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Sample records for receptors molecular cloning

  1. Gene Transfer and Molecular Cloning of the Human NGF Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Moses V.; Bothwell, Mark A.; Ross, Alonzo H.; Koprowski, Hilary; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Buck, C. Randall; Sehgal, Amita

    1986-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptor are important in the development of cells derived from the neural crest. Mouse L cell transformants have been generated that stably express the human NGF receptor gene transfer with total human DNA. Affinity cross-linking, metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, and equilibrium binding with 125I-labeled NGF revealed that this NGF receptor had the same size and binding characteristics as the receptor from human melanoma cells and rat PC12 cells. The sequences encoding the NGF receptor were molecularly cloned using the human Alu repetitive sequence as a probe. A cosmid clone that contained the human NGF receptor gene allowed efficient transfection and expression of the receptor.

  2. Molecular cloning of estrogen receptor alpha of the Nile crocodile.

    PubMed

    Katsu, Yoshinao; Myburgh, Jan; Kohno, Satomi; Swan, Gerry E; Guillette, Louis J; Iguchi, Taisen

    2006-03-01

    Estrogens are essential for normal reproductive activity in female and male vertebrates. In female reptiles, they are essential for ovarian differentiation during a critical developmental stage. To understand the molecular mechanisms of estrogen action in the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus), we have isolated cDNA encoding the estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) from the ovary. Degenerate PCR primers specific to ER were designed and used to amplify Nile crocodile cDNA from the ovary. The full-length Nile crocodile ERalpha cDNA was obtained using 5' and 3' rapid amplification cDNA ends (RACE). The deduced amino acid sequence of the Nile crocodile ERalpha showed high identity to the American alligator ERalpha (98%), caiman ER (98%), lizard ER (82%) and chicken ERalpha (92%), although phylogenetic analysis suggested profound differences in the rate of sequence evolution for vertebrate ER sequences. Expression of ERalpha was observed in the ovary and testis of juvenile Nile crocodiles. These data provide a novel tool allowing future studies examining the regulation and ontogenic expression of ERalpha in crocodiles and expands our knowledge of estrogen receptor evolution. PMID:16455277

  3. The 5-HT4 receptor: molecular cloning and pharmacological characterization of two splice variants.

    PubMed Central

    Gerald, C; Adham, N; Kao, H T; Olsen, M A; Laz, T M; Schechter, L E; Bard, J A; Vaysse, P J; Hartig, P R; Branchek, T A

    1995-01-01

    Molecular cloning efforts have provided primary amino acid sequence and signal transduction data for a large collection of serotonin receptor subtypes. These include five 5-HT1-like receptors, three 5-HT2 receptors, one 5-HT3 receptor, two 5-HT5 receptors, one 5-HT6 receptor and one 5-HT7 receptor. Molecular biological information on the 5-HT4 receptor is notably absent from this list. We now report the cloning of the pharmacologically defined 5-HT4 receptor. Using degenerate oligonucleotide primers, we identified a rat brain PCR fragment which encoded a '5-HT receptor-like' amino acid sequence. The corresponding full length cDNA was isolated from a rat brain cDNA library. Transiently expressed in COS-7 cells, this receptor stimulates adenylyl cyclase activity and is sensitive to the benzamide derivative cisapride. The response is also blocked by ICS-205930. Interestingly, we isolated two splice variants of the receptor, 5-HT4L and 5-HT4S, differing in the length and sequence of their C-termini. In rat brain, the 5-HT4S transcripts are restricted to the striatum, but the 5-HT4L transcripts are expressed throughout the brain, except in the cerebellum where it was barely detectable. In peripheral tissues, differential expression was also observed in the atrium of the heart where only the 5-HT4S isoform was detectable. Images PMID:7796807

  4. Human GluR6 kainate receptor (GRIK2): Molecular cloning, expression, polymorphism, and chromosomal assignment

    SciTech Connect

    Paschen, W.; Blackstone, C.D.; Huganir, R.L. ); Ross, C.A. Max-Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Koeln )

    1994-04-01

    Glutamate receptors mediate the majority of excitatory neurotransmission in the brain, and molecular cloning studies have revealed several distinct families. Because neuropathological states and possibly human disorders may involve kainate-preferring glutamate receptors, the authors have isolated a cDNA clone for the human GluR6 kainate-preferring receptor. This clone shows a very high sequence similarity with that of the rat, except for a part of the 3[prime] untranslated region in which there is a TAA triplet repeat. When the protein was overexpressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, it had a molecular weight, an antibody recognition, and a glutamate ligand-binding profile similar to those of the rate GluR6 receptor. Northern analysis showed expression in both human cerebral and cerebellar cortices. By PCR analysis of rodent-human monochromosomal cell lines, the human GluR6 could be assigned to chromosome 6. The length of the TAA triplet repeat was polymorphic in the normal population, with at least four alleles and an observed heterozygosity of about 45%. These studies should provide the basis for expression or linkage studies of the GluR6 kainate receptor in human disease or neuropathologic states. 53 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Molecular cloning and expression of a GABA receptor subunit from the crayfish Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Vázquez, Eric N; Díaz-Velásquez, Clara E; Uribe, R M; Arias, Juan M; García, Ubaldo

    2016-02-01

    Molecular cloning has introduced an unexpected, large diversity of neurotransmitter hetero- oligomeric receptors. Extensive research on the molecular structure of the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAR) has been of great significance for understanding how the nervous system works in both vertebrates and invertebrates. However, only two examples of functional homo-oligomeric GABA-activated Cl(-) channels have been reported. In the vertebrate retina, the GABAρ1 subunit of various species forms homo-oligomeric receptors; in invertebrates, a cDNA encoding a functional GABA-activated Cl(-) channel has been isolated from a Drosophila melanogaster head cDNA library. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, these subunits function efficiently as a homo-oligomeric complex. To investigate the structure-function of GABA channels from the crayfish Procambarus clarkii, we cloned a subunit and expressed it in human embryonic kidney cells. Electrophysiological recordings show that this subunit forms a homo-oligomeric ionotropic GABAR that gates a bicuculline-insensitive Cl(-) current. The order of potency of the agonists was GABA > trans-4-amino-crotonic acid = cis-4-aminocrotonic acid > muscimol. These data support the notion that X-organ sinus gland neurons express at least two GABA subunits responsible for the formation of hetero-oligomeric and homo-oligomeric receptors. In addition, by in situ hybridization studies we demonstrate that most X-organ neurons from crayfish eyestalk express the isolated pcGABAA β subunit. This study increases the knowledge of the genetics of the crayfish, furthers the understanding of this important neurotransmitter receptor family, and provides insight into the evolution of these genes among vertebrates and invertebrates. PMID:26577600

  6. Molecular characterization of a mouse prostaglandin D receptor and functional expression of the cloned gene.

    PubMed

    Hirata, M; Kakizuka, A; Aizawa, M; Ushikubi, F; Narumiya, S

    1994-11-01

    Prostanoid receptors belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors with seven transmembrane domains. By taking advantage of nucleotide sequence homology among the prostanoid receptors, we have isolated and identified a cDNA fragment and its gene encoding a mouse prostaglandin (PG) D receptor by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and gene cloning. This gene codes for a polypeptide of 357 amino acids, with a calculated molecular weight of 40,012. The deduced amino acid sequence has a high degree of similarity with the mouse PGI receptor and the EP2 subtype of the PGE receptor, which together form a subgroup of the prostanoid receptors. Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the gene showed a single class of binding sites for [#H]PGD2 with a Kd of 40 nM. This binding was displaced by unlabeled ligands in the following order: PGD2 > BW 245C (a PGD agonist) > BW A868C (a PGD antagonist) > STA2 (a thromboxane A2 agonist). PGE2, PGF2 alpha, and iloprost showed little displacement activity at concentrations up to 10 microM. PGD2 and BW 245C also increased cAMP levels in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the receptor, in a concentration-dependent manner. BW A868C showed a partial agonist activity in the cAMP assay. Northern blotting analysis with mouse poly(A)+ RNA identified a major mRNA species of 3.5 kb that was most abundantly expressed in the ileum, followed by lung, stomach, and uterus. PMID:7972033

  7. Molecular cloning and sequencing of a novel human P2 nucleotide receptor.

    PubMed

    Southey, M C; Hammet, F; Hutchins, A M; Paidhungat, M; Somers, G R; Venter, D J

    1996-11-11

    A novel human P2 nucleotide receptor has been cloned from a T-cell cDNA library. The predicted amino acid sequence shows characteristics of a G-protein-coupled receptor, and shares 88% homology with a recently characterised rat P2 nucleotide receptor sequence. Distinctive features include an extremely short cytoplasmic tail with only one putative protein kinase C phosphorylation site. Northern blot analysis revealed a 1.9 kb transcript expressed in the placenta. PMID:8950181

  8. Molecular cloning and pharmacological characterization of giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) melanocortin-4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Wei; Shi, Lin; Chai, Ji-Tian; Zhang, Xin-Jun; Tao, Ya-Xiong

    2016-04-01

    The melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is critical in regulating mammalian food intake and energy expenditure. Giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), famous as the living fossil, is an endangered species endemic to China. We are interested in exploring the functions of the giant panda MC4R (amMC4R) in regulating energy homeostasis and report herein the molecular cloning and pharmacology of the amMC4R. Sequence analysis revealed that amMC4R was highly homologous (>88%) at nucleotide and amino acid sequences to several mammalian MC4Rs. Western blot revealed that the expression construct myc-amMC4R in pcDNA3.1 was successfully constructed and expressed in HEK293T cells. With human MC4R (hMC4R) as a control, pharmacological characteristics of amMC4R were analyzed with binding and signaling assays. Four agonists, including [Nle(4), D-Phe(7)]-α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (NDP-MSH), α- and β-MSH, and a small molecule agonist, THIQ, were used in binding and signaling assays. We showed that amMC4R bound NDP-MSH with the highest affinity followed by THIQ, α-MSH, and β-MSH, with the same ranking order as hMC4R. Treatment of HEK293T cells expressing amMC4R with different concentrations of agonists resulted in dose-dependent increase of intracellular cAMP levels, with similar EC50s for the four agonists. The results suggested that the cloned amMC4R encoded a functional MC4R. The availability of amMC4R and its binding and signaling properties will facilitate the investigation of amMC4R in regulating food intake and energy homeostasis. PMID:26896843

  9. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of the diapause hormone receptor in the corn earworm Helicoverpa zea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diapause hormone (DH) in the heliothine moth has shown its activity in termination of pupal diapause, while the orthology in the silkworm is known to induce embryonic diapause. In the current study, we cloned the diapause hormone receptor from the corn earworm Helicoverpa zea (HzDHr) and tested ...

  10. Molecular cloning and characterization of a nuclear androgen receptor activated by 11-ketotestosterone

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Per-Erik; Berg, A Håkan; von Hofsten, Jonas; Grahn, Birgitta; Hellqvist, Anna; Larsson, Anders; Karlsson, Johnny; Modig, Carina; Borg, Bertil; Thomas, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Although 11-ketotestosterone is a potent androgen and induces male secondary sex characteristics in many teleosts, androgen receptors with high binding affinity for 11-ketotestosterone or preferential activation by 11-ketotestosterone have not been identified. So, the mechanism by which 11-ketotestosterone exhibits such high potency remains unclear. Recently we cloned the cDNA of an 11-ketotestosterone regulated protein, spiggin, from three-spined stickleback renal tissue. As spiggin is the only identified gene product regulated by 11-ketotestosterone, the stickleback kidney is ideal for determination of the mechanism of 11-ketotestosterone gene regulation. A single androgen receptor gene with two splicing variants, belonging to the androgen receptor-β subfamily was cloned from stickleback kidney. A high affinity, saturable, single class of androgen specific binding sites, with the characteristics of an androgen receptor, was identified in renal cytosolic and nuclear fractions. Measurement of ligand binding moieties in the cytosolic and nuclear fractions as well as to the recombinant receptor revealed lower affinity for 11-ketotestosterone than for dihydrotestosterone. Treatment with different androgens did not up-regulate androgen receptor mRNA level or increase receptor abundance, suggesting that auto-regulation is not involved in differential ligand activation. However, comparison of the trans-activation potential of the stickleback androgen receptor with the human androgen receptor, in both human HepG2 cells and zebrafish ZFL cells, revealed preferential activation by 11-ketotestosterone of the stickleback receptor, but not of the human receptor. These findings demonstrate the presence of a receptor preferentially activated by 11-ketotestosterone in the three-spined stickleback, so far the only one known in any animal. PMID:16107211

  11. Molecular cloning and functional expression of a brain-specific somatostatin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, J F; Xu, Y; Song, J; Berelowitz, M

    1992-01-01

    The PCR and conventional library screening were used to clone the brain-specific somatostatin receptor rSSTR-4 from a rat genomic library. The deduced amino acid sequence encodes a protein of 384 amino acids and displays structural and sequence homologies with members of the G protein-receptor superfamily. The amino acid sequence of rSSTR-4 is 60% and 48% identical to that of somatostatin receptors SSTR-1 and SSTR-2, respectively, two recently cloned subtypes. Competition curve analysis of the binding properties of the receptor transiently expressed in COS-1 cells revealed a higher apparent affinity for somatostatin 14 than for somatostatin 28. In contrast, the somatostatin analogs SMS 201-995, IM 4-28, and MK-678 failed to displace specific binding in transfected cells. These characteristics resemble the pharmacological binding properties of the previously described brain-specific somatostatin-receptor subtype. Examination of the tissue distribution of mRNA for rSSTR-4 revealed expression limited to various brain regions with highest levels in the cortex and hippocampus. Thus, based on the pharmacology and tissue localization of this receptor, we conclude that rSSTR-4 represents a brain-specific somatostatin receptor. Images PMID:1360663

  12. Molecular cloning and expression of an additional epidermal growth factor receptor-related gene.

    PubMed Central

    Plowman, G D; Whitney, G S; Neubauer, M G; Green, J M; McDonald, V L; Todaro, G J; Shoyab, M

    1990-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha), and amphiregulin are structurally and functionally related growth regulatory proteins. These secreted polypeptides all bind to the 170-kDa cell-surface EGF receptor, activating its intrinsic kinase activity. However, amphiregulin exhibits different activities than EGF and TGF-alpha in a number of biological assays. Amphiregulin only partially competes with EGF for binding EGF receptor, and amphiregulin does not induce anchorage-independent growth of normal rat kidney cells (NRK) in the presence of TGF-beta. Amphiregulin also appears to abrogate the stimulatory effect of TGF-alpha on the growth of several aggressive epithelial carcinomas that overexpress EGF receptor. These findings suggest that amphiregulin may interact with a separate receptor in certain cell types. Here we report the cloning of another member of the human EGF receptor (HER) family of receptor tyrosine kinases, which we have named "HER3/ERRB3." The cDNA was isolated from a human carcinoma cell line, and its 6-kilobase transcript was identified in various human tissues. We have generated peptide-specific antisera that recognizes the 160-kDa HER3 protein when transiently expressed in COS cells. These reagents will allow us to determine whether HER3 binds amphiregulin or other growth regulatory proteins and what role HER3 protein plays in the regulation of cell growth. Images PMID:2164210

  13. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida haem receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Naka, H; Hirono, I; Aoki, T

    2005-02-01

    A haem receptor gene from Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida (formerly known as Pasteurella piscicida) has been cloned, sequenced and analysed for its function. The gene, designated as pph, has an open reading frame consisting of 2154 bp, a predicted 718 amino acid residues and exists as a single copy. It is homologous with the haem receptors of Vibrio anguillarum hupA, V. cholerae hutA, V. mimicus mhuA and V. vulnificus hupA at 32.7, 32.7, 45.6 and 30.9%, respectively, and is highly conserved, consisting of a Phe-Arg-Ala-Pro sequence (FRAP), an iron transport related molecule (TonB) and a Asn-Pron-Asn-Leu sequence (NPNL), binding motifs associated with haem receptors. As a single gene knockout mutant P. damselae subsp. piscicida was able to bind haem in the absence of pph, suggesting that other receptors may be involved in its iron transport system. This study shows that the P. damselae subsp. piscicida pph belongs to the haem receptor family, is conserved and that its iron-binding system may involve more than one receptor. PMID:15705153

  14. Molecular cloning, characterization, and expression profiles of androgen receptors in spotted scat (Scatophagus argus).

    PubMed

    Chen, H P; Deng, S P; Dai, M L; Zhu, C H; Li, G L

    2016-01-01

    Androgen plays critical roles in vertebrate reproductive systems via androgen receptors (ARs). In the present study, the full-length spotted scat (Scatophagus argus) androgen receptor (sAR) cDNA sequence was cloned from testis. The sAR cDNA measured 2448 bp in length with an open-reading frame of 2289 bp, encoding 763 amino acids. Amino acid alignment analyses showed that the sARs exhibited highly evolutionary conserved functional domains. Phylogenetically, the sARs clustered within the ARβ common vertebrate group. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that sAR expression varied in level and distribution throughout the tissues of both females and males. sAR expression was detected during testicular development by quantitative RT-PCR. The results showed that the highest transcription of sARs was observed in the mid-testicular stage, and remained at a high expression level until the late-testicular stage. In addition, the effects of 17α-methyltestosterone (MT) and estrogen (E2) on the expression of sARs in ovaries were determined using quantitative RT-PCR. sAR expression increased at 12 and 24 h post-MT treatment and decreased with E2 treatment. The present study provides preliminary evidence indicating gonadal plasticity of spotted scat under exogenous steroidal hormone treatments. It also provides a theoretical basis for sex reversal and production of artificial pseudo-males for female monosex breeding. PMID:27173207

  15. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of mannose receptor C type 1 in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Liu, Lichun; Zhou, Yang; Zhao, Xiaoheng; Xi, Mingjun; Wei, Shun; Fang, Rui; Ji, Wei; Chen, Nan; Gu, Zemao; Liu, Xueqin; Wang, Weimin; Asim, Muhammad; Liu, Xiaoling; Lin, Li

    2014-03-01

    Mannose receptor C type 1 (MRC1) is a pattern-recognition receptor (PRR) which plays a significant role in immune responses. Much work on MRC1 has been done in mammals and birds while little in fish. In this study, we cloned and characterized MRC1 in grass carp (gcMR). The full-length gcMR contained 5291bp encoding a putative protein of 1432 amino acids. The predicted amino acid sequences showed that gcMR contained a signal peptide, a cysteine-rich (CR) domain, a fibronectin type II (FN II) domain, eight C-type lectin-like domains (CTLDs), a transmembrane domain and a short cytoplasmic domain. gcMR were constitutively expressed in different organs with the higher expression in spleen and head kidney. During embryonic development, gcMR transcript levels were highest at cleavage stage. The up-regulation expression of gcMR, IL-1β and TNF-α in liver, spleen, head kidney and intestine after Aeromonas hydrophila infection indicating it involved in innate immune regulation during bacterial infections. PMID:24184700

  16. Molecular cloning of the estrogen and progesterone receptors of the American alligator.

    PubMed

    Katsu, Yoshinao; Bermudez, Dieldrich S; Braun, Edward L; Helbing, Caren; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Gunderson, Mark P; Kohno, Satomi; Bryan, Teresa A; Guillette, Louis J; Iguchi, Taisen

    2004-03-01

    Steroid hormones perform many essential roles in vertebrates during embryonic development, reproduction, growth, water balance, and responses to stress. The estrogens are essential for normal reproductive activity in female and male vertebrates and appear to have direct actions during sex determination in some vertebrates. To begin to understand the molecular mechanisms of estrogen action in alligators, we have isolated cDNAs encoding the estrogen receptors (ER) from the ovary. Degenerate PCR primers specific to ER were designed and used to amplify alligator ovary RNA. Two different DNA fragments (ERalpha and ERbeta) were obtained and the full-length alligator ERalpha cDNA was obtained using 5' and 3' RACE. The inferred amino acid sequence of alligator ERalpha (aERalpha) was very similar to the chicken ERalpha (91% identity), although phylogenetic analyses suggested profound differences in the rate of sequence evolution for vertebrate ER sequences. We also isolated partial DNA fragments encoding ERbeta and the progesterone receptor (PR) of the alligator, both of which show strong sequence similarities to avian ERbeta and PR. We examined the expression levels of these three steroid receptors (ERalpha, ERbeta, and PR) in the ovary of juvenile alligators and observed detectable levels of all three receptors. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that gonadal ERalpha transcript levels in juvenile alligators decreased after E2 treatment whereas ERbeta and PR transcripts were not changed. These results provide tools that will allow future studies examining the regulation and ontogenic expression of steroid receptors in alligators and expand our knowledge of vertebrate steroid receptor evolution. PMID:14980803

  17. Molecular cloning and characterization of a glycine-like receptor gene from the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae)

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Fernández, José Miguel; Gutiérrez-Ortega, Abel; Padilla-Camberos, Eduardo; Rosario-Cruz, Rodrigo; Hernández-Gutiérrez, Rodolfo; Martínez-Velázquez, Moisés

    2014-01-01

    The cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is the most economically important ectoparasite affecting the cattle industry in tropical and subtropical areas around the world. The principal method of tick control has relied mainly on the use of chemical acaricides, including ivermectin; however, cattle tick populations resistant to ivermectin have recently been reported in Brazil, Mexico, and Uruguay. Currently, the molecular basis for ivermectin susceptibility and resistance are not well understood in R. microplus. This prompted us to search for potential molecular targets for ivermectin. Here, we report the cloning and molecular characterization of a R. microplus glycine-like receptor (RmGlyR) gene. The characterized mRNA encodes for a 464-amino acid polypeptide, which contains features common to ligand-gated ion channels, such as a large N-terminal extracellular domain, four transmembrane domains, a large intracellular loop and a short C-terminal extracellular domain. The deduced amino acid sequence showed around 30% identity to GlyRs from some invertebrate and vertebrate organisms. The polypeptide also contains the PAR motif, which is important for forming anion channels, and a conserved glycine residue at the third transmembrane domain, which is essential for high ivermectin sensitivity. PCR analyses showed that RmGlyR is expressed at egg, larval and adult developmental stages. Our findings suggest that the deduced receptor is an additional molecular target to ivermectin and it might be involved in ivermectin resistance in R. microplus. PMID:25174962

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of a glycine-like receptor gene from the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Flores-Fernández, José Miguel; Gutiérrez-Ortega, Abel; Padilla-Camberos, Eduardo; Rosario-Cruz, Rodrigo; Hernández-Gutiérrez, Rodolfo; Martínez-Velázquez, Moisés

    2014-01-01

    The cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is the most economically important ectoparasite affecting the cattle industry in tropical and subtropical areas around the world. The principal method of tick control has relied mainly on the use of chemical acaricides, including ivermectin; however, cattle tick populations resistant to ivermectin have recently been reported in Brazil, Mexico, and Uruguay. Currently, the molecular basis for ivermectin susceptibility and resistance are not well understood in R. microplus. This prompted us to search for potential molecular targets for ivermectin. Here, we report the cloning and molecular characterization of a R. microplus glycine-like receptor (RmGlyR) gene. The characterized mRNA encodes for a 464-amino acid polypeptide, which contains features common to ligand-gated ion channels, such as a large N-terminal extracellular domain, four transmembrane domains, a large intracellular loop and a short C-terminal extracellular domain. The deduced amino acid sequence showed around 30% identity to GlyRs from some invertebrate and vertebrate organisms. The polypeptide also contains the PAR motif, which is important for forming anion channels, and a conserved glycine residue at the third transmembrane domain, which is essential for high ivermectin sensitivity. PCR analyses showed that RmGlyR is expressed at egg, larval and adult developmental stages. Our findings suggest that the deduced receptor is an additional molecular target to ivermectin and it might be involved in ivermectin resistance in R. microplus. PMID:25174962

  19. [Advances in Molecular Cloning].

    PubMed

    Ashwini, M; Murugan, S B; Balamurugan, S; Sathishkumar, R

    2016-01-01

    "Molecular cloning" meaning creation of recombinant DNA molecules has impelled advancement throughout life sciences. DNA manipulation has become easy due to powerful tools showing exponential growth in applications and sophistication of recombinant DNA technology. Cloning genes has become simple what led to an explosion in the understanding of gene function by seamlessly stitching together multiple DNA fragments or by the use of swappable gene cassettes, maximizing swiftness and litheness. A novel archetype might materialize in the near future with synthetic biology techniques that will facilitate quicker assembly and iteration of DNA clones, accelerating the progress of gene therapy vectors, recombinant protein production processes and new vaccines by in vitro chemical synthesis of any in silico-specified DNA construct. The advent of innovative cloning techniques has opened the door to more refined applications such as identification and mapping of epigenetic modifications and high-throughput assembly of combinatorial libraries. In this review, we will examine the major breakthroughs in cloning techniques and their applications in various areas of biological research that have evolved mainly due to easy construction of novel expression systems. PMID:27028806

  20. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of the diapause hormone receptor in the corn earworm Helicoverpa zea

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongbo; Wei, Zhaojun; Nachman, Ronald J.; Park, Yoonseong

    2013-01-01

    The diapause hormone (DH) in the heliothine moth has shown its activity in termination of pupal diapause, while the orthology in the silkworm is known to induce embryonic diapause. In the current study, we cloned the diapause hormone receptor from the corn earworm Helicoverpa zea (HzDHr) and tested its ligand specificities in a heterologous reporter system. HzDHr was expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, which were co-transfected with the aequorin reporter, and was used to measure the ligand activities. A total of 68 chemicals, including natural DH analogs and structurally similar peptide mimetics, were tested for agonistic and antagonistic activities. Several peptide mimetics with a 2-amino-7-bromofluorene-succinoyl (2Abf-Suc) N-terminal modification showed strong agonistic activities; these mimetics included 2Abf-Suc-F[dA]PRLamide, 2Abf-Suc-F[dR]PRLamide, 2Abf-Suc-FKPRLamide and 2Abf-Suc-FGPRLamide. Antagonistic activity was found in the ecdysis triggering hormone in Drosophila melanogaster (FFLKITKNVPRLamide). Interestingly, HzDHr does not discriminate between DH (WFGPRLamide C-terminal motif) and another closely related endogenous peptide, pyrokinin 1 (FXPRXamide; a C-terminal motif that is separate from WFGPRLamide). We provide large-scale in vitro data that serve as a reference for the development of agonists and antagonists to disrupt the DH signaling pathway. PMID:24257143

  1. Molecular cloning and sequencing analysis of the interferon receptor (IFNAR-1) from Columba livia

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei Shan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Partial sequence cloning of interferon receptor (IFNAR-1) of Columba livia. Material and methods In order to obtain a certain length (630 bp) of gene, a pair of primers was designed according to the conserved nucleotide sequence of Gallus (EU477527.1) and Taeniopygia guttata (XM_002189232.1) IFNAR-1 gene fragment that was published by GenBank. Special primers were designed by the Race method to amplify the 3'terminal cDNA. Results The Columba livia IFNAR-1 displayed 88.5%, 80.5% and 73.8% nucleotide identity to Falco peregrinus, Gallus and Taeniopygia guttata, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the IFNAR1 gene showed that the relationship of Columba livia, Falco peregrinus and chicken had high homology. Conclusions We successfully obtained a Columba livia IFNAR-1 gene partial sequence. Analysis of the genetic tree showed that the relationship of Columba livia and Falco peregrinus IFNAR-1 had high homology. This result can be used as reference for further research and practical application. PMID:26155117

  2. Molecular cloning, characterization, and expression analysis of an ecdysone receptor homolog in Teleogryllus emma (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    He, Hui; Xi, Gengsi; Lu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Ecdysteroids are steroid hormones that play important roles in the regulation of Arthropoda animal growth development, larvae ecdysis, and reproduction. The effect of ecdysteroids is mediated by ecdysteroid receptor (EcR). The ecdysone receptor (EcR) belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptors (NRs) that are ligand-dependent transcription factors. Ecdysone receptor is present only in invertebrates and plays a critical role in regulating the expression of a series of genes during development and reproduction. Here, we isolated and characterized cDNA of the cricket Teleopgryllus emma (Ohmachi & Matsuura) (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) and studied mRNA expression pattern using real time-polymerase chain reaction. The full-length cDNA of T. emma EcR, termed TeEcR, is 2,558 bp and contains a 5'-untranslated region of 555 bp and a 3'-untranslated region of 407 bp. The open reading frame of TeEcR encodes deduced 531-amino acid peptides with a predicted molecular mass of 60.7 kDa. The amino acid sequence of T. emma EcR was similar to that of known EcR especially in the ligand-binding domain of insect EcR. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to compare TeEcR mRNA expression level at the whole body and gonad during T. emma development. The data revealed that TeEcR mRNA is differentially expressed during T. emma development, with the highest expression level in late-instar larvae of the body and lowest in third instar. The levels of TeEcR transcripts also vary among gonads development, and levels in ovaries were higher than in testes at every developmental stage. These results suggest that TeEcR may have potential significance to regulate the morphological structure and gonad development of T. emma, due to its expression in different developmental periods. PMID:25797799

  3. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel dopamine receptor (D3) as a target for neuroleptics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokoloff, Pierre; Giros, Bruno; Martres, Marie-Pascale; Bouthenet, Marie-Louise; Schwartz, Jean-Charles

    1990-09-01

    A dopamine receptor has been characterized which differs in its pharmacology and signalling system from the D1 or D2 receptor and represents both an autoreceptor and a postsynaptic receptor. The D3 receptor is localized to limbic areas of the brain, which are associated with cognitive, emotional and endocrine functions. It seems to mediate some of the effects of antipsychotic drugs and drugs used against Parkinson's disease, that were previously thought to interact only with D2 receptors.

  4. Molecular Cloning, Functional Characterization, and Evolutionary Analysis of Vitamin D Receptors Isolated from Basal Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Kollitz, Erin M.; Zhang, Guozhu; Hawkins, Mary Beth; Whitfield, G. Kerr; Reif, David M.; Kullman, Seth W.

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate genome is a result of two rapid and successive rounds of whole genome duplication, referred to as 1R and 2R. Furthermore, teleost fish have undergone a third whole genome duplication (3R) specific to their lineage, resulting in the retention of multiple gene paralogs. The more recent 3R event in teleosts provides a unique opportunity to gain insight into how genes evolve through specific evolutionary processes. In this study we compare molecular activities of vitamin D receptors (VDR) from basal species that diverged at key points in vertebrate evolution in order to infer derived and ancestral VDR functions of teleost paralogs. Species include the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), a 1R jawless fish; the little skate (Leucoraja erinacea), a cartilaginous fish that diverged after the 2R event; and the Senegal bichir (Polypterus senegalus), a primitive 2R ray-finned fish. Saturation binding assays and gel mobility shift assays demonstrate high affinity ligand binding and classic DNA binding characteristics of VDR has been conserved across vertebrate evolution. Concentration response curves in transient transfection assays reveal EC50 values in the low nanomolar range, however maximum transactivational efficacy varies significantly between receptor orthologs. Protein-protein interactions were investigated using co-transfection, mammalian 2-hybrid assays, and mutations of coregulator activation domains. We then combined these results with our previous study of VDR paralogs from 3R teleosts into a bioinformatics analysis. Our results suggest that 1, 25D3 acts as a partial agonist in basal species. Furthermore, our bioinformatics analysis suggests that functional differences between VDR orthologs and paralogs are influenced by differential protein interactions with essential coregulator proteins. We speculate that we may be observing a change in the pharmacodynamics relationship between VDR and 1, 25D3 throughout vertebrate evolution that may have been

  5. Molecular cloning, functional characterization, and evolutionary analysis of vitamin D receptors isolated from basal vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kollitz, Erin M; Zhang, Guozhu; Hawkins, Mary Beth; Whitfield, G Kerr; Reif, David M; Kullman, Seth W

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate genome is a result of two rapid and successive rounds of whole genome duplication, referred to as 1R and 2R. Furthermore, teleost fish have undergone a third whole genome duplication (3R) specific to their lineage, resulting in the retention of multiple gene paralogs. The more recent 3R event in teleosts provides a unique opportunity to gain insight into how genes evolve through specific evolutionary processes. In this study we compare molecular activities of vitamin D receptors (VDR) from basal species that diverged at key points in vertebrate evolution in order to infer derived and ancestral VDR functions of teleost paralogs. Species include the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), a 1R jawless fish; the little skate (Leucoraja erinacea), a cartilaginous fish that diverged after the 2R event; and the Senegal bichir (Polypterus senegalus), a primitive 2R ray-finned fish. Saturation binding assays and gel mobility shift assays demonstrate high affinity ligand binding and classic DNA binding characteristics of VDR has been conserved across vertebrate evolution. Concentration response curves in transient transfection assays reveal EC50 values in the low nanomolar range, however maximum transactivational efficacy varies significantly between receptor orthologs. Protein-protein interactions were investigated using co-transfection, mammalian 2-hybrid assays, and mutations of coregulator activation domains. We then combined these results with our previous study of VDR paralogs from 3R teleosts into a bioinformatics analysis. Our results suggest that 1, 25D3 acts as a partial agonist in basal species. Furthermore, our bioinformatics analysis suggests that functional differences between VDR orthologs and paralogs are influenced by differential protein interactions with essential coregulator proteins. We speculate that we may be observing a change in the pharmacodynamics relationship between VDR and 1, 25D3 throughout vertebrate evolution that may have been

  6. Molecular cloning, tissue distribution, and pharmacological characterization of melanocortin-4 receptor in spotted scat, Scatophagus argus.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Tao; Yang, Zhao; Chen, Hua-Pu; Zhu, Chun-Hua; Deng, Si-Ping; Li, Guang-Li; Tao, Ya-Xiong

    2016-05-01

    Melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) plays an important role in the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure in mammals. The functions of the MC4R in fish have not been investigated extensively. We herein reported on the cloning, tissue distribution, and pharmacological characterization of spotted scat (Scatophagus argus) MC4R (SAMC4R). It consisted of a 984bp open reading frame predicted to encode a protein of 327 amino acids. Sequence analysis revealed that SAMC4R was highly homologous (>80%) at amino acid levels to several teleost MC4Rs. Phylogenetic analyses showed that SAMC4R was closely related to piscine MC4R. Using RT-PCR, we showed that in addition to brain, pituitary, and gonads, mc4r mRNA was also widely expressed in peripheral tissues of spotted scat in sexually divergent pattern. With human MC4R (hMC4R) as a control, several agonists including α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), [Nle(4), D-Phe(7)]-α-MSH (NDP-MSH), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and THIQ (N-[(3R)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolinium3-ylcarbonyl]-(1R)-1-(4-chlorobenzyl)-2-[4-cyclohexyl-4-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-ylmethyl)piperidin-1-yl]-2-oxoethylamine), were used to investigate the binding and signaling properties of SAMC4R. The results showed that SAMC4R bound NDP-MSH with the highest affinity followed by ACTH (1-24) and α-MSH. Similar ranking was also found for hMC4R, although SAMC4R had two to five-fold higher affinities for these ligands. THIQ did not displace NDP-MSH from SAMC4R, different from hMC4R. α-MSH, NDP-MSH, and ACTH (1-24) were identified as potent agonists to stimulate cAMP generation followed by THIQ in SAMC4R. The availability of SAMC4R and its pharmacological characteristics will facilitate the investigation of its function in regulating diverse physiological processes in spotted scat. PMID:27080551

  7. Molecular cloning and properties of a full-length putative thyroid hormone receptor coactivator.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, A; Yen, P M; Misiti, S; Cardona, G R; Liu, Y; Chin, W W

    1996-08-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are ligand-dependent transcription factors that regulate target gene transcription. The conserved carboxy-terminal region of the ligand-binding domain (AF-2) has been thought to play a critical role in mediating ligand-dependent transactivation by the interaction with coactivator(s). Using bacterially-expressed TR as a probe, far-Western-based expression cDNA library screening identified cDNAs that encode, in part, the recently reported partial steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) sequence. Additional work, including 5' RACE, has characterized a full-length cDNA that encodes a approximately 160 kD protein as a putative thyroid hormone receptor coactivator (F-SRC-1). In vitro binding studies show that F-SRC-1 binds to a variety of nuclear hormone receptors in a ligand-dependent manner, along with TBP and TFIIB, suggesting that F-SRC-1 may play a role as a bridging molecule between nuclear hormone receptors and general transcription factors. Interestingly, AF-2 mutants also retain ligand-dependent interaction with F-SRC-1. Although F-SRC-1 recognizes the ligand-induced conformational changes of nuclear hormone receptors, our observations suggest that F-SRC-1 may bind directly with subregion(s) in nuclear hormone receptors other than the AF-2 region. PMID:8754792

  8. Molecular cloning and gene expression of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor in the orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, S L; Chuang, H C; Nan, F H; Ruan, Y H; Kuo, C M

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R) involved in the endocrine regulation of reproduction in the orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides. The full-length cDNA encoding GnRH-R type I was successfully cloned from the pituitary by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE) methods in the grouper. The complete GnRH-R type I cDNA is 1607 bp, which includes an open reading frame of 1092 bp encoding a protein of 364 amino acids, a seven-alpha helix transmembrane domain, a N-terminal extracellular domain, and a C-terminal cytoplasmic domain. The expression of GnRH-R type I was found to be highest in the pituitary. An intramuscular injection of various GnRH types in vivo was attempted. The expression of GnRH-R type I was stimulated by a single injection of salmon GnRH, while in the case of chicken GnRH II treatment, the expression of GnRH-R type I was inhibited. This suggests that the action of chick GnRH II is probably enhanced through the GnRH receptor of different forms. Furthermore, none of them were expressed by an injection of seabream GnRH, and this is likely attributed to the injection dose being below the threshold level, and this remains to be further examined. In conclusion, GnRHs of various types are effective in stimulating the expression of gonadotropins through various forms of the GnRH-R, and multiple forms of the receptor gene likely exist in teleosts. PMID:17329139

  9. Molecular cloning and characterization of the allatotropin precursor and receptor in the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria

    PubMed Central

    Lismont, Els; Vleugels, Rut; Marchal, Elisabeth; Badisco, Liesbeth; Van Wielendaele, Pieter; Lenaerts, Cynthia; Zels, Sven; Tobe, Stephen S.; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Verlinden, Heleen

    2015-01-01

    Allatotropins (ATs) are pleiotropic neuropeptides initially isolated from the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. In 2008, the first receptor for AT-like peptides (ATR) was characterized in Bombyx mori. Since then, ATRs have also been characterized in M. sexta, Tribolium castaneum, Aedes aegypti and Bombus terrestris. These receptors show sequence similarity to vertebrate orexin (ORX) receptors. When generating an EST-database of the desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria) central nervous system, we found cDNA sequences encoding the Schgr-AT precursor and a fragment of its putative receptor. This receptor cDNA has now been completed and functionally expressed in mammalian cell lines. Activation of this receptor, designated as Schgr-ATR, by Schgr-AT caused an increase in intracellular calcium ions, as well as cyclic AMP (cAMP), with an EC50 value in the nanomolar range. In addition, the transcript distribution of both the Schgr-AT precursor and Schgr-ATR was investigated by means of quantitative real-time PCR. Moreover, we found more evidence for the myotropic and allatostimulatory actions of Schgr-AT in the desert locust. These data are discussed and situated in a broader context by comparison with literature data on AT and ATR in insects. PMID:25814925

  10. Molecular cloning and characterization of a Toll receptor gene from Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Srisuk, Chutima; Longyant, Siwaporn; Senapin, Saengchan; Sithigorngul, Paisarn; Chaivisuthangkura, Parin

    2014-02-01

    Toll receptors are cell surface molecules acting as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that have been implicated in the signaling pathway of innate immune responses. In this study, the full-length cDNA of a Toll receptor gene of Macrobrachium rosenbergii, designated MrToll, was successfully isolated using designed degenerate primers and the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The MrToll gene sequence contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 2799 nucleotides encoding a protein of 932 amino acid residues. The protein contained distinct structural motifs of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, including an extracellular domain containing 15 leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), a transmembrane segment of 23 amino acids, and a cytoplasmic Toll/interleukin-1R (TIR) domain of 139 residues. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that MrToll and Toll receptor of Marsupenaeus japonicus (MjToll) evolved closely. However, the MrToll ORF demonstrated only 48-49% identity with shrimp Toll1, suggesting that MrToll isolated from a palaemonid shrimp might belong to a novel class of Toll receptors in shrimp. The transcripts of the MrToll gene were constitutively expressed in various tissues, with high levels in hemocytes, the stomach and muscle. A reverse transcriptase PCR assay demonstrated that the expression patterns of MrToll were distinctly modulated after Aeromonas caviae stimulation, with significant enhancement at 3-12 h post-challenge and a decline to basal levels at 24 h post-challenge. In addition, when MrToll-silenced shrimp were challenged with A. caviae, there was a significant increase in mortality and bacterial CFU counts. These results suggest that MrToll might be involved in host innate defense, especially against the pathogen A. caviae. PMID:24398262

  11. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of an ethylene receptor gene from sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) by hormone and environmental stresses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethylene receptor (ethylene response sensor, ERS) is the primary component involving in the ethylene biosynthesis and ethylene signal transduction pathway. In the present study, a GZ-ERS gene encoding ERS was cloned from a sugarcane cv. YL17 (Saccharum spp.) using RT-PCR and ligation-mediated PCR wi...

  12. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Four Genes Encoding Ethylene Receptors Associated with Pineapple (Ananas comosus L.) Flowering

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun-He; Wu, Qing-Song; Huang, Xia; Liu, Sheng-Hui; Zhang, Hong-Na; Zhang, Zhi; Sun, Guang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous ethylene, or ethephon, has been widely used to induce pineapple flowering, but the molecular mechanism behind ethephon induction is still unclear. In this study, we cloned four genes encoding ethylene receptors (designated AcERS1a, AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b). The 5′ flanking sequences of these four genes were also cloned by self-formed adaptor PCR and SiteFinding-PCR, and a group of putative cis-acting elements was identified. Phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that AcERS1a, AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b belonged to the plant ERS1s and ETR2/EIN4-like groups. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that AcETR2a and AcETR2b (subfamily 2) were more sensitive to ethylene treatment compared with AcERS1a and AcERS1b (subfamily 1). The relative expression of AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b was significantly increased during the earlier period of pineapple inflorescence formation, especially at 1–9 days after ethylene treatment (DAET), whereas AcERS1a expression changed less than these three genes. In situ hybridization results showed that bract primordia (BP) and flower primordia (FP) appeared at 9 and 21 DAET, respectively, and flowers were formed at 37 DAET. AcERS1a, AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b were mainly expressed in the shoot apex at 1–4 DAET; thereafter, with the appearance of BP and FP, higher expression of these genes was found in these new structures. Finally, at 37 DAET, the expression of these genes was mainly focused in the flower but was also low in other structures. These findings indicate that these four ethylene receptor genes, especially AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b, play important roles during pineapple flowering induced by exogenous ethephon. PMID:27252725

  13. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Four Genes Encoding Ethylene Receptors Associated with Pineapple (Ananas comosus L.) Flowering.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-He; Wu, Qing-Song; Huang, Xia; Liu, Sheng-Hui; Zhang, Hong-Na; Zhang, Zhi; Sun, Guang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous ethylene, or ethephon, has been widely used to induce pineapple flowering, but the molecular mechanism behind ethephon induction is still unclear. In this study, we cloned four genes encoding ethylene receptors (designated AcERS1a, AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b). The 5' flanking sequences of these four genes were also cloned by self-formed adaptor PCR and SiteFinding-PCR, and a group of putative cis-acting elements was identified. Phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that AcERS1a, AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b belonged to the plant ERS1s and ETR2/EIN4-like groups. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that AcETR2a and AcETR2b (subfamily 2) were more sensitive to ethylene treatment compared with AcERS1a and AcERS1b (subfamily 1). The relative expression of AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b was significantly increased during the earlier period of pineapple inflorescence formation, especially at 1-9 days after ethylene treatment (DAET), whereas AcERS1a expression changed less than these three genes. In situ hybridization results showed that bract primordia (BP) and flower primordia (FP) appeared at 9 and 21 DAET, respectively, and flowers were formed at 37 DAET. AcERS1a, AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b were mainly expressed in the shoot apex at 1-4 DAET; thereafter, with the appearance of BP and FP, higher expression of these genes was found in these new structures. Finally, at 37 DAET, the expression of these genes was mainly focused in the flower but was also low in other structures. These findings indicate that these four ethylene receptor genes, especially AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b, play important roles during pineapple flowering induced by exogenous ethephon. PMID:27252725

  14. Molecular cloning and tissue distribution of cholecystokinin-1 receptor (CCK-1R) in yellowtail Seriola quinqueradiata and its response to feeding and in vitro CCK treatment.

    PubMed

    Furutani, Takahiro; Masumoto, Toshiro; Fukada, Haruhisa

    2013-06-01

    In vertebrates, the peptide cholecystokinin (CCK) is one of the most important neuroregulatory digestive hormones. CCK acts via CCK receptors that are classified into two subtypes, CCK-1 receptor (CCK-1R; formally CCK-A) and CCK-2 receptor (formally CCK-B). In particular, the CCK-1R is involved in digestion and is regulated by CCK. However, very little information is known about CCK-1R in fish. Therefore, we performed molecular cloning of CCK-1R cDNA from the digestive tract of yellowtail Seriola quinqueradiata. Phylogenetic tree analysis showed a high sequence identity between the cloned yellowtail CCK receptor cDNA and CCK-1R, which belongs to the CCK-1R cluster. Furthermore, the expression of yellowtail CCK receptor mRNA was observed in gallbladder, pyloric caeca, and intestines, similarly to CCK-1R mRNA expression in mammals, suggesting that the cloned cDNA is of CCK-1R from yellowtail. In in vivo experiments, the CCK-1R mRNA levels increased in the gallbladder and pyloric caeca after feeding, whereas in vitro, mRNA levels of CCK-1R and digestive enzymes in cultured pyloric caeca increased by the addition of CCK. These results suggest that CCK-1R plays an important role in digestion stimulated by CCK in yellowtail. PMID:23467070

  15. Molecular cloning, expression and potential functions of the human proteinase-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed Central

    Bohm, S K; Kong, W; Bromme, D; Smeekens, S P; Anderson, D C; Connolly, A; Kahn, M; Nelken, N A; Coughlin, S R; Payan, D G; Bunnett, N W

    1996-01-01

    We used PCR to amplify proteinase activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) from human kidney cDNA. The open reading frame comprised 1191 bp and encoded a protein of 397 residues with 83% identity with mouse PAR-2. In KNRK cells (a line of kirsten murine sarcoma virus-transformed rat kidney epithelial cells) transfected with this cDNA, trypsin and activating peptide (AP) corresponding to the tethered ligand exposed by trypsin cleavage (SLIGKV-NH2) induced a prompt increase in cytosolic calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i). Human PAR-2 (hPAR-2) resided both on the plasma membrane and in the Golgi apparatus. hPAR-2 mRNA was highly expressed in human pancreas, kidney, colon, liver and small intestine, and by A549 lung and SW480 colon adenocarcinoma cells. Hybridization in situ revealed high expression in intestinal epithelial cells throughout the gut. Trypsin and AP stimulated an increase in [Ca2+]i in a rat intestinal epithelial cell line (hBRIE 380) and stimulated amylase secretion in isolated pancreatic acini. In A549 cells, which also responded to trypsin and AP with mobilization of cytosolic Ca2+, AP inhibited colony formation. Thus PAR-2 may serve as a trypsin sensor in the gut. Its expression by cells and tissues not normally exposed to pancreatic trypsin suggests that other proteases could serve as physiological activators. PMID:8615752

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of two nicotinic acetylcholine receptor β subunit genes from Apis cerana cerana.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoli; Wang, Mian; Kang, Mingjiang; Liu, Li; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2011-08-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediate fast cholinergic synaptic transmission in the insect nervous system and are important targets for insecticides. In this study, we identified and characterized two novel β subunit genes (Accβ1 and Accβ2) from Apis cerana cerana. Homology analysis indicated that Accβ1 and Accβ2 possess characteristics that are typical of nAChR subunits although Accβ2 was distinct from Accβ1 and the other nAChR subunits, due to its unusual transmembrane structure and uncommon exon-intron boundary within the genomic region encoding the TM1 transmembrane domain. Analysis of the 5' flanking regions indicated that Accβ1 and Accβ2 possess different regulatory elements, suggesting that the genes might exhibit various expression and regulatory patterns. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that Accβ2 was expressed at a much higher level than Accβ1 in the tissues of adult bees. During development, Accβ1 was highly expressed at the pupal stages, whereas Accβ2 was abundantly expressed at the larval stages. Furthermore, Accβ1 and Accβ2 were both induced by exposure to various insecticides and environmental stresses although Accβ2 was more responsive than Accβ1. These results indicate that Accβ1 and Accβ2 may have distinct roles in insect growth and development and that they may belong to separate regulatory pathways involved in the response to insecticides and environmental stresses. This report is the first description of the differences between the nAChR β subunit genes in the Chinese honey bee and establishes an initial foundation for further study. PMID:21618599

  17. Molecular cloning and expression of the porcine trigeminal ganglion cDNA encoding a 5-ht(1F) receptor.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Pankaj; Sharma, Hari S; Wurch, Thierry; Pauwels, Petrus J; Saxena, Pramod R

    2002-02-01

    Using a combination of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and inverse-PCR techniques, we amplified, cloned and sequenced a full-length porcine 5-hydroxytryptamine 1F (5-ht(1F)) receptor complementary DNA (cDNA) derived from porcine trigeminal ganglion. Sequence analysis revealed 1101 base pairs (bp) encoding an open reading frame of 366 amino acids showing a high similarity (>90%) with the 5-ht(1F) receptor sequences from other species, including human. The recombinant porcine 5-ht(1F) receptor was expressed in African green monkey kidney cell lines (COS-7 cells) and its ligand binding profile was determined using [3H]5-HT. The affinities of several agonists (LY334370 (5-(4-fluorobenzoyl)amino-3-(1-methylpiperidin-4-yl)-1H-indole fumarate)>CP122638 (N-methyl-3 [pyrrolidin 2(R)-yl methyl]-1H-indol-5-ylmethyl sulphonamide)=naratriptan =5HT>eletriptan>sumatriptan>frovatriptan =avitriptan>dihydroergotamine>zolmitriptan>5-carboxamidotryptamine>rizatriptan>alniditan=donitriptan>L694247 (2-[5-[3-(4-methylsulphonylamino)benzyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]-1H-indole-3-yl] ethylamine) and putative antagonists (methiothepin>GR127935 (N-[4-methoxy-3-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl) phenyl]-2'-methyl 4'-(5-methyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl) [1,1-biphenyl]-4-carboxamide hydrochloride)>ritanserin>SB224289 (2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-1'-methyl-5-[2'-methyl-4'(5-methyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl) biphenyl-4-carbonyl] furo [2,3-f] indole-3-spiro-4'-piperidine hydrochloride)>BRL155572 ([1-(3-chlorophenyl)-4-[3,3-diphenyl (2-(S,R) hydroxypropanyl)piperazine] hydrochloride)>ketanserin=pindolol) correlated highly with those described for the recombinant human 5-ht(1F) receptor (Spearman correlation coefficient; r(s)=0.942). Nevertheless, as compared to the human homologue, some triptans (i.e. sumatriptan, zolmitriptan and rizatriptan) displayed a 10- to 15-fold lower affinity for the porcine 5-ht(1F) receptor. Using RT-PCR technique, the expression of porcine 5-ht(1F) receptor mRNA was observed in

  18. The receptor of Bacillus sphaericus binary toxin in Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) midgut: molecular cloning and expression.

    PubMed

    Darboux, I; Nielsen-LeRoux, C; Charles, J F; Pauron, D

    2001-09-01

    Culex pipiens larval midgut is the primary target of the binary toxin (Bin) present in parasporal inclusions of Bacillus sphaericus. Cpm1, a 60-kDa protein purified from brush border membranes, has been proposed as the receptor of the Bin toxin in the midgut epithelial cells of mosquitoes. We have cloned and characterized the corresponding cDNA from midgut of Culex pipiens larvae. The open reading frame predicted a 580 amino-acid protein with a putative signal peptide at the N-terminus and a putative GPI-anchoring signal at the C-terminus. The amino acid sequence of the cloned Cpm1 exhibited 39-43% identities with insect maltases (alpha-glucosidases and alpha-amylases). Recombinant Cpm1 expressed in E. coli specifically bound to the Bin toxin and had a significant alpha-glucosidase activity but no alpha-amylase activity. These results support the view that Cpm1 is an alpha-glucosidase expressed in Culex midgut where it constitutes the receptor for the Bin toxin. To date, this is the first component involved in the mosquitocidal activity of the Bacillus sphaericus Bin toxin to be characterized. Its identification provides a key step to elucidate the mode of action of the Bin toxin and the mechanisms of resistance developed against it by some mosquito strains. PMID:11483434

  19. Molecular cloning of the canine c-Met/HGF receptor and its expression in normal and regenerated liver.

    PubMed

    Neo, Sakurako; Kansaku, Norio; Furuichi, Mitsuru; Watanabe, Masashi; Hisamatsu, Sin; Ohno, Koichi; Hisasue, Masaharu; Tsuchiya, Ryo; Yamada, Takatsugu

    2005-05-01

    The c-Met proto-oncogene is the receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), which is a member of the tyrosine kinase family. Activation of the HGF/c-Met signal pathway leads to cell proliferation, motility, regeneration, and morphogenesis. In this study, the complete nucleotide sequence of complementary DNA (cDNA) of canine c-Met was cloned, and its distribution was determined in tissues. The canine c-Met cDNA clone had an open reading frame of 4419 bp that encoded a putative polypeptide of 1383 amino acids. The c-Met mRNA was expressed in a variety of canine tissues including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), bone marrow, liver, kidney, lung, stomach, uterus, testis, thymus, lymph node, small intestine, colon, adrenal gland, thyroid gland, heart, muscle, skin, pancreas, ovary, prostate, spleen, fat, cerebrum, and cerebellum. In addition, the c-Met mRNA expression in normal and regenerated liver was examined. The levels of the mRNA increased 2-fold in regenerated liver compared to that found in normal liver, indicating that c-Met is involved in various functions including remodeling of canine hepatocytes. PMID:15942139

  20. Molecular Cloning and Functional Characterization of Mannose Receptor in Zebra Fish (Danio rerio) during Infection with Aeromonas sobria.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Feifei; Asim, Muhammad; Lan, Jiangfeng; Zhao, Lijuan; Wei, Shun; Chen, Nan; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhou, Yang; Lin, Li

    2015-01-01

    Mannose receptor (MR) is a member of pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), which plays a significant role in immunity responses. Much work on MR has been done in mammals and birds while little in fish. In this report, a MR gene (designated as zfMR) was cloned from zebra fish (Danio rerio), which is an attractive model for the studies of animal diseases. The full-length cDNA of zfMR contains 6248 bp encoding a putative protein of 1428 amino acids. The predicted amino acid sequences showed that zfMR contained a cysteine-rich domain, a single fibronectin type II (FN II) domain, eight C-type lectin-like domains (CTLDs), a transmembrane domain and a short C-terminal cytoplasmic domain, sharing highly conserved structures with MRs from the other species. The MR mRNA could be detected in all examined tissues with highest level in kidney. The temporal expression patterns of MR, IL-1β and TNF-α mRNAs were analyzed in the liver, spleen, kidney and intestine post of infection with Aeromonas sobria. By immunohistochemistry assay, slight enhancement of MR protein was also observed in the spleen and intestine of the infected zebra fish. The established zebra fish-A. sobria infection model will be valuable for elucidating the role of MR in fish immune responses to infection. PMID:25988382

  1. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Estrogen, Androgen, and Progesterone Nuclear Receptors from a Freshwater Turtle (Pseudemys nelsoni)

    PubMed Central

    Katsu, Yoshinao; Ichikawa, Rie; Ikeuchi, Toshitaka; Kohno, Satomi; Guillette, Louis J.; Iguchi, Taisen

    2008-01-01

    Steroid hormones are essential for the normal function of many organ systems in vertebrates. Reproductive activity in females and males, such as the differentiation, growth, and maintenance of the reproductive system, requires signaling by the sex steroids. Although extensively studied in mammals and a few fish, amphibians, and bird species, the molecular mechanisms of sex steroid hormone (estrogens, androgens, and progestins) action are poorly understood in reptiles. Here we evaluate hormone receptor ligand interactions in a freshwater turtle, the red-belly slider (Pseudemys nelsoni), after the isolation of cDNAs encoding an estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), an androgen receptor (AR), and a progesterone receptor (PR). The full-length red-belly slider turtle (t)ERα, tAR, and tPR cDNAs were obtained using 5′ and 3′ rapid amplification cDNA ends. The deduced amino acid sequences showed high identity to the chicken orthologs (tERα, 90%; tAR, 71%; tPR, 71%). Using transient transfection assays of mammalian cells, tERα protein displayed estrogen-dependent activation of transcription from an estrogen-responsive element-containing promoter. The other receptor proteins, tAR and tPR, also displayed androgen- or progestin-dependent activation of transcription from androgen- and progestin-responsive murine mammary tumor virus promoters. We further examined the transactivation of tERα, tAR and tPR by ligands using a modified GAL4-transactivation system. We found that the GAL4-transactivation system was not suitable for the measurement of tAR and tPR transactivations. This is the first report of the full coding regions of a reptilian AR and PR and the examination of their transactivation by steroid hormones. PMID:17916628

  2. Molecular cloning and expression of toll-like receptor 4 (tlr4) in the blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala).

    PubMed

    Lai, Ruifang; Liu, Han; Jakovlić, Ivan; Zhan, Fanbin; Wei, Jin; Yang, Pinhong; Wang, Weimin

    2016-06-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a pivotal role in teleost innate immune system. In this study, Megalobrama amblycephala (ma) tlr4 gene was cloned, its putative polypeptide product characterized, and expression analysed. Matlr4 cDNA is 2862 bp long, with an open reading frame of 2364 bp encoding 787 amino acids. MaTlr4 is a typical TLR protein, including the extracellular part with nine leucine-rich repeat motifs, a transmembrane region and a cytoplasmic Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain. MaTlr4 has the highest level of identity (94%) and similarity (97%) with the grass carp Tlr4.2 homolog. This was also corroborated by the phylogenetic analysis, which placed MaTlr4 in a cluster with other cyprinid homologs. Matlr4 mRNA was ubiquitously expressed in all examined tissues and during all sampled developmental stages. The observed peak in matlr4 mRNA expression during gastrula and somite stages is in good agreement with its proposed role in the development of the neural system. Temporal expression patterns of matlr4 and maMyD88 mRNAs and proteins were analyzed in liver, spleen, head kidney, trunk kidney and intestine after Aeromonas hydrophila infection. And mRNA expression varied between different time-points. Both MaTlr4 and MaMyD88 protein expressions at 12 hpi were significantly enhanced in head kidney and intestine. These results indicate that matlr4 is involved in the immune response in M. amblycephala, and that it is indeed a functional homologue of tlr4s described in other animal species. PMID:26802439

  3. Molecular cloning, characterisation and mRNA expression of the ryanodine receptor from the peach-potato aphid, Myzus persicae.

    PubMed

    Troczka, B J; Williams, A J; Bass, C; Williamson, M S; Field, L M; Davies, T G E

    2015-02-10

    The peach potato aphid, Myzus persicae, is one of the most important agricultural pests of temperate climates. It is mainly controlled through the judicious application of insecticides; however, over time, aphids have developed resistance to many insecticidal classes. The recent introduction of synthetic diamide insecticides, with a novel mode of action, potentially offers new tools to control aphid populations. These diamides act on the ryanodine receptor (RyR), a large endoplasmic calcium release channel. In this study we have cloned cDNAs encoding the complete open reading frame of the RyR from M. persicae. The open reading frame is 15,306 base pairs long and encodes a protein of 5101 amino acids. The aphid RyR shares many of the features of other insect and vertebrate RyRs, including a highly conserved transmembrane region. However, unlike the other RyRs characterised to date, the M. persicae channel does not display alternative splicing at any stage of its developmental cycle, so it cannot generate functional variants of the channel. PMID:25447916

  4. Molecular cloning, characterisation and mRNA expression of the ryanodine receptor from the peach-potato aphid, Myzus persicae

    PubMed Central

    Troczka, B.J.; Williams, A.J.; Bass, C.; Williamson, M.S.; Field, L.M.; Davies, T.G.E.

    2015-01-01

    The peach potato aphid, Myzus persicae, is one of the most important agricultural pests of temperate climates. It is mainly controlled through the judicious application of insecticides; however, over time, aphids have developed resistance to many insecticidal classes. The recent introduction of synthetic diamide insecticides, with a novel mode of action, potentially offers new tools to control aphid populations. These diamides act on the ryanodine receptor (RyR), a large endoplasmic calcium release channel. In this study we have cloned cDNAs encoding the complete open reading frame of the RyR from M. persicae. The open reading frame is 15,306 base pairs long and encodes a protein of 5101 amino acids. The aphid RyR shares many of the features of other insect and vertebrate RyRs, including a highly conserved transmembrane region. However, unlike the other RyRs characterised to date, the M. persicae channel does not display alternative splicing at any stage of its developmental cycle, so it cannot generate functional variants of the channel. PMID:25447916

  5. Molecular cloning and analysis of a receptor-like promoter of Gbvdr3 gene in sea island cotton.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B-J; Zhang, H-P; Chen, Q-Z; Tang, N; Wang, L-K; Wang, R-F; Zhang, B-L

    2016-01-01

    Verticillium wilt caused by soil borne fungus Verticillium dahliae could significantly reduce cotton yield. The Ve1 homologous gene Gbvdr3 is resistant to Verticillium wilt. In order to understand of the function of the promoter Gbvdr3 in Gossypium barbadense, the promoter region of the receptor-like gene Gbvdr3 was obtained by genome walking, and the cis-element in the promoter was identified using the PLACE software in this study. The sequence analysis showed that the promoter contained elements related to stress resistance and light regulation. The cloned promoter was fused to the GUS reporter gene and transformed into Arabidopsis. GUS expression was specifically detected in roots, flowers, and seeds, suggesting that the expression of Gbvdr3 is tissue-specific. Separation and characterization analysis of the promoter of Gbvdr3 provides a platform for further research and application of this gene. Thorough understanding of the function of the Gbvdr3 promoter is important for better understanding of Gbvdr3 function. These results indicated that the promoter of Gbvdr3 was a tissue-specific promoter. PMID:27323087

  6. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of the FSH receptor gene promoter from the volcano mouse (Neotomodon alstoni alstoni).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Solis, Marco Allán; Macías, Héctor; Acosta-MontesdeOca, Adriana; Pasapera, Ana María; Fierro, Reyna; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo; Gutiérrez-Sagal, Rubén

    2010-02-01

    To gain further insights on the genetic divergence and the species-specific characteristics of the follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), we cloned 946 bp of the 5'-flanking region of the FSHR gene from the volcano mouse (Neotomodon alstoni alstoni), and compared its features with those from other mammalian species. The sequence of neotomodon FSHR (nFSHR) gene from the translation initiation site to -946 is 74, 71, 64, and 59% homologous to rat, mouse (129/J), human, and sheep, respectively. The nFSHR 5'-flanking region exhibits new interesting putative cis-regulatory elements including those for the SRY transcription factor, which had not been previously related to the FSHR gene. The transcriptional regulation properties of nFSHR gene were studied in mouse Sertoli (MSC-1) and non-Sertoli (H441) cell lines, and compared with those obtained with similar 129/J constructs. All constructs tested were more active in H441 than in MSC-1 cells. The low transcription levels detected in MSC-1 cells probably reflect the recruitment of Sertoli cells-specific nuclear factors that repress transcription of the FSHR gene. In H441 cells, 129/J constructs were more active than their neotomodon counterparts, indicating important species-specific differences in their transcription pattern. Functional analysis of a series of progressive 5'-deletion mutants identified regions involved in positive and negative transcriptional regulation as well as the strongest minimal promoter spanning 260 bp upstream the translation initiation site. The identification of inhibitory nuclear transcription factors, which are apparently expressed in MSC-1 cells, may contribute to a better understanding of the transcriptional regulation of the FSHR gene. PMID:19862645

  7. Molecular cloning and evolutionary analysis of captive forest musk deer bitter taste receptor gene T2R16.

    PubMed

    Zhao, G J; Wu, N; Li, D Y; Zeng, D J; Chen, Q; Lu, L; Feng, X L; Zhang, C L; Zheng, C L; Jie, H

    2015-01-01

    Sensing bitter tastes is crucial for most animals because it can prevent them from ingesting harmful food. This process is mainly mediated by the bitter taste receptors (T2R) that are largely expressed in the taste buds. Previous studies have identified some T2R gene repertoires. Marked variation in repertoire size has been noted among species. However, research on T2Rs is still limited and the mechanisms underlying the evolution of vertebrate T2Rs remain poorly understood. In the present study, we analyzed the structure and features of the protein encoded by the forest musk deer (Moschus berezovskii) T2R16 and submitted the gene sequence to NCBI GenBank. The results showed that the full coding DNA sequence (CDS) of musk deer T2R16 (GenBank accession No. KP677279) was 906 bp, encoding 301 amino acids, which contained ATG start codon and TGA stop codon, with a calculated molecular weight of 35.03 kDa and an isoelectric point of 9.56. The T2R16 protein receptor had seven conserved transmembrane regions. Hydrophobicity analysis showed that most amino acid residues in T2R16 protein were hydrophobic, and the grand average of hydrophobicity (GRAVY) was 0.657. Phylogenetic analysis based on this gene revealed that forest musk deer had the closest association with sheep (Ovis aries), as compared to cow (Bos taurus), Tursiops truncatus, and other species, whereas it was genetically farthest from humans (Homo sapiens). We hope these results would complement the existing data on T2R16 and encourage further research in this respect. PMID:26662411

  8. Molecular cloning and expression of Pgp-1. The mouse homolog of the human H-CAM (Hermes) lymphocyte homing receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, D F; Ding, J F; Picker, L J; Bargatze, R F; Butcher, E C; Goeddel, D V

    1989-11-15

    Mouse phagocytic glycoprotein-1 (Pgp-1; Ly-24) is a 95-kDa glycoprotein of unknown function that has served as an important T cell/leukocyte differentiation marker. Recent work has suggested that it may be related to a human 85- to 95-kDa glycoprotein (termed variously the Hermes Ag/lymphocyte homing receptor, ECMRIII, P80, and CD44) that is involved in lymphocyte binding to high endothelial venules in the process of lymphocyte homing, and has been implicated in other cell adhesion events. The widespread expression of this molecular class in diverse organ systems suggests a broad role in cellular adhesion, and has led to the unifying designation homing-cellular adhesion molecule (H-CAM). By using human H-CAM cDNA probes, we have isolated a full-length cDNA for the mouse homolog. Comparison of the human and mouse sequences reveals that an N-terminal domain homologous to cartilage proteoglycan core and link proteins, as well as the C-terminal transmembrane and cytoplasmic sequences, are highly conserved (89% and 86% identity, respectively). In contrast, a proximal extracellular domain thought to serve as a target for O-glycosylation and chondroitin sulfate attachment has undergone substantial divergence (only 42% identity). Transient expression of the cDNA in CHO cells followed by immunologic staining confirms that this mouse H-CAM cDNA encodes Pgp-1.1, one of two known Pgp-1 alloantigens. PMID:2681416

  9. Molecular cloning of a putative receptor protein kinase gene encoded at the self-incompatibility locus of Brassica oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.C.; Howlett, B.; Boyes, D.C.; Nasrallah, M.E.; Nasrallah, J.B. )

    1991-10-01

    Self-recognition between pollen and stigma during pollination in Brassica oleracea is genetically controlled by the multiallelic self-incompatibility locus (S). The authors describe the S receptor kinase (SRK) gene, a previously uncharacterized gene that residues at the S locus. The nucleotide sequences of genomic DNA and of cDNAs corresponding to SRK predict a putative transmembrane receptor having serine/threonine-specific protein kinase activity. Its extracellular domain exhibits striking homology to the secreted product of the S-locus genotypes are highly polymorphic and have apparently evolved in unison with genetically linked alleles of SLG. SRK directs the synthesis of several alternative transcripts, which potentially encode different protein products, and these transcripts were detected exclusively in reproductive organs. The identification of SRK may provide new perspectives into the signal transduction mechanism underlying pollen recognition.

  10. Cloning, Expression Analysis, and Molecular Modeling of the Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor Alpha2 Subunit Gene from the Common Cutworm, Spodoptera litura

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Hongliang; Gao, Lu; Hu, Zhen; Liu, Haiyuan; Zhong, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Intensive research on the molecule structures of the gamma-nminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor in agricultural pests has great significance to the mechanism investigation, resistance prevention, and molecular design of novel pesticides. The GABA receptor a2 (SlGABARα2) subunit gene in Spodoptera litura (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was cloned using the technologies of reverse transcription PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The gemonic DNA sequence of SlGABARα2 has 5164 bp with 8 exons and 7 introns that were in accordance with the GT-AG splicing formula. The complete mRNA sequence of SlGABARα2 was 1965 bp, with an open reading frame of 1500 bp encoding a protein of 499 amino acids. The GABA receptor is highly conserved among insects. The conserved regions include several N-glycosylation, Oglycosylation, and phosphorylation sites, as well as 4 transmembrane domains. The identities that SlGABARα2 shared with the GABA receptor a2 subunit of Spodoptera exigua, Heliothis virescens, Chilo suppressalis, Plutella xylostella, Bombyx mori ranged from 99.2% to 87.2% at the amino acid level. The comparative 3-dimensional model of SlGABARα2 showed that its tertiary structure was composed of 4 major α-helixes located at the 4 putative transmembrane domains on one side, with some β-sheets and 1 small α-helix on the other side. SlGABARα2 may be attached to the membrane by 4 α-helixes that bind ions in other conserved domains to transport them through the membrane. The results of quantitative real time PCR demonstrated that SlGABARα2 was expressed in all developmental stages of S. litura. The relative expression level of SlGABARα2 was the lowest in eggs and increased with larval growth, while it declined slightly in pupae and reached the peak in adults. The expressions of SlGABARα2 in larvae varied among different tissues; it was extremely high in the brain but was low in the midgut, epicuticle, Malpighian tube, and fat body. PMID:23909412

  11. Cloning, expression analysis, and molecular modeling of the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor alpha2 subunit gene from the common cutworm, Spodoptera litura.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Hongliang; Gao, Lu; Hu, Zhen; Liu, Haiyuan; Zhong, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Intensive research on the molecule structures of the gamma-nminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor in agricultural pests has great significance to the mechanism investigation, resistance prevention, and molecular design of novel pesticides. The GABA receptor a2 (SlGABARα2) subunit gene in Spodoptera litura (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was cloned using the technologies of reverse transcription PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The gemonic DNA sequence of SlGABARα2 has 5164 bp with 8 exons and 7 introns that were in accordance with the GT-AG splicing formula. The complete mRNA sequence of SlGABARα2 was 1965 bp, with an open reading frame of 1500 bp encoding a protein of 499 amino acids. The GABA receptor is highly conserved among insects. The conserved regions include several N-glycosylation, Oglycosylation, and phosphorylation sites, as well as 4 transmembrane domains. The identities that SlGABARα2 shared with the GABA receptor a2 subunit of Spodoptera exigua, Heliothis virescens, Chilo suppressalis, Plutella xylostella, Bombyx mori ranged from 99.2% to 87.2% at the amino acid level. The comparative 3-dimensional model of SlGABARα2 showed that its tertiary structure was composed of 4 major α-helixes located at the 4 putative transmembrane domains on one side, with some β-sheets and 1 small α-helix on the other side. SlGABARα2 may be attached to the membrane by 4 α-helixes that bind ions in other conserved domains to transport them through the membrane. The results of quantitative real time PCR demonstrated that SlGABARα2 was expressed in all developmental stages of S. litura. The relative expression level of SlGABARα2 was the lowest in eggs and increased with larval growth, while it declined slightly in pupae and reached the peak in adults. The expressions of SlGABARα2 in larvae varied among different tissues; it was extremely high in the brain but was low in the midgut, epicuticle, Malpighian tube, and fat body. PMID:23909412

  12. Molecular cloning and functional expression of two monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 receptors reveals alternative splicing of the carboxyl-terminal tails.

    PubMed Central

    Charo, I F; Myers, S J; Herman, A; Franci, C; Connolly, A J; Coughlin, S R

    1994-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) is a member of the chemokine family of cytokines that mediate leukocyte chemotaxis. The potent and specific activation of monocytes by MCP-1 may mediate the monocytic infiltration of tissues in atherosclerosis and other inflammatory diseases. We have isolated cDNAs that encode two MCP-1-specific receptors with alternatively spliced carboxyl tails. Expression of the receptors in Xenopus oocytes conferred robust mobilization of intracellular calcium in response to nanomolar concentrations of MCP-1 but not to related chemokines. The MCP-1 receptors are most closely related to the receptor for the chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha and RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T expressed and secreted). The identification of the MCP-1 receptor and cloning of two distinct isoforms provide powerful tools for understanding the specificity and signaling mechanisms of this important chemokine. Images PMID:8146186

  13. Molecular cloning, expression, and stress response of the estrogen-related receptor gene (AccERR) from Apis cerana cerana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weixing; Zhu, Ming; Zhang, Ge; Liu, Feng; Wang, Hongfang; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2016-04-01

    Estrogen-related receptor (ERR), which belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily, has been implicated in diverse physiological processes involving the estrogen signaling pathway. However, little information is available on ERR in Apis cerana cerana. In this report, we isolated the ERR gene and investigated its involvement in antioxidant defense. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) revealed that the highest mRNA expression occurred in eggs during different developmental stages. The expression levels of AccERR were highest in the muscle, followed by the rectum. The predicted transcription factor binding sites in the promoter of AccERR suggested that AccERR potentially functions in early development and in environmental stress responses. The expression of AccERR was induced by cold (4 °C), heat (42 °C), ultraviolet light (UV), HgCl2, and various types of pesticides (phoxim, deltamethrin, triadimefon, and cyhalothrin). Western blot was used to measure the expression levels of AccERR protein. These data suggested that AccERR might play a vital role in abiotic stress responses. PMID:26922780

  14. Molecular cloning, expression, and stress response of the estrogen-related receptor gene (AccERR) from Apis cerana cerana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weixing; Zhu, Ming; Zhang, Ge; Liu, Feng; Wang, Hongfang; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2016-04-01

    Estrogen-related receptor (ERR), which belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily, has been implicated in diverse physiological processes involving the estrogen signaling pathway. However, little information is available on ERR in Apis cerana cerana. In this report, we isolated the ERR gene and investigated its involvement in antioxidant defense. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) revealed that the highest mRNA expression occurred in eggs during different developmental stages. The expression levels of AccERR were highest in the muscle, followed by the rectum. The predicted transcription factor binding sites in the promoter of AccERR suggested that AccERR potentially functions in early development and in environmental stress responses. The expression of AccERR was induced by cold (4 °C), heat (42 °C), ultraviolet light (UV), HgCl2, and various types of pesticides (phoxim, deltamethrin, triadimefon, and cyhalothrin). Western blot was used to measure the expression levels of AccERR protein. These data suggested that AccERR might play a vital role in abiotic stress responses.

  15. Molecular cloning of a type A chicken corticotropin-releasing factor receptor with high affinity for urotensin I.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Xie, L Y; Abou-Samra, A B

    1996-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is an essential physiological system in many species. CRF, the major neuropeptide regulating ACTH secretion, is highly conserved in its primary sequence. Evolutionary conservation of the CRF sequence suggests that the CRF receptor (CRF-R) complementary DNA and examined its properties. The avian CRF-R complementary DNA encodes a 420-amino acid protein that is 87-88% identical to those of human, rat, and mouse. Most sequence divergence occurs in the putative signal peptide and the extracellular amino-terminus of the receptor. Five additional amino acids are inserted in the amino-terminus of the cCRF-R. When expressed in COS-7 cells, the cCRF-R binds the CRF and urotensin I radioligands with high affinities. Urotensin I competes for binding to the chicken CRF-R, expressed in COS-7 cells, with an apparent affinity 20 times higher than that of CRF. Both urotensin I and sauvagine were more effective in stimulating cAMP accumulation in COS-7 cells transfected with the cCRF-R than CRF. The effects of CRF and urotensin I on inositol phosphate accumulation were also tested. Urotensin I was an effective as CRF in stimulating inositol phosphate accumulation in COS-7 cells transfected with the cCRF-R. These data suggest that the sequence of the CRF-R is highly conserved from avian to mammalian species and that, despite its high sequence homology to the type A mammalian CRF-R, the ligand binding properties of cCRF-R are similar to those of the type B CRF-R i.e. a higher affinity for urotensin I than for CRF. PMID:8536612

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of the human interleukin-11 receptor {alpha}-chain gene, IL11RA, located on chromosome 9p13

    SciTech Connect

    Van Leuven, F.; Stas, L.; Hilliker, C.

    1996-01-01

    The human gene coding for the interleukin-11 receptor (IL11RA) was cloned and its structure analyzed. The gene is composed of 13 exons comprising nearly 10 kb of DNA that was completely sequenced. The intron-exon boundaries were determined based on the mouse Etl2 and interleukin-11 receptor cDNAs that were recently cloned. The protein sequence predicted by the human gene was over 83% identical with its murine counterpart, with very strict conservation of functionally important domains and signatures. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed the gene to be located on human chromosome 9p13, syntenic with the mouse etl2 gene on chromosome 4. The coding exons of the interleukin-11 gene were sequenced in a patient with the cartilage-hair hypoplasia syndrome, which has been linked to a gene on chromosome 9, but no functional mutations were detected. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of interleukin (IL)-15 and IL-15 receptor α from rock bream, Oplegnathus fasciatus.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jin-Sol; Shim, Sang Hee; Hwang, Seong Don; Kim, Ju-Won; Park, Dae-Won; Park, Chan-Il

    2013-10-01

    Mammalian interleukin (IL)-15 plays an important role in the activation of CD8(+) T cells and natural killer (NK) cells along with its receptor α (IL-15Rα). To understand the potential roles of IL-15 and IL-15Rα in fish, we identified IL-15 and IL-15Rα cDNA from rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus) and investigated their gene expression profiles after bacterial and viral infection. Coding regions of rock bream (Rb) IL-15 and RbIL-15Rα cDNAs were 534 and 402 bp encoding 177 and 133 amino acid residues, respectively. The sushi domain of IL-15Rα was highly conserved between rock bream and other species. Unlike other IL-15Rαs, RbIL-15Rα does not have a transmembrane region. Gene expression of RbIL-15 and RbIL-15Rα was widely expressed in different tissues of healthy fish, especially immune-related tissues. RbIL-15 and RbIL-15Rα were highly induced in the kidney and spleen after infection with Edwardsiella tarda, Streptococcus iniae and red seabream iridovirus. Gene expression patterns of RbIL-15 and RbIL-15Rα were similar in the kidney and spleen after pathogen infection. However, these genes were differentially induced in the liver after pathogen infection. These results suggest that the different responses of RbIL-15 and RbIL-15Rα to pathogen infection may be induced by different tissues or cell types. PMID:23911652

  18. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of prostaglandin E receptor 2 gene in cashmere goat (Capra hircus) skin during hair follicle development.

    PubMed

    Geng, Rong-Qing; Yuan, Chao; Chen, Yu-Lin

    2014-04-01

    As a member of the four subtypes of receptors for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), prostaglandin E receptor 2 (PTGER2) is in the family of G-protein coupled receptors and has been characterized to be involved in the development and growth of hair follicles. In this study, we cloned and characterized the full-length coding sequence (CDS) of PTGER2 gene from cashmere goat skin. The entire open reading frame (ORF) of PTGER2 gene was 1047 bp and encoded 348 amino acid residues. The deduced protein contained one G-protein coupled receptors family 1 signature, seven transmembrane domains, and other potential sites. Tissue expression analysis showed that PTGER2 gene was expressed strongly in the skin. The general expression tendency of PTGER2 gene at different hair follicle developmental stages in the skin was gradually decreased from anagen to catagen to telogen. After comparing with the expression of BMP4 gene and related reports, we further presume that it seems to have a relationship between the hair follicle cycle and the expression level of PTGER2 gene in cashmere goat skin. PMID:24555795

  19. Cloning, molecular characterization, and chromosomal assignment of a gene encoding a second D sub 1 dopamine receptor subtype: Differential expression pattern in rat brain compared with the D sup 1A receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberi, M.; Jarvie, K.R.; Silvia, C.; Falardeau, P.; Gingrich, J.A.; Godinot, N.; Bertrand, L.; Fremeau, R.T. Jr.; Caron, M.G. ); Yang-Feng, T.L. )

    1991-09-01

    Multiple D{sub 1} dopaminergic receptor subtypes have been postulated on the basis of pharmacological, biochemical, and genetic studies. The authors describe the isolation and characterization of a rat gene encoding a dopamine receptor that is structurally and functionally similar to the D{sub 1} dopamine receptor. The coding region, which is intronless, encodes a protein of 475 amino acids (M{sub r} 52,834) with structural features that are consistent with receptors coupled to guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins. The expressed protein binds dopaminergic ligands and mediates stimulation of adenylyl cyclase with pharmacological properties similar to those of the D{sub 1} dopamine receptor. The gene encoding the human homologue of this receptor subtype is located to the short arm of chromosome 4 (4p16.3), the same region as the Huntington disease gene. In striking contrast to the previously cloned D{sub 1} receptor, little or no mRNA for the receptor described here was observed in striatum, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, and frontal cortex. High levels of mRNA for this receptor were found in distinct layers of the hippocampus, the mammillary nuclei, and the anterior pretectal nuclei, brain regions that have been shown to exhibit little or no D{sub 1} dopamine receptor binding. On the basis of its properties the authors propose that this dopamine receptor subtype be called D{sub 1B}.

  20. Cloning, molecular characterization, and chromosomal assignment of a gene encoding a second D1 dopamine receptor subtype: differential expression pattern in rat brain compared with the D1A receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Tiberi, M; Jarvie, K R; Silvia, C; Falardeau, P; Gingrich, J A; Godinot, N; Bertrand, L; Yang-Feng, T L; Fremeau, R T; Caron, M G

    1991-01-01

    Multiple D1 dopaminergic receptor subtypes have been postulated on the basis of pharmacological, biochemical, and genetic studies. We describe the isolation and characterization of a rat gene encoding a dopamine receptor that is structurally and functionally similar to the D1 dopamine receptor. The coding region, which is intronless, encodes a protein of 475 amino acids (Mr 52,834) with structural features that are consistent with receptors coupled to guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins. The expressed protein binds dopaminergic ligands and mediates stimulation of adenylyl cyclase with pharmacological properties similar to those of the D1 dopamine receptor. The gene encoding the human homologue of this receptor subtype is located to the short arm of chromosome 4 (4p16.3), the same region as the Huntington disease gene. In striking contrast to the previously cloned D1 receptor, little or no mRNA for the receptor described here was observed in striatum, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, and frontal cortex. High levels of mRNA for this receptor were found in distinct layers of the hippocampus, the mammillary nuclei, and the anterior pretectal nuclei, brain regions that have been shown to exhibit little or no D1 dopamine receptor binding. On the basis of its properties we propose that this dopamine receptor subtype be called D1B. Images PMID:1831904

  1. Molecular cloning of TRPC3a, an N-terminally extended, store-operated variant of the human C3 transient receptor potential channel.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Eda; Kawasaki, Brian T; Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2005-03-01

    AK032317 is the GenBank accession no. of a full-length RIKEN mouse cDNA. It encodes a putative variant of the C3-type TRPC (transient receptor potential channel) that differs from the previously cloned murine TRPC3 cDNA in that it has a 5' extension stemming from inclusion of an additional exon (exon 0). The extended cDNA adds 62 aa to the sequence of the murine TRPC3. Here, we report the cloning of a cDNA encoding the human homologue of this extended TRPC3 having a highly homologous 73-aa N-terminal extension, referred to as hTRPC3a. A query of the GenBank genomic database predicts the existence of a similar gene product also in rats. Transient expression of the longer TRPC3a in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells showed that it mediates Ca2+ entry in response to stimulation of the Gq-phospholipase C beta pathway, which is similar to that mediated by the shorter hTRPC3. However, after isolation of HEK cells expressing hTRPC3 in stable form, TRPC3a gave rise to Ca2+-entry channels that are not only activated by the Gq-phospholipase C beta pathway (receptor-activated Ca entry) but also by thapsigargin triggered store depletion. In conjunction with findings from our and other laboratories that TRPC1, TRPC2, TRPC4, TRPC5, and TRPC7, can each mediate store-depletion-activated Ca2+ entry in mammalian cells, our findings with hTRC3a support our previous proposal that TRPCs form capacitative Ca-entry channels. PMID:15728370

  2. Group III human metabotropic glutamate receptors 4, 7 and 8: molecular cloning, functional expression, and comparison of pharmacological properties in RGT cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, S; Wright, R A; Rockey, P K; Burgett, S G; Arnold, J S; Rosteck, P R; Johnson, B G; Schoepp, D D; Belagaje, R M

    1998-01-01

    Cloning and expression in a stable mammalian cell line co-transfected with a glutamate transporter (RGT cells) were used as tools for studying the functions and pharmacological properties of group III metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Complementary DNAs (cDNAs) encoding the human mGluR4, human mGluR7, and human mGluR8 were isolated from human cerebellum, fetal brain or retinal cDNA libraries. The human mGluR4, mGluR7 and mGluR8 receptors were 912, 915 and 908 amino acid residues long and share 67-70% amino acid similarity with each other and 42-45% similarity with the members of mGluR subgroups I and II. The human mGluR4 and mGluR7 had amino acid identity of 96% and 99.5% with rat mGluR4 and 7, respectively, whereas the human mGluR8 has 98.8% amino acid identity with the mouse mGluR8. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences in the coding region of human mGluR4 and mGluR7 were found to be identical to the previously published sequences by Flor et al. and Makoff et al. Following stable expression in RGT cells, highly significant inhibitions of forskolin stimulation of cAMP production by group III agonists were found for each receptor. The relative potencies of the group III agonist L-AP4 varied greatly between the group III clones, being mGluR8>mGluR4 > mGluR7. The reported group II mGluR agonist L-CCG-I was a highly potent mGluR8 agonist (EC50=0.35 microM), with significant agonist activities at both mGluR4 (EC50=3.7 microM) and mGluR7 (EC50=47 microM). The antagonist potency of the purported group III mGluR antagonist MPPG also varied among the receptors being human mGluR8 > mGluR4 = mGluR7. The expression and second messenger coupling of human group III mGluRs expressed in the RGT cell line are useful to clearly define the subtype selectivities of mGluR ligands. PMID:9473604

  3. Methods in molecular cardiology: in silico cloning

    PubMed Central

    Passier, R.; Doevendans, P.A.

    2004-01-01

    Advancements in sequencing technology have made it possible to obtain more information about the DNA sequence, structure and the transcript products of the genome from different species. This information is collected in DNA databases. These databases contain many genes of which the functions have not yet been discovered. By using online biotechnology tools novel genes and their transcripts can be identified. The identification of novel genes using DNA database analysis is referred to as in silico cloning. In silico cloning may not only provide new information on genes and their biological function, it may also lead to identification of molecular targets for drug discovery activities. In this review we describe the process of in silico cloning and its application in biomedical research. ImagesFigure 1Figure 3 PMID:25696371

  4. Molecular cloning, genomic structure, and genetic mapping of two Rdl-orthologous genes of GABA receptors in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Guorui; Gao, Weiyue; Yang, Yihua; Wu, Yidong

    2010-06-01

    The Resistance to dieldrin (Rdl) gene encodes a subunit of the insect gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor. Cyclodiene resistance in many insects is associated with replacement of a single amino acid (alanine at position 302) with either a serine or a glycine in the Rdl gene. Two Rdl-orthologous genes of GABA receptors (PxGABARalpha1 and PxGABARalpha2) were cloned and sequenced from a susceptible strain (Roth) of Plutella xylostella. PxGABARalpha1 and PxGABARalpha2 showed 84% and 77% identity with the Rdl gene of Drosophila melanogaster at an amino acid level, respectively. The coding regions of PxGABARalpha1 and PxGABARalpha2 both comprise ten exons, with two alternative RNA-splicing forms in exon 3 of both genes. At the orthologous position of alanine-302 in D. melanogaster Rdl, PxGABARalpha1 has a conserved alanine at position 282. PxGABARalpha2 has a serine instead of an alanine at the equivalent position. With two informative DNA markers, both PxGABARalpha1 and PxGABARalpha2 were mapped onto the Z chromosome of P. xylostella. PMID:20513056

  5. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of Toll-like receptor 5M gene in Japanese sea perch (Lateolabrax japonicas) after bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengyang; Zhao, Chao; Fu, Mingjun; Bao, Weiyang; Qiu, Lihua

    2016-09-01

    Toll-like receptor 5M belongs to Toll-like receptors (TLRs) family, which plays a crucial role in innate immunity due to its important role in the recognition of bacteria invasion and in the activation of immune related pathways downstream. In the present study, we firstly cloned the full-length cDNAs of TLR 5M (LjTLR 5M) from Japanese sea perch (Lateolabrax japonicas). The full-length cDNAs of LjTLR 5M include an open reading frame (ORF) of 2676 bp encoding a polypeptide of 891 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence analysis showed that LiTLR 5M contains LRRs (extracellular leucine rich repeats), transmembrane and TIR (Toll/interleukin-1 receptor) domain. Transcriptional expression analysis indicated that LiTLR 5M mRNAs were ubiquitously expressed in wide array of tissues and the peak level was observed in the head-kidney. The expression patterns of LjTLR 5M after Vibro harveyi and Streptococus agalactiae infection were detected by qRT-PCR, and the results showed that LjTLR 5M was significant up-regulated in spleen, liver and head-kidney. Additionally, the expression patterns of LjTLR 5M in infected spleen and head-kidney were further validated by in situ hybridization (ISH). In summary, these findings indicate that LjTLR 5M is significant induced after different bacterial infection and is involved in immune response. Furthermore, this study will provide foundational information for other TLRs research of L. japonicas against different bacterial pathogens invasion. PMID:27417233

  6. Molecular cloning of the mouse grb2 gene: differential interaction of the Grb2 adaptor protein with epidermal growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Suen, K L; Bustelo, X R; Pawson, T; Barbacid, M

    1993-01-01

    We report the isolation and molecular characterization of the mouse grb2 gene. The product of this gene, the Grb2 protein, is highly related to the Caenorhabditis elegans sem-5 gene product and the human GRB2 protein and displays the same SH3-SH2-SH3 structural motifs. In situ hybridization studies revealed that the mouse grb2 gene is widely expressed throughout embryonic development (E9.5 to P0). However, grb2 transcripts are not uniformly distributed, and in certain tissues (e.g., thymus) they appear to be regulated during development. Recent genetic and biochemical evidence has implicated the Grb2 protein in the signaling pathways that link cell surface tyrosine kinase receptors with Ras. We have investigated the association of the Grb2 protein with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. EGF treatment of PC12 cells results in the rapid association of Grb2 with the activated EGF receptors, an interaction mediated by the Grb2 SH2 domain. However, Grb2 does not bind to NGF-activated Trk receptors. Mitogenic signaling of NGF in NIH 3T3 cells ectopically expressing Trk receptors also takes place without detectable association between Grb2 and Trk. These results suggest that whereas EGF and NGF can activate the Ras signaling pathway in PC12 cells, only the EGF receptor is likely to do so through a direct interaction with Grb2. Finally, binding studies with glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins indicate that Grb2 binds two distinct subsets of proteins which are individually recognized by its SH2 and SH3 domains. These observations add further support to the concept that Grb2 is a modular adaptor protein. Images PMID:7689150

  7. Molecular cloning, characterization, tissue distribution and mRNA expression changes during the hibernation and reproductive periods of estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) in Chinese alligator, Alligator sinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruidong; Hu, Yuehong; Wang, Huan; Yan, Peng; Zhou, Yongkang; Wu, Rong; Wu, Xiaobing

    2016-10-01

    Chinese alligator, Alligator sinensis, is a critically endangered reptile species unique to China. Little is known about the mechanism of growth- and reproduction-related hormones gene expression in Chinese alligator. Estrogens play important roles in regulating multiple reproduction- and non-reproduction-related functions by binding to their corresponding receptors. Here, the full-length cDNA of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα/ESR1) was cloned and sequenced from Chinese alligator for the first time, which comprises 1764bp nucleotides and encodes a predicted protein of 587 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis of ESR1 showed that crocodilians and turtles were the sister-group of birds. The results of real-time quantitative PCR indicated that the ESR1 mRNA was widely expressed in the brain and peripheral tissues. In the brain and pituitary gland, ESR1 was most highly transcribed in the cerebellum. But in other peripheral tissues, ESR1 mRNA expression level was the highest in the ovary. Compared with hibernation period, ESR1 mRNA expression levels were increased significantly in the reproductive period (P<0.05) in cerebellum, pituitary gland, liver, spleen, lung, kidney and ovary, while no significant change in other examined tissues (P>0.05). The ESR1 mRNA expression levels changes during the two periods of different tissues suggested that ESR1 might play an important role in mediation of estrogenic multiple reproductive effects in Chinese alligator. Furthermore, it was the first time to quantify ESR1 mRNA level in the brain of crocodilians, and the distribution and expression of ESR1 mRNA in the midbrain, cerebellum and medulla oblongata was also reported for the first time in reptiles. PMID:27212643

  8. Molecular Cloning and Functional Characterization of Xenopus tropicalis Frog Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Reveal Its Functional Evolution for Heat, Acid, and Capsaicin Sensitivities in Terrestrial Vertebrates*

    PubMed Central

    Ohkita, Masashi; Saito, Shigeru; Imagawa, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Kenji; Tominaga, Makoto; Ohta, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    The functional difference of thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in the evolutionary context has attracted attention, but thus far little information is available on the TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) function of amphibians, which diverged earliest from terrestrial vertebrate lineages. In this study we cloned Xenopus tropicalis frog TRPV1 (xtTRPV1), and functional characterization was performed using HeLa cells heterologously expressing xtTRPV1 (xtTRPV1-HeLa) and dorsal root ganglion neurons isolated from X. tropicalis (xtDRG neurons) by measuring changes in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). The channel activity was also observed in xtTRPV1-expressing Xenopus oocytes. Furthermore, we tested capsaicin- and heat-induced nocifensive behaviors of the frog X. tropicalis in vivo. At the amino acid level, xtTRPV1 displays ∼60% sequence identity to other terrestrial vertebrate TRPV1 orthologues. Capsaicin induced [Ca2+]i increases in xtTRPV1-HeLa and xtDRG neurons and evoked nocifensive behavior in X. tropicalis. However, its sensitivity was extremely low compared with mammalian orthologues. Low extracellular pH and heat activated xtTRPV1-HeLa and xtDRG neurons. Heat also evoked nocifensive behavior. In oocytes expressing xtTRPV1, inward currents were elicited by heat and low extracellular pH. Mutagenesis analysis revealed that two amino acids (tyrosine 523 and alanine 561) were responsible for the low sensitivity to capsaicin. Taken together, our results indicate that xtTRPV1 functions as a polymodal receptor similar to its mammalian orthologues. The present study demonstrates that TRPV1 functions as a heat- and acid-sensitive channel in the ancestor of terrestrial vertebrates. Because it is possible to examine vanilloid and heat sensitivities in vitro and in vivo, X. tropicalis could be the ideal experimental lower vertebrate animal for the study of TRPV1 function. PMID:22130664

  9. Molecular cloning, genomic structure, and tissue distribution of EW135, a novel chicken egg white protein with group B scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Whayoung; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Asanuma, Hideki; Matsushita, Misao

    2013-11-01

    Approximately 80 proteins are reported to be present in chicken egg white. The major function of egg white proteins isolated so far is to defend the egg yolk against infections. We recently isolated a novel protein termed EW135 from chicken egg white. In this paper, we have determined the complete amino acid sequence of EW135 based on cDNA cloning. EW135 consists of 970 amino acids with a putative signal peptide of 17 amino acids. It is composed exclusively of tandem repeats of nine group B scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domains separated by eight seven-amino acid peptides. The features of consensus sequences found in the group B SRCR domain were well conserved in EW135. The EW135 gene consists of putative 11 exons, with each SRCR domain being encoded by a single exon. Reverse transcription PCR showed that EW135 is expressed in only the oviduct among the 11 types of tissues tested. EW135 is a second soluble protein belonging to the group B SRCR domain superfamily identified in chickens. One of the important functions of proteins belonging to the group B SRCR domain superfamily is to recognize pathogens in innate immunity. It is, therefore, conceivable that EW135 could be involved in host defense in egg white. PMID:23913278

  10. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of porcine toll-like receptor 7 involved in recognition of single-stranded RNA virus/ssRNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiliang; Guo, Yingjun; Lv, Ke; Wang, Kaiyu; Sun, Shuhan

    2008-02-01

    The interest in understanding interaction between the toll-like receptor and the viral infection has increased because of its importance in disease control. Here we have cloned the porcine TLR7 (pTLR7) cDNA encoding for 1050 amino acids. The pTLR7 Exhibits 90, 87, 87, 86, 84 and 78% similarity to TLR7 from cattle, dog, horse, cat, human and mouse, respectively. RT-PCR data suggested that pTLR7 mRNA was mostly synthesized in secondary lymphoid tissues (spleen, lymph node and tonsil) and antigen-presenting cells (macrophage and B cell). The cellular experiments indicated that immunostimulatory RNA oligonucleotides (ORN) found in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) activated nuclear factor-kB and induced the expression of IFN-alpha via pTLR7. We found that the ORN induced Th1-type cytokines and activated immunocytes in PBMC. The study provides foundation for further investigation in pTLR7 interactions with its ligands and interactions between the porcine immune system and pathogens. PMID:17889367

  11. Molecular cloning, expression of, and regulation by thyroid-hormone receptor α A in the half-smooth tongue sole Cynoglossus semilaevis during metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W T; Liu, K; Xiang, J S; Zhang, L Y; Liu, W J; Dong, Z D; Li, Y Z; Li, H L; Chen, S L; Wang, N

    2016-05-01

    To elucidate the effect of thyroid hormone receptor α A (thraa) on metamorphosis, the full length cDNA of half-smooth tongue sole Cynoglossus semilaevis was cloned. The relative gene transcript level of thraa at different development stages was quantified using real-time PCR. Transcription of thraa increased and declined rapidly during metamorphosis. Hyperthyroidism was induced in juveniles and larvae with exposure to T3 and T4, and hypothyroidism with thiourea (TU), 2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole (MMI). thraa mRNA was higher in fish treated for 6 days with MMI than in untreated controls, although inhibited larvae did not complete metamorphosis. The addition of exogenous T4 reversed this effect in the MMI-treated group, but not in the TU-treated group. In situ hybridization revealed progressive tail end of body growth and change during developmental stages, with corresponding changes in thraa expression. This process may be induced by thyroid hormones with thraa as a major mediator. The morphological changes of tip of the tail may be associated with the development of lateral swimming. PMID:26953104

  12. Molecular cloning and characterization of canine ICOS.

    PubMed

    Lee, Je-Hwan; Joo, Young-Don; Yim, Daesong; Lee, Richard; Ostrander, Elaine A; Loretz, Carol; Little, Marie-Térèse; Storb, Rainer; Kuhr, Christian S

    2004-10-01

    Inducible costimulatory receptor (ICOS) is one recently identified member of the CD28 family of costimulatory molecules. Evidence suggests ICOS functions as a critical immune regulator and, to evaluate these effects, we employed the canine model system that has been used to develop strategies currently in clinical use for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To investigate the effects of blocking the ICOS pathway in the canine hematopoietic cell transplantation model, we tested existing murine and human reagents and cloned the full length of the open reading frame of canine ICOS cDNA to allow the development of reagents specific for the canine ICOS. Canine ICOS contains a major open reading frame of 624 nucleotides, encoding a protein of 208 amino acids, and localizes to chromosome 37. Canine ICOS shares 79% sequence identity with human ICOS, 70% with mouse, and 69% with rat. Canine ICOS expression is limited to stimulated PBMC. PMID:15475250

  13. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) gene in golden pompano Trachinotus ovatus fed Artemia nauplii with different enrichments.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qibin; Zheng, Panlong; Ma, Zhenhua; Li, Tao; Jiang, Shigui; Qin, Jian G

    2015-12-01

    The retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are involved in the skeletal development and other biological process such as blood vessel formation and metabolism. Partial sequences of RXRα and β genes were obtained, and their expressions were quantified on golden pompano Trachinotus ovatus at 28 days post hatching (DPH) to explore the molecular response to nutritional manipulation in fish larvae. As live food, Artemia nauplii were separately enriched with Nannochloropsis and Algamac 3080 and non-enriched Artemia nauplii (control) for fish feeding. The expressions of RXRs were detected in the embryos and fish larvae at early stages, suggesting that the skeletal development in golden pompano initiated before yolk re-sorption completion. Fish fed non-enriched Artemia nauplii ended up with higher jaw malformation. The highest specific growth rate was obtained when fish were fed with the Artemia nauplii enriched with Algamac 3080, and the lowest growth rate was observed when fish were fed with unenriched Artemia nauplii. The highest survival was obtained when fish were fed with non-enriched or Nannochloropsis-enriched Artemia nauplii. This study indicates that the use of enriched formula for Artemia nauplii can significantly affect the expression levels of RXRs and jaw malformation of golden pompano larvae, but there is no clear correlation between RXRs expressions and malformation rates when fish are subjected to nutrient challenge. PMID:26159320

  14. Molecular cloning of protein-based polymers.

    PubMed

    Mi, Lixin

    2006-07-01

    Protein-based biopolymers have become a promising class of materials for both biomedical and pharmaceutical applications, as they have well-defined molecular weights, monomer compositions, as well as tunable chemical, biological, and mechanical properties. Using standard molecular biology tools, it is possible to design and construct genes encoding artificial proteins or protein-based polymers containing multiple repeats of amino acid sequences. This article reviews some of the traditional methods used for constructing DNA duplexes encoding these repeat-containing genes, including monomer generation, concatemerization, iterative oligomerization, and seamless cloning. A facile and versatile method, called modules of degenerate codons (MDC), which uses PCR and codon degeneracy to overcome some of the disadvantages of traditional methods, is introduced. Re-engineering of the random coil spacer domain of a bioactive protein, WPT2-3R, is used to demonstrate the utility of the MDC method. MDC re-constructed coding sequences facilitate further manipulations, such as insertion, deletion, and swapping of various sequence modules. A summary of some promising emerging techniques for synthesizing repetitive sequence-containing artificial proteins is also provided. PMID:16827576

  15. Cloning and pharmacological characterization of a rat kappa opioid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Meng, F; Xie, G X; Thompson, R C; Mansour, A; Goldstein, A; Watson, S J; Akil, H

    1993-01-01

    A full-length cDNA was isolated from a rat striatal library by using low-stringency screening with two PCR fragments, one spanning transmembrane domains 3-6 of the mouse delta opioid receptor and the other unidentified but homologous to the mouse delta receptor from rat brain. The novel cDNA had a long open reading frame encoding a protein of 380 residues with 59% identity to the mouse delta receptor and topography consistent with a seven-helix guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled receptor. COS-1 cells transfected with the coding region of this clone showed high-affinity binding to kappa opioid receptor-selective ligands such as dynorphin A and U-50,488 and also nonselective opioid ligands such as bremazocine, ethylketocyclazocine, and naloxone. Not bound at all (or bound with low affinity) were dynorphin A-(2-13), enantiomers of naloxone and levophanol [i.e., (+)-naloxone and dextrorphan], and selective mu and delta opioid receptor ligands. Activation of the expressed receptor by kappa receptor agonists led to inhibition of cAMP. Finally, in situ hybridization revealed a mRNA distribution in rat brain that corresponded well to the distribution of binding sites labeled with kappa-selective ligands. These observations indicate that we have cloned a cDNA encoding a rat kappa receptor of the kappa 1 subtype. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8234341

  16. Molecular cloning of Salmo salar Toll-like receptors (TLR1, TLR22, TLR5M and TLR5S) and expression analysis in SHK-1 cells during Piscirickettsia salmonis infection.

    PubMed

    Salazar, C; Haussmann, D; Kausel, G; Figueroa, J

    2016-02-01

    In fish, the innate immune system is the primary response against infection. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize pathogens through pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and some target molecules of TLRs are homologous between fish and mammals. Piscirickettsia salmonis is one of the main pathogens affecting the salmon industry in Chile. Better knowledge of mechanisms underlying its invasive capacity and recognition of target cells is crucial for vaccine development. Therefore, Salmo salar L. TLR1, TLR22, membrane TLR5M and soluble TLR5S sequences were cloned, and expression kinetics were analysed by RT-qPCR in salmon head kidney cells (SHK-1) infected with three different P. salmonis preparations: alive, formaldehyde treated, extract. Clearly, all analysed TLRs were expressed and transcription level changes were revealed at 2 hpi, 12 or 16 hpi and 24 hpi depending on P. salmonis infection scheme. Increased IL1-beta expression confirmed TLR pathway response. Furthermore, significant expression modulations of several members of the TLR pathway in this in vitro model suggest that P. salmonis extract rather than formaldehyde-inactivated bacteria might strengthen the salmon immune system. PMID:25903926

  17. CYTOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF NORMAL AND CLONED BULLS’ MEIOSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cytological and molecular analysis of meiotic cells from two bull clones and three non-clones was performed in order to detect effects of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SNCT) on the meiotic process. Pachytene cells were analyzed by immunohistology using antibodies against the synaptonemal complex pr...

  18. Molecular cloning and comparative responses of Toll-like receptor 22 following ligands stimulation and parasitic infection in yellowtail (Seriola lalandi).

    PubMed

    Reyes-Becerril, Martha; Ascencio-Valle, Felipe; Alamillo, Erika; Hirono, Ikuo; Kondo, Hidehiro; Jirapongpairoj, Walissara; Angulo, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    TLR22 is exclusively present in teleosts and amphibians and is expected to play the distinctive role in innate immunity. In this study, we cloned the full-length cDNA sequence of yellowtail (Seriola lalandi) TLR22 (SlTLR22). The complete cDNA sequence of SlTLR22 was 4208 bp and encodes a polypeptide of 961 amino acids. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence indicated that SlTLR22 has typical structural features of proteins belonging to the TLR family. These included 17 LRR domains (residues 91-633) and one C-terminal LRR domain (LRR-CT, residues 693-744) in the extracellular region, and a TIR domain (residues 800-943) in the cytoplasmic region. Comparison with homologous proteins showed that the deduced SlTLR22 has the highest sequence identity to turbot TLR22 (76%). Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis demonstrated the constitutive expression of SlTLR22 mRNA in all examined tissues with higher levels in the head kidney, intestine, skin and spleen. Further, SlTLR22 expression was significantly up-regulated following TLR ligands injection with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), CpG ODN2006 and polyinosinic: polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) in spleen and liver. Amyloodinium ocellatum infection also induced a high expression of SlTLR22 in spleen, intestine, muscle, skin and gill, with maximum increases ranging from 1000 to 100 fold upon different ligands and organs. Finally, histological examination in gill tissue confirmed infection by the parasite and histopathological lesion was observed also in spleen and skin. These findings suggest a possible role of SlTLR22 in the immune responses to the infections of a broad range of pathogens that include DNA and RNA viruses and parasites. PMID:26102460

  19. Molecular cloning of chicken aggrecan. Structural analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, L; Tanzer, M L

    1992-01-01

    The large, aggregating chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan of cartilage, aggrecan, has served as a generic model of proteoglycan structure. Molecular cloning of aggrecans has further defined their amino acid sequences and domain structures. In this study, we have obtained the complete coding sequence of chicken sternal cartilage aggrecan by a combination of cDNA and genomic DNA sequencing. The composite sequence is 6117 bp in length, encoding 1951 amino acids. Comparison of chicken aggrecan protein primary structure with rat, human and bovine aggrecans has disclosed both similarities and differences. The domains which are most highly conserved at 70-80% identity are the N-terminal domains G1 and G2 and the C-terminal domain G3. The chondroitin sulphate domain of chicken aggrecan is smaller than that of rat and human aggrecans and has very distinctive repeat sequences. It has two separate sections, one comprising 12 consecutive Ser-Gly-Glu repeats of 20 amino acids each, adjacent to the other which has 23 discontinuous Ser-Gly-Glu repeats of 10 amino acids each; this latter region, N-terminal to the former one, appears to be unique to chicken aggrecan. The two regions contain a total of 94 potential chondroitin sulphate attachment sites. Genomic comparison shows that, although chicken exons 11-14 are identical in size to the rat and human exons, chicken exon 10 is the smallest of the three species. This is also reflected in the size of its chondroitin sulphate coding region and in the total number of Ser-Gly pairs. The putative keratan sulphate domain shows 31-45% identity with the other species and lacks the repetitive sequences seen in the others. In summary, while the linear arrangement of specific domains of chicken aggrecan is identical to that in the aggrecans of other species, and while there is considerable identity of three separate domains, chicken aggrecan demonstrates unique features, notably in its chondroitin sulphate domain and its keratan sulphate

  20. Molecular cloning, pathologically-correlated expression and functional characterization of the colonystimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) gene from a teleost, Plecoglossus altivelis

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, Qiang; LU, Xin-Jiang; LI, Ming-Yun; CHEN, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    Colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) is an important regulator of monocytes/macrophages (MO/MΦ). Although several CSF-1R genes have been identified in teleosts, the precise role of CSF- 1R in ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis) remains unclear. In this study, we characterized the CSF-1R homologue from P. altivelis, and named it PaCSF-1R. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree analysis showed that PaCSF-1R was most closely related to that of Japanese ricefish (Oryzias latipes). Tissue distribution and expression analysis showed that the PaCSF-1R transcript was mainly expressed in the head kidney-derived MO/MΦ, spleen, and head kidney, and its expression was significantly altered in various tissues upon Vibrio anguillarum infection. After PaCSF-1R neutralization for 48 h, the phagocytic activity of MO/MΦ was significantly decreased, suggesting that PaCSF-1R plays a role in regulating the phagocytic function of ayu MO/MΦ. PMID:27029867

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of estrogen receptor gene in the scallop Chlamys farreri: expression profiles in response to endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Pan, Luqing; Zhang, Lin

    2012-06-01

    In order to gain insights into the mechanism of sex steroid signaling in molluscs, the full-length cDNA of estrogen receptor (ER) was isolated and characterized from Chlamys farreri for the first time. The positions of cysteine residues and other residues around them that constitute the two zinc finger motifs and the P-box are conserved. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the CfER is an ortholog of the other mollusk ERs. Tissue distribution analysis of the CfER mRNA revealed that the expression of ER mRNA was observed in various tissues, and highest in the gonad of males and females. C. farreri were exposed for 10 days to endocrine disrupting chemicals including Benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)p) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDE-47). B(a)p exposure at 0.4 and 2 μg/L caused significant increase in mRNA expression of ER and VTG, but B(a)p at 10 μg/L down-regulated CfER and VTG mRNA expression compared to control. Varying increase of ER and VTG mRNA transcripts was resulted in by BDE-47 at 0.1, 1 and 10 μg/L. These results elucidate potential roles of CfER induced by xenobiotics in C. farreri and can be helpful for investigating the mechanism of sex steroid signaling in bivalve mollusks. PMID:22507668

  2. Molecular cloning, expression profile and transcriptional modulation of two splice variants of very low density lipoprotein receptor during ovarian follicle development in geese (Anser cygnoide).

    PubMed

    Hu, Shenqiang; Liu, Hehe; Pan, Zhixiong; Xia, Lu; Dong, Xia; Li, Liang; Xu, Feng; He, Hua; Wang, Jiwen

    2014-10-01

    Very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR)-mediated endocytosis of plasma lipoproteins into the ovary is essential for ovarian follicle development. Two splice variants of VLDLR have been identified in several species, yet little is known about their distinctive roles in ovarian developing follicles. In the present study, the full-length cDNAs of two splice isoforms of VLDLR were obtained from geese (Anser cygnoide) ovaries using the RACE method. The longer isoform (TypeI VLDLR) is 3141bp and contains five conserved structural domains, while the other (TypeII VLDLR) lacks 90bp encoding for the O-linked sugar domain. TypeII VLDLR was predominantly expressed in the ovary, with greater amounts of mRNA in theca and granulosa cells from early stages of follicle development but decreased during vitellogenesis. However, there was minimal expression of the TypeI VLDLR gene in theca cells and expression was almost undetectable in granulosa cells throughout follicle development. Yolk VLDL concentrations decreased as stage of development advanced while yolk triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations increased in a follicular size-dependent manner. The significant correlations between transcripts of TypeII VLDLR and yolk lipids supported its important role on yolk lipid deposition. In addition, in vitro experiments suggested that exogenous cholesterol, 25-hydroxycholesterol and mevinolin (a highly potent competitive inhibitor of HMG-CoA) treatment could significantly alter TypeII VLDLR gene expression in granulosa cells from both pre-hierarchical and pre-ovulatory follicles. Collectively, data from the present study indicate that TypeII VLDLR is more important for the transport of plasma lipoproteins into developing follicles than TypeI VLDLR, and provide new evidence about the influence of steroids in modulating VLDLR gene expression in ovarian cells. PMID:25018046

  3. [Molecular physiology of glycine receptors in nervous system of vertebrates].

    PubMed

    2014-03-01

    Glycine receptor is the anion-selective channel, providing fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system of vertebrates. Together with the nicotinic acetylcholine, GABA and serotonin (5-HT3R) receptors, it belongs to the superfamily of pentameric cys-loop receptors. It has been cloned one beta and four alpha subunits of glycine receptor, which are specifically distributed in different areas of the nervous system. Due to their specific molecular properties and distribution, different subunits ensure important physiological functions: from control of motor activity and regulation of neuronal differentiation to sensory information processing and modulation of pain sensitivity. In this review we briefly describe main functions of these transmembrane proteins, their distribution and molecular architecture. Special attention is paid to recent studies on the molecular physiology of these receptors, as well as on presenting of molecular domains responsible for their modulation and dysfunction. PMID:25508361

  4. [Molecular physiology of glycine receptors in nervous system of vertebrates].

    PubMed

    Maleeva, G V; Brezhestovskiĭ, P D

    2014-03-01

    Glycine receptor is the anion-selective channel, providing fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system of vertebrates. Together with the nicotinic acetylcholine, GABA and serotonin (5-HT3R) receptors, it belongs to the superfamily of pentameric cys-loop receptors. It has been cloned one beta and four alpha subunits of glycine receptor, which are specifically distributed in different areas of the nervous system. Due to their specific molecular properties and distribution, different subunits ensure important physiological functions: from control of motor activity and regulation of neuronal differentiation to sensory information processing and modulation of pain sensitivity. In this review we briefly describe main functions of these transmembrane proteins, their distribution and molecular architecture. Special attention is paid to recent studies on the molecular physiology of these receptors, as well as on presenting of molecular domains responsible for their modulation and dysfunction. PMID:25464730

  5. Molecular cloning of a second subunit of the receptor for human granulocyte - macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF): Reconstitution of a high-affinity GM-CSF receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashida, Kazuhiro; Kitamura, Toshio; Gorman, D.M.; Miyajima, Atsushi ); Arai, Kenichi; Yokota, Takashi )

    1990-12-01

    Using the mouse interleukin 3 (IL-3) receptor cDNA as a probe, the authors obtained a monologous cDNA (KH97) from a cDNA library of a human hemopoietic cell line, TF-1. The protein encoded by the KH97 cDNA has 56% amino acid sequence identity with the mouse IL-3 receptor and retains features common to the family of cytokine receptors. Fibroblasts transfected with the KH97 cDNA expressed a protein of 120 kDa but did not bind any human cytokines, including IL-3 and granulocyte - macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Interestingly, cotransfection of cDNAs for KH97 and the low-affinity human GM-CSF receptor in fibroblasts resulted in formation of a high-affinity receptor for GM-CSF. The dissociation rate of GM-CSF from the reconstituted high-affinity receptor was slower than that from the low-affinity site, whereas the association rate was unchanged. Cross-linking of {sup 125}I-labeled GM-CSF to fibroblasts cotransfected with both cDNAs revealed the same cross-linking patterns as in TF-1 cells - i.e., two major proteins of 80 and 120 kDa which correspond to the low-affinity GM-CSF receptor and the KH97 protein, respectively. These results indicate that the high-affinity GM-CSF receptor is composed of at least two components in a manner analogous to the IL-2 receptor. They therefore propose to designate the low-affinity GM-CSF receptor and the KH97 protein as the {alpha} and {beta} subunits of the GM-CSF receptor, respectively.

  6. Molecular characterization of opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this research was to purify and characterize active opioid receptors and elucidate molecular aspects of opioid receptor heterogeneity. Purification to apparent homogeneity of an opioid binding protein from bovine caudate was achieved by solubilization in the non-ionic detergent, digitonin, followed by sequential chromatography on the opiate affinity matrix, ..beta..-naltrexylethylenediamine-CH-Sepharose 4B, and on the lectine affinity matrix, wheat germ agglutinin-agarose. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS-PAGE) followed by autoradiography revealed that radioiodinated purified receptor gave a single band. Purified receptor preparations showed a specific activity of 12,000-15,000 fmol of opiate bound per mg of protein. Radioiodinated human beta-endorphin (/sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/) was used as a probe to investigate the ligand binding subunits of mu and delta opioid receptors. /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ was shown to bind to a variety of opioid receptor-containing tissues with high affinity and specificity with preference for mu and delta sites, and with little, if any, binding to kappa sites. Affinity crosslinking techniques were employed to covalently link /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ to opioid receptors, utilizing derivatives of bis-succinimidyl esters that are bifunctional crosslinkers with specificities for amino and sulfhydryl groups. This, and competition experiments with high type-selective ligands, permitted the assignment of two labeled peptides to their receptor types, namely a peptide of M/sub r/ = 65,000 for mu receptors and one of M/sub r/ = 53,000 for delta receptors.

  7. Molecular cloning and characterization of multidomain xylanase from manure library

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gene (manf-x10) encoding xylanase from an environmental genomic DNA library was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The encoded enzyme was predicted to be 467 amino acids with a molecular mass of 50.3 kD. The recombinant ManF-X10 was purified by HisTrap affinity column and showed activit...

  8. Advances and applications of molecular cloning in clinical microbiology.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kamal; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Mehraj, Vikram; Duraisamy, Ganesh Selvaraj

    2014-10-01

    Molecular cloning is based on isolation of a DNA sequence of interest to obtain multiple copies of it in vitro. Application of this technique has become an increasingly important tool in clinical microbiology due to its simplicity, cost effectiveness, rapidity, and reliability. This review entails the recent advances in molecular cloning and its application in the clinical microbiology in the context of polymicrobial infections, recombinant antigens, recombinant vaccines, diagnostic probes, antimicrobial peptides, and recombinant cytokines. Culture-based methods in polymicrobial infection have many limitation, which has been overcome by cloning techniques and provide gold standard technique. Recombinant antigens produced by cloning technique are now being used for screening of HIV, HCV, HBV, CMV, Treponema pallidum, and other clinical infectious agents. Recombinant vaccines for hepatitis B, cholera, influenza A, and other diseases also use recombinant antigens which have replaced the use of live vaccines and thus reduce the risk for adverse effects. Gene probes developed by gene cloning have many applications including in early diagnosis of hereditary diseases, forensic investigations, and routine diagnosis. Industrial application of this technology produces new antibiotics in the form of antimicrobial peptides and recombinant cytokines that can be used as therapeutic agents. PMID:25023463

  9. Molecular cloning, cDNA analysis, and localization of a monomer of the N-acetylglucosamine-specific receptor of the thyroid, NAGR1, to chromosome 19p13. 3-13. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Blanck, O.; Perrin, C.; Mziaut, H.; Miquelis, R. ); Darbon, H. ); Mattei, M.G. )

    1994-05-01

    The authors have proposed that the GlcNAc thyroid receptor triggers selective recycling of immature GlcNAc-bearing thyroglobulin molecules through the Golgi back to the apical membrane for further processing until maturation is achieved. This process, which is called [open quotes]receptor-mediated exocytosis,[close quotes] prevents lysosomal degradation of thyroid prohormones. In the present study, the authors report cloning of the cDNA encoding the (or one of the) monomer(s) constituting the human GlcNAc thyroid receptor. This novel gene, called NAGR1, was assigned by in situ hybridization to subbands p13.3-p13.2 of chromosome 19. Northern blot analysis showed that the mRNA encoding NAGR1 was present as a single transcript of 2.1 kb in the thyroid, but not in the heart, brain, placenta, lung, liver, skeletal muscle, kidney, and pancreas. The deduced amino acid sequence comprised a 51-kDa type I membrane protein with a single spanning region and a short intracytoplasmic domain. Sequence analysis showed that NAGR1 is a glycine-, tryptophan-, and methionine-rich protein with no cysteine residues or glycosylation site. No sequence homology with any known cDNA or protein was noted. The extracellular domain is composed of 420 amino acids and contains a region of 204 residues showing 15 repeats of 4 amino acids, each 1 having an acidic amino acid presumably involved in calcium coordination. The intracellular domain contained what appeared to be a tyrosine internalization signal. The usefulness of this clone in glycobiology, cell biology, and thyroid pathology studies is discussed. 53 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of expanded B-cell clones from multiclonal versus monoclonal B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Ana; Rodríguez-Caballero, Arancha; Criado, Ignacio; Langerak, Anton W.; Nieto, Wendy G.; Lécrevisse, Quentin; González, Marcos; Cortesão, Emília; Paiva, Artur; Almeida, Julia; Orfao, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Chronic antigen-stimulation has been recurrently involved in the earlier stages of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The expansion of two or more B-cell clones has frequently been reported in individuals with these conditions; potentially, such coexisting clones have a greater probability of interaction with common immunological determinants. Here, we analyzed the B-cell receptor repertoire and molecular profile, as well as the phenotypic, cytogenetic and hematologic features, of 228 chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like and non-chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like clones comparing multiclonal (n=85 clones from 41 cases) versus monoclonal (n=143 clones) monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The B-cell receptor of B-cell clones from multiclonal cases showed a slightly higher degree of HCDR3 homology than B-cell clones from mono clonal cases, in association with unique hematologic (e.g. lower B-lymphocyte counts) and cytogenetic (e.g. lower frequency of cytogenetically altered clones) features usually related to earlier stages of the disease. Moreover, a subgroup of coexisting B-cell clones from individual multiclonal cases which were found to be phylogenetically related showed unique molecular and cytogenetic features: they more frequently shared IGHV3 gene usage, shorter HCDR3 sequences with a greater proportion of IGHV mutations and del(13q14.3), than other unrelated B-cell clones. These results would support the antigen-driven nature of such multiclonal B-cell expansions, with potential involvement of multiple antigens/epitopes. PMID:24488564

  11. Molecular cloning and amino acid sequence of human 5-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Funk, C.D.; Radmark, O.; Hoeoeg, J.O.; Joernvall, H.; Samuelsson, B.

    1988-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.34), a Ca/sup 2 +/- and ATP-requiring enzyme, catalyzes the first two steps in the biosynthesis of the peptidoleukotrienes and the chemotactic factor leukotriene B/sub 4/. A cDNA clone corresponding to 5-lipoxygenase was isolated from a human lung lambda gt11 expression library by immunoscreening with a polyclonal antibody. Additional clones from a human placenta lambda gt11 cDNA library were obtained by plaque hybridization with the /sup 32/P-labeled lung cDNA clone. Sequence data obtained from several overlapping clones indicate that the composite DNAs contain the complete coding region for the enzyme. From the deduced primary structure, 5-lipoxygenase encodes a 673 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 77,839. Direct analysis of the native protein and its proteolytic fragments confirmed the deduced composition, the amino-terminal amino acid sequence, and the structure of many internal segments. 5-Lipoxygenase has no apparent sequence homology with leukotriene A/sub 4/ hydrolase or Ca/sup 2 +/-binding proteins. RNA blot analysis indicated substantial amounts of an mRNA species of approx. = 2700 nucleotides in leukocytes, lung, and placenta.

  12. Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    Cloning describes the processes used to create an exact genetic replica of another cell, tissue or organism. ... named Dolly. There are three different types of cloning: Gene cloning, which creates copies of genes or ...

  13. Molecular cloning and physical mapping of murine cytomegalovirus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Ebeling, A; Keil, G M; Knust, E; Koszinowski, U H

    1983-01-01

    Murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) Smith strain DNA is cleaved by restriction endonuclease HindIII into 16 fragments, ranging in size from 0.64 to 22.25 megadaltons. Of the 16 HindIII fragments, 15 were cloned in plasmid pACYC177 in Escherichia coli HB101 (recA). The recombinant plasmid clones were characterized by cleavage with the enzymes XbaI and EcoRI. In addition, fragments generated by double digestion of cloned fragments with HindIII and XbaI were inserted into the plasmid vector pACYC184. The results obtained after hybridization of 32P-labeled cloned fragments to Southern blots of MCMV DNA cleaved with HindIII, XbaI, EcoRI, BamHI, ApaI, ClaI, EcoRV, or KpnI allowed us to construct complete physical maps of the viral DNA for the restriction endonucleases HindIII, XbaI, and EcoRI. On the basis of the cloning and mapping experiments, it was calculated that the MCMV genome spans about 235 kilobase pairs, corresponding to a molecular weight of 155,000,000. All fragments were found to be present in equimolar concentrations, and no cross-hybridization between any of the fragments was seen. We conclude that the MCMV DNA molecule consists of a long unique sequence without large terminal or internal repeat regions. Thus, the structural organization of the MCMV genome is fundamentally different from that of the human cytomegalovirus or herpes simplex virus genome. Images PMID:6312075

  14. Cloning, constitutive activity and expression profiling of two receptors related to relaxin receptors in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Van Hiel, Matthias B; Vandersmissen, Hans Peter; Proost, Paul; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2015-06-01

    Leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptors (LGRs) comprise a cluster of transmembrane proteins, characterized by the presence of a large N-terminal extracellular domain. This receptor group can be classified into three subtypes. Belonging to the subtype C LGRs are the mammalian relaxin receptors LGR7 (RXFP1) and LGR8 (RXFP2), which mediate important reproductive and other processes. We identified two related receptors in the genome of the fruit fly and cloned their open reading frames into an expression vector. Interestingly, dLGR3 demonstrated constitutive activity at very low doses of transfected plasmid, whereas dLGR4 did not show any basal activity. Both receptors exhibited a similar expression pattern during development, with relatively high transcript levels during the first larval stage. In addition, both receptors displayed higher expression in male adult flies as compared to female flies. Analysis of the tissue distribution of both receptor transcripts revealed a high expression of dLGR3 in the female fat body, while the expression of dLGR4 peaked in the midgut of both the wandering and adult stage. PMID:25064813

  15. Molecular cloning of canine co-chaperone small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein α (SGTA) and investigation of its ability to suppress androgen receptor signalling in androgen-independent prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuiko; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Michishita, Masaki; Azakami, Daigo; Nakahira, Rei; Morimatsu, Masami; Ishiguro-Oonuma, Toshina; Yoshikawa, Yasunaga; Kobayashi, Masato; Bonkobara, Makoto; Kobayashi, Masanori; Takahashi, Kimimasa; Watanabe, Masami; Omi, Toshinori

    2015-11-01

    Although the morbidity of canine prostate cancer is low, the majority of cases present with resistance to androgen therapy and poor clinical outcomes. These pathological conditions are similar to the signs of the terminal stage of human androgen-independent prostate cancer. The co-chaperone small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein α (SGTA) is known to be overexpressed in human androgen-independent prostate cancer. However, there is little information about the structure and function of canine SGTA. In this study, canine SGTA was cloned and analysed for its ability to suppress androgen receptor signalling. The full-length open reading frame (ORF) of the canine SGTA gene was amplified by RT-PCR using primers designed from canine-expressed sequence tags that were homologous to human SGTA. The canine SGTA ORF has high homology with the corresponding human (89%) and mouse (81%) sequences. SGTA dimerisation region and tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains are conserved across the three species. The ability of canine SGTA to undergo homodimerisation was demonstrated by a mammalian two-hybrid system and a pull-down assay. The negative impact of canine SGTA on androgen receptor (AR) signalling was demonstrated using a reporter assay in androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell lines. Pathological analysis showed overexpression of SGTA in canine prostate cancer, but not in hyperplasia. A reporter assay in prostate cells demonstrated suppression of AR signalling by canine SGTA. Altogether, these results suggest that canine SGTA may play an important role in the acquisition of androgen independence by canine prostate cancer cells. PMID:26346258

  16. Dopamine receptor genes: new tools for molecular psychiatry.

    PubMed Central

    Niznik, H B; Van Tol, H H

    1992-01-01

    For over a decade it has been generally assumed that all the pharmacological and biochemical actions of dopamine within the central nervous system and periphery were mediated by two distinct dopamine receptors. These receptors, termed D1 and D2, were defined as those coupled to the stimulation or inhibition of adenylate cyclase, respectively, and by their selectivity and avidity for various drugs and compounds. The concept that two dopamine receptors were sufficient to account for all the effects mediated by dopamine was an oversimplification. Recent molecular biological studies have identified five distinct genes which encode at least eight functional dopamine receptors. The members of the expanded dopamine receptor family, however, can still be codifed by way of the original D1 and D2 receptor dichotomy. These include two genes encoding dopamine D1-like receptors (D1 [D1A]/D5 [D1B]) and three genes encoding D2-like receptors (D2/D3/D4). We review here our recent work on the cloning and characterization of some of the members of the dopamine receptor gene family (D1, D2, D4, D5), their relationship to neuropsychiatric disorders and their potential role in antipsychotic drug action. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1450188

  17. Functional properties of a cloned 5-hydroxytryptamine ionotropic receptor subunit: comparison with native mouse receptors.

    PubMed

    Hussy, N; Lukas, W; Jones, K A

    1994-12-01

    1. A comparative study of the whole-cell and single-channel properties of cloned and native mouse 5-hydroxytryptamine ionotropic receptors (5-HT3) was undertaken using mammalian cell lines expressing the cloned 5-HT3 receptor subunit A (5-HT3R-A), superior cervical ganglia (SCG) neurones and N1E-115 cells. 2. No pharmacological difference was found in the sensitivity to the agonists 5-HT and 2-methyl-5-HT, or to the antagonists d-tubocurare and 3-tropanyl-3,5-dichlorobenzoate (MDL-72222). 3. Current-voltage (I-V) relationships of whole-cell currents showed inward rectification in the three preparations. Rectification was stronger both in cells expressing the 5-HT3R-A subunit and in N1E-115 cells when compared with SCG neurones. 4. No clear openings could be resolved in 5-HT-activated currents in patches excised from cells expressing the 5-HT3R-A subunit or N1E-115 cells. Current fluctuation analysis of whole-cell and excised-patch records revealed a slope conductance of 0.4-0.6 pS in both preparations. Current-voltage relationships of these channels showed strong rectification that fully accounted for the whole-cell voltage dependence. 5. In contrast, single channels of about 10 pS were activated by 5-HT in patches excised from SCG neurones. The weak voltage dependence of their conductance did not account completely for the rectification of whole-cell currents. A lower unitary conductance (3.4 pS) was inferred from whole-cell noise analysis. 6. We conclude that the receptor expressed from the cloned cDNA is indistinguishable from the 5-HT3 receptor of N1E-115 cells, suggesting an identical structure for these two receptors. The higher conductance and different voltage dependence of the 5-HT3 receptor in SCG neurones might indicate the participation of an additional subunit in the structure of native ganglionic 5-HT3 receptors. Homo-oligomeric 5-HT3R-A channels may also be present as suggested by the lower conductance estimated by whole-cell noise analysis. PMID

  18. Molecular cloning and expression analysis on LPL of Coilia nasus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meiyao; Xu, Dongpo; Liu, Kai; Yang, Jian; Xu, Pao

    2016-06-01

    Coilia nasus is one important commercial anadromous species which mainly distributed in the Yangtze River in China. At present, it has been on the "National Key Protective Species List" because of its severe resource damage. Lipid metabolism is very important during its long-distance migration. To make further research on lipid metabolism of C. nasus, we cloned lipoprotein lipase gene with homologous cloning method. A full-length cDNA of LPL of C. nasus was cloned from liver which covered 3537 bp with a 1519 bp open reading frame encoding 505 deduced amino acids whose molecular mass was 57.5 kDa and theoretical isoelectric point was 7.58. The deduced amino acids had high similarity with the reported LPL sequence of other species. It had typical conserved domain of LPL protein containing catalytic triad, N-linked glycosylation sites and conserved heparin-binding site, etc. We adopted quantitative real-time RT-PCR method to detect the mRNA expression of LPL of C. nasus in ten tissues including mesenteric adipose, liver, muscle, stomach, spleen, heart, head kidney, trunk kidney, gill and brain with β-actin as internal reference. LPL expressed in all the detected tissues. The highest expression was in mesenteric adipose, and followed by liver, muscle, stomach. Lipid expressed lowly in spleen, heart, head kidney, trunk kidney, gill and brain. The research on the cloning and differential expression of LPL of C. nasus will lay foundation for further research on lipid metabolism of C. nasus. PMID:26877109

  19. Expression cloning of a rat brain somatostatin receptor cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kluxen, F W; Bruns, C; Lübbert, H

    1992-01-01

    We have used an expression-cloning strategy to isolate a cDNA encoding a somatostatin (somatotropin release-inhibiting factor, SRIF) receptor from rat cortex and hippocampus. A positive clone was identified by autoradiography after binding of radiolabeled SRIF to COS-1 cells previously transfected with pools of cDNA clones. The deduced amino acid sequence of the receptor displays sequence and structural homology to the family of G-protein-coupled receptors. The affinity of various SRIF analogs to the expressed receptor resembles their effects on growth hormone release from pituitary cells. In addition, the distribution of the mRNA in various tissues corresponds to that described for native SRIF receptors. Therefore, we conclude that we have isolated a rat brain SRIF receptor cDNA. Images PMID:1374909

  20. Isolation and partial characterization of cDNA clone of human ceruloplasmin receptor.

    PubMed

    Sasina, L K; Tsymbalenko, N V; Platonova, N A; Puchkova, L V; Voronina, O V; Gyulikhandanova, N E; Gaitskhoki, V S

    2000-05-01

    An individual clone, presumably carrying a 3 bp fragment of ceruloplasmin receptor cDNA was isolated from the expression library of human placenta cDNA using polyclonal specific antibodies to ceruloplasmin receptors. EcoR1-hydrolysate of isolated DNA was cloned in a pTZ19 bacterial vector and sequenced in the forward and reverse direction. The comparison of the revealed sequence with known sequences of human genome revealed its high similarity to ceruloplasmin cDNA. PMID:10977961

  1. Characteristic molecular vibrations of adenosine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Chee, Hyun Keun; Yang, Jin-San; Joung, Je-Gun; Zhang, Byoung-Tak; Oh, S June

    2015-02-13

    Although the regulation of membrane receptor activation is known to be crucial for molecular signal transduction, the molecular mechanism underlying receptor activation is not fully elucidated. Here we study the physicochemical nature of membrane receptor behavior by investigating the characteristic molecular vibrations of receptor ligands using computational chemistry and informatics methods. By using information gain, t-tests, and support vector machines, we have identified highly informative features of adenosine receptor (AdoR) ligand and corresponding functional amino acid residues such as Asn (6.55) of AdoR that has informative significance and is indispensable for ligand recognition of AdoRs. These findings may provide new perspectives and insights into the fundamental mechanism of class A G protein-coupled receptor activation. PMID:25622891

  2. Cloning of the cDNA and gene for a human D sub 2 dopamine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.K.; Makam, H.; Stofko, R.E.; Bunzow, J.R.; Civelli, O. ); Marchionni, M.A.; Alfano, M.; Frothingham, L.; Fischer, J.B.; Burke-Howie, K.J.; Server, A.C. )

    1989-12-01

    A clone encoding a human D{sub 2} dopamine receptor was isolated from a pituitary cDNA library and sequenced. The deduced protein sequence is 96% identical with that of the cloned rat receptor with one major difference: the human receptor contains an additional 29 amino acids in its putative third cytoplasmic loop. Southern blotting demonstrated the presence of only one human D{sub 2} receptor gene. Two overlapping phage containing the gene were isolated and characterized. DNA sequence analysis of these clones showed that the coding sequence is interrupted by six introns and that the additional amino acids present in the human pituitary receptor are encoded by a single exon of 87 base pairs. The involvement of this sequence in alternative splicing and its biological significance are discussed.

  3. A highly efficient molecular cloning platform that utilises a small bacterial toxin gene.

    PubMed

    Mok, Wendy W K; Li, Yingfu

    2013-04-15

    Molecular cloning technologies that have emerged in recent years are more efficient and simpler to use than traditional strategies, but many have the disadvantages of requiring multiple steps and expensive proprietary enzymes. We have engineered cloning vectors containing variants of IbsC, a 19-residue toxin from Escherichia coli K-12. These toxic peptides offer selectivity to minimise the background, labour, and cost associated with conventional molecular cloning. As demonstrated with the cloning of reporter genes, this "detox cloning" system consistently produced over 95 % positive clones. Purification steps between digestion and ligation are not necessary, and the total time between digestion and plating of transformants can be as little as three hours. Thus, these IbsC-based cloning vectors are as reliable and amenable to high-throughput cloning as commercially available systems, and have the advantage of being more time-efficient and cost-effective. PMID:23512843

  4. Molecular cloning of the extracellular endodextranase of Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed Central

    Lawman, P; Bleiweis, A S

    1991-01-01

    We report the cloning in Escherichia coli of the gene encoding an extracellular endodextranase (alpha-1,6-glucanhydrolase, EC 3.2.1.11) from Streptococcus salivarius PC-1. Recombinants from a S. salivarius PC-1-Lambda ZAP II genomic library specifying dextranase activity were identified as plaques surrounded by zones of clearing on blue dextran agar. One such clone, PD1, had a 6.3-kb EcoRI fragment insert which encoded a 190-kDa protein with dextranase activity. The recombinant strain also produced two lower-molecular-mass polypeptides (90 and 70 kDa) that had dextranase activity. Native dextranase was recovered from concentrated culture fluids of S. salivarius as a single 110-kDa polypeptide. PD1 phage lysate and PC-1 culture supernatant fluid extract were used to measure substrate specificity of the recombinant and native forms of dextranase, respectively. Analysis of these reaction products by thin-layer chromatography revealed the expected isomaltosaccharide products yielded by the recombinant-specified enzyme but was unable to resolve the larger polysaccharide products of the native enzyme. Furthermore, S. salivarius utilized neither the substrates nor the products of dextran hydrolysis for growth. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:1938938

  5. Ab initio multiple cloning algorithm for quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Makhov, Dmitry V.; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V.; Glover, William J.; Martinez, Todd J.

    2014-08-07

    We present a new algorithm for ab initio quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics that combines the best features of ab initio Multiple Spawning (AIMS) and Multiconfigurational Ehrenfest (MCE) methods. In this new method, ab initio multiple cloning (AIMC), the individual trajectory basis functions (TBFs) follow Ehrenfest equations of motion (as in MCE). However, the basis set is expanded (as in AIMS) when these TBFs become sufficiently mixed, preventing prolonged evolution on an averaged potential energy surface. We refer to the expansion of the basis set as “cloning,” in analogy to the “spawning” procedure in AIMS. This synthesis of AIMS and MCE allows us to leverage the benefits of mean-field evolution during periods of strong nonadiabatic coupling while simultaneously avoiding mean-field artifacts in Ehrenfest dynamics. We explore the use of time-displaced basis sets, “trains,” as a means of expanding the basis set for little cost. We also introduce a new bra-ket averaged Taylor expansion (BAT) to approximate the necessary potential energy and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements. The BAT approximation avoids the necessity of computing electronic structure information at intermediate points between TBFs, as is usually done in saddle-point approximations used in AIMS. The efficiency of AIMC is demonstrated on the nonradiative decay of the first excited state of ethylene. The AIMC method has been implemented within the AIMS-MOLPRO package, which was extended to include Ehrenfest basis functions.

  6. Ab initio multiple cloning algorithm for quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhov, Dmitry V.; Glover, William J.; Martinez, Todd J.; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V.

    2014-08-01

    We present a new algorithm for ab initio quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics that combines the best features of ab initio Multiple Spawning (AIMS) and Multiconfigurational Ehrenfest (MCE) methods. In this new method, ab initio multiple cloning (AIMC), the individual trajectory basis functions (TBFs) follow Ehrenfest equations of motion (as in MCE). However, the basis set is expanded (as in AIMS) when these TBFs become sufficiently mixed, preventing prolonged evolution on an averaged potential energy surface. We refer to the expansion of the basis set as "cloning," in analogy to the "spawning" procedure in AIMS. This synthesis of AIMS and MCE allows us to leverage the benefits of mean-field evolution during periods of strong nonadiabatic coupling while simultaneously avoiding mean-field artifacts in Ehrenfest dynamics. We explore the use of time-displaced basis sets, "trains," as a means of expanding the basis set for little cost. We also introduce a new bra-ket averaged Taylor expansion (BAT) to approximate the necessary potential energy and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements. The BAT approximation avoids the necessity of computing electronic structure information at intermediate points between TBFs, as is usually done in saddle-point approximations used in AIMS. The efficiency of AIMC is demonstrated on the nonradiative decay of the first excited state of ethylene. The AIMC method has been implemented within the AIMS-MOLPRO package, which was extended to include Ehrenfest basis functions.

  7. Ab initio multiple cloning algorithm for quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Makhov, Dmitry V; Glover, William J; Martinez, Todd J; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V

    2014-08-01

    We present a new algorithm for ab initio quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics that combines the best features of ab initio Multiple Spawning (AIMS) and Multiconfigurational Ehrenfest (MCE) methods. In this new method, ab initio multiple cloning (AIMC), the individual trajectory basis functions (TBFs) follow Ehrenfest equations of motion (as in MCE). However, the basis set is expanded (as in AIMS) when these TBFs become sufficiently mixed, preventing prolonged evolution on an averaged potential energy surface. We refer to the expansion of the basis set as "cloning," in analogy to the "spawning" procedure in AIMS. This synthesis of AIMS and MCE allows us to leverage the benefits of mean-field evolution during periods of strong nonadiabatic coupling while simultaneously avoiding mean-field artifacts in Ehrenfest dynamics. We explore the use of time-displaced basis sets, "trains," as a means of expanding the basis set for little cost. We also introduce a new bra-ket averaged Taylor expansion (BAT) to approximate the necessary potential energy and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements. The BAT approximation avoids the necessity of computing electronic structure information at intermediate points between TBFs, as is usually done in saddle-point approximations used in AIMS. The efficiency of AIMC is demonstrated on the nonradiative decay of the first excited state of ethylene. The AIMC method has been implemented within the AIMS-MOLPRO package, which was extended to include Ehrenfest basis functions. PMID:25106573

  8. Characterization of new monoclonal antibodies against porcine lymphocytes: molecular characterization of clone 7G3, an antibody reactive with the constant region of the T-cell receptor delta-chains.

    PubMed

    Tang, W-R; Shioya, N; Eguchi, T; Ebata, T; Matsui, J; Takenouchi, H; Honma, D; Yasue, H; Takagaki, Y; Enosawa, S; Itagaki, M; Taguchi, T; Kiyokawa, N; Amemiya, H; Fujimoto, J

    2005-01-10

    A battery of mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) reactive with porcine peripheral blood (PB) leukocytes was generated. Among the mAbs, 6F10 was found to react probably with cluster of differentiation (CD)8 alpha-chain, while 7G3 and 3E12 were found to recognize gammadelta T-cells, as revealed by two-color flow cytometric and immunoprecipitation studies. 7G3 was shown to react with the constant (C) region of the T-cell receptor (TCR) delta-chain by the following facts: (1) 7G3 immunoprecipitated full-length TCR delta-chain protein fused with glutathione S-transferase (GST) produced by Esherichia coli and (2) 7G3 reacted with TCR delta-chain expressing Cos-7 cells transfected with either full-length or N-terminal deleted mutant cDNA, but did not react with Cos-7 cells transfected with C-terminal deleted mutant TCR delta-chain cDNA. All three mAbs produced high-quality immunostaining results on frozen sections, revealing a distinct distribution of gammadelta T-cells and CD8(+) cells. This report precisely characterizes mAbs against porcine TCR for the first time, facilitating molecular biological investigations of the porcine immune system. PMID:15626467

  9. Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA Reproductive cloning, which creates copies of whole animals Therapeutic cloning, which creates embryonic stem cells. Researchers hope to use these cells to grow healthy tissue to replace injured or diseased tissues in the human body. NIH: National Human Genome Research Institute

  10. Using "Pseudomonas Putida xylE" Gene to Teach Molecular Cloning Techniques for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Xu; Xin, Yi; Ye, Li; Ma, Yufang

    2009-01-01

    We have developed and implemented a serial experiment in molecular cloning laboratory course for undergraduate students majored in biotechnology. "Pseudomonas putida xylE" gene, encoding catechol 2, 3-dioxygenase, was manipulated to learn molecular biology techniques. The integration of cloning, expression, and enzyme assay gave students a chance…

  11. Molecular and biological characterization of a neurovirulent molecular clone of simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, M T; Hauer, D A; Mankowski, J L; Zink, M C; Clements, J E

    1997-01-01

    To identify the molecular determinants of neurovirulence, we constructed an infectious simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) molecular clone, SIV/17E-Fr, that contained the 3' end of a neurovirulent strain of SIV, SIV/17E-Br, derived by in vivo virus passage. SIV/17E-Fr is macrophage tropic in vitro and neurovirulent in macaques. In contrast, a molecular clone, SIV/17E-Cl, that contains the SU and a portion of the TM sequences of SIV/17E-Br is macrophage tropic but not neurovirulent. To identify the amino acids that accounted for the replication differences between SIV/17E-Fr and SIV/17E-Cl in primary macaque cells in vitro, additional infectious molecular clones were constructed. Analysis of these recombinant viruses revealed that changes in the TM portion of the envelope protein were required for the highest level of replication in primary macaque macrophages and brain cells derived from the microvessel endothelium. In addition, a full-length Nef protein is necessary for optimum virus replication in both of these cell types. Finally, viruses expressing a full-length Nef protein in conjunction with the changes in the TM had the highest specific infectivity in a sMAGI assay. Thus, changes in the TM and nef genes between SIV/17E-Cl and SIV/17E-Fr account for replication differences in vitro and correlate with replication in the central nervous system in vivo. PMID:9223467

  12. Molecular properties of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    HAGA, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, which comprise five subtypes (M1-M5 receptors), are expressed in both the CNS and PNS (particularly the target organs of parasympathetic neurons). M1-M5 receptors are integral membrane proteins with seven transmembrane segments, bind with acetylcholine (ACh) in the extracellular phase, and thereafter interact with and activate GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) in the intracellular phase: M1, M3, and M5 receptors interact with Gq-type G proteins, and M2 and M4 receptors with Gi/Go-type G proteins. Activated G proteins initiate a number of intracellular signal transduction systems. Agonist-bound muscarinic receptors are phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases, which initiate their desensitization through uncoupling from G proteins, receptor internalization, and receptor breakdown (down regulation). Recently the crystal structures of M2 and M3 receptors were determined and are expected to contribute to the development of drugs targeted to muscarinic receptors. This paper summarizes the molecular properties of muscarinic receptors with reference to the historical background and bias to studies performed in our laboratories. PMID:23759942

  13. 3D modeling, ligand binding and activation studies of the cloned mouse delta, mu; and kappa opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Filizola, M; Laakkonen, L; Loew, G H

    1999-11-01

    Refined 3D models of the transmembrane domains of the cloned delta, mu and kappa opioid receptors belonging to the superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) were constructed from a multiple sequence alignment using the alpha carbon template of rhodopsin recently reported. Other key steps in the procedure were relaxation of the 3D helix bundle by unconstrained energy optimization and assessment of the stability of the structure by performing unconstrained molecular dynamics simulations of the energy optimized structure. The results were stable ligand-free models of the TM domains of the three opioid receptors. The ligand-free delta receptor was then used to develop a systematic and reliable procedure to identify and assess putative binding sites that would be suitable for similar investigation of the other two receptors and GPCRs in general. To this end, a non-selective, 'universal' antagonist, naltrexone, and agonist, etorphine, were used as probes. These ligands were first docked in all sites of the model delta opioid receptor which were sterically accessible and to which the protonated amine of the ligands could be anchored to a complementary proton-accepting residue. Using these criteria, nine ligand-receptor complexes with different binding pockets were identified and refined by energy minimization. The properties of all these possible ligand-substrate complexes were then examined for consistency with known experimental results of mutations in both opioid and other GPCRs. Using this procedure, the lowest energy agonist-receptor and antagonist-receptor complexes consistent with these experimental results were identified. These complexes were then used to probe the mechanism of receptor activation by identifying differences in receptor conformation between the agonist and the antagonist complex during unconstrained dynamics simulation. The results lent support to a possible activation mechanism of the mouse delta opioid receptor similar to that recently

  14. Molecular Pharmacology of Chemokine Receptors.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Raymond H; de Munnik, Sabrina M; Leurs, Rob; Vischer, Henry F; Smit, Martine J

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors are involved in various pathologies such as inflammatory diseases, cancer, and HIV infection. Small molecule and antibody-based antagonists have been developed to inhibit chemokine-induced receptor activity. Currently two small molecule inhibitors targeting CXCR4 and CCR5 are on the market for stem cell mobilization and the treatment of HIV infection, respectively. Antibody fragments (e.g., nanobodies) targeting chemokine receptors are primarily orthosteric ligands, competing for the chemokine binding site. This is opposed by most small molecules, which act as allosteric modulators and bind to the receptor at a topographically distinct site as compared to chemokines. Allosteric modulators can be distinguished from orthosteric ligands by unique features, such as a saturable effect and probe dependency. For successful drug development, it is essential to determine pharmacological parameters (i.e., affinity, potency, and efficacy) and the mode of action of potential drugs during early stages of research in order to predict the biological effect of chemokine receptor targeting drugs in the clinic. This chapter explains how the pharmacological profile of chemokine receptor targeting ligands can be determined and quantified using binding and functional experiments. PMID:26921959

  15. Cloning and expression of prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype 1 (ep 1 ) in Bostrichthys sinensis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiao Jian; Hong, Wan Shu; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Yu Ting; Chen, Shi Xi

    2014-08-01

    Our previous studies suggested that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a putative sex pheromone in Chinese black sleeper Bostrichthys sinensis, a fish species that inhabits intertidal zones and mates and spawns inside a muddy burrow. We found immunoreactivities of PGE2 receptor subtypes (Ep1-3) expressed in the olfactory sac, but only Ep1 presented higher density of immunoreactivity in mature fish than that in immature fish in both sexes. To gain a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanism for the detection of PGE2 in the olfactory system, we cloned an ep 1 cDNA from the adult olfactory sac. The open-reading frame of the ep 1 consisted of 1,134-bp nucleotides that encoded a 378-amino acid-long protein with a seven-transmembrane domain, typical for the G protein-coupled receptors superfamily. Expression of ep 1 mRNA was observed in all tissues examined, with higher levels obtained in the olfactory sacs and testes. The expression of ep 1 mRNA in the olfactory sacs and gonads was significantly higher in both sexes of mature fish than in those of immature ones. Taken together, our results suggested that Ep1, which is highly expressed in the olfactory sacs and gonads of mature fish, is important for the control of reproduction and may be involved in PGE2-initiated spawning behavior in B. sinensis. PMID:24566823

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Prolactin and Its Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Prolactin and the prolactin receptors are members of a family of hormone/receptor pairs which include GH, erythropoietin, and other ligand/receptor pairs. The mechanisms of these ligand/receptor pairs have broad similarities, including general structures, ligand/receptor stoichiometries, and activation of several common signaling pathways. But significant variations in the structural and mechanistic details are present among these hormones and their type 1 receptors. The prolactin receptor is particularly interesting because it can be activated by three sequence-diverse human hormones: prolactin, GH, and placental lactogen. This system offers a unique opportunity to compare the detailed molecular mechanisms of these related hormone/receptor pairs. This review critically evaluates selected literature that informs these mechanisms, compares the mechanisms of the three lactogenic hormones, compares the mechanism with those of other class 1 ligand/receptor pairs, and identifies information that will be required to resolve mechanistic ambiguities. The literature describes distinct mechanistic differences between the three lactogenic hormones and their interaction with the prolactin receptor and describes more significant differences between the mechanisms by which other related ligands interact with and activate their receptors. PMID:22577091

  17. Molecular characterization of an. alpha. sub 2B -adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.K.; Dewan Zeng; D'Angelo, D.D.; Tucker, A.L.; Zhihong Lu; Barber, C.M.; Lynch, K.R. )

    1990-02-26

    {alpha}{sub 2}-Adrenergic receptors comprise a heterogeneous population based on pharmacologic and molecular evidence. The authors have isolated a cDNA clone (pRNG{alpha}2) encoding a previously undescribed third subtype of an {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor from a rat kidney cDNA library. The library was screened with an oligonucleotide encoding a highly conserved region found in all biogenic amine receptors described to date. The deduced amino acid sequence displays many features of G-protein coupled receptors with exception of the absence of the consensus N-linked glycosylation site at the amino terminus. Membranes prepared from COS-1 cells transfected with pRNG{alpha}2 display high affinity and saturable binding to {sup 3}H-rauwolscine (K{sub d}=2 nM).Competition curve data analysis shows that pRNG{alpha}2 protein binds to a variety of adrenergic drugs with the following rank order of potency: yohimbine {ge} cholorpromazine > prazosin {ge} clonidine > norepinephrine {ge} oxymetazoline. pRNG{alpha}2 RNA accumulates in both adult rat kidney and rat neonatal lung (predominant species is 4.0 kb). They conclude that pRNG{alpha}2 likely represents a cDNA for the {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor.

  18. Databasing Molecular Identities of Louisiana, Florida, and Texas Sugarcane Clones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) clones (cultivars and superior breeding lines) are routinely exchanged across geographic locations for field-testing or crossing. It is crucial to maintain the genetic identity of these clones during field collection, shipping, and quarantine. Traditionally, suga...

  19. Cloning and retinal expression of melatonin receptors in the European sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax.

    PubMed

    Sauzet, Sandrine; Besseau, Laurence; Herrera Perez, Patricia; Covès, Denis; Chatain, Béatrice; Peyric, Elodie; Boeuf, Gilles; Muñoz-Cueto, José Antonio; Falcón, Jack

    2008-06-01

    Melatonin contributes to synchronizing behaviors and physiological functions to daily and seasonal rhythm in fish. However, no coherent vision emerges because the effects vary with the species, sex, age, moment of the year or sexual cycle. And, scarce information is available concerning the melatonin receptors, which is crucial to our understanding of the role melatonin plays. We report here the full length cloning of three different melatonin receptor subtypes in the sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax, belonging, respectively, to the MT1, MT2 and Mel1c subtypes. MT1, the most abundantly expressed, was detected in the central nervous system, retina, and gills. MT2 was detected in the pituitary gland, blood cells and, to a lesser extend, in the optic tectum, diencephalon, liver and retina. Mel1c was mainly expressed in the skin; traces were found in the retina. The cellular sites of MT1 and MT2 expressions were investigated by in situ hybridization in the retina of pigmented and albino fish. The strongest signals were obtained with the MT1 riboprobes. Expression was seen in cells also known to express the enzymes of the melatonin biosynthesis, i.e., in the photoreceptor, inner nuclear and ganglion cell layers. MT1 receptor mRNAs were also abundant in the retinal pigment epithelium. The results are consistent with the idea that melatonin is an autocrine (neural retina) and paracrine (retinal pigment epithelium) regulator of retinal function. The molecular tools provided here will be of valuable interest to further investigate the targets and role of melatonin in nervous and peripheral tissues of fish. PMID:18555069

  20. Applications of the Restriction Free (RF) cloning procedure for molecular manipulations and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Unger, Tamar; Jacobovitch, Yossi; Dantes, Ada; Bernheim, Reut; Peleg, Yoav

    2010-10-01

    Molecular manipulations, including DNA cloning and mutagenesis are basic tools used on a routine basis in all life-science disciplines. Over the last decade new methodologies have emerged that facilitated and expanded the applications for DNA cloning and mutagenesis. Ligation-Independent Cloning (LIC) techniques were developed and replaced the classical Ligation Dependent Cloning (LDC) platform. Restriction Free (RF) cloning was originally developed for introduction of foreign DNA into a plasmid at any predetermined position. RF cloning is based on PCR amplification of a DNA fragment, which serves as a mega-primer for the linear amplification of the vector and insert. Here we present several novel applications of the Restriction Free (RF) cloning platform for DNA cloning and mutagenesis. The new applications include simultaneous cloning of several DNA fragments into distinct positions within an expression vector, simultaneous multi-component assembly, and parallel cloning of the same PCR product into a series of different vectors. In addition, we have expanded the application of the RF cloning platform for multiple alterations of the target DNA, including simultaneous multiple-site mutagenesis and simultaneous introduction of deletions and insertions at different positions. We further demonstrate the robustness of the new applications for facilitating recombinant protein expression in the Escherichia coli system. PMID:20600952

  1. Cloning and expression of an A1 adenosine receptor from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, L.C.; McVittie, L.D.; Smyk-Randall, E.M.; Nakata, H.; Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Gerfen, C.R.; Sibley, D.R. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction technique to selectively amplify guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein)-coupled receptor cDNA sequences from rat striatal mRNA, using sets of highly degenerate primers derived from transmembrane sequences of previously cloned G protein-coupled receptors. A novel cDNA fragment was identified, which exhibits considerable homology to various members of the G protein-coupled receptor family. This fragment was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a rat striatal library. A 2.2-kilobase clone was obtained that encodes a protein of 326 amino acids with seven transmembrane domains, as predicted by hydropathy analysis. Stably transfected mouse A9-L cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells that expressed mRNA for this clone were screened with putative receptor ligands. Saturable and specific binding sites for the A1 adenosine antagonist (3H)-1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine were identified on membranes from transfected cells. The rank order of potency and affinities of various adenosine agonist and antagonist ligands confirmed the identity of this cDNA clone as an A1 adenosine receptor. The high affinity binding of A1 adenosine agonists was shown to be sensitive to the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanylyl-5{prime}-imidodiphosphate. In adenylyl cyclase assays, adenosine agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP production by greater than 50%, in a pharmacologically specific fashion. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses of receptor mRNA in brain tissues revealed two transcripts of 5.6 and 3.1 kilobases, both of which were abundant in cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, and thalamus, with lower levels in olfactory bulb, striatum, mesencephalon, and retina. These regional distribution data are in good agreement with previous receptor autoradiographic studies involving the A1 adenosine receptor.

  2. Molecular cloning, characterization, and expression of sheep FGF5 gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihua; He, Sangang; Liu, Mingjun; Liu, Guosong; Yuan, Zheng; Liu, Chenxi; Zhang, Xumei; Zhang, Ning; Li, Wenrong

    2015-01-25

    The fibroblast growth factor 5 gene (FGF5) is a member of the FGF gene family, and represents a candidate gene for hair length because of its role in the regulation of the hair follicle growth cycle. In our current study, we cloned, sequenced, and characterized the full-length FGF5 cDNA of Chinese Merino sheep. We obtained the complete genomic sequence of the FGF5 gene from sheep blood samples, and compared it to other FGF5 sequences in GenBank. We found that the FGF5 gene spanned 21,743bp of genomic DNA, and consisted of 3 exons and 2 introns, both of which differed from those of a previously annotated FGF5 genomic sequence from sheep. We also identified a previously undescribed FGF5 mRNA splicing variant, FGF5S, and the western blot analysis showed that the molecular weights of the FGF5 (34kDa) and FGF5s (17kDa) proteins were consistent with the estimates based on the genomic and cDNA sequence data. We examined the expression of both FGF5 mRNAs in various tissues of sheep, and found that the expression of the FGF5S mRNA was restricted to the brain, spleen, and skin tissue. The single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis of the genomic sequence revealed 72 genetic variants of the FGF5 gene. Our findings provide insight into the functions of the FGF5 gene in Chinese Merino. PMID:25445274

  3. RTA, a candidate G protein-coupled receptor: cloning, sequencing, and tissue distribution.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, P C; Figler, R A; Corjay, M H; Barber, C M; Adam, N; Harcus, D R; Lynch, K R

    1990-01-01

    Genomic and cDNA clones, encoding a protein that is a member of the guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein)-coupled receptor superfamily, were isolated by screening rat genomic and thoracic aorta cDNA libraries with an oligonucleotide encoding a highly conserved region of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. Sequence analyses of these clones showed that they encode a 343-amino acid protein (named RTA). The RTA gene is single copy, as demonstrated by restriction mapping and Southern blotting of genomic clones and rat genomic DNA. Sequence analysis of the genomic clone further showed that the RTA gene has an intron interrupting the region encoding the amino terminus of the protein. RTA RNA sequences are relatively abundant throughout the gut, vas deferens, uterus, and aorta but are only barely detectable (on Northern blots) in liver, kidney, lung, and salivary gland. In the rat brain, RTA sequences are markedly abundant in the cerebellum. RTA is most closely related to the mas oncogene (34% identity), which has been suggested to be a forebrain angiotensin receptor. We cannot detect angiotensin binding to the RTA protein after introducing the cognate cDNA or mRNA into COS cells or Xenopus oocytes, respectively, nor can we detect an electrophysiologic response in the oocyte after application of angiotensin peptides. We conclude that RTA is not an angiotensin receptor; to date, we have been unable to identify its ligand. Images PMID:2109324

  4. mu opiate receptor: cDNA cloning and expression.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J B; Imai, Y; Eppler, C M; Gregor, P; Spivak, C E; Uhl, G R

    1993-01-01

    mu opiate receptors recognize morphine with high affinity. A 2.1-kb rat brain cDNA whose predicted translation product displays 63% identity with recently described delta and kappa opiate receptor sequences was identified through polymerase chain reaction and cDNA homology approaches. This cDNA recognizes a 10.5-kb mRNA that is expressed in thalamic neurons. COS-cell expression confers naloxonazine-, Na(+)-, and GTP-sensitive binding of mu but not delta or kappa opioid ligands. Expressing cells bind morphine, [D-Ala2,N-methyl-Phe4,glyol5]enkephalin (DAMGO), and [D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin (DADLE) with nanomolar or subnanomolar affinities, defining a mu opiate receptor that avidly recognizes analgesic and euphoric opiate drugs and opioid peptides. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8234282

  5. Cloning of a factor required for activity of the Ah (dioxin) receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.C.; Reyes, H.; Chu, Fongfong; Sander, F.; Conley, L.H.; Brooks, B.A.; Hankinson, O. )

    1991-05-17

    The aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor binds various environmental pollutants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic amines, and polychlorinated aromatic compounds (dioxins, dibenzofurans, and biphenyls), and mediates the carcinogenic effects of these agents. The complementary DNA and part of the gene for an 87-kilodalton human protein that is necessary for Ah receptor function have been cloned. The protein is not the ligand-binding subunit of the receptor but is a factor that is required for the ligand-binding subunit to translocate from the cytosol to the nucleus after binding ligand. The requirement for this factor distinguishes the Ah receptor from the glucocorticoid receptor, to which the Ah receptor has been presumed to be similar. Two portions of the 87-kilodalton protein share sequence similarities with two Drosophila proteins, Per and Sim. Another segment of the protein shows conformity to the consensus sequence for the basic helix-loop-helix motif found in proteins that bind DNA as homodimers or heterodimers.

  6. Problem-Solving Test: Expression Cloning of the Erythropoietin Receptor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: cytokines, cytokine receptors, cDNA library, cDNA synthesis, poly(A)[superscript +] RNA, primer, template, reverse transcriptase, restriction endonucleases, cohesive ends, expression vector, promoter, Shine-Dalgarno sequence, poly(A) signal, DNA helicase, DNA ligase, topoisomerases,…

  7. Molecular characterization of human thyroid hormone receptor β isoform 4.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Kenji; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Futawaka, Kumi; Atake, Asami; Kasahara, Masato; Tagami, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone exerts a pleiotropic effect on development, differentiation, and metabolism through thyroid hormone receptor (TR). A novel thyroid hormone receptor β isoform (TRβ4) was cloned using PCR from a human pituitary cDNA library as a template. We report here the characterization of TRβ4 from a molecular basis. Temporal expression of TRβ4 during the fetal period is abundant in the brain and kidney, comparable with the adult pattern. Western blot analysis revealed that TRs are ubiquitination labile proteins, while TRβ1 is potentially stable. TRβ1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), and vitamin D receptor (VDR), which belong to class II transcription factors that function via the formation of heterodimeric complexes with retinoid X receptor (RXR), were suppressed by TRβ4 in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, TRβ4 exhibits ligand-independent transcriptional silencing, possibly as a substitute for dimerized RXR. In this study, TRβ1 and TRβ4 transcripts were detected in several cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR assay showed that the expression of TRβ4 in human embryonic carcinoma cells of the testis was suppressed by sex hormone in a reciprocal manner to TRβ1. In contrast, TRβ4 was expressed under a high dose of triiodothyronine (T3) in a reciprocal manner to TRβ1. Finally, in transiently transfected NIH-3T3 cells, green fluorescence protein (GFP)-tagged TRβ4 was mostly nuclear in both the absence and the presence of T3. By mutating defined regions of both TRβs, we found that both TRβ1 and TRβ4 had altered nuclear/cytoplasmic distribution as compared with wild-type, and different to T3 and the nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR). Thus, site-specific DNA binding is not essential for maintaining TRβs within the nucleus. PMID:26513165

  8. Molecular cloning of viral DNA from human genital warts.

    PubMed Central

    de Villiers, E M; Gissmann, L; zur Hausen, H

    1981-01-01

    The DNA of human papilloma virus type 6 (HPV 6) has been cloned in Escherichia coli K-12 by using pBR322 as vector. The DNA was cloned at the BamHI and EcoRI cleavage sites. This DNA was mapped by employing further restriction endonucleases and by terminal labeling. No major differences were noted as compared to HPV 6 DNA originating directly from a genital wart. The existence of at least two DNA subtypes (HPV 6a and 6b) became apparent. Images PMID:6275126

  9. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of avian interleukin-19

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study describes the cloning and functional characterization of avian interleukin (IL)-19, a cytokine that, in mammals, alters the balance of Th1 and Th2 cells in favor of the Th2 phenotype. The full-length avian IL-19 gene, located on chromosome 26, was amplified from LPS-stimulated chi...

  10. Molecular cloning of gluconobacter oxydans DSM 2003 xylitol dehydrogenase gene

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, H. Mir Mohammad; Ahmadi, R.; Aghaabdollahian, S.; Mofid, M.R.; Ghaemi, Y.; Abedi, D.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the widespread applications of xylitol dehydrogenase, an enzyme used for the production of xylitol, the present study was designed for the cloning of xylitol dehydrogenase gene from Glcunobacter oxydans DSM 2003. After extraction of genomic DNA from this bacterium, xylitol dehydrogenase gene was replicated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The amplified product was entered into pTZ57R cloning vector by T/A cloning method and transformation was performed by heat shocking of the E. coli XL1-blue competent cells. Following plasmid preparation, the cloned gene was digested out and ligated into the expression vector pET-22b(+). Electrophoresis of PCR product showed a 789 bp band. Recombinant plasmid (rpTZ57R) was then constructed. This plasmid was double digested with XhoI and EcoRI resulting in 800 bp and 2900 bp bands. The obtained insert was ligated into pET-22b(+) vector and its orientation was confirmed with XhoI and BamHI restriction enzymes. In conclusion, in the present study the recombinant expression vector containing xylitol dehydrogenase gene has been constructed and can be used for the production of this enzyme in high quantities. PMID:22110522

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of duck interleukin-17

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) belonging to the Th17 family is a proinflammatory cytokine produced by activated T cells. A 1034-bp cDNA encoding duck IL-17 (duIL-17) was cloned from ConA-activated splenic lymphocytes of ducks. The encoded protein, predicted to consisted of 169 amino acids, displayed a molec...

  12. [Molecular mechanisms for AMPA receptor trafficking].

    PubMed

    Fukata, Masaki; Fukata, Yuko

    2008-06-01

    Finely tuned synaptic transmission in the brain provides the molecular basis for learning and memory. The misregulation of synaptic transmission is involved in the pathogenesis of various neurological disorders like epilepsy. AMPA-typed glutamate receptors (AMPARs) mediate the most prominent form of excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. Dynamic regulation of AMPARs is thought to be a primary mechanism for controlling synaptic strength. We have analyzed the molecular mechanism for AMPAR-trafficking and function by focusing on PSD-95, a major postsynaptic scaffolding protein. Here, we review the novel regulatory mechanisms of AMPARs by 1) the PSD-95 palmitoylating enzyme, which determines the position of PSD-95 at postsynapses, and 2) the epilepsy related ligand/receptor, LGI1/ADAM22, identified as the PSD-95-interacting protein. PMID:18646599

  13. Molecular Cloning and Analysis of a DNA Repetitive Element from the Mouse Genome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geisinger, Adriana; Cossio, Gabriela; Wettstein, Rodolfo

    2006-01-01

    We report the development of a 3-week laboratory activity for an undergraduate molecular biology course. This activity introduces students to the practice of basic molecular techniques such as restriction enzyme digestion, agarose gel electrophoresis, cloning, plasmid DNA purification, Southern blotting, and sequencing. Students learn how to carry…

  14. Functional cloning of a gp100-reactive T-cell receptor from vitiligo patient skin.

    PubMed

    Klarquist, Jared; Eby, Jonathan M; Henning, Steven W; Li, Mingli; Wainwright, Derek A; Westerhof, Wiete; Luiten, Rosalie M; Nishimura, Michael I; Le Poole, I Caroline

    2016-05-01

    We isolated gp100-reactive T cells from perilesional skin of a patient with progressive vitiligo with superior reactivity toward melanoma cells compared with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes 1520, a melanoma-derived T-cell line reactive with the same cognate peptide. After dimer enrichment and limited dilution cloning, amplified cells were subjected to reverse transcription and 5' RACE to identify the variable TCRα and TCRβ subunit sequences. The full-length sequence was cloned into a retroviral vector separating both subunits by a P2A slippage sequence and introduced into Jurkat cells and primary T cells. Cytokine secreted by transduced cells in response to cognate peptide and gp100-expressing targets signifies that we have successfully cloned a gp100-reactive T-cell receptor from actively depigmenting skin. PMID:26824221

  15. Anti-idiotypes, receptors, and molecular mimicry

    SciTech Connect

    Linthicum, D.S.; Farid, N.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides a review of new methods and results in anti-idiotypes, receptors, and molecular mimicry. It begins with a discussion of the theoretical background of the anti-idiotypic network, it's role in the regulation of immune response, and the physical characteristics of anti-idiotypic antibodies. It then goes on to explore many applications in such areas as insulin action, thyroid cell function, the neurosciences, cardiology, virology, pharmacology, and reproduction.

  16. Molecular cloning of mannose-binding lectins from Clivia miniata.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Smeets, K; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1994-03-01

    Screening of a cDNA library constructed from total RNA isolated from young developing ovaries of Clivia miniata Regel with the amaryllis lectin cDNA clone resulted in the isolation of four different isolectin clones which clearly differ from each other in their nucleotide sequences and hence also in their deduced amino acid sequences. Apparently the lectin is translated from an mRNA of ca. 800 nucleotides encoding a precursor polypeptide of 163 amino acids. Northern blot analysis of total RNA isolated from different tissues of Clivia miniata has shown that the lectin is expressed in most plant tissues with very high lectin mRNA concentrations in the ovary and the seed endosperm. PMID:8193308

  17. Cloning and functional characterization of Chondrichthyes, cloudy catshark, Scyliorhinus torazame and whale shark, Rhincodon typus estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Katsu, Yoshinao; Kohno, Satomi; Narita, Haruka; Urushitani, Hiroshi; Yamane, Koudai; Hara, Akihiko; Clauss, Tonya M; Walsh, Michael T; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Guillette, Louis J; Iguchi, Taisen

    2010-09-15

    Sex-steroid hormones are essential for normal reproductive activity in both sexes in all vertebrates. Estrogens are required for ovarian differentiation during a critical developmental stage and promote the growth and differentiation of the female reproductive system following puberty. Recent studies have shown that environmental estrogens influence the developing reproductive system as well as gametogenesis, especially in males. To understand the molecular mechanisms of estrogen actions and to evaluate estrogen receptor-ligand interactions in Elasmobranchii, we cloned a single estrogen receptor (ESR) from two shark species, the cloudy catshark (Scyliorhinus torazame) and whale shark (Rhincodon typus) and used an ERE-luciferase reporter assay system to characterize the interaction of these receptors with steroidal and other environmental estrogens. In the transient transfection ERE-luciferase reporter assay system, both shark ESR proteins displayed estrogen-dependent activation of transcription, and shark ESRs were more sensitive to 17beta-estradiol compared with other natural and synthetic estrogens. Further, the environmental chemicals, bisphenol A, nonylphenol, octylphenol and DDT could activate both shark ESRs. The assay system provides a tool for future studies examining the receptor-ligand interactions and estrogen disrupting mechanisms in Elasmobranchii. PMID:20600039

  18. Molecular Cloning and Physical Mapping of the Daptomycin Gene Cluster from Streptomyces roseosporus

    PubMed Central

    Mchenney, Margaret A.; Hosted, Thomas J.; Dehoff, Bradley S.; Rosteck, Paul R.; Baltz, Richard H.

    1998-01-01

    The daptomycin biosynthetic gene cluster of Streptomyces roseosporus was analyzed by Tn5099 mutagenesis, molecular cloning, partial DNA sequencing, and insertional mutagenesis with cloned segments of DNA. The daptomycin biosynthetic gene cluster spans at least 50 kb and is located about 400 to 500 kb from one end of the ∼7,100-kb linear chromosome. We identified two peptide synthetase coding regions interrupted by a 10- to 20-kb region that may encode other functions in lipopeptide biosynthesis. PMID:9422604

  19. Generation of transmissible hepatitis C virions from a molecular clone in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Hong, Z; Beaudet-Miller, M; Lanford, R E; Guerra, B; Wright-Minogue, J; Skelton, A; Baroudy, B M; Reyes, G R; Lau, J Y

    1999-03-30

    Multiple alignments of hepatitis C virus (HCV) polyproteins from six different genotypes identified a total of 22 nonconsensus mutations in a clone derived from the Hutchinson (H77) isolate. These mutations, collectively, may have contributed to the failure in generating a "functionally correct" or "infectious" clone in earlier attempts. A consensus clone was constructed after systematic repair of these mutations, which yielded infectious virions in a chimpanzee after direct intrahepatic inoculation of in vitro transcribed RNAs. This RNA-infected chimpanzee has developed hepatitis and remained HCV positive for more than 11 months. To further verify this RNA-derived infectivity, a second naive chimpanzee was injected intravenously with serum collected from the first chimpanzee. Infectivity analysis of the second chimpanzee demonstrated that the HCV infection was successfully transmitted, which validated unequivocally the infectivity of our repaired molecular clone. Amino acid sequence comparisons revealed that our repaired infectious clone had 4 mismatches with the isogenic clone reported by Kolykhalov et al. (1997, Science 277, 570-574) and 8 mismatches with that reported by Yanagi et al. (1997, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94, 8738-8743). At the RNA level, more mismatches (43 and 67, respectively) were identified; most of them were synonymous substitutions. Further comparisons with 16 isolates from different genotypes demonstrated that our repaired clone shares greater consensus than the reported isogenic clones. This approach of generating infectious HCV RNA validates the importance of amino acid sequence consensus in relation to the biology of HCV. PMID:10087224

  20. GABAA receptor beta subunit heterogeneity: functional expression of cloned cDNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Ymer, S; Schofield, P R; Draguhn, A; Werner, P; Köhler, M; Seeburg, P H

    1989-01-01

    Cloned cDNAs encoding two new beta subunits of the rat and bovine GABAA receptor have been isolated using a degenerate oligonucleotide probe based on a highly conserved peptide sequence in the second transmembrane domain of GABAA receptor subunits. The beta 2 and beta 3 subunits share approximately 72% sequence identity with the previously characterized beta 1 polypeptide. Northern analysis showed that both beta 2 and beta 3 mRNAs are more abundant in the brain than beta 1 mRNA. All three beta subunit encoding cDNAs were also identified in a library constructed from adrenal medulla RNA. Each beta subunit, when co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes with an alpha subunit, forms functional GABAA receptors. These results, together with the known alpha subunit heterogeneity, suggest that a variety of related but functionally distinct GABAA receptor subtypes are generated by different subunit combinations. Images PMID:2548852

  1. Purification, molecular cloning, and expression of the mammalian sigma1-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Hanner, M; Moebius, F F; Flandorfer, A; Knaus, H G; Striessnig, J; Kempner, E; Glossmann, H

    1996-01-01

    Sigma-ligands comprise several chemically unrelated drugs such as haloperidol, pentazocine, and ditolylguanidine, which bind to a family of low molecular mass proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. These so-called sigma-receptors are believed to mediate various pharmacological effects of sigma-ligands by as yet unknown mechanisms. Based on their opposite enantioselectivity for benzomorphans and different molecular masses, two subtypes are differentiated. We purified the sigma1-binding site as a single 30-kDa protein from guinea pig liver employing the benzomorphan(+)[3H]pentazocine and the arylazide (-)[3H]azidopamil as specific probes. The purified (+)[3H]pentazocine-binding protein retained its high affinity for haloperidol, pentazocine, and ditolylguanidine. Partial amino acid sequence obtained after trypsinolysis revealed no homology to known proteins. Radiation inactivation of the pentazocine-labeled sigma1-binding site yielded a molecular mass of 24 +/- 2 kDa. The corresponding cDNA was cloned using degenerate oligonucleotides and cDNA library screening. Its open reading frame encoded a 25.3-kDa protein with at least one putative transmembrane segment. The protein expressed in yeast cells transformed with the cDNA showed the pharmacological characteristics of the brain and liver sigma1-binding site. The deduced amino acid sequence was structurally unrelated to known mammalian proteins but it shared homology with fungal proteins involved in sterol synthesis. Northern blots showed high densities of the sigma1-binding site mRNA in sterol-producing tissues. This is also in agreement with the known ability of sigma1-binding sites to interact with steroids, such as progesterone. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8755605

  2. Prototypical Recombinant Multi-Protease Inhibitor Resistant Infectious Molecular Clones of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Vici; Mitsuya, Yumi; Fessel, W Jeffrey; Liu, Tommy F; Melikian, George L; Katzenstein, David A; Schiffer, Celia A; Holmes, Susan P; Shafer, Robert W

    2013-06-24

    The many genetic manifestations of HIV-1 protease inhibitor (PI) resistance present challenges to research into the mechanisms of PI-resistance and the assessment of new PIs. To address these challenges, we created a panel of recombinant multi-PI resistant infectious molecular clones designed to represent the spectrum of clinically relevant multi-PI resistant viruses. To assess the representativeness of this panel, we examined the sequences of the panel's viruses in the context of a correlation network of PI-resistance amino acid substitutions in sequences from more than 10,000 patients. The panel of recombinant infectious molecular clones comprised 29 of 41 study-defined PI-resistance amino acid substitutions and 23 of the 27 tightest amino acid substitution clusters. Based on their phenotypic properties, the clones were classified into four groups with increasing cross-resistance to the PIs most commonly used for salvage therapy: lopinavir (LPV), tipranavir (TPV), and darunavir (DRV). The panel of recombinant infectious molecular clones has been made available without restriction through the NIH AIDS Research and Reference Reagent Program. The public availability of the panel makes it possible to compare the inhibitory activity of different PIs with one another. The diversity of the panel and the high-level PI resistance of its clones suggest that investigational PIs active against the clones in this panel will retain antiviral activity against most, if not all clinically relevant PI-resistant viruses. PMID:23796938

  3. Mannose receptor contribution to Candida albicans phagocytosis by murine E-clone J774 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Porcaro, Isabelle; Vidal, Michel; Jouvert, Sylvie; Stahl, Philip D; Giaimis, Jean

    2003-08-01

    Mannoproteins, as the main constituents of the outer layer of yeast cell walls, are able to interact with phagocytic cells in an opsonin-independent manner through the mannose receptor (MR) and to induce yeast ingestion by the professional phagocytes. Moreover, the MR also mediates endocytosis of soluble ligands through clathrin-coated pits. Here, we studied some aspects of the interaction between the MR and Candida albicans using murine E-clone macrophages and the consequences on MR trafficking. Using a pull-down assay involving mixture E-clone macrophage detergent lysate with mannosylated Sepharose beads and glutaraldehyde-fixed, heat-killed (HK) C. albicans, we found that binding of solubilized MR to mannosylated particles occurred with characteristics similar to the receptor's cell-surface mannose-binding activity. We then demonstrated that MR expressed on E-clone macrophages contributed to phagocytosis of unopsonized, HK C. albicans and that yeast phagocytosis induced a decrease in MR endocytic activity without concomitant degradation of the receptor in the time lapse studied. PMID:12885937

  4. Cloning, expression and pharmacological characterization of rabbit adenosine A1 and A3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Hill, R J; Oleynek, J J; Hoth, C F; Kiron, M A; Weng, W; Wester, R T; Tracey, W R; Knight, D R; Buchholz, R A; Kennedy, S P

    1997-01-01

    The role of adenosine A1 and A3 receptors in mediating cardioprotection has been studied predominantly in rabbits, yet the pharmacological characteristics of rabbit adenosine A1 and A3 receptor subtypes are unknown. Thus, the rabbit adenosine A3 receptor was cloned and expressed, and its pharmacology was compared with that of cloned adenosine A1 receptors. Stable transfection of rabbit A1 or A3 cDNAs in Chinese hamster ovary-K1 cells resulted in high levels of expression of each of the receptors, as demonstrated by high-affinity binding of the A1/A3 adenosine receptor agonist N6-(4-amino-3-[125I]iodobenzyl)adenosine (125I-ABA). For both receptors, binding of 125I-ABA was inhibited by the GTP analog 5'-guanylimidodiphosphate, and forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation was inhibited by the adenosine receptor agonist (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine. The rank orders of potency of adenosine receptor agonists for inhibition of 125I-ABA binding were as follows: rabbit A1, N6-cyclopentyladenosine = (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine > N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > or = I-ABA > or = N6-2-(4-aminophenyl) ethyladenosine > > N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide > N6-(4-amino-3-benzyl)adenosine; rabbit A3, N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide > or = I-ABA > > N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > N6-2-(4-aminophenyl) ethyladenosine = N6-cyclopentyladenosine = (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine > N6-(4-amino-3-benzyl)adenosine. The adenosine receptor antagonist rank orders were as follow: rabbit A1, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine > 1,3- dipropyl-8-(4-acrylate)phenylxanthine > or = xanthine amine congener > > 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline; rabbit A3, xanthine amine congener > 1,3-dipropyl-8-(4-acrylate)phenylxanthine > or = 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine > > 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline. These observations confirm the identity of the expressed proteins as A1 and A3 receptors. The results will facilitate further in-depth studies of the roles of A1 and A3 receptors in

  5. Molecular Pharmacology of δ-Opioid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Gendron, Louis; Cahill, Catherine M; von Zastrow, Mark; Schiller, Peter W; Pineyro, Graciela

    2016-07-01

    Opioids are among the most effective analgesics available and are the first choice in the treatment of acute severe pain. However, partial efficacy, a tendency to produce tolerance, and a host of ill-tolerated side effects make clinically available opioids less effective in the management of chronic pain syndromes. Given that most therapeutic opioids produce their actions via µ-opioid receptors (MOPrs), other targets are constantly being explored, among which δ-opioid receptors (DOPrs) are being increasingly considered as promising alternatives. This review addresses DOPrs from the perspective of cellular and molecular determinants of their pharmacological diversity. Thus, DOPr ligands are examined in terms of structural and functional variety, DOPrs' capacity to engage a multiplicity of canonical and noncanonical G protein-dependent responses is surveyed, and evidence supporting ligand-specific signaling and regulation is analyzed. Pharmacological DOPr subtypes are examined in light of the ability of DOPr to organize into multimeric arrays and to adopt multiple active conformations as well as differences in ligand kinetics. Current knowledge on DOPr targeting to the membrane is examined as a means of understanding how these receptors are especially active in chronic pain management. Insight into cellular and molecular mechanisms of pharmacological diversity should guide the rational design of more effective, longer-lasting, and better-tolerated opioid analgesics for chronic pain management. PMID:27343248

  6. The GPCR, class C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A) receptor: from cloning to physiological function

    PubMed Central

    Clemmensen, C; Smajilovic, S; Wellendorph, P; Bräuner-Osborne, H

    2014-01-01

    GPRC6A (GPCR, class C, group 6, subtype A) is a class C GPCR that has been cloned from human, mouse and rat. Several groups have shown that the receptor is activated by a range of basic and small aliphatic L-α-amino acids of which L-arginine, L-lysine and L-ornithine are the most potent compounds with EC50 values in the mid-micromolar range. In addition, several groups have shown that the receptor is either directly activated or positively modulated by divalent cations such as Ca2+ albeit in concentrations above 5 mM, which is above the physiological concentration in most tissues. More recently, the peptide osteocalcin and the steroid testosterone have also been suggested to be endogenous GPRC6A agonists. The receptor is widely expressed in all three species which, along with the omnipresence of the amino acids and divalent cation ligands, suggest that the receptor could be involved in a broad range of physiological functions. So far, this has mainly been addressed by analyses of genetically modified mice where the GPRC6A receptor has been ablated. Although there has been some discrepancies among results reported from different groups, there is increasing evidence that the receptor is involved in regulation of inflammation, metabolism and endocrine functions. GPRC6A could thus be an interesting target for new drugs in these therapeutic areas. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of GPCRs. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-5 PMID:24032653

  7. Cloning and pharmacological characterization of the dog P2X7 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Roman, S; Cusdin, FS; Fonfria, E; Goodwin, JA; Reeves, J; Lappin, SC; Chambers, L; Walter, DS; Clay, WC; Michel, AD

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Human and rodent P2X7 receptors exhibit differences in their sensitivity to antagonists. In this study we have cloned and characterized the dog P2X7 receptor to determine if its antagonist sensitivity more closely resembles the human or rodent orthologues. Experimental approach: A cDNA encoding the dog P2X7 receptor was isolated from a dog heart cDNA library, expressed in U-2 OS cells using the BacMam viral expression system and characterized in electrophysiological, ethidium accumulation and radioligand binding studies. Native P2X7 receptors were examined by measuring ATP-stimulated interleukin-1β release in dog and human whole blood. Key results: The dog P2X7 receptor was 595 amino acids long and exhibited high homology (>70%) to the human and rodent orthologues although it contained an additional threonine at position 284 and an amino acid deletion at position 538. ATP possessed low millimolar potency at dog P2X7 receptors. 2′-&3′-O-(4benzoylbenzoyl) ATP had slightly higher potency but was a partial agonist. Dog P2X7 receptors possessed relatively high affinity for a number of selective antagonists of the human P2X7 receptor although there were some differences in potency between the species. Compound affinities in human and dog blood exhibited a similar rank order of potency as observed in studies on the recombinant receptor although absolute potency was considerably lower. Conclusions and implications: Dog recombinant and native P2X7 receptors display a number of pharmacological similarities to the human P2X7 receptor. Thus, dog may be a suitable species for assessing target-related toxicity of antagonists intended for evaluation in the clinic. PMID:19814727

  8. Cloning and expression of a rat brain. alpha. sub 2B -adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Flordellis, C.S.; Handy, D.E.; Bresnahan, M.R.; Zannis, V.I.; Gavras, H. )

    1991-02-01

    The authors isolated a cDNA clone (RB{alpha}{sub 2B}) and its homologous gene (GR{alpha}{sub 2B}) encoding an {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype by screening a rat brain cDNA and a rat genomic library. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that both clones code for a protein of 458 amino acids, which is 87% homologous to the human kidney glycosylated adrenergic receptor ({alpha}{sub 2}-C4) and divergent from the rat kidney nonglycosylated {alpha}{sub 2B} subtype (RNG{alpha}{sub 2}). Transient expression of RB{alpha}{sub 2B} in COS-7 cells resulted in high-affinity saturable binding for ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine and a high receptor number in the membranes of transfected COS-7 cells. Pharmacological analysis demonstrated that the expressed receptor bound adrenergic ligands with the following order of potency: rauwolscine {gt} yohimbine {gt} prazosin {gt} oxymetazoline, with a prazosin-to-oxymetazoline K{sub i} ratio of 0.34. This profile is characteristic of the {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype. Blotting analysis of rat brain mRNA gave one major and two minor mRNA species, and hybridization with strand-specific probes showed that both DNA strands of GR{alpha}{sub 2B} may be transcriptionally active. These findings show that rat brain expresses an {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype that is structurally different from the rat kidney nonglycosylated {alpha}{sub 2B} subtype. Thus the rat expresses at least two divergent {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptors.

  9. A novel IL-1 receptor, cloned from B cells by mammalian expression, is expressed in many cell types.

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, C J; Slack, J L; Mosley, B; Cosman, D; Lupton, S D; Brunton, L L; Grubin, C E; Wignall, J M; Jenkins, N A; Brannan, C I

    1991-01-01

    cDNA clones corresponding to an Mr approximately 80,000 receptor (type I receptor) for interleukin-1 (IL-1) have been isolated previously by mammalian expression. Here, we report the use of an improved expression cloning method to isolate human and murine cDNA clones encoding a second type (Mr approximately 60,000) of IL-1 receptor (type II receptor). The mature type II IL-1 receptor consists of (i) a ligand binding portion comprised of three immunoglobulin-like domains; (ii) a single transmembrane region; and (iii) a short cytoplasmic domain of 29 amino acids. This last contrasts with the approximately 215 amino acid cytoplasmic domain of the type I receptor, and suggests that the two IL-1 receptors may interact with different signal transduction pathways. The type II receptor is expressed in a number of different tissues, including both B and T lymphocytes, and can be induced in several cell types by treatment with phorbol ester. Both IL-1 receptors appear to be well conserved in evolution, and map to the same chromosomal location. Like the type I receptor, the human type II IL-1 receptor can bind all three forms of IL-1 (IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-1ra). Vaccinia virus contains an open reading frame bearing strong resemblance to the type II IL-1 receptor. Images PMID:1833184

  10. Molecular cloning of virulence genes from Erwinia stewartii.

    PubMed Central

    Coplin, D L; Frederick, R D; Majerczak, D R; Haas, E S

    1986-01-01

    A library of Erwinia stewartii DNA was constructed in cosmid pVK100 and used to complement spontaneous and Mu pf7701-induced (designated by the prefix MU) avirulent mutants. Plasmid pES4507 restored water-soaking ability and extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) synthesis to mutants MU14110 and MU2B70 (group I); pES1044 restored water-soaking ability to MU43, MU51, MU136, MU141, and RDF6011 (group II); and pES2144 complemented four spontaneous EPS- mutants (group III). Hybridization of labeled plasmid DNA to Southern blots of genomic DNA from the mutants revealed that a Mu pf7701 insertion was associated with the respective cloned region in all mutants except MU2B70 and MU223. In these strains, the plasmid may be suppressing the avirulent phenotype rather than complementing the mutation. Images PMID:3782017

  11. Molecular cloning and expression vector construction of bovine TRIM28.

    PubMed

    Ma, X; Zhai, Z C; Zhang, M L; Song, B H; Zhu, Y R; Yang, S B; Dong, X Q; Su, L Y; Wang, C F; Ma, H X; Luan, W M

    2016-01-01

    The bovine TRIM28 gene was amplified from ovary tissue by using RT-PCR. The TRIM28 gene was inserted into the eukaryotic expression vector pIRES2-EGFP and transfected into bovine fetal fibroblasts by using Lipofectamine 3000. TRIM28 mRNA and protein were detected by fluorescence microscope and western blotting. The results showed that the full length of TRIM28 was cloned and pIRES2-EGFP-TRIM28 was constructed successfully. EGFP expression was observed, and the pIRES2-EGFP-TRIM28 transfected group expressed more TRIM28 protein than that by the pIRES2-EGFP group. The TIMR28 gene has been successfully transferred into bovine fetal fibroblasts. PMID:27420979

  12. Cloning of human genes encoding novel G protein-coupled receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Marchese, A.; Docherty, J.M.; Heiber, M.

    1994-10-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of several novel human genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors. Each of the receptors contained the familiar seven transmembrane topography and most closely resembled peptide binding receptors. Gene GPR1 encoded a receptor protein that is intronless in the coding region and that shared identity (43% in the transmembrane regions) with the opioid receptors. Northern blot analysis revealed that GPR1 transcripts were expressed in the human hippocampus, and the gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.6. Gene GPR2 encoded a protein that most closely resembled an interleukin-8 receptor (51% in the transmembrane regions), and this gene, not expressed in the six brain regions examined, was localized to chromosome 17q2.1-q21.3. A third gene, GPR3, showed identity (56% in the transmembrane regions) with a previously characterized cDNA clone from rat and was localized to chromosome 1p35-p36.1. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Molecular cloning of a hyaluronidase from Bothrops pauloensis venom gland

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hyaluronate is one of the major components of extracellular matrix from vertebrates whose breakdown is catalyzed by the enzyme hyaluronidase. These enzymes are widely described in snake venoms, in which they facilitate the spreading of the main toxins in the victim’s body during the envenoming. Snake venoms also present some variants (hyaluronidases-like substances) that are probably originated by alternative splicing, even though their relevance in envenomation is still under investigation. Hyaluronidases-like proteins have not yet been purified from any snake venom, but the cDNA that encodes these toxins was already identified in snake venom glands by transcriptomic analysis. Herein, we report the cloning and in silico analysis of the first hyaluronidase-like proteins from a Brazilian snake venom. Methods The cDNA sequence of hyaluronidase was cloned from the transcriptome of Bothrops pauloensis venom glands. This sequence was submitted to multiple alignment with other related sequences by ClustalW. A phylogenetic analysis was performed using MEGA 4 software by the neighbor joining (NJ) method. Results The cDNA from Bothrops pauloensis venom gland that corresponds to hyaluronidase comprises 1175 bp and codifies a protein containing 194 amino acid residues. The sequence, denominated BpHyase, was identified as hyaluronidase-like since it shows high sequence identities (above 83%) with other described snake venom hyaluronidase-like sequences. Hyaluronidases-like proteins are thought to be products of alternative splicing implicated in deletions of central amino acids, including the catalytic residues. Structure-based sequence alignment of BpHyase to human hyaluronidase hHyal-1 demonstrates a loss of some key secondary structures. The phylogenetic analysis indicates an independent evolution of BpHyal when compared to other hyaluronidases. However, these toxins might share a common ancestor, thus suggesting a broad hyaluronidase-like distribution among

  14. (Molecular cloning and structural characteristics of the R complex of maize)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Studies on the R complex in Maize continued Progress is discussed in the following areas: Establishing identity of R components and cloning of R components; CO allele origin; molecular organization of R-r complex; NCO allele origin; genetic analysis of R-r complex; studies of the Sn locus and reverse paramutation.

  15. [Molecular cloning and structural characteristics of the R complex of maize]. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    Studies on the R complex in Maize continued Progress is discussed in the following areas: Establishing identity of R components and cloning of R components; CO allele origin; molecular organization of R-r complex; NCO allele origin; genetic analysis of R-r complex; studies of the Sn locus and reverse paramutation.

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of Schistosoma japonicum aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Jipeng; Wang, Shuqi; Xu, Bin; Liu, Xiufeng; Wang, Xiaoning; Hu, Wei

    2013-02-01

    Antioxidant defense is an essential mechanism for schistosomes to cope with damage from host immune-generated reactive oxygen species. The evaluation of the effects of aldose reductase, an important enzyme that may be involved in this system, has long been neglected. In the present study, aldose reductase of Schistosoma japonicum (SjAR) was cloned and characterized. The activity of SjAR was assessed in vitro and was suppressed by the reported inhibitor, epalrestat. RT-PCR analysis revealed that SjAR was expressed at each of the development stages analyzed with increased levels in cercariae. The results also showed that SjAR was expressed at higher levels in adult male worms than in adult female worms. Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blot analysis indicated that the purified recombinant SjAR (rSjAR) protein displayed a significant level of antigenicity. Immunolocalization analysis revealed that SjAR was mainly distributed in the gynecophoral canal of adult male worms. BALB/c mice immunized with rSjAR induced a 32.91 % worm reduction compared to the adjuvant group (P < 0.01). Moreover, a 28.27 % reduction in egg development in the liver (P > 0.05) and a 42.75 % reduction in egg development in the fecal samples (P < 0.05) were also observed. These results suggested that SjAR may be a potential new drug target or vaccine candidate for schistosomes. PMID:23160889

  17. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of pig CD138.

    PubMed

    Bae, Joonbeom; Jeong, Seonah; Lee, Ju Yeon; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Choi, Bong-Hwan; Kim, Ji-Eun; Choi, Inho; Chun, Taehoon

    2013-12-01

    CD138 (syndecan-1) interacts with various components of the extracellular matrix and associates with the actin cytoskeleton. In this study, we cloned pig CD138 cDNA and determined its complete cDNA sequence. Pig CD138 cDNA contained an open reading frame (930 bp) encoding 309 amino acids with five well conserved putative glycosaminoglycan attachment sites, a putative cleavage site for matrix metalloproteinases, and conserved motifs involved in signal transduction among mammalian species. Pig CD138 mRNA was detected in various tissues, including lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs, indicating the multicellular functions of CD138 in pigs. Western blot and flow cytometry analyses detected an approximate 35 kDa pig CD138 protein expressed on the cell surface. Further immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that CD138 expression was mainly observed in submucosa and lamina propria of the pig small intestine. Further study will be necessary to define the functional importance of CD138 during specific infectious diseases in pigs. PMID:24128845

  18. Molecular cloning of cecropin B responsive endonucleases in Yersinia ruckeri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously demonstrated that Yersinia ruckeri resists cecropin B in an inducible manner. In this study, we sought to identify the molecular changes responsible for the inducible cecropin B resistance of Y. ruckeri. Differences in gene expression associated with the inducible resistance were ...

  19. Immunoglobulin M receptors on memory cells of immunoglobulin G antibody-forming cell clones.

    PubMed

    Abney, E R; Keeler, K D; Parkhouse, R M; Willcox, H N

    1976-06-01

    The memory cells of two antibody-forming cell clones had receptors of the IgM class, even though the clones had been producing IgG1 or IgG2a anti-2,4-dinitrophenyl antibodies for 9-15 months previously (on exposure to antigen). Thus a phenotypic switch in heavy chain constant region evidently occurred after re-exposure of these memory cells to antigen. To show that, we first removed the clonal cells' surface immunoglobins by "capping" and "stripping", with class- or subclass-specific antisera. Then, to assay their remaining receptor activity, the cells were incubated with antigen in vitro, washed and transferred (together with carrier primed cells) to irradiated recipients, and their antibody responses to this in vitro boost were assayed by iselectric focusing. Pretreatment with anti-mu serum, as well as with anti-Fab(kappa), prevented the responses of the IgG1 and IgG2a clones to an in vitro boost, while anti-gamma1 and anti-gamma2a antisera had no effect. An antiserum to the putative mouse IgD also had no effect. The anti-mu serum failed to react with the IgG1 and IgG2A clonal serum antibodies in the test tube. Some other contaminating clones were suppressed completely only by the anti-Fab serum. This result strongly suggests that switching in class commitment may occur during the differentiation of memory cells to antibody producers, and may therefore be antigen-dependent. It also implies that some apparently naive cells with surface IgM may, in reality, be B memory cells. PMID:825376

  20. Cloning and characterization of an immunoglobulin A Fc receptor from cattle.

    PubMed

    Morton, H Craig; Pleass, Richard J; Storset, Anne K; Dissen, Erik; Williams, John L; Brandtzaeg, Per; Woof, Jenny M

    2004-02-01

    Here, we describe the cloning, sequencing and characterization of an immunoglobulin A (IgA) Fc receptor from cattle (bFcalphaR). By screening a translated EST database with the protein sequence of the human IgA Fc receptor (CD89) we identified a putative bovine homologue. Subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification confirmed that the identified full-length cDNA was expressed in bovine cells. COS-1 cells transfected with a plasmid containing the cloned cDNA bound to beads coated with either bovine or human IgA, but not to beads coated with bovine IgG2 or human IgG. The bFcalphaR cDNA is 873 nucleotides long and is predicted to encode a 269 amino-acid transmembrane glycoprotein composed of two immunoglobulin-like extracellular domains, a transmembrane region and a short cytoplasmic tail devoid of known signalling motifs. Genetically, bFcalphaR is more closely related to CD89, bFcgamma2R, NKp46, and the KIR and LILR gene families than to other FcRs. Moreover, the bFcalphaR gene maps to the bovine leucocyte receptor complex on chromosome 18. Identification of the bFcalphaR will aid in the understanding of IgA-FcalphaR interactions, and may facilitate the isolation of FcalphaR from other species. PMID:15027906

  1. Biological, molecular, and structural analysis of a cytopathic variant from a molecularly cloned simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    LaBranche, C C; Sauter, M M; Haggarty, B S; Vance, P J; Romano, J; Hart, T K; Bugelski, P J; Hoxie, J A

    1994-01-01

    Some isolates of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) have been shown to infect Sup-T1 cells with slow kinetics and in the absence of cytopathic effects, including cell fusion or CD4 down-modulation (J. A. Hoxie, B. S. Haggarty, S. Bonser, J. Rackowski, H. Shan, and P. Kanki, J. Virol. 62:2557-2568, 1988). In the present study, we describe the isolation and characterization of a SIVmac variant, derived from the BK28 infectious molecular clone, that became highly cytopathic for Sup-T1 cells. This variant, termed CP-MAC, exhibited a number of differences from BK28, including (i) an altered tropism which largely restricted its host range to Sup-T1 cells, (ii) the ability to induce cell fusion and CD4 down-modulation, and (iii) a highly stable interaction of its external (SU) and transmembrane (TM) envelope glycoproteins. In addition, a marked increase in the level of surface envelope glycoproteins was observed both on CP-MAC-infected cells and on virions. The CP-MAC env gene was PCR amplified from infected cells, and sequence analysis identified five amino acid changes in SU and six in TM compared with BK28. The introduction of these changes into BK28 was shown to fully reconstitute the biological and morphological properties of CP-MAC. The limited number of mutations in CP-MAC should enable the molecular determinants to be more precisely defined and help to identify the underlying mechanisms responsible for the striking biological and structural alterations exhibited by this virus. Images PMID:8057433

  2. Cloning and functional characterization of the rabbit C-C chemokine receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Deshun; Yuan, Xiu-juan; Evans, Robert J; Pappas, Amy T; Wang, He; Su, Eric W; Hamdouchi, Chafiq; Venkataraman, Chandrasekar

    2005-01-01

    Background CC-family chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is implicated in the trafficking of blood-borne monocytes to sites of inflammation and is implicated in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and atherosclerosis. The major challenge in the development of small molecule chemokine receptor antagonists is the lack of cross-species activity to the receptor in the preclinical species. Rabbit models have been widely used to study the role of various inflammatory molecules in the development of inflammatory processes. Therefore, in this study, we report the cloning and characterization of rabbit CCR2. Data regarding the activity of the CCR2 antagonist will provide valuable tools to perform toxicology and efficacy studies in the rabbit model. Results Sequence alignment indicated that rabbit CCR2 shares 80 % identity to human CCR2b. Tissue distribution indicated that rabbit CCR2 is abundantly expressed in spleen and lung. Recombinant rabbit CCR2 expressed as stable transfectants in U-937 cells binds radiolabeled 125I-mouse JE (murine MCP-1) with a calculated Kd of 0.1 nM. In competition binding assays, binding of radiolabeled mouse JE to rabbit CCR2 is differentially competed by human MCP-1, -2, -3 and -4, but not by RANTES, MIP-1α or MIP-1β. U-937/rabbit CCR2 stable transfectants undergo chemotaxis in response to both human MCP-1 and mouse JE with potencies comparable to those reported for human CCR2b. Finally, TAK-779, a dual CCR2/CCR5 antagonist effectively inhibits the binding of 125I-mouse JE (IC50 = 2.3 nM) to rabbit CCR2 and effectively blocks CCR2-mediated chemotaxis. Conclusion In this study, we report the cloning of rabbit CCR2 and demonstrate that this receptor is a functional chemotactic receptor for MCP-1. PMID:16001983

  3. Cloning and expression of the VHDL receptor from fat body of the corn ear worm, Helicoverpa zea.

    PubMed

    Persaud, Deryck R; Haunerland, Norbert H

    2004-01-01

    In Noctuids, storage proteins are taken up into fat body by receptor-mediated endocytosis. These include arylphorin and a second, structurally unrelated very high-density lipoprotein (VHDL). Previously, we have isolated a single storage protein receptor from the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, which binds both VHDL and arylphorin. The receptor protein is a basic, N-terminally blocked, approximately 80 kDa protein that is associated with fat body membranes. Microsequencing of proteolytic fragments of the isolated receptor protein revealed internal sequences that were used to clone the complete cDNA of the VHDL receptor by 3' and 5' RACE techniques. The receptor protein, when expressed in vitro via a suitable insect expression vector, reacted with antibodies against the native VHDL receptor and bound strongly to its ligand VHDL, thus confirming that the cloned cDNA represents indeed the previously purified VHDL receptor. The receptor protein and a second, similar protein also found associated with the fat body membrane show considerable homology to putative basic juvenile hormone suppressible proteins cloned previously from other Noctuid species. Sequence analysis revealed that the receptor is likely a peripheral membrane protein that may mediate the selective uptake of VHDL. PMID:15861222

  4. Cloning and expression of the VHDL receptor from fat body of the corn ear worm, Helicoverpa zea

    PubMed Central

    Persaud, Deryck R.; Haunerland, Norbert H.

    2004-01-01

    In Noctuids, storage proteins are taken up into fat body by receptor-mediated endocytosis. These include arylphorin and a second, structurally unrelated very high-density lipoprotein (VHDL). Previously, we have isolated a single storage protein receptor from the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, which binds both VHDL and arylphorin. The receptor protein is a basic, N-terminally blocked, ∼80 kDa protein that is associated with fat body membranes. Microsequencing of proteolytic fragments of the isolated receptor protein revealed internal sequences that were used to clone the complete cDNA of the VHDL receptor by 3′ and 5′ RACE techniques. The receptor protein, when expressed in vitro via a suitable insect expression vector, reacted with antibodies against the native VHDL receptor and bound strongly to its ligand VHDL, thus confirming that the cloned cDNA represents indeed the previously purified VHDL receptor. The receptor protein and a second, similar protein also found associated with the fat body membrane show considerable homology to putative basic juvenile hormone suppressible proteins cloned previously from other Noctuid species. Sequence analysis revealed that the receptor is likely a peripheral membrane protein that may mediate the selective uptake of VHDL. Abbreviation: BJHSP basic juvenile hormone suppressible protein FITC fluorescein isothiocyanate HRP horseraddish peroxidase RACE rapid amplification of cDNA ends VHDL very high density lipoprotein PMID:15861222

  5. CDNA CLONING OF FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) ESTROGEN AND ANDROGEN RECEPTORS FOR USE IN STEROID RECEPTOR EXTRAPOLATION STUDIES FOR ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    cDNA Cloning of Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) Estrogen and Androgen Receptors for Use in Steroid Receptor Extrapolation Studies for Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals.

    Wilson, V.S.1,, Korte, J.2, Hartig P. 1, Ankley, G.T.2, Gray, L.E., Jr 1, , and Welch, J.E.1. 1U.S...

  6. Molecular cloning, expression and characterization of pyridoxamine–pyruvate aminotransferase

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikane, Yu; Yokochi, Nana; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Hayashi, Hideyuki; Yagi, Toshiharu

    2006-01-01

    Pyridoxamine–pyruvate aminotransferase is a PLP (pyridoxal 5′-phosphate) (a coenzyme form of vitamin B6)-independent aminotransferase which catalyses a reversible transamination reaction between pyridoxamine and pyruvate to form pyridoxal and L-alanine. The gene encoding the enzyme has been identified, cloned and overexpressed for the first time. The mlr6806 gene on the chromosome of a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium, Mesorhizobium loti, encoded the enzyme, which consists of 393 amino acid residues. The primary sequence was identical with those of archaeal aspartate aminotransferase and rat serine–pyruvate aminotransferase, which are PLP-dependent aminotransferases. The results of fold-type analysis and the consensus amino acid residues found around the active-site lysine residue identified in the present study showed that the enzyme could be classified into class V aminotransferases of fold type I or the AT IV subfamily of the α family of the PLP-dependent enzymes. Analyses of the absorption and CD spectra of the wild-type and point-mutated enzymes showed that Lys197 was essential for the enzyme activity, and was the active-site lysine residue that corresponded to that found in the PLP-dependent aminotransferases, as had been suggested previously [Hodsdon, Kolb, Snell and Cole (1978) Biochem. J. 169, 429–432]. The Kd value for pyridoxal determined by means of CD was 100-fold lower than the Km value for it, suggesting that Schiff base formation between pyridoxal and the active-site lysine residue is partially rate determining in the catalysis of pyridoxal. The active-site structure and evolutionary aspects of the enzyme are discussed. PMID:16545075

  7. Behavior of a cloned murine interferon alpha/beta receptor expressed in homospecific or heterospecific background.

    PubMed Central

    Uzé, G; Lutfalla, G; Bandu, M T; Proudhon, D; Mogensen, K E

    1992-01-01

    A murine interferon (IFN) alpha/beta receptor was cloned from the IFN-sensitive L1210 cell line on the basis of its homology with the human receptor. A combination of methods that includes the screening of random-primed and oligo(dT)-primed cDNA libraries and polymerase chain reactions with a single-side specificity was used. At the amino acid level, the murine IFN-alpha/beta shows 46% identity with its human counterpart. Both human WISH cells presenting a low sensitivity to mouse IFN and a murine L1210 mutant subline that does not express the receptor have been stably transfected with the murine IFN-alpha/beta receptor. Whereas transfected human cells became sensitive to a limited number of mouse IFN-alpha/beta subtypes, the transfected murine L1210 mutant was found to be fully complemented and became sensitive to all mouse IFN-alpha/beta subtypes tested, including those that were not active on transfected human cells. These results strongly suggest that the receptor described here is implicated in the mediation of the activities of all murine IFN-alpha/beta subtypes. Images PMID:1533935

  8. Molecular cloning and characterization of l-methionine γ-lyase from Streptomyces avermitilis.

    PubMed

    Kudou, Daizou; Yasuda, Eri; Hirai, Yoshiyuki; Tamura, Takashi; Inagaki, Kenji

    2015-10-01

    A pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent methionine γ-lyase (MGL) was cloned from Streptomyces avermitilis catalyzed the degradation of methionine to α-ketobutyrate, methanethiol, and ammonia. The sav7062 gene (1,242 bp) was corresponded to 413 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 42,994 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence showed a high degree of similarity to those of other MGL enzymes. The sav7062 gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity and exhibited the MGL catalytic activities. We cloned the enzyme that has the MGL activity in Streptomyces for the first time. PMID:25817696

  9. Construction and Characterization of an Infectious Molecular Clone of Koala Retrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Shojima, Takayuki; Hoshino, Shigeki; Abe, Masumi; Yasuda, Jiro; Shogen, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Koala retrovirus (KoRV) is a gammaretrovirus that is currently endogenizing into koalas. Studies on KoRV infection have been hampered by the lack of a replication-competent molecular clone. In this study, we constructed an infectious molecular clone, termed plasmid pKoRV522, of a KoRV isolate (strain Aki) from a koala reared in a Japanese zoo. The virus KoRV522, derived from pKoRV522, grew efficiently in human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cells, attaining 106 focus-forming units/ml. Several mutations in the Gag (L domain) and Env regions reported to be involved in reduction in viral infection/production in vitro are found in pKoRV522, yet KoRV522 replicated well, suggesting that any effects of these mutations are limited. Indeed, a reporter virus pseudotyped with pKoRV522 Env was found to infect human, feline, and mink cell lines efficiently. Analyses of KoRV L-domain mutants showed that an additional PPXY sequence, PPPY, in Gag plays a critical role in KoRV budding. Altogether, our results demonstrate the construction and characterization of the first infectious molecular clone of KoRV. The infectious clone reported here will be useful for elucidating the mechanism of endogenization of the virus in koalas and screening for antiretroviral drugs for KoRV-infected koalas. PMID:23427161

  10. Anandamide, an endogenous cannabimimetic eicosanoid, binds to the cloned human cannabinoid receptor and stimulates receptor-mediated signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Felder, C C; Briley, E M; Axelrod, J; Simpson, J T; Mackie, K; Devane, W A

    1993-01-01

    Arachidonylethanolamide (anandamide), a candidate endogenous cannabinoid ligand, has recently been isolated from porcine brain and displayed cannabinoid-like binding activity to synaptosomal membrane preparations and mimicked cannabinoid-induced inhibition of the twitch response in isolated murine vas deferens. In this study, anandamide and several congeners were evaluated as cannabinoid agonists by examining their ability to bind to the cloned cannabinoid receptor, inhibit forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation, inhibit N-type calcium channels, and stimulate one or more functional second messenger responses. Synthetic anandamide, and all but one congener, competed for [3H]CP55,940 binding to plasma membranes prepared from L cells expressing the rat cannabinoid receptor. The ability of anandamide to activate receptor-mediated signal transduction was evaluated in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the human cannabinoid receptor (HCR, termed CHO-HCR cells) and compared to control CHO cells expressing the muscarinic m5 receptor (CHOm5 cells). Anandamide inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in CHO-HCR cells, but not in CHOm5 cells, and this response was blocked with pertussis toxin. N-type calcium channels were inhibited by anandamide and several active congeners in N18 neuroblastoma cells. Anandamide stimulated arachidonic acid and intracellular calcium release in both CHOm5 and CHO-HCR cells and had no effect on the release of inositol phosphates or phosphatidylethanol, generated after activation of phospholipase C and D, respectively. Anandamide appears to exhibit the essential criteria required to be classified as a cannabinoid/anandamide receptor agonist and shares similar nonreceptor effects on arachidonic acid and intracellular calcium release as other cannabinoid agonists. PMID:8395053

  11. Mole ghrelin: cDNA cloning, gene expression, and diverse molecular forms in Mogera imaizumii.

    PubMed

    Satou, Motoyasu; Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Nishi, Yoshihiro; Shinohara, Akio; Kawada, Shin-Ichiro; Miyazato, Mikiya; Kangawa, Kenji; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    Here, we describe cDNA cloning and purification of the ghrelin gene sequences and ghrelin peptides from the Japanese true mole, Mogera imaizumii. The gene spans >2.9kbp, has four exons and three introns, and shares structural similarity with those of terrestrial animals. Mature mole ghrelin peptide was predicted to be 28 amino acids long (GSSFLSPEHQKVQQRKESKKPPSKPQPR) and processed from a prepropeptide of 116 amino acids. To further elucidate molecular characteristics, we purified ghrelin peptides from mole stomach. By mass spectrometry, we found that the mole ghrelin peptides had higher ratios of the odd-number fatty acids (C9 and C11 as much as C8) attached to the third serine residue than other vertebrate ghrelin. Truncated forms of ghrelins such as [1-27], [1-19], [1-16] and [1-15], and that lacked the 14th glutamine residue (des-Gln14 ghrelin) were produced in the stomach. Marked expression of ghrelin mRNA in lung was observed as in stomach and brain. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the branch of M. imaizumii has slightly higher dN/dS ratios (the nucleotide substitution rates at non-synonymous and synonymous sites) than did other eulipotyphlans. Peptide length was positively correlated with human ghrelin receptor activation, whereas the length of fatty-acyl chains showed no obvious functional correlation. The basal higher luciferase activities of the 5'-proximal promoter region of mole ghrelin were detected in ghrelin-negative C2C12 cells and hypoxic culture conditions impaired transcriptional activity. These results indicated that moles have acquired diverse species of ghrelin probably through distinctive fatty acid metabolism because of their food preferences. The results provide a gateway to understanding ghrelin metabolism in fossorial animals. PMID:27102942

  12. Cloning of a type I cytokine receptor most related to the IL-2 receptor β chain

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Katsutoshi; Kikly, Kristine; Michalovich, David; Young, Peter R.; Leonard, Warren J.

    2000-01-01

    We have identified a type I cytokine receptor, which we have termed novel interleukin receptor (NILR), that is most related to the IL-2 receptor β chain (IL-2Rβ) and physically adjacent to the IL-4 receptor α chain gene on chromosome 16. NILR mRNA is most highly expressed in thymus and spleen, and is induced by phytohemagglutinin in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. NILR protein was detected on human T cell lymphotropic virus type I-transformed T cell lines, Raji B cells, and YT natural killer-like cells. Artificial homodimerization of the NILR cytoplasmic domain confers proliferation to Ba/F3 murine pro-B cells but not to 32D myeloid progenitor cells or CTLL-2 murine helper T cells. In these latter cells, heterodimerization of IL-2Rβ and the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) cytoplasmic domains allows potent proliferation, whereas such heterodimerization of NILR with γc does not. This finding suggests that NILR has signaling potential but that a full understanding of its signaling partner(s) is not yet clear. Like IL-2Rβ, NILR associates with Jak1 and mediates Stat5 activation. PMID:11016959

  13. Molecular cloning and expression of Corynebacterium glutamicum genes for amino acid synthesis in Escherichia coli cells

    SciTech Connect

    Beskrovnaya, O.Yu.; Fonshtein, M.Yu.; Kolibaba, L.G.; Yankovskii, N.K.; Debabov, V.G.

    1989-01-01

    Molecular cloning of Corynebacterium glutamicum genes for threonine and lysine synthesis has been done in Escherichia coli cells. The clonal library of EcoRI fragments of chromosomal DNA of C. glutamicum was constructed on the plasmid vector /lambda/pSL5. The genes for threonine and lysine synthesis were identified by complementation of E. coli mutations in thrB and lysA genes, respectively. Recombinant plasmids, isolated from independent ThrB/sup +/ clone have a common 4.1-kb long EcoRI DNA fragment. Hybrid plasmids isolated from LysA/sup +/ transductants of E. coli have common 2.2 and 3.3 kb long EcoRI fragments of C. glutamicum DNA. The hybrid plasmids consistently transduced the markers thrB/sup +/ and lysA/sup +/. The Southern hybridization analysis showed that the cloned DNA fragments hybridized with the fragments of identical length in C. glutamicum chromosomes.

  14. The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}7 subunit gene: Cloning, mapping, structure, and targeting in mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Orr-Urtreger, A.; Baldini, A.; Beaudet, A.L.

    1994-09-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}7 subunit is a member of a family of ligand-gated ion channels, and is the only subunit know to bind {alpha}-bungarotoxin in mammalian brain. {alpha}-Bungarotoxin binding sites are known to be more abundant in the hippocampus of mouse strains that are particularly sensitive to nicotine-induced seizures. The {alpha}7 receptor is highly permeable to calcium, which could suggest a role in synaptic plasticity in the nervous system. Auditory gating deficiency, an abnormal response to a second auditory stimulus, is characteristic of schizophrenia. Mouse strains that exhibit a similar gating deficit have reduced hippocampal expression of the {alpha}7 subunit. We have cloned and sequenced the full length cDNA for the mouse {alpha}7 gene (Acra-7) and characterized its gene structure. The murine {alpha}7 shares amino acid identity of 99% and 93% with the rat and human {alpha}7 subunits, respectively. Using an interspecies backcross panel, the murine gene was mapped to chromosome 7 near the p locus, a region syntenic with human chromosome 15; the human gene (CHRNA7) was confirmed to map to 15q13-q14 by FISH. To generate a mouse {alpha}7 mutant by homologous recombination, we have constructed a replacement vector which will delete transmembrane domains II-IV and the cytoplasmic domain from the gene product. Recombinant embryonic stem (ES) cell clones were selected and used to develop mouse chimeras that are currently being bred to obtain germline transmission.

  15. Development and characterization of an in vivo pathogenic molecular clone of equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Cook, R F; Leroux, C; Cook, S J; Berger, S L; Lichtenstein, D L; Ghabrial, N N; Montelaro, R C; Issel, C J

    1998-02-01

    An infectious nonpathogenic molecular clone (19-2-6A) of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) was modified by substitution of a 3.3-kbp fragment amplified by PCR techniques from a pathogenic variant (EIAV(PV)) of the cell culture-adapted strain of EIAV (EIAV(PR)). This substitution consisted of coding sequences for 77 amino acids at the carboxyl terminus of the integrase, the S1 (encoding the second exon of tat), S2, and S3 (encoding the second exon of rev) open reading frames, the complete env gene (including the first exon of rev), and the 3' long terminal repeat (LTR). Modified 19-2-6A molecular clones were designated EIAV(PV3.3), and infection of a single pony (678) with viruses derived from a mixture of five of these molecular clones induced clinical signs of acute equine infectious anemia (EIA) at 23 days postinfection (dpi). As a consequence of this initial study, a single molecular clone, EIAV(PV3.3#3) (redesignated EIAV(UK)), was selected for further study and inoculated into two ponies (613 and 614) and two horses (700 and 764). Pony 614 and the two horses developed febrile responses by 12 dpi, which was accompanied by a 48 to 64% reduction in platelet number, whereas pony 613 did not develop fever (40.6 degrees C) until 76 dpi. EIAV could be isolated from the plasma of these animals by 5 to 7 dpi, and all became seropositive for antibodies to this virus by 21 dpi. Analysis of the complete nucleotide sequence demonstrated that the 3.3-kbp 3' fragment of EIAV(UK) differed from the consensus sequence of EIAV(PV) by just a single amino acid residue in the second exon of the rev gene. Complete homology with the EIAV(PV) consensus sequence was observed in the hypervariable region of the LTR. However, EIAV(UK) was found to contain an unusual 68-bp nucleotide insertion/duplication in a normally conserved region of the LTR sequence. These results demonstrate that substitution of a 3.3-kbp fragment from the EIAV(PV) strain into the infectious nonpathogenic

  16. Cloning, characterization, and tissue distribution of prolactin receptor in the sea bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Santos, C R; Ingleton, P M; Cavaco, J E; Kelly, P A; Edery, M; Power, D M

    2001-01-01

    The prolactin receptor (PRLR) was cloned and its tissue distribution characterized in adults of the protandrous hermaphrodite marine teleost, the sea bream (Sparus aurata). An homologous cDNA probe for sea bream PRLR (sbPRLR) was obtained by RT-PCR using gill mRNA. This probe was used to screen intestine and kidney cDNA libraries from which two overlapping clones (1100 and 2425 bp, respectively) were obtained. These clones had 100% sequence identity in the overlapping region (893 bp) and were used to deduce the complete amino acid sequence of sbPRLR. The receptor spans 2640 bp and encodes a protein of 537 amino acids. Features characteristic of PRLR, two pairs of cysteines, WS box, hydrophobic transmembrane domain, box 1, and box 2, were identified and showed a high degree of sequence identity to PRLRs from other vertebrate species. SbPRLR is 29 and 32% identical to tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and goldfish (Carassius auratus) PRLRs, respectively. In the sea bream two PRLR transcripts of 2.8 and 3.2 kb were detected in the intestine, kidney, and gills and a single transcript of 2.8 kb was detected in skin and pituitary by Northern blot. Spermiating gonads (more than 95% male tissue; gonado-somatic index of 0.6) contained, in addition to the 2.8-kb transcript, three more transcripts of 1.9, 1.3, and 1.1 kb. RT-PCR, which is a far more sensitive method than Northern blot, detected PRLR mRNA in gills, intestine, brain, pituitary, kidney, liver, gonads, spleen, head-kidney, heart, muscle, and bone. Immunohistochemistry using specific polyclonal antibodies raised against an oligopeptide from the extracellular domain of sbPRLR detected PRLR in several epithelial tissues of juvenile sea bream, including the anterior gut, renal tubule, choroid membrane of the third ventricle, saccus vasculosus, branchial chloride cells, and branchial cartilage. PMID:11161768

  17. Structure of a cannabinoid receptor and functional expression of the cloned cDNA.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, L A; Lolait, S J; Brownstein, M J; Young, A C; Bonner, T I

    1990-08-01

    Marijuana and many of its constituent cannabinoids influence the central nervous system (CNS) in a complex and dose-dependent manner. Although CNS depression and analgesia are well documented effects of the cannabinoids, the mechanisms responsible for these and other cannabinoid-induced effects are not so far known. The hydrophobic nature of these substances has suggested that cannabinoids resemble anaesthetic agents in their action, that is, they nonspecifically disrupt cellular membranes. Recent evidence, however, has supported a mechanism involving a G protein-coupled receptor found in brain and neural cell lines, and which inhibits adenylate cyclase activity in a dose-dependent, stereoselective and pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. Also, the receptor is more responsive to psychoactive cannabinoids than to non-psychoactive cannabinoids. Here we report the cloning and expression of a complementary DNA that encodes a G protein-coupled receptor with all of these properties. Its messenger RNA is found in cell lines and regions of the brain that have cannabinoid receptors. These findings suggest that this protein is involved in cannabinoid-induced CNS effects (including alterations in mood and cognition) experienced by users of marijuana. PMID:2165569

  18. Molecular cloning and bioinformatic analysis of SPATA4 gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shang-feng; Ai, Chao; Ge, Zhong-qi; Liu, Hai-luo; Liu, Bo-wen; He, Shan; Wang, Zhao

    2005-11-30

    Full-length cDNA sequences of four novel SPATA4 genes in chimpanzee, cow, chicken and ascidian were identified by bioinformatic analysis using mouse or human SPATA4 cDNA fragment as electronic probe. All these genes have 6 exons and have similar protein molecular weight and do not localize in sex chromosome. The mouse SPATA4 sequence is identified as significantly changed in cryptorchidism, which shares no significant homology with any known protein in swissprot databases except for the homologous genes in various vertebrates. Our searching results showed that all SPATA4 proteins have a putative conserved domain DUF1042. The percentages of putative SPATA4 protein sequence identity ranging from 30 % to 99 %. The high similarity was also found in 1 kb promoter regions of human, mouse and rat SPATA4 gene. The similarities of the sequences upstream of SPATA4 promoter also have a high proportion. The results of searching SymAtlas (http://symatlas.gnf.org/SymAtlas/) showed that human SPATA4 has a high expression in testis, especially in testis interstitial, leydig cell, seminiferous tubule and germ cell. Mouse SPATA4 was observed exclusively in adult mouse testis and almost no signal was detected in other tissues. The pI values of the protein are negative, ranging from 9.44 to 10.15. The subcellular location of the protein is usually in the nucleus. And the signal peptide possibilities for SPATA4 are always zero. Using the SNPs data in NCBI, we found 33 SNPs in human SPATA4 gene genomic DNA region, with the distribution of 29 SNPs in the introns. CpG island searching gives the data about CpG island, which shows that the regions of the CpG island have a high similarity with each other, though the length of the CpG island is different from each other. This research is a fundamental work in the fields of the bioinformational analysis, and also put forward a new way for the bioinformatic analysis of other genes. PMID:16336790

  19. [Molecular structure of luminal diuretic receptors].

    PubMed

    Gamba, G

    1995-01-01

    Since day to day sodium and water intake is more or less constant, the output by urinary sodium excretion is the key to maintain extracellular fluid volume within physiologic ranges. To achieve this goal, the kidneys ensure that most of the large quantities of filtered sodium are reabsorbed, a function that takes place in the proximal tubule, the loop of Henle and the distal tubule, and then the kidneys adjust the small amount of sodium that is excreted in urine in such a way that sodium balance is maintained. This adjustment occurs in the collecting duct. Three groups of diuretic-sensitive sodium transport mechanisms have been identified in the apical membranes of the distal nephron based on their different sensitivities to diuretics and requirements for chloride and potassium: 1) the sulfamoylbenzoic (or bumetanide)-sensitive Na+:K+:2CI- and Na+:CI- symporters in the thick ascending loop of Henle; 2) the benzothiadiazine (or thiazide)-sensitive Na+:CI- cotransporter in the distal tubule; and 3) the amiloride-sensitive Na+ channel in the collecting tubule. The inhibition of any one of these proteins by diuretics results in increased sodium urinary excretion. Recently, the use of molecular biology techniques, specially the functional expression cloning in Xenopus laevis oocytes, has led to the identification of cDNA's encoding members of the three groups of diuretic-sensitive transport proteins. The present paper reviews the primary structure and some aspects of the relationship between structure and function of these transporters as well as the new protein families emerging from these sequences. It also discusses the future implications of these discoveries on the physiology and pathophysiology of kidney disease and sodium retaining states. PMID:7569367

  20. Molecular cloning of a putative tetrodotoxin-resistant rat heart Na+ channel isoform.

    PubMed Central

    Rogart, R B; Cribbs, L L; Muglia, L K; Kephart, D D; Kaiser, M W

    1989-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels in mammalian heart differ from those in nerve and skeletal muscle. One major difference is that tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant cardiac Na+ channels are blocked by 1-10 microM TTX, whereas TTX-sensitive nerve Na+ channels are blocked by nanomolar TTX concentrations. We constructed a cDNA library from 6-day-old rat hearts, where only low-affinity [3H]saxitoxin receptors, corresponding to TTX-resistant Na+ channels, were detected. We isolated several overlapping cDNA clones encompassing 7542 nucleotides and encoding the entire alpha subunit of a cardiac-specific Na+ channel isoform (designated rat heart I) as well as several rat brain I Na+ channel cDNA clones. The derived amino acid sequence of rat heart I was highly homologous to, but distinct from, previous Na+ channel clones. RNase protection studies showed that the corresponding mRNA species is abundant in newborn and adult rat hearts, but not detectable in brain or innervated skeletal muscle. The same mRNA species appears upon denervation of skeletal muscle, likely accounting for expression of new TTX-resistant Na+ channels. Thus, this cardiac-specific Na+ channel clone appears to encode a distinct TTX-resistant isoform and is another member of the mammalian Na+ channel multigene family, found in newborn heart and denervated skeletal muscles. Images PMID:2554302

  1. Cloning and olfactory expression of progestin receptors in the Chinese black sleeper Bostrichthys sinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu Ting; Liu, Dong Teng; Zhu, Yong; Chen, Shi Xi; Hong, Wan Shu

    2016-05-01

    Our previous studies suggested that 17α,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (DHP), an oocyte maturation inducing progestin, also acts as a sex pheromone in Chinese black sleeper Bostrichthys sinensis, a fish species that inhabits intertidal zones and mates and spawns inside a muddy burrow. The electro-olfactogram response to DHP increased during the breeding season. In the present study, we cloned the cDNAs of the nine progestin receptors (pgr, paqr5, 6, 7(a, b), 8, 9, pgrmc1, 2) from B. sinensis, analyzed their tissue distribution, and determined the expression in the olfactory rosette during the reproductive cycle in female and male fish. The deduced amino acid sequences of the nine progestin receptors share high sequence identities with those of other fish species and relatively lower homology with their mammalian counterparts, and phylogenetic analyses classified the nine B. sinensis progestin receptors into their respective progestin receptor groups. Tissue distribution of B. sinensis progestin receptors showed differential expression patterns, but all these nine genes were expressed in the olfactory rosette. Interestingly, paqr5 mRNA was found in the intermediate and basal parts of the olfactory epithelium but not in the central core using in situ hybridization, and its expression level was the highest in the olfactory rosette among the tissues examined. These results suggested Paqr5 may have an important role for transmitting progestin signaling in the olfactory system. The expression levels of paqr7a and paqr7b, pgr and pgrmc2 mRNA peaked around the mid meiotic stage, and that of paqr8 peaked at late meiotic stage in the olfactory rosette in males, while the olfactory expression of paqr5 decreased gradually as spermatogenesis progressed. In contrast, the expression of the progestin receptors did not change significantly during the development of the ovary in the olfactory rosette in females, except that of pgr. Interestingly, the changes of paqr8 expression in

  2. Particle infectivity of HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones in a subtype C heterosexual transmission pair following high fidelity amplification and unbiased cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Deymier, Martin J.; Claiborne, Daniel T.; Ende, Zachary; Ratner, Hannah K.; Kilembe, William; Hunter, Eric

    2014-11-15

    The high genetic diversity of HIV-1 impedes high throughput, large-scale sequencing and full-length genome cloning by common restriction enzyme based methods. Applying novel methods that employ a high-fidelity polymerase for amplification and an unbiased fusion-based cloning strategy, we have generated several HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones from an epidemiologically linked transmission pair. These clones represent the transmitted/founder virus and phylogenetically diverse non-transmitted variants from the chronically infected individual's diverse quasispecies near the time of transmission. We demonstrate that, using this approach, PCR-induced mutations in full-length clones derived from their cognate single genome amplicons are rare. Furthermore, all eight non-transmitted genomes tested produced functional virus with a range of infectivities, belying the previous assumption that a majority of circulating viruses in chronic HIV-1 infection are defective. Thus, these methods provide important tools to update protocols in molecular biology that can be universally applied to the study of human viral pathogens. - Highlights: • Our novel methodology demonstrates accurate amplification and cloning of full-length HIV-1 genomes. • A majority of plasma derived HIV variants from a chronically infected individual are infectious. • The transmitted/founder was more infectious than the majority of the variants from the chronically infected donor.

  3. Structural and Molecular Modeling Features of P2X Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Luiz Anastacio; da Silva, João Herminio Martins; Ferreira, Dinarte Neto Moreira; Fidalgo-Neto, Antonio Augusto; Teixeira, Pedro Celso Nogueira; de Souza, Cristina Alves Magalhães; Caffarena, Ernesto Raúl; de Freitas, Mônica Santos

    2014-01-01

    Currently, adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) is recognized as the extracellular messenger that acts through P2 receptors. P2 receptors are divided into two subtypes: P2Y metabotropic receptors and P2X ionotropic receptors, both of which are found in virtually all mammalian cell types studied. Due to the difficulty in studying membrane protein structures by X-ray crystallography or NMR techniques, there is little information about these structures available in the literature. Two structures of the P2X4 receptor in truncated form have been solved by crystallography. Molecular modeling has proven to be an excellent tool for studying ionotropic receptors. Recently, modeling studies carried out on P2X receptors have advanced our knowledge of the P2X receptor structure-function relationships. This review presents a brief history of ion channel structural studies and shows how modeling approaches can be used to address relevant questions about P2X receptors. PMID:24637936

  4. Molecular Mechanisms of Opioid Receptor-Dependent Signaling and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hasani, Ream; Bruchas, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Opioid receptors have been targeted for the treatment of pain and related disorders for thousands of years, and remain the most widely used analgesics in the clinic. Mu (μ), kappa (κ), and delta (δ) opioid receptors represent the originally classified receptor subtypes, with opioid receptor like-1 (ORL1) being the least characterized. All four receptors are G-protein coupled, and activate inhibitory G-proteins. These receptors form homo- and hetereodimeric complexes, signal to kinase cascades, and scaffold a variety of proteins. In this review, we discuss classical mechanisms and developments in understanding opioid tolerance, opioid receptor signaling, and highlight advances in opioid molecular pharmacology, behavioral pharmacology, and human genetics. We put into context how opioid receptor signaling leads to the modulation of behavior with the potential for therapeutic intervention. Finally, we conclude that there is a continued need for more translational work on opioid receptors in vivo. PMID:22020140

  5. Immersing Undergraduate Students in the Research Experience: A Practical Laboratory Module on Molecular Cloning of Microbial Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jack T. H.; Schembri, Mark A.; Ramakrishna, Mathitha; Sagulenko, Evgeny; Fuerst, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular cloning skills are an essential component of biological research, yet students often do not receive this training during their undergraduate studies. This can be attributed to the complexities of the cloning process, which may require many weeks of progressive design and experimentation. To address this issue, we incorporated an…

  6. Cloning of a putative G-protein-coupled receptor from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Josefsson, L G; Rask, L

    1997-10-15

    We have cloned and characterized a cDNA from Arabidopsis thaliana that most likely encodes a novel member of the vast superfamily of G-protein-coupled receptor proteins (GPCRs). By taking advantage of amino acid sequence similarities between plant expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and established G-protein-coupled receptor sequences, a probe was obtained which was used for the screening of an Arabidopsis cDNA library. The cDNA which was found is very infrequently represented in the cDNA library, suggesting a low and/or spatially restricted expression. A region of the translated sequence of the cDNA shows the highest similarity to cAMP receptors from the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. The same region is also similar to that in members of the animal calcitonin family of receptors. Another region of the putative receptor, however, is similar to sequences of serotonin receptors and other receptors of the so-called rhodopsin family of GPCRs. The rhodopsin family has numerous members in higher vertebrate species. Alignments and phylogenetic analyses of the regions of similarity yielded results in accordance with other evolutionary considerations. Our cDNA thus occurred on a distinct major branch in relation to the rest of the rhodopsin family. In relation to the calcitonin family, our cDNA and cAMP receptors occurred together on a distinct major branch but appear to have diverged from each other shortly after their divergence from the rest of the calcitonin family. Other features further argue for a tentative identification of it as a GPCR. It displays seven discrete and strongly predicted transmembrane domains when analyzed in hydropathy plots. The preferred orientation is with the amino terminus towards the outside. It has one Cys residue in extracellular loop 1 and another in extracellular loop 2. Cys residues in these loops are known to form disulfide bridges in many other GPCRs. Finally, it has several fully conserved amino acids that belong to the most conserved

  7. Cloning and expression profile of ionotropic receptors in the parasitoid wasp Microplitis mediator (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan-Ning; Peng, Yong; Lu, Zi-Yun; Dhiloo, Khalid Hussain; Zheng, Yao; Shan, Shuang; Li, Rui-Jun; Zhang, Yong-Jun; Guo, Yu-Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Ionotropic receptors (IRs) mainly detect the acids and amines having great importance in many insect species, representing an ancient olfactory receptor family in insects. In the present work, we performed RNAseq of Microplitis mediator antennae and identified seventeen IRs. Full-length MmedIRs were cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis of the Hymenoptera IRs revealed that ten MmedIR genes encoded "antennal IRs" and seven encoded "divergent IRs". Among the IR25a orthologous groups, two genes, MmedIR25a.1 and MmedIR25a.2, were found in M. mediator. Gene structure analysis of MmedIR25a revealed a tandem duplication of IR25a in M. mediator. The tissue distribution and development specific expression of the MmedIR genes suggested that these genes showed a broad expression profile. Quantitative gene expression analysis showed that most of the genes are highly enriched in adult antennae, indicating the candidate chemosensory function of this family in parasitic wasps. Using immunocytochemistry, we confirmed that one co-receptor, MmedIR8a, was expressed in the olfactory sensory neurons. Our data will supply fundamental information for functional analysis of the IRs in parasitoid wasp chemoreception. PMID:27208597

  8. Cloning and expression of a human kidney cDNA for an /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor subtype

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, J.W.; Kobilka, T.S.; Yang-Feng, T.L.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.; Kobilka, B.K.

    1988-09-01

    An /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor subtype has been cloned from a human kidney cDNA library using the gene for the human platelet /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor as a probe. The deduced amino acid sequence resembles the human platelet /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor and is consistent with the structure of other members of he family of guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled receptors. The cDNA was expressed in a mammalian cell line (COS-7), and the /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic ligand (/sup 3/H)rauwolscine was bound. Competition curve analysis with a variety of adrenergic ligands suggests that this cDNA clone represents the /alpha//sub 2/B-adrenergic receptor. The gene for this receptor is on human chromosome 4, whereas the gene for the human platelet /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor (/alpha//sub 2/A) lies on chromosome 10. This ability to express the receptor in mammalian cells, free of other adrenergic receptor subtypes, should help in developing more selective /alpha/-adrenergic ligands.

  9. Molecular cloning and expression of an Erwinia sp. gene encoding diphenyl ether cleavage in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Liaw, H J; Srinivasan, V R

    1989-01-01

    A 2.1-kilobase fragment obtained by restriction enzyme HindIII digestion of Erwinia sp. genomic DNA was cloned into plasmid pUC19 and introduced into Escherichia coli by transformation. The transformants with diphenyl ether cleaving activity (Dpe+) were selected on agar plates with a specially designed medium (LTFN) containing 4-nitrodiphenyl ether. The positive clones showed a clear zone around the colonies. Analysis of mutants obtained by transposon mini-Mu dI(lacZ Kmr) mutagenesis indicated the coding region of the gene (dpe) and the utilization of a lacZ promoter of pUC19 for transcription of dpe. Clones with dpe in the opposite orientation in pUC19 were not expressed, confirming the need for a lacZ promoter. Utilization of a lacZ promoter in pUC19 was further confirmed by the observation that the degradation of 4-nitrodiphenyl ether was enhanced in the presence of isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside. Expression of dpe was also found in pDPE7321, generated from cloning this gene into another plasmid, pSP73. Analysis of the plasmid-encoded proteins by the maxicell technique showed a polypeptide of 21,000 molecular weight as the product of dpe. Images PMID:2679381

  10. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: molecular cloning of genomic RNA and its diagnostic application

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, K.V.

    1987-01-01

    Molecular cloning of a field isolate of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain 72 RNA was done in this study. The sensitivity and specificity of cloned cDNA sequences in hybridization assays with various BVDV strains were determined. cDNA was synthesized from polyadenylated BVDV RNA templates with oligo-dT primers, reverse transcriptase, and DNA polymerase I. The newly synthesized double-stranded BVDV cDNA was C-tailed with terminal deoxytransferase and annealed into G-tailed, Pst-1-cut pUC9 plasmid. Escherichia coli was transformed with the recombinant plasmids and a library of approximately 200 BVDV specific cDNA clones varying in length from 0.5 to 2.6 kilobases were isolated. The sensitivity and specificity of hybridization between the labelled cDNA and BVDV target sequences were determined. Cloned BVDV sequences were isolated from pUC9 plasmid DNA and labelled with /sup 32/P by nick translation. The detection limit by dot blot hybridization assay was 20 pg of purified genomic BVDV RNA. cDNA hybridization probes were specific for all strains of BVDV tested, regardless of whether they were noncytopathic and cytopathic, but did not hybridize with heterologous bovine viruses tested. Probes did not hybridize with uninfected cell culture or cellular RNA. Hybridization probes were at least as sensitive as infectivity assays in detecting homologous virus.

  11. Cloning, expression and functional analysis of the duck Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) gene

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuqiang; Sun, Yingjie; Wang, Hengan; Shi, Shuduan; Yan, Yaxian; Li, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) is responsible for the recognition of bacterial flagellin in vertebrates. In the present study, the first TLR5 gene in duck was cloned. The open reading frame (ORF) of duck TLR5 (dTLR5) cDNA is 2580 bp and encodes a polypeptide of 859 amino acids. We also cloned partial sequences of myeloid differentiation factor 88, 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), and myxovirus resistance (Mx) genes from duck. dTLR5 mRNA was highly expressed in the bursa of Fabricius, spleen, trachea, lung, jejunum, rectum, and skin; moderately expressed in the muscular and glandular tissues, duodenum, ileum, caecum, and pancreas; and minimally expressed in the heart, liver, kidney, and muscle. DF-1 or HeLa cells transfected with DNA constructs encoding dTLR5 can activate NF-κB leading to the activation of interleukin-6 (IL-6) promoter. When we challenged ducks with a Herts33 Newcastle disease virus (NDV), mRNA transcription of the antiviral molecules Mx, Double stranded RNA activated protein kinase (PKR), and OAS was up-regulated in the liver, lung, and spleen 1 and 2 days post-inoculation. PMID:25269719

  12. Cloning and functional expression of the equine luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotrophin receptor.

    PubMed

    Saint-Dizier, Marie; Foulon-Gauze, Florence; Lecompte, François; Combarnous, Yves; Chopineau, Maryse

    2004-12-01

    Pituitary equine luteinizing hormone (eLH) and fetal chorionic gonadotrophin (eCG) have identical polypeptidic chains, but different linked carbohydrates. In equine tissues, eCG and eLH bind only to the LH/CG receptor (eLH/CG-R) and have no FSH activity. However, radio-receptor assays on equine luteal or testicular tissues have shown that eCG binds to the eLH/CG-R with only 2-4% of the binding activity of eLH. In order to study the structure-function relationship of eLH and eCG in a homologous system, we undertook the cloning and functional expression of the eLH/CG-R. Based on sequence homologies among mammalian sequences for the LH/CG-R, overlapping partial fragments of LH/CG-R cDNAs were obtained from mare luteal RNA using reverse transcription-PCR and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends. Ligations of the partial cDNA fragments encoded a part of the signal peptide followed by a putative 672 amino acid eLH/CG-R mature protein. The mature eLH/CG-R displayed 88.2-92.8% overall sequence homology with the other mammalian LH/CG-Rs and contained one unique seventh N-glycosylation site in its extracellular domain. COS-7 cells were transiently transfected with a cDNA construct encoding an engineered complete signal peptide and the mature eLH/CG-R. Membrane preparations from transfected COS-7 cells bound 125I-eLH with high affinity (Kd 3.8 x 10(-10) M). On a molar basis, eCG competed with 125I-eLH on membrane preparations with only 12.4% of the eLH binding activity. In transfected COS-7, both eLH and eCG increased the extracellular cAMP concentration in a dose-dependent manner, whereas eFSH did not. Furthermore, on a molar basis, eCG stimulated cAMP production with only 13.9% of the eLH stimulating activity. We conclude that the cloned cDNA encodes a The differences functional eLH/CG-R. between eLH and eCG activities towards this receptor will be useful in studies of the influence of carbohydrates on gonadotrophin receptor binding and activation. PMID:15590981

  13. Molecular determinants of NMDA receptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Roche, K W; Standley, S; McCallum, J; Dune Ly, C; Ehlers, M D; Wenthold, R J

    2001-08-01

    Although synaptic AMPA receptors have been shown to rapidly internalize, synaptic NMDA receptors are reported to be static. It is not certain whether NMDA receptor stability at synaptic sites is an inherent property of the receptor, or is due to stabilization by scaffolding proteins. In this study, we demonstrate that NMDA receptors are internalized in both heterologous cells and neurons, and we define an internalization motif, YEKL, on the distal C-terminus of NR2B. In addition, we show that the synaptic protein PSD-95 inhibits NR2B-mediated internalization, and that deletion of the PDZ-binding domain of NR2B increases internalization in neurons. This suggests an involvement for PSD-95 in NMDA receptor regulation and an explanation for NMDA receptor stability at synaptic sites. PMID:11477425

  14. Molecular evolution of GPCRs: Ghrelin/ghrelin receptors.

    PubMed

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2014-06-01

    After the discovery in 1996 of the GH secretagogue-receptor type-1a (GHS-R1a) as an orphan G-protein coupled receptor, many research groups attempted to identify the endogenous ligand. Finally, Kojima and colleagues successfully isolated the peptide ligand from rat stomach extracts, determined its structure, and named it ghrelin. The GHS-R1a is now accepted to be the ghrelin receptor. The existence of the ghrelin system has been demonstrated in many animal classes through biochemical and molecular biological strategies as well as through genome projects. Our work, focused on identifying the ghrelin receptor and its ligand ghrelin in laboratory animals, particularly nonmammalian vertebrates, has provided new insights into the molecular evolution of the ghrelin receptor. In mammals, it is assumed that the ghrelin receptor evolution is in line with the plate tectonics theory. In contrast, the evolution of the ghrelin receptor in nonmammalian vertebrates differs from that of mammals: multiplicity of the ghrelin receptor isoforms is observed in nonmammalian vertebrates only. This multiplicity is due to genome duplication and polyploidization events that particularly occurred in Teleostei. Furthermore, it is likely that the evolution of the ghrelin receptor is distinct from that of its ligand, ghrelin, because only one ghrelin isoform has been detected in all species examined so far. In this review, we summarize current knowledge related to the molecular evolution of the ghrelin receptor in mammalian and nonmammalian vertebrates. PMID:24353285

  15. A dedicated database program for cataloging recombinant clones and other laboratory products of molecular biology technology.

    PubMed

    Jenson, H B

    1989-06-01

    A novel computer database program dedicated to storing, cataloging, and accessing information about recombinant clones and libraries has been developed for the IBM (or compatible) personal computer. This program, named CLONES, also stores information about bacterial strains and plasmid and bacteriophage vectors used in molecular biology. The advantages of this method are improved organization of data, fast and easy assimilation of new data, automatic association of new data with existing data, and rapid retrieval of desired records using search criteria specified by the user. Individual records are indexed in the database using B-trees, which automatically index new entries and expedite later access. The use of multiple windows, pull-down menus, scrolling pick-lists, and field-input techniques make the program intuitive to understand and easy to use. Daughter databases can be created to include all records of a particular type, or only those records matching user-specified search criteria. Separate databases can also be merged into a larger database. This computer program provides an easy-to-use and accurate means to organize, maintain, access, and share information about recombinant clones and other laboratory products of molecular biology technology. PMID:2631777

  16. Particle infectivity of HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones in a subtype C heterosexual transmission pair following high fidelity amplification and unbiased cloning

    PubMed Central

    Deymier, Martin J.; Claiborne, Daniel T.; Ende, Zachary; Ratner, Hannah K.; Kilembe, William; Allen, Susan; Hunter, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The high genetic diversity of HIV-1 impedes high throughput, large-scale sequencing and full-length genome cloning by common restriction enzyme based methods. Applying novel methods that employ a high-fidelity polymerase for amplification and an unbiased fusion-based cloning strategy, we have generated several HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones from an epidemiologically linked transmission pair. These clones represent the transmitted/founder virus and phylogenetically diverse non-transmitted variants from the chronically infected individual's diverse quasispecies near the time of transmission. We demonstrate that, using this approach, PCR-induced mutations in full-length clones derived from their cognate single genome amplicons are rare. Furthermore, all eight non-transmitted genomes tested produced functional virus with a range of infectivities, belying the previous assumption that a majority of circulating viruses in chronic HIV-1 infection are defective. Thus, these methods provide important tools to update protocols in molecular biology that could be universally applied to the study of human viral pathogens. PMID:25243334

  17. Molecular characterization of cloned variants of Coxiella burnetii isolated in China.

    PubMed

    Ning, Z; Yu, S R; Quan, Y G; Xue, Z

    1992-03-01

    To study the molecular properties of Coxiella burnetii phase variants we cloned the phase variants of C. burnetii Qiyi (CBQY) strain by the red plaque technique. Three cloned strains, CBQYIC3 (phase I), CBQYIIC7 (phase II) and CBQYIIC5 (semirough-phase) were analysed by SDS-PAGE, immunoblot assay, plasmid isolation and agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA restriction fragments. The results suggest that the unique phase-dependent substance is a lipopolysaccharide and that most protein components of phase I and phase II cells are shared. No significant differences of DNA restriction fragments were found between clonal isolates of phase I and phase II C. burnetii CBQY strains. A plasmid of approximately 56 Kb was isolated from both phase I and phase II variants indicating that phase variation probably could not be attributed to its presence or absence. PMID:1359769

  18. CD8+ T-cell clones deficient in the expression of the CD45 protein tyrosine phosphatase have impaired responses to T-cell receptor stimuli.

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, C T; Pingel, J T; Nelson, J O; Thomas, M L

    1991-01-01

    CD45 is a high-molecular-weight transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase expressed only by nucleated cells of hematopoietic origin. To examine function, mouse CD8+ cytolytic T-cell clones were derived that had a specific defect in the expression of CD45. Northern (RNA) blot analysis indicates that the CD45 deficiency is due to either a transcriptional defect or mRNA instability. The CD45-deficient cells were greatly diminished in their ability to respond to antigen. All functional parameters of T-cell receptor signalling analyzed (cytolysis of targets, proliferation, and cytokine production) were markedly diminished. A CD45+ revertant was isolated, and the ability to respond to antigen was restored. These results support a central and immediate role for this transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase in T-cell receptor signalling. Images PMID:1652055

  19. Cloning and mapping of the mouse {alpha}7-neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Orr-Urtreger, A.; Baldini, A.; Beaudet, A.L.

    1995-03-20

    We report the isolation of cDNA clones for the mouse {alpha}7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit (gene symbol Acra7), the only nicotinic receptor subunit known to bind a-bungarotoxin in mammalian brain. This gene may have relevance to nicotine sensitivity and to some electrophysiologic findings in schizophrenia. The mouse {alpha}7 subunit gene encodes a protein of 502 amino acids with substantial identity to the rat (99.6%), human (92.8%), and chicken (87.5%) amino acid sequences. The {alpha}7 gene was mapped to mouse chromosome 7 near the p locus with the following gene order from proximal to distal: Myod1-3.5 {+-}1.7 cM-Gas2-0.9 cM {+-} 0.9 cM-D7Mit70-1.8 {+-} 1.2 cM- Acra7-4.4 {+-}1.0 cM-Hras1-ps11/Igf1r/Snrp2a. The human gene was confirmed to map to the homologous region of human chromosome 15q13-q14. 26 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Molecular tracking of antigen-specific T cell clones in neurological immune-mediated disorders

    PubMed Central

    Muraro, Paolo A.; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Bielekova, Bibiana; Gran, Bruno; Marques, Adriana; Utz, Ursula; McFarland, Henry F.; Jacobson, Steve; Martin, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Summary T cells recognizing self or microbial antigens may trigger or reactivate immune-mediated diseases. Monitoring the frequency of specific T cell clonotypes to assess a possible link with the course of disease has been a difficult task with currently available technology. Our goal was to track individual candidate pathogenic T cell clones, selected on the basis of previous extensive studies from patients with immune-mediated disorders of the CNS, including multiple sclerosis, HTLV-I associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/ TSP) and chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis. We developed and applied a highly specific and sensitive technique to track single CD4+ and CD8+ T cell clones through the detection and quantification of T cell receptor (TCR) α or β chain complementarity-determining region 3 transcripts by real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR. We examined the frequency of the candidate pathogenic T cell clones in the peripheral blood and CSF during the course of neurological disease. Using this approach, we detected variations of clonal frequencies that appeared to be related to clinical course, significant enrichment in the CSF, or both. By integrating clono-type tracking with direct visualization of antigen-specific staining, we showed that a single T cell clone contributed substantially to the overall recognition of the viral peptide/MHC complex in a patient with HAM/ TSP. T cell clonotype tracking is a powerful new technology enabling further elucidation of the dynamics of expansion of autoreactive or pathogen-specific T cells that mediate pathological or protective immune responses in neurological disorders. PMID:12477694

  1. Cloning of the cat TSH receptor and evidence against an autoimmune etiology of feline hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Lynda Q; Arseven, Onur Karamanoglu; Gerber, Hans; Stein, Barbara S; Jameson, J Larry; Kopp, Peter

    2002-02-01

    Cats are the only nonhuman mammalian species with a high incidence of hyperthyroidism, and a better understanding of the pathogenesis of feline hyperthyroidism is of clinical relevance for veterinary medicine. The etiology of this disease in cats remains controversial. Both an intrinsic autonomy of growth and function of follicular cells as well as an autoimmune-related mechanism have been proposed. To explore the role of the autologous TSH receptor (TSHR) in the pathogenesis of hyperthyroidism in cats, we cloned the coding sequence of the feline TSHR by RT-PCR. The open reading frame consists of 2292 nucleotides and encodes a 763-amino acid protein, one amino acid less than the human TSHR. Species comparison reveals that the cat TSHR is most closely related to the canine TSHR, with 96% identity and 97% similarity in amino acid sequence. cAMP accumulation, inositol phosphate production, and TSH binding were similar in the feline TSHR, compared with the human receptor. Analogous to the human TSHR, the cat TSHR also displays basal constitutive activity. To test the possibility that hyperthyroid cats develop antibodies that stimulate the autologous receptor, transfected cells expressing the feline TSHR were treated with sera or purified IgG obtained from 16 hyperthyroid cats. There was no increase in cAMP-dependent luciferase activity in the hyperthyroid cats, suggesting the absence of stimulatory autoantibodies. These sera were also negative for TSH-binding inhibitory Igs in an RRA. At least in the animals included in this study, there is no evidence for the presence of circulating thyroid stimulating factors as a mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of feline hyperthyroidism, and the findings support a model involving intrinsic autonomy of thyroid follicular cell growth and function. PMID:11796491

  2. Molecular transformation, gene cloning, and gene expression systems for filamentous fungi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gold, Scott E.; Duick, John W.; Redman, Regina S.; Rodriguez, Rusty J.

    2001-01-01

    This chapter discusses the molecular transformation, gene cloning, and gene expression systems for filamentous fungi. Molecular transformation involves the movement of discrete amounts of DNA into cells, the expression of genes on the transported DNA, and the sustainable replication of the transforming DNA. The ability to transform fungi is dependent on the stable replication and expression of genes located on the transforming DNA. Three phenomena observed in bacteria, that is, competence, plasmids, and restriction enzymes to facilitate cloning, were responsible for the development of molecular transformation in fungi. Initial transformation success with filamentous fungi, involving the complementation of auxotrophic mutants by exposure to sheared genomic DNA or RNA from wt isolates, occurred with low transformation efficiencies. In addition, it was difficult to retrieve complementing DNA fragments and isolate genes of interest. This prompted the development of transformation vectors and methods to increase efficiencies. The physiological studies performed with fungi indicated that the cell wall could be removed to generate protoplasts. It was evident that protoplasts could be transformed with significantly greater efficiencies than walled cells.

  3. A simple and rapid strategy for the molecular cloning and monitoring of mouse HtrA2 serine protease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Goo-Young; Nam, Min-Kyung; Kim, Sang-Soo; Kim, Ho-Young; Lee, Sang-Kyu; Rhim, Hyangshuk

    2008-03-01

    A simple and rapid strategy for molecular cloning using a gel-free and antibiotic selection method is described which allows for the complete elimination of DNA extraction by gel electrophoresis, and thus has several advantages over gel-based cloning methods, including: (i) a cloning efficiency that is approximately 10-times higher due to the prevention of ethidium bromide ultraviolet-induced DNA damage and contamination with ligase inhibitors; (ii) the amount of plasmid DNA required is approximately five times less; and (iii) the cloning time is several hours less. Once the target gene, such as mouse HtrA2 serine protease, was cloned into the pEGFP-N3 plasmid, the integrity of the kanamycin-resistant molecular clone encoding the GFP fusion protein was verified by immunoblot and immunofluorescence assays. In addition, the integrity of the ampicillin-resistant molecular clone was directly evaluated by analyzing the expression and affinity purification of the GST fusion protein and by measuring its enzymatic activity. Therefore, this method is suitable for the routine construction of a plasmid expressing the gene of interest, and the usefulness of this strategy can be demonstrated by monitoring the expression of the target gene in E. coli and mammalian cells. PMID:17939055

  4. Virtual Screening of Receptor Sites for Molecularly Imprinted Polymers.

    PubMed

    Bates, Ferdia; Cela-Pérez, María Concepción; Karim, Kal; Piletsky, Sergey; López-Vilariño, José Manuel

    2016-08-01

    Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs) are highly advantageous in the field of analytical chemistry. However, interference from secondary molecules can also impede capture of a target by a MIP receptor. This greatly complicates the design process and often requires extensive laboratory screening which is time consuming, costly, and creates substantial waste products. Herein, is presented a new technique for screening of "virtually imprinted receptors" for rebinding of the molecular template as well as secondary structures, correlating the virtual predictions with experimentally acquired data in three case studies. This novel technique is particularly applicable to the evaluation and prediction of MIP receptor specificity and efficiency in complex aqueous systems. PMID:27076379

  5. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of a 10-epi-junenol synthase from Inula hupehensis.

    PubMed

    Gou, Jun-Bo; Li, Zhen-Qiu; Li, Chang-Fu; Chen, Fang-Fang; Lv, Shi-You; Zhang, Yan-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Junenol based-eudesmanolides have been detected in many compositae plant species and were reported to exhibit various pharmacological activities. So far, the gene encoding junenol synthase has never been isolated. Here we report the molecular cloning and functional analysis of a 10-epi-junenol synthase from Inula hupehensis (designated IhsTPS1). IhsTPS1 converts the substrate farnesyl diphosphate into multiple sesquiterpenes with the product 10-epi-junenol being predominant. The transcript levels of IhsTPS1 correlate well with the accumulation pattern of 10-epi-junenol in I. hupehensis organs, supporting its biochemical roles in vivo. PMID:27231873

  6. Molecular cloning, expression, and characterization of endoglucanase genes from Fibrobacter succinogenes AR1.

    PubMed Central

    Cavicchioli, R; Watson, K

    1991-01-01

    A cosmid gene library was constructed in Escherichia coli from genomic DNA isolated from the ruminal anaerobe Fibrobacter succinogenes AR1. Clones were screened on carboxymethyl cellulose, and 8 colonies that produced large clearing zones and 25 colonies that produced small clearing zones were identified. Southern blot hybridization revealed the existence of at least three separate genes encoding cellulase activity. pRC093, which is representative of cosmid clones that produce large clearing zones, was subcloned in pGem-1, and the resulting hybrid pRCEH directed synthesis of endoglucanase activity localized on a 2.1-kb EcoRI-HindIII insert. Activity was expressed from this fragment when it was cloned in both orientations in pGem-1 and pGem-2, indicating that F. succinogenes promoters functioned successfully in E. coli. A high level of endoglucanase activity was detected on acid-swollen cellulose, ball-milled cellulose, and carboxymethyl cellulose; and a moderate level was detected on filter paper, Avicel, lichenan, and xylan. Most activity (80%) was localized in the periplasm of E. coli, with low but significant levels (16%) being detected in the extracellular medium. The periplasmic endoglucanase had an estimated molecular weight of 46,500, had an optimum temperature of 39 degrees C, and exhibited activity over a broad pH range, with a maximum at pH 5.0. Images PMID:2014986

  7. Molecular cloning, expression, and sequence of the pilin gene from nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae M37.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, T; Grass, S; Munson, R

    1991-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae M37 adheres to human buccal epithelial cells and exhibits mannose-resistant hemagglutination of human erythrocytes. An isogenic variant of this strain which was deficient in hemagglutination was isolated. A protein with an apparent molecular weight of 22,000 was present in the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel profile of sarcosyl-insoluble proteins from the hemagglutination-proficient strain but was absent from the profile of the isogenic hemagglutination-deficient variant. A monoclonal antibody which reacts with the hemagglutination-proficient isolate but not with the hemagglutination-deficient isolate has been characterized. This monoclonal antibody was employed in an affinity column for purification of the protein as well as to screen a genomic library for recombinant clones expressing the gene. Several clones which contained overlapping genomic fragments were identified by reaction with the monoclonal antibody. The gene for the 22-kDa protein was subcloned and sequenced. The gene for the type b pilin from H. influenzae type b strain MinnA was also cloned and sequenced. The DNA sequence of the strain MinnA gene was identical to that reported previously for two other type b strains. The DNA sequence of the strain M37 gene is 77% identical to that of the type b pilin gene, and the derived amino acid sequence is 68% identical to that of the type b pilin. Images PMID:1673447

  8. Establishment and Characterization of Molecular Clones of Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses Replicating on Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Czauderna, Frank; Fischer, Nicole; Boller, Klaus; Kurth, Reinhard; Tönjes, Ralf R.

    2000-01-01

    The use of pig xenografts is being considered to alleviate the shortage of allogeneic organs for transplantation. In addition to the problems overcoming immunological and physiological barriers, the existence of numerous porcine microorganisms poses the risk of initiating a xenozoonosis. Recently, different classes of type C porcine endogenous retoviruses (PERV) which are infectious for human cells in vitro have been partially described. We therefore examined whether completely intact proviruses exist that produce infectious and replication-competent virions. Several proviral PERV sequences were cloned and characterized. One molecular PERV class B clone, PERV-B(43), generated infectious particles after transfection into human 293 cells. A second clone, PERV-B(33), which was highly homologous to PERV-B(43), showed a G-to-A mutation in the first start codon (Met to Ile) of the env gene, preventing this provirus from replicating. However, a genetic recombinant, PERV-B(33)/ATG, carrying a restored env start codon, became infectious and could be serially passaged on 293 cells similar to virus clone PERV-B(43). PERV protein expression was detected 24 to 48 h posttransfection (p.t.) using cross-reacting antiserum, and reverse transcriptase activity was found at 12 to 14 days p.t. The transcriptional start and stop sites as well as the splice donor and splice acceptor sites of PERV mRNA were mapped, yielding a subgenomic env transcript of 3.1 kb. PERV-B(33) and PERV-B(43) differ in the number of copies of a 39-bp segment in the U3 region of the long terminal repeat. Strategies to identify and to specifically suppress or eliminate those proviruses from the pig genome might help in the production of PERV-free animals. PMID:10756014

  9. Molecular Physiology of Enteric Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Galligan, James J.; Akbarali, Hamid I.

    2015-01-01

    Opioid drugs have powerful antidiarrheal effects and many patients taking these drugs for chronic pain relief experience chronic constipation that can progress to opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. Three classes of opioid receptors are expressed by enteric neurons: μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors (MOR, DOR, and KOR). MOR and DOR couple to inhibition of adenylate cylase and nerve terminal Ca2+ channels and activation of K+ channels. These effects reduce neuronal activity and neurotransmitter release. KOR couples to inhibition of Ca2+ channels and inhibition of neurotransmitter release. In the human gastrointestinal tract, MOR, DOR, and KOR link to inhibition of acetylcholine release from enteric interneurons and purine/nitric oxide release from inhibitory motorneurons. These actions inhibit propulsive motility. MOR and DOR also link to inhibition of submucosal secretomotor neurons, reducing active Cl− secretion and passive water movement into the colonic lumen. These effects account for the constipation caused by opioid receptor agonists. Tolerance develops to the analgesic effects of opioid receptor agonists but not to the constipating actions. This may be due to differential β-arrestin-2-dependent opioid receptor desensitization and internalization in enteric nerves in the colon compared with the small intestine and in neuronal pain pathways. Further studies of differential opioid receptor desensitization and tolerance in subsets of enteric neurons may identify new drugs or other treatment strategies of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. PMID:25207608

  10. Molecular physiology of enteric opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Galligan, James J; Akbarali, Hamid I

    2014-09-10

    Opioid drugs have powerful antidiarrheal effects and many patients taking these drugs for chronic pain relief experience chronic constipation that can progress to opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. Three classes of opioid receptors are expressed by enteric neurons: μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors (MOR, DOR, and KOR). MOR and DOR couple to inhibition of adenylate cylase and nerve terminal Ca(2+) channels and activation of K(+) channels. These effects reduce neuronal activity and neurotransmitter release. KOR couples to inhibition of Ca(2+) channels and inhibition of neurotransmitter release. In the human gastrointestinal tract, MOR, DOR, and KOR link to inhibition of acetylcholine release from enteric interneurons and purine/nitric oxide release from inhibitory motorneurons. These actions inhibit propulsive motility. MOR and DOR also link to inhibition of submucosal secretomotor neurons, reducing active Cl(-) secretion and passive water movement into the colonic lumen. These effects account for the constipation caused by opioid receptor agonists. Tolerance develops to the analgesic effects of opioid receptor agonists but not to the constipating actions. This may be due to differential β-arrestin-2-dependent opioid receptor desensitization and internalization in enteric nerves in the colon compared with the small intestine and in neuronal pain pathways. Further studies of differential opioid receptor desensitization and tolerance in subsets of enteric neurons may identify new drugs or other treatment strategies of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. PMID:25207608

  11. Cloning and functional expression of a rat kidney extracellular calcium/polyvalent cation-sensing receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Riccardi, D; Park, J; Lee, W S; Gamba, G; Brown, E M; Hebert, S C

    1995-01-01

    The maintenance of a stable extracellular concentration of ionized calcium depends on the integrated function of a number of specialized cells (e.g., parathyroid and certain kidney epithelial cells). We recently identified another G protein-coupled receptor (BoPCaRI) from bovine parathyroid that responds to changes in extracellular Ca2+ within the millimolar range and provides a key mechanism for regulating the secretion of parathyroid hormone. Using an homology-based strategy, we now report the isolation of a cDNA encoding an extracellular Ca2+/polyvalent cation-sensing receptor (RaKCaR) from rat kidney. The predicted RaKCaR protein shares 92% identity with BoPCaR1 receptor and features a seven membrane-spanning domain, characteristic of the G protein-coupled receptors, which is preceded by a large hydrophilic extracellular NH2 terminus believed to be involved in cation binding. RaKCaR cRNA-injected Xenopus oocytes responded to extracellular Ca2+, Mg2+, Gd3+, and neomycin with characteristic activation of inositol phospholipid-dependent, intracellular Ca(2+)-induced Cl- currents. In rat kidney, Northern analysis revealed RaKCaR transcripts of 4 and 7 kb, and in situ hybridization showed localization primarily in outer medulla and cortical medullary rays. Our results provide important insights into the molecular structure of an extracellular Ca2+/polyvalent cation-sensing receptor in rat kidney and provide another basis on which to understand the role of extracellular divalent cations in regulating kidney function in mineral metabolism. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7816802

  12. From Lesions to Viral Clones: Biological and Molecular Diversity amongst Autochthonous Brazilian Vaccinia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Graziele; Assis, Felipe; Almeida, Gabriel; Albarnaz, Jonas; Lima, Maurício; Andrade, Ana Cláudia; Calixto, Rafael; Oliveira, Cairo; Neto, José Diomedes; Trindade, Giliane; Ferreira, Paulo César; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Abrahão, Jônatas

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) has had an important role for humanity because of its use during the smallpox eradication campaign. VACV is the etiologic agent of the bovine vaccinia (BV), an emerging zoonosis that has been associated with economic, social, veterinary and public health problems, mainly in Brazil and India. Despite the current and historical VACV importance, there is little information about its circulation, prevalence, origins and maintenance in the environment, natural reservoirs and diversity. Brazilian VACV (VACV-BR) are grouped into at least two groups based on genetic and biological diversity: group 1 (G1) and group 2 (G2). In this study, we went to the field and investigated VACV clonal diversity directly from exanthemous lesions, during BV outbreaks. Our results demonstrate that the G1 VACV-BR were more frequently isolated. Furthermore, we were able to co-detect the two variants (G1 and G2) in the same sample. Molecular and biological analysis corroborated previous reports and confirmed the co-circulation of two VACV-BR lineages. The detected G2 clones presented exclusive genetic and biological markers, distinct to reference isolates, including VACV-Western Reserve. Two clones presented a mosaic profile, with both G1 and G2 features based on the molecular analysis of A56R, A26L and C23L genes. Indeed, some SNPs and INDELs in A56R nucleotide sequences were observed among clones of the same virus population, maybe as a result of an increased mutation rate in a mixed population. These results provide information about the diversity profile in VACV populations, highlighting its importance to VACV evolution and maintenance in the environment. PMID:25785515

  13. From lesions to viral clones: biological and molecular diversity amongst autochthonous Brazilian vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Graziele; Assis, Felipe; Almeida, Gabriel; Albarnaz, Jonas; Lima, Maurício; Andrade, Ana Cláudia; Calixto, Rafael; Oliveira, Cairo; Diomedes Neto, José; Trindade, Giliane; Ferreira, Paulo César; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Abrahão, Jônatas

    2015-03-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) has had an important role for humanity because of its use during the smallpox eradication campaign. VACV is the etiologic agent of the bovine vaccinia (BV), an emerging zoonosis that has been associated with economic, social, veterinary and public health problems, mainly in Brazil and India. Despite the current and historical VACV importance, there is little information about its circulation, prevalence, origins and maintenance in the environment, natural reservoirs and diversity. Brazilian VACV (VACV-BR) are grouped into at least two groups based on genetic and biological diversity: group 1 (G1) and group 2 (G2). In this study, we went to the field and investigated VACV clonal diversity directly from exanthemous lesions, during BV outbreaks. Our results demonstrate that the G1 VACV-BR were more frequently isolated. Furthermore, we were able to co-detect the two variants (G1 and G2) in the same sample. Molecular and biological analysis corroborated previous reports and confirmed the co-circulation of two VACV-BR lineages. The detected G2 clones presented exclusive genetic and biological markers, distinct to reference isolates, including VACV-Western Reserve. Two clones presented a mosaic profile, with both G1 and G2 features based on the molecular analysis of A56R, A26L and C23L genes. Indeed, some SNPs and INDELs in A56R nucleotide sequences were observed among clones of the same virus population, maybe as a result of an increased mutation rate in a mixed population. These results provide information about the diversity profile in VACV populations, highlighting its importance to VACV evolution and maintenance in the environment. PMID:25785515

  14. Molecular cloning and biochemical characterization of carbonic anhydrase from Populus tremula x tremuloides.

    PubMed

    Larsson, S; Björkbacka, H; Forsman, C; Samuelsson, G; Olsson, O

    1997-07-01

    A leaf cDNA library from hybrid aspen, Populus tremula x tremuloides, was constructed. From this two different cDNA clones, denoted CA1a and CA1b, encoding a chloroplastic carbonic anhydrase (CA) were isolated and DNA sequenced. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences showed that the isolated CAs belong to the beta-CA family, and have identities around 70% to other dicotyledonous plant CAs. The two hybrid aspen cDNA clones display a high nucleotide sequence identity, only 12 nucleotides differ. Since only one gene copy of this soluble chloroplastic CA is present in the nuclear genome, we postulate that the two isolated cDNA clones are alleles. Northern blot hybridization revealed a CA transcript of ca. 1300 bases, 140 bases shorter than in pea. Western and northern blot hybridizations on crude protein extracts and on total RNA, respectively, isolated from stem and leaves, showed that hybrid aspen CA is expressed specifically in the leaf under the growth conditions used. Based on the deduced amino acid sequence, the mature hybrid aspen CA enzyme subunit has a molecular mass of 24.8 kDa. The enzyme was over-expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified by affinity chromatography. Biochemical characterization showed that the protein structure and the CO2-hydration activity are similar to the pea enzyme. Molecular characterization of a CA from a perennial plant has not previously been performed, and it demonstrates that both the structure and activity of hybrid aspen CA resembles CAs from annual plants. PMID:9247540

  15. Cloning yeast actin cDNA leads to an investigative approach for the molecular biology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Black, Michael W; Tuan, Alice; Jonasson, Erin

    2008-05-01

    The emergence of molecular tools in multiple disciplines has elevated the importance of undergraduate laboratory courses that train students in molecular biology techniques. Although it would also be desirable to provide students with opportunities to apply these techniques in an investigative manner, this is generally not possible in the classroom because of the preparation, expense, and logistics involved in independent student projects. The authors have designed a 10-week lab series that mimics the research environment by tying separate fundamental lab techniques to a common goal: to build a plasmid with yeast actin cDNA cloned in a particular orientation. In the process of completing this goal, a problem arises in that students are unable to obtain the target plasmid and instead only recover the gene cloned in the opposite orientation. To address this problem, students identify four plausible hypotheses and work in teams to address them by designing and executing experiments. This project reinforces the utility and flexibility of techniques covered earlier in the class and serves to develop their skills in experimental design and analysis. As the project is focused on one problem, the diversity of experimental approaches is limited and may be prepared in advance with little additional expense in reagents or technical support. PMID:21591194

  16. Cloning, expression, and molecular dynamics simulations of a xylosidase obtained from Thermomyces lanuginosus.

    PubMed

    Gramany, Vashni; Khan, Faez Iqbal; Govender, Algasan; Bisetty, Krishna; Singh, Suren; Permaul, Kugenthiren

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to clone, express, and characterize a β-xylosidase (Tlxyn1) from the thermophilic fungus Thermomyces lanuginosus SSBP in Pichia pastoris GS115 as well as analyze optimal activity and stability using computational and experimental methods. The enzyme was constitutively expressed using the GAP promoter and secreted into the medium due to the alpha-mating factor secretion signal present on the expression vector pBGPI. The 1276 bp gene consists of an open reading frame that does not contain introns. A 12% SDS-PAGE gel revealed a major protein band at an estimated molecular mass of 50 kDa which corresponded to zymogram analysis. The three-dimensional structure of β-xylosidase was predicted, and molecular dynamics simulations at different ranges of temperature and pH were performed in order to predict optimal activity and folding energy. The results suggested a strong conformational temperature and pH dependence. The recombinant enzyme exhibited optimal activity at pH 7 and 50°C and retained 80% activity at 50°C, pH 7 for about 45 min. This is the first report of the cloning, functional expression, and simulations study of a β-xylosidase from Thermomyces species in a fungal host. PMID:26336893

  17. Cloning and expression of a cell surface receptor for advanced glycosylation end products of proteins.

    PubMed

    Neeper, M; Schmidt, A M; Brett, J; Yan, S D; Wang, F; Pan, Y C; Elliston, K; Stern, D; Shaw, A

    1992-07-25

    Advanced glycosylation end products of proteins (AGEs) are nonenzymatically glycosylated proteins which accumulate in vascular tissue in aging and at an accelerated rate in diabetes. A approximately 35-kDa polypeptide with a unique NH2-terminal sequence has been isolated from bovine lung and found to be present on the surface of endothelial cells where it mediates the binding of AGEs (receptor for advanced glycosylation end product or RAGE). Using an oligonucleotide probe based on the amino-terminal sequence of RAGE, an apparently full-length cDNA of 1.5 kilobases was isolated from a bovine lung cDNA library. This cDNA encoded a 394 amino acid mature protein comprised of the following putative domains: an extracellular domain of 332 amino acids, a single hydrophobic membrane spanning domain of 19 amino acids, and a carboxyl-terminal domain of 43 amino acids. A partial clone encoding the human counterpart of RAGE, isolated from a human lung library, was found to be approximately 90% homologous to the bovine molecule. Based on computer analysis of the amino acid sequence of RAGE and comparison with databases, RAGE is a new member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell surface molecules and shares significant homology with MUC 18, NCAM, and the cytoplasmic domain of CD20. Expression of the RAGE cDNA in 293 cells allowed them to bind 125I-AGE-albumin in a saturable and dose-dependent manner (Kd approximately 100 nM), blocked by antibody to RAGE. Western blots of 293 cells transfected with RAGE cDNA probed with anti-RAGE IgG demonstrated expression of immunoreactive protein compared to its absence in mock-transfected cells. These results suggest that RAGE functions as a cell surface receptor for AGEs, which could potentially mediate cellular effects of this class of glycosylated proteins. PMID:1378843

  18. [Cloning and regulation of pig estrogen related receptor β gene (ESRRB) promoter].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Yaxian; Du, Lixia; Wang, Huayan

    2015-04-01

    The estrogen related receptor family member Esrrb (Estrogen related receptor β) is a gene that expresses in the early stage of embryo and plays an important role in the core pluripotent network. Its function has been analyzed in human and mouse, although no report so far related to pig. Therefore, to explore its mechanism of transcriptional regulation and expression pattern, we cloned a 3.3 kb pig ESRRB promoter by PCR and constructed the green fluorescence protein (GFP) reporter vector pE3.3. We used these vectors to study the ESRRB expression pattern in 293T, Hela and C2C12. Sequence was analyzed for regulatory elements that share homology to known transcription factor binding sites by TFSEARCH and JASPER program. Some pluripotency related genes such as SMAD, STAT3, MYC, KLF4 and ESRRB have been found within the 3.3 kb sequence by co-transfected pig ESRRB promoter and these potential regulators. We found that ESRRB only expressed in 293T and SMAD could activate ESRRB expression obviously. To determine the core promoter region, a series of ESRRB promoter fragments with gradually truncated 5'-end were produced by PCR and inserted into pGL3-Basic vector. After transient transfection into 293T, dual luciferase assay was used to measure these promoter activities. The result suggested that the core promoter of pig ESRRB located within -25 bp to -269 bp region. These results suggest that these transcription factor binding sites and the core promoter region may be essential for transcriptional regulation of pig ESRRB gene. PMID:26380406

  19. Cloning and characterization of two nuclear receptors from the filarial nematode Brugia pahangi.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J; Devaney, E

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) encompass a superfamily of cytoplasmic/nuclear localized receptors that on ligand binding (or by phosphorylation) directly regulate the transcription of target genes. NRs are involved in many developmental processes, including moulting in insects and dauer larva formation in Caenorhabditis elegans. Here we report the isolation of two genes related to NRs from the filarial nematode Brugia pahangi. Bp-nhr-1 is a member of the NGF1-B subfamily of NRs and is expressed at very low levels in post-infective larval stage 3 (L3) after their transmission to the mammalian host. The second gene, Bp-nhr-2, is related to XR78E/F of Drosophila, a gene involved in the ecdysone response, over the region of its DNA-binding domain. cDNA and genomic clones have been isolated that correspond to Bp-nhr-2. The most striking feature of the encoded protein is that, although there is a DNA-binding domain similar to that of other NRs, the ligand-binding domain is absent. To investigate the pattern of transcription of Bp-nhr-2 in the filarial life cycle, semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase-mediated PCR was performed; this analysis demonstrated that the gene is expressed in early stages after infection and in the adult and microfilariae, and is up-regulated just before the moult between L3 and L4 but is not expressed during the moult between L4 and adult. Antibodies raised against a peptide corresponding to the transactivation domain of Bp-nhr-2 demonstrate that the protein is expressed in microfilariae and adult samples and that another cross-reactive protein is expressed in these life-cycle stages. PMID:10548557

  20. Cloning, Characterization, and Expression Profile of Estrogen Receptor in Common Chinese Cuttlefish, Sepiella japonica.

    PubMed

    Lü, Zhen-Ming; Liu, Wan; Liu, Li-Qin; Wang, Tian-Ming; Shi, Hui-Lai; Ping, Hong-Ling; Chi, Chang-Feng; Yang, Jing-Wen; Wu, Chang-Wen

    2016-03-01

    Sex steroid hormones are widely detected in molluscs and play important roles in sex determination, gonadal tissue maturation, and gametogenesis. Nevertheless, the signaling pathways of sex steroids in cephalopod have not yet been clearly elucidated. In the present study, a full-length sequence encoding the estrogen receptor (ER) was isolated from common Chinese cuttlefish, Sepiella japonica. The sjER cDNA clone was found to contain 1,788 nucleotides including a 1,470 bp open reading frame encoding 489 amino acid (aa) residues. The deduced ER protein consisted of six nuclear receptor characteristic domains. Based on a phylogenetic analysis, the ER DNA-binding domain and ligand-binding domain are highly conserved compared to other mollusc ERs. Highest aa identities were found for sjER with common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) ER (89%) and pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) ER (61%). Tissue expression analysis confirmed that sjER was widely distributed among tissues and predominantly expressed in the brain, liver, gonad (testis and ovary), and other accessory sexual gland (nidamental gland). The ER expression was temporally upregulated in the brain, liver, and ovary during the early sexual maturation period in S. japonica, which is coincident with the fluctuation of ovary estradiol content. These suggest that sjER may be involved in regulating the reproductive cycle of S. japonica. A fusion protein transient transfections assay showed that sjER was mainly located in the nucleus, suggesting a possible orthodox working mechanism of S. japonica ER in the nucleus through a ligand-dependent activation of specific gene transcription. PMID:27076436

  1. Production of retroviral constructs for effective transfer and expression of T-cell receptor genes using Golden Gate cloning.

    PubMed

    Coren, Lori V; Jain, Sumiti; Trivett, Matthew T; Ohlen, Claes; Ott, David E

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an improved strategy for producing T-cell receptor (TCR)-expressing retroviral vectors using a Golden Gate cloning strategy. This method takes advantage of the modular nature of TCR genes by directly amplifying TCR α and β variable regions from RNA or cDNA, then cloning and fusing them with their respective constant region genes resident in a retroviral TCR expression vector. Our one-step approach greatly streamlines the TCR vector production process in comparison to the traditional three-step procedure that typically involves cloning whole TCR genes, producing a TCR expression cassette, and constructing a retroviral construct. To date, we have generated TCR vectors that transferred seven functional human/rhesus macaque TCRs into primary T cells. The approach also holds promise for the assembly of other genes with defined variable regions, such as immunoglobulins. PMID:25757546

  2. Receptor Activity-modifying Proteins 2 and 3 Generate Adrenomedullin Receptor Subtypes with Distinct Molecular Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Harriet A.; Chakravarthy, Madhuri; Abhayawardana, Rekhati S.; Gingell, Joseph J.; Garelja, Michael; Pardamwar, Meenakshi; McElhinney, James M. W. R.; Lathbridge, Alex; Constantine, Arran; Harris, Paul W. R.; Yuen, Tsz-Ying; Brimble, Margaret A.; Barwell, James; Poyner, David R.; Woolley, Michael J.; Conner, Alex C.; Pioszak, Augen A.; Reynolds, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a peptide hormone with numerous effects in the vascular systems. AM signals through the AM1 and AM2 receptors formed by the obligate heterodimerization of a G protein-coupled receptor, the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), and receptor activity-modifying proteins 2 and 3 (RAMP2 and RAMP3), respectively. These different CLR-RAMP interactions yield discrete receptor pharmacology and physiological effects. The effective design of therapeutics that target the individual AM receptors is dependent on understanding the molecular details of the effects of RAMPs on CLR. To understand the role of RAMP2 and -3 on the activation and conformation of the CLR subunit of AM receptors, we mutated 68 individual amino acids in the juxtamembrane region of CLR, a key region for activation of AM receptors, and determined the effects on cAMP signaling. Sixteen CLR mutations had differential effects between the AM1 and AM2 receptors. Accompanying this, independent molecular modeling of the full-length AM-bound AM1 and AM2 receptors predicted differences in the binding pocket and differences in the electrostatic potential of the two AM receptors. Druggability analysis indicated unique features that could be used to develop selective small molecule ligands for each receptor. The interaction of RAMP2 or RAMP3 with CLR induces conformational variation in the juxtamembrane region, yielding distinct binding pockets, probably via an allosteric mechanism. These subtype-specific differences have implications for the design of therapeutics aimed at specific AM receptors and for understanding the mechanisms by which accessory proteins affect G protein-coupled receptor function. PMID:27013657

  3. Receptor Activity-modifying Proteins 2 and 3 Generate Adrenomedullin Receptor Subtypes with Distinct Molecular Properties.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Harriet A; Chakravarthy, Madhuri; Abhayawardana, Rekhati S; Gingell, Joseph J; Garelja, Michael; Pardamwar, Meenakshi; McElhinney, James M W R; Lathbridge, Alex; Constantine, Arran; Harris, Paul W R; Yuen, Tsz-Ying; Brimble, Margaret A; Barwell, James; Poyner, David R; Woolley, Michael J; Conner, Alex C; Pioszak, Augen A; Reynolds, Christopher A; Hay, Debbie L

    2016-05-27

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a peptide hormone with numerous effects in the vascular systems. AM signals through the AM1 and AM2 receptors formed by the obligate heterodimerization of a G protein-coupled receptor, the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), and receptor activity-modifying proteins 2 and 3 (RAMP2 and RAMP3), respectively. These different CLR-RAMP interactions yield discrete receptor pharmacology and physiological effects. The effective design of therapeutics that target the individual AM receptors is dependent on understanding the molecular details of the effects of RAMPs on CLR. To understand the role of RAMP2 and -3 on the activation and conformation of the CLR subunit of AM receptors, we mutated 68 individual amino acids in the juxtamembrane region of CLR, a key region for activation of AM receptors, and determined the effects on cAMP signaling. Sixteen CLR mutations had differential effects between the AM1 and AM2 receptors. Accompanying this, independent molecular modeling of the full-length AM-bound AM1 and AM2 receptors predicted differences in the binding pocket and differences in the electrostatic potential of the two AM receptors. Druggability analysis indicated unique features that could be used to develop selective small molecule ligands for each receptor. The interaction of RAMP2 or RAMP3 with CLR induces conformational variation in the juxtamembrane region, yielding distinct binding pockets, probably via an allosteric mechanism. These subtype-specific differences have implications for the design of therapeutics aimed at specific AM receptors and for understanding the mechanisms by which accessory proteins affect G protein-coupled receptor function. PMID:27013657

  4. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequence of a transforming gene detected by transfection of chicken B-cell lymphoma DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goubin, Gerard; Goldman, Debra S.; Luce, Judith; Neiman, Paul E.; Cooper, Geoffrey M.

    1983-03-01

    A transforming gene detected by transfection of chicken B-cell lymphoma DNA has been isolated by molecular cloning. It is homologous to a conserved family of sequences present in normal chicken and human DNAs but is not related to transforming genes of acutely transforming retroviruses. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned transforming gene suggests that it encodes a protein that is partially homologous to the amino terminus of transferrin and related proteins although only about one tenth the size of transferrin.

  5. Molecular Cloning and Gene Expression of Canine Apoptosis Inhibitor of Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    TOMURA, Shintaro; UCHIDA, Mona; YONEZAWA, Tomohiro; KOBAYASHI, Masato; BONKOBARA, Makoto; ARAI, Satoko; MIYAZAKI, Toru; TAMAHARA, Satoshi; MATSUKI, Naoaki

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis inhibitor of macrophage (AIM) plays roles in survival of macrophages. In this study, we cloned canine AIM cDNA and observed its transcriptional expression levels in various tissues. The coding sequence of canine AIM was 1,023 bp encoding 340 amino acid residues, which had around 65% homology with those of the human, mouse and rat. Transcriptional expression of AIM was observed in the spleen, lung, liver and lymph node, which confirmed the expression of canine AIM in tissue macrophages. Moreover, AIM was highly expressed in one of the canine histiocytic sarcoma cell lines. CD36, the receptor of AIM, was also expressed in various tissues and these cell lines. These findings are useful to reveal the actual functions of canine AIM. PMID:25649949

  6. Cloning and expression analysis of androgen receptor gene in chicken embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Hironori; Ogino, Yukiko; Yamada, Gen

    2006-03-01

    We cloned a full-length androgen receptor (AR) cDNA from chicken (Gallus gallus) gonads. The cDNA sequence has an open reading frame of 2109 bp encoding 703 amino acids. The chicken AR (cAR) shares high homology with ARs from other species in its amino acid sequences, in particular DNA binding domain (DBD) and ligand binding domain (LBD). RT-PCR analysis revealed that cAR mRNA is expressed in several embryonic tissues of both sexes, and relatively higher expression was observed in left ovary compared with testis. The immunoreactive signal of AR was co-localized within the ovarian cell nucleus, while such nuclear localization was not detected in those of testis. To get insight on the possible role of androgen-AR signaling during gonadal development, non-steroidal AR antagonist, flutamide, was administrated in ovo. The treatment induced the disorganization of sex cords in ovarian cortex at day 12 of incubation. The effect was restored by testosterone co-treatment, implying the possibility that AR mediated signaling may be involved in ovarian morphogenesis. Furthermore, co-treatment of flutamide with estradiol-17beta (E2) also restored the phenotype, suggesting androgen-AR signaling might activate aromatase expression that is necessary for estrogen synthesis. These findings suggest androgen-AR signaling might contribute to chicken embryonic ovarian development. PMID:16480982

  7. Cloning of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rho 1 cDNA: a GABA receptor subunit highly expressed in the retina.

    PubMed Central

    Cutting, G R; Lu, L; O'Hara, B F; Kasch, L M; Montrose-Rafizadeh, C; Donovan, D M; Shimada, S; Antonarakis, S E; Guggino, W B; Uhl, G R

    1991-01-01

    Type A gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors are a family of ligand-gated chloride channels that are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the nervous system. Molecular cloning has revealed diversity in the subunits that compose this heterooligomeric receptor, but each previously elucidated subunit displays amino acid similarity in conserved structural elements. We have used these highly conserved regions to identify additional members of this family by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). One PCR product was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a human retina cDNA library. The mature protein predicted from this cDNA sequence in 458 amino acids long and displays between 30 and 38% amino acid similarity to the previously identified GABAA subunits. This gene is expressed primarily in the retina but transcripts are also detected in the brain, lung, and thymus. Injection of Xenopus oocytes with RNA transcribed in vitro produces a GABA-responsive chloride conductance and expression of the cDNA in COS cells yields GABA-displaceable muscimol binding. These features are consistent with our identification of a GABA subunit, GABA rho 1, with prominent retinal expression that increases the diversity and tissue specificity of this ligand-gated ion-channel receptor family. Images PMID:1849271

  8. Molecular characterization of thyroid hormone receptors from the leopard gecko, and their differential expression in the skin.

    PubMed

    Kanaho, Yoh-Ichiro; Endo, Daisuke; Park, Min Kyun

    2006-06-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) play crucial roles in various developmental and physiological processes in vertebrates, including squamate reptiles. The effect of THs on shedding frequency is interesting in Squamata, since the effects on lizards are quite the reverse of those in snakes: injection of thyroxine increases shedding frequency in lizards, but decreases it in snakes. However, the mechanism underlying this differential effect remains unclear. To facilitate the investigation of the molecular mechanism of the physiological functions of THs in Squamata, their two specific receptor (TRalpha and beta) cDNAs, which are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, were cloned from a lizard, the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius. This is the first molecular cloning of thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) from reptiles. The deduced amino acid sequences showed high identity with those of other species, especially in the C and E/F domains, which are characteristic domains in nuclear hormone receptors. Expression analysis revealed that TRs were widely expressed in many tissues and organs, as in other animals. To analyze their role in the skin, temporal expression analysis was performed by RT-PCR, revealing that the two TRs had opposing expression patterns: TRalpha was expressed more strongly after than before skin shedding, whereas TRbeta was expressed more strongly before than after skin shedding. This provides good evidence that THs play important roles in the skin, and that the roles of their two receptor isoforms are distinct from each other. PMID:16849843

  9. Characterization of an infectious molecular clone of human T-cell leukemia virus type I.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, T M; Robinson, M A; Bowers, F S; Kindt, T J

    1995-01-01

    An infectious molecular clone of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) was derived from an HTLV-I-transformed rabbit T-cell line, RH/K30, obtained by coculture of rabbit peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with the human HTLV-I-transformed cell line MT-2. The RH/K30 cell line contained two integrated proviruses, an intact HTLV-I genome and an apparently defective provirus with an in-frame stop codon in the env gene. A genomic DNA fragment containing the intact HTLV-I provirus was cloned into bacteriophage lambda (K30 phi) and subcloned into a plasmid vector (K30p). HTLV-I p24gag protein was detected in culture supernatants of human and rabbit T-cell and fibroblast lines transfected with these clones, at levels comparable to those of the parental cell line RH/K30. Persistent expression of virus was observed in one of these lines, RL-5/K30p, for more than 24 months. Biologic characterization of this cell line revealed the presence of integrated HTLV-I provirus, spliced and unspliced mRNA transcripts, and typical extracellular type C retrovirus particles. As expected, these virus particles contained HTLV-I RNA and reverse transcriptase activity. The transfected cells also expressed surface major histocompatibility complex class II, whereas no expression of this molecule was detected in the parental RL-5 cell line. Virus was passaged by cocultivation of irradiated RL-5/K30p cells with either rabbit PBMC or human cord blood mononuclear cells, demonstrating in vitro infectivity. The virus produced in these cells was also infectious in vivo, since rabbits injected with RL-5/K30p cells became productively infected, as evidenced by seroconversion, amplification of HTLV-I-specific sequences by PCR from PBMC DNA, and virus isolation from PBMC. Availability of infectious molecular clones will facilitate functional studies of HTLV-I genes and gene products. PMID:7884847

  10. Cloning and characterization of a human Mac-2-binding protein, a new member of the superfamily defined by the macrophage scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain.

    PubMed

    Koths, K; Taylor, E; Halenbeck, R; Casipit, C; Wang, A

    1993-07-01

    We have purified and sequenced a secreted glycoprotein from both the human breast carcinoma cell line, SK-BR-3, and human breast milk. The native protein binds specifically to a human macrophage-associated lectin known as Mac-2. This Mac-2 binding protein (Mac-2-BP) has an apparent native molecular mass of several million daltons and contains subunits of 85-97 kDa that are very susceptible to proteolysis at a dibasic cleavage site. Western analysis suggests that Mac-2-BP is found in serum, semen, saliva, urine, and tears, in addition to breast milk. The gene encoding Mac-2-BP was cloned from a cDNA bank of a human monocytic cell line, using degenerate PCR primers based on the protein sequence. Recombinant Mac-2-BP was expressed in Cos cells and secreted as a high molecular weight complex. The cDNA clone encodes a mature protein of 567 amino acids, preceded by an 18-amino acid leader. The mature protein contains 16 cysteines and has seven potential N-linked glycosylation sites. The first 106 amino acids represent a domain that is highly similar to an ancient protein superfamily defined by the macrophage scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain. PMID:8390986

  11. Snake acetylcholine receptor: cloning of the domain containing the four extracellular cysteines of the alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Neumann, D; Barchan, D; Horowitz, M; Kochva, E; Fuchs, S

    1989-09-01

    The acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) at the neuromuscular junction of elapid snakes binds cholinergic ligands but unlike other muscle AcChoRs does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin. Numerous studies indicate that the ligand-binding site of the AcChoR includes cysteine residues at positions 192 and 193 of the alpha subunit. We have previously shown that a synthetic dodecapeptide corresponding to residues 185-196 of the Torpedo AcChoR alpha subunit contains the essential elements of the ligand-binding site. In an attempt to elucidate the structural basis for the precise binding properties of snake AcChoR, we sequenced a portion of the snake AcChoR alpha subunit. First, a mouse AcChoR alpha-subunit cDNA probe was used to screen a size-selected snake (Natrix tessellata) genomic library. A genomic clone was isolated and was found to contain sequences homologous to the exon including the first two cysteines (Cys-128 and -142) of AcChoR alpha subunit. The domain of the alpha subunit from Natrix and cobra AcChoR (amino acid residues 119-222), which contains the four extracellular cysteines (128, 142, 192, and 193), was amplified by reverse transcription of mRNA and the polymerase chain reaction and then sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence showed that the snake alpha subunit contains the two tandem cysteines at positions 192 and 193, resembling all other AcChoR alpha subunits. Sequence comparison revealed that the cloned region of the snake alpha subunit is highly homologous (75-80%) to other muscle AcChoRs and not to neuronal AcChoR, which also does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin. In the presumed ligand-binding site, in the vicinity of Cys-192 and Cys-193, four major substitutions occur in the snake sequence--at positions 184 (Trp----Phe), 185 (Lys----Trp), 187 (Trp----Ser), and 194 (Pro----Leu). In addition, Asn-189 is a putative N-glycosylation site, present only in the snake. These changes, or part of them, may explain the lack of alpha-bungarotoxin-binding to snake Ac

  12. Snake acetylcholine receptor: cloning of the domain containing the four extracellular cysteines of the alpha subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, D; Barchan, D; Horowitz, M; Kochva, E; Fuchs, S

    1989-01-01

    The acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) at the neuromuscular junction of elapid snakes binds cholinergic ligands but unlike other muscle AcChoRs does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin. Numerous studies indicate that the ligand-binding site of the AcChoR includes cysteine residues at positions 192 and 193 of the alpha subunit. We have previously shown that a synthetic dodecapeptide corresponding to residues 185-196 of the Torpedo AcChoR alpha subunit contains the essential elements of the ligand-binding site. In an attempt to elucidate the structural basis for the precise binding properties of snake AcChoR, we sequenced a portion of the snake AcChoR alpha subunit. First, a mouse AcChoR alpha-subunit cDNA probe was used to screen a size-selected snake (Natrix tessellata) genomic library. A genomic clone was isolated and was found to contain sequences homologous to the exon including the first two cysteines (Cys-128 and -142) of AcChoR alpha subunit. The domain of the alpha subunit from Natrix and cobra AcChoR (amino acid residues 119-222), which contains the four extracellular cysteines (128, 142, 192, and 193), was amplified by reverse transcription of mRNA and the polymerase chain reaction and then sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence showed that the snake alpha subunit contains the two tandem cysteines at positions 192 and 193, resembling all other AcChoR alpha subunits. Sequence comparison revealed that the cloned region of the snake alpha subunit is highly homologous (75-80%) to other muscle AcChoRs and not to neuronal AcChoR, which also does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin. In the presumed ligand-binding site, in the vicinity of Cys-192 and Cys-193, four major substitutions occur in the snake sequence--at positions 184 (Trp----Phe), 185 (Lys----Trp), 187 (Trp----Ser), and 194 (Pro----Leu). In addition, Asn-189 is a putative N-glycosylation site, present only in the snake. These changes, or part of them, may explain the lack of alpha-bungarotoxin-binding to snake Ac

  13. Molecular mechanisms of platelet P2Y(12) receptor regulation.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Margaret R; Nisar, Shaista P; Mundell, Stuart J

    2013-02-01

    Platelets are critical for haemostasis, however inappropriate activation can lead to the development of arterial thrombosis, which can result in heart attack and stroke. ADP is a key platelet agonist that exerts its actions via stimulation of two surface GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors), P2Y(1) and P2Y(12). Similar to most GPCRs, P2Y receptor activity is tightly regulated by a number of complex mechanisms including receptor desensitization, internalization and recycling. In the present article, we review the molecular mechanisms that underlie P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) receptor regulation, with particular emphasis on the structural motifs within the P2Y(12) receptor, which are required to maintain regulatory protein interaction. The implications of these findings for platelet responsiveness are also discussed. PMID:23356287

  14. Molecular evidence for zoonotic transmission of an emergent, highly pathogenic Campylobacter jejuni clone in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Orhan; Fitzgerald, Collette; Stroika, Steven; Zhao, Shaohua; Sippy, Rachel J; Kwan, Patrick; Plummer, Paul J; Han, Jing; Yaeger, Michael J; Zhang, Qijing

    2012-03-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major zoonotic pathogen. A highly virulent, tetracycline-resistant C. jejuni clone (clone SA) has recently emerged in ruminant reservoirs and has become the predominant cause of sheep abortion in the United States. To determine whether clone SA is associated with human disease, we compared the clinical isolates of clone SA from sheep abortions with the human isolates of the PulseNet National Campylobacter databases at the CDC and the FDA using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and serotyping. The combined SmaI and KpnI PFGE pattern designations of clone SA from sheep were indistinguishable from those of 123 (9.03%) human C. jejuni isolates (total, 1,361) in the CDC database, among which 56 were associated with sporadic infections and 67 were associated with outbreaks that occurred in multiple states from 2003 to 2010. Most of the outbreaks were attributed to raw milk, while the sources for most of the sporadic cases were unknown. All clone SA isolates examined, including PFGE-matched human isolates, belong to sequence type 8 (ST-8) by MLST and serotype HS:1,8, further indicating the clonality of the related isolates from different host species. Additionally, C. jejuni clone SA was identified in raw milk, cattle feces, the feces and bile of healthy sheep, and abortion cases of cattle and goats, indicating the broad distribution of this pathogenic clone in ruminants. These results provide strong molecular and epidemiological evidence for zoonotic transmission of this emergent clone from ruminants to humans and indicate that C. jejuni clone SA is an important threat to public health. PMID:22189122

  15. Neuromedin B and Its Receptor: Gene Cloning, Tissue Distribution and Expression Levels of the Reproductive Axis in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhiyu; Su, Juan; Guo, Tingting; Jin, Mengmeng; Li, Xiang; Lei, Zhihai; Hou, Yuanlong; Li, Xiaoliang; Jia, Cuicui; Zhang, Zheng; Ahmed, Ejlal

    2016-01-01

    Neuromedin B is one member of a family of bombesin-like peptides, which performs a variety of physiological functions via their receptor (NMBR) in most mammals. However, the genes encoding NMB and NMBR and their functions especially reproduction of the pigs are currently not fully understood. To research the physiological functions of NMB, we cloned and analyzed the NMB and NMBR genes, and systematically investigated the expression levels of NMB and NMBR mRNA using relative real-time PCR and the distribution of NMBR by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Experimental results show that the sequences of the amino acid and gene of NMB and NMBR were highly conservative and homology in many species, Significantly, the relative RT-PCR results revealed that NMB was mainly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), whereas NMBR is highly expressed in peripheral tissues and organs, such as endocrine tissues, glands and reproductive organs. The IHC results show that NMBR positive cells were widely distributed in the body, such as respiratory and circulatory system, digestive system, urogenital system, in lymphatic organs and in the endocrine system. We also systematically investigated expression levels of NMB and NMBR in the reproductive axis using relative real-time PCR. In sow estrous cycle, the hypothalamic levels of both NMB and NMBR mRAN were similar, but the expression levels of the pituitary were negatively correlated. Expression levels in the ovarian system are lowest in metestrus phases and highest in proestrus and estrus phases. In boar post-natal development stages, the hypothalamic, pituitary and testicular levels of NMB and NMBR mRNAs showed developmental changes on postnatal day 30, 60, 90 and 120. Taken together, this study provided molecular and morphological data necessary for further research of physiological function of NMB/NMBR system in the pigs. PMID:27010315

  16. Neuromedin B and Its Receptor: Gene Cloning, Tissue Distribution and Expression Levels of the Reproductive Axis in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiyu; Su, Juan; Guo, Tingting; Jin, Mengmeng; Li, Xiang; Lei, Zhihai; Hou, Yuanlong; Li, Xiaoliang; Jia, Cuicui; Zhang, Zheng; Ahmed, Ejlal

    2016-01-01

    Neuromedin B is one member of a family of bombesin-like peptides, which performs a variety of physiological functions via their receptor (NMBR) in most mammals. However, the genes encoding NMB and NMBR and their functions especially reproduction of the pigs are currently not fully understood. To research the physiological functions of NMB, we cloned and analyzed the NMB and NMBR genes, and systematically investigated the expression levels of NMB and NMBR mRNA using relative real-time PCR and the distribution of NMBR by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Experimental results show that the sequences of the amino acid and gene of NMB and NMBR were highly conservative and homology in many species, Significantly, the relative RT-PCR results revealed that NMB was mainly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), whereas NMBR is highly expressed in peripheral tissues and organs, such as endocrine tissues, glands and reproductive organs. The IHC results show that NMBR positive cells were widely distributed in the body, such as respiratory and circulatory system, digestive system, urogenital system, in lymphatic organs and in the endocrine system. We also systematically investigated expression levels of NMB and NMBR in the reproductive axis using relative real-time PCR. In sow estrous cycle, the hypothalamic levels of both NMB and NMBR mRAN were similar, but the expression levels of the pituitary were negatively correlated. Expression levels in the ovarian system are lowest in metestrus phases and highest in proestrus and estrus phases. In boar post-natal development stages, the hypothalamic, pituitary and testicular levels of NMB and NMBR mRNAs showed developmental changes on postnatal day 30, 60, 90 and 120. Taken together, this study provided molecular and morphological data necessary for further research of physiological function of NMB/NMBR system in the pigs. PMID:27010315

  17. Hyperspectral molecular imaging of multiple receptors using immunolabeled plasmonic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Seekell, Kevin; Crow, Matthew J.; Marinakos, Stella; Ostrander, Julie; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Wax, Adam

    2011-01-01

    This work presents simultaneous imaging and detection of three different cell receptors using three types of plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs). The size, shape, and composition-dependent scattering profiles of these NPs allow for a system of multiple distinct molecular markers using a single optical source. With this goal in mind, tags consisting of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor gold nanorods, anti-insulin-like growth factor 1-R silver nanospheres, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2Ab gold nanospheres were developed to monitor the expression of receptors commonly overexpressed by cancer cells. These labels were chosen because they scatter strongly in distinct spectral windows. A hyperspectral darkfield microspectroscopy system was developed to record the scattering spectra of cells labeled with these molecular tags. Simultaneous monitoring of multiple tags may lead to applications such as profiling of cell line immunophenotype and investigation of receptor signaling pathways. Single, dual, and triple tag experiments were performed to analyze NP tag specificity as well as their interactions. Distinct resonance peaks were observed in these studies, showing the ability to characterize cell lines using conjugated NPs. However, interpreting shifts in these peaks due to changes in a cellular dielectric environment may be complicated by plasmon coupling between NPs bound to proximal receptors and other coupling mechanisms due to the receptors themselves. PMID:22112108

  18. Hyperspectral molecular imaging of multiple receptors using immunolabeled plasmonic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seekell, Kevin; Crow, Matthew J.; Marinakos, Stella; Ostrander, Julie; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Wax, Adam

    2011-11-01

    This work presents simultaneous imaging and detection of three different cell receptors using three types of plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs). The size, shape, and composition-dependent scattering profiles of these NPs allow for a system of multiple distinct molecular markers using a single optical source. With this goal in mind, tags consisting of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor gold nanorods, anti-insulin-like growth factor 1-R silver nanospheres, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2Ab gold nanospheres were developed to monitor the expression of receptors commonly overexpressed by cancer cells. These labels were chosen because they scatter strongly in distinct spectral windows. A hyperspectral darkfield microspectroscopy system was developed to record the scattering spectra of cells labeled with these molecular tags. Simultaneous monitoring of multiple tags may lead to applications such as profiling of cell line immunophenotype and investigation of receptor signaling pathways. Single, dual, and triple tag experiments were performed to analyze NP tag specificity as well as their interactions. Distinct resonance peaks were observed in these studies, showing the ability to characterize cell lines using conjugated NPs. However, interpreting shifts in these peaks due to changes in a cellular dielectric environment may be complicated by plasmon coupling between NPs bound to proximal receptors and other coupling mechanisms due to the receptors themselves.

  19. Construction and characterization of a full-length infectious simian T-cell lymphotropic virus type 3 molecular clone.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Sébastien Alain; Walic, Marine; Calattini, Sara; Mallet, Adeline; Prévost, Marie-Christine; Gessain, Antoine; Mahieux, Renaud

    2007-06-01

    Together with their simian T-cell lymphotropic virus (STLV) equivalent, human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), HTLV-2, and HTLV-3 form the primate T-cell lymphotropic virus (PTLV) group. Over the years, understanding the biology and pathogenesis of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 has been widely improved by the creation of molecular clones. In contrast, so far, PTLV-3 experimental studies have been restricted to the overexpression of the tax gene using reporter assays. We have therefore decided to construct an STLV-3 molecular clone. We generated a full-length STLV-3 proviral clone (8,891 bp) by PCR amplification of overlapping fragments. This STLV-3 molecular clone was then transfected into 293T cells. Reverse transcriptase PCR experiments followed by sequence analysis of the amplified products allowed us to establish that both gag and tax/rex mRNAs were transcribed. Western blotting further demonstrated the presence of the STLV-3 p24gag protein in the cell culture supernatant from transfected cells. Transient transfection of 293T cells and of 293T-long terminal repeat-green fluorescent protein cells with the STLV-3 clone promoted syncytium formation, a hallmark of PTLV Env expression, as well as the appearance of fluorescent cells, also demonstrating that the Tax3 protein was expressed. Virus particles were visible by electron microscopy. These particles are infectious, as demonstrated by our cell-free-infection experiments with purified virions. All together, our data demonstrate that the STLV-3 molecular clone is functional and infectious. This clone will give us a unique opportunity to study in vitro the different pX transcripts and the putative presence of antisense transcripts and to evaluate the PTLV-3 pathogenicity in vivo. PMID:17428869

  20. An infectious molecular clone of an unusual macrophage-tropic and highly cytopathic strain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Collman, R; Balliet, J W; Gregory, S A; Friedman, H; Kolson, D L; Nathanson, N; Srinivasan, A

    1992-01-01

    We isolated and molecularly cloned a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strain (89.6) which is unusual because it is both macrophage-tropic and extremely cytopathic in lymphocytes. Moreover, this is the first well-characterized infectious molecularly cloned macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strain derived from peripheral blood. HIV-1 89.6 differs markedly from other macrophage-tropic isolates within the envelope V3 region, which is important in determining cell tropism and cytopathicity. HIV-1 89.6 may thus represent a transitional isolate between noncytopathic macrophage-tropic viruses and cytopathic lymphocyte-tropic viruses. Images PMID:1433527

  1. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of borneol dehydrogenase from the glandular trichomes of Lavandula x intermedia.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Lukman S; Galata, Mariana; Demissie, Zerihun A; Mahmoud, Soheil S

    2012-12-15

    Several varieties of Lavandula x intermedia (lavandins) are cultivated for their essential oils (EOs) for use in cosmetic, hygiene and personal care products. These EOs are mainly constituted of monoterpenes including camphor, which contributes an off odor reducing the olfactory appeal of the oil. We have recently constructed a cDNA library from the glandular trichomes (the sites of EO synthesis) of L. x intermedia plants. Here, we describe the cloning of a borneol dehydrogenase cDNA (LiBDH) from this library. The 780 bp open reading frame of the cDNA encoded a 259 amino acid short chain alcohol dehydrogenase with a predicted molecular mass of ca. 27.5 kDa. The recombinant LiBDH was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified by Ni-NTA agarose affinity chromatography, and functionally characterized in vitro. The bacterially produced enzyme specifically converted borneol to camphor as the only product with K(m) and k(cat) values of 53 μM and 4.0 × 10(-4) s(-1), respectively. The LiBDH transcripts were specifically expressed in glandular trichomes of mature flowers indicating that like other Lavandula monoterpene synthases the expression of this gene is regulated in a tissue-specific manner. The cloning of LiBDH has far reaching implications in improving the quality of Lavandula EOs through metabolic engineering. PMID:23058847

  2. Cloning and molecular characterization of a putative voltage-gated sodium channel gene in the crayfish.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Cagil; Purali, Nuhan

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channel genes and associated proteins have been cloned and studied in many mammalian and invertebrate species. However, there is no data available about the sodium channel gene(s) in the crayfish, although the animal has frequently been used as a model to investigate various aspects of neural cellular and circuit function. In the present work, by using RNA extracts from crayfish abdominal ganglia samples, the complete open reading frame of a putative sodium channel gene has firstly been cloned and molecular properties of the associated peptide have been analyzed. The open reading frame of the gene has a length of 5793 bp that encodes for the synthesis of a peptide, with 1930 amino acids, that is 82% similar to the α-peptide of a sodium channel in a neighboring species, Cancer borealis. The transmembrane topology analysis of the crayfish peptide indicated a pattern of four folding domains with several transmembrane segments, as observed in other known voltage-gated sodium channels. Upon analysis of the obtained sequence, functional regions of the putative sodium channel responsible for the selectivity filter, inactivation gate, voltage sensor, and phosphorylation have been predicted. The expression level of the putative sodium channel gene, as defined by a qPCR method, was measured and found to be the highest in nervous tissue. PMID:27032955

  3. Cloning, molecular characterization, and expression pattern of FGF5 in Cashmere goat (Capra hircus).

    PubMed

    Bao, W L; Yao, R Y; He, Q; Guo, Z X; Bao, C; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z G

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 5 (FGF5) is a secreted signaling protein that belongs to the FGF family, and was found to be associated with hair growth in humans and other animals. The Inner Mongolia Cashmere goat (Capra hircus) is a goat breed that provides superior cashmere; this breed was formed by spontaneous mutation in China. Here, we report the cloning, molecular characterization, and expression pattern of the Cashmere goat FGF5. The cloned FGF5 cDNA was 813 base pairs (KM596772), including an open reading frame encoding a 270-amino-acid polypeptide. The nucleotide sequence shared 99% homology with Ovis aries FGF5 (NM_001246263.1). Bioinformatic analysis revealed that FGF5 contained a signal peptide, an FGF domain, and a heparin-binding growth factor/FGF family signature. There was 1 cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site, 11 protein kinase C phosphorylation sites, 4 casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, 1 amidation site, 1 N-glycosylation site, and 1 tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site in FGF5. Real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that FGF5 mRNA levels were higher in testis than in the pancreas and liver. These data suggest that FGF5 may play a crucial role in Cashmere goat hair growth. PMID:26400346

  4. Characterization and cloning of a receptor for BMP-2 and BMP-4 from NIH 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, B B; Cook, J S; Wolsing, D H; Ting, J; Tiesman, J P; Correa, P E; Olson, C A; Pecquet, A L; Ventura, F; Grant, R A

    1994-01-01

    The bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are a group of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta)-related factors whose only receptor identified to date is the product of the daf-4 gene from Caenorhabditis elegans. Mouse embryonic NIH 3T3 fibroblasts display high-affinity 125I-BMP-4 binding sites. Binding assays are not possible with the isoform 125I-BMP-2 unless the positively charged N-terminal sequence is removed to create a modified BMP-2, 125I-DR-BMP-2. Cross-competition experiments reveal that BMP-2 and BMP-4 interact with the same binding sites. Affinity cross-linking assays show that both BMPs interact with cell surface proteins corresponding in size to the type I (57- to 62-kDa) and type II (75- to 82-kDa) receptor components for TGF-beta and activin. Using a PCR approach, we have cloned a cDNA from NIH 3T3 cells which encodes a novel member of the transmembrane serine/threonine kinase family most closely resembling the cloned type I receptors for TGF-beta and activin. Transient expression of this receptor in COS-7 cells leads to an increase in specific 125I-BMP-4 binding and the appearance of a major affinity-labeled product of approximately 64 kDa that can be labeled by either tracer. This receptor has been named BRK-1 in recognition of its ability to bind BMP-2 and BMP-4 and its receptor kinase structure. Although BRK-1 does not require cotransfection of a type II receptor in order to bind ligand in COS cells, complex formation between BRK-1 and the BMP type II receptor DAF-4 can be demonstrated when the two receptors are coexpressed, affinity labeled, and immunoprecipitated with antibodies to either receptor subunit. We conclude that BRK-1 is a putative BMP type I receptor capable of interacting with a known type II receptor for BMPs. Images PMID:8065329

  5. Applications of molecular replacement to G protein-coupled receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, Andrew C.; Manglik, Aashish; Kobilka, Brian K.; Weis, William I.

    2013-11-01

    The use of molecular replacement in solving the structures of G protein-coupled receptors is discussed, with specific examples being described in detail. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large class of integral membrane proteins involved in regulating virtually every aspect of human physiology. Despite their profound importance in human health and disease, structural information regarding GPCRs has been extremely limited until recently. With the advent of a variety of new biochemical and crystallographic techniques, the structural biology of GPCRs has advanced rapidly, offering key molecular insights into GPCR activation and signal transduction. To date, almost all GPCR structures have been solved using molecular-replacement techniques. Here, the unique aspects of molecular replacement as applied to individual GPCRs and to signaling complexes of these important proteins are discussed.

  6. Molecular cloning of α-2-macroglobulin from hemocytes of common periwinkle Littorina littorea.

    PubMed

    Borisova, Elena A; Gorbushin, Alexander M

    2014-08-01

    We report the sequence of the proteinase inhibitor with a wide inhibition spectrum, α-2-macroglobulin (α2M), belonging to the thioester superfamily of proteins. This is the first α2M sequence from coenogastropod prosobranch snails. The full-length cDNA was cloned by RACE method, spans 7897 bp and contains an open reading frame of 5460 bp. The ORF encodes a protein of 1819 amino acids. The deduced mature protein contains 1795 amino acids with a molecular weight of 200 kDa and isoelectric point of 5.00. Littorina littorea α2M bears 4 conserved α2M domains and one internal thioester. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the sequence forms well supported cluster with Mollusca species and other representatives of Lophotrochozoa. PMID:24830774

  7. Molecular cloning, tissue distribution, and functional analysis of porcine Akirin2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoling; Huang, Zhiqing; Jia, Gang; Wu, Xiuqun; Wu, Caimei

    2012-04-01

    Akirin2 is a recently discovered gene that is involved in innate immune response. In this study, the porcine Akirin2 gene was cloned. The full-length coding sequence (CDS) of porcine Akirin2 consists of 612 bp and encodes 203 amino acids with a molecular mass of 22493 kD. The homology tree analysis showed that the pig Akirin2 has closer genetic relationships and distance with the known mammalian Akirin2. Real time quantitative PCR analysis showed that the porcine Akirin2 transcript was most abundant in the lung, followed by the skeletal muscle, heart, liver, fat, thymus, lymph node, small intestine, kidney, and spleen. Overexpression of porcine Akirin2 increased expression of IL-6 in porcine jejunal epithelial cell line IPEC-J2 cells. Our data suggest that porcine Akirin2 could play an important role in intestinal immune regulation. PMID:22537061

  8. Molecular cloning of an Onchocerca volvulus extracellular Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed Central

    James, E R; McLean, D C; Perler, F

    1994-01-01

    Onchocerca volvulus, a human parasitic nematode, is the third leading cause of preventable blindness worldwide. This study describes the molecular cloning of a novel superoxide dismutase (SOD) from the parasite. This putative O. volvulus extracellular SOD (OvEcSOD) is 628 nucleotides (nt) long, including a 22-nt 5' spliced leader (SL1) and a portion encoding an N-terminal hydrophobic 42-amino-acid signal peptide. The remainder of the cDNA shares 71% identity with an O. volvulus cytosolic SOD sequence and is 3 nt longer. All residues involved in metal ion binding, active site formation, folding, and dimer formation in SODs are conserved. Data indicate the OvEcSOD and O. volvulus cytosolic SOD are separate gene products and that the OvEcSOD appears to possess the characteristics of a membrane-bound or secreted enzyme which may be involved in the parasite defense against phagocyte-generated reactive oxygen species. Images PMID:8300230

  9. Molecular Cloning and Characterisation of Farnesyl Pyrophosphate Synthase from Tripterygium wilfordii

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu-Jun; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Meng; Su, Ping; Liu, Yu-Jia; Tong, Yu-Ru; Wang, Xiu-Juan; Huang, Lu-Qi; Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Farnesylpyrophosphate synthase (FPS) catalyzes the biosynthesis of farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP), which is an important precursor of sesquiterpenoids such as artemisinin and wilfordine. In the present study, we report the molecular cloning and characterization of two full-length cDNAs encoding FPSs from Tripterygium wilfordii (TwFPSs). TwFPSs maintained their capability to synthesise FPP in vitro when purified as recombinant proteins from E. coli. Consistent with the endogenous role of FPS in FPP biosynthesis, TwFPSs were highly expressed in T. wilfordii roots, and were up-regulated upon methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment. The global gene expression profiles suggested that the TwFPSs might play an important regulatory role interpenoid biosynthesis in T. wilfordii, laying the groundwork for the future study of the synthetic biology of natural terpene products. PMID:25938487

  10. A murine platelet-activating factor receptor gene: cloning, chromosomal localization and up-regulation of expression by lipopolysaccharide in peritoneal resident macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, S; Matsuda, Y; Nakamura, M; Waga, I; Kume, K; Izumi, T; Shimizu, T

    1996-01-01

    A murine gene encoding a platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) was cloned. The gene was mapped to a region of the D2.2 band of chromosome 4 both by fluorescence in situ hybridization and by molecular linkage analysis. Northern blot analysis showed a high expression of the PAFR message in peritoneal macrophages. When C3H/HeN macrophages were treated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or synthetic lipid A, the PAFR gene expression was induced. Bacterial LPS, but not lipid A, induced the level of PAFR mRNA in LPS unresponsive C3H/HeJ macrophages. These induction patterns were parallel to those of tumor necrosis factor-alpha mRNA. Thus the PAFR in macrophages is important in LPS-induced pathologies. PMID:8670084