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Sample records for receptor lepr snp

  1. Leptin receptor (LEPR) SNP polymorphisms in HELLP syndrome patients determined by quantitative real-time PCR and melting curve analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown overexpression of leptin in microarray experiments in pre-eclampsia (PE) and in hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets (HELLP) syndrome. We decided to study four leptin receptor (LEPR) SNP polymorphisms in HELLP syndrome patients by using quantitative real-time PCR and melting curve analysis. Methods DNA was isolated from blood samples from 83 normotensive pregnant women and 75 HELLP syndrome patients. Four SNPs, LEPR c.326A>G (K109), LEPR c.668A>G (Q223R), LEPR c.1968G>C (K656N) and LEPR c.3024A>G (S1008) were determined by quantitative real-time PCR and melting curve analysis. Investigators were blinded to clinical outcomes. Results LEPR c.326A>G, LEPR c.668A>G, LEPR c.1968G>C and LEPR c.3024A>G allele, genotype and haplotype polymorphisms were not different in HELLP syndrome patients and normotensive healthy pregnants. There were strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) between loci c.326A>G and c.6687A>G (D' = 0.974), and c.668A>G and c.1968G>C (D' = 0.934), and c.326A>G and c.1968G>C (D' = 0.885), and c.1968G>C and c.3024A>G (D' = 1.0). However, linkages of c.3024A>G with c.668A>G (D' = 0.111) and c.326A>G (D' = 0.398) were weak. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was observed for all polymorphisms. However the LEPR c.326A>G AG genotype was twice more frequent and the (AG AG GG AG) haplotype was three times more frequent in HELLP syndrome patients. The introduced quantitative real-time PCR combined with melting curve analysis is a fast and reliable method for the determination of LEPR SNPs. Conclusion Although certain LEPR haplotypes are more frequent in HELLP syndrome, we conclude that there is no compelling evidence that the four studied LEPR SNP polymorphisms associated with the development of HELLP syndrome. PMID:20149225

  2. Long form leptin receptor and SNP effect on reproductive traits during embryo attachment in Suzhong sows.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yanfeng; Li, Lan; Li, Bixia; Fang, Xiaomin; Ren, Shouwen

    2016-05-01

    To ascertain whether the long form leptin receptor (LEPR) affects the regulation of embryo attachment and whether there are LEPR Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with reproductive traits in pigs, Real-time qPCR was used to detect relative abundance of LEPR mRNA pattern in different tissues of Suzhong sows during the embryo attachment period (pregnancy day 13, 18 and 24) to the uterus, and PCR-RFLP as well as PCR-sequencing were used to investigate the coding sequence for SNPs of LEPR in a population of 512 Suzhong sows. Real-time qPCR results indicated that LEPR mRNA was present in all 22 tissues of pigs with differences in relative abundance of the LEPR mRNA (P<0.05). Among these tissues, the greatest relative abundance occurred at the endometrial attachment site (P<0.01), followed by the hypothalamus and most reproductive tissues (P<0.05), and there was a lesser relative abundance of the LEPR mRNA in the pituitary. During different embryo attachment periods, LEPR mRNA was greatest on Day 18 (attachment; P<0.05), followed by Day 24 (post-attachment), and relative abundance was least on Day 13 (pre-attachment). The prevalence of the LEPR mRNA in pregnant sows was greater than in non-pregnant sows (P<0.05). At the c.2856C>T locus of LEPR, Chi-square test results demonstrated that allele and genotype frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium at this locus, PCR-RFLP results revealed that Genotype TT was greater than Genotype CC (P<0.05) for reproductive traits of TNB (Total Number Born) and NBA (Number Born Alive), which suggested that T allele at c.2856C>T locus has advantageous effects on litter size and litter weight in Suzhong pigs. In conclusion, the expression of the LEPR gene might be involved in the regulation of embryo attachment mechanisms in pigs, and the LEPR SNP c.2856C>T could be a molecular marker for improving litter size and litter weight in pig breeding. PMID:27020480

  3. Association between Variants of the Leptin Receptor Gene (LEPR) and Overweight: A Systematic Review and an Analysis of the CoLaus Study

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Nicole; Allemann, Noëmi; Marek, Diana; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Mooser, Vincent; Egger, Matthias; Bochud, Murielle

    2011-01-01

    Background Three non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (Q223R, K109R and K656N) of the leptin receptor gene (LEPR) have been tested for association with obesity-related outcomes in multiple studies, showing inconclusive results. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis on the association of the three LEPR variants with BMI. In addition, we analysed 15 SNPs within the LEPR gene in the CoLaus study, assessing the interaction of the variants with sex. Methodology/Principal Findings We searched electronic databases, including population-based studies that investigated the association between LEPR variants Q223R, K109R and K656N and obesity- related phenotypes in healthy, unrelated subjects. We furthermore performed meta-analyses of the genotype and allele frequencies in case-control studies. Results were stratified by SNP and by potential effect modifiers. CoLaus data were analysed by logistic and linear regressions and tested for interaction with sex. The meta-analysis of published data did not show an overall association between any of the tested LEPR variants and overweight. However, the choice of a BMI cut-off value to distinguish cases from controls was crucial to explain heterogeneity in Q223R. Differences in allele frequencies across ethnic groups are compatible with natural selection of derived alleles in Q223R and K109R and of the ancient allele in K656N in Asians. In CoLaus, the rs10128072, rs3790438 and rs3790437 variants showed interaction with sex for their association with overweight, waist circumference and fat mass in linear regressions. Conclusions Our systematic review and analysis of primary data from the CoLaus study did not show an overall association between LEPR SNPs and overweight. Most studies were underpowered to detect small effect sizes. A potential effect modification by sex, population stratification, as well as the role of natural selection should be addressed in future genetic association studies. PMID:22028824

  4. The receptor-like kinase SOBIR1 interacts with Brassica napus LepR3 and is required for Leptosphaeria maculans AvrLm1-triggered immunity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lisong; Borhan, M Hossein

    2015-01-01

    The fungus Leptosphaeria maculans (L. maculans) is the causal agent of blackleg disease of canola/oilseed rape (Brassica napus) worldwide. We previously reported cloning of the B. napus blackleg resistance gene, LepR3, which encodes a receptor-like protein. LepR3 triggers localized cell death upon recognition of its cognate Avr protein, AvrLm1. Here, we exploited the Nicotiana benthamiana model plant to investigate the recognition mechanism of AvrLm1 by LepR3. Co-expression of the LepR3/AvrLm1 gene pair in N. benthamiana resulted in development of a hypersensitive response (HR). However, a truncated AvrLm1 lacking its indigenous signal peptide was compromised in its ability to induce LepR3-mediated HR, indicating that AvrLm1 is perceived by LepR3 extracellularly. Structure-function analysis of the AvrLm1 protein revealed that the C-terminal region of AvrLm1 was required for LepR3-mediated HR in N. benthamiana and for resistance to L. maculans in B. napus. LepR3 was shown to be physically interacting with the B. napus receptor like kinase, SOBIR1 (BnSOBIR1). Silencing of NbSOBIR1 or NbSERK3 (BAK1) compromised LepR3-AvrLm1-dependent HR in N. benthamiana, suggesting that LepR3-mediated resistance to L. maculans in B. napus requires SOBIR1 and BAK1/SERK3. Using this model system, we determined that BnSOBIR1 and SERK3/BAK1 are essential partners in the LepR3 signaling complex and were able to define the AvrLm1 effector domain. PMID:26579176

  5. Genome-wide association study identifies polymorphisms in LEPR as determinants of plasma soluble leptin receptor levels.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Kraft, Peter; Qi, Lu; van Dam, Rob M; Girman, Cynthia J; Laurie, Cathy C; Mirel, Daniel B; Gong, Huizi; Sheu, Chau-Chyun; Christiani, David C; Hunter, David J; Mantzoros, Christos S; Hu, Frank B

    2010-05-01

    Plasma soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R) levels were inversely associated with diabetes risk factors, including adiposity and insulin resistance, and highly correlated with the expression levels of leptin receptor, which is ubiquitously expressed in most tissues. We conducted a genome-wide association study of sOB-R in 1504 women of European ancestry from the Nurses' Health Study. The initial scan yielded 26 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with sOB-R levels (P < 5 x 10(-8)); all mapping to the leptin receptor gene (LEPR). Analysis of imputed genotypes on autosomal chromosomes revealed an additional 106 SNPs in and adjacent to this gene that reached genome-wide significance level. Of these 132 SNPs (including two non-synonymous SNPs, rs1137100 and rs1137101), rs2767485, rs1751492 and rs4655555 remained associated with sOB-R levels at the 0.05 level (P = 9.1 x 10(-9), 0.0105 and 0.0267, respectively) after adjustment for other univariately associated SNPs in a forward selection procedure. Significant associations with these SNPs were replicated in an independent sample of young males (n = 875) residing in Cyprus (P < 1 x 10(-4)). These data provide novel evidence revealing the role of polymorphisms in LEPR in modulating plasma levels of sOB-R and may further our understanding of the complex relationships among leptin, leptin receptor and diabetes-related traits. PMID:20167575

  6. Genome-wide association study identifies polymorphisms in LEPR as determinants of plasma soluble leptin receptor levels

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qi; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Kraft, Peter; Qi, Lu; van Dam, Rob M.; Girman, Cynthia J.; Laurie, Cathy C.; Mirel, Daniel B.; Gong, Huizi; Sheu, Chau-Chyun; Christiani, David C.; Hunter, David J.; Mantzoros, Christos S.; Hu, Frank B.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R) levels were inversely associated with diabetes risk factors, including adiposity and insulin resistance, and highly correlated with the expression levels of leptin receptor, which is ubiquitously expressed in most tissues. We conducted a genome-wide association study of sOB-R in 1504 women of European ancestry from the Nurses' Health Study. The initial scan yielded 26 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with sOB-R levels (P < 5 × 10−8); all mapping to the leptin receptor gene (LEPR). Analysis of imputed genotypes on autosomal chromosomes revealed an additional 106 SNPs in and adjacent to this gene that reached genome-wide significance level. Of these 132 SNPs (including two non-synonymous SNPs, rs1137100 and rs1137101), rs2767485, rs1751492 and rs4655555 remained associated with sOB-R levels at the 0.05 level (P = 9.1 × 10−9, 0.0105 and 0.0267, respectively) after adjustment for other univariately associated SNPs in a forward selection procedure. Significant associations with these SNPs were replicated in an independent sample of young males (n = 875) residing in Cyprus (P < 1 × 10−4). These data provide novel evidence revealing the role of polymorphisms in LEPR in modulating plasma levels of sOB-R and may further our understanding of the complex relationships among leptin, leptin receptor and diabetes-related traits. PMID:20167575

  7. Sex Differences in Somatotrope Dependency on Leptin Receptors in Young Mice: Ablation of LEPR Causes Severe Growth Hormone Deficiency and Abdominal Obesity in Males.

    PubMed

    Allensworth-James, Melody L; Odle, Angela; Haney, Anessa; Childs, Gwen

    2015-09-01

    Leptin receptor (LEPR) signaling controls appetite and energy expenditure. Somatotrope-specific deletion of the LEPRb signaling isoform causes GH deficiency and obesity. The present study selectively ablated Lepr exon 1 in somatotropes, which removes the signal peptide, causing the loss of all isoforms of LEPR. Excision of Lepr exon 1 was restricted to the pituitary, and mutant somatotropes failed to respond to leptin. Young (2-3 mo) males showed a severe 84% reduction in serum GH levels and more than 60% reduction in immunolabeled GH cells compared with 41%-42% reductions in GH and GH cells in mutant females. Mutant males (35 d) and females (45 d) weighed less than controls and males had lower lean body mass. Image analysis of adipose tissue by magnetic resonance imaging showed that young males had a 2-fold increase in abdominal fat mass and increased adipose tissue density. Young females had only an overall increase in adipose tissue. Both males and females showed lower energy expenditure and higher respiratory quotient, indicating preferential carbohydrate burning. Young mutant males slept less and were more restless during the dark phase, whereas the opposite was true of females. The effects of a Cre-bearing sire on his non-Cre-recombinase bearing progeny are seen by increased respiratory quotient and reduced litter sizes. These studies elucidate clear sex differences in the extent to which somatotropes are dependent on all isoforms of LEPR. These results, which were not seen with the ablation of Lepr exon 17, highlight the severe consequences of ablation of LEPR in male somatotropes. PMID:26168341

  8. Leptin receptor null mice with reexpression of LepR in GnRHR expressing cells display elevated FSH levels but remain in a prepubertal state.

    PubMed

    Allen, Susan J; Garcia-Galiano, David; Borges, Beatriz C; Burger, Laura L; Boehm, Ulrich; Elias, Carol F

    2016-06-01

    Leptin signals energy sufficiency to the reproductive hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Studies using genetic models have demonstrated that hypothalamic neurons are major players mediating these effects. Leptin receptor (LepR) is also expressed in the pituitary gland and in the gonads, but the physiological effects of leptin in these sites are still unclear. Female mice with selective deletion of LepR in a subset of gonadotropes show normal pubertal development but impaired fertility. Conditional deletion approaches, however, often result in redundancy or developmental adaptations, which may compromise the assessment of leptin's action in gonadotropes for pubertal maturation. To circumvent these issues, we adopted a complementary genetic approach and assessed if selective reexpression of LepR only in gonadotropes is sufficient to enable puberty and improve fertility of LepR null female mice. We initially assessed the colocalization of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) and LepR in the HPG axis using GnRHR-IRES-Cre (GRIC) and LepR-Cre reporter (tdTomato or enhanced green fluorescent protein) mice. We found that GRIC and leptin-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 are expressed in distinct hypothalamic neurons. Whereas LepR-Cre was observed in theca cells, GRIC expression was rarely found in the ovarian parenchyma. In contrast, a subpopulation of gonadotropes expressed the LepR-Cre reporter gene (tdTomato). We then crossed the GRIC mice with the LepR null reactivable (LepR(loxTB)) mice. These mice showed an increase in FSH levels, but they remained in a prepubertal state. Together with previous findings, our data indicate that leptin-selective action in gonadotropes serves a role in adult reproductive physiology but is not sufficient to allow pubertal maturation in mice. PMID:27101301

  9. Functional consequences of the human leptin receptor (LEPR) Q223R transversion

    PubMed Central

    Stratigopoulos, George; LeDuc, Charles A.; Matsuoka, Naoki; Gutman, Roee; Rausch, Richard; Robertson, Scott A.; Myers, Martin G; Chung, Wendy K; Chua, Streamson C.; Leibel, Rudolph L.

    2010-01-01

    Perturbations in the functional integrity of the leptin axis are obvious candidates for mediation of altered adiposity. In a large number of genetic association studies in humans, the non-conservative LEPR Q223R allele has been inconsistently associated with adiposity. Subtle, long term effects of such genetic variants can be obscured by effects of the environment and other confounders that render definitive inferences difficult to reach. We directly assessed the biological effects of this variant in 129P3/J mice segregating for the humanized Lepr allele at codon 223. No effects of this allele were detected on body weight, composition, or energy expenditure in animals fed diets of varying fat content over periods as long as 235 days. In vitro, Q223R did not affect leptin signaling as reflected by activation of STAT3. We conclude that Q223R is unlikely to play a significant role in regulation of human adiposity. This approach to vetting of human allelic variation might be more widely employed. PMID:18997673

  10. Complementary Effects of Genetic Variations in LEPR on Body Composition and Soluble Leptin Receptor Concentration after 3-Month Lifestyle Intervention in Prepubertal Obese Children.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, Joanna; Kuryłowicz, Alina; Mierzejewska, Ewa; Ambroszkiewicz, Jadwiga; Chełchowska, Magdalena; Weker, Halina; Puzianowska-Kuźnicka, Monika

    2016-01-01

    In obese individuals, weight loss might be affected by variants of the adipokine-encoding genes. We verified whether selected functional single nucleotide polymorphisms in LEP, LEPR and ADIPOQ are associated with changes in serum levels of the respective adipokines and weight loss in 100 prepubertal obese (SDS-BMI > 2) Caucasian children undergoing lifestyle intervention. Frequencies of the -2548G > A LEP, Q223R LEPR, K656N LEPR, -11377C > G and -11426A > G ADIPOQ polymorphisms were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Serum adipokine and soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R) concentrations were measured using the ELISA method. Among the analyzed polymorphisms, only LEPR polymorphisms were associated with changes of SDS-BMI or sOB-R concentrations in children after therapy. Carriers of the wild-type K665N and at least one minor Q223R allele had the greatest likelihood of losing weight (OR = 5.09, p = 0.006), an increase in sOB-R (ptrend = 0.022) and decrease in SDS-BMI correlated with the decrease of fat mass (p < 0.001). In contrast, carrying of the wild-type Q223R and at least one minor K665N allele were associated with a decrease in sOB-R concentrations and a decrease in SDS-BMI correlated with a decrease in fat-free mass (p = 0.002). We suggest that the combination of different LEPR variants, not a single variant, might determine predisposition to weight loss in the prepubertal period. PMID:27240401

  11. Complementary Effects of Genetic Variations in LEPR on Body Composition and Soluble Leptin Receptor Concentration after 3-Month Lifestyle Intervention in Prepubertal Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Gajewska, Joanna; Kuryłowicz, Alina; Mierzejewska, Ewa; Ambroszkiewicz, Jadwiga; Chełchowska, Magdalena; Weker, Halina; Puzianowska-Kuźnicka, Monika

    2016-01-01

    In obese individuals, weight loss might be affected by variants of the adipokine-encoding genes. We verified whether selected functional single nucleotide polymorphisms in LEP, LEPR and ADIPOQ are associated with changes in serum levels of the respective adipokines and weight loss in 100 prepubertal obese (SDS-BMI > 2) Caucasian children undergoing lifestyle intervention. Frequencies of the -2548G > A LEP, Q223R LEPR, K656N LEPR, -11377C > G and -11426A > G ADIPOQ polymorphisms were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Serum adipokine and soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R) concentrations were measured using the ELISA method. Among the analyzed polymorphisms, only LEPR polymorphisms were associated with changes of SDS-BMI or sOB-R concentrations in children after therapy. Carriers of the wild-type K665N and at least one minor Q223R allele had the greatest likelihood of losing weight (OR = 5.09, p = 0.006), an increase in sOB-R (ptrend = 0.022) and decrease in SDS-BMI correlated with the decrease of fat mass (p < 0.001). In contrast, carrying of the wild-type Q223R and at least one minor K665N allele were associated with a decrease in sOB-R concentrations and a decrease in SDS-BMI correlated with a decrease in fat-free mass (p = 0.002). We suggest that the combination of different LEPR variants, not a single variant, might determine predisposition to weight loss in the prepubertal period. PMID:27240401

  12. Effect of LEPR, ABCG2 and SCD1 gene polymorphisms on reproductive traits in the Iranian Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Asadollahpour Nanaei, H; Ansari Mahyari, S; Edriss, M-A

    2014-10-01

    During the last decades, genetic selection for milk production traits has led to increased fertility and health problems in dairy cattle. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of three polymorphisms located in the ATP-binding cassette superfamily G member 2 transporter (ABCG2), stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) and leptin receptor (LEPR) genes on reproductive traits and somatic cell count (SCC). The analysis was conducted on 408 randomly selected cows. The SNPs within the genes (LEPR, ABCG2 and SCD1) were genotyped using the PCR-RFLP method. All three possible genotypes were observed for SCD1-T878C and LEPR-T945M SNPs, but not for ABCG2-Y581S SNP. LEPR-T945M and ABCG2-Y581S SNPs had no statistically significant effect on the studied reproductive traits and SCC. However, SCD1-T878C SNP were negatively and significantly related to pregnancy length, dry days and open days (p < 0.05), which lead to decreased profitability in dairy herds. The results suggest that the T878C SNP of SCD1 might be useful as a DNA marker to decrease reproductive problems and improve production traits in Iranian Holstein dairy cows. PMID:25130486

  13. Data in support of the discovery of alternative splicing variants of quail LEPR and the evolutionary conservation of qLEPRl by nucleotide and amino acid sequences alignment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dandan; Xu, Chunlin; Wang, Taian; Li, Hong; Li, Yanmin; Ren, Junxiao; Tian, Yadong; Li, Zhuanjian; Jiao, Yuping; Kang, Xiangtao; Liu, Xiaojun

    2016-03-01

    Leptin receptor (LEPR) belongs to the class I cytokine receptor superfamily which share common structural features and signal transduction pathways. Although multiple LEPR isoforms, which are derived from one gene, were identified in mammals, they were rarely found in avian except the long LEPR. Four alternative splicing variants of quail LEPR (qLEPR) had been cloned and sequenced for the first time (Wang et al., 2015 [1]). To define patterns of the four splicing variants (qLEPRl, qLEPR-a, qLEPR-b and qLEPR-c) and locate the conserved regions of qLEPRl, this data article provides nucleotide sequence alignment of qLEPR and amino acid sequence alignment of representative vertebrate LEPR. The detailed analysis was shown in [1]. PMID:26759819

  14. Data in support of the discovery of alternative splicing variants of quail LEPR and the evolutionary conservation of qLEPRl by nucleotide and amino acid sequences alignment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dandan; Xu, Chunlin; Wang, Taian; Li, Hong; Li, Yanmin; Ren, Junxiao; Tian, Yadong; Li, Zhuanjian; Jiao, Yuping; Kang, Xiangtao; Liu, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Leptin receptor (LEPR) belongs to the class I cytokine receptor superfamily which share common structural features and signal transduction pathways. Although multiple LEPR isoforms, which are derived from one gene, were identified in mammals, they were rarely found in avian except the long LEPR. Four alternative splicing variants of quail LEPR (qLEPR) had been cloned and sequenced for the first time (Wang et al., 2015 [1]). To define patterns of the four splicing variants (qLEPRl, qLEPR-a, qLEPR-b and qLEPR-c) and locate the conserved regions of qLEPRl, this data article provides nucleotide sequence alignment of qLEPR and amino acid sequence alignment of representative vertebrate LEPR. The detailed analysis was shown in [1]. PMID:26759819

  15. The Impact of LEP G-2548A and LEPR Gln223Arg Polymorphisms on Adiposity, Leptin, and Leptin-Receptor Serum Levels in a Mexican Mestizo Population

    PubMed Central

    Chavarria-Avila, Efraín; Gomez-Bañuelos, Eduardo; Ruiz-Quezada, Sandra-Luz; Castro-Albarran, Jorge; Sánchez-López, Lizeth; Martín-Marquez, Beatriz Teresita; Navarro-Hernández, Rosa-Elena

    2015-01-01

    The polymorphisms in leptin (LEP G-2548A) and leptin-receptor (LEPR Gln223Arg) seem to influence obesity and lipid metabolism among others. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of these polymorphisms on adiposity, leptin (sLeptin), and leptin-receptor (sLeptin-receptor) serum concentrations as well as inflammation markers. We included 382 adults originally from Western Mexico. They were genotyped by PCR-RFLP. Obese individuals showed higher sLeptin (58.2 ± 31.35 ng/mL) but lower sLeptin-receptor (12.6 ± 3.74 ng/mL) levels than normal weight ones (17.6 ± 14.62 ng/mL, 17.4 ± 4.62 ng/mL, resp.), P < 0.001. Obese subjects carriers of Arg/Arg genotype had more (P = 0.016) sLeptin-receptor (14.7 ± 4.96 ng/mL) and less (P = 0.004) sLeptin (44.0 ± 28.12 ng/mL) levels than Gln/Gln genotype (11.0 ± 2.92 ng/mL, 80.3 ± 33.24 ng/mL, resp.). Body fat mass was lower (P from 0.003 to 0.045) for A/A (36.5% ± 6.80) or Arg/Arg (36.8% ± 6.82) genotypes with respect to G/G (41.3% ± 5.52) and G/A (41.6% ± 5.61) or Gln/Gln (43.7% ± 4.74) and Gln/Arg (41.0% ± 5.52) genotypes carriers. Our results suggest that LEP -2548A and LEPR 223Arg could be genetic markers of less body fat mass accumulation in obese subjects from Western Mexico. PMID:26064921

  16. Novel locus for fibrinogen in 3' region of LEPR gene in island population of Vis (Croatia).

    PubMed

    Tomas, Željka; Petranović, Matea Zajc; Škarić-Jurić, Tatjana; Barešić, Ana; Salihović, Marijana Peričić; Narančić, Nina Smolej

    2014-11-01

    Leptin, a possible mediator between energy homeostasis, inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD), acts via leptin receptors. We investigated association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes of the leptin receptor gene (LEPR) with several CVD risk factors: body mass index, waist circumference (WC), serum lipids, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein levels. Thirty-one SNPs in and near LEPR gene were analyzed in 986 inhabitants of the island of Vis, Croatia and 29 SNPs in the inland sample (N=499). We assessed linkage disequilibrium (LD), SNP and haplotype associations with the selected phenotypes. rs4291477 significantly associated with fibrinogen (P=0.003) and rs7539471 marginally significantly with high-density lipoprotein (P=0.004), but only in the Vis sample, while rs10493384 marginally significantly associated with triglyceride levels (P=0.006) in the inland sample. SNPs were grouped into eight LD blocks in Vis and in seven blocks in the inland population. Haplotype A-C-A-A-G-A in block 5 in Vis (rs1782754, rs1171269, rs1022981, rs6673324, rs3790426, rs10493380) and haplotype A-A-A-A in block 4 in the inland data (rs1782754, rs1022981, rs6673324, rs1137100) were nominally associated with WC, P=7.085 × 10(-22) (adjusted P=0.0979) and P=5.496 × 10(-144) (adjusted P=0.1062), respectively. PMID:25296580

  17. A polymorphism in the leptin receptor gene at position 223 is associated with growth hormone replacement therapy responsiveness in idiopathic short stature and growth hormone deficiency patients.

    PubMed

    Su, Pen-Hua; Yang, Shun-Fa; Yu, Ju-Shan; Chen, Suh-Jen; Chen, Jia-Yuh

    2012-12-01

    We hypothesized that responses to growth hormone (GH) therapy by idiopathic short stature (ISS) and growth hormone deficiency (GHD) patients were associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the leptin (LEP) and leptin receptor (LEPR) genes. We retrospectively enrolled ISS (n = 32) and GHD (n = 38) patients and forty healthy age-and gender-matched children. They were genotyped for the LEP promoter at nt.-2548, and LEPR K109R and LEPR Q223R polymorphisms. Clinical and laboratory variables were determined before and after 2 years of GH treatment. ISS patients with G/A or A/A genotypes of the LEPR Q223R SNP had a significantly higher height velocity (cm/y) than ISS patients with the G/G genotype at 2 years after GH treatment. For GHD patients, G/A or A/A genotype of the LEPR K109R SNP was associated with higher body weight, higher BMI, and higher weight velocity than patients with the G/G genotype before GH treatment, but not after GH treatment. G/A or A/A genotype of the LEPR Q223R SNP was associated with a significantly higher body weight, higher height velocity before treatment, but not after GH treatment. G/A or A/A genotype of the LEPR Q223R SNP was associated with a significantly higher weight velocity before treatment, but a significantly lower weight velocity was found at 2 years after GH treatment. These results suggest LEPR Q223R SNP (rs1137101) is associated with outcomes of GH replacement therapy in ISS and GHD patients. PMID:23009903

  18. Polymorphisms of the LEP- and LEPR gene and obesity in patients using antipsychotic medication.

    PubMed

    Gregoor, Jochem G; van der Weide, Jan; Mulder, Hans; Cohen, Dan; van Megen, Harold J G M; Egberts, Antoine C G; Heerdink, Eibert R

    2009-02-01

    Weight gain is one of the most serious adverse effects of atypical antipsychotic agents. Genetic factors influence the risk of an individual to gain weight. The objective of our study was to determine whether the LEPR Q223R polymorphism and the LEP promoter 2548G/A polymorphism are associated with obesity in a group of male and female patients using atypical antipsychotic drugs. A cross-sectional study design was used. The study population consisted of 200 patients aged between 18 and 65 years, diagnosed with a psychotic disorder, all of whom had been using an atypical antipsychotic for at least 3 months. The primary outcome measure was the presence of obesity. Determinants were the LEPR Q223R (rs1137101) polymorphism and the LEP promoter 2548G/A single nucleotide polymorphism ([SNP] rs7799039). Of the 200 included patients, 61 (31%) were obese. In females, the LEPR 223QR (adjusted odds ratio, 0.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.02-0.54) and LEPR 223RR (adjusted odds ratio, 0.07; 95% CI, 0.01-0.63) genotypes were associated with a lower risk of obesity. In males, this association was not found. In females, the average body weight was 13.6 kg more (95% CI, 1.11-26.1) in the LEPR 223QQ group compared with the LEPR 223RR group. No significant association was found between the LEP promoter 2548G/A polymorphism and obesity. Taken together, the results of our study show that the LEPR Q223R polymorphism may be associated with obesity in women with a psychotic disorder treated with atypical antipsychotic drugs and stress the importance of stratification for gender when investigating the role of variations of the LEP- and LEPR genes on the metabolic side effects of antipsychotic medications. PMID:19142102

  19. Estrogen, SNP-Dependent Chemokine Expression and Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Regulation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ming-Fen; Bongartz, Tim; Liu, Mohan; Kalari, Krishna R; Goss, Paul E; Shepherd, Lois E; Goetz, Matthew P; Kubo, Michiaki; Ingle, James N; Wang, Liewei; Weinshilboum, Richard M

    2016-03-01

    We previously reported, on the basis of a genome-wide association study for aromatase inhibitor-induced musculoskeletal symptoms, that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near the T-cell leukemia/lymphoma 1A (TCL1A) gene were associated with aromatase inhibitor-induced musculoskeletal pain and with estradiol (E2)-induced TCL1A expression. Furthermore, variation in TCL1A expression influenced the downstream expression of proinflammatory cytokines and cytokine receptors. Specifically, the top hit genome-wide association study SNP, rs11849538, created a functional estrogen response element (ERE) that displayed estrogen receptor (ER) binding and increased E2 induction of TCL1A expression only for the variant SNP genotype. In the present study, we pursued mechanisms underlying the E2-SNP-dependent regulation of TCL1A expression and, in parallel, our subsequent observations that SNPs at a distance from EREs can regulate ERα binding and that ER antagonists can reverse phenotypes associated with those SNPs. Specifically, we performed a series of functional genomic studies using a large panel of lymphoblastoid cell lines with dense genomic data that demonstrated that TCL1A SNPs at a distance from EREs can modulate ERα binding and expression of TCL1A as well as the expression of downstream immune mediators. Furthermore, 4-hydroxytamoxifen or fulvestrant could reverse these SNP-genotype effects. Similar results were found for SNPs in the IL17A cytokine and CCR6 chemokine receptor genes. These observations greatly expand our previous results and support the existence of a novel molecular mechanism that contributes to the complex interplay between estrogens and immune systems. They also raise the possibility of the pharmacological manipulation of the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in a SNP genotype-dependent fashion. PMID:26866883

  20. The association between LEPR Q223R polymorphisms and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yadong; Yang, Haiyan; Gao, Huiyan; Wang, Haiyu

    2015-05-01

    Recently, we have read with great interest the article entitled "The association between polymorphisms in the leptin receptor (LEPR) gene and risk of breast cancer: a systematic review and pooled analysis" published online by Wang et al. (Breast Cancer Res Treat 136:231-239, 2012). This article suggests that the A allele of LEPR gene rs1137101 variant was low-penetrant risk factor for developing breast cancer. The result is encouraging. Nevertheless, several key issues are worth noticing. PMID:25863476

  1. Common genetic variation in adiponectin, leptin, and leptin receptor and association with breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Nyante, Sarah J.; Gammon, Marilie D.; Kaufman, Jay S.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Lin, Dan Yu; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Hu, Yijuan; He, Qianchuan; Luo, Jingchun; Millikan, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Adipocytokines are produced by visceral fat, and levels may be associated with breast cancer risk. We investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in adipocytokine genes adiponectin (ADIPOQ), leptin (LEP), and the leptin receptor (LEPR) were associated with basal-like or luminal A breast cancer subtypes. 104 candidate and tag SNPs were genotyped in 1776 of 2022 controls and 1972 (200 basal-like, 679 luminal A) of 2311 cases from the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS), a population-based case–control study of whites and African Americans. Breast cancer molecular subtypes were determined by immunohistochemistry. Genotype odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Haplotype ORs and 95% CIs were estimated using Hapstat. Interactions with waist-hip ratio were evaluated using a multiplicative interaction term. Ancestry was estimated from 144 ancestry informative markers (AIMs), and included in models to control for population stratification. Candidate SNPs LEPR K109R (rs1137100) and LEPR Q223R (rs1137101) were positively associated with luminal A breast cancer, whereas ADIPOQ +45 T/G (rs2241766), ADIPOQ +276 G/T (rs1501299), and LEPR K656N (rs8129183) were not associated with either subtype. Few patterns were observed among tag SNPs, with the exception of 3 LEPR SNPs (rs17412175, rs9436746, and rs9436748) that were in moderate LD and inversely associated with basal-like breast cancer. However, no SNP associations were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Haplotypes in LEP and LEPR were associated with both basal-like and luminal A subtypes. There was no evidence of interaction with waist-hip ratio. Data suggest associations between LEPR candidate SNPs and luminal A breast cancer in the CBCS and LEPR intron 2 tag SNPs and basal-like breast cancer. Replication in additional studies where breast cancer subtypes have been defined is necessary to confirm these

  2. Common genetic variation in adiponectin, leptin, and leptin receptor and association with breast cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Nyante, Sarah J; Gammon, Marilie D; Kaufman, Jay S; Bensen, Jeannette T; Lin, Dan Yu; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Hu, Yijuan; He, Qianchuan; Luo, Jingchun; Millikan, Robert C

    2011-09-01

    Adipocytokines are produced by visceral fat, and levels may be associated with breast cancer risk. We investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in adipocytokine genes adiponectin (ADIPOQ), leptin (LEP), and the leptin receptor (LEPR) were associated with basal-like or luminal A breast cancer subtypes. 104 candidate and tag SNPs were genotyped in 1776 of 2022 controls and 1972 (200 basal-like, 679 luminal A) of 2311 cases from the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS), a population-based case-control study of whites and African Americans. Breast cancer molecular subtypes were determined by immunohistochemistry. Genotype odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Haplotype ORs and 95% CIs were estimated using Hapstat. Interactions with waist-hip ratio were evaluated using a multiplicative interaction term. Ancestry was estimated from 144 ancestry informative markers (AIMs), and included in models to control for population stratification. Candidate SNPs LEPR K109R (rs1137100) and LEPR Q223R (rs1137101) were positively associated with luminal A breast cancer, whereas ADIPOQ +45 T/G (rs2241766), ADIPOQ +276 G/T (rs1501299), and LEPR K656N (rs8129183) were not associated with either subtype. Few patterns were observed among tag SNPs, with the exception of 3 LEPR SNPs (rs17412175, rs9436746, and rs9436748) that were in moderate LD and inversely associated with basal-like breast cancer. However, no SNP associations were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Haplotypes in LEP and LEPR were associated with both basal-like and luminal A subtypes. There was no evidence of interaction with waist-hip ratio. Data suggest associations between LEPR candidate SNPs and luminal A breast cancer in the CBCS and LEPR intron 2 tag SNPs and basal-like breast cancer. Replication in additional studies where breast cancer subtypes have been defined is necessary to confirm these

  3. SNP genotypes of olfactory receptor genes associated with olfactory ability in German Shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Yang, M; Geng, G-J; Zhang, W; Cui, L; Zhang, H-X; Zheng, J-L

    2016-04-01

    To find out the relationship between SNP genotypes of canine olfactory receptor genes and olfactory ability, 28 males and 20 females from German Shepherd dogs in police service were scored by odor detection tests and analyzed using the Beckman GenomeLab SNPstream. The representative 22 SNP loci from the exonic regions of 12 olfactory receptor genes were investigated, and three kinds of odor (human, ice drug and trinitrotoluene) were detected. The results showed that the SNP genotypes at the OR10H1-like:c.632C>T, OR10H1-like:c.770A>T, OR2K2-like:c.518G>A, OR4C11-like:c.511T>G and OR4C11-like:c.692G>A loci had a statistically significant effect on the scenting abilities (P < 0.001). The kind of odor influenced the performances of the dogs (P < 0.001). In addition, there were interactions between genotype and the kind of odor at the following loci: OR10H1-like:c.632C>T, OR10H1-like:c.770A>T, OR4C11-like:c.511T>G and OR4C11-like:c.692G>A (P < 0.001). The dogs with genotype CC at the OR10H1-like:c.632C>T, genotype AA at the OR10H1-like:c.770A>T, genotype TT at the OR4C11-like:c.511T>G and genotype GG at the OR4C11-like:c.692G>A loci did better at detecting the ice drug. We concluded that there was linkage between certain SNP genotypes and the olfactory ability of dogs and that SNP genotypes might be useful in determining dogs' scenting potential. PMID:26582499

  4. Exogenous Parathyroid Hormone-Related Peptide Promotes Fracture Healing in Lepr(-/-) Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Anlong; Li, Yishan; Wang, Yinhe; Liu, Li; Shi, Hongfei; Qiu, Yong

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic osteoporosis continues to surge worldwide, increasing the risk of fracture. We have previously demonstrated that haploinsufficiency of endogenous parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) impairs fracture healing. However, whether an exogenous supply of PTHrP can repair bone damage and accelerate fracture healing remains unclear. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of PTHrP in healing fractures. Standardized mid-diaphyseal femur fractures were generated in 12-week-old wild-type and leptin receptor null Lepr(-/-) mice. After administration of PTHrP for 2 weeks, callus tissue properties were analyzed by radiography, micro-computed tomography, histology, histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and molecular biology techniques. At 2 weeks post-fracture, cartilaginous callus areas were reduced, while total callus and bony callus areas were increased in PTHrP-treated Lepr(-/-) animals and control wild-type mice, compared with vehicle-treated Lepr(-/-) mice. The following parameters were enhanced both in Lepr(-/-) mice after treatment with PTHrP and vehicle-treated wild-type animals, compared with vehicle-treated Lepr(-/-) mice: osteoblast numbers; tissue alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and Type I collagen immunopositive areas; mRNA levels of ALP, Type I collagen, osteoprotegerin, and receptor activator for nuclear factor-κ B ligand; protein levels of Runt-related transcription factor 2 and insulin-like growth factor-1; and the number and surface of osteoclasts. In conclusion, exogenous PTHrP by subcutaneous injection promotes fracture repair in Lepr(-/-) mice by increasing callus formation and accelerating cell transformation: upregulated osteoblastic gene and protein expression, increased endochondral bone formation, osteoblastic bone formation, and osteoclastic bone resorption. However, complete repair was not obtained in PTHrP-treated Lepr(-/-) mice as in control wild-type animals. PMID:26314884

  5. The Association of Polymorphisms in Leptin/Leptin Receptor Genes and Ghrelin/Ghrelin Receptor Genes With Overweight/Obesity and the Related Metabolic Disturbances: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ghalandari, Hamid; Hosseini-Esfahani, Firoozeh; Mirmiran, Parvin

    2015-01-01

    Context: Leptin and ghrelin are two important appetite and energy balance-regulating peptides. Common polymorphisms in the genes coding these peptides and their related receptors are shown to be associated with body weight, different markers of obesity and metabolic abnormalities. This review article aims to investigate the association of common polymorphisms of these genes with overweight/obesity and the metabolic disturbances related to it. Evidence Acquisition: The keywords leptin, ghrelin, polymorphism, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), obesity, overweight, Body Mass Index, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) (MeSH headings) were used to search in the following databases: Pubmed, Sciencedirect (Elsevier), and Google scholar. Overall, 24 case-control studies, relevant to our topic, met the criteria and were included in the review. Results: The most prevalent leptin/leptin receptor genes (LEP/LEPR) and ghrelin/ghrelin receptor genes (GHRL/GHSR) single nucleotide polymorphisms studied were LEP G-2548A, LEPR Q223R, and Leu72Met, respectively. Nine studies of the 17 studies on LEP/LEPR, and three studies of the seven studies on GHRL/GHSR showed significant relationships. Conclusions: In general, our study suggests that the association between LEP/LEPR and GHRL/GHSR with overweight/obesity and the related metabolic disturbances is inconclusive. These results may be due to unidentified gene-environment interactions. More investigations are needed to further clarify this association. PMID:26425125

  6. Haplotypic diversity of porcine LEP and LEPR genes involved in growth and fatness regulation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Montarelo, Dafne; Rodríguez, M Carmen; Fernández, Almudena; Benítez, Rita; García, Fabián; Silió, Luis; Fernández, Ana I

    2015-11-01

    The analysis of structural genetic variability in candidate genes can make it possible to analyse the selection footprint and deepen the understanding of the genetic basis of complex traits. The leptin (LEP) and its receptor (LEPR) porcine genes are involved in food intake and energy homeostasis, and polymorphisms associated to growth and fatness traits have been detected in both genes. The main objective of this study was to explore the genetic variability of the most polymorphic regions of both genes in a variety of pig populations and wild boars from diverse European and Asian origins. In total, 54 animals were included in the analyses, with a remarkable sampling of Spanish wild boars and Iberian pigs. The sequencing allowed the identification of 69 and 26 polymorphisms in LEP and LEPR genes, respectively. Neighbour-joining trees built for the 69 haplotypes identified in the LEP and the 24 haplotypes detected in the LEPR showed the known genetic divergence between European and Asian pig breeds. A high variability of the LEP was detected in the different analysed populations providing new data for the existence of two domestication centres in Asia. In comparison to the LEP gene, the LEPR showed a lower variability, especially in the Iberian breed that showed no variability. Moreover, results of the Hudson-Kreitman-Aguadé neutrality test support a possible selection event of the LEPR gene region in this breed, potentially related with its leptin resistance pattern and good adaptation to a traditional extensive production system with strong seasonal changes of feeding resources. PMID:25910874

  7. Nucleotide Sequencing and SNP Detection of Toll-Like Receptor-4 Gene in Murrah Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, M.; Taraphder, S.; Sonawane, G. S.; Verma, A.

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) has an important pattern recognition receptor that recognizes endotoxins associated with gram negative bacterial infections. The present investigation was carried out to study nucleotide sequencing and SNP detection by PCR-RFLP analysis of the TLR-4 gene in Murrah buffalo. Genomic DNA was isolated from 102 lactating Murrah buffalo from NDRI herd. The amplified PCR fragments of TLR-4 comprised of exon 1, exon 2, exon 3.1, and exon 3.2 were examined to RFLP. PCR products were obtained with sizes of 165, 300, 478, and 409 bp. TLR-4 gene of investigated Murrah buffaloes was highly polymorphic with AA, AB, and BB genotypes as revealed by PCR-RFLP analysis using Dra I, Hae III, and Hinf I REs. Nucleotide sequencing of the amplified fragment of TLR-4 gene of Murrah buffalo was done. Twelve SNPs were identified. Six SNPs were nonsynonymous resulting in change in amino acids. Murrah is an indigenous Buffalo breed and the presence of the nonsynonymous SNP is indicative of its unique genomic architecture. Sequence alignment and homology across species using BLAST analysis revealed 97%, 97%, 99%, 98%, and 80% sequence homology with Bos taurus, Bos indicus, Ovis aries, Capra hircus, and Homo sapiens, respectively.

  8. ADRB2 and LEPR gene polymorphisms: synergistic effects on the risk of obesity in Japanese.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Tiago V; Mingroni-Netto, Regina C; Yamada, Yoshiji

    2011-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to validate a recently reported synergistic effect between variants located in the leptin receptor (LEPR) gene and in the β-2 adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) gene on the risk of overweight/obesity. We studied a middle-aged/elderly sample of 4,193 nondiabetic Japanese subjects stratified according gender (1,911 women and 2,282 men). The LEPR Gln223Arg (rs1137101) variant as well as both ADRB2 Arg16Gly (rs1042713) and Gln27Glu (rs1042714) polymorphisms were analyzed. The primary outcome was the risk of overweight/obesity defined as BMI ≥25 kg/m(2), whereas secondary outcomes included the risk of a BMI ≥27 kg/m(2) and BMI as a continuous variable. None of the studied polymorphisms showed statistically significant individual effects, regardless of the group or phenotype studied. Haplotype analysis also did not disclose any associations of ADRB2 polymorphisms with BMI. However, dimensionality reduction-based models confirmed significant interactions among the investigated variants for BMI as a continuous variable as well as for the risk of obesity defined as BMI ≥27 kg/m(2). All disclosed interactions were found in men only. Our results provide external validation for a male specific ADRB2-LEPR interaction effect on the risk of overweight/obesity, but indicate that effect sizes associated with these interactions may be smaller in the population studied. PMID:21233812

  9. The Q223R polymorphism in LEPR is associated with obesity in Pacific Islanders.

    PubMed

    Furusawa, Takuro; Naka, Izumi; Yamauchi, Taro; Natsuhara, Kazumi; Kimura, Ryosuke; Nakazawa, Minato; Ishida, Takafumi; Inaoka, Tsukasa; Matsumura, Yasuhiro; Ataka, Yuji; Nishida, Nao; Tsuchiya, Naoyuki; Ohtsuka, Ryutaro; Ohashi, Jun

    2010-03-01

    Various Pacific Island populations have experienced a marked increase in the prevalence of obesity in past decades. This study examined the association of a promoter polymorphism of the leptin gene (LEP), G-2548A (rs7799039), and two non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms of the leptin receptor gene (LEPR), K109R (rs1137100) and Q223R (rs1137101), with body weight, body mass index (BMI) and obesity (BMI > or = 30) in Pacific Islanders. A total of 745 Austronesian (AN)-speaking participants were analyzed after adjusting for age, gender, and population differences. The results revealed that carriers of the 223Q alleles of LEPR had significantly higher body weight (P = 0.0009) and BMI (P = 0.0022) than non-carriers (i.e., 223R homozygotes); furthermore, the 223Q carriers also had a signiWcantly higher risk of obesity in comparison to non-carriers (P = 0.0222). The other two polymorphisms, G-2548A and K109R, were associated with neither body weight, BMI, nor obesity. The 223Q allele was widely found among the AN-speaking study subjects, thus suggesting that the LEPR Q223R polymorphism is one of the factors contributing to the high prevalence of obesity in the Pacific Island populations. PMID:20183928

  10. Common genetic variations in the LEP and LEPR genes, obesity and breast cancer incidence and survival

    PubMed Central

    Cleveland, Rebecca J.; Gammon, Marilie D.; Long, Chang-Min; Gaudet, Mia M.; Eng, Sybil M.; Teitelbaum, Susan L.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Santella, Regina M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Obesity is a strong risk factor for breast cancer in postmenopausal women and adverse prognostic indicator regardless of menopausal status. Leptin is an important regulator of adipose tissue mass and has been associated with tumor cell growth. Leptin exerts its effects through interaction with the leptin receptor (LEPR). We investigated whether genetic variations in the leptin (LEP) and LEPR genes are associated with risk of breast cancer, or once diagnosed, with survival. Methods The polymorphisms LEP G-2548A and LEPR Q223R were characterized in population-based study consisting of mostly European-American women. The study examined 1,065 women diagnosed with first, primary invasive breast cancer between 1996 and 1997. Controls were 1,108 women frequency matched to the cases by 5-year age group. Results A modest increase in risk of developing breast cancer was associated with the LEP -2548AA genotype when compared to the LEP -2548GG genotype (age-adjusted OR=1.30; 95% CI=1.01–1.66). This association was stronger among postmenopausal women who were obese (OR=1.86; 95% CI=0.95–3.64) although the interaction was of borderline statistical significance (P=0.07). We found no evidence of an association with polymorphisms of either LEP or LEPR in relation to all-cause or breast cancer-specific mortality among women with breast cancer (mean follow-up time=66.7 months). The effects of these genotypes on breast cancer risk and mortality did not vary significantly when stratified by menopausal status. Conclusions In summary, our results show that a common variant in LEP may be associated with the risk of developing breast cancer supporting the hypothesis that leptin is involved in breast carcinogenesis. PMID:19697123

  11. The effect of SCD and LEPR genetic polymorphisms on fat content and composition is maintained throughout fattening in Duroc pigs.

    PubMed

    Henriquez-Rodriguez, E; Bosch, L; Tor, M; Pena, R N; Estany, J

    2016-11-01

    The effects of the stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD; AY487830:g.2228T>C) and leptin receptor (LEPR; NM_001024587:g.1987C>T) polymorphisms on fat content and fatty acid (FA) composition were investigated throughout fattening. Samples of Longissimus thoracis (LT) and subcutaneous fat (SF) from 214 Duroc barrows were collected from 160days to slaughter age (220days) using a longitudinal design. Results indicated that the positive effect of the T allele at the SCD gene on monounsaturated FA and of the T allele at the LEPR gene on saturated FA are maintained throughout the growing-finishing period, both in LT and SF. In LEPR, however, compositional changes, particularly in SF, are a result of increased fatness. There is very limited evidence of genotype by age interaction, and thus it is concluded that the combined selection for the SCD T and LEPR C alleles is a good strategy to increase the MUFA/SFA ratio regardless of the age at slaughter. PMID:27240305

  12. The effect of ponderal index at birth on the relationships between common LEP and LEPR polymorphisms and adiposity in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Labayen, Idoia; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Moreno, Luis A; Ortega, Francisco B; Beghin, Laurent; DeHenauw, Stefaan; Benito, Pedro J; Diaz, Ligia E; Ferrari, Marika; Moschonis, George; Kafatos, Anthony; Molnar, Dénes; Widhalm, Kurt; Dallongeville, Jean; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Gottrand, Frédéric

    2011-10-01

    This study examined the effect of ponderal index (PI) at birth on the relationships between eight common polymorphisms of the leptin (LEP) and leptin receptor (LEPR) genes and adiposity in adolescents. A total of 823 European adolescents (45.4% girls) aged 14.8 ± 1.4 years were genotyped for the LEP (rs2167270, rs12706832, rs10244329, rs2071045, and rs3828942) and LEPR (rs1137100, rs1137101, and rs8179183) polymorphisms. The PI was calculated from parental reports of birth weight and length. Fat mass index (FMI) was calculated. Analyses were adjusted for relevant confounders. An "adiposity-risk-allele score" based on genotypes at the three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with adolescents' FMI in adolescents within the lower tertile of PI was calculated. The LEP rs10244329 and rs3828942 polymorphisms were associated with higher FMI only in adolescents within the lower PI tertile (+0.55 kg/m(2) per minor T allele, P = 0.040, and +0.58 kg/m(2) per major G allele, P = 0.028, respectively). The LEPR rs8179183 polymorphism was significantly associated with higher FMI in adolescents within the lower PI tertile (+0.87 kg/m(2) per minor C allele, P = 0.006). After correction for multiple comparisons, only the association between the LEPR rs8179183 and FMI persisted. However, each additional risk allele conferred 0.53 kg/m(2) greater FMI in adolescents within the lower tertile of PI (P = 0.008). In conclusion, our results suggest that those adolescents born with lower PI could be more vulnerable to the influence of the LEP rs10244329 and rs3828942 polymorphisms and LEPR rs8179183 polymorphism on total adiposity content. Due to the relatively small sample size, these findings should be replicated in further larger population samples. PMID:21512510

  13. Selective breeding for high anxiety introduces a synonymous SNP that increases neuropeptide S receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Slattery, David A; Naik, Roshan R; Grund, Thomas; Yen, Yi-Chun; Sartori, Simone B; Füchsl, Andrea; Finger, Beate C; Elfving, Betina; Nordemann, Uwe; Guerrini, Remo; Calo, Girolamo; Wegener, Gregers; Mathé, Aleksander A; Singewald, Nicolas; Czibere, Ludwig; Landgraf, Rainer; Neumann, Inga D

    2015-03-18

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) has generated substantial interest due to its anxiolytic and fear-attenuating effects in rodents, while a corresponding receptor polymorphism associated with increased NPS receptor (NPSR1) surface expression and efficacy has been implicated in an increased risk of panic disorder in humans. To gain insight into this paradox, we examined the NPS system in rats and mice bred for high anxiety-related behavior (HAB) versus low anxiety-related behavior, and, thereafter, determined the effect of central NPS administration on anxiety- and fear-related behavior. The HAB phenotype was accompanied by lower basal NPS receptor (Npsr1) expression, which we could confirm via in vitro dual luciferase promoter assays. Assessment of shorter Npsr1 promoter constructs containing a sequence mutation that introduces a glucocorticoid receptor transcription factor binding site, confirmed via oligonucleotide pull-down assays, revealed increased HAB promoter activity-an effect that was prevented by dexamethasone. Analogous to the human NPSR1 risk isoform, functional analysis of a synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism in the coding region of HAB rodents revealed that it caused a higher cAMP response to NPS stimulation. Assessment of the behavioral consequence of these differences revealed that intracerebroventricular NPS reversed the hyperanxiety of HAB rodents as well as the impaired cued-fear extinction in HAB rats and the enhanced fear expression in HAB mice, respectively. These results suggest that alterations in the NPS system, conserved across rodents and humans, contribute to innate anxiety and fear, and that HAB rodents are particularly suited to resolve the apparent discrepancy between the preclinical and clinical findings to date. PMID:25788677

  14. LEPR, ADBR3, IRS-1 and 5-HTT genes polymorphisms do not associate with obesity.

    PubMed

    Mergen, Hatice; Karaaslan, Cağatay; Mergen, Mehmet; Deniz Ozsoy, Ergi; Ozata, Metin

    2007-02-01

    Obesity is a growing problem and is associated with numerous medical conditions. In several genes coding for molecules involved in the regulation of body weight (fat mass) and thermogenesis, polymorphisms have been reported which possibly modify human obesity risk. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of the following polymorphisms in the following genes in 262 obese (BMI > or = 30) and 138 control (BMI < or = 25) subjects: leptin receptor (LEPR)-Gln223Arg, B3-adrenergic receptor (B3-AR)-Trp64Arg, serotonin transporter (5-HTT)--a 44-base pair insertion/deletion functional polymorphism in the 5-HTTLPR and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1)-Gly972Arg. Our hypothesis was that these polymorphisms would occur more frequently in the obese population. The polymorphisms were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction genotyping in study population. In our results, no strong associations were observed between BMI status and these polymorphisms. Weak, though significant, association coefficients obtained with HTT and LEPR loci indicate that the genotype numbers at these loci may depend on BMI status to some extent. PMID:17124363

  15. Selection in the dopamine receptor 2 gene: a candidate SNP study

    PubMed Central

    Fieder, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine is a major neurotransmitter in the human brain and is associated with various diseases. Schizophrenia, for example, is treated by blocking the dopamine receptors type 2. Shaner, Miller & Mintz (2004) stated that schizophrenia was the low fitness variant of a highly variable mental trait. We therefore explore whether the dopamine receptor 2 gene (DRD2) underwent any selection processes. We acquired genotype data of the 1,000 Genomes project (phase I), which contains 1,093 individuals from 14 populations. We included single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with two minor allele frequencies (MAFs) in the analysis: MAF over 0.05 and over 0.01. This is equivalent to 151 SNPs (MAF > 0.05) and 246 SNPs (MAF > 0.01) for DRD2. We used two different approaches (an outlier approach and a Bayesian approach) to detect loci under selection. The combined results of both approaches yielded nine (MAF > 0.05) and two candidate SNPs (MAF > 0.01), under balancing selection. We also found weak signs for directional selection on DRD2, but in our opinion these were too weak to draw any final conclusions on directional selection in DRD2. All candidates for balancing selection are in the intronic region of the gene and only one (rs12574471) has been mentioned in the literature. Two of our candidate SNPs are located in specific regions of the gene: rs80215768 lies within a promoter flanking region and rs74751335 lies within a transcription factor binding site. We strongly encourage research on our candidate SNPs and their possible effects. PMID:26290802

  16. Association of rs5888 SNP in the scavenger receptor class B type 1 gene and serum lipid levels

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bai Ku Yao is a special subgroup of the Yao minority in China. The present study was undertaken to detect the association of rs5888 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SCARB1) gene and several environmental factors with serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations. Methods A total of 598 subjects of Bai Ku Yao and 585 subjects of Han Chinese were randomly selected from our stratified randomized cluster samples. Genotypes of the SCARB1 rs5888 SNP were determined by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism combined with gel electrophoresis, and then confirmed by direct sequencing. Results The levels of total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), apolipoprotein (Apo) AI were lower but ApoB was higher in Bai Ku Yao than in Han (P < 0.05-0.001). The frequencies of C and T alleles were 78.3% and 21.7% in Bai Ku Yao, and 73.7% and 26.3% in Han (P < 0.01); respectively. The frequencies of CC, CT and TT genotypes were 60.0%, 36.6% and 3.4% in Bai Ku Yao, and 54.2%, 39.0% and 6.8% in Han (P < 0.01); respectively. The subjects with TT genotype in both ethnic groups had lower HDL-C and ApoAI levels than the subjects with CC or CT genotype (P < 0.05 for all). Subgroup analyses showed that the subjects with TT genotype in Bai Ku Yao had lower HDL-C and ApoAI levels in males than the subjects with CC or CT genotype (P < 0.05 for all), and the T allele carriers had higher TC, LDL-C and ApoB levels in females than the T allele noncarriers (P < 0.05 for all). The participants with TT genotype in Han also had a lower tendency of HDL-C and ApoAI levels in males than the participants with CC or CT genotype, but the difference did not reach statistically significant (P = 0.063 and P = 0.086; respectively). The association of serum HDL-C and ApoAI levels and genotypes was confirmed by

  17. Correlation of leptin and soluble leptin receptor levels with anthropometric parameters in mother-newborn pairs

    PubMed Central

    Marino-Ortega, Linda A; Molina-Bello, Adiel; Polanco-García, Julio C; Muñoz-Valle, José F; Salgado-Bernabé, Aralia B; Guzmán-Guzmán, Iris P; Parra-Rojas, Isela

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if anthropometric parameters are associated with both leptin and soluble leptin receptor (sLEPR) levels in newborns and their mothers. This cross-sectional study was performed in 118 mother-newborn pairs. The venous blood sample of mothers was taken before delivery and immediately after delivery an umbilical cord blood sample was collected. Levels of leptin and sLEPR in maternal and umbilical cord sera were assessed by ELISA. Maternal serum concentration of leptin and sLEPR (6.2 and 25.7 ng/ml, respectively) were higher than in umbilical cord blood (2.4 and 14.2 ng/ml, respectively). However, the newborns and their mothers had higher sLEPR levels than leptin levels. In mothers was observed that leptin levels increase with weight gain in pregnancy and decreased sLEPR levels. Cord leptin levels correlated with neonatal birth weight and length, the body circumferences, placental weight and maternal leptin levels. Cord sLEPR levels correlated with maternal sLEPR and leptin levels. Maternal serum concentration of leptin correlated with pre-pregnancy BMI, weight gain, cord sLEPR and leptin levels. Maternal sLEPR concentration correlated with cord sLEPR levels. The leptin and sLEPR levels in mother-newborn pairs are related with anthropometric parameters and an inverse correlation between leptin levels and sLEPR was observed in pairs. PMID:26379933

  18. No association of LEPR Gln223Arg polymorphism with leptin, obesity or metabolic disturbances in children

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to investigate whether the Gln223Arg in the leptin receptor may influence body weight, leptin concentration, and metabolic parameters in children. Materials and methods The examined group included 101 obese children (58 girls and 43 boys) with BMI 31.41 ± 5.03 kg/m2 (BMI ≥ 2 SDS) and the control group consisted of 41 children with BMI 20.0 ± 0.80 kg/m2 (BMI < 1.0 SDS). Polymorphism identification was performed in total genomic DNA using PCRRFLP method. Results The distribution of genotypes LEPR was the following: in the obese group: AA - 20.8%, AG-55.4%, GG-23.8%; in the control group AA-31.7%, AG-53.65%, GG-14.65%. Comparative analyses between AA homozygous children and carriers of G alleles did not confirm any relation between the analyzed polymorphism and BMI, leptin concentrations, and metabolic disturbances in children with obesity. Conclusion In children with obesity we did not observe association of the LEPR Gln223Arg gene polymorphism with obesity, leptin, insulin resistance, and metabolic abnormalities. PMID:20156757

  19. Association of LEPR and ANKK1 Gene Polymorphisms with Weight Gain in Epilepsy Patients Receiving Valproic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongliang; Wang, Xueding; Zhou, Yafang; Ni, Guanzhong; Su, Qibiao; Chen, Ziyi; Chen, Zhuojia; Li, Jiali; Chen, Xinmeng; Hou, Xiangyu; Xie, Wen; Xin, Shuang; Zhou, Liemin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Weight gain is the most frequent adverse effect of valproic acid (VPA) treatment, resulting in poor compliance and many endocrine disturbances. Similarities in the weight change of monozygotic twins receiving VPA strongly suggests that genetic factors are involved in this effect. However, few studies have been conducted to identify the relevant genetic polymorphisms. Additionally, the causal relationship between the VPA concentration and weight gain has been controversial. Thus, we investigated the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in several appetite stimulation and energy homeostasis genes and the steady state plasma concentrations (Css) of VPA on the occurrence of weight gain in patients. Methods: A total of 212 epilepsy patients receiving VPA were enrolled. Nineteen SNPs in 11 genes were detected using the Sequenom MassArray iPlex platform, and VPA Css was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results: After 6 months of treatment, 20.28% of patients were found to gain a significant amount of weight (weight gained ≥7%). Three SNPs in the leptin receptor (LEPR), ankyrin repeat kinase domain containing 1 (ANKK1), and α catalytic subunit of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) showed significant associations with VPA-induced weight gain (p < 0.001, p = 0.017 and p = 0.020, respectively). After Bonferroni correction for multiple tests, the genotypic association of LEPR rs1137101, the allelic association of LEPR rs1137101, and ANKK1 rs1800497 with weight gain remained significant. However, the VPA Css in patents who gained weight were not significantly different from those who did not gain weight (p = 0.121). Conclusions: LEPR and ANKK1 genetic polymorphisms may have value in predicting VPA-induced weight gain. PMID:25740917

  20. Association between variants in the genes for leptin, leptin receptor, and proopiomelanocortin with chronic heart failure in the Czech population.

    PubMed

    Bienertová-Vasků, Julie Anna; Spinarová, Lenka; Bienert, Petr; Vasků, Anna

    2009-03-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) express enhanced catabolic metabolism finally resulting in overall weight loss, whereas adipokines might play a crucial role in signaling among tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible associations of defined variability in leptin (dbSNP ID rs7799039), proopiomelanocortin (dbSNP ID rs3754860 and dbSNP ID rs1009388), and leptin receptor gene (dbSNP rs1137101) with CHF and evaluate their potential as the CHF susceptibility genes. The case-control study comprised a total of 372 patients of Caucasian origin with chronic heart failure (New York Heart Association [NYHA] functional classes II-IV, ejection fraction (EF) <40%) and 407 healthy controls. They were genotyped for the leptin (LEP) -2548 G/A, leptin receptor (LEPR) Gln223Arg, and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) RsaI (5'-untranslated region) and C1032G variants (intron 1) using PCR-based methodology. No case-control differences in genotype as well as allele frequencies were observed between CHF patients and controls. We constructed POMC RsaI/C1032G haplotypes, having found no significant association with body mass index (BMI), left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF), left ventricle hypertrophy (LVH) and diabetes mellitus (DM). Multivariate regression analyses revealed an approximately 2-fold risk for NYHA class IV associated with the LEPR Gln223Arg (P = 0.0000001, odds ratio [OR] = 2.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.56-2.84); it also displayed an independent prediction role for LVEF in heart failure cases of all etiologies (P = 0.002, OR = 4.05, 95% CI = 1.36-10.06). In subanalyses according to CHF etiology the LEPR Gln223Arg showed an independent prediction role for NYHA IV in IHD patients (P = 0.0001, OR = 2.50, 95% CI = 1.69-3.82) and both for NYHA IV(P = 0.007, OR = 2.04, 95% CI = 1.20-3.84) and LVEF (P = 0.004, OR = 11.87, 95% CI = 2.08-55.6) in DCMP patients. The role of the polymorphic variants in the genes encoding for adipokines as potential

  1. A functional SNP upstream of the beta-2 adrenergic receptor gene (ADRB2) is associated with obesity in Oceanic populations

    PubMed Central

    Naka, I; Hikami, K; Nakayama, K; Koga, M; Nishida, N; Kimura, R; Furusawa, T; Natsuhara, K; Yamauchi, T; Nakazawa, M; Ataka, Y; Ishida, T; Inaoka, T; Iwamoto, S; Matsumura, Y; Ohtsuka, R; Tsuchiya, N; Ohashi, J

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Obesity is a growing health concern in the Oceanic populations. To investigate the genetic factors associated with adult obesity in the Oceanic populations, the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the beta-2 adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) gene with obesity was examined in 694 adults living in Tonga and Solomon Islands. RESULTS: A screening for variation in 16 Oceanic subjects detected 17 SNPs in the entire region of ADRB2, of which nine SNPs including two non-synonymous ones, rs1042713 (Arg16Gly) and rs1042714 (Gln27Glu), were further genotyped for all subjects. The rs34623097-A allele, at a SNP located upstream of ADRB2, showed the strongest association with risk for obesity in a logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, and population (P=5.6 × 10−4, odds ratio [OR]=2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.5–4.2). The 27Glu was also significantly associated with obesity in the single-point association analysis (P=0.013, OR=2.0, 95%CI=1.2–3.4); however, this association was no longer significant after adjustment for rs34623097 since these SNPs were in linkage disequilibrium with each other. A copy of the obesity-risk allele, rs34623097-A, led to a 1.6 kg/m2 increase in body mass index (BMI; defined as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) (P=0.0019). A luciferase reporter assay indicated that rs34623097-A reduced the transcriptional activity of the luciferase reporter gene by approximately 10% compared with rs34623097-G. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that rs34623097 modulated the binding affinity with nuclear factors. An evolutionary analysis implies that a G>A mutation at rs34623097 occurred in the Neandertal genome and then the rs34623097-A allele flowed into the ancestors of present-day humans. CONCLUSION: The present results suggest that rs34623097-A, which would lead to lower expression of ADRB2, contributes to the onset of obesity in the Oceanic populations. PMID:23229733

  2. Plasma Leptin levels, LEPR Q223R Polymorphism and Mammographic Breast Density: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Dallal, Cher; Garte, Seymour; Ragin, Camille; Chen, Jiangying; Lloyd, Stacy; Modugno, Francesmary; Weissfeld, Joel; Taioli, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with breast cancer in post-menopausal women, and breast density is a marker of breast cancer risk. Leptin is produced by the adipose tissue, acts through receptors that are polymorphic in nature, and is considered a cancer growth factor. The relationship between Body Mass Index, leptin, leptin receptors and breast density is not well studied. A cross-sectional analysis in 392 post-menopausal healthy women was conducted; participants provided permission to obtain copies of their most recent screening mammogram. Nonfasting plasma leptin levels were determined using a commercially available leptin ELISA kit. The Q223R genotypes of the LEPR gene were performed by polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis using DNA extracted from buffy coat samples. A statistically significant positive relationship was observed between leptin levels and body mass index (P value<0.0001); leptin was significantly positively associated with mammography total breast area and non-dense breast area (P-value<0.0001), while was significantly inversely associated with percent breast density (P-value<0.0001). Leptin levels varied across the LEPR Q223R polymorphism, and were higher in women homozygous for the AA variant. Percent breast density decreased across the LEPR Q223R genotype, with lower percent density in women with the AA genotype. When dense area was considered for quartiles of leptin by LEPR Q223R, a significant inverse trend between leptin levels and dense breast area was observed only among women with the G/G genotype (P-trend<0.001). After adjustment for possible confounders, leptin levels were significantly inversely associated with percent breast density (p=0.01). A significant interaction between body mass index and leptin levels on percent breast density was observed (p=0.03). These findings suggest that the association between leptin and breast density may vary by LEPR Q223R genotype, and that body mass index

  3. Genome-Wide Association Study Singles Out SCD and LEPR as the Two Main Loci Influencing Intramuscular Fat Content and Fatty Acid Composition in Duroc Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ros-Freixedes, Roger; Gol, Sofia; Pena, Ramona N.; Tor, Marc; Ibáñez-Escriche, Noelia; Dekkers, Jack C. M.; Estany, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) content and fatty acid composition affect the organoleptic quality and nutritional value of pork. A genome-wide association study was performed on 138 Duroc pigs genotyped with a 60k SNP chip to detect biologically relevant genomic variants influencing fat content and composition. Despite the limited sample size, the genome-wide association study was powerful enough to detect the association between fatty acid composition and a known haplotypic variant in SCD (SSC14) and to reveal an association of IMF and fatty acid composition in the LEPR region (SSC6). The association of LEPR was later validated with an independent set of 853 pigs using a candidate quantitative trait nucleotide. The SCD gene is responsible for the biosynthesis of oleic acid (C18:1) from stearic acid. This locus affected the stearic to oleic desaturation index (C18:1/C18:0), C18:1, and saturated (SFA) and monounsaturated (MUFA) fatty acids content. These effects were consistently detected in gluteus medius, longissimus dorsi, and subcutaneous fat. The association of LEPR with fatty acid composition was detected only in muscle and was, at least in part, a consequence of its effect on IMF content, with increased IMF resulting in more SFA, less polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and greater SFA/PUFA ratio. Marker substitution effects estimated with a subset of 65 animals were used to predict the genomic estimated breeding values of 70 animals born 7 years later. Although predictions with the whole SNP chip information were in relatively high correlation with observed SFA, MUFA, and C18:1/C18:0 (0.48–0.60), IMF content and composition were in general better predicted by using only SNPs at the SCD and LEPR loci, in which case the correlation between predicted and observed values was in the range of 0.36 to 0.54 for all traits. Results indicate that markers in the SCD and LEPR genes can be useful to select for optimum fatty acid profiles of pork. PMID:27023885

  4. CRTAP AND LEPRE1 MUTATIONS IN RECESSIVE OSTEOGENESIS IMPERFECTA

    PubMed Central

    Baldridge, Dustin; Schwarze, Ulrike; Morello, Roy; Lennington, Jennifer; Bertin, Terry K.; Pace, James M.; Pepin, Melanie G.; Weis, MaryAnn; Eyre, David R.; Walsh, Jennifer; Lambert, Deborah; Green, Andrew; Robinson, Haynes; Michelson, Melonie; Houge, Gunnar; Lindman, Carl; Martin, Judith; Ward, Jewell; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Mitchell, John J.; Krakow, Deborah; Rimoin, David L.; Cohn, Daniel H.; Byers, Peter H.; Lee, Brendan

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal dominant osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is caused by mutations in the genes (COL1A1 or COL1A2) encoding the chains of type I collagen. Recently, dysregulation of hydroxylation of a single proline residue at position 986 of both the triple-helical domains of type I collagen α1(I) and type II collagen α1(II) chains has been implicated in the pathogenesis of recessive forms of OI. Two proteins, CRTAP, or cartilage-associated protein, and prolyl-3-hydroxylase-1 (P3H1, encoded by the LEPRE1 gene) form a complex that performs the hydroxylation and brings the prolyl cis-trans isomerase cyclophilin-B (CYPB) to the unfolded collagen. In our screen of 78 subjects diagnosed with OI type II or III, we identified three probands with mutations in CRTAP and sixteen with mutations in LEPRE1. The latter group includes a mutation in patients from the Irish Traveller population, a genetically isolated community with increased incidence of OI. The clinical features resulting from CRTAP or LEPRE1 loss of function mutations were difficult to distinguish at birth. Infants in both groups had multiple fractures, decreased bone modeling (affecting especially the femurs), and extremely low bone mineral density. Interestingly, “popcorn” epiphyses may reflect underlying cartilaginous and bone dysplasia in this form of OI. These results expand the range of CRTAP/LEPRE1 mutations that result in recessive OI and emphasize the importance of distinguishing recurrence of severe OI of recessive inheritance from those that result from parental germline mosaicism for COL1A1 or COL1A2 mutations. PMID:18566967

  5. Role of leptin receptors in granulosa cells during ovulation.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Lisa; Schuermann, Yasmin; Cohen, Tamara; Siddappa, Dayananda; Kalaiselvanraja, Anitha; Pansera, Melissa; Bordignon, Vilceu; Duggavathi, Raj

    2014-02-01

    Leptin is an important hormone influencing reproductive function. However, the mechanisms underpinning the role of leptin in the regulation of reproduction remain to be completely deciphered. In this study, our objective is to understand the mechanisms regulating the expression of leptin receptor (Lepr) and its role in ovarian granulosa cells during ovulation. First, granulosa cells were collected from superovulated mice to profile mRNA expression of Lepr isoforms (LeprA and LeprB) throughout follicular development. Expression of LeprA and LeprB was dramatically induced in the granulosa cells of ovulating follicles at 4 h after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) treatment. Relative abundance of both mRNA and protein of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (Cebpβ) increased in granulosa cells from 1 to 7 h post-hCG. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay confirmed the recruitment of Cebpβ to Lepr promoter. Thus, hCG-induced transcription of Lepr appears to be regulated by Cebpβ, which led us to hypothesise that Lepr may play a role during ovulation. To test this hypothesis, we used a recently developed pegylated superactive mouse leptin antagonist (PEG-SMLA) to inhibit Lepr signalling during ovulation. I.p. administration of PEG-SMLA (10 μg/g) to superovulated mice reduced ovulation rate by 65% compared with control treatment. Although the maturation stage of the ovulated oocytes remained unaltered, ovulation genes Ptgs2 and Has2 were downregulated in PEG-SMLA-treated mice compared with control mice. These results demonstrate that Lepr is dramatically induced in the granulosa cells of ovulating follicles and this induction of Lepr expression requires the transcription factor Cebpβ. Lepr plays a critical role in the process of ovulation by regulating, at least in part, the expression of the important genes involved in the preovulatory maturation of follicles. PMID:24256641

  6. Association of LEP G2548A and LEPR Q223R Polymorphisms with Cancer Susceptibility: Evidence from a Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ting-Yan; Zhu, Mei-Ling; Wang, Meng-Yun; Li, Qiao-Xin; Zhou, Xiao-Yan; Qiu, Li-Xin; Wei, Qing-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Background Numerous epidemiological studies have examined associations of genetic variations in LEP (G2548A, -2548 nucleotide upstream of the ATG start site) and LEPR (Q223R, nonsynonymous SNP in exon 6) with cancer susceptibility; however, the findings are inconsistent. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to comprehensively evaluate such associations. Methods We searched published literature from MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and CBM for eligible publications. We also assessed genotype-based mRNA expression data from HapMap for rs7799039 (G2548A) and rs1137101 (Q223R) in normal cell lines derived from 270 subjects with different ethnicities. Results The final analysis included 16 published studies of 6569 cases and 8405 controls for the LEP G2548A and 19 studies of 7504 cases and 9581 controls for the LEPR Q223R. Overall, LEP G2548A was statistically significantly associated with an increased risk of overall cancer (AA vs. GG: OR=1.27, 95% CI=1.05-1.54; recessive model: OR=1.19, 95% CI=1.00-1.41). Further stratifications by cancer type showed an increased risk for prostate cancer (recessive model: OR=1.26, 95% CI=1.05-1.51) but not for other cancers. For LEPR Q223R, no statistical evidence for an association with risk of cancer was found for all; however, further stratification by ethnicity showed an increased risk for Africans but not for other ethnicities. No significantly differences in LEP and LEPR mRNA expression were found among genotypes or by ethnicity. Conclusions Despite some limitations, this meta-analysis found some statistical evidence for an association between the LEP 2548AA genotype and overall risk of cancer, particularly for prostate cancer, but given this variant did not have an effect on mRNA expression, this association warrants additional validation in large and well-designed studies. PMID:24146750

  7. Measurement of the levels of leptin, BDNF associated with polymorphisms LEP G2548A, LEPR Gln223Arg and BDNF Val66Met in Thai with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic risk factors including dyslipidemia, impaired glucose tolerance, hypertension and central obesity. BDNF (Brain-derived neurotrophic factor) and leptin have been implied in the energy homeostasis. The purposes of this study were to examine concentrations of leptin, BDNF and biochemical parameters in metabolic-syndrome subjects and healthy controls, and also to search for associations of leptin gene (LEP) G2548A, leptin receptor gene (LEPR) Gln223Arg, and BDNF gene (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphisms with leptin levels, BDNF levels and metabolic syndrome among Thais. Methods The case-controlled design was performed using 322 Thai volunteers (160 metabolic-syndrome subjects; 162 controls) during the health screening program. Metabolic syndrome was assessed by using the modified National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. The levels of leptin, BDNF, insulin, glucose and lipids were measured in samples. Genotyping of LEP G2548A, LEPR Gln223Arg and BDNF Val66Met was carried out using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Results Serum leptin levels were significantly higher in the metabolic-syndrome group than the control group (p < 0.01), but the BDNF difference between them was not significant. Significant associations of LEPR Gln223Arg polymorphism were found with leptin and glucose levels (p < 0.05), after adjusting for potential covariates. This LEPR polymorphism in the metabolic-syndrome group was also significantly more frequent than in the control group (p < 0.05). However, other gene polymorphisms, LEP G2548A and BDNF Val66Met, showed no significant relationship with leptin levels, BDNF levels or metabolic syndrome. Conclusion These findings suggest leptin levels are linked with metabolic syndrome. LEPR Gln223Arg polymorphism impacted leptin concentrations, and this gene polymorphism may influence susceptibility to metabolic syndrome among

  8. Creating leptin-like biofunctions by active immunization against chicken leptin receptor in growing chickens.

    PubMed

    Lei, M M; Wu, S Q; Shao, X B; Li, X W; Chen, Z; Ying, S J; Shi, Z D

    2015-01-01

    In this study, immunization against chicken leptin receptor (cLEPR) extracellular domain (ECD) was applied to investigate leptin regulation and LEPR biofunction in growing chicken pullets. A recombinant protein (cLEPR ECD) based on the cLEPR complemenary DNA sequence corresponding to the 582nd to 796th amino acid residues of cLEPR mature peptide was prepared and used as antigen. Immunization against cLEPR ECD in growing chickens increased anti-cLEPR ECD antibody titers in blood, enhanced proportions of phosphorylated janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and served as signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) protein in liver tissue. Chicken live weight gain and abdominal fat mass were significantly decreased (P < 0.05), but feed intake was stimulated by cLEPR ECD immunization (P < 0.05). The treatment also upregulated the gene expression levels of lepR, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), acetyl CoA carboxylase-2 (ACC2), and uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) in liver, abdominal fat, and breast muscle (P < 0.05) but decreased fasn expression levels (P < 0.01). Apart from that of lepR, the expression of appetite-regulating genes, such as orexigenic genes, agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY), were upregulated (P < 0.01), whereas the anorexigenic gene proopiomelanocortin (POMC) was downregulated in the hypothalamic tissue of cLEPR-immunized pullets (P < 0.01). Blood concentrations of metabolic molecules, such as glucose, triglycerides, and very-low-density lipoprotein, were significantly decreased in cLEPR-immunized pullets but those of cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein increased. These results demonstrate that antibodies to membrane proximal cLEPR ECD enhance cLEPR signal transduction, which stimulates metabolism and reduces fat deposition in chickens. PMID:25447880

  9. The Influence of LepR Tyrosine Site Mutations on Mouse Ovary Development and Related Gene Expression Changes

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Xiaoyu; Kuang, Zhichao; Gong, Xia; Shi, Yan; Yu, Lin; Shi, Huijuan; Wang, Jian; Sun, Zhaogui

    2015-01-01

    Leptin exerts many biological functions, such as in metabolism and reproduction, through binding to and activating the leptin receptor, LepRb, which is expressed in many regions of the brain. To better understand the roles of LepR downstream signaling pathways, Y123F mice, which expressed mutant leptin receptors with phenylalanine (F) substituted for three tyrosines (Y) (Tyr985, Tyr1077 and Tyr1138), were generated. The body weight and abdominal fat deposits of Y123F homozygous mice (HOM) were higher than those of wild-type mice (WT). HOM ovaries were atrophic and the follicles developed abnormally; however, the HOM ovaries did not exhibit polycystic phenotypes. Moreover, Y123F HOM adults had no estrous cycle and the blood estrogen concentration remained stable at a low level below detection limit of 5 pg/ml. LepR expression in HOM ovaries was higher than in WT ovaries. Using cDNA Microarrays, the mRNA expressions of 41 genes were increased, and 100 were decreased in HOM vs. WT ovaries, and many signaling pathways were evaluated to be involved significantly. The expressions of 19 genes were validated by real-time quantitative PCR, most of which were consistent with the microarray results. Thus, Y123F HOM mice were suggested as a new animal model of PCOS for research that mainly emphasizes metabolic disorders and anovulation, but not the polycystic phenotype. Meanwhile, using the model, we found that JAK-STAT and hormone biosynthesis pathways were involved in the follicular development and ovulation disorders caused by LepR deficiency in ovaries, although we could not exclude indirect actions from the brain. PMID:26529315

  10. Analysis of 10 independent samples provides evidence for association between schizophrenia and a SNP flanking fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2)

    PubMed Central

    O’Donovan, M.C.; Norton, N.; Williams, H.; Peirce, T.; Moskvina, V.; Nikolov, I.; Hamshere, M.; Carroll, L.; Georgieva, L.; Dwyer, S; Holmans, P.; Marchini, J. L.; Spencer, C.C.A.; Howie, B.; Leung, H-T.; Giegling, I.; Hartmann, A.M.; Möller, H.-J.; Morris, D.W.; Shi, Y.; Feng, G.; Hoffmann, P.; Propping, P.; Vasilescu, C.; Maier, W.; Rietschel, M.; Zammit, S.; Schumacher, J.; Quinn, E.M.; Schulze, T.G.; Iwata, N.; Ikeda, M.; Darvasi, A.; Shifman, S.; He, L.; Duan, J.; Sanders, A.R.; Levinson, D.F.; Adolfsson, R.; Ösby, U.; Terenius, Lars; Jönsson, Erik G; Cichon, S.; Nöthen, M. M.; Gill, M.; Corvin, A.P.; Rujescu, D.; Gejman, P.V.; Kirov, G.; Craddock, N.; Williams, N.M.; Owen, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    We and others have previously reported linkage to schizophrenia on chromosome 10q25-q26 but, to date, a susceptibility gene in the region has not been identified. We examined data from 3606 SNPs mapping to 10q25-q26 that had been typed in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of schizophrenia (479 UK cases/2937 controls). SNPs with p<0.01 (n=40) were genotyped in an additional 163 UK cases and those markers that remained nominally significant at p<0.01 (n=22) were genotyped in replication samples from Ireland, Germany and Bulgaria consisting of a total of 1664 cases with schizophrenia and 3541 controls. Only one SNP, rs17101921, was nominally significant after meta-analyses across the replication samples and this was genotyped in an additional six samples from the US/Australia, Germany, China, Japan, Israel and Sweden (n= 5142 cases/ 6561 controls). Across all replication samples, the allele at rs17101921 that was associated in the GWAS showed evidence for association independent of the original data (OR 1.17 (95% CI 1.06-1.29), p=0.0009). The SNP maps 85kb from the nearest gene encoding fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) making this a potential susceptibility gene for schizophrenia. PMID:18813210

  11. DNA microarray analysis identifies CKS2 and LEPR as potential markers of meningioma recurrence.

    PubMed

    Menghi, Francesca; Orzan, Francesca N; Eoli, Marica; Farinotti, Mariangela; Maderna, Emanuela; Pisati, Federica; Bianchessi, Donatella; Valletta, Lorella; Lodrini, Sandro; Galli, Giuseppe; Anghileri, Elena; Pellegatta, Serena; Pollo, Bianca; Finocchiaro, Gaetano

    2011-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most frequent intracranial tumors. Surgery can be curative, but recurrences are possible. We performed gene expression analyses and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies looking for new markers predicting the recurrence risk. We analyzed expression profiles of 23 meningiomas (10 grade I, 10 grade II, and 3 grade III) and validated the data using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). We performed LOH analysis on 40 meningiomas, investigating chromosomal regions on 1p, 9p, 10q, 14q, and 22q. We found 233 and 268 probe sets to be significantly down- and upregulated, respectively, in grade II or III meningiomas. Genes downregulated in high-grade meningiomas were overrepresented on chromosomes 1, 6, 9, 10, and 14. Based on functional enrichment analysis, we selected LIM domain and actin binding 1 (LIMA1), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3 (TIMP3), cyclin-dependent kinases regulatory subunit 2 (CKS2), leptin receptor (LEPR), and baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5) for validation using qPCR and confirmed their differential expression in the two groups of tumors. We calculated ΔCt values of CKS2 and LEPR and found that their differential expression (C-L index) was significantly higher in grade I than in grade II or III meningiomas (p < .0001). Interestingly, the C-L index of nine grade I meningiomas from patients who relapsed in <5 years was significantly lower than in grade I meningiomas from patients who did not relapse. These findings indicate that the C-L index may be relevant to define the progression risk in meningioma patients, helping guide their clinical management. A prospective analysis on a larger number of cases is warranted. PMID:21948653

  12. Variations in the Obesity Gene "LEPR" Contribute to Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Evidence from a Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming Ming; Wang, Jun; Fan, Jiao Jie; Ng, Tsz Kin; Sun, Dian Jun; Guo, Xin; Teng, Yan; Li, Yan-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is a hormone protein regulating food intake and energy expenditure. A number of studies have evaluated the genetic effect of leptin (LEP) and leptin receptor (LEPR) genes on T2DM. This study aimed to investigate the association between these gene polymorphisms and T2DM by a systematic review and meta-analysis. Published studies were identified through extensive search in PubMed and EMBASE. A total of 5143 T2DM cases and 5021 controls from 14 articles were included in this study. Five functional variants in LEPR were well evaluated. Meta-analysis showed that rs1137101 (p.R223Q) was significantly associated with T2DM in all genetic models: allele model (OR = 1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.13-1.42), dominant model (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.05-1.35), homozygote model (OR = 1.82, 95% CI = 1.38-2.39), and recessive model (OR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.35-2.28), with minimal heterogeneity and no indication of publication bias. Similar associations with T2DM were also found for rs62589000 (p.P1019P) and 3'UTR ins/del, although the data was obtained from a small number of studies. For the other two polymorphisms rs1137100 (p.R109K) and rs8179183 (p.K656N), they were not significantly associated with T2DM. Our results provide robust evidences for the genetic association of rs1137101 (p.R223Q) in LEPR with T2DM susceptibility. PMID:27195302

  13. Polymorphism in LEP and LEPR May Modify Leptin Levels and Represent Risk Factors for Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Marcello, Marjory Alana; Calixto, Antonio Ramos; de Almeida, Jacqueline Fatima Martins; Martins, Mariana Bonjiorno; Cunha, Lucas Leite; Cavalari, Camila Ayume Amano; Etchebehere, Elba C S; da Assumpção, Ligia Vera Montalli; Geloneze, Bruno; Carvalho, Andre Lopes; Ward, Laura Sterian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To understand the role of polymorphisms in the LEP (rs7799039 and rs2167270) and LEPR (rs1137101 and rs1137100) genes in DTC susceptibility and their effect on leptin levels. Methods. We studied 153 patients with DTC and 234 controls through TaqMan SNP Genotyping and ELISA, comparing these data to the clinicopathological data of patients with DTC. Results. Patients with AA genotype of rs7799039 had higher levels of serum leptin (9.22 ± 0.98 ng/mL) than those with AG genotype (10.07 ± 0.60 ng/mL; P = 0.005). Individuals with AG genotype of rs2167270 also produced higher serum leptin levels (10.05 ± 0.59 ng/mL) than the subjects with GG genotype (9.52 ± 0.79 ng/mL; P < 0.05). A multivariate logistic regression adjusted for gender, age, and BMI showed that the AG genotype of rs7799039 was an independent risk for DTC (OR, 11.689; P = 0.0183; 95% CI, 1.516-90.119). Similarly, AG and GG genotypes of rs1137101 increased the susceptibility to DTC (OR, 3.747; P = 0.027; 95% CI, 1.161-12.092 and OR, 5.437; P = 0.013; 95% CI, 1.426-20.729). Conclusions. We demonstrated that rs7799039 and rs2167270 polymorphisms modify the serum leptin concentrations in patients with DTC. Furthermore, polymorphisms rs7799039 and rs1137101 increase the risk of DTC development, although they do not correlate with tumor aggressiveness. PMID:25810718

  14. Polymorphism in LEP and LEPR May Modify Leptin Levels and Represent Risk Factors for Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marcello, Marjory Alana; Calixto, Antonio Ramos; de Almeida, Jacqueline Fatima Martins; Cunha, Lucas Leite; Cavalari, Camila Ayume Amano; Etchebehere, Elba C. S.; da Assumpção, Ligia Vera Montalli; Geloneze, Bruno; Carvalho, Andre Lopes; Ward, Laura Sterian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To understand the role of polymorphisms in the LEP (rs7799039 and rs2167270) and LEPR (rs1137101 and rs1137100) genes in DTC susceptibility and their effect on leptin levels. Methods. We studied 153 patients with DTC and 234 controls through TaqMan SNP Genotyping and ELISA, comparing these data to the clinicopathological data of patients with DTC. Results. Patients with AA genotype of rs7799039 had higher levels of serum leptin (9.22 ± 0.98 ng/mL) than those with AG genotype (10.07 ± 0.60 ng/mL; P = 0.005). Individuals with AG genotype of rs2167270 also produced higher serum leptin levels (10.05 ± 0.59 ng/mL) than the subjects with GG genotype (9.52 ± 0.79 ng/mL; P < 0.05). A multivariate logistic regression adjusted for gender, age, and BMI showed that the AG genotype of rs7799039 was an independent risk for DTC (OR, 11.689; P = 0.0183; 95% CI, 1.516–90.119). Similarly, AG and GG genotypes of rs1137101 increased the susceptibility to DTC (OR, 3.747; P = 0.027; 95% CI, 1.161–12.092 and OR, 5.437; P = 0.013; 95% CI, 1.426–20.729). Conclusions. We demonstrated that rs7799039 and rs2167270 polymorphisms modify the serum leptin concentrations in patients with DTC. Furthermore, polymorphisms rs7799039 and rs1137101 increase the risk of DTC development, although they do not correlate with tumor aggressiveness. PMID:25810718

  15. Associations of Candidate SNP on Age, Leptin Concentration, Backfat, and Body Weight at Puberty in Gilts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Body weight (BW), backfat thickness (BF), and leptin play important roles in livestock reproduction. The objective of this study was to determine whether polymorphisms in the leptin (LEP), leptin receptor (LEPR), PAX5, and POMC genes were associated with age, leptin concentration, body condition as ...

  16. Conditional Expression of Pomc in the Lepr-Positive Subpopulation of POMC Neurons Is Sufficient for Normal Energy Homeostasis and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Daniel D.; Attard, Courtney A.; Mercer, Aaron J.; Myers, Martin G.; Rubinstein, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Peptides derived from the proopiomelanocortin (POMC) precursor are critical for the normal regulation of many physiological parameters, and POMC deficiency results in severe obesity and metabolic dysfunction. Conversely, augmentation of central nervous system melanocortin function is a promising therapeutic avenue for obesity and diabetes but is confounded by detrimental cardiovascular effects including hypertension. Because the hypothalamic population of POMC-expressing neurons is neurochemically and neuroanatomically heterogeneous, there is interest in the possible dissociation of functionally distinct POMC neuron subpopulations. We used a Cre recombinase-dependent and hypothalamus-specific reactivatable PomcNEO allele to restrict Pomc expression to hypothalamic neurons expressing leptin receptor (Lepr) in mice. In contrast to mice with total hypothalamic Pomc deficiency, which are severely obese, mice with Lepr-restricted Pomc expression displayed fully normal body weight, food consumption, glucose homeostasis, and locomotor activity. Thus, Lepr+ POMC neurons, which constitute approximately two-thirds of the total POMC neuron population, are sufficient for normal regulation of these parameters. This functional dissociation approach represents a promising avenue for isolating therapeutically relevant POMC neuron subpopulations. PMID:25594696

  17. Evaluation of leptin receptor expression on buffalo leukocytes.

    PubMed

    De Matteis, Giovanna; Grandoni, Francesco; Scatà, Maria Carmela; Catizone, Angela; Reale, Anna; Crisà, Alessandra; Moioli, Bianca

    2016-09-01

    Experimental evidences support a direct role for leptin in immunity. Besides controlling food intake and energy expenditure, leptin was reported to be involved in the regulation of the immune system in ruminants. The aim of this work was to highlight the expression of leptin receptor (LEPR) on Bubalus bubalis immune cells using a multi-approach assessment: flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and gene expression analysis. Flow cytometric analysis of LEPR expression showed that peripheral blood monocytes were the predominant cells expressing LEPR. This result was corroborated by confocal microscopy and RT-PCR analysis. Moreover, among lymphocytes, LEPR was mainly expressed by B lymphocytes and Natural Killer cells. Evidence of LEPR expression on buffalo blood leukocytes showed to be a good indicator of the responsivity of these cells to leptin, so confirming the involvement of leptin in buffalo immune response. PMID:27436440

  18. Leptin receptor polymorphisms interact with polyunsaturated fatty acids to augment risk of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leptin receptor (LEPR) is associated with insulin resistance, a key feature of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Gene-fatty acid interactions may affect MetS risk. The objective was to investigate the relationship among LEPR polymorphisms, insulin resistance, andMetSrisk and whether plasma fatty acids,...

  19. The methylation of the LEPR/LEPROT genotype at the promoter and body regions influence concentrations of leptin in girls and BMI at age 18 years if their mother smoked during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Mitra; Karmaus, Wilfried; Zhang, Hongmei; Ewart, Susan; Arshad, Hasan; Holloway, John W

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether DNA methylation (DNA-M) of the leptin receptor genotype (LEPR/LEPROT) links gestational smoking and leptin serum levels and BMI later in life, we focused on female offspring, 18 years of age, from the Isle of Wight Birth Cohort (IOWBC). Leptin binds to the leptin receptor encoded by the LEPR/LEPROT genotype. Using general linear models, we tested a two-stage model. First, we investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) acting as methylation quantitative trait loci (methQTLs) depending on gestational smoking were related to differentially methylated cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sites. In stage 2, we tested whether the selected CpG sites, in interaction with other SNPs (modifiable genetic variants, modGV), are associated with serum leptin and BMI (stage 2). Children from the IOWBC were followed from birth to age 18. Information on gestational smoking was gathered upon delivery. SNPs tagging LEPR and LEPROT genes were genotyped. Data on LEPR/LEPROT DNA-M and leptin were obtained from blood samples drawn at age 18; to determine BMI, height and weight were ascertained. Blood samples were provided by 238 girls. Of the 21 CpG sites, interactions between gestational smoking and SNPs were detected for 16 CpGs. Methylation of seven of the 16 CpGs were, in interaction with modGVs, associated with leptin levels at age 18 years. Two CpGs survived a multiple testing penalty and were also associated with BMI. This two-stage model may explain why maternal smoking has a long-term effect on leptin levels and BMI in girls at age 18 years. PMID:23875062

  20. SNP-VISTA

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Nameeta; Teplitsky, Michael; Minovitsky, Simon; Dubchak, Inna

    2005-11-07

    SNP-VISTA aids in analyses of the following types of data: A. Large-scale re-sequence data of disease-related genes for discovery of associated and/or causative alleles (GeneSNP-VISTA). B. Massive amounts of ecogenomics data for studying homologous recombination in microbial populations (EcoSNP-VISTA). The main features and capabilities of SNP-VISTA are: 1) Mapping of SNPs to gene structure; 2) classification of SNPs, based on their location in the gene, frequency of occurrence in samples and allele composition; 3) clustering, based on user-defined subsets of SNPs, highlighting haplotypes as well as recombinant sequences; 4) integration of protein conservation visualization; and 5) display of automatically calculated recombination points that are user-editable. The main strength of SNP-VISTA is its graphical interface and use of visual representations, which support interactive exploration and hence better understanding of large-scale SNPs data.

  1. IGF2, LEPR, POMC, PPARG, and PPARGC1 gene variants are associated with obesity-related risk phenotypes in Brazilian children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, E.M.; Cândido, A.P.C.; Castro, I.M.; Bastos, A.Q.A.; Machado-Coelho, G.L.L.; Freitas, R.N.

    2015-01-01

    Association studies of genetic variants and obesity and/or obesity-related risk factors have yielded contradictory results. The aim of the present study was to determine the possible association of five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the IGF2, LEPR, POMC, PPARG, and PPARGC1genes with obesity or obesity-related risk phenotypes. This case-control study assessed overweight (n=192) and normal-weight (n=211) children and adolescents. The SNPs were analyzed using minisequencing assays, and variables and genotype distributions between the groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance and Pearson's chi-square or Fisher's exact tests. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age and gender was used to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) for selected phenotype risks in each group. No difference in SNP distribution was observed between groups. In children, POMC rs28932472(C) was associated with lower diastolic blood pressure (P=0.001), higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (P=0.014), and higher risk in overweight children of altered total cholesterol (OR=7.35, P=0.006). In adolescents, IGF2 rs680(A) was associated with higher glucose (P=0.012) and higher risk in overweight adolescents for altered insulin (OR=10.08, P=0.005) and homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (OR=6.34, P=0.010). PPARG rs1801282(G) conferred a higher risk of altered insulin (OR=12.31, P=0.003), and HOMA-IR (OR=7.47, P=0.005) in overweight adolescents. PARGC1 rs8192678(A) was associated with higher triacylglycerols (P=0.005), and LEPR rs1137101(A) was marginally associated with higher LDL cholesterol (P=0.017). LEPR rs1137101(A) conferred higher risk for altered insulin, and HOMA-IR in overweight adolescents. The associations observed in this population suggested increased risk for cardiovascular diseases and/or type 2 diabetes later in life for individuals carrying these alleles. PMID:25923461

  2. IGF2, LEPR, POMC, PPARG, and PPARGC1 gene variants are associated with obesity-related risk phenotypes in Brazilian children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, E M; Cândido, A P C; Castro, I M; Bastos, A Q A; Machado-Coelho, G L L; Freitas, R N

    2015-07-01

    Association studies of genetic variants and obesity and/or obesity-related risk factors have yielded contradictory results. The aim of the present study was to determine the possible association of five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the IGF2, LEPR, POMC, PPARG, and PPARGC1 genes with obesity or obesity-related risk phenotypes. This case-control study assessed overweight (n=192) and normal-weight (n=211) children and adolescents. The SNPs were analyzed using minisequencing assays, and variables and genotype distributions between the groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance and Pearson's chi-square or Fisher's exact tests. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age and gender was used to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) for selected phenotype risks in each group. No difference in SNP distribution was observed between groups. In children, POMC rs28932472(C) was associated with lower diastolic blood pressure (P=0.001), higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (P=0.014), and higher risk in overweight children of altered total cholesterol (OR=7.35, P=0.006). In adolescents, IGF2 rs680(A) was associated with higher glucose (P=0.012) and higher risk in overweight adolescents for altered insulin (OR=10.08, P=0.005) and homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (OR=6.34, P=0.010). PPARG rs1801282(G) conferred a higher risk of altered insulin (OR=12.31, P=0.003), and HOMA-IR (OR=7.47, P=0.005) in overweight adolescents. PARGC1 rs8192678(A) was associated with higher triacylglycerols (P=0.005), and LEPR rs1137101(A) was marginally associated with higher LDL cholesterol (P=0.017). LEPR rs1137101(A) conferred higher risk for altered insulin, and HOMA-IR in overweight adolescents. The associations observed in this population suggested increased risk for cardiovascular diseases and/or type 2 diabetes later in life for individuals carrying these alleles. PMID:25923461

  3. Transcriptional Characterization of Porcine Leptin and Leptin Receptor Genes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Montarelo, Dafne; Fernández, Almudena; Barragán, Carmen; Noguera, Jose L; Folch, Josep M; Rodríguez, M Carmen; Ovilo, Cristina; Silió, Luis; Fernández, Ana I

    2013-01-01

    The leptin (LEP) and its receptor (LEPR) regulate food intake and energy balance through hypothalamic signaling. However, the LEP-LEPR axis seems to be more complex and its expression regulation has not been well described. In pigs, LEP and LEPR genes have been widely studied due to their relevance. Previous studies reported significant effects of SNPs located in both genes on growth and fatness traits. The aim of this study was to determine the expression profiles of LEP and LEPR across hypothalamic, adipose, hepatic and muscle tissues in Iberian x Landrace backcrossed pigs and to analyze the effects of gene variants on transcript abundance. To our knowledge, non porcine LEPR isoforms have been described rather than LEPRb. A short porcine LEPR isoform (LEPRa), that encodes a protein lacking the intracellular residues responsible of signal transduction, has been identified for the first time. The LEPRb isoform was only quantifiable in hypothalamus while LEPRa appeared widely expressed across tissues, but at higher levels in liver, suggesting that both isoforms would develop different roles. The unique LEP transcript showed expression in backfat and muscle. The effects of gene variants on transcript expression revealed interesting results. The LEPRc.1987C>T polymorphism showed opposite effects on LEPRb and LEPRa hypothalamic expression. In addition, one out of the 16 polymorphisms identified in the LEPR promoter region revealed high differential expression in hepatic LEPRa. These results suggest a LEPR isoform-specific regulation at tissue level. Conversely, non-differential expression of LEP conditional on the analyzed polymorphisms could be detected, indicating that its regulation is likely affected by other mechanisms rather than gene sequence variants. The present study has allowed a transcriptional characterization of LEP and LEPR isoforms on a range of tissues. Their expression patterns seem to indicate that both molecules develop peripheral roles apart from

  4. Leptin receptor expression and Gln223Arg polymorphism as prognostic markers in oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, P R S; Maia, L L; Santos, M; Peterle, G T; Alves, L U; Takamori, J T; Souza, R P; Barbosa, W M; Mercante, A M C; Nunes, F D; Carvalho, M B; Tajara, E H; Louro, I D; Silva-Conforti, A M A

    2015-01-01

    The leptin gene product is released into the blood stream, passes through the blood-brain barrier, and finds the leptin receptor (LEPR) in the central nervous system. This hormone regulates food intake, hematopoiesis, inflammation, immunity, differentiation, and cell proliferation. The LEPR Gln223Arg polymorphism has been reported to alter receptor function and expression, both of which have been related with prognostics in several tumor types. Furthermore, several studies have shown a relationship between the Gln223Arg polymorphism and tumor development, and its role in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma is now well understood. In this study, 315 DNA samples were used for LEPR Gln223Arg genotyping and 87 primary oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas were used for immunohistochemical expression analysis, such that a relationship between these and tumor development and prognosis could be established. Homozygous LEPR Arg223 was found to be associated with a 2-fold reduction in oral and oropharyngeal cancer risk. In contrast, the presence of the Arg223 allele in tumors was associated with worse disease-free and disease-specific survival. Low LEPR expression was found to be an independent risk factor, increasing the risk for lymph node metastasis 4-fold. In conclusion, the Gln223Arg polymorphism and LEPR expression might be valuable markers for oral and oropharyngeal cancer, suggesting that LEPR might serve as a potential target for future therapies. PMID:26634459

  5. Family-Based Association Study Between SLC2A1, HK1, and LEPR Polymorphisms With Myelomeningocele in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Suazo, José; Castillo, Silvia; Martin, Luz Maria; Rojas, Francisca; Santos, José Luis; Rotter, Karin; Solar, Margarita; Tapia, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Obese/diabetic mothers present a higher risk to develop offspring with myelomeningocele (MM), evidence supporting the role of energy homeostasis-related genes in neural tube defects. Using polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism, we have genotyped SLC2A1, HK1, and LEPR single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 105 Chilean patients with MM and their parents in order to evaluate allele–phenotype associations by means of allele/haplotype transmission test (TDT) and parent-of-origin effects. We detected an undertransmission for the SLC2A1 haplotype T-A (rs710218-rs2229682; P = .040), which was not significant when only lower MM (90% of the cases) was analyzed. In addition, the leptin receptor rs1137100 G allele showed a significant increase in the risk of MM for maternal-derived alleles in the whole sample (2.43-fold; P = .038) and in lower MM (3.20-fold; P = .014). Our results support the role of genes involved in energy homeostasis in the risk of developing MM, thus sustaining the hypothesis of diverse pathways and genetic mechanisms acting in the expression of such birth defect. PMID:23427181

  6. SNP-VISTA

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-11-07

    SNP-VISTA aids in analyses of the following types of data: A. Large-scale re-sequence data of disease-related genes for discovery of associated and/or causative alleles (GeneSNP-VISTA). B. Massive amounts of ecogenomics data for studying homologous recombination in microbial populations (EcoSNP-VISTA). The main features and capabilities of SNP-VISTA are: 1) Mapping of SNPs to gene structure; 2) classification of SNPs, based on their location in the gene, frequency of occurrence in samples and allele composition; 3) clustering,more » based on user-defined subsets of SNPs, highlighting haplotypes as well as recombinant sequences; 4) integration of protein conservation visualization; and 5) display of automatically calculated recombination points that are user-editable. The main strength of SNP-VISTA is its graphical interface and use of visual representations, which support interactive exploration and hence better understanding of large-scale SNPs data.« less

  7. Leptin Receptor Promotes Adipogenesis and Reduces Osteogenesis by Regulating Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Adult Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Yue, Rui; Zhou, Bo O; Shimada, Issei S; Zhao, Zhiyu; Morrison, Sean J

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal stem cells (SSCs) that are the major source of osteoblasts and adipocytes in adult bone marrow express leptin receptor (LepR). To test whether LepR regulates SSC function, we conditionally deleted Lepr from limb bone marrow stromal cells, but not from the axial skeleton or hypothalamic neurons, using Prx1-Cre. Prx1-Cre;Lepr(fl/fl) mice exhibited normal body mass and normal hematopoiesis. However, limb bones from Prx1-Cre;Lepr(fl/fl) mice exhibited increased osteogenesis, decreased adipogenesis, and accelerated fracture healing. Leptin increased adipogenesis and reduced osteogenesis by activating Jak2/Stat3 signaling in bone marrow stromal cells. A high-fat diet increased adipogenesis and reduced osteogenesis in limb bones from wild-type mice, but not from Prx1-Cre;Lepr(fl/fl) mice. This reflected local effects of LepR on osteogenesis and adipogenesis by bone marrow stromal cells and systemic effects on bone resorption. Leptin/LepR signaling regulates adipogenesis and osteogenesis by mesenchymal stromal cells in the bone marrow in response to diet and adiposity. PMID:27053299

  8. Allelic background of LEPRE1 mutations that cause recessive forms of osteogenesis imperfecta in different populations

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Melanie G; Schwarze, Ulrike; Singh, Virendra; Romana, Marc; Jones-LeCointe, Altheia; Byers, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    Biallelic mutations in LEPRE1 result in recessively inherited forms of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) that are often lethal in the perinatal period. A mutation (c.1080+1G>T, IVS5+1G>T) in African Americans has a carrier frequency of about 1/240. The mutant allele originated in West Africa in tribes of Ghana and Nigeria where the carrier frequencies are 2% and 5%. By examining 200 samples from an African-derived population in Tobago and reviewing hospital neonatal death records, we determined that the carrier frequency of c.1080+1G>T was about one in 200 and did not contribute to the neonatal deaths recorded over a 3-year period of time in Trinidad. In the course of sequence analysis, we found surprisingly high LEPRE1 allelic diversity in the Tobago DNA samples in which there were 11 alleles distinguished by a single basepair variant in or near exon 5. All the alleles found in the Tobago population that were within the sequence analysis region were found in the African American population in the Exome Variant Project. This diversity appeared to reflect the geographic origin of the original population in Tobago. In 44 individuals with biallelic LEPRE1 mutations identified by clinical diagnostic testing, we found the sequence alterations occurred on seven of the 11 variant alleles. All but one of the mutations identified resulted in mRNA or protein instability for the majority of the transcripts from the altered allele. These findings suggest that the milder end of the clinical spectrum could be due to as yet unidentified missense mutations in LEPRE1. PMID:24498616

  9. SNP panels/Imputation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Participants from thirteen countries discussed services that Interbull can perform or recommendations that Interbull can make to promote harmonization and assist member countries in improving their genomic evaluations in regard to SNP panels and imputation. The panel recommended: A mechanism to shar...

  10. Discovery and functional characterization of leptin and its receptors in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica).

    PubMed

    Wang, Dandan; Xu, Chunlin; Wang, Taian; Li, Hong; Li, Yanmin; Ren, Junxiao; Tian, Yadong; Li, Zhuanjian; Jiao, Yuping; Kang, Xiangtao; Liu, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is an important endocrine regulation factor of food intake and energy homeostasis in mammals; however, the existence of a poultry leptin gene (LEP) is still debated. Here, for the first time, we report the cloning of a partial exon 3 sequence of LEP (qLEP) and four different leptin receptor splicing variants, including a long receptor (qLEPRl) and three soluble receptors (qLEPR-a, qLEPR-b and qLEPR-c) in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). The qLEP gene had high GC content (64%), which is similar to other reported avian leptin genes. The encoded qLEP protein possessed the conserved pair of cysteine residues that are required to form a lasso knot for full biological activity, but shared relatively low identities with LEPs of other vertebrates. The translated qLEPRl protein contained 1143 amino acids and shared high amino acid sequence identity with a chicken homolog (89% identity). qLEPRl also contained all the motifs, domains, and basic tyrosine residues that are conserved in the LEPRl proteins of other vertebrates. qRT-PCR analysis showed that LEP and the four LEPR variants were expressed extensively in all tissues examined; the expression levels of LEP were relatively high in hypothalamus, skeletal muscle, and pancreas, while the expression levels of the LEPRs were highest in the pituitary. Compared with the expression levels of juvenile qLEP and total qLEPR (including all LEPR variants), the expression levels of mature qLEP and total qLEPR were up-regulated in the hypothalamus and pituitary, and down-regulated in the ovary. The expressions of LEP/LEPR increased when fasting and decreased when refeeding in the brain and peripheral tissues of juvenile quail, which suggested that the LEP/LEPR system modulated food intake and energy expenditure, although, unlike in mammals, LEP may actually act to inhibit food intake during fasting, at least in juvenile quail. The results indicate that qLEP and qLEPR have unique expression patterns and that the encoded

  11. Osteogenesis imperfecta due to compound heterozygosity for the LEPRE1 gene.

    PubMed

    Moul, Adrienne; Alladin, Amanda; Navarrete, Cristina; Abdenour, George; Rodriguez, Maria M

    2013-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a rare connective tissue disorder characterized by bone fragility and low bone density. Most cases are caused by an autosomal dominant mutation in either COL1A1 or COL1A2 gene encoding type I collagen. However, autosomal recessive forms have been identified. We present a patient with severe respiratory distress due to osteogenesis imperfecta simulating type II, born to a non-consanguineous couple with mixed African-American and African-Hispanic ethnicity. Cultured skin fibroblasts demonstrated compound heterozygosity for mutations in the LEPRE1 gene encoding prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 confirming the diagnosis of autosomal recessive osteogenesis imperfecta type VIII, perinatal lethal type. PMID:23301918

  12. Leptin Receptor Gene Polymorphism may Affect Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Patients with Acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Turgut, Sebahat; Topsakal, Senay; Ata, Melek Tunç; Herek, Duygu; Akın, Fulya; Özkan, Şeyma; Turgut, Günfer

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acromegaly is associated with increased morbidity and mortality related to cardiovascular diseases. Leptin (LEP) and Leptin Receptor (LEPR) gene polymorphisms can increase cardiovascular risks. The aim of this study was to investigate association between the frequencies of LEP and LEPR gene polymorphisms and subclinical atherosclerosis in acromegalic patients. Methods: Forty-four acromegalic patients and 30 controls were admitted to study. The polymorphisms were identified by using polymerase chain reaction from peripheral blood samples. The levels of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, BMI, fasting plasma glucose, fasting insulin, IGF-I, GH, IGFBP3, leptin, triglyceride, carotid Intima Media Thickness (cIMT) and HDL and LDL cholesterol concentrations were evaluated. Results: There was statistically significant difference between the LEPR genotypes of acromegalic patients (GG 11.4%, GA 52.3%, and AA 36.4%) and controls (GG 33.3%, GA 50%, and AA 16.7%) although their LEP genotype distribution was similar. In addition, the prevalence of the LEPR gene G and A alleles was significantly different between patients and controls. No significant difference was found among the G(-2548) A leptin genotypes of groups in terms of the clinical parameters. cIMT significantly increased homozygote LEPR GG genotype group compared to AA subjects in patients. But the other parameters were not different between LEPR genotypes groups of patients and controls. Conclusion: It can be said that the LEPR gene polymorphism may affect cIMT in patients. The reason is that LEPR GG genotype carriers may have more risk than other genotypes in the development of subclinical atherosclerosis in acromegaly. PMID:27563428

  13. Human-Specific SNP in Obesity Genes, Adrenergic Receptor Beta2 (ADRB2), Beta3 (ADRB3), and PPAR γ2 (PPARG), during Primate Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Takenaka, Akiko; Nakamura, Shin; Mitsunaga, Fusako; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Udono, Toshifumi; Suryobroto, Bambang

    2012-01-01

    Adrenergic-receptor beta2 (ADRB2) and beta3 (ADRB3) are obesity genes that play a key role in the regulation of energy balance by increasing lipolysis and thermogenesis. The Glu27 allele in ADRB2 and the Arg64 allele in ADRB3 are associated with abdominal obesity and early onset of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) in many ethnic groups. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARG) is required for adipocyte differentiation. Pro12Ala mutation decreases PPARG activity and resistance to NIDDM. In humans, energy-expense alleles, Gln27 in ADRB2 and Trp64 in ADRB3, are at higher frequencies than Glu27 and Arg64, respectively, but Ala12 in PPARG is at lower frequency than Pro12. Adaptation of humans for lipolysis, thermogenesis, and reduction of fat accumulation could be considered by examining which alleles in these genes are dominant in non-human primates (NHP). All NHP (P. troglodytes, G. gorilla, P. pygmaeus, H. agilis and macaques) had energy-thrifty alleles, Gly16 and Glu27 in ADRB2, and Arg64 in ADRB3, but did not have energy-expense alleles, Arg16, Gln27 and Trp64 alleles. In PPARG gene, all NHP had large adipocyte accumulating type, the Pro12 allele. Conclusions These results indicate that a tendency to produce much more heat through the energy-expense alleles developed only in humans, who left tropical rainforests for savanna and developed new features in their heat-regulation systems, such as reduction of body hair and increased evaporation of water, and might have helped the protection of entrails from cold at night, especially in glacial periods. PMID:22937051

  14. Common Variants of IL6, LEPR, and PBEF1 Are Associated With Obesity in Indian Children

    PubMed Central

    Tabassum, Rubina; Mahendran, Yuvaraj; Dwivedi, Om Prakash; Chauhan, Ganesh; Ghosh, Saurabh; Marwaha, Raman K.; Tandon, Nikhil; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan

    2012-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity in urban Indian children is indicative of an impending crisis of metabolic disorders. Although perturbations in the secretion of adipokines and inflammatory molecules in childhood obesity are well documented, the contribution of common variants of genes encoding them is not well investigated. We assessed the association of 125 common variants from 21 genes, encoding adipocytokines and inflammatory markers in 1,325 urban Indian children (862 normal weight [NW group] and 463 overweight/obese [OW/OB group]) and replicated top loci in 1,843 Indian children (1,399 NW children and 444 OW/OB children). Variants of four genes (PBEF1 [rs3801266] [P = 4.5 × 10−4], IL6 [rs2069845] [P = 8.7 × 10−4], LEPR [rs1137100] [P = 1.8 × 10−3], and IL6R [rs7514452] [P = 2.1 × 10−3]) were top signals in the discovery sample. Associations of rs2069845, rs1137100, and rs3801266 were replicated (P = 7.9 × 10−4, 8.3 × 10−3, and 0.036, respectively) and corroborated in meta-analysis (P = 2.3 × 10−6, 3.9 × 10−5, and 4.3 × 10−4, respectively) that remained significant after multiple testing corrections. These variants also were associated with quantitative measures of adiposity (weight, BMI, and waist and hip circumferences). Allele dosage analysis of rs2069845, rs1137100, and rs3801266 revealed that children with five to six risk alleles had an approximately four times increased risk of obesity than children with less than two risk alleles (P = 1.2 × 10−7). In conclusion, our results demonstrate the association of the common variants of IL6, LEPR, and PBEF1 with obesity in Indian children. PMID:22228719

  15. Differences in metabolomic profiles of male db/db and s/s, leptin receptor mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Saadat, Nadia; IglayReger, Heidi B.; Myers, Martin G.; Bodary, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Leptin, a protein hormone secreted by adipose tissue, plays an important role in regulating energy metabolism and the immune response. Despite similar extremes of adiposity, mutant mouse models, db/db, carrying spontaneous deletion of the active form of the leptin receptor (LEPR-B) intracellular signaling domain, and the s/s, carrying a specific point mutation leading to a dysfunctional LEPR-B-STAT3 signaling pathway, have been shown to have robust differences in glucose homeostasis. This suggests specific effects of leptin, mediated by non-STAT3 LEPR-B pathways. Differences in the LEPR-B signaling pathways in these two LEPR-B mutant mice models are expected to lead to differences in metabolism. In the current study, the hypothesized differences in metabolism were investigated using the metabolomics approach. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1HNMR) was conducted on 24 h urine samples in deuterium oxide using a 500 MHz instrument at 25°C. Principle Component Analysis showed clear separation of urine NMR spectra between the groups (P < 0.05). The CHENOMX metabolite database was used to identify several metabolites that differed between the two mouse models. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in metabolites associated with the glycine, serine, and homocysteine metabolism were observed. The results demonstrate that the metabolomic profile of db/db and s/s mice are fundamentally different and provide insight into the unique metabolic effects of leptin exerted through non-STAT3 LEPR-B pathways. PMID:22318992

  16. SNP-VISTA: An interactive SNP visualization tool

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nameeta; Teplitsky, Michael V; Minovitsky, Simon; Pennacchio, Len A; Hugenholtz, Philip; Hamann, Bernd; Dubchak, Inna L

    2005-01-01

    Background Recent advances in sequencing technologies promise to provide a better understanding of the genetics of human disease as well as the evolution of microbial populations. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) are established genetic markers that aid in the identification of loci affecting quantitative traits and/or disease in a wide variety of eukaryotic species. With today's technological capabilities, it has become possible to re-sequence a large set of appropriate candidate genes in individuals with a given disease in an attempt to identify causative mutations. In addition, SNPs have been used extensively in efforts to study the evolution of microbial populations, and the recent application of random shotgun sequencing to environmental samples enables more extensive SNP analysis of co-occurring and co-evolving microbial populations. The program is available at [1]. Results We have developed and present two modifications of an interactive visualization tool, SNP-VISTA, to aid in the analyses of the following types of data: A. Large-scale re-sequence data of disease-related genes for discovery of associated and/or causative alleles (GeneSNP-VISTA). B. Massive amounts of ecogenomics data for studying homologous recombination in microbial populations (EcoSNP-VISTA). The main features and capabilities of SNP-VISTA are: 1) mapping of SNPs to gene structure; 2) classification of SNPs, based on their location in the gene, frequency of occurrence in samples and allele composition; 3) clustering, based on user-defined subsets of SNPs, highlighting haplotypes as well as recombinant sequences; 4) integration of protein evolutionary conservation visualization; and 5) display of automatically calculated recombination points that are user-editable. Conclusion The main strength of SNP-VISTA is its graphical interface and use of visual representations, which support interactive exploration and hence better understanding of large-scale SNP data by the user. PMID

  17. Leptin receptor signaling in T cells is required for Th17 differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Bernardo S; Lee, Kihyun; Fanok, Melania H; Mascaraque, Cristina; Amoury, Manal; Cohn, Lillian; Rogoz, Aneta; Dallner, Olof S; Moraes-Vieira, Pedro M; Domingos, Ana I; Mucida, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The hormone leptin plays a key role in energy homeostasis, and the absence of either leptin or its receptor (lepR) leads to severe obesity and metabolic disorders. To avoid indirect effects and to address the cell-intrinsic role of leptin signaling in the immune system, we conditionally targeted lepR in T cells. In contrast to pleiotropic immune disorders reported in obese mice with leptin or lepR deficiency, we found that lepR deficiency in CD4+ T cells resulted in a selective defect in both autoimmune and protective Th17 responses. Reduced capacity for differentiation towards a Th17 phenotype by lepr-deficient T cells was attributed to reduced activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and its downstream targets. This study establishes cell-intrinsic roles for leptin receptor signaling in the immune system and suggests that leptin signaling during T cell differentiation plays a crucial role in T cell peripheral effector function. PMID:25917102

  18. Transcriptomic analysis of aggressive meningiomas identifies PTTG1 and LEPR as prognostic biomarkers independent of WHO grade

    PubMed Central

    Jungk, Christine; Sahm, Felix; Ull, Anna Theresa; Warta, Rolf; Lamszus, Katrin; Gousias, Konstantinos; Ketter, Ralf; Roesch, Saskia; Rapp, Carmen; Schefzyk, Sebastian; Urbschat, Steffi; Lahrmann, Bernd; Kessler, Almuth F.; Löhr, Mario; Senft, Christian; Grabe, Niels; Reuss, David; Beckhove, Philipp; Westphal, Manfred; von Deimling, Andreas; Unterberg, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are frequent central nervous system tumors. Although most meningiomas are benign (WHO grade I) and curable by surgery, WHO grade II and III tumors remain therapeutically challenging due to frequent recurrence. Interestingly, relapse also occurs in some WHO grade I meningiomas. Hence, we investigated the transcriptional features defining aggressive (recurrent, malignantly progressing or WHO grade III) meningiomas in 144 cases. Meningiomas were categorized into non-recurrent (NR), recurrent (R), and tumors undergoing malignant progression (M) in addition to their WHO grade. Unsupervised transcriptomic analysis in 62 meningiomas revealed transcriptional profiles lining up according to WHO grade and clinical subgroup. Notably aggressive subgroups (R+M tumors and WHO grade III) shared a large set of differentially expressed genes (n=332; p<0.01, FC>1.25). In an independent multicenter validation set (n=82), differential expression of 10 genes between WHO grades was confirmed. Additionally, among WHO grade I tumors differential expression between NR and aggressive R+M tumors was affirmed for PTTG1, AURKB, ECT2, UBE2C and PRC1, while MN1 and LEPR discriminated between NR and R+M WHO grade II tumors. Univariate survival analysis revealed a significant association with progression-free survival for PTTG1, LEPR, MN1, ECT2, PRC1, COX10, UBE2C expression, while multivariate analysis identified a prediction for PTTG1 and LEPR mRNA expression independent of gender, WHO grade and extent of resection. Finally, stainings of PTTG1 and LEPR confirmed malignancy-associated protein expression changes. In conclusion, based on the so far largest study sample of WHO grade III and recurrent meningiomas we report a comprehensive transcriptional landscape and two prognostic markers. PMID:26894859

  19. Duplicated Leptin Receptors in Two Species of Eel Bring New Insights into the Evolution of the Leptin System in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Morini, Marina; Pasquier, Jérémy; Dirks, Ron; van den Thillart, Guido; Tomkiewicz, Jonna; Rousseau, Karine; Dufour, Sylvie; Lafont, Anne-Gaëlle

    2015-01-01

    Since its discovery in mammals as a key-hormone in reproduction and metabolism, leptin has been identified in an increasing number of tetrapods and teleosts. Tetrapods possess only one leptin gene, while most teleosts possess two leptin genes, as a result of the teleost third whole genome duplication event (3R). Leptin acts through a specific receptor (LEPR). In the European and Japanese eels, we identified two leptin genes, and for the first time in vertebrates, two LEPR genes. Synteny analyses indicated that eel LEPRa and LEPRb result from teleost 3R. LEPRb seems to have been lost in the teleost lineage shortly after the elopomorph divergence. Quantitative PCRs revealed a wide distribution of leptins and LEPRs in the European eel, including tissues involved in metabolism and reproduction. Noticeably, leptin1 was expressed in fat tissue, while leptin2 in the liver, reflecting subfunctionalization. Four-month fasting had no impact on the expression of leptins and LEPRs in control European eels. This might be related to the remarkable adaptation of silver eel metabolism to long-term fasting throughout the reproductive oceanic migration. In contrast, sexual maturation induced differential increases in the expression of leptins and LEPRs in the BPG-liver axis. Leptin2 was strikingly upregulated in the liver, the central organ of the reproductive metabolic challenge in teleosts. LEPRs were differentially regulated during sexual maturation, which may have contributed to the conservation of the duplicated LEPRs in this species. This suggests an ancient and positive role of the leptin system in the vertebrate reproductive function. This study brings new insights on the evolutionary history of the leptin system in vertebrates. Among extant vertebrates, the eel represents a unique case of duplicated leptins and leptin receptors as a result of 3R. PMID:25946034

  20. Duplicated leptin receptors in two species of eel bring new insights into the evolution of the leptin system in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Morini, Marina; Pasquier, Jérémy; Dirks, Ron; van den Thillart, Guido; Tomkiewicz, Jonna; Rousseau, Karine; Dufour, Sylvie; Lafont, Anne-Gaëlle

    2015-01-01

    Since its discovery in mammals as a key-hormone in reproduction and metabolism, leptin has been identified in an increasing number of tetrapods and teleosts. Tetrapods possess only one leptin gene, while most teleosts possess two leptin genes, as a result of the teleost third whole genome duplication event (3R). Leptin acts through a specific receptor (LEPR). In the European and Japanese eels, we identified two leptin genes, and for the first time in vertebrates, two LEPR genes. Synteny analyses indicated that eel LEPRa and LEPRb result from teleost 3R. LEPRb seems to have been lost in the teleost lineage shortly after the elopomorph divergence. Quantitative PCRs revealed a wide distribution of leptins and LEPRs in the European eel, including tissues involved in metabolism and reproduction. Noticeably, leptin1 was expressed in fat tissue, while leptin2 in the liver, reflecting subfunctionalization. Four-month fasting had no impact on the expression of leptins and LEPRs in control European eels. This might be related to the remarkable adaptation of silver eel metabolism to long-term fasting throughout the reproductive oceanic migration. In contrast, sexual maturation induced differential increases in the expression of leptins and LEPRs in the BPG-liver axis. Leptin2 was strikingly upregulated in the liver, the central organ of the reproductive metabolic challenge in teleosts. LEPRs were differentially regulated during sexual maturation, which may have contributed to the conservation of the duplicated LEPRs in this species. This suggests an ancient and positive role of the leptin system in the vertebrate reproductive function. This study brings new insights on the evolutionary history of the leptin system in vertebrates. Among extant vertebrates, the eel represents a unique case of duplicated leptins and leptin receptors as a result of 3R. PMID:25946034

  1. Leptin receptor gene polymorphisms in severely pre-eclamptic women.

    PubMed

    Rigó, János; Szendei, György; Rosta, Klára; Fekete, Andrea; Bögi, Krisztina; Molvarec, Attila; Rónai, Zsolt; Vér, Agota

    2006-09-01

    Variants of the leptin receptor gene (LEPR) may modulate the effect of elevated serum leptin levels in pre-eclampsia. The aim of our study was to evaluate the LEPR gene polymorphisms Lys109Arg (A109G) and Gln223Arg (A223G) in severely pre-eclamptic women. In a case-control study, we analyzed blood samples from 124 severely pre-eclamptic patients and 107 healthy control women by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The Pearson chi2 test was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The association was adjusted for maternal age, pre-pregnancy body mass index and primiparity with logistic regression analysis. Pregnant women with the LEPR 223G allele (223A/G or 223G/G genotype) had almost double the risk of developing severe pre-eclampsia compared with patients with the 223A/A genotype (adjusted OR = 1.92, 95% CI: 1.07-3.41). Genotype variants of LEPR A109G alone did not affect the risk of severe pre-eclampsia. Haplotype estimation of A109G and A223G polymorphisms of the LEPR gene revealed that the G-A haplotype versus other pooled haplotypes was significantly less common in the pre-eclamptic group (p < 0.01), while the G-G haplotype versus others was overrepresented among severely pre-eclamptic patients (p < 0.01), compared with controls. In conclusion, our data indicate that LEPR A223G polymorphism may individually modify the risk of severe pre-eclampsia. PMID:17071538

  2. SNP genotyping by heteroduplex analysis.

    PubMed

    Paniego, Norma; Fusari, Corina; Lia, Verónica; Puebla, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Heteroduplex-based genotyping methods have proven to be technologically effective and economically efficient for low- to medium-range throughput single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) determination. In this chapter we describe two protocols that were successfully applied for SNP detection and haplotype analysis of candidate genes in association studies. The protocols involve (1) enzymatic mismatch cleavage with endonuclease CEL1 from celery, associated with fragment separation using capillary electrophoresis (CEL1 cleavage), and (2) differential retention of the homo/heteroduplex DNA molecules under partial denaturing conditions on ion pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography (dHPLC). Both methods are complementary since dHPLC is more versatile than CEL1 cleavage for identifying multiple SNP per target region, and the latter is easily optimized for sequences with fewer SNPs or small insertion/deletion polymorphisms. Besides, CEL1 cleavage is a powerful method to localize the position of the mutation when fragment resolution is done using capillary electrophoresis. PMID:25373754

  3. The association between polymorphisms in the leptin receptor gene and risk of breast cancer: a systematic review and pooled analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-qiang; Shen, Wei; Xu, Lan; Chen, Min-Bin; Gong, Ting; Lu, Pei-Hua; Tao, Guo-Qing

    2012-11-01

    Many epidemiological studies have found that leptin correlates to body fat extent and breast cancer. Leptin exerts its physiological action through the leptin receptor (LEPR). However, published data on the association between LEPR alleles and breast cancer occurrence have led to in contradictory results. A total of 10 studies were identified to the meta-analysis, including 4,644 cases and 5,485 controls for LEPR rs1137101 polymorphism, 5 studies with 2,759 cases and 4,464 controls for rs1137100 polymorphism, and 2 studies for rs8051542, rs8051542, and rs8051542 polymorphisms. The pooled odds ratios (OR) with 95 % confidence intervals (CI) for breast cancer risk associated with LEPR genotypes were estimated. Elevated breast cancer risk was associated with LEPR rs1137101 polymorphism when all studies were pooled in the meta-analysis (allele contrast model: OR = 0.71, 95 % CI = 0.551-0.997). In the stratified analysis by ethnicity, significantly increased risks were also found among Asians for allele contrast model (OR 0.414, 95 % CI 0.312-0.550) and dominant model (OR 0.537, 95 % CI 0.370-0.781); for Africans, significantly increased risks were also found for allele contrast model (OR 0.716, 95 % CI 0.595-0.861), homozygote codominant (OR 0.537, 95 % CI 0.370-0.781) and dominant model (OR 1.595, 95 % CI 1.207-2.108). And significantly elevated breast cancer risk was associated with LEPR rs1137100 polymorphism for allele contrast (OR = 0.666, 95 % CI = 0.603-0.720) and homozygote codominant models (OR = 0.344, 95 % CI = 0.282-0.421). For LEPR rs8179183, rs4655537, and rs3762274 polymorphisms, no significant associations were detected in all comparison models. This pooled analysis suggested that rs1137101 and rs1137100 polymorphisms were significantly correlated with breast cancer risk and the A allele of LEPR rs1137101 variant and the G allele of LEPR rs1137100 variant were low-penetrant risk factors for developing breast cancer. Further, no

  4. Variants in the LEPR gene are nominally associated with higher BMI and lower 24 hour energy expenditure in Pima Indians

    PubMed Central

    Traurig, Michael; Perez, Jessica; Ma, Lijun; Bian, Li; Kobes, Sayuko; Hanson, Robert L.; Knowler, William C.; Krakoff, Jonathan; Bogardus, Clifton; Baier, Leslie J.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have been used to search for susceptibility genes for type 2 diabetes and obesity in the Pima Indians, a population with high a prevalence of both diseases. In these studies, a variant (rs2025804) in the LEPR gene was nominally associated with BMI in 1082 subjects (P=0.03 adjusted for age, sex, birth year, and family membership). Therefore the LEPR and leptin overlapping transcript (LEPROT) genes were selected for further sequencing and genotyping in larger population-based samples for association analyses with obesity-related phenotypes. Selected variants (n=80) spanning these genes were genotyped in a sample of full-heritage Pima Indians (n=2842) and several common variants including rs2025804 were nominally associated with BMI (P=0.05-0.003 adjusted for age, sex, birth year, and family membership). Four common tag variants associated with BMI in the full-heritage Pima Indian sample were genotyped in a second sample of mixed-heritage Native Americans (n=2969) and 3 of the variants showed nominal replication (P=0.03-0.006 adjusted as above and additionally for Indian heritage). Combining both samples provided the strongest evidence for association (adjusted P=0.0003-0.0001). A subset of these individuals (n=403) had been metabolically characterized for predictors of obesity and the BMI risk alleles for the variants tagged by rs2025804 were also associated with lower 24 hour energy expenditure as assessed in a human respiratory chamber (P=0.0007 adjusted for age, sex, fat mass, fat free mass, activity, and family membership). We conclude that common non-coding variation in the LEPR gene is associated with higher BMI and lower energy expenditure in Native Americans. PMID:22810975

  5. Correlation of leptin receptor expression with BMI in differential grades of human meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    RUTKOWSKI, ROBERT; RESZEC, JOANNA; HERMANOWICZ, ADAM; CHRZANOWSKI, ROBERT; LYSON, TOMASZ; MARIAK, ZENON; CHYCZEWSKI, LECH

    2016-01-01

    Meningioma is one of the most common primary brain tumor, especially in postmenopausal women. The most important risk factors include radiation, primary head injury or genetic alterations, however it is currently unclear why postmenopausal women are predominantly affected. The aim of the present study was to evaluate leptin receptor (LEPR) expression and body mass index (BMI) in patients with meningiomas of differential grades. Specimens of 158 meningiomas were classified as either G1 (low-grade meningiomas, n=114) or G2/G3 (high-grade meningiomas, n=44). Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess LEPR expression. The mean BMIs of the female and male patient groups were 28.43±5.29 and 23.93±4.66, respectively. Mean BMI was significantly higher in the female group, by ~4.50 kg/m2. Patient age significantly correlated with LEPR expression, with the highly positive (++) and positive (+) groups having mean ages of 62.3±12.07 and 52.3±13.04, respectively. A strong positive correlation (r=0.73) was observed between leptin receptor expression and BMI, with the LEPR (++) group having a mean BMI of 30.11±4.49, compared to 22.12±2.48 for the LEPR (+) group. Furthermore, in the low-grade meningioma group, mean BMI was higher in female patients than male patients (28.13±5.54 and 25.38±4.57, respectively; P=0.01). Additionally, there was strong positive correlation between BMI and leptin receptor expression in the low-grade meningioma group (r=0.69). For the high-grade meningioma group, mean BMI was 29.49±4.26 and 21.76±3.98 in female and male patients, respectively, and LEPR expression strongly correlated with BMI in this group (r=0.80). The present study demonstrates a correlation between patient BMI, age, and LEPR expression status in low- and high-grade meningiomas. Our results indicate that in addition to endogenous hormones, such as estrogen or progesterone, or fatty tissue-associated proinflammatory cytokines, LEPR expression status may be a risk factor for

  6. Leptin and leptin receptor genes in relation to premenopausal breast cancer incidence and grade in Caucasian women.

    PubMed

    Gu, Fangyi; Kraft, Peter; Rice, Megan; Michels, Karin B

    2012-01-01

    Body mass is inversely related to breast cancer risk among premenopausal women. Leptin, an essential cytokine regulating food intake, energy expenditure, glucose, and fat metabolism may be part of the mechanistic pathway. We investigated 50 tagging and candidate SNPs in the leptin (LEP) and leptin receptor (LEPR) genes for associations with premenopausal breast cancer incidence using 405 cases and 810 controls nested within the Nurses' Health Study II. We also examined associations between these SNPs and circulating leptin (among 910 women) and breast cancer grade (among 267 patients). Permutation tests were performed to adjust for multiple testing. We did not detect a significant association between SNPs in the LEP or LEPR gene and either breast cancer incidence or plasma leptin levels. Among cases, 14 SNPs of the LEPR gene were significantly associated with cancer grade, and rs1137101 (Q223R) survived multiple testing adjustment (adjusted P = 0.04). The G carriers of rs1137101 were more likely to have poorly differentiated than well-differentiated cancers. Our data suggest that common genetic variation in the LEP or LEPR gene has no strong association with premenopausal breast cancer risk. The LEPR gene might be associated with breast cancer grade. PMID:21947707

  7. Leptin and leptin receptor genes in relation to premenopausal breast cancer incidence and grade in Caucasian women

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Fangyi; Kraft, Peter; Rice, Megan; Michels, Karin B.

    2012-01-01

    Body mass is inversely related to breast cancer risk among premenopausal women. Leptin, an essential cytokine regulating food intake, energy expenditure, glucose, and fat metabolism may be part of the mechanistic pathway. We investigated 50 tagging and candidate SNPs in the leptin (LEP) and leptin receptor (LEPR) genes for associations with premenopausal breast cancer incidence using 405 cases and 810 controls nested within the Nurses’ Health Study II. We also examined associations between these SNPs and circulating leptin (among 910 women) and breast cancer grade (among 267 patients). Permutation tests were performed to adjust for multiple testing. We did not detect a significant association between SNPs in the LEP or LEPR gene and either breast cancer incidence or plasma leptin levels. Among cases, 14 SNPs of the LEPR gene were significantly associated with cancer grade, and rs1137101 (Q223R) survived multiple testing adjustment (adjusted P = 0.04). The G carriers of rs1137101 were more likely to have poorly differentiated than well-differentiated cancers. Our data suggest that common genetic variation in the LEP or LEPR gene has no strong association with premenopausal breast cancer risk. The LEPR gene might be associated with breast cancer grade. PMID:21947707

  8. SNP-SNP interaction analysis of NF-κB signaling pathway on breast cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Maral; Fagerholm, Rainer; Khan, Sofia; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Andrulis, Irene L; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Devilee, Peter; Fasching, Peter A; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Guo, Qi; Rhenius, Valerie; Cornelissen, Sten; Rudolph, Anja; Knight, Julia A; Loehberg, Christian R; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Bojesen, Stig E; Flyger, Henrik; Brenner, Hermann; Holleczek, Bernd; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Van Dyck, Laurien; Nevelsteen, Ines; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Giles, Graham G; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Hooning, Maartje J; Martens, John W M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Simard, Jacques; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Pharoah, Paul D P; Hall, Per; Blomqvist, Carl; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2015-11-10

    In breast cancer, constitutive activation of NF-κB has been reported, however, the impact of genetic variation of the pathway on patient prognosis has been little studied. Furthermore, a combination of genetic variants, rather than single polymorphisms, may affect disease prognosis. Here, in an extensive dataset (n = 30,431) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, we investigated the association of 917 SNPs in 75 genes in the NF-κB pathway with breast cancer prognosis. We explored SNP-SNP interactions on survival using the likelihood-ratio test comparing multivariate Cox' regression models of SNP pairs without and with an interaction term. We found two interacting pairs associating with prognosis: patients simultaneously homozygous for the rare alleles of rs5996080 and rs7973914 had worse survival (HRinteraction 6.98, 95% CI=3.3-14.4, P=1.42E-07), and patients carrying at least one rare allele for rs17243893 and rs57890595 had better survival (HRinteraction 0.51, 95% CI=0.3-0.6, P = 2.19E-05). Based on in silico functional analyses and literature, we speculate that the rs5996080 and rs7973914 loci may affect the BAFFR and TNFR1/TNFR3 receptors and breast cancer survival, possibly by disturbing both the canonical and non-canonical NF-κB pathways or their dynamics, whereas, rs17243893-rs57890595 interaction on survival may be mediated through TRAF2-TRAIL-R4 interplay. These results warrant further validation and functional analyses. PMID:26317411

  9. SNP-SNP interaction analysis of NF-κB signaling pathway on breast cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidi, Maral; Fagerholm, Rainer; Khan, Sofia; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Andrulis, Irene L.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Devilee, Peter; Fasching, Peter A.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Guo, Qi; Rhenius, Valerie; Cornelissen, Sten; Rudolph, Anja; Knight, Julia A.; Loehberg, Christian R.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Flyger, Henrik; Brenner, Hermann; Holleczek, Bernd; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Dyck, Laurien Van; Nevelsteen, Ines; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Giles, Graham G.; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Hooning, Maartje J.; Martens, John W.M.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Simard, Jacques; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Hall, Per; Blomqvist, Carl; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2015-01-01

    In breast cancer, constitutive activation of NF-κB has been reported, however, the impact of genetic variation of the pathway on patient prognosis has been little studied. Furthermore, a combination of genetic variants, rather than single polymorphisms, may affect disease prognosis. Here, in an extensive dataset (n = 30,431) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, we investigated the association of 917 SNPs in 75 genes in the NF-κB pathway with breast cancer prognosis. We explored SNP-SNP interactions on survival using the likelihood-ratio test comparing multivariate Cox’ regression models of SNP pairs without and with an interaction term. We found two interacting pairs associating with prognosis: patients simultaneously homozygous for the rare alleles of rs5996080 and rs7973914 had worse survival (HRinteraction 6.98, 95% CI=3.3-14.4, P = 1.42E-07), and patients carrying at least one rare allele for rs17243893 and rs57890595 had better survival (HRinteraction 0.51, 95% CI=0.3-0.6, P = 2.19E-05). Based on in silico functional analyses and literature, we speculate that the rs5996080 and rs7973914 loci may affect the BAFFR and TNFR1/TNFR3 receptors and breast cancer survival, possibly by disturbing both the canonical and non-canonical NF-κB pathways or their dynamics, whereas, rs17243893-rs57890595 interaction on survival may be mediated through TRAF2-TRAIL-R4 interplay. These results warrant further validation and functional analyses. PMID:26317411

  10. Association of leptin receptor gene Gln223Arg polymorphism with susceptibility to colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arkani, Maral; Safaei, Akram; Pourhoseingholi, Mohamad Amin; Mohebbi, Seyed Reza; Fatemi, Seyed Reza; Vafaei, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Aim Leptin is a 16 kDa polypeptide hormone which secreted by adipose tissue and has an important role in energy balance, insulin pathway and inflammation, because of that it may play an important role in colorectal cancer (CRC). Leptin exerts its effect through the leptin receptor (LEPR) a member of the class I cytokine receptor family. Background We have investigated whether glutamine to arginine substitution (Gln223Arg) in exon 6 of the leptin receptor gene, has implications for susceptibility to CRC. Patients and methods Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction enzyme digestion (RFLP) was performed to evaluate the association between the Gln223Arg polymorphism of the LEPR and CRC risk in a case-control study in 346 subjects involving 173 cases with CRC and 173 controls. Results There was no statistically evidence of significant difference in genotype and allele frequencies between the cases with CRC and controls for the Gln223Arg polymorphism of LEPR, before or after adjusting for confounders (age, BMI, sex, and smoking status). Furthermore, no significant difference was observed between the CRC cases and controls by BMI, sex and smoking status. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the LEPR Gln223Arg polymorphism is not associated with the risk of CRC in Iranian population. PMID:24834182

  11. Genetic modifiers of Lepr{sup fa} associated with variability in insulin production and susceptibility to NIDDM

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, W.K.; Zheng, M.; Chua, M.

    1997-05-01

    In an attempt to identify the genetic basis for susceptibility to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus within the context of obesity, we generated 401 genetically obese Lepr{sup fa}/Lepr{sup fa} F2 WKY13M intercross rats that demonstrated wide variation in multiple phenotypic measures related to diabetes, including plasma glucose concentration, percentage of glycosylated hemoglobin, plasma insulin concentration, and pancreatic islet morphology. Using selective genotyping genome scanning approaches, we have identified three quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on Chr. 1 (LOD 7.1 for pancreatic morpholology), Chr. 12 (LOD 5.1 for body mass index and LOD 3.4 for plasma glucose concentration), and Chr. 16 (P < 0.001 for genotype effect on plasma glucose concentration). The obese F2 progeny demonstrated sexual dimorphism for these traits, with increased diabetes susceptibility in the males appearing at approximately 6 weeks of age, as sexual maturation occurred. For each of the QTLs, the linked phenotypes demonstrated sexual dimorphism (more severe affection in males). The QTL on Chr. 1 maps to a region vicinal to that previously linked to adiposity in studies of diabetes susceptibility in the nonobese Goto-Kakizaki rat, which is genetically closely related to the Wistar counterstrain we employed. Several candidate genes, including tubby (tub), multigenic obesity 1 (Mob1), adult obesity and diabetes (Ad), and insulin-like growth factor-2 (Igf2), map to murine regions homologous to the QTL region identified on rat Chr. 1. 60 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. The Expression of LEP, LEPR, IGF1 and IL10 in Obesity and the Relationship with microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Viesti A. Collares, Renata; Salgado, Wilson; Pretti da Cunha Tirapelli, Daniela; dos Santos, José Sebastião

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease, with epigenetic alterations. Have been described modifications in the expression of some microRNAs, and some proteins related to obesity. The objective was to determine and correlate, in obese patients, the gene expression of LEP, LEPR, IGF1, IL10 and of miR-27a, miR-27b, miR-143 and miR-145. RNA was extracted from biopsies of subcutaneous fat, liver and visceral fat of 15 obese subjects submitted to bariatric surgery and of 15 non-obese subjects submitted to cholecystectomy for cDNA synthesis and for RT-PCR. The microRNAs were chosen using the TargetScan software. An increased expression of LEP and IGF1 was detected in the subcutaneous fat of the obese group compared to control, while the expression of IGF1 was higher in the control group than in the obese one. MiRNA-27a had a higher expression in the omentum of the obese patients and there was also a correlation in the expression of miRNA-145 and LEPR in the omentum of this group. PMID:24690978

  13. SNP-SNP interactions in breast cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Onay, Venüs Ümmiye; Briollais, Laurent; Knight, Julia A; Shi, Ellen; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wells, Sean; Li, Hong; Rajendram, Isaac; Andrulis, Irene L; Ozcelik, Hilmi

    2006-01-01

    Background Breast cancer predisposition genes identified to date (e.g., BRCA1 and BRCA2) are responsible for less than 5% of all breast cancer cases. Many studies have shown that the cancer risks associated with individual commonly occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are incremental. However, polygenic models suggest that multiple commonly occurring low to modestly penetrant SNPs of cancer related genes might have a greater effect on a disease when considered in combination. Methods In an attempt to identify the breast cancer risk conferred by SNP interactions, we have studied 19 SNPs from genes involved in major cancer related pathways. All SNPs were genotyped by TaqMan 5'nuclease assay. The association between the case-control status and each individual SNP, measured by the odds ratio and its corresponding 95% confidence interval, was estimated using unconditional logistic regression models. At the second stage, two-way interactions were investigated using multivariate logistic models. The robustness of the interactions, which were observed among SNPs with stronger functional evidence, was assessed using a bootstrap approach, and correction for multiple testing based on the false discovery rate (FDR) principle. Results None of these SNPs contributed to breast cancer risk individually. However, we have demonstrated evidence for gene-gene (SNP-SNP) interaction among these SNPs, which were associated with increased breast cancer risk. Our study suggests cross talk between the SNPs of the DNA repair and immune system (XPD-[Lys751Gln] and IL10-[G(-1082)A]), cell cycle and estrogen metabolism (CCND1-[Pro241Pro] and COMT-[Met108/158Val]), cell cycle and DNA repair (BARD1-[Pro24Ser] and XPD-[Lys751Gln]), and within carcinogen metabolism (GSTP1-[Ile105Val] and COMT-[Met108/158Val]) pathways. Conclusion The importance of these pathways and their communication in breast cancer predisposition has been emphasized previously, but their biological interactions

  14. Leptin and its receptors.

    PubMed

    Wada, Nobuhiro; Hirako, Satoshi; Takenoya, Fumiko; Kageyama, Haruaki; Okabe, Mai; Shioda, Seiji

    2014-11-01

    Leptin is mainly produced in the white adipose tissue before being secreted into the blood and transported across the blood-brain barrier. Leptin binds to a specific receptor (LepR) that has numerous subtypes (LepRa, LepRb, LepRc, LepRd, LepRe, and LepRf). LepRb, in particular, is expressed in several brain nuclei, including the arcuate nucleus, the paraventricular nucleus, and the dorsomedial, lateral and ventromedial regions of the hypothalamus. LepRb is also co-expressed with several neuropeptides, including proopiomelanocortin, neuropeptide Y, galanin, galanin-like peptide, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, tyrosine hydroxylase and neuropeptide W. Functionally, LepRb induces activation of the JAK2/ERK, /STAT3, /STAT5 and IRS/PI3 kinase signaling cascades, which are important for the regulation of energy homeostasis and appetite in mammals. In this review, we discuss the structure, genetics and distribution of the leptin receptors, and their role in cell signaling mechanisms. PMID:25218975

  15. Gene-gene interactions among CX3CL1, LEPR and IL-6 related to coronary artery disease in Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Song-Gen; Chen, Guo-Lin; Yang, Song-Liu; Zhao, Ming-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the interactions among CX3CL1 (rs170364 and rs614230), LEPR (rs6700896), and IL-6 (rs2066992) polymorphisms on the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in Chinese Han population. Methods: 120 CAD patients and 109 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing methods were used to analyze the genotypes of CX3CL1, LEPR, and IL-6 polymorphisms. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) software was utilized to analyze gene-gene interactions. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used for evaluating the association between gene polymorphisms or gene-gene interactions and CAD risk. Results: In the study, TT genotype of rs170364 in CX3CL1 might decrease the CAD risk (OR=0.39, 95% CI=0.16-0.98). No significant correlation was found between T allele of rs170364 and CAD risk (P>0.05). CC genotype and C allele in rs614230 (CX3CL1) were significantly related with decreased risk of CAD (OR=0.38, 95% CI=0.17-0.86; OR=0.66, 95% CI=0.45-0.97). For IL-6 rs2066992 polymorphism. GG genotype could increase the risk of CAD (OR=2.32, 95% CI=1.04-5.17). Whereas, no significant correlation was observed between LEPR rs6700896 and CAD susceptibility. MDR analysis showed that CX3CL1, LEPR and IL-6 genes might jointly promote the occurrence of CAD. Conclusions: The interactions of CX3CL1, LEPR and IL-6 genes might increase the risk of CAD. PMID:26191329

  16. BM-SNP: A Bayesian Model for SNP Calling Using High Throughput Sequencing Data.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanxun; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Yuan, Yuan; Estecio, Marcos R; Issa, Jean-Pierre; Qiu, Peng; Ji, Yuan; Liang, Shoudan

    2014-01-01

    A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is a sole base change in the DNA sequence and is the most common polymorphism. Detection and annotation of SNPs are among the central topics in biomedical research as SNPs are believed to play important roles on the manifestation of phenotypic events, such as disease susceptibility. To take full advantage of the next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, we propose a Bayesian approach, BM-SNP, to identify SNPs based on the posterior inference using NGS data. In particular, BM-SNP computes the posterior probability of nucleotide variation at each covered genomic position using the contents and frequency of the mapped short reads. The position with a high posterior probability of nucleotide variation is flagged as a potential SNP. We apply BM-SNP to two cell-line NGS data, and the results show a high ratio of overlap ( >95 percent) with the dbSNP database. Compared with MAQ, BM-SNP identifies more SNPs that are in dbSNP, with higher quality. The SNPs that are called only by BM-SNP but not in dbSNP may serve as new discoveries. The proposed BM-SNP method integrates information from multiple aspects of NGS data, and therefore achieves high detection power. BM-SNP is fast, capable of processing whole genome data at 20-fold average coverage in a short amount of time. PMID:26357041

  17. Leptin receptor polymorphisms interact with polyunsaturated fatty acids to augment risk of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in adults.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Catherine M; Goumidi, Louisa; Bertrais, Sandrine; Field, Martyn R; Ordovas, Jose M; Cupples, L Adrienne; Defoort, Catherine; Lovegrove, Julie A; Drevon, Christian A; Blaak, Ellen E; Gibney, Michael J; Kiec-Wilk, Beata; Karlstrom, Britta; Lopez-Miranda, Jose; McManus, Ross; Hercberg, Serge; Lairon, Denis; Planells, Richard; Roche, Helen M

    2010-02-01

    The leptin receptor (LEPR) is associated with insulin resistance, a key feature of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Gene-fatty acid interactions may affect MetS risk. The objective was to investigate the relationship among LEPR polymorphisms, insulin resistance, and MetS risk and whether plasma fatty acids, a biomarker of dietary fatty acids, modulate this. LEPR polymorphisms (rs10493380, rs1137100, rs1137101, rs12067936, rs1805096, rs2025805, rs3790419, rs3790433, rs6673324, and rs8179183), biochemical measurements, and plasma fatty acid profiles were determined in the LIPGENE-SU.VI.MAX study of MetS cases and matched controls (n = 1754). LEPR rs3790433 GG homozygotes had increased MetS risk compared with the minor A allele carriers [odds ratio (OR) = 1.65; 95% CI: 1.05-2.57; P = 0.028], which may be accounted for by their increased risk of elevated insulin concentrations (OR 2.40; 95% CI: 1.28-4.50; P = 0.006) and insulin resistance (OR = 2.15; 95% CI: 1.18-3.90; P = 0.012). Low (less than median) plasma (n-3) and high (n-6) PUFA status exacerbated the genetic risk conferred by GG homozygosity to hyperinsulinemia (OR 2.92-2.94) and insulin resistance (OR 3.40-3.47). Interestingly, these associations were abolished against a high (n-3) or low (n-6) PUFA background. Importantly, we replicated some of these findings in an independent cohort. Homozygosity for the LEPR rs3790433 G allele was associated with insulin resistance, which may predispose to increased MetS risk. Novel gene-nutrient interactions between LEPR rs3790433 and PUFA suggest that these genetic influences were more evident in individuals with low plasma (n-3) or high plasma (n-6) PUFA. PMID:20032477

  18. Selective Deletion of Leptin Receptors in Gonadotropes Reveals Activin and GnRH-Binding Sites as Leptin Targets in Support of Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Akhter, Noor; CarlLee, Tyler; Syed, Mohsin M.; Odle, Angela K.; Cozart, Michael A.; Haney, Anessa C.; Allensworth-James, Melody L.; Beneš, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The adipokine, leptin (LEP), is a hormonal gateway, signaling energy stores to appetite-regulatory neurons, permitting reproduction when stores are sufficient. Dual-labeling for LEP receptors (LEPRs) and gonadotropins or GH revealed a 2-fold increase in LEPR during proestrus, some of which was seen in LH gonadotropes. We therefore investigated LEPR functions in gonadotropes with Cre-LoxP technology, deleting the signaling domain of the LEPR (Lepr-exon 17) with Cre-recombinase driven by the rat LH-β promoter (Lhβ-cre). Selectivity of the deletion was validated by organ genotyping and lack of LEPR and responses to LEP by mutant gonadotropes. The mutation had no impact on growth, body weight, the timing of puberty, or pregnancy. Mutant females took 36% longer to produce their first litter and had 50% fewer pups/litter. When the broad impact of the loss of gonadotrope LEPR on all pituitary hormones was studied, mutant diestrous females had reduced serum levels of LH (40%), FSH (70%), and GH (54%) and mRNA levels of Fshβ (59%) and inhibin/activin β A and β B (25%). Mutant males had reduced serum levels of GH (74%), TSH (31%), and prolactin (69%) and mRNA levels of Gh (31%), Ghrhr (30%), Fshβ (22%), and glycoprotein α-subunit (Cga) (22%). Serum levels of LEP and ACTH and mRNA levels of Gnrhr were unchanged. However, binding to GnRH receptors was reduced in LEPR-null LH or FSH gonadotropes by 82% or 89%, respectively, in females (P < .0001) and 27% or 53%, respectively, in males (P < .03). This correlated with reductions in GnRH receptor protein immunolabeling, suggesting that LEP's actions may be posttranscriptional. Collectively, these studies highlight the importance of LEP to gonadotropes with GnRH-binding sites and activin as potential targets. LEP may modulate population growth, adjusting the number of offspring to the availability of food supplies. PMID:25057790

  19. The Acute-Phase Protein Orosomucoid Regulates Food Intake and Energy Homeostasis via Leptin Receptor Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Yang, Yili; Qin, Zhen; Cai, Jinya; Guo, Xiuming; Tang, Yun; Wan, Jingjing; Su, Ding-Feng; Liu, Xia

    2016-06-01

    The acute-phase protein orosomucoid (ORM) exhibits a variety of activities in vitro and in vivo, notably modulation of immunity and transportation of drugs. We found in this study that mice lacking ORM1 displayed aberrant energy homeostasis characterized by increased body weight and fat mass. Further investigation found that ORM, predominantly ORM1, is significantly elevated in sera, liver, and adipose tissues from the mice with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and db/db mice that develop obesity spontaneously due to mutation in the leptin receptor (LepR). Intravenous or intraperitoneal administration of exogenous ORM decreased food intake in C57BL/6, HFD, and leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, which was absent in db/db mice and was significantly reduced in mice with arcuate nucleus (ARC) LepR knockdown, whereas enforced expression of ORM1 in ARC significantly decreased food intake, body weight, and serum insulin level. Furthermore, we found that ORM is able to bind directly to LepR and activate the receptor-mediated JAK2-STAT3 signaling in hypothalamus tissue and GT1-7 cells, which was derived from hypothalamic tumor. These data indicated that ORM could function through LepR to regulate food intake and energy homeostasis in response to nutrition status. Modulating the expression of ORM is a novel strategy for the management of obesity and related metabolic disorders. PMID:27207522

  20. Detecting Susceptibility to Breast Cancer with SNP-SNP Interaction Using BPSOHS and Emotional Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Peng, Qinke; Fan, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Studies for the association between diseases and informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have received great attention. However, most of them just use the whole set of useful SNPs and fail to consider the SNP-SNP interactions, while these interactions have already been proven in biology experiments. In this paper, we use a binary particle swarm optimization with hierarchical structure (BPSOHS) algorithm to improve the effective of PSO for the identification of the SNP-SNP interactions. Furthermore, in order to use these SNP interactions in the susceptibility analysis, we propose an emotional neural network (ENN) to treat SNP interactions as emotional tendency. Different from the normal architecture, just as the emotional brain, this architecture provides a specific path to treat the emotional value, by which the SNP interactions can be considered more quickly and directly. The ENN helps us use the prior knowledge about the SNP interactions and other influence factors together. Finally, the experimental results prove that the proposed BPSOHS_ENN algorithm can detect the informative SNP-SNP interaction and predict the breast cancer risk with a much higher accuracy than existing methods. PMID:27294121

  1. Detecting Susceptibility to Breast Cancer with SNP-SNP Interaction Using BPSOHS and Emotional Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Fan, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Studies for the association between diseases and informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have received great attention. However, most of them just use the whole set of useful SNPs and fail to consider the SNP-SNP interactions, while these interactions have already been proven in biology experiments. In this paper, we use a binary particle swarm optimization with hierarchical structure (BPSOHS) algorithm to improve the effective of PSO for the identification of the SNP-SNP interactions. Furthermore, in order to use these SNP interactions in the susceptibility analysis, we propose an emotional neural network (ENN) to treat SNP interactions as emotional tendency. Different from the normal architecture, just as the emotional brain, this architecture provides a specific path to treat the emotional value, by which the SNP interactions can be considered more quickly and directly. The ENN helps us use the prior knowledge about the SNP interactions and other influence factors together. Finally, the experimental results prove that the proposed BPSOHS_ENN algorithm can detect the informative SNP-SNP interaction and predict the breast cancer risk with a much higher accuracy than existing methods. PMID:27294121

  2. A novel application of pattern recognition for accurate SNP and indel discovery from high-throughput data: targeted resequencing of the glucocorticoid receptor co-chaperone FKBP5 in a Caucasian population.

    PubMed

    Pelleymounter, Linda L; Moon, Irene; Johnson, Julie A; Laederach, Alain; Halvorsen, Matt; Eckloff, Bruce; Abo, Ryan; Rossetti, Sandro

    2011-12-01

    The detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion/deletions (indels) with precision from high-throughput data remains a significant bioinformatics challenge. Accurate detection is necessary before next-generation sequencing can routinely be used in the clinic. In research, scientific advances are inhibited by gaps in data, exemplified by the underrepresented discovery of rare variants, variants in non-coding regions and indels. The continued presence of false positives and false negatives prevents full automation and requires additional manual verification steps. Our methodology presents applications of both pattern recognition and sensitivity analysis to eliminate false positives and aid in the detection of SNP/indel loci and genotypes from high-throughput data. We chose FK506-binding protein 51(FKBP5) (6p21.31) for our clinical target because of its role in modulating pharmacological responses to physiological and synthetic glucocorticoids and because of the complexity of the genomic region. We detected genetic variation across a 160 kb region encompassing FKBP5. 613 SNPs and 57 indels, including a 3.3 kb deletion were discovered. We validated our method using three independent data sets and, with Sanger sequencing and Affymetrix and Illumina microarrays, achieved 99% concordance. Furthermore we were able to detect 267 novel rare variants and assess linkage disequilibrium. Our results showed both a sensitivity and specificity of 98%, indicating near perfect classification between true and false variants. The process is scalable and amenable to automation, with the downstream filters taking only 1.5h to analyze 96 individuals simultaneously. We provide examples of how our level of precision uncovered the interactions of multiple loci, their predicted influences on mRNA stability, perturbations of the hsp90 binding site, and individual variation in FKBP5 expression. Finally we show how our discovery of rare variants may change current

  3. Leptin and Leptin Receptor Genetic Variants Associate with Habitual Physical Activity and the Arm Body Composition Response to Resistance Training

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, S; Haddad, CJ; Kostek, MA; Angelopoulos, TJ; Clarkson, PM; Gordon, PM; Moyna, NM; Visich, PS; Zoeller, RF; Seip, RL; Bilbie, S; Thompson, PD; Devaney, J; Gordish-Dressman, H; Hoffman, EP; Price, Thomas B.; Pescatello, LS

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE We investigated the influence of Leptin (LEP) and leptin receptor (LEPR) SNPs on habitual physical activity (PA) and body composition response to a unilateral, upper body resistance training (RT) program. METHODS European-derived American volunteers (men=111, women=131, 23.4±5.4 yr, 24.4±4.6 kg·m−2) were genotyped for LEP 19 G>A (rs2167270), and LEPR 326 A>G (rs1137100), 668 A>G (rs1137101), 3057 G>A (rs1805096), and 1968 G>C (rs8179183). They completed the Paffenbarger PA Questionnaire. Arm muscle and subcutaneous fat volumes were measured before and after 12wk of supervised RT with MRI. Multivariate and repeated measures ANCOVA tested differences among phenotypes by genotype and gender with age and body mass index as covariates. RESULTS Adults with the LEP 19 GG genotype reported more kcal/wk in vigorous intensity PA (1273.3±176.8, p=0.017) and sports/recreation (1922.8±226.0, p<0.04) than A allele carriers (718.0±147.2, 1328.6±188.2, respectively). Those with the LEP 19 GG genotype spent more hr/wk in light intensity PA (39.7±1.6) than A allele carriers (35.0±1.4, p=0.03). In response to RT, adults with the LEPR 668 G allele gained greater arm muscle volume (67687.05±3186.7 vs. 52321.87±5125.05 mm3, p=0.01) and subcutaneous fat volume (10599.89±3683.57 vs. −5224.73±5923.98 mm3, p=0.02) than adults with the LEPR 668 AA genotype, respectively. CONCLUSION LEP19 G>A and LEPR 668 A>G associated with habitual PA and the body composition response to RT. These LEP and LEPR SNPs are located in coding exons likely influencing LEP and LEPR function. Further investigation is needed to confirm our findings and establish mechanisms for LEP and LEPR genotype and PA and body composition associations we observed. PMID:22975643

  4. SNP genotyping by DNA photoligation: application to SNP detection of genes from food crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Yoshinaga; Ohtake, Tomoko; Okada, Hajime; Ami, Takehiro; Tsukaguchi, Tadashi; Fujimoto, Kenzo

    2009-06-01

    We describe a simple and inexpensive single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing method, using DNA photoligation with 5-carboxyvinyl-2'-deoxyuridine and two fluorophores. This SNP-typing method facilitates qualitative determination of genes from indica and japonica rice, and showed a high degree of single nucleotide specificity up to 10 000. This method can be used in the SNP typing of actual genomic DNA samples from food crops.

  5. SNP Arrays for Species Identification in Salmonids.

    PubMed

    Wenne, Roman; Drywa, Agata; Kent, Matthew; Sundsaasen, Kristil Kindem; Lien, Sigbjørn

    2016-01-01

    The use of SNP genotyping microarrays, developed in one species to analyze a closely related species for which genomic sequence information is scarce, enables the rapid development of a genomic resource (SNP information) without the need to develop new species-specific markers. Using large numbers of microarray SNPs offers the best chance to detect informative markers in nontarget species, markers that can very often be assayed using a lower throughput platform as is described in this paper. PMID:27460372

  6. Leptin Receptor Gene Polymorphisms and the Risk of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Coronary Atherosclerosis in the Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    An, Bai-Quan; Lu, Lin-Lin; Yuan, Chen; Xin, Yong-Ning; Xuan, Shi-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background Leptin receptor (LEPR) polymorphisms have been reported to be associated with lipid metabolism and insulin resistance in various populations. However, whether LEPR polymorphisms are associated with the risks of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and coronary atherosclerosis in the Chinese Han population remains unknown. Objectives To investigate the association of LEPR polymorphisms at Q223R and K109R with the risks of NAFLD and coronary atherosclerosis in the Chinese Han population. Patients and Methods Genotypes of LEPR Q223R and K109R were determined by polymerase chain reaction followed by sequencing in patients with NAFLD (n = 554), coronary atherosclerosis (n = 421), and healthy controls (n = 550). Serum lipid profiles were determined using biochemical methods. Pearson’s χ2 test was used to check for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and to analyze the distributions of genotypes’ alleles between groups. Baseline characteristics were analyzed using student’s t-test, paired-samples t-test, or the χ2 test where appropriate. Results The LEPR Q223R A allele significantly reduced the risks of both NAFLD and coronary atherosclerosis (OR = 0.683, 95% CI: 0.527 - 0.884, P = 0.004 and OR = 0.724, 95% CI: 0.548 - 0.955, P = 0.022, respectively). Compared to controls, no significant differences in the genotype and allele frequencies of K109R were found in the NAFLD and coronary atherosclerosis populations, respectively. However, there was a significantly increased risk of coronary atherosclerosis in NAFLD patients who carried the K109R A allele (OR = 2.283, 95% CI: 1.556 - 3.348, P < 0.001). Conclusions LEPR Q223R polymorphisms may confer a significant risk of NAFLD and coronary atherosclerosis. The A allele in the K109R polymorphism might be considered an independent risk factor for coronary atherosclerosis in NAFLD patients. PMID:27257426

  7. Genome-wide SNP detection, validation, and development of an 8K SNP array for apple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As high-throughput genetic marker screening systems are essential for a range of genetics studies and plant breeding applications, the International RosBREED SNP Consortium (IRSC) has utilized the Illumina Infinium® II system to develop a medium- to high-throughput SNP screening tool for genome-wide...

  8. SNPMeta: SNP annotation and SNP metadata collection without a reference genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increase in availability of resequencing data is greatly accelerating SNP discovery and has facilitated the development of SNP genotyping assays. This, in turn, is increasing interest in annotation of individual SNPs. Currently, these data are only available through curation, or comparison to a ...

  9. Neuropeptide Y and Agouti-Related Peptide Mediate Complementary Functions of Hyperphagia and Reduced Energy Expenditure in Leptin Receptor Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Na; Marcelin, Genevieve; Liu, Shun Mei; Schwartz, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AGRP) can produce hyperphagia, reduce energy expenditure, and promote triglyceride deposition in adipose depots. As these two neuropeptides are coexpressed within the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and mediate a major portion of the obesity caused by leptin signaling deficiency, we sought to determine whether the two neuropeptides mediated identical or complementary actions. Because of separate neuropeptide receptors and signal transduction mechanisms, there is a possibility of distinct encoding systems for the feeding and energy expenditure aspects of leptin-regulated metabolism. We have genetically added NPY deficiency and/or AGRP deficiency to LEPR deficiency isolated to AGRP cells. Our results indicate that the obesity of LEPR deficiency in AGRP/NPY neurons can produce obesity with either AGRP or NPY alone with AGRP producing hyperphagia while NPY promotes reduced energy expenditure. The absence of both NPY and AGRP prevents the development of obesity attributable to isolated LEPR deficiency in AGRP/NPY neurons. Operant behavioral testing indicated that there were no alterations in the reward for a food pellet from the AGRP-specific LEPR deficiency. PMID:21285324

  10. Rapid and efficient identification of the mouse leptin receptor mutation (C57BL/KsJ-db/db) by tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) analysis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Harry; Nam, Hajin; Suh, Jun-Gyo

    2016-03-01

    The C57BLKS/J-Lepr(db) mouse has a point mutation in the leptin receptor gene and is one of the most useful animal model for non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus in human. Since the homozygote of C57BLKS/J-Lepr(db) mouse is infertile, detection of point mutation in the leptin receptor gene is important for efficient maintaining strains as well as mass production of homozygotes. To develop a rapid and efficient genotyping method for C57BLKS/J-Lepr(db) mouse, the tetra-primer amplification-refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) was used. The 407 and 199 bp PCR products were amplified from normal (+/+) mice; while the 407 and 268 bp PCR products were amplified from homozygotes (db/db) mice; and the 407, 268, and 199 bp PCR products were amplified from heterozygotes (db/+) mice. This result showed that the tetra-primer ARMS-PCR analysis by us is suitable to detect point mutation of the leptin receptor gene. Taken together, our method will dramatically reduce animal use for maintenance of strains as well as production of homozygote in the C57BLKS/J-Lepr(db) strains. PMID:27051445

  11. SNP Discovery Using Next Generation Transcriptomic Sequencing.

    PubMed

    De Wit, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, I will guide the user through methods to find new SNP markers from expressed sequence (RNA-Seq) data, focusing on the sample preparation and also on the bioinformatic analyses needed to sort through the immense flood of data from high-throughput sequencing machines. The general steps included are as follows: sample preparation, sequencing, quality control of data, assembly, mapping, SNP discovery, filtering, validation. The first few steps are traditional laboratory protocols, whereas steps following the sequencing are of bioinformatic nature. The bioinformatics described herein are by no means exhaustive, rather they serve as one example of a simple way of analyzing high-throughput sequence data to find SNP markers. Ideally, one would like to run through this protocol several times with a new dataset, while varying software parameters slightly, in order to determine the robustness of the results. The final validation step, although not described in much detail here, is also quite critical as that will be the final test of the accuracy of the assumptions made in silico.There is a plethora of downstream applications of a SNP dataset, not covered in this chapter. For an example of a more thorough protocol also including differential gene expression and functional enrichment analyses, BLAST annotation and downstream applications of SNP markers, a good starting point could be the "Simple Fool's Guide to population genomics via RNA-Seq," which is available at http://sfg.stanford.edu . PMID:27460371

  12. A mutation in the leptin receptor is associated with Entamoeba histolytica infection in children

    PubMed Central

    Duggal, Priya; Guo, Xiaoti; Haque, Rashidul; Peterson, Kristine M.; Ricklefs, Stacy; Mondal, Dinesh; Alam, Faisal; Noor, Zannatun; Verkerke, Hans P.; Marie, Chelsea; Leduc, Charles A.; Jr., Streamson C. Chua; Jr., Martin G. Myers; Leibel, Rudolph L.; Houpt, Eric; Gilchrist, Carol A.; Sher, Alan; Porcella, Stephen F.; Jr., William A. Petri

    2011-01-01

    Malnutrition substantially increases susceptibility to Entamoeba histolytica in children. Leptin is a hormone produced by adipocytes that inhibits food intake, influences the immune system, and is suppressed in malnourished children. Therefore we hypothesized that diminished leptin function may increase susceptibility to E. histolytica infection. We prospectively observed a cohort of children, beginning at preschool age, for infection by the parasite E. histolytica every other day over 9 years and evaluated them for genetic variants in leptin (LEP) and the leptin receptor (LEPR). We found increased susceptibility to intestinal infection by this parasite associated with an amino acid substitution in the cytokine receptor homology domain 1 of LEPR. Children carrying the allele for arginine (223R) were nearly 4 times more likely to have an infection compared with those homozygous for the ancestral glutamine allele (223Q). An association of this allele with amebic liver abscess was also determined in an independent cohort of adult patients. In addition, mice carrying at least 1 copy of the R allele of Lepr were more susceptible to infection and exhibited greater levels of mucosal destruction and intestinal epithelial apoptosis after amebic infection. These findings suggest that leptin signaling is important in mucosal defense against amebiasis and that polymorphisms in the leptin receptor explain differences in susceptibility of children in the Bangladesh cohort to amebiasis. PMID:21393862

  13. Panax notoginseng saponins ameliorate impaired arterial vasodilation in SHRSP.Z-Lepr(fa) /lzmDmcr rats with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ting; Sun, Jianning; Kagota, Satomi; Maruyama, Kana; Wakuda, Hirokazu; Shinozuka, Kazumasa

    2016-04-01

    Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS) are major components of Panax notoginseng, a herb with established clinical efficacy against vascular diseases. SHRSP.Z-Lepr(fa) /IzmDmcr (SHRSP.ZF) rats, a new animal model for metabolic syndrome, display an impaired vasorelaxation response in aortas and mesenteric arteries that is mediated by nitric oxide (NO). This study investigated whether PNS and its components can ameliorate this vascular dysfunction in SHRSP.ZF rats. In an in vitro study, in the presence or absence of PNS and its components, vasodilation in response to nitroprusside was determined from myographs under isometric tension conditions in aortas and mesenteric arteries from male SHRSP.ZF rats at 18-20 weeks of age. In an in vivo study, PNS (30 mg/kg per day) was orally administered to SHRSP.ZF rats from 8 to 20 weeks of age. In vitro treatment with PNS and Ginsenoside Rb1 increased nitroprusside-induced relaxation of aortas and mesenteric arteries in SHRSP.ZF rats. The PNS-induced increase was not affected by a nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor or endothelium denudation. Relaxation in response to a cell-permeable cGMP analogue was increased by PNS, but cGMP accumulation by nitroprusside was not altered. In vivo treatment with PNS in SHRSP.ZF rats lowered blood pressure and increased relaxation and the expression of soluble guanylyl cyclase protein in arteries, without affecting metabolic abnormalities. These results indicate that PNS causes an increase in vasodilation in response to NO and a decrease in blood pressure, resulting in protection against vascular dysfunction in SHRSP.ZF rats. PNS might be beneficial in alleviating impaired vasodilation in metabolic syndrome. PMID:26784885

  14. SNP Array in Hematopoietic Neoplasms: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jinming; Shao, Haipeng

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis is essential for the diagnosis and prognosis of hematopoietic neoplasms in current clinical practice. Many hematopoietic malignancies are characterized by structural chromosomal abnormalities such as specific translocations, inversions, deletions and/or numerical abnormalities that can be identified by karyotype analysis or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays offer high-resolution identification of copy number variants (CNVs) and acquired copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH)/uniparental disomy (UPD) that are usually not identifiable by conventional cytogenetic analysis and FISH studies. As a result, SNP arrays have been increasingly applied to hematopoietic neoplasms to search for clinically-significant genetic abnormalities. A large numbers of CNVs and UPDs have been identified in a variety of hematopoietic neoplasms. CNVs detected by SNP array in some hematopoietic neoplasms are of prognostic significance. A few specific genes in the affected regions have been implicated in the pathogenesis and may be the targets for specific therapeutic agents in the future. In this review, we summarize the current findings of application of SNP arrays in a variety of hematopoietic malignancies with an emphasis on the clinically significant genetic variants. PMID:27600067

  15. The SNP Consortium website: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Thorisson, Gudmundur A; Stein, Lincoln D

    2003-01-01

    The SNP Consortium website (http://snp.cshl.org) has undergone many changes since its initial conception three years ago. The database back end has been changed from the venerable ACeDB to the more scalable MySQL engine. Users can access the data via gene or single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) keyword searches and browse or dump SNP data to textfiles. A graphical genome browsing interface shows SNPs mapped onto the genome assembly in the context of externally available gene predictions and other features. SNP allele frequency and genotype data are available via FTP-download and on individual SNP report web pages. SNP linkage maps are available for download and for browsing in a comparative map viewer. All software components of the data coordinating center (DCC) website (http://snp.cshl.org) are open source. PMID:12519964

  16. An Improved Opposition-Based Learning Particle Swarm Optimization for the Detection of SNP-SNP Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Junliang; Sun, Yan; Li, Shengjun; Liu, Jin-Xing; Zheng, Chun-Hou; Zhang, Junying

    2015-01-01

    SNP-SNP interactions have been receiving increasing attention in understanding the mechanism underlying susceptibility to complex diseases. Though many works have been done for the detection of SNP-SNP interactions, the algorithmic development is still ongoing. In this study, an improved opposition-based learning particle swarm optimization (IOBLPSO) is proposed for the detection of SNP-SNP interactions. Highlights of IOBLPSO are the introduction of three strategies, namely, opposition-based learning, dynamic inertia weight, and a postprocedure. Opposition-based learning not only enhances the global explorative ability, but also avoids premature convergence. Dynamic inertia weight allows particles to cover a wider search space when the considered SNP is likely to be a random one and converges on promising regions of the search space while capturing a highly suspected SNP. The postprocedure is used to carry out a deep search in highly suspected SNP sets. Experiments of IOBLPSO are performed on both simulation data sets and a real data set of age-related macular degeneration, results of which demonstrate that IOBLPSO is promising in detecting SNP-SNP interactions. IOBLPSO might be an alternative to existing methods for detecting SNP-SNP interactions. PMID:26236727

  17. Polymorphisms of the porcine cathepsins, growth hormone-releasing hormone and leptin receptor genes and their association with meat quality traits in Ukrainian Large White breed.

    PubMed

    Balatsky, Viktor; Bankovska, Irina; Pena, Ramona N; Saienko, Artem; Buslyk, Tetyana; Korinnyi, Sergii; Doran, Olena

    2016-06-01

    Cathepsins, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) and leptin receptor (LEPR) genes have been receiving increasing attention as potential markers for meat quality and pig performance traits. This study investigated the allele variants in four cathepsin genes (CTSB, CTSK, CTSL, CTSS), GHRH and LEPR in pure-bred Ukrainian Large White pigs and evaluated effects of the allele variants on meat quality characteristics. The study was conducted on 72 pigs. Genotyping was performed using PCR-RFLP technique. Meat quality characteristics analysed were intramuscular fat content, tenderness, total water content, ultimate pH, crude protein and ashes. A medium level of heterozygosity values was established for GHRH and LEPR genes which corresponded to very high levels of informativeness indexes. Cathepsins CTSL, CTSB and CTSK had a low level of heterozygosity, and CTSS did not segregate in this breed. Association studies established that intramuscular fat content and tenderness were affected by the allele variance in GHRH and LEPR but not by CTSB and CTSL genes. The GHRH results could be particularly relevant for the production of lean prime cuts as the A allele is associated with both, a lower meat fat content and better tenderness values, which are two attributes highly regarded by consumers. Results of this study suggest that selective breeding towards GHRH/AA genotype would be particularly useful for improving meat quality characteristics in the production systems involving lean Large White lines, which typically have less than 2 % intramuscular fat content. PMID:27075656

  18. Interactions between SNP alleles at multiple loci contribute to skin color differences between caucasoid and mongoloid subjects.

    PubMed

    Anno, Sumiko; Abe, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takushi

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) alleles at multiple loci associated with racial differences in skin color using SNP genotyping. A total of 122 Caucasians in Toledo, Ohio and 100 Mongoloids in Japan were genotyped for 20 SNPs in 7 candidate genes, encoding the Agouti signaling protein (ASIP), tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TYRP1), tyrosinase (TYR), melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), and myosin VA (MYO5A). Data were used to analyze associations between the 20 SNP alleles using linkage disequilibrium (LD). Combinations of SNP alleles were jointly tested under LD for associations with racial groups by performing a chi(2) test for independence. Results showed that SNP alleles at multiple loci can be considered the haplotype that contributes to significant differences between the two population groups and suggest a high probability of LD. Confirmation of these findings requires further study with other ethnic groups to analyze the associations between SNP alleles at multiple loci and skin color variation among races. PMID:18392143

  19. Exhaustive Genome-Wide Search for SNP-SNP Interactions Across 10 Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Murk, William; DeWan, Andrew T

    2016-01-01

    The identification of statistical SNP-SNP interactions may help explain the genetic etiology of many human diseases, but exhaustive genome-wide searches for these interactions have been difficult, due to a lack of power in most datasets. We aimed to use data from the Resource for Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) study to search for SNP-SNP interactions associated with 10 common diseases. FastEpistasis and BOOST were used to evaluate all pairwise interactions among approximately N = 300,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥ 0.15, for the dichotomous outcomes of allergic rhinitis, asthma, cardiac disease, depression, dermatophytosis, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, hemorrhoids, hypertensive disease, and osteoarthritis. A total of N = 45,171 subjects were included after quality control steps were applied. These data were divided into discovery and replication subsets; the discovery subset had > 80% power, under selected models, to detect genome-wide significant interactions (P < 10(-12)). Interactions were also evaluated for enrichment in particular SNP features, including functionality, prior disease relevancy, and marginal effects. No interaction in any disease was significant in both the discovery and replication subsets. Enrichment analysis suggested that, for some outcomes, interactions involving SNPs with marginal effects were more likely to be nominally replicated, compared to interactions without marginal effects. If SNP-SNP interactions play a role in the etiology of the studied conditions, they likely have weak effect sizes, involve lower-frequency variants, and/or involve complex models of interaction that are not captured well by the methods that were utilized. PMID:27185397

  20. Exhaustive Genome-Wide Search for SNP-SNP Interactions Across 10 Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Murk, William; DeWan, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    The identification of statistical SNP-SNP interactions may help explain the genetic etiology of many human diseases, but exhaustive genome-wide searches for these interactions have been difficult, due to a lack of power in most datasets. We aimed to use data from the Resource for Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) study to search for SNP-SNP interactions associated with 10 common diseases. FastEpistasis and BOOST were used to evaluate all pairwise interactions among approximately N = 300,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥ 0.15, for the dichotomous outcomes of allergic rhinitis, asthma, cardiac disease, depression, dermatophytosis, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, hemorrhoids, hypertensive disease, and osteoarthritis. A total of N = 45,171 subjects were included after quality control steps were applied. These data were divided into discovery and replication subsets; the discovery subset had > 80% power, under selected models, to detect genome-wide significant interactions (P < 10−12). Interactions were also evaluated for enrichment in particular SNP features, including functionality, prior disease relevancy, and marginal effects. No interaction in any disease was significant in both the discovery and replication subsets. Enrichment analysis suggested that, for some outcomes, interactions involving SNPs with marginal effects were more likely to be nominally replicated, compared to interactions without marginal effects. If SNP-SNP interactions play a role in the etiology of the studied conditions, they likely have weak effect sizes, involve lower-frequency variants, and/or involve complex models of interaction that are not captured well by the methods that were utilized. PMID:27185397

  1. A novel approach to analyzing fMRI and SNP data via parallel independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingyu; Pearlson, Godfrey; Calhoun, Vince; Windemuth, Andreas

    2007-03-01

    There is current interest in understanding genetic influences on brain function in both the healthy and the disordered brain. Parallel independent component analysis, a new method for analyzing multimodal data, is proposed in this paper and applied to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. The method aims to identify the independent components of each modality and the relationship between the two modalities. We analyzed 92 participants, including 29 schizophrenia (SZ) patients, 13 unaffected SZ relatives, and 50 healthy controls. We found a correlation of 0.79 between one fMRI component and one SNP component. The fMRI component consists of activations in cingulate gyrus, multiple frontal gyri, and superior temporal gyrus. The related SNP component is contributed to significantly by 9 SNPs located in sets of genes, including those coding for apolipoprotein A-I, and C-III, malate dehydrogenase 1 and the gamma-aminobutyric acid alpha-2 receptor. A significant difference in the presences of this SNP component is found between the SZ group (SZ patients and their relatives) and the control group. In summary, we constructed a framework to identify the interactions between brain functional and genetic information; our findings provide new insight into understanding genetic influences on brain function in a common mental disorder.

  2. A Bayesian Framework for SNP Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Havre, Susan L.; Payne, Deborah A.

    2005-07-01

    Current proteomics techniques, such as mass spectrometry, focus on protein identification, usually ignoring most types of modifications beyond post-translational modifications, with the assumption that only a small number of peptides have to be matched to a protein for a positive identification. However, not all proteins are being identified with current techniques and improved methods to locate points of mutation are becoming a necessity. In the case when single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are observed, brute force is the most common method to locate them, quickly becoming computationally unattractive as the size of the database associated with the model organism grows. We have developed a Bayesian model for SNPs, BSNP, incorporating evolutionary information at both the nucleotide and amino acid levels. Formulating SNPs as a Bayesian inference problem allows probabilities of interest to be easily obtained, for example the probability of a specific SNP or specific type of mutation over a gene or entire genome. Three SNP databases were observed in the evaluation of the BSNP model; the first SNP database is a disease specific gene in human, hemoglobin, the second is also a disease specific gene in human, p53, and the third is a more general SNP database for multiple genes in mouse. We validate that the BSNP model assigns higher posterior probabilities to the SNPs defined in all three separate databases than can be attributed to chance under specific evolutionary information, for example the amino acid model described by Majewski and Ott in conjunction with either the four-parameter nucleotide model by Bulmer or seven-parameter nucleotide model by Majewski and Ott.

  3. METU-SNP: an integrated software system for SNP-complex disease association analysis.

    PubMed

    Ustünkar, Gürkan; Aydın Son, Yeşim

    2011-01-01

    Recently, there has been increasing research to discover genomic biomarkers, haplotypes, and potentially other variables that together contribute to the development of diseases. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common form of genomic variations and they can represent an individual’s genetic variability in greatest detail. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of SNPs, high-dimensional case-control studies, are among the most promising approaches for identifying disease causing variants. METU-SNP software is a Java based integrated desktop application specifically designed for the prioritization of SNP biomarkers and the discovery of genes and pathways related to diseases via analysis of the GWAS case-control data. Outputs of METU-SNP can easily be utilized for the downstream biomarkers research to allow the prediction and the diagnosis of diseases and other personalized medical approaches. Here, we introduce and describe the system functionality and architecture of the METU-SNP. We believe that the METU-SNP will help researchers with the reliable identification of SNPs that are involved in the etiology of complex diseases, ultimately supporting the development of personalized medicine approaches and targeted drug discoveries. PMID:22156365

  4. eSNPO: An eQTL-based SNP Ontology and SNP functional enrichment analysis platform

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin; Wang, Limei; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Jizhe; Li, Xue; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chunyu; Teng, Zhixia; Zhang, Ruijie; Lv, Hongchao; Guo, Maozu

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have mined many common genetic variants associated with human complex traits like diseases. After that, the functional annotation and enrichment analysis of significant SNPs are important tasks. Classic methods are always based on physical positions of SNPs and genes. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) are genomic loci that contribute to variation in gene expression levels and have been proven efficient to connect SNPs and genes. In this work, we integrated the eQTL data and Gene Ontology (GO), constructed associations between SNPs and GO terms, then performed functional enrichment analysis. Finally, we constructed an eQTL-based SNP Ontology and SNP functional enrichment analysis platform. Taking Parkinson Disease (PD) as an example, the proposed platform and method are efficient. We believe eSNPO will be a useful resource for SNP functional annotation and enrichment analysis after we have got significant disease related SNPs. PMID:27470167

  5. eSNPO: An eQTL-based SNP Ontology and SNP functional enrichment analysis platform.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Wang, Limei; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Jizhe; Li, Xue; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chunyu; Teng, Zhixia; Zhang, Ruijie; Lv, Hongchao; Guo, Maozu

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have mined many common genetic variants associated with human complex traits like diseases. After that, the functional annotation and enrichment analysis of significant SNPs are important tasks. Classic methods are always based on physical positions of SNPs and genes. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) are genomic loci that contribute to variation in gene expression levels and have been proven efficient to connect SNPs and genes. In this work, we integrated the eQTL data and Gene Ontology (GO), constructed associations between SNPs and GO terms, then performed functional enrichment analysis. Finally, we constructed an eQTL-based SNP Ontology and SNP functional enrichment analysis platform. Taking Parkinson Disease (PD) as an example, the proposed platform and method are efficient. We believe eSNPO will be a useful resource for SNP functional annotation and enrichment analysis after we have got significant disease related SNPs. PMID:27470167

  6. SNP sets and reading ability: testing confirmation of a 10-SNP set in a population sample.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Michelle; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Bates, Timothy C

    2011-06-01

    A set of 10 SNPs associated with reading ability in 7-year-olds was reported based on initial pooled analyses of 100K SNP chip data, with follow-up testing stages using pooling and individual testing. Here we examine this association in an adolescent population sample of Australian twins and siblings (N = 1177) aged 12 to 25 years. One (rs1842129) of the 10 SNPs approached significance (P = .05) but no support was found for the remaining 9 SNPs or the SNP set itself. Results indicate that these SNPs are not associated with reading ability in an Australian population. The results are interpreted as supporting use of much larger SNP sets in common disorders where effects are small. PMID:21623652

  7. Identification of genes with nonsynonymous SNP in Jeju horse by whole-genome resequencing reveals a functional role for immune response.

    PubMed

    Lee, J-H; Song, K-D; Kim, J-M; Leem, H-K; Park, K-D

    2016-03-01

    Jeju horse (Natural Monument number 347) is a breed of horse that has experienced long-term isolation and domestication in Jeju Island, South Korea. We evaluated genetic features of this breed, including SNP, by whole-genome resequencing using an Illumina HiSeq 2000. A total of 5,986,852 SNP were identified in 4 Jeju horses and were divided into homozygous and heterozygous SNP (2,357,099 and 3,629,753 SNP, respectively). It revealed that 63.8% of these SNP resided in intergenic regions. Immune response genes with nonsynonymous SNP were overrepresented in Jeju horses as evidenced by Gene Ontology clustering. Among these genes, Toll-like receptors (TLR) are highly enriched. Comparing TLR genes between Jeju horses and the Przewalski's horse, and genes showed "possibly damaging" mutations in several regions by analysis with PolyPhen-2. These results provide a framework for further genetic studies in Jeju horse by domestication. Furthermore, research on functions of SNP-associated genes would aid in understanding the molecular genetic variation of horse breeds. PMID:27065251

  8. Smarter clustering methods for SNP genotype calling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yan; Tseng, George C.; Cheong, Soo Yeon; Bean, Lora J. H.; Sherman, Stephanie L.; Feingold, Eleanor

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Most genotyping technologies for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers use standard clustering methods to ‘call’ the SNP genotypes. These methods are not always optimal in distinguishing the genotype clusters of a SNP because they do not take advantage of specific features of the genotype calling problem. In particular, when family data are available, pedigree information is ignored. Furthermore, prior information about the distribution of the measurements for each cluster can be used to choose an appropriate model-based clustering method and can significantly improve the genotype calls. One special genotyping problem that has never been discussed in the literature is that of genotyping of trisomic individuals, such as individuals with Down syndrome. Calling trisomic genotypes is a more complicated problem, and the addition of external information becomes very important. Results: In this article, we discuss the impact of incorporating external information into clustering algorithms to call the genotypes for both disomic and trisomic data. We also propose two new methods to call genotypes using family data. One is a modification of the K-means method and uses the pedigree information by updating all members of a family together. The other is a likelihood-based method that combines the Gaussian or beta-mixture model with pedigree information. We compare the performance of these two methods and some other existing methods using simulation studies. We also compare the performance of these methods on a real dataset generated by the Illumina platform (www.illumina.com). Availability: The R code for the family-based genotype calling methods (SNPCaller) is available to be downloaded from the following website: http://watson.hgen.pitt.edu/register. Contact: liny@upmc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:18826959

  9. Linkage mapping bovine EST-based SNP

    PubMed Central

    Snelling, Warren M; Casas, Eduardo; Stone, Roger T; Keele, John W; Harhay, Gregory P; Bennett, Gary L; Smith, Timothy PL

    2005-01-01

    Background Existing linkage maps of the bovine genome primarily contain anonymous microsatellite markers. These maps have proved valuable for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) to broad regions of the genome, but more closely spaced markers are needed to fine-map QTL, and markers associated with genes and annotated sequence are needed to identify genes and sequence variation that may explain QTL. Results Bovine expressed sequence tag (EST) and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)sequence data were used to develop 918 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers to map genes on the bovine linkage map. DNA of sires from the MARC reference population was used to detect SNPs, and progeny and mates of heterozygous sires were genotyped. Chromosome assignments for 861 SNPs were determined by twopoint analysis, and positions for 735 SNPs were established by multipoint analyses. Linkage maps of bovine autosomes with these SNPs represent 4585 markers in 2475 positions spanning 3058 cM . Markers include 3612 microsatellites, 913 SNPs and 60 other markers. Mean separation between marker positions is 1.2 cM. New SNP markers appear in 511 positions, with mean separation of 4.7 cM. Multi-allelic markers, mostly microsatellites, had a mean (maximum) of 216 (366) informative meioses, and a mean 3-lod confidence interval of 3.6 cM Bi-allelic markers, including SNP and other marker types, had a mean (maximum) of 55 (191) informative meioses, and were placed within a mean 8.5 cM 3-lod confidence interval. Homologous human sequences were identified for 1159 markers, including 582 newly developed and mapped SNP. Conclusion Addition of these EST- and BAC-based SNPs to the bovine linkage map not only increases marker density, but provides connections to gene-rich physical maps, including annotated human sequence. The map provides a resource for fine-mapping quantitative trait loci and identification of positional candidate genes, and can be integrated with other data to guide and

  10. pfSNP: An integrated potentially functional SNP resource that facilitates hypotheses generation through knowledge syntheses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingbo; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Chong, Samuel S; Lee, Caroline G L

    2011-01-01

    Currently, >14,000,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are reported. Identifying phenotype-affecting SNPs among these many SNPs pose significant challenges. Although several Web resources are available that can inform about the functionality of SNPs, these resources are mainly annotation databases and are not very comprehensive. In this article, we present a comprehensive, well-annotated, integrated pfSNP (potentially functional SNPs) Web resource (http://pfs.nus.edu.sg/), which is aimed to facilitate better hypothesis generation through knowledge syntheses mediated by better data integration and a user-friendly Web interface. pfSNP integrates >40 different algorithms/resources to interrogate >14,000,000 SNPs from the dbSNP database for SNPs of potential functional significance based on previous published reports, inferred potential functionality from genetic approaches as well as predicted potential functionality from sequence motifs. Its query interface has the user-friendly "auto-complete, prompt-as-you-type" feature and is highly customizable, facilitating different combination of queries using Boolean-logic. Additionally, to facilitate better understanding of the results and aid in hypotheses generation, gene/pathway-level information with text clouds highlighting enriched tissues/pathways as well as detailed-related information are also provided on the results page. Hence, the pfSNP resource will be of great interest to scientists focusing on association studies as well as those interested to experimentally address the functionality of SNPs. PMID:20672376

  11. KinSNP software for homozygosity mapping of disease genes using SNP microarrays.

    PubMed

    Amir, El-Ad David; Bartal, Ofer; Morad, Efrat; Nagar, Tal; Sheynin, Jony; Parvari, Ruti; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered

    2010-08-01

    Consanguineous families affected with a recessive genetic disease caused by homozygotisation of a mutation offer a unique advantage for positional cloning of rare diseases. Homozygosity mapping of patient genotypes is a powerful technique for the identification of the genomic locus harbouring the causing mutation. This strategy relies on the observation that in these patients a large region spanning the disease locus is also homozygous with high probability. The high marker density in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays is extremely advantageous for homozygosity mapping. We present KinSNP, a user-friendly software tool for homozygosity mapping using SNP arrays. The software searches for stretches of SNPs which are homozygous to the same allele in all ascertained sick individuals. User-specified parameters control the number of allowed genotyping 'errors' within homozygous blocks. Candidate disease regions are then reported in a detailed, coloured Excel file, along with genotypes of family members and healthy controls. An interactive genome browser has been included which shows homozygous blocks, individual genotypes, genes and further annotations along the chromosomes, with zooming and scrolling capabilities. The software has been used to identify the location of a mutated gene causing insensitivity to pain in a large Bedouin family. KinSNP is freely available from. PMID:20846928

  12. SNP marker detection and genotyping in tilapia.

    PubMed

    Van Bers, N E M; Crooijmans, R P M A; Groenen, M A M; Dibbits, B W; Komen, J

    2012-09-01

    We have generated a unique resource consisting of nearly 175 000 short contig sequences and 3569 SNP markers from the widely cultured GIFT (Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia) strain of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). In total, 384 SNPs were selected to monitor the wider applicability of the SNPs by genotyping tilapia individuals from different strains and different geographical locations. In all strains and species tested (O. niloticus, O. aureus and O. mossambicus), the genotyping assay was working for a similar number of SNPs (288-305 SNPs). The actual number of polymorphic SNPs was, as expected, highest for individuals from the GIFT population (255 SNPs). In the individuals from an Egyptian strain and in individuals caught in the wild in the basin of the river Volta, 197 and 163 SNPs were polymorphic, respectively. A pairwise calculation of Nei's genetic distance allowed the discrimination of the individual strains and species based on the genotypes determined with the SNP set. We expect that this set will be widely applicable for use in tilapia aquaculture, e.g. for pedigree reconstruction. In addition, this set is currently used for assaying the genetic diversity of native Nile tilapia in areas where tilapia is, or will be, introduced in aquaculture projects. This allows the tracing of escapees from aquaculture and the monitoring of effects of introgression and hybridization. PMID:22524158

  13. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) in the Adiponectin Gene and Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Chirumbolo, Salvatore

    2016-07-01

    by others[9] or a direct marker for CAD affected patients[10]. The paper by Mohammadzadeh et al.[1] assesses data coming elsewhere from literature but raises important concerns about the suitability of ADIPOQ SNPs in diagnosing susceptibility to CAD and the relationship with plasma adiponectin level. In normal, non diabetic, normoglycemic subject, this relationship does not seem to work. Therefore the question is how much predictive this SNP haplotype may be to foresee metabolic syndrome and CAD onset risk in young health subjects? Maybe, the role of adiponectin in cardiovascular physiology depends on its ability to target adiponectin receptors and to negatively regulate obesity. Some authors reported in healthy volunteers an absence of correlation between circulating adiponectin levels and biochemical markers, particularly lipoproteins and suggested that SNP +276G>T was related to an independent effect on adiponectin levels and on lipoprotein metabolism[11]. On the contrary, adiponectin genetic variants and SNP +276G>T was associated with increasing susceptibility of type 2 diabetes and plasma glucose impairment[12]. The interesting study by Mohammadzadeh et al.[1] suggests that SNP of ADIPOQ +276G>T should be related to susceptibility to glucose metabolism, while indirectly to lipid metabolism and fat-related cardiovascular damage. PMID:26884098

  14. Imputation of KIR Types from SNP Variation Data.

    PubMed

    Vukcevic, Damjan; Traherne, James A; Næss, Sigrid; Ellinghaus, Eva; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Dilthey, Alexander; Lathrop, Mark; Karlsen, Tom H; Franke, Andre; Moffatt, Miriam; Cookson, William; Trowsdale, John; McVean, Gil; Sawcer, Stephen; Leslie, Stephen

    2015-10-01

    Large population studies of immune system genes are essential for characterizing their role in diseases, including autoimmune conditions. Of key interest are a group of genes encoding the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), which have known and hypothesized roles in autoimmune diseases, resistance to viruses, reproductive conditions, and cancer. These genes are highly polymorphic, which makes typing expensive and time consuming. Consequently, despite their importance, KIRs have been little studied in large cohorts. Statistical imputation methods developed for other complex loci (e.g., human leukocyte antigen [HLA]) on the basis of SNP data provide an inexpensive high-throughput alternative to direct laboratory typing of these loci and have enabled important findings and insights for many diseases. We present KIR∗IMP, a method for imputation of KIR copy number. We show that KIR∗IMP is highly accurate and thus allows the study of KIRs in large cohorts and enables detailed investigation of the role of KIRs in human disease. PMID:26430804

  15. Imputation of KIR Types from SNP Variation Data

    PubMed Central

    Vukcevic, Damjan; Traherne, James A.; Næss, Sigrid; Ellinghaus, Eva; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Dilthey, Alexander; Lathrop, Mark; Karlsen, Tom H.; Franke, Andre; Moffatt, Miriam; Cookson, William; Trowsdale, John; McVean, Gil; Sawcer, Stephen; Leslie, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Large population studies of immune system genes are essential for characterizing their role in diseases, including autoimmune conditions. Of key interest are a group of genes encoding the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), which have known and hypothesized roles in autoimmune diseases, resistance to viruses, reproductive conditions, and cancer. These genes are highly polymorphic, which makes typing expensive and time consuming. Consequently, despite their importance, KIRs have been little studied in large cohorts. Statistical imputation methods developed for other complex loci (e.g., human leukocyte antigen [HLA]) on the basis of SNP data provide an inexpensive high-throughput alternative to direct laboratory typing of these loci and have enabled important findings and insights for many diseases. We present KIR∗IMP, a method for imputation of KIR copy number. We show that KIR∗IMP is highly accurate and thus allows the study of KIRs in large cohorts and enables detailed investigation of the role of KIRs in human disease. PMID:26430804

  16. Large-Scale SNP Marker Development and Genotyping in Oat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, our goals are to develop genome-wide SNP markers using next generation sequencing technologies and to apply a highly parallel SNP genotyping system developed by Illumina for genetics and breeding applications in oat. The large amount of DNA sequence sources generated from cDNAs and Di...

  17. SNPConvert: SNP Array Standardization and Integration in Livestock Species

    PubMed Central

    Nicolazzi, Ezequiel Luis; Marras, Gabriele; Stella, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    One of the main advantages of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array technology is providing genotype calls for a specific number of SNP markers at a relatively low cost. Since its first application in animal genetics, the number of available SNP arrays for each species has been constantly increasing. However, conversely to that observed in whole genome sequence data analysis, SNP array data does not have a common set of file formats or coding conventions for allele calling. Therefore, the standardization and integration of SNP array data from multiple sources have become an obstacle, especially for users with basic or no programming skills. Here, we describe the difficulties related to handling SNP array data, focusing on file formats, SNP allele coding, and mapping. We also present SNPConvert suite, a multi-platform, open-source, and user-friendly set of tools to overcome these issues. This tool, which can be integrated with open-source and open-access tools already available, is a first step towards an integrated system to standardize and integrate any type of raw SNP array data. The tool is available at: https://github. com/nicolazzie/SNPConvert.git. PMID:27600083

  18. SNPConvert: SNP Array Standardization and Integration in Livestock Species.

    PubMed

    Nicolazzi, Ezequiel Luis; Marras, Gabriele; Stella, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    One of the main advantages of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array technology is providing genotype calls for a specific number of SNP markers at a relatively low cost. Since its first application in animal genetics, the number of available SNP arrays for each species has been constantly increasing. However, conversely to that observed in whole genome sequence data analysis, SNP array data does not have a common set of file formats or coding conventions for allele calling. Therefore, the standardization and integration of SNP array data from multiple sources have become an obstacle, especially for users with basic or no programming skills. Here, we describe the difficulties related to handling SNP array data, focusing on file formats, SNP allele coding, and mapping. We also present SNPConvert suite, a multi-platform, open-source, and user-friendly set of tools to overcome these issues. This tool, which can be integrated with open-source and open-access tools already available, is a first step towards an integrated system to standardize and integrate any type of raw SNP array data. The tool is available at: https://github. com/nicolazzie/SNPConvert.git. PMID:27600083

  19. Accelerating genetic improvement with SNP chips and DNA sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assays is expected to have a profound impact on genetic progress in the U.S. dairy industry. In the 16 months since its initial availability, the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip has been used to genotype nearly 20,000 Holsteins. Thes...

  20. Atomic Force Microscopy for DNA SNP Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valbusa, Ugo; Ierardi, Vincenzo

    The knowledge of the effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human genome greatly contributes to better comprehension of the relation between genetic factors and diseases. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA in different individuals reveals positions where variations that involve individual base substitutions can occur. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms are highly abundant and can have different consequences at phenotypic level. Several attempts were made to apply atomic force microscopy (AFM) to detect and map SNP sites in DNA strands. The most promising approach is the study of DNA mutations producing heteroduplex DNA strands and identifying the mismatches by means of a protein that labels the mismatches. MutS is a protein that is part of a well-known complex of mismatch repair, which initiates the process of repairing when the MutS binds to the mismatched DNA filament. The position of MutS on the DNA filament can be easily recorded by means of AFM imaging.

  1. Germline Mutation of the CCK Receptor: A Novel Biomarker for Pancreas Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alsubai, Jelal; Matters, Gail L; McGovern, Christopher O; Liao, Jiangang; Gilius, Evan L; Smith, Jill P

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Today, genetic biomarkers have been demonstrated to play an important role in identifying at-risk subjects for familial or inherited cancers. We have identified a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that results in missplicing of the cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor gene and expressing a larger mutated receptor in pancreatic cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the significance and specificity of this SNP as a potential biomarker in patients with pancreatic cancer compared with other gastrointestinal (GI) cancers that also have CCK receptors. Methods: DNA was isolated and genotyped for the CCK receptor SNP from frozen tumor tissue from banked specimens of patients with pancreas, gastric, or colon cancer and from human cancer cell lines. Genotype and allelic frequencies were compared between the cancer cohort and two normal control databases using Fisher's exact test and odds ratio (OR). The Kaplan–Meier method was used to estimate the survival for patients with the CCK-B receptor SNP compared with those with the wild-type genotype. Immunohistochemical staining of cancer cells was done to detect the mutated receptor. Results: Colon and gastric cancer patients had similar genotype frequencies for the CCK receptor SNP as that reported in the normal population. In contrast, the prevalence of the SNP in subjects with pancreatic cancer was twice that of controls and other GI cancers. Survival was adversely affected by the presence of the SNP only in those with pancreatic cancer. Immunoreactivity for the mutated receptor was positive in pancreatic cancer tissues with the SNP but absent in other GI cancers. Conclusions: A SNP of the CCK receptor is significantly increased in patients with pancreatic cancer but not in those with other GI malignancies. Therefore, this SNP may be a potential biomarker for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26741064

  2. Analysis of Gln223Agr polymorphism of Leptin Receptor Gene in type II diabetic mellitus subjects among Malaysians.

    PubMed

    Etemad, Ali; Ramachandran, Vasudevan; Pishva, Seyyed Reza; Heidari, Farzad; Aziz, Ahmad Fazli Abdul; Yusof, Ahmad Khairuddin Mohamed; Pei, Chong Pei; Ismail, Patimah

    2013-01-01

    Leptin is known as the adipose peptide hormone. It plays an important role in the regulation of body fat and inhibits food intake by its action. Moreover, it is believed that leptin level deductions might be the cause of obesity and may play an important role in the development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM), as well as in cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The Leptin Receptor (LEPR) gene and its polymorphisms have not been extensively studied in relation to the T2DM and its complications in various populations. In this study, we have determined the association of Gln223Agr loci of LEPR gene in three ethnic groups of Malaysia, namely: Malays, Chinese and Indians. A total of 284 T2DM subjects and 281 healthy individuals were recruited based on International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. Genomic DNA was extracted from the buccal specimens of the subjects. The commercial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was carried out by proper restriction enzyme MSP I to both amplify and digest the Gln223Agr polymorphism. The p-value among the three studied races was 0.057, 0.011 and 0.095, respectively. The values such as age, WHR, FPG, HbA1C, LDL, HDL, Chol and Family History were significantly different among the subjects with Gln223Agr polymorphism of LEPR (p < 0.05). PMID:24051404

  3. Analysis of Gln223Agr Polymorphism of Leptin Receptor Gene in Type II Diabetic Mellitus Subjects among Malaysians

    PubMed Central

    Etemad, Ali; Ramachandran, Vasudevan; Pishva, Seyyed Reza; Heidari, Farzad; Aziz, Ahmad Fazli Abdul; Yusof, Ahmad Khairuddin Mohamed; Pei, Chong Pei; Ismail, Patimah

    2013-01-01

    Leptin is known as the adipose peptide hormone. It plays an important role in the regulation of body fat and inhibits food intake by its action. Moreover, it is believed that leptin level deductions might be the cause of obesity and may play an important role in the development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM), as well as in cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The Leptin Receptor (LEPR) gene and its polymorphisms have not been extensively studied in relation to the T2DM and its complications in various populations. In this study, we have determined the association of Gln223Agr loci of LEPR gene in three ethnic groups of Malaysia, namely: Malays, Chinese and Indians. A total of 284 T2DM subjects and 281 healthy individuals were recruited based on International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. Genomic DNA was extracted from the buccal specimens of the subjects. The commercial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was carried out by proper restriction enzyme MSP I to both amplify and digest the Gln223Agr polymorphism. The p-value among the three studied races was 0.057, 0.011 and 0.095, respectively. The values such as age, WHR, FPG, HbA1C, LDL, HDL, Chol and Family History were significantly different among the subjects with Gln223Agr polymorphism of LEPR (p < 0.05). PMID:24051404

  4. Leptin and leptin receptor gene polymorphisms and their association with plasma leptin levels and obesity in a multi-ethnic Malaysian suburban population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was to investigate the prevalence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in leptin gene LEP (A19G and G2548A) and leptin receptor gene LEPR (K109R and Q223R) and their association with fasting plasma leptin level (PLL) and obesity in a Malaysian suburban population in Kampar, Perak. Methods Convenience sampling was performed with informed consents, and the study sample was drawn from patients who were patrons of the Kampar Health Clinic. A total of 408 subjects (mean age, 52.4 ± 13.7 years; 169 men, 239 women; 190 obese, 218 non-obese; 148 Malays, 177 ethnic Chinese, 83 ethnic Indians) participated. Socio-demographic data and anthropometric measurements were taken, and genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Results The LEP A19G, G2548A and LEPR K109R, Q223R variant allele frequencies were 0.74, 0.67 and 0.61, 0.79, respectively. The genotype and allele distributions of these gene variants were significantly different among ethnic groups, but not among body mass index (BMI) classes. Subjects with LEPR K109 and Q223 allele had significantly higher systolic blood pressure and adiposity indices after adjustment for ethnicity (higher BMI, total body and subcutaneous fat; lower skeletal muscle percentage). Subjects with LEPR 109R allele had lower PLL than their wild-type allele counterparts. The influence of LEP A19G and G2548A SNPs on blood pressures, anthropometrics, and PLL was not evident. Interestingly, synergistic effect of the LEP and LEPR SNPs was observed as subjects homozygous for all four SNPs studied exhibited significantly higher subcutaneous fat and PLL than those with other genotype combinations. Conclusions The LEP and LEPR SNPs in this study may not be an obesity marker among Malaysians in this population, but were associated with ethnicity. Our findings suggest that each of these SNPs contributes to minor but significant variation in obesity

  5. SNP variation in ADRB3 gene reflects the breed difference of sheep populations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianliang; Qiao, Liying; Liu, Jianhua; Yuan, Yanan; Liu, Wenzhong

    2012-08-01

    The β3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3), a G-protein coupled receptor, plays a major role in energy metabolism and regulation of lipolysis and homeostasis. We detect the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variation in full-length sequence of ovine ADRB3 gene in 12 domestic sheep populations within four types by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism and sequencing to reveal the breed difference. Twenty-two SNPs, 12 of which in the exon 1 and ten in the intron, were detected, and 12 new exonic and four new intronic SNPs were found. Most SNPs presented in Shanxi Dam Line and least ones in Dorset. The average SNP number in both meat and dual purpose for meat and wool breeds was significantly higher than general and dual purpose breeds for wool and meat. Frequency of each SNP in studied breeds or types was different. The 18C Del and 1617T Ins majorly existed in dual purpose breeds for wool and meat. The 25A Del, 119C>G and 130C>T were mostly found in the meat and dual purpose for meat and wool breeds. The 1764C>A more frequently presented in meat than in other types. The majority of variations came from within the populations as suggested by analysis of molecular variance. Close relationship presented among the Chinese and western breeds, respectively. In conclusion, SNPs of ovine ADRB3 gene can reflect the breed difference and within- and between-population variations, and to a great extent, the breed relationship. PMID:22711302

  6. Omega-3 fatty acids protect renal functions by increasing docosahexaenoic acid-derived metabolite levels in SHR.Cg-Lepr(cp)/NDmcr rats, a metabolic syndrome model.

    PubMed

    Katakura, Masanori; Hashimoto, Michio; Inoue, Takayuki; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Tanabe, Yoko; Iwamoto, Ryo; Arita, Makoto; Tsuchikura, Satoru; Shido, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and/or eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) protect against diabetic nephropathy by inhibiting inflammation. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of highly purified DHA and EPA or EPA only administration on renal function and renal eicosanoid and docosanoid levels in an animal model of metabolic syndrome, SHR.Cg-Lepr(cp)/NDmcr (SHRcp) rats. Male SHRcp rats were divided into 3 groups. Control (5% arabic gum), TAK-085 (300 mg/kg/day, containing 467 mg/g EPA and 365 mg/g DHA), or EPA (300 mg/kg/day) was orally administered for 20 weeks. The urinary albumin to creatinine ratio in the TAK-085-administered group was significantly lower than that in other groups. The glomerular sclerosis score in the TAK-085-administered group was significantly lower than that in the other groups. Although DHA levels were increased in total kidney fatty acids, the levels of nonesterified DHA were not significantly different among the 3 groups, whereas the levels of protectin D1, resolvin D1, and resolvin D2 were significantly increased in the TAK-085-administered group. The results show that the use of combination therapy with DHA and EPA in SHRcp rats improved or prevented renal failure associate with metabolic syndrome with decreasing triglyceride levels and increasing ω-3 PUFA lipid mediators. PMID:24642910

  7. The Perils of SNP Microarray Testing: Uncovering Unexpected Consanguinity

    PubMed Central

    Tarini, Beth A.; Konczal, Laura; Goldenberg, Aaron J.; Goldman, Edward B.; McCandless, Shawn E.

    2013-01-01

    Background While single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chromosomal microarrays identify areas of small genetic deletions/duplications, they can also reveal regions of homozygosity indicative of consanguinity. As more non-geneticists order SNP microarrays, they must prepare for the potential ethical, legal and social issues that result from revelation of unanticipated consanguinity. Patient An infant with multiple congenital anomalies underwent SNP microarray testing. Results The results of the SNP microarray revealed several large regions of homozygosity that indicated identity by descent most consistent with a second or third degree relative mating (e.g., uncle/ niece, half brother/sister, first cousins). Mother was not aware of the test's potential to reveal consanguinity. When informed of the test results, she reluctantly admitted to being raped by her half-brother around the time of conception. Conclusions During the pre-testing consent process, providers should inform parents that SNP microarray testing could reveal consanguinity. Providers must also understand the psychological implications, as well as the legal and moral obligations, that accompany SNP microarray results that indicate consanguinity. PMID:23827427

  8. Relationships between plasma leptin levels, leptin G2548A, leptin receptor Gln223Arg polymorphisms and gestational diabetes mellitus in Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mei; Peng, Songxu; Li, Wei; Wan, Zhihua; Fan, Linlin; Du, Yukai

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine concentrations of leptin and biochemical parameters in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) patients and normal glucose tolerance (NGT) individuals, and also to explore the links of leptin (LEP) G2548A and leptin receptor (LEPR) Gln223Arg polymorphisms with leptin levels and GDM risk among Chinese. Our study included 357 GDM and 355 NGT individuals who were at 24~30 gestational weeks. Plasma leptin and insulin levels were analyzed by ELISA. Gene polymorphisms were genotyped using TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. The results showed that plasma leptin levels were significantly higher in the impaired fasting glucose (IFG) group than NGT group (34.35 (26.54, 56.48) ng/mL vs 26.31 (17.99, 37.87) ng/mL, P < 0.05). Plasma leptin levels correlated with plasma fasting insulin levels, pre-pregnant body mass index, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index both in GDM and NGT group (P < 0.05). However, neither LEP G2548A nor LEPR Gln223Arg polymorphisms were significantly associated with GDM risk and plasma leptin levels (P > 0.05). Our findings showed that high leptin level was associated with GDM. And larger and more rigorous researches were needed to further explore the association of LEP and LEPR gene polymorphisms and GDM among Chinese population. PMID:27034205

  9. Leptin Receptor Gene Gln223Arg Polymorphism Is Not Associated with Hypertension: A Preliminary Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Pena, Geórgia das Graças; Guimarães, Andre L. S.; Veloso, Rosângela R.; Reis, Tatiana C.; Gomes, Crizian S.; Neto, João F. R.; Velasquez-Melendez, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is responsible for high morbidity and mortality as one of the most important cardiometabolic risk factors. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the Gln223Arg in the leptin receptor (LEPR) influences the prevalence of hypertension. A cross-sectional study was carried out in individuals aged ≥ 18 years. Polymorphism identification was performed using PCR-RFLP analysis. Participants with blood pressure ≥ 140/90 mmHg or medication use were considered hypertensive. Frequencies, means, cross-tabulations, and multivariate models were produced to study differences in hypertension prevalence by genotypes. The study includes 470 participants. The frequency of GG polymorphism variant was 10.43%, 46.81% AG, and 42.77% AA. The distribution of hypertension frequency by LEPR genotypes was the following: AA 43.8%, AG 40.4%, and GG 40.8%; there were no significant differences between groups. Comparative analysis which used multivariate Poisson regression adjusted by many potential confounders (age, sex, schooling, smoking, alcohol intake, obesity, and family history of parental obesity) did not modify this result. In this large sample of population-based study, the association of the LEPR Gln223Arg gene polymorphism with hypertension was not observed. PMID:24772364

  10. Leptin and leptin receptor genotypes and colon cancer: Gene–gene and gene–lifestyle interactions

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Wolff, Roger K.; Herrick, Jennifer; Caan, Bette J.; Potter, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Leptin may play an important role in colorectal cancer because of its role in energy balance, insulin and inflammation. We evaluated the LEP rs2167270 (19 G > A) and rs7799039 (−2548 G > A) polymorphisms and the leptin receptor, LEPR rs6588147 (located in intron 2), polymorphism with risk of developing colon cancer in a study of 1,567 cases and 1,965 controls. We evaluated the effects of the polymorphisms with body mass index (BMI), recent use of aspirin/NSAIDs and genetic variations in genes related to insulin signaling pathways including insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), and insulin- related substrates 1 and 2 (IRS1, IRS2) and the vitamin D receptor (VDR). We observed a slight reduction in colon cancer risk with the AA LEP rs2167270 genotype (OR 0.79 95% CI 0.64, 0.98) and although not reaching statistical significance, with the combined GG LEP rs2167270 and GG LEPR rs6588147 (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.49, 1.02) genotypes. BMI did not interact with any of these polymorphisms to alter colon cancer risk. However, recent aspirin/NSAID use significantly interacted with both LEP polymorphisms. Likewise, variants of IGF1 and IRS2 interacted with the LEP rs2167270 polymorphism. VDR polymorphisms interacted with all LEP and LEPR polymorphisms. These data support an association between LEP and colon cancer. They also suggest that the mechanisms linking leptin to colon cancer may be independent of energy balance. PMID:18059035

  11. A SNP resource for Douglas-fir: de novo transcriptome assembly and SNP detection and validation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), one of the most economically and ecologically important tree species in the world, also has one of the largest tree breeding programs. Although the coastal and interior varieties of Douglas-fir (vars. menziesii and glauca) are native to North America, the coastal variety is also widely planted for timber production in Europe, New Zealand, Australia, and Chile. Our main goal was to develop a SNP resource large enough to facilitate genomic selection in Douglas-fir breeding programs. To accomplish this, we developed a 454-based reference transcriptome for coastal Douglas-fir, annotated and evaluated the quality of the reference, identified putative SNPs, and then validated a sample of those SNPs using the Illumina Infinium genotyping platform. Results We assembled a reference transcriptome consisting of 25,002 isogroups (unique gene models) and 102,623 singletons from 2.76 million 454 and Sanger cDNA sequences from coastal Douglas-fir. We identified 278,979 unique SNPs by mapping the 454 and Sanger sequences to the reference, and by mapping four datasets of Illumina cDNA sequences from multiple seed sources, genotypes, and tissues. The Illumina datasets represented coastal Douglas-fir (64.00 and 13.41 million reads), interior Douglas-fir (80.45 million reads), and a Yakima population similar to interior Douglas-fir (8.99 million reads). We assayed 8067 SNPs on 260 trees using an Illumina Infinium SNP genotyping array. Of these SNPs, 5847 (72.5%) were called successfully and were polymorphic. Conclusions Based on our validation efficiency, our SNP database may contain as many as ~200,000 true SNPs, and as many as ~69,000 SNPs that could be genotyped at ~20,000 gene loci using an Infinium II array—more SNPs than are needed to use genomic selection in tree breeding programs. Ultimately, these genomic resources will enhance Douglas-fir breeding and allow us to better understand landscape-scale patterns of genetic variation

  12. Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography: high throughput mutation screening in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and SNP genotyping in motor neurone disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, B; Sawyer, N A; Caramins, M; Yuan, Z G; Saunderson, R B; Pamphlett, R; Richmond, D R; Jeremy, R W; Trent, R J

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the usefulness of denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) as a high throughput tool in: (1) DNA mutation detection in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC), and (2) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery and validation in sporadic motor neurone disease (MND). Methods: The coding sequence and intron–exon boundaries of the cardiac β myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7) were screened by DHPLC for mutation identification in 150 unrelated patients diagnosed with FHC. One hundred and forty patients with sporadic MND were genotyped for the A67T SNP in the poliovirus receptor gene. All DHPLC positive signals were confirmed by conventional methods. Results: Mutation screening of MYH7 covered 10 kb with a total of 5700 amplicons, and more than 6750 DHPLC injections were completed within 35 days. The causative mutation was identified in 14% of FHC cases, including seven novel missense mutations (L227V, E328G, K351E, V411I, M435T, E894G, and E927K). Genotyping of the A67T SNP was performed at two different temperatures both in MND cases and 280 controls. This coding SNP was found more frequently in MND cases (13.6%) than in controls (6.8%). Furthermore, 19 and two SNPs were identified in MYH7 and the poliovirus receptor gene, respectively, during DHPLC screening. Conclusions: DHPLC is a high throughput, sensitive, specific, and robust platform for the detection of DNA variants, such as disease causing mutations or SNPs. It enables rapid and accurate screening of large genomic regions. PMID:15858117

  13. DoGSD: the dog and wolf genome SNP database.

    PubMed

    Bai, Bing; Zhao, Wen-Ming; Tang, Bi-Xia; Wang, Yan-Qing; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Zhang; Yang, He-Chuan; Liu, Yan-Hu; Zhu, Jun-Wei; Irwin, David M; Wang, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The rapid advancement of next-generation sequencing technology has generated a deluge of genomic data from domesticated dogs and their wild ancestor, grey wolves, which have simultaneously broadened our understanding of domestication and diseases that are shared by humans and dogs. To address the scarcity of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data provided by authorized databases and to make SNP data more easily/friendly usable and available, we propose DoGSD (http://dogsd.big.ac.cn), the first canidae-specific database which focuses on whole genome SNP data from domesticated dogs and grey wolves. The DoGSD is a web-based, open-access resource comprising ∼ 19 million high-quality whole-genome SNPs. In addition to the dbSNP data set (build 139), DoGSD incorporates a comprehensive collection of SNPs from two newly sequenced samples (1 wolf and 1 dog) and collected SNPs from three latest dog/wolf genetic studies (7 wolves and 68 dogs), which were taken together for analysis with the population genetic statistics, Fst. In addition, DoGSD integrates some closely related information including SNP annotation, summary lists of SNPs located in genes, synonymous and non-synonymous SNPs, sampling location and breed information. All these features make DoGSD a useful resource for in-depth analysis in dog-/wolf-related studies. PMID:25404132

  14. DoGSD: the dog and wolf genome SNP database

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Bing; Zhao, Wen-Ming; Tang, Bi-Xia; Wang, Yan-Qing; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Zhang; Yang, He-Chuan; Liu, Yan-Hu; Zhu, Jun-Wei; Irwin, David M.; Wang, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The rapid advancement of next-generation sequencing technology has generated a deluge of genomic data from domesticated dogs and their wild ancestor, grey wolves, which have simultaneously broadened our understanding of domestication and diseases that are shared by humans and dogs. To address the scarcity of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data provided by authorized databases and to make SNP data more easily/friendly usable and available, we propose DoGSD (http://dogsd.big.ac.cn), the first canidae-specific database which focuses on whole genome SNP data from domesticated dogs and grey wolves. The DoGSD is a web-based, open-access resource comprising ∼19 million high-quality whole-genome SNPs. In addition to the dbSNP data set (build 139), DoGSD incorporates a comprehensive collection of SNPs from two newly sequenced samples (1 wolf and 1 dog) and collected SNPs from three latest dog/wolf genetic studies (7 wolves and 68 dogs), which were taken together for analysis with the population genetic statistics, Fst. In addition, DoGSD integrates some closely related information including SNP annotation, summary lists of SNPs located in genes, synonymous and non-synonymous SNPs, sampling location and breed information. All these features make DoGSD a useful resource for in-depth analysis in dog-/wolf-related studies. PMID:25404132

  15. Substantial SNP-based heritability estimates for working memory performance

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, C; Gschwind, L; Coynel, D; Freytag, V; Milnik, A; Egli, T; Heck, A; de Quervain, D J-F; Papassotiropoulos, A

    2014-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is an important endophenotype in neuropsychiatric research and its use in genetic association studies is thought to be a promising approach to increase our understanding of psychiatric disease. As for any genetically complex trait, demonstration of sufficient heritability within the specific study context is a prerequisite for conducting genetic studies of that trait. Recently developed methods allow estimating trait heritability using sets of common genetic markers from genome-wide association study (GWAS) data in samples of unrelated individuals. Here we present single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based heritability estimates (h2SNP) for a WM phenotype. A Caucasian sample comprising a total of N=2298 healthy and young individuals was subjected to an N-back WM task. We calculated the genetic relationship between all individuals on the basis of genome-wide SNP data and performed restricted maximum likelihood analyses for variance component estimation to derive the h2SNP estimates. Heritability estimates for three 2-back derived WM performance measures based on all autosomal chromosomes ranged between 31 and 41%, indicating a substantial SNP-based heritability for WM traits. These results indicate that common genetic factors account for a prominent part of the phenotypic variation in WM performance. Hence, the application of GWAS on WM phenotypes is a valid method to identify the molecular underpinnings of WM. PMID:25203169

  16. Whole genome SNP scanning of snow sheep (Ovis nivicola).

    PubMed

    Deniskova, T E; Okhlopkov, I M; Sermyagin, A A; Gladyr', E A; Bagirov, V A; Sölkner, J; Mamaev, N V; Brem, G; Zinov'eva, N A

    2016-07-01

    This is the first report performing the whole genome SNP scanning of snow sheep (Ovis nivicola). Samples of snow sheep (n = 18) collected in six different regions of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) from 64° to 71° N. For SNP genotyping, we applied Ovine 50K SNP BeadChip (Illumina, United States), designed for domestic sheep. The total number of genotyped SNPs (call rate 90%) was 47796 (88.1% of total SNPs), wherein 1006 SNPs were polymorphic (2.1%). Principal component analysis (PCA) showed the clear differentiation within the species O. nivicola: studied individuals were distributed among five distinct arrays corresponding to the geographical locations of sampling points. Our results demonstrate that the DNA chip designed for domestic sheep can be successfully used to study the allele pool and the genetic structure of snow sheep populations. PMID:27599514

  17. Detection of copy number variation by SNP-allelotyping.

    PubMed

    Parker, Brett; Alexander, Ryan; Wu, Xingyao; Feely, Shawna; Shy, Michael; Schnetz-Boutaud, Nathalie; Li, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is caused by an abnormal copy number variation (CNV) with a trisomy of chromosome 17p12. The increase of the DNA-segment copy number is expected to alter the allele frequency of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within the duplicated region. We tested whether SNP allele frequency determined by a Sequenom MassArray can be used to detect the CMT1A mutation. Our results revealed distinct patterns of SNP allele frequency distribution, which reliably differentiated CMT1A patients from controls. This finding suggests that this technique may serve as an alternative approach to identifying CNV in certain diseases, including CMT1A. PMID:24830919

  18. Conditions for the validity of SNP-based heritability estimation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The heritability of a trait (h2) is the proportion of its population variance caused by genetic differences, and estimates of this parameter are important for interpreting the results of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). In recent years, researchers have adopted a novel method for estimating a lower bound on heritability directly from GWAS data that uses realized genetic similarities between nominally unrelated individuals. The quantity estimated by this method is purported to be the contribution to heritability that could in principle be recovered from association studies employing the given panel of SNPs (hSNP2). Thus far, the validity of this approach has mostly been tested empirically. Here, we provide a mathematical explication and show that the method should remain a robust means of obtaining hSNP2 SNP under circumstances wider than those under which it has so far been derived. PMID:24744256

  19. A robust SNP barcode for typing Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains

    PubMed Central

    Coll, Francesc; McNerney, Ruth; Guerra-Assunção, José Afonso; Glynn, Judith R.; Perdigão, João; Viveiros, Miguel; Portugal, Isabel; Pain, Arnab; Martin, Nigel; Clark, Taane G.

    2014-01-01

    Strain-specific genomic diversity in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) is an important factor in pathogenesis that may affect virulence, transmissibility, host response and emergence of drug resistance. Several systems have been proposed to classify MTBC strains into distinct lineages and families. Here, we investigate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as robust (stable) markers of genetic variation for phylogenetic analysis. We identify ~92k SNP across a global collection of 1,601 genomes. The SNP-based phylogeny is consistent with the gold-standard regions of difference (RD) classification system. Of the ~7k strain-specific SNPs identified, 62 markers are proposed to discriminate known circulating strains. This SNP-based barcode is the first to cover all main lineages, and classifies a greater number of sublineages than current alternatives. It may be used to classify clinical isolates to evaluate tools to control the disease, including therapeutics and vaccines whose effectiveness may vary by strain type. PMID:25176035

  20. A 48 SNP set for grapevine cultivar identification

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rapid and consistent genotyping is an important requirement for cultivar identification in many crop species. Among them grapevine cultivars have been the subject of multiple studies given the large number of synonyms and homonyms generated during many centuries of vegetative multiplication and exchange. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers have been preferred until now because of their high level of polymorphism, their codominant nature and their high profile repeatability. However, the rapid application of partial or complete genome sequencing approaches is identifying thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) that can be very useful for such purposes. Although SNP markers are bi-allelic, and therefore not as polymorphic as microsatellites, the high number of loci that can be multiplexed and the possibilities of automation as well as their highly repeatable results under any analytical procedure make them the future markers of choice for any type of genetic identification. Results We analyzed over 300 SNP in the genome of grapevine using a re-sequencing strategy in a selection of 11 genotypes. Among the identified polymorphisms, we selected 48 SNP spread across all grapevine chromosomes with allele frequencies balanced enough as to provide sufficient information content for genetic identification in grapevine allowing for good genotyping success rate. Marker stability was tested in repeated analyses of a selected group of cultivars obtained worldwide to demonstrate their usefulness in genetic identification. Conclusions We have selected a set of 48 stable SNP markers with a high discrimination power and a uniform genome distribution (2-3 markers/chromosome), which is proposed as a standard set for grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) genotyping. Any previous problems derived from microsatellite allele confusion between labs or the need to run reference cultivars to identify allele sizes disappear using this type of marker. Furthermore, because SNP

  1. SNP Marker Discovery in Koala TLR Genes

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jian; Frankham, Greta J.; Johnson, Rebecca N.; Polkinghorne, Adam; Timms, Peter; O’Meally, Denis; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Belov, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in the early defence against invading pathogens, yet our understanding of TLRs in marsupial immunity is limited. Here, we describe the characterisation of nine TLRs from a koala immune tissue transcriptome and one TLR from a draft sequence of the koala genome and the subsequent development of an assay to study genetic diversity in these genes. We surveyed genetic diversity in 20 koalas from New South Wales, Australia and showed that one gene, TLR10 is monomorphic, while the other nine TLR genes have between two and 12 alleles. 40 SNPs (16 non-synonymous) were identified across the ten TLR genes. These markers provide a springboard to future studies on innate immunity in the koala, a species under threat from two major infectious diseases. PMID:25799012

  2. SNP marker discovery in koala TLR genes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Frankham, Greta J; Johnson, Rebecca N; Polkinghorne, Adam; Timms, Peter; O'Meally, Denis; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Belov, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in the early defence against invading pathogens, yet our understanding of TLRs in marsupial immunity is limited. Here, we describe the characterisation of nine TLRs from a koala immune tissue transcriptome and one TLR from a draft sequence of the koala genome and the subsequent development of an assay to study genetic diversity in these genes. We surveyed genetic diversity in 20 koalas from New South Wales, Australia and showed that one gene, TLR10 is monomorphic, while the other nine TLR genes have between two and 12 alleles. 40 SNPs (16 non-synonymous) were identified across the ten TLR genes. These markers provide a springboard to future studies on innate immunity in the koala, a species under threat from two major infectious diseases. PMID:25799012

  3. Genetic mapping in grapevine using a SNP microarray: intensity values

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genotyping microarrays are widely used for genome wide association studies, but in high-diversity organisms, the quality of SNP calls can be diminished by genetic variation near the assayed nucleotide. To address this limitation in grapevine, we developed a simple heuristic that uses hybridization i...

  4. SNP marker diversity in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Cortés, Andrés J; Chavarro, Martha C; Blair, Matthew W

    2011-09-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers have become a genetic technology of choice because of their automation and high precision of allele calls. In this study, our goal was to develop 94 SNPs and test them across well-chosen common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm. We validated and accessed SNP diversity at 84 gene-based and 10 non-genic loci using KASPar technology in a panel of 70 genotypes that have been used as parents of mapping populations and have been previously evaluated for SSRs. SNPs exhibited high levels of genetic diversity, an excess of middle frequency polymorphism, and a within-genepool mismatch distribution as expected for populations affected by sudden demographic expansions after domestication bottlenecks. This set of markers was useful for distinguishing Andean and Mesoamerican genotypes but less useful for distinguishing within each gene pool. In summary, slightly greater polymorphism and race structure was found within the Andean gene pool than within the Mesoamerican gene pool but polymorphism rate between genotypes was consistent with genepool and race identity. Our survey results represent a baseline for the choice of SNP markers for future applications because gene-associated SNPs could themselves be causative SNPs for traits. Finally, we discuss that the ideal genetic marker combination with which to carry out diversity, mapping and association studies in common bean should consider a mix of both SNP and SSR markers. PMID:21785951

  5. SNP Discovery through Next-Generation Sequencing and Its Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Banks, Travis W.; Cloutier, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    The decreasing cost along with rapid progress in next-generation sequencing and related bioinformatics computing resources has facilitated large-scale discovery of SNPs in various model and nonmodel plant species. Large numbers and genome-wide availability of SNPs make them the marker of choice in partially or completely sequenced genomes. Although excellent reviews have been published on next-generation sequencing, its associated bioinformatics challenges, and the applications of SNPs in genetic studies, a comprehensive review connecting these three intertwined research areas is needed. This paper touches upon various aspects of SNP discovery, highlighting key points in availability and selection of appropriate sequencing platforms, bioinformatics pipelines, SNP filtering criteria, and applications of SNPs in genetic analyses. The use of next-generation sequencing methodologies in many non-model crops leading to discovery and implementation of SNPs in various genetic studies is discussed. Development and improvement of bioinformatics software that are open source and freely available have accelerated the SNP discovery while reducing the associated cost. Key considerations for SNP filtering and associated pipelines are discussed in specific topics. A list of commonly used software and their sources is compiled for easy access and reference. PMID:23227038

  6. Do you really know where this SNP goes?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The release of build 10.2 of the swine genome was a marked improvement over previous builds and has proven extremely useful. However, as most know, there are regions of the genome that this particular build does not accurately represent. For instance, nearly 25% of the 62,162 SNP on the Illumina Por...

  7. Analysis of genetic diversity using SNP markers in oat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery was carried out in cultivated oat using Roche 454 sequencing methods. DNA sequences were generated from cDNAs originating from a panel of 20 diverse oat cultivars, and from Diversity Array Technology (DArT) genomic complexity reductions fr...

  8. Software solutions for the livestock genomics SNP array revolution.

    PubMed

    Nicolazzi, E L; Biffani, S; Biscarini, F; Orozco Ter Wengel, P; Caprera, A; Nazzicari, N; Stella, A

    2015-08-01

    Since the beginning of the genomic era, the number of available single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays has grown considerably. In the bovine species alone, 11 SNP chips not completely covered by intellectual property are currently available, and the number is growing. Genomic/genotype data are not standardized, and this hampers its exchange and integration. In addition, software used for the analyses of these data usually requires not standard (i.e. case specific) input files which, considering the large amount of data to be handled, require at least some programming skills in their production. In this work, we describe a software toolkit for SNP array data management, imputation, genome-wide association studies, population genetics and genomic selection. However, this toolkit does not solve the critical need for standardization of the genotypic data and software input files. It only highlights the chaotic situation each researcher has to face on a daily basis and gives some helpful advice on the currently available tools in order to navigate the SNP array data complexity. PMID:25907889

  9. Association of selected SNP with carcass and taste panel assessed meat quality traits in a commercial population of Aberdeen Angus-sired beef cattle

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Jennifer L; Bishop, Stephen C; McCorquodale, Caroline; Williams, John L; Wiener, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), previously associated with meat and milk quality traits in cattle, in a population of 443 commercial Aberdeen Angus-cross beef cattle. The eight SNP, which were located within five genes: μ-calpain (CAPN1), calpastatin (CAST), leptin (LEP), growth hormone receptor (GHR) and acylCoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1), are included in various commercial tests for tenderness, fatness, carcass composition and milk yield/quality. Methods A total of 27 traits were examined, 19 relating to carcass quality, such as carcass weight and fatness, one mechanical measure of tenderness, and the remaining seven were sensory traits, such as flavour and tenderness, assessed by a taste panel. Results An SNP in the CAPN1 gene, CAPN316, was significantly associated with tenderness measured by both the tenderometer and the taste panel as well as the weight of the hindquarter, where animals inheriting the CC genotype had more tender meat and heavier hindquarters. An SNP in the leptin gene, UASMS2, significantly affected overall liking, where animals with the TT genotype were assigned higher scores by the panellists. The SNP in the GHR gene was significantly associated with odour, where animals inheriting the AA genotype produced steaks with an intense odour when compared with the other genotypes. Finally, the SNP in the DGAT1 gene was associated with sirloin weight after maturation and fat depth surrounding the sirloin, with animals inheriting the AA genotype having heavier sirloins and more fat. Conclusion The results of this study confirm some previously documented associations. Furthermore, novel associations have been identified which, following validation in other populations, could be incorporated into breeding programmes to improve meat quality. PMID:19555501

  10. Association of Atherosclerotic Peripheral Arterial Disease with Adiponectin Genes SNP+45 and SNP+276: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Gherman, Claudia D.; Bolboacă, Sorana D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We hypothesized that adiponectin gene SNP+45 (rs2241766) and SNP+276 (rs1501299) would be associated with atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Furthermore, the association between circulating adiponectin levels, fetuin-A, and tumoral necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in patients with atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease was investigated. Method. Several blood parameters (such as adiponectin, fetuin-A, and TNF-α) were measured in 346 patients, 226 with atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and 120 without symptomatic PAD (non-PAD). Two common SNPs of the ADIPOQ gene represented by +45T/G 2 and +276G/T were also investigated. Results. Adiponectin concentrations showed lower circulating levels in the PAD patients compared to non-PAD patients (P < 0.001). Decreasing adiponectin concentration was associated with increasing serum levels of fetuin-A in the PAD patients. None of the investigated adiponectin SNPs proved to be associated with the subjects' susceptibility to PAD (P > 0.05). Conclusion. The results of our study demonstrated that neither adiponectin SNP+45 nor SNP+276 is associated with the risk of PAD. PMID:23819115

  11. High throughput SNP discovery and validation in the pig: towards the development of a high density swine SNP chip

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent developments in sequencing technology have allowed the generation of millions of short read sequences in a fast and inexpensive way. This enables the cost effective large scale identification of hundreds of thousands of SNPs needed for the development of high density SNP arrays. Currently, a ...

  12. Large-Scale SNP Discovery through RNA Sequencing and SNP Genotyping by Targeted Enrichment Sequencing in Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz)

    PubMed Central

    Pootakham, Wirulda; Shearman, Jeremy R.; Ruang-areerate, Panthita; Sonthirod, Chutima; Sangsrakru, Duangjai; Jomchai, Nukoon; Yoocha, Thippawan; Triwitayakorn, Kanokporn; Tragoonrung, Somvong; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke

    2014-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is one of the most important crop species being the main source of dietary energy in several countries. Marker-assisted selection has become an essential tool in plant breeding. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery via transcriptome sequencing is an attractive strategy for genome complexity reduction in organisms with large genomes. We sequenced the transcriptome of 16 cassava accessions using the Illumina HiSeq platform and identified 675,559 EST-derived SNP markers. A subset of those markers was subsequently genotyped by capture-based targeted enrichment sequencing in 100 F1 progeny segregating for starch viscosity phenotypes. A total of 2,110 non-redundant SNP markers were used to construct a genetic map. This map encompasses 1,785 cM and consists of 19 linkage groups. A major quantitative trait locus (QTL) controlling starch pasting properties was identified and shown to coincide with the QTL previously reported for this trait. With a high-density SNP-based linkage map presented here, we also uncovered a novel QTL associated with starch pasting time on LG 10. PMID:25551642

  13. Regulation of the seasonal leptin and leptin receptor expression profile during early sexual maturation and feed restriction in male Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., parr.

    PubMed

    Trombley, Susanne; Mustafa, Arshi; Schmitz, Monika

    2014-08-01

    In mammals, leptin acts as an adiposity signal and is a crucial link between nutritional status and the reproductive axis. So far the link between leptin and energy balance during sexual maturation in teleosts has been poorly investigated. In this study, seasonal gene expression changes in two leptin genes (lepa1 and lepa2) and the leptin receptor were investigated during early sexual maturation in male Atlantic salmon parr under fully fed (control) and feed restricted conditions from April through September. Both Atlantic salmon lepa1 and lepa2 in the liver and lepr in the brain were significantly down-regulated in non-maturing control males in early spring, coinciding with the start of the growth and fat accumulation. In maturing control males, hepatic leptin expression increased during mid-spermatogenesis and lepa1 and lepa2 mRNA levels were up-regulated by 7.7 and 49 times respectively during final maturation. For the first time in a fish species, a significant up-regulation of lepr expression was observed in the testis throughout mid to late spermatogenesis. Feed restriction decreased the incidence of sexual maturation by 53% and highly up-regulated both leptin genes in the liver and the leptin receptor in the pituitary. This study shows that hepatic lepa1 and lepa2 expression and lepr expression in the testis is affected by early sexual maturation in male Atlantic salmon parr. Fast growth and high fat stores are associated with low leptin levels while feed restriction has a stimulatory effect on hepatic leptin and leptin receptor gene expression in the pituitary, suggesting a role for leptin other than that as an adiposity signal. PMID:24818969

  14. Multiple SNP Set Analysis for Genome-Wide Association Studies Through Bayesian Latent Variable Selection.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhao-Hua; Zhu, Hongtu; Knickmeyer, Rebecca C; Sullivan, Patrick F; Williams, Stephanie N; Zou, Fei

    2015-12-01

    The power of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for mapping complex traits with single-SNP analysis (where SNP is single-nucleotide polymorphism) may be undermined by modest SNP effect sizes, unobserved causal SNPs, correlation among adjacent SNPs, and SNP-SNP interactions. Alternative approaches for testing the association between a single SNP set and individual phenotypes have been shown to be promising for improving the power of GWAS. We propose a Bayesian latent variable selection (BLVS) method to simultaneously model the joint association mapping between a large number of SNP sets and complex traits. Compared with single SNP set analysis, such joint association mapping not only accounts for the correlation among SNP sets but also is capable of detecting causal SNP sets that are marginally uncorrelated with traits. The spike-and-slab prior assigned to the effects of SNP sets can greatly reduce the dimension of effective SNP sets, while speeding up computation. An efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm is developed. Simulations demonstrate that BLVS outperforms several competing variable selection methods in some important scenarios. PMID:26515609

  15. High-throughput SNP genotyping for breeding applications in rice using the BeadXpress platform

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiplexed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers have the potential to increase the speed and cost-effectiveness of genotyping, provided that an optimal SNP density is used for each application. To test the efficiency of multiplexed SNP genotyping for diversity, mapping and breeding applicat...

  16. Development of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Markers for Use in Commercial Maize (Zea Mays L.) Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in maize offer the opportunity to utilize DNA markers in many new areas of population genetics, gene discovery, plant breeding, and germplasm identification. However, the steps from sequencing and SNP discovery to SNP marker design and ...

  17. The development and characterization of a 57K SNP array for rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper we describe the development and characterization of the first high density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping array for rainbow trout. The SNP array is publically available from a commercial vendor. The SNP genotyping quality was high and validation rate was close to 90%...

  18. Influence of MDM2 SNP309 and SNP285 status on the risk of cancer in the breast, prostate, lung and colon.

    PubMed

    Gansmo, Liv B; Knappskog, Stian; Romundstad, Pål; Hveem, Kristian; Vatten, Lars; Lønning, Per E

    2015-07-01

    MDM2 is a key regulator of the p53 tumor suppressor protein and is overexpressed in many human cancers. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the MDM2 intronic promoter (P2) have been found to exert biological function. The G-allele of SNP309T>G; rs2279744 increases MDM2 transcription and has been linked to increased cancer risk. In contrast, the less frequent SNP285G>C; rs117039649, which is in complete linkage disequilibrium with SNP309 (generating a SNP285C/309G variant haplotype), has been related to reduced MDM2 transcription and to reduced risk of breast, endometrial and ovarian cancer. In this large population-based case-control study, we genotyped SNP309 and SNP285 in 10,830 individuals, including cases with cancer of the breast (n=1,717), colon (n=1,532), lung (n=1,331) and prostate (n=2,501), as well as 3,749 non-cancer controls. We found a slightly reduced risk for lung cancer among individuals harboring the SNP309TG/GG genotypes compared to the SNP309TT genotype (OR= 0.86; CI = 0.67-0.98), but this association was restricted to women (OR = 0.77; CI = 0.63-0.95) and was not present among men (OR = 0.91; CI = 0.77-1.08). Consistent with previous findings, we found a reduced risk for breast cancer among individuals carrying the SNP285GC/309GG genotype versus the SNP285GG/309GG genotype (OR = 0.55; CI = 0.33-0.93). In conclusion, our data support the hypothesis that the effects of both SNP285 and SNP309 status are tissue dependent. PMID:25431177

  19. SNP analysis of follistatin gene associated with polycystic ovarian syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Panneerselvam, Palanisamy; Sivakumari, Kanakarajan; Jayaprakash, Ponmani; Srikanth, Ramanathan

    2010-01-01

    Follistatin has been reported as a candidate gene for polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) based on linkage and association studies. In this study, investigation of polymorphisms in the FST gene was done to determine if genetic variation is associated with susceptibility to PCOS. The nucleotide sequence of human follistatin and the protein sequence of human follistatin were retrieved from the NCBI database using Entrez. The follistatin protein of human was retrieved from the Swiss-Prot database. There are 344 amino acids and the molecular weight is 38,007 Da. The ProtParam analysis shows that the isoelectric point is 5.53 and the aliphatic index is 61.25. The hydropathicity is −0.490. The domains in FST protein are as follows: Pfam-B 5005 domain from 1 to 92; EGF-like subdomain from 93 to 116; Kazal 1 domain, occurred in three places, namely, 118–164, 192–239, and 270–316. There are 31 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for this gene. Some are nonsynonymous, some occur in the intron region, and some in an untranslated region. Two nonsynonymous SNPs, namely, rs11745088 and rs1127760, were taken for analysis. In the SNP rs11745088, the change is E152Q. Likewise, in rs1127760, the change is C239S. SIFT (Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant) showed positions of amino acids and the single letter code of amino acids that can be tolerated or deleterious for each position. There were six SNP results and each result had links to it. The dbSNP id, primary database id, and the type of mutation whether silent and if occurring in coding region are given as phenotype alterations. The FASTA format of protein was given to the nsSNP Analyzer tool, and the variation E152Q and C239S were given as inputs in the SNP data field. E152Q change was neutral and C239S causes disease. Using PANTHER for evolutionary analysis of coding SNPs, the protein sequence was given as input and analyzed for the E152Q and C239S SNPs for deleterious effect on protein function. The genetic association

  20. SNP analysis of follistatin gene associated with polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Panneerselvam, Palanisamy; Sivakumari, Kanakarajan; Jayaprakash, Ponmani; Srikanth, Ramanathan

    2010-01-01

    Follistatin has been reported as a candidate gene for polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) based on linkage and association studies. In this study, investigation of polymorphisms in the FST gene was done to determine if genetic variation is associated with susceptibility to PCOS. The nucleotide sequence of human follistatin and the protein sequence of human follistatin were retrieved from the NCBI database using Entrez. The follistatin protein of human was retrieved from the Swiss-Prot database. There are 344 amino acids and the molecular weight is 38,007 Da. The ProtParam analysis shows that the isoelectric point is 5.53 and the aliphatic index is 61.25. The hydropathicity is -0.490. The domains in FST protein are as follows: Pfam-B 5005 domain from 1 to 92; EGF-like subdomain from 93 to 116; Kazal 1 domain, occurred in three places, namely, 118-164, 192-239, and 270-316. There are 31 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for this gene. Some are nonsynonymous, some occur in the intron region, and some in an untranslated region. Two nonsynonymous SNPs, namely, rs11745088 and rs1127760, were taken for analysis. In the SNP rs11745088, the change is E152Q. Likewise, in rs1127760, the change is C239S. SIFT (Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant) showed positions of amino acids and the single letter code of amino acids that can be tolerated or deleterious for each position. There were six SNP results and each result had links to it. The dbSNP id, primary database id, and the type of mutation whether silent and if occurring in coding region are given as phenotype alterations. The FASTA format of protein was given to the nsSNP Analyzer tool, and the variation E152Q and C239S were given as inputs in the SNP data field. E152Q change was neutral and C239S causes disease. Using PANTHER for evolutionary analysis of coding SNPs, the protein sequence was given as input and analyzed for the E152Q and C239S SNPs for deleterious effect on protein function. The genetic association

  1. Investigating single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density in the human genome and its implications for molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhongming; Fu, Yun-Xin; Hewett-Emmett, David; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2003-07-17

    We investigated the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density across the human genome and in different genic categories using two SNP databases: Celera's CgsSNP, which includes SNPs identified by comparing genomic sequences, and Celera's RefSNP, which includes SNPs from a variety of sources and is biased toward disease-associated genes. Based on CgsSNP, the average numbers of SNPs per 10 kb was 8.33, 8.44, and 8.09 in the human genome, in intergenic regions, and in genic regions, respectively. In genic regions, the SNP density in intronic, exonic and adjoining untranslated regions was 8.21, 5.28, and 7.51 SNPs per 10 kb, respectively. The pattern of SNP density based on RefSNP was different from that based on CgsSNP, emphasizing its utility for genotype-phenotype association studies but not for most population genetic studies. The number of SNPs per chromosome was correlated with chromosome length, but the density of SNPs estimated by CgsSNP was not significantly correlated with the GC content of the chromosome. Based on CgsSNP, the ratio of nonsense to missense mutations (0.027), the ratio of missense to silent mutations (1.15), and the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous mutations (1.18) was less than half of that expected in a human protein coding sequence under the neutral mutation theory, reflecting a role for natural selection, especially purifying selection. PMID:12909357

  2. Multiple SNP-sets Analysis for Genome-wide Association Studies through Bayesian Latent Variable Selection

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhaohua; Zhu, Hongtu; Knickmeyer, Rebecca C; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Stephanie, Williams N.; Zou, Fei

    2015-01-01

    The power of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for mapping complex traits with single SNP analysis may be undermined by modest SNP effect sizes, unobserved causal SNPs, correlation among adjacent SNPs, and SNP-SNP interactions. Alternative approaches for testing the association between a single SNP-set and individual phenotypes have been shown to be promising for improving the power of GWAS. We propose a Bayesian latent variable selection (BLVS) method to simultaneously model the joint association mapping between a large number of SNP-sets and complex traits. Compared to single SNP-set analysis, such joint association mapping not only accounts for the correlation among SNP-sets, but also is capable of detecting causal SNP-sets that are marginally uncorrelated with traits. The spike-slab prior assigned to the effects of SNP-sets can greatly reduce the dimension of effective SNP-sets, while speeding up computation. An efficient MCMC algorithm is developed. Simulations demonstrate that BLVS outperforms several competing variable selection methods in some important scenarios. PMID:26515609

  3. Genetic heterogeneity in rhabdomyosarcoma revealed by SNP array analysis.

    PubMed

    Walther, Charles; Mayrhofer, Markus; Nilsson, Jenny; Hofvander, Jakob; Jonson, Tord; Mandahl, Nils; Øra, Ingrid; Gisselsson, David; Mertens, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children and adolescents. Alveolar (ARMS) and embryonal (ERMS) histologies predominate, but rare cases are classified as spindle cell/sclerosing (SRMS). For treatment stratification, RMS is further subclassified as fusion-positive (FP-RMS) or fusion-negative (FN-RMS), depending on whether a gene fusion involving PAX3 or PAX7 is present or not. We investigated 19 cases of pediatric RMS using high resolution single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. FP-ARMS displayed, on average, more structural rearrangements than ERMS; the single FN-ARMS had a genomic profile similar to ERMS. Apart from previously known amplification (e.g., MYCN, CDK4, and MIR17HG) and deletion (e.g., NF1, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B) targets, amplification of ERBB2 and homozygous loss of ASCC3 or ODZ3 were seen. Combining SNP array with cytogenetic data revealed that most cases were polyploid, with at least one case having started as a near-haploid tumor. Further bioinformatic analysis of the SNP array data disclosed genetic heterogeneity, in the form of subclonal chromosomal imbalances, in five tumors. The outcome was worse for patients with FP-ARMS than ERMS or FN-ARMS (6/8 vs. 1/9 dead of disease), and the only children with ERMS showing intratumor diversity or with MYOD1 mutation-positive SRMS also died of disease. High resolution SNP array can be useful in evaluating genomic imbalances in pediatric RMS. PMID:26482321

  4. Introgression browser: high-throughput whole-genome SNP visualization.

    PubMed

    Aflitos, Saulo Alves; Sanchez-Perez, Gabino; de Ridder, Dick; Fransz, Paul; Schranz, Michael E; de Jong, Hans; Peters, Sander A

    2015-04-01

    Breeding by introgressive hybridization is a pivotal strategy to broaden the genetic basis of crops. Usually, the desired traits are monitored in consecutive crossing generations by marker-assisted selection, but their analyses fail in chromosome regions where crossover recombinants are rare or not viable. Here, we present the Introgression Browser (iBrowser), a bioinformatics tool aimed at visualizing introgressions at nucleotide or SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) accuracy. The software selects homozygous SNPs from Variant Call Format (VCF) information and filters out heterozygous SNPs, multi-nucleotide polymorphisms (MNPs) and insertion-deletions (InDels). For data analysis iBrowser makes use of sliding windows, but if needed it can generate any desired fragmentation pattern through General Feature Format (GFF) information. In an example of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) accessions we visualize SNP patterns and elucidate both position and boundaries of the introgressions. We also show that our tool is capable of identifying alien DNA in a panel of the closely related S. pimpinellifolium by examining phylogenetic relationships of the introgressed segments in tomato. In a third example, we demonstrate the power of the iBrowser in a panel of 597 Arabidopsis accessions, detecting the boundaries of a SNP-free region around a polymorphic 1.17 Mbp inverted segment on the short arm of chromosome 4. The architecture and functionality of iBrowser makes the software appropriate for a broad set of analyses including SNP mining, genome structure analysis, and pedigree analysis. Its functionality, together with the capability to process large data sets and efficient visualization of sequence variation, makes iBrowser a valuable breeding tool. PMID:25704554

  5. Detection of homologous horizontal gene transfer in SNP data

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-07-23

    We study the detection of mutations, sequencing errors, and homologous horizontal gene transfers (HGT) in a set of closely related microbial genomes. We base the model on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP's) and break the genomes into blocks to handle the rearrangement problem. Then we apply a synamic programming algorithm to model whether changes within each block are likely a result of mutations, sequencing errors, or HGT.

  6. Robust Demographic Inference from Genomic and SNP Data

    PubMed Central

    Excoffier, Laurent; Dupanloup, Isabelle; Huerta-Sánchez, Emilia; Sousa, Vitor C.; Foll, Matthieu

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a flexible and robust simulation-based framework to infer demographic parameters from the site frequency spectrum (SFS) computed on large genomic datasets. We show that our composite-likelihood approach allows one to study evolutionary models of arbitrary complexity, which cannot be tackled by other current likelihood-based methods. For simple scenarios, our approach compares favorably in terms of accuracy and speed with , the current reference in the field, while showing better convergence properties for complex models. We first apply our methodology to non-coding genomic SNP data from four human populations. To infer their demographic history, we compare neutral evolutionary models of increasing complexity, including unsampled populations. We further show the versatility of our framework by extending it to the inference of demographic parameters from SNP chips with known ascertainment, such as that recently released by Affymetrix to study human origins. Whereas previous ways of handling ascertained SNPs were either restricted to a single population or only allowed the inference of divergence time between a pair of populations, our framework can correctly infer parameters of more complex models including the divergence of several populations, bottlenecks and migration. We apply this approach to the reconstruction of African demography using two distinct ascertained human SNP panels studied under two evolutionary models. The two SNP panels lead to globally very similar estimates and confidence intervals, and suggest an ancient divergence (>110 Ky) between Yoruba and San populations. Our methodology appears well suited to the study of complex scenarios from large genomic data sets. PMID:24204310

  7. PanSNPdb: The Pan-Asian SNP Genotyping Database

    PubMed Central

    Ngamphiw, Chumpol; Assawamakin, Anunchai; Xu, Shuhua; Shaw, Philip J.; Yang, Jin Ok; Ghang, Ho; Bhak, Jong; Liu, Edison; Tongsima, Sissades

    2011-01-01

    The HUGO Pan-Asian SNP consortium conducted the largest survey to date of human genetic diversity among Asians by sampling 1,719 unrelated individuals among 71 populations from China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand. We have constructed a database (PanSNPdb), which contains these data and various new analyses of them. PanSNPdb is a research resource in the analysis of the population structure of Asian peoples, including linkage disequilibrium patterns, haplotype distributions, and copy number variations. Furthermore, PanSNPdb provides an interactive comparison with other SNP and CNV databases, including HapMap3, JSNP, dbSNP and DGV and thus provides a comprehensive resource of human genetic diversity. The information is accessible via a widely accepted graphical interface used in many genetic variation databases. Unrestricted access to PanSNPdb and any associated files is available at: http://www4a.biotec.or.th/PASNP. PMID:21731755

  8. How far from the SNP may the causative genes be?

    PubMed

    Brodie, Aharon; Azaria, Johnathan Roy; Ofran, Yanay

    2016-07-27

    While GWAS identify many disease-associated SNPs, using them to decipher disease mechanisms is hindered by the difficulty in mapping SNPs to genes. Most SNPs are in non-coding regions and it is often hard to identify the genes they implicate. To explore how far the SNP may be from the affected genes we used a pathway-based approach. We found that affected genes are often up to 2 Mbps away from the associated SNP, and are not necessarily the closest genes to the SNP. Existing approaches for mapping SNPs to genes leave many SNPs unmapped to genes and reveal only 86 significant phenotype-pathway associations for all known GWAS hits combined. Using the pathway-based approach we propose here allows mapping of virtually all SNPs to genes and reveals 435 statistically significant phenotype-pathway associations. In search for mechanisms that may explain the relationships between SNPs and distant genes, we found that SNPs that are mapped to distant genes have significantly more large insertions/deletions around them than other SNPs, suggesting that these SNPs may sometimes be markers for large insertions/deletions that may affect large genomic regions. PMID:27269582

  9. Development of a forensic identity SNP panel for Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Augustinus, Daniel; Gahan, Michelle E; McNevin, Dennis

    2015-07-01

    Genetic markers included in forensic identity panels must exhibit Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium (HWE and LE). "Universal" panels designed for global use can fail these tests in regional jurisdictions exhibiting high levels of genetic differentiation such as the Indonesian archipelago. This is especially the case where a single DNA database is required for allele frequency estimates to calculate random match probabilities (RMPs) and associated likelihood ratios (LRs). A panel of 65 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a reduced set of 52 SNPs have been selected from 15 Indonesian subpopulations in the HUGO Pan Asian SNP database using a SNP selection strategy that could be applied to any panel of forensic identity markers. The strategy consists of four screening steps: (1) application of a G test for HWE; (2) ranking for high heterozygosity; (3) selection for LE; and (4) selection for low inbreeding depression. SNPs in our Indonesian panel perform well in comparison to some other universal SNP and short tandem repeat (STR) panels as measured by Fisher's exact test for HWE and LE and Wright's F statistics. PMID:25104323

  10. Multiplex Detection and SNP Genotyping in a Single Fluorescence Channel

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Guoliang; Miles, Andrea; Alphey, Luke

    2012-01-01

    Probe-based PCR is widely used for SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) genotyping and pathogen nucleic acid detection due to its simplicity, sensitivity and cost-effectiveness. However, the multiplex capability of hydrolysis probe-based PCR is normally limited to one target (pathogen or allele) per fluorescence channel. Current fluorescence PCR machines typically have 4–6 channels. We present a strategy permitting the multiplex detection of multiple targets in a single detection channel. The technique is named Multiplex Probe Amplification (MPA). Polymorphisms of the CYP2C9 gene (cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily C, polypeptide 9, CYP2C9*2) and human papillomavirus sequences HPV16, 18, 31, 52 and 59 were chosen as model targets for testing MPA. The allele status of the CYP2C9*2 determined by MPA was entirely concordant with the reference TaqMan® SNP Genotyping Assays. The four HPV strain sequences could be independently detected in a single fluorescence detection channel. The results validate the multiplex capacity, the simplicity and accuracy of MPA for SNP genotyping and multiplex detection using different probes labeled with the same fluorophore. The technique offers a new way to multiplex in a single detection channel of a closed-tube PCR. PMID:22272339

  11. Multiplex detection and SNP genotyping in a single fluorescence channel.

    PubMed

    Fu, Guoliang; Miles, Andrea; Alphey, Luke

    2012-01-01

    Probe-based PCR is widely used for SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) genotyping and pathogen nucleic acid detection due to its simplicity, sensitivity and cost-effectiveness. However, the multiplex capability of hydrolysis probe-based PCR is normally limited to one target (pathogen or allele) per fluorescence channel. Current fluorescence PCR machines typically have 4-6 channels. We present a strategy permitting the multiplex detection of multiple targets in a single detection channel. The technique is named Multiplex Probe Amplification (MPA). Polymorphisms of the CYP2C9 gene (cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily C, polypeptide 9, CYP2C9*2) and human papillomavirus sequences HPV16, 18, 31, 52 and 59 were chosen as model targets for testing MPA. The allele status of the CYP2C9*2 determined by MPA was entirely concordant with the reference TaqMan® SNP Genotyping Assays. The four HPV strain sequences could be independently detected in a single fluorescence detection channel. The results validate the multiplex capacity, the simplicity and accuracy of MPA for SNP genotyping and multiplex detection using different probes labeled with the same fluorophore. The technique offers a new way to multiplex in a single detection channel of a closed-tube PCR. PMID:22272339

  12. Population distribution and ancestry of the cancer protective MDM2 SNP285 (rs117039649).

    PubMed

    Knappskog, Stian; Gansmo, Liv B; Dibirova, Khadizha; Metspalu, Andres; Cybulski, Cezary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Aaltonen, Lauri; Vatten, Lars; Romundstad, Pål; Hveem, Kristian; Devilee, Peter; Evans, Gareth D; Lin, Dongxin; Van Camp, Guy; Manolopoulos, Vangelis G; Osorio, Ana; Milani, Lili; Ozcelik, Tayfun; Zalloua, Pierre; Mouzaya, Francis; Bliznetz, Elena; Balanovska, Elena; Pocheshkova, Elvira; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Atramentova, Lubov; Nymadawa, Pagbajabyn; Titov, Konstantin; Lavryashina, Maria; Yusupov, Yuldash; Bogdanova, Natalia; Koshel, Sergey; Zamora, Jorge; Wedge, David C; Charlesworth, Deborah; Dörk, Thilo; Balanovsky, Oleg; Lønning, Per E

    2014-09-30

    The MDM2 promoter SNP285C is located on the SNP309G allele. While SNP309G enhances Sp1 transcription factor binding and MDM2 transcription, SNP285C antagonizes Sp1 binding and reduces the risk of breast-, ovary- and endometrial cancer. Assessing SNP285 and 309 genotypes across 25 different ethnic populations (>10.000 individuals), the incidence of SNP285C was 6-8% across European populations except for Finns (1.2%) and Saami (0.3%). The incidence decreased towards the Middle-East and Eastern Russia, and SNP285C was absent among Han Chinese, Mongolians and African Americans. Interhaplotype variation analyses estimated SNP285C to have originated about 14,700 years ago (95% CI: 8,300 - 33,300). Both this estimate and the geographical distribution suggest SNP285C to have arisen after the separation between Caucasians and modern day East Asians (17,000 - 40,000 years ago). We observed a strong inverse correlation (r = -0.805; p < 0.001) between the percentage of SNP309G alleles harboring SNP285C and the MAF for SNP309G itself across different populations suggesting selection and environmental adaptation with respect to MDM2 expression in recent human evolution. In conclusion, we found SNP285C to be a pan-Caucasian variant. Ethnic variation regarding distribution of SNP285C needs to be taken into account when assessing the impact of MDM2 SNPs on cancer risk. PMID:25327560

  13. Population distribution and ancestry of the cancer protective MDM2 SNP285 (rs117039649)

    PubMed Central

    Knappskog, Stian; Gansmo, Liv B.; Dibirova, Khadizha; Metspalu, Andres; Cybulski, Cezary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Aaltonen, Lauri; Vatten, Lars; Romundstad, Pål; Hveem, Kristian; Devilee, Peter; Evans, Gareth D.; Lin, Dongxin; Camp, Guy Van; Manolopoulos, Vangelis G.; Osorio, Ana; Milani, Lili; Ozcelik, Tayfun; Zalloua, Pierre; Mouzaya, Francis; Bliznetz, Elena; Balanovska, Elena; Pocheshkova, Elvira; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Atramentova, Lubov; Nymadawa, Pagbajabyn; Titov, Konstantin; Lavryashina, Maria; Yusupov, Yuldash; Bogdanova, Natalia; Koshel, Sergey; Zamora, Jorge; Wedge, David C.; Charlesworth, Deborah; Dörk, Thilo; Balanovsky, Oleg; Lønning, Per E.

    2014-01-01

    The MDM2 promoter SNP285C is located on the SNP309G allele. While SNP309G enhances Sp1 transcription factor binding and MDM2 transcription, SNP285C antagonizes Sp1 binding and reduces the risk of breast-, ovary- and endometrial cancer. Assessing SNP285 and 309 genotypes across 25 different ethnic populations (>10.000 individuals), the incidence of SNP285C was 6-8% across European populations except for Finns (1.2%) and Saami (0.3%). The incidence decreased towards the Middle-East and Eastern Russia, and SNP285C was absent among Han Chinese, Mongolians and African Americans. Interhaplotype variation analyses estimated SNP285C to have originated about 14,700 years ago (95% CI: 8,300 – 33,300). Both this estimate and the geographical distribution suggest SNP285C to have arisen after the separation between Caucasians and modern day East Asians (17,000 - 40,000 years ago). We observed a strong inverse correlation (r = -0.805; p < 0.001) between the percentage of SNP309G alleles harboring SNP285C and the MAF for SNP309G itself across different populations suggesting selection and environmental adaptation with respect to MDM2 expression in recent human evolution. In conclusion, we found SNP285C to be a pan-Caucasian variant. Ethnic variation regarding distribution of SNP285C needs to be taken into account when assessing the impact of MDM2 SNPs on cancer risk. PMID:25327560

  14. Mouse SNP Miner: an annotated database of mouse functional single nucleotide polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Reuveni, Eli; Ramensky, Vasily E; Gross, Cornelius

    2007-01-01

    Background The mapping of quantitative trait loci in rat and mouse has been extremely successful in identifying chromosomal regions associated with human disease-related phenotypes. However, identifying the specific phenotype-causing DNA sequence variations within a quantitative trait locus has been much more difficult. The recent availability of genomic sequence from several mouse inbred strains (including C57BL/6J, 129X1/SvJ, 129S1/SvImJ, A/J, and DBA/2J) has made it possible to catalog DNA sequence differences within a quantitative trait locus derived from crosses between these strains. However, even for well-defined quantitative trait loci (<10 Mb) the identification of candidate functional DNA sequence changes remains challenging due to the high density of sequence variation between strains. Description To help identify functional DNA sequence variations within quantitative trait loci we have used the Ensembl annotated genome sequence to compile a database of mouse single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are predicted to cause missense, nonsense, frameshift, or splice site mutations (available at ). For missense mutations we have used the PolyPhen and PANTHER algorithms to predict whether amino acid changes are likely to disrupt protein function. Conclusion We have developed a database of mouse SNPs predicted to cause missense, nonsense, frameshift, and splice-site mutations. Our analysis revealed that 20% and 14% of missense SNPs are likely to be deleterious according to PolyPhen and PANTHER, respectively, and 6% are considered deleterious by both algorithms. The database also provides gene expression and functional annotations from the Symatlas, Gene Ontology, and OMIM databases to further assess candidate phenotype-causing mutations. To demonstrate its utility, we show that Mouse SNP Miner successfully finds a previously identified candidate SNP in the taste receptor, Tas1r3, that underlies sucrose preference in the C57BL/6J strain. We also use Mouse

  15. No evidence that GATA3 rs570613 SNP modifies breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Johnatty, Sharon E.; Couch, Fergus J.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Tarrell, Robert; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Singer, Christian F.; Fuerhauser, Christine; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Caligo, Maria A.; Hopper, John; Southey, Melissa C.; Giles, Graham G.; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Nevanlinna, Heli; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Rosalind; Pichert, Gabriella; Eccles, Diana; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Douglas, Fiona; Chu, Carol; Hodgson, Shirley; Paterson, Joan; Hogervorst, Frans B.L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Wijnen, Juul; Vreeswijk, Maaike; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn; Luijt, Rob B. van der; van Os, Theo A.M.; Gille, Hans J.P.; Blok, Marinus J.; Issacs, Claudine; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2009-01-01

    GATA-binding protein 3 (GATA3) is a transcription factor that is crucial to mammary gland morphogenesis and differentiation of progenitor cells, and has been suggested to have a tumor suppressor function. The rs570613 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in intron 4 of GATA3 was previously found to be associated with a reduction in breast cancer risk in the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility project and in pooled analysis of two case-control studies from Norway and Poland (Ptrend =0.004), with some evidence for a stronger association with estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumours [1]. We genotyped GATA3 rs570613 in 6,388 cases and 4,995 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and 5,617 BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). We found no association between this SNP and breast cancer risk in BCAC cases overall (ORper-allele = 1.00, 95% CI 0.94 − 1.05), in ER negative BCAC cases (ORper-allele = 1.02, 95% CI 0.91−1.13), in BRCA1 mutation carriers RRper-allele = 0.99, 95% CI 0.90−1.09) or BRCA2 mutation carriers (RRper-allele = 0.93, 95% CI 0.80−1.07). We conclude that there is no evidence that either GATA3 rs570613, or any variant in strong linkage disequilibrium with it, is associated with breast cancer risk in women. PMID:19082709

  16. Exploration of SNP variants affecting hair colour prediction in Europeans.

    PubMed

    Söchtig, Jens; Phillips, Chris; Maroñas, Olalla; Gómez-Tato, Antonio; Cruz, Raquel; Alvarez-Dios, Jose; de Cal, María-Ángeles Casares; Ruiz, Yarimar; Reich, Kristian; Fondevila, Manuel; Carracedo, Ángel; Lareu, María V

    2015-09-01

    DNA profiling is a key tool for forensic analysis; however, current methods identify a suspect either by direct comparison or from DNA database searches. In cases with unidentified suspects, prediction of visible physical traits e.g. pigmentation or hair distribution of the DNA donors can provide important probative information. This study aimed to explore single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variants for their effect on hair colour prediction. A discovery panel of 63 SNPs consisting of already established hair colour markers from the HIrisPlex hair colour phenotyping assay as well as additional markers for which associations to human pigmentation traits were previously identified was used to develop multiplex assays based on SNaPshot single-base extension technology. A genotyping study was performed on a range of European populations (n = 605). Hair colour phenotyping was accomplished by matching donor's hair to a graded colour category system of reference shades and photography. Since multiple SNPs in combination contribute in varying degrees to hair colour predictability in Europeans, we aimed to compile a compact marker set that could provide a reliable hair colour inference from the fewest SNPs. The predictive approach developed uses a naïve Bayes classifier to provide hair colour assignment probabilities for the SNP profiles of the key SNPs and was embedded into the Snipper online SNP classifier ( http://mathgene.usc.es/snipper/ ). Results indicate that red, blond, brown and black hair colours are predictable with informative probabilities in a high proportion of cases. Our study resulted in the identification of 12 most strongly associated SNPs to hair pigmentation variation in six genes. PMID:26162598

  17. Computational tradeoffs in multiplex PCR assay design for SNP genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Rachlin, John; Ding, Chunming; Cantor, Charles; Kasif, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Background Multiplex PCR is a key technology for detecting infectious microorganisms, whole-genome sequencing, forensic analysis, and for enabling flexible yet low-cost genotyping. However, the design of a multiplex PCR assays requires the consideration of multiple competing objectives and physical constraints, and extensive computational analysis must be performed in order to identify the possible formation of primer-dimers that can negatively impact product yield. Results This paper examines the computational design limits of multiplex PCR in the context of SNP genotyping and examines tradeoffs associated with several key design factors including multiplexing level (the number of primer pairs per tube), coverage (the % of SNP whose associated primers are actually assigned to one of several available tube), and tube-size uniformity. We also examine how design performance depends on the total number of available SNPs from which to choose, and primer stringency criterial. We show that finding high-multiplexing/high-coverage designs is subject to a computational phase transition, becoming dramatically more difficult when the probability of primer pair interaction exceeds a critical threshold. The precise location of this critical transition point depends on the number of available SNPs and the level of multiplexing required. We also demonstrate how coverage performance is impacted by the number of available snps, primer selection criteria, and target multiplexing levels. Conclusion The presence of a phase transition suggests limits to scaling Multiplex PCR performance for high-throughput genomics applications. Achieving broad SNP coverage rapidly transitions from being very easy to very hard as the target multiplexing level (# of primer pairs per tube) increases. The onset of a phase transition can be "delayed" by having a larger pool of SNPs, or loosening primer selection constraints so as to increase the number of candidate primer pairs per SNP, though the latter

  18. QuantiSNP: an Objective Bayes Hidden-Markov Model to detect and accurately map copy number variation using SNP genotyping data.

    PubMed

    Colella, Stefano; Yau, Christopher; Taylor, Jennifer M; Mirza, Ghazala; Butler, Helen; Clouston, Penny; Bassett, Anne S; Seller, Anneke; Holmes, Christopher C; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    2007-01-01

    Array-based technologies have been used to detect chromosomal copy number changes (aneuploidies) in the human genome. Recent studies identified numerous copy number variants (CNV) and some are common polymorphisms that may contribute to disease susceptibility. We developed, and experimentally validated, a novel computational framework (QuantiSNP) for detecting regions of copy number variation from BeadArray SNP genotyping data using an Objective Bayes Hidden-Markov Model (OB-HMM). Objective Bayes measures are used to set certain hyperparameters in the priors using a novel re-sampling framework to calibrate the model to a fixed Type I (false positive) error rate. Other parameters are set via maximum marginal likelihood to prior training data of known structure. QuantiSNP provides probabilistic quantification of state classifications and significantly improves the accuracy of segmental aneuploidy identification and mapping, relative to existing analytical tools (Beadstudio, Illumina), as demonstrated by validation of breakpoint boundaries. QuantiSNP identified both novel and validated CNVs. QuantiSNP was developed using BeadArray SNP data but it can be adapted to other platforms and we believe that the OB-HMM framework has widespread applicability in genomic research. In conclusion, QuantiSNP is a novel algorithm for high-resolution CNV/aneuploidy detection with application to clinical genetics, cancer and disease association studies. PMID:17341461

  19. Silica nanoparticles activate purinergic signaling via P2X7 receptor in dendritic cells, leading to production of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Kana; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi; Tanuma, Sei-Ichi; Takeda, Ken; Kojima, Shuji

    2016-09-01

    We examined the mechanism of SNP-mediated stimulation of IL-1β and IL-18 production via P2R-mediated pathways in mouse bone marrow dendritic cells (mBMDCs). Examination of uptake of SNPs with diameters of 30, 70, and 300nm (SNP30, SNP70, and SNP300, respectively) by lipopolysaccharide-matured mBMDCs revealed that significant uptake of SNP30 occurred within as short a time as 1h. Production of IL-1β and IL-18 by cells exposed to SNPs increased dose-dependently, and was highest in cells exposed to SNP30. The SNP30-induced cytokine production was significantly inhibited by ATPase (apyrase) and by P2X7 receptor antagonist (A438079). ATP release was also highest in SNP30-exposed cells. Treatment of mBMDCs with exogenous ATP induced release of high levels of IL-1β and IL-18, and this release was also significantly inhibited by apyrase and A438079. The order of effectiveness of the three SNPs for inducing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production accorded well with those of cytokine production and ATP release. ROS production was inhibited by diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI). SNPs, especially SNP30, activate purinergic signaling in matured mBMDCs by inducing ATP release via P2X7 receptor. ATP induces ROS production via NADPH oxidase, and ROS activate inflammasomes, leading to caspase-1-dependent processing of pro-cytokines and release of IL-1β and IL-18. PMID:27311643

  20. Prognostic significance of interleukin-6 single nucleotide polymorphism genotypes in neuroblastoma: rs1800795 (promoter) and rs8192284 (receptor)

    PubMed Central

    Lagmay, Joanne P.; London, Wendy B.; Gross, Thomas G.; Termuhlen, Amanda; Sullivan, Nicholas; Axel, Amy; Mundy, Bethany; Ranalli, Mark; Canner, Jason; McGrady, Patrick; Hall, Brett

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer of the sympathetic nervous system and many patients present with high risk disease. Risk stratification, based on pathology and tumor-derived biomarkers, has improved prediction of clinical outcomes, but overall survival rates remain unfavorable and new therapeutic targets are needed. Some studies suggest a link between interleukin-6 and more aggressive behavior in neuroblastoma tumor cells. Therefore, we examined the impact of two IL-6 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) on neuroblastoma disease progression. Experimental design DNA samples from 96 high risk neuroblastoma patients were screened for two SNP that are known to regulate the serum levels of IL-6 and the soluble IL-6 receptor (IL-6R), rs1800795 and rs8192284 respectively. The genotype for each SNP was determined in a blinded fashion and independent statistical analysis was performed to determine SNP-related event free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) rates. Results The rs1800795 IL-6 promoter SNP is an independent prognostic factor for EFS and OS in -high risk neuroblastoma patients. In contrast, the rs8192284 IL-6 receptor SNP revealed no prognostic value. Conclusions The rs1800795 SNP (-174 IL-6 (G>C) represents a novel and independent prognostic marker for both EFS and OS in high risk neuroblastoma. Since the rs1800795 SNP (-174 IL-6 (G>C) has been shown to correlate with production of IL-6, this cytokine may represent a target for development of new therapies in neuroblastoma. PMID:19671870

  1. PCR amplification of SNP loci from crude DNA for large-scale genotyping of oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian; Lyon, Rebecca; Zhou, Yuxin; Lamour, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    Similar to other eukaryotes, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers are abundant in many oomycete plant pathogen genomes. High resolution DNA melting analysis (HR-DMA) is a cost-effective method for SNP genotyping, but like many SNP marker technologies, is limited by the amount and quality of template DNA. We describe PCR preamplification of Phytophthora and Peronospora SNP loci from crude DNA extracted from a small amount of mycelium and/or infected plant tissue to produce sufficient template to genotype at least 10 000 SNPs. The approach is fast, inexpensive, requires minimal biological material and should be useful for many organisms in a variety of contexts. PMID:24871597

  2. Accuracy of direct genomic values in Holstein bulls and cows using subsets of SNP markers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background At the current price, the use of high-density single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) genotyping assays in genomic selection of dairy cattle is limited to applications involving elite sires and dams. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of low-density assays to predict direct genomic value (DGV) on five milk production traits, an overall conformation trait, a survival index, and two profit index traits (APR, ASI). Methods Dense SNP genotypes were available for 42,576 SNP for 2,114 Holstein bulls and 510 cows. A subset of 1,847 bulls born between 1955 and 2004 was used as a training set to fit models with various sets of pre-selected SNP. A group of 297 bulls born between 2001 and 2004 and all cows born between 1992 and 2004 were used to evaluate the accuracy of DGV prediction. Ridge regression (RR) and partial least squares regression (PLSR) were used to derive prediction equations and to rank SNP based on the absolute value of the regression coefficients. Four alternative strategies were applied to select subset of SNP, namely: subsets of the highest ranked SNP for each individual trait, or a single subset of evenly spaced SNP, where SNP were selected based on their rank for ASI, APR or minor allele frequency within intervals of approximately equal length. Results RR and PLSR performed very similarly to predict DGV, with PLSR performing better for low-density assays and RR for higher-density SNP sets. When using all SNP, DGV predictions for production traits, which have a higher heritability, were more accurate (0.52-0.64) than for survival (0.19-0.20), which has a low heritability. The gain in accuracy using subsets that included the highest ranked SNP for each trait was marginal (5-6%) over a common set of evenly spaced SNP when at least 3,000 SNP were used. Subsets containing 3,000 SNP provided more than 90% of the accuracy that could be achieved with a high-density assay for cows, and 80% of the high-density assay for young bulls

  3. Lack of association between MDM2 promoter SNP309 and clinical outcome in patients with neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Rihani, Ali; Van Maerken, Tom; De Wilde, Bram; Zeka, Fjoralba; Laureys, Geneviève; Norga, Koen; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Coco, Simona; Versteeg, Rogier; Noguera, Rosa; Schulte, Johannes H; Eggert, Angelika; Stallings, Raymond L; Speleman, Frank; Vandesompele, Jo

    2014-10-01

    While a polymorphism located within the promoter region of the MDM2 proto-oncogene, SNP309 (T > G), has previously been associated with increased risk and aggressiveness of neuroblastoma and other tumor entities, a protective effect has also been reported in certain other cancers. In this study, we evaluated the association of MDM2 SNP309 with outcome in 496 patients with neuroblastoma and its effect on MDM2 expression. No significant difference in overall or event-free survival was observed among patients with neuroblastoma with or without MDM2 SNP309. The presence of SNP309 does not affect MDM2 expression in neuroblastoma. PMID:24391119

  4. Genome-wide SNP discovery in walnut with an AGSNP pipeline updated for SNP discovery in allogamous organisms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A genome-wide set of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is a valuable resource in genetic research and breeding and is usually developed by re-sequencing a genome. If a genome sequence is not available, an alternative strategy must be used. We previously reported the development of a pipeline (AGSNP) for genome-wide SNP discovery in coding sequences and other single-copy DNA without a complete genome sequence in self-pollinating (autogamous) plants. Here we updated this pipeline for SNP discovery in outcrossing (allogamous) species and demonstrated its efficacy in SNP discovery in walnut (Juglans regia L.). Results The first step in the original implementation of the AGSNP pipeline was the construction of a reference sequence and the identification of single-copy sequences in it. To identify single-copy sequences, multiple genome equivalents of short SOLiD reads of another individual were mapped to shallow genome coverage of long Sanger or Roche 454 reads making up the reference sequence. The relative depth of SOLiD reads was used to filter out repeated sequences from single-copy sequences in the reference sequence. The second step was a search for SNPs between SOLiD reads and the reference sequence. Polymorphism within the mapped SOLiD reads would have precluded SNP discovery; hence both individuals had to be homozygous. The AGSNP pipeline was updated here for using SOLiD or other type of short reads of a heterozygous individual for these two principal steps. A total of 32.6X walnut genome equivalents of SOLiD reads of vegetatively propagated walnut scion cultivar ‘Chandler’ were mapped to 48,661 ‘Chandler’ bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) end sequences (BESs) produced by Sanger sequencing during the construction of a walnut physical map. A total of 22,799 putative SNPs were initially identified. A total of 6,000 Infinium II type SNPs evenly distributed along the walnut physical map were selected for the construction of an Infinium Bead

  5. RNASEL and MIR146A SNP-SNP Interaction as a Susceptibility Factor for Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farzan, Shohreh F.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Christensen, Brock C.; Li, Zhongze; Kuriger, Jacquelyn K.; Nelson, Heather H.

    2014-01-01

    Immunity and inflammatory pathways are important in the genesis of non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC). Functional genetic variation in immune modulators has the potential to affect disease etiology. We investigated associations between common variants in two key regulators, MIR146A and RNASEL, and their relation to NMSCs. Using a large population-based case-control study of basal cell (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), we investigated the impact of MIR146A SNP rs2910164 on cancer risk, and interaction with a SNP in one of its putative targets (RNASEL, rs486907). To examine associations between genotype and BCC and SCC, occurrence odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression, accounting for multiple confounding factors. We did not observe an overall change in the odds ratios for SCC or BCC among individuals carrying either of the RNASEL or MIR146A variants compared with those who were wild type at these loci. However, there was a sex-specific association between BCC and MIR146A in women (ORGC = 0.73, [95%CI = 0.52–1.03]; ORCC = 0.29, [95% CI = 0.14–0.61], p-trend<0.001), and a reduction in risk, albeit not statistically significant, associated with RNASEL and SCC in men (ORAG = 0.88, [95%CI = 0.65–1.19]; ORAA = 0.68, [95%CI = 0.43–1.08], p-trend = 0.10). Most striking was the strong interaction between the two genes. Among individuals carrying variant alleles of both rs2910164 and rs486907, we observed inverse relationships with SCC (ORSCC = 0.56, [95%CI = 0.38–0.81], p-interaction = 0.012) and BCC (ORBCC = 0.57, [95%CI = 0.40–0.80], p-interaction = 0.005). Our results suggest that genetic variation in immune and inflammatory regulators may influence susceptibility to NMSC, and novel SNP-SNP interaction for a microRNA and its target. These data suggest that RNASEL, an enzyme involved in RNA turnover, is controlled by miR-146a

  6. RNASEL and MIR146A SNP-SNP interaction as a susceptibility factor for non-melanoma skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Farzan, Shohreh F; Karagas, Margaret R; Christensen, Brock C; Li, Zhongze; Kuriger, Jacquelyn K; Nelson, Heather H

    2014-01-01

    Immunity and inflammatory pathways are important in the genesis of non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC). Functional genetic variation in immune modulators has the potential to affect disease etiology. We investigated associations between common variants in two key regulators, MIR146A and RNASEL, and their relation to NMSCs. Using a large population-based case-control study of basal cell (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), we investigated the impact of MIR146A SNP rs2910164 on cancer risk, and interaction with a SNP in one of its putative targets (RNASEL, rs486907). To examine associations between genotype and BCC and SCC, occurrence odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression, accounting for multiple confounding factors. We did not observe an overall change in the odds ratios for SCC or BCC among individuals carrying either of the RNASEL or MIR146A variants compared with those who were wild type at these loci. However, there was a sex-specific association between BCC and MIR146A in women (ORGC = 0.73, [95%CI = 0.52-1.03]; ORCC = 0.29, [95% CI = 0.14-0.61], p-trend<0.001), and a reduction in risk, albeit not statistically significant, associated with RNASEL and SCC in men (ORAG = 0.88, [95%CI = 0.65-1.19]; ORAA = 0.68, [95%CI = 0.43-1.08], p-trend = 0.10). Most striking was the strong interaction between the two genes. Among individuals carrying variant alleles of both rs2910164 and rs486907, we observed inverse relationships with SCC (ORSCC = 0.56, [95%CI = 0.38-0.81], p-interaction = 0.012) and BCC (ORBCC = 0.57, [95%CI = 0.40-0.80], p-interaction = 0.005). Our results suggest that genetic variation in immune and inflammatory regulators may influence susceptibility to NMSC, and novel SNP-SNP interaction for a microRNA and its target. These data suggest that RNASEL, an enzyme involved in RNA turnover, is controlled by miR-146a and may be important in NMSC etiology. PMID:24699816

  7. SNP Markers and Their Impact on Plant Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Mammadov, Jafar; Aggarwal, Rajat; Buyyarapu, Ramesh; Kumpatla, Siva

    2012-01-01

    The use of molecular markers has revolutionized the pace and precision of plant genetic analysis which in turn facilitated the implementation of molecular breeding of crops. The last three decades have seen tremendous advances in the evolution of marker systems and the respective detection platforms. Markers based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have rapidly gained the center stage of molecular genetics during the recent years due to their abundance in the genomes and their amenability for high-throughput detection formats and platforms. Computational approaches dominate SNP discovery methods due to the ever-increasing sequence information in public databases; however, complex genomes pose special challenges in the identification of informative SNPs warranting alternative strategies in those crops. Many genotyping platforms and chemistries have become available making the use of SNPs even more attractive and efficient. This paper provides a review of historical and current efforts in the development, validation, and application of SNP markers in QTL/gene discovery and plant breeding by discussing key experimental strategies and cases exemplifying their impact. PMID:23316221

  8. Eigenanalysis of SNP data with an identity by descent interpretation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiuwen; Weir, Bruce S

    2016-02-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is widely used in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and the principal component axes often represent perpendicular gradients in geographic space. The explanation of PCA results is of major interest for geneticists to understand fundamental demographic parameters. Here, we provide an interpretation of PCA based on relatedness measures, which are described by the probability that sets of genes are identical-by-descent (IBD). An approximately linear transformation between ancestral proportions (AP) of individuals with multiple ancestries and their projections onto the principal components is found. In addition, a new method of eigenanalysis "EIGMIX" is proposed to estimate individual ancestries. EIGMIX is a method of moments with computational efficiency suitable for millions of SNP data, and it is not subject to the assumption of linkage equilibrium. With the assumptions of multiple ancestries and their surrogate ancestral samples, EIGMIX is able to infer ancestral proportions (APs) of individuals. The methods were applied to the SNP data from the HapMap Phase 3 project and the Human Genome Diversity Panel. The APs of individuals inferred by EIGMIX are consistent with the findings of the program ADMIXTURE. In conclusion, EIGMIX can be used to detect population structure and estimate genome-wide ancestral proportions with a relatively high accuracy. PMID:26482676

  9. Vascular smooth muscle-specific deletion of the leptin receptor attenuates leptin-induced alterations in vascular relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Michael J; Coleman, T Taylor; Sasser, Jennifer M; Pittman, Katarina M; Hankins, Michael W; Stec, David E

    2016-05-15

    Obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is associated with increased plasma levels of the adipose-derived hormone leptin. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) express leptin receptors (LepR); however, their physiological role is unclear. We hypothesized that leptin, at levels to mimic morbid obesity, impairs vascular relaxation. To test this, we used control and VSM-LepR knockout mice (VSM-LepR KO) created with a tamoxifen-inducible specific Cre recombinase to delete the LepR gene in VSMC. Control (10-12 wk old) and VSM-LepR KO (10-12 wk old) mice were fed a diet containing tamoxifen (50 mg/kg) for 6 wk, after which vascular reactivity was studied in isolated carotid arteries using an organ chamber bath. Vessels were incubated with leptin (100 ng/ml) or vehicle (0.1 mM Tris·HCl) for 30 min. Leptin treatment resulted in significant impairment of vessel relaxation to the endothelial-specific agonist acetylcholine (ACh). When these experiments were repeated in the presence of the superoxide scavenger tempol, relaxation responses to ACh were restored. VSM-LepR deletion resulted in a significant attenuation of leptin-mediated impaired ACh-induced relaxation. These data show that leptin directly impairs vascular relaxation via a VSM-LepR-mediated mechanism, suggesting a potential pathogenic role for leptin to increase cardiovascular risk during obesity. PMID:26936780

  10. SNP-SNP Interaction between TLR4 and MyD88 in Susceptibility to Coronary Artery Disease in the Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dandan; Sun, Liping; Xu, Qian; Gong, Yuehua; Wang, Honghu; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)-dependent signaling pathway plays a role in the initiation and progression of coronary artery disease (CAD). We investigated SNP–SNP interactions between the TLR4 and MyD88 genes in CAD susceptibility and assessed whether the effects of such interactions were modified by confounding risk factors (hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection). Participants with CAD (n = 424) and controls (n = 424) without CAD were enrolled. Polymerase chain restriction-restriction fragment length polymorphism was performed on genomic DNA to detect polymorphisms in TLR4 (rs10116253, rs10983755, and rs11536889) and MyD88 (rs7744). H. pylori infections were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and the cardiovascular risk factors for each subject were evaluated clinically. The significant interaction between TLR4 rs11536889 and MyD88 rs7744 was associated with an increased CAD risk (p value for interaction = 0.024). In conditions of hyperglycemia, the interaction effect was strengthened between TLR4 rs11536889 and MyD88 rs7744 (p value for interaction = 0.004). In hyperlipidemic participants, the interaction strength was also enhanced for TLR4 rs11536889 and MyD88 rs7744 (p value for interaction = 0.006). Thus, the novel interaction between TLR4 rs11536889 and MyD88 rs7744 was related with an increased risk of CAD, that could be strengthened by the presence of hyperglycemia or hyperlipidemia. PMID:26959040

  11. FunctSNP: an R package to link SNPs to functional knowledge and dbAutoMaker: a suite of Perl scripts to build SNP databases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Whole genome association studies using highly dense single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are a set of methods to identify DNA markers associated with variation in a particular complex trait of interest. One of the main outcomes from these studies is a subset of statistically significant SNPs. Finding the potential biological functions of such SNPs can be an important step towards further use in human and agricultural populations (e.g., for identifying genes related to susceptibility to complex diseases or genes playing key roles in development or performance). The current challenge is that the information holding the clues to SNP functions is distributed across many different databases. Efficient bioinformatics tools are therefore needed to seamlessly integrate up-to-date functional information on SNPs. Many web services have arisen to meet the challenge but most work only within the framework of human medical research. Although we acknowledge the importance of human research, we identify there is a need for SNP annotation tools for other organisms. Description We introduce an R package called FunctSNP, which is the user interface to custom built species-specific databases. The local relational databases contain SNP data together with functional annotations extracted from online resources. FunctSNP provides a unified bioinformatics resource to link SNPs with functional knowledge (e.g., genes, pathways, ontologies). We also introduce dbAutoMaker, a suite of Perl scripts, which can be scheduled to run periodically to automatically create/update the customised SNP databases. We illustrate the use of FunctSNP with a livestock example, but the approach and software tools presented here can be applied also to human and other organisms. Conclusions Finding the potential functional significance of SNPs is important when further using the outcomes from whole genome association studies. FunctSNP is unique in that it is the only R package that links SNPs to

  12. SNP Discovery for mapping alien introgressions in wheat

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Monitoring alien introgressions in crop plants is difficult due to the lack of genetic and molecular mapping information on the wild crop relatives. The tertiary gene pool of wheat is a very important source of genetic variability for wheat improvement against biotic and abiotic stresses. By exploring the 5Mg short arm (5MgS) of Aegilops geniculata, we can apply chromosome genomics for the discovery of SNP markers and their use for monitoring alien introgressions in wheat (Triticum aestivum L). Results The short arm of chromosome 5Mg of Ae. geniculata Roth (syn. Ae. ovata L.; 2n = 4x = 28, UgUgMgMg) was flow-sorted from a wheat line in which it is maintained as a telocentric chromosome. DNA of the sorted arm was amplified and sequenced using an Illumina Hiseq 2000 with ~45x coverage. The sequence data was used for SNP discovery against wheat homoeologous group-5 assemblies. A total of 2,178 unique, 5MgS-specific SNPs were discovered. Randomly selected samples of 59 5MgS-specific SNPs were tested (44 by KASPar assay and 15 by Sanger sequencing) and 84% were validated. Of the selected SNPs, 97% mapped to a chromosome 5Mg addition to wheat (the source of t5MgS), and 94% to 5Mg introgressed from a different accession of Ae. geniculata substituting for chromosome 5D of wheat. The validated SNPs also identified chromosome segments of 5MgS origin in a set of T5D-5Mg translocation lines; eight SNPs (25%) mapped to TA5601 [T5DL · 5DS-5MgS(0.75)] and three (8%) to TA5602 [T5DL · 5DS-5MgS (0.95)]. SNPs (gsnp_5ms83 and gsnp_5ms94), tagging chromosome T5DL · 5DS-5MgS(0.95) with the smallest introgression carrying resistance to leaf rust (Lr57) and stripe rust (Yr40), were validated in two released germplasm lines with Lr57 and Yr40 genes. Conclusion This approach should be widely applicable for the identification of species/genome-specific SNPs. The development of a large number of SNP markers will facilitate the precise introgression and

  13. Molecular characterization, tissue expression profile and SNP analysis of porcine GLP2R.

    PubMed

    Chai, Y L; Ma, H M; Jiang, J

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 receptor (GLP2R), a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor family, plays an important role in intramuscular fat formation. Little is known, however, about porcine GLP2R. In the present study, GLP2R was cloned, and its expression in pig muscle characterized. By rapid amplification of cDNA ends, gene sequence was obtained from Shaziling pigs. Full-length cDNA was 1868 bp, including an open reading frame 1665 bp in length, encoding 554 amino acids, and 203 bp at the 3' end. The GLP2R homology between porcine and other species was performed using bioinformatics techniques to construct a phylogenetic tree. Porcine GLP2R was most closely related to those from Orcinus orca and Ovis aries, and most distantly related to those from Chrysemys picta, Taeniopygia guttata, and Falco peregrinus. Real-time PCR analysis showed expression of porcine GLP2R in 10 different tissues from 25-day-old Yorkshire and Shaziling piglets, with expression levels being highest in the longissimus dorsi muscle and lowest in kidney. For each pig breed, expression level in longissimus dorsi muscle was highest among ten tissues (P < 0.05). Between the two breeds, GLP2R expression levels were significant in pancreas, the crureus and longissimus dorsi muscles (P < 0.05). A single SNP of porcine GLP2R, A343G, was identified, and genotypes were determined by PCR-RFLP. This study provides an insight into the function of GLP2R in swine. PMID:26505446

  14. Identification of SNP barcode biomarkers for genes associated with facial emotion perception using particle swarm optimization algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Facial emotion perception (FEP) can affect social function. We previously reported that parts of five tested single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MET and AKT1 genes may individually affect FEP performance. However, the effects of SNP-SNP interactions on FEP performance remain unclear. Methods This study compared patients with high and low FEP performances (n = 89 and 93, respectively). A particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm was used to identify the best SNP barcodes (i.e., the SNP combinations and genotypes that revealed the largest differences between the high and low FEP groups). Results The analyses of individual SNPs showed no significant differences between the high and low FEP groups. However, comparisons of multiple SNP-SNP interactions involving different combinations of two to five SNPs showed that the best PSO-generated SNP barcodes were significantly associated with high FEP score. The analyses of the joint effects of the best SNP barcodes for two to five interacting SNPs also showed that the best SNP barcodes had significantly higher odds ratios (2.119 to 3.138; P < 0.05) compared to other SNP barcodes. In conclusion, the proposed PSO algorithm effectively identifies the best SNP barcodes that have the strongest associations with FEP performance. Conclusions This study also proposes a computational methodology for analyzing complex SNP-SNP interactions in social cognition domains such as recognition of facial emotion. PMID:24955105

  15. A new SNP panel for evaluating genetic diversity in a composite cattle breed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A custom 60K SNP panel, extracted from Bovine HD SNP chip was used to evaluate genotypic frequency changes in Braford (BF, a composite breed) when compared to progenitor breeds: Hereford (HF), Brahman (BR), and Nelore (NE). Samples from both the U. S. and Brazil were used. The new panel differentiat...

  16. A Coordinated Approach to Peach SNP Discovery in RosBREED

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the USDA-funded multi-institutional and trans-disciplinary project, “RosBREED”, crop-specific SNP genome scan platforms are being developed for peach, apple, strawberry, and cherry at a resolution of at least one polymorphic SNP marker every 5 cM in any random cross, for use in Pedigree-Based Ana...

  17. A genome-wide SNP panel for genetic diversity, mapping and breeding studies in rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genome-wide SNP resource was developed for rice using the GoldenGate assay and used to genotype 400 landrace accessions of O. sativa. SNPs were originally discovered using Perlegen re-sequencing technology in 20 diverse landraces of O. sativa as part of OryzaSNP project (http://irfgc.irri.org). An...

  18. Characterization of the Cattle HapMap Population using the Illumina Bovine-50K SNP Chip

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Bovine 50K Illumina™ iSelect SNP chip (51,386 polymorphic SNP markers) was designed using a combination of publicly available SNPs along with highly informative novel SNPs discovered using a reduced representation and next-generation sequencing technology strategy. A total of 576 animals (426 mal...

  19. Strategies to build high-density linkage maps of the porcine 60k SNP chip

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present here two different strategies to compute high-density linkage maps based on the porcine 60k SNP chip that was genotyped on 4 different pedigrees with a total of 5600 animals. The first strategy uses the draft sequence as a reference order, the SNP being first mapped to it. The second stra...

  20. Development and Applications of a Bovine 50,000 SNP Chip

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To develop an Illumina iSelect high density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay for cattle, the collaborative iBMC (Illumina, USDA ARS Beltsville, University of Missouri, USDA ARS Clay Center) Consortium first performed a de novo SNP discovery project in which genomic reduced representation l...

  1. The development and characterization of a 60K SNP chip for chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In livestock species like the chicken, high throughput SNP genotyping assays are increasingly being used for whole genome association studies and as a tool in breeding (referred to as genomic selection). We describe the design of a moderate density (60K) Illumina SNP BeadChip in chicken consisting o...

  2. SNP discovery and allele frequency estimation by deep sequencing of reduced representation libraries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome projects routinely produce draft sequences for species from diverse evolutionary clades, but generally do not create single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) resources. We present an approach for de novo SNP discovery based on short-read sequencing of reduced representation libraries (RRL) to ge...

  3. SNP-VISTA: An Interactive SNPs Visualization Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Nameeta; Teplitsky, Michael V.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Hamann, Bernd; Dubchak, Inna L.

    2005-07-05

    Recent advances in sequencing technologies promise better diagnostics for many diseases as well as better understanding of evolution of microbial populations. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms(SNPs) are established genetic markers that aid in the identification of loci affecting quantitative traits and/or disease in a wide variety of eukaryotic species. With today's technological capabilities, it is possible to re-sequence a large set of appropriate candidate genes in individuals with a given disease and then screen for causative mutations.In addition, SNPs have been used extensively in efforts to study the evolution of microbial populations, and the recent application of random shotgun sequencing to environmental samples makes possible more extensive SNP analysis of co-occurring and co-evolving microbial populations. The program is available at http://genome.lbl.gov/vista/snpvista.

  4. SNP and haplotype mapping for genetic analysis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Saar, Kathrin; Beck, Alfred; Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Birney, Ewan; Brocklebank, Denise; Chen, Yuan; Cuppen, Edwin; Demonchy, Stephanie; Dopazo, Joaquin; Flicek, Paul; Foglio, Mario; Fujiyama, Asao; Gut, Ivo G; Gauguier, Dominique; Guigo, Roderic; Guryev, Victor; Heinig, Matthias; Hummel, Oliver; Jahn, Niels; Klages, Sven; Kren, Vladimir; Kube, Michael; Kuhl, Heiner; Kuramoto, Takashi; Kuroki, Yoko; Lechner, Doris; Lee, Young-Ae; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Lathrop, G Mark; Mashimo, Tomoji; Medina, Ignacio; Mott, Richard; Patone, Giannino; Perrier-Cornet, Jeanne-Antide; Platzer, Matthias; Pravenec, Michal; Reinhardt, Richard; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Schilhabel, Markus; Schulz, Herbert; Serikawa, Tadao; Shikhagaie, Medya; Tatsumoto, Shouji; Taudien, Stefan; Toyoda, Atsushi; Voigt, Birger; Zelenika, Diana; Zimdahl, Heike; Hubner, Norbert

    2008-05-01

    The laboratory rat is one of the most extensively studied model organisms. Inbred laboratory rat strains originated from limited Rattus norvegicus founder populations, and the inherited genetic variation provides an excellent resource for the correlation of genotype to phenotype. Here, we report a survey of genetic variation based on almost 3 million newly identified SNPs. We obtained accurate and complete genotypes for a subset of 20,238 SNPs across 167 distinct inbred rat strains, two rat recombinant inbred panels and an F2 intercross. Using 81% of these SNPs, we constructed high-density genetic maps, creating a large dataset of fully characterized SNPs for disease gene mapping. Our data characterize the population structure and illustrate the degree of linkage disequilibrium. We provide a detailed SNP map and demonstrate its utility for mapping of quantitative trait loci. This community resource is openly available and augments the genetic tools for this workhorse of physiological studies. PMID:18443594

  5. TcSNP: a database of genetic variation in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Alejandro A.; Carmona, Santiago J.; Agüero, Fernán

    2009-01-01

    The TcSNP database (http://snps.tcruzi.org) integrates information on genetic variation (polymorphisms and mutations) for different stocks, strains and isolates of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. The database incorporates sequences (genes from the T. cruzi reference genome, mRNAs, ESTs and genomic sequences); multiple sequence alignments obtained from these sequences; and single-nucleotide polymorphisms and small indels identified by scanning these multiple sequence alignments. Information in TcSNP can be readily interrogated to arrive at gene sets, or SNP sets of interest based on a number of attributes. Sequence similarity searches using BLAST are also supported. This first release of TcSNP contains nearly 170 000 high-confidence candidate SNPs, derived from the analysis of annotated coding sequences. As new sequence data become available, TcSNP will incorporate these data, mapping new candidate SNPs onto the reference genome sequences. PMID:18974180

  6. Genotyping NAT2 with only two SNPs (rs1041983 and rs1801280) outperforms the tagging SNP rs1495741 and is equivalent to the conventional 7-SNP NAT2 genotype.

    PubMed

    Selinski, Silvia; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Lehmann, Marie-Louise; Ovsiannikov, Daniel; Moormann, Oliver; Guballa, Christoph; Kress, Alexander; Truss, Michael C; Gerullis, Holger; Otto, Thomas; Barski, Dimitri; Niegisch, Günter; Albers, Peter; Frees, Sebastian; Brenner, Walburgis; Thüroff, Joachim W; Angeli-Greaves, Miriam; Seidel, Thilo; Roth, Gerhard; Dietrich, Holger; Ebbinghaus, Rainer; Prager, Hans M; Bolt, Hermann M; Falkenstein, Michael; Zimmermann, Anna; Klein, Torsten; Reckwitz, Thomas; Roemer, Hermann C; Löhlein, Dietrich; Weistenhöfer, Wobbeke; Schöps, Wolfgang; Hassan Rizvi, Syed Adibul; Aslam, Muhammad; Bánfi, Gergely; Romics, Imre; Steffens, Michael; Ekici, Arif B; Winterpacht, Andreas; Ickstadt, Katja; Schwender, Holger; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2011-10-01

    Genotyping N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) is of high relevance for individualized dosing of antituberculosis drugs and bladder cancer epidemiology. In this study we compared a recently published tagging single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (rs1495741) to the conventional 7-SNP genotype (G191A, C282T, T341C, C481T, G590A, A803G and G857A haplotype pairs) and systematically analysed if novel SNP combinations outperform the latter. For this purpose, we studied 3177 individuals by PCR and phenotyped 344 individuals by the caffeine test. Although the tagSNP and the 7-SNP genotype showed a high degree of correlation (R=0.933, P<0.0001) the 7-SNP genotype nevertheless outperformed the tagging SNP with respect to specificity (1.0 vs. 0.9444, P=0.0065). Considering all possible SNP combinations in a receiver operating characteristic analysis we identified a 2-SNP genotype (C282T, T341C) that outperformed the tagging SNP and was equivalent to the 7-SNP genotype. The 2-SNP genotype predicted the correct phenotype with a sensitivity of 0.8643 and a specificity of 1.0. In addition, it predicted the 7-SNP genotype with sensitivity and specificity of 0.9993 and 0.9880, respectively. The prediction of the NAT2 genotype by the 2-SNP genotype performed similar in populations of Caucasian, Venezuelan and Pakistani background. A 2-SNP genotype predicts NAT2 phenotypes with similar sensitivity and specificity as the conventional 7-SNP genotype. This procedure represents a facilitation in individualized dosing of NAT2 substrates without losing sensitivity or specificity. PMID:21750470

  7. Design and Characterization of a 52K SNP Chip for Goats

    PubMed Central

    Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola; Bardou, Philippe; Bouchez, Olivier; Cabau, Cédric; Crooijmans, Richard; Dong, Yang; Donnadieu-Tonon, Cécile; Eggen, André; Heuven, Henri C. M.; Jamli, Saadiah; Jiken, Abdullah Johari; Klopp, Christophe; Lawley, Cynthia T.; McEwan, John; Martin, Patrice; Moreno, Carole R.; Mulsant, Philippe; Nabihoudine, Ibouniyamine; Pailhoux, Eric; Palhière, Isabelle; Rupp, Rachel; Sarry, Julien; Sayre, Brian L.; Tircazes, Aurélie; Jun Wang; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Wenguang

    2014-01-01

    The success of Genome Wide Association Studies in the discovery of sequence variation linked to complex traits in humans has increased interest in high throughput SNP genotyping assays in livestock species. Primary goals are QTL detection and genomic selection. The purpose here was design of a 50–60,000 SNP chip for goats. The success of a moderate density SNP assay depends on reliable bioinformatic SNP detection procedures, the technological success rate of the SNP design, even spacing of SNPs on the genome and selection of Minor Allele Frequencies (MAF) suitable to use in diverse breeds. Through the federation of three SNP discovery projects consolidated as the International Goat Genome Consortium, we have identified approximately twelve million high quality SNP variants in the goat genome stored in a database together with their biological and technical characteristics. These SNPs were identified within and between six breeds (meat, milk and mixed): Alpine, Boer, Creole, Katjang, Saanen and Savanna, comprising a total of 97 animals. Whole genome and Reduced Representation Library sequences were aligned on >10 kb scaffolds of the de novo goat genome assembly. The 60,000 selected SNPs, evenly spaced on the goat genome, were submitted for oligo manufacturing (Illumina, Inc) and published in dbSNP along with flanking sequences and map position on goat assemblies (i.e. scaffolds and pseudo-chromosomes), sheep genome V2 and cattle UMD3.1 assembly. Ten breeds were then used to validate the SNP content and 52,295 loci could be successfully genotyped and used to generate a final cluster file. The combined strategy of using mainly whole genome Next Generation Sequencing and mapping on a contig genome assembly, complemented with Illumina design tools proved to be efficient in producing this GoatSNP50 chip. Advances in use of molecular markers are expected to accelerate goat genomic studies in coming years. PMID:24465974

  8. Relationship Between Leptin G2548A and Leptin Receptor Q223R Gene Polymorphisms and Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome Risk in Tunisian Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Boumaiza, Imen; Omezzine, Asma; Rejeb, Jihène; Rebhi, Lamia; Ouedrani, Amani; Ben Rejeb, Nabila; Nabli, Naoufel; Ben Abdelaziz, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Leptin is a key hormone of weight regulation that modulates food intake. Since the elaboration of the leptin action mechanism, several studies tried to establish the relationship between obesity and the common polymorphisms of leptin (LEP) and leptin receptor (LEPR) genes, but results were controversial. We studied the association of G2548A of the LEP gene and Q223R of LEPR gene polymorphisms with obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS). We recruited 169 nonobese volunteers (body mass index [BMI] <30 kg/m2) and 160 obese ones (BMI ≥30 kg/m2). Glucose, insulin, and lipids were measured. BMI, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and daily energy intake were calculated. After adjustment to confounders parameters, 2548AA was found to increase the MetS (p=0.043) and obesity risk (p=0.019) in the studied population. After stratification according to the degree of obesity, the odds ratio [OR] of 2548AA was associated with moderate obesity (p=0.048) and morbid obesity (p=0.048). The LEPR 223RR genotype was associated with obesity in the studied population (OR=1.74, p=0.037) and only in the overweight (OR=1.8, p=0.049). Subjects with 2548AA had significantly higher BMI, daily energy intake, total cholesterol (TC), waist circumference (WC), insulinemia, and low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. With regard to 223RR, we noted a significantly higher daily energy intake, BMI, TC, glycemia, insulinemia, HOMA-IR index, and low HDL-C levels. Haplotype model AR (2548A+223R) and AQ (2548A+223Q) increased the risk of obesity (OR=3.36, p<0.001; OR=2.56, p=0.010, respectively). When we added daily energy intake in adjustment, these significant associations disappeared. In addition, the AR and AQ increased the MetS risk. This significant association persisted after we had added daily energy intake in adjustment. This study showed that LEP G2548A and LEPR Q223R polymorphisms and haplotype combination were associated with MetS and obesity risk

  9. A Customized Pigmentation SNP Array Identifies a Novel SNP Associated with Melanoma Predisposition in the SLC45A2 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Santos; Boyano, M. Dolores; Peña-Chilet, Maria; Pita, Guillermo; Aviles, Jose A.; Mayor, Matias; Gomez-Fernandez, Cristina; Casado, Beatriz; Martin-Gonzalez, Manuel; Izagirre, Neskuts; De la Rua, Concepcion; Asumendi, Aintzane; Perez-Yarza, Gorka; Arroyo-Berdugo, Yoana; Boldo, Enrique; Lozoya, Rafael; Torrijos-Aguilar, Arantxa; Pitarch, Ana; Pitarch, Gerard; Sanchez-Motilla, Jose M.; Valcuende-Cavero, Francisca; Tomas-Cabedo, Gloria; Perez-Pastor, Gemma; Diaz-Perez, Jose L.; Gardeazabal, Jesus; de Lizarduy, Iñigo Martinez; Sanchez-Diez, Ana; Valdes, Carlos; Pizarro, Angel; Casado, Mariano; Carretero, Gregorio; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Nagore, Eduardo; Lazaro, Pablo; Lluch, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Martinez-Cadenas, Conrado; Ribas, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    As the incidence of Malignant Melanoma (MM) reflects an interaction between skin colour and UV exposure, variations in genes implicated in pigmentation and tanning response to UV may be associated with susceptibility to MM. In this study, 363 SNPs in 65 gene regions belonging to the pigmentation pathway have been successfully genotyped using a SNP array. Five hundred and ninety MM cases and 507 controls were analyzed in a discovery phase I. Ten candidate SNPs based on a p-value threshold of 0.01 were identified. Two of them, rs35414 (SLC45A2) and rs2069398 (SILV/CKD2), were statistically significant after conservative Bonferroni correction. The best six SNPs were further tested in an independent Spanish series (624 MM cases and 789 controls). A novel SNP located on the SLC45A2 gene (rs35414) was found to be significantly associated with melanoma in both phase I and phase II (P<0.0001). None of the other five SNPs were replicated in this second phase of the study. However, three SNPs in TYR, SILV/CDK2 and ADAMTS20 genes (rs17793678, rs2069398 and rs1510521 respectively) had an overall p-value<0.05 when considering the whole DNA collection (1214 MM cases and 1296 controls). Both the SLC45A2 and the SILV/CDK2 variants behave as protective alleles, while the TYR and ADAMTS20 variants seem to function as risk alleles. Cumulative effects were detected when these four variants were considered together. Furthermore, individuals carrying two or more mutations in MC1R, a well-known low penetrance melanoma-predisposing gene, had a decreased MM risk if concurrently bearing the SLC45A2 protective variant. To our knowledge, this is the largest study on Spanish sporadic MM cases to date. PMID:21559390

  10. Identification, validation and survey of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associated with pungency in Capsicum spp.

    PubMed

    Garcés-Claver, Ana; Fellman, Shanna Moore; Gil-Ortega, Ramiro; Jahn, Molly; Arnedo-Andrés, María S

    2007-11-01

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associated with pungency was detected within an expressed sequence tag (EST) of 307 bp. This fragment was identified after expression analysis of the EST clone SB2-66 in placenta tissue of Capsicum fruits. Sequence alignments corresponding to this new fragment allowed us to identify an SNP between pungent and non-pungent accessions. Two methods were chosen for the development of the SNP marker linked to pungency: tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system-PCR (tetra-primer ARMS-PCR) and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence. Results showed that both methods were successful in distinguishing genotypes. Nevertheless, tetra-primer ARMS-PCR was chosen for SNP genotyping because it was more rapid, reliable and less cost-effective. The utility of this SNP marker for pungency was demonstrated by the ability to distinguish between 29 pungent and non-pungent cultivars of Capsicum annuum. In addition, the SNP was also associated with phenotypic pungent character in the tested genotypes of C. chinense, C. baccatum, C. frutescens, C. galapagoense, C. eximium, C. tovarii and C. cardenasi. This SNP marker is a faster, cheaper and more reproducible method for identifying pungent peppers than other techniques such as panel tasting, and allows rapid screening of the trait in early growth stages. PMID:17882396

  11. Nuclear receptor coregulator SNP discovery and impact on breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Coregulator proteins are "master regulators", directing transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of many target genes, and are critical in many normal physiological processes, but also in hormone driven diseases, such as breast cancer. Little is known on how genetic changes in these genes impact disease development and progression. Thus, we set out to identify novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within SRC-1 (NCoA1), SRC-3 (NCoA3, AIB1), NCoR (NCoR1), and SMRT (NCoR2), and test the most promising SNPs for associations with breast cancer risk. Methods The identification of novel SNPs was accomplished by sequencing the coding regions of these genes in 96 apparently normal individuals (48 Caucasian Americans, 48 African Americans). To assess their association with breast cancer risk, five SNPs were genotyped in 1218 familial BRCA1/2-mutation negative breast cancer cases and 1509 controls (rs1804645, rs6094752, rs2230782, rs2076546, rs2229840). Results Through our resequencing effort, we identified 74 novel SNPs (30 in NCoR, 32 in SMRT, 10 in SRC-3, and 2 in SRC-1). Of these, 8 were found with minor allele frequency (MAF) >5% illustrating the large amount of genetic diversity yet to be discovered. The previously shown protective effect of rs2230782 in SRC-3 was strengthened (OR = 0.45 [0.21-0.98], p = 0.04). No significant associations were found with the other SNPs genotyped. Conclusions This data illustrates the importance of coregulators, especially SRC-3, in breast cancer development and suggests that more focused studies, including functional analyses, should be conducted. PMID:20003447

  12. A system for exact and approximate genetic linkage analysis of SNP data in large pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Silberstein, Mark; Weissbrod, Omer; Otten, Lars; Tzemach, Anna; Anisenia, Andrei; Shtark, Oren; Tuberg, Dvir; Galfrin, Eddie; Gannon, Irena; Shalata, Adel; Borochowitz, Zvi U.; Dechter, Rina; Thompson, Elizabeth; Geiger, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: The use of dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data in genetic linkage analysis of large pedigrees is impeded by significant technical, methodological and computational challenges. Here we describe Superlink-Online SNP, a new powerful online system that streamlines the linkage analysis of SNP data. It features a fully integrated flexible processing workflow comprising both well-known and novel data analysis tools, including SNP clustering, erroneous data filtering, exact and approximate LOD calculations and maximum-likelihood haplotyping. The system draws its power from thousands of CPUs, performing data analysis tasks orders of magnitude faster than a single computer. By providing an intuitive interface to sophisticated state-of-the-art analysis tools coupled with high computing capacity, Superlink-Online SNP helps geneticists unleash the potential of SNP data for detecting disease genes. Results: Computations performed by Superlink-Online SNP are automatically parallelized using novel paradigms, and executed on unlimited number of private or public CPUs. One novel service is large-scale approximate Markov Chain–Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis. The accuracy of the results is reliably estimated by running the same computation on multiple CPUs and evaluating the Gelman–Rubin Score to set aside unreliable results. Another service within the workflow is a novel parallelized exact algorithm for inferring maximum-likelihood haplotyping. The reported system enables genetic analyses that were previously infeasible. We demonstrate the system capabilities through a study of a large complex pedigree affected with metabolic syndrome. Availability: Superlink-Online SNP is freely available for researchers at http://cbl-hap.cs.technion.ac.il/superlink-snp. The system source code can also be downloaded from the system website. Contact: omerw@cs.technion.ac.il Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23162081

  13. Drug-SNPing: an integrated drug-based, protein interaction-based tagSNP-based pharmacogenomics platform for SNP genotyping.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Cheng, Yu-Huei; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2013-03-15

    Many drug or single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-related resources and tools have been developed, but connecting and integrating them is still a challenge. Here, we describe a user-friendly web-based software package, named Drug-SNPing, which provides a platform for the integration of drug information (DrugBank and PharmGKB), protein-protein interactions (STRING), tagSNP selection (HapMap) and genotyping information (dbSNP, REBASE and SNP500Cancer). DrugBank-based inputs include the following: (i) common name of the drug, (ii) synonym or drug brand name, (iii) gene name (HUGO) and (iv) keywords. PharmGKB-based inputs include the following: (i) gene name (HUGO), (ii) drug name and (iii) disease-related keywords. The output provides drug-related information, metabolizing enzymes and drug targets, as well as protein-protein interaction data. Importantly, tagSNPs of the selected genes are retrieved for genotyping analyses. All drug-based and protein-protein interaction-based SNP genotyping information are provided with PCR-RFLP (PCR-restriction enzyme length polymorphism) and TaqMan probes. Thus, users can enter any drug keywords/brand names to obtain immediate information that is highly relevant to genotyping for pharmacogenomics research. PMID:23418190

  14. Conditional knockout of the leptin receptor in the colonic epithelium revealed the local effects of leptin receptor signaling in the progression of colonic tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Higurashi, Takuma; Endo, Hiroki; Uchiyama, Takashi; Uchiyama, Shiori; Yamada, Eiji; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Sakai, Eiji; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Maeda, Shin; Wada, Koichiro; Natsumeda, Yutaka; Hippo, Yoshitaka; Nakajima, Atsushi; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2014-09-01

    Leptin, secreted by the adipose tissue and known to be related to obesity, is considered to be involved in the onset and progression of colorectal cancer. However, the exact role of leptin in colorectal carcinogenesis is still unclear, as several controversial reports have been published on the various systemic effects of leptin. The aim of this study was to clarify the local and precise roles of leptin receptor (LEPR)-mediated signaling in colonic carcinogenesis using intestinal epithelium-specific LEPRb conditional knockout (cKO) mice. We produced and used colonic epithelium-specific LEPRb cKO mice to investigate the carcinogen-induced formation of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and tumors in the colon, using their littermates as control. There were no differences in the body weight or systemic condition between the control and cKO mice. The tumor sizes and number of large-sized tumors were significantly lower in the cKO mice as compared with those in the control mice. On the other hand, there was no significant difference in the proliferative activity of the normal colonic epithelial cells or ACF formation between the control and cKO mice. In the control mice, marked increase of the LEPRb expression level was observed in the colonic tumors as compared with that in the normal epithelium; furthermore, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3) was activated in the tumor cells. These findings suggest that STAT3 is one of the important molecules downstream of LEPRb, and LEPRb/STAT3 signaling controls tumor cell proliferation. We demonstrated the importance of local/regional LEPR-mediated signaling in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:24958593

  15. SNP Markers as Additional Information to Resolve Complex Kinship Cases

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, M. Lurdes; Fondevila, Manuel; Laréu, Maria Victoria; Medeiros, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background DNA profiling with sets of highly polymorphic autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) markers has been applied in various aspects of human identification in forensic casework for nearly 20 years. However, in some cases of complex kinship investigation, the information provided by the conventionally used STR markers is not enough, often resulting in low likelihood ratio (LR) calculations. In these cases, it becomes necessary to increment the number of loci under analysis to reach adequate LRs. Recently, it has been proposed that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could be used as a supportive tool to STR typing, eventually even replacing the methods/markers now employed. Methods In this work, we describe the results obtained in 7 revised complex paternity cases when applying a battery of STRs, as well as 52 human identification SNPs (SNPforID 52plex identification panel) using a SNaPshot methodology followed by capillary electrophoresis. Results Our results show that the analysis of SNPs, as complement to STR typing in forensic casework applications, would at least increase by a factor of 4 total PI values and correspondent Essen-Möller's W value. Conclusions We demonstrated that SNP genotyping could be a key complement to STR information in challenging casework of disputed paternity, such as close relative individualization or complex pedigrees subject to endogamous relations. PMID:26733770

  16. Porcine colonization of the Americas: a 60k SNP story

    PubMed Central

    Burgos-Paz, W; Souza, C A; Megens, H J; Ramayo-Caldas, Y; Melo, M; Lemús-Flores, C; Caal, E; Soto, H W; Martínez, R; Álvarez, L A; Aguirre, L; Iñiguez, V; Revidatti, M A; Martínez-López, O R; Llambi, S; Esteve-Codina, A; Rodríguez, M C; Crooijmans, R P M A; Paiva, S R; Schook, L B; Groenen, M A M; Pérez-Enciso, M

    2013-01-01

    The pig, Sus scrofa, is a foreign species to the American continent. Although pigs originally introduced in the Americas should be related to those from the Iberian Peninsula and Canary islands, the phylogeny of current creole pigs that now populate the continent is likely to be very complex. Because of the extreme climates that America harbors, these populations also provide a unique example of a fast evolutionary phenomenon of adaptation. Here, we provide a genome wide study of these issues by genotyping, with a 60k SNP chip, 206 village pigs sampled across 14 countries and 183 pigs from outgroup breeds that are potential founders of the American populations, including wild boar, Iberian, international and Chinese breeds. Results show that American village pigs are primarily of European ancestry, although the observed genetic landscape is that of a complex conglomerate. There was no correlation between genetic and geographical distances, neither continent wide nor when analyzing specific areas. Most populations showed a clear admixed structure where the Iberian pig was not necessarily the main component, illustrating how international breeds, but also Chinese pigs, have contributed to extant genetic composition of American village pigs. We also observe that many genes related to the cardiovascular system show an increased differentiation between altiplano and genetically related pigs living near sea level. PMID:23250008

  17. Sturgeon conservation genomics: SNP discovery and validation using RAD sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ogden, R; Gharbi, K; Mugue, N; Martinsohn, J; Senn, H; Davey, J W; Pourkazemi, M; McEwing, R; Eland, C; Vidotto, M; Sergeev, A; Congiu, L

    2013-06-01

    Caviar-producing sturgeons belonging to the genus Acipenser are considered to be one of the most endangered species groups in the world. Continued overfishing in spite of increasing legislation, zero catch quotas and extensive aquaculture production have led to the collapse of wild stocks across Europe and Asia. The evolutionary relationships among Adriatic, Russian, Persian and Siberian sturgeons are complex because of past introgression events and remain poorly understood. Conservation management, traceability and enforcement suffer a lack of appropriate DNA markers for the genetic identification of sturgeon at the species, population and individual level. This study employed RAD sequencing to discover and characterize single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) DNA markers for use in sturgeon conservation in these four tetraploid species over three biological levels, using a single sequencing lane. Four population meta-samples and eight individual samples from one family were barcoded separately before sequencing. Analysis of 14.4 Gb of paired-end RAD data focused on the identification of SNPs in the paired-end contig, with subsequent in silico and empirical validation of candidate markers. Thousands of putatively informative markers were identified including, for the first time, SNPs that show population-wide differentiation between Russian and Persian sturgeons, representing an important advance in our ability to manage these cryptic species. The results highlight the challenges of genotyping-by-sequencing in polyploid taxa, while establishing the potential genetic resources for developing a new range of caviar traceability and enforcement tools. PMID:23473098

  18. Genome-Wide Joint Meta-Analysis of SNP and SNP-by-Smoking Interaction Identifies Novel Loci for Pulmonary Function

    PubMed Central

    Imboden, Medea; Koch, Beate; McArdle, Wendy L.; Smith, Albert V.; Smolonska, Joanna; Sood, Akshay; Tang, Wenbo; Wilk, Jemma B.; Zhai, Guangju; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aschard, Hugues; Burkart, Kristin M.; Curjuric, Ivan; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Elliott, Paul; Gu, Xiangjun; Harris, Tamara B.; Janson, Christer; Homuth, Georg; Hysi, Pirro G.; Liu, Jason Z.; Loehr, Laura R.; Lohman, Kurt; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Manning, Alisa K.; Marciante, Kristin D.; Obeidat, Ma'en; Postma, Dirkje S.; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Brusselle, Guy G.; Chen, Ting-hsu; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Franceschini, Nora; Heinrich, Joachim; Rotter, Jerome I.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Williams, O. Dale; Bentley, Amy R.; Hofman, Albert; Laurie, Cathy C.; Lumley, Thomas; Morrison, Alanna C.; Joubert, Bonnie R.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Couper, David J.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Liu, Yongmei; Wjst, Matthias; Wain, Louise V.; Vonk, Judith M.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Rochat, Thierry; Rich, Stephen S.; Psaty, Bruce M.; O'Connor, George T.; North, Kari E.; Mirel, Daniel B.; Meibohm, Bernd; Launer, Lenore J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hammond, Christopher J.; Gläser, Sven; Marchini, Jonathan; Kraft, Peter; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Völzke, Henry; Stricker, Bruno H. C.; Spector, Timothy D.; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Jarvis, Deborah; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Heckbert, Susan R.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Boezen, H. Marike; Barr, R. Graham; Cassano, Patricia A.; Strachan, David P.; Fornage, Myriam; Hall, Ian P.; Dupuis, Josée; Tobin, Martin D.; London, Stephanie J.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified numerous genetic loci for spirometic measures of pulmonary function, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and its ratio to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC). Given that cigarette smoking adversely affects pulmonary function, we conducted genome-wide joint meta-analyses (JMA) of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and SNP-by-smoking (ever-smoking or pack-years) associations on FEV1 and FEV1/FVC across 19 studies (total N = 50,047). We identified three novel loci not previously associated with pulmonary function. SNPs in or near DNER (smallest PJMA = 5.00×10−11), HLA-DQB1 and HLA-DQA2 (smallest PJMA = 4.35×10−9), and KCNJ2 and SOX9 (smallest PJMA = 1.28×10−8) were associated with FEV1/FVC or FEV1 in meta-analysis models including SNP main effects, smoking main effects, and SNP-by-smoking (ever-smoking or pack-years) interaction. The HLA region has been widely implicated for autoimmune and lung phenotypes, unlike the other novel loci, which have not been widely implicated. We evaluated DNER, KCNJ2, and SOX9 and found them to be expressed in human lung tissue. DNER and SOX9 further showed evidence of differential expression in human airway epithelium in smokers compared to non-smokers. Our findings demonstrated that joint testing of SNP and SNP-by-environment interaction identified novel loci associated with complex traits that are missed when considering only the genetic main effects. PMID:23284291

  19. Fish scales and SNP chips: SNP genotyping and allele frequency estimation in individual and pooled DNA from historical samples of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background DNA extracted from historical samples is an important resource for understanding genetic consequences of anthropogenic influences and long-term environmental change. However, such samples generally yield DNA of a lower amount and quality, and the extent to which DNA degradation affects SNP genotyping success and allele frequency estimation is not well understood. We conducted high density SNP genotyping and allele frequency estimation in both individual DNA samples and pooled DNA samples extracted from dried Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) scales stored at room temperature for up to 35 years, and assessed genotyping success, repeatability and accuracy of allele frequency estimation using a high density SNP genotyping array. Results In individual DNA samples, genotyping success and repeatability was very high (> 0.973 and > 0.998, respectively) in samples stored for up to 35 years; both increased with the proportion of DNA of fragment size > 1000 bp. In pooled DNA samples, allele frequency estimation was highly repeatable (Repeatability = 0.986) and highly correlated with empirical allele frequency measures (Mean Adjusted R2 = 0.991); allele frequency could be accurately estimated in > 95% of pooled DNA samples with a reference group of at least 30 individuals. SNPs located in polyploid regions of the genome were more sensitive to DNA degradation: older samples had lower genotyping success at these loci, and a larger reference panel of individuals was required to accurately estimate allele frequencies. Conclusions SNP genotyping was highly successful in degraded DNA samples, paving the way for the use of degraded samples in SNP genotyping projects. DNA pooling provides the potential for large scale population genetic studies with fewer assays, provided enough reference individuals are also genotyped and DNA quality is properly assessed beforehand. We provide recommendations for future studies intending to conduct high-throughput SNP

  20. Prevalence of PIK3CA mutations and the SNP rs17849079 in Arab breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Karakas, Bedri; Colak, Dilek; Kaya, Namik; Ghebeh, Hazem; Al-Qasem, Abeer; Hendrayani, Fawziah; Toulimat, Mohamed; Al-Tweigeri, Taher; Park, Ben Ho; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2013-01-01

    Carcinomas initiate and progress due to genetic and epigenetic alterations in epithelial cells. However, recently, these alterations have also been reported in stromal fibroblasts. The gain-of-function mutations in the PI3K p110 catalytic subunit (PIK3CA) have been identified in many cancers with a current global incidence of 26% (18–40%) in breast carcinomas. We analyzed the mutational frequency of PIK3CA of three hotspots (exons 1, 9, and 20) in 81 primary invasive breast cancers (BC) and 25 cultured breast cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) samples by Sanger sequencing in Arab breast cancer patients. Associations between the incidence of any PIK3CA mutation and several clinicopathologic characteristics were assessed using chi-square tests for categorical or t test for continuous variables. Furthermore, survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method with the log rank test to evaluate the significance of their differences. We identified a total of 21 PIK3CA missense mutations with a frequency of 25.9%. The majority of the mutations, 17 out of 21 (81%), were in exon 20 (p.His1047Arg, p.His1047Lys, p.Thr1025Ala, p.Gly1049Arg, p.Asp1056Asn) while the remainder, 4 out of 21 (19%) were in exon 9 (p.Glu545Lys). PIK3CA mutations were significantly associated with lower grade and hormone receptor positivity. Although there was a favorable trend in overall survival for patients whose tumor harbored PIK3CA mutations, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.10). However, we did not detect any somatic mutations in CAFs. Furthermore, we have shown a high prevalence (8.2-fold) of a silent variant (SNP, rs17849079) in the Arab breast cancer population compared with disease-free individuals. PMID:23982433

  1. Prevalence of PIK3CA mutations and the SNP rs17849079 in Arab breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Karakas, Bedri; Colak, Dilek; Kaya, Namik; Ghebeh, Hazem; Al-Qasem, Abeer; Hendrayani, Fawziah; Toulimat, Mohamed; Al-Tweigeri, Taher; Park, Ben Ho; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2013-10-01

    Carcinomas initiate and progress due to genetic and epigenetic alterations in epithelial cells. However, recently, these alterations have also been reported in stromal fibroblasts. The gain-of-function mutations in the PI3K p110 catalytic subunit (PIK3CA) have been identified in many cancers with a current global incidence of 26% (18-40%) in breast carcinomas. We analyzed the mutational frequency of PIK3CA of three hotspots (exons 1, 9, and 20) in 81 primary invasive breast cancers (BC) and 25 cultured breast cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) samples by Sanger sequencing in Arab breast cancer patients. Associations between the incidence of any PIK3CA mutation and several clinicopathologic characteristics were assessed using chi-square tests for categorical or t test for continuous variables. Furthermore, survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method with the log rank test to evaluate the significance of their differences. We identified a total of 21 PIK3CA missense mutations with a frequency of 25.9%. The majority of the mutations, 17 out of 21 (81%), were in exon 20 (p.His1047Arg, p.His1047Lys, p.Thr1025Ala, p.Gly1049Arg, p.Asp1056Asn) while the remainder, 4 out of 21 (19%) were in exon 9 (p.Glu545Lys). PIK3CA mutations were significantly associated with lower grade and hormone receptor positivity. Although there was a favorable trend in overall survival for patients whose tumor harbored PIK3CA mutations, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.10). However, we did not detect any somatic mutations in CAFs. Furthermore, we have shown a high prevalence (8.2-fold) of a silent variant (SNP, rs17849079) in the Arab breast cancer population compared with disease-free individuals. PMID:23982433

  2. Identification of SNP Haplotypes and Prospects of Association Mapping in Watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watermelon is the fifth most economically important vegetable crop cultivated world-wide. Implementing Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) marker technology in watermelon breeding and germplasm evaluation programs holds a key to improve horticulturally important traits. Next-generation sequencing...

  3. SNP analysis of AMY2 and CTSL genes in Litopenaeus vannamei and Penaeus monodon shrimp.

    PubMed

    Glenn, K L; Grapes, L; Suwanasopee, T; Harris, D L; Li, Y; Wilson, K; Rothschild, M F

    2005-06-01

    Genetic studies in shrimp have focused on disease, with production traits such as growth left unexamined. Two shrimp species, Litopenaeus vannamei and Penaeus monodon, which represent the majority of US shrimp imports, were selected for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery in alpha-amylase (AMY2) and cathepsin-l (CTSL), both candidate genes for growth. In L. vannamei, four SNPs were found in AMY2 and one SNP was found in CTSL. In P. monodon, one SNP was identified in CTSL. The CTSL gene was mapped to linkage group 28 of P. monodon using the female map developed with the Australian P. monodon mapping population. Association analyses for the AMY2 and CTSL genes with body weight (BW) were performed in two L. vannamei populations. While neither gene was found to be significantly associated with BW in these populations, there was a trend in one population towards higher BW for allele G of CTSL SNP C681G. PMID:15932404

  4. Interim report on updated microarray probes for the LLNL Burkholderia pseudomallei SNP array

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S; Jaing, C

    2012-03-27

    The overall goal of this project is to forensically characterize 100 unknown Burkholderia isolates in the US-Australia collaboration. We will identify genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from B. pseudomallei and near neighbor species including B. mallei, B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis. We will design microarray probes to detect these SNP markers and analyze 100 Burkholderia genomic DNAs extracted from environmental, clinical and near neighbor isolates from Australian collaborators on the Burkholderia SNP microarray. We will analyze the microarray genotyping results to characterize the genetic diversity of these new isolates and triage the samples for whole genome sequencing. In this interim report, we described the SNP analysis and the microarray probe design for the Burkholderia SNP microarray.

  5. SNP discovery through de novo deep sequencing using the next generation of DNA sequencers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The production of high volumes of DNA sequence data using new technologies has permitted more efficient identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms in vertebrate genomes. This chapter presented practical methodology for production and analysis of DNA sequence data for SNP discovery....

  6. Evaluation of approaches for identifying population informative markers from high density SNP Chips

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic markers can be used to identify and verify the origin of individuals. Motivation for the inference of ancestry ranges from conservation genetics to forensic analysis. High density assays featuring Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers can be exploited to create a reduced panel containing the most informative markers for these purposes. The objectives of this study were to evaluate methods of marker selection and determine the minimum number of markers from the BovineSNP50 BeadChip required to verify the origin of individuals in European cattle breeds. Delta, Wright's FST, Weir & Cockerham's FST and PCA methods for population differentiation were compared. The level of informativeness of each SNP was estimated from the breed specific allele frequencies. Individual assignment analysis was performed using the ranked informative markers. Stringency levels were applied by log-likelihood ratio to assess the confidence of the assignment test. Results A 95% assignment success rate for the 384 individually genotyped animals was achieved with < 80, < 100, < 140 and < 200 SNP markers (with increasing stringency threshold levels) across all the examined methods for marker selection. No further gain in power of assignment was achieved by sampling in excess of 200 SNP markers. The marker selection method that required the lowest number of SNP markers to verify the animal's breed origin was Wright's FST (60 to 140 SNPs depending on the chosen degree of confidence). Certain breeds required fewer markers (< 100) to achieve 100% assignment success. In contrast, closely related breeds require more markers (~200) to achieve > 95% assignment success. The power of assignment success, and therefore the number of SNP markers required, is dependent on the levels of genetic heterogeneity and pool of samples considered. Conclusions While all SNP selection methods produced marker panels capable of breed identification, the power of assignment varied markedly among

  7. Association of the SNP rs2623047 in the HSPG modification enzyme SULF1 with an Australian Caucasian breast cancer cohort.

    PubMed

    Okolicsanyi, Rachel K; Faure, Marion; Jacinto, Jose M E; Chacon-Cortes, Diego; Chambers, Suzanne; Youl, Philippa H; Haupt, Larisa M; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2014-08-15

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide and the most common cancer reported in women. This malignant tumour is characterised by a number of specific features including uncontrolled cell proliferation. It ranks fifth in the world as a cause of cancer death overall in developed countries and is the second most frequent cause of cancer death in women. Early diagnosis increases 5-year survival rates up to 95%. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are complex proteins composed of a core protein to which a number of highly sulfated side chains attach, ubiquitous to the cell surface and within the extracellular matrix. HSPG side chains are synthesised by a highly co-ordinated process resulting in distinct sulfation patterns, which determine specific interactions with cell-signalling partners including growth factors, their receptors, ligands and morphogens. The enzymes responsible for chain initiation, elongation and sulfation are critical for creating HS chain variability conferring biological functionality. This study investigated a single nucleotide polymorphism in SULF1, the enzyme responsible for the 6-O desulfation of heparan sulfate side chains. We investigated this SNP in an Australian Caucasian case-control breast cancer population and found a significant association between SULF1 and breast cancer at both the allelic and genotypic levels (allele, p=0.016; genotype, p=0.032). Our results suggest that the rs2623047 SNP in SULF1 may impact breast cancer susceptibility. Specifically, the T allele of rs2623047 in SULF1 is associated with an increased risk of developing breast cancer in our cohort. The identification of markers including SULF1 may improve detection of this disease at its earliest stages improving patient treatment and prognosis. PMID:24911625

  8. High-resolution SNP arrays in mental retardation diagnostics: how much do we gain?

    PubMed Central

    Bernardini, Laura; Alesi, Viola; Loddo, Sara; Novelli, Antonio; Bottillo, Irene; Battaglia, Agatino; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Zampino, Giuseppe; Ertel, Adam; Fortina, Paolo; Surrey, Saul; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    We used Affymetrix 6.0 GeneChip SNP arrays to characterize copy number variations (CNVs) in a cohort of 70 patients previously characterized on lower-density oligonucleotide arrays affected by idiopathic mental retardation and dysmorphic features. The SNP array platform includes ∼900 000 SNP probes and 900 000 non-SNP oligonucleotide probes at an average distance of 0.7 Kb, which facilitates coverage of the whole genome, including coding and noncoding regions. The high density of probes is critical for detecting small CNVs, but it can lead to data interpretation problems. To reduce the number of false positives, parameters were set to consider only imbalances >75 Kb encompassing at least 80 probe sets. The higher resolution of the SNP array platform confirmed the increased ability to detect small CNVs, although more than 80% of these CNVs overlapped to copy number ‘neutral' polymorphism regions and 4.4% of them did not contain known genes. In our cohort of 70 patients, of the 51 previously evaluated as ‘normal' on the Agilent 44K array, the SNP array platform disclosed six additional CNV changes, including three in three patients, which may be pathogenic. This suggests that about 6% of individuals classified as ‘normal' using the lower-density oligonucleotide array could be found to be affected by a genomic disorder when evaluated with the higher-density microarray platforms. PMID:19809473

  9. Construction of a versatile SNP array for pyramiding useful genes of rice.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Yusuke; Noda, Tomonori; Yamagata, Yoshiyuki; Angeles-Shim, Rosalyn; Sunohara, Hidehiko; Uehara, Kanako; Furuta, Tomoyuki; Nagai, Keisuke; Jena, Kshirod Kumar; Yasui, Hideshi; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Doi, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    DNA marker-assisted selection (MAS) has become an indispensable component of breeding. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) are the most frequent polymorphism in the rice genome. However, SNP markers are not readily employed in MAS because of limitations in genotyping platforms. Here the authors report a Golden Gate SNP array that targets specific genes controlling yield-related traits and biotic stress resistance in rice. As a first step, the SNP genotypes were surveyed in 31 parental varieties using the Affymetrix Rice 44K SNP microarray. The haplotype information for 16 target genes was then converted to the Golden Gate platform with 143-plex markers. Haplotypes for the 14 useful allele are unique and can discriminate among all other varieties. The genotyping consistency between the Affymetrix microarray and the Golden Gate array was 92.8%, and the accuracy of the Golden Gate array was confirmed in 3 F2 segregating populations. The concept of the haplotype-based selection by using the constructed SNP array was proofed. PMID:26566831

  10. SNP Microarray in FISH Negative Clinically Suspected 22q11.2 Microdeletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Manish; Kalsi, Amanpreet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the role of SNP microarray in 101 cases of clinically suspected FISH negative (noninformative/normal) 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome. SNP microarray was carried out using 300 K HumanCytoSNP-12 BeadChip array or CytoScan 750 K array. SNP microarray identified 8 cases of 22q11.2 microdeletions and/or microduplications in addition to cases of chromosomal abnormalities and other pathogenic/likely pathogenic CNVs. Clinically suspected specific deletions (22q11.2) were detectable in approximately 8% of cases by SNP microarray, mostly from FISH noninformative cases. This study also identified several LOH/AOH loci with known and well-defined UPD (uniparental disomy) disorders. In conclusion, this study suggests more strict clinical criteria for FISH analysis. However, if clinical criteria are few or doubtful, in particular newborn/neonate in intensive care, SNP microarray should be the first screening test to be ordered. FISH is ideal test for detecting mosaicism, screening family members, and prenatal diagnosis in proven families. PMID:27051557

  11. Rapid Identification of Ginseng Cultivars (Panax ginseng Meyer) Using Novel SNP-Based Probes

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Ick-Hyun; Bang, Kyong Hwan; Kim, Young-Chang; Lee, Jei-Wan; Seo, A-Yeon; Seong, Bong-Jae; Kim, Hyun-Ho; Kim, Dong-Hwi; Cha, Seon-Woo; Cho, Yong-Gu; Kim, Hong-Sig

    2011-01-01

    In order to develop a novel system for the discrimination of five ginseng cultivars (Panax ginseng Meyer), single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assays with real-time polymerase chain reaction were conducted. Nucleotide substitution in gDNA library clones of P. ginseng cv. Yunpoong was targeted for the SNP genotyping assay. From these SNP sites, a set of modified SNP specific fluorescence probes (PGP74, PGP110, and PGP130) and novel primer sets have been developed to distinguish among five ginseng cultivars. The combination of the SNP type of the five cultivars, Chungpoong, Yunpoong, Gopoong, Kumpoong, and Sunpoong, was identified as ‘ATA’, ‘GCC’, ‘GTA’, ‘GCA’, and ‘ACC’, respectively. This study represents the first report of the identification of ginseng cultivars by fluorescence probes. An SNP genotyping assay using fluorescence probes could prove useful for the identification of ginseng cultivars and ginseng seed management systems and guarantee the purity of ginseng seed. PMID:23717098

  12. Hybridization modeling of oligonucleotide SNP arrays for accurate DNA copy number estimation

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Lin; Sun, Kelian; Ding, Qi; Cui, Yuehua; Li, Ming; Wen, Yalu; Elston, Robert C.; Qian, Minping; Fu, Wenjiang J

    2009-01-01

    Affymetrix SNP arrays have been widely used for single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype calling and DNA copy number variation inference. Although numerous methods have achieved high accuracy in these fields, most studies have paid little attention to the modeling of hybridization of probes to off-target allele sequences, which can affect the accuracy greatly. In this study, we address this issue and demonstrate that hybridization with mismatch nucleotides (HWMMN) occurs in all SNP probe-sets and has a critical effect on the estimation of allelic concentrations (ACs). We study sequence binding through binding free energy and then binding affinity, and develop a probe intensity composite representation (PICR) model. The PICR model allows the estimation of ACs at a given SNP through statistical regression. Furthermore, we demonstrate with cell-line data of known true copy numbers that the PICR model can achieve reasonable accuracy in copy number estimation at a single SNP locus, by using the ratio of the estimated AC of each sample to that of the reference sample, and can reveal subtle genotype structure of SNPs at abnormal loci. We also demonstrate with HapMap data that the PICR model yields accurate SNP genotype calls consistently across samples, laboratories and even across array platforms. PMID:19586935

  13. SNP Microarray in FISH Negative Clinically Suspected 22q11.2 Microdeletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Halder, Ashutosh; Jain, Manish; Kalsi, Amanpreet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the role of SNP microarray in 101 cases of clinically suspected FISH negative (noninformative/normal) 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome. SNP microarray was carried out using 300 K HumanCytoSNP-12 BeadChip array or CytoScan 750 K array. SNP microarray identified 8 cases of 22q11.2 microdeletions and/or microduplications in addition to cases of chromosomal abnormalities and other pathogenic/likely pathogenic CNVs. Clinically suspected specific deletions (22q11.2) were detectable in approximately 8% of cases by SNP microarray, mostly from FISH noninformative cases. This study also identified several LOH/AOH loci with known and well-defined UPD (uniparental disomy) disorders. In conclusion, this study suggests more strict clinical criteria for FISH analysis. However, if clinical criteria are few or doubtful, in particular newborn/neonate in intensive care, SNP microarray should be the first screening test to be ordered. FISH is ideal test for detecting mosaicism, screening family members, and prenatal diagnosis in proven families. PMID:27051557

  14. Functional SNP in stem of mir-146a affects Her2 status and breast cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Meshkat, Mahboobeh; Tanha, Hamzeh Mesrian; Naeini, Marjan Mojtabavi; Ghaedi, Kamran; Sanati, Mohammad H; Meshkat, Marzieh; Bagheri, Fatemeh

    2016-07-01

    In-silico investigation suggested a common variant within stem of miR-146a-5p precursor (rs2910164, n.60C>G) associated with breast cancer (BC) phenotypes. Our aim was computationally predicting possible targets of miR-146a-5p and probable rs2910164 mechanism of action in expression of phenotypes in BC. Additionally, a case-control study was designated to examine experimentally the correlation of mir-146a rs2910164 variant and BC phenotypes. In this study, 152 BC subjects and healthy controls were genotyped using RFLP-PCR. Allelic and genotypic association and Armitage's trend tests were run to investigate the correlation between the alleles and genotypes and expressed phenotypes of BC. Bioinformatics analyses introduce regulatory function of miR-146a-5p in numerous signaling pathways and impact of allele substitution upon mir-146a stem-loop stability. Logistic regression data represented the C allele of rs2910164 (OR = 4.00, p= 0.0037) as the risk allele and associated with Her2-positive phenotype. In a similar vein, data revealed the correlation of the C allele and cancer death less than two years in BC patients (OR = 2.65, p= 0.0217). Ultimately, unconditional logistical regression models suggested log-additive model for inheritance manner of rs2910164 in either Her2 status or BC survival (OR = 5.64, p= 0.0025 and OR = 3.13, p= 0.019, respectively). Using bioinformatics connected association of Her2 status to altered function of miR-146a-5p in regulation of focal adhesion and Ras pathway. Furthermore, computations inferred the association between death phenotype and studied SNP upon specific target genes of miR-146a-5p involved in focal adhesion, EGF receptor, Ras, ErbB, interleukin, Toll-like receptor, NGF, angiogenesis, and p53 feedback loops 2 signaling pathways. These verdicts may enhance our perceptions of how mir-146a rs2910164 affect expressed phenotypes in BC, and might have potential implications to develop BC treatment in future. PMID:27434289

  15. Aerobic Fitness Does Not Modify the Effect of FTO Variation on Body Composition Traits

    PubMed Central

    Huuskonen, Antti; Lappalainen, Jani; Oksala, Niku; Santtila, Matti; Häkkinen, Keijo; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Atalay, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Poor physical fitness and obesity are risk factors for all cause morbidity and mortality. We aimed to clarify whether common genetic variants of key energy intake determinants in leptin (LEP), leptin receptor (LEPR), and fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) are associated with aerobic and neuromuscular performance, and whether aerobic fitness can alter the effect of these genotypes on body composition. Methods 846 healthy Finnish males of Caucasian origin were genotyped for FTO (rs8050136), LEP (rs7799039) and LEPR (rs8179183 and rs1137101) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and studied for associations with maximal oxygen consumption, body fat percent, serum leptin levels, waist circumference and maximal force of leg extensor muscles. Results Genotype AA of the FTO SNP rs8050136 associated with higher BMI and greater waist circumference compared to the genotype CC. In general linear model, no significant interaction for FTO genotype-relative VO2max (mL·kg−1·min−1) or FTO genotype-absolute VO2max (L·min−1) on BMI or waist circumference was found. Main effects of aerobic performance on body composition traits were significant (p<0.001). Logistic regression modelling found no significant interaction between aerobic fitness and FTO genotype. LEP SNP rs7799039, LEPR SNPs rs8179183 and rs1137101 did not associate with any of the measured variables, and no significant interactions of LEP or LEPR genotype with aerobic fitness were observed. In addition, none of the studied SNPs associated with aerobic or neuromuscular performance. Conclusions Aerobic fitness may not modify the effect of FTO variation on body composition traits. However, relative aerobic capacity associates with lower BMI and waist circumference regardless of the FTO genotype. FTO, LEP and LEPR genotypes unlikely associate with physical performance. PMID:23284729

  16. Phocid seal leptin: tertiary structure and hydrophobic receptor binding site preservation during distinct leptin gene evolution.

    PubMed

    Hammond, John A; Hauton, Chris; Bennett, Kimberley A; Hall, Ailsa J

    2012-01-01

    The cytokine hormone leptin is a key signalling molecule in many pathways that control physiological functions. Although leptin demonstrates structural conservation in mammals, there is evidence of positive selection in primates, lagomorphs and chiropterans. We previously reported that the leptin genes of the grey and harbour seals (phocids) have significantly diverged from other mammals. Therefore we further investigated the diversification of leptin in phocids, other marine mammals and terrestrial taxa by sequencing the leptin genes of representative species. Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed that leptin diversification was pronounced within the phocid seals with a high dN/dS ratio of 2.8, indicating positive selection. We found significant evidence of positive selection along the branch leading to the phocids, within the phocid clade, but not over the dataset as a whole. Structural predictions indicate that the individual residues under selection are away from the leptin receptor (LEPR) binding site. Predictions of the surface electrostatic potential indicate that phocid seal leptin is notably different to other mammalian leptins, including the otariids. Cloning the grey seal leptin binding domain of LEPR confirmed that this was structurally conserved. These data, viewed in toto, support a hypothesis that phocid leptin divergence is unlikely to have arisen by random mutation. Based upon these phylogenetic and structural assessments, and considering the comparative physiology and varying life histories among species, we postulate that the unique phocid diving behaviour has produced this selection pressure. The Phocidae includes some of the deepest diving species, yet have the least modified lung structure to cope with pressure and volume changes experienced at depth. Therefore, greater surfactant production is required to facilitate rapid lung re-inflation upon surfacing, while maintaining patent airways. We suggest that this additional surfactant requirement

  17. Identification of Laying-Related SNP Markers in Geese Using RAD Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, ShiGang; Chu, WeiWei; Zhang, LiFan; Han, HouMing; Zhao, RongXue; Wu, Wei; Zhu, JiangNing; Dodson, Michael V.; Wei, Wei; Liu, HongLin; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Laying performance is an important economical trait of goose production. As laying performance is of low heritability, it is of significance to develop a marker-assisted selection (MAS) strategy for this trait. Definition of sequence variation related to the target trait is a prerequisite of quantitating MAS, but little is presently known about the goose genome, which greatly hinders the identification of genetic markers for the laying traits of geese. Recently developed restriction site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing is a possible approach for discerning large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and reducing the complexity of a genome without having reference genomic information available. In the present study, we developed a pooled RAD sequencing strategy for detecting geese laying-related SNP. Two DNA pools were constructed, each consisting of equal amounts of genomic DNA from 10 individuals with either high estimated breeding value (HEBV) or low estimated breeding value (LEBV). A total of 139,013 SNP were obtained from 42,291,356 sequences, of which 18,771,943 were for LEBV and 23,519,413 were for HEBV cohorts. Fifty-five SNP which had different allelic frequencies in the two DNA pools were further validated by individual-based AS-PCR genotyping in the LEBV and HEBV cohorts. Ten out of 55 SNP exhibited distinct allele distributions in these two cohorts. These 10 SNP were further genotyped in a goose population of 492 geese to verify the association with egg numbers. The result showed that 8 of 10 SNP were associated with egg numbers. Additionally, liner regression analysis revealed that SNP Record-111407, 106975 and 112359 were involved in a multiplegene network affecting laying performance. We used IPCR to extend the unknown regions flanking the candidate RAD tags. The obtained sequences were subjected to BLAST to retrieve the orthologous genes in either ducks or chickens. Five novel genes were cloned for geese which harbored the candidate laying

  18. Optimal Design of Low-Density SNP Arrays for Genomic Prediction: Algorithm and Applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Lin; Xu, Jiaqi; Feng, Guofei; Wiggans, George R; Taylor, Jeremy F; He, Jun; Qian, Changsong; Qiu, Jiansheng; Simpson, Barry; Walker, Jeremy; Bauck, Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Low-density (LD) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays provide a cost-effective solution for genomic prediction and selection, but algorithms and computational tools are needed for the optimal design of LD SNP chips. A multiple-objective, local optimization (MOLO) algorithm was developed for design of optimal LD SNP chips that can be imputed accurately to medium-density (MD) or high-density (HD) SNP genotypes for genomic prediction. The objective function facilitates maximization of non-gap map length and system information for the SNP chip, and the latter is computed either as locus-averaged (LASE) or haplotype-averaged Shannon entropy (HASE) and adjusted for uniformity of the SNP distribution. HASE performed better than LASE with ≤1,000 SNPs, but required considerably more computing time. Nevertheless, the differences diminished when >5,000 SNPs were selected. Optimization was accomplished conditionally on the presence of SNPs that were obligated to each chromosome. The frame location of SNPs on a chip can be either uniform (evenly spaced) or non-uniform. For the latter design, a tunable empirical Beta distribution was used to guide location distribution of frame SNPs such that both ends of each chromosome were enriched with SNPs. The SNP distribution on each chromosome was finalized through the objective function that was locally and empirically maximized. This MOLO algorithm was capable of selecting a set of approximately evenly-spaced and highly-informative SNPs, which in turn led to increased imputation accuracy compared with selection solely of evenly-spaced SNPs. Imputation accuracy increased with LD chip size, and imputation error rate was extremely low for chips with ≥3,000 SNPs. Assuming that genotyping or imputation error occurs at random, imputation error rate can be viewed as the upper limit for genomic prediction error. Our results show that about 25% of imputation error rate was propagated to genomic prediction in an Angus population. The

  19. Identification of Laying-Related SNP Markers in Geese Using RAD Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yu, ShiGang; Chu, WeiWei; Zhang, LiFan; Han, HouMing; Zhao, RongXue; Wu, Wei; Zhu, JiangNing; Dodson, Michael V; Wei, Wei; Liu, HongLin; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Laying performance is an important economical trait of goose production. As laying performance is of low heritability, it is of significance to develop a marker-assisted selection (MAS) strategy for this trait. Definition of sequence variation related to the target trait is a prerequisite of quantitating MAS, but little is presently known about the goose genome, which greatly hinders the identification of genetic markers for the laying traits of geese. Recently developed restriction site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing is a possible approach for discerning large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and reducing the complexity of a genome without having reference genomic information available. In the present study, we developed a pooled RAD sequencing strategy for detecting geese laying-related SNP. Two DNA pools were constructed, each consisting of equal amounts of genomic DNA from 10 individuals with either high estimated breeding value (HEBV) or low estimated breeding value (LEBV). A total of 139,013 SNP were obtained from 42,291,356 sequences, of which 18,771,943 were for LEBV and 23,519,413 were for HEBV cohorts. Fifty-five SNP which had different allelic frequencies in the two DNA pools were further validated by individual-based AS-PCR genotyping in the LEBV and HEBV cohorts. Ten out of 55 SNP exhibited distinct allele distributions in these two cohorts. These 10 SNP were further genotyped in a goose population of 492 geese to verify the association with egg numbers. The result showed that 8 of 10 SNP were associated with egg numbers. Additionally, liner regression analysis revealed that SNP Record-111407, 106975 and 112359 were involved in a multiplegene network affecting laying performance. We used IPCR to extend the unknown regions flanking the candidate RAD tags. The obtained sequences were subjected to BLAST to retrieve the orthologous genes in either ducks or chickens. Five novel genes were cloned for geese which harbored the candidate laying

  20. Generation of SNP datasets for orangutan population genomics using improved reduced-representation sequencing and direct comparisons of SNP calling algorithms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High-throughput sequencing has opened up exciting possibilities in population and conservation genetics by enabling the assessment of genetic variation at genome-wide scales. One approach to reduce genome complexity, i.e. investigating only parts of the genome, is reduced-representation library (RRL) sequencing. Like similar approaches, RRL sequencing reduces ascertainment bias due to simultaneous discovery and genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and does not require reference genomes. Yet, generating such datasets remains challenging due to laboratory and bioinformatical issues. In the laboratory, current protocols require improvements with regards to sequencing homologous fragments to reduce the number of missing genotypes. From the bioinformatical perspective, the reliance of most studies on a single SNP caller disregards the possibility that different algorithms may produce disparate SNP datasets. Results We present an improved RRL (iRRL) protocol that maximizes the generation of homologous DNA sequences, thus achieving improved genotyping-by-sequencing efficiency. Our modifications facilitate generation of single-sample libraries, enabling individual genotype assignments instead of pooled-sample analysis. We sequenced ~1% of the orangutan genome with 41-fold median coverage in 31 wild-born individuals from two populations. SNPs and genotypes were called using three different algorithms. We obtained substantially different SNP datasets depending on the SNP caller. Genotype validations revealed that the Unified Genotyper of the Genome Analysis Toolkit and SAMtools performed significantly better than a caller from CLC Genomics Workbench (CLC). Of all conflicting genotype calls, CLC was only correct in 17% of the cases. Furthermore, conflicting genotypes between two algorithms showed a systematic bias in that one caller almost exclusively assigned heterozygotes, while the other one almost exclusively assigned homozygotes. Conclusions

  1. Polymorphisms in the Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Genes Affect the Expression Levels of Membrane-Bound Type I and Type II Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sennikov, Sergey V.; Vasilyev, Filipp F.; Lopatnikova, Julia A.; Shkaruba, Nadezhda S.; Silkov, Alexander N.

    2014-01-01

    The level of TNF receptors on various cells of immune system and its association with the gene polymorphism were investigated. Determining the levels of membrane-bound TNFα receptors on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was performed by flow cytometry using BD QuantiBRITE calibration particles. Soluble TNFα receptor (sTNFRs) levels were determined by ELISA and genotyping was determined by PCR-RFLP. Homozygous TT individuals at SNP −609G/T TNFRI (rs4149570) showed lower levels of sTNFRI compared to GG genotype carriers. Homozygous carriers of CC genotype at SNP −1207G/C TNFRI (rs4149569) had lower expression densities of membrane-bound TNFRI on intact CD14+ monocytes compared to individuals with the GC genotype. The frequency differences in the CD3+ and CD19+ cells expressing TNFRII in relation to SNP −1709A/T TNFRII (rs652625) in healthy individuals were also determined. The genotype CC in SNP −3609C/T TNFRII (rs590368) was associated with a lower percentage of CD14+ cells expressing TNFRII compared to individuals with the CT genotype. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis had no significant changes in the frequencies of genotypes. Reduced frequency was identified for the combination TNFRI −609GT + TNFRII −3609CC only. The polymorphisms in genes represent one of cell type-specific mechanisms affecting the expression levels of membrane-bound TNFα receptors and TNFα-mediated signaling. PMID:24782596

  2. AMY-tree: an algorithm to use whole genome SNP calling for Y chromosomal phylogenetic applications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to the rapid progress of next-generation sequencing (NGS) facilities, an explosion of human whole genome data will become available in the coming years. These data can be used to optimize and to increase the resolution of the phylogenetic Y chromosomal tree. Moreover, the exponential growth of known Y chromosomal lineages will require an automatic determination of the phylogenetic position of an individual based on whole genome SNP calling data and an up to date Y chromosomal tree. Results We present an automated approach, ‘AMY-tree’, which is able to determine the phylogenetic position of a Y chromosome using a whole genome SNP profile, independently from the NGS platform and SNP calling program, whereby mistakes in the SNP calling or phylogenetic Y chromosomal tree are taken into account. Moreover, AMY-tree indicates ambiguities within the present phylogenetic tree and points out new Y-SNPs which may be phylogenetically relevant. The AMY-tree software package was validated successfully on 118 whole genome SNP profiles of 109 males with different origins. Moreover, support was found for an unknown recurrent mutation, wrong reported mutation conversions and a large amount of new interesting Y-SNPs. Conclusions Therefore, AMY-tree is a useful tool to determine the Y lineage of a sample based on SNP calling, to identify Y-SNPs with yet unknown phylogenetic position and to optimize the Y chromosomal phylogenetic tree in the future. AMY-tree will not add lineages to the existing phylogenetic tree of the Y-chromosome but it is the first step to analyse whole genome SNP profiles in a phylogenetic framework. PMID:23405914

  3. High-throughput SNP genotyping in Cucurbita pepo for map construction and quantitative trait loci mapping

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cucurbita pepo is a member of the Cucurbitaceae family, the second- most important horticultural family in terms of economic importance after Solanaceae. The "summer squash" types, including Zucchini and Scallop, rank among the highest-valued vegetables worldwide. There are few genomic tools available for this species. The first Cucurbita transcriptome, along with a large collection of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP), was recently generated using massive sequencing. A set of 384 SNP was selected to generate an Illumina GoldenGate assay in order to construct the first SNP-based genetic map of Cucurbita and map quantitative trait loci (QTL). Results We herein present the construction of the first SNP-based genetic map of Cucurbita pepo using a population derived from the cross of two varieties with contrasting phenotypes, representing the main cultivar groups of the species' two subspecies: Zucchini (subsp. pepo) × Scallop (subsp. ovifera). The mapping population was genotyped with 384 SNP, a set of selected EST-SNP identified in silico after massive sequencing of the transcriptomes of both parents, using the Illumina GoldenGate platform. The global success rate of the assay was higher than 85%. In total, 304 SNP were mapped, along with 11 SSR from a previous map, giving a map density of 5.56 cM/marker. This map was used to infer syntenic relationships between C. pepo and cucumber and to successfully map QTL that control plant, flowering and fruit traits that are of benefit to squash breeding. The QTL effects were validated in backcross populations. Conclusion Our results show that massive sequencing in different genotypes is an excellent tool for SNP discovery, and that the Illumina GoldenGate platform can be successfully applied to constructing genetic maps and performing QTL analysis in Cucurbita. This is the first SNP-based genetic map in the Cucurbita genus and is an invaluable new tool for biological research, especially considering that most

  4. SSCP-SNP in pearl millet--a new marker system for comparative genetics.

    PubMed

    Bertin, I; Zhu, J H; Gale, M D

    2005-05-01

    A considerable array of genomic resources are in place in pearl millet, and marker-aided selection is already in use in the public breeding programme at ICRISAT. This paper describes experiments to extend these publicly available resources to a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based marker system. A new marker system, single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP)-SNP, was developed using annotated rice genomic sequences to initially predict the intron-exon borders in millet expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and then to design primers that would amplify across the introns. An adequate supply of millet ESTs was available for us to identify 299 homologues of single-copy rice genes in which the intron positions could be precisely predicted. PCR primers were then designed to amplify approximately 500-bp genomic fragments containing introns. Analysis of these fragments on SSCP gels revealed considerable polymorphism. A detailed DNA sequence analysis of variation at four of the SSCP-SNP loci over a panel of eight inbred genotypes showed complex patterns of variation, with about one SNP or indel (insertion-deletion) every 59 bp in the introns, but considerably fewer in the exons. About two-thirds of the variation was derived from SNPs and one-third from indels. Most haplotypes were detected by SSCP. As a marker system, SSCP-SNP has lower development costs than simple sequence repeats (SSRs), because much of the work is in silico, and similar deployment costs and through-put potential. The rates of polymorphism were lower but useable, with a mean PIC of 0.49 relative to 0.72 for SSRs in our eight inbred genotype panel screen. The major advantage of the system is in comparative applications. Syntenic information can be used to target SSCP-SNP markers to specific chromosomal regions or, conversely, SSCP-SNP markers can be used to unravel detailed syntenic relationships in specific parts of the genome. Finally, a preliminary analysis showed that the millet SSCP-SNP primers

  5. A novel algorithm for simultaneous SNP selection in high-dimensional genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Identification of causal SNPs in most genome wide association studies relies on approaches that consider each SNP individually. However, there is a strong correlation structure among SNPs that needs to be taken into account. Hence, increasingly modern computationally expensive regression methods are employed for SNP selection that consider all markers simultaneously and thus incorporate dependencies among SNPs. Results We develop a novel multivariate algorithm for large scale SNP selection using CAR score regression, a promising new approach for prioritizing biomarkers. Specifically, we propose a computationally efficient procedure for shrinkage estimation of CAR scores from high-dimensional data. Subsequently, we conduct a comprehensive comparison study including five advanced regression approaches (boosting, lasso, NEG, MCP, and CAR score) and a univariate approach (marginal correlation) to determine the effectiveness in finding true causal SNPs. Conclusions Simultaneous SNP selection is a challenging task. We demonstrate that our CAR score-based algorithm consistently outperforms all competing approaches, both uni- and multivariate, in terms of correctly recovered causal SNPs and SNP ranking. An R package implementing the approach as well as R code to reproduce the complete study presented here is available from http://strimmerlab.org/software/care/. PMID:23113980

  6. Highly specific SNP detection using 2D graphene electronics and DNA strand displacement

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Michael T.; Landon, Preston B.; Lee, Joon; Choi, Duyoung; Mo, Alexander H.; Glinsky, Gennadi; Lal, Ratnesh

    2016-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a gene sequence are markers for a variety of human diseases. Detection of SNPs with high specificity and sensitivity is essential for effective practical implementation of personalized medicine. Current DNA sequencing, including SNP detection, primarily uses enzyme-based methods or fluorophore-labeled assays that are time-consuming, need laboratory-scale settings, and are expensive. Previously reported electrical charge-based SNP detectors have insufficient specificity and accuracy, limiting their effectiveness. Here, we demonstrate the use of a DNA strand displacement-based probe on a graphene field effect transistor (FET) for high-specificity, single-nucleotide mismatch detection. The single mismatch was detected by measuring strand displacement-induced resistance (and hence current) change and Dirac point shift in a graphene FET. SNP detection in large double-helix DNA strands (e.g., 47 nt) minimize false-positive results. Our electrical sensor-based SNP detection technology, without labeling and without apparent cross-hybridization artifacts, would allow fast, sensitive, and portable SNP detection with single-nucleotide resolution. The technology will have a wide range of applications in digital and implantable biosensors and high-throughput DNA genotyping, with transformative implications for personalized medicine. PMID:27298347

  7. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Arrays and Unexpected Consanguinity: Considerations for Clinicians When Returning Results to Families

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Fernanda; Tabor, Holly K.; Chow, Penny M.; Conta, Jessie H.; Feldman, Kenneth W.; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Beck, Anita E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The broad use of SNP microarrays has increased identification of unexpected consanguinity. Therefore, guidelines to address reporting of consanguinity have been published for clinical laboratories. Because no such guidelines exist for clinicians, we describe a case and present recommendations for clinicians to disclose unexpected consanguinity to families. Methods In a boy with multiple endocrine abnormalities and structural birth defects, SNP array analysis revealed ~23% autosomal homozygosity suggestive of a 1st-degree parental relationship. We assembled an interdisciplinary healthcare team, planned the most appropriate way to discuss results of the SNP array with the adult mother including the possibility of multiple autosomal recessive disorders in her child, and finally met with her as a team. Results From these discussions, we developed four major considerations for clinicians returning results of unexpected consanguinity, all guided by the child’s best interests: 1) ethical and legal obligations for reporting possible abuse, 2) preservation of the clinical relationship, 3) attention to justice and psychosocial challenges, and 4) utilization of the SNP array results to guide further testing. Conclusion As SNP arrays become a common clinical diagnostic tool, clinicians can use this framework to return results of unexpected consanguinity to families in a supportive and productive manner. PMID:25232848

  8. Mining and Analysis of SNP in Response to Salinity Stress in Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoge; Lu, Xuke; Wang, Junjuan; Wang, Delong; Yin, Zujun; Fan, Weili; Wang, Shuai; Ye, Wuwei

    2016-01-01

    Salinity stress is a major abiotic factor that affects crop output, and as a pioneer crop in saline and alkaline land, salt tolerance study of cotton is particularly important. In our experiment, four salt-tolerance varieties with different salt tolerance indexes including CRI35 (65.04%), Kanghuanwei164 (56.19%), Zhong9807 (55.20%) and CRI44 (50.50%), as well as four salt-sensitive cotton varieties including Hengmian3 (48.21%), GK50 (40.20%), Xinyan96-48 (34.90%), ZhongS9612 (24.80%) were used as the materials. These materials were divided into salt-tolerant group (ST) and salt-sensitive group (SS). Illumina Cotton SNP 70K Chip was used to detect SNP in different cotton varieties. SNPv (SNP variation of the same seedling pre- and after- salt stress) in different varieties were screened; polymorphic SNP and SNPr (SNP related to salt tolerance) were obtained. Annotation and analysis of these SNPs showed that (1) the induction efficiency of salinity stress on SNPv of cotton materials with different salt tolerance index was different, in which the induction efficiency on salt-sensitive materials was significantly higher than that on salt-tolerant materials. The induction of salt stress on SNPv was obviously biased. (2) SNPv induced by salt stress may be related to the methylation changes under salt stress. (3) SNPr may influence salt tolerance of plants by affecting the expression of salt-tolerance related genes. PMID:27355327

  9. A SNP discovery method to assess variant allele probability from next-generation resequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yufeng; Wan, Zhengzheng; Coarfa, Cristian; Drabek, Rafal; Chen, Lei; Ostrowski, Elizabeth A.; Liu, Yue; Weinstock, George M.; Wheeler, David A.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Yu, Fuli

    2010-01-01

    Accurate identification of genetic variants from next-generation sequencing (NGS) data is essential for immediate large-scale genomic endeavors such as the 1000 Genomes Project, and is crucial for further genetic analysis based on the discoveries. The key challenge in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery is to distinguish true individual variants (occurring at a low frequency) from sequencing errors (often occurring at frequencies orders of magnitude higher). Therefore, knowledge of the error probabilities of base calls is essential. We have developed Atlas-SNP2, a computational tool that detects and accounts for systematic sequencing errors caused by context-related variables in a logistic regression model learned from training data sets. Subsequently, it estimates the posterior error probability for each substitution through a Bayesian formula that integrates prior knowledge of the overall sequencing error probability and the estimated SNP rate with the results from the logistic regression model for the given substitutions. The estimated posterior SNP probability can be used to distinguish true SNPs from sequencing errors. Validation results show that Atlas-SNP2 achieves a false-positive rate of lower than 10%, with an ∼5% or lower false-negative rate. PMID:20019143

  10. Different SNP combinations in the GCH1 gene and use of labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate if there is an association between different SNP combinations in the guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase (GCH1) gene and a number of pain behavior related outcomes during labor. A population-based sample of pregnant women (n = 814) was recruited at gestational week 18. A plasma sample was collected from each subject. Genotyping was performed and three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) previously defined as a pain-protective SNP combination of GCH1 were used. Results Homozygous carriers of the pain-protective SNP combination of GCH1 arrived to the delivery ward with a more advanced stage of cervical dilation compared to heterozygous carriers and non-carriers. However, homozygous carriers more often used second line labor analgesia compared to the others. Conclusion The pain-protective SNP combination of GCH1 may be of importance in the limited number of homozygous carriers during the initial dilation of cervix but upon arrival at the delivery unit these women are more inclined to use second line labor analgesia. PMID:20633294

  11. Supervised learning-based tagSNP selection for genome-wide disease classifications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingzhong; Yang, Jack; Chen, Zhongxue; Yang, Mary Qu; Sung, Andrew H; Huang, Xudong

    2008-01-01

    Background Comprehensive evaluation of common genetic variations through association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with complex human diseases on the genome-wide scale is an active area in human genome research. One of the fundamental questions in a SNP-disease association study is to find an optimal subset of SNPs with predicting power for disease status. To find that subset while reducing study burden in terms of time and costs, one can potentially reconcile information redundancy from associations between SNP markers. Results We have developed a feature selection method named Supervised Recursive Feature Addition (SRFA). This method combines supervised learning and statistical measures for the chosen candidate features/SNPs to reconcile the redundancy information and, in doing so, improve the classification performance in association studies. Additionally, we have proposed a Support Vector based Recursive Feature Addition (SVRFA) scheme in SNP-disease association analysis. Conclusions We have proposed using SRFA with different statistical learning classifiers and SVRFA for both SNP selection and disease classification and then applying them to two complex disease data sets. In general, our approaches outperform the well-known feature selection method of Support Vector Machine Recursive Feature Elimination and logic regression-based SNP selection for disease classification in genetic association studies. Our study further indicates that both genetic and environmental variables should be taken into account when doing disease predictions and classifications for the most complex human diseases that have gene-environment interactions. PMID:18366619

  12. Highly specific SNP detection using 2D graphene electronics and DNA strand displacement.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Michael T; Landon, Preston B; Lee, Joon; Choi, Duyoung; Mo, Alexander H; Glinsky, Gennadi; Lal, Ratnesh

    2016-06-28

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a gene sequence are markers for a variety of human diseases. Detection of SNPs with high specificity and sensitivity is essential for effective practical implementation of personalized medicine. Current DNA sequencing, including SNP detection, primarily uses enzyme-based methods or fluorophore-labeled assays that are time-consuming, need laboratory-scale settings, and are expensive. Previously reported electrical charge-based SNP detectors have insufficient specificity and accuracy, limiting their effectiveness. Here, we demonstrate the use of a DNA strand displacement-based probe on a graphene field effect transistor (FET) for high-specificity, single-nucleotide mismatch detection. The single mismatch was detected by measuring strand displacement-induced resistance (and hence current) change and Dirac point shift in a graphene FET. SNP detection in large double-helix DNA strands (e.g., 47 nt) minimize false-positive results. Our electrical sensor-based SNP detection technology, without labeling and without apparent cross-hybridization artifacts, would allow fast, sensitive, and portable SNP detection with single-nucleotide resolution. The technology will have a wide range of applications in digital and implantable biosensors and high-throughput DNA genotyping, with transformative implications for personalized medicine. PMID:27298347

  13. CsSNP: A Web-Based Tool for the Detecting of Comparative Segments SNPs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Shuangshuang; Zhou, Dongjie; Yang, Shuai; Xu, Yongchao; Yang, Chao; Yang, Long

    2016-07-01

    SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) is a popular tool for the study of genetic diversity, evolution, and other areas. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a convenient, utility, robust, rapid, and open source detecting-SNP tool for all researchers. Since the detection of SNPs needs special software and series steps including alignment, detection, analysis and present, the study of SNPs is limited for nonprofessional users. CsSNP (Comparative segments SNP, http://biodb.sdau.edu.cn/cssnp/ ) is a freely available web tool based on the Blat, Blast, and Perl programs to detect comparative segments SNPs and to show the detail information of SNPs. The results are filtered and presented in the statistics figure and a Gbrowse map. This platform contains the reference genomic sequences and coding sequences of 60 plant species, and also provides new opportunities for the users to detect SNPs easily. CsSNP is provided a convenient tool for nonprofessional users to find comparative segments SNPs in their own sequences, and give the users the information and the analysis of SNPs, and display these data in a dynamic map. It provides a new method to detect SNPs and may accelerate related studies. PMID:27347883

  14. A novel three-round multiplex PCR for SNP genotyping with next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Zhou, Yu-Xun; Li, Kai; Qi, Li-Xin; Zhang, Qi-Fei; Wang, Mao-Chun; Xiao, Jun-Hua

    2016-06-01

    Owing to the high throughput and low cost, next generation sequencing has attracted much attention for SNP genotyping application for researchers. Here, we introduce a new method based on three-round multiplex PCR to precisely genotype SNPs with next generation sequencing. This method can as much as possible consume the equivalent amount of each pair of specific primers to largely eliminate the amplification discrepancy between different loci. After the PCR amplification, the products can be directly subjected to next generation sequencing platform. We simultaneously amplified 37 SNP loci of 757 samples and sequenced all amplicons on ion torrent PGM platform; 90.5 % of the target SNP loci were accurately genotyped (at least 15×) and 90.4 % amplicons had uniform coverage with a variation less than 50-fold. Ligase detection reaction (LDR) was performed to genotype the 19 SNP loci (as part of the 37 SNP loci) with 91 samples randomly selected from the 757 samples, and 99.5 % genotyping data were consistent with the next generation sequencing results. Our results demonstrate that three-round PCR coupled with next generation sequencing is an efficient and economical genotyping approach. Graphical Abstract The schematic diagram of three-round PCR. PMID:27113460

  15. Breast cancer-associated high-order SNP-SNP interaction of CXCL12/CXCR4-related genes by an improved multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR-ER).

    PubMed

    Fu, Ou-Yang; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Lin, Yu-Da; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Hou, Ming-Feng; Yang, Cheng-Hong

    2016-09-01

    In association studies, the combined effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-SNP interactions and the problem of imbalanced data between cases and controls are frequently ignored. In the present study, we used an improved multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) approach namely MDR-ER to detect the high order SNP‑SNP interaction in an imbalanced breast cancer data set containing seven SNPs of chemokine CXCL12/CXCR4 pathway genes. Most individual SNPs were not significantly associated with breast cancer. After MDR‑ER analysis, six significant SNP‑SNP interaction models with seven genes (highest cross‑validation consistency, 10; classification error rates, 41.3‑21.0; and prediction error rates, 47.4‑55.3) were identified. CD4 and VEGFA genes were associated in a 2‑loci interaction model (classification error rate, 41.3; prediction error rate, 47.5; odds ratio (OR), 2.069; 95% bootstrap CI, 1.40‑2.90; P=1.71E‑04) and it also appeared in all the best 2‑7‑loci models. When the loci number increased, the classification error rates and P‑values decreased. The powers in 2‑7‑loci in all models were >0.9. The minimum classification error rate of the MDR‑ER‑generated model was shown with the 7‑loci interaction model (classification error rate, 21.0; OR=15.282; 95% bootstrap CI, 9.54‑23.87; P=4.03E‑31). In the epistasis network analysis, the overall effect with breast cancer susceptibility was identified and the SNP order of impact on breast cancer was identified as follows: CD4 = VEGFA > KITLG > CXCL12 > CCR7 = MMP2 > CXCR4. In conclusion, the MDR‑ER can effectively and correctly identify the best SNP‑SNP interaction models in an imbalanced data set for breast cancer cases. PMID:27461876

  16. SNP Discovery by Illumina-Based Transcriptome Sequencing of the Olive and the Genetic Characterization of Turkish Olive Genotypes Revealed by AFLP, SSR and SNP Markers

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Hilal Betul; Cetin, Oznur; Kaya, Hulya; Sahin, Mustafa; Sefer, Filiz; Kahraman, Abdullah; Tanyolac, Bahattin

    2013-01-01

    Background The olive tree (Olea europaea L.) is a diploid (2n = 2x = 46) outcrossing species mainly grown in the Mediterranean area, where it is the most important oil-producing crop. Because of its economic, cultural and ecological importance, various DNA markers have been used in the olive to characterize and elucidate homonyms, synonyms and unknown accessions. However, a comprehensive characterization and a full sequence of its transcriptome are unavailable, leading to the importance of an efficient large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery in olive. The objectives of this study were (1) to discover olive SNPs using next-generation sequencing and to identify SNP primers for cultivar identification and (2) to characterize 96 olive genotypes originating from different regions of Turkey. Methodology/Principal Findings Next-generation sequencing technology was used with five distinct olive genotypes and generated cDNA, producing 126,542,413 reads using an Illumina Genome Analyzer IIx. Following quality and size trimming, the high-quality reads were assembled into 22,052 contigs with an average length of 1,321 bases and 45 singletons. The SNPs were filtered and 2,987 high-quality putative SNP primers were identified. The assembled sequences and singletons were subjected to BLAST similarity searches and annotated with a Gene Ontology identifier. To identify the 96 olive genotypes, these SNP primers were applied to the genotypes in combination with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers. Conclusions/Significance This study marks the highest number of SNP markers discovered to date from olive genotypes using transcriptome sequencing. The developed SNP markers will provide a useful source for molecular genetic studies, such as genetic diversity and characterization, high density quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis, association mapping and map-based gene cloning in the olive. High levels of

  17. Transcriptome sequencing for SNP discovery across Cucumis melo

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    from India and Africa as compared to commercial cultivars, cultigens and landraces from Eastern Europe, Western Asia and the Mediterranean basin is consistent with the evolutionary history proposed for the species. Group-specific SNVs that will be useful in introgression programs were also detected. In a sample of 143 selected putative SNPs, we verified 93% of the polymorphisms in a panel of 78 genotypes. Conclusions This study provides the first comprehensive resequencing data for wild, exotic, and cultivated (landraces and commercial) melon transcriptomes, yielding the largest melon SNP collection available to date and representing a notable sample of the species diversity. This data provides a valuable resource for creating a catalog of allelic variants of melon genes and it will aid in future in-depth studies of population genetics, marker-assisted breeding, and gene identification aimed at developing improved varieties. PMID:22726804

  18. SNP Formation Bias in the Murine Genome Provides Evidence for Parallel Evolution.

    PubMed

    Plyler, Zackery E; Hill, Aubrey E; McAtee, Christopher W; Cui, Xiangqin; Moseley, Leah A; Sorscher, Eric J

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we show novel DNA motifs that promote single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) formation and are conserved among exons, introns, and intergenic DNA from mice (Sanger Mouse Genomes Project), human genes (1000 Genomes), and tumor-specific somatic mutations (data from TCGA). We further characterize SNPs likely to be very recent in origin (i.e., formed in otherwise congenic mice) and show enrichment for both synonymous and parallel DNA variants occurring under circumstances not attributable to purifying selection. The findings provide insight regarding SNP contextual bias and eukaryotic codon usage as strategies that favor long-term exonic stability. The study also furnishes new information concerning rates of murine genomic evolution and features of DNA mutagenesis (at the time of SNP formation) that should be viewed as "adaptive." PMID:26253317

  19. Cross-Species Application of SNP Chips is Not Suitable for Identifying Runs of Homozygosity.

    PubMed

    Shafer, Aaron B A; Miller, Joshua M; Kardos, Marty

    2016-03-01

    Cross-species application of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips is a valid, relatively cost-effective alternative to the high-throughput sequencing methods generally required to obtain a genome-wide sampling of polymorphisms. Kharzinova et al. (2015) examined the applicability of SNP chips developed in domestic bovids (cattle and sheep) to a semi-wild cervid (reindeer). The ancestors of bovids and cervids diverged between 20 and 30 million years ago (Hassanin and Douzery 2003; Bibi et al. 2013). Empirical work has shown that for a SNP chip developed in a bovid and applied to a cervid species, approximately 50% genotype success with 1% of the loci being polymorphic is expected (Miller et al. 2012). The genotyping of Kharzinova et al. (2015) follows this pattern; however, these data are not appropriate for identifying runs of homozygosity (ROH) and can be problematic for estimating linkage disequilibrium (LD) and we caution readers in this regard. PMID:26774056

  20. SNP-Seek database of SNPs derived from 3000 rice genomes.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Nickolai; Tai, Shuaishuai; Wang, Wensheng; Mansueto, Locedie; Palis, Kevin; Fuentes, Roven Rommel; Ulat, Victor Jun; Chebotarov, Dmytro; Zhang, Gengyun; Li, Zhikang; Mauleon, Ramil; Hamilton, Ruaraidh Sackville; McNally, Kenneth L

    2015-01-01

    We have identified about 20 million rice SNPs by aligning reads from the 3000 rice genomes project with the Nipponbare genome. The SNPs and allele information are organized into a SNP-Seek system (http://www.oryzasnp.org/iric-portal/), which consists of Oracle database having a total number of rows with SNP genotypes close to 60 billion (20 M SNPs × 3 K rice lines) and web interface for convenient querying. The database allows quick retrieving of SNP alleles for all varieties in a given genome region, finding different alleles from predefined varieties and querying basic passport and morphological phenotypic information about sequenced rice lines. SNPs can be visualized together with the gene structures in JBrowse genome browser. Evolutionary relationships between rice varieties can be explored using phylogenetic trees or multidimensional scaling plots. PMID:25429973

  1. A SNP-Based Molecular Barcode for Characterization of Common Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Gao, LiFeng; Jia, JiZeng; Kong, XiuYing

    2016-01-01

    Wheat is grown as a staple crop worldwide. It is important to develop an effective genotyping tool for this cereal grain both to identify germplasm diversity and to protect the rights of breeders. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping provides a means for developing a practical, rapid, inexpensive and high-throughput assay. Here, we investigated SNPs as robust markers of genetic variation for typing wheat cultivars. We identified SNPs from an array of 9000 across a collection of 429 well-known wheat cultivars grown in China, of which 43 SNP markers with high minor allele frequency and variations discriminated the selected wheat varieties and their wild ancestors. This SNP-based barcode will allow for the rapid and precise identification of wheat germplasm resources and newly released varieties and will further assist in the wheat breeding program. PMID:26985664

  2. A SNP-Based Molecular Barcode for Characterization of Common Wheat.

    PubMed

    Gao, LiFeng; Jia, JiZeng; Kong, XiuYing

    2016-01-01

    Wheat is grown as a staple crop worldwide. It is important to develop an effective genotyping tool for this cereal grain both to identify germplasm diversity and to protect the rights of breeders. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping provides a means for developing a practical, rapid, inexpensive and high-throughput assay. Here, we investigated SNPs as robust markers of genetic variation for typing wheat cultivars. We identified SNPs from an array of 9000 across a collection of 429 well-known wheat cultivars grown in China, of which 43 SNP markers with high minor allele frequency and variations discriminated the selected wheat varieties and their wild ancestors. This SNP-based barcode will allow for the rapid and precise identification of wheat germplasm resources and newly released varieties and will further assist in the wheat breeding program. PMID:26985664

  3. Developing single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers from transcriptome sequences for identification of longan (Dimocarpus longan) germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Boyi; Tan, Hua-Wei; Fang, Wanping; Meinhardt, Lyndel W; Mischke, Sue; Matsumoto, Tracie; Zhang, Dapeng

    2015-01-01

    Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) is an important tropical fruit tree crop. Accurate varietal identification is essential for germplasm management and breeding. Using longan transcriptome sequences from public databases, we developed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers; validated 60 SNPs in 50 longan germplasm accessions, including cultivated varieties and wild germplasm; and designated 25 SNP markers that unambiguously identified all tested longan varieties with high statistical rigor (P<0.0001). Multiple trees from the same clone were verified and off-type trees were identified. Diversity analysis revealed genetic relationships among analyzed accessions. Cultivated varieties differed significantly from wild populations (Fst=0.300; P<0.001), demonstrating untapped genetic diversity for germplasm conservation and utilization. Within cultivated varieties, apparent differences between varieties from China and those from Thailand and Hawaii indicated geographic patterns of genetic differentiation. These SNP markers provide a powerful tool to manage longan genetic resources and breeding, with accurate and efficient genotype identification. PMID:26504559

  4. Large Scale Association Analysis for Drug Addiction: Results from SNP to Gene

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaobo; Liu, Zhifa; Wang, Xueqin; Zhang, Heping

    2012-01-01

    Many genetic association studies used single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) data to identify genetic variants for complex diseases. Although SNP-based associations are most common in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), gene-based association analysis has received increasing attention in understanding genetic etiologies for complex diseases. While both methods have been used to analyze the same data, few genome-wide association studies compare the results or observe the connection between them. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the data from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment (SAGE) and compared the results from the SNP-based and gene-based analyses. Our results suggest that the gene-based method complements the individual SNP-based analysis, and conceptually they are closely related. In terms of gene findings, our results validate many genes that were either reported from the analysis of the same dataset or based on animal studies for substance dependence. PMID:23365539

  5. Vitis Phylogenomics: Hybridization Intensities from a SNP Array Outperform Genotype Calls

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Allison J.; Matasci, Naim; Schwaninger, Heidi; Aradhya, Mallikarjuna K.; Prins, Bernard; Zhong, Gan-Yuan; Simon, Charles; Buckler, Edward S.; Myles, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Understanding relationships among species is a fundamental goal of evolutionary biology. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified through next generation sequencing and related technologies enable phylogeny reconstruction by providing unprecedented numbers of characters for analysis. One approach to SNP-based phylogeny reconstruction is to identify SNPs in a subset of individuals, and then to compile SNPs on an array that can be used to genotype additional samples at hundreds or thousands of sites simultaneously. Although powerful and efficient, this method is subject to ascertainment bias because applying variation discovered in a representative subset to a larger sample favors identification of SNPs with high minor allele frequencies and introduces bias against rare alleles. Here, we demonstrate that the use of hybridization intensity data, rather than genotype calls, reduces the effects of ascertainment bias. Whereas traditional SNP calls assess known variants based on diversity housed in the discovery panel, hybridization intensity data survey variation in the broader sample pool, regardless of whether those variants are present in the initial SNP discovery process. We apply SNP genotype and hybridization intensity data derived from the Vitis9kSNP array developed for grape to show the effects of ascertainment bias and to reconstruct evolutionary relationships among Vitis species. We demonstrate that phylogenies constructed using hybridization intensities suffer less from the distorting effects of ascertainment bias, and are thus more accurate than phylogenies based on genotype calls. Moreover, we reconstruct the phylogeny of the genus Vitis using hybridization data, show that North American subgenus Vitis species are monophyletic, and resolve several previously poorly known relationships among North American species. This study builds on earlier work that applied the Vitis9kSNP array to evolutionary questions within Vitis vinifera and has general

  6. Mycobacterium leprae in Colombia described by SNP7614 in gyrA, two minisatellites and geography

    PubMed Central

    Cardona-Castro, Nora; Beltrán-Alzate, Juan Camilo; Romero-Montoya, Irma Marcela; Li, Wei; Brennan, Patrick J; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2013-01-01

    New cases of leprosy are still being detected in Colombia after the country declared achievement of the WHO defined ‘elimination’ status. To study the ecology of leprosy in endemic regions, a combination of geographic and molecular tools were applied for a group of 201 multibacillary patients including six multi-case families from eleven departments. The location (latitude and longitude) of patient residences were mapped. Slit skin smears and/or skin biopsies were collected and DNA was extracted. Standard agarose gel electrophoresis following a multiplex PCR-was developed for rapid and inexpensive strain typing of M. leprae based on copy numbers of two VNTR minisatellite loci 27-5 and 12-5. A SNP (C/T) in gyrA (SNP7614) was mapped by introducing a novel PCR-RFLP into an ongoing drug resistance surveillance effort. Multiple genotypes were detected combining the three molecular markers. The two frequent genotypes in Colombia were SNP7614(C)/27-5(5)/12-5(4) [C54] predominantly distributed in the Atlantic departments and SNP7614 (T)/27-5(4)/12-5(5) [T45] associated with the Andean departments. A novel genotype SNP7614 (C)/27-5(6)/12-5(4) [C64] was detected in cities along the Magdalena river which separates the Andean from Atlantic departments; a subset was further characterized showing association with a rare allele of minisatellite 23-3 and the SNP type 1 of M. leprae. The genotypes within intra-family cases were conserved. Overall, this is the first large scale study that utilized simple and rapid assay formats for identification of major strain types and their distribution in Colombia. It provides the framework for further strain type discrimination and geographic information systems as tools for tracing transmission of leprosy. PMID:23291420

  7. Mycobacterium leprae in Colombia described by SNP7614 in gyrA, two minisatellites and geography.

    PubMed

    Cardona-Castro, Nora; Beltrán-Alzate, Juan Camilo; Romero-Montoya, Irma Marcela; Li, Wei; Brennan, Patrick J; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2013-03-01

    New cases of leprosy are still being detected in Colombia after the country declared achievement of the WHO defined 'elimination' status. To study the ecology of leprosy in endemic regions, a combination of geographic and molecular tools were applied for a group of 201 multibacillary patients including six multi-case families from eleven departments. The location (latitude and longitude) of patient residences were mapped. Slit skin smears and/or skin biopsies were collected and DNA was extracted. Standard agarose gel electrophoresis following a multiplex PCR-was developed for rapid and inexpensive strain typing of Mycobacterium leprae based on copy numbers of two VNTR minisatellite loci 27-5 and 12-5. A SNP (C/T) in gyrA (SNP7614) was mapped by introducing a novel PCR-RFLP into an ongoing drug resistance surveillance effort. Multiple genotypes were detected combining the three molecular markers. The two frequent genotypes in Colombia were SNP7614(C)/27-5(5)/12-5(4) [C54] predominantly distributed in the Atlantic departments and SNP7614 (T)/27-5(4)/12-5(5) [T45] associated with the Andean departments. A novel genotype SNP7614 (C)/27-5(6)/12-5(4) [C64] was detected in cities along the Magdalena river which separates the Andean from Atlantic departments; a subset was further characterized showing association with a rare allele of minisatellite 23-3 and the SNP type 1 of M. leprae. The genotypes within intra-family cases were conserved. Overall, this is the first large scale study that utilized simple and rapid assay formats for identification of major strain types and their distribution in Colombia. It provides the framework for further strain type discrimination and geographic information systems as tools for tracing transmission of leprosy. PMID:23291420

  8. Association of MDM2 SNP309, age of onset, and gender in cutaneous melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Firoz, Elnaz F.; Warycha, Melanie; Zakrzewski, Jan; Pollens, Danuta; Wang, Guimin; Shapiro, Richard; Berman, Russell; Pavlick, Anna; Manga, Prashiela; Ostrer, Harry; Celebi, Julide Tok; Kamino, Hideko; Darvishian, Farbod; Rolnitzky, Linda; Goldberg, Judith D.; Osman, Iman; Polsky, David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In certain cancers, MDM2 SNP309 has been associated with early tumor onset in women. In melanoma, incidence rates are higher in women than in men among individuals less than age 40; however, among those older than age 50, melanoma is more frequent in men than in women. To investigate this difference, we examined the association between MDM2 SNP309, age at diagnosis, and gender among melanoma patients. Experimental Design Prospectively enrolled melanoma patients (N=227) were evaluated for MDM2 SNP309 and the related polymorphism, p53 Arg72Pro. DNA was isolated from patient blood samples and genotypes were analyzed by PCR-RFLP. Associations between MDM2 SNP309, p53 Arg72Pro, age at diagnosis, and clinicopathologic features of melanoma were analyzed. Results The median age at diagnosis was 13 years earlier among women with a SNP309 GG genotype (46 years) compared to women with TG+TT genotypes (59 years; p=0.19). Analyses using age dichotomized at each decade indicated that women with a GG genotype had significantly higher risks of being diagnosed with melanoma at ages less than 50 compared to women 50 and older, but not 60 and older. At ages less than 50, women with a GG genotype had a 3.89 times greater chance of being diagnosed compared to women with TG+TT genotypes (p=0.01). Similar observations were not seen among men. Conclusions Our data suggest that MDM2 may play an important role in the development of melanoma in women. The MDM2 SNP309 genotype may help identify women at risk for developing melanoma at a young age. PMID:19318491

  9. Linkage Analysis and QTL Mapping Using SNP Dosage Data in a Tetraploid Potato Mapping Population

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Christine A.; McLean, Karen; Bryan, Glenn J.

    2013-01-01

    New sequencing and genotyping technologies have enabled researchers to generate high density SNP genotype data for mapping populations. In polyploid species, SNP data usually contain a new type of information, the allele dosage, which is not used by current methodologies for linkage analysis and QTL mapping. Here we extend existing methodology to use dosage data on SNPs in an autotetraploid mapping population. The SNP dosages are inferred from allele intensity ratios using normal mixture models. The steps of the linkage analysis (testing for distorted segregation, clustering SNPs, calculation of recombination fractions and LOD scores, ordering of SNPs and inference of parental phase) are extended to use the dosage information. For QTL analysis, the probability of each possible offspring genotype is inferred at a grid of locations along the chromosome from the ordered parental genotypes and phases and the offspring dosages. A normal mixture model is then used to relate trait values to the offspring genotypes and to identify the most likely locations for QTLs. These methods are applied to analyse a tetraploid potato mapping population of parents and 190 offspring, genotyped using an Infinium 8300 Potato SNP Array. Linkage maps for each of the 12 chromosomes are constructed. The allele intensity ratios are mapped as quantitative traits to check that their position and phase agrees with that of the corresponding SNP. This analysis confirms most SNP positions, and eliminates some problem SNPs to give high-density maps for each chromosome, with between 74 and 152 SNPs mapped and between 100 and 300 further SNPs allocated to approximate bins. Low numbers of double reduction products were detected. Overall 3839 of the 5378 polymorphic SNPs can be assigned putative genetic locations. This methodology can be applied to construct high-density linkage maps in any autotetraploid species, and could also be extended to higher autopolyploids. PMID:23704960

  10. Using Hamming Distance as Information for SNP-Sets Clustering and Testing in Disease Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Charlotte; Kao, Wen-Hsin; Hsiao, Chuhsing Kate

    2015-01-01

    The availability of high-throughput genomic data has led to several challenges in recent genetic association studies, including the large number of genetic variants that must be considered and the computational complexity in statistical analyses. Tackling these problems with a marker-set study such as SNP-set analysis can be an efficient solution. To construct SNP-sets, we first propose a clustering algorithm, which employs Hamming distance to measure the similarity between strings of SNP genotypes and evaluates whether the given SNPs or SNP-sets should be clustered. A dendrogram can then be constructed based on such distance measure, and the number of clusters can be determined. With the resulting SNP-sets, we next develop an association test HDAT to examine susceptibility to the disease of interest. This proposed test assesses, based on Hamming distance, whether the similarity between a diseased and a normal individual differs from the similarity between two individuals of the same disease status. In our proposed methodology, only genotype information is needed. No inference of haplotypes is required, and SNPs under consideration do not need to locate in nearby regions. The proposed clustering algorithm and association test are illustrated with applications and simulation studies. As compared with other existing methods, the clustering algorithm is faster and better at identifying sets containing SNPs exerting a similar effect. In addition, the simulation studies demonstrated that the proposed test works well for SNP-sets containing a large proportion of neutral SNPs. Furthermore, employing the clustering algorithm before testing a large set of data improves the knowledge in confining the genetic regions for susceptible genetic markers. PMID:26302001

  11. An Integrated SNP Mining and Utilization (ISMU) Pipeline for Next Generation Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Sarwar; Rathore, Abhishek; Shah, Trushar M.; Telluri, Mohan; Amindala, BhanuPrakash; Ruperao, Pradeep; Katta, Mohan A. V. S. K.; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2014-01-01

    Open source single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery pipelines for next generation sequencing data commonly requires working knowledge of command line interface, massive computational resources and expertise which is a daunting task for biologists. Further, the SNP information generated may not be readily used for downstream processes such as genotyping. Hence, a comprehensive pipeline has been developed by integrating several open source next generation sequencing (NGS) tools along with a graphical user interface called Integrated SNP Mining and Utilization (ISMU) for SNP discovery and their utilization by developing genotyping assays. The pipeline features functionalities such as pre-processing of raw data, integration of open source alignment tools (Bowtie2, BWA, Maq, NovoAlign and SOAP2), SNP prediction (SAMtools/SOAPsnp/CNS2snp and CbCC) methods and interfaces for developing genotyping assays. The pipeline outputs a list of high quality SNPs between all pairwise combinations of genotypes analyzed, in addition to the reference genome/sequence. Visualization tools (Tablet and Flapjack) integrated into the pipeline enable inspection of the alignment and errors, if any. The pipeline also provides a confidence score or polymorphism information content value with flanking sequences for identified SNPs in standard format required for developing marker genotyping (KASP and Golden Gate) assays. The pipeline enables users to process a range of NGS datasets such as whole genome re-sequencing, restriction site associated DNA sequencing and transcriptome sequencing data at a fast speed. The pipeline is very useful for plant genetics and breeding community with no computational expertise in order to discover SNPs and utilize in genomics, genetics and breeding studies. The pipeline has been parallelized to process huge datasets of next generation sequencing. It has been developed in Java language and is available at http://hpc.icrisat.cgiar.org/ISMU as a standalone

  12. k-merSNP discovery: Software for alignment-and reference-free scalable SNP discovery, phylogenetics, and annotation for hundreds of microbial genomes

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-18

    With the flood of whole genome finished and draft microbial sequences, we need faster, more scalable bioinformatics tools for sequence comparison. An algorithm is described to find single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in whole genome data. It scales to hundreds of bacterial or viral genomes, and can be used for finished and/or draft genomes available as unassembled contigs or raw, unassembled reads. The method is fast to compute, finding SNPs and building a SNP phylogeny in minutes to hours, depending on the size and diversity of the input sequences. The SNP-based trees that result are consistent with known taxonomy and trees determined in other studies. The approach we describe can handle many gigabases of sequence in a single run. The algorithm is based on k-mer analysis.

  13. k-merSNP discovery: Software for alignment-and reference-free scalable SNP discovery, phylogenetics, and annotation for hundreds of microbial genomes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-11-18

    With the flood of whole genome finished and draft microbial sequences, we need faster, more scalable bioinformatics tools for sequence comparison. An algorithm is described to find single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in whole genome data. It scales to hundreds of bacterial or viral genomes, and can be used for finished and/or draft genomes available as unassembled contigs or raw, unassembled reads. The method is fast to compute, finding SNPs and building a SNP phylogeny inmore » minutes to hours, depending on the size and diversity of the input sequences. The SNP-based trees that result are consistent with known taxonomy and trees determined in other studies. The approach we describe can handle many gigabases of sequence in a single run. The algorithm is based on k-mer analysis.« less

  14. Long-term cognitive enrichment affects opioid receptor expression in the amygdala of domestic pigs.

    PubMed

    Kalbe, C; Puppe, B

    2010-02-01

    Enriching the housing environment by stimuli that challenge both reward and cognitive mechanisms may enhance behavioural experiences and can improve animal welfare, particularly in farm animals. A newly developed experimental feeding system for domestic pigs using food-rewarded learning of discriminatory and instrumental tasks enabled the animals to successfully master a cognitive challenge and to be rewarded ca. 30 times per day with small food portions. Reward-related behaviour is expected to be modulated by endogenous opioid systems. Furthermore, recent evidence supports a role for the amygdala in processing positive affects by stimulus-reward learning. Hence, the present study investigates mRNA expression of cerebral receptors, which are involved in these processes. In an initial step, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) provided the first evidence that transcripts of three different opioid receptors (MOR, DOR, KOR), as well as the neuropeptide Y 5 receptor (NPY5R), leptin receptor (LEPR) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC), are expressed in both the porcine amygdala and hypothalamus. Using real-time PCR we could show that the expression of two receptors of the opioid system (amygdala: KOR, DOR), in addition to the expression of NPY5R (hypothalamus) in eight enriched housed pigs was markedly downregulated compared to that of conventionally housed and fed pigs. Focusing on opioid receptors in the amygdala, the present study shows that long-term cognitive enrichment acts as a biologically relevant stimulus that causes modifications of gene expression of reward-sensitive cerebral receptors in domestic pigs. PMID:19804558

  15. A novel SNP in 3' UTR of INS gene: A case report of neonatal diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bogari, Neda M; Rayes, Husni H; Mostafa, Fakri; Abdel-Latif, Azza M; Ramadan, Abeer; Al-Allaf, Faisal A; Taher, Mohiuddin M; Fawzy, Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) is a rare condition with a prevalence of 1 in 300,000 live births. We have found 3 known SNPs in 5'UTR and a novel SNP in 3' UTR in the INS gene. These SNPs were present in 9-month-old girl from Saudi Arabia and also present in the father and mother. The novel SNP we found is not present in 1000 Genome project or other databases. Further, the newly identified 3' UTR mutation in the INS gene may abolish the polyadenylation signal and result in severe RNA instability. PMID:26212367

  16. Association and CpG SNP analysis of HTR4 polymorphisms with suicidal behavior in subjects with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Polsinelli, Gina; Zai, Clement C; Strauss, John; Kennedy, James L; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2013-02-01

    Suicide is a major contributor to the morbidity and mortality rates in schizophrenia. Genetic and epigenetic factors have been reported to modulate the risk for suicide although the precise mechanism and magnitude of these contributions is unknown. Previous research indicates that suicide attempters present abnormalities in the serotonergic system. The present study aimed to identify genetic and epigenetic risk variants of the serotonin 5-HT₄ receptor gene (HTR4) for suicidal behavior. We included 234 subjects diagnosed with schizophrenia. For this purpose, we analyzed 11 markers across HTR4 and performed genotype, haplotype and potential methylation analyses, correcting for clinical covariates and ethnic stratification. Three blocks were revealed from the LD analysis. Haplotypes in Block 3 were significantly associated with suicide attempt. The potential methylation analysis was not significant. Our results suggest that HTR4 polymorphisms may not play a major role in the susceptibility for suicidal behavior in subjects with schizophrenia. Moreover, although not significant, the CpG SNP potential methylation analysis would be informative for future methylation analysis on this gene. PMID:22842674

  17. Purinergic signaling via P2X7 receptor mediates IL-1β production in Kupffer cells exposed to silica nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Shuji; Negishi, Yusuke; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi; Takenouchi, Takato; Kitani, Hiroshi; Takeda, Ken

    2014-07-01

    There is extensive evidence that nanoparticles (NPs) cause adverse effects in multiple organs, including liver, though the mechanisms involved remain to be fully established. Kupffer cells are macrophages resident in the liver, and play important roles in liver inflammation induced by various toxic agents, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Interleukin-1 (IL-1) family members IL-1α,β are released from LPS-primed macrophages exposed to NPs, including silica NPs (SNPs), via activation of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing 3 inflammasomes. Here, we investigated the mechanism of production of IL-1β via activation of inflammasomes in mouse Kupffer cell line KUP5, focusing on the role of purinergic signaling via P2X7 receptor. IL-1β production by LPS-primed KUP5 cells exposed to SNPs was increased dose-dependently, and was greatest in response to SNPs with a diameter of 30 nm (SNP30), as compared with 70-nm and 300-nm SNPs (SNP70 and SNP300). ATP release was also highest in cells exposed to SNP30. Treatment of LPS-primed KUP5 cells with ATP also induced a high level of IL-1β production, similar to that induced by SNP30. IL-1β production was significantly inhibited by apyrase (an ecto-nucleotidase) and A438079 (a P2X7 antagonist/ATP-release inhibitor). Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was confirmed in cells exposed to SNP30. In conclusion, ATP released from P2X7 receptor in response to stimulation of KUP5 cells with SNP30 induces ROS production via cell-membrane NADPH oxidase. The ROS causes activation of inflammasomes, leading to caspase-1-dependent processing of IL-1β. PMID:24685903

  18. Meta-Analysis of High-Density SNP Associations for Beef Cattle Production Traits from Three Countries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    About 50,000 SNP were evaluated for associations with growth, carcass, and meat quality traits in three populations of cattle in the United States, Canada, and Australia. Regression coefficients for each SNP were independently estimated within each country. Coefficients for similar traits were stand...

  19. MDM2 promoter SNP55 (rs2870820) affects risk of colon cancer but not breast-, lung-, or prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Helwa, Reham; Gansmo, Liv B; Romundstad, Pål; Hveem, Kristian; Vatten, Lars; Ryan, Bríd M; Harris, Curtis C; Lønning, Per E; Knappskog, Stian

    2016-01-01

    Two functional SNPs (SNP285G > C; rs117039649 and SNP309T > G; rs2279744) have previously been reported to modulate Sp1 transcription factor binding to the promoter of the proto-oncogene MDM2, and to influence cancer risk. Recently, a third SNP (SNP55C > T; rs2870820) was also reported to affect Sp1 binding and MDM2 transcription. In this large population based case-control study, we genotyped MDM2 SNP55 in 10,779 Caucasian individuals, previously genotyped for SNP309 and SNP285, including cases of colon (n = 1,524), lung (n = 1,323), breast (n = 1,709) and prostate cancer (n = 2,488) and 3,735 non-cancer controls, as well as 299 healthy African-Americans. Applying the dominant model, we found an elevated risk of colon cancer among individuals harbouring SNP55TT/CT genotypes compared to the SNP55CC genotype (OR = 1.15; 95% CI = 1.01-1.30). The risk was found to be highest for left-sided colon cancer (OR = 1.21; 95% CI = 1.00-1.45) and among females (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 1.01-1.74). Assessing combined genotypes, we found the highest risk of colon cancer among individuals harbouring the SNP55TT or CT together with the SNP309TG genotype (OR = 1.21; 95% CI = 1.00-1.46). Supporting the conclusions from the risk estimates, we found colon cancer cases carrying the SNP55TT/CT genotypes to be diagnosed at younger age as compared to SNP55CC (p = 0.053), in particular among patients carrying the SNP309TG/TT genotypes (p = 0.009). PMID:27624283

  20. Longevity and plasticity of CFTR provide an argument for noncanonical SNP organization in hominid DNA.

    PubMed

    Hill, Aubrey E; Plyler, Zackery E; Tiwari, Hemant; Patki, Amit; Tully, Joel P; McAtee, Christopher W; Moseley, Leah A; Sorscher, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Like many other ancient genes, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has survived for hundreds of millions of years. In this report, we consider whether such prodigious longevity of an individual gene--as opposed to an entire genome or species--should be considered surprising in the face of eons of relentless DNA replication errors, mutagenesis, and other causes of sequence polymorphism. The conventions that modern human SNP patterns result either from purifying selection or random (neutral) drift were not well supported, since extant models account rather poorly for the known plasticity and function (or the established SNP distributions) found in a multitude of genes such as CFTR. Instead, our analysis can be taken as a polemic indicating that SNPs in CFTR and many other mammalian genes may have been generated--and continue to accrue--in a fundamentally more organized manner than would otherwise have been expected. The resulting viewpoint contradicts earlier claims of 'directional' or 'intelligent design-type' SNP formation, and has important implications regarding the pace of DNA adaptation, the genesis of conserved non-coding DNA, and the extent to which eukaryotic SNP formation should be viewed as adaptive. PMID:25350658

  1. The use of SNP data for the monitoring of genetic diversity in cattle breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    LD between SNPs contains information about effective population size. In this study, we investigate the use of genome-wide SNP data for marker based estimation of effective population size for two taurine cattle breeds of Africa and two local cattle breeds of Switzerland. Estimated recombination rat...

  2. Application of RAD LongRead sequencing for SNP discovery in sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sugarcane (hybrid Saccharum spp.) genome presents a difficult challenge for SNP discovery and analysis due to its complex polyploid nature. This is compounded further due to the absence of a reference genome sequence. We report the discovery of SNPs in sugarcane through reductive sequencing and ...

  3. SNP-revealed genetic diversity in wild emmer wheat correlates with ecological factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patterns of genetic diversity between and within natural plant populations and their driving forces are of great interest in evolutionary biology. However, few studies have been performed on the genetic structure and population divergence in wild emmer wheat using a large number of EST-related single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Results In the present study, twenty-five natural wild emmer wheat populations representing a wide range of ecological conditions in Israel and Turkey were used. Genetic diversity and genetic structure were investigated using over 1,000 SNP markers. A moderate level of genetic diversity was detected due to the biallelic property of SNP markers. Clustering based on Bayesian model showed that grouping pattern is related to the geographical distribution of the wild emmer wheat. However, genetic differentiation between populations was not necessarily dependent on the geographical distances. A total of 33 outlier loci under positive selection were identified using a FST-outlier method. Significant correlations between loci and ecogeographical factors were observed. Conclusions Natural selection appears to play a major role in generating adaptive structures in wild emmer wheat. SNP markers are appropriate for detecting selectively-channeled adaptive genetic diversity in natural populations of wild emmer wheat. This adaptive genetic diversity is significantly associated with ecological factors. PMID:23937410

  4. Applying SNP marker technology in the cacao breeding program at the Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this investigation 45 parental cacao plants and five progeny derived from the parental stock studied were genotyped using six SNP markers to determine off-types or mislabeled clones and to authenticate crosses made in the Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana (CRIG) breeding program. Investigation wa...

  5. SNP Discovery in Swine by Reduced Representation and High Throughput Pyrosequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relatively little information is available for sequence variation in the pig. Because reduced representation reduces the complexity of the genome being sampled by orders of magnitude and samples identical regions dispersed across the genome, it is an ideal strategy for SNP discovery in a species wit...

  6. An integrative segmentation method for detecting germline copy number variations in SNP arrays.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianxin; Li, Peng

    2012-05-01

    Germline copy number variations (CNVs) are a major source of genetic variation in humans. In large-scale studies of complex diseases, CNVs are usually detected from data generated by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping arrays. In this paper, we develop an integrative segmentation method, SegCNV, for detecting CNVs integrating both log R ratio (LRR) and B allele frequency (BAF). Based on simulation studies, SegCNV had modestly better power to detect deletions and substantially better power to detect duplications compared with circular binary segmentation (CBS) that relies purely on LRRs; and it had better power to detect deletions and a comparable performance to detect duplications compared with PennCNV and QuantiSNP. In two Hapmap subjects with deep sequence data available as a gold standard, SegCNV detected more true short deletions than PennCNV and QuantiSNP. For 21 short duplications validated experimentally in the AGRE dataset, SegCNV, QuantiSNP, and PennCNV detected all of them while CBS detected only three. SegCNV is much faster than the HMM-based (where HMM is hidden Markov model) methods, taking only several seconds to analyze genome-wide data for one subject. PMID:22539397

  7. SNP-based genotyping in lentil: linking sequence information with phenotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lentil (Lens culinaris) has been late to enter the world of high throughput molecular analysis due to a general lack of genomic resources. Using a 454 sequencing-based approach, SNPs have been identified in genes across the lentil genome. Several hundred have been turned into single SNP KASP assay...

  8. Measuring diversity in Gossypium hirsutum using the CottonSNP63K Array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A CottonSNP63K array and accompanying cluster file has been developed and includes 45,104 intra-specific SNPs and 17,954 inter-specific SNPs for automated genotyping of cotton (Gossypium spp.) samples. Development of the cluster file included genotyping of 1,156 samples, a subset of which were iden...

  9. Making a chocolate chip: development and evaluation of a 6K SNP array for Theobroma cacao.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Theobroma cacao, the key ingredient in chocolate production, is one of the world's most important tree fruit crops, with ~4,000,000 metric tons produced across 50 countries. To move towards gene discovery and marker-assisted breeding in cacao, a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) identification pr...

  10. Development of a SNP genotyping panel for genetic monitoring of the laboratory mouse.

    PubMed

    Petkov, Petko M; Cassell, Megan A; Sargent, Evelyn E; Donnelly, Charles J; Robinson, Phil; Crew, Victor; Asquith, Steven; Haar, Raymond Vonder; Wiles, Michael V

    2004-05-01

    We have developed a genotyping system for detecting genetic contamination in the laboratory mouse based on assaying single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers positioned on all autosomes and the X chromosome. This system provides a fast, reliable, and cost-effective way for genetic monitoring, while maintaining a very high degree of confidence. We describe the allelic distribution of 235 SNPs in 48 mouse strains, thereby creating a database of polymorphisms useful for genotyping purposes. The SNP markers used in this study were chosen from publicly available SNP databases. Four genotyping methods were evaluated, and dynamic two-tube allele-specific PCR assays were developed for each marker and tested on a set of 48 inbred mouse strains. The minimal number of assays sufficient to distinguish groups consisting of different numbers of mouse strains was estimated, and a panel of 28 SNPs sufficient to distinguish virtually all of the inbred strains tested was selected. Amplifluor SNP detection assays were developed for these markers and tested on an extended list of 96 strains. This panel was used as a genetic quality control approach to monitor the genotypes of nearly 300 inbred, wild-derived, congenic, consomic, and recombinant inbred strains maintained at The Jackson Laboratory. We have concluded that this marker panel is sufficient for genetic contamination monitoring in colonies containing a large number of genetically diverse mouse strains and that reduced versions of the panel could be implemented in facilities housing a lower number of strains. PMID:15081119

  11. Identification of a SNP marker associated with WB242 nematode resistance in sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The beet-cyst nematode (Heterodera schachtii Schmidt) is one of the major diseases of sugar beet. The identification of molecular markers associated to the nematode resistance would be helpful for developing resistant varieties. The aim of this study was the identification of SNP (Single Nucleotide ...

  12. Field ionization process of Eu 4f76snp Rydberg states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Shen, Li; Dai, Chang-Jian

    2015-11-01

    The field ionization process of the Eu 4f76snp Rydberg states, converging to the first ionization limit, 4f76s 9S4, is systematically investigated. The spectra of the Eu 4f76snp Rydberg states are populated with three-step laser excitation, and detected by electric field ionization (EFI) method. Two different kinds of the EFI pulses are applied after laser excitation to observe the possible impacts on the EFI process. The exact EFI ionization thresholds for the 4f76snp Rydberg states can be determined by observing the corresponding EFI spectra. In particular, some structures above the EFI threshold are found in the EFI spectra, which may be interpreted as the effect from black body radiation (BBR). Finally, the scaling law of the EFI threshold for the Eu 4f76snp Rydberg states with the effective quantum number is built. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11004151 and 11174218).

  13. High-throughput SNP scoring with GAMMArrays: genomic analysis using multiplexed microsphere arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Lance D.; Cai, Hong; Torney, David C.; Wood, Diane J.; Uribe-Romeo, Francisco J.; Kaderali, Lars; Nolan, John P.; White, P. S.

    2002-06-01

    We have developed a SNP scoring platform, yielding high throughput, inexpensive assays. The basic platform uses fluorescently labeled DNA fragments bound to microspheres, which are analyzed using flow cytometry. SNP scoring is performed using minisequencing primers and fluorescently labeled dideoxynucleotides. Furthermore, multiplexed microspheres make it possible to score hundreds of SNPs simultaneously. Multiplexing, coupled with high throughput rates allow inexpensive scoring of several million SNPs/day. GAMMArrays use universal tags that consist of computer designed, unique DNA tails. These are incorporated into each primer, and the reverse-component is attached to a discrete population of microspheres in a multiplexed set. This enables simultaneous minisequencing of many SNPs in solution, followed by capture onto the appropriate microsphere for multiplexed analysis by flow cytometry. We present results from multiplexed SNP analyses of bacterial pathogens, and human mtDNA variation. Analytes are performed on PCR amplicons, each containing numerous SNPs scored simultaneously. In addition, these assays easily integrate into conventional liquid handling automation, and require no unique instrumentation for setup and analysis. Very high signal-to-noise ratios, ease of setup, flexibility in format and scale, and low cost make these assays extremely versatile and valuable tools for a wide variety of SNP scoring applications.

  14. SNP discovery in swine by reduced representation and high throughput pyrosequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A reduced representation library (RRL) of porcine genomic fragments was used to identify SNP from a pool of DNA isolated from 26 animals (52 chromosomes) relevant to current pork production. Treatment of the pooled DNA with a restriction enzyme, coupled with gel-based size selection of 450 base pair...

  15. Association Analyses of Candidate SNP on Reproductive and Production Traits in Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to identify young females with superior reproduction would have a large economic impact on commercial swine production. Previous studies have discovered SNP associated with economically important traits such as litter size, growth rate, and feed intake. The objective of this study was to...

  16. High-density SNP Scan of Production and Product Quality Traits in Beef Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genotypes from the BovineSNP50 BeadChip (50K) were obtained on animals derived from 150 AI sires from seven breeds (22 sires per breed; Angus, Charolais, Gelbvieh, Hereford, Limousin, Red Angus, and Simmental) as either progeny (F1; 590 steers) or grandprogeny (F1 x F1 = F1**2; 1,306 steers and 707 ...

  17. Utilization of a whole genome SNP panel for efficient genetic mapping in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Jennifer L.; Bolton, Andrew D.; Tran, Pamela V.; Brown, Alison; Dwyer, Noelle D.; Manning, Danielle K.; Bjork, Bryan C.; Li, Cheng; Montgomery, Kate; Siepka, Sandra M.; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Wiltshire, Tim; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Beier, David R.

    2006-01-01

    Phenotype-driven genetics can be used to create mouse models of human disease and birth defects. However, the utility of these mutant models is limited without identification of the causal gene. To facilitate genetic mapping, we developed a fixed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) panel of 394 SNPs as an alternative to analyses using simple sequence length polymorphism (SSLP) marker mapping. With the SNP panel, chromosomal locations for 22 monogenic mutants were identified. The average number of affected progeny genotyped for mapped monogenic mutations is nine. Map locations for several mutants have been obtained with as few as four affected progeny. The average size of genetic intervals obtained for these mutants is 43 Mb, with a range of 17–83 Mb. Thus, our SNP panel allows for identification of moderate resolution map position with small numbers of mice in a high-throughput manner. Importantly, the panel is suitable for mapping crosses from many inbred and wild-derived inbred strain combinations. The chromosomal localizations obtained with the SNP panel allow one to quickly distinguish between potentially novel loci or remutations in known genes, and facilitates fine mapping and positional cloning. By using this approach, we identified DNA sequence changes in two ethylnitrosourea-induced mutants. PMID:16461637

  18. Development and validation of a low-density SNP panel related to prolificacy in sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-density SNP panels (e.g., 50,000 and 600,000 markers) have been used in exploratory population genetic studies with commercial and minor breeds of sheep. However, routine genetic diversity evaluations of large numbers of samples with large panels are in general cost-prohibitive for gene banks. ...

  19. SNP discovery in complex allotetraploid genomes (Gossypium spp., Malvaceae) using genotyping by sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dramatic decreases in the cost of DNA sequencing have enabled the development of very large numbers of markers based on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) for phylogenetic studies, population genetics, linkage mapping, marker-assisted breeding and other applications. Using Illumina next-generatio...

  20. Association mapping of resistance to leaf rust in emmer wheat using high throughput SNP markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum L. subsp. dicoccum) is known to be a useful source of genes for many desirable characters for improvement of modern cultivated wheat. Recently, a panel of 181 emmer wheat accessions has been genotyped with wheat 9K SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) markers and exte...

  1. Development of gene-tagged SNP markers for gland morphogenesis in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton (Gossypium spp.) plants, including cottonseed, have small, pigmented glands containing gossypol and other terpenoid compounds that are toxic to humans and non-ruminant animals. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers involved in gland morphogenesis are useful for the discovery of candid...

  2. Association of Agronomic Traits with SNP Markers in Durum Wheat (Triticum turgidum L. durum (Desf.))

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin; Ren, Jing; Ren, Xifeng; Huang, Sisi; Sabiel, Salih A. I.; Luo, Mingcheng; Nevo, Eviatar; Fu, Chunjie; Peng, Junhua; Sun, Dongfa

    2015-01-01

    Association mapping is a powerful approach to detect associations between traits of interest and genetic markers based on linkage disequilibrium (LD) in molecular plant breeding. In this study, 150 accessions of worldwide originated durum wheat germplasm (Triticum turgidum spp. durum) were genotyped using 1,366 SNP markers. The extent of LD on each chromosome was evaluated. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) markers with ten agronomic traits measured in four consecutive years was analyzed under a mix linear model (MLM). Two hundred and one significant association pairs were detected in the four years. Several markers were associated with one trait, and also some markers were associated with multiple traits. Some of the associated markers were in agreement with previous quantitative trait loci (QTL) analyses. The function and homology analyses of the corresponding ESTs of some SNP markers could explain many of the associations for plant height, length of main spike, number of spikelets on main spike, grain number per plant, and 1000-grain weight, etc. The SNP associations for the observed traits are generally clustered in specific chromosome regions of the wheat genome, mainly in 2A, 5A, 6A, 7A, 1B, and 6B chromosomes. This study demonstrates that association mapping can complement and enhance previous QTL analyses and provide additional information for marker-assisted selection. PMID:26110423

  3. New tools and methods for direct programmatic access to the dbSNP relational database

    PubMed Central

    Saccone, Scott F.; Quan, Jiaxi; Mehta, Gaurang; Bolze, Raphael; Thomas, Prasanth; Deelman, Ewa; Tischfield, Jay A.; Rice, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies often incorporate information from public biological databases in order to provide a biological reference for interpreting the results. The dbSNP database is an extensive source of information on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for many different organisms, including humans. We have developed free software that will download and install a local MySQL implementation of the dbSNP relational database for a specified organism. We have also designed a system for classifying dbSNP tables in terms of common tasks we wish to accomplish using the database. For each task we have designed a small set of custom tables that facilitate task-related queries and provide entity-relationship diagrams for each task composed from the relevant dbSNP tables. In order to expose these concepts and methods to a wider audience we have developed web tools for querying the database and browsing documentation on the tables and columns to clarify the relevant relational structure. All web tools and software are freely available to the public at http://cgsmd.isi.edu/dbsnpq. Resources such as these for programmatically querying biological databases are essential for viably integrating biological information into genetic association experiments on a genome-wide scale. PMID:21037260

  4. High-throughput RAD-SNP genotyping for characterization of sugar beet genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-throughput SNP genotyping provides a rapid way of developing resourceful set of markers for delineating the genetic architecture and for effective species discrimination. In the presented research, we demonstrate a set of 192 SNPs for effective genotyping in sugar beet using high-throughput mar...

  5. Fine mapping of copy number variations on two cattle genome assemblies using high density SNP array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Btau_4.0 and UMD3.1 are two distinct cattle reference genome assemblies. In our previous study using the low density BovineSNP50 array, we reported a copy number variation (CNV) analysis on Btau_4.0 with 521 animals of 21 cattle breeds, yielding 682 CNV regions with a total length of 139.8 megabases...

  6. Changes in variance explained by top SNP windows over generations for three traits in broiler chicken

    PubMed Central

    Fragomeni, Breno de Oliveira; Misztal, Ignacy; Lourenco, Daniela Lino; Aguilar, Ignacio; Okimoto, Ronald; Muir, William M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the set of genomic regions inferred as accounting for the majority of genetic variation in quantitative traits remain stable over multiple generations of selection. The data set contained phenotypes for five generations of broiler chicken for body weight, breast meat, and leg score. The population consisted of 294,632 animals over five generations and also included genotypes of 41,036 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) for 4,866 animals, after quality control. The SNP effects were calculated by a GWAS type analysis using single step genomic BLUP approach for generations 1–3, 2–4, 3–5, and 1–5. Variances were calculated for windows of 20 SNP. The top ten windows for each trait that explained the largest fraction of the genetic variance across generations were examined. Across generations, the top 10 windows explained more than 0.5% but less than 1% of the total variance. Also, the pattern of the windows was not consistent across generations. The windows that explained the greatest variance changed greatly among the combinations of generations, with a few exceptions. In many cases, a window identified as top for one combination, explained less than 0.1% for the other combinations. We conclude that identification of top SNP windows for a population may have little predictive power for genetic selection in the following generations for the traits here evaluated. PMID:25324857

  7. SNP-based high density genetic map and mapping of btwd1 dwarfing gene in barley

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xifeng; Wang, Jibin; Liu, Lipan; Sun, Genlou; Li, Chengdao; Luo, Hong; Sun, Dongfa

    2016-01-01

    A high-density linkage map is a valuable tool for functional genomics and breeding. A newly developed sequence-based marker technology, restriction site associated DNA (RAD) sequencing, has been proven to be powerful for the rapid discovery and genotyping of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and for the high-density genetic map construction. The objective of this research was to construct a high-density genetic map of barley using RAD sequencing. 1894 high-quality SNP markers were developed and mapped onto all seven chromosomes together with 68 SSR markers. These 1962 markers constituted a total genetic length of 1375.8 cM and an average of 0.7 cM between adjacent loci. The number of markers within each linkage group ranged from 209 to 396. The new recessive dwarfing gene btwd1 in Huaai 11 was mapped onto the high density linkage maps. The result showed that the btwd1 is positioned between SNP marks 7HL_6335336 and 7_249275418 with a genetic distance of 0.9 cM and 0.7 cM on chromosome 7H, respectively. The SNP-based high-density genetic map developed and the dwarfing gene btwd1 mapped in this study provide critical information for position cloning of the btwd1 gene and molecular breeding of barley. PMID:27530597

  8. Imputation of microsatellite allele from dense SNP genotypes for parentage verification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsatellite (MS) markers have recently been used for parental verification and are still the international standard despite higher cost, error rate, and turnaround time compared with Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP)-based assays. Despite domestic and international interest from producers an...

  9. Optimal design of low-density SNP arrays for genomic prediction: algorithm and applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-density (LD) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays provide a cost-effective solution for genomic prediction and selection, but algorithms and computational tools are needed for their optimal design. A multiple-objective, local optimization (MOLO) algorithm was developed for design of optim...

  10. selectSNP – An R package for selecting SNPs optimal for genetic evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been a huge increase in the number of SNPs in the public repositories. This has made it a challenge to design low and medium density SNP panels, which requires careful selection of available SNPs considering many criteria, such as map position, allelic frequency, possible biological functi...

  11. SNP-based high density genetic map and mapping of btwd1 dwarfing gene in barley.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xifeng; Wang, Jibin; Liu, Lipan; Sun, Genlou; Li, Chengdao; Luo, Hong; Sun, Dongfa

    2016-01-01

    A high-density linkage map is a valuable tool for functional genomics and breeding. A newly developed sequence-based marker technology, restriction site associated DNA (RAD) sequencing, has been proven to be powerful for the rapid discovery and genotyping of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and for the high-density genetic map construction. The objective of this research was to construct a high-density genetic map of barley using RAD sequencing. 1894 high-quality SNP markers were developed and mapped onto all seven chromosomes together with 68 SSR markers. These 1962 markers constituted a total genetic length of 1375.8 cM and an average of 0.7 cM between adjacent loci. The number of markers within each linkage group ranged from 209 to 396. The new recessive dwarfing gene btwd1 in Huaai 11 was mapped onto the high density linkage maps. The result showed that the btwd1 is positioned between SNP marks 7HL_6335336 and 7_249275418 with a genetic distance of 0.9 cM and 0.7 cM on chromosome 7H, respectively. The SNP-based high-density genetic map developed and the dwarfing gene btwd1 mapped in this study provide critical information for position cloning of the btwd1 gene and molecular breeding of barley. PMID:27530597

  12. Development and Characterization of a High Density SNP Genotyping Assay for Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The success of genomewide association (GWA) studies for the detection of sequence variation affecting complex traits in human has spurred interest in the use of large-scale high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping for the identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and for ma...

  13. An improved consensus linkage map of barley based on flow-sorted chromosomes and SNP markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent advances in high-throughput genotyping have made it easier to combine information from different mapping populations into consensus genetic maps, which provide increased marker density and genome coverage compared to individual maps. Previously, a SNP-based genotyping platform was developed a...

  14. The development and characterization of a 57K SNP Chip for rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper we describe the development and characterization of the first high density SNP chip for rainbow trout. The chip included 57,500 putative SNPs, of which 49,500 (86%) were validated as high quality and polymorphic in our validation panel of 960 rainbow trout samples. This array is compa...

  15. Longevity and Plasticity of CFTR Provide an Argument for Noncanonical SNP Organization in Hominid DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Aubrey E.; Plyler, Zackery E.; Tiwari, Hemant; Patki, Amit; Tully, Joel P.; McAtee, Christopher W.; Moseley, Leah A.; Sorscher, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Like many other ancient genes, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has survived for hundreds of millions of years. In this report, we consider whether such prodigious longevity of an individual gene – as opposed to an entire genome or species – should be considered surprising in the face of eons of relentless DNA replication errors, mutagenesis, and other causes of sequence polymorphism. The conventions that modern human SNP patterns result either from purifying selection or random (neutral) drift were not well supported, since extant models account rather poorly for the known plasticity and function (or the established SNP distributions) found in a multitude of genes such as CFTR. Instead, our analysis can be taken as a polemic indicating that SNPs in CFTR and many other mammalian genes may have been generated—and continue to accrue—in a fundamentally more organized manner than would otherwise have been expected. The resulting viewpoint contradicts earlier claims of ‘directional’ or ‘intelligent design-type’ SNP formation, and has important implications regarding the pace of DNA adaptation, the genesis of conserved non-coding DNA, and the extent to which eukaryotic SNP formation should be viewed as adaptive. PMID:25350658

  16. Recombination mapping using Boolean logic and high-density SNP genotyping for exome sequence filtering

    PubMed Central

    Markello, Thomas C.; Han, Ted; Carlson-Donohoe, Hannah; Ahaghotu, Chidi; Harper, Ursula; Jones, MaryPat; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Anikster, Yair; Adams, David R.; Gahl, William A.; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.

    2012-01-01

    Whole genome sequence data for small pedigrees has been shown to provide sufficient information to resolve detailed haplotypes in small pedigrees. Using such information, recombinations can be mapped onto chromosomes, compared with the segregation of a disease of interest and used to filter genome sequence variants. We now show that relatively inexpensive SNP array data from small pedigrees can be used in a similar manner to provide a means of identifying regions of interest in exome sequencing projects. We demonstrate that in those situations where one can assume complete penetrance and parental DNA is available, SNP recombination mapping using Boolean logic identifies chromosomal regions identical to those detected by multipoint linkage using microsatellites but with much less computation. We further show that this approach is successful because the probability of a double crossover between informative SNP loci is negligible. Our observations provide a rationale for using SNP arrays and recombination mapping as a rapid and cost-effective means of incorporating chromosome segregation information into exome sequencing projects intended for disease-gene identification. PMID:22264778

  17. A web-based genome browser for 'SNP-aware' assay design

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human and animal genomes contain an abundance of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are useful for genetic testing. However, the relatively large number of SNPs present in diverse populations can pose serious problems when designing assays. It is important to “mask” some SNP positions so ...

  18. The impact of SNP fingerprinting and parentage analysis on the effectiveness of variety recommendations in cacao

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evidence for the impact of mislabeling and/or pollen contamination on consistency of field performance has been lacking to reinforce the need for strict adherence to quality control protocols in cacao seed garden and germplasm plot management. The present study used SNP fingerprinting at 64 loci to ...

  19. Development of the catfish 250K SNP array for genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Quantitative traits, such as disease resistance, are most often controlled by a set of genes involving a complex array of regulation. The dissection of genetic basis of quantitative traits requires large numbers of genetic markers with good genome coverage. The application of next-generation sequencing technologies has allowed discovery of over eight million SNPs in catfish, but the challenge remains as to how to efficiently and economically use such SNP resources for genetic analysis. Results In this work, we developed a catfish 250K SNP array using Affymetrix Axiom genotyping technology. The SNPs were obtained from multiple sources including gene-associated SNPs, anonymous genomic SNPs, and inter-specific SNPs. A set of 640K high-quality SNPs obtained following specific requirements of array design were submitted. A panel of 250,113 SNPs was finalized for inclusion on the array. The performance evaluated by genotyping individuals from wild populations and backcross families suggested the good utility of the catfish 250K SNP array. Conclusions This is the first high-density SNP array for catfish. The array should be a valuable resource for genome-wide association studies (GWAS), fine QTL mapping, high-density linkage map construction, haplotype analysis, and whole genome-based selection. PMID:24618043

  20. Construction and application of a bovine high-density SNP assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine genomics has entered a new era and has been transformed by the availability of the whole genome sequence data. An additional resource currently under development is a 60,000 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array that will soon be made commercially available. Targetted content for this SN...

  1. SNP discovery in candidate adaptive genes using exon capture in a free-ranging alpine ungulate.

    PubMed

    Roffler, Gretchen H; Amish, Stephen J; Smith, Seth; Cosart, Ted; Kardos, Marty; Schwartz, Michael K; Luikart, Gordon

    2016-09-01

    Identification of genes underlying genomic signatures of natural selection is key to understanding adaptation to local conditions. We used targeted resequencing to identify SNP markers in 5321 candidate adaptive genes associated with known immunological, metabolic and growth functions in ovids and other ungulates. We selectively targeted 8161 exons in protein-coding and nearby 5' and 3' untranslated regions of chosen candidate genes. Targeted sequences were taken from bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) exon capture data and directly from the domestic sheep genome (Ovis aries v. 3; oviAri3). The bighorn sheep sequences used in the Dall's sheep (Ovis dalli dalli) exon capture aligned to 2350 genes on the oviAri3 genome with an average of 2 exons each. We developed a microfluidic qPCR-based SNP chip to genotype 476 Dall's sheep from locations across their range and test for patterns of selection. Using multiple corroborating approaches (lositan and bayescan), we detected 28 SNP loci potentially under selection. We additionally identified candidate loci significantly associated with latitude, longitude, precipitation and temperature, suggesting local environmental adaptation. The three methods demonstrated consistent support for natural selection on nine genes with immune and disease-regulating functions (e.g. Ovar-DRA, APC, BATF2, MAGEB18), cell regulation signalling pathways (e.g. KRIT1, PI3K, ORRC3), and respiratory health (CYSLTR1). Characterizing adaptive allele distributions from novel genetic techniques will facilitate investigation of the influence of environmental variation on local adaptation of a northern alpine ungulate throughout its range. This research demonstrated the utility of exon capture for gene-targeted SNP discovery and subsequent SNP chip genotyping using low-quality samples in a nonmodel species. PMID:27327375

  2. SNP Discovery in the Transcriptome of White Pacific Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei by Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Wei, Jiankai; Zhang, Xiaojun; Liu, Jingwen; Liu, Chengzhang; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2014-01-01

    The application of next generation sequencing technology has greatly facilitated high throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery and genotyping in genetic research. In the present study, SNPs were discovered based on two transcriptomes of Litopenaeus vannamei (L. vannamei) generated from Illumina sequencing platform HiSeq 2000. One transcriptome of L. vannamei was obtained through sequencing on the RNA from larvae at mysis stage and its reference sequence was de novo assembled. The data from another transcriptome were downloaded from NCBI and the reads of the two transcriptomes were mapped separately to the assembled reference by BWA. SNP calling was performed using SAMtools. A total of 58,717 and 36,277 SNPs with high quality were predicted from the two transcriptomes, respectively. SNP calling was also performed using the reads of two transcriptomes together, and a total of 96,040 SNPs with high quality were predicted. Among these 96,040 SNPs, 5,242 and 29,129 were predicted as non-synonymous and synonymous SNPs respectively. Characterization analysis of the predicted SNPs in L. vannamei showed that the estimated SNP frequency was 0.21% (one SNP per 476 bp) and the estimated ratio for transition to transversion was 2.0. Fifty SNPs were randomly selected for validation by Sanger sequencing after PCR amplification and 76% of SNPs were confirmed, which indicated that the SNPs predicted in this study were reliable. These SNPs will be very useful for genetic study in L. vannamei, especially for the high density linkage map construction and genome-wide association studies. PMID:24498047

  3. Development and Validation of a High-Density SNP Genotyping Array for African Oil Palm.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Qi Bin; Teh, Chee Keng; Ong, Ai Ling; Heng, Huey Ying; Lee, Heng Leng; Mohamed, Mohaimi; Low, Joel Zi-Bin; Apparow, Sukganah; Chew, Fook Tim; Mayes, Sean; Kulaveerasingam, Harikrishna; Tammi, Martti; Appleton, David Ross

    2016-08-01

    High-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping arrays are powerful tools that can measure the level of genetic polymorphism within a population. To develop a whole-genome SNP array for oil palms, SNP discovery was performed using deep resequencing of eight libraries derived from 132 Elaeis guineensis and Elaeis oleifera palms belonging to 59 origins, resulting in the discovery of >3 million putative SNPs. After SNP filtering, the Illumina OP200K custom array was built with 170 860 successful probes. Phenetic clustering analysis revealed that the array could distinguish between palms of different origins in a way consistent with pedigree records. Genome-wide linkage disequilibrium declined more slowly for the commercial populations (ranging from 120 kb at r(2) = 0.43 to 146 kb at r(2) = 0.50) when compared with the semi-wild populations (19.5 kb at r(2) = 0.22). Genetic fixation mapping comparing the semi-wild and commercial population identified 321 selective sweeps. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) detected a significant peak on chromosome 2 associated with the polygenic component of the shell thickness trait (based on the trait shell-to-fruit; S/F %) in tenera palms. Testing of a genomic selection model on the same trait resulted in good prediction accuracy (r = 0.65) with 42% of the S/F % variation explained. The first high-density SNP genotyping array for oil palm has been developed and shown to be robust for use in genetic studies and with potential for developing early trait prediction to shorten the oil palm breeding cycle. PMID:27112659

  4. Development and Characterization of a High Density SNP Genotyping Assay for Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Matukumalli, Lakshmi K.; Lawley, Cynthia T.; Schnabel, Robert D.; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Allan, Mark F.; Heaton, Michael P.; O'Connell, Jeff; Moore, Stephen S.; Smith, Timothy P. L.; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Van Tassell, Curtis P.

    2009-01-01

    The success of genome-wide association (GWA) studies for the detection of sequence variation affecting complex traits in human has spurred interest in the use of large-scale high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping for the identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and for marker-assisted selection in model and agricultural species. A cost-effective and efficient approach for the development of a custom genotyping assay interrogating 54,001 SNP loci to support GWA applications in cattle is described. A novel algorithm for achieving a compressed inter-marker interval distribution proved remarkably successful, with median interval of 37 kb and maximum predicted gap of <350 kb. The assay was tested on a panel of 576 animals from 21 cattle breeds and six outgroup species and revealed that from 39,765 to 46,492 SNP are polymorphic within individual breeds (average minor allele frequency (MAF) ranging from 0.24 to 0.27). The assay also identified 79 putative copy number variants in cattle. Utility for GWA was demonstrated by localizing known variation for coat color and the presence/absence of horns to their correct genomic locations. The combination of SNP selection and the novel spacing algorithm allows an efficient approach for the development of high-density genotyping platforms in species having full or even moderate quality draft sequence. Aspects of the approach can be exploited in species which lack an available genome sequence. The BovineSNP50 assay described here is commercially available from Illumina and provides a robust platform for mapping disease genes and QTL in cattle. PMID:19390634

  5. De novo sequencing of sunflower genome for SNP discovery using RAD (Restriction site Associated DNA) approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Application of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) marker technology as a tool in sunflower breeding programs offers enormous potential to improve sunflower genetics, and facilitate faster release of sunflower hybrids to the market place. Through a National Sunflower Association (NSA) funded initiative, we report on the process of SNP discovery through reductive genome sequencing and local assembly of six diverse sunflower inbred lines that represent oil as well as confection types. Results A combination of Restriction site Associated DNA Sequencing (RAD-Seq) protocols and Illumina paired-end sequencing chemistry generated high quality 89.4 M paired end reads from the six lines which represent 5.3 GB of the sequencing data. Raw reads from the sunflower line, RHA 464 were assembled de novo to serve as a framework reference genome. About 15.2 Mb of sunflower genome distributed over 42,267 contigs were obtained upon assembly of RHA 464 sequencing data, the contig lengths ranged from 200 to 950 bp with an N50 length of 393 bp. SNP calling was performed by aligning sequencing data from the six sunflower lines to the assembled reference RHA 464. On average, 1 SNP was located every 143 bp of the sunflower genome sequence. Based on several filtering criteria, a final set of 16,467 putative sequence variants with characteristics favorable for Illumina Infinium Genotyping Technology (IGT) were mined from the sequence data generated across six diverse sunflower lines. Conclusion Here we report the molecular and computational methodology involved in SNP development for a complex genome like sunflower lacking reference assembly, offering an attractive tool for molecular breeding purposes in sunflower. PMID:23947483

  6. Analysis of the Baroreceptor and Vestibular Receptor Inputs in the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla following Hypotension in Conscious Rats.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yan; Lu, Huan-Jun; Jiang, Xian; Li, Li-Wei; Yang, Yan-Zhao; Jin, Guang-Shi; Park, Joo Young; Kim, Min Sun; Park, Byung Rim; Jin, Yuan-Zhe

    2015-03-01

    Input signals originating from baroreceptors and vestibular receptors are integrated in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) to maintain blood pressure during postural movement. The contribution of baroreceptors and vestibular receptors in the maintenance of blood pressure following hypotension were quantitatively analyzed by measuring phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase (pERK) expression and glutamate release in the RVLM. The expression of pERK and glutamate release in the RVLM were measured in conscious rats that had undergone bilateral labyrinthectomy (BL) and/or sinoaortic denervation (SAD) following hypotension induced by a sodium nitroprusside (SNP) infusion. The expression of pERK was significantly increased in the RVLM in the control group following SNP infusion, and expression peaked 10 min after SNP infusion. The number of pERK positive neurons increased following SNP infusion in BL, SAD, and BL+SAD groups, although the increase was smaller than seen in the control group. The SAD group showed a relatively higher reduction in pERK expression when compared with the BL group. The level of glutamate release was significantly increased in the RVLM in control, BL, SAD groups following SNP infusion, and this peaked 10 min after SNP infusion. The SAD group showed a relatively higher reduction in glutamate release when compared with the BL group. These results suggest that the baroreceptors are more powerful in pERK expression and glutamate release in the RVLM following hypotension than the vestibular receptors, but the vestibular receptors still have an important role in the RVLM. PMID:25729278

  7. Association between Single Nucleotide Polymorphism of Vitamin D Receptor Gene FokI Polymorphism and Clinical Progress of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Li; Zhu, Jian-guo; Pan, Cong; Hua, Xing; Yuan, Dong-bo; Li, Zheng-ming; Zhong, Wei-de

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene and clinical progress of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in Chinese men. Methods. The DNA was extracted from blood of 200 BPH patients with operation (progression group) and 200 patients without operation (control group), respectively. The genotypes of VDR gene FokI SNP represented by “F/f” were identified by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The odds ratio (OR) of having progression of BPH for having the genotype were calculated. Results. Our date indicated that the f alleles of the VDR gene FokI SNP associated with the progression of BPH (P = 0.009). Conclusion. For the first time, our study demonstrated that VDR gene FokI SNP may be associated with the risk of BPH progress. PMID:25685834

  8. Leptin receptor overlapping transcript (LepROT) gene participates in insulin pathway through FoxO.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuan-Xu; Zhao, Ai-Hua

    2016-08-01

    Leptin receptor overlapping transcript (LepROT) is co-transcribed with the leptin receptor (LepR). However, the function and mechanism of LepROT in insulin pathway is unclear. In this study, we report the function of LepROT in maintaining consistent FoxO transcription. LepROT is constitutively expressed during larval development. 20-Hydroxyecdysone, methoprene, and insulin have no effect on the transcription of LepROT. However, the knockdown of LepROT by dsRNA injection in larvae causes delay of the development of Helicoverpa armigera. Knockdown of LepROT results in the upregulation of FoxO and downregulation of PI3K. The knockdown of LepROT also results in the subcellular translocation of FoxO from cytoplasm to nuclei. By contrast, overexpression of LepROT in the HaEpi cell line inhibits FoxO expression. Results suggest that LepROT participates in insulin signaling. PMID:27106118

  9. Identification of Mendelian inconsistencies between SNP and pedigree information of sibs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Using SNP genotypes to apply genomic selection in breeding programs is becoming common practice. Tools to edit and check the quality of genotype data are required. Checking for Mendelian inconsistencies makes it possible to identify animals for which pedigree information and genotype information are not in agreement. Methods Straightforward tests to detect Mendelian inconsistencies exist that count the number of opposing homozygous marker (e.g. SNP) genotypes between parent and offspring (PAR-OFF). Here, we develop two tests to identify Mendelian inconsistencies between sibs. The first test counts SNP with opposing homozygous genotypes between sib pairs (SIBCOUNT). The second test compares pedigree and SNP-based relationships (SIBREL). All tests iteratively remove animals based on decreasing numbers of inconsistent parents and offspring or sibs. The PAR-OFF test, followed by either SIB test, was applied to a dataset comprising 2,078 genotyped cows and 211 genotyped sires. Theoretical expectations for distributions of test statistics of all three tests were calculated and compared to empirically derived values. Type I and II error rates were calculated after applying the tests to the edited data, while Mendelian inconsistencies were introduced by permuting pedigree against genotype data for various proportions of animals. Results Both SIB tests identified animal pairs for which pedigree and genomic relationships could be considered as inconsistent by visual inspection of a scatter plot of pairwise pedigree and SNP-based relationships. After removal of 235 animals with the PAR-OFF test, SIBCOUNT (SIBREL) identified 18 (22) additional inconsistent animals. Seventeen animals were identified by both methods. The numbers of incorrectly deleted animals (Type I error), were equally low for both methods, while the numbers of incorrectly non-deleted animals (Type II error), were considerably higher for SIBREL compared to SIBCOUNT. Conclusions Tests to remove

  10. Detection of selective sweeps in cattle using genome-wide SNP data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The domestication and subsequent selection by humans to create breeds and biological types of cattle undoubtedly altered the patterning of variation within their genomes. Strong selection to fix advantageous large-effect mutations underlying domesticability, breed characteristics or productivity created selective sweeps in which variation was lost in the chromosomal region flanking the selected allele. Selective sweeps have now been identified in the genomes of many animal species including humans, dogs, horses, and chickens. Here, we attempt to identify and characterise regions of the bovine genome that have been subjected to selective sweeps. Results Two datasets were used for the discovery and validation of selective sweeps via the fixation of alleles at a series of contiguous SNP loci. BovineSNP50 data were used to identify 28 putative sweep regions among 14 diverse cattle breeds. Affymetrix BOS 1 prescreening assay data for five breeds were used to identify 85 regions and validate 5 regions identified using the BovineSNP50 data. Many genes are located within these regions and the lack of sequence data for the analysed breeds precludes the nomination of selected genes or variants and limits the prediction of the selected phenotypes. However, phenotypes that we predict to have historically been under strong selection include horned-polled, coat colour, stature, ear morphology, and behaviour. Conclusions The bias towards common SNPs in the design of the BovineSNP50 assay led to the identification of recent selective sweeps associated with breed formation and common to only a small number of breeds rather than ancient events associated with domestication which could potentially be common to all European taurines. The limited SNP density, or marker resolution, of the BovineSNP50 assay significantly impacted the rate of false discovery of selective sweeps, however, we found sweeps in common between breeds which were confirmed using an ultra

  11. Snat: a SNP annotation tool for bovine by integrating various sources of genomic information

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Most recently, with maturing of bovine genome sequencing and high throughput SNP genotyping technologies, a large number of significant SNPs associated with economic important traits can be identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). To further determine true association findings in GWAS, the common strategy is to sift out most promising SNPs for follow-up replication studies. Hence it is crucial to explore the functional significance of the candidate SNPs in order to screen and select the potential functional ones. To systematically prioritize these statistically significant SNPs and facilitate follow-up replication studies, we developed a bovine SNP annotation tool (Snat) based on a web interface. Results With Snat, various sources of genomic information are integrated and retrieved from several leading online databases, including SNP information from dbSNP, gene information from Entrez Gene, protein features from UniProt, linkage information from AnimalQTLdb, conserved elements from UCSC Genome Browser Database and gene functions from Gene Ontology (GO), KEGG PATHWAY and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA). Snat provides two different applications, including a CGI-based web utility and a command-line version, to access the integrated database, target any single nucleotide loci of interest and perform multi-level functional annotations. For further validation of the practical significance of our study, SNPs involved in two commercial bovine SNP chips, i.e., the Affymetrix Bovine 10K chip array and the Illumina 50K chip array, have been annotated by Snat, and the corresponding outputs can be directly downloaded from Snat website. Furthermore, a real dataset involving 20 identified SNPs associated with milk yield in our recent GWAS was employed to demonstrate the practical significance of Snat. Conclusions To our best knowledge, Snat is one of first tools focusing on SNP annotation for livestock. Snat confers researchers with a

  12. Association between vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms and chronic periodontitis among Libyans

    PubMed Central

    El Jilani, Mouna M.; Mohamed, Abdenaser A.; Zeglam, Hamza Ben; Alhudiri, Inas M.; Ramadan, Ahmad M.; Saleh, Saleh S.; Elkabir, Mohamed; Amer, Ibrahim Ben; Ashammakhi, Nureddin; Enattah, Nabil S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic periodontitis (CP) is a common oral disease characterized by inflammation in the supporting tissue of the teeth ‘the periodontium’, periodontal attachment loss, and alveolar bone loss. The disease has a microbial etiology; however, recent findings suggest that the genetic factors, such as vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms, have also been included. Aim Investigation of the relationship between VDR gene polymorphisms and CP among Libyans. Materials and methods In this study, we examined 196 unrelated Libyans between the ages of 25 and 65 years, including 99 patients and 97 controls. An oral examination based on Ramfjord Index was performed at different dental clinics in Tripoli and information were collected using a self-reported questionnaire. DNA was extracted from buccal swabs; the VDR ApaI, BsmI, and FokI polymorphisms were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction and were sequenced using Sanger Method. Results A significant difference in the newly detected ApaI SNP C/T rs#731236 was found (p=0.022), whereas no significant differences were found in ApaI SNP G/T rs#7975232, BsmI SNP A/G rs#1544410, and FokI SNP A/G rs#2228570 between patients and controls (p=0.939, 0.466, 0.239), respectively. Conclusion VDR ApaI SNP C/T rs#731236 may be related to the risk of CP in the Libyan population. PMID:25795245

  13. Pigment phenotype and biogeographical ancestry from ancient skeletal remains: inferences from multiplexed autosomal SNP analysis.

    PubMed

    Bouakaze, Caroline; Keyser, Christine; Crubézy, Eric; Montagnon, Daniel; Ludes, Bertrand

    2009-07-01

    In the present study, a multiplexed genotyping assay for ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located within six pigmentation candidate genes was developed on modern biological samples and applied to DNA retrieved from 25 archeological human remains from southern central Siberia dating from the Bronze and Iron Ages. SNP genotyping was successful for the majority of ancient samples and revealed that most probably had typical European pigment features, i.e., blue or green eye color, light hair color and skin type, and were likely of European individual ancestry. To our knowledge, this study reports for the first time the multiplexed typing of autosomal SNPs on aged and degraded DNA. By providing valuable information on pigment traits of an individual and allowing individual biogeographical ancestry estimation, autosomal SNP typing can improve ancient DNA studies and aid human identification in some forensic casework situations when used to complement conventional molecular markers. PMID:19415315

  14. Genome-wide SNP association-based localization of a dwarfism gene in Friesian dwarf horses.

    PubMed

    Orr, N; Back, W; Gu, J; Leegwater, P; Govindarajan, P; Conroy, J; Ducro, B; Van Arendonk, J A M; MacHugh, D E; Ennis, S; Hill, E W; Brama, P A J

    2010-12-01

    The recent completion of the horse genome and commercial availability of an equine SNP genotyping array has facilitated the mapping of disease genes. We report putative localization of the gene responsible for dwarfism, a trait in Friesian horses that is thought to have a recessive mode of inheritance, to a 2-MB region of chromosome 14 using just 10 affected animals and 10 controls. We successfully genotyped 34,429 SNPs that were tested for association with dwarfism using chi-square tests. The most significant SNP in our study, BIEC2-239376 (P(2df)=4.54 × 10(-5), P(rec)=7.74 × 10(-6)), is located close to a gene implicated in human dwarfism. Fine-mapping and resequencing analyses did not aid in further localization of the causative variant, and replication of our findings in independent sample sets will be necessary to confirm these results. PMID:21070269

  15. SNPit: a federated data integration system for the purpose of functional SNP annotation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Terry H; Carlson, Christopher S; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Genome wide association studies can potentially identify the genetic causes behind the majority of human diseases. With the advent of more advanced genotyping techniques, there is now an explosion of data gathered on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The need exists for an integrated system that can provide up-to-date functional annotation information on SNPs. We have developed the SNP Integration Tool (SNPit) system to address this need. Built upon a federated data integration system, SNPit provides current information on a comprehensive list of SNP data sources. Additional logical inference analysis was included through an inference engine plug in. The SNPit web servlet is available online for use. SNPit allows users to go to one source for up-to-date information on the functional annotation of SNPs. A tool that can help to integrate and analyze the potential functional significance of SNPs is important for understanding the results from genome wide association studies. PMID:19327864

  16. Slider—maximum use of probability information for alignment of short sequence reads and SNP detection

    PubMed Central

    Malhis, Nawar; Butterfield, Yaron S. N.; Ester, Martin; Jones, Steven J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: A plethora of alignment tools have been created that are designed to best fit different types of alignment conditions. While some of these are made for aligning Illumina Sequence Analyzer reads, none of these are fully utilizing its probability (prb) output. In this article, we will introduce a new alignment approach (Slider) that reduces the alignment problem space by utilizing each read base's probabilities given in the prb files. Results: Compared with other aligners, Slider has higher alignment accuracy and efficiency. In addition, given that Slider matches bases with probabilities other than the most probable, it significantly reduces the percentage of base mismatches. The result is that its SNP predictions are more accurate than other SNP prediction approaches used today that start from the most probable sequence, including those using base quality. Contact: nmalhis@bcgsc.ca Supplementary information and availability: http://www.bcgsc.ca/platform/bioinfo/software/slider PMID:18974170

  17. Applying SNP-Derived Molecular Coancestry Estimates to Captive Breeding Programs.

    PubMed

    Ivy, Jamie A; Putnam, Andrea S; Navarro, Asako Y; Gurr, Jessica; Ryder, Oliver A

    2016-09-01

    Captive breeding programs for wildlife species typically rely on pedigrees to inform genetic management. Although pedigree-based breeding strategies are quite effective at retaining long-term genetic variation, management of zoo-based breeding programs continues to be hampered when pedigrees are poorly known. The objective of this study was to evaluate 2 options for generating single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data to resolve unknown relationships within captive breeding programs. We generated SNP data for a zoo-based population of addax (Addax nasomasculatus) using both the Illumina BovineHD BeadChip and double digest restriction site-associated DNA (ddRAD) sequencing. Our results demonstrated that estimates of allele sharing (AS) between pairs of individuals exhibited low variances. Average AS variances were highest when using 50 loci (SNPchipall = 0.00159; ddRADall = 0.0249), but fell below 0.0003 for the SNP chip dataset when sampling ≥250 loci and below 0.0025 for the ddRAD dataset when sampling ≥500 loci. Furthermore, the correlation between the SNPchipall and ddRADall AS datasets was 0.88 (95%CI = 0.84-0.91) when subsampling 500 loci. Collectively, our results indicated that both SNP genotyping methods produced sufficient data for accurately estimating relationships, even within an extremely bottlenecked population. Our results also suggested that analytic assumptions historically integrated into the addax pedigree are not adversely impacting long-term pedigree-based management; kinships calculated from the analytic pedigree were significantly correlated (P < 0.001) with AS estimates. Overall, our conclusions are intended to serve as both a proof of concept and a model for applying molecular data to the genetic management of captive breeding programs. PMID:27208150

  18. Genome Rearrangements Detected by SNP Microarrays in Individuals with Intellectual Disability Referred with Possible Williams Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pani, Ariel M.; Hobart, Holly H.; Morris, Colleen A.; Mervis, Carolyn B.; Bray-Ward, Patricia; Kimberley, Kendra W.; Rios, Cecilia M.; Clark, Robin C.; Gulbronson, Maricela D.; Gowans, Gordon C.; Gregg, Ronald G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Intellectual disability (ID) affects 2–3% of the population and may occur with or without multiple congenital anomalies (MCA) or other medical conditions. Established genetic syndromes and visible chromosome abnormalities account for a substantial percentage of ID diagnoses, although for ∼50% the molecular etiology is unknown. Individuals with features suggestive of various syndromes but lacking their associated genetic anomalies pose a formidable clinical challenge. With the advent of microarray techniques, submicroscopic genome alterations not associated with known syndromes are emerging as a significant cause of ID and MCA. Methodology/Principal Findings High-density SNP microarrays were used to determine genome wide copy number in 42 individuals: 7 with confirmed alterations in the WS region but atypical clinical phenotypes, 31 with ID and/or MCA, and 4 controls. One individual from the first group had the most telomeric gene in the WS critical region deleted along with 2 Mb of flanking sequence. A second person had the classic WS deletion and a rearrangement on chromosome 5p within the Cri du Chat syndrome (OMIM:123450) region. Six individuals from the ID/MCA group had large rearrangements (3 deletions, 3 duplications), one of whom had a large inversion associated with a deletion that was not detected by the SNP arrays. Conclusions/Significance Combining SNP microarray analyses and qPCR allowed us to clone and sequence 21 deletion breakpoints in individuals with atypical deletions in the WS region and/or ID or MCA. Comparison of these breakpoints to databases of genomic variation revealed that 52% occurred in regions harboring structural variants in the general population. For two probands the genomic alterations were flanked by segmental duplications, which frequently mediate recurrent genome rearrangements; these may represent new genomic disorders. While SNP arrays and related technologies can identify potentially pathogenic deletions and

  19. MAFsnp: A Multi-Sample Accurate and Flexible SNP Caller Using Next-Generation Sequencing Data.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiyuan; Li, Tengfei; Xiu, Zidi; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Most existing statistical methods developed for calling single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using next-generation sequencing (NGS) data are based on Bayesian frameworks, and there does not exist any SNP caller that produces p-values for calling SNPs in a frequentist framework. To fill in this gap, we develop a new method MAFsnp, a Multiple-sample based Accurate and Flexible algorithm for calling SNPs with NGS data. MAFsnp is based on an estimated likelihood ratio test (eLRT) statistic. In practical situation, the involved parameter is very close to the boundary of the parametric space, so the standard large sample property is not suitable to evaluate the finite-sample distribution of the eLRT statistic. Observing that the distribution of the test statistic is a mixture of zero and a continuous part, we propose to model the test statistic with a novel two-parameter mixture distribution. Once the parameters in the mixture distribution are estimated, p-values can be easily calculated for detecting SNPs, and the multiple-testing corrected p-values can be used to control false discovery rate (FDR) at any pre-specified level. With simulated data, MAFsnp is shown to have much better control of FDR than the existing SNP callers. Through the application to two real datasets, MAFsnp is also shown to outperform the existing SNP callers in terms of calling accuracy. An R package "MAFsnp" implementing the new SNP caller is freely available at http://homepage.fudan.edu.cn/zhangh/softwares/. PMID:26309201

  20. Typing SNP based on the near-infrared spectroscopy and artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Li; Wang, Wei-Peng; Gao, Yu-Zhen; Yu, Xiao-Wei; Xie, Hong-Ping

    2009-07-01

    Based on the near-infrared spectra (NIRS) of the measured samples as the discriminant variables of their genotypes, the genotype discriminant model of SNP has been established by using back-propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN). Taking a SNP (857G > A) of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) as an example, DNA fragments containing the SNP site were amplified by the PCR method based on a pair of primers to obtain the three-genotype (GG, AA, and GA) modeling samples. The NIRS-s of the amplified samples were directly measured in transmission by using quartz cell. Based on the sample spectra measured, the two BP-ANN-s were combined to obtain the stronger ability of the three-genotype classification. One of them was established to compress the measured NIRS variables by using the resilient back-propagation algorithm, and another network established by Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm according to the compressed NIRS-s was used as the discriminant model of the three-genotype classification. For the established model, the root mean square error for the training and the prediction sample sets were 0.0135 and 0.0132, respectively. Certainly, this model could rightly predict the three genotypes (i.e. the accuracy of prediction samples was up to100%) and had a good robust for the prediction of unknown samples. Since the three genotypes of SNP could be directly determined by using the NIRS-s without any preprocessing for the analyzed samples after PCR, this method is simple, rapid and low-cost.

  1. Efficient Genome-Wide TagSNP Selection Across Populations via the Linkage Disequilibrium Criterion

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yonghui; Lonardi, Stefano; Jiang, Tao

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In this article, we studied the tag single-nucleotide polymorphism (tagSNP) selection problem on multiple populations using the pairwise r2 linkage disequilibrium criterion. We proposed a novel combinatorial optimization model for the tagSNP selection problem, called the minimum common tagSNP selection (MCTS) problem, and presented efficient solutions for MCTS. Our approach consists of the following three main steps: (i) partitioning the SNP markers into small disjoint components, (ii) applying some data reduction rules to simplify the problem, and (iii) applying either a fast greedy algorithm or a Lagrangian relaxation algorithm to solve the remaining (general) MCTS. These algorithms also provide lower bounds on tagging (i.e., the minimum number of tagSNPs needed). The lower bounds allow us to evaluate how far our solution is from the optimum. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time the tagging lower bounds are discussed in the literature. We assessed the performance of our algorithms on real HapMap data for genome-wide tagging. The experiments demonstrated that our algorithms run 3–4 orders of magnitude faster than the existing single-population tagging programs such as FESTA, LD-Select, and the multiple-population tagging method MultiPop-TagSelect. Our method also greatly reduced the required tagSNPs compared with LD-Select on a single population and MultiPop-TagSelect on multiple populations. Moreover, the numbers of tagSNPs selected by our algorithms are almost optimal because they are very close to the corresponding lower bounds obtained by our method. PMID:20078395

  2. Genome-wide SNP analysis of the Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome (Clarkson disease)

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhihui; Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Iwaki, Shoko; Chan, Eunice; Wisch, Laura; Young, Michael; Nelson, Celeste M; Porcella, Stephen F; Druey, Kirk M

    2013-01-01

    The Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome (SCLS) is an extremely rare, orphan disease that resembles, and is frequently erroneously diagnosed as, systemic anaphylaxis. The disorder is characterized by repeated, transient, and seemingly unprovoked episodes of hypotensive shock and peripheral edema due to transient endothelial hyperpermeability. SCLS is often accompanied by a monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS). Using Affymetrix Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) microarrays, we performed the first genome-wide SNP analysis of SCLS in a cohort of 12 disease subjects and 18 controls. Exome capture sequencing was performed on genomic DNA from nine of these patients as validation for the SNP-chip discoveries and de novo data generation. We identified candidate susceptibility loci for SCLS, which included a region flanking CAV3 (3p25.3) as well as SNP clusters in PON1 (7q21.3), PSORS1C1 (6p21.3), and CHCHD3 (7q33). Among the most highly ranked discoveries were gene-associated SNPs in the uncharacterized LOC100130480 gene (rs6417039, rs2004296). Top case-associated SNPs were observed in BTRC (rs12355803, 3rs4436485), ARHGEF18 (rs11668246), CDH13 (rs4782779), and EDG2 (rs12552348), which encode proteins with known or suspected roles in B cell function and/or vascular integrity. 61 SNPs that were significantly associated with SCLS by microarray analysis were also detected and validated by exome deep sequencing. Functional annotation of highly ranked SNPs revealed enrichment of cell projections, cell junctions and adhesion, and molecules containing pleckstrin homology, Ras/Rho regulatory, and immunoglobulin Ig-like C2/fibronectin type III domains, all of which involve mechanistic functions that correlate with the SCLS phenotype. These results highlight SNPs with potential relevance to SCLS. PMID:24808988

  3. Haplotype inference from unphased SNP data in heterozygous polyploids based on SAT

    PubMed Central

    Neigenfind, Jost; Gyetvai, Gabor; Basekow, Rico; Diehl, Svenja; Achenbach, Ute; Gebhardt, Christiane; Selbig, Joachim; Kersten, Birgit

    2008-01-01

    Background Haplotype inference based on unphased SNP markers is an important task in population genetics. Although there are different approaches to the inference of haplotypes in diploid species, the existing software is not suitable for inferring haplotypes from unphased SNP data in polyploid species, such as the cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum). Potato species are tetraploid and highly heterozygous. Results Here we present the software SATlotyper which is able to handle polyploid and polyallelic data. SATlo-typer uses the Boolean satisfiability problem to formulate Haplotype Inference by Pure Parsimony. The software excludes existing haplotype inferences, thus allowing for calculation of alternative inferences. As it is not known which of the multiple haplotype inferences are best supported by the given unphased data set, we use a bootstrapping procedure that allows for scoring of alternative inferences. Finally, by means of the bootstrapping scores, it is possible to optimise the phased genotypes belonging to a given haplotype inference. The program is evaluated with simulated and experimental SNP data generated for heterozygous tetraploid populations of potato. We show that, instead of taking the first haplotype inference reported by the program, we can significantly improve the quality of the final result by applying additional methods that include scoring of the alternative haplotype inferences and genotype optimisation. For a sub-population of nineteen individuals, the predicted results computed by SATlotyper were directly compared with results obtained by experimental haplotype inference via sequencing of cloned amplicons. Prediction and experiment gave similar results regarding the inferred haplotypes and phased genotypes. Conclusion Our results suggest that Haplotype Inference by Pure Parsimony can be solved efficiently by the SAT approach, even for data sets of unphased SNP from heterozygous polyploids. SATlotyper is freeware and is distributed as

  4. SNP Discovery Using Next Generation Transcriptomic Sequencing in Atlantic Herring (Clupea harengus)

    PubMed Central

    Bekkevold, Dorte; Babbucci, Massimiliano; van Houdt, Jeroen; Maes, Gregory E.; Bargelloni, Luca; Nielsen, Rasmus O.; Taylor, Martin I.; Ogden, Rob; Cariani, Alessia; Carvalho, Gary R.; Consortium, FishPopTrace; Panitz, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has revolutionised population genetics, providing studies of non-model species with unprecedented genomic coverage, allowing evolutionary biologists to address questions previously far beyond the reach of available resources. Furthermore, the simple mutation model of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) permits cost-effective high-throughput genotyping in thousands of individuals simultaneously. Genomic resources are scarce for the Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus), a small pelagic species that sustains high revenue fisheries. This paper details the development of 578 SNPs using a combined NGS and high-throughput genotyping approach. Eight individuals covering the species distribution in the eastern Atlantic were bar-coded and multiplexed into a single cDNA library and sequenced using the 454 GS FLX platform. SNP discovery was performed by de novo sequence clustering and contig assembly, followed by the mapping of reads against consensus contig sequences. Selection of candidate SNPs for genotyping was conducted using an in silico approach. SNP validation and genotyping were performed simultaneously using an Illumina 1,536 GoldenGate assay. Although the conversion rate of candidate SNPs in the genotyping assay cannot be predicted in advance, this approach has the potential to maximise cost and time efficiencies by avoiding expensive and time-consuming laboratory stages of SNP validation. Additionally, the in silico approach leads to lower ascertainment bias in the resulting SNP panel as marker selection is based only on the ability to design primers and the predicted presence of intron-exon boundaries. Consequently SNPs with a wider spectrum of minor allele frequencies (MAFs) will be genotyped in the final panel. The genomic resources presented here represent a valuable multi-purpose resource for developing informative marker panels for population discrimination, microarray development and for population

  5. Performance in working memory and attentional control is associated with the rs2180619 SNP in the CNR1 gene.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Contreras, A E; Carrillo-Sánchez, K; Ortega-Mora, I; Barrera-Tlapa, M A; Román-López, T V; Rosas-Escobar, C B; Flores-Barrera, L; Caballero-Sánchez, U; Muñoz-Torres, Z; Romero-Hidalgo, S; Hernández-Morales, S; González-Barrios, J A; Vadillo-Ortega, F; Méndez-Díaz, M; Aguilar-Roblero, R; Prospéro-García, O

    2014-02-01

    Individual differences in cognitive performance are partly dependent, on genetic polymporhisms. One of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of the CNR1 gene, which codes for cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R), is the rs2180619, located in a regulatory region of this gene (6q14-q15). The alleles of the rs2180619 are A > G; the G allele has been associated with addiction and high levels of anxiety (when the G allele interacts with the SS genotype of the 5-HTTLPR gene). However, GG genotype is observed also in healthy subjects. Considering G allele as risk for 'psychopathological conditions', it is possible that GG healthy subjects do not be addicted or anxious, but would have reduced performance, compared to AA subjects, in attentional control and working memory processing. One hundred and sixty-four healthy young Mexican-Mestizo subjects (100 women and 64, men; mean age: 22.86 years, SD=2.72) participated in this study, solving a task where attentional control and working memory were required. GG subjects, compared to AA subjects showed: (1) a general lower performance in the task (P = 0.02); (2) lower performance only when a high load of information was held in working memory (P = 0.02); and (3) a higher vulnerability to distractors (P = 0.03). Our results suggest that, although the performance of GG subjects was at normal levels, a lower efficiency of the endocannabinoid system, probably due to a lowered expression of CB1R, produced a reduction in the performance of these subjects when attentional control and working memory processing is challenged. PMID:24152087

  6. An extended Tajima’s D neutrality test incorporating SNP calling and imputation uncertainties

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingrun; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Long, Quan

    2015-01-01

    To identify evolutionary events from the footprints left in the patterns of genetic variation in a population, people use many statistical frameworks, including neutrality tests. In datasets from current high throughput sequencing and genotyping platforms, it is common to have missing data and low-confidence SNP calls at many segregating sites. However, the traditional statistical framework for neutrality tests does not allow for these possibilities; therefore the usual way of treating missing data is to ignore segregating sites with missing/low confidence calls, regardless of the good SNP calls at these sites in other individuals. In this work, we propose a modified neutrality test, Extended Tajima’s D, which incorporates missing data and SNP-calling uncertainties. Because we do not specify any particular error-generating mechanism, this approach is robust and widely applicable. Simulations show that in most cases the power of the new test is better than the original Tajima’s D, given the same type I error. Applications to real data show that it detects fewer outliers associated with low quality data. PMID:26681995

  7. Quadruplex-single nucleotide polymorphisms (Quad-SNP) influence gene expression difference among individuals

    PubMed Central

    Baral, Aradhita; Kumar, Pankaj; Halder, Rashi; Mani, Prithvi; Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Singh, Ankita; Das, Swapan K.; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2012-01-01

    Non-canonical guanine quadruplex structures are not only predominant but also conserved among bacterial and mammalian promoters. Moreover recent findings directly implicate quadruplex structures in transcription. These argue for an intrinsic role of the structural motif and thereby posit that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) that compromise the quadruplex architecture could influence function. To test this, we analysed SNPs within quadruplex motifs (Quad-SNP) and gene expression in 270 individuals across four populations (HapMap) representing more than 14 500 genotypes. Findings reveal significant association between quadruplex-SNPs and expression of the corresponding gene in individuals (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, analysis of Quad-SNPs obtained from population-scale sequencing of 1000 human genomes showed relative selection bias against alteration of the structural motif. To directly test the quadruplex-SNP-transcription connection, we constructed a reporter system using the RPS3 promoter—remarkable difference in promoter activity in the ‘quadruplex-destabilized’ versus ‘quadruplex-intact’ promoter was noticed. As a further test, we incorporated a quadruplex motif or its disrupted counterpart within a synthetic promoter reporter construct. The quadruplex motif, and not the disrupted-motif, enhanced transcription in human cell lines of different origin. Together, these findings build direct support for quadruplex-mediated transcription and suggest quadruplex-SNPs may play significant role in mechanistically understanding variations in gene expression among individuals. PMID:22238381

  8. Making a chocolate chip: development and evaluation of a 6K SNP array for Theobroma cacao

    PubMed Central

    Livingstone, Donald; Royaert, Stefan; Stack, Conrad; Mockaitis, Keithanne; May, Greg; Farmer, Andrew; Saski, Christopher; Schnell, Ray; Kuhn, David; Motamayor, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Theobroma cacao, the key ingredient in chocolate production, is one of the world's most important tree fruit crops, with ∼4,000,000 metric tons produced across 50 countries. To move towards gene discovery and marker-assisted breeding in cacao, a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) identification project was undertaken using RNAseq data from 16 diverse cacao cultivars. RNA sequences were aligned to the assembled transcriptome of the cultivar Matina 1-6, and 330,000 SNPs within coding regions were identified. From these SNPs, a subset of 6,000 high-quality SNPs were selected for inclusion on an Illumina Infinium SNP array: the Cacao6kSNP array. Using Cacao6KSNP array data from over 1,000 cacao samples, we demonstrate that our custom array produces a saturated genetic map and can be used to distinguish among even closely related genotypes. Our study enhances and expands the genetic resources available to the cacao research community, and provides the genome-scale set of tools that are critical for advancing breeding with molecular markers in an agricultural species with high genetic diversity. PMID:26070980

  9. Application of LogitBoost Classifier for Traceability Using SNP Chip Data

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyunsung; Cho, Seoae; Kim, Heebal; Seo, Kang-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Consumer attention to food safety has increased rapidly due to animal-related diseases; therefore, it is important to identify their places of origin (POO) for safety purposes. However, only a few studies have addressed this issue and focused on machine learning-based approaches. In the present study, classification analyses were performed using a customized SNP chip for POO prediction. To accomplish this, 4,122 pigs originating from 104 farms were genotyped using the SNP chip. Several factors were considered to establish the best prediction model based on these data. We also assessed the applicability of the suggested model using a kinship coefficient-filtering approach. Our results showed that the LogitBoost-based prediction model outperformed other classifiers in terms of classification performance under most conditions. Specifically, a greater level of accuracy was observed when a higher kinship-based cutoff was employed. These results demonstrated the applicability of a machine learning-based approach using SNP chip data for practical traceability. PMID:26436917

  10. Novel approach for deriving genome wide SNP analysis data from archived blood spots

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The ability to transport and store DNA at room temperature in low volumes has the advantage of optimising cost, time and storage space. Blood spots on adapted filter papers are popular for this, with FTA (Flinders Technology Associates) Whatman™TM technology being one of the most recent. Plant material, plasmids, viral particles, bacteria and animal blood have been stored and transported successfully using this technology, however the method of porcine DNA extraction from FTA Whatman™TM cards is a relatively new approach, allowing nucleic acids to be ready for downstream applications such as PCR, whole genome amplification, sequencing and subsequent application to single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays has hitherto been under-explored. Findings DNA was extracted from FTA Whatman™TM cards (following adaptations of the manufacturer’s instructions), whole genome amplified and subsequently analysed to validate the integrity of the DNA for downstream SNP analysis. DNA was successfully extracted from 288/288 samples and amplified by WGA. Allele dropout post WGA, was observed in less than 2% of samples and there was no clear evidence of amplification bias nor contamination. Acceptable call rates on porcine SNP chips were also achieved using DNA extracted and amplified in this way. Conclusions DNA extracted from FTA Whatman cards is of a high enough quality and quantity following whole genomic amplification to perform meaningful SNP chip studies. PMID:22974252

  11. High-throughput SNP-genotyping analysis of the relationships among Ponto-Caspian sturgeon species

    PubMed Central

    Rastorguev, Sergey M; Nedoluzhko, Artem V; Mazur, Alexander M; Gruzdeva, Natalia M; Volkov, Alexander A; Barmintseva, Anna E; Mugue, Nikolai S; Prokhortchouk, Egor B

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Legally certified sturgeon fisheries require population protection and conservation methods, including DNA tests to identify the source of valuable sturgeon roe. However, the available genetic data are insufficient to distinguish between different sturgeon populations, and are even unable to distinguish between some species. We performed high-throughput single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-genotyping analysis on different populations of Russian (Acipenser gueldenstaedtii), Persian (A. persicus), and Siberian (A. baerii) sturgeon species from the Caspian Sea region (Volga and Ural Rivers), the Azov Sea, and two Siberian rivers. We found that Russian sturgeons from the Volga and Ural Rivers were essentially indistinguishable, but they differed from Russian sturgeons in the Azov Sea, and from Persian and Siberian sturgeons. We identified eight SNPs that were sufficient to distinguish these sturgeon populations with 80% confidence, and allowed the development of markers to distinguish sturgeon species. Finally, on the basis of our SNP data, we propose that the A. baerii-like mitochondrial DNA found in some Russian sturgeons from the Caspian Sea arose via an introgression event during the Pleistocene glaciation. In the present study, the high-throughput genotyping analysis of several sturgeon populations was performed. SNP markers for species identification were defined. The possible explanation of the baerii-like mitotype presence in some Russian sturgeons in the Caspian Sea was suggested. PMID:24567827

  12. A functional SNP in FLT1 increases risk of coronary artery disease in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Konta, Atsuko; Ozaki, Kouichi; Sakata, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Atsushi; Morizono, Takashi; Suna, Shinichiro; Onouchi, Yoshihiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Kubo, Michiaki; Komuro, Issei; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2016-05-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) including myocardial infarction is one of the leading causes of death in many countries. Similar to other common diseases, its pathogenesis is thought to result from complex interactions among multiple genetic and environmental factors. Recent large-scale genetic association analysis for CAD identified 15 new loci. We examined the reproducibility of these previous association findings with 7990 cases and 6582 controls in a Japanese population. We found a convincing association of rs9319428 in FLT1, encoding fms-related tyrosine kinase 1 (P=5.98 × 10(-8)). Fine mapping using tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at FLT1 locus revealed that another SNP (rs74412485) showed more profound genetic effect for CAD (P=2.85 × 10(-12)). The SNP, located in intron 1 in FLT1, enhanced the transcriptional level of FLT1. RNA interference experiment against FLT1 showed that the suppression of FLT1 resulted in decreased expression of inflammatory adhesion molecules. Expression of FLT1 was observed in endothelial cells of human coronary artery. Our results indicate that the genetically coded increased expression of FLT1 by a functional SNP implicates activation in an inflammatory cascade that might eventually lead to CAD. PMID:26791355

  13. Making a chocolate chip: development and evaluation of a 6K SNP array for Theobroma cacao.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Donald; Royaert, Stefan; Stack, Conrad; Mockaitis, Keithanne; May, Greg; Farmer, Andrew; Saski, Christopher; Schnell, Ray; Kuhn, David; Motamayor, Juan Carlos

    2015-08-01

    Theobroma cacao, the key ingredient in chocolate production, is one of the world's most important tree fruit crops, with ∼4,000,000 metric tons produced across 50 countries. To move towards gene discovery and marker-assisted breeding in cacao, a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) identification project was undertaken using RNAseq data from 16 diverse cacao cultivars. RNA sequences were aligned to the assembled transcriptome of the cultivar Matina 1-6, and 330,000 SNPs within coding regions were identified. From these SNPs, a subset of 6,000 high-quality SNPs were selected for inclusion on an Illumina Infinium SNP array: the Cacao6kSNP array. Using Cacao6KSNP array data from over 1,000 cacao samples, we demonstrate that our custom array produces a saturated genetic map and can be used to distinguish among even closely related genotypes. Our study enhances and expands the genetic resources available to the cacao research community, and provides the genome-scale set of tools that are critical for advancing breeding with molecular markers in an agricultural species with high genetic diversity. PMID:26070980

  14. Identification and SNP association analysis of a novel gene in chicken.

    PubMed

    Mei, Xingxing; Kang, Xiangtao; Liu, Xiaojun; Jia, Lijuan; Li, Hong; Li, Zhuanjian; Jiang, Ruirui

    2016-02-01

    A novel gene that was predicted to encode a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) transcript was identified in a previous study that aimed to detect candidate genes related to growth rate differences between Chinese local breed Gushi chickens and Anka broilers. To characterise the biological function of the lncRNA, we cloned and sequenced the complete open reading frame of the gene. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to analyse the expression patterns of the lncRNA in different tissues of chicken at different development stages. The qPCR data showed that the novel lncRNA gene was expressed extensively, with the highest abundance in spleen and lung and the lowest abundance in pectoralis and leg muscle. Additionally, we identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at the 5'-end of the gene and studied the association between the SNP and chicken growth traits using data from an F2 resource population of Gushi chickens and Anka broilers. The association analysis showed that the SNP was significantly (P < 0.05) associated with leg muscle weight, chest breadth, sternal length and body weight in chickens at 1 day, 4 weeks and 6 weeks of age. We concluded that the novel lncRNA gene, which we designated pouBW1, may play an important role in regulating chicken growth. PMID:26643990

  15. PEAS V1.0: a package for elementary analysis of SNP data.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuhua; Gupta, Sanchit; Jin, Li

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a software package named PEAS to facilitate analyses of large data sets of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for population genetics and molecular phylogenetics studies. PEAS reads SNP data in various formats as input and is versatile in data formatting; using PEAS, it is easy to create input files for many popular packages, such as STRUCTURE, frappe, Arlequin, Haploview, LDhat, PLINK, EIGENSOFT, PHASE, fastPHASE, MEGA and PHYLIP. In addition, PEAS fills up several analysis gaps in currently available computer programs in population genetics and molecular phylogenetics. Notably, (i) It calculates genetic distance matrices with bootstrapping for both individuals and populations from genome-wide high-density SNP data, and the output can be streamlined to MEGA and PHYLIP programs for further processing; (ii) It calculates genetic distances from STRUCTURE output and generates MEGA file to reconstruct component trees; (iii) It provides tools to conduct haplotype sharing analysis for phylogenetic studies based on high-density SNP data. To our knowledge, these analyses are not available in any other computer program. PEAS for Windows is freely available for academic users from http://www.picb.ac.cn/~xushua/index.files/Download_PEAS.htm. PMID:21565121

  16. ASSIsT: an automatic SNP scoring tool for in- and outbreeding species

    PubMed Central

    Di Guardo, Mario; Micheletti, Diego; Bianco, Luca; Koehorst-van Putten, Herma J. J.; Longhi, Sara; Costa, Fabrizio; Aranzana, Maria J.; Velasco, Riccardo; Arús, Pere; Troggio, Michela; van de Weg, Eric W.

    2015-01-01

    ASSIsT (Automatic SNP ScorIng Tool) is a user-friendly customized pipeline for efficient calling and filtering of SNPs from Illumina Infinium arrays, specifically devised for custom genotyping arrays. Illumina has developed an integrated software for SNP data visualization and inspection called GenomeStudio® (GS). ASSIsT builds on GS-derived data and identifies those markers that follow a bi-allelic genetic model and show reliable genotype calls. Moreover, ASSIsT re-edits SNP calls with null alleles or additional SNPs in the probe annealing site. ASSIsT can be employed in the analysis of different population types such as full-sib families and mating schemes used in the plant kingdom (backcross, F1, F2), and unrelated individuals. The final result can be directly exported in the format required by the most common software for genetic mapping and marker–trait association analysis. ASSIsT is developed in Python and runs in Windows and Linux. Availability and implementation: The software, example data sets and tutorials are freely available at http://compbiotoolbox.fmach.it/assist/. Contact: eric.vandeweg@wur.nl PMID:26249809

  17. Rapid Detection of Rare Deleterious Variants by Next Generation Sequencing with Optional Microarray SNP Genotype Data

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Christopher M.; Crinnion, Laura A.; Gurgel‐Gianetti, Juliana; Harrison, Sally M.; Daly, Catherine; Antanavicuite, Agne; Lascelles, Carolina; Markham, Alexander F.; Pena, Sergio D. J.; Bonthron, David T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autozygosity mapping is a powerful technique for the identification of rare, autosomal recessive, disease‐causing genes. The ease with which this category of disease gene can be identified has greatly increased through the availability of genome‐wide SNP genotyping microarrays and subsequently of exome sequencing. Although these methods have simplified the generation of experimental data, its analysis, particularly when disparate data types must be integrated, remains time consuming. Moreover, the huge volume of sequence variant data generated from next generation sequencing experiments opens up the possibility of using these data instead of microarray genotype data to identify disease loci. To allow these two types of data to be used in an integrated fashion, we have developed AgileVCFMapper, a program that performs both the mapping of disease loci by SNP genotyping and the analysis of potentially deleterious variants using exome sequence variant data, in a single step. This method does not require microarray SNP genotype data, although analysis with a combination of microarray and exome genotype data enables more precise delineation of disease loci, due to superior marker density and distribution. PMID:26037133

  18. Application of LogitBoost Classifier for Traceability Using SNP Chip Data.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwondo; Seo, Minseok; Kang, Hyunsung; Cho, Seoae; Kim, Heebal; Seo, Kang-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Consumer attention to food safety has increased rapidly due to animal-related diseases; therefore, it is important to identify their places of origin (POO) for safety purposes. However, only a few studies have addressed this issue and focused on machine learning-based approaches. In the present study, classification analyses were performed using a customized SNP chip for POO prediction. To accomplish this, 4,122 pigs originating from 104 farms were genotyped using the SNP chip. Several factors were considered to establish the best prediction model based on these data. We also assessed the applicability of the suggested model using a kinship coefficient-filtering approach. Our results showed that the LogitBoost-based prediction model outperformed other classifiers in terms of classification performance under most conditions. Specifically, a greater level of accuracy was observed when a higher kinship-based cutoff was employed. These results demonstrated the applicability of a machine learning-based approach using SNP chip data for practical traceability. PMID:26436917

  19. Evaluation of Y chromosomal SNP haplogrouping in the HID-Ion AmpliSeq™ Identity Panel.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Eriko; Minaguchi, Kiyoshi; Nambiar, Phrabhakaran; Kakimoto, Yu; Satoh, Fumiko; Nakatome, Masato; Miyashita, Keiko; Osawa, Motoki

    2016-09-01

    The Y chromosomal haplogroup determined from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) combinations is a valuable genetic marker to study ancestral male lineage and ethical distribution. Next-generation sequencing has been developed for widely diverse genetics fields. For this study, we demonstrate 34 Y-SNP typing employing the Ion PGM™ system to perform haplogrouping. DNA libraries were constructed using the HID-Ion AmpliSeq™ Identity Panel. Emulsion PCR was performed, then DNA sequences were analyzed on the Ion 314 and 316 Chip Kit v2. Some difficulties became apparent during the analytic processes. No-call was reported at rs2032599 and M479 in six samples, in which the least coverage was observed at M479. A minor misreading occurred at rs2032631 and M479. A real time PCR experiment using other pairs of oligonucleotide primers showed that these events might result from the flanking sequence. Finally, Y haplogroup was determined completely for 81 unrelated males including Japanese (n=59) and Malay (n=22) subjects. The allelic divergence differed between the two populations. In comparison with the conventional Sanger method, next-generation sequencing provides a comprehensive SNP analysis with convenient procedures, but further system improvement is necessary. PMID:27591541

  20. How to Use SNP_TATA_Comparator to Find a Significant Change in Gene Expression Caused by the Regulatory SNP of This Gene's Promoter via a Change in Affinity of the TATA-Binding Protein for This Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Ponomarenko, Mikhail; Rasskazov, Dmitry; Arkova, Olga; Ponomarenko, Petr; Suslov, Valentin; Savinkova, Ludmila; Kolchanov, Nikolay

    2015-01-01

    The use of biomedical SNP markers of diseases can improve effectiveness of treatment. Genotyping of patients with subsequent searching for SNPs more frequent than in norm is the only commonly accepted method for identification of SNP markers within the framework of translational research. The bioinformatics applications aimed at millions of unannotated SNPs of the “1000 Genomes” can make this search for SNP markers more focused and less expensive. We used our Web service involving Fisher's Z-score for candidate SNP markers to find a significant change in a gene's expression. Here we analyzed the change caused by SNPs in the gene's promoter via a change in affinity of the TATA-binding protein for this promoter. We provide examples and discuss how to use this bioinformatics application in the course of practical analysis of unannotated SNPs from the “1000 Genomes” project. Using known biomedical SNP markers, we identified 17 novel candidate SNP markers nearby: rs549858786 (rheumatoid arthritis); rs72661131 (cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis); rs562962093 (stroke); rs563558831 (cyclophosphamide bioactivation); rs55878706 (malaria resistance, leukopenia), rs572527200 (asthma, systemic sclerosis, and psoriasis), rs371045754 (hemophilia B), rs587745372 (cardiovascular events); rs372329931, rs200209906, rs367732974, and rs549591993 (all four: cancer); rs17231520 and rs569033466 (both: atherosclerosis); rs63750953, rs281864525, and rs34166473 (all three: malaria resistance, thalassemia). PMID:26516624

  1. Efficient SNP Discovery by Combining Microarray and Lab-on-a-Chip Data for Animal Breeding and Selection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao-Wei; Lin, Yu-Tsung; Ding, Shih-Torng; Lo, Ling-Ling; Wang, Pei-Hwa; Lin, En-Chung; Liu, Fang-Wei; Lu, Yen-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The genetic markers associated with economic traits have been widely explored for animal breeding. Among these markers, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) are gradually becoming a prevalent and effective evaluation tool. Since SNPs only focus on the genetic sequences of interest, it thereby reduces the evaluation time and cost. Compared to traditional approaches, SNP genotyping techniques incorporate informative genetic background, improve the breeding prediction accuracy and acquiesce breeding quality on the farm. This article therefore reviews the typical procedures of animal breeding using SNPs and the current status of related techniques. The associated SNP information and genotyping techniques, including microarray and Lab-on-a-Chip based platforms, along with their potential are highlighted. Examples in pig and poultry with different SNP loci linked to high economic trait values are given. The recommendations for utilizing SNP genotyping in nimal breeding are summarized. PMID:27600241

  2. Generation of large numbers of SNP in cattle by coupling reduced genome representation with high throughput sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whole genome sequencing projects have produced draft sequences for species from diverse evolutionary clades for comparative evolutionary studies. Generally, these projects have not simultaneously created extensive single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) resources for use in genetics studies within the...

  3. Citrus (Rutaceae) SNP markers based on Competitive Allele-Specific PCR; transferability across the Aurantioideae subfamily1

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Lor, Andres; Ancillo, Gema; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers based on Competitive Allele-Specific PCR (KASPar) were developed from sequences of three Citrus species. Their transferability was tested in 63 Citrus genotypes and 19 relative genera of the subfamily Aurantioideae to estimate the potential of SNP markers, selected from a limited intrageneric discovery panel, for ongoing broader diversity analysis at the intra- and intergeneric levels and systematic germplasm bank characterization. • Methods and Results: Forty-two SNP markers were developed using KASPar technology. Forty-one were successfully genotyped in all of the Citrus germplasm, where intra- and interspecific polymorphisms were observed. The transferability and diversity decreased with increasing taxonomic distance. • Conclusions: SNP markers based on the KASPar method developed from sequence data of a limited intrageneric discovery panel provide a valuable molecular resource for genetic diversity analysis of germplasm within a genus and should be useful for germplasm fingerprinting at a much broader diversity level. PMID:25202535

  4. Developing Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers from transcriptome sequences for the identification of longan (Dimocarpus longan) germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) is an important tropical fruit tree crop. Accurate varietal identification is essential for germplasm management and breeding. Using longan transcriptome sequences from public databases, we developed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers; validated 60 SNPs in...

  5. Association of a genetic polymorphism (-44 C/G SNP) in the human DEFB1 gene with expression and inducibility of multiple β-defensins in gingival keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kalus, Andrea A; Fredericks, L Page; Hacker, Beth M; Dommisch, Henrik; Presland, Richard B; Kimball, Janet R; Dale, Beverly A

    2009-01-01

    Background Human β-defensins (hBDs) are antimicrobial peptides with a role in innate immune defense. Our laboratory previously showed that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 5' untranslated region of the hBD1 gene (DEFB1), denoted -44 (rs1800972), is correlated with protection from oral Candida. Because this SNP alters the putative mRNA structure, we hypothesized that it alters hBD1 expression. Methods Transfection of reporter constructs and evaluation of antimicrobial activity and mRNA expression levels in keratinocytes from multiple donors were used to evaluate the effect of this SNP on constitutive and induced levels of expression. Results Transfection of CAT reporter constructs containing the 5' untranslated region showed that the -44 G allele yielded a 2-fold increase in CAT protein compared to other common haplotypes suggesting a cis effect on transcription or translation. The constitutive hBD1 mRNA level in human oral keratinocytes was significantly greater in cells from donors with the -44 GG genotype compared to those with the common CC genotype. Surprisingly, the hBD3 mRNA level as well as antimicrobial activity of keratinocyte extracts also correlated with the -44 G allele. Induced levels of hBD1, hBD2, and hBD3 mRNA were evaluated in keratinocytes challenged with Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 ligands, interleukin-1β, TNFα, and interferon-γ (IFNγ). In contrast to constitutive expression levels, IFNγ-induced keratinocyte hBD1 and hBD3 mRNA expression was significantly greater in cells with the common CC genotype, but there was no clear correlation of genotype with hBD2 expression. Conclusion The DEFB1 -44 G allele is associated with an increase in overall constitutive antimicrobial activity and expression of hBD1 and hBD3 in a manner that is consistent with protection from candidiasis, while the more common C allele is associated with IFNγ inducibility of these β-defensins and is likely to be more protective in conditions that enhance IFN

  6. LincSNP: a database of linking disease-associated SNPs to human large intergenic non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with a wide range of human diseases. However, many of these disease-associated SNPs are located in non-coding regions and have remained largely unexplained. Recent findings indicate that disease-associated SNPs in human large intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) may lead to susceptibility to diseases through their effects on lincRNA expression. There is, therefore, a need to specifically record these SNPs and annotate them as potential candidates for disease. Description We have built LincSNP, an integrated database, to identify and annotate disease-associated SNPs in human lincRNAs. The current release of LincSNP contains approximately 140,000 disease-associated SNPs (or linkage disequilibrium SNPs), which can be mapped to around 5,000 human lincRNAs, together with their comprehensive functional annotations. The database also contains annotated, experimentally supported SNP-lincRNA-disease associations and disease-associated lincRNAs. It provides flexible search options for data extraction and searches can be performed by disease/phenotype name, SNP ID, lincRNA name and chromosome region. In addition, we provide users with a link to download all the data from LincSNP and have developed a web interface for the submission of novel identified SNP-lincRNA-disease associations. Conclusions The LincSNP database aims to integrate disease-associated SNPs and human lincRNAs, which will be an important resource for the investigation of the functions and mechanisms of lincRNAs in human disease. The database is available at http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/LincSNP. PMID:24885522

  7. A Multiple-SNP Approach for Genome-Wide Association Study of Milk Production Traits in Chinese Holstein Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ming; Fu, Weixuan; Jiang, Dan; Zhang, Qin; Sun, Dongxiao; Ding, Xiangdong; Liu, Jianfeng

    2014-01-01

    The multiple-SNP analysis has been studied by many researchers, in which the effects of multiple SNPs are simultaneously estimated and tested in a multiple linear regression. The multiple-SNP association analysis usually has higher power and lower false-positive rate for detecting causative SNP(s) than single marker analysis (SMA). Several methods have been proposed to simultaneously estimate and test multiple SNP effects. In this research, a fast method called MEML (Mixed model based Expectation-Maximization Lasso algorithm) was developed for simultaneously estimate of multiple SNP effects. An improved Lasso prior was assigned to SNP effects which were estimated by searching the maximum joint posterior mode. The residual polygenic effect was included in the model to absorb many tiny SNP effects, which is treated as missing data in our EM algorithm. A series of simulation experiments were conducted to validate the proposed method, and the results showed that compared with SMMA, the new method can dramatically decrease the false-positive rate. The new method was also applied to the 50k SNP-panel dataset for genome-wide association study of milk production traits in Chinese Holstein cattle. Totally, 39 significant SNPs and their nearby 25 genes were found. The number of significant SNPs is remarkably fewer than that by SMMA which found 105 significant SNPs. Among 39 significant SNPs, 8 were also found by SMMA and several well-known QTLs or genes were confirmed again; furthermore, we also got some positional candidate gene with potential function of effecting milk production traits. These novel findings in our research should be valuable for further investigation. PMID:25148050

  8. Use of the Illumina GoldenGate assay for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping in cereal crops.

    PubMed

    Chao, Shiaoman; Lawley, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    Highly parallel genotyping assays, such as the GoldenGate assay developed by Illumina, capable of interrogating up to 3,072 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) simultaneously, have greatly facilitated genome-wide studies, particularly for crops with large and complex genome structures. In this report, we provide detailed information and guidelines regarding genomic DNA preparation, SNP assay design, SNP assay protocols, and genotype calling using Illumina's GenomeStudio software. PMID:25373766

  9. Identification of SNP and SSR Markers in Finger Millet Using Next Generation Sequencing Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Gimode, Davis; Odeny, Damaris A.; de Villiers, Etienne P.; Wanyonyi, Solomon; Dida, Mathews M.; Mneney, Emmarold E.; Muchugi, Alice; Machuka, Jesse; de Villiers, Santie M.

    2016-01-01

    Finger millet is an important cereal crop in eastern Africa and southern India with excellent grain storage quality and unique ability to thrive in extreme environmental conditions. Since negligible attention has been paid to improving this crop to date, the current study used Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies to develop both Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers. Genomic DNA from cultivated finger millet genotypes KNE755 and KNE796 was sequenced using both Roche 454 and Illumina technologies. Non-organelle sequencing reads were assembled into 207 Mbp representing approximately 13% of the finger millet genome. We identified 10,327 SSRs and 23,285 non-homeologous SNPs and tested 101 of each for polymorphism across a diverse set of wild and cultivated finger millet germplasm. For the 49 polymorphic SSRs, the mean polymorphism information content (PIC) was 0.42, ranging from 0.16 to 0.77. We also validated 92 SNP markers, 80 of which were polymorphic with a mean PIC of 0.29 across 30 wild and 59 cultivated accessions. Seventy-six of the 80 SNPs were polymorphic across 30 wild germplasm with a mean PIC of 0.30 while only 22 of the SNP markers showed polymorphism among the 59 cultivated accessions with an average PIC value of 0.15. Genetic diversity analysis using the polymorphic SNP markers revealed two major clusters; one of wild and another of cultivated accessions. Detailed STRUCTURE analysis confirmed this grouping pattern and further revealed 2 sub-populations within wild E. coracana subsp. africana. Both STRUCTURE and genetic diversity analysis assisted with the correct identification of the new germplasm collections. These polymorphic SSR and SNP markers are a significant addition to the existing 82 published SSRs, especially with regard to the previously reported low polymorphism levels in finger millet. Our results also reveal an unexploited finger millet genetic resource that can be included in the regional

  10. Supplementing High-Density SNP Microarrays for Additional Coverage of Disease-Related Genes: Addiction as a Paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    SacconePhD, Scott F; Chesler, Elissa J; Bierut, Laura J; Kalivas, Peter J; Lerman, Caryn; Saccone, Nancy L; Uhl, George R; Li, Chuan-Yun; Philip, Vivek M; Edenberg, Howard; Sherry, Steven; Feolo, Michael; Moyzis, Robert K; Rutter, Joni L

    2009-01-01

    Commercial SNP microarrays now provide comprehensive and affordable coverage of the human genome. However, some diseases have biologically relevant genomic regions that may require additional coverage. Addiction, for example, is thought to be influenced by complex interactions among many relevant genes and pathways. We have assembled a list of 486 biologically relevant genes nominated by a panel of experts on addiction. We then added 424 genes that showed evidence of association with addiction phenotypes through mouse QTL mappings and gene co-expression analysis. We demonstrate that there are a substantial number of SNPs in these genes that are not well represented by commercial SNP platforms. We address this problem by introducing a publicly available SNP database for addiction. The database is annotated using numeric prioritization scores indicating the extent of biological relevance. The scores incorporate a number of factors such as SNP/gene functional properties (including synonymy and promoter regions), data from mouse systems genetics and measures of human/mouse evolutionary conservation. We then used HapMap genotyping data to determine if a SNP is tagged by a commercial microarray through linkage disequilibrium. This combination of biological prioritization scores and LD tagging annotation will enable addiction researchers to supplement commercial SNP microarrays to ensure comprehensive coverage of biologically relevant regions.

  11. Supplementing High-Density SNP Microarrays for Additional Coverage of Disease-Related Genes: Addiction as a Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Saccone, Scott F.; Bierut, Laura J.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Kalivas, Peter W.; Lerman, Caryn; Saccone, Nancy L.; Uhl, George R.; Li, Chuan-Yun; Philip, Vivek M.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Sherry, Stephen T.; Feolo, Michael; Moyzis, Robert K.; Rutter, Joni L.

    2009-01-01

    Commercial SNP microarrays now provide comprehensive and affordable coverage of the human genome. However, some diseases have biologically relevant genomic regions that may require additional coverage. Addiction, for example, is thought to be influenced by complex interactions among many relevant genes and pathways. We have assembled a list of 486 biologically relevant genes nominated by a panel of experts on addiction. We then added 424 genes that showed evidence of association with addiction phenotypes through mouse QTL mappings and gene co-expression analysis. We demonstrate that there are a substantial number of SNPs in these genes that are not well represented by commercial SNP platforms. We address this problem by introducing a publicly available SNP database for addiction. The database is annotated using numeric prioritization scores indicating the extent of biological relevance. The scores incorporate a number of factors such as SNP/gene functional properties (including synonymy and promoter regions), data from mouse systems genetics and measures of human/mouse evolutionary conservation. We then used HapMap genotyping data to determine if a SNP is tagged by a commercial microarray through linkage disequilibrium. This combination of biological prioritization scores and LD tagging annotation will enable addiction researchers to supplement commercial SNP microarrays to ensure comprehensive coverage of biologically relevant regions. PMID:19381300

  12. Alternative oxidase pathway is involved in the exogenous SNP-elevated tolerance of Medicago truncatula to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Jian, Wei; Zhang, Da-Wei; Zhu, Feng; Wang, Shuo-Xun; Pu, Xiao-Jun; Deng, Xing-Guang; Luo, Shi-Shuai; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2016-04-01

    Exogenous application of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) would enhance the tolerance of plants to stress conditions. Some evidences suggested that nitric oxide (NO) could induce the expression of alternative oxidase (AOX). In this study, Medicago truncatula (Medicago) was chosen to study the role of AOX in the SNP-elevated resistance to salt stress. Our results showed that the expression of AOX genes (especially AOX1 and AOX2b1) and cyanide-resistant respiration rate (Valt) could be significantly induced by salt stress. Exogenous application of SNP could further enhance the expression of AOX genes and Valt. Exogenous application of SNP could alleviate the oxidative damage and photosynthetic damage caused by salt stress. However, the stress resistance was significantly decreased in the plants which were pretreated with n-propyl gallate (nPG). More importantly, the damage in nPG-pretreated plants could not be alleviated by application of SNP. Further study showed that effects of nPG on the activities of antioxidant enzymes were minor. These results showed that AOX pathway played an important role in the SNP-elevated resistance of Medicago to salt stress. AOX could contribute to regulating the accumulation of reactive oxygen (ROS) and protect of photosystem, and we proposed that all these were depend on the ability of maintaining the homeostasis of redox state. PMID:26962709

  13. Strategies for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping to enhance genotype imputation in Gyr (Bos indicus) dairy cattle: Comparison of commercially available SNP chips.

    PubMed

    Boison, S A; Santos, D J A; Utsunomiya, A H T; Carvalheiro, R; Neves, H H R; O'Brien, A M Perez; Garcia, J F; Sölkner, J; da Silva, M V G B

    2015-07-01

    Genotype imputation is widely used as a cost-effective strategy in genomic evaluation of cattle. Key determinants of imputation accuracies, such as linkage disequilibrium patterns, marker densities, and ascertainment bias, differ between Bos indicus and Bos taurus breeds. Consequently, there is a need to investigate effectiveness of genotype imputation in indicine breeds. Thus, the objective of the study was to investigate strategies and factors affecting the accuracy of genotype imputation in Gyr (Bos indicus) dairy cattle. Four imputation scenarios were studied using 471 sires and 1,644 dams genotyped on Illumina BovineHD (HD-777K; San Diego, CA) and BovineSNP50 (50K) chips, respectively. Scenarios were based on which reference high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) panel (HDP) should be adopted [HD-777K, 50K, and GeneSeek GGP-75Ki (Lincoln, NE)]. Depending on the scenario, validation animals had their genotypes masked for one of the lower-density panels: Illumina (3K, 7K, and 50K) and GeneSeek (SGGP-20Ki and GGP-75Ki). We randomly selected 171 sires as reference and 300 as validation for all the scenarios. Additionally, all sires were used as reference and the 1,644 dams were imputed for validation. Genotypes of 98 individuals with 4 and more offspring were completely masked and imputed. Imputation algorithms FImpute and Beagle v3.3 and v4 were used. Imputation accuracies were measured using the correlation and allelic correct rate. FImpute resulted in highest accuracies, whereas Beagle 3.3 gave the least-accurate imputations. Accuracies evaluated as correlation (allelic correct rate) ranged from 0.910 (0.942) to 0.961 (0.974) using 50K as HDP and with 3K (7K) as low-density panels. With GGP-75Ki as HDP, accuracies were moderate for 3K, 7K, and 50K, but high for SGGP-20Ki. The use of HD-777K as HDP resulted in accuracies of 0.888 (3K), 0.941 (7K), 0.980 (SGGP-20Ki), 0.982 (50K), and 0.993 (GGP-75Ki). Ungenotyped individuals were imputed with an

  14. Leptin receptor gene in the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax): Cloning, phylogeny, tissue distribution and neuroanatomical organization.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Sebastián; Rocha, Ana; Felip, Alicia; Carrillo, Manuel; Zanuy, Silvia; Kah, Olivier; Servili, Arianna

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we report the cloning of three transcripts for leptin receptor in the European sea bass, a marine teleost of economic interest. The two shortest variants, generated by different splice sites, encode all functional extracellular and intracellular domains but missed the transmembrane domain. The resulting proteins are therefore potential soluble binding proteins for leptin. The longest transcript (3605bp), termed sblepr, includes all the essential domains for binding and transduction of the signal. Thus, it is proposed as the ortholog for the human LEPR gene, the main responsible for leptin signaling. Phylogenetic analysis shows the sblepr clustered within the teleost leptin receptor group in 100% of the bootstrap replicates. The neuroanatomical localization of sblepr expressing cells has been assessed by in situ hybridization in brains of sea bass of both sexes during their first sexual maturation. At histological level, the distribution pattern of sblepr expressing cells in the brain shows no clear differences regarding sex or reproductive season. Transcripts of the sblepr have a widespread distribution throughout the forebrain and midbrain until the caudal portion of the hypothalamus. A high hybridization signal is detected in the telencephalon, preoptic area, medial basal and caudal hypothalamus and in the pituitary gland. In a more caudal region, sblepr expressing cells are identified in the longitudinal torus. The expression pattern observed for sblepr suggests that in sea bass, leptin is very likely to be involved in the control of food intake, energy reserves and reproduction. PMID:26979276

  15. A GWAS SNP for Schizophrenia Is Linked to the Internal MIR137 Promoter and Supports Differential Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, Alix; Breen, Gerome; Bubb, Vivien J.; Quinn, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MIR137 gene locus have been shown to confer risk for schizophrenia through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The expression levels of microRNA-137 (miR-137) and its validated gene targets have also been shown to be disrupted in several neuropsychiatric conditions, including schizophrenia. Regulation of miR-137 expression is thus imperative for normal neuronal functioning. We previously characterized an internal promoter domain within the MIR137 gene that contained a variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism and could alter the in vitro levels of miR-137 in a stimulus-induced and allele-specific manner. We now demonstrate that haplotype tagging-SNP analysis linked the rs1625579 GWAS SNP for schizophrenia to this internal MIR137 promoter through a proxy SNP rs2660304 located at this domain. We postulated that the rs2660304 promoter SNP may act as predisposing factor for schizophrenia through altering the levels of miR-137 expression in a genotype-dependent manner. Reporter gene analysis of the internal MIR137 promoter containing the common VNTR variant demonstrated genotype-dependent differences in promoter activity with respect to rs2660304. In line with previous reports, the major allele of the rs2660304 proxy SNP, which has previously been linked with schizophrenia risk through genetic association, resulted in downregulation of reporter gene expression in a tissue culture model. The genetic influence of the rs2660304 proxy SNP on the transcriptional activity of the internal MIR137 promoter, and thus the levels of miR-137 expression, therefore offers a distinct regulatory mechanism to explain the functional significance of the rs1625579 GWAS SNP for schizophrenia risk. PMID:26429811

  16. A GWAS SNP for Schizophrenia Is Linked to the Internal MIR137 Promoter and Supports Differential Allele-Specific Expression.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Alix; Breen, Gerome; Bubb, Vivien J; Quinn, John P

    2016-07-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MIR137 gene locus have been shown to confer risk for schizophrenia through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The expression levels of microRNA-137 (miR-137) and its validated gene targets have also been shown to be disrupted in several neuropsychiatric conditions, including schizophrenia. Regulation of miR-137 expression is thus imperative for normal neuronal functioning. We previously characterized an internal promoter domain within the MIR137 gene that contained a variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism and could alter the in vitro levels of miR-137 in a stimulus-induced and allele-specific manner. We now demonstrate that haplotype tagging-SNP analysis linked the rs1625579 GWAS SNP for schizophrenia to this internal MIR137 promoter through a proxy SNP rs2660304 located at this domain. We postulated that the rs2660304 promoter SNP may act as predisposing factor for schizophrenia through altering the levels of miR-137 expression in a genotype-dependent manner. Reporter gene analysis of the internal MIR137 promoter containing the common VNTR variant demonstrated genotype-dependent differences in promoter activity with respect to rs2660304. In line with previous reports, the major allele of the rs2660304 proxy SNP, which has previously been linked with schizophrenia risk through genetic association, resulted in downregulation of reporter gene expression in a tissue culture model. The genetic influence of the rs2660304 proxy SNP on the transcriptional activity of the internal MIR137 promoter, and thus the levels of miR-137 expression, therefore offers a distinct regulatory mechanism to explain the functional significance of the rs1625579 GWAS SNP for schizophrenia risk. PMID:26429811

  17. Imputation of microsatellite alleles from dense SNP genotypes for parentage verification across multiple Bos taurus and Bos indicus breeds

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Matthew C.; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Wiggans, George R.; Van Eenennaam, Alison L.; Weber, Kristina L.; Penedo, Cecilia T.; Berry, Donagh P.; Flynn, John; Garcia, Jose F.; Carmo, Adriana S.; Regitano, Luciana C. A.; Albuquerque, Milla; Silva, Marcos V. G. B.; Machado, Marco A.; Coffey, Mike; Moore, Kirsty; Boscher, Marie-Yvonne; Genestout, Lucie; Mazza, Raffaele; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Schnabel, Robert D.; Simpson, Barry; Marques, Elisa; McEwan, John C.; Cromie, Andrew; Coutinho, Luiz L.; Kuehn, Larry A.; Keele, John W.; Piper, Emily K.; Cook, Jim; Williams, Robert; Van Tassell, Curtis P.

    2013-01-01

    To assist cattle producers transition from microsatellite (MS) to single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping for parental verification we previously devised an effective and inexpensive method to impute MS alleles from SNP haplotypes. While the reported method was verified with only a limited data set (N = 479) from Brown Swiss, Guernsey, Holstein, and Jersey cattle, some of the MS-SNP haplotype associations were concordant across these phylogenetically diverse breeds. This implied that some haplotypes predate modern breed formation and remain in strong linkage disequilibrium. To expand the utility of MS allele imputation across breeds, MS and SNP data from more than 8000 animals representing 39 breeds (Bos taurus and B. indicus) were used to predict 9410 SNP haplotypes, incorporating an average of 73 SNPs per haplotype, for which alleles from 12 MS markers could be accurately be imputed. Approximately 25% of the MS-SNP haplotypes were present in multiple breeds (N = 2 to 36 breeds). These shared haplotypes allowed for MS imputation in breeds that were not represented in the reference population with only a small increase in Mendelian inheritance inconsistancies. Our reported reference haplotypes can be used for any cattle breed and the reported methods can be applied to any species to aid the transition from MS to SNP genetic markers. While ~91% of the animals with imputed alleles for 12 MS markers had ≤1 Mendelian inheritance conflicts with their parents' reported MS genotypes, this figure was 96% for our reference animals, indicating potential errors in the reported MS genotypes. The workflow we suggest autocorrects for genotyping errors and rare haplotypes, by MS genotyping animals whose imputed MS alleles fail parentage verification, and then incorporating those animals into the reference dataset. PMID:24065982

  18. Deriving Gene Networks from SNP Associated with Triacylglycerol and Phospholipid Fatty Acid Fractions from Ribeyes of Angus Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Justin W.; Reecy, James M.; Garrick, Dorian J.; Duan, Qing; Beitz, Don C.; Koltes, James E.; Saatchi, Mahdi; Koesterke, Lars; Mateescu, Raluca G.

    2016-01-01

    The fatty acid profile of beef is a complex trait that can benefit from gene-interaction network analysis to understand relationships among loci that contribute to phenotypic variation. Phenotypic measures of fatty acid profile from triacylglycerol and phospholipid fractions of longissimus muscle, pedigree information, and Illumina 54 k bovine SNP genotypes were utilized to derive an annotated gene network associated with fatty acid composition in 1,833 Angus beef cattle. The Bayes-B statistical model was utilized to perform a genome wide association study to estimate associations between 54 k SNP genotypes and 39 individual fatty acid phenotypes within each fraction. Posterior means of the effects were estimated for each of the 54 k SNP and for the collective effects of all the SNP in every 1-Mb genomic window in terms of the proportion of genetic variance explained by the window. Windows that explained the largest proportions of genetic variance for individual lipids were found in the triacylglycerol fraction. There was almost no overlap in the genomic regions explaining variance between the triacylglycerol and phospholipid fractions. Partial correlations were used to identify correlated regions of the genome for the set of largest 1 Mb windows that explained up to 35% genetic variation in either fatty acid fraction. SNP were allocated to windows based on the bovine UMD3.1 assembly. Gene network clusters were generated utilizing a partial correlation and information theory algorithm. Results were used in conjunction with network scoring and visualization software to analyze correlated SNP across 39 fatty acid phenotypes to identify SNP of significance. Significant pathways implicated in fatty acid metabolism through GO term enrichment analysis included homeostasis of number of cells, homeostatic process, coenzyme/cofactor activity, and immunoglobulin. These results suggest different metabolic pathways regulate the development of different types of lipids found in

  19. Association of rs2072183 SNP and serum lipid levels in the Mulao and Han populations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Niemann-pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) is a key protein for intestinal cholesterol transportation. Common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NPC1L1 gene have been associated with cholesterol absorption and serum lipid levels. The present study was undertaken to explore the possible association of NPC1L1 rs2072183 1735 C > G SNP and several environmental factors with serum lipid levels in the Mulao and Han populations. Methods Genotyping of the rs2072183 SNP was performed in 688 subjects of Mulao and 738 participants of Han Chinese. The interactions between NPC1L1 1735 C > G polymorphism and several environmental factors on serum lipid phenotypes were tested using the factorial design covariance analysis after controlling for potential confounders. Results The frequency of G allele was lower in Mulao than in Han (29.72% vs. 37.26%, P < 0.001). The frequency of CC, CG and GG genotypes was 49.85%, 40.84% and 9.31% in Mulao, and 39.30%, 46.88% and 13.82% in Han (P < 0.001); respectively. The levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), apolipoprotein (Apo) B and the ratio of ApoAI/ApoB in Han but not in Mulao were different among the three genotypes (P < 0.05 for all), the subjects with GG and CG genotypes had higher LDL-C, ApoB levels and lower ApoAI/ApoB ratio than the subjects with CC genotype. Subgroup analysis showed that the G allele carriers in Han had higher total cholesterol (TC), LDL-C and ApoB levels in males (P < 0.05) and lower ApoAI/ApoB ratio in both sexes (P < 0.05) than the G allele noncarriers. The G allele carriers in Mulao had higher TC and LDL-C levels in males (P < 0.05) and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels in both sexes (P < 0.05) than the G allele noncarriers. Serum TC, LDL-C, ApoB levels and ApoAI/ApoB ratio were correlated with genotypes in Han males (P < 0.05) but not in females. Serum lipid parameters were also correlated with several environmental

  20. A polymorphism in the nuclear receptor coactivator 7 gene and breast cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Süllner, Julia; Lattrich, Claus; Häring, Julia; Görse, Regina; Ortmann, Olaf; Treeck, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear receptor coactivator 7 (NCoA7) gene codes for an estrogen receptor-associated protein that plays a significant role in the cellular response to estrogens. Given that NCoA7 is expressed in the mammary gland, alterations in this gene may affect breast cancer risk. In this study, we compared the genotype and allele frequencies of the missense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1567, located in the coding region of the NCoA7 gene and resulting in an amino acid exchange from asparagine to glutamine, in 305 women with sporadic breast cancer and 346 women without any malignancy. Statistical analysis of the observed frequencies did not reveal a significant difference between the cancer and control groups, nor did a comparison between histological breast cancer subgroups. In conclusion, the results of our phenotype-genotype association study indicate that NCoA7 SNP rs1567 does not affect breast cancer susceptibility. PMID:22740868

  1. A polymorphism in the nuclear receptor coactivator 7 gene and breast cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    SÜLLNER, JULIA; LATTRICH, CLAUS; HÄRING, JULIA; GÖRSE, REGINA; ORTMANN, OLAF; TREECK, OLIVER

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear receptor coactivator 7 (NCoA7) gene codes for an estrogen receptor-associated protein that plays a significant role in the cellular response to estrogens. Given that NCoA7 is expressed in the mammary gland, alterations in this gene may affect breast cancer risk. In this study, we compared the genotype and allele frequencies of the missense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1567, located in the coding region of the NCoA7 gene and resulting in an amino acid exchange from asparagine to glutamine, in 305 women with sporadic breast cancer and 346 women without any malignancy. Statistical analysis of the observed frequencies did not reveal a significant difference between the cancer and control groups, nor did a comparison between histological breast cancer subgroups. In conclusion, the results of our phenotype-genotype association study indicate that NCoA7 SNP rs1567 does not affect breast cancer susceptibility. PMID:22740868

  2. No association of IFNG+874T/A SNP and NOS2A-954G/C SNP variants with nitric oxide radical serum levels or susceptibility to tuberculosis in a Brazilian population subset.

    PubMed

    Leandro, Ana Cristina C S; Rocha, Márcia Andrade; Lamoglia-Souza, Andreia; VandeBerg, John L; Rolla, Valeria Cavalcanti; Bonecini-Almeida, Maria da Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most common infectious diseases in the world. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection leads to pulmonary active disease in approximately 5-10% of exposed individuals. Both bacteria- and host-related characteristics influence latent infection and disease. Host genetic predisposition to develop TB may involve multiple genes and their polymorphisms. It was reported previously that interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) are expressed on alveolar macrophages from TB patients and are responsible for bacilli control; thus, we aimed this study at genotyping single nucleotide polymorphisms IFNG+874T/A SNP and NOS2A-954G/C SNP to estimate their role on TB susceptibility and determine whether these polymorphisms influence serum nitrite and NOx(-) production. This case-control study enrolled 172 TB patients and 179 healthy controls. Neither polymorphism was associated with susceptibility to TB. NOS2A-954G/C SNP was not associated with serum levels of nitrite and NOx(-). These results indicate that variants of IFNG+874T/A SNP and NOS2A-954G/C SNP do not influence TB susceptibility or the secretion of nitric oxide radicals in the study population. PMID:24024215

  3. Allele-Specific Amplification in Cancer Revealed by SNP Array Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Amplification, deletion, and loss of heterozygosity of genomic DNA are hallmarks of cancer. In recent years a variety of studies have emerged measuring total chromosomal copy number at increasingly high resolution. Similarly, loss-of-heterozygosity events have been finely mapped using high-throughput genotyping technologies. We have developed a probe-level allele-specific quantitation procedure that extracts both copy number and allelotype information from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array data to arrive at allele-specific copy number across the genome. Our approach applies an expectation-maximization algorithm to a model derived from a novel classification of SNP array probes. This method is the first to our knowledge that is able to (a) determine the generalized genotype of aberrant samples at each SNP site (e.g., CCCCT at an amplified site), and (b) infer the copy number of each parental chromosome across the genome. With this method, we are able to determine not just where amplifications and deletions occur, but also the haplotype of the region being amplified or deleted. The merit of our model and general approach is demonstrated by very precise genotyping of normal samples, and our allele-specific copy number inferences are validated using PCR experiments. Applying our method to a collection of lung cancer samples, we are able to conclude that amplification is essentially monoallelic, as would be expected under the mechanisms currently believed responsible for gene amplification. This suggests that a specific parental chromosome may be targeted for amplification, whether because of germ line or somatic variation. An R software package containing the methods described in this paper is freely available at http://genome.dfci.harvard.edu/~tlaframb/PLASQ. PMID:16322765

  4. Identification of SNP and SSR markers in eggplant using RAD tag sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) genome is relatively unexplored, especially compared to those of the other major Solanaceae crops tomato and potato. In particular, no SNP markers are publicly available; on the other hand, over 1,000 SSR markers were developed and publicly available. We have combined the recently developed Restriction-site Associated DNA (RAD) approach with Illumina DNA sequencing for rapid and mass discovery of both SNP and SSR markers for eggplant. Results RAD tags were generated from the genomic DNA of a pair of eggplant mapping parents, and sequenced to produce ~17.5 Mb of sequences arrangeable into ~78,000 contigs. The resulting non-redundant genomic sequence dataset consisted of ~45,000 sequences, of which ~29% were putative coding sequences and ~70% were in common between the mapping parents. The shared sequences allowed the discovery of ~10,000 SNPs and nearly 1,000 indels, equivalent to a SNP frequency of 0.8 per Kb and an indel frequency of 0.07 per Kb. Over 2,000 of the SNPs are likely to be mappable via the Illumina GoldenGate assay. A subset of 384 SNPs was used to successfully fingerprint a panel of eggplant germplasm, producing a set of informative diversity data. The RAD sequences also included nearly 2,000 putative SSRs, and primer pairs were designed to amplify 1,155 loci. Conclusion The high throughput sequencing of the RAD tags allowed the discovery of a large number of DNA markers, which will prove useful for extending our current knowledge of the genome organization of eggplant, for assisting in marker-aided selection and for carrying out comparative genomic analyses within the Solanaceae family. PMID:21663628

  5. A Whole Methylome CpG-SNP Association Study of Psychosis in Blood and Brain Tissue.

    PubMed

    van den Oord, Edwin J C G; Clark, Shaunna L; Xie, Lin Ying; Shabalin, Andrey A; Dozmorov, Mikhail G; Kumar, Gaurav; Vladimirov, Vladimir I; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Aberg, Karolina A

    2016-07-01

    Mutated CpG sites (CpG-SNPs) are potential hotspots for human diseases because in addition to the sequence variation they may show individual differences in DNA methylation. We performed methylome-wide association studies (MWAS) to test whether methylation differences at those sites were associated with schizophrenia. We assayed all common CpG-SNPs with methyl-CpG binding domain protein-enriched genome sequencing (MBD-seq) using DNA extracted from 1408 blood samples and 66 postmortem brain samples (BA10) of schizophrenia cases and controls. Seven CpG-SNPs passed our FDR threshold of 0.1 in the blood MWAS. Of the CpG-SNPs methylated in brain, 94% were also methylated in blood. This significantly exceeded the 46.2% overlap expected by chance (P-value < 1.0×10(-8)) and justified replicating findings from blood in brain tissue. CpG-SNP rs3796293 in IL1RAP replicated (P-value = .003) with the same direction of effects. This site was further validated through targeted bisulfite pyrosequencing in 736 independent case-control blood samples (P-value < 9.5×10(-4)). Our top result in the brain MWAS (P-value = 8.8×10(-7)) was CpG-SNP rs16872141 located in the potential promoter of ENC1. Overall, our results suggested that CpG-SNP methylation may reflect effects of environmental insults and can provide biomarkers in blood that could potentially improve disease management. PMID:26656881

  6. PredictSNP: Robust and Accurate Consensus Classifier for Prediction of Disease-Related Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Bendl, Jaroslav; Stourac, Jan; Salanda, Ondrej; Pavelka, Antonin; Wieben, Eric D.; Zendulka, Jaroslav; Brezovsky, Jan; Damborsky, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    Single nucleotide variants represent a prevalent form of genetic variation. Mutations in the coding regions are frequently associated with the development of various genetic diseases. Computational tools for the prediction of the effects of mutations on protein function are very important for analysis of single nucleotide variants and their prioritization for experimental characterization. Many computational tools are already widely employed for this purpose. Unfortunately, their comparison and further improvement is hindered by large overlaps between the training datasets and benchmark datasets, which lead to biased and overly optimistic reported performances. In this study, we have constructed three independent datasets by removing all duplicities, inconsistencies and mutations previously used in the training of evaluated tools. The benchmark dataset containing over 43,000 mutations was employed for the unbiased evaluation of eight established prediction tools: MAPP, nsSNPAnalyzer, PANTHER, PhD-SNP, PolyPhen-1, PolyPhen-2, SIFT and SNAP. The six best performing tools were combined into a consensus classifier PredictSNP, resulting into significantly improved prediction performance, and at the same time returned results for all mutations, confirming that consensus prediction represents an accurate and robust alternative to the predictions delivered by individual tools. A user-friendly web interface enables easy access to all eight prediction tools, the consensus classifier PredictSNP and annotations from the Protein Mutant Database and the UniProt database. The web server and the datasets are freely available to the academic community at http://loschmidt.chemi.muni.cz/predictsnp. PMID:24453961

  7. Plastid DNA sequencing and nuclear SNP genotyping help resolve the puzzle of central American Platanus

    PubMed Central

    De Castro, Olga; Di Maio, Antonietta; Lozada García, José Armando; Piacenti, Danilo; Vázquez-Torres, Mario; De Luca, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Recent research on the history of Platanus reveals that hybridization phenomena occurred in the central American species. This study has two goals: to help resolve the evolutive puzzle of central American Platanus, and to test the potential of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detecting ancient hybridization. Methods Sequencing of a uniparental plastid DNA marker [psbA-trnH(GUG) intergenic spacer] and qualitative and quantitative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping of biparental nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) markers [LEAFY intron 2 (LFY-i2) and internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2)] were used. Key Results Based on the SNP genotyping results, several Platanus accessions show the presence of hybridization/introgression, including some accessions of P. rzedowskii and of P. mexicana var. interior and one of P. mexicana var. mexicana from Oaxaca (= P. oaxacana). Based on haplotype analyses of the psbA-trnH spacer, five haplotypes were detected. The most common of these is present in taxa belonging to P. orientalis, P. racemosa sensu lato, some accessions of P. occidentalis sensu stricto (s.s.) from Texas, P. occidentalis var. palmeri, P. mexicana s.s. and P. rzedowskii. This is highly relevant to genetic relationships with the haplotypes present in P. occidentalis s.s. and P. mexicana var. interior. Conclusions Hybridization and introgression events between lineages ancestral to modern central and eastern North American Platanus species occurred. Plastid haplotypes and qualitative and quantitative SNP genotyping provide information critical for understanding the complex history of Mexican Platanus. Compared with the usual molecular techniques of sub-cloning, sequencing and genotyping, real-time PCR assay is a quick and sensitive technique for analysing complex evolutionary patterns. PMID:23798602

  8. High-density SNP assay development for genetic analysis in maritime pine (Pinus pinaster).

    PubMed

    Plomion, C; Bartholomé, J; Lesur, I; Boury, C; Rodríguez-Quilón, I; Lagraulet, H; Ehrenmann, F; Bouffier, L; Gion, J M; Grivet, D; de Miguel, M; de María, N; Cervera, M T; Bagnoli, F; Isik, F; Vendramin, G G; González-Martínez, S C

    2016-03-01

    Maritime pine provides essential ecosystem services in the south-western Mediterranean basin, where it covers around 4 million ha. Its scattered distribution over a range of environmental conditions makes it an ideal forest tree species for studies of local adaptation and evolutionary responses to climatic change. Highly multiplexed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping arrays are increasingly used to study genetic variation in living organisms and for practical applications in plant and animal breeding and genetic resource conservation. We developed a 9k Illumina Infinium SNP array and genotyped maritime pine trees from (i) a three-generation inbred (F2) pedigree, (ii) the French breeding population and (iii) natural populations from Portugal and the French Atlantic coast. A large proportion of the exploitable SNPs (2052/8410, i.e. 24.4%) segregated in the mapping population and could be mapped, providing the densest ever gene-based linkage map for this species. Based on 5016 SNPs, natural and breeding populations from the French gene pool exhibited similar level of genetic diversity. Population genetics and structure analyses based on 3981 SNP markers common to the Portuguese and French gene pools revealed high levels of differentiation, leading to the identification of a set of highly differentiated SNPs that could be used for seed provenance certification. Finally, we discuss how the validated SNPs could facilitate the identification of ecologically and economically relevant genes in this species, improving our understanding of the demography and selective forces shaping its natural genetic diversity, and providing support for new breeding strategies. PMID:26358548

  9. Role of an SNP in Alternative Splicing of Bovine NCF4 and Mastitis Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuge; Yang, Chunhong; Sun, Yan; Jiang, Qiang; Wang, Fei; Li, Mengjiao; Zhong, Jifeng; Huang, Jinming

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil cytosolic factor 4 (NCF4) is component of the nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate oxidase complex, a key factor in biochemical pathways and innate immune responses. In this study, splice variants and functional single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of NCF4 were identified to determine the variability and association of the gene with susceptibility to bovine mastitis characterized by inflammation. A novel splice variant, designated as NCF4-TV and characterized by the retention of a 48 bp sequence in intron 9, was detected in the mammary gland tissues of infected cows. The expression of the NCF4-reference main transcript in the mastitic mammary tissues was higher than that in normal tissues. A novel SNP, g.18174 A>G, was also found in the retained 48 bp region of intron 9. To determine whether NCF4-TV could be due to the g.18174 A>G mutation, we constructed two mini-gene expression vectors with the wild-type or mutant NCF4 g.18174 A>G fragment. The vectors were then transiently transfected into 293T cells, and alternative splicing of NCF4 was analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR and sequencing. Mini-gene splicing assay demonstrated that the aberrantly spliced NCF4-TV with 48 bp retained fragment in intron 9 could be due to g.18174 A>G, which was associated with milk somatic count score and increased risk of mastitis infection in cows. NCF4 expression was also regulated by alternative splicing. This study proposes that NCF4 splice variants generated by functional SNP are important risk factors for mastitis susceptibility in dairy cows. PMID:26600390

  10. CLUSTAG & WCLUSTAG: Hierarchical Clustering Algorithms for Efficient Tag-SNP Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Sio-Iong

    More than 6 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human genome have been genotyped by the HapMap project. Although only a pro portion of these SNPs are functional, all can be considered as candidate markers for indirect association studies to detect disease-related genetic variants. The complete screening of a gene or a chromosomal region is nevertheless an expensive undertak ing for association studies. A key strategy for improving the efficiency of association studies is to select a subset of informative SNPs, called tag SNPs, for analysis. In the chapter, hierarchical clustering algorithms have been proposed for efficient tag SNP selection.

  11. mrsFAST-Ultra: a compact, SNP-aware mapper for high performance sequencing applications

    PubMed Central

    Hach, Faraz; Sarrafi, Iman; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Alkan, Can; Eichler, Evan E.; Sahinalp, S. Cenk

    2014-01-01

    High throughput sequencing (HTS) platforms generate unprecedented amounts of data that introduce challenges for processing and downstream analysis. While tools that report the ‘best’ mapping location of each read provide a fast way to process HTS data, they are not suitable for many types of downstream analysis such as structural variation detection, where it is important to report multiple mapping loci for each read. For this purpose we introduce mrsFAST-Ultra, a fast, cache oblivious, SNP-aware aligner that can handle the multi-mapping of HTS reads very efficiently. mrsFAST-Ultra improves mrsFAST, our first cache oblivious read aligner capable of handling multi-mapping reads, through new and compact index structures that reduce not only the overall memory usage but also the number of CPU operations per alignment. In fact the size of the index generated by mrsFAST-Ultra is 10 times smaller than that of mrsFAST. As importantly, mrsFAST-Ultra introduces new features such as being able to (i) obtain the best mapping loci for each read, and (ii) return all reads that have at most n mapping loci (within an error threshold), together with these loci, for any user specified n. Furthermore, mrsFAST-Ultra is SNP-aware, i.e. it can map reads to reference genome while discounting the mismatches that occur at common SNP locations provided by db-SNP; this significantly increases the number of reads that can be mapped to the reference genome. Notice that all of the above features are implemented within the index structure and are not simple post-processing steps and thus are performed highly efficiently. Finally, mrsFAST-Ultra utilizes multiple available cores and processors and can be tuned for various memory settings. Our results show that mrsFAST-Ultra is roughly five times faster than its predecessor mrsFAST. In comparison to newly enhanced popular tools such as Bowtie2, it is more sensitive (it can report 10 times or more mappings per read) and much faster (six times

  12. SNP discovery in non-model organisms using 454 next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wheat, Christopher W

    2012-01-01

    Roche 454 sequencing of the transcriptome has become a standard approach for efficiently obtaining single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in non-model species. In this chapter, the primary issues facing the development of SNPs from the transcriptome in non-model species are presented: tissue and sampling choices, mRNA preparation, considerations of normalization, pooling and barcoding, how much to sequence, how to assemble the data and assess the assembly, calling transcriptome SNPs, developing these into genomic SNPs, and publishing the work. Discussion also covers the comparison of this approach to RAD-tag sequencing and the potential of using other sequencing platforms for SNP development. PMID:22665274

  13. SNP annotation-based whole genomic prediction and selection: an application to feed efficiency and its component traits in pigs.

    PubMed

    Do, D N; Janss, L L G; Jensen, J; Kadarmideen, H N

    2015-05-01

    The study investigated genetic architecture and predictive ability using genomic annotation of residual feed intake (RFI) and its component traits (daily feed intake [DFI], ADG, and back fat [BF]). A total of 1,272 Duroc pigs had both genotypic and phenotypic records, and the records were split into a training (968 pigs) and a validation dataset (304 pigs) by assigning records as before and after January 1, 2012, respectively. SNP were annotated by 14 different classes using Ensembl variant effect prediction. Predictive accuracy and prediction bias were calculated using Bayesian Power LASSO, Bayesian A, B, and Cπ, and genomic BLUP (GBLUP) methods. Predictive accuracy ranged from 0.508 to 0.531, 0.506 to 0.532, 0.276 to 0.357, and 0.308 to 0.362 for DFI, RFI, ADG, and BF, respectively. BayesCπ100.1 increased accuracy slightly compared to the GBLUP model and other methods. The contribution per SNP to total genomic variance was similar among annotated classes across different traits. Predictive performance of SNP classes did not significantly differ from randomized SNP groups. Genomic prediction has accuracy comparable to observed phenotype, and use of genomic prediction can be cost effective by replacing feed intake measurement. Genomic annotation had less impact on predictive accuracy traits considered here but may be different for other traits. It is the first study to provide useful insights into biological classes of SNP driving the whole genomic prediction for complex traits in pigs. PMID:26020301

  14. Lipoxin receptors.

    PubMed

    Romano, Mario; Recchia, Irene; Recchiuti, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Lipoxins (LXs) represent a class of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites that carry potent immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, LXA4 and LXB4 being the main components of this series. LXs are generated by cooperation between 5-lipoxygenase (LO) and 12- or 15-LO during cell-cell interactions or by single cell types. LX epimers at carbon 15, the 15-epi-LXs, are formed by aspirin-acetylated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in cooperation with 5-LO. 15-epi-LXA4 is also termed aspirin-triggered LX (ATL). In vivo studies with stable LX and ATL analogs have established that these eicosanoids possess potent anti-inflammatory activities. A LXA4 receptor has been cloned. It belongs to the family of chemotactic receptors and clusters with formyl peptide receptors on chromosome 19. Therefore, it was initially denominated formyl peptide receptor like 1 (FPRL1). This receptor binds with high affinity and stereoselectivity LXA4 and ATL. It also recognizes a variety of peptides, synthetic, endogenously generated, or disease associated, but with lower affinity compared to LXA4. For this reason, this receptor has been renamed ALX. This review summarizes the current knowledge on ALX expression, signaling, and potential pathophysiological role. The involvement of additional recognition sites in LX bioactions is also discussed. PMID:17767357

  15. SNPsplit: Allele-specific splitting of alignments between genomes with known SNP genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Felix; Andrews, Simon R.

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing reads overlapping polymorphic sites in diploid mammalian genomes may be assigned to one allele or the other. This holds the potential to detect gene expression, chromatin modifications, DNA methylation or nuclear interactions in an allele-specific fashion. SNPsplit is an allele-specific alignment sorter designed to read files in SAM/BAM format and determine the allelic origin of reads or read-pairs that cover known single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) positions. For this to work libraries must have been aligned to a genome in which all known SNP positions were masked with the ambiguity base 'N' and aligned using a suitable mapping program such as Bowtie2, TopHat, STAR, HISAT2, HiCUP or Bismark. SNPsplit also provides an automated solution to generate N-masked reference genomes for hybrid mouse strains based on the variant call information provided by the Mouse Genomes Project. The unique ability of SNPsplit to work with various different kinds of sequencing data including RNA-Seq, ChIP-Seq, Bisulfite-Seq or Hi-C opens new avenues for the integrative exploration of allele-specific data. PMID:27429743

  16. A Genome Wide Survey of SNP Variation Reveals the Genetic Structure of Sheep Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Kijas, James W.; Townley, David; Dalrymple, Brian P.; Heaton, Michael P.; Maddox, Jillian F.; McGrath, Annette; Wilson, Peter; Ingersoll, Roxann G.; McCulloch, Russell; McWilliam, Sean; Tang, Dave; McEwan, John; Cockett, Noelle; Oddy, V. Hutton; Nicholas, Frank W.; Raadsma, Herman

    2009-01-01

    The genetic structure of sheep reflects their domestication and subsequent formation into discrete breeds. Understanding genetic structure is essential for achieving genetic improvement through genome-wide association studies, genomic selection and the dissection of quantitative traits. After identifying the first genome-wide set of SNP for sheep, we report on levels of genetic variability both within and between a diverse sample of ovine populations. Then, using cluster analysis and the partitioning of genetic variation, we demonstrate sheep are characterised by weak phylogeographic structure, overlapping genetic similarity and generally low differentiation which is consistent with their short evolutionary history. The degree of population substructure was, however, sufficient to cluster individuals based on geographic origin and known breed history. Specifically, African and Asian populations clustered separately from breeds of European origin sampled from Australia, New Zealand, Europe and North America. Furthermore, we demonstrate the presence of stratification within some, but not all, ovine breeds. The results emphasize that careful documentation of genetic structure will be an essential prerequisite when mapping the genetic basis of complex traits. Furthermore, the identification of a subset of SNP able to assign individuals into broad groupings demonstrates even a small panel of markers may be suitable for applications such as traceability. PMID:19270757

  17. GStream: Improving SNP and CNV Coverage on Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Arnald; Marsal, Sara; Tortosa, Raül; Canela-Xandri, Oriol; Julià, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    We present GStream, a method that combines genome-wide SNP and CNV genotyping in the Illumina microarray platform with unprecedented accuracy. This new method outperforms previous well-established SNP genotyping software. More importantly, the CNV calling algorithm of GStream dramatically improves the results obtained by previous state-of-the-art methods and yields an accuracy that is close to that obtained by purely CNV-oriented technologies like Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH). We demonstrate the superior performance of GStream using microarray data generated from HapMap samples. Using the reference CNV calls generated by the 1000 Genomes Project (1KGP) and well-known studies on whole genome CNV characterization based either on CGH or genotyping microarray technologies, we show that GStream can increase the number of reliably detected variants up to 25% compared to previously developed methods. Furthermore, the increased genome coverage provided by GStream allows the discovery of CNVs in close linkage disequilibrium with SNPs, previously associated with disease risk in published Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS). These results could provide important insights into the biological mechanism underlying the detected disease risk association. With GStream, large-scale GWAS will not only benefit from the combined genotyping of SNPs and CNVs at an unprecedented accuracy, but will also take advantage of the computational efficiency of the method. PMID:23844243

  18. Linkage Disequilibrium Estimation of Chinese Beef Simmental Cattle Using High-density SNP Panels

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, M.; Zhu, B.; Wang, Y. H.; Wu, Y.; Xu, L.; Guo, L. P.; Yuan, Z. R.; Zhang, L. P.; Gao, X.; Gao, H. J.; Xu, S. Z.; Li, J. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Linkage disequilibrium (LD) plays an important role in genomic selection and mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL). In this study, the pattern of LD and effective population size (Ne) were investigated in Chinese beef Simmental cattle. A total of 640 bulls were genotyped with IlluminaBovinSNP50BeadChip and IlluminaBovinHDBeadChip. We estimated LD for each autosomal chromosome at the distance between two random SNPs of <0 to 25 kb, 25 to 50 kb, 50 to 100 kb, 100 to 500 kb, 0.5 to 1 Mb, 1 to 5 Mb and 5 to 10 Mb. The mean values of r2 were 0.30, 0.16 and 0.08, when the separation between SNPs ranged from 0 to 25 kb to 50 to 100 kb and then to 0.5 to 1 Mb, respectively. The LD estimates decreased as the distance increased in SNP pairs, and increased with the increase of minor allelic frequency (MAF) and with the decrease of sample sizes. Estimates of effective population size for Chinese beef Simmental cattle decreased in the past generations and Ne was 73 at five generations ago. PMID:25049849

  19. Fast and Rigorous Computation of Gene and Pathway Scores from SNP-Based Summary Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Rueedi, Rico; Kutalik, Zoltán; Bergmann, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Integrating single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) p-values from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) across genes and pathways is a strategy to improve statistical power and gain biological insight. Here, we present Pascal (Pathway scoring algorithm), a powerful tool for computing gene and pathway scores from SNP-phenotype association summary statistics. For gene score computation, we implemented analytic and efficient numerical solutions to calculate test statistics. We examined in particular the sum and the maximum of chi-squared statistics, which measure the strongest and the average association signals per gene, respectively. For pathway scoring, we use a modified Fisher method, which offers not only significant power improvement over more traditional enrichment strategies, but also eliminates the problem of arbitrary threshold selection inherent in any binary membership based pathway enrichment approach. We demonstrate the marked increase in power by analyzing summary statistics from dozens of large meta-studies for various traits. Our extensive testing indicates that our method not only excels in rigorous type I error control, but also results in more biologically meaningful discoveries. PMID:26808494

  20. Whole-Genome Analysis of Diversity and SNP-Major Gene Association in Peach Germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Micheletti, Diego; Dettori, Maria Teresa; Micali, Sabrina; Aramini, Valeria; Pacheco, Igor; Da Silva Linge, Cassia; Foschi, Stefano; Banchi, Elisa; Barreneche, Teresa; Quilot-Turion, Bénédicte; Lambert, Patrick; Pascal, Thierry; Iglesias, Ignasi; Carbó, Joaquim; Wang, Li-rong; Ma, Rui-juan; Li, Xiong-wei; Gao, Zhong-shan; Nazzicari, Nelson; Troggio, Michela; Bassi, Daniele; Rossini, Laura; Verde, Ignazio; Laurens, François; Arús, Pere; Aranzana, Maria José

    2015-01-01

    Peach was domesticated in China more than four millennia ago and from there it spread world-wide. Since the middle of the last century, peach breeding programs have been very dynamic generating hundreds of new commercial varieties, however, in most cases such varieties derive from a limited collection of parental lines (founders). This is one reason for the observed low levels of variability of the commercial gene pool, implying that knowledge of the extent and distribution of genetic variability in peach is critical to allow the choice of adequate parents to confer enhanced productivity, adaptation and quality to improved varieties. With this aim we genotyped 1,580 peach accessions (including a few closely related Prunus species) maintained and phenotyped in five germplasm collections (four European and one Chinese) with the International Peach SNP Consortium 9K SNP peach array. The study of population structure revealed the subdivision of the panel in three main populations, one mainly made up of Occidental varieties from breeding programs (POP1OCB), one of Occidental landraces (POP2OCT) and the third of Oriental accessions (POP3OR). Analysis of linkage disequilibrium (LD) identified differential patterns of genome-wide LD blocks in each of the populations. Phenotypic data for seven monogenic traits were integrated in a genome-wide association study (GWAS). The significantly associated SNPs were always in the regions predicted by linkage analysis, forming haplotypes of markers. These diagnostic haplotypes could be used for marker-assisted selection (MAS) in modern breeding programs. PMID:26352671

  1. Performance of different SNP panels for parentage testing in two East Asian cattle breeds.

    PubMed

    Strucken, E M; Gudex, B; Ferdosi, M H; Lee, H K; Song, K D; Gibson, J P; Kelly, M; Piper, E K; Porto-Neto, L R; Lee, S H; Gondro, C

    2014-08-01

    The International Society for Animal Genetics (ISAG) proposed a panel of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for parentage testing in cattle (a core panel of 100 SNPs and an additional list of 100 SNPs). However, markers specific to East Asian taurine cattle breeds were not included, and no information is available as to whether the ISAG panel performs adequately for these breeds. We tested ISAG's core (100 SNP) and full (200 SNP) panels on two East Asian taurine breeds: the Korean Hanwoo and the Japanese Wagyu, the latter from the Australian herd. Even though the power of exclusion was high at 0.99 for both ISAG panels, the core panel performed poorly with 3.01% false-positive assignments in the Hanwoo population and 3.57% in the Wagyu. The full ISAG panel identified all sire-offspring relations correctly in both populations with 0.02% of relations wrongly excluded in the Hanwoo population. Based on these results, we created and tested two population-specific marker panels: one for the Wagyu population, which showed no false-positive assignments with either 100 or 200 SNPs, and a second panel for the Hanwoo, which still had some false-positive assignments with 100 SNPs but no false positives using 200 SNPs. In conclusion, for parentage assignment in East Asian cattle breeds, only the full ISAG panel is adequate for parentage testing. If fewer markers should be used, it is advisable to use population-specific markers rather than the ISAG panel. PMID:24730981

  2. SNP discovery in complex allotetraploid genomes (Gossypium spp., Malvaceae) using genotyping by sequencing1

    PubMed Central

    Logan-Young, Carla Jo; Yu, John Z.; Verma, Surender K.; Percy, Richard G.; Pepper, Alan E.

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker discovery in plants with complex allotetraploid genomes is often confounded by the presence of homeologous loci (along with paralogous and orthologous loci). Here we present a strategy to filter for SNPs representing orthologous loci. Methods and Results: Using Illumina next-generation sequencing, 54 million reads were collected from restriction enzyme–digested DNA libraries of a diversity of Gossypium taxa. Loci with one to three SNPs were discovered using the Stacks software package, yielding 25,529 new cotton SNP combinations, including those that are polymorphic at both interspecific and intraspecific levels. Frequencies of predicted dual-homozygous (aa/bb) marker polymorphisms ranged from 6.7–11.6% of total shared fragments in intraspecific comparisons and from 15.0–16.4% in interspecific comparisons. Conclusions: This resource provides dual-homozygous (aa/bb) marker polymorphisms. Both in silico and experimental validation efforts demonstrated that these markers are enriched for single orthologous loci that are homozygous for alternative alleles. PMID:25798340

  3. Prenatal SNP array testing in 1000 fetuses with ultrasound anomalies: causative, unexpected and susceptibility CNVs.

    PubMed

    Srebniak, Malgorzata I; Diderich, Karin Em; Joosten, Marieke; Govaerts, Lutgarde Cp; Knijnenburg, Jeroen; de Vries, Femke At; Boter, Marjan; Lont, Debora; Knapen, Maarten Fcm; de Wit, Merel C; Go, Attie Tji; Galjaard, Robert-Jan H; Van Opstal, Diane

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array testing in 1033 fetuses with ultrasound anomalies we investigated the prevalence and genetic nature of pathogenic findings. We reclassified all pathogenic findings into three categories: causative findings; unexpected diagnoses (UD); and susceptibility loci (SL) for neurodevelopmental disorders. After exclusion of trisomy 13, 18, 21, sex-chromosomal aneuploidy and triploidies, in 76/1033 (7.4%) fetuses a pathogenic chromosome abnormality was detected by genomic SNP array: in 19/1033 cases (1.8%) a microscopically detectable abnormality was found and in 57/1033 (5.5%) fetuses a pathogenic submicroscopic chromosome abnormality was detected. 58% (n=44) of all these pathogenic chromosome abnormalities involved a causative finding, 35% (n=27) a SL for neurodevelopmental disorder, and 6% (n=5) a UD of an early-onset untreatable disease. In 0.3% of parental samples an incidental pathogenic finding was encountered. Our results confirm that a genomic array should be the preferred first-tier technique in fetuses with ultrasound anomalies. All UDs involved early-onset diseases, which is beneficial for the patients to know. It also seems that UDs occur at a comparable frequency among microscopic and submicroscopic pathogenic findings. SL were more often detected than in pregnancies without ultrasound anomalies. PMID:26328504

  4. Use of Microsatellite and SNP Markers for Biotype Characterization in Hessian Fly

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Yan Ma; Cambron, Sue E.; Crane, Charles F.; Shukle, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    Exploration of the biotype structure of Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), would improve our knowledge regarding variation in virulence phenotypes and difference in genetic background. Microsatellites (simple sequence repeats) and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are highly variable genetic markers that are widely used in population genetic studies. This study developed and tested a panel of 18 microsatellite and 22 SNP markers to investigate the genetic structure of nine Hessian fly biotypes: B, C, D, E, GP, L, O, vH9, and vH13. The simple sequence repeats were more polymorphic than the SNP markers, and their neighbor-joining trees differed in consequence. Microsatellites suggested a simple geographic association of related biotypes that did not progressively gain virulence with increasing genetic distance from a founder type. Use of the k-means clustering algorithm in the STRUCTURE program shows that the nine biotypes comprise six to eight populations that are related to geography or history within laboratory cultures. PMID:26543089

  5. SNP diversity within and among Brassica rapa accessions reveals no geographic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Tanhuanpää, P; Erkkilä, M; Tenhola-Roininen, T; Tanskanen, J; Manninen, O

    2016-01-01

    Genetic diversity was studied in a collection of 61 accessions of Brassica rapa, which were mostly oil-type turnip rapes but also included two oil-type subsp. dichotoma and five subsp. trilocularis accessions, as well as three leaf-type subspecies (subsp. japonica, pekinensis, and chinensis) and five turnip cultivars (subsp. rapa). Two-hundred and nine SNP markers, which had been discovered by amplicon resequencing, were used to genotype 893 plants from the B. rapa collection using Illumina BeadXpress. There was great variation in the diversity indices between accessions. With STRUCTURE analysis, the plant collection could be divided into three groups that seemed to correspond to morphotype and flowering habit but not to geography. According to AMOVA analysis, 65% of the variation was due to variation within accessions, 25% among accessions, and 10% among groups. A smaller subset of the plant collection, 12 accessions, was also studied with 5727 GBS-SNPs. Diversity indices obtained with GBS-SNPs correlated well with those obtained with Illumina BeadXpress SNPs. The developed SNP markers have already been used and will be used in future plant breeding programs as well as in mapping and diversity studies. PMID:26694015

  6. PrimerMapper: high throughput primer design and graphical assembly for PCR and SNP detection.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Damien M

    2016-01-01

    Primer design represents a widely employed gambit in diverse molecular applications including PCR, sequencing, and probe hybridization. Variations of PCR, including primer walking, allele-specific PCR, and nested PCR provide specialized validation and detection protocols for molecular analyses that often require screening large numbers of DNA fragments. In these cases, automated sequence retrieval and processing become important features, and furthermore, a graphic that provides the user with a visual guide to the distribution of designed primers across targets is most helpful in quickly ascertaining primer coverage. To this end, I describe here, PrimerMapper, which provides a comprehensive graphical user interface that designs robust primers from any number of inputted sequences while providing the user with both, graphical maps of primer distribution for each inputted sequence, and also a global assembled map of all inputted sequences with designed primers. PrimerMapper also enables the visualization of graphical maps within a browser and allows the user to draw new primers directly onto the webpage. Other features of PrimerMapper include allele-specific design features for SNP genotyping, a remote BLAST window to NCBI databases, and remote sequence retrieval from GenBank and dbSNP. PrimerMapper is hosted at GitHub and freely available without restriction. PMID:26853558

  7. MultiBLUP: improved SNP-based prediction for complex traits.

    PubMed

    Speed, Doug; Balding, David J

    2014-09-01

    BLUP (best linear unbiased prediction) is widely used to predict complex traits in plant and animal breeding, and increasingly in human genetics. The BLUP mathematical model, which consists of a single random effect term, was adequate when kinships were measured from pedigrees. However, when genome-wide SNPs are used to measure kinships, the BLUP model implicitly assumes that all SNPs have the same effect-size distribution, which is a severe and unnecessary limitation. We propose MultiBLUP, which extends the BLUP model to include multiple random effects, allowing greatly improved prediction when the random effects correspond to classes of SNPs with distinct effect-size variances. The SNP classes can be specified in advance, for example, based on SNP functional annotations, and we also provide an adaptive procedure for determining a suitable partition of SNPs. We apply MultiBLUP to genome-wide association data from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (seven diseases), and from much larger studies of celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease, finding that it consistently provides better prediction than alternative methods. Moreover, MultiBLUP is computationally very efficient; for the largest data set, which includes 12,678 individuals and 1.5 M SNPs, the total analysis can be run on a single desktop PC in less than a day and can be parallelized to run even faster. Tools to perform MultiBLUP are freely available in our software LDAK. PMID:24963154

  8. Coding region SNP analysis to enhance dog mtDNA discrimination power in forensic casework.

    PubMed

    Verscheure, Sophie; Backeljau, Thierry; Desmyter, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    The high population frequencies of three control region haplotypes contribute to the low discrimination power of the dog mtDNA control region. It also diminishes the evidential power of a match with one of these haplotypes in forensic casework. A mitochondrial genome study of 214 Belgian dogs suggested 26 polymorphic coding region sites that successfully resolved dogs with the three most frequent control region haplotypes. In this study, three SNP assays were developed to determine the identity of the 26 informative sites. The control region of 132 newly sampled dogs was sequenced and added to the study of 214 dogs. The assays were applied to 58 dogs of the haplotypes of interest, which confirmed their suitability for enhancing dog mtDNA discrimination power. In the Belgian population study of 346 dogs, the set of 26 sites divided the dogs into 25 clusters of mtGenome sequences with substantially lower population frequency estimates than their control region sequences. In case of a match with one of the three control region haplotypes, using these three SNP assays in conjunction with control region sequencing would augment the exclusion probability of dog mtDNA analysis from 92.9% to 97.0%. PMID:25299153

  9. Three clinical experiences with SNP array results consistent with parental incest: a narrative with lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Helm, Benjamin M; Langley, Katherine; Spangler, Brooke; Vergano, Samantha

    2014-08-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays have the ability to reveal parental consanguinity which may or may not be known to healthcare providers. Consanguinity can have significant implications for the health of patients and for individual and family psychosocial well-being. These results often present ethical and legal dilemmas that can have important ramifications. Unexpected consanguinity can be confounding to healthcare professionals who may be unprepared to handle these results or to communicate them to families or other appropriate representatives. There are few published accounts of experiences with consanguinity and SNP arrays. In this paper we discuss three cases where molecular evidence of parental incest was identified by SNP microarray. We hope to further highlight consanguinity as a potential incidental finding, how the cases were handled by the clinical team, and what resources were found to be most helpful. This paper aims to contribute further to professional discourse on incidental findings with genomic technology and how they were addressed clinically. These experiences may provide some guidance on how others can prepare for these findings and help improve practice. As genetic and genomic testing is utilized more by non-genetics providers, we also hope to inform about the importance of engaging with geneticists and genetic counselors when addressing these findings. PMID:24222483

  10. Differentiation of drug and non-drug Cannabis using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay.

    PubMed

    Rotherham, D; Harbison, S A

    2011-04-15

    Cannabis sativa is both an illegal drug and a legitimate crop. The differentiation of illegal drug Cannabis from non-drug forms of Cannabis is relevant in the context of the growth of fibre and seed oil varieties of Cannabis for commercial purposes. This differentiation is currently determined based on the levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in adult plants. DNA based methods have the potential to assay Cannabis material unsuitable for analysis using conventional means including seeds, pollen and severely degraded material. The purpose of this research was to develop a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay for the differentiation of "drug" and "non-drug"Cannabis plants. An assay was developed based on four polymorphisms within a 399 bp fragment of the tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase gene, utilising the snapshot multiplex kit. This SNP assay was tested on 94 Cannabis plants, which included 10 blind samples, and was able to differentiate between "drug" and "non-drug"Cannabis in all cases, while also differentiating between Cannabis and other species. Non-drug plants were found to be homozygous at the four sites assayed while drug Cannabis plants were either homozygous or heterozygous. PMID:21036496

  11. SNP Miniplexes for Individual Identification of Random-Bred Domestic Cats.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Ashley; Creighton, Erica K; Gandolfi, Barbara; Khan, Razib; Grahn, Robert A; Lyons, Leslie A

    2016-05-01

    Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of the cat can be obtained from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) analyses of fur. This study developed miniplexes using SNPs with high discriminating power for random-bred domestic cats, focusing on individual and phenotypic identification. Seventy-eight SNPs were investigated using a multiplex PCR followed by a fluorescently labeled single base extension (SBE) technique (SNaPshot(®) ). The SNP miniplexes were evaluated for reliability, reproducibility, sensitivity, species specificity, detection limitations, and assignment accuracy. Six SNPplexes were developed containing 39 intergenic SNPs and 26 phenotypic SNPs, including a sex identification marker, ZFXY. The combined random match probability (cRMP) was 6.58 × 10(-19) across all Western cat populations and the likelihood ratio was 1.52 × 10(18) . These SNPplexes can distinguish individual cats and their phenotypic traits, which could provide insight into crime reconstructions. A SNP database of 237 cats from 13 worldwide populations is now available for forensic applications. PMID:27122395

  12. Fast and Rigorous Computation of Gene and Pathway Scores from SNP-Based Summary Statistics.

    PubMed

    Lamparter, David; Marbach, Daniel; Rueedi, Rico; Kutalik, Zoltán; Bergmann, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Integrating single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) p-values from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) across genes and pathways is a strategy to improve statistical power and gain biological insight. Here, we present Pascal (Pathway scoring algorithm), a powerful tool for computing gene and pathway scores from SNP-phenotype association summary statistics. For gene score computation, we implemented analytic and efficient numerical solutions to calculate test statistics. We examined in particular the sum and the maximum of chi-squared statistics, which measure the strongest and the average association signals per gene, respectively. For pathway scoring, we use a modified Fisher method, which offers not only significant power improvement over more traditional enrichment strategies, but also eliminates the problem of arbitrary threshold selection inherent in any binary membership based pathway enrichment approach. We demonstrate the marked increase in power by analyzing summary statistics from dozens of large meta-studies for various traits. Our extensive testing indicates that our method not only excels in rigorous type I error control, but also results in more biologically meaningful discoveries. PMID:26808494

  13. SNP Detection in mRNA in Living Cells Using Allele Specific FRET Probes

    PubMed Central

    Dahan, Liya; Huang, Lingyan; Kedmi, Ranit; Behlke, Mark A.; Peer, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Live mRNA detection allows real time monitoring of specific transcripts and genetic alterations. The main challenge of live genetic detection is overcoming the high background generated by unbound probes and reaching high level of specificity with minimal off target effects. The use of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) probes allows differentiation between bound and unbound probes thus decreasing background. Probe specificity can be optimized by adjusting the length and through use of chemical modifications that alter binding affinity. Herein, we report the use of two oligonucleotide FRET probe system to detect a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in murine Hras mRNA, which is associated with malignant transformations. The FRET oligonucleotides were modified with phosphorothioate (PS) bonds, 2′OMe RNA and LNA residues to enhance nuclease stability and improve SNP discrimination. Our results show that a point mutation in Hras can be detected in endogenous RNA of living cells. As determined by an Acceptor Photobleaching method, FRET levels were higher in cells transfected with perfect match FRET probes whereas a single mismatch showed decreased FRET signal. This approach promotes in vivo molecular imaging methods and could further be applied in cancer diagnosis and theranostic strategies. PMID:24039756

  14. PrimerMapper: high throughput primer design and graphical assembly for PCR and SNP detection

    PubMed Central

    O’Halloran, Damien M.

    2016-01-01

    Primer design represents a widely employed gambit in diverse molecular applications including PCR, sequencing, and probe hybridization. Variations of PCR, including primer walking, allele-specific PCR, and nested PCR provide specialized validation and detection protocols for molecular analyses that often require screening large numbers of DNA fragments. In these cases, automated sequence retrieval and processing become important features, and furthermore, a graphic that provides the user with a visual guide to the distribution of designed primers across targets is most helpful in quickly ascertaining primer coverage. To this end, I describe here, PrimerMapper, which provides a comprehensive graphical user interface that designs robust primers from any number of inputted sequences while providing the user with both, graphical maps of primer distribution for each inputted sequence, and also a global assembled map of all inputted sequences with designed primers. PrimerMapper also enables the visualization of graphical maps within a browser and allows the user to draw new primers directly onto the webpage. Other features of PrimerMapper include allele-specific design features for SNP genotyping, a remote BLAST window to NCBI databases, and remote sequence retrieval from GenBank and dbSNP. PrimerMapper is hosted at GitHub and freely available without restriction. PMID:26853558

  15. Use of Sequenom Sample ID Plus® SNP Genotyping in Identification of FFPE Tumor Samples

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jessica K.; Buchner, Nicholas; Timms, Lee; Tam, Shirley; Luo, Xuemei; Brown, Andrew M. K.; Pasternack, Danielle; Bristow, Robert G.; Fraser, Michael; Boutros, Paul C.; McPherson, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) analysis, such as the AmpFlSTR® Identifiler® Plus kit, is a standard, PCR-based human genotyping method used in the field of forensics. Misidentification of cell line and tissue DNA can be costly if not detected early; therefore it is necessary to have quality control measures such as STR profiling in place. A major issue in large-scale research studies involving archival formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues is that varying levels of DNA degradation can result in failure to correctly identify samples using STR genotyping. PCR amplification of STRs of several hundred base pairs is not always possible when DNA is degraded. The Sample ID Plus® panel from Sequenom allows for human DNA identification and authentication using SNP genotyping. In comparison to lengthy STR amplicons, this multiplexing PCR assay requires amplification of only 76–139 base pairs, and utilizes 47 SNPs to discriminate between individual samples. In this study, we evaluated both STR and SNP genotyping methods of sample identification, with a focus on paired FFPE tumor/normal DNA samples intended for next-generation sequencing (NGS). The ability to successfully validate the identity of FFPE samples can enable cost savings by reducing rework. PMID:24551080

  16. Varietal identification of tea (Camellia sinensis) using nanofluidic array of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Wan-Ping; Meinhardt, Lyndel W; Tan, Hua-Wei; Zhou, Lin; Mischke, Sue; Zhang, Dapeng

    2014-01-01

    Apart from water, tea is the world’s most widely consumed beverage. Tea is produced in more than 50 countries with an annual production of approximately 4.7 million tons. The market segment for specialty tea has been expanding rapidly owing to increased demand, resulting in higher revenues and profits for tea growers and the industry. Accurate varietal identification is critically important to ensure traceability and authentication of premium tea products, which in turn contribute to on-farm conservation of tea genetic diversity. Using a set of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers developed from the expressed sequence tag (EST) database of Camilla senensis, we genotyped deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) samples extracted from a diverse group of tea varieties, including both fresh and processed commercial loose-leaf teas. The validation led to the designation of 60 SNPs that unambiguously identified all 40 tested tea varieties with high statistical rigor (p<0.0001). Varietal authenticity and genetic relationships among the analyzed cultivars were further characterized by ordination and Bayesian clustering analysis. These SNP markers, in combination with a high-throughput genotyping protocol, effectively established and verified specific DNA fingerprints for all tested tea varieties. This method provides a powerful tool for variety authentication and quality control for the tea industry. It is also highly useful for the management of tea genetic resources and breeding, where accurate and efficient genotype identification is essential. PMID:26504544

  17. SNPs3D: Candidate gene and SNP selection for association studies

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Peng; Melamud, Eugene; Moult, John

    2006-01-01

    Background The relationship between disease susceptibility and genetic variation is complex, and many different types of data are relevant. We describe a web resource and database that provides and integrates as much information as possible on disease/gene relationships at the molecular level. Description The resource has three primary modules. One module identifies which genes are candidates for involvement in a specified disease. A second module provides information about the relationships between sets of candidate genes. The third module analyzes the likely impact of non-synonymous SNPs on protein function. Disease/candidate gene relationships and gene-gene relationships are derived from the literature using simple but effective text profiling. SNP/protein function relationships are derived by two methods, one using principles of protein structure and stability, the other based on sequence conservation. Entries for each gene include a number of links to other data, such as expression profiles, pathway context, mouse knockout information and papers. Gene-gene interactions are presented in an interactive graphical interface, providing rapid access to the underlying information, as well as convenient navigation through the network. Use of the resource is illustrated with aspects of the inflammatory response and hypertension. Conclusion The combination of SNP impact analysis, a knowledge based network of gene relationships and candidate genes, and access to a wide range of data and literature allow a user to quickly assimilate available information, and so develop models of gene-pathway-disease interaction. PMID:16551372

  18. Genome-wide prediction of cancer driver genes based on SNP and cancer SNV data.

    PubMed

    He, Quanze; He, Quanyuan; Liu, Xiaohui; Wei, Youheng; Shen, Suqin; Hu, Xiaohui; Li, Qiao; Peng, Xiangwen; Wang, Lin; Yu, Long

    2014-01-01

    Identifying cancer driver genes and exploring their functions are essential and the most urgent need in basic cancer research. Developing efficient methods to differentiate between driver and passenger somatic mutations revealed from large-scale cancer genome sequencing data is critical to cancer driver gene discovery. Here, we compared distinct features of SNP with SNV data in detail and found that the weighted ratio of SNV to SNP (termed as WVPR) is an excellent indicator for cancer driver genes. The power of WVPR was validated by accurate predictions of known drivers. We ranked most of human genes by WVPR and did functional analyses on the list. The results demonstrate that driver genes are usually highly enriched in chromatin organization related genes/pathways. And some protein complexes, such as histone acetyltransferase, histone methyltransferase, telomerase, centrosome, sin3 and U12-type spliceosomal complexes, are hot spots of driver mutations. Furthermore, this study identified many new potential driver genes (e.g. NTRK3 and ZIC4) and pathways including oxidative phosphorylation pathway, which were not deemed by previous methods. Taken together, our study not only developed a method to identify cancer driver genes/pathways but also provided new insights into molecular mechanisms of cancer development. PMID:25057442

  19. Diversity in 113 cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L) Walp] accessions assessed with 458 SNP markers.

    PubMed

    Egbadzor, Kenneth F; Ofori, Kwadwo; Yeboah, Martin; Aboagye, Lawrence M; Opoku-Agyeman, Michael O; Danquah, Eric Y; Offei, Samuel K

    2014-01-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers were used in characterization of 113 cowpea accessions comprising of 108 from Ghana and 5 from abroad. Leaf tissues from plants cultivated at the University of Ghana were genotyped at KBioscience in the United Kingdom. Data was generated for 477 SNPs, out of which 458 revealed polymorphism. The results were used to analyze genetic dissimilarity among the accessions using Darwin 5 software. The markers discriminated among all of the cowpea accessions and the dissimilarity values which ranged from 0.006 to 0.63 were used for factorial plot. Unexpected high levels of heterozygosity were observed on some of the accessions. Accessions known to be closely related clustered together in a dendrogram drawn with WPGMA method. A maximum length sub-tree which comprised of 48 core accessions was constructed. The software package structure was used to separate accessions into three groups, and the programme correctly identified varieties that were known hybrids. The hybrids were those accessions with numerous heterozygous loci. The structure plot showed closely related accessions with similar genome patterns. The SNP markers were more efficient in discriminating among the cowpea germplasm than morphological, seed protein polymorphism and simple sequence repeat studies reported earlier on the same collection. PMID:25332852

  20. MultiBLUP: improved SNP-based prediction for complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Balding, David J.

    2014-01-01

    BLUP (best linear unbiased prediction) is widely used to predict complex traits in plant and animal breeding, and increasingly in human genetics. The BLUP mathematical model, which consists of a single random effect term, was adequate when kinships were measured from pedigrees. However, when genome-wide SNPs are used to measure kinships, the BLUP model implicitly assumes that all SNPs have the same effect-size distribution, which is a severe and unnecessary limitation. We propose MultiBLUP, which extends the BLUP model to include multiple random effects, allowing greatly improved prediction when the random effects correspond to classes of SNPs with distinct effect-size variances. The SNP classes can be specified in advance, for example, based on SNP functional annotations, and we also provide an adaptive procedure for determining a suitable partition of SNPs. We apply MultiBLUP to genome-wide association data from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (seven diseases), and from much larger studies of celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease, finding that it consistently provides better prediction than alternative methods. Moreover, MultiBLUP is computationally very efficient; for the largest data set, which includes 12,678 individuals and 1.5 M SNPs, the total analysis can be run on a single desktop PC in less than a day and can be parallelized to run even faster. Tools to perform MultiBLUP are freely available in our software LDAK. PMID:24963154

  1. Informatics Enhanced SNP Microarray Analysis of 30 Miscarriage Samples Compared to Routine Cytogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Lathi, Ruth B.; Loring, Megan; Massie, Jamie A. M.; Demko, Zachary P.; Johnson, David; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Gemelos, George; Rabinowitz, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The metaphase karyotype is often used as a diagnostic tool in the setting of early miscarriage; however this technique has several limitations. We evaluate a new technique for karyotyping that uses single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays (SNP). This technique was compared in a blinded, prospective fashion, to the traditional metaphase karyotype. Methods Patients undergoing dilation and curettage for first trimester miscarriage between February and August 2010 were enrolled. Samples of chorionic villi were equally divided and sent for microarray testing in parallel with routine cytogenetic testing. Results Thirty samples were analyzed, with only four discordant results. Discordant results occurred when the entire genome was duplicated or when a balanced rearrangement was present. Cytogenetic karyotyping took an average of 29 days while microarray-based karytoyping took an average of 12 days. Conclusions Molecular karyotyping of POC after missed abortion using SNP microarray analysis allows for the ability to detect maternal cell contamination and provides rapid results with good concordance to standard cytogenetic analysis. PMID:22403611

  2. A Pipeline for Classifying Relationships Using Dense SNP/SNV Data and Putative Pedigree Information.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhen; Weeks, Daniel E; Chen, Wei; Mukhopadhyay, Nandita; Feingold, Eleanor

    2016-02-01

    When genome-wide association studies (GWAS) or sequencing studies are performed on family-based datasets, the genotype data can be used to check the structure of putative pedigrees. Even in datasets of putatively unrelated people, close relationships can often be detected using dense single-nucleotide polymorphism/variant (SNP/SNV) data. A number of methods for finding relationships using dense genetic data exist, but they all have certain limitations, including that they typically use average genetic sharing, which is only a subset of the available information. Here, we present a set of approaches for classifying relationships in GWAS datasets or large-scale sequencing datasets. We first propose an empirical method for detecting identity by descent segments in close relative pairs using un-phased dense SNP data and demonstrate how that information can assist in building a relationship classifier. We then develop a strategy to take advantage of putative pedigree information to enhance classification accuracy. Our methods are tested and illustrated with two datasets from two distinct populations. Finally, we propose classification pipelines for checking and identifying relationships in datasets containing a large number of small pedigrees. PMID:26709242

  3. Heritability of Recurrent Exertional Rhabdomyolysis in Standardbred and Thoroughbred Racehorses Derived From SNP Genotyping Data.

    PubMed

    Norton, Elaine M; Mickelson, James R; Binns, Matthew M; Blott, Sarah C; Caputo, Paul; Isgren, Cajsa M; McCoy, Annette M; Moore, Alison; Piercy, Richard J; Swinburne, June E; Vaudin, Mark; McCue, Molly E

    2016-11-01

    Recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis (RER) in Thoroughbred and Standardbred racehorses is characterized by episodes of muscle rigidity and cell damage that often recur upon strenuous exercise. The objective was to evaluate the importance of genetic factors in RER by obtaining an unbiased estimate of heritability in cohorts of unrelated Thoroughbred and Standardbred racehorses. Four hundred ninety-one Thoroughbred and 196 Standardbred racehorses were genotyped with the 54K or 74K SNP genotyping arrays. Heritability was calculated from genome-wide SNP data with a mixed linear and Bayesian model, utilizing the standard genetic relationship matrix (GRM). Both the mixed linear and Bayesian models estimated heritability of RER in Thoroughbreds to be approximately 0.34 and in Standardbred racehorses to be approximately 0.45 after adjusting for disease prevalence and sex. To account for potential differences in the genetic architecture of the underlying causal variants, heritability estimates were adjusted based on linkage disequilibrium weighted kinship matrix, minor allele frequency and variant effect size, yielding heritability estimates that ranged between 0.41-0.46 (Thoroughbreds) and 0.39-0.49 (Standardbreds). In conclusion, between 34-46% and 39-49% of the variance in RER susceptibility in Thoroughbred and Standardbred racehorses, respectively, can be explained by the SNPs present on these 2 genotyping arrays, indicating that RER is moderately heritable. These data provide further rationale for the investigation of genetic mutations associated with RER susceptibility. PMID:27489252

  4. SNPsplit: Allele-specific splitting of alignments between genomes with known SNP genotypes.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Felix; Andrews, Simon R

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing reads overlapping polymorphic sites in diploid mammalian genomes may be assigned to one allele or the other. This holds the potential to detect gene expression, chromatin modifications, DNA methylation or nuclear interactions in an allele-specific fashion. SNPsplit is an allele-specific alignment sorter designed to read files in SAM/BAM format and determine the allelic origin of reads or read-pairs that cover known single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) positions. For this to work libraries must have been aligned to a genome in which all known SNP positions were masked with the ambiguity base 'N' and aligned using a suitable mapping program such as Bowtie2, TopHat, STAR, HISAT2, HiCUP or Bismark. SNPsplit also provides an automated solution to generate N-masked reference genomes for hybrid mouse strains based on the variant call information provided by the Mouse Genomes Project. The unique ability of SNPsplit to work with various different kinds of sequencing data including RNA-Seq, ChIP-Seq, Bisulfite-Seq or Hi-C opens new avenues for the integrative exploration of allele-specific data. PMID:27429743

  5. Evaluating the Influence of Quality Control Decisions and Software Algorithms on SNP Calling for the Affymetrix 6.0 SNP Array Platform

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Mariza; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Bamlet, William R.; Matsumoto, Martha E.; Maharjan, Sooraj; Slager, Susan L.; Vachon, Celine M.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Our goal was to evaluate the influence of quality control (QC) decisions using two genotype calling algorithms, CRLMM and Birdseed, designed for the Affymetrix SNP Array 6.0. Methods Various QC options were tried using the two algorithms and comparisons were made on subject and call rate and on association results using two data sets. Results For Birdseed, we recommend using the contrast QC instead of QC call rate for sample QC. For CRLMM, we recommend using the signal-to-noise rate ≥4 for sample QC and a posterior probability of 90% for genotype accuracy. For both algorithms, we recommend calling the genotype separately for each plate, and dropping SNPs with a lower call rate (<95%) before evaluating samples with lower call rates. To investigate whether the genotype calls from the two algorithms impacted the genome-wide association results, we performed association analysis using data from the GENOA cohort; we observed that the number of significant SNPs were similar using either CRLMM or Birdseed. Conclusions Using our suggested workflow both algorithms performed similarly; however, fewer samples were removed and CRLMM took half the time to run our 854 study samples (4.2 h) compared to Birdseed (8.4 h). PMID:21734406

  6. Population structure of Atlantic mackerel inferred from RAD-seq-derived SNP markers: effects of sequence clustering parameters and hierarchical SNP selection.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Bradbury, Ian R; Mendibil, Iñaki; Álvarez, Paula; Cotano, Unai; Irigoien, Xabier

    2016-07-01

    Restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) and related methods are revolutionizing the field of population genomics in nonmodel organisms as they allow generating an unprecedented number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) even when no genomic information is available. Yet, RAD-seq data analyses rely on assumptions on nature and number of nucleotide variants present in a single locus, the choice of which may lead to an under- or overestimated number of SNPs and/or to incorrectly called genotypes. Using the Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus L.) and a close relative, the Atlantic chub mackerel (Scomber colias), as case study, here we explore the sensitivity of population structure inferences to two crucial aspects in RAD-seq data analysis: the maximum number of mismatches allowed to merge reads into a locus and the relatedness of the individuals used for genotype calling and SNP selection. Our study resolves the population structure of the Atlantic mackerel, but, most importantly, provides insights into the effects of alternative RAD-seq data analysis strategies on population structure inferences that are directly applicable to other species. PMID:26936210

  7. Seq4SNPs: new software for retrieval of multiple, accurately annotated DNA sequences, ready formatted for SNP assay design

    PubMed Central

    Field, Helen I; Scollen, Serena A; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Morrison, Jonathan; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Pharoah, Paul DP

    2009-01-01

    Background In moderate-throughput SNP genotyping there was a gap in the workflow, between choosing a set of SNPs and submitting their sequences to proprietary assay design software, which was not met by existing software. Retrieval and formatting of sequences flanking each SNP, prior to assay design, becomes rate-limiting for more than about ten SNPs, especially if annotated for repetitive regions and adjacent variations. We routinely process up to 50 SNPs at once. Implementation We created Seq4SNPs, a web-based, walk-away software that can process one to several hundred SNPs given rs numbers as input. It outputs a file of fully annotated sequences formatted for one of three proprietary design softwares: TaqMan's Primer-By-Design FileBuilder, Sequenom's iPLEX or SNPstream's Autoprimer, as well as unannotated fasta sequences. We found genotyping assays to be inhibited by repetitive sequences or the presence of additional variations flanking the SNP under test, and in multiplexes, repetitive sequence flanking one SNP adversely affects multiple assays. Assay design software programs avoid such regions if the input sequences are appropriately annotated, so we used Seq4SNPs to provide suitably annotated input sequences, and improved our genotyping success rate. Adjacent SNPs can also be avoided, by annotating sequences used as input for primer design. Conclusion The accuracy of annotation by Seq4SNPs is significantly better than manual annotation (P < 1e-5). Using Seq4SNPs to incorporate all annotation for additional SNPs and repetitive elements into sequences, for genotyping assay designer software, minimizes assay failure at the design stage, reducing the cost of genotyping. Seq4SNPs provides a rapid route for replacement of poor test SNP sequences. We routinely use this software for assay sequence preparation. Seq4SNPs is available as a service at and , currently for human SNPs, but easily extended to include any species in dbSNP. PMID:19523221

  8. SNiPloid: A Utility to Exploit High-Throughput SNP Data Derived from RNA-Seq in Allopolyploid Species.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Marine; Combes, Marie-Christine; Cenci, Alberto; Lashermes, Philippe; Dereeper, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing is a common approach to discover SNP variants, especially in plant species. However, methods to analyze predicted SNPs are often optimized for diploid plant species whereas many crop species are allopolyploids and combine related but divergent subgenomes (homoeologous chromosome sets). We created a software tool, SNiPloid, that exploits and interprets putative SNPs in the context of allopolyploidy by comparing SNPs from an allopolyploid with those obtained in its modern-day diploid progenitors. SNiPloid can compare SNPs obtained from a sample to estimate the subgenome contribution to the transcriptome or SNPs obtained from two polyploid accessions to search for SNP divergence. PMID:24163691

  9. SNP Analysis and Whole Exome Sequencing: Their Application in the Analysis of a Consanguineous Pedigree Segregating Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, Sarah L.; Marquis-Nicholson, Renate; Claxton, Karen; Ashton, Fern; Leong, Ivone U. S.; Prosser, Debra O.; Love, Jennifer M.; George, Alice M.; Taylor, Graham; Wilson, Callum; McKinlay Gardner, R. J.; Love, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia encompasses a large and heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. We employed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis and whole exome sequencing to investigate a consanguineous Maori pedigree segregating ataxia. We identified a novel mutation in exon 10 of the SACS gene: c.7962T>G p.(Tyr2654*), establishing the diagnosis of autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS). Our findings expand both the genetic and phenotypic spectrum of this rare disorder, and highlight the value of high-density SNP analysis and whole exome sequencing as powerful and cost-effective tools in the diagnosis of genetically heterogeneous disorders such as the hereditary ataxias.

  10. SNiPloid: A Utility to Exploit High-Throughput SNP Data Derived from RNA-Seq in Allopolyploid Species

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Marine; Combes, Marie-Christine; Lashermes, Philippe; Dereeper, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing is a common approach to discover SNP variants, especially in plant species. However, methods to analyze predicted SNPs are often optimized for diploid plant species whereas many crop species are allopolyploids and combine related but divergent subgenomes (homoeologous chromosome sets). We created a software tool, SNiPloid, that exploits and interprets putative SNPs in the context of allopolyploidy by comparing SNPs from an allopolyploid with those obtained in its modern-day diploid progenitors. SNiPloid can compare SNPs obtained from a sample to estimate the subgenome contribution to the transcriptome or SNPs obtained from two polyploid accessions to search for SNP divergence. PMID:24163691

  11. Genome-wide detection of CNVs in Chinese indigenous sheep with different types of tails using ovine high-density 600K SNP arrays

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Caiye; Fan, Hongying; Yuan, Zehu; Hu, Shijin; Ma, Xiaomeng; Xuan, Junli; Wang, Hongwei; Zhang, Li; Wei, Caihong; Zhang, Qin; Zhao, Fuping; Du, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Chinese indigenous sheep can be classified into three types based on tail morphology: fat-tailed, fat-rumped, and thin-tailed sheep, of which the typical breeds are large-tailed Han sheep, Altay sheep, and Tibetan sheep, respectively. To unravel the genetic mechanisms underlying the phenotypic differences among Chinese indigenous sheep with tails of three different types, we used ovine high-density 600K SNP arrays to detect genome-wide copy number variation (CNV). In large-tailed Han sheep, Altay sheep, and Tibetan sheep, 371, 301, and 66 CNV regions (CNVRs) with lengths of 71.35 Mb, 51.65 Mb, and 10.56 Mb, respectively, were identified on autosomal chromosomes. Ten CNVRs were randomly chosen for confirmation, of which eight were successfully validated. The detected CNVRs harboured 3130 genes, including genes associated with fat deposition, such as PPARA, RXRA, KLF11, ADD1, FASN, PPP1CA, PDGFA, and PEX6. Moreover, multilevel bioinformatics analyses of the detected candidate genes were significantly enriched for involvement in fat deposition, GTPase regulator, and peptide receptor activities. This is the first high-resolution sheep CNV map for Chinese indigenous sheep breeds with three types of tails. Our results provide valuable information that will support investigations of genomic structural variation underlying traits of interest in sheep. PMID:27282145

  12. Genome-wide detection of CNVs in Chinese indigenous sheep with different types of tails using ovine high-density 600K SNP arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Caiye; Fan, Hongying; Yuan, Zehu; Hu, Shijin; Ma, Xiaomeng; Xuan, Junli; Wang, Hongwei; Zhang, Li; Wei, Caihong; Zhang, Qin; Zhao, Fuping; Du, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Chinese indigenous sheep can be classified into three types based on tail morphology: fat-tailed, fat-rumped, and thin-tailed sheep, of which the typical breeds are large-tailed Han sheep, Altay sheep, and Tibetan sheep, respectively. To unravel the genetic mechanisms underlying the phenotypic differences among Chinese indigenous sheep with tails of three different types, we used ovine high-density 600K SNP arrays to detect genome-wide copy number variation (CNV). In large-tailed Han sheep, Altay sheep, and Tibetan sheep, 371, 301, and 66 CNV regions (CNVRs) with lengths of 71.35 Mb, 51.65 Mb, and 10.56 Mb, respectively, were identified on autosomal chromosomes. Ten CNVRs were randomly chosen for confirmation, of which eight were successfully validated. The detected CNVRs harboured 3130 genes, including genes associated with fat deposition, such as PPARA, RXRA, KLF11, ADD1, FASN, PPP1CA, PDGFA, and PEX6. Moreover, multilevel bioinformatics analyses of the detected candidate genes were significantly enriched for involvement in fat deposition, GTPase regulator, and peptide receptor activities. This is the first high-resolution sheep CNV map for Chinese indigenous sheep breeds with three types of tails. Our results provide valuable information that will support investigations of genomic structural variation underlying traits of interest in sheep. PMID:27282145

  13. Pacifiplex: an ancestry-informative SNP panel centred on Australia and the Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Santos, Carla; Phillips, Christopher; Fondevila, Manuel; Daniel, Runa; van Oorschot, Roland A H; Burchard, Esteban G; Schanfield, Moses S; Souto, Luis; Uacyisrael, Jolame; Via, Marc; Carracedo, Ángel; Lareu, Maria V

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of human population variation is an area of considerable interest in the forensic, medical genetics and anthropological fields. Several forensic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assays provide ancestry-informative genotypes in sensitive tests designed to work with limited DNA samples, including a 34-SNP multiplex differentiating African, European and East Asian ancestries. Although assays capable of differentiating Oceanian ancestry at a global scale have become available, this study describes markers compiled specifically for differentiation of Oceanian populations. A sensitive multiplex assay, termed Pacifiplex, was developed and optimized in a small-scale test applicable to forensic analyses. The Pacifiplex assay comprises 29 ancestry-informative marker SNPs (AIM-SNPs) selected to complement the 34-plex test, that in a combined set distinguish Africans, Europeans, East Asians and Oceanians. Nine Pacific region study populations were genotyped with both SNP assays, then compared to four reference population groups from the HGDP-CEPH human diversity panel. STRUCTURE analyses estimated population cluster membership proportions that aligned with the patterns of variation suggested for each study population's currently inferred demographic histories. Aboriginal Taiwanese and Philippine samples indicated high East Asian ancestry components, Papua New Guinean and Aboriginal Australians samples were predominantly Oceanian, while other populations displayed cluster patterns explained by the distribution of divergence amongst Melanesians, Polynesians and Micronesians. Genotype data from Pacifiplex and 34-plex tests is particularly well suited to analysis of Australian Aboriginal populations and when combined with Y and mitochondrial DNA variation will provide a powerful set of markers for ancestry inference applied to modern Australian demographic profiles. On a broader geographic scale, Pacifiplex adds highly informative data for inferring the ancestry

  14. SNP Regulation of microRNA Expression and Subsequent Colon Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Mullany, Lila E.; Wolff, Roger K.; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Buas, Matthew F.; Slattery, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and as such have been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer. MiRNAs regulate mRNAs through binding of the miRNA 5’ seed sequence (~7–8 nucleotides) to the mRNA 3’ UTRs; polymorphisms in these regions have the potential to alter miRNA-mRNA target associations. SNPs in miRNA genes as well as miRNA-target genes have been proposed to influence cancer risk through altered miRNA expression levels. Methods MiRNA-SNPs and miRNA-target gene-SNPs were identified through the literature. We used SNPs from Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) data that were matched to individuals with miRNA expression data generated from an Agilent platform for colon tumor and non-tumor paired tissues. These samples were used to evaluate 327 miRNA-SNP pairs for associations between SNPs and miRNA expression levels as well as for SNP associations with colon cancer. Results Twenty-two miRNAs expressed in non-tumor tissue were significantly different by genotype and 21 SNPs were associated with altered tumor/non-tumor differential miRNA expression across genotypes. Two miRNAs were associated with SNP genotype for both non-tumor and tumor/non-tumor differential expression. Of the 41 miRNAs significantly associated with SNPs all but seven were significantly differentially expressed in colon tumor tissue. Two of the 41 SNPs significantly associated with miRNA expression levels were associated with colon cancer risk: rs8176318 (BRCA1), ORAA 1.31 95% CI 1.01, 1.78, and rs8905 (PRKAR1A), ORGG 2.31 95% CI 1.11, 4.77. Conclusion Of the 327 SNPs identified in the literature as being important because of their potential regulation of miRNA expression levels, 12.5% had statistically significantly associations with miRNA expression. However, only two of these SNPs were significantly associated with colon cancer. PMID:26630397

  15. The human lactase persistence-associated SNP -13910*T enables in vivo functional persistence of lactase promoter-reporter transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lin; Ahn, Jong Kun; Wodziak, Dariusz; Sibley, Eric

    2012-07-01

    Lactase is the intestinal enzyme responsible for digestion of the milk sugar lactose. Lactase gene expression declines dramatically upon weaning in mammals and during early childhood in humans (lactase nonpersistence). In various ethnic groups, however, lactase persists in high levels throughout adulthood (lactase persistence). Genetic association studies have identified that lactase persistence in northern Europeans is strongly associated with a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located 14 kb upstream of the lactase gene: -13910*C/T. To determine whether the -13910*T SNP can function in vivo to mediate lactase persistence, we generated transgenic mice harboring human DNA fragments with the -13910*T SNP or the ancestral -13910*C SNP cloned upstream of a 2-kb rat lactase gene promoter in a luciferase reporter construct. We previously reported that the 2-kb rat lactase promoter directs a post-weaning decline of luciferase transgene expression similar to that of the endogenous lactase gene. In the present study, the post-weaning decline directed by the rat lactase promoter is impeded by addition of the -13910*T SNP human DNA fragment, but not by addition of the -13910*C ancestral SNP fragment. Persistence of transgene expression associated with the -13910*T SNP represents the first in vivo data in support of a functional role for the -13910*T SNP in mediating the human lactase persistence phenotype. PMID:22258180

  16. Design of the Illumina Porcine 50K+ SNP Iselect(TM) Beadchip and Characterization of the Porcine HapMap Population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using next generation sequencing technology the International Swine SNP Consortium has identified 500,000 SNPs and used these to design an Illumina Infinium iSelect™ SNP BeadChip with a selection of 60,218 SNPs. The selected SNPs include previously validated SNPs and SNPs identified de novo using se...

  17. Developments of geriatric autopsy database and Internet-based database of Japanese single nucleotide polymorphisms for geriatric research (JG-SNP).

    PubMed

    Sawabe, Motoji; Arai, Tomio; Kasahara, Ichiro; Esaki, Yukiyoshi; Nakahara, Ken-ichi; Hosoi, Takayuki; Orimo, Hajime; Takubo, Kaiyo; Murayama, Shigeo; Tanaka, Noriko

    2004-08-01

    To facilitate geriatric research on the roles of genetic polymorphisms of candidate genes, two databases were developed based on data obtained from autopsy examinations of elderly subjects: the geriatric autopsy database (GEAD) and the Japanese single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) database for geriatric research (JG-SNP) which is accessible on the Internet (http://www.tmgh.metro.tokyo.jp/jg-snp/english/E_top.html). The data for the GEAD were derived from 1074 consecutive autopsy cases (565 male and 509 female cases) with an average age of 80 years. The GEAD was installed on a stand-alone Windows 2000 server using Oracle 8i as the database application. The GEAD contains clinical diagnoses of 26 geriatric diseases, histories of smoking and alcohol consumption, pathological findings (720 items), severity of atherosclerosis, genetic polymorphism data, etc. On the JG-SNP website, case distribution corresponding to a specified SNP or disease can be searched or downloaded. Although there are several Internet-based SNP databases such as dbSNP, no databases are available at present on the web that contain both SNP data and phenotypic data. As autopsy studies can provide large amounts of accurate medical information, including the presence of undiagnosed diseases such as latent cancers, the GEAD is a unique and excellent database for research on genetic polymorphisms. PMID:15336912

  18. A high resolution genetic linkage map of soybean based on 357 recombinant inbred lines genotyped with BARCSoySNP6K

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to construct a high density genetic map of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr) using a high throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping on 357 F7 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) from a cross of ‘Wyandot’ × PI 567301B. Of 5,403 SNP loci scored from the Infiniu...

  19. Electrochemical detection of type 2 diabetes mellitus-related SNP via DNA-mediated growth of silver nanoparticles on single walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jia; Zhao, Peng; Zheng, Jing; Wu, Cuichen; Shi, Muling; Li, Jishan; Li, Yinhui; Yang, Ronghua

    2015-11-01

    Herein, we proposed a new electrochemical sensing strategy for T2DM-related SNP detection via DNA-mediated growth of AgNPs on a SWCNT-modified electrode. Coupled with RNase HII enzyme assisted amplification, this approach could realize T2DM-related SNP assay and be applied in crude extracts of carcinoma pancreatic β-cell lines. PMID:26365891

  20. A large maize (Zea Mays L.) SNP genotyping array: development and germplasm genotyping, and genetic mapping to compare with the B73 reference genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SNP genotyping arrays have been useful for many applications that require a large number of molecular markers such as high-density genetic mapping, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and genomic selection for accelerated breeding. We report the establishment of a large SNP array for maize and i...

  1. Incorporation of Personal Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Data into a National Level Electronic Health Record for Disease Risk Assessment, Part 2: The Incorporation of SNP into the National Health Information System of Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Beyan, Timur

    2014-01-01

    Background A personalized medicine approach provides opportunities for predictive and preventive medicine. Using genomic, clinical, environmental, and behavioral data, the tracking and management of individual wellness is possible. A prolific way to carry this personalized approach into routine practices can be accomplished by integrating clinical interpretations of genomic variations into electronic medical record (EMR)s/electronic health record (EHR)s systems. Today, various central EHR infrastructures have been constituted in many countries of the world, including Turkey. Objective As an initial attempt to develop a sophisticated infrastructure, we have concentrated on incorporating the personal single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data into the National Health Information System of Turkey (NHIS-T) for disease risk assessment, and evaluated the performance of various predictive models for prostate cancer cases. We present our work as a miniseries containing three parts: (1) an overview of requirements, (2) the incorporation of SNP into the NHIS-T, and (3) an evaluation of SNP data incorporated into the NHIS-T for prostate cancer. Methods For the second article of this miniseries, we have analyzed the existing NHIS-T and proposed the possible extensional architectures. In light of the literature survey and characteristics of NHIS-T, we have proposed and argued opportunities and obstacles for a SNP incorporated NHIS-T. A prototype with complementary capabilities (knowledge base and end-user applications) for these architectures has been designed and developed. Results In the proposed architectures, the clinically relevant personal SNP (CR-SNP) and clinicogenomic associations are shared between central repositories and end-users via the NHIS-T infrastructure. To produce these files, we need to develop a national level clinicogenomic knowledge base. Regarding clinicogenomic decision support, we planned to complete interpretation of these associations on the end

  2. SNP in starch biosynthesis genes associated with nutritional and functional properties of rice

    PubMed Central

    Kharabian-Masouleh, Ardashir; Waters, Daniel L. E.; Reinke, Russell F.; Ward, Rachelle; Henry, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Starch is a major component of human diets. The relative contribution of variation in the genes of starch biosynthesis to the nutritional and functional properties of the rice was evaluated in a rice breeding population. Sequencing 18 genes involved in starch synthesis in a population of 233 rice breeding lines discovered 66 functional SNPs in exonic regions. Five genes, AGPS2b, Isoamylase1, SPHOL, SSIIb and SSIVb showed no polymorphism. Association analysis found 31 of the SNP were associated with differences in pasting and cooking quality properties of the rice lines. Two genes appear to be the major loci controlling traits under human selection in rice, GBSSI (waxy gene) and SSIIa. GBSSI influenced amylose content and retrogradation. Other genes contributing to retrogradation were GPT1, SSI, BEI and SSIIIa. SSIIa explained much of the variation in cooking characteristics. Other genes had relatively small effects. PMID:22870386

  3. Design and synthesis of the superionic conductor Na10SnP2S12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, William D.; Tsujimura, Tomoyuki; Miara, Lincoln J.; Wang, Yan; Kim, Jae Chul; Ong, Shyue Ping; Uechi, Ichiro; Suzuki, Naoki; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2016-03-01

    Sodium-ion batteries are emerging as candidates for large-scale energy storage due to their low cost and the wide variety of cathode materials available. As battery size and adoption in critical applications increases, safety concerns are resurfacing due to the inherent flammability of organic electrolytes currently in use in both lithium and sodium battery chemistries. Development of solid-state batteries with ionic electrolytes eliminates this concern, while also allowing novel device architectures and potentially improving cycle life. Here we report the computation-assisted discovery and synthesis of a high-performance solid-state electrolyte material: Na10SnP2S12, with room temperature ionic conductivity of 0.4 mS cm-1 rivalling the conductivity of the best sodium sulfide solid electrolytes to date. We also computationally investigate the variants of this compound where tin is substituted by germanium or silicon and find that the latter may achieve even higher conductivity.

  4. To Cheat or Not To Cheat: Tryptophan Hydroxylase 2 SNP Variants Contribute to Dishonest Behavior.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiang; Teo, Meijun; Winter, Eyal; Hart, Einav; Chew, Soo H; Ebstein, Richard P

    2016-01-01

    Although, lying (bear false witness) is explicitly prohibited in the Decalogue and a focus of interest in philosophy and theology, more recently the behavioral and neural mechanisms of deception are gaining increasing attention from diverse fields especially economics, psychology, and neuroscience. Despite the considerable role of heredity in explaining individual differences in deceptive behavior, few studies have investigated which specific genes contribute to the heterogeneity of lying behavior across individuals. Also, little is known concerning which specific neurotransmitter pathways underlie deception. Toward addressing these two key questions, we implemented a neurogenetic strategy and modeled deception by an incentivized die-under-cup task in a laboratory setting. The results of this exploratory study provide provisional evidence that SNP variants across the tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) gene, that encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of brain serotonin, contribute to individual differences in deceptive behavior. PMID:27199691

  5. SNP genotyping by combination of 192-well MADGE, ARMS and computerized gel image analysis.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, S D; Gaunt, T R; Day, I N

    2000-09-01

    A new modification of the microplate array diagonal gel electrophoresis (MADGE) system accommodates the dual amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) products of 96 samples on one 192-well gel. Simultaneous electrophoresis of a number of horizontal ARMS-MADGE gels achieves high throughput. Gels are imaged digitally, here using the FluorImager 595 fluorescent scanning system. Customized software by Phoretix enables rapid computerized calling of band patterns in ARMS-MADGE arrays, in which the two wells receiving a pair of allele-specific assays for a single template are juxtaposed to form one virtual track, with genotype data exported directly into Microsoft Excel for statistical analysis. An ARMS assay of the A/T base change at the -23/HphI RFLP in the insulin gene promoter, which initiates from 2.5 ng template DNA, was used here to demonstrate this improved general approach for population SNP analyses. PMID:10997263

  6. A high-performance computing toolset for relatedness and principal component analysis of SNP data.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiuwen; Levine, David; Shen, Jess; Gogarten, Stephanie M; Laurie, Cathy; Weir, Bruce S

    2012-12-15

    Genome-wide association studies are widely used to investigate the genetic basis of diseases and traits, but they pose many computational challenges. We developed gdsfmt and SNPRelate (R packages for multi-core symmetric multiprocessing computer architectures) to accelerate two key computations on SNP data: principal component analysis (PCA) and relatedness analysis using identity-by-descent measures. The kernels of our algorithms are written in C/C++ and highly optimized. Benchmarks show the uniprocessor implementations of PCA and identity-by-descent are ∼8-50 times faster than the implementations provided in the popular EIGENSTRAT (v3.0) and PLINK (v1.07) programs, respectively, and can be sped up to 30-300-fold by using eight cores. SNPRelate can analyse tens of thousands of samples with millions of SNPs. For example, our package was used to perform PCA on 55 324 subjects from the 'Gene-Environment Association Studies' consortium studies. PMID:23060615

  7. Prediction of a time-to-event trait using genome wide SNP data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A popular objective of many high-throughput genome projects is to discover various genomic markers associated with traits and develop statistical models to predict traits of future patients based on marker values. Results In this paper, we present a prediction method for time-to-event traits using genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We also propose a MaxTest associating between a time-to-event trait and a SNP accounting for its possible genetic models. The proposed MaxTest can help screen out nonprognostic SNPs and identify genetic models of prognostic SNPs. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated through simulations. Conclusions In conjunction with the MaxTest, the proposed method provides more parsimonious prediction models but includes more prognostic SNPs than some naive prediction methods. The proposed method is demonstrated with real GWAS data. PMID:23418752

  8. A Method for Checking Genomic Integrity in Cultured Cell Lines from SNP Genotyping Data

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Shane A.; Durbin, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Genomic screening for chromosomal abnormalities is an important part of quality control when establishing and maintaining stem cell lines. We present a new method for sensitive detection of copy number alterations, aneuploidy, and contamination in cell lines using genome-wide SNP genotyping data. In contrast to other methods designed for identifying copy number variations in a single sample or in a sample composed of a mixture of normal and tumor cells, this new method is tailored for determining differences between cell lines and the starting material from which they were derived, which allows us to distinguish between normal and novel copy number variation. We implemented the method in the freely available BCFtools package and present results based on induced pluripotent stem cell lines obtained in the HipSci project. PMID:27176002

  9. Use of SNP-arrays for ChIP assays: computational aspects.

    PubMed

    Muro, Enrique M; McCann, Jennifer A; Rudnicki, Michael A; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2009-01-01

    The simultaneous genotyping of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a genome using SNP-Arrays is a very important tool that is revolutionizing genetics and molecular biology. We expanded the utility of this technique by using it following chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) to assess the multiple genomic locations protected by a protein complex recognized by an antibody. The power of this technique is illustrated through an analysis of the changes in histone H4 acetylation, a marker of open chromatin and transcriptionally active genomic regions, which occur during differentiation of human myoblasts into myotubes. The findings have been validated by the observation of a significant correlation between the detected histone modifications and the expression of the nearby genes, as measured by DNA expression microarrays. This chapter focuses on the computational analysis of the data. PMID:19588091

  10. Highly effective SNP-based association mapping and management of recessive defects in livestock.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Carole; Coppieters, Wouter; Rollin, Frédéric; Desmecht, Daniel; Agerholm, Jorgen S; Cambisano, Nadine; Carta, Eloisa; Dardano, Sabrina; Dive, Marc; Fasquelle, Corinne; Frennet, Jean-Claude; Hanset, Roger; Hubin, Xavier; Jorgensen, Claus; Karim, Latifa; Kent, Matthew; Harvey, Kirsten; Pearce, Brian R; Simon, Patricia; Tama, Nico; Nie, Haisheng; Vandeputte, Sébastien; Lien, Sigbjorn; Longeri, Maria; Fredholm, Merete; Harvey, Robert J; Georges, Michel

    2008-04-01

    The widespread use of elite sires by means of artificial insemination in livestock breeding leads to the frequent emergence of recessive genetic defects, which cause significant economic and animal welfare concerns. Here we show that the availability of genome-wide, high-density SNP panels, combined with the typical structure of livestock populations, markedly accelerates the positional identification of genes and mutations that cause inherited defects. We report the fine-scale mapping of five recessive disorders in cattle and the molecular basis for three of these: congenital muscular dystony (CMD) types 1 and 2 in Belgian Blue cattle and ichthyosis fetalis in Italian Chianina cattle. Identification of these causative mutations has an immediate translation into breeding practice, allowing marker assisted selection against the defects through avoidance of at-risk matings. PMID:18344998

  11. To Cheat or Not To Cheat: Tryptophan Hydroxylase 2 SNP Variants Contribute to Dishonest Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qiang; Teo, Meijun; Winter, Eyal; Hart, Einav; Chew, Soo H.; Ebstein, Richard P.

    2016-01-01

    Although, lying (bear false witness) is explicitly prohibited in the Decalogue and a focus of interest in philosophy and theology, more recently the behavioral and neural mechanisms of deception are gaining increasing attention from diverse fields especially economics, psychology, and neuroscience. Despite the considerable role of heredity in explaining individual differences in deceptive behavior, few studies have investigated which specific genes contribute to the heterogeneity of lying behavior across individuals. Also, little is known concerning which specific neurotransmitter pathways underlie deception. Toward addressing these two key questions, we implemented a neurogenetic strategy and modeled deception by an incentivized die-under-cup task in a laboratory setting. The results of this exploratory study provide provisional evidence that SNP variants across the tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) gene, that encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of brain serotonin, contribute to individual differences in deceptive behavior. PMID:27199691

  12. Efficient fast heuristic algorithms for minimum error correction haplotyping from SNP fragments.

    PubMed

    Anaraki, Maryam Pourkamali; Sadeghi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Availability of complete human genome is a crucial factor for genetic studies to explore possible association between the genome and complex diseases. Haplotype, as a set of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on a single chromosome, is believed to contain promising data for disease association studies, detecting natural positive selection and recombination hotspots. Various computational methods for haplotype reconstruction from aligned fragment of SNPs have already been proposed. This study presents a novel approach to obtain paternal and maternal haplotypes form the SNP fragments on minimum error correction (MEC) model. Reconstructing haplotypes in MEC model is an NP-hard problem. Therefore, our proposed methods employ two fast and accurate clustering techniques as the core of their procedure to efficiently solve this ill-defined problem. The assessment of our approaches, compared to conventional methods, on two real benchmark datasets, i.e., ACE and DALY, proves the efficiency and accuracy. PMID:25539847

  13. SNP-based pathway enrichment analysis for genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recently we have witnessed a surge of interest in using genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to discover the genetic basis of complex diseases. Many genetic variations, mostly in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), have been identified in a wide spectrum of diseases, including diabetes, cancer, and psychiatric diseases. A common theme arising from these studies is that the genetic variations discovered by GWAS can only explain a small fraction of the genetic risks associated with the complex diseases. New strategies and statistical approaches are needed to address this lack of explanation. One such approach is the pathway analysis, which considers the genetic variations underlying a biological pathway, rather than separately as in the traditional GWAS studies. A critical challenge in the pathway analysis is how to combine evidences of association over multiple SNPs within a gene and multiple genes within a pathway. Most current methods choose the most significant SNP from each gene as a representative, ignoring the joint action of multiple SNPs within a gene. This approach leads to preferential identification of genes with a greater number of SNPs. Results We describe a SNP-based pathway enrichment method for GWAS studies. The method consists of the following two main steps: 1) for a given pathway, using an adaptive truncated product statistic to identify all representative (potentially more than one) SNPs of each gene, calculating the average number of representative SNPs for the genes, then re-selecting the representative SNPs of genes in the pathway based on this number; and 2) ranking all selected SNPs by the significance of their statistical association with a trait of interest, and testing if the set of SNPs from a particular pathway is significantly enriched with high ranks using a weighted Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. We applied our method to two large genetically distinct GWAS data sets of schizophrenia, one from European

  14. Differential frequency of NKG2C/KLRC2 deletion in distinct African populations and susceptibility to Trachoma: a new method for imputation of KLRC2 genotypes from SNP genotyping data.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Adriana; Makalo, Pateh; Joof, Hassan; Burr, Sarah; Ramadhani, Athumani; Massae, Patrick; Malisa, Aiweda; Mtuy, Tara; Derrick, Tamsyn; Last, Anna R; Nabicassa, Meno; Cassama, Eunice; Houghton, Joanna; Palmer, Christine D; Pickering, Harry; Burton, Matthew J; Mabey, David C W; Bailey, Robin L; Goodier, Martin R; Holland, Martin J; Roberts, Chrissy H

    2016-08-01

    NKG2C is an activating receptor that is preferentially expressed on natural killer (NK) cells. The gene encoding NKG2C (killer cell lectin-like receptor C2, KLRC2) is present at different copy numbers in the genomes of different individuals. Deletion at the NKG2C locus was investigated in a case-control study of 1522 individuals indigenous to East- and West-Africa and the association with the ocular Chlamydia trachomatis infection and its sequelae was explored. The frequency of homozygous KLRC2 deletion was 13.7 % in Gambians and 4.7 % in Tanzanians. A significantly higher frequency of the deletion allele was found in West-Africans from the Gambia and Guinea-Bissau (36.2 % p = 2.105 × 10(-8), 26.8 % p = 0.050; respectively) in comparison to East-African Tanzanians where the frequency of the deletion is comparable to other human populations (20.9 %). We found no evidence for an association between the numbers of KLRC2 gene copies and the clinical manifestations of trachoma (follicular trachoma or conjunctival scarring). A new method for imputation of KLRC2 genotypes from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data in 2621 individuals from the Gambia further confirmed these results. Our data suggest that NKG2C does not play a major role in trachomatous disease. We found that the deletion allele is present at different frequencies in different populations but the reason behind these differences is currently not understood. The new method offers the potential to use SNP arrays from genome wide association studies to study the frequency of KLRC2 deletion in other populations and its association with other diseases. PMID:27312142

  15. Mapping of Genetic Abnormalities of Primary Tumours from Metastatic CRC by High-Resolution SNP Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Sayagués, José María; Fontanillo, Celia; Abad, María del Mar; González-González, María; Sarasquete, María Eugenia; del Carmen Chillon, Maria; Garcia, Eva; Bengoechea, Oscar; Fonseca, Emilio; Gonzalez-Diaz, Marcos; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Background For years, the genetics of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) have been studied using a variety of techniques. However, most of the approaches employed so far have a relatively limited resolution which hampers detailed characterization of the common recurrent chromosomal breakpoints as well as the identification of small regions carrying genetic changes and the genes involved in them. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we applied 500K SNP arrays to map the most common chromosomal lesions present at diagnosis in a series of 23 primary tumours from sporadic CRC patients who had developed liver metastasis. Overall our results confirm that the genetic profile of metastatic CRC is defined by imbalanced gains of chromosomes 7, 8q, 11q, 13q, 20q and X together with losses of the 1p, 8p, 17p and 18q chromosome regions. In addition, SNP-array studies allowed the identification of small (<1.3 Mb) and extensive/large (>1.5 Mb) altered DNA sequences, many of which contain cancer genes known to be involved in CRC and the metastatic process. Detailed characterization of the breakpoint regions for the altered chromosomes showed four recurrent breakpoints at chromosomes 1p12, 8p12, 17p11.2 and 20p12.1; interestingly, the most frequently observed recurrent chromosomal breakpoint was localized at 17p11.2 and systematically targeted the FAM27L gene, whose role in CRC deserves further investigations. Conclusions/Significance In summary, in the present study we provide a detailed map of the genetic abnormalities of primary tumours from metastatic CRC patients, which confirm and extend on previous observations as regards the identification of genes potentially involved in development of CRC and the metastatic process. PMID:21060790

  16. JAM: A Scalable Bayesian Framework for Joint Analysis of Marginal SNP Effects

    PubMed Central

    Conti, David V.; Richardson, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recently, large scale