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Sample records for receptor scanning update

  1. Forward scanning in verbal working memory updating.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Yoav; Oberauer, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Effective use of working memory (WM) for high-level cognitive tasks requires coordinating two conflicting requirements: robust maintenance and rapid updating. Models of WM suggest that these demands are coordinated by a gate between perceptual input and WM. Previous work with a letter-updating paradigm (Kessler & Oberauer, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 40, 738-754, 2014) supported a scanning and gate-switching (SGS) model of WM updating. The present work provides further evidence for the SGS model. Participants were required to keep track of the last letter that appeared in each of a row of frames on the screen. On each updating step, a variable subset of letters in varying positions in the row had to be updated. The SGS model assumes that on each updating step, participants scan through the memory set sequentially, opening the gate when a letter requires updating, and closing the gate when the next letter needs to be maintained. As is predicted by the SGS model, the reaction times for each updating step increased with the number of updated items and with the number of gate switches. In addition, the present experiment provides direct evidence supporting the scanning assumption of the model. Hebrew-speaking participants performed the task with either Hebrew or English letter stimuli, in different blocks. As was predicted, the scanning direction of the stimulus set was from left to right in English and from right to left in Hebrew. The SGS model fit the data only when the scanning direction was taken into account, establishing the role of item-based forward scanning during WM updating. PMID:25962687

  2. Update on melatonin receptors: IUPHAR Review 20.

    PubMed

    Jockers, Ralf; Delagrange, Philippe; Dubocovich, Margarita L; Markus, Regina P; Renault, Nicolas; Tosini, Gianluca; Cecon, Erika; Zlotos, Darius P

    2016-09-01

    Melatonin receptors are seven transmembrane-spanning proteins belonging to the GPCR superfamily. In mammals, two melatonin receptor subtypes exist - MT1 and MT2 - encoded by the MTNR1A and MTNR1B genes respectively. The current review provides an update on melatonin receptors by the corresponding subcommittee of the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. We will highlight recent developments of melatonin receptor ligands, including radioligands, and give an update on the latest phenotyping results of melatonin receptor knockout mice. The current status and perspectives of the structure of melatonin receptor will be summarized. The physiological importance of melatonin receptor dimers and biologically important and type 2 diabetes-associated genetic variants of melatonin receptors will be discussed. The role of melatonin receptors in physiology and disease will be further exemplified by their functions in the immune system and the CNS. Finally, antioxidant and free radical scavenger properties of melatonin and its relation to melatonin receptors will be critically addressed. PMID:27314810

  3. Estrogen receptors and human disease: an update

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    A myriad of physiological processes in mammals are influenced by estrogens and the estrogen receptors (ERs), ERα and ERβ. As we reviewed previously, given the widespread role for estrogen in normal human physiology, it is not surprising that estrogen is implicated in the development or progression of a number of diseases. In this review, we are giving a 5-year update of the literature regarding the influence of estrogens on a number of human cancers (breast, ovarian, colorectal, prostate, and endometrial), endometriosis, fibroids, and cardiovascular disease. A large number of sophisticated experimental studies have provided insights into human disease, but for this review, the literature citations were limited to articles published after our previous review (Deroo and Korach in J Clin Invest 116(3):561–570, 2006) and will focus in most cases on human data and clinical trials. We will describe the influence in which estrogen’s action, through one of or both of the ERs, mediates the aforementioned human disease states. PMID:22648069

  4. Multispectral Airborne Laser Scanning for Automated Map Updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matikainen, Leena; Hyyppä, Juha; Litkey, Paula

    2016-06-01

    During the last 20 years, airborne laser scanning (ALS), often combined with multispectral information from aerial images, has shown its high feasibility for automated mapping processes. Recently, the first multispectral airborne laser scanners have been launched, and multispectral information is for the first time directly available for 3D ALS point clouds. This article discusses the potential of this new single-sensor technology in map updating, especially in automated object detection and change detection. For our study, Optech Titan multispectral ALS data over a suburban area in Finland were acquired. Results from a random forests analysis suggest that the multispectral intensity information is useful for land cover classification, also when considering ground surface objects and classes, such as roads. An out-of-bag estimate for classification error was about 3% for separating classes asphalt, gravel, rocky areas and low vegetation from each other. For buildings and trees, it was under 1%. According to feature importance analyses, multispectral features based on several channels were more useful that those based on one channel. Automatic change detection utilizing the new multispectral ALS data, an old digital surface model (DSM) and old building vectors was also demonstrated. Overall, our first analyses suggest that the new data are very promising for further increasing the automation level in mapping. The multispectral ALS technology is independent of external illumination conditions, and intensity images produced from the data do not include shadows. These are significant advantages when the development of automated classification and change detection procedures is considered.

  5. Membrane guanylyl cyclase receptors: an update

    PubMed Central

    Garbers, David L.; Chrisman, Ted D.; Wiegn, Phi; Katafuchi, Takeshi; Albanesi, Joseph P.; Bielinski, Vincent; Barylko, Barbara; Redfield, Margaret M.; Burnett, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated key roles for several membrane guanylyl cyclase receptors in the regulation of cell hyperplasia, hypertrophy, migration and extracellular matrix production, all of which having an impact on clinically relevant diseases, including tissue remodeling after injury. Additionally, cell differentiation, and even tumor progression, can be profoundly influenced by one or more of these receptors. Some of these receptors also mediate important communication between the heart and intestine, and the kidney to regulate blood volume and Na+ balance. PMID:16815030

  6. Novel NMDA Receptor Modulators: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Santangelo, Rose M.; Acker, Timothy M.; Zimmerman, Sommer S.; Katzman, Brooke M.; Strong, Katie L.; Traynelis, Stephen F.; Liotta, Dennis C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction The NMDA receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel that plays a critical role in higher level brain processes and has been implicated in a range of neurological and psychiatric conditions. Although initial studies for the use of NMDA receptor antagonists in neuroprotection were unsuccessful, more recently, NMDA receptor antagonists have shown clinical promise in other indications such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, pain and depression. Based on the clinical observations and more recent insights into receptor pharmacology, new modulatory approaches are beginning to emerge, with potential therapeutic benefit. Areas Covered The article covers the known pharmacology and important features regarding NMDA receptors and their function. A discussion of pre-clinical and clinical relevance is included, as well. The subsequent patent literature review highlights the current state of the art targeting the receptor since the last review in 2010. Expert Opinion The complex nature of the NMDA receptor structure and function is becoming better understood. As knowledge about this receptor increases, it opens up new opportunities for targeting the receptor for many therapeutic indications. New strategies and advances in older technologies will need to be further developed before clinical success can be achieved. First-in-class potentiators and subunit-selective agents form the basis for most new strategies, complemented by efforts to limit off-target liability and fine-tune on-target properties. PMID:23009122

  7. Update on the Role of Cannabinoid Receptors after Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Capettini, Luciano S. A.; Savergnini, Silvia Q.; da Silva, Rafaela F.; Stergiopulos, Nikos; Santos, Robson A. S.; Mach, François; Montecucco, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoids are considered as key mediators in the pathophysiology of inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis. In particular, they have been shown to reduce the ischemic injury after acute cardiovascular events, such as acute myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. These protective and anti-inflammatory properties on peripheral tissues and circulating inflammatory have been demonstrated to involve their binding with both selective cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and type 2 (CB2) transmembrane receptors. On the other hands, the recent discoveries of novel different classes of cannabinoids and receptors have increased the complexity of this system in atherosclerosis. Although only preliminary data have been reported on the activities of novel cannabinoid receptors, several studies have already investigated the role of CB1 and CB2 receptors in ischemic stroke. While CB1 receptor activation has been shown to directly reduce atherosclerotic plaque inflammation, controversial data have been shown on neurotransmission and neuroprotection after stroke. Given its potent anti-inflammatory activities on circulating leukocytes, the CB2 activation has been proven to produce protective effects against acute poststroke inflammation. In this paper, we will update evidence on different cannabinoid-triggered avenues to reduce inflammation and neuronal injury in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:22577257

  8. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Merino, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) retinal imaging has become very popular in the past few years, especially within the ophthalmic research community. Several different retinal techniques, such as fundus imaging cameras or optical coherence tomography systems, have been coupled with AO in order to produce impressive images showing individual cell mosaics over different layers of the in vivo human retina. The combination of AO with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy has been extensively used to generate impressive images of the human retina with unprecedented resolution, showing individual photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, as well as microscopic capillary vessels, or the nerve fiber layer. Over the past few years, the technique has evolved to develop several different applications not only in the clinic but also in different animal models, thanks to technological developments in the field. These developments have specific applications to different fields of investigation, which are not limited to the study of retinal diseases but also to the understanding of the retinal function and vision science. This review is an attempt to summarize these developments in an understandable and brief manner in order to guide the reader into the possibilities that AO scanning laser ophthalmoscopy offers, as well as its limitations, which should be taken into account when planning on using it. PMID:27175057

  9. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope imaging: technology update.

    PubMed

    Merino, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) retinal imaging has become very popular in the past few years, especially within the ophthalmic research community. Several different retinal techniques, such as fundus imaging cameras or optical coherence tomography systems, have been coupled with AO in order to produce impressive images showing individual cell mosaics over different layers of the in vivo human retina. The combination of AO with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy has been extensively used to generate impressive images of the human retina with unprecedented resolution, showing individual photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium cells, as well as microscopic capillary vessels, or the nerve fiber layer. Over the past few years, the technique has evolved to develop several different applications not only in the clinic but also in different animal models, thanks to technological developments in the field. These developments have specific applications to different fields of investigation, which are not limited to the study of retinal diseases but also to the understanding of the retinal function and vision science. This review is an attempt to summarize these developments in an understandable and brief manner in order to guide the reader into the possibilities that AO scanning laser ophthalmoscopy offers, as well as its limitations, which should be taken into account when planning on using it. PMID:27175057

  10. Update on leukotriene, lipoxin and oxoeicosanoid receptors: IUPHAR Review 7

    PubMed Central

    Bäck, Magnus; Powell, William S; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Drazen, Jeffrey M; Evans, Jilly F; Serhan, Charles N; Shimizu, Takao; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Rovati, G Enrico

    2014-01-01

    The endogenous ligands for the LT, lipoxin (LX) and oxoeicosanoid receptors are bioactive products produced by the action of the lipoxygenase family of enzymes. The LT receptors BLT1 and BLT2, are activated by LTB4 and the CysLT1 and CysLT2 receptors are activated by the cysteinyl-LTs, whereas oxoeicosanoids exert their action through the OXE receptor. In contrast to these pro-inflammatory mediators, LXA4 transduces responses associated with the resolution of inflammation through the receptor FPR2/ALX (ALX/FPR2). The aim of the present review is to give a state of the field on these receptors, with focus on recent important findings. For example, BLT1 receptor signalling in cancer and the dual role of the BLT2 receptor in pro- and anti-inflammatory actions have added more complexity to lipid mediator signalling. Furthermore, a cross-talk between the CysLT and P2Y receptor systems has been described, and also the presence of novel receptors for cysteinyl-LTs, such as GPR17 and GPR99. Finally, lipoxygenase metabolites derived from ω-3 essential polyunsaturated acids, the resolvins, activate the receptors GPR32 and ChemR23. In conclusion, the receptors for the lipoxygenase products make up a sophisticated and tightly controlled system of endogenous pro- and anti-inflammatory signalling in physiology and pathology. PMID:24588652

  11. SCAN+

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Krebs, John Svoboda

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determine the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.

  12. Biochemical pharmacology of the vanilloid receptor TRPV1. An update.

    PubMed

    Cortright, Daniel N; Szallasi, Arpad

    2004-05-01

    There is mounting evidence that the vanilloid (capsaicin) receptor; transient receptor potential channel, vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1), is subjected to multiple interacting levels of control. The first level is by reversible phosphorylation catalyzed by intrinsic kinases (e.g. protein kinase A and C) and phosphatases (e.g. calcineurin), which plays a pivotal role in receptor sensitization vs. tachyphylaxis. In addition, this mechanism links TRPV1 to intracellular signaling by various important endogenous as well as exogenous substances such as bradykinin, ethanol, nicotin and insulin. It is not clear, however, whether phosphorylation per se is sufficient to liberate TRPV1 under the inhibitory control of phosphatydylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate. The second level of control is by forming TRPV1 heteromers and their association with putative regulatory proteins. The next level of regulation is by subcellular compartmentalization. The membrane form of TRPV1 functions as a nonselective cation channel. On the endoplasmic reticulum, TRPV1 is present in two differentially regulated forms, one of which is inositol triphosphate-dependent whereas the other is not. These three TRPV1 compartments provide a versatile regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Last, there is a complex and poorly understood regulation of TRPV1 activity via control of gene expression. Factors that downregulate TRPV1 expression include vanilloid treatment and growth factor (notably, nerve growth factor) deprivation. By contrast, TRPV1 appears to be upregulated during inflammatory conditions. Interestingly, following experimental nerve injury and in animal models of diabetic neuropathy TRPV1 is present on neurons that do not normally express TRPV1. Combined, these findings imply an important role for aberrant TRPV1 expression in the development of neuropathic pain and hyperalgesia. In humans, disease-related changes in TRPV1 expression have already been described (e.g. inflammatory bowel disease

  13. SCAN+

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determinemore » the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.« less

  14. A Review of the Updated Pharmacophore for the Alpha 5 GABA(A) Benzodiazepine Receptor Model

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Terry; Poe, Michael M.; Rallapalli, Sundari; Biawat, Poonam; Savić, Miroslav M.; Rowlett, James K.; Gallos, George; Emala, Charles W.; Kaczorowski, Catherine C.; Stafford, Douglas C.; Arnold, Leggy A.; Cook, James M.

    2015-01-01

    An updated model of the GABA(A) benzodiazepine receptor pharmacophore of the α5-BzR/GABA(A) subtype has been constructed prompted by the synthesis of subtype selective ligands in light of the recent developments in both ligand synthesis, behavioral studies, and molecular modeling studies of the binding site itself. A number of BzR/GABA(A) α5 subtype selective compounds were synthesized, notably α5-subtype selective inverse agonist PWZ-029 (1) which is active in enhancing cognition in both rodents and primates. In addition, a chiral positive allosteric modulator (PAM), SH-053-2′F-R-CH3 (2), has been shown to reverse the deleterious effects in the MAM-model of schizophrenia as well as alleviate constriction in airway smooth muscle. Presented here is an updated model of the pharmacophore for α5β2γ2 Bz/GABA(A) receptors, including a rendering of PWZ-029 docked within the α5-binding pocket showing specific interactions of the molecule with the receptor. Differences in the included volume as compared to α1β2γ2, α2β2γ2, and α3β2γ2 will be illustrated for clarity. These new models enhance the ability to understand structural characteristics of ligands which act as agonists, antagonists, or inverse agonists at the Bz BS of GABA(A) receptors. PMID:26682068

  15. Clinical applications of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis in dermatology--an up-date

    SciTech Connect

    Forslind, B.

    1988-06-01

    Dermatological papers comprising scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis data published 1983 through 1986 in international journals are reviewed, as an update to our 1984 paper on Clinical applications of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis in dermatology. The present paper not only deals with a review of recent publications in this area but also presents the application of microincineration to hair and cryosectioned freeze-dried skin specimens. Examples of the increased contrast obtained in hair cross sections are presented and a discussion on the feasibility of microincineration at analysis of hair and skin cross sections is given. Particle probe analysis (EDX: energy dispersive X-ray analysis and PMP: proton microprobe analysis) as applied to hair and skin samples are presented with stress put on the proton probe analysis. The complementarity of EDX and PMP is demonstrated and future applications are suggested. 75 references.

  16. An Environmental Scan Update, 1992-93. 2020: Perfect Vision for the Next Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedel, J. N., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    A key component to Eastern Iowa Community College District's (EICCD) strategic planning process, called "2020 Vision: A Perfect Vision for the Future," was the publication of the report "An Environmental Scan" in 1989, which summarized major trends occurring in the external environment which may impact the community college, the industries and…

  17. Computational Prediction of Alanine Scanning and Ligand Binding Energetics in G-Protein Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Boukharta, Lars; Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo; Åqvist, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis combined with binding affinity measurements is widely used to probe the nature of ligand interactions with GPCRs. Such experiments, as well as structure-activity relationships for series of ligands, are usually interpreted with computationally derived models of ligand binding modes. However, systematic approaches for accurate calculations of the corresponding binding free energies are still lacking. Here, we report a computational strategy to quantitatively predict the effects of alanine scanning and ligand modifications based on molecular dynamics free energy simulations. A smooth stepwise scheme for free energy perturbation calculations is derived and applied to a series of thirteen alanine mutations of the human neuropeptide Y1 receptor and series of eight analogous antagonists. The robustness and accuracy of the method enables univocal interpretation of existing mutagenesis and binding data. We show how these calculations can be used to validate structural models and demonstrate their ability to discriminate against suboptimal ones. PMID:24743773

  18. Bronchoalveolar lavage analysis, gallium-67 lung scanning and soluble interleukin-2 receptor levels in asbestos exposure.

    PubMed

    Delclos, G L; Flitcraft, D G; Brousseau, K P; Windsor, N T; Nelson, D L; Wilson, R K; Lawrence, E C

    1989-04-01

    This study examined different markers of lung immunologic and inflammatory responses to previous asbestos exposure. We performed bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and gallium-67 (67Ga) lung scans and measured serum and BAL soluble interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (SACE) levels in 32 subjects with a history of significant asbestos exposure, 14 without (EXP) and 18 with (ASB) radiographic evidence of asbestosis. BAL analysis revealed increases in neutrophils in both ASB and EXP when compared to controls (P less than 0.01), which persisted after adjustment for smoking category. Although significant abnormalities of macrophage and total lymphocyte profiles were not found in the study population, lymphocyte subpopulation analysis revealed elevation of BAL T4/T8 ratios in the entire study group (ASB + EXP) when compared to controls (P less than 0.05), independent of smoking category. 67Ga lung scan activity was increased in 56% of ASB and in 36% of EXP: no correlations between positive scans and different radiological and functional parameters could be found. There was no significant elevation of mean SACE, serum, or BAL IL-2R levels in any of the study categories. These data suggest that asbestos exposure may be associated with parenchymal inflammation, even in the absence of clinical criteria for asbestosis. Abnormalities of gallium uptake and of BAL analysis reflect the clinically inapparent inflammation. The increased BAL T4/T8 ratios observed suggest that abnormal local pulmonary immunoregulation may play a role in the pathogenesis of asbestos-related lung diseases. PMID:2538325

  19. Orbit CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... results may mean: Bleeding Broken eye socket bone Graves disease Infection Tumor Risks CT scans and other x- ... Livingstone; 2014:chap 66. Read More CT scan Graves disease Tumor Update Date 1/18/2015 Updated by: ...

  20. Localization of Neuroendocrine Tumors Using Somatostatin Receptor Imaging With Indium-111-Pentetreotide (OctreoScan).

    PubMed

    Ellison; Schirmer; Olsen; Pozderac; Hinkle; Hill; O'Dorisio; O'Dorisio

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many imaging methods have been used to detect neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal system. There is no gold standard for identifying the location of primary tumors and their potential metastases, and most conventional imaging techniques cannot detect tumors less than 1.0 cm in size. METHODS: The authors have investigated the use of 111-In-pentetreotide as an imaging agent for abdominal neuroendocrine tumors. RESULTS: The agent is cleared rapidly by the kidneys and is primarily excreted intact with a biologic half-life of six hours. The largest radiation burden is to the spleen and kidneys. A nine-center study conducted in Europe involved 365 patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors that were also imaged by other methods. The results of 111-In-pentetreotide were in agreement with those obtained by other methods for 79% of tumor locations. An additional 110 tumor localizations were detected that were not seen with conventional methods. The smallest gastrinoma imaged by 111-In-pentetreotide was a 4-mm duodenal tumor. CONCLUSIONS: Scintigraphy with 111-In-pentetreotide is effective in visualizing various somatostatin receptors characteristic of neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. Insulinomas, however, are not well imaged. Concurrent computed tomography scanning is advised to minimize the risk of missing liver metastases. PMID:10763002

  1. International Union of Pharmacology. LXXXIX. Update on the Extended Family of Chemokine Receptors and Introducing a New Nomenclature for Atypical Chemokine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bachelerie, Francoise; Ben-Baruch, Adit; Burkhardt, Amanda M.; Combadiere, Christophe; Farber, Joshua M.; Graham, Gerard J.; Horuk, Richard; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander Hovard; Locati, Massimo; Luster, Andrew D.; Mantovani, Alberto; Matsushima, Kouji; Nibbs, Robert; Nomiyama, Hisayuki; Power, Christine A.; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.; Rosenkilde, Mette M.; Rot, Antal; Sozzani, Silvano; Thelen, Marcus; Yoshie, Osamu; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen years ago, the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology approved a system for naming human seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled chemokine receptors, the large family of leukocyte chemoattractant receptors that regulates immune system development and function, in large part by mediating leukocyte trafficking. This was announced in Pharmacological Reviews in a major overview of the first decade of research in this field [Murphy PM, Baggiolini M, Charo IF, Hébert CA, Horuk R, Matsushima K, Miller LH, Oppenheim JJ, and Power CA (2000) Pharmacol Rev 52:145–176]. Since then, several new receptors have been discovered, and major advances have been made for the others in many areas, including structural biology, signal transduction mechanisms, biology, and pharmacology. New and diverse roles have been identified in infection, immunity, inflammation, development, cancer, and other areas. The first two drugs acting at chemokine receptors have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), maraviroc targeting CCR5 in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS, and plerixafor targeting CXCR4 for stem cell mobilization for transplantation in cancer, and other candidates are now undergoing pivotal clinical trials for diverse disease indications. In addition, a subfamily of atypical chemokine receptors has emerged that may signal through arrestins instead of G proteins to act as chemokine scavengers, and many microbial and invertebrate G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and soluble chemokine-binding proteins have been described. Here, we review this extended family of chemokine receptors and chemokine-binding proteins at the basic, translational, and clinical levels, including an update on drug development. We also introduce a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors with the stem ACKR (atypical chemokine receptor) approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology and the Human

  2. Selective Agonists and Antagonists of Formylpeptide Receptors: Duplex Flow Cytometry and Mixture-Based Positional Scanning Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Pinilla, Clemencia; Edwards, Bruce S.; Appel, Jon R.; Yates-Gibbins, Tina; Giulianotti, Marc A.; Medina-Franco, Jose L.; Young, Susan M.; Santos, Radleigh G.

    2013-01-01

    The formylpeptide receptor (FPR1) and formylpeptide-like 1 receptor (FPR2) are G protein–coupled receptors that are linked to acute inflammatory responses, malignant glioma stem cell metastasis, and chronic inflammation. Although several N-formyl peptides are known to bind to these receptors, more selective small-molecule, high-affinity ligands are needed for a better understanding of the physiologic roles played by these receptors. High-throughput assays using mixture-based combinatorial libraries represent a unique, highly efficient approach for rapid data acquisition and ligand identification. We report the superiority of this approach in the context of the simultaneous screening of a diverse set of mixture-based small-molecule libraries. We used a single cross-reactive peptide ligand for a duplex flow cytometric screen of FPR1 and FPR2 in color-coded cell lines. Screening 37 different mixture-based combinatorial libraries totaling more than five million small molecules (contained in 5,261 mixture samples) resulted in seven libraries that significantly inhibited activity at the receptors. Using positional scanning deconvolution, selective high-affinity (low nM Ki) individual compounds were identified from two separate libraries, namely, pyrrolidine bis-diketopiperazine and polyphenyl urea. The most active individual compounds were characterized for their functional activities as agonists or antagonists with the most potent FPR1 agonist and FPR2 antagonist identified to date with an EC50 of 131 nM (4 nM Ki) and an IC50 of 81 nM (1 nM Ki), respectively, in intracellular Ca2+ response determinations. Comparative analyses of other previous screening approaches clearly illustrate the efficiency of identifying receptor selective, individual compounds from mixture-based combinatorial libraries. PMID:23788657

  3. The Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor in Brain Functions: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Guimond, Marie-Odile; Gallo-Payet, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the main active product of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), mediating its action via two major receptors, namely, the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor and the type 2 (AT2) receptor. Recent results also implicate several other members of the renin-angiotensin system in various aspects of brain functions. The first aim of this paper is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the properties and signaling of the AT2 receptor, its expression in the brain, and its well-established effects. Secondly, we will highlight the potential role of the AT2 receptor in cognitive function, neurological disorders and in the regulation of appetite and the possible link with development of metabolic disorders. The potential utility of novel nonpeptide selective AT2 receptor ligands in clarifying potential roles of this receptor in physiology will also be discussed. If confirmed, these new pharmacological tools should help to improve impaired cognitive performance, not only through its action on brain microcirculation and inflammation, but also through more specific effects on neurons. However, the overall physiological relevance of the AT2 receptor in the brain must also consider the Ang IV/AT4 receptor. PMID:23320146

  4. Detection of circulating tumor cells using GeneScan analysis for antigen receptor gene rearrangements in canine lymphoma patients

    PubMed Central

    HIYOSHI-KANEMOTO, Saaya; GOTO-KOSHINO, Yuko; FUKUSHIMA, Kenjiro; TAKAHASHI, Masashi; KANEMOTO, Hideyuki; UCHIDA, Kazuyuki; FUJINO, Yasuhito; OHNO, Koichi; TSUJIMOTO, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) serves as a prognostic marker and indicator of disease relapse, as well as a means of evaluating treatment efficacy in human and canine lymphoma patients. As an extension of our previous study for the construction of clinically useful GeneScan system, we utilized the GeneScan system for detecting CTCs in canine lymphoma patients. Samples from the primary lesion and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from 32 dogs with lymphoma at initial diagnosis. All samples were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for antigen receptor gene rearrangements (PARR) followed by GeneScan analysis. Common clonal rearrangements with identical amplified fragments were detected in both the primary lesion and PBMCs in 19 of the 32 dogs (59.4%). However, the detection rate of CTCs varied among the anatomical classification of lymphoma studied. GeneScan analysis following PARR would facilitate studies on determining the clinical significance of CTCs in canine lymphoma patients. PMID:26888583

  5. Rapid and Adaptable Measurement of Protein Thermal Stability by Differential Scanning Fluorimetry: Updating a Common Biochemical Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, R. Jeremy; Savas, Christopher J.; Kartje, Zachary; Hoops, Geoffrey C.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of protein denaturation and protein folding is a common laboratory technique used in undergraduate biochemistry laboratories. Differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) provides a rapid, sensitive, and general method for measuring protein thermal stability in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory. In this method, the thermal…

  6. N-Methyl scan of somatostatin octapeptide agonists produces interesting effects on receptor subtype specificity.

    PubMed

    Rajeswaran, W G; Hocart, S J; Murphy, W A; Taylor, J E; Coy, D H

    2001-04-26

    The search for synthetic analogues of somatostatin which exhibit selective affinities for the five receptor subtypes is of considerable basic and therapeutic interest and has generated a large number of potent agonist analogues with a wide spectrum of binding profiles. In the past, conformational restriction of side chain groups and the peptide backbone has yielded the most interesting results. Under the latter category and as part of the present study, we were interested in the potential effects of N-methylation of peptide bond NH groups on binding affinity since this approach had not been systematically examined with these peptides. This was aided by new chemistries for introducing an N-Me group during regular solid-phase peptide synthesis using Boc protection. A number of interesting effects were noted on relative binding affinities of the two series of agonist sequences chosen, DPhe(5)(or Tyr(5))-c[Cys(6)-Phe(7)-DTrp(8)-Lys(9)-Thr(10)-Cys(11)]Thr(12)-NH(2) (SRIF numbering), at the five known human somatostatin receptors transfected into and stably expressed by CHO cells. N-Methylation of residues 7 (Phe), 10 (Thr), 11 (Cys), and 12 (Thr) largely destroyed affinities for all five receptors. N-Methylation of DTrp in the DPhe series gave an analogue with extraordinarily high affinity for the type 5 receptor for which it was also quite selective. N-Methylation of Lys in both series resulted in retention of type 2 affinity despite this residue constituting the "active center" of somatostatin peptides. N-Methylation of either the N-terminal Tyr residue or of Cys(6) in the Tyr series resulted in analogues with extraordinarily high affinity for the type 3 receptor, also with a degree of specificity. N-Methylation of the peptide bond constrains the conformational space of the amino acid and eliminates the possibility of donor hydrogen bond formation from the amide linkage. The beta-bend conformation of the agonists around DTrp-Lys is stabilized by a transannular

  7. An Update on PYRIN Domain-Containing Pattern Recognition Receptors: From Immunity to Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Ratsimandresy, Rojo A.; Dorfleutner, Andrea; Stehlik, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Cytosolic pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) sense a wide range of endogenous danger-associated molecular patterns as well as exogenous pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In particular, Nod-like receptors containing a pyrin domain (PYD), called NLRPs, and AIM2-like receptors (ALRs) have been shown to play a critical role in host defense by facilitating clearance of pathogens and maintaining a healthy gut microflora. NLRPs and ALRs both encode a PYD, which is crucial for relaying signals that result in an efficient innate immune response through activation of several key innate immune signaling pathways. However, mutations in these PRRs have been linked to the development of auto-inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. In addition, they have been implicated in metabolic diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of PYD-containing NLRPs and ALRs and address their contribution to innate immunity, host defense, and immune-linked diseases. PMID:24367371

  8. Dopamine D3 receptor ligands for drug addiction treatment: update on recent findings.

    PubMed

    Le Foll, Bernard; Collo, Ginetta; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Boileau, Isabelle; Merlo Pich, Emilio; Sokoloff, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine D3 receptor is located in the limbic area and apparently mediates selective effects on motivation to take drugs and drug-seeking behaviors, so that there has been considerable interest on the possible use of D3 receptor ligands to treat drug addiction. However, only recently selective tools allowing studying this receptor have been developed. This chapter presents an overview of findings that were presented at a symposium on the conference Dopamine 2013 in Sardinia in May 2013. Novel neurobiological findings indicate that drugs of abuse can lead to significant structural plasticity in rodent brain and that this is dependent on the availability of functional dopamine D3 autoreceptor, whose activation increased phosphorylation in the ERK pathway and in the Akt/mTORC1 pathway indicating the parallel engagement of a series of intracellular signaling pathways all involved in cell growth and survival. Preclinical findings using animal models of drug-seeking behaviors confirm that D3 antagonists have a promising profile to treat drug addiction across drugs of abuse type. Imaging the D3 is now feasible in human subjects. Notably, the development of (+)-4-propyl-9-hydroxynaphthoxazine ligand used in positron emission tomography (PET) studies in humans allows to measure D3 and D2 receptors based on the area of the brain under study. This PET ligand has been used to confirm up-regulation of D3 sites in psychostimulant users and to reveal that tobacco smoking produces elevation of dopamine at the level of D3 sites. There are now novel antagonists being developed, but also old drugs such as buspirone, that are available to test the D3 hypothesis in humans. The first results of clinical investigations are now being provided. Overall, those recent findings support further exploration of D3 ligands to treat drug addiction. PMID:24968784

  9. Role of leukotriene receptor antagonists in the management of pediatric asthma: an update.

    PubMed

    Dumitru, Catalina; Chan, Susan M H; Turcanu, Victor

    2012-10-01

    At present, the main indications for leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRA) in pediatric asthma are as add-on therapy to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and as initial controller therapy in children with mild asthma, especially those who cannot or will not use ICS. LTRA are also useful for patients who have concomitant rhinitis, and patients with viral-induced wheeze and exercise-induced asthma. It should be noted that the benefits of LTRA therapy have been demonstrated in children as young as 6 months of age and recent clinical trials have further proven the benefits of LTRA in acute asthma exacerbations. However, considering the important pro-inflammatory effects that leukotrienes (LT) have in experimental models of asthma, it may seem surprising that LTRA treatment outcomes are not better and that in some clinical trials only a minority of patients could be classified as full responders. This could be explained by potential additional LT receptors that are not affected by LTRA. Such receptors could represent new therapeutic targets in asthma. Furthermore, progress in differentiating between asthma phenotypes that result from different pathogenic mechanisms, some of which may involve LT to a lesser degree, should lead to an improved, personalized use of LTRA for treating asthma. PMID:22897162

  10. Mutation scan of the D1 dopamine receptor gene in 22 cases of bipolar I disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, M.; Coon, H.; Holik, J.; Hoff, M.

    1995-04-24

    In a previous study we found suggestive evidence of linkage between manic-depressive illness (MDI) in eight multiplex pedigrees and D5S62, a DNA marker mapping to the telomeric region of 5q. As the D1 dopamine receptor gene (DRDI) maps to this region and as alterations in dopaminergic neurotransmission have been indirectly implicated in the pathogenesis of MDI, we directly searched for mutations in the coding region of the DRDI gene in 22 unrelated cases of bipolar I (BPI) disorder derived from multiplex families. Using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, we did not observe any abnormal SSCP variants in the BPI cases that differed from controls. 30 refs., 1 fig.

  11. International Union of Pharmacology. LXX. Subtypes of γ-Aminobutyric AcidA Receptors: Classification on the Basis of Subunit Composition, Pharmacology, and Function. Update

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Richard W.; Sieghart, Werner

    2010-01-01

    In this review we attempt to summarize experimental evidence on the existence of defined native GABAA receptor subtypes and to produce a list of receptors that actually seem to exist according to current knowledge. This will serve to update the most recent classification of GABAA receptors (Pharmacol Rev 50:291–313, 1998) approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology. GABAA receptors are chloride channels that mediate the major form of fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. They are members of the Cys-loop pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (LGIC) superfamily and share structural and functional homology with other members of that family. GABAA receptors are assembled from a family of 19 homologous subunit gene products and form numerous, mostly hetero-oligomeric, pentamers. Such receptor subtypes with properties that depend on subunit composition vary in topography and ontogeny, in cellular and subcellular localization, in their role in brain circuits and behaviors, in their mechanisms of regulation, and in their pharmacology. We propose several criteria, which can be applied to all the members of the LGIC superfamily, for including a receptor subtype on a list of native hetero-oligomeric subtypes. With these criteria, we develop a working GABAA receptor list, which currently includes 26 members, but will undoubtedly be modified and grow as information expands. The list is divided into three categories of native receptor subtypes: “identified,” “existence with high probability,” and “tentative.” PMID:18790874

  12. OctreoScan 111 for imaging of a somatostatin receptor-positive islet cell tumor in rat.

    PubMed

    Bruns, C; Stolz, B; Albert, R; Marbach, P; Pless, J

    1993-01-01

    Somatostatin (SRIF) receptors are present in a variety of human tumors such as pituitary and endocrine pancreatic tumors, brain tumors, small cell lung cancers and malignant breast tumors. The 111In-labeled SRIF analog SDZ 215-811 (OctreoScan 111) binds with a high affinity to somatostatin receptors and exhibits SRIF-like biological properties, as demonstrated by the inhibition of growth hormone release from pituitary cells. We report here the in vitro characterization of SDZ 215-811 and the in vivo imaging of an islet cell tumor grown in rats using [111In]SDZ 215-811. In vitro autoradiographies revealed a high density of SRIF receptors on the pancreatic tumor tissue. As early as 5 min after intravenous injection of [111In]SDZ 215-811 into tumor-bearing rats, the tumors were clearly localized by gamma-camera scintigraphy. Even 24 h post injection, the islet cell tumor was still detectable. The radioligand was mainly cleared from the circulation via the kidneys, with a rapid alpha-phase (t1/2 = 5.6 min) and a slow elimination phase (t1/2 = 7.3 h). Biodistribution studies revealed a relatively high accumulation of radioactivity in the kidneys, but low uptake into the liver and the intestine. High uptake of [111In]SDZ 215-811 was observed for the tumor tissue (0.92 +/- 0.07% ID/g; 1 h post injection). Interestingly, a tumor load of 0.14 +/- 0.01% ID/g was still measured after 24 h. The tumor/blood ratio was 4.93 after 24 h, indicating specific accumulation of radioactivity in the islet cell tumor.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8392488

  13. An in vivo OctreoScan-negative adrenal pheochromocytoma expresses somatostatin receptors and responds to somatostatin analogs treatment in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zatelli, M C; Piccin, D; Bondanelli, M; Tagliati, F; De Carlo, E; Culler, M D; Uberti, E C degli

    2003-06-01

    A 52-yr-old woman presented with hypertension, elevated urinary vanillylmandelic acid, metanephrines, normetanephrines, and plasma chromogranin A (CgA), but normal urinary catecholamine levels. Abdominal ultrasonography and subsequent MRI imaging showed a 3 cm nodular lesion of the right adrenal gland also visualized by 123I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy consistent with a pheochromocytoma (PC). Her OctreoScan was negative. The patient underwent right adrenalectomy and histological examination showed a PC. The adrenal medulla tissue was examined for somatostatin (SRIH) receptor subtypes 1 to 5 (SSTR1 to 5) expression by RT-PCR. Cultured tumor cells were treated with either SRIH, Lanreotide (Lan), or an SSTR2 (BIM-23 120) or SSTR5 (BIM-23 206) selective agonist. CgA secretion was measured in the medium by ELISA and catecholamine levels by HPLC after 6h. Cell viability was assessed after 48h. RT-PCR analysis showed that SSTR1, 2, 3 and 4 were expressed. CgA secretion was significantly reduced by SRIH (- 80 %), Lan (- 35 %), and the SSTR2 selective agonist (- 65 %). Norepinephrine secretion was reduced by SRIH (- 66 %), Lan (- 40 %), and BIM-23 120 (- 70 %). Epinephrine and dopamine secretion was also inhibited by treatment with SRIH (- 90 % and - 93 %, respectively) and BIM-23 120 (- 33 % and - 75 %, respectively) but not by Lan. Cell viability was also significantly reduced by SRIH (- 30 %), Lan (- 10 %), and the SSTR2 selective agonist (- 20 %). The SSTR5 selective agonist did not modify either CgA and catecholamine secretion or cell viability. Our data show that SSTRs may be present in a PC although OctreoScan is negative in vivo, and that SRIH and its analogs may reduce both differentiated and proliferative functions in chromaffin cells in vitro. These findings suggest that SRIH analogs with enhanced SSTR2 affinity might be useful in the medical therapy of PC, even when an OctreoScan is negative. PMID:12920656

  14. A genome-wide association scan on estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease and may be characterized on the basis of whether estrogen receptors (ER) are expressed in the tumour cells. ER status of breast cancer is important clinically, and is used both as a prognostic indicator and treatment predictor. In this study, we focused on identifying genetic markers associated with ER-negative breast cancer risk. Methods We conducted a genome-wide association analysis of 285,984 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 617 ER-negative breast cancer cases and 4,583 controls. We also conducted a genome-wide pathway analysis on the discovery dataset using permutation-based tests on pre-defined pathways. The extent of shared polygenic variation between ER-negative and ER-positive breast cancers was assessed by relating risk scores, derived using ER-positive breast cancer samples, to disease state in independent, ER-negative breast cancer cases. Results Association with ER-negative breast cancer was not validated for any of the five most strongly associated SNPs followed up in independent studies (1,011 ER-negative breast cancer cases, 7,604 controls). However, an excess of small P-values for SNPs with known regulatory functions in cancer-related pathways was found (global P = 0.052). We found no evidence to suggest that ER-negative breast cancer shares a polygenic basis to disease with ER-positive breast cancer. Conclusions ER-negative breast cancer is a distinct breast cancer subtype that merits independent analyses. Given the clinical importance of this phenotype and the likelihood that genetic effect sizes are small, greater sample sizes and further studies are required to understand the etiology of ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:21062454

  15. Toll-like receptors as developmental tools that regulate neurogenesis during development: an update.

    PubMed

    Barak, Boaz; Feldman, Noa; Okun, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis, the process of generating new neurons in the brain, fascinates researchers for its promise to affect multiple cognitive and functional processes in both health and disease. Many cellular pathways are involved in the regulation of neurogenesis, a complexity exemplified by the extensive regulation of this process during brain development. Toll-like receptors (TLRs), hallmarks of innate immunity, are increasingly implemented in various central nervous system plasticity-related processes including neurogenesis. As TLRs are involved in neurodegenerative disorders, understanding the involvement of TLRs in neurogenesis may hold keys for future therapeutic interventions. Herein, we describe the current knowledge on the involvement of TLRs in neurogenesis and neuronal plasticity and point to current knowledge gaps in the field. PMID:25221470

  16. Toll-like receptors as developmental tools that regulate neurogenesis during development: an update

    PubMed Central

    Barak, Boaz; Feldman, Noa; Okun, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis, the process of generating new neurons in the brain, fascinates researchers for its promise to affect multiple cognitive and functional processes in both health and disease. Many cellular pathways are involved in the regulation of neurogenesis, a complexity exemplified by the extensive regulation of this process during brain development. Toll-like receptors (TLRs), hallmarks of innate immunity, are increasingly implemented in various central nervous system plasticity-related processes including neurogenesis. As TLRs are involved in neurodegenerative disorders, understanding the involvement of TLRs in neurogenesis may hold keys for future therapeutic interventions. Herein, we describe the current knowledge on the involvement of TLRs in neurogenesis and neuronal plasticity and point to current knowledge gaps in the field. PMID:25221470

  17. Update on the urotensinergic system: new trends in receptor localization, activation, and drug design.

    PubMed

    Chatenet, David; Nguyen, Thi-Tuyet M; Létourneau, Myriam; Fournier, Alain

    2012-01-01

    The urotensinergic system plays central roles in the physiological regulation of major mammalian organ systems, including the cardiovascular system. As a matter of fact, this system has been linked to numerous pathophysiological states including atherosclerosis, heart failure, hypertension, diabetes as well as psychological, and neurological disorders. The delineation of the (patho)physiological roles of the urotensinergic system has been hampered by the absence of potent and selective antagonists for the urotensin II-receptor (UT). Thus, a more precise definition of the molecular functioning of the urotensinergic system, in normal conditions as well as in a pathological state is still critically needed. The recent discovery of nuclear UT within cardiomyocytes has highlighted the cellular complexity of this system and suggested that UT-associated biological responses are not only initiated at the cell surface but may result from the integration of extracellular and intracellular signaling pathways. Thus, such nuclear-localized receptors, regulating distinct signaling pathways, may represent new therapeutic targets. With the recent observation that urotensin II (UII) and urotensin II-related peptide (URP) exert different biological effects and the postulate that they could also have distinct pathophysiological roles in hypertension, it appears crucial to reassess the recognition process involving UII and URP with UT, and to push forward the development of new analogs of the UT system aimed at discriminating UII- and URP-mediated biological activities. The recent development of such compounds, i.e. urocontrin A and rUII(1-7), is certainly useful to decipher the specific roles of UII and URP in vitro and in vivo. Altogether, these studies, which provide important information regarding the pharmacology of the urotensinergic system and the conformational requirements for binding and activation, will ultimately lead to the development of potent and selective drugs. PMID

  18. Update on the urotensinergic system: new trends in receptor localization, activation, and drug design

    PubMed Central

    Chatenet, David; Nguyen, Thi-Tuyet M.; Létourneau, Myriam; Fournier, Alain

    2012-01-01

    The urotensinergic system plays central roles in the physiological regulation of major mammalian organ systems, including the cardiovascular system. As a matter of fact, this system has been linked to numerous pathophysiological states including atherosclerosis, heart failure, hypertension, diabetes as well as psychological, and neurological disorders. The delineation of the (patho)physiological roles of the urotensinergic system has been hampered by the absence of potent and selective antagonists for the urotensin II-receptor (UT). Thus, a more precise definition of the molecular functioning of the urotensinergic system, in normal conditions as well as in a pathological state is still critically needed. The recent discovery of nuclear UT within cardiomyocytes has highlighted the cellular complexity of this system and suggested that UT-associated biological responses are not only initiated at the cell surface but may result from the integration of extracellular and intracellular signaling pathways. Thus, such nuclear-localized receptors, regulating distinct signaling pathways, may represent new therapeutic targets. With the recent observation that urotensin II (UII) and urotensin II-related peptide (URP) exert different biological effects and the postulate that they could also have distinct pathophysiological roles in hypertension, it appears crucial to reassess the recognition process involving UII and URP with UT, and to push forward the development of new analogs of the UT system aimed at discriminating UII- and URP-mediated biological activities. The recent development of such compounds, i.e. urocontrin A and rUII(1–7), is certainly useful to decipher the specific roles of UII and URP in vitro and in vivo. Altogether, these studies, which provide important information regarding the pharmacology of the urotensinergic system and the conformational requirements for binding and activation, will ultimately lead to the development of potent and selective drugs

  19. STATISTICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN THE EMPLOYMENT OF SAX (SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSOPY WITH AUTOMATED IMAGE ANALYSIS AND X-RAY ENERGY SPECTROSCOPY) RESULTS FOR RECEPTOR MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hundreds of thousands of individual particle measurements may be accumulated in a receptor model study employing Scanning electron microscopy with Automated image analysis and X-ray energy spectroscopy (SAX). At present, the summaries of these data are utilized in apportionment c...

  20. An update of radiolabeled bombesin analogs for gastrin-releasing peptide receptor targeting.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zilin; Ananias, Hildo J K; Carlucci, Giuseppe; Hoving, Hilde D; Helfrich, Wijnand; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Wang, Fan; de Jong, Igle J; Elsinga, Philip H

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a critical public health problem in USA and Europe. New non-invasive imaging methods are urgently needed, due to the low accuracy and specificity of current screen methods and the desire of localizing primary prostate cancer and bone metastasis. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) are the non-invasive and sensitive imaging methods which have been widely used for diagnosing diseases in the clinic. Lack of suitable radiotracers is the major issue for nuclear imaging of prostate cancer, although radiolabeled bombesin (BN) peptides targeting the Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor (GRPR) on tumor cells are widely investigated. In this review we discuss the recent trends in the development of GRPR-targeted radiopharmaceuticals based on BN analogs with regard to their potential for imaging and therapy of GRPR-expressing malignancies. Following a brief introduction of GRPR and bombesin peptides, we summarize the properties of prostate cancer specific radiolabeled bombesins. New bombesin tracers published in the last five years are reviewed and compared according to their novelties in biomolecules, radionuclides, labeling methods, bifunctional chelators and linkers. Hot topics such as multimerization, application of agonists and antagonists are highlighted in the review. Lastly, a few clinical trials of cancer nuclear imaging with radiolabeled bombesin have been discussed. PMID:23431995

  1. External sense receptors in microdrile oligochaetes (Annelida, Clitellata) as revealed by scanning electron microscopy: Typology and patterns of distribution in the main taxonomic groups.

    PubMed

    Caramelo, Carlos; Martínez-Ansemil, Enrique

    2010-12-01

    This work summarizes the observations on 30 species of microdriles belonging to the families Naididae (Rhyacodrilinae, Pristininae, Naidinae, Phallodrilinae, and Tubificinae), Phreodrilidae, Lumbriculidae, and Enchytraeidae using scanning electron microscopy. The lumbricid Eiseniella tetraedra, a megadrile species common in typical microdrile habitats, was used for comparison. Microdriles display external ciliate sense structures along the entire body; even at the clitellum and in budding and regeneration zones. According to the shape of the cilia, these sense structures can be divided into receptors of blunt cilia, receptors of sharp cilia, and composed receptors. Sense receptors can be morphologically unconspicuous or clearly defined on sensory buds or papillae. All microdriles studied have receptors of blunt cilia. Enchytraeids have characteristic receptors of short cilia. Pristina (Pristininae), Chaetogaster, Ophidonais, and Stylaria (Naidinae) have receptors of long blunt cilia. Composed receptors were found only in some microdriles and E. tetraedra. Receptors of sharp cilia have been found in most microdriles. Enchytraeids might be the only exception, but sharp cilia are probably present in the amphibiotic Cognettia sphagnetorum. Sensory cells with long sharp cilia might play a rheoreceptor role, and their presence in E. tetraedra and C. sphagnetorum would imply the reappearing of an ancient character that was probably lost with the transit from aquatic to terrestrial habitats. Some lumbriculids have ciliated fields. Anatomically, these structures appear as intermediate between the typical isolate sensory structures of microdriles and the sensillae of the hirudineans. The general pattern in microdriles is that uniciliate receptors and multiciliate receptors are separated, which supports the presumed aquatic origin of the clitellates. PMID:20886570

  2. Deep mutational scanning of an antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor using mammalian cell display and massively parallel pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Charles M.; Juan, Veronica; Akamatsu, Yoshiko; DuBridge, Robert B.; Doan, Minhtam; Ivanov, Alexander V.; Ma, Zhiyuan; Polakoff, Dixie; Razo, Jennifer; Wilson, Keith; Powers, David B.

    2013-01-01

    We developed a method for deep mutational scanning of antibody complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) that can determine in parallel the effect of every possible single amino acid CDR substitution on antigen binding. The method uses libraries of full length IgGs containing more than 1000 CDR point mutations displayed on mammalian cells, sorted by flow cytometry into subpopulations based on antigen affinity and analyzed by massively parallel pyrosequencing. Higher, lower and neutral affinity mutations are identified by their enrichment or depletion in the FACS subpopulations. We applied this method to a humanized version of the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody cetuximab, generated a near comprehensive data set for 1060 point mutations that recapitulates previously determined structural and mutational data for these CDRs and identified 67 point mutations that increase affinity. The large-scale, comprehensive sequence-function data sets generated by this method should have broad utility for engineering properties such as antibody affinity and specificity and may advance theoretical understanding of antibody-antigen recognition. PMID:23765106

  3. Vitamin D Receptor Gene FokI Polymorphism Contributes to Increasing the Risk of Tuberculosis: An Update Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liling; Liu, Cunxu; Liao, Guangfu; Yang, Xiaobing; Tang, Xiuwen; Chen, Jingjie

    2015-12-01

    The association between vitamin D receptor (VDR) FokI polymorphism and tuberculosis (TB) risk remains a matter of debate. Potential selection bias exists in most studies using HIV-positive TB patients.An update meta-analysis was carried out to derive a more reliable assessment of the association between FokI polymorphisms and TB risk, especially in HIV-negative TB patients. All major databases from inception to June 2015 were searched for all publications that studied the association between FokI polymorphism and TB risk. The odds ratios (ORs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated according to the frequencies of genotypes.In total, 32 studies with 4894 cases and 5319 controls were included in this meta-analysis. In the overall analysis, the estimated OR was 1.34 (95% CI=1.091-1.646, P = 0.005) in the best genetic model (recessive model, ff vs fF+FF) with moderate heterogeneity (I = 32.2%, P = 0.043). In the subgroup analysis stratified by HIV status, significant associations were found only in the HIV-negative TB group (OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.180-2.077, P = 0.002; I = 29.5%, and P = 0.141 for heterogeneity). In the subgroup analysis stratified by ethnicity, significant associations were found in the Asian group (OR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.205-2.261, P = 0.002; I = 43.9%, and P = 0.024 for heterogeneity), but not in the Caucasian group (OR = 1.09, 95% CI = 0.762-1.547, P = 0.649; I = 0.0%, and P = 0.740 for heterogeneity) and African group (OR = 0.99, 95% CI = 0.726-1.341, P = 0.934; I = 43.9%, and P = 0.024 for heterogeneity).This meta-analysis confirms that VDR FokI polymorphism contributes to the risk of TB, especially in HIV-negative TB patients and in the Asian group. Further studies are required to clarify the role of the FokI polymorphism in HIV-positive TB and in other ethnic groups. PMID:26705207

  4. 'Reverse discordance' between 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT and 177Lu-DOTA-TATE posttherapy scan: the plausible explanations and its implications for high-dose therapy with radiolabeled somatostatin receptor analogs.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sandip; Abhyankar, Amit; Kand, Purushottam; Kumar, Rakesh; Asopa, Ramesh; Rajan, Mysore Govinda Ramakrishna; Nayak, Uday; Shimpi, Hemant; Das, Tapas; Venkatesh, Meera; Chakrabarty, Sudipta; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2011-07-01

    In this technical note, an unusual discordance between diagnostic and posttherapeutic scan resulting from the use of different somatostatin receptor ligands in two settings is described. Such observation, we believe, is multifactorial, but most importantly arises due to different receptor affinity profile of the ligands and different somatostatin receptor subtype expression in different tumors. It is important for the treating physician to be aware of this phenomenon that would aid in improving our understanding of complex ligand-receptor interactions in various somatostatin receptor-positive tumors with its possible implications for therapeutic decision making with radiolabeled somatostatin receptor analogues. PMID:21654355

  5. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXXIII: classification of prostanoid receptors, updating 15 years of progress.

    PubMed

    Woodward, D F; Jones, R L; Narumiya, S

    2011-09-01

    It is now more than 15 years since the molecular structures of the major prostanoid receptors were elucidated. Since then, substantial progress has been achieved with respect to distribution and function, signal transduction mechanisms, and the design of agonists and antagonists (http://www.iuphar-db.org/DATABASE/FamilyIntroductionForward?familyId=58). This review systematically details these advances. More recent developments in prostanoid receptor research are included. The DP(2) receptor, also termed CRTH2, has little structural resemblance to DP(1) and other receptors described in the original prostanoid receptor classification. DP(2) receptors are more closely related to chemoattractant receptors. Prostanoid receptors have also been found to heterodimerize with other prostanoid receptor subtypes and nonprostanoids. This may extend signal transduction pathways and create new ligand recognition sites: prostacyclin/thromboxane A(2) heterodimeric receptors for 8-epi-prostaglandin E(2), wild-type/alternative (alt4) heterodimers for the prostaglandin FP receptor for bimatoprost and the prostamides. It is anticipated that the 15 years of research progress described herein will lead to novel therapeutic entities. PMID:21752876

  6. Dual-color dual-focus line-scanning FCS for quantitative analysis of receptor-ligand interactions in living specimens

    PubMed Central

    Dörlich, René M.; Chen, Qing; Niklas Hedde, Per; Schuster, Vittoria; Hippler, Marc; Wesslowski, Janine; Davidson, Gary; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Cellular communication in multi-cellular organisms is mediated to a large extent by a multitude of cell-surface receptors that bind specific ligands. An in-depth understanding of cell signaling networks requires quantitative information on ligand-receptor interactions within living systems. In principle, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) based methods can provide such data, but live-cell applications have proven extremely challenging. Here, we have developed an integrated dual-color dual-focus line-scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (2c2f lsFCS) technique that greatly facilitates live-cell and tissue experiments. Absolute ligand and receptor concentrations and their diffusion coefficients within the cell membrane can be quantified without the need to perform additional calibration experiments. We also determine the concentration of ligands diffusing in the medium outside the cell within the same experiment by using a raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) based analysis. We have applied this robust technique to study the interactions of two Wnt antagonists, Dickkopf1 and Dickkopf2 (Dkk1/2), to their cognate receptor, low-density-lipoprotein-receptor related protein 6 (LRP6), in the plasma membrane of living HEK293T cells. We obtained significantly lower affinities than previously reported using in vitro studies, underscoring the need to measure such data on living cells or tissues. PMID:25951521

  7. A single photon emission computed tomography scan study of striatal dopamine D2 receptor binding with 123I-epidepride in patients with schizophrenia and controls.

    PubMed

    Tibbo, P; Silverstone, P H; McEwan, A J; Scott, J; Joshua, A; Golberg, K

    1997-01-01

    The usefulness of 123I-epidepride as a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan D2 receptor ligand was examined in vivo in 13 medicated patients with schizophrenia and age- and sex-matched normal controls. To establish the effect of endogenous dopamine on 123I-epidepride binding, 4 of the 13 controls also received 20 mg D-amphetamine. The results showed that 123I-epidepride had high specific binding to the striatum in both patients with schizophrenia and normal controls. There was a trend for the total striatal binding of medicated patients with schizophrenia, as measured by total basal ganglia: frontal cortex (TBG:FC) ratios, to be less than the binding of controls (P = 0.053). This trend confirms previous work showing that antipsychotic medication decreases the number of D2 receptors available for binding to the radioligand. Interestingly, there was also a significant relationship between 123I-epidepride binding ratios and global functioning scales (Global Assessment of Functioning scale [GAF]) for schizophrenia (r = 0.56, P = 0.045), although there was no such relationship with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). In addition, our results showed that amphetamine-induced dopamine release did not alter 123I-epidepride binding, confirming the high specific binding of 123I-epidepride to the D2 receptor. We conclude that 123I-epidepride appears to be a very useful SPECT ligand for imaging the D2 receptor. PMID:9002391

  8. PET-Scan Shows Peripherally Increased Neurokinin 1 Receptor Availability in Chronic Tennis Elbow: Visualizing Neurogenic Inflammation?

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Magnus; Svärdsudd, Kurt; Appel, Lieuwe; Engler, Henry; Aarnio, Mikko; Gordh, Torsten; Långström, Bengt; Sörensen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    In response to pain, neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor availability is altered in the central nervous system. The NK1 receptor and its primary agonist, substance P, also play a crucial role in peripheral tissue in response to pain, as part of neurogenic inflammation. However, little is known about alterations in NK1 receptor availability in peripheral tissue in chronic pain conditions and very few studies have been performed on human beings. Ten subjects with chronic tennis elbow were therefore examined by positron emission tomography (PET) with the NK1 specific radioligand [11C]GR205171 before and after treatment with graded exercise. The radioligand signal intensity was higher in the affected arm as compared with the unaffected arm, measured as differences between the arms in volume of voxels and signal intensity of this volume above a reference threshold set as 2.5 SD above mean signal intensity of the unaffected arm before treatment. In the eight subjects examined after treatment, pain ratings decreased in all subjects but signal intensity decreased in five and increased in three. In conclusion, NK1 receptors may be activated, or up-regulated in the peripheral, painful tissue of a chronic pain condition. This up-regulation does, however, have moderate correlation to pain ratings. The increased NK1 receptor availability is interpreted as part of ongoing neurogenic inflammation and may have correlation to the pathogenesis of chronic tennis elbow. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00888225 http://clinicaltrials.gov/ PMID:24155873

  9. Construction of a multicolor GeneScan analytical system to detect clonal rearrangements of immunoglobulin and T cell receptor genes in canine lymphoid tumors.

    PubMed

    Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Sato, Masahiko; Nakashima, Ko; Hiyoshi, Saaya; Fujiwara-Igarashi, Aki; Maeda, Shingo; Nakamura, Kenji; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Fujino, Yasuhito; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2015-05-15

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification to detect immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) and T cell receptor γ-chain (TCRγ) gene rearrangements has recently become widely used as part of the diagnostic strategy for lymphoid tumors in dogs. In this study, we constructed a multicolor GeneScan analytical system to improve the sensitivity and resolution of the clonality analysis of antigen receptor gene rearrangements in dogs. We used 7 reactions per sample, with 2 PCR conditions, to amplify IgH/TCRγ and control genes. By using multicolor-labeled primers, these 7 PCR products could be combined into 3 tubes before capillary electrophoresis. Clonal rearrangement of the IgH/TCRγ genes was detected in 93.3% of dogs with multicentric lymphoma and 84.6% of dogs with gastrointestinal lymphoma. Detection sensitivity of the clonally expanded cells in the background of normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells was 1-10%. The multicolor GeneScan analytical system developed here may prove to be helpful for the diagnosis of lymphoid tumors in dogs. PMID:25840823

  10. Versatility or Promiscuity: The Estrogen Receptors, Control of Ligand Selectivity and an Update on Subtype Selective Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Hui Wen; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2014-01-01

    The estrogen receptors (ERs) are a group of versatile receptors. They regulate an enormity of processes starting in early life and continuing through sexual reproduction, development, and end of life. This review provides a background and structural perspective for the ERs as part of the nuclear receptor superfamily and discusses the ER versatility and promiscuity. The wide repertoire of ER actions is mediated mostly through ligand-activated transcription factors and many DNA response elements in most tissues and organs. Their versatility, however, comes with the drawback of promiscuous interactions with structurally diverse exogenous chemicals with potential for a wide range of adverse health outcomes. Even when interacting with endogenous hormones, ER actions can have adverse effects in disease progression. Finally, how nature controls ER specificity and how the subtle differences in receptor subtypes are exploited in pharmaceutical design to achieve binding specificity and subtype selectivity for desired biological response are discussed. The intent of this review is to complement the large body of literature with emphasis on most recent developments in selective ER ligands. PMID:25162709

  11. An Update of Microsomal Prostaglandin E Synthase-1 and PGE2 Receptors in Cardiovascular Health and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), especially cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective inhibitors, are among the most widely used drugs to treat pain and inflammation. However, clinical trials have revealed that these inhibitors predisposed patients to a significantly increased cardiovascular risk, consisting of thrombosis, hypertension, myocardial infarction, heart failure, and sudden cardiac death. Thus, microsomal prostaglandin E (PGE) synthase-1 (mPGES-1), the key terminal enzyme involved in the synthesis of inflammatory prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and the four PGE2 receptors (EP1–4) have gained much attention as alternative targets for the development of novel analgesics. The cardiovascular consequences of targeting mPGES-1 and the PGE2 receptors are substantially studied. Inhibition of mPGES-1 has displayed a relatively innocuous or preferable cardiovascular profile. The modulation of the four EP receptors in cardiovascular system is diversely reported as well. In this review, we highlight the most recent advances from our and other studies on the regulation of PGE2, particularly mPGES-1 and the four PGE2 receptors, in cardiovascular function, with a particular emphasis on blood pressure regulation, atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and myocardial infarction. This might lead to new avenues to improve cardiovascular disease management strategies and to seek optimized anti-inflammatory therapeutic options. PMID:27594972

  12. An Update of Microsomal Prostaglandin E Synthase-1 and PGE2 Receptors in Cardiovascular Health and Diseases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guangrui; Chen, Lihong

    2016-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), especially cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective inhibitors, are among the most widely used drugs to treat pain and inflammation. However, clinical trials have revealed that these inhibitors predisposed patients to a significantly increased cardiovascular risk, consisting of thrombosis, hypertension, myocardial infarction, heart failure, and sudden cardiac death. Thus, microsomal prostaglandin E (PGE) synthase-1 (mPGES-1), the key terminal enzyme involved in the synthesis of inflammatory prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and the four PGE2 receptors (EP1-4) have gained much attention as alternative targets for the development of novel analgesics. The cardiovascular consequences of targeting mPGES-1 and the PGE2 receptors are substantially studied. Inhibition of mPGES-1 has displayed a relatively innocuous or preferable cardiovascular profile. The modulation of the four EP receptors in cardiovascular system is diversely reported as well. In this review, we highlight the most recent advances from our and other studies on the regulation of PGE2, particularly mPGES-1 and the four PGE2 receptors, in cardiovascular function, with a particular emphasis on blood pressure regulation, atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and myocardial infarction. This might lead to new avenues to improve cardiovascular disease management strategies and to seek optimized anti-inflammatory therapeutic options. PMID:27594972

  13. Scanning, Scanning, Everywhere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekhaml, Leticia; Myers, Brenda

    1997-01-01

    Discusses uses of scanning (process of copying or converting text, images, and objects into information that the computer can recognize and manipulate) in schools and notes possible desktop publishing projects. Describes popular scanners and ways to edit a scanned image. A sidebar gives costs and telephone numbers for nine scanners. (AEF)

  14. A genome-wide "pleiotropy scan" does not identify new susceptibility loci for estrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Campa, Daniele; Barrdahl, Myrto; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Severi, Gianluca; Diver, W Ryan; Siddiq, Afshan; Chanock, Stephen; Hoover, Robert N; Ziegler, Regina G; Berg, Christine D; Buys, Saundra S; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Le Marchand, Loïc; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Lindström, Sara; Hunter, David J; Hankinson, Susan E; Willett, Walter C; Kraft, Peter; Cox, David G; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Tjønneland, Anne; Dossus, Laure; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Panico, Salvatore; van Gils, Carla H; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Barricarte, Aurelio; Sund, Malin; Gaudet, Mia M; Giles, Graham; Southey, Melissa; Baglietto, Laura; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Kaaks, Rudolf; Canzian, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 15-30% of all breast cancer tumors are estrogen receptor negative (ER-). Compared with ER-positive (ER+) disease they have an earlier age at onset and worse prognosis. Despite the vast number of risk variants identified for numerous cancer types, only seven loci have been unambiguously identified for ER-negative breast cancer. With the aim of identifying new susceptibility SNPs for this disease we performed a pleiotropic genome-wide association study (GWAS). We selected 3079 SNPs associated with a human complex trait or disease at genome-wide significance level (P<5 × 10(-8)) to perform a secondary analysis of an ER-negative GWAS from the National Cancer Institute's Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3), including 1998 cases and 2305 controls from prospective studies. We then tested the top ten associations (i.e. with the lowest P-values) using three additional populations with a total sample size of 3509 ER+ cases, 2543 ER- cases and 7031 healthy controls. None of the 3079 selected variants in the BPC3 ER-GWAS were significant at the adjusted threshold. 186 variants were associated with ER- breast cancer risk at a conventional threshold of P<0.05, with P-values ranging from 0.049 to 2.3 × 10(-4). None of the variants reached statistical significance in the replication phase. In conclusion, this study did not identify any novel susceptibility loci for ER-breast cancer using a "pleiotropic approach". PMID:24523857

  15. Bombesin receptors and transplanted stem cells in rat brain: High-resolution scan with 99mTc BN1.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopinaro, F.; Paschali, E.; Di Santo, G.; Antonellis, T.; Massari, R.; Trotta, C.; Gourni, H.; Bouziotis, P.; David, V.; Soluri, A.; Varvarigou, A. D.

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this work is to detect the presence of transplanted stem cells (TSC) in rat brain with high-resolution (HR) scintigraphy and labelled bombesin (BN). BN is a morphogen for Central Nervous System (CNS) as well as for other organs: CNS-oriented TSC over-express BN Receptors (BNR). BN is also a neurotransmitter and modulates several functions of CNS. 99mTc labelled BN-like peptide scan of CNS is the ideal method to detect growing TSC once knowing normal distribution of BNRs in CNS. HR Planar and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) images of rat brain were performed with new HR detectors (Li-tech, Italy). Pertechnetate, 99mTc HMPAO and the new 99mTc BN1.1 (patented) were i.v. administered in five rats. HR SPECT of 99mTc BN1.1 detected olfactory tract, fronto-lateral cortex, cerebellum, basal ganglia and amygdale. Results of SPECT were confirmed by bio-distribution study performed after autopsy of three of the five rats. The remaining two rats underwent cerebral lesions followed by transplant of TSC. Three months later, HR scintigraphy was repeated and showed images completely different from previous basal study, with hot spot of 99mTc BN1.1 corresponding to the site of TSC transplant. Immuno-histochemistry confirmed the presence of viable TSC. Not only 99mTc BN1.1 HR scan showed viability of transplanted TSC but also the "background brain" was the still now unknown map of BNR in mammalian brain.

  16. Lack of association between vitamin D receptor gene BsmI polymorphism and breast cancer risk: an updated meta-analysis involving 23,020 subjects.

    PubMed

    Du, Yingying; Hu, Lixia; Kong, Fanliang; Pan, Yueyin

    2014-03-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a crucial mediator for the cellular effects of vitamin D. A great number of studies regarding the association between BsmI polymorphism in the VDR gene and breast cancer have been published. However, the results have been contradicting. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to re-examine the controversy. Published literatures from PubMed, Embase, and Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM) were searched (updated to July 10, 2013). The principal outcome measure was the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for breast cancer risk associated with VDR BsmI polymorphism. With all studies involved, the meta-analysis results suggest no statistically significant association between VDR BsmI polymorphism and breast cancer risk (B vs. b, OR = 0.922, 95% CI = 0.836-1.018, P = 0.108, I (2)  = 80.0%; BB vs. bb, OR = 0.843, 95% CI = 0.697-1.021, P = 1.75, I (2)  = 75.5%; Bb vs. bb, OR = 0.930, 95% CI = 0.814-1.063, P = 0.31, I (2)  = 73.1%; BB+Bb vs. bb, OR = 0.906, 95% CI = 0.787-1.043, P = 1.37, I (2)  = 78.7%; BB vs. bb+Bb, OR = 0.899, 95% CI = 0.786-1.028, P = 1.56, I (2)  = 61.0%). The results were not changed when studies were stratified by ethnicity or source of controls. This meta-analysis suggested that there were no associations between VDR BsmI polymorphism and breast cancer. PMID:24248540

  17. In vivo molecular imaging of somatostatin receptors in pancreatic islet cells and neuroendocrine tumors by miniaturized confocal laser-scanning fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fottner, C; Mettler, E; Goetz, M; Schirrmacher, E; Anlauf, M; Strand, D; Schirrmacher, R; Klöppel, G; Delaney, P; Schreckenberger, M; Galle, P R; Neurath, M F; Kiesslich, R; Weber, M M

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate real time in vivo molecular imaging of somatostatin receptors (sstrs) using a handheld miniaturized confocal laser scan microscope (CLM) in conjunction with fluorescein-labeled octreotate (OcF) in healthy mice and murine models of neuroendocrine tumors. For CLM a small rigid probe (diameter 7 mm) with an integrated single line laser (488 nm) was used (optical slice thickness 7 mum; lateral resolution 0.7 mum). OcF was synthesized via Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis and purified by HPLC showing high-affinity binding to the sstr2 (IC(50) 6.2 nmol). For in vitro evaluation, rat and human pancreatic cancer cells were used and characterized with respect to its sstr subtype expression and functional properties. For in vivo confocal imaging, healthy mouse pancreatic islet and renal tubular cells as well as immunoincompetent nude mice harboring sstr-expressing tumors were evaluated. Incubation of sstr-positive cells with OcF showed a specific time- and dose-dependent staining of sstr-positive cells. CLM showed rapid internalization and homogenous cytoplasmatic distribution. After systemic application to mice (n = 8), specific time-dependent internalization and cytoplasmatic distribution into pancreatic islet cells and tubular cells of the renal cortex was recorded. After injection in tumor-harboring nude mice (n = 8), sstr-positive cells selectively displayed a cell surface and cytoplasmatic staining. CLM-targeted biopsies detected sstr-positive tumor cells with a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 100% as correlated with ex vivo immunohistochemistry. CLM with OcF permits real-time molecular, functional, and morphological imaging of sstr-expressing cell structures, allowing the specific visualization of pancreatic islet cells and neuroendocrine tumors in vivo. PMID:20233796

  18. WBC scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the body. It is a type of nuclear scan . How the Test is Performed Blood will ... radiation. Due to the slight radiation exposure, most nuclear scans (including WBC scan) are not recommended for ...

  19. CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan; Computed axial tomography scan; Computed tomography scan ... Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, et al. eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ...

  20. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  1. PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    You may feel a sharp sting when the needle with the tracer is placed into your vein. A PET scan causes no pain. The table may be ... The amount of radiation used in a PET scan is about the same amount as used in most CT scans. These scans use ...

  2. CT Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  3. Gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    Liver gallium scan; Bony gallium scan ... You will get a radioactive material called gallium injected into your vein. The gallium travels through the bloodstream and collects in the bones and certain organs. Your health care provider will ...

  4. Bone scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... scan is an imaging test used to diagnose bone diseases and find out how severe they are. How ... a 3-phase bone scan. To evaluate metastatic bone disease, images are taken only after the 3- to ...

  5. Thyroid scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read More Anaplastic thyroid cancer Cancer Goiter - simple Hyperthyroidism Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) II PET scan Skin ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Hyperthyroidism Hypothyroidism Nuclear Scans Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Diseases Thyroid ...

  6. Bone scan

    MedlinePlus

    A bone scan is an imaging test used to diagnose bone diseases and find out how severe they are. ... A bone scan involves injecting a very small amount of radioactive material (radiotracer) into a vein. The substance travels through ...

  7. Bone scanning.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, L D; Bennett, L R

    1975-03-01

    Scanning is based on the uptake of a nuclide by the crystal lattice of bone and is related to bone blood flow. Cancer cells do not take up the tracer. Normally, the scan visualizes the highly vascular bones. Scans are useful and are indicated in metastatic bone disease, primary bone tumors, hematologic malignancies and some non-neoplastic diseases. The scan is more sensitive than x-ray in the detection of malignant diseases of the skeleton. PMID:1054210

  8. The Witch Weed Is Able To Detect a Wide Range of Chemicals from Plants through Its Sensitive and Specific Receptors: The Strigolactone Story Updated.

    PubMed

    Molinaro, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Striga is a very noxious weed because of the molecular versatility of its protein receptors to strigolactone and its derivatives. Striga in fact parasitizes host plants and this triggers its seeds production. At molecular level, this is attained by strigolactone detection by a set of receptors with broad specificity and high sensitivity. PMID:26581190

  9. Binding interaction of the heregulinbeta egf domain with ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptors assessed by alanine scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Jones, J T; Ballinger, M D; Pisacane, P I; Lofgren, J A; Fitzpatrick, V D; Fairbrother, W J; Wells, J A; Sliwkowski, M X

    1998-05-01

    Individual residues of the heregulinbeta (HRG) egf domain were mutated to alanine and displayed monovalently on phagemid particles as gene III fusion proteins. Wild type HRGbeta egf domain displayed on phage was properly folded as evidenced by its ability to bind ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptor-IgG fusion proteins with affinities close to those measured for bacterially produced HRGbeta egf domain. Binding to ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptors was affected by mutation of residues throughout the egf domain; including the NH2 terminus (His2 and Leu3), the two beta-turns (Val15-Gly18 and Gly42-Gln46), and some discontinuous residues (including Leu3, Val4, Phe13, Val23, and Leu33) that form a patch on the major beta-sheet and the COOH-terminal region (Tyr48 and Met50-Phe53). Binding affinity was least changed by mutations throughout the Omega-loop and the second strand of the major beta-sheet. More mutants had greater affinity loss for ErbB3 compared with ErbB4 implying that it has more stringent binding requirements. Many residues important for HRG binding to its receptors correspond to critical residues for epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor alpha binding to the EGF receptor. Specificity may be determined in part by bulky groups that prevent binding to the unwanted receptor. All of the mutants tested were able to induce phosphorylation and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation through ErbB4 receptors and were able to modulate a transphosphorylation signal from ErbB3 to ErbB2 in MCF7 cells. An understanding of binding similarities and differences among the EGF family of ligands may facilitate the development of egf-like analogs with broad or narrow specificity. PMID:9565587

  10. Tree Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Alan R.; Maxwell, Taylor; Posada, David; Stengård, Jari H.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sing, Charles F.

    2005-01-01

    We use evolutionary trees of haplotypes to study phenotypic associations by exhaustively examining all possible biallelic partitions of the tree, a technique we call tree scanning. If the first scan detects significant associations, additional rounds of tree scanning are used to partition the tree into three or more allelic classes. Two worked examples are presented. The first is a reanalysis of associations between haplotypes at the Alcohol Dehydrogenase locus in Drosophila melanogaster that was previously analyzed using a nested clade analysis, a more complicated technique for using haplotype trees to detect phenotypic associations. Tree scanning and the nested clade analysis yield the same inferences when permutation testing is used with both approaches. The second example is an analysis of associations between variation in various lipid traits and genetic variation at the Apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene in three human populations. Tree scanning successfully identified phenotypic associations expected from previous analyses. Tree scanning for the most part detected more associations and provided a better biological interpretative framework than single SNP analyses. We also show how prior information can be incorporated into the tree scan by starting with the traditional three electrophoretic alleles at APOE. Tree scanning detected genetically determined phenotypic heterogeneity within all three electrophoretic allelic classes. Overall, tree scanning is a simple, powerful, and flexible method for using haplotype trees to detect phenotype/genotype associations at candidate loci. PMID:15371364

  11. Email Updates

    MedlinePlus

    ... unsubscribe. Prevent MedlinePlus emails from being marked as "spam" or "junk" To ensure that MedlinePlus email updates ... com to your email address book, adjust your spam settings, or follow the instructions from your email ...

  12. Comparative Functional Alanine Positional Scanning of the α-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone and NDP-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Demonstrates Differential Structure-Activity Relationships at the Mouse Melanocortin Receptors.

    PubMed

    Todorovic, Aleksandar; Ericson, Mark D; Palusak, Ryan D; Sorensen, Nicholas B; Wood, Michael S; Xiang, Zhimin; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2016-07-20

    The melanocortin system has been implicated in the regulation of various physiological functions including melanogenesis, steroidogenesis, energy homeostasis, and feeding behavior. Five melanocortin receptors have been identified to date and belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Post-translational modification of the proopiomelanocortin (POMC) prohormone leads to the biosynthesis of the endogenous melanocortin agonists, including α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), β-MSH, γ-MSH, and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). All the melanocortin agonists derived from the POMC prohormone contain a His-Phe-Arg-Trp tetrapeptide sequence that has been implicated in eliciting the pharmacological responses at the melanocortin receptors. Herein, an alanine (Ala) positional scan is reported for the endogenous α-MSH ligand and the synthetic, more potent, NDP-MSH peptide (Ac-Ser(1)-Tyr(2)-Ser(3)-Nle(4)-Glu(5)-His(6)-DPhe(7)-Arg(8)-Trp(9)-Gly(10)-Lys(11)-Pro(12)-Val(13)-NH2) at the cloned mouse melanocortin receptors to test the assumption that the structure-activity relationships of one ligand would apply to the other. Several residues outside of the postulated pharmacophore altered potency at the melanocortin receptors, most notably the 1560-, 37-, and 15-fold potency loss when the Glu(5) position of α-MSH was substituted with Ala at the mMC1R, mMC3R, and mMC4R, respectively. Importantly, the altered potencies due to Ala substitutions in α-MSH did not necessarily correlate with equivalent Ala substitutions in NDP-MSH, indicating that structural modifications and corresponding biological activities in one of these melanocortin ligands may not be predictive for the other agonist. PMID:27135265

  13. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... functions inside your body. They use a special camera that detects radioactivity. Before the test, you receive ... you lie still on a table while the camera makes images. Most scans take 20 to 45 ...

  14. MRI Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from torn ...

  15. Update on the Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2-Angiotensin (1–7)-Mas Receptor Axis: Fetal Programing, Sex Differences, and Intracellular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Mark C.; Marshall, Allyson C.; Alzayadneh, Ebaa M.; Shaltout, Hossam A.; Diz, Debra I.

    2013-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) constitutes an important hormonal system in the physiological regulation of blood pressure. Indeed, dysregulation of the RAS may lead to the development of cardiovascular pathologies including kidney injury. Moreover, the blockade of this system by the inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) or antagonism of the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) constitutes an effective therapeutic regimen. It is now apparent with the identification of multiple components of the RAS that the system is comprised of different angiotensin peptides with diverse biological actions mediated by distinct receptor subtypes. The classic RAS can be defined as the ACE-Ang II-AT1R axis that promotes vasoconstriction, sodium retention, and other mechanisms to maintain blood pressure, as well as increased oxidative stress, fibrosis, cellular growth, and inflammation in pathological conditions. In contrast, the non-classical RAS composed of the ACE2-Ang-(1–7)-Mas receptor axis generally opposes the actions of a stimulated Ang II-AT1R axis through an increase in nitric oxide and prostaglandins and mediates vasodilation, natriuresis, diuresis, and oxidative stress. Thus, a reduced tone of the Ang-(1–7) system may contribute to these pathologies as well. Moreover, the non-classical RAS components may contribute to the effects of therapeutic blockade of the classical system to reduce blood pressure and attenuate various indices of renal injury. The review considers recent studies on the ACE2-Ang-(1–7)-Mas receptor axis regarding the precursor for Ang-(1–7), the intracellular expression and sex differences of this system, as well as an emerging role of the Ang1-(1–7) pathway in fetal programing events and cardiovascular dysfunction. PMID:24409169

  16. Update '98.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mock, Karen R.

    1998-01-01

    Updates cases and issues previously discussed in this regular column on human rights in Canada, including racism and anti-Semitism, laws on hate crimes, hate sites on the World Wide Web, the use of the "free speech" defense by hate groups, and legal challenges to antiracist groups by individuals criticized by them. (DSK)

  17. Plus updates.

    PubMed

    Parkhouse, Richard C

    2008-01-01

    Inevitably, with an innovative and fast growing technique, improvements in hardware and refinements are ongoing. So it is with Plus. Therefore there are some relevant updates, subsequent to my article "Current Products and Practice: Tip-Edge Plus" (reprinted in the last issue of International Journalof Orthodontics by kind permission of the British Journal of Orthodontics). PMID:19263632

  18. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors for epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancers: an update for recent advances in therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chung, Clement

    2016-06-01

    The presence of activating gene mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor of non-small cell lung cancer patients is predictive (improved progression-free survival and improved response rate) when treated with small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib. The two most common mutations that account for greater than 85% of all EGFR gene mutations are in-frame deletions in exon 19 (LREA deletions) and substitution in exon 21 (L858R). Exon 18 mutations occur much less frequently at about 4% of all EGFR gene mutations. Together, exon 19 deletion and exon 21 L858R gene substitution are present in about 10% of Caucasian patients and 20-40% of Asian patients with non-small cell lung cancer. T790M gene mutation at exon 20 is associated with acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Early studies showed that activating EGFR gene mutations are most common in patients with adenocarcinoma histology, women, never smokers and those of Asian ethnicity. A recent multi-center phase III trial suggested that frontline epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy with afatinib is associated with improved progression-free survival compared to chemotherapy regardless of race. Moreover, guidelines now suggest EGFR gene mutation testing should be conducted in all patients with lung adenocarcinoma or mixed lung cancers with an adenocarcinoma component, regardless of characteristics such as smoking status, gender or race. The success of targeted therapies in non-small cell lung cancer patients has changed the treatment paradigm in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. However, despite a durable response of greater than a year, resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors inevitably occurs. This mini-review describes the clinically relevant EGFR gene mutations and the efficacy/toxicity of small molecule epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase

  19. Infrared Scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    United Scanning Technologies, Inc.'s Infrared thermography is a relatively new noncontact, nondestructive inspection and testing tool which makes temperatures visible to the human eye. Infrared scanning devices produce images that show, by color or black and white shading differences, heat losses through damaged or inadequately insulated walls or roofs. The MISS Aeroscan services are designed to take the guesswork out of industrial roof maintenance and provide companies big savings by identifying the location of moisture damage from roof leaks, effectively targeting maintenance attention.

  20. Analysis by substituted cysteine scanning mutagenesis of the fourth transmembrane domain of the CXCR4 receptor in its inactive and active state.

    PubMed

    Boulais, Philip E; Escher, Emanuel; Leduc, Richard

    2013-02-15

    The chemokine SDF-1 (CXCL12) selectively binds to CXCR4, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. In this study, we used the substituted-cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) to identify specific residues of the fourth transmembrane domain (TM4) that contribute to the formation of the binding pocket of CXCR4 in its inactive and active state. We successively substituted each residue from E179((4.68)) to K154((4.43)) with cysteine and expressed the mutants in COS-7 cells. Mutant receptors were then alkylated with methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA), and binding inhibition was monitored using the CXCR4 antagonist FC131 [cyclo(-D-Tyr(1)-Arg(2)-Arg(3)-Nal(4)-Gly(5)-)], which displays anti-HIV activity. MTSEA treatment resulted in a significant reduction of FC131 binding to D171C((4.60)) and P170C((4.59)). To assess TM4 accessibility in an active state of CXCR4, TM4 cysteine mutants were transposed within the constitutively active mutant N119S((3.35)). MTSEA treatment of TM4 mutants N119S-S178C((4.67)), N119S-V177C((4.66)) and N119S-I173C((4.62)) resulted in a significant reduction in FC131 binding. Protection assays using FC131 prior to MTSEA treatment significantly reduced the alkylation of all MTSEA-sensitive mutants. The accessibility of the D171C((4.60)) and P170C((4.59)) residues suggests that they are oriented towards a water-accessible area of the binding pocket of CXCR4. S178C((4.67)), V177C((4.66)) and I173C((4.62)) showed binding inhibition only in an N119S((3.35)) background. Taken together our results suggest that TM4 and ECL2 undergo conformational changes during CXCR4 activation and also demonstrate how TM4 is an important feature for the binding of anti-HIV compounds. PMID:23219524

  1. Kinetics of T-cell receptor-dependent antigen recognition determined in vivo by multi-spectral normalized epifluorescence laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favicchio, Rosy; Zacharakis, Giannis; Oikonomaki, Katerina; Zacharopoulos, Athanasios; Mamalaki, Clio; Ripoll, Jorge

    2012-07-01

    Detection of multiple fluorophores in conditions of low signal represents a limiting factor for the application of in vivo optical imaging techniques in immunology where fluorescent labels report for different functional characteristics. A noninvasive in vivo Multi-Spectral Normalized Epifluorescence Laser scanning (M-SNELS) method was developed for the simultaneous and quantitative detection of multiple fluorophores in low signal to noise ratios and used to follow T-cell activation and clonal expansion. Colocalized DsRed- and GFP-labeled T cells were followed in tandem during the mounting of an immune response. Spectral unmixing was used to distinguish the overlapping fluorescent emissions representative of the two distinct cell populations and longitudinal data reported the discrete pattern of antigen-driven proliferation. Retrieved values were validated both in vitro and in vivo with flow cytometry and significant correlation between all methodologies was achieved. Noninvasive M-SNELS successfully quantified two colocalized fluorescent populations and provides a valid alternative imaging approach to traditional invasive methods for detecting T cell dynamics.

  2. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) rs1801282 C>G polymorphism is associated with cancer susceptibility in asians: an updated meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yafeng; Chen, Yu; Jiang, Heping; Tang, Weifeng; Kang, Mingqiang; Liu, Tianyun; Guo, Zengqing; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) is related to inflammation and plays an important role in the development of cancer. PPARG rs1801282 C>G polymorphism might influence the risk of cancer by regulating production of PPARG gene. Hence, a comprehensive meta-analysis was conducted to explore the association of PPARG rs1801282 C>G polymorphism with cancer susceptibility. An extensive search of PubMed and Embase databases for all relevant publications was carried out. A total of 38 publications with 16,844 cancer cases and 23,736 controls for PPARG rs1801282 C>G polymorphism were recruited in our study. Our results indicated that PPARG rs1801282 C>G variants were associated with an increased cancer risk in Asian populations and gastric cancer. In summary, the findings suggest that PPARG rs1801282 C>G polymorphism may play a crucial role in malignant transformation and the development of cancer. PMID:26550180

  3. Working memory updating latency reflects the cost of switching between maintenance and updating modes of operation.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Yoav; Oberauer, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Updating and maintenance of information are 2 conflicting demands on working memory (WM). We examined the time required to update WM (updating latency) as a function of the sequence of updated and not-updated items within a list. Participants held a list of items in WM and updated a variable subset of them in each trial. Four experiments that vary the number of to-be-updated and to-be-maintained items, as well as their positions in the list, are reported. The pattern of latencies was best explained by a model assuming forward scanning of the list, updating modified items, and maintaining nonmodified items. Switching between updating and maintenance incurred a response time cost, which increased with overall set-size. The formation of new item-position associations accounted for an additional response time component. The finding of an update-switch cost provides novel behavioral support for a class of physiologically inspired computational models, in which updating and maintenance require 2 different states of WM. PMID:24446752

  4. Rhabdomyolysis updated

    PubMed Central

    Efstratiadis, G; Voulgaridou, A; Nikiforou, D; Kyventidis, A; Kourkouni, E; Vergoulas, G

    2007-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis constitutes a common cause of acute renal failure and presents paramount interest. A large variety of causes with different pathogenetic mechanisms can involve skeletal muscles resulting in rhabdomyolysis with or without acute renal failure. Crush syndrome, one of the most common causes of rhabdomyolysis presents increased clinical interest, particularly in areas often involved by earthquakes, such as Greece and Turkey. Drug abusers are another sensitive group of young patients prone to rhabdomyolysis, which attracts the clinical interest of a variety of medical specialties. We herein review the evidence extracted from updated literature concerning the data related to pathogenetic mechanisms and pathophysiology as well as the management of this interesting syndrome. PMID:19582207

  5. [Pharmacovigilance update].

    PubMed

    Livio, F

    2013-01-01

    Main pharmacovigilance updates in 2012 are reviewed here. Dabigatran: elderly patients with renal failure are at higher risk of bleeding. Dual renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade comprising aliskiren is harmful. Incretins: low risk of acute pancreatitis. Interaction between fusidic acid and statins: many reports of rhabdomyolysis. Interactions between boceprevir/telaprevir and antiretroviral therapies: complex, but manageable. Citalopram, ondansetron: maximum recommended doses are reduced. Atomoxetine: significant increase in blood pressure and heart rate in a fraction of exposed patients. Agomelatine: elevated liver enzymes are common. Fingolimod: bradycardia and heart blocks after first dose - stronger safety recommendations regarding use in patients with heart conditions and strengthened cardiovascular monitoring. PMID:23367709

  6. [Pharmacovigilance update].

    PubMed

    Fogarasi Szabo, Nathalie; Diezi, Léonore; Delenclos, Laurie; Renard, Delphine; Chtioui, Haithem; Rothuizen, Laura E; Buclin, Thierry; Livio, Françoise

    2015-01-14

    The main pharmacovigilance updates in 2014 are reviewed. Ivabradine: increased risk of cardiovascular death and myocardial infarction in patients with symptomatic angina treated with high dosages. Clopidogrel: rare observations of acquired hemophilia. Orlistat: may reduce the absorption of HIV antiretrovirals. Ponatinib: increased risk of arteriopathy and thrombosis. Axitinib: significant risk of heart failure (class effect). Tocilizumab: possible causal relationship with the emergence or aggravation of psoriasis. Lithium: hypercalcemia and hyperparathyroidism commonly observed. Sildenalfil: suspected causal association with melanoma, so far not proven, Methylphenidate: rare observations of priapism. St John's wort (Hypericum): reduced effectiveness of hormonal contraceptives, including implants. PMID:25799668

  7. [Pharmacovigilance update].

    PubMed

    Dao, Kim; Chtioui, Haithem; Rothuizen, Laura E; Diezi, Léonore; Prod'hom, Sylvain; Winterfeld, Ursula; Buclin, Thierry; Livio, Françoise

    2016-01-13

    The main pharmacovigilance updates in 2015are reviewed. Sofosbuvir amiodarone interaction: risk of severe bradycardia. Dasabuvir clopidogrel interaction: increased dasabuvir concentrations and potential risk of QTprolongation. SGLT2 inhibitors: risks of diabetic acidocetosis and bone fracture. Dabigatran: therapeutic drug monitoring may improve benefit-risk ratio. Ibuprofen: at higher dosage, vascular risks are comparable to coxibs. Pregabaline, gabapentine: potential for abuse and addiction. Varenicline: potentiates alcohol's effects. Codeine: contra-indicated as cough medicine under the age of twelve. Valproate: strengthened warnings on the risks of valproate use in pregnancy. Dimethylfumarate: rare observations of progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy. Ustekinumab: rare observations of erythrodermia. PMID:26946710

  8. Impact of the polymorphism in vitamin D receptor gene BsmI and the risk of systemic lupus erythematosus: an updated meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weiping; Niu, Guodong; Lin, Yong; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lin, Ling

    2016-04-01

    The etiology of system lupus erythematosus (SLE) still remains unclear, and vitamin D is associated with immune response. Although a few studies are conducted to investigate the association between polymorphism in vitamin D receptor (VDR) genes and SLE risk, their results are conflicting. Following the guideline of PRISMA, we conducted a systematic search and meta-analysis of the BsmI polymorphism rs1544410 and the risk of SLE. The pooled odds ratios (OR) and its 95 % confidential interval (CI) were calculated by using Stata Version 10 with dominant and recessive model and allele analyses. Nine studies were included in our meta-analysis with a total of 1247 SLE cases and 1687 controls. No significant association was found in both models in the overall population. Only Bb + BB genotypes showed a significantly elevated SLE risk in Asian subgroup with an OR of 3.26 (95 % CI = 1.30-8.17) while no significance was observed in Caucasian population. Notably, B allele significantly increased the SLE risk among Asian population with an OR of 2.29 (95 % CI = 1.14-4.61). No positive findings were reported in Caucasian population and in the overall analysis. In Asian population, Bb + BB genotype and B allele can significantly increase the SLE risk. PMID:26712498

  9. Latrophilins updated.

    PubMed

    Meza-Aguilar, Diana G; Boucard, Antony A

    2014-12-01

    Latrophilins (LPHN) are part of a yet unexplored family of receptors comprising three isoforms, LPHN1-3, and belonging to a unique branch of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) named adhesion GPCR (aGPCR). LPHN are considered to be prototypical models for the study of aGPCR as they are one of the most evolutionary conserved members. Previously described as the target for a potent neurotoxin from the black widow spider venom, LPHN are now being studied under a whole new perspective. Indeed, recent advances have provided a better understanding of different aspects of this prototypical family of receptors: 1) elucidation of LPHN ectodomain organization by crystallography has unveiled a new functional domain with great repercussion on all the other members of the aGPCR family, 2) proteomic approaches have opened the gate to unsuspected functional characteristics of LPHN cellular role, and 3) genetic approaches have provided hints into the physiological functions of LPHN in specific systems and organisms. Moreover, genomic linkage studies screening human patients from diverse genetic backgrounds have involved LPHN gene defects in human disorders such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and cancer. In this review, we will provide a historical perspective addressing experimental research on these receptors while highlighting the new advances and discoveries concerning LPHN functions. As GPCR still represent the most studied targets for the development of pharmacological approaches aiming at alleviating human disorders, the relevance of studying LPHN retains a high pertinence to better understand these receptors for the treatment of human diseases. PMID:25429599

  10. RESRAD update

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; Cheng, J.J.; Zielen, A.J.; Jones, L.G.; LePoire, D.J.; Wang, Y.Y. ); Yuan, Y.C. ); Loureiro, C.O. . Escola de Engenharia); Wallo, A. III; Peterson, H. . Offic

    1993-01-01

    A microcomputer program called RESRAD, which implements a pathway analysis method for radiological risk assessment, was developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 1989. This program is used to derive allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil and to predict effective dose equivalents and excess cancer incidence risks incurred by an individual exposed to radioactive materials. Since its development, the RESRAD code has been adopted by DOE in Order 5400.5 for the derivation of soil cleanup criteria and dose calculations, and it has been used widely by DOE, other agencies, and their contractors. The original models used by ANL to develop RESRAD were initially developed as part of a DOE effort that began in the early 1980s and involved most of the national laboratories and DOE program offices. The RESRAD code is continuously improved and updated to incorporate comments from users and new features that ease the interaction with users and increase the code's capability and flexibility. The DOE Offices of Environmental Guidance and Environmental Restoration also provide periodic guidance regarding any significant changes to the code. The RESRAD update, Version 5.0, has substantial improvements in many aspects compared with the last version released in 1989.

  11. RESRAD update

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; Cheng, J.J.; Zielen, A.J.; Jones, L.G.; LePoire, D.J.; Wang, Y.Y.; Yuan, Y.C.; Loureiro, C.O.; Wallo, A. III; Peterson, H.; H Williams, W.A.

    1993-05-01

    A microcomputer program called RESRAD, which implements a pathway analysis method for radiological risk assessment, was developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 1989. This program is used to derive allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil and to predict effective dose equivalents and excess cancer incidence risks incurred by an individual exposed to radioactive materials. Since its development, the RESRAD code has been adopted by DOE in Order 5400.5 for the derivation of soil cleanup criteria and dose calculations, and it has been used widely by DOE, other agencies, and their contractors. The original models used by ANL to develop RESRAD were initially developed as part of a DOE effort that began in the early 1980s and involved most of the national laboratories and DOE program offices. The RESRAD code is continuously improved and updated to incorporate comments from users and new features that ease the interaction with users and increase the code`s capability and flexibility. The DOE Offices of Environmental Guidance and Environmental Restoration also provide periodic guidance regarding any significant changes to the code. The RESRAD update, Version 5.0, has substantial improvements in many aspects compared with the last version released in 1989.

  12. Heart CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - heart; Computed axial tomography scan - heart; Computed tomography scan - heart; Calcium scoring; Multi-detector CT scan - heart; Electron beam computed tomography - heart; Agaston score; Coronary calcium scan

  13. [Pharmacovigilance update].

    PubMed

    Diezi, Léonore; Renard, Delphine; Rothuizen, Laura E; Livio, Françoise

    2014-01-15

    The main pharmacovigilance updates in 2013 are reviewed. Nitrofurantoin: lower efficacy and an increased risk of adverse events when creatinine clearance is below 60 ml/min. Dabigatran: contraindicated in patients with mechanical heart valves. Azithromycin: QT prolongation and increased risk of death. Zolpidem: towards a lower dosage. Roflumilast: avoid in patients known or at risk for mood disorders. Retigabine: indication restricted to last-line use and new monitoring requirements after reports of pigment changes in retina and other tissues. Telaprevir and rituximab: severe mucocutaneous reactions. Fingolimod: rare cases of progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy. Tolvaptan: potential for hepatotoxicity. Nicotinic acid/laropiprant: suspension of marketing authorization as benefits no longer outweigh risks. PMID:24558915

  14. Exploration Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Delores Beasley, NASA Public Affairs, introduces the panel who consist of: Scott "Doc" Horowitz, Associate Administrator of Exploration Systems from NASA Headquarters; Jeff Henley, Constellation Program Manager from NASA Johnson Space Flight Center; and Steve Cook, Manager Exploration Launch Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Scott Horowitz presents a short video entitled, "Ares Launching the Future". He further explains how NASA personnel came up with the name of Ares and where the name Ares was derived. Jeff Henley, updates the Constellation program and Steve Cook presents two slide presentations detailing the Ares l crew launch vehicle and Ares 5 cargo launch vehicle. A short question and answer period from the news media follows.

  15. Activities update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Gerald A.

    1994-07-01

    The present report is an update on activities for the second year of funding. Research leading to a detailed characterization of antiproton annihilation in nuclei has resulted in a published analysis of fast deuteron production from carbon and uranium targets. This follows previously reported work and publications by our group on gamma-ray, neutral and charged pion, proton, and neutron production. The deuteron measurements are important to our SHIVA Star antiproton- catalyzed microfission experiment at the Phillips Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, in that they help constrain theoretical models of light nuclei production and subsequent energy deposition in the target. Work continues at SHIVA Star on working fluid formation and target compression for the microfission experiment. Excellent progress has been made, both theoretically and experimentally, on these important aspects of the experiment. The Penn State group, working in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory physicists, trapped and held up to 721,000 antiprotons per beam injection pulse from the LEAR accelerator during July, 1993. This was a crucial step to the ultimate goal of transferring large numbers of antiprotons to the Phillips Laboratory for the antiproton-catalyzed microfission experiment.

  16. Gallbladder radionuclide scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gallbladder scan; Biliary scan; Cholescintigraphy: HIDA; Hepatobiliary nuclear imaging scan ... test results. This test is combined with other imaging (such as CT or ultrasound). After the gallbladder ...

  17. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial ... or other growth (mass) Cerebral atrophy (loss of brain tissue) ... with the hearing nerve Stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA)

  18. Abscess scan - radioactive

    MedlinePlus

    Radioactive abscess scan; Abscess scan; Indium Scan; Indium-labelled white blood cell scan ... the white blood cells are tagged with a radioactive substance called indium. The cells are then injected ...

  19. Arm CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - arm; Computed axial tomography scan - arm; Computed tomography scan - arm; CT scan - arm ... Mosby; 2013:chap 57. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  20. Sinus CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - sinus; Computed axial tomography scan - sinus; Computed tomography scan - sinus; CT scan - sinus ... 2014:chap 67. Shaw AS, Dixon AK. Multidetector computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, eds. Grainger & Allison's ...

  1. Leg CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - leg; Computed axial tomography scan - leg; Computed tomography scan - leg; CT scan - leg ... Saunders; 2012:chap 11. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  2. Pelvic CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - pelvis; Computed axial tomography scan - pelvis; Computed tomography scan - pelvis; CT scan - pelvis ... gov/pubmed/18381118 . Shaw AS, Dixon AK. Multidetector computed tomography. In: Grainger RC, Allison D, Adam, Dixon AK, ...

  3. Shoulder CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - shoulder; Computed axial tomography scan - shoulder; Computed tomography scan - shoulder; CT scan - shoulder ... Mosby; 2012:chap 57. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  4. Update in Internal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    López-Jiménez, Francisco; Brito, Máximo; Aude, Y. Wady; Scheinberg, Phillip; Kaplan, Mariana; Dixon, Denise A.; Schneiderman, Neil; Trejo, Jorge F.; López-Salazar, Luis Humberto; Ramírez-Barba, Ector Jaime; Kalil, Roberto; Ortiz, Carmen; Goyos, José; Buenaño, Alvaro; Kottiech, Samer; Lamas, Gervasio A.

    2009-01-01

    More than 500,000 new medical articles are published every year and available time to keep updated is scarcer every day. Nowadays, the task of selecting useful, consistent, and relevant information for clinicians is a priority in many major medical journals. This review has the aim of gathering the results of the most important findings in clinical medicine in the last few years. It is focused on results from randomized clinical trials and well-designed observational research. Findings were included preferentially if they showed solid results, and we avoided as much as possible including only preliminary data, or results that included only non-clinical outcomes. Some of the most relevant findings reported here include the significant benefit of statins in patients with coronary artery disease even with mean cholesterol level. It also provides a substantial review of the most significant trials assessing the effectiveness of IIb/IIIa receptor blockers. In gastroenterology many advances have been made in the H. pylori eradication, and the finding that the cure of H. pylori infection may be followed by gastroesophageal reflux disease. Some new antivirals have shown encouraging results in patients with chronic hepatitis. In the infectious disease arena, the late breaking trials in anti-retroviral disease are discussed, as well as the new trends regarding antibiotic resistance. This review approaches also the role of leukotriene modifiers in the treatment of asthma and discusses the benefit of using methylprednisolone in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome, among many other advances in internal medicine. PMID:11068074

  5. Updating Situation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwaan, Rolf A.; Madden, Carol J.

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined how situation models are updated during text comprehension. If comprehenders keep track of the evolving situation, they should update their models such that the most current information, the here and now, is more available than outdated information. Contrary to this updating hypothesis, E. J. O'Brien, M. L. Rizzella, J. E.…

  6. Coronary Calcium Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Coronary Calcium Scan? A coronary calcium scan is a test ... you have calcifications in your coronary arteries. Coronary Calcium Scan Figure A shows the position of the ...

  7. Heart PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... A PET scan requires a small amount of radioactive material (tracer). This tracer is given through a vein (IV), ...

  8. Knee CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - knee; Computed axial tomography scan - knee; Computed tomography scan - knee ... Saunders; 2015:chap 93. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  9. Lumbar spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - lumbar spine; Computed axial tomography scan - lumbar spine; Computed tomography scan - lumbar spine; CT - lower back ... stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the spine area, called slices. These images can be stored, ...

  10. Live ultrasound volume reconstruction using scout scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Amelie; Lasso, Andras; Ungi, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-guided interventions often necessitate scanning of deep-seated anatomical structures that may be hard to visualize. Visualization can be improved using reconstructed 3D ultrasound volumes. High-resolution 3D reconstruction of a large area during clinical interventions is challenging if the region of interest is unknown. We propose a two-stage scanning method allowing the user to perform quick low-resolution scouting followed by high-resolution live volume reconstruction. Scout scanning is accomplished by stacking 2D tracked ultrasound images into a low-resolution volume. Then, within a region of interest defined in the scout scan, live volume reconstruction can be performed by continuous scanning until sufficient image density is achieved. We implemented the workflow as a module of the open-source 3D Slicer application, within the SlicerIGT extension and building on the PLUS toolkit. Scout scanning is performed in a few seconds using 3 mm spacing to allow region of interest definition. Live reconstruction parameters are set to provide good image quality (0.5 mm spacing, hole filling enabled) and feedback is given during live scanning by regularly updated display of the reconstructed volume. Use of scout scanning may allow the physician to identify anatomical structures. Subsequent live volume reconstruction in a region of interest may assist in procedures such as targeting needle interventions or estimating brain shift during surgery.

  11. Safety in the scanning electron microscopy laboratory--1984 update.

    PubMed

    Barber, V C

    1984-01-01

    Recent information on hazards as they relate to safety in the SEM laboratory has been compiled. The paper concentrates on recent information on formaldehyde, embeddants, and a reminder of the possible hazards of photographic chemicals. A review of formaldehyde does not substantiate it as a human carcinogen or mutagen. However, the other hazards associated with it suggest that formaldehyde needs to be handled with care. The recent substantiation of epoxy resins as mutagens suggests that all operations involving embeddants should be undertaken in an effective fume hood. Other precautions are also important. The hazards of photographic chemicals need to be reiterated. It should also be pointed out that adequate ventilation of dark rooms would do a lot to reduce this hazard. PMID:6529456

  12. Vasopressin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F

    2015-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is the principal hormone involved in regulating the tonicity of body fluids. Less appreciated is the role that AVP plays in a variety of other physiologic functions including glucose metabolism, cardiovascular homeostasis, bone metabolism, and cognitive behavior. AVP receptor antagonists are now available and currently approved to treat hyponatremia. There is a great deal of interest in exploring the potential benefits that these drugs may play in blocking AVP-mediated effects in other organ systems. The purpose of this report is to provide an update on the expanding role of AVP receptor antagonists and what disease states these drugs may eventually be used for. PMID:25604388

  13. Moving Objects Updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jidong; Meng, Xiaofeng

    In moving objects applications, large numbers of locations can be sampled by sensors or GPS periodically, then sent from moving clients to the server and stored in a database. Therefore, continuously maintaining in a database the current locations of moving objects by using a tracking technique becomes very important. The key issue is minimizing the number of updates, while providing precise locations for query results. In this chapter, we will introduce some underlying location update methods. Then, we describe two location update strategies in detail, which can improve the performance. One is the proactive location update strategy, which predicts the movement of moving objects to lower the update frequency; the other is the group location update strategy, which groups the objects to minimize the total number of objects reporting their locations.

  14. Identification of Tetrapeptides from a Mixture Based Positional Scanning Library That Can Restore nM Full Agonist Function of the L106P, I69T, I102S, A219V, C271Y, and C271R Human Melanocortin-4 Polymorphic Receptors (hMC4Rs)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human obesity has been linked to genetic factors and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) SNPs have been associated with up to 6% frequency in morbidly obese children and adults. A potential therapy for individuals possessing such genetic modifications is the identification of molecules that can restore proper receptor signaling and function. These compounds could serve as personalized medications improving quality of life issues as well as alleviating diseases symptoms associated with obesity including type 2 diabetes. Several hMC4 SNP receptors have been pharmacologically characterized in vitro to have a decreased, or a lack of response, to endogenous agonists such as α-, β-, and γ2-melanocyte stimulating hormones (MSH) and adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH). Herein we report the use of a mixture based positional scanning combinatorial tetrapeptide library to discover molecules with nM full agonist potency and efficacy to the L106P, I69T, I102S, A219V, C271Y, and C271R hMC4Rs. The most potent compounds at all these hMC4R SNPs include Ac-His-(pI)DPhe-Tic-(pNO2)DPhe-NH2, Ac-His-(pCl)DPhe-Tic-(pNO2)DPhe-NH2, Ac-His-(pCl)DPhe-Arg-(pI)Phe-NH2, and Ac-Arg-(pCl)DPhe-Tic-(pNO2)DPhe-NH2, revealing new ligand pharmacophore models for melanocortin receptor drug design strategies. PMID:24517312

  15. ISS Update: Suitport

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update commentator Lynnette Madison interviews Mallory Jennings, Suitport Human Testing Lead, about making spacewalks easier and more efficient with the Suitport. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @...

  16. The template update problem.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Iain; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Baker, Simon

    2004-06-01

    Template tracking dates back to the 1981 Lucas-Kanade algorithm. One question that has received very little attention, however, is how to update the template so that it remains a good model of the tracked object. We propose a template update algorithm that avoids the "drifting" inherent in the naive algorithm. PMID:18579941

  17. Country Update: Israel 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marar, Marianne Maurice

    2005-01-01

    Country Updates is a new section of "Intercultural Education." Starting in "Intercultural Education," Volume 16 No. 5, this column will focus on recent developments during the last two to three years in the field of intercultural education in one particular country. These updates can include recent policy decisions, the main results of important…

  18. Breast PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007469.htm Breast PET scan To use the sharing features on this page, ... enable JavaScript. A breast positron emission tomography (PET) scan is an imaging test that uses a radioactive ...

  19. Lung gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... any concerns you have about radiation with the health care provider who recommends the test. ... Usually the health care provider will recommend this scan based on ... the scan. For this reason, this test is not often done anymore.

  20. Heart PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    Heart nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... Udelson JE, Dilsizian V, Bonow RO. Nuclear cardiology. In: Mann DL, ... A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  1. RBC nuclear scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003835.htm RBC nuclear scan To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An RBC nuclear scan uses small amounts of radioactive material to ...

  2. Bone density scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone the higher the risk of fractures. A bone scan, along with a patient's medical history, is a ... and whether any preventative treatment is needed. A bone density scan has the advantage of being painless and exposing ...

  3. Lung PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2015 Updated by: Yi-Bin Chen, MD, Leukemia/Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. Also reviewed ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  4. Optical scanning cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Ting-Chung

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a technique called optical scanning cryptography (OSC). The technique can perform encryption on-the-fly using laser beams and can be implemented using an optical heterodyne scanning. We shall first describe the optical heterodyne scanning system and then provide some computer simulations to clarify and confirm the idea of encryption and decryption.

  5. Multipurpose binocular scanning apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, F. R.; Parker, G. L.

    1969-01-01

    Optical gimballing apparatus directs narrow fields of view throughout solid angle approaching 4 pi steradians. Image rotation produced by scanning can be eliminated or altered by gear trains directly linked to the scanning drive assembly. It provides the basis for a binocular scanning capability.

  6. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    MedlinePlus

    V/Q scan; Ventilation/perfusion scan; Lung ventilation/perfusion scan ... A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan is actually two tests. They may be done separately or together. During the perfusion scan, a health ...

  7. Genomics and Health Impact Update

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genomics in Practice Newborn Screening Pharmacogenomics Reproductive Health Tools and Databases About the Genomics & Health Impact Update The Office of Public Health Genomics provides updated and credible ...

  8. Scanning NASTRAN output data for maximum and minimum values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    A computer program called NASCAN (NASTRAN scan) is described. NASCAN enables users to scan lengthy NASTRAN output files for maximum and minimum values in easy user oriented categories. Areas of high stress or deflections in any of the NASTRAN rigid formats are quickly detected and listed out for project documentations. The NASTRAN model is then revised if necessary by updating an input file tape which is processed through the NASTRAN program.

  9. Rapid frequency scan EPR.

    PubMed

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A; Quine, Richard W; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2011-08-01

    In rapid frequency scan EPR with triangular scans, sufficient time must be allowed to insure that the magnetization in the x, y plane decays to baseline at the end of the scan, which typically is about 5T(2) after the spins are excited. To permit relaxation of signals excited toward the extremes of the scan the total scan time required may be much longer than 5T(2). However, with periodic, saw-tooth excitation, the slow-scan EPR spectrum can be recovered by Fourier deconvolution of data recorded with a total scan period of 5T(2), even if some spins are excited later in the scan. This scan time is similar to polyphase excitation methods. The peak power required for either polyphase excitation or rapid frequency scans is substantially smaller than for pulsed EPR. The use of an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) and cross loop resonator facilitated implementation of the rapid frequency scan experiments reported here. The use of constant continuous low B(1), periodic excitation waveform, and constant external magnetic field is similar to polyphase excitation, but could be implemented without the AWG that is required for polyphase excitation. PMID:21664848

  10. Rapid Frequency Scan EPR

    PubMed Central

    Tseitlin, Mark; Rinard, George A.; Quine, Richard W.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2011-01-01

    In rapid frequency scan EPR with triangular scans, sufficient time must be allowed to insure that the magnetization in the x,y plane decays to baseline at the end of the scan, which typically is about 5 T2 after the spins are excited. To permit relaxation of signals excited toward the extremes of the scan the total scan time required may be much longer than 5 T2. However, with periodic, saw-tooth excitation, the slow-scan EPR spectrum can be recovered by Fourier deconvolution of data recorded with a total scan period of 5 T2, even if some spins are excited later in the scan. This scan time is similar to polyphase excitation methods. The peak power required for either polyphase excitation or rapid frequency scans is substantially smaller than for pulsed EPR. The use of an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) and cross loop resonator facilitated implementation of the rapid frequency scan experiments reported here. The use of constant continuous low B1, periodic excitation waveform, and constant external magnetic field is similar to polyphase excitation, but could be implemented without the AWG that is required for polyphase excitation. PMID:21664848

  11. Line-scanning, stage scanning confocal microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carucci, John A.; Stevenson, Mary; Gareau, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    We created a line-scanning, stage scanning confocal microscope as part of a new procedure: video assisted micrographic surgery (VAMS). The need for rapid pathological assessment of the tissue on the surface of skin excisions very large since there are 3.5 million new skin cancers diagnosed annually in the United States. The new design presented here is a confocal microscope without any scanning optics. Instead, a line is focused in space and the sample, which is flattened, is physically translated such that the line scans across its face in a direction perpendicular to the line its self. The line is 6mm long and the stage is capable of scanning 50 mm, hence the field of view is quite large. The theoretical diffraction-limited resolution is 0.7um lateral and 3.7um axial. However, in this preliminary report, we present initial results that are a factor of 5-7 poorer in resolution. The results are encouraging because they demonstrate that the linear array detector measures sufficient signal from fluorescently labeled tissue and also demonstrate the large field of view achievable with VAMS.

  12. Pharmacodynamics of Memantine: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Rammes, G; Danysz, W; Parsons, C.G

    2008-01-01

    Memantine received marketing authorization from the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (EMEA) for the treatment of moderately severe to severe Alzheimer´s disease (AD) in Europe on 17th May 2002 and shortly thereafter was also approved by the FDA for use in the same indication in the USA. Memantine is a moderate affinity, uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist with strong voltage-dependency and fast kinetics. Due to this mechanism of action (MOA), there is a wealth of other possible therapeutic indications for memantine and numerous preclinical data in animal models support this assumption. This review is intended to provide an update on preclinical studies on the pharmacodynamics of memantine, with an additional focus on animal models of diseases aside from the approved indication. For most studies prior to 1999, the reader is referred to a previous review [196]. In general, since 1999, considerable additional preclinical evidence has accumulated supporting the use of memantine in AD (both symptomatic and neuroprotective). In addition, there has been further confirmation of the MOA of memantine as an uncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist and essentially no data contradicting our understanding of the benign side effect profile of memantine. PMID:19305788

  13. Large energy-spread beam diagnostics through quadrupole scans

    SciTech Connect

    Frederico, Joel; Adli, Erik; Hogan, Mark; Raubenheimer, Tor

    2012-12-21

    The Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests (FACET) is a new user facility at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, servicing next-generation accelerator experiments. The 1.5% RMS energy spread of the FACET beam causes large chromatic aberrations in optics. These aberrations necessitate updated quadrupole scan fits to remain accurate.

  14. ISS Update: NEEMO 16

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update commentator Josh Byerly interviews astronaut Stan Love about the NEEMO 16 mission from Aquarius Base. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Johnson and include the hashtag #askStation. For ...

  15. ISS Update: Suitport Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update commentator Lynnette Madison interviews Joel Maganza, Test Director, about thermal vacuum chambers and unmanned and human-testing with the Suitport. Questions? Ask us on Twitter @NASA_Jo...

  16. Radionucleotide scanning in osteomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Sachs, W.; Kanat, I.O.

    1986-07-01

    Radionucleotide bone scanning can be an excellent adjunct to the standard radiograph and clinical findings in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis. Bone scans have the ability to detect osteomyelitis far in advance of the standard radiograph. The sequential use of technetium and gallium has been useful in differentiating cellulitis and osteomyelitis. Serial scanning with technetium and gallium may be used to monitor the response of osteomyelitis to antibiotic therapy.

  17. Imaging dopamine receptors in the human brain by position tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Burns, H.D.; Dannals, R.F.; Wong, D.F.; Langstrom, B.; Duelfer, T.; Frost, J.J.; Ravert, H.T.; Links, J.M.; Rosenbloom, S.B.

    1983-01-01

    Neurotransmitter receptors may be involved in a number of neuropsychiatric disease states. The ligand 3-N-(/sup 11/C)methylspiperone, which preferentially binds to dopamine receptors in vivo, was used to image the receptors by positron emission tomography scanning in baboons and in humans. This technique holds promise for noninvasive clinical studies of dopamine receptors in humans.

  18. Environmental Scanning Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truckee Meadows Community Coll., Sparks, NV.

    This report describes Truckee Meadows Community College's (Nevada) environmental scanning process and results. The college decided that environmental scanning and forecasting techniques should be used to plan for both short-term and long-term external factors that impact programs, enrollment, and budgets. Strategic goals include: (1) keeping pace…

  19. Getting a CAT Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Getting a CAT Scan (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Print A A A Text Size en español Obtención de una tomografía computada (video) CAT stands for "computerized axial tomography." Translated, that means ...

  20. Optical Scanning Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Hans

    The successful use of optical scanning at the University of the Pacific (UOP) indicates that such techniques can simplify a number of administrative data processing tasks. Optical scanning is regularly used at UOP to assist with data processing in the areas of admissions, registration and grade reporting and also has applications for other tasks…

  1. Spatial updating in human parietal cortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriam, Elisha P.; Genovese, Christopher R.; Colby, Carol L.

    2003-01-01

    Single neurons in monkey parietal cortex update visual information in conjunction with eye movements. This remapping of stimulus representations is thought to contribute to spatial constancy. We hypothesized that a similar process occurs in human parietal cortex and that we could visualize it with functional MRI. We scanned subjects during a task that involved remapping of visual signals across hemifields. We observed an initial response in the hemisphere contralateral to the visual stimulus, followed by a remapped response in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the stimulus. We ruled out the possibility that this remapped response resulted from either eye movements or visual stimuli alone. Our results demonstrate that updating of visual information occurs in human parietal cortex.

  2. Electronic scanning-slit fluorography.

    PubMed

    Plenkovich, D

    1989-01-01

    Scattered radiation degrades contrast and signal-to-noise ratio of an x-ray image. If an image intensifier is used as the image receptor, scattering of light photons and electrons within the image intensifier, optical system, and video camera produces veiling glare. anti-scatter grids, air gaps, and paired scanning slits have been used for rejection of scattered radiation. However, none of these methods is effective against veiling glare, because veiling glare is generated after the radiation has passed through any of these anti-scatter devices. In chapter 1 is introduced an innovative approach for highly efficient rejection of both scattered radiation and veiling glare in digital fluorography. This method has been named electronic collimation, and the x-ray imaging technique based upon it is called electronic scanning-slit fluorography. It involves replacing paired fore and aft slits for scatter rejection with only one beam-defining tantalum fore aperture. As this aperture scans across the portion of the patient to be imaged, pulsed x-ray exposures produce images which are digitized and stored in the computer memory. Since the video signal within the projection of the aperture on the image intensifier is much more intense than behind the tantalum, one can discriminate electronically between these two signals and thus eliminate the unwanted x-ray scatter and veiling glare. Such electronic collimation does not require synchronization between the slit scanning and detector readout, which makes it much simpler than alternative methods and potentially adaptable to any digital fluorography system. Theoretical considerations relevant for the construction and evaluation of a prototype unit for electronic scanning slit fluorography are presented in Chapter 2. This chapter consists of four sections. In the first section 'Principles of image detection' the concepts of quantum efficiency and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) are introduced as the most meaningful way to

  3. Laser Scanning In Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Patricia; Baker, Lionel R.

    1989-03-01

    This paper is a review of the applications of laser scanning in inspection. The reasons for the choice of a laser in flying spot scanning and the optical properties of a laser beam which are of value in a scanning instrument will be given. The many methods of scanning laser beams in both one and two dimensions will be described. The use of one dimensional laser scanners for automatic surface inspection for transmitting and reflective products will be covered in detail, with particular emphasis on light collection techniques. On-line inspection applications which will be mentioned include: photographic film web, metal strip products, paper web, glass sheet, car body paint surfaces and internal cylinder bores. Two dimensional laser scanning is employed in applications where increased resolution, increased depth of focus, and better contrast are required compared with conventional vidicon TV or solid state array cameras. Such examples as special microscope laser scanning systems and a TV compatible system for use in restricted areas of a nuclear reactor will be described. The technical and economic benefits and limitations of laser scanning video systems will be compared with conventional TV and CCD array devices.

  4. Virtual slit scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fiolka, Reto; Stemmer, Andreas; Belyaev, Yury

    2007-12-01

    We present a novel slit scanning confocal microscope with a CCD camera image sensor and a virtual slit aperture for descanning that can be adjusted during post-processing. A very efficient data structure and mathematical criteria for aligning the virtual aperture guarantee the ease of use. We further introduce a method to reduce the anisotropic lateral resolution of slit scanning microscopes. System performance is evaluated against a spinning disk confocal microscope on identical specimens. The virtual slit scanning microscope works as the spinning disk type and outperforms on thick specimens. PMID:17891411

  5. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... imaging - leg; Magnetic resonance imaging - lower extremity; MRI - ankle; Magnetic resonance imaging - ankle; MRI - femur; MRI - leg ... or bone scan Birth defects of the leg, ankle, or foot Bone pain and fever Broken bone ...

  6. Fiber-Scanned Microdisplays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossman-Bosworth, Janet; Seibel, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Helmet- and head-mounted display systems, denoted fiber-scanned microdisplays, have been proposed to provide information in an "augmented reality" format (meaning that the information would be optically overlaid on the user's field of view).

  7. Knee MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the knee joint and ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  8. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging) scan of the leg uses strong magnets to create pictures of the leg. This may ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  9. Cervical MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the part of the ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  10. Arm MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses strong magnets to create pictures of the upper and lower ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  11. Pediatric CT Scans

    Cancer.gov

    The Radiation Epidemiology Branch and collaborators have initiated a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure from CT scans conducted during childhood and adolescence and the subsequent development of cancer.

  12. CT scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    CT stands for computerized tomography. In this procedure, a thin X-ray beam is rotated around the ... D image of a section through the body. CT scans are very detailed and provide excellent information ...

  13. Brain PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests, such as magnetic resonance imaging ( MRI ) and computed tomography ( CT ) scans only reveal the structure of the ... a PET/CT. Alternative Names ... PT, Rijntjes M, Weiller C. Neuroimaging: Functional neuroimaging. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, Jankovic ...

  14. Lumbar MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging (MRI) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the lower part of ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  15. The Scanning Optical Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, C. J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the principle of the scanning optical microscope and explains its advantages over the conventional microscope in the improvement of resolution and contrast, as well as the possibility of producing a picture from optical harmonies generated within the specimen.

  16. Chest CT Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... pictures to create a very detailed, three-dimensional (3D) model of organs. Sometimes, a substance called contrast dye is injected into a vein in your arm for the CT scan. This substance highlights areas in your chest, which ...

  17. Slow Scan Telemedicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Originally developed under contract for NASA by Ball Bros. Research Corporation for acquiring visual information from lunar and planetary spacecraft, system uses standard closed circuit camera connected to a device called a scan converter, which slows the stream of images to match an audio circuit, such as a telephone line. Transmitted to its destination, the image is reconverted by another scan converter and displayed on a monitor. In addition to assist scans, technique allows transmission of x-rays, nuclear scans, ultrasonic imagery, thermograms, electrocardiograms or live views of patient. Also allows conferencing and consultation among medical centers, general practitioners, specialists and disease control centers. Commercialized by Colorado Video, Inc., major employment is in business and industry for teleconferencing, cable TV news, transmission of scientific/engineering data, security, information retrieval, insurance claim adjustment, instructional programs, and remote viewing of advertising layouts, real estate, construction sites or products.

  18. Pharmacological Profiles of Oligomerized μ-Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cynthia Wei-Sheng; Ho, Ing-Kang

    2013-01-01

    Opioids are widely prescribed pain relievers with multiple side effects and potential complications. They produce analgesia via G-protein-protein coupled receptors: μ-, δ-, κ-opioid and opioid receptor-like 1 receptors. Bivalent ligands targeted to the oligomerized opioid receptors might be the key to developing analgesics without undesired side effects and obtaining effective treatment for opioid addicts. In this review we will update the biological effects of μ-opioids on homo- or hetero-oligomerized μ-opioid receptor and discuss potential mechanisms through which bivalent ligands exert beneficial effects, including adenylate cyclase regulation and receptor-mediated signaling pathways. PMID:24709876

  19. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.; Weiss, S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, M.; Chemla, D.S.

    1994-01-01

    The authors have developed a general technique which combines the temporal resolution of ultrafast laser spectroscopy with the spatial resolution of scanned probe microscopy (SPM). Using this technique with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), they have obtained simultaneous 2 ps time resolution and 50 {angstrom} spatial resolution. This improves the time resolution currently attainable with STM by nine orders of magnitude. The potential of this powerful technique for studying ultrafast dynamical phenomena on surfaces with atomic resolution is discussed.

  20. Wide scanning spherical antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Bing (Inventor); Stutzman, Warren L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for calculating the surface shapes for subreflectors in a suboptic assembly of a tri-reflector spherical antenna system is introduced, modeled from a generalization of Galindo-Israel's method of solving partial differential equations to correct for spherical aberration and provide uniform feed to aperture mapping. In a first embodiment, the suboptic assembly moves as a single unit to achieve scan while the main reflector remains stationary. A feed horn is tilted during scan to maintain the illuminated area on the main spherical reflector fixed throughout the scan thereby eliminating the need to oversize the main spherical reflector. In an alternate embodiment, both the main spherical reflector and the suboptic assembly are fixed. A flat mirror is used to create a virtual image of the suboptic assembly. Scan is achieved by rotating the mirror about the spherical center of the main reflector. The feed horn is tilted during scan to maintain the illuminated area on the main spherical reflector fixed throughout the scan.

  1. Veterinary medicines update.

    PubMed

    2016-09-10

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues. PMID:27609956

  2. Veterinary medicines update.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues. PMID:27493045

  3. Cultural practices updates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultural practice updates from 2013 included the effects of shredding in spring, residue management, periodic flooding, no-till fertilizer applications, and billet planting on cane tonnage and sugar yield. Shredding, whether high or low, had little impacts in 2013. However, burning following shreddi...

  4. SEI: An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peach, Lewis L., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An update on the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) is given in viewgraph form. Topics covered include the key prerequisites of human exploration, project planning, Mars and lunar explorations, supporting technologies, near-term strategies for SEI, human support elements, and Space Station Freedom SEI accommodations.

  5. Community Update, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Julie, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document consists of nine issues (covering January through December 1999) of the newsletter "Community Update," containing articles on community and family involvement in education. Article topics include: new programs to help students prepare for college early; Vice President Al Gore announced the first-ever national Hispanic Education…

  6. Veterinary medicines update.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues. PMID:27365238

  7. Veterinary medicines update.

    PubMed

    2016-06-11

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues. PMID:27288166

  8. Updating Older Fume Hoods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, G. Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Provides information on updating older fume hoods. Areas addressed include: (1) adjustment of the hood's back baffle; (2) hood air leakage; (3) light level; (4) hood location in relation to room traffic and room air; and (5) establishing and maintaining hood performance. (JN)

  9. Update: Biological Nitrogen Fixation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Alan; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Updates knowledge on nitrogen fixation, indicating that investigation of free-living nitrogen-fixing organisms is proving useful in understanding bacterial partners and is expected to lead to development of more effective symbioses. Specific areas considered include biochemistry/genetics, synthesis control, proteins and enzymes, symbiotic systems,…

  10. Veterinary medicines update.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues. PMID:26940413

  11. Veterinary medicines update.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    The following information has been produced for Veterinary Record by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) to provide an update for veterinary surgeons on recent changes to marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines in the UK and on other relevant issues. PMID:26851100

  12. Community Update, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Nicole, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document consists of 10 issues (covering January through December 2000) of the newsletter, "Community Update," which features articles on community and family involvement in education. In addition to the articles, each issue (except the Special Issue) includes a preview of the month's Satellite Town Meeting; events and information discussed…

  13. Southern Horticultural Lab Update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication is a new quarterly update for members of the Mississippi Nursery and Landscape Association that is published quarterly in their association newsletter. Two other versions of this newsletter are being submitted to the Louisiana Nursery and Landscape Association (LALNLA) and the Alaba...

  14. Supreme Court Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Kelley R.

    2009-01-01

    "Chief Justice Flubs Oath." "Justice Ginsburg Has Cancer Surgery." At the start of this year, those were the news headlines about the U.S. Supreme Court. But January 2009 also brought news about key education cases--one resolved and two others on the docket--of which school administrators should take particular note. The Supreme Court updates on…

  15. Updating: Learning versus Supposing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Jiaying; Crupi, Vincenzo; Tentori, Katya; Fitelson, Branden; Osherson, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Bayesian orthodoxy posits a tight relationship between conditional probability and updating. Namely, the probability of an event "A" after learning "B" should equal the conditional probability of "A" given "B" prior to learning "B". We examine whether ordinary judgment conforms to the orthodox view. In three experiments we found substantial…

  16. Mucolipidosis Type IV: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Kazuyo; Gustafson, Ann Marie; Sidransky, Ellen; Goldin, Ehud

    2011-01-01

    Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) is a neurodevelopmental as well as neurodegenerative disorder with severe psychomotor developmental delay, progressive visual impairment, and achlorydria. It is characterized by the presence of lysosomal inclusions in many cell types in patients. MLIV is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in MCOLN1, which encodes for mucolipin-1, a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel family. Although approximately 70-80% of patients identified are Ashkenazi Jewish, MLIV is a pan-ethnic disorder. Importantly, while MLIV is thought to be a rare disease, its frequency may be greater than currently appreciated, for its common presentation as a cerebral palsy-like encephalopathy can lead to misdiagnosis. Moreover, patients with milder variants are often not recognized as having MLIV. This review provides an update on the ethnic distribution, clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, methods of diagnosis, molecular genetics, differential diagnosis, and treatment of patients with MLIV. An enhanced awareness of the manifestations of this disorder may help to elucidate the true frequency and range of symptoms associated with MLIV, providing insight into the pathogenesis of this multi-system disease. PMID:21763169

  17. Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesendanger, Roland

    1994-09-01

    Preface; List of acronyms; Introduction; Part I. Experimental Methods and Theoretical Background of Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy: 1. Scanning tunnelling microscopy; 2. Scanning force microscopy; 3. Related scanning probe techniques; Part II. Applications of Scanning Probe Microscopy and Spectroscopy: 4. Condensed matter physics; 5. Chemistry; 6. Organic materials; 7. Metrology and standards; 8. Nanotechnology; References; Index.

  18. Shipborne hydrographic laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfennigbauer, Martin; Rieger, Peter; Schaich, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Applications like hydro-archeology, hydrobiology, or hydraulic engineering sometimes require accurate surveying of submerged areas with point densities usually only achieved with mobile or terrestrial laser scanning. For navigable waterbodies, hydrographic laser scanning from a floating platform represents a viable solution. RIEGL's new hydrographic laser scanner VQ-820-G with its exceptionally high measurement rate of up to 110,000 net measurements per second and its small laser footprint is optimally suited for such applications. We present results from a measurement campaign surveying prehistoric lake dwellings at Lake Constance in Germany. While the aim of typical hydrographic laser scanning applications is to roughly acquire the ground's shape and structure, in this case it was tried to determine the exact position, shape, and attitude of the remainders of the piles. The special requirements with respect to mission planning and data processing are discussed and the performance of the laser scanner is assessed.

  19. Femtosecond scanning tunneling microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.J.; Donati, G.P.; Rodriguez, G.; Gosnell, T.R.; Trugman, S.A.; Some, D.I.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). By combining scanning tunneling microscopy with ultrafast optical techniques we have developed a novel tool to probe phenomena on atomic time and length scales. We have built and characterized an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope in terms of temporal resolution, sensitivity and dynamic range. Using a novel photoconductive low-temperature-grown GaAs tip, we have achieved a temporal resolution of 1.5 picoseconds and a spatial resolution of 10 nanometers. This scanning tunneling microscope has both cryogenic and ultra-high vacuum capabilities, enabling the study of a wide range of important scientific problems.

  20. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

    1988-02-05

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold. 7 figs.

  1. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James M.; Leighton, James F.

    1990-01-01

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardward for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

  2. Adaptive Optical Scanning Holography.

    PubMed

    Tsang, P W M; Poon, Ting-Chung; Liu, J-P

    2016-01-01

    Optical Scanning Holography (OSH) is a powerful technique that employs a single-pixel sensor and a row-by-row scanning mechanism to capture the hologram of a wide-view, three-dimensional object. However, the time required to acquire a hologram with OSH is rather lengthy. In this paper, we propose an enhanced framework, which is referred to as Adaptive OSH (AOSH), to shorten the holographic recording process. We have demonstrated that the AOSH method is capable of decreasing the acquisition time by up to an order of magnitude, while preserving the content of the hologram favorably. PMID:26916866

  3. Scanning computed confocal imager

    DOEpatents

    George, John S.

    2000-03-14

    There is provided a confocal imager comprising a light source emitting a light, with a light modulator in optical communication with the light source for varying the spatial and temporal pattern of the light. A beam splitter receives the scanned light and direct the scanned light onto a target and pass light reflected from the target to a video capturing device for receiving the reflected light and transferring a digital image of the reflected light to a computer for creating a virtual aperture and outputting the digital image. In a transmissive mode of operation the invention omits the beam splitter means and captures light passed through the target.

  4. Adaptive Optical Scanning Holography

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, P. W. M.; Poon, Ting-Chung; Liu, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Optical Scanning Holography (OSH) is a powerful technique that employs a single-pixel sensor and a row-by-row scanning mechanism to capture the hologram of a wide-view, three-dimensional object. However, the time required to acquire a hologram with OSH is rather lengthy. In this paper, we propose an enhanced framework, which is referred to as Adaptive OSH (AOSH), to shorten the holographic recording process. We have demonstrated that the AOSH method is capable of decreasing the acquisition time by up to an order of magnitude, while preserving the content of the hologram favorably. PMID:26916866

  5. Dopamine receptors - IUPHAR Review 13.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Jean-Martin; Espinoza, Stefano; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-01-01

    The variety of physiological functions controlled by dopamine in the brain and periphery is mediated by the D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5 dopamine GPCRs. Drugs acting on dopamine receptors are significant tools for the management of several neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and Parkinson's disease. Recent investigations of dopamine receptor signalling have shown that dopamine receptors, apart from their canonical action on cAMP-mediated signalling, can regulate a myriad of cellular responses to fine-tune the expression of dopamine-associated behaviours and functions. Such signalling mechanisms may involve alternate G protein coupling or non-G protein mechanisms involving ion channels, receptor tyrosine kinases or proteins such as β-arrestins that are classically involved in GPCR desensitization. Another level of complexity is the growing appreciation of the physiological roles played by dopamine receptor heteromers. Applications of new in vivo techniques have significantly furthered the understanding of the physiological functions played by dopamine receptors. Here we provide an update of the current knowledge regarding the complex biology, signalling, physiology and pharmacology of dopamine receptors. PMID:25671228

  6. Sequence History Update Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanampompan, Teerapat; Gladden, Roy; Fisher, Forest; DelGuercio, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The Sequence History Update Tool performs Web-based sequence statistics archiving for Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Using a single UNIX command, the software takes advantage of sequencing conventions to automatically extract the needed statistics from multiple files. This information is then used to populate a PHP database, which is then seamlessly formatted into a dynamic Web page. This tool replaces a previous tedious and error-prone process of manually editing HTML code to construct a Web-based table. Because the tool manages all of the statistics gathering and file delivery to and from multiple data sources spread across multiple servers, there is also a considerable time and effort savings. With the use of The Sequence History Update Tool what previously took minutes is now done in less than 30 seconds, and now provides a more accurate archival record of the sequence commanding for MRO.

  7. [Update on anticancer drugs].

    PubMed

    Roila, Fausto; Ballatori, Enzo

    2014-01-01

    Update on anticancer drugs. A thorough review of the clinical trials published over the last two years in major medical and oncological journals on a comprehensive spectrum of oncological conditions aims to provide at the same time (as the authors are well known representatives of the critical and complementary competences of clinical care and research methodology) an interesting double opportunity of update on: a) what is truly (i.e.documented and reliable) innovative and deserves adoption in daily care,vs what is either purely suggestive or clearly misleading; b) what are the methological, concrete, simple rules to observe in a field which is certainly moving fast, but at the same time generates highly controversial behaviors in research as well as in daily practices. The accompanying editorial (pag 60-63) further illustrates the way and the yield of using this material and approach both in the areas of nursing sciences and practice. PMID:25002061

  8. Sensors, Update 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Fedder, Gary K.; Korvink, Jan G.

    2003-04-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  9. Sensors, Update 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    2001-02-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections: Sensor Technology reviews highlights in applied and basic research, while Sensor Applications covers new or improved applications of sensors, and Sensor Markets provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be invaluable to scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  10. Sensors, Update 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    1996-10-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Furthermore, the sensor market as well as peripheral aspects such as standards are covered. Each volume is divided into four sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  11. Sensors, Update 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Fedder, Gary K.; Korvink, Jan G.

    2003-03-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field, presenting the current highlights of sensor and related microelectromechanical systems technology. Coverage includes most recent developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles based on micro- and nanotechnology. Each volume is divided into three sections: Sensor Technology reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications covers new or improved applications of sensors and Sensor Markets provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update is of must-have value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  12. Sensors, Update 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    1996-12-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Treatments include current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Furthermore, the sensor market as well as peripheral aspects such as standards are covered. Each volume is divided into four sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides an overview of suppliers and market trends for a particular section, and Sensor Standards, reviews recent legislation and requirements for sensors. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  13. Sensors, Update 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Fedder, Gary K.; Korvink, Jan G.

    2002-04-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  14. Sensors, Update 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    2001-10-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  15. SIM-Lite Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Discussion focus on: SIM-Lite Instrument Update - 6m baseline, 50cm, approximately 900M cost; Technology Update - Systematic errors and floor; SIM-Lite terrestrial planet discovery capability; Double blind multiple planet study summary; and the changing landscape of exoplanet science and the role of SIM-Lite. Slides include technology to flight component engineering; instrumental systematic errors; ultra deep search for Earth clones; double blind test, astrometric detection of Earths in multiplanet systems; the current era of exoplanet science and where SIM-Lite fits in; the next frontier and where SIM-Lite fits in, why SIM is unique in discovering Earths; imaging planet status is uncertain without masses and ages; SIM role in establishing how planetary systems form and evolve; and SIM probes of broad planet mass range around young stars.

  16. Update on gastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllou, Maria; Stanley, Adrian J

    2014-01-01

    Although less common than oesophageal variceal haemorrhage, gastric variceal bleeding remains a serious complication of portal hypertension, with a high associated mortality. In this review we provide an update on the aetiology, classification and management of gastric varices, including acute bleeding, prevention of rebleeding and primary prophylaxis. We describe the optimum management strategies for gastric varices including drug, endoscopic and radiological therapies, focusing on recent published evidence. PMID:24891929

  17. Teratoma - MRI scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This MRI scan shows a tumor (teratoma) at the base of the spine (seen on the left lower edge of the screen), located in the sacrum and coccyx (sacrococcygeal) area. Teratomas are present at birth and may contain hair, teeth, and other tissues.

  18. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Shimon; Chemla, Daniel S.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Botkin, David

    1995-01-01

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  19. Gallbladder radionuclide scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. Gallbladder radionuclide scan is a test that uses radioactive material to check gallbladder function. It is also used to look for bile duct blockage or leak. How the Test is Performed The health care provider will inject ...

  20. Skimming & Scanning. Advanced Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Edward B.

    Part of a series intended to develop essential specialized reading skills, this text/workbook is designed to provide instruction and practice in skimming and scanning for students reading at the seventh through tenth grade reading levels, considered the advanced level. Part 1 of the book deals with skimming. A lesson defines skimming (the rapid…

  1. Scan This Book!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albanese, Andrew Richard

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author presents an interview with Brewster Kahle, leader of the Open Content Alliance (OCA). OCA book scan program is an alternative to Google's library project that aims to make books accessible online. In this interview, Kahle discusses his views on the challenges of getting books on the Web, on Google's library…

  2. THE 2016 ENVIRONMENTAL SCAN.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, Gene

    2015-09-01

    Every year, the American Hospital Association compiles the Environmental Scan to provide hospital leaders with insight and information about market forces that are likely to affect the health care field. One common theme this year is the pace of change. PMID:26495611

  3. Environmental Scanning Report, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Min

    In response to the change in the provincial economy from natural-resource-based industries to service-oriented industries, Vancouver Community College (VCC) in British Columbia (BC) conducted an environmental scan of the social and economic trends in the college's service region that will most likely affect prospective students' educational and…

  4. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  5. How Documentalists Update SIMBAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buga, M.; Bot, C.; Brouty, M.; Bruneau, C.; Brunet, C.; Cambresy, L.; Eisele, A.; Genova, F.; Lesteven, S.; Loup, C.; Neuville, M.; Oberto, A.; Ochsenbein, F.; Perret, E.; Siebert, A.; Son, E.; Vannier, P.; Vollmer, B.; Vonflie, P.; Wenger, M.; Woelfel, F.

    2015-04-01

    The Strasbourg astronomical Data Center (CDS) was created in 1972 and has had a major role in astronomy for more than forty years. CDS develops a service called SIMBAD that provides basic data, cross-identifications, bibliography, and measurements for astronomical objects outside the solar system. It brings to the scientific community an added value to content which is updated daily by a team of documentalists working together in close collaboration with astronomers and IT specialists. We explain how the CDS staff updates SIMBAD with object citations in the main astronomical journals, as well as with astronomical data and measurements. We also explain how the identification is made between the objects found in the literature and those already existing in SIMBAD. We show the steps followed by the documentalist team to update the database using different tools developed at CDS, like the sky visualizer Aladin, and the large catalogues and survey database VizieR. As a direct result of this teamwork, SIMBAD integrates almost 10.000 bibliographic references per year. The service receives more than 400.000 queries per day.

  6. Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan? A lung ventilation/perfusion scan, or VQ scan, is a ... that measures air and blood flow in your lungs. A VQ scan most often is used to ...

  7. Scanning thermal plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpace, F. L.; Madding, R. P.; Green, T., III

    1975-01-01

    Over a three-year period 800 thermal line scans of power plant plumes were made by an airborne scanner, with ground truth measured concurrently at the plants. Computations using centered finite differences in the thermal scanning imagery show a lower bound in the horizontal temperature gradient in excess of 1.6 C/m. Gradients persist to 3 m below the surface. Vector plots of the velocity of thermal fronts are constructed by tracing the front motion in successive thermal images. A procedure is outlined for the two-point ground calibration of a thermal scanner from an equation describing the scanner signal and the voltage for two known temperatures. The modulation transfer function is then calculated by input of a thermal step function and application of digital time analysis techniques using Fast Fourier Transforms to the voltage output. Field calibration tests are discussed. Data accuracy is limited by the level of ground truth effort chosen.

  8. Fly-scan ptychography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, Xiaojing; Lauer, Kenneth; Clark, Jesse N.; Xu, Weihe; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian K.; Chu, Yong S.

    2015-03-13

    We report an experimental ptychography measurement performed in fly-scan mode. With a visible-light laser source, we demonstrate a 5-fold reduction of data acquisition time. By including multiple mutually incoherent modes into the incident illumination, high quality images were successfully reconstructed from blurry diffraction patterns. This approach significantly increases the throughput of ptychography, especially for three-dimensional applications and the visualization of dynamic systems.

  9. Scanning micro-sclerometer

    DOEpatents

    Oliver, Warren C.; Blau, Peter J.

    1994-01-01

    A scanning micro-sclerometer measures changes in contact stiffness and correlates these changes to characteristics of a scratch. A known force is applied to a contact junction between two bodies and a technique employing an oscillating force is used to generate the contact stiffness between the two bodies. As the two bodies slide relative to each other, the contact stiffness changes. The change is measured to characterize the scratch.

  10. Fly-scan ptychography

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaojing; Lauer, Kenneth; Clark, Jesse N.; Xu, Weihe; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian K.; Chu, Yong S.

    2015-01-01

    We report an experimental ptychography measurement performed in fly-scan mode. With a visible-light laser source, we demonstrate a 5-fold reduction of data acquisition time. By including multiple mutually incoherent modes into the incident illumination, high quality images were successfully reconstructed from blurry diffraction patterns. This approach significantly increases the throughput of ptychography, especially for three-dimensional applications and the visualization of dynamic systems. PMID:25766519

  11. Scanning micro-sclerometer

    DOEpatents

    Oliver, W.C.; Blau, P.J.

    1994-11-01

    A scanning micro-sclerometer measures changes in contact stiffness and correlates these changes to characteristics of a scratch. A known force is applied to a contact junction between two bodies and a technique employing an oscillating force is used to generate the contact stiffness between the two bodies. As the two bodies slide relative to each other, the contact stiffness changes. The change is measured to characterize the scratch. 2 figs.

  12. Scanning Tomographic Acoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, G.; Meyyappan, A.

    1988-07-01

    The technology for "seeing" with sound has an important and interesting history. Some of nature's creatures have been using sound waves for many millenia to image otherwise unobservable objects. The human species, lacking this natural ability, have overcome this deficiency by developing several different ultrasonic imaging techniques. acoustic microscopy is one such technique, which produces high resolution images of detailed structure of small objects in a non-destructive fashion. Two types of acoustic microscopes have evolved for industrial exploitation. They are the scanning laser acoustic microscope (SLAM) and the scanning acoustic microscope (SAM). In this paper, we review the principles of SLAM and describe how we use elements of SLAM to realize the scanning tomographic acoustic microscope (STAM). We describe the data acquisition process and the image reconstruction procedure. We also describe techniques to obtain projection data from different angles of wave incidence enabling us to reconstruct different planes of a complex specimen tomo-graphically. Our experimental results show that STAM is capable of producing high-quality high-resolution subsurface images.

  13. Scanning tomographic acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hua

    2002-11-01

    This paper provides an overview of the design and development of the scanning tomographic acoustic microscopy (STAM). This research effort spans over a period of more than 12 years, which successfully elevated the acoustic microscopy from the traditional intensity-mapping mode to the level of holographic and tomographic imaging. The tomographic imaging capability of STAM was developed on the platform of the scanning laser acoustic microscope (SLAM), which operates in a coherent transmission mode with plane-wave illumination and scanning laser wavefield detection. The image formation techniques were based on the backward propagation method implemented in the plane-to-plane format. In this paper, the key elements of the design and development, including the modification of the data-acquisition hardware, implementation of image reconstruction algorithms for multiple-frequency and multiple-angle tomography, and the high-precision phase-correction and image registration techniques for the superposition of coherent sub-images, will be discussed. Results of full-scale experiments will also be included to demonstrate the capability of holographic and tomographic image formation in microscopic scale.

  14. Scanning holographic lidar telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Wilkerson, Thomas D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a unique telescope for lidar using a holographic optical element (HOE) as the primary optic. The HOE diffracts 532 nm laser backscatter making a 43 deg angle with a normal to its surface to a focus located 130 cm along the normal. The field of view scans a circle as the HOE rotates about the normal. The detector assembly and baffling remain stationary, compared to conventional scanning lidars in which the entire telescope and detector assembly require steering, or which use a large flat steerable mirror in front of the telescope to do the pointing. The spectral bandpass of our HOE is 50 nm (FWHM). Light within that bandpass is spectrally dispersed at 0.6 nm/mm in the focal plane. An aperture stop reduces the bandpass of light reaching the detector from one direction to 1 nm while simultaneously reducing the field of view to 1 mrad. Wavelengths outside the 50 nm spectral bandpass pass undiffracted through HOE to be absorbed by a black backing. Thus, the HOE combines three functions into one optic: the scanning mirror, the focusing mirror, and a narrowband filter.

  15. Forensic Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeley, R. H.

    1983-03-01

    The scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer is a versatile instrument which has many uses in the investigation of crime and preparation of scientific evidence for the courts. Major applications include microscopy and analysis of very small fragments of paint, glass and other materials which may link an individual with a scene of crime, identification of firearms residues and examination of questioned documents. Although simultaneous observation and chemical analysis of the sample is the most important feature of the instrument, other modes of operation such as cathodoluminescence spectrometry, backscattered electron imaging and direct x-ray excitation are also exploited. Marks on two bullets or cartridge cases can be compared directly by sequential scanning with a single beam or electronic linkage of two instruments. Particles of primer residue deposited on the skin and clothing when a gun is fired can be collected on adhesive tape and identified by their morphology and elemental composition. It is also possible to differentiate between the primer residues of different types of ammunition. Bullets may be identified from the small fragments left behind as they pass through the body tissues. In the examination of questioned documents the scanning electron microscope is used to establish the order in which two intersecting ink lines were written and to detect traces of chemical markers added to the security inks on official documents.

  16. Descreening of scanned images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurilin, Ilya V.; Safonov, Ilia V.; Lee, HoKeun; Kim, Sang Ho

    2010-01-01

    Screen or halftone pattern appears on the majority of images printed on electrophotographic and ink-jet printers as well as offset machines. When such halftoned image is scanned, a noisy effect called a Moiré pattern often appears on the image. There are plenty of methods proposed for descreening of images. Common way is adaptive smoothing of scanned images. However the descreening techniques face the following dilemma: deep screen reduction and restoration of contone images leads to blurring of sharp edges of text and other graphics primitives, on the other hand insufficient smoothing keeps screen in halftoned areas. We propose novel descreening algorithm that is primarily intended for preservation of sharpness and contrast of text edges and for restoration contone images from halftone ones accurately. Proposed technique for descreening of scanned images comprises five steps. The first step is decrease of edge transition slope length via local tone mapping with ordering; it is carried out before adaptive smoothing, and it allows better preservation of edges. Adaptive low-pass filter applies simplified idea of Non-Local Means filter for area classification; similarity is calculated between central block of window and different adjacent block that is selected randomly. If similarity is high then current pixel relates to flat region, otherwise pixel relates to edge region. For prevention of edges blurring, flat regions are smoothed stronger than edge regions. By random selection of blocks we avoid the computational overhead related to excessive directional edge detection. Final three stages include additional decrease of edge transition slope length using local tone mapping, increase of local contrast via modified unsharp mask filter, that uses bilateral filter with special edge-stop function for modest smoothing of edges, and global contrast stretching. These stages are intended to compensate decreasing of sharpness and contrast due to low-pass filtering, it allows

  17. Updated Conceptual Cost Estimating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    16-page report discusses development and use of NASA TR-1508, the Kennedy Space Center Aerospace Construction Price Book for preparing conceptual, budget, funding, cost-estimating, and preliminary cost-engineering reports. Updated annually from 1974 through 1985 with actual bid prices and government estimates. Includes labor and material quantities and prices with contractor and subcontractor markups for buildings, facilities, and systems at Kennedy Space Center. While data pertains to aerospace facilities, format and cost-estimating techniques guide estimation of costs in other construction applications.

  18. Fuel Cell Handbook update

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, W.R.; Hirschenhofer, J.H.; Engleman, R.R. Jr.; Stauffer, D.B.

    1993-11-01

    The objective of this work was to update the 1988 version of DOE`s Fuel Cell Handbook. Significant developments in the various fuel cell technologies required revisions to reflect state-of-the-art configurations and performance. The theoretical presentation was refined in order to make the handbook more useful to both the casual reader and fuel cell or systems analyst. In order to further emphasize the practical application of fuel cell technologies, the system integration information was expanded. In addition, practical elements, such as suggestions and guidelines to approximate fuel cell performance, were provided.

  19. Fuel Cell Handbook update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, W. R.; Hirschenhofer, J. H.; Engleman, R. R., Jr.; Stauffer, D. B.

    The objective of this work was to update the 1988 version of DOE's Fuel Cell Handbook. Significant developments in the various fuel cell technologies required revisions to reflect state-of-the-art configurations and performance. The theoretical presentation was refined in order to make the handbook more useful to both the casual reader and fuel cell or systems analyst. In order to further emphasize the practical application of fuel cell technologies, the system integration information was expanded. In addition, practical elements, such as suggestions and guidelines to approximate fuel cell performance, were provided.

  20. The applicability of SRTM in [18F]fallypride PET investigations: impact of scan durations

    PubMed Central

    Vernaleken, Ingo; Peters, Lisa; Raptis, Mardjan; Lin, Robert; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Zhou, Yun; Winz, Oliver; Rösch, Frank; Bartenstein, Peter; Wong, Dean F; Schäfer, Wolfgang M; Gründer, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    The high-affinity radioligand [18F]fallypride (FP) is frequently used for quantification of striatal/extrastriatal D2/3 receptors and the receptor occupancies of antipsychotics (APs). Its 110 minutes half-life allows long scan durations. However, the optimum scan duration is a matter of debate. This investigation focuses on scan-duration-related effects on simplified reference tissue model (SRTM) results and the time point of transient equilibrium in a large sample of dynamic FP positron emission tomography (PET) scans. Fifty drug-free and 50 AP-treated subjects underwent FP-PET scans (180 minutes scan duration). The binding potential (BPND) of the putamen, thalamus, and temporal cortex were calculated using the SRTM and the transient equilibrium model. Furthermore, receptor occupancies were calculated for AP-treated patients. Transient equilibrium in the unblocked putamen occurred after 121±29.6 minutes. The transient equilibrium occurred much earlier in the extrastriatal regions or under AP treatment. Stepwise scan shortening caused BPND underestimations of 0.58% for the first 10-minute reduction (putamen, SRTM), finally reaching 5.76% after 1 hour scan-time reduction. We observed preferential extrastriatal AP binding irrespective of the analytical method. [18F]fallypride scan durations of 180 minutes reliably reach equilibrium even in D2/3-receptor-rich regions. Moderate reductions in FP scan durations only caused small changes to SRTM results even in receptor-rich regions. Apparently, the D2/3 receptor occupancy results of APs, especially preferential extrastriatal binding observations, are not relevantly biased by inappropriate scan durations. PMID:21587267

  1. The applicability of SRTM in [(18)F]fallypride PET investigations: impact of scan durations.

    PubMed

    Vernaleken, Ingo; Peters, Lisa; Raptis, Mardjan; Lin, Robert; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Zhou, Yun; Winz, Oliver; Rösch, Frank; Bartenstein, Peter; Wong, Dean F; Schäfer, Wolfgang M; Gründer, Gerhard

    2011-09-01

    The high-affinity radioligand [(18)F]fallypride (FP) is frequently used for quantification of striatal/extrastriatal D(2/3) receptors and the receptor occupancies of antipsychotics (APs). Its 110 minutes half-life allows long scan durations. However, the optimum scan duration is a matter of debate. This investigation focuses on scan-duration-related effects on simplified reference tissue model (SRTM) results and the time point of transient equilibrium in a large sample of dynamic FP positron emission tomography (PET) scans. Fifty drug-free and 50 AP-treated subjects underwent FP-PET scans (180 minutes scan duration). The binding potential (BP(ND)) of the putamen, thalamus, and temporal cortex were calculated using the SRTM and the transient equilibrium model. Furthermore, receptor occupancies were calculated for AP-treated patients. Transient equilibrium in the unblocked putamen occurred after 121±29.6 minutes. The transient equilibrium occurred much earlier in the extrastriatal regions or under AP treatment. Stepwise scan shortening caused BP(ND) underestimations of 0.58% for the first 10-minute reduction (putamen, SRTM), finally reaching 5.76% after 1 hour scan-time reduction. We observed preferential extrastriatal AP binding irrespective of the analytical method. [(18)F]fallypride scan durations of 180 minutes reliably reach equilibrium even in D(2/3)-receptor-rich regions. Moderate reductions in FP scan durations only caused small changes to SRTM results even in receptor-rich regions. Apparently, the D(2/3) receptor occupancy results of APs, especially preferential extrastriatal binding observations, are not relevantly biased by inappropriate scan durations. PMID:21587267

  2. Scanning radiographic apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, R.D.

    1980-04-01

    Visual display of dental, medical or other radiographic images is realized with an x-ray tube in which an electron beam is scanned through an x-y raster pattern on a broad anode plate, the scanning being synchronized with the x-y sweep signals of a cathode ray tube display and the intensity signal for the display being derived from a small x-ray detector which receives x-rays that have passed through the subject to be imaged. Positioning and support of the detector are provided for by disposing the detector in a probe which may be attached to the x-ray tube at any of a plurality of different locations and by providing a plurality of such probes of different configuration in order to change focal length, to accommodate to different detector placements relative to the subject, to enhance patient comfort and to enable production of both periapical images and wider angle pantomographic images. High image definition with reduced radiation dosage is provided for by a lead glass collimator situated between the x-ray tube and subject and having a large number of spaced-apart minute radiation transmissive passages convergent on the position of the detector. Releasable mounting means enable changes of collimator in conjunction with changes of the probe to change focal length. A control circuit modifies the x-y sweep signals applied to the x-ray tube and modulates electron beam energy and current in order to correct for image distortions and other undesirable effects which can otherwise be present in a scanning x-ray system.

  3. Working Memory Updating Latency Reflects the Cost of Switching between Maintenance and Updating Modes of Operation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Yoav; Oberauer, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Updating and maintenance of information are 2 conflicting demands on working memory (WM). We examined the time required to update WM (updating latency) as a function of the sequence of updated and not-updated items within a list. Participants held a list of items in WM and updated a variable subset of them in each trial. Four experiments that vary…

  4. An update on PPAR activation by cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Saoirse Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    Some cannabinoids activate the different isoforms of PPARs (α, β and γ), as shown through the use of reporter gene assays, binding studies, selective antagonists and knockout studies. Activation of all isoforms, but primarily PPARα and γ, mediates some (but not all) of the analgesic, neuroprotective, neuronal function modulation, anti-inflammatory, metabolic, anti-tumour, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular effects of some cannabinoids, often in conjunction with activation of the more traditional target sites of action such as the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors and the TRPV1 ion channel. PPARs also mediate some of the effects of inhibitors of endocannabinoid degradation or transport. Cannabinoids may be chaperoned to the PPARs by fatty acid binding proteins. The aims of this review are to update the evidence supporting PPAR activation by cannabinoids and to review the physiological responses to cannabinoids that are mediated, and not mediated, by PPAR activation. PMID:27077495

  5. Scans Solo: A One-Person Environmental Scanning Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clagett, Craig A.

    An effective environmental scan will improve the quality of community college planning and decision making by alerting institutional leaders to the challenges and opportunities in the environment. Scanning can be done in three ways: (1) establishing a scanning committee to gather and synthesize information to guide planning; (2) sponsoring a…

  6. Updates Technologies of Media Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Whether as status notifications in news feeds or interactive prompts in online video services, updates punctuate the background routines of media by bringing a variety of changes to the attention of users. In this dissertation I argue that updates rationalize media change by making previously obscure actions of users and movements of technologies…

  7. Memory Updating and Mental Arithmetic

    PubMed Central

    Han, Cheng-Ching; Yang, Tsung-Han; Lin, Chia-Yuan; Yen, Nai-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Is domain-general memory updating ability predictive of calculation skills or are such skills better predicted by the capacity for updating specifically numerical information? Here, we used multidigit mental multiplication (MMM) as a measure for calculating skill as this operation requires the accurate maintenance and updating of information in addition to skills needed for arithmetic more generally. In Experiment 1, we found that only individual differences with regard to a task updating numerical information following addition (MUcalc) could predict the performance of MMM, perhaps owing to common elements between the task and MMM. In Experiment 2, new updating tasks were designed to clarify this: a spatial updating task with no numbers, a numerical task with no calculation, and a word task. The results showed that both MUcalc and the spatial task were able to predict the performance of MMM but only with the more difficult problems, while other updating tasks did not predict performance. It is concluded that relevant processes involved in updating the contents of working memory support mental arithmetic in adults. PMID:26869971

  8. Tiotropium Bromide: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Heredia, Josep Lluis

    2009-01-01

    Tiotropium bromide is a once-daily inhaled anticholinergic bronchodilator. It works by blocking the muscarinic receptors in airway smooth muscle. Tiotropium has a wide therapeutic margin, due to its poor gastrointestinal absorption and its very low systemic bioavailability. The drug is mainly indicated in COPD patients. Clinically relevant outcomes such as significant improvements in spirometry, hyperinflation, dyspnea, heath status, acute exacerbations and mortality have been consistently observed in tiotropium clinical trials, and the drug has been shown to reduce the risk of mortality due to cardiac-vascular disease and respiratory failure. The main side effect reported is dryness of the mouth. Some subgroups of asthmatics also seem to respond to anticholinergic drugs: among them, those with the Arg/Arg genotype for the β2-adrenergic receptor and those with a high percentage of neutrophils in sputum. PMID:19461900

  9. A-Scan Echoencephalography

    PubMed Central

    White, D. Naldrett

    1966-01-01

    The technique of A-scan echoencephalography is criticized in so far as it lacks objectivity and reproducibility. In the author's laboratory, the M-echo, being of higher amplitude than other intracranial echoes, is distinguished from other echoes by an averaging technique—a time exposure. Double transmission pulses indicate the theoretical position of echoes from the true mid-line and superimposition of far-side echoes ensures that the transducers are correctly aligned. The very considerable difficulties in identifying the anatomical structures giving rise to other echoes seen within the skull are outlined. They are largely due to variations in the reflected energy, depending upon the shape and orientation and position of the various interfaces with respect to the ultrasonic beam. Despite these difficulties and limitations, A-scan echoencephalography appears to have an important part to play as a simple, safe and quick form of neurological examination, if the technique can be made truly objective. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:5901162

  10. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.A. |

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  11. Free Motion Scanning System

    SciTech Connect

    Sword, Charles K.

    1998-06-18

    The present invention relates to an ultrasonic scanner and method for the imaging of a part surface, the scanner comprising: a probe assembly spaced apart from the surface including at least two tracking signals for emitting electromagnetic radiation and a transmitter for emitting ultrasonic waves onto a surface in order to induce at least a portion of said waves to be reflected from the surface, at least one detector for receiving the electromagnetic radiation wherein the detector is positioned to receive said radiation from the tracking signals, an analyzing means for recognizing a three-dimensional location of the tracking signals based on said emitted electromagnetic radiation, a differential conversion means for generating an output signal representative of the waveform of the reflected waves, and a means for relating said tracking signal location with the output signal and projecting an image of the resulting data. The scanner and method are particularly useful to acquire ultrasonic inspection data by scanning the probe-over a complex part surface in an arbitrary scanning pattern.

  12. Free motion scanning system

    DOEpatents

    Sword, Charles K.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to an ultrasonic scanner system and method for the imaging of a part system, the scanner comprising: a probe assembly spaced apart from the surface of the part including at least two tracking signals for emitting radiation and a transmitter for emitting ultrasonic waves onto a surface in order to induce at least a portion of the waves to be reflected from the part, at least one detector for receiving the radiation wherein the detector is positioned to receive the radiation from the tracking signals, an analyzer for recognizing a three-dimensional location of the tracking signals based on the emitted radiation, a differential converter for generating an output signal representative of the waveform of the reflected waves, and a device such as a computer for relating said tracking signal location with the output signal and projecting an image of the resulting data. The scanner and method are particularly useful to acquire ultrasonic inspection data by scanning the probe over a complex part surface in an arbitrary scanning pattern.

  13. Bone Densitometry (Bone Density Scan)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a physician specifically trained to supervise and interpret radiology examinations, will analyze the images and send a ... the best images for evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique ...

  14. Neurocritical care update.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    This update comprises six important topics under neurocritical care that require reevaluation. For post-cardiac arrest brain injury, the evaluation of the injury and its corresponding therapy, including temperature modulation, is required. Analgosedation for target temperature management is an essential strategy to prevent shivering and minimizes endogenous stress induced by catecholamine surges. For severe traumatic brain injury, the diverse effects of therapeutic hypothermia depend on the complicated pathophysiology of the condition. Continuous electroencephalogram monitoring is an essential tool for detecting nonconvulsive status epilepticus in the intensive care unit (ICU). Neurocritical care, including advanced hemodynamic monitoring, is a fundamental approach for delayed cerebral ischemia following subarachnoid hemorrhage. We must be mindful of the high percentage of ICU patients who may develop sepsis-associated brain dysfunction. PMID:27239312

  15. Update on infection control.

    PubMed

    1999-12-01

    Infection control is a dynamic and ever-changing subject and all dental staff should be kept aware of the most up-to-date procedures required to prevent the transmission of infection and should understand why these procedures are necessary. Regular monitoring and updating of all procedures in the light of new scientific evidence is necessary and all new staff must be trained in infection control procedures prior to working in the surgery. A practitioner who is routinely following an appropriate infection control policy, including the use of techniques and products of proven efficacy (perhaps through accreditation), is better placed to refute allegations arising in the course of civil litigation, health and safety at work prosecution, complaints and disciplinary procedures, or investigations by the GDC. PMID:16892574

  16. Macrofouling control technology update

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, J.L.; Armor, A.F.

    1996-12-31

    Macrofouling of condenser systems with debris, fish, clams, barnacles, mussels, algae, and other marine organisms can significantly affect power plant availability and performance. Typical difficulties include increased condenser back pressure due to reduced cooling-water flow, malfunctioning of on-line tube-cleaning equipment, and accelerated corrosion and erosion of tubing. In some severe cases, condenser back pressure increased to a point that the turbine had to be tripped. In 1981 EPRI initiated a research project to develop utility industry guidelines for reducing macrofouling problems. In 1987 EPRI published the Guidelines on Macrofouling Control Technology. Since then significant progress has been made by EPRI, utility members, equipment manufacturers, and others. The purpose of this paper is to update the macrofouling control technology. Control technology covered will include thermal treatment, mechanical removal devices, antifouling coatings, and chemical treatment.

  17. Perinatal neuroprotection update.

    PubMed

    Jelin, Angie C; Salmeen, Kirsten; Gano, Dawn; Burd, Irina; Thiet, Mari-Paule

    2016-01-01

    Antepartum, intrapartum, and neonatal events can result in a spectrum of long-term neurological sequelae, including cerebral palsy, cognitive delay, schizophrenia, and autism spectrum disorders [1]. Advances in obstetrical and neonatal care have led to survival at earlier gestational ages and consequently increasing numbers of periviable infants who are at significant risk for long-term neurological deficits. Therefore, efforts to decrease and prevent cerebral insults attempt not only to decrease preterm delivery but also to improve neurological outcomes in infants delivered preterm. We recently published a comprehensive review addressing the impacts of magnesium sulfate, therapeutic hypothermia, delayed cord clamping, infections, and prevention of preterm delivery on the modification of neurological risk [2]. In this review, we will briefly provide updates to the aforementioned topics as well as an expansion on avoidance of toxin and infections, specifically the Zika virus. PMID:27606053

  18. Perinatal neuroprotection update

    PubMed Central

    Jelin, Angie C.; Salmeen, Kirsten; Gano, Dawn; Burd, Irina; Thiet, Mari-Paule

    2016-01-01

    Antepartum, intrapartum, and neonatal events can result in a spectrum of long-term neurological sequelae, including cerebral palsy, cognitive delay, schizophrenia, and autism spectrum disorders [1]. Advances in obstetrical and neonatal care have led to survival at earlier gestational ages and consequently increasing numbers of periviable infants who are at significant risk for long-term neurological deficits. Therefore, efforts to decrease and prevent cerebral insults attempt not only to decrease preterm delivery but also to improve neurological outcomes in infants delivered preterm. We recently published a comprehensive review addressing the impacts of magnesium sulfate, therapeutic hypothermia, delayed cord clamping, infections, and prevention of preterm delivery on the modification of neurological risk [2]. In this review, we will briefly provide updates to the aforementioned topics as well as an expansion on avoidance of toxin and infections, specifically the Zika virus. PMID:27606053

  19. Update on toxic myopathies.

    PubMed

    Mastaglia, F L; Needham, M

    2012-02-01

    The toxic myopathies are a clinically and pathologically diverse group of disorders that can be caused by a variety of therapeutic agents used in clinical practice, as well as various venoms and other biological toxins. The most important iatrogenic causes are the statin and fibrate cholesterol-lowering agents that can cause a severe necrotizing myopathy and acute rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria. The current update focuses on the mechanisms of statin myotoxicity and the importance of genetic predisposing factors for statin myopathy, as well as the recently described form of necrotizing autoimmune myopathy, which is associated with antibodies to the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase enzyme and is responsive to aggressive immunotherapy. Mitochondrial myopathies associated with antiretroviral agents and the pyrimidine nucleoside analogue clevudine, and recent reports of myopathies caused by ingestion of red yeast rice and toxic species of mushrooms are also discussed. PMID:21968786

  20. ILRS Website Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Carey E.; Torrence, Mark H.; Pollack, Nathan H.; Tyahla, Lori J.

    2013-01-01

    The ILRS website, http://ilrs.gsfc.nasa.gov, is the central source of information for all aspects of the service. The website provides information on the organization and operation of the ILRS and descriptions of ILRS components data, and products. Furthermore, the website provides an entry point to the archive of these data products available through the data centers. Links are provided to extensive information on the ILRS network stations including performance assesments and data quality evaluations. Descriptions of suported satellite missions (current, future, and past) are provided to aid in station acquisition and data analysis. The website was reently redesigned. Content was reviewed during the update process, ensuring information is current and useful. This poster will provide specific examples of key sections, applicaitons, and webpages.

  1. Updating the Read Codes

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, David; Comp, Dip; Schulz, Erich; Brown, Philip; Price, Colin

    1997-01-01

    Abstract The Read Codes are a hierarchically-arranged controlled clinical vocabulary introduced in the early 1980s and now consisting of three maintained versions of differing complexity. The code sets are dynamic, and are updated quarterly in response to requests from users including clinicians in both primary and secondary care, software suppliers, and advice from a network of specialist healthcare professionals. The codes' continual evolution of content, both across and within versions, highlights tensions between different users and uses of coded clinical data. Internal processes, external interactions and new structural features implemented by the NHS Centre for Coding and Classification (NHSCCC) for user interactive maintenance of the Read Codes are described, and over 2000 items of user feedback episodes received over a 15-month period are analysed. PMID:9391934

  2. LDEF environment modeling updates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Tim; Rantanen, Ray; Whitaker, Ann F.

    1995-01-01

    An updated gas dynamics model for gas interactions around the LDEF is presented that includes improved scattering algorithms. The primary improvement is more accurate predictions of surface fluxes in the wake region. The code used is the Integrated Spacecraft Environments Model (ISEM). Additionally, initial results of a detailed ISEM prediction model of the Solar Array Passive LDEF Experiment (SAMPLE), A0171, is presented. This model includes details of the A0171 geometry and outgassing characteristics of the many surfaces on the experiment. The detailed model includes the multiple scattering that exists between the ambient atmosphere, LDEF outgassing, and atomic oxygen erosion products. Predictions are made for gas densities, surface fluxes and deposition at three different time periods of the LDEF mission.

  3. OctreoScan positive Crohn's disease mimicking an ileal carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Marko, Jamie; Lamba, Reema; Miller, Frank; Buchman, Alan; Spies, Stewart; Nikolaidis, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Somatostatin receptors have been identified in many tissues throughout the human body. Alterations in the expression of somatostatin receptors have been reported in many disease states including both tumorous and nontumorous conditions. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy utilizing OctreoScan (Mallinckrodt Medical, Inc., St. Louis, MO), a radiolabled form of octreotide, has been reported to be a highly sensitive imaging technique for identifying pathology, such as neuroendocrine tumors, that are somatostatin receptor dense. Unfortunately, many conditions cause an increase in the quantity of somatostatin receptors and therefore may cause false positive Octreoscans. In this report, we discuss the alterations in somatostatin receptors that occur with Crohn's disease and describe a case of an OctreoScan-positive inflammatory mass mimicking a carcinoid tumor. PMID:18097293

  4. ADAS Update and Maintainability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2000, both the National Weather Service Melbourne (NWS MLB) and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) have used a local data integration system (LOIS) as part of their forecast and warning operations. The original LOIS was developed by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in 1998 (Manobianco and Case 1998) and has undergone subsequent improvements. Each has benefited from three-dimensional (3-D) analyses that are delivered to forecasters every 15 minutes across the peninsula of Florida. The intent is to generate products that enhance short-range weather forecasts issued in support of NWS MLB and SMG operational requirements within East Central Florida. The current LDIS uses the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (AD AS) package as its core, which integrates a wide variety of national, regional, and local observational data sets. It assimilates all available real-time data within its domain and is run at a finer spatial and temporal resolution than current national or regional-scale analysis packages. As such, it provides local forecasters with a more comprehensive understanding of evolving fine-scale weather features. Over the years, the LDIS has become problematic to maintain since it depends on AMU-developed shell scripts that were written for an earlier version of the ADAS software. The goals of this task were to update the NWS MLB/SMG LDIS with the latest version of ADAS, incorporate new sources of observational data, and upgrade and modify the AMU-developed shell scripts written to govern the system. In addition, the previously developed ADAS graphical user interface (GUI) was updated. Operationally, these upgrades will result in more accurate depictions of the current local environment to help with short-range weather forecasting applications, while also offering an improved initialization for local versions of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model used by both groups.

  5. Homeodomain proteins: an update.

    PubMed

    Bürglin, Thomas R; Affolter, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Here, we provide an update of our review on homeobox genes that we wrote together with Walter Gehring in 1994. Since then, comprehensive surveys of homeobox genes have become possible due to genome sequencing projects. Using the 103 Drosophila homeobox genes as example, we present an updated classification. In animals, there are 16 major classes, ANTP, PRD, PRD-LIKE, POU, HNF, CUT (with four subclasses: ONECUT, CUX, SATB, and CMP), LIM, ZF, CERS, PROS, SIX/SO, plus the TALE superclass with the classes IRO, MKX, TGIF, PBC, and MEIS. In plants, there are 11 major classes, i.e., HD-ZIP (with four subclasses: I to IV), WOX, NDX, PHD, PLINC, LD, DDT, SAWADEE, PINTOX, and the two TALE classes KNOX and BEL. Most of these classes encode additional domains apart from the homeodomain. Numerous insights have been obtained in the last two decades into how homeodomain proteins bind to DNA and increase their specificity by interacting with other proteins to regulate cell- and tissue-specific gene expression. Not only protein-DNA base pair contacts are important for proper target selection; recent experiments also reveal that the shape of the DNA plays a role in specificity. Using selected examples, we highlight different mechanisms of homeodomain protein-DNA interaction. The PRD class of homeobox genes was of special interest to Walter Gehring in the last two decades. The PRD class comprises six families in Bilateria, and tinkers with four different motifs, i.e., the PAIRED domain, the Groucho-interacting motif EH1 (aka Octapeptide or TN), the homeodomain, and the OAR motif. Homologs of the co-repressor protein Groucho are also present in plants (TOPLESS), where they have been shown to interact with small amphipathic motives (EAR), and in yeast (TUP1), where we find an EH1-like motif in MATα2. PMID:26464018

  6. The Scanning Process: Getting Started.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renfro, William L.; Morrison, James L.

    1983-01-01

    Scanning the external environment will become more essential to colleges in the coming decade. Developing an environmental scanning system can identify important emerging issues that may constitute either threats or opportunities. The organizational features of a mature scanning process are described. (MLW)

  7. Breast and gastrointestinal cancer updates from ASCO 2015

    PubMed Central

    Dawood, Shaheenah

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the updates presented at the ASCO 2015 symposium in breast and gastrointestinal malignancies. Some were practice changing while others gave us an exciting glimpse into what's to come in the very near future. Immunotherapy was the buzz word this year with data presented on every tumor site. Data on the efficacy of anti PD-1 agents in colorectal, hepatocellular and gastric cancer were presented. In breast cancer we saw data on a new and exciting therapeutic target in the form of androgen receptor among triple receptor negative breast tumors presented. Positive results of the PALOMA 3 trial were presented that has given women with hormone receptor positive metastatic breast cancer another therapeutic option. Furthermore data on strategies to further improve anti her2 therapy, optimizing of chemotherapy in the early and advanced stage and various strategies to improve endocrine therapy among patients with breast cancer were presented. PMID:26855529

  8. Breast and gastrointestinal cancer updates from ASCO 2015.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Shaheenah

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the updates presented at the ASCO 2015 symposium in breast and gastrointestinal malignancies. Some were practice changing while others gave us an exciting glimpse into what's to come in the very near future. Immunotherapy was the buzz word this year with data presented on every tumor site. Data on the efficacy of anti PD-1 agents in colorectal, hepatocellular and gastric cancer were presented. In breast cancer we saw data on a new and exciting therapeutic target in the form of androgen receptor among triple receptor negative breast tumors presented. Positive results of the PALOMA 3 trial were presented that has given women with hormone receptor positive metastatic breast cancer another therapeutic option. Furthermore data on strategies to further improve anti her2 therapy, optimizing of chemotherapy in the early and advanced stage and various strategies to improve endocrine therapy among patients with breast cancer were presented. PMID:26855529

  9. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amemiya, Shigeru; Bard, Allen J.; Fan, Fu-Ren F.; Mirkin, Michael V.; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2008-07-01

    This review describes work done in scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) since 2000 with an emphasis on new applications and important trends, such as nanometer-sized tips. SECM has been adapted to investigate charge transport across liquid/liquid interfaces and to probe charge transport in thin films and membranes. It has been used in biological systems like single cells to study ion transport in channels, as well as cellular and enzyme activity. It is also a powerful and useful tool for the evaluation of the electrocatalytic activities of different materials for useful reactions, such as oxygen reduction and hydrogen oxidation. SECM has also been used as an electrochemical tool for studies of the local properties and reactivity of a wide variety of materials, including metals, insulators, and semiconductors. Finally, SECM has been combined with several other nonelectrochemical techniques, such as atomic force microscopy, to enhance and complement the information available from SECM alone.

  10. A scanning cavity microscope

    PubMed Central

    Mader, Matthias; Reichel, Jakob; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Hunger, David

    2015-01-01

    Imaging the optical properties of individual nanosystems beyond fluorescence can provide a wealth of information. However, the minute signals for absorption and dispersion are challenging to observe, and only specialized techniques requiring sophisticated noise rejection are available. Here we use signal enhancement in a high-finesse scanning optical microcavity to demonstrate ultra-sensitive imaging. Harnessing multiple interactions of probe light with a sample within an optical resonator, we achieve a 1,700-fold signal enhancement compared with diffraction-limited microscopy. We demonstrate quantitative imaging of the extinction cross-section of gold nanoparticles with a sensitivity less than 1 nm2; we show a method to improve the spatial resolution potentially below the diffraction limit by using higher order cavity modes, and we present measurements of the birefringence and extinction contrast of gold nanorods. The demonstrated simultaneous enhancement of absorptive and dispersive signals promises intriguing potential for optical studies of nanomaterials, molecules and biological nanosystems. PMID:26105690