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Sample records for receptor-stimulated cortical neurons

  1. Angiotensin II type-2 receptor stimulation induces neuronal VEGF synthesis after cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Mateos, Laura; Perez-Alvarez, Maria Jose; Wandosell, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    Intense efforts are being undertaken to understand the pathobiology of ischemia and to develop novel and effective treatments. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) is related with a beneficial role in neurodegenerative disorders, including ischemia. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we have established that AT2R stimulation by C21 compound, a specific AT2R agonist, caused a VEGF upregulation. Using mouse primary cortical neurons exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), we established that this effect was mediated by a mechanism dependent of mTORC1 signaling since mTOR inhibition abolished the C21-induced VEGF upregulation. Also, we have temporally characterized the changes on VEGF levels after ischemia induction in rats using two different approaches: transient and permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO and pMCAO). VEGF levels were permanently augmented after reperfusion (tMCAO) whereas lower levels of VEGF were found after pMCAO, remarkably at 21days. Therefore, C21 compound accelerated the recovery of the neurological status of pMCAO rats, reduced the ischemic damage area and abolished pMCAO-induced VEGF downregulation at 21days. This effect of C21 compound was mainly observed in neurons of the peri-infarct area. Our results suggest that a C21-induced VEGF upregulation may be crucial after an ischemic neuronal insult in both of our experimental approaches. This upregulation was mediated by a mechanism dependent of Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, since mTOR inhibition abolished the VEGF upregulation induced by C21. Considering that VEGF is involved in regenerative processes, we propose that AT2R activation could be used as a potential pharmacological strategy after ischemic stroke. PMID:27045356

  2. Biomechanics of Single Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bernick, Kristin B.; Prevost, Thibault P.; Suresh, Subra; Socrate, Simona

    2011-01-01

    This study presents experimental results and computational analysis of the large strain dynamic behavior of single neurons in vitro with the objective of formulating a novel quantitative framework for the biomechanics of cortical neurons. Relying on the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique, novel testing protocols are developed to enable the characterization of neural soma deformability over a range of indentation rates spanning three orders of magnitude – 10, 1, and 0.1 μm/s. Modified spherical AFM probes were utilized to compress the cell bodies of neonatal rat cortical neurons in load, unload, reload and relaxation conditions. The cell response showed marked hysteretic features, strong non-linearities, and substantial time/rate dependencies. The rheological data were complemented with geometrical measurements of cell body morphology, i.e. cross-diameter and height estimates. A constitutive model, validated by the present experiments, is proposed to quantify the mechanical behavior of cortical neurons. The model aimed to correlate empirical findings with measurable degrees of (hyper-) elastic resilience and viscosity at the cell level. The proposed formulation, predicated upon previous constitutive model developments undertaken at the cortical tissue level, was implemented into a three-dimensional finite element framework. The simulated cell response was calibrated to the experimental measurements under the selected test conditions, providing a novel single cell model that could form the basis for further refinements. PMID:20971217

  3. Characterization of the inward current induced by metabotropic glutamate receptor stimulation in rat ventromedial hypothalamic neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K; Boden, P R

    1997-01-01

    1. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were made from rat ventromedial hypothalamic neurones in slices of brain tissue in vitro. Bath application of 50 microM (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (1S,3R-ACPD) depolarized all neurones tested by activation of an inward current of approximately 55 pA at -60 mV. 2. The inward current elicited by 1S,3R-ACPD was unaffected by K+ channel blockade with external Cs+, Ba2+ or TEA. However, the current was significantly reduced by replacement of the external NaCl with either Tris-HCl or LiCl. 3. The 1S,3R-ACPD-induced current was reduced by the heavy metal ions Ni2+ or La3+ and also by the Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange current inhibitor 3',4'-dichlorobenzamil. 4. The effects of 1S,3R-ACPD were mimicked by the group I metabotropic agonist 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) but not by the group III selective agonist, L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutanoate (L-AP4). Furthermore, the effects of 1S,3R-ACPD were inhibited by the metabotropic antagonists alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG) and 1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA) but not by the presynaptic metabotropic receptor antagonists alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG) or alpha-methyl-4-tetrazolylphenylglycine (MTPG). 5. Photorelease of caged GDP beta S inside neurones irreversibly blocked the 1S,3R-ACPD-induced current whilst photolysis of caged GTP gamma S inside neurones irreversibly potentiated this current. 6. The PLC inhibitor U-73,122 significantly reduced the size of the inward current induced by 1S,3R-ACPD. This effect was not mimicked by the inactive analogue U-73,343. 7. Flash photolysis of the caged calcium chelator diazo-2 inside neurones diminished the response to 1S,3R-ACPD. 8. It is concluded that group I metabotropic glutamate receptors depolarize neurones in the VMH by activation of a Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange current through a G-protein coupled increase in intracellular Ca2+. PMID:9401972

  4. Characterization of the inward current induced by metabotropic glutamate receptor stimulation in rat ventromedial hypothalamic neurones.

    PubMed

    Lee, K; Boden, P R

    1997-11-01

    1. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were made from rat ventromedial hypothalamic neurones in slices of brain tissue in vitro. Bath application of 50 microM (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (1S,3R-ACPD) depolarized all neurones tested by activation of an inward current of approximately 55 pA at -60 mV. 2. The inward current elicited by 1S,3R-ACPD was unaffected by K+ channel blockade with external Cs+, Ba2+ or TEA. However, the current was significantly reduced by replacement of the external NaCl with either Tris-HCl or LiCl. 3. The 1S,3R-ACPD-induced current was reduced by the heavy metal ions Ni2+ or La3+ and also by the Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange current inhibitor 3',4'-dichlorobenzamil. 4. The effects of 1S,3R-ACPD were mimicked by the group I metabotropic agonist 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) but not by the group III selective agonist, L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutanoate (L-AP4). Furthermore, the effects of 1S,3R-ACPD were inhibited by the metabotropic antagonists alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG) and 1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA) but not by the presynaptic metabotropic receptor antagonists alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG) or alpha-methyl-4-tetrazolylphenylglycine (MTPG). 5. Photorelease of caged GDP beta S inside neurones irreversibly blocked the 1S,3R-ACPD-induced current whilst photolysis of caged GTP gamma S inside neurones irreversibly potentiated this current. 6. The PLC inhibitor U-73,122 significantly reduced the size of the inward current induced by 1S,3R-ACPD. This effect was not mimicked by the inactive analogue U-73,343. 7. Flash photolysis of the caged calcium chelator diazo-2 inside neurones diminished the response to 1S,3R-ACPD. 8. It is concluded that group I metabotropic glutamate receptors depolarize neurones in the VMH by activation of a Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange current through a G-protein coupled increase in intracellular Ca2+. PMID:9401972

  5. Retinoic acid receptor stimulation protects midbrain dopaminergic neurons from inflammatory degeneration via BDNF-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Katsuki, Hiroshi; Kurimoto, Emi; Takemori, Sachiko; Kurauchi, Yuki; Hisatsune, Akinori; Isohama, Yoichiro; Izumi, Yasuhiko; Kume, Toshiaki; Shudo, Koichi; Akaike, Akinori

    2009-07-01

    Functions of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) in adult CNS have been poorly characterized. Here we investigated potential neuroprotective action of tamibarotene (Am80), an RARalpha/beta agonist available for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia, on midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Am80 protected dopaminergic neurons in rat midbrain slice culture from injury mediated by lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia, without affecting production of nitric oxide, a key mediator of cell injury. The effect of Am80 was mimicked by another RAR agonist, TAC-101, but not by a retinoid X receptor agonist, HX630, and HX630 did not synergize with Am80. We observed neuronal expression of RARalpha and RARbeta in midbrain slice culture and also found that Am80 increased tissue level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA. Exogenous BDNF prevented dopaminergic neurodegeneration, and the neuroprotective effect of Am80 was suppressed by a TrkB inhibitor, K252a, or by anti-BDNF neutralizing antibody. These results reveal a novel action of RARs mediated by enhancement of BDNF expression. Finally, oral administration of Am80 prevented dopaminergic cell loss in the substantia nigra induced by local injection of lipopolysaccharide in mice, indicating that RARs are a promising target of therapeutics for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19457078

  6. Recombinant Probes Reveal Dynamic Localization of CaMKIIα within Somata of Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Rudy J.; Roberts, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    In response to NMDA receptor stimulation, CaMKIIα moves rapidly from a diffuse distribution within the shafts of neuronal dendrites to a clustered postsynaptic distribution. However, less is known about CaMKIIα localization and trafficking within neuronal somata. Here we use a novel recombinant probe capable of labeling endogenous CaMKIIα in living rat neurons to examine its localization and trafficking within the somata of cortical neurons. This probe, which was generated using an mRNA display selection, binds to endogenous CaMKIIα at high affinity and specificity following expression in rat cortical neurons in culture. In ∼45% of quiescent cortical neurons, labeled clusters of CaMKIIα 1–4 μm in diameter were present. Upon exposure to glutamate and glycine, CaMKIIα clusters disappeared in a Ca2+-dependent manner within seconds. Moreover, minutes after the removal of glutamate and glycine, the clusters returned to their original configuration. The clusters, which also appear in cortical neurons in sections taken from mouse brains, contain actin and disperse upon exposure to cytochalasin D, an actin depolymerizer. In conclusion, within the soma, CaMKII localizes and traffics in a manner that is distinct from its localization and trafficking within the dendrites. PMID:24005308

  7. ALUMINUM DECREASES MUSCARINIC, ADRENERGIC, AND METABOTROPIC RECEPTOR-STIMULATED PHOSPHOINOSITIDE HYDROLYSIS IN HIPPOCAMPAL AND CORTICAL SLICES FROM RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of aluminum chloride (AlCl3) (0.1 to 1000 um) on inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation stimulated by carbachol (CARB), norepinephrine (NE) or quisqualate (QUIS) were examined in rat hippocampal and cortical slices. n the absence of agonist, only 1000 um AIC1 significantly ...

  8. Optimizing sound features for cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    deCharms, R C; Blake, D T; Merzenich, M M

    1998-05-29

    The brain's cerebral cortex decomposes visual images into information about oriented edges, direction and velocity information, and color. How does the cortex decompose perceived sounds? A reverse correlation technique demonstrates that neurons in the primary auditory cortex of the awake primate have complex patterns of sound-feature selectivity that indicate sensitivity to stimulus edges in frequency or in time, stimulus transitions in frequency or intensity, and feature conjunctions. This allows the creation of classes of stimuli matched to the processing characteristics of auditory cortical neurons. Stimuli designed for a particular neuron's preferred feature pattern can drive that neuron with higher sustained firing rates than have typically been recorded with simple stimuli. These data suggest that the cortex decomposes an auditory scene into component parts using a feature-processing system reminiscent of that used for the cortical decomposition of visual images. PMID:9603734

  9. Serotonin modulation of cortical neurons and networks

    PubMed Central

    Celada, Pau; Puig, M. Victoria; Artigas, Francesc

    2013-01-01

    The serotonergic pathways originating in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DR and MnR, respectively) are critically involved in cortical function. Serotonin (5-HT), acting on postsynaptic and presynaptic receptors, is involved in cognition, mood, impulse control and motor functions by (1) modulating the activity of different neuronal types, and (2) varying the release of other neurotransmitters, such as glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine and dopamine. Also, 5-HT seems to play an important role in cortical development. Of all cortical regions, the frontal lobe is the area most enriched in serotonergic axons and 5-HT receptors. 5-HT and selective receptor agonists modulate the excitability of cortical neurons and their discharge rate through the activation of several receptor subtypes, of which the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT3 subtypes play a major role. Little is known, however, on the role of other excitatory receptors moderately expressed in cortical areas, such as 5-HT2C, 5-HT4, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors are key players and exert opposite effects on the activity of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The activation of 5-HT1A receptors in mPFC hyperpolarizes pyramidal neurons whereas that of 5-HT2A receptors results in neuronal depolarization, reduction of the afterhyperpolarization and increase of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and of discharge rate. 5-HT can also stimulate excitatory (5-HT2A and 5-HT3) and inhibitory (5-HT1A) receptors in GABA interneurons to modulate synaptic GABA inputs onto pyramidal neurons. Likewise, the pharmacological manipulation of various 5-HT receptors alters oscillatory activity in PFC, suggesting that 5-HT is also involved in the control of cortical network activity. A better understanding of the actions of 5-HT in PFC may help to develop treatments for mood and cognitive disorders associated with an abnormal function of the frontal lobe

  10. High-Degree Neurons Feed Cortical Computations.

    PubMed

    Timme, Nicholas M; Ito, Shinya; Myroshnychenko, Maxym; Nigam, Sunny; Shimono, Masanori; Yeh, Fang-Chin; Hottowy, Pawel; Litke, Alan M; Beggs, John M

    2016-05-01

    Recent work has shown that functional connectivity among cortical neurons is highly varied, with a small percentage of neurons having many more connections than others. Also, recent theoretical developments now make it possible to quantify how neurons modify information from the connections they receive. Therefore, it is now possible to investigate how information modification, or computation, depends on the number of connections a neuron receives (in-degree) or sends out (out-degree). To do this, we recorded the simultaneous spiking activity of hundreds of neurons in cortico-hippocampal slice cultures using a high-density 512-electrode array. This preparation and recording method combination produced large numbers of neurons recorded at temporal and spatial resolutions that are not currently available in any in vivo recording system. We utilized transfer entropy (a well-established method for detecting linear and nonlinear interactions in time series) and the partial information decomposition (a powerful, recently developed tool for dissecting multivariate information processing into distinct parts) to quantify computation between neurons where information flows converged. We found that computations did not occur equally in all neurons throughout the networks. Surprisingly, neurons that computed large amounts of information tended to receive connections from high out-degree neurons. However, the in-degree of a neuron was not related to the amount of information it computed. To gain insight into these findings, we developed a simple feedforward network model. We found that a degree-modified Hebbian wiring rule best reproduced the pattern of computation and degree correlation results seen in the real data. Interestingly, this rule also maximized signal propagation in the presence of network-wide correlations, suggesting a mechanism by which cortex could deal with common random background input. These are the first results to show that the extent to which a neuron

  11. High-Degree Neurons Feed Cortical Computations

    PubMed Central

    Timme, Nicholas M.; Ito, Shinya; Shimono, Masanori; Yeh, Fang-Chin; Litke, Alan M.; Beggs, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has shown that functional connectivity among cortical neurons is highly varied, with a small percentage of neurons having many more connections than others. Also, recent theoretical developments now make it possible to quantify how neurons modify information from the connections they receive. Therefore, it is now possible to investigate how information modification, or computation, depends on the number of connections a neuron receives (in-degree) or sends out (out-degree). To do this, we recorded the simultaneous spiking activity of hundreds of neurons in cortico-hippocampal slice cultures using a high-density 512-electrode array. This preparation and recording method combination produced large numbers of neurons recorded at temporal and spatial resolutions that are not currently available in any in vivo recording system. We utilized transfer entropy (a well-established method for detecting linear and nonlinear interactions in time series) and the partial information decomposition (a powerful, recently developed tool for dissecting multivariate information processing into distinct parts) to quantify computation between neurons where information flows converged. We found that computations did not occur equally in all neurons throughout the networks. Surprisingly, neurons that computed large amounts of information tended to receive connections from high out-degree neurons. However, the in-degree of a neuron was not related to the amount of information it computed. To gain insight into these findings, we developed a simple feedforward network model. We found that a degree-modified Hebbian wiring rule best reproduced the pattern of computation and degree correlation results seen in the real data. Interestingly, this rule also maximized signal propagation in the presence of network-wide correlations, suggesting a mechanism by which cortex could deal with common random background input. These are the first results to show that the extent to which a neuron

  12. Synaptogenesis in Purified Cortical Subplate Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shatz, Carla J.

    2009-01-01

    An ideal preparation for investigating events during synaptogenesis would be one in which synapses are sparse, but can be induced at will using a rapid, exogenous trigger. We describe a culture system of immunopurified subplate neurons in which synaptogenesis can be triggered, providing the first homogeneous culture of neocortical neurons for the investigation of synapse development. Synapses in immunopurified rat subplate neurons are sparse, and can be induced by a 48-h exposure to feeder layers of neurons and glia, an induction more rapid than any previously reported. Induced synapses are electrophysiologically functional and ultrastructurally normal. Microarray and real-time PCR experiments reveal a new program of gene expression accompanying synaptogenesis. Surprisingly few known synaptic genes are upregulated during the first 24 h of synaptogenesis; Gene Ontology annotation reveals a preferential upregulation of synaptic genes only at a later time. In situ hybridization confirms that some of the genes regulated in cultures are also expressed in the developing cortex. This culture system provides both a means of studying synapse formation in a homogeneous population of cortical neurons, and better synchronization of synaptogenesis, permitting the investigation of neuron-wide events following the triggering of synapse formation. PMID:19029062

  13. More sensitivity of cortical GABAergic neurons than glutamatergic neurons in response to acidosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hua; Li, Fang; Wang, Chunyan; Su, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-25

    Acidosis impairs brain functions. Neuron-specific mechanisms underlying acidosis-induced brain dysfunction remain elusive. We studied the sensitivity of cortical GABAergic neurons and glutamatergic neurons to acidosis by whole-cell recording in brain slices. The acidification to the neurons was induced by perfusing artificial cerebral spinal fluid with lower pH. This acidification impairs excitability and synaptic transmission in the glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. Acidosis impairs spiking capacity in the GABAergic neurons more than in the glutamatergic neurons. Acidosis also strengthens glutamatergic synaptic transmission and attenuates GABAergic synaptic transmission on the GABAergic neurons more than the glutamatergic neurons, which results in the functional impairment of these GABAergic neurons. This acidosis-induced dysfunction predominantly in the cortical GABAergic neurons drives the homeostasis of neuronal networks toward overexcitation and exacerbates neuronal impairment. PMID:27116702

  14. Secretory function in subplate neurons during cortical development

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Shinichi; Al-Hasani, Hannah; Hoerder-Suabedissen, Anna; Wang, Wei Zhi; Molnár, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Subplate cells are among the first generated neurons in the mammalian cerebral cortex and have been implicated in the establishment of cortical wiring. In rodents some subplate neurons persist into adulthood. Here we would like to highlight several converging findings which suggest a novel secretory function of subplate neurons during cortical development. Throughout the postnatal period in rodents, subplate neurons have highly developed rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are under an ER stress condition. By comparing gene expression between subplate and layer 6, we found that several genes encoding secreted proteins are highly expressed in subplate neurons. One of these secreted proteins, neuroserpin, encoded by the serpini1 gene, is localized to the ER in subplate cells. We propose that subplate might influence cortical circuit formation through a transient secretory function. PMID:25859180

  15. Effects of Morphology Constraint on Electrophysiological Properties of Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Geng; Du, Liping; Jin, Lei; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in engineering nerve cells in vitro to control architecture and connectivity of cultured neuronal networks or to build neuronal networks with predictable computational function. Pattern technologies, such as micro-contact printing, have been developed to design ordered neuronal networks. However, electrophysiological characteristics of the single patterned neuron haven’t been reported. Here, micro-contact printing, using polyolefine polymer (POP) stamps with high resolution, was employed to grow cortical neurons in a designed structure. The results demonstrated that the morphology of patterned neurons was well constrained, and the number of dendrites was decreased to be about 2. Our electrophysiological results showed that alterations of dendritic morphology affected firing patterns of neurons and neural excitability. When stimulated by current, though both patterned and un-patterned neurons presented regular spiking, the dynamics and strength of the response were different. The un-patterned neurons exhibited a monotonically increasing firing frequency in response to injected current, while the patterned neurons first exhibited frequency increase and then a slow decrease. Our findings indicate that the decrease in dendritic complexity of cortical neurons will influence their electrophysiological characteristics and alter their information processing activity, which could be considered when designing neuronal circuitries. PMID:27052791

  16. Effects of Morphology Constraint on Electrophysiological Properties of Cortical Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Geng; Du, Liping; Jin, Lei; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    There is growing interest in engineering nerve cells in vitro to control architecture and connectivity of cultured neuronal networks or to build neuronal networks with predictable computational function. Pattern technologies, such as micro-contact printing, have been developed to design ordered neuronal networks. However, electrophysiological characteristics of the single patterned neuron haven’t been reported. Here, micro-contact printing, using polyolefine polymer (POP) stamps with high resolution, was employed to grow cortical neurons in a designed structure. The results demonstrated that the morphology of patterned neurons was well constrained, and the number of dendrites was decreased to be about 2. Our electrophysiological results showed that alterations of dendritic morphology affected firing patterns of neurons and neural excitability. When stimulated by current, though both patterned and un-patterned neurons presented regular spiking, the dynamics and strength of the response were different. The un-patterned neurons exhibited a monotonically increasing firing frequency in response to injected current, while the patterned neurons first exhibited frequency increase and then a slow decrease. Our findings indicate that the decrease in dendritic complexity of cortical neurons will influence their electrophysiological characteristics and alter their information processing activity, which could be considered when designing neuronal circuitries.

  17. Effects of Morphology Constraint on Electrophysiological Properties of Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Geng; Du, Liping; Jin, Lei; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in engineering nerve cells in vitro to control architecture and connectivity of cultured neuronal networks or to build neuronal networks with predictable computational function. Pattern technologies, such as micro-contact printing, have been developed to design ordered neuronal networks. However, electrophysiological characteristics of the single patterned neuron haven't been reported. Here, micro-contact printing, using polyolefine polymer (POP) stamps with high resolution, was employed to grow cortical neurons in a designed structure. The results demonstrated that the morphology of patterned neurons was well constrained, and the number of dendrites was decreased to be about 2. Our electrophysiological results showed that alterations of dendritic morphology affected firing patterns of neurons and neural excitability. When stimulated by current, though both patterned and un-patterned neurons presented regular spiking, the dynamics and strength of the response were different. The un-patterned neurons exhibited a monotonically increasing firing frequency in response to injected current, while the patterned neurons first exhibited frequency increase and then a slow decrease. Our findings indicate that the decrease in dendritic complexity of cortical neurons will influence their electrophysiological characteristics and alter their information processing activity, which could be considered when designing neuronal circuitries. PMID:27052791

  18. Hydrolysis of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-stimulated cAMP and cGMP by PDE4 and PDE2 phosphodiesterases in primary neuronal cultures of rat cerebral cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Suvarna, Neesha U; O'Donnell, James M

    2002-07-01

    Stimulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors on neurons activates both cAMP and cGMP signaling pathways. Experiments were carried out to determine which phosphodiesterase (PDE) families are involved in the hydrolysis of the cyclic nucleotides formed via this mechanism, using primary neuronal cultures prepared from rat cerebral cortex and hippocampus. The nonselective PDE inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) potentiated the ability of NMDA to increase cAMP and cGMP. However, among the family-selective inhibitors, only the PDE4 inhibitor rolipram enhanced the ability of NMDA to increase cAMP in the neurons. In contrast, only the PDE2 inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (EHNA) enhanced the ability of NMDA to increase cGMP. Neither adenosine nor an adenosine deaminase inhibitor mimicked the effect of EHNA; this suggests that EHNA's inhibition of PDE2, not its effects on adenosine metabolism, mediates its effects on NMDA-stimulated cGMP concentrations. The PDE inhibitor-augmented effects of NMDA on cAMP and cGMP formation were antagonized by 5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d] cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate (MK-801), verifying NMDA receptor mediation. In contrast, only NMDA-mediated cGMP formation was affected by altering either nitric oxide signaling or guanylyl cyclase; this suggests that NMDA-induced changes in cAMP are not secondary to altered cGMP concentrations. Overall, the present findings indicate that cAMP and cGMP formed in neurons as a result of NMDA receptor stimulation are hydrolyzed by PDE4 and PDE2, respectively. Selective inhibitors of the two PDE families will differentially affect the functional consequences of activation of these two signaling pathways by NMDA receptor stimulation. PMID:12065724

  19. Early phenotype expression of cortical neurons: Evidence that a subclass of migrating neurons have callosal axons

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M.L.; Rakic, P.; Goldman-Rakic, P.S. )

    1991-02-15

    The use of ({sup 3}H)thymidine labeling in combination with various axonal transport tracers has revealed that a subset of migrating neurons in the fetal monkey cerebrum issue axons to the opposite cerebral hemisphere while still migrating to their final positions in the cortical plate. Other cortical neurons with the same birthdate (i.e., that underwent their last round of DNA synthesis on the same day) are not retrogradely labeled by tracer injections of the opposite hemisphere. These findings suggest that the cardinal distinction between projection and local circuit neurons may be specified in postmitotic neurons before they acquire their final positions in the cortex.

  20. Somatostatin-expressing neurons in cortical networks.

    PubMed

    Urban-Ciecko, Joanna; Barth, Alison L

    2016-07-01

    Somatostatin-expressing GABAergic neurons constitute a major class of inhibitory neurons in the mammalian cortex and are characterized by dense wiring into the local network and high basal firing activity that persists in the absence of synaptic input. This firing provides both GABA type A receptor (GABAAR)- and GABABR-mediated inhibition that operates at fast and slow timescales. The activity of somatostatin-expressing neurons is regulated by brain state, during learning and in rewarded behaviour. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of how this class of cells can control network activity, with specific reference to how this is constrained by their anatomical and electrophysiological properties. PMID:27225074

  1. Control of cortical neuronal migration by glutamate and GABA

    PubMed Central

    Luhmann, Heiko J.; Fukuda, A.; Kilb, W.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal migration in the cortex is controlled by the paracrine action of the classical neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. Glutamate controls radial migration of pyramidal neurons by acting primarily on NMDA receptors and regulates tangential migration of inhibitory interneurons by activating non-NMDA and NMDA receptors. GABA, acting on ionotropic GABAA-rho and GABAA receptors, has a dichotomic action on radially migrating neurons by acting as a GO signal in lower layers and as a STOP signal in upper cortical plate (CP), respectively. Metabotropic GABAB receptors promote radial migration into the CP and tangential migration of interneurons. Besides GABA, the endogenous GABAergic agonist taurine is a relevant agonist controlling radial migration. To a smaller extent glycine receptor activation can also influence radial and tangential migration. Activation of glutamate and GABA receptors causes increases in intracellular Ca2+ transients, which promote neuronal migration by acting on the cytoskeleton. Pharmacological or genetic manipulation of glutamate or GABA receptors during early corticogenesis induce heterotopic cell clusters in upper layers and loss of cortical lamination, i.e., neuronal migration disorders which can be associated with neurological or neuropsychiatric diseases. The pivotal role of NMDA and ionotropic GABA receptors in cortical neuronal migration is of major clinical relevance, since a number of drugs acting on these receptors (e.g., anti-epileptics, anesthetics, alcohol) may disturb the normal migration pattern when present during early corticogenesis. PMID:25688185

  2. Control of cortical neuronal migration by glutamate and GABA.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Heiko J; Fukuda, A; Kilb, W

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal migration in the cortex is controlled by the paracrine action of the classical neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. Glutamate controls radial migration of pyramidal neurons by acting primarily on NMDA receptors and regulates tangential migration of inhibitory interneurons by activating non-NMDA and NMDA receptors. GABA, acting on ionotropic GABAA-rho and GABAA receptors, has a dichotomic action on radially migrating neurons by acting as a GO signal in lower layers and as a STOP signal in upper cortical plate (CP), respectively. Metabotropic GABAB receptors promote radial migration into the CP and tangential migration of interneurons. Besides GABA, the endogenous GABAergic agonist taurine is a relevant agonist controlling radial migration. To a smaller extent glycine receptor activation can also influence radial and tangential migration. Activation of glutamate and GABA receptors causes increases in intracellular Ca(2+) transients, which promote neuronal migration by acting on the cytoskeleton. Pharmacological or genetic manipulation of glutamate or GABA receptors during early corticogenesis induce heterotopic cell clusters in upper layers and loss of cortical lamination, i.e., neuronal migration disorders which can be associated with neurological or neuropsychiatric diseases. The pivotal role of NMDA and ionotropic GABA receptors in cortical neuronal migration is of major clinical relevance, since a number of drugs acting on these receptors (e.g., anti-epileptics, anesthetics, alcohol) may disturb the normal migration pattern when present during early corticogenesis. PMID:25688185

  3. Cortical cell and neuron density estimates in one chimpanzee hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Collins, Christine E; Turner, Emily C; Sawyer, Eva Kille; Reed, Jamie L; Young, Nicole A; Flaherty, David K; Kaas, Jon H

    2016-01-19

    The density of cells and neurons in the neocortex of many mammals varies across cortical areas and regions. This variability is, perhaps, most pronounced in primates. Nonuniformity in the composition of cortex suggests regions of the cortex have different specializations. Specifically, regions with densely packed neurons contain smaller neurons that are activated by relatively few inputs, thereby preserving information, whereas regions that are less densely packed have larger neurons that have more integrative functions. Here we present the numbers of cells and neurons for 742 discrete locations across the neocortex in a chimpanzee. Using isotropic fractionation and flow fractionation methods for cell and neuron counts, we estimate that neocortex of one hemisphere contains 9.5 billion cells and 3.7 billion neurons. Primary visual cortex occupies 35 cm(2) of surface, 10% of the total, and contains 737 million densely packed neurons, 20% of the total neurons contained within the hemisphere. Other areas of high neuron packing include secondary visual areas, somatosensory cortex, and prefrontal granular cortex. Areas of low levels of neuron packing density include motor and premotor cortex. These values reflect those obtained from more limited samples of cortex in humans and other primates. PMID:26729880

  4. Cortical cell and neuron density estimates in one chimpanzee hemisphere

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Christine E.; Turner, Emily C.; Sawyer, Eva Kille; Reed, Jamie L.; Young, Nicole A.; Flaherty, David K.; Kaas, Jon H.

    2016-01-01

    The density of cells and neurons in the neocortex of many mammals varies across cortical areas and regions. This variability is, perhaps, most pronounced in primates. Nonuniformity in the composition of cortex suggests regions of the cortex have different specializations. Specifically, regions with densely packed neurons contain smaller neurons that are activated by relatively few inputs, thereby preserving information, whereas regions that are less densely packed have larger neurons that have more integrative functions. Here we present the numbers of cells and neurons for 742 discrete locations across the neocortex in a chimpanzee. Using isotropic fractionation and flow fractionation methods for cell and neuron counts, we estimate that neocortex of one hemisphere contains 9.5 billion cells and 3.7 billion neurons. Primary visual cortex occupies 35 cm2 of surface, 10% of the total, and contains 737 million densely packed neurons, 20% of the total neurons contained within the hemisphere. Other areas of high neuron packing include secondary visual areas, somatosensory cortex, and prefrontal granular cortex. Areas of low levels of neuron packing density include motor and premotor cortex. These values reflect those obtained from more limited samples of cortex in humans and other primates. PMID:26729880

  5. Rich-Club Organization in Effective Connectivity among Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Sunny; Shimono, Masanori; Ito, Shinya; Yeh, Fang-Chin; Timme, Nicholas; Myroshnychenko, Maxym; Lapish, Christopher C; Tosi, Zachary; Hottowy, Pawel; Smith, Wesley C; Masmanidis, Sotiris C; Litke, Alan M; Sporns, Olaf; Beggs, John M

    2016-01-20

    The performance of complex networks, like the brain, depends on how effectively their elements communicate. Despite the importance of communication, it is virtually unknown how information is transferred in local cortical networks, consisting of hundreds of closely spaced neurons. To address this, it is important to record simultaneously from hundreds of neurons at a spacing that matches typical axonal connection distances, and at a temporal resolution that matches synaptic delays. We used a 512-electrode array (60 μm spacing) to record spontaneous activity at 20 kHz from up to 500 neurons simultaneously in slice cultures of mouse somatosensory cortex for 1 h at a time. We applied a previously validated version of transfer entropy to quantify information transfer. Similar to in vivo reports, we found an approximately lognormal distribution of firing rates. Pairwise information transfer strengths also were nearly lognormally distributed, similar to reports of synaptic strengths. Some neurons transferred and received much more information than others, which is consistent with previous predictions. Neurons with the highest outgoing and incoming information transfer were more strongly connected to each other than chance, thus forming a "rich club." We found similar results in networks recorded in vivo from rodent cortex, suggesting the generality of these findings. A rich-club structure has been found previously in large-scale human brain networks and is thought to facilitate communication between cortical regions. The discovery of a small, but information-rich, subset of neurons within cortical regions suggests that this population will play a vital role in communication, learning, and memory. Significance statement: Many studies have focused on communication networks between cortical brain regions. In contrast, very few studies have examined communication networks within a cortical region. This is the first study to combine such a large number of neurons (several

  6. Rich-Club Organization in Effective Connectivity among Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shimono, Masanori; Ito, Shinya; Yeh, Fang-Chin; Timme, Nicholas; Myroshnychenko, Maxym; Lapish, Christopher C.; Tosi, Zachary; Hottowy, Pawel; Smith, Wesley C.; Masmanidis, Sotiris C.; Litke, Alan M.; Sporns, Olaf; Beggs, John M.

    2016-01-01

    The performance of complex networks, like the brain, depends on how effectively their elements communicate. Despite the importance of communication, it is virtually unknown how information is transferred in local cortical networks, consisting of hundreds of closely spaced neurons. To address this, it is important to record simultaneously from hundreds of neurons at a spacing that matches typical axonal connection distances, and at a temporal resolution that matches synaptic delays. We used a 512-electrode array (60 μm spacing) to record spontaneous activity at 20 kHz from up to 500 neurons simultaneously in slice cultures of mouse somatosensory cortex for 1 h at a time. We applied a previously validated version of transfer entropy to quantify information transfer. Similar to in vivo reports, we found an approximately lognormal distribution of firing rates. Pairwise information transfer strengths also were nearly lognormally distributed, similar to reports of synaptic strengths. Some neurons transferred and received much more information than others, which is consistent with previous predictions. Neurons with the highest outgoing and incoming information transfer were more strongly connected to each other than chance, thus forming a “rich club.” We found similar results in networks recorded in vivo from rodent cortex, suggesting the generality of these findings. A rich-club structure has been found previously in large-scale human brain networks and is thought to facilitate communication between cortical regions. The discovery of a small, but information-rich, subset of neurons within cortical regions suggests that this population will play a vital role in communication, learning, and memory. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Many studies have focused on communication networks between cortical brain regions. In contrast, very few studies have examined communication networks within a cortical region. This is the first study to combine such a large number of neurons (several

  7. Tunable neuromimetic integrated system for emulating cortical neuron models.

    PubMed

    Grassia, Filippo; Buhry, Laure; Lévi, Timothée; Tomas, Jean; Destexhe, Alain; Saïghi, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, many software solutions are currently available for simulating neuron models. Less conventional than software-based systems, hardware-based solutions generally combine digital and analog forms of computation. In previous work, we designed several neuromimetic chips, including the Galway chip that we used for this paper. These silicon neurons are based on the Hodgkin-Huxley formalism and they are optimized for reproducing a large variety of neuron behaviors thanks to tunable parameters. Due to process variation and device mismatch in analog chips, we use a full-custom fitting method in voltage-clamp mode to tune our neuromimetic integrated circuits. By comparing them with experimental electrophysiological data of these cells, we show that the circuits can reproduce the main firing features of cortical cell types. In this paper, we present the experimental measurements of our system which mimic the four most prominent biological cells: fast spiking, regular spiking, intrinsically bursting, and low-threshold spiking neurons into analog neuromimetic integrated circuit dedicated to cortical neuron simulations. This hardware and software platform will allow to improve the hybrid technique, also called "dynamic-clamp," that consists of connecting artificial and biological neurons to study the function of neuronal circuits. PMID:22163213

  8. Signal transfer within a cultured asymmetric cortical neuron circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Takuya; Shimba, Kenta; Takayama, Yuzo; Takeuchi, Akimasa; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Simplified neuronal circuits are required for investigating information representation in nervous systems and for validating theoretical neural network models. Here, we developed patterned neuronal circuits using micro fabricated devices, comprising a micro-well array bonded to a microelectrode-array substrate. Approach. The micro-well array consisted of micrometre-scale wells connected by tunnels, all contained within a silicone slab called a micro-chamber. The design of the micro-chamber confined somata to the wells and allowed axons to grow through the tunnels bidirectionally but with a designed, unidirectional bias. We guided axons into the point of the arrow structure where one of the two tunnel entrances is located, making that the preferred direction. Main results. When rat cortical neurons were cultured in the wells, their axons grew through the tunnels and connected to neurons in adjoining wells. Unidirectional burst transfers and other asymmetric signal-propagation phenomena were observed via the substrate-embedded electrodes. Seventy-nine percent of burst transfers were in the forward direction. We also observed rapid propagation of activity from sites of local electrical stimulation, and significant effects of inhibitory synapse blockade on bursting activity. Significance. These results suggest that this simple, substrate-controlled neuronal circuit can be applied to develop in vitro models of the function of cortical microcircuits or deep neural networks, better to elucidate the laws governing the dynamics of neuronal networks.

  9. Direct control of paralysed muscles by cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Chet T; Perlmutter, Steve I; Fetz, Eberhard E

    2008-12-01

    A potential treatment for paralysis resulting from spinal cord injury is to route control signals from the brain around the injury by artificial connections. Such signals could then control electrical stimulation of muscles, thereby restoring volitional movement to paralysed limbs. In previously separate experiments, activity of motor cortex neurons related to actual or imagined movements has been used to control computer cursors and robotic arms, and paralysed muscles have been activated by functional electrical stimulation. Here we show that Macaca nemestrina monkeys can directly control stimulation of muscles using the activity of neurons in the motor cortex, thereby restoring goal-directed movements to a transiently paralysed arm. Moreover, neurons could control functional stimulation equally well regardless of any previous association to movement, a finding that considerably expands the source of control signals for brain-machine interfaces. Monkeys learned to use these artificial connections from cortical cells to muscles to generate bidirectional wrist torques, and controlled multiple neuron-muscle pairs simultaneously. Such direct transforms from cortical activity to muscle stimulation could be implemented by autonomous electronic circuitry, creating a relatively natural neuroprosthesis. These results are the first demonstration that direct artificial connections between cortical cells and muscles can compensate for interrupted physiological pathways and restore volitional control of movement to paralysed limbs. PMID:18923392

  10. Neuronal gap junctions play a role in the secondary neuronal death following controlled cortical impact.

    PubMed

    Belousov, Andrei B; Wang, Yongfu; Song, Ji-Hoon; Denisova, Janna V; Berman, Nancy E; Fontes, Joseph D

    2012-08-22

    In the mammalian CNS, excessive release of glutamate and overactivation of glutamate receptors are responsible for the secondary (delayed) neuronal death following neuronal injury, including ischemia, traumatic brain injury (TBI) and epilepsy. Recent studies in mice showed a critical role for neuronal gap junctions in NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity and ischemia-mediated neuronal death. Here, using controlled cortical impact (CCI) in adult mice, as a model of TBI, and Fluoro-Jade B staining for analysis of neuronal death, we set to determine whether neuronal gap junctions play a role in the CCI-mediated secondary neuronal death. We report that 24h post-CCI, substantial neuronal death is detected in a number of brain regions outside the injury core, including the striatum. The striatal neuronal death is reduced both in wild-type mice by systemic administration of mefloquine (a relatively selective blocker of neuronal gap junctions) and in knockout mice lacking connexin 36 (neuronal gap junction protein). It is also reduced by inactivation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (with LY341495) which, as reported previously, control the rapid increase in neuronal gap junction coupling following different types of neuronal injury. The results suggest that neuronal gap junctions play a critical role in the CCI-induced secondary neuronal death. PMID:22781494

  11. Cortical neurons exposed to glutamate rapidly leak preloaded chromium 51

    SciTech Connect

    Maulucci-Gedde, M.; Choi, D.W.

    1987-05-01

    The acute toxic effects of excess glutamate exposure on cortical neurons in culture was followed using a novel adaptation of the /sup 51/Cr efflux assay. Although the acute, sodium-dependent phase of glutamate neurotoxicity may contribute to several acute disease settings, including sustained seizures and stroke, functional aspects of the phenomenon have not been previously studied. We report here that the earliest morphologic sign of glutamate neurotoxicity, neuronal swelling, is accompanied by a large efflux of complexed /sup 51/Cr from preloaded neurons in the first hour after exposure, and that this efflux is detectable as early as 15 min after the onset of glutamate exposure. We suggest that this pathological burst of /sup 51/Cr may result from glutamate-induced leakiness of neuronal cell membranes.

  12. Rich club neurons dominate Information Transfer in local cortical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, Sunny; Shimono, Masanori; Sporns, Olaf; Beggs, John

    2015-03-01

    The performance of complex networks depends on how they route their traffic. It is unknown how information is transferred in local cortical networks of hundreds of closely-spaced neurons. To address this, it is necessary to record simultaneously from hundreds of neurons at a spacing that matches typical axonal connection distances, and at a temporal resolution that matches synaptic delays. We used a 512 electrode array (60 μm spacing) to record spontaneous activity at 20 kHz, simultaneously from up to 700 neurons in slice cultures of mouse somatosensory cortex for 1 hr at a time. We used transfer entropy to quantify directed information transfer (IT) between pairs of neurons. We found an approximately lognormal distribution of firing rates as reported in in-vivo. Pairwise information transfer strengths also were nearly lognormally distributed, similar to synaptic strengths. 20% of the neurons accounted for 70% of the total IT coming into, and going out of the network and were defined as rich nodes. These rich nodes were more densely and strongly connected to each other expected by chance, forming a rich club. This highly uneven distribution of IT has implications for the efficiency and robustness of local cortical networks, and gives clues to the plastic processes that shape them. JSPS.

  13. Taste responses of cortical neurons in freely ingesting rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Matsuo, R; Kiyomitsu, Y; Kitamura, R

    1989-06-01

    1. Activities of 35 taste-responsive neurons in the cortical gustatory area were recorded with chronically implanted fine wires in freely ingesting Wistar rats. Quantitative analyses were performed on responses to distilled water, food solution, and four taste stimuli: sucrose, NaCl, HCl, and quinine hydrochloride. 2. Taste-responsive neurons were classified into type-1 and type-2 groups according to the response patterns to licking of the six taste stimuli. Type-1 neurons (n = 29) responded in excitatory or inhibitory directions to one or more of the taste stimuli. Type-2 neurons (n = 6) showed responses in different directions depending upon palatability of the liquids to rats: neurons showing excitatory (or inhibitory) responses to palatable stimuli exhibited inhibitory (or excitatory) responses to unpalatable stimuli. 3. Correlation coefficients of responses to pairs of stimuli across neurons suggested that palatable stimuli (water, food solution, sucrose, and NaCl) and unpalatable stimuli (HCl and quinine) elicited reciprocal (excitatory vs. inhibitory) responses in type-2 neurons, whereas type-1 neurons showed positively correlated responses to specific combinations of stimuli such as food solution and NaCl, sucrose and HCl, NaCl and quinine, and HCl and quinine. 4. A tendency toward equalization of effectiveness in eliciting responses among the four basic taste stimuli was detected on the cortex. The ratios of mean evoked responses in 29 type-1 neurons in comparison with spontaneous rate (4.4 spikes/s) were 1.7, 1.9, 1.8, and 1.9 for sucrose, NaCl, HCl, and quinine, respectively. 5. The breadth of responsiveness to the four basic taste stimuli was quantified by means of the entropy measure introduced by Smith and Travers (33). The mean entropy value was 0.540 for 29 type-1 neurons, which was similar to 0.588 previously reported for rat chorda tympani fibers, suggesting that breadth of tuning is not more narrowly tuned in a higher level of the gustatory

  14. Interleukin-1 beta guides the migration of cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) is expressed at high levels in the developing brain and declines to low constitutive levels in the adult. However, the pathophysiological function of IL-1β during brain development remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the role of IL-1β in neuronal migration. Methods The Boyden transwell assay was used to examine the effects of IL-1β on the migration of dissociated primary cortical neurons. To determine the role of IL-1β in neuron leading process pathfinding, we employed a growth cone turning assay. In utero electroporation combined with RNAi technology was used to examine the neuronal migration in vivo during brain development in Sprague–Dawley rats. Results IL-1β at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10 ng/mL in the lower chamber of a transwell induced a significant increase in the number of migrating neurons in a dose-dependent manner. When IL-1β was simultaneously put in both the upper and lower chambers to eliminate the gradient, no significant differences in cell migration were observed. IL-1 receptor antagonist IL-1RA dose-dependently blocked the attractive effect of IL-1β on neuronal migration. Microscopic gradients of IL-1β were created near the growth cones of isolated neurons by repetitive pulsatile application of picoliters of a IL-1β-containing solution with a micropipette. We found that growth cones exhibited a clear bias toward the source of IL-1β at the end of a one hour period in the IL-1β gradient. No significant difference was observed in the rate of neurite extension between IL-1β and controls. We electroporated specific siRNA constructs against IL-1R1 mRNA into cortical progenitors at embryonic day 16 and examined the position and distribution of transfected cells in the somatosensory cortex at postnatal day 5. We found that neurons transfected with IL-1R1-siRNA displayed a severe retardation in radial migration, with about 83% of total cells unable to arrive

  15. Cortical neuronal activity does not regulate sleep homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Mei-Hong; Chen, Michael C.; Lu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The neural substrate of sleep homeostasis is unclear, but both cortical and subcortical structures are thought to be involved in sleep regulation. To test whether prior neuronal activity in the cortex or in subcortical regions drives sleep rebound, we systemically administered atropine (100 mg/kg) to rats, producing a dissociated state with slow-wave cortical EEG but waking behavior (eg. locomotion). Atropine injections during the light period produced six hours of slow-wave cortical EEG but also subcortical arousal. Afterwards, rats showed a significant increase in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, compared to the same period on a baseline day. Consistent with the behavioral and cortical EEG state produced by systemic atropine, c-Fos expression was low in the cortex but high in multiple subcortical arousal systems. These data suggest that subcortical arousal and behavior are sufficient to drive sleep homeostasis, while a sleep-like pattern of cortical activity is not sufficient to satisfy sleep homeostasis. PMID:25864961

  16. Selective Thalamic Innervation of Rat Frontal Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Naoki; Ueta, Yoshifumi; Mohamed, Alsayed A; Hatada, Sayuri; Fukuda, Takaichi; Kubota, Yoshiyuki; Kawaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    Most glutamatergic inputs in the neocortex originate from the thalamus or neocortical pyramidal cells. To test whether thalamocortical afferents selectively innervate specific cortical cell subtypes and surface domains, we investigated the distribution patterns of thalamocortical and corticocortical excitatory synaptic inputs in identified postsynaptic cortical cell subtypes using intracellular and immunohistochemical staining combined with confocal laser scanning and electron microscopic observations in 2 thalamorecipient sublayers, lower layer 2/3 (L2/3b) and lower layer 5 (L5b) of rat frontal cortex. The dendrites of GABAergic parvalbumin (PV) cells preferentially received corticocortical inputs in both sublayers. The somata of L2/3b PV cells received thalamic inputs in similar proportions to the basal dendritic spines of L2/3b pyramidal cells, whereas L5b PV somata were mostly innervated by cortical inputs. The basal dendrites of L2/3b pyramidal and L5b corticopontine pyramidal cells received cortical and thalamic glutamatergic inputs in proportion to their local abundance, whereas crossed-corticostriatal pyramidal cells in L5b exhibited a preference for thalamic inputs, particularly in their distal dendrites. Our data demonstrate an exquisite selectivity among thalamocortical afferents in which synaptic connectivity is dependent on the postsynaptic neuron subtype, cortical sublayer, and cell surface domain. PMID:26045568

  17. Sensory experience regulates cortical inhibition by inducing IGF1 in VIP neurons.

    PubMed

    Mardinly, A R; Spiegel, I; Patrizi, A; Centofante, E; Bazinet, J E; Tzeng, C P; Mandel-Brehm, C; Harmin, D A; Adesnik, H; Fagiolini, M; Greenberg, M E

    2016-03-17

    Inhibitory neurons regulate the adaptation of neural circuits to sensory experience, but the molecular mechanisms by which experience controls the connectivity between different types of inhibitory neuron to regulate cortical plasticity are largely unknown. Here we show that exposure of dark-housed mice to light induces a gene program in cortical vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-expressing neurons that is markedly distinct from that induced in excitatory neurons and other subtypes of inhibitory neuron. We identify Igf1 as one of several activity-regulated genes that are specific to VIP neurons, and demonstrate that IGF1 functions cell-autonomously in VIP neurons to increase inhibitory synaptic input onto these neurons. Our findings further suggest that in cortical VIP neurons, experience-dependent gene transcription regulates visual acuity by activating the expression of IGF1, thus promoting the inhibition of disinhibitory neurons and affecting inhibition onto cortical pyramidal neurons. PMID:26958833

  18. Broadband macroscopic cortical oscillations emerge from intrinsic neuronal response failures

    PubMed Central

    Goldental, Amir; Vardi, Roni; Sardi, Shira; Sabo, Pinhas; Kanter, Ido

    2015-01-01

    Broadband spontaneous macroscopic neural oscillations are rhythmic cortical firing which were extensively examined during the last century, however, their possible origination is still controversial. In this work we show how macroscopic oscillations emerge in solely excitatory random networks and without topological constraints. We experimentally and theoretically show that these oscillations stem from the counterintuitive underlying mechanism—the intrinsic stochastic neuronal response failures (NRFs). These NRFs, which are characterized by short-term memory, lead to cooperation among neurons, resulting in sub- or several- Hertz macroscopic oscillations which coexist with high frequency gamma oscillations. A quantitative interplay between the statistical network properties and the emerging oscillations is supported by simulations of large networks based on single-neuron in-vitro experiments and a Langevin equation describing the network dynamics. Results call for the examination of these oscillations in the presence of inhibition and external drives. PMID:26578893

  19. Dendritic spikes enhance stimulus selectivity in cortical neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Smith, Spencer L; Smith, Ikuko T; Branco, Tiago; Häusser, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Neuronal dendrites are electrically excitable: they can generate regenerative events such as dendritic spikes in response to sufficiently strong synaptic input. Although such events have been observed in many neuronal types, it is not well understood how active dendrites contribute to the tuning of neuronal output in vivo. Here we show that dendritic spikes increase the selectivity of neuronal responses to the orientation of a visual stimulus (orientation tuning). We performed direct patch-clamp recordings from the dendrites of pyramidal neurons in the primary visual cortex of lightly anaesthetized and awake mice, during sensory processing. Visual stimulation triggered regenerative local dendritic spikes that were distinct from back-propagating action potentials. These events were orientation tuned and were suppressed by either hyperpolarization of membrane potential or intracellular blockade of NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) receptors. Both of these manipulations also decreased the selectivity of subthreshold orientation tuning measured at the soma, thus linking dendritic regenerative events to somatic orientation tuning. Together, our results suggest that dendritic spikes that are triggered by visual input contribute to a fundamental cortical computation: enhancing orientation selectivity in the visual cortex. Thus, dendritic excitability is an essential component of behaviourally relevant computations in neurons. PMID:24162850

  20. Cortical and striatal neurone number in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Heinsen, H; Strik, M; Bauer, M; Luther, K; Ulmar, G; Gangnus, D; Jungkunz, G; Eisenmenger, W; Götz, M

    1994-01-01

    The total cortical and striatal neurone and glial numbers were estimated in five cases of Huntington's disease (three males, two females) and five age- and sex-matched control cases. Serial 500-microns-thick gallocyanin-stained frontal sections through the left hemisphere were analysed using Cavalieri's principle for volume and the optical disector for cell density estimations. The average cortical neurone number of five controls (mean age 53 +/- 13 years, range 36-72 years) was 5.97 x 10(9) +/- 320 x 10(6), the average number of small striatal neurones was 82 x 10(6) +/- 15.8 x 10(6). The left striatum (caudatum, putamen, and accumbens) contained a mean of 273 x 10(6) +/- 53 x 10(6) glial cells (oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and unclassifiable glial profiles). The mean cortical neurone number in Huntington's disease patients (mean age 49 +/- 14 years, range 36-75 years) was diminished by about 33% to 3.99 x 10(9) +/- 218 x 10(6) nerve cells (P < or = 0.012, Mann-Whitney U-test). The mean number of small striatal neurones decreased tremendously to 9.72 x 10(6) +/- 3.64 x 10(6) (-88%). The decrease in total glial cells was less pronounced (193 x 10(6) +/- 26 x 10(6)) but the mean glial index, the numerical ratio of glial cells per neurone, increased from 3.35 to 22.59 in Huntington's disease. Qualitatively, neuronal loss was most pronounced in supragranular layers of primary sensory areas (Brodmann's areae 3,1,2; area 17, area 41). Layer IIIc pyramidal cells were preferentially lost in association areas of the temporal, frontal, and parietal lobes, whereas spared layer IV granule cells formed a conspicuous band between layer III and V in these fields. Methodological issues are discussed in context with previous investigations and similarities and differences of laminar and lobar nerve cell loss in Huntington's disease are compared with nerve cell degeneration in other neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:7839825

  1. Computational Study of Subdural Cortical Stimulation: Effects of Simulating Anisotropic Conductivity on Activation of Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyeon; Kim, Donghyeon; Jun, Sung Chan

    2015-01-01

    Subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS) is an appealing method in the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of SuCS have been applied to determine the optimal design for electrotherapy. To achieve a better understanding of computational modeling on the stimulation effects of SuCS, the influence of anisotropic white matter conductivity on the activation of cortical neurons was investigated in a realistic head model. In this paper, we constructed pyramidal neuronal models (layers 3 and 5) that showed primary excitation of the corticospinal tract, and an anatomically realistic head model reflecting complex brain geometry. The anisotropic information was acquired from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) and then applied to the white matter at various ratios of anisotropic conductivity. First, we compared the isotropic and anisotropic models; compared to the isotropic model, the anisotropic model showed that neurons were activated in the deeper bank during cathodal stimulation and in the wider crown during anodal stimulation. Second, several popular anisotropic principles were adapted to investigate the effects of variations in anisotropic information. We observed that excitation thresholds varied with anisotropic principles, especially with anodal stimulation. Overall, incorporating anisotropic conductivity into the anatomically realistic head model is critical for accurate estimation of neuronal responses; however, caution should be used in the selection of anisotropic information. PMID:26057524

  2. Polysaccharides from wolfberry antagonizes glutamate excitotoxicity in rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yuen-Shan; Yu, Man-Shan; Yik, Suet-Yi; So, Kwok-Fai; Yuen, Wai-Hung; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung

    2009-12-01

    Glutamate excitotoxicity is involved in many neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Attenuation of glutamate toxicity is one of the therapeutic strategies for AD. Wolfberry (Lycium barbarum) is a common ingredient in oriental cuisines. A number of studies suggest that wolfberry has anti-aging properties. In recent years, there is a trend of using dried Wolfberry as food supplement and health product in UK and North America. Previously, we have demonstrated that a fraction of polysaccharide from Wolfberry (LBA) provided remarkable neuroprotective effects against beta-amyloid peptide-induced cytotoxicity in primary cultures of rat cortical neurons. To investigate whether LBA can protect neurons from other pathological factors such as glutamate found in Alzheimer brain, we examined whether it can prevent neurotoxicity elicited by glutamate in primary cultured neurons. The glutamate-induced cell death as detected by lactate dehydrogenase assay and caspase-3-like activity assay was significantly reduced by LBA at concentrations ranging from 10 to 500 microg/ml. Protective effects of LBA were comparable to memantine, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist. LBA provided neuroprotection even 1 h after exposure to glutamate. In addition to glutamate, LBA attenuated N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced neuronal damage. To further explore whether LBA might function as antioxidant, we used hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) as oxidative stress inducer in this study. LBA could not attenuate the toxicity of H(2)O(2). Furthermore, LBA did not attenuate glutamate-induced oxidation by using NBT assay. Western blot analysis indicated that glutamate-induced phosphorylation of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was reduced by treatment with LBA. Taken together, LBA exerted significant neuroprotective effects on cultured cortical neurons exposed to glutamate. PMID:19499323

  3. Human Temporal Cortical Single Neuron Activity during Language: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ojemann, George A.

    2013-01-01

    Findings from recordings of human temporal cortical single neuron activity during several measures of language, including object naming and word reading are reviewed and related to changes in activity in the same neurons during recent verbal memory and verbal associative learning measures, in studies conducted during awake neurosurgery for the treatment of epilepsy. The proportion of neurons changing activity with language tasks was similar in either hemisphere. Dominant hemisphere activity was characterized by relative inhibition, some of which occurred during overt speech, possibly to block perception of one’s own voice. However, the majority seems to represent a dynamic network becoming active with verbal memory encoding and especially verbal learning, but inhibited during performance of overlearned language tasks. Individual neurons are involved in different networks for different aspects of language, including naming or reading and naming in different languages. The majority of the changes in activity were tonic sustained shifts in firing. Patterned phasic activity for specific language items was very infrequently recorded. Human single neuron recordings provide a unique perspective on the biologic substrate for language, for these findings are in contrast to many of the findings from other techniques for investigating this. PMID:24961418

  4. The effects of cholinergic neuromodulation on neuronal phase-response curves of modeled cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Stiefel, Klaus M.; Gutkin, Boris S.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2010-01-01

    The response of an oscillator to perturbations is described by its phase-response curve (PRC), which is related to the type of bifurcation leading from rest to tonic spiking. In a recent experimental study, we have shown that the type of PRC in cortical pyramidal neurons can be switched by cholinergic neuromodulation from type II (biphasic) to type I (monophasic). We explored how intrinsic mechanisms affected by acetylcholine influence the PRC using three different types of neuronal models: a theta neuron, single-compartment neurons and a multi-compartment neuron. In all of these models a decrease in the amount of a spike-frequency adaptation current was a necessary and sufficient condition for the shape of the PRC to change from biphasic (type II) to purely positive (type I). PMID:18784991

  5. Probabilistic Identification of Cerebellar Cortical Neurones across Species

    PubMed Central

    Van Dijck, Gert; Van Hulle, Marc M.; Heiney, Shane A.; Blazquez, Pablo M.; Meng, Hui; Angelaki, Dora E.; Arenz, Alexander; Margrie, Troy W.; Mostofi, Abteen; Edgley, Steve; Bengtsson, Fredrik; Ekerot, Carl-Fredrik; Jörntell, Henrik; Dalley, Jeffrey W.; Holtzman, Tahl

    2013-01-01

    Despite our fine-grain anatomical knowledge of the cerebellar cortex, electrophysiological studies of circuit information processing over the last fifty years have been hampered by the difficulty of reliably assigning signals to identified cell types. We approached this problem by assessing the spontaneous activity signatures of identified cerebellar cortical neurones. A range of statistics describing firing frequency and irregularity were then used, individually and in combination, to build Gaussian Process Classifiers (GPC) leading to a probabilistic classification of each neurone type and the computation of equi-probable decision boundaries between cell classes. Firing frequency statistics were useful for separating Purkinje cells from granular layer units, whilst firing irregularity measures proved most useful for distinguishing cells within granular layer cell classes. Considered as single statistics, we achieved classification accuracies of 72.5% and 92.7% for granular layer and molecular layer units respectively. Combining statistics to form twin-variate GPC models substantially improved classification accuracies with the combination of mean spike frequency and log-interval entropy offering classification accuracies of 92.7% and 99.2% for our molecular and granular layer models, respectively. A cross-species comparison was performed, using data drawn from anaesthetised mice and decerebrate cats, where our models offered 80% and 100% classification accuracy. We then used our models to assess non-identified data from awake monkeys and rabbits in order to highlight subsets of neurones with the greatest degree of similarity to identified cell classes. In this way, our GPC-based approach for tentatively identifying neurones from their spontaneous activity signatures, in the absence of an established ground-truth, nonetheless affords the experimenter a statistically robust means of grouping cells with properties matching known cell classes. Our approach therefore

  6. Inhibitory neurons modulate spontaneous signaling in cultured cortical neurons: density-dependent regulation of excitatory neuronal signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Michael; Guaraldi, Mary; Shea, Thomas B.

    2010-06-01

    Cortical neuronal activity depends on a balance between excitatory and inhibitory influences. Culturing of neurons on multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) has provided insight into the development and maintenance of neuronal networks. Herein, we seeded MEAs with murine embryonic cortical/hippocampal neurons at different densities (<150 or >1000 cells mm-2) and monitored resultant spontaneous signaling. Sparsely seeded cultures displayed a large number of bipolar, rapid, high-amplitude individual signals with no apparent temporal regularity. By contrast, densely seeded cultures instead displayed clusters of signals at regular intervals. These patterns were observed even within thinner and thicker areas of the same culture. GABAergic neurons (25% of total neurons in our cultures) mediated the differential signal patterns observed above, since addition of the inhibitory antagonist bicuculline to dense cultures and hippocampal slice cultures induced the signal pattern characteristic of sparse cultures. Sparsely seeded cultures likely lacked sufficient inhibitory neurons to modulate excitatory activity. Differential seeding of MEAs can provide a unique model for analyses of pertubation in the interaction between excitatory and inhibitory function during aging and neuropathological conditions where dysregulation of GABAergic neurons is a significant component.

  7. Apaf1-deficient cortical neurons exhibit defects in axonal outgrowth.

    PubMed

    De Zio, Daniela; Molinari, Francesca; Rizza, Salvatore; Gatta, Lucia; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Salvatore, Anna Maria; Mathiassen, Søs Grønbæk; Cwetsch, Andrzej W; Filomeni, Giuseppe; Rosano, Giuseppe; Ferraro, Elisabetta

    2015-11-01

    The establishment of neuronal polarity and axonal outgrowth are key processes affecting neuronal migration and synapse formation, their impairment likely leading to cognitive deficits. Here we have found that the apoptotic protease activating factor 1 (Apaf1), apart from its canonical role in apoptosis, plays an additional function in cortical neurons, where its deficiency specifically impairs axonal growth. Given the central role played by centrosomes and microtubules in the polarized extension of the axon, our data suggest that Apaf1-deletion affects axonal outgrowth through an impairment of centrosome organization. In line with this, centrosomal protein expression, as well as their centrosomal localization proved to be altered upon Apaf1-deletion. Strikingly, we also found that Apaf1-loss affects trans-Golgi components and leads to a robust activation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK), this confirming the stressful conditions induced by Apaf1-deficiency. Since AMPK hyper-phosphorylation is known to impair a proper axon elongation, our finding contributes to explain the effect of Apaf1-deficiency on axogenesis. We also discovered that the signaling pathways mediating axonal growth and involving glycogen synthase kinase-3β, liver kinase B1, and collapsing-response mediator protein-2 are altered in Apaf1-KO neurons. Overall, our results reveal a novel non-apoptotic role for Apaf1 in axonal outgrowth, suggesting that the neuronal phenotype due to Apaf1-deletion could not only be fully ascribed to apoptosis inhibition, but might also be the result of defects in axogenesis. The discovery of new molecules involved in axonal elongation has a clinical relevance since it might help to explain neurological abnormalities occurring during early brain development. PMID:25975226

  8. Using melanopsin to study G protein signaling in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    McGregor, K M; Bécamel, C; Marin, P; Andrade, R

    2016-09-01

    Our understanding of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the central nervous system (CNS) has been hampered by the limited availability of tools allowing for the study of their signaling with precise temporal control. To overcome this, we tested the utility of the bistable mammalian opsin melanopsin to examine G protein signaling in CNS neurons. Specifically, we used biolistic (gene gun) approaches to transfect melanopsin into cortical pyramidal cells maintained in organotypic slice culture. Whole cell recordings from transfected neurons indicated that application of blue light effectively activated the transfected melanopsin to elicit the canonical biphasic modulation of membrane excitability previously associated with the activation of GPCRs coupling to Gαq-11 Remarkably, full mimicry of exogenous agonist concentration could be obtained with pulses as short as a few milliseconds, suggesting that their triggering required a single melanopsin activation-deactivation cycle. The resulting temporal control over melanopsin activation allowed us to compare the activation kinetics of different components of the electrophysiological response. We also replaced the intracellular loops of melanopsin with those of the 5-HT2A receptor to create a light-activated GPCR capable of interacting with the 5-HT2A receptor interacting proteins. The resulting chimera expressed weak activity but validated the potential usefulness of melanopsin as a tool for the study of G protein signaling in CNS neurons. PMID:27306679

  9. Effects of 810 nm laser on mouse primary cortical neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharkwal, Gitika B.; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Huang, Ying-Ying; De Taboada, Luis; McCarthy, Thomas; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2011-03-01

    In the past four decades numerous studies have reported the efficacy of low level light (laser) therapy (LLLT) as a treatment for diverse diseases and injuries. Recent studies have shown that LLLT can biomodulate processes in the central nervous system and has been extensively studied as a stroke treatment. However there is still a lack of knowledge on the effects of LLLT at the cellular level in neurons. The present study aimed to study the effect of 810 nm laser on several cellular processes in primary cortical neurons cultured from mouse embryonic brains. Neurons were irradiated with light dose of 0.03, 0.3, 3, 10 and 30 J/cm2 and intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide and calcium were measured. The changes in mitochondrial function in response to light were studied in terms of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Light induced a significant increase in calcium, ATP and MMP at lower fluences and a decrease at higher fluence. ROS was induced significantly by light at all light doses. Nitric oxide levels also showed an increase on treatment with light. The results of the present study suggest that LLLT at lower fluences is capable of inducing mediators of cell signaling process which in turn may be responsible for the biomodulatory effects of the low level laser. At higher fluences beneficial mediators are reduced but potentially harmful mediators are increased thus offering an explanation for the biphasic dose response.

  10. Loss of MeCP2 From Forebrain Excitatory Neurons Leads to Cortical Hyperexcitation and Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Peterson, Matthew; Beyer, Barbara; Frankel, Wayne N.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of MECP2 cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder leading to loss of motor and cognitive functions, impaired social interactions, and seizure at young ages. Defects of neuronal circuit development and function are thought to be responsible for the symptoms of RTT. The majority of RTT patients show recurrent seizures, indicating that neuronal hyperexcitation is a common feature of RTT. However, mechanisms underlying hyperexcitation in RTT are poorly understood. Here we show that deletion of Mecp2 from cortical excitatory neurons but not forebrain inhibitory neurons in the mouse leads to spontaneous seizures. Selective deletion of Mecp2 from excitatory but not inhibitory neurons in the forebrain reduces GABAergic transmission in layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal and somatosensory cortices. Loss of MeCP2 from cortical excitatory neurons reduces the number of GABAergic synapses in the cortex, and enhances the excitability of layer 5 pyramidal neurons. Using single-cell deletion of Mecp2 in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons, we show that GABAergic transmission is reduced in neurons without MeCP2, but is normal in neighboring neurons with MeCP2. Together, these results suggest that MeCP2 in cortical excitatory neurons plays a critical role in the regulation of GABAergic transmission and cortical excitability. PMID:24523563

  11. Spatial organization of cortical and spinal neurons controlling motor behavior

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Ariel J; Lewallen, Kathryn A; Pfaff, Samuel L

    2013-01-01

    A major task of the central nervous system (CNS) is to control behavioral actions, which necessitates a precise regulation of muscle activity. The final components of the circuitry controlling muscles are the motorneurons, which settle into pools in the ventral horn of the spinal cord in positions that mirror the musculature organization within the body. This ‘musculotopic’ motor-map then becomes the internal CNS reference for the neuronal circuits that control motor commands. This review describes recent progress in defining the neuroanatomical organization of the higher-order motor circuits in the cortex and spinal cord, and our current understanding of the integrative features that contribute to complex motor behaviors. We highlight emerging evidence that cortical and spinal motor command centers are loosely organized with respect to the musculotopic spatial-map, but these centers also incorporate organizational features that associate with the function of different muscle groups during commonly enacted behaviors. PMID:22841417

  12. Ketamine-induced apoptosis in cultured rat cortical neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Takadera, Tsuneo . E-mail: t-takadera@hokuriku-u.ac.jp; Ishida, Akira; Ohyashiki, Takao

    2006-01-15

    Recent data suggest that anesthetic drugs cause neurodegeneration during development. Ketamine is frequently used in infants and toddlers for elective surgeries. The purpose of this study is to determine whether glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is involved in ketamine-induced apoptosis. Ketamine increased apoptotic cell death with morphological changes which were characterized by cell shrinkage, nuclear condensation or fragmentation. In addition, insulin growth factor-1 completely blocked the ketamine-induced apoptotic cell death. Ketamine decreased Akt phosphorylation. GSK-3 is known as a downstream target of Akt. The selective inhibitors of GSK-3 prevented the ketamine-induced apoptosis. Moreover, caspase-3 activation was accompanied by the ketamine-induced cell death and inhibited by the GSK-3 inhibitors. These results suggest that activation of GSK-3 is involved in ketamine-induced apoptosis in rat cortical neurons.

  13. Selection and parameterization of cortical neurons for neuroprosthetic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahnoun, Remy; He, Jiping; Helms Tillery, Stephen I.

    2006-06-01

    When designing neuroprosthetic interfaces for motor function, it is crucial to have a system that can extract reliable information from available neural signals and produce an output suitable for real life applications. Systems designed to date have relied on establishing a relationship between neural discharge patterns in motor cortical areas and limb movement, an approach not suitable for patients who require such implants but who are unable to provide proper motor behavior to initially tune the system. We describe here a method that allows rapid tuning of a population vector-based system for neural control without arm movements. We trained highly motivated primates to observe a 3D center-out task as the computer played it very slowly. Based on only 10-12 s of neuronal activity observed in M1 and PMd, we generated an initial mapping between neural activity and device motion that the animal could successfully use for neuroprosthetic control. Subsequent tunings of the parameters led to improvements in control, but the initial selection of neurons and estimated preferred direction for those cells remained stable throughout the remainder of the day. Using this system, we have observed that the contribution of individual neurons to the overall control of the system is very heterogeneous. We thus derived a novel measure of unit quality and an indexing scheme that allowed us to rate each neuron's contribution to the overall control. In offline tests, we found that fewer than half of the units made positive contributions to the performance. We tested this experimentally by having the animals control the neuroprosthetic system using only the 20 best neurons. We found that performance in this case was better than when the entire set of available neurons was used. Based on these results, we believe that, with careful task design, it is feasible to parameterize control systems without any overt behaviors and that subsequent control system design will be enhanced with

  14. Human temporal cortical single neuron activity during working memory maintenance.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Leona; Corina, David; Ojemann, George

    2016-06-01

    The Working Memory model of human memory, first introduced by Baddeley and Hitch (1974), has been one of the most influential psychological constructs in cognitive psychology and human neuroscience. However the neuronal correlates of core components of this model have yet to be fully elucidated. Here we present data from two studies where human temporal cortical single neuron activity was recorded during tasks differentially affecting the maintenance component of verbal working memory. In Study One we vary the presence or absence of distracting items for the entire period of memory storage. In Study Two we vary the duration of storage so that distractors filled all, or only one-third of the time the memory was stored. Extracellular single neuron recordings were obtained from 36 subjects undergoing awake temporal lobe resections for epilepsy, 25 in Study one, 11 in Study two. Recordings were obtained from a total of 166 lateral temporal cortex neurons during performance of one of these two tasks, 86 study one, 80 study two. Significant changes in activity with distractor manipulation were present in 74 of these neurons (45%), 38 Study one, 36 Study two. In 48 (65%) of those there was increased activity during the period when distracting items were absent, 26 Study One, 22 Study Two. The magnitude of this increase was greater for Study One, 47.6%, than Study Two, 8.1%, paralleling the reduction in memory errors in the absence of distracters, for Study One of 70.3%, Study Two 26.3% These findings establish that human lateral temporal cortex is part of the neural system for working memory, with activity during maintenance of that memory that parallels performance, suggesting it represents active rehearsal. In 31 of these neurons (65%) this activity was an extension of that during working memory encoding that differed significantly from the neural processes recorded during overt and silent language tasks without a recent memory component, 17 Study one, 14 Study two

  15. Exogenous Reelin modifies the migratory behavior of neurons depending on cortical location.

    PubMed

    Britto, Joanne M; Tait, Karen J; Lee, Ean Phing; Gamble, Robin S; Hattori, Mitsuharu; Tan, Seong-Seng

    2014-11-01

    Malformations of cortical development can arise when projection neurons generated in the germinal zones fail to migrate properly into the cortical plate. This process is critically dependent on the Reelin glycoprotein, which when absent leads to an inversion of cortical layers and blurring of borders. Reelin has other functions including supporting neuron migration and maintaining their trajectories; however, the precise role on glial fiber-dependent or -independent migration of neurons remains controversial. In this study, we wish to test the hypothesis that migrating cortical neurons at different levels of the cortical wall have differential responses to Reelin. We exposed neurons migrating across the cortical wall to exogenous Reelin and monitored their migratory behavior using time-lapse imaging. Our results show that, in the germinal zones, exogenous Reelin retarded neuron migration and altered their trajectories. This behavior is in contrast to the response of neurons located in the intermediate zone (IZ), possibly because Reelin receptors are not expressed in this zone. In the reeler cortex, Reelin receptors are expressed in the IZ and exposure to exogenous Reelin was able to rescue the migratory defect. These studies demonstrate that migrating neurons have nonequivalent responses to Reelin depending on their location within the cortical wall. PMID:23749873

  16. The SH2 domain is crucial for function of Fyn in neuronal migration and cortical lamination

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xi; Hu, Xinde; Song, Lingzhen; An, Lei; Duan, Minghui; Chen, Shulin; Zhao, Shanting

    2015-01-01

    Neurons in the developing brain form the cortical plate (CP) in an inside-out manner, in which the late-born neurons are located more superficially than the early-born neurons. Fyn, a member of the Src family kinases, plays an important role in neuronal migration by binding to many substrates. However, the role of the Src-homology 2 (SH2) domain in function of Fyn in neuronal migration remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the SH2 domain is essential for the action of Fyn in neuronal migration and cortical lamination. A point mutation in the Fyn SH2 domain (FynR176A) impaired neuronal migration and their final location in the cerebral cortex, by inducing neuronal aggregation and branching. Thus, we provide the first evidence of the Fyn SH2 domain contributing to neuronal migration and neuronal morphogenesis. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(2): 97-102] PMID:24912779

  17. Development and Maturation of Embryonic Cortical Neurons Grafted into the Damaged Adult Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ballout, Nissrine; Frappé, Isabelle; Péron, Sophie; Jaber, Mohamed; Zibara, Kazem; Gaillard, Afsaneh

    2016-01-01

    Injury to the human central nervous system can lead to devastating consequences due to its poor ability to self-repair. Neural transplantation aimed at replacing lost neurons and restore functional circuitry has proven to be a promising therapeutical avenue. We previously reported in adult rodent animal models with cortical lesions that grafted fetal cortical neurons could effectively re-establish specific patterns of projections and synapses. The current study was designed to provide a detailed characterization of the spatio-temporal in vivo development of fetal cortical transplanted cells within the lesioned adult motor cortex and their corresponding axonal projections. We show here that as early as 2 weeks after grafting, cortical neuroblasts transplanted into damaged adult motor cortex developed appropriate projections to cortical and subcortical targets. Grafted cells initially exhibited characteristics of immature neurons, which then differentiated into mature neurons with appropriate cortical phenotypes where most were glutamatergic and few were GABAergic. All cortical subtypes identified with the specific markers CTIP2, Cux1, FOXP2, and Tbr1 were generated after grafting as evidenced with BrdU co-labeling. The set of data provided here is of interest as it sets biological standards for future studies aimed at replacing fetal cells with embryonic stem cells as a source of cortical neurons. PMID:27536221

  18. Prenatal Cerebral Ischemia Disrupts MRI-Defined Cortical Microstructure Through Disturbances in Neuronal Arborization

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Kelly; Azimi-Zonooz, Aryan; Chen, Kevin; Riddle, Art; Gong, Xi; Sharifnia, Elica; Hagen, Matthew; Ahmad, Tahir; Leigland, Lindsey A.; Back, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Children who survive preterm birth exhibit persistent unexplained disturbances in cerebral cortical growth with associated cognitive and learning disabilities. The mechanisms underlying these deficits remain elusive. We used ex vivo diffusion magnetic resonance imaging to demonstrate in a preterm large-animal model that cerebral ischemia impairs cortical growth and the normal maturational decline in cortical fractional anisotropy (FA). Analysis of pyramidal neurons revealed that cortical deficits were associated with impaired expansion of the dendritic arbor and reduced synaptic density. Together, these findings suggest a link between abnormal cortical FA and disturbances of neuronal morphological development. To experimentally investigate this possibility, we measured the orientation distribution of dendritic branches and observed that it corresponds with the theoretically predicted pattern of increased anisotropy within cases that exhibited elevated cortical FA after ischemia. We conclude that cortical growth impairments are associated with diffuse disturbances in the dendritic arbor and synapse formation of cortical neurons, which may underlie the cognitive and learning disabilities in survivors of preterm birth. Further, measurement of cortical FA may be useful for noninvasively detecting neurological disorders affecting cortical development. PMID:23325800

  19. Distribution of neurons in functional areas of the mouse cerebral cortex reveals quantitatively different cortical zones

    PubMed Central

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Watson, Charles; Paxinos, George

    2013-01-01

    How are neurons distributed along the cortical surface and across functional areas? Here we use the isotropic fractionator (Herculano-Houzel and Lent, 2005) to analyze the distribution of neurons across the entire isocortex of the mouse, divided into 18 functional areas defined anatomically. We find that the number of neurons underneath a surface area (the N/A ratio) varies 4.5-fold across functional areas and neuronal density varies 3.2-fold. The face area of S1 contains the most neurons, followed by motor cortex and the primary visual cortex. Remarkably, while the distribution of neurons across functional areas does not accompany the distribution of surface area, it mirrors closely the distribution of cortical volumes—with the exception of the visual areas, which hold more neurons than expected for their volume. Across the non-visual cortex, the volume of individual functional areas is a shared linear function of their number of neurons, while in the visual areas, neuronal densities are much higher than in all other areas. In contrast, the 18 functional areas cluster into three different zones according to the relationship between the N/A ratio and cortical thickness and neuronal density: these three clusters can be called visual, sensory, and, possibly, associative. These findings are remarkably similar to those in the human cerebral cortex (Ribeiro et al., 2013) and suggest that, like the human cerebral cortex, the mouse cerebral cortex comprises two zones that differ in how neurons form the cortical volume, and three zones that differ in how neurons are distributed underneath the cortical surface, possibly in relation to local differences in connectivity through the white matter. Our results suggest that beyond the developmental divide into visual and non-visual cortex, functional areas initially share a common distribution of neurons along the parenchyma that become delimited into functional areas according to the pattern of connectivity established later

  20. Cortical neurons express nerve growth factor receptors in advanced age and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mufson, E J; Kordower, J H

    1992-01-01

    Using a monoclonal antibody directed against the primate nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor, we examined the expression of NGF receptors within neuronal perikarya of normal adult human cerebral cortex (27-98 years old) and individuals with Alzheimer disease (AD). This expression of cortical NGF receptors was compared with that seen in other neurological diseases and normal human development as well as in young and aged nonhuman primates. NGF receptor-containing cortical neurons were not observed in young adults (less than 50 years old) and were observed only infrequently in non-demented elderly individuals (50-80 years old). In contrast, numerous NGF receptor-containing cortical neurons were seen in AD patients of all ages and in one 98-year-old nondemented patient. In advanced age and AD, numerous NGF receptor-positive neurons were located within laminae II-VI of temporal association cortices whereas only a few were seen in the subicular complex, entorhinal cortex, parahippocampal gyrus, and amygdaloid complex. These perikarya appeared healthy, with bipolar, fusiform, or multipolar morphologies and extended varicose dendritic arbors. These neurons failed to express neurofibrillary tangle-bearing material. In contrast to AD, NGF receptor-containing cortical neurons were not observed in Parkinson disease, Pick disease, or Shy-Drager syndrome. The NGF receptor-containing cortical neurons seen in advanced age and AD were similar in morphology to those observed in human fetal cortex. No NGF receptor-containing cortical neurons were observed in young or aged nonhuman primates. These findings suggest that neurons within the human cerebral cortex exhibit plasticity in their expression of NGF receptors in AD and extreme advanced aging. Images PMID:1309947

  1. Magnesium Sulfate Protects Against the Bioenergetic Consequences of Chronic Glutamate Receptor Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Clerc, Pascaline; Young, Christina A.; Bordt, Evan A.; Grigore, Alina M.; Fiskum, Gary; Polster, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular glutamate is elevated following brain ischemia or trauma and contributes to neuronal injury. We tested the hypothesis that magnesium sulfate (MgSO4, 3 mM) protects against metabolic failure caused by excitotoxic glutamate exposure. Rat cortical neuron preparations treated in medium already containing a physiological concentration of Mg2+ (1 mM) could be segregated based on their response to glutamate (100 µM). Type I preparations responded with a decrease or small transient increase in oxygen consumption rate (OCR). Type II neurons responded with >50% stimulation in OCR, indicating a robust response to increased energy demand without immediate toxicity. Pre-treatment with MgSO4 improved the initial bioenergetic response to glutamate and ameliorated subsequent loss of spare respiratory capacity, measured following addition of the uncoupler FCCP, in Type I but not Type II neurons. Spare respiratory capacity in Type I neurons was also improved by incubation with MgSO4 or NMDA receptor antagonist MK801 in the absence of glutamate treatment. This finding indicates that the major difference between Type I and Type II preparations is the amount of endogenous glutamate receptor activity. Incubation of Type II neurons with 5 µM glutamate prior to excitotoxic (100 µM) glutamate exposure recapitulated a Type I phenotype. MgSO4 protected against an excitotoxic glutamate-induced drop in neuronal ATP both with and without prior 5 µM glutamate exposure. Results indicate that MgSO4 protects against chronic moderate glutamate receptor stimulation and preserves cellular ATP following treatment with excitotoxic glutamate. PMID:24236167

  2. Real-time Recordings of Migrating Cortical Neurons from GFP and Cre Recombinase Expressing Mice.

    PubMed

    Tielens, Sylvia; Godin, Juliette D; Nguyen, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral cortex is one of the most intricate regions of the brain that requires elaborate cell migration patterns for its development. Experimental observations show that projection neurons migrate radially within the cortical wall, whereas interneurons migrate along multiple tangential paths to reach the developing cortex. Tight regulation of the cell migration processes ensures proper positioning and functional integration of neurons to specific cerebral cortical circuits. Disruption of neuronal migration often leads to cortical dysfunction and/or malformation associated with neurological disorders. Unveiling the molecular control of neuron migration is thus fundamental to understanding the physiological or pathological development of the cerebral cortex. In this unit, protocols allowing detailed analysis of patterns of migration of both interneurons and projection neurons under different experimental conditions (i.e., loss or gain of function) are presented. PMID:26729032

  3. Rab, Arf, and Arl-Regulated Membrane Traffic in Cortical Neuron Migration.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bor Luen

    2016-07-01

    The migration of projection neurons from its birthplace in the subventricular zone to their final destination in the cortical plate is a complex process that requires a series of highly coordinated cellular events. Amongst the key factors involved in the processes are modulators of cytoskeletal dynamics, as well as cellular membrane traffic. Members of the small GTPases family responsible for the latter process, the Rabs and Arfs, have been recently implicated in cortical neuron migration. Rab5 and Rab11, which are key modulators of endocytosis and endocytic recycling respectively, ensure proper surface expression and distribution of N-cadherin, a key adhesion protein that tethers migrating neurons to the radial glia fiber tracts during pia-directed migration. Rab7, which is associated with lysosomal biogenesis and function, is important for the final step of terminal translocation when N-cadherin is downregulated by lysosomal degradation. Arf6 activity, which is known to be important in neuronal processes outgrowth, may negatively impact the multipolar-bipolar transition of cortical neurons undergoing radial migration, but the downstream effector of Arf6 in this regard is not yet known. In addition to the above, members of the Arl family which have been recently shown to be important in radial glia scaffold formation, would also be important for cortical neuron migration. In this short review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the importance of membrane traffic regulated by the Rab, Arf, and Arl family members in cortical neuron migration. PMID:26587959

  4. MicroRNA overexpression increases cortical neuronal vulnerability to injury

    PubMed Central

    Truettner, Jessie S.; Motti, Dario; Dietrich, W. Dalton

    2013-01-01

    Previously we reported that several microRNAs (miRNA) are upregulated following experimentally induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) using both in vivo and in vitro approaches. Specific miRNAs were found to be sensitive to therapeutic hypothermia and may therefore be important targets for neuroprotective strategies. In this study we developed plasmid constructs that overexpress temperature sensitive miRNAs: miR-34a, miR-451, and miR-874. These constructs were transfected into cultured cortical neurons that were subjected to stretch injury using a cell injury controller device. Levels of expression of genes associated with stress, inflammation, apoptosis and transcriptional regulation were measured by qRT-PCR. mRNA levels of cytokines interleukin 1-β (IL1-β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) as well as heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and Caspase 11 were found to be increased up to 24 fold higher than controls in cells overexpressing these miRNAs. After moderate stretch injury, the expression of IL1-β, TNF-α, HSP70 and Caspase 11 all increased over control levels found in uninjured cells suggesting that overexpression of these miRNAs increases cellular vulnerability. miR-34a directly inhibits Bcl2 and XIAP, both anti-apoptotic proteins. The observed increase in Caspase 11 with over-expression of miR-34a indicates that miR-34a may be inducing apoptosis by reducing the levels of antiapoptotic proteins. miR-34a is predicted to inhibit Jun, which was seen to decrease in cells overexpressing this miRNA along with Fos. Over expression of several miRNAs found to be induced by TBI in vivo (miR-34a, miR-451 and miR-874) leads to increased vulnerability in transfected neurons. Therapeutic hypothermia blunts the expression of these miRNAs in vivo and antisense silencing could be a potential therapeutic approach to targeting the consequences of TBI. PMID:23948100

  5. Sleep active cortical neurons expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase are active after both acute sleep deprivation and chronic sleep restriction.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, M R; Kim, Y; Karpova, S A; Winston, S; McCarley, R W; Strecker, R E; Gerashchenko, D

    2013-09-01

    Non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep electroencephalographic (EEG) delta power (~0.5-4 Hz), also known as slow wave activity (SWA), is typically enhanced after acute sleep deprivation (SD) but not after chronic sleep restriction (CSR). Recently, sleep-active cortical neurons expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) were identified and associated with enhanced SWA after short acute bouts of SD (i.e., 6h). However, the relationship between cortical nNOS neuronal activity and SWA during CSR is unknown. We compared the activity of cortical neurons expressing nNOS (via c-Fos and nNOS immuno-reactivity, respectively) and sleep in rats in three conditions: (1) after 18-h of acute SD; (2) after five consecutive days of sleep restriction (SR) (18-h SD per day with 6h ad libitum sleep opportunity per day); (3) and time-of-day matched ad libitum sleep controls. Cortical nNOS neuronal activity was enhanced during sleep after both 18-h SD and 5 days of SR treatments compared to control treatments. SWA and NREM sleep delta energy (the product of NREM sleep duration and SWA) were positively correlated with enhanced cortical nNOS neuronal activity after 18-h SD but not 5days of SR. That neurons expressing nNOS were active after longer amounts of acute SD (18h vs. 6h reported in the literature) and were correlated with SWA further suggest that these cells might regulate SWA. However, since these neurons were active after CSR when SWA was not enhanced, these findings suggest that mechanisms downstream of their activation are altered during CSR. PMID:23685166

  6. Amyloid precursor protein expression and processing are differentially regulated during cortical neuron differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Petra; Agholme, Lotta; Nazir, Faisal Hayat; Satir, Tugce Munise; Toombs, Jamie; Wellington, Henrietta; Strandberg, Joakim; Bontell, Thomas Olsson; Kvartsberg, Hlin; Holmström, Maria; Boreström, Cecilia; Simonsson, Stina; Kunath, Tilo; Lindahl, Anders; Blennow, Kaj; Hanse, Eric; Portelius, Erik; Wray, Selina; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its cleavage product amyloid β (Aβ) have been thoroughly studied in Alzheimer’s disease. However, APP also appears to be important for neuronal development. Differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) towards cortical neurons enables in vitro mechanistic studies on human neuronal development. Here, we investigated expression and proteolytic processing of APP during differentiation of human iPSCs towards cortical neurons over a 100-day period. APP expression remained stable during neuronal differentiation, whereas APP processing changed. α-Cleaved soluble APP (sAPPα) was secreted early during differentiation, from neuronal progenitors, while β-cleaved soluble APP (sAPPβ) was first secreted after deep-layer neurons had formed. Short Aβ peptides, including Aβ1-15/16, peaked during the progenitor stage, while processing shifted towards longer peptides, such as Aβ1-40/42, when post-mitotic neurons appeared. This indicates that APP processing is regulated throughout differentiation of cortical neurons and that amyloidogenic APP processing, as reflected by Aβ1-40/42, is associated with mature neuronal phenotypes. PMID:27383650

  7. Reactive Oxygen Species Modulate the Differentiation of Neurons in Clonal Cortical Cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Tsatmali, Marina; Walcott, Elisabeth C.; Makarenkova, Helen; Crossin, Kathryn L.

    2007-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important regulators of intracellular signaling. We examined the expression of ROS during rat brain development and explored their role in differentiation using cortical cultures. High levels of ROS were found in newborn neurons. Neurons produced ROS, not connected with cell death, throughout embryogenesis and postnatal stages. By P20, ROS-producing cells were found only in neurogenic regions. Cells with low levels of ROS, isolated from E15 brains by FACS, differentiated into neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes in clonal cultures. Neurons produced high ROS early in culture and later differentiated into two types: large pyramidal-like neurons that fired no or only a single action potential and smaller neurons that expressed nuclear calretinin and fired repeated action potentials. Antioxidant treatment did not alter neuron number but increased the ratio of small to large neurons. These findings suggest that modulation of ROS levels influences multiple aspects of neuronal differentiation. PMID:17000118

  8. Low level laser therapy reduces oxidative stress in cortical neurons in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Tedford, Clark E.; McCarthy, Thomas; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2012-03-01

    It is accepted that the mechanisms of low level laser therapy (LLLT) involves photons that are absorbed in the mitochondria of cells and lead to increase of mitochondrial metabolism resulting in more electron transport, increase of mitochondrial membrane potential, and more ATP production. Intracellular calcium changes are seen that correlate with mitochondrial stimulation. The situation with two other intermediates is more complex however: reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). Evidence exists that low levels of ROS are produced by LLLT in normal cells that can be beneficial by (for instance) activating NF-kB. However high fluences of light can produce large amounts of ROS that can damage the cells. In oxidatively stressed cells the situation may be different. We exposed primary cultured cortical neurons to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or cobalt chloride (CoCl2) oxidative insults in the presence or absence of LLLT (810-nm laser at 0.3 or 3 J/cm2). Cell viability of cortical neurons was determined by lactate dehydrogenase assay. ROS in neurons was detected using an ROS probe, MitoRox with confocal microscopy. Results showed that LLLT dose-dependently reversed ROS production and protected cortical neurons against H2O2 or CoCl2 induced oxidative injury in cultured cortical neurons. Conclusion: LLLT can protect cortical neurons against oxidative stress by reversing the levels of ROS.

  9. Alkalosis leads to the over-activity of cortical principal neurons.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunting; Yi, Lian; Liu, Danian; Li, Jinlong; Sun, Ling; Zhang, Zhongling

    2012-09-13

    Alkalosis patients manifest anxiety, manic and convulsion. The elevation of mood and behavior is hypothetically a scenario that alkalosis resets the functional status of neuronal networks to overexcitation. In addition to the downregulation of inhibitory neurons, we examined whether alkalosis upregulates the functions of cortical principal neurons by electrophysiological approach. High extracellular pH condition downgrades inhibitory postsynaptic current frequency, as well as upregulates excitatory synaptic events and spike production in cortical principal neurons. Their functional upregulation is associated with the decreases of spike refractory period and threshold potential. Alkalosis downregulates GABA release from inhibitory neurons and upregulates the functions of principal neurons, which lead to imbalance between inhibitory and excitatory networks for the elevated mood and behaviors. PMID:22842394

  10. Excitatory cortical neurons with multipolar shape establish neuronal polarity by forming a tangentially oriented axon in the intermediate zone.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Yumiko; Yamauchi, Kenta

    2013-01-01

    The formation of axon-dendrite polarity is crucial for neuron to make the proper information flow within the brain. Although the processes of neuronal polarity formation have been extensively studied using neurons in dissociated culture, the corresponding developmental processes in vivo are still unclear. Here, we illuminate the initial steps of morphological polarization of excitatory cortical neurons in situ, by sparsely labeling their neuroepithelial progenitors using in utero electroporation and then examining their neuronal progeny in brain sections and in slice cultures. Morphological analysis showed that an axon-like long tangential process formed in progeny cells in the intermediate zone (IZ). Time-lapse imaging analysis using slice culture revealed that progeny cells with multipolar shape, after alternately extending and retracting their short processes for several hours, suddenly elongated a long process tangentially. These cells then transformed into a bipolar shape, extending a pia-directed leading process, and migrated radially leaving the tangential process behind, which gave rise to an "L-shaped" axon. Our findings suggest that neuronal polarity in these cells is established de novo from a nonpolarized stage in vivo and indicate that excitatory cortical neurons with multipolar shape in the IZ initiate axon outgrowth before radial migration into the cortical plate. PMID:22267309

  11. Assessing similarity to primary tissue and cortical layer identity in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cortical neurons through single-cell transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Handel, Adam E.; Chintawar, Satyan; Lalic, Tatjana; Whiteley, Emma; Vowles, Jane; Giustacchini, Alice; Argoud, Karene; Sopp, Paul; Nakanishi, Mahito; Bowden, Rory; Cowley, Sally; Newey, Sarah; Akerman, Colin; Ponting, Chris P.; Cader, M. Zameel

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cortical neurons potentially present a powerful new model to understand corticogenesis and neurological disease. Previous work has established that differentiation protocols can produce cortical neurons, but little has been done to characterize these at cellular resolution. In particular, it is unclear to what extent in vitro two-dimensional, relatively disordered culture conditions recapitulate the development of in vivo cortical layer identity. Single-cell multiplex reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to interrogate the expression of genes previously implicated in cortical layer or phenotypic identity in individual cells. Totally, 93.6% of single cells derived from iPSCs expressed genes indicative of neuronal identity. High proportions of single neurons derived from iPSCs expressed glutamatergic receptors and synaptic genes. And, 68.4% of iPSC-derived neurons expressing at least one layer marker could be assigned to a laminar identity using canonical cortical layer marker genes. We compared single-cell RNA-seq of our iPSC-derived neurons to available single-cell RNA-seq data from human fetal and adult brain and found that iPSC-derived cortical neurons closely resembled primary fetal brain cells. Unexpectedly, a subpopulation of iPSC-derived neurons co-expressed canonical fetal deep and upper cortical layer markers. However, this appeared to be concordant with data from primary cells. Our results therefore provide reassurance that iPSC-derived cortical neurons are highly similar to primary cortical neurons at the level of single cells but suggest that current layer markers, although effective, may not be able to disambiguate cortical layer identity in all cells. PMID:26740550

  12. Increase of p25 associated with cortical neuronal death induced by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tianwen; Fang, Lijun; Lin, Zhiying; Huang, En; Ye, Qinyong

    2016-09-01

    The mechanisms of neuronal damage in hypoxic cerebral cortex are complicated. Recent studies indicated that deregulation of Cdk5 was involved in neuronal death induced by hypoxia (1% O2). However, the pathological effect of Cdk5 is not fully elucidated. Therefore, in order to decipher the effect of Cdk5 on cellular death in hypoxic condition, the Cdk5 and its activator p35/p25 were investigated in cortical neurons at 10 DIV (Days In Vitro). Upon exposure to hypoxia, the cortical neurons showed a time-dependent increase of neuronal death compared to normoxia-treated control neurons. In correlation to the increase of neuronal death under hypoxia, the level of p25, a truncated form of p35, also increased in a time-dependent manner. Importantly, inhibition of Cdk5 kinase activity by roscovitine protected neurons from death under hypoxic stress. In contrast, ectopic upregulation of Cdk5 kinase activity in neurons expressing p25 led to an increase of neuronal death in comparison to control neurons expressing GFP. It suggests that ectopic increase of Cdk5 kinase activity through conversion of p35 to p25 is involved in the process of neuronal death induced by hypoxia. PMID:27402274

  13. Cultured networks of excitatory projection neurons and inhibitory interneurons for studying human cortical neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin-Chong; Fan, Jing; Wang, Xueqing; Eacker, Stephen M; Kam, Tae-In; Chen, Li; Yin, Xiling; Zhu, Juehua; Chi, Zhikai; Jiang, Haisong; Chen, Rong; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2016-04-01

    Translating neuroprotective treatments from discovery in cell and animal models to the clinic has proven challenging. To reduce the gap between basic studies of neurotoxicity and neuroprotection and clinically relevant therapies, we developed a human cortical neuron culture system from human embryonic stem cells or human inducible pluripotent stem cells that generated both excitatory and inhibitory neuronal networks resembling the composition of the human cortex. This methodology used timed administration of retinoic acid to FOXG1(+)neural precursor cells leading to differentiation of neuronal populations representative of the six cortical layers with both excitatory and inhibitory neuronal networks that were functional and homeostatically stable. In human cortical neuronal cultures, excitotoxicity or ischemia due to oxygen and glucose deprivation led to cell death that was dependent onN-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, nitric oxide (NO), and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) (a cell death pathway called parthanatos that is distinct from apoptosis, necroptosis, and other forms of cell death). Neuronal cell death was attenuated by PARP inhibitors that are currently in clinical trials for cancer treatment. This culture system provides a new platform for the study of human cortical neurotoxicity and suggests that PARP inhibitors may be useful for ameliorating excitotoxic and ischemic cell death in human neurons. PMID:27053772

  14. A synaptic organizing principle for cortical neuronal groups

    PubMed Central

    Perin, Rodrigo; Berger, Thomas K.; Markram, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal circuitry is often considered a clean slate that can be dynamically and arbitrarily molded by experience. However, when we investigated synaptic connectivity in groups of pyramidal neurons in the neocortex, we found that both connectivity and synaptic weights were surprisingly predictable. Synaptic weights follow very closely the number of connections in a group of neurons, saturating after only 20% of possible connections are formed between neurons in a group. When we examined the network topology of connectivity between neurons, we found that the neurons cluster into small world networks that are not scale-free, with less than 2 degrees of separation. We found a simple clustering rule where connectivity is directly proportional to the number of common neighbors, which accounts for these small world networks and accurately predicts the connection probability between any two neurons. This pyramidal neuron network clusters into multiple groups of a few dozen neurons each. The neurons composing each group are surprisingly distributed, typically more than 100 μm apart, allowing for multiple groups to be interlaced in the same space. In summary, we discovered a synaptic organizing principle that groups neurons in a manner that is common across animals and hence, independent of individual experiences. We speculate that these elementary neuronal groups are prescribed Lego-like building blocks of perception and that acquired memory relies more on combining these elementary assemblies into higher-order constructs. PMID:21383177

  15. Monoclonal antibody identification of subpopulations of cerebral cortical neurons affected in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, C A; Rudnicka, M; Hinton, D R; Blanks, J C; Kozlowski, M

    1987-01-01

    Neuronal degeneration is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD). Given the paucity of molecular markers available for the identification of neuronal subtypes, the specificity of neuronal loss within the cerebral cortex has been difficult to evaluate. With a panel of four monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) applied to central nervous system tissues from AD patients, we have immunocytochemically identified a population of vulnerable cortical neurons; a subpopulation of pyramidal neurons is recognized by mABs 3F12 and 44.1 in the hippocampus and neocortex, and clusters of multipolar neurons in the entorhinal cortex reactive with mAb 44.1 show selective degeneration. Closely adjacent stellate-like neurons in these regions, identified by mAB 6A2, show striking preservation in AD. The neurons recognized by mAbs 3F12 and 44.1, to the best of our knowledge, do not comprise a single known neurotransmitter system. mAb 3A4 identifies a phosphorylated antigen that is undetectable in normal brain but accumulates early in the course of AD in somas of vulnerable neurons. Antigen 3A4 is distinct from material reactive with thioflavin S or antibody generated against paired helical filaments. Initially, antigen 3A4 is localized to neurons in the entorhinal cortex and subiculum, later in the association neocortex, and, ultimately in cases of long duration, in primary sensory cortical regions. mAb 3F12 recognizes multiple bands on immunoblots of homogenates of normal and AD cortical tissues, whereas mAb 3A4 does not bind to immunoblots containing neurofilament proteins or brain homogenates from AD patients. Ultrastructurally, antigen 3A4 is localized to paired helical filaments. Using these mAbs, further molecular characterization of the affected cortical neurons is now possible. Images PMID:3120196

  16. Caloric restriction stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons through neuropeptide Y and ghrelin receptors activation

    PubMed Central

    Carmo-Silva, Sara; Botelho, Mariana; de Almeida, Luís Pereira; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction is an anti-aging intervention known to extend lifespan in several experimental models, at least in part, by stimulating autophagy. Caloric restriction increases neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus and plasma ghrelin, a peripheral gut hormone that acts in hypothalamus to modulate energy homeostasis. NPY and ghrelin have been shown to be neuroprotective in different brain areas and to induce several physiological modifications similar to those induced by caloric restriction. However, the effect of NPY and ghrelin in autophagy in cortical neurons is currently not known. Using a cell culture of rat cortical neurons we investigate the involvement of NPY and ghrelin in caloric restriction-induced autophagy. We observed that a caloric restriction mimetic cell culture medium stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons and NPY or ghrelin receptor antagonists blocked this effect. On the other hand, exogenous NPY or ghrelin stimulate autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Moreover, NPY mediates the stimulatory effect of ghrelin on autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Since autophagy impairment occurs in aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases, NPY and ghrelin synergistic effect on autophagy stimulation may suggest a new strategy to delay aging process. PMID:27441412

  17. Caloric restriction stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons through neuropeptide Y and ghrelin receptors activation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Marques, Marisa; Aveleira, Célia A; Carmo-Silva, Sara; Botelho, Mariana; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2016-07-01

    Caloric restriction is an anti-aging intervention known to extend lifespan in several experimental models, at least in part, by stimulating autophagy. Caloric restriction increases neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus and plasma ghrelin, a peripheral gut hormone that acts in hypothalamus to modulate energy homeostasis. NPY and ghrelin have been shown to be neuroprotective in different brain areas and to induce several physiological modifications similar to those induced by caloric restriction. However, the effect of NPY and ghrelin in autophagy in cortical neurons is currently not known. Using a cell culture of rat cortical neurons we investigate the involvement of NPY and ghrelin in caloric restriction-induced autophagy. We observed that a caloric restriction mimetic cell culture medium stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons and NPY or ghrelin receptor antagonists blocked this effect. On the other hand, exogenous NPY or ghrelin stimulate autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Moreover, NPY mediates the stimulatory effect of ghrelin on autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Since autophagy impairment occurs in aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases, NPY and ghrelin synergistic effect on autophagy stimulation may suggest a new strategy to delay aging process. PMID:27441412

  18. N-Adamantyl-4-methylthiazol-2-amine suppresses amyloid β-induced neuronal oxidative damage in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chang Hun; Kim, Eun-A; Kim, Jiae; Choi, Soo Young; Yang, Seung-Ju; Cho, Sung-Woo

    2016-06-01

    Recently, we have reported that N-adamantyl-4-methylthiazol-2-amine (KHG26693) successfully reduced the production of oxidative stress in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and lipopolysaccharide-induced BV-2 microglial cells by increasing their antioxidant capacity. However, antioxidative effects of KHG26693 against Aβ (Aβ)-induced oxidative stress have not yet been reported. In the present study, we further investigated the antioxidative function of KHG26693 in Aβ-mediated primary cultured cortical neurons. We showed here that KHG26693 attenuated Aβ-induced cytotoxicity, increase of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, elevation of caspase-3 expression, and impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential in cultured primary cortical neurons. KHG26693 also decreases the Aβ-mediated formation of malondialdehyde, reactive oxygen species, and NO production by decreasing nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NADPH oxidase level. Moreover, KHG26693 suppress the Aβ-induced oxidative stress through a possible mechanism involving attenuation of GSH and antioxidant enzyme activities such as glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Finally, pretreatment of cortical neurons with KHG26693 significantly reduced the Aβ-induced protein oxidation and nitration. To our knowledge, this is the first report, showing that KHG26693 significantly attenuates Aβ-induced oxidative stress in primary cortical neurons, and may prove attractive strategies to reduce Aβ-induced neural cell death. PMID:27002191

  19. Sulfite triggers sustained calcium overload in cultured cortical neurons via a redox-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Cao, Hui; Guan, Xin-Lei; Long, Li-Hong; Hu, Zhuang-Li; Ni, Lan; Wang, Fang; Chen, Jian-Guo; Wu, Peng-Fei

    2016-09-01

    Sulfite is a compound commonly used as preservative in foods and pharmaceuticals. Many studies have examined the neurotoxicity of sulfite, but its effect on neuronal calcium homeostasis has not yet been reported. Here, we observed the effect of sulfite on the cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in cultured cortical neurons using Fura-2/AM based calcium imaging technique. Sulfite (250-1000μM) caused a sustained increase in [Ca(2+)]i in the neurons via a dose-dependent manner. In Ca(2+)-free solution, sulfite failed to increase [Ca(2+)]i. After the depletion of the intracellular calcium store, the effect of sulfite on the [Ca(2+)]i was largely abolished. Pharmacological inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC)-inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) signaling pathway blocked sulfite-induced increase of [Ca(2+)]i. Interestingly, antioxidants such as trolox and dithiothreitol, abolished the increase of [Ca(2+)]i induced by sulfite. Exposure to sulfite triggered generation of sulfur- and oxygen-centered free radicals in neurons and increased oxidative stress both in the cultured cortical neurons and the prefrontal cortex of rats. Furthemore, sulfite decreased cell viability in cultured cortical neurons via a calcium-dependent manner. Thus, our current study suggests that the redox-dependent calcium overload triggered by sulfite in cortical neuronsmay be involved in its neurotoxicity. PMID:27313092

  20. Mechanism of soluble beta-amyloid 25-35 neurotoxicity in primary cultured rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Lili; Hu, Weimin; Li, Guanglai

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of different concentrations of soluble beta-amyloid 25-35 (Aβ25-35) on cell viability, calcium overload, and PI3K-p85 expression in cultured cortical rat neurons. Primary cultured cerebral cortical neurons of newborn rats were divided randomly into six groups. Five groups were treated with soluble Aβ25-35 at concentrations of 10nmol/L, 100nmol/L, 1μmol/L, 10μmol/L, or 30μmol/L. Cell Counting Kit-8 staining was used to measure cell viability, laser-scanning confocal imaging was used to detect changes in intracellular free calcium concentration, and western blot assay was used to measure neuronal PI3K-p85 expression. Soluble Aβ25-35 was found to reduce cell viability and induce calcium overload in primary cultured rat cerebral cortical neurons, in a concentration-dependent manner. At certain concentrations, soluble Aβ25-35 also increased neuronal PI3K-p85 expression. These findings reveal that soluble Aβ25-35 reduces the viability of cultured cerebral cortical rat neurons. The neurotoxicity mechanism may involve calcium overload and disruption of insulin signal transduction pathways. PMID:26940239

  1. GVS-111 prevents oxidative damage and apoptosis in normal and Down's syndrome human cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Pelsman, Alejandra; Hoyo-Vadillo, Carlos; Gudasheva, Tatiana A; Seredenin, Sergei B; Ostrovskaya, Rita U; Busciglio, Jorge

    2003-05-01

    The neuroprotective activity of a novel N-acylprolyl-containing dipeptide analog of the nootropic 2-oxo-1-pyrrolidine acetamide (Piracetam) designated as GVS-111 (DVD-111/Noopept) was tested in two in vitro models of neuronal degeneration mediated by oxidative stress: normal human cortical neurons treated with H(2)O(2), and Down's syndrome (DS) cortical neurons. Incubation of normal cortical neurons with 50 microM H(2)O(2) for 1h resulted in morphological and structural changes consistent with neuronal apoptosis and in the degeneration of more than 60% of the neurons present in the culture. GVS-111 significantly increased neuronal survival after H(2)O(2)-treatment displaying a dose-dependent neuroprotective activity from 10nM to 100 microM, and an IC(50) value of 1.21+/-0.07 microM. GVS-111 inhibited the accumulation of intracellular free radicals and lipid peroxidation damage in neurons treated with H(2)O(2) or FeSO(4), suggesting an antioxidant mechanism of action. GVS-111 exhibited significantly higher neuroprotection compared to the standard cognition enhancer Piracetam, or to the antioxidants Vitamin E, propyl gallate and N-tert-butyl-2-sulpho-phenylnitrone (s-PBN). In DS cortical cultures, chronic treatment with GVS-111 significantly reduced the appearance of degenerative changes and enhanced neuronal survival. The results suggest that the neuroprotective effect of GVS-111 against oxidative damage and its potential nootropic activity may present a valuable therapeutic combination for the treatment of mental retardation and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:12711349

  2. Fates of visual cortical neurons in the ferret after isochronic and heterochronic transplantation.

    PubMed

    McConnell, S K

    1988-03-01

    In the mammalian cerebral cortex, neurons in a given layer are generated at about the same time in development. These cells also tend to share similar sets of morphological and physiological properties and have projection patterns characteristic of that layer. This correspondence between the birthday and eventual fate of a cortical neuron suggests the possibility that the commitment of a cell to a particular laminar position and set of connections may occur very early on in cortical development. The experiments described here constitute an attempt to manipulate the fates of newly generated cortical neurons upon transplantation. The first set of experiments addressed the normal development of neurons in the primary visual cortex (area 17) of the ferret. Injections of 3H-thymidine into newborn ferrets showed that neurons generated after birth are destined to sit in layer 2/3 of the cortex, whereas neurons born on embryonic day (E) 32 populate primarily layers 5 and 6. Many layer 2/3 neurons in adult ferrets could be retrogradely labeled with HRP from visual cortical areas 18 and 19, while about half of the neurons in layer 6 were found to project to the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN). In the second set of experiments, presumptive layer 2/3 cells were labeled in vivo by injecting ferrets with 3H-thymidine on P1 and P2. Before the cells had a chance to migrate, they were removed from the donor brain, incubated in a fluorescent dye (DAPI or fast blue), and dissociated into a single-cell suspension. The labeled cells were then transplanted into the proliferative zone of a littermate host ferret ("isochronic" transplants). Over the next few weeks, many of these dye-labeled cells underwent changes in their position and morphology that were consistent with a radially directed migration and subsequent differentiation into cortical neurons. The final positions of isochronically transplanted neurons in the host brain were mapped out by using the 3H-thymidine marker after

  3. Extraction and analysis of neuron firing signals from deep cortical video microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kerekes, Ryan A; Blundon, Jay

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a method for extracting and analyzing neuronal activity time signals from video of the cortex of a live animal. The signals correspond to the firing activity of individual cortical neurons. Activity signals are based on the changing fluorescence of calcium indicators in the cells over time. We propose a cell segmentation method that relies on a user-specified center point, from which the signal extraction method proceeds. A stabilization approach is used to reduce tissue motion in the video. The extracted signal is then processed to flatten the baseline and detect action potentials. We show results from applying the method to a cortical video of a live mouse.

  4. Building a Large-Scale Computational Model of a Cortical Neuronal Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemanová, Lucia; Zhou, Changsong; Kurths, Jürgen

    We introduce the general framework of the large-scale neuronal model used in the 5th Helmholtz Summer School — Complex Brain Networks. The main aim is to build a universal large-scale model of a cortical neuronal network, structured as a network of networks, which is flexible enough to implement different kinds of topology and neuronal models and which exhibits behavior in various dynamical regimes. First, we describe important biological aspects of brain topology and use them in the construction of a large-scale cortical network. Second, the general dynamical model is presented together with explanations of the major dynamical properties of neurons. Finally, we discuss the implementation of the model into parallel code and its possible modifications and improvements.

  5. Ketamine effects on somatosensory cortical single neurons and on behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, I M; Chapin, J K

    1990-06-01

    cortical neuronal excitation and sensory suppression in the same cortical region may explain in part the mechanism of dissociative anesthesia and hallucinatory side effects observed in humans during emergence from ketamine anesthesia. PMID:2344058

  6. Baicalein reverts L-valine-induced persistent sodium current up-modulation in primary cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Caioli, Silvia; Candelotti, Elena; Pedersen, Jens Z; Saba, Luana; Antonini, Alessia; Incerpi, Sandra; Zona, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    L-valine is a branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) largely used as dietary integrator by athletes and involved in some inherited rare diseases such as maple syrup urine disease. This pathology is caused by an altered BCAA metabolism with the accumulation of toxic keto acids in tissues and body fluids with consequent severe neurological symptoms. In animal models of BCAA accumulation, increased oxidative stress levels and lipid peroxidation have been reported. The aim of this study was to analyze both whether high BCAA concentrations in neurons induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and whether, by performing electrophysiological recordings, the neuronal functional properties are modified. Our results demonstrate that in primary cortical cultures, a high dose of valine increases ROS production and provokes neuronal hyperexcitability because the action potential frequencies and the persistent sodium current amplitudes increase significantly compared to non-treated neurons. Since Baicalein, a flavone obtained from the Scutellaria root, has been shown to act as a strong antioxidant with neuroprotective effects, we evaluated its possible antioxidant activity in primary cortical neurons chronically exposed to L-valine. The preincubation of cortical neurons with Baicalein prevents the ROS production and is able to revert both the neuronal hyperexcitability and the increase of the persistent sodium current, indicating a direct correlation between the ROS production and the altered physiological parameters. In conclusion, our data show that the electrophysiological alterations of cortical neurons elicited by high valine concentration are due to the increase in ROS production, suggesting much caution in the intake of BCAA dietary integrators. PMID:26721313

  7. TETRAMETHRIN AND DDT INHIBIT SPONTANEOUS FIRING IN CORTICAL NEURONAL NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The insecticidal and neurotoxic effects of pyrethroids result from prolonged sodium channel inactivation, which causes alterations in neuronal firing and communication. Previously, we determined the relative potencies of 11 type I and type II pyrethroid insecticides using microel...

  8. Magnetic Tunnel Junction Mimics Stochastic Cortical Spiking Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Abhronil; Panda, Priyadarshini; Wijesinghe, Parami; Kim, Yusung; Roy, Kaushik

    2016-01-01

    Brain-inspired computing architectures attempt to mimic the computations performed in the neurons and the synapses in the human brain in order to achieve its efficiency in learning and cognitive tasks. In this work, we demonstrate the mapping of the probabilistic spiking nature of pyramidal neurons in the cortex to the stochastic switching behavior of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction in presence of thermal noise. We present results to illustrate the efficiency of neuromorphic systems based on such probabilistic neurons for pattern recognition tasks in presence of lateral inhibition and homeostasis. Such stochastic MTJ neurons can also potentially provide a direct mapping to the probabilistic computing elements in Belief Networks for performing regenerative tasks. PMID:27443913

  9. Magnetic Tunnel Junction Mimics Stochastic Cortical Spiking Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Abhronil; Panda, Priyadarshini; Wijesinghe, Parami; Kim, Yusung; Roy, Kaushik

    2016-07-01

    Brain-inspired computing architectures attempt to mimic the computations performed in the neurons and the synapses in the human brain in order to achieve its efficiency in learning and cognitive tasks. In this work, we demonstrate the mapping of the probabilistic spiking nature of pyramidal neurons in the cortex to the stochastic switching behavior of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction in presence of thermal noise. We present results to illustrate the efficiency of neuromorphic systems based on such probabilistic neurons for pattern recognition tasks in presence of lateral inhibition and homeostasis. Such stochastic MTJ neurons can also potentially provide a direct mapping to the probabilistic computing elements in Belief Networks for performing regenerative tasks.

  10. Magnetic Tunnel Junction Mimics Stochastic Cortical Spiking Neurons.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Abhronil; Panda, Priyadarshini; Wijesinghe, Parami; Kim, Yusung; Roy, Kaushik

    2016-01-01

    Brain-inspired computing architectures attempt to mimic the computations performed in the neurons and the synapses in the human brain in order to achieve its efficiency in learning and cognitive tasks. In this work, we demonstrate the mapping of the probabilistic spiking nature of pyramidal neurons in the cortex to the stochastic switching behavior of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction in presence of thermal noise. We present results to illustrate the efficiency of neuromorphic systems based on such probabilistic neurons for pattern recognition tasks in presence of lateral inhibition and homeostasis. Such stochastic MTJ neurons can also potentially provide a direct mapping to the probabilistic computing elements in Belief Networks for performing regenerative tasks. PMID:27443913

  11. Chronic benzodiazepine treatment decreases spine density in cortical pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Curto, Yasmina; Garcia-Mompo, Clara; Bueno-Fernandez, Clara; Nacher, Juan

    2016-02-01

    The adult brain retains a substantial capacity for synaptic reorganization, which includes a wide range of modifications from molecular to structural plasticity. Previous reports have demonstrated that the structural remodeling of excitatory neurons seems to occur in parallel to changes in GABAergic neurotransmission. The function of neuronal inhibitory networks can be modified through GABAA receptors, which have a binding site for benzodiazepines (BZ). Although BZs are among the most prescribed drugs, is not known whether they modify the structure and connectivity of pyramidal neurons. In the present study we wish to elucidate the impact of a chronic treatment of 21 days with diazepam (2mg/kg, ip), a BZ that acts as an agonist of GABAA receptors, on the structural plasticity of pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex of adult mice. We have examined the density of dendritic spines and the density of axonal en passant boutons in the cingulate cortex. Although no significant changes were observed in their anxiety levels, animals treated with diazepam showed a decrease in the density of spines in the apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons. Most GFP-expressing en passant boutons in the upper layers of the cingulate cortex had an extracortical origin and no changes in their density were detected after diazepam treatment. These results indicate that the chronic potentiation of GABAergic synapses can induce the structural remodeling of postsynaptic elements in pyramidal neurons. PMID:26733301

  12. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gefei; Li, Rui; Jiang, Zhiwu; Gu, Liming; Chen, Yanxia; Dai, Jianping; Li, Kangsheng

    2016-01-01

    Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i.) but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy. PMID:27525278

  13. Gαz regulates BDNF-induction of axon growth in cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hultman, Rainbo; Kumari, Udhaya; Michel, Nadine; Casey, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    The disruption of neurotransmitter and neurotrophic factor signaling in the central nervous system (CNS) is implicated as the root cause of neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, epilepsy, chronic pain, and depression. Therefore, identifying the underlying molecular mechanisms by which neurotransmitter and neurotrophic factor signaling regulates neuronal survival or growth may facilitate identification of more effective therapies for these disorders. Previously, our lab found that the heterotrimeric G protein, Gz, mediates crosstalk between G protein-coupled receptors and neurotrophin signaling in the neural cell line PC12. These data, combined with Gαz expression profiles - predominantly in neuronal cells with higher expression levels corresponding to developmental times of target tissue innervation - suggested that Gαz may play an important role in neurotrophin signaling and neuronal development. Here, we provide evidence in cortical neurons, both manipulated ex vivo and those cultured from Gz knockout mice, that Gαz is localized to axonal growth cones and plays a significant role in the development of axons of cortical neurons in the CNS. Our findings indicate that Gαz inhibits BDNF-stimulated axon growth in cortical neurons, establishing an endogenous role for Gαz in regulating neurotrophin signaling in the CNS. PMID:24321455

  14. tPA promotes cortical neuron survival via mTOR-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Grummisch, Julia A; Jadavji, Nafisa M; Smith, Patrice D

    2016-07-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a thrombolytic agent commonly used in the treatment of ischemic stroke. While the thrombolytic effects of tPA have been well established, the impact of this blood-brain barrier (BBB) crossing drug on neurons is not known. Given the widespread use of tPA in the clinical setting and the strict therapeutic window established for effective use of the drug, we examined the molecular mechanisms mediating the impact of tPA on postnatal cortical neurons isolated from the mouse brain. Dissociated postnatal primary cortical neurons were treated with tPA and the effects on neuron survival were evaluated. Pharmacological inhibitors of several signaling pathways previously implicated in neuroprotection (mTOR, JAK/STAT, MAPK and PKA-dependent mechanisms) were used to pinpoint the mechanistic effectors of tPA on neuron survival in vitro. We report here that tPA treatment results in a time-dependent neuroprotective effect on postnatal cortical neurons that relies predominantly on Janus kinase (JAK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling mechanisms. Taken together, these data suggest that tPA promotes neuroprotection in a temporally-regulated manner and that both JAK and mTOR signaling effectors are critical mediators of this neuroprotective effect. The results suggest the possibility of targeting these defined mechanisms to potentially expand the therapeutic window for tPA. PMID:26995507

  15. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhiwu; Gu, Liming; Chen, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i.) but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy. PMID:27525278

  16. Subset of Thin Spike Cortical Neurons Preserve the Peripheral Encoding of Stimulus Onsets

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Frank G.

    2010-01-01

    An important question in auditory neuroscience concerns how the neural representation of sound features changes from the periphery to the cortex. Here we focused on the encoding of sound onsets and we used a modeling approach to explore the degree to which auditory cortical neurons follow a similar envelope integration mechanism found at the auditory periphery. Our “forward” model was able to predict relatively accurately the timing of first spikes evoked by natural communication calls in the auditory cortex of awake, head-restrained mice, but only for a subset of cortical neurons. These neurons were systematically different in their encoding of the calls, exhibiting less call selectivity, shorter latency, greater precision, and more transient spiking compared with the same factors of their poorly predicted counterparts. Importantly, neurons that fell into this best-predicted group all had thin spike waveforms, suggestive of suspected interneurons conveying feedforward inhibition. Indeed, our population of call-excited thin spike neurons had significantly higher spontaneous rates and larger frequency tuning bandwidths than those of thick spike neurons. Thus the fidelity of our model's first spike predictions segregated neurons into one earlier responding subset, potentially dominated by suspected interneurons, which preserved a peripheral mechanism for encoding sound onsets and another longer latency subset that reflected higher, likely centrally constructed nonlinearities. These results therefore provide support for the hypothesis that physiologically distinct subclasses of neurons in the auditory cortex may contribute hierarchically to the representation of natural stimuli. PMID:20943946

  17. Alterations in cortical network oscillations and parvalbumin neurons in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Burgos, Guillermo; Cho, Raymond Y; Lewis, David A

    2015-06-15

    Cognitive deficits are a core clinical feature of schizophrenia but respond poorly to available medications. Thus, understanding the neural basis of these deficits is crucial for the development of new therapeutic interventions. The types of cognitive processes affected in schizophrenia are thought to depend on the precisely timed transmission of information in cortical regions via synchronous oscillations at gamma band frequency. Here, we review 1) data from clinical studies suggesting that induction of frontal cortex gamma oscillations during tasks that engage cognitive or complex perceptual functions is attenuated in schizophrenia; 2) findings from basic neuroscience studies highlighting the features of parvalbumin-positive interneurons that are critical for gamma oscillation production; and 3) results from recent postmortem human brain studies providing additional molecular bases for parvalbumin-positive interneuron alterations in prefrontal cortical circuitry in schizophrenia. PMID:25863358

  18. Alterations in Cortical Network Oscillations and Parvalbumin Neurons in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Burgos, Guillermo; Cho, Raymond Y; Lewis, David A

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive deficits are a core clinical feature of schizophrenia but respond poorly to available medications. Thus, understanding the neural basis of these deficits is crucial for the development of new therapeutic interventions. The types of cognitive processes affected in schizophrenia are thought to depend on the precisely timed transmission of information in cortical regions via synchronous oscillations at gamma band frequency. Here, we review 1) data from clinical studies suggesting that induction of frontal cortex gamma oscillations during tasks that engage cognitive or complex perceptual functions is attenuated in schizophrenia, 2) findings from basic neuroscience studies highlighting the features of parvalbumin-positive (PV) interneurons that are critical for gamma oscillation production and 3) results from recent postmortem human brain studies providing additional molecular bases for PV interneuron alterations in prefrontal cortical circuitry in schizophrenia. PMID:25863358

  19. Cortical neuronal cytoskeletal changes associated with FIV infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, S.; Henriksen, S. J.; Prospero-Garcia, O.; Phillips, T. R.; Elder, J. H.; Young, W. G.; Bloom, F. E.; Fox, H. S.

    1997-01-01

    HIV-1 infection is often complicated by central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction. Degenerative neuronal changes as well as neuronal loss have been documented in individuals with AIDS. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection of cats provides a model for both the immune and the central nervous system manifestations of HIV infection of humans. In this study we have examined neurons in the frontal cortex of feline immunodeficiency virus-infected cats and controls for immunoreactivity with SMI 32, an antibody recognizing a non-phosphorylated epitope on neurofilaments. We noted a significant increase in the number of immunoreactive pyramidal cells in infected animals compared to controls. The changes seen in the neuronal cytoskeleton as a consequence of the inoculation with FIV were similar to those seen in humans undergoing the normal aging process as well as those suffering from neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's and dementia pugilistica. The changes we noted in the feline brain were also similar to that reported in animals with traumatic injuries or with spontaneously occurring or induced motor neuron diseases, suggesting that the increase in reactivity represents a deleterious effect of FIV on the central nervous system.

  20. Linear integration of spine Ca2+ signals in layer 4 cortical neurons in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hongbo; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Sakmann, Bert; Konnerth, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Sensory information reaches the cortex through synchronously active thalamic axons, which provide a strong drive to layer 4 (L4) cortical neurons. Because of technical limitations, the dendritic signaling processes underlying the rapid and efficient activation of L4 neurons in vivo remained unknown. Here we introduce an approach that allows the direct monitoring of single dendritic spine Ca2+ signals in L4 spiny stellate cells of the vibrissal mouse cortex in vivo. Our results demonstrate that activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors is required for sensory-evoked action potential (AP) generation in these neurons. By analyzing NMDA receptor-mediated Ca2+ signaling, we identify whisker stimulation-evoked large responses in a subset of dendritic spines. These sensory-stimulation–activated spines, representing predominantly thalamo-cortical input sites, were denser at proximal dendritic regions. The amplitude of sensory-evoked spine Ca2+ signals was independent of the activity of neighboring spines, without evidence for cooperativity. Furthermore, we found that spine Ca2+ signals evoked by back-propagating APs sum linearly with sensory-evoked synaptic Ca2+ signals. Thus, our results identify in sensory information-receiving L4 cortical neurons a linear mode of dendritic integration that underlies the rapid and reliable transfer of peripheral signals to the cortical network. PMID:24927564

  1. Tangential migration of glutamatergic neurons and cortical patterning during development: Lessons from Cajal-Retzius cells.

    PubMed

    Barber, Melissa; Pierani, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    Tangential migration is a mode of cell movement, which in the developing cerebral cortex, is defined by displacement parallel to the ventricular surface and orthogonal to the radial glial fibers. This mode of long-range migration is a strategy by which distinct neuronal classes generated from spatially and molecularly distinct origins can integrate to form appropriate neural circuits within the cortical plate. While it was previously believed that only GABAergic cortical interneurons migrate tangentially from their origins in the subpallial ganglionic eminences to integrate in the cortical plate, it is now known that transient populations of glutamatergic neurons also adopt this mode of migration. These include Cajal-Retzius cells (CRs), subplate neurons (SPs), and cortical plate transient neurons (CPTs), which have crucial roles in orchestrating the radial and tangential development of the embryonic cerebral cortex in a noncell-autonomous manner. While CRs have been extensively studied, it is only in the last decade that the molecular mechanisms governing their tangential migration have begun to be elucidated. To date, the mechanisms of SPs and CPTs tangential migration remain unknown. We therefore review the known signaling pathways, which regulate parameters of CRs migration including their motility, contact-redistribution and adhesion to the pial surface, and discuss this in the context of how CR migration may regulate their signaling activity in a spatial and temporal manner. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 847-881, 2016. PMID:26581033

  2. Paracrine Neuroprotective Effects of Neural Stem Cells on Glutamate-Induced Cortical Neuronal Cell Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Geranmayeh, Mohammad Hossein; Baghbanzadeh, Ali; Barin, Abbas; Salar-Amoli, Jamileh; Dehghan, Mohammad Mehdi; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Azari, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Glutamate is a major excitatory neurotransmitter in mammalian central nervous system. Excessive glutamate releasing overactivates its receptors and changes calcium homeostasis that in turn leads to a cascade of intracellular events causing neuronal degeneration. In current study, we used neural stem cells conditioned medium (NSCs-CM) to investigate its neuroprotective effects on glutamate-treated primary cortical neurons. Methods: Embryonic rat primary cortical cultures were exposed to different concentrations of glutamate for 1 hour and then they incubated with NSCs-CM. Subsequently, the amount of cell survival in different glutamate excitotoxic groups were measured after 24 h of incubation by trypan blue exclusion assay and MTT assay. Hoechst and propidium iodide were used for determining apoptotic and necrotic cell death pathways proportion and then the effect of NSCs-CM was investigated on this proportion. Results: NSCs conditioned medium increased viability rate of the primary cortical neurons after glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. Also we found that NSCs-CM provides its neuroprotective effects mainly by decreasing apoptotic cell death rate rather than necrotic cell death rate. Conclusion: The current study shows that adult neural stem cells could exert paracrine neuroprotective effects on cortical neurons following a glutamate neurotoxic insult. PMID:26819924

  3. Regulation of Cerebral Cortical Size and Neuron Number by Fibroblast Growth Factors: Implications for Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaccarino, Flora M.; Grigorenko, Elena L.; Smith, Karen Muller; Stevens, Hanna E.

    2009-01-01

    Increased brain size is common in children with autism spectrum disorders. Here we propose that an increased number of cortical excitatory neurons may underlie the increased brain volume, minicolumn pathology and excessive network excitability, leading to sensory hyper-reactivity and seizures, which are often found in autism. We suggest that…

  4. Elemental gesture dynamics are encoded by song premotor cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Amador, Ana; Perl, Yonatan Sanz; Mindlin, Gabriel B; Margoliash, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Quantitative biomechanical models can identify control parameters that are used during movements, and movement parameters that are encoded by premotor neurons. We fit a mathematical dynamical systems model including subsyringeal pressure, syringeal biomechanics and upper-vocal-tract filtering to the songs of zebra finches. This reduces the dimensionality of singing dynamics, described as trajectories (motor 'gestures') in a space of syringeal pressure and tension. Here we assess model performance by characterizing the auditory response 'replay' of song premotor HVC neurons to the presentation of song variants in sleeping birds, and by examining HVC activity in singing birds. HVC projection neurons were excited and interneurons were suppressed within a few milliseconds of the extreme time points of the gesture trajectories. Thus, the HVC precisely encodes vocal motor output through activity at the times of extreme points of movement trajectories. We propose that the sequential activity of HVC neurons is used as a 'forward' model, representing the sequence of gestures in song to make predictions on expected behaviour and evaluate feedback. PMID:23446354

  5. Extracting Kinematic Parameters for Monkey Bipedal Walking from Cortical Neuronal Ensemble Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fitzsimmons, Nathan A.; Lebedev, Mikhail A.; Peikon, Ian D.; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to walk may be critically impacted as the result of neurological injury or disease. While recent advances in brain–machine interfaces (BMIs) have demonstrated the feasibility of upper-limb neuroprostheses, BMIs have not been evaluated as a means to restore walking. Here, we demonstrate that chronic recordings from ensembles of cortical neurons can be used to predict the kinematics of bipedal walking in rhesus macaques – both offline and in real time. Linear decoders extracted 3D coordinates of leg joints and leg muscle electromyograms from the activity of hundreds of cortical neurons. As more complex patterns of walking were produced by varying the gait speed and direction, larger neuronal populations were needed to accurately extract walking patterns. Extraction was further improved using a switching decoder which designated a submodel for each walking paradigm. We propose that BMIs may one day allow severely paralyzed patients to walk again. PMID:19404411

  6. Bottom-Up and Top-Down Input Augment the Variability of Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Laberge, Camille; Smolyanskaya, Alexandra; Nassi, Jonathan J; Kreiman, Gabriel; Born, Richard T

    2016-08-01

    Neurons in the cerebral cortex respond inconsistently to a repeated sensory stimulus, yet they underlie our stable sensory experiences. Although the nature of this variability is unknown, its ubiquity has encouraged the general view that each cell produces random spike patterns that noisily represent its response rate. In contrast, here we show that reversibly inactivating distant sources of either bottom-up or top-down input to cortical visual areas in the alert primate reduces both the spike train irregularity and the trial-to-trial variability of single neurons. A simple model in which a fraction of the pre-synaptic input is silenced can reproduce this reduction in variability, provided that there exist temporal correlations primarily within, but not between, excitatory and inhibitory input pools. A large component of the variability of cortical neurons may therefore arise from synchronous input produced by signals arriving from multiple sources. PMID:27427459

  7. Acidosis and alkalosis impair brain functions through weakening spike encoding at cortical GABAergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Song, Rongrong; Zhang, Liming; Yang, Zichao; Tian, Xiaoyan

    2011-05-15

    Acidosis and alkalosis, associated with metabolic disorders, lead to the pathological changes of cognition and behaviors in clinical practices of neurology and psychology. Cellular mechanisms for these functional disorders in the central nervous system remain unclear. We have investigated the influences of acidosis and alkalosis on the functions of cortical GABAergic neurons. Both acidosis and alkalosis impair the ability of encoding sequential spikes at these GABAergic neurons. The impairments of their spiking are associated with the increases of refractory periods, threshold potential and afterhyperpolarization. Our studies reveal that acidosis and alkalosis impair cortical GABAergic neurons and in turn deteriorate brain functions, in which their final targets may be voltage-gated channels of sodium and potassium. PMID:21353681

  8. Interplay of environmental signals and progenitor diversity on fate specification of cortical GABAergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Romcy-Pereira, Rodrigo N.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical GABAergic interneurons constitute an extremely diverse population of cells organized in a well-defined topology of precisely interconnected cells. They play a crucial role regulating inhibitory-excitatory balance in brain circuits, gating sensory perception, and regulating spike timing to brain oscillations during distinct behaviors. Dysfunctions in the establishment of proper inhibitory circuits have been associated to several brain disorders such as autism, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. In the rodent adult cortex, inhibitory neurons are generated during the second gestational week from distinct progenitor lineages located in restricted domains of the ventral telencephalon. However, only recently, studies have revealed some of the mechanisms generating the heterogeneity of neuronal subtypes and their modes of integration in brain networks. Here we will discuss some the events involved in the production of cortical GABAergic neuron diversity with focus on the interaction between intrinsically driven genetic programs and environmental signals during development. PMID:25972784

  9. Characterization of neurons in the cortical white matter in human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Richter, Zsófia; Janszky, József; Sétáló, György; Horváth, Réka; Horváth, Zsolt; Dóczi, Tamás; Seress, László; Ábrahám, Hajnalka

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present work was to characterize neurons in the archi- and neocortical white matter, and to investigate their distribution in mesial temporal sclerosis. Immunohistochemistry and quantification of neurons were performed on surgically resected tissue sections of patients with therapy-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy. Temporal lobe tissues of patients with tumor but without epilepsy and that from autopsy were used as controls. Neurons were identified with immunohistochemistry using antibodies against NeuN, calcium-binding proteins, transcription factor Tbr1 and neurofilaments. We found significantly higher density of neurons in the archi- and neocortical white matter of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy than in that of controls. Based on their morphology and neurochemical content, both excitatory and inhibitory cells were present among these neurons. A subset of neurons in the white matter was Tbr-1-immunoreactive and these neurons coexpressed NeuN and neurofilament marker SMI311R. No colocalization of Tbr1 was observed with the inhibitory neuronal markers, calcium-binding proteins. We suggest that a large population of white matter neurons comprises remnants of the subplate. Furthermore, we propose that a subset of white matter neurons was arrested during migration, highlighting the role of cortical maldevelopment in epilepsy associated with mesial temporal sclerosis. PMID:27423628

  10. Transport mechanisms for adenosine and uridine in primary-cultured rat cortical neurons and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Katsuhito; Nagasawa, Kazuki; Fujimoto, Sadaki

    2005-09-01

    Endogenous adenosine and uridine are important modulators of neural survival and activity. In the present study, we examined transport mechanisms of adenosine and uridine in primary-cultured rat cortical neurons, and compared the results for neurons with those for astrocytes. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction identified the mRNAs for ENT1, ENT2, and CNT2, but not CNT1 and CNT3, in neurons and astrocytes. [3H]Adenosine and [3H]uridine were time-, temperature-, and concentration-dependently taken up into neurons and astrocytes. In kinetic analyses, the uptake of both substrates by neurons and astrocytes consisted of two and one, respectively, saturable transport components. The uptake clearance for both substrates by neurons was greater than that by astrocytes. The relative contribution of the high-affinity major component of both substrates to total uptake was estimated to be approximately 80% in neurons. The uptake of [3H]adenosine and [3H]uridine by both neurons and astrocytes was almost entirely Na+-independent, and sensitive to micro, but not nano, molar concentrations of nitrobenzylmercaptopurine riboside, which are transport characteristics of ENT2. Therefore, it was indicated that adenosine and uridine are more efficiently taken up into neurons than into astrocytes, and ENT2 may predominantly contribute to the transport of the nucleosides as a high-affinity transport system in neurons, as in the case of astrocytes. PMID:16043124

  11. Methamphetamine induces heme oxygenase-1 expression in cortical neurons and glia to prevent its toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.-N.; Wu, C.-H.; Lin, T.-C.; Wang, J.-Y.

    2009-11-01

    The impairment of cognitive and motor functions in humans and animals caused by methamphetamine (METH) administration underscores the importance of METH toxicity in cortical neurons. The heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) exerts a cytoprotective effect against various neuronal injures; however, it remains unclear whether HO-1 is involved in METH-induced toxicity. We used primary cortical neuron/glia cocultures to explore the role of HO-1 in METH-induced toxicity. Exposure of cultured cells to various concentrations of METH (0.1, 0.5, 1, 3, 5, and 10 mM) led to cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. A METH concentration of 5 mM, which caused 50% of neuronal death and glial activation, was chosen for subsequent experiments. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed that METH significantly induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression, both preceded cell death. Double and triple immunofluorescence staining further identified HO-1-positive cells as activated astrocytes, microglia, and viable neurons, but not dying neurons. Inhibition of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway significantly blocked HO-1 induction by METH and aggravated METH neurotoxicity. Inhibition of HO activity using tin protoporphyrine IX significantly reduced HO activity and exacerbated METH neurotoxicity. However, prior induction of HO-1 using cobalt protoporphyrine IX partially protected neurons from METH toxicity. Taken together, our results suggest that induction of HO-1 by METH via the p38 signaling pathway may be protective, albeit insufficient to completely protect cortical neurons from METH toxicity.

  12. Golgi, histochemical, and immunocytochemical analyses of the neurons of auditory-related cortices of the rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Cipolloni, P B; Pandya, D N

    1991-10-01

    Morphological characteristics of the neurons of the auditory cortical areas of the rhesus monkey were investigated using Golgi and horseradish peroxidase methods. Neurons of the auditory cortices can be segregated into two categories, spinous and nonspinous, which can be further subclassified according to their dendritic arrays. The spinous neurons include pyramidal, "star pyramid," multipolar, and bipolar cells. As in other cortices, pyramidal cells are found in layers II-VI and appear to be the most numerous of all cortical neurons. The "star pyramids" have radially oriented dendrites with a less prominent apical shaft and are found mainly in the middle cortical layers. The spinous multipolar neurons are also found in the middle cortical layers and have their dendrites radially arrayed but have no apical dendrite. The spinous bipolar cells, found in the infragranular layers, occur most frequently in the lateral auditory association cortex. The nonspinous neurons include neurogliaform, multipolar, bitufted, and bipolar cells and are found in all cortical layers. The neurogliaform cells are the smallest of all neurons and have radially arrayed, recurving dendrites. The nonspinous multipolar cells also have radially arrayed dendrites but vary in size from being confined to one cortical layer to extending across four laminae. The bitufted neurons are subclassified into three groups: neurons whose primary dendrites arise radially from their somata, those whose dendrites arise from two poles of their somata, and those that have a single primary dendrite arising from one pole and multiple dendrites from another pole of their somata. The nonspinous bipolar cells also have several variants but usually have dendrites arising from two poles of the somata. The chemical characteristics of the auditory neurons were investigated using histochemical and immunocytochemical methods. Peptidergic neurons, i.e., cholecystokinin-, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-, somatostatin-, and

  13. During postnatal development endogenous neurosteroids influence GABA-ergic neurotransmission of mouse cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Adam R.; Mitchell, Scott J.; Peden, Dianne R.; Herd, Murray B.; Seifi, Mohsen; Swinny, Jerome D.; Belelli, Delia; Lambert, Jeremy J.

    2016-01-01

    As neuronal development progresses, GABAergic synaptic transmission undergoes a defined program of reconfiguration. For example, GABAA receptor (GABAAR)-mediated synaptic currents, (miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents; mIPSCs), which initially exhibit a relatively slow decay phase, become progressively reduced in duration, thereby supporting the temporal resolution required for mature network activity. Here we report that during postnatal development of cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons, GABAAR-mediated phasic inhibition is influenced by a resident neurosteroid tone, which wanes in the second postnatal week, resulting in the brief phasic events characteristic of mature neuronal signalling. Treatment of cortical slices with the immediate precursor of 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one (5α3α), the GABAAR-inactive 5α-dihydroprogesterone, (5α-DHP), greatly prolonged the mIPSCs of P20 pyramidal neurons, demonstrating these more mature neurons retain the capacity to synthesize GABAAR-active neurosteroids, but now lack the endogenous steroid substrate. Previously, such developmental plasticity of phasic inhibition was ascribed to the expression of synaptic GABAARs incorporating the α1 subunit. However, the duration of mIPSCs recorded from L2/3 cortical neurons derived from α1 subunit deleted mice, were similarly under the developmental influence of a neurosteroid tone. In addition to principal cells, synaptic GABAARs of L2/3 interneurons were modulated by native neurosteroids in a development-dependent manner. In summary, local neurosteroids influence synaptic transmission during a crucial period of cortical neurodevelopment, findings which may be of importance for establishing normal network connectivity. PMID:26626485

  14. Parvalbumin neurons and gamma rhythms enhance cortical circuit performance

    PubMed Central

    Sohal, Vikaas S.; Zhang, Feng; Yizhar, Ofer; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Synchronized oscillations and inhibitory interneurons have important and interconnected roles within cortical microcircuits. In particular, interneurons defined by the fast-spiking phenotype and expression of the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin1,2 have been suggested to be involved in gamma (30–80 Hz) oscillations3–7, which are hypothesized to enhance information processing8,9. However, because parvalbumin interneurons cannot be selectively controlled, definitive tests of their functional significance in gamma oscillations, and quantitative assessment of the impact of parvalbumin interneurons and gamma oscillations on cortical circuits, have been lacking despite potentially enormous significance (for example, abnormalities in parvalbumin interneurons may underlie altered gamma-frequency synchronization and cognition in schizophrenia10 and autism11). Here we use a panel of optogenetic technologies12–14 in mice to selectively modulate multiple distinct circuit elements in neocortex, alone or in combination. We find that inhibiting parvalbumin interneurons suppresses gamma oscillations in vivo, whereas driving these interneurons (even by means of non-rhythmic principal cell activity) is sufficient to generate emergent gamma-frequency rhythmicity. Moreover, gamma-frequency modulation of excitatory input in turn was found to enhance signal transmission in neocortex by reducing circuit noise and amplifying circuit signals, including inputs to parvalbumin interneurons. As demonstrated here, optogenetics opens the door to a new kind of informational analysis of brain function, permitting quantitative delineation of the functional significance of individual elements in the emergent operation and function of intact neural circuitry. PMID:19396159

  15. Growth and structural discrimination of cortical neurons on randomly oriented and vertically aligned dense carbon nanotube networks

    PubMed Central

    Nick, Christoph; Yadav, Sandeep; Joshi, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Summary The growth of cortical neurons on three dimensional structures of spatially defined (structured) randomly oriented, as well as on vertically aligned, carbon nanotubes (CNT) is studied. Cortical neurons are attracted towards both types of CNT nano-architectures. For both, neurons form clusters in close vicinity to the CNT structures whereupon the randomly oriented CNTs are more closely colonised than the CNT pillars. Neurons develop communication paths via neurites on both nanoarchitectures. These neuron cells attach preferentially on the CNT sidewalls of the vertically aligned CNT architecture instead than onto the tips of the individual CNT pillars. PMID:25247139

  16. Mechanisms of epileptiform synchronization in cortical neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Avoli, M

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal synchronization supports different physiological states such as cognitive functions and sleep, and it is mirrored by identifiable EEG patterns ranging from gamma to delta oscillations. However, excessive neuronal synchronization is often the hallmark of epileptic activity in both generalized and partial epileptic disorders. Here, I will review the synchronizing mechanisms involved in generating epileptiform activity in the limbic system, which is closely involved in the pathophysiogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). TLE is often associated to a typical pattern of brain damage known as mesial temporal sclerosis, and it is one of the most refractory adult form of partial epilepsy. This epileptic disorder can be reproduced in animals by topical or systemic injection of pilocarpine or kainic acid, or by repetitive electrical stimulation; these procedures induce an initial status epilepticus and cause 1-4 weeks later a chronic condition of recurrent limbic seizures. Remarkably, a similar, seizure-free, latent period can be identified in TLE patients who suffered an initial insult in childhood and develop partial seizures in adolescence or early adulthood. Specifically, I will focus here on the neuronal mechanisms underlying three abnormal types of neuronal synchronization seen in both TLE patients and animal models mimicking this disorder: (i) interictal spikes; (ii) high frequency oscillations (80-500 Hz); and (iii) ictal (i.e., seizure) discharges. In addition, I will discuss the relationship between interictal spikes and ictal activity as well as recent evidence suggesting that specific seizure onsets in the pilocarpine model of TLE are characterized by distinctive patterns of spiking (also termed preictal) and high frequency oscillations. PMID:24251567

  17. Mechanisms of Epileptiform Synchronization in Cortical Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Avoli, M.

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal synchronization supports different physiological states such as cognitive functions and sleep, and it is mirrored by identifiable EEG patterns ranging from gamma to delta oscillations. However, excessive neuronal synchronization is often the hallmark of epileptic activity in both generalized and partial epileptic disorders. Here, I will review the synchronizing mechanisms involved in generating epileptiform activity in the limbic system, which is closely involved in the pathophysiogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). TLE is often associated to a typical pattern of brain damage known as mesial temporal sclerosis, and it is one of the most refractory adult form of partial epilepsy. This epileptic disorder can be reproduced in animals by topical or systemic injection of pilocarpine or kainic acid, or by repetitive electrical stimulation; these procedures induce an initial status epilepticus and cause 1–4 weeks later a chronic condition of recurrent limbic seizures. Remarkably, a similar, seizure-free, latent period can be identified in TLE patients who suffered an initial insult in childhood and develop partial seizures in adolescence or early adulthood. Specifically, I will focus here on the neuronal mechanisms underlying three abnormal types of neuronal synchronization seen in both TLE patients and animal models mimicking this disorder: (i) interictal spikes; (ii) high frequency oscillations (80–500 Hz); and (iii) ictal (i.e., seizure) discharges. In addition, I will discuss the relationship between interictal spikes and ictal activity as well as recent evidence suggesting that specific seizure onsets in the pilocarpine model of TLE are characterized by distinctive patterns of spiking (also termed preictal) and high frequency oscillations. PMID:24251567

  18. Alterations of cortical pyramidal neurons in mice lacking high-affinity nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros-Yáñez, Inmaculada; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Bourgeois, Jean-Pierre; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; DeFelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are allosteric membrane proteins involved in multiple cognitive processes, including attention, learning, and memory. The most abundant form of heterooligomeric nAChRs in the brain contains the β2- and α4- subunits and binds nicotinic agonists with high affinity. In the present study, we investigated in the mouse the consequences of the deletion of one of the nAChR components: the β2-subunit (β2−/−) on the microanatomy of cortical pyramidal cells. Using an intracellular injection method, complete basal dendritic arbors of 650 layer III pyramidal neurons were sampled from seven cortical fields, including primary sensory, motor, and associational areas, in both β2−/− and WT animals. We observed that the pyramidal cell phenotype shows significant quantitative differences among different cortical areas in mutant and WT mice. In WT mice, the density of dendritic spines was rather similar in all cortical fields, except in the prelimbic/infralimbic cortex, where it was significantly higher. In the absence of the β2-subunit, the most significant reduction in the density of spines took place in this high-order associational field. Our data suggest that the β2-subunit is involved in the dendritic morphogenesis of pyramidal neurons and, in particular, in the circuits that contribute to the high-order functional connectivity of the cerebral cortex. PMID:20534523

  19. Cortical hypoexcitation defines neuronal responses in the immediate aftermath of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Victoria Philippa Anne; Yan, Edwin Bingbing; Alwis, Dasuni Sathsara; Rajan, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) from a blow to the head is often associated with complex patterns of brain abnormalities that accompany deficits in cognitive and motor function. Previously we reported that a long-term consequence of TBI, induced with a closed-head injury method modelling human car and sporting accidents, is neuronal hyper-excitation in the rat sensory barrel cortex that receives tactile input from the face whiskers. Hyper-excitation occurred only in supra-granular layers and was stronger to complex than simple stimuli. We now examine changes in the immediate aftermath of TBI induced with same injury method. At 24 hours post-trauma significant sensorimotor deficits were observed and characterisation of the cortical population neuronal responses at that time revealed a depth-dependent suppression of neuronal responses, with reduced responses from supragranular layers through to input layer IV, but not in infragranular layers. In addition, increased spontaneous firing rate was recorded in cortical layers IV and V. We postulate that this early post-injury suppression of cortical processing of sensory input accounts for immediate post-trauma sensory morbidity and sets into train events that resolve into long-term cortical hyper-excitability in upper sensory cortex layers that may account for long-term sensory hyper-sensitivity in humans with TBI. PMID:23667624

  20. Development of coherent neuronal activity patterns in mammalian cortical networks: common principles and local hetereogeneity.

    PubMed

    Egorov, Alexei V; Draguhn, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Many mammals are born in a very immature state and develop their rich repertoire of behavioral and cognitive functions postnatally. This development goes in parallel with changes in the anatomical and functional organization of cortical structures which are involved in most complex activities. The emerging spatiotemporal activity patterns in multi-neuronal cortical networks may indeed form a direct neuronal correlate of systemic functions like perception, sensorimotor integration, decision making or memory formation. During recent years, several studies--mostly in rodents--have shed light on the ontogenesis of such highly organized patterns of network activity. While each local network has its own peculiar properties, some general rules can be derived. We therefore review and compare data from the developing hippocampus, neocortex and--as an intermediate region--entorhinal cortex. All cortices seem to follow a characteristic sequence starting with uncorrelated activity in uncoupled single neurons where transient activity seems to have mostly trophic effects. In rodents, before and shortly after birth, cortical networks develop weakly coordinated multineuronal discharges which have been termed synchronous plateau assemblies (SPAs). While these patterns rely mostly on electrical coupling by gap junctions, the subsequent increase in number and maturation of chemical synapses leads to the generation of large-scale coherent discharges. These patterns have been termed giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) for predominantly GABA-induced events or early network oscillations (ENOs) for mostly glutamatergic bursts, respectively. During the third to fourth postnatal week, cortical areas reach their final activity patterns with distinct network oscillations and highly specific neuronal discharge sequences which support adult behavior. While some of the mechanisms underlying maturation of network activity have been elucidated much work remains to be done in order to fully

  1. Graphene Oxide Nanosheets Disrupt Lipid Composition, Ca(2+) Homeostasis, and Synaptic Transmission in Primary Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Bramini, Mattia; Sacchetti, Silvio; Armirotti, Andrea; Rocchi, Anna; Vázquez, Ester; León Castellanos, Verónica; Bandiera, Tiziano; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-07-26

    Graphene has the potential to make a very significant impact on society, with important applications in the biomedical field. The possibility to engineer graphene-based medical devices at the neuronal interface is of particular interest, making it imperative to determine the biocompatibility of graphene materials with neuronal cells. Here we conducted a comprehensive analysis of the effects of chronic and acute exposure of rat primary cortical neurons to few-layer pristine graphene (GR) and monolayer graphene oxide (GO) flakes. By combining a range of cell biology, microscopy, electrophysiology, and "omics" approaches we characterized the graphene-neuron interaction from the first steps of membrane contact and internalization to the long-term effects on cell viability, synaptic transmission, and cell metabolism. GR/GO flakes are found in contact with the neuronal membrane, free in the cytoplasm, and internalized through the endolysosomal pathway, with no significant impact on neuron viability. However, GO exposure selectively caused the inhibition of excitatory transmission, paralleled by a reduction in the number of excitatory synaptic contacts, and a concomitant enhancement of the inhibitory activity. This was accompanied by induction of autophagy, altered Ca(2+) dynamics, and a downregulation of some of the main players in the regulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis in both excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Our results show that, although graphene exposure does not impact neuron viability, it does nevertheless have important effects on neuronal transmission and network functionality, thus warranting caution when planning to employ this material for neurobiological applications. PMID:27359048

  2. Enhancement of synaptic transmission induced by BDNF in cultured cortical neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun; Li, Yanling; Luo, Qingming

    2005-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), like other neurotrophins, has long-term effects on neuronal survival and differentiation; furthermore, BDNF has been reported to exert an acute potentiation of synaptic activity and are critically involved in long-term potentiation (LTP). We found that BDNF rapidly induced potentiation of synaptic activity and an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in cultured cortical neurons. Within minutes of BDNF application to cultured cortical neurons, spontaneous firing rate was dramatically increased as were the frequency and amplitude of excitatory spontaneous postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Fura-2 recordings showed that BDNF acutely elicited an increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]c). This effect was partially dependent on [Ca2+]o; The BDNF-induced increase in [Ca2+]c can not be completely blocked by Ca2+-free solution. It was completely blocked by K252a and partially blocked by Cd2+ and TTX. The results demonstrate that BDNF can enhances synaptic transmission and that this effect is accompanied by a rise in [Ca2+]c that requires two route: the release of Ca2+ from intracellular calcium stores and influx of extracellular Ca2+ through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in cultured cortical neurons.

  3. Selective regulation of neurosteroid biosynthesis under ketamine-induced apoptosis of cortical neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianli; Yu, Yang; Wang, Bei; Wu, Honghai; Xue, Gai; Hou, Yanning

    2016-02-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that ketamine administration can induce neuroapoptosis in primary cultured cortical neurons. Neurosteroids modulate neuronal function and serve important roles in the central nervous system, however the role of neurosteroids in neuroapoptosis induced by ketamine remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to explore whether neurosteroidogenesis was a pivotal mechanism for neuroprotection against ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis, and whether it may be selectively regulated under ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis conditions in primary cultured cortical neurons. To study this hypothesis, the effect of ketamine exposure on neurosteroidogenesis in primary cultured cortical neurons was investigated. Cholesterol, a substrate involved in the synthesis of neurosteroids, was added to the culture medium, and neurosteroids were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The data demonstrated that cholesterol blocked ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis by promoting the synthesis of various neurosteroids, and the pathway of neurosteroid testosterone conversion into estradiol was inhibited by ketamine exposure. These data suggest that endogenous neurosteroids biosynthesis is critical for neuroprotection against ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis and inhibiting the biosynthesis of neuroprotective-neurosteroid estradiol is of notable importance for ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis. PMID:26709052

  4. MicroRNA-181 promotes synaptogenesis and attenuates axonal outgrowth in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Kos, Aron; Olde Loohuis, Nikkie; Meinhardt, Julia; van Bokhoven, Hans; Kaplan, Barry B; Martens, Gerard J; Aschrafi, Armaz

    2016-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are non-coding gene transcripts abundantly expressed in both the developing and adult mammalian brain. They act as important modulators of complex gene regulatory networks during neuronal development and plasticity. miR-181c is highly abundant in cerebellar cortex and its expression is increased in autism patients as well as in an animal model of autism. To systematically identify putative targets of miR-181c, we repressed this miR in growing cortical neurons and found over 70 differentially expressed target genes using transcriptome profiling. Pathway analysis showed that the miR-181c-modulated genes converge on signaling cascades relevant to neurite and synapse developmental processes. To experimentally examine the significance of these data, we inhibited miR-181c during rat cortical neuronal maturation in vitro; this loss-of miR-181c function resulted in enhanced neurite sprouting and reduced synaptogenesis. Collectively, our findings suggest that miR-181c is a modulator of gene networks associated with cortical neuronal maturation. PMID:27017280

  5. Selective regulation of neurosteroid biosynthesis under ketamine-induced apoptosis of cortical neurons in vitro

    PubMed Central

    LI, JIANLI; YU, YANG; WANG, BEI; WU, HONGHAI; XUE, GAI; HOU, YANNING

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that ketamine administration can induce neuroapoptosis in primary cultured cortical neurons. Neurosteroids modulate neuronal function and serve important roles in the central nervous system, however the role of neurosteroids in neuroapoptosis induced by ketamine remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to explore whether neurosteroidogenesis was a pivotal mechanism for neuroprotection against ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis, and whether it may be selectively regulated under ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis conditions in primary cultured cortical neurons. To study this hypothesis, the effect of ketamine exposure on neurosteroidogenesis in primary cultured cortical neurons was investigated. Cholesterol, a substrate involved in the synthesis of neurosteroids, was added to the culture medium, and neurosteroids were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The data demonstrated that cholesterol blocked ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis by promoting the synthesis of various neurosteroids, and the pathway of neurosteroid testosterone conversion into estradiol was inhibited by ketamine exposure. These data suggest that endogenous neurosteroids biosynthesis is critical for neuroprotection against ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis and inhibiting the biosynthesis of neuroprotective-neurosteroid estradiol is of notable importance for ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis. PMID:26709052

  6. Functional connectivity dynamics among cortical neurons: a dependence analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Park, Il Memming; Seth, Sohan; Sanchez, Justin C; Principe, José C

    2012-01-01

    This paper quantifies and comparatively validates functional connectivity between neurons by measuring the statistical dependence between their firing rates. Based on statistical analysis of the pairwise functional connectivity, we estimate, exclusively from neural data, the neural assembly functional connectivity given a behavior task, which provides a quantifiable representation of the dynamic nature during the behavioral task. Because of the time scale of behavior (100-1000 ms), a statistical method that yields robust estimators for this small sample size is desirable. In this work, the temporal resolutions of four estimators of functional connectivity are compared on both simulated data and real neural ensemble recordings. The comparison highlights how the properties and assumptions of statistical-based and phase-based metrics affect the interpretation of connectivity. Simulation results show that mean square contingency (MSC) and mutual information (MI) create more robust quantification of functional connectivity under identical conditions than cross correlation (CC) and phase synchronization (PhS) when the sample size is 1 s. The results of the simulated analysis are extended to real neuronal recordings to assess the functional connectivity in monkey's cortex corresponding to three movement states in a food reaching task and construct the assembly graph given a movement state and the activation degree of a state-related assembly over time using the statistical test exclusively from neural data dependencies. The activation degree of a given state-related assembly reaches the peak repeatedly when the specific movement states occur, which also reveals the network of interactions among the neurons are key for the operation of a specific behavior. PMID:22194249

  7. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Protects Mouse Cortical Neurons From Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia-Mediated Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Xiaoyang; Chi, Liying; Ke, Yan; Luo, Chun; Qian, Steven; Gozal, David; Liu, Rugao

    2007-01-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) syndrome has been recognized as a highly prevalent public health problem and is associated with major neurobehavioral morbidity. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), a major pathological component of OSA, increases oxidative damage to the brain cortex and decreases neurocognitive function in rodent models resembling human OSA. We employed in vitro and in vivo approaches to identify the specific phases and subcellular compartments in which enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated during CIH. In addition, we utilized the cell culture and animal models to analyze the consequences of enhanced production of ROS on cortical neuronal cell damage and neurocognitive dysfunction. In a primary cortical neuron culture system, we demonstrated that the transition phase from hypoxia to normoxia (NOX) during CIH generates more ROS than the transition phase from NOX to hypoxia or hypoxia alone, all of which generate more ROS than NOX. Using selective inhibitors of the major pathways underlying ROS generation in the cell membrane, cytosol, and mitochondria, we showed that the mitochondria are the predominant source of enhanced ROS generation during CIH in mouse cortical neuronal cells. Furthermore, in both cell culture and transgenic mice, we demonstrated that overexpression of MnSOD decreased CIH-mediated cortical neuronal apoptosis, and reduced spatial learning deficits measured with the Morris water maze assay. Together, the data from the in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that CIH-mediated mitochondrial oxidative stress may play a major role in the neuronal cell loss and neurocognitive dysfunction in OSA. Thus, therapeutic strategies aiming at reducing ROS generation from mitochondria may improve the neurobehavioral morbidity in OSA. PMID:17719231

  8. Excitation and depression of cortical neurones by 5-hydroxytryptamine

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, M. H. T.; Straughan, D. W.

    1967-01-01

    1. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and various 5-HT antagonists have been applied micro-electrophoretically from multibarrelled micropipettes into the environment of single neurones in the post-sigmoid and suprasylvian gyri of the cat cerebral cortex. 2. In unanaesthetized animals (encéphale isolé) a high proportion of neurones (30%) were excited by 5-HT. This excitation usually had a rapid onset and was seen both in spontaneously active neurones and in otherwise quiescent neurones in which firing was induced by L-glutamate. Some neurones were so sensitive that the uncontrolled diffusion from micropipettes was sufficient to excite them. More cells were excited by 5-HT applied as a cation from solutions of the bimaleate salt than when solutions of the creatinine sulphate salt were used. 3. In a high proportion of cells (33%) spontaneous firing or amino acid excitation was depressed by 5-HT. 4. A mixed effect was seen in a small proportion (6%) of the cells tested; usually 5-HT caused an excitation initially which was followed by a depression. In other cells, desensitization occurred, and the excitatory effect of 5-HT was diminished or lost. 5. When glutamate was used to excite otherwise quiescent cells, there was a significant increase in the number of cells excited by 5-HT and a significant decrease in the number of cells unaffected compared with spontaneously active cells. 6. The micro-electrophoretic application of D-lysergic diethylamide (LSD 25), 2-brom LSD (BOL 148), methysergide (UML 491), or 2′- (3-dimethylaminopropylthio)cinnamanilide (SQ 10643) temporarily prevented excitation by 5-HT in half the cells tested. LSD and SQ 10643 were particularly potent in this respect. This antagonism of 5-HT excitation could still be seen when excitation of the cell by L-glutamate or acetylcholine (ACh) was unaffected. 7. The depression induced by 5-HT was not prevented by the application of known 5-HT antagonists in the majority of the cells tested (93%). In two cells

  9. Cryopreserved rat cortical cells develop functional neuronal networks on microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Otto, Frauke; Görtz, Philipp; Fleischer, Wiebke; Siebler, Mario

    2003-09-30

    Neurons growing on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are promising tools to investigate principal neuronal network mechanisms and network responses to pharmaceutical substances. However, broad application of these tools, e.g. in pharmaceutical substance screening, requires neuronal cells that provide stable activity on MEAs. Cryopreserved cortical neurons (CCx) from embryonic rats were cultured on MEAs and their immunocytochemical and electrophysiological properties were compared with acutely dissociated neurons (Cx). Both cell types formed neuritic networks and expressed the neuron-specific markers microtubule associated protein 2, synaptophysin, neurofilament and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Spontaneous spike activity (SSA) was recorded after 9 up to 74 days in vitro (DIV) in CCx and from 5 to 30 DIV in Cx, respectively. Cx and CCx exhibited synchronized burst activity with similar spiking characteristics. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) abolished the SSA of both cell types reversibly. In CCx SSA-inhibition occurred with an IC50 of 1.1 nM for TTX, 161 microM for magnesium, 18 microM for D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV) and 1 microM for GABA. CCx cells were easy to handle and developed long living, stable and active neuronal networks on MEAs with similar characteristics as Cx. Thus, these neurochips seem to be suitable for studying neuronal network properties and screening in pharmaceutical research. PMID:12948560

  10. Foxp1 Regulates Cortical Radial Migration and Neuronal Morphogenesis in Developing Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Xiao, Jian; Fröhlich, Henning; Tu, Xiaomeng; Li, Lianlian; Xu, Yue; Cao, Huateng; Qu, Jia; Rappold, Gudrun A.; Chen, Jie-Guang

    2015-01-01

    FOXP1 is a member of FOXP subfamily transcription factors. Mutations in FOXP1 gene have been found in various development-related cognitive disorders. However, little is known about the etiology of these symptoms, and specifically the function of FOXP1 in neuronal development. Here, we report that suppression of Foxp1 expression in mouse cerebral cortex led to a neuronal migration defect, which was rescued by overexpression of Foxp1. Mice with Foxp1 knockdown exhibited ectopic neurons in deep layers of the cortex postnatally. The neuronal differentiation of Foxp1-downregulated cells was normal. However, morphological analysis showed that the neurons with Foxp1 deficiency had an inhibited axonal growth in vitro and a weakened transition from multipolar to bipolar in vivo. Moreover, we found that the expression of Foxp1 modulated the dendritic maturation of neurons at a late postnatal date. Our results demonstrate critical roles of Foxp1 in the radial migration and morphogenesis of cortical neurons during development. This study may shed light on the complex relationship between neuronal development and the related cognitive disorders. PMID:26010426

  11. Physiological synaptic signals initiate sequential spikes at soma of cortical pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Ge, Rongjing; Qian, Hao; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2011-01-01

    The neurons in the brain produce sequential spikes as the digital codes whose various patterns manage well-organized cognitions and behaviors. A source for the physiologically integrated synaptic signals to initiate digital spikes remains unknown, which we studied at pyramidal neurons of cortical slices. In dual recordings from the soma vs. axon, the signals recorded in vivo induce somatic spikes with higher capacity, which is associated with lower somatic thresholds and shorter refractory periods mediated by voltage-gated sodium channels. The introduction of these parameters from the soma and axon into NEURON model simulates sequential spikes being somatic in origin. Physiological signals integrated from synaptic inputs primarily trigger the soma to encode neuronal digital spikes. PMID:21549002

  12. Poloxamer-188 and citicoline provide neuronal membrane integrity and protect membrane stability in cortical spreading depression.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Timur; Eylen, Alpaslan; Lule, Sevda; Erdener, Sefik Evren; Vural, Atay; Karatas, Hulya; Ozveren, Mehmet Faik; Dalkara, Turgay; Gursoy-Ozdemir, Yasemin

    2015-01-01

    Under pathological conditions such as brain trauma, subarachnoid hemorrhage and stroke, cortical spreading depression (CSD) or peri-infarct depolarizations contribute to brain damage in animal models of neurological disorders as well as in human neurological diseases. CSD causes transient megachannel opening on the neuronal membrane, which may compromise neuronal survival under pathological conditions. Poloxamer-188 (P-188) and citicoline are neuroprotectants with membrane sealing properties. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of P-188 and citicoline on the neuronal megachannel opening induced by CSD in the mouse brain. We have monitored megachannel opening with propidium iodide, a membrane impermeable fluorescent dye and, demonstrate that P-188 and citicoline strikingly decreased CSD-induced neuronal PI influx in cortex and hippocampal dentate gyrus. Therefore, these agents may be providing neuroprotection by blocking megachannel opening, which may be related to their membrane sealing action and warrant further investigation for treatment of traumatic brain injury and ischemic stroke. PMID:25340256

  13. EPSPs Measured in Proximal Dendritic Spines of Cortical Pyramidal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Acker, Corey D; Hoyos, Erika; Loew, Leslie M

    2016-01-01

    EPSPs occur when the neurotransmitter glutamate binds to postsynaptic receptors located on small pleomorphic membrane protrusions called dendritic spines. To transmit the synaptic signal, these potentials must travel through the spine neck and the dendritic tree to reach the soma. Due to their small size, the electrical behavior of spines and their ability to compartmentalize electrical signals has been very difficult to assess experimentally. In this study, we developed a method to perform simultaneous two-photon voltage-sensitive dye recording with two-photon glutamate uncaging in order to measure the characteristics (amplitude and duration) of uncaging-evoked EPSPs in single spines on the basal dendrites of L5 pyramidal neurons in acute brain slices from CD1 control mice. We were able to record uncaging-evoked spine potentials that resembled miniature EPSPs at the soma from a wide range of spine morphologies. In proximal spines, these potentials averaged 13.0 mV (range, 6.5-30.8 mV; N = 20) for an average somatic EPSP of 0.59 mV, whereas the mean attenuation ratio (spine/soma) was found to be 25.3. Durations of spine EPSP waveforms were found to be 11.7 ms on average. Modeling studies demonstrate the important role that spine neck resistance (R neck) plays in spine EPSP amplitudes. Simulations used to estimate R neck by fits to voltage-sensitive dye measurements produced a mean of 179 MΩ (range, 23-420 MΩ; N = 19). Independent measurements based on fluorescence recovery after photobleaching of a cytosolic dye from spines of the same population of neurons produced a mean R neck estimate of 204 MΩ (range, 52-521 MΩ; N = 34). PMID:27257618

  14. Changes in long-range connectivity and neuronal reorganization in partial cortical deafferentation model of epileptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kuśmierczak, Magda; Lajeunesse, Francis; Grand, Laszlo; Timofeev, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Severe brain injuries can trigger epileptogenesis, a latent period that eventually leads to epilepsy. Previous studies have demonstrated that changes in local connectivity between cortical neurons are a part of the epileptogenic processes. In the present study we aimed to investigate whether changes in long-range connectivity are also involved in epileptogenesis. We performed a large unilateral transection (undercut) of the white matter below the suprasylvian gyrus in cats. After about 2 months, we either injected retrograde tracer (choleratoxin, sub-unit B, CTB) or performed Golgi staining. We analyzed distribution of retrogradely labeled neurons, counted dendritic spines in the neocortex (Golgi staining), and analyzed dendritic orientation in control conditions and after the injury. We found a significant increase in the number of detected cells at the frontal parts of the injured hemisphere, which suggests that the process of axonal sprouting occurs in the deafferented area. The increase in the number of retrogradely stained neurons was accompanied with a significant decrease in neocortical spine density in the undercut area, a reduction in vertical and an increase in horizontal orientation of neuronal processes. The present study shows global morphological changes underlying epileptogenesis. An increased connectivity in the injured cortical regions accompanied with a decrease in spine density suggests that excitatory synapses might be formed on dendritic shafts, which probably contributes to the altered neuronal excitability that was described in previous studies on epileptogenesis. PMID:25304932

  15. Differential organization of cortical inputs to striatal projection neurons of the matrix compartment in rats

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yunping; Lanciego, Jose; Goff, Lydia Kerkerian-Le; Coulon, Patrice; Salin, Pascal; Kachidian, Philippe; Lei, Wanlong; Del Mar, Nobel; Reiner, Anton

    2015-01-01

    In prior studies, we described the differential organization of corticostriatal and thalamostriatal inputs to the spines of direct pathway (dSPNs) and indirect pathway striatal projection neurons (iSPNs) of the matrix compartment. In the present electron microscopic (EM) analysis, we have refined understanding of the relative amounts of cortical axospinous vs. axodendritic input to the two types of SPNs. Of note, we found that individual dSPNs receive about twice as many axospinous synaptic terminals from IT-type (intratelencephalically projecting) cortical neurons as they do from PT-type (pyramidal tract projecting) cortical neurons. We also found that PT-type axospinous synaptic terminals were about 1.5 times as common on individual iSPNs as IT-type axospinous synaptic terminals. Overall, a higher percentage of IT-type terminals contacted dSPN than iSPN spines, while a higher percentage of PT-type terminals contacted iSPN than dSPN spines. Notably, IT-type axospinous synaptic terminals were significantly larger on iSPN spines than on dSPN spines. By contrast to axospinous input, the axodendritic PT-type input to dSPNs was more substantial than that to iSPNs, and the axodendritic IT-type input appeared to be meager and comparable for both SPN types. The prominent axodendritic PT-type input to dSPNs may accentuate their PT-type responsiveness, and the large size of axospinous IT-type terminals on iSPNs may accentuate their IT-type responsiveness. Using transneuronal labeling with rabies virus to selectively label the cortical neurons with direct input to the dSPNs projecting to the substantia nigra pars reticulata, we found that the input predominantly arose from neurons in the upper layers of motor cortices, in which IT-type perikarya predominate. The differential cortical input to SPNs is likely to play key roles in motor control and motor learning. PMID:25926776

  16. TRPV1 Activation in Primary Cortical Neurons Induces Calcium-Dependent Programmed Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Song, Juhyun; Lee, Jun Hong; Lee, Sung Ho; Park, Kyung Ah; Lee, Won Taek; Lee, Jong Eun

    2013-03-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1, also known as vanilloid receptor 1) is a receptor that detects capsaicin, a pungent component of chili peppers, and noxious heat. Although its function in the primary nociceptor as a pain receptor is well established, whether TRPV1 is expressed in the brain is still under debate. In this study, the responses of primary cortical neurons were investigated. Here, we report that 1) capsaicin induces caspase-3-dependent programmed cell death, which coincides with increased production of nitric oxide and peroxynitrite ; that 2) the prolonged capsaicin treatment induces a steady increase in the degree of capase-3 activation, which is prevented by the removal of capsaicin; 3) and that blocking calcium entry and calcium-mediated signaling prevents capsaicin-induced cell death. These results indicate that cortical neurons express TRPV1 whose prolonged activation causes cell death. PMID:23585723

  17. Ultrastructural characteristics of human adult and infant cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, W Y; Garey, L J

    1991-01-01

    Biopsy specimens of human cerebral cortex from three adults and two infants were studied by correlating their light microscopic features in semithin sections with their ultrastructural characteristics. There was good tissue preservation, due to a minimum delay between obtaining the specimens and fixation. Pyramidal cells had a prominent apical dendrite, fine heterochromatin clumps in the nucleus and generally small numbers of cytoplasmic organelles, except for numerous free ribosomes in some of the large pyramids of Layers III to VI. Non-pyramidal cells lacked an apical dendrite and were further classified, on size and ultrastructure, into small, medium and large types. Large numbers of asymmetrical and symmetrical synapses were present in the neuropil but very few axosomatic synapses were found in the human cerebral cortex compared with subhuman primates and other mammals. Some symmetrical synapses were characterised by the presence of wide pre- and postsynaptic densities. The same general features of the adult cortex were also encountered in the infant, with certain exceptions. Many of the infant neurons had less densely packed heterochromatin, but greater numbers of free ribosomes, compared with the adult, and lipofuscin was absent. There was a total absence of myelinated fibres from the infant cortex; more large diameter dendrites were present than in the adult and axosomatic synapses were commoner. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 PMID:2050578

  18. Simple Cortical and Thalamic Neuron Models for Digital Arithmetic Circuit Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Nanami, Takuya; Kohno, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Trade-off between reproducibility of neuronal activities and computational efficiency is one of crucial subjects in computational neuroscience and neuromorphic engineering. A wide variety of neuronal models have been studied from different viewpoints. The digital spiking silicon neuron (DSSN) model is a qualitative model that focuses on efficient implementation by digital arithmetic circuits. We expanded the DSSN model and found appropriate parameter sets with which it reproduces the dynamical behaviors of the ionic-conductance models of four classes of cortical and thalamic neurons. We first developed a four-variable model by reducing the number of variables in the ionic-conductance models and elucidated its mathematical structures using bifurcation analysis. Then, expanded DSSN models were constructed that reproduce these mathematical structures and capture the characteristic behavior of each neuron class. We confirmed that statistics of the neuronal spike sequences are similar in the DSSN and the ionic-conductance models. Computational cost of the DSSN model is larger than that of the recent sophisticated Integrate-and-Fire-based models, but smaller than the ionic-conductance models. This model is intended to provide another meeting point for above trade-off that satisfies the demand for large-scale neuronal network simulation with closer-to-biology models. PMID:27242397

  19. Cortically evoked responses of superior salivary nucleus neurons in the cat.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, K; Murakami, T

    1989-01-01

    Salivation can be controlled by the inputs from the cerebral cortex as well as from the sensory nerves. However, there has been no detailed report so far on the inputs to superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) neurons from the cerebral cortex. The responses of SSN neurons to electrical stimulation of orbital and coronal gyri were investigated in ketamine anesthetized cats. A total of 56 SSN neurons were identified by the antidromic spike responses to stimulation of the right chorda tympani nerve. Their responsiveness to stimulation of the orbital and anterior coronal gyri and the lingual nerve at the ipsilateral side was tested. Thirty-five neurons (63%) responded with spikes to stimulation of the orbital and/or coronal gyri. They were also activated by stimulation of the lingual nerve. Other eleven neurons (20%) received the inputs from the lingual nerve only. The remaining 10 neurons (17%) failed to respond to stimulation of either the cerebral cortex or the lingual nerve. The mean latencies of the responses to stimulation of the orbital gyrus, coronal gyrus and lingual nerve were 29.0 ms (n = 28), 22.7 ms (n = 33) and 10.2 ms (n = 46), respectively. In this study, the excitatory inputs converging from the cerebral cortex and the lingual nerve, found in 63% of SSN neurons, could play an important role in submandibular and sublingual salivation. Cortically induced salivation, in particular, may be involved in salivary secretion in the conditioned reflexes as well as in mastication. PMID:2635781

  20. Chronic ciguatoxin treatment induces synaptic scaling through voltage gated sodium channels in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Martín, Víctor; Vale, Carmen; Rubiolo, Juan A; Roel, Maria; Hirama, Masahiro; Yamashita, Shuji; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luís M

    2015-06-15

    Ciguatoxins are sodium channels activators that cause ciguatera, one of the most widespread nonbacterial forms of food poisoning, which presents with long-term neurological alterations. In central neurons, chronic perturbations in activity induce homeostatic synaptic mechanisms that adjust the strength of excitatory synapses and modulate glutamate receptor expression in order to stabilize the overall activity. Immediate early genes, such as Arc and Egr1, are induced in response to activity changes and underlie the trafficking of glutamate receptors during neuronal homeostasis. To better understand the long lasting neurological consequences of ciguatera, it is important to establish the role that chronic changes in activity produced by ciguatoxins represent to central neurons. Here, the effect of a 30 min exposure of 10-13 days in vitro (DIV) cortical neurons to the synthetic ciguatoxin CTX 3C on Arc and Egr1 expression was evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction approaches. Since the toxin increased the mRNA levels of both Arc and Egr1, the effect of CTX 3C in NaV channels, membrane potential, firing activity, miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), and glutamate receptors expression in cortical neurons after a 24 h exposure was evaluated using electrophysiological and western blot approaches. The data presented here show that CTX 3C induced an upregulation of Arc and Egr1 that was prevented by previous coincubation of the neurons with the NaV channel blocker tetrodotoxin. In addition, chronic CTX 3C caused a concentration-dependent shift in the activation voltage of NaV channels to more negative potentials and produced membrane potential depolarization. Moreover, 24 h treatment of cortical neurons with 5 nM CTX 3C decreased neuronal firing and induced synaptic scaling mechanisms, as evidenced by a decrease in the amplitude of mEPSCs and downregulation in the protein level of glutamate receptors that was also prevented by tetrodotoxin

  1. Homeostatic sleep pressure is the primary factor for activation of cortical nNOS/NK1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Lars; Morairty, Stephen R; Warrier, Deepti R; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2015-02-01

    Cortical interneurons, immunoreactive for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and the receptor NK1, express the functional activity marker Fos selectively during sleep. NREM sleep 'pressure' is hypothesized to accumulate during waking and to dissipate during sleep. We reported previously that the proportion of Fos(+) cortical nNOS/NK1 neurons is correlated with established electrophysiological markers of sleep pressure. As these markers covary with the amount of NREM sleep, it remained unclear whether cortical nNOS/NK1 neurons are activated to the same degree throughout NREM sleep or whether the extent of their activation is related to the sleep pressure that accrued during the prior waking period. To distinguish between these possibilities, we used hypnotic medications to control the amount of NREM sleep in rats while we varied prior wake duration and the resultant sleep pressure. Drug administration was preceded by 6 h of sleep deprivation (SD) ('high sleep pressure') or undisturbed conditions ('low sleep pressure'). We find that the proportion of Fos(+) cortical nNOS/NK1 neurons was minimal when sleep pressure was low, irrespective of the amount of time spent in NREM sleep. In contrast, a large proportion of cortical nNOS/NK1 neurons was Fos(+) when an equivalent amount of sleep was preceded by SD. We conclude that, although sleep is necessary for cortical nNOS/NK1 neuron activation, the proportion of cells activated is dependent upon prior wake duration. PMID:25139062

  2. Reach task-associated excitatory overdrive of motor cortical neurons following infusion with ALS-CSF.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayani, R; Raghavan, Mohan; Nalini, A; Laxmi, T R; Raju, T R

    2014-01-01

    Converging evidence from transgenic animal models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and human studies suggest alterations in excitability of the motor neurons in ALS. Specifically, in studies on human subjects with ALS the motor cortex was reported to be hyperexcitable. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that infusion of cerebrospinal fluid from patients with sporadic ALS (ALS-CSF) into the rat brain ventricle can induce hyperexcitability and structural changes in the motor cortex leading to motor dysfunction. A robust model of sporadic ALS was developed experimentally by infusing ALS-CSF into the rat ventricle. The effects of ALS-CSF at the single neuron level were examined by recording extracellular single unit activity from the motor cortex while rats were performing a reach to grasp task. We observed an increase in the firing rate of the neurons of the motor cortex in rats infused with ALS-CSF compared to control groups. This was associated with impairment in a specific component of reach with alterations in the morphological characteristics of the motor cortex. It is likely that the increased cortical excitability observed in the present study could be the result of changes in the intrinsic properties of motor cortical neurons, a dysfunctional inhibitory mechanism and/or an underlying structural change culminating in a behavioral deficit. PMID:23900732

  3. PLD1 participates in BDNF-induced signalling in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Ammar, Mohamed Raafet; Thahouly, Tamou; Hanauer, André; Stegner, David; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Vitale, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor BDNF plays a critical role in neuronal development and the induction of L-LTP at glutamatergic synapses in several brain regions. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these BDNF effects have not been firmly established. Using in vitro cultures of cortical neurons from knockout mice for Pld1 and Rsk2, BDNF was observed to induce a rapid RSK2-dependent activation of PLD and to stimulate BDNF ERK1/2-CREB and mTor-S6K signalling pathways, but these effects were greatly reduced in Pld1(-/-) neurons. Furthermore, phospho-CREB did not accumulate in the nucleus, whereas overexpression of PLD1 amplified the BDNF-dependent nuclear recruitment of phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-CREB. This BDNF retrograde signalling was prevented in cells silenced for the scaffolding protein PEA15, a protein which complexes with PLD1, ERK1/2, and RSK2 after BDNF treatment. Finally PLD1, ERK1/2, and RSK2 partially colocalized on endosomal structures, suggesting that these proteins are part of the molecular module responsible for BDNF signalling in cortical neurons. PMID:26437780

  4. PLD1 participates in BDNF-induced signalling in cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ammar, Mohamed Raafet; Thahouly, Tamou; Hanauer, André; Stegner, David; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Vitale, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor BDNF plays a critical role in neuronal development and the induction of L-LTP at glutamatergic synapses in several brain regions. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these BDNF effects have not been firmly established. Using in vitro cultures of cortical neurons from knockout mice for Pld1 and Rsk2, BDNF was observed to induce a rapid RSK2-dependent activation of PLD and to stimulate BDNF ERK1/2-CREB and mTor-S6K signalling pathways, but these effects were greatly reduced in Pld1−/− neurons. Furthermore, phospho-CREB did not accumulate in the nucleus, whereas overexpression of PLD1 amplified the BDNF-dependent nuclear recruitment of phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-CREB. This BDNF retrograde signalling was prevented in cells silenced for the scaffolding protein PEA15, a protein which complexes with PLD1, ERK1/2, and RSK2 after BDNF treatment. Finally PLD1, ERK1/2, and RSK2 partially colocalized on endosomal structures, suggesting that these proteins are part of the molecular module responsible for BDNF signalling in cortical neurons. PMID:26437780

  5. EGF transactivation of Trk receptors regulates the migration of newborn cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Puehringer, Dirk; Orel, Nadiya; Lüningschrör, Patrick; Subramanian, Narayan; Herrmann, Thomas; Chao, Moses V; Sendtner, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The development of neuronal networks in the neocortex depends on control mechanisms for mitosis and migration that allow newborn neurons to find their accurate position. Multiple mitogens, neurotrophic factors, guidance molecules and their corresponding receptors are involved in this process, but the mechanisms by which these signals are integrated are only poorly understood. We found that TrkB and TrkC, the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), are activated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling rather than by BDNF or NT-3 in embryonic mouse cortical precursor cells. This transactivation event regulated migration of early neuronal cells to their final position in the developing cortex. Transactivation by EGF led to membrane translocation of TrkB, promoting its signaling responsiveness. Our results provide genetic evidence that TrkB and TrkC activation in early cortical neurons do not depend on BDNF and NT-3, but instead on transactivation by EGFR signaling. PMID:23416450

  6. EGF transactivation of Trk receptors regulates the migration of newborn cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Puehringer, Dirk; Orel, Nadiya; Lüningschrör, Patrick; Subramanian, Narayan; Herrmann, Thomas; Chao, Moses V; Sendtner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The development of neuronal networks in the neocortex depends on control mechanisms for mitosis and migration that allow newborn neurons to find their accurate position. Multiple mitogens, neurotrophic factors, guidance molecules and their corresponding receptors are involved in this process, but the mechanisms by which these signals are integrated are only poorly understood. We found that TrkB and TrkC, the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), are activated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling rather than by BDNF or NT-3 in embryonic mouse cortical precursor cells. This transactivation event regulated migration of early neuronal cells to their final position in the developing cortex. Transactivation by EGF led to membrane translocation of TrkB, promoting its signaling responsiveness. Our results provide genetic evidence that TrkB and TrkC activation in early cortical neurons do not depend on BDNF and NT-3, but instead on transactivation by EGFR signaling. PMID:23416450

  7. GSK-3 signaling in developing cortical neurons is essential for radial migration and dendritic orientation

    PubMed Central

    Morgan-Smith, Meghan; Wu, Yaohong; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Pringle, Julia; Snider, William D

    2014-01-01

    GSK-3 is an essential mediator of several signaling pathways that regulate cortical development. We therefore created conditional mouse mutants lacking both GSK-3α and GSK-3β in newly born cortical excitatory neurons. Gsk3-deleted neurons expressing upper layer markers exhibited striking migration failure in all areas of the cortex. Radial migration in hippocampus was similarly affected. In contrast, tangential migration was not grossly impaired after Gsk3 deletion in interneuron precursors. Gsk3-deleted neurons extended axons and developed dendritic arbors. However, the apical dendrite was frequently branched while basal dendrites exhibited abnormal orientation. GSK-3 regulation of migration in neurons was independent of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Importantly, phosphorylation of the migration mediator, DCX, at ser327, and phosphorylation of the semaphorin signaling mediator, CRMP-2, at Thr514 were markedly decreased. Our data demonstrate that GSK-3 signaling is essential for radial migration and dendritic orientation and suggest that GSK-3 mediates these effects by phosphorylating key microtubule regulatory proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02663.001 PMID:25073924

  8. Neuronal Avalanches Imply Maximum Dynamic Range in Cortical Networks at Criticality

    PubMed Central

    Shew, Woodrow L.; Yang, Hongdian; Petermann, Thomas; Roy, Rajarshi

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous neuronal activity is a ubiquitous feature of cortex. Its spatiotemporal organization reflects past input and modulates future network output. Here we study whether a particular type of spontaneous activity is generated by a network that is optimized for input processing. Neuronal avalanches are a type of spontaneous activity observed in superficial cortical layers in vitro and in vivo with statistical properties expected from a network operating at “criticality.” Theory predicts that criticality and, therefore, neuronal avalanches are optimal for input processing, but until now, this has not been tested in experiments. Here, we use cortex slice cultures grown on planar microelectrode arrays to demonstrate that cortical networks that generate neuronal avalanches benefit from a maximized dynamic range, i.e., the ability to respond to the greatest range of stimuli. By changing the ratio of excitation and inhibition in the cultures, we derive a network tuning curve for stimulus processing as a function of distance from criticality in agreement with predictions from our simulations. Our findings suggest that in the cortex, (1) balanced excitation and inhibition establishes criticality, which maximizes the range of inputs that can be processed, and (2) spontaneous activity and input processing are unified in the context of critical phenomena. PMID:20007483

  9. Stability and Autolysis of Cortical Neurons in Post-Mortem Adult Rat Brains

    PubMed Central

    Sheleg, Sergey V; LoBello, Janine R; Hixon, Hugh; Coons, Stephen W; Lowry, David; Nedzved, Mikhail K

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the dynamics of autolytic damage of the cortical neurons in adult brains for 24 hours at room temperature (+20°C) after cardiac arrest. The progressive histological and ultrastructural changes were documented using routine and immunohistochemical staining as well as electron microscopy. Our results demonstrated that there were no autolytic damages in the ultrastructure of cerebral neurons in the first 6 hours after warm cardiac arrest, in agreement with previous studies in other mammals. Interestingly, the activation of caspase-3 was observed in a significant number of neurons of the cerebellum and neocortex 9 hours following cardiac arrest. No significant changes related to autolysis were observed using amnio-cupric acid and Nissl (thionine) staining. PMID:18784829

  10. Additivity of Pyrethroid Actions on Sodium Influx in Cortical Neurons in Cerebrocortical Neurons in Primary Culture

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Pyrethroid insecticides bind to voltage-gated sodium channels and modify their gating kinetics, thereby disrupting neuronal function. Although previous work has tested the additivity of pyrethroids in vivo, this has not been assessed directly at the primary molecular ...

  11. Modulation of Specific Sensory Cortical Areas by Segregated Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Demonstrated by Neuronal Tracing and Optogenetic Stimulation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chaves-Coira, Irene; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Rodrigo-Angulo, Margarita; Núñez, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Neocortical cholinergic activity plays a fundamental role in sensory processing and cognitive functions. Previous results have suggested a refined anatomical and functional topographical organization of basal forebrain (BF) projections that may control cortical sensory processing in a specific manner. We have used retrograde anatomical procedures to demonstrate the existence of specific neuronal groups in the BF involved in the control of specific sensory cortices. Fluoro-Gold (FlGo) and Fast Blue (FB) fluorescent retrograde tracers were deposited into the primary somatosensory (S1) and primary auditory (A1) cortices in mice. Our results revealed that the BF is a heterogeneous area in which neurons projecting to different cortical areas are segregated into different neuronal groups. Most of the neurons located in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) projected to the S1 cortex, indicating that this area is specialized in the sensory processing of tactile stimuli. However, the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (B) nucleus shows a similar number of cells projecting to the S1 as to the A1 cortices. In addition, we analyzed the cholinergic effects on the S1 and A1 cortical sensory responses by optogenetic stimulation of the BF neurons in urethane-anesthetized transgenic mice. We used transgenic mice expressing the light-activated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2, tagged with a fluorescent protein (ChR2-YFP) under the control of the choline-acetyl transferase promoter (ChAT). Cortical evoked potentials were induced by whisker deflections or by auditory clicks. According to the anatomical results, optogenetic HDB stimulation induced more extensive facilitation of tactile evoked potentials in S1 than auditory evoked potentials in A1, while optogenetic stimulation of the B nucleus facilitated either tactile or auditory evoked potentials equally. Consequently, our results suggest that cholinergic projections to the cortex are organized into segregated

  12. Modulation of Specific Sensory Cortical Areas by Segregated Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Demonstrated by Neuronal Tracing and Optogenetic Stimulation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chaves-Coira, Irene; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Rodrigo-Angulo, Margarita; Núñez, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Neocortical cholinergic activity plays a fundamental role in sensory processing and cognitive functions. Previous results have suggested a refined anatomical and functional topographical organization of basal forebrain (BF) projections that may control cortical sensory processing in a specific manner. We have used retrograde anatomical procedures to demonstrate the existence of specific neuronal groups in the BF involved in the control of specific sensory cortices. Fluoro-Gold (FlGo) and Fast Blue (FB) fluorescent retrograde tracers were deposited into the primary somatosensory (S1) and primary auditory (A1) cortices in mice. Our results revealed that the BF is a heterogeneous area in which neurons projecting to different cortical areas are segregated into different neuronal groups. Most of the neurons located in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) projected to the S1 cortex, indicating that this area is specialized in the sensory processing of tactile stimuli. However, the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (B) nucleus shows a similar number of cells projecting to the S1 as to the A1 cortices. In addition, we analyzed the cholinergic effects on the S1 and A1 cortical sensory responses by optogenetic stimulation of the BF neurons in urethane-anesthetized transgenic mice. We used transgenic mice expressing the light-activated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2, tagged with a fluorescent protein (ChR2-YFP) under the control of the choline-acetyl transferase promoter (ChAT). Cortical evoked potentials were induced by whisker deflections or by auditory clicks. According to the anatomical results, optogenetic HDB stimulation induced more extensive facilitation of tactile evoked potentials in S1 than auditory evoked potentials in A1, while optogenetic stimulation of the B nucleus facilitated either tactile or auditory evoked potentials equally. Consequently, our results suggest that cholinergic projections to the cortex are organized into segregated

  13. Homocysteine Aggravates Cortical Neural Cell Injury through Neuronal Autophagy Overactivation following Rat Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yaqian; Huang, Guowei; Chen, Shuang; Gou, Yun; Dong, Zhiping; Zhang, Xumei

    2016-01-01

    Elevated homocysteine (Hcy) levels have been reported to be involved in neurotoxicity after ischemic stroke. However, the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood to date. In the current study, we hypothesized that neuronal autophagy activation may be involved in the toxic effect of Hcy on cortical neurons following cerebral ischemia. Brain cell injury was determined by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining and TdT-mediated dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) staining. The level and localization of autophagy were detected by transmission electron microscopy, western blot and immunofluorescence double labeling. The oxidative DNA damage was revealed by immunofluorescence of 8-Hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Hcy treatment aggravated neuronal cell death, significantly increased the formation of autophagosomes and the expression of LC3B and Beclin-1 in the brain cortex after middle cerebral artery occlusion-reperfusion (MCAO). Immunofluorescence analysis of LC3B and Beclin-1 distribution indicated that their expression occurred mainly in neurons (NeuN-positive) and hardly in astrocytes (GFAP-positive). 8-OHdG expression was also increased in the ischemic cortex of Hcy-treated animals. Conversely, LC3B and Beclin-1 overexpression and autophagosome accumulation caused by Hcy were partially blocked by the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). Hcy administration enhanced neuronal autophagy, which contributes to cell death following cerebral ischemia. The oxidative damage-mediated autophagy may be a molecular mechanism underlying neuronal cell toxicity of elevated Hcy level. PMID:27455253

  14. Clinacanthus nutans Protects Cortical Neurons Against Hypoxia-Induced Toxicity by Downregulating HDAC1/6.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsin-Da; Wu, Jui-Sheng; Kao, Mei-Han; Chen, Jin-Jer; Sun, Grace Y; Ong, Wei-Yi; Lin, Teng-Nan

    2016-09-01

    Many population-based epidemiological studies have unveiled an inverse correlation between intake of herbal plants and incidence of stroke. C. nutans is a traditional herbal medicine widely used for snake bite, viral infection and cancer in Asian countries. However, its role in protecting stroke damage remains to be studied. Despite of growing evidence to support epigenetic regulation in the pathogenesis and recovery of stroke, a clear understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms is still lacking. In the present study, primary cortical neurons were subjected to in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-reoxygenation and hypoxic neuronal death was used to investigate the interaction between C. nutans and histone deacetylases (HDACs). Using pharmacological agents (HDAC inhibitor/activator), loss-of-function (HDAC siRNA) and gain-of-function (HDAC plasmid) approaches, we demonstrated an early induction of HDAC1/2/3/8 and HDAC6 in neurons after OGD insult. C. nutans extract selectively inhibited HDAC1 and HDAC6 expression and attenuated neuronal death. Results of reporter analysis further revealed that C. nutans suppressed HDAC1 and HDAC6 transcription. Besides ameliorating neuronal death, C. nutans also protected astrocytes and endothelial cells from hypoxic-induced cell death. In summary, results support ability for C. nutans to suppress post-hypoxic HDACs activation and mitigate against OGD-induced neuronal death. This study further opens a new avenue for the use of herbal medicines to regulate epigenetic control of brain injury. PMID:27165113

  15. Apoptosis and necrosis: two distinct events induced by cadmium in cortical neurons in culture

    PubMed Central

    López, E; Figueroa, S; Oset-Gasque, M J; González, M P

    2003-01-01

    Cadmium is an extremely toxic metal commonly found in industrial workplaces, a food contaminant and a major component of cigarette smoke. Cadmium can severely damage several organs, including the brain. In this work, we have studied both the cadmium toxicity on rat cortical neurons in culture and the possible protective effect of serum. Our results indicate that: (1) cadmium is taken up by the neurons in a dose and serum dependent way; (2) cadmium, at concentrations from 1 μM or 10 μM (depending on the absence or the presence of serum) up to 100 μM, decreases the metabolic capacity, which was evaluated by the XTT (tetrazolium salt) test; (3) cadmium induces apoptosis and LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) release in a dose dependent way; (4) in a serum-free medium, the cadmium-induced apoptosis is accompanied by caspase-3 activation; (5) both the caspase-3 activation and the cadmium-induced apoptosis are reversed by N-acethyl-Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-aldehyde (Ac-DEVD-CHO), a selective caspase-3 inhibitor, indicating that the caspase-3 pathway is involved in cadmium-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons; and (6) the cadmium concentrations which produce caspase-3 activation do not modify the intracellular ATP levels; however, higher cadmium concentrations lead to both intracellular ATP depletion and ATP release, but do not increase the caspase-3 activity, indicating that cadmium also produces cellular death by necrosis. These results suggest that cadmium induces either apoptosis or necrosis in rat cortical neurons, depending on the cadmium concentration. PMID:12642392

  16. Neuropilin 1 directly interacts with Fer kinase to mediate semaphorin 3A-induced death of cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Susan X; Whitehead, Shawn; Aylsworth, Amy; Slinn, Jacqueline; Zurakowski, Bogdan; Chan, Kenneth; Li, Jianjun; Hou, Sheng T

    2010-03-26

    Neuropilins (NRPs) are receptors for the major chemorepulsive axonal guidance cue semaphorins (Sema). The interaction of Sema3A/NRP1 during development leads to the collapse of growth cones. Here we show that Sema3A also induces death of cultured cortical neurons through NRP1. A specific NRP1 inhibitory peptide ameliorated Sema3A-evoked cortical axonal retraction and neuronal death. Moreover, Sema3A was also involved in cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal death. Expression levels of Sema3A and NRP1, but not NRP2, were significantly increased early during brain reperfusion following transient focal cerebral ischemia. NRP1 inhibitory peptide delivered to the ischemic brain was potently neuroprotective and prevented the loss of motor functions in mice. The integrity of the injected NRP1 inhibitory peptide into the brain remained unchanged, and the intact peptide permeated the ischemic hemisphere of the brain as determined using MALDI-MS-based imaging. Mechanistically, NRP1-mediated axonal collapse and neuronal death is through direct and selective interaction with the cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase Fer. Fer RNA interference effectively attenuated Sema3A-induced neurite retraction and neuronal death in cortical neurons. More importantly, down-regulation of Fer expression using Fer-specific RNA interference attenuated cerebral ischemia-induced brain damage. Together, these studies revealed a previously unknown function of NRP1 in signaling Sema3A-evoked neuronal death through Fer in cortical neurons. PMID:20133938

  17. Passive Synaptic Normalization and Input Synchrony-Dependent Amplification of Cortical Feedback in Thalamocortical Neuron Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, William M.; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    significantly increase the influence of corticothalamic feedback on sensory information transfer. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons in first-order thalamic nuclei transmit sensory information from the periphery to the cortex. However, the numerically dominant synaptic input to thalamocortical neurons comes from the cortex, which provides a strong, activity-dependent modulatory feedback influence on information flow through the thalamus. Here, we reveal how individual quantal-sized corticothalamic EPSPs propagate within thalamocortical neuron dendrites and how different spatial and temporal input patterns are integrated by these cells. We find that thalamocortical neurons have voltage- and synchrony-dependent postsynaptic mechanisms, involving NMDA receptors and T-type Ca2+ channels that allow nonlinear amplification of integrated corticothalamic EPSPs. These mechanisms significantly increase the responsiveness of thalamocortical neurons to cortical excitatory input and broaden the “modulatory” influence exerted by corticothalamic synapses. PMID:27030759

  18. Taste-Guided Decisions Differentially Engage Neuronal Ensembles across Gustatory Cortices

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Christopher J.; Meck, Warren H.; Simon, Sidney A.; Nicolelis, Miguel A.L.

    2009-01-01

    Much remains to be understood about the differential contributions from primary and secondary sensory cortices to sensory guided decision making. To address this issue we simultaneously recorded activity from neuronal ensembles in primary (gustatory cortex – GC) and secondary gustatory (orbitofrontal cortex – OFC) cortices while rats made a taste-guided decision between two response alternatives. We found that before animals commenced a response guided by a tastant cue, GC ensembles contained more information than OFC about the response alternative about to be selected. Thereafter, while the animal’s response was underway the response selective information in ensembles from both regions increased, albeit to a greater degree in OFC. In GC, this increase depends on a representation of the taste cue guiding the animal‘s response. The increase in the OFC also depends on the taste cue guiding and other features of the response such as its spatiomotor properties and the behavioral context under which it is executed. Each of these latter features is encoded by different ensembles of OFC neurons that are recruited at specific times throughout the response selection process. These results indicate that during a taste-guided decision task both primary and secondary gustatory cortices dynamically encode different types of information. PMID:19741134

  19. Physiological approaches to understanding molecular actions on dorsolateral prefrontal cortical neurons underlying higher cognitive processing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Arnsten, Amy F T

    2015-11-18

    Revealing how molecular mechanisms influence higher brain circuits in primates will be essential for understanding how genetic insults lead to increased risk of cognitive disorders. Traditionally, modulatory influences on higher cortical circuits have been examined using lesion techniques, where a brain region is depleted of a particular transmitter to determine how its loss impacts cognitive function. For example, depletion of catecholamines or acetylcholine from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex produces striking deficits in working memory abilities. More directed techniques have utilized direct infusions of drug into a specific cortical site to try to circumvent compensatory changes that are common following transmitter depletion. The effects of drug on neuronal firing patterns are often studied using iontophoresis, where a minute amount of drug is moved into the brain using a tiny electrical current, thus minimizing the fluid flow that generally disrupts neuronal recordings. All of these approaches can be compared to systemic drug administration, which remains a key arena for the development of effective therapeutics for human cognitive disorders. Most recently, viral techniques are being developed to be able to manipulate proteins for which there is no developed pharmacology, and to allow optogenetic manipulations in primate cortex. As the association cortices greatly expand in brain evolution, research in nonhuman primates is particularly important for understanding the modulatory regulation of our highest order cognitive operations. PMID:26646567

  20. Physiological approaches to understanding molecular actions on dorsolateral prefrontal cortical neurons underlying higher cognitive processing

    PubMed Central

    WANG, Min; ARNSTEN, Amy F.T.

    2015-01-01

    Revealing how molecular mechanisms influence higher brain circuits in primates will be essential for understanding how genetic insults lead to increased risk of cognitive disorders. Traditionally, modulatory influences on higher cortical circuits have been examined using lesion techniques, where a brain region is depleted of a particular transmitter to determine how its loss impacts cognitive function. For example, depletion of catecholamines or acetylcholine from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex produces striking deficits in working memory abilities. More directed techniques have utilized direct infusions of drug into a specific cortical site to try to circumvent compensatory changes that are common following transmitter depletion. The effects of drug on neuronal firing patterns are often studied using iontophoresis, where a minute amount of drug is moved into the brain using a tiny electrical current, thus minimizing the fluid flow that generally disrupts neuronal recordings. All of these approaches can be compared to systemic drug administration, which remains a key arena for the development of effective therapeutics for human cognitive disorders. Most recently, viral techniques are being developed to be able to manipulate proteins for which there is no developed pharmacology, and to allow optogenetic manipulations in primate cortex. As the association cortices greatly expand in brain evolution, research in nonhuman primates is particularly important for understanding the modulatory regulation of our highest order cognitive operations. PMID:26646567

  1. Genetic Enhancement of Visual Learning by Activation of Protein Kinase C Pathways in Small Groups of Rat Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-rong; Wang, Xiaodan; Kong, Lingxin; Lu, Xiu-gui; Lee, Brian; Liu, Meng; Sun, Mei; Franklin, Corinna; Cook, Robert G.; Geller, Alfred I.

    2006-01-01

    Although learning and memory theories hypothesize that memories are encoded by specific circuits, it has proven difficult to localize learning within a cortical area. Neural network theories predict that activation of a small fraction of the neurons in a circuit can activate that circuit. Consequently, altering the physiology of a small group of neurons might potentiate a specific circuit and enhance learning, thereby localizing learning to that circuit. In this study, we activated protein kinase C (PKC) pathways in small groups of neurons in rat postrhinal (POR) cortex. We microinjected helper virus-free herpes simplex virus vectors that expressed a constitutively active PKC into POR cortex. This PKC was expressed predominantly in glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons in POR cortex. This intervention increased phosphorylation of five PKC substrates that play critical roles in neurotransmitter release (GAP-43 and dynamin) or glutamatergic neurotransmission (specific subunits of AMPA or NMDA receptors and myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate). Additionally, activation of PKC pathways in cultured cortical neurons supported activation-dependent increases in release of glutamate and GABA. This intervention enhanced the learning rate and accuracy of visual object discriminations. In individual rats, the numbers of transfected neurons positively correlated with this learning. During learning, neuronal activity was increased in neurons proximal to the transfected neurons. These results demonstrate that potentiating small groups of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons in POR cortex enhances visual object learning. More generally, these results suggest that learning can be mediated by specific cortical circuits. PMID:16162929

  2. Serotonin type-1D receptor stimulation of A-type K(+) channel decreases membrane excitability through the protein kinase A- and B-Raf-dependent p38 MAPK pathways in mouse trigeminal ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xianyang; Zhang, Yuan; Qin, Wenjuan; Cao, Junping; Zhang, Yi; Ni, Jianqiang; Sun, Yangang; Jiang, Xinghong; Tao, Jin

    2016-08-01

    Although recent studies have implicated serotonin 5-HT1B/D receptors in the nociceptive sensitivity of primary afferent neurons, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we identified a novel functional role of the 5-HT1D receptor subtype in regulating A-type potassium (K(+)) currents (IA) as well as membrane excitability in small trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons. We found that the selective activation of 5-HT1D, rather than 5-HT1B, receptors reversibly increased IA, while the sustained delayed rectifier K(+) current was unaffected. The 5-HT1D-mediated IA increase was associated with a depolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of inactivation. Blocking G-protein signaling with pertussis toxin or by intracellular application of a selective antibody raised against Gαo or Gβ abolished the 5-HT1D effect on IA. Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA), but not of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase or protein kinase C, abolished the 5-HT1D-mediated IA increase. Analysis of phospho-p38 (p-p38) revealed that activation of 5-HT1D, but not 5-HT1B, receptors significantly activated p38, while p-ERK and p-JNK were unaffected. The p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580, but not its inactive analogue SB202474, and inhibition of B-Raf blocked the 5-HT1D-mediated IA response. Functionally, we observed a significantly decreased action potential firing rate induced by the 5-HT1D receptors; pretreatment with 4-aminopyridine abolished this effect. Taken together, these results suggest that the activation of 5-HT1D receptors selectively enhanced IA via the Gβγ of the Go-protein, PKA, and the sequential B-Raf-dependent p38 MAPK signaling cascade. This 5-HT1D receptor effect may contribute to neuronal hypoexcitability in small TG neurons. PMID:27156838

  3. Multiplex Networks of Cortical and Hippocampal Neurons Revealed at Different Timescales

    PubMed Central

    Timme, Nicholas; Ito, Shinya; Myroshnychenko, Maxym; Yeh, Fang-Chin; Hiolski, Emma; Hottowy, Pawel; Beggs, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the importance of multiplex networks – interdependent networks with shared nodes and different types of connections – in systems primarily outside of neuroscience. Though the multiplex properties of networks are frequently not considered, most networks are actually multiplex networks and the multiplex specific features of networks can greatly affect network behavior (e.g. fault tolerance). Thus, the study of networks of neurons could potentially be greatly enhanced using a multiplex perspective. Given the wide range of temporally dependent rhythms and phenomena present in neural systems, we chose to examine multiplex networks of individual neurons with time scale dependent connections. To study these networks, we used transfer entropy – an information theoretic quantity that can be used to measure linear and nonlinear interactions – to systematically measure the connectivity between individual neurons at different time scales in cortical and hippocampal slice cultures. We recorded the spiking activity of almost 12,000 neurons across 60 tissue samples using a 512-electrode array with 60 micrometer inter-electrode spacing and 50 microsecond temporal resolution. To the best of our knowledge, this preparation and recording method represents a superior combination of number of recorded neurons and temporal and spatial recording resolutions to any currently available in vivo system. We found that highly connected neurons (“hubs”) were localized to certain time scales, which, we hypothesize, increases the fault tolerance of the network. Conversely, a large proportion of non-hub neurons were not localized to certain time scales. In addition, we found that long and short time scale connectivity was uncorrelated. Finally, we found that long time scale networks were significantly less modular and more disassortative than short time scale networks in both tissue types. As far as we are aware, this analysis represents the first

  4. Comparison of spike parameters from optically identified GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons in sparse cortical cultures

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Keiko; Blanquie, Oriane; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Sinning, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Primary neuronal cultures share many typical features with the in vivo situation, including similarities in distinct electrical activity patterns and synaptic network interactions. Here, we use multi-electrode array (MEA) recordings from spontaneously active cultures of wildtype and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice to evaluate which spike parameters differ between GABAergic interneurons and principal, putatively glutamatergic neurons. To analyze this question we combine MEA recordings with optical imaging in sparse cortical cultures to assign individual spikes to visually-identified single neurons. In our culture system, excitatory and inhibitory neurons are present at a similar ratio as described in vivo, and spike waveform characteristics and firing patterns are fully developed after 2 weeks in vitro. Spike amplitude, but not other spike waveform parameters, correlated with the distance between the recording electrode and the location of the assigned neuron’s soma. Cluster analysis of spike waveform properties revealed no particular cell population that may be assigned to putative inhibitory or excitatory neurons. Moreover, experiments in primary cultures from transgenic GAD67-GFP mice, which allow optical identification of GABAergic interneurons and thus unambiguous assignment of extracellular signals, did not reveal any significant difference in spike timing and spike waveform parameters between inhibitory and excitatory neurons. Despite of our detailed characterization of spike waveform and temporal spiking properties we could not identify an unequivocal electrical parameter to discriminate between individual excitatory and inhibitory neurons in vitro. Our data suggest that under in vitro conditions cellular classifications of single neurons on the basis of their extracellular firing properties should be treated with caution. PMID:25642167

  5. TFP5, a peptide derived from p35, a Cdk5 neuronal activator, rescues cortical neurons from glucose toxicity.

    PubMed

    Binukumar, B K; Zheng, Ya-Li; Shukla, Varsha; Amin, Niranjana D; Grant, Philip; Pant, Harish C

    2014-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence link the incidence of diabetes to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Patients with diabetes have a 50 to 75% increased risk of developing AD. Cyclin dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a serine/threonine protein kinase, which forms active complexes with p35 or p39, found principally in neurons and in pancreatic β cells. Recent studies suggest that Cdk5 hyperactivity is a possible link between neuropathology seen in AD and diabetes. Previously, we identified P5, a truncated 24-aa peptide derived from the Cdk5 activator p35, later modified as TFP5, so as to penetrate the blood-brain barrier after intraperitoneal injections in AD model mice. This treatment inhibited abnormal Cdk5 hyperactivity and significantly rescued AD pathology in these mice. The present study explores the potential of TFP5 peptide to rescue high glucose (HG)-mediated toxicity in rat embryonic cortical neurons. HG exposure leads to Cdk5-p25 hyperactivity and oxidative stress marked by increased reactive oxygen species production, and decreased glutathione levels and superoxide dismutase activity. It also induces hyperphosphorylation of tau, neuroinflammation as evident from the increased expression of inflammatory cytokines like TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, and apoptosis. Pretreatment of cortical neurons with TFP5 before HG exposure inhibited Cdk5-p25 hyperactivity and significantly attenuated oxidative stress by decreasing reactive oxygen species levels, while increasing superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione. Tau hyperphosphorylation, inflammation, and apoptosis induced by HG were also considerably reduced by pretreatment with TFP5. These results suggest that TFP5 peptide may be a novel candidate for type 2 diabetes therapy. PMID:24326517

  6. Lamin B1 protein is required for dendrite development in primary mouse cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Giacomini, Caterina; Mahajani, Sameehan; Ruffilli, Roberta; Marotta, Roberto; Gasparini, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Lamin B1, a key component of the nuclear lamina, plays an important role in brain development and function. A duplication of the human lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene has been linked to adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy, and mouse and human loss-of-function mutations in lamin B1 are susceptibility factors for neural tube defects. In the mouse, experimental ablation of endogenous lamin B1 (Lmnb1) severely impairs embryonic corticogenesis. Here we report that in primary mouse cortical neurons, LMNB1 overexpression reduces axonal outgrowth, whereas deficiency of endogenous Lmnb1 results in aberrant dendritic development. In the absence of Lmnb1, both the length and complexity of dendrites are reduced, and their growth is unresponsive to KCl stimulation. This defective dendritic outgrowth stems from impaired ERK signaling. In Lmnb1-null neurons, ERK is correctly phosphorylated, but phospho-ERK fails to translocate to the nucleus, possibly due to delocalization of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) at the nuclear envelope. Taken together, these data highlight a previously unrecognized role of lamin B1 in dendrite development of mouse cortical neurons through regulation of nuclear shuttling of specific signaling molecules and NPC distribution. PMID:26510501

  7. PSD-95 and Calcineurin Control the Sensitivity of NMDA Receptors to Calpain Cleavage in Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Eunice Y.; Ren, Yi; Yan, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is a Ca2+-permeable glutamate receptor mediating many neuronal functions under normal and pathological conditions. Ca2+-influx via NMDARs activates diverse intracellular targets, including Ca2+-dependent protease calpain. Biochemical studies suggest that NR2A and NR2B subunits of NMDARs are substrates of calpain. Our physiological data showed that calpain, activated by prolonged NMDA treatment (100 µM, 5 min) of cultured cortical neurons, irreversibly decreased the whole-cell currents mediated by extrasynaptic NMDARs. Animals exposed to transient forebrain ischemia, a condition that activates calpain, exhibited the reduced NMDAR current density and the lower full-length NR2A/B level in a calpain-dependent manner. Disruption of the association between NMDARs and the scaffolding protein PSD-95 facilitated the calpain regulation of synaptic NMDAR responses and NR2 cleavage in cortical slices, while inhibition of calcineurin activity blocked the calpain effect on NMDAR currents and NR2 cleavage. Calpain-cleaved NR2B subunits were removed from the cell surface. Moreover, cell viability assays showed that calpain, by targeting NMDARs, provided a negative feedback to dampen neuronal excitability in excitotoxic conditions. These data suggest that calpain activation suppresses NMDAR function via proteolytic cleavage of NR2 subunits in vitro and in vivo, and the susceptibility of NMDARs to calpain cleavage is controlled by PSD-95 and calcineurin. PMID:18445709

  8. Impact of calcium-activated potassium channels on NMDA spikes in cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bock, Tobias; Stuart, Greg J

    2016-03-01

    Active electrical events play an important role in shaping signal processing in dendrites. As these events are usually associated with an increase in intracellular calcium, they are likely to be under the control of calcium-activated potassium channels. Here, we investigate the impact of calcium-activated potassium channels onN-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent spikes, or NMDA spikes, evoked by glutamate iontophoresis onto basal dendrites of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons. We found that small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK channels) act to reduce NMDA spike amplitude but at the same time, also decrease the iontophoretic current required for their generation. This SK-mediated decrease in NMDA spike threshold was dependent on R-type voltage-gated calcium channels and indicates a counterintuitive, excitatory effect of SK channels on NMDA spike generation, whereas the capacity of SK channels to suppress NMDA spike amplitude is in line with the expected inhibitory action of potassium channels on dendritic excitability. Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels had no significant impact on NMDA spikes, indicating that these channels are either absent from basal dendrites or not activated by NMDA spikes. These experiments reveal complex and opposing interactions among NMDA receptors, SK channels, and voltage-gated calcium channels in basal dendrites of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons during NMDA spike generation, which are likely to play an important role in regulating the way these neurons integrate the thousands of synaptic inputs they receive. PMID:26936985

  9. Amyloid beta-peptide disrupts carbachol-induced muscarinic cholinergic signal transduction in cortical neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, J F; Furukawa, K; Barger, S W; Rengen, M R; Mark, R J; Blanc, E M; Roth, G S; Mattson, M P

    1996-01-01

    Cholinergic pathways serve important functions in learning and memory processes, and deficits in cholinergic transmission occur in Alzheimer disease (AD). A subset of muscarinic cholinergic receptors are linked to G-proteins that activate phospholipase C, resulting in the liberation of inositol trisphosphate and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. We now report that amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta), which forms plaques in the brain in AD, impairs muscarinic receptor activation of G proteins in cultured rat cortical neurons. Exposure of rodent fetal cortical neurons to Abeta25-35 and Abeta1-40 resulted in a concentration and time-dependent attenuation of carbachol-induced GTPase activity without affecting muscarinic receptor ligand binding parameters. Downstream events in the signal transduction cascade were similarly attenuated by Abeta. Carbachol-induced accumulation of inositol phosphates (IP, IP2, IP3, and IP4) was decreased and calcium imaging studies revealed that carbachol-induced release of calcium was severely impaired in neurons pretreated with Abeta. Muscarinic cholinergic signal transduction was disrupted with subtoxic levels of exposure to AP. The effects of Abeta on carbachol-induced GTPase activity and calcium release were attenuated by antioxidants, implicating free radicals in the mechanism whereby Abeta induced uncoupling of muscarinic receptors. These data demonstrate that Abeta disrupts muscarinic receptor coupling to G proteins that mediate induction of phosphoinositide accumulation and calcium release, findings that implicate Abeta in the impairment of cholinergic transmission that occurs in AD. PMID:8692890

  10. Amyloid beta-peptide disrupts carbachol-induced muscarinic cholinergic signal transduction in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J F; Furukawa, K; Barger, S W; Rengen, M R; Mark, R J; Blanc, E M; Roth, G S; Mattson, M P

    1996-06-25

    Cholinergic pathways serve important functions in learning and memory processes, and deficits in cholinergic transmission occur in Alzheimer disease (AD). A subset of muscarinic cholinergic receptors are linked to G-proteins that activate phospholipase C, resulting in the liberation of inositol trisphosphate and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. We now report that amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta), which forms plaques in the brain in AD, impairs muscarinic receptor activation of G proteins in cultured rat cortical neurons. Exposure of rodent fetal cortical neurons to Abeta25-35 and Abeta1-40 resulted in a concentration and time-dependent attenuation of carbachol-induced GTPase activity without affecting muscarinic receptor ligand binding parameters. Downstream events in the signal transduction cascade were similarly attenuated by Abeta. Carbachol-induced accumulation of inositol phosphates (IP, IP2, IP3, and IP4) was decreased and calcium imaging studies revealed that carbachol-induced release of calcium was severely impaired in neurons pretreated with Abeta. Muscarinic cholinergic signal transduction was disrupted with subtoxic levels of exposure to AP. The effects of Abeta on carbachol-induced GTPase activity and calcium release were attenuated by antioxidants, implicating free radicals in the mechanism whereby Abeta induced uncoupling of muscarinic receptors. These data demonstrate that Abeta disrupts muscarinic receptor coupling to G proteins that mediate induction of phosphoinositide accumulation and calcium release, findings that implicate Abeta in the impairment of cholinergic transmission that occurs in AD. PMID:8692890

  11. Contrasting roles for parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory neurons in two forms of adult visual cortical plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Eitan S; Cooke, Sam F; Komorowski, Robert W; Chubykin, Alexander A; Thomazeau, Aurore; Khibnik, Lena A; Gavornik, Jeffrey P; Bear, Mark F

    2016-01-01

    The roles played by cortical inhibitory neurons in experience-dependent plasticity are not well understood. Here we evaluate the participation of parvalbumin-expressing (PV+) GABAergic neurons in two forms of experience-dependent modification of primary visual cortex (V1) in adult mice: ocular dominance (OD) plasticity resulting from monocular deprivation and stimulus-selective response potentiation (SRP) resulting from enriched visual experience. These two forms of plasticity are triggered by different events but lead to a similar increase in visual cortical response. Both also require the NMDA class of glutamate receptor (NMDAR). However, we find that PV+ inhibitory neurons in V1 play a critical role in the expression of SRP and its behavioral correlate of familiarity recognition, but not in the expression of OD plasticity. Furthermore, NMDARs expressed within PV+ cells, reversibly inhibited by the psychotomimetic drug ketamine, play a critical role in SRP, but not in the induction or expression of adult OD plasticity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11450.001 PMID:26943618

  12. Paired associative transspinal and transcortical stimulation produces plasticity in human cortical and spinal neuronal circuits.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Luke; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Santora, Danielle; Knikou, Maria

    2016-08-01

    Anatomical, physiological, and functional connectivity exists between the neurons of the primary motor cortex (M1) and spinal cord. Paired associative stimulation (PAS) produces enduring changes in M1, based on the Hebbian principle of associative plasticity. The present study aimed to establish neurophysiological changes in human cortical and spinal neuronal circuits by pairing noninvasive transspinal stimulation with transcortical stimulation via transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). We delivered paired transspinal and transcortical stimulation for 40 min at precise interstimulus intervals, with TMS being delivered after (transspinal-transcortical PAS) or before (transcortical-transspinal PAS) transspinal stimulation. Transspinal-transcortical PAS markedly decreased intracortical inhibition, increased intracortical facilitation and M1 excitability with concomitant decreases of motor threshold, and reduced the soleus Hoffmann's reflex (H-reflex) low frequency-mediated homosynaptic depression. Transcortical-transspinal PAS did not affect intracortical circuits, decreased M1 excitability, and reduced the soleus H-reflex-paired stimulation pulses' mediated postactivation depression. Both protocols affected the excitation threshold of group Ia afferents and motor axons. These findings clearly indicate that the pairing of transspinal with transcortical stimulation produces cortical and spinal excitability changes based on the timing interval and functional network interactions between the two associated inputs. This new PAS paradigm may constitute a significant neuromodulation method with physiological impact, because it can be used to alter concomitantly excitability of intracortical circuits, corticospinal neurons, and spinal inhibition in humans. PMID:27281748

  13. Soman and glutamate toxicity in cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons: An in vitro model for testing neuroprotective drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, S.S.; Filbert, M.G.; Cann, F.J.

    1993-05-13

    An in vitro mammalian model neuronal system to evaluate intrinsic toxicity of soman and other neurotoxicants and the efficacy of potential countermeasures was developed. Primary dissociated cell cultures from rat hippocampus and cerebral neocortex have been established. The link between soman toxicity, glutamate hyperactivity and neuronal death in the central nervous system was investigated. The cytotoxicity was assessed by trypan blue dye exclusion and also from the measurement of LDH released by damaged cells in the extracellular fluid 24 hr after exposure. Cortical or hippocampal cells exposed to glutamate for 15 min caused neuronal death in almost 80 % of the cells examined at 24 hr. when cortical cells were exposed to soman alone for 15 to 120 min, washed to remove excess ChE inhibitor and incubated for 24 hr, no damage was evident as assessed by trypan blue exclusion or LDH assay. Soman does not appear to have direct toxic effect on the cerebral cortical neurons.

  14. Intermediate Progenitor Cohorts Differentially Generate Cortical Layers and Require Tbr2 for Timely Acquisition of Neuronal Subtype Identity.

    PubMed

    Mihalas, Anca B; Elsen, Gina E; Bedogni, Francesco; Daza, Ray A M; Ramos-Laguna, Kevyn A; Arnold, Sebastian J; Hevner, Robert F

    2016-06-28

    Intermediate progenitors (IPs) amplify the production of pyramidal neurons, but their role in selective genesis of cortical layers or neuronal subtypes remains unclear. Using genetic lineage tracing in mice, we find that IPs destined to produce upper cortical layers first appear early in corticogenesis, by embryonic day 11.5. During later corticogenesis, IP laminar fates are progressively limited to upper layers. We examined the role of Tbr2, an IP-specific transcription factor, in laminar fate regulation using Tbr2 conditional mutant mice. Upon Tbr2 inactivation, fewer neurons were produced by immediate differentiation and laminar fates were shifted upward. Genesis of subventricular mitoses was, however, not reduced in the context of a Tbr2-null cortex. Instead, neuronal and laminar differentiation were disrupted and delayed. Our findings indicate that upper-layer genesis depends on IPs from many stages of corticogenesis and that Tbr2 regulates the tempo of laminar fate implementation for all cortical layers. PMID:27320921

  15. Rhythmic Cortical Neurons Increase their Oscillations and Sculpt Basal Ganglia Signaling During Motor Learning

    PubMed Central

    Day, Nancy F.; Nick, Teresa A.

    2014-01-01

    The function and modulation of neural circuits underlying motor skill may involve rhythmic oscillations (Feller, 1999; Marder and Goaillard, 2006; Churchland et al., 2012). In the proposed pattern generator for birdsong, the cortical nucleus HVC, the frequency and power of oscillatory bursting during singing increases with development (Crandall et al., 2007; Day et al., 2009). We examined the maturation of cellular activity patterns that underlie these changes. Single unit ensemble recording combined with antidromic identification (Day et al., 2011) was used to study network development in anesthetized zebra finches. Autocovariance quantified oscillations within single units. A subset of neurons oscillated in the theta/alpha/mu/beta range (8–20 Hz), with greater power in adults compared to juveniles. Across the network, the normalized oscillatory power in the 8–20 Hz range was greater in adults than juveniles. In addition, the correlated activity between rhythmic neuron pairs increased with development. We next examined the functional impact of the oscillators on the output neurons of HVC. We found that the firing of oscillatory neurons negatively correlated with the activity of cortico-basal ganglia neurons (HVCXs), which project to Area X (the song basal ganglia). If groups of oscillators work together to tonically inhibit and precisely control the spike timing of adult HVCXs with coordinated release from inhibition, then the activity of HVCXs in juveniles should be decreased relative to adults due to uncorrelated, tonic inhibition. Consistent with this hypothesis, HVCXs had lower activity in juveniles. These data reveal network changes that shape cortical-to-basal ganglia signaling during motor learning. PMID:23776169

  16. The Expression of Tubb2b Undergoes a Developmental Transition in Murine Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Breuss, Martin; Morandell, Jasmin; Nimpf, Simon; Gstrein, Thomas; Lauwers, Mattias; Hochstoeger, Tobias; Braun, Andreas; Chan, Kelvin; Sánchez Guajardo, Edmundo R; Zhang, Lijuan; Suplata, Marek; Heinze, Katrin G; Elsayad, Kareem; Keays, David A

    2015-10-15

    The development of the mammalian brain requires the generation, migration, and differentiation of neurons, cellular processes that are dependent on a dynamic microtubule cytoskeleton. Mutations in tubulin genes, which encode for the structural subunits of microtubules, cause detrimental neurological disorders known as the tubulinopathies. The disease spectra associated with different tubulin genes are overlapping but distinct, an observation believed to reflect functional specification of this multigene family. Perturbation of the β-tubulin TUBB2B is known to cause polymicrogyria, pachygyria, microcephaly, and axon guidance defects. Here we provide a detailed analysis of the expression pattern of its murine homolog Tubb2b. The generation and characterization of BAC-transgenic eGFP reporter mouse lines has revealed that it is highly expressed in progenitors and postmitotic neurons during cortical development. This contrasts with the 8-week-old cortex, in which Tubb2b expression is restricted to macroglia, and expression is almost completely absent in mature neurons. This developmental transition in neurons is mirrored in the adult hippocampus and the cerebellum but is not a universal feature of Tubb2b; its expression persists in a population of postmitotic neurons in the 8-week-old retina. We propose that the dynamic spatial and temporal expression of Tubb2b reflects specific functional requirements of the microtubule cytoskeleton. PMID:26105993

  17. Mechanism of neuroprotection by donepezil pretreatment in rat cortical neurons chronically treated with donepezil.

    PubMed

    Takada-Takatori, Yuki; Kume, Toshiaki; Ohgi, Yuta; Izumi, Yasuhiko; Niidome, Tetsuhiro; Fujii, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Hachiro; Akaike, Akinori

    2008-12-01

    Previously, we showed that in rat cortical neurons, chronic donepezil treatment (10 microM, 4 days) up-regulates nicotinic receptors (nAChR) and makes neurons more sensitive to the neuroprotective effect of donepezil. Here we examined the mechanism of donepezil-induced neuroprotection in neurons chronically treated with donepezil. The mechanism of neuroprotection was examined under different conditions of exposure to glutamate, acute and moderate, that induce cell death associated with necrotic and apoptotic cell death, respectively. Concomitant treatment with antagonists of nAChRs but not muscarinic receptors inhibited donepezil pretreatment-induced neuroprotection against acute glutamate treatment-induced death. Donepezil pretreatment prevented acute glutamate- and ionomycin-induced neurotoxicity, but not S-nitrosocysteine-induced neurotoxicity, suggesting that donepezil protects neurons via nAChR at levels before nitric oxide synthase activation against acute glutamate neurotoxicity. Concomitant treatment with antagonists of nAChR or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling inhibitors significantly inhibited neuroprotection against moderate glutamate neurotoxicity and decreased the phosphorylation level of Akt. Neuroprotection was also inhibited by treatment with inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase. These results suggest that donepezil protects neurons against moderate glutamate neurotoxicity via nAChR-PI3K-Akt and MAPK signaling pathways. This study provides novel insight into the mechanism of donepezil-induced neuroprotection that involves nAChR up-regulation. PMID:18655200

  18. Opto-Current-Clamp Actuation of Cortical Neurons Using a Strategically Designed Channelrhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Tanimoto, Saki; Egawa, Ryo; Matsuzaka, Yoshiya; Mushiake, Hajime; Ishizuka, Toru; Yawo, Hiromu

    2010-01-01

    Background Optogenetic manipulation of a neuronal network enables one to reveal how high-order functions emerge in the central nervous system. One of the Chlamydomonas rhodopsins, channelrhodopsin-1 (ChR1), has several advantages over channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in terms of the photocurrent kinetics. Improved temporal resolution would be expected by the optogenetics using the ChR1 variants with enhanced photocurrents. Methodology/Principal Findings The photocurrent retardation of ChR1 was overcome by exchanging the sixth helix domain with its counterpart in ChR2 producing Channelrhodopsin-green receiver (ChRGR) with further reform of the molecule. When the ChRGR photocurrent was measured from the expressing HEK293 cells under whole-cell patch clamp, it was preferentially activated by green light and has fast kinetics with minimal desensitization. With its kinetic advantages the use of ChRGR would enable one to inject a current into a neuron by the time course as predicted by the intensity of the shedding light (opto-current clamp). The ChRGR was also expressed in the motor cortical neurons of a mouse using Sindbis pseudovirion vectors. When an oscillatory LED light signal was applied sweeping through frequencies, it robustly evoked action potentials synchronized to the oscillatory light at 5–10 Hz in layer 5 pyramidal cells in the cortical slice. The ChRGR-expressing neurons were also driven in vivo with monitoring local field potentials (LFPs) and the time-frequency energy distribution of the light-evoked response was investigated using wavelet analysis. The oscillatory light enhanced both the in-phase and out-phase responses of LFP at the preferential frequencies of 5–10 Hz. The spread of activity was evidenced by the fact that there were many c-Fos-immunoreactive neurons that were negative for ChRGR in a region of the motor cortex. Conclusions/Significance The opto-current-clamp study suggests that the depolarization of a small number of neurons wakes up the

  19. 14,15-EET promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and protects cortical neurons against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lai; Chen, Man; Yuan, Lin; Xiang, Yuting; Zheng, Ruimao; Zhu, Shigong

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • 14,15-EET inhibits OGD-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons. • Mitochondrial biogenesis of cortical neurons is promoted by 14,15-EET. • 14,15-EET preserves mitochondrial function of cortical neurons under OGD. • CREB mediates effect of 14,15-EET on mitochondrial biogenesis and function. - Abstract: 14,15-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET), a metabolite of arachidonic acid, is enriched in the brain cortex and exerts protective effect against neuronal apoptosis induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Although apoptosis has been well recognized to be closely associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and function, it is still unclear whether the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET is mediated by promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in cortical neurons under the condition of oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD). In this study, we found that 14,15-EET improved cell viability and inhibited apoptosis of cortical neurons. 14,15-EET significantly increased the mitochondrial mass and the ratio of mitochondrial DNA to nuclear DNA. Key makers of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were elevated at both mRNA and protein levels in the cortical neurons treated with 14,15-EET. Moreover, 14,15-EET markedly attenuated the decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced ROS, while increased ATP synthesis. Knockdown of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) by siRNA blunted the up-regulation of PGC-1α and NRF-1 stimulated by 14,15-EET, and consequently abolished the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET. Our results indicate that 14,15-EET protects neurons from OGD-induced apoptosis by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function through CREB mediated activation of PGC-1α and NRF-1.

  20. CNTF-Treated Astrocyte Conditioned Medium Enhances Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channel Activity in Rat Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meiqun; Liu, Hongli; Xu, Huanbai; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaojing

    2016-08-01

    Seizure activity is linked to astrocyte activation as well as dysfunctional cortical neuron excitability produced from changes in calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channel function. Ciliary neurotrophic factor-treated astrocyte conditioned medium (CNTF-ACM) can be used to investigate the peripheral effects of activated astrocytes upon cortical neurons. However, CNTF-ACM's effect upon KCa channel activity in cultured cortical neurons has not yet been investigated. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were performed in rat cortical neurons to evaluate CNTF-ACM's effects upon charybdotoxin-sensitive large-conductance KCa (BK) channel currents and apamin-sensitive small-conductance KCa (SK) channel current. Biotinylation and RT-PCR were applied to assess CNTF-ACM's effects upon the protein and mRNA expression, respectively, of the SK channel subunits SK2 and SK3 and the BK channel subunits BKα1 and BKβ3. An anti-fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) monoclonal neutralizing antibody was used to assess the effects of the FGF-2 component of CNTF-ACM. CNTF-ACM significantly increased KCa channel current density, which was predominantly attributable to gains in BK channel activity (p < 0.05). CNTF-ACM produced a significant increase in BKα1 and BKβ3 expression (p < 0.05) but had no significant effect upon SK2 or SK3 expression (p > 0.05). Blocking FGF-2 produced significant reductions in KCa channel current density (p > 0.05) as well as BKα1 and BKβ3 expression in CNTF-ACM-treated neurons (p > 0.05). CNTF-ACM significantly enhances BK channel activity in rat cortical neurons and that FGF-2 is partially responsible for these effects. CNTF-induced astrocyte activation results in secretion of neuroactive factors which may affect neuronal excitability and resultant seizure activity in mammalian cortical neurons. PMID:27097551

  1. Resistance to neurotoxicity in cortical cultures from neuronal nitric oxide synthase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Dawson, V L; Kizushi, V M; Huang, P L; Snyder, S H; Dawson, T M

    1996-04-15

    In addition to its functions as a neuronal messenger molecule, nitric oxide (NO) has also been implicated in playing a major role in ischemic damage and glutamate neurotoxicity. Using primary cortical cultures from transgenic neuronal NO synthase (NOS) null (nNOS-) mice, we definitively establish NO as a mediator of NMDA and hypoxic neurotoxicity. Neurotoxicity elicited by NMDA is markedly attenuated in nNOS- cortical cultures compared with wild-type cultures. The NOS inhibitor nitro-L-arginine is neuroprotective in wild-type but not nNOS-cultures, confirming the role of nNOS-derived NO in glutamate neurotoxicity. Confirming that the nNOS- cultures lack NMDA-stimulated nNOS activity, NMDA did not stimulate the formation of cGMP in nNOS- cultures, but markedly elevates cGMP in wild-type cultures. Both wild-type and nNOS- cultures are sensitive to toxicity induced by NO donors, indicating that pathways stimulated by NO that result in neuronal cell death are still intact in the transgenic mice. Superoxide dismutase is neuroprotective against NMDA and NO neurotoxicity in both wild-type and nNOS- cultures, highlighting the importance of superoxide anion in subsequent neuronal damage. The unknown cellular factors that endow differential resistance to NMDA neurotoxicity and differential susceptibility to quisqualate neurotoxicity remain intact in the nNOS- cultures, because the response of somatostatin-immunopositive neurons in nNOS- cultures to high-dose NMDA and low-dose quisqualate is identical to the response of NOS-immunopositive neurons in the wild-type cultures. There is no difference in susceptibility to kainate neurotoxicity between nNOS- and wild-type cultures and only a modest resistance to quisqualate neurotoxicity, confirming observations that NO-mediated neurotoxicity is associated primarily with activation of the NMDA receptor. The nNOS- cultures are markedly protected from 60 min of combined oxygen-glucose deprivation neurotoxicity compared with wild

  2. [HOMOCYSTEINE-INDUCED MEMBRANE CURRENTS, CALCIUM RESPONSES AND CHANGES OF MITOCHONDRIAL POTENTIAL IN RAT CORTICAL NEURONS].

    PubMed

    Abushik, P A; Karelina, T V; Sibarov, D A; Stepanenko, J D; Giniatullin, R; Antonov, S M

    2015-01-01

    Homocysteine, a sulfur-containing amino acid, exhibits neurotoxic effects and is involved in the pathogenesis of several major neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast to well studied excitoxicity of glutamate, the mechanism of homocysteine neurotoxicity is not clearly understood. By using whole-cell patch-clamp, calcium imaging (fluo-3) and measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (rhodamine 123) we studied transmembrane currents, calcium signals and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential induced by homocysteine versus responses induced by NMDA and glutamate in cultured rat cortical neurons. L-homocysteine (50 µM) induced inward currents that could be completely blocked by the selective antagonist of NMDA receptors - AP-5. In contrast to NMDA-induced currents, homocysteine-induced currents had a smaller steady-state amplitude. Comparison of calcium responses to homocysteine, NMDA or glutamate demonstrated that in all cortical neurons homocysteine elicited short, oscillatory-type calcium responses, whereas NMDA or glutamate induced sustained increase of intracellular calcium. Analysis of mitochondrial changes demonstrated that in contrast to NMDA homocysteine did not cause a drop of mitochondrial membrane potential at the early stages of action. However, after its long-term action, as in the case of NMDA and glutamate, the changes in mitochondrial membrane potential were comparable with the full drop of respiratory chain induced by protonophore FCCP. Our data suggest that in cultured rat cortical neuron homocysteine at the first stages of action induces neurotoxic effects through activation of NMDA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors with strong calcium influx through the channels of these receptors. The long-term action of homocysteine may lead to mitochondrial disfuction and appears as a drop of mitochondrial membrane potential. PMID:26547950

  3. Neuronal activity is required for the development of specific cortical interneuron subtypes.

    PubMed

    De Marco García, Natalia V; Karayannis, Theofanis; Fishell, Gord

    2011-04-21

    Electrical activity has been shown to regulate development in a variety of species and in various structures, including the retina, spinal cord and cortex. Within the mammalian cortex specifically, the development of dendrites and commissural axons in pyramidal cells is activity-dependent. However, little is known about the developmental role of activity in the other major cortical population of neurons, the GABA-producing interneurons. These neurons are morphologically and functionally heterogeneous and efforts over the past decade have focused on determining the mechanisms that contribute to this diversity. It was recently discovered that 30% of all cortical interneurons arise from a relatively novel source within the ventral telencephalon, the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE). Owing to their late birth date, these interneurons populate the cortex only after the majority of other interneurons and pyramidal cells are already in place and have started to functionally integrate. Here we demonstrate in mice that for CGE-derived reelin (Re)-positive and calretinin (Cr)-positive (but not vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-positive) interneurons, activity is essential before postnatal day 3 for correct migration, and that after postnatal day 3, glutamate-mediated activity controls the development of their axons and dendrites. Furthermore, we show that the engulfment and cell motility 1 gene (Elmo1), a target of the transcription factor distal-less homeobox 1 (Dlx1), is selectively expressed in Re(+) and Cr(+) interneurons and is both necessary and sufficient for activity-dependent interneuron migration. Our findings reveal a selective requirement for activity in shaping the cortical integration of specific neuronal subtypes. PMID:21460837

  4. Prenatal Exposure to Benzo(a)pyrene Impairs Later-Life Cortical Neuronal Function

    PubMed Central

    McCallister, Monique M.; Maguire, Mark; Ramesh, Aramandla; Aimin, Qiao; Liu, Sheng; Khoshbouei, Habibeh; Aschner, Michael; Ebner, Ford F.; Hood, Darryl B.

    2009-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to environmental contaminants, such as Benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] has been shown to impair brain development. The overarching hypothesis of our work is that glutamate receptor subunit expression is crucial for cortical evoked responses and that prenatal B(a)P exposure modulates the temporal developmental expression of glutamatergic receptor subunits in the somatosensory cortex. To characterize prenatal B(a)P exposure on the development of cortical function, pregnant Long Evans rats were exposed to low-level B(a)P (300μg/kg BW) by oral gavage on gestational days 14 to 17. At this exposure dose, there was no significant effect of B(a)P on 1) the number of pups born per litter, 2) the pre-weaning growth curves and 3) initial and final brain to body weight ratios. Control and B(a)P-exposed offspring were profiled for B(a)P metabolites in plasma and whole brain during the pre-weaning period. No detectable levels of metabolites were found in the control offspring. However, a time-dependent decrease in total metabolite concentration was observed in B(a)P-exposed offspring. On PND100-120, cerebrocortical mRNA expression was determined for the glutamatergic NMDA receptor subunit (NR2B) in control and B(a)P-exposed offspring. Neural activity was also recorded from neurons in primary somatic sensory (barrel) cortex. Semiquantitative PCR from B(a)P-exposed offspring revealed a significant 50% reduction in NR2B mRNA expression in B(a)P-exposed offspring relative to controls. Recordings from B(a)P-exposed offspring revealed that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor -dependent neuronal activity in barrel cortex evoked by whisker stimulation was also significantly reduced (70%) as compared to controls. Analysis showed that the greatest deficit in cortical neuronal responses occurred in the shorter latency epochs from 5-20ms post-stimulus. The results suggest that in utero exposure to benzo(a)pyrene results in diminished mRNA expression of the NMDA NR2B receptor

  5. Regulation and subcellular localization of the microtubule-destabilizing stathmin family phosphoproteins in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Gavet, Olivier; El Messari, Saïd; Ozon, Sylvie; Sobel, André

    2002-06-01

    Stathmin is a ubiquitous cytosolic phosphoprotein, preferentially expressed in the nervous system, and the generic element of a protein family that includes the neural-specific proteins SCG10, SCLIP, and RB3 and its splice variants, RB3' and RB3". All phosphoproteins of the family share with stathmin its tubulin binding and microtubule (MT)-destabilizing activities. To understand better the specific roles of these proteins in neuronal cells, we performed a comparative study of their expression, regulation, and intracellular distribution in embryonic cortical neurons in culture. We found that stathmin is highly expressed ( approximately 0.25% of total proteins) and uniformly present in the various neuronal compartments (cell body, dendrites, axon, growth cones). It appeared mainly unphosphorylated or weakly phosphorylated on one site, and antisera to specific phosphorylated sites (serines 16, 25, or 38) did not reveal a differential regulation of its phosphorylation among neuronal cell compartments. However, they revealed a subpopulation of cells in which stathmin was highly phosphorylated on serine 16, possibly by CaM kinase II also active in a similar subpopulation. The other proteins of the stathmin family are expressed about 100-fold less than stathmin in partially distinct neuronal populations, RB3 being detected in only about 20% of neurons in culture. In contrast to stathmin, they are each mostly concentrated at the Golgi apparatus and are also present along dendrites and axons, including growth cones. Altogether, our results suggest that the different members of the stathmin family have complementary, at least partially distinct functions in neuronal cell regulation, in particular in relation to MT dynamics. PMID:12111843

  6. Mitochondrial dysfunction precedes depression of AMPK/AKT signaling in insulin resistance induced by high glucose in primary cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yunhua; Liu, Jing; Shi, Le; Tang, Ying; Gao, Dan; Long, Jiangang; Liu, Jiankang

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated brain insulin signaling impairment and mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetes. Hyperinsulinemia and hyperlipidemia arising from diabetes have been linked to neuronal insulin resistance, and hyperglycemia induces peripheral sensory neuronal impairment and mitochondrial dysfunction. However, how brain glucose at diabetic conditions elicits cortical neuronal insulin signaling impairment and mitochondrial dysfunction remains unknown. In the present study, we cultured primary cortical neurons with high glucose levels and investigated the neuronal mitochondrial function and insulin response. We found that mitochondrial function was declined in presence of 10 mmol/L glucose, prior to the depression of AKT signaling in primary cortical neurons. We further demonstrated that the cerebral cortex of db/db mice exhibited both insulin resistance and loss of mitochondrial complex components. Moreover, we found that adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inactivation is involved in high glucose-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance in primary cortical neurons and neuroblastoma cells, as well as in cerebral cortex of db/db mice, and all these impairments can be rescued by mitochondrial activator, resveratrol. Taken together, our results extend the finding that high glucose (≥10 mmol/L) comparable to diabetic brain extracellular glucose level leads to neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction and resultant insulin resistance, and targeting mitochondria-AMPK signaling might be a promising strategy to protect against diabetes-related neuronal impairment in central nerves system. We found that high glucose (≥10 mmol/L), comparable to diabetic brain extracellular glucose level, leads to neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction and resultant insulin resistance in an AMPK-dependent manner, and targeting mitochondria-AMPK signaling might be a promising strategy to protect against diabetes-related neuronal impairment in central

  7. Development of cortical influences on superior colliculus multisensory neurons: Effects of dark-rearing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Liping; Xu, Jinghong; Rowland, Benjamin A.; Stein, Barry E.

    2013-01-01

    Rearing cats from birth to adulthood in darkness prevents neurons in the superior colliculus (SC) from developing the capability to integrate visual and non-visual (e.g., visual-auditory) inputs. Presumably, this developmental anomaly is due to a lack of experience with the combination of those cues, which is essential to form associative links between them. The visual-auditory multisensory integration capacity of SC neurons has also been shown to depend on the functional integrity of converging visual and auditory inputs from ipsilateral association cortex. Disrupting these cortico-collicular projections at any stage of life results in a pattern of outcomes similar to those found after dark-rearing: SC neurons respond to stimuli in both sensory modalities, but cannot integrate the information they provide. Thus, it is possible that dark-rearing compromises the development of these descending tectopetal connections and the essential influences they convey. However, the results of the present experiments, using cortical deactivation to assess the presence of cortico-collicular influences, demonstrate that dark-rearing does not prevent association cortex from developing robust influences over SC multisensory responses. In fact, dark-rearing may increase their potency over that observed in normally-reared animals. Nevertheless, their influences are still insufficient to support SC multisensory integration. It appears that cross-modal experience shapes the cortical influence to selectively enhance responses to cross-modal stimulus combinations that are likely to be derived from the same event. In the absence of this experience, the cortex develops an indiscriminate excitatory influence over its multisensory SC target neurons. PMID:23534923

  8. Donepezil attenuates excitotoxic damage induced by membrane depolarization of cortical neurons exposed to veratridine.

    PubMed

    Akasofu, Shigeru; Sawada, Kohei; Kosasa, Takashi; Hihara, Hiroe; Ogura, Hiroo; Akaike, Akinori

    2008-07-01

    Long-lasting membrane depolarization in cerebral ischemia causes neurotoxicity via increases of intracellular sodium concentration ([Na+]i) and calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). Donepezil has been shown to exert neuroprotective effects in an oxygen-glucose deprivation model. In the present study, we examined the effect of donepezil on depolarization-induced neuronal cell injury resulting from prolonged opening of Na+ channels with veratridine in rat primary-cultured cortical neurons. Veratridine (10 microM)-induced neuronal cell damage was completely prevented by 0.1 microM tetrodotoxin. Pretreatment with donepezil (0.1-10 microM) for 1 day significantly decreased cell death in a concentration-dependent manner, and a potent NMDA receptor antagonist, dizocilpine (MK801), showed a neuroprotective effect at the concentration of 10 microM. The neuroprotective effect of donepezil was not affected by nicotinic or muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists. We further characterized the neuroprotective properties of donepezil by measuring the effect on [Na+]i and [Ca2+]i in cells stimulated with veratridine. At 0.1-10 microM, donepezil significantly and concentration-dependently reduced the veratridine-induced increase of [Ca2+]i, whereas MK801 had no effect. At 10 microM, donepezil significantly decreased the veratridine-induced increase of [Na+]i. We also measured the effect on veratridine-induced release of the excitatory amino acids, glutamate and glycine. While donepezil decreased the release of glutamate and glycine, MK801 did not. In conclusion, our results indicate that donepezil has neuroprotective activity against depolarization-induced toxicity in rat cortical neurons via inhibition of the rapid influx of sodium and calcium ions, and via decrease of glutamate and glycine release, and also that this depolarization-induced toxicity is mediated by glutamate receptor activation. PMID:18508044

  9. Proneural transcription factors regulate different steps of cortical neuron migration through Rnd-mediated inhibition of RhoA signaling.

    PubMed

    Pacary, Emilie; Heng, Julian; Azzarelli, Roberta; Riou, Philippe; Castro, Diogo; Lebel-Potter, Mélanie; Parras, Carlos; Bell, Donald M; Ridley, Anne J; Parsons, Maddy; Guillemot, François

    2011-03-24

    Little is known of the intracellular machinery that controls the motility of newborn neurons. We have previously shown that the proneural protein Neurog2 promotes the migration of nascent cortical neurons by inducing the expression of the atypical Rho GTPase Rnd2. Here, we show that another proneural factor, Ascl1, promotes neuronal migration in the cortex through direct regulation of a second Rnd family member, Rnd3. Both Rnd2 and Rnd3 promote neuronal migration by inhibiting RhoA signaling, but they control distinct steps of the migratory process, multipolar to bipolar transition in the intermediate zone and locomotion in the cortical plate, respectively. Interestingly, these divergent functions directly result from the distinct subcellular distributions of the two Rnd proteins. Because Rnd proteins also regulate progenitor divisions and neurite outgrowth, we propose that proneural factors, through spatiotemporal regulation of Rnd proteins, integrate the process of neuronal migration with other events in the neurogenic program. PMID:21435554

  10. The inhibitory effect of propofol on Kv2.1 potassium channel in rat parietal cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Zhuo; Zhang, Rui; Zeng, Xian-Zhang; Song, Chun-Yu

    2016-03-11

    Excessive K(+) efflux via activated voltage-gated K(+) channels can deplete intracellular K(+) and lead to long-lasting membrane depolarization which will promote neuronal apoptosis during ischemia/hypoxia injury. The Kv2.1 potassium channel was the major component of delayed rectifier potassium current (Ik) in pyramidal neurons in cortex and hippocampus. The neuronal protective effect of propofol has been proved. Delayed rectifier potassium current (Ik) has been shown to have close relationship with neuronal damage. The study was designed to test the inhibitory effect of propofol on Kv2.1 potassium channel in rat parietal cortical neurons. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings and Western blot analysis were used to investigate the electrophysiological function and protein expression of Kv2.1 in rat parietal cortical neurons after propofol treatment. We found that propofol concentration-dependently inhibited Ik in pyramidal neurons. Propofol also caused a downward shift of the I-V curve of Ik at 30μM concentration. Propofol significantly inhibited the expression of Kv2.1 protein level at 30μM, 50μM, 100μM concentration. In conclusion, our data showed that propofol could inhibit Ik, probably via depressing the expression of Kv2.1 protein in rat cerebral parietal cortical neurons. PMID:26828304

  11. Complex Spectral Interactions Encoded by Auditory Cortical Neurons: Relationship Between Bandwidth and Pattern

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Kevin N.; Yin, Pingbo; Petkov, Christopher I.; Sutter, Mitchell L.

    2010-01-01

    The focus of most research on auditory cortical neurons has concerned the effects of rather simple stimuli, such as pure tones or broad-band noise, or the modulation of a single acoustic parameter. Extending these findings to feature coding in more complex stimuli such as natural sounds may be difficult, however. Generalizing results from the simple to more complex case may be complicated by non-linear interactions occurring between multiple, simultaneously varying acoustic parameters in complex sounds. To examine this issue in the frequency domain, we performed a parametric study of the effects of two global features, spectral pattern (here ripple frequency) and bandwidth, on primary auditory (A1) neurons in awake macaques. Most neurons were tuned for one or both variables and most also displayed an interaction between bandwidth and pattern implying that their effects were conditional or interdependent. A spectral linear filter model was able to qualitatively reproduce the basic effects and interactions, indicating that a simple neural mechanism may be able to account for these interdependencies. Our results suggest that the behavior of most A1 neurons is likely to depend on multiple parameters, and so most are unlikely to respond independently or invariantly to specific acoustic features. PMID:21152347

  12. Neurotrophic effects of L-DOPA in postnatal midbrain dopamine neuron/cortical astrocyte cocultures.

    PubMed

    Mena, M A; Davila, V; Sulzer, D

    1997-10-01

    L-DOPA is toxic to catecholamine neurons in culture, but the toxicity is reduced by exposure to astrocytes. We tested the effect of L-DOPA on dopamine neurons using postnatal ventral midbrain neuron/cortical astrocyte cocultures in serum-free, glia-conditioned medium. L-DOPA (50 microM) protected against dopamine neuronal cell death and increased the number and branching of dopamine processes. In contrast to embryonically derived glia-free cultures, where L-DOPA is toxic, postnatal midbrain cultures did not show toxicity at 200 microM L-DOPA. The stereoisomer D-DOPA (50-400 microM) was not neurotrophic. The aromatic amino acid decarboxylase inhibitor carbidopa (25 microM) did not block the neurotrophic effect. These data suggest that the neurotrophic effect of L-DOPA is stereospecific but independent of the production of dopamine. However, L-DOPA increased the level of glutathione. Inhibition of glutathione peroxidase by L-buthionine sulfoximine (3 microM for 24 h) blocked the neurotrophic action of L-DOPA. N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (250 microM for 48 h), which promotes glutathione synthesis, had a neurotrophic effect similar to that of L-DOPA. These data suggest that the neurotrophic effect of L-DOPA may be mediated, at least in part, by elevation of glutathione content. PMID:9326268

  13. A metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist does not mediate neuronal degeneration in cortical culture.

    PubMed

    Koh, J Y; Palmer, E; Lin, A; Cotman, C W

    1991-10-11

    In light of the evidence that calcium plays a critical role in excitotoxic neuronal death, it has been speculated that the metabotropic glutamate receptor may also contribute to excitotoxic damage through the mobilization of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. In the present study we examined this possibility by studying the neurotoxicity of trans-1-amino-cyclopentyl-1,3-dicarboxylate (trans-ACPD), a selective agonist of the metabotropic glutamate receptor. Exposure of cortical neurons to 100 microM trans-ACPD substantially increased phosphoinositide hydrolysis and intraneuronal free calcium in the presence of CPP and CNQX. Despite the presence of functional metabotropic receptors on cultured neurons, however, exposure of cultures to as high as 1 mM trans-ACPD for 24 h failed to produce any morphological or chemical signs of neuronal damage. Furthermore, trans-ACPD did not potentiate submaximal neurotoxicity produced by other non-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) agonists, kainate and D,L-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA). PMID:1666330

  14. Molecular Pathways Underlying Projection Neuron Production and Migration during Cerebral Cortical Development

    PubMed Central

    Ohtaka-Maruyama, Chiaki; Okado, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    Glutamatergic neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex originate from radial glia (RG) progenitors in the ventricular zone (VZ). During corticogenesis, neuroblasts migrate toward the pial surface using two different migration modes. One is multipolar (MP) migration with random directional movement, and the other is locomotion, which is a unidirectional movement guided by the RG fiber. After reaching their final destination, the neurons finalize their migration by terminal translocation, which is followed by maturation via dendrite extension to initiate synaptogenesis and thereby complete neural circuit formation. This switching of migration modes during cortical development is unique in mammals, which suggests that the RG-guided locomotion mode may contribute to the evolution of the mammalian neocortical 6-layer structure. Many factors have been reported to be involved in the regulation of this radial neuronal migration process. In general, the radial migration can be largely divided into four steps; (1) maintenance and departure from the VZ of neural progenitor cells, (2) MP migration and transition to bipolar cells, (3) RG-guided locomotion, and (4) terminal translocation and dendrite maturation. Among these, many different gene mutations or knockdown effects have resulted in failure of the MP to bipolar transition (step 2), suggesting that it is a critical step, particularly in radial migration. Moreover, this transition occurs at the subplate layer. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying each of these steps. Finally, we discuss the evolutionary aspects of neuronal migration in corticogenesis. PMID:26733777

  15. Imaging separation of neuronal from vascular effects of cocaine on rat cortical brain in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Z.; Du, C.; Yuan, Z.; Luo, Z.; Volkow, N.D.; Pan, Y.; Du, C.

    2010-09-08

    MRI techniques to study brain function assume coupling between neuronal activity, metabolism and flow. However, recent evidence of physiological uncoupling between neuronal and cerebrovascular events highlights the need for methods to simultaneously measure these three properties. We report a multimodality optical approach that integrates dual-wavelength laser speckle imaging (measures changes in blood flow, blood volume and hemoglobin oxygenation), digital-frequency-ramping optical coherence tomography (images quantitative 3D vascular network) and Rhod2 fluorescence (images intracellular calcium for measure of neuronal activity) at high spatiotemporal resolutions (30 {micro}m, 10 Hz) and over a large field of view (3 x 5 mm{sup 2}). We apply it to assess cocaine's effects in rat cortical brain and show an immediate decrease 3.5 {+-} 0.9 min, phase (1) in the oxygen content of hemoglobin and the cerebral blood flow followed by an overshoot 7.1 {+-} 0.2 min, phase (2) lasting over 20 min whereas Ca{sup 2+} increased immediately (peaked at t = 4.1 {+-} 0.4 min) and remained elevated. This enabled us to identify a delay (2.9 {+-} 0.5 min) between peak neuronal and vascular responses in phase 2. The ability of this multimodality optical approach for simultaneous imaging at high spatiotemporal resolutions permits us to distinguish the vascular versus cellular changes of the brain, thus complimenting other neuroimaging modalities for brain functional studies (e. g., PET, fMRI).

  16. Molecular Pathways Underlying Projection Neuron Production and Migration during Cerebral Cortical Development.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka-Maruyama, Chiaki; Okado, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    Glutamatergic neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex originate from radial glia (RG) progenitors in the ventricular zone (VZ). During corticogenesis, neuroblasts migrate toward the pial surface using two different migration modes. One is multipolar (MP) migration with random directional movement, and the other is locomotion, which is a unidirectional movement guided by the RG fiber. After reaching their final destination, the neurons finalize their migration by terminal translocation, which is followed by maturation via dendrite extension to initiate synaptogenesis and thereby complete neural circuit formation. This switching of migration modes during cortical development is unique in mammals, which suggests that the RG-guided locomotion mode may contribute to the evolution of the mammalian neocortical 6-layer structure. Many factors have been reported to be involved in the regulation of this radial neuronal migration process. In general, the radial migration can be largely divided into four steps; (1) maintenance and departure from the VZ of neural progenitor cells, (2) MP migration and transition to bipolar cells, (3) RG-guided locomotion, and (4) terminal translocation and dendrite maturation. Among these, many different gene mutations or knockdown effects have resulted in failure of the MP to bipolar transition (step 2), suggesting that it is a critical step, particularly in radial migration. Moreover, this transition occurs at the subplate layer. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying each of these steps. Finally, we discuss the evolutionary aspects of neuronal migration in corticogenesis. PMID:26733777

  17. FMRP regulates multipolar to bipolar transition affecting neuronal migration and cortical circuitry.

    PubMed

    La Fata, Giorgio; Gärtner, Annette; Domínguez-Iturza, Nuria; Dresselaers, Tom; Dawitz, Julia; Poorthuis, Rogier B; Averna, Michele; Himmelreich, Uwe; Meredith, Rhiannon M; Achsel, Tilmann; Dotti, Carlos G; Bagni, Claudia

    2014-12-01

    Deficiencies in fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) are the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability, fragile X syndrome (FXS), with symptoms manifesting during infancy and early childhood. Using a mouse model for FXS, we found that Fmrp regulates the positioning of neurons in the cortical plate during embryonic development, affecting their multipolar-to-bipolar transition (MBT). We identified N-cadherin, which is crucial for MBT, as an Fmrp-regulated target in embryonic brain. Furthermore, spontaneous network activity and high-resolution brain imaging revealed defects in the establishment of neuronal networks at very early developmental stages, further confirmed by an unbalanced excitatory and inhibitory network. Finally, reintroduction of Fmrp or N-cadherin in the embryo normalized early postnatal neuron activity. Our findings highlight the critical role of Fmrp in the developing cerebral cortex and might explain some of the clinical features observed in patients with FXS, such as alterations in synaptic communication and neuronal network connectivity. PMID:25402856

  18. Modeling the Formation Process of Grouping Stimuli Sets through Cortical Columns and Microcircuits to Feature Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Adam

    2013-01-01

    A computational model of a self-structuring neuronal net is presented in which repetitively applied pattern sets induce the formation of cortical columns and microcircuits which decode distinct patterns after a learning phase. In a case study, it is demonstrated how specific neurons in a feature classifier layer become orientation selective if they receive bar patterns of different slopes from an input layer. The input layer is mapped and intertwined by self-evolving neuronal microcircuits to the feature classifier layer. In this topical overview, several models are discussed which indicate that the net formation converges in its functionality to a mathematical transform which maps the input pattern space to a feature representing output space. The self-learning of the mathematical transform is discussed and its implications are interpreted. Model assumptions are deduced which serve as a guide to apply model derived repetitive stimuli pattern sets to in vitro cultures of neuron ensembles to condition them to learn and execute a mathematical transform. PMID:24369455

  19. Nuclear phospholipase C-β1 and diacylglycerol LIPASE-α in brain cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    García del Caño, Gontzal; Montaña, Mario; Aretxabala, Xabier; González-Burguera, Imanol; López de Jesús, Maider; Barrondo, Sergio; Sallés, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoinositide (PtdIns) signaling involves the generation of lipid second messengers in response to stimuli in a receptor-mediated manner at the plasma membrane. In neuronal cells of adult brain, the standard model proposes that activation of metabotropic receptors coupled to Phospholipase C-β1 (PLC-β1) is linked to endocannabinoid signaling through the production of diacylglycerol (DAG), which could be systematically metabolized by 1,2-diacylglycerol Lipases (DAGL) to produce an increase of 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG), the most abundant endocannabinoid in the brain. However, the existence of a nuclear PtdIns metabolism independent from that occurring elsewhere in the cell is now widely accepted, suggesting that the nucleus constitutes both a functional and a distinct compartment for PtdIns metabolism. In this review, we shall highlight the main achievements in the field of neuronal nuclear inositol lipid metabolism with particular attention to progress made linked to the 2-AG biosynthesis. Our aim has been to identify potential sites of 2-AG synthesis other than the neuronal cytoplasmic compartment by determining the subcellular localization of PLC-β1 and DAGL-α, which is much more abundant than DAGL-β in brain. Our data show that PLC-β1 and DAGL-α are detected in discrete brain regions, with a marked predominance of pyramidal morphologies of positive cortical cells, consistent with their role in the biosynthesis and release of 2-AG by pyramidal neurons to control their synaptic inputs. However, as novelty, we showed here an integrated description of the localization of PLC-β1 and DAGL-α in the neuronal nuclear compartment. We discuss our comparative analysis of the expression patterns of PLC-β1 and DAGL-α, providing some insight into the potential autocrine role of 2-AG production in the neuronal nuclear compartment that probably subserve additional roles to the recognized activation of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor. PMID:24076015

  20. Spatiotemporal memory is an intrinsic property of networks of dissociated cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Ju, Han; Dranias, Mark R; Banumurthy, Gokulakrishna; VanDongen, Antonius M J

    2015-03-01

    The ability to process complex spatiotemporal information is a fundamental process underlying the behavior of all higher organisms. However, how the brain processes information in the temporal domain remains incompletely understood. We have explored the spatiotemporal information-processing capability of networks formed from dissociated rat E18 cortical neurons growing in culture. By combining optogenetics with microelectrode array recording, we show that these randomly organized cortical microcircuits are able to process complex spatiotemporal information, allowing the identification of a large number of temporal sequences and classification of musical styles. These experiments uncovered spatiotemporal memory processes lasting several seconds. Neural network simulations indicated that both short-term synaptic plasticity and recurrent connections are required for the emergence of this capability. Interestingly, NMDA receptor function is not a requisite for these short-term spatiotemporal memory processes. Indeed, blocking the NMDA receptor with the antagonist APV significantly improved the temporal processing ability of the networks, by reducing spontaneously occurring network bursts. These highly synchronized events have disastrous effects on spatiotemporal information processing, by transiently erasing short-term memory. These results show that the ability to process and integrate complex spatiotemporal information is an intrinsic property of generic cortical networks that does not require specifically designed circuits. PMID:25740531

  1. The mechanisms of generation and propagation of synchronized bursting in developing networks of cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Maeda, E; Robinson, H P; Kawana, A

    1995-10-01

    The characteristics and mechanisms of synchronized firing in developing networks of cultured cortical neurons were studied using multisite recording through planar electrode arrays (PEAs). With maturation of the network (from 3 to 40 d after plating), the frequency and propagation velocity of bursts increased markedly (approximately from 0.01 to 0.5 Hz and from 5 to 100 mm/sec, respectively), and the sensitivity to extracellular magnesium concentration (0-10 mM) decreased. The source of spontaneous bursts, estimated from the relative delay of onset of activity between electrodes, varied randomly with each burst. Physical separation of synchronously bursting networks into several parts using an ultraviolet laser, divided synchronous bursting into different frequencies and phases in each part. Focal stimulation through the PEA was effective at multiple sites in eliciting bursts, which propagated over the network from the site of stimulation. Stimulated bursts exhibited both an absolute refractory period and a relative refractory period, in which partially propagating bursts could be elicited. Periodic electrical stimulation (at 1 to 30 sec intervals) produced slower propagation velocities and smaller numbers of spikes per burst at shorter stimulation intervals. These results suggest that the generation and propagation of spontaneous synchronous bursts in cultured cortical neurons is governed by the level of spontaneous presynaptic firing, by the degree of connectivity of the network, and by a distributed balance between excitation and recovery processes. PMID:7472441

  2. TRPV1 stimulation triggers apoptotic cell death of rat cortical neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Shirakawa, Hisashi; Yamaoka, Tomoko; Sanpei, Kazuaki; Sasaoka, Hirotoshi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2008-12-26

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) functions as a polymodal nociceptor and is activated by several vanilloids, including capsaicin, protons and heat. Although TRPV1 channels are widely distributed in the brain, their roles remain unclear. Here, we investigated the roles of TRPV1 in cytotoxic processes using TRPV1-expressing cultured rat cortical neurons. Capsaicin induced severe neuronal death with apoptotic features, which was completely inhibited by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine and was dependent on extracellular Ca{sup 2+} influx. Interestingly, nifedipine, a specific L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel blocker, attenuated capsaicin cytotoxicity, even when applied 2-4 h after the capsaicin. ERK inhibitor PD98059 and several antioxidants, but not the JNK and p38 inhibitors, attenuated capsaicin cytotoxicity. Together, these data indicate that TRPV1 activation triggers apoptotic cell death of rat cortical cultures via L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel opening, Ca{sup 2+} influx, ERK phosphorylation, and reactive oxygen species production.

  3. Neuroprotective effect of the endogenous neural peptide apelin in cultured mouse cortical neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xiang Jun; Yu, Shan Ping; Zhang, Like; Wei, Ling

    2010-07-01

    The adipocytokine apelin and its G protein-coupled APJ receptor were initially isolated from a bovine stomach and have been detected in the brain and cardiovascular system. Recent studies suggest that apelin can protect cardiomyocytes from ischemic injury. Here, we investigated the effect of apelin on apoptosis in mouse primary cultures of cortical neurons. Exposure of the cortical cultures to a serum-free medium for 24 h induced nuclear fragmentation and apoptotic death; apelin-13 (1.0-5.0 nM) markedly prevented the neuronal apoptosis. Apelin neuroprotective effects were mediated by multiple mechanisms. Apelin-13 reduced serum deprivation (SD)-induced ROS generation, mitochondria depolarization, cytochrome c release and activation of caspase-3. Apelin-13 prevented SD-induced changes in phosphorylation status of Akt and ERK1/2. In addition, apelin-13 attenuated NMDA-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} accumulation. These results indicate that apelin is an endogenous neuroprotective adipocytokine that may block apoptosis and excitotoxic death via cellular and molecular mechanisms. It is suggested that apelins may be further explored as a potential neuroprotective reagent for ischemia-induced brain damage.

  4. Dysregulated expression of neuregulin-1 by cortical pyramidal neurons disrupts synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit; Zhang, Mingyue; Trembak-Duff, Irina; Unterbarnscheidt, Tilmann; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Dibaj, Payam; Martins de Souza, Daniel; Boretius, Susann; Brzózka, Magdalena M; Steffens, Heinz; Berning, Sebastian; Teng, Zenghui; Gummert, Maike N; Tantra, Martesa; Guest, Peter C; Willig, Katrin I; Frahm, Jens; Hell, Stefan W; Bahn, Sabine; Rossner, Moritz J; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Zhang, Weiqi; Schwab, Markus H

    2014-08-21

    Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) gene variants are associated with increased genetic risk for schizophrenia. It is unclear whether risk haplotypes cause elevated or decreased expression of NRG1 in the brains of schizophrenia patients, given that both findings have been reported from autopsy studies. To study NRG1 functions in vivo, we generated mouse mutants with reduced and elevated NRG1 levels and analyzed the impact on cortical functions. Loss of NRG1 from cortical projection neurons resulted in increased inhibitory neurotransmission, reduced synaptic plasticity, and hypoactivity. Neuronal overexpression of cysteine-rich domain (CRD)-NRG1, the major brain isoform, caused unbalanced excitatory-inhibitory neurotransmission, reduced synaptic plasticity, abnormal spine growth, altered steady-state levels of synaptic plasticity-related proteins, and impaired sensorimotor gating. We conclude that an "optimal" level of NRG1 signaling balances excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the cortex. Our data provide a potential pathomechanism for impaired synaptic plasticity and suggest that human NRG1 risk haplotypes exert a gain-of-function effect. PMID:25131210

  5. Generation of human cortical neurons from a new immortal fetal neural stem cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Cacci, E.; Villa, A.; Parmar, M.; Cavallaro, M.; Mandahl, N.; Lindvall, O.; Martinez-Serrano, A.; Kokaia, Z. . E-mail: Zaal.Kokaia@med.lu.se

    2007-02-01

    Isolation and expansion of neural stem cells (NSCs) of human origin are crucial for successful development of cell therapy approaches in neurodegenerative diseases. Different epigenetic and genetic immortalization strategies have been established for long-term maintenance and expansion of these cells in vitro. Here we report the generation of a new, clonal NSC (hc-NSC) line, derived from human fetal cortical tissue, based on v-myc immortalization. Using immunocytochemistry, we show that these cells retain the characteristics of NSCs after more than 50 passages. Under proliferation conditions, when supplemented with epidermal and basic fibroblast growth factors, the hc-NSCs expressed neural stem/progenitor cell markers like nestin, vimentin and Sox2. When growth factors were withdrawn, proliferation and expression of v-myc and telomerase were dramatically reduced, and the hc-NSCs differentiated into glia and neurons (mostly glutamatergic and GABAergic, as well as tyrosine hydroxylase-positive, presumably dopaminergic neurons). RT-PCR analysis showed that the hc-NSCs retained expression of Pax6, Emx2 and Neurogenin2, which are genes associated with regionalization and cell commitment in cortical precursors during brain development. Our data indicate that this hc-NSC line could be useful for exploring the potential of human NSCs to replace dead or damaged cortical cells in animal models of acute and chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Taking advantage of its clonality and homogeneity, this cell line will also be a valuable experimental tool to study the regulatory role of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in human NSC biology.

  6. In Utero Electroporation: Assay System for Migration of Cerebral Cortical Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabata, Hidenori; Nakajima, Kazunori

    During the development of the cerebral cortex, the majority of cortical neurons are generated in the ventricular zone (VZ) facing the lateral ventricle and then migrate toward the pial surface to form the highly organized 6-layered cerebral cortex. Detailed profiles of these processes and their molecular mechanisms had been largely unknown because of the absence of an efficient assay system. The in vivo electroporation system was initially devised for use within chick embryos (Funahashi et al., 1999; Itasaki et al., 1999; Momose et al., 1999; Muramatsu et al., 1997), and we and other groups have used that system as a basis for developing an in utero electroporation system, which allows plasmid DNA to be introduced into cortical progenitor cells in developing mouse embryos in the uterus (Fukuchi-Shimogori and Grove, 2001; Saito and Nakatsuji, 2001; Tabata and Nakajima, 2001; Takahashi et al., 2002). In utero electroporation of other sites in the brain, including the hippocampus (Navarro-Quiroga et al., 2007), cerebral basal ganglia (Borrell et al., 2005; Nakahira et al., 2006), cortical hem (Takiguchi-Hayashi et al., 2004), and dorsal thalamus (Bonnin et al., 2007), has recently been reported. Introducing green fluorescent protein (GFP) enables the entire processes of migration and layer formation to be visualized (Ajioka and Nakajima, 2005; Sasaki et al., 2008; Tabata and Nakajima, 2002, 2003), and the role of any gene involved in these processes can be easily assessed by overexpressing the proteins or their mutants (Ohshima et al., 2007), or by knocking down the genes by the RNA interference technique (Bai et al., 2003). Furthermore, the Tet-On/Off system and/or other plasmid- vector-based technologies will expand the potential of the analyses. In this section we review the principles and methods of gene transfer into the cortical wall of mouse embryos by means of the in utero electroporation system.

  7. Tissue-type plasminogen activator induces synaptic vesicle endocytosis in cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Yepes, M; Wu, F; Torre, E; Cuellar-Giraldo, D; Jia, D; Cheng, L

    2016-04-01

    The release of the serine proteinase tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) from the presynaptic terminal of cerebral cortical neurons plays a central role in the development of synaptic plasticity, adaptation to metabolic stress and neuronal survival. Our earlier studies indicate that by inducing the recruitment of the cytoskeletal protein βII-spectrin and voltage-gated calcium channels to the active zone, tPA promotes Ca(2+)-dependent translocation of synaptic vesicles (SVs) to the synaptic release site where they release their load of neurotransmitters into the synaptic cleft. Here we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro experiments to investigate whether this effect leads to depletion of SVs in the presynaptic terminal. Our data indicate that tPA promotes SV endocytosis via a mechanism that does not require the conversion of plasminogen into plasmin. Instead, we show that tPA induces calcineurin-mediated dynamin I dephosphorylation, which is followed by dynamin I-induced recruitment of the actin-binding protein profilin II to the presynaptic membrane, and profilin II-induced F-actin formation. We report that this tPA-induced sequence of events leads to the association of newly formed SVs with F-actin clusters in the endocytic zone. In summary, the data presented here indicate that following the exocytotic release of neurotransmitters tPA activates the mechanism whereby SVs are retrieved from the presynaptic membrane and endocytosed to replenish the pool of vesicles available for a new cycle of exocytosis. Together, these results indicate that in murine cerebral cortical neurons tPA plays a central role coupling SVs exocytosis and endocytosis. PMID:26820595

  8. The dynamic brain: from spiking neurons to neural masses and cortical fields.

    PubMed

    Deco, Gustavo; Jirsa, Viktor K; Robinson, Peter A; Breakspear, Michael; Friston, Karl

    2008-01-01

    The cortex is a complex system, characterized by its dynamics and architecture, which underlie many functions such as action, perception, learning, language, and cognition. Its structural architecture has been studied for more than a hundred years; however, its dynamics have been addressed much less thoroughly. In this paper, we review and integrate, in a unifying framework, a variety of computational approaches that have been used to characterize the dynamics of the cortex, as evidenced at different levels of measurement. Computational models at different space-time scales help us understand the fundamental mechanisms that underpin neural processes and relate these processes to neuroscience data. Modeling at the single neuron level is necessary because this is the level at which information is exchanged between the computing elements of the brain; the neurons. Mesoscopic models tell us how neural elements interact to yield emergent behavior at the level of microcolumns and cortical columns. Macroscopic models can inform us about whole brain dynamics and interactions between large-scale neural systems such as cortical regions, the thalamus, and brain stem. Each level of description relates uniquely to neuroscience data, from single-unit recordings, through local field potentials to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), electroencephalogram (EEG), and magnetoencephalogram (MEG). Models of the cortex can establish which types of large-scale neuronal networks can perform computations and characterize their emergent properties. Mean-field and related formulations of dynamics also play an essential and complementary role as forward models that can be inverted given empirical data. This makes dynamic models critical in integrating theory and experiments. We argue that elaborating principled and informed models is a prerequisite for grounding empirical neuroscience in a cogent theoretical framework, commensurate with the achievements in the physical sciences. PMID

  9. EGFR mediates astragaloside IV-induced Nrf2 activation to protect cortical neurons against in vitro ischemia/reperfusion damages.

    PubMed

    Gu, Da-Min; Lu, Pei-Hua; Zhang, Ke; Wang, Xiang; Sun, Min; Chen, Guo-Qian; Wang, Qiong

    2015-02-13

    In this study, we tested the potential role of astragaloside IV (AS-IV) against oxygen and glucose deprivation/re-oxygenation (OGD/R)-induced damages in murine cortical neurons, and studied the associated signaling mechanisms. AS-IV exerted significant neuroprotective effects against OGD/R by reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, thereby attenuating oxidative stress and neuronal cell death. We found that AS-IV treatment in cortical neurons resulted in NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling activation, evidenced by Nrf2 Ser-40 phosphorylation, and its nuclear localization, as well as transcription of antioxidant-responsive element (ARE)-regulated genes: heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1) and sulphiredoxin 1 (SRXN-1). Knockdown of Nrf2 through lentiviral shRNAs prevented AS-IV-induced ARE genes transcription, and abolished its anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities. Further, we discovered that AS-IV stimulated heparin-binding-epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) release to trans-activate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in cortical neurons. Blockage or silencing EGFR prevented Nrf2 activation by AS-IV, thus inhibiting AS-IV-mediated anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities against OGD/R. In summary, AS-IV protects cortical neurons against OGD/R damages through activating of EGFR-Nrf2 signaling. PMID:25582778

  10. Orbitofrontal cortical neurons encode expectation-driven initiation of reward-seeking.

    PubMed

    Moorman, David E; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2014-07-30

    Adaptive execution and inhibition of behavior are guided by the activity of neuronal populations across multiple frontal cortical areas. The rodent medial prefrontal cortex has been well studied with respect to these behaviors, influencing behavioral execution/inhibition based on context. Other frontal regions, in particular the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), are critical in directing behavior to obtain rewards, but the relationship between OFC neuronal activity and response execution or inhibition has been poorly characterized. In particular, little is known about OFC with respect to extinction learning, an important example of context-guided response inhibition. Here, we recorded the activity of OFC neurons while rats performed a discriminative-stimulus (DS)-driven sucrose-seeking task followed by multiple days of extinction of the DS. OFC neuronal activity was maximally responsive (1) to reward-predicting stimuli (RS) that triggered a lever press (i.e., lever-response initiation) and (2) during reward-well approach in pursuit of sucrose (i.e., well-response initiation). RS presentation that was not followed by a lever press or RS presentation during extinction produced weak activation, as did nonrewarded stimulus (NS) presentation regardless of response (press or withhold) or session (DS-sucrose or extinction). Activity related to nonrewarded well entry was minor, and activity was significantly inhibited during reward consumption. Finally, OFC neuronal activity switched selectivity to track rewarded behaviors when the RS/NS contingencies were reversed. Thus, rather than signaling variables related to extinction or response inhibition, activity in OFC was strongest at the initiation of multiple components of reward-seeking behavior, most prominently when valid reward-predicting cues drove these behaviors. PMID:25080585

  11. Graded defragmentation of cortical neuronal firing during recovery of consciousness in rats.

    PubMed

    Vizuete, J A; Pillay, S; Ropella, K M; Hudetz, A G

    2014-09-01

    State-dependent neuronal firing patterns reflect changes in ongoing information processing and cortical function. A disruption of neuronal coordination has been suggested as the neural correlate of anesthesia. Here, we studied the temporal correlation patterns of ongoing spike activity, during a stepwise reduction of the volatile anesthetic desflurane, in the cerebral cortex of freely moving rats. We hypothesized that the recovery of consciousness from general anesthesia is accompanied by specific changes in the spatiotemporal pattern and correlation of neuronal activity. Sixty-four contact microelectrode arrays were chronically implanted in the primary visual cortex (contacts spanning 1.4-mm depth and 1.4-mm width) for recording of extracellular unit activity at four steady-state levels of anesthesia (8-2% desflurane) and wakefulness. Recovery of consciousness was defined as the regaining of the righting reflex (near 4%). High-intensity firing (HI) periods were segmented using a threshold (200-ms) representing the minimum in the neurons' bimodal interspike interval histogram under anesthesia. We found that the HI periods were highly fragmented in deep anesthesia and gradually transformed to a near-continuous firing pattern at wakefulness. As the anesthetic was withdrawn, HI periods became longer and increasingly correlated among the units both locally and across remote recording sites. Paradoxically, in 4 of 8 animals, HI correlation was also high at the deepest level of anesthesia (8%) when local field potentials (LFP) were burst-suppressed. We conclude that recovery from desflurane anesthesia is accompanied by a graded defragmentation of neuronal activity in the cerebral cortex. Hypersynchrony during deep anesthesia is an exception that occurs only with LFP burst suppression. PMID:24952333

  12. Orbitofrontal Cortical Neurons Encode Expectation-Driven Initiation of Reward-Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Aston-Jones, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive execution and inhibition of behavior are guided by the activity of neuronal populations across multiple frontal cortical areas. The rodent medial prefrontal cortex has been well studied with respect to these behaviors, influencing behavioral execution/inhibition based on context. Other frontal regions, in particular the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), are critical in directing behavior to obtain rewards, but the relationship between OFC neuronal activity and response execution or inhibition has been poorly characterized. In particular, little is known about OFC with respect to extinction learning, an important example of context-guided response inhibition. Here, we recorded the activity of OFC neurons while rats performed a discriminative-stimulus (DS)-driven sucrose-seeking task followed by multiple days of extinction of the DS. OFC neuronal activity was maximally responsive (1) to reward-predicting stimuli (RS) that triggered a lever press (i.e., lever-response initiation) and (2) during reward-well approach in pursuit of sucrose (i.e., well-response initiation). RS presentation that was not followed by a lever press or RS presentation during extinction produced weak activation, as did nonrewarded stimulus (NS) presentation regardless of response (press or withhold) or session (DS-sucrose or extinction). Activity related to nonrewarded well entry was minor, and activity was significantly inhibited during reward consumption. Finally, OFC neuronal activity switched selectivity to track rewarded behaviors when the RS/NS contingencies were reversed. Thus, rather than signaling variables related to extinction or response inhibition, activity in OFC was strongest at the initiation of multiple components of reward-seeking behavior, most prominently when valid reward-predicting cues drove these behaviors. PMID:25080585

  13. Rosuvastatin induces delayed preconditioning against L-glutamate excitotoxicity in cultured cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Domoki, Ferenc; Kis, Béla; Gáspár, Tamás; Snipes, James A.; Bari, Ferenc; Busija, David W.

    2009-01-01

    We tested whether rosuvastatin (RST) protected against excitotoxic neuronal cell death in rat primary cortical neuronal cultures. L-glutamate (200µM, 1h) reduced neuronal viability (% of naive controls, mean±SEM, n=8–32, *p<0.05) from 100±2% to 60±1%*, but pretreatment with RST (0.5 µM, 3 days) increased survival to 88±2%*. RST-induced neuroprotection was not affected by coapplication with mevalonate (10µM), although the same dose of mevalonate fully prevented the neurotoxic effects of a high dose (20µM) of RST. RST (0.5 µM) pretreatment did not affect mitochondrial membrane potential or superoxide anion levels in quiescent neurons. However, RST pretreatment blunted elevations in free intracellular Ca2+ and reduced increases in superoxide anion levels following glutamate exposure. Manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD), copper-zinc SOD, catalase, and reduced glutathione levels were unaffected by RST pretreatment. In contrast, acute, one time RST application did not affect either baseline or L-glutamate-induced increases in superoxide levels. In summary, 3- day RST pretreatment induces resistance to the excitotoxic effect of L-glutamate in cultured neurons apparently by a mechanism that is independent of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A- reductase inhibition. The delayed neuroprotection by RST against excitotoxicity does not involve sustained mitochondrial depolarization or superoxide anion production as initiating events, although it is associated with reduced Ca2+ influx and superoxide anion production upon L-glutamate challenge. PMID:19931334

  14. Effects of Vinpocetine on mitochondrial function and neuroprotection in primary cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Tárnok, K; Kiss, E; Luiten, P G M; Nyakas, C; Tihanyi, K; Schlett, K; Eisel, U L M

    2008-12-01

    Vinpocetine (ethyl apovincaminate), a synthetic derivative of the Vinca minor alkaloid vincamine, is widely used for the treatment of cerebrovascular-related diseases. One of the proposed mechanisms underlying its action is to protect against the cytotoxic effects of glutamate overexposure. Glutamate excitotoxicity leads to the disregulation of mitochondrial function and neuronal metabolism. As Vinpocetine has a binding affinity to the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) involved in the mitochondrial transition pore complex, we investigated whether neuroprotection can be at least partially due to Vinpocetine's effects on PBRs. Neuroprotective effects of PK11195 and Ro5-4864, two drugs with selective and high affinity to PBR, were compared to Vinpocetine in glutamate excitotoxicity assays on primary cortical neuronal cultures. Vinpocetine exerted a neuroprotective action in a 1-50microM concentration range while PK11195 and Ro5-4864 were only slightly neuroprotective, especially in high (>25microM) concentrations. Combined pretreatment of neuronal cultures with Vinpocetine and PK11195 or Ro5-4864 showed increased neuroprotection in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that the different drugs may have different targets. To test this hypothesis, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) of cultured neurons was measured by flow cytometry. 25microM Vinpocetine reduced the decrease of mitochondrial inner membrane potential induced by glutamate exposure, but Ro5-4864 in itself was found to be more potent to block glutamate-evoked changes in MMP. Combination of Ro5-4864 and Vinpocetine treatment was found to be even more effective. In summary, the present results indicate that the neuroprotective action of vinpocetine in culture can not be explained by its effect on neuronal PBRs alone and that additional drug targets are involved. PMID:18793690

  15. Lycopene Prevents Amyloid [Beta]-Induced Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress and Dysfunctions in Cultured Rat Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Qu, Mingyue; Jiang, Zheng; Liao, Yuanxiang; Song, Zhenyao; Nan, Xinzhong

    2016-06-01

    Brains affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD) show a large spectrum of mitochondrial alterations at both morphological and genetic level. The causal link between β-amyloid (Aβ) and mitochondrial dysfunction has been established in cellular models of AD. We observed previously that lycopene, a member of the carotenoid family of phytochemicals, could counteract neuronal apoptosis and cell damage induced by Aβ and other neurotoxic substances, and that this neuroprotective action somehow involved the mitochondria. The present study aims to investigate the effects of lycopene on mitochondria in cultured rat cortical neurons exposed to Aβ. It was found that lycopene attenuated Aβ-induced oxidative stress, as evidenced by the decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondria-derived superoxide production. Additionally, lycopene ameliorated Aβ-induced mitochondrial morphological alteration, opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pores and the consequent cytochrome c release. Lycopene also improved mitochondrial complex activities and restored ATP levels in Aβ-treated neuron. Furthermore, lycopene prevented mitochondrial DNA damages and improved the protein level of mitochondrial transcription factor A in mitochondria. Those results indicate that lycopene protects mitochondria against Aβ-induced damages, at least in part by inhibiting mitochondrial oxidative stress and improving mitochondrial function. These beneficial effects of lycopene may account for its protection against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:26816095

  16. Cultured Cortical Neurons Can Perform Blind Source Separation According to the Free-Energy Principle.

    PubMed

    Isomura, Takuya; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Blind source separation is the computation underlying the cocktail party effect--a partygoer can distinguish a particular talker's voice from the ambient noise. Early studies indicated that the brain might use blind source separation as a signal processing strategy for sensory perception and numerous mathematical models have been proposed; however, it remains unclear how the neural networks extract particular sources from a complex mixture of inputs. We discovered that neurons in cultures of dissociated rat cortical cells could learn to represent particular sources while filtering out other signals. Specifically, the distinct classes of neurons in the culture learned to respond to the distinct sources after repeating training stimulation. Moreover, the neural network structures changed to reduce free energy, as predicted by the free-energy principle, a candidate unified theory of learning and memory, and by Jaynes' principle of maximum entropy. This implicit learning can only be explained by some form of Hebbian plasticity. These results are the first in vitro (as opposed to in silico) demonstration of neural networks performing blind source separation, and the first formal demonstration of neuronal self-organization under the free energy principle. PMID:26690814

  17. Intracellular oxidative stress and cytotoxicity in rat primary cortical neurons exposed to cholesterol secoaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Raghavamenon, Achuthan C; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Babu, Sainath; D'Auvergne, Oswald; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Kadowitz, Philip J; Uppu, Rao M

    2009-08-14

    Cholesterol secoaldehyde (ChSeco or 3beta-hydroxy-5-oxo-5,6-secocholestan-6-al) has been shown to induce Abeta aggregation and apoptosis in GT1-7 hypothalamic neurons. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of ChSeco on rat primary cortical neuronal cells. ChSeco was cytotoxic at concentrations ranging from 5 to 20 microM, while cholesterol of comparable concentrations showed little or no toxicity. In ChSeco-exposed neuronal cells, there was an increased formation of intracellular peroxide or peroxide-like substance(s), the levels of which were comparable to those found in typical menadione exposures. There was a loss in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, the extent of which was dependent on concentration of ChSeco employed. Pre-treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (5 mM; 1 h) offered protection against the cytotoxicity and the generation of intracellular oxidants. Cytotoxicity of ChSeco was evidenced by the loss of axonal branches and also condensed apoptotic nuclei in these cells. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a decreased intracellular Abeta42 staining proportional to the loss in the axonal out growth and dendritic branches. The observed decrease in Abeta42 has been suggested to be due to loss of integrity of dendrites and the plasma membrane, possibly resulting from increased production of reactive oxygen species. PMID:19505436

  18. Bidirectional Regulation of Innate and Learned Behaviors That Rely on Frequency Discrimination by Cortical Inhibitory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Aizenberg, Mark; Mwilambwe-Tshilobo, Laetitia; Briguglio, John J.; Natan, Ryan G.; Geffen, Maria N.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to discriminate tones of different frequencies is fundamentally important for everyday hearing. While neurons in the primary auditory cortex (AC) respond differentially to tones of different frequencies, whether and how AC regulates auditory behaviors that rely on frequency discrimination remains poorly understood. Here, we find that the level of activity of inhibitory neurons in AC controls frequency specificity in innate and learned auditory behaviors that rely on frequency discrimination. Photoactivation of parvalbumin-positive interneurons (PVs) improved the ability of the mouse to detect a shift in tone frequency, whereas photosuppression of PVs impaired the performance. Furthermore, photosuppression of PVs during discriminative auditory fear conditioning increased generalization of conditioned response across tone frequencies, whereas PV photoactivation preserved normal specificity of learning. The observed changes in behavioral performance were correlated with bidirectional changes in the magnitude of tone-evoked responses, consistent with predictions of a model of a coupled excitatory-inhibitory cortical network. Direct photoactivation of excitatory neurons, which did not change tone-evoked response magnitude, did not affect behavioral performance in either task. Our results identify a new function for inhibition in the auditory cortex, demonstrating that it can improve or impair acuity of innate and learned auditory behaviors that rely on frequency discrimination. PMID:26629746

  19. Reaction-diffusion waves in neuronal tissue and the window of cortical excitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlem, M. A.; Müller, S. C.

    2004-07-01

    Spreading depression (SD) is a dynamic wave phenomenon occurring in all gray matter regions of the central nervous systems (CNS). It is characterized by a sudden breakdown of neuronal activity and accompanied by a massive influx and efflux of ions across the membrane of neurons. The retina is a constituent of the CNS in which one can easily observe the dynamic behavior of the SD wave fronts, because SD changes the optical properties of the tissue. There is ample evidence that SD belongs to the self-organization processes due to the coupling of reaction with diffusion in excitable medium. It is assumed that the occurrence of SD is associated with some neurological symptoms of migraine with aura. A frequently reported aura symptom is a traveling visual blind region (scotoma) with a preceding figure of scintillating line segments. The characteristic form and development of the scotoma suggests that the underlying phenomenon is a wave propagating through the primary visual cortex, most likely the cortical spreading depression. In this article we discuss similarities between SD waves and the migraine aura on the basis of properties of reaction-diffusion waves known from other excitable media. In particular, the propagation velocities, the shape and the dynamics of the waves are compared with each other. We find that the assumption of the neuronal tissue to be in a state of only weak excitability explains some properties of the migraine aura, such as the confined appearance and its propagation with a stable velocity.

  20. NPAS4 Facilitates the Autophagic Clearance of Endogenous Tau in Rat Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenhui; Long, Yan; Lai, Yujie; Wang, Xuefeng; Chen, Guojun; Zhu, Binglin

    2016-04-01

    Tau, a microtubule-binding phosphoprotein, plays a critical role in the stabilisation of microtubules and neuronal function. However, hyperphosphorylated tau is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other tauopathies. The facilitation of tau clearance is now regarded as a valid therapeutic strategy for these neurodegenerative tauopathies. Here, we provide the first demonstration that the over-expression of neuronal PAS domain protein 4 (NPAS4)-induced autophagy and effectively facilitated the clearance of endogenous total and phosphorylated tau in rat primary cortical neurons. Moreover, the activation of autophagy by serum depletion significantly decreased endogenous total and phosphorylated tau levels. Autophagy inhibitors, such as 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine (CQ), induced tau aggregation. However, NPAS4 over-expression reversed the aggregation of tau that was induced by the inhibition of autophagy. Interestingly, proteasome inhibition by MG132, had no effect on autophagy, but did reduce tau levels, indicating that NPAS4 may also degrade tau proteins through an unknown proteasome-mediated mechanism. Furthermore, NPAS4 did not alter the activity of two major tau kinases, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5). Taken together, the results indicate that targeting NPAS4 could provide a therapeutic approach for the treatment of AD and other tauopathies. PMID:26635026

  1. Bidirectional Regulation of Innate and Learned Behaviors That Rely on Frequency Discrimination by Cortical Inhibitory Neurons.

    PubMed

    Aizenberg, Mark; Mwilambwe-Tshilobo, Laetitia; Briguglio, John J; Natan, Ryan G; Geffen, Maria N

    2015-12-01

    The ability to discriminate tones of different frequencies is fundamentally important for everyday hearing. While neurons in the primary auditory cortex (AC) respond differentially to tones of different frequencies, whether and how AC regulates auditory behaviors that rely on frequency discrimination remains poorly understood. Here, we find that the level of activity of inhibitory neurons in AC controls frequency specificity in innate and learned auditory behaviors that rely on frequency discrimination. Photoactivation of parvalbumin-positive interneurons (PVs) improved the ability of the mouse to detect a shift in tone frequency, whereas photosuppression of PVs impaired the performance. Furthermore, photosuppression of PVs during discriminative auditory fear conditioning increased generalization of conditioned response across tone frequencies, whereas PV photoactivation preserved normal specificity of learning. The observed changes in behavioral performance were correlated with bidirectional changes in the magnitude of tone-evoked responses, consistent with predictions of a model of a coupled excitatory-inhibitory cortical network. Direct photoactivation of excitatory neurons, which did not change tone-evoked response magnitude, did not affect behavioral performance in either task. Our results identify a new function for inhibition in the auditory cortex, demonstrating that it can improve or impair acuity of innate and learned auditory behaviors that rely on frequency discrimination. PMID:26629746

  2. Visual and noxious electrical stimulus-evoked membrane-potential responses in anterior cingulate cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li-Qing; Ning, Li; Wang, Zhiru; Wang, Ying-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is known to participate in numerous brain functions, such as memory storage, emotion, attention, as well as perception of acute and chronic pain. ACC-dependent brain functions often rely on ACC processing of various forms of environmental information. To understand the neural basis of ACC functions, previous studies have investigated ACC responses to environmental stimulation, particularly complex sensory stimuli as well as award and aversive stimuli, but this issue remains to be further clarified. Here, by performing whole-cell recording in vivo in anaesthetized adult rats, we examined membrane-potential (MP) responses of layer II/III ACC neurons that were evoked by a brief flash of visual stimulation and pain-related electrical stimulation delivered to hind paws. We found that ~54 and ~81 % ACC neurons exhibited excitatory MP responses, subthreshold or suprathreshold, to the visual stimulus and the electrical stimulus, respectively, with no cell showing inhibitory MP responses. We further found that the visually evoked ACC response could be greatly diminished by local lidocaine infusion in the visual thalamus, and only their temporal patterns but not amplitudes could be changed by large-scale visual cortical lesions. Our in vivo whole-cell recording data characterized in ACC neurons a visually evoked response, which was largely dependent on the visual thalamus but not visual cortex, as well as a noxious electrical stimulus-evoked response. These findings may provide potential mechanisms that are used for ACC functions on the basis of sensory information processing. PMID:27585569

  3. Cultured Cortical Neurons Can Perform Blind Source Separation According to the Free-Energy Principle

    PubMed Central

    Isomura, Takuya; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Blind source separation is the computation underlying the cocktail party effect––a partygoer can distinguish a particular talker’s voice from the ambient noise. Early studies indicated that the brain might use blind source separation as a signal processing strategy for sensory perception and numerous mathematical models have been proposed; however, it remains unclear how the neural networks extract particular sources from a complex mixture of inputs. We discovered that neurons in cultures of dissociated rat cortical cells could learn to represent particular sources while filtering out other signals. Specifically, the distinct classes of neurons in the culture learned to respond to the distinct sources after repeating training stimulation. Moreover, the neural network structures changed to reduce free energy, as predicted by the free-energy principle, a candidate unified theory of learning and memory, and by Jaynes’ principle of maximum entropy. This implicit learning can only be explained by some form of Hebbian plasticity. These results are the first in vitro (as opposed to in silico) demonstration of neural networks performing blind source separation, and the first formal demonstration of neuronal self-organization under the free energy principle. PMID:26690814

  4. Minimal Hodgkin-Huxley type models for different classes of cortical and thalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Pospischil, Martin; Toledo-Rodriguez, Maria; Monier, Cyril; Piwkowska, Zuzanna; Bal, Thierry; Frégnac, Yves; Markram, Henry; Destexhe, Alain

    2008-11-01

    We review here the development of Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) type models of cerebral cortex and thalamic neurons for network simulations. The intrinsic electrophysiological properties of cortical neurons were analyzed from several preparations, and we selected the four most prominent electrophysiological classes of neurons. These four classes are "fast spiking", "regular spiking", "intrinsically bursting" and "low-threshold spike" cells. For each class, we fit "minimal" HH type models to experimental data. The models contain the minimal set of voltage-dependent currents to account for the data. To obtain models as generic as possible, we used data from different preparations in vivo and in vitro, such as rat somatosensory cortex and thalamus, guinea-pig visual and frontal cortex, ferret visual cortex, cat visual cortex and cat association cortex. For two cell classes, we used automatic fitting procedures applied to several cells, which revealed substantial cell-to-cell variability within each class. The selection of such cellular models constitutes a necessary step towards building network simulations of the thalamocortical system with realistic cellular dynamical properties. PMID:19011929

  5. Effect of Anatomically Realistic Full-Head Model on Activation of Cortical Neurons in Subdural Cortical Stimulation—A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyeon; Kim, Donghyeon; Jun, Sung Chan

    2016-01-01

    Electrical brain stimulation (EBS) is an emerging therapy for the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of EBS have been used to determine the optimal parameters for highly cost-effective electrotherapy. Recent notable growth in computing capability has enabled researchers to consider an anatomically realistic head model that represents the full head and complex geometry of the brain rather than the previous simplified partial head model (extruded slab) that represents only the precentral gyrus. In this work, subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS) was found to offer a better understanding of the differential activation of cortical neurons in the anatomically realistic full-head model than in the simplified partial-head models. We observed that layer 3 pyramidal neurons had comparable stimulation thresholds in both head models, while layer 5 pyramidal neurons showed a notable discrepancy between the models; in particular, layer 5 pyramidal neurons demonstrated asymmetry in the thresholds and action potential initiation sites in the anatomically realistic full-head model. Overall, the anatomically realistic full-head model may offer a better understanding of layer 5 pyramidal neuronal responses. Accordingly, the effects of using the realistic full-head model in SuCS are compelling in computational modeling studies, even though this modeling requires substantially more effort. PMID:27273817

  6. Effect of Anatomically Realistic Full-Head Model on Activation of Cortical Neurons in Subdural Cortical Stimulation-A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyeon; Kim, Donghyeon; Jun, Sung Chan

    2016-01-01

    Electrical brain stimulation (EBS) is an emerging therapy for the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of EBS have been used to determine the optimal parameters for highly cost-effective electrotherapy. Recent notable growth in computing capability has enabled researchers to consider an anatomically realistic head model that represents the full head and complex geometry of the brain rather than the previous simplified partial head model (extruded slab) that represents only the precentral gyrus. In this work, subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS) was found to offer a better understanding of the differential activation of cortical neurons in the anatomically realistic full-head model than in the simplified partial-head models. We observed that layer 3 pyramidal neurons had comparable stimulation thresholds in both head models, while layer 5 pyramidal neurons showed a notable discrepancy between the models; in particular, layer 5 pyramidal neurons demonstrated asymmetry in the thresholds and action potential initiation sites in the anatomically realistic full-head model. Overall, the anatomically realistic full-head model may offer a better understanding of layer 5 pyramidal neuronal responses. Accordingly, the effects of using the realistic full-head model in SuCS are compelling in computational modeling studies, even though this modeling requires substantially more effort. PMID:27273817

  7. Effect of Anatomically Realistic Full-Head Model on Activation of Cortical Neurons in Subdural Cortical Stimulation—A Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hyeon; Kim, Donghyeon; Jun, Sung Chan

    2016-06-01

    Electrical brain stimulation (EBS) is an emerging therapy for the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of EBS have been used to determine the optimal parameters for highly cost-effective electrotherapy. Recent notable growth in computing capability has enabled researchers to consider an anatomically realistic head model that represents the full head and complex geometry of the brain rather than the previous simplified partial head model (extruded slab) that represents only the precentral gyrus. In this work, subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS) was found to offer a better understanding of the differential activation of cortical neurons in the anatomically realistic full-head model than in the simplified partial-head models. We observed that layer 3 pyramidal neurons had comparable stimulation thresholds in both head models, while layer 5 pyramidal neurons showed a notable discrepancy between the models; in particular, layer 5 pyramidal neurons demonstrated asymmetry in the thresholds and action potential initiation sites in the anatomically realistic full-head model. Overall, the anatomically realistic full-head model may offer a better understanding of layer 5 pyramidal neuronal responses. Accordingly, the effects of using the realistic full-head model in SuCS are compelling in computational modeling studies, even though this modeling requires substantially more effort.

  8. Differential Tiam1/Rac1 activation in hippocampal and cortical neurons mediates differential spine shrinkage in response to oxygen/glucose deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Suárez, Elena; Fiuza, Maria; Liu, Xun; Chakkarapani, Elavazhagan; Hanley, Jonathan G

    2014-01-01

    Distinct neuronal populations show differential sensitivity to global ischemia, with hippocampal CA1 neurons showing greater vulnerability compared to cortical neurons. The mechanisms that underlie differential vulnerability are unclear, and we hypothesize that intrinsic differences in neuronal cell biology are involved. Dendritic spine morphology changes in response to ischemic insults in vivo, but cell type-specific differences and the molecular mechanisms leading to such morphologic changes are unexplored. To directly compare changes in spine size in response to oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) in cortical and hippocampal neurons, we used separate and equivalent cultures of each cell type. We show that cortical neurons exhibit significantly greater spine shrinkage compared to hippocampal neurons. Rac1 is a Rho-family GTPase that regulates the actin cytoskeleton and is involved in spine dynamics. We show that Rac1 and the Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Tiam1 are differentially activated by OGD in hippocampal and cortical neurons. Hippocampal neurons express more Tiam1 than cortical neurons, and reducing Tiam1 expression in hippocampal neurons by shRNA enhances OGD-induced spine shrinkage. Tiam1 knockdown also reduces hippocampal neuronal vulnerability to OGD. This work defines fundamental differences in signalling pathways that regulate spine morphology in distinct neuronal populations that may have a role in the differential vulnerability to ischemia. PMID:25248834

  9. CNTF-ACM promotes mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in cortical neurons through upregulating L-type calcium channel activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meiqun; Liu, Hongli; Xu, Huanbai; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaojing

    2016-09-01

    A specialized culture medium termed ciliary neurotrophic factor-treated astrocyte-conditioned medium (CNTF-ACM) allows investigators to assess the peripheral effects of CNTF-induced activated astrocytes upon cultured neurons. CNTF-ACM has been shown to upregulate neuronal L-type calcium channel current activity, which has been previously linked to changes in mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate CNTF-ACM's effects upon mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in rat cortical neurons. Cortical neurons, CNTF-ACM, and untreated control astrocyte-conditioned medium (UC-ACM) were prepared from neonatal Sprague-Dawley rat cortical tissue. Neurons were cultured in either CNTF-ACM or UC-ACM for a 48-h period. Changes in the following parameters before and after treatment with the L-type calcium channel blocker isradipine were assessed: (i) intracellular calcium levels, (ii) mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), (iii) oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) formation, (iv) intracellular nitric oxide (NO) levels, (v) mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and (vi) susceptibility to the mitochondrial complex I toxin rotenone. CNTF-ACM neurons displayed the following significant changes relative to UC-ACM neurons: (i) increased intracellular calcium levels (p < 0.05), (ii) elevation in ΔΨm (p < 0.05), (iii) increased OCR and ATP formation (p < 0.05), (iv) increased intracellular NO levels (p < 0.05), (v) increased mitochondrial ROS production (p < 0.05), and (vi) increased susceptibility to rotenone (p < 0.05). Treatment with isradipine was able to partially rescue these negative effects of CNTF-ACM (p < 0.05). CNTF-ACM promotes mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in cortical neurons through elevating L-type calcium channel activity. PMID:27514537

  10. Monoaminergic substrates underlying cocaine-induced enhancement of somatosensory-evoked discharges in rat barrel field cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, B D; Gould, E M; Bekavac, I

    1996-11-01

    Previously, we have described a selective potentiating effect of systemically administered cocaine (0.25-1.0 mg/kg i.v.) on long-latency excitatory responses (E2) of rat "barrel field" cortical neurons to mystacial vibrissae stimulation. The rat trigeminal system receives both norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-HT)-containing afferents, but only minimal input from dopaminergic sources. The goal of the present study was to determine which of these monoamine systems was responsible for the previously observed facilitating action of cocaine on E2 responses of barrel field cortical neurons. Two approaches were used: 1) evaluation of cocaine effects on cortical neuron responses to whisker stimulation in NE- or 5-HT-depleted animals and 2) assessment of the effects of selective monoamine uptake blockers on cortical neuron responses to whisker deflection. Extracellular recordings were obtained from spontaneously active neurons in the barrel field cortex of halothane-anesthetized rats. Spontaneous activity and cellular responses to mechanical displacement of a single whisker were monitored before and after systemic (i.v.) administration of either cocaine or one of the following selective uptake blockers, fluoxetine (5-HT), desipramine (NE) and GBR12909 (dopamine). Cocaine-induced increases in the E2 response were observed in N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4, noradrenergic neurotoxin)-treated animals, but were reduced or abolished in p-chlorophenylalanine-treated (5-HT depletion) rats. Fluoxetine and desipramine, but not GBR12909, produced cocaine-like potentiation of the E2 response to whisker stimulation. These results point to a 5-HT-dependent mechanism as the substrate underlying cocaine's facilitating effects on long-latency somatosensory cortical neuron responses to receptive field stimulation. PMID:8930160

  11. Bcl11a (Ctip1) Controls Migration of Cortical Projection Neurons through Regulation of Sema3c.

    PubMed

    Wiegreffe, Christoph; Simon, Ruth; Peschkes, Katharina; Kling, Carolin; Strehle, Michael; Cheng, Jin; Srivatsa, Swathi; Liu, Pentao; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G; Tarabykin, Victor; Britsch, Stefan

    2015-07-15

    During neocortical development, neurons undergo polarization, oriented migration, and layer-type-specific differentiation. The transcriptional programs underlying these processes are not completely understood. Here, we show that the transcription factor Bcl11a regulates polarity and migration of upper layer neurons. Bcl11a-deficient late-born neurons fail to correctly switch from multipolar to bipolar morphology, resulting in impaired radial migration. We show that the expression of Sema3c is increased in migrating Bcl11a-deficient neurons and that Bcl11a is a direct negative regulator of Sema3c transcription. In vivo gain-of-function and rescue experiments demonstrate that Sema3c is a major downstream effector of Bcl11a required for the cell polarity switch and for the migration of upper layer neurons. Our data uncover a novel Bcl11a/Sema3c-dependent regulatory pathway used by migrating cortical neurons. PMID:26182416

  12. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Modulates Cortical Neuronal Activity in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marceglia, Sara; Mrakic-Sposta, Simona; Rosa, Manuela; Ferrucci, Roberta; Mameli, Francesca; Vergari, Maurizio; Arlotti, Mattia; Ruggiero, Fabiana; Scarpini, Elio; Galimberti, Daniela; Barbieri, Sergio; Priori, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) showed that Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by increased theta power, decreased alpha and beta power, and decreased coherence in the alpha and theta band in posterior regions. These abnormalities are thought to be associated with functional disconnections among cortical areas, death of cortical neurons, axonal pathology, and cholinergic deficits. Since transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) over the temporo-parietal area is thought to have beneficial effects in patients with AD, in this study we aimed to investigate whether tDCS benefits are related to tDCS-induced changes in cortical activity, as represented by qEEG. A weak anodal current (1.5 mA, 15 min) was delivered bilaterally over the temporal-parietal lobe to seven subjects with probable AD (Mini-Mental State Examination, MMSE score >20). EEG (21 electrodes, 10–20 international system) was recorded for 5 min with eyes closed before (baseline, t0) and 30 min after anodal and cathodal tDCS ended (t1). At the same time points, patients performed a Word Recognition Task (WRT) to assess working memory functions. The spectral power and the inter- and intra-hemispheric EEG coherence in different frequency bands (e.g., low frequencies, including delta and theta; high frequencies, including alpha and beta) were calculated for each subject at t0 and t1. tDCS-induced changes in EEG neurophysiological markers were correlated with the performance of patients at the WRT. At baseline, qEEG features in AD patients confirmed that the decreased high frequency power was correlated with lower MMSE. After anodal tDCS, we observed an increase in the high-frequency power in the temporo-parietal area and an increase in the temporo-parieto-occipital coherence that correlated with the improvement at the WRT. In addition, cathodal tDCS produced a non-specific effect of decreased theta power all over the scalp that was not correlated with the clinical observation at the WRT

  13. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Modulates Cortical Neuronal Activity in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Marceglia, Sara; Mrakic-Sposta, Simona; Rosa, Manuela; Ferrucci, Roberta; Mameli, Francesca; Vergari, Maurizio; Arlotti, Mattia; Ruggiero, Fabiana; Scarpini, Elio; Galimberti, Daniela; Barbieri, Sergio; Priori, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) showed that Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by increased theta power, decreased alpha and beta power, and decreased coherence in the alpha and theta band in posterior regions. These abnormalities are thought to be associated with functional disconnections among cortical areas, death of cortical neurons, axonal pathology, and cholinergic deficits. Since transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) over the temporo-parietal area is thought to have beneficial effects in patients with AD, in this study we aimed to investigate whether tDCS benefits are related to tDCS-induced changes in cortical activity, as represented by qEEG. A weak anodal current (1.5 mA, 15 min) was delivered bilaterally over the temporal-parietal lobe to seven subjects with probable AD (Mini-Mental State Examination, MMSE score >20). EEG (21 electrodes, 10-20 international system) was recorded for 5 min with eyes closed before (baseline, t0) and 30 min after anodal and cathodal tDCS ended (t1). At the same time points, patients performed a Word Recognition Task (WRT) to assess working memory functions. The spectral power and the inter- and intra-hemispheric EEG coherence in different frequency bands (e.g., low frequencies, including delta and theta; high frequencies, including alpha and beta) were calculated for each subject at t0 and t1. tDCS-induced changes in EEG neurophysiological markers were correlated with the performance of patients at the WRT. At baseline, qEEG features in AD patients confirmed that the decreased high frequency power was correlated with lower MMSE. After anodal tDCS, we observed an increase in the high-frequency power in the temporo-parietal area and an increase in the temporo-parieto-occipital coherence that correlated with the improvement at the WRT. In addition, cathodal tDCS produced a non-specific effect of decreased theta power all over the scalp that was not correlated with the clinical observation at the WRT

  14. Differences in the strength of cortical and brainstem inputs to SSA and non-SSA neurons in the inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Yaneri A.; Udeh, Adanna; Dutta, Kelsey; Bishop, Deborah; Malmierca, Manuel S.; Oliver, Douglas L.

    2015-01-01

    In an ever changing auditory scene, change detection is an ongoing task performed by the auditory brain. Neurons in the midbrain and auditory cortex that exhibit stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA) may contribute to this process. Those neurons adapt to frequent sounds while retaining their excitability to rare sounds. Here, we test whether neurons exhibiting SSA and those without are part of the same networks in the inferior colliculus (IC). We recorded the responses to frequent and rare sounds and then marked the sites of these neurons with a retrograde tracer to correlate the source of projections with the physiological response. SSA neurons were confined to the non-lemniscal subdivisions and exhibited broad receptive fields, while the non-SSA were confined to the central nucleus and displayed narrow receptive fields. SSA neurons receive strong inputs from auditory cortical areas and very poor or even absent projections from the brainstem nuclei. On the contrary, the major sources of inputs to the neurons that lacked SSA were from the brainstem nuclei. These findings demonstrate that auditory cortical inputs are biased in favor of IC synaptic domains that are populated by SSA neurons enabling them to compare top-down signals with incoming sensory information from lower areas. PMID:25993334

  15. Memantine protects rat cortical cultured neurons against beta-amyloid-induced toxicity by attenuating tau phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Song, M S; Rauw, G; Baker, G B; Kar, S

    2008-11-01

    It has been suggested that accumulation of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide triggers neurodegeneration, at least in part, via glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. This is supported by observations that toxicity induced by Abeta peptide in cultured neurons and in adult rat brain is known to be mediated by activation of glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Additionally, recent clinical studies have shown that memantine, a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, can significantly improve cognitive functions in some AD patients. However, very little is currently known about the potential role of memantine against Abeta-induced toxicity. In the present study, we have shown that Abeta(1-42)-induced toxicity in rat primary cortical cultured neurons is accompanied by increased extracellular and decreased intracellular glutamate levels. We subsequently demonstrated that Abeta toxicity is induced by increased phosphorylation of tau protein and activation of tau kinases, i.e. glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2. Additionally, Abeta treatment induced cleavage of caspase-3 and decreased phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element binding protein, which are critical in determining survival of neurons. Memantine treatment significantly protected cultured neurons against Abeta-induced toxicity by attenuating tau-phosphorylation and its associated signaling mechanisms. However, this drug did not alter either conformation or internalization of Abeta(1-42) and it was unable to attenuate Abeta-induced potentiation of extracellular glutamate levels. These results, taken together, provide new insights into the possible neuroprotective action of memantine in AD pathology. PMID:19046381

  16. Neuron-specific stimulus masking reveals interference in spike timing at the cortical level.

    PubMed

    Larson, Eric; Maddox, Ross K; Perrone, Ben P; Sen, Kamal; Billimoria, Cyrus P

    2012-02-01

    The auditory system is capable of robust recognition of sounds in the presence of competing maskers (e.g., other voices or background music). This capability arises despite the fact that masking stimuli can disrupt neural responses at the cortical level. Since the origins of such interference effects remain unknown, in this study, we work to identify and quantify neural interference effects that originate due to masking occurring within and outside receptive fields of neurons. We record from single and multi-unit auditory sites from field L, the auditory cortex homologue in zebra finches. We use a novel method called spike timing-based stimulus filtering that uses the measured response of each neuron to create an individualized stimulus set. In contrast to previous adaptive experimental approaches, which have typically focused on the average firing rate, this method uses the complete pattern of neural responses, including spike timing information, in the calculation of the receptive field. When we generate and present novel stimuli for each neuron that mask the regions within the receptive field, we find that the time-varying information in the neural responses is disrupted, degrading neural discrimination performance and decreasing spike timing reliability and sparseness. We also find that, while removing stimulus energy from frequency regions outside the receptive field does not significantly affect neural responses for many sites, adding a masker in these frequency regions can nonetheless have a significant impact on neural responses and discriminability without a significant change in the average firing rate. These findings suggest that maskers can interfere with neural responses by disrupting stimulus timing information with power either within or outside the receptive fields of neurons. PMID:21964794

  17. Graded defragmentation of cortical neuronal firing during recovery of consciousness in rats

    PubMed Central

    VIZUETE, JEANNETTE A.; PILLAY, SIVESHIGAN; ROPELLA, KRISTINA M.; HUDETZ, ANTHONY G.

    2014-01-01

    State-dependent neuronal firing patterns reflect changes in ongoing information processing and cortical function. A disruption of neuronal coordination has been suggested as the neural correlate of anesthesia. Here, we studied the temporal correlation patterns of ongoing spike activity, during a stepwise reduction of the volatile anesthetic desflurane, in the cerebral cortex of freely moving rats. We hypothesized that the recovery of consciousness from general anesthesia is accompanied by specific changes in the spatiotemporal pattern and correlation of neuronal activity. Sixty-four contact microelectrode arrays were chronically implanted in primary visual cortex (contacts spanning 1.4 mm depth and 1.4 mm width) for recording of extracellular unit activity at four steady-state levels of anesthesia (8%–2% desflurane) and wakefulness. Recovery of consciousness was defined as the regaining of the righting reflex (near 4%). High-intensity firing (HI) periods were segmented using a threshold (200 ms) representing the minimum in the neurons’ bimodal interspike interval histogram under anesthesia. We found that the HI periods were highly fragmented in deep anesthesia and gradually transformed to a near-continuous firing pattern at wakefulness. As the anesthetic was withdrawn, HI periods became longer and increasingly correlated among the units both locally and across remote recording sites. Paradoxically, in 4 of 8 animals, HI correlation was also high at the deepest level of anesthesia (8%) when local field potentials (LFP) were burst-suppressed. We conclude that recovery from desflurane anesthesia is accompanied by a graded defragmentation of neuronal activity in the cerebral cortex. Hypersynchrony during deep anesthesia is an exception that occurs only with LFP burst suppression. PMID:24952333

  18. Inferring learning rules from distributions of firing rates in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sukbin; McKee, Jillian L; Woloszyn, Luke; Amit, Yali; Freedman, David J; Sheinberg, David L; Brunel, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Information about external stimuli is thought to be stored in cortical circuits through experience-dependent modifications of synaptic connectivity. These modifications of network connectivity should lead to changes in neuronal activity as a particular stimulus is repeatedly encountered. Here we ask what plasticity rules are consistent with the differences in the statistics of the visual response to novel and familiar stimuli in inferior temporal cortex, an area underlying visual object recognition. We introduce a method that allows one to infer the dependence of the presumptive learning rule on postsynaptic firing rate, and we show that the inferred learning rule exhibits depression for low postsynaptic rates and potentiation for high rates. The threshold separating depression from potentiation is strongly correlated with both mean and s.d. of the firing rate distribution. Finally, we show that network models implementing a rule extracted from data show stable learning dynamics and lead to sparser representations of stimuli. PMID:26523643

  19. Evaluation of the Neuroactivity of ToxCast Compounds Using Multi-well Microelectrode Array Recordings in Primary Cortical Neurons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of the Neuroactivity of ToxCast Compounds Using Multi-well Microelectrode Array Recordings in Primary Cortical Neurons P Valdivia1, M Martin2, WR LeFew3, D Hall3, J Ross1, K Houck2 and TJ Shafer3 1Axion Biosystems, Atlanta GA and 2NCCT, 3ISTD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RT...

  20. VGluT1+ Neuronal Glutamatergic Signaling Regulates Postnatal Developmental Maturation of Cortical Protoplasmic Astroglia

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Lydie; Higashimori, Haruki; Tolman, Michaela

    2014-01-01

    Functional maturation of astroglia is characterized by the development of a unique, ramified morphology and the induction of important functional proteins, such as glutamate transporter GLT1. Although pathways regulating the early fate specification of astroglia have been characterized, mechanisms regulating postnatal maturation of astroglia remain essentially unknown. Here we used a new in vivo approach to illustrate and quantitatively analyze developmental arborization of astroglial processes. Our analysis found a particularly high increase in the number of VGluT1+ neuronal glutamatergic synapses that are ensheathed by processes from individual developing astroglia from postnatal day (P) 14 to P26, when astroglia undergo dramatic postnatal maturation. Subsequent silencing of VGluT1+ synaptic activity in VGluT1 KO mice significantly reduces astroglial domain growth and the induction of GLT1 in the cortex, but has no effect on astroglia in the hypothalamus, where non-VGluT1+ synaptic signaling predominates. In particular, electron microscopy analysis showed that the loss of VGluT1+ synaptic signaling significantly decreases perisynaptic enshealthing of astroglial processes on synapses. To further determine whether synaptically released glutamate mediates VGluT1+ synaptic signaling, we pharmacologically inhibited and genetically ablated metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs, especially mGluR5) in developing cortical astroglia and found that developmental arborization of astroglial processes and expression of functional proteins, such as GLT1, is significantly decreased. In summary, our genetic analysis provides new in vivo evidence that VGluT1+ glutamatergic signaling, mediated by the astroglial mGluR5 receptor, regulates the functional maturation of cortical astroglia during development. These results elucidate a new mechanism for regulating the developmental formation of functional neuron-glia synaptic units. PMID:25122895

  1. Neurotoxicity of Ecstasy metabolites in rat cortical neurons, and influence of hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Capela, João Paulo; Meisel, Andreas; Abreu, Artur Reis; Branco, Paula Sério; Ferreira, Luísa Maria; Lobo, Ana Maria; Remião, Fernando; Bastos, Maria Lurdes; Carvalho, Félix

    2006-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "Ecstasy") is a widely abused, psychoactive recreational drug. There is growing evidence that the MDMA neurotoxic profile may be highly dependent on both its hepatic metabolism and body temperature. Metabolism of MDMA involves N-demethylation to 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), which is also a drug of abuse. MDMA and MDA are O-demethylenated to N-methyl-alpha-methyldopamine (N-Me-alpha-MeDA) and alpha-methyldopamine (alpha-MeDA), respectively, both of which are catechols that can undergo oxidation to the corresponding ortho-quinones. In the presence of glutathione (GSH), ortho-quinones may be conjugated with GSH to form glutathionyl adducts. In this study, we evaluated the neurotoxicity of MDMA and three of its metabolites obtained by synthesis, N-Me-alpha-MeDA, alpha-MeDA, and 5-(GSH)-alpha-MeDA [5-(glutathion-S-yl)-alpha-methyldopamine] in rat cortical neuronal serum-free cultures under normal (36.5 degrees C) and hyperthermic (40 degrees C) conditions. Cell viability was assessed, and the mechanism of cell death was also evaluated. Our study shows that these metabolites are more neurotoxic [5-(GSH)-alpha-MeDA being the most toxic] than the parent compound MDMA. The neurotoxicity of MDMA metabolites was partially prevented by the antioxidants N-acetylcystein and also, in a minor extent, by alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone. All the tested compounds induced apoptotic cell death in cortical neurons, and their neurotoxic effect was potentiated under hyperthermic conditions. These data suggest that MDMA metabolites, especially under hyperthermic conditions, contribute to MDMA-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:16183702

  2. Interplay between kinesin-1 and cortical dynein during axonal outgrowth and microtubule organization in Drosophila neurons

    PubMed Central

    del Castillo, Urko; Winding, Michael; Lu, Wen; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how microtubule motors organize microtubules in Drosophila neurons. We showed that, during the initial stages of axon outgrowth, microtubules display mixed polarity and minus-end-out microtubules push the tip of the axon, consistent with kinesin-1 driving outgrowth by sliding antiparallel microtubules. At later stages, the microtubule orientation in the axon switches from mixed to uniform polarity with plus-end-out. Dynein knockdown prevents this rearrangement and results in microtubules of mixed orientation in axons and accumulation of microtubule minus-ends at axon tips. Microtubule reorganization requires recruitment of dynein to the actin cortex, as actin depolymerization phenocopies dynein depletion, and direct recruitment of dynein to the membrane bypasses the actin requirement. Our results show that cortical dynein slides ‘minus-end-out’ microtubules from the axon, generating uniform microtubule arrays. We speculate that differences in microtubule orientation between axons and dendrites could be dictated by differential activity of cortical dynein. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10140.001 PMID:26615019

  3. Responses of primate cortical neurons to unitary and binary taste stimuli.

    PubMed

    Miyaoka, Y; Pritchard, T C

    1996-01-01

    1. The responses of 126 neurons in primary gustatory cortices of two rhesus monkeys were recorded during sapid stimulation of the tongue with 18 taste stimuli. Ten of these stimuli were dissolved in distilled water (DW): 1.0 M sucrose (Suc), 0.1 M and 0.03 M sodium chloride (NaCl), 0.003 M hydrochloric acid (HCl), 0.001 M quinine hydrochloride (QHCl), 0.03 M monosodium glutamate (MSG), 0.03 M polycose, 0.3 M glycine, 0.1 M proline, and 0.1 M malic acid. Seven other stimuli were dissolved in 0.03 M MSG; the last stimulus was a mixture of 1.0 M Suc and 0.03 M NaCl. 2. The average spontaneous rate (2.2 +/- 0.2 spikes/s, mean +/- SE) and response to DW (2.5 +/- 0.2) of these 126 neurons was low but within the range previously reported for neurons in primate taste cortex. Suc was the most effective stimulus for 24.1% of the neurons tested followed by NaCl (15.7%), QHCl (14.8%), HCl (11.1%), MSG (10.2%), and other miscellaneous unitary gustatory stimuli (8.3%). Binary taste mixtures were the most effective stimuli for 15.7% of the sample. The net responses (corrected for DW, in spikes/s) for Suc-best (3.3), NaCl-best (4.3), HCl-best (3.4), QHCl-best (2.3), and MSG-best (4.1) were sluggish, but comparable with that reported previously. 3. The response breadth of the 82 neurons that responded best to either Suc, NaCl, HCl, or QHCl measured with the entropy coefficient indicated a moderate response breadth for these neurons (mean = 0.79; range = 0.30-0.98). According to the response criteria adopted in this experiment (water response +/- 1.96 SD), however, 81 of these 82 neurons (98.1%) responded to only one or two of the four basic taste stimuli. The disparity between the entropy- and criterion-based measures of response derive from the nature of the two statistics. Adjustments that would make the entropy statistic less inclusive and the definition of a response according to statistical criteria less exclusive would increase their concordance. 4. Three multivariate

  4. Neonatal seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol or kainic acid disrupt primary cilia growth on developing mouse cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Parker, Alexander K; Le, Megan M; Smith, Tyler S; Hoang-Minh, Lan B; Atkinson, Eric W; Ugartemendia, George; Semple-Rowland, Susan; Coleman, Jason E; Sarkisian, Matthew R

    2016-08-01

    Neonatal or early-life seizures (ELS) are often associated with life-long neurophysiological, cognitive and behavioral deficits, but the underlying mechanisms contributing to these deficits remain poorly understood. Newborn, post-migratory cortical neurons sprout ciliary buds (procilia) that mature into primary cilia. Disruption of the growth or signaling capabilities of these cilia has been linked to atypical neurite outgrowth from neurons and abnormalities in neuronal circuitry. Here, we tested the hypothesis that generalized seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) or kainic acid (KA) during early postnatal development impair neuronal and/or glial ciliogenesis. Mice received PTZ (50 or 100mg/kg), KA (2mg/kg), or saline either once at birth (P0), or once daily from P0 to P4. Using immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy, the cilia of neurons and glia were examined at P7, P14, and P42. A total of 83 regions were analyzed, representing 13 unique neocortical and hippocampal regions. Neuronal cilia were identified by co-expression of NeuN and type 3 adenylyl cyclase (ACIII) or somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), while glial cilia were identified by co-expression of GFAP, Arl13b, and gamma-tubulin. We found that PTZ exposure at either P0 or from P0 to P4 induced convulsive behavior, followed by acute and lasting effects on neuronal cilia lengths that varied depending on the cortical region, PTZ dose, injection frequency, and time post-PTZ. Both increases and decreases in neuronal cilia length were observed. No changes in the length of glial cilia were observed under any of the test conditions. Lastly, we found that a single KA seizure at P0 led to similar abnormalities in neuronal cilia lengths. Our results suggest that seizure(s) occurring during early stages of cortical development induce persistent and widespread changes in neuronal cilia length. Given the impact neuronal cilia have on neuronal differentiation, ELS-induced changes in ciliogenesis may

  5. Somatosensory cortical efferent neurons of the awake rabbit: latencies to activation via supra--and subthreshold receptive fields.

    PubMed

    Swadlow, H A; Hicks, T P

    1996-04-01

    1. Latencies to peripheral sensory stimulation were examined in four classes of antidromically identified efferent neurons in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) of awake rabbits. Both suprathreshold responses (action potentials) and subthreshold responses were examined. Subthreshold responses were examined by monitoring the thresholds of efferent neurons to juxtasomal current pulses (JSCPs) delivered through the recording microelectrode (usually 1-3 microA). Through the use of this method, excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) were manifested as decreases and increases in threshold, respectively. Efferent populations examined included callosal (CC) neurons, ipsilateral corticocortical (C-IC) neurons, and descending corticofugal neurons of layer 5 (CF-5) and layer 6 (CF-6). Very brief air puffs (rise and fall times 0.6 ms) were delivered to the receptor periphery via a high-speed solenoid valve. 2. Whereas all CF-5 neurons had demonstrable suprathreshold excitatory and/or inhibitory responses to peripheral stimulation, most CC, C-IC, and CF-6 neurons did not. CC and CF-6 neurons that yielded no suprathreshold response to the stimulus had lower axonal conduction velocities than those that did respond (P < 0.0001 in both cases). However, subthreshold receptive fields could be demonstrated in many of the otherwise unresponsive CC (81%), C-IC (88%), and CF-6 (43%) neurons. The subthreshold responses usually consisted of an initial excitatory component (a decrease in the threshold to the JSCP) and a subsequent long-duration (> 80 ms) inhibitory component. A few neurons (1 CC, 1 C-IC, and 5 CF-6) showed an initial short latency inhibitory response in the absence of any excitatory component. 3. Some CC and C-IC neurons yielded supra- and/or subthreshold responses to peripheral stimulation at latencies of 6.1-7 ms. All such neurons were found at intermediate cortical depths (thought to correspond to deep layer 2

  6. A stochastic mean field model for an excitatory and inhibitory synaptic drive cortical neuronal network.

    PubMed

    Hui, Qing; Haddad, Wassim M; Bailey, James M; Hayakawa, Tomohisa

    2014-04-01

    With the advances in biochemistry, molecular biology, and neurochemistry there has been impressive progress in understanding the molecular properties of anesthetic agents. However, there has been little focus on how the molecular properties of anesthetic agents lead to the observed macroscopic property that defines the anesthetic state, that is, lack of responsiveness to noxious stimuli. In this paper, we develop a mean field synaptic drive firing rate cortical neuronal model and demonstrate how the induction of general anesthesia can be explained using multistability; the property whereby the solutions of a dynamical system exhibit multiple attracting equilibria under asymptotically slowly changing inputs or system parameters. In particular, we demonstrate multistability in the mean when the system initial conditions or the system coefficients of the neuronal connectivity matrix are random variables. Uncertainty in the system coefficients is captured by representing system uncertain parameters by a multiplicative white noise model wherein stochastic integration is interpreted in the sense of Itô. Modeling a priori system parameter uncertainty using a multiplicative white noise model is motivated by means of the maximum entropy principle of Jaynes and statistical analysis. PMID:24807952

  7. Mitigation of ROS Insults by Streptomyces Secondary Metabolites in Primary Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a common point in neurodegenerative diseases, widely connected with mitochondrial dysfunction. In this study, we screened seven natural products from Streptomyces sources against hydrogen peroxide insult in primary cortical neurons, an oxidative stress in vitro model. We showed the ability of these compounds to inhibit neuronal cytotoxicity and to reduce ROS release after 12 h treatment. Among the tested compounds, the quinone anhydroexfoliamycin and the red pyrrole-type pigment undecylprodigiosin stand out. These two compounds displayed the most complete protection against oxidative stress with mitochondrial function improvement, ROS production inhibition, and increase of antioxidant enzyme levels, glutathione and catalase. Further investigations confirmed that anhydroexfoliamycin acts over the Nrf2-ARE pathway, as a Nrf2 nuclear translocation inductor, and is able to strongly inhibit the effect of the mitochondrial uncoupler FCCP over cytosolic Ca2+, pointing to mitochondria as a cellular target for this molecule. In addition, both compounds were able to reduce caspase-3 activity induced by the apoptotic enhancer staurosporine, but undecylprodigiosin failed to inhibit FCCP effects and it did not act over the Nrf2 pathway as was the case for anhydroexfoliamycin. These results show that Streptomyces metabolites could be useful for the development of new drugs for prevention of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases and cerebral ischemia. PMID:24219236

  8. Synergistic Regulation of Glutamatergic Transmission by Serotonin and Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors in Prefrontal Cortical Neurons*

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Eunice Y.; Qin, Luye; Wei, Jing; Liu, Wenhua; Liu, Aiyi; Yan, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    The monoamine system in the prefrontal cortex has been implicated in various mental disorders and has been the major target of anxiolytics and antidepressants. Clinical studies show that serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) produce better therapeutic effects than single selective reuptake inhibitors, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we found that low dose SNRIs, by acting on 5-HT1A and α2-adrenergic receptors, synergistically reduced AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents and AMPAR surface expression in prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons via a mechanism involving Rab5/dynamin-mediated endocytosis of AMPARs. The synergistic effect of SNRIs on AMPARs was blocked by inhibition of activator of G protein signaling 3, a G protein modulator that prevents reassociation of Gi protein α subunit and prolongs the βγ-mediated signaling pathway. Moreover, the depression of AMPAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents by SNRIs required p38 kinase activity, which was increased by 5-HT1A and α2-adrenergic receptor co-activation in an activator of G protein signaling 3-dependent manner. These results have revealed a potential mechanism for the synergy between the serotonin and norepinephrine systems in the regulation of glutamatergic transmission in cortical neurons. PMID:25056951

  9. Modulation of Presynaptic GABA Release by Oxidative Stress in Mechanically-isolated Rat Cerebral Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hahm, Eu-Teum; Seo, Jung-Woo; Hur, Jinyoung

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), which include hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the superoxide anion (O2-·), and the hydroxyl radical (OH·), are generated as by-products of oxidative metabolism in cells. The cerebral cortex has been found to be particularly vulnerable to production of ROS associated with conditions such as ischemia-reperfusion, Parkinson's disease, and aging. To investigate the effect of ROS on inhibitory GABAergic synaptic transmission, we examined the electrophysiological mechanisms of the modulatory effect of H2O2 on GABAergic miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current (mIPSCs) in mechanically isolated rat cerebral cortical neurons retaining intact synaptic boutons. The membrane potential was voltage-clamped at -60 mV and mIPSCs were recorded and analyzed. Superfusion of 1-mM H2O2 gradually potentiated mIPSCs. This potentiating effect of H2O2 was blocked by the pretreatment with either 10,000-unit/mL catalase or 300-µM N-acetyl-cysteine. The potentiating effect of H2O2 was occluded by an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, and was blocked by a protein kinase A inhibitor, N-(2-[p-bromocinnamylamino] ethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide hydrochloride. This study indicates that oxidative stress may potentiate presynaptic GABA release through the mechanism of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent pathways, which may result in the inhibition of the cerebral cortex neuronal activity. PMID:20631883

  10. Nicotinic modulation of Ca2+ oscillations in rat cortical neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, JianGang; Wang, YaLi; Guo, FangLi; Feng, ZhiBo; Wang, XiangFang; Lu, ChengBiao

    2016-05-01

    The roles of nicotine on Ca(2+) oscillations [intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) oscillation] in rat primary cultured cortical neurons were studied. The spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i oscillations (SCO) were recorded in a portion of the neurons (65%) cultured for 7-10 days in vitro. Application of nicotine enhanced [Ca(2+)]i oscillation frequency and amplitude, which were reduced by the selective α4β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE) hydrobromide, and the selective α7-nAChRs antagonist methyllycaconitine citrate (MLA, 20 nM). DHβE reduced SCO frequency and prevented the nicotinic increase in the frequency. DHβE somewhat enhanced SCO amplitude and prevented nicotinic increase in the amplitude. MLA (20 nM) itself reduced SCO frequency without affecting the amplitude but blocked nicotinic increase in [Ca(2+)]i oscillation frequency and amplitude. Furthermore, coadministration of both α4β2- and α7-nAChRs antagonists completely prevented nicotinic increment in [Ca(2+)]i oscillation frequency and amplitude. Thus, our results indicate that both α4β2- and α7-nAChRs mediated nicotine-induced [Ca(2+)]i oscillations, and two nAChR subtypes differentially regulated SCO. PMID:26843531