Payment System in 2000 led to a dramatic reduction in home health length of stay and number of skilled nursing visits among Medicare beneficiaries. While policy leaders have focused on the rising costs of home health care, its potential underutilization, and the relationship between service use and patient outcomes including hospitalization rates have not been rigorously examined. A secondary analysis of five Medicare-owned assessment and claims data sets for the year 2009 was conducted among two independently randomly selected samples of Medicare-reimbursed home health recipients (each n = 31,485) to examine the relationship between home health length of stay or number of skilled nursing visits and hospitalization rates within 90 days of discharge from home health. Patients who had a home health length of stay of at least 22 days or received at least four skilled nursing visits had significantly lower odds of hospitalization than patients with shorter home health stays and fewer skilled nursing visits. Additional study is needed to clarify the best way to structure home health services and determine readiness for discharge to reduce hospitalization among this chronically ill population. In the mean time, the findings of this study suggest that home health providers should consider the benefits of at least four SNV and/or a home health LOS of 22 days or longer. PMID:25990046

  19. Home Appliance Expo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quiring, Susan M.

    This description of a free, two-day home appliance exposition organized by the county extension center of Johnson County, Kansas, outlines the basic structure of the exposition in a format that can serve as a guide for organizing similar expositions. Discussion of the exposition is divided into the following sections: rationale for an appliance…

  20. Humanizing Home Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hass, Glen; Fleury, Donna

    The use of correspondence or home study courses for noncredit is a recent development in the field of adult education. The challenge facing the extension worker is to be able to develop and deliver the type of program that not only meets the learning (content) need of the participant but that also meets the learning situation. Unfortunately, the…

  1. Home Visiting Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson County Public Schools, Lakewood, CO.

    This handbook describes the home visiting program of the Jefferson County, Colorado public schools, in which teacher assistants, under supervision of the head teacher, visit parents of the children they are responsible for in the preschool center. Section I is an overview of the goals and purpose of the program. Section II describes the program in…

  2. At Home with Montessori.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oriti, Patricia; Kahn, David, Ed.

    Based on Montessori's ideas about children's innate capabilities and potential, this book encourages restructuring the home environment to provide children, especially preschool children, with opportunities for self-directed activities and personal autonomy. In each of the chapters, a different room is examined as to how it could be redesigned to…

  3. At Home with History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biemiller, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    Charles Carroll Jr. would be long forgotten but for a single notable accomplishment: he built an exceedingly handsome house. Begun in 1801 with money from his wealthy father-- Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the only Roman Catholic signer of the Declaration of Independence-- the Federal-style home has near-perfect proportions and airy rooms. The…

  4. Solar Electricity for Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    Every day, the sun showers the Earth with millions of times more energy than its people use. The only problem is that energy is spread out over the entire Earth's surface and must be harvested. Engineers are learning to capture and use some of this energy to make electricity for homes. Solar panels make up the heart of a solar system. They can be…

  5. Close to Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2006-01-01

    In 1954, when the U.S. Supreme Court handed down its decision in "Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka," the South Lawndale neighborhood on Chicago's southwest side was home primarily to Polish and Czech immigrants. In the decades since, South Lawndale has undergone dramatic change. Eastern Europeans moved out, and people of Mexican descent…

  6. Genetics Home Reference: cherubism

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Contact Us Selection Criteria for Links Copyright Privacy Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 ...

  7. Home, Hearth and Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seelig, Anita

    1982-01-01

    Advantages of having children use microcomputers at school and home include learning about sophisticated concepts early in life without a great deal of prodding, playing games that expand knowledge, and becoming literate in computer knowledge needed later in life. Includes comments from parents on their experiences with microcomputers and…

  8. School Music Goes Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Susan Hobson

    2012-01-01

    This article explores ways for music teachers to influence music making in the home. Often preschool music programs include parents in the music education process, but when children enter school, the parent connection is not usually continued with the same intensity. This article will serve as a catalyst for further conversations on ways to…

  9. Home Start Evaluation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    High/Scope Educational Research Foundation, Ypsilanti, MI.

    Case studies of seven Home Start programs are given as the third section of an evaluation study. Communities involved are Huntsville, Alabama; Fairbanks, Alaska; Fort Defiance, Arizona; Dardanelle, Arkansas; Wichita, Kansas; Gloucester, Massachusetts; and Reno, Nevada. Although each study varies in format, each describes in detail the degree and…

  10. Home-cooked care.

    PubMed

    Dean, Erin

    Hospital patients undoubtedly benefit when visitors bring in home-cooked meals. Patients are more likely to be well-nourished if they can eat food they enjoy. But it can present practical difficulties. Banning such food can prevent visitors from showing they care and present nurses with a dilemma. PMID:22880341

  11. Home Weatherization Visit

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven

    2013-05-29

    Secretary Steven Chu visits a home that is in the process of being weatherized in Columbus, OH, along with Ohio Governor Ted Strickland and Columbus Mayor Michael Coleman. They discuss the benefits of weatherization and how funding from the recovery act is having a direct impact in communities across America.

  12. Exploring Home Schooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Wanda A. R.

    2002-01-01

    Examines concerns expressed by home-schooling parents in the context of guidelines of the World Organization for Early Childhood Education and the Association for Childhood Education International. Connects guidelines to recent literature to suggest effective strategies for meeting parental needs and responding to the diverse responsibilities of…

  13. Composting Begins at Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreckman, George P.

    1994-01-01

    Reports the results of a year-long home composting pilot program run by the city of Madison, Wisconsin. The study was designed to gather data on the amount and type of materials composted by 300 volunteer households and to determine the feasibility of a full-scale program. (LZ)

  14. Home Energy Conservation Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, V. William; And Others

    This guide was prepared to support a program of training for community specialists in contemporary and practical techniques of home energy conservation. It is designed to assist professionals in efficient operation of energy conservation programs and to provide ideas for expanding education operations. Eight major sections are presented: (1)…

  15. Solar Energy: Home Heating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on home heating is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies. The module…

  16. Eldercare at Home: Caregiving

    MedlinePlus

    ... fill up all your time. This will then increase your stress and reduce your ability to give good care. Pay attention to positive ... If you do, caregiving can wear you out, increase your stress, and interfere with your ability to give good care at home. Support groups ...

  17. Home Furnishing Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Dept. of Occupational Education and Technology.

    The secondary level curriculum guide in home furnishings was designed for coordinated vocational-academic education (CVAE) students, in-school youth possessing academic, socioeconomic, or other handicaps which prevent them from succeeding in traditional educational endeavors. The first of two parts of the guide is the overview which describes the…

  18. Are Consumer-Directed Home Care Beneficiaries Satisfied? Evidence from Washington State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, Joshua M.; Anderson, Wayne L.; Khatutsky, Galina

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study analyzed the effect of consumer-directed versus agency-directed home care on satisfaction with paid personal assistance services among Medicaid beneficiaries in Washington State. Design and Methods: The study analyzed a survey of 513 Medicaid beneficiaries receiving home- and community-based services. As part of a larger study,…

  19. 76 FR 11187 - Due Date of Initial Application Requirements for State Home Construction Grant

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ... assistance for a State home construction project (or acquisition of an existing facility to be used as a... Construction Grant AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: This document... must receive an initial application for a State Home Construction Grant in order for the application...

  20. Assisting Cognitively Impaired Nursing Home Residents with Bathing: Effects of Two Bathing Interventions on Caregiving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoeffer, Beverly; Talerico, Karen Amann; Rasin, Joyce; Mitchell, C. Madeline; Stewart, Babara J.; McKenzie, Darlene; Barrick, Ann Louise; Rader, Joanne; Sloane, Philip D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: When cognitively impaired nursing home residents exhibit agitated and aggressive behaviors during bathing, nursing home caregivers are in a unique position to improve residents' experience. This report addresses whether certified nursing assistants (CNAs) who received training in a person-centered approach with showering and with the…

  1. Post-Acute Home Care and Hospital Readmission of Elderly Patients with Congestive Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hong; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Proctor, Enola K.

    2004-01-01

    After inpatient hospitalization, many elderly patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are discharged home and receive post-acute home care from informal (family) caregivers and formal service providers. Hospital readmission rates are high among elderly patients with CHF, and it is thought that use of informal and formal services may reduce…

  2. Home Schooling in the United States: Trends and Characteristics. Working Paper No. 53.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauman, Kurt J.

    Home schooling has the potential to greatly impact the education system but has received little attention compared to other educational trends. This report draws on the 1994 October Current Population Survey and the 1996 and 1999 National Household Education Surveys (NHES) to determine the extent of home schooling and the social, demographic, and…

  3. The Arizona Home Language Survey: The Identification of Students for ELL Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldenberg, Claude; Rutherford-Quach, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Assuring that English language learners (ELLs) receive the services to which they have a right requires accurately identifying those students. Virtually all states identify ELLs in a two-step process. First, parents fill out a home language survey. Second, students in whose homes a language other than English is spoken and who therefore might…

  4. The Key to Me: Seniors' Perceptions of Relationship-Building with In-Home Service Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gantert, Thomas W.; McWilliam, Carol L.; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Allen, Natalie J.

    2008-01-01

    Changing demographics and hospital downsizing have placed increasing demands on the home care sector. Many of those receiving in-home care are seniors whose chronic conditions require a collaborative approach. Both providers' paternalistic orientations toward senior clients and seniors' passivity within provider-client interactions have the…

  5. The Social Context of Mother-Infant Relations: A Study of Home Based Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fein, Greta G.

    This paper describes the results of a longitudinal study which compared the effects of three types of home-based, parent-oriented, infant education curricula. One curriculum stressed language, another stressed play, and a third stressed social development. Mothers and children from 108 middle and working class families received home visits…

  6. HOME-BASED THERAPY FOR OEDEMATOUS MALNUTRITION WITH READY-TO-USE THERAPEUTIC FOOD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Standard recommendations are that children with oedematous malnutrition receive inpatient therapy with a graduated feeding regimen. Aim: To investigate exclusive home-based therapy for children with oedematous malnutrition. METHODS: Children with oedematous malnutrition, good appetite, a...

  7. There's No Place Like Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature: Senior Living There's No Place Like Home Past Issues / ... state offices on aging; social services organizations; nearby senior centers; and civic, tribal, and religious organizations. They ...

  8. Home apnea monitor use - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000755.htm Home apnea monitor use - infants To use the sharing features on this page, ... oxygen or a breathing machine How Does my Baby get Started on an Apnea Monitor? A home ...

  9. Removing Mold from Your Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mitigation Planning Hazus High Water Mark Initiative Home Hurricane Katrina Incident Management Assistance Teams Independent Study Program ... Flood-Damaged Home After natural disasters such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and floods, excess moisture and standing water ...

  10. Final Scientific/Technical Report: Context-Aware Smart Home Energy Manager (CASHEM)

    SciTech Connect

    Foslien, Wendy K; Curtner, Keith L

    2013-01-15

    Because of growing energy demands and shortages, residential home owners are turning to energy conservation measures and smart home energy management devices to help them reduce energy costs and live more sustainably. In this context, the Honeywell team researched, developed, and tested the Context Aware Smart Home Energy Manager (CASHEM) as a trusted advisor for home energy management. The project focused on connecting multiple devices in a home through a uniform user interface. The design of the user interface was an important feature of the project because it provided a single place for the homeowner to control all devices and was also where they received coaching. CASHEM then used data collected from homes to identify the contexts that affect operation of home appliances. CASHEM's goal was to reduce energy consumption while keeping the user's key needs satisfied. Thus, CASHEM was intended to find the opportunities to minimize energy consumption in a way that fit the user's lifestyle.

  11. Enhancing fire department home visiting programs: results of a community intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Gielen, Andrea C; Shields, Wendy; Frattaroli, Shannon; McDonald, Eileen; Jones, Vanya; Bishai, David; O'Brocki, Raymond; Perry, Elise C; Bates-Hopkins, Barbara; Tracey, Pat; Parsons, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of an enhanced fire department home visiting program on community participation and installation of smoke alarms, and describes the rate of fire and burn hazards observed in homes. Communities were randomly assigned to receive either a standard or enhanced home visiting program. Before implementing the program, 603 household surveys were completed to determine comparability between the communities. During a 1-year intervention period, 171 home visits took place with 8080 homes. At baseline, 60% of homes did not have working smoke alarms on every level, 44% had unsafe water temperatures, and 72% did not have carbon monoxide alarms. Residents in the enhanced community relative to those in the standard community were significantly more likely to let the fire fighters into their homes (75 vs 62%). Among entered homes, those in the enhanced community were significantly more likely to agree to have smoke alarms installed (95 vs 92%), to be left with a working smoke alarm on every level of the home (84 vs 78%), and to have more smoke alarms installed per home visited (1.89 vs 1.74). The high baseline rates of home hazards suggest that fire department home visiting programs should take an "all hazards" approach. Community health workers and community partnerships can be effective in promoting fire departments' fire and life safety goals. Public health academic centers should partner with the fire service to help generate evidence on program effectiveness that can inform decision making about resource allocation for prevention. PMID:23237821

  12. Affordability and other factors affecting the purchase of energy-efficient manufactured homes

    SciTech Connect

    Hattrup, M.P.; Lee, A.D.; Sandahl, L.J.; Onisko, S.A.

    1993-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) conducted this study to evaluate the manufactured home owner`s purchase decision process and to provide Bonneville with a better understanding of how consumers view a manufactured home`s affordability and energy efficiency. This study addresses manufactured homes built under the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) standards; these homes are sometimes referred to as HUD-code homes or mobile homes. Manufactured home owners in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington were included in this analysis. This report adds to the information presented in Sandahl et al. (1992), which discussed the practices of lenders, appraisers, and dealers -- all of whom play a key role in the manufactured home market due to the impact their practices have on the overall affordability of manufactured homes. This report focuses exclusively on the most important, and probably least understood, player -- the home buyer. The primary data were collected via a mail survey sent to 1,550 manufactured home owners in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington in late 1992. A 71% response rate was achieved; 1,106 usable responses were received. This study focuses on the Pacific Northwest but presents information that may be relevant to other parts of the country.

  13. Coe Receives 2007 Gilbert Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogue, Scott W.; Coe, Robert S.

    2008-05-01

    Robert S. Coe received the 2007 William Gilbert Award at the 2007 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. The award recognizes outstanding and unselfish work in magnetism of Earth materials and of the Earth and planets.

  14. The Good Enough Home? Home Environment and Outcomes of Young Maltreated Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Lara R.; Boris, Neil W.; Heller, Sherryl Scott; Rice, Janet; Zeanah, Charles H.; Clark, Cinda; Hawkins, Shantice

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mixed results in the literature related to type of permanent placement and developmental outcomes of maltreated children suggest differences in postmaltreatment placement environments may be an important mechanism to consider. Objective: The goal of this study was to identify how home environment variables mediate risk in maltreated…

  15. Quality Assurance in Nursing Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balgopal, Pallassana R.; And Others

    This manual, developed for the nursing home employee, examines the concept of quality assurance in nursing homes, describes the benefits of an effective quality assurance program, and provides guidelines to aid nursing homes in developing an appropriate quality assurance program. After a brief introduction, a working definition of quality…

  16. The New American Home 2011

    SciTech Connect

    2010-12-01

    The New American Home® is built annually as a showcase home for the International Builders’ Show® to demonstrate innovative technologies, construction techniques, products, and design trends for the homebuilding industry to use in any new or remodeled home.

  17. Guide to Home Energy Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-01

    A proper home energy assessment (also called a home energy audit) will tell you how much energy you use in your house, the most cost-effective measures you can take to improve the energy efficiency of your home, and how to save money on energy bills.

  18. Home Schooling Comes of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lines, Patricia M.

    1996-01-01

    As state legislators, school boards, and the public at large become more receptive, home-schoolers are gaining access to more resources, including those at public schools. Researchers disagree over home schooling's effects on academic achievement and social development. Home schooling could be an important resource for studying how children learn…

  19. Home Making Around the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Extension Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This book is designed to aid American home economists sent to other countries on technical assistance programs and home economists of other countries responsible for beginning such programs focused on the home and family. The information describes the pioneering experience of trained people in many countries and some ways in which basic principles…

  20. Home-Based Supervisor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Assessment Management, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    The Head Start home-based supervisor provides guidance, support, direction, and continuing staff development opportunities while attempting to maintain and improve quality of services to Head Start children and families. This guide is designed to help the home-based supervisor in carrying out responsibilities while supporting the home visitor, who…

  1. Legal Issues in Nursing Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapp, Marshall B.

    This paper examines the variety of legal rules and processes which have been established to assess and ensure that the quality of care provided in nursing homes satisfies an acceptable level. It begins with a general overview of nursing home law. Areas discussed in this section include: (1) sources of nursing home law; (2) theories of liability;…

  2. Can Intimacy Justify Home Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merry, Michael S.; Howell, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Many parents cite intimacy as one of their reasons for deciding to educate at home. It seems intuitively obvious that home education is conducive to intimacy because of the increased time families spend together. Yet what is not clear is whether intimacy can provide justification for one's decision to home educate. To see whether this is so, we…

  3. Streak camera receiver definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. B.; Hunkler, L. T., Sr.; Letzring, S. A.; Jaanimagi, P.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed streak camera definition studies were made as a first step toward full flight qualification of a dual channel picosecond resolution streak camera receiver for the Geoscience Laser Altimeter and Ranging System (GLRS). The streak camera receiver requirements are discussed as they pertain specifically to the GLRS system, and estimates of the characteristics of the streak camera are given, based upon existing and near-term technological capabilities. Important problem areas are highlighted, and possible corresponding solutions are discussed.

  4. Everyday Life in Distance Education: One Family's Home Schooling Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Nicole C.

    2006-01-01

    This article offers a narrative portrait of one family enrolled in a school of distance education in Queensland, Australia. Most of the families own or manage sheep and/or beef grazing properties, and their children receive their education by correspondence papers and daily UHF radio lessons. The students complete their school work at home with a…

  5. Homework: A Natural Means of Home-School Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olympia, Daniel E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Places homework in framework of emerging interest in development of effective home-school partnerships. Reviews homework literature, paying attention to parent-, teacher-, and child-mediated programs. Describes several homework programs that have received empirical support. Explores role of school psychologists in supporting and coordinating…

  6. Journey Home: A Multimedia Work in Progress on Homer's Odyssey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalker, Sandy; Whitney, Terri

    In 1992, North Shore Community College received a grant to develop a multimedia program for literature instruction based on Homer's "Odyssey." Rather than providing the text of the work, the program, "Journey Home," provides access to a wide array of related materials related to the "Odyssey," including 150 excerpts from critical essays, articles,…

  7. Social Support and the Receipt of Home Care Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Neena L.

    1985-01-01

    Compares differences between elderly who use formal home care services and those who do not. Data revealed users as less healthy and less active and as receiving more assistance from both formal and informal sources. Suggests that formal and informal services complement rather than substitute for one another. (NRB)

  8. A Profile of the Newly-Admitted Nursing Home Resident.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erber, Joan T.; Dye, Carol J.

    1982-01-01

    Recently admitted nursing home residents received a battery of psychological tests and were rated on a number of behavioral indices. Results revealed the morale/anxiety dimension was independent of cognitive competency, internally controlled residents were rated high by others in behavioral competency, and self-rating scales measure something…

  9. No Home, No Family: Homeless Children in Rural Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ronald K.; Johnson, Alice K.; Bremseth, Michael D.; Tracy, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    Statewide study of 455 Ohio children who received family preservation or reunification services found that the homeless child was more likely to be a child of color, to be younger, to have problems maintaining a bond with parents, and to be in a relative's home, and less likely to have behavior problems or successful service outcomes. Contains 22…

  10. An Evaluation of Home-Based Respite Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upshur, Carole C.

    1982-01-01

    Findings of an evaluation of a pilot home-based respite care program designed to serve 35 severely mentally retarded and disabled persons were reported. Results indicated that respite care services had never been previously received by 51.8% of the families. (Author/SB)

  11. Next generation digital GPS receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, G. B.; Yakos, Michael D.

    1990-07-01

    The architecture and technology features of the next-generation (NGR) digital GPS receiver manufactured by Collins are described. The project's objective was to develop an advanced GPS receiver chipset with high antijam capabilities. The program, initiated in 1985, has provided the technology for miniature receiver products for both unmanned and manned vehicle applications. A two-channel version of the receiver is currently in full-scale development for tactical missile applications. A five-channel version is being tested and evaluated as a drop-in replacement for RCVR-3A, the US Department of Defense standard high dynamic receiver. The NGR design started with the digital signal processing architecture developed for the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) hand-held GPS receiver. Enhancements were made to improve the antijam and signal acquisition performance. Producible, qualifiable and cost-effective silicon monolithic microwave integrated circuits and semicustom digital technologies were used to develop the core GPS chipset. A system design approach was established to permit reuse of mature and validated GPS software.

  12. Solar dynamic heat receiver technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedgwick, Leigh M.

    1991-01-01

    A full-size, solar dynamic heat receiver was designed to meet the requirements specified for electrical power modules on the U.S. Space Station, Freedom. The heat receiver supplies thermal energy to power a heat engine in a closed Brayton cycle using a mixture of helium-xenon gas as the working fluid. The electrical power output of the engine, 25 kW, requires a 100 kW thermal input throughout a 90 minute orbit, including when the spacecraft is eclipsed for up to 36 minutes from the sun. The heat receiver employs an integral thermal energy storage system utilizing the latent heat available through the phase change of a high-temperature salt mixture. A near eutectic mixture of lithium fluoride and calcium difluoride is used as the phase change material. The salt is contained within a felt metal matrix which enhances heat transfer and controls the salt void distribution during solidification. Fabrication of the receiver is complete and it was delivered to NASA for verification testing in a simulated low-Earth-orbit environment. This document reviews the receiver design and describes its fabrication history. The major elements required to operate the receiver during testing are also described.

  13. Low cost airborne microwave landing system receiver, task 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, J. B.; Vancleave, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Work performed on the low cost airborne Microwave Landing System (MLS) receiver is summarized. A detailed description of the prototype low cost MLS receiver is presented. This detail includes block diagrams, schematics, board assembly drawings, photographs of subassemblies, mechanical construction, parts lists, and microprocessor software. Test procedures are described and results are presented.

  14. American Academy of Home Care Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletter Certification/Training Donate Featured Members Home Care Medicine in America The American Academy of Home Care ... Resources with the American Academy of Home Care Medicine. The American Academy of Home Care Medicine understands ...

  15. Jobs with Service Programs: Home Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Anne

    1976-01-01

    A review of the kinds of jobs available in services developed to help the homebound elderly: Home health care, homemaker-home health aide, chore service, home repair and maintenance, home-delivered meals, telephone reassurance, and friendly visiting. (JT)

  16. SCI Hospital in Home Program: Bringing Hospital Care Home for Veterans With Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Madaris, Linda L; Onyebueke, Mirian; Liebman, Janet; Martin, Allyson

    2016-01-01

    The complex nature of spinal cord injury (SCI) and the level of care required for health maintenance frequently result in repeated hospital admissions for recurrent medical complications. Prolonged hospitalizations of persons with SCI have been linked to the increased risk of hospital-acquired infections and development or worsening pressure ulcers. An evidence-based alternative for providing hospital-level care to patients with specific diagnoses who are willing to receive that level of care in the comfort of their home is being implemented in a Department of Veterans Affairs SCI Home Care Program. The SCI Hospital in Home (HiH) model is similar to a patient-centered interdisciplinary care model that was first introduced in Europe and later tested as part of a National Demonstration and Evaluation Study through Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and School of Public Health. This was funded by the John A. Hartford Foundation and the Department of Veterans Affairs. The objectives of the program are to support veterans' choice and access to patient-centered care, reduce the reliance on inpatient medical care, allow for early discharge, and decrease medical costs. Veterans with SCI who are admitted to the HiH program receive daily oversight by a physician, daily visits by a registered nurse, access to laboratory services, oxygen, intravenous medications, and nursing care in the home setting. In this model, patients may typically access HiH services either as an "early discharge" from the hospital or as a direct admit to the program from the emergency department or SCI clinic. Similar programs providing acute hospital-equivalent care in the home have been previously implemented and are successfully demonstrating decreased length of stay, improved patient access, and increased patient satisfaction. PMID:26938182

  17. 76 FR 21790 - Petition for Exemption; Summary of Petition Received

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-18

    ... published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78). Docket: To read background documents or comments received, go... mechanism by flight crews, allowing them to operate the aft stairs from within the aircraft while on...

  18. 78 FR 39825 - Petition for Exemption; Summary of Petition Received

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... (65 FR 19477-78). Docket: To read background documents or comments received, go to http://www... effective mechanic certificate, with both an airframe rating and a powerplant rating, which has been...

  19. Healthy Homes University: A Home-Based Environmental Intervention and Education Program for Families with Pediatric Asthma in Michigan

    PubMed Central

    Largo, Thomas W.; Borgialli, Michele; Wisinski, Courtney L.; Wahl, Robert L.; Priem, Wesley F.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental conditions within the home can exacerbate asthmatic children's symptoms. To improve health outcomes among this group, we implemented an in-home environmental public health program—Healthy Homes University—for low-income families in Lansing, Michigan, from 2005 to 2008. Families received four visits during a six-month intervention. Program staff assessed homes for asthma triggers and subsequently provided products and services to reduce exposures to cockroaches, dust mites, mold, tobacco smoke, and other triggers. We also provided asthma education that included identification of asthma triggers and instructions on specific behaviors to reduce exposures. Based on self-reported data collected from 243 caregivers at baseline and six months, the impact of asthma on these children was substantially reduced, and the proportion who sought acute unscheduled health care for their asthma decreased by more than 47%. PMID:21563708

  20. Hammering Home Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Carl

    1998-01-01

    In Wise County, Virginia, the If I Had a Hammer Housing Construction and Rehabilitation Program teaches the construction trades to local men and women receiving county housing assistance, while rehabilitating local housing. Trainees work for minimum wage, attend classes eight hours per week without pay, and receive support services and high school…

  1. [Accidents in nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Mediås, I B; Fiskerud, R

    1991-08-20

    169 "injury situations" involving 61 patients were registered in a nursing home during one year. Four patients were sent to hospital. A few patients had several falls. Men were more prone to injury than women. Age itself seemed to be of no importance. Patients on shortterm admittance were at high risk. In general patients with dementia were not at higher risk but suffered the more serious injuries and were also involved in various episodes of patient violence. The risk of injuries is generally high in nursing homes. A certain risk must be accepted, but it is important to introduce prophylactic measures. A larger nursing staff might have prevented some of the situations. PMID:1926073

  2. Hydropathy at Home:

    PubMed Central

    Marland, Hilary; Adams, Jane

    2009-01-01

    This article explores domestic practices of hydropathy in Britain, suggesting that these formed a major contribution to the popularity of the system in the mid-nineteenth century. Domestic hydropathy was encouraged by hydropathic practitioners in their manuals and in the training they provided at their establishments. We argue that hydropathy can be seen as belonging to two interacting spheres, the hydro and the home, and was associated with a mission to encourage self-healing practices as well as commercial interests. Home treatments were advocated as a follow-up to attendance at hydros and encouraged as a low-cost option for those unable to afford such visits. Domestic hydropathy emphasized the high profile of the patient and was depicted as being especially appropriate for women, though in many households it appears to have been a common concern between husbands and wives. PMID:19801794

  3. [Aromatherapy in nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Barré, Lucile

    2015-01-01

    Pierre Delaroche de Clisson hospital uses essential oils as part of its daily organisation for the treatment of pain and the development of palliative care. The setting up of this project, in nursing homes and long-term care units, is the fruit of a complex mission carried out by a multidisciplinary team, which had to take into account the risks involved and overcome a certain amount of reluctance. PMID:26154352

  4. PPM Receiver Implemented in Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Andrew; Kang, Edward; Lay, Norman; Vilnrotter, Victor; Srinivasan, Meera; Lee, Clement

    2010-01-01

    A computer program has been written as a tool for developing optical pulse-position- modulation (PPM) receivers in which photodetector outputs are fed to analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) and all subsequent signal processing is performed digitally. The program can be used, for example, to simulate an all-digital version of the PPM receiver described in Parallel Processing of Broad-Band PPM Signals (NPO-40711), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The program can also be translated into a design for digital PPM receiver hardware. The most notable innovation embodied in the software and the underlying PPM-reception concept is a digital processing subsystem that performs synchronization of PPM time slots, even though the digital processing is, itself, asynchronous in the sense that no attempt is made to synchronize it with the incoming optical signal a priori and there is no feedback to analog signal processing subsystems or ADCs. Functions performed by the software receiver include time-slot synchronization, symbol synchronization, coding preprocessing, and diagnostic functions. The program is written in the MATLAB and Simulink software system. The software receiver is highly parameterized and, hence, programmable: for example, slot- and symbol-synchronization filters have programmable bandwidths.

  5. Fused silica windows for solar receiver applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, Johannes; Uhlig, Ralf; Söhn, Matthias; Schenk, Christian; Helsch, Gundula; Bornhöft, Hansjörg

    2016-05-01

    A comprehensive study of optical and mechanical properties of quartz glass (fused silica) with regard to application in high temperature solar receivers is presented. The dependence of rupture strength on different surface conditions as well as high temperature is analyzed, focussing particularly on damage by devitrification and sandblasting. The influence of typical types of contamination in combination with thermal cycling on the optical properties of fused silica is determined. Cleaning methods are compared regarding effectiveness on contamination-induced degradation for samples with and without antireflective coating. The FEM-aided design of different types of receiver windows and their support structure is presented. A large-scale production process has been developed for producing fused silica dome shaped windows (pressurized window) up to a diameter of 816 mm. Prototypes were successfully pressure-tested in a test bench and certified according to the European Pressure Vessel Directive.

  6. Manufactured Homes Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-03-09

    The MH Tool software is designed to evaluate existing and new manufactured homes for structural adequacy in high winds. Users define design elements of a manufactured home and then select the hazard(s) for analysis. MH Tool then calculates and reports structural analysis results for the specified design and hazard Method of Solution: Design engineers input information (geometries, materials, etc.) describing the structure of a manufactured home, from which the software automatically creates a mathematical model.more » Windows, doors, and interior walls can be added to the initial design. HUD Code loads (wind, snow loads, interior live loads, etc.) are automatically applied. A finite element analysis is automatically performed using a third party solver to find forces and stresses throughout the structure. The designer may then employ components of strength (and cost) most appropriate for the loads that must be carried at each location, and then re-run the analysis for verification. If forces and stresses are still within tolerable limits (such as the HUD requirements), construction costs would be reduced without sacrificing quality.« less

  7. Manufactured Homes Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2005-03-09

    The MH Tool software is designed to evaluate existing and new manufactured homes for structural adequacy in high winds. Users define design elements of a manufactured home and then select the hazard(s) for analysis. MH Tool then calculates and reports structural analysis results for the specified design and hazard Method of Solution: Design engineers input information (geometries, materials, etc.) describing the structure of a manufactured home, from which the software automatically creates a mathematical model. Windows, doors, and interior walls can be added to the initial design. HUD Code loads (wind, snow loads, interior live loads, etc.) are automatically applied. A finite element analysis is automatically performed using a third party solver to find forces and stresses throughout the structure. The designer may then employ components of strength (and cost) most appropriate for the loads that must be carried at each location, and then re-run the analysis for verification. If forces and stresses are still within tolerable limits (such as the HUD requirements), construction costs would be reduced without sacrificing quality.

  8. Robust quantum receivers for coherent state discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, Francisco Elohim

    2014-05-01

    Quantum state discrimination is a central task for quantum information and is a fundamental problem in quantum mechanics. Nonorthogonal states, such as coherent states which have intrinsic quantum noise, cannot be discriminated with total certainty because of their intrinsic overlap. This nonorthogonality is at the heart of quantum key distribution for ensuring absolute secure communications between a transmitter and a receiver, and can enable many quantum information protocols based on coherent states. At the same time, while coherent states are used for communications because of their robustness to loss and simplicity of generation and detection, their nonorthogonality inherently produces errors in the process of decoding the information. The minimum error probability in the discrimination of nonorthogonal coherent states measured by an ideal lossless and noiseless conventional receiver is given by the standard quantum limit (SQL). This limit sets strict bounds on the ultimate performance of coherent communications and many coherent-state-based quantum information protocols. However, measurement strategies based on the quantum properties of these states can allow for better measurements that surpass the SQL and approach the ultimate measurement limits allowed by quantum mechanics. These measurement strategies can allow for optimally extracting information encoded in these states for coherent and quantum communications. We present the demonstration of a receiver based on adaptive measurements and single-photon counting that unconditionally discriminates multiple nonorthogonal coherent states below the SQL. We also discuss the potential of photon-number-resolving detection to provide robustness and high sensitivity under realistic conditions for an adaptive coherent receiver with detectors with finite photon-number resolution.

  9. Reduction of convective losses in solar cavity receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Graham; Pye, John; Kaufer, Martin; Abbasi-Shavazi, Ehsan; Zhang, Jack; McIntosh, Adam; Lindley, Tim

    2016-05-01

    Two design innovations are reported that can help improve the thermal performance of a solar cavity receiver. These innovations utilise the natural variation of wall temperature inside the cavity and active management of airflow in the vicinity of the receiver. The results of computational fluid dynamics modelling and laboratory-scale experiments suggest that the convective loss from a receiver can be reduced substantially by either mechanism. A further benefit is that both radiative and overall thermal losses from the cavity may be reduced. Further work to assess the performance of such receiver designs under operational conditions is discussed.

  10. Hospice management of patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy: problems and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Hicks, F; Corcoran, G

    1993-12-01

    In Britain, the specialty of palliative medicine continues to develop, encouraging the referral of patients early in the palliative phase of their illness. This had led to an increased number of patients receiving palliative chemotherapy and hospice care concurrently, posing special problems to the professionals involved. In this retrospective study, 52 patients were identified who received chemotherapy and hospice care simultaneously. Case notes were reviewed to reveal problems arising from sharing the duty of care. The poor quality of communication between professionals, perhaps reflecting a limited understanding of the various roles in patient care, we found to cause significant difficulties. The duration and discontinuation of cytotoxic therapy seems to be a particularly difficult matter. Hospice admission often signalled the end of this treatment. In a third of the patients, no decision was taken to stop chemotherapy despite the last dose being an average of just 1 week before death. The value of chemotherapy for patients who are too ill to return home is questioned. Seven patients were diagnosed as suffering from chemotherapy-induced sepsis and neutropenia either by hospice inpatient or home care teams, and were admitted to their acute centres accordingly. Most patients who died during the study period received terminal care in the hospice. Suggestions are made on improving professional education and communication, including the use of a 'chemotherapy card'. PMID:7505105

  11. Measure Guideline: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, R.

    2014-02-01

    This report, developed by Building America research team CARB, addresses adding or improving mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The goal of this report is to assist decision makers and contractors in making informed decisions when selecting ventilation systems for homes. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including examination of relevant codes and standards. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors.

  12. Frequency synthesizers for telemetry receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stirling, Ronald C.

    1990-07-01

    The design of a frequency synthesizer is presented for telemetry receivers. The synthesizer contains two phase-locked loops, each with a programmable frequency counter, and incorporates fractional frequency synthesis but does not use a phase accumulator. The selected receiver design has a variable reference loop operating as a part of the output loop. Within the synthesizer, a single VTO generates the output frequency that is voltage-tunable from 375-656 MHz. The single-sideband phase noise is measured with an HP 8566B spectrum analyzer, and the receiver's bit error rate (BER) is measured with a carrier frequency of 250 MHz, synthesized LO at 410 MHz, and the conditions of BPSK, NRZ-L, and 2.3 kHz bit rate. The phase noise measurement limits and the BER performance data are presented in tabular form.

  13. Receiver-exciter controller design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansma, P. A.

    1982-06-01

    A description of the general design of both the block 3 and block 4 receiver-exciter controllers for the Deep Space Network (DSN) Mark IV-A System is presented along with the design approach. The controllers are designed to enable the receiver-exciter subsystem (RCV) to be configured, calibrated, initialized and operated from a central location via high level instructions. The RECs are designed to be operated under the control of the DMC subsystem. The instructions are in the form of standard subsystem blocks (SSBs) received via the local area network (LAN). The centralized control provided by RECs and other DSCC controllers in Mark IV-A is intended to reduce DSN operations costs from the Mark III era.

  14. Receiver-exciter controller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansma, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    A description of the general design of both the block 3 and block 4 receiver-exciter controllers for the Deep Space Network (DSN) Mark IV-A System is presented along with the design approach. The controllers are designed to enable the receiver-exciter subsystem (RCV) to be configured, calibrated, initialized and operated from a central location via high level instructions. The RECs are designed to be operated under the control of the DMC subsystem. The instructions are in the form of standard subsystem blocks (SSBs) received via the local area network (LAN). The centralized control provided by RECs and other DSCC controllers in Mark IV-A is intended to reduce DSN operations costs from the Mark III era.

  15. Central solar-energy receiver

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-10-27

    An improved tower-mounted central solar energy receiver for heating air drawn through the receiver by an induced draft fan is described. A number of vertically oriented, energy absorbing, fin-shaped slats are radially arranged in a number of concentric cylindrical arrays on top of the tower coaxially surrounding a pipe having air holes through which the fan draws air which is heated by the slats which receive the solar radiation from a heliostat field. A number of vertically oriented and wedge-shaped columns are radially arranged in a number of concentric cylindrical clusters surrounding the slat arrays. The columns have two mirror-reflecting sides to reflect radiation into the slat arrays and one energy absorbing side to reduce reradiation and reflection from the slat arrays.

  16. The GBT 4mm Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frayer, David T.; White, S.; Watts, G.; Stennes, M.; Maddalena, R. J.; Simon, R.; Pospieszalski, M.; Bryerton, E.

    2013-01-01

    The new 4mm receiver (67--93 GHz) for the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) was built to take advantage of the improved surface accuracy of the dish. The low frequency end of the 3mm atmospheric window is not available with ALMA (<84 GHz), and the sensitivity of the GBT is better than any other facility within this band. We discuss the design and performance of this new receiver for the GBT, and highlight the science opportunities available with the instrument. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  17. Digital Receiver for Microwave Radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellingson, Steven W.; Hampson, Grant A.; Johnson, Joel T.

    2005-01-01

    A receiver proposed for use in L-band microwave radiometry (for measuring soil moisture and sea salinity) would utilize digital signal processing to suppress interfering signals. Heretofore, radio frequency interference has made it necessary to limit such radiometry to a frequency band about 20 MHz wide, centered at .1,413 MHz. The suppression of interference in the proposed receiver would make it possible to expand the frequency band to a width of 100 MHz, thereby making it possible to obtain greater sensitivity and accuracy in measuring moisture and salinity

  18. Optical receivers using rough reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V. A.

    1985-01-01

    This report examines the possible use of rough, or nondiffraction-limited, reflectors for collecting optical signals. It is shown that in the absence of background radiation, the reflector's surface quality has little effect on the performance of a properly designed receiver, but that the presence of even small amounts of background radiation can lead to severe performance degradation. Techniques are suggested for improving receiver performance in high-background environments, and bounds and approximations to the exact error-probability expressions are derived.

  19. Technology Solutions for New Manufactured Homes: Idaho, Oregon, and Washington Manufactured Home Builders (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    The Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and Northwest Energy Works (NEW), the current Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program (NEEM) administrator, have been collaborating to conduct research on new specifications that would improve on the energy requirements of a NEEM home. In its role as administrator, NEW administers the technical specs, performs research and engineering analysis, implements ongoing construction quality management procedures, and maintains a central database with home tracking. This project prototyped and assessed the performances of cost-effective high performance building assemblies and mechanical systems that are not commonly deployed in the manufacturing setting. The package of measures is able to reduce energy used for space conditioning, water heating and lighting by 50 percent over typical manufactured homes produced in the northwest.

  20. Variations in levels of care between nursing home patients in a public health care system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Within the setting of a public health service we analyse the distribution of resources between individuals in nursing homes funded by global budgets. Three questions are pursued. Firstly, whether there are systematic variations between nursing homes in the level of care given to patients. Secondly, whether such variations can be explained by nursing home characteristics. And thirdly, how individual need-related variables are associated with differences in the level of care given. Methods The study included 1204 residents in 35 nursing homes and extra care sheltered housing facilities. Direct time spent with patients was recorded. In average each patient received 14.8 hours direct care each week. Multilevel regression analysis is used to analyse the relationship between individual characteristics, nursing home characteristics and time spent with patients in nursing homes. The study setting is the city of Trondheim, with a population of approximately 180 000. Results There are large variations between nursing homes in the total amount of individual care given to patients. As much as 24 percent of the variation of individual care between patients could be explained by variation between nursing homes. Adjusting for structural nursing home characteristics did not substantially reduce the variation between nursing homes. As expected a negative association was found between individual care and case-mix, implying that at nursing home level a more resource demanding case-mix is compensated by lowering the average amount of care. At individual level ADL-disability is the strongest predictor for use of resources in nursing homes. For the average user one point increase in ADL-disability increases the use of resources with 27 percent. Conclusion In a financial reimbursement model for nursing homes with no adjustment for case-mix, the amount of care patients receive does not solely depend on the patients’ own needs, but also on the needs of all the other residents

  1. Support and maneuvering apparatus for solar energy receivers

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Lawrence M.

    1989-01-01

    A support and maneuvering apparatus is disclosed for a solar energy receiving device adpated for receiving and concentrating solar energy and having a central axis extending through the center thereof. The apparatus includes a frame for mounting the perimeter of said solar energy receiving device. A support member extends along the central axis of the receiving device and has a base end passing through the center of the receiving device and an outer distal end adapted for carrying a solar energy receiving and conversion mechanism. A variable tension mechanism interconnects the support member with the frame to provide stiffening for the support member and the frame and to assist in the alignment of the frame to optimize the optical efficiency of the solar energy receiving device. A rotatable base is provided, and connecting members extend from the base for pivotable attachment to the frame at spaced positions therealong. Finally, an elevation assembly is connected to the receiving device for selectively pivoting the receiving device about an axis defined between the attachment positions of the connecting members on the frame.

  2. Support and maneuvering apparatus for solar energy receivers

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, L.M.

    1988-07-28

    A support and maneuvering apparatus is disclosed for a solar energy receiving device adapted for receiving and concentrating solar energy and having a central axis extending through the center thereof. The apparatus includes a frame for mounting the perimeter of said solar energy receiving device. A support member extends along the central axis of the receiving device and has a base end passing through the center of the receiving device and an outer distal end adapted for carrying a solar energy receiving and conversion mechanism. A variable tension mechanism interconnects the support member with the frame to provide stiffening for the support member and the frame and to assist in the alignment of the frame to optimize the optical efficiency of the solar energy receiving device. A rotatable base is provided, and connecting members extend from the base for pivotable attachment to the frame at spaced positions therealong. Finally, an elevation assembly is connected to the receiving device for selectively pivoting the receiving about an axis defined between the attachment positions of the connecting members on the frame. 4 figs.

  3. Introducing information technology into the home: conducting a home assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Zayas-Cabán, Teresa

    2002-01-01

    Abstract As the home becomes an increasingly important site for health care, an increasing number of technology applications or devices are being introduced to support health at home. However, introducing new technology into a household raises a number of issues that must be considered prior to, during, and after the technology is implemented. This paper reviews the experiences of the UW-Madison Advanced Technologies for Health@Home Project, summarizing our assessment of household requirements that should be analyzed prior to introducing new technology. The overall goal of the Health@Home project is to improve the functionality and content of information technology innovations for the home. Using Venkatesh and Mazumdar's framework this article will summarize the relevant social, behavioral, technological, and physical dimensions of households that must be carefully assessed and understood to help ensure that the technology fits the needs of home residents. PMID:12463960

  4. Pulsed lavage: promoting comfort and healing in home care.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D; Hoelscher, J

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if hydrodebridement with pulsed lavage facilitates the removal of necrotic tissue, promotes healing, and increases comfort in the homebound patient. Home healthcare provides cost-effective care in the setting that is most conducive to healing. People want to be at home, yet many illnesses require services that cannot be obtained at home. Wound care sometimes falls into this category. Pulsed lavage has expanded treatment options for the homebound patient. Hydrodebridement with pulsed lavage is site specific, avoids cross contamination, and is less expensive than whirlpool therapy. It also may facilitate the removal of necrotic tissue and promote the formation of healthy granulation tissue. The authors performed a retrospective audit to gather data on 28 patients who received pulsed lavage treatments at home. A descriptive analysis of five variables that affect healing was undertaken including mobility/activity, nutritional status, cardiovascular/respiratory status, continence, and sensory perception. All of the clients in the sample achieved a clean, warm, moist wound bed, free of signs and symptoms of infection, absence of necrotic tissue, and the presence of granulation tissue to meet the definition of "ready for healing" as presented in the literature. The majority of clients experienced no pain. Although comorbid conditions required rehospitalization for 35.7% of the sample, the conditions did not interfere with healing. Hydrodebridement with pulsed lavage is a viable nontraumatic, noninvasive, site-specific treatment alternative for patients receiving care in the home. PMID:10788926

  5. Galileo probe relay receiver - Acquisition and tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Der Embse, U. A.

    1983-01-01

    The probe-to-orbiter data link for the Jovian mission uses a Manchester encoded BPSK waveform which is demodulated by the Galileo probe relay receiver. Signal acquisition and tracking consists of a sequential probability ratio signal search, frequency acquisition with a least-squares estimator, wide-band phase lock acquisition, and a self-regulating mode control. A discrete Fourier transform serves as the basic mechanism to generate the algorithms that provide this orderly transition to phase tracking. Acquisition and tracking is addressed in this paper with emphasis on key algorithms, rationale, and theoretical/measured performance.

  6. Microwave blackbodies for spaceborne receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of microwave blackbody targets are explained as they apply to the calibration of spaceborne receivers. Also described are several practicable, blackbody targets used to test and calibrate receivers in the laboratory and in the thermal vacuum chamber. Problems with the precision and the accuracy of blackbody targets, and blackbody target design concepts that overcome some of the accuracy limitations present in existing target designs, are presented. The principle of the Brewster angle blackbody target is described where the blackbody is applied as a fixed-temperature test target in the laboratory and as a variable-temperature target in the thermal vacuum chamber. The reflectivity of a Brewster angle target is measured in the laboratory. From this measurement, the emissivity of the target is calculated. Radiatively cooled thermal suspensions are discussed as the coolants of blackbody targets and waveguide terminations that function as calibration devices in spaceborne receivers. Examples are given for the design of radiatively cooled thermal suspensions. Corrugated-horn antennas used to observe the cosmic background and to provide a cold-calibration source for spaceborne receivers are described.

  7. RFID receiver apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jeffrey Wayne

    2006-12-26

    An RFID backscatter interrogator for transmitting data to an RFID tag, generating a carrier for the tag, and receiving data from the tag modulated onto the carrier, the interrogator including a single grounded-coplanar wave-guide circuit board and at least one surface mount integrated circuit supported by the circuit board.

  8. Advances in SIS receiver technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frerking, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    Significant advances in SIS receiver technology since the last Asilomar meeting include: superconductor materials, integrated inductive tuning elements, and planar mounting structures. The effect of these advances is to push the upper frequency operating limit from about 600 to 1500 GHz, and to enhance the feasibility of focal plane arrays of heterodyne receivers. A fundamental high frequency operating limit of SIS mixers is set by the superconducting energy gap. A practical limitation for high frequency operation of SIS junctions is their parasitic capacitance and resistance. The performance of the mixer will be degraded by the Resistor-Capacitor rolloff. Several designs were reported for inductive elements integrated on the same substrate as the SIS junctions to tune out the bulk junction capacitance. Most millimeter SIS-based heterodyne receivers have used waveguide coupling structures. Technology has advanced to the state where programs that have a high probability of success can be defined to produce arrays of SIS receivers for frequencies as high as 1500 GHz.

  9. Clark Receives Ocean Sciences Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Michael R.; Clark, H. Lawrence

    2008-09-01

    H. Lawrence Clark received the 2008 Ocean Sciences Award at the 2008 Ocean Sciences Meeting, held 2-7 March 2008 in Orlando, Fla. The award is given in recognition of outstanding and long-standing service to the ocean sciences.

  10. Converting accounts receivable into cash.

    PubMed

    Folk, M D; Roest, P R

    1995-09-01

    In recent years, increasing numbers of healthcare providers have converted their accounts receivable into cash through a process called securitization. This practice has gained popularity because it provides a means to raise capital necessary to healthcare organizations. Although securitization transactions can be complex, they may provide increased financial flexibility to providers as they prepare for continuing change in the healthcare industry. PMID:10145096

  11. Alert management for home healthcare based on home automation analysis.

    PubMed

    Truong, T T; de Lamotte, F; Diguet, J-Ph; Said-Hocine, F

    2010-01-01

    Rising healthcare for elder and disabled people can be controlled by offering people autonomy at home by means of information technology. In this paper, we present an original and sensorless alert management solution which performs multimedia and home automation service discrimination and extracts highly regular home activities as sensors for alert management. The results of simulation data, based on real context, allow us to evaluate our approach before application to real data. PMID:21096576

  12. The effects of receiving a rape disclosure: college friends' stories.

    PubMed

    Branch, Kathryn A; Richards, Tara N

    2013-05-01

    Research suggests that college women are at greater risk for rape and sexual assault than women in the general population or in a comparable age group. College women, away from home and family, may turn to friends for support. Friends may experience emotional reactions that affect their own functioning and may not feel they have anywhere to turn. In this study, we interviewed male and female college students who had received a rape disclosure from a friend. Their unique stories provide insight into the secondary effects of rape disclosure on friends. Implications of these findings for college campuses are discussed. PMID:23743351

  13. HomeADL for adaptive ADL monitoring within smart homes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xin; Nugent, Chris D; Finlay, Dewar D; Mulvenna, Maurice

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present homeADL: a representation standard for an inference hierarchy of activities of daily living which may be monitored in a sensor equipped smart home. The approach allows a free exchange of ADL monitoring structures between different communities who share the same concern of providing high quality healthcare to the elderly. Its ability of matching different ADL protocols enables a mapping between an ADL protocol to a suitable smart home which makes an effective management of smart homes within a community hence, not only being able to satisfy an individual's healthcare requirements but also efficiently using monitoring resources at hand. PMID:19163419

  14. Lighting Options for Homes.

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, W.S.

    1991-04-01

    This report covers many aspects of various lighting options for homes. Types of light sources described include natural light, artificial light, incandescent lamps, fluorescent lamps, and high intensity discharge lamps. A light source selection guide gives the physical characteristics of these, design considerations, and common applications. Color, strategies for efficient lighting, and types of lighting are discussed. There is one section giving tips for various situations in specific rooms. Rooms and types of fixtures are shown on a matrix with watts saved by using the recommended type lighting for that room and room location. A major emphasis of this report is saving energy by utilizing the most suitable, recommended lighting option. (BN)

  15. Home care for brain tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Andrea; Villani, Veronica; Di Pasquale, Antonella; Benincasa, Dario; Guariglia, Lara; Ieraci, Sonia; Focarelli, Silvia; Carapella, Carmine Maria; Pompili, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Background Brain tumor patients are quite different from other populations of cancer patients due to the complexity of supportive care needs, the trajectory of disease, the very short life expectancy, and resulting need for a specific palliative approach. Methods A pilot program of comprehensive palliative care for brain tumor patients was started in the Regina Elena National Cancer Institute of Rome in October 2000, supported by the Lazio Regional Health System. The aim of this model of assistance was to meet patient's needs for care in all stages of disease, support the families, and reduce the rehospitalization rate. The efficacy of the model of care was evaluated analyzing the place of death, caregiver satisfaction, rehospitalization rate, and the impact on costs to the health system. Results From October 2000 to December 2012, 848 patients affected by brain tumor were enrolled in a comprehensive program of neuro-oncological home care. Out of 529 patients who died, 323 (61%) were assisted at home until death, 117 (22.2%) died in hospital, and 89 (16.8%) died in hospice. A cost-effectiveness analysis demonstrated a significant reduction in hospital readmission rates in the last 2 months of life compared with the control group (16.7% vs 38%; P < .001). Conclusions Our findings concerning death at home, rehospitalization rate, quality of life, and satisfaction of patients and their relatives with the care received suggest that a neuro-oncologic palliative home-care program has a positive impact on the quality of care for brain tumor patients, particularly at the end of life. PMID:26034609

  16. Research on the model of home networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Xiang; Feng, Xiancheng

    2007-11-01

    It is the research hotspot of current broadband network to combine voice service, data service and broadband audio-video service by IP protocol to transport various real time and mutual services to terminal users (home). Home Networking is a new kind of network and application technology which can provide various services. Home networking is called as Digital Home Network. It means that PC, home entertainment equipment, home appliances, Home wirings, security, illumination system were communicated with each other by some composing network technology, constitute a networking internal home, and connect with WAN by home gateway. It is a new network technology and application technology, and can provide many kinds of services inside home or between homes. Currently, home networking can be divided into three kinds: Information equipment, Home appliances, Communication equipment. Equipment inside home networking can exchange information with outer networking by home gateway, this information communication is bidirectional, user can get information and service which provided by public networking by using home networking internal equipment through home gateway connecting public network, meantime, also can get information and resource to control the internal equipment which provided by home networking internal equipment. Based on the general network model of home networking, there are four functional entities inside home networking: HA, HB, HC, and HD. (1) HA (Home Access) - home networking connects function entity; (2) HB (Home Bridge) Home networking bridge connects function entity; (3) HC (Home Client) - Home networking client function entity; (4) HD (Home Device) - decoder function entity. There are many physical ways to implement four function entities. Based on theses four functional entities, there are reference model of physical layer, reference model of link layer, reference model of IP layer and application reference model of high layer. In the future home network

  17. Transient simulation of molten salt central receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doupis, Dimitri; Wang, Chuan; Carcorze-Soto, Jorge; Chen, Yen-Ming; Maggi, Andrea; Losito, Matteo; Clark, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Alstom is developing concentrated solar power (CSP) utilizing 60/40wt% NaNO3-KNO3 molten salt as the working fluid in a tower receiver for the global renewable energy market. In the CSP power generation cycle, receivers undergo a daily cyclic operation due to the transient nature of solar energy. Development of robust and efficient start-up and shut-down procedures is critical to avoiding component failures due to mechanical fatigue resulting from thermal transients, thus maintaining the performance and availability of the CSP plant. The Molten Salt Central Receiver (MSCR) is subject to thermal transients during normal daily operation, a cycle that includes warmup, filling, operation, draining, and shutdown. This paper describes a study to leverage dynamic simulation and finite element analysis (FEA) in development of start-up, shutdown, and transient operation concepts for the MSCR. The results of the FEA also verify the robustness of the MSCR design to the thermal transients anticipated during the operation of the plant.

  18. Home-based care, technology, and the maintenance of selves.

    PubMed

    Parks, Jennifer A

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, I will argue that there is a deep connection between home-based care, technology, and the self. Providing the means for persons (especially older persons) to receive care at home is not merely a kindness that respects their preference to be at home: it is an important means of extending their selfhood and respecting the unique selves that they are. Home-based technologies like telemedicine and robotic care may certainly be useful tools in providing care for persons at home, but they also have important implications for sustaining selfhood in ways that are of value to individuals and those who care for them. I will argue, by appealing to Hilde Lindemann's notion of "holding" persons' identities in place, that technological interventions are not only useful tools for improving and sustaining health and good care at home, but that they may also help to extend our personal identities and relational capacities in ways that are practically and ethically good. Because of these important goods, I will claim that there is a prima facie moral duty to do this "holding" work and that it is best done by family members and loved ones who are well suited to the job because of their history and relationship with the individual that needs to be "held" in place. PMID:25787720

  19. Care on demand in nursing homes: a queueing theoretic approach.

    PubMed

    van Eeden, Karin; Moeke, Dennis; Bekker, René

    2016-09-01

    Nursing homes face ever-tightening healthcare budgets and are searching for ways to increase the efficiency of their healthcare processes without losing sight of the needs of their residents. Optimizing the allocation of care workers plays a key role in this search as care workers are responsible for the daily care of the residents and account for a significant proportion of the total labor expenses. In practice, the lack of reliable data makes it difficult for nursing home managers to make informed staffing decisions. The focus of this study lies on the 'care on demand' process in a Belgian nursing home. Based on the analysis of real-life 'call button' data, a queueing model is presented which can be used by nursing home managers to determine the number of care workers required to meet a specific service level. Based on numerical experiments an 80/10 service level is proposed for this nursing home, meaning that at least 80 percent of the clients should receive care within 10 minutes after a call button request. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to develop a quantitative model for the 'care on demand' process in a nursing home. PMID:25542224

  20. Climate@Home: Crowdsourcing Climate Change Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Yang, C.; Li, J.; Sun, M.; Bambacus, M.

    2011-12-01

    Climate change deeply impacts human wellbeing. Significant amounts of resources have been invested in building super-computers that are capable of running advanced climate models, which help scientists understand climate change mechanisms, and predict its trend. Although climate change influences all human beings, the general public is largely excluded from the research. On the other hand, scientists are eagerly seeking communication mediums for effectively enlightening the public on climate change and its consequences. The Climate@Home project is devoted to connect the two ends with an innovative solution: crowdsourcing climate computing to the general public by harvesting volunteered computing resources from the participants. A distributed web-based computing platform will be built to support climate computing, and the general public can 'plug-in' their personal computers to participate in the research. People contribute the spare computing power of their computers to run a computer model, which is used by scientists to predict climate change. Traditionally, only super-computers could handle such a large computing processing load. By orchestrating massive amounts of personal computers to perform atomized data processing tasks, investments on new super-computers, energy consumed by super-computers, and carbon release from super-computers are reduced. Meanwhile, the platform forms a social network of climate researchers and the general public, which may be leveraged to raise climate awareness among the participants. A portal is to be built as the gateway to the climate@home project. Three types of roles and the corresponding functionalities are designed and supported. The end users include the citizen participants, climate scientists, and project managers. Citizen participants connect their computing resources to the platform by downloading and installing a computing engine on their personal computers. Computer climate models are defined at the server side. Climate

  1. Energy 101: Home Energy Assessment

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-29

    A home energy checkup helps owners determine where their house is losing energy and money - and how such problems can be corrected to make the home more energy efficient. A professional technician - often called an energy auditor - can give your home a checkup. You can also do some of the steps yourself. Items shown here include checking for leaks, examining insulation, inspecting the furnace and ductwork, performing a blower door test and using an infrared camera.

  2. Energy 101: Home Energy Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    A home energy checkup helps owners determine where their house is losing energy and money - and how such problems can be corrected to make the home more energy efficient. A professional technician - often called an energy auditor - can give your home a checkup. You can also do some of the steps yourself. Items shown here include checking for leaks, examining insulation, inspecting the furnace and ductwork, performing a blower door test and using an infrared camera.

  3. Homing pigeons develop local route stereotypy.

    PubMed

    Meade, Jessica; Biro, Dora; Guilford, Tim

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms used by homing pigeons (Columba livia) to navigate homeward from distant sites have been well studied, yet the mechanisms underlying navigation within, and mapping of, the local familiar area have been largely neglected. In the local area pigeons pote ntially have access to a powerful navigational aid--a memorized landscape map. Current opinion suggests that landmarks are used only to recognize a familiar start position and that the goalward route is then achieved solely using compass orientation. We used high-resolution global positioning system (GPS) loggers to track homing pigeons as they became progressively familiar with a local homing task. Here, we demonstrate that birds develop highly stereotyped yet individually distinctive routes over the landscape, which remain substantially inefficient. Precise aerial route recapitulation implies close control by localized geocentric cues. Magnetic cues are unlikely to have been used, since recapitulation remains despite magnetic disruption treatment, and olfactory cues would have been positionally unstable under the variable wind conditions, making visual landmarks the most likely cues used. PMID:15875565

  4. SAW correlator spread spectrum receiver

    DOEpatents

    Brocato, Robert W

    2014-04-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) correlator spread-spectrum (SS) receiver is disclosed which utilizes a first demodulation stage with a chip length n and a second demodulation stage with a chip length m to decode a transmitted SS signal having a code length l=n.times.m which can be very long (e.g. up to 2000 chips or more). The first demodulation stage utilizes a pair of SAW correlators which demodulate the SS signal to generate an appropriate code sequence at an intermediate frequency which can then be fed into the second demodulation stage which can be formed from another SAW correlator, or by a digital correlator. A compound SAW correlator comprising two input transducers and a single output transducer is also disclosed which can be used to form the SAW correlator SS receiver, or for use in processing long code length signals.

  5. 30 GHz Commercial Satellite Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Ponchak, George E.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    NASA's research and development work in satellite communications for the past 10 years has included a major technology thrust aimed at opening the Ka frequency band to commercial exploitation. This has included the development and testing of advanced system network architectures, on-board switching and processing, multibeam and phased array antennas, and satellite and ground terminal RF and digital hardware. Development work in system hardware has focused on critical components including power amplifiers, satellite IF switch matrices, low noise receivers, baseband processors, and high data rate bandwidth efficient modems. This paper describes NASA's work in developing and testing 30 GHz low noise satellite receivers for commercial space communications uplink applications. Frequencies allotted for fixed service commercial satellite communications in the Ka band are 27.5 - 30.0 GHz for uplink transmission and 17.7 - 20.2 GHz for downlink transmission. The relatively large 2.5 GHz bandwidth lends itself to wideband, high data rate digital transmission applications.

  6. Femtosecond Photon-Counting Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Rambo, Timothy M.; Yang, Guangning; Lu, Wei; Numata, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    An optical correlation receiver is described that provides ultra-precise distance and/or time-pulse-width measurements even for weak (single photons) and short (femtosecond) optical signals. A new type of optical correlation receiver uses a fourth-order (intensity) interferometer to provide micron distance measurements even for weak (single photons) and short (femtosecond) optical signals. The optical correlator uses a low-noise-integrating detector that can resolve photon number. The correlation (range as a function of path delay) is calculated from the variance of the photon number of the difference of the optical signals on the two detectors. Our preliminary proof-of principle data (using a short-pulse diode laser transmitter) demonstrates tens of microns precision.

  7. Femtosecond Photon-Counting Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Rambo, Timothy M.; Yang, Guangning; Lu, Wei; Numata, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    An optical correlation receiver is described that provides ultra-precise distance and/or time/pulse-width measurements even for weak (single photons) and short (femtosecond) optical signals. A new type of optical correlation receiver uses a fourth-order (intensity) interferometer to provide micron distance measurements even for weak (single photons) and short (femtosecond) optical signals. The optical correlator uses a low-noise-integrating detector that can resolve photon number. The correlation (range as a function of path delay) is calculated from the variance of the photon number of the difference of the optical signals on the two detectors. Our preliminary proof-of principle data (using a short-pulse diode laser transmitter) demonstrates tens of microns precision.

  8. Scintillation-Hardened GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    CommLargo, Inc., has developed a scintillation-hardened Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver that improves reliability for low-orbit missions and complies with NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standards. A software-defined radio (SDR) implementation allows a single hardware element to function as either a conventional radio or as a GPS receiver, providing backup and redundancy for platforms such as the International Space Station (ISS) and high-value remote sensing platforms. The innovation's flexible SDR implementation reduces cost, weight, and power requirements. Scintillation hardening improves mission reliability and variability. In Phase I, CommLargo refactored an open-source GPS software package with Kalman filter-based tracking loops to improve performance during scintillation and also demonstrated improved navigation during a geomagnetic storm. In Phase II, the company generated a new field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based GPS waveform to demonstrate on NASA's Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) test bed.

  9. Home advantage in Greek football.

    PubMed

    Armatas, Vasilis; Pollard, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Home advantage as it relates to team performance at football was examined in Superleague Greece using nine seasons of game-by-game performance data, a total of 2160 matches. After adjusting for team ability and annual fluctuations in home advantage, there were significant differences between teams. Previous findings regarding the role of territorial protection were strengthened by the fact that home advantage was above average for the team from Xanthi (P =0.015), while lower for teams from the capital city Athens (P =0.008). There were differences between home and away teams in the incidence of most of the 13 within-game match variables, but associated effect sizes were only moderate. In contrast, outcome ratios derived from these variables, and measuring shot success, had negligible effect sizes. This supported a previous finding that home and away teams differed in the incidence of on-the-ball behaviours, but not in their outcomes. By far the most important predictor of home advantage, as measured by goal difference, was the difference between home and away teams in terms of kicked shots from inside the penalty area. Other types of shots had little effect on the final score. The absence of a running track between spectators and the playing field was also a significant predictor of goal difference, worth an average of 0.102 goals per game to the home team. Travel distance did not affect home advantage. PMID:24533517

  10. Home health care in France.

    PubMed

    Charles, B

    1990-02-23

    Home health care in France has a long tradition, but is limited in its development. Since 1970 hospitals are by law permitted to extend services at home. Apart from this, patient associations are a driving force in the organization of home health care. There is a trend to more home health care, but this is hampered by splitting of responsibilities of local, departmental or central authorities. The hospital pharmacist is recommended to focus on his scientific and technical competence. Improved relations between community pharmacists and hospital pharmacists are advocated. PMID:2314994

  11. Digital-data receiver synchronization

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen F.; Turner, Gary W.

    2005-08-02

    Digital-data receiver synchronization is provided with composite phase-frequency detectors, mutually cross-connected comparison feedback or both to provide robust reception of digital data signals. A single master clock can be used to provide frequency signals. Advantages can include fast lock-up time in moderately to severely noisy conditions, greater tolerance to noise and jitter when locked, and improved tolerance to clock asymmetries.

  12. Home Visiting: A Service Strategy to Reduce Poverty and Mitigate Its Consequences.

    PubMed

    Minkovitz, Cynthia S; O'Neill, Kay M G; Duggan, Anne K

    2016-04-01

    established 4 mechanisms of research, evaluation, and quality improvement to enhance home visiting implementation and effectiveness. PMID:27044687

  13. Home Assessment and Remediation.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Charles S; Horner, W Elliott; Kennedy, Kevin; Grimes, Carl; Miller, J David

    2016-01-01

    Awareness of the relationship of fungi to asthma in indoor air is very old and well documented. There is substantial evidence that mold and dampness exacerbate asthma in sensitized individuals. Many governmental and nongovernmental organizations around the world have issued guidelines to the effect that the elimination of moisture intrusion and the removal of moldy items from living space can improve respiratory health. The process of home assessment for moisture and mold presence is discussed along with factors that can be used to guide fungal exposure reduction efforts. An approach to the assessment process itself is outlined, and common causes of moisture and mold damage are described. Points that should be included in a report resulting from a home assessment and rudimentary elements of report interpretation are discussed. Emphasis is that interpretation of sampling for moisture and fungal presence should be provided by the person performing the assessment. We conclude that multifaceted remediation contributes to fungal allergen avoidance. The use of an indoor environmental professional to generate evaluation reports and remediation activities can be a valuable contribution to an overall allergen avoidance strategy. PMID:27157934

  14. Radon in homes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-07

    Radon 222 and its radioactive decay products can enter buildings and, through inhalation, expose the inhabitants' pulmonary tissues to ionizing radiation. Studies of radon levels in the US indicate that variations of 100-fold or greater exist among private dwellings. In one region, 55% of homes had levels exceeding 4 pCi/L (0.15 Bq/L), which is the guidance level recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Ventilation and tightness of construction are important determinants of radon levels. In some instances, fans or heat exchangers can reduce excessive concentrations, but in others more elaborate remedial measures may be required. Physicians may obtain information about radon through Environmental Protection Agency regional offices and state radiation control programs. The risk of radiogenic cancer is believed to increase with exposure to ionizing radiation. According to some estimates, concentrations of radon decay products in US homes could be responsible for several thousand cases of lung cancer per year. Studies of radon levels in representative buildings and guidelines are needed to ensure safe, effective, and cost-effective counter-measures. Architects, contractors, designers, building code administrators, health physicists, and biomedical investigators can help with solutions.

  15. Assessing the Deployment of Home Visiting: Learning from a State-Wide Survey of Home Visiting Programs.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Robert L; Anthony, Elizabeth R; Lalich, Nina; Nevar, Ann; Bakaki, Paul; Koroukian, Siran

    2016-03-01

    Objectives Large-scale planning for health and human services programming is required to inform effective public policy as well as deliver services to meet community needs. The present study demonstrates the value of collecting data directly from deliverers of home visiting programs across a state. This study was conducted in response to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which requires states to conduct a needs assessment of home visiting programs for pregnant women and young children to receive federal funding. In this paper, we provide a descriptive analysis of a needs assessment of home visiting programs in Ohio. Methods All programs in the state that met the federal definition of home visiting were included in this study. Program staff completed a web-based survey with open- and close-ended questions covering program management, content, goals, and characteristics of the families served. Results Consistent with the research literature, program representatives reported great diversity with regard to program management, reach, eligibility, goals, content, and services delivered, yet consistently conveyed great need for home visiting services across the state. Conclusions Results demonstrate quantitative and qualitative assessments of need have direct implications for public policy. Given the lack of consistency highlighted in Ohio, other states are encouraged to conduct a similar needs assessment to facilitate cross-program and cross-state comparisons. Data could be used to outline a capacity-building and technical assistance agenda to ensure states can effectively meet the need for home visiting in their state. PMID:26576591

  16. Center for Consumer Home Economics Education. Project Number 91-0095 and 91-0095, A-1 and A-2, January 31, 1992-June 30, 1993. A Report on Center Operation and Activities Conducted for California Community College Home Economics and Related Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Coll., Walnut, CA.

    In an effort to improve community college home economics programs, the Chancellor's Office of the California Community Colleges established the Center for Consumer Home Economics Education (CCHEE) to provide support services for colleges receiving home economics MiniGrants, to establish linkages between colleges and the Chancellor's Office, and to…

  17. 42 CFR 484.36 - Condition of participation: Home health aide services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... nursing care, but is receiving another skilled service (that is, physical therapy, occupational therapy... services are provided to a patient who is not receiving skilled nursing care, physical or occupational... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Home health...

  18. Early Home-Based Intervention in the Netherlands for Children at Familial Risk of Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Otterloo, Sandra G.; van der Leij, Aryan; Henrichs, Lotte F.

    2009-01-01

    Dutch children at higher familial risk of reading disability received a home-based intervention programme before formal reading instruction started to investigate whether this would reduce the risk of dyslexia. The experimental group (n = 23) received a specific training in phoneme awareness and letter knowledge. A control group (n = 25) received…

  19. Longitudinal Changes in the Amount of Informal Care among Publicly Paid Home Care Recipients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Lydia W.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined how the amount of informal care received by disabled elders changes when they are receiving publicly paid home care, and whether formal service use, disability, caregiving arrangements, and demographic characteristics of older adults predict changes in the amount of informal care. Design and Methods: Hierarchical…

  20. Farmers' Preferences for Methods of Receiving Information on New or Innovative Farming Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riesenberg, Lou E.; Gor, Christopher Obel

    1989-01-01

    Survey of 386 Idaho farmers (response rate 58 percent) identified preferred methods of receiving information on new or innovative farming practices. Analysis revealed preference for interpersonal methods (demonstrations, tours, and field trips) over mass media such as computer-assisted instruction (CAI) and home study, although younger farmers,…