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Sample records for receptor potential vanilloid-1

  1. Serotonin Receptor 2B Mediates Mechanical Hyperalgesia by Regulating Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1.

    PubMed

    Su, Yeu-Shiuan; Chiu, Yuan-Yi; Lin, Shih-Yuan; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Sun, Wei-Hsin

    2016-05-01

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)], an inflammatory mediator, contributes to inflammatory pain. The presence of multiple 5-HT subtype receptors on peripheral and central nociceptors complicates the role of 5-HT in pain. Previously, we found that 5-HT2B/2C antagonist could block 5-HT-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. However, the types of neurons or circuits underlying this effect remained unsolved. Here, we demonstrate that the Gq/11-phospholipase Cβ-protein kinase Cε (PKCε) pathway mediated by 5-HT2B is involved in 5-HT-induced mechanical hyperalgesia in mice. Administration of a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist inhibited the 5-HT-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. 5-HT injection enhanced 5-HT- and capsaicin-evoked calcium signals specifically in isolectin B4 (IB4)-negative neurons; signals were inhibited by a 5-HT2B/2C antagonist and PKCε blocker. Thus, 5-HT2B mediates 5-HT-induced mechanical hyperalgesia by regulating TRPV1 function. PMID:26635025

  2. Structure-Driven Pharmacology of Transient Receptor Potential Channel Vanilloid 1.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Caceres-Molina, Javier; Sepulveda, Romina V; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando; Latorre, Ramon

    2016-09-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is a polymodal receptor that mediates the flux of cations across the membrane in response to several stimuli, including heat, voltage, and ligands. The best known agonist of TRPV1 channels is capsaicin, the pungent component of "hot" chili peppers. In addition, peptides found in the venom of poisonous animals, along with the lipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate, lysophosphatidic acid, and cholesterol, bind to TRPV1 with high affinity to modulate channel gating. Here, we discuss the functional evidence regarding ligand-dependent activation of TRPV1 channels in light of structural data recently obtained by cryoelectron microscopy. This review focuses on the mechanistic insights into ligand binding and allosteric gating of TRPV1 channels and the relevance of accurate polymodal receptor biophysical characterization for drug design in novel pain therapies. PMID:27335334

  3. Inhibitory effect of oleanolic acid from the rhizomes of Cyperus rotundus on transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel.

    PubMed

    Nam, Joo Hyun; Lee, Dong-Ung

    2015-01-01

    Cyperus rotundus is used as an analgesic and sedative in oriental medicine and has been reported to exhibit antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects. On the other hand, the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel is a nonselective cation channel that senses various noxious chemical and thermal stimuli. However, it has recently been reported that the epidermally expressed transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel is involved in heat- and UV-induced skin aging. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether C. rotundus extract and its constituents can inhibit this channel. Ethylacetate and hexane fractions of the methanol extract were found to partially inhibit transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel activity, and at a concentration of 90 µM, oleanolic acid, which was one of three constituents isolated from the ethylacetate fraction, inhibited this activity by 61.4 ± 8.0 %. This is first electrophysiological study to be conducted on the effects of C. rotundus extract and its constituents on the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel. The results obtained provide insight of the potential therapeutic effects of C. rotundus in the contexts of analgesia and UV-induced photoaging. PMID:25402944

  4. Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 in Inflammation and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Fumio; Aono, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a non-selective cation channel, is a receptor activated by high temperatures and chemical agonists such as the vanilloids and protons. Because of these properties, TRPV1 has emerged as a polymodal nocisensor of nociceptive afferent neurons. TRPV1 is thought to be a central transducer of hyperalgesia and a prime target for controlling pain pharmacologically because it is a point where many proalgesic pathways converge and it is upregulated and sensitized by inflammation and injury. However, whether TRPV1 agonists promote or inhibit inflammation remains unclear. We recently demonstrated that SA13353 (1-[2-(1-adamantyl)ethyl]-1-pentyl-3-[3-(4-pyridyl)propyl]urea), a novel TRPV1 agonist, inhibits tumor necrosis factor-a production by the activation of capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurons and reduces the severity of symptoms in kidney injury, lung inflammation, arthritis, and encephalomyelitis. These results suggest that TRPV1 agonists may act as anti-inflammatories in certain inflammatory and autoimmune conditions in vivo. Given the potential deleterious effects of inhibiting the population of channels with a protective function, caution should be taken in the use of potent TRPV1 antagonists as a general strategy to treat inflammation. Further studies are required to clarify the role of TRPV1 and neuropeptides, which are released because of TRPV1 activation in inflammation and autoimmune diseases. PMID:24280677

  5. Involvement of Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channel Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in Myoblast Fusion.

    PubMed

    Kurosaka, Mitsutoshi; Ogura, Yuji; Funabashi, Toshiya; Akema, Tatsuo

    2016-10-01

    The mechanisms that underlie the complex process of muscle regeneration after injury remain unknown. Transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is expressed in several cell types, including skeletal muscle, and is activated by high temperature and by certain molecules secreted during tissue inflammation. Severe inflammation and local temperature perturbations are induced during muscle regeneration, which suggests that TRPV1 might be activated and involved in the process. The aim of this study, was to clarify the role of TRPV1 in the myogenic potential of satellite cells responsible for muscle regeneration. We found that mRNA and protein levels of TRPV1 increased during regeneration after cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced muscle injury in mice. Using isolated mouse satellite cells (i.e., myoblasts), we observed that activation of TRPV1 by its agonist capsaicin (CAP) augmented myogenin protein levels. Whereas CAP did not alter myoblast proliferation, it facilitated myoblast fusion (evaluated using myonucleii number per myotube and fusion index). In contrast, suppression of TRPV1 by siRNA impaired myoblast fusion. Using mice, we also demonstrated that intramuscular injection of CAP facilitated muscle repair after CTX-induced muscle injury. Moreover, we showed that these roles of TRPV1 might be mediated by interleukin-4 and calcium signaling during myoblast fusion. Collectively, these results suggest that TRPV1 underlies normal myogenesis through promotion of myoblast fusion. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2275-2285, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26892397

  6. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 in Epidermal Keratinocytes May Contribute to Acute Pain in Herpes Zoster.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Bum; Kim, Hyeree; Cho, Sang Hyun; Lee, Jeong Deuk; Chung, Jin Ho; Kim, Hei Sung

    2016-03-01

    The role of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) in the initiation of neurogenic inflammation and transduction of pain is well established. In this study 33 patients with herpes zoster (HZ) were recruited from a single centre and underwent a questionnaire interview at their first visit. Punch biopsies from the HZ lesions and the contralateral unaffected skin were performed to localize and quantify the expression of TRPV1. Immunofluorescent staining for TRPV1 was most prominent in the epidermal keratinocytes. Both TRPV1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly higher in the HZ epidermis than in control epidermis (relative ratio 1.62 ± 0.27, p = 0.033 and 2.55 ± 0.51, p = 0.005, respectively). Protein TRPV1 ratio (HZ lesion/control) correlated with the degree of pain (measured on a visual analogue scale; VAS) (p = 0.017) and was significantly lower in patients who had taken either HZ medication or painkillers prior to their visit. These results suggest that non-neuronal TRPV1 may contribute to acute pain in herpes zoster. PMID:26390894

  7. Propacetamol-Induced Injection Pain Is Associated with Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Schillers, Florian; Eberhardt, Esther; Leffler, Andreas; Eberhardt, Mirjam

    2016-10-01

    Propacetamol (PPCM) is a prodrug of paracetamol (PCM), which was generated to increase water solubility of PCM for intravenous delivery. PPCM is rapidly hydrolyzed by plasma esterases to PCM and diethylglycine and shares some structural and metabolic properties with lidocaine. Although PPCM is considered to be comparable to PCM regarding its analgesic properties, injection pain is a common side effect described for PPCM but not PCM. Injection pain is a frequent and unpleasant side effect of numerous drugs in clinical use, and previous reports have indicated that the ligand gated ion channels transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) can mediate this effect on sensory neurons. This study aimed to investigate molecular mechanisms by which PPCM, in contrast to PCM, causes injection pain. Therefore, human TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors were expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells and investigated by means of whole-cell patch clamp and ratiometric calcium imaging. PPCM (but not PCM) activated TRPV1, sensitized heat-induced currents, and caused an increase in intracellular calcium. In TRPA1-expressing cells however, both PPCM and PCM evoked calcium responses but failed to induce inward currents. Intracutaneous injection of PPCM, but not of PCM, in human volunteers induced an intense and short-lasting pain and an increase in superficial blood flow, indicating activation of nociceptive C fibers and subsequent neuropeptide release. In conclusion, activation of human TRPV1 by PPCM seems to be a relevant mechanism for induction of pain upon intracutaneous injection and thus also for pain reported as an adverse side effect upon intravenous administration. PMID:27457427

  8. The role of endogenous molecules in modulating pain through transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Lázaro, Sara L; Simon, Sidney A; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Pain is a physiological response to a noxious stimulus that decreases the quality of life of those sufferring from it. Research aimed at finding new therapeutic targets for the treatment of several maladies, including pain, has led to the discovery of numerous molecular regulators of ion channels in primary afferent nociceptive neurons. Among these receptors is TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1), a member of the TRP family of ion channels. TRPV1 is a calcium-permeable channel, which is activated or modulated by diverse exogenous noxious stimuli such as high temperatures, changes in pH, and irritant and pungent compounds, and by selected molecules released during tissue damage and inflammatory processes. During the last decade the number of endogenous regulators of TRPV1's activity has increased to include lipids that can negatively regulate TRPV1, as is the case for cholesterol and PIP2 (phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate) while, in contrast, other lipids produced in response to tissue injury and ischaemic processes are known to positively regulate TRPV1. Among the latter, lysophosphatidic acid activates TRPV1 while amines such as N-acyl-ethanolamines and N-acyl-dopamines can sensitize or directly activate TRPV1. It has also been found that nucleotides such as ATP act as mediators of chemically induced nociception and pain and gases, such as hydrogen sulphide and nitric oxide, lead to TRPV1 activation. Finally, the products of lipoxygenases and omega-3 fatty acids among other molecules, such as divalent cations, have also been shown to endogenously regulate TRPV1 activity. Here we provide a comprehensive review of endogenous small molecules that regulate the function of TRPV1. Acting through mechanisms that lead to sensitization and desensitization of TRPV1, these molecules regulate pathways involved in pain and nociception. Understanding how these compounds modify TRPV1 activity will allow us to comprehend how some pathologies are associated with

  9. The Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 Channel in Thermoregulation: A Thermosensor It Is Not

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Maria C.; Garami, Andras; Steiner, Alexandre A.; Norman, Mark H.; Morrison, Shaun F.; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Burmeister, Jeffrey J.; Nucci, Tatiane B.

    2009-01-01

    The development of antagonists of the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channel as pain therapeutics has revealed that these compounds cause hyperthermia in humans. This undesirable on-target side effect has triggered a surge of interest in the role of TRPV1 in thermoregulation and revived the hypothesis that TRPV1 channels serve as thermosensors. We review literature data on the distribution of TRPV1 channels in the body and on thermoregulatory responses to TRPV1 agonists and antagonists. We propose that two principal populations of TRPV1-expressing cells have connections with efferent thermoeffector pathways: 1) first-order sensory (polymodal), glutamatergic dorsal-root (and possibly nodose) ganglia neurons that innervate the abdominal viscera and 2) higher-order sensory, glutamatergic neurons presumably located in the median preoptic hypothalamic nucleus. We further hypothesize that all thermoregulatory responses to TRPV1 agonists and antagonists and thermoregulatory manifestations of TRPV1 desensitization stem from primary actions on these two neuronal populations. Agonists act primarily centrally on population 2; antagonists act primarily peripherally on population 1. We analyze what roles TRPV1 might play in thermoregulation and conclude that this channel does not serve as a thermosensor, at least not under physiological conditions. In the hypothalamus, TRPV1 channels are inactive at common brain temperatures. In the abdomen, TRPV1 channels are tonically activated, but not by temperature. However, tonic activation of visceral TRPV1 by nonthermal factors suppresses autonomic cold-defense effectors and, consequently, body temperature. Blockade of this activation by TRPV1 antagonists disinhibits thermoeffectors and causes hyperthermia. Strategies for creating hyperthermia-free TRPV1 antagonists are outlined. The potential physiological and pathological significance of TRPV1-mediated thermoregulatory effects is discussed. PMID:19749171

  10. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Expression and Functionality in MCF-7 Cells: A Preliminary Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Barbero, Raffaella; Cuniberti, Barbara; Racca, Silvia; Abbadessa, Giuliana; Piccione, Francesca; Re, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a nonselective cation channel belonging to the transient receptor potential family, and it is expressed in different neoplastic tissues. Its activation is associated with regulation of cancer growth and progression. The aim of this research was to study the expression and pharmacological characteristics of TRPV1 in cells derived from human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Methods TRPV1 presence was assessed by binding studies and Western blotting. Receptor binding characteristics were evaluated through competition assays, while 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5,-dipheyltetrazolium bromide reduction assays were performed to confirm an early hypothesis regarding the modulation of cancer cell proliferation. The functionality of TRPV1 was evaluated by measuring Ca2+ uptake in the presence of increasing concentrations of TRPV1 agonists and antagonists. Results Binding studies identified a single class of TRPV1 (Bmax 1,492±192 fmol/mg protein), and Western blot showed a signal at 100 kDa corresponding to the molecular weight of human TRPV1. Among the different tested agonists and antagonists, anandamide (Ki: 2.8×10-11 M) and 5-iodoresiniferatoxin (5-I-RTX) (Ki: 5.6×10-11 M) showed the highest degrees of affinity for TRPV1, respectively. All tested TRPV1 agonists and antagonists caused a significant (p<0.05) decrease in cell growth rate in MCF-7 cells. For agonists and antagonists, the efficacy of tested compounds displayed the following rank order: resiniferatoxin>anandamide>capsaicin and 5-I-RTX=capsazepine, respectively. Conclusion These data indicate that both TRPV1 agonists and antagonists induce significant inhibition of MCF-7 cell growth. Even though the mechanisms involved in the antiproliferative effects of TRPV1 agonists and antagonists should be further investigated, it has been suggested that agonists cause desensitization of the receptor, leading to alteration in Ca2+-influx regulation. By contrast

  11. Activation of mitochondrial transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel contributes to microglial migration.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Takahito; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2015-10-01

    Microglia, the resident immune cells in the brain, survey the environment of the healthy brain. Microglial migration is essential for many physiological and pathophysiological processes. Although microglia express some members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family, there is little knowledge regarding the physiological roles of TRP channels in microglia. Here, we explored the role of TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a channel opened by capsaicin, heat, protons, and endovanilloids, in microglia. We found that application of capsaicin induced concentration-dependent migration in microglia derived from wild-type mice but not in those derived from TRPV1 knockout (TRPV1-KO) mice. Capsaicin-induced microglial migration was significantly inhibited by co-application of the TRPV1 blocker SB366791 and the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM. Using RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry, we validated that TRPV1 was expressed in microglia. Electrophysiological recording, intracellular Ca(2+) imaging, and immunocytochemistry indicated that TRPV1 was localized primarily in intracellular organelles. Treatment with capsaicin induced an increase in intramitochondrial Ca(2+) concentrations and mitochondrial depolarization. Furthermore, microglia derived from TRPV1-KO mice showed delayed Ca(2+) efflux compared with microglia derived from wild-type mice. Capsaicin-induced microglial migration was inhibited by membrane-permeable antioxidants and MAPK inhibitors, suggesting that mitochondrial TRPV1 activation induced Ca(2+) -dependent production of ROS followed by MAPK activation, which correlated with an augmented migration of microglia. Moreover, a mixture of three endovanilloids augmented microglial migration via TRPV1 activation. Together, these results indicate that mitochondrial TRPV1 plays an important role in inducing microglial migration. Activation of TRPV1 triggers an increase in intramitochondrial Ca(2+) concentration and following depolarization of mitochondria, which results in mt

  12. Regulation of particulate matter-induced mucin secretion by transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongmei; Li, Qi; Kolosov, Victor P; Perelman, Juliy M; Zhou, Xiangdong

    2012-12-01

    Exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) is a worldwide health problem. Previous studies have reported that PMs induced depolarizing currents and increased intracellular Ca(2+) in human bronchial epithelial cells. Ca(2+) plays important role in the regulation of mucus exocytosis, and mucin hypersecretion is a key pathological feature of inflammatory respiratory diseases. To explore more mechanisms underlying PM toxicity, we measured PM-induced mucin secretion in human bronchial epithelial (16HBE) cells. MUC5AC secretion and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level were detected by ELISA. Transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV)1 inward currents were examined by electrophysiology. Ca(2+) concentration was assessed by laser scanning confocal microscope. Exposure of PMs to 16HBE cells was found to induce mucin secretion, as a consequence of sustained Ca(2+) influx and cAMP increase through TRPV1 receptors. Mucin secretion was completely inhibited by TRPV1 receptor antagonist capsazepine. Removal of Ca(2+) by Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA or inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) by the PKA inhibitors H-89 each partially reduced PC(2)s-induced mucin secretion. The combination of BAPTA and H-89 completely prevented mucin secretion mediated by PMs. These results suggest that PM induces mucin secretion through Ca(2+) influx and cAMP/PKA pathway by TRPV1 receptors in human bronchial epithelial cells, thereby providing a potential mechanism to reduce PM toxicity. PMID:22829138

  13. Potentiation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel contributes to pruritogenesis in a rat model of liver disease.

    PubMed

    Belghiti, Majedeline; Estévez-Herrera, Judith; Giménez-Garzó, Carla; González-Usano, Alba; Montoliu, Carmina; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Felipo, Vicente; Planells-Cases, Rosa

    2013-04-01

    Persistent pruritus is a common disabling dermatologic symptom associated with different etiologic factors. These include primary skin conditions, as well as neuropathic, psychogenic, or systemic disorders like chronic liver disease. Defective clearance of potential pruritogenic substances that activate itch-specific neurons innervating the skin is thought to contribute to cholestatic pruritus. However, because the underlying disease-specific pruritogens and itch-specific neuronal pathways and mechanism(s) are unknown, symptomatic therapeutic intervention often leads to no or only limited success. In the current study, we aimed to first validate rats with bile duct ligation (BDL) as a model for hepatic pruritus and then to evaluate the contribution of inflammation, peripheral neuronal sensitization, and specific signaling pathways and subpopulations of itch-responsive neurons to scratching behavior and thermal hypersensitivity. Chronic BDL rats displayed enhanced scratching behavior and thermal hyperalgesia indicative of peripheral neuroinflammation. BDL-induced itch and hypersensitivity involved a minor contribution of histaminergic/serotonergic receptors, but significant activation of protein-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) receptors, prostaglandin PGE2 formation, and potentiation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel activity. The sensitization of dorsal root ganglion nociceptors in BDL rats was associated with increased surface expression of PAR2 and TRPV1 proteins and an increase in the number of PAR2- and TRPV1-expressing peptidergic neurons together with a shift of TRPV1 receptor expression to medium sized dorsal root ganglion neurons. These results suggest that pruritus and hyperalgesia in chronic cholestatic BDL rats are associated with neuroinflammation and involve PAR2-induced TRPV1 sensitization. Thus, pharmacological modulation of PAR2 and/or TRPV1 may be a valuable therapeutic approach for patients with chronic liver pruritus

  14. Potentiation of the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Channel Contributes to Pruritogenesis in a Rat Model of Liver Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Belghiti, Majedeline; Estévez-Herrera, Judith; Giménez-Garzó, Carla; González-Usano, Alba; Montoliu, Carmina; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Felipo, Vicente; Planells-Cases, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Persistent pruritus is a common disabling dermatologic symptom associated with different etiologic factors. These include primary skin conditions, as well as neuropathic, psychogenic, or systemic disorders like chronic liver disease. Defective clearance of potential pruritogenic substances that activate itch-specific neurons innervating the skin is thought to contribute to cholestatic pruritus. However, because the underlying disease-specific pruritogens and itch-specific neuronal pathways and mechanism(s) are unknown, symptomatic therapeutic intervention often leads to no or only limited success. In the current study, we aimed to first validate rats with bile duct ligation (BDL) as a model for hepatic pruritus and then to evaluate the contribution of inflammation, peripheral neuronal sensitization, and specific signaling pathways and subpopulations of itch-responsive neurons to scratching behavior and thermal hypersensitivity. Chronic BDL rats displayed enhanced scratching behavior and thermal hyperalgesia indicative of peripheral neuroinflammation. BDL-induced itch and hypersensitivity involved a minor contribution of histaminergic/serotonergic receptors, but significant activation of protein-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) receptors, prostaglandin PGE2 formation, and potentiation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel activity. The sensitization of dorsal root ganglion nociceptors in BDL rats was associated with increased surface expression of PAR2 and TRPV1 proteins and an increase in the number of PAR2- and TRPV1-expressing peptidergic neurons together with a shift of TRPV1 receptor expression to medium sized dorsal root ganglion neurons. These results suggest that pruritus and hyperalgesia in chronic cholestatic BDL rats are associated with neuroinflammation and involve PAR2-induced TRPV1 sensitization. Thus, pharmacological modulation of PAR2 and/or TRPV1 may be a valuable therapeutic approach for patients with chronic liver pruritus

  15. The sympathetic nervous system is controlled by transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in the regulation of body temperature

    PubMed Central

    Alawi, Khadija M.; Aubdool, Aisah A.; Liang, Lihuan; Wilde, Elena; Vepa, Abhinav; Psefteli, Maria-Paraskevi; Brain, Susan D.; Keeble, Julie E.

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is involved in sensory nerve nociceptive signaling. Recently, it has been discovered that TRPV1 receptors also regulate basal body temperature in multiple species from mice to humans. In the present study, we investigated whether TRPV1 modulates basal sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity. C57BL6/J wild-type (WT) mice and TRPV1 knockout (KO) mice were implanted with radiotelemetry probes for measurement of core body temperature. AMG9810 (50 mg/kg) or vehicle (2% DMSO/5% Tween 80/10 ml/kg saline) was injected intraperitoneally. Adrenoceptor antagonists or vehicle (5 ml/kg saline) was injected subcutaneously. In WT mice, the TRPV1 antagonist, AMG9810, caused significant hyperthermia, associated with increased noradrenaline concentrations in brown adipose tissue. The hyperthermia was significantly attenuated by the β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol, the mixed α-/β-adrenoceptor antagonist labetalol, and the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin. TRPV1 KO mice have a normal basal body temperature, indicative of developmental compensation. d-Amphetamine (potent sympathomimetic) caused hyperthermia in WT mice, which was reduced in TRPV1 KO mice, suggesting a decreased sympathetic drive in KOs. This study provides new evidence that TRPV1 controls thermoregulation upstream of the SNS, providing a potential therapeutic target for sympathetic hyperactivity thermoregulatory disorders.—Alawi, K. M., Aubdool, A. A., Liang, L., Wilde, E., Vepa, A., Psefteli, M.-P., Brain, S. D., Keeble, J. E. The sympathetic nervous system is controlled by transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in the regulation of body temperature. PMID:26136480

  16. The degradation of airway tight junction protein under acidic conditions is probably mediated by transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Li, Qi; Zhou, Jia; Zhou, Xiang-dong; Perelman, Juliy M.; Kolosov, Victor P.

    2013-01-01

    Acidic airway microenvironment is one of the representative pathophysiological features of chronic inflammatory respiratory diseases. Epithelial barrier function is maintained by TJs (tight junctions), which act as the first physical barrier against the inhaled substances and pathogens of airway. As previous studies described, acid stress caused impaired epithelial barriers and led the hyperpermeability of epithelium. However, the specific mechanism is still unclear. We have showed previously the existence of TRPV (transient receptor potential vanilloid) 1 channel in airway epithelium, as well as its activation by acidic stress in 16HBE cells. In this study, we explored the acidic stress on airway barrier function and TJ proteins in vitro with 16HBE cell lines. Airway epithelial barrier function was determined by measuring by TER (trans-epithelial electrical resistance). TJ-related protein [claudin-1, claudin-3, claudin-4, claudin-5, claudin-7 and ZO-1 (zonula occluden 1)] expression was examined by western blotting of insoluble fractions of cell extraction. The localization of TJ proteins were visualized by immunofluorescent staining. Interestingly, stimulation by pH 6.0 for 8 h slightly increased the epithelial resistance in 16HBE cells insignificantly. However, higher concentration of hydrochloric acid (lower than pH 5.0) did reduce the airway epithelial TER of 16HBE cells. The decline of epithelial barrier function induced by acidic stress exhibited a TRPV1-[Ca2+]i-dependent pathway. Of the TJ proteins, claudin-3 and claudin-4 seemed to be sensitive to acidic stress. The degradation of claudin-3 and claudin-4 induced by acidic stress could be attenuated by the specific TRPV1 blocker or intracellular Ca2+ chelator BAPTA/AM [1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid tetrakis(acetoxymethyl ester)]. PMID:24073800

  17. Cannabinoid 1 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors discretely modulate evoked glutamate separately from spontaneous glutamate transmission.

    PubMed

    Fawley, Jessica A; Hofmann, Mackenzie E; Andresen, Michael C

    2014-06-11

    Action potentials trigger synaptic terminals to synchronously release vesicles, but some vesicles release spontaneously. G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can modulate both of these processes. At cranial primary afferent terminals, the GPCR cannabinoid 1 (CB1) is often coexpressed with transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a nonselective cation channel present on most afferents. Here we tested whether CB1 activation modulates synchronous, action potential-evoked (eEPSCs) and/or spontaneous (sEPSCs) EPSCs at solitary tract nucleus neurons. In rat horizontal brainstem slices, activation of solitary tract (ST) primary afferents generated ST-eEPSCs that were rapidly and reversibly inhibited from most afferents by activation of CB1 with arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA) or WIN 55,212-2 [R-(+)-(2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-[(4-morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl)(1-naphthalenyl) methanone monomethanesulfonate]. The CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist AM251 [N-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-1-piperidinyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide] blocked these responses. Despite profound depression of ST-eEPSCs during CB1 activation, sEPSCs in these same neurons were unaltered. Changes in temperature changed sEPSC frequency only from TRPV1(+) afferents (i.e., thermal sEPSC responses only occurred in TRPV1(+) afferents). CB1 activation failed to alter these thermal sEPSC responses. However, the endogenous arachidonate metabolite N-arachidonyldopamine (NADA) promiscuously activated both CB1 and TRPV1 receptors. NADA inhibited ST-eEPSCs while simultaneously increasing sEPSC frequency, and thermally triggered sEPSC increases in neurons with TRPV1(+) afferents. We found no evidence for CB1/TRPV1 interactions suggesting independent regulation of two separate vesicle pools. Together, these data demonstrate that action potential-evoked synchronous glutamate release is modulated separately from TRPV1-mediated glutamate release despite coexistence

  18. The sympathetic nervous system is controlled by transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in the regulation of body temperature.

    PubMed

    Alawi, Khadija M; Aubdool, Aisah A; Liang, Lihuan; Wilde, Elena; Vepa, Abhinav; Psefteli, Maria-Paraskevi; Brain, Susan D; Keeble, Julie E

    2015-10-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is involved in sensory nerve nociceptive signaling. Recently, it has been discovered that TRPV1 receptors also regulate basal body temperature in multiple species from mice to humans. In the present study, we investigated whether TRPV1 modulates basal sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity. C57BL6/J wild-type (WT) mice and TRPV1 knockout (KO) mice were implanted with radiotelemetry probes for measurement of core body temperature. AMG9810 (50 mg/kg) or vehicle (2% DMSO/5% Tween 80/10 ml/kg saline) was injected intraperitoneally. Adrenoceptor antagonists or vehicle (5 ml/kg saline) was injected subcutaneously. In WT mice, the TRPV1 antagonist, AMG9810, caused significant hyperthermia, associated with increased noradrenaline concentrations in brown adipose tissue. The hyperthermia was significantly attenuated by the β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol, the mixed α-/β-adrenoceptor antagonist labetalol, and the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin. TRPV1 KO mice have a normal basal body temperature, indicative of developmental compensation. d-Amphetamine (potent sympathomimetic) caused hyperthermia in WT mice, which was reduced in TRPV1 KO mice, suggesting a decreased sympathetic drive in KOs. This study provides new evidence that TRPV1 controls thermoregulation upstream of the SNS, providing a potential therapeutic target for sympathetic hyperactivity thermoregulatory disorders. PMID:26136480

  19. Agonist-dependence of functional properties for common nonsynonymous variants of human transient receptor potential vanilloid 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Joseph, John; Diatchenko, Luda; Ro, Jin Y; Chung, Man-Kyo

    2016-07-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a polymodal receptor activated by capsaicin, heat, and acid, which plays critical roles in thermosensation and pain. In addition, TRPV1 also contributes to multiple pathophysiological states in respiratory, cardiovascular, metabolic, and renal systems. These contributions are further supported by evidence that variations in the human TRPV1 (hTRPV1) gene are associated with various physiological and pathological phenotypes. However, it is not well understood how the variations in hTRPV1 affect channel functions. In this study, we examined functional consequences of amino acid variations of hTRPV1 induced by 5 nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that most commonly exist in the human population. Using electrophysiological assays in HEK293 cells, we examined 9 parameters: activation, Ca permeation, and desensitization after activation by capsaicin, acid, and heat. Our results demonstrated that the 5 SNPs differentially affected functional properties of hTRPV1 in an agonist-dependent manner. Based upon the directionality of change of each phenotype and cumulative changes in each SNP, we classified the 5 SNPs into 3 presumptive functional categories: gain of function (hTRPV1 Q85R, P91S, and T469I), loss of function (I585V), and mixed (M315I). These results reveal a spectrum of functional variation among common hTRPV1 polymorphisms in humans and may aid mechanistic interpretation of phenotypes associated with nonsynonymous hTRPV1 SNPs under pathophysiological conditions. PMID:26967694

  20. Rapid, Opioid-sensitive Mechanisms Involved in Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Sensitization*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Vetter, Irina; Cheng, Wei; Peiris, Madusha; Wyse, Bruce D.; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J.; Zheng, Jie; Monteith, Gregory R.; Cabot, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    TRPV1 is a nociceptive, Ca2+-selective ion channel involved in the development of several painful conditions. Sensitization of TRPV1 responses by cAMP-dependent PKA crucially contributes to the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. However, the pathways involved in potentiation of TRPV1 responses by cAMP-dependent PKA remain largely unknown. Using HEK cells stably expressing TRPV1 and the μ opioid receptor, we demonstrated that treatment with the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin significantly increased the multimeric TRPV1 species. Pretreatment with the μ opioid receptor agonist morphine reversed this increased TRPV1 multimerization. FRET analysis revealed that treatment with forskolin did not cause multimerization of pre-existing TRPV1 monomers on the plasma membrane and that intracellular pools of TRPV1 exist mostly as monomers in this model. This suggests that increased TRPV1 multimerization occurred from an intracellular store of inactive TRPV1 monomers. Treatment with forskolin also caused an increase in TRPV1 expression on the plasma membrane not resulting from increased TRPV1 expression, and this rapid TRPV1 translocation was inhibited by treatment with morphine. Thus, potentiation of TRPV1 responses by cAMP-dependent PKA involves plasma membrane insertion of functional TRPV1 multimers formed from an intracellular store of inactive TRPV1 monomers. This potentiation occurs rapidly and can be dynamically modulated by activation of the μ opioid receptor under conditions where cAMP levels are raised, such as with inflammation. Increased translocation and multimerization of TRPV1 channels provide a cellular mechanism for finetuning of nociceptive responses that allow for rapid modulation of TRPV1 responses independent of transcriptional changes. PMID:18482991

  1. Pharmacology of modality-specific transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 antagonists that do not alter body temperature.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Regina M; McDonald, Heath A; Puttfarcken, Pamela S; Joshi, Shailen K; Lewis, LaGeisha; Pai, Madhavi; Franklin, Pamela H; Segreti, Jason A; Neelands, Torben R; Han, Ping; Chen, Jun; Mantyh, Patrick W; Ghilardi, Joseph R; Turner, Teresa M; Voight, Eric A; Daanen, Jerome F; Schmidt, Robert G; Gomtsyan, Arthur; Kort, Michael E; Faltynek, Connie R; Kym, Philip R

    2012-08-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channel is involved in the development and maintenance of pain and participates in the regulation of temperature. The channel is activated by diverse agents, including capsaicin, noxious heat (≥ 43°C), acidic pH (< 6), and endogenous lipids including N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA). Antagonists that block all modes of TRPV1 activation elicit hyperthermia. To identify efficacious TRPV1 antagonists that do not affect temperature antagonists representing multiple TRPV1 pharmacophores were evaluated at recombinant rat and human TRPV1 channels with Ca(2+) flux assays, and two classes of antagonists were identified based on their differential ability to inhibit acid activation. Although both classes of antagonists completely blocked capsaicin- and NADA-induced activation of TRPV1, select compounds only partially inhibited activation of the channel by protons. Electrophysiology and calcitonin gene-related peptide release studies confirmed the differential pharmacology of these antagonists at native TRPV1 channels in the rat. Comparison of the in vitro pharmacological properties of these TRPV1 antagonists with their in vivo effects on core body temperature confirms and expands earlier observations that acid-sparing TRPV1 antagonists do not significantly increase core body temperature. Although both classes of compounds elicit equivalent analgesia in a rat model of knee joint pain, the acid-sparing antagonist tested is not effective in a mouse model of bone cancer pain. PMID:22570364

  2. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 modulates nociceptive signaling through direct phosphorylation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1

    PubMed Central

    Pareek, Tej K.; Keller, Jason; Kesavapany, Sashi; Agarwal, Nitin; Kuner, Rohini; Pant, Harish C.; Iadarola, Michael J.; Brady, Roscoe O.; Kulkarni, Ashok B.

    2007-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a ligand-gated cation channel highly expressed in small-diameter sensory neurons, is activated by heat, protons, and capsaicin. The phosphorylation of TRPV1 provides a versatile regulation of intracellular calcium levels and is critical for TRPV1 function in responding to a pain stimulus. We have previously reported that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) activity regulates nociceptive signaling. In this article we report that the Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 at threonine-407 can modulate agonist-induced calcium influx. Inhibition of Cdk5 activity in cultured dorsal root ganglia neurons resulted in a significant reduction of TRPV1-mediated calcium influx, and this effect could be reversed by restoring Cdk5 activity. Primary nociceptor-specific Cdk5 conditional-knockout mice showed reduced TRPV1 phosphorylation, resulting in significant hypoalgesia. Thus, the present study indicates that Cdk5-mediated TRPV1 phosphorylation is important in the regulation of pain signaling. PMID:17194758

  3. Endovanilloids. Putative endogenous ligands of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channels.

    PubMed

    Van Der Stelt, Mario; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2004-05-01

    Endovanilloids are defined as endogenous ligands of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) protein, a nonselective cation channel that belongs to the large family of TRP ion channels, and is activated by the pungent ingredient of hot chilli peppers, capsaicin. TRPV1 is expressed in some nociceptor efferent neurons, where it acts as a molecular sensor of noxious heat and low pH. However, the presence of these channels in various regions of the central nervous system, where they are not likely to be targeted by these noxious stimuli, suggests the existence of endovanilloids. Three different classes of endogenous lipids have been found recently that can activate TRPV1, i.e. unsaturated N-acyldopamines, lipoxygenase products of arachidonic acid and the endocannabinoid anandamide with some of its congeners. To classify a molecule as an endovanilloid, the compound should be formed or released in an activity-dependent manner in sufficient amounts to evoke a TRPV1-mediated response by direct activation of the channel. To control TRPV1 signaling, endovanilloids should be inactivated within a short time-span. In this review, we will discuss, for each of the proposed endogenous ligands of TRPV1, their ability to act as endovanilloids in light of the criteria mentioned above. PMID:15128293

  4. Short-term increases in transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 mediate stress-induced enhancement of neuronal excitation.

    PubMed

    Weitlauf, Carl; Ward, Nicholas J; Lambert, Wendi S; Sidorova, Tatiana N; Ho, Karen W; Sappington, Rebecca M; Calkins, David J

    2014-11-12

    Progression of neurodegeneration in disease and injury is influenced by the response of individual neurons to stressful stimuli and whether this response includes mechanisms to counter declining function. Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels transduce a variety of disease-relevant stimuli and can mediate diverse stress-dependent changes in physiology, both presynaptic and postsynaptic. Recently, we demonstrated that knock-out or pharmacological inhibition of the TRP vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) capsaicin-sensitive subunit accelerates degeneration of retinal ganglion cell neurons and their axons with elevated ocular pressure, the critical stressor in the most common optic neuropathy, glaucoma. Here we probed the mechanism of the influence of TRPV1 on ganglion cell survival in mouse models of glaucoma. We found that induced elevations of ocular pressure increased TRPV1 in ganglion cells and its colocalization at excitatory synapses to their dendrites, whereas chronic elevation progressively increased ganglion cell Trpv1 mRNA. Enhanced TRPV1 expression in ganglion cells was transient and supported a reversal of the effect of TRPV1 on ganglion cells from hyperpolarizing to depolarizing, which was also transient. Short-term enhancement of TRPV1-mediated activity led to a delayed increase in axonal spontaneous excitation that was absent in ganglion cells from Trpv1(-/-) retina. In isolated ganglion cells, pharmacologically activated TRPV1 mobilized to discrete nodes along ganglion cell dendrites that corresponded to sites of elevated Ca(2+). These results suggest that TRPV1 may promote retinal ganglion cell survival through transient enhancement of local excitation and axonal activity in response to ocular stress. PMID:25392504

  5. Role of the Outer Pore Domain in Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Dynamic Permeability to Large Cations*

    PubMed Central

    Munns, Clare H.; Chung, Man-Kyo; Sanchez, Yuly E.; Amzel, L. Mario; Caterina, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) has been shown to alter its ionic selectivity profile in a time- and agonist-dependent manner. One hallmark of this dynamic process is an increased permeability to large cations such as N-methyl-d-glucamine (NMDG). In this study, we mutated residues throughout the TRPV1 pore domain to identify loci that contribute to dynamic large cation permeability. Using resiniferatoxin (RTX) as the agonist, we identified multiple gain-of-function substitutions within the TRPV1 pore turret (N628P and S629A), pore helix (F638A), and selectivity filter (M644A) domains. In all of these mutants, maximum NMDG permeability was substantially greater than that recorded in wild type TRPV1, despite similar or even reduced sodium current density. Two additional mutants, located in the pore turret (G618W) and selectivity filter (M644I), resulted in significantly reduced maximum NMDG permeability. M644A and M644I also showed increased and decreased minimum NMDG permeability, respectively. The phenotypes of this panel of mutants were confirmed by imaging the RTX-evoked uptake of the large cationic fluorescent dye YO-PRO1. Whereas none of the mutations selectively altered capsaicin-induced changes in NMDG permeability, the loss-of-function phenotypes seen with RTX stimulation of G618W and M644I were recapitulated in the capsaicin-evoked YO-PRO1 uptake assay. Curiously, the M644A substitution resulted in a loss, rather than a gain, in capsaicin-evoked YO-PRO1 uptake. Modeling of our mutations onto the recently determined TRPV1 structure revealed several plausible mechanisms for the phenotypes observed. We conclude that side chain interactions at a few specific loci within the TRPV1 pore contribute to the dynamic process of ionic selectivity. PMID:25568328

  6. Short-Term Increases in Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 Mediate Stress-Induced Enhancement of Neuronal Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Weitlauf, Carl; Ward, Nicholas J.; Lambert, Wendi S.; Sidorova, Tatiana N.; Ho, Karen W.; Sappington, Rebecca M.

    2014-01-01

    Progression of neurodegeneration in disease and injury is influenced by the response of individual neurons to stressful stimuli and whether this response includes mechanisms to counter declining function. Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels transduce a variety of disease-relevant stimuli and can mediate diverse stress-dependent changes in physiology, both presynaptic and postsynaptic. Recently, we demonstrated that knock-out or pharmacological inhibition of the TRP vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) capsaicin-sensitive subunit accelerates degeneration of retinal ganglion cell neurons and their axons with elevated ocular pressure, the critical stressor in the most common optic neuropathy, glaucoma. Here we probed the mechanism of the influence of TRPV1 on ganglion cell survival in mouse models of glaucoma. We found that induced elevations of ocular pressure increased TRPV1 in ganglion cells and its colocalization at excitatory synapses to their dendrites, whereas chronic elevation progressively increased ganglion cell Trpv1 mRNA. Enhanced TRPV1 expression in ganglion cells was transient and supported a reversal of the effect of TRPV1 on ganglion cells from hyperpolarizing to depolarizing, which was also transient. Short-term enhancement of TRPV1-mediated activity led to a delayed increase in axonal spontaneous excitation that was absent in ganglion cells from Trpv1−/− retina. In isolated ganglion cells, pharmacologically activated TRPV1 mobilized to discrete nodes along ganglion cell dendrites that corresponded to sites of elevated Ca2+. These results suggest that TRPV1 may promote retinal ganglion cell survival through transient enhancement of local excitation and axonal activity in response to ocular stress. PMID:25392504

  7. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) Is a Mediator of Lung Toxicity for Coal Fly Ash Particulate Material

    PubMed Central

    Deering-Rice, Cassandra E.; Johansen, Mark E.; Roberts, Jessica K.; Thomas, Karen C.; Romero, Erin G.; Lee, Jeewoo; Yost, Garold S.; Veranth, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental particulate matter (PM) pollutants adversely affect human health, but the molecular basis is poorly understood. The ion channel transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) has been implicated as a sensor for environmental PM and a mediator of adverse events in the respiratory tract. The objectives of this study were to determine whether TRPV1 can distinguish chemically and physically unique PM that represents important sources of air pollution; to elucidate the molecular basis of TRPV1 activation by PM; and to ascertain the contributions of TRPV1 to human lung cell and mouse lung tissue responses exposed to an insoluble PM agonist, coal fly ash (CFA1). The major findings of this study are that TRPV1 is activated by some, but not all of the prototype PM materials evaluated, with rank-ordered responses of CFA1 > diesel exhaust PM > crystalline silica; TRP melastatin-8 is also robustly activated by CFA1, whereas other TRP channels expressed by airway sensory neurons and lung epithelial cells that may also be activated by CFA1, including TRPs ankyrin 1 (A1), canonical 4α (C4α), M2, V2, V3, and V4, were either slightly (TRPA1) or not activated by CFA1; activation of TRPV1 by CFA1 occurs via cell surface interactions between the solid components of CFA1 and specific amino acid residues of TRPV1 that are localized in the putative pore-loop region; and activation of TRPV1 by CFA1 is not exclusive in mouse lungs but represents a pathway by which CFA1 affects the expression of selected genes in lung epithelial cells and airway tissue. PMID:22155782

  8. Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is a mediator of lung toxicity for coal fly ash particulate material.

    PubMed

    Deering-Rice, Cassandra E; Johansen, Mark E; Roberts, Jessica K; Thomas, Karen C; Romero, Erin G; Lee, Jeewoo; Yost, Garold S; Veranth, John M; Reilly, Christopher A

    2012-03-01

    Environmental particulate matter (PM) pollutants adversely affect human health, but the molecular basis is poorly understood. The ion channel transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) has been implicated as a sensor for environmental PM and a mediator of adverse events in the respiratory tract. The objectives of this study were to determine whether TRPV1 can distinguish chemically and physically unique PM that represents important sources of air pollution; to elucidate the molecular basis of TRPV1 activation by PM; and to ascertain the contributions of TRPV1 to human lung cell and mouse lung tissue responses exposed to an insoluble PM agonist, coal fly ash (CFA1). The major findings of this study are that TRPV1 is activated by some, but not all of the prototype PM materials evaluated, with rank-ordered responses of CFA1 > diesel exhaust PM > crystalline silica; TRP melastatin-8 is also robustly activated by CFA1, whereas other TRP channels expressed by airway sensory neurons and lung epithelial cells that may also be activated by CFA1, including TRPs ankyrin 1 (A1), canonical 4α (C4α), M2, V2, V3, and V4, were either slightly (TRPA1) or not activated by CFA1; activation of TRPV1 by CFA1 occurs via cell surface interactions between the solid components of CFA1 and specific amino acid residues of TRPV1 that are localized in the putative pore-loop region; and activation of TRPV1 by CFA1 is not exclusive in mouse lungs but represents a pathway by which CFA1 affects the expression of selected genes in lung epithelial cells and airway tissue. PMID:22155782

  9. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 agonists cause endoplasmic reticulum stress and cell death in human lung cells.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Karen C; Sabnis, Ashwini S; Johansen, Mark E; Lanza, Diane L; Moos, Philip J; Yost, Garold S; Reilly, Christopher A

    2007-06-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a calcium-selective ion channel expressed in human lung cells. We show that activation of the intracellular subpopulation of TRPV1 causes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and cell death in human bronchial epithelial and alveolar cells. TRPV1 agonist (nonivamide) treatment caused calcium release from the ER and altered the transcription of growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible transcript 3 (GADD153), GADD45alpha, GRP78/BiP, ATF3, CCND1, and CCNG2) in a manner comparable with prototypical ER stress-inducing agents. The TRPV1 antagonist N-(4-tert-butylbenzyl)-N'-(1-[3-fluoro-4-(methylsulfonylamino)-phenyl]ethyl)thiourea (LJO-328) inhibited mRNA responses and cytotoxicity. EGTA and ruthenium red inhibited cell surface TRPV1 activity, but they did not prevent ER stress gene responses or cytotoxicity. Cytotoxicity paralleled eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2, subunit 1 (EIF2alpha) phosphorylation and the induction of GADD153 mRNA and protein. Transient overexpression of GADD153 caused cell death independent of agonist treatment, and cells selected for stable overexpression of a GADD153 dominant-negative mutant exhibited reduced sensitivity. Salubrinal, an inhibitor of ER stress-induced cytotoxicity via the EIF2alphaK3/EIF2alpha pathway, or stable overexpression of the EIF2alpha-S52A dominant-negative mutant also inhibited cell death. Treatment of the TRPV1-null human embryonic kidney 293 cell line with TRPV1 agonists did not initiate ER stress responses. Likewise, n-benzylnonanamide, an inactive analog of nonivamide, failed to cause ER calcium release, an increase in GADD153 expression, and cytotoxicity. We conclude that activation of ER-bound TRPV1 and stimulation of GADD153 expression via the EIF2alphaK3/EIF2alpha pathway represents a common mechanism for cytotoxicity by cell-permeable TRPV1 agonists. These findings are significant within the context of lung inflammatory diseases where elevated

  10. Inhibition of platelet aggregation by vanilloid-like agents is not mediated by transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 channels or cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Almaghrabi, Safa; Geraghty, Dominic; Ahuja, Kiran; Adams, Murray

    2016-06-01

    Vanilloid-like agents, including capsaicin, N-arachidonoyl-dopamine and N-oleoyldopamine inhibit platelet aggregation, however little is known about the precise mechanism(s) of action. The authors have previously shown that blocking of the capsaicin receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1), does not interfere with capsaicin action during adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced aggregation. This research is extended to investigate the effect of these vanilloid-like-agents on platelet count, and to test whether the effect of these agents is mediated through TRPV1 and/or cannabinoid (CB1 and CB2) receptors in the presence of other agonists, including collagen and arachidonic acid. Incubation of platelets with each of the individual vanilloids, or with receptor antagonists of TRPV1 (SB452533), CB1 (AM251) and CB2 (AM630), for up to 2 h did not significantly affect the platelet count. Similarly, the effect of individual vanilloids on the inhibition of platelet aggregation was not significantly different in the presence of receptor agonists compared to control, irrespective of the agonist used, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of vanilloids on platelet aggregation is independent of TRPV1, CB1 and CB2 receptors. Further research on the antiplatelet activity of vanilloids should focus on mechanisms other than those associated with vanilloid receptors. PMID:26991025

  11. Unique Responses are Observed in Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 and Vanilloid 1 (TRPA1 and TRPV1) Co-Expressing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sadofsky, Laura R.; Sreekrishna, Koti T.; Lin, Yakang; Schinaman, Renee; Gorka, Kate; Mantri, Yogita; Haught, John Christian; Huggins, Thomas G.; Isfort, Robert J.; Bascom, Charles C.; Morice, Alyn H.

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors are implicated in modulation of cough and nociception. In vivo, TRPA1 and TRPV1 are often co-expressed in neurons and TRPA1V1 hetero-tetramer formation is noted in cells co-transfected with the respective expression plasmids. In order to understand the impact of TRP receptor interaction on activity, we created stable cell lines expressing the TRPA1, TRPV1 and co-expressing the TRPA1 and TRPV1 (TRPA1V1) receptors. Among the 600 compounds screened against these receptors, we observed a number of compounds that activated the TRPA1, TRPV1 and TRPA1V1 receptors; compounds that activated TRPA1 and TRPA1V1; compounds that activated TRPV1 and TRPA1V1; compounds in which TRPA1V1 response was modulated by either TRPA1 or TRPV1; and compounds that activated only TRPV1 or TRPA1 or TRPA1V1; and one compound that activated TRPA1 and TRPV1, but not TRPA1V1. These results suggest that co-expression of TRPA1 and TRPV1 receptors imparts unique activation profiles different from that of cells expressing only TRPA1 or TRPV1. PMID:24921186

  12. Regulation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 expression in trigeminal ganglion neurons via methyl-CpG binding protein 2 signaling contributes tongue heat sensitivity and inflammatory hyperalgesia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Azumi; Honda, Kuniya; Shirakawa, Tetsuro; Iwata, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Background Pain hypoalgesia has been reported in Rett syndrome patients, a severe neurodevelopmental disorder which can be attributed to mutations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Here, we examined the role of MeCP2 signaling in tongue heat sensitivity in the normal and inflamed state using Mecp2 heterozygous (Mecp2+/−) mice. Results Heat hypoalgesia of the tongue occurred in Mecp2+/− mice and submucosal injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant into the tongue produced a long-lasting heat hyperalgesia at the inflamed site in wild-type mice but not in Mecp2+/− mice. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 was expressed in a large number of MeCP2-immunoreactive trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the tongue in both wild-type and Mecp2+/− mice (70.9% in wild type; 72.1% in Mecp2+/−). The number of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1-immunoreactive trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the tongue was smaller in Mecp2+/− mice relative to wild-type mice (30.5% in wild type; 20.2% in Mecp2+/−). Following complete Freund’s adjuvant injection, the number of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1- and MeCP2-immunoreactive trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the tongue, as well as MeCP2 protein expression in trigeminal ganglion, was significantly increased in wild-type mice but not in Mecp2+/− mice. Additionally, tongue heat hyperalgesia following complete Freund’s adjuvant injection was completely suppressed by the administration of SB366791, a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 antagonist, in the tongue. Conclusions These findings indicate that tongue heat sensitivity and hypersensitivity are dependent on the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 which is regulated via MeCP2 signaling in trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the tongue. PMID:27030715

  13. NOX3 NADPH Oxidase Couples Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 to Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1-Mediated Inflammation and Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjea, Debashree; Jajoo, Sarvesh; Sheehan, Kelly; Kaur, Tejbeer; Sheth, Sandeep; Bunch, Jennifer; Perro, Christopher; Rybak, Leonard P.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is implicated in cisplatin ototoxicity. Activation of this channel by cisplatin increases reactive oxygen species generation, which contribute to loss of outer hair cells in the cochlea. Knockdown of TRPV1 by short interfering RNA protected against cisplatin ototoxicity. In this study, we examined the mechanism underlying TRPV1-mediated ototoxicity using cultured organ of Corti transformed cells (UB/OC-1) and rats. Trans-tympanic injections of capsaicin produced transient hearing loss within 24 h, which recovered by 72 h. In UB/OC-1 cells, capsaicin increased NOX3 NADPH oxidase activity and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1). Intratympanic administration of capsaicin transiently increased STAT1 activity and expression of downstream proinflammatory molecules. Capsaicin produced a transient increase in CD14-positive inflammatory cells into the cochlea, which mimicked the temporal course of STAT1 activation but did not alter the expression of apoptotic genes or damage to outer hair cells. In addition, trans-tympanic administration of STAT1 short interfering RNA protected against capsaicin-induced hearing loss. These data suggest that activation of TRPV1 mediates temporary hearing loss by initiating an inflammatory process in the cochlea via activation of NOX3 and STAT1. Thus, these proteins represent reasonable targets for ameliorating hearing loss. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 999–1010. PMID:20712533

  14. NOX3 NADPH oxidase couples transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 to signal transducer and activator of transcription 1-mediated inflammation and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Mukherjea, Debashree; Jajoo, Sarvesh; Sheehan, Kelly; Kaur, Tejbeer; Sheth, Sandeep; Bunch, Jennifer; Perro, Christopher; Rybak, Leonard P; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2011-03-15

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is implicated in cisplatin ototoxicity. Activation of this channel by cisplatin increases reactive oxygen species generation, which contribute to loss of outer hair cells in the cochlea. Knockdown of TRPV1 by short interfering RNA protected against cisplatin ototoxicity. In this study, we examined the mechanism underlying TRPV1-mediated ototoxicity using cultured organ of Corti transformed cells (UB/OC-1) and rats. Trans-tympanic injections of capsaicin produced transient hearing loss within 24 h, which recovered by 72 h. In UB/OC-1 cells, capsaicin increased NOX3 NADPH oxidase activity and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1). Intratympanic administration of capsaicin transiently increased STAT1 activity and expression of downstream proinflammatory molecules. Capsaicin produced a transient increase in CD14-positive inflammatory cells into the cochlea, which mimicked the temporal course of STAT1 activation but did not alter the expression of apoptotic genes or damage to outer hair cells. In addition, trans-tympanic administration of STAT1 short interfering RNA protected against capsaicin-induced hearing loss. These data suggest that activation of TRPV1 mediates temporary hearing loss by initiating an inflammatory process in the cochlea via activation of NOX3 and STAT1. Thus, these proteins represent reasonable targets for ameliorating hearing loss. PMID:20712533

  15. Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) influences how retinal ganglion cell neurons respond to pressure-related stress

    PubMed Central

    Sappington, Rebecca M; Sidorova, Tatiana; Ward, Nicholas J; Chakravarthy, Rohini; Ho, Karen W; Calkins, David J

    2015-01-01

    Our recent studies implicate the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channel as a mediator of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) function and survival. With elevated pressure in the eye, TRPV1 increases in RGCs, supporting enhanced excitability, while Trpv1 -/- accelerates RGC degeneration in mice. Here we find TRPV1 localized in monkey and human RGCs, similar to rodents. Expression increases in RGCs exposed to acute changes in pressure. In retinal explants, contrary to our animal studies, both Trpv1 -/- and pharmacological antagonism of the channel prevented pressure-induced RGC apoptosis, as did chelation of extracellular Ca2+. Finally, while TRPV1 and TRPV4 co-localize in some RGC bodies and form a protein complex in the retina, expression of their mRNA is inversely related with increasing ocular pressure. We propose that TRPV1 activation by pressure-related insult in the eye initiates changes in expression that contribute to a Ca2+-dependent adaptive response to maintain excitatory signaling in RGCs. PMID:25713995

  16. 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) is a novel activator of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel.

    PubMed

    Wen, Hairuo; Östman, Johan; Bubb, Kristen J; Panayiotou, Catherine; Priestley, John V; Baker, Mark D; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2012-04-20

    TRPV1 is a member of the transient receptor potential ion channel family and is gated by capsaicin, the pungent component of chili pepper. It is expressed predominantly in small diameter peripheral nerve fibers and is activated by noxious temperatures >42 °C. 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) is a cytochrome P-450 4A/4F-derived metabolite of the membrane phospholipid arachidonic acid. It is a powerful vasoconstrictor and has structural similarities with other TRPV1 agonists, e.g. the hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid 12-HPETE, and we hypothesized that it may be an endogenous ligand for TRPV1 in sensory neurons innervating the vasculature. Here, we demonstrate that 20-HETE both activates and sensitizes mouse and human TRPV1, in a kinase-dependent manner, involving the residue Ser(502) in heterologously expressed hTRPV1, at physiologically relevant concentrations. PMID:22389490

  17. Molecular Cloning and Functional Characterization of Xenopus tropicalis Frog Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Reveal Its Functional Evolution for Heat, Acid, and Capsaicin Sensitivities in Terrestrial Vertebrates*

    PubMed Central

    Ohkita, Masashi; Saito, Shigeru; Imagawa, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Kenji; Tominaga, Makoto; Ohta, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    The functional difference of thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in the evolutionary context has attracted attention, but thus far little information is available on the TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) function of amphibians, which diverged earliest from terrestrial vertebrate lineages. In this study we cloned Xenopus tropicalis frog TRPV1 (xtTRPV1), and functional characterization was performed using HeLa cells heterologously expressing xtTRPV1 (xtTRPV1-HeLa) and dorsal root ganglion neurons isolated from X. tropicalis (xtDRG neurons) by measuring changes in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). The channel activity was also observed in xtTRPV1-expressing Xenopus oocytes. Furthermore, we tested capsaicin- and heat-induced nocifensive behaviors of the frog X. tropicalis in vivo. At the amino acid level, xtTRPV1 displays ∼60% sequence identity to other terrestrial vertebrate TRPV1 orthologues. Capsaicin induced [Ca2+]i increases in xtTRPV1-HeLa and xtDRG neurons and evoked nocifensive behavior in X. tropicalis. However, its sensitivity was extremely low compared with mammalian orthologues. Low extracellular pH and heat activated xtTRPV1-HeLa and xtDRG neurons. Heat also evoked nocifensive behavior. In oocytes expressing xtTRPV1, inward currents were elicited by heat and low extracellular pH. Mutagenesis analysis revealed that two amino acids (tyrosine 523 and alanine 561) were responsible for the low sensitivity to capsaicin. Taken together, our results indicate that xtTRPV1 functions as a polymodal receptor similar to its mammalian orthologues. The present study demonstrates that TRPV1 functions as a heat- and acid-sensitive channel in the ancestor of terrestrial vertebrates. Because it is possible to examine vanilloid and heat sensitivities in vitro and in vivo, X. tropicalis could be the ideal experimental lower vertebrate animal for the study of TRPV1 function. PMID:22130664

  18. H2O2 generated by NADPH oxidase 4 contributes to transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel-mediated mechanosensation in the rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chian-Shiung; Lee, Shang-Hsing; Huang, Ho-Shiang; Chen, Yih-Sharng; Ma, Ming-Chieh

    2015-08-15

    The presence of NADPH oxidase (Nox) in the kidney, especially Nox4, results in H2O2 production, which regulates Na(+) excretion and urine formation. Redox-sensitive transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channels (TRPV1s) are distributed in mechanosensory fibers of the renal pelvis and monitor changes in intrapelvic pressure (IPP) during urine formation. The present study tested whether H2O2 derived from Nox4 affects TRPV1 function in renal sensory responses. Perfusion of H2O2 into the renal pelvis dose dependently increased afferent renal nerve activity and substance P (SP) release. These responses were attenuated by cotreatment with catalase or TRPV1 blockers. In single unit recordings, H2O2 activated afferent renal nerve activity in response to rising IPP but not high salt. Western blots revealed that Nox2 (gp91(phox)) and Nox4 are both present in the rat kidney, but Nox4 is abundant in the renal pelvis and originates from dorsal root ganglia. This distribution was associated with expression of the Nox4 regulators p22(phox) and polymerase δ-interacting protein 2. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that IPP increases polymerase δ-interacting protein 2 association with Nox4 or p22(phox) in the renal pelvis. Interestingly, immunofluorescence labeling demonstrated that Nox4 colocalizes with TRPV1 in sensory fibers of the renal pelvis, indicating that H2O2 generated from Nox4 may affect TRPV1 activity. Stepwise increases in IPP and saline loading resulted in H2O2 and SP release, sensory activation, diuresis, and natriuresis. These effects, however, were remarkably attenuated by Nox inhibition. Overall, these results suggest that Nox4-positive fibers liberate H2O2 after mechanostimulation, thereby contributing to a renal sensory nerve-mediated diuretic/natriuretic response. PMID:26136558

  19. Ameliorating Endothelial Mitochondrial Dysfunction Restores Coronary Function via Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1-Mediated Protein Kinase A/Uncoupling Protein 2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shiqiang; Wang, Peijian; Ma, Liqun; Gao, Peng; Gong, Liuping; Li, Li; Li, Qiang; Sun, Fang; Zhou, Xunmei; He, Hongbo; Chen, Jing; Yan, Zhencheng; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2016-02-01

    Coronary heart disease arising from atherosclerosis is a leading cause of cardiogenic death worldwide. Mitochondria are the principal source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and defective oxidative phosphorylation by the mitochondrial respiratory chain contributes to ROS generation. Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), an adaptive antioxidant defense factor, protects against mitochondrial ROS-induced endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis. The activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) attenuates vascular dysfunction. Therefore, whether TRPV1 activation antagonizes coronary lesions by alleviating endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction and enhancing the activity of the protein kinase A/UCP2 pathway warrants examination. ApoE(-/-), ApoE(-/-)/TRPV1(-/-), and ApoE(-/-)/UCP2(-/-) mice were fed standard chow, a high-fat diet (HFD), or the HFD plus 0.01% capsaicin. HFD intake profoundly impaired coronary vasodilatation and myocardial perfusion and shortened the survival duration of ApoE(-/-) mice. TRPV1 or UCP2 deficiency exacerbated HFD-induced coronary dysfunction and was associated with increased ROS generation and reduced nitric oxide production in the endothelium. The activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin upregulated UCP2 expression via protein kinase A phosphorylation, thereby alleviating endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibiting mitochondrial ROS generation. In vivo, dietary capsaicin supplementation enhanced coronary relaxation and prolonged the survival duration of HFD-fed ApoE(-/-) mice. These effects were not observed in ApoE(-/-) mice lacking the TRPV1 or UCP2 gene. The upregulation of protein kinase A /UCP2 via TRPV1 activation ameliorates coronary dysfunction and prolongs the lifespan of atherosclerotic mice by ameliorating endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction. Dietary capsaicin supplementation may represent a promising intervention for the primary prevention of coronary heart disease. PMID:26667415

  20. Transient receptor potential melastatin 8 channel inhibition potentiates the hypothermic response to transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 activation in the conscious mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Feketa, Viktor V.; Zhang, Yi; Cao, Zhijuan; Balasubramanian, Adithya; Flores, Christopher M.; Player, Mark R.; Marrelli, Sean P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Mild decrease in core temperature (therapeutic hypothermia; TH) provides lasting neuroprotection following cardiac arrest or cerebral ischemia. However, current methods for producing TH trigger a cold-defense response which must be countered by sedatives, muscle paralytics and mechanical ventilation. We aimed to determine methods for producing hypothermia in the conscious mouse by targeting two transient receptor potential (TRP) channels involved in thermoregulation, TRPV1 and TRPM8. Design Controlled prospective animal study. Subjects Conscious unrestrained young and aged male mice. Setting Research laboratory at academic medical center. Interventions Mice were treated with the TRPV1 agonist dihydrocapsaicin (DHC), a TRPM8 inhibitor (“compound 5”) or their combination and the effects on core temperature (Tcore) were measured by implanted thermocouples and wireless transponders. Measurements and Main Results TRPV1 agonist DHC produced a dose-dependent (2–4 mg/kg, s.c.) drop in Tcore. A loading dose followed by continuous infusion of DHC produced a rapid and prolonged (>6 hrs) drop of Tcore within the therapeutic range (32–34 °C). The hypothermic effect of DHC was augmented in aged mice and was not desensitized with repeated administration. TRPM8 inhibitor “compound 5” (20 mg/kg s.c.) augmented the drop in core temperature during cold exposure (8 °C). When “compound 5” (30 mg/kg) was combined with DHC (1.25–2.5 mg/kg), the drop in Tcore was amplified and prolonged. Conclusions Activating warm receptors (TRPV1) produced rapid and lasting hypothermia in young and old mice. Furthermore, hypothermia induced by TRPV1 agonists was potentiated and prolonged by simultaneous inhibition of TRPM8. PMID:24595220

  1. A novel 3-(4,5-diphenyl-1,3-oxazol-2-yl)propanal oxime compound is a potent Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 and Vanilloid 1 (TRPA1 and V1) receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Payrits, M; Sághy, É; Mátyus, P; Czompa, A; Ludmerczki, R; Deme, R; Sándor, Z; Helyes, Zs; Szőke, É

    2016-06-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 and Vanilloid 1 (TRPA1, TRPV1) ion channels expressed on nociceptive primary sensory neurons are important regulators of pain and inflammation. TRPA1 is activated by several inflammatory mediators including formaldehyde and methylglyoxal that are products of the semicarbazide-sensitive amine-oxidase enzyme (SSAO). SZV-1287 is a new 3-(4,5-diphenyl-1,3-oxazol-2-yl)propanal oxime SSAO inhibitor, its chemical structure is similar to other oxime derivatives described as TRPA1 antagonists. Therefore, we investigated its effects on TRPA1 and TRPV1 receptor activation on the cell bodies and peripheral terminals of primary sensory neurons and TRPA1 or TRPV1 receptor-expressing cell lines. Calcium influx in response to the TRPA1 agonist allyl-isothiocyanate (AITC) (200μM) and the TRPV1 stimulator capsaicin (330nM) in rat trigeminal neurons or TRPA1 and TRPV1 receptor-expressing cell lines was measured by microfluorimetry or radioactive (45)Ca(2+) uptake experiments. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release as the indicator of 100μM AITC - or 100nM capsaicin-induced peripheral sensory nerve terminal activation was measured by radioimmunoassay. SZV-1287 (100, 500 and 1000nM) exerted a concentration-dependent significant inhibition on both AITC- and capsaicin-evoked calcium influx in trigeminal neurons and TRPA1 or TRPV1 receptor-expressing cell lines. It also significantly inhibited the TRPA1, but not the TRPV1 activation-induced CGRP release from the peripheral sensory nerve endings in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, the reference SSAO inhibitor LJP 1207 with a different structure had no effect on TRPA1 or TRPV1 activation in either model system. This is the first evidence that our novel oxime compound SZV-1287 originally developed as a SSAO inhibitor has a potent dual antagonistic action on TRPA1 and TRPV1 ion channels on primary sensory neurons. PMID:26930003

  2. Functionally important amino acid residues in the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel – an overview of the current mutational data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This review aims to create an overview of the currently available results of site-directed mutagenesis studies on transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor. Systematization of the vast number of data on the functionally important amino acid mutations of TRPV1 may provide a clearer picture of this field, and may promote a better understanding of the relationship between the structure and function of TRPV1. The review summarizes information on 112 unique mutated sites along the TRPV1, exchanged to multiple different residues in many cases. These mutations influence the effect or binding of different agonists, antagonists, and channel blockers, alter the responsiveness to heat, acid, and voltage dependence, affect the channel pore characteristics, and influence the regulation of the receptor function by phosphorylation, glycosylation, calmodulin, PIP2, ATP, and lipid binding. The main goal of this paper is to publish the above mentioned data in a form that facilitates in silico molecular modelling of the receptor by promoting easier establishment of boundary conditions. The better understanding of the structure-function relationship of TRPV1 may promote discovery of new, promising, more effective and safe drugs for treatment of neurogenic inflammation and pain-related diseases and may offer new opportunities for therapeutic interventions. PMID:23800232

  3. Visualization by High Resolution Immunoelectron Microscopy of the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 at Inhibitory Synapses of the Mouse Dentate Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Canduela, Miren-Josune; Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Puente, Nagore; Reguero, Leire; Elezgarai, Izaskun; Ramos-Uriarte, Almudena; Gerrikagoitia, Inmaculada; Grandes, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    We have recently shown that the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), a non-selective cation channel in the peripheral and central nervous system, is localized at postsynaptic sites of the excitatory perforant path synapses in the hippocampal dentate molecular layer (ML). In the present work, we have studied the distribution of TRPV1 at inhibitory synapses in the ML. With this aim, a preembedding immunogold method for high resolution electron microscopy was applied to mouse hippocampus. About 30% of the inhibitory synapses in the ML are TRPV1 immunopositive, which is mostly localized perisynaptically (∼60% of total immunoparticles) at postsynaptic dendritic membranes receiving symmetric synapses in the inner 1/3 of the layer. This TRPV1 pattern distribution is not observed in the ML of TRPV1 knock-out mice. These findings extend the knowledge of the subcellular localization of TRPV1 to inhibitory synapses of the dentate molecular layer where the channel, in addition to excitatory synapses, is present. PMID:25775089

  4. Quantitative determination of capsaicin, a transient receptor potential channel vanilloid 1 agonist, by liquid chromatography quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry: evaluation of in vitro metabolic stability.

    PubMed

    Beaudry, Francis; Vachon, Pascal

    2009-02-01

    Capsaicin is the most abundant pungent molecule present in red peppers and it is widely used for food flavoring, in pepper spray in self-defense devices and more recently in ointments for the relief of neuropathic pain. Capsaicin is a selective agonist of transient receptor potential channel, vanilloid subfamily member 1. A selective and sensitive quantitative method for the determination of capsaicin by LC-ESI/MS/MS was developed. The method consisted of a protein precipitation extraction followed by analysis using liquid chromatography electrospray quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. The chromatographic separation was achieved using a 100 x 2 mm C(18) Waters Symmetry column combined with a gradient mobile phase composed of acetonitrile and 0.1% formic acid aqueous solution at a flow rate of 220 microL/min. The mass spectrometer was operating in full-scan MS/MS mode using two-segment analysis. An analytical range of 10-5000 ng/mL was used in the calibration curve constructed in rat plasma. The interbatch precision and accuracy observed were 6.5, 6.7, 5.3 and 101.2, 102.7, 103.5% at 50, 500 and 5000 ng/mL, respectively. An in vitro metabolic stability study was performed in rat, dog and mouse liver microsomes and the novel analytical method was adapted and used to determine intrinsic clearance of capsaicin. Results suggest very rapid degradation with T(1/2) ranging from 2.3 to 4.1 min and high clearance values suggesting that drug bioavailability will be considerably reduced, consequently affecting drug response and efficacy. PMID:18816461

  5. Triazine-based vanilloid 1 receptor open channel blockers: design, synthesis, evaluation, and SAR analysis.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Mosquera, Miquel; Fernández-Carvajal, Asia; Moure, Alejandra; Valente, Pierluigi; Planells-Cases, Rosa; González-Ros, José M; Bujons, Jordi; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Messeguer, Angel

    2011-11-10

    The thermosensory transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel (TRPV1) is a polymodal receptor activated by physical and chemical stimuli. TRPV1 activity is drastically potentiated by proinflammatory agents released upon tissue damage. Given the pivotal role of TRPV1 in human pain, there is pressing need for improved TRPV1 antagonists, the development of which will require identification of new pharmacophore scaffolds. Uncompetitive antagonists acting as open-channel blockers might serve as activity-dependent blockers that preferentially modulate the activity of overactive channels, thus displaying fewer side effects than their competitive counterparts. Herein we report the design, synthesis, biological evaluation, and SAR analysis of a family of triazine-based compounds acting as TRPV1 uncompetitive antagonists. We identified the triazine 8aA as a potent, pure antagonist that inhibits TRPV1 channel activity with nanomolar efficacy and strong voltage dependency. It represents a new class of activity-dependent TRPV1 antagonists and may serve as the basis for lead optimization in the development of new analgesics. PMID:21950613

  6. (R)-(5-tert-butyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl)-3-(1H-indazol-4-yl)-urea (ABT-102) blocks polymodal activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors in vitro and heat-evoked firing of spinal dorsal horn neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Surowy, Carol S; Neelands, Torben R; Bianchi, Bruce R; McGaraughty, Steve; El Kouhen, Rachid; Han, Ping; Chu, Katharine L; McDonald, Heath A; Vos, Melissa; Niforatos, Wende; Bayburt, Erol K; Gomtsyan, Arthur; Lee, Chih-Hung; Honore, Prisca; Sullivan, James P; Jarvis, Michael F; Faltynek, Connie R

    2008-09-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 1 receptor, a nonselective cation channel expressed on peripheral sensory neurons and in the central nervous system, plays a key role in pain. TRPV1 receptor antagonism is a promising approach for pain management. In this report, we describe the pharmacological and functional characteristics of a structurally novel TRPV1 antagonist, (R)-(5-tert-butyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl)-3-(1H-indazol-4-yl)-urea (ABT-102), which has entered clinical trials. At the recombinant human TRPV1 receptor ABT-102 potently (IC(50) = 5-7 nM) inhibits agonist (capsaicin, N-arachidonyl dopamine, anandamide, and proton)-evoked increases in intracellular Ca(2+) levels. ABT-102 also potently (IC(50) = 1-16 nM) inhibits capsaicin-evoked currents in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and currents evoked through activation of recombinant rat TRPV1 currents by capsaicin, protons, or heat. ABT-102 is a competitive antagonist (pA(2) = 8.344) of capsaicin-evoked increased intracellular Ca(2+) and shows high selectivity for blocking TRPV1 receptors over other TRP receptors and a range of other receptors, ion channels, and transporters. In functional studies, ABT-102 blocks capsaicin-evoked calcitonin gene-related peptide release from rat DRG neurons. Intraplantar administration of ABT-102 blocks heat-evoked firing of wide dynamic range and nociceptive-specific neurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn of the rat. This effect is enhanced in a rat model of inflammatory pain induced by administration of complete Freund's adjuvant. Therefore, ABT-102 potently blocks multiple modes of TRPV1 receptor activation and effectively attenuates downstream consequences of receptor activity. ABT-102 is a novel and selective TRPV1 antagonist with pharmacological and functional properties that support its advancement into clinical studies. PMID:18515644

  7. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase protects against doxorubicin cardiotoxicity through a transient receptor potential channel vanilloid 1-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ge, Wei; Yuan, Ming; Ceylan, Asli F; Wang, Xiaoming; Ren, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Cardiotoxicity is one of the major life-threatening effects encountered in cancer chemotherapy with doxorubicin and other anthracyclines. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) may alleviate doxorubicin toxicity although the mechanism remains elusive. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of ALDH2 overexpression on doxorubicin-induced myocardial damage with a focus on mitochondrial injury. Wild-type (WT) and transgenic mice overexpressing ALDH2 driven by chicken β-actin promoter were challenged with doxorubicin (15mg/kg, single i.p. injection, for 6days) and cardiac mechanical function was assessed using the echocardiographic and IonOptix systems. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate intracellular Ca(2+) regulatory and mitochondrial proteins, PKA and its downstream signal eNOS. Doxorubicin challenge altered cardiac geometry and function evidenced by enlarged left ventricular end systolic and diastolic diameters, decreased factional shortening, cell shortening and intracellular Ca(2+) rise, prolonged relengthening and intracellular Ca(2+) decay, the effects of which were attenuated by ALDH2. Doxorubicin challenge compromised mitochondrial integrity and upregulated 4-HNE and UCP-2 levels while downregulating levels of TRPV1, SERCA2a and PGC-1α, the effects of which were alleviated by ALDH2. Doxorubicin-induced cardiac functional defect and apoptosis were reversed by the TRPV1 agonist SA13353 and the ALDH-2 agonist Alda-1 whereas the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine nullified ALDH2/Alda-1-induced protection. Doxorubicin suppressed phosphorylation of PKA and eNOS, the effect of which was reversed by ALDH2. Moreover, 4-HNE mimicked doxorubicin-induced cardiomyocyte anomalies, the effect of which was ablated by SA13353. Taken together, our results suggested that ALDH2 may rescue against doxorubicin cardiac toxicity possibly through a TRPV1-mediated protection of mitochondrial integrity. PMID:26692169

  8. Transient Receptor Potential Channel Polymorphisms Are Associated with the Somatosensory Function in Neuropathic Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Ralf; Maier, Christoph; Tölle, Thomas R.; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Berthele, Achim; Faltraco, Frank; Flor, Herta; Gierthmühlen, Janne; Haenisch, Sierk; Huge, Volker; Magerl, Walter; Maihöfner, Christian; Richter, Helmut; Rolke, Roman; Scherens, Andrea; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Ufer, Mike; Wasner, Gunnar; Zhu, Jihong; Cascorbi, Ingolf

    2011-01-01

    Transient receptor potential channels are important mediators of thermal and mechanical stimuli and play an important role in neuropathic pain. The contribution of hereditary variants in the genes of transient receptor potential channels to neuropathic pain is unknown. We investigated the frequency of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1, transient receptor potential melastin 8 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 single nucleotide polymorphisms and their impact on somatosensory abnormalities in neuropathic pain patients. Within the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (Deutscher Forscbungsverbund Neuropathischer Schmerz) 371 neuropathic pain patients were phenotypically characterized using standardized quantitative sensory testing. Pyrosequencing was employed to determine a total of eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms in transient receptor potential channel genes of the neuropathic pain patients and a cohort of 253 German healthy volunteers. Associations of quantitative sensory testing parameters and single nucleotide polymorphisms between and within groups and subgroups, based on sensory phenotypes, were analyzed. Single nucleotide polymorphisms frequencies did not differ between both the cohorts. However, in neuropathic pain patients transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 710G>A (rs920829, E179K) was associated with the presence of paradoxical heat sensation (p = 0.03), and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G (rs8065080, I585V) with cold hypoalgesia (p = 0.0035). Two main subgroups characterized by preserved (1) and impaired (2) sensory function were identified. In subgroup 1 transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G led to significantly less heat hyperalgesia, pinprick hyperalgesia and mechanical hypaesthesia (p = 0.006, p = 0.005 and p<0.001) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1103C>G (rs222747, M315I) to cold hypaesthesia (p = 0.002), but there was absence of associations in subgroup 2. In

  9. Changes in Gene Expression Patterns of Circadian-Clock, Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 and Nerve Growth Factor in Inflamed Human Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shu-Chuan; Chen, Chien-Lin; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Shieh, Kun-Ruey

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythm is driven by the molecular circadian-clock system and regulates many physiological functions. Diurnal rhythms in the gastrointestinal tract are known to be related to feeding pattern, but whether these rhythms are also related to the gastrointestinal damage or injuries; for example, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), is unclear. This study was conducted to determine whether expression of circadian-clock genes or factors involved in vagal stimulation or sensitization were altered in the esophagus of GERD patients. Diurnal patterns of PER1, PER2, BMAL1, CRY2, TRPV1, and NGF mRNA expression were found in patient controls, and these patterns were altered and significantly correlated to the GERD severity in GERD patients. Although levels of CRY1, TIM, CB1, NHE3, GDNF, and TAC1 mRNA expression did not show diurnal patterns, they were elevated and also correlated with GERD severity in GERD patients. Finally, strong correlations among PER1, TRPV1, NGF and CRY2 mRNA expression, and among PER2, TRPV1 and CRY2 expression were found. Expression levels of CRY1 mRNA highly correlated with levels of TIM, CB1, NHE3, GDNF and TAC1. This study suggests that the circadian rhythm in the esophagus may be important for the mediation of and/or the response to erosive damage in GERD patients. PMID:26337663

  10. Benzo[d]imidazole Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Antagonists for the Treatment of Pain: Discovery of trans-2-(2-{2-[2-(4-Trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-vinyl]-1H-benzimidazol-5-yl}-phenyl)-propan-2-ol (Mavatrep).

    PubMed

    Parsons, William H; Calvo, Raul R; Cheung, Wing; Lee, Yu-Kai; Patel, Sharmila; Liu, Jian; Youngman, Mark A; Dax, Scott L; Stone, Dennis; Qin, Ning; Hutchinson, Tasha; Lubin, Mary Lou; Zhang, Sui-Po; Finley, Michael; Liu, Yi; Brandt, Michael R; Flores, Christopher M; Player, Mark R

    2015-05-14

    Reported herein is the design, synthesis, and pharmacologic characterization of a class of TRPV1 antagonists constructed on a benzo[d]imidazole platform that evolved from a biaryl amide lead. This design composes three sections: a 2-substituted 5-phenyl headgroup attached to the benzo[d]imidazole platform, which is tethered at the two position to a phenyl tail group. Optimization of this design led to the identification of 4 (mavatrep), comprising a trifluoromethyl-phenyl-vinyl tail. In a TRPV1 functional assay, using cells expressing recombinant human TRPV1 channels, 4 antagonized capsaicin-induced Ca(2+) influx, with an IC50 value of 4.6 nM. In the complete Freund's adjuvant- and carrageenan-induced thermal hypersensitivity models, 4 exhibited full efficacy, with ED80 values of 7.8 and 0.5 mg/kg, respectively, corresponding to plasma levels of 270.8 and 9.2 ng/mL, respectively. On the basis of its superior pharmacologic and safety profile, 4 (mavatrep) was selected for clinical development for the treatment of pain. PMID:25850459

  11. 2-(3-Fluoro-4-methylsulfonylaminophenyl) Propanamides as Potent Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) Antagonists: Structure Activity Relationships of 2-Amino Derivatives in the N-(6-trifluoromethyl-pyridin-3-ylmethyl) C-region

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myeong Seop; Ryu, HyungChul; Kang, Dong Wook; Cho, Seong-Hee; Seo, Sejin; Park, Young Soo; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Kwak, Eun Joo; Kim, Yong Soo; Bhondwe, Rahul S.; Kim, Ho Shin; Park, Seul-gi; Son, Karam; Choi, Sun; DeAndrea-Lazarus, Ian; Pearce, Larry V.; Blumberg, Peter M.; Frank, Robert; Bahrenberg, Gregor; Stockhausen, Hannelore; Kögel, Babette Y.; Schiene, Klaus; Christoph, Thomas; Lee, Jeewoo

    2012-01-01

    A series of N-(2-amino-6-trifluoromethyl-pyridin-3-ylmethyl) 2-(3-fluoro-4-methylsulfonylaminophenyl) propanamides were designed combining previously identified pharmacophoric elements and evaluated as hTRPV1 antagonists. The SAR analysis indicated that specific hydrophobic interactions of the 2-amino substituents in the C-region of the ligand were critical for high hTRPV1binding potency. In particular, compound 49S was an excellent TRPV1 antagonist (Ki(CAP) = 0.2 nM; IC50(pH) = 6.3 nM) and was thus ca. 100- and 20-fold more potent, respectively, than the parent compounds 2 and 3 for capsaicin antagonism. Furthermore, it demonstrated strong analgesic activity in the rat neuropathic model superior to 2 with almost no side effects. Compound 49S antagonized capsaicin induced hypothermia in mice, but showed TRPV1-related hyperthermia. The basis for the high potency of 49S compared to 2 is suggested by docking analysis with our hTRPV1 homology model in which the 4-methylpiperidinyl group in the C-region of 49S made additional hydrophobic interactions with the hydrophobic region. PMID:22957803

  12. Structural determinants of the transient receptor potential 1 (TRPV1) channel activation by phospholipid analogs.

    PubMed

    Morales-Lázaro, Sara L; Serrano-Flores, Barbara; Llorente, Itzel; Hernández-García, Enrique; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Banerjee, Souvik; Miller, Duane; Gududuru, Veeresh; Fells, James; Norman, Derek; Tigyi, Gabor; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2014-08-29

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is a polymodal protein that responds to various stimuli, including capsaicin (the pungent compound found in chili peppers), extracellular acid, and basic intracellular pH, temperatures close to 42 °C, and several lipids. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), an endogenous lipid widely associated with neuropathic pain, is an agonist of the TRPV1 channel found in primary afferent nociceptors and is activated by other noxious stimuli. Agonists or antagonists of lipid and other chemical natures are known to possess specific structural requirements for producing functional effects on their targets. To better understand how LPA and other lipid analogs might interact and affect the function of TRPV1, we set out to determine the structural features of these lipids that result in the activation of TRPV1. By changing the acyl chain length, saturation, and headgroup of these LPA analogs, we established strict requirements for activation of TRPV1. Among the natural LPA analogs, we found that only LPA 18:1, alkylglycerophosphate 18:1, and cyclic phosphatidic acid 18:1, all with a monounsaturated C18 hydrocarbon chain activate TRPV1, whereas polyunsaturated and saturated analogs do not. Thus, TRPV1 shows a more restricted ligand specificity compared with LPA G-protein-coupled receptors. We synthesized fatty alcohol phosphates and thiophosphates and found that many of them with a single double bond in position Δ9, 10, or 11 and Δ9 cyclopropyl group can activate TRPV1 with efficacy similar to capsaicin. Finally, we developed a pharmacophore and proposed a mechanistic model for how these lipids could induce a conformational change that activates TRPV1. PMID:25035428

  13. Canonical transient receptor potential 5.

    PubMed

    Beech, D J

    2007-01-01

    Canonical transient receptor potential 5 TRPC5 (also TrpC5, trp-5 or trp5) is one of the seven mammalian TRPC proteins. Its known functional property is that of a mixed cationic plasma membrane channel with calcium permeability. It is active alone or as a heteromultimeric assembly with TRPC1; TRPC4 and TRPC3 may also be involved. Multiple activators of TRPC5 are emerging, including various G protein-coupled receptor agonists, lysophospholipids, lanthanide ions and, in some contexts, calcium store depletion. Intracellular calcium has complex impact on TRPC5, including a permissive role for other activators, as well as inhibition at high concentrations. Protein kinase C is inhibitory and mediates desensitisation following receptor activation. Tonic TRPC5 activity is detected and may reflect the presence of constitutive activation signals. The channel has voltage dependence but the biological significance of this is unknown; it is partially due to intracellular magnesium blockade at aspartic acid residue 633. Protein partners include calmodulin, CaBP1, enkurin, Na(+)-H+ exchange regulatory factor (NHERF) and stathmin. TRPC5 is included in local vesicular trafficking regulated by growth factors through phosphatidylinositol (PI)-3-kinase, Rac1 and PIP-5-kinase. Inhibition of myosin light chain kinase suppresses TRPC5, possibly via an effect on trafficking. Biological roles of TRPC5 are emerging but more reports on this aspect are needed. One proposed role is as a mediator of calcium entry and excitation in smooth muscle, another as an inhibitor of neuronal growth cone extension. The latter is intriguing in view of the original cloning of the human TRPC5 gene from a region of the X chromosome linked to mental retardation. TRPC5 is a broadly expressed calcium channel with capability to act as an integrator of extracellular and intracellular signals at the level of calcium entry. PMID:17217053

  14. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is downregulated in keratinocytes in human non-melanoma skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Fusi, Camilla; Materazzi, Serena; Minocci, Daiana; Maio, Vincenza; Oranges, Teresa; Massi, Daniela; Nassini, Romina

    2014-09-01

    A subgroup of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, including vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), TRPV2, TRPV3, TRPV4, and TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), is expressed in cutaneous peptidergic somatosensory neurons, and has been found in skin non-neuronal cells, such as keratinocytes. Different cancer cells express TRPs, where they may exert either pro- or antitumorigenic roles. Expression and function of TRPs in skin cancers have been, however, poorly investigated. Here, we have studied the distribution and expression of TRPs by immunohistochemistry and messenger RNA (mRNA) in human healthy skin and human keratinocytic tumors, including intraepidermal proliferative disorders (solar keratosis (SK) and Bowen's disease), and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC; basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas). Similar TRPV1, TRPV2, and TRPV3 staining was found in keratinocytes from healthy and tumor tissues. TRPA1 staining was increased solely in SK samples. However, the marked TRPV4 staining and TRPV4 mRNA expression, observed in healthy or inflamed skin, was abrogated both in premalignant lesions and NMSC. In a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT), TRPV4 stimulation released IL-8, which in turn downregulated TRPV4 expression. Selective reduction in TRPV4 expression could represent an early biomarker of skin carcinogenesis. Whether the cytokine-dependent, autocrine pathway that results in TRPV4 downregulation contributes to NMSC mechanism remains to be determined. PMID:24643128

  15. Cellular Functions of Transient Receptor Potential channels

    PubMed Central

    Dadon, Daniela; Minke, Baruch

    2010-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential channels are polymodal cellular sensors involved in a wide variety of cellular processes, mainly by increasing cellular Ca2+. In this review we focus on the roles of these channels in: i) cell death ii) proliferation and differentiation and iii) synaptic vesicle release. Cell death Ca2+ influx participates in apoptotic and necrotic cell death. The Ca2+ permeability and high sensitivity of part of these channels to oxidative/metabolic stress make them important participants in cell death. Several examples are given. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 is activated by H2O2, inducing cell death through an increase in cellular Ca2+ and activation of Poly ADP-Ribose Polymerase. Exposure of cultured cortical neurons to oxygen-glucose deprivation, in vitro, causes cell death via cation influx, mediated by Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7. Metabolic stress constitutively activates the Ca2+ permeable Transient Receptor Potential channels of Drosophila photoreceptor in the dark, potentially leading to retinal degeneration. Similar sensitivity to metabolic stress characterizes several mammalian Transient Receptor Potential Canonical channels. Proliferation and differentiation The rise in cytosolic Ca2+ induces cell growth, differentiation and proliferation via activation of several transcription factors. Activation a variety of store operated and Transient Receptor Potential channels cause a rise in cytosolic Ca2+, making these channels components involved in proliferation and differentiation. Synaptic vesicle release Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7 channels reside in synaptic vesicles and regulate neurotransmitter release by a mechanism that is not entirely clear. All the above features of Transient Receptor Potential channels make them crucial components in important, sometimes conflicting, cellular processes that still need to be explored. PMID:20399884

  16. Activation of transient receptor potential A1 by a non-pungent capsaicin-like compound, capsiate

    PubMed Central

    Shintaku, Kenji; Uchida, Kunitoshi; Suzuki, Yoshiro; Zhou, Yiming; Fushiki, Tohru; Watanabe, Tatsuo; Yazawa, Susumu; Tominaga, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Capsiate is produced by ‘CH-19 Sweet’ (Capsicum annuun L.), a non-pungent cultivar of red pepper. Like capsaicin, capsiate is thought to enhance energy metabolism by activating the sympathetic nervous system and suppressing inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms for this are uncertain. We previously reported that capsiate could activate transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a capsaicin receptor. The purpose of the present study is to investigate whether capsinoids activate other TRP channels. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Using Ca2+ imaging and whole-cell patch-clamp methods, we analysed the response of TRP channels to three kinds of capsinoids, capsiate, dihydrocapsiate and nordihydrocapsiate, in HEK293T cells expressing TRP channels or in primary cultures of mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons. KEY RESULTS We found that in both cell types TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) had a slightly weaker response to capsinoids compared with TRPV1, with the capsiate EC50 for TRPA1 activation being more than that for TRPV1 activation, and that the capsinoid-evoked action was blocked by a specific TRPA1 antagonist. TRPA1 was activated by capsinoids, but not by their degradation products. Amino acids known to participate in TRPA1 activation following cysteine covalent modification or zinc treatment were not involved in the activation of TRPA1 by capsinoid. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Taken together, these results indicate that capsinoids activate TRPA1 by an as yet unknown mechanism, and TRPA1 could be involved in physiological phenomena associated with capsinoid treatment. PMID:21883144

  17. The blockade of transient receptor potential ankirin 1 (TRPA1) signalling mediates antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like actions in mice

    PubMed Central

    de Moura, Juliana Cavalcante; Noroes, Maíra Macedo; Rachetti, Vanessa de Paula Soares; Soares, Bruno Lobão; Preti, Delia; Nassini, Romina; Materazzi, Serena; Marone, Ilaria Maddalena; Minocci, Daiana; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Gavioli, Elaine Cristina; André, Eunice

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) are involved in many biological processes, including nociception and hyperalgesia. Whereas the involvement of TRPV1 in psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression has been reported, little is known regarding the role of TRPA1 in these conditions. Experimental Approach We investigated the role of TRPA1 in mice models of depression [forced swimming test (FST)] and anxiety [elevated plus maze (EPM) test]. Key Results Administration of the TRPA1 antagonist (HC030031, 30 nmol in 2 μL, i.c.v.) reduced immobility time in the FST. Similar results were obtained after oral administration of HC030031 (30–300 mg·kg−1). The reduction in immobility time in FST induced by HC030031 (100 mg·kg−1) was completely prevented by pretreatment with TRPA1 agonist, cinnamaldehyde (50 mg·kg−1, p.o.), which per se was inactive. In the EPM test, pretreatment with cinnamaldehyde (50 mg·kg−1, p.o.), which per se did not affect behaviour response, prevented the anxiolytic-like effect (increased open arm exploration) evoked by TRPA1 blockade (HC030031, 100 mg·kg−1, p.o.). Treatment with either cinnamaldehyde or HC030031 did not affect spontaneous ambulation. Furthermore, TRPA1-deficient mice showed anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like phenotypes in the FST and EPM test respectively. Conclusion and Implications The present findings indicate that genetic deletion or pharmacological blockade of TRPA1 produces inhibitory activity in mouse models of anxiety and depression. These results imply that TRPA1 exerts tonic control, promoting anxiety and depression, and that TRPA1 antagonism has potential as an innovative strategy for the treatment of anxiety and mood disorders. PMID:24846744

  18. 3-Iodothyronamine increases transient receptor potential melastatin channel 8 (TRPM8) activity in immortalized human corneal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lucius, Alexander; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Reinach, Peter S; Köhrle, Josef; Dhandapani, Priyavathi; Huimann, Philipp; Ljubojevic, Nina; Grötzinger, Carsten; Mergler, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    3-Iodothyronamine (3T1AM) is an endogenous thyroid hormone metabolite that interacts with the human trace amine-associated receptor 1 (hTAAR1), a G-protein-coupled receptor, to induce numerous physiological responses including dose-dependent body temperature lowering in rodents. 3T1AM also directly activates cold-sensitive transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) channels in human conjunctival epithelial cells (HCjEC) at constant temperature as well as reducing rises in IL-6 release induced by transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) activation by capsaicin (CAP). Here, we describe that 3T1AM-induced TRPM8 activation suppresses through crosstalk TRPV1 activation in immortalized human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC). RT-PCR and immunofluorescent staining identified TRPM8 gene and protein expression. Increases in Ca(2+) influx induced by the TRPM8 agonists either 3T1AM (0.1-10 μM), menthol (500 μM), icilin (15-60 μM) or temperature lowering (either <17°C or >17°C) were all blocked by 10-20 μM BCTC, a mixed TRPV1/TRPM8 antagonist. BCTC blocked 3T1AM-induced recombinant TRPM8 activation of Ca(2+) transients in an osteosarcoma heterologous expression system. The effects of BCTC in HCEC were attributable to selective TRPM8 inhibition since whole-cell patch-clamp currents underlying Ca(2+) rises induced by 20 μM CAP were BCTC insensitive. On the other hand, Ca(2+) transients induced by activating TRPV1 with either CAP or a hyperosmolar medium were suppressed during exposure to either 1 μM 3T1AM or 15 μM icilin. All of these modulatory effects on intracellular Ca(2+) regulation induced by the aforementioned agents were attributable to changes in underlying inward and outward current. Taken together, TRPM8 activation by 3T1AM markedly attenuates and even eliminates hyperosmolar and CAP induced TRPV1 activation through crosstalk. PMID:26689735

  19. Therapeutic Potential of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Hovelsø, N; Sotty, F; Montezinho, L.P; Pinheiro, P.S; Herrik, K.F; Mørk, A

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS) and is a major player in complex brain functions. Glutamatergic transmission is primarily mediated by ionotropic glutamate receptors, which include NMDA, AMPA and kainate receptors. However, glutamate exerts modulatory actions through a family of metabotropic G-protein-coupled glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Dysfunctions of glutamatergic neurotransmission have been implicated in the etiology of several diseases. Therefore, pharmacological modulation of ionotropic glutamate receptors has been widely investigated as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of several disorders associated with glutamatergic dysfunction. However, blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors might be accompanied by severe side effects due to their vital role in many important physiological functions. A different strategy aimed at pharmacologically interfering with mGluR function has recently gained interest. Many subtype selective agonists and antagonists have been identified and widely used in preclinical studies as an attempt to elucidate the role of specific mGluRs subtypes in glutamatergic transmission. These studies have allowed linkage between specific subtypes and various physiological functions and more importantly to pathological states. This article reviews the currently available knowledge regarding the therapeutic potential of targeting mGluRs in the treatment of several CNS disorders, including schizophrenia, addiction, major depressive disorder and anxiety, Fragile X Syndrome, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and pain. PMID:22942876

  20. Discovery of (R)-1-(7-chloro-2,2-bis(fluoromethyl)chroman-4-yl)-3-(3-methylisoquinolin-5-yl)urea (A-1165442): a temperature-neutral transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) antagonist with analgesic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Voight, Eric A; Gomtsyan, Arthur R; Daanen, Jerome F; Perner, Richard J; Schmidt, Robert G; Bayburt, Erol K; DiDomenico, Stanley; McDonald, Heath A; Puttfarcken, Pamela S; Chen, Jun; Neelands, Torben R; Bianchi, Bruce R; Han, Ping; Reilly, Regina M; Franklin, Pamela H; Segreti, Jason A; Nelson, Richard A; Su, Zhi; King, Andrew J; Polakowski, James S; Baker, Scott J; Gauvin, Donna M; Lewis, LaGeisha R; Mikusa, Joseph P; Joshi, Shailen K; Faltynek, Connie R; Kym, Philip R; Kort, Michael E

    2014-09-11

    The synthesis and characterization of a series of selective, orally bioavailable 1-(chroman-4-yl)urea TRPV1 antagonists is described. Whereas first-generation antagonists that inhibit all modes of TRPV1 activation can elicit hyperthermia, the compounds disclosed herein do not elevate core body temperature in preclinical models and only partially block acid activation of TRPV1. Advancing the SAR of this series led to the eventual identification of (R)-1-(7-chloro-2,2-bis(fluoromethyl)chroman-4-yl)-3-(3-methylisoquinolin-5-yl)urea (A-1165442, 52), an analogue that possesses excellent pharmacological selectivity, has a favorable pharmacokinetic profile, and demonstrates good efficacy against osteoarthritis pain in rodents. PMID:25100568

  1. Transient Receptor Potential Channels in the Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Earley, Scott; Brayden, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian genome encodes 28 distinct members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily of cation channels, which exhibit varying degrees of selectivity for different ionic species. Multiple TRP channels are present in all cells and are involved in diverse aspects of cellular function, including sensory perception and signal transduction. Notably, TRP channels are involved in regulating vascular function and pathophysiology, the focus of this review. TRP channels in vascular smooth muscle cells participate in regulating contractility and proliferation, whereas endothelial TRP channel activity is an important contributor to endothelium-dependent vasodilation, vascular wall permeability, and angiogenesis. TRP channels are also present in perivascular sensory neurons and astrocytic endfeet proximal to cerebral arterioles, where they participate in the regulation of vascular tone. Almost all of these functions are mediated by changes in global intracellular Ca2+ levels or subcellular Ca2+ signaling events. In addition to directly mediating Ca2+ entry, TRP channels influence intracellular Ca2+ dynamics through membrane depolarization associated with the influx of cations or through receptor- or store-operated mechanisms. Dysregulation of TRP channels is associated with vascular-related pathologies, including hypertension, neointimal injury, ischemia-reperfusion injury, pulmonary edema, and neurogenic inflammation. In this review, we briefly consider general aspects of TRP channel biology and provide an in-depth discussion of the functions of TRP channels in vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and perivascular cells under normal and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:25834234

  2. Pathological potential of astroglial purinergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Franke, Heike; Illes, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Acute brain injury and neurodegenerative disorders may result in astroglial activation. Astrocytes are able to determine the progression and outcome of these neuropathologies in a beneficial or detrimental way. Nucleotides, e.g. adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), released after acute or chronic neuronal injury, are important mediators of glial activation and astrogliosis.Acute injury may cause significant changes in ATP balance, resulting in (1) a decline of intracellular ATP levels and (2) an increase in extracellular ATP concentrations via efflux from the intracellular space. The released ATP may have trophic effects, but can also act as a proinflammatory mediator or cytotoxic factor, inducing necrosis/apoptosis as a universal "danger" signal. Furthermore, ATP, primarily released from astrocytes, is a means of communication between neurons, glial cells, and intracerebral blood vessels.Astrocytes express a heterogeneous battery of purinergic ionotropic and metabotropic receptors (P2XRs and P2YRs, respectively) to respond to extracellular nucleotides.In this chapter, we summarize the contemporary knowledge on the pathological potential of P2Rs in relation to changes of astrocytic functions, determined by distinct molecular signaling cascades, in a variety of diseases. We discuss specific aspects of reactive astrogliosis, with respect to the involvement of prominent receptor subtypes, such as the P2X7 and P2Y1/2Rs. Examples of purinergic signaling of microglia, oligodendrocytes, and blood vessels under pathophysiological conditions will also be presented.The understanding of the pathological potential of purinergic signaling in "controlling and fine-tuning" of astrocytic responses is important for identifying possible therapeutic principles to treat acute and chronic central nervous system diseases. PMID:25236731

  3. Dimerization of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor potentiates hormone-dependent receptor phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Song, Gyun Jee; Jones, Brian W; Hinkle, Patricia M

    2007-11-13

    The G protein-coupled thyrotropin (TSH)-releasing hormone (TRH) receptor forms homodimers. Regulated receptor dimerization increases TRH-induced receptor endocytosis. These studies test whether dimerization increases receptor phosphorylation, which could potentiate internalization. Phosphorylation at residues 355-365, which is critical for internalization, was measured with a highly selective phospho-site-specific antibody. Two strategies were used to drive receptor dimerization. Dimerization of a TRH receptor-FK506-binding protein (FKBP) fusion protein was stimulated by a dimeric FKBP ligand. The chemical dimerizer caused a large increase in TRH-dependent phosphorylation within 1 min, whereas a monomeric FKBP ligand had no effect. The dimerizer did not alter phoshorylation of receptors lacking the FKBP domain. Dimerization of receptors containing an N-terminal HA epitope also was induced with anti-HA antibody. Anti-HA IgG strongly increased TRH-induced phosphorylation, whereas monomeric Fab fragments had no effect. Anti-HA antibody did not alter phosphorylation in receptors lacking an HA tag. Furthermore, two phosphorylation-defective TRH receptors functionally complemented one another and permitted phosphorylation. Receptors with a D71A mutation in the second transmembrane domain do not signal, whereas receptors with four Ala mutations in the 355-365 region signal normally but lack phosphorylation sites. When D71A- and 4Ala-TRH receptors were expressed alone, neither underwent TRH-dependent phosphorylation. When they were expressed together, D71A receptor was phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases in response to TRH. These results suggest that the TRH receptor is phosphorylated preferentially when it is in dimers or when preexisting receptor dimers are driven into microaggregates. Increased receptor phosphorylation may amplify desensitization. PMID:17989235

  4. Potentiation of the ionotropic GABA receptor response by whiskey fragrance.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Sheikh Julfikar; Aoshima, Hitoshi; Koda, Hirofumi; Kiso, Yoshinobu

    2002-11-01

    It is well-known that the target of most mood-defining compounds is an ionotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA(A) receptor). The potentiation of the response of these inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors induces anxiolytic, sedative, and anesthetic activity in the human brain. To study the effects of whiskey fragrance on the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response, GABA(A) receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocyte by injecting rat whole brain mRNA or cRNA prepared from the cloned cDNA for the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the bovine receptors. Most whiskey components such as phenol, ethoxy, and lactone derivatives potentiated the electrical responses of GABA(A) receptors, especially ethyl phenylpropanoate (EPP), which strongly potentiated the response. When this compound was applied to mice through respiration, the convulsions induced by pentetrazole were delayed, suggesting that EPP was absorbed by the brain, where it could potentiate the GABA(A) receptor responses. The extract of other alcoholic drinks such as wine, sake, brandy, and shochu also potentiated the responses to varying degrees. Although these fragrant components are present in alcoholic drinks at low concentrations (extremely small quantities compared with ethanol), they may also modulate the mood or consciousness of the human through the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor response after absorption into the brain, because these hydrophobic fragrant compounds are easily absorbed into the brain through the blood-brain barrier and are several thousands times as potent as ethanol in the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response. PMID:12405783

  5. Autocrine endocannabinoid signaling through CB1 receptors potentiates OX1 orexin receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Jäntti, Maria H; Putula, Jaana; Turunen, Pauli M; Näsman, Johnny; Reijonen, Sami; Lindqvist, Christer; Kukkonen, Jyrki P

    2013-03-01

    It has been proposed that OX(1) orexin receptors and CB(1) cannabinoid receptors can form heteromeric complexes, which affect the trafficking of OX(1) receptors and potentiate OX(1) receptor signaling to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). We have recently shown that OX(1) receptor activity releases high levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), suggesting an alternative route for OX(1)-CB(1) receptor interaction in signaling, for instance, in retrograde synaptic transmission. In the current study, we set out to investigate this possibility utilizing recombinant Chinese hamster ovary K1 cells. 2-AG released from OX(1) receptor-expressing cells acted as a potent paracrine messenger stimulating ERK activity in neighboring CB(1) receptor-expressing cells. When OX(1) and CB(1) receptors were expressed in the same cells, OX(1) stimulation-induced ERK phosphorylation and activity were strongly potentiated. The potentiation but not the OX(1) response as such was fully abolished by specific inhibition of CB(1) receptors or the enzyme responsible for 2-AG generation, diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL). Although the results do not exclude the previously proposed OX(1)-CB(1) heteromerization, they nevertheless unequivocally identify DAGL-dependent 2-AG generation as the pivotal determinant of the OX(1)-CB(1) synergism and thus suggest a functional rather than a molecular interaction of OX(1) and CB(1) receptors. PMID:23233488

  6. Pharmacology and therapeutic potential of sigma(1) receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Cobos, E J; Entrena, J M; Nieto, F R; Cendán, C M; Del Pozo, E

    2008-12-01

    Sigma (sigma) receptors, initially described as a subtype of opioid receptors, are now considered unique receptors. Pharmacological studies have distinguished two types of sigma receptors, termed sigma(1) and sigma(2). Of these two subtypes, the sigma(1) receptor has been cloned in humans and rodents, and its amino acid sequence shows no homology with other mammalian proteins. Several psychoactive drugs show high to moderate affinity for sigma(1) receptors, including the antipsychotic haloperidol, the antidepressant drugs fluvoxamine and sertraline, and the psychostimulants cocaine and methamphetamine; in addition, the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin allosterically modulates sigma(1) receptors. Certain neurosteroids are known to interact with sigma(1) receptors, and have been proposed to be their endogenous ligands. These receptors are located in the plasma membrane and in subcellular membranes, particularly in the endoplasmic reticulum, where they play a modulatory role in intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. Sigma(1) receptors also play a modulatory role in the activity of some ion channels and in several neurotransmitter systems, mainly in glutamatergic neurotransmission. In accordance with their widespread modulatory role, sigma(1) receptor ligands have been proposed to be useful in several therapeutic fields such as amnesic and cognitive deficits, depression and anxiety, schizophrenia, analgesia, and against some effects of drugs of abuse (such as cocaine and methamphetamine). In this review we provide an overview of the present knowledge of sigma(1) receptors, focussing on sigma(1) ligand neuropharmacology and the role of sigma(1) receptors in behavioral animal studies, which have contributed greatly to the potential therapeutic applications of sigma(1) ligands. PMID:19587856

  7. Sigma 1 receptor modulation of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling: potentiation of opioid transduction independent from receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Felix J; Kovalyshyn, Ivanka; Burgman, Maxim; Neilan, Claire; Chien, Chih-Cheng; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2010-04-01

    sigma Ligands modulate opioid actions in vivo, with agonists diminishing morphine analgesia and antagonists enhancing the response. Using human BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells that natively express opioid receptors and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells transfected with a cloned mu opioid receptor, we now demonstrate a similar modulation of opioid function, as assessed by guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTP gamma S) binding, by sigma(1) receptors. sigma Ligands do not compete opioid receptor binding. Administered alone, neither sigma agonists nor antagonists significantly stimulated [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. Yet sigma receptor selective antagonists, but not agonists, shifted the EC(50) of opioid-induced stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding by 3- to 10-fold to the left. This enhanced potency was seen without a change in the efficacy of the opioid, as assessed by the maximal stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. sigma(1) Receptors physically associate with mu opioid receptors, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation studies in transfected HEK cells, implying a direct interaction between the proteins. Thus, sigma receptors modulate opioid transduction without influencing opioid receptor binding. RNA interference knockdown of sigma(1) in BE(2)-C cells also potentiated mu opioid-induced stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. These modulatory actions are not limited to mu and delta opioid receptors. In mouse brain membrane preparations, sigma(1)-selective antagonists also potentiated both opioid receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding, suggesting a broader role for sigma receptors in modulating G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. PMID:20089882

  8. σ1 Receptor Modulation of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling: Potentiation of Opioid Transduction Independent from Receptor Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Felix J.; Kovalyshyn, Ivanka; Burgman, Maxim; Neilan, Claire; Chien, Chih-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    σ Ligands modulate opioid actions in vivo, with agonists diminishing morphine analgesia and antagonists enhancing the response. Using human BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells that natively express opioid receptors and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells transfected with a cloned μ opioid receptor, we now demonstrate a similar modulation of opioid function, as assessed by guanosine 5′-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate ([35S]GTPγS) binding, by σ1 receptors. σ Ligands do not compete opioid receptor binding. Administered alone, neither σ agonists nor antagonists significantly stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding. Yet σ receptor selective antagonists, but not agonists, shifted the EC50 of opioid-induced stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding by 3- to 10-fold to the left. This enhanced potency was seen without a change in the efficacy of the opioid, as assessed by the maximal stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding. σ1 Receptors physically associate with μ opioid receptors, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation studies in transfected HEK cells, implying a direct interaction between the proteins. Thus, σ receptors modulate opioid transduction without influencing opioid receptor binding. RNA interference knockdown of σ1 in BE(2)-C cells also potentiated μ opioid-induced stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding. These modulatory actions are not limited to μ and δ opioid receptors. In mouse brain membrane preparations, σ1-selective antagonists also potentiated both opioid receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding, suggesting a broader role for σ receptors in modulating G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. PMID:20089882

  9. CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor As Potential Target against Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aso, Ester; Ferrer, Isidro

    2016-01-01

    The CB2 receptor is one of the components of the endogenous cannabinoid system, a complex network of signaling molecules and receptors involved in the homeostatic control of several physiological functions. Accumulated evidence suggests a role for CB2 receptors in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and indicates their potential as a therapeutic target against this neurodegenerative disease. Levels of CB2 receptors are significantly increased in post-mortem AD brains, mainly in microglia surrounding senile plaques, and their expression levels correlate with the amounts of Aβ42 and β-amyloid plaque deposition. Moreover, several studies on animal models of AD have demonstrated that specific CB2 receptor agonists, which are devoid of psychoactive effects, reduce AD-like pathology, resulting in attenuation of the inflammation associated with the disease but also modulating Aβ and tau aberrant processing, among other effects. CB2 receptor activation also improves cognitive impairment in animal models of AD. This review discusses available data regarding the role of CB2 receptors in AD and the potential usefulness of specific agonists of these receptors against AD. PMID:27303261

  10. Canonical transient receptor potential 4 and its small molecule modulators

    PubMed Central

    FU, Jie; GAO, ZhaoBing; SHEN, Bing; ZHU, Michael X.

    2015-01-01

    Canonical transient receptor potential 4 (TRPC4) forms non-selective cation channels that contribute to phospholipase C-dependent Ca2+ entry into cells following stimulation of G protein coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases. More-over, the channels are regulated by pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi/o proteins, lipids, and various other signaling mechanisms. TRPC4-containing channels participate in the regulation of a variety of physiological functions, including excitability of both gastrointestinal smooth muscles and brain neurons. This review is to present recent advances in the understanding of physiology and development of small molecular modulators of TRPC4 channels. PMID:25480324

  11. Discoidin Domain Receptors: Potential Actors and Targets in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rammal, Hassan; Saby, Charles; Magnien, Kevin; Van-Gulick, Laurence; Garnotel, Roselyne; Buache, Emilie; El Btaouri, Hassan; Jeannesson, Pierre; Morjani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix critically controls cancer cell behavior by inducing several signaling pathways through cell membrane receptors. Besides conferring structural properties to tissues around the tumor, the extracellular matrix is able to regulate cell proliferation, survival, migration, and invasion. Among these receptors, the integrins family constitutes a major class of receptors that mediate cell interactions with extracellular matrix components. Twenty years ago, a new class of extracellular matrix receptors has been discovered. These tyrosine kinase receptors are the two discoidin domain receptors DDR1 and DDR2. DDR1 was first identified in the Dictyostelium discoideum and was shown to mediate cell aggregation. DDR2 shares highly conserved sequences with DDR1. Both receptors are activated upon binding to collagen, one of the most abundant proteins in extracellular matrix. While DDR2 can only be activated by fibrillar collagen, particularly types I and III, DDR1 is mostly activated by type I and IV collagens. In contrast with classical growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors which display a rapid and transient activation, DDR1 and DDR2 are unique in that they exhibit delayed and sustained receptor phosphorylation upon binding to collagen. Recent studies have reported differential expression and mutations of DDR1 and DDR2 in several cancer types and indicate clearly that these receptors have to be taken into account as new players in the different aspects of tumor progression, from non-malignant to highly malignant and invasive stages. This review will discuss the current knowledge on the role of DDR1 and DDR2 in malignant transformation, cell proliferation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, migratory, and invasive processes, and finally the modulation of the response to chemotherapy. These new insights suggest that DDR1 and DDR2 are new potential targets in cancer therapy. PMID:27014069

  12. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor-2 Antagonists: Therapeutic Potential and Potential Risks

    PubMed Central

    Blankenbach, Kira V.; Schwalm, Stephanie; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Meyer zu Heringdorf, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling system with its specific G-protein-coupled S1P receptors, the enzymes of S1P metabolism and the S1P transporters, offers a multitude of promising targets for drug development. Until today, drug development in this area has nearly exclusively focused on (functional) antagonists at the S1P1 receptor, which cause a unique phenotype of immunomodulation. Accordingly, the first-in class S1P1 receptor modulator, fingolimod, has been approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, and novel S1P1 receptor (functional) antagonists are being developed for autoimmune and inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, lupus erythematodes, or polymyositis. Besides the S1P1 receptor, also S1P2 and S1P3 are widely expressed and regulate many diverse functions throughout the body. The S1P2 receptor, in particular, often exerts cellular functions which are opposed to the functions of the S1P1 receptor. As a consequence, antagonists at the S1P2 receptor have the potential to be useful in a contrasting context and different areas of indication compared to S1P1 antagonists. The present review will focus on the therapeutic potential of S1P2 receptor antagonists and discuss their opportunities as well as their potential risks. Open questions and areas which require further investigations will be emphasized in particular. PMID:27445808

  13. Sigma-2 Receptor as Potential Indicator of Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Jodi L.; Panyutin, Irina; Chaudhry, Aneeka; Zeng, Chenbo; Mach, Robert H.; Frank, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The sigma-2 (σ2) receptor is a potential biomarker of proliferative status of solid tumors. Specific synthetic probes using N-substituted-9-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-3α-yl carbamate analogs have been designed and implemented for experimental cancer diagnosis and therapy. Procedures We employed the fluorescently-labeled σ2 receptor probe, SW120, to evaluate σ2 receptor expression in human stem cells (SC), including: bone marrow stromal (BMSC), neural progenitor (NPC), amniotic fluid (AFSC), hematopoetic (HSC) and embryonic stem cells (ESC). We concurrently evaluated the intensity of SW120 and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) relative to passage number and multipotency. Results We substantiated significantly higher σ2 receptor density among proliferating SC relative to lineage-restricted cell types. Additionally, cellular internalization of the σ2 receptor in SC was consistent with receptor-mediated endocytosis and confocal microscopy indicated SW120 specific co-localization with a fluorescent marker of lysosomes in all SC imaged. Conclusion These results suggest that σ2 receptors may serve to monitor stem cell differentiation in future experimental studies. PMID:21614680

  14. Metabotropic glutamate receptors: their therapeutic potential in anxiety.

    PubMed

    Spooren, Will; Lesage, Anne; Lavreysen, Hilde; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Steckler, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Psychiatric and neurological disorders are linked to changes in synaptic excitatory processes with a key role for glutamate, that is, the most abundant excitatory amino-acid. Molecular cloning of the metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors has led to the identification of eight mGlu receptors, which, in contrast to ligand-gated ion channels (responsible for fast excitatory transmission), modulate and fine-tune the efficacy of synaptic transmission. mGlu receptors are G protein-coupled and constitute a new group of "drugable" targets for the treatment of various CNS disorders. The recent discovery of small molecules that selectively bind to receptors of Groups I (mGlu1 and mGlu5) and II (mGlu2 and mGlu3) allowed significant advances in our understanding of the roles of these receptors in brain function and dysfunction including anxiety. Although investigation of the role of the Group III (mGlu4, 6, 7, and 8) receptors is less advanced, the generation of genetically manipulated animals and recent advances in the identification of subtype-selective compounds have revealed some first insights into the therapeutic potential of this group of receptors. PMID:21309118

  15. 5-Hydroxytryptamine Receptor Subtypes and their Modulators with Therapeutic Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Pithadia, Anand B.; Jain, Sunita M.

    2009-01-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) has become one of the most investigated and complex biogenic amines. The main receptors and their subtypes, e.g., 5-HTI (5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HTID, 5-HTIE and 5-HT1F), 5-HT2 (5-HT2A, 5-HT2B and 5-HT2C), 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5 (5-HT5A, 5-HT5B), 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 have been identified. Specific drugs which are capable of either selectively stimulating or inhibiting these receptor subtypes are being designed. This has generated therapeutic potentials of 5-HT receptor modulators in a variety of disease conditions. Conditions where 5-HT receptor modulators have established their use with distinct efficacy and advantages include migraine, anxiety, psychosis, obesity and cancer therapy-induced vomiting by cytotoxic drugs and radiation. Discovery of 5-HT, its biosynthesis, metabolism, physiological role and the potential of 5-HT receptor modulators in various nervous, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal tract disorders, bone growth and micturition have been discussed in this article. Keywords 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors; Modulators; Biogenic amines PMID:22505971

  16. Propofol Restores Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Receptor Subtype-1 Sensitivity via Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin Receptor Subtype-1 in Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyu; Wickley, Peter J.; Sinha, Sayantani; Bratz, Ian N.; Damron, Derek S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Crosstalk between peripheral nociceptors belonging to the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor subtype-1 (TRPV1) and ankyrin subtype-1 (TRPA1) family has recently been demonstrated. Moreover, the intravenous anesthetic propofol has been shown to directly activate TRPA1 receptors, and indirectly restore sensitivity of TRPV1 receptors in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. Our objective was to determine the extent to which TRPA1 activation is involved in mediating the propofol-induced restoration of TRPV1 sensitivity. Methods Mouse DRG neurons were isolated by enzymatic dissociation and grown for 24 h. F-11 cells were transfected with complementary DNA for both TRPV1 and TRPA1 or TRPV1 only. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration was measured in individual cells via fluorescence microscopy. Following TRPV1 de-sensitization with capsaicin (100 nM), cells were treated with propofol (1, 5 and 10 μM) alone, propofol in the presence of the TRPA1 antagonist, HC-030031 (0.5 μM) or the TRPA1 agonist, Allyl isothiocyanate (AITC, 100 μM) and capsaicin was then reapplied. Results In DRG neurons that contain both TRPV1 and TRPA1, propofol and AITC restored TRPV1 sensitivity. However, in DRG neurons containing only TRPV1 receptors, exposure to propofol or AITC following de-sensitization did not restore capsaicin-induced TRPV1 sensitivity. Similarly, in F-11 cells transfected with both TRPV1 and TRPA1, propofol and AITC restored TRPV1 sensitivity. However, in F-11 cells transfected with TRPV1 only, neither propofol nor AITC were capable of restoring TRPV1 sensitivity. Conclusions These data demonstrate that propofol restores TRPV1 sensitivity in primary DRG neurons and in cultured F-11 cells transfected with both the TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors via a TRPA1-dependent process. Propofol’s effects on sensory neurons may be clinically important and contribute to peripheral sensitization to nociceptive stimuli in traumatized tissue. PMID:21364461

  17. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXIX. Cannabinoid Receptors and Their Ligands: Beyond CB1 and CB2

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, A. C.; Abood, M. E.; Alexander, S. P. H.; Di Marzo, V.; Elphick, M. R.; Greasley, P. J.; Hansen, H. S.; Kunos, G.; Mackie, K.; Mechoulam, R.; Ross, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    There are at least two types of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2). Ligands activating these G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) include the phytocannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, numerous synthetic compounds, and endogenous compounds known as endocannabinoids. Cannabinoid receptor antagonists have also been developed. Some of these ligands activate or block one type of cannabinoid receptor more potently than the other type. This review summarizes current data indicating the extent to which cannabinoid receptor ligands undergo orthosteric or allosteric interactions with non-CB1, non-CB2 established GPCRs, deorphanized receptors such as GPR55, ligand-gated ion channels, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, and other ion channels or peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptors. From these data, it is clear that some ligands that interact similarly with CB1 and/or CB2 receptors are likely to display significantly different pharmacological profiles. The review also lists some criteria that any novel “CB3” cannabinoid receptor or channel should fulfil and concludes that these criteria are not currently met by any non-CB1, non-CB2 pharmacological receptor or channel. However, it does identify certain pharmacological targets that should be investigated further as potential CB3 receptors or channels. These include TRP vanilloid 1, which possibly functions as an ionotropic cannabinoid receptor under physiological and/or pathological conditions, and some deorphanized GPCRs. Also discussed are 1) the ability of CB1 receptors to form heteromeric complexes with certain other GPCRs, 2) phylogenetic relationships that exist between CB1/CB2 receptors and other GPCRs, 3) evidence for the existence of several as-yet-uncharacterized non-CB1, non-CB2 cannabinoid receptors; and 4) current cannabinoid receptor nomenclature. PMID:21079038

  18. gp130 receptor ligands as potential therapeutic targets for obesity

    PubMed Central

    Febbraio, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    Obesity and its related cluster of pathophysiologic conditions including insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension are recognized as growing threats to world health. It is now estimated that 10% of the world’s population is overweight or obese. As a result, new therapeutic options for the treatment of obesity are clearly warranted. Recent research has focused on the role that gp130 receptor ligands may play as potential therapeutic targets in obesity. One cytokine in particular, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), acts both centrally and peripherally and mimics the biologic actions of the appetite control hormone leptin, but unlike leptin, CNTF appears to be effective in obesity and as such may have therapeutic potential. In addition, CNTF suppresses inflammatory signaling cascades associated with lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle. This review examines the potential role of gp130 receptor ligands as part of a therapeutic strategy to treat obesity. PMID:17404609

  19. Bitropic D3 Dopamine Receptor Selective Compounds s Potential Antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Luedtke, Robert R; Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Malik, Mahinder; Reichert, David E; Mach, R H

    2015-01-01

    modified to develop bivalent ligands capable of interacting with receptor dimers or oligomers are also provided. Preclinical studies using bitropic D3 dopamine receptor selective ligands are also discussed as strategy to pharmacologically dissect the role of the D2 and D3 dopamine receptor subtypes in animal models of neuropsychiatric, neurological and substance abuse disorders. This research has the potential to a) advance the understanding of the role of the D2 and D3 dopamine receptor subtypes in neuropsychiatric disorders and b) lead to new treatment strategies for neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26205291

  20. Functional expression of purinergic P2 receptors and transient receptor potential channels by the human urothelium

    PubMed Central

    Shabir, Saqib; Cross, William; Kirkwood, Lisa A.; Pearson, Joanna F.; Appleby, Peter A.; Walker, Dawn; Eardley, Ian

    2013-01-01

    In addition to its role as a physical barrier, the urothelium is considered to play an active role in mechanosensation. A key mechanism is the release of transient mediators that activate purinergic P2 receptors and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels to effect changes in intracellular Ca2+. Despite the implied importance of these receptors and channels in urothelial tissue homeostasis and dysfunctional bladder disease, little is known about their functional expression by the human urothelium. To evaluate the expression and function of P2X and P2Y receptors and TRP channels, the human ureter and bladder were used to separate urothelial and stromal tissues for RNA isolation and cell culture. RT-PCR using stringently designed primer sets was used to establish which P2 and TRP species were expressed at the transcript level, and selective agonists/antagonists were used to confirm functional expression by monitoring changes in intracellular Ca2+ and in a scratch repair assay. The results confirmed the functional expression of P2Y4 receptors and excluded nonexpressed receptors/channels (P2X1, P2X3, P2X6, P2Y6, P2Y11, TRPV5, and TRPM8), while a dearth of specific agonists confounded the functional validation of expressed P2X2, P2X4, P2Y1, P2Y2, TRPV2, TRPV3, TRPV6 and TRPM7 receptors/channels. Although a conventional response was elicited in control stromal-derived cells, the urothelial cell response to well-characterized TRPV1 and TRPV4 agonists/antagonists revealed unexpected anomalies. In addition, agonists that invoked an increase in intracellular Ca2+ promoted urothelial scratch repair, presumably through the release of ATP. The study raises important questions about the ligand selectivity of receptor/channel targets expressed by the urothelium. These pathways are important in urothelial tissue homeostasis, and this opens the possibility of selective drug targeting. PMID:23720349

  1. Therapeutic Potential of 5-HT6 Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Karila, Delphine; Freret, Thomas; Bouet, Valentine; Boulouard, Michel; Dallemagne, Patrick; Rochais, Christophe

    2015-10-22

    Given its predominant expression in the central nervous system (CNS), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT: serotonin) subtype 6 receptor (5-HT6R) has been considered as a valuable target for the development of CNS drugs with limited side effects. After 2 decades of intense research, numerous selective ligands have been developed to target this receptor; this holds potential interest for the treatment of neuropathological disorders. In fact, some agents (mainly antagonists) are currently undergoing clinical trial. More recently, a series of potent and selective agonists have been developed, and preclinical studies have been conducted that suggest the therapeutic interest of 5-HT6R agonists. This review details the medicinal chemistry of these agonists, highlights their activities, and discusses their potential for treating cognitive issues associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), depression, or obesity. Surprisingly, some studies have shown that both 5-HT6R agonists and antagonists exert similar procognitive activities. This article summarizes the hypotheses that could explain this paradox. PMID:26099069

  2. [Ion channels and action potentials in olfactory receptor cells].

    PubMed

    Kawai, Fusao; Miyachi, Ei-ichi

    2007-11-01

    The first step in olfactory sensation involves the binding of odorant molecules to specific receptor proteins on the ciliary surface of olfactory receptor cells (ORCs). Odorant receptors coupled to G-proteins activate adenylyl cyclase leading to the generation of cAMP, which directly gates a cyclic nucleotide-gated cationic channel in the ciliary membrane. This initial excitation causes a slow and graded depolarizing voltage change, which is encoded into a train of action potentials. Action potentials of ORCs are generated by voltage-gated Na- currents and T-type Ca2- currents in the somatic membrane. Isolated ORCs that have lost their cilia during the dissociation procedure are known to exhibit spike frequency accommodation by injecting the steady current. This raises the possibility that somatic ionic channels in ORCs may serve for odor adaptation at the level of spike encoding, although odor adaptation is mainly accomplished by the ciliary transduction machinery. This review discusses current knowledge concerning the mechanisms of spike generation in ORCs. It also reviews how neurotransmitters and hormones modulate ionic currents and action potentials in ORCs. PMID:18154041

  3. Transient receptor potential M3 channels are ionotropic steroid receptors in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Thomas F J; Loch, Sabine; Lambert, Sachar; Straub, Isabelle; Mannebach, Stefanie; Mathar, Ilka; Düfer, Martina; Lis, Annette; Flockerzi, Veit; Philipp, Stephan E; Oberwinkler, Johannes

    2008-12-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels are renowned for their ability to sense diverse chemical stimuli. Still, for many members of this large and heterogeneous protein family it is unclear how their activity is regulated and whether they are influenced by endogenous substances. On the other hand, steroidal compounds are increasingly recognized to have rapid effects on membrane surface receptors that often have not been identified at the molecular level. We show here that TRPM3, a divalent-permeable cation channel, is rapidly and reversibly activated by extracellular pregnenolone sulphate, a neuroactive steroid. We show that pregnenolone sulphate activates endogenous TRPM3 channels in insulin-producing beta cells. Application of pregnenolone sulphate led to a rapid calcium influx and enhanced insulin secretion from pancreatic islets. Our results establish that TRPM3 is an essential component of an ionotropic steroid receptor enabling unanticipated crosstalk between steroidal and insulin-signalling endocrine systems. PMID:18978782

  4. Metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands as potential therapeutics for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Olive, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter glutamate plays a pivotal role in drug addiction and alcoholism. As a result, there has been increasing interest in developing glutamate-based therapies for the treatment of addictive disorders. Receptors for glutamate are primarily divided into two classes: ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) that mediate fast excitatory glutamate transmission, and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), which are G-protein coupled receptors that mediate slower, modulatory glutamate transmission. Most iGluR antagonists, while showing some efficacy in animal models of addiction, exhibit serious side effects when tested in humans. mGluR ligands, on the other hand, which have been advanced to testing in clinical trials for various medical conditions, have demonstrated the ability to reduce drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse-like behaviors in animal studies. mGluR ligands that have been shown to be primarily effective are Group I (mGluR1 and mGluR5) negative allosteric modulators and Group II (mGluR2 and mGluR3) orthosteric presynaptic autoreceptor agonists. In this review, we will summarize findings from animal studies suggesting that these mGluR ligands may be of potential benefit in reducing on-going drug self-administration and may aid in the prevention of relapse. The neuroanatomical distribution of mGluR1, mGluR2/3, and mGluR5 receptors and the pharmacological properties of Group I negative allosteric modulators and Group II agonists will also be overviewed. Finally, we will discuss the current status of mGluR ligands in human clinical trials. PMID:19630739

  5. Transient receptor potential-like channels mediate metabotropic glutamate receptor EPSCs in rat dopamine neurones.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, C Peter; Tozzi, Alessandro; Bernardi, Giorgio; Mercuri, Nicola B

    2004-03-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels form cationic channels activated by diverse factors including mechanical stimuli, changes in osmolarity, pH and temperature, as well as the exogenous irritant, capsaicin. Metabotropic glutamate receptors have also recently been linked to TRP channel activation in neurones of the substantia nigra, hippocampus and cerebellum, suggesting a novel role for such channels in synaptic communication via endogenous neurotransmitters. We tested this for dopamine neurones in rat brain slices by characterizing the current-voltage relationship and pharmacology of EPSCs mediated by group I metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1 (mGluR1). Slow inward currents (273 +/- 35 pA peak amplitude, 381 +/- 25 ms latency, holding potential (V(h)) =-73 mV) representing evoked mGluR1 EPSCs were isolated in the presence of antagonists of AMPA, NMDA, GABA(A), GABA(B), muscarinic and glycine receptors. CPCCOEt (100 microM), an mGluR1 antagonist, blocked the residual EPSC in all recordings. mGluR1-activated EPSCs reversed polarity near -10 mV, consistent with the involvement of a cationic channel. Extracellular application of the non-selective TRP channel blockers SKF 96365, flufenamic acid and ruthenium red caused reversible inhibition of mGluR1-activated EPSCs. These characteristics parallel those of mGluR1 activation with an agonist and indicate the involvement of a TRP-like channel in mGluR1-mediated EPSCs. PMID:14724196

  6. Allosterism and Structure in Thermally Activated Transient Receptor Potential Channels.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Poblete, Horacio; Miño-Galaz, Germán; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-07-01

    The molecular sensors that mediate temperature changes in living organisms are a large family of proteins known as thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. These membrane proteins are polymodal receptors that can be activated by cold or hot temperatures, depending on the channel subtype, voltage, and ligands. The stimuli sensors are allosterically coupled to a pore domain, increasing the probability of finding the channel in its ion conductive conformation. In this review we first discuss the allosteric coupling between the temperature and voltage sensor modules and the pore domain, and then discuss the thermodynamic foundations of thermo-TRP channel activation. We provide a structural overview of the molecular determinants of temperature sensing. We also posit an anisotropic thermal diffusion model that may explain the large temperature sensitivity of TRP channels. Additionally, we examine the effect of several ligands on TRP channel function and the evidence regarding their mechanisms of action. PMID:27297398

  7. Assay of TRPV1 Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Moriello, Aniello Schiano; De Petrocellis, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 ion channel (TRPV1) is a non-selective ligand-gated cation channel. It is an integrator of a wide variety of exogenous and endogenous physical and chemical stimuli, including capsaicin, noxious heat (>42 °C), and protons (pH < 5.2). TRPV1 is expressed predominantly in primary sensory neurons involved in pain sensation, but also in other neuronal cell types, in the plasma membrane of different non-neuronal cells such as immune cells, keratinocytes, smooth muscle cells, and in the urothelium. Some of these cell types are involved in inflammation. When activated, TRPV1 leads to the gating of cations, including Ca(2+), thus generating changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Calcium ions play fundamental roles in many cellular processes, virtually in all cells. The use of Ca(2+) fluorescent indicators is a tool for monitoring intracellular Ca(2+) concentration.In this chapter, we describe a method for recording and monitoring Ca(2+) signals through the single wavelength fluorescent indicator Fluo-4 acetoxymethyl (AM), and the ratiometric fluorescent indicator Fura-2 AM in HEK-293 cells transfected with TRPV1 and other TRP channels. TRPV1 pharmacological modulation may potentially represent a strategy for the control of pain and inflammatory conditions in a variety of diseases and injury states. PMID:27245892

  8. Application potential of toll-like receptors in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ming; Chen, Xi; Ye, Kangruo; Yao, Yuanfei; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Toll-like receptors (TLRs), as the most important pattern recognition receptors in innate immunity, play a pivotal role in inducing immune response through recognition of microbial invaders or specific agonists. Recent studies have suggested that TLRs could serve as important regulators in the development of a variety of cancer. However, increasing evidences have shown that TLRs may display quite opposite outcomes in cancer development. Although several potential therapeutic Toll-like receptor ligands have been found, the mechanism and therapy prospect of TLRs in cancer development has to be further elucidated to accelerate the clinical application. By performing a systematic review of the present findings on TLRs in cancer immunology, we attempted to evaluate the therapeutic potential of TLRs in cancer therapy and elucidate the potential mechanism of cancer progress regulated by TLR signaling and the reported targets on TLRs for clinical application. An electronic databases search was conducted in PubMed, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, and Chinese Biomedical Literature Database from their inception to February 1, 2016. The following keywords were used to search the databases: Toll-like receptors, cancer therapy, therapeutic target, innate immunity. Of 244 studies that were identified, 97 nonrelevant studies were excluded. In total, 147 full-text articles were assessed, and from these, 54 were excluded as they did not provide complete key information. Thus, 93 studies were considered eligible and included in the analysis. According to the data from the included trials, 14 TLR ligands (77.8%) from 82 studies have been demonstrated to display antitumor property in various cancers, whereas 4 ligands (22.2%) from 11 studies promote tumors. Among them, only 3 TLR ligands have been approved for cancer therapy, and 9 ligands were in clinical trials. In addition, the potential mechanism of recently reported targets on TLRs for clinical application was also

  9. Transient receptor potential cation channels in visceral sensory pathways

    PubMed Central

    Blackshaw, L Ashley

    2014-01-01

    The extensive literature on this subject is in direct contrast to the limited range of clinical uses for ligands of the transient receptor potential cation channels (TRPs) in diseases of the viscera. TRPV1 is the most spectacular example of this imbalance, as it is in other systems, but it is nonetheless the only TRP target that is currently targeted clinically in bladder sensory dysfunction. It is not clear why this discrepancy exists, but a likely answer is in the promiscuity of TRPs as sensors and transducers for environmental mechanical and chemical stimuli. This review first describes the different sensory pathways from the viscera, and on which nociceptive and non-nociceptive neurones within these pathways TRPs are expressed. They not only fulfil roles as both mechano-and chemo-sensors on visceral afferents, but also form an effector mechanism for cell activation after activation of GPCR and cytokine receptors. Their role may be markedly changed in diseased states, including chronic pain and inflammation. Pain presents the most obvious potential for further development of therapeutic interventions targeted at TRPs, but forms of inflammation are emerging as likely to benefit also. However, despite much basic research, we are still at the beginning of exploring such potential in visceral sensory pathways. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:24641218

  10. Stress Induces Pain Transition by Potentiation of AMPA Receptor Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changsheng; Yang, Ya; Liu, Sufang; Fang, Huaqiang; Zhang, Yong; Furmanski, Orion; Skinner, John; Xing, Ying; Johns, Roger A.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic postsurgical pain is a serious issue in clinical practice. After surgery, patients experience ongoing pain or become sensitive to incident, normally nonpainful stimulation. The intensity and duration of postsurgical pain vary. However, it is unclear how the transition from acute to chronic pain occurs. Here we showed that social defeat stress enhanced plantar incision-induced AMPA receptor GluA1 phosphorylation at the Ser831 site in the spinal cord and greatly prolonged plantar incision-induced pain. Interestingly, targeted mutation of the GluA1 phosphorylation site Ser831 significantly inhibited stress-induced prolongation of incisional pain. In addition, stress hormones enhanced GluA1 phosphorylation and AMPA receptor-mediated electrical activity in the spinal cord. Subthreshold stimulation induced spinal long-term potentiation in GluA1 phosphomimetic mutant mice, but not in wild-type mice. Therefore, spinal AMPA receptor phosphorylation contributes to the mechanisms underlying stress-induced pain transition. PMID:25297100

  11. Combined therapeutic potential of nuclear receptors with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wairagu, Peninah M.; Park, Kwang Hwa; Kim, Jihye; Choi, Jong-Whan; Kim, Hyun-Won; Yeh, Byung-Il; Jung, Soon-Hee; Yong, Suk-Joong; Jeong, Yangsik

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • The 48 NR genes and 48 biological anti-cancer targets are profiled in paired-cells. • Growth inhibition by NR ligands or TKIs is target receptor level-dependent. • T0901317 with gefitinib/PHA665752 shows additive growth inhibition in lung cells. - Abstract: Cancer heterogeneity is a big hurdle in achieving complete cancer treatment, which has led to the emergence of combinational therapy. In this study, we investigated the potential use of nuclear receptor (NR) ligands for combinational therapy with other anti-cancer drugs. We first profiled all 48 NRs and 48 biological anti-cancer targets in four pairs of lung cell lines, where each pair was obtained from the same patient. Two sets of cell lines were normal and the corresponding tumor cell lines while the other two sets consisted of primary versus metastatic tumor cell lines. Analysis of the expression profile revealed 11 NRs and 15 cancer targets from the two pairs of normal versus tumor cell lines, and 9 NRs and 9 cancer targets from the primary versus metastatic tumor cell lines had distinct expression patterns in each category. Finally, the evaluation of nuclear receptor ligand T0901317 for liver X receptor (LXR) demonstrated its combined therapeutic potential with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The combined treatment of cMET inhibitor PHA665752 or EGFR inhibitor gefitinib with T0901317 showed additive growth inhibition in both H2073 and H1993 cells. Mechanistically, the combined treatment suppressed cell cycle progression by inhibiting cyclinD1 and cyclinB expression. Taken together, this study provides insight into the potential use of NR ligands in combined therapeutics with other biological anti-cancer drugs.

  12. Binding Mode Prediction of Evodiamine within Vanilloid Receptor TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhanli; Sun, Lidan; Yu, Hui; Zhang, Yanhui; Gong, Wuzhuang; Jin, Hongwei; Zhang, Liangren; Liang, Huaping

    2012-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the potential binding mode of drugs is crucial to computer-aided drug design paradigms. It has been reported that evodiamine acts as an agonist of the vanilloid receptor Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1). However, the precise interaction between evodiamine and TRPV1 was still not fully understood. In this perspective, the homology models of TRPV1 were generated using the crystal structure of the voltage-dependent shaker family K+ channel as a template. We then performed docking and molecular dynamics simulation to gain a better understanding of the probable binding modes of evodiamine within the TRPV1 binding pocket. There are no significant interspecies differences in evodiamine binding in rat, human and rabbit TRPV1 models. Pharmacophore modeling further provided confidence for the validity of the docking studies. This study is the first to shed light on the structural determinants required for the interaction between TRPV1 and evodiamine, and gives new suggestions for the rational design of novel TRPV1 ligands. PMID:22942745

  13. Transient receptor potential channel C5 in cancer chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    He, Dong-xu; Ma, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily contains at least 28 homologs in mammalian. These proteins form TRP channels are permeable to monovalent and divalent cations and participate in a variety of physiological functions. Dysregulation of TRP channels is responsible for numerous diseases. This review provides a brief short overview of mammalian TRP channels with a focus on TRPC5 and its role in cancers. Dysregulation of TRPC5 interrupts Ca2+ homeostasis in cancer cells, which activates signaling pathways that are highly associated with cancer progression, especially cancer chemoresistance. Based on the important role of TRPC5, we also discuss the potential of TRPC5 as a target for therapeutic intervention. Either direct targeting of TRPC5 or indirect interruption of TRPC5-related signaling pathways may effectively overcome cancer chemoresistance. PMID:26657058

  14. Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels in T cells.

    PubMed

    Bertin, Samuel; Raz, Eyal

    2016-05-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) family of ion channels is widely expressed in many cell types and plays various physiological roles. Growing evidence suggests that certain TRP channels are functionally expressed in the immune system. Indeed, an increasing number of reports have demonstrated the functional expression of several TRP channels in innate and adaptive immune cells and have highlighted their critical role in the activation and function of these cells. However, very few reviews have been entirely dedicated to this subject. Here, we will summarize the recent findings with regards to TRP channel expression in T cells and discuss their emerging role as regulators of T cell activation and functions. Moreover, these studies suggest that beyond their pharmaceutical interest in pain management, certain TRP channels may represent potential novel therapeutic targets for various immune-related diseases. PMID:26468011

  15. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) antagonists.

    PubMed

    Preti, Delia; Saponaro, Giulia; Szallasi, Arpad

    2015-01-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel is an irritant sensor highly expressed on nociceptive neurons. The clinical use of TRPA1 antagonists is based on the concept that TRPA1 is active during disease states like neuropathic pain. Indeed, in Phase 2a proof-of-concept studies the TRPA1 antagonist GRC17536 has shown efficacy in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy. Moreover, animal studies suggest that the therapeutic value of TRPA1 antagonists extends beyond pain to pruritus, asthma and cough with limited safety concerns. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the patent literature (since 2007) on small-molecule inhibitors of the TRPA1 channel. Despite the clear progress, many unanswered questions remain. Future advancement to Phase 3 studies will assess the real translational potential of this research field. PMID:25853468

  16. Ionotropic and Metabotropic Proton-Sensing Receptors Involved in Airway Inflammation in Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Haruka; Mogi, Chihiro; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2014-01-01

    An acidic microenvironment has been shown to evoke a variety of airway responses, including cough, bronchoconstriction, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), infiltration of inflammatory cells in the lung, and stimulation of mucus hyperproduction. Except for the participation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in severe acidic pH (of less than 6.0)-induced cough and bronchoconstriction through sensory neurons, the molecular mechanisms underlying extracellular acidic pH-induced actions in the airways have not been fully understood. Recent studies have revealed that ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1)-family G protein-coupled receptors, which sense pH of more than 6.0, are expressed in structural cells, such as airway smooth muscle cells and epithelial cells, and in inflammatory and immune cells, such as eosinophils and dendritic cells. They function in a variety of airway responses related to the pathophysiology of inflammatory diseases, including allergic asthma. In the present review, we discuss the roles of ionotropic TRPV1 and ASICs and metabotropic OGR1-family G protein-coupled receptors in the airway inflammation and AHR in asthma and respiratory diseases. PMID:25197168

  17. Main ion channels and receptors associated with visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Rocha, Heraldo Arcela; Dantas, Bruna Priscilla Vasconcelos; Rolim, Thaísa Leite; Costa, Bagnólia Araújo; de Medeiros, Arnaldo Correia

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a very frequent functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort and alteration of bowel habits. The IBS physiopathology is extremely complex. Visceral hypersensitivity plays an important role in the pathogenesis of abdominal pain in both in vitro and in vivo models of this functional disorder. In order to obtain a general view of the participation of the main ion channels and receptors regarding the visceral hypersensitivity in the IBS and to describe their chemical structure, a literature review was carried out. A bibliographical research in the following electronic databases: Pubmed and Virtual Library in Health (BVS) was fulfilled by using the search terms “ion channels” “or” “receptors” “and” “visceral hypersensitivity” “or” “visceral nociception” “and” “irritable bowel syndrome”. Original and review articles were considered for data acquisition. The activation of the ATP ion-gated channels, voltage-gated sodium (Nav) and calcium (Cav) channels, as well as the activation of protease-activated receptors (PAR2), transient receptor potential vanilloide-1, serotonin, cannabinoids and cholecystokinin are involved in the genesis of visceral hypersensitivity in IBS. The involvement of ion channels and receptors concerning visceral hypersensitivity is noteworthy in IBS models. PMID:24976114

  18. Transient Receptor Potential Canonical 1 (TRPC1) Channels as Regulators of Sphingolipid and VEGF Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Muhammad Yasir; Magnusson, Melissa; Kemppainen, Kati; Sukumaran, Pramod; Löf, Christoffer; Pulli, Ilari; Kalhori, Veronica; Törnquist, Kid

    2015-01-01

    The identity of calcium channels in the thyroid is unclear. In human follicular thyroid ML-1 cancer cells, sphingolipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), through S1P receptors 1 and 3 (S1P1/S1P3), and VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) stimulates migration. We show that human thyroid cells express several forms of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels, including TRPC1. In TRPC1 knockdown (TRPC1-KD) ML-1 cells, the basal and S1P-evoked invasion and migration was attenuated. Furthermore, the expression of S1P3 and VEGFR2 was significantly down-regulated. Transfecting wild-type ML-1 cells with a nonconducting TRPC1 mutant decreased S1P3 and VEGFR2 expression. In TRPC1-KD cells, receptor-operated calcium entry was decreased. To investigate whether the decreased receptor expression was due to attenuated calcium entry, cells were incubated with the calcium chelator BAPTA-AM (1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid). In these cells, and in cells where calmodulin and calmodulin-dependent kinase were blocked pharmacologically, S1P3 and VEGFR2 expression was decreased. In TRPC1-KD cells, both hypoxia-inducible factor 1α expression and the secretion and activity of MMP2 and MMP9 were attenuated, and proliferation was decreased in TRPC1-KD cells. This was due to a prolonged G1 phase of the cell cycle, a significant increase in the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27, and a decrease in the expression of cyclin D2, cyclin D3, and CDK6. Transfecting TRPC1 to TRPC1-KD cells rescued receptor expression, migration, and proliferation. Thus, the expression of S1P3 and VEGFR2 is mediated by a calcium-dependent mechanism. TRPC1 has a crucial role in this process. This regulation is important for the invasion, migration, and proliferation of thyroid cancer cells. PMID:25971967

  19. Acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Acidosis is a noxious condition associated with inflammation, ischaemia or defective acid containment. As a consequence, acid sensing has evolved as an important property of afferent neurons with unmyelinated and thinly myelinated nerve fibres. Protons evoke multiple currents in primary afferent neurons, which are carried by several acid-sensitive ion channels. Among these, acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) ion channels have been most thoroughly studied. ASICs survey moderate decreases in extracellular pH, whereas TRPV1 is activated only by severe acidosis resulting in pH values below 6. Two-pore-domain K(+) (K(2P)) channels are differentially regulated by small deviations of extra- or intracellular pH from physiological levels. Other acid-sensitive channels include TRPV4, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPP2 (PKD2L1), ionotropic purinoceptors (P2X), inward rectifier K(+) channels, voltage-activated K(+) channels, L-type Ca(2+) channels, hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated channels, gap junction channels, and Cl(-) channels. In addition, acid-sensitive G protein coupled receptors have also been identified. Most of these molecular acid sensors are expressed by primary sensory neurons, although to different degrees and in various combinations. Emerging evidence indicates that many of the acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors play a role in acid sensing, acid-induced pain and acid-evoked feedback regulation of homeostatic reactions. The existence and apparent redundancy of multiple pH surveillance systems attests to the concept that acid-base regulation is a vital issue for cell and tissue homeostasis. Since upregulation and overactivity of acid sensors appear to contribute to various forms of chronic pain, acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors are considered as targets for novel analgesic drugs. This approach will only be successful if the pathological implications of acid sensors can be differentiated

  20. Acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Acidosis is a noxious condition associated with inflammation, ischaemia or defective acid containment. As a consequence, acid sensing has evolved as an important property of afferent neurons with unmyelinated and thinly myelinated nerve fibres. Protons evoke multiple currents in primary afferent neurons, which are carried by several acid-sensitive ion channels. Among these, acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) ion channels have been most thoroughly studied. ASICs survey moderate decreases in extracellular pH whereas TRPV1 is activated only by severe acidosis resulting in pH values below 6. Two-pore domain K+ (K2P) channels are differentially regulated by small deviations of extra- or intracellular pH from physiological levels. Other acid-sensitive channels comprise TRPV4, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPP2 (PKD2L1), ionotropic purinoceptors (P2X), inward rectifier K+ channels, voltage-activated K+ channels, L-type Ca2+ channels, hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, gap junction channels, and Cl− channels. In addition, acid-sensitive G protein-coupled receptors have also been identified. Most of these molecular acid sensors are expressed by primary sensory neurons, although to different degrees and in various combinations. Emerging evidence indicates that many of the acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors play a role in acid sensing, acid-induced pain and acid-evoked feedback regulation of homeostatic reactions. The existence and apparent redundancy of multiple pH surveillance systems attests to the concept that acid-base regulation is a vital issue for cell and tissue homeostasis. Since upregulation and overactivity of acid sensors appear to contribute to various forms of chronic pain, acid-sensitive ion channels and receptors are considered as targets for novel analgesic drugs. This approach will only be successful if the pathological implications of acid sensors can be differentiated

  1. Transient Receptor Potential Channels as Targets for Phytochemicals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To date, 28 mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been cloned and characterized. They are grouped into six subfamilies on the basis of their amino acid sequence homology: TRP Ankyrin (TRPA), TRP Canonical (TRPC), TRP Melastatin (TRPM), TRP Mucolipin (TRPML), TRP Polycystin (TRPP), and TRP Vanilloid (TRPV). Most of the TRP channels are nonselective cation channels expressed on the cell membrane and exhibit variable permeability ratios for Ca2+ versus Na+. They mediate sensory functions (such as vision, nociception, taste transduction, temperature sensation, and pheromone signaling) and homeostatic functions (such as divalent cation flux, hormone release, and osmoregulation). Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the specific roles of these TRP channels and their activation mechanisms. In this Review, the emphasis will be on the activation of TRP channels by phytochemicals that are claimed to exert health benefits. Recent findings complement the anecdotal evidence that some of these phytochemicals have specific receptors and the activation of which is responsible for the physiological effects. Now, the targets for these phytochemicals are being unveiled; a specific hypothesis can be proposed and tested experimentally to infer a scientific validity of the claims of the health benefits. The broader and pressing issues that have to be addressed are related to the quantities of the active ingredients in a given preparation, their bioavailability, metabolism, adverse effects, excretion, and systemic versus local effects. PMID:24926802

  2. Function and regulation of endothelin type A receptor-operated transient receptor potential canonical channels.

    PubMed

    Horinouchi, Takahiro; Terada, Koji; Higa, Tsunaki; Aoyagi, Hiroyuki; Nishiya, Tadashi; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Miwa, Soichi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels responsible for receptor-operated Ca(2+) entry (ROCE) triggered by activation of endothelin type A receptor (ET(A)R) and to clarify the importance of calmodulin (CaM) / inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor binding (CIRB) domain at the C terminus of TRPC channels in ET(A)R-activated channel regulation. In HEK293 cells coexpressing ET(A)R and one of seven TRPC isoforms, ET(A)R stimulation induced ROCE through TRPC3, TRPC5, TRPC6, and TRPC7. The TRPC3- and TRPC6-mediated ROCE was inhibited by selective inhibitors of G(q) protein, phospholipase C (PLC), and CaM. The CIRB domain deletion mutants of TRPC3 and TRPC6 failed to induce ET(A)R-mediated ROCE. Either deletion of the CIRB domain or pharmacological inhibition of CaM did not inhibit the targeting of these channels to the plasma membrane. These results suggest that 1) TRPC3, TRPC5, TRPC6, and TRPC7 can function as ET(A)R-operated Ca(2+) channels; 2) G(q) protein, PLC, and CaM are involved in TRPC3- and TRPC6-mediated ROCE; 3) ET(A)R-mediated activation of TRPC3 and TRPC6 requires the CIRB domain; and 4) abolition of ET(A)R-induced ROCE by CIRB domain deletion and CaM inhibition is due to loss of CaM binding to the channels but not loss of cell surface TRPC3 and TRPC6. PMID:22129540

  3. Cannabinoid receptor 2: Potential role in immunomodulation and neuroinflammation Review

    PubMed Central

    Rom, Slava; Persidsky, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    An accumulating body of evidence suggests that endocannabinoids and cannabinoid receptors type 1 and 2 (CB1, CB2) play a significant role in physiologic and pathologic processes, including cognitive and immune functions. While the addictive properties of marijuana, an extract from the Cannabis plant, are well recognized, there is growing appreciation of the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids in multiple pathologic conditions involving chronic inflammation (inflammatory bowel disease, arthritis, autoimmune disorders, multiple sclerosis, HIV-1 infection, stroke, Alzheimer’s disease to name a few), mainly mediated by CB2 activation. Development of CB2 agonists as therapeutic agents has been hampered by the complexity of their intracellular signaling, relative paucity of highly selective compounds and insufficient data regarding end effects in the target cells and organs. This review attempts to summarize recent advances in studies of CB2 activation in the setting of neuroinflammation, immunomodulation and HIV-1 infection. PMID:23471521

  4. Cannabinoid receptor 2: potential role in immunomodulation and neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Rom, Slava; Persidsky, Yuri

    2013-06-01

    An accumulating body of evidence suggests that endocannabinoids and cannabinoid receptors type 1 and 2 (CB(1), CB(2)) play a significant role in physiologic and pathologic processes, including cognitive and immune functions. While the addictive properties of marijuana, an extract from the Cannabis plant, are well recognized, there is growing appreciation of the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids in multiple pathologic conditions involving chronic inflammation (inflammatory bowel disease, arthritis, autoimmune disorders, multiple sclerosis, HIV-1 infection, stroke, Alzheimer's disease to name a few), mainly mediated by CB(2) activation. Development of CB(2) agonists as therapeutic agents has been hampered by the complexity of their intracellular signaling, relative paucity of highly selective compounds and insufficient data regarding end effects in the target cells and organs. This review attempts to summarize recent advances in studies of CB(2) activation in the setting of neuroinflammation, immunomodulation and HIV-1 infection. PMID:23471521

  5. Pharmacology of transient receptor potential melastatin channels in the vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Zholos, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM) non-selective cation channels, the largest TRP subfamily, are widely expressed in excitable and non-excitable cells where they perform diverse functions ranging from detection of cold, taste, osmolarity, redox state and pH to control of Mg2+ homeostasis and cell proliferation or death. Recently, TRPM gene expression has been identified in vascular smooth muscles with dominance of the TRPM8 channel. There has been in parallel considerable progress in decoding the functional roles of several TRPMs in the vasculature. This research on native cells is aided by the knowledge of the activation mechanisms and pharmacological properties of heterologously expressed TRPM subtypes. This paper summarizes the present state of knowledge of vascular TRPM channels and outlines several anticipated directions of future research in this area. PMID:20233227

  6. Short latency compound action potentials from mammalian gravity receptor organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Jones, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    Gravity receptor function was characterized in four mammalian species using far-field vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs). VsEPs are compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve and central relays that are elicited by linear acceleration ramps applied to the cranium. Rats, mice, guinea pigs, and gerbils were studied. In all species, response onset occurred within 1.5 ms of the stimulus onset. Responses persisted during intense (116 dBSPL) wide-band (50 to 50 inverted question mark omitted inverted question mark000 Hz) forward masking, whereas auditory responses to intense clicks (112 dBpeSPL) were eliminated under the same conditions. VsEPs remained after cochlear extirpation but were eliminated following bilateral labyrinthectomy. Responses included a series of positive and negative peaks that occurred within 8 ms of stimulus onset (range of means at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms: P1=908 to 1062 micros, N1=1342 to 1475 micros, P2=1632 to 1952 micros, N2=2038 to 2387 micros). Mean response amplitudes at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms ranged from 0.14 to 0.99 microV. VsEP input/output functions revealed latency slopes that varied across peaks and species ranging from -19 to -51 micros/dB. Amplitude-intensity slopes also varied ranging from 0.04 to 0.08 microV/dB for rats and mice. Latency values were comparable to those of birds although amplitudes were substantially smaller in mammals. VsEP threshold values were considerably higher in mammals compared to birds and ranged from -8.1 to -10.5 dBre 1.0 g/ms across species. These results support the hypothesis that mammalian gravity receptors are less sensitive to dynamic stimuli than are those of birds.

  7. Oligopyrrole Macrocycles: Receptors and Chemosensors for Potentially Hazardous Materials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Oligopyrroles represent a diverse class of molecular receptors that have been utilized in a growing number of applications. Recently, these systems have attracted interest as receptors and chemosensors for hazardous materials, including harmful anionic species, high-valent actinide cations, and nitroaromatic explosives. These versatile molecular receptors have been used to develop rudimentary colorimetric and fluorimetric assays for hazardous materials. PMID:21465591

  8. Artificial sweeteners and salts producing a metallic taste sensation activate TRPV1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Riera, Céline E; Vogel, Horst; Simon, Sidney A; le Coutre, Johannes

    2007-08-01

    Throughout the world many people use artificial sweeteners (AS) for the purpose of reducing caloric intake. The most prominently used of these molecules include saccharin, aspartame (Nutrasweet), acesulfame-K, and cyclamate. Despite the caloric advantage they provide, one key concern in their use is their aversive aftertaste that has been characterized on a sensory level as bitter and/or metallic. Recently, it has been shown that the activation of particular T2R bitter taste receptors is partially involved with the bitter aftertaste sensation of saccharin and acesulfame-K. To more fully understand the biology behind these phenomena we have addressed the question of whether AS could stimulate transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptors, as these receptors are activated by a large range of structurally different chemicals. Moreover, TRPV1 receptors and/or their variants are found in taste receptor cells and in nerve terminals throughout the oral cavity. Hence, TRPV1 activation could be involved in the AS aftertaste or even contribute to the poorly understood metallic taste sensation. Using Ca(2+) imaging on TRPV1 receptors heterologously expressed in the human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells and on dissociated primary sensory neurons, we find that in both systems, AS activate TRPV1 receptors, and, moreover, they sensitize these channels to acid and heat. We also found that TRPV1 receptors are activated by CuSO(4), ZnSO(4), and FeSO(4), three salts known to produce a metallic taste sensation. In summary, our results identify a novel group of compounds that activate TRPV1 and, consequently, provide a molecular mechanism that may account for off tastes of sweeteners and metallic tasting salts. PMID:17567713

  9. Transient Receptor Potential Channels and Corneal Stromal Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yuka; Reinach, Peter S; Shirai, Kumi; Kitano-Izutani, Ai; Miyajima, Masayasu; Yamanaka, Osamu; Sumioka, Takayoshi; Saika, Shizuya

    2015-11-01

    Corneal transparency is dependent on the maintenance of the structural integrity and functional activity of its epithelial and endothelial limiting layers and the stroma. Different transient receptor potential (TRP) channel subtypes are expressed in cells and on corneal sensory nerve endings. They serve as sensors and transducers of environmental stimuli that can reduce tissue transparency. These nonselective cation channels are members of a superfamily sharing TRP box protein sequence homology having 6 membrane spanning domains with a pore between the fifth and sixth segments. TRP channels are composed of 4 monomeric subunits that oligomerize in homomeric or heteromeric configurations derived from different TRP subtypes belonging to the same or any of 6 different subfamilies. TRP subfamily members identified in the cornea include those belonging to the canonical, vanilloid, ankyrin, or melastatin subfamilies. In this review, we specifically focus on the functional roles of TRPV1 and TRPA1 expression in the cornea as their activation provides adaptive nociceptive and immune responses to noxious environmental stresses such as irritating ligands, temperature fluctuations, rises in ambient osmolarity, mechanical stretch, decline in pH, and tissue injury. Our previous studies have indicated that TRPV1 and TRPA1 subtypes are potential drug targets for improving corneal wound healing after alkali burns, because injury-induced fibrosis, neovascularization, and inflammation in either TRPV1 or TRPA1 gene-silenced mice were all significantly reduced. PMID:26448171

  10. Are AMPA receptor positive allosteric modulators potential pharmacotherapeutics for addiction?

    PubMed

    Watterson, Lucas R; Olive, M Foster

    2013-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors are a diverse class of compounds that increase fast excitatory transmission in the brain. AMPA PAMs have been shown to facilitate long-term potentiation, strengthen communication between various cortical and subcortical regions, and some of these compounds increase the production and release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in an activity-dependent manner. Through these mechanisms, AMPA PAMs have shown promise as broad spectrum pharmacotherapeutics in preclinical and clinical studies for various neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In recent years, a small collection of preclinical animal studies has also shown that AMPA PAMs may have potential as pharmacotherapeutic adjuncts to extinction-based or cue-exposure therapies for the treatment of drug addiction. The present paper will review this preclinical literature, discuss novel data collected in our laboratory, and recommend future research directions for the possible development of AMPA PAMs as anti-addiction medications. PMID:24380895

  11. Are AMPA Receptor Positive Allosteric Modulators Potential Pharmacotherapeutics for Addiction?

    PubMed Central

    Watterson, Lucas R.; Olive, M. Foster

    2013-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors are a diverse class of compounds that increase fast excitatory transmission in the brain. AMPA PAMs have been shown to facilitate long-term potentiation, strengthen communication between various cortical and subcortical regions, and some of these compounds increase the production and release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in an activity-dependent manner. Through these mechanisms, AMPA PAMs have shown promise as broad spectrum pharmacotherapeutics in preclinical and clinical studies for various neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In recent years, a small collection of preclinical animal studies has also shown that AMPA PAMs may have potential as pharmacotherapeutic adjuncts to extinction-based or cue-exposure therapies for the treatment of drug addiction. The present paper will review this preclinical literature, discuss novel data collected in our laboratory, and recommend future research directions for the possible development of AMPA PAMs as anti-addiction medications. PMID:24380895

  12. Selective potentiation of alpha 1 glycine receptors by ginkgolic acid

    PubMed Central

    Maleeva, Galyna; Buldakova, Svetlana; Bregestovski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) belong to the superfamily of pentameric cys-loop receptor-operated channels and are involved in numerous physiological functions, including movement, vision, and pain. In search for compounds performing subunit-specific modulation of GlyRs we studied action of ginkgolic acid, an abundant Ginkgo biloba product. Using patch-clamp recordings, we analyzed the effects of ginkgolic acid in concentrations from 30 nM to 25 μM on α1–α3 and α1/β, α2/β configurations of GlyR and on GABAARs expressed in cultured CHO-K1 cells and mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells. Ginkgolic acid caused an increase in the amplitude of currents mediated by homomeric α1 and heteromeric α1/β GlyRs and provoked a left-shift of the concentration-dependent curves for glycine. Even at high concentrations (10–25 μM) ginkgolic acid was not able to augment ionic currents mediated by α2, α2/β, and α3 GlyRs, or by GABAAR consisting of α1/β2/γ2 subunits. Mutation of three residues (T59A/A261G/A303S) in the α2 GlyR subunit to the corresponding ones from the α1 converted the action of ginkgolic acid to potentiation with a distinct decrease in EC50 for glycine, suggesting an important role for these residues in modulation by ginkgolic acid. Our results suggest that ginkgolic acid is a novel selective enhancer of α1 GlyRs. PMID:26578878

  13. Identification of potential glucocorticoid receptor therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alexandra L.; Coarfa, Cristian; Qian, Jun; Wilkerson, Joseph J.; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Krett, Nancy L.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Rosen, Steven T.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are a cornerstone of combination therapies for multiple myeloma. However, patients ultimately develop resistance to GCs frequently based on decreased glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression. An understanding of the direct targets of GC actions, which induce cell death, is expected to culminate in potential therapeutic strategies for inducing cell death by regulating downstream targets in the absence of a functional GR. The specific goal of our research is to identify primary GR targets that contribute to GC-induced cell death, with the ultimate goal of developing novel therapeutics around these targets that can be used to overcome resistance to GCs in the absence of GR. Using the MM.1S glucocorticoid-sensitive human myeloma cell line, we began with the broad platform of gene expression profiling to identify glucocorticoid-regulated genes further refined by combination treatment with phosphatidylinositol-3’-kinase inhibition (PI3Ki). To further refine the search to distinguish direct and indirect targets of GR that respond to the combination GC and PI3Ki treatment of MM.1S cells, we integrated 1) gene expression profiles of combination GC treatment with PI3Ki, which induces synergistic cell death; 2) negative correlation between genes inhibited by combination treatment in MM.1S cells and genes over-expressed in myeloma patients to establish clinical relevance and 3) GR chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq) in myeloma cells to identify global chromatin binding for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Using established bioinformatics platforms, we have integrated these data sets to identify a subset of candidate genes that may form the basis for a comprehensive picture of glucocorticoid actions in multiple myeloma. As a proof of principle, we have verified two targets, namely RRM2 and BCL2L1, as primary functional targets of GR involved in GC-induced cell death. PMID:26715915

  14. The pain receptor TRPV1 displays agonist-dependent activation stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Hazan, Adina; Kumar, Rakesh; Matzner, Henry; Priel, Avi

    2015-01-01

    The receptor channel TRPV1 (Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1) is expressed by primary afferent sensory neurons of the pain pathway, where it functions as a sensor of noxious heat and various chemicals, including eicosanoids, capsaicin, protons and peptide toxins. Comprised of four identical subunits that organize into a non-selective cationic permeable channel, this receptor has a variety of binding sites responsible for detecting their respective agonists. Although its physiological role as a chemosensor has been described in detail, the stoichiometry of TRPV1 activation by its different ligands remains unknown. Here, we combined the use of concatemeric constructs harboring mutated binding sites with patch-clamp recordings in order to determine the stoichiometry for TRPV1 activation through the vanilloid binding site and the outer-pore domain by capsaicin and protons, respectively. We show that, while a single capsaicin-bound subunit was sufficient to achieve a maximal open-channel lifetime, all four proton-binding sites were required. Thus, our results demonstrate a distinct stoichiometry of TRPV1 activation through two of its different agonist-binding domains. PMID:26194846

  15. The pain receptor TRPV1 displays agonist-dependent activation stoichiometry

    PubMed Central

    Hazan, Adina; Kumar, Rakesh; Matzner, Henry; Priel, Avi

    2015-01-01

    The receptor channel TRPV1 (Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1) is expressed by primary afferent sensory neurons of the pain pathway, where it functions as a sensor of noxious heat and various chemicals, including eicosanoids, capsaicin, protons and peptide toxins. Comprised of four identical subunits that organize into a non-selective cationic permeable channel, this receptor has a variety of binding sites responsible for detecting their respective agonists. Although its physiological role as a chemosensor has been described in detail, the stoichiometry of TRPV1 activation by its different ligands remains unknown. Here, we combined the use of concatemeric constructs harboring mutated binding sites with patch-clamp recordings in order to determine the stoichiometry for TRPV1 activation through the vanilloid binding site and the outer-pore domain by capsaicin and protons, respectively. We show that, while a single capsaicin-bound subunit was sufficient to achieve a maximal open-channel lifetime, all four proton-binding sites were required. Thus, our results demonstrate a distinct stoichiometry of TRPV1 activation through two of its different agonist-binding domains. PMID:26194846

  16. Pharmacology of the capsaicin receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 ion channel.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Istvan; Friston, Dominic; Valente, Jojo Sousa; Torres Perez, Jose Vicente; Andreou, Anna P

    2014-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 ion channel (TRPV1), has been identified as a polymodal transducer molecule on a sub-set of primary sensory neurons which responds to various stimuli including noxious heat (> -42 degrees C), protons and vanilloids such as capsaicin, the hot ingredient of chilli peppers. Subsequently, TRPV1 has been found indispensable for the development of burning pain and reflex hyperactivity associated with inflammation of peripheral tissues and viscera, respectively. Therefore, TRPV1 is regarded as a major target for the development of novel agents for the control of pain and visceral hyperreflexia in inflammatory conditions. Initial efforts to introduce agents acting on TRPV1 into clinics have been hampered by unexpected side-effects due to wider than expected expression in various tissues, as well as by the complex pharmacology, of TRPV1. However, it is believed that better understanding of the pharmacological properties of TRPV1 and specific targeting of tissues may eventually lead to the development of clinically useful agents. In order to assist better understanding of TRPV1 pharmacology, here we are giving a comprehensive account on the activation and inactivation mechanisms and the structure-function relationship of TRPV1. PMID:24941664

  17. The role of transient receptor potential channels in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming; Tepel, Martin

    2008-11-01

    Metabolic syndrome is correlated with increased cardiovascular risk and characterized by several factors, including visceral obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. Several members of a large family of nonselective cation entry channels, e.g., transient receptor potential (TRP) canonical (TRPC), vanilloid (TRPV), and melastatin (TRPM) channels, have been associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Thus, disruption of TRP channel expression or function may account for the observed increased cardiovascular risk in metabolic syndrome patients. TRPV1 regulates adipogenesis and inflammation in adipose tissues, whereas TRPC3, TRPC5, TRPC6, TRPV1, and TRPM7 are involved in vasoconstriction and regulation of blood pressure. Other members of the TRP family are involved in regulation of insulin secretion, lipid composition, and atherosclerosis. Although there is no evidence that a single TRP channelopathy may be the cause of all metabolic syndrome characteristics, further studies will help to clarify the role of specific TRP channels involved in the metabolic syndrome. (Hypertens Res 2008; 31: 1989-1995). PMID:19098369

  18. Toll-like receptors: potential targets for lupus treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan-wei; Tang, Wei; Zuo, Jian-ping

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by the loss of tolerance to self-nuclear antigens. Accumulating evidence shows that Toll-like receptors (TLRs), previously proven to be critical for host defense, are implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases by recognition of self-molecules. Genome-wide association studies, experimental mouse models and clinical sample studies have provided evidence for the involvement of TLRs, including TLR2/4, TLR5, TLR3 and TLR7/8/9, in SLE pathogenesis. A number of downstream proteins in the TLR signaling cascade (such as MyD88, IRAKs and IFN-α) are identified as potential therapeutic targets for SLE treatment. Numerous antagonists targeting TLR signaling, including oligonucleotides, small molecular inhibitors and antibodies, are currently under preclinical studies or clinical trials for SLE treatment. Moreover, the emerging new manipulation of TLR signaling by microRNA (miRNA) regulation shows promise for the future treatment of SLE. PMID:26592511

  19. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Yosuke; Szallasi, Arpad

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are important mediators of sensory signals with marked effects on cellular functions and signalling pathways. Indeed, mutations in genes encoding TRP channels are the cause of several inherited diseases in humans (the so-called ‘TRP channelopathies’) that affect the cardiovascular, renal, skeletal and nervous systems. TRP channels are also promising targets for drug discovery. The initial focus of research was on TRP channels that are expressed on nociceptive neurons. Indeed, a number of potent, small-molecule TRPV1, TRPV3 and TRPA1 antagonists have already entered clinical trials as novel analgesic agents. There has been a recent upsurge in the amount of work that expands TRP channel drug discovery efforts into new disease areas such as asthma, cancer, anxiety, cardiac hypertrophy, as well as obesity and metabolic disorders. A better understanding of TRP channel functions in health and disease should lead to the discovery of first-in-class drugs for these intractable diseases. With this review, we hope to capture the current state of this rapidly expanding and changing field. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:24102319

  20. Lipid modulation of thermal transient receptor potential channels.

    PubMed

    Hernández-García, Enrique; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    There is a subgroup of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels that are responsive to temperature (thermo-TRP channels). These are important to a variety of sensory and physiological phenomena such as pain and taste perception. All thermo-TRP channels known to date are subject to modulation by lipidic molecules of many kinds, from the ubiquitous cholesterol to more specialized molecules such as prostaglandins. Although the mechanisms and sites of binding of lipids on thermo-TRPs are largely unknown, the explosion on research of lipids and ion channels has revealed previously unsuspected roles for them. Diacyl glycerol is a lipid produced by phospholipase C (PLC) and it was discovered to modulate TRP channels in the eye of the fly, and many mammal TRP channels have been found to interact with lipids. While most of the lipids acting on thermo-TRP channels have been found to activate them, there are a few capable of inhibition. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate is even capable of both inhibition and activation on a couple of thermo-TRPs, depending on the cellular context. More data is required to assess the mechanism through which lipids affect thermo-TRP channel activity and the physiological importance of this interaction. PMID:25366236

  1. Folate Receptor Alpha, Mesothelin and Megakaryocyte Potentiating Factor as Potential Serum Markers of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Somers, Elizabeth B; O’Shannessy, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Renal disease is the eighth leading cause of death in the United States. Early diagnosis is usually based on the detection of proteinuria or elevated serum creatinine, a relatively poor biomarker that does not accurately predict renal disease progression. As a result, more predictive biomarkers of renal function are sought. We present preliminary data on three protein biomarkers, folate receptor alpha (FRA), mesothelin (MSLN), and megakaryocyte potentiating factor (MPF), currently being pursued for applications in oncology diagnostics, and evaluate serum and urine levels in subjects with renal disease. Compared to healthy subjects, a significant (P < 0.0001) increase in all three biomarkers in both serum and urine of subjects with renal disease was demonstrated. Further, serum levels of these three protein biomarkers increased with increasing stage of disease suggesting their potential value in predicting progression in subjects with renal disease and raising caution in interpretation of data in oncology applications. PMID:24932099

  2. Purinergic receptors as potential therapeutic targets in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Woods, Lucas T; Ajit, Deepa; Camden, Jean M; Erb, Laurie; Weisman, Gary A

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive loss of memory and cognitive ability and is a serious cause of mortality. Many of the pathological characteristics associated with AD are revealed post-mortem, including amyloid-β plaque deposition, neurofibrillary tangles containing hyperphosphorylated tau proteins and neuronal loss in the hippocampus and cortex. Although several genetic mutations and risk factors have been associated with the disease, the causes remain poorly understood. Study of disease-initiating mechanisms and AD progression in humans is inherently difficult as most available tissue specimens are from late-stages of disease. Therefore, AD researchers rely on in vitro studies and the use of AD animal models where neuroinflammation has been shown to be a major characteristic of AD. Purinergic receptors are a diverse family of proteins consisting of P1 adenosine receptors and P2 nucleotide receptors for ATP, UTP and their metabolites. This family of receptors has been shown to regulate a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes, including neuroinflammation, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and AD. Experimental evidence from human AD tissue has suggested that purinergic receptors may play a role in AD progression and studies using selective purinergic receptor agonists and antagonists in vitro and in AD animal models have demonstrated that purinergic receptors represent novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of AD. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration'. PMID:26519903

  3. Aging of whiskey increases the potentiation of GABA(A) receptor response.

    PubMed

    Koda, Hirofumi; Hossain, Sheikh Julfikar; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Aoshima, Hitoshi

    2003-08-27

    It is known that the target of most mood-defining compounds such as ethanol is an ionotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA(A) receptor). The potentiation of the response of these inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors induces anxiolytic, sedative, and anesthetic activities in the human brain. Because both extracts of whiskey by pentane and fragrant components in whiskey potentiate the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response, GABA(A) receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocyte by injecting cRNAs prepared from the cloned cDNA for the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the bovine receptors in order to study the effects of whiskey itself on the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response. Whiskey itself also potentiated the electrical responses of GABA(A) receptors generally more than ethanol at the same concentration as that of the whiskey. The potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response increased with the aging period of the whiskey. Inhalation of whiskey to mice increased the sleeping time induced by pentobarbital more than that of the same concentration of ethanol as the whiskey. These results suggest that not only ethanol but also minor components in whiskey play an important role in the potentiation of GABA(A) receptor-mediated response and possibly the sedative effect of whiskey. Although the minor components are present in extremely small quantities compared with ethanol in alcoholic beverages, they may modulate the mood or consciousness of humans through the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor response after absorption into the brain, because these hydrophobic compounds are easily absorbed into the brain across the blood-brain barrier and are several thousands times as potent as ethanol in the potentiation of the GABA(A) receptor-mediated response. PMID:12926865

  4. Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells express functional erythropoietin receptor: Potential therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    PONIEWIERSKA-BARAN, AGATA; SUSZYNSKA, MALWINA; SUN, WENYUE; ABDELBASET-ISMAIL, AHMED; SCHNEIDER, GABRIELA; BARR, FREDERIC G.; RATAJCZAK, MARIUSZ Z.

    2015-01-01

    The erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) is expressed by cells from the erythroid lineage; however, evidence has accumulated that it is also expressed by some solid tumors. This is an important observation, because recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) is employed in cancer patients to treat anemia related to chemo/radiotherapy. In our studies we employed eight rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines (three alveolar-type RMS cell lines and five embrional-type RMS cell lines), and mRNA samples obtained from positive, PAX7-FOXO1-positive, and fusion-negative RMS patient samples. Expression of EpoR was evaluated by RT-PCR, gene array and FACS. The functionality of EpoR in RMS cell lines was evaluated by chemotaxis, adhesion, and direct cell proliferation assays. In some of the experiments, RMS cells were exposed to vincristine (VCR) in the presence or absence of EPO to test whether EPO may impair the therapeutic effect of VCR. We report for a first time that functional EpoR is expressed in human RMS cell lines as well as by primary tumors from RMS patients. Furthermore, EpoR is detectably expressed in both embryonal and alveolar RMS subtypes. At the functional level, several human RMS cell lines responded to EPO stimulation by enhanced proliferation, chemotaxis, cell adhesion, and phosphorylation of MAPKp42/44 and AKT. Moreover, RMS cells became more resistant to VCR treatment in the presence of EPO. Our findings have important potential clinical implications, indicating that EPO supplementation in RMS patients may have the unwanted side effect of tumor progression. PMID:26412593

  5. Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells express functional erythropoietin receptor: Potential therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Poniewierska-Baran, Agata; Suszynska, Malwina; Sun, Wenyue; Abdelbaset-Ismail, Ahmed; Schneider, Gabriela; Barr, Frederic G; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2015-11-01

    The erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) is expressed by cells from the erythroid lineage; however, evidence has accumulated that it is also expressed by some solid tumors. This is an important observation, because recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) is employed in cancer patients to treat anemia related to chemo/radiotherapy. In our studies we employed eight rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines (three alveolar-type RMS cell lines and five embrional-type RMS cell lines), and mRNA samples obtained from positive, PAX7-FOXO1-positive, and fusion-negative RMS patient samples. Expression of EpoR was evaluated by RT-PCR, gene array and FACS. The functionality of EpoR in RMS cell lines was evaluated by chemotaxis, adhesion, and direct cell proliferation assays. In some of the experiments, RMS cells were exposed to vincristine (VCR) in the presence or absence of EPO to test whether EPO may impair the therapeutic effect of VCR. We report for a first time that functional EpoR is expressed in human RMS cell lines as well as by primary tumors from RMS patients. Furthermore, EpoR is detectably expressed in both embryonal and alveolar RMS subtypes. At the functional level, several human RMS cell lines responded to EPO stimulation by enhanced proliferation, chemotaxis, cell adhesion, and phosphorylation of MAPKp42/44 and AKT. Moreover, RMS cells became more resistant to VCR treatment in the presence of EPO. Our findings have important potential clinical implications, indicating that EPO supplementation in RMS patients may have the unwanted side effect of tumor progression. PMID:26412593

  6. The transient receptor potential family of ion channels.

    PubMed

    Nilius, Bernd; Owsianik, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) multigene superfamily encodes integral membrane proteins that function as ion channels. Members of this family are conserved in yeast, invertebrates and vertebrates. The TRP family is subdivided into seven subfamilies: TRPC (canonical), TRPV (vanilloid), TRPM (melastatin), TRPP (polycystin), TRPML (mucolipin), TRPA (ankyrin) and TRPN (NOMPC-like); the latter is found only in invertebrates and fish. TRP ion channels are widely expressed in many different tissues and cell types, where they are involved in diverse physiological processes, such as sensation of different stimuli or ion homeostasis. Most TRPs are non-selective cation channels, only few are highly Ca2+ selective, some are even permeable for highly hydrated Mg2+ ions. This channel family shows a variety of gating mechanisms, with modes of activation ranging from ligand binding, voltage and changes in temperature to covalent modifications of nucleophilic residues. Activated TRP channels cause depolarization of the cellular membrane, which in turn activates voltage-dependent ion channels, resulting in a change of intracellular Ca2+ concentration; they serve as gatekeeper for transcellular transport of several cations (such as Ca2+ and Mg2+), and are required for the function of intracellular organelles (such as endosomes and lysosomes). Because of their function as intracellular Ca2+ release channels, they have an important regulatory role in cellular organelles. Mutations in several TRP genes have been implicated in diverse pathological states, including neurodegenerative disorders, skeletal dysplasia, kidney disorders and pain, and ongoing research may help find new therapies for treatments of related diseases. PMID:21401968

  7. The transient receptor potential family of ion channels

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Summary The transient receptor potential (TRP) multigene superfamily encodes integral membrane proteins that function as ion channels. Members of this family are conserved in yeast, invertebrates and vertebrates. The TRP family is subdivided into seven subfamilies: TRPC (canonical), TRPV (vanilloid), TRPM (melastatin), TRPP (polycystin), TRPML (mucolipin), TRPA (ankyrin) and TRPN (NOMPC-like); the latter is found only in invertebrates and fish. TRP ion channels are widely expressed in many different tissues and cell types, where they are involved in diverse physiological processes, such as sensation of different stimuli or ion homeostasis. Most TRPs are non-selective cation channels, only few are highly Ca2+ selective, some are even permeable for highly hydrated Mg2+ ions. This channel family shows a variety of gating mechanisms, with modes of activation ranging from ligand binding, voltage and changes in temperature to covalent modifications of nucleophilic residues. Activated TRP channels cause depolarization of the cellular membrane, which in turn activates voltage-dependent ion channels, resulting in a change of intracellular Ca2+ concentration; they serve as gatekeeper for transcellular transport of several cations (such as Ca2+ and Mg2+), and are required for the function of intracellular organelles (such as endosomes and lysosomes). Because of their function as intracellular Ca2+ release channels, they have an important regulatory role in cellular organelles. Mutations in several TRP genes have been implicated in diverse pathological states, including neurodegenerative disorders, skeletal dysplasia, kidney disorders and pain, and ongoing research may help find new therapies for treatments of related diseases. PMID:21401968

  8. The heterodimeric sweet taste receptor has multiple potential ligand binding sites.

    PubMed

    Cui, Meng; Jiang, Peihua; Maillet, Emeline; Max, Marianna; Margolskee, Robert F; Osman, Roman

    2006-01-01

    The sweet taste receptor is a heterodimer of two G protein coupled receptors, T1R2 and T1R3. This discovery has increased our understanding at the molecular level of the mechanisms underlying sweet taste. Previous experimental studies using sweet receptor chimeras and mutants show that there are at least three potential binding sites in this heterodimeric receptor. Receptor activity toward the artificial sweeteners aspartame and neotame depends on residues in the amino terminal domain of human T1R2. In contrast, receptor activity toward the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole depends on residues within the transmembrane domain of human T1R3. Furthermore, receptor activity toward the sweet protein brazzein depends on the cysteine rich domain of human T1R3. Although crystal structures are not available for the sweet taste receptor, useful homology models can be developed based on appropriate templates. The amino terminal domain, cysteine rich domain and transmembrane helix domain of T1R2 and T1R3 have been modeled based on the crystal structures of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1, tumor necrosis factor receptor, and bovine rhodopsin, respectively. We have used homology models of the sweet taste receptors, molecular docking of sweet ligands to the receptors, and site-directed mutagenesis of the receptors to identify potential ligand binding sites of the sweet taste receptor. These studies have led to a better understanding of the structure and function of this heterodimeric receptor, and can act as a guide for rational structure-based design of novel non-caloric sweeteners, which can be used in the fighting against obesity and diabetes. PMID:17168764

  9. Potentiation of Gamma Aminobutyric Acid Receptors (GABAAR) by Ethanol: How Are Inhibitory Receptors Affected?

    PubMed Central

    Förstera, Benjamin; Castro, Patricio A.; Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Aguayo, Luis G.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increase in the understanding of ethanol actions on the type A γ-aminobutyric acid chloride channel (GABAAR), a member of the pentameric ligand gated ion channels (pLGICs). However, the mechanism by which ethanol potentiates the complex is still not fully understood and a number of publications have shown contradictory results. Thus many questions still remain unresolved requiring further studies for a better comprehension of this effect. The present review concentrates on the involvement of GABAAR in the acute actions of ethanol and specifically focuses on the immediate, direct or indirect, synaptic and extra-synaptic modulatory effects. To elaborate on the immediate, direct modulation of GABAAR by acute ethanol exposure, electrophysiological studies investigating the importance of different subunits, and data from receptor mutants will be examined. We will also discuss the nature of the putative binding sites for ethanol based on structural data obtained from other members of the pLGICs family. Finally, we will briefly highlight the glycine gated chloride channel (GlyR), another member of the pLGIC family, as a suitable target for the development of new pharmacological tools. PMID:27199667

  10. Expression and functionality of TRPV1 receptor in human MCF-7 and canine CF.41 cells.

    PubMed

    Vercelli, C; Barbero, R; Cuniberti, B; Odore, R; Re, G

    2015-06-01

    As canine mammary tumours (CMT) and human breast cancer share clinical and prognostic features, the former have been proposed as a model to study carcinogenesis and improved therapeutic treatment in human breast cancer. In recent years, it has been shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is expressed in different neoplastic tissues and its activation has been associated with regulation of cancer growth and progression. The aim of the present research was to demonstrate the presence of TRPV1 in human and canine mammary cancer cells, MCF-7 and CF.41, respectively, and to study the role of TRPV1 in regulating cell proliferation. The images obtained by Western blot showed a signal at 100 kDa corresponding to the molecular weight of TRPV1 receptor. All tested TRPV1 agonists and antagonists caused a significant decrease (P < 0.05) of cell growth rate in MCF-7 cells. By contrast, in CF.41 cells capsaicin and capsazepine induced a significant increase (P < 0.05) in cell proliferation, whereas resiniferatoxin (RTX) and 5-iodo-resiniferatoxin (5-I-RTX) had no influence on CF.41 cell proliferation. Further studies are needed to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism responsible for the different effects evoked by TRPV1 activation in MCF-7 and CF.41 cells. PMID:23510405

  11. D1 dopamine receptor-induced cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation and potentiation of striatal glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Price, C J; Kim, P; Raymond, L A

    1999-12-01

    Dopamine receptor activation regulates cyclic AMP levels and is critically involved in modulating neurotransmission in the striatum. Others have shown that alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA)-type glutamate receptor-mediated current is potentiated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activation. We made whole-cell patch clamp recordings from cultured striatal neurons and tested whether D1-type dopamine receptor activation affected AMPA receptor-mediated currents. After a 5-min exposure to the D1 agonist SKF 81297 (1 microM), kainate-evoked current amplitude was enhanced in approximately 75% of cells to 121+/-2.5% of that recorded prior to addition of drug. This response was inhibited by the D1 antagonist SCH 23390 and mimicked by activators of PKA. Moreover, by western blot analysis using an antibody specific for the phosphorylated PKA site Ser845 of GluR1, we observed a marked increase in phosphorylated GluR1 following a 10-min exposure of striatal neurons to 1 microM SKF 81297. Our data demonstrate that activation of D1-type dopamine receptors on striatal neurons promotes phosphorylation of AMPA receptors by PKA as well as potentiation of current amplitude. These results elucidate one mechanism by which dopamine can modulate neurotransmission in the striatum. PMID:10582604

  12. Therapeutic potential of Toll-like receptor 9 activation.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Arthur M

    2006-06-01

    In the decade since the discovery that mouse B cells respond to certain unmethylated CpG dinucleotides in bacterial DNA, a specific receptor for these 'CpG motifs' has been identified, Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), and a new approach to immunotherapy has moved into the clinic based on the use of synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) as TLR9 agonists. This review highlights the current understanding of the mechanism of action of these CpG ODN, and provides an overview of the preclinical data and early human clinical trial results using these drugs to improve vaccines and treat cancer, infectious disease and allergy/asthma. PMID:16763660

  13. Role of transient receptor potential and acid-sensing ion channels in peripheral inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    White, John P M; Cibelli, Mario; Rei Fidalgo, Antonio; Paule, Cleoper C; Noormohamed, Faruq; Urban, Laszlo; Maze, Mervyn; Nagy, Istvan

    2010-03-01

    Pain originating in inflammation is the most common pathologic pain condition encountered by the anesthesiologist whether in the context of surgery, its aftermath, or in the practice of pain medicine. Inflammatory agents, released as components of the body's response to peripheral tissue damage or disease, are now known to be collectively capable of activating transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 4, transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1, and acid-sensing ion channels, whereas individual agents may activate only certain of these ion channels. These ionotropic receptors serve many physiologic functions-as, indeed, do many of the inflammagens released in the inflammatory process. Here, we introduce the reader to the role of these ionotropic receptors in mediating peripheral pain in response to inflammation. PMID:20179512

  14. ROLE OF NMDA, NICOTINIC, AND GABA RECEPTORS IN THE STEADY STATE VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIAL IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript characterizes the receptor pathways involved in pattern-evoked potential generation in rats

    " NMDA and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors appear to be involved in the generation of the steady-state pattern evoked response in vivo.

    " The pattern evok...

  15. BDNF released during neuropathic pain potentiates NMDA receptors in primary afferent terminals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenling; Walwyn, Wendy; Ennes, Helena S; Kim, Hyeyoung; McRoberts, James A; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G

    2014-05-01

    NMDA receptors in primary afferent terminals can contribute to hyperalgesia by increasing neurotransmitter release. In rats and mice, we found that the ability of intrathecal NMDA to induce neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) internalization (a measure of substance P release) required a previous injection of BDNF. Selective knock-down of NMDA receptors in primary afferents decreased NMDA-induced NK1R internalization, confirming the presynaptic location of these receptors. The effect of BDNF was mediated by tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB) receptors and not p75 neurotrophin receptors (p75(NTR) ), because it was not produced by proBDNF and was inhibited by the trkB antagonist ANA-12 but not by the p75(NTR) inhibitor TAT-Pep5. These effects are probably mediated through the truncated form of the trkB receptor as there is little expression of full-length trkB in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Src family kinase inhibitors blocked the effect of BDNF, suggesting that trkB receptors promote the activation of these NMDA receptors by Src family kinase phosphorylation. Western blots of cultured DRG neurons revealed that BDNF increased Tyr(1472) phosphorylation of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, known to have a potentiating effect. Patch-clamp recordings showed that BDNF, but not proBDNF, increased NMDA receptor currents in cultured DRG neurons. NMDA-induced NK1R internalization was also enabled in a neuropathic pain model or by activating dorsal horn microglia with lipopolysaccharide. These effects were decreased by a BDNF scavenger, a trkB receptor antagonist and a Src family kinase inhibitor, indicating that BDNF released by microglia potentiates NMDA receptors in primary afferents during neuropathic pain. PMID:24611998

  16. AMPA RECEPTOR POTENTIATORS: FROM DRUG DESIGN TO COGNITIVE ENHANCEMENT

    PubMed Central

    PARTIN, KATHRYN M.

    2014-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of ionotropic glutamate receptors have emerged as a target for treating cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration, but also mental illnesses such as major depressive disorder. The possibility of creating a new class of pharmaceutical agent to treat refractive mental health issues has compelled researchers to redouble their efforts to develop a safe, effective treatment for memory and cognition impairments. Coupled with the more robust research methodologies that have emerged, including more sophisticated high-throughput-screens, higher resolution structural biology techniques, and more focused assessment on pharmacokinetics, the development of positive modulators of AMPA receptors holds great promise. We describe recent approaches that improve our understanding of the basic physiology underlying memory and cognition, and their application towards promoting human health. PMID:25462292

  17. The hypothermic response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide critically depends on brain CB1, but not CB2 or TRPV1, receptors

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Alexandre A; Molchanova, Alla Y; Dogan, M Devrim; Patel, Shreya; Pétervári, Erika; Balaskó, Márta; Wanner, Samuel P; Eales, Justin; Oliveira, Daniela L; Gavva, Narender R; Almeida, M Camila; Székely, Miklós; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Hypothermia occurs in the most severe cases of systemic inflammation, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. This study evaluated whether the hypothermic response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is modulated by the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) and its receptors: cannabinoid-1 (CB1), cannabinoid-2 (CB2) and transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1). In rats exposed to an ambient temperature of 22°C, a moderate dose of LPS (25–100 μg kg−1i.v.) induced a fall in body temperature with a nadir at ∼100 min postinjection. This response was not affected by desensitization of intra-abdominal TRPV1 receptors with resiniferatoxin (20 μg kg−1i.p.), by systemic TRPV1 antagonism with capsazepine (40 mg kg−1i.p.), or by systemic CB2 receptor antagonism with SR144528 (1.4 mg kg−1i.p.). However, CB1 receptor antagonism by rimonabant (4.6 mg kg−1i.p.) or SLV319 (15 mg kg−1i.p.) blocked LPS hypothermia. The effect of rimonabant was further studied. Rimonabant blocked LPS hypothermia when administered i.c.v. at a dose (4.6 μg) that was too low to produce systemic effects. The blockade of LPS hypothermia by i.c.v. rimonabant was associated with suppression of the circulating level of tumour necrosis factor-α. In contrast to rimonabant, the i.c.v. administration of AEA (50 μg) enhanced LPS hypothermia. Importantly, i.c.v. AEA did not evoke hypothermia in rats not treated with LPS, thus indicating that AEA modulates LPS-activated pathways in the brain rather than thermoeffector pathways. In conclusion, the present study reveals a novel, critical role of brain CB1 receptors in LPS hypothermia. Brain CB1 receptors may constitute a new therapeutic target in systemic inflammation and sepsis. PMID:21486787

  18. The hypothermic response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide critically depends on brain CB1, but not CB2 or TRPV1, receptors.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Alexandre A; Molchanova, Alla Y; Dogan, M Devrim; Patel, Shreya; Pétervári, Erika; Balaskó, Márta; Wanner, Samuel P; Eales, Justin; Oliveira, Daniela L; Gavva, Narender R; Almeida, M Camila; Székely, Miklós; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2011-05-01

    Hypothermia occurs in the most severe cases of systemic inflammation, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. This study evaluated whether the hypothermic response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is modulated by the endocannabinoid anandamide(AEA) and its receptors: cannabinoid-1 (CB1), cannabinoid-2 (CB2) and transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1). In rats exposed to an ambient temperature of 22◦C, a moderate dose of LPS (25 - 100 μg kg−1 I.V.) induced a fall in body temperature with a nadir at ∼100 minpostinjection. This response was not affected by desensitization of intra-abdominal TRPV1 receptors with resiniferatoxin (20 μg kg - 1 I.P.), by systemic TRPV1 antagonism with capsazepine(40mg kg−1 I.P.), or by systemic CB2 receptor antagonism with SR144528 (1.4 mg kg−1 I.P.).However, CB1 receptor antagonism by rimonabant (4.6mg kg−1 I.P.) or SLV319 (15mg kg−1 I.P.)blocked LPS hypothermia. The effect of rimonabant was further studied. Rimonabant blocked LPS hypothermia when administered I.C.V. at a dose (4.6 μg) that was too low to produce systemic effects. The blockade of LPS hypothermia by I.C.V. rimonabant was associated with suppression of the circulating level of tumour necrosis factor-α. In contrast to rimonabant,the I.C.V. administration of AEA (50 μg) enhanced LPS hypothermia. Importantly, I.C.V. AEAdid not evoke hypothermia in rats not treated with LPS, thus indicating that AEA modulates LPS-activated pathways in the brain rather than thermo effector pathways. In conclusion, the present study reveals a novel, critical role of brain CB1 receptors in LPS hypothermia. Brain CB1 receptors may constitute a new therapeutic target in systemic inflammation and sepsis. PMID:21486787

  19. Enteric P2X receptors as potential targets for drug treatment of the irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Galligan, James J

    2004-01-01

    The irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a gastrointestinal motility disorder affecting millions of patients. IBS symptoms include diarrhea, constipation and pain. The etiology of IBS is due partly to changes in the function of nerves supplying the gastrointestinal tract, immune system activation and to psychological factors. P2X receptors are multimeric ATP-gated cation channels expressed by neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Sensory nerve endings in the gastrointestinal tract express P2X receptors. ATP released from gastrointestinal cells activates P2X receptors on sensory nerve endings to stimulate motor reflexes and to transmit nociceptive signals. Antagonists acting at P2X receptors on sensory nerves could attenuate abdominal pain in IBS patients. Primary afferent neurons intrinsic to the gut, and enteric motor- and interneurons express P2X receptors. These neurons participate in motor reflexes. Agonists acting at enteric P2X receptors may enhance gastrointestinal propulsion and secretion, and these drugs could be useful for treating constipation-predominant IBS. Antagonists acting at enteric P2X receptors would decrease propulsion and secretion and they might be useful for treating diarrhea-predominant IBS. Current knowledge of P2X receptor distribution and function in the gut of laboratory animals provides a rational basis for further exploration of the therapeutic potential for drugs acting at P2X receptors in IBS patients. However, more information about P2X receptor distribution and function in the human gastrointestinal tract is needed. Data on the distribution and function of P2X receptors on gastrointestinal immune cells would also provide insights into the therapeutic potential of P2X receptor agents in IBS. PMID:15051631

  20. Regulation of Action Potential Waveforms by Axonal GABAA Receptors in Cortical Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yang; Zhao, Yuan; Yang, Mingpo; Zeng, Shaoqun; Shu, Yousheng

    2014-01-01

    GABAA receptors distributed in somatodendritic compartments play critical roles in regulating neuronal activities, including spike timing and firing pattern; however, the properties and functions of GABAA receptors at the axon are still poorly understood. By recording from the cut end (bleb) of the main axon trunk of layer –5 pyramidal neurons in prefrontal cortical slices, we found that currents evoked by GABA iontophoresis could be blocked by picrotoxin, indicating the expression of GABAA receptors in axons. Stationary noise analysis revealed that single-channel properties of axonal GABAA receptors were similar to those of somatic receptors. Perforated patch recording with gramicidin revealed that the reversal potential of the GABA response was more negative than the resting membrane potential at the axon trunk, suggesting that GABA may hyperpolarize the axonal membrane potential. Further experiments demonstrated that the activation of axonal GABAA receptors regulated the amplitude and duration of action potentials (APs) and decreased the AP-induced Ca2+ transients at the axon. Together, our results indicate that the waveform of axonal APs and the downstream Ca2+ signals are modulated by axonal GABAA receptors. PMID:24971996

  1. Therapeutic Potential of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Daniel; Lee, Chih-Hung L; Flood, Dorothy; Marger, Fabrice; Donnelly-Roberts, Diana

    2015-10-01

    Progress in the fields of neuroscience and molecular biology has identified the forebrain cholinergic system as being important in many higher order brain functions. Further analysis of the genes encoding the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) has highlighted, in particular, the role of α7 nAChRs in these higher order brain functions as evidenced by their peculiar physiologic and pharmacological properties. As this receptor has gained the attention of scientists from academia and industry, our knowledge of its roles in various brain and bodily functions has increased immensely. We have also seen the development of small molecules that have further refined our understanding of the roles of α7 nAChRs, and these molecules have begun to be tested in clinical trials for several indications. Although a large body of data has confirmed a role of α7 nAChRs in cognition, the translation of small molecules affecting α7 nAChRs into therapeutics has to date only progressed to the stage of testing in clinical trials. Notably, however, most recent human genetic and biochemical studies are further underscoring the crucial role of α7 nAChRs and associated genes in multiple organ systems and disease states. The aim of this review is to discuss our current knowledge of α7 nAChRs and their relevance as a target in specific functional systems and disease states. PMID:26419447

  2. Potentiation of glucocorticoid receptor transcriptional activity by sumoylation.

    PubMed

    Le Drean, Yves; Mincheneau, Nathalie; Le Goff, Pascale; Michel, Denis

    2002-09-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a transcription factor, subject to several types of posttranslational modifications including phosphorylation and ubiquitination. We showed that the GR is covalently modified by the small ubiquitin-related modifier-1 (SUMO-1) peptide in mammalian cells. We demonstrated that GR sumoylation is not dependent on the presence of the ligand and regulates the stability of the protein as well as its transcriptional activity. SUMO-1 overexpression induces dramatic GR degradation, abolished by proteasome inhibition. We also found that SUMO-1 stimulates the transactivation capacity of GRs to an extent largely exceeding those observed so far for other sumoylated transcription factors. Overexpression of SUMO-1 specifically enhances the ligand-induced transactivation of GR up to 8-fold. However, this hyperactivation occurs only in the context of a synergy between multiple molecules of GRs. It requires more than one receptor DNA-binding site in promoter and becomes more prominent as the number of sites increases. Interestingly, these observations may be related to the transcriptional properties of the synergy control region of GRs, which precisely contains two evolutionary conserved sumoylation sites. We propose a model in which SUMO-1 regulates the synergy control function of GR and serves as a unique signal for activation and destruction. PMID:12193561

  3. TRPV1: A Potential Drug Target for Treating Various Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Rafael; Sheth, Sandeep; Mukherjea, Debashree; Rybak, Leonard P.; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is an ion channel present on sensory neurons which is activated by heat, protons, capsaicin and a variety of endogenous lipids termed endovanilloids. As such, TRPV1 serves as a multimodal sensor of noxious stimuli which could trigger counteractive measures to avoid pain and injury. Activation of TRPV1 has been linked to chronic inflammatory pain conditions and peripheral neuropathy, as observed in diabetes. Expression of TRPV1 is also observed in non-neuronal sites such as the epithelium of bladder and lungs and in hair cells of the cochlea. At these sites, activation of TRPV1 has been implicated in the pathophysiology of diseases such as cystitis, asthma and hearing loss. Therefore, drugs which could modulate TRPV1 channel activity could be useful for the treatment of conditions ranging from chronic pain to hearing loss. This review describes the roles of TRPV1 in the normal physiology and pathophysiology of selected organs of the body and highlights how drugs targeting this channel could be important clinically. PMID:24861977

  4. Pharmacological hypothermia: a potential for future stroke therapy?

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaiyin; Khan, Hajra; Geng, Xiaokun; Zhang, Jun; Ding, Yuchuan

    2016-06-01

    Mild physical hypothermia after stroke has been associated with positive outcomes. Despite the well-studied beneficial effects of hypothermia in the treatment of stroke, lack of precise temperature control, intolerance for the patient, and immunosuppression are some of the reasons which limit its clinical translation. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia has been explored as a possible treatment option following stroke in animal models. Currently, there are eight classes of pharmacological agents/agonists with hypothermic effects affecting a multitude of systems including cannabinoid, opioid, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), neurotensin, thyroxine derivatives, dopamine, gas, and adenosine derivatives. Interestingly, drugs in the TRPV1, neurotensin, and thyroxine families have been shown to have effects in thermoregulatory control in decreasing the compensatory hypothermic response during cooling. This review will briefly present drugs in the eight classes by summarizing their proposed mechanisms of action as well as side effects. Reported thermoregulatory effects of the drugs will also be presented. This review offers the opinion that these agents may be useful in combination therapies with physical hypothermia to achieve faster and more stable temperature control in hypothermia. PMID:27320243

  5. Potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated transmission in striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Manfred J; Schulz, Jan M; Kelsch, Wolfgang; Oorschot, Dorothy E; Reynolds, John N J

    2015-01-01

    Pauses in the tonic firing of striatal cholinergic interneurons (CINs) emerge during reward-related learning in response to conditioning of a neutral cue. We have previously reported that augmenting the postsynaptic response to cortical afferents in CINs is coupled to the emergence of a cell-intrinsic afterhyperpolarization (AHP) underlying pauses in tonic activity. Here we investigated in a bihemispheric rat-brain slice preparation the mechanisms of synaptic plasticity of excitatory afferents to CINs and the association with changes in the AHP. We found that high frequency stimulation (HFS) of commissural corticostriatal afferents from the contralateral hemisphere induced a robust long-term depression (LTD) of postsynaptic potentials (PSP) in CINs. Depression of the PSP of smaller magnitude and duration was observed in response to HFS of the ipsilateral white matter or cerebral cortex. In Mg(2+)-free solution HFS induced NMDA receptor-dependent potentiation of the PSP, evident in both the maximal slope and amplitude of the PSP. The increase in maximal slope corroborates previous findings, and was blocked by antagonism of either D1-like dopamine receptors with SCH23390 or D2-like dopamine receptors with sulpiride during HFS in Mg(2+)-free solution. Potentiation of the slower PSP amplitude component was due to augmentation of the NMDA receptor-mediated potential as this was completely reversed on subsequent application of the NMDA receptor antagonist AP5. HFS similarly potentiated NMDA receptor currents isolated by blockade of AMPA/kainate receptors with CNQX. The plasticity-induced increase in the slow PSP component was directly associated with an increase in the subsequent AHP. Thus plasticity of cortical afferent synapses is ideally suited to influence the cue-induced firing dynamics of CINs, particularly through potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission. PMID:25914618

  6. Antibodies and Their Receptors: Different Potential Roles in Mucosal Defense

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Rachel E.; Vidarsson, Gestur

    2013-01-01

    Over recent years it has become increasingly apparent that mucosal antibodies are not only restricted to the IgM and IgA isotypes, but that also other isotypes and particularly IgG can be found in significant quantities at some mucosal surfaces, such as in the genital tract. Their role is more complex than traditionally believed with, among other things, the discovery of novel function of mucosal immunoglobulin receptors. A thorough knowledge in the source and function and mucosal immunoglobulins is particularly important in development of vaccines providing mucosal immunity, and also in the current climate of microbicide development, to combat major world health issues such as HIV. We present here a comprehensive review of human antibody mediated mucosal immunity. PMID:23882268

  7. Modulation of neurosteroid potentiation by protein kinases at synaptic- and extrasynaptic-type GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Joanna M.; Thomas, Philip; Smart, Trevor G.

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors are important for inhibition in the CNS where neurosteroids and protein kinases are potent endogenous modulators. Acting individually, these can either enhance or depress receptor function, dependent upon the type of neurosteroid or kinase and the receptor subunit combination. However, in vivo, these modulators probably act in concert to fine-tune GABAA receptor activity and thus inhibition, although how this is achieved remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between these modulators at synaptic-type α1β3γ2L and extrasynaptic-type α4β3δ GABAA receptors using electrophysiology. For α1β3γ2L, potentiation of GABA responses by tetrahydro-deoxycorticosterone was reduced after inhibiting protein kinase C, and enhanced following its activation, suggesting this kinase regulates neurosteroid modulation. In comparison, neurosteroid potentiation was reduced at α1β3S408A,S409Aγ2L receptors, and unaltered by PKC inhibitors or activators, indicating that phosphorylation of β3 subunits is important for regulating neurosteroid activity. To determine whether extrasynaptic-type GABAA receptors were similarly modulated, α4β3δ and α4β3S408A,S409Aδ receptors were investigated. Neurosteroid potentiation was reduced at both receptors by the kinase inhibitor staurosporine. By contrast, neurosteroid-mediated potentiation at α4S443Aβ3S408A,S409Aδ receptors was unaffected by protein kinase inhibition, strongly suggesting that phosphorylation of α4 and β3 subunits is required for regulating neurosteroid activity at extrasynaptic receptors. Western blot analyses revealed that neurosteroids increased phosphorylation of β3S408,S409 implying that a reciprocal pathway exists for neurosteroids to modulate phosphorylation of GABAA receptors. Overall, these findings provide important insight into the regulation of GABAA receptors in vivo, and into the mechanisms by which GABAergic inhibitory transmission may be simultaneously tuned by

  8. The Elastin Receptor Complex: A Unique Matricellular Receptor with High Anti-tumoral Potential

    PubMed Central

    Scandolera, Amandine; Odoul, Ludivine; Salesse, Stéphanie; Guillot, Alexandre; Blaise, Sébastien; Kawecki, Charlotte; Maurice, Pascal; El Btaouri, Hassan; Romier-Crouzet, Béatrice; Martiny, Laurent; Debelle, Laurent; Duca, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Elastin, one of the longest-lived proteins, confers elasticity to tissues with high mechanical constraints. During aging or pathophysiological conditions such as cancer progression, this insoluble polymer of tropoelastin undergoes an important degradation leading to the release of bioactive elastin-derived peptides (EDPs), named elastokines. EDP exhibit several biological functions able to drive tumor development by regulating cell proliferation, invasion, survival, angiogenesis, and matrix metalloproteinase expression in various tumor and stromal cells. Although, several receptors have been suggested to bind elastokines (αvβ3 and αvβ5 integrins, galectin-3), their main receptor remains the elastin receptor complex (ERC). This heterotrimer comprises a peripheral subunit, named elastin binding protein (EBP), associated to the protective protein/cathepsin A (PPCA). The latter is bound to a membrane-associated protein called Neuraminidase-1 (Neu-1). The pro-tumoral effects of elastokines have been linked to their binding onto EBP. Additionally, Neu-1 sialidase activity is essential for their signal transduction. Consistently, EDP-EBP interaction and Neu-1 activity emerge as original anti-tumoral targets. Interestingly, besides its direct involvement in cancer progression, the ERC also regulates diabetes outcome and thrombosis, an important risk factor for cancer development and a vascular process highly increased in patients suffering from cancer. In this review, we will describe ERC and elastokines involvement in cancer development suggesting that this unique receptor would be a promising therapeutic target. We will also discuss the pharmacological concepts aiming at blocking its pro-tumoral activities. Finally, its emerging role in cancer-associated complications and pathologies such as diabetes and thrombotic events will be also considered. PMID:26973522

  9. P2Y Receptors in Synaptic Transmission and Plasticity: Therapeutic Potential in Cognitive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Segundo J.; Gerevich, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    ATP released from neurons and astrocytes during neuronal activity or under pathophysiological circumstances is able to influence information flow in neuronal circuits by activation of ionotropic P2X and metabotropic P2Y receptors and subsequent modulation of cellular excitability, synaptic strength, and plasticity. In the present paper we review cellular and network effects of P2Y receptors in the brain. We show that P2Y receptors inhibit the release of neurotransmitters, modulate voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels, and differentially influence the induction of synaptic plasticity in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. The findings discussed here may explain how P2Y1 receptor activation during brain injury, hypoxia, inflammation, schizophrenia, or Alzheimer's disease leads to an impairment of cognitive processes. Hence, it is suggested that the blockade of P2Y1 receptors may have therapeutic potential against cognitive disturbances in these states. PMID:27069691

  10. The GABAA receptor is an FMRP target with therapeutic potential in fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Braat, Sien; D'Hulst, Charlotte; Heulens, Inge; De Rubeis, Silvia; Mientjes, Edwin; Nelson, David L; Willemsen, Rob; Bagni, Claudia; Van Dam, Debby; De Deyn, Peter P; Kooy, R Frank

    2015-01-01

    Previous research indicates that the GABAAergic system is involved in the pathophysiology of the fragile X syndrome, a frequent form of inherited intellectual disability and associated with autism spectrum disorder. However, the molecular mechanism underlying GABAAergic deficits has remained largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate reduced mRNA expression of GABAA receptor subunits in the cortex and cerebellum of young Fmr1 knockout mice. In addition, we show that the previously reported underexpression of specific subunits of the GABAA receptor can be corrected in YAC transgenic rescue mice, containing the full-length human FMR1 gene in an Fmr1 knockout background. Moreover, we demonstrate that FMRP directly binds several GABAA receptor mRNAs. Finally, positive allosteric modulation of GABAA receptors with the neurosteroid ganaxolone can modulate specific behaviors in Fmr1 knockout mice, emphasizing the therapeutic potential of the receptor. PMID:25790165

  11. The GABAA receptor is an FMRP target with therapeutic potential in fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Braat, Sien; D'Hulst, Charlotte; Heulens, Inge; De Rubeis, Silvia; Mientjes, Edwin; Nelson, David L; Willemsen, Rob; Bagni, Claudia; Van Dam, Debby; De Deyn, Peter P; Kooy, R Frank

    2015-01-01

    Previous research indicates that the GABAAergic system is involved in the pathophysiology of the fragile X syndrome, a frequent form of inherited intellectual disability and associated with autism spectrum disorder. However, the molecular mechanism underlying GABAAergic deficits has remained largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate reduced mRNA expression of GABAA receptor subunits in the cortex and cerebellum of young Fmr1 knockout mice. In addition, we show that the previously reported underexpression of specific subunits of the GABAA receptor can be corrected in YAC transgenic rescue mice, containing the full-length human FMR1 gene in an Fmr1 knockout background. Moreover, we demonstrate that FMRP directly binds several GABAA receptor mRNAs. Finally, positive allosteric modulation of GABAA receptors with the neurosteroid ganaxolone can modulate specific behaviors in Fmr1 knockout mice, emphasizing the therapeutic potential of the receptor. PMID:25790165

  12. Potential applications for sigma receptor ligands in cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    van Waarde, Aren; Rybczynska, Anna A; Ramakrishnan, Nisha K; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Elsinga, Philip H; Dierckx, Rudi A J O

    2015-10-01

    Sigma receptors (sigma-1 and sigma-2) represent two independent classes of proteins. Their endogenous ligands may include the hallucinogen N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and sphingolipid-derived amines which interact with sigma-1 receptors, besides steroid hormones (e.g., progesterone) which bind to both sigma receptor subpopulations. The sigma-1 receptor is a ligand-regulated molecular chaperone with various ion channels and G-protein-coupled membrane receptors as clients. The sigma-2 receptor was identified as the progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1). Although sigma receptors are over-expressed in tumors and up-regulated in rapidly dividing normal tissue, their ligands induce significant cell death only in tumor tissue. Sigma ligands may therefore be used to selectively eradicate tumors. Multiple mechanisms appear to underlie cell killing after administration of sigma ligands, and the signaling pathways are dependent both on the type of ligand and the type of tumor cell. Recent evidence suggests that the sigma-2 receptor is a potential tumor and serum biomarker for human lung cancer and an important target for inhibiting tumor invasion and cancer progression. Current radiochemical efforts are focused on the development of subtype-selective radioligands for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Right now, the mostpromising tracers are [18F]fluspidine and [18F]FTC-146 for sigma-1 receptors and [11C]RHM-1 and [18F]ISO-1 for the sigma-2 subtype. Nanoparticles coupled to sigma ligands have shown considerable potential for targeted delivery of antitumor drugs in animal models of cancer, but clinical studies exploring this strategy in cancer patients have not yet been reported. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. PMID:25173780

  13. Urate Crystal Induced Inflammation and Joint Pain Are Reduced in Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 Deficient Mice – Potential Role for Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 in Gout

    PubMed Central

    Moilanen, Lauri J.; Hämäläinen, Mari; Lehtimäki, Lauri; Nieminen, Riina M.; Moilanen, Eeva

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In gout, monosodium urate (MSU) crystals deposit intra-articularly and cause painful arthritis. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that Transient Receptor Poten-tial Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), an ion channel mediating nociceptive signals and neurogenic in-flammation, is involved in MSU crystal-induced responses in gout by utilizing three experi-mental murine models. Methods The effects of selective pharmacological inhibition (by HC-030031) and genetic depletion of TRPA1 were studied in MSU crystal-induced inflammation and pain by using 1) spontaneous weight-bearing test to assess MSU crystal-induced joint pain, 2) subcutaneous air-pouch model resembling joint inflammation to measure MSU crystal-induced cytokine production and inflammatory cell accumulation, and 3) MSU crystal-induced paw edema to assess acute vascular inflammatory responses and swelling. Results Intra-articularly injected MSU crystals provoked spontaneous weight shift off from the affected limb in wild type but not in TRPA1 knock-out mice referring alleviated joint pain in TRPA1 deficient animals. MSU crystal-induced inflammatory cell infiltration and accumulation of cytokines MCP-1, IL-6, IL-1beta, MPO, MIP-1alpha and MIP-2 into subcu-taneous air-pouch (resembling joint cavity) was attenuated in TRPA1 deficient mice and in mice treated with the selective TRPA1 inhibitor HC-030031 as compared to control animals. Further, HC-030031 treated and TRPA1 deficient mice developed tempered inflammatory edema when MSU crystals were injected into the paw. Conclusions TRPA1 mediates MSU crystal-induced inflammation and pain in experimental models supporting the role of TRPA1 as a potential mediator and a drug target in gout flare. PMID:25658427

  14. Neuroprotection by selective allosteric potentiators of the EP2 prostaglandin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jianxiong; Ganesh, Thota; Du, Yuhong; Thepchatri, Pahk; Rojas, Asheebo; Lewis, Iestyn; Kurtkaya, Serdar; Li, Lian; Qui, Min; Serrano, Geidy; Shaw, Renee; Sun, Aiming; Dingledine, Ray

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the Gαs-coupled EP2 receptor for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) promotes cell survival in several models of tissue damage. To advance understanding of EP2 functions, we designed experiments to develop allosteric potentiators of this key prostaglandin receptor. Screens of 292,000 compounds identified 93 that at 20 μM (i) potentiated the cAMP response to a low concentration of PGE2 by > 50%; (ii) had no effect on EP4 or β2 adrenergic receptors, the cAMP assay itself, or the parent cell line; and (iii) increased the potency of PGE2 on EP2 receptors at least 3-fold. In aqueous solution, the active compounds are largely present as nanoparticles that appear to serve as active reservoirs for bioactive monomer. From 94 compounds synthesized or purchased, based on the modification of one hit compound, the most active increased the potency of PGE2 on EP2 receptors 4- to 5-fold at 10 to 20 μM and showed substantial neuroprotection in an excitotoxicity model. These small molecules represent previously undescribed allosteric modulators of a PGE2 receptor. Our results strongly reinforce the notion that activation of EP2 receptors by endogenous PGE2 released in a cell-injury setting is neuroprotective. PMID:20080612

  15. Structure-Based Virtual Screening for Dopamine D2 Receptor Ligands as Potential Antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Silva, Andrea G; Loza, María I; Kolb, Peter; Castro, Marián; Poso, Antti

    2016-04-01

    Structure-based virtual screening using a D2 receptor homology model was performed to identify dopamine D2 receptor ligands as potential antipsychotics. From screening a library of 6.5 million compounds, 21 were selected and were subjected to experimental validation. From these 21 compounds tested, ten D2 ligands were identified (47.6 % success rate, among them D2 receptor antagonists, as expected) that have additional affinity for other receptors tested, in particular 5-HT2A receptors. The affinity (Ki values) of the compounds ranged from 58 nm to about 24 μm. Similarity and fragment analysis indicated a significant degree of structural novelty among the identified compounds. We found one D2 receptor antagonist that did not have a protonatable nitrogen atom, which is a key structural element of the classical D2 pharmacophore model necessary for interaction with the conserved Asp(3.32) residue. This compound exhibited greater than 20-fold binding selectivity for the D2 receptor over the D3 receptor. We provide additional evidence that the amide hydrogen atom of this compound forms a hydrogen bond with Asp(3.32), as determined by tests of its derivatives that cannot maintain this interaction. PMID:26990027

  16. Distribution of somatostatin receptors in normal and neoplastic human tissues: recent advances and potential relevance.

    PubMed Central

    Reubi, J. C.; Schaer, J. C.; Markwalder, R.; Waser, B.; Horisberger, U.; Laissue, J.

    1997-01-01

    This short review describes the localization of somatostatin receptors with in vitro receptor autoradiography techniques in several non-classical, normal human somatostatin target tissues as well as in selected human tumors. In addition to brain, gut and neuroendocrine localizations, somatostatin receptors are expressed in most lymphatic tissues, including gut-associated lymphatic tissue, spleen and thymus; in the cortical and medullary area of the kidney; in the stroma of the prostate and in the epithelial cells of the thyroid. Among human tumors, the extremely high density of somatostatin receptors in medulloblastomas should be stressed as well as the favorable prognostic role of the presence of somatostatin receptors in neuroblastomas. Moreover, several types of mesenchymal tumors have somatostatin receptors as well. The receptor subtypes expressed by distinct tumors may vary: Whereas medulloblastomas and neuroblastomas predominantly express sst2, prostate cancers express sst1 rather than sst2. A further emerging somatostatin target is represented by the peritumoral veins, also known to express sst2 receptors. The multiple somatostatin targets in normal and pathological human tissues represents the basis for potential diagnostic and clinical applications of somatostatin analogs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9825475

  17. Devil's Claw to Suppress Appetite—Ghrelin Receptor Modulation Potential of a Harpagophytum procumbens Root Extract

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Fuentes, Cristina; Theeuwes, Wessel F.; McMullen, Michael K.; McMullen, Anna K.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.; Schellekens, Harriët

    2014-01-01

    Ghrelin is a stomach-derived peptide that has been identified as the only circulating hunger hormone that exerts a potent orexigenic effect via activation of its receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R1a). Hence, the ghrelinergic system represents a promising target to treat obesity and obesity-related diseases. In this study we analysed the GHS-R1a receptor activating potential of Harpagophytum procumbens, popularly known as Devil's Claw, and its effect on food intake in vivo. H. procumbens is an important traditional medicinal plant from Southern Africa with potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. This plant has been also used as an appetite modulator but most evidences are anecdotal and to our knowledge, no clear scientific studies relating to appetite modulation have been done to this date. The ghrelin receptor activation potential of an extract derived from the dried tuberous roots of H. procumbens was analysed by calcium mobilization and receptor internalization assays in human embryonic kidney cells (Hek) stably expressing the GHS-R1a receptor. Food intake was investigated in male C57BL/6 mice following intraperitoneal administration of H. procumbens root extract in ad libitum and food restricted conditions. Exposure to H. procumbens extract demonstrated a significant increased cellular calcium influx but did not induce subsequent GHS-R1a receptor internalization, which is a characteristic for full receptor activation. A significant anorexigenic effect was observed in male C57BL/6 mice following peripheral administration of H. procumbens extract. We conclude that H. procumbens root extract is a potential novel source for potent anti-obesity bioactives. These results reinforce the promising potential of natural bioactives to be developed into functional foods with weight-loss and weight maintenance benefits. PMID:25068823

  18. A neurosteroid potentiation site can be moved among GABAA receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Bracamontes, John R; Li, Ping; Akk, Gustav; Steinbach, Joe Henry

    2012-11-15

    Endogenous neurosteroids are among the most potent and efficacious potentiators of activation of GABA(A) receptors. It has been proposed that a conserved glutamine residue in the first membrane-spanning region (TM1 region) of the α subunits is required for binding of potentiating neurosteroids. Mutations of this residue can reduce or remove the ability of steroids to potentiate function. However, it is not known whether potentiation requires that a steroid interact with the α subunit, or not. To examine this question we mutated the homologous residue in the β2 and γ2L subunits to glutamine, and found that these mutations could not confer potentiation by allopregnanolone (3α5αP) when expressed in receptors containing ineffective α1 subunits. However, potentiation is restored when the entire TM1 region from the α1 subunit is transferred to the β2 or γ2L subunit. Mutations in the TM1 region that affect potentiation when made in the α1 subunit have similar effects when made in transferred TM1 region. Further, the effects of 3α5αP on single-channel kinetics are similar for wild-type receptors and receptors with moved TM1 regions. These results support the idea that steroids bind in the transmembrane regions of the receptor. The observations are consistent with previous work indicating that neurosteroid potentiation is mediated by an action that affects the receptor as a whole, rather than an individual subunit or pair of subunits, and in addition demonstrate that the mechanism is independent of the nature of the subunit that interacts with steroid. PMID:22988137

  19. TRPV1 receptors augment basal synaptic transmission in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Saffarzadeh, F; Eslamizade, M J; Mousavi, S M M; Abraki, S B; Hadjighassem, M R; Gorji, A

    2016-02-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy in human and animals is attributed to alterations in brain function especially hippocampus formation. Changes in synaptic activity might be causally related to the alterations during epileptogenesis. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) as one of the non-selective ion channels has been shown to be involved in synaptic transmission. However, the potential role of TRPV1 receptors in synaptic function in the epileptic brain needs to be elucidated. In the present study, we used quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), western blotting, and immunohistochemistry to assess hippocampal TRPV1 mRNA expression, protein content, and distribution. Moreover, the effects of pharmacologic activation and inhibition of TRPV1 receptors on the slope of evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) were analyzed in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons, after 3months of pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). SE induced an upregulation of TRPV1 mRNA and protein content in the whole hippocampal extract, as well as its distribution in both CA1 and CA3 regions. Activation and inhibition of TRPV1 receptors (via capsaicin 1μM and capsazepine 10μM, respectively) did not influence basal synaptic transmission in CA1 and CA3 regions of control slices, however, capsaicin increased and capsazepine decreased synaptic transmission in both regions in tissues from epileptic animals. Taken together, these findings suggest that a higher expression of TRPV1 in the epileptic condition is accompanied by alterations in basal synaptic transmission. PMID:26621124

  20. Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) Channels and Cardiac Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Zhichao; Zhang, Yanhui; Xie, Jia; Jiang, Jianmin; Yue, Lixia

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is associated with most cardiac diseases. Fibrosis is an accumulation of excessive extracellular matrix proteins (ECM) synthesized by cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Fibroblasts are the most prevalent cell type in the heart, comprising 75% of cardiac cells. Myofibroblasts are hardly present in healthy normal heart tissue, but appear abundantly in diseased hearts. Cardiac fibroblasts are activated by a variety of pathological stimuli, such as myocardial injury, oxidative stress, mechanical stretch, and elevated autocrine-paracrine mediators, thereby undergoing proliferation, differentiation to myofibroblasts, and production of various cytokines and ECM proteins. A number of signaling pathways and bioactive molecules are involved and work in concert to activate fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in the fibrogenesis cascade. Fibroblasts and myofibroblasts are not only principal ECM producers, but also play a central role in fibrogenesis and myocardial remodeling in fibrotic heart disease. Thus, understanding the biological processes of cardiac fibroblasts will provide novel insights into the underlying mechanisms of fibrosis and provide potential targets for developing anti-fibrotic drugs. Recent studies demonstrate that Ca2+ signal is essential for fibroblast proliferation, differentiation, and ECM-protein production. This review focuses on the recent advances in understanding molecular mechanisms of Ca2+ signaling in cardiac fibrogenesis, and potential role of Ca2+-permeable channels, in particular, the transient potential (TRP) channels in fibrotic heart disease. TRP channels are highly expressed in cardiac fibroblasts. TRPM7 has been shown to be essential in TGFβ1 mediated fibrogenesis, and TRPC3 has been demonstrated to play an essential role in regulating fibroblast function. Thus, the Ca2+-permeable TRP channels may serve as potential novel targets for developing anti-fibrotic drugs. PMID:23432060

  1. A potential role for cannabinoid receptors in the therapeutic action of fenofibrate.

    PubMed

    Priestley, Richard S; Nickolls, Sarah A; Alexander, Stephen P H; Kendall, David A

    2015-04-01

    Cannabinoids are reported to have actions through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which led us to investigate PPAR agonists for activity at the cannabinoid receptors. Radio-ligand binding and functional assays were conducted using human recombinant cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) or cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptors, as well as the guinea pig isolated ileum, using the full agonist CP55940 as a positive control. The PPAR-α agonist fenofibrate exhibited submicromolar affinity for both receptors (pKi CB1, 6.3 ± 0.1; CB2, 7.7 ± 0.1). Functionally, fenofibrate acted as an agonist at the CB2 receptor (pEC50, 7.7 ± 0.1) and a partial agonist at the CB1 receptor, although with a decrease in functional response at higher concentrations, producing bell-shaped concentration-response curves. High concentrations of fenofibrate were able to increase the dissociation rate constant for [(3)H]-CP55940 at the CB1 receptor, (kfast without: 1.2 ± 0.2/min; with: 3.8 ± 0.1 × 10(-2)/min) and decrease the maximal response to CP55940 (Rmax, 86 ± 2%), which is consistent with a negative allosteric modulator. Fenofibrate also reduced electrically induced contractions in isolated guinea pig ileum via CB1 receptors (pEC50, 6.0 ± 0.4). Fenofibrate is thus identified as an example of a new class of cannabinoid receptor ligand and allosteric modulator, with the potential to interact therapeutically with cannabinoid receptors in addition to its primary PPAR target. PMID:25550466

  2. Determinants of zinc potentiation on the alpha4 subunit of neuronal nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Bernard; Mihalak, Karla B; Repicky, Sarah E; Everhart, Drew; Mederos, Ana H; Malhotra, Arun; Luetje, Charles W

    2006-01-01

    We have shown previously that the function of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors can be modulated by zinc. This modulation varies from potentiation to inhibition, depending on receptor subunit composition and zinc concentration, with the alpha4beta2 and alpha4beta4 receptors displaying the most dramatic potentiation. In this study, we used site-directed mutagenesis to identify glutamate 59 and histidine 162 on the rat alpha4 subunit as potential mediators of zinc potentiation. By modeling the extracellular domain of the receptor pentamer, we locate these residues to two subunit-subunit interfaces that alternate with the two acetylcholine-binding interfaces. Substitution of a cysteine at either position allows additional reduction of zinc potentiation upon treatment with the methanethiosulfonate reagents N-biotinoylaminoethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSEA-biotin) and [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] methanethiosulfonate. Mutagenesis and methanethiosulfonate treatment are most effective at position 162, and the presence of zinc hinders the reaction of MTSEA-biotin with the substituted cysteine at this position, suggesting that alpha4His162 participates in forming a coordination site for zinc. Mutagenesis and methanethiosulfonate treatment are less effective at position 59, suggesting that whereas alpha4Glu59 may be near the zinc coordination site, it may not be participating in coordination of the zinc ion. It is noteworthy that the position of alpha4Glu59 within the neuronal nAChR is identical to that of a residue that lines the benzodiazepine-binding site on GABA(A) receptors. We suggest that the zinc potentiation sites on neuronal nAChRs are structurally and functionally similar to the benzodiazepine-binding sites on GABA(A) receptors. PMID:16189299

  3. Potential combinatorial effects of recombinant atypical chemokine receptors in breast cancer cell invasion: A research perspective.

    PubMed

    Chew, Ai Lan; Tan, Wee Yee; Khoo, Boon Yin

    2013-03-01

    Apart from their major function in the coordination of leukocyte recruitment, chemokines, in cooperation with their receptors, have been implicated in the progression of various diseases including different types of cancer, affecting survival, proliferation and metastasis. A complex network of chemokines and receptors exists in the tumor microenvironment and affects tumor development in various ways where chemokines activate typical signalling pathways by binding to the respective receptors. The identification and characterization of a group of atypical chemokine receptors [D6, Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC), ChemoCentryx chemokine receptor (CCX-CKR) and CXCR7] which appear to use unique biochemical properties to regulate the biological activities of these chemokines, is useful in the effort to therapeutically manipulate chemokines in a broad spectrum of diseases in which these chemokines play a critical role. The aim of this review was to investigate the combinatorial effect of two reported atypical chemokine receptors, D6 and DARC, on breast cancer cell invasion to understand their role and therapeutic potential in cancer treatment. In this regard, findings of the present review should be confirmed via the construction of recombinant D6 and DARC clones as well as the expression of the respective recombinant proteins using the Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) expression system is to be performed in a future study in order to support findings of the current review. PMID:24648916

  4. Endocytosis and Trafficking of Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A: Potential Role of Short Sequence Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2015-01-01

    The targeted endocytosis and redistribution of transmembrane receptors among membrane-bound subcellular organelles are vital for their correct signaling and physiological functions. Membrane receptors committed for internalization and trafficking pathways are sorted into coated vesicles. Cardiac hormones, atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) bind to guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) and elicit the generation of intracellular second messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP), which lowers blood pressure and incidence of heart failure. After ligand binding, the receptor is rapidly internalized, sequestrated, and redistributed into intracellular locations. Thus, NPRA is considered a dynamic cellular macromolecule that traverses different subcellular locations through its lifetime. The utilization of pharmacologic and molecular perturbants has helped in delineating the pathways of endocytosis, trafficking, down-regulation, and degradation of membrane receptors in intact cells. This review describes the investigation of the mechanisms of internalization, trafficking, and redistribution of NPRA compared with other cell surface receptors from the plasma membrane into the cell interior. The roles of different short-signal peptide sequence motifs in the internalization and trafficking of other membrane receptors have been briefly reviewed and their potential significance in the internalization and trafficking of NPRA is discussed. PMID:26151885

  5. Pannexin1 channels dominate ATP release in the cochlea ensuring endocochlear potential and auditory receptor potential generation and hearing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin; Zhu, Yan; Liang, Chun; Chen, Jing; Zhao, Hong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Pannexin1 (Panx1) is a gap junction gene in vertebrates whose proteins mainly function as non-junctional channels on the cell surface. Panx1 channels can release ATP under physiological conditions and play critical roles in many physiological and pathological processes. Here, we report that Panx1 deficiency can reduce ATP release and endocochlear potential (EP) generation in the cochlea inducing hearing loss. Panx1 extensively expresses in the cochlea, including the cochlear lateral wall. We found that deletion of Panx1 in the cochlear lateral wall almost abolished ATP release under physiological conditions. Positive EP is a driving force for current through hair cells to produce auditory receptor potential. EP generation requires ATP. In the Panx1 deficient mice, EP and auditory receptor potential as measured by cochlear microphonics (CM) were significantly reduced. However, no apparent hair cell loss was detected. Moreover, defect of connexin hemichannels by deletion of connexin26 (Cx26) and Cx30, which are predominant connexin isoforms in the cochlea, did not reduce ATP release under physiological conditions. These data demonstrate that Panx1 channels dominate ATP release in the cochlea ensuring EP and auditory receptor potential generation and hearing. Panx1 deficiency can reduce ATP release and EP generation causing hearing loss. PMID:26035172

  6. β-Adrenergic receptor signaling and modulation of long-term potentiation in the mammalian hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, Thomas J.; Connor, Steven A.; Guglietta, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Encoding new information in the brain requires changes in synaptic strength. Neuromodulatory transmitters can facilitate synaptic plasticity by modifying the actions and expression of specific signaling cascades, transmitter receptors and their associated signaling complexes, genes, and effector proteins. One critical neuromodulator in the mammalian brain is norepinephrine (NE), which regulates multiple brain functions such as attention, perception, arousal, sleep, learning, and memory. The mammalian hippocampus receives noradrenergic innervation and hippocampal neurons express β-adrenergic receptors, which are known to play important roles in gating the induction of long-lasting forms of synaptic potentiation. These forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) are believed to importantly contribute to long-term storage of spatial and contextual memories in the brain. In this review, we highlight the contributions of noradrenergic signaling in general and β-adrenergic receptors in particular, toward modulating hippocampal LTP. We focus on the roles of NE and β-adrenergic receptors in altering the efficacies of specific signaling molecules such as NMDA and AMPA receptors, protein phosphatases, and translation initiation factors. Also, the roles of β-adrenergic receptors in regulating synaptic “tagging” and “capture” of LTP within synaptic networks of the hippocampus are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and cellular bases of noradrenergic signaling will enrich our grasp of how the brain makes new, enduring memories, and may shed light on credible strategies for improving mental health through treatment of specific disorders linked to perturbed memory processing and dysfunctional noradrenergic synaptic transmission. PMID:26286656

  7. Metabotropic glutamate receptors are required for the induction of long-term potentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, F.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    Recent observations have led to the suggestion that the metabotropic glutamate receptor may play a role in the induction or maintenance of long-term potentiation (LTP). However, experimental evidence supporting a role for this receptor in the induction of LTP is still inconclusive and controversial. Here we report that, in rat dorsolateral septal nucleus (DLSN) neurons, which have the highest density of metabotropic receptors and show functional responses, the induction of LTP is not blocked by the NMDA receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate, but is blocked by two putative metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, L-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid and L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate. Furthermore, superfusion of (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid, a selective metabotropic glutamate agonist, resulted in a long-lasting potentiation of synaptic transmission similar to that induced by tetanic stimuli. Our results demonstrated that activation of postsynaptic metabotropic receptors is both necessary and sufficient for the induction of LTP in the DLSN, and we suggest that such a mechanism may be important at other CNS synapses.

  8. Estrogen-dependent up-regulation of TRPA1 and TRPV1 receptor proteins in the rat endometrium.

    PubMed

    Pohóczky, Krisztina; Kun, József; Szalontai, Bálint; Szőke, Éva; Sághy, Éva; Payrits, Maja; Kajtár, Béla; Kovács, Krisztina; Környei, József László; Garai, János; Garami, András; Perkecz, Anikó; Czeglédi, Levente; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2016-02-01

    Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors expressed predominantly in sensory nerves are activated by inflammatory stimuli and mediate inflammation and pain. Although they have been shown in the human endometrium, their regulation and function are unknown. Therefore, we investigated their estrogen- and progesterone-dependent alterations in the rat endometrium in comparison with the estrogen-regulated inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Four-week-old (sexually immature) and four-month-old (sexually mature) female rats were treated with the non-selective estrogen receptor (ER) agonist diethylstilboestrol (DES), progesterone and their combination, or ovariectomized. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were performed to determine mRNA and protein expression levels respectively. Channel function was investigated with ratiometric [Ca(2+)]i measurement in cultured primary rat endometrial cells. Both TRP receptors and MIF were detected in the endometrium at mRNA and protein levels, and their localizations were similar. Immunostaining was observed in the immature epithelium, while stromal, glandular and epithelial positivity were observed in adults. Functionally active TRP receptor proteins were shown in endometrial cells by activation-induced calcium influx. In adults, Trpa1 and Trpv1 mRNA levels were significantly up-regulated after DES treatment. TRPA1 increased after every treatment, but TRPV1 remained unchanged following the combined treatment and ovariectomy. In immature rats, DES treatment resulted in increased mRNA expression of both channels and elevated TRPV1 immunopositivity. MIF expression changed in parallel with TRPA1/TRPV1 in most cases. DES up-regulated Trpa1, Trpv1 and Mif mRNA levels in endometrial cell cultures, but 17β-oestradiol having ERα-selective potency increased only the expression of Trpv1. We provide the first evidence for TRPA1/TRPV1 expression and their estrogen-induced up

  9. NPY receptors as potential targets for anti-obesity drug development

    PubMed Central

    Yulyaningsih, Ernie; Zhang, Lei; Herzog, Herbert; Sainsbury, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    The neuropeptide Y system has proven to be one of the most important regulators of feeding behaviour and energy homeostasis, thus presenting great potential as a therapeutic target for the treatment of disorders such as obesity and at the other extreme, anorexia. Due to the initial lack of pharmacological tools that are active in vivo, functions of the different Y receptors have been mainly studied in knockout and transgenic mouse models. However, over recent years various Y receptor selective peptidic and non-peptidic agonists and antagonists have been developed and tested. Their therapeutic potential in relation to treating obesity and other disorders of energy homeostasis is discussed in this review. PMID:21545413

  10. Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) Channel and Neurogenic Inflammation in Pathogenesis of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hang; Li, ShuZhuang

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, airway obstruction, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and it affects 300 million people worldwide. However, our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie asthma remains limited. Recent studies have suggested that transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), one of the transient receptor potential cation channels, may be involved in airway inflammation in asthma. The present review discusses the relationship between TRPA1 and neurogenic inflammation in asthma, hoping to enhance our understanding of the mechanisms of airway inflammation in asthma. PMID:27539812

  11. Positive selection moments identify potential functional residues in human olfactory receptors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, M. S.; Weisinger-Lewin, Y.; Lancet, D.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    Correlated mutation analysis and molecular models of olfactory receptors have provided evidence that residues in the transmembrane domains form a binding pocket for odor ligands. As an independent test of these results, we have calculated positive selection moments for the alpha-helical sixth transmembrane domain (TM6) of human olfactory receptors. The moments can be used to identify residues that have been preferentially affected by positive selection and are thus likely to interact with odor ligands. The results suggest that residue 622, which is commonly a serine or threonine, could form critical H-bonds. In some receptors a dual-serine subsite, formed by residues 622 and 625, could bind hydroxyl determinants on odor ligands. The potential importance of these residues is further supported by site-directed mutagenesis in the beta-adrenergic receptor. The findings should be of practical value for future physiological studies, binding assays, and site-directed mutagenesis.

  12. Role and therapeutic potential of G-protein coupled receptors in breast cancer progression and metastases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anukriti; Nunes, Jessica J.; Ateeq, Bushra

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large family of cell-surface receptors, which have recently emerged as key players in tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and metastasis. In this review, we discussed our current understanding of the many roles played by GPCRs in general, and particularly Angiotensin II type I receptor (AGTR1), a member of the seven-transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and its significance in breast cancer progression and metastasis. We have also discussed different strategies for targeting AGTR1, and its ligand Angiotension II (Ang II), which might unravel unique opportunities for breast cancer prevention and treatment. For example, AGTR1 blockers (ARBs) which are already in clinical use for treating hypertension, merit further investigation as a therapeutic strategy for AGTR1-positive cancer patients and may have the potential to prevent Ang II-AGTR1 signalling mediated cancer pathogenesis and metastases. PMID:25981295

  13. Role and therapeutic potential of G-protein coupled receptors in breast cancer progression and metastases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anukriti; Nunes, Jessica J; Ateeq, Bushra

    2015-09-15

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large family of cell-surface receptors, which have recently emerged as key players in tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and metastasis. In this review, we discussed our current understanding of the many roles played by GPCRs in general, and particularly Angiotensin II type I receptor (AGTR1), a member of the seven-transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and its significance in breast cancer progression and metastasis. We have also discussed different strategies for targeting AGTR1, and its ligand Angiotension II (Ang II), which might unravel unique opportunities for breast cancer prevention and treatment. For example, AGTR1 blockers (ARBs) which are already in clinical use for treating hypertension, merit further investigation as a therapeutic strategy for AGTR1-positive cancer patients and may have the potential to prevent Ang II-AGTR1 signalling mediated cancer pathogenesis and metastases. PMID:25981295

  14. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  15. Novel drugs that target the estrogen-related receptor alpha: their therapeutic potential in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    May, Felicity EB

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer continues to rise: 1.7 million women were diagnosed with and 521,000 women died from breast cancer in 2012. This review considers first current treatment options: surgery; radiotherapy; and systemic endocrine, anti-biological, and cytotoxic therapies. Clinical management includes prevention, early detection by screening, treatment with curative intent, management of chronic disease, and palliative control of advanced breast cancer. Next, the potential of novel drugs that target DNA repair, growth factor dependence, intracellular and intercellular signal transduction, and cell cycle are considered. Estrogen-related receptor alpha has attracted attention as a therapeutic target in triple-negative breast cancers with de novo resistance to, and in breast cancers with acquired resistance to, endocrine therapies such as antiestrogens and aromatase inhibitors. Estrogen-related receptor alpha is an orphan receptor and transcription factor. Its activity is regulated by coregulator proteins and posttranslational modification. It is an energy sensor that controls adaptation to energy demand and may facilitate glycolytic metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative respiration in breast cancer cells. Estrogen-related receptor alpha increases breast cancer cell migration, proliferation, and tumor development. It is expressed at high levels in estrogen receptor-negative tumors, and is proposed to activate estrogen-responsive genes in endocrine-resistant tumors. The structures and functions of the ligand-binding domains of estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen-related receptor alpha, their ability to bind estrogens, phytoestrogens, and synthetic ligands, and the effects of ligand agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists on biological activity, are evaluated. Synthetic ligands of estrogen-related receptor alpha have activity in preclinical models of metabolic disorders, diabetes, osteoporosis, and oncology. The clinical settings in which these novel

  16. Long-term potentiation alters the modulator pharmacology of AMPA-type glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bin; Brücher, Fernando A; Colgin, Laura Lee; Lynch, Gary

    2002-06-01

    Changes in the biophysical properties of AMPA-type glutamate receptors have been proposed to mediate the expression of long-term potentiation (LTP). The present study tested if, as predicted from this hypothesis, AMPA receptor modulators differentially affect potentiated versus control synaptic currents. Whole cell recordings were collected from CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices from adult rats. Within-neuron comparisons were made of the excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) elicited by two separate groups of Schaffer-collateral/commissural synapses. LTP was induced by theta burst stimulation in one set of inputs; cyclothiazide (CTZ), a drug that acts on the desensitization kinetics of AMPA receptors, was infused 30 min later. The decay time constants of the potentiated EPSCs prior to drug infusion were slightly, but significantly, shorter than those of control EPSCs. CTZ slowed the decay of the EPSCs, as reported in prior studies, and did so to a significantly greater degree in the potentiated synapses. Additionally, infusion of CTZ resulted in significantly greater effects on amplitude in potentiated pathways as compared with control pathways. The interaction between LTP and CTZ was also obtained in a separate set of experiments in which GABA receptor antagonists were used to block inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Additionally, there was no significant change in paired-pulse facilitation in the presence of CTZ, indicating that presynaptic effects of the drug were negligible. These findings provide new evidence that LTP modifies AMPA receptor kinetics. Candidates for the changes responsible for the observed effects of LTP were evaluated using a model of AMPA receptor kinetics; a simple increase in the channel opening rate provided the most satisfactory match with the LTP data. PMID:12037181

  17. Activity of new NOP receptor ligands in a rat peripheral mononeuropathy model: Potentiation of Morphine anti-allodynic activity by NOP receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Khroyan, Taline V.; Polgar, Willma E.; Orduna, Juan; Jiang, Faming; Olsen, Cris; Toll, Lawrence; Zaveri, Nurulain T.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of new NOP receptor agonists and antagonists in the rat chronic constriction injury model was investigated. Intraperitoneally administered NOP receptor agonist SR14150 and antagonists SR16430 and SR14148, had no effect on mechanical allodynia when given alone. The nonselective NOP/mu-opioid receptor agonist SR16435, however, produced an anti-allodynic response, similar to morphine and reversible by naloxone. Notably, co-administration of the NOP receptor antagonists potentiated the anti-allodynic activity of both morphine and SR16435. Increased levels of the NOP receptor are implicated in the reduced efficacy of morphine in neuropathic pain. Our results suggest the utility of NOP receptor antagonists for potentiating opioid efficacy in chronic pain. PMID:19285491

  18. Glucocorticoid Receptor as a Potential Target to Decrease Aromatase Expression and Inhibit Leydig Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Panza, Salvatore; Malivindi, Rocco; Chemi, Francesca; Rago, Vittoria; Giordano, Cinzia; Barone, Ines; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Gelsomino, Luca; Giordano, Francesca; Andò, Sebastiano; Catalano, Stefania

    2016-05-01

    Leydig cell tumors are the most frequent interstitial neoplasms of the testis with increased incidence in recent years. They are hormonally active and are considered one of the steroid-secreting tumors. Although usually benign, the malignant phenotype responds poorly to conventional chemotherapy or radiation, highlighting the need to identify new therapeutic targets for treatment. Here, we identified a novel glucocorticoid-mediated mechanism that controls cell growth in Leydig cell tumors. We found that a synthetic glucocorticoid receptor agonist, dexamethasone, reduces cell proliferation in rat Leydig tumor cells by decreasing the expression and the enzymatic activity of the estrogen-producing enzyme aromatase. This inhibitory effect relies on the ability of activated glucocorticoid receptor to regulate the aromatase gene transcriptional activity through the recruitment of nuclear receptor corepressor protein and silencing mediator of retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors to a newly identified putative glucocorticoid responsive element within the aromatase promoter II. Our in vivo studies reveal a reduction of tumor growth, after dexamethasone treatment, in animal xenografts. Tumors from dexamethasone-treated mice exhibit a decrease in the expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67 and the aromatase enzyme. Our data demonstrate that activated glucocorticoid receptor, decreasing aromatase expression, induces Leydig tumor regression both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that glucocorticoid receptor might be a potential target for the therapy of Leydig cell tumors. PMID:26968343

  19. GLUCOCORTICOID RECEPTOR REGULATION IN THE RAT EMBRYO: A POTENTIAL SITE FOR DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glucocorticoid receptor regulation in the rat embryo: a potential site for developmental toxicity?

    Ghosh B, Wood CR, Held GA, Abbott BD, Lau C.

    National Research Council, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711, USA.

  20. Enhanced AMPA Receptor Function Promotes Cerebellar Long-Term Depression Rather than Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Beugen, Boeke J.; Qiao, Xin; Simmons, Dana H.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Hansel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Ampakines are allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors that facilitate hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and learning, and have been considered for the treatment of cognition and memory deficits. Here, we show that the ampakine CX546 raises the amplitude and slows the decay time of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) at cerebellar…

  1. Structure-activity studies on the potentiation of benzodiazepine receptor binding by ethylenediamine analogues and derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, P. F.; Stone, T. W.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of ethylenediamine analogues on in vitro binding of [3H]-diazepam to crude cerebral cortical synaptosomal membranes in the rat was studied. Ethylenediamine significantly increased [3H]-diazepam binding to a maximum potentiation of 154% control (EC50 = 1.8 X 10(-4) M) and was the most active compound studied in terms of both potency and the maximum potentiation observed. Potentiation of [3H]-diazepam binding by ethylenediamine analogues is dependent on carbon-chain length, appears to require two terminal amino groups, and is not observed in the rigid analogues studied. Potentiation of [3H]-diazepam binding by ethylenediamine analogues is mediated largely by a change in receptor number and not receptor affinity. Results are discussed in terms of the possible nature of the ethylenediamine binding site. PMID:6317124

  2. Synthesis and characterization of iodobenzamide analogues: Potential D-2 dopamine receptor imaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, R.A.; Kung, H.F.; Kung, M.P.; Billings, J. )

    1990-01-01

    (S)-N-((1-Ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl)-2-hydroxy-3-iodo-6- methoxybenzamide (({sup 123}I)IBZM) is a central nervous system (CNS) D-2 dopamine receptor imaging agent. In order to investigate the versatility of this parent structure in specific dopamine receptor localization and the potential for developing new dopamine receptor imaging agents, a series of new iodinated benzamides with fused ring systems, naphthalene (INAP) and benzofuran (IBF), was synthesized and radiolabeled, and the in vivo and in vitro biological properties were characterized. The best analogue of IBZM is IBF (21). The specific binding of ({sup 125}I)IBF (21) with rat striatal tissue preparation was found to be saturable and displayed a Kd of 0.106 {plus minus} 0.015 nM. Competition data of various receptor ligands for ({sup 125}I)IBF (21) binding show the following rank order of potency: spiperone greater than IBF (21) greater than IBZM greater than (+)-butaclamol greater than ({plus minus})-ADTN,6,7 greater than ketanserin greater than SCH-23390 much greater than propranolol. The in vivo biodistribution results confirm that ({sup 125}I)IBF (21) concentrated in the striatal area after iv injection into rats. The study demonstrates that ({sup 123}I)IBF (21) is a potential agent for imaging CNS D-2 dopamine receptors.

  3. The 5-HT7 receptor as a potential target for treating drug and alcohol abuse.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Sheketha R; Hedlund, Peter B; Roberts, Amanda J; Sari, Youssef; Bell, Richard L; Engleman, Eric A

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol and drug abuse take a large toll on society and affected individuals. However, very few effective treatments are currently available to treat alcohol and drug addiction. Basic and clinical research has begun to provide some insights into the underlying neurobiological systems involved in the addiction process. Several neurotransmitter pathways have been implicated and distinct reward neurocircuitry have been proposed-including the mesocorticolimbic dopamine (MCL-DA) system and the extended amygdala. The serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmitter system is of particular interest and multiple 5-HT receptors are thought to play significant roles in alcohol and drug self-administration and the development of drug dependence. Among the 5-HT receptors, the 5-HT7 receptor is currently undergoing characterization as a potential target for the treatment of several psychiatric disorders. Although this receptor has received only limited research regarding addictive behaviors, aspects of its neuroanatomical, biochemical, physiological, pharmacological, and behavioral profiles suggest that it could play a key role in the addiction process. For instance, genomic studies in humans have suggested a link between variants in the gene encoding the 5-HT7 receptor and alcoholism. Recent behavioral testing using high-affinity antagonists in mice and preliminary tests with alcohol-preferring rats suggest that this receptor could mediate alcohol consumption and/or reinforcement and play a role in seeking/craving behavior. Interest in the development of new and more selective pharmacological agents for this receptor will aid in examining the 5-HT7 receptor as a novel target for treating addiction. PMID:25628528

  4. The 5-HT7 receptor as a potential target for treating drug and alcohol abuse

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Sheketha R.; Hedlund, Peter B.; Roberts, Amanda J.; Sari, Youssef; Bell, Richard L.; Engleman, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol and drug abuse take a large toll on society and affected individuals. However, very few effective treatments are currently available to treat alcohol and drug addiction. Basic and clinical research has begun to provide some insights into the underlying neurobiological systems involved in the addiction process. Several neurotransmitter pathways have been implicated and distinct reward neurocircuitry have been proposed—including the mesocorticolimbic dopamine (MCL-DA) system and the extended amygdala. The serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmitter system is of particular interest and multiple 5-HT receptors are thought to play significant roles in alcohol and drug self-administration and the development of drug dependence. Among the 5-HT receptors, the 5-HT7 receptor is currently undergoing characterization as a potential target for the treatment of several psychiatric disorders. Although this receptor has received only limited research regarding addictive behaviors, aspects of its neuroanatomical, biochemical, physiological, pharmacological, and behavioral profiles suggest that it could play a key role in the addiction process. For instance, genomic studies in humans have suggested a link between variants in the gene encoding the 5-HT7 receptor and alcoholism. Recent behavioral testing using high-affinity antagonists in mice and preliminary tests with alcohol-preferring rats suggest that this receptor could mediate alcohol consumption and/or reinforcement and play a role in seeking/craving behavior. Interest in the development of new and more selective pharmacological agents for this receptor will aid in examining the 5-HT7 receptor as a novel target for treating addiction. PMID:25628528

  5. CPEB3 Deficiency Elevates TRPV1 Expression in Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons to Potentiate Thermosensation.

    PubMed

    Fong, Sitt Wai; Lin, Hsiu-Chen; Wu, Meng-Fang; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Yi-Shuian

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein 3 (CPEB3) is a sequence-specific RNA-binding protein that downregulates translation of multiple plasticity-related proteins (PRPs) at the glutamatergic synapses. Activity-induced synthesis of PRPs maintains long-lasting synaptic changes that are critical for memory consolidation and chronic pain manifestation. CPEB3-knockout (KO) mice show aberrant hippocampus-related plasticity and memory, so we investigated whether CPEB3 might have a role in nociception-associated plasticity. CPEB3 is widely expressed in the brain and peripheral afferent sensory neurons. CPEB3-KO mice with normal mechanosensation showed hypersensitivity to noxious heat. In the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain model, CPEB3-KO animals showed normal thermal hyperalgesia and transiently enhanced mechanical hyperalgesia. Translation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) RNA was suppressed by CPEB3 in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), whereas CFA-induced inflammation reversed this inhibition. Moreover, CPEB3/TRPV1 double-KO mice behaved like TRPV1-KO mice, with severely impaired thermosensation and thermal hyperalgesia. An enhanced thermal response was recapitulated in non-inflamed but not inflamed conditional-KO mice, with cpeb3 gene ablated mostly but not completely, in small-diameter nociceptive DRG neurons. CPEB3-regulated translation of TRPV1 RNA may play a role in fine-tuning thermal sensitivity of nociceptors. PMID:26915043

  6. CPEB3 Deficiency Elevates TRPV1 Expression in Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons to Potentiate Thermosensation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Yi-Shuian

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein 3 (CPEB3) is a sequence-specific RNA-binding protein that downregulates translation of multiple plasticity-related proteins (PRPs) at the glutamatergic synapses. Activity-induced synthesis of PRPs maintains long-lasting synaptic changes that are critical for memory consolidation and chronic pain manifestation. CPEB3-knockout (KO) mice show aberrant hippocampus-related plasticity and memory, so we investigated whether CPEB3 might have a role in nociception-associated plasticity. CPEB3 is widely expressed in the brain and peripheral afferent sensory neurons. CPEB3-KO mice with normal mechanosensation showed hypersensitivity to noxious heat. In the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain model, CPEB3-KO animals showed normal thermal hyperalgesia and transiently enhanced mechanical hyperalgesia. Translation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) RNA was suppressed by CPEB3 in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), whereas CFA-induced inflammation reversed this inhibition. Moreover, CPEB3/TRPV1 double-KO mice behaved like TRPV1-KO mice, with severely impaired thermosensation and thermal hyperalgesia. An enhanced thermal response was recapitulated in non-inflamed but not inflamed conditional-KO mice, with cpeb3 gene ablated mostly but not completely, in small-diameter nociceptive DRG neurons. CPEB3-regulated translation of TRPV1 RNA may play a role in fine-tuning thermal sensitivity of nociceptors. PMID:26915043

  7. Structure-activity relationships of vanilloid receptor agonists for arteriolar TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Czikora, Á; Lizanecz, E; Bakó, P; Rutkai, I; Ruzsnavszky, F; Magyar, J; Pórszász, R; Kark, T; Facskó, A; Papp, Z; Édes, I; Tóth, A

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) plays a role in the activation of sensory neurons by various painful stimuli and is a therapeutic target. However, functional TRPV1 that affect microvascular diameter are also expressed in peripheral arteries and we attempted to characterize this receptor. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Sensory TRPV1 activation was measured in rats by use of an eye wiping assay. Arteriolar TRPV1-mediated smooth muscle specific responses (arteriolar diameter, changes in intracellular Ca2+) were determined in isolated, pressurized skeletal muscle arterioles obtained from the rat and wild-type or TRPV1−/− mice and in canine isolated smooth muscle cells. The vascular pharmacology of the TRPV1 agonists (potency, efficacy, kinetics of action and receptor desensitization) was determined in rat isolated skeletal muscle arteries. KEY RESULTS Capsaicin evoked a constrictor response in isolated arteries similar to that mediated by noradrenaline, this was absent in arteries from TRPV1 knockout mice and competitively inhibited by TRPV1 antagonist AMG9810. Capsaicin increased intracellular Ca2+ in the arteriolar wall and in isolated smooth muscle cells. The TRPV1 agonists evoked similar vascular constrictions (MSK-195 and JYL-79) or were without effect (resiniferatoxin and JYL-273), although all increased the number of responses (sensory activation) in the eye wiping assay. Maximal doses of all agonists induced complete desensitization (tachyphylaxis) of arteriolar TRPV1 (with the exception of capsaicin). Responses to the partial agonist JYL-1511 suggested 10% TRPV1 activation is sufficient to evoke vascular tachyphylaxis without sensory activation. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Arteriolar TRPV1 have different pharmacological properties from those located on sensory neurons in the rat. PMID:21883148

  8. The Role of Steroid Receptor Coactivators in Hormone Dependent Cancers and Their Potential as Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Lonard, David M; O'Malley, Bert W

    2016-08-01

    Steroid receptor coactivator (SRC) family members (SRC-1, SRC-2, SRC-3) interact with nuclear receptors (NRs) and many transcription factors to enhance target gene transcription. Deregulation of SRCs is widely implicated in NR mediated diseases, especially hormone dependent cancers. By integrating steroid hormone signaling and growth factor pathways, SRC proteins exert multiple modes of oncogenic regulation in cancers and represent emerging targets for cancer therapeutics. Recent work has identified SRC-targeting agents that show promise in blocking tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, and have the potential to function as powerful and broadly encompassing treatments for different cancers. PMID:27125199

  9. Estrogen Receptors Alpha (ERα) and Beta (ERβ): Subtype-Selective Ligands and Clinical Potential

    PubMed Central

    Paterni, Ilaria; Granchi, Carlotta; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Minutolo, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptors alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ) are nuclear transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of many complex physiological processes in humans. Modulation of these receptors by prospective therapeutic agents is currently being considered for prevention and treatment of a wide variety of pathological conditions, such as, cancer, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, neurodegeneration, inflammation, and osteoporosis. This review provides an overview and update of compounds that have been recently reported as modulators of ERs, with a particular focus on their potential clinical applications. PMID:24971815

  10. Sigma receptors: potential targets for a new class of antidepressant drug

    PubMed Central

    Fishback, James A.; Robson, Matthew J.; Xu, Yan-Tong; Matsumoto, Rae R.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the widespread and devastating impact of depression on society, our current understanding of its pathogenesis is limited. Likewise, existing treatments are inadequate, providing relief to only a subset of people suffering from depression. The search for more effective antidepressant drugs includes the investigation of new molecular targets. Among them, current data suggests that sigma receptors are involved in multiple processes effecting antidepressant-like actions in vivo and in vitro. This review summarizes accumulated evidence supporting a role for sigma receptors in antidepressant effects and provides a conceptual framework for delineating their potential roles over the course of antidepressant treatment. PMID:20438757

  11. In Vivo Quantification of Tumor Receptor Binding Potential with Dual-Reporter Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Sexton, Kristian J.; Hextrum, Shannon K.; Yang, Harold H.; Klubben, W. Spencer; Gunn, Jason R.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Receptor availability represents a key component of current cancer management. However, no approaches have been adopted to do this clinically, and the current standard of care is invasive tissue biopsy. A dual-reporter methodology capable of quantifying available receptor binding potential of tumors in vivo within a clinically relevant time scale is presented. Procedures To test the methodology, a fluorescence imaging-based adaptation was validated against ex vivo and in vitro measures of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) binding potential in four tumor lines in mice, each line expected to express a different level of EGFR. Results A strong correlation was observed between in vivo and ex vivo measures of binding potential for all tumor lines (r=0.99, p<0.01, slope=1.80±0.48, and intercept=−0.58±0.84) and between in vivo and in vitro for the three lines expressing the least amount of EGFR (r=0.99, p<0.01, slope=0.64±0.32, and intercept=0.47±0.51). Conclusions By providing a fast and robust measure of receptor density in tumors, the presented methodology has powerful implications for improving choices in cancer intervention, evaluation, and monitoring, and can be scaled to the clinic with an imaging modality like SPECT. PMID:22203241

  12. Overview and potential unifying themes of the atypical chemokine receptor family.

    PubMed

    Vacchini, Alessandro; Locati, Massimo; Borroni, Elena Monica

    2016-06-01

    Chemokines modulate immune responses through their ability to orchestrate the migration of target cells. Chemokines directly induce cell migration through a distinct set of 7 transmembrane domain G protein-coupled receptors but are also recognized by a small subfamily of atypical chemokine receptors, characterized by their inability to support chemotactic activity. Atypical chemokine receptors are now emerging as crucial regulatory components of chemokine networks in a wide range of physiologic and pathologic contexts. Although a new nomenclature has been approved recently to reflect their functional distinction from their conventional counterparts, a systematic view of this subfamily is still missing. This review discusses their biochemical and immunologic properties to identify potential unifying themes in this emerging family. PMID:26740381

  13. Therapeutic potential of targeting group III metabotropic glutamate receptors in the treatment of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Duty, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Current drugs used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), for example, L-DOPA and dopamine agonists, are very effective at reversing the motor symptoms of the disease. However, they do little to combat the underlying degeneration of dopaminergic neurones in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and their long-term use is associated with the appearance of adverse effects such as L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Much emphasis has therefore been placed on finding alternative non-dopaminergic drugs that may circumvent some or all of these problems. Group III metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors were first identified in the basal ganglia a decade ago. One or more of these receptors (mGlu4, mGlu7 or mGlu8) is found on pre-synaptic terminals of basal ganglia pathways whose overactivity is implicated not only in the generation of motor symptoms in PD, but also in driving the progressive SNc degeneration. The finding that drugs which activate group III mGlu receptors can inhibit transmission across these overactive synapses has lead to the proposal that group III mGlu receptors are promising targets for drug discovery in PD. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the role and target potential of group III mGlu receptors in the basal ganglia. Overwhelming evidence obtained from in vitro studies and animal models of PD supports group III mGlu receptors as potentially important drug targets for providing both symptom relief and neuroprotection in PD. PMID:20735415

  14. Evidence that receptors mediating central synaptic potentials extend beyond the postsynaptic density.

    PubMed Central

    Faber, D S; Funch, P G; Korn, H

    1985-01-01

    Physiological recordings and computer simulations of unitary inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in the Mauthner cell of the goldfish central nervous system have been used to estimate the expected size of the postsynaptic receptor matrix at individual junctions. Simultaneous pre- and postsynaptic recordings were used to determine the kinetic parameters of the quantal responses under normal conditions and in the presence of strychnine, a competitive antagonist of glycine, which is the putative transmitter at these synapses. Calculations indicate that if the postsynaptic density, which has a radius of 0.1 micron, were to accommodate the population of channels estimated to be opened during a quantal response, the glycine binding site density in that region would be unrealistically high. Computer simulation of the quantal responses included transmitter diffusion, transmitter-receptor interactions, and channel activation under conditions including both normal and lowered binding site densities, the latter corresponding to the experimental data obtained with strychnine. The data indicate that the synaptic receptors involved in generating unitary responses are widely distributed to include regions located outside the junctional area, which directly faces the presynaptic release sites. We further suggest that the receptor matrix is surrounded by a restricted diffusional space; this geometrical organization may underlie the finding that response rise times are relatively independent of receptor binding site densities. PMID:2582417

  15. Cross-species sensitivity to a novel androgen receptor agonist of potential environmental concern, spironolactone.

    PubMed

    LaLone, Carlie A; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Cavallin, Jenna E; Kahl, Michael D; Durhan, Elizabeth J; Makynen, Elizabeth A; Jensen, Kathleen M; Stevens, Kyle E; Severson, Megan N; Blanksma, Chad A; Flynn, Kevin M; Hartig, Philip C; Woodard, Jonne S; Berninger, Jason P; Norberg-King, Teresa J; Johnson, Rodney D; Ankley, Gerald T

    2013-11-01

    Spironolactone is a pharmaceutical that in humans is used to treat conditions like hirsutism, various dermatologic afflictions, and female-pattern hair loss through antagonism of the androgen receptor. Although not routinely monitored in the environment, spironolactone has been detected downstream of a pharmaceutical manufacturer, indicating a potential for exposure of aquatic species. Furthermore, spironolactone has been reported to cause masculinization of female western mosquitofish, a response indicative of androgen receptor activation. Predictive methods to identify homologous proteins to the human and western mosquitofish androgen receptor suggest that vertebrates would be more susceptible to adverse effects mediated by chemicals like spironolactone that target the androgen receptor compared with invertebrate species that lack a relevant homolog. In addition, an adverse outcome pathway previously developed for activation of the androgen receptor suggests that androgen mimics can lead to reproductive toxicity in fish. To assess this, 21-d reproduction studies were conducted with 2 fish species, fathead minnow and Japanese medaka, and the invertebrate Daphnia magna. Spironolactone significantly reduced the fecundity of medaka and fathead minnows at 50 μg/L, whereas daphnia reproduction was not affected by concentrations as large as 500 μg/L. Phenotypic masculinization of females of both fish species was observed at 5 μg/L as evidenced by formation of tubercles in fathead minnows and papillary processes in Japanese medaka. Effects in fish occurred at concentrations below those reported in the environment. These results demonstrate how a priori knowledge of an adverse outcome pathway and the conservation of a key molecular target across vertebrates can be utilized to identify potential chemicals of concern in terms of monitoring and highlight potentially sensitive species and endpoints for testing. PMID:23881739

  16. The D1 family dopamine receptor, DopR, potentiates hind leg grooming behavior in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Pitmon, E; Stephens, G; Parkhurst, S J; Wolf, F W; Kehne, G; Taylor, M; Lebestky, T

    2016-03-01

    Drosophila groom away debris and pathogens from the body using their legs in a stereotyped sequence of innate motor behaviors. Here, we investigated one aspect of the grooming repertoire by characterizing the D1 family dopamine receptor, DopR. Removal of DopR results in decreased hind leg grooming, as substantiated by quantitation of dye remaining on mutant and RNAi animals vs. controls and direct scoring of behavioral events. These data are also supported by pharmacological results that D1 receptor agonists fail to potentiate grooming behaviors in headless DopR flies. DopR protein is broadly expressed in the neuropil of the thoracic ganglion and overlaps with TH-positive dopaminergic neurons. Broad neuronal expression of dopamine receptor in mutant animals restored normal grooming behaviors. These data provide evidence for the role of DopR in potentiating hind leg grooming behaviors in the thoracic ganglion of adult Drosophila. This is a remarkable juxtaposition to the considerable role of D1 family dopamine receptors in rodent grooming, and future investigations of evolutionary relationships of circuitry may be warranted. PMID:26749475

  17. Loss of inhibition by brain natriuretic peptide over P2X3 receptors contributes to enhanced spike firing of trigeminal ganglion neurons in a mouse model of familial hemiplegic migraine type-1.

    PubMed

    Marchenkova, Anna; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Nistri, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Purinergic P2X3 receptors (P2X3Rs) play an important role in pain pathologies, including migraine. In trigeminal neurons, P2X3Rs are constitutively downregulated by endogenous brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). In a mouse knock-in (KI) model of familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 with upregulated calcium CaV2.1 channel function, trigeminal neurons exhibit hyperexcitability with gain-of-function of P2X3Rs and their deficient BNP-mediated inhibition. We studied whether the absent BNP-induced control over P2X3Rs activity in KI cultures may be functionally expressed in altered firing activity of KI trigeminal neurons. Patch-clamp experiments investigated the excitability of wild-type and KI trigeminal neurons induced by either current or agonists for P2X3Rs or transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptors. Consistent with the constitutive inhibition of P2X3Rs by BNP, sustained pharmacological block of BNP receptors selectively enhanced P2X3R-mediated excitability of wild-type neurons without affecting firing evoked by the other protocols. This effect included increased number of action potentials, lower spike threshold and shift of the firing pattern distribution toward higher spiking activity. Thus, inactivation of BNP signaling transformed the wild-type excitability phenotype into the one typical for KI. BNP receptor block did not influence excitability of KI neurons in accordance with the lack of BNP-induced P2X3R modulation. Our study suggests that, in wild-type trigeminal neurons, negative control over P2X3Rs by the BNP pathway is translated into tonic suppression of P2X3Rs-mediated excitability. Lack of this inhibition in KI cultures results in a hyperexcitability phenotype and might contribute to facilitated trigeminal pain transduction relevant for migraine. PMID:27346147

  18. Midazolam inhibits long-term potentiation through modulation of GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Evans, M S; Viola-McCabe, K E

    1996-03-01

    Benzodiazepine drugs (BZ) are used for anxiety, insomnia, and seizures. They worsen memory, especially in large doses, but the mechanism of this action is uncertain. In micromolar concentrations, benzodiazepines have been shown to reduce long-term potentiation (LTP), which could be a cellular basis for their amnesic action. We have found that the LTP-inhibiting effects of BZ occur in the nanomolar concentrations attained in humans, and that this effect occurs through modulation of GABAA receptor function. We recorded extracellular synaptic input/output (I/O) curves for population spikes (PS) and EPSPs in rat hippocampal slices before and after induction of LTP. LTP increased maximal PS and EPSPs and shifted I/O curves for PS and EPSPs to the left, reflecting increased synaptic responsiveness after LTP. Curves relating EPSPs to PS were also shifted, so that after LTP larger PS were elicited for the same size EPSP (E-S potentiation). Midazolam (0.5 microM) markedly inhibited the left-shift in PS I/O curves due to E-S potentiation but did not significantly affect other parameters. 8-Phenyltheophylline (10 microM), an adenosine receptor antagonist, did not prevent midazolam inhibition of LTP. Bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, caused a dose-dependent antagonism of midazolam's LTP inhibition. Our results suggest that benzodiazepines reduce LTP primarily through reduction of E-S potentiation, and that this effect occurs through modulation of GABAA receptor function. This could in part account for the ability of benzodiazepines to disturb new memory formation. PMID:8783210

  19. Multiscale design of coarse-grained elastic network-based potentials for the μ opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Fossépré, Mathieu; Leherte, Laurence; Laaksonen, Aatto; Vercauteren, Daniel P

    2016-09-01

    Despite progress in computer modeling, most biological processes are still out of reach when using all-atom (AA) models. Coarse-grained (CG) models allow classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to be accelerated. Although simplification of spatial resolution at different levels is often investigated, simplification of the CG potential in itself has been less common. CG potentials are often similar to AA potentials. In this work, we consider the design and reliability of purely mechanical CG models of the μ opioid receptor (μOR), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). In this sense, CG force fields (FF) consist of a set of holonomic constraints guided by an elastic network model (ENM). Even though ENMs are used widely to perform normal mode analysis (NMA), they are not often implemented as a single FF in the context of MD simulations. In this work, various ENM-like potentials were investigated by varying their force constant schemes and connectivity patterns. A method was established to systematically parameterize ENM-like potentials at different spatial resolutions by using AA data. To do so, new descriptors were introduced. The choice of conformation descriptors that also include flexibility information is important for a reliable parameterization of ENMs with different degrees of sensitivity. Hence, ENM-like potentials, with specific parameters, can be sufficient to accurately reproduce AA MD simulations of μOR at highly coarse-grained resolutions. Therefore, the essence of the flexibility properties of μOR can be captured with simple models at different CG spatial resolutions, opening the way to mechanical approaches to understanding GPCR functions. Graphical Abstract All atom structure, residue interaction network and coarse-grained elastic network models of the μ opioid receptor (μOR). PMID:27566318

  20. The Role of Canonical Transient Receptor Potential Channels in Seizure and Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fang; Phelan, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels are a family of polymodal cation channels with some degree of Ca2+ permeability. Although initially thought to be channels mediating store-operated Ca2+ influx, TRPC channels can be activated by stimulation of Gq-coupled G-protein coupled receptors, or by an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration. Thus, activation of TRPC channels could be a common downstream event of many signaling pathways that contribute to seizure and excitotoxicity, such as N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx, or metabotropic glutamate receptor activation. Recent studies with genetic ablation of various TRPC family members have demonstrated that TRPC channels, in particular heteromeric TRPC1/4 channels and homomeric TRPC5 channels, play a critical role in both pilocarpine-induced acute seizures and neuronal cell death. However, exact underlying mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated, and selective TRPC modulators and antibodies with better specificity are urgently needed for future research. PMID:24722470

  1. Innate immune receptors in heart failure: Side effect or potential therapeutic target?

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Katharina B; Felix, Stephan B; Riad, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in western countries and occasions major expenses for public health systems. Although optimal medical treatment is widely available according to current guidelines, the prognosis of patients with HF is still poor. Despite the etiology of the disease, increased systemic or cardiac activation of the innate immune system is well documented in several types of HF. In some cases there is evidence of an association between innate immune activation and clinical outcome of patients with this disease. However, the few large trials conducted with the use of anti-inflammatory medication in HF have not revealed its benefits. Thus, greater understanding of the relationship between alteration in the immune system and development and progression of HF is urgently necessary: prior to designing therapeutic interventions that target pathological inflammatory processes in preventing harmful cardiac effects of immune modulatory therapy. In this regard, relatively recently discovered receptors of the innate immune system, i.e., namely toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nod-like receptors (NLRs)-are the focus of intense cardiovascular research. These receptors are main up-stream regulators of cytokine activation. This review will focus on current knowledge of the role of TLRs and NLRs, as well as on downstream cytokine activation, and will discuss potential therapeutic implications. PMID:25228958

  2. MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors: ligands, models, oligomers, and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Zlotos, Darius P; Jockers, Ralf; Cecon, Erika; Rivara, Silvia; Witt-Enderby, Paula A

    2014-04-24

    Numerous physiological functions of the pineal gland hormone melatonin are mediated via activation of two G-protein-coupled receptors, MT1 and MT2. The melatonergic drugs on the market, ramelteon and agomelatine, as well as the most advanced drug candidates under clinical evaluation, tasimelteon and TIK-301, are high-affinity nonselective MT1/MT2 agonists. A great number of MT2-selective ligands and, more recently, several MT1-selective agents have been reported to date. Herein, we review recent advances in the field focusing on high-affinity agonists and antagonists and those displaying selectivity toward MT1 and MT2 receptors. Moreover, the existing models of MT1 and MT2 receptors as well as the current status in the emerging field of melatonin receptor oligomerization are critically discussed. In addition to the already existing indications, such as insomnia, circadian sleep disorders, and depression, new potential therapeutic applications of melatonergic ligands including cardiovascular regulation, appetite control, tumor growth inhibition, and neurodegenerative diseases are presented. PMID:24228714

  3. Potential of GRID2 receptor gene for preventing TNF-induced neurodegeneration in autism.

    PubMed

    Kalkan, Zeynep; Durasi, İlknur Melis; Sezerman, Ugur; Atasever-Arslan, Belkis

    2016-05-01

    Autism is one of the most common subtypes of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Recent studies suggested a relationship between immune-dependent coding genes and ASD, indicating that long term neuroimmunological anomalies affect brain development and synaptic transmission among neural networks. Furthermore, various studies focused on biomarker potential of TNF-α in autism. Ionotropic receptors are also studied as potential marker for autism since altered gene expression levels are observed in autistic patients. GRID2 is a candidate ionotropic receptor which is involved glutamate transfer. In this study, to propose TNF-α dependent cellular processes involved in autism aetiology in relation to GRID2 we performed a bioinformatic network analysis and identified potential pathways and genes that are involved in TNF-α induced changes at GRID2 receptor levels. As a result, we ascertained the GRID2 receptor gene as a candidate gene and further studied the association between GRID2 expression levels and TNF-induced neurodegeneration. Our bioinformatic analyses and experimental results revealed that TNF-α regulates GRID2 gene expression by activating Cdc42 and GOPC genes. Moreover, increased TNF-α levels leads to increase of caspase-3 protein levels triggering neuronal apoptosis leading to neuronal deficiency, which is one of the major symptoms of autism. The study is the first to show the role of TNF-α in regulation of GRID2 gene expression and its signalling pathway. As a result, GRID2 gene can be a suppressor in TNF-induced neurodegeneration which may help to understand the main factors leading to autism. PMID:27019035

  4. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 activation constricts the human bronchus via the release of cysteinyl leukotrienes.

    PubMed

    McAlexander, M Allen; Luttmann, Mark A; Hunsberger, Gerald E; Undem, Bradley J

    2014-04-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated that the ion channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is functionally expressed in airway smooth muscle cells and that TRPV4 single nucleotide polymorphisms are associated with airflow obstruction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We sought to use isometric tension measurements in ex vivo airways to determine whether short-term pharmacological activation of TRPV4 with the potent agonist GSK1016790 [N-((1S)-1-{[4-((2S)-2-{[(2,4-dichlorophenyl)sulfonyl]amino}-3-hydroxypropanoyl)-1-piperazinyl]carbonyl}-3-methylbutyl)-1-benzothiophene-2-carboxamide] would constrict human bronchial tissue. As predicted, transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 activation in the human airway produces contractions that are blocked by the nonselective transient receptor potential channel blocker ruthenium red. Moreover, the novel TRPV4-selective blocker GSK2334775 [(R)-6-(methylsulfonyl)-3-((4-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)piperindin-1-yl)methyl)-N-(2,2,2,-trifluoro-1-phenylethyl)-2-(3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)quinoline-4-carboxamide] inhibited these contractions over a concentration range consistent with its in vitro potency against recombinant and native TRPV4-containing channels. Surprisingly, TRPV4-dependent contractions were also blocked by a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor and two structurally distinct cysteinyl leukotriene 1 receptor antagonists. In aggregate, our results fail to support the hypothesis that TRPV4 in airway smooth muscle cells regulates airway contractility short term. Rather, we provide pharmacological evidence that TRPV4 activation causes human airway constriction that is entirely dependent upon the production of cysteinyl leukotrienes. Together, these data identify a novel mechanism by which TRPV4 activation may contribute to pathologic remodeling and inflammation, in addition to airflow obstruction, in the diseased human respiratory tract. PMID:24504097

  5. Serotonin stimulates lateral habenula via activation of the post-synaptic serotonin 2/3 receptors and transient receptor potential channels.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Wanhong; Zhang, Yong; Xie, Guiqin; Gregor, Danielle; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-02-01

    There is growing interest on the role of the lateral habenula (LHb) in depression, because it closely and bilaterally connects with the serotoninergic raphe nuclei. The LHb sends glutamate efferents to the raphe nuclei, while it receives serotoninergic afferents, and expresses a high density of serotonin (5-HT) receptors. Recent studies suggest that 5-HT receptors exist both in the presynaptic and postsynaptic sites of LHb neurons, and activation of these receptors may have different effects on the activity of LHb neurons. The current study focused on the effect of 5-HT on the postsynaptic membrane. We found that 5-HT initiated a depolarizing inward current (I((5-HTi))) and accelerated spontaneous firing in ∼80% of LHb neurons in rat brain slices. I((5-HTi)) was also induced by the 5-HT uptake blocker citalopram, indicating activity of endogenous 5-HT. I((5-HTi)) was diminished by 5-HT(2/3) receptor antagonists (ritanserin, SB-200646 or ondansetron), and activated by the selective 5-HT(2/3) agonists 1-(3-Chlorophenyl) piperazine hydrochloride or 1-(3-Chlorophenyl) biguanide hydrochloride. Furthermore, I((5-HTi)) was attenuated by 2-Aminoethyl diphenylborinate, a blocker of transient receptor potential channels, and an IP3 receptor inhibitor, indicating the involvement of transient receptor potential channels. These results demonstrate that the reciprocal connection between the LHb and the 5-HT system highlights a key role for 5-HT stimulation of LHb neurons that may be important in the pathogenesis of depression. PMID:26471419

  6. NMDA receptor hypofunction produces concomitant firing rate potentiation and burst activity reduction in the prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Mark E.; Homayoun, Houman; Moghaddam, Bita

    2004-01-01

    Cognitive deficits associated with frontal lobe dysfunction are a determinant of long-term disability in schizophrenia and are not effectively treated with available medications. Clinical studies show that many aspects of these deficits are transiently induced in healthy individuals treated with N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists. These findings and recent genetic linkage studies strongly implicate NMDA receptor deficiency in schizophrenia and suggest that reversing this deficiency is pertinent to treating the cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. Despite the wealth of behavioral data on the effects of NMDA antagonist treatment in humans and laboratory animals, there is a fundamental lack of understanding about the mechanisms by which a general state of NMDA deficiency influences the function of cortical neurons. Using ensemble recording in freely moving rats, we found that NMDA antagonist treatment, at doses that impaired working memory, potentiated the firing rate of most prefrontal cortex neurons. This potentiation, which correlated with expression of behavioral stereotypy, resulted from an increased number of irregularly discharged single spikes. Concurrent with the increase in spike activity, there was a significant reduction in organized bursting activity. These results identify two distinct mechanisms by which NMDA receptor deficiency may disrupt frontal lobe function: an increase in disorganized spike activity, which may enhance cortical noise and transmission of disinformation; and a decrease in burst activity, which reduces transmission efficacy of cortical neurons. These findings provide a physiological basis for the NMDA receptor deficiency model of schizophrenia and may clarify the nature of cortical dysfunction in this disease. PMID:15159546

  7. Polymodal Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type 1 Nocisensor: Structure, Modulators, and Therapeutic Applications.

    PubMed

    Cui, Minghua; Gosu, Vijayakumar; Basith, Shaherin; Hong, Sunhye; Choi, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels belong to a superfamily of sensory-related ion channels responding to a wide variety of thermal, mechanical, or chemical stimuli. In an attempt to comprehend the piquancy and pain mechanism of the archetypal vanilloids, transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 1 was discovered. TRPV1, a well-established member of the TRP family, is implicated in a range of functions including inflammation, painful stimuli sensation, and mechanotransduction. TRPV1 channels are nonselective cation receptors that are gated by a broad array of noxious ligands. Such polymodal-sensor aspect makes the TRPV1 channel extremely versatile and important for its role in sensing burning pain. Besides ligands, TRPV1 signaling can also be modulated by lipids, secondary messengers, protein kinases, cytoskeleton, and several other proteins. Due to its central role in hyperalgesia transduction and inflammatory processes, it is considered as the primary pharmacological pain target. Moreover, understanding the structural and functional intricacies of the channel is indispensable for the therapeutic intervention of TRPV1 in pain and other pathological disorders. In this chapter, we seek to give a mechanistic outlook on the TRPV1 channel. Specifically, we will explore the TRPV1 structure, activation, modulation, ligands, and its therapeutic targeting. However, the major objective of this review is to highlight the fact that TRPV1 channel can be treated as an effective therapeutic target for treating several pain- and nonpain-related physiological and pathological states. PMID:27038373

  8. Capsaicin may have important potential for promoting vascular and metabolic health

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Mark F; DiNicolantonio, James J; O'Keefe, James H

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin, the phytochemical responsible for the spiciness of peppers, has the potential to modulate metabolism via activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors, which are found not only on nociceptive sensory neurons, but also in a range of other tissues. TRPV1 activation induces calcium influx, and in certain tissues this is associated with increased activation or expression of key proteins such as endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), KLF2, PPARdelta, PPARgamma, and LXRα. The calcium influx triggered by TRPV1 activation in endothelial cells mimics the impact of shear stress in this regard, activating and increasing the expression of eNOS—but also increasing expression of cox-2, thrombomodulin, and nrf2-responsive antioxidant enzymes, while decreasing expression of proinflammatory proteins. Hence, dietary capsaicin has favourably impacted endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rodents. TRPV1-mediated induction of LXRα in foam cells promotes cholesterol export, antagonising plaque formation. Capsaicin-mediated activation of TRPV1-expressing neurons in the gastrointestinal tract promotes sympathetically mediated stimulation of brown fat, raising metabolic rate. The increased expression of UCP2 induced by TRPV1 activation exerts a protective antioxidant effect on the liver in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and on vascular endothelium in the context of hyperglycaemia. In rodent studies, capsaicin-rich diets have shown favourable effects on atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver, cardiac hypertrophy, hypertension and stroke risk. Clinically, ingestion of capsaicin—or its less stable non-pungent analogue capsiate—has been shown to boost metabolic rate modestly. Topical application of capsaicin via patch was found to increase exercise time to ischaemic threshold in patients with angina. Further clinical studies with capsaicin administered in food, capsules

  9. Therapeutic Potential of 5-HT2C Receptor Agonists for Addictive Disorders.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Guy A; Fletcher, Paul J

    2015-07-15

    The neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) has long been associated with the control of a variety of motivated behaviors, including feeding. Much of the evidence linking 5-HT and feeding behavior was obtained from studies of the effects of the 5-HT releaser (dex)fenfluramine in laboratory animals and humans. Recently, the selective 5-HT2C receptor agonist lorcaserin received FDA approval for the treatment of obesity. This review examines evidence to support the use of selective 5-HT2C receptor agonists as treatments for conditions beyond obesity, including substance abuse (particularly nicotine, psychostimulant, and alcohol dependence), obsessive compulsive, and excessive gambling disorder. Following a brief survey of the early literature supporting a role for 5-HT in modulating food and drug reinforcement, we propose that intrinsic differences between SSRI and serotonin releasers may have underestimated the value of serotonin-based pharmacotherapeutics to treat clinical forms of addictive behavior beyond obesity. We then highlight the critical involvement of the 5-HT2C receptor in mediating the effect of (dex)fenfluramine on feeding and body weight gain and the evidence that 5-HT2C receptor agonists reduce measures of drug reward and impulsivity. A recent report of lorcaserin efficacy in a smoking cessation trial further strengthens the idea that 5-HT2C receptor agonists may have potential as a treatment for addiction. This review was prepared as a contribution to the proceedings of the 11th International Society for Serotonin Research Meeting held in Hermanus, South Africa, July 9-12, 2014. PMID:25870913

  10. Symptomatic treatment of vestibular deficits: therapeutic potential of histamine H4 receptors.

    PubMed

    Wersinger, Eric; Gaboyard-Niay, Sophie; Travo, Cécile; Soto, Enrique; Baez, Adriana; Vega, Rosario; Brugeaud, Aurore; Chabbert, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Vestibular disorders display high prevalence and can severely impact the daily life. However, pharmacological options that would efficiently relieve the vertigo symptoms without side effects are still lacking. In the present review we briefly review the common history of histamine receptor modulation and the pharmacological therapy of vestibular disorders. We also discuss the recent demonstration of Histamine H4 Receptor mRNAs expression in Scarpa's ganglion of mammal and the potential use of specific H4R antagonists as vestibulomodulators. Additional original data confirm the expression of H4R proteins in the rat vestibular primary neurons, the neuromodulatory properties of specific H4R antagonists in vitro (inhibition of vestibular neuron excitability) as well as their efficacy to decrease vestibular deficits induced in different in animal models. PMID:24177347

  11. Modulation of defensive behavior by Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type-1 (TRPV1) channels.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, D C; Moreira, F A; Terzian, A L; Fogaça, M V; Lisboa, S F; Wotjak, C T; Guimaraes, F S

    2014-10-01

    The Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type-1 (TRPV1) was first characterized in primary afferent fibers as a receptor for capsaicin (the pungent ingredient of chili peppers). Later on, this cation-permeable ion channel was also described in the central nervous system, where its main putative endogenous ligand is N-arachidonoyl ethanolamide (an endocannabinoid, also known as anandamide). Recent results employing genetic, pharmacological and histochemical techniques indicate that TRPV1 tonically modulate anxiety, fear and panic responses in brain regions related to defensive responses, such as the dorsal periaqueductal gray, the hippocampus and the medial prefrontal cortex. Genetic deletion or antagonism of this ion channel induces anxiolytic-like effects in several animal models. The main mechanism responsible for TRPV1-mediated effects on anxiety seems to involve facilitation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. In addition, there is evidence for interactions with other neurotransmitter systems, such as nitric oxide and endocannabinoids. PMID:24726577

  12. Adaptors in toll-like receptor signaling and their potential as therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Ve, Thomas; Gay, Nicholas J; Mansell, Ashley; Kobe, Bostjan; Kellie, Stuart

    2012-10-01

    To initiate the innate immune response, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) associate with cytoplasmic adaptor proteins through TIR (Toll/interleukin-1 receptor) domain interactions. The four principal signaling adaptor proteins include MyD88, MAL, TRIF and TRAM, and the fifth protein SARM, involved in negative regulation of TLR pathways, is usually considered a part of the TIR domain-containing adaptor protein group. Other TIR domain-containing proteins have also been shown to regulate these signaling pathways, including ST2 and SIGIRR, as well as several bacterial and viral TIR domain-containing proteins that modulate these pathways as virulence factors. TLR pathways and the adaptor proteins are associated with a number of diseases, including infection, sepsis, inflammatory, allergic and autoimmune diseases and cancer. We review our current understanding of the structure and function of adaptor proteins and their regulatory proteins, their association with disease and their potential as therapeutic targets in human disease. PMID:22664090

  13. Evaluation on Potential Contributions of Protease Activated Receptors Related Mediators in Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huiyun; Zeng, Xiaoning; He, Shaoheng

    2014-01-01

    Protease activated receptors (PARs) have been recognized as a distinctive four-member family of seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that can be cleaved by certain serine proteases. In recent years, there has been considerable interest in the role of PARs in allergic inflammation, the fundamental pathologic changes of allergy, but the potential roles of PARs in allergy remain obscure. Since many of these proteases are produced and actively involved in the pathologic process of inflammation including exudation of plasma components, inflammatory cell infiltration, and tissue damage and repair, PARs appear to make important contribution to allergy. The aim of the present review is to summarize the expression of PARs in inflammatory and structural cells, the influence of agonists or antagonists of PARs on cell behavior, and the involvement of PARs in allergic disorders, which will help us to better understand the roles of serine proteases and PARs in allergy. PMID:24876677

  14. Activation of Muscarinic M1 Acetylcholine Receptors Induces Long-Term Potentiation in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Siobhan H.; Pasqui, Francesca; Colvin, Ellen M.; Sanger, Helen; Mogg, Adrian J.; Felder, Christian C.; Broad, Lisa M.; Fitzjohn, Steve M.; Isaac, John T.R.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2016-01-01

    Muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptors (M1Rs) are highly expressed in the hippocampus, and their inhibition or ablation disrupts the encoding of spatial memory. It has been hypothesized that the principal mechanism by which M1Rs influence spatial memory is by the regulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Here, we use a combination of recently developed, well characterized, selective M1R agonists and M1R knock-out mice to define the roles of M1Rs in the regulation of hippocampal neuronal and synaptic function. We confirm that M1R activation increases input resistance and depolarizes hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and show that this profoundly increases excitatory postsynaptic potential-spike coupling. Consistent with a critical role for M1Rs in synaptic plasticity, we now show that M1R activation produces a robust potentiation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission onto CA1 pyramidal neurons that has all the hallmarks of long-term potentiation (LTP): The potentiation requires NMDA receptor activity and bi-directionally occludes with synaptically induced LTP. Thus, we describe synergistic mechanisms by which acetylcholine acting through M1Rs excites CA1 pyramidal neurons and induces LTP, to profoundly increase activation of CA1 pyramidal neurons. These features are predicted to make a major contribution to the pro-cognitive effects of cholinergic transmission in rodents and humans. PMID:26472558

  15. Potentiation of tonic GABAergic inhibition by activation of postsynaptic kainate receptors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, L; Kang, D; Kang, J

    2015-07-01

    Presynaptic kainate-type glutamate ionotropic receptors (KARs) that mediate either the depression or the facilitation of GABA release have been intensively studied. Little attention has been given to the modulation of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) by postsynaptic KARs. Recent studies suggest that two GABAAR populations, synaptic (sGABAAR) and extrasynaptic (eGABAAR) GABAARs, mediate phasic and tonic forms of inhibition, respectively. Tonic inhibition plays an important role in the excitability of neuronal circuits and the occurrence of epileptic seizures. For this study, we are the first to report that the activation of postsynaptic KARs by the KAR agonist, Kainic acid (KA, 5 μM), enhanced tonic inhibition by potentiating eGABAARs. KA enhanced THIP-induced eGABAAR currents and prolonged the rise and decay time of muscimol-induced sGABAAR/eGABAAR currents, but also depressed the amplitude of evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), unitary IPSCs (uIPSCs), and muscimol-induced sGABAAR/eGABAAR currents. The PKC inhibitor, staurosporine (1 μM), in the patch pipette solution fully blocked the KA-induced potentiation of tonic inhibition, suggesting the involvement of an intracellular PKC pathway. Our study suggests that the activation of postsynaptic KARs potentiates eGABAARs but depresses sGABAARs. By activating postsynaptic KARs, synaptically released glutamate depresses phasic inhibition to facilitate neuronal plasticity, but potentiates tonic inhibition to protect neurons from over-excitation. PMID:25934031

  16. Spontaneous muscle action potentials fail to develop without fetal-type acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Masazumi; Kubo, Tai; Mizoguchi, Akira; Carlson, C. George; Endo, Katsuaki; Ohnishi, Katsunori

    2002-01-01

    In mammals, two combinations of muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are used: α2βγδ (γ-AChR) or α2βɛδ (ɛ-AChR). After birth, γ-AChRs are replaced by ɛ-AChRs (γ/ɛ-switch). The two receptors have different conductances and open times. During perinatal period, the long open time γ-AChRs generate random myofiber action potentials from uniquantal miniature end-plate potentials (mEPPs). ɛ-AChRs are suitable for strong adult muscle activities. Since the effect of the γ/ɛ-switch on neuromuscular development was unclear, despite the many differences in channel characteristics, we carried out this study to generate γ-subunit-deficient mice. Homozygotes born alive survived for 2 days in a stable condition, and were able to move their forelimbs. Endplate AChRs included ɛ-subunits, and muscle fibers had multiple neuromuscular junctions. Both pre- and postsynapses were abnormal and spontaneous action potentials generated from mEPPs were totally absent. Results suggest a requirement for γ-AChRs in mediating synaptically-induced action potential activity critical for neuromuscular development. PMID:12101101

  17. Activation of Muscarinic M1 Acetylcholine Receptors Induces Long-Term Potentiation in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Siobhan H; Pasqui, Francesca; Colvin, Ellen M; Sanger, Helen; Mogg, Adrian J; Felder, Christian C; Broad, Lisa M; Fitzjohn, Steve M; Isaac, John T R; Mellor, Jack R

    2016-01-01

    Muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptors (M1Rs) are highly expressed in the hippocampus, and their inhibition or ablation disrupts the encoding of spatial memory. It has been hypothesized that the principal mechanism by which M1Rs influence spatial memory is by the regulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Here, we use a combination of recently developed, well characterized, selective M1R agonists and M1R knock-out mice to define the roles of M1Rs in the regulation of hippocampal neuronal and synaptic function. We confirm that M1R activation increases input resistance and depolarizes hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and show that this profoundly increases excitatory postsynaptic potential-spike coupling. Consistent with a critical role for M1Rs in synaptic plasticity, we now show that M1R activation produces a robust potentiation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission onto CA1 pyramidal neurons that has all the hallmarks of long-term potentiation (LTP): The potentiation requires NMDA receptor activity and bi-directionally occludes with synaptically induced LTP. Thus, we describe synergistic mechanisms by which acetylcholine acting through M1Rs excites CA1 pyramidal neurons and induces LTP, to profoundly increase activation of CA1 pyramidal neurons. These features are predicted to make a major contribution to the pro-cognitive effects of cholinergic transmission in rodents and humans. PMID:26472558

  18. Novel gold nanoparticles coated with somatostatin as a potential delivery system for targeting somatostatin receptors.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, Ahmed A H; Zayed, Gamal; El-Bakry, Asmaa; Zaky, Alaa; Saleem, Imran Y; Tawfeek, Hesham M

    2016-11-01

    Targeting of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) like somatostatin-14 (SST-14) could have a potential interest in delivery of anti-cancer agents to tumor cells. Attachment of SST to different nano-carriers e.g. polymeric nanoparticles is limited due to the difficulty of interaction between SST itself and those nano-carriers. Furthermore, the instability problems associated with the final formulation. Attaching of SST to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using the positive and negative charge of SST and citrate-AuNPs could be considered a new technique to get stable non-aggregated AuNPs coated with SST. Different analyses techniques have been performed to proof the principle of coating between AuNPs and SST. Furthermore, cellular uptake studies on HCC-1806, HELA and U-87 cell lines has been investigated to show the ability of AuNPs coated SST to enter the cells via SST receptors. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) indicated a successful coating of SST on the MUA-AuNPs surface. Furthermore, all the performed analysis including DLS, SDS-PAGE and UV-VIS absorption spectra indicated a successful coating of AuNPs with SST. Cellular uptake studies on HCC-1806, HELA and U-87 cell lines showed that the number of AuNPs-SST per cell is signiflcantly higher compared to citrate-AuNPs when quantified using inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy. Moreover, the binding of AuNPs-SST to cells can be suppressed by addition of antagonist, indicating that the binding of AuNPs-SST to cells is due to receptor-specific binding. In conclusion, AuNPs could be attached to SST via adsorption to get stable AuNPs coated SST. This new formulation has a potential to target SST receptors localized in many normal and tumor cells. PMID:27032509

  19. Application potential of toll-like receptors in cancer immunotherapy: Systematic review.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming; Chen, Xi; Ye, Kangruo; Yao, Yuanfei; Li, Yu

    2016-06-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs), as the most important pattern recognition receptors in innate immunity, play a pivotal role in inducing immune response through recognition of microbial invaders or specific agonists. Recent studies have suggested that TLRs could serve as important regulators in the development of a variety of cancer. However, increasing evidences have shown that TLRs may display quite opposite outcomes in cancer development. Although several potential therapeutic Toll-like receptor ligands have been found, the mechanism and therapy prospect of TLRs in cancer development has to be further elucidated to accelerate the clinical application. By performing a systematic review of the present findings on TLRs in cancer immunology, we attempted to evaluate the therapeutic potential of TLRs in cancer therapy and elucidate the potential mechanism of cancer progress regulated by TLR signaling and the reported targets on TLRs for clinical application. An electronic databases search was conducted in PubMed, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, and Chinese Biomedical Literature Database from their inception to February 1, 2016. The following keywords were used to search the databases: Toll-like receptors, cancer therapy, therapeutic target, innate immunity. Of 244 studies that were identified, 97 nonrelevant studies were excluded. In total, 147 full-text articles were assessed, and from these, 54 were excluded as they did not provide complete key information. Thus, 93 studies were considered eligible and included in the analysis. According to the data from the included trials, 14 TLR ligands (77.8%) from 82 studies have been demonstrated to display antitumor property in various cancers, whereas 4 ligands (22.2%) from 11 studies promote tumors. Among them, only 3 TLR ligands have been approved for cancer therapy, and 9 ligands were in clinical trials. In addition, the potential mechanism of recently reported targets on TLRs for clinical application was also evaluated

  20. Solubilization and reconstitution of the D-1 dopamine receptor: potentiation of the agonist high-affinity state of the receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, A.

    1988-11-29

    The D-1 dopamine receptor was extracted from rat striatal membranes with sodium cholate and NaCl in the presence of a specific agonist and phospholipids. The soluble receptor then was reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles by further addition of phospholipids prior to detergent removal. Of the total membrane receptors, up to 48% were extracted and 36% were reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles. Yields were greatly reduced if the agonist was omitted or replaced with an antagonist. The solubilized and reconstituted D-1 receptors retained the pharmacological properties of the membrane-bound receptors, including the ability to discriminate between active and inactive enantiomers of specific agonists and antagonists. In this regard, the affinity of the reconstituted receptors for the D-1 specific antagonist /sup 125/I SCH 23982 was similar to that of the membrane-bound receptors with a Kd of 1.5 nM. Both the soluble and reconstituted forms of the D-1 receptor exhibited two affinity states for the D-1 specific agonist SKandF R-38393. In contrast to the low proportion of the receptors that had a high affinity for the agonists in striatal membranes (less than 6%), there was a dramatic increase following solubilization (22%) and reconstitution (40%). Similar results were obtained by using dopamine; the proportion of high-affinity sites increased from 4% (membrane-bound) to 48% (reconstituted) of the total receptor population. These high-affinity sites were coupled to G proteins, as guanyl nucleotides completely abolished them. Addition of guanyl nucleotides prior to solubilization or to reconstitution, however, had no effect on the subsequent yield of the reconstituted receptors.

  1. Acute NMDA receptor antagonism disrupts synchronization of action potential firing in rat prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Molina, Leonardo A; Skelin, Ivan; Gruber, Aaron J

    2014-01-01

    Antagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) have psychotomimetic effects in humans and are used to model schizophrenia in animals. We used high-density electrophysiological recordings to assess the effects of acute systemic injection of an NMDAR antagonist (MK-801) on ensemble neural processing in the medial prefrontal cortex of freely moving rats. Although MK-801 increased neuron firing rates and the amplitude of gamma-frequency oscillations in field potentials, the synchronization of action potential firing decreased and spike trains became more Poisson-like. This disorganization of action potential firing following MK-801 administration is consistent with changes in simulated cortical networks as the functional connections among pyramidal neurons become less clustered. Such loss of functional heterogeneity of the cortical microcircuit may disrupt information processing dependent on spike timing or the activation of discrete cortical neural ensembles, and thereby contribute to hallucinations and other features of psychosis induced by NMDAR antagonists. PMID:24465743

  2. Selective activation of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor achieved by allosteric potentiation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lei; Seager, Matthew A; Seager, Matthew; Wittmann, Marion; Jacobson, Marlene; Bickel, Denise; Burno, Maryann; Jones, Keith; Graufelds, Valerie Kuzmick; Xu, Guangping; Pearson, Michelle; McCampbell, Alexander; Gaspar, Renee; Shughrue, Paul; Danziger, Andrew; Regan, Christopher; Flick, Rose; Pascarella, Danette; Garson, Susan; Doran, Scott; Kreatsoulas, Constantine; Veng, Lone; Lindsley, Craig W; Shipe, William; Kuduk, Scott; Sur, Cyrille; Kinney, Gene; Seabrook, Guy R; Ray, William J

    2009-09-15

    The forebrain cholinergic system promotes higher brain function in part by signaling through the M(1) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR). During Alzheimer's disease (AD), these cholinergic neurons degenerate, therefore selectively activating M(1) receptors could improve cognitive function in these patients while avoiding unwanted peripheral responses associated with non-selective muscarinic agonists. We describe here benzyl quinolone carboxylic acid (BQCA), a highly selective allosteric potentiator of the M(1) mAChR. BQCA reduces the concentration of ACh required to activate M(1) up to 129-fold with an inflection point value of 845 nM. No potentiation, agonism, or antagonism activity on other mAChRs is observed up to 100 microM. Furthermore studies in M(1)(-/-) mice demonstrates that BQCA requires M(1) to promote inositol phosphate turnover in primary neurons and to increase c-fos and arc RNA expression and ERK phosphorylation in the brain. Radioligand-binding assays, molecular modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicate that BQCA acts at an allosteric site involving residues Y179 and W400. BQCA reverses scopolamine-induced memory deficits in contextual fear conditioning, increases blood flow to the cerebral cortex, and increases wakefulness while reducing delta sleep. In contrast to M(1) allosteric agonists, which do not improve memory in scopolamine-challenged mice in contextual fear conditioning, BQCA induces beta-arrestin recruitment to M(1), suggesting a role for this signal transduction mechanism in the cholinergic modulation of memory. In summary, BQCA exploits an allosteric potentiation mechanism to provide selectivity for the M(1) receptor and represents a promising therapeutic strategy for cognitive disorders. PMID:19717450

  3. Selective activation of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor achieved by allosteric potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lei; Seager, Matthew A.; Wittmann, Marion; Jacobson, Marlene; Bickel, Denise; Burno, Maryann; Jones, Keith; Graufelds, Valerie Kuzmick; Xu, Guangping; Pearson, Michelle; McCampbell, Alexander; Gaspar, Renee; Shughrue, Paul; Danziger, Andrew; Regan, Christopher; Flick, Rose; Pascarella, Danette; Garson, Susan; Doran, Scott; Kreatsoulas, Constantine; Veng, Lone; Lindsley, Craig W.; Shipe, William; Kuduk, Scott; Sur, Cyrille; Kinney, Gene; Seabrook, Guy R.; Ray, William J.

    2009-01-01

    The forebrain cholinergic system promotes higher brain function in part by signaling through the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR). During Alzheimer's disease (AD), these cholinergic neurons degenerate, therefore selectively activating M1 receptors could improve cognitive function in these patients while avoiding unwanted peripheral responses associated with non-selective muscarinic agonists. We describe here benzyl quinolone carboxylic acid (BQCA), a highly selective allosteric potentiator of the M1 mAChR. BQCA reduces the concentration of ACh required to activate M1 up to 129-fold with an inflection point value of 845 nM. No potentiation, agonism, or antagonism activity on other mAChRs is observed up to 100 μM. Furthermore studies in M1−/− mice demonstrates that BQCA requires M1 to promote inositol phosphate turnover in primary neurons and to increase c-fos and arc RNA expression and ERK phosphorylation in the brain. Radioligand-binding assays, molecular modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicate that BQCA acts at an allosteric site involving residues Y179 and W400. BQCA reverses scopolamine-induced memory deficits in contextual fear conditioning, increases blood flow to the cerebral cortex, and increases wakefulness while reducing delta sleep. In contrast to M1 allosteric agonists, which do not improve memory in scopolamine-challenged mice in contextual fear conditioning, BQCA induces β-arrestin recruitment to M1, suggesting a role for this signal transduction mechanism in the cholinergic modulation of memory. In summary, BQCA exploits an allosteric potentiation mechanism to provide selectivity for the M1 receptor and represents a promising therapeutic strategy for cognitive disorders. PMID:19717450

  4. Activin Controls Ethanol Potentiation of Inhibitory Synaptic Transmission Through GABAA Receptors and Concomitant Behavioral Sedation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fang; Puppel, Anne; Huber, Sabine E; Link, Andrea S; Eulenburg, Volker; van Brederode, Johannes F; Müller, Christian P; Alzheimer, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Activin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β family, exerts multiple functions in the nervous system. Originally identified as a neurotrophic and -protective agent, increasing evidence implicates activin also in the regulation of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in brain regions associated with cognitive and affective functions. To explore how activin impacts on ethanol potentiation of GABA synapses and related behavioral paradigms, we used an established transgenic model of disrupted activin receptor signaling, in which mice express a dominant-negative activin receptor IB mutant (dnActRIB) under the control of the CaMKIIα promoter. Comparison of GABAA receptor currents in hippocampal neurons from dnActRIB mice and wild-type mice showed that all concentrations of ethanol tested (30-150 mM) produced much stronger potentiation of phasic inhibition in the mutant preparation. In dentate granule cells of dnActRIB mice, tonic GABA inhibition was more pronounced than in wild-type neurons, but remained insensitive to low ethanol (30 mM) in both preparations. The heightened ethanol sensitivity of phasic inhibition in mutant hippocampi resulted from both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms, the latter probably involving PKCɛ. At the behavioral level, ethanol produced significantly stronger sedation in dnActRIB mice than in wild-type mice, but did not affect consumption of ethanol or escalation after withdrawal. We link the abnormal narcotic response of dnActRIB mice to ethanol to the excessive potentiation of inhibitory neurotransmission. Our study suggests that activin counteracts oversedation from ethanol by curtailing its augmenting effect at GABA synapses. PMID:26717882

  5. An analysis of receptor potential and tension of isolated cat muscle spindles in response to sinusoidal stretch.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, C C; Wilkinson, R S

    1980-01-01

    In isolated cat muscle spindles the receptor potential responses of primary and secondary endings as well as tension responses to sinusoidal length changes in the steady state have been analysed. 1. At a given stimulus frequency, receptor potential per unit length change (receptor potential gain) in both primary and secondary endings is constant when displacement is less than about 10 micrometer. With larger stretches, receptor potential gain decreases approximately as a power function of displacement, the gain of primary endings decreasing more rapidly with increasing displacement than that of secondary endings. Tension per unit length change (tension gain) shows a similar constant range above which it also decreases as a power function of displacement. 2. In spite of the large reduction in gain at high displacement amplitudes, response wave forms remained essentially sinusoidal. The gain reduction results principally from a displacement-dependent non-linearity which has a rapid onset and slow decay. 3. Receptor potential and tension responses to small amplitude sinusoidal stretch depend, in a parallel manner, on the initial length of the preparation. 4. Both receptor potential and tension responses are highly dependent on frequency of sinusoidal stretch. In primary endings receptor potential gain increased as a power function of frequency over the range 0 . 01 to about 40 Hz, above which frequency the gain decreased; phase advance remained relatively constant up to 10 Hz then decreased to become a phase lag at higher frequency. In secondary endings receptor potential gain remained fairly constant between 0 . 01 and 1 Hz then rose as a power function of frequency but less steeply than in primary endings. 3. The possible mechanisms underlying these findings are discussed. PMID:6447781

  6. Structure, Dynamics, and Allosteric Potential of Ionotropic Glutamate Receptor N-Terminal Domains

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, James; Bahar, Ivet; Greger, Ingo H.

    2015-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) are tetrameric cation channels that mediate synaptic transmission and plasticity. They have a unique modular architecture with four domains: the intracellular C-terminal domain (CTD) that is involved in synaptic targeting, the transmembrane domain (TMD) that forms the ion channel, the membrane-proximal ligand-binding domain (LBD) that binds agonists such as L-glutamate, and the distal N-terminal domain (NTD), whose function is the least clear. The extracellular portion, comprised of the LBD and NTD, is loosely arranged, mediating complex allosteric regulation and providing a rich target for drug development. Here, we briefly review recent work on iGluR NTD structure and dynamics, and further explore the allosteric potential for the NTD in AMPA-type iGluRs using coarse-grained simulations. We also investigate mechanisms underlying the established NTD allostery in NMDA-type iGluRs, as well as the fold-related metabotropic glutamate and GABAB receptors. We show that the clamshell motions intrinsically favored by the NTD bilobate fold are coupled to dimeric and higher-order rearrangements that impact the iGluR LBD and ultimately the TMD. Finally, we explore the dynamics of intact iGluRs and describe how it might affect receptor operation in a synaptic environment. PMID:26255587

  7. Canonical transient receptor potential channels promote cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through activation of calcineurin signaling.

    PubMed

    Bush, Erik W; Hood, David B; Papst, Philip J; Chapo, Joseph A; Minobe, Wayne; Bristow, Michael R; Olson, Eric N; McKinsey, Timothy A

    2006-11-01

    The calcium/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin plays a central role in the control of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in response to pathological stimuli. Although calcineurin is present at high levels in normal heart, its activity appears to be unaffected by calcium during the course of a cardiac cycle. The mechanism(s) whereby calcineurin is selectively activated by calcium under pathological conditions has remained unclear. Here, we demonstrate that diverse signals for cardiac hypertrophy stimulate expression of canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels. TRPC consists of a family of seven membrane-spanning nonselective cation channels that have been implicated in the nonvoltage-gated influx of calcium in response to G protein-coupled receptor signaling, receptor tyrosine kinase signaling, and depletion of internal calcium stores. TRPC3 expression is up-regulated in multiple rodent models of pathological cardiac hypertrophy, whereas TRPC5 expression is induced in failing human heart. We demonstrate that TRPC promotes cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through activation of calcineurin and its downstream effector, the nuclear factor of activated T cells transcription factor. These results define a novel role for TRPC channels in the control of cardiac growth, and suggest that a TRPC-derived pool of calcium contributes to selective activation of calcineurin in diseased heart. PMID:16950785

  8. Subunit composition of mammalian transient receptor potential channels in living cells.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Thomas; Schaefer, Michael; Schultz, Günter; Gudermann, Thomas

    2002-05-28

    Hormones, neurotransmitters, and growth factors give rise to calcium entry via receptor-activated cation channels that are activated downstream of phospholipase C activity. Members of the transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) family have been characterized as molecular substrates mediating receptor-activated cation influx. TRPC channels are assumed to be composed of multiple TRPC proteins. However, the cellular principles governing the assembly of TRPC proteins into homo- or heteromeric ion channels still remain elusive. By pursuing four independent experimental approaches--i.e., subcellular cotrafficking of TRPC subunits, differential functional suppression by dominant-negative subunits, fluorescence resonance energy transfer between labeled TRPC subunits, and coimmunoprecipitation--we investigate the combinatorial rules of TRPC assembly. Our data show that (i) TRPC2 does not interact with any known TRPC protein and (ii) TRPC1 has the ability to form channel complexes together with TRPC4 and TRPC5. (iii) All other TRPCs exclusively assemble into homo- or heterotetramers within the confines of TRPC subfamilies--e.g., TRPC4/5 or TRPC3/6/7. The principles of TRPC channel formation offer the conceptual framework to assess the physiological role of distinct TRPC proteins in living cells. PMID:12032305

  9. The role of thermosensitive TRP (transient receptor potential) channels in insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kunitoshi; Tominaga, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells is the only efficient means to decrease blood glucose concentrations. Glucose is the principal stimulator of insulin secretion with the ATP-sensitive K+ channel-voltage-gated Ca2+ channel-mediated pathway being the primary one involved in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Recently, several reports demonstrated that some transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are expressed in pancreatic β-cells and contribute to pancreatic β-cell functions. Interestingly, six of them (TRPM2, TRPM4, TRPM5, TRPV1, TRPV2 and TRPV4) are thermosensitive TRP channels. Thermosensitive TRP channels in pancreatic β-cells can function as multimodal receptors and cause Ca2+ influx and membrane depolarization at physiological body temperature. TRPM channels (TRPM2, TRPM4 and TRPM5) control insulin secretion levels by sensing intracellular Ca2+ increase, NAD metabolites, or hormone receptor activation. TRPV2 is involved not only in insulin secretion but also cell proliferation, and is regulated by the autocrine effects of insulin. TRPV1 expressed in sensory neurons is involved in β-cell stress and islet inflammation by controlling neuropeptide release levels. It is thus clear that thermosensitive TRP channels play important roles in pancreatic β-cell functions, and future analyses of TRP channel function will lead to better understanding of the complicated mechanisms involved in insulin secretion and diabetes pathogenesis. PMID:21785227

  10. Contribution of metabotropic glutamate receptors to the depression of excitatory postsynaptic potentials during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    de Mendonça, A; Ribeiro, J A

    1997-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) might contribute to the depression of excitatory postsynaptic potentials during hypoxia. The experiments were performed on hippocampal slices taken from young (12-14 days old) Wistar rats. The depression induced by hypoxia (14 min) was not modified in the presence of either the non-selective mGluR antagonist (which blocks mainly group I and II mGluR), MCPG (500 microM) or the selective group III mGluR antagonist, MPPG (500 microM). However, in experiments performed in the presence of the selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, DPCPX (50 nM), part of the hypoxia-induced depression could be prevented by MPPG (500 microM). Activation of group III mGluR may contribute to the hypoxia-induced depression, but this contribution is only revealed when adenosine A1 receptors are blocked. PMID:9427348

  11. Interleukin-1 receptor associated kinase inhibitors: potential therapeutic agents for inflammatory- and immune-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Bahia, Malkeet Singh; Kaur, Maninder; Silakari, Pragati; Silakari, Om

    2015-06-01

    The various cells of innate immune system quickly counter-attack invading pathogens, and mount up "first line" defense through their trans-membrane receptors including Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and interleukin receptors (IL-Rs) that result in the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Albeit such inflammatory responses are beneficial in pathological conditions, their overstimulation may cause severe inflammatory damage; thus, make this defense system a "double edged sword". IRAK-4 has been evaluated as an indispensable element of IL-Rs and TLR pathways that can regulate the abnormal levels of cytokines, and therefore could be employed to manage immune- and inflammation-related disorders. Historically, the identification of selective and potent inhibitors has been challenging; thus, a limited number of small molecule IRAK-4 inhibitors are available in literature. Recently, IRAK-4 achieved great attention, when Ligand® pharmaceutical and Nimbus Discovery® reported the beneficial potentials of IRAK-4 inhibitors in the pre-clinical evaluation for various inflammatory- and immune-related disorders, but not limited to, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, psoriasis, gout, asthma and cancer. PMID:25728511

  12. Arsenite and insulin exhibit opposing effects on epidermal growth factor receptor and keratinocyte proliferative potential

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Timothy J.; Rice, Robert H. . E-mail: rhrice@ucdavis.edu

    2007-05-15

    Previous work has suggested that arsenic exposure contributes to skin carcinogenesis by preserving the proliferative potential of human epidermal keratinocytes, thereby slowing the exit of putative target stem cells into the differentiation pathway. To find a molecular basis for this action, present work has explored the influence of arsenite on keratinocyte responses to epidermal growth factor (EGF). The ability of cultured keratinocytes to found colonies upon passaging several days after confluence was preserved by arsenite and EGF in an additive fashion, but neither was effective when the receptor tyrosine kinase activity was inhibited. Arsenite prevented the loss of EGF receptor protein and phosphorylation of tyrosine 1173, preserving its capability to signal. The level of nuclear {beta}-catenin was higher in cells treated with arsenite and EGF in parallel to elevated colony forming ability, and expression of a dominant negative {beta}-catenin suppressed the increase in both colony forming ability and yield of putative stem cells induced by arsenite and EGF. As judged by expression of three genes regulated by {beta}-catenin, this transcription factor had substantially higher activity in the arsenite/EGF-treated cells. Trivalent antimony exhibited the same effects as arsenite. A novel finding is that insulin in the medium induced the loss of EGF receptor protein, which was largely prevented by arsenite exposure.

  13. Therapeutic potential of Takeda-G-protein-receptor-5 (TGR5) agonists. Hope or hype?

    PubMed

    Hodge, R J; Nunez, D J

    2016-05-01

    The gastrointestinal tract regulates glucose and energy metabolism, and there is increasing recognition that bile acids function as key signalling molecules in these processes. For example, bile acid changes that occur after bariatric surgery have been implicated in the effects on satiety, lipid and cholesterol regulation, glucose and energy metabolism, and the gut microbiome. In recent years, Takeda-G-protein-receptor-5 (TGR5), a bile acid receptor found in widely dispersed tissues, has been the target of significant drug discovery efforts in the hope of identifying effective treatments for metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes, obesity, atherosclerosis, fatty liver disease and cancer. Although the benefits of targeting the TGR5 receptor are potentially great, drug development work to date has identified risks that include histopathological changes, tumorigenesis, gender differences, and questions about the translation of animal data to humans. The present article reviews the noteworthy challenges that must be addressed along the path of development of a safe and effective TGR5 agonist therapy. PMID:26818602

  14. Vandetanib as a potential new treatment for estrogen receptor-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Hatem, Rana; Labiod, Dalila; Château-Joubert, Sophie; de Plater, Ludmilla; El Botty, Rania; Vacher, Sophie; Bonin, Florian; Servely, Jean-Luc; Dieras, Véronique; Bièche, Ivan; Marangoni, Elisabetta

    2016-05-15

    The receptor tyrosine kinase RET is implicated in the progression of luminal breast cancers (BC) but its role in estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumors is unknown. Here we investigated the expression of RET in breast cancer patients tumors and patient-derived xenografts (PDX) and evaluated the therapeutic potential of Vandetanib, a tyrosin kinase inhibitor with strong activity against RET, EGFR and VEGFR2, in ER negative breast cancer PDX. The RT-PCR analysis of RET expression in breast tumors of 446 patients and 57 PDX, showed elevated levels of RET in ER+ and HER2+ subtypes and in a small subgroup of triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC). The activity of Vandetanib was tested in vivo in three PDX models of TNBC and one model of HER2+ BC with different expression levels of RET and EGFR. Vandetanib induced tumor regression in PDX models with high expression of RET or EGFR. The effect was associated with inhibition of RET/EGFR phosphorylation and MAP kinase pathway and increased necrosis. In a PDX model with no expression of RET nor EGFR, Vandetanib slowed tumor growth without inducing tumor regression. In addition, treatment by Vandetanib decreased expression of murine Vegf receptors and the endothelial marker Cd31 in the four PDX models tested, suggesting inhibition of tumor vascularization. In summary, these preclinical results suggest that Vandetanib treatment could be useful for patients with ER negative breast cancers overexpressing Vandetanib's main targets. PMID:26686064

  15. Regulation of canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channel function by diacylglycerol and protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, Kartik; Zheng, Fei; Gill, Donald L

    2003-08-01

    The mechanism of receptor-induced activation of the ubiquitously expressed family of mammalian canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels has been the focus of intense study. Primarily responding to phospholipase C (PLC)-coupled receptors, the channels are reported to receive modulatory input from diacylglycerol, endoplasmic reticulum inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors and Ca2+ stores. Analysis of TRPC5 channels transfected within DT40 B cells and deletion mutants thereof revealed efficient activation in response to PLC-beta or PLC-gamma activation, which was independent of inositol 1,4,5-trisphoshate receptors or the content of stores. In both HEK293 cells and DT40 cells, TRPC5 and TRPC3 channel responses to PLC activation were highly analogous, but only TRPC3 and not TRPC5 channels responded to the addition of the permeant diacylglycerol (DAG) analogue, 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG). However, OAG application or elevated endogenous DAG, resulting from either DAG lipase or DAG kinase inhibition, completely prevented TRPC5 or TRPC4 activation. This inhibitory action of DAG on TRPC5 and TRPC4 channels was clearly mediated by protein kinase C (PKC), in distinction to the stimulatory action of DAG on TRPC3, which is established to be PKC-independent. PKC activation totally blocked TRPC3 channel activation in response to OAG, and the activation was restored by PKC-blockade. PKC inhibition resulted in decreased TRPC3 channel deactivation. Store-operated Ca2+ entry in response to PLC-coupled receptor activation was substantially reduced by OAG or DAG-lipase inhibition in a PKC-dependent manner. However, store-operated Ca2+ entry in response to the pump blocker, thapsigargin, was unaffected by PKC. The results reveal that each TRPC subtype is strongly inhibited by DAG-induced PKC activation, reflecting a likely universal feedback control on TRPCs, and that DAG-mediated PKC-independent activation of TRPC channels is highly subtype-specific. The

  16. The role of classical transient receptor potential channels in the regulation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, B; Dietrich, A; Gudermann, T; Kalwa, H; Grimminger, F; Weissmann, N

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is an essential mechanism of the lung matching blood perfusion to ventilation during local alveolar hypoxia. HPV thus optimizes pulmonary gas exchange. In contrast chronic and generalized hypoxia leads to pulmonary vascular remodeling with subsequent pulmonary hypertension and right heart hypertrophy. Among other non-selective cation channels, the family of classical transient receptor potential channels (TRPC) has been shown to be expressed in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. Among this family, TRPC6 is essential for the regulation of acute HPV in mice. Against this background, in this chapter we give an overview about the TRPC family and their role in HPV. PMID:20204731

  17. Natural-Product-Derived Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 8 (TRPM8) Channel Modulators.

    PubMed

    LeGay, Christina M; Gorobets, Evgueni; Iftinca, Mircea; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Altier, Christophe; Derksen, Darren J

    2016-06-01

    A library of novel structural hybrids of menthol and cubebol was tested for each derivative's ability to interact with the transient receptor potential subfamily melastatin member 8 (TRPM8) channel. This structure-activity relationship study revealed three potent modulators of the TRPM8 ion channel: a novel agonist (4) with an EC50 value of 11 ± 1 μM, an antagonist (15) with an IC50 value of 2 ± 1 μM, and an allosteric modulator (21) that minimized channel desensitization toward menthol. Each of these novel exocyclic olefin analogues of menthol is readily accessible by synthesis and was tested using Ca(2+) assays and electrophysiology. PMID:27171974

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, a potential therapeutic target for alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Yue-Min; Wang, Rong-Qi; Fu, Na

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic liver injury represents a progressive process with a range of consequences including hepatic steatosis, steatohepatitis, liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Targeting key molecular regulators involved in the development of alcoholic liver injury may be of great value in the prevention of liver injury. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) plays a pivotal role in modulation of hepatic lipid metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammatory response and fibrogenesis. As such, PPARα may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:25009377

  19. Compound gravity receptor polarization vectors evidenced by linear vestibular evoked potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S. M.; Jones, T. A.; Bell, P. L.; Taylor, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    The utricle and saccule are gravity receptor organs of the vestibular system. These receptors rely on a high-density otoconial membrane to detect linear acceleration and the position of the cranium relative to Earth's gravitational vector. The linear vestibular evoked potential (VsEP) has been shown to be an effective non-invasive functional test specifically for otoconial gravity receptors (Jones et al., 1999). Moreover, there is some evidence that the VsEP can be used to independently test utricular and saccular function (Taylor et al., 1997; Jones et al., 1998). Here we characterize compound macular polarization vectors for the utricle and saccule in hatchling chickens. Pulsed linear acceleration stimuli were presented in two axes, the dorsoventral (DV, +/- Z axis) to isolate the saccule, and the interaural (IA, +/- Y axis) to isolate the utricle. Traditional signal averaging was used to resolve responses recorded from the surface of the skull. Latency and amplitude of eighth nerve components of the linear VsEP were measured. Gravity receptor responses exhibited clear preferences for one stimulus direction in each axis. With respect to each utricular macula, lateral translation in the IA axis produced maximum ipsilateral response amplitudes with substantially greater amplitude intensity (AI) slopes than medially directed movement. Downward caudal motions in the DV axis produced substantially larger response amplitudes and AI slopes. The results show that the macula lagena does not contribute to the VsEP compound polarization vectors of the sacculus and utricle. The findings suggest further that preferred compound vectors for the utricle depend on the pars externa (i.e. lateral hair cell field) whereas for the saccule they depend on pars interna (i.e. superior hair cell fields). These data provide evidence that maculae saccule and utricle can be selectively evaluated using the linear VsEP.

  20. A Critical Role for the Transient Receptor Potential Channel Type 6 in Human Platelet Activation

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Christine; Khasawneh, Fadi T.

    2015-01-01

    While calcium signaling is known to play vital roles in platelet function, the mechanisms underlying its receptor-operated calcium entry component (ROCE) remain poorly understood. It has been proposed, but never proven in platelets, that the canonical transient receptor potential channel-6 (TRPC6) mediates ROCE. Nonetheless, we have previously shown that the mouse TRPC6 regulates hemostasis, thrombogenesis by regulating platelet aggregation. In the present studies, we used a pharmacological approach to characterize the role of TRPC6 in human platelet biology. Thus, interestingly, we observed that a TRPC6 inhibitor exerted significant inhibitory effects on human platelet aggregation in a thromboxane receptor (TPR)-selective manner; no additional inhibition was observed in the presence of the calcium chelator BAPTA. This inhibitor also significantly inhibited human platelet secretion (dense and alpha granules), integrin IIb-IIIa, Akt and ERK phosphorylation, again, in a TPR-selective manner; no effects were observed in response to ADP receptor stimulation. Furthermore, there was a causal relationship between these inhibitory effects, and the capacity of the TRPC6 inhibitor to abrogate elevation in intracellular calcium, that was again found to be TPR-specific. This effect was not found to be due to antagonism of TPR, as the TRPC6 inhibitor did not displace the radiolabeled antagonist [3H]SQ29,548 from its binding sites. Finally, our studies also revealed that TRPC6 regulates human clot retraction, as well as physiological hemostasis and thrombus formation, in mice. Taken together, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that TRPC6 directly regulates TPR-dependent ROCE and platelet function. Moreover, these data highlight TRPC6 as a novel promising therapeutic strategy for managing thrombotic disorders. PMID:25928636

  1. Clemizole hydrochloride is a novel and potent inhibitor of transient receptor potential channel TRPC5.

    PubMed

    Richter, Julia M; Schaefer, Michael; Hill, Kerstin

    2014-11-01

    Canonical transient receptor potential channel 5 (TRPC5) is a nonselective, Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel that belongs to the large family of transient receptor potential channels. It is predominantly found in the central nervous system with a high expression density in the hippocampus, the amygdala, and the frontal cortex. Several studies confirm that TRPC5 channels are implicated in the regulation of neurite length and growth cone morphology. We identified clemizole as a novel inhibitor of TRPC5 channels. Clemizole efficiently blocks TRPC5 currents and Ca(2+) entry in the low micromolar range (IC50 = 1.0-1.3 µM), as determined by fluorometric intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) measurements and patch-clamp recordings. Clemizole blocks TRPC5 currents irrespectively of the mode of activation, for example, stimulation of G protein-coupled receptors, hypo-osmotic buffer conditions, or by the direct activator riluzole. Electrophysiological whole-cell recordings revealed that the block was mostly reversible. Moreover, clemizole was still effective in blocking TRPC5 single channels in excised inside-out membrane patches, hinting to a direct block of TRPC5 by clemizole. Based on fluorometric [Ca(2+)]i measurements, clemizole exhibits a sixfold selectivity for TRPC5 over TRPC4β (IC50 = 6.4 µM), the closest structural relative of TRPC5, and an almost 10-fold selectivity over TRPC3 (IC50 = 9.1 µM) and TRPC6 (IC50 = 11.3 µM). TRPM3 and M8 as well as TRPV1, V2, V3, and V4 channels were only weakly affected by markedly higher clemizole concentrations. Clemizole was not only effective in blocking heterologously expressed TRPC5 homomers but also TRPC1:TRPC5 heteromers as well as native TRPC5-like currents in the U-87 glioblastoma cell line. PMID:25140002

  2. Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products: from disease marker to potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Geroldi, Diego; Falcone, Colomba; Emanuele, Enzo

    2006-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a cell-bound receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily which may be activated by a variety of proinflammatory ligands including advanced glycoxidation end products, S100/calgranulins, high mobility group box 1, and amyloid beta-peptide. RAGE has a secretory splice isoform, soluble RAGE (sRAGE), that lacks the transmembrane domain and therefore circulates in plasma. By competing with cell-surface RAGE for ligand binding, sRAGE may contribute to the removal/neutralization of circulating ligands thus functioning as a decoy. Clinical studies have recently shown that higher plasma levels of sRAGE are associated with a reduced risk of coronary artery disease, hypertension, the metabolic syndrome, arthritis and Alzheimer's disease. Increasing the production of plasma sRAGE is therefore considered to be a promising therapeutic target that has the potential to prevent vascular damage and neurodegeneration. This review presents the state of the art in the use of sRAGE as a disease marker and discusses the therapeutic potential of targeting sRAGE for the treatment of inflammation-related diseases such as atherosclerosis, arthritis and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:16842191

  3. Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation by midazolam by targeting transient receptor potential melastatin 7.

    PubMed

    Dou, Yunling; Li, Yuan; Chen, Jingkao; Wu, Sihan; Xiao, Xiao; Xie, Shanshan; Tang, Lipeng; Yan, Min; Wang, Youqiong; Lin, Jun; Zhu, Wenbo; Yan, Guangmei

    2013-03-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7), a Ca(2+)-permeable channel, has been demonstrated to be present in cancer cells and involved in their growth and proliferation. The present study used midazolam, a benzodiazepine class anesthesic, to pharmacologically intervene in the expression of TRPM7 and to inhibit cancer cell proliferation. Midazolam significantly inhibited the growth and proliferation of FaDu human hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma cells, concurring with the induction of G(0)/G(1) cell cycle arrest and blockage of Rb activation. Central-type and peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor antagonists did not abrogate proliferation inhibition by midazolam, while the specific TRPM7 agonist bradykinin reversed this effect. In addition, other benzodiazepines, diazepam and clonazepam also exhibited anti-proliferative activities. The inhibitory activity on cancer cell growth and proliferation, combined with the TRPM-dependent mechanism, reveals the anticancer potential of midazolam as a TRPM7 inhibitor and supports the suggestion that TRPM7 is a valuable target for pharmaceutical intervention. PMID:23426784

  4. Expression and function of transient receptor potential channels in the female bovine reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Ghavideldarestani, Maryam; Atkin, Stephen L; Leese, Henry J; Sturmey, Roger G

    2016-07-15

    The epithelium lining the oviduct is critical for early reproductive events, many of which are mediated via intracellular calcium ions. Despite this, little is known about the regulation of calcium homeostasis in the oviductal epithelium. Epithelial transient receptor potential channels (TRPCs) modulate calcium flux in other tissues, and their expression and functional regulation have therefore been examined using the bovine oviduct as a model for the human. The effects of FSH, LH, 17β-estradiol, and progesterone on TRPCs expression and intracellular calcium flux were determined. Transient receptor potential channels 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 were expressed in the bovine reproductive tract, and their gene expression varied throughout the estrous cycle. In more detailed studies undertaken on TRPC1 and 6, we show that protein expression varied through the estrus cycle; specifically, 17β-estradiol, FSH, and LH individually and in combination upregulated TRPC1 and 6 expression in cultured bovine oviduct epithelial cells although progesterone antagonized these effects. Functional studies showed changes in calcium mobilization in bovine oviduct epithelial cells were dependent on TRPCs. In conclusion, TRPC1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 are present in the epithelium lining the bovine oviduct, and TRPC1 and 6 vary through the estrous cycle suggesting an important role in early reproductive function. PMID:27001231

  5. Identification of amino acids involved in histamine potentiation of GABA A receptors.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Ulrike; Platt, Sarah J; Wolf, Steffen; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a neurotransmitter involved in a number of physiological and neuronal functions. In mammals, such as humans, and rodents, the histaminergic neurons found in the tuberomamillary nucleus project widely throughout the central nervous system. Histamine acts as positive modulator of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) and, in high concentrations (10 mM), as negative modulator of the strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor. However, the exact molecular mechanisms by which histamine acts on GABAARs are unknown. In our study, we aimed to identify amino acids potentially involved in the modulatory effect of histamine on GABAARs. We expressed GABAARs with 12 different point mutations in Xenopus laevis oocytes and characterized the effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. Our data demonstrate that the amino acid residues β2(N265) and β2(M286), which are important for modulation by propofol, are not involved in the action of histamine. However, we found that histamine modulation is dependent on the amino acid residues α1(R120), β2(Y157), β2(D163), β3(V175), and β3(Q185). We showed that the amino acid residues β2(Y157) and β3(Q185) mediate the positive modulatory effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents, whereas α1(R120) and β2(D163) form a potential histamine interaction site in GABAARs. PMID:26074818

  6. Identification of amino acids involved in histamine potentiation of GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Ulrike; Platt, Sarah J.; Wolf, Steffen; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a neurotransmitter involved in a number of physiological and neuronal functions. In mammals, such as humans, and rodents, the histaminergic neurons found in the tuberomamillary nucleus project widely throughout the central nervous system. Histamine acts as positive modulator of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) and, in high concentrations (10 mM), as negative modulator of the strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor. However, the exact molecular mechanisms by which histamine acts on GABAARs are unknown. In our study, we aimed to identify amino acids potentially involved in the modulatory effect of histamine on GABAARs. We expressed GABAARs with 12 different point mutations in Xenopus laevis oocytes and characterized the effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. Our data demonstrate that the amino acid residues β2(N265) and β2(M286), which are important for modulation by propofol, are not involved in the action of histamine. However, we found that histamine modulation is dependent on the amino acid residues α1(R120), β2(Y157), β2(D163), β3(V175), and β3(Q185). We showed that the amino acid residues β2(Y157) and β3(Q185) mediate the positive modulatory effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents, whereas α1(R120) and β2(D163) form a potential histamine interaction site in GABAARs. PMID:26074818

  7. Metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists potentiate a slow afterdepolarization in CNS neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, F.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    We have previously reported that, in the rat dorsolateral septal nucleus (DLSN), metabotropic glutamate receptor (met-GluR) agonists evoked a slow depolarization accompanied by an increase in membrane conductance and burst firing. We have speculated that the burst firing elicited by met-GluR agonists may be due to activation or enhancement of a non-specific cation current, which exists in some DLSN neurons. Now we report that a slow afterdepolarization (sADP) mediated by a non-specific cation current was potentiated by both 1S,3R-ACPD and quisqualate. In addition, met-GluR agonists unmask a sADP in DLSN neurons which did not show a sADP under control conditions. Our data suggest that a non-specific cation current can be potentiated by activation of the met-GluR.

  8. Group I and group II metabotropic glutamate receptor allosteric modulators as novel potential antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Walker, Adam G; Conn, P Jeffrey

    2015-02-01

    Recently, there has been a shift in the schizophrenia field focusing on restoring glutamate signaling. Extensive preclinical data suggests that mGlu5 PAMs could have efficacy in all three symptom domains but there is concern of potential adverse effects. New insights into mechanisms underlying this toxicity may provide a path for discovery of safe mGlu5 PAMs. Genetic mutations in mGlu1 have been described in schizophrenics creating interest in this receptor as a therapeutic target. Preclinical data demonstrated the antipsychotic potential of mGlu2/3 agonists but clinical trials were not successful. However, studies have suggested that mGlu2 is the subtype mediating antipsychotic effects and selective mGlu2 PAMs are now in clinical development. Finally, recent genetic studies suggest mGlu3 modulators may be pro-cognitive. PMID:25462291

  9. Histamine H3 receptor as a potential target for cognitive symptoms in neuropsychiatric diseases.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Bassem; Saad, Ali; Sadeq, Adel; Jalal, Fakhreya; Stark, Holger

    2016-10-01

    The potential contributions of the brain histaminergic system in neurodegenerative diseases, and the possiblity of histamine-targeting treatments is attracting considerable interests. The histamine H3 receptor (H3R) is expressed mainly in the central nervous system, and is, consequently, an attractive pharmacological target. Although recently described clinical trials have been disappointing in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and schizophrenia (SCH), numerous H3R antagonists, including pitolisant, demonstrate potential in the treatment of narcolepsy, excessive daytime sleepiness associated with cognitive impairment, epilepsy, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). This review focuses on the recent preclinical as well as clinical results that support the relevance of H3R antagonists for the treatment of cognitive symptoms in neuropsychiatric diseases, namely AD, epilepsy and SCH. The review summarizes the role of histaminergic neurotransmission with focus on these brain disorders, as well as the effects of numerous H3R antagonists on animal models and humans. PMID:27363923

  10. Trialkyltin Rexinoid-X Receptor Agonists Selectively Potentiate Thyroid Hormone Induced Programs of Xenopus laevis Metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Mengeling, Brenda J; Murk, Albertinka J; Furlow, J David

    2016-07-01

    The trialkyltins tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPT) can function as rexinoid-X receptor (RXR) agonists. We recently showed that RXR agonists can alter thyroid hormone (TH) signaling in a mammalian pituitary TH-responsive reporter cell line, GH3.TRE-Luc. The prevalence of TBT and TPT in the environment prompted us to test whether they could also affect TH signaling. Both trialkyltins induced the integrated luciferase reporter alone and potentiated TH activation at low doses. Trimethyltin, which is not an RXR agonist, did not. We turned to a simple, robust, and specific in vivo model system of TH action: metamorphosis of Xenopus laevis, the African clawed frog. Using a precocious metamorphosis assay, we found that 1nM TBT and TPT, but not trimethyltin, greatly potentiated the effect of TH treatment on resorption phenotypes of the tail, which is lost at metamorphosis, and in the head, which undergoes extensive remodeling including gill loss. Consistent with these responses, TH-induced caspase-3 activation in the tail was enhanced by cotreatment with TBT. Induction of a transgenic reporter gene and endogenous collagenase 3 (mmp13) and fibroblast-activating protein-α (fap) genes were not induced by TBT alone, but TH induction was significantly potentiated by TBT. However, induction of other TH receptor target genes such as TRβ and deiodinase 3 by TH were not affected by TBT cotreatment. These data indicate that trialkyltins that can function as RXR agonists can selectively potentiate gene expression and resultant morphological programs directed by TH signaling in vivo. PMID:27167774

  11. A COMPUTATIONALLY-BASED IDENTIFICATION ALGORITHM FOR POTENTIAL ESTROGEN RECEPTOR LIGANDS, PART II. AN EVALUATION OF A HUMAN RECEPTOR-BASED MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the capability of an expert system described in the previous paper (Bradbury et al., 2000; Toxicol. Sci.) to identify the potential for chemicals to act as ligands of mammalian estrogen receptors (ERs). The basis of that algorithm was a...

  12. Inhibition of TRPV1 channels enables long-term potentiation in the entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Banke, Tue G

    2016-04-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel is a non-selective cation channel that is mainly found in nociceptive neurons of the peripheral nervous system; however, these channels have also been located within the CNS, including the entorhinal cortex. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of principal entorhinal cortex (EC) layers II/III neurons revealed that evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents were depressed by application of the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin (CAP), accompanied by a change in the pair-pulse ratio (PPR). In addition, recordings of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) revealed that inter-event intervals but not amplitude were decreased in wild-type (WT) after application of CAP. This suggests that TRPV1 channels are functional in the entorhinal cortex and are located on inhibitory neurons with their axonal arborization within layers II/III. In order to study TRPV1 channels and their involvement in long-term potentiation (LTP) induction in a more intact circuit, extracellular field potential recordings were performed in EC layers II/III. It was found that activated TRPV1 channels preclude induction of long-term potentiation. In sharp contrast, clear LTP was observed when antagonizing TRPV1 channels or recording from TRPV1 knock-out mice. Thus, these results suggests that signaling through activating inhibitory presynaptic TRPV1 channels represents a novel mechanism by which a shift in feed-forward inhibition of layers II/III cortical principal neurons prompt changes in synaptic strength and thereby contribute to a change of information storage within the brain. PMID:26729265

  13. Potential role of transient receptor potential channel M5 in sensing putative pheromones in mouse olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Oshimoto, Arisa; Wakabayashi, Yoshihiro; Garske, Anna; Lopez, Roberto; Rolen, Shane; Flowers, Michael; Arevalo, Nicole; Restrepo, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Based on pharmacological studies of chemosensory transduction in transient receptor potential channel M5 (TRPM5) knockout mice it was hypothesized that this channel is involved in transduction for a subset of putative pheromones in mouse olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Yet, in the same study an electroolfactogram (EOG) in the mouse olfactory epithelium showed no significant difference in the responses to pheromones (and odors) between wild type and TRPM5 knockout mice. Here we show that the number of OSNs expressing TRPM5 is increased by unilateral naris occlusion. Importantly, EOG experiments show that mice lacking TRPM5 show a decreased response in the occluded epithelia to putative pheromones as opposed to wild type mice that show no change upon unilateral naris occlusion. This evidence indicates that under decreased olfactory sensory input TRPM5 plays a role in mediating putative pheromone transduction. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cyclic nucleotide gated channel A2 knockout (CNGA2-KO) mice that show substantially decreased or absent responses to odors and pheromones also have elevated levels of TRPM5 compared to wild type mice. Taken together, our evidence suggests that TRPM5 plays a role in mediating transduction for putative pheromones under conditions of reduced chemosensory input. PMID:23613997

  14. Potential Role of Transient Receptor Potential Channel M5 in Sensing Putative Pheromones in Mouse Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Oshimoto, Arisa; Wakabayashi, Yoshihiro; Garske, Anna; Lopez, Roberto; Rolen, Shane; Flowers, Michael; Arevalo, Nicole; Restrepo, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Based on pharmacological studies of chemosensory transduction in transient receptor potential channel M5 (TRPM5) knockout mice it was hypothesized that this channel is involved in transduction for a subset of putative pheromones in mouse olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Yet, in the same study an electroolfactogram (EOG) in the mouse olfactory epithelium showed no significant difference in the responses to pheromones (and odors) between wild type and TRPM5 knockout mice. Here we show that the number of OSNs expressing TRPM5 is increased by unilateral naris occlusion. Importantly, EOG experiments show that mice lacking TRPM5 show a decreased response in the occluded epithelia to putative pheromones as opposed to wild type mice that show no change upon unilateral naris occlusion. This evidence indicates that under decreased olfactory sensory input TRPM5 plays a role in mediating putative pheromone transduction. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cyclic nucleotide gated channel A2 knockout (CNGA2-KO) mice that show substantially decreased or absent responses to odors and pheromones also have elevated levels of TRPM5 compared to wild type mice. Taken together, our evidence suggests that TRPM5 plays a role in mediating transduction for putative pheromones under conditions of reduced chemosensory input. PMID:23613997

  15. Regulation of the transient receptor potential channel TRPM3 by phosphoinositides

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Balázs I.; Konrad, Maik; Ghosh, Debapriya; Mohr, Florian; Halaszovich, Christian R.; Leitner, Michael G.; Vriens, Joris

    2015-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) channel TRPM3 is a calcium-permeable cation channel activated by heat and by the neurosteroid pregnenolone sulfate (PregS). TRPM3 is highly expressed in sensory neurons, where it plays a key role in heat sensing and inflammatory hyperalgesia, and in pancreatic β cells, where its activation enhances glucose-induced insulin release. However, despite its functional importance, little is known about the cellular mechanisms that regulate TRPM3 activity. Here, we provide evidence for a dynamic regulation of TRPM3 by membrane phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs). Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI[4,5]P2) and ATP applied to the intracellular side of excised membrane patches promote recovery of TRPM3 from desensitization. The stimulatory effect of cytosolic ATP on TRPM3 reflects activation of phosphatidylinositol kinases (PI-Ks), leading to resynthesis of PIPs in the plasma membrane. Various PIPs directly enhance TRPM3 activity in cell-free inside-out patches, with a potency order PI(3,4,5)P3 > PI(3,5)P2 > PI(4,5)P2 ≈ PI(3,4)P2 >> PI(4)P. Conversely, TRPM3 activity is rapidly and reversibly inhibited by activation of phosphatases that remove the 5-phosphate from PIPs. Finally, we show that recombinant TRPM3, as well as the endogenous TRPM3 in insuloma cells, is rapidly and reversibly inhibited by activation of phospholipase C–coupled muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Our results reveal basic cellular mechanisms whereby membrane receptors can regulate TRPM3 activity. PMID:26123194

  16. Distribution of transient receptor potential channels in the rat carotid chemosensory pathway.

    PubMed

    Buniel, Maria C F; Schilling, William P; Kunze, Diana L

    2003-09-22

    Glomus cells in the carotid body respond to decreases in oxygen tension of the blood and transmit this sensory information in the carotid sinus nerve to the brain via neurons in the petrosal ganglion. G-protein-coupled membrane receptors linked to phospholipase C may play an important role in this response through the activation of the cation channels formed by the transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins. In the present study, expression of TRPC proteins in the rat carotid body and petrosal ganglion was examined using immunohistochemical techniques. TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPC6, and TRPC7 were present in neurons throughout the ganglion. TRPC1 was expressed in only 28% of petrosal neurons, and of this population, 45% were tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive, accounting for essentially all the TH-expressing neurons in the ganglion. Because TH-positive neurons project to the carotid body, this result suggests that TRPC1 is selectively associated with the chemosensory pathway. Confocal images through the carotid body showed that TRPC1/3/4/5/6 proteins localize to the carotid sinus nerve fibers, some of which were immunoreactive to an anti-neurofilament (NF) antibody cocktail. TRPC1 and TRPC3 were present in both NF-positive and NF-negative fibers, whereas TPRC4, TRPC5, and TRPC6 expression was primarily localized to NF-negative fibers. Only TRPC1 and TRPC4 were localized in the afferent nerve terminals that encircle individual glomus cells. TRPC7 was not expressed in sensory fibers. All the TRPC proteins studied were present in type I glomus cells. Although their role as receptor-activated cation channels in the chemosensory pathway is yet to be established, the presence of TRPC channels in glomus cells and sensory nerves of the carotid body suggests a role in facilitating and/or sustaining the hypoxic response. PMID:12900933

  17. Triphenyl phosphate-induced developmental toxicity in zebrafish: Potential role of the retinoic acid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Isales, Gregory M.; Hipszer, Rachel A.; Raftery, Tara D.; Chen, Albert; Stapleton, Heather M.; Volz, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Using zebrafish as a model, we previously reported that developmental exposure to triphenyl phosphate (TPP) – a high-production volume organophosphate-based flame retardant – results in dioxin-like cardiac looping impairments that are independent of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Using a pharmacologic approach, the objective of this study was to investigate the potential role of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) – a nuclear receptor that regulates vertebrate heart morphogenesis – in mediating TPP-induced developmental toxicity in zebrafish. We first revealed that static exposure of zebrafish from 5-72 hours post-fertilization (hpf) to TPP in the presence of non-toxic concentrations of an RAR antagonist (BMS493) significantly enhanced TPP-induced toxicity (relative to TPP alone), even though identical non-toxic BMS493 concentrations mitigated retinoic acid (RA)-induced toxicity. BMS493-mediated enhancement of TPP toxicity was not a result of differential TPP uptake or metabolism, as internal embryonic doses of TPP and diphenyl phosphate (DPP) – a primary TPP metabolite - were not different in the presence or absence of BMS493. Using real-time PCR, we then quantified the relative change in expression of cytochrome P450 26a1 (cyp26a1) – a major target gene for RA-induced RAR activation in zebrafish – and found that RA and TPP exposure resulted in a ∼5-fold increase and decrease in cyp26a1 expression, respectively, relative to vehicle-exposed embryos. To address whether TPP may interact with human RARs, we then exposed Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with chimeric human RARα-, RARβ-, or RARγ to TPP in the presence of RA, and found that TPP significantly inhibited RA-induced luciferase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Overall, our findings suggest that zebrafish RARs may be involved in mediating TPP-induced developmental toxicity, a mechanism of action that may have relevance to humans. PMID:25725299

  18. Human Milk Contains Novel Glycans That Are Potential Decoy Receptors for Neonatal Rotaviruses*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Song, Xuezheng; Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Mickum, Megan L.; Ashline, David J.; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; Estes, Mary K.; Reinhold, Vernon N.; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Human milk contains a rich set of soluble, reducing glycans whose functions and bioactivities are not well understood. Because human milk glycans (HMGs) have been implicated as receptors for various pathogens, we explored the functional glycome of human milk using shotgun glycomics. The free glycans from pooled milk samples of donors with mixed Lewis and Secretor phenotypes were labeled with a fluorescent tag and separated via multidimensional HPLC to generate a tagged glycan library containing 247 HMG targets that were printed to generate the HMG shotgun glycan microarray (SGM). To investigate the potential role of HMGs as decoy receptors for rotavirus (RV), a leading cause of severe gastroenteritis in children, we interrogated the HMG SGM with recombinant forms of VP8* domains of the RV outer capsid spike protein VP4 from human neonatal strains N155(G10P[11]) and RV3(G3P[6]) and a bovine strain, B223(G10P[11]). Glycans that were bound by RV attachment proteins were selected for detailed structural analyses using metadata-assisted glycan sequencing, which compiles data on each glycan based on its binding by antibodies and lectins before and after exo- and endo-glycosidase digestion of the SGM, coupled with independent MSn analyses. These complementary structural approaches resulted in the identification of 32 glycans based on RV VP8* binding, many of which are novel HMGs, whose detailed structural assignments by MSn are described in a companion report. Although sialic acid has been thought to be important as a surface receptor for RVs, our studies indicated that sialic acid is not required for binding of glycans to individual VP8* domains. Remarkably, each VP8* recognized specific glycan determinants within a unique subset of related glycan structures where specificity differences arise from subtle differences in glycan structures. PMID:25048705

  19. A novel antidiabetic therapy: free fatty acid receptors as potential drug target.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Hiroki; Kasubuchi, Mayu; Hasegawa, Sae; Pelisch, Nicolas; Kimura, Ikuo; Ichimura, Atsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Excessive dietary intake of fat is strongly involved in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Free fatty acids (FFAs), which are provided from dietary fat, are not only important nutrients, but also act as signaling molecules and stimulate key biological functions. Recent physiological and pharmacological studies have shown that several G-protein coupled receptors, such as FFAR1-4, are receptors for FFAs. FFAR1 and FFAR4 are activated by medium- and long-chain fatty acids, whereas FFAR2 and FFAR3 are activated by short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). These FFA receptors (FFARs) mediate various physiological functions, depending on the carbon chain length of the FFAs and the ligand specificity of the FFARs. Functional analyses have revealed that FFARs mediate important metabolic functions, such as peptide hormone secretion and inflammation, and thereby contribute to energy homeostasis. Since imbalances in energy homeostasis lead to metabolic disorders, such as obesity and T2D, FFARs are considered to be key therapeutic targets in these diseases. In particular, recent studies have shown that the administration of selective agonists of FFAR1 and FFAR4 improved glucose metabolism and ameliorated systemic metabolic disorders. Furthermore, the biological functions of SCFAs in anti-inflammation and energy metabolism are linked with the activation of FFAR2 and FFAR3. Hence, in this review, we summarize the physiological functions of FFARs and discuss the potential of selective ligands of FFARs for development as drugs to treat metabolic disorders, such as T2D and obesity. PMID:25732031

  20. Antidepressant/anxiolytic potential and adverse effect liabilities of melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonists in animal models.

    PubMed

    Chaki, Shigeyuki; Shimazaki, Toshiharu; Nishiguchi, Mariko; Funakoshi, Takeo; Iijima, Michihiko; Ito, Akie; Kanuma, Kosuke; Sekiguchi, Yoshinori

    2015-08-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCH1 receptor) is known to be involved in the control of mood and stress, in addition to the regulation of feeding. Here, we report further evidence that the blockade of the MCH1 receptor exhibits antidepressant and anxiolytic-like effects in a variety of animal models using TASP0382650 and TASP0489838, newly synthesized MCH1 receptor antagonists, with different scaffolds. Both TASP0382650 and TASP0489838 exhibited high affinities for human MCH1 receptor with IC50 values of 7.13 and 3.80nM, respectively. Both compounds showed potent antagonist activities at the MCH1 receptor, as assessed using MCH-increased [(35)S]GTPγS binding to human MCH1 receptor and an MCH-induced [Ca(2+)]i assay in rat MCH1 receptor expressing cells. In contrast, neither TASP0382650 nor TASP0489838 showed an affinity for the MCH2 receptor, another MCH receptor subtype. The oral administration of TASP0382650 or TASP0489838 significantly reduced the immobility time during the forced swimming test in rats, and reduced hyperemotionality induced by an olfactory bulbectomy, both of which are indicative of an antidepressant-like potential. In the olfactory bulbectomy model, the antidepressant effect of TASP0382650 appeared following a single administration, suggesting a faster onset of action, compared with current medications. Moreover, both TASP0382650 and TASP0489838 exhibited anxiolytic effects in several animal models of anxiety. In contrast, both TASP0382650 and TASP0489838 did not affect spontaneous locomotor activity, motor function, spatial memory during the Morris water maze task, or the convulsion threshold to pentylenetetrazole. These findings provide additional evidence that the blockade of the MCH1 receptor exhibits antidepressant- and anxiolytic activities with no adverse effects in experimental animal models. PMID:26044968

  1. Potentiation of acid-sensing ion channel activity by peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xiong; Wu, Jing; Ren, Cuixia; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Li, Yan-Kun; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Glutamate activates peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and contributes to inflammatory pain. However, it is still not clear the mechanisms are involved in group I mGluR-mediated peripheral sensitization. Herein, we report that group I mGluRs signaling sensitizes acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and contributes to acidosis-evoked pain. DHPG, a selective group I mGluR agonist, can potentiate the functional activity of ASICs, which mediated the proton-induced events. DHPG concentration-dependently increased proton-gated currents in DRG neurons. It shifted the proton concentration-response curve upwards, with a 47.3±7.0% increase of the maximal current response to proton. Group I mGluRs, especially mGluR5, mediated the potentiation of DHPG via an intracellular cascade. DHPG potentiation of proton-gated currents disappeared after inhibition of intracellular Gq/11 proteins, PLCβ, PKC or PICK1 signaling. Moreover, DHPG enhanced proton-evoked membrane excitability of rat DRG neurons and increased the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of spikes induced by acid stimuli. Finally, peripherally administration of DHPG dose-dependently exacerbated nociceptive responses to intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. Potentiation of ASIC activity by group I mGluR signaling in rat DRG neurons revealed a novel peripheral mechanism underlying group I mGluRs involvement in hyperalgesia. PMID:26946972

  2. Serotonin 5-HT7 receptor agents: structure-activity relationships and potential therapeutic applications in central nervous system disorders

    PubMed Central

    Leopoldo, Marcello; Lacivita, Enza; Berardi, Francesco; Perrone, Roberto; Hedlund, Peter B.

    2010-01-01

    Since its discovery in the 1940s in serum, the mammalian intestinal mucosa, and in the central nervous system, serotonin (5-HT) has been shown to be involved in virtually all cognitive and behavioral human functions, and alterations in its neurochemistry have been implicated in the etiology of a plethora of neuropsychiatric disorders. The cloning of 5-HT receptor subtypes has been of importance in enabling them to be classified as specific protein molecules encoded by specific genes. The 5-HT7 receptor is the most recently classified member of the serotonin receptor family. Since its identification, it has been the subject of intense research efforts driven by its presence in functionally relevant regions of the brain. The availability of some selective antagonists and agonists, in combination with genetically modified mice lacking the 5-HT7 receptor, has allowed for a better understanding of the pathophysiological role of this receptor. This paper reviews data on localization and pharmacological properties of the 5-HT7 receptor, and summarizes the results of structure-activity relationship studies aimed at the discovery of selective 5-HT7 receptor ligands. Additionally, an overview of the potential therapeutic applications of 5-HT7 receptor agonists and antagonists in central nervous system disorders is presented. PMID:20923682

  3. Physiological functions of transient receptor potential channels in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Ru; Lin, Mo-Jun; Sham, James S K

    2010-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) gene superfamily, which consists of 7 subfamilies with at least 28 mammalian homologues, is known to encode a wide variety of cation channels with diverse biophysical properties, activation mechanisms, and physiological functions. Recent studies have identified multiple TRP channel subtypes, belonging to the canonical (TRPC), melastatin-related (TRPM), and vanilloid-related (TRPV) subfamilies, in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). They operate as specific Ca(2+) pathways responsive to stimuli, including Ca(2+) store depletion, receptor activation, reactive oxygen species, growth factors, and mechanical stress. Increasing evidence suggests that these channels play crucial roles in agonist-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction, hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, smooth muscle cell proliferation, vascular remodeling, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. This chapter highlighted and discussed these putative physiological functions of TRP channels in pulmonary vasculatures. Since Ca(2+) ions regulate many cellular processes via specific Ca(2+) signals, future investigations of these novel channels will likely uncover more important regulatory mechanisms of pulmonary vascular functions in health and in disease states. PMID:20204726

  4. Angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitors: clinical potential in heart failure and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jagdeep SS; Lang, Chim C

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure remains a major concern across the globe as life expectancies and delivery of health care continue to improve. There has been a dearth of new developments in heart failure therapies in the last decade until last year, with the release of the results from the PARADIGM-HF Trial heralding the arrival of a promising new class of drug, ie, the angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor. In this review, we discuss the evolution of our incremental understanding of the neurohormonal mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of heart failure, which has led to our success in modulating its various pathways. We start by examining the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, followed by the challenges of modulating the natriuretic peptide system. We then delve deeper into the pharmacology and mechanisms by which angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitors achieve their significant cardiovascular benefits. Finally, we also consider the potential application of this new class of drug in other areas, such as heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, hypertension, patients with renal impairment, and following myocardial infarction. PMID:26082640

  5. Involvement of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) 4 in mouse sperm thermotaxis

    PubMed Central

    HAMANO, Koh-ichi; KAWANISHI, Tae; MIZUNO, Atsuko; SUZUKI, Makoto; TAKAGI, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) 4 is one of the temperature-sensitive ion channels involved in temperature receptors, and it is known to be activated from 35 to 40ºC. Here we analyzed sperm motility function of Trpv4 knockout (KO) mouse in temperature-gradient conditions to elucidate the thermotaxis of mouse sperm and the involvement of TRPV4 in thermotaxis. The sperm were introduced at the vertical column end of a T-shaped chamber filled with medium in a plastic dish, and we measured the number of sperm that arrived at both ends of the wide column where we had established a temperature gradient of approx. 2ºC, and we evaluated the sperm’s thermotaxis. Large numbers of wild-type (WT) mouse sperm migrated into the high level of the temperature gradient that was set in the wide column, and thermotaxis was confirmed. The ratio of migrated sperm at the high temperature level of the T-shaped chamber was decreased in the KO sperm and Ruthenium red (a TRPV antagonist) treated sperm compared with the WT sperm. The thermotaxis of the mouse sperm was confirmed, and the involvement of TRPV4 in this thermotaxis was suggested. PMID:27180924

  6. Transient Receptor Potential Canonical 7 (TRPC7): A Diacylglycerol-Activated Non-Selective Cation Channel

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuexin

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential canonical 7 (TRPC7) channel is the seventh member of the mammalian TRPC channel family. TRPC7 mRNA, protein and channel activity have been detected in many tissues and organs from mouse, rat and human. TRPC7 has high sequence homology with TRPC3 and TRPC6 and all three channels are activated by membrane receptors that couple to isoforms of phospholipase C (PLC) and mediate non-selective cation currents. TRPC7, along with TRPC3 and TRPC6 can be activated by direct exogenous application of diacylglycerol (DAG) analogs and by pharmacological maneuvers that increase endogenous DAG in cells. TRPC7 shows distinct properties of activation, such as constitutive activity, susceptibility to negative regulation by extracellular Ca2+ and by protein kinase C. TRPC7 can form heteromultimers with TRPC3 and TRPC6. Although TRPC7 remains one of the least studied TRPC channel, its role in various cell types and physiological and pathophysiological conditions is begining to emerge. PMID:24756707

  7. Transient receptor potential channel 1 (TRPC1) reduces calcium permeability in heteromeric channel complexes.

    PubMed

    Storch, Ursula; Forst, Anna-Lena; Philipp, Maximilian; Gudermann, Thomas; Mederos y Schnitzler, Michael

    2012-01-27

    Specific biological roles of the classical transient receptor potential channel 1 (TRPC1) are still largely elusive. To investigate the function of TRPC1 proteins in cell physiology, we studied heterologously expressed TRPC1 channels and found that recombinant TRPC1 subunits do not form functional homomeric channels. Instead, by electrophysiological analysis TRPC1 was shown to form functional heteromeric, receptor-operated channel complexes with TRPC3, -4, -5, -6, and -7 indicating that TRPC1 proteins can co-assemble with all members of the TRPC subfamily. In all TRPC1-containing heteromers, TRPC1 subunits significantly decreased calcium permeation. The exchange of select amino acids in the putative pore-forming region of TRPC1 further reduced calcium permeability, suggesting that TRPC1 subunits contribute to the channel pore. In immortalized immature gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons endogenously expressing TRPC1, -2, -5, and -6, down-regulation of TRPC1 resulted in increased calcium permeability and elevated basal cytosolic calcium concentrations. We did not observe any involvement of TRPC1 in store-operated cation influx. Notably, TRPC1 suppressed the migration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons without affecting cell proliferation. Conversely, in TRPC1 knockdown neurons, specific migratory properties like distance covered, locomotion speed, and directionality were increased. These findings suggest a novel regulatory mechanism relying on the expression of TRPC1 and the subsequent formation of heteromeric TRPC channel complexes with reduced calcium permeability, thereby fine-tuning neuronal migration. PMID:22157757

  8. Polymodal Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) Ion Channels in Chondrogenic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Szűcs Somogyi, Csilla; Matta, Csaba; Foldvari, Zsofia; Juhász, Tamás; Katona, Éva; Takács, Ádám Roland; Hajdú, Tibor; Dobrosi, Nóra; Gergely, Pál; Zákány, Róza

    2015-01-01

    Mature and developing chondrocytes exist in a microenvironment where mechanical load, changes of temperature, osmolarity and acidic pH may influence cellular metabolism. Polymodal Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) receptors are environmental sensors mediating responses through activation of linked intracellular signalling pathways. In chondrogenic high density cultures established from limb buds of chicken and mouse embryos, we identified TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV3, TRPV4 and TRPV6 mRNA expression with RT-PCR. In both cultures, a switch in the expression pattern of TRPVs was observed during cartilage formation. The inhibition of TRPVs with the non-selective calcium channel blocker ruthenium red diminished chondrogenesis and caused significant inhibition of proliferation. Incubating cell cultures at 41 °C elevated the expression of TRPV1, and increased cartilage matrix production. When chondrogenic cells were exposed to mechanical load at the time of their differentiation into matrix producing chondrocytes, we detected increased mRNA levels of TRPV3. Our results demonstrate that developing chondrocytes express a full palette of TRPV channels and the switch in the expression pattern suggests differentiation stage-dependent roles of TRPVs during cartilage formation. As TRPV1 and TRPV3 expression was altered by thermal and mechanical stimuli, respectively, these are candidate channels that contribute to the transduction of environmental stimuli in chondrogenic cells. PMID:26262612

  9. Angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitors: clinical potential in heart failure and beyond.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jagdeep S S; Lang, Chim C

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure remains a major concern across the globe as life expectancies and delivery of health care continue to improve. There has been a dearth of new developments in heart failure therapies in the last decade until last year, with the release of the results from the PARADIGM-HF Trial heralding the arrival of a promising new class of drug, ie, the angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor. In this review, we discuss the evolution of our incremental understanding of the neurohormonal mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of heart failure, which has led to our success in modulating its various pathways. We start by examining the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, followed by the challenges of modulating the natriuretic peptide system. We then delve deeper into the pharmacology and mechanisms by which angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitors achieve their significant cardiovascular benefits. Finally, we also consider the potential application of this new class of drug in other areas, such as heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, hypertension, patients with renal impairment, and following myocardial infarction. PMID:26082640

  10. GLP-1 receptor antagonist as a potential probe for pancreatic {beta}-cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Eri; Toyoda, Kentaro; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Masashi; Temma, Takashi; Hirao, Konomu; Nagakawa, Kenji; Saji, Hideo; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2009-11-20

    We examined exendin(9-39), an antagonist of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R), as a potential probe for imaging of pancreatic {beta}-cells. To evaluate in vitro receptor specificity, binding assay was performed using dispersed mouse islet cells. Binding assay showed competitive inhibition of [{sup 125}I]BH-exendin(9-39) binding by non-radioactive exendin(9-39). To assess in vivo selectivity, the biodistribution was evaluated by intravenous administration of [{sup 125}I]BH-exendin(9-39) to mice. Radioactivity of harvested pancreas reached highest levels at 60 and 120 min among organs examined except lung. Pre-administration of excess non-radioactive exendin(9-39) remarkably and specifically blocked the radioactivity of pancreas. After [{sup 125}I]BH-exendin(9-39) injection into transgenic mice with pancreatic {beta}-cells expressing GFP, fluorescent and radioactive signals of sections of pancreas were evaluated with an image analyzer. Imaging analysis showed that the fluorescent GFP signals and the radioactive signals were correspondingly located. Thus, the GLP-1R antagonist exendin(9-39) may serve as a useful probe for pancreatic {beta}-cell imaging.

  11. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, vascular tone and autoregulation of cerebral blood flow.

    PubMed

    Brayden, Joseph E; Earley, Scott; Nelson, Mark T; Reading, Stacey

    2008-09-01

    Members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel superfamily are present in vascular smooth muscle cells and play important roles in the regulation of vascular contractility. The TRPC3 and TRPC6 channels are activated by stimulation of several excitatory receptors in vascular smooth muscle cells. Activation of these channels leads to myocyte depolarization, which stimulates Ca2+ entry via voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCC), leading to vasoconstriction. The TRPV4 channels in arterial myocytes are activated by epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, and activation of the channels enhances Ca2+ spark and transient Ca2+-sensitive K+ channel activity, thereby hyperpolarizing and relaxing vascular smooth muscle cells. The TRPC6 and TRPM4 channels are activated by mechanical stimulation of cerebral artery myocytes. Subsequent depolarization and activation of VDCC Ca2+ entry is directly linked to the development of myogenic tone in vitro and to autoregulation of cerebral blood flow in vivo. These findings imply a fundamental importance of TRP channels in the regulation of vascular smooth muscle tone and suggest that TRP channels could be important targets for drug therapy under conditions in which vascular contractility is disturbed (e.g. hypertension, stroke, vasospasm). PMID:18215190

  12. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin-3 (TRPM3) Mediates Nociceptive-Like Responses in Hydra vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Malafoglia, Valentina; Traversetti, Lorenzo; Del Grosso, Floriano; Scalici, Massimiliano; Lauro, Filomena; Russo, Valeria; Persichini, Tiziana; Salvemini, Daniela; Mollace, Vincenzo; Fini, Massimo; Raffaeli, William

    2016-01-01

    The ability of mammals to feel noxious stimuli lies in a heterogeneous group of primary somatosensory neurons termed nociceptors, which express specific membrane receptors, such as the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) family. Here, we show that one of the most important nociceptive-like pathways is conserved in the freshwater coelenterate Hydra vulgaris, the most primitive organism possessing a nervous system. In particular, we found that H. vulgaris expresses TRPM3, a nociceptor calcium channel involved in the detection of noxious heat in mammals. Furthermore, we detected that both heat shock and TRPM3 specific agonist (i.e., pregnenolone sulfate) induce the modulation of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS), two genes activated by TRP-mediated heat painful stimuli in mammals. As expected, these effects are inhibited by a TRPM3 antagonist (i.e., mefenamic acid). Interestingly, the TRPM3 agonist and heat shock also induce the expression of nuclear transcription erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), known markers of oxidative stress; noteworthy gene expression was also inhibited by the TRPM3 antagonist. As a whole, our results demonstrate the presence of conserved molecular oxidative/nociceptive-like pathways at the primordial level of the animal kingdom. PMID:26974325

  13. Acid potentiation of the capsaicin receptor determined by a key extracellular site.

    PubMed

    Jordt, S E; Tominaga, M; Julius, D

    2000-07-01

    The capsaicin (vanilloid) receptor, VR1, is a sensory neuron-specific ion channel that serves as a polymodal detector of pain-producing chemical and physical stimuli. The response of VR1 to capsaicin or noxious heat is dynamically potentiated by extracellular protons within a pH range encountered during tissue acidosis, such as that associated with arthritis, infarction, tumor growth, and other forms of injury. A molecular determinant for this important physiological activity was localized to an extracellular Glu residue (E600) in the region linking the fifth transmembrane domain with the putative pore-forming region of the channel. We suggest that this residue serves as a key regulatory site of the receptor by setting sensitivity to other noxious stimuli in response to changes in extracellular proton concentration. We also demonstrate that protons, vanilloids, and heat promote channel opening through distinct pathways, because mutations at a second site (E648) selectively abrogate proton-evoked channel activation without diminishing responses to other noxious stimuli. Our findings provide molecular evidence for stimulus-specific steps in VR1 activation and offer strategies for the development of novel analgesic agents. PMID:10859346

  14. Involvement of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) 4 in mouse sperm thermotaxis.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Koh-Ichi; Kawanishi, Tae; Mizuno, Atsuko; Suzuki, Makoto; Takagi, Yuji

    2016-08-25

    Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) 4 is one of the temperature-sensitive ion channels involved in temperature receptors, and it is known to be activated from 35 to 40ºC. Here we analyzed sperm motility function of Trpv4 knockout (KO) mouse in temperature-gradient conditions to elucidate the thermotaxis of mouse sperm and the involvement of TRPV4 in thermotaxis. The sperm were introduced at the vertical column end of a T-shaped chamber filled with medium in a plastic dish, and we measured the number of sperm that arrived at both ends of the wide column where we had established a temperature gradient of approx. 2ºC, and we evaluated the sperm's thermotaxis. Large numbers of wild-type (WT) mouse sperm migrated into the high level of the temperature gradient that was set in the wide column, and thermotaxis was confirmed. The ratio of migrated sperm at the high temperature level of the T-shaped chamber was decreased in the KO sperm and Ruthenium red (a TRPV antagonist) treated sperm compared with the WT sperm. The thermotaxis of the mouse sperm was confirmed, and the involvement of TRPV4 in this thermotaxis was suggested. PMID:27180924

  15. Diabetes Stimulates Osteoclastogenesis by Acidosis-Induced Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channels.

    PubMed

    Reni, Carlotta; Mangialardi, Giuseppe; Meloni, Marco; Madeddu, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes have lower bone mineral density and higher risk of fractures. The role of osteoblasts in diabetes-related osteoporosis is well acknowledged whereas the role of osteoclasts (OCLs) is still unclear. We hypothesize that OCLs participate in pathological bone remodeling. We conducted studies in animals (streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice) and cellular models to investigate canonical and non-canonical mechanisms underlying excessive OCL activation. Diabetic mice show an increased number of active OCLs. In vitro studies demonstrate the involvement of acidosis in OCL activation and the implication of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1). In vivo studies confirm the establishment of local acidosis in the diabetic bone marrow (BM) as well as the ineffectiveness of insulin in correcting the pH variation and osteoclast activation. Conversely, treatment with TRPV1 receptor antagonists re-establishes a physiological OCL availability. These data suggest that diabetes causes local acidosis in the BM that in turn increases osteoclast activation through the modulation of TRPV1. The use of clinically available TRPV1 antagonists may provide a new means to combat bone problems associated with diabetes. PMID:27468810

  16. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin-3 (TRPM3) Mediates Nociceptive-Like Responses in Hydra vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Malafoglia, Valentina; Traversetti, Lorenzo; Del Grosso, Floriano; Scalici, Massimiliano; Lauro, Filomena; Russo, Valeria; Persichini, Tiziana; Salvemini, Daniela; Mollace, Vincenzo; Fini, Massimo; Raffaeli, William; Muscoli, Carolina; Colasanti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The ability of mammals to feel noxious stimuli lies in a heterogeneous group of primary somatosensory neurons termed nociceptors, which express specific membrane receptors, such as the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) family. Here, we show that one of the most important nociceptive-like pathways is conserved in the freshwater coelenterate Hydra vulgaris, the most primitive organism possessing a nervous system. In particular, we found that H. vulgaris expresses TRPM3, a nociceptor calcium channel involved in the detection of noxious heat in mammals. Furthermore, we detected that both heat shock and TRPM3 specific agonist (i.e., pregnenolone sulfate) induce the modulation of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS), two genes activated by TRP-mediated heat painful stimuli in mammals. As expected, these effects are inhibited by a TRPM3 antagonist (i.e., mefenamic acid). Interestingly, the TRPM3 agonist and heat shock also induce the expression of nuclear transcription erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), known markers of oxidative stress; noteworthy gene expression was also inhibited by the TRPM3 antagonist. As a whole, our results demonstrate the presence of conserved molecular oxidative/nociceptive-like pathways at the primordial level of the animal kingdom. PMID:26974325

  17. Post-anesthesia AMPA receptor potentiation prevents anesthesia-induced learning and synaptic deficits.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lianyan; Cichon, Joseph; Ninan, Ipe; Yang, Guang

    2016-06-22

    Accumulating evidence has shown that repeated exposure to general anesthesia during critical stages of brain development results in long-lasting behavioral deficits later in life. To date, there has been no effective treatment to mitigate the neurotoxic effects of anesthesia on brain development. By performing calcium imaging in the mouse motor cortex, we show that ketamine anesthesia causes a marked and prolonged reduction in neuronal activity during the period of post-anesthesia recovery. Administration of the AMPAkine drug CX546 [1-(1,4-benzodioxan-6-ylcarbonyl)piperidine] to potentiate AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) receptor activity during emergence from anesthesia in mice enhances neuronal activity and prevents long-term motor learning deficits induced by repeated neonatal anesthesia. In addition, we show that CX546 administration also ameliorates various synaptic deficits induced by anesthesia, including reductions in synaptic expression of NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) and AMPA receptor subunits, motor training-evoked neuronal activity, and dendritic spine remodeling associated with motor learning. Together, our results indicate that pharmacologically enhancing neuronal activity during the post-anesthesia recovery period could effectively reduce the adverse effects of early-life anesthesia. PMID:27334260

  18. Acid-sensing ion channels and transient-receptor potential ion channels in zebrafish taste buds.

    PubMed

    Levanti, M; Randazzo, B; Viña, E; Montalbano, G; Garcia-Suarez, O; Germanà, A; Vega, J A; Abbate, F

    2016-09-01

    Sensory information from the environment is required for life and survival, and it is detected by specialized cells which together make up the sensory system. The fish sensory system includes specialized organs that are able to detect mechanical and chemical stimuli. In particular, taste buds are small organs located on the tongue in terrestrial vertebrates that function in the perception of taste. In fish, taste buds occur on the lips, the flanks, and the caudal (tail) fins of some species and on the barbels of others. In fish taste receptor cells, different classes of ion channels have been detected which, like in mammals, presumably participate in the detection and/or transduction of chemical gustatory signals. However, since some of these ion channels are involved in the detection of additional sensory modalities, it can be hypothesized that taste cells sense stimuli other than those specific for taste. This mini-review summarizes current knowledge on the presence of transient-receptor potential (TRP) and acid-sensing (ASIC) ion channels in the taste buds of teleosts, especially adult zebrafish. Up to now ASIC4, TRPC2, TRPA1, TRPV1 and TRPV4 ion channels have been found in the sensory cells, while ASIC2 was detected in the nerves supplying the taste buds. PMID:27513962

  19. Diabetes Stimulates Osteoclastogenesis by Acidosis-Induced Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channels

    PubMed Central

    Reni, Carlotta; Mangialardi, Giuseppe; Meloni, Marco; Madeddu, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes have lower bone mineral density and higher risk of fractures. The role of osteoblasts in diabetes-related osteoporosis is well acknowledged whereas the role of osteoclasts (OCLs) is still unclear. We hypothesize that OCLs participate in pathological bone remodeling. We conducted studies in animals (streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice) and cellular models to investigate canonical and non-canonical mechanisms underlying excessive OCL activation. Diabetic mice show an increased number of active OCLs. In vitro studies demonstrate the involvement of acidosis in OCL activation and the implication of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1). In vivo studies confirm the establishment of local acidosis in the diabetic bone marrow (BM) as well as the ineffectiveness of insulin in correcting the pH variation and osteoclast activation. Conversely, treatment with TRPV1 receptor antagonists re-establishes a physiological OCL availability. These data suggest that diabetes causes local acidosis in the BM that in turn increases osteoclast activation through the modulation of TRPV1. The use of clinically available TRPV1 antagonists may provide a new means to combat bone problems associated with diabetes. PMID:27468810

  20. Activation of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 by quercetin and its analogs.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Miyoshi, Noriyuki; Ishii, Takeshi; Nishikawa, Miyu; Ikushiro, Shinichi; Watanabe, Tatsuo

    2016-05-01

    The agonistic activity of quercetin and its analogs towards the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) has been experimentally investigated. The human TRPA1 was expressed in HEK293T cells using a tetracycline-inducible system. The activation of TRPA1 was evaluated by a fluo-4 fluorescence assay based on calcium sensing. The results of a structure-activity relationship study led to the selection of six flavonoids, all of which activated the TRPA1 channel in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, the activation of TRPA1 by these flavonoid aglycones was completely inhibited by the co-treatment of the HEK293T cells with the TRPA1-specific antagonist, HC-030031. Several flavonoid glycosides and metabolites were also evaluated, but did not activate the TRPA1 except for methylated quercetin. On the other hand, TRPV1 (vanilloid receptor) did not respond to any of the flavonoids evaluated in this study. Therefore, these data suggest that the flavonoids would be promising ligands for the TRPA1. PMID:26806540

  1. Transient Receptor Potential Channel 1 (TRPC1) Reduces Calcium Permeability in Heteromeric Channel Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Storch, Ursula; Forst, Anna-Lena; Philipp, Maximilian; Gudermann, Thomas; Mederos y Schnitzler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Specific biological roles of the classical transient receptor potential channel 1 (TRPC1) are still largely elusive. To investigate the function of TRPC1 proteins in cell physiology, we studied heterologously expressed TRPC1 channels and found that recombinant TRPC1 subunits do not form functional homomeric channels. Instead, by electrophysiological analysis TRPC1 was shown to form functional heteromeric, receptor-operated channel complexes with TRPC3, -4, -5, -6, and -7 indicating that TRPC1 proteins can co-assemble with all members of the TRPC subfamily. In all TRPC1-containing heteromers, TRPC1 subunits significantly decreased calcium permeation. The exchange of select amino acids in the putative pore-forming region of TRPC1 further reduced calcium permeability, suggesting that TRPC1 subunits contribute to the channel pore. In immortalized immature gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons endogenously expressing TRPC1, -2, -5, and -6, down-regulation of TRPC1 resulted in increased calcium permeability and elevated basal cytosolic calcium concentrations. We did not observe any involvement of TRPC1 in store-operated cation influx. Notably, TRPC1 suppressed the migration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons without affecting cell proliferation. Conversely, in TRPC1 knockdown neurons, specific migratory properties like distance covered, locomotion speed, and directionality were increased. These findings suggest a novel regulatory mechanism relying on the expression of TRPC1 and the subsequent formation of heteromeric TRPC channel complexes with reduced calcium permeability, thereby fine-tuning neuronal migration. PMID:22157757

  2. [Regulation of potential-dependant calcium channels by 5-HT1B serotonin receptors in various populations of hippocampal cells].

    PubMed

    Kononov, A V; Ivanov, S V; Zinchenko, V P

    2013-01-01

    Metabotropic serotonin receptors of 5HT1-type in brain neurons participate in regulation of such human emotional states as aggression, fear and dependence on alcohol. Activated presynaptic 5-HT1B receptors suppress the Ca2+ influx through the potential-dependent calcium channels in certain neurons. The Ca2+ influx into the cells has been measured by increase of calcium ions concentration in cytoplasm in reply to the depolarization caused by 35mM KC1. Using system of image analysis in hippocampal cells culture we found out that Ca2+-signals to depolarization oin various populations of neurons differed in form, speed and amplitude. 5HT1B receptor agonists in 86 +/- 3 % of neurons slightly suppressed the activity of potential-dependent calcium channels. Two minor cell populations (5-8 % of cells each) were found out, that strongly differed in Ca2+ signal desensitization. Calcium signal caused by depolarization in one cells population differed in characteristic delay and high rate of decay. 5HT1B receptor agonists strongly inhibited the amplitude of the Ca2+ response on KCl only in this population of neurons. The calcium signal in second cell population differed by absence desensitization and smaller amplitude which constantly increased during depolarization. 5HT 1 B receptor agonists increased the calcium response amplitude to depolarization in this population of neurons. Thus we show various sensitivity of potential-dependent calcium channels of separate neurons to 5HTB1 receptor agonist. PMID:23659057

  3. Endothelin potentiates TRPV1 via ETA receptor-mediated activation of protein kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Tim D; Zöllner, Christian; Kepura, Frauke; Mousa, Shaaban S; Eichhorst, Jenny; Schaefer, Michael; Furkert, Jens; Stein, Christoph; Oksche, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Background Endothelin-1 (ET-1) both stimulates nociceptors and sensitizes them to noxious stimuli, an effect probably mediated by the ETA receptor (ETAR) expressed in sensory neurons. The cellular mechanisms of this ET-1-mediated effect are only poorly understood. TRPV1, the heat-, pH- and capsaicin-sensitive cation channel already known to be modulated by a number of cellular mediators released in response to noxious stimuli and during inflammation, is a potential target for the action of ET-1. Results We studied the effects of ET-1 on TRPV1 in sensory neurons from the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and in HEK293 cells coexpressing TRPV1 and the ETAR. Specific 125I-ET-1 binding sites (817 ± 92 fmol/mg) were detected in membrane preparations of DRG with an ETAR/ETBR ratio of 60:40. In an immunofluorescence analysis, coexpression of TRPV1 and the ETAR was found in a subpopulation of primary sensory neurons. ET-1 strongly potentiated capsaicin-induced TRPV1 currents in some neurons, and in HEK293 cells co-expressing TRPV1 and the ETAR. Weaker potentiation was observed in HEK293 cells coexpressing TRPV1 and the ETBR. ETAR activation also increased responses to low pH and heat. In HEK293 cells, strong potentiation of TRPV1 like that induced by ET-1 via the ETAR could be induced by PKC activation, but not with activators of the adenylyl cyclase or the PKA pathway. Furthermore, inhibition of PKC with bisindolylmaleimide X (BIM X) or mutation of the PKC phosphorylation site S800 completely prevented ETAR-mediated potentiation. Conclusion We conclude that ET-1 potentiates TRPV1 by a PKC-dependent mechanism and that this could play a major role in the algogenic and hyperalgesic effects of ET-1 described in previous studies. PMID:18001466

  4. Abuse Potential of Soma®: the GABAA Receptor as a Target

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Lorie A.; Gatch, Michael B.; Forster, Michael J.; Dillon, Glenn H.

    2010-01-01

    Soma® (carisoprodol) is an increasingly abused, centrally-acting muscle relaxant. Despite the prevalence of carisoprodol abuse, its mechanism of action remains unclear. Its sedative effects, which contribute to its therapeutic and recreational use, are generally attributed to the actions of its primary metabolite, meprobamate, at GABAA receptors (GABAAR). Meprobamate is a controlled substance at the federal level; ironically, carisoprodol is not currently classified as such. Using behavioral and molecular pharmacological approaches, we recently demonstrated carisoprodol, itself, is capable of modulating GABAAR function in a manner similar to central nervous system depressants. Its functional similarities with this highly addictive class of drugs may contribute to the abuse potential of carisoprodol. The site of action of carisoprodol has not been identified; based on our studies, interaction with benzodiazepine or barbiturate sites is unlikely. These recent findings, when coupled with numerous reports in the literature, support the contention that the non-controlled status of carisoprodol should be reevaluated. PMID:20419052

  5. Potential protective mechanisms of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) signaling in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vatsal; Vezina, Chad M

    2011-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is an evolutionarily conserved ligand activated transcription factor best known for its role in mediating toxic responses to dioxin-like environmental contaminants. However, AHR signaling has also emerged as an active participant in processes of normal development and disease progression. Here, we review the role of AHR signaling in prostate development and disease processes, with a particular emphasis on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Inappropriate AHR activation has recently been associated with a decreased risk of symptomatic BPH in humans and has been shown to impair prostate development and disrupt endocrine signaling in rodents. We highlight known physiological responses to AHR activation in prostate and other tissues and discuss potential mechanisms by which it may act in adult human prostate to protect against symptomatic BPH. PMID:21684673

  6. Immunohistochemical study on the distribution of canonical transient receptor potential channels in rat basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yoon Hee; Kim, Daejin; Moon, Nam Joo; Oh, Chang Seok; Lee, Eunju; Shin, Dong Hoon; Kim, Sung Su; Lee, Won Bok; Lee, Jun-Young; Cha, Choong Ik

    2007-07-01

    In the present study, we examined the localizations of canonical transient receptor potential channels (TRPCs) in rat basal ganglia. The dot-like staining pattern of TRPC5 was observed through the globus pallidus (GP) and caudate-putamen. TRPC7 had a strikingly high level of expression in the neuropil in the GP. In the subthalamic nucleus, strong staining for TRPC5 was observed in the cell bodies, while moderate to high immunoreactivies for TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4 and TRPC7 were found in the cell bodies and surrounding neuropil. In the substantia nigra, immunoreactivities for TRPC3 and TRPC7 were prominent in the cell bodies and several processes in the pars compacta and pars reticulata. TRPC6 was expressed in the neuropil, not in the cell bodies. This study may provide useful data for the future investigations on the structural and functional properties of TRPCs. PMID:17590510

  7. Calreticulin, a potential cell surface receptor involved in cell penetration of anti-DNA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Seddiki, N; Nato, F; Lafaye, P; Amoura, Z; Piette, J C; Mazié, J C

    2001-05-15

    A 50-kDa protein was purified as a potential receptor, using an affinity matrix containing biotinylated F14.6 or H9.3 anti-DNA mAbs derived from autoimmune (New Zealand Black x New Zealand White)F(1) mouse and membrane extracts from cells. This protein was identified as calreticulin (CRT) by microsequencing. Confocal microscopy and FACS analysis showed that CRT was present on the surface of various cells. CRT protein was recognized by a panel of anti-DNA mAbs in ELISA. The binding of F14.6 to lymphocytes and Chinese hamster ovary cells was inhibited by soluble CRT or SPA-600. Thus, the anti-DNA mAbs used in this study bound to CRT, suggesting that CRT may mediate their penetration into the cells and play an important role in lupus pathogenesis. PMID:11342668

  8. Vanilloid and Melastatin Transient Receptor Potential Channels in Vascular Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Earley, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily consists of six subfamilies that are defined by structural homology: TRPC (conventional or canonical), TRPV (vanilloid), TRPM (melastatin), TRPA (ankyrin), TRPP (polycystin), and TRPML (mucoliptin). This review focuses on channels belonging to the vanilloid (V) and melastatin (M) TRP subfamilies. The TRPV subfamily consists of six members (TRPV1–6) and the TRPM subfamily has eight (TRPM1–8). The basic biophysical properties of these channels are briefly described. All of these channels except TRPV5, TRPV6, and TRPM1 are reportedly present in arterial smooth muscle from various segments of the vasculature. Studies demonstrating involvement of TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV4, TRPM4, TRPM7 and TRPM8 in regulation of arterial smooth muscle function are reviewed. The functions of TRPV3, TRPM2, TRPM3, and TRPM6 channels in arterial myocytes have not been reported. PMID:20536737

  9. Transport of AMPA receptors during long-term potentiation is impaired in rats with hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Monfort, Pilar; Piedrafita, Blanca; Felipo, Vicente

    2009-12-01

    Cognitive function is impaired in patients with hepatic encephalopathy. Learning ability is also impaired in rats with hepatic encephalopathy due to portacaval shunts. Long-term potentiation (LTP) in hippocampus, considered the basis of some forms of learning and memory, is impaired in rats with portacaval shunt. We analyzed the mechanisms by which LTP is impaired in these rats. In control rats, application of the tetanus to induce LTP increases phosphorylation of Thr286 of calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase II. This activates the kinase which phosphorylates the GluR1 subunit of AMPA receptors in Ser831 and induces its translocation to the post-synaptic densities. All these steps are completely prevented in rats with hepatic encephalopathy in which the tetanus does not induce phosphorylation of CaMKII or GluR1 nor translocation of this subunit to the post-synaptic membrane. This would explain the impairment in LTP in these rats. PMID:19450629

  10. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in the airway: role in airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Grace, M S; Baxter, M; Dubuis, E; Birrell, M A; Belvisi, M G

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, there has been an explosion of scientific publications reporting the many and varied roles of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels in physiological and pathological systems throughout the body. The aim of this review is to summarize the existing literature on the role of TRP channels in the lungs and discuss what is known about their function under normal and diseased conditions. The review will focus mainly on the pathogenesis and symptoms of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and the role of four members of the TRP family: TRPA1, TRPV1, TRPV4 and TRPM8. We hope that the article will help the reader understand the role of TRP channels in the normal airway and how their function may be changed in the context of respiratory disease. PMID:24286227

  11. Changes in Membrane Receptors and Ion Channels as Potential Biomarkers for Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Rebecca; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), a degenerative joint condition, is currently difficult to detect early enough for any of the current treatment options to be completely successful. Early diagnosis of this disease could increase the numbers of patients who are able to slow its progression. There are now several diseases where membrane protein biomarkers are used for early diagnosis. The numbers of proteins in the membrane is vast and so it is a rich source of potential biomarkers for OA but we need more knowledge of these before they can be considered practical biomarkers. How are they best measured and are they selective to OA or even certain types of OA? The first step in this process is to identify membrane proteins that change in OA. Here, we summarize several ion channels and receptors that change in OA models and/or OA patients, and may thus be considered candidates as novel membrane biomarkers of OA. PMID:26648874

  12. Potential soluble, reactive, adsorptive and particulate tracers for source-receptor experiments in MATEX

    SciTech Connect

    Senum, G.I.; Dietz, R.N.

    1985-07-01

    A survey of potential non-conservative tracers for use in source-receptor studies in acid deposition is presented. Classes of tracers considered were water soluble tracers, chemically reactive tracers, adsorptive tracers and particulate tracers. A criterion used for the selection of compounds for nonconservative tracers is that they be as reasonably compatible in the analytical detection system used for the conservative perfluorocarbon tracers. For each class of non-conservative tracers several example compounds are given and discussed, along with the research needed to develop these tracers. A reasonable development time for these tracers is as follows; adsorptive tracers, 2 years; particulate tracers, 2 1/2 years; soluble tracers, 3 years and reactive tracers, 3 1/2 years. By development, it is meant that 1 or 2 tracers have been developed and at least demonstrated in a small field test. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. The Potential Applications of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor δ Ligands in Assisted Reproductive Technology

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jaou-Chen

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ, also known as PPARβ) has ubiquitous distribution and extensive biological functions. The reproductive function of PPARδ was first revealed in the uterus at the implantation site. Since then, PPARδ and its ligand have been discovered in all reproductive tissues, including the gametes and the preimplantation embryos. PPARδ in preimplantation embryos is normally activated by oviduct-derived PPARδ ligand. PPARδ activation is associated with an increase in embryonic cell proliferation and a decrease in programmed cell death (apoptosis). On the other hand, the role of PPARδ and its ligand in gamete formation and function is less well understood. This review will summarize the reproductive functions of PPARδ and project its potential applications in assisted reproductive technology. PMID:19096716

  14. Canonical transient receptor potential channels expression is elevated in a porcine model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guoqing; Oboukhova, Elena A; Kumar, Sanjay; Sturek, Michael; Obukhov, Alexander G

    2009-05-01

    Plasma epinephrine and heart rate are elevated in metabolic syndrome, suggesting enhanced catecholamine secretion from the adrenal medulla. Canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels are implicated in mediating hormone-induced Ca(2+) influx and catecholamine secretion in adrenomedullary chromaffin cells. We studied the pattern of TRPC expression in the pig adrenal medulla and investigated whether adrenal TRPC expression is altered in prediabetic metabolic syndrome Ossabaw miniature pigs. We used a combination of molecular biological, biochemical, and fluorescence imaging techniques. We determined the sequence of pig TRPC1 and TRPC3-7 channels. We found that the pig adrenal medulla expressed predominantly TRPC1, TRPC5, and TRPC6 transcripts. The expression level of these TRPCs was significantly elevated in the adrenal medulla from pigs with metabolic syndrome. Interestingly, aldosterone, which is endogenously secreted in the adjacent adrenal cortex, increased TRPC1, TRPC5, and TRPC6 expression in adrenal chromaffin cells isolated from metabolic syndrome but not control pigs. Spironolactone, a blocker of mineralocorticoid receptors, inhibited the aldosterone effect. Dexamethasone also increased TRPC5 expression in metabolic syndrome chromaffin cells. The amplitude of hormone-induced divalent cation influx correlated with the level of TRPC expression in adrenal chromaffin cells. Orai1/Stim1 protein expression was not significantly altered in the metabolic syndrome adrenal medulla when compared with the control. We propose that in metabolic syndrome, abnormally elevated adrenal TRPC expression may underlie increased plasma epinephrine and heart rate. The excess of plasma catecholamines and increased heart rate are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Thus, TRPCs are potential therapeutic targets in the fight against cardiovascular disease. PMID:19221052

  15. Functionalized Ergot-alkaloids as potential dopamine D3 receptor agonists for treatment of schizophrenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Bojidarka; Spiteller, Michael

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between the molecular structure and physical properties of functionalized naturally occurred Ergot-alkaloids as potential dopamine D3 receptor agonists is presented. The molecular modeling of the ergoline-skeleton is based on the comprehensive theoretical study of the binding affinity of the isolated chemicals towards the active sites of the D3 sub-type receptor (D3R) loops. The studied proton accepting ability under physiological conditions allows classifying four types of monocationics, characterizing with the different binding modes to D3R involving selected amino acid residues to the active sites. These results marked the pharmaceutical potential and clinical usage of the reported compounds as antipsychotic drugs for Schizophrenia treatment, since they allowed evaluating the highlights of the different hypothesizes of the biochemical causes the illness. The applied complex approach for theoretical and experimental elucidation, including quantum chemistry method, electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric (MS) methods, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational IR and Raman spectroscopy on the isolated fifteen novel derivatives (1)-(15) and their different protonated forms (1a)-(15a) evidenced a strong dependence of molecular conformation, physical properties and binding affinity. Thus, the semi-synthetic functionalization of the naturally occurred products (NPs), provided significant possibilities to further molecular drugs-design and development of novel derivatives with wanted biological function, using the established profile of selected classes/families of NPs. The work described chiefly the non-linear (NL) approach for the interpretation of the mass chromatograms on the performed hybrid high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) tandem MS/MS and MS/MS/MS experiments, discussing the merits and great diversity of instrumentation flexibility, thus achieving fundamental

  16. Screening of Transient Receptor Potential Canonical Channel Activators Identifies Novel Neurotrophic Piperazine Compounds.

    PubMed

    Sawamura, Seishiro; Hatano, Masahiko; Takada, Yoshinori; Hino, Kyosuke; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Tanikawa, Jun; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Hase, Hideharu; Nakao, Akito; Hirano, Mitsuru; Rotrattanadumrong, Rachapun; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Mori, Masayuki X; Nishida, Motohiro; Hu, Yaopeng; Inoue, Ryuji; Nagata, Ryu; Mori, Yasuo

    2016-03-01

    Transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) proteins form Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels activated upon stimulation of metabotropic receptors coupled to phospholipase C. Among the TRPC subfamily, TRPC3 and TRPC6 channels activated directly by diacylglycerol (DAG) play important roles in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling, promoting neuronal development and survival. In various disease models, BDNF restores neurologic deficits, but its therapeutic potential is limited by its poor pharmacokinetic profile. Elucidation of a framework for designing small molecules, which elicit BDNF-like activity via TRPC3 and TRPC6, establishes a solid basis to overcome this limitation. We discovered, through library screening, a group of piperazine-derived compounds that activate DAG-activated TRPC3/TRPC6/TRPC7 channels. The compounds [4-(5-chloro-2-methylphenyl)piperazin-1-yl](3-fluorophenyl)methanone (PPZ1) and 2-[4-(2,3-dimethylphenyl)piperazin-1-yl]-N-(2-ethoxyphenyl)acetamide (PPZ2) activated, in a dose-dependent manner, recombinant TRPC3/TRPC6/TRPC7 channels, but not other TRPCs, in human embryonic kidney cells. PPZ2 activated native TRPC6-like channels in smooth muscle cells isolated from rabbit portal vein. Also, PPZ2 evoked cation currents and Ca(2+) influx in rat cultured central neurons. Strikingly, both compounds induced BDNF-like neurite growth and neuroprotection, which were abolished by a knockdown or inhibition of TRPC3/TRPC6/TRPC7 in cultured neurons. Inhibitors of Ca(2+) signaling pathways, except calcineurin, impaired neurite outgrowth promotion induced by PPZ compounds. PPZ2 increased activation of the Ca(2+)-dependent transcription factor, cAMP response element-binding protein. These findings suggest that Ca(2+) signaling mediated by activation of DAG-activated TRPC channels underlies neurotrophic effects of PPZ compounds. Thus, piperazine-derived activators of DAG-activated TRPC channels provide important insights for future development of a

  17. Cannabidiol enhances microglial phagocytosis via transient receptor potential (TRP) channel activation

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Samia; Eldeeb, Khalil; Millns, Paul J; Bennett, Andrew J; Alexander, Stephen P H; Kendall, David A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Microglial cells are important mediators of the immune response in the CNS. The phytocannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), has been shown to have central anti-inflammatory properties, and the purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of CBD and other phytocannabinoids on microglial phagocytosis. Experimental Approach Phagocytosis was assessed by measuring ingestion of fluorescently labelled latex beads by cultured microglial cells. Drug effects were probed using single-cell Ca2+ imaging and expression of mediator proteins by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Key Results CBD (10 μM) enhanced bead phagocytosis to 175 ± 7% control. Other phytocannabinoids, synthetic and endogenous cannabinoids were without effect. The enhancement was dependent upon Ca2+ influx and was abolished in the presence of EGTA, the Ca2+ channel inhibitor SKF96365, the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel blocker ruthenium red, and the TRPV1 antagonists capsazepine and AMG9810. CBD produced a sustained increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration in BV-2 microglia and this was abolished by ruthenium red. CBD rapidly increased the expression of TRPV2 and TRPV1 proteins and caused a translocation of TRPV2 to the cell membrane. Wortmannin blocked CBD enhancement of BV-2 cell phagocytosis, suggesting that it is mediated by PI3K signalling downstream of the Ca2+ influx. Conclusions and Implications The TRPV-dependent phagocytosis-enhancing effect of CBD suggests that pharmacological modification of TRPV channel activity could be a rational approach to treating neuroinflammatory disorders involving changes in microglial function and that CBD is a potential starting point for future development of novel therapeutics acting on the TRPV receptor family. PMID:24641282

  18. Antagonism of Lateral Amygdala Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors Facilitates Fear Conditioning and Long-Term Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzaro, Stephanie C.; Hou, Mian; Cunha, Catarina; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Cain, Christopher K.

    2010-01-01

    Norepinephrine receptors have been studied in emotion, memory, and attention. However, the role of alpha1-adrenergic receptors in fear conditioning, a major model of emotional learning, is poorly understood. We examined the effect of terazosin, an alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, on cued fear conditioning. Systemic or intra-lateral amygdala…

  19. Sex Differences in Kappa Opioid Receptor Function and Their Potential Impact on Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Chartoff, Elena H.; Mavrikaki, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral, biological, and social sequelae that lead to drug addiction differ between men and women. Our efforts to understand addiction on a mechanistic level must include studies in both males and females. Stress, anxiety, and depression are tightly linked to addiction, and whether they precede or result from compulsive drug use depends on many factors, including biological sex. The neuropeptide dynorphin (DYN), an endogenous ligand at kappa opioid receptors (KORs), is necessary for stress-induced aversive states and is upregulated in the brain after chronic exposure to drugs of abuse. KOR agonists produce signs of anxiety, fear, and depression in laboratory animals and humans, findings that have led to the hypothesis that drug withdrawal-induced DYN release is instrumental in negative reinforcement processes that drive addiction. However, these studies were almost exclusively conducted in males. Only recently is evidence available that there are sex differences in the effects of KOR activation on affective state. This review focuses on sex differences in DYN and KOR systems and how these might contribute to sex differences in addictive behavior. Much of what is known about how biological sex influences KOR systems is from research on pain systems. The basic molecular and genetic mechanisms that have been discovered to underlie sex differences in KOR function in pain systems may apply to sex differences in KOR function in reward systems. Our goals are to discuss the current state of knowledge on how biological sex contributes to KOR function in the context of pain, mood, and addiction and to explore potential mechanisms for sex differences in KOR function. We will highlight evidence that the function of DYN-KOR systems is influenced in a sex-dependent manner by: polymorphisms in the prodynorphin (pDYN) gene, genetic linkage with the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R), heterodimerization of KORs and mu opioid receptors (MORs), and gonadal hormones. Finally, we

  20. History and perspectives of A2A adenosine receptor antagonists as potential therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Preti, Delia; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Moorman, Allan R; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2015-07-01

    Growing evidence emphasizes that the purine nucleoside adenosine plays an active role as a local regulator in different pathologies. Adenosine is a ubiquitous nucleoside involved in various physiological and pathological functions by stimulating A1 , A2A , A2B , and A3 adenosine receptors (ARs). At the present time, the role of A2A ARs is well known in physiological conditions and in a variety of pathologies, including inflammatory tissue damage and neurodegenerative disorders. In particular, the use of selective A2A antagonists has been reported to be potentially useful in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). In this review, A2A AR signal transduction pathways, together with an analysis of the structure-activity relationships of A2A antagonists, and their corresponding pharmacological roles and therapeutic potential have been presented. The initial results from an emerging polypharmacological approach are also analyzed. This approach is based on the optimization of the affinity and/or functional activity of the examined compounds toward multiple targets, such as A1 /A2A ARs and monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B), both closely implicated in the pathogenesis of PD. PMID:25821194

  1. Depletion of serotonin in the basolateral amygdala elevates glutamate receptors and facilitates fear-potentiated startle

    PubMed Central

    Tran, L; Lasher, B K; Young, K A; Keele, N B

    2013-01-01

    Our previous experiments demonstrated that systemic depletion of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), similar to levels reported in patients with emotional disorders, enhanced glutamateric activity in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA) and potentiated fear behaviors. However, the effects of isolated depletion of 5-HT in the LA, and the molecular mechanisms underlying enhanced glutamatergic activity are unknown. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that depletion of 5-HT in the LA induces increased fear behavior, and concomitantly enhances glutamate receptor (GluR) expression. Bilateral infusions of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (4 μg per side) into the LA produced a regional reduction of serotonergic fibers, resulting in decreased 5-HT concentrations. The induction of low 5-HT in the LA elevated fear-potentiated startle, with a parallel increase in GluR1 mRNA and GluR1 protein expression. These findings suggest that low 5-HT concentrations in the LA may facilitate fear behavior through enhanced GluR-mediated mechanisms. Moreover, our data support a relationship between 5-HT and glutamate in psychopathologies. PMID:24002084

  2. Activation of the human transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 by essential oils.

    PubMed

    Ohkawara, Susumu; Tanaka-Kagawa, Toshiko; Furukawa, Yoko; Nishimura, Tetsuji; Jinno, Hideto

    2010-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel activated by capsaicin. TRPV1 is expressed not only on human sensory neurons but also on human epidermal and hair follicle keratinocytes. Therefore, TRPV1 could have the potential to be a therapeutic target for skin disorders. To search for novel TRPV1 agonists, we screened 31 essential oils by using human TRPV1-expressing HEK293 cells. TRPV1 was activated by 4 essential oils: rose, thyme geraniol, palmarosa, and tolu balsam. The dose-response curves for TRPV1 activation by the essential oils revealed a rank order potency [the half-maximal effective concentration (EC(50))] of rose>palmarosa>thyme geraniol>tolu balsam, and rank order efficiency (% activity in response to 1 microM capsaicin) of tolu balsam>rose>palmarosa>thyme geraniol. Moreover, the dose-response curves for TRPV1 activation by citronellol (main constituent of rose oil) and geraniol (main constituent of thyme geraniol and palmarosa oils) were consistent with the potency and efficiency of each essential oil. In contrast, benzyl cinnamate and benzyl benzoate (main constituent of tolu balsam oil) and geranyl acetate (main constituent of thyme geraniol oil) did not show TRPV1 activity. In this first-of-its-kind study, we successfully investigated the role of some essential oils in promoting human TRPV1 activation, and also identified two monoterpenes, citronellol and geraniol, as new human TRPV1 agonists. PMID:20686244

  3. Therapeutic potential of vanilloid receptor TRPV1 agonists and antagonists as analgesics: Recent advances and setbacks.

    PubMed

    Wong, Gilbert Y; Gavva, Narender R

    2009-04-01

    The vanilloid receptor TRPV1 is a homotetrameric, non-selective cation channel abundantly expressed in the nociceptors (c-fibers). TRPV1 is considered as a highly validated pain target because, i) its agonists such as capsaicin cause desensitization of TRPV1 channels that relieves pain behaviors in preclinical species, and ii) its antagonists relieve pain behaviors in rodent models of inflammation, osteoarthritis, and cancer. Hence, both agonists and antagonists of TRPV1 are being evaluated as potential analgesics in clinical trials. Clinical trial results of TRPV1 agonists such as resiniferatoxin in interstitial cystitis, NGX 4010 in post-herpetic neuralgia, and 4975 (Adlea) in osteoarthritis, bunionectomy, and Morton's neuroma have been reported. Similarly, clinical trial results of TRPV1 antagonists such as SB-705498 and AMG 517 have also been published recently. Overall, some molecules (e.g., capsaicin) demonstrated potential analgesia in certain conditions (postsurgical pain, postherpetic neuralgia, pain in diabetic neuropathy, osteoarthritis, bunionectomy, and Morton's neuroma), whereas others fell out of the clinic due to on-target liabilities or failed to demonstrate efficacy. This review summarizes recent advances and setbacks of TRPV1 agonists and antagonists in the clinic and predicts future directions. PMID:19150372

  4. Transient receptor potential melastatin 4 channel contributes to migration of androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kilch, Tatiana; Jochum, Marcus Martin; Urban, Sabine Katharina; Jung, Volker; Stöckle, Michael; Rother, Karen; Greiner, Markus; Peinelt, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Impaired Ca2+ signaling in prostate cancer contributes to several cancer hallmarks, such as enhanced proliferation and migration and a decreased ability to induce apoptosis. Na+ influx via transient receptor potential melastatin 4 channel (TRPM4) can reduce store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) by decreasing the driving force for Ca2+. In patients with prostate cancer, gene expression of TRPM4 is elevated. Recently, TRPM4 was identified as a cancer driver gene in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer. We investigated TRPM4 protein expression in cancer tissue samples from 20 patients with prostate cancer. We found elevated TRPM4 protein levels in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and prostate cancer tissue compared to healthy tissue. In primary human prostate epithelial cells (hPEC) from healthy tissue and in the androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC3, TRPM4 mediated large Na+ currents. We demonstrated significantly increased SOCE after siRNA targeting of TRPM4 in hPEC and DU145 cells. In addition, knockdown of TRPM4 reduced migration but not proliferation of DU145 and PC3 cells. Taken together, our data identify TRPM4 as a regulator of SOCE in hPEC and DU145 cells, demonstrate a role for TRPM4 in cancer cell migration and suggest that TRPM4 is a promising potential therapeutic target. PMID:26496025

  5. Modulation of Adult Mesenchymal Stem Cells Activity by Toll-Like Receptors: Implications on Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    DelaRosa, Olga; Lombardo, Eleuterio

    2010-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are of special interest as therapeutic agents in the settings of both chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Toll-like receptors (TLR) ligands have been linked with the perpetuation of inflammation in a number of chronic inflammatory diseases due to the permanent exposure of the immune system to TLR-specific stimuli. Therefore, MSCs employed in therapy can be potentially exposed to TLR ligands, which may modulate MSC therapeutic potential in vivo. Recent results demonstrate that MSCs are activated by TLR ligands leading to modulation of the differentiation, migration, proliferation, survival, and immunosuppression capacities. However inconsistent results among authors have been reported suggesting that the source of MSCs, TLR stimuli employed or culture conditions play a role. Notably, activation by TLR ligands has not been reported to modulate the “immunoprivileged” phenotype of MSCs which is of special relevance regarding the use of allogeneic MSC-based therapies. In this review, we discuss the available data on the modulation of MSCs activity through TLR signalling. PMID:20628526

  6. A dual role of transient receptor potential melastatin 2 channel in cytotoxicity induced by silica nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Peilin; Li, Jin; Jiang, Jialin; Zhao, Zunquan; Hui, Zhaoyuan; Zhang, Jun; Zheng, Yifan; Ling, Daishun; Wang, Lie; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Luo, Jianhong; Zhu, Xinqiang; Yang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles (NPs) have remarkable applications. However, accumulating evidence suggests NPs can cause cellular toxicity by inducing ROS production and increasing intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), but the underlying molecular mechanism is largely unknown. Transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) channel is known to be a cellular redox potential sensor that provides an important pathway for increasing the [Ca2+]i under oxidative stress. In this study, we examined the role of TRPM2 channel in silica NPs-induced oxidative stress and cell death. By quantitation of cell viability, ROS production, [Ca2+]i, and protein identification, we showed that TRPM2 channel is required for ROS production and Ca2+ increase induced by silica NPs through regulating NADPH oxidase activity in HEK293 cells. Strikingly, HEK293 cells expressing low levels of TRPM2 were more susceptible to silica NPs than those expressing high levels of TRPM2. Macrophages from young mice showed significantly lower TRPM2 expression than those from senescent mice and had significantly lower viability after silica NPs exposure than those from senescent ones. Taken together, these findings demonstrate for the first time that TRPM2 channel acts as an oxidative stress sensor that plays a dual role in silica NPs-induced cytotoxicity by differentially regulating the NADPH oxidase activity and ROS generation. PMID:26656285

  7. Expression of canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) proteins in human glomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Sours, Sherry; Du, Juan; Chu, Shaoyou; Ding, Min; Zhou, Xin J; Ma, Rong

    2006-06-01

    Mesangial cells are located within glomerular capillary loops and contribute to the physiological regulation of glomerular hemodynamics. The function of mesangial cells is controlled by a variety of ion channels in the plasma membrane, including nonselective cation channels, receptor-operated Ca2+ channels, and recently identified store-operated Ca2+ channels. Although the significance of these channels has been widely acknowledged, their molecular identities are still unknown. Recently, the members of the canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) protein family have been demonstrated to behave as cation channels. The present study was performed to identify the isoforms of endogenous TRPC proteins in human mesangial cells (HMCs) and their interactions. Western blotting showed that TRPC1, 3, 4, and 6 were expressed in cultured HMCs. Consistently, immunofluorescent confocal microscopy revealed specific stainings for TRPC1, 3, 4, and 6 with predominant intracellular localization. However, TRPC5 and 7 were not detectable at protein level by either Western blotting or immunofluorescent staining. The expression of TRPC1, 3, 4, and 6 was also observed in rat and human glomeruli using fluorescent immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, coimmunoprecipitation experiments and immunofluorescent double staining displayed that TRPC1 had physical interaction with TRPC4 and 6, while no interactions were detected among other isoforms of TRPCs. Ca2+ fluorescent ratiometry measurement showed that store-operated Ca2+ entry in HMCs was significantly reduced by knocking down TRPC1, but enhanced by overexpressing TRPC1. These results suggest that HMCs specifically express isoforms of TRPC1, 3, 4, and 6 proteins. These isoforms of TRPCs might selectively assemble to form functional complexes. PMID:16418302

  8. Cannabinoid receptor signalling in neurodegenerative diseases: a potential role for membrane fluidity disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Maccarrone, M; Bernardi, G; Agrò, A Finazzi; Centonze, D

    2011-01-01

    Type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is the most abundant G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) in the brain. CB1 and its endogenous agonists, the so-called ‘endocannabinoids (eCBs)’, belong to an ancient neurosignalling system that plays important functions in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory disorders like Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. For this reason, research on the therapeutic potential of drugs modulating the endogenous tone of eCBs is very intense. Several GPCRs reside within subdomains of the plasma membranes that contain high concentrations of cholesterol: the lipid rafts. Here, the hypothesis that changes in membrane fluidity alter function of the endocannabinoid system, as well as progression of particular neurodegenerative diseases, is described. To this end, the impact of membrane cholesterol on membrane properties and hence on neurodegenerative diseases, as well as on CB1 signalling in vitro and on CB1-dependent neurotransmission within the striatum, is discussed. Overall, present evidence points to the membrane environment as a critical regulator of signal transduction triggered by CB1, and calls for further studies aimed at better clarifying the contribution of membrane lipids to eCBs signalling. The results of these investigations might be exploited also for the development of novel therapeutics able to combat disorders associated with abnormal activity of CB1. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-7 PMID:21323908

  9. Synthesis and radioiodination of ergoline derivatives: potential in-vivo dopamine receptor site mapping radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhail, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    The need of a dopamine-receptor based radiopharmaceutical for brain imaging is apparent. If such an agent is made available to physicians, it could provide means for detecting brain tumors, and diagnose such mental disorders as parkinsonism, schizophrenia and psychosis. Currently, such agents are yet to be discovered. Procedures were developed to synthesize and label four ergoline derivatives which could potentially exhibit affinity to dopamine receptors. Labelling with /sup 125/I was accomplished in some cases by displacing a suitably positioned leaving group with /sup 125/I-anion, while in other cases iodine exchange procedures were utilized. Formulations of the labeled derivatives were achieved via the formation of their water soluble tartarate salts. Biodistribution studies in mature Sprague-Dawley rats showed that of the four radioactive compounds injected, the highest uptake in the brain and adrenals was achieved with 8 ..beta..-(I-125)-iodomethyl-6-propylergoline. In addition, high target/nontarget ratios were obtained with the above mentioned compound. On the other hand, the least brain and adrenal uptake as well as the lowest target/nontarget ratios were exhibited by 8 ..beta..-(I-125)-(p-iodobenzenesulfonyl)-lysergol presumably due to its in-vivo instability. A comparative biodistribution study for ergoline derivatives and N-isopropyl-(I-123)-p-iodoamphetamine was conducted. The biodistribution studies showed that the brain to blood ratio for the ergoline derivative 8 ..beta..-(I-125)-iodomethyl-6-propylergoline to be very close to that for /sup 125/I-IMP at 1 minute after dose administration. However after 15 minutes the brain/blood ratio of compound XLVI was half the value of /sup 123/I-IMP. Different mechanisms of brain influx and efflux are known to occur with the amphetamine and ergoline derivatives.

  10. Structural and Functional Interactions between Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Subfamily 1 and Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Botulinum neurotoxins are produced by Clostridium botulinum bacteria. There are eight serologically distinct botulinum neurotoxin isoforms (serotypes A–H). Currently, botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT⁄A) is commonly used for the treatment of many disorders, such as hyperactive musculoskeletal disorders, dystonia, and pain. However, the effectiveness of BoNT⁄A for pain alleviation and the mechanisms that mediate the analgesic effects of BoNT⁄A remain unclear. To define the antinociceptive mechanisms by which BoNT/A functions, the interactions between BoNT⁄A and the transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily 1 (TRPV1) were investigated using immunofluorescence, co-immunoprecipitation, and western blot analysis in primary mouse embryonic dorsal root ganglion neuronal cultures. Results 1) Three-week-old cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons highly expressed transient TRPV1, synaptic vesicle 2A (SV2A) and synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25). SV2A and SNAP-25 are the binding receptor and target protein, respectively, of BoNT⁄A. 2) TRPV1 colocalized with both BoNT⁄A and cleaved SNAP-25 when BoNT⁄A was added to dorsal root ganglia neuronal cultures. 3) After 24 hours of BoNT⁄A treatment (1 nmol⁄l), both TRPV1 and BoNT⁄A positive bands were detected in western blots of immunoprecipitated pellets. 4) Blocking TRPV1 with a specific antibody decreased the cleavage of SNAP-25 by BoNT⁄A. Conclusion BoNT/A interacts with TRPV1 both structurally and functionally in cultured mouse embryonic dorsal root ganglion neurons. These results suggest that an alternative mechanism is used by BoNT⁄A to mediate pain relief. PMID:26745805

  11. Transient receptor potential melastatin 3 is a phosphoinositide-dependent ion channel

    PubMed Central

    Badheka, Doreen; Borbiro, Istvan

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are emerging as general regulators of the functionally diverse transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) has been reported to positively regulate many TRP channels, but in several cases phosphoinositide regulation is controversial. TRP melastatin 3 (TRPM3) is a heat-activated ion channel that is also stimulated by chemical agonists, such as pregnenolone sulfate. Here, we used a wide array of approaches to determine the effects of phosphoinositides on TRPM3. We found that channel activity in excised inside-out patches decreased over time (rundown), an attribute of PI(4,5)P2-dependent ion channels. Channel activity could be restored by application of either synthetic dioctanoyl (diC8) or natural arachidonyl stearyl (AASt) PI(4,5)P2. The PI(4,5)P2 precursor phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI(4)P) was less effective at restoring channel activity. TRPM3 currents were also restored by MgATP, an effect which was inhibited by two different phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase inhibitors, or by pretreatment with a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) enzyme, indicating that MgATP acted by generating phosphoinositides. In intact cells, reduction of PI(4,5)P2 levels by chemically inducible phosphoinositide phosphatases or a voltage-sensitive 5′-phosphatase inhibited channel activity. Activation of PLC via muscarinic receptors also inhibited TRPM3 channel activity. Overall, our data indicate that TRPM3 is a phosphoinositide-dependent ion channel and that decreasing PI(4,5)P2 abundance limits its activity. As all other members of the TRPM family have also been shown to require PI(4,5)P2 for activity, our data establish PI(4,5)P2 as a general positive cofactor of this ion channel subfamily. PMID:26123195

  12. Calcium regulation by temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential channels in human uveal melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mergler, Stefan; Derckx, Raissa; Reinach, Peter S; Garreis, Fabian; Böhm, Arina; Schmelzer, Lisa; Skosyrski, Sergej; Ramesh, Niraja; Abdelmessih, Suzette; Polat, Onur Kerem; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Riechardt, Aline Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is both the most common and fatal intraocular cancer among adults worldwide. As with all types of neoplasia, changes in Ca(2+) channel regulation can contribute to the onset and progression of this pathological condition. Transient receptor potential channels (TRPs) and cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) are two different types of Ca(2+) permeation pathways that can be dysregulated during neoplasia. We determined in malignant human UM and healthy uvea and four different UM cell lines whether there is gene and functional expression of TRP subtypes and CB1 since they could serve as drug targets to either prevent or inhibit initiation and progression of UM. RT-PCR, Ca(2+) transients, immunohistochemistry and planar patch-clamp analysis probed for their gene expression and functional activity, respectively. In UM cells, TRPV1 and TRPM8 gene expression was identified. Capsaicin (CAP), menthol or icilin induced Ca(2+) transients as well as changes in ion current behavior characteristic of TRPV1 and TRPM8 expression. Such effects were blocked with either La(3+), capsazepine (CPZ) or BCTC. TRPA1 and CB1 are highly expressed in human uvea, but TRPA1 is not expressed in all UM cell lines. In UM cells, the CB1 agonist, WIN 55,212-2, induced Ca(2+) transients, which were suppressed by La(3+) and CPZ whereas CAP-induced Ca(2+) transients could also be suppressed by CB1 activation. Identification of functional TRPV1, TRPM8, TRPA1 and CB1 expression in these tissues may provide novel drug targets for treatment of this aggressive neoplastic disease. PMID:24084605

  13. Role of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 in gastric accommodation in conscious guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Junichi; Oshima, Tadayuki; Kondo, Takashi; Tomita, Toshihiko; Fukui, Hirokazu; Watari, Jiro; Hattori, Tomohisa; Kase, Yoshio; Miwa, Hiroto

    2012-04-01

    We report the establishment of a new model for measuring gastric tone and liquid meal-induced accommodation in conscious guinea pigs and the role played by transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1). An indwelling polyethylene bag was placed in proximal stomachs of 5-week-old male Hartley guinea pigs. Gastric tone was measured by distending the bag and recording changes in intrabag pressure at various volumes. Gastric accommodation was measured by administering liquid meals and recording intrabag pressure over time. N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) (a nitric-oxide synthase inhibitor), atropine sulfate (atropine) (a muscarinic receptor antagonist), allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) (a TRPA1 agonist), or theophylline-7-(N-4-isopropylphenyl) acetamide (HC-030031) (a selective TRPA1 antagonist) was administered 15 to 60 min before measurement. Gastric tone was increased by stepwise distension of the bag and was further significantly increased by L-NAME and significantly decreased by atropine. A liquid meal (15% w/v; 1.7 kcal) significantly decreased intrabag pressure 5 to 20 min after administration, indicating gastric accommodation; this was completely suppressed by L-NAME and further enhanced by atropine. AITC significantly increased gastric tone; this increase was decreased by HC-030031 and atropine. A combination of AITC and L-NAME significantly increased gastric tone compared with L-NAME alone. HC-030031 alone significantly decreased gastric tone. Liquid meal-induced gastric accommodation was significantly suppressed by pretreatment with AITC. We established a new model for measuring gastric tone and accommodation in conscious guinea pigs. TRPA1 activation suppresses gastric accommodation by increasing gastric tone through cholinergic neuronal pathways. PMID:22262922

  14. CRF1 and CRF2 Receptors are Required for Potentiated Startle to Contextual but not Discrete Cues

    PubMed Central

    Risbrough, Victoria B; Geyer, Mark A; Hauger, Richard L; Coste, Sarah; Stenzel-Poore, Mary; Wurst, Wolfgang; Holsboer, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) peptides and their receptors have crucial roles in behavioral and endocrine responses to stress. Dysregulation of CRF signaling has been linked to post-traumatic stress disorder, which is associated with increased startle reactivity in response to threat. Thus, understanding the mechanisms underlying CRF regulation of startle may identify pathways involved in this disorder. Here, we tested the hypothesis that both CRF1 and CRF2 receptors contribute to fear-induced increases in startle. Startle responses of wild type (WT) and mice with null mutations (knockout, KO) for CRF1 or CRF2 receptor genes were measured immediately after footshock (shock sensitization) or in the presence of cues previously associated with footshock (ie fear-potentiated startle, FPS). WT mice exhibited robust increases in startle immediately after footshock, which was dependent upon contextual cues. This effect was completely absent in CRF1 KO mice, and significantly attenuated in CRF2 KO mice. In contrast, CRF1 and CRF2 KO mice exhibited normal potentiation of startle by discrete conditioned cues. Blockade of both receptors via CRF1 receptor antagonist treatment in CRF2 KO mice also had no effect on FPS. These results support an additive model of CRF1 and CRF2 receptor activation effects on potentiated startle. These data also indicate that both CRF receptor subtypes contribute to contextual fear but are not required for discrete cued fear effects on startle reactivity. Thus, we suggest that either CRF1 or CRF2 could contribute to the increased startle observed in anxiety disorders with CRF system abnormalities. PMID:19020499

  15. Enhanced itch elicited by capsaicin in a chronic itch model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guang; Yang, Niuniu; Li, Fengxian; Chen, Meijuan; Guo, Changxiong J; Wang, Changming; Hu, Danyou; Yang, Yan; Zhu, Chan; Wang, Zhongli; Shi, Hao; Gegen, Tana; Tang, Ming; He, Qian; Liu, Qin; Tang, Zongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Chronic itch (pruritus) is an important clinical problem. However, the underlying molecular basis has yet to be understood. The Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 channel is a heat-sensitive cation channel expressed in primary sensory neurons and involved in both thermosensation and pain, but its role in chronic itch remains elusive. Here, we for the first time revealed an increased innervation density of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1-expressing sensory fibers in the skin afflicted with chronic itch. Further analysis indicated that this phenomenon is due to an expansion of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1-expressing sensory neurons under chronic itch conditions. As a functional correlates of this neuronal expansion, we observed an enhanced neuronal responsiveness to capsaicin under the dry skin conditions. Importantly, the neuronal hypersensitivity to capsaicin results in itch, rather than pain sensation, suggesting that the up-regulated Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 underlies the pain-to-itch switch under chronic itchy conditions. The study shows that there are different mechanisms of chronic pain and itching, and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 plays an important role in chronic itch. PMID:27118771

  16. Enhanced itch elicited by capsaicin in a chronic itch model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guang; Yang, Niuniu; Li, Fengxian; Chen, Meijuan; Guo, Changxiong J; Wang, Changming; Hu, Danyou; Yang, Yan; Zhu, Chan; Wang, Zhongli; Shi, Hao; Gegen, Tana; Tang, Ming; He, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Chronic itch (pruritus) is an important clinical problem. However, the underlying molecular basis has yet to be understood. The Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 channel is a heat-sensitive cation channel expressed in primary sensory neurons and involved in both thermosensation and pain, but its role in chronic itch remains elusive. Here, we for the first time revealed an increased innervation density of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1-expressing sensory fibers in the skin afflicted with chronic itch. Further analysis indicated that this phenomenon is due to an expansion of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1-expressing sensory neurons under chronic itch conditions. As a functional correlates of this neuronal expansion, we observed an enhanced neuronal responsiveness to capsaicin under the dry skin conditions. Importantly, the neuronal hypersensitivity to capsaicin results in itch, rather than pain sensation, suggesting that the up-regulated Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 underlies the pain-to-itch switch under chronic itchy conditions. The study shows that there are different mechanisms of chronic pain and itching, and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 plays an important role in chronic itch. PMID:27118771

  17. Eph receptor A10 has a potential as a target for a prostate cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Kazuya; Yamashita, Takuya; Inoue, Masaki; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Abe, Yasuhiro; Mukai, Yohei; Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi

    2014-07-18

    We recently identified Eph receptor A10 (EphA10) as a novel breast cancer-specific protein. Moreover, we also showed that an in-house developed anti-EphA10 monoclonal antibody (mAb) significantly inhibited proliferation of breast cancer cells, suggesting EphA10 as a promising target for breast cancer therapy. However, the only other known report for EphA10 was its expression in the testis at the mRNA level. Therefore, the potency of EphA10 as a drug target against cancers other than the breast is not known. The expression of EphA10 in a wide variety of cancer cells was studied and the potential of EphA10 as a drug target was evaluated. Screening of EphA10 mRNA expression showed that EphA10 was overexpressed in breast cancer cell lines as well as in prostate and colon cancer cell lines. Thus, we focused on prostate cancers in which EphA10 expression was equivalent to that in breast cancers. As a result, EphA10 expression was clearly shown in clinical prostate tumor tissues as well as in cell lines at the mRNA and protein levels. In order to evaluate the potential of EphA10 as a drug target, we analyzed complement-dependent cytotoxicity effects of anti-EphA10 mAb and found that significant cytotoxicity was mediated by the expression of EphA10. Therefore, the idea was conceived that the overexpression of EphA10 in prostate cancers might have a potential as a target for prostate cancer therapy, and formed the basis for the studies reported here. PMID:24924629

  18. Dopamine D3 Receptor Antagonist (GSK598809) Potentiates the Hypertensive Effects of Cocaine in Conscious, Freely-Moving Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shou-Hua; Holmes, Tyson H.; Acri, Jane B.

    2015-01-01

    The chronic and relapsing nature of addiction presents unique challenges for ensuring the safety of a potential medication. A patient may use cocaine, for example, while taking the medication or take more medication than prescribed. Thus, a potential medication must be safe and not exacerbate the effects of cocaine. Multiple published studies support antagonism of brain dopamine D3 receptor function as a potential mechanism of action for an anti-addiction medication. Dopamine D3 receptors are widely distributed outside the central nervous system, however; for example, dopamine D3 receptors in the kidneys are implicated in regulating blood pressure. The selective dopamine D3 receptor antagonist GSK598809 [1-(2-fluoro-4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-3-{3-[4-methyl-5-(4-methyl-oxazol-5-yl)-4H-[1,2,4]triazol-3-ylsulfanyl]-propyl}-3-aza-bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane] has been proposed as a medication to treat cocaine and other substance use disorders. The US Food and Drug Administration has established guidelines recommending safety studies to investigate potential undesirable pharmacodynamic effects of a substance in relation to exposure in the therapeutic range and above. Hence, we assessed the interaction between this selective dopamine D3 receptor antagonist and cocaine on hemodynamics and cardiac function in freely-moving, telemetered dogs before conducting a clinical trial. GSK598809 increased the hemodynamic effect of cocaine in this model. Thus, the increase in blood pressure after intravenous cocaine was greater in animals that had been pretreated with GSK598809 compared with vehicle. This finding suggests that GSK598809 in particular, and perhaps dopamine D3 receptor antagonists as a class, may produce unacceptable cardiovascular risks as medications to treat cocaine use disorder. PMID:26177654

  19. Dopamine D3 Receptor Antagonist (GSK598809) Potentiates the Hypertensive Effects of Cocaine in Conscious, Freely-Moving Dogs.

    PubMed

    Appel, Nathan M; Li, Shou-Hua; Holmes, Tyson H; Acri, Jane B

    2015-09-01

    The chronic and relapsing nature of addiction presents unique challenges for ensuring the safety of a potential medication. A patient may use cocaine, for example, while taking the medication or take more medication than prescribed. Thus, a potential medication must be safe and not exacerbate the effects of cocaine. Multiple published studies support antagonism of brain dopamine D3 receptor function as a potential mechanism of action for an anti-addiction medication. Dopamine D3 receptors are widely distributed outside the central nervous system, however; for example, dopamine D3 receptors in the kidneys are implicated in regulating blood pressure. The selective dopamine D3 receptor antagonist GSK598809 [1-(2-fluoro-4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-3-{3-[4-methyl-5-(4-methyl-oxazol-5-yl)-4H-[1,2,4]triazol-3-ylsulfanyl]-propyl}-3-aza-bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane] has been proposed as a medication to treat cocaine and other substance use disorders. The US Food and Drug Administration has established guidelines recommending safety studies to investigate potential undesirable pharmacodynamic effects of a substance in relation to exposure in the therapeutic range and above. Hence, we assessed the interaction between this selective dopamine D3 receptor antagonist and cocaine on hemodynamics and cardiac function in freely-moving, telemetered dogs before conducting a clinical trial. GSK598809 increased the hemodynamic effect of cocaine in this model. Thus, the increase in blood pressure after intravenous cocaine was greater in animals that had been pretreated with GSK598809 compared with vehicle. This finding suggests that GSK598809 in particular, and perhaps dopamine D3 receptor antagonists as a class, may produce unacceptable cardiovascular risks as medications to treat cocaine use disorder. PMID:26177654

  20. Endothelin inhibits renin release from juxtaglomerular cells via endothelin receptors A and B via a transient receptor potential canonical‐mediated pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz‐Capisano, M. Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Renin is the rate‐limiting step in the production of angiotensin II: a critical element in the regulation of blood pressure and in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Renin release from the juxtaglomerular (JG) cell is stimulated by the second messenger cAMP and inhibited by increases in calcium (Ca). Endothelins (ETs) inhibit renin release in a Ca‐dependent manner. JG cells contain multiple isoforms of canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) Ca‐permeable channels. The proposed hypothesis is that endothelin inhibits renin release by activating TRPC store‐operated Ca channels. RT‐PCR and immunofluorescence revealed expression of both ETA and ETB receptors in mouse JG cells. Incubation of primary cultures of JG cells with ET‐1 (10 nmol/L) decreased renin release by 28%. Addition of either an ETA or an ETB receptor blocker completely prevented the ET inhibition of renin release. Incubation with the TRPC blocker (SKF 96365, 50 μmol/L) completely reversed the Ca‐mediated inhibition of renin release by ETs. These results suggest that endothelin inhibits renin release from JG cells via both ETA and ETB receptors, which leads to the activation of TRPC store‐operated Ca channels. PMID:25524278

  1. Loss of D2 Dopamine Receptor Function Modulates Cocaine-Induced Glutamatergic Synaptic Potentiation in the Ventral Tegmental Area

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Anuradha; Argilli, Emanuela; Bonci, Antonello

    2013-01-01

    Potentiation of glutamate responses is a critical synaptic response to cocaine exposure in ventral tegmental area (VTA) neurons. However, the mechanism by which cocaine exposure promotes potentiation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) and subsequently AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is not fully understood. In this study we demonstrate that repeated cocaine treatment causes loss of D2 dopamine receptor functional responses via interaction with lysosome-targeting G-protein-associated sorting protein1 (GASP1). We also show that the absence of D2 downregulation in GASP1-KO mice prevents cocaine-induced potentiation of NMDAR currents, elevation of the AMPA/NMDA ratio, and redistribution of NMDAR and AMPAR subunits to the membrane. As a pharmacological parallel, coadministration of the high-affinity D2 agonist, aripiprazole, reduces not only functional downregulation of D2s in response to cocaine but also potentiation of NMDAR and AMPAR responses in wild-type mice. Together these data suggest that functional loss of D2 receptors is a critical mechanism mediating cocaine-induced glutamate plasticity in VTA neurons. PMID:23884939

  2. Activation of Group II Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Induces Depotentiation in Amygdala Slices and Reduces Fear-Potentiated Startle in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chia-Ho; Lee, Chia-Ching; Huang, Ya-Chun; Wang, Su-Jane; Gean, Po-Wu

    2005-01-01

    There is a close correlation between long-term potentiation (LTP) in the synapses of lateral amygdala (LA) and fear conditioning in animals. We predict that reversal of LTP (depotentiation) in this area of the brain may ameliorate conditioned fear. Activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR II) with DCG-IV induces…

  3. Loss of D2 dopamine receptor function modulates cocaine-induced glutamatergic synaptic potentiation in the ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, Anuradha; Argilli, Emanuela; Bonci, Antonello; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2013-07-24

    Potentiation of glutamate responses is a critical synaptic response to cocaine exposure in ventral tegmental area (VTA) neurons. However, the mechanism by which cocaine exposure promotes potentiation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) and subsequently AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is not fully understood. In this study we demonstrate that repeated cocaine treatment causes loss of D2 dopamine receptor functional responses via interaction with lysosome-targeting G-protein-associated sorting protein1 (GASP1). We also show that the absence of D2 downregulation in GASP1-KO mice prevents cocaine-induced potentiation of NMDAR currents, elevation of the AMPA/NMDA ratio, and redistribution of NMDAR and AMPAR subunits to the membrane. As a pharmacological parallel, coadministration of the high-affinity D2 agonist, aripiprazole, reduces not only functional downregulation of D2s in response to cocaine but also potentiation of NMDAR and AMPAR responses in wild-type mice. Together these data suggest that functional loss of D2 receptors is a critical mechanism mediating cocaine-induced glutamate plasticity in VTA neurons. PMID:23884939

  4. Blockade of peripheral P2Y1 receptors prevents the induction of thermal hyperalgesia via modulation of TRPV1 expression in carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain rats: involvement of p38 MAPK phosphorylation in DRGs.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon-Gu; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Moon, Ji-Young; Choi, Sheu-Ran; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Kang, Suk-Yun; Han, Ho-Jae; Beitz, Alvin J; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2014-04-01

    Although previous reports have suggested that P2Y1 receptors (P2Y1Rs) are involved in cutaneous nociceptive signaling, it remains unclear how P2Y1Rs contribute to peripheral sensitization. The current study was designed to delineate the role of peripheral P2Y1Rs in pain and to investigate potential linkages to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in DRGs and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) expression in a rodent inflammatory pain model. Following injection of 2% carrageenan into the hind paw, expressions of P2Y1 and TRPV1 and the phosphorylation rates of both p38 MAPK and ERK but not JNK were increased and peaked at day 2 post-injection. Blockade of peripheral P2Y1Rs by the P2Y1R antagonist, MRS2500 injection (i.pl, D0 to D2) significantly reduced the induction of thermal hyperalgesia, but not mechanical allodynia. Simultaneously, MRS2500 injections suppressed upregulated TRPV1 expression and DRG p38 phosphorylation, while pERK signaling was not affected. Furthermore, inhibition of p38 activation in the DRGs by SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor, i.t, D0 to D2) prevented the upregulation of TRPV1 and a single i.t injection of SB203580 reversed the established thermal hyperalgesia, but not mechanical allodynia. Lastly, to identify the mechanism of action of P2Y1Rs, we repeatedly injected the P2Y1 agonist, MRS2365 into the naïve rat's hind paw and observed a dose-dependent increase in TRPV1 expression and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. These data demonstrate a sequential role for P2Y1R, p38 MAPK and TRPV1 in inflammation-induced thermal hyperalgesia; thus, peripheral P2Y1Rs activation modulates p38 MAPK signaling and TRPV1 expression, which ultimately leads to the induction of thermal hyperalgesia. PMID:24333674

  5. Interaction of new antidepressants with sigma-1 receptor chaperones and their potentiation of neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Ishima, Tamaki; Fujita, Yuko; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2014-03-15

    The sigma-1 receptor chaperone located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) may be implicated in the mechanistic action of some antidepressants. The present study was undertaken to examine whether new antidepressant drugs interact with the sigma-1 receptor chaperone. First, we examined the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (fluvoxamine, paroxetine, sertraline, citalopram and escitalopram), serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) (duloxetine, venlafaxine, milnacipran), and mirtazapine, a noradrenaline and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA), on [(3)H](+)-pentazocine binding to rat brain membranes. Then, we examined the effects of these drugs on nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The order of potency for drugs at the sigma-1 receptor chaperone was as follows: fluvoxamine>sertraline>fluoxetine>escitalopram>citalopram>paroxetine>duoxetine. Venlafaxine, milnacipran, and mirtazapine showed very weak affinity for this chaperone. Furthermore, fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, escitalopram, and mirtazapine significantly potentiated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in cell assays, and the effects of all these drugs, excluding mirtazapine, were antagonized by NE-100, a selective antagonist of the sigma-1 receptor chaperone. Moreover, the effects of fluvoxamine and fluoxetine on neurite outgrowth were also antagonized by sertraline, indicating that sertraline may be an antagonist at the sigma-1 receptor chaperone. The effect of mirtazapine on neurite outgrowth was antagonized by the selective 5-hydroxytryptamine1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635. These findings suggest that activation at the sigma-1 receptor chaperone may be involved in the action of some SSRIs, such as fluvoxamine, fluoxetine and escitalopram. In contrast, mirtazapine independently potentiated neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells, indicating that this beneficial effect may mediate its pharmacological effect. PMID:24508523

  6. Dopamine D₁-D₂ receptor heteromer regulates signaling cascades involved in addiction: potential relevance to adolescent drug susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Melissa L; O'Dowd, Brian F; George, Susan R

    2014-01-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period that has been associated with heightened sensitivity to psychostimulant-induced reward, thus placing adolescents at increased risk to develop drug addiction. Although alterations in dopamine-induced synaptic plasticity are perhaps the most critical factor in mediating addiction processes, developmental differences in the cell signaling mechanisms that contribute to synaptic plasticity, and their contribution to adolescent reward sensitivity, has been grossly understudied. The most abundant dopamine receptors, the D1 and D2 receptors, as well as the dopamine D1-D2 receptor heteromer, exhibit age-dependent and brain region-specific changes in their expression and function and are responsible for regulating cell signaling pathways known to significantly contribute to the neurobiological mechanisms underlying addiction. The D1-D2 receptor heteromer, for instance, has been associated with calcium calmodulin kinase IIα, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) signaling, three proteins highly implicated in the regulation of glutamate transmission and synaptic plasticity and which regulate addiction to amphetamine, opioids and cocaine. Therefore, in this review the importance of these signaling proteins as potential mediators of addiction susceptibility in adolescence will be highlighted, and the therapeutic potential of the D1-D2 receptor heteromer in addiction will be discussed. It is the overall goal of this review to draw attention to the research gap in dopamine-induced cell signaling in the adolescent brain--knowledge that would provide much-needed insights into adolescent addiction vulnerability. PMID:24820626

  7. Partial adenosine A1 receptor agonism: a potential new therapeutic strategy for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Greene, Stephen J; Sabbah, Hani N; Butler, Javed; Voors, Adriaan A; Albrecht-Küpper, Barbara E; Düngen, Hans-Dirk; Dinh, Wilfried; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) represents a global public health and economic problem associated with unacceptable rates of death, hospitalization, and healthcare expenditure. Despite available therapy, HF carries a prognosis comparable to many forms of cancer with a 5-year survival rate of ~50%. The current treatment paradigm for HF with reduced ejection fraction (EF) centers on blocking maladaptive neurohormonal activation and decreasing cardiac workload with therapies that concurrently lower blood pressure and heart rate. Continued development of hemodynamically active medications for stepwise addition to existing therapies carries the risk of limited tolerability and safety. Moreover, this treatment paradigm has thus far failed for HF with preserved EF. Accordingly, development of hemodynamically neutral HF therapies targeting primary cardiac pathologies must be considered. In this context, a partial adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) agonist holds promise as a potentially hemodynamically neutral therapy for HF that could simultaneous improve cardiomyocyte energetics, calcium homeostasis, cardiac structure and function, and long-term clinical outcomes when added to background therapies. In this review, we describe the physiology and pathophysiology of HF as it relates to adenosine agonism, examine the existing body of evidence and biologic rationale for modulation of adenosine A1R activity, and review the current state of drug development of a partial A1R agonist for the treatment of HF. PMID:26701329

  8. Transient receptor potential protein subunit assembly and membrane distribution in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Brownlow, Sharon L; Sage, Stewart O

    2005-10-01

    We have previously suggested that the human homologue of the Drosophila transient receptor potential protein, TRPC1, is involved in conducting store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) in human platelets since an antibody raised against the pore-forming region of TRPC1 inhibited SOCE. Here we have investigated plasma membrane expression of TRPC1 in human platelets and have probed for the presence of other TRPC proteins in these cells. Biotinylation revealed the presence of TRPC1 in the plasma membrane of resting platelets. Surface expression was not detectibly changed following Ca2+ store depletion or stimulation with thrombin. Western blotting demonstrated the presence of TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5 and TRPC6 in platelet lysates. TRPC1, TRPC4 and TRPC5 coimmunoprecipitated, as did TRPC3 and TRPC6. TRPC1, TRPC4 and TRPC5 were associated with detergent-resistant platelet membranes, from which they were partially released when the cells were cholesterol-depleted using methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. The distributions of TRPC3 and TRPC6 between soluble and membrane fractions were not affected by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin treatment. These results suggest that TRPC1, TRPC4 and TRPC5 form a heteromultimer associated with platelet lipid raft domains, whereas TRPC3 and TRPC6 associate independently of lipid rafts. PMID:16270640

  9. Olfactory neurons expressing transient receptor potential channel M5 (TRPM5) are involved in sensing semiochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Weihong; Margolskee, Robert; Donnert, Gerald; Hell, Stefan W.; Restrepo, Diego

    2007-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the main olfactory epithelium respond to environmental odorants. Recent studies reveal that these OSNs also respond to semiochemicals such as pheromones and that main olfactory input modulates animal reproduction, but the transduction mechanism for these chemosignals is not fully understood. Previously, we determined that responses to putative pheromones in the main olfactory system were reduced but not eliminated in mice defective for the canonical cAMP transduction pathway, and we suggested, on the basis of pharmacology, an involvement of phospholipase C. In the present study, we find that a downstream signaling component of the phospholipase C pathway, the transient receptor potential channel M5 (TRPM5), is coexpressed with the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel subunit A2 in a subset of mature OSNs. These neurons project axons primarily to the ventral olfactory bulb, where information from urine and other socially relevant signals is processed. We find that these chemosignals activate a subset of glomeruli targeted by TRPM5-expressing OSNs. Our data indicate that TRPM5-expressing OSNs that project axons to glomeruli in the ventral area of the main olfactory bulb are involved in processing of information from semiochemicals. PMID:17267604

  10. Tryptamine-Based Derivatives as Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin Type 8 (TRPM8) Channel Modulators.

    PubMed

    Bertamino, Alessia; Ostacolo, Carmine; Ambrosino, Paolo; Musella, Simona; Di Sarno, Veronica; Ciaglia, Tania; Soldovieri, Maria Virginia; Iraci, Nunzio; Fernandez Carvajal, Asia; de la Torre-Martinez, Roberto; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Gonzalez Muniz, Rosario; Novellino, Ettore; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Campiglia, Pietro; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel

    2016-03-10

    Pharmacological modulation of the transient receptor potential melastatin type 8 (TRPM8) is currently under investigation as a new approach for the treatment of pain and other diseases. In this study, a series of N-substituted tryptamines was prepared to explore the structural requirements determining TRPM8 modulation. Using a fluorescence-based screening assay, we identified two compounds acting as an activator (2-(1H-indol-3-yl)-N-(4-phenoxybenzyl)ethanamine, 21) or an inhibitor (N,N-dibenzyl-2-(1H-indol-3-yl)ethanamine, 12) of calcium influx in HEK293 cells. In patch-clamp recordings, compound 21 displayed a significantly higher potency (EC50 = 40 ± 4 μM) and a similar efficacy when compared to menthol; by contrast, compound 12 produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of menthol-induced TRPM8 currents (IC50 = 367 ± 24 nM). Molecular modeling studies using a homology model of a single rat TRPM8 subunit identified a putative binding site located between the VSD and the TRP box, disclosing differences in the binding modes for the agonist and the antagonist. PMID:26847872

  11. Enhanced AMPA receptor function promotes cerebellar long-term depression rather than potentiation

    PubMed Central

    van Beugen, Boeke J.; Qiao, Xin; Simmons, Dana H.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2014-01-01

    Ampakines are allosteric modulators of AMPA receptors that facilitate hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and learning, and have been considered for the treatment of cognition and memory deficits. Here, we show that the ampakine CX546 raises the amplitude and slows the decay time of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) at cerebellar parallel fiber (PF) to Purkinje cell synapses, thus resembling CX546 effects described at hippocampal synapses. Using the fluorescent calcium indicator dye Oregon Green BAPTA-2 and an ultra-high-speed CCD camera, we also monitored calcium transients in Purkinje cell dendrites. In the presence of CX546 in the bath, PF-evoked calcium transients were enhanced and prolonged, suggesting that CX546 not only enhances synaptic transmission, but also boosts dendritic calcium signaling at cerebellar synapses. In contrast to previous observations in the hippocampus, however, CX546 applied during cerebellar recordings facilitates long-term depression (LTD) rather than LTP at PF synapses. These findings show that ampakines selectively modify the LTP–LTD balance depending on the brain area and type of synapse, and may provide tools for the targeted regulation of synaptic memories. PMID:25403454

  12. Canonical transient receptor potential 1 channel is involved in contractile function of glomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Sours-Brothers, Sherry; Coleman, Rashadd; Ding, Min; Graham, Sarabeth; Kong, De-Hu; Ma, Rong

    2007-05-01

    Contractility of mesangial cells (MC) is tightly controlled by [Ca(2+)](i). Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane constitutes a major component of mesangial responses to vasoconstrictors. Canonical transient receptor potential 1 (TRPC1) is a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel in a variety of cell types. This study was performed to investigate whether TRPC1 takes part in vasoconstrictor-induced mesangial contraction by mediating Ca(2+) entry. It was found that angiotensin II (AngII) evoked remarkable contraction of the cultured MC. Downregulation of TRPC1 using RNA interference significantly attenuated the contractile response. Infusion of AngII or endothelin-1 in rats caused a decrease in GFR. The GFR decline was significantly reduced by infusion of TRPC1 antibody that targets an extracellular domain in the pore region of TRPC1 channel. However, the treatment of TRPC1 antibody did not affect the AngII-induced vasopressing effect. Electrophysiologic experiments revealed that functional or biologic inhibition of TRPC1 significantly depressed AngII-induced channel activation. Fura-2 fluorescence-indicated that Ca(2+) entry in response to AngII stimulation was also dramatically inhibited by TRPC1 antibody and TRPC1-specific RNA interference. These results suggest that TRPC1 plays an important role in controlling contractile function of MC. Mediation of Ca(2+) entry might be the underlying mechanism for the TRPC1-associated MC contraction. PMID:17389736

  13. Sweet-P inhibition of glucocorticoid receptor β as a potential cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nwaneri, Assumpta C.; McBeth, Lucien; Hinds, Terry D.

    2016-01-01

    The need for the development of new cancer therapies and push for the design of new targeting techniques is on the rise, and would be useful for cancers that are resistant to current drug treatments. The understanding of the genome has significantly advanced cancer therapy, as well as prevention and earlier detection. This research highlight discusses a potential new type of cancer-targeting molecule, Sweet-P, which is the first of its kind. Sweet-P specifically targets the microRNA-144 binding site in the 3′ untranslated region (3′ UTR) of the human glucocorticoid receptor β (GRβ), which has been demonstrated to increase expression. GRβ has been shown to be highly expressed in cells from solid tumors of uroepithelial carcinomas, gliomas, osteosarcomas, and hepatocellular carcinomas, as well as in liquid tumor cells from leukemia patients. In non-cancerous diseases, GRβ has been shown to be highly expressed in glucocorticoid-resistant asthma. These maladies brought the need for the development of the Sweet-P anti-GRβ molecule. Sweet-P was shown to repress the migration of bladder cancer cells, and may serve as a new therapeutic for GRβ-related diseases. PMID:27468424

  14. Transient receptor potential A1 channels: insights into cough and airway inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Belvisi, Maria G; Dubuis, Eric; Birrell, Mark A

    2011-10-01

    Cough is a common symptom of diseases such as asthma and COPD and also presents as a disease in its own right. Treatment options are limited; a recent meta-analysis concluded that over-the-counter remedies are ineffective, and there is increasing concern about their use in children. Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) channels are nonselective cation channels that are activated by a range of natural products (eg, allyl isothiocyanate), a multitude of environmental irritants (eg, acrolein, which is present in air pollution, vehicle exhaust, and cigarette smoke), and inflammatory mediators (eg, cyclopentenone prostaglandins). TRPA1 is primarily expressed in small-diameter, nociceptive neurons where its activation probably contributes to the perception of noxious stimuli. Inhalational exposure to irritating gases, fumes, dusts, vapors, chemicals, and endogenous mediators can lead to the development of cough. The respiratory tract is innervated by primary sensory afferent nerves, which are activated by mechanical and chemical stimuli. Recent data suggest that activation of TRPA1 on these vagal sensory afferents by these irritant substances could lead to central reflexes, including dyspnea, changes in breathing pattern, and cough, which contribute to the symptoms and pathophysiology of respiratory diseases. PMID:21972382

  15. Upregulation of Transient Receptor Potential Canonical Channels Contributes to Endotoxin-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gui-Lan; Jiang, Hongni; Zou, Fangdong

    2016-01-01

    Background Septic shock is a pathologic condition caused by endotoxin-producing bacteria, and often associated with severe pulmonary hypertension. Inflammation is a major systemic response to endotoxin; however, it is unknown whether endotoxin has a direct impact on pulmonary arteries that contributes to pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. Material/Methods Rat pulmonary arteries and primary pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were cultured in vitro and treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and blockers of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels. Neointimal growth and arterial stenosis were observed on cryosections of cultured pulmonary arteries. Proliferation of PASMCs was examined by a WST-1 (water-soluble tetrazolium salt) assay. Expression of TRPC genes in pulmonary arteries and PASMCs were detected and quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Results LPS significantly induced neointimal growth and stenosis of pulmonary arteries and promoted proliferation of PASMCs. TRPC channel blockers 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and SKF-96365 inhibited LPS-induced remodeling of pulmonary arteries and PASMC proliferation. Expression of TRPC1/3/4/6 was detected in pulmonary arteries and PASMCs. LPS treatment dramatically increased the expression of TRPC3 and TRPC4 at both messenger RNA and protein levels. Conclusions LPS stimulates stenosis of pulmonary arteries through enhancement of TRPC-mediated Ca2+ entry into PASMCs, which is caused by upregulation of TRPC3 and TRPC4 channels. PMID:27471122

  16. Pathway Analysis Revealed Potential Diverse Health Impacts of Flavonoids that Bind Estrogen Receptors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Ge, Weigong; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-03-26

    Flavonoids are frequently used as dietary supplements in the absence of research evidence regarding health benefits or toxicity. Furthermore, ingested doses could far exceed those received from diet in the course of normal living. Some flavonoids exhibit binding to estrogen receptors (ERs) with consequential vigilance by regulatory authorities at the U.S. EPA and FDA. Regulatory authorities must consider both beneficial claims and potential adverse effects, warranting the increases in research that has spanned almost two decades. Here, we report pathway enrichment of 14 targets from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) and the Herbal Ingredients’ Targets (HIT) database for 22 flavonoidsmore » that bind ERs. The selected flavonoids are confirmed ER binders from our earlier studies, and were here found in mainly involved in three types of biological processes, ER regulation, estrogen metabolism and synthesis, and apoptosis. Besides cancers, we conjecture that the flavonoids may affect several diseases via apoptosis pathways. We find diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, viral myocarditis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease could be implicated. More generally, apoptosis processes may be importantly evolved biological functions of flavonoids that bind ERs and high dose ingestion of those flavonoids could adversely disrupt the cellular apoptosis process.« less

  17. Pathway Analysis Revealed Potential Diverse Health Impacts of Flavonoids that Bind Estrogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Ge, Weigong; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids are frequently used as dietary supplements in the absence of research evidence regarding health benefits or toxicity. Furthermore, ingested doses could far exceed those received from diet in the course of normal living. Some flavonoids exhibit binding to estrogen receptors (ERs) with consequential vigilance by regulatory authorities at the U.S. EPA and FDA. Regulatory authorities must consider both beneficial claims and potential adverse effects, warranting the increases in research that has spanned almost two decades. Here, we report pathway enrichment of 14 targets from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) and the Herbal Ingredients’ Targets (HIT) database for 22 flavonoids that bind ERs. The selected flavonoids are confirmed ER binders from our earlier studies, and were here found in mainly involved in three types of biological processes, ER regulation, estrogen metabolism and synthesis, and apoptosis. Besides cancers, we conjecture that the flavonoids may affect several diseases via apoptosis pathways. Diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, viral myocarditis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease could be implicated. More generally, apoptosis processes may be importantly evolved biological functions of flavonoids that bind ERs and high dose ingestion of those flavonoids could adversely disrupt the cellular apoptosis process. PMID:27023590

  18. Antagonism of NMDA receptors as a potential treatment for Down syndrome: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Boada, R; Hutaff-Lee, C; Schrader, A; Weitzenkamp, D; Benke, T A; Goldson, E J; Costa, A C S

    2012-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability. The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor uncompetitive antagonist, memantine hydrochloride (memantine), has been shown to improve learning/memory and rescue one form of hippocampus synaptic plasticity dysfunction in the best-studied mouse model of DS available, the Ts65Dn mouse. Given the status of memantine as a treatment for Alzheimer's disease (AD) approved by the Food and Drug Administration, the preclinical evidence of potential efficacy in Ts65Dn mice, and the favorable safety profile of memantine, we designed a study to investigate whether the findings in the mouse model could be translated to individuals with DS. In this pilot, proof-of-principle study we hypothesized that memantine therapy would improve test scores of young adults with DS on measures of episodic and spatial memory, which are generally considered to be hippocampus dependent. Accordingly, in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we compared the effect of 16-week treatment with either memantine or placebo on cognitive and adaptive functions of 40 young adults with DS using a carefully selected set of neuropsychological outcome measures. Safety and tolerability were also monitored. Although no significant differences were observed between the memantine and placebo groups on the two primary outcome measures, we found a significant improvement in the memantine group in one of the secondary measures associated with the primary hypothesis. Only infrequent and mild adverse events were noted. PMID:22806212

  19. Orphan nuclear receptor nurr1 as a potential novel marker for progression in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Yang, Jing; Zou, Ying; Huang, Guo-Liang; He, Zhi-Wei

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies have indicated that Nurr1, which belongs to a novel class of orphan nuclear receptors (the NR4A family), is important for carcinogenesis. Here we investigated expression of Nurr1 protein in benign and malignant human prostate tissues and association with clinicopathologic features using immunohistochemical techniques. Moreover, we also investigated the ability of Nurr1 to influence proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis of human prostate cancer cells using small interfering RNA silencing. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the expression of Nurr1 protein was higher in prostate cancer tissues than in benign prostate tissue (P < 0.001), levels being positively correlated with tumor T classification (P = 0.003), N classification (P = 0.017), M classification (P = 0.011) and the Gleason score (P = 0.020) of prostate cancer patients. In vitro, silencing of endogenous Nurr1 attenuated cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and induced apoptosis of prostate cancer cells. These results suggest that Nurr1 may be used as an indicator for prostate cancer progression and be useful for novel potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:23679312

  20. Zinc-induced Neurotoxicity Mediated by Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7 Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Koichi; Branigan, Deborah; Xiong, Zhi-Gang

    2010-01-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) channels are novel Ca2+-permeable non-selective cation channels ubiquitously expressed. Activation of TRPM7 channels has been shown to be involved in cellular Mg2+ homeostasis, diseases caused by abnormal magnesium absorption, and in Ca2+-mediated neuronal injury under ischemic conditions. Here we show strong evidence suggesting that TRPM7 channels also play an important role in cellular Zn2+ homeostasis and in Zn2+-mediated neuronal injury. Using a combination of fluorescent Zn2+ imaging, small interfering RNA, pharmacological analysis, and cell injury assays, we show that activation of TRPM7 channels augmented Zn2+-induced injury of cultured mouse cortical neurons. The Zn2+-mediated neurotoxicity was inhibited by nonspecific TRPM7 blockers Gd3+ or 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, and by knockdown of TRPM7 channels with small interfering RNA. In addition, Zn2+-mediated neuronal injury under oxygen-glucose deprivation conditions was also diminished by silencing TRPM7. Furthermore, we show that overexpression of TRPM7 channels in HEK293 cells increased intracellular Zn2+ accumulation and Zn2+-induced cell injury, while silencing TRPM7 by small interfering RNA attenuated the Zn2+-mediated cell toxicity. Thus, TRPM7 channels may represent a novel target for neurological disorders where Zn2+ toxicity plays an important role. PMID:20048154

  1. Transient receptor potential ion channels in primary sensory neurons as targets for novel analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Sousa-Valente, J; Andreou, A P; Urban, L; Nagy, I

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed an explosion in novel findings relating to the molecules involved in mediating the sensation of pain in humans. Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels emerged as the greatest group of molecules involved in the transduction of various physical stimuli into neuronal signals in primary sensory neurons, as well as, in the development of pain. Here, we review the role of TRP ion channels in primary sensory neurons in the development of pain associated with peripheral pathologies and possible strategies to translate preclinical data into the development of effective new analgesics. Based on available evidence, we argue that nociception-related TRP channels on primary sensory neurons provide highly valuable targets for the development of novel analgesics and that, in order to reduce possible undesirable side effects, novel analgesics should prevent the translocation from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane and the sensitization of the channels rather than blocking the channel pore or binding sites for exogenous or endogenous activators. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:24283624

  2. Methylglyoxal Activates Nociceptors through Transient Receptor Potential Channel A1 (TRPA1)

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Mirjam J.; Filipovic, Milos R.; Leffler, Andreas; de la Roche, Jeanne; Kistner, Katrin; Fischer, Michael J.; Fleming, Thomas; Zimmermann, Katharina; Ivanovic-Burmazovic, Ivana; Nawroth, Peter P.; Bierhaus, Angelika; Reeh, Peter W.; Sauer, Susanne K.

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathic pain can develop as an agonizing sequela of diabetes mellitus and chronic uremia. A chemical link between both conditions of altered metabolism is the highly reactive compound methylglyoxal (MG), which accumulates in all cells, in particular neurons, and leaks into plasma as an index of the severity of the disorder. The electrophilic structure of this cytotoxic ketoaldehyde suggests TRPA1, a receptor channel deeply involved in inflammatory and neuropathic pain, as a molecular target. We demonstrate that extracellularly applied MG accesses specific intracellular binding sites of TRPA1, activating inward currents and calcium influx in transfected cells and sensory neurons, slowing conduction velocity in unmyelinated peripheral nerve fibers, and stimulating release of proinflammatory neuropeptides from and action potential firing in cutaneous nociceptors. Using a model peptide of the N terminus of human TRPA1, we demonstrate the formation of disulfide bonds based on MG-induced modification of cysteines as a novel mechanism. In conclusion, MG is proposed to be a candidate metabolite that causes neuropathic pain in metabolic disorders and thus is a promising target for medicinal chemistry. PMID:22740698

  3. A Novel Homozygous Mutation in the Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 6 Gene: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Altıncık, Ayça; Schlingmann, Karl Peter; Tosun, Mahya Sultan

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia (HSH) is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the transient receptor potential melastatin 6 (TRPM6) gene. Affected individuals present in early infancy with seizures caused by the severe hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia. By presenting this case report, we also aimed to highlight the need for molecular genetic analysis in inbred or familial cases with hypomagnesemia. A Turkish inbred girl, now aged six years, had presented to another hospital at age two months with seizures diagnosed to be due to hypomagnesemia. She was on magnesium replacement therapy when she was admitted to our clinic with complaints of chronic diarrhea at age 3.6 years. During her follow-up in our clinic, she showed an age-appropriate physical and neurological development. In molecular genetic analysis, a novel homozygous frame-shift mutation (c.3447delT>p.F1149fs) was identified in the TRPM6 gene. This mutation leads to a truncation of the TRPM6 protein, thereby complete loss of function. We present the clinical follow-up findings of a pediatric HSH case due to a novel mutation in the TRPM6 gene and highlight the need for molecular genetic analysis in inbred or familial cases with hypomagnesemia. PMID:26759217

  4. Role of oxidative stress & transient receptor potential in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Protiti; Bathri, Rashmi; Kumar, Lalit; Vijayan, V.K.; Maudar, K.K.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affect millions of people worldwide and is known to be one of the leading causes of death. The highly sensitive airways protect themselves from irritants by cough and sneeze which propel endogenous and exogenous substances to minimize airway noxious effects. One noxious effect of these substances is activation of peripheral sensory nerve endings of nociceptor neurons innervating these airways lining thus transmitting dangerous signals from the environment to the central nervous system (CNS). Nociceptor neurons include transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels, especially the vanilloid and ankyrin subfamilies, TRPV1/A1 which can be activated by noxious chemical challenges in models of airways disease. As oxidative stress may activate airways sensory neurons and contribute to COPD exacerbations we sought to review the role that TRP channel activation by oxidative signals may have on airway responses. It would be prudent to target the TRP channels with antagonists and lower systemic oxidative stress with agents that can modulate TRP expression and boost the endogenous levels of antioxidants for treatment and management of COPD. PMID:26458340

  5. The Role of Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channels in Ca2+ Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gees, Maarten; Colsoul, Barbara; Nilius, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    The 28 mammalian members of the super-family of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are cation channels, mostly permeable to both monovalent and divalent cations, and can be subdivided into six main subfamilies: the TRPC (canonical), TRPV (vanilloid), TRPM (melastatin), TRPP (polycystin), TRPML (mucolipin), and the TRPA (ankyrin) groups. TRP channels are widely expressed in a large number of different tissues and cell types, and their biological roles appear to be equally diverse. In general, considered as polymodal cell sensors, they play a much more diverse role than anticipated. Functionally, TRP channels, when activated, cause cell depolarization, which may trigger a plethora of voltage-dependent ion channels. Upon stimulation, Ca2+ permeable TRP channels generate changes in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i, by Ca2+ entry via the plasma membrane. However, more and more evidence is arising that TRP channels are also located in intracellular organelles and serve as intracellular Ca2+ release channels. This review focuses on three major tasks of TRP channels: (1) the function of TRP channels as Ca2+ entry channels; (2) the electrogenic actions of TRPs; and (3) TRPs as Ca2+ release channels in intracellular organelles. PMID:20861159

  6. Abuse Potential of Soma: the GABA(A) Receptor as a Target.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Lorie A; Gatch, Michael B; Forster, Michael J; Dillon, Glenn H

    2009-01-01

    Soma(®) (carisoprodol) is an increasingly abused, centrally-acting muscle relaxant. Despite the prevalence of carisoprodol abuse, its mechanism of action remains unclear. Its sedative effects, which contribute to its therapeutic and recreational use, are generally attributed to the actions of its primary metabolite, meprobamate, at GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)R). Meprobamate is a controlled substance at the federal level; ironically, carisoprodol is not currently classified as such. Using behavioral and molecular pharmacological approaches, we recently demonstrated carisoprodol, itself, is capable of modulating GABA(A)R function in a manner similar to central nervous system depressants. Its functional similarities with this highly addictive class of drugs may contribute to the abuse potential of carisoprodol. The site of action of carisoprodol has not been identified; based on our studies, interaction with benzodiazepine or barbiturate sites is unlikely. These recent findings, when coupled with numerous reports in the literature, support the contention that the non-controlled status of carisoprodol should be reevaluated. PMID:20419052

  7. Classical Transient Receptor Potential 1 (TRPC1): Channel or Channel Regulator?

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Alexander; Fahlbusch, Meike; Gudermann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to other Classical Transient Receptor Potential TRPC channels the function of TRPC1 as an ion channel is a matter of debate, because it is often difficult to obtain substantial functional signals over background in response to over-expression of TRPC1 alone. Along these lines, heterologously expressed TRPC1 is poorly translocated to the plasma membrane as a homotetramer and may not function on its own physiologically, but may rather be an important linker and regulator protein in heteromeric TRPC channel tetramers. However, due to the lack of specific TRPC1 antibodies able to detect native TRPC1 channels in primary cells, identification of functional TRPC1 containing heteromeric TRPC channel complexes in the plasma membrane is still challenging. Moreover, an extended TRPC1 cDNA, which was recently discovered, may seriously question results obtained in heterologous expression systems transfected with shortened cDNA versions. Therefore, this review will focus on the current status of research on TRPC1 function obtained in primary cells and a TRPC1-deficient mouse model. PMID:25268281

  8. Zinc-induced neurotoxicity mediated by transient receptor potential melastatin 7 channels.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Koichi; Branigan, Deborah; Xiong, Zhi-Gang

    2010-03-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) channels are novel Ca(2+)-permeable non-selective cation channels ubiquitously expressed. Activation of TRPM7 channels has been shown to be involved in cellular Mg(2+) homeostasis, diseases caused by abnormal magnesium absorption, and in Ca(2+)-mediated neuronal injury under ischemic conditions. Here we show strong evidence suggesting that TRPM7 channels also play an important role in cellular Zn(2+) homeostasis and in Zn(2+)-mediated neuronal injury. Using a combination of fluorescent Zn(2+) imaging, small interfering RNA, pharmacological analysis, and cell injury assays, we show that activation of TRPM7 channels augmented Zn(2+)-induced injury of cultured mouse cortical neurons. The Zn(2+)-mediated neurotoxicity was inhibited by nonspecific TRPM7 blockers Gd(3+) or 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, and by knockdown of TRPM7 channels with small interfering RNA. In addition, Zn(2+)-mediated neuronal injury under oxygen-glucose deprivation conditions was also diminished by silencing TRPM7. Furthermore, we show that overexpression of TRPM7 channels in HEK293 cells increased intracellular Zn(2+) accumulation and Zn(2+)-induced cell injury, while silencing TRPM7 by small interfering RNA attenuated the Zn(2+)-mediated cell toxicity. Thus, TRPM7 channels may represent a novel target for neurological disorders where Zn(2+) toxicity plays an important role. PMID:20048154

  9. Ursolic Acid, a Pentacyclin Triterpene, Potentiates TRAIL-induced Apoptosis through p53-independent Up-regulation of Death Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R.; Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2011-01-01

    Discovery of the molecular targets of traditional medicine and its chemical footprints can validate the use of such medicine. In the present report, we investigated the effect of ursolic acid (UA), a pentacyclic triterpenoid found in rosemary and holy basil, on apoptosis induced by TRAIL. We found that UA potentiated TRAIL-induced apoptosis in cancer cells. In addition, UA also sensitized TRAIL-resistant cancer cells to the cytokine. When we investigated the mechanism, we found that UA down-regulated cell survival proteins and induced the cell surface expression of both TRAIL receptors, death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and -5). Induction of receptors by UA occurred independently of cell type. Gene silencing of either receptor by small interfering RNA reduced the apoptosis induced by UA and the effect of TRAIL. In addition, UA also decreased the expression of decoy receptor 2 (DcR2) but not DcR1. Induction of DRs was independent of p53 because UA induced DR4 and DR5 in HCT116 p53−/− cells. Induction of DRs, however, was dependent on JNK because UA induced JNK, and its pharmacologic inhibition abolished the induction of the receptors. The down-regulation of survival proteins and up-regulation of the DRs required reactive oxygen species (ROS) because UA induced ROS, and its quenching abolished the effect of the terpene. Also, potentiation of TRAIL-induced apoptosis by UA was significantly reduced by both ROS quenchers and JNK inhibitor. In addition, UA was also found to induce the expression of DRs, down-regulate cell survival proteins, and activate JNK in orthotopically implanted human colorectal cancer in a nude mouse model. Overall, our results showed that UA potentiates TRAIL-induced apoptosis through activation of ROS and JNK-mediated up-regulation of DRs and down-regulation of DcR2 and cell survival proteins. PMID:21156789

  10. The Insect Ecdysone Receptor is a Good Potential Target for RNAi-based Pest Control

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rong; Xu, Xinping; Liang, Yongkang; Tian, Honggang; Pan, Zhanqing; Jin, Shouheng; Wang, Na; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has great potential for use in insect pest control. However, some significant challenges must be overcome before RNAi-based pest control can become a reality. One challenge is the proper selection of a good target gene for RNAi. Here, we report that the insect ecdysone receptor (EcR) is a good potential target for RNAi-based pest control in the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens, a serious insect pest of rice plants. We demonstrated that the use of a 360 bp fragment (NlEcR-c) that is common between NlEcR-A and NlEcR-B for feeding RNAi experiments significantly decreased the relative mRNA expression levels of NlEcR compared with those in the dsGFP control. Feeding RNAi also resulted in a significant reduction in the number of offspring per pair of N. lugens. Consequently, a transgenic rice line expressing NlEcR dsRNA was constructed by Agrobacterium- mediated transformation. The results of qRT-PCR showed that the total copy number of the target gene in all transgenic rice lines was 2. Northern blot analysis showed that the small RNA of the hairpin dsNlEcR-c was successfully expressed in the transgenic rice lines. After newly hatched nymphs of N. lugens fed on the transgenic rice lines, effective RNAi was observed. The NlEcR expression levels in all lines examined were decreased significantly compared with the control. In all lines, the survival rate of the nymphs was nearly 90%, and the average number of offspring per pair in the treated groups was significantly less than that observed in the control, with a decrease of 44.18-66.27%. These findings support an RNAi-based pest control strategy and are also important for the management of rice insect pests. PMID:25516715

  11. The flavonoid baicalein promotes NMDA receptor-dependent long-term potentiation and enhances memory

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Fang; Yang, Yuan-Jian; Hu, Zhuang-Li; Long, Li-Hong; Fu, Hui; Xie, Na; Chen, Jian-Guo

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE There is growing interest in the physiological functions of flavonoids, especially in their effects on cognitive function and on neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the current investigation was to evaluate the role of the flavonoid baicalein in long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampal CA1 region and cognitive behavioural performance. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Effects of baicalein on LTP in rat hippocampal slices were investigated by electrophysiological methods. Phosphorylation of Akt (at Ser473), the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and the transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) (at Ser133) were analysed by Western blot. Fear conditioning was used to determine whether baicalein could improve learning and memory in rats. KEY RESULTS Baicalein enhanced the N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor-dependent LTP in a bell-shaped concentration-dependent manner. Addition of the lipoxygenase metabolites 12(S)-HETE and 12(S)-HPETE did not reverse these effects of baicalein. Baicalein treatment enhanced phosphorylation of Akt during induction of LTP with the same bell-shaped dose–response curve. LTP potentiation induced by baicalein was blocked by inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase. CREB phosphorylation was also increased in the CA1 region of baicalein-treated slices. Baicalein-treated rats performed significantly better than controls in a hippocampus-dependent contextual fear conditioning task. Furthermore, baicalein treatment selectively increased the phosphorylation of Akt and CREB in the CA1 region of hippocampus, but not in the prefrontal cortex, after fear conditioning training. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results demonstrate that the flavonoid baicalein can facilitate memory, and therefore it might be useful in the treatment of patients with memory disorders. PMID:21133890

  12. Inhibition of transient receptor potential canonical channels impairs cytokinesis in human malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Bomben, V. C.; Sontheimer, H. W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Glial-derived primary brain tumours, gliomas, are among the fastest growing malignancies and present a huge clinical challenge. Research suggests an important, yet poorly understood, role of ion channels in growth control of normal and malignant cells. In this study, we sought to functionally characterize Transient Receptor Potential Canoncial (TRPC) channels in glioma cell proliferation. TRPC channels form non-selective cation channels that have been suggested to represent a Ca2+ influx pathway impacting cellular growth. Materials and Methods Employing a combination of molecular, biochemical and biophysical techniques, we characterized TRPC channels in glioma cells. Results We showed consistent expression of four channel family members (TRPC-1, -3, -5, -6) in glioma cell lines and acute patient-derived tissues. These channels gave rise to small, non-voltage-dependent cation currents that were blocked by the TRPC inhibitors GdCl3, 2-APB, or SKF96365. Importantly, TRPC channels contributed to the resting conductance of glioma cells and their acute pharmacological inhibition caused an ~10 mV hyperpolarization of the cells’ resting potential. Additionally, chronic application of the TRPC inhibitor SKF96365 caused near complete growth arrest. A detailed analysis, by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and time-lapse microscopy, showed that growth inhibition occurred at the G2 + M phase of the cell cycle with cytokinesis defects. Cells underwent incomplete cell divisions and became multinucleate, enlarged cells. Conclusions Nuclear atypia and enlarged cells are histopathological hallmarks for glioblastoma multiforme, the highest grade glioma, suggesting that a defect in TRPC channel function may contribute to cellular abnormalities in these tumours. PMID:18211288

  13. Apigenin, a plant-derived flavone, activates transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 cation channel

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xin; He, Dongxu; Ru, Xiaochen; Chen, Yun; Cai, Yanfei; Bruce, Iain C; Xia, Qiang; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Jin, Jian

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is a Ca2+-permeable channel with multiple modes of activation. Apigenin is a plant-derived flavone, which has potential preventive effects on the development of cardiovascular disease. We set out to explore the effects of apigenin on TRPV4 channel activity and its role in vasodilatation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of apigenin (0.01–30 µM) on TPRV4 channels were investigated in HEK293 cells over-expressing TRPV4, rat primary cultured mesenteric artery endothelial cells (MAECs) and isolated small mesenteric arterial segments using whole-cell patch clamp, fluorescent Ca2+ imaging, intracellular recording and pressure myography. KEY RESULTS Whole-cell patch clamp and fluorescent Ca2+ imaging in HEK cells over-expressing TRPV4 showed that apigenin concentration-dependently stimulated the TRPV4-mediated cation current and Ca2+ influx. In MAECs, apigenin stimulated Ca2+ influx in a concentration-dependent manner. These increases in cation current and Ca2+ influx were markedly inhibited by TRPV4-specific blockers and siRNAs. Furthermore, pressure myography and intracellular recording in small third-order mesenteric arteries showed that apigenin dose-dependently evoked smooth muscle cell membrane hyperpolarization and subsequent vascular dilatation, which were significantly inhibited by TRPV4-specific blockers. TRPV4 blocker or charybdotoxin (200 nM) plus apamin (100 nM) diminished the apigenin-induced dilatation. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS This is the first study to demonstrate the selective stimulation of TRPV4 by apigenin. Apigenin was found to activate TRPV4 channels in a dose-dependent manner in HEK cells over-expressing TRPV4 and in native endothelial cells. In rat small mesenteric arteries, apigenin acts on TRPV4 in endothelial cells to induce EDHF-mediated vascular dilatation. PMID:22049911

  14. The insect ecdysone receptor is a good potential target for RNAi-based pest control.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rong; Xu, Xinping; Liang, Yongkang; Tian, Honggang; Pan, Zhanqing; Jin, Shouheng; Wang, Na; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has great potential for use in insect pest control. However, some significant challenges must be overcome before RNAi-based pest control can become a reality. One challenge is the proper selection of a good target gene for RNAi. Here, we report that the insect ecdysone receptor (EcR) is a good potential target for RNAi-based pest control in the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens, a serious insect pest of rice plants. We demonstrated that the use of a 360 bp fragment (NlEcR-c) that is common between NlEcR-A and NlEcR-B for feeding RNAi experiments significantly decreased the relative mRNA expression levels of NlEcR compared with those in the dsGFP control. Feeding RNAi also resulted in a significant reduction in the number of offspring per pair of N. lugens. Consequently, a transgenic rice line expressing NlEcR dsRNA was constructed by Agrobacterium- mediated transformation. The results of qRT-PCR showed that the total copy number of the target gene in all transgenic rice lines was 2. Northern blot analysis showed that the small RNA of the hairpin dsNlEcR-c was successfully expressed in the transgenic rice lines. After newly hatched nymphs of N. lugens fed on the transgenic rice lines, effective RNAi was observed. The NlEcR expression levels in all lines examined were decreased significantly compared with the control. In all lines, the survival rate of the nymphs was nearly 90%, and the average number of offspring per pair in the treated groups was significantly less than that observed in the control, with a decrease of 44.18-66.27%. These findings support an RNAi-based pest control strategy and are also important for the management of rice insect pests. PMID:25516715

  15. Vitamin D receptor expression is linked to potential markers of human thyroid papillary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Izkhakov, Elena; Somjen, Dalia; Sharon, Orli; Knoll, Esther; Aizic, Asaf; Fliss, Dan M; Limor, Rona; Stern, Naftali

    2016-05-01

    Genes regulated cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion and degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have been screened as potential markers of malignant thyroid nodules. The mRNA expression levels of two of them, the ECM protein-1 (ECM1) and the type II transmembrane serine protease-4 (TMPRSS4), were shown to be an independent predictor of an existing thyroid carcinoma. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in epithelial cells of the normal thyroid gland, as well as in malignant dividing cells, which respond to the active metabolite of vitamin D by decreased proliferative activity in vitro. We evaluated the relationship between mRNA gene expressions of TMPRSS4, ECM1 and VDR in 21 papillary thyroid carcinoma samples and compared it to 21 normal thyroid tissues from the same patients. Gene expression was considered as up- or down-regulated if it varied by more or less than 2-fold in the cancer tissue relative to the normal thyroid tissue (Ca/N) from the same patient. We found an overall significant adjusted correlation between the mRNA expression ratio (ExR) of VDR and that of ECM1 in Ca/N thyroid tissue (R=0.648, P<0.001). There was a high ExR of VDR between Ca/N thyroid tissue from the same patient (3.06±2.9), which also exhibited a high Ca/N ExR of ECM1 and/or of TMPRSS4 (>2, P=0.05).The finding that increased VDR expression in human thyroid cancer cells is often linked to increased ECM1 and/or TPMRSS4 expression warrants further investigation into the potential role of vitamin D analogs in thyroid carcinoma. PMID:26907966

  16. Critical role of canonical transient receptor potential channel 7 in initiation of seizures.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Kevin D; Shwe, U Thaung; Abramowitz, Joel; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Zheng, Fang

    2014-08-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a life-threatening disease that has been recognized since antiquity but still causes over 50,000 deaths annually in the United States. The prevailing view on the pathophysiology of SE is that it is sustained by a loss of normal inhibitory mechanisms of neuronal activity. However, the early process leading to the initiation of SE is not well understood. Here, we show that, as seen in electroencephalograms, SE induced by the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine in mice is preceded by a specific increase in the gamma wave, and genetic ablation of canonical transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) 7 significantly reduces this pilocarpine-induced increase of gamma wave activity, preventing the occurrence of SE. At the cellular level, TRPC7 plays a critical role in the generation of spontaneous epileptiform burst firing in cornu ammonis (CA) 3 pyramidal neurons in brain slices. At the synaptic level, TRPC7 plays a significant role in the long-term potentiation at the CA3 recurrent collateral synapses and Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses, but not at the mossy fiber-CA3 synapses. Taken together, our data suggest that epileptiform burst firing generated in the CA3 region by activity-dependent enhancement of recurrent collateral synapses may be an early event in the initiation process of SE and that TRPC7 plays a critical role in this cellular event. Our findings reveal that TRPC7 is intimately involved in the initiation of seizures both in vitro and in vivo. To our knowledge, this contribution to initiation of seizures is the first identified functional role for the TRPC7 ion channel. PMID:25049394

  17. Critical role of canonical transient receptor potential channel 7 in initiation of seizures

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Kevin D.; Shwe, U Thaung; Abramowitz, Joel; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Zheng, Fang

    2014-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a life-threatening disease that has been recognized since antiquity but still causes over 50,000 deaths annually in the United States. The prevailing view on the pathophysiology of SE is that it is sustained by a loss of normal inhibitory mechanisms of neuronal activity. However, the early process leading to the initiation of SE is not well understood. Here, we show that, as seen in electroencephalograms, SE induced by the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine in mice is preceded by a specific increase in the gamma wave, and genetic ablation of canonical transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) 7 significantly reduces this pilocarpine-induced increase of gamma wave activity, preventing the occurrence of SE. At the cellular level, TRPC7 plays a critical role in the generation of spontaneous epileptiform burst firing in cornu ammonis (CA) 3 pyramidal neurons in brain slices. At the synaptic level, TRPC7 plays a significant role in the long-term potentiation at the CA3 recurrent collateral synapses and Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses, but not at the mossy fiber-CA3 synapses. Taken together, our data suggest that epileptiform burst firing generated in the CA3 region by activity-dependent enhancement of recurrent collateral synapses may be an early event in the initiation process of SE and that TRPC7 plays a critical role in this cellular event. Our findings reveal that TRPC7 is intimately involved in the initiation of seizures both in vitro and in vivo. To our knowledge, this contribution to initiation of seizures is the first identified functional role for the TRPC7 ion channel. PMID:25049394

  18. Aldolase potentiates DIDS activation of the ryanodine receptor in rabbit skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Seo, In-Ra; Moh, Sang Hyun; Lee, Eun Hui; Meissner, Gerhard; Kim, Do Han

    2006-10-15

    DIDS (4,4'-di-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate), an anion channel blocker, triggers Ca2+ release from skeletal muscle SR (sarcoplasmic reticulum). The present study characterized the effects of DIDS on rabbit skeletal single Ca2+-release channel/RyR1 (ryanodine receptor type 1) incorporated into a planar lipid bilayer. When junctional SR vesicles were used for channel incorporation (native RyR1), DIDS increased the mean P(o) (open probability) of RyR1 without affecting unitary conductance when Cs+ was used as the charge carrier. Lifetime analysis of single RyR1 activities showed that 10 microM DIDS induced reversible long-lived open events (P(o)=0.451+/-0.038) in the presence of 10 microM Ca2+, due mainly to a new third component for both open and closed time constants. However, when purified RyR1 was examined in the same condition, 10 microM DIDS became considerably less potent (P(o)=0.206+/-0.025), although the caffeine response was similar between native and purified RyR1. Hence we postulated that a DIDS-binding protein, essential for the DIDS sensitivity of RyR1, was lost during RyR1 purification. DIDS-affinity column chromatography of solubilized junctional SR, and MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight) MS analysis of the affinity-column-associated proteins, identified four major DIDS-binding proteins in the SR fraction. Among them, aldolase was the only protein that greatly potentiated DIDS sensitivity. The association between RyR1 and aldolase was further confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and aldolase-affinity batch-column chromatography. Taken together, we conclude that aldolase is physically associated with RyR1 and could confer a considerable potentiation of the DIDS effect on RyR1. PMID:16817780

  19. Nicotinic Acid Activates the Capsaicin Receptor TRPV1 – A Potential Mechanism for Cutaneous Flushing

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Linlin; Lee, Bo Hyun; Mao, Rongrong; Cai, Anping; Jia, Yunfang; Clifton, Heather; Schaefer, Saul; Xu, Lin; Zheng, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nicotinic acid (a.k.a. niacin or vitamin B3), widely used to treat dyslipidemias, represents an effective and safe means to reduce the risk of mortality from cardiovascular disease. Nonetheless, a substantial fraction of patients discontinue treatment due to a strong side effect of cutaneous vasodilation, commonly termed flushing. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that nicotinic acid causes flushing partially by activating the capsaicin receptor TRPV1, a polymodal cellular sensor that mediates the flushing response upon consumption of spicy food. Approach and Results We observed that the nicotinic acid-induced increase in blood flow was substantially reduced in Trpv1−/− knockout mice, indicating involvement of the channel in flushing response. Using exogenously expressed TRPV1, we confirmed that nicotinic acid at sub-millimolar to millimolar concentrations directly and potently activates TRPV1 from the intracellular side. Binding of nicotinic acid to TRPV1 lowers its activation threshold for heat, causing channel opening at physiological temperatures. Activation of TRPV1 by voltage or ligands (capsaicin and 2-APB) is also potentiated by nicotinic acid. We further demonstrated that nicotinic acid does not compete directly with capsaicin but may activate TRPV1 through the 2-APB activation pathway. Using live-cell fluorescence imaging, we observed that nicotinic acid can quickly enter the cell through a transporter-mediated pathway to activate TRPV1. Conclusions Direct activation of TRPV1 by nicotinic acid may lead to cutaneous vasodilation that contributes to flushing, suggesting a potential novel pathway to inhibit flushing and improve compliance. PMID:24675661

  20. Activation of the chemosensing transient receptor potential channel A1 (TRPA1) by alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Stenger, Bernhard; Zehfuss, Franziska; Mückter, Harald; Schmidt, Annette; Balszuweit, Frank; Schäfer, Eva; Büch, Thomas; Gudermann, Thomas; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) cation channel is expressed in different tissues including skin, lung and neuronal tissue. Recent reports identified TRPA1 as a sensor for noxious substances, implicating a functional role in the molecular toxicology. TRPA1 is activated by various potentially harmful electrophilic substances. The chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (SM) is a highly reactive alkylating agent that binds to numerous biological targets. Although SM is known for almost 200 years, detailed knowledge about the pathophysiology resulting from exposure is lacking. A specific therapy is not available. In this study, we investigated whether the alkylating agent 2-chloroethyl-ethylsulfide (CEES, a model substance for SM-promoted effects) and SM are able to activate TRPA1 channels. CEES induced a marked increase in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in TRPA1-expressing but not in TRPA1-negative cells. The TRP-channel blocker AP18 diminished the CEES-induced calcium influx. HEK293 cells permanently expressing TRPA1 were more sensitive toward cytotoxic effects of CEES compared with wild-type cells. At low CEES concentrations, CEES-induced cytotoxicity was prevented by AP18. Proof-of-concept experiments using SM resulted in a pronounced increase in [Ca(2+)]i in HEK293-A1-E cells. Human A549 lung epithelial cells, which express TRPA1 endogenously, reacted with a transient calcium influx in response to CEES exposure. The CEES-dependent calcium response was diminished by AP18. In summary, our results demonstrate that alkylating agents are able to activate TRPA1. Inhibition of TRPA1 counteracted cellular toxicity and could thus represent a feasible approach to mitigate SM-induced cell damage. PMID:25395009

  1. The potential role of dopamine D3 receptor neurotransmission in cognition

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Shinichiro; Gerretsen, Philip; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Caravaggio, Fernando; Chow, Tiffany; Le Foll, Bernard; Mulsant, Benoit; Pollock, Bruce; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2013-01-01

    Currently available treatments have limited pro-cognitive effects for neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. The primary objective of this work is to review the literature on the role of dopamine D3 receptors in cognition, and propose dopamine D3 receptor antagonists as possible cognitive enhancers for neuropsychiatric disorders. A literature search was performed to identify animal and human studies on D3 receptors and cognition using PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE. The search terms included “dopamine D3 receptor” and “cognition”. The literature search identified 164 articles. The results revealed: (1) D3 receptors are associated with cognitive functioning in both healthy individuals and those with neuropsychiatric disorders; (2) D3 receptor blockade appears to enhance while D3 receptor agonism seems to impair cognitive function, including memory, attention, learning, processing speed, social recognition and executive function independent of age; and (3) D3 receptor antagonists may exert their pro-cognitive effect by enhancing the release of acetylcholine in the prefrontal cortex, disinhibiting the activity of dopamine neurons projecting to the nucleus accumbens or prefrontal cortex, or activating CREB signaling in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that D3 receptor blockade may enhance cognitive performance in healthy individuals and treat cognitive dysfunction in individuals with a neuropsychiatric disorder. Clinical trials are needed to confirm these effects. PMID:23791072

  2. Receptor tyrosine kinase (c-Kit) inhibitors: a potential therapeutic target in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abbaspour Babaei, Maryam; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Saleem, Mohammad; Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Ahmadipour, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    c-Kit, a receptor tyrosine kinase, is involved in intracellular signaling, and the mutated form of c-Kit plays a crucial role in occurrence of some cancers. The function of c-Kit has led to the concept that inhibiting c-Kit kinase activity can be a target for cancer therapy. The promising results of inhibition of c-Kit for treatment of cancers have been observed in some cancers such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor, acute myeloid leukemia, melanoma, and other tumors, and these results have encouraged attempts toward improvement of using c-Kit as a capable target for cancer therapy. This paper presents the findings of previous studies regarding c-Kit as a receptor tyrosine kinase and an oncogene, as well as its gene targets and signaling pathways in normal and cancer cells. The c-Kit gene location, protein structure, and the role of c-Kit in normal cell have been discussed. Comprehending the molecular mechanism underlying c-Kit-mediated tumorogenesis is consequently essential and may lead to the identification of future novel drug targets. The potential mechanisms by which c-Kit induces cellular transformation have been described. This study aims to elucidate the function of c-Kit for future cancer therapy. In addition, it has c-Kit inhibitor drug properties and their functions have been listed in tables and demonstrated in schematic pictures. This review also has collected previous studies that targeted c-Kit as a novel strategy for cancer therapy. This paper further emphasizes the advantages of this approach, as well as the limitations that must be addressed in the future. Finally, although c-Kit is an attractive target for cancer therapy, based on the outcomes of treatment of patients with c-Kit inhibitors, it is unlikely that Kit inhibitors alone can lead to cure. It seems that c-Kit mutations alone are not sufficient for tumorogenesis, but do play a crucial role in cancer occurrence. PMID:27536065

  3. Receptor tyrosine kinase (c-Kit) inhibitors: a potential therapeutic target in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Abbaspour Babaei, Maryam; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Saleem, Mohammad; Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Ahmadipour, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    c-Kit, a receptor tyrosine kinase, is involved in intracellular signaling, and the mutated form of c-Kit plays a crucial role in occurrence of some cancers. The function of c-Kit has led to the concept that inhibiting c-Kit kinase activity can be a target for cancer therapy. The promising results of inhibition of c-Kit for treatment of cancers have been observed in some cancers such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor, acute myeloid leukemia, melanoma, and other tumors, and these results have encouraged attempts toward improvement of using c-Kit as a capable target for cancer therapy. This paper presents the findings of previous studies regarding c-Kit as a receptor tyrosine kinase and an oncogene, as well as its gene targets and signaling pathways in normal and cancer cells. The c-Kit gene location, protein structure, and the role of c-Kit in normal cell have been discussed. Comprehending the molecular mechanism underlying c-Kit-mediated tumorogenesis is consequently essential and may lead to the identification of future novel drug targets. The potential mechanisms by which c-Kit induces cellular transformation have been described. This study aims to elucidate the function of c-Kit for future cancer therapy. In addition, it has c-Kit inhibitor drug properties and their functions have been listed in tables and demonstrated in schematic pictures. This review also has collected previous studies that targeted c-Kit as a novel strategy for cancer therapy. This paper further emphasizes the advantages of this approach, as well as the limitations that must be addressed in the future. Finally, although c-Kit is an attractive target for cancer therapy, based on the outcomes of treatment of patients with c-Kit inhibitors, it is unlikely that Kit inhibitors alone can lead to cure. It seems that c-Kit mutations alone are not sufficient for tumorogenesis, but do play a crucial role in cancer occurrence. PMID:27536065

  4. Potential Involvement of P2 Receptors in the Pathological Processes of Hyperthyroidism: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wu; Li, Guodong; Nie, Yijun; Zou, Lifang; Zhang, Xi; Liu, Shuangmei; Li, Guilin; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Chun-Ping; Liang, Shangdong

    2016-05-01

    Symptoms of hyperthyroidism manifest mainly as changes in the nervous and metabolic systems. Whether P2X receptors (ionotropic ATP purinergic receptors, including P2X3 receptor and P2X7 receptor) are involved in the alterations of these disorders still remains unclear. Thus, this study aimed to assess the association of hyperthyroidism with the expression of P2X3 and P2X7 receptors and the concentrations of ATP in blood leukocytes and catecholamine. Twelve healthy subjects and twelve patients diagnosed with hyperthyroidism were recruited. Serum free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels had been detected by chemiluminescence method. Meanwhile, the catecholamine levels (including adrenaline, noradrenaline, and dopamine) in plasma, ATP level and P2X receptors (including P2X3 receptor and P2X7 receptor) in peripheral blood had been detected by high performance liquid chromatography, bioluminescence method, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Levels of epinephrine and norepinephrine were significantly higher in the hyperthyroidism group compared with the control group. The concentration of ATP in the hyperthyroidism group was significantly higher than its in the control group. The expression of P2X3 mRNA and P2X7 mRNA in hyperthyroidism group were significantly increased compared with those in control group. In a conclusion, there is a relationship between the elevated expression of P2X3 receptor and P2X7 receptor in peripheral blood leukocytes and high serum epinephrine and norepinephrine levels in hyperthyroidism patients. PMID:27312548

  5. Olfactory Bulb Glomerular NMDA Receptors Mediate Olfactory Nerve Potentiation and Odor Preference Learning in the Neonate Rat

    PubMed Central

    Harley, Carolyn W.; Yuan, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Rat pup odor preference learning follows pairing of bulbar beta-adrenoceptor activation with olfactory input. We hypothesize that NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated olfactory input to mitral cells is enhanced during training, such that increased calcium facilitates and shapes the critical cAMP pattern. Here, we demonstrate, in vitro, that olfactory nerve stimulation, at sniffing frequencies, paired with beta-adrenoceptor activation, potentiates olfactory nerve-evoked mitral cell firing. This potentiation is blocked by a NMDAR antagonist and by increased inhibition. Glomerular dishinhibtion also induces NMDAR-sensitive potentiation. In vivo, in parallel, behavioral learning is prevented by glomerular infusion of an NMDAR antagonist or a GABAA receptor agonist. A glomerular GABAA receptor antagonist paired with odor can induce NMDAR-dependent learning. The NMDA GluN1 subunit is phosphorylated in odor-specific glomeruli within 5 min of training suggesting early activation, and enhanced calcium entry, during acquisition. The GluN1 subunit is down-regulated 3 h after learning; and at 24 h post-training the GluN2B subunit is down-regulated. These events may assist memory stability. Ex vivo experiments using bulbs from trained rat pups reveal an increase in the AMPA/NMDA EPSC ratio post-training, consistent with an increase in AMPA receptor insertion and/or the decrease in NMDAR subunits. These results support a model of a cAMP/NMDA interaction in generating rat pup odor preference learning. PMID:22496886

  6. Kappa-opioid receptor signaling in the striatum as a potential modulator of dopamine transmission in cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Trifilieff, Pierre; Martinez, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is accompanied by a decrease in striatal dopamine signaling, measured as a decrease in dopamine D2 receptor binding as well as blunted dopamine release in the striatum. These alterations in dopamine transmission have clinical relevance, and have been shown to correlate with cocaine-seeking behavior and response to treatment for cocaine dependence. However, the mechanisms contributing to the hypodopaminergic state in cocaine addiction remain unknown. Here we review the positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies showing alterations in D2 receptor binding potential and dopamine transmission in cocaine abusers and their significance in cocaine-seeking behavior. Based on animal and human studies, we propose that the kappa receptor/dynorphin system, because of its impact on dopamine transmission and upregulation following cocaine exposure, could contribute to the hypodopaminergic state reported in cocaine addiction, and could thus be a relevant target for treatment development. PMID:23760592

  7. Eph receptor A10 has a potential as a target for a prostate cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nagano, Kazuya; Yamashita, Takuya; Inoue, Masaki; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Abe, Yasuhiro; Kamada, Haruhiko; and others

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • EphA10 mRNA is overexpressed in breast, prostate and colon cancer cell lines. • EphA10 is overexpressed in clinical prostate tumors at mRNA and protein levels. • Anti-EphA10 antibodies were cytotoxic on EphA10-positive prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: We recently identified Eph receptor A10 (EphA10) as a novel breast cancer-specific protein. Moreover, we also showed that an in-house developed anti-EphA10 monoclonal antibody (mAb) significantly inhibited proliferation of breast cancer cells, suggesting EphA10 as a promising target for breast cancer therapy. However, the only other known report for EphA10 was its expression in the testis at the mRNA level. Therefore, the potency of EphA10 as a drug target against cancers other than the breast is not known. The expression of EphA10 in a wide variety of cancer cells was studied and the potential of EphA10 as a drug target was evaluated. Screening of EphA10 mRNA expression showed that EphA10 was overexpressed in breast cancer cell lines as well as in prostate and colon cancer cell lines. Thus, we focused on prostate cancers in which EphA10 expression was equivalent to that in breast cancers. As a result, EphA10 expression was clearly shown in clinical prostate tumor tissues as well as in cell lines at the mRNA and protein levels. In order to evaluate the potential of EphA10 as a drug target, we analyzed complement-dependent cytotoxicity effects of anti-EphA10 mAb and found that significant cytotoxicity was mediated by the expression of EphA10. Therefore, the idea was conceived that the overexpression of EphA10 in prostate cancers might have a potential as a target for prostate cancer therapy, and formed the basis for the studies reported here.

  8. Scavenger Receptors and Their Potential as Therapeutic Targets in the Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, Sam L.; Freestone, Katie; Dunn, Sarah; Twigg, Michael W.; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Walker, John H.; Wheatcroft, Stephen B.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2010-01-01

    Scavenger receptors act as membrane-bound and soluble proteins that bind to macromolecular complexes and pathogens. This diverse supergroup of proteins mediates binding to modified lipoprotein particles which regulate the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic plaques. In vascular tissues, scavenger receptors are implicated in regulating intracellular signaling, lipid accumulation, foam cell development, and cellular apoptosis or necrosis linked to the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. One approach is using gene therapy to modulate scavenger receptor function in atherosclerosis. Ectopic expression of membrane-bound scavenger receptors using viral vectors can modify lipid profiles and reduce the incidence of atherosclerosis. Alternatively, expression of soluble scavenger receptors can also block plaque initiation and progression. Inhibition of scavenger receptor expression using a combined gene therapy and RNA interference strategy also holds promise for long-term therapy. Here we review our current understanding of the gene delivery by viral vectors to cells and tissues in gene therapy strategies and its application to the modulation of scavenger receptor function in atherosclerosis. PMID:20981357

  9. Human eosinophils - potential pharmacological model applied in human histamine H4 receptor research.

    PubMed

    Grosicki, Marek; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Histamine and histamine receptors are well known for their immunomodulatory role in inflammation. In this review we describe the role of histamine and histamine H4 receptor on human eosinophils. In the first part of article we provide short summary of histamine and histamine receptors role in physiology and histamine related therapeutics used in clinics. We briefly describe the human histamine receptor H4 and its ligands, as well as human eosinophils. In the second part of the review we provide detailed description of known histamine effects on eosinophils including: intracellular calcium concentration flux, actin polymerization, cellular shape change, upregulation of adhesion proteins and cellular chemotaxis. We provide proofs that these effects are mainly connected with the activation of histamine H4 receptor. When examining experimental data we discuss the controversial results and limitations of the studies performed on isolated eosinophils. In conclusion we believe that studies on histamine H4 receptor on human eosinophils can provide interesting new biomarkers that can be used in clinical studies of histamine receptors, that in future might result in the development of new strategies in the treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions like asthma or allergy, in which eosinophils are involved. PMID:25760088

  10. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 Inhibits γ-Aminobutyric Acid-Activated Current in Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhiwen; Tian, Yujing; Qi, Mengwen; Li, Yingchun; Du, Yimei; Chen, Lei; Liu, Wentao; Chen, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems is crucial for the modulation of neuronal excitability in the central nervous system (CNS). The activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is reported to enhance the response of hippocampal glutamate receptors, but whether the inhibitory neurotransmitter system can be regulated by TRPV4 remains unknown. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the CNS. Here, we show that application of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) synthetic (GSK1016790A or 4α-PDD) or endogenous agonist (5,6-EET) inhibited GABA-activated current (I GABA) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, which was blocked by specific antagonists of TRPV4 and of GABAA receptors. GSK1016790A increased the phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK) and decreased the phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-Akt) protein levels, which was attenuated by removing extracellular calcium or by a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β antagonist. GSK1016790A-induced decrease of p-Akt protein level was sensitive to an AMPK antagonist. GSK1016790A-inhibited I GABA was blocked by an AMPK antagonist or a phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K) agonist. GSK1016790A-induced inhibition of I GABA was also significantly attenuated by a protein kinase C (PKC) antagonist but was unaffected by protein kinase A or calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II antagonist. We conclude that activation of TRPV4 inhibits GABAA receptor, which may be mediated by activation of AMPK and subsequent down-regulation of PI3K/Akt signaling and activation of PKC signaling. Inhibition of GABAA receptors may account for the neuronal hyperexcitability caused by TRPV4 activation. PMID:27616980

  11. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 Inhibits γ-Aminobutyric Acid-Activated Current in Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zhiwen; Tian, Yujing; Qi, Mengwen; Li, Yingchun; Du, Yimei; Chen, Lei; Liu, Wentao; Chen, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems is crucial for the modulation of neuronal excitability in the central nervous system (CNS). The activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is reported to enhance the response of hippocampal glutamate receptors, but whether the inhibitory neurotransmitter system can be regulated by TRPV4 remains unknown. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the CNS. Here, we show that application of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) synthetic (GSK1016790A or 4α-PDD) or endogenous agonist (5,6-EET) inhibited GABA-activated current (IGABA) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, which was blocked by specific antagonists of TRPV4 and of GABAA receptors. GSK1016790A increased the phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK) and decreased the phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-Akt) protein levels, which was attenuated by removing extracellular calcium or by a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β antagonist. GSK1016790A-induced decrease of p-Akt protein level was sensitive to an AMPK antagonist. GSK1016790A-inhibited IGABA was blocked by an AMPK antagonist or a phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K) agonist. GSK1016790A-induced inhibition of IGABA was also significantly attenuated by a protein kinase C (PKC) antagonist but was unaffected by protein kinase A or calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II antagonist. We conclude that activation of TRPV4 inhibits GABAA receptor, which may be mediated by activation of AMPK and subsequent down-regulation of PI3K/Akt signaling and activation of PKC signaling. Inhibition of GABAA receptors may account for the neuronal hyperexcitability caused by TRPV4 activation.

  12. Neurokinin 1 receptor activates transient receptor potential-like currents in noradrenergic A7 neurons in rats.

    PubMed

    Min, Ming-Yuan; Shih, Pei-Yu; Wu, Yu-Wei; Lu, Hsin-Wei; Lee, Meng-Larn; Yang, Hsiu-Wen

    2009-09-01

    Noradrenergic (NAergic) A7 neurons are involved in modulating nociception by releasing noradrenaline in the dorsal spinal cord. Since NAergic A7 neurons receive dense Substance P (Sub-P) releasing terminals from ventromedial medulla, here we tested the effect of Sub-P on them. Bath application of Sub-P induced an inward current (I(Sub-P)) in NAergic neurons, which was significantly blocked by Neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor antagonist. The I(Sub-P) was reversed at approximately -20 mV, blocked by several TRP channel blockers, enhanced by OAG and negatively regulated by PKC. Immunohistochemistry staining showed that NAergic A7 neurons express high level of TRPC6 channel proteins, which is consistent with pharmacological properties of I(Sub-P) shown above, as TRPC6 channel is shown to be augmented by OAG and inhibited by PKC. In conclusion, the above results provide mechanism underlying postsynaptic action of Sub-P on NAergic A7 neurons and a role for TRPC6 channel in NAergic pain modulation. PMID:19463951

  13. Human Mu Opioid Receptor (OPRM1A118G) polymorphism is associated with brain mu- opioid receptor binding potential in smokers

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.; Logan, J.; Ray, R.; Ruparel, K.; Newberg, A.; Wileyto, E.P.; Loughead, J.W.; Divgi, C.; Blendy, J.A.; Logan, J.; Zubieta, J.-K.; Lerman, C.

    2011-04-15

    Evidence points to the endogenous opioid system, and the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) in particular, in mediating the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, including nicotine. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human MOR gene (OPRM1 A118G) has been shown to alter receptor protein level in preclinical models and smoking behavior in humans. To clarify the underlying mechanisms for these associations, we conducted an in vivo investigation of the effects of OPRM1 A118G genotype on MOR binding potential (BP{sub ND} or receptor availability). Twenty-two smokers prescreened for genotype (12 A/A, 10 */G) completed two [{sup 11}C] carfentanil positron emission tomography (PET) imaging sessions following overnight abstinence and exposure to a nicotine-containing cigarette and a denicotinized cigarette. Independent of session, smokers homozygous for the wild-type OPRM1 A allele exhibited significantly higher levels of MOR BP{sub ND} than smokers carrying the G allele in bilateral amygdala, left thalamus, and left anterior cingulate cortex. Among G allele carriers, the extent of subjective reward difference (denicotinized versus nicotine cigarette) was associated significantly with MOR BP{sub ND} difference in right amygdala, caudate, anterior cingulate cortex, and thalamus. Future translational investigations can elucidate the role of MORs in nicotine addiction, which may lead to development of novel therapeutics.

  14. Evidence for Novel Pharmacological Sensitivities of Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) Channels in Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Bais, Swarna; Churgin, Matthew A.; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Greenberg, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis, caused by parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma, is a neglected tropical disease affecting hundreds of millions globally. Praziquantel (PZQ), the only drug currently available for treatment and control, is largely ineffective against juvenile worms, and reports of PZQ resistance lend added urgency to the need for development of new therapeutics. Ion channels, which underlie electrical excitability in cells, are validated targets for many current anthelmintics. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are a large family of non-selective cation channels. TRP channels play key roles in sensory transduction and other critical functions, yet the properties of these channels have remained essentially unexplored in parasitic helminths. TRP channels fall into several (7–8) subfamilies, including TRPA and TRPV. Though schistosomes contain genes predicted to encode representatives of most of the TRP channel subfamilies, they do not appear to have genes for any TRPV channels. Nonetheless, we find that the TRPV1-selective activators capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX) induce dramatic hyperactivity in adult worms; capsaicin also increases motility in schistosomula. SB 366719, a highly-selective TRPV1 antagonist, blocks the capsaicin-induced hyperactivity in adults. Mammalian TRPA1 is not activated by capsaicin, yet knockdown of the single predicted TRPA1-like gene (SmTRPA) in S. mansoni effectively abolishes capsaicin-induced responses in adult worms, suggesting that SmTRPA is required for capsaicin sensitivity in these parasites. Based on these results, we hypothesize that some schistosome TRP channels have novel pharmacological sensitivities that can be targeted to disrupt normal parasite neuromuscular function. These results also have implications for understanding the phylogeny of metazoan TRP channels and may help identify novel targets for new or repurposed therapeutics. PMID:26655809

  15. Interleukin 6 Receptor Is an Independent Prognostic Factor and a Potential Therapeutic Target of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Isobe, Aki; Sawada, Kenjiro; Kinose, Yasuto; Ohyagi-Hara, Chifumi; Nakatsuka, Erika; Makino, Hiroshi; Ogura, Tomonori; Mizuno, Tomoko; Suzuki, Noriko; Morii, Eiichi; Nakamura, Koji; Sawada, Ikuko; Toda, Aska; Hashimoto, Kae; Mabuchi, Seiji; Ohta, Tsuyoshi; Morishige, Ken-ichirou; Kurachi, Hirohisa; Kimura, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer remains the most lethal gynecologic cancer and new targeted molecular therapies against this miserable disease continue to be challenging. In this study, we analyzed the expressional patterns of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and its receptor (IL-6R) expression in ovarian cancer tissues, evaluated the impact of these expressions on clinical outcomes of patients, and found that a high-level of IL-6R expression but not IL-6 expression in cancer cells is an independent prognostic factor. In in vitro analyses using ovarian cell lines, while six (RMUG-S, RMG-1, OVISE, A2780, SKOV3ip1 and OVCAR-3) of seven overexpressed IL-6R compared with a primary normal ovarian surface epithelium, only two (RMG-1, OVISE) of seven cell lines overexpressed IL-6, suggesting that IL-6/IL-6R signaling exerts in a paracrine manner in certain types of ovarian cancer cells. Ovarian cancer ascites were collected from patients, and we found that primary CD11b+CD14+ cells, which were predominantly M2-polarized macrophages, are the major source of IL-6 production in an ovarian cancer microenvironment. When CD11b+CD14+ cells were co-cultured with cancer cells, both the invasion and the proliferation of cancer cells were robustly promoted and these promotions were almost completely inhibited by pretreatment with anti-IL-6R antibody (tocilizumab). The data presented herein suggest a rationale for anti-IL-6/IL-6R therapy to suppress the peritoneal spread of ovarian cancer, and represent evidence of the therapeutic potential of anti-IL-6R therapy for ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:25658637

  16. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 regulates aquaporin-5 abundance under hypotonic conditions.

    PubMed

    Sidhaye, Venkataramana K; Güler, Ali D; Schweitzer, Kelly S; D'Alessio, Franco; Caterina, Michael J; King, Landon S

    2006-03-21

    Aquaporin-5 (AQP5) is expressed in epithelia of lung, cornea, and various secretory glands, sites where extracellular osmolality is known to fluctuate. Hypertonic aquaporin (AQP) induction has been described, but little is known about the effects of a hypotonic environment on AQP abundance. We report that, when mouse lung epithelial cells were exposed to hypotonic medium, a dose-responsive decrease in AQP5 abundance was observed. Hypotonic reduction of AQP5 was blocked by ruthenium red, methanandamide, and miconazole, agents that inhibit the cation channel transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 4 present in lung epithelial cells. Several observations indicate that TRPV4 participates in hypotonic reduction of AQP5, including a requirement for extracellular calcium to achieve AQP5 reduction; an increase in intracellular calcium in mouse lung epithelial (MLE) cells after hypotonic stimulation; and reduction of AQP5 abundance after addition of the TRPV4 agonist 4alpha-Phorbol-12,13-didecanoate (4alpha-PDD). Similarly, addition of hypotonic PBS to mouse trachea in vivo decreased AQP5 within 1 h, an effect blocked by ruthenium red. To confirm a functional interaction, AQP5 was expressed in control or TRPV4-expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells. Hypotonic reduction of AQP5 was observed only in the presence of TRPV4 and was blocked by ruthenium red. Combined with earlier studies, these observations indicate that AQP5 abundance is tightly regulated along a range of osmolalities and that AQP5 reduction by extracellular hypotonicity can be mediated by TRPV4. These findings have direct relevance to regulation of membrane water permeability and water homeostasis in epithelia of the lung and other organs. PMID:16537379

  17. Polygalasaponin F induces long-term potentiation in adult rat hippocampus via NMDA receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Feng; Sun, Jian-dong; Han, Ning; Li, Chuang-jun; Yuan, Yu-he; Zhang, Dong-ming; Chen, Nai-hong

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect and underlying mechanisms of polygalasaponin F (PGSF), a triterpenoid saponin isolated from Polygala japonica, on long-term potentiation (LTP) in hippocampus dentate gyrus (DG) of anesthetized rats. Methods: Population spike (PS) of hippocampal DG was recorded in anesthetized male Wistar rats. PGSF, the NMDAR inhibitor MK801 and the CaMKII inhibitor KN93 were intracerebroventricularly administered. Western blotting analysis was used to examine the phosphorylation expressions of NMDA receptor subunit 2B (NR2B), Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Results: Intracerebroventricular administration of PGSF (1 and 10 μmol/L) produced long-lasting increase of PS amplitude in hippocampal DG in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-injection of MK801 (100 μmol/L) or KN93 (100 μmol/L) completely blocked PGSF-induced LTP. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of NR2B, CaMKII, ERK, and CREB in hippocampus was significantly increased 5–60 min after LTP induction. The up-regulation of p-CaMKII expression could be completely abolished by pre-injection of MK801. The up-regulation of p-ERK and p-CREB expressions could be partially blocked by pre-injection of KN93. Conclusion: PGSF could induce LTP in hippocampal DG in anesthetized rats via NMDAR activation mediated by CaMKII, ERK and CREB signaling pathway. PMID:22286914

  18. Transient receptor potential canonical channels are required for in vitro endothelial tube formation.

    PubMed

    Antigny, Fabrice; Girardin, Nathalie; Frieden, Maud

    2012-02-17

    In endothelial cells Ca(2+) entry is an essential component of the Ca(2+) signal that takes place during processes such as cell proliferation or angiogenesis. Ca(2+) influx occurs via the store-operated Ca(2+) entry pathway, involving stromal interaction molecule-1 (STIM1) and Orai1, but also through channels gated by second messengers like the transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels. The human umbilical vein-derived endothelial cell line EA.hy926 expressed STIM1 and Orai1 as well as several TRPC channels. By invalidating each of these molecules, we showed that TRPC3, TRPC4, and TRPC5 are essential for the formation of tubular structures observed after EA.hy926 cells were plated on Matrigel. On the contrary, the silencing of STIM1 or Orai1 did not prevent tubulogenesis. Soon after being plated on Matrigel, the cells displayed spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations that were strongly reduced by treatment with siRNA against TRPC3, TRPC4, or TRPC5, but not siRNA against STIM1 or Orai1. Furthermore, we showed that cell proliferation was reduced upon siRNA treatment against TRPC3, TRPC5, and Orai1 channels, whereas the knockdown of STIM1 had no effect. On primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells, TRPC1, TRPC4, and STIM1 are involved in tube formation, whereas Orai1 has no effect. These data showed that TRPC channels are essential for in vitro tubulogenesis, both on endothelial cell line and on primary endothelial cells. PMID:22203682

  19. Transient Receptor Potential Canonical Type 3 Channels Control the Vascular Contractility of Mouse Mesenteric Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Yeon, Soo-In; Kim, Joo Young; Yeon, Dong-Soo; Abramowitz, Joel; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Muallem, Shmuel; Lee, Young-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential canonical type 3 (TRPC3) channels are non-selective cation channels and regulate intracellular Ca2+ concentration. We examined the role of TRPC3 channels in agonist-, membrane depolarization (high K+)-, and mechanical (pressure)-induced vasoconstriction and vasorelaxation in mouse mesenteric arteries. Vasoconstriction and vasorelaxation of endothelial cells intact mesenteric arteries were measured in TRPC3 wild-type (WT) and knockout (KO) mice. Calcium concentration ([Ca2+]) was measured in isolated arteries from TRPC3 WT and KO mice as well as in the mouse endothelial cell line bEnd.3. Nitric oxide (NO) production and nitrate/nitrite concentrations were also measured in TRPC3 WT and KO mice. Phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction was reduced in TRPC3 KO mice when compared to that of WT mice, but neither high K+- nor pressure-induced vasoconstriction was altered in TRPC3 KO mice. Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was inhibited in TRPC3 KO mice and by the selective TRPC3 blocker pyrazole-3. Acetylcholine blocked the phenylephrine-induced increase in Ca2+ ratio and then relaxation in TRPC3 WT mice but had little effect on those outcomes in KO mice. Acetylcholine evoked a Ca2+ increase in endothelial cells, which was inhibited by pyrazole-3. Acetylcholine induced increased NO release in TRPC3 WT mice, but not in KO mice. Acetylcholine also increased the nitrate/nitrite concentration in TRPC3 WT mice, but not in KO mice. The present study directly demonstrated that the TRPC3 channel is involved in agonist-induced vasoconstriction and plays important role in NO-mediated vasorelaxation of intact mesenteric arteries. PMID:25310225

  20. A fibrinogen-related protein identified from hepatopancreas of crayfish is a potential pattern recognition receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiming; Bai, Suhua; Dong, Chaohua

    2016-09-01

    Fibrinogen-related protein (FREP) family is a large group of proteins containing fibrinogen-like (FBG) domain and plays multiple physiological roles in animals. However, their immune functions in crayfish are not fully explored. In the present study, a novel fibrinogen-like protein (designated as PcFBN1) was identified and characterized from hepatopancreas of red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii. The cDNA sequence of PcFBN1 contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 1353 bp encoding a protein of 450 amino acids. Sequence and structural analysis indicated that PcFBN1 contains an FBG domain in C-terminal and a putative signal peptide of 19 amino acids in N-terminal. Semi-quantitative PCR revealed that the main expression of PcFBN1 was observed in hepatopancreas and hemocyte. Temporal expression analysis exhibited that PcFBN1 expression could be significantly induced by heat-killed Aeromonas hydrophila. Tissue distribution and temporal change of PcFBN1 suggested that PcFBN1 may be involved in immune responses of red swamp crayfish. Recombinant PcFBN1 protein binds and agglutinates both gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and gram-positive bacteria Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Moreover, binding and agglutination is Ca(2+) dependent. Further analysis indicated that PcFBN1 recognizes some acetyl group-containing substance LPS and PGN. RNAi experiment revealed that PcFBN1 is required for bacterial clearance and survival from A. hydrophila infection. Reduction of PcFBN1 expression significantly decreased the survival and enhanced the number of A. hydrophila in the hemolymph. These results indicated that PcFBN1 plays an important role in the innate immunity of red swamp crayfish as a potential pattern recognition receptor. PMID:27417229

  1. Chiral dicarboxamide scaffolds containing a sulfiliminyl moiety as potential ryanodine receptor activators.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Sha; Jia, Zhehui; Xiong, Lixia; Yan, Tao; Yang, Na; Wu, Guiping; Song, Haibin; Li, Zhengming

    2014-07-01

    To search for new environmentally benign insecticides with high activity, low toxicity, and low residue, novel chiral configurations introduced into dicarboxamide scaffolds containing N-cyano sulfiliminyl moieties were first studied. Four series of phthalamides with sulfur-containing side chains were designed, synthesized, and evaluated against oriental armyworm (Pseudaletia separata Walker) and diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella (L.)) for their insecticidal activities. All structures were characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and HRMS (or elemental analysis), and their configurations were confirmed by optical polarimetry. The biological assessment indicated that some title compounds exhibited significant insecticidal activities. For oriental armyworm, these stereoisomers exerted different impacts on biological activity following the sequence (Sc, Ss) ≥ (Sc, Rs) ≫ (Rc, Ss) > (Rc, Rs), and carbon chirality influenced the activities more strongly than sulfur. Compounds Ia and IIa reached as high an activity as commercial flubendiamide, with LC50 values of 0.0504 and 0.0699 mg L(-1), respectively, lower than that of flubendiamide (0.1230 mg L(-1)). For diamondback moth, the sequence of activity was (Sc, Ss) > (Sc, Rs), and the sulfur chirality influenced the activities more greatly than carbon. Compound IIe exhibited even higher activity than flubendiamide, whereas Ie and Ic,d reached the activity of the latter. The results indicated that the improvement of insecticidal activity probably required a coordination of both carbon and sulfur chirality. Comparative molecular field analysis calculation indicated that stereoisomers with Sc configurations containing strong electron-withdrawing groups such as as CN are important in maintaining the high activity. The chiral scaffolds containing the N-cyano sulfiliminyl moiety are also essential for high larvicidal activity. Some title compounds could be considered as potential candidates for ryanodine receptor activators

  2. Temperature and voltage coupling to channel opening in transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8).

    PubMed

    Raddatz, Natalia; Castillo, Juan P; Gonzalez, Carlos; Alvarez, Osvaldo; Latorre, Ramon

    2014-12-19

    Expressed in somatosensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglion, the transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) channel is a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel activated by cold, voltage, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and menthol. Although TRPM8 channel gating has been characterized at the single channel and macroscopic current levels, there is currently no consensus regarding the extent to which temperature and voltage sensors couple to the conduction gate. In this study, we extended the range of voltages where TRPM8-induced ionic currents were measured and made careful measurements of the maximum open probability the channel can attain at different temperatures by means of fluctuation analysis. The first direct measurements of TRPM8 channel temperature-driven conformational rearrangements provided here suggest that temperature alone is able to open the channel and that the opening reaction is voltage-independent. Voltage is a partial activator of TRPM8 channels, because absolute open probability values measured with fully activated voltage sensors are less than 1, and they decrease as temperature rises. By unveiling the fast temperature-dependent deactivation process, we show that TRPM8 channel deactivation is well described by a double exponential time course. The fast and slow deactivation processes are temperature-dependent with enthalpy changes of 27.2 and 30.8 kcal mol(-1). The overall Q10 for the closing reaction is about 33. A three-tiered allosteric model containing four voltage sensors and four temperature sensors can account for the complex deactivation kinetics and coupling between voltage and temperature sensor activation and channel opening. PMID:25352597

  3. Increased rhythmicity in hypertensive arterial smooth muscle is linked to transient receptor potential canonical channels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoping; Yang, Dachun; Ma, Shuangtao; He, Hongbo; Luo, Zhidan; Feng, Xiaoli; Cao, Tingbing; Ma, Liqun; Yan, Zhencheng; Liu, Daoyan; Tepel, Martin; Zhu, Zhiming

    2010-10-01

    Vasomotion describes oscillations of arterial vascular tone due to synchronized changes of intracellular calcium concentrations. Since increased calcium influx into vascular smooth muscle cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) has been associated with variances of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels, in the present study we tested the hypothesis that increased vasomotion in hypertension is directly linked to increased TRPC expression. Using a small vessel myograph we observed significantly increased norepinephrine-induced vasomotion in mesenteric arterioles from SHR compared to normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Using immunoblottings we obtained significantly increased expression of TRPC1, TRPC3 and TRPC5 in mesenteric arterioles from SHR compared to WKY, whereas TRPC4 and TRPC6 showed no differences. Norepinephrine-induced vasomotion from SHR was significantly reduced in the presence of verapamil, SKF96365, 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane (2-APB) or gadolinium. Pre-incubation of mesenteric arterioles with anti-TRPC1 and anti-TRPC3 antibodies significantly reduced norepinephrine-induced vasomotion and calcium influx. Control experiments with pre-incubation of TRPC antibodies plus their respective antigenic peptide or in the presence of anti-β-actin antibodies or random immunoglobulins not related to TRPC channels showed no inhibitory effects of norepinephrine-induced vasomotion and calcium influx. Administration of candesartan or telmisartan, but not amlodipine to SHR for 16 weeks significantly reduced either the expression of TRPC1, TRPC3 and TRPC5 as well as norepinephrine-induced vasomotion in mesenteric arterioles. In conclusion we gave experimental evidence that the increased TRPC1, TRPC3 and TRPC5 expression in mesenteric arterioles from SHR causes increased vasomotion in hypertension. PMID:19725917

  4. The Role of Homer1c in Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor-dependent Long-Term Potentiation

    PubMed Central

    O’Riordan, Kenneth; Gerstein, Hilary; Hullinger, Rikki; Burger, Corinna

    2016-01-01

    Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1/5) play a role in synaptic plasticity and they demonstrate direct interactions with the neuronal Homer1c protein. We have previously shown that Homer1c can restore the plasticity deficits in Homer1 knockout mice (H1-KO). Here, we investigated the role of Homer1c in mGluR-dependent synaptic plasticity in wild-type mice, H1-KO, and H1-KO mice overexpressing Homer1c (KO+H1c). We used a form of plasticity induced by activation of mGluR1/5 that transforms short-term potentiaion (STP) induced by a subthreshold theta burst stimulation into long-term potentiation (LTP). We have shown that although acute hippocampal slices from wild-type animals can induce LTP using this stimulation protocol, H1-KO only show STP. Gene delivery of Homer1c into the hippocampus of H1-KO mice rescued LTP to wild-type levels. This form of synaptic plasticity was dependent on mGluR5 but not mGluR1 activation both in wild-type mice and in KO+H1c. mGluR1/5-dependent LTP was blocked with inhibitors of the MEK-ERK and PI3K-mTOR pathways in KO+H1c mice. Moreover, blocking Homer1c–mGluR5 interactions prevented the maintenance of LTP in acute hippocampal slices from KO+H1c. These data indicate that Homer1c–mGluR5 interactions are necessary for mGluR-dependent LTP, and that mGluR1/5-dependent LTP involves PI3K and ERK activation. PMID:24167026

  5. Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 Channel Involved in Atherosclerosis and Macrophage-Foam Cell Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jin-Feng; Shyue, Song-Kun; Kou, Yu Ru; Lu, Tse-Min; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channel (TRPA1) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, yet its role and the underlying mechanism in atherosclerosis remain unclear. We aimed to investigate the role of TRPA1 in atherosclerosis and foam-cell formation in vivo in mice and in vitro in mouse macrophages. Histopathology was examined by hematoxylin and eosin staining, levels of cytokines and lipid profile were evaluated by assay kits, and protein expression was determined by western blot analysis. TRPA1 expression was increased in macrophage foam cells in atherosclerotic aortas of apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE-/-) mice. Atherosclerotic lesions, hyperlipidemia and systemic inflammation were worsened with chronic administration of the TRPA1 channel antagonist HC030031 or genetic ablation of TRPA1 (TRPA1-/-) in apoE-/- mice. Treatment with allyl isothiocyanate (AITC, a TRPA1 agonist) retarded the progression of atherosclerosis in apoE-/- mice but not apoE-/-TRPA1-/- mice. Mouse macrophages showed oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) activated TRPA1 channels. OxLDL-induced lipid accumulation of macrophages was exacerbated by HC030031 or loss of function of TRPA1. Inhibition of TRPA1 activity did not alter oxLDL internalization but impaired cholesterol efflux by downregulating the ATP-binding cassette transporters. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor-α-induced inflammatory response was attenuated in AITC-activated macrophages. TRPA1 may be a pivotal regulator in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cholesterol metabolism of macrophage foam cells. PMID:27313495

  6. DHA, G-protein coupled receptors and melanoma: Is GPR40 a potential therapeutic target?

    PubMed Central

    Nehra, Deepika; Pan, Amy H.; Le, Hau D.; Fallon, Erica M.; Carlson, Sarah J.; Kalish, Brian T.; Puder, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on the growth of human melanoma in vitro and in vivo and to better understand the potential role of the G-protein coupled receptors in mediating this effect. Materials and Methods For in vitro studies, human melanoma and control fibroblast cells were treated with DHA and TAK-875 (selective GPR40 agonist) and a cell viability assay was performed to determine cell counts. A murine subcutaneous xenograft model of human melanoma was used to test the effect of dietary treatment with an omega-3 fatty acid (FA) rich diet compared to an omega-6 FA rich diet on the growth of human melanoma in vivo. A similar animal model was used to test the effect of oral TAK-875 on the growth of established melanoma tumors in vivo. Results DHA has an inhibitory effect on the growth of human melanoma both in vitro and in vivo. Tumors from animals on the omega-3 FA rich diet were 69% smaller in weight (P=0.005) and 76% smaller in volume compared to tumors from animals on the omega-6 FA rich diet. TAK-875 has an inhibitory effect on the growth of human melanoma both in vitro and in vivo. Tumors from animals treated with TAK-875 were 46% smaller in weight (P=0.07), 62% smaller in volume (P=0.03) and grew 77% slower (P=0.04) compared to the placebo group. Conclusion DHA and TAK-875 have a profound and selective inhibitory effect on the growth of human melanoma both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24576779

  7. Noninvasive diode laser activation of transient receptor potential proteins and nociceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Cooper, Brian Y.; Nemenov, Michael I.

    2007-02-01

    We investigated diode laser (980 nm) evoked activation of transient receptor potential proteins (TRPV1 and TRPV2). C and A-delta (Aδ) nociceptor families are primarily responsible for pain mediation in the peripheral nervous system. TRPV1 proteins have been associated with heat evoked pain in C fibers while Aδ fibers have been associated with TRPV2. Diode laser stimulation allows a margin of safety between non-invasive activation and damage 19, 22, 34. Laser pulses (20-50 ms, 0.1-10 W, 980 nm) were used to stimulate: A) in vitro: excised patches from HEK293 cells expressing TRPV1; B) in vitro: rat DRG nociceptors expressing either TRPV1 or TRPV2; and C) in vivo: C-fibers of the rat saphenous nerve (SN) trunk. Cell currents were recorded using standard patch clamp methods. The SN was also stimulated electrically with bipolar electrodes. Stimulation (20-50 ms) of HEK and DRG cells expressing TRPV1 was highly reproducible. Activation and peak currents were achieved at estimated peak temperatures of 55°C and 70°C. Threshold activation was also observed in DRG neurons expressing TRPV2. The conduction velocity for laser-activated saphenous nerve afferents was in the C fiber range (0.5-1 m/s). Electrically stimulated nerve contained stimulation artifacts and complex neural components with conduction velocities ranging from 0.3-30 m/s. Diode laser activation of TRPV1 protein is a reproducible and effective means to probe TRP activity in both in vivo and in vitro preparations

  8. Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 in Neutrophil Activation and Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Michalick, Laura; Tang, Christine; Tabuchi, Arata; Goldenberg, Neil; Dan, Qinghong; Awwad, Khader; Wang, Liming; Erfinanda, Lasti; Nouailles, Geraldine; Witzenrath, Martin; Vogelzang, Alexis; Lv, Lu; Lee, Warren L; Zhang, Haibo; Rotstein, Ori; Kapus, Andras; Szaszi, Katalin; Fleming, Ingrid; Liedtke, Wolfgang B; Kuppe, Hermann; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2016-03-01

    The cation channel transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 4 is expressed in endothelial and immune cells; however, its role in acute lung injury (ALI) is unclear. The functional relevance of TRPV4 was assessed in vivo, in isolated murine lungs, and in isolated neutrophils. Genetic deficiency of TRPV4 attenuated the functional, histological, and inflammatory hallmarks of acid-induced ALI. Similar protection was obtained with prophylactic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, GSK2193874; however, therapeutic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, HC-067047, after ALI induction had no beneficial effect. In isolated lungs, platelet-activating factor (PAF) increased vascular permeability in lungs perfused with trpv4(+/+) more than with trpv4(-/-) blood, independent of lung genotype, suggesting a contribution of TRPV4 on blood cells to lung vascular barrier failure. In neutrophils, TRPV4 inhibition or deficiency attenuated the PAF-induced increase in intracellular calcium. PAF induced formation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids by neutrophils, which, in turn, stimulated TRPV4-dependent Ca(2+) signaling, whereas inhibition of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid formation inhibited the Ca(2+) response to PAF. TRPV4 deficiency prevented neutrophil responses to proinflammatory stimuli, including the formation of reactive oxygen species, neutrophil adhesion, and chemotaxis, putatively due to reduced activation of Rac. In chimeric mice, however, the majority of protective effects in acid-induced ALI were attributable to genetic deficiency of TRPV4 in parenchymal tissue, whereas TRPV4 deficiency in circulating blood cells primarily reduced lung myeloperoxidase activity. Our findings identify TRPV4 as novel regulator of neutrophil activation and suggest contributions of both parenchymal and neutrophilic TRPV4 in the pathophysiology of ALI. PMID:26222277

  9. Transient receptor potential channel ankyrin-1 is not a cold sensor for autonomic thermoregulation in rodents.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Cristiane; Garami, Andras; Lehto, Sonya G; Pakai, Eszter; Tekus, Valeria; Pohoczky, Krisztina; Youngblood, Beth D; Wang, Weiya; Kort, Michael E; Kym, Philip R; Pinter, Erika; Gavva, Narender R; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2014-03-26

    The rodent transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) channel has been hypothesized to serve as a temperature sensor for thermoregulation in the cold. We tested this hypothesis by using deletion of the Trpa1 gene in mice and pharmacological blockade of the TRPA1 channel in rats. In both Trpa1(-/-) and Trpa1(+/+) mice, severe cold exposure (8°C) resulted in decreases of skin and deep body temperatures to ∼8°C and 13°C, respectively, both temperatures being below the reported 17°C threshold temperature for TRPA1 activation. Under these conditions, Trpa1(-/-) mice had the same dynamics of body temperature as Trpa1(+/+) mice and showed no weakness in the tail skin vasoconstriction response or thermogenic response to cold. In rats, the effects of pharmacological blockade were studied by using two chemically unrelated TRPA1 antagonists: the highly potent and selective compound A967079, which had been characterized earlier, and the relatively new compound 43 ((4R)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-4-[3-(3-methoxypropoxy)phenyl]-2-thioxo-5H-indeno[1,2-d]pyrimidin-5-one), which we further characterized in the present study and found to be highly potent (IC50 against cold of ∼8 nm) and selective. Intragastric administration of either antagonist at 30 mg/kg before severe (3°C) cold exposure did not affect the thermoregulatory responses (deep body and tail skin temperatures) of rats, even though plasma concentrations of both antagonists well exceeded their IC50 value at the end of the experiment. In the same experimental setup, blocking the melastatin-8 (TRPM8) channel with AMG2850 (30 mg/kg) attenuated cold-defense mechanisms and led to hypothermia. We conclude that TRPA1 channels do not drive autonomic thermoregulatory responses to cold in rodents. PMID:24671991

  10. The lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1: a new potential molecular target in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Murdocca, Michela; Mango, Ruggiero; Pucci, Sabina; Biocca, Silvia; Testa, Barbara; Capuano, Rosamaria; Paolesse, Roberto; Sanchez, Massimo; Orlandi, Augusto; di Natale, Corrado; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2016-03-22

    The identification of new biomarkers and targets for tailored therapy in human colorectal cancer (CRC) onset and progression is an interesting challenge. CRC tissue produces an excess of ox-LDL, suggesting a close correlation between lipid dysfunction and malignant transformation. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is involved in several mechanisms closely linked to tumorigenesis. Here we report a tumor specific LOX-1 overexpression in human colon cancers: LOX-1 results strongly increased in the 72% of carcinomas (P<0.001), and strongly overexpressed in 90% of highly aggressive and metastatic tumours (P<0.001), as compared to normal mucosa. Moreover LOX-1 results modulated since the early stage of the disease (adenomas vs normal mucosa; P<0.001) suggesting an involvement in tumor insurgence and progression. The in vitro knockdown of LOX-1 in DLD-1 and HCT-8 colon cancer cells by siRNA and anti-LOX-1 antibody triggers to an impaired proliferation rate and affects the maintenance of cell growth and tumorigenicity. The wound-healing assay reveals an evident impairment in closing the scratch. Lastly knockdown of LOX-1 delineates a specific pattern of volatile compounds characterized by the presence of a butyrate derivative, suggesting a potential role of LOX-1 in tumor-specific epigenetic regulation in neoplastic cells. The role of LOX-1 as a novel biomarker and molecular target represents a concrete opportunity to improve current therapeutic strategies for CRC. In addition, the innovative application of a technology focused to the identification of LOX-1 driven volatiles specific to colorectal cancer provides a promising diagnostic tool for CRC screening and for monitoring the response to therapy. PMID:26895376

  11. The lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1: a new potential molecular target in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murdocca, Michela; Mango, Ruggiero; Pucci, Sabina; Biocca, Silvia; Testa, Barbara; Capuano, Rosamaria; Paolesse, Roberto; Sanchez, Massimo; Orlandi, Augusto; di Natale, Corrado; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2016-01-01

    The identification of new biomarkers and targets for tailored therapy in human colorectal cancer (CRC) onset and progression is an interesting challenge. CRC tissue produces an excess of ox-LDL, suggesting a close correlation between lipid dysfunction and malignant transformation. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is involved in several mechanisms closely linked to tumorigenesis. Here we report a tumor specific LOX-1 overexpression in human colon cancers: LOX-1 results strongly increased in the 72% of carcinomas (P<0.001), and strongly overexpressed in 90% of highly aggressive and metastatic tumours (P<0.001), as compared to normal mucosa. Moreover LOX-1 results modulated since the early stage of the disease (adenomas vs normal mucosa; P<0.001) suggesting an involvement in tumor insurgence and progression. The in vitro knockdown of LOX-1 in DLD-1 and HCT-8 colon cancer cells by siRNA and anti-LOX-1 antibody triggers to an impaired proliferation rate and affects the maintenance of cell growth and tumorigenicity. The wound-healing assay reveals an evident impairment in closing the scratch. Lastly knockdown of LOX-1 delineates a specific pattern of volatile compounds characterized by the presence of a butyrate derivative, suggesting a potential role of LOX-1 in tumor-specific epigenetic regulation in neoplastic cells. The role of LOX-1 as a novel biomarker and molecular target represents a concrete opportunity to improve current therapeutic strategies for CRC. In addition, the innovative application of a technology focused to the identification of LOX-1 driven volatiles specific to colorectal cancer provides a promising diagnostic tool for CRC screening and for monitoring the response to therapy. PMID:26895376

  12. Membrane potential governs calcium influx into microvascular endothelium: integral role for muscarinic receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Behringer, Erik J; Segal, Steven S

    2015-10-15

    In resistance arteries, coupling a rise of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) to endothelial cell hyperpolarization underlies smooth muscle cell relaxation and vasodilatation, thereby increasing tissue blood flow and oxygen delivery. A controversy persists as to whether changes in membrane potential (V(m)) alter endothelial cell [Ca(2+)]i. We tested the hypothesis that V(m) governs [Ca(2+)]i in endothelium of resistance arteries by performing Fura-2 photometry while recording and controlling V(m) of intact endothelial tubes freshly isolated from superior epigastric arteries of C57BL/6 mice. Under resting conditions, [Ca(2+)]i did not change when V(m) shifted from baseline (∼-40 mV) via exposure to 10 μM NS309 (hyperpolarization to ∼-80 mV), via equilibration with 145 mm [K(+)]o (depolarization to ∼-5 mV), or during intracellular current injection (±0.5 to 5 nA, 20 s pulses) while V(m) changed linearly between ∼-80 mV and +10 mV. In contrast, during the plateau (i.e. Ca(2+) influx) phase of the [Ca(2+)]i response to approximately half-maximal stimulation with 100 nm ACh (∼EC50), [Ca(2+)]i increased as V(m) hyperpolarized below -40 mV and decreased as V(m) depolarized above -40 mV. The magnitude of [Ca(2+)]i reduction during depolarizing current injections correlated with the amplitude of the plateau [Ca(2+)]i response to ACh. The effect of hyperpolarization on [Ca(2+)]i was abolished following removal of extracellular Ca(2+), was enhanced subtly by raising extracellular [Ca(2+)] from 2 mm to 10 mm and was reduced by half in endothelium of TRPV4(-/-) mice. Thus, during submaximal activation of muscarinic receptors, V(m) can modulate Ca(2+) entry through the plasma membrane in accord with the electrochemical driving force. PMID:26260126

  13. Temperature and Voltage Coupling to Channel Opening in Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 8 (TRPM8)*♦

    PubMed Central

    Raddatz, Natalia; Castillo, Juan P.; Gonzalez, Carlos; Alvarez, Osvaldo; Latorre, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Expressed in somatosensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglion, the transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) channel is a Ca2+-permeable cation channel activated by cold, voltage, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and menthol. Although TRPM8 channel gating has been characterized at the single channel and macroscopic current levels, there is currently no consensus regarding the extent to which temperature and voltage sensors couple to the conduction gate. In this study, we extended the range of voltages where TRPM8-induced ionic currents were measured and made careful measurements of the maximum open probability the channel can attain at different temperatures by means of fluctuation analysis. The first direct measurements of TRPM8 channel temperature-driven conformational rearrangements provided here suggest that temperature alone is able to open the channel and that the opening reaction is voltage-independent. Voltage is a partial activator of TRPM8 channels, because absolute open probability values measured with fully activated voltage sensors are less than 1, and they decrease as temperature rises. By unveiling the fast temperature-dependent deactivation process, we show that TRPM8 channel deactivation is well described by a double exponential time course. The fast and slow deactivation processes are temperature-dependent with enthalpy changes of 27.2 and 30.8 kcal mol−1. The overall Q10 for the closing reaction is about 33. A three-tiered allosteric model containing four voltage sensors and four temperature sensors can account for the complex deactivation kinetics and coupling between voltage and temperature sensor activation and channel opening. PMID:25352597

  14. Inhibition of Transient Receptor Potential Channel 5 Reverses 5-Fluorouracil Resistance in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Teng; Chen, Zhen; Zhu, Yifei; Pan, Qiongxi; Liu, Yanjun; Qi, Xiaowei; Jin, Linfang; Jin, Jian; Ma, Xin; Hua, Dong

    2015-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu) is commonly used in the chemotherapy of colorectal cancer (CRC), but resistance to 5-Fu occurs in most cases, allowing cancer progression. Suppressing ABCB1 (ATP-binding cassette, subfamily B, member 1), which is a pump overproduced in cancer cells to export cytotoxic drugs, is an attractive strategy to overcome drug resistance. In the present study, transient receptor potential channel TrpC5 was found to be overproduced at the mRNA and protein levels together with ABCB1 in 5-Fu-resistant human CRC HCT-8 (HCT-8/5-Fu) and LoVo (LoVo/5-Fu) cells. More nuclear-stabilized β-catenin accumulation was found in HCT-8/5-Fu and LoVo/5-Fu cells than in HCT-8 and LoVo cells. Suppressing TrpC5 expression with TrpC5-specific siRNA inhibited the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signal pathway, reduced the induction of ABCB1, weakened the ABCB1 efflux pump, and caused a remarkable reversal of 5-Fu resistance in HCT-8/5-Fu and LoVo/5-Fu cells. On the contrary, enforcing TrpC5 expression resulted in an activated Wnt/β-catenin signal pathway and up-regulation of ABCB1. Taken together, we demonstrated an essential role of TrpC5 in ABCB1 induction and drug resistance in human CRC cells via promoting nuclear β-catenin accumulation. PMID:25404731

  15. Dimerization mediated through a leucine zipper activates the oncogenic potential of the met receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, G A; Park, M

    1993-01-01

    Oncogenic activation of the met (hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor) receptor tyrosine kinase involves a genomic rearrangement that generates a hybrid protein containing tpr-encoded sequences at its amino terminus fused directly to the met-encoded receptor kinase domain. Deletion of Tpr sequences abolishes the transforming ability of this protein, implicating this region in oncogenic activation. We demonstrate, by site-directed mutagenesis and coimmunoprecipitation experiments, that a leucine zipper motif within Tpr mediates dimerization of the tpr-met product and is essential for the transforming activity of the met oncogene. By analogy with ligand-stimulated activation of receptor tyrosine kinases, we propose that constitutive dimerization mediated by a leucine zipper motif within Tpr is responsible for oncogenic activation of the Met kinase. The possibility that this mechanism of activation represents a paradigm for a class of receptor tyrosine kinase oncogenes activated by DNA rearrangement is discussed. Images PMID:8413267

  16. LASSO-ing Potential Nuclear Receptor Agonists and Antagonists: A New Computational Method for Database Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are important biological macromolecular transcription factors that are implicated in multiple biological pathways and may interact with other xenobiotics that are endocrine disruptors present in the environment. Examples of important NRs include the androg...

  17. The therapeutic potential of histamine receptor ligands in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Detlef; Seifert, Roland

    2014-09-01

    In the intestine of patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease concentrations of histamine are increased compared to healthy controls. Genetic ablation of histamine production in mice ameliorates the course of experimentally induced colitis. These observations and first pharmacological studies indicate a function of histamine in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. However, a closer examination reveals that available data are highly heterogeneous, limiting the rational design of strategies addressing specific histamine receptor subtypes as possible target for pharmacological interaction. However, very recently first clinical data indicate that antagonism at the histamine receptor subtype H4 provides a beneficial effect in at least the skin. Here, we discuss the available data on histamine effects and histamine receptor subtype functions in inflammatory bowel disease with a special emphasis on the histamine H4-receptor. PMID:24929116

  18. Drug addiction: targeting dynamic neuroimmune receptor interactions as a potential therapeutic strategy.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Jonathan Henry W; Hutchinson, Mark R; Mustafa, Sanam

    2016-02-01

    Drug addiction and dependence have proven to be difficult psychiatric disorders to treat. The limited efficacy of neuronally acting medications, such as acamprosate and naltrexone, highlights the need to identify novel targets. Recent research has underscored the importance of the neuroimmune system in many behavioural manifestations of drug addiction. In this review, we propose that our appreciation for complex phenotypes such as drug addiction and dependence will come with a greater understanding that these disorders are the result of intricate, interconnected signalling pathways that are, if only partially, determined at the receptor level. The idea of receptor heteromerisation and receptor mosaics will be introduced to explain cross talk between the receptors and signalling molecules implicated in neuroimmune signalling pathways. PMID:26657076

  19. Controlling ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors with light: principles and potential

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Andreas; Levitz, Joshua; Isacoff, Ehud Y.

    2014-01-01

    Light offers unique advantages for studying and manipulating biomolecules and the cellular processes that they control. Optical control of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors has garnered significant interest, since these receptors are central to signaling at neuronal synapses and only optical approaches provide the spatial and temporal resolution required to directly probe receptor function in cells and tissue. Following the classical method of glutamate photo-uncaging, recently developed methods have added other forms of remote control, including those with high molecular specificity and genetic targeting. These tools open the door to the direct optical control of synaptic transmission and plasticity, as well as the probing of native receptor function in intact neural circuits. PMID:25573450

  20. A region of the rat N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2A subunit that is sufficient for potentiation by phorbol esters.

    PubMed

    Grant, E R; Guttmann, R P; Seifert, K M; Lynch, D R

    2001-09-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are modulated by protein kinase C (PKC) in vivo and in heterologous expression systems. In heterologous expression systems, PKC-mediated modulation is subunit specific with NR2A-containing receptors being potentiated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), while NR2C-containing receptors are inhibited or unaffected. In the present study we have produced chimeric receptors containing NR2A and NR2C to define the components of NR2A which are sufficient for potentiation by PMA. Amino acids 1105-1400 of NR2A placed onto the C-terminus of NR2C at amino acid 1102 was the minimum region sufficient for producing a PMA-stimulated receptor. This suggests that this region contains structural determinants for PKC-mediated potentiation of NR2A receptors. PMID:11524145

  1. Small Molecules from Nature Targeting G-Protein Coupled Cannabinoid Receptors: Potential Leads for Drug Discovery and Development.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Charu; Sadek, Bassem; Goyal, Sameer N; Sinha, Satyesh; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Ojha, Shreesh

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid molecules are derived from Cannabis sativa plant which acts on the cannabinoid receptors types 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2) which have been explored as potential therapeutic targets for drug discovery and development. Currently, there are numerous cannabinoid based synthetic drugs used in clinical practice like the popular ones such as nabilone, dronabinol, and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol mediates its action through CB1/CB2 receptors. However, these synthetic based Cannabis derived compounds are known to exert adverse psychiatric effect and have also been exploited for drug abuse. This encourages us to find out an alternative and safe drug with the least psychiatric adverse effects. In recent years, many phytocannabinoids have been isolated from plants other than Cannabis. Several studies have shown that these phytocannabinoids show affinity, potency, selectivity, and efficacy towards cannabinoid receptors and inhibit endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes, thus reducing hyperactivity of endocannabinoid systems. Also, these naturally derived molecules possess the least adverse effects opposed to the synthetically derived cannabinoids. Therefore, the plant based cannabinoid molecules proved to be promising and emerging therapeutic alternative. The present review provides an overview of therapeutic potential of ligands and plants modulating cannabinoid receptors that may be of interest to pharmaceutical industry in search of new and safer drug discovery and development for future therapeutics. PMID:26664449

  2. Small Molecules from Nature Targeting G-Protein Coupled Cannabinoid Receptors: Potential Leads for Drug Discovery and Development

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Charu; Sadek, Bassem; Goyal, Sameer N.; Sinha, Satyesh; Ojha, Shreesh

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid molecules are derived from Cannabis sativa plant which acts on the cannabinoid receptors types 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2) which have been explored as potential therapeutic targets for drug discovery and development. Currently, there are numerous cannabinoid based synthetic drugs used in clinical practice like the popular ones such as nabilone, dronabinol, and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol mediates its action through CB1/CB2 receptors. However, these synthetic based Cannabis derived compounds are known to exert adverse psychiatric effect and have also been exploited for drug abuse. This encourages us to find out an alternative and safe drug with the least psychiatric adverse effects. In recent years, many phytocannabinoids have been isolated from plants other than Cannabis. Several studies have shown that these phytocannabinoids show affinity, potency, selectivity, and efficacy towards cannabinoid receptors and inhibit endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes, thus reducing hyperactivity of endocannabinoid systems. Also, these naturally derived molecules possess the least adverse effects opposed to the synthetically derived cannabinoids. Therefore, the plant based cannabinoid molecules proved to be promising and emerging therapeutic alternative. The present review provides an overview of therapeutic potential of ligands and plants modulating cannabinoid receptors that may be of interest to pharmaceutical industry in search of new and safer drug discovery and development for future therapeutics. PMID:26664449

  3. [Influence of GABA(C)-Receptor Antagonist on Formation of Evoked Potentials in Columns of the Rat Somatosensory Cortex].

    PubMed

    Matukhno, A E; Lysenko, L V; Andreeva, Y V; Sukhov, A G

    2015-01-01

    Microelectrode studies of evoked potentials (EP) in neuronal column of rats barrel cortex show activating action of selective GABA(C)-receptor antagonist 1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl-methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA) mainly on secondary components of EP of supragranular afferent layers of column compared to the efferent infragranular layers. These data suggest localization of GABA(C)-receptors on pre- synaptic terminals of thalamo-cortical glutamatergic afferents and ascending apical dendrites of pyramidal cells. A blockade of GABA(C)-receptors with the selective antagonist TPM PA leads to dose-dependent afferent depolarization with development of presynaptic inhibition and suppression of primary components of EP GABA(C)-receptors blocker produces different effects on secondary components of EP in supragranular layers of the cortex caused by the development of neuronal after hyperpolarization followed by high-amplitude primary response and afterdepolarization followed by low-amplitude primary responses with subsequent activation of different voltage-gated channels and formation of different level of cortical direct current potential gradients. PMID:26841661

  4. Canonical transient receptor potential TRPC7 can function as both a receptor- and store-operated channel in HEK-293 cells.

    PubMed

    Lièvremont, Jean-Philippe; Bird, Gary St J; Putney, James W

    2004-12-01

    Previous studies on the activation mechanism of canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels have often produced conflicting conclusions. All seven have been shown to be activated by phospholipase C (PLC)-coupled receptors, but TRPC1, TRPC2, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5, and TRPC7 have also been proposed to function as store-operated channels.(1)1Although PLC activation inevitably leads to activation of store-operated channels, in this report when we refer to PLC-activated channels, we mean those channels that are specifically activated by PLC independently of store depletion. In the case of TRPC3, the expression environment and the expression level appear to determine the mode of regulation. Evidence of a close structural relative of TRPC3, TRPC7, has been presented that this channel is activated by receptor activation or by store depletion. On the basis of previous findings for TRPC3, we reasoned that subtle differences in structure or expression conditions might account for the apparent distinct gating mechanisms of TRPC7. To reexamine the mode of activation of TRPC7, we stably and transiently transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells with cDNA encoding for human TRPC7. We examined the ability of a PLC-activating agonist and an intracellular Ca(2+) store-depleting agent to activate these channels. Our findings demonstrate that when transiently expressed in HEK-293 cells, TRPC7 forms channels that are activated by PLC-stimulating agonists, but not by Ca(2+) store depletion. However, when stably expressed in HEK-293 cells, TRPC7 can be activated by either Ca(2+) store depletion or PLC activation. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a channel protein that can be activated by both receptor- and store-operated modes in the same cell. In addition, the results reconcile the apparently conflicting findings of other laboratories regarding TRPC7 regulation. PMID:15342342

  5. Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) protein and transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) protein coupling is required for sustained inflammatory signaling.

    PubMed

    Poole, Daniel P; Amadesi, Silvia; Veldhuis, Nicholas A; Abogadie, Fe C; Lieu, TinaMarie; Darby, William; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Lew, Michael J; McIntyre, Peter; Bunnett, Nigel W

    2013-02-22

    G protein-coupled receptors of nociceptive neurons can sensitize transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels, which amplify neurogenic inflammation and pain. Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR(2)), a receptor for inflammatory proteases, is a major mediator of neurogenic inflammation and pain. We investigated the signaling mechanisms by which PAR(2) regulates TRPV4 and determined the importance of tyrosine phosphorylation in this process. Human TRPV4 was expressed in HEK293 cells under control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter, allowing controlled and graded channel expression. In cells lacking TRPV4, the PAR(2) agonist stimulated a transient increase in [Ca(2+)](i). TRPV4 expression led to a markedly sustained increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Removal of extracellular Ca(2+) and treatment with the TRPV4 antagonists Ruthenium Red or HC067047 prevented the sustained response. Inhibitors of phospholipase A(2) and cytochrome P450 epoxygenase attenuated the sustained response, suggesting that PAR(2) generates arachidonic acid-derived lipid mediators, such as 5',6'-EET, that activate TRPV4. Src inhibitor 1 suppressed PAR(2)-induced activation of TRPV4, indicating the importance of tyrosine phosphorylation. The TRPV4 tyrosine mutants Y110F, Y805F, and Y110F/Y805F were expressed normally at the cell surface. However, PAR(2) was unable to activate TRPV4 with the Y110F mutation. TRPV4 antagonism suppressed PAR(2) signaling to primary nociceptive neurons, and TRPV4 deletion attenuated PAR(2)-stimulated neurogenic inflammation. Thus, PAR(2) activation generates a signal that induces sustained activation of TRPV4, which requires a key tyrosine residue (TRPV4-Tyr-110). This mechanism partly mediates the proinflammatory actions of PAR(2). PMID:23288842

  6. G-coupled protein receptors and breast cancer progression: potential drug targets.

    PubMed

    Taborga, Marcelo; Corcoran, Kelly E; Fernandes, Neil; Ramkissoon, Shakti H; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2007-03-01

    Breast cancer remains a leading cause of death despite early screening and advances in medicine. Bone marrow metastasis often complicates the clinical picture by requiring more aggressive treatment and worsening long-term prognoses. Recent therapeutic targeting of hormonal receptors such as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and estrogen receptor has shown limited success in treating localized disease for those patients whose cancer cells are responsive. Although traditional approaches such as chemotherapy have demonstrated many successes, these agents fail to target quiescent cancer stem cells, which might have entered the bone marrow where they might be responsible for the quiescence population. Following years of clinical remission, these dormant cells could lead to secondary cancer resurgence. To date, little progress has been made in the development of targeted treatments for receptor negative and metastatic disease. In this review, we discuss the role of G-protein coupled receptors, including neurokinin-1, neurokinin-2 and chemokine receptor 4, as novel targets in the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:17346217

  7. Memory recuperative potential of rifampicin in aluminum chloride-induced dementia: role of pregnane X receptors.

    PubMed

    Kaur, P; Sodhi, R K

    2015-03-12

    The present study has been designed to investigate the potential of rifampicin [Pregnane X receptors (PXR) agonist] in experimental dementia. Aluminum chloride (AlCl3) [100mg/kg, p.o. for 42days] was administered to Wistar rats (n=6) to induce dementia. Morris water maze (MWM) test was used to assess learning and memory and rota rod test was used to assess locomotor activity of the animals. A battery of biochemical tests and histopathological evaluation using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Congo Red stains were performed at the end of the study. AlCl3-treated rats demonstrated impaired cognition and locomotor activity on MWM apparatus and rota rod test, respectively. These animals exhibited a significant rise in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity (138±3.6), thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) level (15±1.6), nitrite (56±2.4) level and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity (4.1±0.9) along with decline in reduced glutathione (GSH) level (22±1.3) in comparison to the control group (p<0.05). Further the H&E and Congo Red-stained cerebral cortex sections of AlCl3-treated rats indicated severe neutrophilic infiltration and amyloid deposition. Rifampicin-treated AlCl3-rats exhibited significant attenuation in memory deficits, biochemical parameters like AChE activity (33±1.4), TBARS level (4.1±1.0), nitrite level (64±2.6), MPO activity (3.6±1.0) and GSH level (53±2.4) along with improved histopathological alterations and locomotor activity when compared with AlCl3-treated rats (p<0.05). Combined administration of ketoconazole (a PXR antagonist) and rifampicin to AlCl3-treated animals reversed the rifampicin-induced protective effects. Therefore the results obtained from the study indicate a defensive role of rifampicin in memory dysfunction which may probably be due to its anti-cholinesterase, anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and amyloid lowering effects. Moreover the study speculates the potential of PXR in the pathophysiology of dementia which is subject

  8. Activation of transient receptor potential canonical 3 (TRPC3)-mediated Ca2+ entry by A1 adenosine receptor in cardiomyocytes disturbs atrioventricular conduction.

    PubMed

    Sabourin, Jessica; Antigny, Fabrice; Robin, Elodie; Frieden, Maud; Raddatz, Eric

    2012-08-01

    Although the activation of the A(1)-subtype of the adenosine receptors (A(1)AR) is arrhythmogenic in the developing heart, little is known about the underlying downstream mechanisms. The aim of this study was to determine to what extent the transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channel 3, functioning as receptor-operated channel (ROC), contributes to the A(1)AR-induced conduction disturbances. Using embryonic atrial and ventricular myocytes obtained from 4-day-old chick embryos, we found that the specific activation of A(1)AR by CCPA induced sarcolemmal Ca(2+) entry. However, A(1)AR stimulation did not induce Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Specific blockade of TRPC3 activity by Pyr3, by a dominant negative of TRPC3 construct, or inhibition of phospholipase Cs and PKCs strongly inhibited the A(1)AR-enhanced Ca(2+) entry. Ca(2+) entry through TRPC3 was activated by the 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) analog OAG via PKC-independent and -dependent mechanisms in atrial and ventricular myocytes, respectively. In parallel, inhibition of the atypical PKCζ by myristoylated PKCζ pseudosubstrate inhibitor significantly decreased the A(1)AR-enhanced Ca(2+) entry in both types of myocytes. Additionally, electrocardiography showed that inhibition of TRPC3 channel suppressed transient A(1)AR-induced conduction disturbances in the embryonic heart. Our data showing that A(1)AR activation subtly mediates a proarrhythmic Ca(2+) entry through TRPC3-encoded ROC by stimulating the phospholipase C/DAG/PKC cascade provide evidence for a novel pathway whereby Ca(2+) entry and cardiac function are altered. Thus, the A(1)AR-TRPC3 axis may represent a potential therapeutic target. PMID:22692208

  9. Experimental absence seizures: potential role of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid and GABAB receptors.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, R; Lauber, J; Marescaux, C; Vergnes, M; Martin, P; Rubio, V; Leonhardt, T; Reymann, N; Bittiger, H

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated whether the pathogenesis of spontaneous generalized non-convulsive seizures in rats with genetic absence epilepsy is due to an increase in the brain levels of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) or in the rate of its synthesis. Concentrations of GHB or of its precursor gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) were measured with a new GC/MS technique which allows the simultaneous assessment of GHB and GBL. The rate of GHB synthesis was estimated from the increase in GHB levels after inhibition of its catabolism with valproate. The results of this study do not indicate significant differences in GHB or GBL levels, or in their rates of synthesis in rats showing spike-and-wave discharges (SWD) as compared to rats without SWD. Binding data indicate that GHB, but not GBL, has a selective, although weak affinity for GABAB receptors (IC50 = 150 microM). Similar IC50 values were observed in membranes prepared from rats showing SWD and from control rats. The average GHB brain levels of 2.12 +/- 0.23 nmol/g measured in the cortex and of 4.28 +/- 0.90 nmol/g in the thalamus are much lower than the concentrations necessary to occupy a major part of the GABAB receptors. It is unlikely that local accumulations of GHB reach concentrations 30-70-fold higher than the average brain levels. After injection of 3.5 mmol/kg GBL, a dose sufficient to induce SWD, brain concentrations reach 240 +/- 31 nmol/g (Snead, 1991) and GHB could thus stimulate the GABAB receptor. Like the selective and potent GABAB receptor agonist R(-)-baclofen, GHB causes a dose-related decrease in cerebellar cGMP. This decrease and the increase in SWD caused by R(-)-baclofen were completely blocked by the selective and potent GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 35348, whereas only the increase in the duration of SWD induced by GHB was totally antagonized by CGP 35348. The decrease in cerebellar cGMP levels elicited by GHB was only partially antagonized by CGP 35348. These findings suggest that all effects of R

  10. Lactate Transport and Receptor Actions in Retina: Potential Roles in Retinal Function and Disease.

    PubMed

    Kolko, Miriam; Vosborg, Fia; Henriksen, Ulrik L; Hasan-Olive, Md Mahdi; Diget, Elisabeth Holm; Vohra, Rupali; Gurubaran, Iswariya Raja Sridevi; Gjedde, Albert; Mariga, Shelton Tendai; Skytt, Dorte M; Utheim, Tor Paaske; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Bergersen, Linda H

    2016-06-01

    In retina, like in brain, lactate equilibrates across cell membranes via monocarboxylate transporters and in the extracellular space by diffusion, forming a basis for the action of lactate as a transmitter of metabolic signals. In the present paper, we argue that the lactate receptor GPR81, also known as HCAR1, may contribute importantly to the control of retinal cell functions in health and disease. GPR81, a G-protein coupled receptor, is known to downregulate cAMP both in adipose and nervous tissue. The receptor also acts through other down-stream mechanisms to control functions, such as excitability, metabolism and inflammation. Recent publications predict effects of the lactate receptor on neurodegeneration. Neurodegenerative diseases in retina, where the retinal ganglion cells die, notably glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, may be linked to disturbed lactate homeostasis. Pilot studies reveal high GPR81 mRNA in retina and indicate GPR81 localization in Müller cells and retinal ganglion cells. Moreover, monocarboxylate transporters are expressed in retinal cells. We envision that lactate receptors and transporters could be useful future targets of novel therapeutic strategies to protect neurons and prevent or counteract glaucoma as well as other retinal diseases. PMID:26677077

  11. Immunoglobulin Transporting Receptors Are Potential Targets for the Immunity Enhancement and Generation of Mammary Gland Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xuemei; Hu, Jianjun; Thirumalai, Diraviyam; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    The functions of immunoglobulin transporting receptors (Ig transporting receptors) in immune system encompass from passive immunity to adaptive immunity by transporting immunoglobulins (Igs) and prolonging their half-life as well as enhancing immunosurveillance. Prior to the weaning, Ig transportations from mother to offspring confer the immediate passive immunity for neonates. After the weaning, FcRn and polymeric immunoglobulin receptor on infant intestinal epithelial cells retrieve Ig in intestinal lamina propria into the gut lumen for preventing pathogen invasion. This is not only improving the pathological consequences of infection but also helping the neonates for developing their own immune response; besides it would be the guidance for designing novel vaccines. Moreover, the investigations on Ig transporting receptors over-expressed transgenic animals have been carried out to improve Ig concentrations in serum and milk; thus, it would be a sustainable method to produce antibody-enriched milk-derived colostrum replacer for neonates. In order to generate mammary gland bioreactor, a series of methods have been developed for enhanced regulation of Ig transporting receptors expression and Ig transportation. PMID:27375616

  12. Allosteric Modulation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors: Structural Insights and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Karen J.; Dong, Elizabeth N.; Meiler, Jens; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Allosteric modulation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represents a novel approach to the development of probes and therapeutics that is expected to enable subtype-specific regulation of central nervous system target receptors. The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlus) are class C GPCRs that play important neuromodulatory roles throughout the brain, as such they are attractive targets for therapeutic intervention for a number of psychiatric and neurological disorders including anxiety, depression, Fragile X Syndrome, Parkinson’s disease and schizophrenia. Over the last fifteen years, selective allosteric modulators have been identified for many members of the mGlu family. The vast majority of these allosteric modulators are thought to bind within the transmembrane-spanning domains of the receptors to enhance or inhibit functional responses. A combination of mutagenesis-based studies and pharmacological approaches are beginning to provide a better understanding of mGlu allosteric sites. Collectively, when mapped onto a homology model of the different mGlu subtypes based on the β2-adrenergic receptor, the previous mutagenesis studies suggest commonalities in the location of allosteric sites across different members of the mGlu family. In addition, there is evidence for multiple allosteric binding pockets within the transmembrane region that can interact to modulate one another. In the absence of a class C GPCR crystal structure, this approach has shown promise with respect to the interpretation of mutagenesis data and understanding structure-activity relationships of allosteric modulator pharmacophores. PMID:20637216

  13. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7 Cation Channel Kinase: New Player in Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Tayze T; Callera, Glaucia E; He, Ying; Yogi, Alvaro; Ryazanov, Alexey G; Ryazanova, Lillia V; Zhai, Alexander; Stewart, Duncan J; Shrier, Alvin; Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-04-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is a bifunctional protein comprising a magnesium (Mg(2+))/cation channel and a kinase domain. We previously demonstrated that vasoactive agents regulate vascular TRPM7. Whether TRPM7 plays a role in the pathophysiology of hypertension and associated cardiovascular dysfunction is unknown. We studied TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice (TRPM7Δkinase; heterozygous for TRPM7 kinase) and wild-type (WT) mice infused with angiotensin II (Ang II; 400 ng/kg per minute, 4 weeks). TRPM7 kinase expression was lower in heart and aorta from TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice, effects that were further reduced by Ang II infusion. Plasma Mg(2+) was lower in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice in basal and stimulated conditions. Ang II increased blood pressure in both strains with exaggerated responses in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT groups (P<0.05). Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was reduced in Ang II-infused TRPM7Δkinase mice, an effect associated with Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression was increased in Ang II-infused TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice. TRPM7 kinase targets, calpain, and annexin-1, were activated by Ang II in WT but not in TRPM7Δkinase mice. Echocardiographic and histopathologic analysis demonstrated cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction in Ang II-treated groups. In TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice, Ang II-induced cardiac functional and structural effects were amplified compared with WT counterparts. Our data demonstrate that in TRPM7Δkinase mice, Ang II-induced hypertension is exaggerated, cardiac remodeling and left ventricular dysfunction are amplified, and endothelial function is impaired. These processes are associated with hypomagnesemia, blunted TRPM7 kinase expression/signaling, endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation, and proinflammatory vascular responses. Our findings identify TRPM7 kinase as a novel player in Ang II-induced hypertension

  14. Liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1): a potential therapeutic target for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nadolny, Christina; Dong, Xiaoqun

    2015-01-01

    Liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) is a nuclear receptor involved in various biological processes. This nuclear receptor has critical functions in embryonic development as well as in adult homeostasis. Although the physiological functions of LRH-1 in normal breast, pancreas, and intestine have been widely investigated, the dysregulation that occurs during pathological conditions is not well understood. LRH-1 has been implicated in pancreatic, breast, and gastrointestinal cancer, where it exerts its effect of initiation and progression by promoting cell proliferation and metastasis. In addition to mechanistic studies, LRH-1 agonists and antagonists are being explored. Identification and development of endogenous and synthetic ligands has been pursued using computational-based structural analysis. Through ligand identification and a thorough understanding of the pathological roles of LRH-1, new therapeutic avenues for cancer treatment based upon LRH-1 may be a desirable focus for further research. PMID:25951367

  15. Acceleration of cardiovascular disease by a dysfunctional prostacyclin receptor mutation, potential implications for COX-2 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Arehart, Eric; Stitham, Jeremiah; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Douville, Karen; MacKenzie, Todd; Fetalvero, Kristina M.; Gleim, Scott; Kasza, Zsolt; Rao, Yamini; Martel, Laurie; Segel, Sharon; Robb, John; Kaplan, Aaron; Simons, Michael; Powell, Richard J.; Moore, Jason H.; Rimm, Eric B.; Martin, Kathleen A.

    2009-01-01

    Recent increased adverse cardiovascular events observed with selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition led to the withdrawal of rofecoxib (Vioxx) and valdecoxib (Bextra), but the mechanisms underlying these atherothrombotic events remain unclear. Prostacyclin is the major endproduct of COX-2 in vascular endothelium. Using a naturally occurring mutation in the prostacyclin receptor, we report for the first time that a deficiency in prostacyclin signaling through its G protein coupled receptor contributes to atherothrombosis in human patients. We report that a prostacyclin receptor variant (R212C) is defective in adenylyl cyclase activation in both patient blood and in an in vitro COS-1 overexpression system. This promotes increased platelet aggregation, a hallmark of atherothrombosis. Our analysis of patients in three separate Caucasian cohorts reveals that this dysfunctional receptor is not likely an initiating factor in cardiovascular disease, but that it accelerates the course of disease in those patients with the greatest risk factors. R212C was associated with cardiovascular disease only in the high cardiovascular risk cohort (n=980), with no association in the low risk cohort (n=2263). In those at highest cardiovascular risk, both disease severity and adverse cardiovascular events were significantly increased with R212C when compared to age and risk factor-matched normal allele patients. We conclude that for haploinsufficient mutants, such as the R212C, the enhanced atherothrombotic phenotype is likely dependent upon the presence of existing atherosclerosis or injury (high risk factors), analogous to what has been observed in the COX-2 inhibition studies or prostacyclin receptor knockout mice studies. Combining both biochemical and clinical approaches, we conclude that diminished prostacyclin receptor signaling may contribute in part to the underlying adverse cardiovascular outcomes observed with COX-2 inhibition. PMID:18323528

  16. Acceleration of cardiovascular disease by a dysfunctional prostacyclin receptor mutation: potential implications for cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Arehart, Eric; Stitham, Jeremiah; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Douville, Karen; MacKenzie, Todd; Fetalvero, Kristina M; Gleim, Scott; Kasza, Zsolt; Rao, Yamini; Martel, Laurie; Segel, Sharon; Robb, John; Kaplan, Aaron; Simons, Michael; Powell, Richard J; Moore, Jason H; Rimm, Eric B; Martin, Kathleen A; Hwa, John

    2008-04-25

    Recent increased adverse cardiovascular events observed with selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition led to the withdrawal of rofecoxib (Vioxx) and valdecoxib (Bextra), but the mechanisms underlying these atherothrombotic events remain unclear. Prostacyclin is the major end product of cyclooxygenase-2 in vascular endothelium. Using a naturally occurring mutation in the prostacyclin receptor, we report for the first time that a deficiency in prostacyclin signaling through its G protein-coupled receptor contributes to atherothrombosis in human patients. We report that a prostacyclin receptor variant (R212C) is defective in adenylyl cyclase activation in both patient blood and in an in vitro COS-1 overexpression system. This promotes increased platelet aggregation, a hallmark of atherothrombosis. Our analysis of patients in 3 separate white cohorts reveals that this dysfunctional receptor is not likely an initiating factor in cardiovascular disease but that it accelerates the course of disease in those patients with the greatest risk factors. R212C was associated with cardiovascular disease only in the high cardiovascular risk cohort (n=980), with no association in the low-risk cohort (n=2293). In those at highest cardiovascular risk, both disease severity and adverse cardiovascular events were significantly increased with R212C when compared with age- and risk factor-matched normal allele patients. We conclude that for haploinsufficient mutants, such as the R212C, the enhanced atherothrombotic phenotype is likely dependent on the presence of existing atherosclerosis or injury (high risk factors), analogous to what has been observed in the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition studies or prostacyclin receptor knockout mice studies. Combining both biochemical and clinical approaches, we conclude that diminished prostacyclin receptor signaling may contribute, in part, to the underlying adverse cardiovascular outcomes observed with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition. PMID:18323528

  17. NMDA and GABA receptors as potential targets in cough hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kian Fan

    2015-06-01

    Chronic cough is a common symptom that can be difficult to treat. It is proposed to be part of a cough hypersensitivity syndrome characterised by troublesome coughing often triggered by low levels of thermal, mechanical or chemical exposure. Upper airway and laryngeal neural dysfunction may also be present. There is evidence that this hypersensitivity may be due to sensory nerve damage caused by inflammatory, infective and allergic factors. Antitussive therapies based on opioid medications are generally not efficacious. Antagonists of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors in the brain stem and use of GABAB receptor agonists such as baclofen acting centrally and possibly peripherally may represent novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25792008

  18. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors: Biology and therapeutic potential in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Jo, S-K; Bajwa, A; Awad, AS; Lynch, KR; Okusa, MD

    2008-01-01

    The major sphingolipid metabolite, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), has important biological functions. S1P is the ligand for a family of five G-protein-coupled receptors with distinct signaling pathways that regulate angiogenesis, vascular maturation, immunity, chemotaxis, and other important biological pathways. Recently, clinical trials have targeted S1P receptors (S1PRs) for autoimmune diseases and transplantation and have generated considerable interest in developing additional, more selective compounds. This review summarizes current knowledge on the biology of S1P and S1PRs that forms the basis for future drug development and the treatment of kidney disease. PMID:18322542

  19. Xanthurenic Acid Activates mGlu2/3 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors and is a Potential Trait Marker for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, Francesco; Lionetto, Luana; Curto, Martina; Iacovelli, Luisa; Cavallari, Michele; Zappulla, Cristina; Ulivieri, Martina; Napoletano, Flavia; Capi, Matilde; Corigliano, Valentina; Scaccianoce, Sergio; Caruso, Alessandra; Miele, Jessica; De Fusco, Antonio; Di Menna, Luisa; Comparelli, Anna; De Carolis, Antonella; Gradini, Roberto; Nisticò, Robert; De Blasi, Antonio; Girardi, Paolo; Bruno, Valeria; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Simmaco, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism has been implicated in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. We report here that the kynurenine metabolite, xanturenic acid (XA), interacts with, and activates mGlu2 and mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptors in heterologous expression systems. However, the molecular nature of this interaction is unknown, and our data cannot exclude that XA acts primarily on other targets, such as the vesicular glutamate transporter, in the CNS. Systemic administration of XA in mice produced antipsychotic-like effects in the MK-801-induced model of hyperactivity. This effect required the presence of mGlu2 receptors and was abrogated by the preferential mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, LY341495. Because the mGlu2 receptor is a potential drug target in the treatment of schizophrenia, we decided to measure serum levels of XA and other kynurenine metabolites in patients affected by schizophrenia. Serum XA levels were largely reduced in a large cohort of patients affected by schizophrenia, and, in patients with first-episode schizophrenia, levels remained low after 12 months of antipsychotic medication. As opposed to other kynurenine metabolites, XA levels were also significantly reduced in first-degree relatives of patients affected by schizophrenia. We suggest that lowered serum XA levels might represent a novel trait marker for schizophrenia. PMID:26643205

  20. A novel form of long-term potentiation selectively expressed by NMDA receptors at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyung-Bae; Castillo, Pablo E.

    2008-01-01

    The mossy fiber to CA3 pyramidal cell synapse (mf-CA3) provides a major source of excitation to the hippocampus. Thus far, these glutamatergic synapses are well recognized for showing a presynaptic, NMDA receptor-independent form of LTP which is expressed as a long-lasting increase of transmitter release. Here, we show that in addition to this “classical” LTP, mf-CA3 synapses can undergo a form of LTP characterized by a selective enhancement of NMDA receptor-mediated transmission. This potentiation requires coactivation of NMDA and mGlu5 receptors, and a postsynaptic calcium rise. Unlike classical LTP, expression of this novel mossy fiber LTP is due to a PKC-dependent recruitment of NMDA receptors specifically to the mf-CA3 synapse via a SNARE-dependent process. Having two mechanistically different forms of LTP may allow mf-CA3 synapses to respond with more flexibility to the changing demands of the hippocampal network. PMID:18184568

  1. An Outer Membrane Receptor of Neisseria meningitidis Involved in Zinc Acquisition with Vaccine Potential

    PubMed Central

    Jongerius, Ilse; de Kok, Natasja; Schilders, Ingrid; Weynants, Vincent E.; Poolman, Jan T.; Tommassen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Since the concentration of free iron in the human host is low, efficient iron-acquisition mechanisms constitute important virulence factors for pathogenic bacteria. In Gram-negative bacteria, TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors are implicated in iron acquisition. It is far less clear how other metals that are also scarce in the human host are transported across the bacterial outer membrane. With the aim of identifying novel vaccine candidates, we characterized in this study a hitherto unknown receptor in Neisseria meningitidis. We demonstrate that this receptor, designated ZnuD, is produced under zinc limitation and that it is involved in the uptake of zinc. Upon immunization of mice, it was capable of inducing bactericidal antibodies and we could detect ZnuD-specific antibodies in human convalescent patient sera. ZnuD is highly conserved among N. meningitidis isolates and homologues of the protein are found in many other Gram-negative pathogens, particularly in those residing in the respiratory tract. We conclude that ZnuD constitutes a promising candidate for the development of a vaccine against meningococcal disease for which no effective universal vaccine is available. Furthermore, the results suggest that receptor-mediated zinc uptake represents a novel virulence mechanism that is particularly important for bacterial survival in the respiratory tract. PMID:20617164

  2. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors: potential therapeutic targets in lung disease?

    PubMed

    Denning, Gerene M; Stoll, Lynn L

    2006-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are a family of nuclear hormone receptors that play central roles in lipid and glucose homeostasis, cellular differentiation, and the immune/inflammatory response. Growing evidence indicates that changes in expression and activation of PPARs likely modulate conditions as diverse as diabetes, atherosclerosis, cancer, asthma, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. Activation of these receptors by natural or pharmacologic ligands leads to both gene-dependent and gene-independent effects that alter the expression of a wide array of proteins. In the lung, PPARs are expressed by alveolar macrophages, as well as by epithelial, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells. Studies both in vitro and in vivo suggest that PPAR ligands may have anti-inflammatory effects in asthma, pulmonary sarcoidosis, and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, as well as antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects in epithelial lung cancers. Further studies to understand the contribution of these receptors to health and disease will be important for determining whether they represent a promising target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:16267824

  3. Cross species sensitivity to a novel androgen receptor agonist of potential environmental concern, spironolactone

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spironolactone (SPL) is a pharmaceutical that is used in humans as an androgen receptor (AR) antagonist to treat conditions like hirsutism, various dermatologic afflictions, and female pattern hair loss, in addition to its common usage as a diuretic to treat hypertension. Althoug...

  4. ß-Adrenergic Receptor Signaling and Modulation of Long-Term Potentiation in the Mammalian Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dell, Thomas J.; Connor, Steven A.; Guglietta, Ryan; Nguyen, Peter V.

    2015-01-01

    Encoding new information in the brain requires changes in synaptic strength. Neuromodulatory transmitters can facilitate synaptic plasticity by modifying the actions and expression of specific signaling cascades, transmitter receptors and their associated signaling complexes, genes, and effector proteins. One critical neuromodulator in the…

  5. The therapeutic potential of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents for tissue protection: a tale of two receptors.

    PubMed

    Brines, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a well-known therapeutic protein employed widely in the treatment of anemia. Over the past decade, abundant evidence has shown that in addition to its systemic role in the regulation of plasma pO(2) by modulating erythrocyte numbers, EPO is also a cytoprotective molecule made locally in response to injury or metabolic stress. Many studies have shown beneficial effects of EPO administration in reducing damage caused by ischemia-reperfusion, trauma, cytotoxicity, infection and inflammation in a variety of organs and tissues. Notably, the receptor mediating the nonerythropoietic effects of EPO differs from the one responsible for hematopoiesis. The tissue-protective receptor exhibits a lower affinity for EPO and is a heteromer consisting of EPO receptor monomers in association with the common receptor that is also employed by granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin 3, and interleukin 5. This heteromeric receptor is expressed immediately following injury, whereas EPO production is delayed. Thus, early administration of EPO can dramatically reduce the deleterious components of the local inflammatory cascade. However, a high dose of EPO is required and this also stimulates the bone marrow to produce highly reactive platelets and activates the vascular endothelium into a prothrombotic state. To circumvent these undesirable effects, the EPO molecule has been successfully altered to selectively eliminate erythropoietic and prothrombotic potencies, while preserving tissue-protective activities. Very recently, small peptide mimetics have been developed that recapitulate the tissue-protective activities of EPO. Nonerythropoietic tissue-protective molecules hold high promise in a wide variety of acute and chronic diseases. PMID:20093809

  6. Potential clinical relevance of Eph receptors and ephrin ligands expressed in prostate carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Fox, Brian P; Tabone, Christopher J; Kandpal, Raj P

    2006-04-21

    The family of Eph and ephrin receptors is involved in a variety of functions in normal cells, and the alterations in their expression profiles have been observed in several cancers. We have compared the transcripts for Eph receptors and ephrin ligands in cell lines established from normal prostate epithelium and several carcinoma cell lines isolated from prostate tumors of varying degree of metastasis. These cell lines included NPTX, CTPX, LNCaP, DU145, PC-3, and PC-3ML. The cell lines displayed characteristic pattern of expression for specific Eph receptors and ephrin ligands, thus allowing identification of Eph receptor signatures for a particular cell line. The sensitivity of these transcripts to genome methylation is also investigated by treating the cells with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. The comparison of expression profiles revealed that normal prostate and primary prostate tumor cell lines differ in the expression of EphA3, EphB3, and ephrin A3 that are over-expressed in normal prostate. Furthermore, the transcript levels for EphA1 decrease progressively from normal prostate to primary prostate tumor cell line and metastatic tumor cells. A converse relationship was observed for ephrin B2. The treatment of cells with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine revealed the sensitivity of EphA3, EphA10, EphB3, and EphB6 to methylation status of genomic DNA. The utility of methylation specific PCR to identify prostate tumor cells and the importance of specific Eph receptors and ephrin ligands in initiation and progression of prostate tumor are discussed. PMID:16516143

  7. Activation of the Farnesoid X-receptor in breast cancer cell lines results in cytotoxicity but not increased migration potential.

    PubMed

    Alasmael, Noura; Mohan, Rati; Meira, Lisiane B; Swales, Karen E; Plant, Nick J

    2016-01-28

    Breast cancer is the commonest form of cancer in women, but successful treatment is confounded by the heterogeneous nature of breast tumours: Effective treatments exist for hormone-sensitive tumours, but triple-negative breast cancer results in poor survival. An area of increasing interest is metabolic reprogramming, whereby drug-induced alterations in the metabolic landscape of a tumour slow tumour growth and/or increase sensitivity to existing therapeutics. Nuclear receptors are transcription factors central to the expression of metabolic and transport proteins, and thus represent potential targets for metabolic reprogramming. We show that activation of the nuclear receptor FXR, either by its endogenous ligand CDCA or the synthetic GW4064, leads to cell death in four breast cancer cell lines with distinct phenotypes: MCF-10A (normal), MCF-7 (receptor positive), MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 (triple negative). Furthermore, we show that the mechanism of cell death is predominantly through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Finally, we demonstrate that FXR agonists do not stimulate migration in breast cancer cell lines, an important potential adverse effect. Together, our data support the continued examination of FXR agonists as a novel class of therapeutics for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26545738

  8. The Membrane-Associated Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Channel Is the Central Heat Shock Receptor Controlling the Cellular Heat Shock Response in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg, Zohar; Goloubinoff, Pierre; Saidi, Younousse; Weiss, Yoram George

    2013-01-01

    The heat shock response (HSR) is a highly conserved molecular response to various types of stresses, including heat shock, during which heat-shock proteins (Hsps) are produced to prevent and repair damages in labile proteins and membranes. In cells, protein unfolding in the cytoplasm is thought to directly enable the activation of the heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1), however, recent work supports the activation of the HSR via an increase in the fluidity of specific membrane domains, leading to activation of heat-shock genes. Our findings support the existence of a plasma membrane-dependent mechanism of HSF-1 activation in animal cells, which is initiated by a membrane-associated transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor (TRPV). We found in various non-cancerous and cancerous mammalian epithelial cells that the TRPV1 agonists, capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX), upregulated the accumulation of Hsp70, Hsp90 and Hsp27 and Hsp70 and Hsp90 respectively, while the TRPV1 antagonists, capsazepine and AMG-9810, attenuated the accumulation of Hsp70, Hsp90 and Hsp27 and Hsp70, Hsp90, respectively. Capsaicin was also shown to activate HSF-1. These findings suggest that heat-sensing and signaling in mammalian cells is dependent on TRPV channels in the plasma membrane. Thus, TRPV channels may be important drug targets to inhibit or restore the cellular stress response in diseases with defective cellular proteins, such as cancer, inflammation and aging. PMID:23468922

  9. Gene Expression of Growth Factors and Growth Factor Receptors for Potential Targeted Therapy of Canine Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    IIDA, Gentoku; ASANO, Kazushi; SEKI, Mamiko; SAKAI, Manabu; KUTARA, Kenji; ISHIGAKI, Kumiko; KAGAWA, Yumiko; YOSHIDA, Orie; TESHIMA, Kenji; EDAMURA, Kazuya; WATARI, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gene expression of growth factors and growth factor receptors of primary hepatic masses, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and nodular hyperplasia (NH), in dogs. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was performed to measure the expression of 18 genes in 18 HCCs, 10 NHs, 11 surrounding non-cancerous liver tissues and 4 healthy control liver tissues. Platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B), transforming growth factor-α, epidermal growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor were found to be differentially expressed in HCC compared with NH and the surrounding non-cancerous and healthy control liver tissues. PDGF-B is suggested to have the potential to become a valuable ancillary target for the treatment of canine HCC. PMID:24189579

  10. The Roles of Rasd1 small G proteins and leptin in the activation of TRPC4 transient receptor potential channels

    PubMed Central

    Wie, Jinhong; Kim, Byung Joo; Myeong, Jongyun; Ha, Kotdaji; Jeong, Seung Joo; Yang, Dongki; Kim, Euiyong; Jeon, Ju-Hong; So, Insuk

    2015-01-01

    TRPC4 is important regulators of electrical excitability in gastrointestinal myocytes, pancreatic β-cells and neurons. Much is known regarding the assembly and function of these channels including TRPC1 as a homotetramer or a heteromultimer and the roles that their interacting proteins play in controlling these events. Further, they are one of the best-studied targets of G protein-coupled receptors and growth factors in general and Gαi/o and Gαq protein coupled receptor or epidermal growth factor and leptin in particular. However, our understanding of the roles of small G proteins and leptin on TRPC4 channels is still rudimentary. We discuss potential roles for Rasd1 small G protein and leptin in channel activation in addition to their known role in cellular signaling. PMID:26083271

  11. Potentiation of mGlu5 receptors with the novel enhancer, VU0360172, reduces spontaneous absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats.

    PubMed

    D'Amore, V; Santolini, I; van Rijn, C M; Biagioni, F; Molinaro, G; Prete, A; Conn, P J; Lindsley, C W; Zhou, Y; Vinson, P N; Rodriguez, A L; Jones, C K; Stauffer, S R; Nicoletti, F; van Luijtelaar, G; Ngomba, R T

    2013-03-01

    Absence epilepsy is generated by the cortico-thalamo-cortical network, which undergoes a finely tuned regulation by metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors. We have shown previously that potentiation of mGlu1 receptors reduces spontaneous occurring spike and wave discharges (SWDs) in the WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy, whereas activation of mGlu2/3 and mGlu4 receptors produces the opposite effect. Here, we have extended the study to mGlu5 receptors, which are known to be highly expressed within the cortico-thalamo-cortical network. We used presymptomatic and symptomatic WAG/Rij rats and aged-matched ACI rats. WAG/Rij rats showed a reduction in the mGlu5 receptor protein levels and in the mGlu5-receptor mediated stimulation of polyphosphoinositide hydrolysis in the ventrobasal thalamus, whereas the expression of mGlu5 receptors was increased in the somatosensory cortex. Interestingly, these changes preceded the onset of the epileptic phenotype, being already visible in pre-symptomatic WAG/Rij rats. SWDs in symptomatic WAG/Rij rats were not influenced by pharmacological blockade of mGlu5 receptors with MTEP (10 or 30 mg/kg, i.p.), but were significantly decreased by mGlu5 receptor potentiation with the novel enhancer, VU0360172 (3 or 10 mg/kg, s.c.), without affecting motor behaviour. The effect of VU0360172 was prevented by co-treatment with MTEP. These findings suggest that changes in mGlu5 receptors might lie at the core of the absence-seizure prone phenotype of WAG/Rij rats, and that mGlu5 receptor enhancers are potential candidates to the treatment of absence epilepsy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors'. PMID:22705340

  12. Structure-based design of eugenol analogs as potential estrogen receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Anita, Yulia; Radifar, Muhammad; Kardono, Leonardus Bs; Hanafi, Muhammad; Istyastono, Enade P

    2012-01-01

    Eugenol is an essential oil mainly found in the buds and leaves of clove (Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merrill and Perry), which has been reported to have activity on inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis induction in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. This biological activity is correlated to its activity as an estrogen receptor antagonist. In this article, we present the construction and validation of structure-based virtual screening (SBVS) protocols to identify the potent estrogen receptor α (ER) antagonists. The selected protocol, which gave acceptable enrichment factors as a virtual screening protocol, subsequently used to virtually screen eugenol, its analogs and their dimers. Based on the virtual screening results, dimer eugenol of 4-[4-hydroxy-3-(prop-2-en-1- yl)phenyl]-2-(prop-2-en-1-yl)phenol is recommended to be developed further in order to discover novel and potent ER antagonists. PMID:23144548

  13. Serotonin 5-ht2c receptor agonists: potential for the treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Miller, Keith J

    2005-10-01

    Obesity continues to be a burgeoning health problem worldwide. Before their removal from the market, fenfluramine and the more active enantiomer dexfenfluramine were considered to be among the most effective of weight loss agents. Much of the weight loss produced by fenfluramine was attributed to the direct activation of serotonin 5-HT(2C) receptors in the central nervous system via the desmethyl-metabolite of fenfluramine, norfenfluramine. Norfenfluramine, however, is non-selective, activating additional serotonin receptors, such as 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2B), which likely mediated the heart valve hypertrophy seen in many patients. Development of highly selective 5-HT(2C) agonists may recapitulate the clinical anti-obesity properties observed with fenfluramine while avoiding the significant cardiovascular and pulmonary side effects. PMID:16249524

  14. Potentiation of Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy by the PARP Inhibitor Olaparib

    PubMed Central

    Nonnekens, Julie; van Kranenburg, Melissa; Beerens, Cecile E.M.T.; Suker, Mustafa; Doukas, Michael; van Eijck, Casper H.J.; de Jong, Marion; van Gent, Dik C.

    2016-01-01

    Metastases expressing tumor-specific receptors can be targeted and treated by binding of radiolabeled peptides (peptide receptor radionuclide therapy or PRRT). For example, patients with metastasized somatostatin receptor-positive neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can be treated with radiolabeled somatostatin analogues, resulting in strongly increased progression-free survival and quality of life. There is nevertheless still room for improvement, as very few patients can be cured at this stage of disease. We aimed to specifically sensitize replicating tumor cells without further damage to healthy tissues. Thereto we investigated the DNA damaging effects of PRRT with the purpose to enhance these effects through modulation of the DNA damage response. Although PRRT induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), a larger fraction of the induced lesions are single strand breaks (expected to be similar to those induced by external beam radiotherapy) that require poly-[ADP-ribose]-polymerase 1 (PARP-1) activity for repair. If these breaks cannot be repaired, they will cause replication fork arrest and DSB formation during replication. Therefore, we used the PARP-1 inhibitor Olaparib to increase the number of cytotoxic DSBs. Here we show that this new combination strategy synergistically sensitized somatostatin receptor expressing cells to PRRT. We observed increased cell death and reduced cellular proliferation compared to the PRRT alone. The enhanced cell death was caused by increased numbers of DSBs that are repaired with remarkably slow kinetics, leading to genome instability. Furthermore, we validated the increased DSB induction after PARP inhibitor addition in the clinically relevant model of living human NET slices. We expect that this combined regimen can thus augment current PRRT outcomes. PMID:27570553

  15. Potentiation of Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy by the PARP Inhibitor Olaparib.

    PubMed

    Nonnekens, Julie; van Kranenburg, Melissa; Beerens, Cecile E M T; Suker, Mustafa; Doukas, Michael; van Eijck, Casper H J; de Jong, Marion; van Gent, Dik C

    2016-01-01

    Metastases expressing tumor-specific receptors can be targeted and treated by binding of radiolabeled peptides (peptide receptor radionuclide therapy or PRRT). For example, patients with metastasized somatostatin receptor-positive neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can be treated with radiolabeled somatostatin analogues, resulting in strongly increased progression-free survival and quality of life. There is nevertheless still room for improvement, as very few patients can be cured at this stage of disease. We aimed to specifically sensitize replicating tumor cells without further damage to healthy tissues. Thereto we investigated the DNA damaging effects of PRRT with the purpose to enhance these effects through modulation of the DNA damage response. Although PRRT induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), a larger fraction of the induced lesions are single strand breaks (expected to be similar to those induced by external beam radiotherapy) that require poly-[ADP-ribose]-polymerase 1 (PARP-1) activity for repair. If these breaks cannot be repaired, they will cause replication fork arrest and DSB formation during replication. Therefore, we used the PARP-1 inhibitor Olaparib to increase the number of cytotoxic DSBs. Here we show that this new combination strategy synergistically sensitized somatostatin receptor expressing cells to PRRT. We observed increased cell death and reduced cellular proliferation compared to the PRRT alone. The enhanced cell death was caused by increased numbers of DSBs that are repaired with remarkably slow kinetics, leading to genome instability. Furthermore, we validated the increased DSB induction after PARP inhibitor addition in the clinically relevant model of living human NET slices. We expect that this combined regimen can thus augment current PRRT outcomes. PMID:27570553

  16. Design and evaluation of xanthine based adenosine receptor antagonists: Potential hypoxia targeted immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Rhiannon; Lee, Joslynn; Chevalier, Vincent; Sadler, Sara; Selesniemi, Kaisa; Hatfield, Stephen; Sitkovsky, Michail; Ondrechen, Mary Jo; Jones, Graham B.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular modeling techniques were applied to the design, synthesis and optimization of a new series of xanthine based adenosine A2A receptor antagonists. The optimized lead compound was converted to a PEG derivative and a functional in vitro bioassay used to confirm efficacy. Additionally, the PEGylated version showed enhanced aqueous solubility and was inert to photoisomerization, a known limitation of existing antagonists of this class. PMID:24126093

  17. Allosteric and Biased G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling Regulation: Potentials for New Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Etienne; Clément, Stéphanie; Laporte, Stéphane A.

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven-transmembrane proteins that participate in many aspects of the endocrine function and are important targets for drug development. They transduce signals mainly, but not exclusively, via hetero-trimeric G proteins, leading to a diversity of intracellular signaling cascades. Ligands binding at the hormone orthosteric sites of receptors have been classified as agonists, antagonists, and/or inverse agonists based on their ability to mainly modulate G protein signaling. Accumulating evidence also indicates that such ligands, alone or in combination with other ones such as those acting outside the orthosteric hormone binding sites (e.g., allosteric modulators), have the ability to selectively engage subsets of signaling responses as compared to the natural endogenous ligands. Such modes of functioning have been variously referred to as “functional selectivity” or “ligand-biased signaling.” In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge regarding GPCR-biased signaling and their functional regulation with a focus on the evolving concept that receptor domains can also be targeted to allosterically bias signaling, and discuss the usefulness of such modes of regulation for the design of more efficient therapeutics. PMID:24847311

  18. Potential antidepressant-like properties of the TC G-1008, a GPR39 (zinc receptor) agonist.

    PubMed

    Młyniec, Katarzyna; Starowicz, Gabriela; Gaweł, Magdalena; Frąckiewicz, Ewelina; Nowak, Gabriel

    2016-09-01

    Some forms of depression appear to be more related to the glutamatergic system. G-coupled protein receptor 39 (GPR39) is the metabotropic zinc receptor, which may be involved in the pathophysiology of depression and in the antidepressant response. Its deficiency abolishes the antidepressant response, which means that GPR39 is required to obtain a therapeutic effect in depression. This raises the possibility that agonists of the zinc receptor may have a role in antidepressant treatment. To explore this possibility we investigated animal behaviour in the forced swim test, the tail suspension test (to assess antidepressant-like properties), the light/dark test and the elevated plus maze test (to assess anxiolytic-like properties), following acute administration of a GPR39 agonist (TC G-1008). We found an antidepressant response (as measured by the forced swim test but not by the tail suspension test) in mice following the GPR39 agonist treatment. Additionally, we observed the opposite results in the light/dark box (decreased overall distance; increased time spent in the lit compartment; decreased time spent in the dark compartment; increased freezing time) and elevated plus maze (no significant changes), which may be a consequence of the sedative effect of TC G-1008. We also found hippocampal GPR39 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) up-regulation following administration of the GPR39 agonist, which may be undiscovered so far as a possible novel agent in the treatment of mood disorders. PMID:27235821

  19. Potential effect of angiotensin II receptor blockade in adipose tissue and bone.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Hironori; Osako, Mariana Kiomy; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence demonstrated that dysregulation of adipocytokine functions seen in abdominal obesity may be involved in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. Angiotensinogen, the precursor of angiotensin (Ang) II, is produced primarily in the liver, and also in adipose tissue, where it is up-regulated during the development of obesity and involved in blood pressure regulation and adipose tissue growth. Blockade of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) attenuates weight gain and adiposity by enhanced energy expenditure, and the favorable metabolic effects of telmisartan have been related to its Ang II receptor blockade and action as a partial agonist of peroxisome proliferators activated receptor (PPAR)-γ. PPARγ plays an important role in regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, and ligands for PPARγ can improve insulin sensitivity and reduce triglyceride levels. Similarly, bone metabolism is closely regulated by hormones and cytokines, which have effects on both bone resorption and deposition. It is known that the receptors of Ang II are expressed in culture osteoclasts and osteoblasts, and Ang II is postulated to be able to act upon the cells involved in bone metabolism. In in vitro system, Ang II induced the differentiation and activation of osteoclasts responsible for bone resorption. Importantly, it was demonstrated by the sub-analysis of a recent clinical study that the fracture risk was significantly reduced by the usage of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. To treat the subgroups of hypertensive patients with osteoporosis RAS can be considered a novel target. PMID:23176218

  20. Transcription Factor AP1 Potentiates Chromatin Accessibility and Glucocorticoid Receptor Binding

    PubMed Central

    Biddie, Simon C.; John, Sam; Sabo, Pete J.; Thurman, Robert E.; Johnson, Thomas A.; Schiltz, R. Louis; Miranda, Tina B.; Sung, Myong-Hee; Trump, Saskia; Lightman, Stafford L.; Vinson, Charles; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Hager, Gordon L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Ligand-dependent transcription by the nuclear receptor glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is mediated by interactions with co-regulators. The role of these interactions in determining selective binding of GR to regulatory elements remains unclear. Recent findings indicate a large fraction of genomic GR binding coincides with chromatin that is accessible prior to hormone treatment, suggesting that receptor binding is dictated by proteins that maintain chromatin in an open state. Combining DNaseI accessibility and chromatin immunoprecipitation with high-throughput sequencing, we identify the activator protein 1 (AP1) as a major partner for productive GR-chromatin interactions. AP1 is critical for GR-regulated transcription and recruitment to co-occupied regulatory elements, illustrating an extensive AP1-GR interaction network. Importantly, the maintenance of baseline chromatin accessibility facilitates GR recruitment and is dependent on AP1 binding. We propose a model where the basal occupancy of transcription factors act to prime chromatin and direct inducible transcription factors to select regions in the genome. PMID:21726817

  1. Potential insight for drug discovery from high fidelity receptor-mediated transduction mechanisms in insects

    PubMed Central

    Raffa, Robert B.; Raffa, Kenneth F.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction There is a pervasive and growing concern about the small number of new pharmaceutical agents. There are many proposed explanations for this trend that do not involve the drug-discovery process per se, but the discovery process itself has also come under scrutiny. If the current paradigms are indeed not working, where are novel ideas to come from? Perhaps it is time to look to novel sources. Areas covered The receptor-signaling and 2nd-messenger transduction processes present in insects are quite similar to those in mammals (involving G proteins, ion channels, etc.). However, a review of these systems reveals an unprecedented degree of high potency and receptor selectivity to an extent greater than that modeled in most current drug-discovery approaches. Expert opinion A better understanding of insect receptor pharmacology could stimulate novel theoretical and practical ideas in mammalian pharmacology (drug discovery) and, conversely, the application of pharmacology and medicinal chemistry principles could stimulate novel advances in entomology (safer and more targeted control of pest species). PMID:21984882

  2. Characteristics of albumin binding to opossum kidney cells and identification of potential receptors.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, N J; Nahorski, S; Walls, J

    1997-02-01

    Albumin re-absorption in the kidney proximal tubule may be pathophysiological in disease. Opossum kidney (OK) cell monolayers were used to investigate the characteristics of [125I]-labelled albumin binding at 4 degrees C. Two binding sites were identified, one with high affinity (KD 154.8 +/-7 mg/l) and low capacity, the other with low affinity (KD 8300 +/- 1000 mg/l) and high capacity. Binding was sensitive to lectins Glycine max and Ulex europaeus I, but not other lectins, indicating involvement of a glycoprotein(s) in the binding process. Binding was also sensitive to a number of agents known to inhibit binding to scavenger receptors. [125I]-Labelled albumin ligand blotting of OK cell membrane proteins identified several albumin-binding proteins with identical lectin affinities to those proteins mediating albumin binding to OK cell monolayers. These results provide initial evidence of the identity of albumin receptors in kidney tubules, and suggest that they may be members of the family of scavenger receptors. PMID:9000429

  3. Potentiation of mGlu5 receptors with the novel enhancer, VU0360172, reduces spontaneous absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats

    PubMed Central

    D’Amore, V.; Santolini, I.; van Rijn, C.M.; Biagioni, F.; Molinaro, G.; Prete, A.; Conn, P.J.; Lindsley, C.W.; Zhou, Y.; Vinson, P.N.; Rodriguez, A.L.; Jones, C.K.; Stauffer, S.R.; Nicoletti, F.; van Luijtelaar, G.; Ngomba, R.T.

    2013-01-01

    Absence epilepsy is generated by the cortico-thalamo-cortical network, which undergoes a finely tuned regulation by metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors. We have shown previously that potentiation of mGlu1 receptors reduces spontaneous occurring spike and wave discharges (SWDs) in the WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy, whereas activation of mGlu2/3 and mGlu4 receptors produces the opposite effect. Here, we have extended the study to mGlu5 receptors, which are known to be highly expressed within the cortico-thalamo-cortical network. We used presymptomatic and symptomatic WAG/Rij rats and aged-matched ACI rats. WAG/Rij rats showed a reduction in the mGlu5 receptor protein levels and in the mGlu5-receptor mediated stimulation of polyphosphoinositide hydrolysis in the ventrobasal thalamus, whereas the expression of mGlu5 receptors was increased in the somatosensory cortex. Interestingly, these changes preceded the onset of the epileptic phenotype, being already visible in pre-symptomatic WAG/Rij rats. SWDs in symptomatic WAG/Rij rats were not influenced by pharmacological blockade of mGlu5 receptors with MTEP (10 or 30 mg/kg, i.p.), but were significantly decreased by mGlu5 receptor potentiation with the novel enhancer, VU0360172 (3 or 10 mg/kg, s.c.), without affecting motor behaviour. The effect of VU0360172 was prevented by co-treatment with MTEP. These findings suggest that changes in mGlu5 receptors might lie at the core of the absence-seizure prone phenotype of WAG/Rij rats, and that mGlu5 receptor enhancers are potential candidates to the treatment of absence epilepsy. PMID:22705340

  4. Endocannabinoids as regulators of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels: A further opportunity to develop new endocannabinoid-based therapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Di Marzo, V; De Petrocellis, L

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1990's, a series of experiments carried out independently in two laboratories led to establish an important connection between the function of the endocannabinoids, which, as exemplified in this special issue, is per se very complex and ubiquitous in animals, and that of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, a large family of plasma membrane cation channels involved in several mammalian and non-mammalian physiological and pathological conditions, overlapping only in part with those in which the cannabinoid receptors participate. These experiments were initially based on the observation that the endocannabinoid anandamide and the xenobiotic ligand of TRP channels of V1 type (TRPV1), capsaicin, are somehow chemically similar, both compounds being fatty acid amides, as are also synthetic activators of these channels and inhibitors of anandamide cellular re-uptake. As discussed in this article, the same type of "chemical thoughts" led to the discovery of N-arachidonoyl-dopamine, an endogenous ligand of TRPV1 channels that behaves also an endocannabinoid. The overlap between the ligand recognition properties of some TRP channels and proteins of the endocannabinoid system, namely the cannabinoid receptors and the proteins and enzymes catalyzing anandamide cellular re-uptake and hydrolysis, is being actively explored through the rational design and synthesis of new endocannabinoid-based drugs with multiple mechanisms of action. These aspects are discussed in this review article, together with the possible functional and pharmacological consequences of endocannabinoid-TRP channel interactions. PMID:20166923

  5. The Transient Receptor Potential Channel TRPM8 Is Inhibited via the α2A Adrenoreceptor Signaling Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Bavencoffe, Alexis; Gkika, Dimitra; Kondratskyi, Artem; Beck, Benjamin; Borowiec, Anne-Sophie; Bidaux, Gabriel; Busserolles, Jérôme; Eschalier, Alain; Shuba, Yaroslav; Skryma, Roman; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    The transient receptor potential channel melastatin member 8 (TRPM8) is expressed in sensory neurons, where it constitutes the main receptor of environmental innocuous cold (10–25 °C). Among several types of G protein-coupled receptors expressed in sensory neurons, Gi-coupled α2A-adrenoreceptor (α2A-AR), is known to be involved in thermoregulation; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrated that stimulation of α2A-AR inhibited TRPM8 in sensory neurons from rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG). In addition, using specific pharmacological and molecular tools combined with patch-clamp current recordings, we found that in heterologously expressed HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney) cells, TRPM8 channel is inhibited by the Gi protein/adenylate cyclase (AC)/cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling cascade. We further identified the TRPM8 S9 and T17 as two key PKA phosphorylation sites regulating TRPM8 channel activity. We therefore propose that inhibition of TRPM8 through the α2A-AR signaling cascade could constitute a new mechanism of modulation of thermosensation in both physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:20110357

  6. Co-expression of non-selective cation channels of the transient receptor potential canonical family in central aminergic neurones.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Olga A; Korotkova, Tatiana M; Scherer, Annette; Brown, Ritchie E; Haas, Helmut L

    2003-06-01

    The mammalian transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) group of channels is a family of Ca2+-permeable cation channels that are activated following receptor-mediated stimulation of different isoforms of phospholipase C. In vitro T