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Sample records for receptor m33 occurs

  1. Receptor Editing Occurs Frequently during Normal B Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Retter, Marc W.; Nemazee, David

    1998-01-01

    Allelic exclusion is established in development through a feedback mechanism in which the assembled immunoglobulin (Ig) suppresses further V(D)J rearrangement. But Ig expression sometimes fails to prevent further rearrangement. In autoantibody transgenic mice, reactivity of immature B cells with autoantigen can induce receptor editing, in which allelic exclusion is transiently prevented or reversed through nested light chain gene rearrangement, often resulting in altered B cell receptor specificity. To determine the extent of receptor editing in a normal, non-Ig transgenic immune system, we took advantage of the fact that λ light chain genes usually rearrange after κ genes. This allowed us to analyze κ loci in IgMλ+ cells to determine how frequently in-frame κ genes fail to suppress λ gene rearrangements. To do this, we analyzed recombined VκJκ genes inactivated by subsequent recombining sequence (RS) rearrangement. RS rearrangements delete portions of the κ locus by a V(D)J recombinase-dependent mechanism, suggesting that they play a role in receptor editing. We show that RS recombination is frequently induced by, and inactivates, functionally rearranged κ loci, as nearly half (47%) of the RS-inactivated VκJκ joins were in-frame. These findings suggest that receptor editing occurs at a surprisingly high frequency in normal B cells. PMID:9763602

  2. THE DISRUPTION AND FUELING OF M33

    SciTech Connect

    Putman, M. E.; Peek, J. E. G.; Muratov, A.; Gnedin, O. Y.; Hsu, W.; Heiles, C.; Douglas, K. A.; Korpela, E. J.; Stanimirovic, S.; Gibson, S. J.

    2009-10-01

    The disruption of the M33 galaxy is evident from its extended gaseous structure. We present new data from the Galactic Arecibo L-Band Feed Array H I (GALFA-H I) Survey that show the full extent and detailed spatial and kinematic structure of M33's neutral hydrogen. Over 18% of the H I mass of M33 (M{sub HI{sub t{sub o{sub t}}}}=1.4x10{sup 9} M {sub sun}) is found beyond the star-forming disk as traced in the far-ultraviolet (FUV). The most distinct features are extended warps, an arc from the northern warp to the disk, diffuse gas surrounding the galaxy, and a southern cloud with a filament back to the galaxy. The features extend out to 22 kpc from the galaxy center (18 kpc from the edge of the FUV disk), and the gas is directly connected to M33's disk. Only five discrete clouds (i.e., gas not directly connected to M33 in position-velocity space) are cataloged in the vicinity of M33, and these clouds show similar properties to Galactic and M31 halo clouds. M33's gaseous features most likely originate from the tidal disruption of M33 by M31 1-3 Gyr ago as shown by an orbit analysis which results in a tidal radius <15 kpc in the majority of M33's possible orbits. M33 is now beyond the disruptive gravitational influence of M31, and the gas appears to be returning to M33's disk and redistributing its star formation fuel. M33's high mean velocity dispersion in the disk (approx18.5 km s{sup -1}) may also be consistent with the previous interaction and high rate of star formation. M33 will either exhaust its star formation fuel in the next few Gyrs or eventually become star formation fuel for M31. The latter represents the accretion of a large gaseous satellite by a spiral galaxy, similar to the Magellanic Clouds' relationship to the Galaxy.

  3. Neon and Oxygen Abundances in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, Nathan R.; Garnett, Donald R.; Massey, Philip; Jacoby, George

    2006-02-01

    We present new spectroscopic observations of 13 H II regions in the Local Group spiral galaxy M33. The regions observed range from 1 to 7 kpc in distance from the nucleus. Of the 13 H II regions observed, the [O III] λ4363 line was detected in six regions. Electron temperatures were thus able to be determined directly from the spectra using the [O III] λλ4959, 5007/λ4363 line ratio. Based on these temperature measurements, oxygen and neon abundances and their radial gradients were calculated. For neon, a gradient of -0.016+/-0.017 dex kpc-1 was computed, which agrees with the Ne/H gradient derived previously from ISO spectra. A gradient of -0.012+/-0.011 dex kpc-1 was computed for O/H, much shallower than was derived in previous studies. The newly calculated O/H and Ne/H gradients are in much better agreement with each other, as expected from predictions of stellar nucleosynthesis. We examine the correlation between the WC/WN ratio and metallicity, and find that the new M33 abundances do not impact the observed correlation significantly. We also identify two new He II-emitting H II regions in M33, the first to be discovered in a spiral galaxy other than the Milky Way. In both cases the nebular He II emission is not associated with Wolf-Rayet stars. Therefore, caution is warranted in interpreting the relationship between nebular He II emission and Wolf-Rayet stars when both are observed in the integrated spectrum of an H II region.

  4. BLENDING OF CEPHEIDS IN M33

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Joy M.; Macri, Lucas M.; Pellerin, Anne

    2012-10-01

    A precise and accurate determination of the Hubble constant based on Cepheid variables requires proper characterization of many sources of systematic error. One of these is stellar blending, which biases the measured fluxes of Cepheids and the resulting distance estimates. We study the blending of 149 Cepheid variables in M33 by matching archival Hubble Space Telescope data with images obtained at the Wisconsin-Indiana-Yale-NOAO (WIYN) 3.5 m telescope, which differ by a factor of 10 in angular resolution. We find that 55% {+-} 4% of the Cepheids have no detectable nearby companions that could bias the WIYN V-band photometry, while the fraction of Cepheids affected below the 10% level is 73% {+-} 4%. The corresponding values for the I band are 60% {+-} 4% and 72% {+-} 4%, respectively. We find no statistically significant difference in blending statistics as a function of period or surface brightness. Additionally, we report all the detected companions within 2'' of the Cepheids (equivalent to 9 pc at the distance of M33) which may be used to derive empirical blending corrections for Cepheids at larger distances.

  5. Detail Chemical Composition of M33 Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliam, Andrew

    2008-08-01

    I propose to perform the first high-resolution detailed chemical abundance study of globular clusters (GCs) in the Local Group spiral galaxy M33 with Keck HIRES. My integrated-light technique permits detailed chemical abundance measurement (and approximate ages) for old populations at larger distance than ever done before. The basic goal is to accurately define the chemical abundance properties of the M33 GC system, for a comparison with the Milky Way, LMC, SMC and Local Group dwarf galaxies. Abundances of Fe, (alpha)-elements, Na and Al will constrain the relative contributions of Type Ia and Type II SNe and probe ~1 Gyr enrichment timescales. The s-process elements (e.g. Zr, Y, Ba, La), made by AGB stars, will probe timescales of several Gyr. These elements are sensitive to whether chemical enrichment occurred slowly, or in a burst, and whether the enrichment was global, or occurred in disparate systems, such as dwarf galaxies that were later accreted. The project will provide basic information to advance an understanding of chemical enrichment and nucleosynthesis, and galaxy evolution.

  6. Unbound molecular complexes in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christine D.

    1990-07-01

    The HI content of the nearby spiral galaxy M33 (d approx. 0.8 Mpc) has been the subject of many detailed studies (most recently Deul and van der Hulst 1987), but similar data on the molecular gas component has been lacking. This galaxy is currently undergoing vigorous high-mass star formation, as evidenced by the many OB associations and HII regions, and so is expected to possess at least some molecular gas. Interferometric studies have detected molecular clouds similar to Galactic Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs) (Boulanger et al. 1988; Wilson et al. 1988). Researchers have recently mapped the nuclear region of M33 in the CO J=1-0 line with a 12 m telescope (half power beam width 55 inches approx. 210 pc) out to a radius of 3.5 minutes in order to trace the detailed distribution of the molecular gas. The resulting map reveals six large complexes with diameters of 200 to 400 pc. Interferometer observations of these regions have resolved them into individual molecular clouds similar to Galactic GMCs (Wilson et al. 1988). The complexes shown are much larger than individual Galactic GMCs (Sanders, Scoville, and Solomon 1985), but are somewhat smaller on average than the large associations seen in the grand-design spiral galaxy M51 (Rand and Kulkarni 1989). If we extend the velocity-diameter relation observed for Galactic GMCs to these larger structures, the predicted velocity widths are a factor of 1.5 to 3 times greater than the observed full-width half-maximum velocities (13 to 29 km (s-1). The peak brightness temperatures are approx. 0.2 K, at least a factor of 10 lower than what is observed for Galactic GMCs. If these large structures are made up of objects similar to Galactic GMCs, the area filling factor of the small clouds is roughly 10 percent. These results suggest that these complexes are not very large GMCs, but rather are associations of many individual GMCs or GMCs embedded in a diffuse gas component.

  7. Spectroscopy of planetary nebulae in M 33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, L.; Perinotto, M.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Mampaso, A.

    2003-03-01

    Spectroscopic observations of 48 emission-line objects of M 33 have been obtained with the multi-object, wide field, fibre spectrograph AF2/WYFFOS at the 4.2 m WHT telescope (La Palma, Spain). Line intensities and logarithmic extinction, cbeta , are presented for 42 objects. Their location in the Sabbadin & D'Odorico diagnostic diagram (Hα /[S II] vs. Hα /[N II]) suggests that >70% of the candidates are Planetary Nebulae (PNe). Chemical abundances and nebular physical parameters have been derived for the three of the six PNe where the 4363 Å, [O II]i emission line was measurable. These are disc PNe, located within a galactocentric distance of 4.1 kpc, and, to date, they are the farthest PNe with a direct chemical abundance determination. No discrepancy in the helium, Oxygen and Argon abundances has been found in comparison with corresponding abundances of PNe in our Galaxy. Only a lower limit to the sulphur abundance has been obtained since we could not detect any [S III] line. N/H appears to be lower than the Galactic value; some possible explanations for this under-abundance are discussed. Based on observations obtained at the 4.2 m WHT telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias.

  8. Primary Macrophage Chemotaxis Induced by Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Agonists Occurs Independently of the CB2 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Lewis; Christou, Ivy; Kapellos, Theodore S.; Buchan, Alice; Brodermann, Maximillian H.; Gianella-Borradori, Matteo; Russell, Angela; Iqbal, Asif J.; Greaves, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of CB2 has been demonstrated to induce directed immune cell migration. However, the ability of CB2 to act as a chemoattractant receptor in macrophages remains largely unexplored. Using a real-time chemotaxis assay and a panel of chemically diverse and widely used CB2 agonists, we set out to examine whether CB2 modulates primary murine macrophage chemotaxis. We report that of 12 agonists tested, only JWH133, HU308, L-759,656 and L-759,633 acted as macrophage chemoattractants. Surprisingly, neither pharmacological inhibition nor genetic ablation of CB2 had any effect on CB2 agonist-induced macrophage chemotaxis. As chemotaxis was pertussis toxin sensitive in both WT and CB2-/- macrophages, we concluded that a non-CB1/CB2, Gi/o-coupled GPCR must be responsible for CB2 agonist-induced macrophage migration. The obvious candidate receptors GPR18 and GPR55 could not mediate JWH133 or HU308-induced cytoskeletal rearrangement or JWH133-induced β-arrestin recruitment in cells transfected with either receptor, demonstrating that neither are the unidentified GPCR. Taken together our results conclusively demonstrate that CB2 is not a chemoattractant receptor for murine macrophages. Furthermore we show for the first time that JWH133, HU308, L-759,656 and L-759,633 have off-target effects of functional consequence in primary cells and we believe that our findings have wide ranging implications for the entire cannabinoid field. PMID:26033291

  9. A Marvelous Star in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polomski, Elisha; Gehrz, R. D.; McQuinn, K.; Paffel, F.; Woodward, C. E.

    2012-05-01

    The end stages of stellar evolution release heavy element enriched dust into the interstellar medium where it is eventually incorporated into star formation regions and later generations of stars. As low mass stars go through this process they bloat in size, pulsate, and expel dust and gas before ultimately transforming into planetary nebulae (PNe). A classic example of this stage of evolution is the well studied class of pulsating stars, the Mira variables. Prior to expelling a PNe, these objects go through a short (tens of thousands of years) stage of evolution where they undergo episodic mass loss and become enshrouded in dust. We report the discovery of an unusual Mira star within the M33 galaxy; IRAC 0134+3029. The source is heavily obscured in the visible, indicating large amounts of enshrouding dust. In addition, Spitzer Space Telescope spectroscopy and imaging show strong thermal emission as well as absorption features from silicates. Examination of the properties of IRAC 0134 suggests that it is the extragalactic analog of the well known "extreme" Mira OH26.5+0.6. We compare spectra and photometry of IRAC 0134 to observations of OH26.5+.6 as well as to the prototype of the Mira class, Omicron Ceti. We also discuss some contradictory archival observations of these objects and suggest possible explanations. This work is based upon observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under NASA contract 1407. The authors were supported in part through contracts 1256406 and 1215746 issued by JPL/Caltech to the University of Minnesota.

  10. Human prostacyclin receptor structure and function from naturally-occurring and synthetic mutations.

    PubMed

    Stitham, Jeremiah; Arehart, Eric J; Gleim, Scott R; Douville, Karen L; Hwa, John

    2007-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) is released by vascular endothelial cells and serves as a potent vasodilator, inhibitor of platelet aggregation (anti-thrombotic), and moderator of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation-migration-differentiation (anti-atherosclerotic). These actions are mediated via a seven transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), known as the human prostacyclin receptor or hIP. Animal studies using prostacyclin receptor knock-out (IP-/-) mice have revealed increased propensities towards thrombosis, intimal hyperplasia, atherosclerosis, restenosis, as well as reperfusion injury. Of further importance has been the world-wide withdrawal of selective COX-2 inhibitors, due to their discriminating suppression of COX-2-derived PGI2 and its cardioprotective effects, leading to increased cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarction and thrombotic stroke. Over the last decade, mutagenesis studies of the IP receptor, in conjunction with in vitro functional assays and molecular modeling, have provided critical insights into the molecular mechanisms of both agonist binding and receptor activation. Most recently, the discovery of naturally-occurring and dysfunctional mutations within the hIP has provided additional insights into the proposed cardioprotective role of prostacyclin. The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent findings regarding hIP receptor structure-function that have developed through the study of both synthetic and naturally-occurring mutations. PMID:17164137

  11. Chandra ACIS Survey of M33: The SNR Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plucinsky, Paul; Long, Knox S.; Gaetz, Terrance; Tuellmann, Ralph

    The Chandra ACIS Survey of M33 (ChASeM33) is a large program to survey the inner re-gions of the M33 galaxy. The survey consists of 7 different fields observed for 200 ks (each field observed twice for 100 ks), covering 70the key projects of the ChASeM33 project is to characterize the SNR population in M33. We have detected 82 of 137 optically-identified SNRs and SNR candidates with a limiting X-ray luminosity of 2.0e34 ergs/s (0.35-2.0 keV), yielding confirmation of (or at least strongly supporting) their SNR identifications. This represents the largest sample of remnants detected at optical and X-ray wavelengths in any galaxy, including the Milky Way. With the high angular resolution of Chandra, we are able to study the X-ray morphology of the bright remnants for the first time. A spectral analysis of the seven X-ray brightest SNRs reveals that two, G98-31 and G98-35, have spectra that appear to indicate enrichment by ejecta from core-collapse supernova explosions. A comparison of the X-ray lu-minosity function of the SNRs in M33 to the LMC and SMC indicates that the LMC, and to a lesser extent the SMC, have more, high luminosity SNRs than M33. We did not discover any close analogs of Cas A, Kepler's SNR, Tycho's SNR or the Crab Nebula in the regions of M33 surveyed, but we have found an X-ray source with a power law spectrum coincident with a small-diameter radio source that may be the first pulsar-wind nebula recognized in M33.

  12. Spectral energy distributions of H ii regions in M 33 (HerM33es)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Relaño, M.; Verley, S.; Pérez, I.; Kramer, C.; Calzetti, D.; Xilouris, E. M.; Boquien, M.; Abreu-Vicente, J.; Combes, F.; Israel, F.; Tabatabaei, F. S.; Braine, J.; Buchbender, C.; González, M.; Gratier, P.; Lord, S.; Mookerjea, B.; Quintana-Lacaci, G.; van der Werf, P.

    2013-04-01

    Aims: Within the framework of the Herschel M 33 extended survey HerM33es and in combination with multi-wavelength data we study the spectral energy distribution (SED) of a set of H ii regions in the Local Group galaxy M 33 as a function of the morphology. We analyse the emission distribution in regions with different morphologies and present models to infer the Hα emission measure observed for H ii regions with well defined morphology. Methods: We present a catalogue of 119 H ii regions morphologically classified: 9 filled, 47 mixed, 36 shell, and 27 clear shell H ii regions. For each object we extracted the photometry at twelve available wavelength bands, covering a wide wavelength range from FUV-1516 Å (GALEX) to IR-250 μm (Herschel), and we obtained the SED for each object. We also obtained emission line profiles in vertical and horizontal directions across the regions to study the location of the stellar, ionised gas, and dust components. We constructed a simple geometrical model for the clear shell regions, whose properties allowed us to infer the electron density of these regions. Results: We find trends for the SEDs related to the morphology of the regions, showing that the star and gas-dust configuration affects the ratios of the emission in different bands. The mixed and filled regions show higher emission at 24 μm, corresponding to warm dust, than the shells and clear shells. This could be due to the proximity of the dust to the stellar clusters in the case of filled and mixed regions. The far-IR peak for shells and clear shells seems to be located towards longer wavelengths, indicating that the dust is colder for this type of object. The logarithmic 100 μm/70 μm ratio for filled and mixed regions remains constant over one order of magnitude in Hα and FUV surface brightness, while the shells and clear shells exhibit a wider range of values of almost two orders of magnitude. We derive dust masses and dust temperatures for each H ii region by fitting

  13. Studying the Gravitational Dark Matter Wake of M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingling, William; Besla, Gurtina

    2016-06-01

    Recent proper motions of M31 by Sohn et al. 2012 indicate that the Milky Way and Andromeda will coalesce in ~5.9 Gyr. We investigate the effects of dynamical friction exerted on M31's satellite galaxy M33 in the near future and throughout the impending Milky Way-Andromeda-M33 merger. We use the merger simulation presented in van der Marel, Besla, et al. (2012) with approximately 10^6 dark matter particles in order to analyze the density and morphology of the induced gravitational wake as M33 orbits within the dark matter halo of Andromeda and ultimately within the halo of the Andromeda-Milky Way merger remnant. We explore the mass, density and time evolution of the induced wake and its future consequences to M33's orbit and Andromeda's galactic disk.

  14. Spectroscopic Confirmation and Classification of the Recent M33 Nova Candidate, M33N 2010-12a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafter, A. W.; Ciardullo, R.; Bode, M. F.; Darnley, M. J.; Misselt, K. A.

    2010-12-01

    We report spectroscopic observations of the M33 nova candidate, M33N 2010-12a, recently discovered at m=16.6 (unfiltered) by T. Yusa on 2010 Dec. 17.42 UT (CBET #2595). At our request a spectrum (410-910 nm) of M33N 2010-12a was obtained by John Caldwell on 2010 Dec. 22.20 UT (~5 days post discovery) with the Marcario Low-Resolution Spectrograph on the 9.2m Hobby-Eberly Telescope.

  15. Spectroscopic Confirmation of the Recent Nova Candidate in M33 M33N 2009-01a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafter, A. W.; Ciardullo, R.; Bode, M. F.; Darnley, M. J.; Misselt, K. A.

    2009-01-01

    We report spectroscopic observations of the recent M33 nova candidate, M33N 2009-01a, which was discovered on 2009 Jan. 07.54 by K. Nishiyama and F. Kabashima (CBET #1659). At our request, a spectrum (410-950 nm) of M33N 2009-01a was obtained approximately a week after discovery on 2009 Jan. 14.15 UT by J. Caldwell with the 9.2m Hobby-Eberly Telescope (+ Marcario Low-Resolution Spectrograph).

  16. Chandra Acis Survey of M33 (ChASeM33): The unequal siblings NGC604 and IC131

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaetz, Terrance; Tuellmann, R.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Gaetz, T. J.; Long, K. S.; Blair, W. P.; Haberl, F.; Kuntz, K. D.; Pannuti, T. G.; Pietsch, W.; Williams, B.; Winkler, P. F.

    2009-09-01

    We present results from the first detailed analysis of the diffuse X-ray emission in NGC604 and IC131. These regions are the only X-ray bright giant HII regions in M33 and were observed as part of ChASeM33. The main bubbles in NGC604 are filled with a hot thermal plasma of kT=0.5keV. The X-ray gas mass and unabsorbed X-ray luminosity in the western part of NGC604 are consistent with stellar mass-loss from 200 OB-stars and agree well with predictions from the standard bubble model. In the eastern part of NGC604 mass loss from young stars alone cannot account for the X-ray luminosity and another mechanism, such as off-center SNRs, is required to produce the additional luminosity. The X-ray spectrum of the extended emission in IC131 can be equally well fitted by an absorbed powerlaw (Γ=2.2) or an absorbed thermal plasma model (kT=4.3keV). Both models predict that more than 40% of the luminosity is emitted above 2keV. Compared to other HII regions, IC131 is extreme regarding its large extent of the X-ray emission (˜200pc), the lack of O stars, its high electron temperature (assuming thermal emission), and large fraction of hard X-rays. A thermal plasma of 4keV poses serious challenges to theoretical models, as it is unclear how such high electron temperatures can be obtained. In case the gas is non-thermal, it remains to be understood if the same mechanisms which create non-thermal X-rays or accelerate CRs in SNRs are applicable to these much larger scales. In both cases appropriate theoretical models are needed. Clearly, NGC604 and IC131 seem to be in completely different evolutionary stages. All O-type stars in IC131 seemed to have turned into SNe, whereas the western part of NGC604 awaits its first SNe to occur. Support for this work was provided by NASA through Chandra Award Number G06-7073A.

  17. The Photometric Properties of a Vast Stellar Substructure in the Outskirts of M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnachie, Alan W.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Irwin, Michael J.; Dubinski, John; Widrow, Lawrence M.; Dotter, Aaron; Ibata, Rodrigo; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2010-11-01

    We have surveyed approximately 40 deg2 surrounding M33 with Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope MegaCam/MegaPrime in the g and i filters out to a maximum projected radius from this galaxy of 50 kpc, as part of the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS). Our observations are deep enough to resolve the top ~4 mag of the red giant branch population in this galaxy. We have previously shown that the disk of M33 is surrounded by a large, irregular, low surface brightness substructure. Here, we quantify the stellar populations and structure of this feature using the PAndAS data. We show that the stellar populations of this feature are consistent with an old population with lang[Fe/H]rang ~ -1.6 dex and an interquartile range in metallicity of ~0.5 dex. We construct a surface brightness map of M33 that traces this feature to μ V ~= 33 mag arcsec-2. At these low surface brightness levels, the structure extends to projected radii of ~40 kpc from the center of M33 in both the northwest and southeast quadrants of the galaxy. Overall, the structure has an "S-shaped" appearance that broadly aligns with the orientation of the H I disk warp. We calculate a lower limit to the integrated luminosity of the structure of -12.7 ± 0.5 mag, comparable to a bright dwarf galaxy such as Fornax or Andromeda II and slightly less than 1% of the total luminosity of M33. Further, we show that there is tentative evidence for a distortion in the distribution of young stars near the edge of the H I disk that occurs at similar azimuth to the warp in H I. The data also hint at a low-level, extended stellar component at larger radius that may be an M33 halo component. We revisit studies of M33 and its stellar populations in light of these new results and discuss possible formation scenarios for the vast stellar structure. Our favored model is that of the tidal disruption of M33 in its orbit around M31.

  18. THE PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF A VAST STELLAR SUBSTRUCTURE IN THE OUTSKIRTS OF M33

    SciTech Connect

    McConnachie, Alan W.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Irwin, Michael J.; Dubinski, John; Widrow, Lawrence M.; Dotter, Aaron; Ibata, Rodrigo; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2010-11-10

    We have surveyed approximately 40 deg{sup 2} surrounding M33 with Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope MegaCam/MegaPrime in the g and i filters out to a maximum projected radius from this galaxy of 50 kpc, as part of the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS). Our observations are deep enough to resolve the top {approx}4 mag of the red giant branch population in this galaxy. We have previously shown that the disk of M33 is surrounded by a large, irregular, low surface brightness substructure. Here, we quantify the stellar populations and structure of this feature using the PAndAS data. We show that the stellar populations of this feature are consistent with an old population with ([Fe/H]) {approx} -1.6 dex and an interquartile range in metallicity of {approx}0.5 dex. We construct a surface brightness map of M33 that traces this feature to {mu}{sub V} {approx_equal} 33 mag arcsec{sup -2}. At these low surface brightness levels, the structure extends to projected radii of {approx}40 kpc from the center of M33 in both the northwest and southeast quadrants of the galaxy. Overall, the structure has an 'S-shaped' appearance that broadly aligns with the orientation of the H I disk warp. We calculate a lower limit to the integrated luminosity of the structure of -12.7 {+-} 0.5 mag, comparable to a bright dwarf galaxy such as Fornax or Andromeda II and slightly less than 1% of the total luminosity of M33. Further, we show that there is tentative evidence for a distortion in the distribution of young stars near the edge of the H I disk that occurs at similar azimuth to the warp in H I. The data also hint at a low-level, extended stellar component at larger radius that may be an M33 halo component. We revisit studies of M33 and its stellar populations in light of these new results and discuss possible formation scenarios for the vast stellar structure. Our favored model is that of the tidal disruption of M33 in its orbit around M31.

  19. Spectroscopic Observations of the Recent M33 Nova Candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafter, A. W.; Ciardullo, R.; Bode, M. F.; Darnley, M. J.; Misselt, K. A.

    2010-10-01

    We report spectroscopic observations of the recent M33 nova candidate (M33N 2010-10a?), which was discovered by K. Nishiyama and F. Kabashima (Miyaki-Argenteus Observatory, Japan) on 2010 Oct. 26.65 UT. At our request a spectrum (410-950 nm) of the nova candidate was obtained by John Caldwell on 2010 Oct. 28.37 UT (~2 days post discovery) with the Marcario Low-Resolution Spectrograph on the 9.2m Hobby-Eberly Telescope.

  20. Discovery of a Probable Nova in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornoch, K.; Vaduvescu, O.; Tudor, V.

    2014-08-01

    We report the discovery of a probable nova in M33 on co-added 960-s narrow-band H-alpha and 480-s R-band CCD images taken with the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) + WFC at La Palma under ~1.1" seeing on 2014 July 29.206 and 29.222 UT, respectively.

  1. NEW UBVRI PHOTOMETRY OF 234 M33 STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jun

    2013-04-15

    This is the second paper of our series. In this paper, we present UBVRI photometry for 234 star clusters in the field of M33. For most of these star clusters, there is photometry in only two bands in previous studies. The photometry of these star clusters is performed using archival images from the Local Group Galaxies Survey, which covers 0.8 deg{sup 2} along the major axis of M33. Detailed comparisons show that, in general, our photometry is consistent with previous measurements, and in particular that our photometry is in good agreement with that of Zloczewski and Kaluzny. Combined with star cluster photometry in previous studies, we present some results: none of the M33 youngest clusters ({approx}10{sup 7} yr) have masses approaching 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }, and comparisons with models of simple stellar populations suggest a large range of ages for M33 star clusters and some as old as the Galactic globular clusters.

  2. ON THE SPECTROSCOPIC CLASSES OF NOVAE IN M33

    SciTech Connect

    Shafter, A. W.; Darnley, M. J.; Bode, M. F.; Ciardullo, R.

    2012-06-20

    We report the initial results from an ongoing multi-year spectroscopic survey of novae in M33. The survey resulted in the spectroscopic classification of six novae (M33N 2006-09a, 2007-09a, 2009-01a, 2010-10a, 2010-11a, and 2011-12a) and a determination of rates of decline (t{sub 2} times) for four of them (2006-09a, 2007-09a, 2009-01a, and 2010-10a). When these data are combined with existing spectroscopic data for two additional M33 novae (2003-09a and 2008-02a), we find that five of the eight novae with available spectroscopic class appear to be members of either the He/N or Fe IIb (hybrid) classes, with only two clear members of the Fe II spectroscopic class. This initial finding is very different from what would be expected based on the results for M31 and the Galaxy where Fe II novae dominate, and the He/N and Fe IIb classes together make up only {approx}20% of the total. It is plausible that the increased fraction of He/N and Fe IIb novae observed in M33 thus far may be the result of the younger stellar population that dominates this galaxy, which is expected to produce novae that harbor generally more massive white dwarfs than those typically associated with novae in M31 or the Milky Way.

  3. Naturally-Occurring Marine Brominated Indoles are Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligands/Agonists

    PubMed Central

    DeGroot, Danica E.; Franks, Diana G.; Higa, Tatsuo; Tanaka, Junichi; Hahn, Mark E.; Denison, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates the toxic and biological effects of structurally diverse chemicals, including the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). As part of a larger effort to identify the full spectrum of chemicals that can bind to and activate the AhR, we have examined the ability of several naturally-occurring marine-derived brominated indoles and brominated (methylthio)indoles (collectively referred to as “brominated indoles”) to bind to the AhR and stimulate AhR-dependent gene expression. Incubation of mouse, rat and guinea pig recombinant cell lines containing a stably transfected AhR-responsive luciferase reporter gene with eight brominated indoles revealed that all compounds stimulated luciferase reporter gene activity, although some species-specific differences were observed. All compounds induced significantly more luciferase activity when incubated with cells for 4 h as compared to 24 h, demonstrating that these compounds are transient activators of the AhR signaling pathway. Three of the brominated indoles induced CYP1A1 mRNA in human HepG2 cells in vitro and Cyp1a mRNA in zebrafish embryos in vivo. The identification of the brominated indoles as direct ligands and activators/agonists of the AhR was confirmed by their ability to compete with [3H]TCDD for binding to the AhR and to stimulate AhR transformation and DNA binding in vitro. Taken together, these marine-derived brominated indoles are members of a new class of naturally-occurring AhR agonists. PMID:26001051

  4. THE WOLF-RAYET CONTENT OF M33

    SciTech Connect

    Neugent, Kathryn F.; Massey, Philip E-mail: phil.massey@lowell.edu

    2011-06-01

    Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars are evolved massive stars, and the relative number of WC-type and WN-type WRs should vary with metallicity, providing a sensitive test of stellar evolutionary theory. The observed WC/WN ratio is much higher than that predicted by theory in some galaxies but this could be due to observational incompleteness for WN types, which have weaker lines. Previous studies of M33's WR content show a galactocentric gradient in the relative numbers of WCs and WNs, but only small regions have been surveyed with sufficient sensitivity to detect all of the WNs. Here, we present a sensitive survey for WRs covering all of M33, finding 55 new WRs, mostly of WN type. Our spectroscopy also improves the spectral types of many previously known WRs, establishing in one case that the star is actually a background quasar. The total number of spectroscopically confirmed WRs in M33 is 206, a number we argue is complete to {approx}5%, with most WRs residing in OB associations, although {approx}2% are truly isolated. The WC/WN ratio in the central regions (<2 kpc) of M33 is much higher than that predicted by the current Geneva evolutionary models, while the WC/WN ratios in the outer regions are in good accord, as are the values in the Small Magellanic Cloud and Large Magellanic Cloud. The WC/WN ratio and the WC subtype distribution both argue that the oxygen abundance gradient in M33 is significantly larger than that found by some recent studies, but are consistent with the two-component model proposed by Magrini et al.

  5. Arecibo Search for Radio Pulses from M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Fronefield; Cordes, James M.; Spitler, Laura

    2016-01-01

    All radio pulsars that have been discovered to date are located within the Milky Way and its globular clusters, or in the Magellanic Clouds. The increased sensitivity of the wide-bandwidth Puerto Rico Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument (PUPPI) installed at the Arecibo Observatory makes detection of pulsars beyond the Magellanic Clouds a promising possibility. We are using the PUPPI backend and the 327 MHz receiver at Arecibo to try to detect giant radio pulses from neutron stars in the nearby spiral galaxy M33. Pulsars in M33 could be used to probe the local intergalactic medium and would help us study neutron star formation and pulsar evolution in another spiral galaxy. Using the Crab pulsar as a guide, we estimate that giant pulses from every Crab-like pulsar beaming toward us from the M33 optical disk ought to be detectable in our search, with several pulses detected in each hour of integration time. In this presentation I describe this project and provide an update on the status of the search.

  6. IRS Follow-up of Sources in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houck, James R.; Roellig, Thomas; Buckalew, Brent; Gehrz, Robert D.; McQuinn, Kristy; Polomski, Elisha; Roellig, Thomas L.; Woodward, Charles

    2006-05-01

    We are currently engaged in a Guaranteed Time Observation (GTO) program (PID 5) to obtain MIPS and IRAC maps of M33 that will provide a global perspective on star formation, stellar evolution, and chemical evolution in the interstellar medium in a spiral galaxy. Combined with ground-based observations, these maps will provide a unified set of images that relate the locations of chemical enrichment, gas available to form stars, star formation, and evolved stars. We are proposing here to perform IRS spectroscopy using all of the IRS modules to follow-up on five embedded compact HII clusters which are located at various distances ranging up to 3.5 kpc from the center of M33. The low-resolution data will be particularly useful in identifying broad-band solid-state features, while the high-resolution module observations will be used to measure the strength of fine-structure emission lines, providing a wealth of information on the excitation levels and electron densities in the targets, without the complicating effects of extinction that hampers optical studies of these highly-enshrouded objects. Our proposed observations will allow important new insight into how star formation environments change across the face of the spiral galaxy M33.

  7. [Ci](1-0) observations in M33 A study of CO dark H2 gas in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glück, C.; Mookerjea, B.; Okada, Y.; Buchbender, C.; Röllig, M.; Stutzki, J.

    2016-05-01

    Based on [Ci] (1-0) observations and complementary Hi, 12/13CO (1-0), 12CO (2-1) and [Cii] data we estimated the column density and fraction of molecular hydrogen in GMCs along the major axis of the galaxy M33. We found that on average 75%± 14% of the hydrogen is in molecular form. Roughly 40-45% of the H2 is both traced by [Cii] and CO, while ˜ 15% by the [Ci] lines. The found CO-dark H2 gas fractions are within the predictions by Wolfire et al. (2010) for a half solar metallicity, Z = 0.5 Z⊙, as in M33.

  8. M33 X-7: ChASeM33 Reveals the First Eclipsing Black Hole X-Ray Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietsch, W.; Haberl, F.; Sasaki, M.; Gaetz, T. J.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Ghavamian, P.; Long, K. S.; Pannuti, T. G.

    2006-07-01

    The first observations conducted as part of the Chandra ACIS survey of M33 (ChASeM33) sampled the eclipsing X-ray binary M33 X-7 over a large part of the 3.45 day orbital period and have resolved eclipse ingress and egress for the first time. The occurrence of the X-ray eclipse allows us to determine an improved ephemeris of mid-eclipse and binary period as HJD (2,453,639.119+/-0.005)+/-N(3.453014+/-0.000020) and constrain the eclipse half-angle to 26.5d+/-1.1d. There are indications for a shortening of the orbital period. The X-ray spectrum is best described by a disk blackbody spectrum typical for black hole X-ray binaries in the Galaxy. We find a flat power density spectrum, and no significant regular pulsations were found in the frequency range of 10-4 to 0.15 Hz. HST WFPC2 images resolve the optical counterpart, which can be identified as an O6 III star with the help of extinction and color corrections derived from the X-ray absorption. Based on the optical light curve, the mass of the compact object in the system most likely exceeds 9 Msolar. This mass, the shape of the X-ray spectrum, and the short-term X-ray time variability identify M33 X-7 as the first eclipsing black hole high-mass X-ray binary.

  9. THE WIND OF VARIABLE C IN M33

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, Roberta M.; Davidson, Kris; Gordon, Michael S.; Weis, Kerstin; Burggraf, Birgitta; Bomans, D. J.; Martin, John C.

    2014-02-20

    We discuss the spectrum of Var C in M33 obtained just before the onset of its current brightening and its recent spectra during its present ''eruption'' or optically thick wind stage. These spectra illustrate the typical luminous blue variable (LBV) transition in apparent spectral type or temperature that characterizes the classical LBV or S Dor-type variability. LBVs are known to have slow, dense winds during their maximum phase. Interestingly, Var C had a slow wind even during its hot, quiescent stage in comparison with the normal hot supergiants with similar temperatures. Its outflow or wind speeds also show very little change between these two states.

  10. Selective phthalate activation of naturally occurring human constitutive androstane receptor splice variants and the pregnane X receptor.

    PubMed

    DeKeyser, Joshua G; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M; Peterson, Eric C; Chen, Tao; Omiecinski, Curtis J

    2011-04-01

    Phthalates and other endocrine-disruptive chemicals are manufactured in large quantities for use as plasticizers and other commercial applications, resulting in ubiquitous human exposure and thus, concern regarding their toxicity. Innate defense against small molecule exposures is controlled in large part by the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X receptor (PXR). The human CAR gene undergoes multiple alternative splicing events resulting in the CAR2 and CAR3 variant receptors. Recent studies from our laboratory show that CAR2 is potently and specifically activated by di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). We hypothesized that alternative splicing is a mechanism for increasing CAR's functional diversity, broadening the human receptors' repertoire of response to environmental xenobiotics. In these studies, we examine the interaction of alternatively spliced CARs and PXR with a range of suspected endocrine disruptors, including phthalates, bisphenol A (BPA), and 4-N-nonylphenol (NP). Transactivation and two-hybrid studies in COS-1 cells revealed differential selectivity of endocrine-disrupting chemicals for the variant CAR and PXR. Ex vivo studies showed DEHP and di-isononyl phthalate potently induced CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 expression in human hepatocytes. Mutation analysis of CAR2, in silico modeling, and ligand docking studies suggested that the SPTV amino acid insertion of CAR2 creates a unique ligand-binding pocket. Alternative gene splicing results in variant CAR receptors that selectively recognize phthalates and BPA. The interaction of phthalates with CAR and PXR suggests a xenobiotic response that is complex and biologically redundant. PMID:21227907

  11. Selective Phthalate Activation of Naturally Occurring Human Constitutive Androstane Receptor Splice Variants and the Pregnane X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    DeKeyser, Joshua G.; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M.; Peterson, Eric C.; Chen, Tao; Omiecinski, Curtis J.

    2011-01-01

    Phthalates and other endocrine-disruptive chemicals are manufactured in large quantities for use as plasticizers and other commercial applications, resulting in ubiquitous human exposure and thus, concern regarding their toxicity. Innate defense against small molecule exposures is controlled in large part by the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X receptor (PXR). The human CAR gene undergoes multiple alternative splicing events resulting in the CAR2 and CAR3 variant receptors. Recent studies from our laboratory show that CAR2 is potently and specifically activated by di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). We hypothesized that alternative splicing is a mechanism for increasing CAR’s functional diversity, broadening the human receptors’ repertoire of response to environmental xenobiotics. In these studies, we examine the interaction of alternatively spliced CARs and PXR with a range of suspected endocrine disruptors, including phthalates, bisphenol A (BPA), and 4-N-nonylphenol (NP). Transactivation and two-hybrid studies in COS-1 cells revealed differential selectivity of endocrine-disrupting chemicals for the variant CAR and PXR. Ex vivo studies showed DEHP and di-isononyl phthalate potently induced CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 expression in human hepatocytes. Mutation analysis of CAR2, in silico modeling, and ligand docking studies suggested that the SPTV amino acid insertion of CAR2 creates a unique ligand-binding pocket. Alternative gene splicing results in variant CAR receptors that selectively recognize phthalates and BPA. The interaction of phthalates with CAR and PXR suggests a xenobiotic response that is complex and biologically redundant. PMID:21227907

  12. The UV interstellar extinction in nearby galaxies: M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Luciana

    2001-07-01

    We previously used HST to determine the UV extinction curve in M31. Our result in M31, together with other studies of the Magellanic Clouds and Milky Way, suggests that dust properties vary in different environments and from galaxy to galaxy. Thus average Galactic dust properties cannot be usefully employed to correct for dust effects in different galaxies. We propose to enlarge our sample by studying the UV extinction properties of dust in M33, sampling different galactocentric distances and levels of star formation activity. The extinction curves will be derived by comparing stars with the same spectral type, but different extinction amounts, in M33. This eliminates uncertainties in using standard stars from other galaxies, that may have different intrinsic spectra. For the targets we have U, B, V and UV photometry, and accurate spectral types from ground based spectra. UV extinction gives information on the properties of dust, which is an important tracer of global heavy element abundances. The steepness of the FUV extinction affects the ionisation and molecular chemistry of a galaxy. Knowledge of the extinction curve also allows accurate corrections of observed fluxes: ultimately, relating dust properties to global galaxy parameters will enable better extinction corrections in distant galaxies and AGN. We also request WFPC2 parallel imaging to continue our stellar population studies.

  13. Variation in the dust emissivity index across M 33 with Herschel and Spitzer (HerM 33es)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaei, F. S.; Braine, J.; Xilouris, E. M.; Kramer, C.; Boquien, M.; Combes, F.; Henkel, C.; Relano, M.; Verley, S.; Gratier, P.; Israel, F.; Wiedner, M. C.; Röllig, M.; Schuster, K. F.; van der Werf, P.

    2014-01-01

    We study the wavelength dependence of the dust emission as a function of position and environment across the disk of M 33 using Spitzer and Herschel photometric data. M 33 is a Local Group spiral with slightly subsolar metallicity, which makes it an ideal stepping-stone to less regular and lower-metallicity objects such as dwarf galaxies and, probably, young-universe objects. Expressing the emissivity of the dust as a power law, the power-law exponent (β) was estimated from two independent approaches designed to properly treat the degeneracy between β and the dust temperature (T). Both β and T are higher in the inner than in the outer disk, contrary to reported β - T anti-correlations found in other sources. In the cold + warm dust model, the warm component and the ionized gas (Hα) have a very similar distribution across the galaxy, demonstrating that the model separates the components in an appropriate way. Both cold- and warm-dust column densities are high in star-forming regions and reach their maxima toward the giant star-forming complexes NGC 604 and NGC 595. β declines from close to 2 in the center to about 1.3 in the outer disk. β is positively correlated with star formation and with the molecular gas column, as traced by the Hα and CO emission. The lower dust-emissivity index in the outer parts of M 33 is most likely related to the reduced metallicity (different grain composition) and possibly to a different size distribution. It is not due to the decrease in stellar radiation field or temperature in a simple way because the far-infrared-bright regions in the outer disk also have a low β. Like most spirals, M 33 has a (decreasing) radial gradient in star formation and molecular-to-atomic gas ratio such that the regions bright in Hα or CO tend to trace the inner disk, which makes it difficult to distinguish between their effects on the dust. The assumption of a constant emissivity index β is obviously not appropriate.

  14. A Deep XMM-Newton Legacy Survey of M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Benjamin

    We propose for financial support that will allow us to reduce and analyze all XMM- Newton data relevant to an A09 deep XMM-Newton legacy survey of M33 covering the entire optical disk with a total of 700000 seconds of exposure time. These data will allow us to determine how the temperature and energetics of the hot interstellar medium (ISM) are affected by star formation, constrain the nature and dynamical masses of new pulsating and eclipsing X-ray binaries, and perform detailed statistical and spectral studies on the largest known extragalactic population of X-ray supernova remnants (SNRs). The support proposed here is crucial for the full analysis and publication of the entire data set. Measurements and model fitting of the spectra and timing of all of the discrete sources detected in our data will constrain the nature and dynamical masses of new pulsating and eclipsing X-ray binaries, as well as provide new insight into the origins of the X-ray SNRs. Spatially-resolved, spectral studies of the diffuse emission will allow us to determine how the temperature and energetics of the hot interstellar medium (ISM) are affected by star formation. Several members of our team have already performed similar analysis to those proposed using data from the deep Chandra ACIS-I survey of M33 (ChASeM33), and we intend to hire a postdoctoral research associate who has experience working with large XMM-Newton data sets. Therefore the techniques for making the measurements are well-understood; however, the deep Chandra ACIS-I survey of M33 does not provide sufficient soft response for detailed spectral measurements of the diffuse gas emission from dozens of individual star forming regions. To reliably determine the temperature structure of the interstellar gas of these regions, our simulations show that we need to go a factor of 10 deeper in the soft X-ray band than existing X-ray data, which will be achieved with our proposed observations. Furthermore, XMM-Newton studies of X

  15. THE M 33 SYNOPTIC STELLAR SURVEY. I. CEPHEID VARIABLES

    SciTech Connect

    Pellerin, Anne; Macri, Lucas M. E-mail: lmacri@physics.tamu.edu

    2011-04-01

    We have conducted a ground-based BVI synoptic survey of the Local Group galaxy M 33 which covers most of its disk and spans a period of 7 years. The survey targets luminous, long-period variables such as Cepheids and Miras and combines images from the DIRECT project and follow-up observations at the WIYN 3.5 m telescope. This paper, the first in a series, presents the discovery and characterization of 564 Cepheid variables, which represent a factor of two increase over previous samples with calibrated point-spread function (PSF) photometry. We also describe the details of the observations and analysis of the survey data, including the use of archival Hubble Space Telescope images to characterize biases in our ground-based PSF photometry.

  16. Bipolar Outflow Offset from the Nucleus of M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roming, P. W. A.; Moody, J. W.; Hintz, M. L.; Wu, K.; Soria, R.

    2002-12-01

    Using long-slit spectra centered in wavelength about Hα , we have produced a velocity map of a 0.5' x 2' hourglass shaped object centered 38" southeast of the optical center of M33. The velocity resolution is 1.1 km/s. We have also produced electron temperature, electron density, and shock heating maps of the same region using the [NII](λ 6548), [NII](λ 6583), Hα , [SII](λ 6717), and [SII](λ 6731) lines. The data reveal that the gas is flowing away from the center of this hourglass shaped object and that the electron temperature and density of the region is relatively low. The shock heating maps indicate that very little of the gas in the region is shock heated. Using this new data and previously published UV, IR, and radio data we investigate possible scenarios that could explain this large scale, low velocity outflow.

  17. THE YELLOW AND RED SUPERGIANTS OF M33

    SciTech Connect

    Drout, Maria R.; Massey, Philip; Meynet, Georges E-mail: phil.massey@lowell.edu

    2012-05-10

    Yellow and red supergiants are evolved massive stars whose numbers and locations on the Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram can provide a stringent test for models of massive star evolution. Previous studies have found large discrepancies between the relative number of yellow supergiants (YSGs) observed as a function of mass and those predicted by evolutionary models, while a disagreement between the predicted and observed locations of red supergiants (RSGs) on the H-R diagram was only recently resolved. Here, we extend these studies by examining the YSG and RSG populations of M33. Unfortunately, identifying these stars is difficult as this portion of the color-magnitude diagram is heavily contaminated by foreground dwarfs. We identify the RSGs through a combination of radial velocities and a two-color surface gravity discriminant, and after re-characterizing the rotation curve of M33 with our newly selected RSGs, we identify the YSGs through a combination of radial velocities and the strength of the O I {lambda}7774 triplet. We examine {approx}1300 spectra in total and identify 121 YSGs (a sample that is unbiased in luminosity above log (L/L{sub Sun }) {approx} 4.8) and 189 RSGs. After placing these objects on the H-R diagram, we find that the latest generation of Geneva evolutionary tracks shows excellent agreement with the observed locations of our RSGs and YSGs, the observed relative number of YSGs with mass, and the observed RSG upper mass limit. These models therefore represent a drastic improvement over previous generations.

  18. The stellar populations of M33's outer regions - IV. Inflow history and chemical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Michael K.; Sarajedini, A.

    2008-10-01

    We have modelled the observed colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) at one location in M33's outskirts under the framework of a simple chemical evolution scenario which adopts instantaneous and delayed recycling for the nucleosynthetic products of Type II and Ia supernovae. In this scenario, interstellar gas forms stars at a rate modulated by the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation and gas outflow occurs at a rate proportional to the star formation rate (SFR). With this approach, we put broad constraints on the role of gas flows during this region's evolution and compare its [α/Fe] versus [Fe/H] relation with that of other Local Group systems. We find that models with gas inflow are significantly better than the closed-box model at reproducing the observed distribution of stars in the CMD. The best models have a majority of gas inflow taking place in the last 7 Gyr, and relatively little in the last 3 Gyr. These models predict most stars in this region to have [α/Fe] ratios lower than the bulk of the Milky Way's halo. The predictions for the present-day SFR, gas mass and oxygen abundance compare favourably to independent empirical estimates. Our results paint a picture in which M33's outer disc formed from the protracted inflow of gas over several Gyr with at least half of the total inflow occurring since z ~ 1.

  19. THE NEUTRAL HYDROGEN BRIDGE BETWEEN M31 AND M33

    SciTech Connect

    Lockman, Felix J.; Free, Nicole L.; Shields, Joseph C.

    2012-08-15

    The Green Bank Telescope has been used to search for 21 cm H I emission over a large area between the galaxies M31 and M33 in an attempt to confirm at 9.'1 angular resolution the detection by Braun and Thilker of a very extensive neutral gas 'bridge' between the two systems at the level N{sub HI} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}. We detect H I emission at several locations up to 120 kpc in projected distance from M31, at least half the distance to M33, with velocities similar to that of the galaxies, confirming the essence of the Braun and Thilker discovery. The H I does not appear to be associated with the extraplanar high-velocity clouds of either galaxy. In two places we measure N{sub HI} > 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}, indicative of concentrations of H I with {approx}10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} on scales {approx}< 2 kpc, but over most of the field we have only 5{sigma} upper limits of N{sub HI} {<=} 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}. In very deep measurements in two directions H I lines were detected at a few 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}. The absence of emission at another location to a 5{sigma} limit N{sub HI} {<=} 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} suggests that the H I bridge is either patchy or confined to within {approx}125 kpc of M31. The measurements also cover two of M31's dwarf galaxies, And II and And XV, but in neither case is there evidence for associated H I at the 5{sigma} level of 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} for And II and 9.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} for And XV.

  20. Three supernova shells around a young M33 star cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camps-Fariña, A.; Beckman, J. E.; Font, J.; Borlaff, A.; Zaragoza-Cardiel, J.; Amram, P.

    2016-09-01

    Using a specialized technique sensitive to the presence of expanding ionized gas, we have detected a set of three concentric expanding shells in an H II region in the nearby spiral galaxy M33. After mapping the kinematics in Hα with Fabry-Perot spectroscopy, we used slit spectra to measure the intensities of the [S II] doublet at λλ671.9, 673.1 nm and the [N II] doublet at λλ645.8, 658.3 nm to corroborate the kinematics and apply diagnostic tests using line ratios. These showed that the expanding shells are shock dominated as would be the case if they had originated with supernova explosions. Estimating their kinetic energies, we find fairly low values, indicating a fairly advanced stage of evolution. We obtain density, mass and parent star mass estimates, which, along with the kinetic energies, are inconsistent with the simplest models of shock-interstellar medium interaction. We propose that the presence and properties of an inhomogeneous medium offer a scenario which can account for these observations, and discuss the implications. Comparing our results with data from the literature supports the combined presence of an H II region and supernova remnant material at the observed position.

  1. Properties of optically selected supernova remnant candidates in M33

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Lee, Myung Gyoon E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-10-01

    Narrowband images covering strong emission lines are efficient for surveying supernova remnants (SNRs) in nearby galaxies. Using the narrowband images provided by the Local Group Galaxy Survey, we searched for SNRs in M33. Culling the objects with enhanced [S II]/Hα and round morphology in the continuum-subtracted Hα and [S II] images, we produced a list of 199 sources. Among them, 79 are previously unknown. Their progenitor and morphology types were classified. A majority of the sample (170 objects) are likely remnants of core-collapse supernovae (SNe), and 29 are remnants of Type Ia SNe. The cumulative size distribution of these objects is found to be similar to that of the M31 remnants derived in a similar way. We obtain a power-law slope, α = 2.38 ± 0.05. Thus, a majority of the sources are considered to be in the Sedov-Taylor phase, consistent with previous findings. The histogram of the emission-line ratio ([S II]/Hα) of the remnants has two concentrations at [S II]/Hα ∼ 0.55 and ∼0.8, as in M31. Interestingly, L {sub X} (and L {sub 20cm}) of the compact center-bright objects are correlated with their optical luminosity. The remnants with X-ray emission have brighter optical surface brightnesses and smaller diameters than those without X-ray emission.

  2. HI and Hα Mapping of M31 & M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, Z. S.; Carignan, C.; Chemin, L.; Hernandez, O.; de Denus-Baillargeon, M.; Djabo, Y.

    2011-12-01

    abstract-type="normal">RésuméWe performed a deep Hi and Hα mapping of M31 and M33 in order to get accurate kinematical data of those two galaxies and also to make a comparison between the Hi and Hα kinematics. The Hi data were obtained with the DRAO interferometer and the Hα data with the Fabry-Perot system of the Observatoire du mont Mégantic using an EMCCD as a detector. These data will give us the best possible datasets to derive accurate rotation curves and mass models for those two Local Group spirals and provide some new data for the Hii regions studies of these galaxies. While the Hi observations are of low resolution (~1 arcmin), the high resolution of the Hα data (~1 arcsec) should allow us to get much more details in the central regions, allowing at the same time a much better determination of the kinematical parameters. Hence, the inner part of the rotation curve, so inportant to constraint properly the mass models, will be determined more accurately.

  3. Properties of Optically Selected Supernova Remnant Candidates in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2014-10-01

    Narrowband images covering strong emission lines are efficient for surveying supernova remnants (SNRs) in nearby galaxies. Using the narrowband images provided by the Local Group Galaxy Survey, we searched for SNRs in M33. Culling the objects with enhanced [S II]/Hα and round morphology in the continuum-subtracted Hα and [S II] images, we produced a list of 199 sources. Among them, 79 are previously unknown. Their progenitor and morphology types were classified. A majority of the sample (170 objects) are likely remnants of core-collapse supernovae (SNe), and 29 are remnants of Type Ia SNe. The cumulative size distribution of these objects is found to be similar to that of the M31 remnants derived in a similar way. We obtain a power-law slope, α = 2.38 ± 0.05. Thus, a majority of the sources are considered to be in the Sedov-Taylor phase, consistent with previous findings. The histogram of the emission-line ratio ([S II]/Hα) of the remnants has two concentrations at [S II]/Hα ~ 0.55 and ~0.8, as in M31. Interestingly, L X (and L 20 cm) of the compact center-bright objects are correlated with their optical luminosity. The remnants with X-ray emission have brighter optical surface brightnesses and smaller diameters than those without X-ray emission.

  4. α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Occur at Postsynaptic Densities of AMPA Receptor-Positive and -Negative Excitatory Synapses in Rat Sensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Robert B.; Aoki, Chiye

    2010-01-01

    NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation requires concurrent membrane depolarization, and glutamatergic synapses lacking AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are often considered “silent” in the absence of another source of membrane depolarization. During the second postnatal week, NMDA currents can be enhanced in rat auditory cortex through activation of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR). Electrophysiological results support a mainly presynaptic role for α7nAChR at these synapses. However, immunocytochemical evidence that α7nAChR is prevalent at postsynaptic sites of glutamatergic synapses in hippocampus and neocortex, along with emerging electrophysiological evidence for postsynaptic nicotinic currents in neocortex and hippocampus, has prompted speculation that α7nAChR allows for activation of NMDAR postsynaptically at synapses lacking AMPAR. Here we used dual immunolabeling and electron microscopy to examine the distribution of α7nAChR relative to AMPAR (GluR1, GluR2, and GluR3 subunits combined) at excitatory synapses in somatosensory cortex of adult and 1-week-old rats. α7nAChR occurred discretely over most of the thick postsynaptic densities in all cortical layers of both age groups. AMPAR immunoreactivity was also detectable at most synapses; its distribution was independent of that of α7nAChR. In both age groups, approximately one-quarter of asymmetrical synapses were α7nAChR positive and AMPAR negative. The variability of postsynaptic α7nAChR labeling density was greater at postnatal day (PD) 7 than in adulthood, and PD 7 neuropil contained a subset of small AMPA receptor-negative synapses with a high density of α7nAChR immunoreactivity. These observations support the idea that acetylcholine receptors can aid in activating glutamatergic synapses and work together with AMPA receptors to mediate postsynaptic excitation throughout life. PMID:12077196

  5. Tethering naturally occurring peptide toxins for cell-autonomous modulation of ion channels and receptors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ibañez-Tallon, Inés; Wen, Hua; Miwa, Julie M; Xing, Jie; Tekinay, Ayse B; Ono, Fumihito; Brehm, Paul; Heintz, Nathaniel

    2004-08-01

    The physiologies of cells depend on electrochemical signals carried by ion channels and receptors. Venomous animals produce an enormous variety of peptide toxins with high affinity for specific ion channels and receptors. The mammalian prototoxin lynx1 shares with alpha-bungarotoxin the ability to bind and modulate nicotinic receptors (nAChRs); however, lynx1 is tethered to the membrane via a GPI anchor. We show here that several classes of neurotoxins, including bungarotoxins and cobratoxins, retain their selective antagonistic properties when tethered to the membrane. Targeted elimination of nAChR function in zebrafish can be achieved with tethered alpha-bungarotoxin, silencing synaptic transmission without perturbing synapse formation. These studies harness the pharmacological properties of peptide toxins for use in genetic experiments. When combined with specific methods of cell and temporal expression, the extension of this approach to hundreds of naturally occurring peptide toxins opens a new landscape for cell-autonomous regulation of cellular physiology in vivo. PMID:15294139

  6. Expression of a naturally occurring angiotensin AT(1) receptor cleavage fragment elicits caspase-activation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Cook, Julia L; Singh, Akannsha; DeHaro, Dawn; Alam, Jawed; Re, Richard N

    2011-11-01

    Several transmembrane receptors are documented to accumulate in nuclei, some as holoreceptors and others as cleaved receptor products. Our prior studies indicate that a population of the 7-transmembrane angiotensin type-1 receptor (AT(1)R) is cleaved in a ligand-augmented manner after which the cytoplasmic, carboxy-terminal cleavage fragment (CF) traffics to the nucleus. In the present report, we determine the precise cleavage site within the AT(1)R by mass spectrometry and Edman sequencing. Cleavage occurs between Leu(305) and Gly(306) at the junction of the seventh transmembrane domain and the intracellular cytoplasmic carboxy-terminal domain. To evaluate the function of the CF distinct from the holoreceptor, we generated a construct encoding the CF as an in-frame yellow fluorescent protein fusion. The CF accumulates in nuclei and induces apoptosis in CHO-K1 cells, rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs), MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells, and H9c2 rat cardiomyoblasts. All cell types show nuclear fragmentation and disintegration, as well as evidence for phosphotidylserine displacement in the plasma membrane and activated caspases. RASMCs specifically showed a 5.2-fold increase (P < 0.001) in CF-induced active caspases compared with control and a 7.2-fold increase (P < 0.001) in cleaved caspase-3 (Asp174). Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase was upregulated 4.8-fold (P < 0.001) in CF expressing cardiomyoblasts and colocalized with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). CF expression also induces DNA laddering, the gold-standard for apoptosis in all cell types studied. CF-induced apoptosis, therefore, appears to be a general phenomenon as it is observed in multiple cell types including smooth muscle cells and cardiomyoblasts. PMID:21813711

  7. A Naturally Occurring GIP Receptor Variant Undergoes Enhanced Agonist-Induced Desensitization, Which Impairs GIP Control of Adipose Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Sameer; Patel, Rajesh T.; Bruno, Joanne; Panhwar, Muhammad Siyab; Wen, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), an incretin hormone secreted from gastrointestinal K cells in response to food intake, has an important role in the control of whole-body metabolism. GIP signals through activation of the GIP receptor (GIPR), a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Dysregulation of this pathway has been implicated in the development of metabolic disease. Here we demonstrate that GIPR is constitutively trafficked between the plasma membrane and intracellular compartments of both GIP-stimulated and unstimulated adipocytes. GIP induces a downregulation of plasma membrane GIPR by slowing GIPR recycling without affecting internalization kinetics. This transient reduction in the expression of GIPR in the plasma membrane correlates with desensitization to the effects of GIP. A naturally occurring variant of GIPR (E354Q) associated with an increased incidence of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease in humans responds to GIP stimulation with an exaggerated downregulation from the plasma membrane and a delayed recovery of GIP sensitivity following cessation of GIP stimulation. This perturbation in the desensitization-resensitization cycle of the GIPR variant, revealed in studies of cultured adipocytes, may contribute to the link of the E354Q variant to metabolic disease. PMID:25047836

  8. Chandra ACIS Survey of M33 (ChASeM33): The Enigmatic X-Ray Emission from IC131

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tüllmann, Ralph; Long, Knox S.; Pannuti, Thomas G.; Winkler, P. Frank; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Williams, Ben; Kuntz, Kip D.; Pietsch, Wolfgang; Blair, William P.; Haberl, Frank; Smith, Randall K.

    2009-12-01

    We present the first X-ray analysis of the diffuse hot ionized gas and the point sources in IC131, after NGC604 the second most X-ray luminous giant H II region (GHR) in M33. The X-ray emission is detected only in the south eastern part of IC131 (named IC131-se) and is limited to an elliptical region of ~200 pc in extent. This region appears to be confined toward the west by a hemispherical shell of warm ionized gas and only fills about half that volume. Although the corresponding X-ray spectrum has 1215 counts, it cannot conclusively be told whether the extended X-ray emission is thermal, non-thermal, or a combination of both. A thermal plasma model of kTe = 4.3 keV or a single power law of Γ sime 2.1 fit the spectrum equally well. If the spectrum is purely thermal (non-thermal), the total unabsorbed X-ray luminosity in the 0.35-8 keV energy band amounts to LX = 6.8(8.7) × 1035 erg s-1. Among other known H II regions IC131-se seems to be extreme regarding the combination of its large extent of the X-ray plasma, the lack of massive O stars, its unusually high electron temperature (if thermal), and the large fraction of LX emitted above 2 keV (~40%-53%). A thermal plasma of ~4 keV poses serious challenges to theoretical models, as it is not clear how high electron temperatures can be produced in H II regions in view of mass-proportional and collisionless heating. If the gas is non-thermal or has non-thermal contributions, synchrotron emission would clearly dominate over inverse Compton emission. It is not clear if the same mechanisms which create non-thermal X-rays or accelerate cosmic rays in supernova remnants can be applied to much larger scales of 200 pc. In both cases the existing theoretical models for GHRs and superbubbles do not explain the hardness and extent of the X-ray emission in IC131-se. We also detect a variable source candidate in IC131. It seems that this object (CXO J013315.10+304453.0) is a high mass X-ray binary whose optical counterpart is a

  9. Shedding of epidermal growth factor receptor is a regulated process that occurs with overexpression in malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Perez-Torres, Marianela; Valle, Blanca L; Maihle, Nita J; Negron-Vega, Lisandra; Nieves-Alicea, Rene; Cora, Elsa M

    2008-10-01

    Soluble isoforms of the epidermal growth factor receptor (sEGFR) previously have been identified in the conditioned culture media (CCM) of the vulvar adenocarcinoma cell line, A431 and within exosomes of the keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. Here, we report that the extracellular domain (ECD) of EGFR is shed from the cell surface of human carcinoma cell lines that express 7x10(5) receptors/cell or more. We purified this proteolytic isoform of EGFR (PI-sEGFR) from the CCM of MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells. The amino acid sequence of PI-sEGFR was determined by reverse-phase HPLC nano-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry of peptides generated by trypsin, chymotrypsin or GluC digestion. The PI-sEGFR protein is identical in amino acid sequence to the EGFR ECD. The release of PI-sEGFR from MDA-MB-468 cells is enhanced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum, pervanadate, and EGFR ligands (i.e., EGF and TGF-alpha). In addition, 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate, an activator of metalloproteases, increased PI-sEGFR levels in the CCM of MDA-MB-468 cells. Inhibitors of metalloproteases decreased the constitutive shedding of EGFR while the PMA-induced shedding was inhibited by metalloprotease inhibitors, by the two serine protease inhibitors leupeptin and 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin (DCI), and by the aspartyl inhibitor pepstatin. These results suggest that PI-sEGFR arises by proteolytic cleavage of EGFR via a mechanism that is regulated by both PKC- and phosphorylation-dependent pathways. Our results further suggest that when proteolytic shedding of EGFR does occur, it is correlated with a highly malignant phenotype. PMID:18687326

  10. Spectroscopy and photometry of the nova candidate M33N 2013-12a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrika, S.; Barsukova, E. A.; Valeev, A. F.; Sholukhova, O.; Hornoch, K.; Shafter, A. W.; Henze, M.

    2014-01-01

    We report optical spectroscopy and photometry of a recent M33 nova candidate (M33N 2013-12a = PNV J01331092+3037511) detected by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search ( http://www.cbat.eps.harvard.edu/unconf/followups/J01331092+3037511.html ).

  11. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the BRI1 receptor kinase occurs via a posttranslational modification and is activated by the juxtamembrane domain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In metazoans, receptor kinases control many essential processes related to growth and development and response to the environment. The receptor kinases in plants and animals are structurally similar but evolutionarily distinct from one another, and thus while most animal receptor kinases are tyrosin...

  12. A 15.65-solar-mass black hole in an eclipsing binary in the nearby spiral galaxy M 33.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Jerome A; McClintock, Jeffrey E; Narayan, Ramesh; Bailyn, Charles D; Hartman, Joel D; Macri, Lucas; Liu, Jiefeng; Pietsch, Wolfgang; Remillard, Ronald A; Shporer, Avi; Mazeh, Tsevi

    2007-10-18

    Stellar-mass black holes are found in X-ray-emitting binary systems, where their mass can be determined from the dynamics of their companion stars. Models of stellar evolution have difficulty producing black holes in close binaries with masses more than ten times that of the Sun (>10; ref. 4), which is consistent with the fact that the most massive stellar black holes known so far all have masses within one standard deviation of 10. Here we report a mass of (15.65 +/- 1.45) for the black hole in the recently discovered system M 33 X-7, which is located in the nearby galaxy Messier 33 (M 33) and is the only known black hole that is in an eclipsing binary. To produce such a massive black hole, the progenitor star must have retained much of its outer envelope until after helium fusion in the core was completed. On the other hand, in order for the black hole to be in its present 3.45-day orbit about its (70.0 +/- 6.9) companion, there must have been a 'common envelope' phase of evolution in which a significant amount of mass was lost from the system. We find that the common envelope phase could not have occurred in M 33 X-7 unless the amount of mass lost from the progenitor during its evolution was an order of magnitude less than what is usually assumed in evolutionary models of massive stars. PMID:17943124

  13. A 15.65-solar-mass black hole in an eclipsing binary in the nearby spiral galaxy M 33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orosz, Jerome A.; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Narayan, Ramesh; Bailyn, Charles D.; Hartman, Joel D.; Macri, Lucas; Liu, Jiefeng; Pietsch, Wolfgang; Remillard, Ronald A.; Shporer, Avi; Mazeh, Tsevi

    2007-10-01

    Stellar-mass black holes are found in X-ray-emitting binary systems, where their mass can be determined from the dynamics of their companion stars. Models of stellar evolution have difficulty producing black holes in close binaries with masses more than ten times that of the Sun (>10; ref. 4), which is consistent with the fact that the most massive stellar black holes known so far all have masses within one standard deviation of 10. Here we report a mass of (15.65+/-1.45) for the black hole in the recently discovered system M 33 X-7, which is located in the nearby galaxy Messier 33 (M 33) and is the only known black hole that is in an eclipsing binary. To produce such a massive black hole, the progenitor star must have retained much of its outer envelope until after helium fusion in the core was completed. On the other hand, in order for the black hole to be in its present 3.45-day orbit about its (70.0+/-6.9) companion, there must have been a `common envelope' phase of evolution in which a significant amount of mass was lost from the system. We find that the common envelope phase could not have occurred in M 33 X-7 unless the amount of mass lost from the progenitor during its evolution was an order of magnitude less than what is usually assumed in evolutionary models of massive stars.

  14. A comprehensive analysis and functional characterization of naturally occurring non-synonymous variants of nuclear receptor PXR.

    PubMed

    Rana, Manjul; Devi, Suneeta; Gourinath, Samudrala; Goswami, Ravinder; Tyagi, Rakesh K

    2016-09-01

    Pregnane & Xenobiotic Receptor (PXR) acts as a xenosensing transcriptional regulator of many drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters of the 'detoxification machinery' that coordinate in elimination of xenobiotics and endobiotics from the cellular milieu. It is an accepted view that some individuals or specific populations display considerable differences in their ability to metabolize different drugs, dietary constituents, herbals etc. In this context we speculated that polymorphisms in PXR gene might contribute to variability in cytochrome P450 (CYP450) metabolizing enzymes of phase I, drug metabolizing components of phase II and efflux components of the detoxification machinery. Therefore, in this study, we have undertaken a comprehensive functional analysis of seventeen naturally occurring non-synonymous variants of human PXR. When compared, we observed that some of the PXR SNP variants exhibit distinct functional and dynamic responses on parameters which included transcriptional function, sub-cellular localization, mitotic chromatin binding, DNA-binding properties and other molecular interactions. One of the unique SNP located within the DNA-binding domain of PXR was found to be functionally null and distinct on other parameters. Similarly, some of the non-synonymous SNPs in PXR imparted reduced transactivation function as compared to wild type PXR. Interestingly, PXR is reported to be a mitotic chromatin binding protein and such an association has been correlated to an emerging concept of 'transcription memory' and altered transcription output. In view of the observations made herein our data suggest that some of the natural PXR variants may have adverse physiological consequences owing to its influence on the expression levels and functional output of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. The present study is expected to explain not only the observed inter-individual responses to different drugs but may also highlight the mechanistic details and

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: M33 HII regions SED (Relano+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Relano, M.; Verley, S.; Perez, I.; Kramer, C.; Calzetti, D.; Xilouris, E. M.; Boquien, M.; Abreu-Vicente, J.; Combes, F.; Israel, F.; Tabatabaei, F. S.; Braine, J.; Buchbender, C.; Gonzalez, M.; Gratier, P.; Lord, S.; Mookerjea, B.; Quintana-Lacaci, G.; van der Werf, P.

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the continuum UV emission of M 33, we used the data from GALEX, in particular the data distributed by de Paz et al. (2007, Cat. J/ApJS/173/185). To trace the ionised gas, we used the narrow-line Hα image of M 33 obtained by Greenawalt (1998, Ph.D. Thesis, New Mexico state University). Dust emission can be investigated through the mid-IR (MIR) and FIR data of M 33 obtained with the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) and Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS). (3 data files).

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE MOST LUMINOUS STAR IN M33: A SUPER SYMBIOTIC BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Mikołajewska, Joanna; Iłkiewicz, Krystian; Caldwell, Nelson; Shara, Michael M.

    2015-01-30

    We present the first spectrum of the most luminous infrared star in M33, and use it to demonstrate that the object is almost certainly a binary composed of a massive O star and a dust-enshrouded red hypergiant. This is the most luminous symbiotic binary ever discovered. Its radial velocity is an excellent match to that of the hydrogen gas in the disk of M33, supporting our interpretation that it is a very young and massive binary star.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Deep XMM-Newton survey of M33 (Williams+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, B. F.; Wold, B.; Haberl, F.; Garofali, K.; Blair, W. P.; Gaetz, T. J.; Kuntz, K. D.; Long, K. S.; Pannuti, T. G.; Pietsch, W.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Winkler, P. F.

    2015-07-01

    To produce an M33 catalog, we have used data of several newly observed XMM-Newton fields in M33 and archival observations of an eighth field (PI: Pietsch; from 2010-01-07 to 2010-02-24). The observation dates for the seven new data fields ranged from 2010 July 09 to August 15 and from 2012 January 10 to January 12. (2 data files).

  18. Activation of alpha6-containing GABAA receptors by pentobarbital occurs through a different mechanism than activation by GABA.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Matthew T; Fisher, Janet L

    2010-03-01

    The GABA(A) receptors are ligand-gated chloride channels which are the targets for many clinically used sedatives, including the barbiturates. The barbiturate pentobarbital acts through multiple sites on the GABA(A) receptor. At low concentrations (muM), it acts as a positive allosteric modulator while at higher concentrations it can directly activate the receptor. This agonist action is influenced by the subunit composition of the receptor, and pentobarbital is a more effective agonist than GABA only at receptors containing an alpha6 subunit. The conformational change that translates GABA binding into channel opening is known to involve a lysine residue located in an extracellular domain between the 2nd and 3rd transmembrane domains. Mutations of this residue disrupt activation of the channel by GABA and have been linked to inherited epilepsy. Pentobarbital binds to the receptor at a different agonist site than GABA, but could use a common signal transduction mechanism to gate the channel. To address this question, we compared the effect of a mutating the homologous lysine residue in the alpha1 or alpha6 subunits (K278 or K277, respectively) to methionine on direct activation of recombinant GABA(A) receptors by GABA or pentobarbital. We found that this mutation reduced GABA sensitivity for both alpha1 and alpha6 subunits, but affected pentobarbital sensitivity only for the alpha1 subunit. This suggests that pentobarbital acts through a distinct signal transduction pathway at the alpha6 subunit, which may account for its greater efficacy compared to GABA at receptors containing this subunit. PMID:20109529

  19. AN UPDATED CATALOG OF M33 CLUSTERS AND CANDIDATES: UBVRI PHOTOMETRY AND SOME STATISTICAL RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jun

    2012-08-15

    We present UBVRI photometry for 392 star clusters and candidates in the field of M33, which are selected from the most recent star cluster catalog. In this catalog, the authors listed star clusters' parameters such as cluster positions, magnitudes, colors in the UBVRIJHK{sub s} filters, and so on. However, a large fraction of objects in this catalog do not have previously published photometry. Photometry is performed using archival images from the Local Group Galaxies Survey, which covers 0.8 deg{sup 2} along the major axis of M33. Detailed comparisons show that, in general, our photometry is consistent with previous measurements. Positions (right ascension and declination) for some clusters are corrected here. Combined with previous literature, ours constitute a large sample of M33 star clusters. Based on this cluster sample, we present some statistical results: none of the youngest M33 clusters ({approx}10{sup 7} yr) have masses approaching 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} ; roughly half the star clusters are consistent with the 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} mass models; the continuous distribution of star clusters along the model line indicates that M33 star clusters have been formed continuously from the epoch of the first star cluster formation until recent times; and there are {approx}50 star clusters which are overlapped with the Galactic globular clusters on the color-color diagram, and these clusters are old globular cluster candidates in M33.

  20. Naturally-Occurring Glucosinolates, Glucoraphanin and Glucoerucin, are Antagonists to Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor as Their Chemopreventive Potency.

    PubMed

    Abdull Razis, Ahmad Faizal; Noor, Noramaliza Mohd

    2015-01-01

    As a cytosolic transcription factor, the aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor is involved in several patho- physiological events leading to immunosuppression and cancer; hence antagonists of the Ah receptor may possess chemoprevention properties. It is known to modulate carcinogen-metabolising enzymes, for instance the CYP1 family of cytochromes P450 and quinone reductase, both important in the biotransformation of many chemical carcinogens via regulating phase I and phase II enzyme systems. Utilising chemically-activated luciferase expression (CALUX) assay it was revealed that intact glucosinolates, glucoraphanin and glucoerucin, isolated from Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala sabellica and Eruca sativa ripe seeds, respectively, are such antagonists. Both glucosinolates were poor ligands for the Ah receptor; however, they effectively antagonised activation of the receptor by the avid ligand benzo[a]pyrene. Indeed, intact glucosinolate glucoraphanin was a more potent antagonist to the receptor than glucoerucin. It can be concluded that both glucosinolates effectively act as antagonists for the Ah receptor, and this may contribute to their established chemoprevention potency. PMID:26320454

  1. Activation and desensitization of peripheral muscle and neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by selected, naturally-occurring pyridine alkaloids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Teratogenic alkaloids can cause developmental defects due to inhibition of fetal movement that results from desensitization of fetal muscletype nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We investigated the ability of two known teratogens, the piperidinyl-pyridine anabasine and its 1,2-dehydropiper...

  2. A soluble class II cytokine receptor, IL-22RA2, is a naturally occurring IL-22 antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenfeng; Presnell, Scott R.; Parrish-Novak, Julia; Kindsvogel, Wayne; Jaspers, Steve; Chen, Zhi; Dillon, Stacey R.; Gao, Zeren; Gilbert, Teresa; Madden, Karen; Schlutsmeyer, Stacy; Yao, Lena; Whitmore, Theodore E.; Chandrasekher, Yasmin; Grant, Francis J.; Maurer, Mark; Jelinek, Laura; Storey, Harold; Brender, Ty; Hammond, Angie; Topouzis, Stavros; Clegg, Christopher H.; Foster, Donald C.

    2001-01-01

    IL-22 is an IL-10 homologue that binds to and signals through the class II cytokine receptor heterodimer IL-22RA1/CRF2–4. IL-22 is produced by T cells and induces the production of acute-phase reactants in vitro and in vivo, suggesting its involvement in inflammation. Here we report the identification of a class II cytokine receptor designated IL-22RA2 (IL-22 receptor-α 2) that appears to be a naturally expressed soluble receptor. IL-22RA2 shares amino acid sequence homology with IL-22RA1 (also known as IL-22R, zcytor11, and CRF2–9) and is physically adjacent to IL-20Rα and IFN-γR1 on chromosome 6q23.3–24.2. We demonstrate that IL-22RA2 binds specifically to IL-22 and neutralizes IL-22-induced proliferation of BaF3 cells expressing IL-22 receptor subunits. IL-22RA2 mRNA is highly expressed in placenta and spleen by Northern blotting. PCR analysis using RNA from various tissues and cell lines showed that IL-22RA2 was expressed in a range of tissues, including those in the digestive, female reproductive, and immune systems. In situ hybridization revealed the dominant cell types expressing IL-22RA2 were mononuclear cells and epithelium. Because IL-22 induces the expression of acute phase reactants, IL-22RA2 may play an important role as an IL-22 antagonist in the regulation of inflammatory responses. PMID:11481447

  3. THE M33 GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM WITH PAndAS DATA: THE LAST OUTER HALO CLUSTER?

    SciTech Connect

    Cockcroft, Robert; Harris, William E.; Ferguson, Annette M. N. E-mail: harris@physics.mcmaster.ca

    2011-04-01

    We use CFHT/MegaCam data to search for outer halo star clusters in M33 as part of the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey. This work extends previous studies out to a projected radius of 50 kpc and covers over 40 deg{sup 2}. We find only one new unambiguous star cluster in addition to the five previously known in the M33 outer halo (10 kpc {<=} r {<=} 50 kpc). Although we identify 2440 cluster candidates of various degrees of confidence from our objective image search procedure, almost all of these are likely background contaminants, mostly faint unresolved galaxies. We measure the luminosity, color, and structural parameters of the new cluster in addition to the five previously known outer halo clusters. At a projected radius of 22 kpc, the new cluster is slightly smaller, fainter, and redder than all but one of the other outer halo clusters, and has g' {approx} 19.9, (g' - i') {approx} 0.6, concentration parameter c {approx} 1.0, a core radius r{sub c} {approx} 3.5 pc, and a half-light radius r{sub h} {approx} 5.5 pc. For M33 to have so few outer halo clusters compared to M31 suggests either tidal stripping of M33's outer halo clusters by M31, or a very different, much calmer accretion history of M33.

  4. Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis of Two-Dimensional Nanomaterials Undergoes Flat Vesiculation and Occurs by Revolution and Self-Rotation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jian; Chen, Pengyu; Liang, Junshi; Guo, Ruohai; Yan, Li-Tang

    2016-01-26

    Two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene and transitional metal dichalcogenide nanosheets, are promising materials for the development of antimicrobial surfaces and the nanocarriers for intracellular therapy. Understanding cell interaction with these emerging materials is an urgently important issue to promoting their wide applications. Experimental studies suggest that two-dimensional nanomaterials enter cells mainly through receptor-mediated endocytosis. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms and kinetic pathways of such processes remain unknown. Here, we combine computer simulations and theoretical derivation of the energy within the system to show that the receptor-mediated transport of two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene nanosheet across model lipid membrane, experiences a flat vesiculation event governed by the receptor density and membrane tension. The graphene nanosheet is found to undergo revolution relative to the membrane and, particularly, unique self-rotation around its normal during membrane wrapping. We derive explicit expressions for the formation of the flat vesiculation, which reveals that the flat vesiculation event can be fundamentally dominated by a dimensionless parameter and a defined relationship determined by complicated energy contributions. The mechanism offers an essential understanding on the cellular internalization and cytotoxicity of the emerging two-dimensional nanomaterials. PMID:26741298

  5. Age and Mass Estimates for 41 Star Clusters in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Zhou, Xu; Chen, Jian-Sheng

    2004-04-01

    In this second paper of our series, we estimate the age of 41 star clusters, which were detected by Melnick & D'odorico in the nearby spiral galaxy M33, by comparing the integrated photometric measurements with theoretical stellar population synthesis models of Bruzual & Charlot. Also, we calculate the mass of these star clusters using the theoretical M/L_V ratio. The results show that, these star clusters formed continuously in M33 from ˜ 7× 106 -- 1010 years and have masses between ˜ 103 and 2 ×106 M⊙. M33 frames were observed as a part of the BATC Multicolor Survey of the sky in 13 intermediate-band filters from 3800 to 10 000 Å. The relation between age and mass confirms that the sample star cluster masses systematically decrease from the oldest to the youngest.

  6. Time variability of the X-ray sources in M33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peres, G.; Reale, F.; Collura, A.; Fabbiano, G.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a variability study of the X-ray sources detected by the Einstein Observatory in the galaxy M33 are reported. Two of the 15 known sources are variable above the 99.73 percent confidence level. The light curve of one of these sources, M33 X-7, exhibits a variability pattern of high and low states, suggesting an eclipsing binary X-ray source. Such a finding would be the first identification of a close accreting binary system with an X-ray source in an external galaxy other than the Magellanic Clouds. The data suggest a binary period of 1.7857 day and an eclipse duration of about 0.4 day. The nuclear source M33 X-8 varies only in the softest part of the spectrum. The observations suggest a rapid variability and show a rapid flare with a rise time shorter than three days together with longer timescale variability.

  7. M33: A Close Neighbor Reveals its True Size and Splendor (3-color composite)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    One of our closest galactic neighbors shows its awesome beauty in this new image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. M33, also known as the Triangulum Galaxy, is a member of what's known as our Local Group of galaxies. Along with our own Milky Way, this group travels together in the universe, as they are gravitationally bound. In fact, M33 is one of the few galaxies that is moving toward the Milky Way despite the fact that space itself is expanding, causing most galaxies in the universe to grow farther and farther apart.

    When viewed with Spitzer's infrared eyes, this elegant spiral galaxy sparkles with color and detail. Stars appear as glistening blue gems (several of which are actually foreground stars in our own galaxy), while dust rich in organic molecules glows green. The diffuse orange-red glowing areas indicate star-forming regions, while small red flecks outside the spiral disk of M33 are most likely distant background galaxies. But not only is this new image beautiful, it also shows M33 to be surprising large bigger than its visible-light appearance would suggest. With its ability to detect cold, dark dust, Spitzer can see emission from cooler material well beyond the visible range of M33's disk. Exactly how this cold material moved outward from the galaxy is still a mystery, but winds from giant stars or supernovas may be responsible.

    M33 is located about 2.9 million light-years away in the constellation Triangulum. This is a three-color composite image showing infrared observations from two of Spitzer instruments. Blue represents combined 3.6- and 4.5-micron light and green shows light of 8 microns, both captured by Spitzer's infrared array camera. Red is 24-micron light detected by Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer.

  8. Mutant forms of tumour necrosis factor receptor I that occur in TNF-receptor-associated periodic syndrome retain signalling functions but show abnormal behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Ian; Radford, Paul M; Draper-Morgan, Kelly-Ann; McIntosh, Richard; Bainbridge, Susan; Dickinson, Peter; Jamhawi, Lama; Sansaridis, Marios; Huggins, Mary L; Tighe, Patrick J; Powell, Richard J

    2004-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is a hereditary autoinflammatory disorder involving autosomal-dominant missense mutations in TNF receptor superfamily 1A (TNFRSF1A) ectodomains. To elucidate the molecular effects of TRAPS-related mutations, we transfected HEK-293 cells to produce lines stably expressing high levels of either wild-type (WT) or single mutant recombinant forms of TNFRSF1A. Mutants with single amino acid substitutions in the first cysteine-rich domain (CRD1) were produced both as full-length receptor proteins and as truncated forms lacking the cytoplasmic signalling domain (Δsig). High-level expression of either WT or mutant full-length TNFRSF1A spontaneously induced apoptosis and interleukin-8 production, indicating that the mutations in CRD1 did not abrogate signalling. Consistent with this, WT and mutant full-length TNFRSF1A formed cytoplasmic aggregates that co-localized with ubiquitin and chaperones, and with the signal transducer TRADD, but not with the inhibitor, silencer of death domain (SODD). Furthermore, as expected, WT and mutant Δsig forms of TNFRSF1A did not induce apoptosis or interleukin-8 production. However, whereas the WT full-length TNFRSF1A was expressed both in the cytoplasm and on the cell surface, the mutant receptors showed strong cytoplasmic expression but reduced cell-surface expression. The WT and mutant Δsig forms of TNFRSF1A were all expressed at the cell surface, but a proportion of the mutant receptors were also retained in the cytoplasm and co-localized with BiP. Furthermore, the mutant forms of surface-expressed Δsig TNFRSF1A were defective in binding TNF-α. We conclude that TRAPS-related CRD1 mutants of TNFRSF1A possess signalling properties associated with the cytoplasmic death domain, but other behavioural features of the mutant receptors are abnormal, including intracellular trafficking and TNF binding. PMID:15312137

  9. Cellular uptake of the antitumor agent Dp44mT occurs via a carrier/receptor-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Merlot, Angelica M; Pantarat, Namfon; Menezes, Sharleen V; Sahni, Sumit; Richardson, Des R; Kalinowski, Danuta S

    2013-12-01

    The chelator di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT) shows potent and selective anticancer and antimetastatic activity. However, the mechanism by which it is initially transported into cells to induce cytotoxicity is unknown. Hence, the current investigation examined the cellular uptake of ¹⁴C-Dp44mT relative to two structurally related ligands, namely the aroylhydrazone ¹⁴C-pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone (¹⁴C-PIH) and the thiosemicarbazone (¹⁴C-2-benzoylpyridine 4-ethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (¹⁴C-Bp4eT). In marked contrast to the cellular uptake of ¹⁴C-PIH and ¹⁴C-Bp4eT, which were linear as a function of concentration, ¹⁴C-Dp44mT uptake was saturable using SK-N-MC neuroepithelioma cells (Bmax, 4.28 × 10⁷ molecules of chelator/cell; and Kd, 2.45 μM). Together with the fact that ¹⁴C-Dp44mT uptake was temperature-dependent and significantly (P < 0.01) decreased by competing unlabeled Dp44mT, these observations indicated a saturable transport mechanism consistent with carrier/receptor-mediated transport. Other unlabeled ligands that shared the saturated N4 structural moiety with Dp44mT significantly (P < 0.01) inhibited ¹⁴C-Dp44mT uptake, illustrating its importance for carrier/receptor recognition. Nevertheless, unlabeled Dp44mT most markedly decreased (¹⁴C-Dp44mT uptake, demonstrating that the putative carrier/receptor shows high selectivity for Dp44mT. Interestingly, in contrast to ¹⁴C-Dp44mT, uptake of its Fe complex [Fe(¹⁴C-Dp44mT)₂] was not saturable as a function of concentration and was much greater than the ligand alone, indicating an alternate mode of transport. Studies examining the tissue distribution of ¹⁴C-Dp44mT injected intravenously into a mouse tumor model demonstrated the ¹⁴C label was primarily identified in the excretory system. Collectively, these findings examining the mechanism of Dp44mT uptake and its distribution and excretion have clinical implications for its

  10. Identification and pharmacological analyses of eight naturally occurring caprine melanocortin-1 receptor mutations in three different goat breeds.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Qi; Chai, Jin; Chen, Mingxin; Tao, Ya-Xiong

    2016-09-01

    The melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) belongs to the family of seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors and plays a central role in animal coat color. We have sequenced the full coding region of 954bp of the MC1R gene in 72 goats of three breeds with different coat colors and identified five missense mutations (K226E, F250V, G255D, V265I, and C267W) and one silent mutation (A61A), among which two haplotypes with complete linkage disequilibrium (A61A and F250V, G255D and V265I) were found. We performed detailed functional studies on the six single and two double mutations in transiently transfected HEK293T cells. We found that none of the mutants had decreased cell surface expression. However, all the mutants except A61A had decreased constitutive activities in the cAMP pathway. Five mutations (F250V, G255D, G267W, A61A/F250V, G255D/V265I) exhibited significant defects in ligand binding and consequent agonist-induced cAMP signaling and ERK1/2 activation. Additionally, K226E, with normal ligand binding affinity and cAMP signaling, showed a significant defect in ERK1/2 activation, exhibiting biased signaling. Co-expression studies showed that the five defective mutants did not affect wild-type MC1R signaling, hence they were not dominant negative. In summary, we provided detailed data of these goat MC1R mutations leading to a better understanding of the role of MC1R mutation and coat color in goats. PMID:27229376

  11. The conjugated linoleic acid isomer trans-9,trans-11 is a dietary occurring agonist of liver X receptor {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, Josef; Liebisch, Gerhard; Patsch, Wolfgang; Schmitz, Gerd

    2009-10-30

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers are dietary fatty acids that modulate gene expression in many cell types. We have previously reported that specifically trans-9,trans-11 (t9,t11)-CLA induces expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism of human macrophages. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this transcriptional activation, we asked whether t9,t11-CLA affects activity of liver X receptor (LXR) {alpha}, a major regulator of macrophage lipid metabolism. Here we show that t9,t11-CLA is a regulator of LXR{alpha}. We further demonstrate that the CLA isomer induces expression of direct LXR{alpha} target genes in human primary macrophages. Knockdown of LXR{alpha} with RNA interference in THP-1 cells inhibited t9,t11-CLA mediated activation of LXR{alpha} including its target genes. To evaluate the effective concentration range of t9,t11-CLA, human primary macrophages were treated with various doses of CLA and well known natural and synthetic LXR agonists and mRNA expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 was analyzed. Incubation of human macrophages with 10 {mu}M t9,t11-CLA led to a significant modulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1 transcription and caused enhanced cholesterol efflux to high density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein AI. In summary, these data show that t9,t11-CLA is an agonist of LXR{alpha} in human macrophages and that its effects on macrophage lipid metabolism can be attributed to transcriptional regulations associated with this nuclear receptor.

  12. M33: A Close Neighbor Reveals its True Size and Splendor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    One of our closest galactic neighbors shows its awesome beauty in this new image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. M33, also known as the Triangulum Galaxy, is a member of what's known as our Local Group of galaxies. Along with our own Milky Way, this group travels together in the universe, as they are gravitationally bound. In fact, M33 is one of the few galaxies that is moving toward the Milky Way despite the fact that space itself is expanding, causing most galaxies in the universe to grow farther and farther apart.

    When viewed with Spitzer's infrared eyes, this elegant spiral galaxy sparkles with color and detail. Stars appear as glistening blue gems (many of which are actually foreground stars in our own galaxy), while dust in the spiral disk of the galaxy glows pink and red. But not only is this new image beautiful, it also shows M33 to be surprising large bigger than its visible-light appearance would suggest. With its ability to detect cold, dark dust, Spitzer can see emission from cooler material well beyond the visible range of M33's disk. Exactly how this cold material moved outward from the galaxy is still a mystery, but winds from giant stars or supernovas may be responsible.

    M33 is located about 2.9 million light-years away in the constellation Triangulum. This composite image was taken by Spitzer's infrared array camera. The color blue indicates infrared light of 3.6 microns, green shows 4.5-micron light, and red 8.0 microns.

  13. Platelet Antistaphylococcal Responses Occur through P2X1 and P2Y12 Receptor-Induced Activation and Kinocidin Release▿

    PubMed Central

    Trier, Darin A.; Gank, Kimberly D.; Kupferwasser, Deborah; Yount, Nannette Y.; French, William J.; Michelson, Alan D.; Kupferwasser, Leon I.; Xiong, Yan Q.; Bayer, Arnold S.; Yeaman, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Platelets (PLTs) act in antimicrobial host defense by releasing PLT microbicidal proteins (PMPs) or PLT kinocidins (PKs). Receptors mediating staphylocidal efficacy and PMP or PK release versus isogenic PMP-susceptible (ISP479C) and -resistant (ISP479R) Staphylococcus aureus strains were examined in vitro. Isolated PLTs were incubated with ISP479C or ISP479R (PLT/S. aureus ratio range, 1:1 to 10,000:1) in the presence or absence of a panel of PLT inhibitors, including P2X and P2Y receptor antagonists of increasingly narrow specificity, and PLT adhesion receptors (CD41, CD42b, and CD62P). PLT-to-S. aureus exposure ratios of ≥10:1 yielded significant reductions in the viability of both strains. Results from reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography indicated that staphylocidal PLT releasates contained PMPs and PKs. At ratios below 10:1, the PLT antistaphylococcal efficacy relative to the intrinsic S. aureus PMP-susceptible or -resistant phenotype diminished. Apyrase (an agent of ADP degradation), suramin (a general P2 receptor antagonist), pyridoxal 5′-phosphonucleotide derivative (a specific P2X1 antagonist), and cangrelor (a specific P2Y12 antagonist) mitigated the PLT staphylocidal response against both strains, correlating with reduced levels of PMP and PK release. Specific inhibition occurred in the presence and absence of homologous plasma. The antagonism of the thromboxane A2, cyclooxygenase-1/cyclooxygenase-2, or phospholipase C pathway or the hindrance of surface adhesion receptors failed to impede PLT anti-S. aureus responses. These results suggest a multifactorial PLT anti-S. aureus response mechanism involving (i) a PLT-to-S. aureus ratio sufficient for activation; (ii) the ensuing degranulation of PMPs, PKs, ADP, and/or ATP; (iii) the activation of P2X1/P2Y12 receptors on adjacent PLTs; and (iv) the recursive amplification of PMP and PK release from these PLTs. PMID:18824536

  14. Activation and Desensitization of Peripheral Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors by Selected, Naturally-Occurring Pyridine Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Green, Benedict T; Lee, Stephen T; Welch, Kevin D; Cook, Daniel; Kem, William R

    2016-01-01

    Teratogenic alkaloids can cause developmental defects due to the inhibition of fetal movement that results from desensitization of fetal muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We investigated the ability of two known teratogens, the piperidinyl-pyridine anabasine and its 1,2-dehydropiperidinyl analog anabaseine, to activate and desensitize peripheral nAChRs expressed in TE-671 and SH-SY5Y cells. Activation-concentration response curves for each alkaloid were obtained in the same multi-well plate. To measure rapid desensitization, cells were first exposed to five potentially-desensitizing concentrations of each alkaloid in log10 molar increments from 10 nM to 100 µM and then to a fixed concentration of acetylcholine (ACh), which alone produces near-maximal activation. The fifty percent desensitization concentration (DC50) was calculated from the alkaloid concentration-ACh response curve. Agonist fast desensitization potency was predicted by the agonist potency measured in the initial response. Anabaseine was a more potent desensitizer than anabasine. Relative to anabaseine, nicotine was more potent to autonomic nAChRs, but less potent to the fetal neuromuscular nAChRs. Our experiments have demonstrated that anabaseine is more effective at desensitizing fetal muscle-type nAChRs than anabasine or nicotine and, thus, it is predicted to be more teratogenic. PMID:27384586

  15. Activation and Desensitization of Peripheral Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors by Selected, Naturally-Occurring Pyridine Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Green, Benedict T.; Lee, Stephen T.; Welch, Kevin D.; Cook, Daniel; Kem, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Teratogenic alkaloids can cause developmental defects due to the inhibition of fetal movement that results from desensitization of fetal muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We investigated the ability of two known teratogens, the piperidinyl-pyridine anabasine and its 1,2-dehydropiperidinyl analog anabaseine, to activate and desensitize peripheral nAChRs expressed in TE-671 and SH-SY5Y cells. Activation-concentration response curves for each alkaloid were obtained in the same multi-well plate. To measure rapid desensitization, cells were first exposed to five potentially-desensitizing concentrations of each alkaloid in log10 molar increments from 10 nM to 100 µM and then to a fixed concentration of acetylcholine (ACh), which alone produces near-maximal activation. The fifty percent desensitization concentration (DC50) was calculated from the alkaloid concentration-ACh response curve. Agonist fast desensitization potency was predicted by the agonist potency measured in the initial response. Anabaseine was a more potent desensitizer than anabasine. Relative to anabaseine, nicotine was more potent to autonomic nAChRs, but less potent to the fetal neuromuscular nAChRs. Our experiments have demonstrated that anabaseine is more effective at desensitizing fetal muscle-type nAChRs than anabasine or nicotine and, thus, it is predicted to be more teratogenic. PMID:27384586

  16. Death Receptor-Induced Apoptosis Signalling Regulation by Ezrin Is Cell Type Dependent and Occurs in a DISC-Independent Manner in Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iessi, Elisabetta; Zischler, Luciana; Etringer, Aurélie; Bergeret, Marion; Morlé, Aymeric; Jacquemin, Guillaume; Morizot, Alexandre; Shirley, Sarah; Lalaoui, Najoua; Elifio-Esposito, Selene L.; Fais, Stefano; Garrido, Carmen; Solary, Eric; Micheau, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Ezrin belongs to the ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) protein family and has been demonstrated to regulate early steps of Fas receptor signalling in lymphoid cells, but its contribution to TRAIL-induced cell death regulation in adherent cancer cells remains unknown. In this study we report that regulation of FasL and TRAIL-induced cell death by ezrin is cell type dependant. Ezrin is a positive regulator of apoptosis in T-lymphoma cell line Jurkat, but a negative regulator in colon cancer cells. Using ezrin phosphorylation or actin-binding mutants, we provide evidence that negative regulation of death receptor-induced apoptosis by ezrin occurs in a cytoskeleton- and DISC-independent manner, in colon cancer cells. Remarkably, inhibition of apoptosis induced by these ligands was found to be tightly associated with regulation of ezrin phosphorylation on serine 66, the tumor suppressor gene WWOX and activation of PKA. Deficiency in WWOX expression in the liver cancer SK-HEP1 or the pancreatic Mia PaCa-2 cell lines as well as WWOX silencing or modulation of PKA activation by pharmacological regulators, in the colon cancer cell line SW480, abrogated regulation of TRAIL signalling by ezrin. Altogether our results show that death receptor pro-apoptotic signalling regulation by ezrin can occur downstream of the DISC in colon cancer cells. PMID:26010871

  17. Dense Gas and Star Formation Along the Major Axis of M33 (HERM33ES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchbender, C.; Kramer, C.; Rosolowsky, E.

    2011-05-01

    Using the IRAM 30m telescope we observed and detected HCN and HCO^+ 1-0 towards 6 positions along the major axis of the nearby spiral galaxy M33, at radial distances of up to 3.4 kpc. M33, viewed at an intermediate inclination from a distance of 840 kpc, is an ideal source to study these molecules in an environment not affected by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Unlike the Galaxy, which is seen edge-on, M33's inclination of 56 degrees allows to determine precise positions and velocities inside its large scale disk. Furthermore, at this distance M33 is still near enough that individual giant molecular clouds (GMCs) can be resolved by the 28" beam of the IRAM 30m at the frequencies of HCN and HCO^+, which translates to 114 pc spatial resolution. HCN, HCO^+, and 13CO were observed at an RMS level of about 0.7 mK at 2 km/s resolution. Additionally, the frequencies of the isotopmeres of HCN and HCO^+, HNC and HOC^+ also fall within the bandwidth of our observation setup. By stacking all observed spectra, paying the price of losing the positional information, we could lower the baseline RMS even further to 0.27 mK and detected HNC and HOC^+ as well as CCH at a very low level of ≈ 3 σ. Having high critical densities they trace the dense gas and thus also star formation (SF). HCN shows a tight correlation with SF that holds for galactic GMCs to the nuclear environment of distant star-burst (SB) galaxies as has been shown by Gao & Solomon 2004 and Wu et al. 2005. Furthermore, the ratio of HCO^+ to HCN is a popular tool in extra-galactic astronomy to investigate the predominant radiation mechanism (X-Ray - AGN , UV - SB) in galactic nuclei. Interestingly, we find HCN-to-HCO^+ ratios in the range of 0.7-2.8. This includes typical values found towards AGN and SB dominated galactic nuclei suggesting that on local scale this interpretation does not hold, since M33 is neither dominated by intense X-ray radiation nor by the influence of a nearby AGN. These observations are

  18. NRO M33 All-Disk Survey of Giant Molecular Clouds (NRO MAGiC): Properties of Giant Molecular Clouds in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onodera, S.; Kuno, N.; Tosaki, T.; Muraoka, K.; Miura, R.; Kohno, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Sawada, T.; Komugi, S.; Kaneko, H.; Hirota, A.; Kawabe, R.

    2013-10-01

    We present the results of the CO-line mapping observations of the local group galaxy M33 as part of the NRO legacy project, NRO M33 All-Disk Survey of Giant Molecular Clouds (NRO MAGiC). The observations were performed using the 45-m telescope of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory and the ASTE 10-m telescope. We find that the star formation rate have very wide range of 109-106 M⊙ yr-1pc-2 among GMCs, while 12CO(J=1-0) intensity is nearly constant. This indicates that the Schmidt-Kenicutt law becomes invalid for the scale of GMCs (˜80pc). We identify 74 major GMCs in the observing field of ASTE from the 12CO(J=1-0) data, and detected 12CO(J=3-2) emission in 65 GMCs among them. We find that the correlation between the 12CO(J=3-2) intensity and the star formation rate still holds at the scale of GMCs. This result show that the star-forming activity is closely associated with warm and dense gases that are traced with the 12CO(J=3-2) line, even in the scale of GMCs. We also find that the GMCs with a high star-forming activity tend to show a high integrated intensity ratio R3-2/1-0. Moreover, we also observe a mass-dependent trend of R3-2/1-0 for the GMCs with a low star-forming activity. From these results, we speculate that the R3-2/1-0 values of the GMCs with a low star-forming activity mainly depend on the dense gas fraction and not on the temperature, and therefore, the dense gas fraction increases with the mass of GMCs, at least in the GMCs with a low star-forming activity.

  19. The Naturally Occurring Luteinizing Hormone Surge Is Diminished in Mice Lacking Estrogen Receptor Beta in the Ovary1

    PubMed Central

    Jayes, Friederike L.; Burns, Katherine A.; Rodriguez, Karina F.; Kissling, Grace E.; Korach, Kenneth S.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Female ESR2-null mice (betaERKO) display defects in ovarian function and are subfertile. Follicular maturation is impaired and explains smaller litters, but betaERKO also produce fewer litters, which may be partially due to inadequate ovulatory signals. To test this, the amplitude and timing of the naturally occurring luteinizing hormone (LH) surge was measured in individual intact betaERKO and wild-type (WT) mice. Vaginal cytology was evaluated daily, and blood samples were taken from mice in proestrus. The amplitude of the LH surge was severely blunted in betaERKO mice compared to WT, but pituitary LH levels revealed no differences. The betaERKO mice did not produce a preovulatory estradiol surge. To determine if the smaller LH surges and the reduced number of litters in betaERKO were due to the lack of ESR2 in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis or due to the absence of ESR2 in the ovary, ovaries were transplanted from WT into betaERKO mice and vice versa. The size of the LH surge was reduced only in mice lacking ESR2 within the ovary, and these mice had fewer litters. Fertility and size of the LH surge were rescued in betaERKO mice receiving a WT ovary. These data provide the first experimental evidence that the LH surge is impaired in betaERKO females and may contribute to their reduced fertility. ESR2 is not necessary within the pituitary and hypothalamus for the generation of a normal LH surge and for normal fertility, but ESR2 is essential within the ovary to provide proper signals. PMID:24337314

  20. STAR CLUSTERS IN M33: UPDATED UBVRI PHOTOMETRY, AGES, METALLICITIES, AND MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Zhou; De Grijs, Richard E-mail: grijs@pku.edu.cn

    2014-04-01

    The photometric characterization of M33 star clusters is far from complete. In this paper, we present homogeneous UBVRI photometry of 708 star clusters and cluster candidates in M33 based on archival images from the Local Group Galaxies Survey, which covers 0.8 deg{sup 2} along the galaxy's major axis. Our photometry includes 387, 563, 616, 580, and 478 objects in the UBVRI bands, respectively, of which 276, 405, 430, 457, and 363 do not have previously published UBVRI photometry. Our photometry is consistent with previous measurements (where available) in all filters. We adopted Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz photometry for complementary purposes, as well as Two Micron All Sky Survey near-infrared JHK photometry where available. We fitted the spectral-energy distributions of 671 star clusters and candidates to derive their ages, metallicities, and masses based on the updated PARSEC simple stellar populations synthesis models. The results of our χ{sup 2} minimization routines show that only 205 of the 671 clusters (31%) are older than 2 Gyr, which represents a much smaller fraction of the cluster population than that in M31 (56%), suggesting that M33 is dominated by young star clusters (<1 Gyr). We investigate the mass distributions of the star clusters—both open and globular clusters—in M33, M31, the Milky Way, and the Large Magellanic Cloud. Their mean values are log (M {sub cl}/M {sub ☉}) = 4.25, 5.43, 2.72, and 4.18, respectively. The fraction of open to globular clusters is highest in the Milky Way and lowest in M31. Our comparisons of the cluster ages, masses, and metallicities show that our results are basically in agreement with previous studies (where objects in common are available); differences can be traced back to differences in the models adopted, the fitting methods used, and stochastic sampling effects.

  1. The Early Spectral Evolution of the Classical Nova ASASSN-15th in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R. Mark; Neric, Marko; Darnley, Matt J.; Williams, Steven; Starrfield, Sumner; Woodward, Charles E.; Prieto, Jose Luis

    2016-06-01

    During the course of the All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) a new transient source designated ASASSN-15th was identified on images of the nearby galaxy M33 obtained with the 14 cm Brutus telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii on 2015 Dec 1.4 UT at V ~ 16.5 mag. Given the location of the transient in M33 and its apparent V magnitude at discovery, the implied absolute visual magnitude was about -8.5 mag suggesting that the transient was a new classical nova outburst in M33. Optical spectroscopy obtained by us on 2015 Dec 2.3 showed broad emission lines of Balmer, Fe II, and Na I D with P Cygni-type line profiles superposed on a blue continuum. The spectrum was consistent with a Fe II-type classical nova in M33 discovered early in the outburst. Subsequent spectra obtained by us on 2015 Dec 10.9 UT showed significant evolution since our first spectrum in that the deep P Cygni-type line profiles seen earlier were now extremely shallow or had almost completely disappeared with the emission component growing in strength. Additional emission lines from O I, Si II, and possibly He I were also present. We obtained optical spectroscopy of ASASSN-15th on 17 epochs between 2015 Dec 1 and 2016 Feb 11 UT with the 2.4 m Hiltner telescope (+OSMOS) of the MDM Observatory, the 2 m fully robotic Liverpool Telescope (+SPRAT), and the 2 x 8.4 m Large Binocular Telescope (+MODS). We will present our spectroscopy and discuss the early evolution of ASASSN-15th in the context of Galactic Fe II-class novae.

  2. THE DEGENERACY OF M33 MASS MODELING AND ITS PHYSICAL IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hague, P. R.; Wilkinson, M. I. E-mail: miw6@le.ac.uk

    2015-02-10

    The Local Group galaxy M33 exhibits a regular spiral structure and is close enough to permit high resolution analysis of its kinematics, making it an ideal candidate for rotation curve studies of its inner regions. Previous studies have claimed the galaxy has a dark matter halo with an Navarro-Frenk-White profile, based on statistical comparisons with a small number of other profiles. We apply a Bayesian method from our previous paper to place the dark matter density profile in the context of a continuous, and more general, parameter space. For a wide range of initial assumptions we find that models with inner log slope γ{sub in} < 0.9 are strongly excluded by the kinematics of the galaxy unless the mass-to-light ratio of the stellar components in the 3.6 μm band satisfies Y{sub 3.6} ≥ 2. Such a high Y{sub 3.6} is inconsistent with current modeling of the stellar population of M33. This suggests that M33 is a galaxy whose dark matter halo has not been significantly modified by feedback. We discuss possible explanations of this result, including ram pressure stripping during earlier interactions with M31.

  3. On the Neutral Hydrogen Filament Between M31 and M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockman, Felix J.; Free, N.; Shields, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    In 2004, Braun & Thilker (B&T) reported the detection of extremely faint 21cm HI emission at the level log10(NH)=17.0 that formed a partial bridge about 200 kpc in extent between M31 and M33. This has been interpreted as the neutral component of a WHIM filament, or the remnant of a past encounter between the two galaxies. B&T used data from the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, operated as an array of single dishes, to obtain the necessary sensitivity, but at the expense of angular resolution ( 45'). Subsequently, Putman et al (2009) have questioned the existence of this filament, noting its absence from the immediate vicinity of M33 at the level log10(NH) 18 in data from Arecibo. We have reobserved much of the region between M31 and M33 using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) at 9' resolution, with a 5-sigma sensitivity limit of log10(NHI) 18.0 and a few much deeper pointings. We detect HI lines consistent with the B&T results. In two locations the emission appears at log(NHI)>18.3, suggesting clumping in the otherwise diffuse gas. We estimate the mass of HI in the bridge, and show examples of the GBT's freedom from instrumental effects down to detection levels of log(NHI) 17.0. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under a cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  4. Spectroscopic study of formation, evolution and interaction of M31 and M33 with star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhou; Yang, Yanbin

    2016-02-01

    The recent studies show that the formation and evolution process of the nearby galaxies are still unclear. By using the Canada France Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) 3.6m telescope, the PanDAS shows complicated substructures (dwarf satellite galaxies, halo globular clusters, extended clusters, star streams, etc.) in the halo of M31 to ~150 kpc from the center of galaxy and M31-M33 interaction has been studied. In our work, we would like to investigate formation, evolution and interaction of M31 and M33, which are the nearest two spiral galaxies in Local Group. The star cluster systems of the two galaxies are good tracers to study the dynamics of the substructures and the interaction. Since 2010, the Xinglong 2.16m, Lijiang 2.4m and MMT 6.5m telescopes have been used for our spectroscopic observations. The radial velocities and Lick absorption-line indices can thus be measured with the spectroscopy and then ages, metallicities and masses of the star clusters can be fitted with the simple stellar population models. These parameters could be used as the input physical parameters for numerical simulations of M31-M33 interaction.

  5. Millimeter and submillimeter excess emission in M 33 revealed by Planck and LABOCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermelo, I.; Relaño, M.; Lisenfeld, U.; Verley, S.; Kramer, C.; Ruiz-Lara, T.; Boquien, M.; Xilouris, E. M.; Albrecht, M.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Previous studies have shown the existence of an excess of emission at submillimeter (submm) and millimeter (mm) wavelengths in the spectral energy distribution (SED) of many low-metallicity galaxies. The so-called "submm excess", whose origin remains unknown, challenges our understanding of the dust properties in low-metallicity environments. Aims: The goal of the present study is to model separately the emission from the star forming (SF) component and the emission from the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) in the nearby spiral galaxy M 33 in order to determine whether both components can be well fitted using radiation transfer models or whether there is an excess of submm emission associated with one or both of them. Methods: We decomposed the observed SED of M 33 into its SF and diffuse components. Mid-infrared (MIR) and far-infrared (FIR) fluxes were extracted from Spitzer and Herschel data. At submm and mm wavelengths, we used ground-based observations from APEX to measure the emission from the SF component and data from the Planck space telescope to estimate the diffuse emission. Both components were separately fitted using radiation transfer models based on standard dust properties (i.e., emissivity index β = 2) and a realistic geometry. The large number of previous studies helped us to estimate the thermal radio emission and to constrain an important part of the input parameters of the models. Both modeled SEDs were combined to build the global SED of M 33. In addition, the radiation field necessary to power the dust emission in our modeling was compared with observations from GALEX, Sloan, and Spitzer. Results: Our modeling is able to reproduce the observations at MIR and FIR wavelengths, but we found a strong excess of emission at submm and mm wavelengths where the model expectations severely underestimate the LABOCA and Planck fluxes. We also found that the ultraviolet (UV) radiation escaping the galaxy is 70% higher than the model predictions

  6. Cocaine-induced dendritic remodeling occurs in both D1 and D2 dopamine receptor-expressing neurons in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Liu, Nuyun; Lu, Kangrong; Zhang, Lei; Gu, Jingjing; Guo, Fukun; An, Shengli; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Lu

    2012-05-31

    Repeated exposure to cocaine can induce persistent alterations in the brain's reward system, including increases in the number of dendrites and spine density on medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). The structural remodeling of dendrites and spines in the NAc is thought to play a critical role in cocaine addiction. MSNs in the NAc can be classified by expression of either D1 or D2 dopamine receptors, which are localized to the direct and indirect pathway, respectively. It is unknown whether the dendritic changes induced by repeated cocaine treatment occur in MSNs of the direct or indirect pathway. Because the traditional Golgi-Cox impregnation of neurons precludes identifying particular subpopulations of MSNs, we performed dendritic morphology analysis after biocytin-labeling and Golgi-Cox impregnation. We found that the biocytin staining MSNs showed higher dendritic spine density and higher number of dendrites than that in Golgi impregnation group. In addition, we found that the increasing spine density induced by repeated cocaine treatment in female mice was higher than that in male mice. Next we used biocytin staining and dynorphin/D2 receptor colocalization to determine which cell type(s) displayed dendritic changes after repeated cocaine treatment. We found that cocaine-induced changes in dendritic parameters occurred in MSNs of both the direct (D1-expressing) and indirect (D2-expressing) pathways. PMID:22561554

  7. Giant Molecular Clouds in M33. I. BIMA All-Disk Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engargiola, G.; Plambeck, R. L.; Rosolowsky, E.; Blitz, L.

    2003-12-01

    We present the first interferometric 12CO (J=1-->0) map of the entire Hα disk of M33. The 13" diameter synthesized beam corresponds to a linear resolution of 50 pc, sufficient to distinguish individual giant molecular clouds (GMCs). From these data we generated a catalog of 148 GMCs with an expectation that no more than 15 of the sources are spurious. The catalog is complete down to GMC masses of 1.5×105Msolar and contains a total mass of 2.3×107Msolar. Single-dish observations of CO in selected fields imply that our survey detects ~50% of the CO flux, hence that the total molecular mass of M33 is 4.5×107Msolar, approximately 2% of the H I mass. The GMCs in our catalog are confined largely to the central region (R<4 kpc). They show a remarkable spatial and kinematic correlation with overdense H I filaments; the geometry suggests that the formation of GMCs follows that of the filaments. The GMCs exhibit a mass spectrum dN/dM~M-2.6+/-0.3, considerably steeper than that found in the Milky Way and in the LMC. Combined with the total mass, this steep function implies that the GMCs in M33 form with a characteristic mass of ~7×104 Msolar. More than 2/3 of the GMCs have associated H II regions, implying that the GMCs have a short quiescent period. Our results suggest the rapid assembly of molecular clouds from atomic gas, with prompt onset of massive star formation.

  8. Planetary nebulae search in the outskirts of M33: looking for the farthest candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galera Rosillo, Rebeca; Corradi, Romano L. M.; Mampaso Recio, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    The nearby disc galaxy M33 is one of the best laboratories for testing chemical evolution models in galaxies and for understanding disc formation mechanisms. In this galaxy, planetary nebulae (PNe) were previously extensively studied only within a galactocentric radius of 8 kpc.In the framework of a broad study of the population of PNe in Local Group disc galaxies, we present the results of a deep narrow-band imaging of the outer regions of M33, performed using the Wide Field Camera at the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT).The INT images were obtained in the narrow-band filters selecting the [OIII] 5007 Å and Hα 6563 Å lines, plus broad-band filters SDSS g and i. A photometric catalog of around 150000 sources covering a total area of 5 square degrees, and extending out to 2 deg (30 kpc at the adopted distance of 840 kpc) from the centre of the galaxy is presented.PNe candidates are selected in the [OIII]-g vs Hα-r colour-colour diagram as bright emitters in the narrowband filters. A number of candidates with similar colours to those of known PNe, and with an apparent [OIII] magnitude > 21 have been selected for future follow-up. Three of these have been already spectroscopically confirmed at the William Herschel Telescope (WHT).Our survey will improve the knowledge of the PNe population in the outskirts of M33, constraining the properties of its metal-poor halo and of the extended disc substructures that have been proposed to be related to a relatively recent interaction with M31.

  9. Evidence for temporal evolution in the M33 disc as traced by its star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, Michael A.; San Roman, Izaskun; Gallart, Carme; Sarajedini, Ata; Aparicio, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    We present precision radial velocities and stellar population parameters for 77 star clusters in the Local Group galaxy M33. Our Gran Telescopio de Canarias and William Herschel Telescope observations sample both young, massive clusters and known/candidate globular clusters (GCs), spanning ages ˜106-1010 yr, and metallicities, [M/H] ˜ -1.7 to solar. The cluster system exhibits an age-metallicity relation; the youngest clusters are the most metal rich. When compared to H I data, clusters with [M/H] ˜ -1.0 and younger than ˜4 Gyr are clearly identified as a disc population. The clusters show evidence for strong time evolution in the disc radial metallicity gradient (d[M/H]dt/dR = 0.03 dex kpc-1 Gyr-1). The oldest clusters have stronger, more negative gradients than the youngest clusters in M33. The clusters also show a clear age-velocity dispersion relation. The line-of-sight velocity dispersions of the clusters increases with age similar to Milky Way open clusters and stars. The general shape of the relation is reproduced by disc heating simulations, and the similarity between the relations in M33 and the Milky Way suggests that heating by substructure and cooling of the interstellar medium both play a role in shaping this relation. We identify 12 `classical' GCs, six of which are newly identified GC candidates. The GCs are more metal rich than Milky Way halo clusters, and show weak rotation. The inner (R < 4.5 kpc) GCs exhibit a steep radial metallicity gradient (d[M/H]/dR = -0.29 ± 0.11 dex kpc-1) and an exponential-like surface density profile. We argue that these inner GCs are thick disc rather than halo objects.

  10. Clouds of neutral hydrogen between M31 and M33 and around the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Spencer A.; Pisano, D. J.; Lockman, F. J.; McGaugh, S. S.; Shaya, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    Large spiral galaxies like our own Milky Way must acquire fresh gas to continue forming new stars. The gas that resides between galaxies may be a source of this material, but we know little about the gas’ structure or extent. I will present my thesis research, which attempts to answer these questions, based on our Green Bank Telescope (GBT) observations of the very faint M31-M33 neutral hydrogen (HI) stream that was first discovered a decade ago using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. Our spectral line observations have over five times higher spatial resolution and roughly three times higher velocity resolution than the Westerbork data. These are the most sensitive observations of the 21 cm line conducted with the GBT. I will discuss our observing and reduction techniques used to reach the sensitivities needed to study the HI stream in detail. We find that the gas is actually composed of small clouds only a few kiloparsecs in diameter. The kinematics of the clouds also suggests that they are associated with M31 and M33 and not each galaxy’s respective High Velocity Cloud (HVC) population. Most, if not all, of the clouds do not appear to have stars associated with them. Thus, we believe that these clouds are part of a condensing intergalactic filament and may be a source of future star formation for M31 and M33. In addition, I will briefly present my research on the High Velocity and Intermediate Velocity Clouds around our Milky Way using the Galactic All-Sky Survey (GASS) at 21 cm that was conducted with the Parkes 64m radio telescope. I will discuss the basic properties of this gas and some interesting features seen in the survey.

  11. OBJECT X: THE BRIGHTEST MID-INFRARED POINT SOURCE IN M33

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Rubab; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Bonanos, A. Z. E-mail: kstanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu E-mail: bonanos@astro.noa.gr

    2011-05-01

    We discuss the nature of the brightest mid-IR point source (which we dub Object X) in the nearby galaxy M33. Although multi-wavelength data on this object have existed in the literature for some time, it had not previously been recognized as the most luminous mid-IR object in M33 because it is entirely unremarkable in both optical and near-IR light. In the Local Group Galaxies Survey, Object X is a faint red source visible in VRI and H{alpha} but not U or B. It was easily seen at JHK{sub s} in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. It is the brightest point source in all four Spitzer IRAC bands and is also visible in the MIPS 24 {mu}m band. Its bolometric luminosity is {approx}5 x 10{sup 5} L{sub sun}. The source is optically variable on short timescales (tens of days) and is also slightly variable in the mid-IR, indicating that it is a star. Archival photographic plates (from 1949 and 1991) show no optical source, so the star has been obscured for at least half a century. Its properties are similar to those of the Galactic OH/IR star IRC+10420, which has a complex dusty circumstellar structure resulting from episodic low-velocity mass ejections. We propose that Object X is an M {approx}> 30 M{sub sun} evolved star obscured in its own dust ejected during episodic mass-loss events over at least {approx}half a century. It may emerge from its current ultra-short evolutionary phase as a hotter post-red-supergiant star analogous to M33 Var A. The existence and rarity of such objects can be an important probe of a very brief yet eventful stellar evolutionary phase.

  12. The star formation history in the far outer disc of M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Michael K.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Cole, A. A.; Ibata, R.; Irwin, M.; Lewis, G. F.; Smecker-Hane, T. A.; Tanvir, N. R.

    2011-01-01

    The outer regions of disc galaxies are becoming increasingly recognized as key testing sites for models of disc assembly and evolution. Important issues are the epoch at which the bulk of the stars in these regions formed and how discs grow radially over time. To address these issues, we use Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging to study the star formation history (SFH) of two fields at 9.1 and 11.6 kpc along M33's northern major axis. These fields lie at ˜ 4 and 5 V-band disc scalelengths and straddle the break in M33's surface brightness profile. The colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) reach the ancient main-sequence turn-off with a signal-to-noise ratio of ˜ 5. From detailed modelling of the CMDs, we find that the majority of stars in both fields combined formed at z < 1. The mean age in the inner field, S1, is ˜ 3 ± 1 Gyr and the mean metallicity is [M/H]˜- 0.5 ± 0.2 dex. The SFH of S1 unambiguously reveals how the inside-out growth previously measured for M33's inner disc out to ? extends out to the disc edge at ?. In comparison, the outer field, S2, is older (mean age ˜ 7 ± 2 Gyr), more metal-poor (mean [M/H]˜- 0.8 ± 0.3 dex), and contains ˜ 30 times less stellar mass. These results provide the most compelling evidence yet that M33's age gradient reverses at large radii near the disc break and that this reversal is accompanied by a break in stellar mass surface density. We discuss several possible interpretations of this behaviour including radial stellar mixing, warping of the gaseous disc, a change in star formation efficiency and a transition to another structural component. These results offer one of the most detailed views yet of the peripheral regions of any disc galaxy and provide a much needed observational constraint on the last major epoch of star formation in the outer disc.

  13. Positions and Spectral Energy Distributions of 41 Star Clusters in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Zhou, Xu; Chen, Jian-Sheng; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Zhao-Ji; Xue, Sui-Jian; Zhu, Jin

    2002-06-01

    We present accurate positions and multi-color photometry for 41 star clusters detected by Melnick & D'odorico in the nearby spiral galaxy M33 as a part of the BATC Color Survey of the sky in 13 intermediate-band filters from 3800 to 10,000 Å. The coordinates of the clusters are found from the HST Guide Star Catalog. By aperture photometry, we obtain the spectral energy distributions of the clusters. Using the relations between the BATC intermediate-band system and UBVRI broadband system, we derive their V magnitudes and B-V colors and find that most of them are blue, which is consistent with previous findings.

  14. Carbon and oxygen abundance gradients in NGC 300 and M33 from optical recombination lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toribio San Cipriano, L.; García-Rojas, J.; Esteban, C.; Bresolin, F.; Peimbert, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present deep spectrophotometry of several H II regions in the nearby low-mass spiral galaxies NGC 300 and M33. The data have been taken with Ultraviolet-Visual Echelle Spectrograph and Optical System for Imaging and low-Intermediate-Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy spectrographs attached to the 8-m Very Large Telescope and 10.4-m Gran Telescopio Canarias telescopes, respectively. We have derived precise values of the physical conditions for each object making use of several emission line-intensity ratios. In particular, we have obtained direct determinations of the electron temperature in all the observed objects. We detect pure recombination lines (RLs) of C II and O II in several of the H II regions, permitting to derive their C/H and C/O ratios. We have derived the radial abundance gradient of O for each galaxy making use of collisionally excited lines (CELs) and RLs, as well as the C and N gradients using RLs and CELs, respectively. We obtain the first determination of the C/H gradient of NGC 300 and improve its determination in the case of M33. In both galaxies, the C/H gradients are steeper than those of O/H, leading to negative C/O gradients. Comparing with similar results for other spiral galaxies, we find a strong correlation between the slope of the C/H gradient and MV. We find that some H II regions located close to the isophotal radius (R25) of NGC 300 and M33 show C/O ratios more similar to those typical of dwarf galaxies than those of H II regions in the discs of more massive spirals. This may be related to the absence of flattening of the gradients in the external parts of NGC 300 and M33. Finally, we find very similar N/H gradients in both galaxies and a fair correlation between the slope of the N/H gradient and MV comparing with similar data for a sample of spiral galaxies.

  15. Spectrum of Var C in M33 in its maximum light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeev, A.; Fabrika, S.; Sholukhova, O.

    2013-11-01

    The classical LBV star Var C in M33 has entered a luminous (or low excitation) state as it was described in ATels #5362, #5403. We have taken spectra of the star with the Russian BTA telescope using SCORPIO spectrograph. The spectra were obtained on 5 Oct 2013 with spectral resolution of 13Å (3800-7200 Å range), on 01 Nov and 02 Nov with resolution of 2.2Å (in 4100-5800 Å and 5800-7400 Å ranges respectively).

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Star clusters in M33 (Beasley+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, M. A.; San, Roman I.; Gallart, G.; Sarajedini, A.; Aparicio, A.

    2015-08-01

    Basic and derived data for M33 cluster sample. This is the full table 2 corresponding to the abbreviated one in the online journal article. Previously confirmed candidates (identified by radial velocities or high-resolution imaging) were observed using OSIRIS on the GTC in long-slit mode during semesters 2010B-2012A. Previously identified star clusters and star cluster candidates identified by San Roman et al. (2010ApJ...720.1674S, Cat. J/ApJ/720/1674) were observed using the WYFFOS/AF2 multifibre instrument on the WHT in La Palma. (1 data file).

  17. The Massive Stellar Population in the Diffuse Ionized Gas of M33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoopes, Charles G.; Walterbos, Rene A. M.

    1995-01-01

    We compare Far-UV, H alpha, and optical broadband images of the nearby spiral galaxy M33, to investigate the massive stars associated with the diffuse ionized gas. The H-alpha/FUV ratio is higher in HII regions than in the DIG, possibly indicating that an older population ionizes the DIG. The broad-band colors support this conclusion. The HII region population is consistent with a young burst, while the DIG colors resemble an older population with constant star formation. Our results indicate that there may be enough massive field stars to ionize the DIG, without the need for photon leakage from HII regions.

  18. Massive Young Star Clusters in M33: Stochastic Star Formation Ruled Out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Lópezlira, R. A.; Pflamm-Altenburg, J.; Kroupa, P.

    2014-09-01

    It is widely accepted that the distribution function of the masses of young star clusters is universal and can be purely interpreted as a probability density distribution function with a constant upper mass limit. As a result of this picture, the masses of the most massive objects would be exclusively determined by the size of the sample. Conversely we show, with very high confidence, that the masses of the most massive young (< 10 Myr) star clusters in the flocculent galaxy M33 decrease with increasing galactocentric radius, in contradiction with a constant shape and upper mass limit of the cluster mass function. Moreover, by comparing the radial distributions of gas surface densities and highest cluster masses, we find that M_{max} ∝ Σ_{gas, total}^{3.8 ± 0.3}, M_{max} ∝ Σ_{H_2}^{1.2± 0.1} and M_{max} ∝ Σ_{SFR}^{0.9 ± 0.1}. Hence, in M33 we can rule out stochastic star formation. The change of the maximum cluster mass there must be due to physical causes, i.e., very massive star clusters may require special physical conditions, like high gas surface densities, in order to form.

  19. The molecular gas content of the nuclear region of M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christine D.; Scoville, Nick

    1989-12-01

    The nearby Sc galaxy M33 has been mapped at half-beamwidth spacing out to a 3.5 arcmin radius in the CO J = 1-0 line using the NRAO 12 m telescope. The map reveals seven large-scale features with sizes of 200-400 pc, and in several cases they are associated with spiral arms. The masses of these structures are insufficient to gravitationally or tidally bind them given their measured sizes and velocity dispersions, and distances from the center of M33. The total mass of molecular hydrogen in the region mapped is 3.4 x 10 to the 7th solar, roughly twice the mass in atomic hydrogen. Within a radius of 800 pc, no evidence is seen for an exponential decrease in the azimuthally averaged molecular hydrogen column density. The rotation curve obtained from the molecular gas agrees well with previous observations, yielding a disk mass of 5 x 10 to the 8th solar, out to a radius of 800 pc and a molecular gas mass total mass ratio of 4 percent.

  20. A Spectroscopic Survey of Massive Stars in M31 and M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip; Neugent, Kathryn F.; Smart, Brianna M.

    2016-09-01

    We describe our spectroscopic follow-up to the Local Group Galaxy Survey (LGGS) photometry of M31 and M33. We have obtained new spectroscopy of 1895 stars, allowing us to classify 1496 of them for the first time. Our study has identified many foreground stars, and established membership for hundreds of early- and mid-type supergiants. We have also found nine new candidate luminous blue variables and a previously unrecognized Wolf–Rayet star. We republish the LGGS M31 and M33 catalogs with improved coordinates, and including spectroscopy from the literature and our new results. The spectroscopy in this paper is responsible for the vast majority of the stellar classifications in these two nearby spiral neighbors. The most luminous (and hence massive) of the stars in our sample are early-type B supergiants, as expected; the more massive O stars are more rare and fainter visually, and thus mostly remain unobserved so far. The majority of the unevolved stars in our sample are in the 20–40 M ⊙ range. The spectroscopic observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution. MMT telescope time was granted by NOAO, through the Telescope System Instrumentation Program (TSIP). TSIP is funded by the National Science Foundation. This paper uses data products produced by the OIR Telescope Data Center, supported by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  1. THE FRACTAL DIMENSION OF STAR-FORMING REGIONS AT DIFFERENT SPATIAL SCALES IN M33

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Nestor; Alfaro, Emilio J.; Anez, Neyda; Odekon, Mary Crone

    2010-09-01

    We study the distribution of stars, H II regions, molecular gas, and individual giant molecular clouds in M33 over a wide range of spatial scales. The clustering strength of these components is systematically estimated through the fractal dimension. We find scale-free behavior at small spatial scales and a transition to a larger correlation dimension (consistent with a nearly uniform distribution) at larger scales. The transition region lies in the range {approx}500-1000 pc. This transition defines a characteristic size that separates the regime of small-scale turbulent motion from that of large-scale galactic dynamics. At small spatial scales, bright young stars and molecular gas are distributed with nearly the same three-dimensional fractal dimension (D {sub f,3D} {approx}< 1.9), whereas fainter stars and H II regions exhibit higher values, D {sub f,3D} {approx_equal} 2.2-2.5. Our results indicate that the interstellar medium in M33 is on average more fragmented and irregular than in the Milky Way.

  2. Common variable immunodeficiency revisited: normal generation of naturally occurring dendritic cells that respond to Toll-like receptors 7 and 9

    PubMed Central

    Taraldsrud, E; Fevang, B; Aukrust, P; Beiske, K H; Fløisand, Y; Frøland, S; Rollag, H; Olweus, J

    2014-01-01

    Patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) have reduced numbers and frequencies of dendritic cells (DCs) in blood, and there is also evidence for defective activation through Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Collectively, these observations may point to a primary defect in the generation of functional DCs. Here, we measured frequencies of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and myeloid DCs (mDCs) in peripheral blood of 26 CVID patients and 16 healthy controls. The results show that the patients have reduced absolute counts of both subsets. However, the decreased numbers in peripheral blood were not reflected in reduced frequencies of CD34+ pDC progenitors in the bone marrow. Moreover, studies at the single cell level showed that DCs from CVID patients and healthy controls produced similar amounts of interferon-α or interleukin-12 and expressed similar levels of activation markers in response to human cytomegalovirus and ligands for TLR-7 and TLR-9. The study represents the most thorough functional characterization to date, and the first to assess bone marrow progenitor output, of naturally occurring DCs in CVID. In conclusion, it seems unlikely that CVID is secondary to insufficient production of naturally occurring DCs or a defect in their signalling through TLR-7 or TLR-9. PMID:24237110

  3. The integrated radio continuum spectrum of M33 - Evidence for free-free absorption by cool ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israel, F. P.; Mahoney, M. J.; Howarth, N.

    1992-01-01

    We present measurements of the integrated radio continuum flux density of M33 at frequencies between 22 and 610 MHz and discuss the radio continuum spectrum of M33 between 22 MHz and 10 GHz. This spectrum has a turnover between 500 and 900 MHz, depending on the steepness of the high frequency radio spectrum of M33. Below 500 MHz the spectrum is relatively flat. We discuss possible mechanisms to explain this spectral shape and consider efficient free-free absorption of nonthermal emission by a cool (not greater than 1000 K) ionized gas to be a very likely possibility. The surface filling factor of both the nonthermal and the thermal material appears to be small (of order 0.001), which could be explained by magnetic field/density fluctuations in the M 33 interstellar medium. We briefly speculate on the possible presence of a nuclear radio source with a steep spectrum.

  4. On the nature of candidate luminous blue variables in M 33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. S.; Castro, N.; Garcia, M.; Herrero, A.; Najarro, F.; Negueruela, I.; Ritchie, B. W.; Smith, K. T.

    2012-05-01

    Context. Luminous blue variables (LBVs) are a class of highly unstable stars that have been proposed to play a critical role in massive stellar evolution as well as being the progenitors of some of the most luminous supernovae known. However the physical processes underlying their characteristic instabilities are currently unknown. Aims: In order to provide observational constraints on this behaviour we have initiated a pilot study of the population of (candidate) LBVs in the Local Group galaxy M 33. Methods: To accomplish this we have obtained new spectra of 18 examples within M 33. These provide a baseline of ≥ 4 yr with respect to previous observations, which is well suited to identifying LBV outbursts. We also employed existing multi-epoch optical and mid-IR surveys of M 33 to further constrain the variability of the sample and search for the presence of dusty ejecta. Results: Combining the datasets reveals that spectroscopic and photometric variability appears common, although in the majority of cases further observations will be needed to distinguish between an origin for this behavour in short lived stochastic wind structure and low level photospheric pulsations or coherent long term LBV excursions. Of the known LBVs we report a hitherto unidentified excursion of M 33 Var C between 2001-5, while the transition of the WNLh star B517 to a cooler B supergiant phase between 1993-2010 implies an LBV classification. Proof-of-concept quantitative model atmosphere analysis is provided for Romano's star; the resultant stellar parameters being consistent with the finding that the LBV excursions of this star are accompanied by changes in bolometric luminosity. The combination of temperature and luminosity of two stars, the BHG [HS80] 110A and the cool hypergiant B324, appear to be in violation of the empirical Humphreys-Davidson limit. Mid-IR observations demonstrate that a number of candidates appear associated with hot circumstellar dust, although no objects as

  5. Star formation in M33 from HST multi-band imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolea, A.; Bianchi, L.

    2004-12-01

    We present results from an on-going study of stellar populations in the Local Group Galaxy M33. By comparing the multi-band photometry to model colors, we derive effective temperature and luminosity of the stellar objects, and information on the extinction by dust, in 27 fields sampling different environments across the galaxy. Two methods are used and the results compared. The stellar physical parameters are used to characterize the stellar populations in the observed fields which include several OB associations. We also reveal several massive star candidates. For more information and preprints, see http://dolomiti.pha.jhu.edu The work was supported by NASA grants HST-GO-9127 and NAG5-9219.

  6. Velocity resolved [C ii] spectroscopy of the center and the BCLMP 302 region of M 33 (HerM 33es)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookerjea, B.; Israel, F.; Kramer, C.; Nikola, T.; Braine, J.; Ossenkopf, V.; Röllig, M.; Henkel, C.; van der Werf, P.; van der Tak, F.; Wiedner, M. C.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The forbidden fine structure transition of C+ at 158 μm is one of the major cooling lines of the interstellar medium (ISM). Aims: We aim to understand the contribution of the ionized, atomic, and molecular phases of the ISM to the [C ii] emission from clouds near the dynamical center and the BCLMP302 H ii region in the north of the nearby galaxy M 33 at a spatial resolution of 50 pc. Methods: We combine high-resolution [C ii] spectra taken with the HIFI spectrometer onboard the Herschel satellite with [C ii] Herschel-PACS maps and ground-based observations of CO(2-1) and H i. All data are at a common spatial resolution of 50 pc. Correlation coefficients between the integrated intensities of [C ii], CO(2-1) and H i are estimated from the velocity-integrated PACS data and from the HIFI data. We decomposed the [C ii] spectra in terms of contribution from molecular and atomic gas detected in CO(2-1) and H i, respectively. At a few positions, we estimated the contribution of ionized gas to [C ii] from the emission measure observed at radio wavelengths. Results: In both regions, the center and BCLMP302, the correlation seen in the [C ii], CO(2-1) and H i intensities from structures of all sizes is significantly higher than the highest correlation in intensity obtained when comparing only structures of the same size. The correlations between the intensities of tracers corresponding to the same velocity range as [C ii], differ from the correlation derived from PACS data. Typically, the [C ii] lines have widths intermediate between the narrower CO(2-1) and broader H i line profiles. A comparison of the spectra shows that the relative contribution of molecular and atomic gas traced by CO(2-1) and H i varies substantially between positions and depends mostly on the local physical conditions and geometry. At the positions of the H ii regions, the ionized gas contributes between 10-25% of the observed [C ii] intensity. We estimate that 11-60% and 5-34% of the [C ii

  7. A Naturally Occurring Null Variant of the NMDA Type Glutamate Receptor NR3B Subunit Is a Risk Factor of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Ryota; Yamamori, Hidenaga; Yasuda, Yuka; Fujimoto, Michiko; Yano-Umeda, Satomi; Saneyoshi, Takeo; Takeda, Masatoshi; Hayashi, Yasunori

    2015-01-01

    Hypofunction of the N-methyl-D-aspartate type glutamate receptor (NMDAR) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Here, we investigated the significance of a common human genetic variation of the NMDAR NR3B subunit that inserts 4 bases within the coding region (insCGTT) in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. The cDNA carrying this polymorphism generates a truncated protein, which is electrophysiologically non-functional in heterologous expression systems. Among 586 schizophrenia patients and 754 healthy controls, insCGTT was significantly overrepresented in patients compared to controls (odds ratio = 1.37, p = 0.035). Among 121 schizophrenia patients and 372 healthy controls, genetic analyses of normal individuals revealed that those carrying insCGTT have a predisposition to schizotypal personality traits (F1,356 = 4.69, p = 0.031). Furthermore, pre-pulse inhibition, a neurobiological trait disturbed in patients with schizophrenia, was significantly impaired in patients carrying insCGTT compared with those with the major allele (F1,116 = 5.72, p = 0.018, F1,238 = 4.46, p = 0.036, respectively). These results indicate that a naturally occurring null variant in NR3B could be a risk factor of schizophrenia. PMID:25768306

  8. Immunohistochemical quantification of the cobalamin transport protein, cell surface receptor and Ki-67 in naturally occurring canine and feline malignant tumors and in adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sysel, Annette M.; Valli, Victor E.; Bauer, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells have an obligate need for cobalamin (vitamin B12) to enable DNA synthesis necessary for cellular replication. This study quantified the immunohistochemical expression of the cobalamin transport protein (transcobalamin II; TCII), cell surface receptor (transcobalamin II-R; TCII-R) and proliferation protein (Ki-67) in naturally occurring canine and feline malignant tumors, and compared these results to expression in corresponding adjacent normal tissues. All malignant tumor tissues stained positively for TCII, TCII-R and Ki-67 proteins; expression varied both within and between tumor types. Expression of TCII, TCII-R and Ki-67 was significantly higher in malignant tumor tissues than in corresponding adjacent normal tissues in both species. There was a strong correlation between TCII and TCII-R expression, and a modest correlation between TCII-R and Ki-67 expression in both species; a modest association between TCII and Ki-67 expression was present in canine tissues only. These results demonstrate a quantifiable, synchronous up-regulation of TCII and TCII-R expression by proliferating canine and feline malignant tumors. The potential to utilize these proteins as biomarkers to identify neoplastic tissues, streamline therapeutic options, evaluate response to anti-tumor therapy and monitor for recurrent disease has important implications in the advancement of cancer management for both human and companion animal patients. PMID:25633912

  9. THE STELLAR ARCHEOLOGY OF THE M33 DISK: RECENT STAR-FORMING HISTORY AND CONSTRAINTS ON THE TIMING OF AN INTERACTION WITH M31

    SciTech Connect

    Davidge, T. J.; Puzia, T. H. E-mail: tpuzia@gmail.com

    2011-09-10

    Images recorded with MegaCam are used to investigate the recent (t {<=} 0.25 Gyr) star-forming history (SFH) of the Local Group Sc galaxy M33. The data sample the entire star-forming disk, as well as areas immediately to the north and south of the galaxy. The properties of the stellar disk change near R{sub GC} = 8 kpc. Within this radius the luminosity function of main-sequence stars indicates that the star formation rate (SFR) has been constant with time during at least the past 250 Myr, while at larger radii the SFR has declined during this same time period. That the recent SFR in the inner disk has been constant suggests that M33 has evolved in isolation for at least the past {approx}0.5 Gyr, thereby providing a constraint on the timing of any recent interaction with M31. The color of the main-sequence ridgeline changes with radius, suggesting a gradient in extinction of size {Delta}A{sub V} /{Delta}R{sub GC} = -0.05 mag kpc{sup -1}. The fractional contribution that young stars make to the total mass of the stellar disk changes with radius, peaking near 8 kpc. Evidence is also presented of systematic spatial variations in the SFH of the disk, such that the SFR during the past 100 Myr in the southern half of the galaxy has been {approx}0.4 dex higher than in the northern half. Finally, structures with sizes spanning many kpc that contain blue objects-presumably main-sequence stars that formed during intermediate epochs-are identified near the disk boundary. It is argued that these are tidal features that were pulled from the main body of M33 and-in some cases-are the fossil remnants of star formation that occurred in an extended disk during intermediate epochs.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Multi-resolution images of M33 (Boquien+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boquien, M.; Calzetti, D.; Aalto, S.; Boselli, A.; Braine, J.; Buat, V.; Combes, F.; Israel, F.; Kramer, C.; Lord, S.; Relano, M.; Rosolowsky, E.; Stacey, G.; Tabatabaei, F.; van der Tak, F.; van der Werf, P.; Verley, S.; Xilouris, M.

    2015-02-01

    The FITS file contains maps of the flux in star formation tracing bands, maps of the SFR, maps of the attenuation in star formation tracing bands, and a map of the stellar mass of M33, each from a resolution of 8"/pixel to 512"/pixel. The FUV GALEX data from NGS were obtained directly from the GALEX website through GALEXVIEW. The observation was carried out on 25 November 2003 for a total exposure time of 3334s. Hα+[NII] observations were carried out in November 1995 on the Burrel Schmidt telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory. The observations and the data processing are analysed in detail in Hoopes & Walterbos (2000ApJ...541..597H). The Spitzer IRAC 8um image sensitive to the emission of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) and the MIPS 24um image sensitive to the emission of Very Small Grains (VSG) were obtained from the NASA Extragalactic Database and have been analysed by Hinz et al. (2004ApJS..154..259H) and Verley et al. (2007A&A...476.1161V, Cat. J/A+A/476/1161). The PACS data at 70um and 100um, which are sensitive to the warm dust heated by massive stars, come from two different programmes. The 100um image was obtained in the context of the Herschel HerM33es open time key project (Kramer et al., 2010A&A...518L..67K, observation ID 1342189079 and 1342189080). The observation was carried out in parallel mode on 7 January 2010 for a duration of 6.3h. It consisted in 2 orthogonal scans at a speed of 20"/s, with a leg length of 7'. The 70um image was obtained as a follow-up open time cycle 2 programme (OT2mboquien4, observation ID 1342247408 and 1342247409). M33 was scanned on 25 June 2012 at a speed of 20"/s in 2 orthogonal directions over 50' with 5 repetitions of this scheme in order to match the depth of the 100um image. The total duration of the observation was 9.9h. The cube, cube.fits files, contains 16 extensions: * FUV * HALPHA * 8 * 24 * 70 * 100 * SFR_FUV * SFR_HALPHA * SFR_24 * SFR_70 * SFR_100 * SFRFUV24 * SFRHALPHA24 * A_FUV * A

  11. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of the brightest supergiants in M31 and M33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, R. M.; Blaha, C.; Dodorico, S.; Gull, T. R.; Benevenuti, P.

    1983-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectroscopy from the IUE, in combination with groundbased visual and infrared photometry, are to determine the energy distributions of the luminous blue variables, the Hubble-Sandage variables, in M31 and M33. The observed energy distributions, especially in the ultraviolet, show that these stars are suffering interstellar reddening. When corrected for interstellar extinction, the integrated energy distributions yield the total luminosities and black body temperatures of the stars. The resulting bolometric magnitudes and temperatures confirm that these peculiar stars are indeed very luminous, hot stars. They occupy the same regions of the sub B01 vs. log T sub e diagram as do eta Car, P Cyg and S Dor in our galaxy and the LMC. Many of the Hubble-Sandage variables have excess infrared radiation which is attributed to free-free emission from their extended atmospheres. Rough mass loss estimates from the infrared excess yield rates of 0.00001 M sub annual/yr. The ultraviolet spectra of the H-S variables are also compared with similar spectra of eta Car, P Cyg and S For.

  12. A search for globular clusters in more remote areas around M31 and M33 II

    SciTech Connect

    Di Tullio Zinn, Graziella; Zinn, Robert

    2014-04-01

    Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), ∼900 deg{sup 2} of the sky surrounding M31 and M33 have been searched for globular clusters (GCs) that through galaxy interaction have become unbound from their parent systems and M31 (hence, intergalactic globular clusters, IGCs). This search reached a maximum of ∼500 kpc in projected galactocentric distance (R {sub gc}) from M31. Visual examination of 283,871 SDSS cutout images and of 1143 fits images yielded 320 candidates. This sample was reduced to six GCs and one likely candidate by excluding galaxies on the basis of combinations of their optical, ultraviolet, and infrared colors from the SDSS, the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer satellite, as well as their photometric redshifts from the SDSS. Since these seven objects have 14 kpc ≤ R {sub gc} ≤ 137 kpc, they are more likely to be GCs in the halo of M31 than IGCs. They are all 'classical' as opposed to 'extended' GCs, and they provide further evidence that the remote halo of M31 (R {sub gc} ≥ 50 kpc) contains more GCs of all types and, in particular, far more 'classical' ones than the remote halo of the Milky Way.

  13. HER kinase axis receptor dimer partner switching occurs in response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibition despite failure to block cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anjali; Penuel, Elicia; Mink, Sheldon; Schmidt, Joanna; Hodge, Amanda; Favero, Kristin; Tindell, Charles; Agus, David B

    2010-03-01

    The human epidermal receptor (HER) axis consists of a dynamic, interconnected family of receptors that make critical contributions to a number of malignancies. Therapeutics targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are unable to effectively inhibit tumor growth in a majority of cases. These tumors are assumed to possess primary resistance to anti-EGFR therapies, but the consequence of inhibiting EGFR in these tumors is unclear. We established isogenic cell lines by prolonged gefitinib treatment at concentrations that are in excess of that which is required for complete EGFR kinase inhibition but only minimally affected growth. Subsequently, we monitored the ligand-dependent HER profiles based on receptor expression, phosphorylation, and dimerization in conjunction with measurements of cellular susceptibility to gefitinib. Chronic EGFR kinase inhibition rapidly switched the HER network from dependence on EGFR to HER2. However, both receptors activated the critical signaling proteins AKT and mitogen-activated protein kinase, and in both cases, HER3 was the common association partner. Remarkably, the switch in receptor dimers caused diminished susceptibility to EGFR-targeted inhibitors gefitinib and cetuximab but acquired susceptibility to the HER2-targeted inhibitor pertuzumab. Overall, our study indicates that the EGFR pathway is responsive to EGFR inhibiting therapies that are not dependent on EGFR for their growth and survival, thus challenging the current definition of primary therapeutic resistance. Furthermore, EGFR kinase inhibition induces HER kinase receptors to engage in alternative dimerization that can ultimately influence therapeutic selection and responsiveness. PMID:20160029

  14. The Chandra ACIS Survey of M33: X-ray, Optical, and Radio Properties of the Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Knox S.; Blair, William P.; Winkler, P. Frank; Becker, Robert H.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Helfand, David J.; Hughes, John P.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Kuntz, Kip D.; McNeil, Emily K.; Pannuti, Thomas G.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Saul, Destry; Tüllmann, Ralph; Williams, Benjamin

    2010-04-01

    M33 contains a large number of emission nebulae identified as supernova remnants (SNRs) based on the high [S II]:Hα ratios characteristic of shocked gas. Using Chandra data from the ChASeM33 survey with a 0.35-2 keV sensitivity of ~2 × 1034 erg s-1, we have detected 82 of 137 SNR candidates, yielding confirmation of (or at least strongly support for) their SNR identifications. This provides the largest sample of remnants detected at optical and X-ray wavelengths in any galaxy, including the Milky Way. A spectral analysis of the seven X-ray brightest SNRs reveals that two, G98-31 and G98-35, have spectra that appear to indicate enrichment by ejecta from core-collapse supernova explosions. In general, the X-ray-detected SNRs have soft X-ray spectra compared to the vast majority of sources detected along the line of sight to M33. It is unlikely that there are any other undiscovered thermally dominated X-ray SNRs with luminosities in excess of ~4 × 1035 erg s-1 in the portions of M33 covered by the ChASeM33 survey. We have used a combination of new and archival optical and radio observations to attempt to better understand why some objects are detected as X-ray sources and others are not. We have also developed a morphological classification scheme for the optically identified SNRs and discussed the efficacy of this scheme as a predictor of X-ray detectability. Finally, we have compared the SNRs found in M33 to those that have been observed in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. There are no close analogs of Cas A, Kepler's SNR, Tycho's SNR, or the Crab Nebula in the regions of M33 surveyed, but we have found an X-ray source with a power-law spectrum coincident with a small-diameter radio source that may be the first pulsar-wind nebula recognized in M33.

  15. Unmasking of CD22 Co-receptor on Germinal Center B-cells Occurs by Alternative Mechanisms in Mouse and Man.

    PubMed

    Macauley, Matthew S; Kawasaki, Norihito; Peng, Wenjie; Wang, Shui-Hua; He, Yuan; Arlian, Britni M; McBride, Ryan; Kannagi, Reiji; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Paulson, James C

    2015-12-11

    CD22 is an inhibitory B-cell co-receptor whose function is modulated by sialic acid (Sia)-bearing glycan ligands. Glycan remodeling in the germinal center (GC) alters CD22 ligands, with as yet no ascribed biological consequence. Here, we show in both mice and humans that loss of high affinity ligands on GC B-cells unmasks the binding site of CD22 relative to naive and memory B-cells, promoting recognition of trans ligands. The conserved modulation of CD22 ligands on GC B-cells is striking because high affinity glycan ligands of CD22 are species-specific. In both species, the high affinity ligand is based on the sequence Siaα2-6Galβ1-4GlcNAc, which terminates N-glycans. The human ligand has N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) as the sialic acid, and the high affinity ligand on naive B-cells contains 6-O-sulfate on the GlcNAc. On human GC B-cells, this sulfate modification is lost, giving rise to lower affinity CD22 ligands. Ligands of CD22 on naive murine B-cells do not contain the 6-O-sulfate modification. Instead, the high affinity ligand for mouse CD22 has N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) as the sialic acid, which is replaced on GC B-cells with Neu5Ac. Human naive and memory B-cells express sulfated glycans as high affinity CD22 ligands, which are lost on GC B-cells. In mice, Neu5Gc-containing glycans serve as high affinity CD22 ligands that are replaced by Neu5Ac-containing glycans on GC B-cells. Our results demonstrate that loss of high affinity CD22 ligands on GC B-cells occurs in both mice and humans through alternative mechanisms, unmasking CD22 relative to naive and memory B-cells. PMID:26507663

  16. ISO Mid-Infrared Observations of Giant HII Regions in M33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelton, B. P.; Waller, W. H.; Hodge, P. W.; Boulanger, F.; Cornett, R. H.; Fanelli, M. N.; Lequeux, J.; Stecher, T. P.; Viallefond, F.; Hui, Y.

    1999-01-01

    We present Infrared Space Observatory Camera (ISOCAM) Circular Variable Filter scans of three giant HII regions in M33. IC 133, NGC 595, and CC 93 span a wide range of metallicity, luminosity, nebular excitation, and infrared excess; three other emission regions (CC 43, CC 99, and a region to the northeast of the core of NGC 595) are luminous enough in the mid-infrared to be detected in the observed fields. ISOCAM CVF observations provide spatially resolved observations (5'') of 151 wavelengths between 5.1 and 16.5 microns with a spectral resolution R = 35 to 50. We observe atomic emission lines ([Ne II], [Ne III], and [S IV]), several "unidentified infrared bands" (UIBs; 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.3, 12.0, and 12.7 microns), and in some cases a continuum which rises steeply at longer wavelengths. We conclude that the spectra of these three GHRs are well explained by combinations of ionized gas, PAHs, and very small grains in various proportions and with different spatial distributions. Comparisons between observed ratios of the various UIBs with model ratios indicate that the PAHs in all three of the GHRs are dehydrogenated and that the small PAHs have been destroyed in IC 133 but have survived in NGC 595 and CC 93. The [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratios observed in IC 133 and NGC 595 are consistent with their ages of 5 and 4.5 Myr, respectively; the deduced ionization parameter is higher in IC 133, consistent with its more compact region of emission.

  17. GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUD EVOLUTIONS IN THE NEARBY SPIRAL GALAXY M33

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Rie E.; Espada, Daniel; Hwang, Narae; Okumura, Sachiko K.; Komugi, Shinya; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Kohno, Kotaro; Tosaki, Tomoka; Kuno, Nario; Hirota, Akihiko; Onodera, Sachiko; Kaneko, Hiroyuki; Kawabe, Ryohei; Muraoka, Kazuyuki; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro

    2012-12-10

    We present a giant molecular cloud (GMC) catalog of M33, containing 71 GMCs in total, based on wide-field and high-sensitivity CO(J = 3-2) observations with a spatial resolution of 100 pc using the ASTE 10 m telescope. Employing archival optical data, we identify 75 young stellar groups (YSGs) from the excess of the surface stellar density, and estimate their ages by comparing with stellar evolution models. A spatial comparison among the GMCs, YSGs, and H II regions enable us to classify GMCs into four categories: Type A, showing no sign of massive star formation (SF); Type B, being associated only with H II regions; Type C, with both H II regions and <10 Myr old YSGs; and Type D, with both H II regions and 10-30 Myr YSGs. Out of 65 GMCs (discarding those at the edges of the observed fields), 1 (1%), 13 (20%), 29 (45%), and 22 (34%) are Types A, B, C, and D, respectively. We interpret these categories as stages in a GMC evolutionary sequence. Assuming that the timescale for each evolutionary stage is proportional to the number of GMCs, the lifetime of a GMC with a mass >10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} is estimated to be 20-40 Myr. In addition, we find that the dense gas fraction as traced by the CO(J = 3-2)/CO(J = 1-0) ratio is enhanced around SF regions. This confirms a scenario where dense gas is preferentially formed around previously generated stars, and will be the fuel for the next stellar generation. In this way, massive SF gradually propagates in a GMC until gas is exhausted.

  18. Strong H-alpha Emission Detected in the M33 Nova Candidate PNV J01340288+3035111

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornoch, K.; Vaduvescu, O.; Tudor, V.

    2014-07-01

    We obtained four 240-s narrow-band H-alpha and four 120-s R-band CCD frames of M33 on 2014 July 29.206 and 29.222 UT, respectively, with the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) + WFC at La Palma under ~1.1" seeing.

  19. HER-kinase Axis Receptor Dimer Partner Switching Occurs in Response to EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition Despite Failure to Block Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anjali; Penuel, Elicia; Mink, Sheldon; Schmidt, Joanna; Hodge, Amanda; Favero, Kristin; Tindell, Charles; Agus, David B.

    2010-01-01

    The HER-axis consists of a dynamic, interconnected family of receptors that make critical contributions to a number of malignancies. Therapeutics targeting EGFR, are unable to effectively inhibit tumor growth in a majority of cases. These tumors are assumed to possess primary resistance to anti-EGFR therapies but the consequence of inhibiting EGFR in these tumors is unclear. We established isogenic cell lines by prolonged gefitinib treatment at concentrations that are in excess of that which is required for complete EGFR kinase inhibition but only minimally effected growth. Subsequently, we monitored the ligand-dependent HER profiles based on receptor expression, phosphorylation and dimerization in conjunction with measurements of cellular susceptibility to gefitinib. Chronic EGFR kinase inhibition rapidly switched the HER network from dependence on EGFR to HER2. However, both receptors activated the critical signaling proteins, AKT and MAPK and in both cases HER3 was the common association partner. Remarkably, the switch in receptor dimers caused diminished susceptibility to EGFR-targeted inhibitors, gefitinib and cetuximab, but acquired susceptibility to the HER2-targeted inhibitor, pertuzumab. Overall, our study indicates that the EGFR pathway is responsive to EGFR inhibiting therapies that are not dependent on EGFR for their growth and survival thus challenging the current definition of primary therapeutic resistance. Further, EGFR kinase inhibition induces HER-kinase receptors to engage in alternative dimerization that can ultimately influence therapeutic selection and responsiveness. PMID:20160029

  20. Cognitive Impairment Induced by Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol Occurs through Heteromers between Cannabinoid CB1 and Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lanfumey, Laurence; Cordomí, Arnau; Pastor, Antoni; de La Torre, Rafael; Gasperini, Paola; Navarro, Gemma; Howell, Lesley A.; Pardo, Leonardo; Lluís, Carmen; Canela, Enric I.; McCormick, Peter J.; Maldonado, Rafael; Robledo, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1R) by delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) produces a variety of negative effects with major consequences in cannabis users that constitute important drawbacks for the use of cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. For this reason, there is a tremendous medical interest in harnessing the beneficial effects of THC. Behavioral studies carried out in mice lacking 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2AR) revealed a remarkable 5-HT2AR-dependent dissociation in the beneficial antinociceptive effects of THC and its detrimental amnesic properties. We found that specific effects of THC such as memory deficits, anxiolytic-like effects, and social interaction are under the control of 5-HT2AR, but its acute hypolocomotor, hypothermic, anxiogenic, and antinociceptive effects are not. In biochemical studies, we show that CB1R and 5-HT2AR form heteromers that are expressed and functionally active in specific brain regions involved in memory impairment. Remarkably, our functional data shows that costimulation of both receptors by agonists reduces cell signaling, antagonist binding to one receptor blocks signaling of the interacting receptor, and heteromer formation leads to a switch in G-protein coupling for 5-HT2AR from Gq to Gi proteins. Synthetic peptides with the sequence of transmembrane helices 5 and 6 of CB1R, fused to a cell-penetrating peptide, were able to disrupt receptor heteromerization in vivo, leading to a selective abrogation of memory impairments caused by exposure to THC. These data reveal a novel molecular mechanism for the functional interaction between CB1R and 5-HT2AR mediating cognitive impairment. CB1R-5-HT2AR heteromers are thus good targets to dissociate the cognitive deficits induced by THC from its beneficial antinociceptive properties. PMID:26158621

  1. Measuring star formation with resolved observations: the test case of M 33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boquien, M.; Calzetti, D.; Aalto, S.; Boselli, A.; Braine, J.; Buat, V.; Combes, F.; Israel, F.; Kramer, C.; Lord, S.; Relaño, M.; Rosolowsky, E.; Stacey, G.; Tabatabaei, F.; van der Tak, F.; van der Werf, P.; Verley, S.; Xilouris, M.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Measuring star formation on a local scale is important to constrain star formation laws. It is not clear yet, however, whether and how the measure of star formation is affected by the spatial scale at which a galaxy is observed. Aims: We wish to understand the impact of the resolution on the determination of the spatially resolved star formation rate (SFR) and other directly associated physical parameters such as the attenuation. Methods: We carried out a multi-scale, pixel-by-pixel study of the nearby galaxy M 33. Assembling FUV, Hα, 8 μm, 24 μm, 70 μm, and 100 μm maps, we have systematically compared the emission in individual bands with various SFR estimators from a resolution of 33 pc to 2084 pc. Results: There are strong, scale-dependent, discrepancies of up to a factor 3 between monochromatic SFR estimators and Hα+24 μm. The scaling factors between individual IR bands and the SFR show a strong dependence on the spatial scale and on the intensity of star formation. Finally, strong variations of the differential reddening between the nebular emission and the stellar continuum are seen, depending on the specific SFR (sSFR) and on the resolution. At the finest spatial scales, there is little differential reddening at high sSFR. The differential reddening increases with decreasing sSFR. At the coarsest spatial scales the differential reddening is compatible with the canonical value found for starburst galaxies. Conclusions: Our results confirm that monochromatic estimators of the SFR are unreliable at scales smaller than 1 kpc. Furthermore, the extension of local calibrations to high-redshift galaxies presents non-trivial challenges because the properties of these systems may be poorly known. The maps (FITS files) and the data cube used in this article are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/578/A8

  2. The Stellar Populations in the Outer Regions of M33. III. Star Formation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Michael K.; Sarajedini, Ata; Geisler, Doug; Harding, Paul; Schommer, Robert

    2007-03-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the star formation history (SFH) of three fields in M33 located approximately four to six visual scale lengths from its nucleus. These fields were imaged with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope and reach ~2.5 mag below the red clump of core helium-burning stars. The observed color-magnitude diagrams are modeled as linear combinations of individual synthetic populations with different ages and metallicities. To gain a better understanding of the systematic errors, we have conducted the analysis with two different sets of stellar evolutionary tracks, which we designate as Padova and Teramo. The precise details of the results depend on which tracks are used, but we can make several conclusions that are fairly robust despite the differences. Both sets of tracks predict the mean age to increase and the mean metallicity to decrease with radius. Allowing age and metallicity to be free parameters and assuming that star formation began ~14 Gyr ago, we find that the mean age of all stars and stellar remnants increases from ~6 to ~8 Gyr, and the mean global metallicity decreases from approximately -0.7 to approximately -0.9. The fraction of stars formed by 4.5 Gyr ago increases from ~65% to ~80%. The mean star formation rate 80-800 Myr ago decreases from ~30% of the lifetime average to just ~5%. The random errors on these estimates are ~10%, 1.0 Gyr, and 0.1 dex. By comparing the results of the two sets of stellar tracks for the real data and for test populations with known SFHs, we have estimated the systematic errors to be 15%, 1.0 Gyr, and 0.2 dex. These do not include uncertainties in the bolometric corrections or variations in α-element abundance, which deserve future study. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5

  3. An atlas of H-alpha-emitting regions in M33: A systematic search for SS433 star candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calzetti, Daniela; Kinney, Anne L.; Ford, Holland; Doggett, Jesse; Long, Knox S.

    1995-01-01

    We report finding charts and accurate positions for 432 compact H-alpha emitting regions in the Local Group galaxy M 33 (NGC 598), in an effort to isolate candidates for an SS433-like stellar system. The objects were extracted from narrow band images, centered in the rest-frame H-alpha (lambda 6563 A) and in the red continuum at 6100 A. The atlas is complete down to V approximately equal to 20 and includes 279 compact HII regions and 153 line emitting point-like sources. The point-like sources undoubtedly include a variety of objects: very small HII regions, early type stars with intense stellar winds, and Wolf-Rayet stars, but should also contain objects with the characteristics of SS433. This extensive survey of compact H-alpha regions in M 33 is a first step towards the identification of peculiar stellar systems like SS433 in external galaxies.

  4. Spectroscopic Classification of M33N 2015-12b (PNV J01335420+3026108) as a Classical Nova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, S. C.; Darnley, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    We obtained a spectrum of nova candidate M33N 2015-12b (PNV J01335420+3026108; see CBAT TOCP) with the SPRAT spectrograph on the 2m Liverpool Telescope (Steele et al. 2004) on 2016 January 4.81 UT. The spectrum shows strong Balmer emission and numerous Fe II lines (including multiplets 27, 28 and 42). Na I (D) and O I (7773 & Aring;) emission lines are also present.

  5. Eclipsing Binaries as Accurate Extragalactic Distance Indicators: Refining the Distance to the Triangulum Spiral Galaxy M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; Prsa, A.; Fitzpatrick, E. L.; Bonanos, A. Z.; Engle, S. G.; Devinney, E. J.; Recker, G.

    2013-06-01

    For over decade we have been using eclipsing binaries (EBs) to determine accurate distances to Local Group Galaxies such as the Magellanic Clouds & M31 (cf. Fitzpatrick et al. 2003; Vilardell et al. 2010). We (and others) have demonstrated that carefully selected EBs can serve as excellent "Standard Candles." Distances measured from EBs are basically geometric and are essentially free from assumptions and uncertainties that complicate other less direct methods. The radii of the stars are determined to better than a few percent from the time-tested analyses of their light and radial velocity curves. With accurate determinations of radii, Teff (or calibrated flux SEDs) and ISM absorption, it is possible to calculate reliable distances with uncertainties of < 5%. M33 is an important face-on spiral galaxy that still has a large range in its measured distance of ~750 - 960 kpc. We carried out HST/COS and STIS FUV-Near-IR (1150 - 8500A) spectrophotometry & WFPC-2 photometry of the19th mag (O7V +O7V) eclipsing binary D33 J013346.2+304439.9 in M33 to try to improve its distance.This EB was used previously by Bonanos et al. (2006) to determine a distance = 964 +/- 54 kpc. Analysis of the HST FUV-NIR data will yield more accurate Teff, Av, and [Fe/H] measures. These quantities, when combined with the results from existing light and radial velocity curves of Bonanos et al. permit the refined distance to be found with more certainty. We discuss the results and compare them with other recent M33 distances. When a reliable distance is found, M33 could replace the LMC as the primary exgalactic distance calibrator since this Sa spiral has chemical and physical properties more in common with the galaxies used to determine the Hubble Law and Ho. This research supported by HST NASA grants HST-GO-10919 & HST-GO-11725.

  6. THE ABUNDANCE SCATTER IN M33 FROM H II REGIONS: IS THERE ANY EVIDENCE FOR AZIMUTHAL METALLICITY VARIATIONS?

    SciTech Connect

    Bresolin, Fabio

    2011-04-01

    Optical spectra of 25 H II regions in the inner 2 kpc of the M33 disk have been obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph at the Gemini North telescope. The oxygen abundance gradient measured from the detection of the [O III] {lambda}4363 auroral line displays a scatter of approximately 0.06 dex, a much smaller value than recently reported by Rosolowsky and Simon in this galaxy. The analysis of the abundances for a large sample of H II regions derived from the R{sub 23} strong-line indicator confirms that the scatter is small over the full disk of M33, consistent with the measuring uncertainties, and comparable to what is observed in other spiral galaxies. No evidence is therefore found for significant azimuthal variations in the present-day metallicity of the interstellar medium in this galaxy on spatial scales from {approx}100 pc to a few kpc. A considerable fraction of M33 H II regions with auroral line detections show spectral features revealing sources of hard ionizing radiation (such as He II emission and large [Ne III], [O III] line fluxes). Since R{sub 23} is shown to severely underestimate the oxygen abundances in such cases, care must be taken in chemical abundance studies of extragalactic H II regions based on this strong-line indicator.

  7. The Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor, mGlu5, Is Required for Extinction Learning That Occurs in the Absence of a Context Change

    PubMed Central

    André, Marion Agnes Emma; Güntürkün, Onur; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors and, in particular, mGlu5 are crucially involved in multiple forms of synaptic plasticity that are believed to underlie explicit memory. MGlu5 is also required for information transfer through neuronal oscillations and for spatial memory. Furthermore, mGlu5 is involved in extinction of implicit forms of learning. This places this receptor in a unique position with regard to information encoding. Here, we explored the role of this receptor in context-dependent extinction learning under constant, or changed, contextual conditions. Animals were trained over 3 days to take a left turn under 25% reward probability in a T-maze with a distinct floor pattern (Context A). On Day 4, they experienced either a floor pattern change (Context B) or the same floor pattern (Context A) in the absence of reward. After acquisition of the task, the animals were returned to the maze once more on Day 5 (Context A, no reward). Treatment with the mGlu5 antagonist, 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl) pyridine, before maze exposure on Day 4 completely inhibited extinction learning in the AAA paradigm but had no effect in the ABA paradigm. A subsequent return to the original context (A, on Day 5) revealed successful extinction in the AAA paradigm, but impairment of extinction in the ABA paradigm. These data support that although extinction learning in a new context is unaffected by mGlu5 antagonism, extinction of the consolidated context is impaired. This suggests that mGlu5 is intrinsically involved in enabling learning that once-relevant information is no longer valid. © 2014 The Authors. Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25160592

  8. Direct Toll-like receptor-mediated stimulation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells occurs in vivo and promotes differentiation toward macrophages.

    PubMed

    Megías, Javier; Yáñez, Alberto; Moriano, Silvia; O'Connor, José-Enrique; Gozalbo, Daniel; Gil, María-Luisa

    2012-07-01

    As Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed by hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), they may play a role in hematopoiesis in response to pathogens during infection. We show here that TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 agonists (tripalmitoyl-S-glyceryl-L-Cys-Ser-(Lys)4 [Pam3CSK4], lipopolysaccharide [LPS], and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide [ODN]) induce the in vitro differentiation of purified murine lineage negative cells (Lin(-) ) as well as HSPCs (identified as Lin(-) c-Kit(+) Sca-1(+) IL-7Rα(-) [LKS] cells) toward macrophages (Mph), through a myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)-dependent pathway. In order to investigate the possible direct interaction of soluble microorganism-associated molecular patterns and TLRs on HSPCs in vivo, we designed a new experimental approach: purified Lin(-) and LKS cells from bone marrow of B6Ly5.1 mice (CD45.1 alloantigen) were transplanted into TLR2(-/-) , TLR4(-/-) , or MyD88(-/-) mice (CD45.2 alloantigen), which were then injected with soluble TLR ligands (Pam3CSK4, LPS, or ODN, respectively). As recipient mouse cells do not recognize the TLR ligands injected, interference by soluble mediators secreted by recipient cells is negligible. Transplanted cells were detected in the spleen and bone marrow of recipient mice, and in response to soluble TLR ligands, cells differentiated preferentially to Mph. These results show, for the first time, that HSPCs may be directly stimulated by TLR agonists in vivo, and that the engagement of these receptors induces differentiation toward Mph. Therefore, HSPCs may sense pathogen or pathogen-derived products directly during infection, inducing a rapid generation of cells of the innate immune system. PMID:22511319

  9. Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent activation of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase occurs upstream of Ca2+-signalling induced by Fcgamma receptor cross-linking in human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Vossebeld, P J; Homburg, C H; Schweizer, R C; Ibarrola, I; Kessler, J; Koenderman, L; Roos, D; Verhoeven, A J

    1997-01-01

    The effect of wortmannin on IgG-receptor (FcgammaR)-mediated stimulation of human neutrophils was investigated. The Ca2+ influx induced by clustering of both Fcgamma receptors was inhibited by wortmannin, as was the release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Wortmannin also inhibited, with the same efficacy, the accumulation of Ins(1,4,5)P3 observed after FcgammaR stimulation, but did not affect the increase in Ins(1,4,5)P3 induced by the chemotactic peptide, formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine. Because wortmannin is, in the concentrations used here, an inhibitor of PtdIns 3-kinase, these results suggested a role for PtdIns 3-kinase upstream of Ca2+ signalling, induced by FcgammaR cross-linking. Support for this notion was obtained by investigating the effect of another inhibitor of PtdIns 3-kinase, LY 294002, and by studying the kinetics of PtdIns 3-kinase activation. We found translocation of PtdIns 3-kinase to the plasma membrane and increased PtdIns 3-kinase activity in the membrane as soon as 5 s after FcgammaR cross-linking, even before the onset of the Ca2+ response. Moreover, the translocation of PtdIns 3-kinase to the plasma membrane was inhibited by co-cross-linking of either FcgammaRIIa and FcgammaRIIIb with the tyrosine phosphatase, CD45, indicating a requirement for protein tyrosine phosphorylation in the recruitment of PtdIns 3-kinase to the plasma membrane. Taken together, our results suggest a role for PtdIns 3-kinase in early signal transduction events after FcgammaR cross-linking in human neutrophils. PMID:9173906

  10. Internalization of RGD peptide conjugates of near-infrared fluorescent probes in different cell lines occurs via different integrin receptor subtypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, S.; Xu, B.; Ye, Y.; Liang, K.; Achilefu, S.

    2006-02-01

    Expression of integrin α vβ 3 is upregulated in a number of cancers including colon, pancreas, lung and breast. Previous studies demonstrated that near infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes designed to target α vβ 3 accumulated both in vitro and in vivo in α vβ 3-positive tumor cells. To evaluate the selectivity of some NIR-labeled RGD peptides for α vβ 3, the molecular probes were incubated in different cells, including the α vβ 3-positive U87 and A549 cells, and α vβ 3-negative HT29 cells. Whereas the RGD compounds tested internalized in the A549 cells, their uptake by the HT29 cell line, which is positive for α vβ 5 and α vβ 6, was low. The uptake of these probes in U87 depended on the structural features of the compounds. Further studies with functional blocking antibodies showed that the internalization in the α vβ 3-positive cells may be mediated by different integrin receptor subtypes. The preliminary results suggest that the internalization of linear RGD peptides is mediated by the α vβ 3 heterodimer but rearrangement of the peptide sequence could alter the selectivity of the molecular probes for different integrin subunits in the dimeric α and β proteins. Thus, a careful choice of RGD peptides can be used to monitor the functional status of different integrins in cells and tissues.

  11. The supernova progenitor mass distributions of M31 and M33: further evidence for an upper mass limit

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Zachary G.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Murphy, Jeremiah W.; Dolphin, Andrew E. E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com

    2014-11-10

    Using Hubble Space Telescope photometry to measure star formation histories, we age-date the stellar populations surrounding supernova remnants (SNRs) in M31 and M33. We then apply stellar evolution models to the ages to infer the corresponding masses for their supernova progenitor stars. We analyze 33 M33 SNR progenitors and 29 M31 SNR progenitors in this work. We then combine these measurements with 53 previously published M31 SNR progenitor measurements to bring our total number of progenitor mass estimates to 115. To quantify the mass distributions, we fit power laws of the form dN/dM∝M {sup –α}. Our new larger sample of M31 progenitors follows a distribution with α=4.4{sub −0.4}{sup +0.4}, and the M33 sample follows a distribution with α=3.8{sub −0.5}{sup +0.4}. Thus both samples are consistent within the uncertainties, and the full sample across both galaxies gives α=4.2{sub −0.3}{sup +0.3}. Both the individual and full distributions display a paucity of massive stars when compared to a Salpeter initial mass function, which we would expect to observe if all massive stars exploded as SN that leave behind observable SNR. If we instead fix α = 2.35 and treat the maximum mass as a free parameter, we find M {sub max} ∼ 35-45 M {sub ☉}, indicative of a potential maximum cutoff mass for SN production. Our results suggest that either SNR surveys are biased against finding objects in the youngest (<10 Myr old) regions, or the highest mass stars do not produce SNe.

  12. The Abundance Scatter in M33 from H II Regions: Is There Any Evidence for Azimuthal Metallicity Variations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresolin, Fabio

    2011-04-01

    Optical spectra of 25 H II regions in the inner 2 kpc of the M33 disk have been obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph at the Gemini North telescope. The oxygen abundance gradient measured from the detection of the [O III] λ4363 auroral line displays a scatter of approximately 0.06 dex, a much smaller value than recently reported by Rosolowsky & Simon in this galaxy. The analysis of the abundances for a large sample of H II regions derived from the R 23 strong-line indicator confirms that the scatter is small over the full disk of M33, consistent with the measuring uncertainties, and comparable to what is observed in other spiral galaxies. No evidence is therefore found for significant azimuthal variations in the present-day metallicity of the interstellar medium in this galaxy on spatial scales from ~100 pc to a few kpc. A considerable fraction of M33 H II regions with auroral line detections show spectral features revealing sources of hard ionizing radiation (such as He II emission and large [Ne III], [O III] line fluxes). Since R 23 is shown to severely underestimate the oxygen abundances in such cases, care must be taken in chemical abundance studies of extragalactic H II regions based on this strong-line indicator. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  13. Dynamical signatures of a ΛCDM-halo and the distribution of the baryons in M 33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbelli, Edvige; Thilker, David; Zibetti, Stefano; Giovanardi, Carlo; Salucci, Paolo

    2014-12-01

    Aims: We determine the mass distribution of stars, gas, and dark matter in M 33 to test cosmological models of galaxy formation and evolution. Methods: We map the neutral atomic gas content of M 33 using high resolution Very Large Array and Green Bank Telescope observations of the 21 cm HI line emission. A tilted ring model is fitted to the HI datacube to determine the varying spatial orientation of the extended gaseous disk and the rotation curve. We derive the stellar mass surface density map of M 33's optical disk via pixel-SED fitting methods based on population synthesis models that allow for positional changes in star formation history. Stellar and gas maps are used in the dynamical analysis of the rotation curve to constrain the dark halo properties. Results: The disk of M 33 warps from 8 kpc outward without substantial change of its inclination with respect to the line of sight; the line of nodes rotates clockwise toward the direction of M 31. Rotational velocities rise steeply with radius in the inner disk, reaching 100 km s-1 in 4 kpc, then the rotation curve becomes more perturbed and flatter with velocities as high as 120-130 km s-1 out to 2.7 R25. The stellar surface density map highlights a star-forming disk with a varying mass-to-light ratio. At larger radii, a dynamically relevant fraction of the baryons are in gaseous form. A dark matter halo with a Navarro-Frenk-White density profile, as predicted by hierarchical clustering and structure formation in a ΛCDM cosmology, provides the best fits to the rotation curve. Dark matter is relevant at all radii in shaping the rotation curve and the most likely dark halo has a concentration C ≃ 9.5 and a total mass of 4.3(±1.0) × 1011 M⊙. This imples a baryonic fraction of order 0.02 and the evolutionary history of this galaxy should therefore account for loss of a large fraction of its original baryonic content. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. A High-avidity WT1-reactive T-Cell Receptor Mediates Recognition of Peptide and Processed Antigen but not Naturally Occurring WT1-positive Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Jaigirdar, Adnan; Rosenberg, Steven A; Parkhurst, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1) is an attractive target antigen for cancer immunotherapy because it is overexpressed in many hematologic malignancies and solid tumors but has limited, low-level expression in normal adult tissues. Multiple HLA class I and class II restricted epitopes have been identified in WT1, and multiple investigators are pursuing the treatment of cancer patients with WT1-based vaccines and adoptively transferred WT1-reactive T cells. Here we isolated an HLA-A*0201-restricted WT1-reactive T-cell receptor (TCR) by stimulating peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy donors with the peptide WT1:126-134 in vitro. This TCR mediated peptide recognition down to a concentration of ∼0.1 ng/mL when pulsed onto T2 cells as well as recognition of HLA-A*0201 target cells transfected with full-length WT1 cDNA. However, it did not mediate consistent recognition of many HLA-A*0201 tumor cell lines or freshly isolated leukemia cells that endogeneously expressed WT1. We dissected this pattern of recognition further and observed that WT1:126-134 was more efficiently processed by immunoproteasomes compared with standard proteasomes. However, pretreatment of WT1 tumor cell lines with interferon gamma did not appreciably enhance recognition by our TCR. In addition, we highly overexpressed WT1 in several leukemia cell lines by electroporation with full-length WT1 cDNA. Some of these lines were still not recognized by our TCR suggesting possible antigen processing defects in some leukemias. These results suggest WT1:126-134 may not be a suitable target for T-cell based tumor immunotherapies. PMID:26938944

  15. Induction of apoptosis through B-cell receptor cross-linking occurs via de novo generated C16-ceramide and involves mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kroesen, B J; Pettus, B; Luberto, C; Busman, M; Sietsma, H; de Leij, L; Hannun, Y A

    2001-04-27

    B-cells, triggered via their surface B-cell receptor (BcR), start an apoptotic program known as activation-induced cell death (AICD), and it is widely believed that this phenomenon plays a role in the restriction and focusing of the immune response. Although both ceramide and caspases have been proposed to be involved in AICD, the contribution of either and the exact molecular events through which AICD commences are still unknown. Here we show that in Ramos B-cells, BcR-triggered cell death is associated with an early rise of C16 ceramide that derives from activation of the de novo pathway, as demonstrated using a specific inhibitor of ceramide synthase, fumonisin B1 (FB1), and using pulse labeling with the metabolic sphingolipid precursor, palmitate. There was no evidence for activation of sphingomyelinases or hydrolysis of sphingomyelin. Importantly, FB1 inhibited several specific apoptotic hallmarks such as poly(A)DP-ribose polymerase cleavage and DNA fragmentation. Electron microscopy revealed morphological evidence of mitochondrial damage, suggesting the involvement of mitochondria in BcR-triggered apoptosis, and this was inhibited by FB1. Moreover, a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential was observed in Ramos cells after BcR cross-linking, which was inhibited by the addition of FB1. Interestingly, benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-dl-Asp, a broad spectrum caspase inhibitor did not inhibit BcR-induced mitochondrial membrane permeability transition but did block DNA fragmentation. These results suggest a crucial role for de novo generated C16 ceramide in the execution of AICD, and they further suggest an ordered and more specific sequence of biochemical events in which de novo generated C16 ceramide is involved in mitochondrial damage resulting in a downstream activation of caspases and apoptosis. PMID:11278517

  16. Bryostatin-1, a Naturally Occurring Antineoplastic Agent, Acts as a Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR-4) Ligand and Induces Unique Cytokines and Chemokines in Dendritic Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Maria Eugenia; Ramakrishnan, Rupal; Singh, Narendra P.; Chauhan, Ashok; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2011-01-01

    Bryostatin-1 (Bryo-1), a natural macrocyclic lactone, is clinically used as an anti-cancer agent. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that Bryo-1 acts as a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligand. Interestingly, activation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (in vitro with Bryo-1) led to a TLR4-dependent biphasic activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and the unique induction of cytokines (IL-5, IL-6, and IL-10) and chemokines, including RANTES (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted) and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP1-α). In addition, EMSA demonstrated that Bryo-1-mediated induction of RANTES was regulated by NF-κB and the interferon regulatory factors (IRF)-1, IRF-3, and IRF-7 to the RANTES independently of myeloid differentiation primary response gene-88 (MyD88). Bryo-1 was able to induce the transcriptional activation of IRF-3 through the TLR4/MD2-dependent pathway. In vivo administration of Bryo-1 triggered a TLR-4-dependent T helper cell 2 (Th2) cytokine response and expanded a subset of myeloid dendritic cells that expressed a CD11chighCD8α− CD11b+CD4+ phenotype. This study demonstrates that Bryo-1 can act as a TLR4 ligand and activate innate immunity. Moreover, the ability of Bryo-1 to trigger RANTES and MIP1-α suggests that Bryo-1 could potentially be used to prevent HIV-1 infection. Finally, induction of a Th2 response by Bryo-1 may help treat inflammatory diseases mediated by Th1 cells. Together, our studies have a major impact on the clinical use of Bryo-1 as an anti-cancer and immunopotentiating agent. PMID:21036898

  17. The close binary frequency of Wolf-Rayet stars as a function of metallicity in M31 and M33

    SciTech Connect

    Neugent, Kathryn F.; Massey, Philip E-mail: phil.massey@lowell.edu

    2014-07-01

    Massive star evolutionary models generally predict the correct ratio of WC-type and WN-type Wolf-Rayet stars at low metallicities, but underestimate the ratio at higher (solar and above) metallicities. One possible explanation for this failure is perhaps single-star models are not sufficient and Roche-lobe overflow in close binaries is necessary to produce the 'extra' WC stars at higher metallicities. However, this would require the frequency of close massive binaries to be metallicity dependent. Here we test this hypothesis by searching for close Wolf-Rayet binaries in the high metallicity environments of M31 and the center of M33 as well as in the lower metallicity environments of the middle and outer regions of M33. After identifying ∼100 Wolf-Rayet binaries based on radial velocity variations, we conclude that the close binary frequency of Wolf-Rayets is not metallicity dependent and thus other factors must be responsible for the overabundance of WC stars at high metallicities. However, our initial identifications and observations of these close binaries have already been put to good use as we are currently observing additional epochs for eventual orbit and mass determinations.

  18. PAndAS in the Mist: The Stellar and Gaseous Mass within the Halos of M31 and M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Geraint F.; Braun, Robert; McConnachie, Alan W.; Irwin, Michael J.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Chapman, Scott C.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Fardal, Mark; Dubinski, John; Widrow, Larry; Mackey, A. Dougal; Babul, Arif; Tanvir, Nial R.; Rich, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale surveys of the prominent members of the Local Group have provided compelling evidence for the hierarchical formation of massive galaxies, revealing a wealth of substructure that is thought to be the debris from ancient and ongoing accretion events. In this paper, we compare two extant surveys of the M31-M33 subgroup of galaxies: the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey of the stellar structure, and a combination of observations of the H I gaseous content, detected at 21 cm. Our key finding is a marked lack of spatial correlation between these two components on all scales, with only a few potential overlaps between stars and gas. The paucity of spatial correlation significantly restricts the analysis of kinematic correlations, although there does appear to be H I kinematically associated with the Giant Stellar Stream where it passes the disk of M31. These results demonstrate that different processes must significantly influence the dynamical evolution of the stellar and H I components of substructures, such as ram pressure driving gas away from a purely gravitational path. Detailed modeling of the offset between the stellar and gaseous substructures will provide a determination of the properties of the gaseous halos of M31 and M33.

  19. PAndAS IN THE MIST: THE STELLAR AND GASEOUS MASS WITHIN THE HALOS OF M31 AND M33

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Geraint F.; Braun, Robert; McConnachie, Alan W.; Irwin, Michael J.; Chapman, Scott C.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Fardal, Mark; Dubinski, John; Widrow, Larry; Mackey, A. Dougal; Babul, Arif; Tanvir, Nial R.; Rich, Michael

    2013-01-20

    Large-scale surveys of the prominent members of the Local Group have provided compelling evidence for the hierarchical formation of massive galaxies, revealing a wealth of substructure that is thought to be the debris from ancient and ongoing accretion events. In this paper, we compare two extant surveys of the M31-M33 subgroup of galaxies: the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey of the stellar structure, and a combination of observations of the H I gaseous content, detected at 21 cm. Our key finding is a marked lack of spatial correlation between these two components on all scales, with only a few potential overlaps between stars and gas. The paucity of spatial correlation significantly restricts the analysis of kinematic correlations, although there does appear to be H I kinematically associated with the Giant Stellar Stream where it passes the disk of M31. These results demonstrate that different processes must significantly influence the dynamical evolution of the stellar and H I components of substructures, such as ram pressure driving gas away from a purely gravitational path. Detailed modeling of the offset between the stellar and gaseous substructures will provide a determination of the properties of the gaseous halos of M31 and M33.

  20. Growth, photosynthetic efficiency, and biochemical composition of Tetraselmis suecica F&M-M33 grown with LEDs of different colors.

    PubMed

    Abiusi, Fabian; Sampietro, Giacomo; Marturano, Giovanni; Biondi, Natascia; Rodolfi, Liliana; D'Ottavio, Massimo; Tredici, Mario R

    2014-05-01

    The effect of light quality on cell size and cell cycle, growth rate, productivity, photosynthetic efficiency and biomass composition of the marine prasinophyte Tetraselmis suecica F&M-M33 grown in 2-L flat panel photobioreactors illuminated with light emitting diodes (LEDs) of different colors was investigated. Biomass productivity and photosynthetic efficiency were comparable between white and red light, while under blue and green light productivity decreased to less than half and photosynthetic efficiency to about one third. Differences in cell size and number correlated with the cell cycle phase. Under red light cells were smaller and more motile. Chlorophyll content was strongly reduced with red and enhanced with blue light, while carotenoids and gross biomass composition were not affected by light quality. The eicosapentaenoic acid content increased under red light. Red light can substitute white light without affecting productivity of T. suecica F&M-M33, leading to smaller and more motile cells and increased eicosapentaenoic acid content. Red LEDs can thus be profitably used for the production of this microalga for aquaculture. PMID:23904253

  1. Wolf-Rayet stars and giant H II regions in M33 - Casual associations or meaningful relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, P. S.; Massey, P.

    1981-10-01

    The discovery is reported of 14 new Wolf-Rayet stars in the Local Group galaxy M33, of which six are surrounded by small H II regions and have spectra and M(v) similar to field W-R stars in the Galaxy. In addition, eight of the stars are found to be among the brightest in the giant H II regions NGC 588, 592, 595 and 604, and similar to the superluminous W-R's found in 30 Dor in the Large Magellanic Cloud and HD 97950 in NGC 3603. It is concluded after a discussion of statistics pertaining to the W-R types known in M33 that selection effects still dominate the discovery process, and it is suggested that the morphological similarities among superluminous W-R star spectra and the dynamics of giant H II regions imply a shared evolutionary pattern where the nebulae may be dominated by the effects of a few massive, unstable objects with W-R spectra.

  2. Formation of the black-hole binary M33 X-7 through mass exchange in a tight massive system.

    PubMed

    Valsecchi, Francesca; Glebbeek, Evert; Farr, Will M; Fragos, Tassos; Willems, Bart; Orosz, Jerome A; Liu, Jifeng; Kalogera, Vassiliki

    2010-11-01

    The X-ray source M33 X-7 in the nearby galaxy Messier 33 is among the most massive X-ray binary stellar systems known, hosting a rapidly spinning, 15.65M(⊙) black hole orbiting an underluminous, 70M(⊙) main-sequence companion in a slightly eccentric 3.45-day orbit (M(⊙), solar mass). Although post-main-sequence mass transfer explains the masses and tight orbit, it leaves unexplained the observed X-ray luminosity, the star's underluminosity, the black hole's spin and the orbital eccentricity. A common envelope phase, or rotational mixing, could explain the orbit, but the former would lead to a merger and the latter to an overluminous companion. A merger would also ensue if mass transfer to the black hole were invoked for its spin-up. Here we report simulations of evolutionary tracks which reveal that if M33 X-7 started as a primary body of 85M(⊙)-99M(⊙) and a secondary body of 28M(⊙)-32M(⊙), in a 2.8-3.1-d orbit, its observed properties can be consistently explained. In this model, the main-sequence primary transfers part of its envelope to the secondary and loses the rest in a wind; it ends its life as a ∼16M(⊙) helium star with an iron-nickel core that collapses to a black hole (with or without an accompanying supernova). The release of binding energy, and possibly collapse asymmetries, 'kick' the nascent black hole into an eccentric orbit. Wind accretion explains the X-ray luminosity, and the black-hole spin can be natal. PMID:20962778

  3. Formation of the black-hole binary M33 X-7 through mass exchange in a tight massive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsecchi, Francesca; Glebbeek, Evert; Farr, Will M.; Fragos, Tassos; Willems, Bart; Orosz, Jerome A.; Liu, Jifeng; Kalogera, Vassiliki

    2010-11-01

    The X-ray source M33 X-7 in the nearby galaxy Messier 33 is among the most massive X-ray binary stellar systems known, hosting a rapidly spinning, 15.65Msolar black hole orbiting an underluminous, 70Msolar main-sequence companion in a slightly eccentric 3.45-day orbit (Msolar, solar mass). Although post-main-sequence mass transfer explains the masses and tight orbit, it leaves unexplained the observed X-ray luminosity, the star's underluminosity, the black hole's spin and the orbital eccentricity. A common envelope phase, or rotational mixing, could explain the orbit, but the former would lead to a merger and the latter to an overluminous companion. A merger would also ensue if mass transfer to the black hole were invoked for its spin-up. Here we report simulations of evolutionary tracks which reveal that if M33 X-7 started as a primary body of 85Msolar-99Msolar and a secondary body of 28Msolar-32Msolar, in a 2.8-3.1-d orbit, its observed properties can be consistently explained. In this model, the main-sequence primary transfers part of its envelope to the secondary and loses the rest in a wind; it ends its life as a ~16Msolar helium star with an iron-nickel core that collapses to a black hole (with or without an accompanying supernova). The release of binding energy, and possibly collapse asymmetries, `kick' the nascent black hole into an eccentric orbit. Wind accretion explains the X-ray luminosity, and the black-hole spin can be natal.

  4. The Close Binary Frequency of Wolf-Rayet Stars as a Function of Metallicity in M31 and M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugent, Kathryn F.; Massey, Philip

    2014-07-01

    Massive star evolutionary models generally predict the correct ratio of WC-type and WN-type Wolf-Rayet stars at low metallicities, but underestimate the ratio at higher (solar and above) metallicities. One possible explanation for this failure is perhaps single-star models are not sufficient and Roche-lobe overflow in close binaries is necessary to produce the "extra" WC stars at higher metallicities. However, this would require the frequency of close massive binaries to be metallicity dependent. Here we test this hypothesis by searching for close Wolf-Rayet binaries in the high metallicity environments of M31 and the center of M33 as well as in the lower metallicity environments of the middle and outer regions of M33. After identifying ~100 Wolf-Rayet binaries based on radial velocity variations, we conclude that the close binary frequency of Wolf-Rayets is not metallicity dependent and thus other factors must be responsible for the overabundance of WC stars at high metallicities. However, our initial identifications and observations of these close binaries have already been put to good use as we are currently observing additional epochs for eventual orbit and mass determinations. The spectroscopic observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution. MMT telescope time was granted by NOAO, through the Telescope System Instrumentation Program (TSIP). TSIP is funded by the National Science Foundation. This paper uses data products produced by the OIR Telescope Data Center, supported by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  5. NRO M 33 All-Disk Survey of Giant Molecular Clouds (NRO MAGiC). II Dense Gas Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onodera, Sachiko; Kuno, Nario; Tosaki, Tomoka; Muraoka, Kazuyuki; Miura, Rie E.; Kohno, Kotaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Komugi, Shinya; Kaneko, Hiroyuki; Hirota, Akihiko; Kawabe, Ryohei

    2012-12-01

    We report the results of our observations of the 12 CO (J = 1-0) and 12 CO (J = 3-2) line emission of 74 major giant molecular clouds (GMCs) within the galactocentric distance of 5.1 kpc in the Local Group galaxy M 33. The observations have been conducted as part of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory M 33 All-disk survey of Giant Molecular Clouds project (NRO MAGiC). The spatial resolutions are 80 pc for 12 CO (J = 1-0) and 100 pc for 12 CO (J = 3-2). We detect 12 CO (J = 3-2) emission of 65 GMCs successfully. Furthermore, we find that the correlation between the surface density of the star formation rate, which is derived from a linear combination of Hα and 24 μ m emissions, and the 12 CO (J = 3-2) integrated intensity still holds at this scale. This result shows that the star-forming activity is closely associated with warm and dense gases that are traced with the 12 CO (J = 3-2) line, even in the scale of GMCs. We also find that the GMCs with a high star-forming activity tend to show a high integrated intensity ratio (R3-2/1-0). Moreover, we also observe a mass-dependent trend of R3-2/1- 0 for the GMCs with a low star-forming activity. From these results, we speculate that the R3-2/1-0 values of the GMCs with a low star-forming activity mainly depend on the dense gas fraction and not on the temperature, and therefore, the dense gas fraction increases with the mass of GMCs, at least in the GMCs with a low star-forming activity.

  6. THE ARAUCARIA PROJECT. A DISTANCE DETERMINATION TO THE LOCAL GROUP SPIRAL M33 FROM NEAR-INFRARED PHOTOMETRY OF CEPHEID VARIABLES

    SciTech Connect

    Gieren, Wolfgang; Pietrzynski, Grzegorz; Graczyk, Dariusz E-mail: pietrzyn@hubble.cfm.udec.cl; and others

    2013-08-10

    Motivated by an amazing range of reported distances to the nearby Local Group spiral galaxy M33, we have obtained deep near-infrared photometry for 26 long-period Cepheids in this galaxy with the ESO Very Large Telescope. From the data, we constructed period-luminosity relations in the J and K bands which together with previous optical VI photometry for the Cepheids by Macri et al. were used to determine the true distance modulus of M33, and the mean reddening affecting the Cepheid sample with the multiwavelength fit method developed in the Araucaria Project. We find a true distance modulus of 24.62 for M33, with a total uncertainty of {+-}0.07 mag which is dominated by the uncertainty on the photometric zero points in our photometry. The reddening is determined as E(B - V) = 0.19 {+-} 0.02, in agreement with the value used by the Hubble Space Telescope Key Project of Freedman et al. but in some discrepancy with other recent determinations based on blue supergiant spectroscopy and an O-type eclipsing binary which yielded lower reddening values. Our derived M33 distance modulus is extremely insensitive to the adopted reddening law. We show that the possible effects of metallicity and crowding on our present distance determination are both at the 1%-2% level and therefore minor contributors to the total uncertainty of our distance result for M33.

  7. The Heating of Mid-infrared Dust in the Nearby Galaxy M33: A Testbed for Tracing Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calapa, Marie D.; Calzetti, Daniela; Draine, Bruce T.; Boquien, Médéric; Kramer, Carsten; Xilouris, Manolis; Verley, Simon; Braine, Jonathan; Relaño, Monica; van der Werf, Paul; Israel, Frank; Hermelo, Israel; Albrecht, Marcus

    2014-04-01

    Infrared emission is an invaluable tool for quantifying star formation in galaxies. Because the 8 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission has been found to correlate with other well-known star formation tracers, it has widely been used as a star formation rate (SFR) tracer. There are, however, studies that challenge the accuracy and reliability of the 8 μm emission as a SFR tracer. Our study, part of the Herschel (Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA) M33 Extended Survey (HERM33ES) open time key program, aims at addressing this issue by analyzing the infrared emission from the nearby spiral galaxy M33 at the high spatial scale of ~75 pc. Combining data from the Herschel Space Observatory and the Spitzer Space Telescope, we find that the 8 μm emission is better correlated with the 250 μm emission, which traces cold interstellar gas, than with the 24 μm emission. Furthermore, the L(8)/L(250) ratio is more tightly correlated with the 3.6 μm emission, a tracer of evolved stellar populations and stellar mass, than with a combination of Hα and 24 μm emission, a tracer of SFR. The L(8)/L(24) ratio is highly depressed in 24 μm luminous regions, which correlate with known H II regions. We also compare our results with the dust emission models by Draine & Li. We confirm that the depression of 8 μm PAH emission near star-forming regions is higher than what is predicted by models; this is possibly an effect of increased stellar radiation from young stars destroying the dust grains responsible for the 8 μm emission as already suggested by other authors. We find that the majority of the 8 μm emission is fully consistent with heating by the diffuse interstellar medium, similar to what recently determined for the dust emission in M31 by Draine et al. We also find that the fraction of 8 μm emission associated with the diffuse

  8. The heating of mid-infrared dust in the nearby galaxy M33: A testbed for tracing galaxy evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Calapa, Marie D.; Calzetti, Daniela; Draine, Bruce T. E-mail: calzetti@astro.umass.edu; and others

    2014-04-01

    Infrared emission is an invaluable tool for quantifying star formation in galaxies. Because the 8 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission has been found to correlate with other well-known star formation tracers, it has widely been used as a star formation rate (SFR) tracer. There are, however, studies that challenge the accuracy and reliability of the 8 μm emission as a SFR tracer. Our study, part of the Herschel (Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA) M33 Extended Survey (HERM33ES) open time key program, aims at addressing this issue by analyzing the infrared emission from the nearby spiral galaxy M33 at the high spatial scale of ∼75 pc. Combining data from the Herschel Space Observatory and the Spitzer Space Telescope, we find that the 8 μm emission is better correlated with the 250 μm emission, which traces cold interstellar gas, than with the 24 μm emission. Furthermore, the L(8)/L(250) ratio is more tightly correlated with the 3.6 μm emission, a tracer of evolved stellar populations and stellar mass, than with a combination of Hα and 24 μm emission, a tracer of SFR. The L(8)/L(24) ratio is highly depressed in 24 μm luminous regions, which correlate with known H II regions. We also compare our results with the dust emission models by Draine and Li. We confirm that the depression of 8 μm PAH emission near star-forming regions is higher than what is predicted by models; this is possibly an effect of increased stellar radiation from young stars destroying the dust grains responsible for the 8 μm emission as already suggested by other authors. We find that the majority of the 8 μm emission is fully consistent with heating by the diffuse interstellar medium, similar to what recently determined for the dust emission in M31 by Draine et al. We also find that the fraction of 8 μm emission associated with the diffuse

  9. Swift-XRT six-year monitoring of the ultraluminous X-ray source M33 X-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Parola, V.; D'Aí, A.; Cusumano, G.; Mineo, T.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The long-term evolution of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULX) with their spectral and luminosity variations in time give important clues on the nature of ULX and on the accretion process that powers them. Aims: We report here the results of a Swift-XRT six-year monitoring campaign of the closest example of a persistent ULX, M33 X-8, that extends the monitoring of this source in the soft X-rays to 16 years. The luminosity of this source is a few 1039 erg s-1, marking the faint end of the ULX luminosity function. Methods: We analyzed the set of 15 observations collected during the Swift monitoring. We searched for differences in the spectral parameters at different observing epochs, adopting several models commonly used to fit the X-ray spectra of ULX. Results: The source exhibits flux variations of about 30%. No significant spectral variations are observed during the monitoring. The average 0.5-10 keV spectrum can be well described by a thermal model, either in the form of a slim disk, or as a combination of a Comptonized corona and a standard accretion disk.

  10. LUMINOUS AND VARIABLE STARS IN M31 AND M33. I. THE WARM HYPERGIANTS AND POST-RED SUPERGIANT EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, Roberta M.; Davidson, Kris; Grammer, Skyler; Kneeland, Nathan; Martin, John C.; Weis, Kerstin; Burggraf, Birgitta

    2013-08-10

    The progenitors of Type IIP supernovae (SNe) have an apparent upper limit to their initial masses of about 20 M{sub Sun }, suggesting that the most massive red supergiants evolve to warmer temperatures before their terminal explosion. But very few post-red supergiants are known. We have identified a small group of luminous stars in M31 and M33 that are candidates for post-red supergiant evolution. These stars have A-F-type supergiant absorption line spectra and strong hydrogen emission. Their spectra are also distinguished by the Ca II triplet and [Ca II] doublet in emission formed in a low-density circumstellar environment. They all have significant near- and mid-infrared excess radiation due to free-free emission and thermal emission from dust. We estimate the amount of mass they have shed and discuss their wind parameters and mass loss rates, which range from a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. On an H-R diagram, these stars will overlap the region of the luminous blue variables (LBVs) at maximum light; however, the warm hypergiants are not LBVs. Their non-spherical winds are not optically thick, and they have not exhibited any significant variability. We suggest, however, that the warm hypergiants may be the progenitors of the ''less luminous'' LBVs such as R71 and even SN1987A.

  11. The Wolf-Rayet star population in the most massive giant H II regions of M33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drissen, Laurent; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Shara, Michael M.

    1990-01-01

    Narrow-band images of NGC 604, NGC 595, and NGC 592, the most massive giant H II regions (GHRs) in M33 have been obtained, in order to study their Wolf-Rayet content. These images reveal the presence of nine candidates in NGC 604 (seven WN, two WC), 10 in NGC 595 (nine WN, one WC), and two in NGC 592 (two WN). Precise positions and estimated magnitudes are given for the candidates, half of which have so far been confirmed spectroscopically as genuine W-R stars. The flux in the emission lines of all candidates is comparable to that of normal Galactic W-R stars of similar subtype. A few of the putative superluminous W-R stars are shown to be close visual double or multiple stars; their newly estimated luminosities are now more compatible with those of normal W-R stars. NGC 595 seems to be overabundant in W-R stars for its mass compared to other GHRs, while NGC 604 is normal. Factors influencing the W-R/O number ratio in GHRs are discussed: metallicity and age appear to be the most important.

  12. KPOT_ckrame01_1: Herschel M33 extended survey (HERMES): star-formation interplay with the ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, C.

    2007-10-01

    In the local universe, most of the observable matter is contained in stellar objects shaping the morphology and dynamics of their "parent" galaxy. In view of the dominance of stellar mass, a better understanding of star formation and its consequences is mandatory and forms a central topic of contemporary astrophysical research. There exist a large number of high linear resolution studies related to individual star forming regions of the Galaxy as well as of low linear resolution studies of external galaxies. For a complete view onto the physical and chemical processes driving star formation and galactic evolution it is, however, essential to combine local conditions affecting individual star formation with properties only becoming apparent on global scales. The optimal target providing such a complete view is a galaxy that is actively forming stars, that is not seen edge-on (like our Galaxy), that has been studied at radio, optical and X-ray wavelengths, and that is sufficiently nearby to also permit studies on small scales. For our carefully chosen template galaxy, we plan to use HIFI to obtain fully-sampled large-scale [CII] (and H2O) maps. PACS will add important interstellar cooling lines, [OI], [NII], [NIII]. And SPIRE & PACS will be used to map the dust spectral energy distribution over the entire galaxy. Observing a deep, extended strip along the major axis of our template galaxy M33, will allow us to study the ionized, atomic, and molecular phases of the interstellar medium, its life cycle and thermal balance, tracing the formation of molecular clouds and of stars. Aside of insights related to the local processes in the galaxy itself, the mapped source will set a standard, providing a basis for the interpretation of phenomena encountered in other targets of the Local Group and in more distant galaxies.

  13. Eclipsing Binaries in the Local Group: III - Unprecedented Accuracy in Distance Determination to M33 and Calibration of the Cosmic Distance Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward

    2009-07-01

    The Great Spiral Galaxy in Triangulum {M33} is a crucial calibrator for the Cosmic Distance Scale, and thus for determining the age and evolution of the Universe. M33 is viewed face-on, has a simple geometry, large and diverse stellar populations, and morphologies similar to our Galaxy and other more distant galaxies used for distance determinations. Yet currently the M33 distance {d 830 +/- 120 kpc} still has measurement dispersions of 10-15%. Moreover, the distance to M33 derived from Cepheids, RR Lyrae stars, H2O masers, RGB stars, and EBs is currently discrepant by 15% {Bonanos et al. 2006}. In our work on the LMC and M31 distances we have demonstrated that double-line eclipsing binaries serve as excellent "standard candles." Distances derived from eclipsing binaries are basically geometric and essentially free from many assumptions and uncertainties that plague other less direct methods, such as metallicity differences and calibration zeropoints. The absolute radii of the component stars of eclipsing binaries can be determined to better than a few percent from the time-tested analyses of their light and radial velocity curves. With accurate determinations of radii, temperatures, and ISM absorption it is possible to determine reliable distances. In Cycle 15 we extended our program of using eclipsing binaries as standard candles to M33 using ACS/SBS and WFPC/2 spectrophotometry of a well suited 19th mag O7+O7 eclipsing binary system. Although insightful, ACS/SBC data alone do not provide sufficient accuracy for the unambigous determination of individual temperatures, [Fe/H], and ISM extinction, which are central to distance determination. We propose a 4 orbit follow-up spectrophotometry with the newly installed HST/COS G140L and the repaired HST/STIS G230L and G430L to obtain the single missing key element of this program. These quantities, when combined with the results from existing light and radial velocity curves for the target {cf. Bonanos et al. 2006

  14. The LAMOST survey of background quasars in the vicinity of M31 and M33 - III. results from the 2013 regular survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zhi-Ying; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Xiang, Mao-Sheng; Shi, Jian-Rong; Yuan, Hai-Bo; Huang, Yang; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yong-Hui; Wang, Yue-Fei; Yang, Ming

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we report new quasars discovered in fields in the vicinity of the Andromeda (M31) and Triangulum (M33) galaxies with the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST, also called the Guo Shou Jing Telescope) during the 2013 observational season, the second year of the regular survey. In total, 1330 new quasars are discovered in an area of ˜133 deg2 around M31 and M33. With i magnitudes ranging from 14.79 to 20.0 and redshifts from 0.08 to 4.85, the 1330 new quasars represent a significant increase in the number of identified quasars in fields in the vicinity of M31 and M33. Up to now, there have been a total of 1870 quasars discovered by LAMOST in this area. The much enlarged sample of known quasars in this area can potentially be utilized to construct a precise astrometric reference frame for the measurement of minute proper motions of M31, M33 and their associated substructures, which are vital for understanding the formation and evolution of M31, M33 and the Local Group of galaxies. Moreover, in the sample, there are a total of 45, 98 and 225 quasars with i magnitudes brighter than 17.0, 17.5 and 18.0 respectively. In the aforementioned brightness bins, 15, 35 and 84 quasars are reported here for the first time, and 6, 21 and 81 are reported in our pervious work. In addition, 0, 1 and 6 are from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and 24, 41 and 54 are from the NED database. These bright quasars provide an invaluable sample to study the kinematics and chemistry of the interstellar/intergalactic medium of the Local Group.

  15. Var C: Long-term photometric and spectral variability of a luminous blue variable in M 33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burggraf, B.; Weis, K.; Bomans, D. J.; Henze, M.; Meusinger, H.; Sholukhova, O.; Zharova, A.; Pellerin, A.; Becker, A.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: So far the highly unstable phase of luminous blue variables (LBVs) has not been understood well. It is still uncertain why and which massive stars enter this phase. Investigating the variabilities by looking for a possible regular or even (semi-)periodic behaviour could give a hint at the underlying mechanism for these variations and might answer the question of where these variabilities originate. Finding out more about the LBV phase also means understanding massive stars better in general, which have (e.g. by enriching the ISM with heavy elements, providing ionising radiation and kinetic energy) a strong and significant influence on the ISM, hence also on their host galaxy. Methods: Photometric and spectroscopic data were taken for the LBV Var C in M 33 to investigate its recent status. In addition, scanned historic plates, archival data, and data from the literature were gathered to trace Var C's behaviour in the past. Its long-term variability and periodicity was investigated. Results: Our investigation of the variability indicates possible (semi-)periodic behaviour with a period of 42.3 years for Var C. That Var C's light curve covers a time span of more than 100 years means that more than two full periods of the cycle are visible. The critical historic maximum around 1905 is less strong but discernible even with the currently rare historic data. The semi-periodic and secular structure of the light curve is similar to the one of LMC R71. Both light curves hint at a new aspect in the evolution of LBVs. Based on observations collected at the Thüringer Landessternwarte (TLS) Tautenburg.Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).Tables 2-4, and 6 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. OPTICAL SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC MONITORING OF THE EXTREME LUMINOUS BLUE VARIABLE STAR GR 290 (ROMANO's STAR) IN M 33

    SciTech Connect

    Polcaro, V. F.; Viotti, R. F.; Rossi, C.; Galleti, S.; Gualandi, R.; Norci, L.

    2011-01-15

    We study the long-term, S Dor-type variability and the present hot phase of the luminous blue variable (LBV) star GR 290 (Romano's Star) in M 33 in order to investigate possible links between the LBV and the late, nitrogen sequence Wolf-Rayet Stars (WNL) stages of very massive stars. We use intermediate-resolution spectra, obtained with the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) in 2008 December, when GR 290 was at minimum (V = {approx}18.6), as well as new low-resolution spectra and BVRI photometry obtained with the Loiano and Cima Ekar telescopes during 2007-2010. We identify more than 80 emission lines in the 3100-10000 A range covered by the WHT spectra, belonging to different species: the hydrogen Balmer and Paschen series, neutral and ionized helium, C III, N II-III, S IV, Si III-IV, and many forbidden lines of [N II], [O III], [S III], [A III], [Ne III], and [Fe III]. Many lines, especially the He I triplets, show a P Cygni profile with an a-e radial velocity difference of -300 to -500 km s{sup -1}. The shape of the 4630-4713 A emission blend and of other emission lines resembles that of WN9 stars; the blend deconvolution shows that the He II 4686 A has a strong broad component with FWHM {approx_equal} 1700 km s{sup -1}. During 2003-2010 the star underwent large spectral variations, best seen in the 4630-4686 A emission feature. Using the late-WN spectral types of Crowther and Smith, GR 290 apparently varied between the WN11 and WN8-9 spectral types; the hotter the star was the fainter its visual magnitude was. This spectrum-visual luminosity anticorrelation of GR 290 is reminiscent of the behavior of the best-studied LBVs, such as S Dor and AG Car. During the 2008 minimum, we found a significant decrease in bolometric luminosity, which could be attributed to absorption by newly formed circumstellar matter. We suggest that the broad 4686 A line and the optical continuum formed in a central Wolf-Rayet region, while the narrow emission line spectrum originated in an

  17. A Multi-ionic Kinematic Investigation of NGC 595, a Giant Extragalactic H II Region in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagrois, Dominic; Joncas, Gilles

    2009-08-01

    Spectro-interferometric observations of the Hα, [O III], and [S II] optical emission lines are combined with radio observations of the 21 cm line in order to obtain a reliable kinematic image of NGC 595, the second largest giant extragalactic H II region in M33. The Hα and [O III] observations reveal that the nebula is exposed to two distinct kinematical regimes. While symmetric, broad velocity profiles dominate a sizeable fraction of the ionized extent, evidence for line splitting is detected in a small region near the most massive stars of the star cluster. A quantitative investigation proposes that two expanding wind-blown bubbles could be held responsible for the observed line splitting. The kinematics of the ionized material presenting one-component velocity profiles likely indicates that Champagne flows are present at the periphery of the molecular component leading to accelerated ionized material in the ambient interstellar medium. In areas not dominated by the photoionization of the molecular clouds, the H+ and S+ material shows a kinematical behavior roughly in agreement with the atomic gas. Mean nonthermal line widths show relatively large, supersonic values especially in [O III]. Models of structure functions indicate that the Hα and [O III] components could be exposed to different turbulent motions which could explain the broadening excess observed for the latter ion. On the full ionized extent of the nebula, the S+ material shows narrower line widths than the two other ions. Combined with the absence of line splitting, these peculiar characteristics indicate that the [S II] component is likely located at the periphery of the nebula and probably does not coexist with Hα and [O III]. The shape of the [S II] structure function is in agreement with a relatively low number of large-scale velocity gradients which partially explains the narrower profiles observed. The mean electron density in the nebula is estimated at 162 ± 106(1σ) cm-3, in agreement

  18. Naturally occurring chemical carcinogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural products are chemicals found in nature which have unique pharmacological effects. Humans are exposed to many of these bioactive naturally occurring chemicals via the air breathed, the water drunk and the food eaten. Exposure also occurs in clinical settings. Naturally occurring chemicals ...

  19. Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide (VIP)-Expressing Neurons in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Provide Sparse GABAergic Outputs to Local Neurons with Circadian Regulation Occurring Distal to the Opening of Postsynaptic GABAA Ionotropic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Junmei; Zeng, Hongkui; Olson, David P.; Huber, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic synaptic transmission plays an important role in resetting and synchronizing circadian rhythms in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Although the circadian modulation of intrinsic membrane currents and biochemical signaling have been examined in the SCN, the modulation of specific synaptic pathways within the SCN is unexplored. In addition, little is known about the functional properties of these pathways, including which ones involve GABAA receptors (GABAA-Rs). In brain slices obtained from mice, we examined synaptic responses originating from the SCN neurons expressing vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP+ neurons). Focusing on the local projection within the ventromedial SCN, we found that VIP+ afferents provided input onto 49% of neurons with a preference for VIP-negative (VIP−) neurons. Responses were mediated by GABAA-Rs. The projection was sparsely connected and preferentially targeted a subset of SCN neurons unrelated to postsynaptic VIP expression. For most aspects of VIP+ network output, there was no circadian regulation. Excitability and spontaneous firing of the presynaptic VIP+ neurons were unchanged between day and night, and their network connectivity and synaptic function up through the evoked synaptic conductance were also unchanged. On the other hand, VIP+ input onto VIP− neurons became less inhibitory at night suggesting a postsynaptic alteration in the coupling of GABAA-R conductances to action potential firing. These data suggest that components of the VIP network and its synaptic output up through GABAA-R opening are invariant during the circadian cycle, but the effect on action potential firing is modulated by postsynaptic processes occurring after GABAA-R channel opening. PMID:25653351

  20. IgG-Mediated Immune Suppression to Erythrocytes by Polyclonal Antibodies Can Occur in the Absence of Activating or Inhibitory Fcγ Receptors in a Full Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Lidice; Yu, Honghui; Amash, Alaa; Zimring, James C; Lazarus, Alan H

    2015-09-01

    Polyclonal anti-D has been used to prevent RhD-negative mothers from becoming immunized against RhD positive fetal erythrocytes, and this mechanism has been referred as Ab or IgG-mediated immune suppression (AMIS). Although anti-D has been highly successful, the inhibitory mechanisms remain poorly understood. Two major theories behind AMIS involve the binding of IgG to activating or inhibitory FcγR, which can induce either erythrocyte clearance or immune inhibition, respectively. In this work, we explored the absolute role of activating and inhibitory FcγR in the AMIS mechanism using the HOD mouse model of RBC immunization. HOD mice contain a RBC-specific recombinant protein composed of hen egg lysozyme (HEL), OVA and human transmembrane Duffy Ag, and erythrocytes from HOD mice can stimulate an immune response to HEL. To assess the contribution of activating and inhibitory FcγR to AMIS, C57BL/6 versus FcRγ-chain(-/-) or FcγRIIB(-/-) mice were used as recipients of HOD-RBC alone or together with anti-HEL Abs (i.e., AMIS) and the resulting immune response to HEL evaluated. We show that anti-HEL polyclonal Abs induce the same degree of AMIS effect in mice lacking these IgG binding receptors as compared with wild-type mice. In agreement with this, F(ab')2 fragments of the AMIS Ab also significantly reduced the Ab response to the HOD cells. In conclusion, successful inhibition of in vivo Ab responses to HOD-RBC by polyclonal IgG can occur independently of activating or inhibitory FcγR involvement. These results may have implications for the understanding of RhD prophylaxis. PMID:26188060

  1. Optical Spectrophotometric Monitoring of the Extreme Luminous Blue Variable Star GR 290 (Romano's Star) in M 33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polcaro, V. F.; Rossi, C.; Viotti, R. F.; Galleti, S.; Gualandi, R.; Norci, L.

    2011-01-01

    We study the long-term, S Dor-type variability and the present hot phase of the luminous blue variable (LBV) star GR 290 (Romano's Star) in M 33 in order to investigate possible links between the LBV and the late, nitrogen sequence Wolf-Rayet Stars (WNL) stages of very massive stars. We use intermediate-resolution spectra, obtained with the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) in 2008 December, when GR 290 was at minimum (V = ~18.6), as well as new low-resolution spectra and BVRI photometry obtained with the Loiano and Cima Ekar telescopes during 2007-2010. We identify more than 80 emission lines in the 3100-10000 Å range covered by the WHT spectra, belonging to different species: the hydrogen Balmer and Paschen series, neutral and ionized helium, C III, N II-III, S IV, Si III-IV, and many forbidden lines of [N II], [O III], [S III], [A III], [Ne III], and [Fe III]. Many lines, especially the He I triplets, show a P Cygni profile with an a-e radial velocity difference of -300 to -500 km s-1. The shape of the 4630-4713 Å emission blend and of other emission lines resembles that of WN9 stars; the blend deconvolution shows that the He II 4686 Å has a strong broad component with FWHM ~= 1700 km s-1. During 2003-2010 the star underwent large spectral variations, best seen in the 4630-4686 Å emission feature. Using the late-WN spectral types of Crowther & Smith, GR 290 apparently varied between the WN11 and WN8-9 spectral types; the hotter the star was the fainter its visual magnitude was. This spectrum-visual luminosity anticorrelation of GR 290 is reminiscent of the behavior of the best-studied LBVs, such as S Dor and AG Car. During the 2008 minimum, we found a significant decrease in bolometric luminosity, which could be attributed to absorption by newly formed circumstellar matter. We suggest that the broad 4686 Å line and the optical continuum formed in a central Wolf-Rayet region, while the narrow emission line spectrum originated in an extended, slowly expanding

  2. H-alpha survey of M33 with the six-meter telescope Morphology of the general diffuse emission, evidence for a chaotic medium of bubbles and filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtes, G.; Petit, H.; Petit, M.; Sivan, J.-P.; Dodonov, S.

    1987-03-01

    A complete photographic H-alpha survey of M33 has been carried out with the f/1 focal reducer of Courtes (1964, 1972), attached to the prime focus of the 6-m telescope of the Soviet Special Astrophysical Observatory. A list of 748 distinct H II regions has been compiled from the survey photographs. 410 nebulae are newly identified objects. The others were previously cataloged by Boulesteix et al. (1974). The photographs are presented together with identification charts. They reveal an impressive, entirely new appearance for the ionized gas in M33. The 'classical' H II regions are seen bathing in a very chaotic background of H-alpha emission: rings, loops, and arc-shaped and filamentary structures are present everywhere all over the galaxy in and between the arms.

  3. Co-Occurring Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Care of You Top Ten Freshman Year Issues Alcohol, Substance Abuse and Depression Winter Break Survival Tips for College Students Implementing ... supporters and consumers in the mental health field. Alcohol and Drug Abuse, Addiction and Co-occurring Disorders: Co-occurring ... In Crisis? Call ...

  4. Luminous and variable stars in M31 and M33. II. Luminous blue variables, candidate LBVs, Fe II emission line stars, and other supergiants

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, Roberta M.; Davidson, Kris; Weis, Kerstin; Bomans, D. J.; Burggraf, Birgitta E-mail: kweis@astro.rub.de

    2014-07-20

    An increasing number of non-terminal eruptions are being found in the numerous surveys for optical transients. Very little is known about these giant eruptions, their progenitors and their evolutionary state. A greatly improved census of the likely progenitor class, including the most luminous evolved stars, the luminous blue variables (LBVs), and the warm and cool hypergiants is now needed for a complete picture of the final pre-supernova stages of very massive stars. We have begun a survey of the evolved and unstable luminous star populations in several nearby resolved galaxies. In this second paper on M31 and M33, we review the spectral characteristics, spectral energy distributions, circumstellar ejecta, and evidence for mass loss for 82 luminous and variable stars. We show that many of these stars have warm circumstellar dust including several of the Fe II emission line stars, but conclude that the confirmed LBVs in M31 and M33 do not. The confirmed LBVs have relatively low wind speeds even in their hot, quiescent or visual minimum state compared to the B-type supergiants and Of/WN stars which they spectroscopically resemble. The nature of the Fe II emission line stars and their relation to the LBV state remains uncertain, but some have properties in common with the warm hypergiants and the sgB[e] stars. Several individual stars are discussed in detail. We identify three possible candidate LBVs and three additional post-red supergiant candidates. We suggest that M33-013406.63 (UIT301,B416) is not an LBV/S Dor variable, but is a very luminous late O-type supergiant and one of the most luminous stars or pair of stars in M33.

  5. The identification of extreme asymptotic giant branch stars and red supergiants in M33 with 24 μm variability

    SciTech Connect

    Montiel, Edward J.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Johnson, Christopher B.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Engelbracht, Charles W.

    2015-02-01

    We present the first detection of 24 μm variability in 24 sources in the Local Group galaxy M33. These results are based on 4 epochs of Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer observations, which are irregularly spaced over ∼750 days. We find that these sources are constrained exclusively to the Holmberg radius of the galaxy, which increases their chances of being members of M33. We have constructed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) ranging from the optical to the submillimeter to investigate the nature of these objects. We find that 23 of our objects are most likely heavily self-obscured, evolved stars, while the remaining source is the Giant H ii region, NGC 604. We believe that the observed variability is the intrinsic variability of the central star reprocessed through their circumstellar dust shells. Radiative transfer modeling was carried out to determine their likely chemical composition, luminosity, and dust production rate (DPR). As a sample, our modeling has determined an average luminosity of (3.8±0.9)×10{sup 4} L{sub ⊙} and a total DPR of (2.3±0.1)×10{sup −5} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. Most of the sources, given the high DPRs and short wavelength obscuration, are likely extreme asymptotic giant branch (XAGB) stars. Five of the sources are found to have luminosities above the classical AGB limit (M{sub bol} <−7.1 mag, L > 54,000 L{sub ⊙}), which classifies them as probable red supergiants (RSGs). Almost all of the sources are classified as oxygen-rich. As also seen in the LMC, a significant fraction of the dust in M33 is produced by a handful of XAGB and RSG stars.

  6. DIRECT Distances to Nearby Galaxies Using Detached Eclipsing Binaries and Cepheids. VII. Additional Variables in the Field M33A Discovered with Image Subtraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochejska, B. J.; Kaluzny, J.; Stanek, K. Z.; Sasselov, D. D.; Szentgyorgyi, A. H.

    2001-04-01

    DIRECT is a project to directly obtain the distances to two Local Group galaxies, M31 and M33, which occupy a crucial position near the bottom of the cosmological distance ladder. As the first step of the DIRECT project, we have searched for detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs) and new Cepheids in the M31 and M33 galaxies with 1 m class telescopes. In this paper, we present a catalog of variable stars discovered in the data from the follow-up observations of the DEB system D33J013346.2+304439.9 in field M33A (α=23.55d, δ=30.72d J2000.0), collected with the Kitt Peak National Observatory's 2.1 m telescope. In our search covering an area of 108 arcmin2, we have found 434 variable stars: 63 eclipsing binaries, 305 Cepheids, and 66 other periodic, possible long-period, or nonperiodic variables. Of these variables, 280 are newly discovered, mainly short-period and/or faint Cepheids. Their light curves were extracted using the ISIS image subtraction package. For 85% of the variables, we present light curves in standard V and B magnitudes, with the remaining 15% expressed in units of differential flux. We have discovered a population of first-overtone Cepheid candidates, and for eight of them we present strong arguments in favor of this interpretation. We also report on the detection of a nonlinearity in the KPNO T2KA and T1KA cameras. The catalog of variables, as well as their photometry (~7.8×104 BV measurements) and finding charts, is available electronically via anonymous ftp and the World Wide Web. The complete set of the CCD frames is available upon request. Based on observations obtained with the 2.1 m telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory.

  7. DIRECT Distances to Nearby Galaxies Using Detached Eclipsing Binaries and Cepheids. VIII. Additional Variables in the Field M33B Discovered with Image Subtraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochejska, B. J.; Kaluzny, J.; Stanek, K. Z.; Sasselov, D. D.; Szentgyorgyi, A. H.

    2001-11-01

    DIRECT is a project to obtain directly the distances to two Local Group galaxies, M31 and M33, which occupy a crucial position near the bottom of the cosmological distance ladder. As the first step of the DIRECT project we have searched for detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs) and new Cepheids in the M31 and M33 galaxies with 1 m class telescopes. In this eighth paper we present a catalog of variable stars discovered in the data from the follow-up observations of DEB system D33J013337.0+303032.8 in field M33B [(α,δ)=(23.48d,30.57d), J2000.0], collected with the Kitt Peak National Observatory 2.1 m telescope. In our search covering an area of 108 arcmin2 we have found 895 variable stars: 96 eclipsing binaries, 349 Cepheids, and 450 other periodic, possibly long-period or nonperiodic variables. Of these variables 612 are newly discovered. Their light curves were extracted using the ISIS image subtraction package. For 77% of the variables we present light curves in standard V and B magnitudes, with the remaining 23% expressed in units of differential flux. We have discovered a population of first-overtone Cepheid candidates, and for six of them we present strong arguments in favor of this interpretation. The catalog of variables, as well as their photometry (about 9.2×104 BV measurements) and finding charts, is available electronically via anonymous ftp and the World Wide Web. The complete set of the CCD frames is available upon request. Based on observations obtained with the 2.1 m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  8. "Naturally occurring asbestos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnard, F.; Lahondère, D.; Blein, O.; Lahfid, A.; Wille, G.

    2012-04-01

    The term asbestos refers to six silicate minerals from amphibole and serpentine groups. By definition, it consists in bundles of thin and flexible long fibers, with high-tensile strength, and chemical and heat resistance. In contrast to asbestos found within commercial products and mining, the specific term ''naturally occurring asbestos'' (NOA) refers to asbestiform minerals occurring within rocks or soils that can be released by human activities or weathering processes. The fact that the exposure to asbestos is related to lung pathologies is now widely demonstrated (e.g. asbestosis, mesothelioma and lung cancer). However, if health risks associated with exposure to NOA exist, they are not yet well documented. The crystallization of natural asbestos occurs in specific Mg-rich lithologies associated with peculiar structural and metamorphic conditions. By recognizing and combining such specific geologic criteria, the presence or the absence of asbestos in bedrock terrains can be reasonably predicted and maps of NOA hazard can be drawn. We present here new results of geological mapping and petrological study concerning the evaluation of the NOA hazard in the Alps and Corsica, in France. The three folds approach consists in (1) a determination of lithologies with potential NOA from a bibliographic compilation and extraction of target zones from a geological geodatabase (2) a geological mapping of the target zones followed by a petrological characterization of sampled asbestiform minerals in the laboratory (optical microscopy, TEM, SEM, and Raman spectroscopy technics), and (3) the drawing of the final map of NOA hazard, at regional-scale. Occurrence criteria can be retained as follows: 1. NOA are abundant in the internal zones of the Alps and Corsica, especially within ophiolitic complexes. Natural asbestos are mostly concentrated within ultramafic rocks but can also occur within basic lithologies such as Mg-metagabbros, metabasalts and meta-pillow-lavas, 2. Asbestos

  9. Luminous and Variable Stars in M31 and M33. II. Luminous Blue Variables, Candidate LBVs, Fe II Emission Line Stars, and Other Supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, Roberta M.; Weis, Kerstin; Davidson, Kris; Bomans, D. J.; Burggraf, Birgitta

    2014-07-01

    An increasing number of non-terminal eruptions are being found in the numerous surveys for optical transients. Very little is known about these giant eruptions, their progenitors and their evolutionary state. A greatly improved census of the likely progenitor class, including the most luminous evolved stars, the luminous blue variables (LBVs), and the warm and cool hypergiants is now needed for a complete picture of the final pre-supernova stages of very massive stars. We have begun a survey of the evolved and unstable luminous star populations in several nearby resolved galaxies. In this second paper on M31 and M33, we review the spectral characteristics, spectral energy distributions, circumstellar ejecta, and evidence for mass loss for 82 luminous and variable stars. We show that many of these stars have warm circumstellar dust including several of the Fe II emission line stars, but conclude that the confirmed LBVs in M31 and M33 do not. The confirmed LBVs have relatively low wind speeds even in their hot, quiescent or visual minimum state compared to the B-type supergiants and Of/WN stars which they spectroscopically resemble. The nature of the Fe II emission line stars and their relation to the LBV state remains uncertain, but some have properties in common with the warm hypergiants and the sgB[e] stars. Several individual stars are discussed in detail. We identify three possible candidate LBVs and three additional post-red supergiant candidates. We suggest that M33-013406.63 (UIT301,B416) is not an LBV/S Dor variable, but is a very luminous late O-type supergiant and one of the most luminous stars or pair of stars in M33. Based on observations with the Multiple Mirror Telescope, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona and on observations obtained with the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are: The University

  10. Detection of [O I] λ6300 and Other Diagnostic Emission Lines in the Diffuse Ionized Gas of M33 with Gemini-North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voges, E. S.; Walterbos, R. A. M.

    2006-06-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in M33 near the H II region NGC 604. We present the first detection of [O I] λ6300 in the DIG of M33, one of the critical lines for distinguishing photoionization from shock ionization models. We measure [O I]/Hα in the range of 0.04-0.10 and an increase in this ratio with decreasing emission measure. Our measurements of [S II]/Hα and [N II]/Hα also rise with decreasing emission measure, while our [O III]/Hβ measurements remain fairly constant. We have one tentative detection of He I in the region of brightest emission measure, with a ratio of He I/Hα = 0.033 +/- 0.019, indicating that the helium is at least partially ionized. We compare our observed emission-line ratios to photoionization models and find that field star ionization models do not fit our data well. Leaky H II region models are consistent with our data, without the need to invoke additional ionization mechanisms to fit our [O I] or [O III] measurements. The closest large H II region is NGC 604 and is therefore a likely candidate for the source of the ionizing photons for the gas in this region.

  11. Naturally occurring cardiac glycosides.

    PubMed

    Radford, D J; Gillies, A D; Hinds, J A; Duffy, P

    1986-05-12

    Cardiac glycoside poisoning from the ingestion of plants, particularly of oleanders, occurs with reasonable frequency in tropical and subtropical areas. We have assessed a variety of plant specimens for their cardiac glycoside content by means of radioimmunoassays with antibodies that differ in their specificity for cardiac glycosides. Significant amounts of immunoreactive cardiac glycoside were found to be present in the ornamental shrubs: yellow oleander (Thevetia peruviana); oleander (Nerium oleander); wintersweet (Carissa spectabilis); bushman's poison (Carissa acokanthera); sea-mango (Cerbera manghas); and frangipani (Plumeria rubra); and in the milkweeds: redheaded cotton-bush (Asclepias curassavica); balloon cotton (Asclepias fruiticosa); king's crown (Calotropis procera); and rubber vine (Cryptostegia grandifolia). The venom gland of the cane toad (Bufo marinus) also contained large quantities of cardiac glycosides. The competitive immunoassay method permits the rapid screening of specimens that are suspected to contain cardiac glycosides. Awareness of the existence of these plant and animal toxins and their dangers allows them to be avoided and poisoning prevented. The method is also useful for the confirmation of the presence of cardiac glycosides in serum in cases of poisoning. PMID:3086679

  12. Naturally Occurring Food Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Laurie C.; Matulka, Ray A.; Burdock, George A.

    2010-01-01

    Although many foods contain toxins as a naturally-occurring constituent or, are formed as the result of handling or processing, the incidence of adverse reactions to food is relatively low. The low incidence of adverse effects is the result of some pragmatic solutions by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other regulatory agencies through the creative use of specifications, action levels, tolerances, warning labels and prohibitions. Manufacturers have also played a role by setting limits on certain substances and developing mitigation procedures for process-induced toxins. Regardless of measures taken by regulators and food producers to protect consumers from natural food toxins, consumption of small levels of these materials is unavoidable. Although the risk for toxicity due to consumption of food toxins is fairly low, there is always the possibility of toxicity due to contamination, overconsumption, allergy or an unpredictable idiosyncratic response. The purpose of this review is to provide a toxicological and regulatory overview of some of the toxins present in some commonly consumed foods, and where possible, discuss the steps that have been taken to reduce consumer exposure, many of which are possible because of the unique process of food regulation in the United States. PMID:22069686

  13. GAS SURFACE DENSITY, STAR FORMATION RATE SURFACE DENSITY, AND THE MAXIMUM MASS OF YOUNG STAR CLUSTERS IN A DISK GALAXY. I. THE FLOCCULENT GALAXY M 33

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A.; Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel

    2012-12-20

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass M{sub max} and surface densities of total gas ({Sigma}{sub gas}), molecular gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}), and star formation rate ({Sigma}{sub SFR}) in the flocculent galaxy M 33, using published gas data and a catalog of more than 600 young star clusters in its disk. By comparing the radial distributions of gas and most massive cluster masses, we find that M{sub max}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sup 4.7{+-}0.4}{sub gas}, M{sub max}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sup 1.3{+-}0.1}{sub H{sub 2}}, and M{sub max}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sup 1.0{+-}0.1}{sub SFR}. We rule out that these correlations result from the size of the sample; hence, the change of the maximum cluster mass must be due to physical causes.

  14. Role of polycomb group protein cbx2/m33 in meiosis onset and maintenance of chromosome stability in the Mammalian germline.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Claudia; De La Fuente, Rabindranath

    2011-01-01

    Polycomb group proteins (PcG) are major epigenetic regulators, essential for establishing heritable expression patterns of developmental control genes. The mouse PcG family member M33/Cbx2 (Chromobox homolog protein 2) is a component of the Polycomb-Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1). Targeted deletion of Cbx2/M33 in mice results in homeotic transformations of the axial skeleton, growth retardation and male-to-female sex reversal. In this study, we tested whether Cbx2 is involved in the control of chromatin remodeling processes during meiosis. Our analysis revealed sex reversal in 28.6% of XY(-/-) embryos, in which a hypoplastic testis and a contralateral ovary were observed in close proximity to the kidney, while the remaining male mutant fetuses exhibited bilateral testicular hypoplasia. Notably, germ cells recovered from Cbx2((XY-/-)) testes on day 18.5 of fetal development exhibited premature meiosis onset with synaptonemal complex formation suggesting a role for Cbx2 in the control of meiotic entry in male germ cells. Mutant females exhibited small ovaries with significant germ cell loss and a high proportion of oocytes with abnormal synapsis and non-homologous interactions at the pachytene stage as well as formation of univalents at diplotene. These defects were associated with failure to resolve DNA double strand breaks marked by persistent γH2AX and Rad51 foci at the late pachytene stage. Importantly, two factors required for meiotic silencing of asynapsed chromatin, ubiquitinated histone H2A (ubH2A) and the chromatin remodeling protein BRCA1, co-localized with fully synapsed chromosome axes in the majority of Cbx2((-/-)) oocytes. These results provide novel evidence that Cbx2 plays a critical and previously unrecognized role in germ cell viability, meiosis onset and homologous chromosome synapsis in the mammalian germline. PMID:22200029

  15. Luminous and Variable Stars in M31 and M33. III. The Yellow and Red Supergiants and Post-red Supergiant Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michael S.; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Jones, Terry J.

    2016-07-01

    Recent supernova (SN) and transient surveys have revealed an increasing number of non-terminal stellar eruptions. Though the progenitor class of these eruptions includes the most luminous stars, little is known of the pre-SN mechanics of massive stars in their most evolved state, thus motivating a census of possible progenitors. From surveys of evolved and unstable luminous star populations in nearby galaxies, we select a sample of yellow and red supergiant (RSG) candidates in M31 and M33 for review of their spectral characteristics and spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Since the position of intermediate- and late-type supergiants on the color–magnitude diagram can be heavily contaminated by foreground dwarfs, we employ spectral classification and multi-band photometry from optical and near-infrared surveys to confirm membership. Based on spectroscopic evidence for mass loss and the presence of circumstellar (CS) dust in their SEDs, we find that 30%–40% of the yellow supergiants are likely in a post-RSG state. Comparison with evolutionary tracks shows that these mass-losing, post-RSGs have initial masses between 20 and 40 M ⊙. More than half of the observed RSGs in M31 and M33 are producing dusty CS ejecta. We also identify two new warm hypergiants in M31, J004621.05+421308.06 and J004051.59+403303.00, both of which are likely in a post-RSG state. Based on observations obtained with the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are: The University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max-Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; The Ohio State University, and The Research Corporation, on behalf of The University of Notre Dame, University of Minnesota, and University of Virginia.

  16. RCT photometry of the Hubble Classical Cepheid V19 in M33: Evidence for the Cessation of Pulsations - A Case of Stellar Evolution in Real Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Scott G.; Guinan, Edward F.; Macri, Lucas; Pellerin, Ann

    2011-03-01

    We report on our continuing efforts to monitor the photometric behavior of Hubble's Variable Star V19 in the Triangulum Spiral Galaxy M33. B,V photometry has been carried out of this unusual 18th mag (previous) Cepheid with the 1.3-m RCT (Robotically Controlled Telescope) at KPNO. With time-series photometry, with a dedicated robotic telescope, we can hope to solve the mystery of V19 and its unprecedented evolutionary behavior. In the influential work "A Spiral Nebula as a Stellar System: Messier 33" (Hubble 1926) Edwin Hubble determined the distance to M33 by using 35 Cepheids he discovered. One of those Cepheids was designated V19. At that time observations revealed V19 to have a 54.7-day period and B-band (converted from photographic magnitudes) light amplitude of 1.1-mag. Its mean B-magnitude was 19.6 /-0.2. V19 properties were consistent with the Period-Luminosity Law for M33 derived by Hubble at that time. Follow-up observations in 1996-1997 as part of the DIRECT Program (Macri et al. 2001), however, revealed large and surprising changes in the properties of V19. Its mean B-magnitude had risen to 19.05 /-0.05 and its amplitude had decreased to less than 0.1-mag. The DIRECT study thoroughly checked for possible misclassifications of the variable or contamination by nearby objects, and found none. For all intents and purposes, V19 is no longer a Classical Cepheid, or at least varying below the detectable levels of the photometry. The only other well-documented instance of Cepheid pulsations declining over time is in the case of Polaris - whose V-band amplitude decreased from just over 0.1-mag to below 0.03-mag over the course of a century (Engle et al 2004). Also, a study of the visual magnitudes of Polaris over the past two millennia has shown a possible increase in brightness of 1-mag over the past 1000 years. The changes observed for V19 are obviously on a much more dramatic scale. We discuss the properties of this unusual (former) Cepheid and discuss

  17. CONSTRAINTS ON THE COMPACT OBJECT MASS IN THE ECLIPSING HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARY XMMU J013236.7+303228 IN M 33

    SciTech Connect

    Bhalerao, Varun B.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Van Kerkwijk, Marten H.

    2012-09-20

    We present optical spectroscopic measurements of the eclipsing high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) XMMU J013236.7+303228 in M 33. Based on spectra taken at multiple epochs of the 1.73 day binary orbital period we determine physical as well as orbital parameters for the donor star. We find the donor to be a B1.5IV subgiant with effective temperature T = 22, 000-23, 000 K. From the luminosity, temperature, and known distance to M 33 we derive a radius of R 8.9 {+-} 0.5 R{sub Sun }. From the radial-velocity measurements, we determine a velocity semi-amplitude of K{sub opt} = 63 {+-} 12 km s{sup -1}. Using the physical properties of the B star determined from the optical spectrum, we estimate the star's mass to be M{sub opt} = 11 {+-} 1 M{sub Sun }. Based on the X-ray spectrum, the compact companion is likely a neutron star, although no pulsations have yet been detected. Using the spectroscopically derived B star mass we find the neutron star companion mass to be M{sub X} = 2.0 {+-} 0.4 M{sub Sun }, consistent with the neutron star mass in the HMXB Vela X-1, but heavier than the canonical value of 1.4 M{sub Sun} found for many millisecond pulsars. We attempt to use as an additional constraint that the B star radius inferred from temperature, flux, and distance should equate to the Roche radius, since the system accretes by Roche lobe overflow. This leads to substantially larger masses, but by trying to apply the technique to known systems, we find that the masses are consistently overestimated. Attempting to account for that in our uncertainties, we derive M{sub X} = 2.2{sup +0.8}{sub -0.6} M{sub Sun} and M{sub opt} = 13 {+-} 4 M{sub Sun }. We conclude that precise constraints require detailed modeling of the shape of the Roche surface.

  18. Numerical computation of gravitational field of infinitely thin axisymmetric disc with arbitrary surface mass density profile and its application to preliminary study of rotation curve of M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2016-03-01

    We developed a numerical method to compute the gravitational field of an infinitely thin axisymmetric disc with an arbitrary surface mass density profile. We evaluate the gravitational potential by a split quadrature using the double exponential rule and obtain the acceleration vector by numerically differentiating the potential by Ridder's algorithm. The new method is of around 12 digit accuracy and sufficiently fast because requiring only one-dimensional integration. By using the new method, we show the rotation curves of some non-trivial discs: (i) truncated power-law discs, (ii) discs with a non-negligible centre hole, (iii) truncated Mestel discs with edge softening, (iv) double power-law discs, (v) exponentially damped power-law discs, and (vi) an exponential disc with a sinusoidal modulation of the density profile. Also, we present a couple of model fittings to the observed rotation curve of M33: (i) the standard deconvolution by assuming a spherical distribution of the dark matter and (ii) a direct fit of infinitely thin disc mass with a double power-law distribution of the surface mass density. Although the number of free parameters is a little larger, the latter model provides a significantly better fit. The FORTRAN 90 programs of the new method are electronically available.

  19. Circumstantial Starbirth in Starbursts: Systematic Variations in the Stellar and Nebular Content of Giant HII Regions in the Local Group Galaxy M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, W. H.; Murphy, E. J.; Gherz, R. D.; Polomski, E.; Woodward, C. E.; Fazio, G. G.; Rieke, G. H.; Spitzer/M33 Research Team

    2005-12-01

    From the Orion Nebula to the Hubble Deep Field, starburst activity can be seen transforming galaxian clouds of gas into populous clusters of stars. The pyrotechnics and chemical enrichment associated with this activity have led to outcomes as ubiquitous as interstellar dust and as exquisite as life on Earth. In this talk, I will focus on the circumstances of star formation in the environmental context of ongoing starburst activity. I begin with the premises that (1) the formation of a single star takes time, (2) the formation of a populous cluster takes even more time, and (3) ''stuff'' happens in the interim. Hubble images of the Orion Nebula and Eagle Nebula show how hot stars can excavate neighboring clouds of gas and photoevaporate the star-forming cores that are exposed. Hubble observations of giant HII regions in M33 reveal a significant variation in the stellar populations, such that the most metal-rich HII regions contain the greatest proportions of the most massive stars. ISO and Spitzer observations of these same HII regions reveal corresponding variations in the nebular content. These multi-wavelength diagnostics of the stellar-nebular feedback in galaxian starbursts suggest a star-forming mechanism which is subject to photo-evaporative ablation -- an erosive process that is systematically mediated by the metal abundance and corresponding amounts of protective dust in the starbursting environment.

  20. APERTURE SYNTHESIS OBSERVATIONS OF CO, HCN, AND 89 GHz CONTINUUM EMISSION TOWARD NGC 604 IN M33: SEQUENTIAL STAR FORMATION INDUCED BY A SUPERGIANT H II REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Rie; Okumura, Sachiko K.; Kurono, Yasutaka; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Tosaki, Tomoka; Tamura, Yoichi; Kuno, Nario; Kawabe, Ryohei; Sakamoto, Seiichi; Hasegawa, Takashi

    2010-12-01

    We present the results from new Nobeyama Millimeter Array observations of CO(1-0), HCN(1-0), and 89 GHz continuum emission toward NGC 604, known as the supergiant H II region in the nearby galaxy M33. Our high spatial resolution images (4.''2 x 2.''6, corresponding to 17 pc x 11 pc physical size) of CO emission allowed us to uncover 10 individual molecular clouds that have masses of (0.8-7.4) x10{sup 5} M{sub sun} and sizes of 5-29 pc, comparable to those of typical Galactic giant molecular clouds. Moreover, we detected for the first time HCN emission in the two most massive clouds and 89 GHz continuum emission at the rims of the 'H{alpha} shells'. The HCN and 89 GHz continuum emission are offset from the CO peak and are distributed in the direction of the central cluster. Three out of ten CO clouds are well correlated with the H{alpha} shells both in spatial and velocity domains, implying an interaction between molecular gas and the expanding H II region. The CO clouds show varieties in star formation efficiencies (SFEs), which are estimated from the 89 GHz emission and combination of H{alpha} and Spitzer 24 {mu}m data. Furthermore, we found that the SFEs decrease with increasing projected distance measured from the heart of the central OB star cluster in NGC 604, suggesting radial changes in the evolutionary stages of the molecular clouds in the course of stellar cluster formation. Our results provide further support to the picture of sequential star formation in NGC 604 initially proposed by Tosaki et al. with the higher spatially resolved molecular clouds, in which an isotropic expansion of the H II region pushes gases outward, which accumulates to form dense molecular clouds, and then induces massive star formations.

  1. Nipah virus entry can occur by macropinocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pernet, Olivier; Pohl, Christine; Ainouze, Michelle; Kweder, Hasan; Buckland, Robin

    2009-12-20

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a zoonotic biosafety level 4 paramyxovirus that emerged recently in Asia with high mortality in man. NiV is a member, with Hendra virus (HeV), of the Henipavirus genus in the Paramyxoviridae family. Although NiV entry, like that of other paramyxoviruses, is believed to occur via pH-independent fusion with the host cell's plasma membrane we present evidence that entry can occur by an endocytic pathway. The NiV receptor ephrinB2 has receptor kinase activity and we find that ephrinB2's cytoplasmic domain is required for entry but is dispensable for post-entry viral spread. The mutation of a single tyrosine residue (Y304F) in ephrinB2's cytoplasmic tail abrogates NiV entry. Moreover, our results show that NiV entry is inhibited by constructions and drugs specific for the endocytic pathway of macropinocytosis. Our findings could potentially permit the rapid development of novel low-cost antiviral treatments not only for NiV but also HeV.

  2. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training).

  3. Detecting change as it occurs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radok, Uwe; Brown, Timothy J.

    1992-01-01

    Traditionally climate changes have been detected from long series of observations and long after they have happened. Our 'inverse sequential' procedure, for detecting change as soon as it occurs, describes the existing or most recent data by their frequency distribution. Its parameter(s) are estimated both from the existing set of observations and from the same set augmented by 1,2,....j new observations. Individual-value probability products ('likelihoods') are used to form ratios which yield two probabilities for erroneously accepting the existing parameter(s) as valid for the augmented data set, and vice versa. A genuine parameter change is signaled when these probabilities (or a more stable compound probability) show a progressive decrease. New parameter values can then be estimated from the new observations alone using standard statistical techniques. The inverse sequential procedure will be illustrated for global annual mean temperatures (assumed normally distributed), and for annual numbers of North Atlantic hurricanes (assumed to represent Poisson distributions). The procedure was developed, but not yet tested, for linear or exponential trends, and for chi-squared means or degrees of freedom, a special measure of autocorrelation.

  4. Signals and Receptors.

    PubMed

    Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Lu, Benson; Evans, Ron; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2016-04-01

    Communication between cells in a multicellular organism occurs by the production of ligands (proteins, peptides, fatty acids, steroids, gases, and other low-molecular-weight compounds) that are either secreted by cells or presented on their surface, and act on receptors on, or in, other target cells. Such signals control cell growth, migration, survival, and differentiation. Signaling receptors can be single-span plasma membrane receptors associated with tyrosine or serine/threonine kinase activities, proteins with seven transmembrane domains, or intracellular receptors. Ligand-activated receptors convey signals into the cell by activating signaling pathways that ultimately affect cytosolic machineries or nuclear transcriptional programs or by directly translocating to the nucleus to regulate transcription. PMID:27037414

  5. Breast carcinomas occurring in young women (< 35 years) are different.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, R. A.; Lees, E.; Webb, M. B.; Dearing, S. J.

    1996-01-01

    One hundred and sixty-three breast carcinomas occurring in women aged between 26 and 44 years were examined for pathological features, oestrogen and progesterone receptor status, proliferation as determined by Ki-67 labelling and the presence of c-erbB-2 and p53 protein, and were compared with a control group of carcinomas from women in the 50-67 years age group. Carcinomas occurring in women aged under 35 years had a significantly high incidence of being poorly differentiated and of having high proliferation rates. This group also had a significantly high incidence of p53 protein staining. Carcinomas in the under 30 years age group had a lower incidence of oestrogen and progesterone receptor positivity. No differences were found in c-erbB-2-positive staining between the groups. Infiltrating lobular carcinomas were only identified in women aged 40 years and over. There was a higher incidence of a family history in the 35-44 years age group (18%) than in the under 35 years age group (11%). Breast carcinomas occurring in women aged under 35 years are more aggressive. An important finding is the high incidence of p53 positivity, which may indicate genetic instability. Images Figure 1 PMID:8956795

  6. WHERE DOES WATERBORNE GIARDIASIS OCCUR, AND WHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over 60 outbreaks of waterborne giardiasis occurred in the United States between 1965 and 1982, mainly in the Northeast, the Rocky Mountain states, and the Pacific states. Outbreaks most often occurred as a result of inadequate or interrupted treatment. Disinfection problems and ...

  7. Dopamine Receptors and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Coronel, Israel; Florán, Benjamín

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is one of the major neurotransmitters and participates in a number of functions such as motor coordination, emotions, memory, reward mechanism, neuroendocrine regulation etc. DA exerts its effects through five DA receptors that are subdivided in 2 families: D1-like DA receptors (D1 and D5) and the D2-like (D2, D3 and D4). All DA receptors are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and play an important role in not only in physiological conditions but also pathological scenarios. Abnormalities in the DAergic system and its receptors in the basal ganglia structures are the basis Parkinson’s disease (PD), however DA also participates in other neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington disease (HD) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Under pathological conditions reorganization of DAergic system has been observed and most of the times, those changes occur as a mechanism of compensation, but in some cases contributes to worsening the alterations. Here we review the changes that occur on DA transmission and DA receptors (DARs) at both levels expression and signals transduction pathways as a result of neurotoxicity, inflammation and in neurodegenerative processes. The better understanding of the role of DA receptors in neuropathological conditions is crucial for development of novel therapeutic approaches to treat alterations related to neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26425390

  8. ST elevation occurring during stress testing

    PubMed Central

    Malouf, Diana; Mugmon, Marc

    2016-01-01

    A case is presented of significant reversible ST elevation occurring during treadmill testing, and the coronary anatomy and subsequent course are described, indicating that ischemia is a potential cause of this electrocardiographic finding. PMID:27124164

  9. Human external ophthalmomyiasis occurring in Barbados.

    PubMed

    Levett, P N; Brooker, L; Reifer, C; Prussia, P R; Eberhard, M L

    2004-06-01

    Human infection with the sheep nasal botfly Oestrus ovis occurs sporadically. In most cases, there is a history of a strike in the eye by the adult fly. Human O. ovis has been reported rarely from the Americas. We report the first case of O. ovis infection in the Caribbean region, which occurred in an urban area of Barbados. The patient responded to removal of the larvae from the conjunctiva and symptomatic treatment. PMID:15352754

  10. Young Children's Reports of when Learning Occurred

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Connie M.; Bartsch, Karen; Nunez, Narina

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated young children's reports of when learning occurred. A total of 96 4-, 5-, and 6-year-olds were recruited from suburban preschools and elementary schools. The children learned an animal fact and a body movement. A week later, children learned another animal fact and another body movement and then answered questions about…

  11. Phonetic Recalibration Only Occurs in Speech Mode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vroomen, Jean; Baart, Martijn

    2009-01-01

    Upon hearing an ambiguous speech sound dubbed onto lipread speech, listeners adjust their phonetic categories in accordance with the lipread information (recalibration) that tells what the phoneme should be. Here we used sine wave speech (SWS) to show that this tuning effect occurs if the SWS sounds are perceived as speech, but not if the sounds…

  12. Changes in joint laxity occurring during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Calguneri, M; Bird, H A; Wright, V

    1982-01-01

    We have studied changes in peripheral joint laxity occurring during pregnancy in 68 females using both the finger hyperextensometer to quantify laxity at the metacarpophalangeal joint of the index finger and Beighton et al.'s modification of the Carter and Wilkinson scoring system. Although the latter system recorded no change, the more sensitive hyperextensometer demonstrated a significant increase in joint laxity during the last trimester of pregnancy (0.02 greater than p greater than 0.01) over the readings from the same individuals after parturition. When primigravidae and multigravidae were compared, a highly significant increase in laxity was found in women having their second baby over those having their first (0.01 greater than p greater than 0.001), though no further increase in laxity occurred in subsequent pregnancies. PMID:7073339

  13. Young children's reports of when learning occurred.

    PubMed

    Tang, Connie M; Bartsch, Karen; Nunez, Narina

    2007-06-01

    This study investigated young children's reports of when learning occurred. A total of 96 4-, 5-, and 6-year-olds were recruited from suburban preschools and elementary schools. The children learned an animal fact and a body movement. A week later, children learned another animal fact and another body movement and then answered questions about when the different learning events occurred. Responses of children who responded correctly to control questions about time supported the hypothesis that temporal distance questions would elicit more correct responses than would temporal location questions. Partial support was also found for the hypothesis that behavior learning would generate more correct reports than would fact learning. Implications for characterizations of children's developing understanding of knowledge and for applications of those characterizations in education and eyewitness testimony are discussed. PMID:17346740

  14. Synthesis of Naturally Occurring Tropones and Tropolones

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Song, Wangze; Schienebeck, Casi M.; Zhang, Min; Tang, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    Tropones and tropolones are an important class of seven-membered non-benzenoid aromatic compounds. They can be prepared directly by oxidation of seven-membered rings. They can also be derived from cyclization or cycloaddition of appropriate precursors followed by elimination or rearrangement. This review discusses the types of naturally occurring tropones and tropolones and outlines important methods developed for the synthesis of tropone and tropolone natural products. PMID:25400298

  15. Naturally Occuring Fish Poisons from Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Jonathan G.; Burton, Robert A.; Wood, Steven G.; Owen, Noel L.

    2004-10-01

    Since prehistoric times, cultures throughout the world have used piscicidal (fish poisoning) plants for fishing. In recent times, scientists have identified many of the plant compounds responsible for killing the fish and have found that these compounds possess other important biological properties, such as insecticidal and anti-cancer activities. This article reviews some of the chemical research that has been performed on naturally occurring fish poisons, including plant sources, methods of use, toxicity, and mechanisms of action of piscicides.

  16. Naturally occurring anti M complicating ABO grouping.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Safoorah; Dantes, Roelyn; Varghese, Sunu; Al Hakawati, Imadeddin

    2011-01-01

    Anti M is considered a naturally occurring antibody that is usually active at temperatures below 37°C and is thus of no clinical significance. This antibody, if present in an individual, can lead to a discrepancy between forward and reverse ABO grouping and thus creates diagnostic difficulties for blood bank staff. We report a case of a 58-year-old lady who had an unexpected reaction in reverse grouping due to anti M that posed a problem for us in the interpretation of results of her blood group. We also reviewed the literature to find out the significance of such discrepancy in blood grouping. PMID:21393909

  17. Naturally occurring products in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, E.; Sankari, Leena S.; Malathi, L.; Krupaa, Jayasri R.

    2015-01-01

    Natural products have been used for the treatment of various diseases and are becoming an important research area for drug discovery. These products, especially phytochemicals have been extensively studies and have exhibited anti-carcinogenic activities by interfering with the initiation, development and progression of cancer through the modulation of various mechanisms including cellular proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and metastasis. This concept is gaining attention because it is a cost-effective alternative to cancer treatment. In this article, we have discussed some of the naturally occurring products used in cancer treatment. PMID:26015704

  18. Cannabinoid receptors in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    McPartland, J M; Agraval, J; Gleeson, D; Heasman, K; Glass, M

    2006-03-01

    Two cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, are expressed in mammals, birds, reptiles, and fish. The presence of cannabinoid receptors in invertebrates has been controversial, due to conflicting evidence. We conducted a systematic review of the literature, using expanded search parameters. Evidence presented in the literature varied in validity, ranging from crude in vivo behavioural assays to robust in silico ortholog discovery. No research existed for several clades of invertebrates; we therefore tested for cannabinoid receptors in seven representative species, using tritiated ligand binding assays with [3H]CP55,940 displaced by the CB1-selective antagonist SR141716A. Specific binding of [3H]CP55,940 was found in neural membranes of Ciona intestinalis (Deuterstoma, a positive control), Lumbricusterrestris (Lophotrochozoa), and three ecdysozoans: Peripatoides novae-zealandiae (Onychophora), Jasus edwardi (Crustacea) and Panagrellus redivivus (Nematoda); the potency of displacement by SR141716A was comparable to measurements on rat cerebellum. No specific binding was observed in Actinothoe albocincta (Cnidaria) or Tethya aurantium (Porifera). The phylogenetic distribution of cannabinoid receptors may address taxonomic questions; previous studies suggested that the loss of CB1 was a synapomorphy shared by ecdysozoans. Our discovery of cannabinoid receptors in some nematodes, onychophorans, and crustaceans does not contradict the Ecdysozoa hypothesis, but gives it no support. We hypothesize that cannabinoid receptors evolved in the last common ancestor of bilaterians, with secondary loss occurring in insects and other clades. Conflicting data regarding Cnidarians precludes hypotheses regarding the last common ancestor of eumetazoans. No cannabinoid receptors are expressed in sponges, which probably diverged before the origin of the eumetazoan ancestor. PMID:16599912

  19. Introduction to naturally occurring radioactive material

    SciTech Connect

    Egidi, P.

    1997-08-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is everywhere; we are exposed to it every day. It is found in our bodies, the food we eat, the places where we live and work, and in products we use. We are also bathed in a sea of natural radiation coming from the sun and deep space. Living systems have adapted to these levels of radiation and radioactivity. But some industrial practices involving natural resources concentrate these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. Other activities, such as flying at high altitudes, expose us to elevated levels of NORM. This session will concentrate on diffuse sources of technologically-enhanced (TE) NORM, which are generally large-volume, low-activity waste streams produced by industries such as mineral mining, ore benefication, production of phosphate Fertilizers, water treatment and purification, and oil and gas production. The majority of radionuclides in TENORM are found in the uranium and thorium decay chains. Radium and its subsequent decay products (radon) are the principal radionuclides used in characterizing the redistribution of TENORM in the environment by human activity. We will briefly review other radionuclides occurring in nature (potassium and rubidium) that contribute primarily to background doses. TENORM is found in many waste streams; for example, scrap metal, sludges, slags, fluids, and is being discovered in industries traditionally not thought of as affected by radionuclide contamination. Not only the forms and volumes, but the levels of radioactivity in TENORM vary. Current discussions about the validity of the linear no dose threshold theory are central to the TENORM issue. TENORM is not regulated by the Atomic Energy Act or other Federal regulations. Control and regulation of TENORM is not consistent from industry to industry nor from state to state. Proposed regulations are moving from concentration-based standards to dose

  20. Epigenetic Mechanisms in Commonly Occurring Cancers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a collection of very complex diseases that share many traits while differing in many ways as well. This makes a universal cure difficult to attain, and it highlights the importance of understanding each type of cancer at a molecular level. Although many strides have been made in identifying the genetic causes for some cancers, we now understand that simple changes in the primary DNA sequence cannot explain the many steps that are necessary to turn a normal cell into a rouge cancer cell. In recent years, some research has shifted to focusing on detailing epigenetic contributions to the development and progression of cancer. These changes occur apart from primary genomic sequences and include DNA methylation, histone modifications, and miRNA expression. Since these epigenetic modifications are reversible, drugs targeting epigenetic changes are becoming more common in clinical settings. Daily discoveries elucidating these complex epigenetic processes are leading to advances in the field of cancer research. These advances, however, come at a rapid and often overwhelming pace. This review specifically summarizes the main epigenetic mechanisms currently documented in solid tumors common in the United States and Europe. PMID:22519822

  1. Naturally occurring hydroxytyrosol: synthesis and anticancer potential.

    PubMed

    Bernini, R; Merendino, N; Romani, A; Velotti, F

    2013-01-01

    Several epidemiological and animal studies have suggested that polyphenols, a group of secondary plant metabolites occurring mainly in the plant kingdom, may have a protective effect against some chronic degenerative diseases such as cancer. Polyphenols are part of the human diet, being present in vegetal food and beverages. Among them, an olive biophenol named hydroxytyrosol [2-(3,4- dihydroxyphenyl)ethanol, HTyr] has recently received particular attention because of its antioxidant, antiproliferative, pro-apoptotic, and anti-inflammatory activities, which have the potential to specifically counteract all cancer hallmarks, thus representing the expectant biological activities underlying the anti-tumor properties of this polyphenol. After a description of the synthetic procedures to prepare pure HTyr, this review takes into consideration the chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential of HTyr as the result of its antioxidant, antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory activities. In particular, the review is focused on the current knowledge of the main cellular and molecular mechanisms used by HTyr to affect carcinogenesis, highlighting the specific oncogenic and inflammatory signaling pathways potentially targeted by HTyr. PMID:23244583

  2. Medicinal significance of naturally occurring cyclotetrapeptides.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Muna Ali

    2016-10-01

    Bioactive natural products are serendipitous drug candidates, which stimulate synthetic approaches for improving and supporting drug discovery and development. Therefore, the search for bioactive metabolites from different natural sources continues to play an important role in fashioning new medicinal agents. Several cyclic peptides were produced by organisms, such as β-defensins, gramicidin S, and tyrocidine A, and exhibited a wide range of bioactivities, such as antiviral activity against HIV-1, influenza A viruses, or antibacterial activity. Cyclic tetrapeptides are a class of natural products that were found to have a broad range of biological activities, promising pharmacokinetic properties, as well as interesting conformational dynamics and ability of slow inter-conversion to several different structures. Cyclooligopeptides, particularly medium ring-sized peptides, were obtained from marine microorganisms and exhibited a wide range of pharmacological properties, including antimicrobial and anti-dinoflagellate activities, cytotoxicity, and inhibitory activity against enzyme sortase B. Most of the naturally occurring cyclotetrapeptides are obtained from fungi. Some natural cyclic tetrapeptides were found to inhibit histone deacetylase (HDAC), which regulate the expression of genes. These compounds are very useful as cancer therapeutics. Various analogues of the natural cyclotetrapeptides were successfully synthesized to find novel lead compounds for pharmacological and biotechnological applications. Therefore, in this review, previously reported novel natural cyclotetrapeptides are briefly discussed, along with their important biological activities as drug candidates, together with their promising therapeutic properties. Moreover, their future perspective in drug discovery as potential therapeutic agents will be determined. PMID:27300506

  3. Does Shear Thickening Occur in Semisolid Metals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Helen V.; Favier, Veronique

    2016-04-01

    In the various forms of semisolid processing such as thixoforming and thixoforging, the entry into the die occurs in a fraction of a second so it is the transient rheological behavior which governs the initial stages of flow. In experiments in the literature, this rheological behavior is probed through applying rapid transitions in shear rate under isothermal conditions. There is contradictory evidence as to whether the behavior during these transitions is shear thinning or shear thickening, although it is clear that once in the die the material is thinning. Here the data in the literature are reanalyzed to obtain a rationalization of the contradictions which has not previously been available. It is argued that if a suspension is initially in a disagglomerated state ( i.e., one which is initially sheared), the instantaneous behavior with a jump-up in shear rate is shear thickening (even if the long-term steady-state behavior is shear thinning) provided the fraction solid is greater than about 0.36 and the final shear rate at the end of the jump is greater than about 100 s-1. If the jump-up in shear rate is made from rest then yield masks the shear thickening.

  4. Sundew adhesive: a naturally occurring hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Sun, Leming; Agrawal, Richa; Zhang, Mingjun

    2015-01-01

    Bioadhesives have drawn increasing interest in recent years, owing to their eco-friendly, biocompatible and biodegradable nature. As a typical bioadhesive, sticky exudate observed on the stalked glands of sundew plants aids in the capture of insects and this viscoelastic adhesive has triggered extensive interests in revealing the implied adhesion mechanisms. Despite the significant progress that has been made, the structural traits of the sundew adhesive, especially the morphological characteristics in nanoscale, which may give rise to the viscous and elastic properties of this mucilage, remain unclear. Here, we show that the sundew adhesive is a naturally occurring hydrogel, consisting of nano-network architectures assembled with polysaccharides. The assembly process of the polysaccharides in this hydrogel is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions mediated with divalent cations. Negatively charged nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 231.9 ± 14.8 nm, are also obtained from this hydrogel and these nanoparticles are presumed to exert vital roles in the assembly of the nano-networks. Further characterization via atomic force microscopy indicates that the stretching deformation of the sundew adhesive is associated with the flexibility of its fibrous architectures. It is also observed that the adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive is susceptible to low temperatures. Both elasticity and adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive reduce in response to lowering the ambient temperature. The feasibility of applying sundew adhesive for tissue engineering is subsequently explored in this study. Results show that the fibrous scaffolds obtained from sundew adhesive are capable of increasing the adhesion of multiple types of cells, including fibroblast cells and smooth muscle cells, a property that results from the enhanced adsorption of serum proteins. In addition, in light of the weak cytotoxic activity exhibited by these scaffolds towards a variety of

  5. Sundew adhesive: a naturally occurring hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yujian; Wang, Yongzhong; Sun, Leming; Agrawal, Richa; Zhang, Mingjun

    2015-06-01

    Bioadhesives have drawn increasing interest in recent years, owing to their eco-friendly, biocompatible and biodegradable nature. As a typical bioadhesive, sticky exudate observed on the stalked glands of sundew plants aids in the capture of insects and this viscoelastic adhesive has triggered extensive interests in revealing the implied adhesion mechanisms. Despite the significant progress that has been made, the structural traits of the sundew adhesive, especially the morphological characteristics in nanoscale, which may give rise to the viscous and elastic properties of this mucilage, remain unclear. Here, we show that the sundew adhesive is a naturally occurring hydrogel, consisting of nano-network architectures assembled with polysaccharides. The assembly process of the polysaccharides in this hydrogel is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions mediated with divalent cations. Negatively charged nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 231.9 ± 14.8 nm, are also obtained from this hydrogel and these nanoparticles are presumed to exert vital roles in the assembly of the nano-networks. Further characterization via atomic force microscopy indicates that the stretching deformation of the sundew adhesive is associated with the flexibility of its fibrous architectures. It is also observed that the adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive is susceptible to low temperatures. Both elasticity and adhesion strength of the sundew adhesive reduce in response to lowering the ambient temperature. The feasibility of applying sundew adhesive for tissue engineering is subsequently explored in this study. Results show that the fibrous scaffolds obtained from sundew adhesive are capable of increasing the adhesion of multiple types of cells, including fibroblast cells and smooth muscle cells, a property that results from the enhanced adsorption of serum proteins. In addition, in light of the weak cytotoxic activity exhibited by these scaffolds towards a variety of

  6. Differential dormancy of co-occurring copepods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohman, Mark D.; Drits, Aleksandr V.; Elizabeth Clarke, M.; Plourde, Stéphane

    1998-08-01

    Four species of planktonic calanoid copepods that co-occur in the California Current System ( Eucalanus californicus Johnson, Rhincalanus nasutus Giesbrecht, Calanus pacificus californicus Brodsky, and Metridia pacifica Brodsky) were investigated for evidence of seasonal dormancy in the San Diego Trough. Indices used to differentiate actively growing from dormant animals included developmental stage structure and vertical distribution; activity of aerobic metabolic enzymes (Citrate Synthase and the Electron Transfer System complex); investment in depot lipids (wax esters and triacylglycerols); in situ grazing activity from gut fluorescence; and egg production rates in simulated in situ conditions. None of the 4 species exhibited a canonical calanoid pattern of winter dormancy - i.e., synchronous developmental arrest as copepodid stage V, descent into deep waters, reduced metabolism, and lack of winter reproduction. Instead, Calanus pacificus californicus has a biphasic life history in this region, with an actively reproducing segment of the population in surface waters overlying a deep dormant segment in winter. Eucalanus californicus is dormant as both adult females and copepodid V's, although winter females respond relatively rapidly to elevated food and temperature conditions; they begin feeding and producing eggs within 2-3 days. Rhincalanus nasutus appears to enter dormancy as adult females, although the evidence is equivocal. Metridia pacifica shows no evidence of dormancy, with sustained active feeding, diel vertical migration behavior, and elevated activity of metabolic enzymes in December as well as in June. The four species also differ markedly in water content, classes of storage lipids, and specific activity of Citrate Synthase. These results suggest that copepod dormancy traits and structural composition reflect diverse adaptations to regional environmental conditions rather than a uniform, canonical series of traits that remain invariant among taxa

  7. Lipoxin receptors.

    PubMed

    Romano, Mario; Recchia, Irene; Recchiuti, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Lipoxins (LXs) represent a class of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites that carry potent immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, LXA4 and LXB4 being the main components of this series. LXs are generated by cooperation between 5-lipoxygenase (LO) and 12- or 15-LO during cell-cell interactions or by single cell types. LX epimers at carbon 15, the 15-epi-LXs, are formed by aspirin-acetylated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in cooperation with 5-LO. 15-epi-LXA4 is also termed aspirin-triggered LX (ATL). In vivo studies with stable LX and ATL analogs have established that these eicosanoids possess potent anti-inflammatory activities. A LXA4 receptor has been cloned. It belongs to the family of chemotactic receptors and clusters with formyl peptide receptors on chromosome 19. Therefore, it was initially denominated formyl peptide receptor like 1 (FPRL1). This receptor binds with high affinity and stereoselectivity LXA4 and ATL. It also recognizes a variety of peptides, synthetic, endogenously generated, or disease associated, but with lower affinity compared to LXA4. For this reason, this receptor has been renamed ALX. This review summarizes the current knowledge on ALX expression, signaling, and potential pathophysiological role. The involvement of additional recognition sites in LX bioactions is also discussed. PMID:17767357

  8. Information Needs While A Disaster Is Occurring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, S. C.

    2010-12-01

    that rainfall intensity at their homes might be less than the intensity up in the mountains where the debris flows would start. Nor did they know that debris flows travel too quickly to be outrun. These and many other examples indicate need for social and natural scientists to increase awareness of what to expect when the disaster strikes. This information must be solidly understood before the event occurs - while a disaster is unfolding there are no teachable moments. Case studies indicate that even those who come into a disaster well educated about the phenomenon can struggle to apply what they know when the real situation is at hand. In addition, psychological studies confirm diminished ability to comprehend information at times of stress.

  9. Dopamine receptor heteromeric complexes and their emerging functions.

    PubMed

    George, Susan R; Kern, Andras; Smith, Roy G; Franco, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine neurotransmission is traditionally accepted as occurring through the five dopamine receptors that transduce its signal. Recent evidence has demonstrated that the range of physiologically relevant dopamine signaling complexes is greatly expanded by the ability of dopamine receptors to interact with other dopamine receptors and with receptors of other endogenous signaling ligands. These novel heteromeric complexes have functional properties distinct from the component receptors or are able to modulate the canonical signaling and function of the cognate receptors. These dopamine receptor heteromers provide new insight into physiological mechanisms and pathophysiological processes involving dopamine. PMID:24968781

  10. Abscisic acid influx into human nucleated cells occurs through the anion exchanger AE2.

    PubMed

    Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Zocchi, Elena; Fresia, Chiara; Booz, Valeria; Guida, Lucrezia

    2016-06-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a hormone conserved from cyanobacteria to higher plants, where it regulates responses to environmental stimuli. ABA also plays a role in mammalian physiology, pointedly in inflammatory responses and in glycemic control. As the animal ABA receptor is on the intracellular side of the plasma membrane, a transporter is required for the hormone's action. Here we demonstrate that ABA transport in human nucleated cells occurs via the anion exchanger AE2. Together with the recent demonstration that ABA influx into human erythrocytes occurs via Band 3, this result identifies the AE family members as the mammalian ABA transporters. PMID:27015766

  11. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  12. Human Parechovirus 1 Infection Occurs via αVβ1 Integrin

    PubMed Central

    Merilahti, Pirjo; Tauriainen, Sisko

    2016-01-01

    Human parechovirus 1 (HPeV-1) (family Picornaviridae) is a global cause of pediatric respiratory and CNS infections for which there is no treatment. Although biochemical and in vitro studies have suggested that HPeV-1 binds to αVβ1, αVβ3 and αVβ6 integrin receptor(s), the actual cellular receptors required for infectious entry of HPeV-1 remain unknown. In this paper we analyzed the expression profiles of αVβ1, αVβ3, αVβ6 and α5β1 in susceptible cell lines (A549, HeLa and SW480) to identify which integrin receptors support HPeV-1 internalization and/or replication cycle. We demonstrate by antibody blocking assay, immunofluorescence microscopy and RT-qPCR that HPeV-1 internalizes and replicates in cell lines that express αVβ1 integrin but not αVβ3 or αVβ6 integrins. To further study the role of β1 integrin, we used a mouse cell line, GE11-KO, which is deficient in β1 expression, and its derivate GE11-β1 in which human integrin β1 subunit is overexpressed. HPeV-1 (Harris strain) and three clinical HPeV-1 isolates did not internalize into GE11-KO whereas GE11-β1 supported the internalization process. An integrin β1-activating antibody, TS2/16, enhanced HPeV-1 infectivity, but infection occurred in the absence of visible receptor clustering. HPeV-1 also co-localized with β1 integrin on the cell surface, and HPeV-1 and β1 integrin co-endocytosed into the cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that in some cell lines the cellular entry of HPeV-1 is primarily mediated by the active form of αVβ1 integrin without visible receptor clustering. PMID:27128974

  13. Naturally occurring dominant drug resistance mutations occur infrequently in the setting of recently acquired hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Applegate, Tanya L; Gaudieri, Silvana; Plauzolles, Anne; Chopra, Abha; Grebely, Jason; Lucas, Michaela; Hellard, Margaret; Luciani, Fabio; Dore, Gregory J; Matthews, Gail V

    2014-01-01

    Background Directly Acting Antivirals (DAAs) are predicted to transform hepatitis C (HCV) therapy, yet little is known about the prevalence of naturally occurring resistance mutations in recently acquired HCV. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and frequency of drug resistance mutations in the viral quasispecies among HIV positive and negative individuals with recent HCV. Methods The NS3 protease, NS5A and NS5B polymerase genes were amplified from fifty genotype 1a participants of the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C. Amino acid variations at sites known to be associated with possible drug resistance were analysed by ultra-deep pyrosequencing. Results Twelve percent of individuals harboured dominant resistance mutations, while 36% demonstrated non dominant resistant variants below that detectable by bulk sequencing (ie < 20%) but above a threshold of 1%. Resistance variants (< 1%) were observed at most sites associated with DAA resistance from all classes, with the exception of sofosbuvir. Conclusions Dominant resistant mutations were uncommonly observed in the setting of recent HCV. However, low level mutations to all DAA classes were observed by deep sequencing at the majority of sites, and in most individuals. The significance of these variants and impact on future treatment options remains to be determined. PMID:25105742

  14. A Naturally-Occurring Transcript Variant of MARCO Reveals the SRCR Domain is Critical for Function

    PubMed Central

    Novakowski, Kyle E.; Huynh, Angela; Han, SeongJun; Dorrington, Michael G.; Yin, Charles; Tu, Zhongyuan; Pelka, Peter; Whyte, Peter; Guarné, Alba; Sakamoto, Kaori; Bowdish, Dawn M.E.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) is a Class A Scavenger Receptor (cA-SR) that recognizes and phagocytoses of a wide variety of pathogens. Most cA-SRs that contain a C-terminal Scavenger Receptor Cysteine Rich (SRCR) domain use the proximal collagenous domain to bind ligands. In contrast, for the role of the SRCR domain of MARCO in phagocytosis, adhesion and pro-inflammatory signalling is less clear. The discovery of a naturally-occurring transcript variant lacking the SRCR domain, MARCOII, provided the opportunity to study the role of the SRCR domain of MARCO. We tested whether the SRCR domain is required for ligand binding, promoting downstream signalling, and enhancing cellular adhesion. Unlike cells expressing full-length MARCO, ligand binding was abolished in MARCOII-expressing cells. Furthermore, co-expression of MARCO and MARCOII impaired phagocytic function, indicating that MARCOII acts as a dominant negative variant. Unlike MARCO, expression of MARCOII did not enhance Toll-Like Receptor 2 (TLR2)-mediated pro-inflammatory signalling in response to bacterial stimulation. MARCO-expressing cells were more adherent and exhibited a dendritic-like phenotype, while MARCOII-expressing cells were less adherent and did not exhibit changes in morphology. These data suggest the SRCR domain of MARCO is the key domain in modulating ligand binding, enhancing downstream pro-inflammatory signalling, and MARCO-mediated cellular adhesion. PMID:26888252

  15. Intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation and segregation in a rat fibroblast cell line transfected with a human insulin receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, J.R.; Olefsky, J.M.

    1988-05-05

    The cellular processing of insulin and insulin receptors was studied using a rat fibroblast cell line that had been transfected with a normal human insulin receptor gene, expressing approximately 500 times the normal number of native fibroblasts insulin receptors. These cells bind and internalize insulin normally. Biochemically assays based on the selective precipitation by polyethylene glycol of intact insulin-receptor complexes but not of free intracellular insulin were developed to study the time course of intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation. Fibroblasts were incubated with radiolabeled insulin at 4/sup 0/C, and internalization of insulin-receptor complexes was initiated by warming the cells to 37/sup 0/C. Within 2 min, 90% of the internalized radioactivity was composed of intact insulin-receptor complexes. The dissociation of insulin from internalized insulin-receptor complexes was markedly inhibited by monensin and chloroquine. Furthermore, chloroquine markedly increased the number of cross-linkable intracellular insulin-receptor complexes, as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis autoradiography. These findings suggest that acidification of intracellular vesicles is responsible for insulin-receptor dissociation. Physical segregation of dissociated intracellular insulin from its receptor was monitored. The results are consistent with the view that segregation of insulin and receptor occurs 5-10 min after initiation of dissociation. These studies demonstrate the intracellular itinerary of insulin-receptor complexes, including internalization, dissociation of insulin from the internalized receptor within an acidified compartment, segregation of insulin from the receptor, and subsequent ligand degradation.

  16. Physiology and pathology of NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Petrović, M; Horák, M; Sedlácek, M; Vyklický, L

    2005-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype are highly expressed in the central nervous system and are involved in excitatory synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity. Prolonged activation of NMDA receptors can lead to excitotoxicity, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration occurring in various acute and chronic disorders of the central nervous system. Recent advances in understanding the function, pharmacology, genetics and structure of NMDA receptors has promoted a search for new compounds that could be therapeutically used. These compounds act on agonist binding sites, either apart from them or directly within the ion channel pore. Members of the last group are called open channel blockers, and some of them, such as memantine and ketamine, are already clinically used. Kinetic modeling of NMDA receptor activity was employed to define the effects of various groups of modulators. Quantifying the action of these substances by kinetic parameters can help us to reveal the molecular mechanism of action at the receptor and to characterize the dependence of its action on the mode of NMDA receptor activation. Two modes are considered: phasic activation, induced by synaptically released glutamate, and tonic activation, which is expected to occur under pathological conditions when low, but sustained levels of glutamate activate NMDA receptors. The aim of our review is to summarize the recent data about the structural and functional properties of NMDA receptors and their role in long-term potentiation and excitotoxicity. PMID:16315761

  17. Gβ promotes pheromone receptor polarization and yeast chemotropism by inhibiting receptor phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ismael, Amber; Tian, Wei; Waszczak, Nicholas; Wang, Xin; Cao, Youfang; Suchkov, Dmitry; Bar, Eli; Metodiev, Metodi V; Liang, Jie; Arkowitz, Robert A; Stone, David E

    2016-01-01

    Gradient-directed cell migration (chemotaxis) and growth (chemotropism) are processes that are essential to the development and life cycles of all species. Cells use surface receptors to sense the shallow chemical gradients that elicit chemotaxis and chemotropism. Slight asymmetries in receptor activation are amplified by downstream signaling systems, which ultimately induce dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton. During the mating response of budding yeast, a model chemotropic system, the pheromone receptors on the plasma membrane polarize to the side of the cell closest to the stimulus. Although receptor polarization occurs before and independently of actin cable-dependent delivery of vesicles to the plasma membrane (directed secretion), it requires receptor internalization. Phosphorylation of pheromone receptors by yeast casein kinase 1 or 2 (Yck1/2) stimulates their internalization. We showed that the pheromone-responsive Gβγ dimer promotes the polarization of the pheromone receptor by interacting with Yck1/2 and locally inhibiting receptor phosphorylation. We also found that receptor phosphorylation is essential for chemotropism, independently of its role in inducing receptor internalization. A mathematical model supports the idea that the interaction between Gβγ and Yck1/2 results in differential phosphorylation and internalization of the pheromone receptor and accounts for its polarization before the initiation of directed secretion. PMID:27072657

  18. Causes and Outcomes of Pediatric Injuries Occurring at School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Scala, Carla; Gallagher, Susan Scavo; Schneps, Sue E.

    1997-01-01

    Used the National Pediatric Trauma Registry, which collects data on child injuries requiring hospitalization, to examine causes and outcomes of injuries occurring at school. Analysis of 1,558 cases indicated that most injuries were unintentional and occurred among students age 10-14 years. Nearly half occurred in recreational areas. Falls and…

  19. Kinematics and mass modelling of M33: Hα observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, Z. S.; Carignan, C.; Chemin, L.; Amram, P.; Epinat, B.

    2015-06-01

    As part of a long-term project to revisit the kinematics and dynamics of the large disc galaxies of the Local Group, we present the first deep, wide-field (˜42 arcmin × 56 arcmin) 3D-spectroscopic survey of the ionized gas disc of Messier 33. Fabry-Perot interferometry has been used to map its Hα distribution and kinematics at unprecedented angular resolution (≲3 arcsec) and resolving power (˜12 600), with the 1.6 m telescope at the Observatoire du Mont Mégantic. The ionized gas distribution follows a complex, large-scale spiral structure, unsurprisingly coincident with the already-known spiral structures of the neutral and molecular gas discs. The kinematical analysis of the velocity field shows that the rotation centre of the Hα disc is distant from the photometric centre by ˜168 pc (sky-projected distance) and that the kinematical major-axis position angle and disc inclination are in excellent agreement with photometric values. The Hα rotation curve agrees very well with the H I rotation curves for 0 < R < 6.5 kpc, but the Hα velocities are 10-20 km s-1 higher for R > 6.5 kpc. The reason for this discrepancy is not well understood. The velocity dispersion profile is relatively flat around 16 km s-1, which is at the low end of velocity dispersions of nearby star-forming galactic discs. A strong relation is also found between the Hα velocity dispersion and the Hα intensity. Mass models were obtained using the Hα rotation curve but, as expected, the dark matter halo's parameters are not very well constrained since the optical rotation curve only extends out to 8 kpc.

  20. Ghrelin Receptor Mutations and Human Obesity.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Tao, Y-X

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) was originally identified as an orphan receptor in porcine and rat anterior pituitary membranes. In 1999, GHSR was deorphanized and shown to be a receptor for ghrelin, a peptide hormone secreted from the stomach. Therefore, GHSR is also called ghrelin receptor. In addition to regulating growth hormone secretion, ghrelin receptor regulates various physiological processes, including food intake and energy expenditure, glucose metabolism, cardiovascular functions, gastric acid secretion and motility, and immune function. Several human genetic studies conducted in populations originated from Europe, Africa, South America, and East Asia identified rare mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms that might be associated with human obesity and short stature. Functional analyses of mutant GHSRs reveal multiple defects, including cell surface expression, ligand binding, and basal and stimulated signaling. With growing understanding in the functionality of naturally occurring GHSR mutations, potential therapeutic strategies including pharmacological chaperones and novel ligands could be used to correct the GHSR mutants. PMID:27288828

  1. Rubemamine and Rubescenamine, Two Naturally Occurring N-Cinnamoyl Phenethylamines with Umami-Taste-Modulating Properties.

    PubMed

    Backes, Michael; Obst, Katja; Bojahr, Juliane; Thorhauer, Anika; Roudnitzky, Natacha; Paetz, Susanne; Reichelt, Katharina V; Krammer, Gerhard E; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Ley, Jakob P

    2015-10-01

    Sensory screening of a series of naturally occurring N-cinnamoyl derivatives of substituted phenethylamines revealed that rubemamine (9, from Chenopodium album) and rubescenamine (10, from Zanthoxylum rubsecens) elicit strong intrinsic umami taste in water at 50 and 10 ppm, respectively. Sensory tests in glutamate- and nucleotide-containing bases showed that the compounds influence the whole flavor profile of savory formulations. Both rubemamine (9) and rubescenamine (10) at 10-100 ppm dose-dependently positively modulated the umami taste of MSG (0.17-0.22%) up to threefold. Among the investigated amides, only rubemamine (9) and rubescenamine (10) are able to directly activate the TAS1R1-TAS1R3 umami taste receptor. Moreover, both compounds also synergistically modulated the activation of TAS1R1-TAS1R3 by MSG. Most remarkably, rubemamine (9) was able to further positively modulate the IMP-enhanced TAS1R1-TAS1R3 response to MSG ∼ 1.8-fold. Finally, armatamide (11), zanthosinamide (13), and dioxamine (14), which lack intrinsic umami taste in vivo and direct receptor response in vitro, also positively modulated receptor activation by MSG about twofold and the IMP-enhanced MSG-induced TAS1R1-TAS1R3 responses approximately by 50%. In sensory experiments, dioxamine (14) at 25 ppm in combination with 0.17% MSG exhibited a sensory equivalent to 0.37% MSG. PMID:26375852

  2. Drosophila TRPA1 channel is required to avoid the naturally occurring insect repellent citronellal

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Young; Kim, Sang Hoon; Ronderos, David S.; Lee, Youngseok; Akitake, Bradley; Woodward, Owen M.; Guggino, William B.; Smith, Dean P.; Montell, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Summary Plants produce naturally occurring insect repellents, such as citronellal, which is the main component of citronellal oil and is among the most widely-used-naturally-occurring insect repellents. However, the molecular pathways through which insects sense botanical repellents are unknown. Here, we showed that Drosophila used two pathways for direct avoidance of citronellal. The olfactory co-receptor, Or83b, which is required for the response to the synthetic repellent DEET, contributed to citronellal repulsion, and was essential for citronellal-evoked action potentials. Mutations affecting the Ca2+-permeable cation channel, TRPA1 resulted in a comparable defect in avoiding citronellal vapor. The TRPA1-dependent aversion to citronellal relied on a G protein/phospholipase C (PLC) signaling cascade, rather than direct detection of citronellal by TRPA1. Loss of TRPA1, Gq or PLC caused an increase in the frequency of citronellal-evoked action potentials in olfactory receptor neurons. Absence of the Ca2+-activated K+ channel, Slowpoke, resulted in a similar impairment in citronellal avoidance, and an increase in the frequency of action potentials. These results suggest that TRPA1 is required for activation of a BK channel to modulate citronellal-evoked action potentials, and for aversion to citronellal. In contrast to Drosophila TRPA1, Anopheles gambiae TRPA1 was directly and potently activated by citronellal, thereby raising the possibility that mosquito TRPA1 may be a target for developing improved repellents to reduce insect-borne diseases such as malaria. PMID:20797863

  3. 32 CFR 716.6 - Death occurring after active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Death occurring after active service. 716.6 Section 716.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL DEATH GRATUITY Provisions Applicable to the Navy and the Marine Corps § 716.6 Death occurring after...

  4. 32 CFR 716.6 - Death occurring after active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Death occurring after active service. 716.6 Section 716.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL DEATH GRATUITY Provisions Applicable to the Navy and the Marine Corps § 716.6 Death occurring after...

  5. 32 CFR 716.6 - Death occurring after active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Death occurring after active service. 716.6 Section 716.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL DEATH GRATUITY Provisions Applicable to the Navy and the Marine Corps § 716.6 Death occurring after...

  6. 32 CFR 716.6 - Death occurring after active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Death occurring after active service. 716.6 Section 716.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL DEATH GRATUITY Provisions Applicable to the Navy and the Marine Corps § 716.6 Death occurring after...

  7. 32 CFR 716.6 - Death occurring after active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Death occurring after active service. 716.6 Section 716.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL DEATH GRATUITY Provisions Applicable to the Navy and the Marine Corps § 716.6 Death occurring after...

  8. Implications of epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced egf receptor aggregation.

    PubMed Central

    Wofsy, C; Goldstein, B; Lund, K; Wiley, H S

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the role of receptor aggregation in EGF binding, we construct a mathematical model describing receptor dimerization (and higher levels of aggregation) that permits an analysis of the influence of receptor aggregation on ligand binding. We answer two questions: (a) Can Scatchard plots of EGF binding data be analyzed productively in terms of two noninteracting receptor populations with different affinities if EGF induced receptor aggregation occurs? No. If two affinities characterize aggregated and monomeric EGF receptors, we show that the Scatchard plot should have curvature characteristic of positively cooperative binding, the opposite of that observed. Thus, the interpretation that the high affinity population represents aggregated receptors and the low affinity population nonaggregated receptors is wrong. If the two populations are interpreted without reference to receptor aggregation, an important determinant of Scatchard plot shape is ignored. (b) Can a model for EGF receptor aggregation and EGF binding be consistent with the "negative curvature" (i.e., curvature characteristic of negatively cooperative binding) observed in most Scatchard plots of EGF binding data? Yes. In addition, the restrictions on the model parameters required to obtain negatively curved Scatchard plots provide new information about binding and aggregation. In particular, EGF binding to aggregated receptors must be negatively cooperative, i.e., binding to a receptor in a dimer (or higher oligomer) having one receptor already bound occurs with lower affinity than the initial binding event. A third question we consider is whether the model we present can be used to detect the presence of mechanisms other than receptor aggregation that are contributing to Scatchard plot curvature. For the membrane and cell binding data we analyzed, the best least squares fits of the model to each of the four data sets deviate systematically from the data, indicating that additional factors are

  9. Comparative Toxicology of Libby Amphibole and Naturally Occurring Asbestos

    EPA Science Inventory

    Summary sentence: Comparative toxicology of Libby amphibole (LA) and site-specific naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) provides new insights on physical properties influencing health effects and mechanisms of asbestos-induced inflammation, fibrosis, and tumorigenesis.Introduction/...

  10. A search for presynaptic inhibitory histamine receptors in guinea-pig tissues: Further H3 receptors but no evidence for H4 receptors.

    PubMed

    Petri, Doris; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2016-07-01

    The histamine H4 receptor is coupled to Gi/o proteins and expressed on inflammatory cells and lymphoid tissues; it was suggested that this receptor also occurs in the brain or on peripheral neurones. Since many Gi/o protein-coupled receptors, including the H3 receptor, serve as presynaptic inhibitory receptors, we studied whether the sympathetic neurones supplying four peripheral tissues and the cholinergic neurones in the hippocampus from the guinea-pig are equipped with release-modulating H4 and H3 receptors. For this purpose, we preincubated tissue pieces from the aorta, atrium, renal cortex and vas deferens with (3)H-noradrenaline and hippocampal slices with (3)H-choline and determined the electrically evoked tritium overflow. The stimulation-evoked overflow in the five superfused tissues was inhibited by the muscarinic receptor agonist oxotremorine, which served as a positive control, but not affected by the H4 receptor agonist 4-methylhistamine. The H3 receptor agonist R-α-methylhistamine inhibited noradrenaline release in the peripheral tissues without affecting acetylcholine release in the hippocampal slices. Thioperamide shifted the concentration-response curve of histamine in the aorta and the renal cortex to the right, yielding apparent pA2 values of 8.0 and 8.1, respectively, which are close to its affinity at other H3 receptors but higher by one log unit than its pKi at the H4 receptor of the guinea-pig. In conclusion, histamine H4 receptors could not be identified in five experimental models of the guinea-pig that are suited for the detection of presynaptic inhibitory receptors whereas H3 receptors could be shown in the peripheral tissues but not in the hippocampus. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. PMID:26211976

  11. Internet Censorship in China: Where Does the Filtering Occur?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xueyang; Mao, Z. Morley; Halderman, J. Alex

    China filters Internet traffic in and out of the country. In order to circumvent the firewall, it is helpful to know where the filtering occurs. In this work, we explore the AS-level topology of China's network, and probe the firewall to find the locations of filtering devices. We find that even though most filtering occurs in border ASes, choke points also exist in many provincial networks. The result suggests that two major ISPs in China have different approaches placing filtering devices.

  12. Unilateral eruptive vellus hair cysts occurring on the face.

    PubMed

    Lew, B-L; Lee, M-H; Haw, C-R

    2006-11-01

    Eruptive vellus hair cysts (EVHC) are small, cystic papules that usually occur on the chest and extremities. Their aetiology is unknown. Fewer than 10 cases of a variant form of EVHC that occur exclusively on the face have been reported. We describe a case of EVHC limited to the right side of the face. To the best of our knowledge, no case of unilateral EVHC has been reported. PMID:17062051

  13. Bombesin-Like Receptor 3: Physiology of a Functional Orphan.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Cuiying; Reitman, Marc L

    2016-09-01

    Bombesin-like receptor 3 (BRS-3) is an X-linked orphan Gq-coupled receptor that regulates food intake, metabolic rate, body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure, and insulin secretion. Most BRS-3 actions occur via the brain, through mechanisms including regulating sympathetic outflow. Ablation of Brs3 causes obesity, while synthetic agonists produce weight loss. PMID:27055378

  14. Evolutionary diversification of the trypanosome haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor from an ancestral haemoglobin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lane-Serff, Harriet; MacGregor, Paula; Peacock, Lori; Macleod, Olivia JS; Kay, Christopher; Gibson, Wendy; Higgins, Matthew K; Carrington, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor of the African trypanosome species, Trypanosoma brucei, is expressed when the parasite is in the bloodstream of the mammalian host, allowing it to acquire haem through the uptake of haptoglobin-haemoglobin complexes. Here we show that in Trypanosoma congolense this receptor is instead expressed in the epimastigote developmental stage that occurs in the tsetse fly, where it acts as a haemoglobin receptor. We also present the structure of the T. congolense receptor in complex with haemoglobin. This allows us to propose an evolutionary history for this receptor, charting the structural and cellular changes that took place as it adapted from a role in the insect to a new role in the mammalian host. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13044.001 PMID:27083048

  15. Feedback, receptor clustering, and receptor restriction to single cells yield large Turing spaces for ligand-receptor-based Turing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurics, Tamás; Menshykau, Denis; Iber, Dagmar

    2014-08-01

    Turing mechanisms can yield a large variety of patterns from noisy, homogenous initial conditions and have been proposed as patterning mechanism for many developmental processes. However, the molecular components that give rise to Turing patterns have remained elusive, and the small size of the parameter space that permits Turing patterns to emerge makes it difficult to explain how Turing patterns could evolve. We have recently shown that Turing patterns can be obtained with a single ligand if the ligand-receptor interaction is taken into account. Here we show that the general properties of ligand-receptor systems result in very large Turing spaces. Thus, the restriction of receptors to single cells, negative feedbacks, regulatory interactions among different ligand-receptor systems, and the clustering of receptors on the cell surface all greatly enlarge the Turing space. We further show that the feedbacks that occur in the FGF10-SHH network that controls lung branching morphogenesis are sufficient to result in large Turing spaces. We conclude that the cellular restriction of receptors provides a mechanism to sufficiently increase the size of the Turing space to make the evolution of Turing patterns likely. Additional feedbacks may then have further enlarged the Turing space. Given their robustness and flexibility, we propose that receptor-ligand-based Turing mechanisms present a general mechanism for patterning in biology.

  16. Feedback, receptor clustering, and receptor restriction to single cells yield large Turing spaces for ligand-receptor-based Turing models.

    PubMed

    Kurics, Tamás; Menshykau, Denis; Iber, Dagmar

    2014-08-01

    Turing mechanisms can yield a large variety of patterns from noisy, homogenous initial conditions and have been proposed as patterning mechanism for many developmental processes. However, the molecular components that give rise to Turing patterns have remained elusive, and the small size of the parameter space that permits Turing patterns to emerge makes it difficult to explain how Turing patterns could evolve. We have recently shown that Turing patterns can be obtained with a single ligand if the ligand-receptor interaction is taken into account. Here we show that the general properties of ligand-receptor systems result in very large Turing spaces. Thus, the restriction of receptors to single cells, negative feedbacks, regulatory interactions among different ligand-receptor systems, and the clustering of receptors on the cell surface all greatly enlarge the Turing space. We further show that the feedbacks that occur in the FGF10-SHH network that controls lung branching morphogenesis are sufficient to result in large Turing spaces. We conclude that the cellular restriction of receptors provides a mechanism to sufficiently increase the size of the Turing space to make the evolution of Turing patterns likely. Additional feedbacks may then have further enlarged the Turing space. Given their robustness and flexibility, we propose that receptor-ligand-based Turing mechanisms present a general mechanism for patterning in biology. PMID:25215767

  17. Solution assembly of cytokine receptor ectodomain complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zining; Ciardelli, T.L.; Johnson, K.W.

    1995-09-01

    For the majority of single transmembrane-spanning cell surface receptors, signal transmission across the lipid bilayer barrier involves several discrete components of molecular recognition. The interaction between ligand and the extracellular segment of its cognate receptor (ectodomain) initiates either homomeric or heteromeric association of receptor subunits. Specific recognition among these subunits may then occur between ectodomain regions, within the membrane by interhelical contact or inside the cell between cytoplasmic domains. Any or all of these interactions may contribute to the stability of the signaling complex. It is the characteristics of ligand binding by the ectodomains of these receptors that controls the heteromeric or homomeric nature and the stoichiometry of the complex. Cytokines and their receptors belong to a growing family of macromolecular systems that exhibit these functional features and share many structural similarities as well. Interleukin-2 is a multifunctional cytokine that represents, perhaps, the most complex example to date of ligand recognition among the hematopoietin receptor family. It is the cooperative binding of IL-2 by all three proteins on the surface of activated T-lymphocytes, however, that ultimately results in crosslinking of the {beta}- and {gamma}-subunits and signaling via association of their cytoplasmic domains. Although the high-affinity IL-2R functions as a heterotrimer, heterodimers of the receptor subunits are also physiologically important. The {alpha}/{beta} heterodimer or {open_quotes}pseudo-high affinity{close_quotes} receptor captures IL-2 as a preformed cell surface complex while the {beta}/{gamma} intermediate affinity site exists, in the absence of the {alpha} subunit, on the majority of natural killer cells. We have begun to study stable complexes of cytokine receptor ectodomains of defined composition and that mimic the ligand binding characteristics of the equivalent cell surface receptor sites.

  18. Effects of naturally occurring coumarins on hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes inmice

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiner, Heather E. Xia, Xiaojun; Sonoda, Junichiro; Zhang, Jun; Pontius, Elizabeth; Abey, Jane; Evans, Ronald M.; Moore, David D.; DiGiovanni, John

    2008-10-15

    Cytochromes P450 (P450s) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute two important enzyme families involved in carcinogen metabolism. Generally, P450s play activation or detoxifying roles while GSTs act primarily as detoxifying enzymes. We previously demonstrated that oral administration of the linear furanocoumarins, isopimpinellin and imperatorin, modulated P450 and GST activities in various tissues of mice. The purpose of the present study was to compare a broader range of naturally occurring coumarins (simple coumarins, and furanocoumarins of the linear and angular type) for their abilities to modulate hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes when administered orally to mice. We now report that all of the different coumarins tested (coumarin, limettin, auraptene, angelicin, bergamottin, imperatorin and isopimpinellin) induced hepatic GST activities, whereas the linear furanocoumarins possessed the greatest abilities to induce hepatic P450 activities, in particular P450 2B and 3A. In both cases, this corresponded to an increase in protein expression of the enzymes. Induction of P4502B10, 3A11, and 2C9 by xenobiotics often is a result of activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and/or constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). Using a pregnane X receptor reporter system, our results demonstrated that isopimpinellin activated both PXR and its human ortholog SXR by recruiting coactivator SRC-1 in transfected cells. In CAR transfection assays, isopimpinellin counteracted the inhibitory effect of androstanol on full-length mCAR, a Gal4-mCAR ligand-binding domain fusion, and restored coactivator binding. Orally administered isopimpinellin induced hepatic mRNA expression of Cyp2b10, Cyp3a11, and GSTa in CAR(+/+) wild-type mice. In contrast, the induction of Cyp2b10 mRNA by isopimpinellin was attenuated in the CAR(-/-) mice, suggesting that isopimpinellin induces Cyp2b10 via the CAR receptor. Overall, the current data indicate that naturally occurring coumarins have

  19. Radiosequence analysis of the human progestin receptor charged with ( sup 3 H)promegestone. A comparison with the glucocorticoid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Stroemstedt, P.E.B.; Berkenstam, A.; Joernvall, H.G.; Gustafsson, J.A.; Carlstedt-Duke, J. )

    1990-08-05

    Partially purified preparations of the human progestin receptor and the human and rat glucocorticoid receptor proteins were covalently charged with the synthetic progestin, ({sup 3}H)promegestone, by photoaffinity labeling. After labeling, the denaturated protein was cleaved and the mixture of peptides subjected to radiosequence analysis as previously described for the rat glucocorticoid receptor protein. The radioactivity labels identified, corresponded to Met-759 and Met-909 after photoaffinity labeling of the human progestin receptor, and Met-622 and Cys-754 after labeling of the rat glucocorticoid receptor. The residues labeled in the glucocorticoid receptor are the same as those previously reported to bind triamcinolone actonide. The corresponding residues were also labeled in the human glucocorticoid receptor. Met-759 of the progestin receptor and Met-622 of the rat glucocorticoid receptor are positioned within a segment with an overall high degree of sequence similarity and are equivalent. However, Met-909 (progestin receptor) and Cys-754 (glucocorticoid receptor) do not occur within equivalent segments of the two proteins. Thus, although the two classes of steroid hormone share a common structure within the A-ring, there are subtle differences in their interaction with the two separate receptor proteins.

  20. Antibodies to cardiac receptors.

    PubMed

    Boivin-Jahns, V; Schlipp, A; Hartmann, S; Panjwani, P; Klingel, K; Lohse, M J; Ertl, G; Jahns, R

    2012-12-01

    Inflammation of cardiac tissue is generally associated with an activation of the host's immune system. On the one hand, this activation is mandatory to protect the heart by fighting the invading microbial agents or toxins and by engaging myocardial reparation and healing processes. On the other hand, uncontrolled activation of the immune defense has the risk of an arousal of auto- or cross-reactive immune cells, which in some cases bring more harm than good. Dependent on the individual genetic predisposition, such heart-directed autoimmune reactions most likely occur as a result of myocyte apoptosis or necrosis and subsequent liberation of self-antigens previously hidden to the immune system. During the past two decades, evidence for a pathogenic relevance of autoimmunity in human heart disease has substantially increased. Conformational cardiac (auto)antibodies affecting cardiac function and, in particular, (auto)antibodies that target G protein-coupled cardiac membrane receptors are thought to play a key role in the development of heart failure. Clinical pilot studies even suggest that such antibodies negatively affect survival in heart failure patients. However, the true prevalence and clinical impact of many cardiac (auto)antibodies in human heart diseases are still unclear, as are the events triggering their formation, their titer course, and their patterns of clearance and/or persistence. The present article summarizes current knowledge in the field of cardiac receptor (auto)antibodies including recent efforts to address some of the aforementioned gaps of knowledge, thereby attempting to pave the way for novel, more specific therapeutic approaches. PMID:23183584

  1. Evolution of melanocortin receptors in cartilaginous fish: melanocortin receptors and the stress axis in elasmobranches.

    PubMed

    Liang, Liang; Reinick, Christina; Angleson, Joseph K; Dores, Robert M

    2013-01-15

    There is general agreement that the presence of five melanocortin receptor genes in tetrapods is the result of two genome duplications that occurred prior to the emergence of the gnathostomes, and at least one local gene duplication that occurred early in the radiation of the ancestral gnathostomes. Hence, it is assumed that representatives from the extant classes of gnathostomes (i.e., Chondrichthyes, Actinopterygii, Sarcopterygii) should also have five paralogous melanocortin genes. Current studies on cartilaginous fishes indicate that while there is evidence for five paralogous melanocortin receptor genes in this class, to date all five paralogs have not been detected in the genome of a single species. This mini-review will discuss the ligand selectivity properties of the melanocortin-3 receptor of the elephant shark (subclass Holocephali) and the ligand selectivity properties of the melanocortin-3 receptor, melanocortin-4 receptor, and the melanocortin-5 receptor of the dogfish (subclass Elasmobranchii). The potential relationship of these melanocortin receptors to the hypothalamus/pituitary/interrenal axis will be discussed. PMID:22964529

  2. On co-design of filter and fault estimator against randomly occurring nonlinearities and randomly occurring deception attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jun; Liu, Steven; Ji, Donghai; Li, Shanqiang

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the co-design problem of filter and fault estimator is studied for a class of time-varying non-linear stochastic systems subject to randomly occurring nonlinearities and randomly occurring deception attacks. Two mutually independent random variables obeying the Bernoulli distribution are employed to characterize the phenomena of the randomly occurring nonlinearities and randomly occurring deception attacks, respectively. By using the augmentation approach, the co-design problem of the robust filter and fault estimator is converted into the recursive filter design problem. A new compensation scheme is proposed such that, for both randomly occurring nonlinearities and randomly occurring deception attacks, an upper bound of the filtering error covariance is obtained and such an upper bound is minimized by properly designing the filter gain at each sampling instant. Moreover, the explicit form of the filter gain is given based on the solution to two Riccati-like difference equations. It is shown that the proposed co-design algorithm is of a recursive form that is suitable for online computation. Finally, a simulation example is given to illustrate the usefulness of the developed filtering approach.

  3. Naturally-occurring chemical analogues for repository-derived radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.

    1996-12-01

    Studies of natural systems are a valuable means of gaining information on the behavior of elements and radionuclides in the geosphere or biosphere that may be used to support performance assessments for radioactive waste repositories. However, these natural system studies face the problem that some of the chemical and isotopic species that occur in radioactive wastes do not occur naturally. Therefore, when attempting to study transport processes for these species other, naturally-occurring species must be examined as {open_quote}chemical analogues{close_quote} for the waste species. Chemical analogues are chosen on the basis of some similarity with the chemical behavior of the waste species in relevant physico-chemical environments. This is a tricky procedure and each system must be considered on a case-by-case basis, although some guidelines can be established and these are given here.

  4. When Does A Gait Transition Occur During Human Locomotion?

    PubMed Central

    Hreljac, Alan; Imamura, Rodney T.; Escamilla, Rafael F.; Edwards, W. Brent

    2007-01-01

    When a treadmill accelerates continuously, the walk-run transition has generally been assumed to occur at the instant when a flight phase is first observed, while the run-walk transition has been assumed to occur at the instant of the first double support period. There is no theoretical or empirical evidence to suggest that gait transitions occur at the instant of these events, nor even whether transitions are abrupt events. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the gait transitions during human locomotion occur abruptly, and if so, to determine the instant during a stride at which a transition occurs. The time history of the vertical velocity of the hip (vhip) and the angular velocity of the ankle (ωankle) were compared between constant speed strides (walking or running) and strides at and near the walk-run and run-walk transitions to determine if and when the transition strides resemble the stride of the corresponding constant speed strides. For both the walk-run and run-walk transitions, the stride prior to the transition resembled the original gait pattern, while the stride following the transition resembled the new gait pattern. The transition stride, however, did not resemble either a walking or a running stride during either of the transition directions. It was concluded that gait transitions are initiated at about midstance of the transition stride, but the transition is not completed until after an adjustment period of between one step and one stride. Thus, gait transitions are not abrupt events during human locomotion. Key pointsGait transitions are not abrupt events.Initiation of a gait transitions occur at about midstance of the transition stride.Gait transitions are completed approximately at the next heelstrike of the ipsilateral foot.Time period between initiation and completion of transition does not resemble either a walk or a run. PMID:24149222

  5. Arsenic poisoning in dairy cattle from naturally occurring arsenic pyrites.

    PubMed

    Hopkirk, R G

    1987-10-01

    An outbreak of arsenic poisoning occurred in which most of a 200 cow dairy herd were affected and six died. The source of the arsenic was naturally occurring arsenic pyrites from the Waiotapu Stream, near Rotorua. Arsenic levels in the nearby soil were as high as 6618 ppm. There was little evidence to suggest that treatment affected the course of the disease. Haematology was of little use in diagnosis, post-mortem signs were not always consistent and persistence of the element in the liver appeared short. Control of further outbreaks have been based on practical measures to minimise the intake of contaminated soil and free laying water by the stock. PMID:16031332

  6. Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome occurring during continuous renal replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tuchman, Shamir; Khademian, Zarir P.; Mistry, Kirtida

    2013-01-01

    The dialysis disequilibrium syndrome (DDS) is characterized by progressive neurological symptoms and signs attributable to cerebral edema that occurs due to fluid shifts into the brain following a relatively rapid decrease in serum osmolality during hemodialysis (HD). Since continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is less efficient at solute clearance than intermittent HD, it seems logical that this mode of therapy is less likely to cause DDS. This entity has not been previously reported to occur with this modality. Here, we report two cases of DDS associated with CRRT that provide insights into its pathophysiological mechanisms and suggest strategies for its prevention. PMID:26120445

  7. Addressing Naturally Occurring Asbestos in the Mining Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieber, D. W.

    2012-12-01

    Mining companies deal with naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) issues on their sites in two ways, avoidance and management. Avoidance simply means that to the extent practical, new mines are located in areas where NOA is unlikely to occur. Where mines are located in areas where NOA may be present, mines implement management procedures to identify and control potential sources of NOA. Management practices may include procedures set forth in regulations such as California's Air Toxicity Control Measure that deals with surface mining, voluntary procedures, or a combination of both. The mining industry generally recognizes that addressing NOA issues is a cost of doing business.;

  8. Historical overview of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Jan-Ake

    2016-03-01

    This review summarizes the birth of the field of nuclear receptors, from Jensen's discovery of estrogen receptor alpha, Gustafsson's discovery of the three-domain structure of the glucocorticoid receptor, the discovery of the glucocorticoid response element and the first partial cloning of the glucocorticoid receptor. Furthermore the discovery of the novel receptors called orphan receptors is described. PMID:25797032

  9. Regulation and ontogeny of subtypes of muscarinic receptors and muscarinic receptor-mediated

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.

    1989-01-01

    The densities of total and M1 muscarinic receptors were measured using the muscarinic receptor antagonists {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine, respectively. Thus, the difference between the density of {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine binding sites represents the density of M2 sites. In addition, there is no observable change in either acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown (suggested to be an M1 receptor-mediated response) or in carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation (suggested to be an M2 receptor-mediated response) in slices of cortex+dorsal hippocampus following chronic atropine administration. In other experiments, it has been shown that the M1 and M2 receptors in rat cortex have different ontogenetic profiles. The M2 receptor is present at adult levels at birth, while the M1 receptor develops slowly from low levels at postnatal week 1 to adult levels at postnatal week 3. The expression of acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown parallels the development of M1 receptors, while the development of carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation occurs abruptly between weeks 2 and 3 postnatally.

  10. Complex high affinity interactions occur between MHCI and superantigens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Herpich, A. R.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins A and C1 (SEA or SEC1) bound to major histocompatibility-I (MHCI) molecules with high affinity (binding constants ranging from 1.1 microM to 79 nM). SEA and SEC1 directly bound MHCI molecules that had been captured by monoclonal antibodies specific for H-2Kk, H-2Dk, or both. In addition, MHCI-specific antibodies inhibited the binding of SEC1 to LM929 cells and SEA competitively inhibited SEC1 binding; indicating that the superantigens bound to MHCI on the cell surface. The affinity and number of superantigen binding sites differed depending on whether MHCI was expressed in the membrane of LM929 cells or whether it was captured. These data support the hypothesis that MHCI molecules can serve as superantigen receptors.