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Sample records for receptors form higher

  1. Higher-order assemblies of oligomeric cargo receptor complexes form the membrane scaffold of the Cvt vesicle.

    PubMed

    Bertipaglia, Chiara; Schneider, Sarah; Jakobi, Arjen J; Tarafder, Abul K; Bykov, Yury S; Picco, Andrea; Kukulski, Wanda; Kosinski, Jan; Hagen, Wim Jh; Ravichandran, Arvind C; Wilmanns, Matthias; Kaksonen, Marko; Briggs, John Ag; Sachse, Carsten

    2016-07-01

    Selective autophagy is the mechanism by which large cargos are specifically sequestered for degradation. The structural details of cargo and receptor assembly giving rise to autophagic vesicles remain to be elucidated. We utilize the yeast cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway, a prototype of selective autophagy, together with a multi-scale analysis approach to study the molecular structure of Cvt vesicles. We report the oligomeric nature of the major Cvt cargo Ape1 with a combined 2.8 Å X-ray and negative stain EM structure, as well as the secondary cargo Ams1 with a 6.3 Å cryo-EM structure. We show that the major dodecameric cargo prApe1 exhibits a tendency to form higher-order chain structures that are broken upon interaction with the receptor Atg19 in vitro The stoichiometry of these cargo-receptor complexes is key to maintaining the size of the Cvt aggregate in vivo Using correlative light and electron microscopy, we further visualize key stages of Cvt vesicle biogenesis. Our findings suggest that Atg19 interaction limits Ape1 aggregate size while serving as a vehicle for vacuolar delivery of tetrameric Ams1. PMID:27266708

  2. METABOTROPIC GLUTAMATE TYPE 5, DOPAMINE D2 AND ADENOSINE A2A RECEPTORS FORM HIGHER-ORDER OLIGOMERS IN LIVING CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Cabello, Nuria; Gandía, Jorge; Bertarelli, Daniela C. G.; Watanabe, Masahiko; Lluís, Carme; Franco, Rafael; Ferré, Sergi; Luján, Rafael; Ciruela, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are known to form homo- and heteromers at the plasma membrane, but the stoichiometry of these receptor oligomers are relatively unknown. Here, by using bimolecular fluorescence complementation, we visualized for the first time the occurrence of heterodimers of metabotropic glutamate mGlu5 receptors (mGlu5R) and dopamine D2 receptors (D2R) in living cells. Furthermore, the combination of bimolecular fluorescence complementation and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer techniques, as well as the sequential resonance energy transfer (SRET) technique, allowed us to detect the occurrence receptor oligomers containing more than two protomers, mGlu5R, D2R and adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR). Interestingly, by using high-resolution immunoelectron microscopy we could confirm that the three receptors co-distribute within the extrasynaptic plasma membrane of the same dendritic spines of asymmetrical, putative glutamatergic, striatal synapses. Also, co-immunoprecipitation experiments in native tissue demonstrated the existence of an association of mGlu5R, D2R and A2AR in rat striatum homogenates. Overall, these results provide new insights into the molecular composition of G protein-coupled receptor oligomers in general and the mGlu5R/D2R/A2AR oligomer in particular, a receptor oligomer that might constitute an important target for the treatment of some neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:19344374

  3. Elastic form factors at higher CEBAF energies

    SciTech Connect

    Petratos, G.G.

    1994-04-01

    The prospects for elastic scattering from few body systems with higher beam energies at CEBAF is presented. The deuteron and{sup 3}He elastic structure functions A(Q{sup 2}) can be measured at sufficiently high momentum transfers to study the transition between the conventional meson-nucleon and the constituent quark-gluon descriptions. Possible improvements in the proton magnetic form factor data are also presented.

  4. Olfactory receptor patterning in a higher primate.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Lisa F; Saraiva, Luis R; Kuang, Donghui; Yoon, Kyoung-hye; Buck, Linda B

    2014-09-10

    The mammalian olfactory system detects a plethora of environmental chemicals that are perceived as odors or stimulate instinctive behaviors. Studies using odorant receptor (OR) genes have provided insight into the molecular and organizational strategies underlying olfaction in mice. One important unanswered question, however, is whether these strategies are conserved in primates. To explore this question, we examined the macaque, a higher primate phylogenetically close to humans. Here we report that the organization of sensory inputs in the macaque nose resembles that in mouse in some respects, but not others. As in mouse, neurons with different ORs are interspersed in the macaque nose, and there are spatial zones that differ in their complement of ORs and extend axons to different domains in the olfactory bulb of the brain. However, whereas the mouse has multiple discrete band-like zones, the macaque appears to have only two broad zones. It is unclear whether the organization of OR inputs in a rodent/primate common ancestor degenerated in primates or, alternatively became more sophisticated in rodents. The mouse nose has an additional small family of chemosensory receptors, called trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs), which may detect social cues. Here we find that TAARs are also expressed in the macaque nose, suggesting that TAARs may also play a role in human olfactory perception. We further find that one human TAAR responds to rotten fish, suggesting a possible role as a sentinel to discourage ingestion of food harboring pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:25209267

  5. Olfactory Receptor Patterning in a Higher Primate

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Lisa F.; Saraiva, Luis R.; Kuang, Donghui; Yoon, Kyoung-hye

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian olfactory system detects a plethora of environmental chemicals that are perceived as odors or stimulate instinctive behaviors. Studies using odorant receptor (OR) genes have provided insight into the molecular and organizational strategies underlying olfaction in mice. One important unanswered question, however, is whether these strategies are conserved in primates. To explore this question, we examined the macaque, a higher primate phylogenetically close to humans. Here we report that the organization of sensory inputs in the macaque nose resembles that in mouse in some respects, but not others. As in mouse, neurons with different ORs are interspersed in the macaque nose, and there are spatial zones that differ in their complement of ORs and extend axons to different domains in the olfactory bulb of the brain. However, whereas the mouse has multiple discrete band-like zones, the macaque appears to have only two broad zones. It is unclear whether the organization of OR inputs in a rodent/primate common ancestor degenerated in primates or, alternatively became more sophisticated in rodents. The mouse nose has an additional small family of chemosensory receptors, called trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs), which may detect social cues. Here we find that TAARs are also expressed in the macaque nose, suggesting that TAARs may also play a role in human olfactory perception. We further find that one human TAAR responds to rotten fish, suggesting a possible role as a sentinel to discourage ingestion of food harboring pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:25209267

  6. Two truncated forms of rat insulin receptor-related receptor.

    PubMed

    Itoh, N; Jobo, K; Tsujimoto, K; Ohta, M; Kawasaki, T

    1993-08-25

    The insulin receptor-related receptor (IRR) (1271 amino acids) is expected to have unique functions as a novel member of the insulin receptor family. In this paper, we report two alternatively spliced variants of rat IRR mRNA, which are predicted to encode two truncated forms of IRR, sIRR-1 (410 amino acids) and sIRR-2 (469 amino acids). The amino acid sequence of sIRR-1 is identical to the N-terminal 410-amino acid sequence of IRR. sIRR-2 has an additional 59-amino acid insertion in the C-terminal region. Both truncated forms retain the N-terminal and cysteine-rich domains but lack the transmembrane and intracellular tyrosine kinase domains, indicating that the truncated forms are the secreted forms. The translation products of the truncated form mRNAs were detected in the stomach and kidney by Western analysis. However, the physiological significance of the secreted forms remains to be elucidated. PMID:7688734

  7. Progesterone Receptors: Form and Function in Brain

    PubMed Central

    Brinton, Roberta Diaz; Thompson, Richard F.; Foy, Michael R.; Baudry, Michel; Wang, JunMing; Finch, Caleb E; Morgan, Todd E.; Stanczyk, Frank Z.; Pike, Christian J.; Nilsen, Jon

    2008-01-01

    Emerging data indicate that progesterone has multiple non-reproductive functions in the central nervous system to regulate cognition, mood, inflammation, mitochondrial function, neurogenesis and regeneration, myelination and recovery from traumatic brain injury. Progesterone-regulated neural responses are mediated by an array of progesterone receptors (PR) that include the classic nuclear PRA and PRB receptors and splice variants of each, the seven transmembrane domain 7TMPRβ and the membrane-associated 25-Dx PR (PGRMC1). These PRs induce classic regulation of gene expression while also transducing signaling cascades that originate at the cell membrane and ultimately activate transcription factors. Remarkably, PRs are broadly expressed throughout the brain and can be detected in every neural cell type. The distribution of PRs beyond hypothalamic borders, suggests a much broader role of progesterone in regulating neural function. Despite the large body of evidence regarding progesterone regulation of reproductive behaviors and estrogen-inducible responses as well as effects of progesterone metabolite neurosteroids, much remains to be discovered regarding the functional outcomes resulting from activation of the complex array of PRs in brain by gonadally and / or glial derived progesterone. Moreover, the impact of clinically used progestogens and developing selective PR modulators for targeted outcomes in brain is a critical avenue of investigation as the non-reproductive functions of PRs have far-reaching implications for hormone therapy to maintain neurological health and function throughout menopausal aging. PMID:18374402

  8. Duality groups, automorphic forms, and higher derivative corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Neil; West, Peter

    2007-03-15

    We study the higher derivative corrections that occur in type II superstring theories in ten dimensions or less. Assuming invariance under a discrete duality group G(Z) we show that the generic functions of the scalar fields that occur can be identified with automorphic forms. We then give a systematic method to construct automorphic forms from a given group G(Z) together with a chosen subgroup H and a linear representation of G(Z). This construction is based on the theory of nonlinear realizations and we find that the automorphic forms contain the weights of G. We also carry out the dimensional reduction of the generic higher derivative corrections of the IIB theory to three dimensions and find that the weights of E{sub 8} occur generalizing previous results of the authors on M theory. Since the automorphic forms of this theory contain the weights of E{sub 8} we can interpret the occurrence of weights in the dimensional reduction as evidence for an underlying U-duality symmetry.

  9. Oligomeric forms of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs)

    PubMed Central

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    Oligomerization is a general characteristic of cell membrane receptors that is shared by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) together with their G protein partners. Recent studies of these complexes, both in vivo and in purified reconstituted forms, unequivocally support this contention for GPCRs, perhaps with only rare exceptions. As evidence has evolved from experimental cell lines to more relevant in vivo studies and from indirect biophysical approaches to well defined isolated complexes of dimeric receptors alone and complexed with G proteins, there is an expectation that the structural basis of oligomerization and the functional consequences for membrane signaling will be elucidated. Oligomerization of cell membrane receptors is fully supported by both thermodynamic calculations and the selectivity and duration of signaling required to reach targets located in various cellular compartments. PMID:20538466

  10. IL-3 specifically inhibits GM-CSF binding to the higher affinity receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Taketazu, F.; Chiba, S.; Shibuya, K.; Kuwaki, T.; Tsumura, H.; Miyazono, K.; Miyagawa, K.; Takaku, F. )

    1991-02-01

    The inhibition of binding between human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and its receptor by human interleukin-3 (IL-3) was observed in myelogenous leukemia cell line KG-1 which bore the receptors both for GM-CSF and IL-3. In contrast, this phenomenon was not observed in histiocytic lymphoma cell line U-937 or in gastric carcinoma cell line KATO III, both of which have apparent GM-CSF receptor but an undetectable IL-3 receptor. In KG-1 cells, the cross-inhibition was preferentially observed when the binding of GM-CSF was performed under the high-affinity binding condition; i.e., a low concentration of 125I-GM-CSF was incubated. Scatchard analysis of 125I-GM-CSF binding to KG-1 cells in the absence and in the presence of unlabeled IL-3 demonstrated that IL-3 inhibited GM-CSF binding to the higher-affinity component of GM-CSF receptor on KG-1 cells. Moreover, a chemical cross-linking study has revealed that the cross-inhibition of the GM-CSF binding observed in KG-1 cells is specific for the beta-chain, Mr 135,000 binding protein which has been identified as a component forming the high-affinity GM-CSF receptor existing specifically on hemopoietic cells.

  11. The Tate form on steroids: resolution and higher codimension fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrie, Craig; Schäfer-Nameki, Sakura

    2013-04-01

    F-theory on singular elliptically fibered Calabi-Yau four-folds provides a setting to geometrically study four-dimensional {N}=1 supersymmetric gauge theories, includingmatter and Yukawa couplings. The gauge degrees of freedom arise from the codimension 1 singular loci, the matter and Yukawa couplings are generated at enhanced singularities in higher codimension. We construct the resolution of the singular Tate form for an elliptic Calabi-Yau four-fold with an ADE type singularity in codimension 1 and study the structure of the fibers in codimension 2 and 3. We determine the fibers in higher codimension which in general are of Kodaira type along minimal singular loci, and are thus consistent with the low energy gauge-theoretic intuition. Furthermore, we provide a complementary description of the fibers in higher codimension, which will also be applicable to non-minimal singularities. The irreducible components in the fiber in codimension 2 correspond to weights of representations of the ADE gauge group. These can split further in codimension 3 in a way that is consistent with the generation of Yukawa couplings. Applying this reasoning, we then venture out to study non-minimal singularities, which occur for A type along codimension 3, and for D and E also in codimension 2. The fibers in this case are non-Kodaira, however some insight into these singularities can be gained by considering the splitting of fiber components along higher codimension, which are shown to be consistent with matter and Yukawa couplings for the corresponding gauge groups.

  12. Human orexin/hypocretin receptors form constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes with each other and with human CB1 cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Jäntti, Maria H; Mandrika, Ilona; Kukkonen, Jyrki P

    2014-03-01

    Human OX1 orexin receptors have been shown to homodimerize and they have also been suggested to heterodimerize with CB1 cannabinoid receptors. The latter has been suggested to be important for orexin receptor responses and trafficking. In this study, we wanted to assess the ability of the other combinations of receptors to also form similar complexes. Vectors for expression of human OX1, OX2 and CB1 receptors, C-terminally fused with either Renilla luciferase or GFP(2) green fluorescent protein variant, were generated. The constructs were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and constitutive dimerization between the receptors was assessed by bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET). Orexin receptor subtypes readily formed homo- and hetero(di)mers, as suggested by significant BRET signals. CB1 receptors formed homodimers, and they also heterodimerized with both orexin receptors. Interestingly, BRET efficiency was higher for homodimers than for almost all heterodimers. This is likely to be due to the geometry of the interaction; the putatively symmetric dimers may place the C-termini in a more suitable orientation in homomers. Fusion of luciferase to an orexin receptor and GFP(2) to CB1 produced more effective BRET than the opposite fusions, also suggesting differences in geometry. Similar was seen for the OX1-OX2 interaction. In conclusion, orexin receptors have a significant propensity to make homo- and heterodi-/oligomeric complexes. However, it is unclear whether this affects their signaling. As orexin receptors efficiently signal via endocannabinoid production to CB1 receptors, dimerization could be an effective way of forming signal complexes with optimal cannabinoid concentrations available for cannabinoid receptors. PMID:24530395

  13. Comparison between different forms of estrogen cytosol receptor and the nuclear receptor extracted by micrococcal nuclease.

    PubMed

    Rochefort, H; André, J

    1978-11-01

    As an approach to the mechanism of the nuclear translocation of estrogen receptor, the estradiol nuclear receptor (RN) of lamb endometrium was extracted with micrococcal nuclease at 2--4 degrees and compared to the "native" 8S and to the Ca2+-transformed cytosol receptors. After extensive digestion of chromatin, giving up to 10% perchloric acid-soluble DNA and a majority of nucleosome monomers, up to 80% of the RN was extracted and under low ionic strength. This RN was found to be completely different from the partially proteolyzed Ca2+-transformed cytosol receptor. It migrated with a sedimentation constant of 4 and 6 S. The Stokes radius of the predominant form as determined by ACA 34 chromatography was 5.3 nm. The calculated apparent molecular weights were 130,000 and 90,000, respectively. The RN was able to bind DNA and was eluted from a diethylaminoethyl cellulose column at 0.23 and 0.30 M KCl. We conclude that the mechanism proposed by Puca et al., according to which the Ca2+-transformed cytosol receptor is split by a Ca2+ receptor-transforming factor into a smaller form able to cross the nuclear membrane, is very unlikely. PMID:698961

  14. Measurement of the pion form factor at higher energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, D.J.

    1994-04-01

    One of the strongest arguments for increasing the nominal CEBAF beam energy to equal or exceed 6 GeV is that one would be able to make quality high Q{sup 2} measurements of the charged pion form factor.

  15. Participative Evaluation for Forming Higher Education Policy: The National Higher Education Planning System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercado del Collado, Ricardo

    Higher education planning in Mexico is discussed, with attention to: conceptual characteristics of Mexico's higher education planning system; relationships among the national, regional, state, and institutional planning levels; and design and operation of the Comprehensive Program for the Development of Higher Education. Responsibilities of…

  16. Characterization of DNA complexes formed by the nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor.

    PubMed

    Frank, Christian; Gonzalez, Manuel Macias; Oinonen, Carita; Dunlop, Thomas W; Carlberg, Carsten

    2003-10-31

    The nuclear receptor constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) acts as a xenobiotic sensor and regulates the expression of enzymes, such as several cytochromes P450s and the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) type 1A1. CAR binds as a heterodimer with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) to specific DNA sites, called response elements (REs). Clusters of CAR REs, referred to as phenobarbital response enhancer modules (PBREMs), have been identified in several CAR target genes. In this study we confirm that REs formed by direct repeats of two AGTTCA hexamers with 4 spacing nucleotides are optimal for the binding of CAR-RXR heterodimers. In addition, we found that the heterodimers also form complexes on everted repeat-type arrangements with 8 spacing nucleotides. We also observed that CAR is able to bind DNA as a monomer and to interact in this form with different coregulators even in the presence of RXR. Systematic variation of the nucleotides 5'-flanking to both AGTTCA hexamers showed that the dinucleotide sequence modulates the DNA complex formation of CAR monomers and CAR-RXR heterodimer by a factor of up to 20. The highest preference was found for the sequence AG and lowest for CC. The increased DNA affinity of CAR is mediated by the positively charged arginines 90 and 91 located in the carboxyl-terminal extension of the DNA-binding domain of the receptor. Furthermore, we show that one of the three CAR REs of the human UGT1A1 PBREM is exclusively bound by CAR monomers and this is regulated by ligands that bind to this nuclear receptor. This points to a physiological role for CAR monomers. Therefore, both CAR-RXR heterodimers and CAR monomers can contribute to the gene activating function of PBREMs in CAR target genes. PMID:12896978

  17. CEBAF at higher energies and the kaon electromagnetic form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, O.K.

    1994-04-01

    The electromagnetic production of strangeness, the physics of exciting systems having strangeness degrees of freedom (production of hadrons with one or more strange constituent quarks) using electromagnetic probes (real or virtual photons), is one of the frontier areas of research which will be investigated at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) when it becomes operational. CEBAF is expected to have an important impact upon this field of research using its specialized set of detection instruments and high quality electron beam. This paper focusses upon one aspect of the associated production of strangeness - the determination of the kaon electromagnetic form factor at high squared momentum transfers.

  18. Human orexin/hypocretin receptors form constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes with each other and with human CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Jäntti, Maria H.; Mandrika, Ilona; Kukkonen, Jyrki P.

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • OX{sub 1} and OX{sub 2} orexin and CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptor dimerization was investigated. • Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer method was used. • All receptors readily formed constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes. - Abstract: Human OX{sub 1} orexin receptors have been shown to homodimerize and they have also been suggested to heterodimerize with CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors. The latter has been suggested to be important for orexin receptor responses and trafficking. In this study, we wanted to assess the ability of the other combinations of receptors to also form similar complexes. Vectors for expression of human OX{sub 1}, OX{sub 2} and CB{sub 1} receptors, C-terminally fused with either Renilla luciferase or GFP{sup 2} green fluorescent protein variant, were generated. The constructs were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and constitutive dimerization between the receptors was assessed by bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET). Orexin receptor subtypes readily formed homo- and hetero(di)mers, as suggested by significant BRET signals. CB{sub 1} receptors formed homodimers, and they also heterodimerized with both orexin receptors. Interestingly, BRET efficiency was higher for homodimers than for almost all heterodimers. This is likely to be due to the geometry of the interaction; the putatively symmetric dimers may place the C-termini in a more suitable orientation in homomers. Fusion of luciferase to an orexin receptor and GFP{sup 2} to CB{sub 1} produced more effective BRET than the opposite fusions, also suggesting differences in geometry. Similar was seen for the OX{sub 1}–OX{sub 2} interaction. In conclusion, orexin receptors have a significant propensity to make homo- and heterodi-/oligomeric complexes. However, it is unclear whether this affects their signaling. As orexin receptors efficiently signal via endocannabinoid production to CB{sub 1} receptors, dimerization could be an effective way

  19. Modular forms and a generalized Cardy formula in higher dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaghoulian, Edgar

    2016-06-01

    We derive a formula which applies to conformal field theories on a spatial torus and gives the asymptotic density of states solely in terms of the vacuum energy on a parallel plate geometry. The formula follows immediately from global scale and Lorentz invariance, but to our knowledge has not previously been made explicit. It can also be understood from the fact that log Z on T2×Rd -1 transforms as the absolute value of a nonholomorphic modular form of weight d -1 , which we show. The results are extended to theories which violate Lorentz invariance and hyperscaling but maintain a scaling symmetry. The formula is checked for the cases of a free scalar, free Maxwell gauge field, and free N =4 super Yang-Mills. The case of a Maxwell gauge field gives Casimir's original calculation of the electromagnetic force between parallel plates in terms of the entropy of a photon gas.

  20. Truncated forms of DNA-binding estrogen receptors in human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, G K; Kushner, P; Vigne, J L; Benz, C C

    1991-01-01

    The likelihood a breast cancer will respond to antiestrogen therapy depends on the tumor content of immunoreactive or ligand-binding estrogen receptor (ER). To investigate the failure of many ER-positive breast cancers to respond to antiestrogen therapy, we examined by gel-shift assay the ability of tumor ER to bind its cognate estrogen response element (ERE). Analysis of 38 primary breast cancers showed that some tumors containing abundant immunoreactive ER failed to demonstrate DNA binding ER. In many other ER-positive tumors, the fraction of DNA binding ER was low and consisted primarily of truncated receptor forms, which on Western analysis were revealed to be 50 kD homodimers and 67-50 kD ER heterodimers. The use of protease inhibitors during tumor extraction and the demonstration of nuclear-localizing ER and ERE-binding COUP (chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter) protein in these tumors indicated that the truncated forms of ER were likely present in vivo. The presence of intact DNA binding ER correlated with higher tumor content of immunoreactive sex steroid receptors (ER and/or PR), standard predictors of tumor responsiveness to antiestrogen, suggesting that loss or truncation of DNA binding ER may be an important prognostic parameter accounting for some forms of clinical resistance to antiestrogen therapy. Images PMID:1864980

  1. Estrogen Receptor Beta in the Brain: From Form to Function

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Michael J.; Foradori, Chad D.; Handa, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Estrogens have numerous effects on the brain, both in adulthood and during development. These actions of estrogen are mediated by two distinct estrogen receptor (ER) systems, ER alpha (ERα) and ER beta (ERβ). In brain, ERα plays a critical role in regulating reproductive neuroendocrine function and behavior, however, a definitive role for ERβ in any neurobiological function has been slow in forthcoming. Clues to the function of ERβ in the central nervous system can be gleaned from the neuroanatomical distribution of ERβ and the phenotypes of neurons that express ERβ. ERβ immunoreactivity has been found in populations of GnRH, CRH, vasopressin, oxytocin and prolactin containing neurons in the hypothalamus. Utilizing subtype-selective estrogen receptor agonists can help determine the roles for ERβ in non-reproductive behaviors in rat models. ERβ selective agonists exert potent anxiolytic activity when animals were tested in a number of behavioral paradigms. Consistent with this, ERβ selective agonists also inhibited the ACTH and corticosterone response to stress. In contrast, ERα selective agonists were found to be anxiogenic and correspondingly increased the hormonal stress response. Taken together, our studies implicate ERβ as an important modulator of some non-reproductive neurobiological systems. The molecular and neuroanatomical targets of estrogen that are mediated by ERβ remain to be determined. A number of splice variants of ERβ mRNA have been reported in brain tissue. Imaging of eGFP labeled chimeric receptor proteins transfected into cell lines show that ERβ splice variation can alter trafficking patterns and function. The originally described ERβ (herein termed ER-β1) is characterized by possessing a high affinity for estradiol. Similar to ERα, it is localized in the nucleus and is trafficked to nuclear sites termed “hyperspeckles” following ligand binding. In contrast, ER-β2 contains an 18 amino acid insert within the ligand

  2. Prefrontal cortical-striatal dopamine receptor mRNA expression predicts distinct forms of impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Simon, Nicholas W; Beas, Blanca S; Montgomery, Karienn S; Haberman, Rebecca P; Bizon, Jennifer L; Setlow, Barry

    2013-06-01

    Variation in dopamine receptor levels has been associated with different facets of impulsivity. To further delineate the neural substrates underlying impulsive action (inability to withhold a prepotent motor response) and impulsive choice (delay aversion), we characterised rats in the Differential Reinforcement of Low Rates of Responding task and a delay discounting task. We also measured performance on an effort-based discounting task. We then assessed D1 and D2 dopamine receptor mRNA expression in subregions of the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens using in situ hybridisation, and compared these data with behavioral performance. Expression of D1 and D2 receptor mRNA in distinct brain regions was predictive of impulsive action. A dissociation within the nucleus accumbens was observed between subregions and receptor subtypes; higher D1 mRNA expression in the shell predicted greater impulsive action, whereas lower D2 mRNA expression in the core predicted greater impulsive action. We also observed a negative correlation between impulsive action and D2 mRNA expression in the prelimbic cortex. Interestingly, a similar relationship was present between impulsive choice and prelimbic cortex D2 mRNA, despite the fact that behavioral indices of impulsive action and impulsive choice were uncorrelated. Finally, we found that both high D1 mRNA expression in the insular cortex and low D2 mRNA expression in the infralimbic cortex were associated with willingness to exert effort for rewards. Notably, dopamine receptor mRNA in these regions was not associated with either facet of impulsivity. The data presented here provide novel molecular and neuroanatomical distinctions between different forms of impulsivity, as well as effort-based decision-making. PMID:23510331

  3. Prefrontal cortical–striatal dopamine receptor mRNA expression predicts distinct forms of impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Nicholas W.; Beas, Blanca S.; Montgomery, Karienn S.; Haberman, Rebecca P.; Bizon, Jennifer L.; Setlow, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Variation in dopamine receptor levels has been associated with different facets of impulsivity. To further delineate the neural substrates underlying impulsive action (inability to withhold a prepotent motor response) and impulsive choice (delay aversion), we characterised rats in the Differential Reinforcement of Low Rates of Responding task and a delay discounting task. We also measured performance on an effort-based discounting task. We then assessed D1 and D2 dopamine receptor mRNA expression in subregions of the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens using in situ hybridisation, and compared these data with behavioral performance. Expression of D1 and D2 receptor mRNA in distinct brain regions was predictive of impulsive action. A dissociation within the nucleus accumbens was observed between subregions and receptor subtypes; higher D1 mRNA expression in the shell predicted greater impulsive action, whereas lower D2 mRNA expression in the core predicted greater impulsive action. We also observed a negative correlation between impulsive action and D2 mRNA expression in the prelimbic cortex. Interestingly, a similar relationship was present between impulsive choice and prelimbic cortex D2 mRNA, despite the fact that behavioral indices of impulsive action and impulsive choice were uncorrelated. Finally, we found that both high D1 mRNA expression in the insular cortex and low D2 mRNA expression in the infralimbic cortex were associated with willingness to exert effort for rewards. Notably, dopamine receptor mRNA in these regions was not associated with either facet of impulsivity. The data presented here provide novel molecular and neuroanatomical distinctions between different forms of impulsivity, as well as effort-based decision-making. PMID:23510331

  4. Monoclonal antibodies against the native or denatured forms of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed Central

    André, C; Guillet, J G; De Backer, J P; Vanderheyden, P; Hoebeke, J; Strosberg, A D

    1984-01-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with affinity-purified muscarinic acetylcholine receptors from calf brain and their splenocytes fused with NS1 myeloma cells. Hybrid cultures were grown and selected for production of antibodies on the basis of enzyme immunoassays on calf and rat forebrain membrane preparations. Thirty-four clones were retained and six of them further subcloned. Two of these subclones produced antibodies that selectively recognized muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-bearing membranes. The M-35b antibodies interacted only with native digitonin-solubilized receptors, and not with denatured receptors. The M-23c antibodies did not react with active digitonin-solubilized receptors but recognized the denatured form. The M-23c antibodies should thus be useful in the purification of the receptor and its precursor translation products, while the M-35b antibodies could be used for the immunocytochemical localization of the receptor in cells and tissues of different species. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6200320

  5. Perturbative no-hair property of form fields for higher dimensional static black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Shiromizu, Tetsuya; Ohashi, Seiju; Tanabe, Kentaro

    2011-04-15

    In this paper we examine the static perturbation of p-form field strengths around higher dimensional Schwarzschild spacetimes. As a result, we can see that the static perturbations do not exist when p{>=}3. This result supports the no-hair properties of p-form fields. However, this does not exclude the presence of the black objects having nonspherical topology.

  6. Traditional and New Forms of Higher Education: Directory of ECE Degree and Certificate Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalinowski, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author provides information on traditional and new forms of higher education. Recent trends include community colleges offering bachelors degrees and traditional universities expanding continuing education efforts. Additionally, certificate programs, private for-profit colleges and universities, and various forms of learning…

  7. SVP-like MADS-box protein from Carya cathayensis forms higher-order complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Hou, Chuanming; Huang, Jianqin; Wang, Zhengjia; Xu, Yingwu

    2015-03-01

    To properly regulate plant flowering time and construct floral pattern, MADS-domain containing transcription factors must form multimers including homo- and hetero-dimers. They are also active in forming hetero-higher-order complexes with three to five different molecules. However, it is not well known if a MADS-box protein can also form homo-higher-order complex. In this study a biochemical approach is utilized to provide insight into the complex formation for an SVP-like MADS-box protein cloned from hickory. The results indicated that the protein is a heterogeneous higher-order complex with the peak population containing over 20 monomers. Y2H verified the protein to form homo-complex in yeast cells. Western blot of the hickory floral bud sample revealed that the protein exists in higher-order polymers in native. Deletion assays indicated that the flexible C-terminal residues are mainly responsible for the higher-order polymer formation and the heterogeneity. Current results provide direct biochemical evidences for an active MADS-box protein to be a high order complex, much higher than a quartermeric polymer. Analysis suggests that a MADS-box subset may be able to self-assemble into large complexes, and thereby differentiate one subfamily from the other in a higher-order structural manner. Present result is a valuable supplement to the action of mechanism for MADS-box proteins in plant development. PMID:25602439

  8. Supramolecular Ensembles Formed between Charged Conjugated Polymers and Glycoprobes for the Fluorogenic Recognition of Receptor Proteins.

    PubMed

    Dou, Wei-Tao; Zeng, Ya-Li; Lv, Ying; Wu, Jiatao; He, Xiao-Peng; Chen, Guo-Rong; Tan, Chunyan

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the simple construction of a unique class of supramolecular ensembles formed by electrostatic self-assembly between charged conjugated polymers and fluorophore-coupled glycoligands (glycoprobes) for the selective fluorogenic detection of receptor proteins at both the molecular and cellular levels. We show that positively and negatively charged diazobenzene-containing poly(p-phenylethynylenes) (PPEs) can be used to form stable fluorogenic probes with fluorescein-based (negatively charged) and rhodamine B based (positively charged) glycoprobes by electrostatic interaction. The structures of the ensembles have been characterized by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The supramolecular probes formed show quenched fluorescence in an aqueous buffer solution, which can be specifically recovered, in a concentration-dependent manner, through competitive complexation with a selective protein receptor, over a range of other unselective proteins. The ensembles also show selective fluorescence enhancement with a live cell that expresses the glycoligand receptor but not a control cell without receptor expression. PMID:27159586

  9. Agnathan VIP, PACAP and Their Receptors: Ancestral Origins of Today's Highly Diversified Forms

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Stephanie Y. L.; Chow, Billy K. C.; Kasamatsu, Jun; Kasahara, Masanori; Lee, Leo T. O.

    2012-01-01

    VIP and PACAP are pleiotropic peptides belonging to the secretin superfamily of brain-gut peptides and interact specifically with three receptors (VPAC1, PAC1 and VPAC2) from the class II B G protein-coupled receptor family. There is immense interest regarding their molecular evolution which is often described closely alongside gene and/or genome duplications. Despite the wide array of information available in various vertebrates and one invertebrate the tunicate, their evolutionary origins remain unresolved. Through searches of genome databases and molecular cloning techniques, the first lamprey VIP/PACAP ligands and VPAC receptors are identified from the Japanese lamprey. In addition, two VPAC receptors (VPACa/b) are identified from inshore hagfish and ligands predicted for sea lamprey. Phylogenetic analyses group these molecules into their respective PHI/VIP, PRP/PACAP and VPAC receptor families and show they resemble ancestral forms. Japanese lamprey VIP/PACAP peptides synthesized were tested with the hagfish VPAC receptors. hfVPACa transduces signal via both adenylyl cylase and phospholipase C pathways, whilst hfVPACb was only able to transduce through the calcium pathway. In contrast to the widespread distribution of VIP/PACAP ligands and receptors in many species, the agnathan PACAP and VPAC receptors were found almost exclusively in the brain. In situ hybridisation further showed their abundance throughout the brain. The range of VIP/PACAP ligands and receptors found are highly useful, providing a glimpse into the evolutionary events both at the structural and functional levels. Though representative of ancestral forms, the VIP/PACAP ligands in particular have retained high sequence conservation indicating the importance of their functions even early in vertebrate evolution. During these nascent stages, only two VPAC receptors are likely responsible for eliciting functions before evolving later into specific subtypes post-Agnatha. We also propose VIP and

  10. Mincle, the receptor for mycobacterial cord factor, forms a functional receptor complex with MCL and FcεRI-γ.

    PubMed

    Lobato-Pascual, Ana; Saether, Per Christian; Fossum, Sigbjørn; Dissen, Erik; Daws, Michael R

    2013-12-01

    Upon receptor activation, the myeloid C-type lectin receptor Mincle signals via the Syk-CARD9-Bcl10-MALT1 pathway. It does so by recruiting the ITAM-bearing FcεRI-γ. The related receptor macrophage C-type Lectin (MCL) has also been shown to be associated with Syk and to be dependent upon this signaling axis. We have previously shown that MCL co-precipitates with FcεRI-γ, but were unable to show a direct association, suggesting that MCL associates with FcεRI-γ via another molecule. Here, we have used rat primary cells and cell lines to investigate this missing link. A combination of flow cytometric and biochemical analysis showed that Mincle and MCL form heteromers on the cell surface. Furthermore, association with MCL and FcεRI-γ increased Mincle expression and enhanced phagocytosis of Ab-coated beads. The results presented in this paper suggest that the Mincle/MCL/FcεRI-γ complex is the functionally optimal form for these C-type lectin receptors on the surface of myeloid cells. PMID:23921530

  11. Giorgio Agamben and the Abandonment Paradigm: A New Form of Student Diversion in Public Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbour, Clifford P.; Wolgemuth, Jennifer R.

    2013-01-01

    This article proposes a new paradigm to understand recent government policies that pose new barriers to student participation and divert students out of public higher education. We explain how the classic diversion paradigm, exemplified by Clark (1960) and Brint and Karabel (1989), is unable to account for this new form of student diversion. We…

  12. Differential regulation of translation and endocytosis of alternatively spliced forms of the type II bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor

    PubMed Central

    Amsalem, Ayelet R.; Marom, Barak; Shapira, Keren E.; Hirschhorn, Tal; Preisler, Livia; Paarmann, Pia; Knaus, Petra; Henis, Yoav I.; Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The expression and function of transforming growth factor-β superfamily receptors are regulated by multiple molecular mechanisms. The type II BMP receptor (BMPRII) is expressed as two alternatively spliced forms, a long and a short form (BMPRII-LF and –SF, respectively), which differ by an ∼500 amino acid C-terminal extension, unique among TGF-β superfamily receptors. Whereas this extension was proposed to modulate BMPRII signaling output, its contribution to the regulation of receptor expression was not addressed. To map regulatory determinants of BMPRII expression, we compared synthesis, degradation, distribution, and endocytic trafficking of BMPRII isoforms and mutants. We identified translational regulation of BMPRII expression and the contribution of a 3’ terminal coding sequence to this process. BMPRII-LF and -SF differed also in their steady-state levels, kinetics of degradation, intracellular distribution, and internalization rates. A single dileucine signal in the C-terminal extension of BMPRII-LF accounted for its faster clathrin-mediated endocytosis relative to BMPRII-SF, accompanied by mildly faster degradation. Higher expression of BMPRII-SF at the plasma membrane resulted in enhanced activation of Smad signaling, stressing the potential importance of the multilayered regulation of BMPRII expression at the plasma membrane. PMID:26739752

  13. Differential regulation of translation and endocytosis of alternatively spliced forms of the type II bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor.

    PubMed

    Amsalem, Ayelet R; Marom, Barak; Shapira, Keren E; Hirschhorn, Tal; Preisler, Livia; Paarmann, Pia; Knaus, Petra; Henis, Yoav I; Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2016-02-15

    The expression and function of transforming growth factor-β superfamily receptors are regulated by multiple molecular mechanisms. The type II BMP receptor (BMPRII) is expressed as two alternatively spliced forms, a long and a short form (BMPRII-LF and -SF, respectively), which differ by an ∼500 amino acid C-terminal extension, unique among TGF-β superfamily receptors. Whereas this extension was proposed to modulate BMPRII signaling output, its contribution to the regulation of receptor expression was not addressed. To map regulatory determinants of BMPRII expression, we compared synthesis, degradation, distribution, and endocytic trafficking of BMPRII isoforms and mutants. We identified translational regulation of BMPRII expression and the contribution of a 3' terminal coding sequence to this process. BMPRII-LF and -SF differed also in their steady-state levels, kinetics of degradation, intracellular distribution, and internalization rates. A single dileucine signal in the C-terminal extension of BMPRII-LF accounted for its faster clathrin-mediated endocytosis relative to BMPRII-SF, accompanied by mildly faster degradation. Higher expression of BMPRII-SF at the plasma membrane resulted in enhanced activation of Smad signaling, stressing the potential importance of the multilayered regulation of BMPRII expression at the plasma membrane. PMID:26739752

  14. Receptor architecture of visual areas in the face and word-form recognition region of the posterior fusiform gyrus.

    PubMed

    Caspers, Julian; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Caspers, Svenja; Schleicher, Axel; Amunts, Katrin; Zilles, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Recently, two extrastriate visual areas on the posterior fusiform gyrus, areas FG1 and FG2, were identified based on cytoarchitectonical criteria (Caspers et al. in Brain Struct Funct 218:511-526, 2013a). They are located within the object-related ventral visual stream at the transition between early and higher-order (category-specific) visual areas. FG2 has a topographical position which is best comparable to the face or visual word-form recognition area. However, the precise function of FG2 is presently unknown. Since transmitter receptors are key molecules of neurotransmission, we analysed the regional and laminar distribution of 15 different receptor binding sites by means of quantitative in vitro receptor autoradiography. Significant differences between receptor densities of both areas were found for NMDA, GABAB, M3, nicotinic α4/β2 and 5-HT1A receptors as well as for GABAA associated benzodiazepine binding sites. These results support the cytoarchitectonic segregation of FG1 and FG2 into two distinct cortical areas. In addition, principal component and hierarchical cluster analyses of the multireceptor data of both fusiform areas and 24 visual, auditory, somatosensory and multimodal association areas not only revealed the typical receptor architectonic characteristics of visual areas for FG1 and FG2, but also suggest their putative function as object recognition regions due to the similarity of their receptor fingerprints with those of areas of the ventral visual stream. Furthermore, FG1 and FG2 build a cluster with the multimodal association areas of the inferior parietal lobule. This underlines their hierarchically high position in the visual system of the human cerebral cortex. PMID:24126835

  15. Real forms of extended Kac-Moody symmetries and higher spin gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henneaux, Marc; Kleinschmidt, Axel; Nicolai, Hermann

    2012-07-01

    We consider the relation between higher spin gauge fields and real Kac-Moody Lie algebras. These algebras are obtained by double and triple extensions of real forms {{g}_0} of the finite-dimensional simple algebras {{g}} arising in dimensional reductions of gravity and supergravity theories. Besides providing an exhaustive list of all such algebras, together with their associated involutions and restricted root diagrams, we are able to prove general properties of their spectrum of generators with respect to a decomposition of the triple extension of {{g}_0} under its gravity subalgebra {{gl}(D,{R})} . These results are then combined with known consistent models of higher spin gauge theory to prove that all but finitely many generators correspond to non-propagating fields and there are no higher spin fields contained in the Kac-Moody algebra.

  16. Characterization of human glucocorticoid receptor complexes formed with DNA fragments containing or lacking glucocorticoid response elements

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, D.B.; Cidlowski, J.A. )

    1989-03-07

    Sucrose density gradient shift assays were used to study the interactions of human glucocorticoid receptors (GR) with small DNA fragments either containing or lacking glucocorticoid response element (GRE) DNA consensus sequences. When crude cytoplasmic extracts containing ({sup 3}H)triamcinolone acetonide (({sup 3}H)TA) labeled GR were incubated with unlabeled DNA under conditions of DNA excess, a GRE-containing DNA fragment obtained from the 5' long terminal repeat of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV LTR) formed a stable 12-16S complex with activated, but not nonactivated, ({sup 3}H)TA receptor. By contrast, if the cytosols were treated with calf thymus DNA-cellulose to deplete non-GR-DNA-binding proteins prior to heat activation, a smaller 7-10S complex was formed with the MMTV LTR DNA fragment. Activated ({sup 3}H)TA receptor from DNA-cellulose pretreated cytosols also interacted with two similarly sized fragments from pBR322 DNA. Stability of the complexes formed between GR and these three DNA fragments was strongly affected by even moderate alterations in either the salt concentration or the pH of the gradient buffer. Under all conditions tested, the complex formed with the MMTV LTR DNA fragment was more stable than the complexes formed with either of the pBR322 DNA fragments. Together these observations indicate that the formation of stable complexes between activated GR and isolated DNA fragments requires the presence of GRE consensus sequences in the DNA.

  17. Photoaffinity labeling of the erythropoietin receptor and its identification in a ligand-free form

    SciTech Connect

    Hosoi, Takayuki; Sawyer, S.T.; Krantz, S.B. )

    1991-01-01

    Pure human recombinant erythropoietin (EP) was acylated through a primary amino residue with a cross-linking reagent, N-((3-((4-((p-azido-m-({sup 125}I)iodophenyl)azo)benzoyl)amino)propanoyl)oxy)-succinimide (Denny-Jaffe reagent), which is photoreactive and cleavable at the azo residue. The resulting conjugated hormone (DJ-EP) was purified from unmodified EP by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography and maintained its capacity to bind to receptors for EP on erythroid progenitor cells. The receptor for EP was previously identified as two related proteins of 100 and 85 kDa molecular mass by chemical cross-linking to {sup 125}I-EP. Recently, D'Andrea and co-workers cloned a cDNA that codes for a protein of 55-66 kDa, which is thought to be the EP receptor. In this report, cross-linking to the receptor through the monofunctional DJ-EP labeled the same 140- and 125-kDa molecular mass bands cross-linked with {sup 125}I-EP and disuccinimidyl suberate. Furthermore, cleavage of the azo bond of the DJ-EP receptor complex by sodium dithionite demonstrated that proteins of 105 and 90 kDa were labeled in ligand-free form by DJ-EP. This result demonstrates that artifactual cross-linking of multiple proteins or other artifacts of cross-linking do not explain the difference in molecular mass of the EP receptor identified by cross-linking and the receptor identified by expression cloning.

  18. Inhibition of Coxsackie B Virus Infection by Soluble Forms of Its Receptors: Binding Affinities, Altered Particle Formation, and Competition with Cellular Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Goodfellow, Ian G.; Evans, David J.; Blom, Anna M.; Kerrigan, Dave; Miners, J. Scott; Morgan, B. Paul; Spiller, O. Brad

    2005-01-01

    We previously reported that soluble decay-accelerating factor (DAF) and coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) blocked coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) myocarditis in mice, but only soluble CAR blocked CVB3-mediated pancreatitis. Here, we report that the in vitro mechanisms of viral inhibition by these soluble receptors also differ. Soluble DAF inhibited virus infection through the formation of reversible complexes with CVB3, while binding of soluble CAR to CVB induced the formation of altered (A) particles with a resultant irreversible loss of infectivity. A-particle formation was characterized by loss of VP4 from the virions and required incubation of CVB3-CAR complexes at 37°C. Dimeric soluble DAF (DAF-Fc) was found to be 125-fold-more effective at inhibiting CVB3 than monomeric DAF, which corresponded to a 100-fold increase in binding affinity as determined by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Soluble CAR and soluble dimeric CAR (CAR-Fc) bound to CVB3 with 5,000- and 10,000-fold-higher affinities than the equivalent forms of DAF. While DAF-Fc was 125-fold-more effective at inhibiting virus than monomeric DAF, complement regulation by DAF-Fc was decreased 4 fold. Therefore, while the virus binding was a cooperative event, complement regulation was hindered by the molecular orientation of DAF-Fc, indicating that the regions responsible for complement regulation and virus binding do not completely overlap. Relative contributions of CVB binding affinity, receptor binding footprint on the virus capsid, and induction of capsid conformation alterations for the ability of cellular DAF and CAR to act as receptors are discussed. PMID:16140777

  19. An Irreducible Form of Gamma Matrices for HMDS Coefficients of the Heat Kernel in Higher Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, M.; Yajima, S.; Higashida, Y.; Kubota, S.; Tokuo, S.; Kamo, Y.

    2009-05-01

    The heat kernel method is used to calculate 1-loop corrections of a fermion interacting with general background fields. To apply the Hadamard-Minakshisundaram-DeWitt-Seeley (HMDS) coefficients a_q(x,x') of the heat kernel to calculate the corrections, it is meaningful to decompose the coefficients into tensorial components with irreducible matrices, which are the totally antisymmetric products of γ matrices. We present formulae for the tensorial forms of the γ-matrix-valued quantities X, tilde{Λ}_{μν} and their product and covariant derivative in terms of the irreducible matrices in higher dimensions. The concrete forms of HMDS coefficients obtained by repeated application of the formulae simplifies the derivation of the loop corrections after the trace calculations, because each term in the coefficients contains one of the irreducible matrices and some of the terms are expressed by commutator and the anticommutator with respect to th e generator of non-abelian gauge groups. The form of the third HMDS coefficient is useful for evaluating some of the fermionic anomalies in 6-dimensional curved space. We show that the new formulae appear in the chiral {U(1)} anomaly when the vector and the third-order tensor gauge fields do not commute.

  20. Regulation of cell surface transferrin receptor-2 by iron-dependent cleavage and release of a soluble form

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Alessia; Vieillevoye, Maud; Nai, Antonella; Rausa, Marco; Ladli, Meriem; Lacombe, Catherine; Mayeux, Patrick; Verdier, Frédérique; Camaschella, Clara; Silvestri, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Transferrin receptor-2 is a transmembrane protein whose expression is restricted to hepatocytes and erythroid cells. Transferrin receptor-2 has a regulatory function in iron homeostasis, since its inactivation causes systemic iron overload. Hepatic transferrin receptor-2 participates in iron sensing and is involved in hepcidin activation, although the mechanism remains unclear. Erythroid transferrin receptor-2 associates with and stabilizes erythropoietin receptors on the erythroblast surface and is essential to control erythrocyte production in iron deficiency. We identified a soluble form of transferrin receptor-2 in the media of transfected cells and showed that cultured human erythroid cells release an endogenous soluble form. Soluble transferrin receptor-2 originates from a cleavage of the cell surface protein, which is inhibited by diferric transferrin in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, the shedding of the transferrin receptor-2 variant G679A, mutated in the Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid motif and unable to bind diferric transferrin, is not modulated by the ligand. This observation links the process of transferrin receptor-2 removal from the plasma membrane to iron homeostasis. Soluble transferrin receptor-2 does not affect the binding of erythropoietin to erythropoietin receptor or the consequent signaling and partially inhibits hepcidin promoter activation only in vitro. Whether it is a component of the signals released by erythropoiesis in iron deficiency remains to be investigated. Our results indicate that membrane transferrin receptor-2, a sensor of circulating iron, is released from the cell membrane in iron deficiency. PMID:25637053

  1. Regulation of cell surface transferrin receptor-2 by iron-dependent cleavage and release of a soluble form.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Alessia; Vieillevoye, Maud; Nai, Antonella; Rausa, Marco; Ladli, Meriem; Lacombe, Catherine; Mayeux, Patrick; Verdier, Frédérique; Camaschella, Clara; Silvestri, Laura

    2015-04-01

    Transferrin receptor-2 is a transmembrane protein whose expression is restricted to hepatocytes and erythroid cells. Transferrin receptor-2 has a regulatory function in iron homeostasis, since its inactivation causes systemic iron overload. Hepatic transferrin receptor-2 participates in iron sensing and is involved in hepcidin activation, although the mechanism remains unclear. Erythroid transferrin receptor-2 associates with and stabilizes erythropoietin receptors on the erythroblast surface and is essential to control erythrocyte production in iron deficiency. We identified a soluble form of transferrin receptor-2 in the media of transfected cells and showed that cultured human erythroid cells release an endogenous soluble form. Soluble transferrin receptor-2 originates from a cleavage of the cell surface protein, which is inhibited by diferric transferrin in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, the shedding of the transferrin receptor-2 variant G679A, mutated in the Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid motif and unable to bind diferric transferrin, is not modulated by the ligand. This observation links the process of transferrin receptor-2 removal from the plasma membrane to iron homeostasis. Soluble transferrin receptor-2 does not affect the binding of erythropoietin to erythropoietin receptor or the consequent signaling and partially inhibits hepcidin promoter activation only in vitro. Whether it is a component of the signals released by erythropoiesis in iron deficiency remains to be investigated. Our results indicate that membrane transferrin receptor-2, a sensor of circulating iron, is released from the cell membrane in iron deficiency. PMID:25637053

  2. Form factors and complete spectrum of XXX antiperiodic higher spin chains by quantum separation of variables

    SciTech Connect

    Niccoli, G.

    2013-05-15

    The antiperiodic transfer matrices associated to higher spin representations of the rational 6-vertex Yang-Baxter algebra are analyzed by generalizing the approach introduced recently in the framework of Sklyanin's quantum separation of variables (SOV) for cyclic representations, spin-1/2 highest weight representations, and also for spin-1/2 representations of the 6-vertex reflection algebra. Such SOV approach allow us to derive exactly results which represent complicate tasks for more traditional methods based on Bethe ansatz and Baxter Q-operator. In particular, we both prove the completeness of the SOV characterization of the transfer matrix spectrum and its simplicity. Then, the derived characterization of local operators by Sklyanin's quantum separate variables and the expression of the scalar products of separate states by determinant formulae allow us to compute the form factors of the local spin operators by one determinant formulae similar to those of the scalar products.

  3. Form factors and complete spectrum of XXX antiperiodic higher spin chains by quantum separation of variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niccoli, G.

    2013-05-01

    The antiperiodic transfer matrices associated to higher spin representations of the rational 6-vertex Yang-Baxter algebra are analyzed by generalizing the approach introduced recently in the framework of Sklyanin's quantum separation of variables (SOV) for cyclic representations, spin-1/2 highest weight representations, and also for spin-1/2 representations of the 6-vertex reflection algebra. Such SOV approach allow us to derive exactly results which represent complicate tasks for more traditional methods based on Bethe ansatz and Baxter Q-operator. In particular, we both prove the completeness of the SOV characterization of the transfer matrix spectrum and its simplicity. Then, the derived characterization of local operators by Sklyanin's quantum separate variables and the expression of the scalar products of separate states by determinant formulae allow us to compute the form factors of the local spin operators by one determinant formulae similar to those of the scalar products.

  4. Purification and characterization of an. alpha. -bungarotoxin receptor that forms a functional nicotinic channel

    SciTech Connect

    Gotti, C.; Ogando, A.E.; Moretti, M.; Clementi, F. ); Hanke, W.; Schlue, R. )

    1991-04-15

    Neither the structure nor the function of {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}Bgtx) binding molecules in the nervous system have yet been completely defined, although it is known that some of these molecules are related to cation channels and some are not. Using an improved method of affinity chromatography, the authors have isolated a toxin binding molecule from chicken optic lobe that contains at least three subunits with apparent M{sub r} values of 52,000, 57,000, and 67,000. The M{sub r} 57,000 subunit binds {alpha}Bgtx receptors of human neuroblastoma cells, fetal calf muscle, and chicken optic lobe but not by antibodies raised against Torpedo acetylcholine receptor, the serum of myasthenic patients, or monoclonal antibody 35. {sup 125}I-labeled {alpha}Bgtx binding to the isolated receptor is blocked, with the same potency, by nicotinic agonists and antagonists, such as nicotine, neuronal bungarotoxin and, d-tubocurarine. When reconstituted in a planar lipid bilayer, the purified {alpha}Bgtx receptor forms cationic channels with a conductance of 50 pS. These channels are activated in a dose-dependent manner by carbamylcholine and blocked by d-tubocurarine.

  5. Cripto forms a complex with activin and type II activin receptors and can block activin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Peter C.; Harrison, Craig A.; Vale, Wylie

    2003-01-01

    Activin, nodal, Vg1, and growth and differentiation factor 1 are members of the transforming growth factor β superfamily and signal via the activin type II (ActRII/IIB) and type I (ALK4) serine/threonine kinase receptors. Unlike activins, however, signaling by nodal, Vg1, and growth and differentiation factor 1 requires a coreceptor from the epidermal growth factor-Cripto-FRL1-Cryptic protein family such as Cripto. Cripto has important roles during development and oncogenesis and binds nodal or related ligands and ALK4 to facilitate assembly of type I and type II receptor signaling complexes. Because Cripto mediates signaling via activin receptors and binds directly to ALK4, we tested whether transfection with Cripto would affect the ability of activin to signal and/or interact with its receptors. Here we show that Cripto can form a complex with activin and ActRII/IIB. We were unable to detect activin binding to Cripto in the absence of ActRII/IIB, indicating that unlike nodal, activin requires type II receptors to bind Cripto. If cotransfected with ActRII/IIB and ALK4, Cripto inhibited crosslinking of activin to ALK4 and the association of ALK4 with ActRII/IIB. In addition, Cripto blocked activin signaling when transfected into either HepG2 cells or 293T cells. We have also shown that under conditions in which Cripto facilitates nodal signaling, it antagonizes activin. Inhibition of activin signaling provides an additional example of a Cripto effect on the regulation of signaling by transforming growth factor-β superfamily members. Because activin is a potent inhibitor of cell growth in multiple cell types, these results provide a mechanism that may partially explain the oncogenic action of Cripto. PMID:12682303

  6. CXCR4 receptor positive spheroid forming cells are responsible for tumor invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Krohn, Alexander; Song, Yao-Hua; Muehlberg, Fabian; Droll, Lilly; Beckmann, Christoph; Alt, Eckhard

    2009-07-18

    Stem cells have been found to be involved in breast cancer growth, but the specific contribution of cancer stem cells in tumor biology, including metastasis, is still uncertain. We found that murine breast cancer cell lines 4T1, 4TO7, 167Farn and 67NR contains cancer stem cells defined by CXCR4 expression and their capability of forming spheroids in suspension culture. Importantly, we showed that CXCR4 expression is essential for tumor invasiveness because both CXCR4 neutralizing antibody and shRNA knockdown of the CXCR4 receptor significantly reduced tumor cell invasion. PMID:19286309

  7. The peroxisomal receptor Pex19p forms a helical mPTS recognition domain

    PubMed Central

    Schueller, Nicole; Holton, Simon J; Fodor, Krisztian; Milewski, Morlin; Konarev, Petr; Stanley, Will A; Wolf, Janina; Erdmann, Ralf; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Song, Young-Hwa; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    The protein Pex19p functions as a receptor and chaperone of peroxisomal membrane proteins (PMPs). The crystal structure of the folded C-terminal part of the receptor reveals a globular domain that displays a bundle of three long helices in an antiparallel arrangement. Complementary functional experiments, using a range of truncated Pex19p constructs, show that the structured α-helical domain binds PMP-targeting signal (mPTS) sequences with about 10 μM affinity. Removal of a conserved N-terminal helical segment from the mPTS recognition domain impairs the ability for mPTS binding, indicating that it forms part of the mPTS-binding site. Pex19p variants with mutations in the same sequence segment abolish correct cargo import. Our data indicate a divided N-terminal and C-terminal structural arrangement in Pex19p, which is reminiscent of a similar division in the Pex5p receptor, to allow separation of cargo-targeting signal recognition and additional functions. PMID:20531392

  8. The Successful Educational Journeys of American Indian Women: Forming Aspirations for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade, Maureen Snow

    2014-01-01

    American Indians (AIs) have lower higher education enrollment and completion rates than Whites and most minority groups. AI women, however, participate at higher rates than AI men, White women, and White men. Research has not examined what contributes to their higher education aspirations. This study explored the middle and high school experiences…

  9. Planning at a Higher Level: Ideas, Form, and Academic Language in Student Prewriting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Paul

    2012-01-01

    For students, writing is too frequently a matter of going through the motions, perhaps no truer than with the traditional academic essay. Although there are many culprits for this disengagement, one is surely an over-emphasis on form--and particularly set form--to the detriment of content. When form becomes formula, planning is stultified, losing…

  10. Dopamine D4 receptor, but not the ADHD-associated D4.7 variant, forms functional heteromers with the dopamine D2S receptor in the brain

    PubMed Central

    González, Sergio; Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Peper, Marcela; Lorenzo, Ramiro; Moreno, Estefanía; Ciruela, Francisco; Borycz, Janusz; Ortiz, Jordi; Lluís, Carme; Franco, Rafael; McCormick, Peter J.; Volkow, Nora D.; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Floran, Benjamin; Ferré, Sergi

    2011-01-01

    Polymorphic variants of the dopamine D4 receptor have been consistently associated with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However the functional significance of the risk polymorphism (variable number of tandem repeats in exon 3) is still unclear. Here we show that whereas the most frequent 4-repeat (D4.4) and the 2-repeat (D4.2) variants form functional heteromers with the short isoform of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2S), the 7-repeat risk allele (D4.7) does not. D2 receptor activation in the D2S-D4 receptor heteromer potentiates D4 receptor-mediated MAPK signaling in transfected cells and in the striatum, which did not occur in cells expressing D4.7 or in the striatum of knock-in mutant mice carrying the 7 repeats of the human D4.7 in the third intracellular loop of the D4 receptor. In the striatum D4 receptors are localized in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals, where they selectively modulate glutamatergic neurotransmission by interacting with D2S receptors. This interaction shows the same qualitative characteristics than the D2S-D4 receptor heteromer-mediated MAPK signaling and D2S receptor activation potentiates D4 receptor-mediated inibition of striatal glutamate release. It is therefore postulated that dysfunctional D2S-D4.7 heteromers may impair presynaptic dopaminergic control of corticostriatal glutamatergic neurotransmission and explain functional deficits associated with ADHD. PMID:21844870

  11. Crystal form control and particle size control of RG3487, a nicotinic α7 receptor partial agonist.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Shanming; Zhang, Pingsheng; Dong, Eric Z; Jennings, Geremia; Zhao, Baoshu; Pierce, Michael

    2016-07-11

    This paper describes solid form control and particle size control of RG3487, a nicotinic receptor partial agonist. Four crystal forms were identified by polymorph screen under ∼100 varying conditions. Form A and Form B are anhydrates, while Forms C and D are solvates. Forms A, which is enantiotropically related to Form B, is the more thermodynamically stable form under ambient conditions and the desired form selected for clinical development. The crystal form control of Form A was achieved by crystallization solvent selection which consistently produced the desired form. Several process parameters impacting particle size of Form A in the final crystallization step were identified and investigated through both online and offline particle size measurement. The investigation results were utilized to control crystallization processes which successfully produced Form A with different particle size in 500g scale. PMID:27167333

  12. Higher Education Corruption in the World Media: Prevalence, Patterns, and Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osipian, Ararat L.

    2007-01-01

    Corruption in higher education is a newly emerging topic in the field of education research. There is a phenomenal growth in the number of media reports on corruption in higher education over the last decade. However, the rigorous systematic research on education corruption is virtually nonexistent. This paper considers corruption in higher…

  13. Mutant forms of tumour necrosis factor receptor I that occur in TNF-receptor-associated periodic syndrome retain signalling functions but show abnormal behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Ian; Radford, Paul M; Draper-Morgan, Kelly-Ann; McIntosh, Richard; Bainbridge, Susan; Dickinson, Peter; Jamhawi, Lama; Sansaridis, Marios; Huggins, Mary L; Tighe, Patrick J; Powell, Richard J

    2004-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is a hereditary autoinflammatory disorder involving autosomal-dominant missense mutations in TNF receptor superfamily 1A (TNFRSF1A) ectodomains. To elucidate the molecular effects of TRAPS-related mutations, we transfected HEK-293 cells to produce lines stably expressing high levels of either wild-type (WT) or single mutant recombinant forms of TNFRSF1A. Mutants with single amino acid substitutions in the first cysteine-rich domain (CRD1) were produced both as full-length receptor proteins and as truncated forms lacking the cytoplasmic signalling domain (Δsig). High-level expression of either WT or mutant full-length TNFRSF1A spontaneously induced apoptosis and interleukin-8 production, indicating that the mutations in CRD1 did not abrogate signalling. Consistent with this, WT and mutant full-length TNFRSF1A formed cytoplasmic aggregates that co-localized with ubiquitin and chaperones, and with the signal transducer TRADD, but not with the inhibitor, silencer of death domain (SODD). Furthermore, as expected, WT and mutant Δsig forms of TNFRSF1A did not induce apoptosis or interleukin-8 production. However, whereas the WT full-length TNFRSF1A was expressed both in the cytoplasm and on the cell surface, the mutant receptors showed strong cytoplasmic expression but reduced cell-surface expression. The WT and mutant Δsig forms of TNFRSF1A were all expressed at the cell surface, but a proportion of the mutant receptors were also retained in the cytoplasm and co-localized with BiP. Furthermore, the mutant forms of surface-expressed Δsig TNFRSF1A were defective in binding TNF-α. We conclude that TRAPS-related CRD1 mutants of TNFRSF1A possess signalling properties associated with the cytoplasmic death domain, but other behavioural features of the mutant receptors are abnormal, including intracellular trafficking and TNF binding. PMID:15312137

  14. Higher density of serotonin-1A receptors in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of alcohol-preferring P rats

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.T.; Threlkeld, P.G. ); Lumeng, L.; Li, Ting-Kai )

    1990-01-01

    Saturable ({sup 3}H)-80HDPAT binding to 5HT-1A receptors in membranes prepared from hippocampus and frontal cerebral cortex of alcohol-preferring (P) rats and of alcohol-nonpreferring (NP) rats has been compared. The B{sub max} values or densities of recognition sites for 5HT-1A receptors in both brain areas of the P rats are 38 and 44 percent lower in the P rats than in the NP rats. The corresponding K{sub D} values are 38 and 44 percent lower in the P rats than in the NP rats, indicating higher affinities of the recognition sites for the 5HT-1A receptors in hippocampus and cerebral cortex of the P rats. These findings indicate either an enrichment of 5HT-1A receptor density during selective breeding for alcohol preference or an upregulation of 5HT-1A receptors of 5HT found in these brain areas of P rats as compared with the NP rats.

  15. The Quest for Quality. Sixteen Forms of Heresy in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodlad, Sinclair

    This book is an exploration of the current debate about quality in higher education. Using a construct of "heresies," it suggests a set of guiding principles in four key areas of university life: curriculum (because selecting what is worth learning in universities is not random); teaching methods (because universities offer opportunities for…

  16. Is Student Voice Necessarily Empowering? Problematising Student Voice as a Form of Higher Education Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Student voice, namely the institutionalisation of students' contributions to the evaluation, and increasingly, the day-to-day running of higher education, has a wide-ranging influence. It shapes the concerns of management and academics; it changes the organisation and content of degree courses and, at times, challenges authority. Through her…

  17. Inquiry-Based Learning in Higher Education: Principal Forms, Educational Objectives, and Disciplinary Variations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aditomo, Anindito; Goodyear, Peter; Bliuc, Ana-Maria; Ellis, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Learning through inquiry is a widely advocated pedagogical approach. However, there is currently little systematic knowledge about the practice of inquiry-based learning (IBL) in higher education. This study examined descriptions of learning tasks that were put forward as examples of IBL by 224 university teachers from various disciplines in three…

  18. The kinase LYK5 is a major chitin receptor in Arabidopsis and forms a chitin-induced complex with related kinase CERK1

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cao, Yangrong; Liang, Yan; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Nguyen, Cuong T.; Jedrzejczak, Robert P.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Stacey, Gary

    2014-10-23

    Chitin is a fungal microbe-associated molecular pattern recognized in Arabidopsis by a lysin motif receptor kinase (LYK), AtCERK1. Previous research suggested that AtCERK1 is the major chitin receptor and mediates chitin-induced signaling through homodimerization and phosphorylation. However, the reported chitin binding affinity of AtCERK1 is quite low, suggesting another receptor with high chitin binding affinity might be present. Here, we propose that AtLYK5 is the primary chitin receptor in Arabidopsis. Mutations in AtLYK5 resulted in a significant reduction in chitin response. AtLYK5 shares overlapping function with AtLYK4 and, therefore, Atlyk4/Atlyk5-2 double mutants show a complete loss of chitin response. AtLYK5more » interacts with AtCERK1 in a chitin-dependent manner. Chitin binding to AtLYK5 is indispensable for chitin-induced AtCERK1 phosphorylation. AtLYK5 binds chitin at a much higher affinity than AtCERK1. The data suggest that AtLYK5 is the primary receptor for chitin, forming a chitin inducible complex with AtCERK1 to induce plant immunity.« less

  19. The kinase LYK5 is a major chitin receptor in Arabidopsis and forms a chitin-induced complex with related kinase CERK1

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yangrong; Liang, Yan; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Nguyen, Cuong T.; Jedrzejczak, Robert P.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Stacey, Gary

    2014-10-23

    Chitin is a fungal microbe-associated molecular pattern recognized in Arabidopsis by a lysin motif receptor kinase (LYK), AtCERK1. Previous research suggested that AtCERK1 is the major chitin receptor and mediates chitin-induced signaling through homodimerization and phosphorylation. However, the reported chitin binding affinity of AtCERK1 is quite low, suggesting another receptor with high chitin binding affinity might be present. Here, we propose that AtLYK5 is the primary chitin receptor in Arabidopsis. Mutations in AtLYK5 resulted in a significant reduction in chitin response. AtLYK5 shares overlapping function with AtLYK4 and, therefore, Atlyk4/Atlyk5-2 double mutants show a complete loss of chitin response. AtLYK5 interacts with AtCERK1 in a chitin-dependent manner. Chitin binding to AtLYK5 is indispensable for chitin-induced AtCERK1 phosphorylation. AtLYK5 binds chitin at a much higher affinity than AtCERK1. The data suggest that AtLYK5 is the primary receptor for chitin, forming a chitin inducible complex with AtCERK1 to induce plant immunity.

  20. Functional calcium release channel formed by the carboxyl-terminal portion of ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, M B; Zhao, J; Takeshima, H; Ma, J

    1997-01-01

    The ryanodine receptor (RyR) is one of the key proteins involved in excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling in skeletal muscle, where it functions as a Ca2+ release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane. RyR consists of a single polypeptide of approximately 560 kDa normally arranged in a homotetrameric structure, which contains a carboxyl (C)-terminal transmembrane domain and a large amino (N)-terminal cytoplasmic domain. To test whether the carboxyl-terminal portion of RyR is sufficient to form a Ca2+ release channel, we expressed the full-length (RyR-wt) and C-terminal (RyR-C, approximately 130 kDa) RyR proteins in a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, and measured their Ca2+ release channel functions in planar lipid bilayer membranes. The single-channel properties of RyR-wt were found to be similar to those of RyR from skeletal muscle SR. The RyR-C protein forms a cation-selective channel that shares some of the channel properties with RyR-wt, including activation by cytoplasmic Ca2+ and regulation by ryanodine. Unlike RyR-wt, which exhibits a linear current-voltage relationship and inactivates at millimolar Ca2+, the channels formed by RyR-C display significant inward rectification and fail to close at high cytoplasmic Ca2+. Our results show that the C-terminal portion of RyR contains structures sufficient to form a functional Ca2+ release channel, but the N-terminal portion of RyR also affects the ion-conduction and calcium-dependent regulation of the Ca2+ release channel. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:9284301

  1. Star Formation in Isolated LIRGs: Clues to Star-forming Processes at Higher z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes-Carrera, Isaura; Olguín, Lorenzo; Ambrocio-Cruz, Patricia; Verley, Simon; Rosado, Margarita; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Repetto, Paolo; Vázquez, Celia; Aguilera, Verónica

    2011-12-01

    Luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) are galaxies with LIR > 1011 L⊙. For a star-forming galaxy to emit at a LIRG level, it must have a very high star formation rate (SFR). In the local Universe, the star formation (SF) is primarily triggered by interactions. However, at intermediate redshift, a large fraction of LIRGs are disk galaxies with little sign of recent merger activity. The question arises whether the intermediate redshift LIRGs are ``triggered'' or experiencing ``normal'', if elevated, SF. Understanding these SF processes is important since this type of systems may have contributed to 20% or more of the cosmic SFR in the early Universe. In order to address this issue we study similar systems in the Local Universe, that is isolated late-type galaxies displaying LIRG activity. We use different observational techniques in order to trace the star-forming history of these systems. Here we present preliminary results.

  2. Binding of receptor-recognized forms of alpha2-macroglobulin to the alpha2-macroglobulin signaling receptor activates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Misra, U K; Pizzo, S V

    1998-05-29

    Ligation of the alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2M) signaling receptor by receptor-recognized forms of alpha2M (alpha2M*) initiates mitogenesis secondary to increased intracellular Ca2+. We report here that ligation of the alpha2M signaling receptor also causes a 1. 5-2.5-fold increase in wortmannin-sensitive phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity as measured by the quantitation of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3). PIP3 formation was alpha2M* concentration-dependent with a maximal response at approximately 50 pM ligand concentration. The peak formation of PIP3 occurred at 10 min of incubation. The alpha2M receptor binding fragment mutant K1370R which binds to the alpha2M signaling receptor activating the signaling cascade, increased PIP3 formation by 2-fold. The mutant K1374A, which binds very poorly to the alpha2M signaling receptor, did not cause any increase in PIP3 formation. alpha2M*-induced DNA synthesis was inhibited by wortmannin. 1, 2Bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acetoxymethylester a chelator of intracellular Ca2+, drastically reduced alpha2M*-induced increases in PIP3 formation. We conclude that PI3K is involved in alpha2M*-induced mitogenesis in macrophages and intracellular Ca2+ plays a role in PI3K activation. PMID:9593670

  3. Statins stimulate the production of a soluble form of the receptor for advanced glycation end products

    PubMed Central

    Quade-Lyssy, Patricia; Kanarek, Anna Maria; Baiersdörfer, Markus; Postina, Rolf; Kojro, Elzbieta

    2013-01-01

    The beneficial effects of statin therapy in the reduction of cardiovascular pathogenesis, atherosclerosis, and diabetic complications are well known. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays an important role in the progression of these diseases. In contrast, soluble forms of RAGE act as decoys for RAGE ligands and may prevent the development of RAGE-mediated disorders. Soluble forms of RAGE are either produced by alternative splicing [endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE)] or by proteolytic shedding mediated by metalloproteinases [shed RAGE (sRAGE)]. Therefore we analyzed whether statins influence the production of soluble RAGE. Lovastatin treatment of either mouse alveolar epithelial cells endogenously expressing RAGE or HEK cells overexpressing RAGE caused induction of RAGE shedding, but did not influence secretion of esRAGE from HEK cells overexpressing esRAGE. Lovastatin-induced secretion of sRAGE was also evident after restoration of the isoprenylation pathway, demonstrating a correlation of sterol biosynthesis and activation of RAGE shedding. Lovastatin-stimulated induction of RAGE shedding was completely abolished by a metalloproteinase ADAM10 inhibitor. We also demonstrate that statins stimulate RAGE shedding at low physiologically relevant concentrations. Our results show that statins, due to their cholesterol-lowering effects, increase the soluble RAGE level by inducing RAGE shedding, and by doing this, might prevent the development of RAGE-mediated pathogenesis. PMID:23966666

  4. Immunoglobulin M receptors on memory cells of immunoglobulin G antibody-forming cell clones.

    PubMed

    Abney, E R; Keeler, K D; Parkhouse, R M; Willcox, H N

    1976-06-01

    The memory cells of two antibody-forming cell clones had receptors of the IgM class, even though the clones had been producing IgG1 or IgG2a anti-2,4-dinitrophenyl antibodies for 9-15 months previously (on exposure to antigen). Thus a phenotypic switch in heavy chain constant region evidently occurred after re-exposure of these memory cells to antigen. To show that, we first removed the clonal cells' surface immunoglobins by "capping" and "stripping", with class- or subclass-specific antisera. Then, to assay their remaining receptor activity, the cells were incubated with antigen in vitro, washed and transferred (together with carrier primed cells) to irradiated recipients, and their antibody responses to this in vitro boost were assayed by iselectric focusing. Pretreatment with anti-mu serum, as well as with anti-Fab(kappa), prevented the responses of the IgG1 and IgG2a clones to an in vitro boost, while anti-gamma1 and anti-gamma2a antisera had no effect. An antiserum to the putative mouse IgD also had no effect. The anti-mu serum failed to react with the IgG1 and IgG2A clonal serum antibodies in the test tube. Some other contaminating clones were suppressed completely only by the anti-Fab serum. This result strongly suggests that switching in class commitment may occur during the differentiation of memory cells to antibody producers, and may therefore be antigen-dependent. It also implies that some apparently naive cells with surface IgM may, in reality, be B memory cells. PMID:825376

  5. Precise Determination of the Neutron Magnetic Form Factor to Higher Q{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    William K. Brooks; Jeffery D. Lachniet

    2004-10-01

    The neutron elastic magnetic form factor G{sub M}{sup n} has been extracted from quasielastic scattering from deuterium in the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, CLAS. The kinematic coverage of the measurement is continuous over a broad range, extending from below 1 GeV{sup 2} to nearly 5 GeV{sup 2} in four-momentum transfer squared. High precision is achieved by employing a ratio technique in which most uncertainties cancel, and by a simultaneous in-situ calibration of the neutron detection efficiency, the largest correction to the data. Preliminary results are shown with statistical errors only.

  6. The fetal form of the acetylcholine receptor distinguishes rhabdomyosarcomas from other childhood tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Gattenloehner, S.; Vincent, A.; Leuschner, I.; Tzartos, S.; Müller-Hermelink, H. K.; Kirchner, T.; Marx, A.

    1998-01-01

    The fetal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) of muscle is an oligomeric membrane protein with subunit composition alpha2betadeltagamma. After birth, the adult form, in which an epsilon-subunit replaces the gamma-subunit, predominates, and expression of the fetal form is limited to thymic myoid cells, extraocular muscles, and denervated striated muscle. We looked for expression of AChR in rhabdomyosarcomas and other childhood tumors by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. mRNA for the AChR gamma-subunit was detected in all embryonal and alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas tested (n = 16) and in some tumors with a rhabdomyomatous component (n = 2) but not in other nonrhabdomyomatous tumors of childhood and adults (n = 45). The fetal form of the AChR was detected immunohistochemically in five of eight embryonal and four of eight alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas and in two Wilms' tumors with a rhabdomyomatous component but not in other tumors or in normal muscle. We conclude that reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for AChR gamma-subunit could be useful for the diagnosis of rhabdomyosarcoma of childhood and for the detection of micrometastases and minimal residual disease. In addition, the fetal AChR protein is the first extracellular tumor marker that can distinguish rhabdomyosarcomas from nonrhabdomyomatous tumors and from normal muscle. Our findings, therefore, imply that the fetal AChR may be a target for in vivo imaging and, as AChR internalization and degradation is increased by antibody-induced cross-linking, may also provide a sensitive and specific target for immunotherapeutic strategies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9466570

  7. Excited baryon form-factors at high momentum transfer at CEBAF at higher energies

    SciTech Connect

    Stoler, P.

    1994-04-01

    The possibilities of measuring the properties of excited nucleons at high Q{sup 2} by means of exclusive single meson production at CEBAF with an electron energy of 8 GeV is considered. The motivation is to access short range phenomena in baryon structure, and to investigate the transition from the low Q{sup 2} non-perturbative QCD regime, where constituent quark models are valid, to higher Q{sup 2} where it is believed perturbative QCD plays an increasingly important role. It is found that high quality baryon decay angular distributions can be obtained for the most prominent states up to Q{sup 2} {approximately} 12 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} using a set of moderate resolution, large solid angle magnetic spectrometers.

  8. Minding the Gap? Young People's Accounts of Taking a Gap Year as a Form of Identity Work in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    A Gap Year is a break in an educational career, principally taken between leaving school and beginning university. Previous research on the Gap Year has suggested it is a form of social class positioning or forum for undertaking transitions in identity during young adulthood. This paper extends this research into the context of higher education…

  9. Memoir as a Form of Auto-Ethnographic Research for Exploring the Practice of Transnational Higher Education in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Joy Denise

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that memoir, as a form of auto-ethnographic research, is an appropriate method for exploring the complexities and singularities in the practice of western educational practitioners who are immersed in the social reality of offshore higher education institutions, such as those in Mainland China. I illustrate this proposition…

  10. The Labor Market Outcomes of Two Forms of Cross-Border Higher Education Degree Programs between Malaysia and Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koda, Yoshiko; Yuki, Takako

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the labor market outcomes of two different forms of cross-border higher education degree programs (i.e., study abroad vs. twinning) between Malaysia and Japan. Based on a new graduate survey, it examines whether there are differences in the labor market outcomes between the two programs and what other factors have significant…

  11. The erythropoietin receptor transmembrane region is necessary for activation by the Friend spleen focus-forming virus gp55 glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Zon, L I; Moreau, J F; Koo, J W; Mathey-Prevot, B; D'Andrea, A D

    1992-01-01

    The erythropoietin receptor (EPO-R), a member of the cytokine receptor superfamily, can be activated by binding either erythropoietin (EPO) or gp55, the Friend spleen focus-forming virus glycoprotein. The highly specific interaction between gp55 and EPO-R triggers cell proliferation and thereby causes the first stage of Friend virus-induced erythroleukemia. We have generated functional chimeric receptors containing regions of the EPO-R and the interleukin-3 receptor (AIC2A polypeptide), a related cytokine receptor which does not interact with gp55. All chimeric receptors were expressed at similar levels, had similar binding affinities for EPO, and conferred EPO-dependent cell growth. Only those chimeric receptors which contained the EPO-R transmembrane region were activated by gp55. These results demonstrate that the transmembrane region of the EPO-R is critical for activation by gp55. In addition, analysis of a soluble, secreted EPO-R and cysteine point mutants of the EPO-R show that the extracytoplasmic region of the EPO-R specifically interacts with gp55. Images PMID:1320192

  12. Higher order explicit symmetric integrators for inseparable forms of coordinates and momenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Wu, Xin; Huang, Guoqing; Liu, Fuyao

    2016-06-01

    Pihajoki proposed the extended phase-space second-order explicit symmetric leapfrog methods for inseparable Hamiltonian systems. On the basis of this work, we survey a critical problem on how to mix the variables in the extended phase space. Numerical tests show that sequent permutations of coordinates and momenta can make the leapfrog-like methods yield the most accurate results and the optimal long-term stabilized error behaviour. We also present a novel method to construct many fourth-order extended phase-space explicit symmetric integration schemes. Each scheme represents the symmetric production of six usual second-order leapfrogs without any permutations. This construction consists of four segments: the permuted coordinates, triple product of the usual second-order leapfrog without permutations, the permuted momenta and the triple product of the usual second-order leapfrog without permutations. Similarly, extended phase-space sixth, eighth and other higher order explicit symmetric algorithms are available. We used several inseparable Hamiltonian examples, such as the post-Newtonian approach of non-spinning compact binaries, to show that one of the proposed fourth-order methods is more efficient than the existing methods; examples include the fourth-order explicit symplectic integrators of Chin and the fourth-order explicit and implicit mixed symplectic integrators of Zhong et al. Given a moderate choice for the related mixing and projection maps, the extended phase-space explicit symplectic-like methods are well suited for various inseparable Hamiltonian problems. Samples of these problems involve the algorithmic regularization of gravitational systems with velocity-dependent perturbations in the Solar system and post-Newtonian Hamiltonian formulations of spinning compact objects.

  13. Expression and purification of an engineered human endothelin receptor B in a monomeric form.

    PubMed

    Mishin, A V; Luginina, A P; Potapenko, A P; Borshchevskiy, V I; Katritch, V; Edelweiss, E; Okhrimenko, I S; Gordeliy, V I; Cherezov, V G

    2016-03-01

    In humans, two endothelin receptors, ETa and ETb, are activated by three endogenous 21-mer cyclic peptides, ET-1, ET-2, and ET-3, which control various physiological processes, including vasoconstriction, vasodilation, and stimulation of cell proliferation. The first stage of this study it to produce a stable solubilized and purified receptor in a monodisperse state. This article is focused on the engineering, expression, purification, and characterization of the endothelin receptor B for subsequent structural and functional studies. PMID:27193723

  14. Global Developmental Gene Programing Involves a Nuclear Form of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-1 (FGFR1).

    PubMed

    Terranova, Christopher; Narla, Sridhar T; Lee, Yu-Wei; Bard, Jonathan; Parikh, Abhirath; Stachowiak, Ewa K; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S; Buck, Michael J; Birkaya, Barbara; Stachowiak, Michal K

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies have placed the Fgfr1 gene at the top of major ontogenic pathways that enable gastrulation, tissue development and organogenesis. Using genome-wide sequencing and loss and gain of function experiments the present investigation reveals a mechanism that underlies global and direct gene regulation by the nuclear form of FGFR1, ensuring that pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells differentiate into Neuronal Cells in response to Retinoic Acid. Nuclear FGFR1, both alone and with its partner nuclear receptors RXR and Nur77, targets thousands of active genes and controls the expression of pluripotency, homeobox, neuronal and mesodermal genes. Nuclear FGFR1 targets genes in developmental pathways represented by Wnt/β-catenin, CREB, BMP, the cell cycle and cancer-related TP53 pathway, neuroectodermal and mesodermal programing networks, axonal growth and synaptic plasticity pathways. Nuclear FGFR1 targets the consensus sequences of transcription factors known to engage CREB-binding protein, a common coregulator of transcription and established binding partner of nuclear FGFR1. This investigation reveals the role of nuclear FGFR1 as a global genomic programmer of cell, neural and muscle development. PMID:25923916

  15. The export receptor Crm1 forms a dimer to promote nuclear export of HIV RNA

    PubMed Central

    Booth, David S; Cheng, Yifan; Frankel, Alan D

    2014-01-01

    The HIV Rev protein routes viral RNAs containing the Rev Response Element (RRE) through the Crm1 nuclear export pathway to the cytoplasm where viral proteins are expressed and genomic RNA is delivered to assembling virions. The RRE assembles a Rev oligomer that displays nuclear export sequences (NESs) for recognition by the Crm1-RanGTP nuclear receptor complex. Here we provide the first view of an assembled HIV-host nuclear export complex using single-particle electron microscopy. Unexpectedly, Crm1 forms a dimer with an extensive interface that enhances association with Rev-RRE and poises NES binding sites to interact with a Rev oligomer. The interface between Crm1 monomers explains differences between Crm1 orthologs that alter nuclear export and determine cellular tropism for viral replication. The arrangement of the export complex identifies a novel binding surface to possibly target an HIV inhibitor and may point to a broader role for Crm1 dimerization in regulating host gene expression. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04121.001 PMID:25486595

  16. Signal transduction in light–oxygen–voltage receptors lacking the adduct-forming cysteine residue

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Estella F.; Diensthuber, Ralph P.; Vaidya, Anand T.; Borbat, Peter P.; Engelhard, Christopher; Freed, Jack H.; Bittl, Robert; Möglich, Andreas; Crane, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Light–oxygen–voltage (LOV) receptors sense blue light through the photochemical generation of a covalent adduct between a flavin-nucleotide chromophore and a strictly conserved cysteine residue. Here we show that, after cysteine removal, the circadian-clock LOV-protein Vivid still undergoes light-induced dimerization and signalling because of flavin photoreduction to the neutral semiquinone (NSQ). Similarly, photoreduction of the engineered LOV histidine kinase YF1 to the NSQ modulates activity and downstream effects on gene expression. Signal transduction in both proteins hence hinges on flavin protonation, which is common to both the cysteinyl adduct and the NSQ. This general mechanism is also conserved by natural cysteine-less, LOV-like regulators that respond to chemical or photoreduction of their flavin cofactors. As LOV proteins can react to light even when devoid of the adduct-forming cysteine, modern LOV photoreceptors may have arisen from ancestral redox-active flavoproteins. The ability to tune LOV reactivity through photoreduction may have important implications for LOV mechanism and optogenetic applications. PMID:26648256

  17. Selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) lasofoxifene forms reactive quinones similar to estradiol.

    PubMed

    Michalsen, Bradley T; Gherezghiher, Teshome B; Choi, Jaewoo; Chandrasena, R Esala P; Qin, Zhihui; Thatcher, Gregory R J; Bolton, Judy L

    2012-07-16

    The bioactivation of both endogenous and equine estrogens to electrophilic quinoid metabolites has been postulated as a contributing factor in carcinogenic initiation and/or promotion in hormone sensitive tissues. Bearing structural resemblance to estrogens, extensive studies have shown that many selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are subject to similar bioactivation pathways. Lasofoxifene (LAS), a third generation SERM which has completed phase III clinical trials for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, is currently approved in the European Union for this indication. Previously, Prakash et al. (Drug Metab. Dispos. (2008) 36, 1218-1226) reported that similar to estradiol, two catechol regioisomers of LAS are formed as primary oxidative metabolites, accounting for roughly half of the total LAS metabolism. However, the potential for further oxidation of these catechols to electrophilic o-quinones has not been reported. In the present study, LAS was synthesized and its oxidative metabolism investigated in vitro under various conditions. Incubation of LAS with tyrosinase, human liver microsomes, or rat liver microsomes in the presence of GSH as a trapping reagent resulted in the formation of two mono-GSH and two di-GSH catechol conjugates which were characterized by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Similar conjugates were also detected in incubations with P450 3A4, P450 2D6, and P450 1B1 supersomes. Interestingly, these conjugates were also detected as major metabolites when compared to competing detoxification pathways such as glucuronidation and methylation. The 7-hydroxylasofoxifene (7-OHLAS) catechol regioisomer was also synthesized and oxidized either chemically or enzymatically to an o-quinone that was shown to form depurinating adducts with DNA. Collectively, these data show that analogous to estrogens, LAS is oxidized to catechols and o-quinones which could potentially contribute to in vivo toxicity for this SERM

  18. The Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator (SERM) Lasofoxifene Forms Reactive Quinones Similar to Estradiol

    PubMed Central

    Michalsen, Bradley T.; Gherezghiher, Teshome B.; Choi, Jaewoo; Esala, R.; Chandrasena, P.; Qin, Zhihui; Thatcher, Gregory R.J.; Bolton, Judy L.

    2012-01-01

    The bioactivation of both endogenous and equine estrogens to electrophilic quinoid metabolites has been postulated as a contributing factor in carcinogenic initiation and/or promotion in hormone sensitive tissues. Bearing structural resemblance to estrogens, extensive studies have shown that many selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are subject to similar bioactivation pathways. Lasofoxifene (LAS), a third generation SERM which has completed Phase III clinical trials for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, is currently approved in the European Union for this indication. Previously, Prakash et al. (Drug Metab. Dispos. 2008, 36, 1218-26) reported that similar to estradiol, two catechol regioisomers of LAS are formed as primary oxidative metabolites, accounting for roughly half of total LAS metabolism. However, the potential for further oxidation of these catechols to electrophilic o-quinones has not been reported. In the present study, LAS was synthesized and its oxidative metabolism investigated in vitro under various conditions. Incubation of LAS with tyrosinase, human liver microsomes, or rat liver microsomes in the presence of GSH as a trapping reagent resulted in formation of two mono-GSH and two di-GSH catechol conjugates which were characterized by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Similar conjugates were also detected in incubations with P450 3A4, P450 2D6, and P450 1B1 supersomes. Interestingly, these conjugates were also detected as major metabolites when compared to competing detoxification pathways such as glucuronidation and methylation. The 7-hydroxylasofoxifene (7-OHLAS) catechol regioisomer was also synthesized and oxidized either chemically or enzymatically to an o-quinone that was shown to form depurinating adducts with DNA. Collectively, these data show that analogous to estrogens, LAS is oxidized to catechols and o-quinones which could potentially contribute to in vivo toxicity for this SERM. PMID

  19. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 subunits with a C2 cytoplasmic loop yellow fluorescent protein insertion form functional receptors

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Teresa A; Liu, Qiang; Whiteaker, Paul; Wu, Jie; Lukas, Ronald J

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Several nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits have been engineered as fluorescent protein (FP) fusions and exploited to illuminate features of nAChRs. The aim of this work was to create a FP fusion in the nAChR α7 subunit without compromising formation of functional receptors. Methods: A gene construct was generated to introduce yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), in frame, into the otherwise unaltered, large, second cytoplamsic loop between the third and fourth transmembrane domains of the mouse nAChR α7 subunit (α7Y). SH-EP1 cells were transfected with mouse nAChR wild type α7 subunits (α7) or with α7Y subunits, alone or with the chaperone protein, hRIC-3. Receptor function was assessed using whole-cell current recording. Receptor expression was measured with 125I-labeled α-bungarotoxin (I-Bgt) binding, laser scanning confocal microscopy, and total internal reflectance fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. Results: Whole-cell currents revealed that α7Y nAChRs and α7 nAChRs were functional with comparable EC50 values for the α7 nAChR-selective agonist, choline, and IC50 values for the α7 nAChR-selective antagonist, methyllycaconitine. I-Bgt binding was detected only after co-expression with hRIC-3. Confocal microscopy revealed that α7Y had primarily intracellular rather than surface expression. TIRF microscopy confirmed that little α7Y localized to the plasma membrane, typical of α7 nAChRs. Conclusion: nAChRs composed as homooligomers of α7Y subunits containing cytoplasmic loop YFP have functional, ligand binding, and trafficking characteristics similar to those of α7 nAChRs. α7Y nAChRs may be used to elucidate properties of α7 nAChRs and to identify and develop novel probes for these receptors, perhaps in high-throughput fashion. PMID:19498423

  20. Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Higher Vertebrate Orthologous of Intra-Cytoplasmic Pattern Recognition Receptors in Grey Bamboo Shark

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ravi; Gopal, Dhinakar Raj; Rajesh, Preeti; Chidambaram, Balachandran; Kalyanasundaram, Aravindan; Angamuthu, Raja

    2014-01-01

    From an immunologist perspective, sharks are an important group of jawed cartilaginous fishes and survey of the public database revealed a great gap in availability of large-scale sequence data for the group of Chondrichthyans the elasmobranchs. In an attempt to bridge this deficit we generated the transcriptome from the spleen and kidney tissues (a total of 1,606,172 transcripts) of the shark, Chiloscyllium griseum using the Illumina HiSeq2000 platform. With a cut off of > = 300 bp and an expression value of >1RPKM we used 43,385 transcripts for BLASTX analysis which revealed 17,548 transcripts matching to the NCBI nr database with an E-value of < = 10−5 and similarity score of 40%. The longest transcript was 16,974 bases with matched to HECT domain containing E3 ubiqutin protein ligase. MEGAN4 annotation pipeline revealed immune and signalling pathways including cell adhesion molecules, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, T-cell receptor signalling pathway and chemokine signaling pathway to be highly expressed in spleen, while different metabolism pathways such as amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism and xenobiotic biodegradation were highly expressed in kidney. Few of the candidate genes were selected to analyze their expression levels in various tissues by real-time PCR and also localization of a receptor by in-situ PCR to validate the prediction. We also predicted the domains structures of some of the identified pattern recognition receptors, their phylogenetic relationship with lower and higher vertebrates and the complete downstream signaling mediators of classical dsRNA signaling pathway. The generated transcriptome will be a valuable resource to further genetic and genomic research in elasmobranchs. PMID:24956167

  1. The sigma-1 receptors are present in monomeric and oligomeric forms in living cells in the presence and absence of ligands

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Deo R.; Biener, Gabriel; Yang, Jay; Oliver, Julie A.; Ruoho, Arnold; Raicu, Valerică

    2015-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a 223-amino-acid membrane protein that resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane of some mammalian cells. The S1R is regulated by various synthetic molecules including (+)-pentazocine, cocaine and haloperidol and endogenous molecules such as sphingosine, dimethyltryptamine and dehydroepiandrosterone. Ligand-regulated protein chaperone functions linked to oxidative stress and neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and neuropathic pain have been attributed to the S1R. Several client proteins that interact with S1R have been identified including various types of ion channels and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). When S1R constructs containing C-terminal monomeric GFP2 and YFP fusions were co-expressed in COS-7 cells and subjected to FRET spectrometry analysis, monomers, dimers and higher oligomeric forms of S1R were identified under non-liganded conditions. In the presence of the prototypic S1R agonist, (+)-pentazocine, however, monomers and dimers were the prevailing forms of S1R. The prototypic antagonist, haloperidol, on the other hand, favoured higher order S1R oligomers. These data, in sum, indicate that heterologously expressed S1Rs occur in vivo in COS-7 cells in multiple oligomeric forms and that S1R ligands alter these oligomeric structures. We suggest that the S1R oligomerization states may regulate its function(s). PMID:25510962

  2. The sigma-1 receptors are present in monomeric and oligomeric forms in living cells in the presence and absence of ligands.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ashish K; Mavlyutov, Timur; Singh, Deo R; Biener, Gabriel; Yang, Jay; Oliver, Julie A; Ruoho, Arnold; Raicu, Valerică

    2015-03-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a 223-amino-acid membrane protein that resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane of some mammalian cells. The S1R is regulated by various synthetic molecules including (+)-pentazocine, cocaine and haloperidol and endogenous molecules such as sphingosine, dimethyltryptamine and dehydroepiandrosterone. Ligand-regulated protein chaperone functions linked to oxidative stress and neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and neuropathic pain have been attributed to the S1R. Several client proteins that interact with S1R have been identified including various types of ion channels and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). When S1R constructs containing C-terminal monomeric GFP2 and YFP fusions were co-expressed in COS-7 cells and subjected to FRET spectrometry analysis, monomers, dimers and higher oligomeric forms of S1R were identified under non-liganded conditions. In the presence of the prototypic S1R agonist, (+)-pentazocine, however, monomers and dimers were the prevailing forms of S1R. The prototypic antagonist, haloperidol, on the other hand, favoured higher order S1R oligomers. These data, in sum, indicate that heterologously expressed S1Rs occur in vivo in COS-7 cells in multiple oligomeric forms and that S1R ligands alter these oligomeric structures. We suggest that the S1R oligomerization states may regulate its function(s). PMID:25510962

  3. Net Shape Spin Formed Cryogenic Aluminum Lithium Cryogenic Tank Domes for Lower Cost Higher Performance Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.; Hoffman, Eric; Domack, Marcia; Brewster, Jeb; Russell, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    With the goal of lower cost (simplified manufacturing and lower part count) and higher performance (higher strength to weight alloys) the NASA Technical Maturation Program in 2006 funded a proposal to investigate spin forming of space launch vehicle cryogenic tank domes. The project funding continued under the NASA Exploration Technology Development Program through completion in FY12. The first phase of the project involved spin forming of eight, 1 meter diameter "path finder" domes. Half of these were processed using a concave spin form process (MT Aerospace, Augsburg Germany) and the other half using a convex process (Spincraft, Boston MA). The convex process has been used to produce the Ares Common Bulkhead and the concave process has been used to produce dome caps for the Space Shuttle light weight external tank and domes for the NASDA H2. Aluminum Lithium material was chosen because of its higher strength to weight ratio than the Aluminum 2219 baseline. Aluminum lithium, in order to obtain the desired temper (T8), requires a cold stretch after the solution heat treatment and quench. This requirement favors the concave spin form process which was selected for scale up. This paper describes the results of processing four, 5.5 meter diameter (upper stage scale) net shaped spin formed Aluminum Lithium domes. In order to allow scalability beyond the limits of foundry and rolling mills (about 12 foot width) the circular blank contained one friction stir weld (heavy lifter scales require a flat blank containing two welds). Mechanical properties data (tensile, fracture toughness, stress corrosion, and simulated service testing) for the parent metal and weld will also be discussed.

  4. A novel form of long-term potentiation selectively expressed by NMDA receptors at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyung-Bae; Castillo, Pablo E.

    2008-01-01

    The mossy fiber to CA3 pyramidal cell synapse (mf-CA3) provides a major source of excitation to the hippocampus. Thus far, these glutamatergic synapses are well recognized for showing a presynaptic, NMDA receptor-independent form of LTP which is expressed as a long-lasting increase of transmitter release. Here, we show that in addition to this “classical” LTP, mf-CA3 synapses can undergo a form of LTP characterized by a selective enhancement of NMDA receptor-mediated transmission. This potentiation requires coactivation of NMDA and mGlu5 receptors, and a postsynaptic calcium rise. Unlike classical LTP, expression of this novel mossy fiber LTP is due to a PKC-dependent recruitment of NMDA receptors specifically to the mf-CA3 synapse via a SNARE-dependent process. Having two mechanistically different forms of LTP may allow mf-CA3 synapses to respond with more flexibility to the changing demands of the hippocampal network. PMID:18184568

  5. Structure-function relationships of peptides forming the calcin family of ryanodine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Liang; Gurrola, Georgina B; Zhang, Jing; Valdivia, Carmen R; SanMartin, Mario; Zamudio, Fernando Z; Zhang, Liming; Possani, Lourival D; Valdivia, Héctor H

    2016-05-01

    Calcins are a novel family of scorpion peptides that bind with high affinity to ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and increase their activity by inducing subconductance states. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the structure-function relationships of the eight calcins known to date, based on their primary sequence, three-dimensional modeling, and functional effects on skeletal RyRs (RyR1). Primary sequence alignment and evolutionary analysis show high similarity among all calcins (≥78.8% identity). Other common characteristics include an inhibitor cysteine knot (ICK) motif stabilized by three pairs of disulfide bridges and a dipole moment (DM) formed by positively charged residues clustering on one side of the molecule and neutral and negatively charged residues segregating on the opposite side. [(3)H]Ryanodine binding assays, used as an index of the open probability of RyRs, reveal that all eight calcins activate RyR1 dose-dependently with Kd values spanning approximately three orders of magnitude and in the following rank order: opicalcin1 > opicalcin2 > vejocalcin > hemicalcin > imperacalcin > hadrucalcin > maurocalcin > urocalcin. All calcins significantly augment the bell-shaped [Ca(2+)]-[(3)H]ryanodine binding curve with variable effects on the affinity constants for Ca(2+) activation and inactivation. In single channel recordings, calcins induce the appearance of a subconductance state in RyR1 that has a unique fractional value (∼20% to ∼60% of the full conductance state) but bears no relationship to binding affinity, DM, or capacity to stimulate Ca(2+) release. Except for urocalcin, all calcins at 100 nM concentration stimulate Ca(2+) release and deplete Ca(2+) load from skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum. The natural variation within the calcin family of peptides offers a diversified set of high-affinity ligands with the capacity to modulate RyRs with high dynamic range and potency. PMID:27114612

  6. Prolactin stimulates cell proliferation through a long form of prolactin receptor and K+ channel activation.

    PubMed Central

    Van Coppenolle, Fabien; Skryma, Roman; Ouadid-Ahidouch, Halima; Slomianny, Christian; Roudbaraki, Morad; Delcourt, Philippe; Dewailly, Etienne; Humez, Sandrine; Crépin, Alexandre; Gourdou, Isabelle; Djiane, Jean; Bonnal, Jean-Louis; Mauroy, Brigitte; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2004-01-01

    PRL (prolactin) has been implicated in the proliferation and differentiation of numerous tissues, including the prostate gland. However, the PRL-R (PRL receptor) signal transduction pathway, leading to the stimulation of cell proliferation, remains unclear and has yet to be mapped. The present study was undertaken to develop a clear understanding of the mechanisms involved in this pathway and, in particular, to determine the role of K(+) channels. We used androgen-sensitive prostate cancer (LNCaP) cells whose proliferation is known to be stimulated by PRL. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis showed that LNCaP cells express a long form of PRL-R, but do not produce its intermediate isoform. Patch-clamp techniques showed that the application of 5 nM PRL increased both the macroscopic K(+) current amplitude and the single K(+)-channel open probability. This single-channel activity increase was reduced by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein, herbimycin A and lavandustine A, thereby indicating that tyrosine kinase phosphorylation is required in PRL-induced K(+) channel stimulation. PRL enhances p59( fyn ) phosphorylation by a factor of 2 after a 10 min application in culture. In addition, where an antip59( fyn ) antibody is present in the patch pipette, PRL no longer increases K(+) current amplitude. Furthermore, the PRL-stimulated proliferation is inhibited by the K(+) channel inhibitors alpha-dendrotoxin and tetraethylammonium. Thus, as K(+) channels are known to be involved in LNCaP cell proliferation, we suggest that K(+) channel modulation by PRL, via p59( fyn ) pathway, is the primary ionic event in PRL signal transduction, triggering cell proliferation. PMID:14565846

  7. Point mutation increases a form of the NK1 receptor with high affinity for neurokinin A and B and septide

    PubMed Central

    Ciucci, Alessandra; Palma, Carla; Manzini, Stefano; Werge, Thomas M

    1998-01-01

    The binding modalities of substance P and neurokinin A on the wild type and Gly166 to-Cys mutant NK1 receptors expressed on CHO cells were investigated in homologous and heterologous binding experiments using both radiolabelled substance P and neurokinin A.On the wild type NK1 receptor NKA displaces radiolabelled substance P with very low apparent affinity, despite its high-affinity binding constant (determined in homologous binding experiments). The Gly166 to-Cys substitution in the NK1 tachykinin receptor greatly enhances the apparent affinity of neurokinin A in competition for radiolabelled substance P, but it does not change the binding constant of neurokinin A. The mutation, thereby, eliminates the discrepancy between the low apparent affinity and the high binding constant of neurokinin A.On the wild type receptor the binding capacity of neurokinin A is significantly smaller than that of substance P. In contrast, the two tachykinins bind to approximately the same number of sites on the mutant receptor.Simultaneous mass action law analysis of binding data in which multiple radioligands were employed in parallel demonstrated that a one-site model was unable to accommodate all the experimental data, whereas a two-site model provided a dramatically better description.These two receptor-sites display equally high affinity for substance P, while neurokinin A strongly discriminates between a high and a low affinity component. The binding affinities of neurokinin A are not affected by the mutation, which instead specifically alters the distribution between receptor sites in favour of a high affinity neurokinin A binding form.The low apparent affinity and binding capacity of neurokinin A on the wild type receptor results from neurokinin A binding with high affinity only to a fraction of the sites labelled by substance P. The mutation increases the proportion of this site, and consequently enhances the apparent affinity and binding capacity of neurokinin A.The binding

  8. Unstimulated human CD4 lymphocytes express a cytoplasmic immature form of the common cytokine receptor gamma-chain.

    PubMed

    Bani, L; Pasquier, V; Kryworuchko, M; Salamero, J; Thèze, J

    2001-07-01

    As a component of various cytokine receptors, common cytokine receptor gamma-chain (gamma(c)) is essential in the development of the immune system and plays an important role in different stages of inflammatory and immune responses. Here we establish that resting CD4 T cells and the Jurkat CD4 T cell line do not express the mature form of gamma(c) (64 kDa) recognized by mAb Tugh4. However, these cells constitutively transcribe the corresponding gamma(c) gene. This apparent paradox was solved by the demonstration that polyclonal anti-gamma(c) Abs detected endoglycosidase-H-sensitive immature forms of gamma(c) (54-58 kDa) expressed by quiescent CD4 T lymphocytes and Jurkat cells. Immature gamma(c) is characterized as an intracellular component localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Pulse-chase analysis shows that the immature gamma(c) is rapidly degraded after synthesis. After activation of CD4 T lymphocytes, and as seen in the CD4 T cell line Kit 225, the endoglycosidase-H-resistant mature form of gamma(c) is detectable at the cell surface and in the endosomal compartment. For the first time, our results demonstrate that a cytokine receptor chain may be constitutively produced as an immature form. Furthermore, this supports the notion that expression of the functional form of gamma(c) may require intracellular interactions with lineage- or subset-specific molecular partners. PMID:11418669

  9. Identification and steroid receptor activity of products formed from the bromination of technical nonylphenol.

    PubMed

    Hill, Elizabeth M; Smith, Michael D

    2006-09-01

    Alkylphenols are commonly present in wastewater effluents and may contribute to the total hormonal loading of receiving waters due to their weakly estrogenic properties. However the presence of reactive bromine species in some treated wastewaters can result in the formation of brominated alkylphenols which may also possess steroid receptor activity. In this study, the products of bromination of technical nonylphenol (NP) were identified, purified and tested in vitro in recombinant yeast steroid receptor transcription assays. Bromination of NP in the presence of acetic acid resulted in the formation of one major product which was identified as 2-bromo-4-nonylphenol (NPBr). In the presence of methanol/water, bromination of NP resulted in the formation 2,6-dibromo-4-nonylphenol (NPBr2) as well as a number of other minor polybrominated products. The EC50 of NPBr in the yeast estrogen receptor transcription (YES) assay was 6.7x10(-6) M, which was 48 fold less active than NP and 86,000 fold less active than the estrogen agonist 17beta-estradiol NPBr2 was not active in the YES assay. NP, NPBr and NPBr2 were all weakly androgenic in the yeast androgen receptor transcription assay but at concentrations which were 100,000 fold less active than the androgen receptor agonist dihydrotestosterone. Neither NP, NPBr or NPBr2 exhibited appreciable anti-estrogenic or anti-androgenic activity in the yeast receptor transcription assays. This study suggests that bromination of NP markedly reduces its estrogen receptor transcription activity but has no effect on the weak androgen receptor transcription activity of the alkylphenol. PMID:16473392

  10. Pore-forming pyocin S5 utilizes the FptA ferripyochelin receptor to kill Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Elfarash, Ameer; Dingemans, Jozef; Ye, Lumeng; Hassan, Ahmed Amir; Craggs, Michael; Reimmann, Cornelia; Thomas, Mark S; Cornelis, Pierre

    2014-02-01

    Pyocins are toxic proteins produced by some strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that are lethal for related strains of the same species. Some soluble pyocins (S2, S3 and S4) were previously shown to use the pyoverdine siderophore receptors to enter the cell. The P. aeruginosa PAO1 pore-forming pyocin S5 encoding gene (PAO985) was cloned into the expression vector pET15b, and the affinity-purified protein product tested for its killing activity against different P. aeruginosa strains. The results, however, did not show any correlation with a specific ferripyoverdine receptor. To further identify the S5 receptor, transposon mutants were generated. Pooled mutants were exposed to pyocin S5 and the resistant colonies growing in the killing zone were selected. The majority of S5-resistant mutants had an insertion in the fptA gene encoding the receptor for the siderophore pyochelin. Complementation of an fptA transposon mutant with the P. aeruginosa fptA gene in trans restored the sensitivity to S5. In order to define the receptor-binding domain of pyocin S5, two hybrid pyocins were constructed containing different regions from pyocin S5 fused to the C-terminal translocation and DNase killing domains of pyocin S2. Only the protein containing amino acid residues 151 to 300 from S5 showed toxicity, indicating that the pyocin S5 receptor-binding domain is not at the N-terminus of the protein as in other S-type pyocins. Pyocin S5 was, however, unable to kill Burkholderia cenocepacia strains producing a ferripyochelin FptA receptor, nor was the B. cenocepacia fptA gene able to restore the sensitivity of the resistant fptA mutant P. aeruginosa strain. PMID:24217175

  11. Higher expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and its receptor in brain tissue of intractable epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunyan; Yang, Lihua; Zhang, Jiadong; Lin, Zhiguo; Qi, Jiping; Duan, Shurong

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to explore the pathogenesis of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP1) and CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) in brain tissue of patients with intractable epilepsy (IE). Hippocampi or temporal lobe tissues were obtained from 40 patients with IE and five patients without IE who had undergone surgical decompression and debridement. The levels of MCP1 and CCR2 were evaluated using immunohistochemistry. Pearson correlation analysis was employed to evaluate the correlation between levels of MCP1 and CCR2 in IE with or without hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and the disease duration, along with age. Higher levels of MCP1 (11.68±4.68% versus 1.72±1.54%) and CCR2 (11.54±4.65% versus 1.52±1.29%; P<0.05) were observed in IE patients compared to controls. Expression levels of MCP1 (R=0.867) and CCR2 (R=0.835) in IE patients with HS were correlated with the disease duration. However, no correlation was found in IE patients without HS. There was also no correlation between levels of MCP1 and CCR2 in IE patients with age, either with HS or without HS. These results suggest that MCP1 and its receptor may play a role in the pathogenesis and progression of IE. PMID:26810469

  12. Expression of obesity gene and obesity gene long form receptor in endometrium of Yorkshire sows during embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongfang; Fu, Jinlian; Wang, Aiguo

    2014-03-01

    There is accumulating evidence that leptin may be directly involved in mammalian reproduction, however, the potential role of obesity gene/obesity gene long form receptor (ob/ob-Rb) system in porcine implantation is poorly understood. To further confirm this role, mRNA and protein expression of ob/ob-Rb in implantation site and inter-implantation sites of porcine uterus on pregnancy day 13, 18 and 24 were compared in this study. Ob mRNA level went up with the advance of pregnancy and was higher in implantation site than inter-implantation site (P < 0.05). But ob-Rb mRNA, which was negative-regulated by leptin, went down with the advance of pregnancy and lessened in implantation site compared with inter-implantation site (P < 0.05). During the three implantation phase, leptin protein peaked at day 18 pregnancy (P < 0.05) and leptin protein at implantation site were always higher than inter-implantation site (P < 0.05). The higher ob-Rb protein in implantation site compared with inter-implantation site (P < 0.05) only appeared at day 18 pregnancy. Localization of ob/ob-Rb protein in porcine uterus was assayed using immunohistochemistry and found that ob/ob-Rb protein mainly located in luminal epithelium and glandular epithelium in pregnant pigs, but distinct immune-staining of leptin also detected in stroma in non-pregnancy porcine uterus except for luminal epithelium and glandular epithelium. In conclusion, the peak of leptin and the peak of ob-Rb protein in implantation site specifically appeared on day 18 pregnancy of pig. Another funning discovery is ob-Rb mRNA in porcine endometrium was mainly negative-regulated by leptin. The space-time difference of gene and protein expression for ob/ob-Rb confirmed ob/ob-Rb system role as delicate regulator of porcine implantation process. PMID:24407604

  13. Targeting the human androgen receptor gene with platinated triplex-forming oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Graham, Mindy K; Brown, Terry R; Miller, Paul S

    2015-04-01

    Platinum-derivatized homopyrimidine triplex-forming oligonucleotides (Pt-TFOs) consisting of 2'-O-methyl-5-methyluridine, 2'-O-methyl-5-methylcytidine, and a single 3'-N7-trans-chlorodiammine platinum(II)-2'-deoxyguanosine were designed to cross-link to the transcribed strand at four different sequences in the human androgen receptor (AR) gene. Fluorescence microscopy showed that a fluorescein-tagged Pt-TFO localizes in both the cytoplasm and nucleus when it is transfected into LAPC-4 cells, a human prostate cancer cell line, using Lipofectamine 2000. A capture assay employing streptavidin-coated magnetic beads followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification was used to demonstrate that 5'-biotin-conjugated Pt-TFOs cross-link in vitro to their four designated AR gene targets in genomic DNA extracted from LAPC-4 cells. Similarly, the capture assay was used to examine cross-linking between the 5'-biotin-conjugated Pt-TFOs and the AR gene in LAPC-4 cells in culture. Three of the four Pt-TFOs cross-linked to their designated target, suggesting that different regions of the AR gene are not uniformly accessible to Pt-TFO cross-linking. LAPC-4 cells were transfected with fluorescein-tagged Pt-TFO or a control oligonucleotide that does not bind or cross-link to AR DNA. The levels of AR mRNA in highly fluorescent cells isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting were determined by RT-qPCR, and the levels of AR protein were monitored by immunofluorescence microscopy. Decreases in mRNA and protein levels of 40 and 30%, respectively, were observed for fluorescein-tagged Pt-TFO versus control treated cells. Although the levels of knockdown of AR mRNA and protein were modest, the results suggest that Pt-TFOs hold potential as agents for controlling gene expression by cross-linking to DNA and disrupting transcription. PMID:25768916

  14. Long form leptin receptor and SNP effect on reproductive traits during embryo attachment in Suzhong sows.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yanfeng; Li, Lan; Li, Bixia; Fang, Xiaomin; Ren, Shouwen

    2016-05-01

    To ascertain whether the long form leptin receptor (LEPR) affects the regulation of embryo attachment and whether there are LEPR Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with reproductive traits in pigs, Real-time qPCR was used to detect relative abundance of LEPR mRNA pattern in different tissues of Suzhong sows during the embryo attachment period (pregnancy day 13, 18 and 24) to the uterus, and PCR-RFLP as well as PCR-sequencing were used to investigate the coding sequence for SNPs of LEPR in a population of 512 Suzhong sows. Real-time qPCR results indicated that LEPR mRNA was present in all 22 tissues of pigs with differences in relative abundance of the LEPR mRNA (P<0.05). Among these tissues, the greatest relative abundance occurred at the endometrial attachment site (P<0.01), followed by the hypothalamus and most reproductive tissues (P<0.05), and there was a lesser relative abundance of the LEPR mRNA in the pituitary. During different embryo attachment periods, LEPR mRNA was greatest on Day 18 (attachment; P<0.05), followed by Day 24 (post-attachment), and relative abundance was least on Day 13 (pre-attachment). The prevalence of the LEPR mRNA in pregnant sows was greater than in non-pregnant sows (P<0.05). At the c.2856C>T locus of LEPR, Chi-square test results demonstrated that allele and genotype frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium at this locus, PCR-RFLP results revealed that Genotype TT was greater than Genotype CC (P<0.05) for reproductive traits of TNB (Total Number Born) and NBA (Number Born Alive), which suggested that T allele at c.2856C>T locus has advantageous effects on litter size and litter weight in Suzhong pigs. In conclusion, the expression of the LEPR gene might be involved in the regulation of embryo attachment mechanisms in pigs, and the LEPR SNP c.2856C>T could be a molecular marker for improving litter size and litter weight in pig breeding. PMID:27020480

  15. The Soluble Form of the EIAV Receptor Encoded by an Alternative Splicing Variant Inhibits EIAV Infection of Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu-Qin; Sun, Liu-Ke; Wang, Xue-Feng; Du, Cheng; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Equine lentivirus receptor 1 (ELR1) has been identified as the sole receptor for equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) and is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily. In addition to the previously described membrane-associated form of ELR1, two other major alternative splicing variant mRNAs were identified in equine monocyte-derived macrophages (eMDMs). One major spliced species (ELR1-IN) contained an insertion of 153 nt, which resulted in a premature stop codon situated 561 nt upstream of the predicted membrane spanning domain. The other major species (ELR1-DE) has a deletion of 109 nt that causes a shift of the open reading frame and generates a stop codon 312 nt downstream. Because ELR1-DE presumably encodes a peptide of a mere 23 residues, only ELR1-IN was further analyzed. The expression of a soluble form of ELR1 (sELR1) by ELR1-IN was confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses. Similar to ELR1, the transcription level of ELR1-IN varied among individual horses and at different time points in the same individuals. The ratio of ELR1-IN mRNA species to ELR1 mRNA was approximately 1∶2.5. Pre-incubation of the recombinant sELR1 with EIAV significantly inhibited EIAV infection in equine macrophages, the primary in vivo target cell of the virus. Fetal equine dermal (FED) cells are susceptible to EIAV in vitro, and the replication of EIAV in FED cells transiently transfected with ELR1-IN was markedly reduced when compared with replication in cells transfected with the empty vector. Finally, the expression levels of both forms of the EIAV receptor were significantly regulated by infection with this virus. Taken together, our data indicate that sELR1 acts as a secreted cellular factor that inhibits EIAV infection in host cells. PMID:24278125

  16. Production and characterization of a soluble, active form of Tva, the subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis virus receptor.

    PubMed

    Balliet, J W; Berson, J; D'Cruz, C M; Huang, J; Crane, J; Gilbert, J M; Bates, P

    1999-04-01

    The receptor for the subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis viruses [ASLV(A)] is the cellular glycoprotein Tva. A soluble form of Tva, sTva, was produced and purified with a baculovirus expression system. Using this system, 7 to 10 mg of purified sTva per liter of cultured Sf9 cells was obtained. Characterization of the carbohydrate modification of sTva revealed that the three N glycosylation sites in sTva were differentially utilized; however, the O glycosylation common to Tva produced in mammalian and avian cells was not observed. Purified sTva demonstrates significant biological activity, specifically blocking infection of avian cells by ASLV(A) with a 90% inhibitory concentration of approximately 25 pM. A quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, developed to assess the binding of sTva to ASLV envelope glycoprotein, demonstrates that sTva has a high affinity for EnvA, with an apparent dissociation constant of approximately 0.3 nM. Once they are bound, a very stable complex is formed between EnvA and sTva, with an estimated complex half-life of 6 h. The soluble receptor protein described here represents a valuable tool for analysis of the receptor-envelope glycoprotein interaction and for structural analysis of Tva. PMID:10074155

  17. A human immunoglobulin G receptor exists in both polypeptide-anchored and phosphatidylinositol-glycan-anchored forms.

    PubMed Central

    Scallon, B J; Scigliano, E; Freedman, V H; Miedel, M C; Pan, Y C; Unkeless, J C; Kochan, J P

    1989-01-01

    Several cDNA clones encoding the human immunoglobulin G receptor CD16 were isolated from human lung or peripheral blood leukocyte cDNA libraries. Nucleotide sequence comparisons revealed that the cDNAs could be divided into two groups. cDNA clones in one group encode a protein that terminates 4 amino acids after the putative transmembrane domain. Clones in the second group encode a protein with an extra 21 amino acids that could comprise a cytoplasmic domain. Direct peptide sequencing was used to determine the N terminus of the mature CD16 receptor protein and supported the existence of the two forms of the receptor. Treatment of neutrophils with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C resulted in the release of a large percentage of the CD16 molecules from the cell surface. In contrast, treatment of natural killer cells with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C did not release any CD16 from the cell surface. These data demonstrate that both polypeptide-anchored and phosphatidylinositol-glycan-anchored forms of the CD16 molecule exist and that they are differentially expressed on neutrophils and natural killer cells. Images PMID:2525780

  18. Form follows function - the three-dimensional structure of antigen receptor gene loci.

    PubMed

    Fugmann, Sebastian D

    2014-04-01

    Antigen receptor genes are assembled during lymphocyte development from individual gene segments by a somatic gene rearrangement process named V(D)J recombination. This process is tightly regulated to ensure the generation of an unbiased broad primary repertoire of immunoglobulins and T cell receptors, and to prevent aberrant recombination products that could initiate lymphomagenesis. One important mode of regulation that has recently been discovered for the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) gene locus is the adoption of distinct three-dimensional structures of the locus. Changes in the spatial conformation are thought to ensure the appropriate access of the V(D)J recombinase machinery at each developmental stage, and the formation of extensive chromosome loops has been implicated in allowing equal access to widely dispersed gene elements. PMID:24549092

  19. Communication: Free energy of ligand-receptor systems forming multimeric complexes.

    PubMed

    Di Michele, Lorenzo; Bachmann, Stephan J; Parolini, Lucia; Mognetti, Bortolo M

    2016-04-28

    Ligand-receptor interactions are ubiquitous in biology and have become popular in materials in view of their applications to programmable self-assembly. Although complex functionalities often emerge from the simultaneous interaction of more than just two linker molecules, state of the art theoretical frameworks enable the calculation of the free energy only in systems featuring one-to-one ligand/receptor binding. In this Communication, we derive a general formula to calculate the free energy of systems featuring simultaneous direct interaction between an arbitrary number of linkers. To exemplify the potential and generality of our approach, we apply it to the systems recently introduced by Parolini et al. [ACS Nano 10, 2392 (2016)] and Halverson and Tkachenko [J. Chem. Phys. 144, 094903 (2016)], both featuring functionalized Brownian particles interacting via three-linker complexes. PMID:27131522

  20. Communication: Free energy of ligand-receptor systems forming multimeric complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Michele, Lorenzo; Bachmann, Stephan J.; Parolini, Lucia; Mognetti, Bortolo M.

    2016-04-01

    Ligand-receptor interactions are ubiquitous in biology and have become popular in materials in view of their applications to programmable self-assembly. Although complex functionalities often emerge from the simultaneous interaction of more than just two linker molecules, state of the art theoretical frameworks enable the calculation of the free energy only in systems featuring one-to-one ligand/receptor binding. In this Communication, we derive a general formula to calculate the free energy of systems featuring simultaneous direct interaction between an arbitrary number of linkers. To exemplify the potential and generality of our approach, we apply it to the systems recently introduced by Parolini et al. [ACS Nano 10, 2392 (2016)] and Halverson and Tkachenko [J. Chem. Phys. 144, 094903 (2016)], both featuring functionalized Brownian particles interacting via three-linker complexes.

  1. Haplotypes of the D{sub 2} dopamine receptor gene in higher and lower alcohol consuming subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Ritchie, T.; Fitch, R.J.

    1994-09-01

    There is now a substantial body of evidence which indicates that the TaqI A D{sub 2} dopamine receptor (DRD2) minor (Al) allele is associated with alcoholism. In the present study, TaqI A DRD2 alleles and haplotypes of the DRD2 gene were determined in 307 Caucasian (non-Hispanic) subjects. These haplotypes are a combination of closely linked alleles in intron 6 and exon 7 and yield three haplotypes (1, 2, and 4) and six genotypes in Caucasians. The sample under study consisted of 54 individuals who consumed 200 or more alcoholic drinks per month (Group A) and 248 persons who drank less than 200 drinks per month (Group B). The results showed that the DRD2 A1 allele was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in Group A (48.2%) compared to group B (32.7%). Haplotype analysis in the same sample showed Group A having a significantly higher (P < 0.007) prevalence (28.4%) of the 1 haplotype than those in group B (14.0%). The results indicate both these genetic markers in the DRD2 gene are associated with higher alcohol consumption; however, the 1 haplotype appears to be a better marker for this behavior. In conclusion, haplotypes within the DRD2 gene and TaqI A DRD2 alleles (located 20-Kb from the 3{prime} coding region of this gene) are both associated with heavier alcohol consumption. These findings add further evidence to the importance of the gene in alcohol-related behaviors.

  2. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Induce a Form of LTP Controlled by Translation and Arc Signaling in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Ardiles, Alvaro O.; Yang, Sunggu; Tran, Trinh; Posada-Duque, Rafael; Valdivia, Gonzalo; Baek, Min; Chuang, Yang-An; Palacios, Adrian G.; Gallagher, Michela; Worley, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent bidirectional modifications of excitatory synaptic strength are essential for learning and storage on new memories. Research on bidirectional synaptic plasticity has largely focused on long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) mechanisms that rely on the activation of NMDA receptors. In principle, metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are also suitable to convert synaptic activity into intracellular signals for synaptic modification. Indeed, dysfunction of a form of LTD that depends on Type I mGluRs (mGluR-LTD), but not NMDARs, has been implicated in learning deficits in aging and mouse models of several neurological conditions, including Fragile X syndrome and Alzheimer's disease. To determine whether mGluR activation can also induce LTP in the absence of NMDAR activation, we examined in hippocampal slices from rats and mice, an NMDAR-independent form of LTP previously characterized as dependent on voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. We found that this form of LTP requires activation of Type I mGluRs and, like mGluR-LTD but unlike NMDAR-dependent plasticity, depends crucially on protein synthesis controlled by fragile X mental retardation protein and on Arc signaling. Based on these observations, we propose the coexistence of two distinct activity-dependent systems of bidirectional synaptic plasticity: one that is based on the activity of NMDARs and the other one based on the activation of mGluRs. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Bidirectional changes of synaptic strength are crucial for the encoding of new memories. Currently, the only activity-dependent mechanism known to support such bidirectional changes are long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) forms that relay on the activation of NMDA receptors. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are, in principle, also suitable to trigger bidirectional synaptic modifications. However, only the mGluR-dependent form of LTD has been characterized. Here we report that an

  3. Surface expression of functional T cell receptor chains formed by interlocus recombination on human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Davodeau, F; Peyrat, M A; Gaschet, J; Hallet, M M; Triebel, F; Vié, H; Kabelitz, D; Bonneville, M

    1994-11-01

    Structural diversity of lymphocyte antigen receptors (the immunoglobulin [Ig] of B cells and the alpha/beta or gamma/delta T cell receptor [TCR] of T cells) is generated through somatic rearrangements of V, D, and J gene segments. Classically, these recombination events involve gene segments from the same Ig or TCR locus. However, occurrence of "trans" rearrangements between distinct loci has also been described, although in no instances was the surface expression of the corresponding protein under normal physiological conditions demonstrated. Here we show that hybrid TCR genes generated by trans rearrangement between V gamma and (D) J beta elements are translated into functional antigen receptor chains, paired with TCR alpha chains. Like classical alpha/beta T cells, cells expressing these hybrid TCR chains express either CD4 or CD8 coreceptors and are frequently alloreactive. These results have several implications in terms of T cell repertoire selection and relationships between TCR structure and specificity. First, they suggest that TCR alloreactivity is determined by the repertoire selection processes operating during lymphocyte development rather than by structural features specific to V alpha V beta regions. Second, they suggest the existence of close structural relationships between gamma/delta and alpha/beta TCR and more particularly, between V gamma and V beta regions. Finally, since a significant fraction of PBL (at least 1/10(4)) expressed hybrid TCR chains on their surface, these observations indicate that trans rearrangements significantly contribute to the combinatorial diversification of the peripheral immune repertoire. PMID:7964454

  4. The Analysis of the Human High Affinity IgE Receptor FceRIa from Multiple Crystal Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Garman, S.C.; Sechi, S.; Kinet, J.-P.; Jardetzky, T.S.

    2010-03-05

    We have solved the structure of the human high affinity IgE receptor, Fc{var_epsilon}RI{alpha}, in six different crystal forms, showing the structure in 15 different chemical environments. This database of structures shows no change in the overall shape of the molecule, as the angle between domains 1 and 2 (D1 and D2) varies little across the ensemble. However, the receptor has local conformational variability in the C' strand of D2 and in the BC loop of D1. In every crystal form, a residue inserts between tryptophan residues 87 and 110, mimicking the position of a proline from the IgE ligand. The different crystal forms reveal a distribution of carbohydrates lining the front and back surfaces of the structure. An analysis of crystal contacts in the different forms indicates regions where the molecule interacts with other proteins, and reveals a potential new binding site distal to the IgE binding site. The results of this study point to new directions for the design of molecules to inhibit the interaction of Fc{var_epsilon}RI{alpha} with its natural ligand and thus to prevent a primary step in the allergic response.

  5. The poliovirus receptor protein is produced both as membrane-bound and secreted forms.

    PubMed Central

    Koike, S; Horie, H; Ise, I; Okitsu, A; Yoshida, M; Iizuka, N; Takeuchi, K; Takegami, T; Nomoto, A

    1990-01-01

    Both genomic and complementary DNA clones encoding poliovirus receptors were isolated from genomic and complementary DNA libraries prepared from HeLa S3 cells, respectively. Nucleotide sequence analysis of these cloned DNAs revealed that the poliovirus receptor gene is approximately 20 kb long and contains seven introns in the coding region, and that at least four mRNA isoforms referring to the coding sequence are generated by alternative splicing and appear to encode four different molecules, that is, PVR alpha, PVR beta, PVR gamma and PVR delta. The predicted amino acid sequences indicate that PVR alpha and PVR delta, corresponding to the previously described cDNA clones H20A and H20B, respectively, are integral membrane proteins while the other two molecules described here for the first time lack a putative transmembrane domain. Mouse cell transformants carrying PVR alpha were permissive for poliovirus infection, but those carrying PVR beta were hardly permissive. In contrast to PVR alpha, PVR beta was not detected on the surface of the mouse cell transformants but was detected in the culture fluid by an immunological method using a monoclonal antibody against poliovirus receptor. Three types of splicing products for PVR alpha, PVR beta and PVR gamma were detected by polymerase chain reactions using appropriate primers in poly(A)+ RNAs of the brain, leukocyte, liver, lung and placenta of humans; the choice of primers used did not permit detection of PVR delta. In situ hybridization using a cDNA fragment as a probe demonstrated that the PVR gene is located at the band q13.1----13.2 of human chromosome 19. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2170108

  6. Synthesis, absolute configuration, conformational analysis and binding affinity properties of enantiomeric forms of DAU 5750, a novel M1-M3 muscarinic receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Turconi, M; Gozzo, A; Schiavi, G; Fronza, G; Mele, A; Bravo, P

    1994-12-01

    Both the enantiomeric forms of DAU 5750, a novel muscarinic receptor antagonist, have been synthesized in order to assess the relevance of configurational/conformational features for high affinity binding to muscarinic receptor subtypes. The attribution of absolute stereochemistry and conformational analysis by means of molecular modelling and NMR techniques are also reported. PMID:7788300

  7. Presence of a truncated form of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in a strain of VDR-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Bula, Craig M; Huhtakangas, Johanna; Olivera, Christopher; Bishop, June E; Norman, Anthony W; Henry, Helen L

    2005-12-01

    As part of our studies on the membrane-initiated actions of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3)] and its localization in caveolae membrane fractions, we used a vitamin D receptor (VDR)-knockout (KO) mouse model to study the binding of [(3)H]-1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) in the presumed absence of the VDR. In this mouse model, known as the Tokyo strain, the second exon of the VDR gene, which encodes the first of the two zinc fingers responsible for DNA binding, was removed, and the resulting animals have been considered to be VDR-null mice. To our surprise, several tissues in these KO mice showed significant (5-50% of that seen in wild-type animals) specific binding of [(3)H]-1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) in nuclear and caveolae membrane fractions. The dissociation constants of this binding in samples from VDR-KO and wild-type mice were indistinguishable. RT-PCR analysis of intestinal mRNA from the VDR-KO animals revealed an mRNA that lacks exon 2 but contains exons 3-9 plus two 5'-untranslated exons. Western analysis of intestinal extracts from VDR-KO mice showed a protein of a size consistent with the use of Met52 as the translational start site. Transfection of a plasmid construct containing the sequence encoding the human analog of this truncated form of the receptor, VDR(52-C), into Cos-1 cells showed that this truncated form of the receptor retains full [(3)H]-1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) binding ability. This same construct was inactive in transactivation assays using the osteocalcin promoter in CV1 cells. Thus, we have determined that this widely used strain of the VDR-KO mouse can express a form of the VDR that can bind ligand but not activate gene transcription. PMID:16150907

  8. Identified lhb-expressing cells from medaka (Oryzias latipes) show similar Ca(2+)-response to all endogenous Gnrh forms, and reveal expression of a novel fourth Gnrh receptor.

    PubMed

    Strandabø, Rønnaug A U; Grønlien, Heidi K; Ager-Wick, Eirill; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; Hildahl, Jon P; Weltzien, Finn-Arne; Haug, Trude M

    2016-04-01

    We have previously characterized the response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gnrh) 2 in luteinizing hormone (lhb)-expressing cells from green fluorescent protein (Gfp)-transgenic medaka (Oryzias latipes), with regard to changes in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. In the current study we present the corresponding responses to Gnrh1 and Gnrh3. Ca(2+) imaging revealed three response patterns to Gnrh1 and Gnrh3, one monophasic and two types of biphasic patterns. There were few significant differences in the shape of the response patterns between the three Gnrh forms, although the amplitude of the Ca(2+) signal was considerably lower for Gnrh1 and Gnrh3 than for Gnrh2, and the distribution between the two different biphasic patterns differed. The different putative Ca(2+) sources were examined by depleting intracellular Ca(2+) stores with thapsigargin, or preventing influx of extracellular Ca(2+) by either extracellular Ca(2+) depletion or the L-type Ca(2+)-channel blocker verapamil. Both Gnrh1 and 3 relied on Ca(2+) from both intracellular and extracellular sources, with some unexpected differences in the relative contribution. Furthermore, gene expression of Gnrh-receptors (gnrhr) in whole pituitaries was studied during development from juvenile to adult. Only two of the four identified medaka receptors were expressed in the pituitary, gnrhr1b and gnrhr2a, with the newly discovered gnrhr2a showing the highest expression level at all stages as analyzed by quantitative PCR. While both receptors differed in expression level according to developmental stage, only the expression of gnrhr2a showed a clear-cut increase with gonadal maturation. RNA sequencing analysis of FACS-sorted Gfp-positive lhb-cells revealed that both gnrhr1b and gnrhr2a were expressed in lhb-expressing cells, and confirmed the higher expression of gnrhr2a compared to gnrhr1b. These results show that although lhb-expressing gonadotropes in medaka show similar Ca(2+) response patterns to all three

  9. Ontogeny of the long form of leptin receptor gene expression in the porcine ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Smolinska, N; Kaminski, T; Siawrys, G; Przala, J

    2013-01-01

    Leptin is a polypeptide hormone produced predominantly in adipocytes. It has been found to be implicated in the regulation of satiety and energy homeostasis. A role for leptin in reproduction was later suggested by findings that this hormone may be involved in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis via endocrine, paracrine and/or autocrine pathways. The objective of the study was to investigate the ontogeny of the long isoform of leptin receptor (OB-Rb) gene in porcine ovarian follicles. The expression of OB-Rb gene was detected in porcine primordial, primary, secondary and antral follicles by in situ hybridization. In summary, our data suggest that leptin might have a direct effect on porcine follicles and plays an important role in the follicular development. PMID:23691582

  10. CARDIAC SULFONYLUREA RECEPTOR SHORT FORM-BASED CHANNELS CONFER A GLIBENCLAMIDE-INSENSITIVE KATP ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Jie-Lin,; Ye, Bin; Kroboth, Stacie L.; McNally, Elizabeth M.; Makielski, Jonathan C.; Shi, Nian-Qing

    2008-01-01

    The cardiac sarcolemmal ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) consists of a Kir6.2 pore and a SUR2 regulatory subunit, which is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. KATP channels have been proposed to play protective roles during ischemic preconditioning. A SUR2 mutant mouse was previously generated by disrupting the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1), where a glibenclamide action site was located. In the mutant ventricular myocytes, a non-conventional glibenclamide-insensitive (10 μM), ATP-sensitive current (IKATPn) was detected in 33% of single-channel recordings with an average amplitude of 12.3±5.4 pA per patch, an IC50 to ATP inhibition at 10 μM, and a mean burst duration at 20.6±1.8 ms. Newly designed SUR2-isoform or variant-specific antibodies identified novel SUR2 short forms in the sizes of 28 and 68 kDa in addition to a 150-kDa long form in the sarcolemmal membrane of wild-type (WT) heart. We hypothesized that channels constituted by these short forms that lack NBD1, confer IKATPn. The absence of the long form in the mutant corresponded to loss of the conventional glibenclamide-sensitive KATP currents (IKATP) in isolated cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells but the SUR2 short forms remained intact. Nested exonic RT-PCR in the mutant indicated that the short forms lacked NBD1 but contained NBD2. The SUR2 short forms co-immunoprecipitated with Kir6.1 or Kir6.2 suggesting that the short forms may function as hemi-transporters reported in other eukaryotic ABC transporter subgroups. Our results indicate that different KATP compositions may co-exist in cardiac sarcolemmal membrane. PMID:18001767

  11. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) receptors: Deficiency in tumor results in scant HBV infection and overexpression in peritumor leads to higher recurrence risk

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fei; Fan, Qing-Min; Yu, Guo-Feng; Yu, Dan-Dan; Gao, Lu; Sun, Kai; Han, Zhi-Peng; Li, Rong; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Qiu-Dong; Wu, Meng-Chao; Wang, Hong-Yang; Wei, Li-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a risk factor for hepatocarcinogenesis and recurrence. Here, we sought to characterize intratumoral and peritumoral expression of HBsAg and its specific receptors in HBsAg-positive hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and further examined their correlation with the recurrence-free survival (RFS). HCC tissue and adjacent normal tissue specimens were acquired from HBsAg-positive patients. The presence of HBsAg and receptors, as well as hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) were detected by tissue microassay and immunohistochemistry. Necroinflammatory activity was evaluated by HE staining. The mean IOD of HBsAg and HBV DNA in the intratumoral tissues was markedly lower than that in the peritumoral tissues (P < 0.001). Pearson correlation analysis further showed a significant correlation between the expression of HBsAg and NTCP (r = 0.461, P < 0.001) or ASGPR (r = 0.506, P < 0.001) in peritumoral tissues. And the peritumoral HBsAg and receptors presented a positive association with necroinflammatory activity (P < 0.05). Inflammation induced by HBV infection presented a positive association with HPCs activation (P < 0.05). Additionally, due to lack of HBV receptors, HPCs was not preferentially infected with HBV, but activated HPCs had a significant correlation with HBsAg expression in peritumoral tissues, and the peritumoral HPCs activation was associated with RFS of HCC patients, therefore, the overexpression of HBsAg and receptors in peritumor were also with higher recurrence risk (P < 0.05). In conclusion, lack of HBV receptors resulted in scant HBV infection in tumor cells, and overexpression of HBsAg and receptors in peritumor was strongly associated with higher recurrence risk in HCC patients. PMID:26515593

  12. Constitutively active form of natriuretic peptide receptor 2 ameliorates experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nawa, Nobutoshi; Ishida, Hidekazu; Katsuragi, Shinichi; Baden, Hiroki; Takahashi, Kunihiko; Higeno, Ryota; Torigoe, Fumiko; Mihara, Seiko; Narita, Jun; Miura, Kohji; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Kogaki, Shigetoyo; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    We recently found a constitutively active mutant of natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (caNPR2; V883M), which synthesizes larger amounts of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) intracellularly without any ligand stimulation than existing drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of gene transduction using caNPR2 for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In vitro gene transduction into human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells using Sendai virus (SeV) vectors carrying caNPR2 induced 10,000-fold increases in the synthesis of cGMP without ligand stimulation, and the proliferation of caNPR2-expressing cells was significantly attenuated. The PAH model rats generated by hypoxia and the administration of SU5416 were then treated with SeV vectors through a direct injection into the left pulmonary artery. Right ventricular systolic pressure was significantly decreased 2 weeks after the treatment, while systemic blood pressure remained unchanged. Histological analyses revealed that the medial wall thickness and occlusion rate of pulmonary arterioles were significantly improved in caNPR2-treated lungs. Neither the systemic integration of virus vectors nor side effects were observed. The massive stimulation of cGMP synthesis by gene therapy with caNPR2 was safe and effective in a PAH rat model and, thus, has potential as a novel therapy for patients with severe progressive PAH. PMID:27419193

  13. Impairement of HT29 Cancer Cells Cohesion by the Soluble Form of Neurotensin Receptor-3

    PubMed Central

    Lacas-Gervais, Sandra; Béraud-Dufour, Sophie; Coppola, Thierry; Mazella, Jean

    2014-01-01

    The neurotensin (NT) receptor-3 (NTSR3), also called sortilin is a multifunctional protein localized at the intracellular and plasma membrane level. The extracellular domain of NTSR3 (sNTSR3) is released by shedding from several cell lines including colonic cancer cells. This soluble protein acts as an active ligand through its ability to bind, to be internalized in the human adenocarcinoma epithelial HT29 cells and to stimulate the PI3 kinase pathway. The aim of this study was to investigate cellular responses induced by sNTSR3 in HT29 cells. The cellular functions of sNTSR3 were monitored by immunofluocytochemistry, electron microscopy and quantitative PCR in order to characterize the cell shape and the expression of adhesion proteins. We evidenced that sNTSR3 significantly regulates the cellular morphology as well as the cell-cell and the cell-matrix adherens properties by decreasing the expession of several integrins and by modifying the structure of desmosomes. Altogether, these properties lead to an increase of cell detachment upon sNTSR3 treatment on HT29, HCT116 and SW620 cancer cells. Our results indicate that sNTSR3 may induce the first phase of a process which weaken HT29 epithelial properties including desmosome architecture, cell spreading, and initiation of cell separation, all events which could be responsible for cancer metastasis. PMID:25221642

  14. Different strategies for producing naturally soluble form of common cytokine receptor γ chain.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jipseol; Kim, Woo H; Fernandez, Cherry P; Kim, Suk; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Jang, Hyung-Kwan; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Woo, Hee-Jong; Min, Wongi

    2015-01-01

    The common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) plays an essential role in regulating lymphoid homeostasis. In fact, alteration of this gene causes severe immunodeficiency in humans and animals. Although soluble γc (sγc) was identified in the late 1990s, much remains unknown about its production. This study describes various mechanisms underlying the generation of sγc isoforms in different species. Our data demonstrate that mouse γc and the avian ortholog γc-a did not generate sγc. Moreover, two mouse isoforms, CRA-a and mγc-b, encoded by transcripts lacking a transmembrane region by alternative splicing, did not yield sγc. However, in ducks, sγc was produced from a γc-b transcript lacking a transmembrane region by alternative splicing. In chickens, sγc was produced in normal cells and cell lines by proteolytic shedding of the γc-b isoform containing intron 5, which displayed a relatively high probability of proteolytic cleavage of the ectodomain. This shedding was suppressed by leupeptin, serine and cysteine protease inhibitor. Compared to the chicken ortholog γc-a, expression of γc-b mRNA was differentially regulated according to tissue type, developmental stage, and antigen stimulation. These data demonstrate several mechanisms for producing sγc and suggest a potential role for sγc in avian lymphoid homeostatic responses to environmental antigens. PMID:25173813

  15. Constitutively active form of natriuretic peptide receptor 2 ameliorates experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nawa, Nobutoshi; Ishida, Hidekazu; Katsuragi, Shinichi; Baden, Hiroki; Takahashi, Kunihiko; Higeno, Ryota; Torigoe, Fumiko; Mihara, Seiko; Narita, Jun; Miura, Kohji; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Kogaki, Shigetoyo; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    We recently found a constitutively active mutant of natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (caNPR2; V883M), which synthesizes larger amounts of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) intracellularly without any ligand stimulation than existing drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of gene transduction using caNPR2 for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In vitro gene transduction into human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells using Sendai virus (SeV) vectors carrying caNPR2 induced 10,000-fold increases in the synthesis of cGMP without ligand stimulation, and the proliferation of caNPR2-expressing cells was significantly attenuated. The PAH model rats generated by hypoxia and the administration of SU5416 were then treated with SeV vectors through a direct injection into the left pulmonary artery. Right ventricular systolic pressure was significantly decreased 2 weeks after the treatment, while systemic blood pressure remained unchanged. Histological analyses revealed that the medial wall thickness and occlusion rate of pulmonary arterioles were significantly improved in caNPR2-treated lungs. Neither the systemic integration of virus vectors nor side effects were observed. The massive stimulation of cGMP synthesis by gene therapy with caNPR2 was safe and effective in a PAH rat model and, thus, has potential as a novel therapy for patients with severe progressive PAH. PMID:27419193

  16. The System of Higher Education in Russia: A Diversity of Forms, Resources, and Prospects--A Roundtable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russian Education and Society, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a roundtable discussion on prospects of the development of higher education in Russia and the realization of the potential of state and nonstate institutions of higher learning. The roundtable was held as part of the second international scientific conference "Higher Education for the Twenty-First Century" held at the Moscow…

  17. Directed evolution of G protein-coupled receptors in yeast for higher functional production in eukaryotic expression hosts

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Marco; Schöppe, Jendrik; Sedlák, Erik; Hillenbrand, Matthias; Nagy-Davidescu, Gabriela; Ehrenmann, Janosch; Klenk, Christoph; Egloff, Pascal; Kummer, Lutz; Plückthun, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent successes, many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remained refractory to detailed molecular studies due to insufficient production yields, even in the most sophisticated eukaryotic expression systems. Here we introduce a robust method employing directed evolution of GPCRs in yeast that allows fast and efficient generation of receptor variants which show strongly increased functional production levels in eukaryotic expression hosts. Shown by evolving three different receptors in this study, the method is widely applicable, even for GPCRs which are very difficult to express. The evolved variants showed up to a 26-fold increase of functional production in insect cells compared to the wild-type receptors. Next to the increased production, the obtained variants exhibited improved biophysical properties, while functional properties remained largely unaffected. Thus, the presented method broadens the portfolio of GPCRs accessible for detailed investigations. Interestingly, the functional production of GPCRs in yeast can be further increased by induced host adaptation. PMID:26911446

  18. Directed evolution of G protein-coupled receptors in yeast for higher functional production in eukaryotic expression hosts.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Marco; Schöppe, Jendrik; Sedlák, Erik; Hillenbrand, Matthias; Nagy-Davidescu, Gabriela; Ehrenmann, Janosch; Klenk, Christoph; Egloff, Pascal; Kummer, Lutz; Plückthun, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent successes, many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remained refractory to detailed molecular studies due to insufficient production yields, even in the most sophisticated eukaryotic expression systems. Here we introduce a robust method employing directed evolution of GPCRs in yeast that allows fast and efficient generation of receptor variants which show strongly increased functional production levels in eukaryotic expression hosts. Shown by evolving three different receptors in this study, the method is widely applicable, even for GPCRs which are very difficult to express. The evolved variants showed up to a 26-fold increase of functional production in insect cells compared to the wild-type receptors. Next to the increased production, the obtained variants exhibited improved biophysical properties, while functional properties remained largely unaffected. Thus, the presented method broadens the portfolio of GPCRs accessible for detailed investigations. Interestingly, the functional production of GPCRs in yeast can be further increased by induced host adaptation. PMID:26911446

  19. Orphan Receptor GPR179 Forms Macromolecular Complexes With Components of Metabotropic Signaling Cascade in Retina ON-Bipolar Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Orlandi, Cesare; Cao, Yan; Martemyanov, Kirill A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. In the mammalian retina, synaptic transmission between light-excited rod photoreceptors and downstream ON-bipolar neurons is indispensable for dim vision, and disruption of this process leads to congenital stationary night blindness in human patients. The ON-bipolar neurons use the metabotropic signaling cascade, initiated by the mGluR6 receptor, to generate depolarizing responses to light-induced changes in neurotransmitter glutamate release from the photoreceptor axonal terminals. Evidence for the identity of the components involved in transducing these signals is growing rapidly. Recently, the orphan receptor, GPR179, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, has been shown to be indispensable for the synaptic responses of ON-bipolar cells. In our study, we investigated the interaction of GPR179 with principle components of the signal transduction cascade. Methods. We used immunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assays in transfected cells and native retinas to characterize the protein–protein interactions involving GPR179. The influence of cascade components on GPR179 localization was examined through immunohistochemical staining of the retinas from genetic mouse models. Results. We demonstrated that, in mouse retinas, GPR179 forms physical complexes with the main components of the metabotropic cascade, recruiting mGluR6, TRPM1, and the RGS proteins. Elimination of mGluR6 or RGS proteins, but not TRPM1, detrimentally affects postsynaptic targeting or GPR179 expression. Conclusions. These observations suggest that the mGluR6 signaling cascade is scaffolded as a macromolecular complex in which the interactions between the components ensure the optimal spatiotemporal characteristics of signal transduction. PMID:24114537

  20. Higher binding of the dopamine D3 receptor-preferring ligand [11C]-(+)-PHNO in Methamphetamine Polydrug Users: A Positron Emission Tomography Study

    PubMed Central

    Boileau, Isabelle; Payer, Doris; Houle, Sylvain; Behzadi, Arian; Rusjan, Pablo M.; Tong, Junchao; Wilkins, Diana; Selby, Peter; George, Tony P.; Zack, Martin; Furukawa, Yoshiaki; McCluskey, Tina; Wilson, Alan A.; Kish, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) findings suggesting lower D2-type dopamine receptors and dopamine concentration in brains of stimulant users have prompted speculation that increasing dopamine signaling might help in drug-treatment. However, this strategy needs to consider the possibility, based on animal and postmortem human data, that dopaminergic activity at the related D3 receptor might, in contrast, be elevated, and thereby contribute to drug-taking behavior. We tested the hypothesis that D3 receptor binding is above-normal in methamphetamine (MA) polydrug users, using PET and the D3-preferring ligand [11C]-(+)-PHNO. Sixteen control subjects and 16 polydrug users reporting MA as their primary drug of abuse underwent PET scanning following [11C]-(+)-PHNO. Compared to control subjects, drug users had higher [11C]-(+)-PHNO binding in the D3-rich midbrain substantia nigra (SN, +46%, p<0.02) and in the globus pallidus (+9%, p=0.06) and ventral pallidum (+11%, p=0.1), whereas binding was slightly lower in the D2-rich dorsal striatum (~−4%, NS; −12% in heavy users, p=0.01) and related to drug-use severity. [11C]-(+)-PHNO binding ratio in D3-rich SN vs. D2-rich dorsal striatum was 55% higher in MA users (p=0.004), with heavy but not moderate users having ratios significantly different from controls. [11C]-(+)-PHNO binding in SN was related to self-reported “drug-wanting.” We conclude that the dopamine D3 receptor, unlike the D2 receptor, might be upregulated in brains of MA polydrug users although lower dopamine levels in MA users could have contributed to the finding. Pharmacological studies are needed to establish whether normalization of D3 receptor function could reduce vulnerability to relapse in stimulant abuse. PMID:22279219

  1. Global Aspirations and Strategising for World-Class Status: New Form of Politics in Higher Education Governance in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mok, Ka Ho; Cheung, Anthony B. L.

    2011-01-01

    In the era of globalisation, competition has also become global. In higher education, countries worldwide are attaching increasing importance to international ranking exercises and subscribing to the "world-class universities" paradigm, complemented by various strategies to benchmark with leading universities in order to enhance the global…

  2. Institutional Changes and the Expansion of Flexible Forms of Employment in Higher Education: The Case of Greek Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolaidis, Evangelos; Maroudas, Leonidas

    2013-01-01

    Extensive institutional changes and restructuring are taking place in higher education within the context of the new managerialism's ideological principles and administrative practices aimed at the fulfilment of the goals of the neoliberal political dominance. These changes involve the massification of universities, along with the reduction…

  3. Estimating the Number of Zeros for Abelian Integrals of Quadratic Reversible Centers with Orbits Formed by Higher-Order Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xiaochun; Xie, Shaolong; Chen, Longwei

    In this study, we determine the associated number of zeros for Abelian integrals in four classes of quadratic reversible centers of genus one. Based on the results of [Li et al., 2002b],, we prove that the upper bounds of the associated number of zeros for Abelian integrals with orbits formed by conics, cubics, quartics, and sextics, under polynomial perturbations of arbitrary degree n, depend linearly on n.

  4. miR-137 forms a regulatory loop with nuclear receptor TLX and LSD1 in neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, GuoQiang; Ye, Peng; Murai, Kiyohito; Lang, Ming-Fei; Li, Shengxiu; Zhang, Heying; Li, Wendong; Fu, Chelsea; Yin, Jason; Wang, Allen; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Shi, Yanhong

    2011-01-01

    miR-137 is a brain-enriched microRNA. Its role in neural development remains unknown. Here we show that miR-137 has an essential role in controlling embryonic neural stem cell fate determination. miR-137 negatively regulates cell proliferation and accelerates neural differentiation of embryonic neural stem cells. In addition, we show that the histone lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1), a transcriptional co-repressor of nuclear receptor TLX, is a downstream target of miR-137. In utero electroporation of miR-137 in embryonic mouse brains led to premature differentiation and outward migration of the transfected cells. Introducing a LSD1 expression vector lacking the miR-137 recognition site rescued miR-137-induced precocious differentiation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that TLX, an essential regulator of neural stem cell self-renewal, represses the expression of miR-137 by recruiting LSD1 to the genomic regions of miR-137. Thus, miR-137 forms a feedback regulatory loop with TLX and LSD1 to control the dynamics between neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation during neural development. PMID:22068596

  5. miR-137 forms a regulatory loop with nuclear receptor TLX and LSD1 in neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, GuoQiang; Ye, Peng; Murai, Kiyohito; Lang, Ming-Fei; Li, Shengxiu; Zhang, Heying; Li, Wendong; Fu, Chelsea; Yin, Jason; Wang, Allen; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Shi, Yanhong

    2012-01-01

    miR-137 is a brain-enriched microRNA. Its role in neural development remains unknown. Here we show that miR-137 plays an essential role in controlling embryonic neural stem cell fate determination. miR-137 negatively regulates cell proliferation and accelerates neural differentiation of embryonic neural stem cells. In addition, we show that histone demethylase LSD1, a transcriptional co-repressor of nuclear receptor TLX, is a downstream target of miR-137. In utero electroporation of miR-137 in embryonic mouse brains led to premature differentiation and outward migration of the transfected cells. Introducing a LSD1 expression vector lacking the miR-137 recognition site rescued miR-137-induced precocious differentiation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that TLX, an essential regulator of neural stem cell self-renewal, represses the expression of miR-137 by recruiting LSD1 to the genomic regions of miR-137. Thus, miR-137 forms a feedback regulatory loop with TLX and LSD1 to control the dynamics between neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation during neural development. PMID:22068596

  6. A puzzle form of a non-verbal intelligence test gives significantly higher performance measures in children with severe intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Katrina D; Goharpey, Nahal; Crewther, Sheila G; Crewther, David P

    2008-01-01

    Background Assessment of 'potential intellectual ability' of children with severe intellectual disability (ID) is limited, as current tests designed for normal children do not maintain their interest. Thus a manual puzzle version of the Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (RCPM) was devised to appeal to the attentional and sensory preferences and language limitations of children with ID. It was hypothesized that performance on the book and manual puzzle forms would not differ for typically developing children but that children with ID would perform better on the puzzle form. Methods The first study assessed the validity of this puzzle form of the RCPM for 76 typically developing children in a test-retest crossover design, with a 3 week interval between tests. A second study tested performance and completion rate for the puzzle form compared to the book form in a sample of 164 children with ID. Results In the first study, no significant difference was found between performance on the puzzle and book forms in typically developing children, irrespective of the order of completion. The second study demonstrated a significantly higher performance and completion rate for the puzzle form compared to the book form in the ID population. Conclusion Similar performance on book and puzzle forms of the RCPM by typically developing children suggests that both forms measure the same construct. These findings suggest that the puzzle form does not require greater cognitive ability but demands sensory-motor attention and limits distraction in children with severe ID. Thus, we suggest the puzzle form of the RCPM is a more reliable measure of the non-verbal mentation of children with severe ID than the book form. PMID:18671882

  7. Higher pretreatment 5-HT1A receptor binding potential in bipolar disorder depression is associated with treatment remission: a naturalistic treatment pilot PET study.

    PubMed

    Lan, Martin J; Hesselgrave, Natalie; Ciarleglio, Adam; Ogden, R Todd; Sullivan, Gregory M; Mann, J John; Parsey, Ramin V

    2013-11-01

    Bipolar disorder is a major cause of disability and a high risk for suicide. The pathophysiology of the disorder remains largely unknown. Medication choice for bipolar depression patients involves trial and error. Our group reported previously that brain serotonin 1A (5-HT(1A)) receptor binding measured by positron emission tomography (PET) is higher in bipolar depression. We now investigated whether pretreatment 5-HT(1A) levels correlates with antidepressant medication outcome. Forty-one medication-free DSM-IV diagnosed, bipolar patients in a major depressive episode had brain PET scans performed using [(11)C]WAY-100635 and a metabolite corrected arterial input function. The patients then received naturalistic psychopharmacologic treatment as outpatients and a follow up Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) after 3 months of treatment. Patients with 24 item HDRS scores less than 10 were considered to have remitted. A linear mixed effects model was used to compare BP(F) (binding potential, proportional to the total number of available receptors) in 13 brain regions of interest between remitters and nonremitters. Thirty-four patients completed 3 months of treatment and ratings; 9 had remitted. Remitters and nonremitters did not differ in age, sex, or recent medication history with serotonergic medications. Remitters had higher [(11)C]WAY-100635 BP(F) across all brain regions compared with nonremitters (P = 0.02). Higher pretreatment brain 5-HT(1A) receptor binding was associated with remission after 3 months of pharmacological treatment in bipolar depression. Prospective treatment studies are warranted to determine whether this test predicts outcome of specific types of treatment. PMID:23720414

  8. Higher-Resolution Structure of the Human Insulin Receptor Ectodomain: Multi-Modal Inclusion of the Insert Domain.

    PubMed

    Croll, Tristan I; Smith, Brian J; Margetts, Mai B; Whittaker, Jonathan; Weiss, Michael A; Ward, Colin W; Lawrence, Michael C

    2016-03-01

    Insulin receptor (IR) signaling is critical to controlling nutrient uptake and metabolism. However, only a low-resolution (3.8 Å) structure currently exists for the IR ectodomain, with some segments ill-defined or unmodeled due to disorder. Here, we revise this structure using new diffraction data to 3.3 Å resolution that allow improved modeling of the N-linked glycans, the first and third fibronectin type III domains, and the insert domain. A novel haptic interactive molecular dynamics strategy was used to aid fitting to low-resolution electron density maps. The resulting model provides a foundation for investigation of structural transitions in IR upon ligand binding. PMID:26853939

  9. Prostamide F2α receptor antagonism combined with inhibition of FAAH may block the pro-inflammatory mediators formed following selective FAAH inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ligresti, Alessia; Martos, Jose; Wang, Jenny; Guida, Francesca; Allarà, Marco; Palmieri, Vittoria; Luongo, Livio; Woodward, David; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Background and PurposeProstamides are lipid mediators formed by COX-2-catalysed oxidation of the endocannabinoid anandamide and eliciting effects often opposed to those caused by anandamide. Prostamides may be formed when hydrolysis of anandamide by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is physiologically, pathologically or pharmacologically decreased. Thus, therapeutic benefits of FAAH inhibitors might be attenuated by concomitant production of prostamide F2α. This loss of benefit might be minimized by compounds designed to selectively antagonize prostamide receptors and also inhibiting FAAH. Experimental ApproachInhibition of FAAH by a series of selective antagonists of prostamide receptors, including AGN 204396, AGN 211335 and AGN 211336, was assessed using rat, mouse and human FAAH in vitro, together with affinity for human recombinant CB1 and CB2 receptors. Effects in vivo were measured in a model of formalin-induced inflammatory pain in mice. Key ResultsThe prostamide F2α receptor antagonists were active against mouse and rat FAAH in the low μM range and behaved as non-competitive and plasma membrane-permeant inhibitors. AGN 211335, the most potent inhibitor of rat FAAH (IC50 = 1.2 μM), raised exogenous anandamide levels in intact cells and also bound to cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Both AGN 211335 and AGN 211336 (0.25–1 mg·kg−1, i.p.) inhibited the formalin-induced nociceptive response in mice. Conclusions and ImplicationsSynthetic compounds with indirect agonist activity at cannabinoid receptors and antagonist activity at prostamide receptors can be developed. Such compounds could be used as alternatives to selective FAAH inhibitors to prevent the possibility of prostamide F2α-induced inflammation and pain. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids 2013. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-6 PMID:24102214

  10. Exploiting the higher specificity of silver amalgamation: selective detection of mercury(II) by forming Ag/Hg amalgam.

    PubMed

    Deng, Li; Ouyang, Xiangyuan; Jin, Jianyu; Ma, Cheng; Jiang, Ying; Zheng, Jing; Li, Jishan; Li, Yinhui; Tan, Weihong; Yang, Ronghua

    2013-09-17

    Heavy metal ion pollution poses severe risks in human health and the environment. Driven by the need to detect trace amounts of mercury, this article demonstrates, for the first time, that silver/mercury amalgamation, combining with DNA-protected silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), can be used for rapid, easy and reliable screening of Hg(2+) ions with high sensitivity and selectivity over competing analytes. In our proposed approach, Hg(2+) detection is achieved by reducing the mercury species to elemental mercury, silver atoms were chosen as the mercury atoms' acceptors by forming Ag/Hg amalgam. To signal fluorescently this silver amalgamation event, a FAM-labeled ssDNA was employed as the signal reporter. AgNPs were grown on the DNA strand that resulted in greatly quenching the FAM fluorescence. Formation of Ag/Hg amalgam suppresses AgNPs growth on the DNA, leading to fluorescence signal increase relative to the fluorescence without Hg(2+) ions, as well as marked by fluorescence quenching. This FAM fluorescence enhancement can be used for detection of Hg(2+) at the a few nanomolar level. Moreover, due to excellent specificity of silver amalgamation with mercury, the sensing system is highly selective for Hg(2+) and does not respond to other metal ions with up to millimolar concentration levels. This sensor is successfully applied to determination of Hg(2+) in tap water, spring water and river water samples. The results shown herein have important implications in the development of new fluorescent sensors for the fast, easy, and selective detection and quantification of Hg(2+) in environmental and biological samples. PMID:23937672

  11. Biological species is the only possible form of existence for higher organisms: the evolutionary meaning of sexual reproduction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Consistent holistic view of sexual species as the highest form of biological existence is presented. The Weismann's idea that sex and recombination provide the variation for the natural selection to act upon is dominated in most discussions of the biological meaning of the sexual reproduction. Here, the idea is substantiated that the main advantage of sex is the opposite: the ability to counteract not only extinction but further evolution as well. Living systems live long owing to their ability to reproduce themselves with a high fidelity. Simple organisms (like bacteria) reach the continued existence due to the high fidelity of individual genome replication. In organisms with a large genome and complex development, the achievable fidelity of DNA replication is not enough for the precise reproduction of the genome. Such species must be capable of surviving and must remain unchanged in spite of the continuous changes of their genes. This problem has no solution in the frame of asexual ("homeogenomic") lineages. They would rapidly degrade and become extinct or blurred out in the course of the reckless evolution. The core outcome of the transition to sexual reproduction was the creation of multiorganismic entity - biological species. Individual organisms forfeited their ability to reproduce autonomously. It implies that individual organisms forfeited their ability to substantive evolution. They evolve as a part of the biological species. In case of obligatory sexuality, there is no such a thing as synchronic multi-level selection. Natural selection cannot select anything that is not a unit of reproduction. Hierarchy in biology implies the functional predestination of the parts for the sake of the whole. A crucial feature of the sexual reproduction is the formation of genomes of individual organisms by random picking them over from the continuously shuffled gene pool instead of the direct replication of the ancestor's genome. A clear anti-evolutionary consequence of

  12. Mice Expressing a "Hyper-Sensitive" Form of the Cannabinoid Receptor 1 (CB1) Are Neither Obese Nor Diabetic

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Mary-Jeanette; Amin, Randa; Henderson-Redmond, Angela N.; Mackie, Ken; Czyzyk, Traci A.; Morgan, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence implicate the endocannabinoid signaling system in the modulation of metabolic disease. Genetic or pharmacological inactivation of CB1 in rodents leads to reduced body weight, resistance to diet-induced obesity, decreased intake of highly palatable food, and increased energy expenditure. Cannabinoid agonists stimulate feeding in rodents and increased levels of endocannabinoids can disrupt lipid metabolism. Therefore, the hypothesis that sustained endocannabinoid signaling can lead to obesity and diabetes was examined in this study using S426A/S430A mutant mice expressing a desensitization-resistant CB1 receptor. These mice display exaggerated and prolonged responses to acute administration of phytocannabinoids, synthetic cannabinoids, and endocannabinoids. As a consequence these mice represent a novel model for determining the effect of enhanced endocannabinoid signaling on metabolic disease. S426A/S430A mutants consumed equivalent amounts of both high fat (45%) and low fat (10%) chow control diet compared to wild-type littermate controls. S426A/S430A mutants and wild-type mice fed either high or low fat control diet displayed similar fasting blood glucose levels and normal glucose clearance following a 2 g/kg glucose challenge. Furthermore, S426A/S430A mutants and wild-type mice consumed similar amounts of chow following an overnight fast. While both THC and JZL195 significantly increased food intake two hours after injection, this increase was similar between the S426A/S430A mutant and wildtype control mice Our results indicate that S426A/S430A mutant mice expressing the desensitization-resistant form of CB1 do not exhibit differences in body weight, food intake, glucose homeostasis, or re-feeding following a fast. PMID:27501235

  13. Mice Expressing a "Hyper-Sensitive" Form of the Cannabinoid Receptor 1 (CB1) Are Neither Obese Nor Diabetic.

    PubMed

    Marcus, David J; Zee, Michael L; Davis, Brian J; Haskins, Chris P; Andrews, Mary-Jeanette; Amin, Randa; Henderson-Redmond, Angela N; Mackie, Ken; Czyzyk, Traci A; Morgan, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence implicate the endocannabinoid signaling system in the modulation of metabolic disease. Genetic or pharmacological inactivation of CB1 in rodents leads to reduced body weight, resistance to diet-induced obesity, decreased intake of highly palatable food, and increased energy expenditure. Cannabinoid agonists stimulate feeding in rodents and increased levels of endocannabinoids can disrupt lipid metabolism. Therefore, the hypothesis that sustained endocannabinoid signaling can lead to obesity and diabetes was examined in this study using S426A/S430A mutant mice expressing a desensitization-resistant CB1 receptor. These mice display exaggerated and prolonged responses to acute administration of phytocannabinoids, synthetic cannabinoids, and endocannabinoids. As a consequence these mice represent a novel model for determining the effect of enhanced endocannabinoid signaling on metabolic disease. S426A/S430A mutants consumed equivalent amounts of both high fat (45%) and low fat (10%) chow control diet compared to wild-type littermate controls. S426A/S430A mutants and wild-type mice fed either high or low fat control diet displayed similar fasting blood glucose levels and normal glucose clearance following a 2 g/kg glucose challenge. Furthermore, S426A/S430A mutants and wild-type mice consumed similar amounts of chow following an overnight fast. While both THC and JZL195 significantly increased food intake two hours after injection, this increase was similar between the S426A/S430A mutant and wildtype control mice Our results indicate that S426A/S430A mutant mice expressing the desensitization-resistant form of CB1 do not exhibit differences in body weight, food intake, glucose homeostasis, or re-feeding following a fast. PMID:27501235

  14. Fas Receptor-deficient lpr Mice are protected against Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity due to Higher Glutathione Synthesis and Enhanced Detoxification of Oxidant Stress

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is a classical model of hepatocellular necrosis; however, the involvement of the Fas receptor in the pathophysiology remains controversial. Fas receptor-deficient (lpr) and C57BL/6 mice were treated with APAP to compare the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity. Lpr mice were partially protected against APAP hepatotoxicity as indicated by reduced plasma ALT and GDH levels and liver necrosis. Hepatic Cyp2e1 protein, adduct formation and hepatic glutathione (GSH) depletion were similar, demonstrating equivalent reactive metabolite generation. There was no difference in cytokine formation or hepatic neutrophil recruitment. Interestingly, hepatic GSH recovered faster in lpr mice than in wild type animals resulting in enhanced detoxification of reactive oxygen species. Driving the increased GSH levels, mRNA induction and protein expression of glutamate-cysteine ligase (gclc) were higher in lpr mice. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein levels at 6h were significantly lower in lpr mice, which correlated with reduced nitrotyrosine staining. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) mRNA levels were substantially higher in lpr mice after APAP. Conclusion: Our data suggest that the faster recovery of hepatic GSH levels during oxidant stress and peroxynitrite formation, reduced iNOS expression and enhanced induction of Hsp70 attenuated the susceptibility to APAP-induced cell death in lpr mice. PMID:23628456

  15. GAB(A) receptors present higher affinity and modified subunit composition in spinal motor neurons from a genetic model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Carunchio, Irene; Mollinari, Cristiana; Pieri, Massimo; Merlo, Daniela; Zona, Cristina

    2008-10-01

    expression of GABA(A) receptors are altered in G93A motor neurons inducing a higher Cl(-) influx into the cell with a possible consequent neuronal excitotoxicity acceleration. PMID:18973555

  16. The Drosophila nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits Dα5 and Dα7 form functional homomeric and heteromeric ion channels

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play an important role as excitatory neurotransmitters in vertebrate and invertebrate species. In insects, nAChRs are the site of action of commercially important insecticides and, as a consequence, there is considerable interest in examining their functional properties. However, problems have been encountered in the successful functional expression of insect nAChRs, although a number of strategies have been developed in an attempt to overcome such difficulties. Ten nAChR subunits have been identified in the model insect Drosophila melanogaster (Dα1-Dα7 and Dβ1-Dβ3) and a similar number have been identified in other insect species. The focus of the present study is the Dα5, Dα6 and Dα7 subunits, which are distinguished by their sequence similarity to one another and also by their close similarity to the vertebrate α7 nAChR subunit. Results A full-length cDNA clone encoding the Drosophila nAChR Dα5 subunit has been isolated and the properties of Dα5-, Dα6- and Dα7-containing nAChRs examined in a variety of cell expression systems. We have demonstrated the functional expression, as homomeric nAChRs, of the Dα5 and Dα7 subunits in Xenopus oocytes by their co-expression with the molecular chaperone RIC-3. Also, using a similar approach, we have demonstrated the functional expression of a heteromeric ‘triplet’ nAChR (Dα5 + Dα6 + Dα7) with substantially higher apparent affinity for acetylcholine than is seen with other subunit combinations. In addition, specific cell-surface binding of [125I]-α-bungarotoxin was detected in both Drosophila and mammalian cell lines when Dα5 was co-expressed with Dα6 and RIC-3. In contrast, co-expression of additional subunits (including Dα7) with Dα5 and Dα6 prevented specific binding of [125I]-α-bungarotoxin in cell lines, suggesting that co-assembly with other nAChR subunits can block maturation of correctly folded nAChRs in some cellular

  17. Activity and Structural Comparisons of Solution Associating and Monomeric Channel-Forming Peptides Derived from the Glycine Receptor M2 Segment

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Gabriel A.; Prakash, Om; Zhang, Ke; Shank, Lalida P.; Takeguchi, Wade A.; Robbins, Ashley; Gong, Yu-Xi; Iwamoto, Takeo; Schultz, Bruce D.; Tomich, John M.

    2004-01-01

    A number of channel-forming peptides derived from the second transmembrane (TM) segment (M2) of the glycine receptor α1 subunit (M2GlyR), including the 22-residue sequence NK4-M2GlyR p22 wild type (WT) (KKKKPARVGLGITTVLTMTTQS), induce anion permeation across epithelial cell monolayers. In vitro assays suggest that this peptide or related sequences might function as a candidate for ion channel replacement therapy in treating channelopathies such as cystic fibrosis (CF). The wild-type sequence forms soluble associations in water that diminish its efficacy. Introduction of a single substitution S22W at the C-terminus, NK4-M2GlyR p22 S22W, eliminates the formation of higher molecular weight associations in solution. The S22W peptide also reduces the concentration of peptide required for half-maximal anion transport induced across Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK) monolayers. A combination of 2D double quantum filtered correlation spectroscopy (DQF-COSY), total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY), nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY), and rotating frame nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (ROESY) data were recorded for both the associating WT and nonassociating S22W peptides and used to compare the primary structures and to assign the secondary structures. High-resolution structural studies were recorded in the solvent system (40% 2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol (TFE)/water), which gave the largest structural difference between the two peptides. Nuclear Overhauser effect crosspeak intensity provided interproton distances and the torsion angles were measured by spin-spin coupling constants. These constraints were put into the DYANA modeling program to generate a group of structures. These studies yielded energy-minimized structures for this mixed solvent environment. Structure for both peptides is confined to the 15-residue transmembrane segments. The energy-minimized structure for the WT peptide shows a partially helical extended structure. The S22W peptide

  18. Microheterogeneous forms of radioiodinated bovine thyrotropin: discrimination of different receptor-active components by gel permeation chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Stanton, P.G.; Hearn, M.T.

    1986-01-01

    The products of the radioiodination and subsequent receptor adsorption of bovine TSH (bTSH) radiolabeled by the lactoperoxidase method have been further investigated. After receptor adsorption, (125I)bTSH was resolved by gel permeation chromatography on Sephadex G-100 (superfine) under low ionic strength conditions into three peaks of radioactivity (tracers 2a, 2b, and 2c, respectively). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nonreducing conditions demonstrated that each tracer component was radiolabeled on both the alpha- and beta-subunits. Analysis of the three tracers by TSH radioreceptor assay (under different radioreceptor assay conditions) showed that tracers 2b and 2c exhibited saturable rebinding to crude thyroid membranes containing functional TSH receptors. However, tracer 2c exhibited a maximum binding 2-fold greater than tracer 2b. This difference has been attributed to the abundance of an apparently low affinity binding component in tracer 2c. Rechromatography of tracers 2b and 2c on Sephadex G-100 (superfine) under high ionic strength conditions yielded tracer profiles that were coincident, demonstrating that the initial separation under low ionic strength conditions was not based on differences in molecular volume. The data indicate that radioiodination of highly purified bTSH yields multiple tracer components. Further, receptor adsorption, commonly used to purify freshly iodinated bTSH before radioreceptor assay, purifies at least two species of receptor-active (125I) bTSH.

  19. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the catalytic domain of human receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase [gamma] in three different crystal forms

    SciTech Connect

    Kish, Kevin; McDonnell, Patricia A.; Goldfarb, Valentina; Gao, Mian; Metzler, William J.; Langley, David R.; Bryson, James W.; Kiefer, Susan E.; Carpenter, Brian; Kostich, Walter A.; Westphal, Ryan S.; Sheriff, Steven

    2013-03-07

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase {gamma} is a membrane-bound receptor and is designated RPTP{gamma}. RPTP{gamma} and two mutants, RPTP{gamma}(V948I, S970T) and RPTP{gamma}(C858S, S970T), were recombinantly expressed and purified for X-ray crystallographic studies. The purified enzymes were crystallized using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method. Crystallographic data were obtained from several different crystal forms in the absence and the presence of inhibitor. In this paper, a description is given of how three different crystal forms were obtained that were used with various ligands. An orthorhombic crystal form and a trigonal crystal form were obtained both with and without ligand, and a monoclinic crystal form was only obtained in the presence of a particularly elaborated inhibitor.

  20. The GABAA receptor agonist muscimol induces an age- and region-dependent form of long-term depression in the mouse striatum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoqun; Yao, Ning; Chergui, Karima

    2016-09-01

    Several forms of long-term depression (LTD) of glutamatergic synaptic transmission have been identified in the dorsal striatum and in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Such experience-dependent synaptic plasticity might play important roles in reward-related learning. The GABAA receptor agonist muscimol was recently found to trigger a long-lasting depression of glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the NAc of adolescent mice, but the mechanisms that underlie this novel form of LTD were not studied. Here we examined the effect of muscimol applied in the perfusion solution on the amplitude of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials/population spikes (fEPSP/PSs) in mouse brain slices. We found that muscimol depressed the fEPSP/PS in the NAc of adolescent mice but not adult mice, through both postsynaptic and presynaptic mechanisms. Indeed, muscimol altered the fEPSP/PS paired-pulse ratio, depolarized the membrane of projection neurons, and decreased the frequency, but not amplitude, of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in the NAc of adolescent mice. The LTD induced by muscimol likely involved endocannabinoids, metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), but not TRPV1 receptors. Muscimol-LTD was occluded by prior induction of LTD through low-frequency stimulation (LFS) of the slice, demonstrating a common pathway in the induction of LFS-LTD and muscimol-LTD. We also found that muscimol induced a form of LTD in the dorsolateral striatum of adult but not adolescent mice. This LTD was mediated by endocannabinoids but did not involve mGluRs or TRPV1 receptors. These results identify a novel form of synaptic plasticity, and its mechanisms of induction, which is age and region dependent. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the increased susceptibility of the adolescent brain to long-term synaptic changes in regions associated with reward mechanisms. PMID:27531838

  1. Relationship between mRNA expression of splice forms of the zeta1 subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and spatial memory in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Das, Siba R; Magnusson, Kathy R

    2008-05-01

    Age-related changes in the protein and mRNA expression of some of the splice forms of the zeta1 (NR1) subunit of the NMDA receptor have been seen in mice and rats. The present study was designed to determine whether individual splice forms of the zeta1 subunit of the NMDA receptor within prefrontal/frontal cortical regions contribute to memory deficits during aging and whether experience in learning tasks can influence the expression of the splice forms. mRNA expression of 4 splice forms (zeta1-1, zeta1-3, zeta1-a and zeta1-b) and mRNA for all known splice forms (zeta1-pan) were examined by in situ hybridization. mRNA for C-terminal splice forms, zeta1-1 (+ C1 and + C2 cassettes) and zeta1-3 (+ C1 and + C2'), showed significant declines during aging in several brain regions even though overall zeta1-pan mRNA expression was not significantly affected by aging. This suggests that these splice forms are more influenced by aging than the subunit as a whole. There was an increase in the expression of zeta1-a (-N1 cassette) splice form in the behaviorally-experienced old mice relative to the younger groups. Old mice with high levels of mRNA expression for the zeta1-a splice form in orbital cortex showed the best performances in the working memory task, but the poorest performances in the cued, associative learning task. These results suggest that there is a complex interaction between zeta1 splice form expression and performance of memory tasks during aging. PMID:18374315

  2. Overexpression of G protein-coupled receptor 87 correlates with poorer tumor differentiation and higher tumor proliferation in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    NII, KAZUHITO; TOKUNAGA, YOSHIMASA; LIU, DAGE; ZHANG, XIA; NAKANO, JUN; ISHIKAWA, SHINYA; KAKEHI, YOSHIYUKI; HABA, REIJI; YOKOMISE, HIROYASU

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 87 (GPR87) is a newly deorphanized member of the transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor family. Recently, GPR87 was suggested to contribute to the viability of human tumor cells and overexpression of GPR87 mRNA was detected in a number of malignant tumors, including lung cancer. We performed a retrospective study of GPR87 expression in association with clinical characteristics and biological markers in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We investigated a total of 123 patients with NSCLC who underwent surgery between 1999 and 2004 (58 adenocarcinomas, 53 squamous cell carcinomas and 12 others). Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the intratumoral expression of GPR87 and the Ki-67 proliferation index. The TUNEL method was also used to investigate tumor apoptosis. A total of 63 tumors (51.2%) were found to be GPR87-positive. These tumors were more frequently encountered among squamous cell carcinomas rather than among adenocarcinomas (62.3 vs. 43.1%, respectively; P=0.044) and were significantly more frequently poorly and moderately differentiated rather than well differentiated (P=0.029). Moreover, the Ki-67 index was significantly higher in GPR87-positive compared to GPR87-negative tumors (57.0 vs. 40.0%, respectively; P=0.002). The overall survival was significantly worse for patients with GPR87-positive compared to those with GPR87-negative tumors (P=0.029). The Cox regression analyses also demonstrated that the GPR87 status was a significant prognostic factor for NSCLC patients [hazard ratio=2.053; P=0.018). The present study demonstrated that in NSCLC, the overexpression of GPR87 is significantly associated with poorer differentiation and higher proliferation. During the progression of NSCLC, GPR87 overexpression may be associated with the acquisition of a more aggressive phenotype and, therefore, is a potentially useful target for prognostication and treatment. PMID:24940491

  3. A Structural Model for the Membrane-Bound Form of the Juxtamembrane Domain of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor.

    SciTech Connect

    Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Carlin, Cathleen R.; Sonnichsen, Frank D.

    2005-06-24

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family involved in the regulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation. Its juxtamembrane domain (JX), the region located between the transmembrane and kinase domains, plays important roles in receptor trafficking. Two sorting signals, a PXXP motif and a 658LL659 motif, are responsible for basolateral sorting in polarized epithelial cells, and a 679LL680 motif targets the ligand-activated receptor for lysosomal degradation. To understand the regulation of these signals, we characterized the structural properties of recombinant JX domain in aqueous solution and in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) detergent. JX is inherently unstructured in aqueous solution, albeit a nascent helix encompasses the lysosomal sorting signal. In DPC micelles, structures derived from NMR data showed three amphipathic, helical segments. A large, internally inconsistent group of long range nuclear Overhauser effects suggest a close proximity of the helices, and the presence of significant conformational averaging. Models were determined for the average JX conformation using restraints representing the translational restriction due to micelle-surface adsorption, and the helix orientations were determined from residual dipolar couplings. Two equivalent average structural models were obtained that differ only in the relative orientation between first and second helices. In these models, the 658LL659 and 679LL680 motifs are located in the first and second helices and face the micelle surface, whereas the PXXP motif is located in a flexible helix-connecting region. The data suggest that the activity of these signals may be regulated by their membrane association and restricted accessibility in the intact receptor.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction of human interleukin-7 bound to unglycosylated and glycosylated forms of its α-receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Wickham, Joseph Jr; Walsh, Scott T. R.

    2007-10-01

    Bacterial and insect cell expression systems have been developed to produce unglycosylated and glycosylated forms of human interleukin-7 (IL-7) and the extracellular domain of its α receptor, IL-7Rα. We report the crystallization and X-ray diffraction of IL-7 complexes to both unglycosylated and glycosylated forms of the IL-7Rα to 2.7 and 3.0 Å, respectively. The interleukin-7 (IL-7) signaling pathway plays an essential role in the development, proliferation and homeostasis of T and B cells in cell-mediated immunity. Understimulation and overstimulation of the IL-7 signaling pathway leads to severe combined immunodeficiency, autoimmune reactions, heart disease and cancers. Stimulation of the IL-7 pathway begins with IL-7 binding to its α-receptor, IL-7Rα. Protein crystals of unglycosylated and glycosylated complexes of human IL-7–IL-7Rα extracellular domain (ECD) obtained using a surface entropy-reduction approach diffract to 2.7 and 3.0 Å, respectively. Anomalous dispersion methods will be used to solve the unglycosylated IL-7–IL-7Rα ECD complex structure and this unglycosylated structure will then serve as a model in molecular-replacement attempts to solve the structure of the glycosylated IL-7–α-receptor complex.

  5. Discovery of a potent and selective EGFR inhibitor (AZD9291) of both sensitizing and T790M resistance mutations that spares the wild type form of the receptor.

    PubMed

    Finlay, M Raymond V; Anderton, Mark; Ashton, Susan; Ballard, Peter; Bethel, Paul A; Box, Matthew R; Bradbury, Robert H; Brown, Simon J; Butterworth, Sam; Campbell, Andrew; Chorley, Christopher; Colclough, Nicola; Cross, Darren A E; Currie, Gordon S; Grist, Matthew; Hassall, Lorraine; Hill, George B; James, Daniel; James, Michael; Kemmitt, Paul; Klinowska, Teresa; Lamont, Gillian; Lamont, Scott G; Martin, Nathaniel; McFarland, Heather L; Mellor, Martine J; Orme, Jonathon P; Perkins, David; Perkins, Paula; Richmond, Graham; Smith, Peter; Ward, Richard A; Waring, Michael J; Whittaker, David; Wells, Stuart; Wrigley, Gail L

    2014-10-23

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors have been used clinically in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring sensitizing (or activating) mutations for a number of years. Despite encouraging clinical efficacy with these agents, in many patients resistance develops leading to disease progression. In most cases, this resistance is in the form of the T790M mutation. In addition, EGFR wild type receptor inhibition inherent with these agents can lead to dose limiting toxicities of rash and diarrhea. We describe herein the evolution of an early, mutant selective lead to the clinical candidate AZD9291, an irreversible inhibitor of both EGFR sensitizing (EGFRm+) and T790M resistance mutations with selectivity over the wild type form of the receptor. Following observations of significant tumor inhibition in preclinical models, the clinical candidate was administered clinically to patients with T790M positive EGFR-TKI resistant NSCLC and early efficacy has been observed, accompanied by an encouraging safety profile. PMID:25271963

  6. Sweet Taste Receptor TAS1R2 Polymorphism (Val191Val) Is Associated with a Higher Carbohydrate Intake and Hypertriglyceridemia among the Population of West Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Lopez, Omar; Panduro, Arturo; Martinez-Lopez, Erika; Roman, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Some high-carbohydrate diets may lead to obesity and multiple metabolic disorders, including hypertriglyceridemia (HTG). This lipid abnormality is considered an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The sweet taste receptor TAS1R2 polymorphism (Ile191Val) has been reported to be associated with carbohydrate intake. The aim of this study was to analyze the association of the TAS1R2 gene polymorphism with carbohydrate intake and HTG among the population of West Mexico. In a cross-sectional study, 441 unrelated subjects were analyzed for TAS1R2 genotypes (Ile/Ile, Ile/Val and Val/Val) by an allelic discrimination assay. Biochemical tests and a three-day food record were assessed. The Val/Val genotype carriers had a higher intake of total carbohydrates, fiber and servings of cereals and vegetables than the other genotype carriers. The Val/Val genotype conferred a higher risk for HTG than the Ile/Val and Ile/Ile genotypes (OR = 3.26, 95%CI 1.35–7.86, p = 0.006 and OR = 2.61, 95%CI 1.12–6.07, p = 0.02, respectively). Furthermore, the Val/Val genotype was associated with approximately 30% higher triglycerides compared with Ile/Val and Ile/Ile genotypes (β = 44.09, 95%CI 9.94–78.25, p = 0.01 and β = 45.7, 95%CI 10.85–80.54, p = 0.01, respectively). In conclusion, the Val/Val genotype of TAS1R2 was associated with a higher carbohydrate intake and HTG. PMID:26907331

  7. Overexpression of the short form of the growth hormone receptor in 3T3-L1 mouse preadipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bick, T.; Frick, G.P.; Leonard, D.

    1994-12-31

    In rodents, the gene for the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gives rise to two mRNA transcripts encoding two proteins: a larger membrane spanning receptor (GHR{sub L}) and a smaller isoform, GHR{sub S} that consists of the extracellular domain and a unique hydrophillic carboxyl terminus. We examined the hypothesis that GHR{sub S} may contribute to cellular binding of GH and play a role in growth hormone (GH) signaling. Rat cDNA encoding GHR{sub S} was ligated into the mammalian expression vector pcDNA-I/neo and stably transfected into mouse 3T3-L1 preadipocytes which have endogenous GH receptors and, when differentiated into adipocytes, have the biochemical machinery to express the various GH effects. Sixteen of 24 neomycin resistant clones secreted at least twice as much GHR{sub s} in the growth medium as cells transfected with the vector alone, and in nine of these, GH binding was increased 2- to 4-fold. The amount of GHR{sub L} in extracts of these cells was unchanged, indicating that increased binding could not be accounted for by effects on formation or degradation of GHR{sub L}. The transfected cDNA for GHR{sub S} directs the synthesis of a 50 kDa protein. We conclude that GHR{sub S} contributes to GH binding and may therefore be a functional receptor. In addition, overexpression of GHR{sub S} in 3T3-L1 cells altered cell function in the absence of GH. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  8. The Matricellular Receptor LRP1 Forms an Interface for Signaling and Endocytosis in Modulation of the Extracellular Tumor Environment.

    PubMed

    Van Gool, Bart; Dedieu, Stéphane; Emonard, Hervé; Roebroek, Anton J M

    2015-01-01

    The membrane protein low-density lipoprotein receptor related-protein 1 (LRP1) has been attributed a role in cancer. However, its presumably often indirect involvement is far from understood. LRP1 has both endocytic and signaling activities. As a matricellular receptor it is involved in regulation, mostly by clearing, of various extracellular matrix degrading enzymes including matrix metalloproteinases, serine proteases, protease inhibitor complexes, and the endoglycosidase heparanase. Furthermore, by binding extracellular ligands including growth factors and subsequent intracellular interaction with scaffolding and adaptor proteins it is involved in regulation of various signaling cascades. LRP1 expression levels are often downregulated in cancer and some studies consider low LRP1 levels a poor prognostic factor. On the contrary, upregulation in brain cancers has been noted and clinical trials explore the use of LRP1 as cargo receptor to deliver cytotoxic agents. This mini-review focuses on LRP1's role in tumor growth and metastasis especially by modulation of the extracellular tumor environment. In relation to this role its diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic potential will be discussed. PMID:26617523

  9. The Matricellular Receptor LRP1 Forms an Interface for Signaling and Endocytosis in Modulation of the Extracellular Tumor Environment

    PubMed Central

    Van Gool, Bart; Dedieu, Stéphane; Emonard, Hervé; Roebroek, Anton J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The membrane protein low-density lipoprotein receptor related-protein 1 (LRP1) has been attributed a role in cancer. However, its presumably often indirect involvement is far from understood. LRP1 has both endocytic and signaling activities. As a matricellular receptor it is involved in regulation, mostly by clearing, of various extracellular matrix degrading enzymes including matrix metalloproteinases, serine proteases, protease inhibitor complexes, and the endoglycosidase heparanase. Furthermore, by binding extracellular ligands including growth factors and subsequent intracellular interaction with scaffolding and adaptor proteins it is involved in regulation of various signaling cascades. LRP1 expression levels are often downregulated in cancer and some studies consider low LRP1 levels a poor prognostic factor. On the contrary, upregulation in brain cancers has been noted and clinical trials explore the use of LRP1 as cargo receptor to deliver cytotoxic agents. This mini-review focuses on LRP1’s role in tumor growth and metastasis especially by modulation of the extracellular tumor environment. In relation to this role its diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic potential will be discussed. PMID:26617523

  10. Preliminary X-ray investigations of several crystal forms of the ferripyoverdine FpvA outer membrane receptor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa bound to ferripyoverdine

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, Christophe; Hoegy, Françoise; Pattus, Franc; Cobessi, David

    2006-05-01

    The crystallization and X-ray data analysis of three crystal forms of the outer membrane pyoverdine transducer FpvA from P. aeruginosa bound to ferripyoverdine are described. The resolution of the crystals ranges from 3.15 to 2.7 Å depending on the crystal form; all were obtained in the presence of C{sub 8}E{sub 4} detergent. Ferripyoverdine transport across the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by the pyoverdine receptor FpvA and the transcriptional regulation of FpvA involve interactions of the FpvA N-terminal TonB box and signalling domain with proteins from the inner membrane. Several crystallization conditions of FpvA–Pvd-Fe solubilized in C{sub 8}E{sub 4} detergent were obtained and X-ray data were collected from three crystal forms. The resolution limits range from 3.15 to 2.7 Å depending on the crystal form. From preliminary analysis of the electron-density maps, the first full-length structure of an outer membrane receptor including a signalling domain should be determined.

  11. The 29-kDa proteins phosphorylated ion thrombin-activated human platelets are forms of the estrogen receptor-related 27-kDa heat shock protein

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.E.; Yan Zhu; O'Neill, S. )

    1991-12-15

    Thrombin plays a critical role in platelet activation, hemostasis, and thrombosis. Cellular activation by thrombin leads to the phosphorylation of multiple proteins, most of which are unidentified. The authors have characterized several 29-kDa proteins that are rapidly phosphorylated following exposure of intact human platelets to thrombin. A murine monoclonal antibody raised to an unidentified estrogen receptor-related 29-kDa protein selectively recognized these proteins as well as a more basic, unphosphorylated 27-kDa protein. Cellular activation by thrombin led to a marked shift in the proportion of protein from the 27-kDa unphosphorylated form to the 29-kDa phosphoprotein species. Using this antibody, they isolated and sequenced a human cDNA clone encoding a protein that was identical to the mammalian 27-kDa heat shock protein (HSP27), a protein of uncertain function that is known to be phosphorylated to several forms and to be transcriptionally induced by estrogen. The 29-kDa proteins were confirmed to be phosphorylated forms of HSP27 by immunoprecipitation studies. Thus, the estrogen receptor-related protein is HSP27, and the three major 20-kDa proteins phosphorylated in thrombin-activated platelets are forms of HSP27. These data suggest a role for HSP27 in the signal transduction events of platelet activation.

  12. SAMe Prevents the Up Regulation of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling in Mallory-Denk Body Forming Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bardag-Gorce, Fawzia; Oliva, Joan; Lin, Andrew; Li, Jun; French, Barbara A.; French, Samuel W.

    2010-01-01

    Mallory-Denk body (MDB) formation is a component of alcoholic and non alcoholic hepatitis. In the present study, the role of the toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway was investigated in the mechanism of MDB formation in the DDC-fed mouse model. Microarray analysis data mining, performed on the livers of drug primed mice refed DDC, showed that TLR2/4 gene expression was significantly up regulated by DDC refeeding. SAMe supplementation prevented this up regulation and prevented the formation of MDBs. qRT-PCR analysis confirmed these results. TLR2/4 activates the adapter protein MyD88. The levels of MyD88 were increased by DDC refeeding. The increase of MyD88 was also prevented by SAMe supplementation. Results showed that MyD88-independent TLR3/4-TRIF-IRF3 pathway was not up regulated in the liver of DDC refed mice. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) is the down stream protein recruited by the MyD88/IRAK protein complex, and is involved in the regulation of innate immune responses. Results showed a significant increase in the levels of TRAF-6. TRAF-6 activation leads to activation of NFkB and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. The TRAF-6 increase was ameliorated by SAMe supplementation. These results suggest that DDC induces MDB formation through the TLR2/4 and MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. In conclusion, SAMe blocked the over-expression of TLR2/4, and their downstream signaling components MyD88 and TRAF-6. SAMe prevented the DDC-induced up regulation of the TLR signaling pathways, probably by preventing the up regulation of INF-γ receptors by DDC feeding. INFγ stimulates the up regulation of TLR2. The ability of SAMe feeding to prevent TLR signaling up regulation has not been previously described. PMID:20206621

  13. Programmed cell death 1 forms negative costimulatory microclusters that directly inhibit T cell receptor signaling by recruiting phosphatase SHP2

    PubMed Central

    Takamatsu, Masako; Kobayashi-Imanishi, Wakana; Hashimoto-Tane, Akiko; Azuma, Miyuki

    2012-01-01

    Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) is a negative costimulatory receptor critical for the suppression of T cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Single cell imaging elucidated a molecular mechanism of PD-1–mediated suppression. PD-1 becomes clustered with T cell receptors (TCRs) upon binding to its ligand PD-L1 and is transiently associated with the phosphatase SHP2 (Src homology 2 domain–containing tyrosine phosphatase 2). These negative costimulatory microclusters induce the dephosphorylation of the proximal TCR signaling molecules. This results in the suppression of T cell activation and blockade of the TCR-induced stop signal. In addition to PD-1 clustering, PD-1–TCR colocalization within microclusters is required for efficient PD-1–mediated suppression. This inhibitory mechanism also functions in PD-1hi T cells generated in vivo and can be overridden by a neutralizing anti–PD-L1 antibody. Therefore, PD-1 microcluster formation is important for regulation of T cell activation. PMID:22641383

  14. The fibroblast growth factor receptor, FGFR3, forms gradients of intact and degraded protein across the growth plate of developing bovine ribs.

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Sujata G; Govindraj, Prasanthi; Sasse, Joachim; Neame, Peter J; Hassell, John R

    2002-01-01

    Point mutations in the human fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor 3 gene (Fgfr3) produce a constitutively active receptor, which disrupts chondrocyte differentiation in the growth plate and results in skeletal dysplasias with severe shortening of the limbs. Alternative splicing of the Fgfr3 transcript gives rise to two isoforms, IIIc and IIIb, which vary in their specificity for FGF ligands. We examined the expression of these FGFR3 isoforms in the bovine fetal rib growth plate to determine whether levels of FGFR3 expression are zone-related. Transcripts for both Fgfr3 isoforms are expressed in rib growth plate, with maximum expression in the hypertrophic region and the least expression in the reserve zone. Fgfr3 IIIc is the predominant isoform in the growth plate. Western-blot analysis revealed the presence of full-length FGFR3 (135 kDa) for both isoforms in the reserve zone, a major 98 kDa fragment in all zones and smaller fragments primarily in the hypertrophic zone. Immunostaining localized FGFR3 to the pericellular region of reserve chondrocytes and to the extracellular matrix in the hypertrophic zone. These results suggest that the transmembrane form of FGFR3 increasingly undergoes proteolytic cleavage towards the hypertrophic zone to produce an extracellular-domain fragment of FGFR3, which is present in large amounts in the matrix of hypertrophic cells. These findings suggest a proteolytic regulatory mechanism for FGFR3, whereby Fgfr3 fragments could control availability of FGF for the intact receptor, and by which proteolysis could inactivate the receptor. PMID:11772395

  15. Expression of the chicken progesterone receptor forms A and B is differentially regulated by estrogen in vivo.

    PubMed

    Syvälä, H; Vienonen, A; Ylikomi, T; Bläuer, M; Zhuang, Y H; Tuohimaa, P

    1997-02-24

    The chicken progesterone receptor (cPR), like its human counterpart (hPR), exists as two isoforms, PR-A and PR-B, displaying different biological activities depending upon cellular and promoter contexts. Here we show that the ratio of PR isoforms observed in the immature chicken oviduct is changed during estrogen-induced differentiation from PR-B dominancy to that of PR-A. This is the first report describing that the expression ratio of PR isoforms is altered by upregulation of PR-A by estrogen action in vivo. This result provides a plausible explanation to the differences in oviduct's response to progesterone depending on hormonal and developmental status of the animal. PMID:9070848

  16. A pathogenic bacterium triggers epithelial signals to form a functional bacterial receptor that mediates actin pseudopod formation.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenshine, I; Ruschkowski, S; Stein, M; Reinscheid, D J; Mills, S D; Finlay, B B

    1996-01-01

    Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) belongs to a group of bacterial pathogens that induce actin accumulation beneath adherent bacteria. We found that EPEC adherence to epithelial cells mediates the formation of fingerlike pseudopods (up to 10 microm) beneath bacteria. These actin-rich structures also contain tyrosine phosphorylated host proteins concentrated at the pseudopod tip beneath adherent EPEC. Intimate bacterial adherence (and pseudopod formation) occurred only after prior bacterial induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of an epithelial membrane protein, Hp90, which then associates directly with an EPEC adhesin, intimin. These interactions lead to cytoskeletal nucleation and pseudopod formation. This is the first example of a bacterial pathogen that triggers signals in epithelial cells which activates receptor binding activity to a specific bacterial ligand and subsequent cytoskeletal rearrangement. Images PMID:8654358

  17. Role of iso-receptors in receptor-receptor interactions with a focus on dopamine iso-receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Agnati, Luigi F; Guidolin, Diego; Cervetto, Chiara; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Fuxe, Kjell

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular and intracellular communication processes consist of signals and recognition/decoding apparatuses of these signals. In humans, the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family represents the largest family of cell surface receptors. More than 30 years ago, it has been proposed that GPCR could form dimers or higher-order oligomers (receptor mosaics [RMs] at the plasma membrane level and receptor-receptor interactions [RRIs] have been proposed as a new integrative mechanism for chemical signals impinging on cell plasma membranes). The basic phenomena involved in RRIs are allostery and cooperativity of membrane receptors, and the present paper provides basic information concerning their relevance for the integrative functions of RMs. In this context, the possible role of iso-receptor RM is discussed (with a special focus on dopamine receptor subtypes and on some of the RMs they form with other dopamine iso-receptors), and it is proposed that two types of cooperativity, namely, homotropic and heterotropic cooperativity, could allow distinguishing two types of functionally different RMs. From a general point of view, the presence of iso-receptors and their topological organization within RMs allow the use of a reduced number of signals for the intercellular communication processes, since the target cells can recognize and decode the same signal in different ways. This theoretical aspect is further analyzed here by means of an analogy with artificial information systems. Thus, it is suggested that the 'multiplexer' and 'demultiplexer' concepts could, at least in part, model the role of RMs formed by iso-receptors in the information handling by the cell. PMID:26418645

  18. Nanoscale patterning of membrane-bound proteins formed through curvature-induced partitioning of phase-specific receptor lipids.

    PubMed

    Ogunyankin, Maria O; Huber, Dale L; Sasaki, Darryl Y; Longo, Marjorie L

    2013-05-21

    This work describes a technique for forming high-density arrays and patterns of membrane-bound proteins through binding to a curvature-organized compositional pattern of metal-chelating lipids (Cu(2+)-DOIDA or Cu(2+)-DSIDA). In this bottom-up approach, the underlying support is an e-beam formed, square lattice pattern of hemispheres. This curvature pattern sorts Cu(2+)-DOIDA to the 200 nm hemispherical lattice sites of a 600 nm × 600 nm unit cell in Ld - Lo phase separated lipid multibilayers. Binding of histidine-tagged green fluorescent protein (His-GFP) creates a high density array of His-GFP-bound pixels localized to the square lattice sites. In comparison, the negative pixel pattern is created by sorting Cu(2+)-DSIDA in Ld - Lβ' phase separated lipid multibilayers to the flat grid between the lattice sites followed by binding to His-GFP. Lattice defects in the His-GFP pattern lead to interesting features such as pattern circularity. We also observe defect-free arrays of His-GFP that demonstrate perfect arrays can be formed by this method suggesting the possibility of using this approach for the localization of various active molecules to form protein, DNA, or optically active molecular arrays. PMID:23642033

  19. Human cord blood T-cell receptor alpha beta cell responses to protein antigens of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis yeast forms.

    PubMed Central

    Munk, M E; Kaufmann, S H

    1995-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis causes a chronic granulomatous mycosis, prevalent in South America, and cell-mediated immunity represents the principal mode of protection against this fungal infection. We investigated the response of naive cord blood T cells to P. brasiliensis lysates. Our results show: (1) P. brasiliensis stimulates T-cell expansion, interleukin-2 (IL-2) production and differentiation into cytotoxic T cells; (2) T-cell stimulation depends on P. brasiliensis processing and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II expression; (3) the responsive T-cell population expresses alpha beta T-cell receptors (TCR) with different V beta gene products, CD4 and CD45RO; (4) the P. brasiliensis components involved in T-cell expansion primarily reside in a high molecular weight (100,000 MW) and a low molecular weight (< 1000 MW) protein fraction. These results indicate that protein antigens of P. brasiliensis stimulate cord blood CD4 alpha beta T cells, independent from in vivo presensitization, and thus question direct correlation of positive in vitro responses with protective immunity in vivo. PMID:7890308

  20. Neuropilin-1 forms complexes with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 during megakaryocytic differentiation of UT-7/TPO cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsaka, Akimichi; Hirota-Komatsu, Satoko; Shibata, Miki; Komatsu, Norio

    2009-12-25

    We investigated whether the gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors (VEGFR and neuropilin-1 [NRP-1]) could be specifically regulated during the megakaryocytic differentiation of human thrombopoietin (TPO)-dependent UT-7/TPO cells. Undifferentiated UT-7/TPO cells expressed a functional VEGFR-2, leading to VEGF binding and VEGF{sub 165}-induced tyrosine phosphorylation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis inhibition. The megakaryocytic differentiation of UT-7/TPO cells on treatment with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) was accompanied by a marked up-regulation of NRP-1 mRNA and protein expression and by an increase in VEGF-binding activity, which was mainly mediated by VEGFR-2. VEGF{sub 165} promoted the formation of complexes containing NRP-1 and VEGFR-2 in undifferentiated UT-7/TPO cells in a dose-dependent manner. Unlike human umbilical vein endothelial cells, PMA-differentiated UT-7/TPO cells exhibited complex formation between NRP-1 and VEGFR-2 even in the absence of VEGF{sub 165}. These findings suggest that NRP-1-VEGFR-2-complex formation may contribute to effective cellular functions mediated by VEGF{sub 165} in megakaryocytic cells.

  1. A novel steroid receptor co-activator protein (SRAP) as an alternative form of steroid receptor RNA-activator gene: expression in prostate cancer cells and enhancement of androgen receptor activity.

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Hidenori; Takano, Haruna; Sugita, Syozo; Takahara, Yuki; Sugimura, Kazunobu; Nakatani, Tatsuya

    2003-01-01

    We have cloned a cDNA coding for a novel steroid receptor co-activator protein termed SRAP from a rat prostate library. Although the nucleotide sequence of the SRAP has 78.2% identity to that of the human steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA), a novel RNA molecule which was reported to act as an RNA transcript without being translated into protein [Lanz, McKenna, Onate, Albrecht, Wong, Tsai, Tsai and O'Malley (1999) Cell 97, 17-27], the cDNA of SRAP is capable of generating a functional protein. Glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays showed that SRAP associates with the partial androgen receptor (AR) protein composed of a DNA-binding domain and an activation function 2. Luciferase assays demonstrated that SRAP enhances the transactivation activity of the AR, the glucocorticoid receptor and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma(1) in a ligand-dependent manner. Using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion-protein construct, we demonstrated in vivo translation of the GFP-SRAP fusion protein in HeLa cells co-transfected with pSG5AR and reporter gene in the presence of 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Co-transfection of the GFP-SRAP fusion protein expression plasmid enhanced the transactivation activity of AR whereas incorporation of mutations in SRAP of the fusion protein resulted in loss of enhancement of the transactivation activity. Northern blot analysis and reverse transcriptase PCR assays showed that SRAP and SRA are expressed in rat and human prostate cancer cell lines respectively. In HeLa cells and the human prostate cancer cells line DU-145, co-transfected with SRAP, the DHT-dependent transactivation activities of AR were not completely inhibited by the anti-androgen flutamide, but the transactivation activities still remained high even in the presence of 5 microM flutamide, suggesting that SRAP may play an important role in enhancing AR activity in prostate cancer. PMID:12350225

  2. Comparative Molecular Field Analysis of fenoterol derivatives interacting with an agonist-stabilized form of the β2-adrenergic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Plazinska, Anita; Pajak, Karolina; Rutkowska, Ewelina; Jimenez, Lucita; Kozocas, Joseph; Koolpe, Gary; Tanga, Mary; Toll, Lawrence; Wainer, Irving W.; Jozwiak, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    The β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) agonist [3H]-(R,R′)-methoxyfenoterol was employed as the marker ligand in displacement studies measuring the binding affinities (Ki values) of the stereoisomers of a series of 4′-methoxyfenoterol analogs in which the length of the alkyl substituent at α′ position was varied from 0 to 3 carbon atoms. The binding affinities of the compounds were additionally determined using the inverse agonist [3H]-CGP-12177 as the marker ligand and the ability of the compounds to stimulate cAMP accumulation, measured as EC50 values, were determined in HEK293 cells expressing the β2-AR. The data indicate that the highest binding affinities and functional activities were produced by methyl and ethyl substituents at the α′ position. The results also indicate that the Ki values obtained using [3H]-(R,R′)-methoxyfenoterol as the marker ligand modeled the EC50 values obtained from cAMP stimulation better than the data obtained using [3H]-CGP-12177 as the marker ligand. The data from this study was combined with data from previous studies and processed using the Comparative Molecular Field Analysis approach to produce a CoMFA model reflecting the binding to the β2-AR conformation probed by [3H]-(R,R′)-4′-methoxyfenoterol. The CoMFA model of the agonist-stabilized β2-AR suggests that the binding of the fenoterol analogs to an agonist-stabilized conformation of the β2-AR is governed to a greater extend by steric effects than binding to the [3H]-CGP-12177-stabilized conformation(s) in which electrostatic interactions play a more predominate role. PMID:24326276

  3. Variations in IL-23 and IL-25 receptor gene structure, sequence and expression associated with the two disease forms of sheep paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nicol, Louise; Gossner, Anton; Watkins, Craig; Chianini, Francesca; Dalziel, Robert; Hopkins, John

    2016-01-01

    The immunopathology of paucibacillary and multibacillary sheep paratuberculosis is characterized by inflammatory T cell and macrophage responses respectively. IL-23 and IL-25 are key to the development of these responses by interaction with their complex receptors, IL-23R/IL-12RB1 and IL-17RA/IL-17RB. In humans, variations in structure, sequence and/or expression of these genes have been implicated in the different pathological forms of tuberculosis and leprosy, and in gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders such as Crohn's disease. Sequencing has identified multiple transcript variants of sheep IL23R, IL12RB1 and IL17RB and a single IL17RA transcript. RT-qPCR assays were developed for all the identified variants and used to compare expression in the ileo-caecal lymph node of sheep with paucibacillary or multibacillary paratuberculosis and uninfected animals. With IL-23 receptor, only the IL12RB1v3 variant, which lacks the receptor activation motif was differentially expressed and was significantly increased in multibacillary disease; this may contribute to high Th2 responses. Of the IL17RB variants only full length IL17RB was differentially expressed and was significantly increased in multibacillary pathology; which may also contribute to Th2 polarization. IL17RA expression was significantly increased in paucibacillary disease. The contrast between the IL17RA and IL17RB results may indicate that, in addition to Th1 cells, Th17 T cells are also involved in paucibacillary pathology. PMID:26861902

  4. Higher-order Zeeman and spin terms in the electron paramagnetic resonance spin Hamiltonian; their description in irreducible form using Cartesian, tesseral spherical tensor and Stevens' operator expressions.

    PubMed

    McGavin, Dennis G; Tennant, W Craighead

    2009-06-17

    In setting up a spin Hamiltonian (SH) to study high-spin Zeeman and high-spin nuclear and/or electronic interactions in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments, it is argued that a maximally reduced SH (MRSH) framed in tesseral combinations of spherical tensor operators is necessary. Then, the SH contains only those terms that are necessary and sufficient to describe the particular spin system. The paper proceeds then to obtain interrelationships between the parameters of the MRSH and those of alternative SHs expressed in Cartesian tensor and Stevens operator-equivalent forms. The examples taken, initially, are those of Cartesian and Stevens' expressions for high-spin Zeeman terms of dimension BS(3) and BS(5). Starting from the well-known decomposition of the general Cartesian tensor of second rank to three irreducible tensors of ranks 0, 1 and 2, the decomposition of Cartesian tensors of ranks 4 and 6 are treated similarly. Next, following a generalization of the tesseral spherical tensor equations, the interrelationships amongst the parameters of the three kinds of expressions, as derived from equivalent SHs, are determined and detailed tables, including all redundancy equations, set out. In each of these cases the lowest symmetry, [Formula: see text] Laue class, is assumed and then examples of relationships for specific higher symmetries derived therefrom. The validity of a spin Hamiltonian containing mixtures of terms from the three expressions is considered in some detail for several specific symmetries, including again the lowest symmetry. Finally, we address the application of some of the relationships derived here to seldom-observed low-symmetry effects in EPR spectra, when high-spin electronic and nuclear interactions are present. PMID:21693947

  5. Chick heat-shock protein of Mr = 90,000, free or released from progesterone receptor, is in a dimeric form.

    PubMed

    Radanyi, C; Renoir, J M; Sabbah, M; Baulieu, E E

    1989-02-15

    A monoclonal antibody (BF4) has been used to characterize and purify the heat-shock protein of Mr approximately 90,000 (hsp 90) present in the chick oviduct. In low salt cytosol, the sedimentation coefficient of hsp 90 is approximately 6.8 S, the Stokes radius approximately 7.1 nm, and the calculated Mr approximately 204,000, thus suggesting a dimeric structure. In 0.4 M KCl cytosol, only slightly smaller values were determined (approximately 6.5 S, approximately 6.8 nm, and approximately 187,000). Following purification by ion exchange and immunoaffinity chromatography, hsp 90 migrated as a single silver-stained band at Mr approximately 90,000 in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, while the sedimentation coefficient 6.2 S, the Stokes radius approximately 6.8 nm, and the Mr approximately 178,000 confirmed the dimeric structure. However, in both antigen or antibody excess conditions, only one molecule of monoclonal antibody could be bound to the hsp 90 dimer. Whether steric hindrance in a homodimer or the presence of two different 90-kDa proteins in a heterodimer explains this result cannot yet be decided. The dimer is not dissociated by high salt (1 M KCl) or the chaotropic agent (0.5 M NaSCN), but is disrupted by 4 M urea, suggesting a stabilization of the structure by hydrogen bonds. The molybdate-stabilized progesterone receptor hetero-oligomer form of approximately 8 S sedimentation coefficient was purified, and its hsp 90 component was then released by salt treatment. It was found to sediment at approximately 5.8 S and have a Stokes radius approximately 7.1 nm, giving Mr approximately 174,000. This observation is consistent with a previous report suggesting from specific activity determination, scanning of polyacrylamide gels, and cross-linking experiments that each purified nontransformed progesterone receptor molecule includes one progesterone binding unit per two 90-kDa protein molecules (Renoir, J. M., Buchou, T., Mester, J

  6. Analysis of T cells bearing different isotypic forms of the gamma/delta T cell receptor in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Gerli, R; Agea, E; Bertotto, A; Tognellini, R; Flenghi, L; Spinozzi, F; Velardi, A; Grignani, F

    1991-10-01

    The expression of gamma/delta T cell receptor (TCR) on peripheral blood CD3+ cells circulating in 74 patients with different systemic autoimmune diseases was evaluated. There was a significant increase in the gamma/delta T cell number only in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) and in untreated patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Unlike healthy subjects, a subgroup of patients with SLE and SS displayed a marked increase in gamma/delta T cells. Immunosuppressive treatment of patients with active SLE led to a normalization of the gamma/delta T cell number. Analysis of surface phenotype showed that when patient gamma/delta T cells were expanded in the peripheral blood, they were not activated but bore "memory" markers. In addition, they preferentially expressed the disulfide linked form of the TCR, except in progressive systemic sclerosis where the nondisulfide form was displayed. Serial determinations in single patients demonstrated that the gamma/delta T cell increase is a persistent immunological feature in these patient subgroups. PMID:1837314

  7. Information Communication Technology in the Form of an Expert System Shell as a Cognitive Tool to Facilitate Higher-Order Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Gary W.; Knoetze, Johan G.

    2014-01-01

    Information communication technology is capable of contributing supplementary teaching and learning strategies that can be used to address various educational challenges faced by higher education. Students who enter South African higher education institutions are often academically under-prepared and have not developed the cognitive skills…

  8. The leukotriene B4 paradox: neutrophils can, but will not, respond to ligand-receptor interactions by forming leukotriene B4 or its omega-metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Haines, K A; Giedd, K N; Rich, A M; Korchak, H M; Weissmann, G

    1987-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (5S,12R-dihydroxy-6,14-cis,8,10-trans-eicosatetraenoic acid, LTB4) is released from neutrophils exposed to calcium ionophores. To determine whether LTB4 might be produced by ligand-receptor interactions at the plasmalemma, we treated human neutrophils with serum-treated zymosan (STZ), heat-aggregated IgG and fMet-Leu-Phe (fMLP), agonists at the C3b, Fc and fMLP receptors respectively. STZ (10 mg/ml) provoked the formation of barely detectable amounts of LTB4 (0.74 ng/10(7) cells); no omega-oxidized metabolites of LTB4 were found. Adding 10 microM-arachidonate did not significantly increase production of LTB4 or its metabolites. Addition of 50 microM-arachidonate (an amount which activates protein kinase C) before STZ caused a 40-fold increase in the quantity of LTB4 and its omega-oxidation products. Neither phorbol myristate acetate (PMA, 200 ng/ml) nor linoleic acid (50 microM), also activators of protein kinase C, augmented generation of LTB4 by cells stimulated with STZ. Neither fMLP (10(-6) M) nor aggregated IgG (0.3 mg/ml) induced LTB4 formation (less than 0.01 ng/10(7) cells). Moreover, cells exposed to STZ, fMLP, or IgG did not form all-trans-LTB4 or 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid; their failure to make LTB4 was therefore due to inactivity of neutrophil 5-lipoxygenase. However, adding 50 microM-arachidonate to neutrophil suspensions before fMLP or IgG triggered LTB4 production, the majority of which was metabolized to its omega-oxidized products (fMLP, 20.2 ng/10(7) cells; IgG, 17.1 ng/10(7) cells). The data show that neutrophils exposed to agonists at defined cell-surface receptors produce significant quantities of LTB4 only when treated with non-physiological concentrations of arachidonate. PMID:3032161

  9. Methyl farnesoate action, and morphogenetic signaling through the ligand binding pocket of the ortholog of the retinoid X receptor, in higher dipter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most attention on metamorphic signaling by small terpenoids has focused action by juvenile hormone (JH) through bHLH-PAS proteins (e.g., MET and GCE), especially as that signaling axis intersects with ecdysteroid action through the receptor EcR. However, a long-standing series of endocrine and pharm...

  10. IL-34 and M-CSF form a novel heteromeric cytokine and regulate the M-CSF receptor activation and localization.

    PubMed

    Ségaliny, Aude I; Brion, Régis; Brulin, Bénédicte; Maillasson, Mike; Charrier, Céline; Téletchéa, Stéphane; Heymann, Dominique

    2015-12-01

    Interleukin-34 (IL-34) is a newly-discovered homodimeric cytokine that regulates, like Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (M-CSF), the differentiation of the myeloid lineage through M-CSF receptor (M-CSFR) signaling pathways. To date, both cytokines have been considered as competitive cytokines with regard to the M-CSFR. The aim of the present work was to study the functional relationships of these cytokines on cells expressing the M-CSFR. We demonstrate that simultaneous addition of M-CSF and IL-34 led to a specific activation pattern on the M-CSFR, with higher phosphorylation of the tyrosine residues at low concentrations. Similarly, both cytokines showed an additive effect on cellular proliferation or viability. In addition, BIAcore experiments demonstrated that M-CSF binds to IL-34, and molecular docking studies predicted the formation of a heteromeric M-CSF/IL-34 cytokine. A proximity ligation assay confirmed this interaction between the cytokines. Finally, co-expression of the M-CSFR and its ligands differentially regulated M-CSFR trafficking into the cell. This study establishes a new foundation for the understanding of the functional relationship between IL-34 and M-CSF, and gives a new vision for the development of therapeutic approaches targeting the IL-34/M-CSF/M-CSFR axis. PMID:26095744

  11. Decreased 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor density is associated with a more severe form of parathyroid hyperplasia in chronic uremic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, N; Tanaka, H; Tominaga, Y; Fukagawa, M; Kurokawa, K; Seino, Y

    1993-01-01

    The resistance of parathyroid cells to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) in uremic hyperparathyroidism is thought to be caused, in part, by a 1,25(OH)2D3 receptor (VDR) deficiency in the parathyroids. However, results of biochemical studies addressing VDR numbers in the parathyroids are controversial. Several studies have found VDR content to be decreased in the parathyroids of uremic patients and animals, while others have found no such decrease in the parathyroids of uremic animals. To clarify the role of VDR, we investigated VDR distribution in surgically-excised parathyroids obtained from chronic dialysis patients by immunohistochemistry. We classified the parathyroids as exhibiting nodular or diffuse hyperplasia. Our studies demonstrated a lower density of VDR in the parathyroids showing nodular hyperplasia than in those showing diffuse hyperplasia. Even in the parathyroids showing diffuse hyperplasia, nodule-forming areas were present; these areas were virtually negative for VDR staining. A significant negative correlation was found between VDR density and the weight of the parathyroids. These findings indicate that the conflicting results of biochemical studies may be caused by the heterogeneous distribution of VDR; the decreased VDR density in parathyroids may contribute to the progression of secondary hyperparathyroidism and to the proliferation of parathyroid cells that is seen in uremia. Images PMID:8397225

  12. Endogenous interleukin-22 protects against inflammatory bowel disease but not autoimmune cholangitis in dominant negative form of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, G-X; Sun, Y; Tsuneyama, K; Zhang, W; Leung, P S C; He, X-S; Ansari, A A; Bowlus, C; Ridgway, W M; Gershwin, M E

    2016-08-01

    During chronic inflammation, interleukin (IL)-22 expression is up-regulated in both CD4 and CD8 T cells, exerting a protective role in infections. However, in autoimmunity, IL-22 appears to have either a protective or a pathogenic role in a variety of murine models of autoimmunity and, by extrapolation, in humans. It is not clear whether IL-22 itself mediates inflammation or is a by-product of inflammation. We have taken advantage of the dominant negative form of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II (dnTGF-βRII) mice that develop both inflammatory bowel disease and autoimmune cholangitis and studied the role and the biological function of IL-22 by generating IL-22(-/-) dnTGF-βRII mice. Our data suggest that the influence of IL-22 on autoimmunity is determined in part by the local microenvironment. In particular, IL-22 deficiency exacerbates tissue injury in inflammatory bowel disease, but has no influence on either the hepatocytes or cholangiocytes in the same model. These data take on particular significance in the previously defined effects of IL-17A, IL-12p40 and IL-23p19 deficiency and emphasize that, in colitis, there is a dominant role of IL-23/T helper type 17 (Th17) signalling. Furthermore, the levels of IL-22 are IL-23-dependent. The use of cytokine therapy in patients with autoimmune disease has significant potential, but must take into account the overlapping and often promiscuous effects that can theoretically exacerbate inflammation. PMID:27148790

  13. Pulmonary Infection with Hypervirulent Mycobacteria Reveals a Crucial Role for the P2X7 Receptor in Aggressive Forms of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Eduardo P.; Ribeiro, Simone C. M.; Lanes, Verônica R.; Almeida, Fabrício M.; de Andrade, Marcelle R. M.; Bomfim, Caio Cesar Barbosa; Salles, Érika M.; Bortoluci, Karina R.; Coutinho-Silva, Robson; Hirata, Mario H.; Alvarez, José M.; Lasunskaia, Elena B.; D'Império-Lima, Maria Regina

    2014-01-01

    The purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is a sensor of extracellular ATP, a damage-associated molecule that is released from necrotic cells and that induces pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cell death. To investigate whether the innate immune response to damage signals could contribute to the development of pulmonary necrotic lesions in severe forms of tuberculosis, disease progression was examined in C57BL/6 and P2X7R−/− mice that were intratracheally infected with highly virulent mycobacterial strains (Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain 1471 of the Beijing genotype family and Mycobacterium bovis strain MP287/03). The low-dose infection of C57BL/6 mice with bacteria of these strains caused the rapid development of extensive granulomatous pneumonia with necrotic areas, intense bacillus dissemination and anticipated animal death. In contrast, in P2X7R−/− mice, the lung pathology presented with moderate infiltrates of mononuclear leukocytes without visible signs of necrosis; the disease attenuation was accompanied by a delay in mortality. In vitro, the hypervirulent mycobacteria grew rapidly inside macrophages and induced death by a P2X7R-dependent mechanism that facilitated the release of bacilli. Furthermore, these bacteria were resistant to the protective mechanisms elicited in macrophages following extracellular ATP stimulation. Based on this study, we propose that the rapid intracellular growth of hypervirulent mycobacteria results in massive macrophage damage. The ATP released by damaged cells engages P2X7R and accelerates the necrotic death of infected macrophages and the release of bacilli. This vicious cycle exacerbates pneumonia and lung necrosis by promoting widespread cell destruction and bacillus dissemination. These findings suggest the use of drugs that have been designed to inhibit the P2X7R as a new therapeutic approach to treat the aggressive forms of tuberculosis. PMID:24991816

  14. Assessment and the Variety of Its Forms. A Report Prepared for the Task Force on Planning and Quality Assessment of the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingle, James R.

    Issues concerning quality assessment and academic accountability in higher education are considered, with a focus on the use of assessment as a tool for curriculum reform through program and institutional evaluation processes. For the following types of assessment, attention is directed to the scope and purposes of assessment, the instruments…

  15. The Presence of Clitoromegaly in the Nonclassical Form of 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency Could Be Partially Modulated by the CAG Polymorphic Tract of the Androgen Receptor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Gomes, Larissa; Bugano Diniz Gomes, Diogo; Marcondes, José Antônio Miguel; Madureira, Guiomar; de Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho; Bachega, Tânia A. Sartori Sanchez

    2016-01-01

    Background In the nonclassical form (NC), good correlation has been observed between genotypes and 17OH-progesterone (17-OHP) levels. However, this correlation was not identified with regard to the severity of hyperandrogenic manifestations, which could depend on interindividual variability in peripheral androgen sensitivity. Androgen action is modulated by the polymorphic CAG tract (nCAG) of the androgen receptor (AR) gene and by polymorphisms in 5α-reductase type 2 (SRD5A2) enzyme, both of which are involved in the severity of hyperandrogenic disorders. Objectives To analyze whether nCAG-AR and SRD5A2 polymorphisms influence the severity of the nonclassical phenotype. Patients NC patients (n = 114) diagnosed by stimulated-17OHP ≥10 ng/mL were divided into groups according to the beginning of hyperandrogenic manifestations (pediatric and adolescent/adult) and CYP21A2 genotypes (C/C: homozygosis for mild mutations; A/C: compound heterozygosis for severe/mild mutations). Methods CYP21A2 mutations were screened by allelic-specific PCR, MLPA and/or sequencing. HpaII-digested and HpaII-undigested DNA samples underwent GeneScan analysis to study nCAG, and the SRD5A2 polymorphisms were screened by RLFP. Results Mean nCAG did not differ among pediatric, adolescent/adult and asymptomatic subjects. In the C/C genotype, we observed a significantly lower frequency of longer CAG alleles in pediatric patients than in adolescent/adults (p = 0.01). In patients carrying the A/C genotype, the frequencies of shorter and longer CAG alleles did not differ between pediatric patients and adolescent/adults (p>0.05). Patients with clitoromegaly had significantly lower weighted CAG biallelic mean than those without it: 19.1±2.7 and 21.6±2.5, respectively (p = 0.007), independent of the CYP21A2 genotype's severity. The SRD5A2 polymorphisms were not associated with the variability of hyperandrogenic NC phenotypes. Conclusions In this series, we observed a modulatory effect of the CAG

  16. Activation of β-Adrenoceptors by Dobutamine May Induce a Higher Expression of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors δ (PPARδ) in Neonatal Rat Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ming-Ting; Lo, Shih-Hsiang; Cheng, Kai-Chun; Li, Yin-Xiao; Chen, Li-Jen; Cheng, Juei-Tang

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence showed the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) in cardiac function. Cardiac contraction induced by various agents is critical in restoring the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors δ (PPARδ) in cardiac myopathy. Because dobutamine is an agent widely used to treat heart failure in emergency setting, this study is aimed to investigate the change of PPARδ in response to dobutamine. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were used to examine the effects of dobutamine on PPARδ expression levels and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) phosphorylation via Western blotting analysis. We show that treatment with dobutamine increased PPARδ expression and cTnI phosphorylation in a time- and dose-dependent manner in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. These increases were blocked by the antagonist of β1-adrenoceptors. Also, the action of dobutamine was related to the increase of calcium ions and diminished by chelating intracellular calcium. Additionally, dobutamine-induced action was reduced by the inhibition of downstream messengers involved in this calcium-related pathway. Moreover, deletion of PPARδ using siRNA generated the reduction of cTnI phosphorylation in cardiomyocytes treated with dobutamine. Thus, we concluded that PPARδ is increased by dobutamine in cardiac cells. PMID:22666095

  17. Production of interferon-gamma and tumour necrosis factor-alpha by human T-cell clones expressing different forms of the gamma delta receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Christmas, S E; Meager, A

    1990-01-01

    Panels of human T-cell clones bearing the gamma delta T-cell receptor (TcR) were obtained from peripheral blood and decidual tissue and maintained in the presence of interleukin-2 (IL-2). TcR V gamma and V delta gene expression was determined in 40 TcR delta 1+ clones using the gamma delta T-cell subset markers Ti gamma A and delta TCS1, in conjunction with Southern blot analysis using TcR J gamma and J delta probes. gamma delta T-cell clones, together with control alpha beta T-cell clones derived from the same lymphocyte populations, were stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and their ability to produce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) tested using specific ELISA. Many clones representative of the major peripheral V gamma 9/V delta 2J1 subset produced high amounts of both cytokines and mean levels were not significantly different from those produced by alpha beta T-cell clones. Panels of clones expressing V gamma 9 and V delta 2J1 produced significantly higher levels of TNF-alpha than clones not expressing V delta 2J1 and those expressing V delta 1J1. There was no relationship between levels of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha produced by individual gamma delta T-cell clones and also no relationship between their non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxic activity and levels of either cytokine. There was a significant tendency for gamma delta T-cell clones to produce more TNF-alpha than IFN-gamma in comparison to alpha beta T-cell clones. The significance of these findings is discussed in the light of the reported differences in distribution in vivo of V delta 1J1+ and V delta 2J1+ cells. Images Figure 1 PMID:2126252

  18. MUC5AC, a Gel-Forming Mucin Accumulating in Gallstone Disease, Is Overproduced via an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Pathway in the Human Gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Finzi, Laetitia; Barbu, Véronique; Burgel, Pierre-Regis; Mergey, Martine; Kirkwood, Kimberly S.; Wick, Elizabeth C.; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Peschaud, Frédérique; Paye, François; Nadel, Jay A.; Housset, Chantal

    2006-01-01

    Despite evidence that mucin overproduction is critical in the pathogenesis of gallstones, the mechanisms triggering mucin production in gallstone disease are unknown. Here, we tested the potential implication of an inflammation-dependent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) pathway in the regulation of gallbladder mucin synthesis. In gallbladder tissue sections from subjects with cholesterol gallstones, mucus accumulation was associated with neutrophil infiltration and with increased expressions of EGF-R and of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). In primary cultures of human gallbladder epithelial cells, TNF-α induced EGF-R overexpression. In the presence of TNF-α, EGF-R ligands (either EGF or transforming growth factor-α) caused significant increases in MUC5AC mRNA and protein production, whereas expression of the other gallbladder mucins MUC1, MUC3, and MUC5B was unchanged. In addition, on gallbladder tissue sections from subjects with gallstones, increased MUC5AC immunoreactivity was detected in the epithelium and within mucus gel in the lumen. Studies in primary cultures demonstrated that MUC5AC up-regulation induced by the combination of TNF-α with EGF-R ligands was completely blunted by inhibitors of EGF-R tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-related kinase kinase. In conclusion, an inflammation-dependent EGF-R cascade causes overproduction of the gel-forming mucin MUC5AC, which accumulates in cholesterol gallstone disease. The ability to interrupt this cascade is of potential interest in the prevention of cholesterol gallstones. PMID:17148666

  19. Development of a Prolactin Receptor-Targeting Fusion Toxin Using a Prolactin Antagonist and a Recombinant Form of Pseudomonas Exotoxin A

    PubMed Central

    Langenheim, John F.; Chen1, Wen Y.

    2005-01-01

    Human prolactin (hPRL) promotes the proliferation and differentiation of mammary epithelial cells during mammary gland development and has been linked to breast tumor development. The receptor for hPRL (hPRL-R) is elevated in a majority of human breast tumors, suggesting the overexpression of hPRL-R makes cancer cells highly sensitive to the mitogenic and anti-apoptotic activity of hPRL. These findings provide the rationale for the development of hPRL-R targeted breast cancer therapeutics. Previously, an hPRL antagonist, G129R, was developed that competitively binds to hPRL-R resulting in growth inhibition and the induction of apoptosis in certain types of breast cancer cells. To further increase the potency of G129R, we fused G129R to a truncated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE40) that lacks the cell recognition domain of the toxin but retains the domains necessary for PE40 to translocate into the cytosol and inhibit protein synthesis. We postulated that the fusion of G129R with PE40-KDEL would 1) deliver the recombinant toxin to breast cancer cells where hPRL-R is overexpressed; 2) block hPRL signaling via its G129R moiety; and 3) inhibit protein synthesis via its PE40-KDEL moiety. We demonstrate that the fusion toxin can competitively displace hPRL from T-47D human breast cancer cells and inhibit STAT5 phosphorylation induced by hPRL. In addition, we show that G129R-PE40-KDEL is selectively cytotoxic to breast cancer cell lines expressing the PRL-R and that cell death is associated with the inhibition of protein synthesis rather than caspase mediated apoptosis. PMID:15830142

  20. Soluble form of complement C3b/C4b receptor (CR1) results from a proteolytic cleavage in the C-terminal region of CR1 transmembrane domain.

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, I; Paccaud, J P; Belin, D; Maeder, C; Carpentier, J L

    1998-01-01

    The complement C3b/C4b receptor (CR1) is an integral protein, anchored in the plasma membrane through a hydrophobic domain of 25 amino acids, but is also found in the plasma in soluble form (sCR1). A recombinant, soluble form of CR1 has been demonstrated to reduce complement-dependent tissue injury in animal models of ischaemia/reperfusion. In view of the important pathophysiological relevance of sCR1, we have investigated the mechanisms governing CR1 release by using various mutated and chimaeric receptors transiently expressed in COS cells. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that (1) sCR1 is produced by a proteolytic process, (2) the cleavage site lies within the C-terminus of CR1 transmembrane domain, (3) the proteolytic process involves a fully glycosylated CR1 form and (4) this process takes place in late secretory vesicles or at the plasma membrane. PMID:9405292

  1. Decentralized University Studies in Economics and English/The DUNE Project--An Evaluative Project Under Sub-Project III, an Alternative Form of Distribution for Higher Education. Educational Development 1976:3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahllof, Urban

    A teaching system practiced in the Swedish DUNE project, Subproject III, offered an alternative to the usual concentrated form of higher education. An attempt was made to solve the problem of educational distribution by cooperative efforts among municipal authorities, adult education associations, and two postsecondary establishments, the…

  2. Predicted structure of the extracellular region of ligand-gated ion-channel receptors shows SH2-like and SH3-like domains forming the ligand-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Gready, J. E.; Ranganathan, S.; Schofield, P. R.; Matsuo, Y.; Nishikawa, K.

    1997-01-01

    Fast synaptic neurotransmission is mediated by ligand-gated ion-channel (LGIC) receptors, which include receptors for acetylcholine, serotonin, GABA, glycine, and glutamate. LGICs are pentamers with extracellular ligand-binding domains and form integral membrane ion channels that are selective for cations (acetylcholine and serotonin 5HT3 receptors) or anions (GABAA and glycine receptors and the invertebrate glutamate-binding chloride channel). They form a protein superfamily with no sequence similarity to any protein of known structure. Using a 1D-3D structure mapping approach, we have modeled the extracellular ligand-binding domain based on a significant match with the SH2 and SH3 domains of the biotin repressor structure. Refinement of the model based on knowledge of the large family of SH2 and SH3 structures, sequence alignments, and use of structure templates for loop building, allows the prediction of both monomer and pentamer models. These are consistent with medium-resolution electron microscopy structures and with experimental structure/function data from ligand-binding, antibody-binding, mutagenesis, protein-labeling and subunit-linking studies, and glycosylation sites. Also, the predicted polarity of the channel pore calculated from electrostatic potential maps of pentamer models of superfamily members is consistent with known ion selectivities. Using the glycine receptor alpha 1 subunit, which forms homopentamers, the monomeric and pentameric models define the agonist and antagonist (strychnine) binding sites to a deep crevice formed by an extended loop, which includes the invariant disulfide bridge, between the SH2 and SH3 domains. A detailed binding site for strychnine is reported that is in strong agreement with known structure/function data. A site for interaction of the extracellular ligand-binding domain with the activation of the M2 transmembrane helix is also suggested. PMID:9144769

  3. Expression of two human beta-adrenergic receptors in Escherichia coli: functional interaction with two forms of the stimulatory G protein.

    PubMed Central

    Freissmuth, M; Selzer, E; Marullo, S; Schütz, W; Strosberg, A D

    1991-01-01

    When expressed in Escherichia coli, the human beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic receptors retain their ligand binding specificity. Their functional integrity was investigated by analyzing receptor-guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory (G) protein coupling by using two splice variants of the alpha subunit of the stimulatory G protein Gs synthesized in E. coli (rGs alpha-S and rGs alpha-L) and the beta gamma subunits of G protein purified from bovine brain. In competition binding experiments with (-)-[125I]iodocyanopindolol and (-)-isoproterenol, rGs alpha-S.beta gamma and rGs alpha-L.beta gamma reconstituted guanine nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity agonist binding with comparable affinities, whereas rGs alpha PT, a mutant of rGs alpha-L with an altered carboxyl terminus, and a recombinant subtype of the alpha subunit of the inhibitory G protein, rGi alpha-1, were approximately 20- and approximately 200-fold less potent, respectively. A comparison of the beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic receptor expressed in E. coli with the beta 2-receptor in S49 murine lymphoma cyc- cell membranes revealed a similar affinity of rGs alpha-S and rGs alpha-L for the recombinant and native receptors. After stable incorporation of rGs alpha-S.beta gamma into E. coli membranes, receptor-G protein coupling was also verified by determining the isoproterenol-mediated acceleration of the rate for guanine 5'-[gamma-[35S]thio]triphosphate binding. These results show that (i) receptor-G protein coupling can be reconstituted in E. coli using recombinant components and that (ii) such an approach may be more generally used to evaluate coupling preferences between defined molecular species of receptors and G-protein subunits. PMID:1656450

  4. Synthesis and characterization of higher amino acid Schiff bases, as monosodium salts and neutral forms. Investigation of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding in all Schiff bases, antibacterial and antifungal activities of neutral forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güngör, Özlem; Gürkan, Perihan

    2014-09-01

    Schiff bases derived from 5-nitro-salicylaldehyde and 4-aminobutyric acid, 5-aminopentanoic acid and 6-aminohexanoic acid were synthesized both as monosodium salts (1a-3a) and neutral forms (1b-3b). The monosodium-Schiff bases were characterized by elemental analysis, 1H/13C NMR, IR, powder XRD, UV-vis spectra and conductivity measurements. The neutral-Schiff bases were characterized by elemental analysis, 1H/13C NMR, 2D NMR (HMQC), mass, IR, powder XRD, UV-vis spectra and conductivity measurements. The intramolecular hydrogen bonding and related tautomeric equilibria in all the Schiff bases were studied by UV-vis and 1H NMR spectra in solution. Additionally, the neutral-Schiff bases were screened against Staphylococcus aureus-EB18, S. aureus-ATCC 25923, Escherichia coli-ATCC 11230, Candida albicans-M3 and C. albicans-ATCC 16231.

  5. Effect of grinding intensity and feed physical form on in vitro adhesion of Salmonella Typhimurium and mannose residues in intestinal mucus receptors for salmonellae.

    PubMed

    Callies, A; Sander, S J; Verspohl, J; Beineke, A; Kamphues, J

    2012-12-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that feeding a fine, pelleted diet (FP) compared to a coarse meal diet (CM) results in a higher mannose content in the intestinal mucus of pigs and therefore an increased in vitro adhesion of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 L to the mucus. The 2 diets were fed to a total of 24 weaned pigs for 6 wk after which mannose content in the mucus was evaluated histochemically using the α1-3-d-mannose-specific lectin Galanthus nivalis agglutinin. The crypt width was determined as an indirect measure for the amount of secreted mucus. Ileal and cecal tissue samples were incubated with approximately 7.77 × 10(7) cfu Salmonella Typhimurium and numbers of salmonellae adhering to the mucus and/or mucosa were determined by culture techniques. There was no effect of feed physical form on the in vitro adhesion of S. Typhimurium either in the ileum (7.1 ± 0.19 log(10) cfu/g tissue) or in the cecum (6.8 ± 0.26 log(10) cfu/g). The mannose content of the mucus also did not differ between the treatment groups. The crypts of the duodenum, jejunum, and cecum were wider (P < 0.05) after feeding the CM diet. This might be an indication for a higher mucus production in these pigs. PMID:23365353

  6. Novel NMDA Receptor Modulators: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Santangelo, Rose M.; Acker, Timothy M.; Zimmerman, Sommer S.; Katzman, Brooke M.; Strong, Katie L.; Traynelis, Stephen F.; Liotta, Dennis C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction The NMDA receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel that plays a critical role in higher level brain processes and has been implicated in a range of neurological and psychiatric conditions. Although initial studies for the use of NMDA receptor antagonists in neuroprotection were unsuccessful, more recently, NMDA receptor antagonists have shown clinical promise in other indications such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, pain and depression. Based on the clinical observations and more recent insights into receptor pharmacology, new modulatory approaches are beginning to emerge, with potential therapeutic benefit. Areas Covered The article covers the known pharmacology and important features regarding NMDA receptors and their function. A discussion of pre-clinical and clinical relevance is included, as well. The subsequent patent literature review highlights the current state of the art targeting the receptor since the last review in 2010. Expert Opinion The complex nature of the NMDA receptor structure and function is becoming better understood. As knowledge about this receptor increases, it opens up new opportunities for targeting the receptor for many therapeutic indications. New strategies and advances in older technologies will need to be further developed before clinical success can be achieved. First-in-class potentiators and subunit-selective agents form the basis for most new strategies, complemented by efforts to limit off-target liability and fine-tune on-target properties. PMID:23009122

  7. Promoting an active form of learning out-of-class via answering online "study questions" leads to higher than expected exam scores in General Biology.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Susan I

    2015-01-01

    online study questions and on three to 77 exams given to students in sections that lacked such access. Data from over 1,800 students in sections with access to the online study questions show that those students scored a statistically significant average of 6.6% points higher on the exam questions analyzed than students in sections without access to the study questions. This difference was greater than the average amount necessary to raise students' exam grades by one grade (e.g., from a "B-" to a "B"). In addition, there was a higher correlation between number of questions answered and success on exam questions on material related to the study questions than between number of questions answered and success on exam questions on material unrelated to the study questions. The online study question system required substantial effort to set up, but required minimal effort to maintain and was effective in significantly raising average exam scores for even very large course sections. PMID:26500828

  8. Promoting an active form of learning out-of-class via answering online “study questions” leads to higher than expected exam scores in General Biology

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    online study questions and on three to 77 exams given to students in sections that lacked such access. Data from over 1,800 students in sections with access to the online study questions show that those students scored a statistically significant average of 6.6% points higher on the exam questions analyzed than students in sections without access to the study questions. This difference was greater than the average amount necessary to raise students’ exam grades by one grade (e.g., from a “B-” to a “B”). In addition, there was a higher correlation between number of questions answered and success on exam questions on material related to the study questions than between number of questions answered and success on exam questions on material unrelated to the study questions. The online study question system required substantial effort to set up, but required minimal effort to maintain and was effective in significantly raising average exam scores for even very large course sections. PMID:26500828

  9. The Heat Shock Cognate Protein hsc73 Assembles with A1 Adenosine Receptors To Form Functional Modules in the Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sarrió, Sara; Casadó, Vicent; Escriche, Marisol; Ciruela, Francisco; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I.; Lluis, Carmen; Franco, Rafael

    2000-01-01

    A1 adenosine receptors (A1Rs) are G protein-coupled heptaspanning receptors that interact at the outer face of the plasma membrane with cell surface ecto-adenosine deaminase (ecto-ADA). By affinity chromatography the heat shock cognate protein hsc73 was identified as a cytosolic component able to interact with the third intracellular loop of the receptor. As demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance, purified A1Rs interact specifically with hsc73 with a dissociation constant in the nanomolar range (0.5 ± 0.1 nM). The interaction between hsc73 and A1R led to a marked reduction in the binding of the ligands and prevented activation of G proteins, as deduced from 35S-labeled guanosine-5′-O-(3-thio)triphosphate binding assays. Interestingly this effect was stronger than that exerted by guanine nucleotide analogs, which uncouple receptors from G proteins, and was completely prevented by ADA. As assessed by immunoprecipitation a high percentage of A1Rs in cell lysates are coupled to hsc73. A relatively high level of colocalization between A1R and hsc73 was detected in DDT1MF-2 cells by means of confocal microscopy, and no similar results were obtained for other G protein-coupled receptors. Colocalization between hsc73 and A1R was detected in specific regions of rat cerebellum and in the body of cortical neurons but not in dendrites or synapses. Remarkably, agonist-induced receptor internalization leads to the endocytosis of A1Rs by two qualitatively different vesicle types, one in which A1R and hsc73 colocalize and another in which hsc73 is absent. These results open the interesting possibility that signaling via G protein-coupled receptors may be regulated by heat shock proteins. PMID:10866672

  10. Lipoxin receptors.

    PubMed

    Romano, Mario; Recchia, Irene; Recchiuti, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Lipoxins (LXs) represent a class of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites that carry potent immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, LXA4 and LXB4 being the main components of this series. LXs are generated by cooperation between 5-lipoxygenase (LO) and 12- or 15-LO during cell-cell interactions or by single cell types. LX epimers at carbon 15, the 15-epi-LXs, are formed by aspirin-acetylated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in cooperation with 5-LO. 15-epi-LXA4 is also termed aspirin-triggered LX (ATL). In vivo studies with stable LX and ATL analogs have established that these eicosanoids possess potent anti-inflammatory activities. A LXA4 receptor has been cloned. It belongs to the family of chemotactic receptors and clusters with formyl peptide receptors on chromosome 19. Therefore, it was initially denominated formyl peptide receptor like 1 (FPRL1). This receptor binds with high affinity and stereoselectivity LXA4 and ATL. It also recognizes a variety of peptides, synthetic, endogenously generated, or disease associated, but with lower affinity compared to LXA4. For this reason, this receptor has been renamed ALX. This review summarizes the current knowledge on ALX expression, signaling, and potential pathophysiological role. The involvement of additional recognition sites in LX bioactions is also discussed. PMID:17767357

  11. The Shc-related adaptor protein, Sck, forms a complex with the vascular-endothelial-growth-factor receptor KDR in transfected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Warner, A J; Lopez-Dee, J; Knight, E L; Feramisco, J R; Prigent, S A

    2000-01-01

    Despite much progress in recent years, the precise signalling events triggered by the vascular-endothelial-growth-factor (VEGF) receptors, fms-like tyrosine kinase (Flt1) and kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR), are incompletely defined. Results obtained when Flt1 and KDR are individually expressed in fibroblasts or porcine aortic endothelial cells have not been entirely consistent with those observed in other endothelial cells expressing both receptors endogenously. It has also been difficult to demonstrate VEGF-induced phosphorylation of Flt1, which has led to speculation that KDR may be the more important receptor for the mitogenic action of VEGF on endothelial cells. In an attempt to identify physiologically important effectors which bind to KDR, we have screened a yeast two-hybrid mouse embryo library with the cytoplasmic domain of KDR. Here we describe the identification of the adaptor protein, Shc-like protein (Sck), as a binding partner for KDR. We demonstrate that this interaction requires phosphorylation of KDR, and identify the binding site for the Src-homology 2 (SH2) domain as tyrosine-1175 of KDR. We have also shown that the SH2 domain of Sck, but not that of Src-homology collagen protein (Shc), can precipitate phosphorylated KDR from VEGF-stimulated porcine aortic endothelial cells expressing KDR, and that an N-terminally truncated Sck protein can associate with KDR, in a phosphorylation-dependent fashion, when co-expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in the two-hybrid assay, both Shc and Sck SH2 domains can associate with the related receptor Flt1. PMID:10749680

  12. A Receptor-Like Kinase, Related to Cell Wall Sensor of Higher Plants, is Required for Sexual Reproduction in the Unicellular Charophycean Alga, Closterium peracerosum-strigosum-littorale Complex.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Naoko; Marukawa, Yuka; Abe, Jun; Hashiba, Sayuri; Ichikawa, Machiko; Tanabe, Yoichi; Ito, Motomi; Nishii, Ichiro; Tsuchikane, Yuki; Sekimoto, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    Here, we cloned the CpRLK1 gene, which encodes a receptor-like protein kinase expressed during sexual reproduction, from the heterothallic Closterium peracerosum-strigosum-littorale complex, one of the closest unicellular alga to land plants. Mating-type plus (mt(+)) cells with knockdown of CpRLK1 showed reduced competence for sexual reproduction and formed an abnormally enlarged conjugation papilla after pairing with mt(-) cells. The knockdown cells were unable to release a naked gamete, which is indispensable for zygote formation. We suggest that the CpRLK1 protein is an ancient cell wall sensor that now functions to regulate osmotic pressure in the cell to allow proper gamete release. PMID:25941232

  13. The TRPM8 channel forms a complex with the 5-HT(1B) receptor and phospholipase D that amplifies its reversal of pain hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vinuela-Fernandez, Ignacio; Sun, Liting; Jerina, Helen; Curtis, John; Allchorne, Andrew; Gooding, Hayley; Rosie, Roberta; Holland, Pamela; Tas, Basak; Mitchell, Rory; Fleetwood-Walker, Sue

    2014-04-01

    Effective relief from chronic hypersensitive pain states remains an unmet need. Here we report the discovery that the TRPM8 ion channel, co-operating with the 5-HT(1B) receptor (5-HT(1B)R) in a subset of sensory afferents, exerts an influence at the spinal cord level to suppress central hypersensitivity in pain processing throughout the central nervous system. Using cell line models, ex vivo rat neural tissue and in vivo pain models, we assessed functional Ca(2+) fluorometric responses, protein:protein interactions, immuno-localisation and reflex pain behaviours, with pharmacological and molecular interventions. We report 5-HT(1B)R expression in many TRPM8-containing afferents and direct interaction of these proteins in a novel multi-protein signalling complex, which includes phospholipase D1 (PLD1). We provide evidence that the 5-HT(1B)R activates PLD1 to subsequently activate PIP 5-kinase and generate PIP2, an allosteric enhancer of TRPM8, achieving a several-fold increase in potency of TRPM8 activation. The enhanced activation responses of synaptoneurosomes prepared from spinal cord and cortical regions of animals with a chronic inflammatory pain state are inhibited by TRPM8 activators that were applied in vivo topically to the skin, an effect potentiated by co-administered 5-HT(1B)R agonists and attenuated by 5-HT(1B)R antagonists, while 5-HT(1B)R agents alone had no detectable effect. Corresponding results are seen when assessing reflex behaviours in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models. Control experiments with alternative receptor/TRP channel combinations reveal no such synergy. Identification of this novel receptor/effector/channel complex and its impact on nociceptive processing give new insights into possible strategies for enhanced analgesia in chronic pain. PMID:24269608

  14. Mutations increasing exposure of a receptor binding site epitope in the soluble and oligomeric forms of the caprine arthritis-encephalitis lentivirus envelope glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Hötzel, Isidro; Cheevers, William P

    2005-09-01

    The caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAEV) and ovine maedi-visna (MVV) viruses are resistant to antibody neutralization, a feature shared with all other lentiviruses. Whether the CAEV gp135 receptor binding site(s) (RBS) in the functional surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) is protected from antibody binding, allowing the virus to resist neutralization, is not known. Two CAEV gp135 regions were identified by extrapolating a gp135 structural model that could affect binding of antibodies to the RBS: the V1 region and a short sequence analogous in position to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 loop B postulated to be located between two major domains of CAEV gp135. Mutation of isoleucine-166 to alanine in the putative loop B of gp135 increased the affinity of soluble gp135 for the CAEV receptor(s) and goat monoclonal antibody (Mab) F7-299 which recognizes an epitope overlapping the gp135 RBS. The I166A mutation also stabilized or exposed the F7-299 epitope in anionic detergent buffers, indicating that the I166A mutation induces conformational changes and stabilizes the RBS of soluble gp135 and enhances Mab F7-299 binding. In contrast, the affinity of a V1 deletion mutant of gp135 for the receptor and Mab F7-299 and its structural stability did not differ from that of the wild-type gp135. However, both the I166A mutation and the V1 deletion of gp135 increased cell-to-cell fusion activity and binding of Mab F7-299 to the oligomeric Env. Therefore, the CAEV gp135 RBS is protected from antibody binding by mechanisms both dependent and independent of Env oligomerization which are disrupted by the V1 deletion and the I166A mutation, respectively. In addition, we found a correlation between side-chain beta-branching at amino acid position 166 and binding of Mab F7-299 to oligomeric Env and cell-to-cell fusion, suggesting local secondary structure constraints in the region around isoleucine-166 as one determinant of gp135 RBS exposure and antibody binding. PMID

  15. Mutations increasing exposure of a receptor binding site epitope in the soluble and oligomeric forms of the caprine arthritis-encephalitis lentivirus envelope glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Hoetzel, Isidro . E-mail: ihotzel@gene.com; Cheevers, William P.

    2005-09-01

    The caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAEV) and ovine maedi-visna (MVV) viruses are resistant to antibody neutralization, a feature shared with all other lentiviruses. Whether the CAEV gp135 receptor binding site(s) (RBS) in the functional surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) is protected from antibody binding, allowing the virus to resist neutralization, is not known. Two CAEV gp135 regions were identified by extrapolating a gp135 structural model that could affect binding of antibodies to the RBS: the V1 region and a short sequence analogous in position to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 loop B postulated to be located between two major domains of CAEV gp135. Mutation of isoleucine-166 to alanine in the putative loop B of gp135 increased the affinity of soluble gp135 for the CAEV receptor(s) and goat monoclonal antibody (Mab) F7-299 which recognizes an epitope overlapping the gp135 RBS. The I166A mutation also stabilized or exposed the F7-299 epitope in anionic detergent buffers, indicating that the I166A mutation induces conformational changes and stabilizes the RBS of soluble gp135 and enhances Mab F7-299 binding. In contrast, the affinity of a V1 deletion mutant of gp135 for the receptor and Mab F7-299 and its structural stability did not differ from that of the wild-type gp135. However, both the I166A mutation and the V1 deletion of gp135 increased cell-to-cell fusion activity and binding of Mab F7-299 to the oligomeric Env. Therefore, the CAEV gp135 RBS is protected from antibody binding by mechanisms both dependent and independent of Env oligomerization which are disrupted by the V1 deletion and the I166A mutation, respectively. In addition, we found a correlation between side-chain {beta}-branching at amino acid position 166 and binding of Mab F7-299 to oligomeric Env and cell-to-cell fusion, suggesting local secondary structure constraints in the region around isoleucine-166 as one determinant of gp135 RBS exposure and antibody binding.

  16. O-GlcNAcylation of AMPA Receptor GluA2 Is Associated with a Novel Form of Long-Term Depression at Hippocampal Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Erica W.; Wang, Kai; Nelson, Amy R.; Bredemann, Teruko M.; Fraser, Kyle B.; Clinton, Sarah M.; Puckett, Rosemary; Marchase, Richard B.; Chatham, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Serine phosphorylation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunits GluA1 and GluA2 modulates AMPAR trafficking during long-term changes in strength of hippocampal excitatory transmission required for normal learning and memory. The post-translational addition and removal of O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) also occurs on serine residues. This, together with the high expression of the enzymes O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and β-N-acetylglucosamindase (O-GlcNAcase), suggests a potential role for O-GlcNAcylation in modifying synaptic efficacy and cognition. Furthermore, because key synaptic proteins are O-GlcNAcylated, this modification may be as important to brain function as phosphorylation, yet its physiological significance remains unknown. We report that acutely increasing O-GlcNAcylation in Sprague Dawley rat hippocampal slices induces an NMDA receptor and protein kinase C-independent long-term depression (LTD) at hippocampal CA3–CA1 synapses (O-GcNAc LTD). This LTD requires AMPAR GluA2 subunits, which we demonstrate are O-GlcNAcylated. Increasing O-GlcNAcylation interferes with long-term potentiation, and in hippocampal behavioral assays, it prevents novel object recognition and placement without affecting contextual fear conditioning. Our findings provide evidence that O-GlcNAcylation dynamically modulates hippocampal synaptic function and learning and memory, and suggest that altered O-GlcNAc levels could underlie cognitive dysfunction in neurological diseases. PMID:24381264

  17. Development of the sigma-1 receptor in C-terminals of motoneurons and colocalization with the N,N'-dimethyltryptamine forming enzyme, indole-N-methyl transferase.

    PubMed

    Mavlyutov, T A; Epstein, M L; Liu, P; Verbny, Y I; Ziskind-Conhaim, L; Ruoho, A E

    2012-03-29

    The function of the sigma-1 receptor (S1R) has been linked to modulating the activities of ion channels and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). In the CNS, the S1R is expressed ubiquitously but is enriched in mouse motoneurons (MN), where it is localized to subsurface cisternae of cholinergic postsynaptic densities, also known as C-terminals. We found that S1R is enriched in mouse spinal MN at late stages of embryonic development when it is first visualized in the endoplasmic reticulum. S1Rs appear to concentrate at C-terminals of mouse MN only on the second week of postnatal development. We found that indole-N-methyl transferase (INMT), an enzyme that converts tryptamine into the sigma-1 ligand dimethyltryptamine (DMT), is also localized to postsynaptic sites of C-terminals in close proximity to the S1R. This close association of INMT and S1Rs suggest that DMT is synthesized locally to effectively activate S1R in MN. PMID:22265729

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF THE SIGMA-1 RECEPTOR IN C-TERMINALS OF MOTONEURONS AND COLOCALIZATION WITH THE N,N’-DIMETHYLTRYPTAMINE FORMING ENZYME, INDOLE-N-METHYL TRANSFERASE

    PubMed Central

    Mavlyutov, Timur A.; Epstein, Miles L.; Liu, Patricia; Verbny, Yakov I.; Ziskind-Conhaim, Lea; Ruoho, Arnold E.

    2012-01-01

    The function of the sigma-1 receptor (S1R) has been linked to modulating the activities of ion channels and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR). In the CNS the S1R is expressed ubiquitously but is enriched in mouse motoneurons (MN), where it is localized to subsurface cisternae of cholinergic postsynaptic densities, also known as C-terminals. We found that S1R is enriched in mouse spinal MN at late stages of embryonic development when it is first visualized in the endoplasmic reticulum. S1Rs appear to concentrate at C-terminals of mouse MN only on the second week of postnatal development. We found that Indole-N-methyl transferase (INMT), an enzyme that converts tryptamine into the sigma-1 ligand dimethyltryptamine (DMT), is also localized to postsynaptic sites of C-terminals in close proximity to the S1R. This close association of INMT and SIRs suggest that DMT is synthesized locally to effectively activate S1R in MN. PMID:22265729

  19. The Critical Role Of VP1 In Forming The Necessary Cavities For Receptor-mediated Entry Of FMDV To The Host Cell.

    PubMed

    Ashkani, Jahanshah; Rees, D J G

    2016-01-01

    The antigenic inconsistency of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is very broad, such that a vaccine made from one isolate will not offer protection against infection with other isolates from the same serotype. Viral particles (VPs) or surface exposed capsid proteins, VP1-VP3, of FMDV determine both the antigenicity of the virus and its receptor-mediated entry into the host cell. Therefore, modifications of these structural proteins may alter the properties of the virus. Here we show putative cavities on the FMDV-SAT1 (FMDV Southern African Territories1) capsid as possible binding sites for the receptor-mediated viral entry into the host cell. We identified three possible cavities on the FMDV capsid surface, from which the largest one (C2) is shaped in the contact regions of VP1-VP3. Our results demonstrate the significance of VP1, in the formation of FMDV-SAT1 surface cavities, which is the main component in all the identified cavities. Our findings can have profound implications in the protein engineering of FMDV in the contact region of VP1-VP3 found to be embedded in several cavities. Such information is of great significance in the context of vaccine design, as it provides the ground for future improvement of synthetic vaccines to control FMD caused by FMDV-SAT1 serotypes. PMID:27249937

  20. The Critical Role Of VP1 In Forming The Necessary Cavities For Receptor-mediated Entry Of FMDV To The Host Cell

    PubMed Central

    Ashkani, Jahanshah; Rees, D. J. G.

    2016-01-01

    The antigenic inconsistency of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is very broad, such that a vaccine made from one isolate will not offer protection against infection with other isolates from the same serotype. Viral particles (VPs) or surface exposed capsid proteins, VP1–VP3, of FMDV determine both the antigenicity of the virus and its receptor-mediated entry into the host cell. Therefore, modifications of these structural proteins may alter the properties of the virus. Here we show putative cavities on the FMDV-SAT1 (FMDV Southern African Territories1) capsid as possible binding sites for the receptor-mediated viral entry into the host cell. We identified three possible cavities on the FMDV capsid surface, from which the largest one (C2) is shaped in the contact regions of VP1–VP3. Our results demonstrate the significance of VP1, in the formation of FMDV-SAT1 surface cavities, which is the main component in all the identified cavities. Our findings can have profound implications in the protein engineering of FMDV in the contact region of VP1–VP3 found to be embedded in several cavities. Such information is of great significance in the context of vaccine design, as it provides the ground for future improvement of synthetic vaccines to control FMD caused by FMDV-SAT1 serotypes. PMID:27249937

  1. Regulator of G protein signaling 8 inhibits protease-activated receptor 1/Gi/o signaling by forming a distinct G protein-dependent complex in live cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinyong; Ghil, Sungho

    2016-05-01

    Activation of seven-transmembrane-domain-possessing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) by extracellular stimuli elicits intracellular responses. One class of GPCRs-protease-activated receptors (PARs)-is activated by endogenous proteases, such as thrombin and trypsin. Members of the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) family stimulate GTP hydrolysis of G protein alpha (Gα) subunits, thereby inhibiting GPCR/Gα-mediated signaling. We previously reported that RGS2 and RGS4 inhibit PAR1/Gα-mediated signaling by interacting with PAR1 in a Gα-dependent manner. Here, employing the bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) technique, we identified RGS8 as a novel PAR1-interacting protein. Very little BRET activity was observed between PAR1-Venus (PAR1-Ven) and RGS8-Luciferase (RGS8-Luc) in the absence of Gα. However, in the presence of Gαo, BRET activity was specifically and significantly increased. This interaction was confirmed by biochemical and immunofluorescence assays. Notably, RGS8 inhibited PAR1/Gαi/o-mediated adenylyl cyclase and ERK activation, and prevented Gαo-induced neurite outgrowth and activation of Necdin protein, a downstream target of Gαo. Our findings suggest a novel function of RGS8 and reveal cellular mechanisms by which RGS8 mediates PAR1 inhibition. PMID:26829215

  2. Challenges for opioid receptor nomenclature: IUPHAR Review 9

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Brian M; Christie, Macdonald J; Devi, Lakshmi; Toll, Lawrence; Traynor, John R

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in the study of the structure and function of opioid receptors raise significant challenges for the definition of individual receptor types and the development of a nomenclature that precisely describes isoforms that may subserve different functions in vivo. Presentations at the 2013 meeting of the International Narcotics Research Conference in Cairns, Australia, considered some of the new discoveries that are now unravelling the complexities of opioid receptor signalling. Variable processing of opioid receptor messenger RNAs may lead to the presence of several isoforms of the μ receptor. Each opioid receptor type can function either as a monomer or as part of a homo- or heterodimer or higher multimer. Additionally, recent evidence points to the existence of agonist bias in the signal transduction pathways activated through μ receptors, and to the presence of regulatory allosteric sites on the receptors. This brief review summarizes the recent discoveries that raise challenges for receptor definition and the characterization of signal transduction pathways activated by specific receptor forms. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24528283

  3. The hyaluronan receptors CD44 and RHAMM (CD168) form complexeswith ERK1,2, which sustain high basal motility in breast cancercells

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Sara R.; Fard, Shireen F.; Paiwand, Frouz F.; Tolg,Cornelia; Veiseh, Mandana; Wang, Chao; McCarthy, James B.; Bissell, MinaJ.; Koropatnick, James; Turley, Eva A.

    2007-03-28

    CD44 is an integral hyaluronan receptor that can promote or inhibit motogenic signaling in tumor cells. Rhamm is a non-integral cell surface hyaluronan receptor (CD168) and intracellular protein that promotes cell motility in culture and its expression is strongly upregulated in diseases like arthritis and aggressive cancers. Here we describe an autocrine mechanism utilizing cell surface Rhamm/CD44 interactions to sustain rapid basal motility in invasive breast cancer cell lines. This mechanism requires endogenous hyaluronan synthesis and the formation of Rhamm/CD44/ERK1, 2 complexes. Motile/ invasive MDA-MB-231 and Ras-MCF10A cells produce more endogenous hyaluronan, cell surface CD44 and Rhamm, an oncogenic Rhamm isoform, and exhibit elevated basal activation of ERK1, 2 than less invasive MCF7 and MCF10A breast cancer cells. Furthermore, CD44, Rhamm and ERK1, 2 uniquely co-immunoprecipitate and co-localize in MDA-MB-231 and Ras-MCF10A cells. Rapid motility of the invasive cell lines requires interaction of hyaluronan with cells, activation of ERK1, 2 and the participation of both cell surface CD44 and Rhamm. Combinations of anti-CD44, anti-Rhamm antibodies and a MEK1 inhibitor (PD098059) have less-than-additive blocking effects, suggesting action of all three proteins on a common motogenic signaling pathway. Collectively, these results show that cell surface Rhamm and CD44 act together in a hyaluronan-dependent, autocrine mechanism to coordinate sustained signaling through ERK1, 2 leading to high basal motility of invasive breast cancer cells. Since CD44/Rhamm complexes are not evident in less motile cells, an effect of CD44 on tumor cell motility may depend in part on its ability to partner with additional proteins, in this case cell surface Rhamm.

  4. A Homozygous [Cys25]PTH(1-84) Mutation That Impairs PTH/PTHrP Receptor Activation Defines a Novel Form of Hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sihoon; Mannstadt, Michael; Guo, Jun; Kim, Seul Min; Yi, Hyon-Seung; Khatri, Ashok; Dean, Thomas; Okazaki, Makoto; Gardella, Thomas J; Jüppner, Harald

    2015-10-01

    Hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia are encountered in idiopathic hypoparathyroidism (IHP) and pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib (PHP1B). In contrast to PHP1B, which is caused by resistance toward parathyroid hormone (PTH), the genetic defects leading to IHP impair production of this important regulator of mineral ion homeostasis. So far, only five PTH mutations were shown to cause IHP, each of which is located in the hormone's pre-pro leader segment and thus impair hormone secretion. In three siblings affected by IHP, we now identified a homozygous arginine-to-cysteine mutation at position 25 (R25C) of the mature PTH(1-84) polypeptide; heterozygous family members are healthy. Depending on the assay used for evaluating these patients, plasma PTH levels were either low or profoundly elevated, thus leading to ambiguities regarding the underlying diagnosis, namely IHP or PHP1B. Consistent with increased PTH levels, recombinant [Cys25]PTH(1-84) and wild-type PTH(1-84) were secreted equally well by transfected COS-7 cells. However, synthetic [Cys25]PTH(1-34) was found to have a lower binding affinity for the PTH receptor type-1 (PTH1R) than PTH(1-34) and consequently a lower efficiency for stimulating cAMP formation in cells expressing this receptor. Consistent with these in vitro findings, long-term infusion of [Cys25]PTH(1-34) resulted only in minimal calcemic and phosphaturic responses, despite readily detectable levels of [Cys25]PTH(1-34) in plasma. The mineral ion abnormalities observed in the three IHP patients are thus most likely caused by the inherited homozygous missense PTH mutation, which reduces bioactivity of the secreted hormone. Based on these findings, screening for PTH(1-84) mutations should be considered when clinical and laboratory findings are consistent with PHP1B, but GNAS methylation changes have been excluded. Differentiating between IHP and PHP1B has considerable implications for genetic counseling, therapy, and long-term outcome because

  5. HYBRID RECEPTOR MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A hybrid receptor model is a specified mathematical procedure which uses not only the ambient species concentration measurements that form the input data for a pure receptor model, but in addition source emission rates or atmospheric dispersion or transformation information chara...

  6. IgA in the horse: cloning of equine polymeric Ig receptor and J chain and characterization of recombinant forms of equine IgA.

    PubMed

    Lewis, M J; Wagner, B; Irvine, R M; Woof, J M

    2010-11-01

    As in other mammals, immunoglobulin A (IgA) in the horse has a key role in immune defense. To better dissect equine IgA function, we isolated complementary DNA (cDNA) clones for equine J chain and polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR). When coexpressed with equine IgA, equine J chain promoted efficient IgA polymerization. A truncated version of equine pIgR, equivalent to secretory component, bound with nanomolar affinity to recombinant equine and human dimeric IgA but not with monomeric IgA from either species. Searches of the equine genome localized equine J chain and pIgR to chromosomes 3 and 5, respectively, with J chain and pIgR coding sequence distributed across 4 and 11 exons, respectively. Comparisons of transcriptional regulatory sequences suggest that horse and human pIgR expression is controlled through common regulatory mechanisms that are less conserved in rodents. These studies pave the way for full dissection of equine IgA function and open up possibilities for immune-based treatment of equine diseases. PMID:20631692

  7. Novel FGFR3 mutations creating cysteine residues in the extracellular domain of the receptor cause achondroplasia or severe forms of hypochondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Heuertz, Solange; Le Merrer, Martine; Zabel, Bernhard; Wright, Michael; Legeai-Mallet, Laurence; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Gibbs, Linda; Bonaventure, Jacky

    2006-12-01

    Achondroplasia (ACH) and hypochondroplasia (HCH) are two autosomal-dominant skeletal disorders caused by recurrent missense FGFR3 mutations in the transmembrane (TM) and tyrosine kinase 1 (TK1) domains of the receptor. Although 98% of ACH cases are accounted for by a single G380R substitution in the TM, a common mutation (N540K) in the TK1 region is detected in only 60-65% of HCH cases. The aim of this study was to determine whether the frequency of mutations in patients with HCH was the result of incomplete mutation screening or genetic heterogeneity. Eighteen exons of the FGFR3 gene were entirely sequenced in a cohort of 25 HCH and one ACH patients in whom common mutations had been excluded. Seven novel missense FGFR3 mutations were identified, one causing ACH and six resulting in HCH. Six of these substitutions were located in the extracellular region and four of them creating additional cysteine residues, were associated with severe phenotypes. No mutations were detected in 19 clinically diagnosed HCH patients. Our results demonstrate that the spectrum of FGFR3 mutations causing short-limb dwarfism is wider than originally recognised and emphasise the requirement for complete screening of the FGFR3 gene if appropriate genetic counselling is to be offered to patients with HCH or ACH lacking the most common mutations and their families. PMID:16912704

  8. Opposing Roles of Membrane and Soluble Forms of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products in Primary Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Allison L.; Sims, Gary P.; Brewah, Yambasu A.; Rebelatto, Marlon C.; Kearley, Jennifer; Benjamin, Ebony; Keller, Ashley E.; Brohawn, Philip; Herbst, Ronald; Coyle, Anthony J.; Kolbeck, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a common respiratory pathogen in infants and the older population, causes pulmonary inflammation and airway occlusion that leads to impairment of lung function. Here, we have established a role for receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in RSV infection. RAGE-deficient (ager−/−) mice were protected from RSV-induced weight loss and inflammation. This protection correlated with an early increase in type I interferons, later decreases in proinflammatory cytokines, and a reduction in viral load. To assess the contribution of soluble RAGE (sRAGE) to RSV-induced disease, wild-type and ager−/− mice were given doses of sRAGE following RSV infection. Of interest, sRAGE treatment prevented RSV-induced weight loss and neutrophilic inflammation to a degree similar to that observed in ager−/− mice. Our work further elucidates the roles of RAGE in the pathogenesis of respiratory infections and highlights the opposing roles of membrane and sRAGE in modulating the host response to RSV infection. PMID:22262795

  9. Diffuse perineuronal nets and modified pyramidal cells immunoreactive for glutamate and the GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit form a unique entity in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Florian; Härtig, Wolfgang; Bringmann, Andreas; Grosche, Jens; Wohlfarth, Kai; Zuschratter, Werner; Brückner, Gert

    2003-12-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNs) consisting of polyanionic chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) and other extracellular matrix components create an exceptional microenvironment around certain types of neurons. In rat neocortex, three types of PNs can be distinguished after staining with Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA) by their different morphological structure: lattice-like PNs associated with subpopulations of nonpyramidal neurons, weakly labeled PNs showing a pyramidal morphology, and diffuse PNs that possess a thick, strongly labeled matrix sheath located mainly in layer VIb above the white matter. The type of neuron surrounded by diffuse nets has not been described so far. This study is focused on the cytochemical and morphological characteristics of neurons associated with diffusely contoured PNs in rat parietal cortex using immunocytochemical staining, intracellular injection, and retrograde tracing methods. Cells surrounded by diffuse PNs were glutamate-immunoreactive in contrast to nonpyramidal, net-associated neurons that showed immunoreactivity for GABA, the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin and the potassium channel subunit Kv3.1b. Both groups of PN-ensheathed cells were mostly immunoreactive for the GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit. Lucifer Yellow-injected neurons surrounded by diffuse PNs displayed the morphological properties of modified pyramidal cells with intracortical main axons. Many neurons with diffuse PNs were retrogradely labeled over a long distance after Fluoro-Gold tracer injection in the parietal cortex, but remained unlabeled after intrathalamic injection. We conclude that neurons associated with diffuse PNs are a subpopulation of glutamatergic modified pyramidal cells that could act as excitatory long-range intracortically projecting neurons. PMID:14769362

  10. UNIVERSAL HIGHER EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCGRATH, EARL J.

    THIS DOCUMENT IS A REPORT ON A GROUP INQUIRY INTO THE SUBSTANCE AND IMPLICATIONS OF UNIVERSAL HIGHER EDUCATION. ELEVEN CHAPTERS ARE PAPERS PRESENTED AT A CONFERENCE HELD UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE INSTITUTE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, TEACHERS COLLEGE, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, IN PUERTO RICO, NOVEMBER 15-21, 1964, FORECASTING THE FORM AND MISSION OF AMERICAN…

  11. Detection of receptor heteromers involving dopamine receptors by the sequential BRET-FRET technology.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Gemma; McCormick, Peter J; Mallol, Josefa; Lluís, Carme; Franco, Rafael; Cortés, Antoni; Casadó, Vicent; Canela, Enric I; Ferré, Sergi

    2013-01-01

    Until very recently, dopamine receptors, like other G-protein-coupled receptors, were believed to function as individual units on the cell surface. Now it has been described by several groups including ours that dopamine receptors not only function as homomers but also form heteromers with other receptors at the membrane level. Bioluminescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (BRET and FRET) based techniques have been very useful to determine the interaction between two receptors, but to demonstrate the existence of higher-order complexes involving more than two molecules requires more sophisticated techniques. Combining BRET and FRET in the Sequential BRET-FRET (SRET) technique permits heteromers formed by three different proteins to be identified. In SRET experiments, the oxidation of a Renilla Luciferase substrate triggers acceptor excitation by BRET and subsequent energy transfer to a FRET acceptor. Using this methodology here we describe the heteromerization between adenosine A(2A), dopamine D(2), and cannabinoids CB(1) receptors in living cells. PMID:23296780

  12. Structure of the ternary complex formed by a chemotaxis receptor signaling domain, the CheA histidine kinase and the coupling protein CheW as determined by pulsed dipolar ESR spectroscopy†

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Jaya; Borbat, Peter P.; Pollard, Abiola M.; Bilwes, Alexandrine M.; Freed, Jack H.; Crane, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    The signaling apparatus that controls bacterial chemotaxis is composed of a core complex containing chemoreceptors, the histidine auto-kinase CheA, and the coupling protein CheW. Site-specific spin labeling and pulsed-dipolar ESR spectroscopy (PDS) have been applied to investigate the structure of a soluble ternary complex formed by T. maritima CheA (TmCheA), CheW, and receptor signaling domains. Thirty-five symmetric spin-labels sites (SLSs) were engineered into the five domains of the CheA dimer and CheW to provide distance restraints within the CheA:CheW complex in the absence and presence of a soluble receptor that inhibits kinase activity (Tm14). Additional PDS restraints between spin-labeled CheA, CheW and an engineered single-chain receptor labeled at six different sites allows docking of the receptor structure relative to the CheA:CheW complex. Disulfide cross-linking between selectively incorporated Cys residues finds two pairs of positions that provide further constraints within the ternary complex: one involving Tm14 and CheW, and another involving Tm14 and CheA. The derived structure of the ternary complex indicates a primary site of interaction between CheW and Tm14 that agrees well with previous biochemical and genetic data on transmembrane chemoreceptors. The PDS distance distributions are most consistent with only one CheW directly engaging one dimeric Tm14. The CheA dimerization domain (P3) aligns roughly antiparallel to the receptor conserved signaling tip, but does not interact strongly with it. The angle of the receptor axis with respect to P3 and the CheW-binding P5 domains is bound by two limits differing by ~20°. In one limit, Tm14 aligns roughly along P3 and may interact to some extent with the hinge region near the P3 hairpin loop. In the other limit, Tm14 tilts to interact with the P5 domain of the opposite subunit in an interface that mimics that observed with the P5 homolog CheW. The time-domain ESR data can be simulated from the model

  13. Photo-reduction of flavin mononucleotide to semiquinone form in LOV domain mutants of blue-light receptor phot from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Song, S-H; Dick, B; Penzkofer, A; Hegemann, P

    2007-04-01

    The photo-excitation dynamics of the mutants LOV1-C57S and LOV2-C250S of the LOV-domains of the phototropin photoreceptor phot from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is investigated by absorption and fluorescence studies. The LOV domains fused to a maltose binding protein (MBP) are expressed in Escherichia coli. The mutants were studied under aerobic conditions in aqueous solution at pH 8. Blue-light exposure reduced the fully oxidized flavin mononucleotide, FMN(ox), to FMN semiquinone, FMNH*, (quantum efficiency around 1%) which further reduced to FMN hydroquinone, FMN(red)H(2) or FMN(red)H(-) (quantum efficiency ca. 3 x 10(-5)). In the dark both reduced forms recovered back to the oxidized form on a minute timescale. Besides photoreduction, blue-light photo-excitation of the mutants resulted in photoproduct formation (efficiency in the 2 x 10(-4) - 10(-3) range). Photo-reaction schemes for the mutants are discussed. PMID:17292618

  14. P2X receptors.

    PubMed

    North, R Alan

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) activates cell surface P2X and P2Y receptors. P2X receptors are membrane ion channels preferably permeable to sodium, potassium and calcium that open within milliseconds of the binding of ATP. In molecular architecture, they form a unique structural family. The receptor is a trimer, the binding of ATP between subunits causes them to flex together within the ectodomain and separate in the membrane-spanning region so as to open a central channel. P2X receptors have a widespread tissue distribution. On some smooth muscle cells, P2X receptors mediate the fast excitatory junction potential that leads to depolarization and contraction. In the central nervous system, activation of P2X receptors allows calcium to enter neurons and this can evoke slower neuromodulatory responses such as the trafficking of receptors for the neurotransmitter glutamate. In primary afferent nerves, P2X receptors are critical for the initiation of action potentials when they respond to ATP released from sensory cells such as taste buds, chemoreceptors or urothelium. In immune cells, activation of P2X receptors triggers the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin 1β. The development of selective blockers of different P2X receptors has led to clinical trials of their effectiveness in the management of cough, pain, inflammation and certain neurodegenerative diseases.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377721

  15. Functional Significance of Serotonin Receptor Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Herrick-Davis, Katharine

    2013-01-01

    The original model of G protein activation by a single G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) is giving way to a new model wherein two protomers of a GPCR dimer interact with a single G protein. This article will review the evidence suggesting that 5-HT receptors form dimers/oligomers and will compare the findings with results obtained from studies with other biogenic amine receptors. Topics to be covered include the origin or biogenesis of dimer formation, potential dimer interface(s), and oligomer size (dimer versus tetramer or higher order). The functional significance will be discussed in terms of G-protein activation following ligand binding to one or two protomers in a dimeric structure, the formation of heterodimers and the development of bivalent ligands. PMID:23811735

  16. Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Robert M.; Gregory, Dennis E.

    Decisions made by federal and state courts during 1983 concerning higher education are reported in this chapter. Issues of employment and the treatment of students underlay the bulk of the litigation. Specific topics addressed in these and other cases included federal authority to enforce regulations against age discrimination and to revoke an…

  17. Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Robert M.

    Litigation in 1987 was very brisk with an increase in the number of higher education cases reviewed. Cases discussed in this chapter are organized under four major topics: (1) intergovernmental relations; (2) employees, involving discrimination claims, tenured and nontenured faculty, collective bargaining and denial of employee benefits; (3)…

  18. Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Robert M.; Finnegan, Dorothy E.

    The higher education case law in 1988 is extensive. Cases discussed in this chapter are organized under five major topics: (1) intergovernmental relations; (2) employees, involving discrimination claims, tenured and nontenured faculty, collective bargaining, and denial of employee benefits; (3) students, involving admissions, financial aid, First…

  19. Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Robert M.

    This eighth chapter of "The Yearbook of School Law, 1986" summarizes and analyzes over 330 state and federal court cases litigated in 1985 in which institutions of higher education were involved. Among the topics examined were relationships between postsecondary institutions and various governmental agencies; discrimination in the employment of…

  20. Risk of tuberculosis is higher with anti-tumor necrosis factor monoclonal antibody therapy than with soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor therapy: The three-year prospective French Research Axed on Tolerance of Biotherapies registry

    PubMed Central

    Tubach, Florence; Salmon, Dominique; Ravaud, Philippe; Allanore, Yannick; Goupille, Philippe; Bréban, Maxime; Pallot-Prades, Béatrice; Pouplin, Sophie; Sacchi, Antoinette; Chichemanian, Rose Marie; Bretagne, Stéphane; Emilie, Dominique; Lemann, Marc; Lorthololary, Olivier; Mariette, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is associated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapy but whether it is drug-specific remains a concern. Our objective was to describe cases of tuberculosis associated with anti-TNF therapy, identify risk factors and estimate the incidence. Methods An incidence study with the French population as reference and a case-control analysis. We collected, for 3 years, cases of TB among French patients receiving anti-TNF therapy, whatever the indication, with two controls treated with anti-TNF agents per case. Results We collected 69 cases of TB in patients treated for rheumatoid arthritis (n=40), spondylarthropathies (n=18), inflammatory colitis (n=9), psoriasis (n=1) and Behçet’s disease (n=1) treated with infliximab (n=36), adalimumab (n=28) and etanercept (n=5). None of the cases had received correct chemoprophylaxis treatment. The sex and age-adjusted incidence rate of TB was 116.7 per 100,000 patient-years. The SIR was 12.2 (95% confidence interval 9.7–15.5) and was higher for therapy with infliximab and adalimumab than for that with etanercept: 18.6 (13.4–25.8) and 29.3 (20.2–42.4) versus 1.8 (0.7–4.3), respectively. In the case-control analysis, the exposure to infliximab or adalimumab versus etanercept was an independent risk factor for TB: odds ratio=13.3 (2.6–69.0) and 17.1 (3.6–80.6), respectively. Other risk factors were age, the first year of anti-TNF treatment, and being born in an endemic area. Conclusions The risk of TB is higher for patients receiving monoclonal-antibody than soluble-receptor anti-TNF therapy. The increased risk with early anti-TNF treatment and the absence of correct chemoprophylaxis treatment favours the reactivation of latent TB. PMID:19565495

  1. Use of criteria pollutants, active and passive mercury sampling, and receptor modeling to understand the chemical forms of gaseous oxidized mercury in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Miller, M. B.; Edgerton, E.; Gustin, M. S.

    2015-04-01

    The highest mercury (Hg) wet deposition in the United States (US) occurs along the Gulf of Mexico, and in the southern and central Mississippi River Valley. Gaseous oxidized Hg (GOM) is thought to be a major contributor due to its high water solubility and reactivity. Therefore, it is critical to understand the concentrations, potential for wet and dry deposition, and GOM compounds present in the air. Concentrations and dry deposition fluxes of GOM were measured at Outlying Landing Field (OLF), Florida, using a Tekran® 2537/1130/1135, and active and passive samplers using cation-exchange and nylon membranes. Relationships with Tekran® derived data must be interpreted with caution, since GOM concentrations can be biased low depending on the chemical compounds in air, and interferences with water vapor and ozone. Only gaseous elemental Hg and GOM are discussed here since the PBM measurement uncertainties are higher. Criteria air pollutants were concurrently measured and Tekran® data were assessed along with these using Principal Component Analysis to identify associations among air pollutants. Based on the diel pattern, high GOM concentrations at this site were associated with fossil fuel combustion and gas phase oxidation during the day, and gas phase oxidation and transport in the free troposphere. The ratio of GEM/CO at OLF (0.008 ng m-3 ppbv-1) was much higher than the numbers reported for the Western United States and central New York for domestic emissions or biomass burning (0.001 ng m-3 ppbv-1), which we suggest is indicative of a marine boundary layer source. Results from nylon membranes with thermal desorption analyses suggest five potential GOM compounds exist in this area, including HgBr2, HgO, Hg(NO3)2, HgSO4, and an unknown compound. This indicates that the site is influenced by different gaseous phase reactions and sources. A~high GOM event related to high CO but average SO2 suggests the air parcels moved from the free troposphere and

  2. Use of Resonance Energy Transfer Techniques for In Vivo Detection of Chemokine Receptor Oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Rodríguez-Frade, José Miguel; Mellado, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Since the first reports on chemokine function, much information has been generated on the implications of these molecules in numerous physiological and pathological processes, as well as on the signaling events activated through their binding to receptors. As is the case for other G protein-coupled receptors, chemokine receptors are not isolated entities that are activated following ligand binding; rather, they are found as dimers and/or higher order oligomers at the cell surface, even in the absence of ligands. These complexes form platforms that can be modified by receptor expression and ligand levels, indicating that they are dynamic structures. The analysis of the conformations adopted by these receptors at the membrane and their dynamics is thus crucial for a complete understanding of the function of the chemokines. We focus here on the methodology insights of new techniques, such as those based on resonance energy transfer for the analysis of chemokine receptor conformations in living cells. PMID:27271913

  3. Genetic analysis on the NifW by utilizing the yeast two-hybrid system revealed that the NifW of Azotobacter vinelandii interacts with the NifZ to form higher-order complexes.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Pulakat, L; Parker, K C; Gavini, N

    1998-03-17

    Nitrogenase is a complex metalloenzyme composed of two separately purified proteins designated the Fe-protein and the MoFe-protein. Apart from these two proteins, a number of accessory proteins are essential for the maturation and assembly of nitrogenase. Even though experimental evidence suggests that these accessory proteins are required for nitrogenase activity, the exact roles played by many of these proteins in the functions of nitrogenase are unclear. Our studies were directed to understand the role of two nif accessory proteins, the NifW and the NifZ in the biological nitrogen fixation. To accomplish this, we have utilized a genetic method, the Yeast based Two-Hybrid protein-protein interaction assay. This analysis showed that the NifW could interact with itself to make a multimeric complex. In contrast, the NifZ could not interact with itself. However, the NifZ could interact with the NifW. Previously it was shown that mutating either the NifW or the NifZ have similar effects on the activity of nitrogenase. This observation indicated that both these proteins may exert their regulation on the nitrogenase by a common pathway. Furthermore, it was suggested that the NifW plays a role in the oxygen-protection of the MoFe-protein by direct physical interaction. Our observation that the NifW can interact with itself as well as with the NifZ, suggests that the NifW and the NifZ may form a higher order complex and such a complex may be needed to exert the effects of the NifW or the NifZ on the nitrogenase activity. PMID:9514861

  4. The Secreted Form of Respiratory Syncytial Virus G Glycoprotein Helps the Virus Evade Antibody-Mediated Restriction of Replication by Acting as an Antigen Decoy and through Effects on Fc Receptor-Bearing Leukocytes▿

    PubMed Central

    Bukreyev, Alexander; Yang, Lijuan; Fricke, Jens; Cheng, Lily; Ward, Jerrold M.; Murphy, Brian R.; Collins, Peter L.

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) readily infects and reinfects during infancy and throughout life, despite maternal antibodies and immunity from prior infection and without the need for significant antigenic change. RSV has two neutralization antigens, the F and G virion glycoproteins. G is expressed in both membrane-bound (mG) and secreted (sG) forms. We investigated whether sG might act as a decoy for neutralizing antibodies by comparing the in vitro neutralization of wild-type (wt) RSV versus recombinant mG RSV expressing only mG. wt RSV indeed was less susceptible than mG RSV to monovalent G-specific and polyvalent RSV-specific antibodies, whereas susceptibility to F-specific antibodies was equivalent. This difference disappeared when the virus preparations were purified to remove sG. Thus, sG appears to function as a neutralization decoy. We evaluated this effect in vivo in mice by comparing the effects of passively transferred antibodies on the pulmonary replication of wt RSV versus mG RSV. Again, wt RSV was less sensitive than mG RSV to G-specific and RSV-specific antibodies; however, a similar difference was also observed with F-specific antibodies. This confirmed that sG helps wt RSV evade the antibody-dependent restriction of replication but indicated that in mice, it is not acting primarily as a decoy for G-specific antibodies, perhaps because sG is produced in insufficient quantities in this poorly permissive animal. Rather, we found that the greater sensitivity of mG versus wt RSV to the antiviral effect of passively transferred RSV antibodies required the presence of inflammatory cells in the lung and was Fcγ receptor dependent. Thus, sG helps RSV escape the antibody-dependent restriction of replication via effects as an antigen decoy and as a modulator of leukocytes bearing Fcγ receptors. PMID:18842713

  5. Structural features of phenoxycarbonylimino neonicotinoids acting at the insect nicotinic receptor.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Ikuya; Tomizawa, Motohiro; Miyazu, Nozomi; Kushibiki, Gohito; Noda, Kumiko; Hasebe, Yasunori; Durkin, Kathleen A; Miyake, Taiji; Kagabu, Shinzo

    2010-10-01

    Substituted-phenoxycarbonylimino neonicotinoid ligands with an electron-donating group showed significantly higher affinity to the insect nicotinic receptor relative to that of the analogue with an electron-withdrawing substituent, thereby establishing in silico binding site interaction model featuring that the phenoxy ring of neonicotinoids and the receptor loop D tryptophan indole plane form a face-to-edge aromatic interaction. PMID:20729079

  6. Analysis of Human Dopamine D3 Receptor Quaternary Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Marsango, Sara; Caltabiano, Gianluigi; Pou, Chantevy; Varela Liste, María José; Milligan, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine D3 receptor is a class A, rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptor that can form dimers and/or higher order oligomers. However, the molecular basis for production of these complexes is not well defined. Using combinations of molecular modeling, site-directed mutagenesis, and homogenous time-resolved FRET, the interfaces that allow dopamine D3 receptor monomers to interact were defined and used to describe likely quaternary arrangements of the receptor. These were then compared with published crystal structures of dimeric β1-adrenoreceptor, μ-opioid, and CXCR4 receptors. The data indicate important contributions of residues from within each of transmembrane domains I, II, IV, V, VI, and VII as well as the intracellular helix VIII in the formation of D3-D3 receptor interfaces within homo-oligomers and are consistent with the D3 receptor adopting a β1-adrenoreceptor-like quaternary arrangement. Specifically, results suggest that D3 protomers can interact with each other via at least two distinct interfaces: the first one comprising residues from transmembrane domains I and II along with those from helix VIII and a second one involving transmembrane domains IV and V. Moreover, rather than existing only as distinct dimeric species, the results are consistent with the D3 receptor also assuming a quaternary structure in which two transmembrane domain I-II-helix VIII dimers interact to form a ”rhombic” tetramer via an interface involving residues from transmembrane domains VI and VII. In addition, the results also provide insights into the potential contribution of molecules of cholesterol to the overall organization and potential stability of the D3 receptor and possibly other GPCR quaternary structures. PMID:25931118

  7. The Conserved Arginine Cluster in the Insert of the Third Cytoplasmic Loop of the Long Form of the D₂ Dopamine Receptor (D2L-R) Acts as an Intracellular Retention Signal.

    PubMed

    Kubale, Valentina; Blagotinšek, Kaja; Nøhr, Jane; Eidne, Karin A; Vrecl, Milka

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether the conserved arginine cluster present within the 29-amino acid insert of the long form of the D₂ dopamine receptor (D2L-R) confers its predominant intracellular localization. We hypothesized that the conserved arginine cluster (RRR) located within the insert could act as an RXR-type endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal. Arginine residues (R) within the cluster at positions 267, 268, and 269 were charge-reserved to glutamic acids (E), either individually or in clusters, thus generating single, double, and triple D2L-R mutants. Through analyses of cellular localization by confocal microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), radioligand binding assay, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET²) β-arrestin 2 (βarr2) recruitment assay, and cAMP signaling, it was revealed that charge reversal of the R residues at all three positions within the motif impaired their colocalization with ER marker calnexin and led to significantly improved cell surface expression. Additionally, these data demonstrate that an R to glutamic acid (E) substitution at position 2 within the RXR motif is not functionally permissible. Furthermore, all generated D2L-R mutants preserved their functional integrity regarding ligand binding, agonist-induced βarr2 recruitment and Gαi-mediated signaling. In summary, our results show that the conserved arginine cluster within the 29-amino acid insert of third cytoplasmic loop (IC3) of the D2L-R appears to be the ER retention signal. PMID:27447620

  8. The Structure of the GM-CSF Receptor Complex Reveals a Distinct Mode of Cytokine Receptor Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Guido; Hercus, Timothy R.; McClure, Barbara J.; Stomski, Frank C.; Dottore, Mara; Powell, Jason; Ramshaw, Hayley; Woodcock, Joanna M.; Xu, Yibin; Guthridge, Mark; McKinstry, William J.; Lopez, Angel F.; Parker, Michael W.

    2008-08-11

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that controls the production and function of blood cells, is deregulated in clinical conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and leukemia, yet offers therapeutic value for other diseases. Its receptors are heterodimers consisting of a ligand-specific {alpha} subunit and a {beta}c subunit that is shared with the interleukin (IL)-3 and IL-5 receptors. How signaling is initiated remains an enigma. We report here the crystal structure of the human GM-CSF/GM-CSF receptor ternary complex and its assembly into an unexpected dodecamer or higher-order complex. Importantly, mutagenesis of the GM-CSF receptor at the dodecamer interface and functional studies reveal that dodecamer formation is required for receptor activation and signaling. This unusual form of receptor assembly likely applies also to IL-3 and IL-5 receptors, providing a structural basis for understanding their mechanism of activation and for the development of therapeutics.

  9. Laryngeal pressure receptors.

    PubMed

    Mathew, O P; Sant'Ambrogio, G; Fisher, J T; Sant'Ambrogio, F B

    1984-07-01

    We studied the response characteristics of laryngeal pressure receptors in anesthetized dogs, breathing through a tracheal cannula, by recording single unit action potentials from the peripheral cut end of the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve. The larynx, with the rest of the upper airway, was isolated and cannulated separately for the application of distending and collapsing pressures. We identified receptors responding to either negative or positive pressure and a few responding to both. All these receptors showed a marked dynamic sensitivity and had the characteristics of slowly adapting mechanoreceptors. The majority of pressure receptors were active at zero transmural pressure and the gain of their response to pressure was higher at lower values, suggesting a role for these receptors in eupnea. Reflex alterations in breathing pattern and upper airway muscle activity during upper airway pressure changes, previously reported, are presumably mediated by the receptors described here. Moreover, these receptors may play a role in certain pathological states, such as obstructive sleep apnea, in which the upper airway is transiently subjected to large collapsing pressure. PMID:6484319

  10. GPCR heteromers and their allosteric receptor-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Fuxe, K; Borroto-Escuela, D O; Marcellino, D; Romero-Fernandez, W; Frankowska, M; Guidolin, D; Filip, M; Ferraro, L; Woods, A S; Tarakanov, A; Ciruela, F; Agnati, L F; Tanganelli, S

    2012-01-01

    The concept of intramembrane receptor-receptor interactions and evidence for their existences were introduced in the beginning of the 1980's, suggesting the existence of receptor heterodimerization. The discovery of GPCR heteromers and the receptor mosaic (higher order oligomers, more than two) has been related to the parallel development and application of a variety of resonance energy transfer techniques such as bioluminescence (BRET), fluorescence (FRET) and sequential energy transfer (SRET). The assembly of interacting GPCRs, heterodimers and receptor mosaic leads to changes in the agonist recognition, signaling, and trafficking of participating receptors via allosteric mechanisms, sometimes involving the appearance of cooperativity. The receptor interface in the GPCR heteromers is beginning to be characterized and the key role of electrostatic epitope-epitope interactions for the formation of the receptor heteromers will be discussed. Furthermore, a "guide-and-clasp" manner of receptor-receptor interactions has been proposed where the "adhesive guides" may be the triplet homologies. These interactions probably represent a general molecular mechanism for receptor-receptor interactions. It is proposed that changes in GPCR function (moonlighting) may develop through the intracellular loops and C-terminii of the GPCR heteromers as a result of dynamic allosteric interactions between different types of G proteins and other receptor interacting proteins in these domains of the receptors. The evidence for the existence of receptor heteromers opens up a new field for a better understanding of neurophysiology and neuropathology. Furthermore, novel therapeutic approaches could be possible based on the use of heteromers as targets for drug development based on their unique pharmacology. PMID:22335512

  11. Regulation of Oligomeric Organization of the Serotonin 5-Hydroxytryptamine 2C (5-HT2C) Receptor Observed by Spatial Intensity Distribution Analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Richard J.; Pediani, John D.; Godin, Antoine G.; Milligan, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    The questions of whether G protein-coupled receptors exist as monomers, dimers, and/or oligomers and if these species interconvert in a ligand-dependent manner are among the most contentious current issues in biology. When employing spatial intensity distribution analysis to laser scanning confocal microscope images of cells stably expressing either a plasma membrane-associated form of monomeric enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) or a tandem version of this fluorophore, the eGFP tandem was identified as a dimer. Similar studies on cells stably expressing an eGFP-tagged form of the epidermal growth factor receptor demonstrated that, although largely a monomer in the basal state, this receptor rapidly became predominantly dimeric upon the addition of its ligand epidermal growth factor. In cells induced to express an eGFP-tagged form of the serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine 2C (5-HT2C) receptor, global analysis of construct quantal brightness was consistent with the predominant form of the receptor being dimeric. However, detailed spatial intensity distribution analysis demonstrated the presence of multiple forms ranging from monomers to higher-order oligomers. Furthermore, treatment with chemically distinct 5-HT2C receptor antagonists resulted in a time-dependent change in the quaternary organization to one in which there was a preponderance of receptor monomers. This antagonist-mediated effect was reversible, because washout of the ligand resulted in the regeneration of many of the oligomeric forms of the receptor. PMID:25825490

  12. Multiple loss-of-function variants of taste receptors in modern humans

    PubMed Central

    Fujikura, K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the knowledge of interindividual taste differences, the underlying genetic backgrounds have remained to be fully elucidated. Much of the taste variation among different mammalian species can be explained by pseudogenization of taste receptors. Here I investigated whether the most recent disruptions of taste receptor genes segregate with their intact forms in modern humans by analyzing 14 ethnically diverse populations. The results revealed an unprecedented prevalence of 25 segregating loss-of-function (LoF) taste receptor variants, identifying one of the most pronounced cases of functional population diversity in the human genome. LoF variant frequency in taste receptors (2.10%) was considerably higher than the overall LoF frequency in human genome (0.16%). In particular, molecular evolutionary rates of candidate sour (14.7%) and bitter (1.8%) receptors were far higher in humans than those of sweet (0.02%), salty (0.05%), and umami (0.17%) receptors compared with other carnivorous mammals, although not all of the taste receptors were identified. Many LoF variants are population-specific, some of which arose even after population differentiation, not before divergence of the modern and archaic human. I conclude that modern humans might have been losing some sour and bitter receptor genes because of high-frequency LoF variants. PMID:26307445

  13. Multiple loss-of-function variants of taste receptors in modern humans.

    PubMed

    Fujikura, Kohei

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the knowledge of interindividual taste differences, the underlying genetic backgrounds have remained to be fully elucidated. Much of the taste variation among different mammalian species can be explained by pseudogenization of taste receptors. Here I investigated whether the most recent disruptions of taste receptor genes segregate with their intact forms in modern humans by analyzing 14 ethnically diverse populations. The results revealed an unprecedented prevalence of 25 segregating loss-of-function (LoF) taste receptor variants, identifying one of the most pronounced cases of functional population diversity in the human genome. LoF variant frequency in taste receptors (2.10%) was considerably higher than the overall LoF frequency in human genome (0.16%). In particular, molecular evolutionary rates of candidate sour (14.7%) and bitter (1.8%) receptors were far higher in humans than those of sweet (0.02%), salty (0.05%), and umami (0.17%) receptors compared with other carnivorous mammals, although not all of the taste receptors were identified. Many LoF variants are population-specific, some of which arose even after population differentiation, not before divergence of the modern and archaic human. I conclude that modern humans might have been losing some sour and bitter receptor genes because of high-frequency LoF variants. PMID:26307445

  14. The Conserved Arginine Cluster in the Insert of the Third Cytoplasmic Loop of the Long Form of the D2 Dopamine Receptor (D2L-R) Acts as an Intracellular Retention Signal

    PubMed Central

    Kubale, Valentina; Blagotinšek, Kaja; Nøhr, Jane; Eidne, Karin A.; Vrecl, Milka

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether the conserved arginine cluster present within the 29-amino acid insert of the long form of the D2 dopamine receptor (D2L-R) confers its predominant intracellular localization. We hypothesized that the conserved arginine cluster (RRR) located within the insert could act as an RXR-type endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal. Arginine residues (R) within the cluster at positions 267, 268, and 269 were charge-reserved to glutamic acids (E), either individually or in clusters, thus generating single, double, and triple D2L-R mutants. Through analyses of cellular localization by confocal microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), radioligand binding assay, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET2) β-arrestin 2 (βarr2) recruitment assay, and cAMP signaling, it was revealed that charge reversal of the R residues at all three positions within the motif impaired their colocalization with ER marker calnexin and led to significantly improved cell surface expression. Additionally, these data demonstrate that an R to glutamic acid (E) substitution at position 2 within the RXR motif is not functionally permissible. Furthermore, all generated D2L-R mutants preserved their functional integrity regarding ligand binding, agonist-induced βarr2 recruitment and Gαi-mediated signaling. In summary, our results show that the conserved arginine cluster within the 29-amino acid insert of third cytoplasmic loop (IC3) of the D2L-R appears to be the ER retention signal. PMID:27447620

  15. MALONDIALDEHYDE AND 4-HYDROXYNONENAL ADDUCTS ARE NOT FORMED ON CARDIAC RYANODINE RECEPTOR (RyR2) AND SARCO(ENDO)PLASMIC RETICULUM Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA2) IN DIABETES

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Caronda J.; Shao, Chun Hong; Nagai, Ryoji; Kutty, Shelby; Singh, Jaipaul; Bidasee, Keshore R.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we reported an elevated level of glucose-derived carbonyl adducts on cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) and sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2) in hearts of streptozotocin(STZ)-induced diabetic rats. We also showed these adduct impaired RyR2 and SERCA2 activities, and altered evoked Ca2+ transients. What is less clear is if lipid-derived malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) also chemically react with and impair RyR2 and SERCA2 activities in diabetes. This study used Western blot assays with adduct-specific antibodies and confocal microscopy to assess levels of MDA, 4-HNE, Nε-carboxy(methyl)lysine (CML), pentosidine and pyrraline adducts on RyR2 and SERCA2 and evoked intracellular transient Ca2+ kinetics in myocytes from control, diabetic and treated-diabetic rats. MDA and 4-HNE adducts were not detected on RyR2 and SERCA2 from control or 8 weeks diabetic rats with altered evoked Ca2+ transients. However, CML, pentosidine, and pyrraline adducts were elevated 3–5 fold (p<0.05). Treating diabetic rats with pyridoxamine (a scavenger of reactive carbonyl species, RCS) or aminoguanidine (a mixed reactive oxygen species-reactive carbonyl species scavenger) reduced CML, pentosidine and pyrraline adducts on RyR2 and SERCA2 and blunted SR Ca2+ cycling changes. Treating diabetic rats with the superoxide dismutase mimetic tempol had no impact on MDA and 4-HNE adducts on RyR2 and SERCA2, and on SR Ca2+ cycling. From these data we conclude that lipid-derived MDA and 4-HNE adducts are not formed on RyR2 and SERCA2 in this model of diabetes, and are therefore unlikely to be directly contributing to the SR Ca2+ dysregulation. PMID:23354458

  16. The soluble form of LR11 protein is a regulator of hypoxia-induced, urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR)-mediated adhesion of immature hematological cells.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Keigo; Nakaseko, Chiaki; Jiang, Meizi; Shimizu, Naomi; Takeuchi, Masahiro; Schneider, Wolfgang J; Bujo, Hideaki

    2013-04-26

    A key property of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) regarding differentiation from the self-renewing quiescent to the proliferating stage is their adhesion to the bone marrow (BM) niche. An important molecule involved in proliferation and pool size of HSPCs in the BM is the hypoxia-induced urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). Here, we show that the soluble form (sLR11) of LR11 (also called SorLA or SORL1) modulates the uPAR-mediated attachment of HSPCs under hypoxic conditions. Immunohistochemical and mRNA expression analyses revealed that hypoxia increased LR11 expression in hematological c-Kit(+) Lin(-) cells. In U937 cells, hypoxia induced a transient rise in LR11 transcription, production of cellular protein, and release of sLR11. Attachment to stromal cells of c-Kit(+) Lin(-) cells of lr11(-/-) mice was reduced by hypoxia much more than of lr11(+/+) animals. sLR11 induced the adhesion of U937 and c-Kit(+) Lin(-) cells to stromal cells. Cell attachment was increased by sLR11 and reduced in the presence of anti-uPAR antibodies. Furthermore, the fraction of uPAR co-immunoprecipitated with LR11 in membrane extracts of U937 cells was increased by hypoxia. CoCl2, a chemical inducer of HIF-1α, enhanced the levels of LR11 and sLR11 in U937 cells. The decrease in hypoxia-induced attachment of HIF-1α-knockdown cells was largely prevented by exogenously added sLR11. Finally, hypoxia induced HIF-1α binding to a consensus binding site in the LR11 promoter. Thus, we conclude that sLR11 regulates the hypoxia-enhanced adhesion of HSPCs via an uPAR-mediated pathway that stabilizes the hematological pool size by controlling cell attachment to the BM niche. PMID:23486467

  17. Analysis of photoaffinity label derivatives to probe thyroid hormone receptor in human fibroblasts, GH1 cells, and soluble receptor preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Z.D.; Sahnoun, H.; Pascual, A.; Casanova, J.; Samuels, H.H.

    1988-05-15

    The regulation of growth hormone gene expression by thyroid hormone in cultured GH1 cells is mediated by a chromatin-associated receptor. We have previously described a photoaffinity label derivative of 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (L-T3) in which the alanine side chain was modified to form N-2-diazo-3,3,3-trifluoropropionyl-L-T3 (L-(125I)T3-PAL). On exposure to 254 nm UV light, L-(125I)T3-PAL generates a carbene which covalently modifies two thyroid hormone receptor forms in intact GH1 cells; an abundant 47,000 Mr species and a less abundant 57,000 Mr form. We have now synthesized similar photoaffinity label derivatives of 3,5,3',5'-tetraiodo-L-thyronine (L-T4) and 3,3',5'-triiodo-L-thyronine (L-rT3). Both compounds identify the same receptor forms in intact cells and in nuclear extracts in vitro as L-(125I)T3-PAL. Labeling by L-(125I)rT3-PAL was low and consistent with the very low occupancy of receptor by L-rT3. Underivatized L-(125I)T3 and L-(125I)T4 labeled the same receptor forms at 254 nm but at a markedly lower efficiency than their PAL derivatives. In contrast, N-bromoacetyl-L-(125I)T3, a chemical affinity labeling agent, did not derivatize either receptor form in vitro. The relative efficiency of coupling to receptor at 254 nm was L-(125I)T4-PAL greater than L-(125I)T3-PAL greater than L-(125I)T4 greater than L-(125I)T3. Although L-(125I)T4-PAL has a lower affinity for receptor than L-(125I)T3-PAL, its coupling efficiency was 5-10-fold higher. This suggests that the alanine side chain of L-(125I)T4-PAL is positioned in the ligand binding region near a residue which is efficiently modified by photoactivation. With L-(125I)T4-PAL we were able to identify three different molecular weight receptor species in human fibroblast nuclei.

  18. Adenosine receptor desensitization and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Stuart; Kelly, Eamonn

    2011-05-01

    As with the majority of G-protein-coupled receptors, all four of the adenosine receptor subtypes are known to undergo agonist-induced regulation in the form of desensitization and trafficking. These processes can limit the ability of adenosine receptors to couple to intracellular signalling pathways and thus reduce the ability of adenosine receptor agonists as well as endogenous adenosine to produce cellular responses. In addition, since adenosine receptors couple to multiple signalling pathways, these pathways may desensitize differentially, while the desensitization of one pathway could even trigger signalling via another. Thus, the overall picture of adenosine receptor regulation can be complex. For all adenosine receptor subtypes, there is evidence to implicate arrestins in agonist-induced desensitization and trafficking, but there is also evidence for other possible forms of regulation, including second messenger-dependent kinase regulation, heterologous effects involving G proteins, and the involvement of non-clathrin trafficking pathways such as caveolae. In this review, the evidence implicating these mechanisms is summarized for each adenosine receptor subtype, and we also discuss those issues of adenosine receptor regulation that remain to be resolved as well as likely directions for future research in this field. PMID:20550943

  19. A small difference in the molecular structure of angiotensin II receptor blockers induces AT1 receptor-dependent and -independent beneficial effects

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Masahiro; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Kiya, Yoshihiro; Tominaga, Yukio; Matsuo, Yoshino; Karnik, Sadashiva S; Saku, Keijiro

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 (AT1) receptor blockers (ARBs) induce multiple pharmacological beneficial effects, but not all ARBs have the same effects and the molecular mechanisms underlying their actions are not certain. In this study, irbesartan and losartan were examined because of their different molecular structures (irbesartan has a cyclopentyl group whereas losartan has a chloride group). We analyzed the binding affinity and production of inositol phosphate (IP), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and adiponectin. Compared with losartan, irbesartan showed a significantly higher binding affinity and slower dissociation rate from the AT1 receptor and a significantly higher degree of inverse agonism and insurmountability toward IP production. These effects of irbesartan were not seen with the AT1-Y113A mutant receptor. On the basis of the molecular modeling of the ARBs–AT1 receptor complex and a mutagenesis study, the phenyl group at Tyr113 in the AT1 receptor and the cyclopentyl group of irbesartan may form a hydrophobic interaction that is stronger than the losartan–AT1 receptor interaction. Interestingly, irbesartan inhibited MCP-1 production more strongly than losartan. This effect was mediated by the inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B activation that was independent of the AT1 receptor in the human coronary endothelial cells. In addition, irbesartan, but not losartan, induced significant adiponectin production that was mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and this effect was not mediated by the AT1 receptor. In conclusion, irbesartan induced greater beneficial effects than losartan due to small differences between their molecular structures, and these differential effects were both dependent on and independent of the AT1 receptor. PMID:20668453

  20. Form classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, K. V. Umamaheswara; Govindaraju, Venu

    2008-01-01

    The problem of form classification is to assign a single-page form image to one of a set of predefined form types or classes. We classify the form images using low level pixel density information from the binary images of the documents. In this paper, we solve the form classification problem with a classifier based on the k-means algorithm, supported by adaptive boosting. Our classification method is tested on the NIST scanned tax forms data bases (special forms databases 2 and 6) which include machine-typed and handwritten documents. Our method improves the performance over published results on the same databases, while still using a simple set of image features.

  1. Queering Transformation in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Msibi, Thabo

    2013-01-01

    Transformation in higher education has tended to focus on race and sex, at the expense of other forms of discrimination. This article addresses the silencing of "queer" issues in higher education. Using queer theory as a framework, and drawing on current literature, popular media reports, two personal critical incidents and a project…

  2. Effective Communication in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    The intent for this paper is to show that communication within the higher education field is a current problem. By looking first at the different styles, forms, and audiences for communication, the reader will hopefully gain perspective as to why this is such a problem in higher education today. Since the Millennial generation is the newest set of…

  3. Adherence and receptor relationships of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Calderone, R A; Braun, P C

    1991-01-01

    such as dithiothreitol, on the other hand, tend to extract mannoproteins containing higher amounts of protein that appear to have receptor function. The mannoproteins of C. albicans are dynamically expressed and may be growth phase and growth form specific. PMID:2030668

  4. 5'-Azido-[3,6-3H2]-1-napthylphthalamic acid, a photoactivatable probe for naphthylphthalamic acid receptor proteins from higher plants: identification of a 23-kDa protein from maize coleoptile plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Zettl, R; Feldwisch, J; Boland, W; Schell, J; Palme, K

    1992-01-01

    1-Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) is a specific inhibitor of polar auxin transport that blocks carrier-mediated auxin efflux from plant cells. To allow identification of the NPA receptor thought to be part of the auxin efflux carrier, we have synthesized a tritiated, photolabile NPA analogue, 5'-azido-[3,6-3H2]NPA ([3H2]N3NPA). This analogue was used to identify NPA-binding proteins in fractions highly enriched for plasma membrane vesicles isolated from maize coleoptiles (Zea mays L.). Competition studies showed that binding of [3H2]N3NPA to maize plasma membrane vesicles was blocked by nonradioactive NPA but not by benzoic acid. After incubation of plasma membrane vesicles with [3H2]N3NPA and exposure to UV light, we observed specific photoaffinity labeling of a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 23 kDa. Pretreatment of the plasma membrane vesicles with indole-3-acetic acid or with the auxin-transport inhibitors NPA and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid strongly reduced specific labeling of this protein. This 23-kDa protein was also labeled by addition of 5-azido-[7-3H]indole-3-acetic acid to plasma membranes prior to exposure to UV light. The 23-kDa protein was solubilized from plasma membranes by 1% Triton X-100. The possibility that this 23-kDa polypeptide is part of the auxin efflux carrier system is discussed. Images PMID:11607252

  5. A long-acting and highly selective prostacyclin receptor agonist prodrug, 2-{4-[(5,6-diphenylpyrazin-2-yl)(isopropyl)amino]butoxy}-N-(methylsulfonyl)acetamide (NS-304), ameliorates rat pulmonary hypertension with unique relaxant responses of its active form, {4-[(5,6-diphenylpyrazin-2-yl)(isopropyl)amino]butoxy}acetic acid (MRE-269), on rat pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Kuwano, Keiichi; Hashino, Asami; Noda, Kumiko; Kosugi, Keiji; Kuwabara, Kenji

    2008-09-01

    2-{4-[(5,6-Diphenylpyrazin-2-yl)(isopropyl)amino]butoxy}-N-(methylsulfonyl)acetamide (NS-304) is an orally available, long-acting nonprostanoid prostacyclin receptor (IP receptor) agonist prodrug. In a rat model of pulmonary hypertension induced by monocrotaline (MCT), NS-304 ameliorated vascular endothelial dysfunction, pulmonary arterial wall hypertrophy, and right ventricular hypertrophy, and it elevated right ventricular systolic pressure and improved survival. {4-[(5,6-Diphenylpyrazin-2-yl)(isopropyl)amino]butoxy}acetic acid (MRE-269), the active form of NS-304, is much more selective for the IP receptor than are the prostacyclin analogs beraprost and iloprost, which also have high affinity for the EP(3) receptor. To investigate the effect of receptor selectivity on vasodilation of the pulmonary artery, we assessed the relaxant response to these IP agonists in rats. MRE-269 induced vasodilation equally in large pulmonary arteries (LPA) and small pulmonary arteries (SPA), whereas beraprost and iloprost induced less vasodilation in SPA than in LPA. An EP(3) agonist, sulprostone, induced SPA and LPA vasoconstriction, and an EP(3) antagonist attenuated the vasoconstriction. Beraprost showed EP(3) agonism and induced LPA and SPA vasoconstriction, whereas the EP(3) antagonist inhibited this vasoconstriction and enhanced beraprost- and iloprost-induced SPA vasodilation. These findings suggest that the EP(3) agonism of beraprost and iloprost interfered with the SPA vasodilation resulting from their IP receptor agonism. Endothelium removal markedly attenuated the vasodilation induced by beraprost, but not that induced by MRE-269 or iloprost. Moreover, the vasodilation induced by beraprost and iloprost, but not that induced by MRE-269, was more strongly attenuated in LPA from MCT-treated rats than from normal rats. NS-304 is a promising alternative medication for pulmonary arterial hypertension with prospects for good patient compliance. PMID:18552131

  6. Estrogen receptor scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Scheidhauer, K; Scharl, A; Schicha, H

    1998-03-01

    Radio-labeled estrogen receptor ligands are tracers that can be used for functional receptor diagnosis. Their specificity towards receptors, together with the fact that only 50-70% of mammary carcinomas are receptor positive, renders them unsuitable for detection of primary tumors or metastases, and this means that estrogen receptor scintigraphy can be used neither for tumor screening nor for staging. However, both 18F-labeled and 123I-labeled estradiol derivatives are suitable for in vivo imaging of estrogen receptors. Their high specificity, established in animal experiments and in vitro studies has been reproduced in in vivo applications in humans. Tracers with positron radiation emitters are, however, hardly suitable for broad application owing to the short half-life of 18F, which would mean that users would need to be situated close to a cyclotron and a correspondingly equipped radiochemical laboratory. The number of available PET scanners, on the other hand, has increased over the last few years, especially in Germany, so that this, at least, does not present a limiting factor. All the same, 123I-labeled estradiol derivatives will find more widespread application, since the number of gamma-cameras incorporating modern multi-head systems is several times greater. The results of studies with 123I-E2-scintigraphy published to date are very promising, even given the initial technical problems mentioned above. As a method of examination, it could be optimised by using improved tracers with a higher tumor contrast and less disturbance from overlapping in diagnostically relevant locations, for instance, by selecting tracers with higher activities whose excretion is more renal than hepatobiliary. The use of modern multi-head camera systems can also be expected to improve the photon yield. PMID:9646642

  7. 5 prime -Azido-(3,6- sup 3 H sub 2 )-1-naphthylphthalamic acid, a photoactivatable probe for naphthylphthalamic acid receptor proteins from higher plants: Identification of a 23-kDa protein from maize coleoptile plasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Zettl, R.; Feldwisch, J.; Schell, J.; Palme, K. ); Boland, W. )

    1992-01-15

    1-Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) is a specific inhibitor of polar auxin transport that blocks carrier mediated auxin efflux from plant cells. To allow identification of the NPA receptor thought to be part of the auxin efflux carrier, the authors have synthesized a tritiated, photolabile NPA analogue, 5{prime}-azido-(3,6-{sup 3}H{sub 2})NPA (({sup 3}H{sub 2})N{sub 3}NPA). This analogue was used to identify NPA-binding proteins in fractions highly enriched for plasma membrane vesicles isolated from maize coleoptiles (Zea mays L.). Competition studies showed that binding of ({sup 3}H{sub 2})N{sub 3}NPA to maize plasma membrane vesicles was blocked by nonradioactive NPA but not by benzoic acid. After incubation of plasma membrane vesicles with ({sup 3}H{sub 2})N{sub 3}NPA and exposure to UV light, they observed specific photoaffinity labeling of a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 23 kDa. Pretreatment of the plasma membrane vesicles with indole-3-acetic acid or with the auxin-transport inhibitors NPA and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid strongly reduced specific labeling of this protein. This 23-kDa protein was also labeled by addition of 5-azido-(7-{sup 3}H)indole-3-acetic acid to plasma membranes prior to exposure to UV light. The 23-kDa protein was solubilized from plasma membranes by 1% Triton X-100. The possibility that this 23-kDa polypeptide is part of the auxin efflux carrier system is discussed.

  8. Permission Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2005-01-01

    The prevailing practice in public schools is to routinely require permission or release forms for field trips and other activities that pose potential for liability. The legal status of such forms varies, but they are generally considered to be neither rock-solid protection nor legally valueless in terms of immunity. The following case and the…

  9. [Interceptors:--"silent" chemokine receptors].

    PubMed

    Grodecka, Magdalena; Waśniowska, Kazimiera

    2007-01-01

    The physiological effect caused by chemokines is regulated by interactions with a group of rodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors share a number of common features: the polypeptide chain is a 7-transmembrane ?-helix (7 TMD motif) and the region involved in G-protein interaction (the DRYLAIV sequence) is located in the second transmembrane loop. So far, 19 chemokine receptors have been identified. Three of them (Duffy glycoprotein, D6, and CCX-CKR proteins), although structurally related to other GPCRs, lack the ability of G-protein signal transduction. Instead, they efficiently internalize their cognate ligands, regulating chemokine levels in various body compartments. These three proteins are suggested to form a distinct chemokine receptor family, designated "interceptors" or "silent" chemokine receptors. PMID:17507871

  10. Neurosteroid interactions with synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAa receptors: regulation of subunit plasticity, phasic and tonic inhibition, and neuronal network excitability

    PubMed Central

    Chase Matthew, Carver; Doodipala Samba, Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Neurosteroids are steroids synthesized within the brain with rapid effects on neuronal excitability. Allopregnanolone, allotetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone, and androstanediol are three widely explored prototype endogenous neurosteroids. They have very different targets and functions compared to conventional steroid hormones. Neuronal GABAa receptors are one of the prime molecular targets of neurosteroids. Objective This review provides a critical appraisal of recent advances in the pharmacology of endogenous neurosteroids that interact with GABAa receptors in the brain. Neurosteroids possess distinct, characteristic effects on the membrane potential and current conductance of the neuron, mainly via potentiation of GABAa receptors at low concentrations and direct activation of receptor chloride channel at higher concentrations. The GABAa receptor mediates two types of inhibition, now characterized as synaptic (phasic) and extrasynaptic (tonic) inhibition. Synaptic release of GABA results in the activation of low-affinity γ2-containing synaptic receptors, while high-affinity δ-containing extrasynaptic receptors are persistently activated by the ambient GABA present in the extracellular fluid. Neurosteroids are potent positive allosteric modulators of synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAa receptors and therefore enhance both phasic and tonic inhibition. Tonic inhibition is specifically more sensitive to neurosteroids. The resulting tonic conductance generates a form of shunting inhibition that controls neuronal network excitability, seizure susceptibility, and behavior. Conclusion The growing understanding of the mechanisms of neurosteroid regulation of the structure and function of the synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAa receptors provide many opportunities to create improved therapies for sleep, anxiety, stress, epilepsy, and other neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:24071826

  11. A threading receptor for polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Mooibroek, Tiddo J; Casas-Solvas, Juan M; Harniman, Robert L; Renney, Charles M; Carter, Tom S; Crump, Matthew P; Davis, Anthony P

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose, chitin and related polysaccharides are key renewable sources of organic molecules and materials. However, poor solubility tends to hamper their exploitation. Synthetic receptors could aid dissolution provided they are capable of cooperative action, for example by multiple threading on a single polysaccharide molecule. Here we report a synthetic receptor designed to form threaded complexes (polypseudorotaxanes) with these natural polymers. The receptor binds fragments of the polysaccharides in aqueous solution with high affinities (K(a) up to 19,000 M(-1)), and is shown--by nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy--to adopt the threading geometry. Evidence from induced circular dichroism and atomic force microscopy implies that the receptor also forms polypseudorotaxanes with cellulose and its polycationic analogue chitosan. The results hold promise for polysaccharide solubilization under mild conditions, as well as for new approaches to the design of biologically active molecules. PMID:26673266

  12. A threading receptor for polysaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooibroek, Tiddo J.; Casas-Solvas, Juan M.; Harniman, Robert L.; Renney, Charles M.; Carter, Tom S.; Crump, Matthew P.; Davis, Anthony P.

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose, chitin and related polysaccharides are key renewable sources of organic molecules and materials. However, poor solubility tends to hamper their exploitation. Synthetic receptors could aid dissolution provided they are capable of cooperative action, for example by multiple threading on a single polysaccharide molecule. Here we report a synthetic receptor designed to form threaded complexes (polypseudorotaxanes) with these natural polymers. The receptor binds fragments of the polysaccharides in aqueous solution with high affinities (Ka up to 19,000 M-1), and is shown—by nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy—to adopt the threading geometry. Evidence from induced circular dichroism and atomic force microscopy implies that the receptor also forms polypseudorotaxanes with cellulose and its polycationic analogue chitosan. The results hold promise for polysaccharide solubilization under mild conditions, as well as for new approaches to the design of biologically active molecules.

  13. The mitochondrial fission receptor Mff selectively recruits oligomerized Drp1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Raymond; Chan, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) is the GTP-hydrolyzing mechanoenzyme that catalyzes mitochondrial fission in the cell. Residing in the cytosol as dimers and tetramers, Drp1 is recruited by receptors on the mitochondrial outer membrane, where it further assembles into a helical ring that drives division via GTP-dependent constriction. The Drp1 receptor Mff is a major regulator of mitochondrial fission, and its overexpression results in increased fission. In contrast, the alternative Drp1 receptors MiD51 and MiD49 appear to recruit inactive forms of Drp1, because their overexpression inhibits fission. Using genetic and biochemical assays, we studied the interaction of Drp1 with Mff. We show that the insert B region of Drp1 inhibits Mff–Drp1 interactions, such that recombinant Drp1 mutants lacking insert B form a stable complex with Mff. Mff cannot bind to assembly-deficient mutants of Drp1, suggesting that Mff selectively interacts with higher-order complexes of Drp1. In contrast, the alternative Drp1 receptors MiD51 and MiD49 can recruit Drp1 dimers. Therefore Drp1 recruitment by Mff versus MiD51 and MiD49 may result in different outcomes because they recruit different subpopulations of Drp1 from the cytosol. PMID:26446846

  14. Evolution of NMDA receptor cytoplasmic interaction domains: implications for organisation of synaptic signalling complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Tomás J; Emes, Richard D; Grant, Seth GN; Komiyama, Noboru H

    2008-01-01

    Background Glutamate gated postsynaptic receptors in the central nervous system (CNS) are essential for environmentally stimulated behaviours including learning and memory in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Though their genetics, biochemistry, physiology, and role in behaviour have been intensely studied in vitro and in vivo, their molecular evolution and structural aspects remain poorly understood. To understand how these receptors have evolved different physiological requirements we have investigated the molecular evolution of glutamate gated receptors and ion channels, in particular the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, which is essential for higher cognitive function. Studies of rodent NMDA receptors show that the C-terminal intracellular domain forms a signalling complex with enzymes and scaffold proteins, which is important for neuronal and behavioural plasticity Results The vertebrate NMDA receptor was found to have subunits with C-terminal domains up to 500 amino acids longer than invertebrates. This extension was specific to the NR2 subunit and occurred before the duplication and subsequent divergence of NR2 in the vertebrate lineage. The shorter invertebrate C-terminus lacked vertebrate protein interaction motifs involved with forming a signaling complex although the terminal PDZ interaction domain was conserved. The vertebrate NR2 C-terminal domain was predicted to be intrinsically disordered but with a conserved secondary structure. Conclusion We highlight an evolutionary adaptation specific to vertebrate NMDA receptor NR2 subunits. Using in silico methods we find that evolution has shaped the NMDA receptor C-terminus into an unstructured but modular intracellular domain that parallels the expansion in complexity of an NMDA receptor signalling complex in the vertebrate lineage. We propose the NR2 C-terminus has evolved to be a natively unstructured yet flexible hub organising postsynaptic signalling. The evolution of the NR2 C-terminus and its

  15. Oligomerization Interface of RAGE Receptor Revealed by MS-Monitored Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Poznański, Jarosław; Kulma, Magdalena; Dadlez, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) leads to a chronic proinflammatory signal, affecting patients with a variety of diseases. Potentially beneficial modification of RAGE activity requires understanding the signal transduction mechanism at the molecular level. The ligand binding domain is structurally uncoupled from the cytoplasmic domain, suggesting receptor oligomerization is a requirement for receptor activation. In this study, we used hydrogen-deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry to map structural differences between the monomeric and oligomeric forms of RAGE. Our results indicated the presence of a region shielded from exchange in the oligomeric form of RAGE and led to the identification of a new oligomerization interface localized at the linker region between domains C1 and C2. Based on this finding, a model of a RAGE dimer and higher oligomeric state was constructed. PMID:24098480

  16. Stargazin is an AMPA receptor auxiliary subunit.

    PubMed

    Vandenberghe, Wim; Nicoll, Roger A; Bredt, David S

    2005-01-11

    AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) receptors mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission in brain and underlie aspects of synaptic plasticity. Numerous AMPA receptor-binding proteins have been implicated in AMPA receptor trafficking and anchoring. However, the relative contributions of these proteins to the composition of native AMPA receptor complexes in brain remain uncertain. Here, we use blue native gel electrophoresis to analyze the composition of native AMPA receptor complexes in cerebellar extracts. We identify two receptor populations: a functional form that contains the transmembrane AMPA receptor-regulatory protein stargazin and an apo-form that lacks stargazin. Limited proteolysis confirms assembly of stargazin with a large proportion of native AMPA receptors. In contrast, other AMPA receptor-interacting proteins, such as synapse-associated protein 97, glutamate receptor-interacting protein 1, protein kinase Calpha binding protein, N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein, AP2, and protein 4.1N, do not show significant association with AMPA receptor complexes on native gels. These data identify stargazin as an auxiliary subunit for a neurotransmitter-gated ion channel. PMID:15630087

  17. Binding of type II nuclear receptors and estrogen receptor to full and half-site estrogen response elements in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Klinge, C M; Bodenner, D L; Desai, D; Niles, R M; Traish, A M

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism by which retinoids, thyroid hormone (T3) and estrogens modulate the growth of breast cancer cells is unclear. Since nuclear type II nuclear receptors, including retinoic acid receptor (RAR), retinoid X receptor (RXR) and thyroid hormone receptor (TR), bind direct repeats (DR) of the estrogen response elements (ERE) half-site (5'-AGGTCA-3'), we examined the ability of estrogen receptor (ER) versus type II nuclear receptors, i.e. RARalpha, beta and gamma, RXRbeta, TRalpha and TRbeta, to bind various EREs in vitro . ER bound a consensus ERE, containing a perfectly palindromic 17 bp inverted repeat (IR), as a homodimer. In contrast, ER did not bind to a single ERE half-site. Likewise, ER did not bind two tandem (38 bp apart) half-sites, but low ER binding was detected to three tandem copies of the same half-site. RARalpha,beta or gamma bound both ERE and half-site constructs as a homodimer. RXRbeta did not bind full or half-site EREs, nor did RXRbeta enhance RARalpha binding to a full ERE. However, RARalpha and RXRbeta bound a half-site ERE cooperatively forming a dimeric complex. The RARalpha-RXRbeta heterodimer bound the Xenopus vitellogenin B1 estrogen responsive unit, with two non-consensus EREs, with higher affinity than one or two copies of the full or half-site ERE. Both TRalpha and TRbeta bound the full and the half-site ERE as monomers and homodimers and cooperatively as heterodimers with RXRbeta. We suggest that the cellular concentrations of nuclear receptors and their ligands, and the nature of the ERE or half-site sequence and those of its flanking sequences determine the occupation of EREs in estrogen-regulated genes in vivo . PMID:9115356

  18. Estradiol receptor of calf uterus: interactions with heparin-agarose and purification.

    PubMed Central

    Molinari, A M; Medici, N; Moncharmont, B; Puca, G A

    1977-01-01

    Heparin attached covalently to agarose beads binds the "native" form of the estradiol receptor with very high affinity. Chondroitin sulfate does not bind to the receptor. When the receptor is complexed with hormone, the affinity is at least 10 times higher. Only the "native" and not the "nuclear" or the "derived" (i.e., after activation by a calcium-dependent enzyme) forms of the estradiol receptor interact with heparin. The "native" estradiol-receptor complex is purified to homogeneity after chromatography on columns of heparin-agarose, Sephadex G-200, and DEAE-cellulose, followed by two more Sephadex G-200 columns. The purified molecule is a single polypeptide of molecular weight 69,000 by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate. The sedimentation coefficient on sucrose gradients is 4.3 S, the Stokes radius from gel filtration is 36.5 A, and the isoelectric point is 6.4. The purified [3H]estradiol-receptor complex exchanges the radioactive hormone with estradiol or other estrogenic steroids, but not with testosterone, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, or progesterone. Images PMID:270721

  19. Nicotinic Receptors in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Posadas, Inmaculada; López-Hernández, Beatriz; Ceña, Valentín

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have focused on expanding our knowledge of the structure and diversity of peripheral and central nicotinic receptors. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the Cys-loop superfamily of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, which include GABA (A and C), serotonin, and glycine receptors. Currently, 9 alpha (α2-α10) and 3 beta (β2-β4) subunits have been identified in the central nervous system (CNS), and these subunits assemble to form a variety of functional nAChRs. The pentameric combination of several alpha and beta subunits leads to a great number of nicotinic receptors that vary in their properties, including their sensitivity to nicotine, permeability to calcium and propensity to desensitize. In the CNS, nAChRs play crucial roles in modulating presynaptic, postsynaptic, and extrasynaptic signaling, and have been found to be involved in a complex range of CNS disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), schizophrenia, Tourette´s syndrome, anxiety, depression and epilepsy. Therefore, there is growing interest in the development of drugs that modulate nAChR functions with optimal benefits and minimal adverse effects. The present review describes the main characteristics of nAChRs in the CNS and focuses on the various compounds that have been tested and are currently in phase I and phase II trials for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases including PD, AD and age-associated memory and mild cognitive impairment. PMID:24179465

  20. Mechanisms of inverse agonist action at D2 dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David J; Strange, Philip G

    2005-05-01

    Mechanisms of inverse agonist action at the D2(short) dopamine receptor have been examined. Discrimination of G-protein-coupled and -uncoupled forms of the receptor by inverse agonists was examined in competition ligand-binding studies versus the agonist [3H]NPA at a concentration labelling both G-protein-coupled and -uncoupled receptors. Competition of inverse agonists versus [3H]NPA gave data that were fitted best by a two-binding site model in the absence of GTP but by a one-binding site model in the presence of GTP. K(i) values were derived from the competition data for binding of the inverse agonists to G-protein-uncoupled and -coupled receptors. K(coupled) and K(uncoupled) were statistically different for the set of compounds tested (ANOVA) but the individual values were different in a post hoc test only for (+)-butaclamol. These observations were supported by simulations of these competition experiments according to the extended ternary complex model. Inverse agonist efficacy of the ligands was assessed from their ability to reduce agonist-independent [35S]GTP gamma S binding to varying degrees in concentration-response curves. Inverse agonism by (+)-butaclamol and spiperone occurred at higher potency when GDP was added to assays, whereas the potency of (-)-sulpiride was unaffected. These data show that some inverse agonists ((+)-butaclamol, spiperone) achieve inverse agonism by stabilising the uncoupled form of the receptor at the expense of the coupled form. For other compounds tested, we were unable to define the mechanism. PMID:15735658

  1. Peptide agonists of the thrombopoietin receptor.

    PubMed

    Dower, W J; Cwirla, S E; Balasubramanian, P; Schatz, P J; Baccanari, D P; Barrett, R W

    1998-01-01

    We have screened a variety of L-amino acid peptide libraries against the extracellular domain of the human thrombopoietin (HuTPO) receptor, c-Mpl. A large number of peptide ligands were recovered and categorized into two families. Peptides from each family compete with the binding of HuTPO and with the binding of peptides from the other familiy. Representative peptides were synthesized and found to activate the full-length HuTPO receptor expressed in Ba/F3 cells to promote proliferation. These peptide families show no apparent homology to the primary sequence of TPO. We have focused our optimization efforts on one of the peptides, a linear 14-mer (IEGPTLRQWLAARA) with an IC50 of 2 nM in a competition binding assay and an EC50 of 400 nM in the proliferation assay. In order to enhance the potency of the compound, we constructed dimeric peptides by linking the carboxy-termini of the 14-mers to a lysine branch. These molecules exhibited slightly higher affinity (0.5 nM) and greatly increased potency (0.1 nM). The EC50 of the dimeric peptide was equivalent to that of the 332 aa form of baculovirus-expressed recombinant HuTPO. As previously shown for the erythropoietin-mimetic peptides, the TPO-mimetic peptides probably activate the TPO receptor by binding and inducing receptor dimerization. This supposition is supported by the observation that covalent dimerization of the peptide enhances its potency by 4,000-fold over that of the monomer. The peptide dimer is also active in stimulating in vitro proliferation of progenitors and maturation of megakaryocytes from human bone marrow, and in promoting an increase in platelet count when administered to normal mice. PMID:11012174

  2. Digital Resilience in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weller, Martin; Anderson, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Higher education institutions face a number of opportunities and challenges as the result of the digital revolution. The institutions perform a number of scholarship functions which can be affected by new technologies, and the desire is to retain these functions where appropriate, whilst the form they take may change. Much of the reaction to…

  3. Lysophospholipid receptors in drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Kihara, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Chun, Jerold

    2014-01-01

    Lysophospholipids (LPs), including lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), sphingosine 1-phospate (S1P), lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), are bioactive lipids that transduce signals through their specific cell-surface G protein-coupled receptors, LPA1–6, S1P1–5, LPI1, and LysoPS1–3, respectively. These LPs and their receptors have been implicated in both physiological and pathophysiological processes such as autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, fibrosis, pain, cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, bone formation, fertility, organismal development, and other effects on most organ systems. Advances in the LP receptor field have enabled the development of novel small molecules targeting LP receptors for several diseases. Most notably, fingolimod (FTY720, Gilenya, Novartis), an S1P receptor modulator, became the first FDA-approved medicine as an orally bioavailable drug for treating relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. This success is currently being followed by multiple, mechanistically related compounds targeting S1P receptor subtypes, which are in various stages of clinical development. In addition, an LPA1 antagonist, BMS-986020 (Bristol-Myers Squibb), is in Phase 2 clinical development for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, as is a distinct compound, SAR100842 (Sanofi) for the treatment of systemic sclerosis and related fibrotic diseases. This review summarizes the current state of drug discovery in the LP receptor field. PMID:25499971

  4. Lysophospholipid receptors in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Chun, Jerold

    2015-05-01

    Lysophospholipids (LPs), including lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), sphingosine 1-phospate (S1P), lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), are bioactive lipids that transduce signals through their specific cell-surface G protein-coupled receptors, LPA1-6, S1P1-5, LPI1, and LysoPS1-3, respectively. These LPs and their receptors have been implicated in both physiological and pathophysiological processes such as autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, fibrosis, pain, cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, bone formation, fertility, organismal development, and other effects on most organ systems. Advances in the LP receptor field have enabled the development of novel small molecules targeting LP receptors for several diseases. Most notably, fingolimod (FTY720, Gilenya, Novartis), an S1P receptor modulator, became the first FDA-approved medicine as an orally bioavailable drug for treating relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. This success is currently being followed by multiple, mechanistically related compounds targeting S1P receptor subtypes, which are in various stages of clinical development. In addition, an LPA1 antagonist, BMS-986020 (Bristol-Myers Squibb), is in Phase 2 clinical development for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, as a distinct compound, SAR100842 (Sanofi) for the treatment of systemic sclerosis and related fibrotic diseases. This review summarizes the current state of drug discovery in the LP receptor field. PMID:25499971

  5. Dimerization of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor potentiates hormone-dependent receptor phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Song, Gyun Jee; Jones, Brian W; Hinkle, Patricia M

    2007-11-13

    The G protein-coupled thyrotropin (TSH)-releasing hormone (TRH) receptor forms homodimers. Regulated receptor dimerization increases TRH-induced receptor endocytosis. These studies test whether dimerization increases receptor phosphorylation, which could potentiate internalization. Phosphorylation at residues 355-365, which is critical for internalization, was measured with a highly selective phospho-site-specific antibody. Two strategies were used to drive receptor dimerization. Dimerization of a TRH receptor-FK506-binding protein (FKBP) fusion protein was stimulated by a dimeric FKBP ligand. The chemical dimerizer caused a large increase in TRH-dependent phosphorylation within 1 min, whereas a monomeric FKBP ligand had no effect. The dimerizer did not alter phoshorylation of receptors lacking the FKBP domain. Dimerization of receptors containing an N-terminal HA epitope also was induced with anti-HA antibody. Anti-HA IgG strongly increased TRH-induced phosphorylation, whereas monomeric Fab fragments had no effect. Anti-HA antibody did not alter phosphorylation in receptors lacking an HA tag. Furthermore, two phosphorylation-defective TRH receptors functionally complemented one another and permitted phosphorylation. Receptors with a D71A mutation in the second transmembrane domain do not signal, whereas receptors with four Ala mutations in the 355-365 region signal normally but lack phosphorylation sites. When D71A- and 4Ala-TRH receptors were expressed alone, neither underwent TRH-dependent phosphorylation. When they were expressed together, D71A receptor was phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases in response to TRH. These results suggest that the TRH receptor is phosphorylated preferentially when it is in dimers or when preexisting receptor dimers are driven into microaggregates. Increased receptor phosphorylation may amplify desensitization. PMID:17989235

  6. Evolution of Cytokine Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Liongue, Clifford; Sertori, Robert; Ward, Alister C

    2016-07-01

    Cytokines represent essential mediators of cell-cell communication with particularly important roles within the immune system. These secreted factors are produced in response to developmental and/or environmental cues and act via cognate cytokine receptors on target cells, stimulating specific intracellular signaling pathways to facilitate appropriate cellular responses. This review describes the evolution of cytokine receptor signaling, focusing on the class I and class II receptor families and the downstream JAK-STAT pathway along with its key negative regulators. Individual components generated over a long evolutionary time frame coalesced to form an archetypal signaling pathway in bilateria that was expanded extensively during early vertebrate evolution to establish a substantial "core" signaling network, which has subsequently undergone limited diversification within discrete lineages. The evolution of cytokine receptor signaling parallels that of the immune system, particularly the emergence of adaptive immunity, which has likely been a major evolutionary driver. PMID:27317733

  7. State Spending on Higher Education Capital Outlays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaney, Jennifer A.; Doyle, William R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the role that state spending on higher education capital outlays plays in state budgets by considering the functional form of the relationship between state spending on higher education capital outlays and four types of state expenditures. Three possible functional forms are tested: a linear model, a quadratic model, and the…

  8. Origin of basal activity in mammalian olfactory receptor neurons

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian odorant receptors form a large, diverse group of G protein–coupled receptors that determine the sensitivity and response profile of olfactory receptor neurons. But little is known if odorant receptors control basal and also stimulus-induced cellular properties of olfactory receptor neurons other than ligand specificity. This study demonstrates that different odorant receptors have varying degrees of basal activity, which drives concomitant receptor current fluctuations and basal action potential firing. This basal activity can be suppressed by odorants functioning as inverse agonists. Furthermore, odorant-stimulated olfactory receptor neurons expressing different odorant receptors can have strikingly different response patterns in the later phases of prolonged stimulation. Thus, the influence of odorant receptor choice on response characteristics is much more complex than previously thought, which has important consequences on odor coding and odor information transfer to the brain. PMID:20974772

  9. Higher Education Exchange, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Research shows that not only does higher education not see the public; when the public, in turn, looks at higher education, it sees mostly malaise, inefficiencies, expense, and unfulfilled promises. Yet, the contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" tell of bright spots in higher education where experiments in working…

  10. Higher Education Exchange, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  11. Higher Education Exchange, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  12. Higher Education Exchange, 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  13. Higher Education Exchange, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  14. Hormone activation of baculovirus expressed progesterone receptors.

    PubMed

    Elliston, J F; Beekman, J M; Tsai, S Y; O'Malley, B W; Tsai, M J

    1992-03-15

    Human and chicken progesterone receptors (A form) were overproduced in a baculovirus expression system. These recombinant progesterone receptors were full-length bound progesterone specifically and were recognized by monoclonal antibodies, AB52 and PR22, specific for human and chicken progesterone receptor, respectively. In gel retardation studies, binding of recombinant human and chicken progesterone receptors to their progesterone response element (PRE) was specific and was enhanced in the presence of progesterone. Binding of human progesterone receptor to the PRE was also enhanced in the presence of the antiprogestin, RU486, but very little effect was observed in the presence of estradiol, dexamethasone, testosterone, and vitamin D. In our cell-free transcription system, human progesterone receptor induced transcription in a receptor-dependent and hormone-activable manner. Receptor-stimulated transcription required the presence of the PRE in the test template and could be specifically inhibited by excess PRE oligonucleotides. Furthermore, chicken progesterone receptor also induced in vitro transcription in a hormone-activable manner. These results demonstrate that steroid receptors overexpressed in a baculovirus expression system are functional and exhibit steroid-responsive binding and transcription. These observations support our present understanding of the mechanism of steroid receptor-regulated gene expression and provide a technological format for studies of the role of hormone and antihormone in altering gene expression. PMID:1544902

  15. Structure–activity correlations of variant forms of the B pentamer of Escherichia coli type II heat-labile enterotoxin LT-IIb with Toll-like receptor 2 binding

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, Vivian; Pace, Jim; Nawar, Hesham F.; King-Lyons, Natalie; Liang, Shuang; Connell, Terry D.; Hajishengallis, George

    2012-12-01

    Structural data for the S74D variant of the pentameric B subunit of type II heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli reveal a smaller pore opening that may explain its reduced Toll-like receptor binding affinity compared to that of the wild type enterotoxin. The explanation for the enhanced Toll-like receptor binding affinity of the S74A variant is more complex than simply being attributed to the pore opening. The pentameric B subunit of the type II heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (LT-IIb-B{sub 5}) is a potent signaling molecule capable of modulating innate immune responses. It has previously been shown that LT-IIb-B{sub 5}, but not the LT-IIb-B{sub 5} Ser74Asp variant [LT-IIb-B{sub 5}(S74D)], activates Toll-like receptor (TLR2) signaling in macrophages. Consistent with this, the LT-IIb-B{sub 5}(S74D) variant failed to bind TLR2, in contrast to LT-IIb-B{sub 5} and the LT-IIb-B{sub 5} Thr13Ile [LT-IIb-B{sub 5}(T13I)] and LT-IIb-B{sub 5} Ser74Ala [LT-IIb-B{sub 5}(S74A)] variants, which displayed the highest binding activity to TLR2. Crystal structures of the Ser74Asp, Ser74Ala and Thr13Ile variants of LT-IIb-B{sub 5} have been determined to 1.90, 1.40 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively. The structural data for the Ser74Asp variant reveal that the carboxylate side chain points into the pore, thereby reducing the pore size compared with that of the wild-type or the Ser74Ala variant B pentamer. On the basis of these crystallographic data, the reduced TLR2-binding affinity of the LT-IIb-B{sub 5}(S74D) variant may be the result of the pore of the pentamer being closed. On the other hand, the explanation for the enhanced TLR2-binding activity of the LT-IIb-B{sub 5}(S74A) variant is more complex as its activity is greater than that of the wild-type B pentamer, which also has an open pore as the Ser74 side chain points away from the pore opening. Data for the LT-IIb-B{sub 5}(T13I) variant show that four of the five variant side chains point to the outside

  16. Tidal Forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolla Pittaluga, M.; Seminara, G.; Tambroni, N.

    2003-04-01

    We give an overview of some recent investigations on the mechanics of the processes whereby forms develop in tidal environments. The viewpoint taken here is mechanistic. Some of the questions which deserve an answer may be summarised as follows: i) do tidal channels tend to some altimetric long term equilibrium? ii) why are they typically convergent and weakly meandering? iii) how is such equilibrium affected by the hydrodynamics and morphodynamics of tidal inlets? iv) what is the hydrodynamic and morphodynamic role played by tidal flats adjacent to the channels? Some of the above questions have received a considerable attention in the last few years. Schuttelaars and de Swart (1996), Lanzoni and Seminara (2002) and, more recently, Bolla Pittaluga (2003) have investigated the first problem. In particular, the latter two contributions have shown that a straight tidal channel connected to a tidal sea at one end and closed at the other end tends to reach a long term equilibrium profile, which is slightly concave seaward and convex landward where a beach forms. The equilibrium profile is strongly sensitive to the harmonic content of the tidal forcing as well as to the value of sediment concentration established by the coastal hydrodynamics in the far field of the inlet region. Less important are the effect of channel convergence and the role of settling lag in the transport of suspended load. Insufficient attention has been devoted to the understanding of what mechanisms control channel convergence and meandering, though some similarities and differences between tidal and fluvial channels have emerged from some recent works. In particular, free bars form in tidal channels due to an instability mechanism essentially similar to that occurring under steady conditions though the oscillatory character of the flow field makes the bar pattern non migrating (Seminara and Tubino, 2001). Similarly, forced bars in curved tidal channels are driven by the development of

  17. Human striatal dopamine receptors are organized in compartments

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, J.N.; Sapp, D.W.; Marshall, J.F.

    1986-10-01

    Dopamine (D2) receptors visualized in postmortem human striatum by quantitative autoradiography of (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding are organized into circumscribed zones of low receptor density separated from other such zones by regions of higher D2 density. The D2-rich zones of the caudate nucleus and putamen contain twice the binding of D2-poor zones. The Hill coefficient, obtained from saturation analysis of (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding to thin sections of human striatum, gave a value near unity, indicating the binding was occurring to a single type of site. The patchiness of (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding was unaltered by postincubation removal of lipid from the tissue sections, indicating that a differential absorption of tritium in white and grey matter does not account for the heterogeneous distribution. The D2-rich and D2-poor regions appear to form labyrinths oriented in the anterior-posterior axis and are typically aligned with, respectively, acetylcholinesterase-rich and -poor compartments as visualized on stained adjacent sections. Thus, the distribution of dopamine D2 receptors conforms to the striosomal organization of the human caudate-putamen, a finding that suggests that this receptor subtype may mediate the influence of dopamine on distinct neurochemical compartments within the structure.

  18. Why a diaminopyrrolic tripodal receptor binds mannosides in acetonitrile but not in water?

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Viçosa, Diogo; Francesconi, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Summary Intermolecular interactions involving carbohydrates and their natural receptors play important roles in several biological processes. The development of synthetic receptors is very useful to study these recognition processes. Recently, it was synthetized a diaminopyrrolic tripodal receptor that is selective for mannosides, which are obtained from mannose, a sugar with significant relevance in living systems. However, this receptor is significantly more active in acetonitrile than in water. In this work, we performed several molecular dynamics and constant-pH molecular dynamics simulations in acetonitrile and water to evaluate the conformational space of the receptor and to understand the molecular detail of the receptor–mannoside interaction. The protonation states sampled by the receptor show that the positive charges are always as distant as possible in order to avoid large intramolecular repulsions. Moreover, the conformational space of the receptor is very similar in water above pH 4.0 and in acetonitrile. From the simulations with the mannoside, we observe that the interactions are more specific in acetonitrile (mainly hydrogen bonds) than in water (mainly hydrophobic). Our results suggest that the readiness of the receptor to bind mannoside is not significantly affected in water (above pH 4.0). Probably, the hydrogen bond network that is formed in acetonitrile (which is weaker in water) is the main reason for the higher activity in this solvent. This work also presents a new implementation of the stochastic titration constant-pH molecular dynamics method to a synthetic receptor of sugars and attests its ability to describe the protonation/conformation coupling in these molecules. PMID:25161708

  19. In situ autoradiography and ligand-dependent tyrosine kinase activity reveal insulin receptors and insulin-like growth factor I receptors in prepancreatic chicken embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Girbau, M; Bassas, L; Alemany, J; de Pablo, F

    1989-01-01

    We previously reported specific cross-linking of 125I-labeled insulin and 125I-labeled insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) to the alpha subunit of their respective receptors in chicken embryos of 20 somites and older. To achieve adequate sensitivity and localize spatially the receptors in younger embryos, we adapted an autoradiographic technique using whole-mounted chicken blastoderms. Insulin receptors and IGF-I receptors were expressed and could be localized as early as gastrulation, before the first somite is formed. Relative density was analyzed by a computer-assisted image system, revealing overall slightly higher binding of IGF-I than of insulin. Structures rich in both types of receptors were predominantly of ectodermal origin: Hensen's node in gastrulating embryos and neural folds, neural tube and optic vesicles during neurulation. The signal transduction capability of the receptors in early organogenesis was assessed by their ability to phosphorylate the exogenous substrate poly(Glu80Tyr20). Ligand-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation was demonstrable with both insulin and IGF-I in glycoprotein-enriched preparations from embryos at days 2 through 6 of embryogenesis. There was a developmentally regulated change in ligand-dependent tyrosine kinase activity, with a sharp increase from day 2 to day 4, in contrast with a small increase in the ligand binding. Binding of 125I-labeled IGF-I was, with the solubilized receptors, severalfold higher than binding of 125I-labeled insulin. However, the insulin-dependent phosphorylation was as high as the IGF-I-dependent phosphorylation at each developmental stage. Images PMID:2548191

  20. Special Higher Education Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Meyer

    1982-01-01

    Cites works relevant to the higher education of Blacks and minority group members. Lists references alphabetically under the following headings: (1) financial aid on the campus; (2) Chicanos in higher education; and (3) race and equality on California campuses. (GC)

  1. Adenosine Receptors and Membrane Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Lasley, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine receptors are a member of the large family of seven transmembrane spanning G protein coupled receptors (GPCR). The four adenosine receptor subtypes – A1, A2a, A2b, A3 – exert their effects via the activation of one or more heterotrimeric G proteins resulting in the modulation of intracellular signaling. Numerous studies over the past decade have documented the complexity of GPCR signaling at the level of protein-protein interactions as well as through signaling crosstalk. With respect to adenosine receptors the activation of one receptor subtype can have profound direct effects in one cell type, but little or no effect in other cells. There is significant evidence that the compartmentation of subcellular signaling plays a physiological role in the fidelity of GPCR signaling. This compartmentation is evident at the level of the plasma membrane in the form of membrane microdomains such as caveolae and lipid rafts. This review will summarize and critically assess our current understanding of the role of membrane microdomains in regulating adenosine receptor signaling. PMID:20888790

  2. Txk, a member of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase of the Tec family, forms a complex with poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 and elongation factor 1α and regulates interferon-γ gene transcription in Th1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, T; Nara, K; Yoshikawa, H; Suzuki, N

    2007-01-01

    We have found previously that Txk, a member of the Tec family tyrosine kinases, is involved importantly in T helper 1 (Th1) cytokine production. However, how Txk regulates interferon (IFN)-γ gene transcription in human T lymphocytes was not fully elucidated. In this study, we identified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) and elongation factor 1α (EF-1α) as Txk-associated molecules that bound to the Txk responsive element of the IFN-γ gene promoter. Txk phosphorylated EF-1α and PARP1 formed a complex with them, and bound to the IFN-γ gene promoter in vitro. In particular, the N terminal region containing the DNA binding domain of PARP1 was important for the trimolecular complex formation involving Txk, EF-1α and PARP1. Several mutant Txk which lacked kinase activity were unable to form the trimolecular complex. A PARP1 inhibitor, PJ34, suppressed IFN-γ but not interleukin (IL)-4 production by normal peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). Multi-colour confocal analysis revealed that Txk and EF-1α located in the cytoplasm in the resting condition. Upon activation, a complex involving Txk, EF-1α and PARP1 was formed and was located in the nucleus. Collectively, Txk in combination with EF-1α and PARP1 bound to the IFN-γ gene promoter, and exerted transcriptional activity on the IFN-γ gene. PMID:17177976

  3. Hyperinsulinemia is Associated with Increased Soluble Insulin Receptors Release from Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hiriart, Marcia; Sanchez-Soto, Carmen; Diaz-Garcia, Carlos Manlio; Castanares, Diana T.; Avitia, Morena; Velasco, Myrian; Mas-Oliva, Jaime; Macias-Silva, Marina; González-Villalpando, Clicerio; Delgado-Coello, Blanca; Sosa-Garrocho, Marcela; Vidaltamayo, Román; Fuentes-Silva, Deyanira

    2014-01-01

    It has been generally assumed that insulin circulates freely in blood. However it can also interact with plasma proteins. Insulin receptors are located in the membrane of target cells and consist of an alpha and beta subunits with a tyrosine kinase cytoplasmic domain. The ectodomain, called soluble insulin receptor (SIR) has been found elevated in patients with diabetes mellitus. We explored if insulin binds to SIRs in circulation under physiological conditions and hypothesize that this SIR may be released by hepatocytes in response to high insulin concentrations. The presence of SIR in rat and human plasmas and the culture medium of hepatocytes was explored using Western blot analysis. A purification protocol was performed to isolated SIR using affinity, gel filtration, and ion exchange chromatographies. A modified reverse hemolytic plaque assay was used to measure SIR release from cultured hepatocytes. Incubation with 1 nmol l−1 insulin induces the release of the insulin receptor ectodomains from normal rat hepatocytes. This effect can be partially prevented by blocking protease activity. Furthermore, plasma levels of SIR were higher in a model of metabolic syndrome, where rats are hyperinsulinemic. We also found increased SIR levels in hyperinsulinemic humans. SIR may be an important regulator of the amount of free insulin in circulation. In hyperinsulinemia, the amount of this soluble receptor increases and this could lead to higher amounts of insulin bound to this receptor, rather than free insulin, which is the biologically active form of the hormone. This observation could enlighten the mechanisms of insulin resistance. PMID:24995000

  4. Hyperinsulinemia is Associated with Increased Soluble Insulin Receptors Release from Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hiriart, Marcia; Sanchez-Soto, Carmen; Diaz-Garcia, Carlos Manlio; Castanares, Diana T; Avitia, Morena; Velasco, Myrian; Mas-Oliva, Jaime; Macias-Silva, Marina; González-Villalpando, Clicerio; Delgado-Coello, Blanca; Sosa-Garrocho, Marcela; Vidaltamayo, Román; Fuentes-Silva, Deyanira

    2014-01-01

    It has been generally assumed that insulin circulates freely in blood. However it can also interact with plasma proteins. Insulin receptors are located in the membrane of target cells and consist of an alpha and beta subunits with a tyrosine kinase cytoplasmic domain. The ectodomain, called soluble insulin receptor (SIR) has been found elevated in patients with diabetes mellitus. We explored if insulin binds to SIRs in circulation under physiological conditions and hypothesize that this SIR may be released by hepatocytes in response to high insulin concentrations. The presence of SIR in rat and human plasmas and the culture medium of hepatocytes was explored using Western blot analysis. A purification protocol was performed to isolated SIR using affinity, gel filtration, and ion exchange chromatographies. A modified reverse hemolytic plaque assay was used to measure SIR release from cultured hepatocytes. Incubation with 1 nmol l(-1) insulin induces the release of the insulin receptor ectodomains from normal rat hepatocytes. This effect can be partially prevented by blocking protease activity. Furthermore, plasma levels of SIR were higher in a model of metabolic syndrome, where rats are hyperinsulinemic. We also found increased SIR levels in hyperinsulinemic humans. SIR may be an important regulator of the amount of free insulin in circulation. In hyperinsulinemia, the amount of this soluble receptor increases and this could lead to higher amounts of insulin bound to this receptor, rather than free insulin, which is the biologically active form of the hormone. This observation could enlighten the mechanisms of insulin resistance. PMID:24995000

  5. Spotlight on Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klinger, Donna; Iwanowski, Jay

    1997-01-01

    A number of current issues and initiatives in higher education are highlighted, including impending reauthorization of the Higher Education Act, the need for advocacy of higher education in public policy arenas, a University of Florida program combining accountability and institutional autonomy, and institutional compliance with nonresident alien…

  6. Higher Education Exchange, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" discuss the concept of growing public scholars; each contribution incorporates a student component. Articles include: (1) "Foreword"…

  7. The Higher Education Enterprise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottinger, Cecilia A.

    1991-01-01

    Higher education not only contributes to the development of the human resources and intellectual betterment of the nation but is also a major economic enterprise. This research brief reviews and highlights data on the size and growth of higher education and illustrates how higher education institutions are preparing the future labor force. It…

  8. Regulation of AMPA Receptor Function by the Human Memory-Associated Gene KIBRA

    PubMed Central

    Makuch, Lauren; Volk, Lenora; Anggono, Victor; Johnson, Richard C.; Yu, Yilin; Duning, Kerstin; Kremerskothen, Joachim; Xia, Jun; Takamiya, Kogo; Huganir, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    KIBRA has recently been identified as a gene associated with human memory performance. Despite the elucidation of the role of KIBRA in several diverse processes in non-neuronal cells, the molecular function of KIBRA in neurons is unknown. We found that KIBRA directly binds to the protein interacting with C-kinase 1 (PICK1) and forms a complex with α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptors (AMPARs), the major excitatory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain. KIBRA knockdown accelerates the rate of AMPAR recycling following N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor induced internalization. Genetic deletion of KIBRA in mice impairs both long-term depression and long-term potentiation at hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses. Moreover, KIBRA knockout mice have severe deficits in contextual fear learning and memory. These results indicate that KIBRA regulates higher brain function by regulating AMPAR trafficking and synaptic plasticity. PMID:21943600

  9. Knock-In Mice with NOP-eGFP Receptors Identify Receptor Cellular and Regional Localization

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Akihiko; Brunori, Gloria; Mercatelli, Daniela; Wu, Jinhua; Cippitelli, Andrea; Zou, Bende; Xie, Xinmin (Simon); Williams, Melissa; Zaveri, Nurulain T.; Low, Sarah; Scherrer, Grégory; Kieffer, Brigitte L.

    2015-01-01

    The nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP) receptor, the fourth member of the opioid receptor family, is involved in many processes common to the opioid receptors including pain and drug abuse. To better characterize receptor location and trafficking, knock-in mice were created by inserting the gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) into the NOP receptor gene (Oprl1) and producing mice expressing a functional NOP-eGFP C-terminal fusion in place of the native NOP receptor. The NOP-eGFP receptor was present in brain of homozygous knock-in animals in concentrations somewhat higher than in wild-type mice and was functional when tested for stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding in vitro and in patch-clamp electrophysiology in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and hippocampal slices. Inhibition of morphine analgesia was equivalent when tested in knock-in and wild-type mice. Imaging revealed detailed neuroanatomy in brain, spinal cord, and DRG and was generally consistent with in vitro autoradiographic imaging of receptor location. Multicolor immunohistochemistry identified cells coexpressing various spinal cord and DRG cellular markers, as well as coexpression with μ-opioid receptors in DRG and brain regions. Both in tissue slices and primary cultures, the NOP-eGFP receptors appear throughout the cell body and in processes. These knock-in mice have NOP receptors that function both in vitro and in vivo and appear to be an exceptional tool to study receptor neuroanatomy and correlate with NOP receptor function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The NOP receptor, the fourth member of the opioid receptor family, is involved in pain, drug abuse, and a number of other CNS processes. The regional and cellular distribution has been difficult to determine due to lack of validated antibodies for immunohistochemical analysis. To provide a new tool for the investigation of receptor localization, we have produced knock-in mice with a fluorescent-tagged NOP receptor in place of the native

  10. Structural and Molecular Modeling Features of P2X Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Luiz Anastacio; da Silva, João Herminio Martins; Ferreira, Dinarte Neto Moreira; Fidalgo-Neto, Antonio Augusto; Teixeira, Pedro Celso Nogueira; de Souza, Cristina Alves Magalhães; Caffarena, Ernesto Raúl; de Freitas, Mônica Santos

    2014-01-01

    Currently, adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) is recognized as the extracellular messenger that acts through P2 receptors. P2 receptors are divided into two subtypes: P2Y metabotropic receptors and P2X ionotropic receptors, both of which are found in virtually all mammalian cell types studied. Due to the difficulty in studying membrane protein structures by X-ray crystallography or NMR techniques, there is little information about these structures available in the literature. Two structures of the P2X4 receptor in truncated form have been solved by crystallography. Molecular modeling has proven to be an excellent tool for studying ionotropic receptors. Recently, modeling studies carried out on P2X receptors have advanced our knowledge of the P2X receptor structure-function relationships. This review presents a brief history of ion channel structural studies and shows how modeling approaches can be used to address relevant questions about P2X receptors. PMID:24637936

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Opioid Receptor-Dependent Signaling and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hasani, Ream; Bruchas, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Opioid receptors have been targeted for the treatment of pain and related disorders for thousands of years, and remain the most widely used analgesics in the clinic. Mu (μ), kappa (κ), and delta (δ) opioid receptors represent the originally classified receptor subtypes, with opioid receptor like-1 (ORL1) being the least characterized. All four receptors are G-protein coupled, and activate inhibitory G-proteins. These receptors form homo- and hetereodimeric complexes, signal to kinase cascades, and scaffold a variety of proteins. In this review, we discuss classical mechanisms and developments in understanding opioid tolerance, opioid receptor signaling, and highlight advances in opioid molecular pharmacology, behavioral pharmacology, and human genetics. We put into context how opioid receptor signaling leads to the modulation of behavior with the potential for therapeutic intervention. Finally, we conclude that there is a continued need for more translational work on opioid receptors in vivo. PMID:22020140

  12. Guidance Receptors in the Nervous and Cardiovascular Systems.

    PubMed

    Rubina, K A; Tkachuk, V A

    2015-10-01

    Blood vessels and nervous fibers grow in parallel, for they express similar receptors for chemokine substances. Recently, much attention is being given to studying guidance receptors and their ligands besides the growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines necessary to form structures in the nervous and vascular systems. Such guidance molecules determine trajectory for growing axons and vessels. Guidance molecules include Ephrins and their receptors, Neuropilins and Plexins as receptors for Semaphorins, Robos as receptors for Slit-proteins, and UNC5B receptors binding Netrins. Apart from these receptors and their ligands, urokinase and its receptor (uPAR) and T-cadherin are also classified as guidance molecules. The urokinase system mediates local proteolysis at the leading edge of cells, thereby providing directed migration. T-cadherin is a repellent molecule that regulates the direction of growing axons and blood vessels. Guidance receptors also play an important role in the diseases of the nervous and cardiovascular systems. PMID:26567567

  13. Atypical chemokine receptors in cancer: friends or foes?

    PubMed

    Massara, Matteo; Bonavita, Ornella; Mantovani, Alberto; Locati, Massimo; Bonecchi, Raffaella

    2016-06-01

    The chemokine system is a fundamental component of cancer-related inflammation involved in all stages of cancer development. It controls not only leukocyte infiltration in primary tumors but also angiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation, and migration to metastatic sites. Atypical chemokine receptors are a new, emerging class of regulators of the chemokine system. They control chemokine bioavailability by scavenging, transporting, or storing chemokines. They can also regulate the activity of canonical chemokine receptors with which they share the ligands by forming heterodimers or by modulating their expression levels or signaling activity. Here, we summarize recent results about the role of these receptors (atypical chemokine receptor 1/Duffy antigen receptor for chemokine, atypical chemokine receptor 2/D6, atypical chemokine receptor 3/CXC-chemokine receptor 7, and atypical chemokine receptor 4/CC-chemokine receptor-like 1) on the tumorigenesis process, indicating that their effects are strictly dependent on the cell type on which they are expressed and on their coexpression with other chemokine receptors. Indeed, atypical chemokine receptors inhibit tumor growth and progression through their activity as negative regulators of chemokine bioavailability, whereas, on the contrary, they can promote tumorigenesis when they regulate the signaling of other chemokine receptors, such as CXC-chemokine receptor 4. Thus, atypical chemokine receptors are key components of the regulatory network of inflammation and immunity in cancer and may have a major effect on anti-inflammatory and immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:26908826

  14. Receptor Expression in Rat Skeletal Muscle Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.

    1996-01-01

    One on the most persistent problems with long-term space flight is atrophy of skeletal muscles. Skeletal muscle is unique as a tissue in the body in that its ability to undergo atrophy or hypertrophy is controlled exclusively by cues from the extracellular environment. The mechanism of communication between muscle cells and their environment is through a group of membrane-bound and soluble receptors, each of which carries out unique, but often interrelated, functions. The primary receptors include acetyl choline receptors, beta-adrenergic receptors, glucocorticoid receptors, insulin receptors, growth hormone (i.e., somatotropin) receptors, insulin-like growth factor receptors, and steroid receptors. This project has been initiated to develop an integrated approach toward muscle atrophy and hypertrophy that takes into account information on the populations of the entire group of receptors (and their respective hormone concentrations), and it is hypothesized that this information can form the basis for a predictive computer model for muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. The conceptual basis for this project is illustrated in the figure below. The individual receptors are shown as membrane-bound, with the exception of the glucocorticoid receptor which is a soluble intracellular receptor. Each of these receptors has an extracellular signalling component (e.g., innervation, glucocorticoids, epinephrine, etc.), and following the interaction of the extracellular component with the receptor itself, an intracellular signal is generated. Each of these intracellular signals is unique in its own way; however, they are often interrelated.

  15. Prolonged signaling at the parathyroid hormone receptor by peptide ligands targeted to a specific receptor conformation

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Makoto; Ferrandon, Sebastien; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Potts, John T.; Gardella, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    The parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR) is a class B G protein-coupled receptor that plays critical roles in bone and mineral ion metabolism. Ligand binding to the PTHR involves interactions to both the amino-terminal extracellular (N) domain, and transmembrane/extracellular loop, or juxtamembrane (J) regions of the receptor. Recently, we found that PTH(1–34), but not PTH-related protein, PTHrP(1–36), or M-PTH(1–14) (M = Ala/Aib1,Aib3,Gln10,Har11,Ala12,Trp14,Arg19), binds to the PTHR in a largely GTPγS-resistant fashion, suggesting selective binding to a novel, high-affinity conformation (R0), distinct from the GTPγS-sensitive conformation (RG). We examined the effects in vitro and in vivo of introducing the M substitutions, which enhance interaction to the J domain, into PTH analogs extended C-terminally to incorporate residues involved in the N domain interaction. As compared with PTH(1–34), M-PTH(1–28) and M-PTH(1–34) bound to R0 with higher affinity, produced more sustained cAMP responses in cells, formed more stable complexes with the PTHR in FRET and subcellular localization assays, and induced more prolonged calcemic and phosphate responses in mice. Moreover, after 2 weeks of daily injection in mice, M-PTH(1–34) induced larger increases in trabecular bone volume and greater increases in cortical bone turnover, than did PTH(1–34). Thus, the putative R0 PTHR conformation can form highly stable complexes with certain PTH ligand analogs and thereby mediate surprisingly prolonged signaling responses in bone and/or kidney PTH target cells. Controlling, via ligand analog design, the selectivity with which a PTH ligand binds to R0, versus RG, may be a strategy for optimizing signaling duration time, and hence therapeutic efficacy, of PTHR agonist ligands. PMID:18946036

  16. Developmental regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate- and kainate-type glutamate receptor expression in the rat spinal cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegenga, S. L.; Kalb, R. G.

    2001-01-01

    Spinal motor neurons undergo experience-dependent development during a critical period in early postnatal life. It has been suggested that the repertoire of glutamate receptor subunits differs between young and mature motor neurons and contributes to this activity-dependent development. In the present study we examined the expression patterns of N-methyl-D-aspartate- and kainate-type glutamate receptor subunits during the postnatal maturation of the spinal cord. Young motor neurons express much higher levels of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 than do adult motor neurons. Although there are eight potential splice variants of NR1, only a subgroup is expressed by motor neurons. With respect to NR2 receptor subunits, young motor neurons express NR2A and C, while adult motor neurons express only NR2A. Young motor neurons express kainate receptor subunits GluR5, 6 and KA2 but we are unable to detect these or any other kainate receptor subunits in the adult spinal cord. Other spinal cord regions display a distinct pattern of developmental regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate and kainate receptor subunit expression in comparison to motor neurons. Our findings indicate a precise spatio-temporal regulation of individual subunit expression in the developing spinal cord. Specific combinations of subunits in developing neurons influence their excitable properties and could participate in the emergence of adult neuronal form and function.

  17. Thermostabilization of the Human Endothelin Type B Receptor.

    PubMed

    Okuta, Akiko; Tani, Kazutoshi; Nishimura, Shoko; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Doi, Tomoko

    2016-06-01

    The peptide hormone endothelin, produced by the vascular endothelium, is involved in several physiological functions, including maintenance of vascular tone and humoral homeostasis. Endothelin transmits signals through the endothelin receptor, a G-protein-coupled receptor. Structural studies of the endothelin type B receptor (ETBR) have been unsuccessful due to its structural flexibility and instability in detergent-solubilized solution. To overcome these problems, we explored thermostabilization of human ETBR by establishing an ETBR expression system in Escherichia coli, followed by systematic alanine scanning mutagenesis. Among 297 point mutations, 11 thermostabilizing residues were selected and further mutated to other amino acids. The thermostability indices of these residues, represented by the ratios of endothelin-1 (ET-1) binding activities with or without heat treatment at 27°C for 30min in a ligand-free form, were compared. The ligand affinity and apparent melting temperature (Tm) of the five most thermostable mutants, R124Y, D154A, K270A, S342A, and I381A, were then examined. The apparent Tm of three single mutants, R124Y, D154A, and K270A, was approximately 7°C higher than that of the wild type. The apparent Tm value of a combination of the five residues, named the Y5 ETBR mutant, was 17°C higher than that of the wild type. The Y5 ETBR mutant exhibited an affinity for ET-1 and activated Gq similar to the wild type. Further investigation of the pharmacological properties affected by combinatorial mutations of ET-1, ET-3, TxET-1, and K8794 suggested that Y5 ETBR is highly suitable for representing a ligand-free form of ETBR and is potentially applicable for studying an ET-1-bound form. PMID:27038509

  18. Chemical bridges for enhancing hydrogen storage by spillover and methods for forming the same

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Ralph T.; Li, Yingwei; Qi, Gongshin; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J.

    2012-12-25

    A composition for hydrogen storage includes a source of hydrogen atoms, a receptor, and a chemical bridge formed between the source and the receptor. The chemical bridge is formed from a precursor material. The receptor is adapted to receive hydrogen spillover from the source.

  19. Receptor Activity-modifying Proteins 2 and 3 Generate Adrenomedullin Receptor Subtypes with Distinct Molecular Properties.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Harriet A; Chakravarthy, Madhuri; Abhayawardana, Rekhati S; Gingell, Joseph J; Garelja, Michael; Pardamwar, Meenakshi; McElhinney, James M W R; Lathbridge, Alex; Constantine, Arran; Harris, Paul W R; Yuen, Tsz-Ying; Brimble, Margaret A; Barwell, James; Poyner, David R; Woolley, Michael J; Conner, Alex C; Pioszak, Augen A; Reynolds, Christopher A; Hay, Debbie L

    2016-05-27

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a peptide hormone with numerous effects in the vascular systems. AM signals through the AM1 and AM2 receptors formed by the obligate heterodimerization of a G protein-coupled receptor, the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), and receptor activity-modifying proteins 2 and 3 (RAMP2 and RAMP3), respectively. These different CLR-RAMP interactions yield discrete receptor pharmacology and physiological effects. The effective design of therapeutics that target the individual AM receptors is dependent on understanding the molecular details of the effects of RAMPs on CLR. To understand the role of RAMP2 and -3 on the activation and conformation of the CLR subunit of AM receptors, we mutated 68 individual amino acids in the juxtamembrane region of CLR, a key region for activation of AM receptors, and determined the effects on cAMP signaling. Sixteen CLR mutations had differential effects between the AM1 and AM2 receptors. Accompanying this, independent molecular modeling of the full-length AM-bound AM1 and AM2 receptors predicted differences in the binding pocket and differences in the electrostatic potential of the two AM receptors. Druggability analysis indicated unique features that could be used to develop selective small molecule ligands for each receptor. The interaction of RAMP2 or RAMP3 with CLR induces conformational variation in the juxtamembrane region, yielding distinct binding pockets, probably via an allosteric mechanism. These subtype-specific differences have implications for the design of therapeutics aimed at specific AM receptors and for understanding the mechanisms by which accessory proteins affect G protein-coupled receptor function. PMID:27013657

  20. Receptor Activity-modifying Proteins 2 and 3 Generate Adrenomedullin Receptor Subtypes with Distinct Molecular Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Harriet A.; Chakravarthy, Madhuri; Abhayawardana, Rekhati S.; Gingell, Joseph J.; Garelja, Michael; Pardamwar, Meenakshi; McElhinney, James M. W. R.; Lathbridge, Alex; Constantine, Arran; Harris, Paul W. R.; Yuen, Tsz-Ying; Brimble, Margaret A.; Barwell, James; Poyner, David R.; Woolley, Michael J.; Conner, Alex C.; Pioszak, Augen A.; Reynolds, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a peptide hormone with numerous effects in the vascular systems. AM signals through the AM1 and AM2 receptors formed by the obligate heterodimerization of a G protein-coupled receptor, the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), and receptor activity-modifying proteins 2 and 3 (RAMP2 and RAMP3), respectively. These different CLR-RAMP interactions yield discrete receptor pharmacology and physiological effects. The effective design of therapeutics that target the individual AM receptors is dependent on understanding the molecular details of the effects of RAMPs on CLR. To understand the role of RAMP2 and -3 on the activation and conformation of the CLR subunit of AM receptors, we mutated 68 individual amino acids in the juxtamembrane region of CLR, a key region for activation of AM receptors, and determined the effects on cAMP signaling. Sixteen CLR mutations had differential effects between the AM1 and AM2 receptors. Accompanying this, independent molecular modeling of the full-length AM-bound AM1 and AM2 receptors predicted differences in the binding pocket and differences in the electrostatic potential of the two AM receptors. Druggability analysis indicated unique features that could be used to develop selective small molecule ligands for each receptor. The interaction of RAMP2 or RAMP3 with CLR induces conformational variation in the juxtamembrane region, yielding distinct binding pockets, probably via an allosteric mechanism. These subtype-specific differences have implications for the design of therapeutics aimed at specific AM receptors and for understanding the mechanisms by which accessory proteins affect G protein-coupled receptor function. PMID:27013657

  1. Autocrine endocannabinoid signaling through CB1 receptors potentiates OX1 orexin receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Jäntti, Maria H; Putula, Jaana; Turunen, Pauli M; Näsman, Johnny; Reijonen, Sami; Lindqvist, Christer; Kukkonen, Jyrki P

    2013-03-01

    It has been proposed that OX(1) orexin receptors and CB(1) cannabinoid receptors can form heteromeric complexes, which affect the trafficking of OX(1) receptors and potentiate OX(1) receptor signaling to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). We have recently shown that OX(1) receptor activity releases high levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), suggesting an alternative route for OX(1)-CB(1) receptor interaction in signaling, for instance, in retrograde synaptic transmission. In the current study, we set out to investigate this possibility utilizing recombinant Chinese hamster ovary K1 cells. 2-AG released from OX(1) receptor-expressing cells acted as a potent paracrine messenger stimulating ERK activity in neighboring CB(1) receptor-expressing cells. When OX(1) and CB(1) receptors were expressed in the same cells, OX(1) stimulation-induced ERK phosphorylation and activity were strongly potentiated. The potentiation but not the OX(1) response as such was fully abolished by specific inhibition of CB(1) receptors or the enzyme responsible for 2-AG generation, diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL). Although the results do not exclude the previously proposed OX(1)-CB(1) heteromerization, they nevertheless unequivocally identify DAGL-dependent 2-AG generation as the pivotal determinant of the OX(1)-CB(1) synergism and thus suggest a functional rather than a molecular interaction of OX(1) and CB(1) receptors. PMID:23233488

  2. Selectivity of oxomemazine for the M1 muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Lee, S W; Woo, C W; Kim, J G

    1994-12-01

    The binding characteristics of pirenzepine and oxomemazine to muscarinic receptor were studied to evaluate the selectivity of oxomemazine for the muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat cerebral microsomes. Equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of (-)-[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate([3H]QNB) determined from saturation isotherms was 64 pM. Analysis of the pirenzepine inhibition curve of [3H]QNB binding to cerebral microsome indicated the presence of two receptor subtypes with high (Ki = 16 nM, M1 receptor) and low (Ki = 400 nM, M3 receptor) affinity for pirenzepine. Oxomemazine also identified two receptor subtypes with about 20-fold difference in the affinity for high (Ki = 84 nM, OH receptor) and low (Ki = 1.65 microM, OL receptor) affinity sites. The percentage populations of M1 and M3 receptors to the total receptors were 61:39, and those of OH and OL receptors 39:61, respectively. Both pirenzepine and oxomemazine increased the KD value for [3H]QNB without affecting the binding site concentrations and Hill coefficient for the [3H]QNB binding. Oxomemazine had a 10-fold higher affinity at M1 receptors than at M3 receptors, and pirenzepine a 8-fold higher affinity at OH receptors than at OL receptors. Analysis of the shallow competition binding curves of oxomemazine for M1 receptors and pirenzepine for OL receptors yielded that 69% of M1 receptors were of OH receptors and the remaining 31% of OL receptors, and that 29% of OL receptors were of M1 receptors and 71% of M3 receptors. However, M3 for oxomemazine and OH for pirenzepine were composed of a uniform population. These results suggest that oxomemazine could be classified as a selective drug for M1 receptors and also demonstrate that rat cerebral microsomes contain three different subtypes of M1, M3 and the other site which is different from M1, M2 and M3 receptors. PMID:10319156

  3. High abundance androgen receptor in goldfish brain: characteristics and seasonal changes

    SciTech Connect

    Pasmanik, M.; Callard, G.V.

    1988-08-01

    Testosterone (T) exerts its actions in brain directly via androgen receptors or, after aromatization to estradiol, via estrogen receptors. Brain aromatase activity in teleost fish is 100-1000 times greater than in mammals and would be expected to significantly reduce the quantity of androgen available for receptor binding. Experiments were carried out on the goldfish Carassius auratus to determine if androgen receptors are present in teleost brain and whether their physicochemical properties reflect elevated aromatase. Cytosolic and nuclear extracts were assayed with the use of (/sup 3/H)T and charcoal, Sephadex LH-20, or DNA-cellulose chromatography to separate bound and free steroids. Binding activity was saturable and had an equally high affinity for T and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone. Although mibolerone was a relatively weak competitor, the putative teleost androgen 11-ketotestosterone, methyltrienolone (R1881), estradiol, progesterone, and cortisol were poor ligands. Characteristics that distinguish this receptor from a steroid-binding protein in goldfish serum are the presence of binding activity in both nuclear and cytosolic extracts, a low rate of ligand-receptor dissociation, electrophoretic mobility, sedimentation properties in low vs. high salt, and tissue distribution. DNA cellulose-adhering and nonadhering forms were detected, but these did not differ in other variables measured. Although goldfish androgen receptors resembled those of mammals in all important physicochemical characteristics, they were unusually abundant compared to levels in rat brain, but comparable to levels in prostate and other male sex hormone target organs. Moreover, there were seasonal variations in total receptors, with a peak at spawning (April) 4- to 5-fold higher than values in reproductively inactive fish.

  4. Association of EP2 receptor and SLC19A3 in regulating breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Cheuk, Isabella W; Shin, Vivian Y; Siu, Man T; Tsang, Julia Y; Ho, John C; Chen, Jiawei; Tse, Gary M; Wang, Xian; Kwong, Ava

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Triple-negative breast cancer patients have higher metastatic rate than patients with other breast cancer subtypes. Distant metastasis is one of the causes leading to the high mortality rates. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) is associated with breast cancer metastasis and the downstream prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) exerted its effect through EP receptors (EP1-EP4). However, the exact molecular events of EP receptors in breast cancer metastasis remain undefined. Expressions of EP receptors were determined during cancer development in NOD-SCID mice inoculated with MB-231 and MB-231-EP2 clone. EP2 overexpressing stable clone was constructed to investigate the proliferation and invasion potentials in vivo and in vitro. Drug transporter array was used to identify EP2 receptor-associated drug transported genes in breast cancer metastasis. Localization of EP2 receptor in primary tissues and xenografts were examined by immunostaining. Stable EP2-expression cells formed larger tumors than parental cells in mice model and was highly expressed in both primary and metastatic tissues. Silencing of EP2 receptor by siRNA and antagonist (AH 6809) significantly decreased cell proliferation and invasion, concomitant with reduced MMP-2 and MMP-9 expressions. Results from array data showed that expression of SLC19A3 was markedly increased in EP2 siRNA transfected cells. Ectopic expression of SLC19A3 retarded cell proliferation, invasion and MMPs expressions. Notably, SLC19A3 had a lower expression in primary tissues and was negatively correlated with EP2 receptor expression. Our novel finding revealed that EP2 receptor regulated metastasis through downregulation of SLC19A3. Thus, targeting EP2-SLC19A3 signaling is a potential therapeutic therapy for treating metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26807319

  5. Association of EP2 receptor and SLC19A3 in regulating breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Cheuk, Isabella W; Shin, Vivian Y; Siu, Man T; Tsang, Julia Y; Ho, John C; Chen, Jiawei; Tse, Gary M; Wang, Xian; Kwong, Ava

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Triple-negative breast cancer patients have higher metastatic rate than patients with other breast cancer subtypes. Distant metastasis is one of the causes leading to the high mortality rates. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) is associated with breast cancer metastasis and the downstream prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) exerted its effect through EP receptors (EP1-EP4). However, the exact molecular events of EP receptors in breast cancer metastasis remain undefined. Expressions of EP receptors were determined during cancer development in NOD-SCID mice inoculated with MB-231 and MB-231-EP2 clone. EP2 overexpressing stable clone was constructed to investigate the proliferation and invasion potentials in vivo and in vitro. Drug transporter array was used to identify EP2 receptor-associated drug transported genes in breast cancer metastasis. Localization of EP2 receptor in primary tissues and xenografts were examined by immunostaining. Stable EP2-expression cells formed larger tumors than parental cells in mice model and was highly expressed in both primary and metastatic tissues. Silencing of EP2 receptor by siRNA and antagonist (AH 6809) significantly decreased cell proliferation and invasion, concomitant with reduced MMP-2 and MMP-9 expressions. Results from array data showed that expression of SLC19A3 was markedly increased in EP2 siRNA transfected cells. Ectopic expression of SLC19A3 retarded cell proliferation, invasion and MMPs expressions. Notably, SLC19A3 had a lower expression in primary tissues and was negatively correlated with EP2 receptor expression. Our novel finding revealed that EP2 receptor regulated metastasis through downregulation of SLC19A3. Thus, targeting EP2-SLC19A3 signaling is a potential therapeutic therapy for treating metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26807319

  6. Cannabinoids, cannabinoid receptors and tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul F; Zheng, Yiwen

    2016-02-01

    One hypothesis suggests that tinnitus is a form of sensory epilepsy, arising partly from neuronal hyperactivity in auditory regions of the brain such as the cochlear nucleus and inferior colliculus. Although there is currently no effective drug treatment for tinnitus, anti-epileptic drugs are used in some cases as a potential treatment option. There is increasing evidence to suggest that cannabinoid drugs, i.e. cannabinoid receptor agonists, can also have anti-epileptic effects, at least in some cases and in some parts of the brain. It has been reported that cannabinoid CB1 receptors and the endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), are expressed in the cochlear nucleus and that they are involved in the regulation of plasticity. This review explores the question of whether cannabinoid receptor agonists are likely to be pro- or anti-epileptic in the cochlear nucleus and therefore whether cannabinoids and Cannabis itself are likely to make tinnitus better or worse. PMID:26433054

  7. Reinventing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Higher education institutions are in the battle of a lifetime as they are coping with political and economic uncertainties, threats to federal aid, declining state support, higher tuition rates and increased competition from for-profit institutions. Amid all these challenges, these institutions are pressed to keep up with technological demands,…

  8. Higher Education in Arkansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Higher Education, Little Rock.

    This report presents information about higher education in Arkansas. Arkansas is 49th in the United States in the number of citizens over the age of 25 with a baccalaureate or higher degree. Arkansas faces shortages of qualified teachers and nurses in regions of the state at a time when the number of graduates in these professions is declining…

  9. Minorities in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justiz, Manuel J., Ed.; And Others

    This book presents 19 papers on efforts to increase the participation of members of minority groups in higher education. The papers are: (1) "Demographic Trends and the Challenges to American Higher Education" (Manuel Justiz); (2) "Three Realities: Minority Life in the United States--The Struggle for Economic Equity (adapted by Don M. Blandin);…

  10. Reimagining Christian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulme, E. Eileen; Groom, David E., Jr.; Heltzel, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    The challenges facing higher education continue to mount. The shifting of the U.S. ethnic and racial demographics, the proliferation of advanced digital technologies and data, and the move from traditional degrees to continuous learning platforms have created an unstable environment to which Christian higher education must adapt in order to remain…

  11. Quality in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruben, Brent D., Ed.

    This volume contains 21 new and classic papers and readings on quality philosophies and concepts, first, as they have been applied in business and industry but primarily as they relate to and can be applied in higher education. The introduction is titled "The Quality Approach in Higher Education: Context and Concepts for Change" by Brent D. Ruben.…

  12. Higher Education Exchange 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Contributors to this issue of the Higher Education Exchange debate the issues around knowledge production, discuss the acquisition of deliberative skills for democracy, and examine how higher education prepares, or does not prepare, students for citizenship roles. Articles include: (1) "Foreword" (Deborah Witte); (2) "Knowledge, Judgment and…

  13. Reinventing Continuing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walshok, Mary Lindenstein

    2012-01-01

    Re-inventing continuing higher education is about finding ways to be a more central player in a region's civic, cultural, and economic life as well as in the education of individuals for work and citizenship. Continuing higher education will require data gathering, analytical tools, convening authority, interpretive skills, new models of delivery,…

  14. Gender and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bank, Barbara J., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This comprehensive, encyclopedic review explores gender and its impact on American higher education across historical and cultural contexts. Challenging recent claims that gender inequities in U.S. higher education no longer exist, the contributors--leading experts in the field--reveal the many ways in which gender is embedded in the educational…

  15. Consumerism in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Mark

    1973-01-01

    In considering consumerism in higher education, the student becomes the consumer,'' the university the corporation,'' and higher education the education industry.'' Other members of the education fraternity become investors, management, workers, direct consumers, and indirect consumers. This article proposes that it behooves the student to…

  16. [Deregulation and Higher Education].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Business Officer, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The extent to which the Reagan Administration has achieved its deregulation goals in the area of higher education is addressed in three articles: "Deregulation and Higher Education: The View a Year Later" (Sheldon Elliot Steinbach); "Student Financial Aid Deregulation: Rhetoric or Reality?" (Robin E. Jenkins); and "Administration Reform of Civil…

  17. Higher Education Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This volume begins with an essay by Noelle McAfee, a contributor who is familiar to readers of Higher Education Exchange (HEX). She reiterates Mathews' argument regarding the disconnect between higher education's sense of engagement and the public's sense of engagement, and suggests a way around the epistemological conundrum of "knowledge produced…

  18. Higher Education Exchange, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This volume begins with an essay by Noelle McAfee, a contributor who is familiar to readers of Higher Education Exchange (HEX). She reiterates Kettering's president David Mathews' argument regarding the disconnect between higher education's sense of engagement and the public's sense of engagement, and suggests a way around the epistemological…

  19. Angiotensin II receptors in the gonads

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilera, G.; Millan, M.A.; Harwood, J.P.

    1989-05-01

    The presence of components of the renin-angiotensin system in ovaries and testes suggests that angiotensin II (AII) is involved in gonadal function, and thus we sought to characterize receptors for AII in rat and primate gonads. In the testes, autoradiographic studies showed receptors in the interstitium in all species. In rat interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptors coincided with hCG receptors indicating that AII receptors are located on the Leydig cells. In Leydig cells and membranes from rat and rhesus monkey prepuberal testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogues and of high affinity (Kd=nM). During development, AII receptor content in rat testes decreases with age parallel to a fall in the ratio of interstitial to tubular tissue. In the ovary, the distribution of AII receptors was dependent on the stage of development, being high in the germinal epithelium and stromal tissue between five and 15 days, and becoming localized in secondary follicles in 20-and 40-day-old rats. No binding was found in primordial or primary follicles. In rhesus monkey ovary, AII receptors were higher in stromal tissue and lower in granulosa and luteal cells of the follicles. Characterization of the binding in rat and monkey ovarian membranes showed a single class of sites with a Kd in the nmol/L range and specificity similar to that of the adrenal glomerulosa and testicular AII receptors. Receptors for AII were also present in membrane fractions from PMSG/hCG primed rat ovaries. Infusion of AII (25 ng/min) or captopril (1.4 micrograms/min) during the PMSG/hCG induction period had no effect on ovarian weight or AII receptor concentration in the ovaries.

  20. Shaping cellular form and function by autophagy.

    PubMed

    Bamber, Bruce A; Rowland, Aaron M

    2006-01-01

    In addition to its familiar role in non-selective bulk degradation of cellular material, autophagy can also bring about specific changes in the structure and function of cells. Autophagy has been proposed to operate in a substrate-selective mode to carry out this function, although evidence to demonstrate selectivity has been lacking. A recent study of synapse formation in the nervous system of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans now provides experimental evidence for substrate-selective autophagy. Synapses form when presynaptic cells contact their postsynaptic partners during development. This contact induces the assembly of synaptically-localized protein complexes in the postsynaptic cell that contain scaffolding proteins and neurotransmitter receptors. When presynaptic contact was blocked, autophagy in the postsynaptic cell was induced. Substrate selectivity was evident in this system: the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A) receptor), an integral-membrane neurotransmitter receptor, trafficked from the cell surface to autophagosomes. By contrast, the acetylcholine receptor, a structurally-similar neurotransmitter receptor, remained on the cell surface. This result provides experimental support for the idea that autophagy can bring about changes in cell structure and behavior by degrading specific cellular proteins, particularly cell surface receptors that are often important for regulating cell growth, differentiation and function. PMID:16874044

  1. Differential regulation of AMPA receptor subunit trafficking by palmitoylation of two distinct sites.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takashi; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Huganir, Richard L

    2005-09-01

    Modification of AMPA receptor function is a major mechanism for the regulation of synaptic transmission and underlies several forms of synaptic plasticity. Post-translational palmitoylation is a reversible modification that regulates localization of many proteins. Here, we report that palmitoylation of the AMPA receptor regulates receptor trafficking. All AMPA receptor subunits are palmitoylated on two cysteine residues in their transmembrane domain (TMD) 2 and in their C-terminal region. Palmitoylation on TMD 2 is upregulated by the palmitoyl acyl transferase GODZ and leads to an accumulation of the receptor in the Golgi and a reduction of receptor surface expression. C-terminal palmitoylation decreases interaction of the AMPA receptor with the 4.1N protein and regulates AMPA- and NMDA-induced AMPA receptor internalization. Moreover, depalmitoylation of the receptor is regulated by activation of glutamate receptors. These data suggest that regulated palmitoylation of AMPA receptor subunits modulates receptor trafficking and may be important for synaptic plasticity. PMID:16129400

  2. Super-complexes of adhesion GPCRs and neural guidance receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Verity A.; Mehmood, Shahid; Chavent, Matthieu; Roversi, Pietro; Carrasquero, Maria; del Toro, Daniel; Seyit-Bremer, Goenuel; Ranaivoson, Fanomezana M.; Comoletti, Davide; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Robinson, Carol V.; Klein, Rüdiger; Seiradake, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Latrophilin adhesion-GPCRs (Lphn1–3 or ADGRL1–3) and Unc5 cell guidance receptors (Unc5A–D) interact with FLRT proteins (FLRT1–3), thereby promoting cell adhesion and repulsion, respectively. How the three proteins interact and function simultaneously is poorly understood. We show that Unc5D interacts with FLRT2 in cis, controlling cell adhesion in response to externally presented Lphn3. The ectodomains of the three proteins bind cooperatively. Crystal structures of the ternary complex formed by the extracellular domains reveal that Lphn3 dimerizes when bound to FLRT2:Unc5, resulting in a stoichiometry of 1:1:2 (FLRT2:Unc5D:Lphn3). This 1:1:2 complex further dimerizes to form a larger ‘super-complex' (2:2:4), using a previously undescribed binding motif in the Unc5D TSP1 domain. Molecular dynamics simulations, point-directed mutagenesis and mass spectrometry demonstrate the stability and molecular properties of these complexes. Our data exemplify how receptors increase their functional repertoire by forming different context-dependent higher-order complexes. PMID:27091502

  3. Super-complexes of adhesion GPCRs and neural guidance receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Verity A.; Mehmood, Shahid; Chavent, Matthieu; Roversi, Pietro; Carrasquero, Maria; Del Toro, Daniel; Seyit-Bremer, Goenuel; Ranaivoson, Fanomezana M.; Comoletti, Davide; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Robinson, Carol V.; Klein, Rüdiger; Seiradake, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Latrophilin adhesion-GPCRs (Lphn1-3 or ADGRL1-3) and Unc5 cell guidance receptors (Unc5A-D) interact with FLRT proteins (FLRT1-3), thereby promoting cell adhesion and repulsion, respectively. How the three proteins interact and function simultaneously is poorly understood. We show that Unc5D interacts with FLRT2 in cis, controlling cell adhesion in response to externally presented Lphn3. The ectodomains of the three proteins bind cooperatively. Crystal structures of the ternary complex formed by the extracellular domains reveal that Lphn3 dimerizes when bound to FLRT2:Unc5, resulting in a stoichiometry of 1:1:2 (FLRT2:Unc5D:Lphn3). This 1:1:2 complex further dimerizes to form a larger `super-complex' (2:2:4), using a previously undescribed binding motif in the Unc5D TSP1 domain. Molecular dynamics simulations, point-directed mutagenesis and mass spectrometry demonstrate the stability and molecular properties of these complexes. Our data exemplify how receptors increase their functional repertoire by forming different context-dependent higher-order complexes.

  4. On higher structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baas, Nils A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we discuss various philosophical aspects of the hyperstructure concept extending networks and higher categories. By this discussion, we hope to pave the way for applications and further developments of the mathematical theory of hyperstructures.

  5. Forecasting Higher Education's Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyken, Don; Buck, Tina S.; Kollie, Ellen; Przyborowski, Danielle; Rondinelli, Joseph A.; Hunter, Jeff; Hanna, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Offers predictions on trends in higher education to accommodate changing needs, lower budgets, and increased enrollment. They involve campus construction, security, administration, technology, interior design, athletics, and transportation. (EV)

  6. Marketing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brian, Edward J.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the 4 basic areas in which institutional marketing can be put to use in higher educational institutions: educational services offered, pricing (tuition), promotion to prospective students, and distribution (extension courses and courses that go to the student). (PG)

  7. Densified waste form and method for forming

    DOEpatents

    Garino, Terry J.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Sava Gallis, Dorina Florentina

    2016-05-17

    Materials and methods of making densified waste forms for temperature sensitive waste material, such as nuclear waste, formed with low temperature processing using metallic powder that forms the matrix that encapsulates the temperature sensitive waste material. The densified waste form includes a temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix, the matrix is a compacted metallic powder. The method for forming the densified waste form includes mixing a metallic powder and a temperature sensitive waste material to form a waste form precursor. The waste form precursor is compacted with sufficient pressure to densify the waste precursor and encapsulate the temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix.

  8. Densified waste form and method for forming

    SciTech Connect

    Garino, Terry J.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Sava Gallis, Dorina Florentina

    2015-08-25

    Materials and methods of making densified waste forms for temperature sensitive waste material, such as nuclear waste, formed with low temperature processing using metallic powder that forms the matrix that encapsulates the temperature sensitive waste material. The densified waste form includes a temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix, the matrix is a compacted metallic powder. The method for forming the densified waste form includes mixing a metallic powder and a temperature sensitive waste material to form a waste form precursor. The waste form precursor is compacted with sufficient pressure to densify the waste precursor and encapsulate the temperature sensitive waste material in a physically densified matrix.

  9. Angiotensin II receptor heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Herblin, W.F.; Chiu, A.T.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L. )

    1991-04-01

    The possibility of receptor heterogeneity in the angiotensin II (AII) system has been suggested previously, based on differences in Kd values or sensitivity to thiol reagents. One of the authors earliest indications was the frequent observation of incomplete inhibition of the binding of AII to adrenal cortical membranes. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated that all of the labeling of the rat adrenal was blocked by unlabeled AII or saralasin, but not by DuP 753. The predominant receptor in the rat adrenal cortex (80%) is sensitive to dithiothreitol (DTT) and DuP 753, and is designated AII-1. The residual sites in the adrenal cortex and almost all of the sites in the rat adrenal medulla are insensitive to both DTT and DuP 753, but were blocked by EXP655. These sites have been confirmed by ligand binding studies and are designated AII-2. The rabbit adrenal cortex is unique in yielding a nonuniform distribution of AII-2 sites around the outer layer of glomerulosa cells. In the rabbit kidney, the sites on the glomeruli are AII-1, but the sites on the kidney capsule are AII-2. Angiotensin III appears to have a higher affinity for AII-2 sites since it inhibits the binding to the rabbit kidney capsule but not the glomeruli. Elucidation of the distribution and function of these diverse sites should permit the development of more selective and specific therapeutic strategies.

  10. Extraordinary Benefit Environment in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenough, William C.

    In terms of benefit plan coverage and protection, or "Benefit Environment", higher education is the most advanced of professional or employment groups. Between 1959 and 1969, the percentage of 4-year institutions of higher education in the U.S. having faculty retirement plans grew from 85% to 95%. About 50% of these institutions have some form of…

  11. Is Higher Education in "Really" "Internationalising"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healey, Nigel M.

    2008-01-01

    It is a widely accepted maxim that, like business generally, higher education is globalising. For many countries, higher education is now an important export sector, with university campuses attracting international students from around the world. Licensing production, in the form of franchising degree provision to international partners, is…

  12. Alternative Mechanisms of Immune Receptor Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Litman, Gary W.; Dishaw, Larry J.; Cannon, John P.; Haire, Robert N.; Rast, Jonathan P.

    2007-01-01

    Our views of both innate and adaptive immunity have been significantly modified by recent studies of immune receptors and immunity in protostomes, invertebrate deuterostomes and jawless vertebrates. Extraordinary variation in the means whereby organisms recognize pathogens has been revealed by a series of recent findings, including: novel forms of familiar immune receptors, high genetic polymorphism for new receptor types, germline rearrangement for non-Ig domain receptors, somatic variation of germline-encoded receptors and unusually complex alternative splicing of genes with both immune and non-immune roles. Collectively, these observations underscore pathways in the evolution of immune recognition and suggest universal processes by which immune systems co-opt and integrate existing cellular mechanisms to effect diverse recognition functions. PMID:17703932

  13. Effect of purification followed by solubilization of receptor material on quantitative receptor assays for anticholinergic drugs.

    PubMed

    Smisterová, J; Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, R A

    1996-08-01

    In order to optimize quantitative receptor assays for anticholinergics, the different receptor preparations resulting from the purification and the solubilization of the P2 pellet from the calf striatum were evaluated. The dissociation constants for two chemically different anticholinergics, the tertiary amine scopolamine and the quaternary amine oxyphenonium, were calculated from inhibition studies of 3H-NMS binding in buffer and plasma. The Kd values for both anticholinergics were similar for all the membrane-bound receptor preparations (unpurified and the purified P2 pellet) either in buffer or in plasma. More pronounced differences were observed between the membrane-bound and solubilized receptors. By introducing the solubilized receptor as well, differences between the individual anticholinergics appeared. On the one hand, for scopolamine, a gain in sensitivity of 1.5-2.8 in plasma was observed for the solubilized receptor. On the other hand, in the case of oxyphenonium, a dramatic loss in sensitivity (by a factor of about 24) was observed with the solubilized receptor, as compared to the membrane-bound receptor, in buffer. Very interestingly, however, when the solubilized receptor was used in plasma, a lowering of the Kd value was found for both anticholinergics, i.e. the assays became more sensitive. Such an effect (not observed for the membrane-bound receptor) could be obtained only when the percentage of digitonin present in the assay was at least 0.12% (w/v) or higher. PMID:8877848

  14. What are Higher Psychological Functions?

    PubMed

    Toomela, Aaro

    2016-03-01

    The concept of Higher Psychological Functions (HPFs) may seem to be well know in psychology today. Yet closer analysis reveals that HPFs are either not defined at all or if defined, then by a set of characteristics not justified theoretically. It is not possible to determine whether HPFs exist or not, unless they are defined. Most commonly the idea of HPFs is related to Vygotsky's theory. According to him, HPFs are: (1) psychological systems, (2) developing from natural processes, (3) mediated by symbols, (4) forms of psychological cooperation, which are (5) internalized in the course of development, (6) products of historical development, (7) conscious and (8) voluntary (9) active forms of adaptation to the environment, (10) dynamically changing in development, and (11) ontogeny of HPFs recapitulates cultural history. In this article these characteristics are discussed together with the relations among them. It is concluded that HPFs are real psychological phenomena. PMID:26403987

  15. Analysis of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4β2 activation at the single-channel level.

    PubMed

    Carignano, Camila; Barila, Esteban Pablo; Spitzmaul, Guillermo

    2016-09-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4β2 forms pentameric proteins with two alternate stoichiometries. The high-sensitivity receptor is related to (α4)2(β2)3 stoichiometry while the low-sensitivity receptor to (α4)3(β2)2 stoichiometry. Both subtypes share two binding sites at the α4((+))/β2((-)) interface with high affinity for agonists. (α4)3(β2)2 has an additional binding site at the α4((+))/α4((-)) interface with low affinity for agonists. We investigated activation kinetics of both receptor subtypes by patch-clamp recordings of single-channel activity in the presence of several concentrations of acetylcholine (0.5 to 300μM). We used kinetic software to fit these data with kinetic models. We found that the high-sensitivity subtype correlates with the low-conductance channel (g-70=29pS) and does not activate with high efficacy. On the contrary, the low-sensitivity subtype correlated with a high-conductance channel (g-70=44pS) and exhibited higher activation efficacy. Opening events of individual nAChRs at high agonist concentrations occurred in clusters, which allowed us to determine kinetic constants for the activation of the triliganded receptor. Our kinetic modeling identified an intermediate state, between resting and open conformation of the receptor. Binding of the third molecule increases the efficacy of receptor activation by favoring the transition between resting and intermediate state around 18 times. The low rate for this transition in the diliganded receptor explains the action of acetylcholine as partial agonist when it binds to the high-affinity sites. The presence of the third binding site emerges as a potent modulator of nicotinic receptor α4β2 activation which may display different functions depending on agonist concentration. PMID:27233449

  16. Racial differences in the androgen/androgen receptor pathway in prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Pettaway, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    Pathologic and epidemiologic data suggest that while little racial variation exists in prostate cancer prevalence ("autopsy cancer"), striking racial variation exists for the clinically diagnosed form of the disease. A review of the available literature was performed to define whether racial differences in serum androgen levels or qualitative or quantitative differences in the androgen receptor were correlated with prostate cancer incidence or severity. Black men were found to be exposed to higher circulating testosterone levels from birth to about age 35 years. Such differences were not consistently noted among older men. Significant differences also were found for dihydrotestosterone metabolites among black, white, and Asian men. Unique racial genetic polymorphisms were noted for the gene for 5 alpha-reductase type 2 among black and Asian men. Novel androgen receptor mutations recently have been described among Japanese, but not white, men with latent prostate cancer. Finally, androgen receptor gene polymorphisms leading to shorter or longer glutamine and glycine residues in the receptor protein are correlated with racial variation in the incidence and severity of prostate cancer. This same polymorphism also could explain racial variation in serum prostate-specific antigen levels. Collectively, these data strongly suggest racial differences within the androgen/androgen receptor pathway not only exist but could be one cause of clinically observed differences in the biology of prostate cancer among racial groups. Images Figure 1 PMID:10628124

  17. DNA binding triggers tetramerization of the glucocorticoid receptor in live cells.

    PubMed

    Presman, Diego M; Ganguly, Sourav; Schiltz, R Louis; Johnson, Thomas A; Karpova, Tatiana S; Hager, Gordon L

    2016-07-19

    Transcription factors dynamically bind to chromatin and are essential for the regulation of genes. Although a large percentage of these proteins appear to self-associate to form dimers or higher order oligomers, the stoichiometry of DNA-bound transcription factors has been poorly characterized in vivo. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a ligand-regulated transcription factor widely believed to act as a dimer or a monomer. Using a unique set of imaging techniques coupled with a cell line containing an array of DNA binding elements, we show that GR is predominantly a tetramer when bound to its target DNA. We find that DNA binding triggers an interdomain allosteric regulation within the GR, leading to tetramerization. We therefore propose that dynamic changes in GR stoichiometry represent a previously unidentified level of regulation in steroid receptor activation. Quaternary structure analysis of other members of the steroid receptor family (estrogen, androgen, and progesterone receptors) reveals variation in oligomerization states among this family of transcription factors. Because GR's oligomerization state has been implicated in therapy outcome, our findings open new doors to the rational design of novel GR ligands and redefine the quaternary structure of steroid receptors. PMID:27382178

  18. Dual mechanism of interleukin-3 receptor blockade by an anti-cancer antibody.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Sophie E; Hercus, Timothy R; Hardy, Matthew P; McClure, Barbara J; Nero, Tracy L; Dottore, Mara; Huynh, Huy; Braley, Hal; Barry, Emma F; Kan, Winnie L; Dhagat, Urmi; Scotney, Pierre; Hartman, Dallas; Busfield, Samantha J; Owczarek, Catherine M; Nash, Andrew D; Wilson, Nicholas J; Parker, Michael W; Lopez, Angel F

    2014-07-24

    Interleukin-3 (IL-3) is an activated T cell product that bridges innate and adaptive immunity and contributes to several immunopathologies. Here, we report the crystal structure of the IL-3 receptor α chain (IL3Rα) in complex with the anti-leukemia antibody CSL362 that reveals the N-terminal domain (NTD), a domain also present in the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), IL-5, and IL-13 receptors, adopting unique "open" and classical "closed" conformations. Although extensive mutational analyses of the NTD epitope of CSL362 show minor overlap with the IL-3 binding site, CSL362 only inhibits IL-3 binding to the closed conformation, indicating alternative mechanisms for blocking IL-3 signaling. Significantly, whereas "open-like" IL3Rα mutants can simultaneously bind IL-3 and CSL362, CSL362 still prevents the assembly of a higher-order IL-3 receptor-signaling complex. The discovery of open forms of cytokine receptors provides the framework for development of potent antibodies that can achieve a "double hit" cytokine receptor blockade. PMID:25043189

  19. Receptor guanylyl cyclases in Inka cells targeted by eclosion hormone.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jer-Cherng; Yang, Ruey-Bing; Adams, Michael E; Lu, Kuang-Hui

    2009-08-11

    A signature of eclosion hormone (EH) action in insect ecdysis is elevation of cGMP in Inka cells, leading to massive release of ecdysis triggering hormone (ETH) and ecdysis initiation. Although this aspect of EH-induced signal transduction is well known, the receptor mediating this process has not been identified. Here, we describe a receptor guanylyl cyclase BdmGC-1 and its isoform BdmGC-1B in the Oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis that are activated by EH. The B form exhibits the conserved domains and putative N-glycosylation sites found in BdmGC-1, but possesses an additional 46-amino acid insertion in the extracellular domain and lacks the C-terminal tail of BdmGC-1. Combined immunolabeling and in situ hybridization reveal that BdmGC-1 is expressed in Inka cells. Heterologous expression of BdmGC-1 in HEK cells leads to robust increases in cGMP following exposure to low picomolar concentrations of EH. The B-isoform responds only to higher EH concentrations, suggesting different physiological roles of these cyclases. We propose that BdmGC-1 and BdmGC-1B are high- and low-affinity EH receptors, respectively. PMID:19666575

  20. Higher dimensional Hadamard matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlichta, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    The paper defines higher dimensional Hadamard matrices and enumerates on some of the simplest three-, four-, and five-dimensional cases and procedures for generating them. Special emphasis is given to proper matrices that have a dimensional hierarchy of orthogonalities. It is determined that this property lends itself primarily to the application of higher dimensional Hadamard matrices to error-correcting codes. A list of derived statements for n-dimensional Hadamard matrices are given, as well as a definition of Hadamard matrix families, such as minimal, Petrie polygon, antipodal (n-2)-dimensional sections, and double proximity shells.

  1. Higher Spin Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chi-Ming

    This dissertation splits into two distinct halves. The first half is devoted to the study of the holography of higher spin gauge theory in AdS 3. We present a conjecture that the holographic dual of W N minimal model in a 't Hooft-like large N limit is an unusual "semi-local" higher spin gauge theory on AdS3 x 1. At each point on the S1 lives a copy of three-dimensional Vasiliev theory, that contains an infinite tower of higher spin gauge fields coupled to a single massive complex scalar propagating in AdS3. The Vasiliev theories at different points on the S1 are correlated only through the AdS3 boundary conditions on the massive scalars. All but one single tower of higher spin symmetries are broken by the boundary conditions. This conjecture is checked by comparing tree-level two- and three-point functions, and also one-loop partition functions on both side of the duality. The second half focuses on the holography of higher spin gauge theory in AdS 4. We demonstrate that a supersymmetric and parity violating version of Vasiliev's higher spin gauge theory in AdS4 admits boundary conditions that preserve N = 0,1,2,3,4 or 6 supersymmetries. In particular, we argue that the Vasiliev theory with U( M) Chan-Paton and N = 6 boundary condition is holographically dual to the 2+1 dimensional U(N) k x U(M) -k ABJ theory in the limit of large N, k and finite M. In this system all bulk higher spin fields transform in the adjoint of the U(M) gauge group, whose bulk t'Hooft coupling is M/N. Our picture suggests that the supersymmetric Vasiliev theory can be obtained as a limit of type IIA string theory in AdS4 x CP3, and that the non-Abelian Vasiliev theory at strong bulk 't Hooft coupling smoothly turn into a string field theory. The fundamental string is a singlet bound state of Vasiliev's higher spin particles held together by U(M) gauge interactions.

  2. Higher spin cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Chethan; Raju, Avinash; Roy, Shubho; Thakur, Somyadip

    2014-02-01

    We construct cosmological solutions of higher spin gravity in 2+1 dimensional de Sitter space. We show that a consistent thermodynamics can be obtained for their horizons by demanding appropriate holonomy conditions. This is equivalent to demanding the integrability of the Euclidean boundary conformal field theory partition function, and it reduces to Gibbons-Hawking thermodynamics in the spin-2 case. By using the prescription of Maldacena, we relate the thermodynamics of these solutions to those of higher spin black holes in AdS3.

  3. Extremal higher spin black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bañados, Máximo; Castro, Alejandra; Faraggi, Alberto; Jottar, Juan I.

    2016-04-01

    The gauge sector of three-dimensional higher spin gravities can be formulated as a Chern-Simons theory. In this context, a higher spin black hole corresponds to a flat connection with suitable holonomy (smoothness) conditions which are consistent with the properties of a generalized thermal ensemble. Building on these ideas, we discuss a definition of black hole extremality which is appropriate to the topological character of 3 d higher spin theories. Our definition can be phrased in terms of the Jordan class of the holonomy around a non-contractible (angular) cycle, and we show that it is compatible with the zero-temperature limit of smooth black hole solutions. While this notion of extremality does not require supersymmetry, we exemplify its consequences in the context of sl(3|2) ⊕ sl(3|2) Chern-Simons theory and show that, as usual, not all extremal solutions preserve supersymmetries. Remarkably, we find in addition that the higher spin setup allows for non-extremal supersymmetric black hole solutions. Furthermore, we discuss our results from the perspective of the holographic duality between sl(3|2) ⊕ sl(3|2) Chern-Simons theory and two-dimensional CFTs with W (3|2) symmetry, the simplest higher spin extension of the N = 2 super-Virasoro algebra. In particular, we compute W (3|2) BPS bounds at the full quantum level, and relate their semiclassical limit to extremal black hole or conical defect solutions in the 3 d bulk. Along the way, we discuss the role of the spectral flow automorphism and provide a conjecture for the form of the semiclassical BPS bounds in general N = 2 two-dimensional CFTs with extended symmetry algebras.

  4. Membrane omega-3 fatty acids modulate the oligomerisation kinetics of adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Guixà-González, Ramon; Javanainen, Matti; Gómez-Soler, Maricel; Cordobilla, Begoña; Domingo, Joan Carles; Sanz, Ferran; Pastor, Manuel; Ciruela, Francisco; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Selent, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Membrane levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA), are decreased in common neuropsychiatric disorders. DHA modulates key cell membrane properties like fluidity, thereby affecting the behaviour of transmembrane proteins like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors, which have special relevance for major neuropsychiatric disorders have recently been shown to form dimers or higher order oligomers, and evidence suggests that DHA levels affect GPCR function by modulating oligomerisation. In this study, we assessed the effect of membrane DHA content on the formation of a class of protein complexes with particular relevance for brain disease: adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptor oligomers. Using extensive multiscale computer modelling, we find a marked propensity of DHA for interaction with both A2A and D2 receptors, which leads to an increased rate of receptor oligomerisation. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) experiments performed on living cells suggest that this DHA effect on the oligomerisation of A2A and D2 receptors is purely kinetic. This work reveals for the first time that membrane ω-3 PUFAs play a key role in GPCR oligomerisation kinetics, which may have important implications for neuropsychiatric conditions like schizophrenia or Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26796668

  5. Membrane omega-3 fatty acids modulate the oligomerisation kinetics of adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guixà-González, Ramon; Javanainen, Matti; Gómez-Soler, Maricel; Cordobilla, Begoña; Domingo, Joan Carles; Sanz, Ferran; Pastor, Manuel; Ciruela, Francisco; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Selent, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Membrane levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA), are decreased in common neuropsychiatric disorders. DHA modulates key cell membrane properties like fluidity, thereby affecting the behaviour of transmembrane proteins like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors, which have special relevance for major neuropsychiatric disorders have recently been shown to form dimers or higher order oligomers, and evidence suggests that DHA levels affect GPCR function by modulating oligomerisation. In this study, we assessed the effect of membrane DHA content on the formation of a class of protein complexes with particular relevance for brain disease: adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptor oligomers. Using extensive multiscale computer modelling, we find a marked propensity of DHA for interaction with both A2A and D2 receptors, which leads to an increased rate of receptor oligomerisation. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) experiments performed on living cells suggest that this DHA effect on the oligomerisation of A2A and D2 receptors is purely kinetic. This work reveals for the first time that membrane ω-3 PUFAs play a key role in GPCR oligomerisation kinetics, which may have important implications for neuropsychiatric conditions like schizophrenia or Parkinson’s disease.

  6. Receptors rather than signals change in expression in four physiological regulatory networks during evolutionary divergence in threespine stickleback.

    PubMed

    Di Poi, Carole; Bélanger, Dominic; Amyot, Marc; Rogers, Sean; Aubin-Horth, Nadia

    2016-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying behavioural evolution following colonization of novel environments are largely unknown. Molecules that interact to control equilibrium within an organism form physiological regulatory networks. It is essential to determine whether particular components of physiological regulatory networks evolve or if the network as a whole is affected in populations diverging in behavioural responses, as this may affect the nature, amplitude and number of impacted traits. We studied the regulation of four physiological regulatory networks in freshwater and marine populations of threespine stickleback raised in a common environment, which were previously characterized as showing evolutionary divergence in behaviour and stress reactivity. We measured nineteen components of these networks (ligands and receptors) using mRNA and monoamine levels in the brain, pituitary and interrenal gland, as well as hormone levels. Freshwater fish showed higher expression in the brain of adrenergic (adrb2a), serotonergic (htr2a) and dopaminergic (DRD2) receptors, but lower expression of the htr2b receptor. Freshwater fish also showed higher expression of the mc2r receptor of the glucocorticoid axis in the interrenals. Collectively, our results suggest that the inheritance of the regulation of these networks may be implicated in the evolution of behaviour and stress reactivity in association with population divergence. Our results also suggest that evolutionary change in freshwater threespine stickleback may be more associated with the expression of specific receptors rather than with global changes of all the measured constituents of the physiological regulatory networks. PMID:27146328

  7. Interdisciplinarity in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanisch, Thor Einar; Vollmann, Wolfgang, Ed.

    The advantages of an interdisciplinary approach to college instruction and research are examined, based in part on a 1983 symposium of the European Centre for Higher Education. Six case studies are also presented. It is noted that interdisciplinarity opens up possibilities of exchange between individual disciplines and encourages the development…

  8. Higher Education's Strange Paradox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Harold, II

    The university which has had the temerity to change the world has not had the nerve to change itself to live in that world. The result is that the university's grading system, curriculum, teaching methods, and philosophies are in conflict with the world beyond the campus gates, and higher education does not meet the intellectual and social needs…

  9. Entrepreneurship and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Jonathan, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Stimulating innovative and growth-oriented entrepreneurship is a key economic and societal challenge to which universities and colleges have much to contribute. This book examines the role that higher education institutions are currently playing through teaching entrepreneurship and transferring knowledge and innovation to enterprises and…

  10. California's Future: Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Hans

    2015-01-01

    California's higher education system is not keeping up with the changing economy. Projections suggest that the state's economy will continue to need more highly educated workers. In 2025, if current trends persist, 41 percent of jobs will require at least a bachelor's degree and 36 percent will require some college education short of a bachelor's…

  11. Corporatizing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Gerda

    2008-01-01

    The process of changing U.S. higher education institutions along a corporate model has been going on for several decades. It consists of changes, some open, some obscured, on various fronts: the erosion of tenure by attrition; the simultaneous increase in the use of contingent faculty; the rise in tuition; the dramatic decrease in federal and…

  12. Marketing in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hockenberger, Susan J.

    Educational institutions must seek new approaches to institutional planning because of such factors as shrinking traditional college age populations, eroding grants, governmental and judicial incursion, the tightening economic belt, and concern over the relevance of education to modern day needs. The concept of marketing higher education is…

  13. Liberty and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Dennis F.

    1989-01-01

    John Stuart Mill's principle of liberty is discussed with the view that it needs to be revised to guide moral judgments in higher education. Three key elements need to be modified: the action that is constrained; the constraint on the action; and the agent whose action is constrained. (MLW)

  14. Higher Education Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clery, Sue; Lee, John

    1999-01-01

    This report reviews changes in higher education staff by occupation between 1993 and 1997. Specific attention is paid to staffing patterns in states with right to work laws compared to those without it. When a state enacts a right to work law, it can be assumed it is not supportive of public unions. This analysis is based on data from the National…

  15. Curriculum in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, A. I., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Four articles on higher education curriculum are presented. In "The Articulate Curriculum" an approach to curriculum description is presented that is designed to have minimal ambiguity concerning the intention, content, and processes of the curriculum and that will lead to questioning several discrete factors in the curriculum planning process. It…

  16. Networks for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Interuniversity Communications Council (EDUCOM), Princeton, NJ.

    EDUCOM, the Inter University Communications Council, Inc., planned its 1972 spring conference as a forum for presentations, discussions, and informal meetings to review the present state and the future possibilities of computer networks for higher education. Speeches presented were specifically related to: (1) the current status and future plans…

  17. Evaluation in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bognar, Branko; Bungic, Maja

    2014-01-01

    One of the means of transforming classroom experience is by conducting action research with students. This paper reports about the action research with university students. It has been carried out within a semester of the course "Methods of Upbringing". Its goal has been to improve evaluation of higher education teaching. Different forms…

  18. Marketing in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalili, Farid

    The use of marketing activities by educational institutions and the transfer of marketing activities from business to higher education are considered. Market analysis helps colleges and universities determine what programs, scheduling, or services are strong and to which student market the institution should appeal. It is suggested that the…

  19. Understanding Higher Education Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middaugh, Michael F.

    2005-01-01

    Public discussion of higher education costs frequently confuses price with expenditure. This article examines factors associated with increases in the sticker price of a college education and the expenditures incurred by institutions in delivering that education. The discussion suggests that while growth in college tuition is real, access to…

  20. Higher Education Exchange, 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The Kettering Foundation's research has been focused on putting the public back into the public's business for more than thirty years. Some questions that have recently been useful to Kettering researchers as the foundation focuses on its work with institutional actors--especially higher education and its relationship with the public--have…

  1. Women in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pifer, Alan

    Women have traditionally been discriminated against in higher education in both the attainment of degrees and in employment after earning degrees. It has been felt that women are not as capable, reliable, or effective as men in administrative and classroom situations. Statistics show that even at the present time women are underemployed and…

  2. Benchmarking for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Norman, Ed.; Lund, Helen, Ed.

    The chapters in this collection explore the concept of benchmarking as it is being used and developed in higher education (HE). Case studies and reviews show how universities in the United Kingdom are using benchmarking to aid in self-regulation and self-improvement. The chapters are: (1) "Introduction to Benchmarking" (Norman Jackson and Helen…

  3. Online Higher Education Commodity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chau, Paule

    2010-01-01

    This article analyzes the current trend towards online education. It examines some of the reasons for the trend and the ramifications it may have on students, faculty and institutions of higher learning. The success and profitability of online programs and institutions such as the University of Phoenix has helped to make the move towards online…

  4. Women in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Sheryl, Ed.; Shaver, Barbara, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Articles on women's studies and females in higher education are presented in this publication. A University of North Dakota project that sought to promote the integration of new research and scholarship results into the curriculum is described in "Women's Equity Committee Offers a Model Project," (Leola Furman, Robert Young). Historical…

  5. Creativity in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaspar, Drazena; Mabic, Mirela

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents results of research related to perception of creativity in higher education made by the authors at the University of Mostar from Bosnia and Herzegovina. This research was based on a survey conducted among teachers and students at the University. The authors developed two types of questionnaires, one for teachers and the other…

  6. Black at Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadi-Hanifi, Karima

    2013-01-01

    This is an exploratory paper, drawing on the author's experiences as well as those of three other black lecturers in Higher Education (HE). Three interviews were carried out, asking the same five questions around themes of concern to the author. These are about the learning and teaching approaches used by these lecturers; their experiences of…

  7. Higher Education Exchange 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.

    Nine articles discuss the relationship between the higher education community and the public. The articles are: (1) "On a Certain Blindness in Teaching" by Michael S. Roth, who stresses the necessity of political citizenship education for a healthy democracy; (2) "Monocultural Perspectives and Campus Diversity" by Jane Fried, who explores the…

  8. Unraveling Higher Education's Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Gus; Charles, Maria

    1998-01-01

    The activity-based costing (ABC) method of analyzing institutional costs in higher education involves four procedures: determining the various discrete activities of the organization; calculating the cost of each; determining the cost drivers; tracing cost to the cost objective or consumer of each activity. Few American institutions have used the…

  9. NEXUS: Digitizing Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Camille

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of digital technology in the context of higher education planning considers how these technologies change teaching; the digital divide; the costs of information technology; hard wiring the campus; material consequences of information technology; digitally enabled crimes and misdemeanors; and libraries and scholarly publishing. Concludes…

  10. Valuing Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    The question of the value of higher education is today set in the context of an unprecedented banking and financial crisis. In this context of fundamental change and financial realignment, it is important that we as members of the university remake our case for why the university deserves to be considered alongside all those other worthy causes…

  11. Developing Higher Level Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limbach, Barbara; Waugh, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    This paper identifies an interdisciplinary, five-step process, built upon existing theory and best practices in cognitive development, effective learning environments, and outcomes-based assessment. The "Process for the Development of Higher Level Thinking Skills" provides teachers with an easy to implement method of moving toward a more…

  12. Free Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Jr., Adolph; Szymanski, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    The crisis of affordability in higher education is intensifying. Illustrations of its resonance abound: from the frequent news articles describing and amplifying the crisis and its sources to legislators' and candidates' proposed responses. Republicans' responses tend to be mainly punitive toward institutions; Democrats' proposals are more…

  13. Shell Higher Olefins Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    Shows how olefin isomerization and the exotic olefin metathesis reaction can be harnessed in industrial processes. Indicates that the Shell Higher Olefins Process makes use of organometallic catalysts to manufacture alpha-olefins and internal carbon-11 through carbon-14 alkenes in a flexible fashion that can be adjusted to market needs. (JN)

  14. Comparative Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G.

    The comparative higher education course offered at the State University of New York at Buffalo is briefly described, and a course schedule is presented, including required and recommended readings for each topic. The course is intended to provide a broad cross-cultural perspective and considers the growth and development of universities in Europe,…

  15. Projection structure of frog rhodopsin in two crystal forms.

    PubMed Central

    Schertler, G F; Hargrave, P A

    1995-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the G protein-coupled receptor that upon light activation triggers the visual transduction cascade. Rod cell outer segment disc membranes were isolated from dark-adapted frog retinas and were extracted with Tween detergents to obtain two-dimensional rhodopsin crystals for electron crystallography. When Tween 80 was used, tubular structures with a p2 lattice (a = 32 A, b = 83 A, gamma = 91 degrees) were formed. The use of a Tween 80/Tween 20 mixture favored the formation of larger p22(1)2(1) lattices (a = 40 A, b = 146 A, gamma = 90 degrees). Micrographs from frozen hydrated frog rhodopsin crystals were processed, and projection structures to 7-A resolution for the p22(1)2(1) form and to 6-A resolution for the p2 form were calculated. The maps of frog rhodopsin in both crystal forms are very similar to the 9-A map obtained previously for bovine rhodopsin and show that the arrangement of the helices is the same. In a tentative topographic model, helices 4, 6, and 7 are nearly perpendicular to the plane of the membrane. In the higher-resolution projection maps of frog rhodopsin, helix 5 looks more tilted than it appeared previously. The quality of the two frog rhodopsin crystals suggests that they would be suitable to obtain a three-dimensional structure in which all helices would be resolved. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 6 PMID:8524807

  16. Implications of epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced egf receptor aggregation.

    PubMed Central

    Wofsy, C; Goldstein, B; Lund, K; Wiley, H S

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the role of receptor aggregation in EGF binding, we construct a mathematical model describing receptor dimerization (and higher levels of aggregation) that permits an analysis of the influence of receptor aggregation on ligand binding. We answer two questions: (a) Can Scatchard plots of EGF binding data be analyzed productively in terms of two noninteracting receptor populations with different affinities if EGF induced receptor aggregation occurs? No. If two affinities characterize aggregated and monomeric EGF receptors, we show that the Scatchard plot should have curvature characteristic of positively cooperative binding, the opposite of that observed. Thus, the interpretation that the high affinity population represents aggregated receptors and the low affinity population nonaggregated receptors is wrong. If the two populations are interpreted without reference to receptor aggregation, an important determinant of Scatchard plot shape is ignored. (b) Can a model for EGF receptor aggregation and EGF binding be consistent with the "negative curvature" (i.e., curvature characteristic of negatively cooperative binding) observed in most Scatchard plots of EGF binding data? Yes. In addition, the restrictions on the model parameters required to obtain negatively curved Scatchard plots provide new information about binding and aggregation. In particular, EGF binding to aggregated receptors must be negatively cooperative, i.e., binding to a receptor in a dimer (or higher oligomer) having one receptor already bound occurs with lower affinity than the initial binding event. A third question we consider is whether the model we present can be used to detect the presence of mechanisms other than receptor aggregation that are contributing to Scatchard plot curvature. For the membrane and cell binding data we analyzed, the best least squares fits of the model to each of the four data sets deviate systematically from the data, indicating that additional factors are

  17. Part-Time Higher Education: Employer Engagement under Threat?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    Employer support for employees who are studying part-time for higher education qualifications constitutes a form of indirect employer engagement with higher education institutions that has contributed strongly to the development of work-related skills and knowledge over the years. However, this form of employer engagement with higher education…

  18. Generalized higher gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Patricia; Sämann, Christian; Schmidt, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    We study a generalization of higher gauge theory which makes use of generalized geometry and seems to be closely related to double field theory. The local kinematical data of this theory is captured by morphisms of graded manifolds between the canonical exact Courant Lie 2-algebroid T M ⊕ T ∗ M over some manifold M and a semistrict gauge Lie 2-algebra. We discuss generalized curvatures and infinitesimal gauge transformations. Finite gauge transformation as well as global kinematical data are then obtained from principal 2-bundles over 2-spaces. As dynamical principle, we consider first the canonical Chern-Simons action for such a gauge theory. We then show that a previously proposed 3-Lie algebra model for the six-dimensional (2,0) theory is very naturally interpreted as a generalized higher gauge theory.

  19. Superplastic forming of alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.D.; Flower, H.L. )

    1994-04-01

    Inconel Alloy 718 (UNS N07718) is now available in a fine-grained, controlled composition modification that can be super-plastically formed. The new superplastic forming (SPF) capability allows the manufacture of large, complex, and detailed parts, which improves integrity by reducing the need for joining. Furthermore, it allows designers to fabricate components having higher strength, fatigue resistance, and temperature capability than parts made of aluminum or titanium alloys.

  20. Arsenite and insulin exhibit opposing effects on epidermal growth factor receptor and keratinocyte proliferative potential

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Timothy J.; Rice, Robert H. . E-mail: rhrice@ucdavis.edu

    2007-05-15

    Previous work has suggested that arsenic exposure contributes to skin carcinogenesis by preserving the proliferative potential of human epidermal keratinocytes, thereby slowing the exit of putative target stem cells into the differentiation pathway. To find a molecular basis for this action, present work has explored the influence of arsenite on keratinocyte responses to epidermal growth factor (EGF). The ability of cultured keratinocytes to found colonies upon passaging several days after confluence was preserved by arsenite and EGF in an additive fashion, but neither was effective when the receptor tyrosine kinase activity was inhibited. Arsenite prevented the loss of EGF receptor protein and phosphorylation of tyrosine 1173, preserving its capability to signal. The level of nuclear {beta}-catenin was higher in cells treated with arsenite and EGF in parallel to elevated colony forming ability, and expression of a dominant negative {beta}-catenin suppressed the increase in both colony forming ability and yield of putative stem cells induced by arsenite and EGF. As judged by expression of three genes regulated by {beta}-catenin, this transcription factor had substantially higher activity in the arsenite/EGF-treated cells. Trivalent antimony exhibited the same effects as arsenite. A novel finding is that insulin in the medium induced the loss of EGF receptor protein, which was largely prevented by arsenite exposure.

  1. Study of structure-activity relationship of enantiomeric, protonated and deprotonated forms of warfarin via vibrational spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Alok; Srivastava, Sunil Kumar; Swati, D.

    2013-09-01

    The structure-activity relationship of the anticoagulant drug warfarin were studied by studying two enantiomeric forms (S-form and R-form) of warfarin and its protonated as well as deprotonated structures in aqueous media using density functional theory (DFT). Theoretically computed Raman and IR spectra of all the computed structures were compared and their specific vibrational spectroscopic signatures were discussed. The percentage contributions of individual normal modes of warfarin, which provides direct evidence of the different molecular activity due to change in relative atomic position of atoms in molecule, were investigated through potential energy distribution (PED). The optimized energy and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) maps show that the S-form of the drug molecules warfarin is energetically more stable than R-form and provides higher docking opportunity for the molecular binding with the receptors in the bio-systems.

  2. Roles of transferrin receptors in erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Soichiro; Masuda, Taro; Uchiyama, Tatsuki; Ohmori, Katsuyuki; Koeffler, H Phillip; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2016-07-01

    Erythropoiesis requires large amounts of iron for hemoglobin synthesis, which is mainly provided by macrophages and the intestines in a transferrin (Tf)-bound form. Bone marrow erythroblasts incorporate Tf through endocytosis, which is mediated by transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1). Recently, human TFR1, aside from its role as a Tf receptor, was also found to be a receptor for the H-subunit of ferritin (FTH). In humans, hematopoietic erythroid precursor cells express high levels of TFR1 and specifically take up the FTH homopolymer (H-ferritin). H-ferritin inhibits the formation of burst forming unit-erythroid colonies in vitro. TFR2, which is also a Tf receptor, is predominantly expressed in hepatocytes and erythroid precursor cells. In the liver, TFR2 forms a complex with HFE, a hereditary hemochromatosis-associated protein, and acts as an iron sensor. In mice, hepatocyte-specific knockout of the TFR2 gene has been shown to cause systemic iron-overload with decreased expression of hepcidin, the central regulator of iron homeostasis. In erythroid cells, TFR2 forms a complex with the erythropoietin receptor and facilitates its trafficking to the cell membrane. Moreover, hematopoietic cell-specific knockout of the TFR2 gene causes microcytic erythrocytosis in mice. This review focuses on the molecular evolution and functions of these TFRs and their ligands. PMID:27498743

  3. A search for presynaptic inhibitory histamine receptors in guinea-pig tissues: Further H3 receptors but no evidence for H4 receptors.

    PubMed

    Petri, Doris; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2016-07-01

    The histamine H4 receptor is coupled to Gi/o proteins and expressed on inflammatory cells and lymphoid tissues; it was suggested that this receptor also occurs in the brain or on peripheral neurones. Since many Gi/o protein-coupled receptors, including the H3 receptor, serve as presynaptic inhibitory receptors, we studied whether the sympathetic neurones supplying four peripheral tissues and the cholinergic neurones in the hippocampus from the guinea-pig are equipped with release-modulating H4 and H3 receptors. For this purpose, we preincubated tissue pieces from the aorta, atrium, renal cortex and vas deferens with (3)H-noradrenaline and hippocampal slices with (3)H-choline and determined the electrically evoked tritium overflow. The stimulation-evoked overflow in the five superfused tissues was inhibited by the muscarinic receptor agonist oxotremorine, which served as a positive control, but not affected by the H4 receptor agonist 4-methylhistamine. The H3 receptor agonist R-α-methylhistamine inhibited noradrenaline release in the peripheral tissues without affecting acetylcholine release in the hippocampal slices. Thioperamide shifted the concentration-response curve of histamine in the aorta and the renal cortex to the right, yielding apparent pA2 values of 8.0 and 8.1, respectively, which are close to its affinity at other H3 receptors but higher by one log unit than its pKi at the H4 receptor of the guinea-pig. In conclusion, histamine H4 receptors could not be identified in five experimental models of the guinea-pig that are suited for the detection of presynaptic inhibitory receptors whereas H3 receptors could be shown in the peripheral tissues but not in the hippocampus. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. PMID:26211976

  4. Nicotine recruits glutamate receptors to postsynaptic sites.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jing-Jing; Lozada, Adrian F; Gou, Chen-Yu; Xu, Jing; Chen, Yuan; Berg, Darwin K

    2015-09-01

    Cholinergic neurons project throughout the nervous system and activate nicotinic receptors to modulate synaptic function in ways that shape higher order brain function. The acute effects of nicotinic signaling on long-term synaptic plasticity have been well-characterized. Less well understood is how chronic exposure to low levels of nicotine, such as those encountered by habitual smokers, can alter neural connections to promote addiction and other lasting behavioral effects. We show here that chronic exposure of hippocampal neurons in culture to low levels of nicotine recruits AMPA and NMDA receptors to the cell surface and sequesters them at postsynaptic sites. The receptors include GluA2-containing AMPA receptors, which are responsible for most of the excitatory postsynaptic current mediated by AMPA receptors on the neurons, and include NMDA receptors containing GluN1 and GluN2B subunits. Moreover, we find that the nicotine treatment also increases expression of the presynaptic component synapsin 1 and arranges it in puncta juxtaposed to the additional AMPA and NMDA receptor puncta, suggestive of increases in synaptic contacts. Consistent with increased synaptic input, we find that the nicotine treatment leads to an increase in the excitatory postsynaptic currents mediated by AMPA and NMDA receptors. Further, the increases skew the ratio of excitatory-to-inhibitory input that the cell receives, and this holds both for pyramidal neurons and inhibitory neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region. The GluN2B-containing NMDA receptor redistribution at synapses is associated with a significant increase in GluN2B phosphorylation at Tyr1472, a site known to prevent GluN2B endocytosis. These results suggest that chronic exposure to low levels of nicotine not only alters functional connections but also is likely to change excitability levels across networks. Further, it may increase the propensity for synaptic plasticity, given the increase in synaptic NMDA receptors. PMID

  5. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Samarajeewa, Anshula; Goldemann, Lolita; Vasefi, Maryam S.; Ahmed, Nawaz; Gondora, Nyasha; Khanderia, Chandni; Mielke, John G.; Beazely, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the cortex and hippocampus. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA)-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins toward the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands. PMID:25426041

  6. Historical overview of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Jan-Ake

    2016-03-01

    This review summarizes the birth of the field of nuclear receptors, from Jensen's discovery of estrogen receptor alpha, Gustafsson's discovery of the three-domain structure of the glucocorticoid receptor, the discovery of the glucocorticoid response element and the first partial cloning of the glucocorticoid receptor. Furthermore the discovery of the novel receptors called orphan receptors is described. PMID:25797032

  7. Analogs of WIN 62,577 define a second allosteric site on muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Lazareno, S; Popham, A; Birdsall, N J M

    2002-12-01

    WIN 51,708 (17-beta-hydroxy-17-alpha-ethynyl-5-alpha-androstano[3,2-b]pyrimido[1,2-a]benzimidazole) and WIN 62,577 (17-beta-hydroxy- 17-alpha-ethynyl-delta(4)-androstano[3,2-b]pyrimido[1,2-a]benzimidazole) are potent and centrally active antagonists at rat, but not human, NK(1) receptors. The interactions of these compounds and some analogs with [(3)H]N-methyl scopolamine ([(3)H]NMS) and unlabeled acetylcholine (ACh) at M(1)-M(4) muscarinic receptors have been studied using equilibrium and nonequilibrium radioligand binding methods. The results are consistent with the predictions of the allosteric ternary complex model. The WIN compounds have log affinities for the unliganded receptor in the range 5 to 6.7, and exhibit positive, negative, or neutral cooperativity with [(3)H]NMS and ACh, depending on the receptor subtype and nature of the interacting ligands. WIN 62,577 is an allosteric enhancer of ACh affinity at M(3) receptors. Although interacting allosterically, WIN 62,577 and WIN 51,708 do not affect [(3)H]NMS dissociation from M(3) receptors. Certain analogs have higher affinities than WIN 62,577, and truncated forms of WIN 62,577, including steroids, also act allosterically. One analog, 17-beta-hydroxy-17-alpha-Delta(4)-androstano[3,2-b]pyrido[2,3-b]indole (PG987), has the unique effect of speeding [(3)H]NMS dissociation; its largest effect, 2.5-fold, is at M(3) receptors. The interaction between PG987 and other allosteric agents on [(3)H]NMS dissociation from M(3) receptors indicate that PG987 binds reversibly to a site distinct from that to which gallamine and strychnine bind: in contrast, PG987 seems to bind to the same site on M(3) receptors as KT5720, staurosporine, and WIN 51,708. Therefore, in addition to the allosteric site that binds strychnine (and probably chloromethyl brucine, another allosteric enhancer) there is a second, nonoverlapping, pharmacologically distinct allosteric site on M(3) receptors that also supports positive cooperativity with

  8. [Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Engen, Kristine; Agartz, Ingrid

    2016-06-01

    BACKGROUND In 2007 a clinical disease caused by autoantibodies directed against the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor was described for the first time. Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis is a subacute, autoimmune neurological disorder with psychiatric manifestations. The disease is a form of limbic encephalitis and is often paraneoplastic. The condition is also treatable. In this review article we examine the development of the disease, clinical practice, diagnostics and treatment.MATERIAL AND METHOD The article is based on references retrieved from searches in PubMed, and a discretionary selection of articles from the authors' own literature archive.RESULTS The disease most frequently affects young women. It may initially be perceived as a psychiatric condition, as it usually presents in the form of delusions, hallucinations or mania. The diagnosis should be suspected in patients who later develop neurological symptoms such as various movement disorders, epileptic seizures and autonomic instability. Examination of serum or cerebrospinal fluid for NMDA receptor antibodies should be included in the assessment of patients with suspected encephalitis. MRI, EEG and assessment for tumours are important tools in diagnosing the condition and any underlying malignancy.INTERPRETATION If treatment is initiated early, the prognosis is good. Altogether 75 % of patients will fully recover or experience significant improvement. Apart from surgical resection of a possible tumour, the treatment consists of immunotherapy. Because of good possibilities for treatment, it is important that clinicians, particularly those in acute psychiatry, are aware of and alert to this condition. PMID:27325034

  9. The formation at 37 C of a nondissociable receptor-estradiol complex.

    PubMed

    Fishman, J H; Fishman, J

    1985-08-30

    The receptor-estradiol complex formed in rat uterine cytosol when heated at 37 C converts from a dissociable to a nondissociable form. The conversion is best observed in cytosols pretreated with charcoal at 0 C which renders the subsequently formed receptor-estradiol complexes thermostable at 37 C. In the presence of dithiothreitol the heated complex remains dissociable. Tamoxifen does not form nondissociable complexes with the estradiol receptor. It is proposed that the nondissociable form of the receptor complex is a required phase in the mechanism of estradiol action. PMID:2412556

  10. An analysis of receptor potential and tension of isolated cat muscle spindles in response to sinusoidal stretch.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, C C; Wilkinson, R S

    1980-01-01

    In isolated cat muscle spindles the receptor potential responses of primary and secondary endings as well as tension responses to sinusoidal length changes in the steady state have been analysed. 1. At a given stimulus frequency, receptor potential per unit length change (receptor potential gain) in both primary and secondary endings is constant when displacement is less than about 10 micrometer. With larger stretches, receptor potential gain decreases approximately as a power function of displacement, the gain of primary endings decreasing more rapidly with increasing displacement than that of secondary endings. Tension per unit length change (tension gain) shows a similar constant range above which it also decreases as a power function of displacement. 2. In spite of the large reduction in gain at high displacement amplitudes, response wave forms remained essentially sinusoidal. The gain reduction results principally from a displacement-dependent non-linearity which has a rapid onset and slow decay. 3. Receptor potential and tension responses to small amplitude sinusoidal stretch depend, in a parallel manner, on the initial length of the preparation. 4. Both receptor potential and tension responses are highly dependent on frequency of sinusoidal stretch. In primary endings receptor potential gain increased as a power function of frequency over the range 0 . 01 to about 40 Hz, above which frequency the gain decreased; phase advance remained relatively constant up to 10 Hz then decreased to become a phase lag at higher frequency. In secondary endings receptor potential gain remained fairly constant between 0 . 01 and 1 Hz then rose as a power function of frequency but less steeply than in primary endings. 3. The possible mechanisms underlying these findings are discussed. PMID:6447781

  11. Receptor activity-modifying proteins; multifunctional G protein-coupled receptor accessory proteins.

    PubMed

    Hay, Debbie L; Walker, Christopher S; Gingell, Joseph J; Ladds, Graham; Reynolds, Christopher A; Poyner, David R

    2016-04-15

    Receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) are single pass membrane proteins initially identified by their ability to determine the pharmacology of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), a family B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). It is now known that RAMPs can interact with a much wider range of GPCRs. This review considers recent developments on the structure of the complexes formed between the extracellular domains (ECDs) of CLR and RAMP1 or RAMP2 as these provide insights as to how the RAMPs direct ligand binding. The range of RAMP interactions is also considered; RAMPs can interact with numerous family B GPCRs as well as examples of family A and family C GPCRs. They influence receptor expression at the cell surface, trafficking, ligand binding and G protein coupling. The GPCR-RAMP interface offers opportunities for drug targeting, illustrated by examples of drugs developed for migraine. PMID:27068971

  12. Higher than Everest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, Paul

    2001-08-01

    Tired of exploring planet Earth? Have you ever imagined what it would be like to explore the Moon? Ever wonder about the topography of Mars? In this unique guidebook all of your extraterrestrial wanderlust can be fulfilled as Paul Hodge takes you on a virtual tour of the most spectacular sites in the Solar System. Hodge includes the latest information about the Solar System into his vivid descriptions of imaginary, challenging expeditions. Imagine: -- Descending into a fabulous canyon on Mars, one that dwarfs the Earth's Grand Canyon; -- Trekking up Venus' precipitous and scorching Mt. Maxwell; -- Journeying through the snows of Saturn's rings and the incredibly high, icy cliff of Miranda, the moon closest to Uranus. A compelling, extensively illustrated introduction to such otherworldly environments, Higher than Everest makes you believe that someday these adventures may actually take place. Paul Hodge is Professor of Astronomy at the University of Washington, Seattle, and Editor-in-Chief of the Astronomical Journal. Higher than Everest is based on a popular undergraduate course on the planets that he has taught for many years. Hodge's research has spanned from interplanetary dust to the extragalactic distance scale and currently includes star-formation and galactic evolution, using the Hubble Space Telescope to investigate nearby galaxies. He has written several books, most recently Meteorite Craters and Impact Structures of the Earth (Cambridge 1994).

  13. Standardizing Scavenger Receptor Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    PrabhuDas, Mercy; Bowdish, Dawn; Drickamer, Kurt; Febbraio, Maria; Herz, Joachim; Kobzik, Lester; Krieger, Monty; Loike, John; Means, Terry K.; Moestrup, Soren K.; Post, Steven; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Silverstein, Samuel; Wang, Xiang-Yang; El Khoury, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Scavenger receptors constitute a large family of proteins that are structurally diverse and participate in a wide range of biological functions. These receptors are expressed predominantly by myeloid cells and recognize a variety of ligands, including endogenous and modified host-derived molecules and microbial pathogens. There are currently eight classes of scavenger receptors, many of which have multiple names, leading to inconsistencies and confusion in the literature. To address this problem, a workshop was organized by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health to help develop a clear definition of scavenger receptors and a standardized nomenclature based on that definition. Fifteen experts in the scavenger receptor field attended the workshop and, after extensive discussion, reached a consensus regarding the definition of scavenger receptors and a proposed scavenger receptor nomenclature. Scavenger receptors were defined as cell surface receptors that typically bind multiple ligands and promote the removal of non-self or altered-self targets. They often function by mechanisms that include endocytosis, phagocytosis, adhesion, and signaling that ultimately lead to the elimination of degraded or harmful substances. Based on this definition, nomenclature and classification of these receptors into 10 classes were proposed. The discussion and nomenclature recommendations described in this report only refer to mammalian scavenger receptors. The purpose of this article is to describe the proposed mammalian nomenclature and classification developed at the workshop and to solicit additional feedback from the broader research community. PMID:24563502

  14. Crystallization and Structure Determination of Superantigens and Immune Receptor Complexes.

    PubMed

    Rödström, Karin E J; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Structure determination of superantigens and the complexes they form with immune receptors have over the years provided insight in their modes of action. This technique requires growing large and highly ordered crystals of the superantigen or receptor-superantigen complex, followed by exposure to X-ray radiation and data collection. Here, we describe methods for crystallizing superantigens and superantigen-receptor complexes using the vapor diffusion technique, how the crystals may be optimized, and lastly data collection and structure determination. PMID:26676036

  15. Careers (A Course of Study). Unit V: Forms, Forms, Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turley, Kay

    Designed to enable special needs students to understand and complete various job-related forms, this set of activities devoted to forms encountered before and after one obtains a job is the fifth in a nine-unit secondary level careers course intended to provide handicapped students with the knowledge and tools necessary to succeed in the world of…

  16. Evidence for monomeric and oligomeric hormone-binding domains in affinity-purified gonadotropin receptor from rat ovary

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q.Y.; Menon, K.M.J. )

    1989-11-01

    Rat ovarian lutropin/choriogonadotropin receptor was purified from a Triton X-100-solubilized membrane preparation by affinity chromatography with Affi-Gel 10 coupled to purified human choriogonadotropin. The affinity-purified receptor preparations contained a single class of high-affinity binding sites for {sup 125}I-labeled human choriogonadotropin, with an equilibrium dissociation constant (K{sub d}) of 2.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} M, which is comparable to the K{sub d} values for membrane-bound and solubilized receptors. The purified receptor appeared as two dominant bands with molecular weights of 135,000 and 92,000 after sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS/PAGE) under nonreducing conditions. When the individual affinity-purified receptor bands were electroeluted from the gel and analyzed again by SDS/PAGE under nonreducing conditions, both the M{sub r} 92,000 and the 135,000 proteins retained their original molecular form even when 8 M urea was included in the gel. However, when the electrophoretically purified M{sub r} 92,000 and 135,000 bands were subjected to SDS/PAGE under reducing conditions, the M{sub r} 135,000 species was almost completely converted to a M{sub r} 92,000 band, but the M{sub r} 92,000 species did not undergo any alteration in molecular weight. The results suggest that the lutropin/choriogonadotropin receptor from rat ovary exists in two molecular forms, and the higher molecular weight form appears to be composed of disulfide-linked M{sup r} 92,000 subunit, which comprises the hormone-binding domain.

  17. Comparative Susceptibility of Different Biological Forms of Anopheles stephensi to Plasmodium berghei ANKA Strain

    PubMed Central

    Basseri, Hamid R.; Mohamadzadeh Hajipirloo, Habib; Mohammadi Bavani, Mulood; Whitten, Miranda M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are varying degrees of compatibility between malaria parasite-mosquito species, and understanding this compatibility may be crucial for developing effective transmission-blocking vaccines. This study investigates the compatibility of different biological forms of a malaria vector, Anopheles stephensi, to Plasmodium berghei ANKA strain. Methods Several biologically different and allopatric forms of A. stephensi were studied. Three forms were isolated from different regions of southern Iran: the variety mysorensis, the intermediate form and the native type form, and an additional type form originated from India (Beech strain).The mosquitoes were experimentally infected with P. berghei to compare their susceptibility to parasitism. Anti-mosquito midgut antiserum was then raised in BALB/cs mice immunized against gut antigens from the most susceptible form of A. stephensi (Beech strain), and the efficacy of the antiserum was assessed in transmission-blocking assays conducted on the least susceptible mosquito biological form. Results The susceptibility of different biological forms of A. stephensi mosquito to P. berghei was specifically inter-type varied. The Beech strain and the intermediate form were both highly susceptible to infection, with higher oocyst and sporozoite infection rates than intermediate and mysorensis forms. The oocyst infection, and particularly sporozite infection, was lowest in the mysorensis strain. Antiserum raised against midgut proteins of the Indian Beech type form blocked infection in this mosquito population, but it was ineffective at blocking both oocyst and sporozoite development in the permissive but geographically distant intermediate form mosquitoes. This suggests that a strong degree of incompatibility exists between the mosquito strains in terms of midgut protein(s) acting as putative ookinete receptors. Conclusions The incompatibility in the midgut protein profiles between two biological forms of A. stephensi

  18. Electromagnetic pion form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.

    1995-08-01

    A phenomenological Dyson-Schwinger/Bethe-Salpeter equation approach to QCD, formalized in terms of a QCD-based model field theory, the Global Color-symmetry Model (GCM), was used to calculate the generalized impulse approximation contribution to the electromagnetic pion form factor at space-like q{sup 2} on the domain [0,10] GeV{sup 2}. In effective field theories this form factor is sometimes understood as simply being due to Vector Meson Dominance (VMD) but this does not allow for a simple connection with QCD where the VMD contribution is of higher order than that of the quark core. In the GCM the pion is treated as a composite bound state of a confined quark and antiquark interacting via the exchange of colored vector-bosons. A direct study of the quark core contribution is made, using a quark propagator that manifests the large space-like-q{sup 2} properties of QCD, parameterizes the infrared behavior and incorporates confinement. It is shown that the few parameters which characterize the infrared form of the quark propagator may be chosen so as to yield excellent agreement with the available data. In doing this one directly relates experimental observables to properties of QCD at small space-like-q{sup 2}. The incorporation of confinement eliminates endpoint and pinch singularities in the calculation of F{sub {pi}}(q{sup 2}). With asymptotic freedom manifest in the dressed quark propagator the calculation yields q{sup 4}F{sub {pi}}(q{sup 2}) = constant, up to [q{sup 2}]- corrections, for space-like-q{sup 2} {approx_gt} 35 GeV{sup 2}, which indicates that soft, nonperturbative contributions dominate the form factor at presently accessible q{sup 2}. This means that the often-used factorization Ansatz fails in this exclusive process. A paper describing this work was submitted for publication. In addition, these results formed the basis for an invited presentation at a workshop on chiral dynamics and will be published in the proceedings.

  19. Teaching at higher levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-11-01

    Undergraduate physics programmes for the 21st century were under discussion at a recent event held in Arlington, USA, open to two or three members of the physics faculties of universities from across the whole country. The conference was organized by the American Association of Physics Teachers with co-sponsorship from the American Institute of Physics, the American Physical Society and Project Kaleidoscope. Among the various aims were to learn about physics departments that have successfully revitalized their undergraduate physics programmes with innovative introductory physics courses and multi-track majors programmes. Engineers and life scientists were to be asked directly how physics programmes can better serve their students, and business leaders would be speaking on how physics departments can help to prepare their students for the diverse careers that they will eventually follow. It was planned to highlight ways that departments could fulfil their responsibilities towards trainee teachers, to identify the resources needed for revitalizing a department's programme, and to develop guidelines and recommendations for a funding programme to support collaborative efforts among physics departments for carrying out the enhancements required. More details about the conference can be found on the AAPT website (see http://www.aapt.org/programs/rupc.html). Meanwhile the UK's Higher Education Funding Council has proposed a two-pronged approach to the promotion of high quality teaching and learning, as well as widening participation in higher education from 1999-2000. A total of £60m should be available to support these initiatives by the year 2001-2002. As part of this scheme the Council will invite bids from institutions to support individual academics in enhancing learning and teaching, as well as in recognition of individual excellence. As with research grants, such awards would enable staff to pursue activities such as the development of teaching materials

  20. Superactivation of AMPA receptors by auxiliary proteins

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Anna L.; Plested, Andrew J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate receptors form complexes in the brain with auxiliary proteins, which control their activity during fast synaptic transmission through a seemingly bewildering array of effects. Here we devise a way to isolate the activation of complexes using polyamines, which enables us to show that transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) exert their effects principally on the channel opening reaction. A thermodynamic argument suggests that because TARPs promote channel opening, receptor activation promotes AMPAR-TARP complexes into a superactive state with high open probability. A simple model based on this idea predicts all known effects of TARPs on AMPA receptor function. This model also predicts unexpected phenomena including massive potentiation in the absence of desensitization and supramaximal recovery that we subsequently detected in electrophysiological recordings. This transient positive feedback mechanism has implications for information processing in the brain, because it should allow activity-dependent facilitation of excitatory synaptic transmission through a postsynaptic mechanism. PMID:26744192

  1. Endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Channick, Richard N; Sitbon, Olivier; Barst, Robyn J; Manes, Alessandra; Rubin, Lewis J

    2004-06-16

    Endothelin receptor antagonism has emerged as an important therapeutic strategy in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Laboratory and clinical investigations have clearly shown that endothelin (ET)-1 is overexpressed in several forms of pulmonary vascular disease and likely plays a significant pathogenetic role in the development and progression of pulmonary vasculopathy. Oral endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs) have been shown to improve pulmonary hemodynamics, exercise capacity, functional status, and clinical outcome in several randomized placebo-controlled trials. Bosentan, a dual-receptor antagonist, is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for class III and IV patients with PAH, based on two phase III trials. In addition to its efficacy as sole therapy, bosentan may have a role as part of a combination of drugs such as a prostanoid or sildenafil. The selective endothelin receptor-A antagonists sitaxsentan and ambrisentan are currently undergoing investigation. PMID:15194180

  2. A History of Learning Communities within American Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, John E.; Inkelas, Karen Kurotsuchi

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the historical development of learning communities within American higher education. We examine the forces both internal and external to higher education that contributed to and stalled the emergence of learning communities in their contemporary form.

  3. Higher-dimensional targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelich, E.J. ); Grebogi, C. Department of Mathematics and Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 ); Ott, E. Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 ); Yorke, J.A. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a procedure to steer rapidly successive iterates of an initial condition on a chaotic attractor to a small target region about any prespecified point on the attractor using only small controlling perturbations. Such a procedure is called targeting.'' Previous work on targeting for chaotic attractors has been in the context of one- and two-dimensional maps. Here it is shown that targeting can also be done in higher-dimensional cases. The method is demonstrated with a mechanical system described by a four-dimensional mapping whose attractor has two positive Lyapunov exponents and a Lyapunov dimension of 2.8. The target is reached by making very small successive changes in a single control parameter. In one typical case, 35 iterates on average are required to reach a target region of diameter 10[sup [minus]4], as compared to roughly 10[sup 11] iterates without the use of the targeting procedure.

  4. Semistrict higher gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurčo, Branislav; Sämann, Christian; Wolf, Martin

    2015-04-01

    We develop semistrict higher gauge theory from first principles. In particular, we describe the differential Deligne cohomology underlying semistrict principal 2-bundles with connective structures. Principal 2-bundles are obtained in terms of weak 2-functors from the Čech groupoid to weak Lie 2-groups. As is demonstrated, some of these Lie 2-groups can be differentiated to semistrict Lie 2-algebras by a method due to Ševera. We further derive the full description of connective structures on semistrict principal 2-bundles including the non-linear gauge transformations. As an application, we use a twistor construction to derive superconformal constraint equations in six dimensions for a non-Abelian tensor multiplet taking values in a semistrict Lie 2-algebra.

  5. Higher dimensional massive bigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Tuan Q.

    2016-08-01

    We study higher-dimensional scenarios of massive bigravity, which is a very interesting extension of nonlinear massive gravity since its reference metric is assumed to be fully dynamical. In particular, the Einstein field equations along with the following constraint equations for both physical and reference metrics of a five-dimensional massive bigravity will be addressed. Then, we study some well-known cosmological spacetimes such as the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker, Bianchi type I, and Schwarzschild-Tangherlini metrics for the five-dimensional massive bigravity. As a result, we find that massive graviton terms will serve as effective cosmological constants in both physical and reference sectors if a special scenario, in which reference metrics are chosen to be proportional to physical ones, is considered for all mentioned metrics. Thanks to the constancy property of massive graviton terms, consistent cosmological solutions will be figured out accordingly.

  6. Higher unit dosage of psychotropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Burrell, C D

    1975-12-01

    The realities of the marketplace dictate that pharmaceutical companies seek to develop higher unit dosage forms. Technical problems not infrequently hinder such development. In low doses once-a-day medication with psychotropics is possible and practical. The potential for adverse reactions frequently renders it desirable to divide higher daily doses into two separate doses, one given in the morning and the other in the evening. PMID:1233527

  7. Higher Education Commons--A Framework for Comparison of Midlevel Units in Higher Education Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roxå, Torgny; Mårtensson, Katarina

    2014-01-01

    Socio-culturally formed collegial contexts in the midlevel of higher education organizations have attracted increased attention from higher education researchers. It is assumed that development, change and stability are dependent on norms, habits and traditions in these contexts. This text introduces a framework useful for identifying and…

  8. Different subtypes of opioid receptors have different affinities for G-proteins.

    PubMed

    Polastron, J; Jauzac, P

    1994-05-01

    In this work, we have characterized the opioid receptor expressed by the human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-BE and compared its hydrodynamic behaviour with those of well known opioid receptors: mu-opioid receptor of rabbit cerebellum and delta-opioid receptor of the hybrid cell line NG 108-15. Human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-BE expresses a substantial amount of opioid receptors (200-300 fmoles/mg of protein). Pharmacological characterization suggests an heterogenous population of receptors and the presence of two delta subtypes which are, at least partially, negatively coupled with adenylate cyclase via a Gi protein. These receptors exist under two different molecular forms and, in this respect, strikingly contrast with the archetypic delta receptors of NG 108-15 hybrid cell line which show only a high molecular weight form and appear more tightly coupled with the G protein. Hydrodynamic behaviour of SK-N-BE opioid receptors is reminiscent of the profile observed with the rabbit cerebellum mu-opioid receptor. This observation is consistent with the presence of two delta-opioid receptors subtypes, one of which exhibiting properties close to those of mu opioid receptors. Taken overall, our results suggest that different types and subtypes of opioid receptors, even if they are coupled to the same inhibitory G protein, are more or less tightly coupled with their transduction proteins and that closely related opioid receptors can form allosterically interacting complexes. PMID:7920183

  9. Effects of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate on uterine estrogen receptor. II. Inhibition of estrogen . receptor transformation.

    PubMed

    Traish, A; Müller, R E; Wotiz, H H

    1980-05-10

    Previous observations suggested that pyridoxal 5'-phosphate was capable of inhibiting estrogen . receptor (R . E2) activation, or translocation to the nucleus, or both. The present study attempts to define more specifically the locus of this action. To this end we have examined the physicochemical alteration produced by interaction of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate with estrogen . receptor complex, using sucrose density gradient analysis and dissociation kinetics. Receptor transformation was inhibited when activation was performed in the presence of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. This effect was protein- and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate concentration-dependent. When pyridoxal 5'-phosphate was introduced postactivation it did not have any effect on the activated receptor, but when similar treatment was followed by NABH4 reduction, the complex reverted to the monomeric entity. The dissociation behavior obtained with cytosol R . E2, warmed in the presence of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, showed a biphasic curve suggesting that a significant portion of receptors remained nonactivated as demonstrated by the fast dissociating component. Due to the fact that Tris buffers cannot be used for pyridoxal 5'-phosphate experiments, we have used a borate buffer which resulted in a displacement of the sedimentation values from a 4S to 4.6 S for the unactivated receptor and 5S to 6 S for the activated form. The observations reported suggest that at least the initial effect of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate results in the inhibition of cytosolic receptor transformation from the nonactivated to the activated form. PMID:7372667

  10. Protease-Activated Receptors and other G-Protein-Coupled Receptors: the Melanoma Connection

    PubMed Central

    Rosero, Rebecca A.; Villares, Gabriel J.; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2016-01-01

    The vast array of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play crucial roles in both physiological and pathological processes, including vision, coagulation, inflammation, autophagy, and cell proliferation. GPCRs also affect processes that augment cell proliferation and metastases in many cancers including melanoma. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet limited therapeutic modalities are available to patients with metastatic melanoma. Studies have found that both chemokine receptors and protease-activated receptors, both of which are GPCRs, are central to the metastatic melanoma phenotype and may serve as potential targets in novel therapies against melanoma and other cancers. PMID:27379162

  11. Generalized structure of higher order nonclassicality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Amit; Pathak, Anirban

    2010-02-01

    A generalized notion of higher order nonclassicality (in terms of higher order moments) is introduced. Under this generalized framework of higher order nonclassicality, conditions of higher order squeezing and higher order subpoissonian photon statistics are derived. A simpler form of the Hong-Mandel higher order squeezing criterion is derived under this framework by using an operator ordering theorem introduced by us in [A. Pathak, J. Phys. A 33 (2000) 5607]. It is also generalized for multi-photon Bose operators of Brandt and Greenberg. Similarly, condition for higher order subpoissonian photon statistics is derived by normal ordering of higher powers of number operator. Further, with the help of simple density matrices, it is shown that the higher order antibunching (HOA) and higher order subpoissonian photon statistics (HOSPS) are not the manifestation of the same phenomenon and consequently it is incorrect to use the condition of HOA as a test of HOSPS. It is also shown that the HOA and HOSPS may exist even in absence of the corresponding lower order phenomenon. Binomial state, nonlinear first order excited squeezed state (NLESS) and nonlinear vacuum squeezed state (NLVSS) are used as examples of quantum state and it is shown that these states may show higher order nonclassical characteristics. It is observed that the Binomial state which is always antibunched, is not always higher order squeezed and NLVSS which shows higher order squeezing does not show HOSPS and HOA. The opposite is observed in NLESS and consequently it is established that the HOSPS and HOS are two independent signatures of higher order nonclassicality.

  12. N-glycosylation sites on the nicotinic ACh receptor subunits regulate receptor channel desensitization and conductance.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2003-06-10

    The present study investigated the effects of N-glycosylation sites on Torpedo acetylcholine (ACh) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes by monitoring whole-cell membrane currents and single-channel currents from excised patches. Receptors with the mutant subunit at the asparagine residue on the conserved N-glycosylation site (mbetaN141D, mgammaN141D, or mdeltaN143D) or the serine/threonine residue (mbetaT143A, mgammaS143A, or mdeltaS145A) delayed the rate of current decay as compared with wild-type receptors, and the most striking effect was found with receptors with mbetaT143A or mgammaS143A. For wild-type receptors, the lectin concanavalin A, that binds to glycosylated membrane proteins with high affinity, mimicked this effect. Receptors with mbetaN141D or mdeltaN143D exhibited lower single-channel conductance, but those with mbetaT143A, mgammaS143A, or mdeltaS145A otherwise revealed higher conductance than wild-type receptors. Mean opening time of single-channel currents was little affected by the mutation. N-glycosylation sites, thus, appear to play a role in the regulation of ACh receptor desensitization and ion permeability. PMID:12829329

  13. 5-HT3 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, A. J.; Lummis, S. C. R.

    2009-01-01

    The 5-HT3 receptor is a member of the Cys-loop family of ligand-gated ion channels. These receptors are located in both the peripheral and central nervous systems, where functional receptors are constructed from five subunits. These subunits may be the same (homopentameric 5-HT3A receptors) or different (heteropentameric receptors, usually comprising of 5-HT3A and 5-HT3B receptor subunits), with the latter having a number of distinct properties. The 5-HT3 receptor binding site is comprised of six loops from two adjacent subunits, and critical ligand binding amino acids in these loops have been largely identified. There are a range of selective agonists and antagonists for these receptors and the pharmacophore is reasonably well understood. There are also a wide range of compounds that can modulate receptor activity. Studies have suggested many diverse potential disease targets that might be amenable to alleviation by 5-HT3 receptor selective compounds but to date only two applications have been fully realised in the clinic: the treatment of emesis and irritable-bowel syndrome. PMID:17073663

  14. Functions of the extracellular histidine residues of receptor activity-modifying proteins vary within adrenomedullin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwasako, Kenji Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Kato, Johji

    2008-12-05

    Receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP)-2 and -3 chaperone calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) to the plasma membrane, where together they form heterodimeric adrenomedullin (AM) receptors. We investigated the contributions made by His residues situated in the RAMP extracellular domain to AM receptor trafficking and receptor signaling by co-expressing hCRLR and V5-tagged-hRAMP2 or -3 mutants in which a His residue was substituted with Ala in HEK-293 cells. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that hRAMP2-H71A mediated normal hCRLR surface delivery, but the resultant heterodimers showed significantly diminished [{sup 125}I]AM binding and AM-evoked cAMP production. Expression of hRAMP2-H124A and -H127A impaired surface delivery of hCRLR, which impaired or abolishing AM binding and receptor signaling. Although hRAMP3-H97A mediated full surface delivery of hCRLR, the resultant heterodimers showed impaired AM binding and signaling. Other His residues appeared uninvolved in hCRLR-related functions. Thus, the His residues of hRAMP2 and -3 differentially govern AM receptor function.

  15. Higher prices in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    1982-03-01

    Price increases in the Jamaica CSM program went into effect on August 31, 1981. The program began in 1975. While the need for higher prices has been under discussion for the past 3 years, this is the 1st time the requisite approval from the Jamaica Price Commission has been obtained. The Jamaica National Family Planning Board (JNFPB) reports that the Panther 3-pack (condom) is up US$0.15 to US$0.30. Each Perle package (oral contraceptive) was increased by US$0.20. Single cycle Perle now sells for US$0.50, and 3-pack Perle sells for US$1.10. The 6-year price stagnation experienced by the CSM program resulted in a decreasing operational budget as program costs continued to rise. Marketing costs alone during this period escalated by 100-300%. For example, Panther pop-up display cartons cost the project US 16U each in 1975. By 1979 the same product cost US 49U. Newspaper advertisements have increased from the 1975 cost of US$68.00 to nearly $200.00 per placement. The overall inflation rate in Jamaica during the last 5 years has averaged more than 20% annually. In the face of these rising costs, outlet expansion for Perle has been prevented, wholesaler margins have been unavailable, and new retailer training has been discontinued. It is projected that the new prices will result in an annual increased revenues of US$80,000 which will be used to reinstate these essential marketing activities. The JNFPB is also planning to introduce a Panther 12-pack and Panther strips to the CSM product line. According to Marketing Manager Aston Evans, "We believe the public is now ready for this type of packaging" which is scheduled to be available soon. Panther is presently only available in a 3-pack, but annual sales have been steady. The new 12-pack will be stocked on supermarket shelves to provide higher product visibility and wider distribution. The selling price has been set as US$1.20 and is expected to yield a 25% increase in sales during the 1st year. A complete sales promotion

  16. Composition, assembly and activation of the avian progesterone receptor.

    PubMed

    Smith, D F; Toft, D O

    1992-03-01

    When isolated from chick oviduct cytosol by antibody adsorption, the inactive progesterone receptor is associated with the two heat shock proteins, hsp90 and hsp70, plus three additional proteins termed p54, p50, and p23 according to their molecular weights. While their functions remain unknown, all of these receptor associated proteins are dissociated upon receptor activation in intact cells. To better understand the assembly and activation mechanisms of progesterone receptor complexes, we have developed a cell-free system for studying receptor interactions with hsp90 and hsp70 and have used this system to examine requirements for hsp90 binding to the receptor. Purified receptor, free of hsp90 and immobilized on an antibody affinity resin, will rebind hsp90 in rabbit reticulocyte lysate when several conditions are met. These include: (1) absence of progesterone, (2) elevated temperature (30 degrees C), (3) presence of ATP, and (4) presence of Mg2+. We have obtained maximal hsp90 binding to receptor when lysate is supplemented with 3 mM MgCl2 and an ATP regenerating system. ATP depletion of lysate by dialysis or ATPase addition blocks hsp90 binding to the receptor. When progesterone is added to pre-formed receptor complexes in reticulocyte lysate it promotes activation and the dissociation of hsp90. This process is also dependent upon ATP. Thus, both the assembly, and activation of the progesterone receptor can be accomplished in the reticulocyte lysate system. PMID:1562503

  17. Identification and characterization of heptapeptide modulators of the glycine receptor.

    PubMed

    Cornelison, Garrett L; Pflanz, Natasha C; Tipps, Megan E; Mihic, S John

    2016-06-01

    The glycine receptor is a member of the Cys-loop receptor superfamily of ligand-gated ion channels and is implicated as a possible therapeutic target for the treatment of diseases such as alcoholism and inflammatory pain. In humans, four glycine receptor subtypes (α1, α2, α3, and β) co-assemble to form pentameric channel proteins as either α homomers or αβ heteromers. To date, few agents have been identified that can selectively modulate the glycine receptor, especially those possessing subtype specificity. We used a cell-based method of phage display panning, coupled with two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology in Xenopus laevis oocytes, to identify novel heptapeptide modulators of the α1β glycine receptor. This involved a panning procedure in which the phage library initially underwent subtractive panning against Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing alternative glycine receptor subtypes before panning the remaining library over HEK 293 cells expressing the target, the α1β glycine receptor. Peptides were identified that act with selectivity on α1β and α3β, compared to α2β, glycine receptors. In addition, peptide activity at the glycine receptor decreased when zinc was chelated by tricine, similar to previous observations of a decrease in ethanol's enhancing actions at the receptor in the absence of zinc. Comparisons of the amino acid sequences of heptapeptides capable of potentiating glycine receptor function revealed several consensus sequences that may be predictive of a peptide's enhancing ability. PMID:27038522

  18. Soluble cytokine receptors in biological therapy.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Botran, Rafael; Crespo, Fabian A; Sun, Xichun

    2002-08-01

    Due to their fundamental involvement in the pathogenesis of many diseases, cytokines constitute key targets for biotherapeutic approaches. The discovery that soluble forms of cytokine receptors are involved in the endogenous regulation of cytokine activity has prompted substantial interest in their potential application as immunotherapeutic agents. As such, soluble cytokine receptors have many advantages, including specificity, low immunogenicity and high affinity. Potential disadvantages, such as low avidity and short in vivo half-lifes, have been addressed by the use of genetically-designed receptors, hybrid proteins or chemical modifications. The ability of many soluble cytokine receptors to inhibit the binding and biological activity of their ligands makes them very specific cytokine antagonists. Several pharmaceutical companies have generated a number of therapeutic agents based on soluble cytokine receptors and many of them are undergoing clinical trials. The most advanced in terms of clinical development is etanercept (Enbrel, Immunex), a fusion protein between soluble TNF receptor Type II and the Fc region of human IgG1. This TNF-alpha; antagonist was the first soluble cytokine receptor to receive approval for use in humans. In general, most agents based on soluble cytokine receptors have been safe, well-tolerated and have shown only minor side effects in the majority of patients. Soluble cytokine receptors constitute a new generation of therapeutic agents with tremendous potential for applications in a wide variety of human diseases. Two current areas of research are the identification of their most promising applications and characterisation of their long-term effects. PMID:12171504

  19. Superplastic forming of ceramic insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieh, T. G.; Wittenauer, J. P.; Wadsworth, J.

    1992-01-01

    Superplasticity has been demonstrated in many fine-grained structural ceramics and ceramic composites, including yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (YTZP), alumina, and Al2O3-reinforced zirconia (Al2O3/YTZ) duplex composites and SiC-reinforced Si3N4. These superplastic ceramics obviously offer the potential benefit of forming net shape or near net shape parts. This could be particularly useful for forming complicated shapes that are difficult to achieve using conventional forming techniques, or require elaborate, subsequent machining. In the present study, we successfully demonstrated the following: (1) superplastic 3Y-TXP and 20 percent Al2O3/YTZ composite have for the first time been successfully deformed into hemispherical caps via a biaxial gas-pressure forming technique; (2) no experimental difficulty was encountered in applying the required gas pressures and temperatures to achieve the results, thus, it is certain that higher rates of deformation than those presented in this study will be possible by using the current test apparatus at higher temperatures and pressures; and (3) an analytical model incorporating material parameters, such as variations during forming in the strain rate sensitivity exponent and grain growth-induced strain hardening, is needed to model accurately and therefore precisely control the biaxial gas-pressure forming of superplastic ceramics. Based on the results of this study, we propose to fabricate zirconia insulation tubes by superplastic extrusion of zirconia polycrystal. This would not only reduce the cost, but also improve the reliability of the tube products.

  20. Spinor helicity structures in higher spin theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananth, Sudarshan

    2012-11-01

    It is shown that the coefficient of the cubic interaction vertex, in higher spin Lagrangians, has a very simple form when written in terms of spinor helicity products. The result for a higher-spin field, of spin λ, is equal to the corresponding Yang-Mills coefficient raised to the power λ. Among other things, this suggests perturbative ties, similar to the KLT relations, between higher spin theories and pure Yang-Mills. This result is obtained in four-dimensional flat spacetime.

  1. [Higher - Further - Faster].

    PubMed

    Platen, P

    2016-08-01

    The striated skeletal muscles consist of different myocytes that have different metabolic and contractile characteristics. They react in a specific way to difference training stimuli: adaptations as a result of endurance training trigger an increase in mitochondria and lead to an intensified oxidative metabolism. Adaptations as a result of strength training result in increased protein biosynthesis and hypertrophy of the skeletal myocytes. About 50 % of the adaptation associated with endurance training are due to genetic factors.The molecular mechanisms that underlie the training adaptations are currently the subject of intense research. They comprise complex interrelated systems with a series of key components. Understanding molecular switches and signalling pathways gives rise to the assumption that the combination of simultaneous strength training and endurance training is counterproductive. The combination of both these forms of training possible weakens the effect on muscle mass and muscle strength. Consequently the recommendation is to plan for enough of time intervals between strength training and endurance training. PMID:27490351

  2. SOCIAL DOMINANCE IN FEMALE MONKEYS: DOPAMINE RECEPTOR FUNCTION AND COCAINE REINFORCEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Nader, Michael A.; Nader, Susan H.; Czoty, Paul W.; Riddick, Natallia V.; Gage, H. Donald; Gould, Robert W.; Blaylock, Brandi L.; Kaplan, Jay R.; Garg, Pradeep K.; Davies, Huw ML; Morton, Daniel; Garg, Sudha; Reboussin, Beth A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Brain imaging and behavioral studies suggest an inverse relationship between dopamine (DA) D2/D3 receptors and vulnerability to cocaine abuse, though most research has utilized males. For example, male monkeys that become dominant in a social group have significant elevations in D2/D3 receptor availability and are less vulnerable to cocaine reinforcement. Methods DA D2/D3 receptor availability was assessed in female cynomolgus monkeys (n=16) using positron emission tomography (PET) while they were individually housed, 3 months after stable social hierarchies had formed and again when individually housed. In addition, PET was used to examine changes in DA transporter (DAT) availability following social hierarchy formation. After imaging studies were complete, monkeys were implanted with indwelling intravenous catheters and self-administered cocaine (0.001–0.1 mg/kg/injection) under a fixed-ratio 30 schedule of reinforcement. Acquisition of cocaine reinforcement occurred when response rates were significantly higher than when saline was self-administered. Results Neither DAT nor D2/D3 receptor availability in the caudate nucleus and putamen was predictive of social rank, but both significantly changed following formation of social hierarchies. D2/D3 receptor availability significantly increased in females that became dominant, while DAT availability decreased in subordinate females. Dominant female monkeys acquired cocaine reinforcement at significantly lower doses than subordinate monkeys. Conclusions Based on these findings, the relationship between D2/D3 receptor availability and vulnerability to cocaine reinforcement appears opposite in females and males. These data indicate that the social environment profoundly affects the DA system, but does so in ways that have different functional consequences for females than males. PMID:22503110

  3. Thiochrome enhances acetylcholine affinity at muscarinic M4 receptors: receptor subtype selectivity via cooperativity rather than affinity.

    PubMed

    Lazareno, S; Dolezal, V; Popham, A; Birdsall, N J M

    2004-01-01

    Thiochrome (2,7-dimethyl-5H-thiachromine-8-ethanol), an oxidation product and metabolite of thiamine, has little effect on the equilibrium binding of l-[3H]N-methyl scopolamine ([3H]NMS) to the five human muscarinic receptor subtypes (M1-M5) at concentrations up to 0.3 mM. In contrast, it inhibits [3H]NMS dissociation from M1 to M4 receptors at submillimolar concentrations and from M5 receptors at 1 mM. These results suggest that thiochrome binds allosterically to muscarinic receptors and has approximately neutral cooperativity with [3H]NMS at M1 to M4 and possibly M5 receptors. Thiochrome increases the affinity of acetylcholine (ACh) 3- to 5-fold for inhibiting [3H]NMS binding to M4 receptors but has no effect on ACh affinity at M1 to M3 or M5 receptors. Thiochrome (0.1 mM) also increases the direct binding of [3H]ACh to M4 receptors but decreases it slightly at M2 receptors. In agreement with the binding data, thiochrome does not affect the potency of ACh for stimulating the binding of guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35S]thiotriphosphate) ([35S]GTPgammaS) to membranes containing M1 to M3 receptors, but it increases ACh potency 3.5-fold at M4 receptors. It also selectively reduces the release of [3H]ACh from potassium-stimulated slices of rat striatum, which contain autoinhibitory presynaptic M4 receptors, but not from hippocampal slices, which contain presynaptic M2 receptors. We conclude that thiochrome is a selective M4 muscarinic receptor enhancer of ACh affinity and has neutral cooperativity with ACh at M1 to M3 receptors; it therefore demonstrates a powerful new form of selectivity, "absolute subtype selectivity", which is derived from cooperativity rather than from affinity. PMID:14722259

  4. Texas Higher Education in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Coll. and Univ. System, Austin. Coordinating Board.

    The status of higher education in Texas is examined in this major report of changes in higher education over the past decade. Information on enrollment, cost, financial aid, job opportunities, and facilities in higher education institutions is given for private higher education, professional higher education, community colleges, and state colleges…

  5. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Sensory Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metherate, Raju

    2004-01-01

    Acetylcholine release in sensory neocortex contributes to higher-order sensory function, in part by activating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Molecular studies have revealed a bewildering array of nAChR subtypes and cellular actions; however, there is some consensus emerging about the major nAChR subtypes and their functions in…

  6. Nitrosamines as nicotinic receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Schuller, Hildegard M

    2007-05-30

    Nitrosamines are carcinogens formed in the mammalian organism from amine precursors contained in food, beverages, cosmetics and drugs. The potent carcinogen, NNK, and the weaker carcinogen, NNN, are nitrosamines formed from nicotine. Metabolites of the nitrosamines react with DNA to form adducts responsible for genotoxic effects. We have identified NNK as a high affinity agonist for the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (alpha7nAChR) whereas NNN bound with high affinity to epibatidine-sensitive nAChRs. Diethylnitrosamine (DEN) bound to both receptors but with lower affinity. High levels of the alpha7nAChR were expressed in human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines and in hamster pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs), which serve as a model for the cell of origin of human SCLC. Exposure of SCLC or PNECs to NNK or nicotine increased expression of the alpha7nAChR and caused influx of Ca(2+), activation of PKC, Raf-1, ERK1/2, and c-myc, resulting in the stimulation of cell proliferation. Signaling via the alpha7nAChR was enhanced when cells were maintained in an environment of 10-15% CO(2) similar to that in the diseased lung. Hamsters with hyperoxia-induced pulmonary fibrosis developed neuroendocrine lung carcinomas similar to human SCLC when treated with NNK, DEN, or nicotine. The development of the NNK-induced tumors was prevented by green tea or theophylline. The beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, isoproterenol or theophylline blocked NNK-induced cell proliferation in vitro. NNK and nicotine-induced hyperactivity of the alpha7nAChR/RAF/ERK1/2 pathway thus appears to play a crucial role in the development of SCLC in smokers and could be targeted for cancer prevention. PMID:17459420

  7. Polyesters in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Kolattukudy, P E

    2001-01-01

    Polyesters occur in higher plants as the structural component of the cuticle that covers the aerial parts of plants. This insoluble polymer, called cutin, attached to the epidermal cell walls is composed of interesterified hydroxy and hydroxy epoxy fatty acids. The most common chief monomers are 10,16-dihydroxy C16 acid, 18-hydroxy-9,10 epoxy C18 acid, and 9,10,18-trihydroxy C18 acid. These monomers are produced in the epidermal cells by omega hydroxylation, in-chain hydroxylation, epoxidation catalyzed by P450-type mixed function oxidase, and epoxide hydration. The monomer acyl groups are transferred to hydroxyl groups in the growing polymer at the extracellular location. The other type of polyester found in the plants is suberin, a polymeric material deposited in the cell walls of a layer or two of cells when a plant needs to erect a barrier as a result of physical or biological stress from the environment, or during development. Suberin is composed of aromatic domains derived from cinnamic acid, and aliphatic polyester domains derived from C16 and C18 cellular fatty acids and their elongation products. The polyesters can be hydrolyzed by pancreatic lipase and cutinase, a polyesterase produced by bacteria and fungi. Catalysis by cutinase involves the active serine catalytic triad. The major function of the polyester in plants is as a protective barrier against physical, chemical, and biological factors in the environment, including pathogens. Transcriptional regulation of cutinase gene in fungal pathogens is being elucidated at a molecular level. The polyesters present in agricultural waste may be used to produce high value polymers, and genetic engineering might be used to produce large quantities of such polymers in plants. PMID:11217409

  8. LDL Receptor-Related Protein-1 (LRP1) Regulates Cholesterol Accumulation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Anna P.; Muratoglu, Selen Catania; Au, Dianaly T.; Migliorini, Mary; Lee, Mi-Jeong; Fried, Susan K.; Mikhailenko, Irina; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2015-01-01

    Within the circulation, cholesterol is transported by lipoprotein particles and is taken up by cells when these particles associate with cellular receptors. In macrophages, excessive lipoprotein particle uptake leads to foam cell formation, which is an early event in the development of atherosclerosis. Currently, mechanisms responsible for foam cell formation are incompletely understood. To date, several macrophage receptors have been identified that contribute to the uptake of modified forms of lipoproteins leading to foam cell formation, but the contribution of the LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) to this process is not known. To investigate the role of LRP1 in cholesterol accumulation in macrophages, we generated mice with a selective deletion of LRP1 in macrophages on an LDL receptor (LDLR)-deficient background (macLRP1-/-). After feeding mice a high fat diet for 11 weeks, peritoneal macrophages isolated from Lrp+/+ mice contained significantly higher levels of total cholesterol than those from macLRP1-/- mice. Further analysis revealed that this was due to increased levels of cholesterol esters. Interestingly, macLRP1-/- mice displayed elevated plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels resulting from accumulation of large, triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles in the circulation. This increase did not result from an increase in hepatic VLDL biosynthesis, but rather results from a defect in catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles in macLRP1-/- mice. These studies reveal an important in vivo contribution of macrophage LRP1 to cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:26061292

  9. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Ligands and Their Role in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Therapeutic Strategies.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Bahman; Samadi, Nasser; Baradaran, Behzad; Shafiei-Irannejad, Vahid; Zarghami, Nosratollah

    2016-07-01

    Imatinib therapy remains the gold standard for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia; however, the acquired resistance to this therapeutic agent in patients has urged the scientists to devise modalities for overcoming this chemoresistance. For this purpose, initially therapeutic agents with higher tyrosine kinase activity were introduced, which had the potential for inhibiting even mutant forms of Bcr-Abl. Furthermore, coupling imatinib with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ligands also showed beneficial effects in chronic myeloid leukemia cell proliferation. These combination protocols inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis as well as differentiation in chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines. In addition, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors ligands increased imatinib uptake by upregulating the expression of human organic cation transporter 1. Taken together, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors ligands are currently being considered as novel promising therapeutic candidates for chronic myeloid leukemia treatment, because they can synergistically enhance the efficacy of imatinib. In this article, we reviewed the potential of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors ligands for use in chronic myeloid leukemia treatment. The mechanism of action of these therapeutics modalities are also presented in detail. PMID:26841308

  10. Novel hormone "receptors".

    PubMed

    Nemere, Ilka; Hintze, Korry

    2008-02-01

    Our concepts of hormone receptors have, until recently, been narrowly defined. In the last few years, an increasing number of reports identify novel proteins, such as enzymes, acting as receptors. In this review we cover the novel receptors for the hormones atrial naturetic hormone, enterostatin, hepcidin, thyroid hormones, estradiol, progesterone, and the vitamin D metabolites 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and 24,25(OH)(2)D(3). PMID:17546587

  11. [Nuclear receptors PPARalpha].

    PubMed

    Soska, V

    2006-06-01

    Mechanism of the fibrates action is mediated by nuclear PPARalpha receptors (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor). These receptors regulate a number of genes that are involved both in lipids and lipoproteins metabolism and other mediators (e.g. inflammatory mediatores). Due to PPARalpha activation by fibrates, triglycerides and small dense LDL concentration is decreased, HDL cholesterol is increased and both inflammation and prothrombotic status are reduced. These effects are very important in patients with metabolic syndrom. PMID:16871768

  12. The "FORM" Approach to Reading Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandel, Lenore

    The FORM approach is designed to help persons in the senior population with the task of filling out the forms or applications required for a myriad of societal and human needs. The acronym represents a four-part approach consisting of: Facing the issue; applying Overview; Rewriting headings as questions; and Matching information as appropriate…

  13. Arbitrary p-form Galileons

    SciTech Connect

    Deffayet, C.; Deser, S.; Esposito-Farese, G.

    2010-09-15

    We show that scalar, 0-form, Galileon actions--models whose field equations contain only second derivatives--can be generalized to arbitrary even p-forms. More generally, they need not even depend on a single form, but may involve mixed p combinations, including equal p multiplets, where odd p fields are also permitted: We construct, for given dimension D, general actions depending on scalars, vectors, and higher p-form field strengths, whose field equations are of exactly second derivative order. We also discuss and illustrate their curved-space generalizations, especially the delicate nonminimal couplings required to maintain this order. Concrete examples of pure and mixed actions, field equations, and their curved-space extensions are presented.

  14. Receptor-mediated mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Osamu; Murakawa, Tomokazu; Nishida, Kazuhiko; Otsu, Kinya

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles that supply ATP through oxidative phosphorylation to maintain cellular homeostasis. Extrinsic or intrinsic agents can impair mitochondria, and these impaired mitochondria can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as byproducts, inducing cellular damage and cell death. The quality control of mitochondria is essential for the maintenance of normal cellular functions, particularly in cardiomyocytes, because they are terminally differentiated. Accumulation of damaged mitochondria is characteristic of various diseases, including heart failure, neurodegenerative disease, and aging-related diseases. Mitochondria are generally degraded through autophagy, an intracellular degradation system that is conserved from yeast to mammals. Autophagy is thought to be a nonselective degradation process in which cytoplasmic proteins and organelles are engulfed by isolation membrane to form autophagosomes in eukaryotic cells. However, recent studies have described the process of selective autophagy, which targets specific proteins or organelles such as mitochondria. Mitochondria-specific autophagy is called mitophagy. Dysregulation of mitophagy is implicated in the development of chronic diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, metabolic diseases, and heart failure. In this review, we discuss recent progress in research on mitophagy receptors. PMID:27021519

  15. Use of the H3 receptor antagonist radioligand [3H]-A-349821 to reveal in vivo receptor occupancy of cognition enhancing H3 receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Miller, TR; Milicic, I; Bauch, J; Du, J; Surber, B; Browman, KE; Marsh, K; Cowart, M; Brioni, JD; Esbenshade, TA

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The histamine H3 receptor antagonist radioligand [3H]-A-349821 was characterized as a radiotracer for assessing in vivo receptor occupancy by H3 receptor antagonists that affect behaviour. This model was established as an alternative to ex vivo binding methods, for relating antagonist H3 receptor occupancy to blood levels and efficacy in preclinical models. Experimental approach: In vivo cerebral cortical H3 receptor occupancy by [3H]-A-349821 was determined in rats from differences in [3H]-A-349821 levels in the isolated cortex and cerebellum, a brain region with low levels of H3 receptors. Comparisons were made to relate antagonist H3 receptor occupancy to blood levels and efficacy in a preclinical model of cognition, the five-trial inhibitory avoidance response in rat pups. Key results: In adult rats, [3H]-A-349821, 1.5 µg·kg−1, penetrated into the brain and cleared more rapidly from cerebellum than cortex; optimally, [3H]-A-349821 levels were twofold higher in the latter. With increasing [3H]-A-349821 doses, cortical H3 receptor occupancy was saturable with a binding capacity consistent with in vitro binding in cortex membranes. In studies using tracer [3H]-A-349821 doses, ABT-239 and other H3 receptor antagonists inhibited H3 receptor occupancy by [3H]-A-349821 in a dose-dependent manner. Blood levels of the antagonists corresponding to H3 receptor occupancy were consistent with blood levels associated with efficacy in the five-trial inhibitory avoidance response. Conclusions and implications: When employed as an occupancy radiotracer, [3H]-A-349821 provided valid measurements of in vivo H3 receptor occupancy, which may be helpful in guiding and interpreting clinical studies of H3 receptor antagonists. PMID:19413577

  16. Maryland Higher Education Commission Data Book, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Higher Education Commission, Annapolis.

    This document provides statistics in summary form about higher education in Maryland. The first table compares Maryland data to national averages for educational achievement, enrollment, campus mix in enrollments, degrees conferred, average resident undergraduate tuition and fees, state funding, and average faculty salaries. Other tables, grouped…

  17. Perspectives on Blended Learning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, N.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the benefits and challenges of blended learning in higher education from the perspective of students, faculty, and administration that have had direct experience with this form of course delivery. Students indicate that a blended learning model provides them with greater time flexibility and improved learning outcomes but…

  18. The Almanac of Higher Education: 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, Washington, DC.

    This overview of United States higher education is organized in two parts, respectively headed "The Nation" and "The States." The book opens with summary statistics followed by key data displayed in map form. A section on nine issues affecting colleges offers a table listing each college's standing on those issues. A section on students displays…

  19. Higher Education and Class: Production or Reproduction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sotiris, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    This article deals with questions relating to the role of education and especially Higher Education in the reproduction of class division in society. Social classes and how they are formed and reproduced has always been one of the greatest challenges for Marxism and social theory in general. The questions regarding the role of education, and…

  20. Threshold Quality Parameters in Hybrid Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coates, Hamish; Mahat, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Quality assurance conventions are being challenged by emerging business scenarios with alluring economies. This paper analyses shaping contexts, resulting hybridised forms of higher education, and consequences for quality assurance. It devotes sustained attention to unpacking what, as a result of contemporary reconfigurations, would appear to be…

  1. Human motion perception: Higher-order organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Proffitt, Dennis R.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of higher-order motion perception and organization. It is argued that motion is sufficient to fully specify a number of environmental properties, including: depth order, three-dimensional form, object displacement, and dynamics. A grammar of motion perception is proposed; applications of this work for display design are discussed.

  2. Cross-Border Higher Education, Who Profits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Graeme; Peim, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Emphasis on "the knowledge economy", the commodification of public services, the massification of HE and decreases in public funding of education are the context for new forms of educational provision. Some nations have led the demand for and provision of cross-national educational services. The largest exporters of Higher Education have been the…

  3. Miscellaneous Waste-Form FEPs

    SciTech Connect

    A. Schenker

    2000-12-08

    The US DOE must provide a reasonable assurance that the performance objectives for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) potential radioactive-waste repository can be achieved for a 10,000-year post-closure period. The guidance that mandates this direction is under the provisions of 10 CFR Part 63 and the US Department of Energy's ''Revised Interim Guidance Pending Issuance of New US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulations (Revision 01, July 22, 1999), for Yucca Mountain, Nevada'' (Dyer 1999 and herein referred to as DOE's Interim Guidance). This assurance must be demonstrated in the form of a performance assessment that: (1) identifies the features, events, and processes (FEPs) that might affect the performance of the potential geologic repository; (2) examines the effects of such FEPs on the performance of the potential geologic repository; (3) estimates the expected annual dose to a specified receptor group; and (4) provides the technical basis for inclusion or exclusion of specific FEPs.

  4. Kinin B1 receptor homo-oligomerization is required for receptor trafficking to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Sandén, Caroline; Leeb-Lundberg, L M Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    The kinin B1 receptor (B1R) is a G protein-coupled receptor with pro-inflammatory activity that is latent in healthy tissues but induced by tissue insult. Here, we investigated if B1R homo-oligomerization is a possible mechanism regulating the presentation of this receptor at the level of maturation and trafficking to the cell surface. To this end, we used HEK293 cells stably expressing N-terminal FLAG and HA epitope-tagged wild-type human B1R and an N-terminal receptor fragment, B1stop135, which terminates at the C-terminal end of the third transmembrane domain and has previously been shown to oligomerize with B1R. Receptors were monitored by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation, receptor function by agonist binding and agonist-promoted phosphoinositide hydrolysis, and receptor trafficking by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. When expressed alone, B1R is core N-glycosylated and forms oligomers localized intracellularly and on the cell surface. B1stop135 also exists as core N-glycosylated oligomers but is localized exclusively intracellularly. When co-expressed, B1stop135 prevents specifically B1R homo-oligomerization by forming nonfunctional B1R-B1stop135 hetero-oligomers, retains B1R intracellularly at least in part in the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER), increases calnexin binding to the receptor, and increases receptor degradation. We conclude that B1R homo-oligomerization is necessary for B1R maturation and trafficking to the cell surface. Modulating this mechanism may be a novel therapeutic avenue in inflammatory disease. PMID:23201435

  5. Autophagy selectivity through receptor clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutenberg, Andrew; Brown, Aidan

    Substrate selectivity in autophagy requires an all-or-none cellular response. We focus on peroxisomes, for which autophagy receptor proteins NBR1 and p62 are well characterized. Using computational models, we explore the hypothesis that physical clustering of autophagy receptor proteins on the peroxisome surface provides an appropriate all-or-none response. We find that larger peroxisomes nucleate NBR1 clusters first, and lose them due to competitive coarsening last, resulting in significant size-selectivity. We then consider a secondary hypothesis that p62 inhibits NBR1 cluster formation. We find that p62 inhibition enhances size-selectivity enough that, even if there is no change of the pexophagy rate, the volume of remaining peroxisomes can significantly decrease. We find that enhanced ubiquitin levels suppress size-selectivity, and that this effect is more pronounced for individual peroxisomes. Sufficient ubiquitin allows receptor clusters to form on even the smallest peroxisomes. We conclude that NBR1 cluster formation provides a viable physical mechanism for all-or-none substrate selectivity in pexophagy. We predict that cluster formation is associated with significant size-selectivity. Now at Simon Fraser University.

  6. Control of the efficiency of agonist-induced information transfer and stability of the ternary complex containing the delta opioid receptor and the alpha subunit of G(i1) by mutation of a receptor/G protein contact interface.

    PubMed

    Moon, H E; Bahia, D S; Cavalli, A; Hoffmann, M; Milligan, G

    2001-09-01

    Fusion proteins were constructed between the delta opioid receptor and forms of the alpha subunit of G(i1) in which cysteine(351) was mutated to a range of amino acids. GDP reduced the binding of the agonist [(3)H]DADLE but not the antagonist [(3)H]naltrindole to both the receptor alone and all the delta opioid receptor-Cys(351)XaaG(i1)alpha fusion proteins. For the fusion proteins the pEC(50) for GDP was strongly correlated with the n-octanol/H(2)O partition co-efficient of G protein residue(351). Fusion proteins in which this residue was either isoleucine or glycine had similar observed binding kinetics for [(3)H]DADLE. However, the rate of dissociation of [(3)H]DADLE was substantially greater for the glycine-containing fusion protein than that containing isoleucine, indicating that more hydrophobic residues imbued greater stability to the agonist-receptor-G protein ternary complex. This resulted in a higher affinity of binding of [(3)H]DADLE to the fusion protein containing isoleucine(351). In expectation with the binding data, maximal DADLE-stimulated GTP hydrolysis by the isoleucine(351)-containing fusion protein was two-fold greater and the potency of DADLE seven-fold higher than for the version containing glycine. These results demonstrate that the stability of the ternary complex between delta opioid receptor, G(i1)alpha and an agonist (but not antagonist) ligand is dependent upon the nature of residue(351) of the G protein and that this determines the effectiveness of information flow from the receptor to the G protein. PMID:11522323

  7. The new biology of histamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing-Feng; Thurmond, Robin L

    2008-03-01

    The physiologic functions of histamine have been recognized for more than 100 years, yet new roles are still being uncovered. Most importantly, a newly discovered receptor of the amine has helped refine our understanding of histamine. This new receptor, the histamine H4 receptor (H4R), has a higher affinity for histamine compared with the histamine H1 receptor and appears to be more selectively expressed, found mainly on hematopoietic cells. H4R is involved in chemotaxis and inflammatory mediator release by eosinophils, mast cells, monocytes, dendritic cells, and T cells. Studies in animal models using selective antagonists or H4R-deficient mice have shown a role for the receptor in inflammation in vivo. In particular, H4R antagonists have shown promise in experimental models of asthma and pruritus, two conditions where currently marketed antihistamines targeting the histamine H1 receptor are not optimally effective in humans. Thus, a new class of H4R-specific antihistamines may be distinctively effective in treating allergic diseases associated with chronic pruritus and asthma. PMID:18377770

  8. The growth hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Waters, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Once thought to be present only in liver, muscle and adipose tissue, the GH receptor is now known to be ubiquitously distributed, in accord with the many pleiotropic actions of GH. These include the regulation of metabolism, postnatal growth, cognition, immune, cardiac and renal systems and gut function. GH exerts these actions primarily through alterations in gene expression, initiated by activation of its membrane receptor and the resultant activation of the associated JAK2 (Janus kinase 2) and Src family kinases. Receptor activation involves hormone initiated movements within a receptor homodimer, rather than simple receptor dimerization. We have shown that binding of the hormone realigns the orientation of the two receptors both by relative rotation and by closer apposition just above the cell membrane. This is a consequence of the asymmetric placement of the binding sites on the hormone. Binding results in a conversion of parallel receptor transmembrane domains into a rotated crossover orientation, which produces separation of the lower part of the transmembrane helices. Because the JAK2 is bound to the Box1 motif proximal to the inner membrane, receptor activation results in separation of the two associated JAK2s, and in particular the removal of the inhibitory pseudokinase domain from the kinase domain of the other JAK2 (and vice versa). This brings the two kinase domains into position for trans-activation and initiates tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor cytoplasmic domain and other substrates such as STAT5, the key transcription factor mediating most genomic actions of GH. There are a limited number of genomic actions initiated by the Src kinase family member which also associates with the upper cytoplasmic domain of the receptor, including important immune regulatory actions to dampen exuberant innate immune activation of cells involved in transplant rejection. These findings offer insights for developing specific receptor antagonists which may be

  9. Sulfate recognition by a hexaaza cryptand receptor.

    PubMed

    Mateus, Pedro; Delgado, Rita; André, Vânia; Teresa Duarte, M

    2015-01-21

    A hexamine macrobicycle with pyrrolyl spacers was evaluated as an anion receptor in its protonated forms. The protonation constants of the receptor, as well as its association constants with Cl(-), NO3(-), AcO(-), ClO4(-), H2PO4(-), and SO4(2-) were determined by potentiometry at 298.2 ± 0.1 K in H2O-MeOH (50 : 50 v/v) and at an ionic strength of 0.10 ± 0.01 M in KTsO. These studies revealed that the Hnpyrr(n+) receptor has a very high effective association constant value for the SO4(2-) at pH 4.0 (log Keff = 6.42), and it is selective for the uptake of this anion in the presence of the other studied anionic substrates. In particular, the receptor showed very high SO4(2-)/NO3(-) selectivity. Using the indicator-displacement approach the receptor is able to signal the presence of sulfate by a change of color. Single crystal X-ray diffraction determination of [(H6pyrr)(SO4)(H2O)3](SO4)2·9.3H2O revealed the presence of one sulfate anion inside the receptor cavity and showed that the encapsulation of the anion is favored by an array of nine hydrogen bonding interactions, including N-HO, C-HO and water-mediated ones. PMID:25407639

  10. Structural basis for molecular recognition at serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Jiang, Yi; Ma, Jinming; Wu, Huixian; Wacker, Daniel; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Liu, Wei; Huang, Xi-Ping; Vardy, Eyal; McCorvy, John D; Gao, Xiang; Zhou, X Edward; Melcher, Karsten; Zhang, Chenghai; Bai, Fang; Yang, Huaiyu; Yang, Linlin; Jiang, Hualiang; Roth, Bryan L; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C; Xu, H Eric

    2013-05-01

    Serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) regulates a wide spectrum of human physiology through the 5-HT receptor family. We report the crystal structures of the human 5-HT1B G protein-coupled receptor bound to the agonist antimigraine medications ergotamine and dihydroergotamine. The structures reveal similar binding modes for these ligands, which occupy the orthosteric pocket and an extended binding pocket close to the extracellular loops. The orthosteric pocket is formed by residues conserved in the 5-HT receptor family, clarifying the family-wide agonist activity of 5-HT. Compared with the structure of the 5-HT2B receptor, the 5-HT1B receptor displays a 3 angstrom outward shift at the extracellular end of helix V, resulting in a more open extended pocket that explains subtype selectivity. Together with docking and mutagenesis studies, these structures provide a comprehensive structural basis for understanding receptor-ligand interactions and designing subtype-selective serotonergic drugs. PMID:23519210

  11. Form 5-Mining venture agreement model form

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This text acts as a reference of the basic terms and conditions for a negotiated mining venture agreement. Alternative clauses and provisions, along with extensive commentary, are supplied. The model form contains many articles which define and detail the process.

  12. Opioid Receptor-Dependent Sex Differences in Synaptic Plasticity in the Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Pathway of the Adult Rat

    PubMed Central

    Harte-Hargrove, Lauren C.; Varga-Wesson, Ada; Duffy, Aine M.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2015-01-01

    The mossy fiber (MF) pathway is critical to hippocampal function and influenced by gonadal hormones. Physiological data are limited, so we asked whether basal transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP) differed in slices of adult male and female rats. The results showed small sex differences in basal transmission but striking sex differences in opioid receptor sensitivity and LTP. When slices were made from females on proestrous morning, when serum levels of 17β-estradiol peak, the nonspecific opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (1 μm) enhanced MF transmission but there was no effect in males, suggesting preferential opioid receptor-dependent inhibition in females when 17β-estradiol levels are elevated. The μ-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonist Cys2,Tyr3,Orn5,Pen7-amide (CTOP; 300 nm) had a similar effect but the δ-opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist naltrindole (NTI; 1 μm) did not, implicating MORs in female MF transmission. The GABAB receptor antagonist saclofen (200 μm) occluded effects of CTOP but the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (10 μm) did not. For LTP, a low-frequency (LF) protocol was used because higher frequencies elicited hyperexcitability in females. Proestrous females exhibited LF-LTP but males did not, suggesting a lower threshold for synaptic plasticity when 17β-estradiol is elevated. NTI blocked LF-LTP in proestrous females, but CTOP did not. Electron microscopy revealed more DOR-labeled spines of pyramidal cells in proestrous females than males. Therefore, we suggest that increased postsynaptic DORs mediate LF-LTP in proestrous females. The results show strong MOR regulation of MF transmission only in females and identify a novel DOR-dependent form of MF LTP specific to proestrus. PMID:25632146

  13. Universities UK Response to the Higher Education White Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Universities UK, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Universities UK's response to the Higher Education White Paper outlines the principles that we believe will underpin a strong future higher education system. These principles form the basis of the specific recommendations we make to government in taking forward a programme of change. They also form the backdrop to our own commitments, which…

  14. Dopamine receptors in a songbird brain

    PubMed Central

    Kubikova, Lubica; Wada, Kazuhiro; Jarvis, Erich D

    2010-01-01

    Dopamine is a key neuromodulatory transmitter in the brain. It acts through dopamine receptors to affect changes in neural activity, gene expression, and behavior. In songbirds, dopamine is released into the striatal song nucleus Area X, and the levels depend on social contexts of undirected and directed singing. This differential release is associated with differential expression of activity-dependent genes, such as egr1 (avian zenk), which in mammalian brain are modulated by dopamine receptors. Here we cloned from zebra finch brain cDNAs of all avian dopamine receptors: the D1 (D1A, D1B, D1D) and D2 (D2, D3, D4) families. Comparative sequence analyses of predicted proteins revealed expected phylogenetic relationships, in which the D1 family exists as single exon and the D2 family exists as spliced exon genes. In both zebra finch and chicken, the D1A, D1B, and D2 receptors were highly expressed in the striatum, the D1D and D3 throughout the pallium and within the mesopallium, respectively, and the D4 mainly in the cerebellum. Furthermore, within the zebra finch, all receptors, except for D4, showed differential expression in song nuclei relative to the surrounding regions and developmentally regulated expression that decreased for most receptors during the sensory acquisition and sensorimotor phases of song learning. Within Area X, half of the cells expressed both D1A and D2 receptors, and a higher proportion of the D1A-only-containing neurons expressed egr1 during undirected but not during directed singing. Our findings are consistent with hypotheses that dopamine receptors may be involved in song development and social context-dependent behaviors. J. Comp. Neurol. 518:741–769, 2010. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20058221

  15. RECEPTOR MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source apportionment (receptor) models are mathematical procedures for identifying and quantifying the sources of ambient air pollutants and their effects at a site (the receptor), primarily on the basis of species concentration measurements at the receptor, and generally without...

  16. Amyloid-β Receptors: The Good, the Bad, and the Prion Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Jarosz-Griffiths, Heledd H.; Noble, Elizabeth; Rushworth, Jo V.; Hooper, Nigel M.

    2016-01-01

    Several different receptor proteins have been identified that bind monomeric, oligomeric, or fibrillar forms of amyloid-β (Aβ). “Good” receptors internalize Aβ or promote its transcytosis out of the brain, whereas “bad” receptors bind oligomeric forms of Aβ that are largely responsible for the synapticloss, memory impairments, and neurotoxicity that underlie Alzheimer disease. The prion protein both removes Aβ from the brain and transduces the toxic actions of Aβ. The clustering of distinct receptors in cell surface signaling platforms likely underlies the actions of distinct oligomeric species of Aβ. These Aβ receptor-signaling platforms provide opportunities for therapeutic intervention in Alzheimer disease. PMID:26719327

  17. Amyloid-β Receptors: The Good, the Bad, and the Prion Protein.

    PubMed

    Jarosz-Griffiths, Heledd H; Noble, Elizabeth; Rushworth, Jo V; Hooper, Nigel M

    2016-02-12

    Several different receptor proteins have been identified that bind monomeric, oligomeric, or fibrillar forms of amyloid-β (Aβ). "Good" receptors internalize Aβ or promote its transcytosis out of the brain, whereas "bad" receptors bind oligomeric forms of Aβ that are largely responsible for the synapticloss, memory impairments, and neurotoxicity that underlie Alzheimer disease. The prion protein both removes Aβ from the brain and transduces the toxic actions of Aβ. The clustering of distinct receptors in cell surface signaling platforms likely underlies the actions of distinct oligomeric species of Aβ. These Aβ receptor-signaling platforms provide opportunities for therapeutic intervention in Alzheimer disease. PMID:26719327

  18. Handbook of Poetic Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padgett, Ron, Ed.

    Intended for secondary teachers and student writers but useful for anyone interested in poetic forms, this book defines 74 basic poetic forms, summarizes their histories, quotes examples from noted poets, and offers professional tricks of the trade on how to use each form. The book covers the following poetic forms: abstract poem, acrostic,…

  19. Bacteria form tellurium nanocrystals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    A team of researchers have found two bacterial species that produce tellurium oxyanions as respiratory electron acceptors for growth, leaving elemental tellurium in the form of nanoparticles. The crystals from the two organisms exhibit distinctively different structures. Bacillus selenitireducens initially forms nanorods that cluster together to form rosettes. Sulfurospirillum barnesii forms irregularly-shaped nanospheres that coalesce into larger composite aggregates.

  20. Progesterone receptor signalling in retinal photoreceptor neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alice C Wyse; Roche, Sarah L; Byrne, Ashleigh M; Ruiz-Lopez, Ana M; Cotter, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    'Norgestrel', a synthetic form of the female hormone progesterone has been identified as potential drug candidate for the treatment of the degenerative eye disease retinitis pigmentosa. However, to date, no work has looked at the compound's specific cellular target. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the receptor target of Norgestrel and begin to examine its potential mechanism of action in the retina. In this work, we identify and characterize the expression of progesterone receptors present in the C57 wild type and rd10 mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. Classical progesterone receptors A and B (PR A/B), progesterone receptor membrane components 1 and 2 (PGRMC1, PGRMC2) and membrane progesterone receptors α, β and γ were found to be expressed. All receptors excluding PR A/B were also found in the 661W photoreceptor cell line. PGRMC1 is a key regulator of apoptosis and its expression is up-regulated in the degenerating rd10 mouse retina. Activated by Norgestrel through nuclear trafficking, siRNA knock down of PGRMC1 abrogated the protective properties of Norgestrel on damaged photoreceptors. Furthermore, specific inhibition of PGRMC1 by AG205 blocked Norgestrel-induced protection in stressed retinal explants. Therefore, we conclude that PGRMC1 is crucial to the neuroprotective effects of Norgestrel on stressed photoreceptors. The synthetic progestin 'Norgestrel' has been identified as a potential therapeutic for the treatment of Retinitis Pigmentosa, a degenerative eye disease. However, the mechanism behind this neuroprotection is currently unknown. In this work, we identify 'Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1' as the major progesterone receptor eliciting the protective effects of Norgestrel, both in vitro and ex vivo. This furthers our understanding of Norgestrel's molecular mechanism, which we hope will help bring Norgestrel one step closer to the clinic. PMID:26447367

  1. Report on Higher Education Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Commission on Higher Education.

    Recognizing the rapid development of telecommunications and networking technologies and their growing importance to higher education and New Jersey's overall economic competitiveness, New Jersey's Plan for Higher Education called for the Commission on Higher Education and the Presidents' Council to appoint a Higher Education Technology Task Force…

  2. Women in Virginia Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New University Conference, Hampton, VA. Peninsula Chapter.

    This document explores how Virginia higher education perpetuates stereotypic social roles, the evolution of sexually segregated schools, the current evidences of sexual discrimination towards faculty, staff and students, the State Council of Higher Education's 1967 plan for higher education, the status of Virginia higher education under the law…

  3. Higher Education and Social Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, John

    2008-01-01

    An agenda for future higher education research is proposed which incorporates four interconnected elements: changing social contexts; their implications for higher education; mechanisms of interaction between higher education and society; higher education's impact on society. The role of comparative research in investigating these topics is…

  4. Moon (Form-Origin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2014-05-01

    When the Earth was formed, it was in a state of burning heat. As time went by, temperature on the planet's surface was falling due to radiation and heat transfer, and various components (crusts) began taking solid form at the Earth's poles. The formation of crusts took place at the Earth's poles, because the stirring of burning and fluid masses on the surface of the Earth was significantly slighter there than it was on the equator. Due to centrifugal force and Coriolis Effect, these solid masses headed towards the equator; those originating from the North Pole followed a south-western course, while those originating from the South Pole followed a north-western course and there they rotated from west to east at a lower speed than the underlying burning and liquid earth, because of their lower initial linear velocity, their solid state and inertia. Because inertia is proportional to mass, the initially larger solid body swept all new solid ones, incorporating them to its western side. The density of the new solid masses was higher, because the components on the surface would freeze and solidify first, before the underlying thicker components. As a result, the western side of the initial islet of solid rocks submerged, while the east side elevated. . As a result of the above, this initial islet began to spin in reverse, and after taking on the shape of a sphere, it formed the "heart" of the Moon. The Moon-sphere, rolling on the equator, would sink the solid rocks that continued to descend from the Earth's poles. The sinking rocks partially melted because of higher temperatures in the greater depths that the Moon descended to, while part of the rocks' mass bonded with the Moon and also served as a heat-insulating material, preventing the descended side of the sphere from melting. Combined with the Earth's liquid mass that covered its emerging eastern surface, new sphere-shaped shells were created, with increased density and very powerful structural cohesion. During the

  5. Moon (Form-Origin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2015-04-01

    When the Earth was formed, it was in a state of burning heat. As time went by, temperature on the planet's surface was falling due to radiation and heat transfer, and various components (crusts) began taking solid form at the Earth's poles. The formation of crusts took place at the Earth's poles, because the stirring of burning and fluid masses on the surface of the Earth was significantly slighter there than it was on the equator. Due to centrifugal force and Coriolis Effect, these solid masses headed towards the equator; those originating from the North Pole followed a south-western course, while those originating from the South Pole followed a north-western course and there they rotated from west to east at a lower speed than the underlying burning and liquid earth, because of their lower initial linear velocity, their solid state and inertia. Because inertia is proportional to mass, the initially larger solid body swept all new solid ones, incorporating them to its western side. The density of the new solid masses was higher, because the components on the surface would freeze and solidify first, before the underlying thicker components. As a result, the western side of the initial islet of solid rocks submerged, while the east side elevated. . As a result of the above, this initial islet began to spin in reverse, and after taking on the shape of a sphere, it formed the "heart" of the Moon. The Moon-sphere, rolling on the equator, would sink the solid rocks that continued to descend from the Earth's poles. The sinking rocks partially melted because of higher temperatures in the greater depths that the Moon descended to, while part of the rocks' mass bonded with the Moon and also served as a heat-insulating material, preventing the descended side of the sphere from melting. Combined with the Earth's liquid mass that covered its emerging eastern surface, new sphere-shaped shells were created, with increased density and very powerful structural cohesion. During the

  6. Moon (Form-Origin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2016-04-01

    When the Earth was formed, it was in a state of burning heat. As time went by, temperature on the planet's surface was falling due to radiation and heat transfer, and various components (crusts) began taking solid form at the Earth's poles. The formation of crusts took place at the Earth's poles, because the stirring of burning and fluid masses on the surface of the Earth was significantly slighter there than it was on the equator. Due to centrifugal force and Coriolis Effect, these solid masses headed towards the equator; those originating from the North Pole followed a south-western course, while those originating from the South Pole followed a north-western course and there they rotated from west to east at a lower speed than the underlying burning and liquid earth, because of their lower initial linear velocity, their solid state and inertia. Because inertia is proportional to mass, the initially larger solid body swept all new solid ones, incorporating them to its western side. The density of the new solid masses was higher, because the components on the surface would freeze and solidify first, before the underlying thicker components. As a result, the western side of the initial islet of solid rocks submerged, while the east side elevated. . As a result of the above, this initial islet began to spin in reverse, and after taking on the shape of a sphere, it formed the "heart" of the Moon. The Moon-sphere, rolling on the equator, would sink the solid rocks that continued to descend from the Earth's poles. The sinking rocks partially melted because of higher temperatures in the greater depths that the Moon descended to, while part of the rocks' mass bonded with the Moon and also served as a heat-insulating material, preventing the descended side of the sphere from melting. Combined with the Earth's liquid mass that covered its emerging eastern surface, new sphere-shaped shells were created, with increased density and very powerful structural cohesion. During the

  7. Cloning, constitutive activity and expression profiling of two receptors related to relaxin receptors in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Van Hiel, Matthias B; Vandersmissen, Hans Peter; Proost, Paul; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2015-06-01

    Leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptors (LGRs) comprise a cluster of transmembrane proteins, characterized by the presence of a large N-terminal extracellular domain. This receptor group can be classified into three subtypes. Belonging to the subtype C LGRs are the mammalian relaxin receptors LGR7 (RXFP1) and LGR8 (RXFP2), which mediate important reproductive and other processes. We identified two related receptors in the genome of the fruit fly and cloned their open reading frames into an expression vector. Interestingly, dLGR3 demonstrated constitutive activity at very low doses of transfected plasmid, whereas dLGR4 did not show any basal activity. Both receptors exhibited a similar expression pattern during development, with relatively high transcript levels during the first larval stage. In addition, both receptors displayed higher expression in male adult flies as compared to female flies. Analysis of the tissue distribution of both receptor transcripts revealed a high expression of dLGR3 in the female fat body, while the expression of dLGR4 peaked in the midgut of both the wandering and adult stage. PMID:25064813

  8. Multiple human D sub 5 dopamine receptor genes: A functional receptor and two pseudogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Grandy, D.K.; Yuan Zhang; Bouvier, C.; Qunyong Zhou; Johnson, R.A.; Allen, L.; Buck, K.; Bunzow, J.R.; Salon, J.; Civelli, O. )

    1991-10-15

    Three genes closely related to the D{sub 1} dopamine receptor were identified in the human genome. One of the genes lacks introns and encodes a functional human dopamine receptor, D{sub 5}, whose deduced amino acid sequence is 49% identical to that of the human D{sub 1} receptor. Compared with the human D{sub 1} dopamine receptor, the D{sub 5} receptor displayed a higher affinity for dopamine and was able to stimulate a biphasic rather than a monophasic intracellular accumulation of cAMP. Neither of the other two genes was able to direct the synthesis of a receptor. nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that these two genes are 98% identical to each other and 95% identical to the D{sub 5} sequence. Relative to the D{sub 5} sequence, both contain insertions and deletions that result in several in-frame termination codons. Premature termination of translation is the most likely explanation for the failure of these genes to produce receptors in COS-7 and 293 cells even though their messages are transcribed. The authors conclude that the two are pseudogenes. Blot hybridization experiments performed on rat genomic DNA suggest that there is one D{sub 5} gene in this species and that the pseudogenes may be the result of a relatively recent evolutionary event.

  9. Biased and G Protein-Independent Signaling of Chemokine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Anne; Larsen, Olav; Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette M.

    2014-01-01

    Biased signaling or functional selectivity occurs when a 7TM-receptor preferentially activates one of several available pathways. It can be divided into three distinct forms: ligand bias, receptor bias, and tissue or cell bias, where it is mediated by different ligands (on the same receptor), different receptors (with the same ligand), or different tissues or cells (for the same ligand–receptor pair). Most often biased signaling is differentiated into G protein-dependent and β-arrestin-dependent signaling. Yet, it may also cover signaling differences within these groups. Moreover, it may not be absolute, i.e., full versus no activation. Here we discuss biased signaling in the chemokine system, including the structural basis for biased signaling in chemokine receptors, as well as in class A 7TM receptors in general. This includes overall helical movements and the contributions of micro-switches based on recently published 7TM crystals and molecular dynamics studies. All three forms of biased signaling are abundant in the chemokine system. This challenges our understanding of “classic” redundancy inevitably ascribed to this system, where multiple chemokines bind to the same receptor and where a single chemokine may bind to several receptors – in both cases with the same functional outcome. The ubiquitous biased signaling confers a hitherto unknown specificity to the chemokine system with a complex interaction pattern that is better described as promiscuous with context-defined roles and different functional outcomes in a ligand-, receptor-, or cell/tissue-defined manner. As the low number of successful drug development plans implies, there are great difficulties in targeting chemokine receptors; in particular with regard to receptor antagonists as anti-inflammatory drugs. Un-defined and putative non-selective targeting of the complete cellular signaling system could be the underlying cause of lack of success. Therefore, biased ligands could be the solution

  10. Signals and Receptors.

    PubMed

    Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Lu, Benson; Evans, Ron; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2016-04-01

    Communication between cells in a multicellular organism occurs by the production of ligands (proteins, peptides, fatty acids, steroids, gases, and other low-molecular-weight compounds) that are either secreted by cells or presented on their surface, and act on receptors on, or in, other target cells. Such signals control cell growth, migration, survival, and differentiation. Signaling receptors can be single-span plasma membrane receptors associated with tyrosine or serine/threonine kinase activities, proteins with seven transmembrane domains, or intracellular receptors. Ligand-activated receptors convey signals into the cell by activating signaling pathways that ultimately affect cytosolic machineries or nuclear transcriptional programs or by directly translocating to the nucleus to regulate transcription. PMID:27037414

  11. Conjoint Forming - Technologies for Simultaneous Forming and Joining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groche, P.; Wohletz, S.; Mann, A.; Krech, M.; Monnerjahn, V.

    2016-03-01

    The market demand for new products optimized for e. g. lightweight applications or smart components leads to new challenges in production engineering. Hybrid structures represent one promising approach. They aim at higher product performance by using a suitable combination of different materials. The developments of hybrid structures stimulate the research on joining of dissimilar materials. Since they allow for joining dissimilar materials without external heating technologies based on joining by plastic deformation seem to be of special attractiveness. The paper at hand discusses the conjoint forming approach. This approach combines forming and joining in one process. Two or more workpieces are joined while at least one workpiece is plastically deformed. After presenting the fundamental joining mechanisms, the conjoint forming approach is discussed comprehensively. Examples of conjoint processes demonstrate the effectiveness and reveal the underlying phenomena.

  12. Plant TRAF Proteins Regulate NLR Immune Receptor Turnover.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuai; Chen, Xuejin; Zhong, Xionghui; Li, Meng; Ao, Kevin; Huang, Jianhua; Li, Xin

    2016-02-10

    In animals, Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF) proteins are molecular adaptors that regulate innate and adaptive immunity, development, and abiotic stress responses. Although gene families encoding TRAF domain-containing proteins exhibit enriched diversity in higher plants, their biological roles are poorly defined. Here, we report the identification of two redundant TRAF proteins, Mutant, snc1-enhancing 13 (MUSE13) and MUSE14, that contribute to the turnover of nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat-containing (NLR) immune receptors SNC1 and RPS2. Loss of both MUSE13 and MUSE14 leads to enhanced pathogen resistance, NLR accumulation, and autoimmunity, while MUSE13 overexpression results in reduced NLR levels and activity. In planta, MUSE13 associates with SNC1, RPS2, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase SCF(CPR1). Taken together, we speculate that MUSE13 and MUSE14 associate with the SCF E3 ligase complex to form a plant-type TRAFasome, which modulates ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of NLR immune sensors to maintain their homeostasis. PMID:26867179

  13. Crystal structure of human interferon-γ receptor 2 reveals the structural basis for receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Mikulecký, Pavel; Zahradník, Jirí; Kolenko, Petr; Černý, Jiří; Charnavets, Tatsiana; Kolářová, Lucie; Nečasová, Iva; Pham, Phuong Ngoc; Schneider, Bohdan

    2016-09-01

    Interferon-γ receptor 2 is a cell-surface receptor that is required for interferon-γ signalling and therefore plays a critical immunoregulatory role in innate and adaptive immunity against viral and also bacterial and protozoal infections. A crystal structure of the extracellular part of human interferon-γ receptor 2 (IFNγR2) was solved by molecular replacement at 1.8 Å resolution. Similar to other class 2 receptors, IFNγR2 has two fibronectin type III domains. The characteristic structural features of IFNγR2 are concentrated in its N-terminal domain: an extensive π-cation motif of stacked residues KWRWRH, a NAG-W-NAG sandwich (where NAG stands for N-acetyl-D-glucosamine) and finally a helix formed by residues 78-85, which is unique among class 2 receptors. Mass spectrometry and mutational analyses showed the importance of N-linked glycosylation to the stability of the protein and confirmed the presence of two disulfide bonds. Structure-based bioinformatic analysis revealed independent evolutionary behaviour of both receptor domains and, together with multiple sequence alignment, identified putative binding sites for interferon-γ and receptor 1, the ligands of IFNγR2. PMID:27599734

  14. The level and distribution of the GABABR1 and GABABR2 receptor subunits in the rat's inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Lena; Khan, Aziz N.; Butt, Sehrish; Patel, Chirag R.; Zhang, Huiming

    2012-01-01

    The type B γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAB receptor) is an important neurotransmitter receptor in the midbrain auditory structure, the inferior colliculus (IC). A functional GABAB receptor is a heterodimer consisting of two subunits, GABABR1 and GABABR2. Western blotting and immunohistochemical experiments were conducted to examine the expression of the two subunits over the IC including its central nucleus, dorsal cortex, and external cortex (ICc, ICd, and ICx). Results revealed that the two subunits existed in both cell bodies and the neuropil throughout the IC. The two subunits had similar regional distributions over the IC. The combined level of cell body and neuropil labeling was higher in the ICd than the other two subdivisions. Labeling in the ICc and ICx was stronger in the dorsal than the ventral regions. In spite of regional differences, no defined boundaries were formed between different areas. For both subunits, the regional distribution of immunoreactivity in the neuropil was parallel to that of combined immunoreactivity in the neuropil and cell bodies. The density of labeled cell bodies tended to be higher but sizes of cell bodies tended to be smaller in the ICd than in the other subdivisions. No systematic regional changes were found in the level of cell body immunoreactivity, except that GABABR2-immunoreactive cell bodies in the ICd had slightly higher optic density (OD) than in other regions. Elongated cell bodies existed throughout the IC. Many labeled cell bodies along the outline of the IC were oriented in parallel to the outline. No strong tendency of orientation was found in labeled cell bodies in ICc. Regional distributions of the subunits in ICc correlated well with inputs to this subdivision. Our finding regarding the contrast in the level of neuropil immunoreactivity among different subdivisions is consistent with the fact that the GABAB receptor has different pre- and postsynaptic functions in different IC regions. PMID:23189044

  15. Assessment of ghrelin and leptin receptor levels in postmenopausal women who received oral or transdermal menopausal hormonal therapy*

    PubMed Central

    Ruszkowska, Barbara; Sokup, Alina; Kulwas, Arleta; Socha, Maciej W.; Góralczyk, Krzysztof; Góralczyk, Barbara; Rość, Danuta

    2012-01-01

    Objective: In postmenopausal women, an increased leptin concentration and reduced levels of ghrelin and adiponectin were observed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concentrations of the active form of ghrelin, total ghrelin, leptin receptor, lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)), and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) in postmenopausal women who received oral or transdermal menopausal hormonal therapy (MHT). Methods: The study involved 76 healthy women: 46 women aged from 44 to 58 years who received oral (26) or transdermal (20) MHT; the control group consisted of 30 women aged from 44 to 54 years who did not receive MHT. The plasma concentrations of total ghrelin, the active form of ghrelin, Lp(a), and PAI-1:Ag were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The concentration of the leptin receptor was measured by enzyme immunometric assay (EIA). Results: We observed a significantly higher concentration of total ghrelin and the active form of ghrelin in women who received transdermal MHT in comparison with those who took oral MHT. We also found a significantly lower concentration of total ghrelin in women who received oral MHT compared with the control group. A higher concentration of PAI-1:Ag was found in the group of women who took transdermal MHT in comparison with those who took oral MHT and with the control group. The differences were statistically significant. Additionally, we found a significant negative correlation between the concentrations of total ghrelin and PAI-1:Ag and a positive correlation between the concentrations of total ghrelin and leptin receptor in women who received transdermal MHT. Conclusions: The study showed that women who used transdermal MHT had higher levels of total ghrelin than women who took oral MHT. This indicates a beneficial effect of the transdermal route of MHT. However, transdermal therapy was associated with adverse effects with regard to the observed higher levels of PAI-1:Ag, which in turn, can lead to

  16. Government and Higher Education Relationships across Three Continents: The Winds of Change. Issues in Higher Education Series, Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neave, Guy, Ed.; van Vught, Frans A., Ed.

    This volume collects several case studies on the relationship between government and higher education in developing nations in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. In particular these studies ask whether specific forms of government regulation help to solve the crisis of higher education in the developing world better than other forms of regulation.…

  17. A natural kinase-deficient variant of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, L Y; Edenson, S P; Yu, Y L; Senderowicz, L; Turck, C W

    1996-08-01

    A fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 variant missing 37 amino acids from the carboxy-terminal tyrosine kinase catalytic domain was discovered in human lung fibroblasts and several other human cell lines. The receptor variant binds specifically to acidic fibroblast growth factor but has no tyrosine kinase activity. It was found that cellular transfectants expressing the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 variant are mitogenically inactive and ligand binding to the receptor causes neither receptor autophosphorylation nor phospholipase C-gamma transphosphorylation. The fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 variant therefore represents an inactive receptor for acidic fibroblast growth factor. Since both kinase and kinase-deficient receptor forms are expressed in cells, it is conceivable that the kinase-deficient receptor plays an important role in regulating cellular responses elicited by acidic fibroblast growth factor stimulation. PMID:8756477

  18. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB-mediated phosphorylation of PDGF beta receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Coats, S R; Love, H D; Pledger, W J

    1994-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulates the proliferation of Balb/c-3T3 fibroblasts through binding and subsequent activation of PDGF receptors. Activation of the PDGF receptors has been proposed to involve receptor dimerization. PDGF-AB has been shown to bind PDGF alpha and beta receptor subunits to form PDGF alpha beta and alpha alpha receptor dimers. In this paper we demonstrate that, following the down-regulation of PDGF alpha receptors, the binding of PDGF-AB to beta receptors occurred at 37 degrees C but not at 4 degrees C. PDGF-AB stimulated the phosphorylation of PDGF beta receptor monomers in cells depleted of PDGF alpha receptors by prior exposure to PDGF-AA. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8297345

  19. Atomic force microscopy of ionotropic receptors bearing subunit-specific tags provides a method for determining receptor architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neish, Calum S.; Martin, Ian L.; Davies, Martin; Henderson, Robert M.; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2003-08-01

    We have developed an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based method for the determination of the subunit architecture of ionotropic receptors, and tested the method using the GABAA receptor as a model system. The most common form of the GABAA receptor probably consists of 2alpha1-, 2beta2- and 1gamma2-subunits. We show here that the arrangement of subunits around the central Cl- ion channel can be deduced by AFM of receptors tagged with subunit-specific antibodies. Transfection of cells with DNA encoding alpha1-, beta2- and gamma2-subunits resulted in the production of receptors containing all three subunits, as judged by both immunoblot analysis and the binding of [3H]-Ro15-1788, a specific radioligand for the GABAA receptor. A His6-tag on the alpha1-subunit was used to purify the receptor from membrane fractions of transfected cells. After incubation with anti-His6 immunoglobulin G, some receptors became tagged with either one or two antibody molecules. AFM analysis of complexes containing two bound antibodies showed that the most common angle between the two tags was 135°, close to the value of 144° expected if the two alpha-subunits are separated by a third subunit. This method is applicable to the complete elucidation of the subunit arrangement around the GABAA receptor rosette, and can also be applied to other ionotropic receptors.

  20. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Imran; Houck, Keith; Judson, Richard S.; Kavlock, Robert J.; Martin, Matthew T.; Reif, David M.; Wambaugh, John; Dix, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nuclear receptors (NR) are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that control a range of cellular processes. Persistent stimulation of some NR is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. Here we report on a systematic analysis of new in vitro human NR activity data on 309 environmental chemicals in relationship to their liver cancer-related chronic outcomes in rodents. Results The effects of 309 environmental chemicals on human constitutive androstane receptors (CAR/NR1I3), pregnane X receptor (PXR/NR1I2), aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR/NR1C), liver X receptors (LXR/NR1H), retinoic X receptors (RXR/NR2B) and steroid receptors (SR/NR3) were determined using in vitro data. Hepatic histopathology, observed in rodents after two years of chronic treatment for 171 of the 309 chemicals, was summarized by a cancer lesion progression grade. Chemicals that caused proliferative liver lesions in both rat and mouse were generally more active for the human receptors, relative to the compounds that only affected one rodent species, and these changes were significant for PPAR (p0.001), PXR (p0.01) and CAR (p0.05). Though most chemicals exhibited receptor promiscuity, multivariate analysis clustered them into relatively few NR activity combinations. The human NR activity pattern of chemicals weakly associated with the severity of rodent liver cancer lesion progression (p0.05). Conclusions The rodent carcinogens had higher in vitro potency for human NR relative to non-carcinogens. Structurally diverse chemicals with similar NR promiscuity patterns weakly associated with the severity of rodent liver cancer progression. While these results do not prove the role of NR activation in human liver cancer, they do have implications for nuclear receptor chemical biology and provide insights into putative toxicity pathways. More importantly, these findings suggest the

  1. Transforming Higher Education: Implications for State Higher Education Finance Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Dewayne

    1998-01-01

    Examines how information technology is transforming higher education (asynchronous learning, distance education, customized program structure, customized delivery, outcome-based programs, collaboration, and competition) and discusses implications for state higher education finance policy (competition, student costs, collaboration, and…

  2. The unliganded long isoform of estrogen receptor beta stimulates brain ryanodine receptor single channel activity alongside with cytosolic Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Rybalchenko, Volodymyr; Grillo, Michael A.; Gastinger, Matthew J.; Rybalchenko, Nataliya; Payne, Andrew J.; Koulen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Ca2+ release from intracellular stores mediated by endoplasmic reticulum membrane ryanodine receptors (RyR) plays a key role in activating and synchronizing downstream Ca2+-dependent mechanisms, in different cells varying from apoptosis to nuclear transcription and development of defensive responses. Recently discovered, atypical “non-genomic” effects mediated by estrogen receptors (ER) include rapid Ca2+ release upon estrogen exposure in conditions implicitly suggesting involvement of RyRs. In the present study, we report various levels of co-localization between RyR type 2 (RyR2) and ER type β (ERβ) in the neuronal cell line HT-22, indicating a possible functional interaction. Electrophysiological analyses revealed a significant increase in single channel ionic currents generated by mouse brain RyRs after application of the soluble monomer of the long form ERβ (ERβ1). The effect was due to a strong increase in open probability of RyR higher open channel sublevels at cytosolic [Ca2+] concentrations of 100 nM, suggesting a synergistic action of ERβ1 and Ca2+ in RyR activation, and a potential contribution to Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release rather than to basal intracellular Ca2+ concentration level at rest. This RyR/ERβ interaction has potential effects on cellular physiology, including roles of shorter ERβ isoforms and modulation of the RyR/ERβ complexes by exogenous estrogens. PMID:19899956

  3. The insulin receptor activation process involves localized conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Baron, V; Kaliman, P; Gautier, N; Van Obberghen, E

    1992-11-15

    The molecular process by which insulin binding to the receptor alpha-subunit induces activation of the receptor beta-subunit with ensuing substrate phosphorylation remains unclear. In this study, we aimed at approaching this molecular mechanism of signal transduction and at delineating the cytoplasmic domains implied in this process. To do this, we used antipeptide antibodies to the following sequences of the receptor beta-subunit: (i) positions 962-972 in the juxtamembrane domain, (ii) positions 1247-1261 at the end of the kinase domain, and (iii) positions 1294-1317 and (iv) positions 1309-1326, both in the receptor C terminus. We have previously shown that insulin binding to its receptor induces a conformational change in the beta-subunit C terminus. Here, we demonstrate that receptor autophosphorylation induces an additional conformational change. This process appears to be distinct from the one produced by ligand binding and can be detected in at least three different beta-subunit regions: the juxtamembrane domain, the kinase domain, and the C terminus. Hence, the cytoplasmic part of the receptor beta-subunit appears to undergo an extended conformational change upon autophosphorylation. By contrast, the insulin-induced change does not affect the juxtamembrane domain 962-972 nor the kinase domain 1247-1261 and may be limited to the receptor C terminus. Further, we show that the hormone-dependent conformational change is maintained in a kinase-deficient receptor due to a mutation at lysine 1018. Therefore, during receptor activation, the ligand-induced change could precede ATP binding and receptor autophosphorylation. We propose that insulin binding leads to a transient receptor form that may allow ATP binding and, subsequently, autophosphorylation. The second conformational change could unmask substrate-binding sites and stabilize the receptor in an active conformation. PMID:1331080

  4. Higher Education and Work. Higher Education Policy Series 23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, John, Ed.; And Others

    The relationship between higher education and the world of work is examined in terms of the changing structures of higher education institutions and the effect of the relationship on curricula. An international perspective is provided on the changing nature of employment and the labor market; the increasing diversification of higher education…

  5. Mission Groups and the New Politics of British Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filippakou, Ourania; Tapper, Ted

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the emergence and impact of the mission groups in British higher education. The central argument is that given the development of a mass and diversified model of higher education it was inevitable that the higher education institutions would form pressure groups, while increased marketisation and growing inter-institutional…

  6. Identification of N-terminal receptor activity-modifying protein residues important for calcitonin gene-related peptide, adrenomedullin, and amylin receptor function.

    PubMed

    Qi, Tao; Christopoulos, George; Bailey, Richard J; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M; Hay, Debbie L

    2008-10-01

    Calcitonin-family receptors comprise calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CL) or calcitonin receptor and receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP) pairings. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptors are CL/RAMP1, whereas adrenomedullin (AM) receptors are CL/RAMP2 (AM1 receptor) or CL/RAMP3 (AM2 receptor). Amylin (Amy) receptors are RAMP hetero-oligomers with the calcitonin receptor (AMY1, AMY2, and AMY3, respectively). How RAMPs change G protein-coupled receptor pharmacology is not fully understood. We exploited sequence differences between RAMP1 and RAMP3 to identify individual residues capable of altering receptor pharmacology. Alignment of human RAMPs revealed eight residues that are conserved in RAMP2 and RAMP3 but are different in RAMP1. We hypothesized that residues in RAMP2 and RAMP3, but not RAMP1, are responsible for making CL/RAMP2 and CL/RAMP3 AM receptors. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we introduced individual RAMP3 residues into RAMP1 and vice versa in these eight positions. Mutant or wild-type RAMPs were transfected into Cos7 cells with CL or the insert-negative form of the calcitonin receptor [CT(a)]. Agonist-stimulated cAMP production and cell-surface expression of constructs were measured. Position 74 in RAMP1 and RAMP3 was critical for determining AM potency and affinity, and Phe93 in RAMP1 was an important contributor to alphaCGRP potency at CGRP receptors. Mutant RAMP/CT(a) receptor complexes displayed different phenotypes. It is noteworthy that RAMP1 S103N and W74E mutations led to enhanced rAmy potency, probably related to increased cell-surface expression of these complexes. This differs from the effect on CL-based receptors where expression was unchanged. Targeted substitution has emphasized the importance of position 74 in RAMP1/RAMP3 as a key determinant of AM pharmacology. PMID:18593822

  7. Signaling by Sensory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Julius, David; Nathans, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Sensory systems detect small molecules, mechanical perturbations, or radiation via the activation of receptor proteins and downstream signaling cascades in specialized sensory cells. In vertebrates, the two principal categories of sensory receptors are ion channels, which mediate mechanosensation, thermosensation, and acid and salt taste; and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which mediate vision, olfaction, and sweet, bitter, and umami tastes. GPCR-based signaling in rods and cones illustrates the fundamental principles of rapid activation and inactivation, signal amplification, and gain control. Channel-based sensory systems illustrate the integration of diverse modulatory signals at the receptor, as seen in the thermosensory/pain system, and the rapid response kinetics that are possible with direct mechanical gating of a channel. Comparisons of sensory receptor gene sequences reveal numerous examples in which gene duplication and sequence divergence have created novel sensory specificities. This is the evolutionary basis for the observed diversity in temperature- and ligand-dependent gating among thermosensory channels, spectral tuning among visual pigments, and odorant binding among olfactory receptors. The coding of complex external stimuli by a limited number of sensory receptor types has led to the evolution of modality-specific and species-specific patterns of retention or loss of sensory information, a filtering operation that selectively emphasizes features in the stimulus that enhance survival in a particular ecological niche. The many specialized anatomic structures, such as the eye and ear, that house primary sensory neurons further enhance the detection of relevant stimuli. PMID:22110046

  8. Arginine vasotocin V1a2 receptor and GnRH-I co-localize in preoptic neurons of the sex changing grouper, Epinephelus adscensionis.

    PubMed

    Kline, Richard J; Holt, G Joan; Khan, Izhar A

    2016-01-01

    The arginine vasotocin/vasopressin (AVT/AVP) and gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) systems are known to control sexual behaviors and reproduction, respectively, in different vertebrate groups. However, a direct functional connection between these two neuroendocrine systems has not been demonstrated for any vertebrate species. Therefore, the objective of this research was to test the hypothesis that AVT acts on the GnRH system via an AVT V1a receptor in a sex changing grouper species, the rock hind, Epinephelus adscensionis. AVT V1a2 receptors were co-localized with GnRH-I on neurons in the preoptic anterior hypothalamus identifying a structural linkage between the AVT system and GnRH-I. Transcripts for avt, gnrh-I, and two AVT receptor subtypes (v1a1 and v1a2) were isolated and characterized for E. adscensionis and their expression was measured in males and females by q-RT-PCR. Translation of V1a-type cDNA sequences revealed two distinct forms of the AVT V1a receptor in E. adscensionis brain similar to those reported for other species. The observation of significantly higher gnrh-I mRNA in the POA+H of rock hind males as compared to females suggests differential regulation of the gnrh-I transcripts in the two sexes of this protogynous species. In male E. adscensionis, but not in females, a negative relationship was seen between plasma 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) and the v1a1 receptor mRNA levels in the POA+H, while a positive trend was observed between 11-KT and v1a2 receptor mRNA levels, indicating that these receptor forms may be differentially regulated. PMID:26361870

  9. Cloning of a putative G-protein-coupled receptor from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Josefsson, L G; Rask, L

    1997-10-15

    We have cloned and characterized a cDNA from Arabidopsis thaliana that most likely encodes a novel member of the vast superfamily of G-protein-coupled receptor proteins (GPCRs). By taking advantage of amino acid sequence similarities between plant expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and established G-protein-coupled receptor sequences, a probe was obtained which was used for the screening of an Arabidopsis cDNA library. The cDNA which was found is very infrequently represented in the cDNA library, suggesting a low and/or spatially restricted expression. A region of the translated sequence of the cDNA shows the highest similarity to cAMP receptors from the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. The same region is also similar to that in members of the animal calcitonin family of receptors. Another region of the putative receptor, however, is similar to sequences of serotonin receptors and other receptors of the so-called rhodopsin family of GPCRs. The rhodopsin family has numerous members in higher vertebrate species. Alignments and phylogenetic analyses of the regions of similarity yielded results in accordance with other evolutionary considerations. Our cDNA thus occurred on a distinct major branch in relation to the rest of the rhodopsin family. In relation to the calcitonin family, our cDNA and cAMP receptors occurred together on a distinct major branch but appear to have diverged from each other shortly after their divergence from the rest of the calcitonin family. Other features further argue for a tentative identification of it as a GPCR. It displays seven discrete and strongly predicted transmembrane domains when analyzed in hydropathy plots. The preferred orientation is with the amino terminus towards the outside. It has one Cys residue in extracellular loop 1 and another in extracellular loop 2. Cys residues in these loops are known to form disulfide bridges in many other GPCRs. Finally, it has several fully conserved amino acids that belong to the most conserved

  10. Gravity receptors and responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Allan H.

    1989-01-01

    The overall process of gravity sensing and response processes in plants may be divided conveniently into at least four components or stages: Stimulus susception (a physical event, characteristically the input to the G receptor system of environmental information about the G force magnitude, its vector direction, or both); information perception (an influence of susception on some biological structure or process that can be described as the transformation of environmental information into a biologicallly meaningful change); information transport (the export, if required, of an influence (often chemical) to cells and organs other than those at the sensor location); and biological response (almost always (in plants) a growth change of some kind). Some analysts of the process identify, between information perception and information transport, an additional stage, transduction, which would emphasize the importance of a transformation from one form of information to another, for example from mechanical statolith displacement to an electric, chemical, or other alteration that was its indirect result. These four (or five) stages are temporally sequential. Even if all that occurs at each stage can not be confidently identified, it seems evident that during transduction and transport, matters dealt with are found relatively late in the information flow rather than at the perception stage. As more and more is learned about the roles played by plant hormones which condition the G responses, the mechanism(s) of perception which should be are not necessarily better understood. However, if by asking the right questions and being lucky with experiments perhaps the discovery of how some process (such as sedimentation of protoplasmic organelles) dictates what happens down stream in the information flow sequence may be made.

  11. Forms of Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Forms of Arthritis Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents Today, ... of Linda Saisselin Osteoarthritis (OA) — the form of arthritis typically occurring during middle or old age, this ...

  12. Forms of Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... stiffness, inflammation, swelling and, sometimes, destruction of joints. Gout — a form of arthritis that occurs when uric ... the joints. Some 2.1 million Americans have gout. Lupus — a form of arthritis, like rheumatoid arthritis, ...

  13. Autoantibodies interacting with purified native thyrotropin receptor.

    PubMed

    Atger, M; Misrahi, M; Young, J; Jolivet, A; Orgiazzi, J; Schaison, G; Milgrom, E

    1999-11-01

    Native thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography from membrane extracts of stably transfected L cells. An ELISA test was devised to study anti-TSHR autoantibodies directly. Comparison of native TSHR with bacterially expressed, denatured TSHR showed that the latter was not recognized by the autoantibodies, suggesting that they bind to conformational epitopes only present on the native receptor. The use of deglycosylated TSHR and of purified receptor ectodomain (alpha-subunit) showed that the autoantibodies recognized only the protein backbone moiety of the receptor and that their epitopes were localized entirely in its ectodomain. Autoantibodies were detected in 45 of 48 subjects with untreated Graves' disease and in 26 of 47 healthy volunteers. The affinity for the receptor was similar in the two groups (Kd = 0.25-1 x 10-10 M) and the autoantibodies belonged to the IgG class in all cases. Although the concentration of autoantibodies was higher in Graves' disease patients (3.50 +/- 0.36 mg.L-1) than in control subjects (1.76 +/- 0.21) (mean +/- SEM), there was an overlap between the groups. Receptor-stimulating autoantibodies (TSAb) were studied by measuring cAMP synthesis in stably transfected HEK 293 cells. Their characteristics (recognition of alpha-subunit, of deglycosylated TSHR, nonrecognition of bacterially expressed denatured receptor) were similar to those of the antibodies detected by the ELISA test. TSAb were only found in individuals with Graves' disease. The ELISA test measures total anti-TSHR antibodies, whereas the test using adenylate cyclase stimulation measures antibodies that recognize specific epitopes involved in receptor activation. Our observations thus disprove the hypothesis according to which Graves' disease is related to the appearance of anti-TSHR antibodies not present in normal subjects. Actually, anti-TSHR antibodies exist in many euthyroid subjects, in some cases even at concentrations higher than those

  14. Calix[4]pyrrole-based ion pair receptors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Kuk; Sessler, Jonathan L

    2014-08-19

    Ion pair receptors, which are able to bind concurrently both a cation and an anion, often display higher selectivity and affinity for specific ion pairs than simple ion receptors capable of recognizing primarily either a cation or an anion. This enhancement in recognition function is attributable to direct or indirect cooperative interactions between cobound ions via electrostatic attractions between oppositely charged ions, as well as to positive allosteric effects. In addition, by virtue of binding the counterions of the targeted ion, ion pair receptors can minimize the solvation of the counterions, which can otherwise have a negative effect on the interactions between the receptors and the targeted ions. As a result of their more favorable interactions, ion pair receptors are attractive for use in applications, such as extraction and sensing, where control of the binding interactions is advantageous. In this Account, we illustrate this potential in the context of ion pair receptors based on the calix[4]pyrrole scaffold. Both simple ditopic ion pair receptors, containing sites for the recognition of a single anion and single cation, and so-called multitopic ion pair receptors will be discussed. The latter systems differ from conventional, so-called ditopic ion pair receptors in that they contain more than one binding site for a given targeted ion (e.g., a cation). This permits a level of selectivity and control over binding function not normally seen for simple ion or ion pair receptors containing one or two binding sites, respectively. Calix[4]pyrroles are macrocyclic compounds consisting of four pyrrole units linked via fully substituted sp(3) hybridized meso carbon atoms. They are effective receptors for Lewis basic anions (e.g., halides) in typical organic media and under certain conditions will recognize ion pairs containing charge diffuse cations, such as a small alkylammonium, imidazolium, or cesium cations. The calix[4]pyrrole framework is further

  15. Reflections on Higher Education Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, George; Moore, Kathryn M.

    1989-01-01

    Two senior scholars assess the first four volumes of "Higher Education: A Handbook of Theory and Research," a series on the nature of higher education as a discipline and the state of research in the field. (Author/MSE)

  16. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise.

  17. Gastrin receptor-avid peptide conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Timothy J.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Li, Ning; Sieckman, Gary; Higginbotham, Chrys-Ann

    2006-12-12

    A compound for use as a therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical includes a group capable of complexing a medically useful metal attached to a moiety which is capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor. A method for treating a subject having a neoplastic disease includes administering to the subject an effective amount of a radiopharmaceutical having a metal chelated with a chelating group attached to a moiety capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor expressed on tumor cells with subsequent internalization inside of the cell. A method of forming a therapeutic or diagnostic compound includes reacting a metal synthon with a chelating group covalently linked with a moiety capable of binding a gastrin releasing peptide receptor.

  18. Gastrin receptor-avid peptide conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Timothy J.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Li, Ning; Sieckman, Gary; Higginbotham, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    A compound for use as a therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical includes a group capable of complexing a medically useful metal attached to a moiety which is capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor. A method for treating a subject having a neoplastic disease includes administering to the subject an effective amount of a radiopharmaceutical having a metal chelated with a chelating group attached to a moiety capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor expressed on tumor cells with subsequent internalization inside of the cell. A method of forming a therapeutic or diagnostic compound includes reacting a metal synthon with a chelating group covalently linked with a moiety capable of binding a gastrin releasing peptide receptor.

  19. Gastrin Receptor-Avid Peptide Conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Timothy J.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Li, Ning; Sieckman, Gary; Higginbotham, Chrys-Ann

    2005-07-26

    A compound for use as a therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical includes a group capable of complexing a medically useful metal attached to a moiety which is capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor. A method for treating a subject having a neoplastic disease includes administering to the subject an effective amount of a radiopharmaceutical having a metal chelated with a chelating group attached to a moiety capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor expressed on tumor cells with subsequent internalization inside of the cell. A method of forming a therapeutic or diagnostic compound includes reacting a metal synthon with a chelating group covalently linked with a moiety capable of binding a gastrin releasing peptide receptor.

  20. Gastrin receptor-avid peptide conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Timothy J.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Sieckman, Gary; Smith, Charles J.; Gali, Hariprasad

    2006-06-13

    A compound for use as a therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical includes a group capable of complexing a medically useful metal attached to a moiety which is capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor. A method for treating a subject having a neoplastic disease includes administering to the subject an effective amount of a radiopharmaceutical having a metal chelated with a chelating group attached to a-moiety capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor expressed on tumor cells with subsequent internalization inside of the cell. A method of forming a therapeutic or diagnostic compound includes reacting a metal synthon with a chelating group covalently linked with a moiety capable of binding a gastrin releasing peptide receptor.